WorldWideScience

Sample records for noise bands pulse

  1. A novel pulse compression algorithm for frequency modulated active thermography using band-pass filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Krishnendu; Roy, Deboshree; Tuli, Suneet

    2017-05-01

    This paper proposes a novel pulse compression algorithm, in the context of frequency modulated thermal wave imaging. The compression filter is derived from a predefined reference pixel in a recorded video, which contains direct measurement of the excitation signal alongside the thermal image of a test piece. The filter causes all the phases of the constituent frequencies to be adjusted to nearly zero value, so that on reconstruction a pulse is obtained. Further, due to band-limited nature of the excitation, signal-to-noise ratio is improved by suppressing out-of-band noise. The result is similar to that of a pulsed thermography experiment, although the peak power is drastically reduced. The algorithm is successfully demonstrated on mild steel and carbon fibre reference samples. Objective comparisons of the proposed pulse compression algorithm with the existing techniques are presented.

  2. Noise exposure in marching bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Joseph

    2005-09-01

    Previous studies involving orchestras have shown that music ensembles can produce hazardous noise levels. There are no similar data for marching bands and pep bands. In order to evaluate the noise levels produced by marching and pep bands, 1/3-octave-band sound-pressure levels were measured while these groups rehearsed and performed. Data were collected while marching with the bands to ensure a realistic environment. Comparing these data to OSHA and NIOSH criteria, marching and pep band exposures often exceed safe values. For typical exposures, OSHA doses range from 11% to 295%, while NIOSH doses range from 35% to 3055%. Exposures that would be considered hazardous in the workplace are common in marching and pep bands; students and band directors should take steps to recognize the risk posed by various instruments and various locations, and should implement hearing conservation efforts.

  3. 50 MW C-band pulse klystron; 50MW C band pulse klystron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    C-band pulse klystron E3746 with an output of 50 MW class was developed jointly with the High-Energy Accelerator Research Organization in the Ministry of Education as the klystron for a linear accelerator. For a large-sized linear accelerator in the next generation, a klystron with higher operating frequency has been required to obtain a compact and efficient accelerator. In E3746, the problem of power resistance during high-frequency operation was solved by mounting a traveling-wave multi-cell output circuit. Moreover, stable operation in the pulse width of 2.5 {mu}s and the output of 54 MW was performed at the same operation efficiency (44%) as the conventional S-band tube by using the frequency (in a C-band frequency band) that is two times as high as the conventional general accelerator. (translated by NEDO)

  4. Noise Pulses in Large Area Optical Modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aiello, Sebastiano; Leonora, Emanuele; Giordano, Valentina

    2013-06-01

    A great number of large area photomultipliers are widely used in neutrino and astro-particle detector to measure Cherenkov light in medium like water or ice. The key element of these detectors are the so-called 'optical module', which consist in photodetectors closed in a transparent pressure-resistant container to protect it and ensure good light transmission. The noise pulses present on the anode of each photomultiplier affect strongly the performance of the detector. A large study was conducted on noise pulses of large area photomultipliers, considering time and charge distributions of dark pulses, prepulses, delayed pulses, and after pulses. The contribution to noise pulses due to the presence of the external glass spheres was also studied, even comparing two vessels of different brands. (authors)

  5. A programmable ultra-low noise X-band exciter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMullen, A; Hoover, L R; Justice, R D; Callahan, B S

    2001-07-01

    A programmable ultra-low noise X-band exciter has been developed using commercial off-the-shelf components. Its phase noise is more than 10 dB below the best available microwave synthesizers. It covers a 7% frequency band with 0.1-Hz resolution. The X-band output at +23 dBm is a combination of signals from an X-band sapphire-loaded cavity oscillator (SLCO), a low noise UHF frequency synthesizer, and special-purpose frequency translation and up-conversion circuitry.

  6. Solid state Ka-band pulse oscillator with frequency electronic switching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dvornichenko V. P.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Transmitting devices for small radars in the millimeter wavelength range with high resolution on range and noise immunity. The work presents the results of research and development of compact pulse oscillators with digital frequency switching from pulse to pulse. The oscillator consists of a frequency synthesizer and a synchronized amplifier on the IMPATT diode. Reference oscillator of synthesizer is synchronized by crystal oscillator with digital PLL system and contains a frequency multiplier and an amplifier operating in pulse mode. Small-sized frequency synthesizer of 8 mm wave lengths provides an output power of ~1.2 W per pulse with a frequency stability of no worse than 2•10–6. Radiation frequency is controlled by three-digit binary code in OOL levels. Synchronized amplifier made on IMPATT diodes provides microwave power up to 20 W in oscillator output with microwave pulse duration of 100—300 ns in an operating band. The oscillator can be used as a driving source for the synchronization of semiconductor and electro-vacuum devices of pulsed mode, and also as a transmitting device for small-sized radar of millimeter wave range.

  7. Wide-band CMOS low-noise amplifier exploiting thermal noise canceling

    OpenAIRE

    Bruccoleri, F.; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Nauta, Bram

    2004-01-01

    Known elementary wide-band amplifiers suffer from a fundamental tradeoff between noise figure (NF) and source impedance matching, which limits the NF to values typically above 3 dB. Global negative feedback can be used to break this tradeoff, however, at the price of potential instability. In contrast, this paper presents a feedforward noise-canceling technique, which allows for simultaneous noise and impedance matching, while canceling the noise and distortion contributions of the matching d...

  8. An Ultra Low Noise Self-Starting Pulse Generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lasri, J.; Bilenca, A.; Dahan, D.

    2002-01-01

    We describe a self-starting optical pulse source generating 10 GHz, 15 ps pulses with an average jitter of 43 fs and a o.15% amplitude noise over a frequency range of 500 Hz - 1 MHz.......We describe a self-starting optical pulse source generating 10 GHz, 15 ps pulses with an average jitter of 43 fs and a o.15% amplitude noise over a frequency range of 500 Hz - 1 MHz....

  9. ENDOR with band-selective shaped inversion pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Claudia E.; Stoll, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    Electron Nuclear DOuble Resonance (ENDOR) is based on the measurement of nuclear transition frequencies through detection of changes in the polarization of electron transitions. In Davies ENDOR, the initial polarization is generated by a selective microwave inversion pulse. The rectangular inversion pulses typically used are characterized by a relatively low selectivity, with full inversion achieved only for a limited number of spin packets with small resonance offsets. With the introduction of pulse shaping to EPR, the rectangular inversion pulses can be replaced with shaped pulses with increased selectivity. Band-selective inversion pulses are characterized by almost rectangular inversion profiles, leading to full inversion for spin packets with resonance offsets within the pulse excitation bandwidth and leaving spin packets outside the excitation bandwidth largely unaffected. Here, we explore the consequences of using different band-selective amplitude-modulated pulses designed for NMR as the inversion pulse in ENDOR. We find an increased sensitivity for small hyperfine couplings compared to rectangular pulses of the same bandwidth. In echo-detected Davies-type ENDOR, finite Fourier series inversion pulses combine the advantages of increased absolute ENDOR sensitivity of short rectangular inversion pulses and increased sensitivity for small hyperfine couplings of long rectangular inversion pulses. The use of pulses with an almost rectangular frequency-domain profile also allows for increased control of the hyperfine contrast selectivity. At X-band, acquisition of echo transients as a function of radiofrequency and appropriate selection of integration windows during data processing allows efficient separation of contributions from weakly and strongly coupled nuclei in overlapping ENDOR spectra within a single experiment.

  10. Phase Noise Comparision of Short Pulse Laser Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Zhang; S. V. Benson; J. Hansknecht; D. Hardy; G. Neil; Michelle D. Shinn

    2006-12-01

    This paper describes the phase noise measurement on several different mode-locked laser systems that have completely different gain media and configurations including a multi-kW free-electron laser. We will focus on the state of the art short pulse lasers, especially the drive lasers for photocathode injectors. A comparison between the phase noise of the drive laser pulses, electron bunches and FEL pulses will also be presented.

  11. Characteristics of temporal modulation in nonlinear propagation of broad-band lasers stacked by chirped pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Youwen; Chen Liezun; Zhang Lifu; Deng Jianqin; Zhang Jin; Wen Shuangchun; Fu Xiquan; Fan Dianyuan

    2010-01-01

    Characteristics of the temporal modulation riding on broad-band lasers stacked by chirped pulses are numerically investigated in nonlinear propagation. For the case of normal dispersion, the temporal modulations induced by interference among pulses and added artificially to simulate the noise weaken gradually with the increase of the propagation distance. For the case of anomalous dispersion, the temporal modulations induced by interference among pulses grow slowly at first, and start to grow rapidly after a long propagation distance; in contrast, the temporal modulations added artificially grow rapidly from the begin, indicating that the temporal peak of damage risk to the optics can be formed easily. (authors)

  12. Low noise InP-based MMIC receivers for W-band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Regis F.

    1991-01-01

    A program to develop a monolithic W-band low noise amplifier (a critical element in any W-band communications, sensors, or radar application) is described. Goals of the program include a completely monolithic low noise amplifier, less than a 3.5 dB noise figure, and a monolithic mixer suitable for integration with the LNA.

  13. Broadband noise limit in the photodetection of ultralow jitter optical pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenlu; Quinlan, Franklyn; Fortier, Tara M; Deschenes, Jean-Daniel; Fu, Yang; Diddams, Scott A; Campbell, Joe C

    2014-11-14

    Applications with optical atomic clocks and precision timing often require the transfer of optical frequency references to the electrical domain with extremely high fidelity. Here we examine the impact of photocarrier scattering and distributed absorption on the photocurrent noise of high-speed photodiodes when detecting ultralow jitter optical pulses. Despite its small contribution to the total photocurrent, this excess noise can determine the phase noise and timing jitter of microwave signals generated by detecting ultrashort optical pulses. A Monte Carlo simulation of the photodetection process is used to quantitatively estimate the excess noise. Simulated phase noise on the 10 GHz harmonic of a photodetected pulse train shows good agreement with previous experimental data, leading to the conclusion that the lowest phase noise photonically generated microwave signals are limited by photocarrier scattering well above the quantum limit of the optical pulse train.

  14. Optimal Linear Filters for Pulse Height Measurements in the Presence of Noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nygaard, K.

    1966-07-01

    For measurements of nuclear pulse height spectra a linear filter is used between the pulse amplifier and the pulse height recorder so as to improve the signal/noise ratio. The problem of finding the optimal filter is investigated with emphasis on technical realizability. The maximum available signal/noise ratio is theoretically calculated on the basis of all the information which can be found in the output of the pulse amplifier, and on an assumed a priori knowledge of the pulse time of arrival. It is then shown that the maximum available signal/noise ratio can be obtained with practical measurements without any a priori knowledge of pulse time of arrival, and a general description of the optimal linear filter is given. The solution is unique, technically realizable, and based solely on data (noise power spectrum and pulse shape) which can be measured at the output terminals of the pulse amplifier used

  15. Optimal Linear Filters for Pulse Height Measurements in the Presence of Noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nygaard, K

    1966-07-15

    For measurements of nuclear pulse height spectra a linear filter is used between the pulse amplifier and the pulse height recorder so as to improve the signal/noise ratio. The problem of finding the optimal filter is investigated with emphasis on technical realizability. The maximum available signal/noise ratio is theoretically calculated on the basis of all the information which can be found in the output of the pulse amplifier, and on an assumed a priori knowledge of the pulse time of arrival. It is then shown that the maximum available signal/noise ratio can be obtained with practical measurements without any a priori knowledge of pulse time of arrival, and a general description of the optimal linear filter is given. The solution is unique, technically realizable, and based solely on data (noise power spectrum and pulse shape) which can be measured at the output terminals of the pulse amplifier used.

  16. Phase Noise and Intensity Noise of the Pulse Train Generated from Mode-locked Lasers in the Demodulation Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Kan; Shum, Ping

    2010-01-01

    The phase noise and intensity noise of a pulse train are theoretically analyzed in the demodulation measurement. The effect of pulse asymmetry is discussed for the first time using Fourier series. Experimentally, photodetectors with different bandwidth and incident power levels are compared to achieve minimum pulse distortion.

  17. Quantum Noise Reduction with Pulsed Light in Optical Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Keren

    Optical fibers offer considerable advantages over bulk nonlinear media for the generation of squeezed states. This thesis reports on experimental investigations of reducing quantum noise by means of squeezing in nonlinear fiber optic interferometers. Fibers have low insertion loss which allows for long interaction lengths. High field intensities are easily achieved in the small cores of single mode fibers. Additionally, the nonlinear process employed is self phase modulation or the Kerr effect, whose broad band nature requires no phase matching and can be exploited with ultra-short pulses of high peak intensity. All these advantageous features of fibers result in easily obtained large nonlinear phase shifts and subsequently large squeezing parameters. By the self phase modulation process a correlation is produced between the phase and amplitude fluctuations of the optical field. The attenuated or squeezed quadrature has a lower noise level than the initial level associated with the coherent state field before propagation. The resulting reduced quantum noise quadrature can be utilized to improve the sensitivity of a phase measuring instrument such as an interferometer. Because the Kerr nonlinearity is a degenerate self pumping process, the squeezed noise is at the same frequency as the pump field. Classical pump noise can therefore interfere with the desired measurement of the quantum noise reduction. The most severe noise process is the phase noise caused by thermally induced index modulation of the fiber. This noise termed Guided Acoustic Wave Brillouin Scattering, or GAWBS, by previous researchers is studied and analyzed. Experiments performed to overcome GAWBS successfully with several schemes are described. An experimental demonstration of an interferometric measurement with better sensitivity than the standard quantum limit is described. The results lead to new understandings into the limitations of quantum noise reduction that can be achieved in the

  18. Wide-band CMOS low-noise amplifier exploiting thermal noise canceling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruccoleri, F.; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Nauta, Bram

    Known elementary wide-band amplifiers suffer from a fundamental tradeoff between noise figure (NF) and source impedance matching, which limits the NF to values typically above 3 dB. Global negative feedback can be used to break this tradeoff, however, at the price of potential instability. In

  19. [Auditory training with wide-band white noise: effects on the recruitment (III)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez Ugidos, L J; Rodríguez Morejón, C; Vallés Varela, H; Iparraguirre Bolinaga, V; Knaster del Olmo, J

    2001-05-01

    The auditory training with wide-band white noise is a methodology for the qualitative recovery of the hearing loss in people suffering from sensorineural hearing loss. It is based on the application of a wide-band white modified noise. In a prospective study, we have assessed the modifications of the recruitment coefficient in a sample of 48 patients who have followed a program of 15 auditory training with wide-band white noise sessions. The average improvement of the recruitment coefficient expressed in percentage is a 7.7498%, which comes up to 23.5249% in the case of a binaural recruitment coefficient. From our results, it can be deduced that the auditory training with wide-band white noise reduces the recruitment. That is to say, the decrease of the recruitment in high intensities both binaurally and in all ears.

  20. High-power test of S-band klystron for long-pulse operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morii, Y.; Oshita, E.; Abe, S.; Keishi, T.; Tomimasu, T.; Ohkubo, Y.; Yoshinao, M.; Yonezawa, H.

    1994-01-01

    FELI(Free Electron Laser Research Institute, Inc.) is constructing a free electron laser facility covering from 20μm (infra red region) to 0.35μm (ultra violet region), using an S-band linac. The linac is commissioning now. An RF system of the linac for FELs is required of long pulse duration and high stability. S-band klystrons (TOSHIBA E3729) of the FELI linac are operated in three pulse operation modes (pulse width and peak RF power; 24μs-24MW, 12.5μs-34MW, 0.5μs-70MW). The S-band klystron and its modulator were combined to test their performance. The high power test results of the S-band klystron are summarized in this paper. (author)

  1. The Noisiness of Low Frequency Bands of Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, B. W.

    1975-01-01

    The relative noisiness of low frequency 1/3-octave bands of noise was examined. The frequency range investigated was bounded by the bands centered at 25 and 200 Hz, with intensities ranging from 50 to 95 db (SPL). Thirty-two subjects used a method of adjustment technique, producing comparison band intensities as noisy as 100 and 200 Hz standard bands at 60 and 72 db. The work resulted in contours of equal noisiness for 1/3-octave bands, ranging in intensity from approximately 58 to 86 db (SPL). These contours were compared with the standard equal noisiness contours; in the region of overlap, between 50 and 200 Hz, the agreement was good.

  2. Ultra low-noise differential ac-coupled photodetector for sensitive pulse detection applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windpassinger, Patrick J; Boisen, Axel; Kjærgaard, Niels; Polzik, Eugene S; Müller, Jörg Helge; Kubasik, Marcin; Koschorreck, Marco

    2009-01-01

    We report on the performance of ultra low-noise differential photodetectors especially designed for probing of atomic ensembles with weak light pulses. The working principle of the detectors is described together with the analysis procedures employed to extract the photon shot noise of light pulses with ∼1 μs duration. As opposed to frequency response peaked detectors, our approach allows for broadband quantum noise measurements. The equivalent noise charge (ENC) for two different hardware approaches is evaluated to 280 and 340 electrons per pulse, respectively, which corresponds to a dark noise equivalent photon number of n 3dB = 0.8 × 10 5 and n 3dB = 1.2 × 10 5 in the two approaches. Finally, we discuss the possibility of removing classical correlations in the output signal caused by detector imperfection by using double-correlated sampling methods

  3. Electrical noise modulates perception of electrical pulses in humans: sensation enhancement via stochastic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliopoulos, Fivos; Nierhaus, Till; Villringer, Arno

    2014-03-01

    Although noise is usually considered to be harmful for signal detection and information transmission, stochastic resonance (SR) describes the counterintuitive phenomenon of noise enhancing the detection and transmission of weak input signals. In mammalian sensory systems, SR-related phenomena may arise both in the peripheral and the central nervous system. Here, we investigate behavioral SR effects of subliminal electrical noise stimulation on the perception of somatosensory stimuli in humans. We compare the likelihood to detect near-threshold pulses of different intensities applied on the left index finger during presence vs. absence of subliminal noise on the same or an adjacent finger. We show that (low-pass) noise can enhance signal detection when applied on the same finger. This enhancement is strong for near-threshold pulses below the 50% detection threshold and becomes stronger when near-threshold pulses are applied as brief trains. The effect reverses at pulse intensities above threshold, especially when noise is replaced by subliminal sinusoidal stimulation, arguing for a peripheral direct current addition. Unfiltered noise applied on longer pulses enhances detection of all pulse intensities. Noise applied to an adjacent finger has two opposing effects: an inhibiting effect (presumably due to lateral inhibition) and an enhancing effect (most likely due to SR in the central nervous system). In summary, we demonstrate that subliminal noise can significantly modulate detection performance of near-threshold stimuli. Our results indicate SR effects in the peripheral and central nervous system.

  4. Photonic-band-gap gyrotron amplifier with picosecond pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Jawla, Sudheer; Lewis, Samantha M.; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2017-12-01

    We report the amplification of 250 GHz pulses as short as 260 ps without observation of pulse broadening using a photonic-band-gap circuit gyrotron traveling-wave-amplifier. The gyrotron amplifier operates with a device gain of 38 dB and an instantaneous bandwidth of 8 GHz. The operational bandwidth of the amplifier can be tuned over 16 GHz by adjusting the operating voltage of the electron beam and the magnetic field. The amplifier uses a 30 cm long photonic-band-gap interaction circuit to confine the desired TE03-like operating mode while suppressing lower order modes which can result in undesired oscillations. The circuit gain is >55 dB for a beam voltage of 23 kV and a current of 700 mA. These results demonstrate the wide bandwidths and a high gain achievable with gyrotron amplifiers. The amplification of picosecond pulses of variable lengths, 260-800 ps, shows good agreement with the theory using the coupled dispersion relation and the gain-spectrum of the amplifier as measured with quasi-CW input pulses.

  5. Ferroelectric switch for a high-power Ka-band active pulse compressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirshfield, Jay L. [Omega-P, Inc., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2013-12-18

    Results are presented for design of a high-power microwave switch for operation at 34.3 GHz, intended for use in an active RF pulse compressor. The active element in the switch is a ring of ferroelectric material, whose dielectric constant can be rapidly changed by application of a high-voltage pulse. As envisioned, two of these switches would be built into a pair of delay lines, as in SLED-II at SLAC, so as to allow 30-MW μs-length Ka-band pulses to be compressed in time by a factor-of-9 and multiplied in amplitude to generate 200 MW peak power pulses. Such high-power pulses could be used for testing and evaluation of high-gradient mm-wave accelerator structures, for example. Evaluation of the switch design was carried out with an X-band (11.43 GHz) prototype, built to incorporate all the features required for the Ka-band version.

  6. PHASE NOISE COMPARISON OF SHORT PULSE LASER SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukui Zhang; Stephen Benson; John Hansknecht; David Hardy; George Neil; Michelle D. Shinn

    2006-08-27

    This paper describes phase noise measurements of several different laser systems that have completely different gain media and configurations including a multi-kW free-electron laser. We will focus on state-of-the-art short pulse lasers, especially drive lasers for photocathode injectors. Phase noise comparison of the FEL drive laser, electron beam and FEL laser output also will be presented.

  7. Optocoupled line receiver input discriminates against narrow noise pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Napier, T M

    1977-01-01

    Describes a simple optocoupled interface which connects a data line to the receiving end of a data link that features pulse length discrimination to enhance noise pulse rejection. A rugged red LED, D /sub 1/, can bypass any reasonable fault currents to protect the relatively fragile optocoupler input diode. (0 refs).

  8. [De-noising and measurement of pulse wave velocity of the wavelet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Baohua; Zhu, Honglian; Ren, Xiaohua

    2011-02-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a vital index of the cardiovascular pathology, so that the accurate measurement of PWV can be of benefit for prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. The noise in the measure system of pulse wave signal, rounding error and selection of the recording site all cause errors in the measure result. In this paper, with wavelet transformation to eliminate the noise and to raise the precision, and with the choice of the point whose slope was maximum as the recording site of the reconstructing pulse wave, the measuring system accuracy was improved.

  9. Relaxation dynamics in the presence of pulse multiplicative noise sources with different correlation properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargovsky, A. V.; Chichigina, O. A.; Anashkina, E. I.; Valenti, D.; Spagnolo, B.

    2015-10-01

    The relaxation dynamics of a system described by a Langevin equation with pulse multiplicative noise sources with different correlation properties is considered. The solution of the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation is derived for Gaussian white noise. Moreover, two pulse processes with regulated periodicity are considered as a noise source: the dead-time-distorted Poisson process and the process with fixed time intervals, which is characterized by an infinite correlation time. We find that the steady state of the system is dependent on the correlation properties of the pulse noise. An increase of the noise correlation causes the decrease of the mean value of the solution at the steady state. The analytical results are in good agreement with the numerical ones.

  10. L-band pulsed klystron for the JHP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, S.; Takeuchi, Y.; Hisamatsu, H.; Anami, S.; Kihara, M.; Takahashi, A.

    1994-01-01

    An L-band high-power klystron for the JHP (6 MW output power and 600 μsec pulse width) was designed at KEK. High-power tests of the test diodes were performed up to a beam voltage of 140 kV, a pulse width of 600 μsec and a repetition rate of 50 pps. The capability to meet the specifications of the gun and the collector was confirmed. High-power tests of the rf window were also performed up to rf powers of 4 MW (600 μsec pulse width) and 5 MW (375 μsec pulse width). We obtained good results for an rf window using high-purity alumina (99.7%). The design considerations and manufacturing process are also described. Manufacturing a prototype tube has been completed and the tube is undergoing the high-power tests. (author)

  11. Effects of acoustic noise on the auditory nerve compound action potentials evoked by electric pulse trains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourski, Kirill V; Abbas, Paul J; Miller, Charles A; Robinson, Barbara K; Jeng, Fuh-Cherng

    2005-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of acoustic noise on the auditory nerve compound action potentials in response to electric pulse trains. Subjects were adult guinea pigs, implanted with a minimally invasive electrode to preserve acoustic sensitivity. Electrically evoked compound action potentials (ECAP) were recorded from the auditory nerve trunk in response to electric pulse trains both during and after the presentation of acoustic white noise. Simultaneously presented acoustic noise produced a decrease in ECAP amplitude. The effect of the acoustic masker on the electric probe was greatest at the onset of the acoustic stimulus and it was followed by a partial recovery of the ECAP amplitude. Following cessation of the acoustic noise, ECAP amplitude recovered over a period of approximately 100-200 ms. The effects of the acoustic noise were more prominent at lower electric pulse rates (interpulse intervals of 3 ms and higher). At higher pulse rates, the ECAP adaptation to the electric pulse train alone was larger and the acoustic noise, when presented, produced little additional effect. The observed effects of noise on ECAP were the greatest at high electric stimulus levels and, for a particular electric stimulus level, at high acoustic noise levels.

  12. High-power picosecond pulse delivery through hollow core photonic band gap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michieletto, Mattia; Johansen, Mette Marie; Lyngsø, Jens Kristian

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated robust and bend insensitive fiber delivery of high power pulsed laser with diffraction limited beam quality for two different kind of hollow core photonic band gap fibers......We demonstrated robust and bend insensitive fiber delivery of high power pulsed laser with diffraction limited beam quality for two different kind of hollow core photonic band gap fibers...

  13. High-power noise-like pulse generation using a 1.56-µm all-fiber laser system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Shian; Hwang, Sheng-Kwang; Liu, Jia-Ming

    2015-07-13

    We demonstrated an all-fiber, high-power noise-like pulse laser system at the 1.56-µm wavelength. A low-power noise-like pulse train generated by a ring oscillator was amplified using a two-stage amplifier, where the performance of the second-stage amplifier determined the final output power level. The optical intensity in the second-stage amplifier was managed well to avoid not only the excessive spectral broadening induced by nonlinearities but also any damage to the device. On the other hand, the power conversion efficiency of the amplifier was optimized through proper control of its pump wavelength. The pump wavelength determines the pump absorption and therefore the power conversion efficiency of the gain fiber. Through this approach, the average power of the noise-like pulse train was amplified considerably to an output of 13.1 W, resulting in a power conversion efficiency of 36.1% and a pulse energy of 0.85 µJ. To the best of our knowledge, these amplified pulses have the highest average power and pulse energy for noise-like pulses in the 1.56-µm wavelength region. As a result, the net gain in the cascaded amplifier reached 30 dB. With peak and pedestal widths of 168 fs and 61.3 ps, respectively, for the amplified pulses, the pedestal-to-peak intensity ratio of the autocorrelation trace remains at the value of 0.5 required for truly noise-like pulses.

  14. 2-GHz band man-made noise evaluation for cryogenic receiver front-end

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narahashi, S; Satoh, K; Suzuki, Y [Research Laboratories, NTT DoCoMo, Inc., 3-5 Hikari-no-oka, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 239-8536 (Japan); Mimura, T [Intellectual Property Department, NTT DoCoMo, Inc., 2-11-1 Nagatacho, Chiyoda, Tokyo 100-6150 (Japan); Nojima, T [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Hokkaido University, Nishi 9, Kita 14, Kita, Sapporo 060-0808 (Japan)], E-mail: narahashi@nttdocomo.co.jp

    2008-02-01

    This paper presents measured results of man-made noise in urban and suburban areas in the 2-GHz band with amplitude probability distribution (APD) in order to evaluate the impact of man-made noise on an experimental cryogenic receiver front-end (CRFE). The CRFE comprises a high-temperature superconducting filter, cryogenically-cooled low-noise amplifier, and highly reliable cryostat that is very compact. The CRFE is anticipated to be an effective way to achieve efficient frequency utilization and to improve the sensitivity of mobile base station receivers. It is important to measure the characteristics of the man-made noise in typical cellular base station antenna environments and confirm their impact on the CRFE reception with APD because if man-made noise has a stronger effect than thermal noise, the CRFE would fail to offer any improvement in sensitivity. The measured results suggest that the contribution of man-made noise in the 2-GHz band can be ignored as far as the wideband code division multiple access (W-CDMA) system is concerned.

  15. Optimal Linear Filters. 2. Pulse Time Measurements in the Presence of Noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nygaard, K

    1966-09-15

    The problem of calculating the maximum available timing information contained in nuclear pulses in the presence of noise is solved theoretically. Practical experiments show that the theoretical values can be obtained by very simple, but untraditional, means. An output pulse from a practical filter connected to a charge sensitive amplifier with a Ge(Li) detector showed a rise time of 30 ns and a noise level of less than 5 keV. The time jitter measured was inversely proportional to the pulse height and less than 30 ns for 10 keV pulses. With the timing filter shown solid state detectors can be classified somewhere between Nal scintillators and organic scintillators with respect to time resolution.

  16. Optimal Linear Filters. 2. Pulse Time Measurements in the Presence of Noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nygaard, K.

    1966-09-01

    The problem of calculating the maximum available timing information contained in nuclear pulses in the presence of noise is solved theoretically. Practical experiments show that the theoretical values can be obtained by very simple, but untraditional, means. An output pulse from a practical filter connected to a charge sensitive amplifier with a Ge(Li) detector showed a rise time of 30 ns and a noise level of less than 5 keV. The time jitter measured was inversely proportional to the pulse height and less than 30 ns for 10 keV pulses. With the timing filter shown solid state detectors can be classified somewhere between Nal scintillators and organic scintillators with respect to time resolution

  17. Solid-state pulse modulator for a 1.7-MW X-band magnetron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jaegu; Shin, Yongmoon; Choi, Youngwook; Kim, Kwanho

    2014-01-01

    Medical linear accelerators (LINAC) for cancer treatment require pulse modulators to generate high-power pulses with a fast rise time, flat top and short duration to drive high-power magnetrons. Solid-state pulse modulators (SSPM) for medical LINACs that use high power semiconductor switches with high repetition rates, high stability and long lifetimes have been introduced to replace conventional linear-type pulse generators that use gaseous discharge switches. In this paper, the performance of a developed SSPM, which mainly consists of a capacitor charger, an insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) - capacitor stack and a pulse transformer, is evaluated with a dummy load and an X-band magnetron load. A theoretical analysis of the pulse transformer, which is a critical element of the SSPM, is carried out. The output pulse has a fast rise time and low droop, such that the modulator can drive the X-band magnetron.

  18. Analysis of in-band interference in noise-based frequency offset modulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bilal, Ibrahim; Meijerink, Arjan; Bentum, Marinus Jan

    2014-01-01

    A noise-based frequency offset modulation (N-FOM) system is considered, employing a wideband noise carrier, transmit reference modulation and a self-correlation receiver. The performance of such a system in the presence of in-band interference is studied by modeling the interference as a Gaussian

  19. Pulse shape analyzer/timing-SCA application to beta measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvi, S.; Celiktas, C.

    2001-01-01

    Electrical noise contribution to pulse height distributions from beta sources due to BC-400 plastic scintillator(PS), preamplifier and spectroscopy amplifier was rejected by setting the electronic set-up processing of the modified beta spectrometer consisted of pulse shape analyzer/timing single channel analyzer (PSA/SCA) and related complementary equipments. Improved noise rejection performance was evaluated in terms of elimination practically only all of the noise band of C-14 and Tl-204 spectra obtained using the two alternate beta spectrometer

  20. Excess quantum noise in optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification

    OpenAIRE

    Manzoni, C.; Moses, J.; Kärtner, F. X.; Cerullo, G.

    2011-01-01

    Noise evolution in an optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier (OPCPA) differs essentially from that of an optical parametric or a conventional laser amplifier, in that an incoherent pedestal is produced by superfluorescence that can overwhelm the signal under strong saturation. Using a model for the nonlinear dynamics consistent with quantum mechanics, we numerically study the evolution of excess noise in an OPCPA. The observed dynamics explain the macroscopic characteristics seen previous...

  1. Generation and characterization of erbium-Raman noise-like pulses from a figure-eight fibre laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santiago-Hernandez, H; Pottiez, O; Paez-Aguirre, R; Ibarra-Villalon, H E; Tenorio-Torres, A; Duran-Sanchez, M; Ibarra-Escamilla, B; Kuzin, E A; Hernandez-Garcia, J C

    2015-01-01

    We report an experimental study of the noise-like pulses generated by a ∼300 m long passively mode-locked erbium-doped figure-eight fibre laser. Non-self-starting mode locking yields the formation of ns scale bunches of sub-ps pulses. Depending on birefringence adjustments, noise-like pulses with a variety of temporal profiles and optical spectra are obtained. In particular, for some adjustments the Raman-enhanced spectrum reaches a 10 dB bandwidth of ∼130 nm. For the first time to our knowledge, we extract information on the inner structure of the noise-like pulses, using a birefringent Sagnac interferometer as a spectral filter and a nonlinear optical loop mirror as an intensity filter. In particular we show that the different spectral components of the bunch are homogeneously distributed within the temporal envelope of the bunch, whereas the amplitude and/or the density of the sub-pulses present substantial variations along the envelope. In some cases, the analysis reveals the existence of an intermediate level of organization in the structure of the noise-like pulse, between the ns bunch and the sub-ps inner pulses, suggesting that these objects may be even more complex than previously recognized. (paper)

  2. Ultra-narrow band diode lasers with arbitrary pulse shape modulation (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryasnyanskiy, Aleksandr I.; Smirnov, Vadim; Mokhun, Oleksiy; Glebov, Alexei L.; Glebov, Leon B.

    2017-03-01

    Wideband emission spectra of laser diode bars (several nanometers) can be largely narrowed by the usage of thick volume Bragg gratings (VBGs) recorded in photo-thermo-refractive glass. Such narrowband systems, with GHz-wide emission spectra, found broad applications for Diode Pumped Alkali vapor Lasers, optically pumped rare gas metastable lasers, Spin Exchange Optical Pumping, atom cooling, etc. Although the majority of current applications of narrow line diode lasers require CW operation, there are a variety of fields where operation in a different pulse mode regime is necessary. Commercial electric pulse generators can provide arbitrary current pulse profiles (sinusoidal, rectangular, triangular and their combinations). The pulse duration and repetition rate however, have an influence on the laser diode temperature, and therefore, the emitting wavelength. Thus, a detailed analysis is needed to understand the correspondence between the optical pulse profiles from a diode laser and the current pulse profiles; how the pulse profile and duty cycle affects the laser performance (e.g. the wavelength stability, signal to noise ratio, power stability etc.). We present the results of detailed studies of the narrowband laser diode performance operating in different temporal regimes with arbitrary pulse profiles. The developed narrowband (16 pm) tunable laser systems at 795 nm are capable of operating in different pulse regimes while keeping the linewidth, wavelength, and signal-to-noise ratio (>20 dB) similar to the corresponding CW modules.

  3. Band-gap tunable dielectric elastomer filter for low frequency noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Kun; Wang, Mian; Lu, Tongqing; Zhang, Jinhua; Wang, Tiejun

    2016-05-01

    In the last decades, diverse materials and technologies for sound insulation have been widely applied in engineering. However, suppressing the noise radiation at low frequency still remains a challenge. In this work, a novel membrane-type smart filter, consisting of a pre-stretched dielectric elastomer membrane with two compliant electrodes coated on the both sides, is presented to control the low frequency noise. Since the stiffness of membrane dominates its acoustic properties, sound transmission band-gap of the membrane filter can be tuned by adjusting the voltage applied to the membrane. The impedance tube experiments have been carried out to measure the sound transmission loss (STL) of the filters with different electrodes, membrane thickness and pre-stretch conditions. The experimental results show that the center frequency of sound transmission band-gap mainly depends on the stress in the dielectric elastomer, and a large band-gap shift (more than 60 Hz) can be achieved by tuning the voltage applied to the 85 mm diameter VHB4910 specimen with pre-stretch {λ }0=3. Based on the experimental results and the assumption that applied electric field is independent of the membrane behavior, 3D finite element analysis has also been conducted to calculate the membrane stress variation. The sound filter proposed herein may provide a promising facility to control low frequency noise source with tonal characteristics.

  4. W-band InP based HEMT MMIC low noise amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, K. Y.; Tang, Y. L.; Wang, H.; Gaier, T.; Gough, R. G.; Sinclair, M.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the designs and measurement results of a three-stage and a four-stage W-band monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC) including a three-stage and a four-stage low noise amplifiers.

  5. Low-noise wide-band amplifiers for stochastic beam cooling experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leskovar, B.; Lo, C.C.

    1982-01-01

    Noise characteristics of the continuous-wave wide-band amplifier systems for stochastic beam cooling experiments are presented. Also, the noise performance, bandwidth capability and gain stability of components used in these amplifiers are summarized and compared in the 100 MHz to 40 GHz frequency range. This includes bipolar and field-effect transistors, parametric amplifier, Schottky diode mixer and maser. Measurements of the noise characteristics and scattering parameters of variety GaAs FETs as a function of ambient temperature are also given. Performance data and design information are presented on a broadband 150-500 MHz preamplifier having noise temperature of approximately 35 0 K at ambient temperature of 20 0 K. An analysis of preamplifier stability based on scattering parameters concept is included

  6. Pulsed laser manipulation of an optically trapped bead: Averaging thermal noise and measuring the pulsed force amplitude

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindballe, Thue Bjerring; Kristensen, Martin V. G.; Keiding, Søren Rud

    2013-01-01

    An experimental strategy for post-eliminating thermal noise on position measurements of optically trapped particles is presented. Using a nanosecond pulsed laser, synchronized to the detection system, to exert a periodic driving force on an optically trapped 10 polystyrene bead, the laser pulse-bead...... interaction is repeated hundreds of times. Traces with the bead position following the prompt displacement from equilibrium, induced by each laser pulse, are averaged and reveal the underlying deterministic motion of the bead, which is not visible in a single trace due to thermal noise. The motion of the bead...... is analyzed from the direct time-dependent position measurements and from the power spectrum. The results show that the bead is on average displaced 208 nm from the trap center and exposed to a force amplitude of 71 nanoNewton, more than five orders of magnitude larger than the trapping forces. Our...

  7. Asymmetric noise sensitivity of pulse trains in an excitable microlaser with delayed optical feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrien, Soizic; Krauskopf, Bernd; Broderick, Neil G. R.; Andréoli, Louis; Selmi, Foued; Braive, Rémy; Beaudoin, Grégoire; Sagnes, Isabelle; Barbay, Sylvain

    2017-10-01

    A semiconductor micropillar laser with delayed optical feedback is considered. In the excitable regime, we show that a single optical perturbation can trigger a train of pulses that is sustained for a finite duration. The distribution of the pulse train duration exhibits an exponential behavior characteristic of a noise-induced process driven by uncorrelated white noise present in the system. The comparison of experimental observations with theoretical and numerical analysis of a minimal model yields excellent agreement. Importantly, the random switch-off process takes place between two attractors of different nature: an equilibrium and a periodic orbit. Our analysis shows that there is a small time window during which the pulsations are very sensitive to noise, and this explains the observed strong bias toward switch-off. These results raise the possibility of all optical control of the pulse train duration that may have an impact for practical applications in photonics and may also apply to the dynamics of other noise-driven excitable systems with delayed feedback.

  8. The neuronal response to electrical constant-amplitude pulse train stimulation: additive Gaussian noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, A J; Abbas, P J; Rubinstein, J T; Miller, C A

    2000-11-01

    Experimental results from humans and animals show that electrically evoked compound action potential (EAP) responses to constant-amplitude pulse train stimulation can demonstrate an alternating pattern, due to the combined effects of highly synchronized responses to electrical stimulation and refractory effects (Wilson et al., 1994). One way to improve signal representation is to reduce the level of across-fiber synchrony and hence, the level of the amplitude alternation. To accomplish this goal, we have examined EAP responses in the presence of Gaussian noise added to the pulse train stimulus. Addition of Gaussian noise at a level approximately -30 dB relative to EAP threshold to the pulse trains decreased the amount of alternation, indicating that stochastic resonance may be induced in the auditory nerve. The use of some type of conditioning stimulus such as Gaussian noise may provide a more 'normal' neural response pattern.

  9. Electrostatic noise bands associated with the electron gyrofrequency and plasma frequency in the outer magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, R.R.

    1975-01-01

    Naturally occurring noise bands near the electron plasma frequency are frequently detected by the University of Iowa plasma wave experiment on the IMP 6 satellite in the region from just inside the plasmapause to radial distances of about 10 earth radii in the outer magnetosphere. The electric field strength of these noise bands is usually small with electric field spectral densities near 10 -15 volts 2 meter -2 Hz -1 . A wave magnetic field has been detected only in a few unusually intense cases, and in these cases the magnetic field energy density is several orders of magnitude smaller than the electric field energy density. The bands are observed at all magnetic latitudes covered by the IMP 6 orbit (parallelγ/sub m/parallel less than or equal to 45 0 ) and appear to be a permanent feature of the outer magnetosphere. They are found at all local times and occur least frequently in the quadrant from 18 to 24 hours. The bands appear to consist of two distinct spectral types, diffuse and narrow. In both types the center frequency of the noise band is bounded by consecutive harmonics of the electron gyrofrequency, and the bands occur most often between harmonics that are near the local electron plasma frequency. These bands appear to merge continuously into two types of plasma wave emissions that are found in dissimilar regions of the magnetosphere (upper hybrid resonance noise, also called Region 3 noise, inside the plasmasphere and (n + 1/2)f/sub g/ harmonics in the outer magnetosphere). It is suggested that this smooth merging is caused by changes in the plasma wave dispersion relation that occur as the spacecraft moves from the cold plasma within the plasmasphere into the warm non-Maxwellian plasma found in the outer magnetosphere

  10. Performance Analysis of IEEE 802.11g Waveform Transmitted Over a Fading Channel with Pulse-Noise Interference

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Taxeidis, Konstantinos

    2006-01-01

    ... only, as well as for AWGN plus pulse-noise interference. The implementation of forward error correction coding with soft decision decoding improves the performance compared to uncoded signal if pulse-noise interference is not present...

  11. Rapid pulse annealing of CdZnTe detectors for reducing electronic noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Lars; Conway, Adam; Nelson, Art; Nikolic, Rebecca J.; Payne, Stephen A.; Swanberg, Jr., Erik Lars

    2018-05-01

    A combination of doping, rapid pulsed optical and/or thermal annealing, and unique detector structure reduces or eliminates sources of electronic noise in a CdZnTe (CZT) detector. According to several embodiments, methods of forming a detector exhibiting minimal electronic noise include: pulse-annealing at least one surface of a detector comprising CZT for one or more pulses, each pulse having a duration of .about.0.1 seconds or less. The at least one surface may optionally be ion-implanted. In another embodiment, a CZT detector includes a detector surface with two or more electrodes operating at different electric potentials and coupled to the detector surface; and one or more ion-implanted CZT surfaces on or in the detector surface, each of the one or more ion-implanted CZT surfaces being independently connected to one of the two or more electrodes and the surface of the detector. At least two of the ion-implanted surfaces are in electrical contact.

  12. The capability of pulsed laser radiation for cutting band saws hardening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinin Evgeny

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the possibilities of pulsed laser radiation for hardening the band saws. The regimes of pulsed laser hardening the band saws of 1 mm thick made of tool steel 9CrV are grounded theoretically and experimentally tested. Selected and justified modes of treatment harden in the autohardening mode without additional heat removal. The results of the experimental research of microhardness are presented and formed as a result of processing of the microstructure. Selected modes increase the microhardness of the surface to 8500 MPa and form ultra highly dispersed structure in the surface layer characterized by high resistance to abrasion.

  13. Correlation of Noise Signature to Pulsed Power Events at the HERMES III Accelerator.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Barbara [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Joseph, Nathan Ryan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Salazar, Juan Diego [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The HERMES III accelerator, which is located at Sandia National Laboratories' Tech Area IV, is the largest pulsed gamma X-ray source in the world. The accelerator is made up of 20 inductive cavities that are charged to 1 MV each by complex pulsed power circuitry. The firing time of the machine components ranges between the microsecond and nanosecond timescales. This results in a variety of electromagnetic frequencies when the accelerator fires. Testing was done to identify the HERMES electromagnetic noise signal and to map it to the various accelerator trigger events. This report will show the measurement methods used to capture the noise spectrum produced from the machine and correlate this noise signature with machine events.

  14. The differences in brain activity between narrow band noise and pure tone tinnitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Vanneste

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tinnitus is an auditory sensation characterized by the perception of sound or noise in the absence of any external sound source. Based on neurobiological research, it is generally accepted that most forms of tinnitus are attributable to maladaptive plasticity due to damage to auditory system. Changes have been observed in auditory structures such as the inferior colliculus, the thalamus and the auditory cortex as well as in non-auditory brain areas. However, the observed changes show great variability, hence lacking a conclusive picture. One of the reasons might be the selection of inhomogeneous groups in data analysis. METHODOLOGY: The aim of the present study was to delineate the differences between the neural networks involved in narrow band noise and pure tone tinnitus conducting LORETA based source analysis of resting state EEG. CONCLUSIONS: Results demonstrated that narrow band noise tinnitus patients differ from pure tone tinnitus patients in the lateral frontopolar (BA 10, PCC and the parahippocampal area for delta, beta and gamma frequency bands, respectively. The parahippocampal-PCC current density differences might be load dependent, as noise-like tinnitus constitutes multiple frequencies in contrast to pure tone tinnitus. The lateral frontopolar differences might be related to pitch specific memory retrieval.

  15. Design and analysis of high gain and low noise figure CMOS low noise amplifier for Q-band nano-sensor application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suganthi, K.; Malarvizhi, S.

    2018-03-01

    A high gain, low power, low Noise figure (NF) and wide band of milli-meter Wave (mmW) circuits design at 50 GHz are used for Radio Frequency (RF) front end. The fundamental necessity of a receiver front-end includes perfect output and input impedance matching and port-to-port isolation with high gain and low noise over the entire band of interest. In this paper, a design of Cascade-Cascode CMOS LNA circuit at 50 GHz for Q-band application is proposed. The design of Low noise amplifier at 50 GHz using Agilent ADS tool with microstrip lines which provides simplicity in fabrication and less chip area. The low off-leakage current Ioff can be maintained with high K-dielectrics CMOS structure. Nano-scale electronics can be achieved with increased robustness. The design has overall gain of 11.091 dB and noise figure of 2.673 dB for the Q-band of 48.3 GHz to 51.3 GHz. Impedance matching is done by T matching network and the obtained input and output reflection coefficients are S11 = <-10 dB and S22 = <-10 dB. Compared to Silicon (Si) material, Wide Band Gap semiconductor materials used attains higher junction temperatures which is well matched to ceramics used in packaging technology, the protection and reliability also can be achieved with the electronic packaging. The reverse transmission coefficient S21 is less than -21 dB has shown that LNA has better isolation between input and output, Stability factor greater than 1 and Power is also optimized in this design. Layout is designed, power gain of 4.6 dB is achieved and area is optimized which is nearly equal to 502 740 μm2. The observed results show that the proposed Cascade-Cascode LNA design can find its suitability in future milli-meter Wave Radar application.

  16. Generation of nanosecond S band microwave pulses based on superradiance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginzburg, N.S.; Zotova, I.V.; Rozental, R.M.

    2002-01-01

    Modeling carried out demonstrates possibility of generation of gigawatt power level S band microwave pulse with duration of several nanoseconds using superradiation of short electron beam moving along slow-wave periodical structure. A 10 ns / 500 keV / 5 kA accelerator of Kanazawa University can be used in such experiments. It is shown that significant increasing peak power can be obtained by optimization of voltage and current pulses waveforms. Required increasing of electron energy and current by the end of electron pulse can be achieved by using self-acceleration of a short beam passing through a system of passive cavities. (author)

  17. Generation of nanosecond S band microwave pulses based on superradiance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginzburg, N.S.; Zotova, I.V.; Rozental, R.M. [Russian Academy of Science, Institute of Applied Physics, Nizhny Novgorod (RU)] [and others

    2002-06-01

    Modeling carried out demonstrates possibility of generation of gigawatt power level S band microwave pulse with duration of several nanoseconds using superradiation of short electron beam moving along slow-wave periodical structure. A 10 ns / 500 keV / 5 kA accelerator of Kanazawa University can be used in such experiments. It is shown that significant increasing peak power can be obtained by optimization of voltage and current pulses waveforms. Required increasing of electron energy and current by the end of electron pulse can be achieved by using self-acceleration of a short beam passing through a system of passive cavities. (author)

  18. Cross-band noise model refinement for transform domain Wyner–Ziv video coding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Xin; Forchhammer, Søren

    2012-01-01

    TDWZ video coding trails that of conventional video coding solutions, mainly due to the quality of side information, inaccurate noise modeling and loss in the final coding step. The major goal of this paper is to enhance the accuracy of the noise modeling, which is one of the most important aspects...... influencing the coding performance of DVC. A TDWZ video decoder with a novel cross-band based adaptive noise model is proposed, and a noise residue refinement scheme is introduced to successively update the estimated noise residue for noise modeling after each bit-plane. Experimental results show...... that the proposed noise model and noise residue refinement scheme can improve the rate-distortion (RD) performance of TDWZ video coding significantly. The quality of the side information modeling is also evaluated by a measure of the ideal code length....

  19. Pulse modulator for X-band klystron at GLCTA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akemoto, M.; Honma, H.; Nakajima, H.; Shidara, T.; Fukuda, S.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents an X-band klystron modulator recently constructed for the Global Linear Collider Test Accelerator (GLCTA) at KEK. The modulator is a thyratron-switched line-type design, and operates two klystrons up to 75 MW peak power, 1.6 μs rf pulse width and up to 150 Hz repetition rate. The major goals of the modulator are reasonably compact size and high reliability. One notable feature is the use of eight 30kJ/s switching power supplies in parallel to charge the pulse forming network. These supplies are a major contributor to compact size of the modulator. The design, specifications and results of performance tests of the modulator are described. (author)

  20. Experimental investigation of 1 GW repeatable ultra-wide band pulse radiating source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Fanbao; Ma Hongge; Zhou Chuanming; Yang Zhoubing; Lu Wei; Ju Bingquan; Yu Huilong

    2001-01-01

    The single cycle pulse of 1.6 GW peak power with 20 Hz repetition-rate was generated. It radiated a peak power of more than 500 MW with a coaxial biconical antenna. The technological problems of the insulation and energy loss during generating and radiating high peak power ultra-wide band (UWB) pulse have been resolved. The experiments show that the material insulation and dispersion in sub-nanosecond pulse should be investigated deeply

  1. Experimental investigation of 1 GW repeatable ultra-wide band pulse radiating source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanbao, Meng; Hongge, Ma; Chuanming, Zhou; Zhoubing, Yang; Wei, Lu; Bingquan, Ju; Huilong, Yu [China Academy of Engineering Physics, Chengdu (China)

    2000-11-01

    The single cycle pulse of 1.6 GW peak power with 20 Hz repetition-rate was generated. It radiated a peak power of more than 500 MW with a coaxial biconical antenna. The technological problems of the insulation and energy loss during generating and radiating high peak power ultra-wide band (UWB) pulse have been resolved. The experiments show that the material insulation and dispersion in subnanosecond pulse should be investigated deeply.

  2. A five-picosecond electron pulse from ANL (Argonne National Laboratory) L-Band Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, G.L.; Jonah, C.D.; Ficht, D.T.; Mavrogenes, G.S.; Sauer, M.C. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The pulse-compression system of the Argonne National Laboratory Chemistry Division L-Band Linac, presented at the 1986 Linear Accelerator Conference at Stanford, California, has been completed. A five-picosecond-wide electron pulse containing 6 x 10 -9 coulomb charge has been achieved. Acceleration parameters and the pulse-width measurement technique are discussed, and future plans for the utilization of this pulse in radiation chemistry studies are presented. 5 refs., 4 figs

  3. Predicting the threshold of pulse-train electrical stimuli using a stochastic auditory nerve model: the effects of stimulus noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yifang; Collins, Leslie M

    2004-04-01

    The incorporation of low levels of noise into an electrical stimulus has been shown to improve auditory thresholds in some human subjects (Zeng et al., 2000). In this paper, thresholds for noise-modulated pulse-train stimuli are predicted utilizing a stochastic neural-behavioral model of ensemble fiber responses to bi-phasic stimuli. The neural refractory effect is described using a Markov model for a noise-free pulse-train stimulus and a closed-form solution for the steady-state neural response is provided. For noise-modulated pulse-train stimuli, a recursive method using the conditional probability is utilized to track the neural responses to each successive pulse. A neural spike count rule has been presented for both threshold and intensity discrimination under the assumption that auditory perception occurs via integration over a relatively long time period (Bruce et al., 1999). An alternative approach originates from the hypothesis of the multilook model (Viemeister and Wakefield, 1991), which argues that auditory perception is based on several shorter time integrations and may suggest an NofM model for prediction of pulse-train threshold. This motivates analyzing the neural response to each individual pulse within a pulse train, which is considered to be the brief look. A logarithmic rule is hypothesized for pulse-train threshold. Predictions from the multilook model are shown to match trends in psychophysical data for noise-free stimuli that are not always matched by the long-time integration rule. Theoretical predictions indicate that threshold decreases as noise variance increases. Theoretical models of the neural response to pulse-train stimuli not only reduce calculational overhead but also facilitate utilization of signal detection theory and are easily extended to multichannel psychophysical tasks.

  4. Transistorized wide band pulse amplifier; Amplificateur d'impulsions a large bande et a transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girard, J; Savinelli, H [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Hazoni, Y [Atomic Energy Commission (Israel)

    1960-07-01

    A simple wide band amplifier is described below, having a stability better than 1{sup 0}/00 deg{sup -1} centigrade, a current gain of 10{sup 3}, bandwidth of 30 MHz, and a signal to noise current ratio of about 100. This amplifier has been studied to answer the necessity of a fast transistor head amplifier for nuclear detectors, having in mind pile up and overloading problems. (author) [French] Un amplificateur simple, a large bande, est decrit ci-apres, il a une stabilite meilleure que le 0/00 par degre centigrade, un gain en courant de 10{sup 3} une largeur de bande de 30 MHz, et un rapport signal sur bruit en courant d'environ 100. Cet amplificateur a ete etudie pour repondre a la necessite de l'amplification des impulsions provenant de detecteurs nucleaires, ayant a l'esprit les problemes d'empilement et de saturation. (auteur)

  5. Shot noise and Fano factor in tunneling in three-band pseudospin-1 Dirac-Weyl systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Rui; Hui, Pak Ming

    2017-06-01

    Tunneling through a potential barrier of height V0 in a two-dimensional system with a band structure consisting of three bands with a flat band intersecting the touching apices of two Dirac cones is studied. Results of the transmission coefficient at various incident angles, conductivity, shot noise, and Fano factor in this pseudospin-1 Dirac-Weyl system are presented and contrasted with those in graphene which is typical of a pseudospin-1/2 system. The pseudospin-1 system is found to show a higher transmission and suppressed shot noise in general. Significant differences in the shot noise and Fano factor due to the super Klein tunneling effect that allows perfect transmission at all incident angles under certain conditions are illustrated. For Fermi energy EF =V0 / 2, super Klein tunneling leads to a noiseless conductivity that takes on the maximum value 2e2 DkF / (πh) for 0 ≤EF ≤V0. This gives rise to a minimum Fano factor, in sharp contrast with that of a local maximum in graphene. For EF =V0, the band structure of pseudospin-1 system no longer leads to a quantized value of the conductivity as in graphene. Both the conductivity and the shot noise show a minimum with the Fano factor approaching 1/4, which is different from the value of 1/3 in graphene.

  6. Speckle noise reduction technique for Lidar echo signal based on self-adaptive pulse-matching independent component analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fan; Wang, Jiaxing; Zhu, Daiyin; Tu, Qi

    2018-04-01

    Speckle noise has always been a particularly tricky problem in improving the ranging capability and accuracy of Lidar system especially in harsh environment. Currently, effective speckle de-noising techniques are extremely scarce and should be further developed. In this study, a speckle noise reduction technique has been proposed based on independent component analysis (ICA). Since normally few changes happen in the shape of laser pulse itself, the authors employed the laser source as a reference pulse and executed the ICA decomposition to find the optimal matching position. In order to achieve the self-adaptability of algorithm, local Mean Square Error (MSE) has been defined as an appropriate criterion for investigating the iteration results. The obtained experimental results demonstrated that the self-adaptive pulse-matching ICA (PM-ICA) method could effectively decrease the speckle noise and recover the useful Lidar echo signal component with high quality. Especially, the proposed method achieves 4 dB more improvement of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) than a traditional homomorphic wavelet method.

  7. Band-selective shaped pulse for high fidelity quantum control in diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Yan-Chun; Xing, Jian; Liu, Gang-Qin; Jiang, Qian-Qing; Li, Wu-Xia; Zhang, Fei-Hao; Gu, Chang-Zhi; Pan, Xin-Yu; Long, Gui-Lu

    2014-01-01

    High fidelity quantum control of qubits is crucially important for realistic quantum computing, and it becomes more challenging when there are inevitable interactions between qubits. We introduce a band-selective shaped pulse, refocusing BURP (REBURP) pulse, to cope with the problems. The electron spin of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond is flipped with high fidelity by the REBURP pulse. In contrast with traditional rectangular pulses, the shaped pulse has almost equal excitation effect in a sharply edged region (in frequency domain). So the three sublevels of host 14 N nuclear spin can be flipped accurately simultaneously, while unwanted excitations of other sublevels (e.g., of a nearby 13 C nuclear spin) is well suppressed. Our scheme can be used for various applications such as quantum metrology, quantum sensing, and quantum information process.

  8. Band-selective shaped pulse for high fidelity quantum control in diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yan-Chun; Xing, Jian; Liu, Gang-Qin; Jiang, Qian-Qing; Li, Wu-Xia [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhang, Fei-Hao [Tsinghua National Laboratory for Information Science and Technology, Beijing 100084 (China); State Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Physics and Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Gu, Chang-Zhi; Pan, Xin-Yu, E-mail: xypan@aphy.iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing 100871 (China); Long, Gui-Lu [Tsinghua National Laboratory for Information Science and Technology, Beijing 100084 (China); State Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Physics and Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-06-30

    High fidelity quantum control of qubits is crucially important for realistic quantum computing, and it becomes more challenging when there are inevitable interactions between qubits. We introduce a band-selective shaped pulse, refocusing BURP (REBURP) pulse, to cope with the problems. The electron spin of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond is flipped with high fidelity by the REBURP pulse. In contrast with traditional rectangular pulses, the shaped pulse has almost equal excitation effect in a sharply edged region (in frequency domain). So the three sublevels of host {sup 14}N nuclear spin can be flipped accurately simultaneously, while unwanted excitations of other sublevels (e.g., of a nearby {sup 13}C nuclear spin) is well suppressed. Our scheme can be used for various applications such as quantum metrology, quantum sensing, and quantum information process.

  9. A z-gradient array for simultaneous multi-slice excitation with a single-band RF pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertan, Koray; Taraghinia, Soheil; Sadeghi, Alireza; Atalar, Ergin

    2018-07-01

    Multi-slice radiofrequency (RF) pulses have higher specific absorption rates, more peak RF power, and longer pulse durations than single-slice RF pulses. Gradient field design techniques using a z-gradient array are investigated for exciting multiple slices with a single-band RF pulse. Two different field design methods are formulated to solve for the required current values of the gradient array elements for the given slice locations. The method requirements are specified, optimization problems are formulated for the minimum current norm and an analytical solution is provided. A 9-channel z-gradient coil array driven by independent, custom-designed gradient amplifiers is used to validate the theory. Performance measures such as normalized slice thickness error, gradient strength per unit norm current, power dissipation, and maximum amplitude of the magnetic field are provided for various slice locations and numbers of slices. Two and 3 slices are excited by a single-band RF pulse in simulations and phantom experiments. The possibility of multi-slice excitation with a single-band RF pulse using a z-gradient array is validated in simulations and phantom experiments. Magn Reson Med 80:400-412, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  10. Life test on indigenous s-band pulsed magnetron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanmode, Y.D.; Shrivastava, P.; Hannurkar, P.R.

    1999-01-01

    A 2 MW S-band pulsed magnetron has been developed under joint collaboration between CAT and CEERI. In this development effort several lab prototypes were evaluated on 2 MW microwave test facility developed at CAT. One magnetron is subjected to life test. The present paper describes the setup and procedures used for life test. Various observations and corrections made during the life tests are also described. Results of the tests are discussed. (author)

  11. Propagation of Partial Discharge and Noise Pulses in Turbine Generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Mogens; Stone, G. C.; Kurtz, M.

    1986-01-01

    Changes with time in the partial discharge (PD) activity originating in a generator stator's insulation system provide information about the electrical integrity of the stator winding. It is desirable to measure PD during normal service to minimize costs. To do this successfully, the influence...... of electrical interference must be reduced. Tests are reported which characterize the nature of discharge and noise pulses when using capacitive couplers mounted on each of the phase leads and an RF current transformer mounted on the neutral lead for signal detection. Significant differences between PD...... and electrical noise have been observed....

  12. Investigations on the relationship between power spectrum and signal-to-noise ratio of frequency-swept pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhuhong; Fan Diayuan

    1993-01-01

    The criterion for obtaining compressed chirp pulses with high signal-to-noise ratio is the shape of the power spectrum, a chirp pulse of Gaussian shaped power spectrum without modulation is needed in CPA system to get the clean compressed pulses. 4 refs., 2 figs

  13. Low-noise pulse-mode current power supply for magnetic field measurements of magnets for accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omel'yanenko, M.M.; Borisov, V.V.; Donyagin, A.M.; Kostromin, S.A.; Makarov, A.A.; Khodzhibagiyan, G.G.; Shemchuk, A.V.

    2017-01-01

    The described pulse-mode current power supply has been designed and fabricated for the magnetic field measurement system of superconducting magnets for accelerators. The power supply is based on a current regulator with pass transistor bank in linear mode. The output current pulses (0-100 A) are produced by using the energy of preliminary charged capacitor bank (5-40 V), which is charged additionally after each pulse. There is no AC-line frequency and harmonics ripple in the output current, the relative noise level is less than -100 dB (or 10 -5 ) of RMS value (it is defined as the ratio of output RMS noise current to the maximal output current 100 A within the operating bandwidth, expressed in dB).

  14. Improved sensitivity for W-band Gd(III)-Gd(III) and nitroxide-nitroxide DEER measurements with shaped pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrenberg, Thorsten; Rosenski, Yael; Carmieli, Raanan; Zibzener, Koby; Qi, Mian; Frydman, Veronica; Godt, Adelheid; Goldfarb, Daniella; Feintuch, Akiva

    2017-10-01

    Chirp and shaped pulses have been recently shown to be highly advantageous for improving sensitivity in DEER (double electron-electron resonance, also called PELDOR) measurements due to their large excitation bandwidth. The implementation of such pulses for pulse EPR has become feasible due to the availability of arbitrary waveform generators (AWG) with high sampling rates to support pulse shaping for pulses with tens of nanoseconds duration. Here we present a setup for obtaining chirp pulses on our home-built W-band (95 GHz) spectrometer and demonstrate its performance on Gd(III)-Gd(III) and nitroxide-nitroxide DEER measurements. We carried out an extensive optimization procedure on two model systems, Gd(III)-PyMTA-spacer-Gd(III)-PyMTA (Gd-PyMTA ruler; zero-field splitting parameter (ZFS) D ∼ 1150 MHz) as well as nitroxide-spacer-nitroxide (nitroxide ruler) to evaluate the applicability of shaped pulses to Gd(III) complexes and nitroxides, which are two important classes of spin labels used in modern DEER/EPR experiments. We applied our findings to ubiquitin, doubly labeled with Gd-DOTA-monoamide (D ∼ 550 MHz) as a model for a system with a small ZFS. Our experiments were focused on the questions (i) what are the best conditions for positioning of the detection frequency, (ii) which pump pulse parameters (bandwidth, positioning in the spectrum, length) yield the best signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) improvements when compared to classical DEER, and (iii) how do the sample's spectral parameters influence the experiment. For the nitroxide ruler, we report an improvement of up to 1.9 in total SNR, while for the Gd-PyMTA ruler the improvement was 3.1-3.4 and for Gd-DOTA-monoamide labeled ubiquitin it was a factor of 1.8. Whereas for the Gd-PyMTA ruler the two setups pump on maximum and observe on maximum gave about the same improvement, for Gd-DOTA-monoamide a significant difference was found. In general the choice of the best set of parameters depends on the D

  15. Testing Time and Frequency Fiber-Optic Link Transfer by Hardware Emulation of Acoustic-Band Optical Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipiński Marcin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The low-frequency optical-signal phase noise induced by mechanical vibration of the base occurs in field-deployed fibers. Typical telecommunication data transfer is insensitive to this type of noise but the phenomenon may influence links dedicated to precise Time and Frequency (T&F fiber-optic transfer that exploit the idea of stabilization of phase or propagation delay of the link. To measure effectiveness of suppression of acoustic noise in such a link, a dedicated measurement setup is necessary. The setup should enable to introduce a low-frequency phase corruption to the optical signal in a controllable way. In the paper, a concept of a setup in which the mechanically induced acoustic-band optical signal phase corruption is described and its own features and measured parameters are presented. Next, the experimental measurement results of the T&F transfer TFTS-2 system’s immunity as a function of the fibre-optic length vs. the acoustic-band noise are presented. Then, the dependency of the system immunity on the location of a noise source along the link is also pointed out.

  16. Design and evaluation of noise suppression sheet for GHz band utilizing magneto-elastic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Toshiyuki; Kondo, Koichi; Yoshida, Shigeyoshi

    2017-12-01

    Feasibility of realizing a noise suppression sheet (NSS) coping with the low SHF band such as the 5 GHz band was investigated, which was composed of soft magnetic metal flakes dispersed in a polymer. For suppressing noises, the higher frequency one of the bimodal frequency dispersion (lower frequency one: Dispersion DII, higher frequency one: Dispersion DIII) seen in the imaginary permeability (μ″; magnetic loss component) spectrum of the NSS was aimed to utilize. Referring to the previous finding that Dispersion DIII is originated from a magneto-elastic effect, several magnetic composite sheets were prepared using various alloy flakes with different saturation magnetostriction (λs), and their frequency (fr(DIII)) and magnitude (μ″(DIII)) of Dispersion DIII were investigated. It was found that the NSS containing flakes with higher λs exhibited higher fr(DIII) and higher μ″(DIII)/μ″(DII), which was ratio of μ″(DIII) to the magnitude of Dispersion DII (μ″(DII)). The fr(DIII) for the NSS having the highest λs containing Fe-Co alloy flake reached 7.45 GHz and μ″ in the 5 GHz band was approximately twice as high as the conventional NSS containing Fe-Si-Al alloy flake. For transmission attenuation power ratio (Rtp) when an NSS was placed on a microstrip line with characteristic impedance of 50 Ω, NSS with larger fr(DIII)2 · μ″(DIII) ∝ Ms2 (Ms: saturation magnetization), which theoretically gave the frequency limit of imaginary permeability for a thin film, exhibited larger Rtp in the low SHF band. These results suggested that an NSS containing a magnetic flake material with both large λs and Ms was suitable for suppressing low SHF band noises.

  17. Impact of non-white noises in pulse amplitude measurements: a time-domain approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pullia, A.

    1998-01-01

    The contribution of the 1/f-noise to the spectral line broadening in pulse amplitude measurements is derived with a time-domain analysis. The known time-domain relationships which provide the contributions of the series and parallel white noises are generalised for the case of 1/f and other typical non-white noises, by using the fractional derivative of either the system impulse response (time-invariant linear filters) or its weight function folded (time-variant linear filters). It is shown that a time-domain approach is also effective to determine the contribution of Lorentzian noises. A simple rule suitable to derive numerically the fractional derivative is given, which permits to calculate the effect of non-white noises even when the filter impulse response is not known analytically but only in sampled form. (orig.)

  18. S-band low noise amplifier and 40 kW high power amplifier subsystems of Japanese Deep Space Earth Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, K.; Handa, K.; Akinaga, W.; Doi, M.; Matsuzaki, O.

    This paper describes the design and the performance of the S-band low noise amplifier and the S-band high power amplifier that have been developed for the Usuda Deep Space Station of the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), Japan. The S-band low noise amplifier consists of a helium gas-cooled parametric amplifier followed by three-stage FET amplifiers and has a noise temperature of 8 K. The high power amplifier is composed of two 28 kW klystrons, capable of transmitting 40 kW continuously when two klystrons are combined. Both subsystems are operating quite satisfactorily in the tracking of Sakigake and Suisei, the Japanese interplanetary probes for Halley's comet exploration, launched by ISAS in 1985.

  19. Suppression of contour perception by band-limited noise and its relation to nonclassical receptive field inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petkov, Nicolai; Westenberg, Michel A.

    Band-spectrum noise has been shown to suppress the visual perception of printed letters. The suppression exhibits a specific dependence on the spatial frequency of the noise, and the frequency domain of most effective inhibition has been related to the size of the letters. In this paper, we address

  20. Random noise effects in pulse-mode digital multilayer neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y C; Shanblatt, M A

    1995-01-01

    A pulse-mode digital multilayer neural network (DMNN) based on stochastic computing techniques is implemented with simple logic gates as basic computing elements. The pulse-mode signal representation and the use of simple logic gates for neural operations lead to a massively parallel yet compact and flexible network architecture, well suited for VLSI implementation. Algebraic neural operations are replaced by stochastic processes using pseudorandom pulse sequences. The distributions of the results from the stochastic processes are approximated using the hypergeometric distribution. Synaptic weights and neuron states are represented as probabilities and estimated as average pulse occurrence rates in corresponding pulse sequences. A statistical model of the noise (error) is developed to estimate the relative accuracy associated with stochastic computing in terms of mean and variance. Computational differences are then explained by comparison to deterministic neural computations. DMNN feedforward architectures are modeled in VHDL using character recognition problems as testbeds. Computational accuracy is analyzed, and the results of the statistical model are compared with the actual simulation results. Experiments show that the calculations performed in the DMNN are more accurate than those anticipated when Bernoulli sequences are assumed, as is common in the literature. Furthermore, the statistical model successfully predicts the accuracy of the operations performed in the DMNN.

  1. Ocean dynamic noise energy flux directivity in the 400 Hz to 700 Hz frequency band

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vladimir A. Shchurov; Galina F. Ivanova; Marianna V. Kuyanova; Helen S. Tkachenko

    2007-01-01

    Results of field studies of underwater dynamic noise energy flux directivity at two wind speeds, 6 m/s and 12 m/s, in the 400 Hz to 700 Hz frequency band in the deep open ocean are presented. The measurements were made by a freely drifting telemetric combined system at 500 m depth. Statistical characteristics of the horizontal and vertical dynamic noise energy flux directivity are considered as functions of wind speed and direction. Correlation between the horizontal dynamic noise energy flux direction and that of the wind was determined; a mechanism of the horizontal dynamic noise energy flux generation is related to the initial noise field scattering on ocean surface waves.

  2. A 115dB-DR Audio DAC with –61dBFS out-of-band noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerveld, H.J.; Schinkel, Daniel; van Tuijl, Adrianus Johannes Maria

    2015-01-01

    Out-of-band noise (OBN) is troublesome in analog circuits that process the output of a noise-shaping audio DAC. It causes slewing in amplifiers and aliasing in sampling circuits like ADCs and class-D amplifiers. Nonlinearity in these circuits also causes cross-modulation of the OBN into the audio

  3. Improving the sensitivity of future GW observatories in the 1-10 Hz band: Newtonian and seismic noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beker, M.G.; Cella, G.; DeSalvo, R.; Doets, M.; Grote, H.; Harms, J.; Hennes, E.; Mandic, V.; Rabeling, D.S.; van den Brand, J.F.J.; van Leeuwen, C.M.

    2011-01-01

    The next generation gravitational wave interferometric detectors will likely be underground detectors to extend the GW detection frequency band to frequencies below the Newtonian noise limit. Newtonian noise originates from the continuous motion of the Earth's crust driven by human activity, tidal

  4. Investigation of LO-leakage cancellation and DC-offset influence on flicker-noise in X-band mixers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michaelsen, Rasmus; Johansen, Tom; Tamborg, Kjeld

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes an investigation on the influences in 1/f noise of LO-leakage and DC-offset cancellation for X-band mixers. Conditions for LO-leakage cancellation and zero DC-offset is derived. Measurements on a double balanced diode mixer shows an improvement in noise figure from 14.3dB to ...

  5. Lunar Noise-Temperature Increase Measurements at S-Band, X-Band, and Ka-Band Using a 34-Meter-Diameter Beam-Waveguide Antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morabito, D. D.

    2006-08-01

    The Moon radiates energy at infrared and microwave wavelengths, in addition to reflecting sunlight at optical wavelengths. As a result, an antenna pointed at or near the Moon will cause an increase in receiver noise temperature that needs to be accounted for in telemetry, radio science, or ranging link budgets. The Deep Space Network may be required to use its antennas in future lunar robotic or human missions, and thus it is important to understand the nature of this temperature increase as a function of observing frequency, lunar phase, and angular offset of the antenna beam from the center of the lunar disk. This article quantifies such a set of measurements acquired at DSS 13, a 34-m-diameter research and development beam-waveguide antenna located at Goldstone, California, at three different telecommunication frequencies, S-band (2.3 GHz), X-band (8.4 GHz), and Ka-band (32 GHz), over a wide range of lunar phase, for both disk-centered and limb-centered positions of the antenna beam.

  6. Proposal of a wide-band mirror polarizer of slow neutrons at a pulsed neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikitenko, Yu.V.; Ostanevich, Yu.M.

    1992-01-01

    The new type wide-band mirror-based neutron polarizer to be operated at a pulsed neutron source is suggested. The idea is to use a movable polarizing mirror system, which, be the incoming beam monochromatized by the time-of-flight, would allow one to tune glancing angles in time so, that the total reflection condition is always fulfilled only for one of the two neutron spin eigenstates. Estimates show, that with the pulsed reactor IBR-2 such polarizer allows one to build a small-angle neutron scattering instrument capable to effectively use the wave-length band from 2 to 15 A. 9 refs.; 1 fig

  7. Random noise can help to improve synchronization of excimer laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingesz, Róbert; Barna, Angéla; Gingl, Zoltán; Mellár, János

    2016-02-01

    Recently, we have reported on a compact microcontroller-based unit developed to accurately synchronize excimer laser pulses (Mingesz et al. 2012 Fluct. Noise Lett. 11, 1240007 (doi:10.1142/S021947751240007X)). We have shown that dithering based on random jitter noise plus pseudorandom numbers can be used in the digital control system to radically reduce the long-term drift of the laser pulse from the trigger and to improve the accuracy of the synchronization. In this update paper, we present our new experimental results obtained by the use of the delay-controller unit to tune the timing of a KrF excimer laser as an addition to our previous numerical simulation results. The hardware was interfaced to the laser using optical signal paths in order to reduce sensitivity to electromagnetic interference and the control algorithm tested by simulations was applied in the experiments. We have found that the system is able to reduce the delay uncertainty very close to the theoretical limit and performs well in real applications. The simple, compact and flexible system is universal enough to also be used in various multidisciplinary applications.

  8. Performance analysis of a low power low noise tunable band pass filter for multiband RF front end

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manjula, J.; Malarvizhi, S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a low power tunable active inductor and RF band pass filter suitable for multiband RF front end circuits. The active inductor circuit uses the PMOS cascode structure as the negative transconductor of a gyrator to reduce the noise voltage. Also, this structure provides possible negative resistance to reduce the inductor loss with wide inductive bandwidth and high resonance frequency. The RF band pass filter is realized using the proposed active inductor with suitable input and output buffer stages. The tuning of the center frequency for multiband operation is achieved through the controllable current source. The designed active inductor and RF band pass filter are simulated in 180 nm and 45 nm CMOS process using the Synopsys HSPICE simulation tool and their performances are compared. The parameters, such as resonance frequency, tuning capability, noise and power dissipation, are analyzed for these CMOS technologies and discussed. The design of a third order band pass filter using an active inductor is also presented. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  9. Lateralization of narrow-band noise by blind and sighted listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Helen J; Divenyi, Pierre L; Lotze, Al

    2002-01-01

    The effects of varying interaural time delay (ITD) and interaural intensity difference (IID) were measured in normal-hearing sighted and congenitally blind subjects as a function of eleven frequencies and at sound pressure levels of 70 and 90 dB, and at a sensation level of 25 dB (sensation level refers to the pressure level of the sound above its threshold for the individual subject). Using an 'acoustic' pointing paradigm, the subject varied the IID of a 500 Hz narrow-band (100 Hz) noise (the 'pointer') to coincide with the apparent lateral position of a 'target' ITD stimulus. ITDs of 0, +/-200, and +/-400 micros were obtained through total waveform delays of narrow-band noise, including envelope and fine structure. For both groups, the results of this experiment confirm the traditional view of binaural hearing for like stimuli: non-zero ITDs produce little perceived lateral displacement away from 0 IID at frequencies above 1250 Hz. To the extent that greater magnitude of lateralization for a given ITD, presentation level, and center frequency can be equated with superior localization abilities, blind listeners appear at least comparable and even somewhat better than sighted subjects, especially when attending to signals in the periphery. The present findings suggest that blind listeners are fully able to utilize the cues for spatial hearing, and that vision is not a mandatory prerequisite for the calibration of human spatial hearing.

  10. Broadband 2D electronic spectrometer using white light and pulse shaping: noise and signal evaluation at 1 and 100 kHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, Nicholas M; Mehlenbacher, Randy D; Jones, Andrew C; Zanni, Martin T

    2017-04-03

    We have developed a broad bandwidth two-dimensional electronic spectrometer that operates shot-to-shot at repetition rates up to 100 kHz using an acousto-optic pulse shaper. It is called a two-dimensional white-light (2D-WL) spectrometer because the input is white-light supercontinuum. Methods for 100 kHz data collection are studied to understand how laser noise is incorporated into 2D spectra during measurement. At 100 kHz, shot-to-shot scanning of the delays and phases of the pulses in the pulse sequence produces a 2D spectrum 13-times faster and with the same signal-to-noise as using mechanical stages and a chopper. Comparing 100 to 1 kHz repetition rates, data acquisition time is decreased by a factor of 200, which is beyond the improvement expected by the repetition rates alone due to reduction in 1/f noise. These improvements arise because shot-to-shot readout and modulation of the pulse train at 100 kHz enables the electronic coherences to be measured faster than the decay in correlation between laser intensities. Using white light supercontinuum for the pump and probe pulses produces high signal-to-noise spectra on samples with optical densities 200 nm bandwidth.

  11. Wide-band residual phase-noise measurements on 40-GHz monolithic mode-locked lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, David; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2005-01-01

    We have performed wide-band residual phase-noise measurements on semiconductor 40-GHz mode-locked lasers by employing electrical waveguide components for the radio-frequency circuit. The intrinsic timing jitters of lasers with one, two, and three quantum wells (QW) are compared and our design......-QW laser. There is good agreement between the measured results and existing theory....

  12. Proposal of a wide-band mirror polarizer of slow neutrons at a pulsed neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikitenko, Yu.V.; Ostanevich, Yu.M.

    1993-01-01

    The new type of wide-band mirror-based neutron polarizer, which is to be operated at a pulsed neutron source, is suggested. The idea is to use a movable polarizing mirror system, which, with the incoming beam monochromatized by the time-of-flight, would allow one to tune glancing angles in time so that the total reflection condition is always fulfilled only for one of the two neutron spin eigenstates. Estimates show that with the pulsed reactor IBR-2 such a polarizer allows one to build a small angle neutron scattering instrument capable of effectively using the wavelength band from 2 A with a rather high luminosity (time-averaged flux at sample position being up to 10 7 n/s/cm -2 ). (orig.)

  13. Maximizing noise energy for noise-masking studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jules Étienne, Cédric; Arleo, Angelo; Allard, Rémy

    2017-08-01

    Noise-masking experiments are widely used to investigate visual functions. To be useful, noise generally needs to be strong enough to noticeably impair performance, but under some conditions, noise does not impair performance even when its contrast approaches the maximal displayable limit of 100 %. To extend the usefulness of noise-masking paradigms over a wider range of conditions, the present study developed a noise with great masking strength. There are two typical ways of increasing masking strength without exceeding the limited contrast range: use binary noise instead of Gaussian noise or filter out frequencies that are not relevant to the task (i.e., which can be removed without affecting performance). The present study combined these two approaches to further increase masking strength. We show that binarizing the noise after the filtering process substantially increases the energy at frequencies within the pass-band of the filter given equated total contrast ranges. A validation experiment showed that similar performances were obtained using binarized-filtered noise and filtered noise (given equated noise energy at the frequencies within the pass-band) suggesting that the binarization operation, which substantially reduced the contrast range, had no significant impact on performance. We conclude that binarized-filtered noise (and more generally, truncated-filtered noise) can substantially increase the energy of the noise at frequencies within the pass-band. Thus, given a limited contrast range, binarized-filtered noise can display higher energy levels than Gaussian noise and thereby widen the range of conditions over which noise-masking paradigms can be useful.

  14. IHEP S-band 45 MW pulse power klystron development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Dong; Zhou Zusheng; Zhang Liang; Li Gangying; Tian Shuangmin

    2006-01-01

    S-band 45 MW pulse power klystron has been developed in the Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP) for the Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPC) upgrade projects (BEPC-II). This new klystron has 5 cavities in its RF-beam interaction and single RF output window, and the RF output power is 45 MW at 310 kV, the gain is 50 dB, the efficiency 40%. The manufacturing, training and testing of a prototype klystron has been finished in IHEP and RF power 45 MW at 300 kV has been reached. The testing results show that all the parameters of the 45 MW klystron reach the design goal. (authors)

  15. Pulse-coupled mixed-mode oscillators: Cluster states and extreme noise sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamchandani, Avinash J.; Graham, James N.; Riecke, Hermann

    2018-04-01

    Motivated by rhythms in the olfactory system of the brain, we investigate the synchronization of all-to-all pulse-coupled neuronal oscillators exhibiting various types of mixed-mode oscillations (MMOs) composed of sub-threshold oscillations (STOs) and action potentials ("spikes"). We focus particularly on the impact of the delay in the interaction. In the weak-coupling regime, we reduce the system to a Kuramoto-type equation with non-sinusoidal phase coupling and the associated Fokker-Planck equation. Its linear stability analysis identifies the appearance of various cluster states. Their type depends sensitively on the delay and the width of the pulses. Interestingly, long delays do not imply slow population rhythms, and the number of emerging clusters only loosely depends on the number of STOs. Direct simulations of the oscillator equations reveal that for quantitative agreement of the weak-coupling theory the coupling strength and the noise have to be extremely small. Even moderate noise leads to significant skipping of STO cycles, which can enhance the diffusion coefficient in the Fokker-Planck equation by two orders of magnitude. Introducing an effective diffusion coefficient extends the range of agreement significantly. Numerical simulations of the Fokker-Planck equation reveal bistability and solutions with oscillatory order parameters that result from nonlinear mode interactions. These are confirmed in simulations of the full spiking model.

  16. The Noisiness of Low-Frequency One-Third Octave Bands of Noise. M.S. Thesis - Southampton Univ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, B. W.

    1975-01-01

    This study examined the relative noisiness of low frequency one-third octave bands of noise bounded by the bands centered at 25 Hz and 200 Hz, with intensities ranging from 50 db sound pressure level (SPL) to 95 db SPL. The thirty-two subjects used a method-of-adjustment technique, producing comparison-band intensities as noisy as standard bands centered at 100 Hz and 200 Hz with intensities of 60 db SPL and 72 db SPL. Four contours of equal noisiness were developed for one-third octave bands, extending down to 25 Hz and ranging in intensity from approximately 58 db SPL to 86 db SPL. These curves were compared with the contours of equal noisiness of Kryter and Pearsons. In the region of overlap (between 50 Hz and 200 Hz) the agreement was good.

  17. Noise Characterization and Performance of MODIS Thermal Emissive Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavan, Sriharsha; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Wu, Aisheng; Wenny, Brian; Chiang, Kwofu; Chen, Na; Wang, Zhipeng; Li, Yonghong

    2016-01-01

    The MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is a premier Earth-observing sensor of the early 21st century, flying onboard the Terra (T) and Aqua (A) spacecraft. Both instruments far exceeded their six-year design life and continue to operate satisfactorily for more than 15 and 13 years, respectively. The MODIS instrument is designed to make observations at nearly a 100% duty cycle covering the entire Earth in less than two days. The MODIS sensor characteristics include a spectral coverage from 0.41micrometers to 14.4 micrometers, of which those wavelengths ranging from 3.7 micrometers to 14.4 micrometers cover the thermal infrared region which is interspaced in 16 thermal emissive bands (TEBs). Each of the TEB contains ten detectors which record samples at a spatial resolution of 1 km. In order to ensure a high level of accuracy for the TEB-measured top-of-atmosphere radiances, an onboard blackbody (BB) is used as the calibration source. This paper reports the noise characterization and performance of the TEB on various counts. First, the stability of the onboard BB is evaluated to understand the effectiveness of the calibration source. Next, key noise metrics such as the noise equivalent temperature difference and the noise equivalent dn difference (NEdN) for the various TEBs are determined from multiple temperature sources. These sources include the nominally controlled BB temperature of 290 K for T-MODIS and 285 K for A-MODIS, as well as a BB warm up-cool down cycle that is performed over a temperature range from roughly 270 to 315 K. The space-view port that measures the background signal serves as a viable cold temperature source for measuring noise. In addition, a well characterized Earth-view target, the Dome Concordia site located in the Antarctic plateau, is used for characterizing the stability of the sensor, indirectly providing a measure of the NEdN. Based on this rigorous characterization, a list of the noisy and inoperable detectors for

  18. Pulsed rf excited spectrometer having improved pulse width control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    RF excitation for a spectrometer is obtained by pulse width modulating an RF carrier to produce the desired broadband RF exciting spectrum. The RF excitation includes a train of composite RF pulses, each composite pulse having a primary pulse portion of a first RF phase and a second pulse portion of a second RF phase opposite that of the first. In this manner, the finite rise and fall times of the primary pulse portion are compensated for by the corresponding rise and fall times of the secondary pulse portion. The primary pulse portion is lengthened by an amount equal to the secondary pulse portion so that the secondary pulse portion cancels the added primary pulse portion. In a spectrometer, the compensating second pulse component removes certain undesired side bands of the RF excitation caused by the finite rise and fall times of the applied RF pulses. The compensating second pulse component removes certain undesired side bands associated with each of the resonant lines of the excited resonance spectrum of the sample under analysis, particularly for wide band RF excitation

  19. Femtosecond photoionization of atoms under noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Kamal P.; Rost, Jan M.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the effect of incoherent perturbations on atomic photoionization due to a femtosecond midinfrared laser pulse by solving the time-dependent stochastic Schroedinger equation. For a weak laser pulse which causes almost no ionization, an addition of a Gaussian white noise to the pulse leads to a significantly enhanced ionization probability. Tuning the noise level, a stochastic resonancelike curve is observed showing the existence of an optimum noise for a given laser pulse. Besides studying the sensitivity of the obtained enhancement curve on the pulse parameters, such as the pulse duration and peak amplitude, we suggest that experimentally realizable broadband chaotic light can also be used instead of the white noise to observe similar features. The underlying enhancement mechanism is analyzed in the frequency domain by computing a frequency-resolved atomic gain profile, as well as in the time domain by controlling the relative delay between the action of the laser pulse and noise

  20. Research on channel characteristics of differential multi pulse position modulation without background noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhuo; Zhan, Weida; Sun, Quan; Hao, Ziqiang

    2018-04-01

    Differential multi-pulse position modulation (DMPPM) is a new type of modulation technology. There is a fast transmission rate, high bandwidth utilization, high modulation rate characteristics. The study of DMPPM modulation has important scientific value and practical significance. Channel capacity is one of the important indexes to measure the communication capability of communication system, and studying the channel capacity of DMPPM without background noise is the key to analyze the characteristics of DMPPM. The DMPPM theoretical model is established. The symbol structure of DMPPM with guard time slot is analyzed, and the channel capacity expression of DMPPM is deduced. Simulation analysis by MATLAB. The curves of unit channel capacity and capacity efficiency at different pulse and photon counting rates are analyzed. The results show that DMPPM is more advantageous than multi-pulse position modulation (MPPM), and is more suitable for future wireless optical communication system.

  1. A new low-cost 10 ns pulsed K(a)-band radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskelinen, Pekka; Ylinen, Juhana

    2011-07-01

    Two Gunn oscillators, conventional intermediate frequency building blocks, and a modified GaAs diode detector are combined to form a portable monostatic 10 ns instrumentation radar for outdoor K(a)-band radar cross section measurements. At 37.8 GHz the radar gives +20 dBm output power and its tangential sensitivity is -76 dBm. Processing bandwidth is 125 MHz, which also allows for some frequency drift in the Gunn devices. Intra-pulse frequency chirp is less than 15 MHz. All functions are steered by a microcontroller. First measurements convince that the construction has a reasonable ability to reduce close-to-ground surface clutter and gives an effective way of resolving target detail. This is beneficial especially when amplitude fluctuations disturb measurements with longer pulses. The new unit operates on 12 V dc, draws a current of less than 3 A, and weighs 5 kg.

  2. A self-starting hybrid optoelectronic oscillator generating ultra low jitter 10-GHz optical pulses and low phase noise electrical signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lasri, J.; Bilenca, A.; Dahan, D.

    2002-01-01

    In this letter, we describe a self-starting optical pulse source generating ultra low noise 15-ps-wide pulses at 10 GHz. It is based on a hybrid optoelectronic oscillator comprising a fiber extended cavity mode-locked diode laser which injection locks a self-oscillating heterojunction bipolar...

  3. Predicting dynamic range and intensity discrimination for electrical pulse-train stimuli using a stochastic auditory nerve model: the effects of stimulus noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yifang; Collins, Leslie M

    2005-06-01

    This work investigates dynamic range and intensity discrimination for electrical pulse-train stimuli that are modulated by noise using a stochastic auditory nerve model. Based on a hypothesized monotonic relationship between loudness and the number of spikes elicited by a stimulus, theoretical prediction of the uncomfortable level has previously been determined by comparing spike counts to a fixed threshold, Nucl. However, no specific rule for determining Nucl has been suggested. Our work determines the uncomfortable level based on the excitation pattern of the neural response in a normal ear. The number of fibers corresponding to the portion of the basilar membrane driven by a stimulus at an uncomfortable level in a normal ear is related to Nucl at an uncomfortable level of the electrical stimulus. Intensity discrimination limens are predicted using signal detection theory via the probability mass function of the neural response and via experimental simulations. The results show that the uncomfortable level for pulse-train stimuli increases slightly as noise level increases. Combining this with our previous threshold predictions, we hypothesize that the dynamic range for noise-modulated pulse-train stimuli should increase with additive noise. However, since our predictions indicate that intensity discrimination under noise degrades, overall intensity coding performance may not improve significantly.

  4. Background reduction and noise discrimination in the proportional counting of tritium using pulse-shape analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochel, R C; Hayes, D W [Du Pont de Nemours (E.I.) and Co., Aiken, S.C. (USA). Savannah River Lab.

    1975-12-01

    A pulse-shape analysis (PSA) unit of commercial design has been incorporated into a proportional counting system to determine the effectiveness of pulse-shape discrimination in increasing the sensitivity of tritium counting. It was found that a quantitative determination of tritium could be obtained directly from the PSA time spectrum eliminating the need for beta-ray energy selection used in the pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) technique. The performance of the proportional counting system was tested using the PSA unit and anticoincidence shielding, both singly and combined, under several types of background. A background reduction factor of 169 was obtained from the combined PSA-anticoincidence system with only a 2% loss in tritium counting efficiency. The PSA method was also found to offer significant reductions in noise background.

  5. Characterization of a low frequency magnetic noise from a two stage pulse tube cryocooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eshraghi, Mohamad Javad; Sasada, Ichiro; Kim, Jin Mok; Lee, Yong Ho

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic noise of a two stage pulse tube cryocooler(PT) has been measured by a fundamental mode orthogonal fluxgate magnetometer and by a LTS SQUID gradiometer. The magnetometer was installed in a Dewar made of aluminum at 12 cm apart from a section containing magnetic regenerative materials of the PT. The magnetic noise shows a clear peak at 1.8 Hz which is the fundamental frequency of the He gas pumping rate. The 1.8 Hz magnetic noise took a peak, during the cooling process, when the cold stage temperature was at (or close to) 12 K, which resembles the variation of the temperature of the second cold stage of 1.8 Hz. Hence we attributed the main source of this magnetic noise to the temperature dependency of magnetic susceptibility of magnetic regenerative materials such as Er3Ni and HoCu2 used at the second stage. We pointed out that the superconducting magnetic shield by lead sheets reduced the interfering magnetic noise generated from this part. With this scheme, the magnetic noise amplitude measured with the first order gradiometer DROS, mounted in the vicinity of the magnetic regenerator, when the noise amplitude is minimum, which could be found from the fluxgate measurement results, was less than 500 pT peak to peak. Whereas without lead shielding the noise level was higher than the dynamic range of SQUID instrumentations which is around ±10nT. (author)

  6. A Dynamical System Exhibits High Signal-to-noise Ratio Gain by Stochastic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makra, Peter; Gingl, Zoltan

    2003-05-01

    On the basis of mixed-signal simulations, we demonstrate that signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gains much greater than unity can be obtained in the double-well potential through stochastic resonance (SR) with a symmetric periodic pulse train as deterministic and Gaussian white noise as random excitation. We also show that significant SNR improvement is possible in this system even for a sub-threshold sinusoid input if, instead of the commonly used narrow-band SNR, we apply an equally simple but much more realistic wide-band SNR definition. Using the latter result as an argument, we draw attention to the fact that the choice of the measure to reflect signal quality is critical with regard to the extent of signal improvement observed, and urge reconsideration of the practice prevalent in SR studies that most often the narrow-band SNR is used to characterise SR. Finally, we pose some questions concerning the possibilities of applying SNR improvement in practical set-ups.

  7. Neutron noise in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaquiere, A.; Pachowska, R.

    1961-06-01

    The power of a nuclear reactor, in the operating conditions, presents fluctuations due to various causes. This random behaviour can be included in the study of 'noises'. Among other sources of noise, we analyse hereafter the fluctuations due: a) to the discontinuous emissions of neutrons from an independent source; b) to the multiplication of neutrons inside the reactor. The method which we present makes use of the analogies between the rules governing a nuclear reactor in operation and a number of radio-electrical systems, in particular the feed-back loops. The reactor can be characterized by its 'passing band' and is described as a system submitted to a sequence of random pulses. In non linear operating condition, the effect of neutron noise is defined by means of a non-linear functional, this theory is thus related to previous works the references of which are given at the end of the present report. This leads us in particular in the case of nuclear reactors to some results given by A. Blaquiere in the case of radio-electrical loops. (author) [fr

  8. Performance Analysis of the Effect of Pulsed-Noise Interference on WLAN Signals Transmitted Over a Nakagami Fading Channel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsoumanis, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    ...) coding with soft decision decoding (SDD) and maximum- likelihood detection improves performance as compared to uncoded signals, In addition, the combination of maximum-likelihood detection and error connection coding renders pulsed-noise...

  9. Background reduction and noise discrimination in the proportional counting of tritium using pulse-shape analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochel, R.C.; Hayes, D.W.

    1975-01-01

    A pulse-shape analysis (PSA) unit of commercial design has been incorporated into a proportional counting system to determine the effectiveness of pulse-shape discrimination in increasing the sensitivity of tritium counting. It was found that a quantitative determination of tritium could be obtained directly from the PSA time spectrum eliminating the need for beta-ray energy selection used in the pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) technique. The performance of the proportional counting system was tested using the PSA unit and anticoincidence shielding, both singly and combined, under several types of background. A background reduction factor of 169 was obtained from the combined PSA-anticoincidence system with only a 2% loss in tritium counting efficiency. The PSA method was also found to offer significant reductions in noise background. (Auth.)

  10. TH-CD-207B-07: Noise Modeling of Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) for Photon Counting CT Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Z; Zheng, X; Deen, J; Peng, H [McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Xing, L [Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) has recently emerged as a promising photodetector for biomedical imaging applications. Due to its high multiplication gain (comparable to PMT), fast timing, low cost and compactness, it is considered a good candidate for photon counting CT. Dark noise is a limiting factor which impacts both energy resolution and detection dynamic range. Our goal is to develop a comprehensive model for noise sources for SiPM sensors. Methods: The physical parameters used in this work were based upon a test SPAD fabricated in 130nm CMOS process. The SPAD uses an n+/p-well junction, which is isolated from the p-substrate by a deep n-well junction. Inter-avalanche time measurement was used to record the time interval between two adjacent avalanche pulses. After collecting 1×106 counts, the histogram was obtained and multiple exponential fitting process was used to extract the lifetime associated with the traps within the bandgap. Results: At room temperature, the breakdown voltage of the SPAD is ∼11.4V and shows a temperature coefficient of 7.7mV/°C. The dark noise of SPAD increases with both the excess biasing voltage and temperature. The primary dark counts from the model were validated against the measurement results. A maximum relative error of 8.7% is observed at 20 °C with an excess voltage of 0.5V. The probabilities of after-pulsing are found to be dependent of both temperature and excess voltage. With 0.5V excess voltage, the after-pulsing probability is 63.5% at - 30 °C and drops to ∼6.6% at 40 °C. Conclusion: A comprehensive noise model for SPAD sensor was proposed. The model takes into account of static, dynamic and statistical behavior of SPADs. We believe that this is the first SPAD circuit simulation model that includes the band-to-band tunneling dark noise contribution and temporal dependence of the after-pulsing probability.

  11. Effect of fMRI acoustic noise on non-auditory working memory task: comparison between continuous and pulsed sound emitting EPI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Sven; Bartsch, Andreas J; Radue, Ernst W; Klarhöfer, Markus; Seifritz, Erich; Scheffler, Klaus

    2005-11-01

    Conventional blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is accompanied by substantial acoustic gradient noise. This noise can influence the performance as well as neuronal activations. Conventional fMRI typically has a pulsed noise component, which is a particularly efficient auditory stimulus. We investigated whether the elimination of this pulsed noise component in a recent modification of continuous-sound fMRI modifies neuronal activations in a cognitively demanding non-auditory working memory task. Sixteen normal subjects performed a letter variant n-back task. Brain activity and psychomotor performance was examined during fMRI with continuous-sound fMRI and conventional fMRI. We found greater BOLD responses in bilateral medial frontal gyrus, left middle frontal gyrus, left middle temporal gyrus, left hippocampus, right superior frontal gyrus, right precuneus and right cingulate gyrus with continuous-sound compared to conventional fMRI. Conversely, BOLD responses were greater in bilateral cingulate gyrus, left middle and superior frontal gyrus and right lingual gyrus with conventional compared to continuous-sound fMRI. There were no differences in psychomotor performance between both scanning protocols. Although behavioral performance was not affected, acoustic gradient noise interferes with neuronal activations in non-auditory cognitive tasks and represents a putative systematic confound.

  12. Fine-scale movement responses of free-ranging harbour porpoises to capture, tagging and short-term noise pulses from a single airgun

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Beest, Floris; Teilmann, Jonas; Hermannsen, Line

    2018-01-01

    , with natural behaviour resumed in less than or equal to 24 h. When we exposed porpoises to airgun pulses at ranges of 420–690 m with noise level estimates of 135–147 dB re 1 µPa2s (sound exposure level), one individual displayed rapid and directed movements away from the exposure site and two individuals used...... them to a single 10 inch3 underwater airgun producing high-intensity noise pulses (2–3 s intervals) for 1 min. All five porpoises responded to capture and tagging with longer, faster and more directed movements as well as with shorter, shallower, less wiggly dives immediately after release...... to the noise exposure. Changes in natural behaviour following anthropogenic disturbances may reduce feeding opportunities, and evaluating potential population-level consequences should be a priority research area....

  13. A dual-band LO generation system using a 40GHz VCO with a phase noise of -106.8dBc/Hz at 1-MHz

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Y.; Pei, Y.; Leenaerts, D.M.W.; Hanock, T.M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a dual-band LO generation system using a low phase noise single-band 40GHz VCO as the signal source. The LO generation system has two outputs: single-band LO1 at 20GHz and dual-band LO2 switchable between 10GHz and 15GHz. Implemented in 0.25-µm SiGe:C BiCMOS, the VCO achieves

  14. A 7MeV S-Band 2998MHz Variable Pulse Length Linear Accelerator System

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez, Michael; Mishin, Andrey V; Saverskiy, Aleksandr J; Skowbo, Dave; Smith, Richard

    2005-01-01

    American Science and Engineering High Energy Systems Division (AS&E HESD) has designed and commissioned a variable pulse length 7 MeV electron accelerator system. The system is capable of delivering a 7 MeV electron beam with a pulse length of 10 nS FWHM and a peak current of 1 ampere. The system can also produce electron pulses with lengths of 20, 50, 100, 200, 400 nS and 3 uS FWHM with corresponding lower peak currents. The accelerator system consists of a gridded electron gun, focusing coil, an electrostatic deflector system, Helmholtz coils, a standing wave side coupled S-band linac, a 2.6 MW peak power magnetron, an RF circulator, a fast toroid, vacuum system and a PLC/PC control system. The system has been operated at repetition rates up to 250pps. The design, simulations and experimental results from the accelerator system are presented in this paper.

  15. Fpga based L-band pulse doppler radar design and implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savci, Kubilay

    As its name implies RADAR (Radio Detection and Ranging) is an electromagnetic sensor used for detection and locating targets from their return signals. Radar systems propagate electromagnetic energy, from the antenna which is in part intercepted by an object. Objects reradiate a portion of energy which is captured by the radar receiver. The received signal is then processed for information extraction. Radar systems are widely used for surveillance, air security, navigation, weather hazard detection, as well as remote sensing applications. In this work, an FPGA based L-band Pulse Doppler radar prototype, which is used for target detection, localization and velocity calculation has been built and a general-purpose Pulse Doppler radar processor has been developed. This radar is a ground based stationary monopulse radar, which transmits a short pulse with a certain pulse repetition frequency (PRF). Return signals from the target are processed and information about their location and velocity is extracted. Discrete components are used for the transmitter and receiver chain. The hardware solution is based on Xilinx Virtex-6 ML605 FPGA board, responsible for the control of the radar system and the digital signal processing of the received signal, which involves Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR) detection and Pulse Doppler processing. The algorithm is implemented in MATLAB/SIMULINK using the Xilinx System Generator for DSP tool. The field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) implementation of the radar system provides the flexibility of changing parameters such as the PRF and pulse length therefore it can be used with different radar configurations as well. A VHDL design has been developed for 1Gbit Ethernet connection to transfer digitized return signal and detection results to PC. An A-Scope software has been developed with C# programming language to display time domain radar signals and detection results on PC. Data are processed both in FPGA chip and on PC. FPGA uses fixed

  16. A comparative evaluation of adaptive noise cancellation algorithms for minimizing motion artifacts in a forehead-mounted wearable pulse oximeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comtois, Gary; Mendelson, Yitzhak; Ramuka, Piyush

    2007-01-01

    Wearable physiological monitoring using a pulse oximeter would enable field medics to monitor multiple injuries simultaneously, thereby prioritizing medical intervention when resources are limited. However, a primary factor limiting the accuracy of pulse oximetry is poor signal-to-noise ratio since photoplethysmographic (PPG) signals, from which arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) and heart rate (HR) measurements are derived, are compromised by movement artifacts. This study was undertaken to quantify SpO2 and HR errors induced by certain motion artifacts utilizing accelerometry-based adaptive noise cancellation (ANC). Since the fingers are generally more vulnerable to motion artifacts, measurements were performed using a custom forehead-mounted wearable pulse oximeter developed for real-time remote physiological monitoring and triage applications. This study revealed that processing motion-corrupted PPG signals by least mean squares (LMS) and recursive least squares (RLS) algorithms can be effective to reduce SpO2 and HR errors during jogging, but the degree of improvement depends on filter order. Although both algorithms produced similar improvements, implementing the adaptive LMS algorithm is advantageous since it requires significantly less operations.

  17. 180 MW/180 KW pulse modulator for S-band klystron of LUE-200 linac of IREN installation of JINR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Kim Dong; Sumbaev, A. P.; Shvetsov, V. N.

    2014-09-01

    The offer on working out of the pulse modulator with 180 MW pulse power and 180 kW average power for pulse S-band klystrons of LUE-200 linac of IREN installation at the Laboratory of neutron physics (FLNP) at JINR is formulated. Main requirements, key parameters and element base of the modulator are presented. The variant of the basic scheme on the basis of 14 (or 11) stage 2 parallel PFN with the thyratron switchboard (TGI2-10K/50) and six parallel high voltage power supplies (CCPS Power Supply) is considered.

  18. A Single-Chip CMOS Pulse Oximeter with On-Chip Lock-In Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diwei He

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pulse oximetry is a noninvasive and continuous method for monitoring the blood oxygen saturation level. This paper presents the design and testing of a single-chip pulse oximeter fabricated in a 0.35 µm CMOS process. The chip includes photodiode, transimpedance amplifier, analogue band-pass filters, analogue-to-digital converters, digital signal processor and LED timing control. The experimentally measured AC and DC characteristics of individual circuits including the DC output voltage of the transimpedance amplifier, transimpedance gain of the transimpedance amplifier, and the central frequency and bandwidth of the analogue band-pass filters, show a good match (within 1% with the circuit simulations. With modulated light source and integrated lock-in detection the sensor effectively suppresses the interference from ambient light and 1/f noise. In a breath hold and release experiment the single chip sensor demonstrates consistent and comparable performance to commercial pulse oximetry devices with a mean of 1.2% difference. The single-chip sensor enables a compact and robust design solution that offers a route towards wearable devices for health monitoring.

  19. A Single-Chip CMOS Pulse Oximeter with On-Chip Lock-In Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Diwei; Morgan, Stephen P; Trachanis, Dimitrios; van Hese, Jan; Drogoudis, Dimitris; Fummi, Franco; Stefanni, Francesco; Guarnieri, Valerio; Hayes-Gill, Barrie R

    2015-07-14

    Pulse oximetry is a noninvasive and continuous method for monitoring the blood oxygen saturation level. This paper presents the design and testing of a single-chip pulse oximeter fabricated in a 0.35 µm CMOS process. The chip includes photodiode, transimpedance amplifier, analogue band-pass filters, analogue-to-digital converters, digital signal processor and LED timing control. The experimentally measured AC and DC characteristics of individual circuits including the DC output voltage of the transimpedance amplifier, transimpedance gain of the transimpedance amplifier, and the central frequency and bandwidth of the analogue band-pass filters, show a good match (within 1%) with the circuit simulations. With modulated light source and integrated lock-in detection the sensor effectively suppresses the interference from ambient light and 1/f noise. In a breath hold and release experiment the single chip sensor demonstrates consistent and comparable performance to commercial pulse oximetry devices with a mean of 1.2% difference. The single-chip sensor enables a compact and robust design solution that offers a route towards wearable devices for health monitoring.

  20. Prewhitening for Rank-Deficient Noise in Subspace Methods for Noise Reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Christian; Jensen, Søren Holdt

    2005-01-01

    A fundamental issue in connection with subspace methods for noise reduction is that the covariance matrix for the noise is required to have full rank, in order for the prewhitening step to be defined. However, there are important cases where this requirement is not fulfilled, e.g., when the noise...... has narrow-band characteristics, or in the case of tonal noise. We extend the concept of prewhitening to include the case when the noise covariance matrix is rank deficient, using a weighted pseudoinverse and the quotient SVD, and we show how to formulate a general rank-reduction algorithm that works...... also for rank deficient noise. We also demonstrate how to formulate this algorithm by means of a quotient ULV decomposition, which allows for faster computation and updating. Finally we apply our algorithm to a problem involving a speech signal contaminated by narrow-band noise....

  1. Synchronization of femtosecond laser pulses and RF signal by using a Sagnac loop Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Hui; Hajima, Ryoichi

    2008-11-01

    For future advanced energy recovery linac to generate femtosecond X-ray pulses, precise synchronization between sub-systems is highly desired. Typical synchronization methods based on direct photo detection are limited by detector nonlinearities, which lead to amplitude-to-phase conversion and introduce excess timing jitter. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate an optical-electronic mixed phase lock loop to synchronize the RF signal and laser pulses. In this synchronism setup, a Sagnac-loop Mach-Zehnder interferometer has been used to suppress the excess noise of direct photo detection. This scheme transfers the timing information into a intensity imbalance between the two output beams of the interferometer. As experimental demonstration, the single side-band phase noise of RF signal from the VCO is locked to the mode-locked Ti:Sapphire laser in the spectrum covering the range of 10 kHz to 1 MHz. This synchronization scheme greatly reduces the phase noise and timing jitter of the RF signal. (author)

  2. Effects of divided attention and operating room noise on perception of pulse oximeter pitch changes: a laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Ryan A; Schlesinger, Joseph J; Wallace, Mark T

    2013-02-01

    Anesthesiology requires performing visually oriented procedures while monitoring auditory information about a patient's vital signs. A concern in operating room environments is the amount of competing information and the effects that divided attention has on patient monitoring, such as detecting auditory changes in arterial oxygen saturation via pulse oximetry. The authors measured the impact of visual attentional load and auditory background noise on the ability of anesthesia residents to monitor the pulse oximeter auditory display in a laboratory setting. Accuracies and response times were recorded reflecting anesthesiologists' abilities to detect changes in oxygen saturation across three levels of visual attention in quiet and with noise. Results show that visual attentional load substantially affects the ability to detect changes in oxygen saturation concentrations conveyed by auditory cues signaling 99 and 98% saturation. These effects are compounded by auditory noise, up to a 17% decline in performance. These deficits are seen in the ability to accurately detect a change in oxygen saturation and in speed of response. Most anesthesia accidents are initiated by small errors that cascade into serious events. Lack of monitor vigilance and inattention are two of the more commonly cited factors. Reducing such errors is thus a priority for improving patient safety. Specifically, efforts to reduce distractors and decrease background noise should be considered during induction and emergence, periods of especially high risk, when anesthesiologists has to attend to many tasks and are thus susceptible to error.

  3. Effects of divided attention and operating room noise on perception of pulse oximeter pitch changes: A laboratory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Ryan A.; Fellow, Postdoctoral; Schlesinger, Joseph J.; Physician, Resident; Wallace, Mark T.

    2012-01-01

    Background Anesthesiology requires performing visually-oriented procedures while monitoring auditory information about a patient’s vital signs. A concern in operating rooms environments is the amount of competing information and the effects that divided attention have on patient monitoring, such as detecting auditory changes in arterial oxygen saturation via pulse oximetry. Methods We measured the impact of visual attentional load and auditory background noise on the ability of anesthesia residents to monitor the pulse oximeter auditory display in a laboratory setting. Accuracies and response times were recorded reflecting anesthesiologists’ abilities to detect changes in oxygen saturation across three levels of visual attention in quiet and with noise. Results Results show that visual attentional load substantially impacts the ability to detect changes in oxygen saturation levels conveyed by auditory cues signaling 99 and 98% saturation. These effects are compounded by auditory noise, with up to a 17% decline in performance. These deficits are seen in the ability to accurately detect a change in oxygen saturation and in speed of response. Conclusions Most anesthesia accidents are initiated by small errors that cascade into serious events. Lack of monitor vigilance and inattention are two of the more commonly cited factors. Reducing such errors is thus a priority for improving patient safety. Specifically, efforts to reduce distractors and lower background noise should be considered during induction and emergence, periods of especially high risk, when anesthesiologists must attend to many tasks and are thus susceptible to error. PMID:23263015

  4. Low-Noise Operation of All-Fiber Femtosecond Cherenkov Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiaomin; Villanueva Ibáñez, Guillermo Eduardo; Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the noise properties of a femtosecond all-fiber Cherenkov radiation source with emission wavelength around 600 nm, based on an Yb-fiber laser and a highly-nonlinear photonic crystal fiber. A relative intensity noise as low as - 103 dBc/Hz, corresponding to 2.48 % pulse-to-pulse...... fluctuation in energy, was observed at the Cherenkov radiation output power of 4.3 mW, or 150 pJ pulse energy. This pulse-to-pulse fluctuation is at least 10.6 dB lower compared to spectrally-sliced supercontinuum sources traditionally used for ultrafast fiberbased generation at visible wavelengths. Low noise...... makes allfiber Cherenkov sources promising for biophotonics applications such as multi-photon microscopy, where minimum pulse-to-pulse energy fluctuation is required. We present the dependency of the noise figure on both the Cherenkov radiation output power and its spectrum....

  5. Complex Molecules in the Laboratory - a Comparison of Chriped Pulse and Emission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermanns, Marius; Wehres, Nadine; Maßen, Jakob; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2017-06-01

    Detecting molecules of astrophysical interest in the interstellar medium strongly relies on precise spectroscopic data from the laboratory. In recent years, the advancement of the chirped-pulse technique has added many more options available to choose from. The Cologne emission spectrometer is an additional path to molecular spectroscopy. It allows to record instantaneously broad band spectra with calibrated intensities. Here we present a comparison of both methods: The Cologne chirped-pulse spectrometer as well as the Cologne emission spectrometer both cover the frequency range of 75-110 GHz, consistent with the ALMA Band 3 receivers. High sensitive heterodyne receivers with very low noise temperature amplifiers are used with a typical bandwidth of 2.5 GHz in a single sideband. Additionally the chirped-pulse spectrometer contains a high power amplifier of 200 mW for the excitation of molecules. Room temperature spectra of methyl cyanide and comparison of key features, such as measurement time, sensitivity, limitations and commonalities are shown in respect to identification of complex molecules of astrophysical importance. In addition, future developments for both setups will be discussed.

  6. Otoacoustic emissions in young adults exposed to drums noise of a college band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Botelho da Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: to identify cochlear dysfunction and occurrence of tinnitus in young adults exposed to drums noise of a college band. Methods: the sample included 50 subjects: 25 musicians (study group and 25 non-musicians (control group. The procedures included anamnesis, pure tone audiometry, acoustic impedance and Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emissions, Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions and Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions Input-Output function. Results: positive correlation between the occurrence of tinnitus and the variables exposure time and use of personal stereos was found. Overall, the study group showed significantly lower Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emissions, when compared to the control group. In the study group, there was a tendency toward worse response in 6 kHz(f2 in Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions in both ears. The Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions Input-Output function did not differ between groups nor did its slope. Conclusion: in general, otoacoustic emissions were worse in noise-exposed young people (study group when compared to the unexposed (control group, indicating that the test may be important in early identification of cochlear changes.

  7. Observations of magnetospheric ionization enhancements using upper-hybrid resonance noise band data from the RAE-1 satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosier, S. R.

    1975-01-01

    Noise bands associated with the upper-hybrid resonance were used to provide direct evidence for the existence of regions of enhanced density in the equatorial magnetosphere near L = 2. Density enhancements ranging from several percent to as high as 45 percent are observed with radial dimensions of several hundred kilometers. The enhancement characteristics strongly suggest their identification as magnetospheric whistler ducts.

  8. Ultra-low-noise transition edge sensors for the SAFARI L-band on SPICA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldie, D. J.; Gao, J. R.; Glowacka, D. M.; Griffin, D. K.; Hijmering, R.; Khosropanah, P.; Jackson, B. D.; Mauskopf, P. D.; Morozov, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Ridder, M.; Trappe, N.; O'Sullivan, C.; Withington, S.

    2012-09-01

    The Far-Infrared Fourier transform spectrometer instrument SAFARI-SPICA which will operate with cooled optics in a low-background space environment requires ultra-sensitive detector arrays with high optical coupling efficiencies over extremely wide bandwidths. In earlier papers we described the design, fabrication and performance of ultra-low-noise Transition Edge Sensors (TESs) operated close to 100mk having dark Noise Equivalent Powers (NEPs) of order 4 × 10-19W/√Hz close to the phonon noise limit and an improvement of two orders of magnitude over TESs for ground-based applications. Here we describe the design, fabrication and testing of 388-element arrays of MoAu TESs integrated with far-infrared absorbers and optical coupling structures in a geometry appropriate for the SAFARI L-band (110 - 210 μm). The measured performance shows intrinsic response time τ ~ 11ms and saturation powers of order 10 fW, and a dark noise equivalent powers of order 7 × 10-19W/√Hz. The 100 × 100μm2 MoAu TESs have transition temperatures of order 110mK and are coupled to 320×320μm2 thin-film β-phase Ta absorbers to provide impedance matching to the incoming fields. We describe results of dark tests (i.e without optical power) to determine intrinsic pixel characteristics and their uniformity, and measurements of the optical performance of representative pixels operated with flat back-shorts coupled to pyramidal horn arrays. The measured and modeled optical efficiency is dominated by the 95Ω sheet resistance of the Ta absorbers, indicating a clear route to achieve the required performance in these ultra-sensitive detectors.

  9. Noise tolerance in wavelength-selective switching of optical differential quadrature-phase-shift-keying pulse train by collinear acousto-optic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Nobuo; Miyazaki, Yasumitsu

    2014-06-01

    Optical switching of high-bit-rate quadrature-phase-shift-keying (QPSK) pulse trains using collinear acousto-optic (AO) devices is theoretically discussed. Since the collinear AO devices have wavelength selectivity, the switched optical pulse trains suffer from distortion when the bandwidth of the pulse train is comparable to the pass bandwidth of the AO device. As the AO device, a sidelobe-suppressed device with a tapered surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) waveguide and a Butterworth-type filter device with a lossy SAW directional coupler are considered. Phase distortion of optical pulse trains at 40 to 100  Gsymbols/s in QPSK format is numerically analyzed. Bit-error-rate performance with additive Gaussian noise is also evaluated by the Monte Carlo method.

  10. Hearing Threshold and Equal Loudness Level Contours of 1/3-octave Noise Bands in a Diffuse Sound Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Maja Kirstine E.; Poulsen, Torben

    1994-01-01

    Hearing threshold levels and equal loudness level contours of 1/3-octave noise bands at 40 phons and 60 phon were measured for 27 normal hearing listeners in an approximately diffuse sound field. The threshold data in the frequency range 125 Hz to 1 kHz were 3-6 dB higher than the values given...

  11. Arterial indices and serum cystatin C level in individuals with occupational wide band noise exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali R Khoshdel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic exposure to noise is known to cause a wide range of health problems including extracellular matrix (ECM proliferation and involvement of cardiovascular system. There are a few studies to investigate noise-induced vascular changes using noninvasive methods. In this study we used carotid artery intima-media thickness (CIMT and aortic augmentation as indices of arterial properties and cystatin C as a serum biomarker relating to ECM metabolism. Materials and Methods: Ninety-three male participants were included in this study from aeronautic technicians: 39 with and 54 without a history of wide band noise (WBN exposure. For better discrimination, the participants were divided into the two age groups: 40 years old. Adjusted aortic augmentation index (AI for a heart rate equal to 75 beats per minute (AIx@HR75 were calculated using pulse wave analysis (PWA. CIMT was measured in 54 participants who accepted to undergo Doppler ultrasonography. Serum cystatin C was also measured. Results: Among younger individuals the mean CIMT was 0.85 ± 0.09 mm and 0.75 ± 0.22 mm in the in the exposed and the control groups respectively. Among older individuals CIMT had a mean of 1.04 ± 0.22 mm vs. 1.00 ± 0.25 mm for the exposed vs. the control group. However, in both age groups the difference was not significant at the 0.05 level. A comparison of AIx@HR75 between exposure group and control group both in younger age group (5.46 ± 11.22 vs. 8.56 ± 8.66 and older age group (17.55 ± 10.07 vs. 16.61 ± 5.77 revealed no significant difference. We did not find any significant correlation between CIMT and AIx@HR75 in exposed group (r = 0.314, P value = 0.145 but the correlation was significant in control group (r = 0.455, P value = 0.019. Serum cystatin C level was significantly lower in individuals with WBN exposure compared to controls (441.10 ± 104.70 ng/L vs. 616.89 ± 136.14, P

  12. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with 9-eV photon-energy pulses generated in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    OpenAIRE

    Bromberger, H.; Ermolov, A.; Belli, F.; Liu, H.; Calegari, F.; Chavez-Cervantes, M.; Li, M. T.; Lin, C. T.; Abdolvand, A.; Russell, P. St. J.; Cavalleri, A.; Travers, J. C.; Gierz, I.

    2015-01-01

    A recently developed source of ultraviolet radiation, based on optical soliton propagation in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber, is applied here to angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Near-infrared femtosecond pulses of only few {\\mu}J energy generate vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation between 5.5 and 9 eV inside the gas-filled fiber. These pulses are used to measure the band structure of the topological insulator Bi2Se3 with a signal to noise ratio comparable to ...

  13. Optimal filter bandwidth for pulse oximetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuban, Norbert; Niwayama, Masatsugu

    2012-10-01

    Pulse oximeters contain one or more signal filtering stages between the photodiode and microcontroller. These filters are responsible for removing the noise while retaining the useful frequency components of the signal, thus improving the signal-to-noise ratio. The corner frequencies of these filters affect not only the noise level, but also the shape of the pulse signal. Narrow filter bandwidth effectively suppresses the noise; however, at the same time, it distorts the useful signal components by decreasing the harmonic content. In this paper, we investigated the influence of the filter bandwidth on the accuracy of pulse oximeters. We used a pulse oximeter tester device to produce stable, repetitive pulse waves with digitally adjustable R ratio and heart rate. We built a pulse oximeter and attached it to the tester device. The pulse oximeter digitized the current of its photodiode directly, without any analog signal conditioning. We varied the corner frequency of the low-pass filter in the pulse oximeter in the range of 0.66-15 Hz by software. For the tester device, the R ratio was set to R = 1.00, and the R ratio deviation measured by the pulse oximeter was monitored as a function of the corner frequency of the low-pass filter. The results revealed that lowering the corner frequency of the low-pass filter did not decrease the accuracy of the oxygen level measurements. The lowest possible value of the corner frequency of the low-pass filter is the fundamental frequency of the pulse signal. We concluded that the harmonics of the pulse signal do not contribute to the accuracy of pulse oximetry. The results achieved by the pulse oximeter tester were verified by human experiments, performed on five healthy subjects. The results of the human measurements confirmed that filtering out the harmonics of the pulse signal does not degrade the accuracy of pulse oximetry.

  14. Micro-Doppler Ambiguity Resolution for Wideband Terahertz Radar Using Intra-Pulse Interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qi; Qin, Yuliang; Deng, Bin; Wang, Hongqiang; You, Peng

    2017-04-29

    Micro-Doppler, induced by micro-motion of targets, is an important characteristic of target recognition once extracted via parameter estimation methods. However, micro-Doppler is usually too significant to result in ambiguity in the terahertz band because of its relatively high carrier frequency. Thus, a micro-Doppler ambiguity resolution method for wideband terahertz radar using intra-pulse interference is proposed in this paper. The micro-Doppler can be reduced several dozen times its true value to avoid ambiguity through intra-pulse interference processing. The effectiveness of this method is proved by experiments based on a 0.22 THz wideband radar system, and its high estimation precision and excellent noise immunity are verified by Monte Carlo simulation.

  15. Characterization of Low Noise TES Detectors Fabricated by D-RIE Process for SAFARI Short-Wavelength Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosropanah, P.; Suzuki, T.; Hijmering, R. A.; Ridder, M. L.; Lindeman, M. A.; Gao, J.-R.; Hoevers, H.

    2014-08-01

    SRON is developing TES detectors based on a superconducting Ti/Au bilayer on a suspended SiN membrane for the short-wavelength band of the SAFARI instrument on SPICA mission. We have recently replaced the wet KOH etching of the Si substrate by deep reactive ion etching. The new process enables us to fabricate the detectors on the substrate and release the membrane at the very last step. Therefore the production of SAFARI large arrays (4343) on thin SiN membrane (250 nm) is feasible. It also makes it possible to realize narrow supporting SiN legs of 1 m, which are needed to meet SAFARI NEP requirements. Here we report the current-voltage characteristics, noise performance and impedance measurement of these devices. The measured results are then compared with the distributed leg model that takes into account the thermal fluctuation noise due to the SiN legs. We measured a dark NEP of 0.7 aW/, which is 1.6 times higher than the theoretically expected phonon noise.

  16. Noise reduction in the beam current monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Shigeaki.

    1982-02-01

    A simple noise reduction system using a pulse transformer and a pair of L C low pass filters has been introduced to the beam current monitor of a current transformer type at the INS electron linac. With this system, the pick-up noise has been reduced to be 1% of the noise without noise reduction. Signal deformation caused by this system is relatively small and the beam current pulse down to 20 mA is successfully monitored in the actual accelerator operation. (author)

  17. Quantum noise and superluminal propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segev, Bilha; Milonni, Peter W.; Babb, James F.; Chiao, Raymond Y.

    2000-01-01

    Causal ''superluminal'' effects have recently been observed and discussed in various contexts. The question arises whether such effects could be observed with extremely weak pulses, and what would prevent the observation of an ''optical tachyon.'' Aharonov, Reznik, and Stern (ARS) [Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 2190 (1998)] have argued that quantum noise will preclude the observation of a superluminal group velocity when the pulse consists of one or a few photons. In this paper we reconsider this question both in a general framework and in the specific example, suggested by Chiao, Kozhekin, and Kurizki (CKK) [Phys. Rev. 77, 1254 (1996)], of off-resonant, short-pulse propagation in an optical amplifier. We derive in the case of the amplifier a signal-to-noise ratio that is consistent with the general ARS conclusions when we impose their criteria for distinguishing between superluminal propagation and propagation at the speed c. However, results consistent with the semiclassical arguments of CKK are obtained if weaker criteria are imposed, in which case the signal can exceed the noise without being ''exponentially large.'' We show that the quantum fluctuations of the field considered by ARS are closely related to superfluorescence noise. More generally, we consider the implications of unitarity for superluminal propagation and quantum noise and study, in addition to the complete and truncated wave packets considered by ARS, the residual wave packet formed by their difference. This leads to the conclusion that the noise is mostly luminal and delayed with respect to the superluminal signal. In the limit of a very weak incident signal pulse, the superluminal signal will be dominated by the noise part, and the signal-to-noise ratio will therefore be very small. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  18. An analysis of collegiate band directors' exposure to sound pressure levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roebuck, Nikole Moore

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a significant but unfortunate common occupational hazard. The purpose of the current study was to measure the magnitude of sound pressure levels generated within a collegiate band room and determine if those sound pressure levels are of a magnitude that exceeds the policy standards and recommendations of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), and the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). In addition, reverberation times were measured and analyzed in order to determine the appropriateness of acoustical conditions for the band rehearsal environment. Sound pressure measurements were taken from the rehearsal of seven collegiate marching bands. Single sample t test were conducted to compare the sound pressure levels of all bands to the noise exposure standards of OSHA and NIOSH. Multiple regression analysis were conducted and analyzed in order to determine the effect of the band room's conditions on the sound pressure levels and reverberation times. Time weighted averages (TWA), noise percentage doses, and peak levels were also collected. The mean Leq for all band directors was 90.5 dBA. The total accumulated noise percentage dose for all band directors was 77.6% of the maximum allowable daily noise dose under the OSHA standard. The total calculated TWA for all band directors was 88.2% of the maximum allowable daily noise dose under the OSHA standard. The total accumulated noise percentage dose for all band directors was 152.1% of the maximum allowable daily noise dose under the NIOSH standards, and the total calculated TWA for all band directors was 93dBA of the maximum allowable daily noise dose under the NIOSH standard. Multiple regression analysis revealed that the room volume, the level of acoustical treatment and the mean room reverberation time predicted 80% of the variance in sound pressure levels in this study.

  19. Molecular Electronic Angular Motion Transducer Broad Band Self-Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, Dmitry; Agafonov, Vadim; Egorov, Egor; Antonov, Alexander; Shabalina, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Modern molecular electronic transfer (MET) angular motion sensors combine high technical characteristics with low cost. Self-noise is one of the key characteristics which determine applications for MET sensors. However, until the present there has not been a model describing the sensor noise in the complete operating frequency range. The present work reports the results of an experimental study of the self-noise level of such sensors in the frequency range of 0.01–200 Hz. Based on the experimental data, a theoretical model is developed. According to the model, self-noise is conditioned by thermal hydrodynamic fluctuations of the operating fluid flow in the frequency range of 0.01–2 Hz. At the frequency range of 2–100 Hz, the noise power spectral density has a specific inversely proportional dependence of the power spectral density on the frequency that could be attributed to convective processes. In the high frequency range of 100–200 Hz, the noise is conditioned by the voltage noise of the electronics module input stage operational amplifiers and is heavily reliant to the sensor electrical impedance. The presented results allow a deeper understanding of the molecular electronic sensor noise nature to suggest the ways to reduce it. PMID:26610502

  20. WIDE-BAND SPECTRA OF GIANT RADIO PULSES FROM THE CRAB PULSAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikami, Ryo; Asano, Katsuaki [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Tanaka, Shuta J. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Konan University, 8-9-1 Okamoto, Kobe, Hyogo, 658-8501 (Japan); Kisaka, Shota [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Aoyama Gakuin University, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, 252-5258 (Japan); Sekido, Mamoru; Takefuji, Kazuhiro [Kashima Space Technology Center, National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, Kashima, Ibaraki 314-8501 (Japan); Takeuchi, Hiroshi [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Misawa, Hiroaki; Tsuchiya, Fuminori [Planetary Plasma and Atmospheric Research Center, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Kita, Hajime [Department of Geophysics, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Yonekura, Yoshinori [Center for Astronomy, Ibaraki University, 2-1-1 Bunkyo, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan); Terasawa, Toshio, E-mail: mikami@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: asanok@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp [iTHES Research Group, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2016-12-01

    We present the results of the simultaneous observation of giant radio pulses (GRPs) from the Crab pulsar at 0.3, 1.6, 2.2, 6.7, and 8.4 GHz with four telescopes in Japan. We obtain 3194 and 272 GRPs occurring at the main pulse and the interpulse phases, respectively. A few GRPs detected at both 0.3 and 8.4 GHz are the most wide-band samples ever reported. In the frequency range from 0.3 to 2.2 GHz, we find that about 70% or more of the GRP spectra are consistent with single power laws and their spectral indices are distributed from −4 to −1. We also find that a significant number of GRPs have such a hard spectral index (approximately −1) that the fluence at 0.3 GHz is below the detection limit (“dim-hard” GRPs). Stacking light curves of such dim-hard GRPs at 0.3 GHz, we detect consistent enhancement compared to the off-GRP light curve. Our samples show apparent correlations between the fluences and the spectral hardness, which indicates that more energetic GRPs tend to show softer spectra. Our comprehensive studies on the GRP spectra are useful materials to verify the GRP model of fast radio bursts in future observations.

  1. WIDE-BAND SPECTRA OF GIANT RADIO PULSES FROM THE CRAB PULSAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikami, Ryo; Asano, Katsuaki; Tanaka, Shuta J.; Kisaka, Shota; Sekido, Mamoru; Takefuji, Kazuhiro; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Misawa, Hiroaki; Tsuchiya, Fuminori; Kita, Hajime; Yonekura, Yoshinori; Terasawa, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of the simultaneous observation of giant radio pulses (GRPs) from the Crab pulsar at 0.3, 1.6, 2.2, 6.7, and 8.4 GHz with four telescopes in Japan. We obtain 3194 and 272 GRPs occurring at the main pulse and the interpulse phases, respectively. A few GRPs detected at both 0.3 and 8.4 GHz are the most wide-band samples ever reported. In the frequency range from 0.3 to 2.2 GHz, we find that about 70% or more of the GRP spectra are consistent with single power laws and their spectral indices are distributed from −4 to −1. We also find that a significant number of GRPs have such a hard spectral index (approximately −1) that the fluence at 0.3 GHz is below the detection limit (“dim-hard” GRPs). Stacking light curves of such dim-hard GRPs at 0.3 GHz, we detect consistent enhancement compared to the off-GRP light curve. Our samples show apparent correlations between the fluences and the spectral hardness, which indicates that more energetic GRPs tend to show softer spectra. Our comprehensive studies on the GRP spectra are useful materials to verify the GRP model of fast radio bursts in future observations.

  2. Statistical Analysis of Coherent Ultrashort Light Pulse CDMA With Multiple Optical Amplifiers Using Additive Noise Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidi, Kambiz; Salehi, Jawad A.

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes a study of the performance of various configurations for placing multiple optical amplifiers in a typical coherent ultrashort light pulse code-division multiple access (CULP-CDMA) communication system using the additive noise model. For this study, a comprehensive performance analysis was developed that takes into account multiple-access noise, noise due to optical amplifiers, and thermal noise using the saddle-point approximation technique. Prior to obtaining the overall system performance, the input/output statistical models for different elements of the system such as encoders/decoders,star coupler, and optical amplifiers were obtained. Performance comparisons between an ideal and lossless quantum-limited case and a typical CULP-CDMA with various losses exhibit more than 30 dB more power requirement to obtain the same bit-error rate (BER). Considering the saturation effect of optical amplifiers, this paper discusses an algorithm for amplifiers' gain setting in various stages of the network in order to overcome the nonlinear effects on signal modulation in optical amplifiers. Finally, using this algorithm,various configurations of multiple optical amplifiers in CULP-CDMA are discussed and the rules for the required optimum number of amplifiers are shown with their corresponding optimum locations to be implemented along the CULP-CDMA system.

  3. The Spread of a Noise Field in a Dispersive Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen Leon

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the production of induced noise by a pulse and the propagation of the noise in a dispersive medium. We present a simple model where the noise is the sum of pulses and where the mean of each pulse is random. We obtain explicit expressions for the standard deviation of the spatial noise as a function of time. We also formulate the problem in terms of a time-frequency phase space approach and in particular we use the Wigner distribution to define the spatial/spatial-frequency distribution.

  4. Health effects of traffic noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ising, H; Dienel, D; Guenther, T; Markert, B

    1980-11-01

    In 57 test persons having worked 1 day under traffic noise (Leq = 85 dB(A) and 1 day without noise (Leq < 50 dB(A)), blood pressure and pulse frequency were measured at 1 h intervals and total urine was collected during working hours. Additionally, blood was sampled at the end of each working day. Psychological parameters were assessed by means of questionnaires. Statistically significant reactions to noise were found in the following fields: 1. Ergonomics: decrease of working quality; 2. Psychology: increase of psychical tension; 3. Blood circulation: increase of blood pressure and pulse frequency; 4. Biochemistry: increase of epinephrine, cAMP, urine and serum Mg, protein, cholesterol plus decrease of erythrocyte Na, and renin. Hypothetical mechanisms of the action of traffic noise are discussed.

  5. Unconstrained pulse pressure monitoring for health management using hetero-core fiber optic sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Michiko; Sonobe, Masako; Watanabe, Kazuhiro

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we present a pulse pressure waveform sensor that does not constrain a wearer's daily activity; the sensor uses hetero-core fiber optics. Hetero-core fiber sensors have been found to be sensitive to moderate bending. To detect minute pulse pressure changes from the radial artery at the wrist, we devised a fiber sensor arrangement using three-point bending supports. We analyzed and evaluated the measurement validity using wavelet transformation, which is well-suited for biological signal processing. It was confirmed that the detected pulse waveform had a fundamental mode frequency of around 1.25 Hz over the time-varying waveform. A band-pass filter with a range of frequencies from 0.85 to 1.7 Hz was used to pick up the fundamental mode. In addition, a high-pass filter with 0.85 Hz frequency eliminated arm motion artifacts; consequently, we achieved high signal-to-noise ratio. For unrestricted daily health management, it is desirable that pulse pressure monitoring can be achieved by simply placing a device on the hand without the sensor being noticed. Two types of arrangements were developed and demonstrated in which the pulse sensors were either embedded in a base, such as an armrest, or in a wearable device. A wearable device without cuff pressure using a sensitivity-enhanced fiber sensor was successfully achieved with a sensitivity of 0.07-0.3 dB with a noise floor lower than 0.01 dB for multiple subjects.

  6. Experimental Demonstration of Nonlinearity and Phase Noise Tolerant 16-QAM OFDM W-Band (75–110 GHz) Signal Over Fiber System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deng, Lei; Pang, Xiaodan; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2014-01-01

    We propose a nonlinearity and phase noise tolerant orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) W-band signal over fiber system based on phase modulation and photonic heterodyne up-conversion techniques. By heterodyne mixing the phase-modulated optical OFDM signal with a free-running laser i...

  7. Molecular beam and pulsed laser deposition of ZnS:Cr for intermediate band solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Nematollahi, Mohammadreza; Yang, Xiaodong; Aas, Lars Martin Sandvik; Ghadyani, Zahra; Kildemo, Morten; Gibson, Ursula; Reenaas, Turid Worren

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the structural and optical properties of Cr-doped ZnS (ZnS:Cr) thin films (0–7.5 at.% Cr) for use in intermediate band solar cells. The films were grown on Si(100) in molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and pulsed laser deposition (PLD) equipments. Introducing Cr into ZnS resulted in Cr related subbandgap absorption, but also reduced the grain size. The sub-bandgap absorption increased with increasing Cr content, and with increasing growth temperature, but did not depend on the ...

  8. Pulse amplifier with high 'common mode rejection'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ijlst, P.

    1987-01-01

    The input signal of a pulse amplifier contains large 'common-mode' signals which have to be suppressed. A transformer, especially constructed for this purpose, is described. It has been tried to optimize the signal to noise ratio of the pulse amplifier by means of noise analysis. (Auth.)

  9. Controlled longitudinal emittance blow-up using band-limited phase noise in CERN PSB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quartullo, D.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Timko, H.

    2017-07-01

    Controlled longitudinal emittance blow-up (from 1 eVs to 1.4 eVs) for LHC beams in the CERN PS Booster is currently achievied using sinusoidal phase modulation of a dedicated high-harmonic RF system. In 2021, after the LHC injectors upgrade, 3 eVs should be extracted to the PS. Even if the current method may satisfy the new requirements, it relies on low-power level RF improvements. In this paper another method of blow-up was considered, that is the injection of band-limited phase noise in the main RF system (h=1), never tried in PSB but already used in CERN SPS and LHC, under different conditions (longer cycles). This technique, which lowers the peak line density and therefore the impact of intensity effects in the PSB and the PS, can also be complementary to the present method. The longitudinal space charge, dominant in the PSB, causes significant synchrotron frequency shifts with intensity, and its effect should be taken into account. Another complication arises from the interaction of the phase loop with the injected noise, since both act on the RF phase. All these elements were studied in simulations of the PSB cycle with the BLonD code, and the required blow-up was achieved.

  10. Novel Signal Noise Reduction Method through Cluster Analysis, Applied to Photoplethysmography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, William; Allen, John; Wightman, James; Sims, Andrew J; Beale, Thomas A W

    2018-01-01

    Physiological signals can often become contaminated by noise from a variety of origins. In this paper, an algorithm is described for the reduction of sporadic noise from a continuous periodic signal. The design can be used where a sample of a periodic signal is required, for example, when an average pulse is needed for pulse wave analysis and characterization. The algorithm is based on cluster analysis for selecting similar repetitions or pulses from a periodic single. This method selects individual pulses without noise, returns a clean pulse signal, and terminates when a sufficiently clean and representative signal is received. The algorithm is designed to be sufficiently compact to be implemented on a microcontroller embedded within a medical device. It has been validated through the removal of noise from an exemplar photoplethysmography (PPG) signal, showing increasing benefit as the noise contamination of the signal increases. The algorithm design is generalised to be applicable for a wide range of physiological (physical) signals.

  11. ECG De-noising

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kærgaard, Kevin; Jensen, Søren Hjøllund; Puthusserypady, Sadasivan

    2015-01-01

    Electrocardiogram (ECG) is a widely used noninvasive method to study the rhythmic activity of the heart and thereby to detect the abnormalities. However, these signals are often obscured by artifacts from various sources and minimization of these artifacts are of paramount important. This paper...... proposes two adaptive techniques, namely the EEMD-BLMS (Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition in conjunction with the Block Least Mean Square algorithm) and DWT-NN (Discrete Wavelet Transform followed by Neural Network) methods in minimizing the artifacts from recorded ECG signals, and compares...... their performance. These methods were first compared on two types of simulated noise corrupted ECG signals: Type-I (desired ECG+noise frequencies outside the ECG frequency band) and Type-II (ECG+noise frequencies both inside and outside the ECG frequency band). Subsequently, they were tested on real ECG recordings...

  12. Noise and its application to neutron flux measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabate Puigmal, Pedro.

    1984-08-01

    Fission Counter's (FC) fundamental principles were studied, operating this neutron detector as pulses generator (AC modes) and fluctuant current (DC modes). Power spectral series were obtained in DC modes, corresponding to: alpha activity of the FC neutron converter, gamma exposition in Co 60 radiation field, and only neutronic field. These noise spectra were correlated with those obtained from the FC in RA-3 critical facility, at different reactor power levels. These experiments allow to verify that, in DC mode, the power noise is very weakly dependent of the reactor gamma field, over a wide range of reactor working power, and that this range is strongly dependent of the detector's position with respect to the core's position. The frequency band of measurement is not critical. The results suggest that it is possible to develop a simple and compact measurement chain for nuclear reactors control. This would be obtained with an adequate combination of the FC operation ranges in AC and DC modes. Approximately ten decades in working power would be thus controlled with this unique type of detector (Campbellian method). A locally devised commercial detector (CFPT9) was used in these tests, and several of the most useful positions of the FC were determined. Frequency band from 150 Hz to 150 KHz was investigated. (M.E.L.) [es

  13. High level white noise generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borkowski, C.J.; Blalock, T.V.

    1979-01-01

    A wide band, stable, random noise source with a high and well-defined output power spectral density is provided which may be used for accurate calibration of Johnson Noise Power Thermometers (JNPT) and other applications requiring a stable, wide band, well-defined noise power spectral density. The noise source is based on the fact that the open-circuit thermal noise voltage of a feedback resistor, connecting the output to the input of a special inverting amplifier, is available at the amplifier output from an equivalent low output impedance caused by the feedback mechanism. The noise power spectral density level at the noise source output is equivalent to the density of the open-circuit thermal noise or a 100 ohm resistor at a temperature of approximately 64,000 Kelvins. The noise source has an output power spectral density that is flat to within 0.1% (0.0043 db) in the frequency range of from 1 KHz to 100 KHz which brackets typical passbands of the signal-processing channels of JNPT's. Two embodiments, one of higher accuracy that is suitable for use as a standards instrument and another that is particularly adapted for ambient temperature operation, are illustrated in this application

  14. High level white noise generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Casimer J.; Blalock, Theron V.

    1979-01-01

    A wide band, stable, random noise source with a high and well-defined output power spectral density is provided which may be used for accurate calibration of Johnson Noise Power Thermometers (JNPT) and other applications requiring a stable, wide band, well-defined noise power spectral density. The noise source is based on the fact that the open-circuit thermal noise voltage of a feedback resistor, connecting the output to the input of a special inverting amplifier, is available at the amplifier output from an equivalent low output impedance caused by the feedback mechanism. The noise power spectral density level at the noise source output is equivalent to the density of the open-circuit thermal noise or a 100 ohm resistor at a temperature of approximately 64,000 Kelvins. The noise source has an output power spectral density that is flat to within 0.1% (0.0043 db) in the frequency range of from 1 KHz to 100 KHz which brackets typical passbands of the signal-processing channels of JNPT's. Two embodiments, one of higher accuracy that is suitable for use as a standards instrument and another that is particularly adapted for ambient temperature operation, are illustrated in this application.

  15. Integrated wide-band low-background amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Il'yushchenko, I.I.

    1980-01-01

    Ways of increasing stability and reproduction of characteristics of wide-band integral amplifiers that would to the least extent increase their background noises, are discussed. Considered are some certain flowsheets of integral wide-band amplifiers with low background noise of foreign production which differ from one another by construction of inlet cascades as well as by the applied feedback type. The principal flowsheets of the amplifiers and their main performances are presented. The analysis of the data obtained has revealed that microcircuits made of cascades with a common emitter and local combined feedback are most wide-band among all the considered microcircuits [ru

  16. A digital long pulse integrator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broesch, J.D.; Strait, E.J.; Snider, R.T.

    1996-10-01

    A prototype digital integrator with very long integration capabilities has been developed and field tested on an inductive magnetic sensor on the DIII-D Tokamak. The integrator is being developed for use on ITER with a pulse length of 1000 s, and has direct applications for other long pulse Tokamaks. Inductive magnetic sensors are routinely used on existing Tokamaks, are well understood, and are extremely robust, however, they require integration of the signal to determine the magnetic field strength. The next generation of Tokamaks, will have pulse lengths of 1000 s or longer, require integrators with drift and noise characteristics compatible with the very long pulse lengths. This paper will discuss the architecture, algorithms, and programming of the Long Pulse Integrator (LPI). Of particular interest are the noise control and the built-in offset correction techniques used in this application

  17. S-band 300 W pulsed solid state microwave amplifier development for driving high power klystrons for electron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohania, Praveen; Shrivastava, Purushottam; Hannurkar, P.R.

    2005-01-01

    S-Band Microwave electron accelerators like microtrons and linear accelerators need pulsed microwaves from few megawatts to tens of megawatts to accelerator the electrons to desired energy and intensity. Klystron tube based driver amplifiers were used to drive the high power klystrons, which need microwave power from few tens of watts to 1 kW depending on tube output power and gain. A endeavour was initiated at Centre for Advanced Technology to develop state of art solid state S-band microwave amplifiers indigenously to drive the klystron tubes. A modular design approach was used and individual modules up to 160 W power levels were developed and tested. Finally combining 160 W modules will give up to 300 W output power. Several more modules can be combined to achieve even high power levels. Present paper describes the developmental efforts of 300 W S-band solid-state amplifiers and related microwave technologies. (author)

  18. Underwater noise from a wave energy converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tougaard, Jakob

    A recent addition to the anthropogenic sources of underwater noise is offshore wave energy converters. Underwater noise was recorded from the Wavestar wave energy converter located at Hastholm, Denmark (57°7.73´N, 8°37.23´E). The Wavestar is a full-scale test and demonstration converter...... in full operation and start and stop of the converter. Median broad band (10 Hz – 20 kHz) sound pressure level (Leq) was 123 dB re. 1 Pa, irrespective of status of the wave energy converter (stopped, running or starting/stopping). The most pronounced peak in the third-octave spectrum was in the 160 Hz...... significant noise above ambient could be detected above the 250 Hz band. The absolute increase in noise above ambient was very small. L50 third-octave levels in the four bands with the converter running were thus only 1-2 dB above ambient L50 levels. The noise recorded 25 m from the wave energy converter...

  19. X-band RF gun and linac for medical Compton scattering X-ray source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobashi, Katsuhito; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Fukasawa, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Fumito; Ebina, Futaro; Ogino, Haruyuki; Urakawa, Junji; Higo, Toshiyasu; Akemoto, Mitsuo; Hayano, Hitoshi; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2004-01-01

    Compton scattering hard X-ray source for 10-80 keV are under construction using the X-band (11.424 GHz) electron linear accelerator and YAG laser at Nuclear Engineering Research laboratory, University of Tokyo. This work is a part of the national project on the development of advanced compact medical accelerators in Japan. National Institute for Radiological Science is the host institute and U.Tokyo and KEK are working for the X-ray source. Main advantage is to produce tunable monochromatic hard (10-80 keV) X-rays with the intensities of 108-1010 photons/s (at several stages) and the table-top size. Second important aspect is to reduce noise radiation at a beam dump by adopting the deceleration of electrons after the Compton scattering. This realizes one beamline of a 3rd generation SR source at small facilities without heavy shielding. The final goal is that the linac and laser are installed on the moving gantry. We have designed the X-band (11.424 GHz) traveling-wave-type linac for the purpose. Numerical consideration by CAIN code and luminosity calculation are performed to estimate the X-ray yield. X-band thermionic-cathode RF-gun and RDS(Round Detuned Structure)-type X-band accelerating structure are applied to generate 50 MeV electron beam with 20 pC microbunches (104) for 1 microsecond RF macro-pulse. The X-ray yield by the electron beam and Q-switch Nd:YAG laser of 2 J/10 ns is 107 photons/RF-pulse (108 photons/sec at 10 pps). We design to adopt a technique of laser circulation to increase the X-ray yield up to 109 photons/pulse (1010 photons/s). 50 MW X-band klystron and compact modulator have been constructed and now under tuning. The construction of the whole system has started. X-ray generation and medical application will be performed in the early next year

  20. X-band RF gun and linac for medical Compton scattering X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobashi, Katsuhito; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Fukasawa, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Fumito; Ebina, Futaro; Ogino, Haruyuki; Urakawa, Junji; Higo, Toshiyasu; Akemoto, Mitsuo; Hayano, Hitoshi; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2004-12-01

    Compton scattering hard X-ray source for 10-80 keV are under construction using the X-band (11.424 GHz) electron linear accelerator and YAG laser at Nuclear Engineering Research laboratory, University of Tokyo. This work is a part of the national project on the development of advanced compact medical accelerators in Japan. National Institute for Radiological Science is the host institute and U.Tokyo and KEK are working for the X-ray source. Main advantage is to produce tunable monochromatic hard (10-80 keV) X-rays with the intensities of 108-1010 photons/s (at several stages) and the table-top size. Second important aspect is to reduce noise radiation at a beam dump by adopting the deceleration of electrons after the Compton scattering. This realizes one beamline of a 3rd generation SR source at small facilities without heavy shielding. The final goal is that the linac and laser are installed on the moving gantry. We have designed the X-band (11.424 GHz) traveling-wave-type linac for the purpose. Numerical consideration by CAIN code and luminosity calculation are performed to estimate the X-ray yield. X-band thermionic-cathode RF-gun and RDS(Round Detuned Structure)-type X-band accelerating structure are applied to generate 50 MeV electron beam with 20 pC microbunches (104) for 1 microsecond RF macro-pulse. The X-ray yield by the electron beam and Q-switch Nd:YAG laser of 2 J/10 ns is 107 photons/RF-pulse (108 photons/sec at 10 pps). We design to adopt a technique of laser circulation to increase the X-ray yield up to 109 photons/pulse (1010 photons/s). 50 MW X-band klystron and compact modulator have been constructed and now under tuning. The construction of the whole system has started. X-ray generation and medical application will be performed in the early next year.

  1. Performance review of an indigenously developed high power test stand built for the Indian S-band 5 MW pulsed klystron development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrivastava, Purushottam; Baxy, D.; Mulchandani, J.; Hannurkar, P.R.; Joshi, L.M.

    2003-01-01

    CAT took up development of 5 MW S-Band klystrons indigenously in collaboration with CEERI Pilani. The development of klystron prototype is completed. These klystrons are very crucial devices, for energizing the 10-20 MeV electron accelerators, which are developed in the country for various industrial, medical and scientific applications. A test station has been developed indigenously at CAT for these klystrons. It consists of a 12 MW peak power 130 kV klystron pulse modulator, a 1 : 10 pulse transformer, 130 kV high voltage deck having high voltage pulse divider, pulse current transformer as well indigenously built klystron socket, filament supplies, klystron support structure and pulse transformer oil tank. After development/rigorous testing the test stand was shifted to CEERI and was installed and commissioned there by CAT. Gun collector test module and prototypes of the 5 MW klystron were tested, aged and conditioned at high power using this test stand. The details of the system / test results are discussed

  2. Aerodynamical noise from wind turbine generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakobsen, J.; Andersen, B.

    1993-06-01

    Two extensive measurement series of noise from wind turbines have been made during different modifications of their rotors. One series focused on the influence from the tip shape on the noise, while the other series dealt with the influence from the trailing edge. The experimental layout for the two investigations was identical. The total A-weighted noise from the wind turbine was measured in 1/3 octave bands from 50 Hz to 10 kHz in 1-minute periods simultaneously with wind speed measurements. The microphone was mounted on a hard board on the ground about 40 m directly downwind of the wind turbine, and the wind speed meter was placed at the same distance upwind of the wind turbine 10 m above ground. Regression analysis was made between noise and wind speed in each 1/3 octave band to determine the spectrum at 8 m/s. During the measurements care was taken to avoid influence from background noise, and the influence from machinery noise was minimized and corrected for. Thus the results display the aerodynamic rotor noise from the wind turbines. By use of this measurement technique, the uncertainty has been reduced to 1.5 - 2 dB per 1/3 octave band in the relevant frequency range and to about 1 dB on the total A-weighted levels. (au) (10 refs.)

  3. Ka Band Phase Locked Loop Oscillator Dielectric Resonator Oscillator for Satellite EHF Band Receiver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Coco

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the design and fabrication of a Ka Band PLL DRO having a fundamental oscillation frequency of 19.250 GHz, used as local oscillator in the low-noise block of a down converter (LNB for an EHF band receiver. Apposite circuital models have been created to describe the behaviour of the dielectric resonator and of the active component used in the oscillator core. The DRO characterization and measurements have shown very good agreement with simulation results. A good phase noise performance is obtained by using a very high Q dielectric resonator.

  4. Detection of time of arrival of ultrasonic pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latino, Carl D; Andersen, Niels Lervad; Voss, Frands

    2006-01-01

    Applications exist that employ transit-time measurements to determine distances to scattering objects. These include blood-flow measurements, fluid-level detection, nondestructive testing of materials, image processing of geometrical bodies etc. Many of these require extreme accuracy in measuring transit time through a medium. The system typically consists of a transmitter, a medium and a receiver. The signal sent must operate within the limitations imposed by this overall system. Under ideal conditions a finite duration pulse consisting of a sinusoidal signal is sent and received. If the transmitted signal contains an integer number of complete cycles of a single frequency, performing a correlation between transmitted and received signals can accurately recover the transit time information. The method has difficulties especially in the presence of noise. The problem is compounded if the desired accuracy is a small fraction of a single sinusoid period. Noise could cause the correlation results to be off by a complete cycle. For a one MHz signal, one cycle error corresponds to a one microsecond error. For applications requiring nanosecond accuracy, this is not acceptable. Varying the frequency content of the signal reduces the error but requires that the transmitter, receiver and medium all have a broader band spectrum. The improvements we propose here work within a narrow band while enhancing the chance of recovering the signal accurately

  5. Practical Ranges of Loudness Levels of Various Types of Environmental Noise, Including Traffic Noise, Aircraft Noise, and Industrial Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine A. Janssen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In environmental noise control one commonly employs the A-weighted sound level as an approximate measure of the effect of noise on people. A measure that is more closely related to direct human perception of noise is the loudness level. At constant A-weighted sound level, the loudness level of a noise signal varies considerably with the shape of the frequency spectrum of the noise signal. In particular the bandwidth of the spectrum has a large effect on the loudness level, due to the effect of critical bands in the human hearing system. The low-frequency content of the spectrum also has an effect on the loudness level. In this note the relation between loudness level and A-weighted sound level is analyzed for various environmental noise spectra, including spectra of traffic noise, aircraft noise, and industrial noise. From loudness levels calculated for these environmental noise spectra, diagrams are constructed that show the relation between loudness level, A‑weighted sound level, and shape of the spectrum. The diagrams show that the upper limits of the loudness level for broadband environmental noise spectra are about 20 to 40 phon higher than the lower limits for narrowband spectra, which correspond to the loudness levels of pure tones. The diagrams are useful for assessing limitations and potential improvements of environmental noise control methods and policy based on A-weighted sound levels.

  6. Wind turbine noise diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richarz, W.; Richarz, H.

    2009-01-01

    This presentation proposed a self-consistent model for broad-band noise emitted from modern wind turbines. The simple source model was consistent with the physics of sound generation and considered the unique features of wind turbines. Although the acoustics of wind turbines are similar to those of conventional propellers, the dimensions of wind turbines pose unique challenges in diagnosing noise emission. The general features of the sound field were deduced. Source motion and source directivity appear to be responsible for amplitude variations. The amplitude modulation is likely to make wind-turbine noise more audible, and may be partly responsible for annoyance that has been reported in the literature. Acoustic array data suggests that broad-band noise is emitted predominantly during the downward sweep of each rotor blade. Source motion and source directivity account for the observed pattern. Rotor-tower interaction effects are of lesser importance. Predicted amplitude modulation ranges from 1 dB to 6dB. 2 refs., 9 figs.

  7. Pulsed laser deposition of HfO{sub 2} thin films on indium zinc oxide: Band offsets measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craciun, D.; Craciun, V., E-mail: valentin.craciun@inflpr.ro

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • High quality amorphous IZO and HfO{sub 2} films were obtained by PLD technique. • XPS measurements were used to obtain the valence band alignment in HfO{sub 2}/IZO heterostructure. • A valence band offset (ΔE{sub V}) of 1.75 eV was obtained for the HfO{sub 2}/IZO heterostructure. • A conduction band offset (ΔE{sub C}) of 0.65 eV was estimated for the HfO{sub 2}/IZO heterostructure. - Abstract: One of the most used dielectric films for amorphous indium zinc oxide (IZO) based thin films transistor is HfO{sub 2}. The estimation of the valence band discontinuity (ΔE{sub V}) of HfO{sub 2}/IZO heterostructure grown using the pulsed laser deposition technique, with In/(In + Zn) = 0.79, was obtained from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements. The binding energies of Hf 4d5, Zn 2p3 and In 3d5 core levels and valence band maxima were measured for thick pure films and for a very thin HfO{sub 2} film deposited on a thick IZO film. A value of ΔE{sub V} = 1.75 ± 0.05 eV was estimated for the heterostructure. Taking into account the measured HfO{sub 2} and IZO optical bandgap values of 5.50 eV and 3.10 eV, respectively, a conduction band offset ΔE{sub C} = 0.65 ± 0.05 eV in HfO{sub 2}/IZO heterostructure was then obtained.

  8. Aircrafts' taxi noise. Sound power level and directivity frequency band results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asensio, C.; Pavón, I.; Ruiz, M.; Pagan Munoz, Raul; Recuero, M.

    2009-01-01

    When noise mapping airports, the main noise sources are take offs and landings. But aircrafts' taxi noise can also be important, and should be considered, for instance when there are residential buildings near the airport's terminal. Main prediction tools, like Integrated Noise Model (INM), do not

  9. Identification and Removal of High Frequency Temporal Noise in a Nd:YAG Macro-Pulse Laser Assisted with a Diagnostic Streak Camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kent Marlett; Ke-Xun Sun

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of a reference streak camera (SC) to diagnose laser performance and guide modifications to remove high frequency noise from Bechtel Nevada's long-pulse laser. The upgraded laser exhibits less than 0.1% high frequency noise in cumulative spectra, exceeding National Ignition Facility (NIF) calibration specifications. Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments require full characterization of streak cameras over a wide range of sweep speeds (10 ns to 480 ns). This paradigm of metrology poses stringent spectral requirements on the laser source for streak camera calibration. Recently, Bechtel Nevada worked with a laser vendor to develop a high performance, multi-wavelength Nd:YAG laser to meet NIF calibration requirements. For a typical NIF streak camera with a 4096 x 4096 pixel CCD, the flat field calibration at 30 ns requires a smooth laser spectrum over 33 MHz to 68 GHz. Streak cameras are the appropriate instrumentation for measuring laser amplitude noise at these very high frequencies since the upper end spectral content is beyond the frequency response of typical optoelectronic detectors for a single shot pulse. The SC was used to measure a similar laser at its second harmonic wavelength (532 nm), to establish baseline spectra for testing signal analysis algorithms. The SC was then used to measure the new custom calibration laser. In both spatial-temporal measurements and cumulative spectra, 6-8 GHz oscillations were identified. The oscillations were found to be caused by inter-surface reflections between amplifiers. Additional variations in the SC spectral data were found to result from temperature instabilities in the seeding laser. Based on these findings, laser upgrades were made to remove the high frequency noise from the laser output

  10. Noise in the Measurement of Light with Photomultipliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robben, F

    1968-05-15

    In order to be able to compare measurements derived from the anode current of a photomultiplier with measurement derived from photoelectron pulse counting, a systematic investigation of the properties of some photomultiplier tubes has been made. This has led to a correlation of the properties of a photomultiplier based on the quantum efficiency {eta}, the gain G, a photoelectron loss factor S and an effective dark rate D. In terms of these quantities the signal to noise ratio of an experimental measurement can be calculated, given the light flux and measurement technique. The fluctuations in a photomultiplier output are divided into two parts; Poisson fluctuations, and those due to excess noise. It is experimentally shown, from measurements on a 931A photomultiplier, that the excess noise exceeds the Poisson fluctuations only at very low frequencies, or long DC measurement times (> 10 s), for both pulse counting and anode current measurements. The Poisson fluctuations are found to be approximately the same for both pulse counting and anode current measurements, at both high light levels where the dark current, or dark pulses, are negligible, as well as at low light levels where the dark current is dominant. The excess noise is found to be somewhat greater in the case of anode current measurements. Thus both pulse counting and anode current measurement techniques have nearly identical noise properties, as far as the photomultiplier is concerned, and selection of either experimental technique depends primarily on the properties of the electronic equipment. By use of a synchronous detection technique, the variance of the pulse count was measured experimentally to an accuracy of {+-} 4 %, and was shown to be in agreement with that predicted by Poisson statistics.

  11. Amperometric Noise at Thin Film Band Electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Simon T.; Heien, Michael L.; Taboryski, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Background current noise is often a significant limitation when using constant-potential amperometry for biosensor application such as amperometric recordings of transmitter release from single cells through exocytosis. In this paper, we fabricated thin-film electrodes of gold and conductive...

  12. Conducted noise analysis and protection of 45 kJ/s, ±50 kV capacitor charging power supply when interfaced with repetitive Marx based pulse power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naresh, P.; Patel, Ankur; Sharma, Archana

    2015-09-01

    Pulse power systems with highly dynamic loads like klystron, backward wave oscillator (BWO), and magnetron generate highly dynamic noise. This noise leads to frequent failure of controlled switches in the inverter stage of charging power supply. Designing a reliable and compatible power supply for pulse power applications is always a tricky job when charging rate is in multiples of 10 kJ/s. A ±50 kV and 45 kJ/s capacitor charging power supply based on 4th order LCLC resonant topology has been developed for a 10 Hz repetitive Marx based system. Conditions for load independent constant current and zero current switching (ZCS) are derived mathematically. Noise generated at load end due to dynamic load is tackled effectively and reduction in magnitude noise voltage is achieved by providing shielding between primary and secondary of high voltage high frequency transformer and with LCLC low pass filter. Shielding scales down the ratio between coupling capacitance (Cc) and the collector-emitter capacitance of insulated gate bi-polar transistor switch, which in turn reduces the common mode noise voltage magnitude. The proposed 4th order LCLC resonant network acts as a low pass filter for differential mode noise in the reverse direction (from load to source). Power supply has been tested repeatedly with 5 Hz repetition rate with repetitive Marx based system connected with BWO load working fine without failure of single switch in the inverter stage.

  13. Design of high–order HTS dual–band bandpass filters with receiver subsystem for future mobile communication systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekiya, N., E-mail: nsekiya@yamanashi.ac.jp

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • We have developed two high-order HTS dual-band BPFs with a receiver subsystem for future mobile communication systems. • We developed a method for flexibly adjusting the coupling coefficient for the two passbands. • We demonstrated an HTS dual-band BPF receiver subsystem that uses a pulse tube cryocooler and a wideband LNA. • The proposed BPF is evaluated by simulation and measurement with good agreement. - Abstract: We have developed two high-order high-temperature superconducting (HTS) dual-band bandpass filters (BPFs) with a receiver subsystem for future mobile communication systems. They feature stub-loaded hair-pin resonators with two types of microstrip lines between them. One has a six-pole design, and the other has an eight-pole design. Both were designed to operate at 2.15 GHz with a 43-MHz (2%) bandwidth for the lower passband and at 3.50 GHz with a 70-MHz (2%) bandwidth for the upper one. They were fabricated using YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y} thin film on a CeO{sub 2}-bufferd r-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate. The measured results for both filters agree well with the simulated ones. The HTS dual-band BPF receiver subsystem uses a pulse tube cryocooler and a wideband low noise amplifier (LNA). We measured the frequency response of the six-pole dual-band BPF with and without a wideband LNA with a gain of 10 dB. The measured return losses were close.

  14. A Ku band pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer using an arbitrary waveform generator for quantum control experiments at millikelvin temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yap, Yung Szen, E-mail: yungszen@utm.my [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka-shi, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Tabuchi, Yutaka [Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology (RCAST), The University of Tokyo, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8904 (Japan); Negoro, Makoto; Kagawa, Akinori; Kitagawa, Masahiro, E-mail: kitagawa@ee.es.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka-shi, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    We present a 17 GHz (Ku band) arbitrary waveform pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer for experiments down to millikelvin temperatures. The spectrometer is located at room temperature, while the resonator is placed either in a room temperature magnet or inside a cryogen-free dilution refrigerator; the operating temperature range of the dilution unit is from ca. 10 mK to 8 K. This combination provides the opportunity to perform quantum control experiments on electron spins in the pure-state regime. At 0.6 T, spin echo experiments were carried out using γ-irradiated quartz glass from 1 K to 12.3 mK. With decreasing temperatures, we observed an increase in spin echo signal intensities due to increasing spin polarizations, in accordance with theoretical predictions. Through experimental data fitting, thermal spin polarization at 100 mK was estimated to be at least 99%, which was almost pure state. Next, to demonstrate the ability to create arbitrary waveform pulses, we generate a shaped pulse by superposing three Gaussian pulses of different frequencies. The resulting pulse was able to selectively and coherently excite three different spin packets simultaneously—a useful ability for analyzing multi-spin system and for controlling a multi-qubit quantum computer. By applying this pulse to the inhomogeneously broadened sample, we obtain three well-resolved excitations at 8 K, 1 K, and 14 mK.

  15. Computer model for estimating electric utility environmental noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teplitzky, A.M.; Hahn, K.J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on a computer code for estimating environmental noise emissions from the operation and the construction of electric power plants that was developed based on algorithms. The computer code (Model) is used to predict octave band sound power levels for power plant operation and construction activities on the basis of the equipment operating characteristics and calculates off-site sound levels for each noise source and for an entire plant. Estimated noise levels are presented either as A-weighted sound level contours around the power plant or as octave band levels at user defined receptor locations. Calculated sound levels can be compared with user designated noise criteria, and the program can assist the user in analyzing alternative noise control strategies

  16. Noise suppression in duct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, A.; Barfeh, M.A.G.

    2001-01-01

    In air-conditioning system the noise generated by supply fan is carried by conditioned air through the ductwork. The noise created in ductwork run may be transmission, regenerative and ductborne. Transmission noise is fan noise, regenerative noise is due to turbulence in flow and ductborne noise is the noise radiating from duct to surroundings. Some noise is attenuated in ducts also but if noise level is high then it needs to be attenuated. A simple mitre bend can attenuate-noise. This principle is extended to V and M-shape ducts with inside lining of fibreglass, which gave maximum attenuation of 77 dB and 62 dB respectively corresponding to 8 kHz frequency as compared to mitre, bend giving maximum 18 dB attenuation. Sound level meter measured sound levels with octave band filter and tests were conducted in anechoic room. A V-shape attenuator can be used at fan outlet and high frequency noise can be minimized greatly. (author)

  17. Natural and man-made terrestrial electromagnetic noise: an outlook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Meloni

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The terrestrial environment is continuously exposed to electromagnetic radiations which set up a «background» electromagnetic noise. Within the Non Ionizing Radiation band (NIR, i.e. for frequencies lower than 300 GHz, this background can have a natural or an artificial origin. Natural origins of electromagnetic radiations are generally atmospheric or cosmic while artificial origins are technological applications, power transmission, communications, etc. This paper briefly describes the natural and man-made electromagnetic noise in the NIR band. Natural noise comes from a large variety of sources involving different physical phenomena and covering a wide range of frequencies and showing various propagation characteristics with an extremely broad range of power levels. Due to technological growth man-made electromagnetic noise is nowadays superimposed on natural noise almost everywhere on Earth. In the last decades man-made noise has increased dramatically over and above the natural noise in residential and business areas. This increase has led some scientists to consider possible negative effects of electromagnetic waves on human life and living systems in general. Accurate measurements of natural and man-made electromagnetic noise are necessary to understand the relative power levels in the different bands and their influence on life.

  18. Pulse shaping system research of CdZnTe radiation detector for high energy x-ray diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Miao; Zhao, Mingkun; Ding, Keyu; Zhou, Shousen; Zhou, Benjie

    2018-02-01

    As one of the typical wide band-gap semiconductor materials, the CdZnTe material has high detection efficiency and excellent energy resolution for the hard X-ray and the Gamma ray. The generated signal of the CdZnTe detector needs to be transformed to the pseudo-Gaussian pulse with a small impulse-width to remove noise and improve the energy resolution by the following nuclear spectrometry data acquisition system. In this paper, the multi-stage pseudo-Gaussian shaping-filter has been investigated based on the nuclear electronic principle. The optimized circuit parameters were also obtained based on the analysis of the characteristics of the pseudo-Gaussian shaping-filter in our following simulations. Based on the simulation results, the falling-time of the output pulse was decreased and faster response time can be obtained with decreasing shaping-time τs-k. And the undershoot was also removed when the ratio of input resistors was set to 1 to 2.5. Moreover, a two stage sallen-key Gaussian shaping-filter was designed and fabricated by using a low-noise voltage feedback operation amplifier LMH6628. A detection experiment platform had been built by using the precise pulse generator CAKE831 as the imitated radiation pulse which was equivalent signal of the semiconductor CdZnTe detector. Experiment results show that the output pulse of the two stage pseudo-Gaussian shaping filter has minimum 200ns pulse width (FWHM), and the output pulse of each stage was well consistent with the simulation results. Based on the performance in our experiment, this multi-stage pseudo-Gaussian shaping-filter can reduce the event-lost caused by pile-up in the CdZnTe semiconductor detector and improve the energy resolution effectively.

  19. Design and test of component circuits of an integrated quantum voltage noise source for Johnson noise thermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Takahiro; Maezawa, Masaaki; Urano, Chiharu

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We demonstrated RSFQ digital components of a new quantum voltage noise source. • A pseudo-random number generator and variable pulse number multiplier are designed. • Fabrication process is based on four Nb wiring layers and Nb/AlOx/Nb junctions. • The circuits successfully operated with wide dc bias current margins, 80–120%. - Abstract: We present design and testing of a pseudo-random number generator (PRNG) and a variable pulse number multiplier (VPNM) which are digital circuit subsystems in an integrated quantum voltage noise source for Jonson noise thermometry. Well-defined, calculable pseudo-random patterns of single flux quantum pulses are synthesized with the PRNG and multiplied digitally with the VPNM. The circuit implementation on rapid single flux quantum technology required practical circuit scales and bias currents, 279 junctions and 33 mA for the PRNG, and 1677 junctions and 218 mA for the VPNM. We confirmed the circuit operation with sufficiently wide margins, 80–120%, with respect to the designed bias currents.

  20. Design and test of component circuits of an integrated quantum voltage noise source for Johnson noise thermometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Takahiro, E-mail: yamada-takahiro@aist.go.jp [Nanoelectronics Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Central 2, Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Maezawa, Masaaki [Nanoelectronics Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Central 2, Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Urano, Chiharu [National Metrology Institute of Japan, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Central 3, Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8563 (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • We demonstrated RSFQ digital components of a new quantum voltage noise source. • A pseudo-random number generator and variable pulse number multiplier are designed. • Fabrication process is based on four Nb wiring layers and Nb/AlOx/Nb junctions. • The circuits successfully operated with wide dc bias current margins, 80–120%. - Abstract: We present design and testing of a pseudo-random number generator (PRNG) and a variable pulse number multiplier (VPNM) which are digital circuit subsystems in an integrated quantum voltage noise source for Jonson noise thermometry. Well-defined, calculable pseudo-random patterns of single flux quantum pulses are synthesized with the PRNG and multiplied digitally with the VPNM. The circuit implementation on rapid single flux quantum technology required practical circuit scales and bias currents, 279 junctions and 33 mA for the PRNG, and 1677 junctions and 218 mA for the VPNM. We confirmed the circuit operation with sufficiently wide margins, 80–120%, with respect to the designed bias currents.

  1. Neural-network-designed pulse sequences for robust control of singlet-triplet qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xu-Chen; Yung, Man-Hong; Wang, Xin

    2018-04-01

    Composite pulses are essential for universal manipulation of singlet-triplet spin qubits. In the absence of noise, they are required to perform arbitrary single-qubit operations due to the special control constraint of a singlet-triplet qubit, while in a noisy environment, more complicated sequences have been developed to dynamically correct the error. Tailoring these sequences typically requires numerically solving a set of nonlinear equations. Here we demonstrate that these pulse sequences can be generated by a well-trained, double-layer neural network. For sequences designed for the noise-free case, the trained neural network is capable of producing almost exactly the same pulses known in the literature. For more complicated noise-correcting sequences, the neural network produces pulses with slightly different line shapes, but the robustness against noises remains comparable. These results indicate that the neural network can be a judicious and powerful alternative to existing techniques in developing pulse sequences for universal fault-tolerant quantum computation.

  2. Development of Ultrasonic Pulse Compression Using Golay Codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young H.; Kim, Young Gil; Jeong, Peter

    1994-01-01

    Conventional ultrasonic flaw detection system uses a large amplitude narrow pulse to excite a transducer. However, these systems are limited in pulse energy. An excessively large amplitude causes a dielectric breakage of the transducer, and an excessively long pulse causes decrease of the resolution. Using the pulse compression, a long pulse of pseudorandom signal can be used without sacrificing resolution by signal correlation. In the present work, the pulse compression technique was implemented into an ultrasonic system. Golay code was used as a pseudorandom signal in this system, since pair sum of autocorrelations has no sidelobe. The equivalent input pulse of the Golay code was derived to analyze the pulse compression system. Throughout the experiment, the pulse compression technique has demonstrated for its improved SNR(signal to noise ratio) by reducing the system's white noise. And the experimental data also indicated that the SNR enhancement was proportional to the square root of the code length used. The technique seems to perform particularly well with highly energy-absorbent materials such as polymers, plastics and rubbers

  3. Performance Analysis of the IEEE 802.11A WLAN Standard Optimum and Sub-Optimum Receiver in Frequency-Selective, Slowly Fading Nakagami Channels with AWGN and Pulsed Noise Jamming

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kalogrias, Christos

    2004-01-01

    ... 802.11a wireless local area network (WLAN) standard receiver when the signal is transmitted over a frequency selective, slow fading Nakagami channel in a worst case, pulse-noise jamming environment...

  4. Application of Circulation Control Technology to Airframe Noise Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Sankar, L. N.; Englar, R. J.; Munro, Scott E.; Li, Yi; Gaeta, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    This report is a summary of the work performed by Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) under NASA Langley Grant NAG-1-2146, which was awarded as a part of NASA's Breakthrough Innovative Technologies (BIT) initiative. This was a three-year program, with a one-year no-cost extension. Each year's study has been an integrated effort consisting of computational fluid dynamics, experimental aerodynamics, and detailed noise and flow measurements. Year I effort examined the feasibility of reducing airframe noise by replacing the conventional wing systems with a Circulation Control Wing (CCW), where steady blowing was used through the trailing edge of the wing over a Coanda surface. It was shown that the wing lift increases with CCW blowing and indeed for the same lift, a CCW wing was shown to produce less noise. Year 2 effort dealt with a similar study on the role of pulsed blowing on airframe noise. The main objective of this portion of the study was to assess whether pulse blowing from the trailing edge of a CCW resulted in more, less, or the same amount of radiated noise to the farfield. Results show that a reduction in farfield noise of up to 5 dB is measured when pulse flow is compared with steady flow for an equivalent lift configuration. This reduction is in the spectral region associated with the trailing edge jet noise. This result is due to the unique advantage that pulsed flow has over steady flow. For a range of frequencies, more lift is experienced with the same mass flow as the steady case. Thus, for an equivalent lift and slot height, the pulsed system can operate at lower jet velocities, and hence lower jet noise. The computational analysis showed that for a given time-averaged mass flow rate, pulsed jets give a higher value of C(sub l) and a higher L/D than equivalent steady jets. This benefit is attributable to higher instantaneous jet velocities, and higher instantaneous C(sub mu) values for the pulsed jet. Pulsed jet benefits increase at higher

  5. Phase-stable, multi-µJ femtosecond pulses from a repetition-rate tunable Ti:Sa-oscillator-seeded Yb-fiber amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saule, T.; Holzberger, S.; De Vries, O.; Plötner, M.; Limpert, J.; Tünnermann, A.; Pupeza, I.

    2017-01-01

    We present a high-power, MHz-repetition-rate, phase-stable femtosecond laser system based on a phase-stabilized Ti:Sa oscillator and a multi-stage Yb-fiber chirped-pulse power amplifier. A 10-nm band around 1030 nm is split from the 7-fs oscillator output and serves as the seed for subsequent amplification by 54 dB to 80 W of average power. The µJ-level output is spectrally broadened in a solid-core fiber and compressed to 30 fs with chirped mirrors. A pulse picker prior to power amplification allows for decreasing the repetition rate from 74 MHz by a factor of up to 4 without affecting the pulse parameters. To compensate for phase jitter added by the amplifier to the feed-forward phase-stabilized seeding pulses, a self-referencing feed-back loop is implemented at the system output. An integrated out-of-loop phase noise of less than 100 mrad was measured in the band from 0.4 Hz to 400 kHz, which to the best of our knowledge corresponds to the highest phase stability ever demonstrated for high-power, multi-MHz-repetition-rate ultrafast lasers. This system will enable experiments in attosecond physics at unprecedented repetition rates, it offers ideal prerequisites for the generation and field-resolved electro-optical sampling of high-power, broadband infrared pulses, and it is suitable for phase-stable white light generation.

  6. A low-noise X-band microstrip VCO with 2.5 GHz tuning range using a GaN-on-SiC p-HEMT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, A.M.P.; Vliet, F.E. van

    2005-01-01

    A low-noise X-band microstrip hybrid VCO has been designed and realised using a 2 × 50 μm GaN-on-SiC pseudo-morphic HEMT as the active device. The transistor has been manufactured by TIGER and features a gate-length of 0.15 μm, an fT of 22 GHz, a break-down voltage of 42 Volts and an Idss, close to

  7. The Protective Effect of Conditioning on Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Is Frequency-Dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Pourbakht

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We compared the extent of temporary threshold shift (TTS and hair cell loss following high level 4 kHz noise exposure with those preconditioned with moderate level 1 and 4 kHz octave band noise. Fifteen Male albino guinea pigs (300- 350 g in weight were randomly allocated into three groups: those exposed to 4 kHz octave band noise at 102 dB SPL (group 1, n=5; those conditioned with 1 kHz octave band noise at 85 dB SPL, 6 hours per day for 5 days, then exposed to noise (group 2, n=5; those conditioned with 4 kHz octave band noise at 85 dB SPL, then exposed to noise (group 3, n=5. An hour and one week after noise exposure, threshold shifts were evaluated by auditory-evoked brainstem response (ABR and then animals were euthanized for histological evaluation. We found that TTS and cochlear damage caused by noise exposure were significantly reduced by 1 kHz and 4 kHz conditioning (P<0.001. We also showed that 4 kHz protocol attenuates noise- induced TTS but no significant TTS reduction occurred by 1 kHz conditioning. Both protocol protected noise-induced cochlear damage. We concluded that lower tone conditioning could not protect against higher tone temporary noise-induced hearing loss, thus conditioning is a local acting and frequency-dependent phenomenon.

  8. Signal processing in noise waveform radar

    CERN Document Server

    Kulpa, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    This book is devoted to the emerging technology of noise waveform radar and its signal processing aspects. It is a new kind of radar, which use noise-like waveform to illuminate the target. The book includes an introduction to basic radar theory, starting from classical pulse radar, signal compression, and wave radar. The book then discusses the properties, difficulties and potential of noise radar systems, primarily for low-power and short-range civil applications. The contribution of modern signal processing techniques to making noise radar practical are emphasized, and application examples

  9. Gain flattened L-band EDFA based on upgraded C-band EDFA using forward ASE pumping in an EDF section

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buxens Azcoaga, Alvaro Juan; Poulsen, Henrik Nørskov; Clausen, Anders

    2000-01-01

    A novel method is presented for implementing an L-band erbium doped fibre amplifier (EDFA) making use of forward amplified spontaneous emission pumping, from a commercially available c-band EDFA, in an erbium doped fibre. Tuning of the length of erbium doped fibre enables a flat gain characteristic...... to be obtained with a low noise figure over the entire L-band window....

  10. SIMULTANEOUS OBSERVATIONS OF GIANT PULSES FROM PULSAR PSR B0031-07 AT 38 AND 74 MHz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Jr-Wei; Simonetti, John H.; Bear, Brandon [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Gough, Jonathan D. [Department of Chemistry, Lehman College, CUNY, Bronx, NY 10468 (United States); Newton, Joseph R. [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Augusta University, Augusta, GA 30912 (United States); Kavic, Michael [Department of Physics, Long Island University, Brooklyn, NY 11201 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    The first station of the Long Wavelength Array was used to study PSR B0031-07 with simultaneous observations at 38 and 74 MHz. We found that 158 (0.35%) of the observed pulses at 38 MHz and 221 (0.49%) of the observed pulses at 74 MHz qualified as giant pulses (GPs) in a total of 12 hr of observations. GPs are defined as having flux densities of a factor of ≥90 times that of an average pulse (AP) at 38 MHz and ≥80 times that of an AP at 74 MHz. The cumulative distribution of pulse strength follows a power law, with an index of −4.2 at 38 MHz and −4.9 at 74 MHz. This distribution has a much more gradual slope than would be expected if observing the tail of a Gaussian distribution of normal pulses. The dispersion measure (DM) value which resulted in the largest signal to noise for dedispersed pulses was DM = 10.9 pc cm{sup −3}. No other transient pulses were detected in the data in the wide DM range from 1 to 5000 pc cm{sup −3}. There were 12 GPs detected within the same period from both 38 and 74 MHz, meaning that the majority of them are not generated in a wide band.

  11. Wide-band fanned-out supercontinuum source covering O-, E-, S-, C-, L- and U-bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, H.; Latif, A. A.; Awang, N. A.; Zulkifli, M. Z.; Thambiratnam, K.; Ghani, Z. A.; Harun, S. W.

    2012-10-01

    A wide-band supercontinuum source generated by mode-locked pulses injected into a Highly Non-Linear Fiber (HNLF) is proposed and demonstrated. A 49 cm long Bismuth-Erbium Doped Fiber (Bi-EDF) pumped by two 1480 nm laser diodes acts as the active gain medium for a ring fiber laser, from which mode-locked pulses are obtained using the Non-Polarization Rotation (NPR) technique. The mode-locked pulses are then injected into a 100 m long HLNF with a dispersion of 0.15 ps/nm km at 1550 nm to generate a supercontinuum spectrum spanning from 1340 nm to more than 1680 nm with a pulse width of 0.08 ps and an average power of -17 dBm. The supercontinuum spectrum is sliced using a 24 channel Arrayed Waveguide Grating (AWG) with a channel spacing of 100 GHz to obtain a fanned-out laser output covering the O-, E-, S-, C-, L- and U-bands. The lasing wavelengths obtained have an average pulse width of 9 ps with only minor fluctuations and a mode-locked repetition rate of 40 MHz, and is sufficiently stable to be used in a variety of sensing and communication applications, most notably as cost-effective sources for Fiber-to-the-Home (FTTH) networks.

  12. Noise-constrained switching times for heteroclinic computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Fabio Schittler; Voit, Maximilian; Timme, Marc

    2017-03-01

    Heteroclinic computing offers a novel paradigm for universal computation by collective system dynamics. In such a paradigm, input signals are encoded as complex periodic orbits approaching specific sequences of saddle states. Without inputs, the relevant states together with the heteroclinic connections between them form a network of states—the heteroclinic network. Systems of pulse-coupled oscillators or spiking neurons naturally exhibit such heteroclinic networks of saddles, thereby providing a substrate for general analog computations. Several challenges need to be resolved before it becomes possible to effectively realize heteroclinic computing in hardware. The time scales on which computations are performed crucially depend on the switching times between saddles, which in turn are jointly controlled by the system's intrinsic dynamics and the level of external and measurement noise. The nonlinear dynamics of pulse-coupled systems often strongly deviate from that of time-continuously coupled (e.g., phase-coupled) systems. The factors impacting switching times in pulse-coupled systems are still not well understood. Here we systematically investigate switching times in dependence of the levels of noise and intrinsic dissipation in the system. We specifically reveal how local responses to pulses coact with external noise. Our findings confirm that, like in time-continuous phase-coupled systems, piecewise-continuous pulse-coupled systems exhibit switching times that transiently increase exponentially with the number of switches up to some order of magnitude set by the noise level. Complementarily, we show that switching times may constitute a good predictor for the computation reliability, indicating how often an input signal must be reiterated. By characterizing switching times between two saddles in conjunction with the reliability of a computation, our results provide a first step beyond the coding of input signal identities toward a complementary coding for

  13. Inverse Bremsstrahlung Stabilization of Noise in the Generation of Ultra-short Intense Pulses by Backward Raman Amplification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, Richard L.; Clark, Daniel S.; Solodov, Andrei; Valeo, Ernest J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2003-01-01

    Inverse bremsstrahlung absorption of the pump laser beam in a backward Raman amplifier over the round-trip light transit time through the sub-critical density plasma can more than double the electron temperature of the plasma and produce time-varying axial temperature gradients. The resulting increased Landau damping of the plasma wave and detuning of the resonance can act to stabilize the pump against unwanted amplification of Langmuir noise without disrupting nonlinear amplification of the femtosecond seed pulse. Because the heating rate increases with the charge state Z, only low-Z plasmas (hydrogen, helium, or helium-hydrogen mixtures) will maintain a low enough temperature for efficient operation

  14. Design and test of component circuits of an integrated quantum voltage noise source for Johnson noise thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takahiro; Maezawa, Masaaki; Urano, Chiharu

    2015-11-01

    We present design and testing of a pseudo-random number generator (PRNG) and a variable pulse number multiplier (VPNM) which are digital circuit subsystems in an integrated quantum voltage noise source for Jonson noise thermometry. Well-defined, calculable pseudo-random patterns of single flux quantum pulses are synthesized with the PRNG and multiplied digitally with the VPNM. The circuit implementation on rapid single flux quantum technology required practical circuit scales and bias currents, 279 junctions and 33 mA for the PRNG, and 1677 junctions and 218 mA for the VPNM. We confirmed the circuit operation with sufficiently wide margins, 80-120%, with respect to the designed bias currents.

  15. Design and analysis of X-band femtosecond linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uesaka, M; Kozawa, T; Takeshita, A; Kobayashi, T; Ueda, T; Miya, K [Tokyo Univ., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab.

    1997-03-01

    Femtosecond quantum phenomena research project is proposed at Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo. The research facility consists of an X-band (11.424GHz) femtosecond electron linac, a femtosecond wavelength tunable laser, two S-band (2.856GHz) picosecond electron linacs and measuring equipments. Especially, we aim to generate a 100 fs (FWHM) electron single bunch with more than 1 nC at the X-band femtosecond linac. Ultrafast processes in radiation physics, chemistry, material science and microscopic electromagnetic phenomena are going to be analyzed there. Here the design and analysis of an X-band femtosecond linac is presented. The simulation of electron dynamics is carried out including magnetic pulse compression by using PARMELA and SUPERFISH. It is found by the simulation that the 600 ps (tail-to-tail) electron emission from a 200 kV thermionic gun can be bunched and compressed to 110 fs (FWHM) with the charge of 0.8 nC which gives 7.3 kA. We plan to use one high power X-band klystron which can supply 60 MW with more than 200 ns pulse duration. The flatness of plateau of the pulse should be 0.2% for stable ultrashort bunch generation. (author)

  16. Noise immunity of optimal tracking demodulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uriadnikov, Iu. F.; Vasilev, N. A.

    1982-05-01

    The noise immunity of optimal discrete tracking demodulators, used in space communication systems, is analyzed in the case of an arbitrary relationship between the signal pulse repetition period and the interval of message correlation. Expressions are obtained which are then used to compare the noise immunities of discrete and continuous tracking demodulators, used for the transmission of messages with spectra approximated by Butterworth polynomials. It is shown that the noise immunity of the discrete demodulator significantly deteriorates

  17. Experimental Study of RF Pulsed Heating on Oxygen Free Electronic Copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pritzkau, David P.

    2003-02-10

    When the thermal stresses induced by RF pulsed heating are larger than the elastic limit, microcracks and surface roughening will occur due to cyclic fatigue. Therefore, pulsed heating limits the maximum surface magnetic field and through it the maximum achievable accelerating gradient. An experiment using circularly cylindrical cavities operating in the TE{sub 011} mode at a resonant frequency of 11.424 GHz was designed to study pulsed heating on Oxygen Free Electronic (OFE) copper. An X-band klystron delivered up to 10 MW to the cavities in 1.5 {micro}s pulses at 60 Hz repetition rate. One run was executed at a temperature rise of 120 K for 56 x 10{sup 6} pulses. Cracks at grain boundaries, slip bands and cracks associated with these slip bands were observed. The second run consisted of 86 x 10{sup 6} pulses with a temperature rise of 82 K, and cracks at grain boundaries and slip bands were seen. Additional information can be derived from the power-coupling iris, and we conclude that a pulsed temperature rise of 250 K for several million pulses leads to destruction of copper. These results can be applied to any mode of any OFE copper cavity.

  18. Improved Noise Minimum Statistics Estimation Algorithm for Using in a Speech-Passing Noise-Rejecting Headset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedtabaee Saeed

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with configuration of an algorithm to be used in a speech-passing angle grinder noise-canceling headset. Angle grinder noise is annoying and interrupts ordinary oral communication. Meaning that, low SNR noisy condition is ahead. Since variation in angle grinder working condition changes noise statistics, the noise will be nonstationary with possible jumps in its power. Studies are conducted for picking an appropriate algorithm. A modified version of the well-known spectral subtraction shows superior performance against alternate methods. Noise estimation is calculated through a multi-band fast adapting scheme. The algorithm is adapted very quickly to the non-stationary noise environment while inflecting minimum musical noise and speech distortion on the processed signal. Objective and subjective measures illustrating the performance of the proposed method are introduced.

  19. Chaotic noise in superconducting microbridge 4-photon X-band parametric amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andresen, J.E.; Christiansen, B.; Levinsen, M.T.

    1988-01-01

    The anomalous noise rise observed in nearly all types of parametric amplifiers based on Josephson junctions has been an intriguing as well as annoying problem for many years. This phenomenon has been most spectacular in microbridge amplifiers. Here we present measurements on externally pumped single microbridge 4-photon unbiased amplifiers, where the slit with the bridge is used as a slotline resonantly coupled to the waveguide in an exceptionally simple coupling scheme. This scheme may be of interest in itself, particularly if the noise problem can be overcome, but also in other connections. Up to 16 dB gain was obtained at the top of the waveguide. However, the noise rise was observed as usual. An analog computer study on a model including an input/output circiut was performed. The results are in very good agreement with the experiments. The amplification is heralded by a seemingly chaotic noise rise. This noise is then amplified linearly when gain occurs. Amplification is found to take place very close to where the supercurrent is completely suppressed by the pump. This has previously been interpreted as loss of phaselock being the cause of the noise rise. However, the power spectra of the time-derivative of the phase show the still to be locked in the region of positive gain. Furthermore, computations of the Lyapunov exponents show one to be positive in the region where gain occurs reaching a maximum value at the parameters corresponding to maximum gain. We therefore conclude that chaotic noise is indeed present in Josephson junction parametric amplifiers where low-impedance devices like microbridges with negligible capacitance are used as the active elements. (orig.)

  20. Modulators for the S-band test linac at DESY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieler, M.; Choroba, S.; Hameister, J.; Lewin, H.-Ch.

    1995-07-01

    The development of adequate modulators for high peak power klystrons is one of the focus points for linear collider R&D programs. For the DESY/THD S-band linear collider study 150 MW rf-pulse power at 50 Hz repetition rate and 3 μs pulse duration is required [1]. Two different modulator schemes are under investigation. One is the conventional line type pulser, using a pulse forming network and a step up transformer, the other one is a hard tube pulser, using a dc power source at the full klystron voltage and a switch tube. This paper is focused on the modulator development for the S-band Test Linac at DESY. After a short overview over the test linac and a brief description of the 150 MW S-band klystron the circuitry of the line type pulse (LTP) is given. A hard tube pulser (HTP), which switches the high voltage directly from a storage capacitor to the klystron, has been built up at DESY. Circuitry and the results of the commissioning of the switch tube are reported.

  1. Broad-Band Analysis of Polar Motion Excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.

    2016-12-01

    Earth rotational changes, i.e. polar motion and length-of-day (LOD), are driven by two types of geophysical excitations: 1) mass redistribution within the Earth system, and 2) angular momentum exchange between the solid Earth (more precisely the crust) and other components of the Earth system. Accurate quantification of Earth rotational excitations has been difficult, due to the lack of global-scale observations of mass redistribution and angular momentum exchange. The over 14-years time-variable gravity measurements from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) have provided a unique means for quantifying Earth rotational excitations from mass redistribution in different components of the climate system. Comparisons between observed Earth rotational changes and geophysical excitations estimated from GRACE, satellite laser ranging (SLR) and climate models show that GRACE-derived excitations agree remarkably well with polar motion observations over a broad-band of frequencies. GRACE estimates also suggest that accelerated polar region ice melting in recent years and corresponding sea level rise have played an important role in driving long-term polar motion as well. With several estimates of polar motion excitations, it is possible to estimate broad-band noise variance and noise power spectra in each, given reasonable assumptions about noise independence. Results based on GRACE CSR RL05 solutions clearly outperform other estimates with the lowest noise levels over a broad band of frequencies.

  2. X-band klystrons for Japan Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, H.; Odagiri, J.; Higo, T.; Yonezawa, H.; Yamaguchi, N.

    1992-01-01

    To achieve the acceleration gradient of 100 MeV/m necessary for the future linear collider in X-band, an RF power source which could produce more than 100 MW peak power with the pulse duration of 500 nsec is needed even with the factor 4 RF pulse compression system. As the first step for the development of the 100 MW class klystrons in X-band (11.424 GHz), a 30 MW class klystron named XB-50K was tested several times since 1990. XB-50K was tested up to the peak power of 18 MW with the pulse duration of 100 ns. A new 100 MW class klystron named XB-72K was designed and fabricated. Some test results of this klystron are reported. (Author) 9 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with 9-eV photon-energy pulses generated in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromberger, H.; Ermolov, A.; Belli, F.; Liu, H.; Calegari, F.; Chávez-Cervantes, M.; Li, M. T.; Lin, C. T.; Abdolvand, A.; Russell, P. St. J.; Cavalleri, A.; Travers, J. C.; Gierz, I.

    2015-08-01

    A recently developed source of ultraviolet radiation, based on optical soliton propagation in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber, is applied here to angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Near-infrared femtosecond pulses of only few μJ energy generate vacuum ultraviolet radiation between 5.5 and 9 eV inside the gas-filled fiber. These pulses are used to measure the band structure of the topological insulator Bi2Se3 with a signal to noise ratio comparable to that obtained with high order harmonics from a gas jet. The two-order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency promises time-resolved ARPES measurements at repetition rates of hundreds of kHz or even MHz, with photon energies that cover the first Brillouin zone of most materials.

  4. General solution to inhomogeneous dephasing and smooth pulse dynamical decoupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Junkai; Deng, Xiu-Hao; Russo, Antonio; Barnes, Edwin

    2018-03-01

    In order to achieve the high-fidelity quantum control needed for a broad range of quantum information technologies, reducing the effects of noise and system inhomogeneities is an essential task. It is well known that a system can be decoupled from noise or made insensitive to inhomogeneous dephasing dynamically by using carefully designed pulse sequences based on square or delta-function waveforms such as Hahn spin echo or CPMG. However, such ideal pulses are often challenging to implement experimentally with high fidelity. Here, we uncover a new geometrical framework for visualizing all possible driving fields, which enables one to generate an unlimited number of smooth, experimentally feasible pulses that perform dynamical decoupling or dynamically corrected gates to arbitrarily high order. We demonstrate that this scheme can significantly enhance the fidelity of single-qubit operations in the presence of noise and when realistic limitations on pulse rise times and amplitudes are taken into account.

  5. Perancangan Low Noise Amplifier dengan Teknik Non Simultaneous Conjugate Match untuk Aplikasi Radar S-Band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yana Taryana

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Radar merupakan sistem pemancar dan penerima gelombang elektromagnetik untuk mendeteksi, mengukur jarak dan membuat peta benda benda seperti pesawat terbang, kapal laut, kendaran bermotor dan informasi cuaca. Salah satu kendala yang dihadapi pada sistem radar adalah sinyal pantulan yang memiliki daya yang rendah sehingga kualitas penerimaan menjadi kurang baik. Untuk mengatasi kendala tersebut dibutuhkan penguat daya pada sistem penerima yaitu Low Noise Amplifier (LNA. Oleh karena itu, tulisan ini memaparkan perancangan LNA dengan menggunakan teknik Non Simultaneous Conjugate Match (NSCM untuk aplikasi radar S-Band. Teknik ini memberikan kemudahan dalam menentukan nilai trade off (TO untuk nilai gain, noise figure (NF dan Voltage Standing Wave Ratio (VSWR yang diinginkan. Dalam proses perancangannya, perangkat lunak Agilent Design System (ADS 2011 digunakan untuk mendapatkan hubungan antara lingkaran gain, lingkaran NF, lingkaran VSWR, dan lingkaran mismatch factor (M. Dari hubungan tersebut diperoleh nilai impedansi masukan dan keluaran dari komponen aktif. Dalam tulisan ini, LNA dirancang dua tingkat untuk mendapatkan penguatan yang tinggi. Masing-masing tingkat menggunakan komponen aktif BJT BFP420 dengan penguatan dirancang sebesar 13,50 dB untuk tingkat pertama dan kedua, dan M sebesar 0,98. Sedangkan untuk saluran penyesuai impedansinya menggunakan substrat teflon fiberglass DiClad527. Hasil simulasi menunjukkan karakteristik LNA pada frekuensi 3 GHz yaitu gain sebesar 28,80 dB, NF sebesar 2,80 dB, VSWRin sebesar 1,05 dan VSWRout sebesar 1,1.

  6. Experimental investigation of electron beam wave interactions utilising short pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiggins, Samuel Mark

    2000-01-01

    Experiments have investigated the production of ultra-short electromagnetic pulses and their interaction with electrons in various resonant structures. Diagnostic systems used in the measurements included large bandwidth detection systems for capturing the short pulses. Deconvolution techniques have been applied to account for bandwidth limitation of the detection systems and to extract the actual pulse amplitudes and durations from the data. A Martin-Puplett interferometer has been constructed for use as a Fourier transform spectrometer. The growth of superradiant electromagnetic spikes from short duration (0.5-1.0 ns), high current (0.6-2.0 kA) electron pulses has been investigated in a Ka-band Cherenkov maser and Ka- and W-band backward wave oscillators (BWO). In the Cherenkov maser, radiation spikes were produced with a peak power ≤ 3 MW, a duration ≥ 70 ps and a bandwidth ≤ 19 %. It is shown that coherent spontaneous emission from the leading edge of the electron pulse drives these interactions, giving rise to self-amplified coherent spontaneous emission (SACSE). BWO spikes were produced with a peak power ≤ 63 MW and a pulse duration ∼ 250 ps in the Ka-band and ≤ 12 MW and ∼ 170 ps in the W-band. Evidence of superradiant evolution has been observed in the measurements of scaling laws such as power scaling with the current squared and duration scaling inversely with the fourth root of the power. An X-band free-electron maser amplifier, in which a short (1.0ns) injected radiation pulse interacts with a long (∼ 140 ns) electron beam, has been investigated. The interaction is shown to evolve in the linear regime. The peak output power was 320 kW, which corresponded to a gain, approximately constant across the band, of 42 dB. Changes to the spectrum, that occur when the input radiation pulse is injected into electrons with an energy gradient, have been analysed. (author)

  7. Conducted and radiated noise in detection devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moisa, D.

    2001-01-01

    Conducted and radiated noise is an external noise which affects the quality of the signals of the detectors. An external noise can be reduced, usually, by shielding. This was the situation with 'older fashion' devices which uses boxes and coaxial cables. As the devices becomes more complex, the shielding of the detectors is more and more difficult and the transmission lines evolves from coaxial cables to twisted pair cables which are no more shielded. In such situation, the conducted and radiated noise (C and R noise) becomes important. Due to complexity of a real detector, the main work is based on experiments with components and simulations of some specific problems, associated with CDC detector. The first experiment was done to understand how the C and R noise is propagated. The emission device was a set of coils (between 3 and 5 turns with diameter from 10 to 50 mm) feed by an 74S140 driver. A pulse of about 8 ns width was generated. A coil of reception of about the same physical characteristics was used to see the emitted pulse. When the two coils are separated by about 80 cm, the receiver generated no signal. But, if along the two coils, a conductive material is introduced (a wire for instance), the receiver senses a signal. This signal is not changed too much if the wire is or not connected to ground. The explanation is simple: the pulse in the emitting coil produces an EM pulse which spreads in space. If a conductive material is around, the EM energy is received by that conductor and it is propagated at tens of meters with small attenuation. When this energy reaches the end of the conductor, it is radiated in space. If some other conductors are around, the energy is received and propagated by that conductors. This experiment was done for about 20 kinds of conductors (different coax cables, twisted-pair ribbons, power cables, metallic bars) and with many coils (different diameters and numbers of turns). It was measured the pk-to-pk level, decay constant and

  8. Communication system with adaptive noise suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozel, David (Inventor); Devault, James A. (Inventor); Birr, Richard B. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A signal-to-noise ratio dependent adaptive spectral subtraction process eliminates noise from noise-corrupted speech signals. The process first pre-emphasizes the frequency components of the input sound signal which contain the consonant information in human speech. Next, a signal-to-noise ratio is determined and a spectral subtraction proportion adjusted appropriately. After spectral subtraction, low amplitude signals can be squelched. A single microphone is used to obtain both the noise-corrupted speech and the average noise estimate. This is done by determining if the frame of data being sampled is a voiced or unvoiced frame. During unvoiced frames an estimate of the noise is obtained. A running average of the noise is used to approximate the expected value of the noise. Spectral subtraction may be performed on a composite noise-corrupted signal, or upon individual sub-bands of the noise-corrupted signal. Pre-averaging of the input signal's magnitude spectrum over multiple time frames may be performed to reduce musical noise.

  9. Design criteria for pulse transformers used in neutron detector pulse counting channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powler, E.P.

    1963-10-01

    The need for long cables between the detector and head amplifier in neutron pulse counting channels has led to the development of systems in which a transformer is used to 'match' the high impedance of a fission or proportional counter to the characteristic impedance of the cable. A further transformer can be used to match the cable to the input of a low noise pulse amplifier if this has a high impedance. This report is intended to give the designer sufficient information to optimise a system and predict the performance in terms of signal to noise ratio, resolving time and gain. Related problems are covered and include the use of balanced twin cables, the requirements of temperatures up to 500 deg. C and the need for high interference rejection. Two systems are described in some detail to emphasise the principles of design. (author)

  10. Performance investigation of the pulse and Campbelling modes of a fission chamber using a Poisson pulse train simulation code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elter, Zs. [CEA, DEN, DER, Instrumentation, Sensors and Dosimetry Laboratory, Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Applied Physics, Division of Nuclear Engineering, SE-412 96 Göteborg (Sweden); Jammes, C., E-mail: christian.jammes@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DER, Instrumentation, Sensors and Dosimetry Laboratory, Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Pázsit, I. [Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Applied Physics, Division of Nuclear Engineering, SE-412 96 Göteborg (Sweden); Pál, L. [Centre for Energy Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1525 Budapest 114, POB 49 (Hungary); Filliatre, P. [CEA, DEN, DER, Instrumentation, Sensors and Dosimetry Laboratory, Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2015-02-21

    The detectors of the neutron flux monitoring system of the foreseen French GEN-IV sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) will be high temperature fission chambers placed in the reactor vessel in the vicinity of the core. The operation of a fission chamber over a wide-range neutron flux will be feasible provided that the overlap of the applicability of its pulse and Campbelling operational modes is ensured. This paper addresses the question of the linearity of these two modes and it also presents our recent efforts to develop a specific code for the simulation of fission chamber pulse trains. Our developed simulation code is described and its overall verification is shown. An extensive quantitative investigation was performed to explore the applicability limits of these two standard modes. It was found that for short pulses the overlap between the pulse and Campbelling modes can be guaranteed if the standard deviation of the background noise is not higher than 5% of the pulse amplitude. It was also shown that the Campbelling mode is sensitive to parasitic noise, while the performance of the pulse mode is affected by the stochastic amplitude distributions.

  11. Seismic Background Noise Analysis of BRTR (PS-43) Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezgi Bakir, Mahmure; Meral Ozel, Nurcan; Umut Semin, Korhan

    2015-04-01

    The seismic background noise variation of BRTR array, composed of two sub arrays located in Ankara and in Ankara-Keskin, has been investigated by calculating Power Spectral Density and Probability Density Functions for seasonal and diurnal noise variations between 2005 and 2011. PSDs were computed within the frequency range of 100 s - 10 Hz. The results show us a little change in noise conditions in terms of time and location. Especially, noise level changes were observed at 3-5 Hz in diurnal variations at Keskin array and there is a 5-7 dB difference in day and night time in cultural noise band (1-10 Hz). On the other hand, noise levels of medium period array is high in 1-2 Hz frequency rather than short period array. High noise levels were observed in daily working times when we compare it to night-time in cultural noise band. The seasonal background noise variation at both sites also shows very similar properties to each other. Since these stations are borehole instruments and away from the coasts, we saw a small change in noise levels caused by microseism. Comparison between Keskin short period array and Ankara medium period array show us Keskin array is quiter than Ankara array.

  12. Underwater Noise Pollution at the Strait of Istanbul (Bosphorus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cem Gazioğlu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Underwater noise pollution (UNP has become a major concern in marine habitats, which is intense anthropogenic noise in the marine (aquatic environment. It is caused by ship traffic, oceanographic experiments, and use of explosives in geophysical research, underwater construction, active sonars and seismic survey techniques. Oceans are much nosier than 1960s. Narrow and shallow channel noisy aquatic environments where noise levels reach the highest value is not surprising. The Strait of Istanbul (SoI; Bosphorus is one of the most important maritime passages (app. 50 000 vessel/year or 140 vessel/day which is situated between the Black Sea and the Aegean Sea are also biologically extremely important gateway not only it provides access to a channel. Many of the varieties of fish migration hunting value are realized through the TSS. Local maritime traffic is another important acoustic sources which are more than 3 000 elements (Kesgin and Vardar, 2001 of everyday local traffic in SoI, which are causing noise in the 2 and 10 kHz range. Large vessels create signals both in bands below 1 kHz (main engine, electrical instruments cavitation noise creates higher frequency bands. Almost all elements of marine traffic in SoI located therefore encountered UND in all bands.

  13. Near-source noise suppression of AMT by compressive sensing and mathematical morphology filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guang; Xiao, Xiao; Tang, Jing-Tian; Li, Jin; Zhu, Hui-Jie; Zhou, Cong; Yan, Fa-Bao

    2017-12-01

    In deep mineral exploration, the acquisition of audio magnetotelluric (AMT) data is severely affected by ambient noise near the observation sites; This near-field noise restricts investigation depths. Mathematical morphological filtering (MMF) proved effective in suppressing large-scale strong and variably shaped noise, typically low-frequency noise, but can not deal with pulse noise of AMT data. We combine compressive sensing and MMF. First, we use MMF to suppress the large-scale strong ambient noise; second, we use the improved orthogonal match pursuit (IOMP) algorithm to remove the residual pulse noise. To remove the noise and protect the useful AMT signal, a redundant dictionary that matches with spikes and is insensitive to the useful signal is designed. Synthetic and field data from the Luzong field suggest that the proposed method suppresses the near-source noise and preserves the signal well; thus, better results are obtained that improve the output of either MMF or IOMP.

  14. Monolithic all-PM femtosecond Yb-fiber laser stabilized with a narrow-band fiber Bragg grating and pulse-compressed in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchinovich, Dmitry; Liu, Xiaomin; Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2008-01-01

    . The laser output is compressed in a spliced-on hollow-core PM photonic crystal fiber, thus providing direct end-of-the-fiber delivery of pulses of around 370 fs duration and 4 nJ energy with high mode quality. Tuning the pump power of the end amplifier of the laser allows for the control of output pulse......We report on an environmentally stable self-starting monolithic (i.e. without any free-space coupling) all-polarization-maintaining (PM) femtosecond Yb-fiber laser, stabilized against Q-switching by a narrow-band fiber Bragg grating and modelocked using a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror...

  15. Noise problems in coal mining complex- a case discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Y.; Mitra, H.; Ghosh, S.; Pal, A.K.

    1996-01-01

    Noise monitoring study was conducted at Moonidih mining complex of Jharia coal-field. The study included monitoring and analysis of ambient as well as workplace noise levels. An attempt has been made to critically analyse the noise situation through octave band analysis, thereby identifying alarming noise frequencies for each noise generating equipment having Leq level more than 90 dBA. A noise model has also been developed to draw noise contours of the entire mining complex. Based on these studies, suitable control measures have been suggested. (author). 6 refs., 3 figs

  16. Analysis of noise in energy-dispersive spectrometers using time-domain methods

    CERN Document Server

    Goulding, F S

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated time domain approach to the optimization of the signal-to-noise ratio in all spectrometer systems that contain a detector that converts incoming quanta of radiation into electrical pulse signals that are amplified and shaped by an electronic pulse shaper. It allows analysis of normal passive pulse shapers as well as time-variant systems where switching of shaping elements occurs in synchronism with the signal. It also deals comfortably with microcalorimeters (sometimes referred to as bolometers), where noise-determining elements, such as the temperature-sensing element's resistance and temperature, change with time in the presence of a signal. As part of the purely time-domain approach, a new method of calculating the Johnson noise in resistors using only the statistics of electron motion is presented. The result is a time-domain analog of the Nyquist formula.

  17. Thermal Noise Canceling in LNAs : A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauta, Bram; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Bruccoleri, Frederico

    2004-01-01

    Most wide-band amplifiers suffer from a fundamental trade-off between noise figure NF and source impedance matching, which limits NF to values typically above 3dB. Recently, a feed-forward noise canceling technique has been proposed to break this trade-off. This paper reviews the principle of the

  18. Amplifiers Exploiting Thermal Noise Canceling: A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Bruccoleri, F.; Stroet, P.M.; Stroet, Peter; Nauta, Bram

    2004-01-01

    Wide-band LNAs suffer from a fundamental trade-off between noise figure NF and source impedance matching, which limits NF to values typically above 3dB. Recently, a feed-forward noise canceling technique has been proposed to break this trade-off. This paper reviews the principle of the technique and

  19. Assessment of noise level and noise propagation generated by light-lift helicopters in mountain natural environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigolato, Stefano; Mologni, Omar; Proto, Andrea Rosario; Zimbalatti, Giuseppe; Cavalli, Raffaele

    2018-01-20

    The use of helicopter rises discussion about environmental noise propagation especially when it operates in proximity of environmentally sensitive areas (ESAs) for an extended period because of its potential implications in wildlife behaviours. In order to support decisions on helicopter logging operation management in proximity of ESAs, this study focused on (i) analysing the noise spectrum of a light-lift helicopter during logging operations and on (ii) assessing the noise propagation in the surrounding environments. This study investigated a helicopter logging operation for wood fuel extraction in the eastern part of the Italian Alps. The potential disturbance area covered for the entire helicopter logging operation was evaluated by a specific GIS application according to hearing sensitivity of the most sensitive wildlife species in the study area (different strigiform species). The noise level at the ground appeared to be affected by the location regardless both the use of equivalent continuous sound pressures level dB(A) (LAeq) and the single-event level (SEL) noise metrics. The lowest values were recorded when the helicopter was flown over the sound meter level located under the forest canopy, while the highest was recorded when the helicopter was unhooking the loads at the landing. The GIS application highlighted the consistent of the exceeded noise area (weighted to strigiform hearing range and sensitivity) for the lower frequency bands (0.016-0.250 kHz). A more restricted exceeded noise area concerned instead the most sensitive frequency bands" for the strigiform (1-2 kHz). Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  20. Measurement and control of occupational noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elammari, Muftah Faraj

    2007-01-01

    High level of environmental and occupational noise remain a problem all over the world. As problems and complaints increased dramatically by the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th centuries focusing on the problem was intensified. In this thesis occupational noise levels at different places were measured and compared with the international permissible levels using the integrating sound level meter (Quest 2800). The calibration of the instrument was carried out before and after each measurement using the acoustic calibrator (Quest CA-12B calibrator). The method which was followed was measuring the sound pressure level of the different noise sources over a broad frequency band covering the audible frequency range using the (octave band filter, model OB-100), disregrading variation with time. Since the human ear is most sensitive in the 2-5 khz range of frequencies and least sensitive at extremely high and low frequencies the instrument was adjusted on the A weighting net work which varies with frequencies in a very similar way as that of the human ear. From the obtained results, some noise levels which were recorded were within the permissible levels i.e. below 90 dba and some noise levels were higher than the permissible limit as in janzour textile factory (95 dba), The welding workshop (120 dba), Benghazi Macaroni factory (100 dba), and near the air blowers at Zletin cement factory, Benghazi cement factory (97-10-dba) in these cases suggestions were made to minimize the problem. Concerning the noise control, four methods of noise control were tested, these methods were: reducing noise by sound absorbing material at Sirt local broadcasting radio, reducing noise by keeping a distance from the noise source, at the Boilers hall at REWDC, reducing noise by enclosures, at the compressors room at Zletin cement factory, and finally reducing noise by performing regular maintenance at Garabolli photo development centre. The percentage of noise reduction was 21%, 12

  1. Low-noise detector and amplifier design for 100 ns direct detection CO{sub 2} LIDAR receiver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cafferty, M.M.; Cooke, B.J.; Laubscher, B.E.; Olivas, N.L.; Fuller, K.

    1997-06-01

    The development and test results of a prototype detector/amplifier design for a background limited, pulsed 100 ns, 10--100 kHz repetition rate LIDAR/DIAL receiver system are presented. Design objectives include near-matched filter detection of received pulse amplitude and round trip time-of-flight, and the elimination of excess correlated detector/amplifier noise for optimal pulse averaging. A novel pole-zero cancellation amplifier, coupled with a state-of-the-art SBRC (Santa Barbara Research Center) infrared detector was implemented to meet design objectives. The pole-zero cancellation amplifier utilizes a tunable, pseudo-matched filter technique to match the width of the laser pulse to the shaping time of the filter for optimal SNR performance. Low frequency correlated noise, (l/f and drift noise) is rejected through a second order high gain feedback loop. The amplifier also employs an active detector bias stage minimizing detector drift. Experimental results will be provided that demonstrate near-background limited, 100 ns pulse detection performance given a 8.5--11.5 {micro}m (300 K B.B.) radiant background, with the total noise floor spectrally white for optimal pulse averaging efficiency.

  2. Low concentration of a Gd-chelate increases the signal-to-noise ratio in fast pulsing BEST experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibille, Nathalie; Bellot, Gaëtan; Wang, Jing; Déméné, Hélène

    2012-11-01

    Despite numerous developments in the past few years that aim to increase the sensitivity of NMR multidimensional experiments, NMR spectroscopy still suffers from intrinsic low sensitivity. In this report, we show that the combination of two developments in the field, the Band-selective Excitation Short-Transient (BEST) experiment [Schanda et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 128 (2006) 9042] and the addition of the nonionic paramagnetic gadolinium chelate gadodiamide into NMR samples, enhances the signal-to-noise ratio. This effect is shown here for four different proteins, three globular and one unfolded, of molecular weights ranging from 6.5 kDa to 40 kDa, using 2D BEST HSQC and 3D BEST triple resonance sequences. Moreover, we show that the increase in signal-to-noise ratio provided by the gadodiamide is higher for peak resonances with lower than average intensity in BEST experiments. It is interesting to note that these residues are on average the weakest ones in those experiments. In this case, the gadodiamide-mediated increase can reach a value of 60% for low and 30% for high molecular weight proteins respectively. An investigation into the origin of this “paramagnetic gain” in BEST experiments is presented.

  3. A low noise preamplifier with optoelectronic overload protection for radioactivity measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sephton, J.P.; Williams, J.M.; Johansson, L.C.; Philips, H.C.

    2012-01-01

    Pulses from detectors used for radioactivity measurement can vary in size by several orders of magnitude. Large pulses will lead to saturation at the preamplifier output and extension of the pulse length. As a consequence, the dead time of the system increases and pulses may be lost. Electronic design techniques employed to protect against overloading tend to increase the amplifier noise level. However, an optoelectronic method of overload protection has been devised which has only a negligible effect on noise. An infrared light emitting diode interfaced to the output of the preamplifier is linked by fibre optic cable to an ultra-low leakage photodiode at the input. The conduction of the photodiode increases with the amplitude of the preamplifier output signal. Excess current is thereby prevented from entering the preamplifier and causing saturation. The preamplifier has been tested on 4π beta–gamma and gas counting systems and found to give good protection against overloading. - Highlights: ► A preamplifier for radioactivity measurements has been developed. ► Low noise. ► Current sensitive. ► Optoelectronic overload protection.

  4. A Multiple-Channel Sub-Band Transient Detection System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Smith

    1998-11-01

    We have developed a unique multiple-channel sub-band transient detection system to record transient electromagnetic signals in carrier-dominated radio environments; the system has been used to make unique observations of weak, transient HF signals. The detection system has made these observations possible through improved sensitivity compared to conventional broadband transient detection systems; the sensitivity improvement is estimated to be at least 20 dB. The increase in sensitivity has been achieved through subdivision of the band of interest (an 18 MHz tunable bandwidth) into eight sub-band independent detection channels, each with a 400 kHz bandwidth and its own criteria. The system generates a system trigger signal when a predetermined number of channels (typically five) trigger within a predetermined window of time (typically 100 ~s). Events are recorded with a broadband data acquisition system sampling at 50 or 100 Msample/s, so despite the fact that the detection system operates on portions of the signal confined to narrow bands, data acquisition is broadband. Between May and September of 1994, the system was used to detect and record over six thousand transient events in the frequency band from 3 to 30 MHz. Approximately 500 of the events have been characterized as paired bursts of radio noise with individual durations of 2 to 10 ps and separations between the bursts of 5 to 160 ps. The paired transients are typically 5 to 40 dB brighter than the background electromagnetic spectrum between carrier signals. We have termed these events SubIonospheric Pulse Pairs (SIPPS) and presently have no explanation as to their source. Our observations of SIPPS resemble observations of TransIonospheric Pulse Pairs (TIPPs) recorded by the Blackboard instrument on the ALEXIS satellite; the source of TIPP events is also unknown. Most of the recorded SIPP events do not exhibit frequency dispersion, implying propagation along a line-of-sight (groundwave) path; but seven of

  5. Group-velocity dispersion effects on quantum noise of a fiber optical soliton in phase space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, Heongkyu; Lee, Euncheol

    2010-01-01

    Group-velocity dispersion (GVD) effects on quantum noise of ultrashort pulsed light are theoretically investigated at the soliton energy level, using Gaussian-weighted pseudo-random distribution of phasors in phase space for the modeling of quantum noise properties including phase noise, photon number noise, and quantum noise shape in phase space. We present the effects of GVD that mixes the different spectral components in time, on the self-phase modulation(SPM)-induced quantum noise properties in phase space such as quadrature squeezing, photon-number noise, and tilting/distortion of quantum noise shape in phase space, for the soliton that propagates a distance of the nonlinear length η NL = 1/( γP 0 ) (P 0 is the pulse peak power and γ is the SPM parameter). The propagation dependence of phase space quantum noise properties for an optical soliton is also provided.

  6. Direction dependent Love and Rayleigh wave noise characteristics using multiple arrays across Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juretzek, Carina; Perleth, Magdalena; Hadziioannou, Celine

    2016-04-01

    Seismic noise has become an important signal source for tomography and monitoring purposes. Better understanding of the noise field characteristics is crucial to further improve noise applications. Our knowledge about common and different origins of Love and Rayleigh waves in the microseism band is still limited. This applies in particular for constraints on source locations and source mechanisms of Love waves. Here, 3-component beamforming is used to distinguish between the different polarized wave types in the primary and secondary microseism noise field recorded at several arrays across Europe. We compare characteristics of Love and Rayleigh wave noise, such as source directions and frequency content. Further, Love to Rayleigh wave ratios are measured and a dependence on direction is found, especially in the primary microseism band. Estimates of the kinetic energy density ratios propose a dominance of coherent Love waves in the primary, but not in the secondary microseism band. The seasonality of the noise field characteristics is examined by using a full year of data in 2013 and is found to be stable.

  7. A Ka-band low-noise amplifier with a coplanar waveguide (CPW) structure with 0.15-μm GaAs pHEMT technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Chia-Song; Chang Chien-Huang; Liu Hsing-Chung; Lin Tah-Yeong; Wu Hsien-Ming

    2010-01-01

    This investigation explores a low-noise amplifier (LNA) with a coplanar waveguide (CPW) structure, in which a two-stage amplifier is associated with a cascade schematic circuit, implemented in 0.15-μm GaAs pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistor (pHEMT) technology in a Ka-band (26.5-40.0 GHz) microwave monolithic integrated circuit (MMIC). The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed LNA has a peak gain of 12.53 dB at 30 GHz and a minimum noise figure of 3.3 dB at 29.5 GHz, when biased at a V ds of 2 V and a V gs of -0.6 V with a drain current of 16 mA in the circuit. The results show that the millimeter-wave LNA with coplanar waveguide structure has a higher gain and wider bandwidth than a conventional circuit. Finally, the overall LNA characterization exhibits high gain and low noise, indicating that the LNA has a compact circuit and favorable RF characteristics. The strong RF character exhibited by the LNA circuit can be used in millimeter-wave circuit applications. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  8. Low noise monolithic CMOS front end electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, G.; Bergmann, H.; Holl, P.; Manfredi, P.F.

    1987-01-01

    Design considerations for low noise charge measurement and their application in CMOS electronics are described. The amplifier driver combination whose noise performance has been measured in detail as well as the analog multiplexing silicon strip detector readout electronics are designed with low power consumption and can be operated in pulsed mode so as to reduce heat dissipation even further in many applications. (orig.)

  9. Analysis of reactor noise; Analiza reaktorskih sumova

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velickovic, Lj [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1967-11-15

    This paper describes the theoretical model for interpretation of experimental results, experimental method for study of reactor noise at the RB reactor, numerical treatment of experimental results by correlation technique for analysis of reactor noise. A computer code was written to obtain autocorrelation function and spectral density function. Experimental results obtained by oscillator technique, pulse technique, and autocorrelation method are presented and discussed.

  10. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with 9-eV photon-energy pulses generated in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromberger, H., E-mail: Hubertus.Bromberger@mpsd.mpg.de; Liu, H.; Chávez-Cervantes, M.; Gierz, I. [Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Ermolov, A.; Belli, F.; Abdolvand, A.; Russell, P. St. J.; Travers, J. C. [Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Günther-Scharowsky-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Calegari, F. [Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Institute for Photonics and Nanotechnologies, IFN-CNR, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Li, M. T.; Lin, C. T. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Cavalleri, A. [Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Rd. Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-31

    A recently developed source of ultraviolet radiation, based on optical soliton propagation in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber, is applied here to angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Near-infrared femtosecond pulses of only few μJ energy generate vacuum ultraviolet radiation between 5.5 and 9 eV inside the gas-filled fiber. These pulses are used to measure the band structure of the topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} with a signal to noise ratio comparable to that obtained with high order harmonics from a gas jet. The two-order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency promises time-resolved ARPES measurements at repetition rates of hundreds of kHz or even MHz, with photon energies that cover the first Brillouin zone of most materials.

  11. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with 9-eV photon-energy pulses generated in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bromberger, H.; Liu, H.; Chávez-Cervantes, M.; Gierz, I.; Ermolov, A.; Belli, F.; Abdolvand, A.; Russell, P. St. J.; Travers, J. C.; Calegari, F.; Li, M. T.; Lin, C. T.; Cavalleri, A.

    2015-01-01

    A recently developed source of ultraviolet radiation, based on optical soliton propagation in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber, is applied here to angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Near-infrared femtosecond pulses of only few μJ energy generate vacuum ultraviolet radiation between 5.5 and 9 eV inside the gas-filled fiber. These pulses are used to measure the band structure of the topological insulator Bi 2 Se 3 with a signal to noise ratio comparable to that obtained with high order harmonics from a gas jet. The two-order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency promises time-resolved ARPES measurements at repetition rates of hundreds of kHz or even MHz, with photon energies that cover the first Brillouin zone of most materials

  12. Development of L-band pillbox RF window

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Y.; Fukuda, S.; Hisamatsu, H.; Saito, Y.; Takahashi, A.

    1994-01-01

    A pillbox RF output window was developed for the L-band pulsed klystron for the Japanese Hadron Project (JHP) 1-GeV proton linac. The window was designed to withstand a peak RF power of 6 MW, where the pulse width is 600 μsec and the repetition rate is 50 Hz. A high power model was fabricated using an alumina ceramic which has a low loss tangent of 2.5x10 -5 . A high power test was successfully performed up to a 113 kW RF average power with a 4 MW peak power, a 565 μsec pulse width and a 50 Hz repetition rate. By extrapolating the data of this high power test, the temperature rise of the ceramic is estimated low enough at the full RF power of 6 MW. Thus this RF window is expected to satisfy the specifications of the L-band Klystron. (author)

  13. Unusual near-band-edge photoluminescence at room temperature in heavily-doped ZnO:Al thin films prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanty, Bhaskar Chandra; Yeon, Deuk Ho; Das, Sachindra Nath; Kwak, Ji Hye; Yoon, Kyung Hoon; Cho, Yong Soo

    2013-01-01

    Room temperature photoluminescence (PL) properties of heavily-doped ZnO:Al thin films (with carrier concentration n in the range of 5–20 × 10 20 cm −3 ) prepared by pulsed laser deposition have been investigated. Despite their high carrier concentration, the films exhibited strong room temperature near-band-edge bound excitons at ∼3.34 eV and an unusual peak at ∼3.16 eV, and negligible deep-level emission even for the films deposited at a temperature as low as 25 °C. The radiative efficiency of the films increased with growth temperature as a result of increased n and improved crystallinity. A large blue shift of optical band gap was observed, which is consistent with the n-dependent Burstein–Moss and band gap-renormalization effects. Comparison of the results of the PL and optical measurements revealed a large Stokes shift that increased with increase in n. It has been explained by a model based on local potential fluctuations caused by randomly-distributed doping impurities. - Highlights: • Studied PL properties of heavily-doped ZnO:Al films grown by PLD. • Unusual strong near-band-edge emissions and negligible deep-level emission at RT. • Increased optical band gap with growth temperature and thus carrier concentration. • Stokes shift and PL peak width increased with carrier concentration. • Results explained by a model based on local potential fluctuations

  14. Frequency noise in frequency swept fiber laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    This Letter presents a measurement of the spectral content of frequency shifted pulses generated by a lightwave synthesized frequency sweeper. We found that each pulse is shifted in frequency with very high accuracy. We also discovered that noise originating from light leaking through the acousto......- optical modulators and forward propagating Brillouin scattering appear in the spectrum. © 2013 Optical Society of America....

  15. Digital baseline estimation method for multi-channel pulse height analyzing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Wuyun; Wei Yixiang; Ai Xianyun

    2005-01-01

    The basic features of digital baseline estimation for multi-channel pulse height analysis are introduced. The weight-function of minimum-noise baseline filter is deduced with functional variational calculus. The frequency response of this filter is also deduced with Fourier transformation, and the influence of parameters on amplitude frequency response characteristics is discussed. With MATLAB software, the noise voltage signal from the charge sensitive preamplifier is simulated, and the processing effect of minimum-noise digital baseline estimation is verified. According to the results of this research, digital baseline estimation method can estimate baseline optimally, and it is very suitable to be used in digital multi-channel pulse height analysis. (authors)

  16. [Suppression of tinnitus by band noise masker--a study of 600 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K; Kamio, T; Ohkawara, D; Aoki, H; Baba, S; Yagi, T

    1997-09-01

    We performed Band Noise Masker (BNM) therapy for the suppression of tinnitus in 600 patients and measured the pitch, loudness and masking level of tinnitus and residual inhibition (RI). We examined the efficiency of BNM therapy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism of suppression of tinnitus by BNM. Tinnitus was suppressed in 394 patients (66%) after BNM therapy. In the group of patients in whom we suppressed tinnitus, the loudness of tinnitus was reduced from 7.7 +/- 5.7dBSL to 7.5 +/- 5.5dBSL (p pitch of tinnitus did not exhibit a marked change. In the group of patients in whom we did not suppress tinnitus, the loudness and pitch of tinnitus did not exhibit a marked change. The efficiency of BNM therapy was high in the cases of presbyacusis and low in the cases of sudden deafness. There was no significant relationship between RI and the efficiency of BNM therapy. We examined these data and discussed the mechanism of suppression of tinnitus by BNM therapy. In all cases, after BNM therapy, the auditory threshold did not become worse. In 4 cases tinnitus became worse temporarily. In conclusion, BNM therapy is an effective mode for tinnitus control, is easily performed in our outpatient clinic or at home, and has no serious complications.

  17. Low Noise Quantum Frequency Conversion from Rb Wavelengths to Telecom O-band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao; Solmeyer, Neal; Stack, Daniel; Quraishi, Qudsia

    2015-05-01

    Ideal quantum repeaters would be composed of long-lived quantum memories entangled with flying qubits. They are becoming essential elements to achieve quantum communication over long distances in a quantum network. However, quantum memories based on neutral atoms operate at wavelengths in the near infrared, unsuitable for long distance communication. The ability to coherently convert photons entangled with quantum memories into telecom wavelengths reduces the transmission loss in optical fibers and therefore dramatically improves the range of a quantum repeater. Furthermore, quantum frequency conversion (QFC) can enable entanglement and communication between different types of quantum memories, thus creating a versatile hybrid quantum network. A recent experiment has shown the conversion of heralded photons from Rb-based memories to the telecom C-band. We implement a setup using a nonlinear PPLN waveguide for the QFC into a wavelength region where the noise-floor would be limited by dark counts rather than pump photons. Our approach uses a pump laser at a much longer wavelength. It has the advantage that the strong pump itself and the broad background in the PPLN can be nearly completely filtered from the converted signal. Such low background level allows for the conversion to be done on the heralding photon, which enables the generated entanglement to be used in a scalable way to multiple nodes remotely situated and to subsequent protocols.

  18. Analysis of broadband aerodynamic noise from VS45

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dundabin, P. [Renewable Energy Systems Ltd., Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the analysis of acoustic data taken from the VS45 at Kaiser-Wilhelm-Koog. The aim was to investigate the dependence of aerodynamic noise on tip speed and angle of attack. In particular, the dependence of noise in individual third octave bands on these variable is examined. The analysis is divided into 3 sections: data selection, data checks and analysis of broadband nacelle noise; analysis of broadband aerodynamic noise and its sensitivity to tip speed and angle of attack. (LN)

  19. RF pulse compression in the NLC test accelerator at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavine, T.L.

    1995-01-01

    At the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), the authors are designing a Next Linear Collider (NLC) with linacs powered by X-band klystrons with rf pulse compression. The design of the linac rf system is based on X-band prototypes which have been tested at high power, and on a systems-integration test - the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) - which is currently under construction at SLAC. This paper discusses some of the systems implications of rf pulse compression, and the use of pulse compression in the NLCTA, both for peak power multiplication and for controlling, by rf phase modulation, intra-pulse variations in the linac beam energy

  20. Frequency notching applicable to CMOS implementation of WLAN compatible IR-UWB pulse generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Ming; Mikkelsen, Jan H.; Jiang, Hao

    2012-01-01

    Due to overlapping frequency bands, IEEE 802.11a WLAN and Ultra Wide-Band systems potentially suffer from mutual interference problems. This paper proposes a method for inserting frequency notches into the IR-UWB power spectrum to ensure compatibility with WLAN systems. In contrast to conventional...... approaches where complicated waveform equations are used, the proposed method uses a dual-pulse frequency notching approach to achieve frequency suppression in selected bands. The proposed method offers a solution that is generically applicable to UWB pulse generators using different pulse waveforms...

  1. Reactor noise in critical and accelerator driven sub-critical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degweker, S.B.; Rana, Y.S.

    2007-01-01

    Noise methods have long been used for reactor kinetics parameters measurement and as diagnostic tools for monitoring the health of a nuclear power plant. It is conceivable that noise techniques would find similar applications in ADS. Measurement/monitoring the degree of sub-criticality of an ADS is one such application for which noise based methods are being considered, among others such as the pulsed source method. For this reason, theoretical studies on ADS noise have appeared since the late nineties. The principal difference between critical reactor noise and ADS noise is due to the statistical properties of the source. Unlike the source due to radioactive decay present in ordinary reactors, the machine produced ADS source cannot be assumed to be a Poisson process. In addition the source is pulsed. All this requires a new theoretical approach to the subject. In a number of papers (beginning in 2000) such a theoretical approach has been developed in BARC. Over the years, our approach has received general acceptance. The paper gives a description of the subject of reactor noise and its applications in critical reactors. The theory of noise in ADS is then outlined, highlighting the differences in approach and results from that of critical reactors. (author)

  2. Low noise amplifier for ZnS(Ag) scintillation chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Do Hoang Cuong

    1998-01-01

    A new pulse amplifier that can be used with standard photomultiplier tubes coupled with Zn(Ag) scintillation chamber is presented. The amplifier based on an IC operational amplifier LF 356N consists of a low-noise charge sensitive preamplifier and pulse shaping circuits for optimization of signal to noise ratio. Temperature instability is ≤ 0.05%/ o C. Dynamic range for linear output signals is equal +7 V. The presented amplifier is used in a measuring head for 0.17 L Lucas chambers developed in Department of Nuclear Instruments and Methods of the INCT in laboratory investigations aimed to develop methods and instruments for measurement of radon concentration in the air. The amplifier can also be employed for measurement of ionizing radiation by means of other scintillators coupled to PM tube. The amplifier is followed by a pulse discriminator with adjustable discrimination level. The amplifier output signal and discriminator output pulses are fed to external devices. (author)

  3. Assessment of impact noise at 31.5Hz

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lentzen, S.S.K.; Koopman, A.; Salomons, E.M.

    2011-01-01

    Due to the increasing popularity of lightweight building methods, vibrations and low frequency noise have become a greater challenge. This work deals with the assessment of impact noise at the 31.5 Hz octave band. Three possible impact sound sources to determine the sound insulation have been tested

  4. Exact folded-band chaotic oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corron, Ned J; Blakely, Jonathan N

    2012-06-01

    An exactly solvable chaotic oscillator with folded-band dynamics is shown. The oscillator is a hybrid dynamical system containing a linear ordinary differential equation and a nonlinear switching condition. Bounded oscillations are provably chaotic, and successive waveform maxima yield a one-dimensional piecewise-linear return map with segments of both positive and negative slopes. Continuous-time dynamics exhibit a folded-band topology similar to Rössler's oscillator. An exact solution is written as a linear convolution of a fixed basis pulse and a discrete binary sequence, from which an equivalent symbolic dynamics is obtained. The folded-band topology is shown to be dependent on the symbol grammar.

  5. Audience noise in concert halls during musical performances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Marie, Pierre; Brunskog, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    functions of the sound pressure levels were obtained in octave bands, which were fitted with three Gaussian distribution curves. The Gaussian distribution curve with the lowest mean value corresponds to a mixture of the technical background noise and audience generated noise, which is named the mixed...... background noise. Finally, the audience noise distribution is extracted by energy subtraction of the technical background noise levels measured in an empty condition from the mixed background noise levels. As a single index, L-90 of the audience noise distribution is named the audience noise level. Empirical...... prediction models were made using the four orchestra concert halls, revealing that the audience noise level is significantly correlated with the technical background noise level. It is therefore concluded that a relaxation of the current background noise recommendations for concert halls is not recommended...

  6. Audience noise in concert halls during musical performances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marie, Pierre; Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Brunskog, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    functions of the sound pressure levels were obtained in octave bands, which were fitted with three Gaussian distribution curves. The Gaussian distribution curve with the lowest mean value corresponds to a mixture of the technical background noise and audience generated noise, which is named the mixed...... background noise. Finally, the audience noise distribution is extracted by energy subtraction of the technical background noise levels measured in an empty condition from the mixed background noise levels. As a single index, L90 of the audience noise distribution is named the audience noise level. Empirical...... prediction models were made using the four orchestra concert halls, revealing that the audience noise level is significantly correlated with the technical background noise level. It is therefore concluded that a relaxation of the current background noise recommendations for concert halls is not recommended....

  7. Few-layer antimonene decorated microfiber: ultra-short pulse generation and all-optical thresholding with enhanced long term stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yufeng; Liang, Zhiming; Jiang, Xiantao; Chen, Yunxiang; Li, Zhongjun; Lu, Lu; Ge, Yanqi; Wang, Ke; Zheng, Jilin; Lu, Shunbin; Ji, Jianhua; Zhang, Han

    2017-12-01

    Antimonene, a new type of mono/few-layer two-dimensional (2D) mono-elemental material purely consisting of antimony similar as graphene and phosphorene, has been theoretically predicted with excellent optical response and enhanced stability. Herein, we experimentally investigated the broadband nonlinear optical response of highly stable few-layer antimonene (FLA) by performing an open-aperture Z-scan laser measurement. Thanks to the direct bandgap and resonant absorption at the telecommunication band, we demonstrated the feasibility of FLA-decorated microfiber not only as an optical saturable absorber for ultrafast photonics operation, but also as a stable all-optical pulse thresholder that can effectively suppress the transmission noise, boost the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and reshape the deteriorated input signal. Our findings, as the first prototypic device of absorption of antimonene, might facilitate the development of antimonene-based optical communication technologies towards high stability and practical applications in the future.

  8. Large-area, low-noise, high-speed, photodiode-based fluorescence detectors with fast overdrive recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickman, S.; DeMille, D.

    2005-01-01

    Two large-area, low-noise, high-speed fluorescence detectors have been built. One detector consists of a photodiode with an area of 28 mmx28 mm and a low-noise transimpedance amplifier. This detector has a input light-equivalent spectral noise density of less than 3 pW/√(Hz), can recover from a large scattered light pulse within 10 μs, and has a bandwidth of at least 900 kHz. The second detector consists of a 16-mm-diam avalanche photodiode and a low-noise transimpedance amplifier. This detector has an input light-equivalent spectral noise density of 0.08 pW/√(Hz), also can recover from a large scattered light pulse within 10 μs, and has a bandwidth of 1 MHz

  9. Pulse radiolysis based on a femtosecond electron beam and a femtosecond laser light with double-pulse injection technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jinfeng; Kondoh, Takafumi; Kozawa, Takahiro; Yoshida, Youichi; Tagawa, Seiichi

    2006-01-01

    A new pulse radiolysis system based on a femtosecond electron beam and a femtosecond laser light with oblique double-pulse injection was developed for studying ultrafast chemical kinetics and primary processes of radiation chemistry. The time resolution of 5.2 ps was obtained by measuring transient absorption kinetics of hydrated electrons in water. The optical density of hydrated electrons was measured as a function of the electron charge. The data indicate that the double-laser-pulse injection technique was a powerful tool for observing the transient absorptions with a good signal to noise ratio in pulse radiolysis

  10. System and process for pulsed multiple reaction monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, Mikhail E

    2013-05-17

    A new pulsed multiple reaction monitoring process and system are disclosed that uses a pulsed ion injection mode for use in conjunction with triple-quadrupole instruments. The pulsed injection mode approach reduces background ion noise at the detector, increases amplitude of the ion signal, and includes a unity duty cycle that provides a significant sensitivity increase for reliable quantitation of proteins/peptides present at attomole levels in highly complex biological mixtures.

  11. Development of Low-Noise Small-Area 24 GHz CMOS Radar Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a low-noise small-area 24 GHz CMOS radar sensor for automotive collision avoidance. This sensor is based on direct-conversion pulsed-radar architecture. The proposed circuit is implemented using TSMC 0.13 μm RF (radio frequency CMOS (fT/fmax=120/140 GHz technology, and it is powered by a 1.5 V supply. This circuit uses transmission lines to reduce total chip size instead of real bulky inductors for input and output impedance matching. The layout techniques for RF are used to reduce parasitic capacitance at the band of 24 GHz. The proposed sensor has low cost and low power dissipation since it is realized using CMOS process. The proposed sensor showed the lowest noise figure of 2.9 dB and the highest conversion gain of 40.2 dB as compared to recently reported research results. It also showed small chip size of 0.56 mm2, low power dissipation of 39.5 mW, and wide operating temperature range of −40 to +125°C.

  12. RF pulse compression in the NLC test accelerator at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavine, T.L.

    1995-01-01

    At the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), we are designing a Next Linear Collider (NLC) with linacs powered by X-band klystrons with rf pulse compression. The design of the linac rf system is based on X-band prototypes which have been tested at high power, and on a systems-integration test---the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA)---which is currently under construction at SLAC. This paper discusses some of the systems implications of rf pulse compression, and the use of pulse compression in the NLCTA, both for peak power multiplication and for controlling, by rf phase modulation, intra-pulse variations in the linac beam energy. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  13. PulseCam: high-resolution blood perfusion imaging using a camera and a pulse oximeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mayank; Suliburk, James; Veeraraghavan, Ashok; Sabharwal, Ashutosh

    2016-08-01

    Measuring blood perfusion is important in medical care as an indicator of injury and disease. However, currently available devices to measure blood perfusion like laser Doppler flowmetry are bulky, expensive, and cumbersome to use. An alternative low-cost and portable camera-based blood perfusion measurement system has recently been proposed, but such camera-only system produces noisy low-resolution blood perfusion maps. In this paper, we propose a new multi-sensor modality, named PulseCam, for measuring blood perfusion by combining a traditional pulse oximeter with a video camera in a unique way to provide low noise and high-resolution blood perfusion maps. Our proposed multi-sensor modality improves per pixel signal to noise ratio of measured perfusion map by up to 3 dB and improves the spatial resolution by 2 - 3 times compared to best known camera-only methods. Blood perfusion measured in the palm using our PulseCam setup during a post-occlusive reactive hyperemia (PORH) test replicates standard PORH response curve measured using laser Doppler flowmetry device but with much lower cost and a portable setup making it suitable for further development as a clinical device.

  14. A comparison of high-frequency noise levels on Cascadia Initiative ocean-bottom seismometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilmo, R.; Wilcock, W. S. D.; Roland, E. C.; Bodin, P.; Connolly, J.

    2017-12-01

    The Cascadia Initiative (CI) included a four-year deployment of 70 ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) on the Cascadia subduction zone and the Juan de Fuca plate for the purposes of characterizing seismicity and imaging the Earth's interior. The Cascadia subduction zone megathrust exhibits very low rates of seismicity relative to most other subduction zones, and there is great motivation to understand deformation on the megathrust because of its potential to produce a catastrophic M9 earthquake. An understanding of earthquake detectability of the CI network, based on knowledge of noise levels, could contribute to the interpretation of earthquake catalogs derived from the experiment and aid in the design of future networks. This project is aimed at estimating these thresholds of local earthquake detectability and how they change across the array both geographically and temporally. We characterize background noise levels recorded from 0.1 to 20 Hz with an emphasis on the frequency band used to detect local seismicity ( 3-15 Hz) to understand how noise levels depend on instrument design and environmental parameters including seafloor depth, season and oceanographic conditions. Our initial analysis of 3 weeks of vertical channel data in September, January, and May 2012-2013 shows that noise increase significantly moving from the continental shelf to deeper water. Noise levels at a given depth vary with instrument type but further analysis is required to determine whether this reflects variations in instrumental noise and ground coupling noise or errors in the scaling of the instrument response. There is also a strong seasonality in recorded noise levels at some frequencies, with winter noise levels exceeding spring and fall noise levels by up to 10 decibels in both the microseism band and in the fin whale calling band (15-20 Hz). In contrast, the seasonal noise level in the local seismicity band for a given instrument type and location shows smaller noise variation

  15. Balanced homodyne detection of optical quantum states at audio-band frequencies and below

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefszky, M S; Mow-Lowry, C M; Chua, S S Y; Shaddock, D A; Buchler, B C; Lam, P K; McClelland, D E; Vahlbruch, H; Khalaidovski, A; Schnabel, R

    2012-01-01

    The advent of stable, highly squeezed states of light has generated great interest in the gravitational wave community as a means for improving the quantum-noise-limited performance of advanced interferometric detectors. To confidently measure these squeezed states, it is first necessary to measure the shot-noise across the frequency band of interest. Technical noise, such as non-stationary events, beam pointing, and parasitic interference, can corrupt shot-noise measurements at low Fourier frequencies, below tens of kilo-hertz. In this paper we present a qualitative investigation into all of the relevant noise sources and the methods by which they can be identified and mitigated in order to achieve quantum noise limited balanced homodyne detection. Using these techniques, flat shot-noise down to Fourier frequencies below 0.5 Hz is produced. This enables the direct observation of large magnitudes of squeezing across the entire audio-band, of particular interest for ground-based interferometric gravitational wave detectors. 11.6 dB of shot-noise suppression is directly observed, with more than 10 dB down to 10 Hz. (paper)

  16. Shielding of the 9 TW pulse thermonuclear device equipment from electromagnetic noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajtsev, V.I.; Kopyrina, R.I.; Kostromin, A.P.; Olejnik, G.M.

    1990-01-01

    A complex of technical solutions providing for reliable noise-immunity of information-measuring systems, is realized at the ANGARA-5 device. The main method of noise elimination consists in the measurement system shielding and careful wiring of various conductors through the shield. The level of noises connected with the device operation does not exceed 30 mV

  17. Modelling of Substrate Noise and Mitigation Schemes for UWB Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Ming; Mikkelsen, Jan H.; Larsen, Torben

    2012-01-01

    tuned elements in the signal paths. However, for UWB designs this is not a viable option and other means are therefore required. Moreover, owing to the ultra-wideband nature and low power spectral density of the signal, UWB mixed-signal integrated circuits are more sensitive to substrate noise compared...... with narrow-band circuits. This chapter presents a study on the modeling and mitigation of substrate noise in mixed-signal integrated circuits (ICs), focusing on UWB system/circuit designs. Experimental impact evaluation of substrate noise on UWB circuits is presented. It shows how a wide-band circuit can......The last chapter of this first part of the book, chapter seven, is devoted to Modeling of Substrate Noise and Mitigation Schemes for Ultrawideband (UWB) systems, and is written by Ming Shen, Jan H. Mikkelsen, and Torben Larsen from Aalborg University, Denmark. In highly integrated mixed...

  18. Pulse shape analyzer/timing-SCA application to beta measurement by plastic scintillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celiktas, C.; Selvi, S.

    2000-01-01

    Noise contribution to pulses from BC-400 plastic scintillators, preamplifier and spectroscopy amplifier is rejected by using electronics processing of the modified beta spectrometer containing pulse shape analyzer/timing SCA and related complementary equipment. The noise rejection capability of the spectrometer which have been developed to measure pure and scattered beta spectra, which are reliable in view of evaluations of the detector and target electron scattering characteristics correctly. (author)

  19. Visibility of wavelet quantization noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, A. B.; Yang, G. Y.; Solomon, J. A.; Villasenor, J.

    1997-01-01

    The discrete wavelet transform (DWT) decomposes an image into bands that vary in spatial frequency and orientation. It is widely used for image compression. Measures of the visibility of DWT quantization errors are required to achieve optimal compression. Uniform quantization of a single band of coefficients results in an artifact that we call DWT uniform quantization noise; it is the sum of a lattice of random amplitude basis functions of the corresponding DWT synthesis filter. We measured visual detection thresholds for samples of DWT uniform quantization noise in Y, Cb, and Cr color channels. The spatial frequency of a wavelet is r 2-lambda, where r is display visual resolution in pixels/degree, and lambda is the wavelet level. Thresholds increase rapidly with wavelet spatial frequency. Thresholds also increase from Y to Cr to Cb, and with orientation from lowpass to horizontal/vertical to diagonal. We construct a mathematical model for DWT noise detection thresholds that is a function of level, orientation, and display visual resolution. This allows calculation of a "perceptually lossless" quantization matrix for which all errors are in theory below the visual threshold. The model may also be used as the basis for adaptive quantization schemes.

  20. Accurate step-FMCW ultrasound ranging and comparison with pulse-echo signaling methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Shyam; Singh, Rahul S.; Lee, Michael; Cox, Brian P.; Culjat, Martin O.; Grundfest, Warren S.; Lee, Hua

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents a method setup for high-frequency ultrasound ranging based on stepped frequency-modulated continuous waves (FMCW), potentially capable of producing a higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) compared to traditional pulse-echo signaling. In current ultrasound systems, the use of higher frequencies (10-20 MHz) to enhance resolution lowers signal quality due to frequency-dependent attenuation. The proposed ultrasound signaling format, step-FMCW, is well-known in the radar community, and features lower peak power, wider dynamic range, lower noise figure and simpler electronics in comparison to pulse-echo systems. In pulse-echo ultrasound ranging, distances are calculated using the transmit times between a pulse and its subsequent echoes. In step-FMCW ultrasonic ranging, the phase and magnitude differences at stepped frequencies are used to sample the frequency domain. Thus, by taking the inverse Fourier transform, a comprehensive range profile is recovered that has increased immunity to noise over conventional ranging methods. Step-FMCW and pulse-echo waveforms were created using custom-built hardware consisting of an arbitrary waveform generator and dual-channel super heterodyne receiver, providing high SNR and in turn, accuracy in detection.

  1. Band alignment studies of Al2O3/CuGaO2 and ZnO/CuGaO2 hetero-structures grown by pulsed laser deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajimsha, R.S.; Das, Amit K.; Joshi, M.P.; Kukreja, L.M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Band offset studies at the interface of Al 2 O 3 /CuGaO 2 and ZnO/CuGaO 2 hetero-structures were performed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. • Valance band offsets (VBO) of these hetero-structures were obtained from respective XPS peak positions and VB spectra using Kraut's equation. • Al 2 O 3 /CuGaO 2 interface exhibited a type I band alignment with valance band offset (VBO) of 4.05 eV whereas type II band alignment was observed in ZnO/CuGaO 2 hetero-structure with a VBO of 2.32 eV. • Schematic band alignment diagram for the interface of these hetero-structures has been constructed. • Band offset and alignment studies of these heterojunctions are important for gaining insight to the design of various optoelectronic devices based on such hetero-structures. - Abstract: We have studied the band offset and alignment of pulsed laser deposited Al 2 O 3 /CuGaO 2 and ZnO/CuGaO 2 hetero-structures using photoelectron spectroscopy. Al 2 O 3 /CuGaO 2 interface exhibited a type I band alignment with valance band offset (VBO) of 4.05 eV whereas type II band alignment was observed in ZnO/CuGaO 2 hetero-structure with a VBO of 2.32 eV. Schematic band alignment diagram for the interface of these hetero-structures has been constructed. Band offset and alignment studies of these heterojunctions are important for gaining insight to the design of various optoelectronic devices based on such hetero-structures

  2. Infrared study of the Crab pulsar: The ''shoulder'' pulse and the 3.45 micron pulse profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleditch, J.; Pennypacker, C.; Burns, M.S.

    1983-01-01

    Infrared measurements of the Crab pulsar with the NASA IRTF 3.0 m telescope show that the spectrum of the main pulse turns downward for wavelengths longer than 3 μm. The ''shoulder'' pulse discovered by Pennypacker is measured in the 0.9--2.4 μm region, but disappears at 3.5 μm. This pulse rises from 0 to 20% of the height of the main pulse within 1 to 2 ms after the main pulse peak and decays with a 4 to 5 ms time constant. Excess infrared flux also appears after the interpulse. The main peak itself may be narrower at 3.45 μm than in the optical to 2.2 μm band

  3. Control of giant pulse duration in neodymium mini lasers with controllable cavity length and pulsed pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berenberg, Vladimir A.; Cervantes, Miguel A.; Terpugov, Vladimir S.

    2006-01-01

    In a solid-state laser incident on aLiNdP4O12 crystal, pumped by a short light pulse, giant pulse oscillation without the use of resonator Q switching is realized. Tuning of the oscillation pulse duration from 2 up to 20 ns is achieved by changing the cavity length from 24 to 3 mm, respectively. Our analysis of this mode of laser radiation is made on the basis of the rate equations. The factors influencing oscillation pulse duration a reinvestigated. It is shown that in a limiting case the minimal value of the pulse duration is limited by only the rate of excitation transfer from the pumping band to the metastable level

  4. On the prediction of impact noise, V: The noise from drop hammers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, E. J.; Carr, I.; Westcott, M.

    1983-06-01

    In earlier papers in this series, the concepts of "acceleration" and "ringing" noise have been studied in relation to impact machines, and values of radiation efficiency have been obtained for the various types of structural components. In the work reported in this paper the predicted and measured noise radiation from a drop hammer, both in full-scale and in {1}/{3}- scale model form, were examined. It is found that overall noise levels ( Leq per event) can be predicted from vibration measurements to within ± 1·5 dB, and to within ±2·5 dB in one-third octave bands. In turn this has permitted noise reduction techniques to be examined by studies of local component vibration levels rather than overall noise, a method which provides considerable enlightenment at the design stage. It is shown that on one particular drop hammer, the noise energy is shared surprisingly uniformly over four or five sources, and that when these have been reduced, the overall noise reduction is severely limited by the "acceleration" noise from the "tup" or "hammer" itself. As this is difficult to eliminate without a basic change in forging technology, it follows that "tup" enclosure or modification of the sharpness of the final "hard" impact are the only means available for any serious noise reduction. Also indicated is the reliability of using model techniques, suitably scaled in frequency and impulse magnitude, in developing machinery with impact characteristics.

  5. Optimal pulse fishing policy in stage-structured models with birth pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Shujing; Chen Lansun; Sun Lihua

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we propose exploited models with stage structure for the dynamics in a fish population for which periodic birth pulse and pulse fishing occur at different fixed time. Using the stroboscopic map, we obtain an exact cycle of system, and obtain the threshold conditions for its stability. Bifurcation diagrams are constructed with the birth rate (or pulse fishing time or harvesting effort) as the bifurcation parameter, and these are observed to display complex dynamic behaviors, including chaotic bands with period windows, period-doubling, multi-period-halving and incomplete period-doubling bifurcation, pitch-fork and tangent bifurcation, non-unique dynamics (meaning that several attractors or attractor and chaos coexist) and attractor crisis. This suggests that birth pulse and pulse fishing provide a natural period or cyclicity that make the dynamical behaviors more complex. Moreover, we show that the pulse fishing has a strong impact on the persistence of the fish population, on the volume of mature fish stock and on the maximum annual-sustainable yield. An interesting result is obtained that, after the birth pulse, the population can sustain much higher harvesting effort if the mature fish is removed as early as possible

  6. Spiral waves in excitable media due to noise and periodic forcing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan Guoyong, E-mail: g-y-yuan@sohu.com [Department of Physics, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050016 (China); Hebei Advanced Thin Films Laboratory, Shijiazhuang 050016 (China); Xu Lin [Department of Physics, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050016 (China); Xu Aiguo; Wang Guangrui [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, P.O. Box 8009, Beijing 100088 (China); Yang Shiping [Department of Physics, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050016 (China); Hebei Advanced Thin Films Laboratory, Shijiazhuang 050016 (China)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: > Excitable media jointly driven by periodic forcing and Gaussian white noise. > The joint driving leads to many unique tip motions. > New type of spiral wave breakup occurs between entrainment bands with 1:1 and 2:1. > Arnold tongues for different noise intensities exhibit stochastic resonance. > Fourier spectrum analysis can interpret tip motions and formation of entrainments. - Abstract: We investigate the jointly driven effects of external periodic forcing and Gaussian white noise on meandering spiral waves in excitable media with FitzHugh-Nagumo local dynamics. Interesting phenomena resulted from various forcing periods are found, for example, piece-wise line drift, intermittent straight-line drift and so on. We also observe new type of breakup of spiral wave between entrainment bands with 1:1 and 2:1. It is believed that the occurrence of the new type is relevant to the appearance of local bidirectional propagation window. There exist optimized noise intensities which can induce the broadest entrainments and Arnold tongues. Such a phenomenon is referred to as stochastic resonance. It is also observed that the noise makes significant effects on the spiral wave with straight-line drift. Via the tip Fourier spectrum, the varying of tip motion with external periods on the resonance band is interpreted.

  7. Effect of external noise on the current response in superlattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suqing Duan; Wu Binyi; Wang Zhigang; Zhao Xiangeng

    2004-01-01

    Within the single-band model and the nearest-neighbor approximation we investigate the effect of external noise on the current response driven by dc-ac field which has a fluctuating component. We find the external noise can destroy the current resonant peaks. When the strength of the external noise becomes enough large, all the current resonant peaks will completely disappear

  8. Thermally controlled femtosecond pulse shaping using metasurface based optical filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Eesa; Şendur, Kürşat

    2018-02-01

    Shaping of the temporal distribution of the ultrashort pulses, compensation of pulse deformations due to phase shift in transmission and amplification are of interest in various optical applications. To address these problems, in this study, we have demonstrated an ultra-thin reconfigurable localized surface plasmon (LSP) band-stop optical filter driven by insulator-metal phase transition of vanadium dioxide. A Joule heating mechanism is proposed to control the thermal phase transition of the material. The resulting permittivity variation of vanadium dioxide tailors spectral response of the transmitted pulse from the stack. Depending on how the pulse's spectrum is located with respect to the resonance of the band-stop filter, the thin film stack can dynamically compress/expand the output pulse span up to 20% or shift its phase up to 360°. Multi-stacked filters have shown the ability to dynamically compensate input carrier frequency shifts and pulse span variations besides their higher span expansion rates.

  9. Towards a better understanding of helicopter external noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damongeot, A.; Dambra, F.; Masure, B.

    The problem of helicopter external noise generation is studied taking into consideration simultaneously the multiple noise sources: rotor rotational-, rotor broadband -, and engine noise. The main data are obtained during flight tests of the rather quiet AS 332 Super Puma. The flight procedures settled by ICAO for noise regulations are used: horizontal flyover at 90 percent of the maximum speed, approach at minimum power velocity, take-off at best rate of climb. Noise source levels are assessed through narrow band analysis of ground microphone recordings, ground measurements of engine noise and theoretical means. With the perceived noise level unit used throughout the study, relative magnitude of noise sources is shown to be different from that obtained with linear noise unit. A parametric study of the influence of some helicopter parameters on external noise has shown that thickness-tapered, chord-tapered, and swept-back blade tips are good means to reduce the overall noise level in flyover and approach.

  10. Cross-correlation measurement of quantum shot noise using homemade transimpedance amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashisaka, Masayuki; Ota, Tomoaki; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Fujisawa, Toshimasa; Muraki, Koji

    2014-01-01

    We report a cross-correlation measurement system, based on a new approach, which can be used to measure shot noise in a mesoscopic conductor at milliKelvin temperatures. In contrast to other measurement systems in which high-speed low-noise voltage amplifiers are commonly used, our system employs homemade transimpedance amplifiers (TAs). The low input impedance of the TAs significantly reduces the crosstalk caused by unavoidable parasitic capacitance between wires. The TAs are designed to have a flat gain over a frequency band from 2 kHz to 1 MHz. Low-noise performance is attained by installing the TAs at a 4 K stage of a dilution refrigerator. Our system thus fulfills the technical requirements for cross-correlation measurements: low noise floor, high frequency band, and negligible crosstalk between two signal lines. Using our system, shot noise generated at a quantum point contact embedded in a quantum Hall system is measured. The good agreement between the obtained shot-noise data and theoretical predictions demonstrates the accuracy of the measurements

  11. Exciter For X-Band Transmitter And Receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Carl E.

    1989-01-01

    Report describes developmental X-band exciter for X-band uplink subsystem of Deep Space Network. X-band transmitter-exciting signal expected to have fractional frequency stability of 5.2 X 10 to negative 15th power during 1,000-second integration period. Generates coherent test signals for S- and X-band Block III translator of Deep Space Network, Doppler-reference signal for associated Doppler-extractor system, first-local-oscillator signal for associated receiver, and reference signal for associated ranging subsystem. Tests of prototype exciter show controlling and monitoring and internal phase-correcting loops perform according to applicable design criteria. Measurements of stability of frequency and of single-sideband noise spectral density of transmitter-exciting signal made subsequently.

  12. Frequency-dependent effects of background noise on subcortical response timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, A; Parbery-Clark, A; Skoe, E; Kraus, N

    2011-12-01

    The addition of background noise to an auditory signal delays brainstem response timing. This effect has been extensively documented using manual peak selection. Peak picking, however, is impractical for large-scale studies of spectrotemporally complex stimuli, and leaves open the question of whether noise-induced delays are frequency-dependent or occur across the frequency spectrum. Here we use an automated, objective method to examine phase shifts between auditory brainstem responses to a speech sound (/da/) presented with and without background noise. We predicted that shifts in neural response timing would also be reflected in frequency-specific phase shifts. Our results indicate that the addition of background noise causes phase shifts across the subcortical response spectrum (70-1000 Hz). However, this noise-induced delay is not uniform such that some frequency bands show greater shifts than others: low-frequency phase shifts (300-500 Hz) are largest during the response to the consonant-vowel formant transition (/d/), while high-frequency shifts (720-1000 Hz) predominate during the response to the steady-state vowel (/a/). Most importantly, phase shifts occurring in specific frequency bands correlate strongly with shifts in the latencies of the predominant peaks in the auditory brainstem response, while phase shifts in other frequency bands do not. This finding confirms the validity of phase shift detection as an objective measure of timing differences and reveals that this method detects noise-induced shifts in timing that may not be captured by traditional peak latency measurements. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. 1/f noise in metallic and semiconducting carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reza, Shahed; Huynh, Quyen T.; Bosman, Gijs; Sippel-Oakley, Jennifer; Rinzler, Andrew G.

    2006-11-01

    The charge transport and noise properties of three terminal, gated devices containing multiple single-wall metallic and semiconducting carbon nanotubes were measured at room temperature. Applying a high voltage pulsed bias at the drain terminal the metallic tubes were ablated sequentially, enabling the separation of measured conductance and 1/f noise into metallic and semiconducting nanotube contributions. The relative low frequency excess noise of the metallic tubes was observed to be two orders of magnitude lower than that of the semiconductor tubes.

  14. W-Band InP Wideband MMIC LNA with 30K Noise Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinreb, S.; Lai, R.; Erickson, N.; Gaier, T.; Wielgus, J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describe a millimeter wave low noise amplifier with extraordinary low noise, low consumption, and wide frequency range. These results are achieved utilizing state-of-the-art InP HEMT transistors coupled with CPW circuit design. The paper describes the transistor models, modeled and measured on-wafer and in-module results at both 300K am 24K operating temperatures for many samples of the device.

  15. Control of low-frequency noise for piping systems via the design of coupled band gap of acoustic metamaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yanfei [College of Power Engineering, Naval University of Engineering, Wuhan, 430033 (China); Shen, Huijie, E-mail: shj588@163.com [College of Power Engineering, Naval University of Engineering, Wuhan, 430033 (China); Zhang, Linke [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, 430063 (China); Su, Yongsheng, E-mail: suyongsheng1981@163.com [College of Power Engineering, Naval University of Engineering, Wuhan, 430033 (China); Yu, Dianlong [Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Integrated Logistics Support, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic wave propagation and sound transmission in a metamaterial-based piping system with Helmholtz resonator (HR) attached periodically are studied. A transfer matrix method is developed to conduct the investigation. Calculational results show that the introduction of periodic HRs in the piping system could generate a band gap (BG) near the resonant frequency of the HR, such that the bandwidth and the attenuation effect of HR improved notably. Bragg type gaps are also exist in the system due to the systematic periodicity. By plotting the BG as functions of HR parameters, the effect of resonator parameters on the BG behavior, including bandwidth, location and attenuation performance, etc., is examined. It is found that Bragg-type gap would interplay with the resonant-type gap under some special situations, thereby giving rise to a super-wide coupled gap. Further, explicit formulation for BG exact coupling is extracted and some key parameters on modulating the width and the attenuation coefficient of coupled gaps are investigated. The coupled gap can be located to any frequency range as one concerned, thus rendering the low-frequency noise control feasible in a broad band range. - Highlights: • A metamaterial-type pipe system with Bragg and resonant acoustic gaps. • A low-frequency acoustic coupled gap. • Exact coupling condition for Bragg and resonant gaps. • Effects of resonant parameters on coupled gaps.

  16. Near noise field characteristics of Nike rocket motors for application to space vehicle payload acoustic qualification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, D. A.; Bruton, D.

    1977-01-01

    Results of a series of noise measurements that were made under controlled conditions during the static firing of two Nike solid propellant rocket motors are presented. The usefulness of these motors as sources for general spacecraft noise testing was assessed, and the noise expected in the cargo bay of the orbiter was reproduced. Brief descriptions of the Nike motor, the general procedures utilized for the noise tests, and representative noise data including overall sound pressure levels, one third octave band spectra, and octave band spectra were reviewed. Data are presented on two motors of different ages in order to show the similarity between noise measurements made on motors having different loading dates. The measured noise from these tests is then compared to that estimated for the space shuttle orbiter cargo bay.

  17. Development of computer program ENMASK for prediction of residual environmental masking-noise spectra, from any three independent environmental parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y.-S.; Liebich, R. E.; Chun, K. C.

    2000-03-31

    Residual environmental sound can mask intrusive4 (unwanted) sound. It is a factor that can affect noise impacts and must be considered both in noise-impact studies and in noise-mitigation designs. Models for quantitative prediction of sensation level (audibility) and psychological effects of intrusive noise require an input with 1/3 octave-band spectral resolution of environmental masking noise. However, the majority of published residual environmental masking-noise data are given with either octave-band frequency resolution or only single A-weighted decibel values. A model has been developed that enables estimation of 1/3 octave-band residual environmental masking-noise spectra and relates certain environmental parameters to A-weighted sound level. This model provides a correlation among three environmental conditions: measured residual A-weighted sound-pressure level, proximity to a major roadway, and population density. Cited field-study data were used to compute the most probable 1/3 octave-band sound-pressure spectrum corresponding to any selected one of these three inputs. In turn, such spectra can be used as an input to models for prediction of noise impacts. This paper discusses specific algorithms included in the newly developed computer program ENMASK. In addition, the relative audibility of the environmental masking-noise spectra at different A-weighted sound levels is discussed, which is determined by using the methodology of program ENAUDIBL.

  18. Noise study in laboratories with exhaust fans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikh, G.H.; Hashmi, R.; Shareef, A.

    2005-01-01

    Noise study has been carried out in 25 laboratories fitted with exhaust fans. We have studied A- Weighted equivalent sound pressure levels (dB(A) LAeJ and equivalent octave band sound pressure levels (dB L/sub eq/ in each of the laboratories surveyed. The data collected has been analyzed for Preferred Speech Interference Levels (PSIL). The results show that the interior noise levels in these laboratories vary from 59.6 to 72.2 dB(A) L/sub Aeq/, which are very high and much beyond the interior noise limits recommended for laboratories. Some ways and means to limit emission of high-level noise from exhaust fans are also discussed. (author)

  19. Low-backgroud preamplifier with pulse drain negative feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tret'yakov, V.A.; Bakhlanov, S.V.

    1978-01-01

    A low-noise preamplifier with a pulsed sinking negative feedback, used in an X-ray spectrometer, is described. The structural diagram of the preamplifier is presented, and its operating principle is considered. The criteria for selecting the amplitude and duration of the discharge pulse are discussed. It was established that the Usub(d) amplitude of the discharge pulse should be chosen within Usub(s) < Usub(s) < Usub(l), where Usub(s) is the voltage on the sink of the field transistor at which the avalanche production of carriers takes place, and Usub(l) is the limiting voltage at the sink; when it is exceeded, the field transistor goes into the cutoff regime. The duration of the discharge pulse should be chosen as short as possible to reduce the deadtime of the spectrometric tract. The results of an investigation into the energy resolution and the loading capacity of the spectrometer for different tau time constants of the forming filter are presented. It is shown that the energy resolution fo the spectrometer improves with increasing tau and reduces with increasing load. The use of pulsed sinkina feedback in low-noise preamplifiers to stabilize the direct-current regime makes it possible to considerably extend the loading potentialities of X-ray spectrometers

  20. Development of a new picosecond pulse radiolysis system by using a femtosecond laser synchronized with a picosecond linac. A step to femtosecond pulse radiolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Yoichi; Yamamoto, Tamotsu; Miki, Miyako; Seki, Shu; Okuda, Shuichi; Honda, Yoshihide; Kimura, Norio; Tagawa, Seiichi [Osaka Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Scientific and Industrial Research; Ushida, Kiminori

    1997-03-01

    A new picosecond pulse radiolysis system by using a Ti sapphire femtosecond laser synchronized with a 20 ps electron pulse from the 38 MeV L-band linac has been developed for the research of the ultra fast reactions in primary processes of radiation chemistry. The timing jitter in the synchronization of the laser pulse with the electron pulse is less than several picosecond. The technique can be used in the next femtosecond pulse radiolysis. (author)

  1. Reconstructing the energy band electronic structure of pulsed laser deposited CZTS thin films intended for solar cell absorber applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandiyan, Rajesh; Oulad Elhmaidi, Zakaria; Sekkat, Zouheir; Abd-lefdil, Mohammed; El Khakani, My Ali

    2017-02-01

    We report here on the use of pulsed KrF-laser deposition (PLD) technique for the growth of high-quality Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) thin films onto Si, and glass substrates without resorting to any post sulfurization process. The PLD-CZTS films were deposited at room temperature (RT) and then subjected to post annealing at different temperatures ranging from 200 to 500 °C in Argon atmosphere. The X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy confirmed that the PLD films crystallize in the characteristic kesterite CZTS structure regardless of their annealing temperature (Ta), but their crystallinity is much improved for Ta ≥ 400 °C. The PLD-CZTS films were found to exhibit a relatively dense morphology with a surface roughness (RMS) that increases with Ta (from ∼14 nm at RT to 70 nm at Ta = 500 °C with a value around 40 nm for Ta = 300-400 °C). The optical bandgap of the PLD-CZTS films, was derived from UV-vis transmission spectra analysis, and found to decrease from 1.73 eV for non-annealed films to ∼1.58 eV for those annealed at Ta = 300 °C. These band gap values are very close to the optimum value needed for an ideal solar cell absorber. In order to achieve a complete reconstruction of the one-dimensional energy band structure of these PLD-CZTS absorbers, we have combined both XPS and UPS spectroscopies to determine their chemical bondings, the position of their valence band maximum (relative to Fermi level), and their work function values. This enabled us to sketch out, as accurately as possible, the band alignment of the heterojunction interface formed between CZTS and both CdS and ZnS buffer layer materials.

  2. Coded excitation and sub-band processing for blood velocity estmation in medical ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gran, Fredrik; Udesen, Jesper; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of broadband coded excitation and subband processing for blood velocity estimation in medical ultrasound. In conventional blood velocity estimation a long (narrow-band) pulse is emitted and the blood velocity is estimated using an auto-correlation based approach....... However, the axial resolution of the narrow-band pulse is too poor for brightness-mode (B-mode) imaging. Therefore, a separate transmission sequence is used for updating the B-mode image, which lowers the overall frame-rate of the system. By using broad-band excitation signals, the backscattered received...... signal can be divided into a number of narrow frequency bands. The blood velocity can be estimated in each of the bands and the velocity estimates can be averaged to form an improved estimate. Furthermore, since the excitation signal is broadband, no secondary B-mode sequence is required, and the frame...

  3. A Q-band two-beam cryogenic receiver for the Tianma Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Wei-Ye; Dong, Jian; Gou, Wei; Yu, Lin-Feng; Wang, Jin-Qing; Xia, Bo; Jiang, Wu; Liu, Cong; Zhang, Hui; Shi, Jun; Yin, Xiao-Xing; Shi, Sheng-Cai; Liu, Qing-Hui; Shen, Zhi-Qiang

    2018-04-01

    A Q-band two-beam cryogenic receiver for the Tianma Radio Telescope (TMRT) has been developed, and it uses the independently-developed key microwave and millimeter-wave components operating from 35 to 50GHz with a fractional bandwidth of 35%. The Q-band receiver consists of three parts: optics, cold unit assembly and warm unit assembly, and it can receive simultaneously the left-handed and right-handed circularly polarized waves. The cold unit assembly of each beam is composed of a feed horn, a noise injection coupler, a differential phase shifter, an orthomode transducer and two low-noise amplifiers, and it works at a temperature range near 20 K to greatly improve the detection sensitivity of the receiving system. The warm unit assembly includes four radio-frequency amplifiers, four radio-frequency high-pass filters, four waveguide biased mixers, four 4–12 GHz intermediate-frequency amplifiers and one 31–38 GHz frequency synthesizer. The measured Q-band four-channel receiver noise temperatures are roughly 30–40 K. In addition, the single-dish spectral line and international very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations between the TMRT and East Asia VLBI Network at the Q-band have been successfully carried out, demonstrating the advantages of the TMRT equipped with the state-of-the-art Q-band receiver.

  4. Interfacial electron-transfer equilibria and flat-band potentials of α-Fe2O3 and TiO2 colloids studied by pulse radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrijevic, N.M.; Savic, D.; Micic, O.I.; Nozik, A.J.

    1984-01-01

    The kinetics and equilibria of electron transfer between methylviologen cation radicals and α-Fe 2 O 3 or TiO 2 colloidal particles were studied with the pulse-radiolysis technique. The rates of electron transfer to both colloids are lower than those predicted for a diffusion-controlled reaction. For higher pHs (TiO 2 , pH > 2; α-Fe 2 O 3 , pH > 9) the established equilibrium MV + in equilibrium MV 2+ + (e - )/sub coll/ is strongly influenced by the MV 2+ concentration and pH. The MV + equilibrium concentration can be exploited to derive the flat-band potential of the semiconductor colloids. The method for determining the flat-band potential of the particles is independent of whether the injected electrons are free or trapped, and whether the electrons raise the bulk Fermi level toward the conduction band or just produce a space charge. The flat-band potentials for both colloids appear to be somewhat more negative (-0.1 to -0.2 V) than the corresponding single-crystal electrodes. Also, the flat-band potentials become slightly more negative with increasing radiation dose (initial MV + concentration). The effect of absorbed radiation dose is explained by the corresponding changes in the ratio of oxidized to reduced forms of the redox couple, which in turn changes the adsorbed ionic charge on the semiconductor surface. For colloidal particles of TiO 2 stabilized by poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), the flat-band potentials were almost the same as those for PVA-free TiO 2 sols. The decrease of particle diameter from 800 to 70 A does not affect the value of the flat-band potentials for TiO 2 and α-Fe 2 O 3 colloids. 28 references, 9 figures

  5. Echoic memory in the rat: effects of inspection time, retention interval, and the spectral composition of masking noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, K; Ison, J R

    1991-10-01

    Memory for tones (1100 vs. 2330 Hz) was studied in 4 rats (Rattus norvegicus), as affected by the durations of both target tones (30 to 620 ms) and noise-filled retention intervals (0 to 480 ms). With a 0-ms delay, performance was near asymptotic with the 30-ms tone, but the memory of this brief tone suffered a massive decrement at retention intervals as brief as 60 ms; in contrast, memory for the 340-ms tone was stable for at least 240 ms. If the retention interval was filled by band-stop noise (with targets presented in the spectral gap), then the rat's memory for brief tones was superior to that obtained with the standard broad-band noise filler, and band-stop noise was better than a band-pass noise that had the tones embedded in the region of its spectral energy. These findings are consistent with the hypotheses that auditory memory in the rat consists of a transient sensorylike echoic store and a short-term store more resistant to the effects of retroactive interference.

  6. Thermally controlled femtosecond pulse shaping using metasurface based optical filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahimi Eesa

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Shaping of the temporal distribution of the ultrashort pulses, compensation of pulse deformations due to phase shift in transmission and amplification are of interest in various optical applications. To address these problems, in this study, we have demonstrated an ultra-thin reconfigurable localized surface plasmon (LSP band-stop optical filter driven by insulator-metal phase transition of vanadium dioxide. A Joule heating mechanism is proposed to control the thermal phase transition of the material. The resulting permittivity variation of vanadium dioxide tailors spectral response of the transmitted pulse from the stack. Depending on how the pulse’s spectrum is located with respect to the resonance of the band-stop filter, the thin film stack can dynamically compress/expand the output pulse span up to 20% or shift its phase up to 360°. Multi-stacked filters have shown the ability to dynamically compensate input carrier frequency shifts and pulse span variations besides their higher span expansion rates.

  7. Estimation of pulses in ultrasound B-scan images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    1991-01-01

    It is shown, based on an expression for the received pressure field in pulsed medical ultrasound systems, that a common one-dimensional pulse can be estimated from individual A-lines. An autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model is suggested for the pulse, and an estimator based on the prediction...... error method is derived. The estimator is used on a segment of an A-line, assuming that the pulse does not change significantly inside the segment. Several examples of the use of the estimator on synthetic data measured from a tissue phantom and in vitro data measured from a calf's liver are given....... They show that a pulse can be estimated even at moderate signal-to-noise ratios...

  8. Photoelectron emission from metal surfaces by ultrashort laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faraggi, M. N.; Gravielle, M. S.; Silkin, V. M.

    2006-01-01

    Electron emission from metal surfaces produced by short laser pulses is studied within the framework of the distorted-wave formulation. The proposed approach, named surface-Volkov (SV) approximation, makes use of the band-structure based (BSB) model and the Volkov phase to describe the interaction of the emitted electron with the surface and the external electric field, respectively. The BSB model provides a realistic representation of the surface, based on a model potential that includes the main features of the surface band structure. The SV method is applied to evaluate the photoelectron emission from the valence band of Al(111). Angular and energy distributions are investigated for different parameters of the laser pulse, keeping in all cases the carrier frequency larger than the plasmon one

  9. Test research of consistency for amplitude calibration coefficients of pulsed electric field sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Cui; Guo Xiaoqiang; Chen Xiangyue; Nie Xin; Mao Congguang; Xiang Hui; Cheng Jianping

    2007-01-01

    The amplitude calibration of an electric field sensor is important in the measurement of electromagnetic pulse. In this paper, an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) is used to generate multi-waveform electric field in the TEM cell and the dipole antenna pulsed electric field sensor is calibrated. In the frequency band of the sensor, the calibrated amplitude coefficients with different waveforms are identical. The coefficient derived from the TEM cell calibration system suits to the measurement of unknown electric field pulse within the frequency band. (authors)

  10. Age-dependent complex noise fluctuations in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mareš, Jan; Vyšata, Oldřich; Procházka, Aleš; Vališ, Martin

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the parameters of colored noise in EEG data of 17 722 professional drivers aged 18–70. The whole study is based upon experiments showing that biological neural networks may operate in the vicinity of the critical point and that the balance between excitation and inhibition in the human brain is important for the transfer of information. This paper is devoted to the study of EEG power spectrum which can be described best by a power function with 1/f λ distribution and colored noise corresponding to the critical point in the EEG signal has the value of λ = 1 (purple noise). The slow accumulation of energy and its quick release is a universal property of the 1/f distribution. The physiological mechanism causing energy dissipation in the brain seems to depend on the number and strength of the connections between clusters of neurons. With ageing, the number of connections between the neurons decreases. Learning ability and intellectual performance also decrease. Therefore, age-related changes in the λ coefficient can be anticipated. We found that absolute values of λ coefficients decrease significantly with increasing age. Deviations from this rule are related to age-dependent slowing of the dominant frequency in the alpha band. Age-dependent change in the parameter and colored noise may be indicative of age-related changes in the self-organization of brain activity. Results obtained include (i) the age-dependent decrease of the absolute values of the average λ coefficient with the regression coefficient 0.005 1/year, (ii) distribution of λ value changes related to EEG frequency bands and to localization of electrodes on the scalp, and (iii) relation of age-dependent changes of colored noise and EEG energy in separate frequency bands. (paper)

  11. Performance Enhancement in L-Band Edfa Through Dual Stage Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. W. Harun and H. Ahmad

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available An experiment on gain enhancement in the long wavelength band erbium doped fiber amplifier (L-band EDFA is demonstrated. It uses a dual stage technique with dual forward pumping scheme. Compared to a conventional single stage amplifier, the small signal gain for 1580nm signal can be improved by 5.5dB without paying much noise figure penalty. The corresponding noise figure penalty was 0.3dB due to the insertion loss of the optical isolator. The optimum pump power ratio for the first pump is experimentally determined to be 33%. The maximum gain improvement of 8.3dB was obtained at a signal wavelength of 1568nm while signal and total pump powers were fixed at -30dBm and 92mW, respectively. The employment of dual stage amplifier system seems to play an important role in the development of practical L-band EDFA from the perspective of economical usage of pump power.Key Words:  erbium doped fibre; optical amplifier; L-band EDFA; dual stage EDFA; amplified spontaneous emission

  12. LNA A 1.9 GHZ low noise amplifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Julián Moreno-Rubio

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows the design, the simulation, and the layout from a low noise amplifier (LNA, designed with and approximate band from 25 to 80 MHz. The design results of the matching neworks are shown, its noise figure, its available and transduced gain according to its non lineal model (TOM, the DC network, crash inductors and matching capacitors with the large impedance transmission lines.

  13. Noise And Charge Transport In Carbon Nanotube Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reza, Shahed; Huynh, Quyen T.; Bosman, Gijs; Sippel, Jennifer; Rinzler, Andrew G.

    2005-11-01

    The charge transport and noise properties of three terminal, gated devices containing multiple, single wall, metallic and semiconductor carbon nanotubes have been measured as a function of gate and drain bias at 300K. Using pulsed bias the metallic tubes could be burned sequentially enabling the separation of measured conductance and low frequency excess noise into metallic and semiconductor contributions. The relative low frequency excess noise of the metallic tubes was about a factor 100 lower than that of the semiconductor tubes, whereas the conductance of the metallic tubes was significantly higher (10 to 50 times) than that of the semiconductor tubes.

  14. Noise study of all-normal dispersion supercontinuum sources for potential application in optical coherence tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bravo Gonzalo, Ivan; Engelsholm, Rasmus Dybbro; Bang, Ole

    2017-01-01

    bandwidths, such sources are characterized by large intensity fluctuations, limiting their performance for applications in imaging such as optical coherence tomography (OCT). An approach to eliminate the influence of noise sensitive effects is to use a so-called all-normal dispersion (ANDi) fiber, in which...... the dispersion is normal for all the wavelengths of interest. Pumping these types of fibers with short enough femtosecond pulses allows to suppress stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), which is known to be as noisy process as modulation instability (MI), and coherent SC is generated through self-phase modulation...... (SPM) and optical wave breaking (OWB). In this study, we show the importance of the pump laser and fiber parameters in the design of low-noise ANDi based SC sources, for application in OCT. We numerically investigate the pulse-to-pulse fluctuations of the SC, calculating the relative intensity noise...

  15. Noise performance of the multiwavelength sub/millimeter inductance camera (MUSIC) detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, S. R.

    2015-07-01

    MUSIC is a multi-band imaging camera that employs 2304 Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) in 576 spatial pixels to cover a 14 arc-minute field of view, with each pixel simultaneously sensitive to 4 bands centered at 0.87, 1.04, 1.33, and 1.98 mm. In April 2012 the MUSIC instrument was commissioned at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory with a subset of the full focal plane. We examine the noise present in the detector timestreams during observations taken in the first year of operation. We find that fluctuations in atmospheric emission dominate at long timescales (electronics contribute significant 1/f-type noise at shorter timescales. We describe a method to remove the amplitude, phase, and atmospheric noise using the fact that they are correlated among carrier tones. After removal, the complex signal is decomposed, or projected, into dissipation and frequency components. White noise from the cryogenic HEMT amplifier dominates in the dissipation component. An excess noise is observed in the frequency component that is likely due to fluctuations in two-level system (TLS) defects in the device substrate. We compare the amplitude of the TLS noise with previous measurements.

  16. Low Noise Frequency Comb Sources Based on Synchronously Pumped Doubly Resonant Optical Parametric Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Chenchen

    Optical frequency combs are coherent light sources consist of thousands of equally spaced frequency lines. Frequency combs have achieved success in applications of metrology, spectroscopy and precise pulse manipulation and control. The most common way to generate frequency combs is based on mode-locked lasers which has the output spectrum of comb structures. To generate stable frequency combs, the output from mode-locked lasers need to be phase stabilized. The whole comb lines will be stabilized if the pulse train repetition rate corresponding to comb spacing and the pulse carrier envelope offset (CEO) frequency are both stabilized. The output from a laser always has fluctuations in parameters known as noise. In laser applications, noise is an important factor to limit the performance and often need to be well controlled. For example in precision measurement such as frequency metrology and precise spectroscopy, low laser intensity and phase noise is required. In mode-locked lasers there are different types of noise like intensity noise, pulse temporal position noise also known as timing jitter, optical phase noise. In term for frequency combs, these noise dynamics is more complex and often related. Understanding the noise behavior is not only of great interest in practical applications but also help understand fundamental laser physics. In this dissertation, the noise of frequency combs and mode-locked lasers will be studied in two projects. First, the CEO frequency phase noise of a synchronously pumped doubly resonant optical parametric oscillators (OPO) will be explored. This is very important for applications of the OPO as a coherent frequency comb source. Another project will focus on the intensity noise coupling in a soliton fiber oscillator, the finding of different noise coupling in soliton pulses and the dispersive waves generated from soliton perturbation can provide very practical guidance for low noise soliton laser design. OPOs are used to generate

  17. How Might People Near National Roads Be Affected by Traffic Noise as Electric Vehicles Increase in Number? A Laboratory Study of Subjective Evaluations of Environmental Noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Ian; Kennedy, John; Martin, Susanna; Rice, Henry

    2016-01-01

    We face a likely shift to electric vehicles (EVs) but the environmental and human consequences of this are not yet well understood. Simulated auditory traffic scenes were synthesized from recordings of real conventional and EVs. These sounded similar to what might be heard by a person near a major national road. Versions of the simulation had 0%, 20%, 40%, 60%, 80% and 100% EVs. Participants heard the auditory scenes in random order, rating each on five perceptual dimensions such as pleasant-unpleasant and relaxing-stressful. Ratings of traffic noise were, overall, towards the negative end of these scales, but improved significantly when there were high proportions of EVs in the traffic mix, particularly when there were 80% or 100% EVs. This suggests a shift towards a high proportion of EVs is likely to improve the subjective experiences of people exposed to traffic noise from major roads. The effects were not a simple result of EVs being quieter: ratings of bandpass-filtered versions of the recordings suggested that people's perceptions of traffic noise were specifically influenced by energy in the 500-2000 Hz band. Engineering countermeasures to reduce noise in this band might be effective for improving the subjective experience of people living or working near major roads, even for conventional vehicles; energy in the 0-100 Hz band was particularly associated with people identifying sound as 'quiet' and, again, this might feed into engineering to reduce the impact of traffic noise on people.

  18. Electronic system for recording proportional counter rare pulses with the pulse shape analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barabanov, I.R.; Gavrin, V.N.; Zakharov, Yu.I.; Tikhonov, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    The anutomated system for recording proportional counter rare pulses is described. The proportional counters are aimed at identification of 37 Ar and H7 1 Gr decays in chemical radiation detectors of solar neutrino. Pulse shape recording by means of a storage oscilloscope and a TV display is performed in the system considered besides two-parametric selection of events (measurement of pulse amplitude in a slow channel and the amplitude of pulse differentiated with time constant of about 10 ns in a parallel fast channel). Pulse discrimination by a front rise rate provides background decrease in the 55 Fe range (5.9 keV) by 6 times; the visual analysis of pulse shapes recorded allows to decrease the background additionally by 25-30%. The background counting rate in the 55 Fe range being equal to 1 pulse per 1.5 days, is obtained when using the installation described above, as well as the passive Pb shield 5 cm thick, and the active shield based on the anticoincidence NaI(Tl) detector with the cathode 5.6 mm in-diameter made of Fe fabircated by zone melting. The installation described allows to reach the background level of 0.6 pulse/day (the total coefficient of background attenuation is 400). Further background decrease is supposed to be provided by installation allocation in the low-noise underground laboratory of the Baksan Neutrino Observatory

  19. Approaches to the Optimal Nonlinear Analysis of Microcalorimeter Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, J. W.; Pappas, C. G.; Alpert, B. K.; Doriese, W. B.; O'Neil, G. C.; Ullom, J. N.; Swetz, D. S.

    2018-03-01

    We consider how to analyze microcalorimeter pulses for quantities that are nonlinear in the data, while preserving the signal-to-noise advantages of linear optimal filtering. We successfully apply our chosen approach to compute the electrothermal feedback energy deficit (the "Joule energy") of a pulse, which has been proposed as a linear estimator of the deposited photon energy.

  20. Set–Reset latch logical operation induced by colored noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Nan; Song, Aiguo

    2014-01-01

    We examine the possibility of obtaining Set–Reset latch logical operation in a symmetric bistable system subjected to OU noise. Three major results are presented. First, we prove the Set–Reset latch logical operation can be obtained driven by OU noise. Second, while increasing the correlation time, the optimal noise band shifts to higher level and becomes wider. Meanwhile, peak performance degrades from 100% accuracy, but the system can still perform reliable logical operation. Third, at fixed noise intensity, the success probability evolves non-monotonically as correlation time increases. The study might provide development of the new paradigm of memory device.

  1. Modeling and experimental studies of a side band power re-injection locked magnetron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Yi; Yuan, Ping; Zhu, Hua-Cheng; Huang, Ka-Ma; Yang, Yang

    2016-12-01

    A side band power re-injection locked (SBPRIL) magnetron is presented in this paper. A tuning stub is placed between the external injection locked (EIL) magnetron and the circulator. Side band power of the EIL magnetron is reflected back to the magnetron. The reflected side band power is reused and pulled back to the central frequency. A phase-locking model is developed from circuit theory to explain the process of reuse of side band power in SBPRIL magnetron. Theoretical analysis proves that the side band power is pulled back to the central frequency of the SBPRIL magnetron, then the amplitude of the RF voltage increases and the phase noise performance is improved. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation of a 10-vane continuous wave (CW) magnetron model is presented. Computer simulation predicts that the frequency spectrum’s peak of the SBPRIL magnetron has an increase of 3.25 dB compared with the free running magnetron. The phase noise performance at the side band offset reduces 12.05 dB for the SBPRIL magnetron. Besides, the SBPRIL magnetron experiment is presented. Experimental results show that the spectrum peak rises by 14.29% for SBPRIL magnetron compared with the free running magnetron. The phase noise reduces more than 25 dB at 45-kHz offset compared with the free running magnetron. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB328902) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61501311).

  2. Studies on multiplication effect of noises of PPD, and a proposal of a new structure to improve the performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oide, H., E-mail: oide@icepp.s.u-tokyo.ac.j [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Murase, T.; Otono, H. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Yamashita, S. [ICEPP, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2010-11-01

    Pixelated photon detectors (PPDs) are arrayed APDs operated in Geiger-mode. Multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC) is a PPD produced by Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. We performed measurement of total noise rate, random noise rate, after-pulsing, crosstalk, and relative photon detection efficiency for a 1600 px MPPC. The explosive increase of total noise rate to over-voltage is able to be understood of multiplication effect of after-pulsing and crosstalk. Considering the electric field structure of MPPC (p-on-n type) and Geiger-efficiency as a function of the position of initial pair creation, these characteristics are all able to be understood. One suggestion for p-on-n type PPD from these results is narrowing the depletion layer below the multiplication layer to reduce random noise and after-pulsing. Another proposal is to put additional buffer capacitance parallel to the diode to accomplish higher gain with lower over-voltage simultaneously with lower noise rate.

  3. Studies on multiplication effect of noises of PPD, and a proposal of a new structure to improve the performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oide, H.; Murase, T.; Otono, H.; Yamashita, S.

    2010-01-01

    Pixelated photon detectors (PPDs) are arrayed APDs operated in Geiger-mode. Multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC) is a PPD produced by Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. We performed measurement of total noise rate, random noise rate, after-pulsing, crosstalk, and relative photon detection efficiency for a 1600 px MPPC. The explosive increase of total noise rate to over-voltage is able to be understood of multiplication effect of after-pulsing and crosstalk. Considering the electric field structure of MPPC (p-on-n type) and Geiger-efficiency as a function of the position of initial pair creation, these characteristics are all able to be understood. One suggestion for p-on-n type PPD from these results is narrowing the depletion layer below the multiplication layer to reduce random noise and after-pulsing. Another proposal is to put additional buffer capacitance parallel to the diode to accomplish higher gain with lower over-voltage simultaneously with lower noise rate.

  4. Pulse retrieval algorithm for interferometric frequency-resolved optical gating based on differential evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyyti, Janne; Escoto, Esmerando; Steinmeyer, Günter

    2017-10-01

    A novel algorithm for the ultrashort laser pulse characterization method of interferometric frequency-resolved optical gating (iFROG) is presented. Based on a genetic method, namely, differential evolution, the algorithm can exploit all available information of an iFROG measurement to retrieve the complex electric field of a pulse. The retrieval is subjected to a series of numerical tests to prove the robustness of the algorithm against experimental artifacts and noise. These tests show that the integrated error-correction mechanisms of the iFROG method can be successfully used to remove the effect from timing errors and spectrally varying efficiency in the detection. Moreover, the accuracy and noise resilience of the new algorithm are shown to outperform retrieval based on the generalized projections algorithm, which is widely used as the standard method in FROG retrieval. The differential evolution algorithm is further validated with experimental data, measured with unamplified three-cycle pulses from a mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser. Additionally introducing group delay dispersion in the beam path, the retrieval results show excellent agreement with independent measurements with a commercial pulse measurement device based on spectral phase interferometry for direct electric-field retrieval. Further experimental tests with strongly attenuated pulses indicate resilience of differential-evolution-based retrieval against massive measurement noise.

  5. Using Correlated Photons to Suppress Background Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Deborah; Hockney, George; Dowling, Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    A proposed method of suppressing the effect of background noise in an optical communication system would exploit the transmission and reception of correlated photons at the receiver. The method would not afford any advantage in a system in which performance is limited by shot noise. However, if the performance of the system is limited by background noise (e.g., sunlight in the case of a free-space optical communication system or incoherently scattered in-band photons in the case of a fiber-optic communication system), then the proposed method could offer an advantage: the proposed method would make it possible to achieve a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) significantly greater than that of an otherwise equivalent background- noise-limited optical communication system based on the classical transmission and reception of uncorrelated photons. The figure schematically depicts a classical optical-communication system and a system according to the proposed method. In the classical system, a modulated laser beam is transmitted along an optical path to a receiver, the optics of which include a narrow-band-pass filter that suppresses some of the background noise. A photodetector in the receiver detects the laser-beam and background photons, most or all of which are uncorrelated. In the proposed system, correlated photons would be generated at the transmitter by making a modulated laser beam pass through a nonlinear parametric down-conversion crystal. The sum of frequencies of the correlated photons in each pair would equal the frequency of the incident photon from which they were generated. As in the classical system, the correlated photons would travel along an optical path to a receiver, where they would be band-pass filtered and detected. Unlike in the classical system, the photodetector in the receiver in this system would be one that intrinsically favors the detection of pairs of correlated photons over the detection of uncorrelated photons. Even though there would be no

  6. Pulsed rf superconductivity program at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campisi, I.E.; Farkas, Z.D.

    1984-08-01

    Recent tests performed at SLAC on superconducting TM 010 caavities using short rf pulses (less than or equal to 2.5 μs) have established that at the cavity surface magnetic fields can be reached in the vicinity of the theoretical critical fields without an appreciable increase in average losses. Tests on niobium and lead cavities are reported. The pulse method seems to be best suited to study peak field properties of superconductors in the microwave band, without the limitations imposed by defects. The short pulses also seem to be more effective in decreasing the causes of field emission by rf processing. Applications of the pulsed rf superconductivity to high-gradient linear accelerators are also possible

  7. Measurement of spectral phase noise in a cryogenically cooled Ti:Sa amplifier (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagymihaly, Roland S.; Jójárt, Péter; Börzsönyi, Ádám.; Osvay, Károly

    2017-05-01

    In most of cases the drift of the carrier envelope phase (CEP) of a chirped pulse amplifier (CPA) system is determined only [1], being the relevant parameter at laser-matter interactions. The need of coherent combination of multiple amplifier channels to further increase the peak power of pulses requires interferometric precision [2]. For this purpose, the stability of the group delay of the pulses may become equally important. Further development of amplifier systems requires the investigation of phase noise contributions of individual subsystems, like amplifier stages. Spectrally resolved interferometry (SRI), which is a completely linear optical method, makes the measurement of spectral phase noise possible of basically any part of a laser system [3]. By utilizing this method, the CEP stability of water-cooled Ti:Sa based amplifiers was investigated just recently, where the effects of seed and pump energy, repetition rate, and the cooling crystal mounts were thoroughly measured [4]. We present a systematic investigation on the noise of the spectral phase, including CEP, of laser pulses amplified in a cryogenically-cooled Ti:Sa amplifier of a CPA chain. The double-pass amplifier was built in the sample arm of a compact Michelson interferometer. The Ti:Sa crystal was cooled below 30 °K. The inherent phase noise was measured for different operation modes, as at various repetition rates, and pump depletion. Noise contributions of the vacuum pumps and the cryogenic refrigerator were found to be 43 and 47 mrad, respectively. We have also identified CEP noise having thermal as well as mechanical origin. Both showed a monotonically decreasing tendency towards higher repetition rates. We found that the widths of the noise distributions are getting broader towards lower repetition rates. Spectral phase noise with and without amplification was measured, and we found no significant difference in the phase noise distributions. The mechanical vibration was also measured in

  8. Cationic polymerization of styrene by means of pulse radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egusa, S.; Arai, S.; Kira, A.; Imamura, M.; Tabata, Y.

    1977-01-01

    The radiation-induced cationic polymerization of styrene has been studied by microsecond pulse radiolysis. It was possible to observe absorption bands of a monomer cation radical (St. + ) at 630 nm and at 350 nm in a mixture of isopentane and n-butyl chloride at - 165 0 C. Three absorption bands, around 1600 nm, at 600 nm and at 450 nm, grew in parallel with the decay of St. + after pulse. The 1600-nm and 600-nm bands were assigned to an associated dimer cation radical (St 2 . + ), and the 450-nm band to a bonded dimer cation radical (St-St. + ) by comparison of absorption spectra of α-methylstyrene, 1,2-dihydronaphthalene and trans-β-methylstyrene. The kinetic behaviour of these species suggests that St-St. + and a part of St 2 . + are formed by the reaction of St. + with a styrene monomer, and the rest of St 2 . + may be formed by positive charge transfer from a solvent cation radical to an auto-associated neutral dimer of styrene. A long-lived absorption band at 340 nm grew with the decay of St-St. + . This band is considered due to a growing polymer carbonium ion. (author)

  9. Estimation of background noise level on seismic station using statistical analysis for improved analysis accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, S. M.; Hahm, I.

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the background noise level of seismic stations in order to collect the observation data of high quality and produce accurate seismic information. Determining of the background noise level was used PSD (Power Spectral Density) method by McNamara and Buland (2004) in this study. This method that used long-term data is influenced by not only innate electronic noise of sensor and a pulse wave resulting from stabilizing but also missing data and controlled by the specified frequency which is affected by the irregular signals without site characteristics. It is hard and inefficient to implement process that filters out the abnormal signal within the automated system. To solve these problems, we devised a method for extracting the data which normally distributed with 90 to 99% confidence intervals at each period. The availability of the method was verified using 62-seismic stations with broadband and short-period sensors operated by the KMA (Korea Meteorological Administration). Evaluation standards were NHNM (New High Noise Model) and NLNM (New Low Noise Model) published by the USGS (United States Geological Survey). It was designed based on the western United States. However, Korean Peninsula surrounded by the ocean on three sides has a complicated geological structure and a high population density. So, we re-designed an appropriate model in Korean peninsula by statistically combined result. The important feature is that secondary-microseism peak appeared at a higher frequency band. Acknowledgements: This research was carried out as a part of "Research for the Meteorological and Earthquake Observation Technology and Its Application" supported by the 2015 National Institute of Meteorological Research (NIMR) in the Korea Meteorological Administration.

  10. Long-pulse Supercontinuum Light Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moselund, Peter M.

    A Supercontinuum (SC) is a broad spectrum generated from a narrow light source through non-linear effects. This thesis describes SC generation based on 1064 nm ps pulses in PCF fibres. We investigate how the SC spectrum can be modified and intensity noise reduced by feeding back part of the SC...

  11. THE CRAB PULSAR AT CENTIMETER WAVELENGTHS. II. SINGLE PULSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hankins, T. H.; Eilek, J. A. [Physics Department, New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Jones, G., E-mail: thankins@aoc.nrao.edu [Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2016-12-10

    We have carried out new, high-frequency, high-time-resolution observations of the Crab pulsar. Combining these with our previous data, we characterize bright single pulses associated with the Main Pulse, both the Low-Frequency and High-Frequency Interpulses, and the two  High-Frequency Components. Our data include observations at frequencies ranging from 1 to 43 GHz with time resolutions down to a fraction of a nanosecond. We find that at least two types of emission physics are operating in this pulsar. Both Main Pulses and Low-Frequency Interpulses, up to ∼10 GHz, are characterized by nanoshot emission—overlapping clumps of narrowband nanoshots, each with its own polarization signature. High-Frequency Interpulses, between 5 and 30 GHz, are characterized by spectral band emission—linearly polarized emission containing ∼30 proportionately spaced spectral bands. We cannot say whether the longer-duration High-Frequency Components pulses are due to a scattering process, or if they come from yet another type of emission physics.

  12. Cardiovascular responses to railway noise during sleep in young and middle-aged adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassi, Patricia; Saremi, Mahnaz; Schimchowitsch, Sarah; Eschenlauer, Arnaud; Rohmer, Odile; Muzet, Alain

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of nocturnal railway noise on cardiovascular reactivity in young (25.8 +/- 2.6 years) and middle-aged (52.2 +/- 2.5 years) adults during sleep. Thirty-eight subjects slept three nights in the laboratory at 1-week interval. They were exposed to 48 randomized pass-bys of Freight, Passenger and Automotive trains either at an 8-h equivalent sound level of 40 dBA (Moderate) and 50 dBA (High) or at a silent Control night. Heart rate response (HRR), heart response amplitude (HRA), heart response latency (HRL) and finger pulse response (FPR), finger pulse amplitude (FPA) and finger pulse latency (FPL) were recorded to measure cardiovascular reactivity after each noise onset and for time-matched pseudo-noises in the control condition. Results show that Freight trains produced the highest cardiac response (increased HRR, HRA and HRL) compared to Passenger and Automotive. But the vascular response was similar whatever the type of train. Juniors exhibited an increased HRR and HRA as compared to seniors, but there was no age difference on vasoconstriction, except a shorter FPL in seniors. Noise level produced dose-dependent effects on all the cardiovascular indices. Sleep stage at noise occurrence was ineffective for cardiac response, but FPA was reduced when noise occurred during REM sleep. In conclusion, our study is in favor of an important impact of nocturnal railway noise on the cardiovascular system of sleeping subjects. In the limit of the samples studied, Freight trains are the most harmful, probably more because of their special length (duration) than because of their speed (rise time).

  13. 40 CFR 211.207 - Computation of the noise -reduction rating (NRR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Computation of the noise -reduction... of the noise -reduction rating (NRR). Calculate the NRR for hearing protective devices by... “A”-weighting relative response corrections applied to any sound levels at the indicated octave band...

  14. Controlling output pulse and prepulse in a resonant microwave pulse compressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shlapakovski, A.; Artemenko, S.; Chumerin, P.; Yushkov, Yu.

    2013-01-01

    A resonant microwave pulse compressor with a waveguide H-plane-tee-based energy extraction unit was studied in terms of its capability to produce output pulses that comprise a low-power long-duration (prepulse) and a high-power short-duration part. The application of such combined pulses with widely variable prepulse and high-power pulse power and energy ratios is of interest in the research area of electronic hardware vulnerability. The characteristics of output radiation pulses are controlled by the variation of the H-plane tee transition attenuation at the stage of microwave energy storage in the compressor cavity. Results of theoretical estimations of the parameters tuning range and experimental investigations of the prototype S-band compressor (1.5 MW, 12 ns output pulse; ∼13.2 dB gain) are presented. The achievable maximum in the prepulse power is found to be about half the power of the primary microwave source. It has been shown that the energy of the prepulse becomes comparable with that of the short-duration (nanosecond) pulse, while the power of the latter decreases insignificantly. The possible range of variation of the prepulse power and energy can be as wide as 40 dB. In the experiments, the prepulse level control within the range of ∼10 dB was demonstrated.

  15. Amplifiers Exploiting Thermal Noise Canceling: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Bruccoleri, Federico; Stroet, Peter; Nauta, Bram

    2004-01-01

    Wide-band LNAs suffer from a fundamental trade-off between noise figure NF and source impedance matching, which limits NF to values typically above 3dB. Recently, a feed-forward noise canceling technique has been proposed to break this trade-off. This paper reviews the principle of the technique and its key properties. Although the technique has been applied to wideband CMOS LNAs, it can just as well be implemented exploiting transconductance elements realized with oth...

  16. A correlation-based pulse detection technique for gamma-ray/neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faisal, Muhammad; Schiffer, Randolph T.; Flaska, Marek; Pozzi, Sara A.; Wentzloff, David D.

    2011-01-01

    We present a correlation-based detection technique that significantly improves the probability of detection for low energy pulses. We propose performing a normalized cross-correlation of the incoming pulse data to a predefined pulse template, and using a threshold correlation value to trigger the detection of a pulse. This technique improves the detector sensitivity by amplifying the signal component of incoming pulse data and rejecting noise. Simulation results for various different templates are presented. Finally, the performance of the correlation-based detection technique is compared to the current state-of-the-art techniques.

  17. Evaluation of wind noise in passenger car compartment in consideration of auditory masking and sound localization; Chokaku masking to hoko chikaku wo koryoshita kazekirion hyoka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshino, H. [Toyota Central Research and Development Labs., Inc., Aichi (Japan); Kato, H. [Toyota Motor Corp., Aichi (Japan)

    1998-05-01

    Discussed is a method for evaluating wind noise in passenger car compartment based on human auditory characteristics. In the study, noise in the compartment of a passenger car travelling at a constant speed is collected by use of a dummy head, and the collected noise is analyzed in view of the masking effect, directional sensation produced by binaural hearing, etc. A masked spectrum of noise in the compartment of a 6-cylinder vehicle travelling at 120km/h is analyzed, and it is found that some frequency bands, especially the band centering on 300Hz, are masked by a loud noise component falling in a low frequency band of 180Hz or lower. By use of masked spectrum analysis, the level of noise that is actually audible to human ears can be calculated. The noise level thus determined by masked spectrum analysis and the noise direction determined by a binaural signal processing model are examined, and then it is found that the noise direction is clearly determined when the noise belongs in a 450Hz band or higher where wind noise prevails. On the bases of the above-mentioned results and the directional sensation produced by binaural hearing, a `binaural wind noise evaluation method` is compiled. 20 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Noise measurements during high-frequency oscillatory and conventional mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berens, R J; Weigle, C G

    1995-10-01

    To evaluate the noise levels with high-frequency oscillatory ventilation and conventional mechanical ventilation. An observational, prospective study. Pediatric intensive care unit. The caretakers and environment of the pediatric intensive care unit. High-frequency oscillatory and conventional mechanical ventilation. Caretakers evaluated noise using a visual analog scale. Noise was measured with a decibel meter and an octave band frequency filter. There was twice as much noise perceived by the caretakers and as measured on the decibel A scale. All measures showed significantly greater noise, especially at low frequencies, with high-frequency oscillatory ventilation. High-frequency oscillatory ventilation exposes the patient to twice as much noise as does the use of conventional mechanical ventilation.

  19. Detecting modulated signals in modulated noise: (II) neural thresholds in the songbird forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bee, Mark A; Buschermöhle, Michael; Klump, Georg M

    2007-10-01

    Sounds in the real world fluctuate in amplitude. The vertebrate auditory system exploits patterns of amplitude fluctuations to improve signal detection in noise. One experimental paradigm demonstrating these general effects has been used in psychophysical studies of 'comodulation detection difference' (CDD). The CDD effect refers to the fact that thresholds for detecting a modulated, narrowband noise signal are lower when the envelopes of flanking bands of modulated noise are comodulated with each other, but fluctuate independently of the signal compared with conditions in which the envelopes of the signal and flanking bands are all comodulated. Here, we report results from a study of the neural correlates of CDD in European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris). We manipulated: (i) the envelope correlations between a narrowband noise signal and a masker comprised of six flanking bands of noise; (ii) the signal onset delay relative to masker onset; (iii) signal duration; and (iv) masker spectrum level. Masked detection thresholds were determined from neural responses using signal detection theory. Across conditions, the magnitude of neural CDD ranged between 2 and 8 dB, which is similar to that reported in a companion psychophysical study of starlings [U. Langemann & G.M. Klump (2007) Eur. J. Neurosci., 26, 1969-1978]. We found little evidence to suggest that neural CDD resulted from the across-channel processing of auditory grouping cues related to common envelope fluctuations and synchronous onsets between the signal and flanking bands. We discuss a within-channel model of peripheral processing that explains many of our results.

  20. Spatio-temporal chaos and thermal noise in Josephson junction series arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez, D.; Cerdeira, H.A.

    1995-01-01

    We study underdamped Josephson junction series arrays that are globally coupled through a resistive shunting load and driven by an rf bias current. We find that they can be an experimental realization of many phenomena currently studied in globally coupled logistic map. Depending on the bias current the array can show Shapiro steps but also spatio-temporal chaos or ''turbulence'' in the IV characteristics. In the turbulent phase there is a saturation of the broad band noise for a large number of junctions. This corresponds to a break down of the law of large numbers as seen in globally coupled maps. We study this phenomenon as a function of thermal noise. We find that when increasing the temperature the broad band noise decreases. (author). 8 refs, 1 fig

  1. Broad-band Gausssian noise is most effective in improving motor performance and is most pleasant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos eTrenado

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Modern attempts to improve human performance focus on stochastic resonance (SR. SR is a phenomenon in nonlinear systems characterized by a response increase of the system induced by a particular level of input noise. Recently, we reported that an optimum level of 0-15 Hz Gaussian noise applied to the human index finger improved static isometric force compensation. A possible explanation was a better sensorimotor integration caused by increase in sensitivity of peripheral receptors and/or of internal SR. The present study in 10 subjects compares SR effects in the performance of the same motor task and on pleasantness, by applying three Gaussian noises chosen on the sensitivity of the fingertip receptors (0-15 Hz mostly for Merkel receptors, 250-300 Hz for Pacini corpuscules and 0-300 Hz for all. We document that only the 0-300 Hz noise induced SR effect during the transitory phase of the task. In contrast, the motor performance was improved during the stationary phase for all three noise frequency bandwidths. This improvement was stronger for 0-300 Hz and 250-300 Hz than for 0-15 Hz noise. Further, we found higher degree of pleasantness for 0-300 Hz and 250-300 Hz noise bandwidths than for 0-15 Hz. Thus, we show that the most appropriate Gaussian noise that could be used in haptic gloves is the 0-300 Hz, as it improved motor performance during both stationary and transitory phases. In addition, this noise had the highest degree of pleasantness and thus reveals that the glabrous skin can also forward pleasant sensations. These new findings provide worthy information for neurorehabilitation.

  2. Characteristics of Broadband Seismic Noise in Taiwan and Neighboring Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Wei; Rau, Ruey-Juin

    2017-04-01

    We used seismic waveform data from 115 broad-band stations of BATS (Institute of Earth Science, Academia Sinica) and Central Weather Bureau Seismic Network from 2012 to 2016 for noise-level mapping in Taiwan and neighboring islands. We computed Power Spectral Density (PSD) for each station and analyzed long-term variance of microseism energy and polarizations of noise for severe weather events. The island of Taiwan is surrounded by ocean and the Central Range which has the highest peak Jade Mountain at 3,952 meters height occupies more than 66% of the island and departs it into the east and west coasts. The geographic settings then result in the high population density in the western plain and northern Taiwan. The dominant noise source in the microseism band (periods from 4-20 seconds) is the coupling between the near-coast ocean and sea floor which produces the high noise of averaging -130 dB along the west coastal area. In the eastern volcanic-arc coastal areas, the noise level is about 7% smaller than the west coast due to its deeper offshore water depth. As for the shorter periods (0.1-0.25 seconds) band, the so-called culture noise, an anthropic activity variance with the highest -103 dB can be identified in the metropolitan areas, such as the Taipei city and the noise level in the Central Range area is averaging -138 dB. Moreover, the noise also shows a daily and temporal evolution mainly related to the traffic effect. Furthermore, we determined the noise level for the entire island of Taiwan during 26-28 September, 2016, when the typhoon Megi hit the island and retrieved the enhancement of secondary microseism energy for each stations. Typhoon Megi landed in eastern and central Taiwan and reached the maximum wind speed of 45m/s in the surrounded eyewall. The Central Range, as a barrier, decreased the wind speed in southern Taiwan making an enhancement less than 10 dB, while in northern Taiwan where the direction the typhoon headed to, can reach more than 35

  3. Effects of noise in excitable systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindner, B.; Garcia-Ojalvo, J.; Neiman, A.; Schimansky-Geier, L.

    2004-01-01

    We review the behavior of theoretical models of excitable systems driven by Gaussian white noise. We focus mainly on those general properties of such systems that are due to noise, and present several applications of our findings in biophysics and lasers. As prototypes of excitable stochastic dynamics we consider the FitzHugh-Nagumo and the leaky integrate-and-fire model, as well as cellular automata and phase models. In these systems, taken as individual units or as networks of globally or locally coupled elements, we study various phenomena due to noise, such as noise-induced oscillations, stochastic resonance, stochastic synchronization, noise-induced phase transitions and noise-induced pulse and spiral dynamics. Our approach is based on stochastic differential equations and their corresponding Fokker-Planck equations, treated by both analytical calculations and/or numerical simulations. We calculate and/or measure the rate and diffusion coefficient of the excitation process, as well as spectral quantities like power spectra and degree of coherence. Combined with a multiparametric bifurcation analysis of the corresponding cumulant equations, these approaches provide a comprehensive picture of the multifaceted dynamical behaviour of noisy excitable systems

  4. Simultaneous exposure to ethyl benzene and noise : synergistic effects on outer hair cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cappaert, N.L.M.; Klis, S.F.L.; Muijser, H.; Kulig, B.M.; Smoorenburg, G.F.

    2001-01-01

    The effects on hearing of simultaneous exposure to the ototoxic organic solvent ethyl benzene and broad-band noise were evaluated in rats. The effects of three ethyl benzene concentrations (0, 300 or 400 ppm) and three noise levels (95 or 105 dBlin SPL or background noise at 65 dBlin SPL) and all

  5. Uncertainty In Measuring Noise Parameters Of a Communication Receiver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korcz, Karol; Palczynska, Beata; Spiralski, Ludwik

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents the method of assessing uncertainty in measuring the usable sensitivity Es of communication receiver. The influence of partial uncertainties of measuring the noise factor F and the energy pass band of the receiver Δf on the combined standard uncertainty level is analyzed. The method to assess the uncertainty in measuring the noise factor on the basis of the systematic component of uncertainty, assuming that the main source of measurement uncertainty is the hardware of the measuring system, is proposed. The assessment of uncertainty in measuring the pass band of the receiver is determined with the assumption that input quantities of the measurement equation are not correlated. They are successive, discrete values of the spectral power density of the noise on the output of receiver. The results of the analyses of particular uncertainties components of measuring the sensitivity, which were carried out for a typical communication receiver, are presented

  6. Poisson–Gaussian Noise Analysis and Estimation for Low-Dose X-ray Images in the NSCT Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangyoon; Lee, Min Seok; Kang, Moon Gi

    2018-01-01

    The noise distribution of images obtained by X-ray sensors in low-dosage situations can be analyzed using the Poisson and Gaussian mixture model. Multiscale conversion is one of the most popular noise reduction methods used in recent years. Estimation of the noise distribution of each subband in the multiscale domain is the most important factor in performing noise reduction, with non-subsampled contourlet transform (NSCT) representing an effective method for scale and direction decomposition. In this study, we use artificially generated noise to analyze and estimate the Poisson–Gaussian noise of low-dose X-ray images in the NSCT domain. The noise distribution of the subband coefficients is analyzed using the noiseless low-band coefficients and the variance of the noisy subband coefficients. The noise-after-transform also follows a Poisson–Gaussian distribution, and the relationship between the noise parameters of the subband and the full-band image is identified. We then analyze noise of actual images to validate the theoretical analysis. Comparison of the proposed noise estimation method with an existing noise reduction method confirms that the proposed method outperforms traditional methods. PMID:29596335

  7. Poisson-Gaussian Noise Analysis and Estimation for Low-Dose X-ray Images in the NSCT Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangyoon; Lee, Min Seok; Kang, Moon Gi

    2018-03-29

    The noise distribution of images obtained by X-ray sensors in low-dosage situations can be analyzed using the Poisson and Gaussian mixture model. Multiscale conversion is one of the most popular noise reduction methods used in recent years. Estimation of the noise distribution of each subband in the multiscale domain is the most important factor in performing noise reduction, with non-subsampled contourlet transform (NSCT) representing an effective method for scale and direction decomposition. In this study, we use artificially generated noise to analyze and estimate the Poisson-Gaussian noise of low-dose X-ray images in the NSCT domain. The noise distribution of the subband coefficients is analyzed using the noiseless low-band coefficients and the variance of the noisy subband coefficients. The noise-after-transform also follows a Poisson-Gaussian distribution, and the relationship between the noise parameters of the subband and the full-band image is identified. We then analyze noise of actual images to validate the theoretical analysis. Comparison of the proposed noise estimation method with an existing noise reduction method confirms that the proposed method outperforms traditional methods.

  8. A comparative study of noise in supercontinuum light sources for ultra-high resolution optical coherence tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maria J., Sanjuan-Ferrer,; Bravo Gonzalo, Ivan; Bondu, Magalie

    2017-01-01

    Supercontinuum (SC) light is a well-established technology, which finds applications in several domains ranging from chemistry to material science and imaging systems [1-2]. More specifically, its ultra-wide optical bandwidth and high average power make it an ideal tool for Optical Coherence...... Tomography (OCT). Over the last 5 years, numerous examples have demonstrated its high potential [3-4] in this context. However, SC light sources present pulse-to-pulse intensity variation that can limit the performance of any OCT system [5] by degrading their signal to noise ratio (SNR). To this goal, we...... have studied and compared the noise of several SC light sources and evaluated how their noise properties affect the performance of Ultra-High Resolution OCT (UHR-OCT) at 1300 nm. We have measured several SC light sources with different parameters (pulse length, energy, seed repetition rate, etc.). We...

  9. Debuncher Momentum Cooling Systems Signal to Noise Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquinelli, Ralph J.; /Fermilab

    2001-12-18

    The Debuncher Momentum cooling systems were carefully measured for signal to noise. It was observed that cooling performance was not optimum. Closer inspection shows that the installed front-end bandpass filters are wider than the pickup response. (The original filters were specified to be wider so that none of the available bandwidth would be clipped.) The end result is excess noise is amplified and passed onto the kickers unimpeded, hence, reducing the achievable system gain. From this data, new filters should be designed to improve performance. New system bandwidths are specified on the data figures. Also included are the transfer function measurements that clearly show adjacent band response. In band 4 upper, the adjacent lobes are strong and out of phase. This is also degrading the system performance. The correlation between spectrum analyzer signal to noise and network analyzer system transfer functions is very strong. The table below has a calculation of expected improvement of front noise reduction by means of building new front-end bandpass filters. The calculation is based on a flat input noise spectrum and is a linear estimation of improvement. The listed 3dB bandwidths of the original filters are from measured data. The expected bandwidth is taken from the linear spectrum analyzer plots and is closer to a 10 dB bandwidth making the percentage improvement conservative. The signal to noise measurements are taken with circulating pbars in the Debuncher. One cooling system was measured at a time with all others off. Beam currents are below ten microamperes.

  10. Debuncher Momentum Cooling Systems Signal to Noise Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasquinelli, Ralph J.

    2001-01-01

    The Debuncher Momentum cooling systems were carefully measured for signal to noise. It was observed that cooling performance was not optimum. Closer inspection shows that the installed front-end bandpass filters are wider than the pickup response. (The original filters were specified to be wider so that none of the available bandwidth would be clipped.) The end result is excess noise is amplified and passed onto the kickers unimpeded, hence, reducing the achievable system gain. From this data, new filters should be designed to improve performance. New system bandwidths are specified on the data figures. Also included are the transfer function measurements that clearly show adjacent band response. In band 4 upper, the adjacent lobes are strong and out of phase. This is also degrading the system performance. The correlation between spectrum analyzer signal to noise and network analyzer system transfer functions is very strong. The table below has a calculation of expected improvement of front noise reduction by means of building new front-end bandpass filters. The calculation is based on a flat input noise spectrum and is a linear estimation of improvement. The listed 3dB bandwidths of the original filters are from measured data. The expected bandwidth is taken from the linear spectrum analyzer plots and is closer to a 10 dB bandwidth making the percentage improvement conservative. The signal to noise measurements are taken with circulating pbars in the Debuncher. One cooling system was measured at a time with all others off. Beam currents are below ten microamperes.

  11. Software emulator of nuclear pulse generation with different pulse shapes and pile-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pechousek, Jiri, E-mail: jiri.pechousek@upol.cz [Department of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Science, Palacky University, 17. listopadu 1192/12, 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Konecny, Daniel [Department of Optics, Faculty of Science, Palacky University, 17. listopadu 1192/12, 77 146 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Novak, Petr; Kouril, Lukas; Kohout, Pavel [Department of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Science, Palacky University, 17. listopadu 1192/12, 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Celiktas, Cuneyt [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Ege University, Bornova, Izmir (Turkey); Vujtek, Milan [Department of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Science, Palacky University, 17. listopadu 1192/12, 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic)

    2016-08-21

    The optimal detection of output signals from nuclear counting devices represents one of the key physical factors that govern accuracy and experimental reproducibility. In this context, the fine calibration of the detector under diverse experimental scenarios, although time costly, is necessary. However this process can be rendered easier with the use of systems that work in lieu of emulators. In this report we describe an innovative programmable pulse generator device capable to emulate the scintillation detector signals, in a way to mimic the detector performances under a variety of experimental conditions. The emulator generates a defined number of pulses, with a given shape and amplitude in the form of a sampled detector signal. The emulator output is then used off-line by a spectrometric system in order to set up its optimal performance. Three types of pulse shapes are produced by our device, with the possibility to add noise and pulse pile-up effects into the signal. The efficiency of the pulse detection, pile-up rejection and/or correction, together with the dead-time of the system, are therein analyzed through the use of some specific algorithms for pulse processing, and the results obtained validate the beneficial use of emulators for the accurate calibration process of spectrometric systems.

  12. EFFECTS OF INTERMITTENT EMISSION: NOISE INVENTORY FOR THE SCINTILLATING PULSAR B0834+06

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwinn, C. R.; Johnson, M. D.; Smirnova, T. V.; Stinebring, D. R.

    2011-01-01

    We compare signal and noise for observations of the scintillating pulsar B0834+06, using very long baseline interferometry and a single-dish spectrometer. Comparisons between instruments and with models suggest that amplitude variations of the pulsar strongly affect the amount and distribution of self-noise. We show that noise follows a quadratic polynomial with flux density, in spectral observations. Constant coefficients, indicative of background noise, agree well with expectation; whereas second-order coefficients, indicative of self-noise, are ∼3 times values expected for a pulsar with constant on-pulse flux density. We show that variations in flux density during the 10 s integration accounts for the discrepancy. In the secondary spectrum, ∼97% of spectral power lies within the pulsar's typical scintillation bandwidth and timescale; an extended scintillation arc contains ∼3%. For a pulsar with constant on-pulse flux density, noise in the dynamic spectrum will appear as a uniformly distributed background in the secondary spectrum. We find that this uniform noise background contains 95% of noise in the dynamic spectrum for interferometric observations; but only 35% of noise in the dynamic spectrum for single-dish observations. Receiver and sky dominate noise for our interferometric observations, whereas self-noise dominates for single-dish. We suggest that intermittent emission by the pulsar, on timescales <300 μs, concentrates self-noise near the origin in the secondary spectrum, by correlating noise over the dynamic spectrum. We suggest that intermittency sets fundamental limits on pulsar astrometry or timing. Accounting of noise may provide means for detection of intermittent sources, when effects of propagation are unknown or impractical to invert.

  13. Ambient noise levels and characterization in Aegean region, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevim, Fatih; Zor, Ekrem; Açıkgöz, Cem; Tarancıoğlu, Adil

    2018-03-01

    We assessed the ambient noise level in the Aegean region and analyzed its diurnal variation and its relation to the earthquake detection capability of the Aegean Region Seismic Network (ARSN). We prepared probability density functions (PDFs) for 19 broadband stations in the Aegean region operated by the Earth and Marine Sciences Institute (EMSI) of the Marmara Research Center (MRC) of the Turkish Scientific Research Council (TÜBİTAK). The power spectral densities (PSDs) used to construct PDFs for each station were computed for the periods between 0.02 and 180 s. In addition, we generated noise map of the Aegean region for different periods using the PDFs to assess the origin of the noise. We analyzed earthquake activity in the region and found that there are more local events recorded at night than during the day for each station. This difference is strongly related to diurnal variation of background noise level for the period range mostly covering the frequency range for the local events. We observed daytime noise level 15 to 20 dB higher than that at the nighttime in high frequencies for almost all stations caused by its proximity to settled areas and roads. Additionally, we observed a splitting peak within the Double Frequency (DF) microseism band; it showed a clear noise increase around the short period DF band at all the stations, decreasing inland. This peak may be related to sea waves locally generated in the Aegean Sea. We also identified a prominent increase related to marble saw companies in some stations' noise PDFs.

  14. An examination of the effects of various noise on physiological sensibility responses by using human EEG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, W. H.; Lee, J. K.; Son, T. Y.; Hwang, S. H.; Choi, H.; Lee, M. S.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated human stress levels based on electroencephalogram (EEG) data and carried out a subjective evaluation analysis about noise. Visual information is very important for finding human's emotional state. And relatively more previous works have been done than those using auditory stimulus. Since there are fewer previous works, we thought that using auditory stimulus is good choice for our study. Twelve human subjects were exposed to classic piano, ocean wave, army alarm, ambulance, and mosquito noises. We used two groups of comfortable and uncomfortable noises are to see the difference between the definitely different two groups to confirm usefulness of using this setting of experiment. EEG data were collected during the experimental session. The subjects were tested in a soundproof chamber and asked to minimize blinking, head movement, and swallowing during the experiment. The total time of the noise experiment included the time of the relaxation phase, during which the subjects relaxed in silence for 10 minutes. The relaxation phase was followed by a 20 -second noise exposure. The alpha band activities of the subjects were significantly decreased for the ambulance and mosquito noises, as it compared to the classic piano and ocean wave noises. The alpha band activities of the subjects decreased by 12.8 ± 2.3% for the ocean wave noise, decreased by 32.0 ± 5.4% for the army alarm noise, decreased by 34.5 ± 6.7% for the ambulance noise and decreased by 58.3 ± 9.1% for the mosquito noise compared to that of classic piano. On the other hand, their beta band activities were significantly increased for the ambulance and mosquito noises as it compared to classic piano and ocean wave. The beta band activities of the subjects increased by 7.9 ± 1.7% for the ocean wave noise, increased by 20.6 ± 5.3% for the army alarm noise, increased by 48.0 ± 7.5% for the ambulance noise and increased by 61.9 ± 11.2% for the mosquito noise, as it is compared to

  15. An examination of the effects of various noise on physiological sensibility responses by using human EEG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, W. H.; Lee, J. K.; Son, T. Y.; Hwang, S. H.; Choi, H. [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, M. S. [Hyundai Motor Company, Hwaseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    This study investigated human stress levels based on electroencephalogram (EEG) data and carried out a subjective evaluation analysis about noise. Visual information is very important for finding human's emotional state. And relatively more previous works have been done than those using auditory stimulus. Since there are fewer previous works, we thought that using auditory stimulus is good choice for our study. Twelve human subjects were exposed to classic piano, ocean wave, army alarm, ambulance, and mosquito noises. We used two groups of comfortable and uncomfortable noises are to see the difference between the definitely different two groups to confirm usefulness of using this setting of experiment. EEG data were collected during the experimental session. The subjects were tested in a soundproof chamber and asked to minimize blinking, head movement, and swallowing during the experiment. The total time of the noise experiment included the time of the relaxation phase, during which the subjects relaxed in silence for 10 minutes. The relaxation phase was followed by a 20 -second noise exposure. The alpha band activities of the subjects were significantly decreased for the ambulance and mosquito noises, as it compared to the classic piano and ocean wave noises. The alpha band activities of the subjects decreased by 12.8 ± 2.3% for the ocean wave noise, decreased by 32.0 ± 5.4% for the army alarm noise, decreased by 34.5 ± 6.7% for the ambulance noise and decreased by 58.3 ± 9.1% for the mosquito noise compared to that of classic piano. On the other hand, their beta band activities were significantly increased for the ambulance and mosquito noises as it compared to classic piano and ocean wave. The beta band activities of the subjects increased by 7.9 ± 1.7% for the ocean wave noise, increased by 20.6 ± 5.3% for the army alarm noise, increased by 48.0 ± 7.5% for the ambulance noise and increased by 61.9 ± 11.2% for the mosquito noise, as it is compared

  16. Use of active noise cancellation devices in caregivers in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, S; Weigle, C G; Cheng, E Y; Toohill, R; Berens, R J

    2000-04-01

    Recent development of noise cancellation devices may offer relief from noise in the intensive care unit environment. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of noise cancellation devices on subjective hearing assessment by caregivers in the intensive care units. Randomized, double-blind. Adult medical intensive care unit and pediatric intensive care unit of a teaching hospital. Caregivers of patients, including nurses, parents, respiratory therapists, and nursing assistants from a medical intensive care unit and pediatric intensive care, were enrolled in the study. Each participant was asked to wear the headphones, functional or nonfunctional noise cancellation devices, for a minimum of 30 mins. Subjective ambient noise level was assessed on a 10-point visual analog scale (VAS) before and during headphone use by each participant. Headphone comfort and the preference of the caregiver to wear the headphone were also evaluated on a 10-point VAS. Simultaneously, objective measurement of noise was done with a sound level meter using the decibel-A scale and at each of nine octave bands at each bedspace. The functional headphones significantly reduced the subjective assessment of noise by 2 (out of 10) VAS points (p noise profiles, based on decibel-A and octave band assessments. Noise cancellation devices improve subjective assessment of noise in caretakers. The benefit of these devices on hearing loss needs further evaluation in caregivers and critically ill patients.

  17. MMSE-based algorithm for joint signal detection, channel and noise variance estimation for OFDM systems

    CERN Document Server

    Savaux, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    This book presents an algorithm for the detection of an orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signal in a cognitive radio context by means of a joint and iterative channel and noise estimation technique. Based on the minimum mean square criterion, it performs an accurate detection of a user in a frequency band, by achieving a quasi-optimal channel and noise variance estimation if the signal is present, and by estimating the noise level in the band if the signal is absent. Organized into three chapters, the first chapter provides the background against which the system model is pr

  18. Noise study of all-normal dispersion supercontinuum sources for potential application in optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo, I. B.; Engelsholm, R. D.; Bang, O.

    2018-03-01

    Commercially available silica-fiber-based and ultra-broadband supercontinuum (SC) sources are typically generated by pumping close to the zero-dispersion wavelength (ZDW) of a photonic crystal fiber (PCF), using high-power picosecond or nanosecond laser pulses. Despite the extremely broad bandwidths, such sources are characterized by large intensity fluctuations, limiting their performance for applications in imaging such as optical coherence tomography (OCT). An approach to eliminate the influence of noise sensitive effects is to use a so-called all-normal dispersion (ANDi) fiber, in which the dispersion is normal for all the wavelengths of interest. Pumping these types of fibers with short enough femtosecond pulses allows to suppress stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), which is known to be as noisy process as modulation instability (MI), and coherent SC is generated through self-phase modulation (SPM) and optical wave breaking (OWB). In this study, we show the importance of the pump laser and fiber parameters in the design of low-noise ANDi based SC sources, for application in OCT. We numerically investigate the pulse-to-pulse fluctuations of the SC, calculating the relative intensity noise (RIN) as a function of the pump pulse duration and fiber length. Furthermore, we experimentally demonstrate the role of the fiber length on the RIN of the ANDi SC, validating the results calculated numerically. In the end, we compare the RIN of a commercial SC source based on MI and the ANDi SC source developed here, which shows better noise performance when it is carefully designed.

  19. Thermal Noise Canceling in LNAs: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Nauta, Bram; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Bruccoleri, Frederico

    2004-01-01

    Most wide-band amplifiers suffer from a fundamental trade-off between noise figure NF and source impedance matching, which limits NF to values typically above 3dB. Recently, a feed-forward noise canceling technique has been proposed to break this trade-off. This paper reviews the principle of the technique and its key properties. Although the technique has been applied to wideband CMOS LNAs, it can just as well be implemented exploiting transconductance elements realized with other types of t...

  20. Binary rf pulse compression experiment at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavine, T.L.; Spalek, G.; Farkas, Z.D.; Menegat, A.; Miller, R.H.; Nantista, C.; Wilson, P.B.

    1990-06-01

    Using rf pulse compression it will be possible to boost the 50- to 100-MW output expected from high-power microwave tubes operating in the 10- to 20-GHz frequency range, to the 300- to 1000-MW level required by the next generation of high-gradient linacs for linear for linear colliders. A high-power X-band three-stage binary rf pulse compressor has been implemented and operated at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). In each of three successive stages, the rf pulse-length is compressed by half, and the peak power is approximately doubled. The experimental results presented here have been obtained at low-power (1-kW) and high-power (15-MW) input levels in initial testing with a TWT and a klystron. Rf pulses initially 770 nsec long have been compressed to 60 nsec. Peak power gains of 1.8 per stage, and 5.5 for three stages, have been measured. This corresponds to a peak power compression efficiency of about 90% per stage, or about 70% for three stages, consistent with the individual component losses. The principle of operation of a binary pulse compressor (BPC) is described in detail elsewhere. We recently have implemented and operated at SLAC a high-power (high-vacuum) three-stage X-band BPC. First results from the high-power three-stage BPC experiment are reported here

  1. Barkhausen noise measurements give direct observation of magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy in ferromagnetic polycrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espina-Hernández, J H; Pérez-Benítez, J A; Caleyo, F; Hallen, J M; Baudin, T; Helbert, A L

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents experimental evidence of the capability of Barkhausen noise measurements to estimate the angular dependence of the average magnetocrystalline energy in soft magnetic polycrystalline materials. Three different API 5L steel samples, all obtained from out-of-service pipelines, were investigated using crystallographic texture and Barkhausen noise measurements. The angular dependence of the rms voltage of the Barkhausen signal was determined in each sample for the time band corresponding to the saturation-to-remanence part of the hysteresis loop where irreversible domain rotation occurs. For each angular position, the rms voltage of the Barkhausen noise signal in this time band was interpreted as a direct measure of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy of the polycrystal in the corresponding direction. A strong correlation between the angular dependence of both the rms voltage of the Barkhausen signal in the time band of interest and the average magnetocrystalline energy obtained from crystallographic texture measurements was found experimentally. (fast track communication)

  2. Quantum theory of NMR adiabatic pulses and their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ke, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Recently explosive developments of in vivo NMR spectroscopy (NMRS) and imaging (NMRI) in biological and medical sciences have resulted in the establishment of NMR as one of the most advanced major technique in life sciences. These developments have created huge demands for a variety of NMR adiabatic pulses with play a very important role in NMR experiments in vivo. In order to develop new NMR adiabatic pulses, a rigorous systematical quantum theory for this kind of pulses is greatly needed. Providing such a theory is one of the important goals of this dissertation. Quantum density matrix theory and product operator method have been used throughout this dissertation. Another goal, which is the major goal of this thesis research, is to use the quantum theory as a guide to develop new NMR adiabatic pulses and their applications. To fill this goal, a technique to construct a new type of adiabatic pulses, narrow band selective adiabatic pulses, has been invented, which is described through the example of constructing an adiabatic DANTE inversion pulse. This new adiabatic pulse is the first narrow band selective adiabatic pulses: Adiabatic homonuclear and heteronuclear spectral editing sequences. Unique to the first pulse sequence is a B 1 -field filter which is built by using two non-refocusing adiabatic full passage pulses to refocus the wanted signal and dephase unwanted signals. This extra filter greatly enhance the editing efficiency. Unlike commonly used heteronuclear spectral editing sequences which depend on the polarization transfer or spectral subtraction by phase cycling techniques, the second pulse sequences accomplishes the editing of heteronuclear J-coupled signals based on the fact that this sequence is transparent to the uncoupled spins and is equivalent a 90 degrees excitation pulse to the heteronuclear J-coupled spins. Experimental results have confirmed the ability of spectral editing with these two new sequences

  3. Analysis of Femtosecond Timing Noise and Stability in Microwave Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    To probe chemical dynamics, X-ray pump-probe experiments trigger a change in a sample with an optical laser pulse, followed by an X-ray probe. At the Linac Coherent Light Source, LCLS, timing differences between the optical pulse and x-ray probe have been observed with an accuracy as low as 50 femtoseconds. This sets a lower bound on the number of frames one can arrange over a time scale to recreate a 'movie' of the chemical reaction. The timing system is based on phase measurements from signals corresponding to the two laser pulses; these measurements are done by using a double-balanced mixer for detection. To increase the accuracy of the system, this paper studies parameters affecting phase detection systems based on mixers, such as signal input power, noise levels, temperature drift, and the effect these parameters have on components such as the mixers, splitters, amplifiers, and phase shifters. Noise data taken with a spectrum analyzer show that splitters based on ferrite cores perform with less noise than strip-line splitters. The data also shows that noise in specific mixers does not correspond with the changes in sensitivity per input power level. Temperature drift is seen to exist on a scale between 1 and 27 fs/ o C for all of the components tested. Results show that any components using more metallic conductor tend to exhibit more noise as well as more temperature drift. The scale of these effects is large enough that specific care should be given when choosing components and designing the housing of high precision microwave mixing systems for use in detection systems such as the LCLS. With these improvements, the timing accuracy can be improved to lower than currently possible.

  4. Gamma noise in CCDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autio, G.W.; Bafico, M.A.

    1975-01-01

    The overall results indicated that charge coupled devices (CCD) used to read out detector signals or as signal processing electronics in future space sensors can operate real time in a high ionising radiation environment. Future work should be directed towards hardening the CCDs during the fabrication processes in order that they may survive total radiation doses up to 1 x 10 6 Rad (Si) and toward investigating ionising radiation effects in CCDs that are coupled with i.r. detectors. CCD devices employed to read out detector signals can be made capable of handling radiation induced excess noise and high false alarm rates generated in the detector elements. Ionising radiation effects induced in the detectors are expected to dominate those generated directly in the CCD readout structure; how much depends on the relative size of the detector. The low frequency γ induced excess noise measured in the CCD/MOSFET structure could cause problems for space sensors required to operate in real time only at the very high γ flux levels. Discrimination and circumvention techniques at the CCD ERO output are possible. γ pulses measured at the CCD ERO output were distributed in amplitude and exhibited variable pulse widths (some were many times a clock period). (author)

  5. Noise performance of the multiwavelength sub/millimeter inductance camera (MUSIC) detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, S. R.

    2015-01-01

    MUSIC is a multi-band imaging camera that employs 2304 Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) in 576 spatial pixels to cover a 14 arc-minute field of view, with each pixel simultaneously sensitive to 4 bands centered at 0.87, 1.04, 1.33, and 1.98 mm. In April 2012 the MUSIC instrument was commissioned at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory with a subset of the full focal plane. We examine the noise present in the detector timestreams during observations taken in the first year of operation. We find that fluctuations in atmospheric emission dominate at long timescales (< 0.5 Hz), and fluctuations in the amplitude and phase of the probe signal due to readout electronics contribute significant 1/f-type noise at shorter timescales. We describe a method to remove the amplitude, phase, and atmospheric noise using the fact that they are correlated among carrier tones. After removal, the complex signal is decomposed, or projected, into dissipation and frequency components. White noise from the cryogenic HEMT amplifier dominates in the dissipation component. An excess noise is observed in the frequency component that is likely due to fluctuations in two-level system (TLS) defects in the device substrate. We compare the amplitude of the TLS noise with previous measurements

  6. Design and evaluation of modelocked semiconductor lasers for low noise and high stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yvind, Kresten; Larsson, David; Christiansen, Lotte Jin

    2005-01-01

    We present work on design of monolithic mode-locked semiconductor lasers with focus on the gain medium. The use of highly inverted quantum wells in a low-loss waveguide enables both low quantum noise, low-chirped pulses and a large stability region. Broadband noise measurements are performed...

  7. New fat suppression RF pulse with shorter duration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Kojiro; Ukai, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01

    The fat suppression radio frequency pulse currently employed for MRI, which selectively saturates the frequency of the fat, has the narrow-band frequency characteristics. Therefore, the application duration for the pulse employed tends to be prolonged. In the present study, we designed a new fat suppression radiofrequency (RF) pulse using the Laguerre function in order to shorten the duration for fat suppression RF pulse and conducted an evaluation with the clinical equipment. The length of the RF pulse that we created allowed to reduce the duration by 47.3% compared with that employed for the clinical equipment. In addition, in the MR imaging evaluation, the new pulse was confirmed to have the fat suppression effect equivalent to that employed for the clinical equipment. (author)

  8. Ultra-low noise supercontinuum source for ultra-high resolution optical coherence tomography at 1300 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo, I. B.; Maria, M.; Engelsholm, R. D.; Feuchter, T.; Leick, L.; Moselund, P. M.; Podoleanu, A.; Bang, O.

    2018-02-01

    Supercontinuum (SC) sources are of great interest for many applications due to their ultra-broad optical bandwidth, good beam quality and high power spectral density [1]. In particular, the high average power over large bandwidths makes SC light sources excellent candidates for ultra-high resolution optical coherence tomography (UHR-OCT) [2-5]. However, conventional SC sources suffer from high pulse-to-pulse intensity fluctuations as a result of the noise-sensitive nonlinear effects involved in the SC generation process [6-9]. This intensity noise from the SC source can limit the performance of OCT, resulting in a reduced signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) [10-12]. Much work has been done to reduce the noise of the SC sources for instance with fiber tapers [7,8] or increasing the repetition rate of the pump laser for averaging in the spectrometer [10,12]. An alternative approach is to use all-normal dispersion (ANDi) fibers [13,14] to generate SC light from well-known coherent nonlinear processes [15-17]. In fact, reduction of SC noise using ANDi fibers compared to anomalous dispersion SC pumped by sub-picosecond pulses has been recently demonstrated [18], but a cladding mode was used to stabilize the ANDi SC. In this work, we characterize the noise performance of a femtosecond pumped ANDi based SC and a commercial SC source in an UHR-OCT system at 1300 nm. We show that the ANDi based SC presents exceptional noise properties compared to a commercial source. An improvement of 5 dB in SNR is measured in the UHR-OCT system, and the noise behavior resembles that of a superluminiscent diode. This preliminary study is a step forward towards development of an ultra-low noise SC source at 1300 nm for ultra-high resolution OCT.

  9. CTS and CZTS for solar cells made by pulsed laser deposition and pulsed electron deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ettlinger, Rebecca Bolt

    This thesis concerns the deposition of thin films for solar cells using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and pulsed electron deposition (PED). The aim was to deposit copper tin sulfide (CTS) and zinc sulfide (ZnS) by pulsed laser deposition to learn about these materials in relation to copper zinc tin...... time. We compared the results of CZTS deposition by PLD at DTU in Denmark to CZTS made by PED at IMEM-CNR, where CIGS solar cells have successfully been fabricated at very low processing temperatures. The main results of this work were as follows: Monoclinic-phase CTS films were made by pulsed laser...... deposition followed by high temperature annealing. The films were used to understand the double band gap that we and other groups observed in the material. The Cu-content of the CTS films varied depending on the laser fluence (the laser energy per pulse and per area). The material transfer from...

  10. Precise generator of stability amplitude pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuk, N.A.; Zdesenko, Yu.G.; Kuts, V.N.

    1989-01-01

    A generator of stability amplitude pulses, designed for stabilization of a low-noise semiconducting spectrometer, used in investigations of 76 Ge2β-decay, is described. The generator contains a permanent-voltage source, a storage element and a switch based on a Hg relay. A thermostatic source provides a relative voltage instability less than ±5x10 -6 per 80h (standard deviation). The Hg relay is placed into a separate thermostat. The relative instability of output generator pulse amplitude does not exceed ±1.5x10 -5 per 24h

  11. X-band uplink feedcone capabilities, components, and layout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlin, H.; Freiley, A.; Hartop, R.

    1986-01-01

    Two new X-(7.2 GHz up, 8.4 GHz down) and S-band (2.1 to 2.3 Ghz) common aperture (XSC) feedcones are being added to the DSS 45 and DSS 65 34-Meter Efficiency Antennas. These new feedcones are modifications of the existing SXC feedcone design incorporating a new high power (20-kW) X-band transmitter. The modified Antenna Microwave Subsystem design also incorporates two additional X-band low noise amplifiers and greater phase stability performance to meet both the increased stability requirements for Galileo gravity wave experiments and requirements for spacecraft navigation near the Sun. A third XSC will be constructed for DSS 15 later.

  12. Bright broadband coherent fiber sources emitting strongly blue-shifted resonant dispersive wave pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tu, Haohua; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Zhang, Rui

    2013-01-01

    We predict and realize the targeted wavelength conversion from the 1550-nm band of a fs Er:fiber laser to an isolated band inside 370-850 nm, corresponding to a blue-shift of 700-1180 nm. The conversion utilizes resonant dispersive wave generation in widely available optical fibers with good...... efficiency (~7%). The converted band has a large pulse energy (~1 nJ), high spectral brightness (~1 mW/nm), and broad Gaussian-like spectrum compressible to clean transform-limited ~17 fs pulses. The corresponding coherent fiber sources open up portable applications of optical parametric oscillators and dual......-output synchronized ultrafast lasers....

  13. RF Pulsed Heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pritzkau, David P.

    2002-01-03

    RF pulsed heating is a process by which a metal is heated from magnetic fields on its surface due to high-power pulsed RF. When the thermal stresses induced are larger than the elastic limit, microcracks and surface roughening will occur due to cyclic fatigue. Pulsed heating limits the maximum magnetic field on the surface and through it the maximum achievable accelerating gradient in a normal conducting accelerator structure. An experiment using circularly cylindrical cavities operating in the TE{sub 011} mode at a resonant frequency of 11.424 GHz is designed to study pulsed heating on OFE copper, a material commonly used in normal conducting accelerator structures. The high-power pulsed RF is supplied by an X-band klystron capable of outputting 50 MW, 1.5 {micro}s pulses. The test pieces of the cavity are designed to be removable to allow testing of different materials with different surface preparations. A diagnostic tool is developed to measure the temperature rise in the cavity utilizing the dynamic Q change of the resonant mode due to heating. The diagnostic consists of simultaneously exciting a TE{sub 012} mode to steady-state in the cavity at 18 GHz and measuring the change in reflected power as the cavity is heated from high-power pulsed RF. Two experimental runs were completed. One run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 120 K for 56 x 10{sup 6} pulses. The second run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 82 K for 86 x 10{sup 6} pulses. Scanning electron microscope pictures show extensive damage occurring in the region of maximum temperature rise on the surface of the test pieces.

  14. Neutron noise in nuclear reactors; Le bruit neutronique des reacteurs nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaquiere, A. [Institut National des Sciences et Techniques Nucleaires (France); Pachowska, R. [Universite Technique de Varsovie (Poland)

    1961-06-15

    The power of a nuclear reactor, in the operating conditions, presents fluctuations due to various causes. This random behaviour can be included in the study of 'noises'. Among other sources of noise, we analyse hereafter the fluctuations due: a) to the discontinuous emissions of neutrons from an independent source; b) to the multiplication of neutrons inside the reactor. The method which we present makes use of the analogies between the rules governing a nuclear reactor in operation and a number of radio-electrical systems, in particular the feed-back loops. The reactor can be characterized by its 'passing band' and is described as a system submitted to a sequence of random pulses. In non linear operating condition, the effect of neutron noise is defined by means of a non-linear functional, this theory is thus related to previous works the references of which are given at the end of the present report. This leads us in particular in the case of nuclear reactors to some results given by A. Blaquiere in the case of radio-electrical loops. (author) [French] La puissance d'un reacteur nucleaire, dans les conditions du regime, est affectee de fluctuations dont les causes sont tres diverses. Ce comportement aleatoire rentre dans le cadre general de l'etude des 'bruits'. Entre autres sources ce bruit, nous analysons ici les fluctuations dues: a) a l'emission discontinue des neutrons provenant d'une source autonome; b) a la multiplication des neutrons au sein du reacteur. La methode que nous introduisons exploite les analogies entre les lois qui regissent un reacteur nucleaire au regime et certains systemes radioelectriques, en particulier les circuits a boucle de reaction. Le reacteur est caracterise par sa 'bande passante' et est decrit comme un systeme soumis a une succession d'impulsions aleatoires. Dans les conditions de fonctionnement non lineaires, l'effet du bruit neutronique est precise en utilisant une fonctionnelle non lineaire, ce qui relie cette theorie a

  15. SFOL Pulse: A High Accuracy DME Pulse for Alternative Aircraft Position and Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euiho Kim

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA performance based navigation strategy announced in 2016, the FAA stated that it would retain and expand the Distance Measuring Equipment (DME infrastructure to ensure resilient aircraft navigation capability during the event of a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS outage. However, the main drawback of the DME as a GNSS back up system is that it requires a significant expansion of the current DME ground infrastructure due to its poor distance measuring accuracy over 100 m. The paper introduces a method to improve DME distance measuring accuracy by using a new DME pulse shape. The proposed pulse shape was developed by using Genetic Algorithms and is less susceptible to multipath effects so that the ranging error reduces by 36.0–77.3% when compared to the Gaussian and Smoothed Concave Polygon DME pulses, depending on noise environment.

  16. Newtonian noise cancellation in tensor gravitational wave detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paik, Ho Jung; Harms, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Terrestrial gravity noise produced by ambient seismic and infrasound fields poses one of the main sensitivity limitations in low-frequency ground-based gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. This noise needs to be suppressed by 3-5 orders of magnitude in the frequency band 10 mHz to 1 Hz, which is extremely challenging. We present a new approach that greatly facilitates cancellation of gravity noise in full-tensor GW detectors. It makes explicit use of the direction of propagation of a GW, and can therefore either be implemented in directional searches for GWs or in observations of known sources. We show that suppression of the Newtonian-noise foreground is greatly facilitated using the extra strain channels in full-tensor GW detectors. Only a modest number of auxiliary, high-sensitivity environmental sensors is required to achieve noise suppression by a few orders of magnitude. (paper)

  17. LTP interferometer-noise sources and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, David; Killow, Christian; Ward, Harry; Hough, Jim; Heinzel, Gerhard; Garcia, Antonio; Wand, Vinzenz; Johann, Ulrich; Braxmaier, Claus

    2005-01-01

    The LISA Technology Package (LTP) uses laser interferometry to measure the changes in relative displacement between two inertial test masses. The goals of the mission require a displacement measuring precision of 10 pm Hz -1/2 at frequencies in the 3-30 mHz band. We report on progress with a prototype LTP interferometer optical bench in which fused silica mirrors and beamsplitters are fixed to a ZERODUR (registered) substrate using hydroxide catalysis bonding to form a rigid interferometer. The couplings to displacement noise of this interferometer of two expected noise sources-laser frequency noise and ambient temperature fluctuations-have been investigated, and an additional, unexpected, noise source has been identified. The additional noise is due to small amounts of signal at the heterodyne frequency arriving at the photodiode preamplifiers with a phase that quasistatically changes with respect to the optical signal. The phase shift is caused by differential changes in the external optical paths the beams travel before they reach the rigid interferometer. Two different external path length stabilization systems have been demonstrated and these allowed the performance of the overall system to meet the LTP displacement noise requirement

  18. Sources and levels of background noise in the NASA Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderman, Paul T.

    1988-01-01

    Background noise levels are measured in the NASA Ames Research Center 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel following installation of a sound-absorbent lining on the test-section walls. Results show that the fan-drive noise dominated the empty test-section background noise at airspeeds below 120 knots. Above 120 knots, the test-section broadband background noise was dominated by wind-induced dipole noise (except at lower harmonics of fan blade-passage tones) most likely generated at the microphone or microphone support strut. Third-octave band and narrow-band spectra are presented for several fan operating conditions and test-section airspeeds. The background noise levels can be reduced by making improvements to the microphone wind screen or support strut. Empirical equations are presented relating variations of fan noise with fan speed or blade-pitch angle. An empirical expression for typical fan noise spectra is also presented. Fan motor electric power consumption is related to the noise generation. Preliminary measurements of sound absorption by the test-section lining indicate that the 152 mm thick lining will adequately absorb test-section model noise at frequencies above 300 Hz.

  19. Effect of noise on the performance of Digital Charge Comparison method for n-γ discrimination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Harleen; Mehra, Rohit

    2017-01-01

    The neutron-gamma discrimination from a mixed radiation field is of prime importance in the field of nuclear safeguards, nuclear fission, radiation therapy etc. The liquid scintillators are widely used for n-γ discrimination as the relative decay rate of neutron pulse is less as compared to γ - ray in these detectors.The most popular and simple technique for pulse shape discrimination (PSD) is the charge comparison (CC). Due to the availability of fast ADCs and FPGAs, the traditional analogue techniques can be implemented in digital domain by sampling the PMT pulses. The performance of a PSD method depends on various parameters like sampling rate, noise distortion in the pulses the duration of processing gate etc. In this paper, the effect of noise levels on the performance of CC method is investigated at optimized processing gate

  20. Underwater noise pollution in a coastal tropical environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, L; Carvalho, R R; Lailson-Brito, J; Azevedo, A F

    2014-06-15

    Underwater noise pollution has become a major concern in marine habitats. Guanabara Bay, southeastern Brazil, is an impacted area of economic importance with constant vessel traffic. One hundred acoustic recording sessions took place over ten locations. Sound sources operating within 1 km radius of each location were quantified during recordings. The highest mean sound pressure level near the surface was 111.56±9.0 dB re 1 μPa at the frequency band of 187 Hz. Above 15 kHz, the highest mean sound pressure level was 76.21±8.3 dB re 1 μPa at the frequency 15.89 kHz. Noise levels correlated with number of operating vessels and vessel traffic composition influenced noise profiles. Shipping locations had the highest noise levels, while small vessels locations had the lowest noise levels. Guanabara Bay showed noise pollution similar to that of other impacted coastal regions, which is related to shipping and vessel traffic. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Improvement of the long pulse operation of the s-band klystron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, T. [Graduate School of Sceince and Technology, Nihon Univ., Funabashi, Chiba (Japan); Sato, I.; Hayakawa, K. [Nihon Univ., Funabashi, Chiba (Japan). Atomic Energy Research Inst

    2000-07-01

    The long pulse operation of the PV3030 klystron for FEL linac at LEBRA in Nihon University has been improved considerably by the additional vacuum system placed immediately downstream the klystron output rf window. With the new vacuum system, the large conductance has enabled a high vacuum in normal operation and a quick recovery when the dielectric breakdown occurred. A high vacuum near the rf window may be essentially important for a stable operation of the high power klystron with long pulse duration. Now the PV3030 klystron can be operated at the condition of 20 MW x 20 {mu}s x 12.5 Hz. (author)

  2. Interference Mitigation Technique for Coexistence of Pulse-Based UWB and OFDM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohno Kohei

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ultra-wideband (UWB is a useful radio technique for sharing frequency bands between radio systems. It uses very short pulses to spread spectrum. However, there is a potential for interference between systems using the same frequency bands at close range. In some regulatory systems, interference detection and avoidance (DAA techniques are required to prevent interference with existing radio systems. In this paper, the effect of interference on orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM signals from pulse-based UWB is discussed, and an interference mitigation technique is proposed. This technique focuses on the pulse repetition cycle of UWB. The pulse repetition interval is set the same or half the period of the OFDM symbol excluding the guard interval to mitigate interference. These proposals are also made for direct sequence (DS-UWB. Bit error rate (BER performance is illustrated through both simulation and theoretical approximations.

  3. Low-complexity Joint Sub-carrier Phase Noise Compensation for Digital Multi-carrier Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yankov, Metodi Plamenov; Barletta, Luca; Zibar, Darko

    2017-01-01

    Joint sub-carrier phase noise processing is proposed which recovers the SNR penalty related to decreased sub-carrier baudrate w.r.t. single carrier systems. The method enables digital sub-banding to be safely employed for nonlinear mitigation for modulation formats of up to 256-QAM.......Joint sub-carrier phase noise processing is proposed which recovers the SNR penalty related to decreased sub-carrier baudrate w.r.t. single carrier systems. The method enables digital sub-banding to be safely employed for nonlinear mitigation for modulation formats of up to 256-QAM....

  4. An analysis of low frequency noise from large wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Møller, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    As wind turbines get larger, worries have emerged, that the noise emitted by the turbines would move down in frequency, and that the contents of low-frequency noise would be enough to cause significant annoyance for the neighbors. The sound emission from 48 wind turbines with nominal electric power......-third-octave-band spectra shows that the relative noise emission is higher in the 63-250 Hz frequency range from turbines above 2 MW than from smaller turbines. The observations confirm a downward shift of the spectrum....

  5. RESULTS of the "ELIMINATING NOISE" campaign

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Unit

    2008-01-01

    From 4 to 6 August, CERN’s nurses conducted a screening campaign entitled "Eliminating noise". This campaign was especially aimed at young people exposed to noise during their leisure hours (playing in a band, listening to MP3 players, attending concerts, etc.). In all, 166 people attended the Infirmary, where they were able to receive personalised advice, documentation and, above all, a hearing test (audiogram). While the high attendance of people in the younger age category (18-30) was a success, their audiogram data were a cause for concern, with 24.5% showing abnormal results, hearing deficiencies which, we should remind you, are irreversible. It should be noted that such conditions are almost exclusively caused by noise exposure in a non-professional environment (leisure activities, music, etc.). This latest campaign confirms the harmful effects of noise on people’s hearing due to the absence or insufficiency of protective equipment during music-related activities; this further unde...

  6. RESULTS of the "ELIMINATING NOISE" campaign

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Unit

    2008-01-01

    From 4 to 6 August, CERN’s nurses conducted a screening campaign entitled "Eliminating noise". This campaign was especially aimed at young people exposed to noise during their leisure hours (playing in a band, listening to MP3 players, attending concerts, etc.). In all, 166 people attended the infirmary, where they were able to receive personalised advice, documentation and, above all, a hearing test (audiogram). While the high attendance of people in the younger age category (18-30) was a success, their audiogram data were a cause for concern, with 24.5% showing abnormal results, hearing deficiencies which, we should remind you, are irreversible. It should be noted that such conditions are almost exclusively caused by noise exposure in a non-professional environment (leisure activities, music, etc.). This latest campaign confirms the harmful effects of noise on people’s hearing due to the absence or insufficiency of protective equipment during music-related activities; this further unde...

  7. Wide Band Low Noise Love Wave Magnetic Field Sensor System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittmann, Anne; Durdaut, Phillip; Zabel, Sebastian; Reermann, Jens; Schmalz, Julius; Spetzler, Benjamin; Meyners, Dirk; Sun, Nian X; McCord, Jeffrey; Gerken, Martina; Schmidt, Gerhard; Höft, Michael; Knöchel, Reinhard; Faupel, Franz; Quandt, Eckhard

    2018-01-10

    We present a comprehensive study of a magnetic sensor system that benefits from a new technique to substantially increase the magnetoelastic coupling of surface acoustic waves (SAW). The device uses shear horizontal acoustic surface waves that are guided by a fused silica layer with an amorphous magnetostrictive FeCoSiB thin film on top. The velocity of these so-called Love waves follows the magnetoelastically-induced changes of the shear modulus according to the magnetic field present. The SAW sensor is operated in a delay line configuration at approximately 150 MHz and translates the magnetic field to a time delay and a related phase shift. The fundamentals of this sensor concept are motivated by magnetic and mechanical simulations. They are experimentally verified using customized low-noise readout electronics. With an extremely low magnetic noise level of ≈100 pT/[Formula: see text], a bandwidth of 50 kHz and a dynamic range of 120 dB, this magnetic field sensor system shows outstanding characteristics. A range of additional measures to further increase the sensitivity are investigated with simulations.

  8. Laser-induced band-gap collapse in GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glezer, E. N.; Siegal, Y.; Huang, L.; Mazur, E.

    1995-03-01

    We present experimentally determined values of the dielectric constant of GaAs at photon energies of 2.2 and 4.4 eV following excitation of the sample with 1.9-eV, 70-fs laser pulses spanning a fluence range from 0 to 2.5 kJ/m2. The data show that the response of the dielectric constant to the excitation is dominated by changes in the electronic band structure and not by the optical susceptibility of the excited free carriers. The behavior of the dielectric constant indicates a drop in the average bonding-antibonding splitting of GaAs following the laser-pulse excitation. This drop in the average splitting leads to a collapse of the band gap on a picosecond time scale for excitation at fluences near the damage threshold of 1.0 kJ/m2 and on a subpicosecond time scale at higher excitation fluences. The changes in the electronic band structure result from a combination of electronic screening of the ionic potential as well as structural deformation of the lattice caused by the destabilization of the covalent bonds.

  9. Long-lasting changes in brain activation induced by a single REAC technology pulse in Wi-Fi bands. Randomized double-blind fMRI qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Salvatore; Mura, Marco; Castagna, Alessandro; Fontani, Vania

    2014-07-11

    The aim of this randomized double-blind study was to evaluate in healthy adult subjects, with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), long lasting changes in brain activation patterns following administration of a single, 250 milliseconds pulse emitted with radio-electric asymmetric conveyer (REAC) technology in the Wi-Fi bands. The REAC impulse was not administered during the scan, but after this, according to a protocol that has previously been demonstrated to be effective in improving motor control and postural balance, in healthy subjects and patients. The study was conducted on 33 healthy volunteers, performed with a 1.5 T unit while operating a motor block task involving cyclical and alternating flexion and extension of one leg. Subsequently subjects were randomly divided into a treatment and a sham treatment control group. Repeated fMRI examinations were performed following the administration of the REAC pulse or sham treatment. The Treated group showed cerebellar and ponto-mesencephalic activation components that disappeared in the second scan, while these activation components persisted in the Sham group. This study shows that a very weak signal, such as 250 milliseconds Wi-Fi pulse, administered with REAC technology, could lead to lasting effects on brain activity modification.

  10. Modular Engine Noise Component Prediction System (MCP) Program Users' Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, Robert A. (Technical Monitor); Herkes, William H.; Reed, David H.

    2004-01-01

    This is a user's manual for Modular Engine Noise Component Prediction System (MCP). This computer code allows the user to predict turbofan engine noise estimates. The program is based on an empirical procedure that has evolved over many years at The Boeing Company. The data used to develop the procedure include both full-scale engine data and small-scale model data, and include testing done by Boeing, by the engine manufacturers, and by NASA. In order to generate a noise estimate, the user specifies the appropriate engine properties (including both geometry and performance parameters), the microphone locations, the atmospheric conditions, and certain data processing options. The version of the program described here allows the user to predict three components: inlet-radiated fan noise, aft-radiated fan noise, and jet noise. MCP predicts one-third octave band noise levels over the frequency range of 50 to 10,000 Hertz. It also calculates overall sound pressure levels and certain subjective noise metrics (e.g., perceived noise levels).

  11. Reconstructing the energy band electronic structure of pulsed laser deposited CZTS thin films intended for solar cell absorber applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandiyan, Rajesh [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Centre-Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, 1650 Blvd. Lionel–Boulet, C.P. 1020, Varennes, QC J3X-1S2 (Canada); Oulad Elhmaidi, Zakaria [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Centre-Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, 1650 Blvd. Lionel–Boulet, C.P. 1020, Varennes, QC J3X-1S2 (Canada); University of Mohammed V, Faculty of Sciences, Materials Physics Laboratory, B.P. 1014 Rabat (Morocco); Sekkat, Zouheir [Optics & Photonics Center, Moroccan Foundation for Advanced Science, Innovation and Research, Rabat (Morocco); Abd-lefdil, Mohammed [University of Mohammed V, Faculty of Sciences, Materials Physics Laboratory, B.P. 1014 Rabat (Morocco); El Khakani, My Ali, E-mail: elkhakani@emt.inrs.ca [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Centre-Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, 1650 Blvd. Lionel–Boulet, C.P. 1020, Varennes, QC J3X-1S2 (Canada)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • High quality CZTS thin films grown by means of PLD technique without resorting to any post sulfurization process. • Effect of thermal annealing treatments (in the 200–500 °C range) on the structural, morphological and optoelectronic properties of PLD-CZTS films. • Experimental determination of key optoelectronic parameters (i.e.; E{sub g}, VBM, ϕ, I{sub p}, and χ) enabling the reconstruction of energy band electronic structure of the PLD-CZTS films. • Investigation on the energy band alignments of the heterojunction interface formed between CZTS and both CdS and ZnS buffer layer materials. - Abstract: We report here on the use of pulsed KrF-laser deposition (PLD) technique for the growth of high-quality Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} (CZTS) thin films onto Si, and glass substrates without resorting to any post sulfurization process. The PLD-CZTS films were deposited at room temperature (RT) and then subjected to post annealing at different temperatures ranging from 200 to 500 °C in Argon atmosphere. The X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy confirmed that the PLD films crystallize in the characteristic kesterite CZTS structure regardless of their annealing temperature (T{sub a}), but their crystallinity is much improved for T{sub a} ≥ 400 °C. The PLD-CZTS films were found to exhibit a relatively dense morphology with a surface roughness (RMS) that increases with T{sub a} (from ∼14 nm at RT to 70 nm at T{sub a} = 500 °C with a value around 40 nm for T{sub a} = 300–400 °C). The optical bandgap of the PLD-CZTS films, was derived from UV–vis transmission spectra analysis, and found to decrease from 1.73 eV for non-annealed films to ∼1.58 eV for those annealed at T{sub a} = 300 °C. These band gap values are very close to the optimum value needed for an ideal solar cell absorber. In order to achieve a complete reconstruction of the one-dimensional energy band structure of these PLD-CZTS absorbers, we have combined both XPS and UPS

  12. Shot noise in systems with semi-Dirac points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai, Feng; Wang, Juan

    2014-01-01

    We calculate the ballistic conductance and shot noise of electrons through a two-dimensional stripe system (width W ≫ length L) with semi-Dirac band-touching points. We find that the ratio between zero-temperature noise power and mean current (the Fano factor) is highly anisotropic. When the transport is along the linear-dispersion direction and the Fermi energy is fixed at the semi-Dirac point, the Fano factor has a universal value F = 0.179 while a minimum conductivity exists and scales with L 1∕2 . Along the parabolic dispersion direction, the Fano factor at the semi-Dirac point has a contact-independent limit exceeding 0.9, which varies weakly with L due to the common-path interference of evanescent waves. Our findings suggest a way to discern the type of band-touching points

  13. An Assessment of Psychological Noise Reduction by Landscape Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Yang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The emphasis in the term ‘Green Transportation’ is on the word ‘green’. Green transportation focuses on the construction of a slow transport system with a visually pleasing, easy and secure trip environment composed of urban parks, green roadside spaces and some other space that is full of landscape plants. This trip environment encourages residents to make trip choices that reduce fuel consumption and pollution and is one of the most important ways of popularizing green transportation. To study the psychological benefits provided by urban parks and other landscape environments, we combined a subjective approach (a questionnaire with an objective quantitative approach (emotional tests using an electroencephalogram; EEG. Using a questionnaire survey, we found that 90% of the subjects believed that landscape plants contribute to noise reduction and that 55% overrated the plants’ actual ability to attenuate noise. Two videos (showing a traffic scene and a plant scene were shown to 40 participants on video glasses. We detected and recorded EEG values with a portable electroencephalograph, and a comparison between the results of the two groups revealed that there was a highly significant asymmetry between the EEG activity of the vegetation scene and traffic scene groups. The results suggest that the emotions aroused by noise and visual stimuli are manifested in the synchronization of beta frequency band and the desynchronization of alpha frequency band, indicating that landscape plants can moderate or buffer the effects of noise. These findings indicate that landscape plants provide excess noise attenuating effects through subjects’ emotional processing, which we term ‘psychological noise reduction’.

  14. Absolute negative mobility induced by white Poissonian noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiechowicz, J; Łuczka, J; Hänggi, P

    2013-01-01

    We study the transport properties of inertial Brownian particles which move in a symmetric periodic potential and are subjected to both a symmetric, unbiased time-periodic external force and a biased Poissonian white shot noise (of non-zero average F) which is composed of a random sequence of δ-shaped pulses with random amplitudes. Upon varying the parameters of the white shot noise, one can conveniently manipulate the transport direction and the overall nonlinear response behavior. We find that within tailored parameter regimes the response is opposite to the applied average bias F of such white shot noise. This particular transport characteristic thus mimics that of a nonlinear absolute negative mobility (ANM) regime. Moreover, such white shot noise driven ANM is robust with respect to the statistics of the shot noise spikes. Our findings can be checked and corroborated experimentally by the use of a setup that consists of a single resistively and capacitively shunted Josephson junction device. (paper)

  15. Reduction of damage threshold in dielectric materials induced by negatively chirped laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louzon, E.; Henis, Z.; Pecker, S.; Ehrlich, Y.; Fisher, D.; Fraenkel, M.; Zigler, A.

    2005-01-01

    The threshold fluence for laser induced damage in wide band gap dielectric materials, fused silica and MgF 2 , is observed to be lower by up to 20% for negatively (down) chirped pulses than for positively (up) chirped, at pulse durations ranging from 60 fs to 1 ps. This behavior of the threshold fluence for damage on the chirp direction was not observed in semiconductors (silicon and GaAs). Based on a model including electron generation in the conduction band and Joule heating, it is suggested that the decrease in the damage threshold for negatively chirped pulse is related to the dominant role of multiphoton ionization in wide gap materials

  16. Application of system concept in vibration and noise reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHENG Meiping

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Although certain vibration and noise control technologies are maturing, such as vibration absorption, vibration isolation, sound absorption and sound insulation, and new methods for specific frequency bands or special environments have been proposed unceasingly, there is still no guarantee that practical effective vibration and noise reduction can be obtained. An important constraint for vibration and noise reduction is the lack of a system concept, and the integrity and relevance of such practical systems as ship structure have not obtained enough attention. We have tried to use the system engineering theory in guiding vibration and noise reduction, and have already achieved certain effects. Based on the system concept, the noise control of a petroleum pipeline production workshop has been completed satisfactorily, and the abnormal noise source identification of an airplane has been accomplished successfully. We want to share our experience and suggestions to promote the popularization of the system engineering theory in vibration and noise control.

  17. Effect of scanner acoustic background noise on strict resting-state fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Rondinoni

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Functional MRI (fMRI resting-state experiments are aimed at identifying brain networks that support basal brain function. Although most investigators consider a ‘resting-state' fMRI experiment with no specific external stimulation, subjects are unavoidably under heavy acoustic noise produced by the equipment. In the present study, we evaluated the influence of auditory input on the resting-state networks (RSNs. Twenty-two healthy subjects were scanned using two similar echo-planar imaging sequences in the same 3T MRI scanner: a default pulse sequence and a reduced “silent” pulse sequence. Experimental sessions consisted of two consecutive 7-min runs with noise conditions (default or silent counterbalanced across subjects. A self-organizing group independent component analysis was applied to fMRI data in order to recognize the RSNs. The insula, left middle frontal gyrus and right precentral and left inferior parietal lobules showed significant differences in the voxel-wise comparison between RSNs depending on noise condition. In the presence of low-level noise, these areas Granger-cause oscillations in RSNs with cognitive implications (dorsal attention and entorhinal, while during high noise acquisition, these connectivities are reduced or inverted. Applying low noise MR acquisitions in research may allow the detection of subtle differences of the RSNs, with implications in experimental planning for resting-state studies, data analysis, and ergonomic factors.

  18. Effect of scanner acoustic background noise on strict resting-state fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondinoni, C; Amaro, E; Cendes, F; dos Santos, A C; Salmon, C E G

    2013-04-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) resting-state experiments are aimed at identifying brain networks that support basal brain function. Although most investigators consider a 'resting-state' fMRI experiment with no specific external stimulation, subjects are unavoidably under heavy acoustic noise produced by the equipment. In the present study, we evaluated the influence of auditory input on the resting-state networks (RSNs). Twenty-two healthy subjects were scanned using two similar echo-planar imaging sequences in the same 3T MRI scanner: a default pulse sequence and a reduced "silent" pulse sequence. Experimental sessions consisted of two consecutive 7-min runs with noise conditions (default or silent) counterbalanced across subjects. A self-organizing group independent component analysis was applied to fMRI data in order to recognize the RSNs. The insula, left middle frontal gyrus and right precentral and left inferior parietal lobules showed significant differences in the voxel-wise comparison between RSNs depending on noise condition. In the presence of low-level noise, these areas Granger-cause oscillations in RSNs with cognitive implications (dorsal attention and entorhinal), while during high noise acquisition, these connectivities are reduced or inverted. Applying low noise MR acquisitions in research may allow the detection of subtle differences of the RSNs, with implications in experimental planning for resting-state studies, data analysis, and ergonomic factors.

  19. Bit rate and pulse width dependence of four-wave mixing of short optical pulses in semiconductor optical amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diez, S.; Mecozzi, A.; Mørk, Jesper

    1999-01-01

    We investigate the saturation properties of four-wave mixing of short optical pulses in a semiconductor optical amplifier. By varying the gain of the optical amplifier, we find a strong dependence of both conversion efficiency and signal-to-background ratio on pulse width and bit rate....... In particular, the signal-to-background ratio can be optimized for a specific amplifier gain. This behavior, which is coherently described in experiment and theory, is attributed to the dynamics of the amplified spontaneous emission, which is the main source of noise in a semiconductor optical amplifier....

  20. Selective Vulnerability of the Cochlear Basal Turn to Acrylonitrile and Noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pouyatos, B.; Gearhart, C.A.; Miller, A.N.; Fulton, S.; Fechter, L.D.; Pouyatos, B.

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to acrylonitrile, a high-production industrial chemical, can promote noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) in the rat even though this agent does not itself produce permanent hearing loss. The mechanism by which acrylonitrile promotes NIHL includes oxidative stress as antioxidant drugs can partially protect the cochlea from acrylonitrile + noise. Acrylonitrile depletes glutathione levels while noise can increase the formation of reactive oxygen species. It was previously noted that the high-frequency or basal turn of the cochlea was particularly vulnerable to the combined effects of acrylonitrile and noise when the octave band noise (OBN) was centered at 8 k Hz. Normally, such a noise would be expected to yield damage at a more apical region of the cochlea. The present study was designed to determine whether the basal cochlea is selectively sensitive to acrylonitrile or whether, by adjusting the frequency of the noise band, it would be possible to control the region of the auditory impairment. Rats were exposed to one of three different OBNs centered at different frequencies (4 k Hz, 110 dB and 8 or 16 k Hz at 97 dB) for 5 days, with and without administration of acrylonitrile (50 mg/kg/day). The noise was set to cause limited NIHL by itself. Auditory function was monitored by recording distortion products, by compound action potentials, and by performing cochlear histology. While the ACN-only and noise-only exposures induced no or little permanent auditory loss, the three exposures to acrylonitrile + noise produced similar auditory and cochlear impairments above 16 k Hz, despite the fact that the noise exposures covered 2 octaves. These observations show that the basal cochlea is much more sensitive to acrylonitrile + noise than the apical partition. They provide an initial basis for distinguishing the pattern of cochlear injury that results from noise exposure from that which occurs due to the combined effects of noise and a chemical contaminant.

  1. Correlated and uncorrelated invisible temporal white noise alters mesopic rod signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathibelagal, Amithavikram R; Feigl, Beatrix; Kremers, Jan; Zele, Andrew J

    2016-03-01

    We determined how rod signaling at mesopic light levels is altered by extrinsic temporal white noise that is correlated or uncorrelated with the activity of one (magnocellular, parvocellular, or koniocellular) postreceptoral pathway. Rod and cone photoreceptor excitations were independently controlled using a four-primary photostimulator. Psychometric (Weibull) functions were measured for incremental rod pulses (50 to 250 ms) in the presence (or absence; control) of perceptually invisible subthreshold extrinsic noise. Uncorrelated (rod) noise facilitates rod detection. Correlated postreceptoral pathway noise produces differential changes in rod detection thresholds and decreases the slope of the psychometric functions. We demonstrate that invisible extrinsic noise changes rod-signaling characteristics within the three retinogeniculate pathways at mesopic illumination depending on the temporal profile of the rod stimulus and the extrinsic noise type.

  2. Noise thermometry in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoewener, H.

    1985-08-01

    Since in nuclear reactors the measuring sensor cannot be easily replaced, the value of the sensor resistance, as well as the selection of transmission lines with respect to good transmission characteristics of the whole arrangement and minimizing the correlative error terms, must already be optimized when designing a noise thermometer arrangement. The TRARAU computer program was developed for this purpose enabling the influences of the lines to be computed by taking into consideration all the effects occurring through the lines, such as transmission errors and correlative error terms. In order to check the accuracy of the TRARAU computer program a series of laboratory measurements were implemented enabling both the pure transmission behaviour of the line arrangement with respect to the measuring signal to be detected, as well as the overall line error. In all cases this resulted in a very good agreement of the measured values with the computed values. The transmission behaviour of noise thermometer arrangements occuring in practice were studied with the example of two reactor experiments. In both cases it was possible to demonstrate successfully the potential of the computer program TRARAU. As the parametric studies have shown, optimum matching over unlimited band widths is not feasible in principle. By reducing the upper band limit, however, the line error can practically always be kept sufficiently small. With good matching larger band widths can also be used. (orig./HP) [de

  3. The EMIR multi-band mm-wave receiver for the IRAM 30-m telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, M.; Lazareff, B.; Maier, D.; Chenu, J.-Y.; Fontana, A.-L.; Bortolotti, Y.; Boucher, C.; Navarrini, A.; Blanchet, S.; Greve, A.; John, D.; Kramer, C.; Morel, F.; Navarro, S.; Peñalver, J.; Schuster, K. F.; Thum, C.

    2012-02-01

    Aims: The prime motivation of this project was to design and build a state-of-art mm-wave heterodyne receiver system to enhance the observing throughput of the IRAM 30-m radiotelescope. More specifically, the requirements were i) state-of-art noise performance for spectroscopic observations; ii) simultaneous dual polarization and dual-frequency observing; iii) coverage of the atmospheric transmission windows from 83 to 360 GHz; iv) compact footprint and minimal maintenance. Methods: Key elements for low noise performance of heterodyne mixers are the superconducting Niobium junctions, operating at ≃4 K. These junctions are embedded in carefully designed coupling structures; furthermore, since atmospheric radiation is a significant contributor to the system noise budget, all mixers are either sideband separating or sideband rejecting. To achieve low noise, it is also essential to maximize the coupling of the receiver to the astronomical source, and to minimize the coupling to thermal radiation from the ground-based environment; this is achieved through mirror optics that realize a wavelength-independent coupling to the telescope. A flexible configuration of mirrors and frequency selective surfaces permits various combinations of frequency bands, as well as dual-load radiometric calibration. Low noise intermediate frequency amplifiers and bias electronics also play an important role in the system performance. Results: The EMIR receiver in operation at the 30 m telescope offers four frequency bands: B1: 83-117 GHz, B2: 129-174 GHz, B3: 200-267 GHz, and B4: 260-360 GHz. In each band, the two orthogonal polarizations are observed simultaneously. Dual-band combinations B1/2 B1/3, and B2/4 are available. Bands 1 and 4 (also 3 as of Nov.-2011) feature sideband separation. In dual-band configuration, including sideband separation and polarization diplexing, up to eight IF channels are delivered to the spectrometers, totaling up to 64 GHz of signal bandwidth (of which 32

  4. Partial Discharge Spectral Characterization in HF, VHF and UHF Bands Using Particle Swarm Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, Guillermo; Fresno, José Manuel; Martínez-Tarifa, Juan Manuel; Ardila-Rey, Jorge Alfredo; Parrado-Hernández, Emilio

    2018-03-01

    The measurement of partial discharge (PD) signals in the radio frequency (RF) range has gained popularity among utilities and specialized monitoring companies in recent years. Unfortunately, in most of the occasions the data are hidden by noise and coupled interferences that hinder their interpretation and renders them useless especially in acquisition systems in the ultra high frequency (UHF) band where the signals of interest are weak. This paper is focused on a method that uses a selective spectral signal characterization to feature each signal, type of partial discharge or interferences/noise, with the power contained in the most representative frequency bands. The technique can be considered as a dimensionality reduction problem where all the energy information contained in the frequency components is condensed in a reduced number of UHF or high frequency (HF) and very high frequency (VHF) bands. In general, dimensionality reduction methods make the interpretation of results a difficult task because the inherent physical nature of the signal is lost in the process. The proposed selective spectral characterization is a preprocessing tool that facilitates further main processing. The starting point is a clustering of signals that could form the core of a PD monitoring system. Therefore, the dimensionality reduction technique should discover the best frequency bands to enhance the affinity between signals in the same cluster and the differences between signals in different clusters. This is done maximizing the minimum Mahalanobis distance between clusters using particle swarm optimization (PSO). The tool is tested with three sets of experimental signals to demonstrate its capabilities in separating noise and PDs with low signal-to-noise ratio and separating different types of partial discharges measured in the UHF and HF/VHF bands.

  5. Noise source emissions, Davis Canyon site, Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-07-01

    This report has been prepared for the purpose of documenting the development of the data provided to the Repository Project Management (RPM) organization. The data provided encompass all phases of activity, from site preparation through the exploratory shaft facility (ESF) and repository construction and operation, and decommissioning. Noise environments expected from construction and operation of transportation corridors associated with the activity were also modeled. The data for the construction of transportation corridors were provided by Bechtel National, Inc. Use of the quietest equipment available within the proven state of the art was assumed, as was the use of acoustical enclosures to the extent practical. The programmatic assumptions are based on the noise-sensitive nature of the Canyonlands National Park. Another feature of the data is the use of 1/3-octave-band rather than 1/1-octave-band resolution of emission spectra. This was done to permit evaluation of audibility of sounds reaching the park

  6. High Data Rate Optical Wireless Communications Based on Ultraviolet Band

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Xiaobin

    2017-01-01

    Optical wireless communication systems based on ultraviolet (UV)-band has a lot inherent advantages, such as low background solar radiation, low device dark noise. Besides, it also has small restrictive requirements for PAT (pointing, acquisition

  7. SII-Based Speech Prepocessing for Intelligibility Improvement in Noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taal, Cees H.; Jensen, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    filter sets certain frequency bands to zero when they do not contribute to intelligibility anymore. Experiments show large intelligibility improvements with the proposed method when used in stationary speech-shaped noise. However, it was also found that the method does not perform well for speech...... corrupted by a competing speaker. This is due to the fact that the SII is not a reliable intelligibility predictor for fluctuating noise sources. MATLAB code is provided....

  8. Integral-equation based methods for parameter estimation in output pulses of radiation detectors: Application in nuclear medicine and spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadian-Behbahani, Mohammad-Reza; Saramad, Shahyar

    2018-04-01

    Model based analysis methods are relatively new approaches for processing the output data of radiation detectors in nuclear medicine imaging and spectroscopy. A class of such methods requires fast algorithms for fitting pulse models to experimental data. In order to apply integral-equation based methods for processing the preamplifier output pulses, this article proposes a fast and simple method for estimating the parameters of the well-known bi-exponential pulse model by solving an integral equation. The proposed method needs samples from only three points of the recorded pulse as well as its first and second order integrals. After optimizing the sampling points, the estimation results were calculated and compared with two traditional integration-based methods. Different noise levels (signal-to-noise ratios from 10 to 3000) were simulated for testing the functionality of the proposed method, then it was applied to a set of experimental pulses. Finally, the effect of quantization noise was assessed by studying different sampling rates. Promising results by the proposed method endorse it for future real-time applications.

  9. Pulse shaping amplifier (PSA) for nuclear spectroscopy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombigit, L.; Maslina Mohd Ibrahim; Nolida Yusup; Nur Aira Abdul Rahman; Yong, C.F.

    2014-01-01

    Pulse Shaping Amplifier (PSA) is an essential components in nuclear spectroscopy system. This networks have two functions; to shape the output pulse and performs noise filtering. In this paper, we describes procedure for design and development of a pulse shaping amplifier which can be used for nuclear spectroscopy system. This prototype was developed using high performance electronics devices and assembled on a FR4 type printed circuit board. Performance of this prototype was tested by comparing it with an equivalent commercial spectroscopy amplifier (Model SILENA 7611). The test results show that the performance of this prototype is comparable to the commercial spectroscopic amplifier. (author)

  10. Pulsed inductive HF laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razhev, A M; Kargapol' tsev, E S [Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Churkin, D S; Demchuk, S V [Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-31

    We report the results of experimentally investigated dependences of temporal, spectral and spatial characteristics of an inductive HF-laser generation on the pump conditions. Gas mixtures H{sub 2} – F{sub 2}(NF{sub 3} or SF6{sub 6}) and He(Ne) – H{sub 2} – F{sub 2}(NF{sub 3} or SF{sub 6}) were used as active media. The FWHM pulse duration reached 0.42 μs. This value corresponded to a pulsed power of 45 kW. For the first time, the emission spectrum of an inductive HF laser was investigated, which consisted of seven groups of bands with centres around the wavelengths of 2732, 2736, 2739, 2835, 2837, 2893 and 2913 nm. The cross section profile of the laser beam was a ring with a diameter of about 20 mm and width of about 5 mm. Parameters of laser operation in the repetitively pulsed regime were sufficiently stable. The amplitude instability of light pulses was no greater than 5% – 6%. (lasers)

  11. Cusp-latitude Pc3 spectra: band-limited and power-law components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Ponomarenko

    Full Text Available This work attempts to fill a gap in comparative studies of upstream-generated Pc3–4 waves and broad band ULF noise observed at cusp latitudes. We performed a statistical analysis of the spectral properties of three years of cusp-latitude ground magnetometer data, finding that the average daytime Pc3–4 spectra are characterized by two principal components: an upstream-related band-limited enhancement (‘signal’ and a power-law background (‘noise’ with S(f a  f -4 . Based on this information we developed an algorithm allowing for the deconvolution of these two components in the spectral domain. The frequency of the signal enhancement increases linearly with IMF magnitude as f [mHz] ~ 4.4 | BIMF | [nT], and its power maximizes around IMF cone angles qxB ~ 20 and 160° and at 10:30–11:00 MLT. Both spectral components exhibit similar semiannual variations with equinoctial maxima. The back-ground noise power grows with increasing southward Bz and remains nearly constant for northward Bz . Its diurnal variation resembles that of Pc5 field-line resonance power, with a maximum near 09:00 MLT. Both the band-limited signal and broad band noise components show power-law growth with solar wind velocity a V 5.71sw and a V 4.12sw, respectively. Thus, the effective signal-to-noise ratio increases with in-creasing Vsw. The observations suggest that the noise generation is associated with reconnection processes.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause, cusp, and boundary layers; MHD waves and instabilities; solar wind magnetosphere interactions

  12. Electron Hole Plasma in Solids Induced by Ultrashort XUV Laser Pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rethfeld, B.; Medvedev, N.

    2013-01-01

    Irradiation of solids with ultrashort XUV laser pulses leads to an excitation of electrons from the valence band and deeper shells to the conduction band leading to a nonequilibrium highly energetic electron hole plasma. We investigate the transient electron dynamics in a solid semiconductor and metal (silicon and aluminum, respectively) under irradiation with a femtosecond VUV to XUV laser pulse as used in experiments with the Free Electron Laser FLASH at DESY in Hamburg, Germany. Applying the Asymptotical Trajectory Monte-Carlo technique, we obtain the transient energy distribution of the excited and ionized electrons within the solid. Photon absorption by electrons in different bands and secondary excitation and ionization processes are simulated event by event. The method was extended in order to take into account the electronic band structure and Pauli's principle for electrons in the conduction band. In this talk we review our results on the dynamics of the transient electron-hole plasma, in particular its transient density and energy distribution in dependence on laser and material parameters. For semiconductors we introduce the concept of an ''effective energy gap'' for collective electronic excitation, which can be applied to estimate the free electron density after high-intensity ultrashort XUV laser pulse irradiation. For aluminum we demonstrate that the electronic spectra depend on the relaxation kinetics of the excited electronic subsystem. Experimentally observed spectra of emitted photons from irradiated aluminum can be explained well with our results. (author)

  13. Linear pulse amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tjutju, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    Pulse amplifier is standard significant part of spectrometer. Apart from other type of amplification, it's a combination of amplification and pulse shaping. Because of its special purpose the device should fulfill the following : High resolution is desired to gain a high yield comparable to its actual state of condition. High signal to noise is desired to nhν resolution. High linearity to facilitate calibration. A good overload recovery, in order to the device will capable of analizing a low energy radiation which appear joinly on the high energy fields. Other expections of the device are its economical and practical use its extentive application. For that reason it's built on a standard NIM principle. Taking also into account the above mentioned considerations. High quality component parts are used throughout, while its availability in the domestic market is secured. (author)

  14. Study of noise in offices with window-type room air-conditioners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikh, G.H.; Hashmi, R.; Shareef, A.

    2005-01-01

    A Study of Noise has been carried out in 17 private offices, with window-type room air-conditioners, to assess noise levels in these offices. A-Weighted equivalent sound-pressure levels (dB(A) LAeq) and equivalent octave-band sound-pressure levels (dB Leq) were measured in each office, and Preferred Speech Interference Levels (PSIL) evaluated. The results show that the interior noise-levels in these offices vary from 59.6 to 72.2 dB(A) LAeq. which are very high and much above the interior noise limits, recommended for offices by some individual workers. Some ways and means to limit its emission of high level of noise from the air conditioners are also discussed. (author)

  15. Sound Exposure of Healthcare Professionals Working with a University Marching Band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Jeffrey A; Yamaguchi, Moegi

    2018-01-01

    Music-induced hearing disorders are known to result from exposure to excessive levels of music of different genres. Marching band music, with its heavy emphasis on brass and percussion, is one type that is a likely contributor to music-induced hearing disorders, although specific data on sound pressure levels of marching bands have not been widely studied. Furthermore, if marching band music does lead to music-induced hearing disorders, the musicians may not be the only individuals at risk. Support personnel such as directors, equipment managers, and performing arts healthcare providers may also be exposed to potentially damaging sound pressures. Thus, we sought to explore to what degree healthcare providers receive sound dosages above recommended limits during their work with a marching band. The purpose of this study was to determine the sound exposure of healthcare professionals (specifically, athletic trainers [ATs]) who provide on-site care to a large, well-known university marching band. We hypothesized that sound pressure levels to which these individuals were exposed would exceed the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) daily percentage allowance. Descriptive observational study. Eight ATs working with a well-known American university marching band volunteered to wear noise dosimeters. During the marching band season, ATs wore an Etymotic ER-200D dosimeter whenever working with the band at outdoor rehearsals, indoor field house rehearsals, and outdoor performances. The dosimeters recorded dose percent exposure, equivalent continuous sound levels in A-weighted decibels, and duration of exposure. For comparison, a dosimeter also was worn by an AT working in the university's performing arts medicine clinic. Participants did not alter their typical duties during any data collection sessions. Sound data were collected with the dosimeters set at the NIOSH standards of 85 dBA threshold and 3 dBA exchange rate; the NIOSH 100% daily dose is

  16. Mode-locking peculiarities in an all-fiber erbium-doped ring ultrashort pulse laser with a highly-nonlinear resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvoretskiy, Dmitriy A.; Sazonkin, Stanislav G.; Kudelin, Igor S.; Orekhov, Ilya O.; Pnev, Alexey B.; Karasik, Valeriy E.; Denisov, Lev K.

    2017-12-01

    Today ultrashort pulse (USP) fiber lasers are in great demand in a frequency metrology field, THz pulse spectroscopy, optical communication, quantum optics application, etc. Therefore mode-locked (ML) fiber lasers have been extensively investigated over the last decade due the number of scientific, medical and industrial applications. It should be noted, that USP fiber lasers can be treated as an ideal platform to expand future applications due to the complex ML nonlinear dynamics in a laser resonator. Up to now a series of novel ML regimes have been investigated e.g. self-similar pulses, noise-like pulses, multi-bound solitons and soliton rain generation. Recently, we have used a highly nonlinear germanosilicate fiber (with germanium oxides concentration in the core 50 mol. %) inside the resonator for more reliable and robust launching of passive mode-locking based on the nonlinear polarization evolution effect in fibers. In this work we have measured promising and stable ML regimes such as stretched pulses, soliton rain and multi-bound solitons formed in a highly-nonlinear ring laser and obtained by intracavity group velocity dispersion (GVD) variation in slightly negative region. As a result, we have obtained the low noise ultrashort pulse generation with duration 59 dB) and relative intensity noise <-101 dBc / Hz.

  17. Digital positron lifetime: the influence of noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krille, Arnold; Krause-Rehberg, Reinhard; Anwand, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to the world around where everything seems to go digital as soon as possible, positron lifetime spectrometers are kind of a 'last sanctuary' for analog measurements. Only a few of the newer spectrometers use the analog-digital-converters directly after the photomultipliers and extract the timing information via computer. Judging from their results it seems as if the current available converters and the timing mathematics are only as good as the conventional analog setup in the timing resolution. As it is decided that EPOS [1] will use digital positron lifetime, we try to find some reasons for limited timing resolution by simulating anode pulses from the photomultipliers and measuring the FWHM. We create pulses similar to current state-of-the-art 4GS/s digitizers but can control the level of noise and the bit-depth independently. We found that especially the noise (that would come from the analog electronics in/before the converters) has a great influence on the timing resolution. Also we try to use lowpass filtering to reduce that influence with great success.

  18. Digital positron lifetime: the influence of noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krille, Arnold; Krause-Rehberg, Reinhard [Department of Physics, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, 06099 Halle (Germany); Anwand, Wolfgang, E-mail: arnold.krille@physik.uni-halle.de [Institute of Ion Beam Physics, Research Center Dresden-Rossendorf, 01314 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-01-10

    In contrast to the world around where everything seems to go digital as soon as possible, positron lifetime spectrometers are kind of a 'last sanctuary' for analog measurements. Only a few of the newer spectrometers use the analog-digital-converters directly after the photomultipliers and extract the timing information via computer. Judging from their results it seems as if the current available converters and the timing mathematics are only as good as the conventional analog setup in the timing resolution. As it is decided that EPOS [1] will use digital positron lifetime, we try to find some reasons for limited timing resolution by simulating anode pulses from the photomultipliers and measuring the FWHM. We create pulses similar to current state-of-the-art 4GS/s digitizers but can control the level of noise and the bit-depth independently. We found that especially the noise (that would come from the analog electronics in/before the converters) has a great influence on the timing resolution. Also we try to use lowpass filtering to reduce that influence with great success.

  19. Active control of the noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez V, Luis Alfonso; Lopez Q, Jose German

    2001-01-01

    The problems of acoustic noise are more and more preponderant in the measure in that the amount of equipment and industrial machinery is increased such as fans, transformers, compressors etc. the use of devices passive mechanics for the reduction of the noise is effective and very appreciated because its effects embrace a wide range of acoustic frequency. However, to low frequencies, such devices become too big and expensive besides that present a tendency to do not effective. The control of active noise, CAN, using the electronic generation anti-noise, constitutes an interesting solution to the problem because their operation principle allows achieving an appreciable reduction of the noise by means of the use of compact devices. The traditional techniques for the control of acoustic noise like barriers and silenced to attenuate it, are classified as passive and their works has been accepted as norm as for the treatment of problems of noise it refers. Such techniques are considered in general very effective in the attenuation of noise of wide band. However, for low frequency, the required passive structures are too big and expensive; also, their effectiveness diminishes flagrantly, that which makes them impractical in many applications. The active suppression is profiled like a practical alternative for the reduction of acoustic noise. The idea in the active treatment of the noise it contemplates the use of a device electro-acoustic, like a speaker for example that it cancels to the noise by the generation of sounds of Same width and of contrary phase (anti-noise). The cancellation phenomenon is carried out when the ant-noise combines acoustically with the noise, what is in the cancellation of both sounds. The effectiveness of the cancellation of the primary source of noise depends on the precision with which the width and the phase of the generated ant-noise are controlled. The active control of noise, ANC (activates noise control), it is being investigated for

  20. Intensity Noise Transfer Through a Diode-pumped Titanium Sapphire Laser System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tawfieq, Mahmoud; Hansen, Anders Kragh; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin

    2017-01-01

    higher RIN than a setup with only a single nonlinear crystal. The Ti:S is shown to have a cut-off frequency around 500 kHz, which means that noise structures of the pump laser above this frequency are strongly suppressed. Finally, the majority of the Ti:S noise seems to originate from the laser itself......In this paper, we investigate the noise performance and transfer in a titanium sapphire (Ti:S) laser system. This system consists of a DBR tapered diode laser, which is frequency doubled in two cascaded nonlinear crystals and used to pump the Ti:S laser oscillator. This investigation includes...... electrical noise characterizations of the utilized power supplies, the optical noise of the fundamental light, the second harmonic light, and finally the optical noise of the femtosecond pulses emitted by the Ti:S laser. Noise features originating from the electric power supply are evident throughout...

  1. Background Noise of the Aldeia da Serra Region (Portugal) from a temporary broad band network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachilala, Piedade; Borges, José; Caldeira, Bento; Bezzeghoud, Mourad

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we analyse seismic background noise to assess the effect of noise based on the detectability of a temporary network constituted by DOCTAR (Deep Ocean Test Array), who have been deployed in a period between 2011 and 2012 in Portugal mainland, and the Évora permanent seismic station. This network is constituted by 14 digital broadband stations (14 CMG-3ESP and one STS2 sensors) with a flat response between the 60 sec to 50 Hz, 24-bit and 120s to 60Hz respectively. The temporary network was operated in continuous recording mode (three-components) in a region located in the north of the region of Évora, within a radius of about 30 km around the village of Aldeia da Serra, region in which there is an important seismic activity in the context of Portugal mainland. We calculated power spectral densities of background noise for each station/component and compare them with high-noise model and low-noise model of Peterson (1993). We consider different for day and night local and for different periods of the year. Power spectral density estimates show moderate noise levels with all stations falling within the high and low bounds of Peterson (1993). Considering the results of the noise, we estimate the detection limit of each station and consequently the detectability of the network. From this information and taking in attention the events recorded during the period of DOCTAR operation we analyse the improvement promoted by this temporary network regarding the existent seismic networks to the local seismicity study. This work was partially supported by COMPETE 2020 program (POCI-01-0145-FEDER-007690 project). We acknowledge GFZ Potsdam for providing part of the data used in this study.

  2. Experimental demonstration of a real-time PAM-4 Q-band RoF system based on CMMA equalization and interleaved RS code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Rui; Yu, Jianjun; He, Jing; Wei, Yiran

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we experimentally demonstrated a complete real-time 4-level pulse amplitude modulation (PAM-4) Q-band radio-over-fiber (RoF) system with optical heterodyning and envelope detector (ED) down-conversion. Meanwhile, a cost-efficient real-time implementation scheme of cascaded multi-modulus algorithm (CMMA) equalization is proposed in this paper. By using the proposed scheme, the CMMA equalization is applied in the system for signal recovery. In addition, to improve the transmission performance of the system, an interleaved Reed-Solomon (RS) code is applied in the real-time system. Although there is serious power impulse noise in the system, the system can still achieve a bit error rate (BER) at below 1 × 10-7 after 25 km standard single mode fiber (SSMF) transmission and 1-m wireless transmission.

  3. Analysis of a simplified normalized covariance measure based on binary weighting functions for predicting the intelligibility of noise-suppressed speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fei; Loizou, Philipos C

    2010-12-01

    The normalized covariance measure (NCM) has been shown previously to predict reliably the intelligibility of noise-suppressed speech containing non-linear distortions. This study analyzes a simplified NCM measure that requires only a small number of bands (not necessarily contiguous) and uses simple binary (1 or 0) weighting functions. The rationale behind the use of a small number of bands is to account for the fact that the spectral information contained in contiguous or nearby bands is correlated and redundant. The modified NCM measure was evaluated with speech intelligibility scores obtained by normal-hearing listeners in 72 noisy conditions involving noise-suppressed speech corrupted by four different types of maskers (car, babble, train, and street interferences). High correlation (r = 0.8) was obtained with the modified NCM measure even when only one band was used. Further analysis revealed a masker-specific pattern of correlations when only one band was used, and bands with low correlation signified the corresponding envelopes that have been severely distorted by the noise-suppression algorithm and/or the masker. Correlation improved to r = 0.84 when only two disjoint bands (centered at 325 and 1874 Hz) were used. Even further improvements in correlation (r = 0.85) were obtained when three or four lower-frequency (<700 Hz) bands were selected.

  4. Noise-Source Separation Using Internal and Far-Field Sensors for a Full-Scale Turbofan Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Miles, Jeffrey H.

    2009-01-01

    Noise-source separation techniques for the extraction of the sub-dominant combustion noise from the total noise signatures obtained in static-engine tests are described. Three methods are applied to data from a static, full-scale engine test. Both 1/3-octave and narrow-band results are discussed. The results are used to assess the combustion-noise prediction capability of the Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP). A new additional phase-angle-based discriminator for the three-signal method is also introduced.

  5. External noise when using biofuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotaleski, J.

    1994-08-01

    The aim of this study has been to cover sources of noise dealing with all steps in a biofuel chain; producing, transporting, storing and firing the biofuel. When the availability of relevant test results from noise surveys is not so good and mostly badly documented, the study has been concentrated on estimation of external noise for planning and design purposes, from a prospective biofuel-fired plant. A synoptic tabulation of estimated acoustic power levels from different noise sources, has been done. The results from measurements of external noise from different existing combined power and heating plants are tabulated. The Nordic model for simulation of external noise has been used for a prospective plant - VEGA - designed by Vattenfall. The aim has been to estimate its noise pollutions at critical points at the nearest residential area (250 m from the fenced industry area). The software - ILYD - is easy to handle, but knowledge about the model is necessary. A requisite for the reliability is the access to measurements or estimations of different sources of noise, at different levels of octaves from 63 to 8000 Hz. The degree of accuracy increases with the number of broad band sources, that are integrated. Using ILYD with available data, a night limit of 40 dB(A) should be possible to fulfill with good degree of accuracy at VEGA, between 10 pm and 7 am, with good planning and under normal operation conditions. A demand for 35 dB(A) as a limit can be harder to fulfill, especially at mornings from 6 to 7. Noise from heavy vehicles within the plant area is classified as industrial noise and not as road traffic noise. This type of noise depends very much on the way of driving and assumed acceleration. Concerning wheel-mounted loaders, they may then only be used during daytime. The simulations show, that even at daytime from 7 to 6 pm, it would be possible to use an acoustically damped chipping machine, inside the power industry area. 31 refs, 13 figs, tabs, 8

  6. Development of a Voice Activity Controlled Noise Canceller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid Noor, Ali O.; Samad, Salina Abdul; Hussain, Aini

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a variable threshold voice activity detector (VAD) is developed to control the operation of a two-sensor adaptive noise canceller (ANC). The VAD prohibits the reference input of the ANC from containing some strength of actual speech signal during adaptation periods. The novelty of this approach resides in using the residual output from the noise canceller to control the decisions made by the VAD. Thresholds of full-band energy and zero-crossing features are adjusted according to the residual output of the adaptive filter. Performance evaluation of the proposed approach is quoted in terms of signal to noise ratio improvements as well mean square error (MSE) convergence of the ANC. The new approach showed an improved noise cancellation performance when tested under several types of environmental noise. Furthermore, the computational power of the adaptive process is reduced since the output of the adaptive filter is efficiently calculated only during non-speech periods. PMID:22778667

  7. Development of a Voice Activity Controlled Noise Canceller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aini Hussain

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a variable threshold voice activity detector (VAD is developed to control the operation of a two-sensor adaptive noise canceller (ANC. The VAD prohibits the reference input of the ANC from containing some strength of actual speech signal during adaptation periods. The novelty of this approach resides in using the residual output from the noise canceller to control the decisions made by the VAD. Thresholds of full-band energy and zero-crossing features are adjusted according to the residual output of the adaptive filter. Performance evaluation of the proposed approach is quoted in terms of signal to noise ratio improvements as well mean square error (MSE convergence of the ANC. The new approach showed an improved noise cancellation performance when tested under several types of environmental noise. Furthermore, the computational power of the adaptive process is reduced since the output of the adaptive filter is efficiently calculated only during non-speech periods.

  8. Eliminating thermal violin spikes from LIGO noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santamore, D. H.; Levin, Yuri

    2001-08-15

    We have developed a scheme for reducing LIGO suspension thermal noise close to violin-mode resonances. The idea is to monitor directly the thermally induced motion of a small portion of (a 'point' on) each suspension fiber, thereby recording the random forces driving the test-mass motion close to each violin-mode frequency. One can then suppress the thermal noise by optimally subtracting the recorded fiber motions from the measured motion of the test mass, i.e., from the LIGO output. The proposed method is a modification of an analogous but more technically difficult scheme by Braginsky, Levin and Vyatchanin for reducing broad-band suspension thermal noise. The efficiency of our method is limited by the sensitivity of the sensor used to monitor the fiber motion. If the sensor has no intrinsic noise (i.e. has unlimited sensitivity), then our method allows, in principle, a complete removal of violin spikes from the thermal-noise spectrum. We find that in LIGO-II interferometers, in order to suppress violin spikes below the shot-noise level, the intrinsic noise of the sensor must be less than {approx}2 x 10{sup -13} cm/Hz. This sensitivity is two orders of magnitude greater than that of currently available sensors.

  9. Eliminating thermal violin spikes from LIGO noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santamore, D. H.; Levin, Yuri

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a scheme for reducing LIGO suspension thermal noise close to violin-mode resonances. The idea is to monitor directly the thermally induced motion of a small portion of (a 'point' on) each suspension fiber, thereby recording the random forces driving the test-mass motion close to each violin-mode frequency. One can then suppress the thermal noise by optimally subtracting the recorded fiber motions from the measured motion of the test mass, i.e., from the LIGO output. The proposed method is a modification of an analogous but more technically difficult scheme by Braginsky, Levin and Vyatchanin for reducing broad-band suspension thermal noise. The efficiency of our method is limited by the sensitivity of the sensor used to monitor the fiber motion. If the sensor has no intrinsic noise (i.e. has unlimited sensitivity), then our method allows, in principle, a complete removal of violin spikes from the thermal-noise spectrum. We find that in LIGO-II interferometers, in order to suppress violin spikes below the shot-noise level, the intrinsic noise of the sensor must be less than ∼2 x 10 -13 cm/Hz. This sensitivity is two orders of magnitude greater than that of currently available sensors

  10. Improvement of the noise figure of the CEBAF switched electrode electronics BPM system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, T.

    1998-01-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) is a high-intensity continuous wave electron accelerator for nuclear physics located at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. A beam energy of 4 GeV is achieved by recirculating the electron beam five times through two anti-parallel 400 MeV linacs. In the linacs, where there is recirculated beam, the BPM specifications must be met for beam intensities between 1 and 100 μA. In the transport lines the BPM specifications must be met for beam intensities between 100 nA and 200 μA. To avoid a complete redesign of the existing electronics, we investigated ways to improve the noise figure of the linac BPM switched-electrode electronics (SEE) so that they could be used in the transport lines. We found that the out-of-band noise contributed significantly to the overall system noise figure. This paper will focus on the source of the excessive out-of-band noise and how it was reduced. The development, commissioning and operational results of this low noise variant of the linac style SEE BPMs as well as techniques for determining the noise figure of the rf chain will also be presented. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  11. A study of new pulse auscultation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Yun; Chang, Rong-Seng

    2015-04-14

    This study presents a new type of pulse auscultation system, which uses a condenser microphone to measure pulse sound waves on the wrist, captures the microphone signal for filtering, amplifies the useful signal and outputs it to an oscilloscope in analog form for waveform display and storage and delivers it to a computer to perform a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and convert the pulse sound waveform into a heartbeat frequency. Furthermore, it also uses an audio signal amplifier to deliver the pulse sound by speaker. The study observed the principles of Traditional Chinese Medicine's pulsing techniques, where pulse signals at places called "cun", "guan" and "chi" of the left hand were measured during lifting (100 g), searching (125 g) and pressing (150 g) actions. Because the system collects the vibration sound caused by the pulse, the sensor itself is not affected by the applied pressure, unlike current pulse piezoelectric sensing instruments, therefore, under any kind of pulsing pressure, it displays pulse changes and waveforms with the same accuracy. We provide an acquired pulse and waveform signal suitable for Chinese Medicine practitioners' objective pulse diagnosis, thus providing a scientific basis for this Traditional Chinese Medicine practice. This study also presents a novel circuit design using an active filtering method. An operational amplifier with its differential features eliminates the interference from external signals, including the instant high-frequency noise. In addition, the system has the advantages of simple circuitry, cheap cost and high precision.

  12. Noise and noise disturbances from wind power plants - Tests with interactive control of sound parameters for more comfortable and less perceptible sounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson-Waye, K.; Oehrstroem, E.; Bjoerkman, M.; Agge, A.

    2001-12-01

    In experimental pilot studies, a methodology has been worked out for interactively varying sound parameters in wind power plants. In the tests, 24 persons varied the center frequency of different band-widths, the frequency of a sinus-tone and the amplitude-modulation of a sinus-tone in order to create as comfortable a sound as possible. The variations build on the noise from the two wind turbines Bonus and Wind World. The variations were performed with a constant dba level. The results showed that the majority preferred a low-frequency tone (94 Hz and 115 Hz for Wind World and Bonus, respectively). The mean of the most comfortable amplitude-modulation varied between 18 and 22 Hz, depending on the ground frequency. The mean of the center-frequency for the different band-widths varied from 785 to 1104 Hz. In order to study the influence of the wind velocity on the acoustic character of the noise, a long-time measurement program has been performed. A remotely controlled system has been developed, where wind velocity, wind direction, temperature and humidity are registered simultaneously with the noise. Long-time registrations have been performed for four different wing turbines

  13. Characterestics of pico-second single bunch at the S-band linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uesaka, Mitsuru; Kozawa, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Toshiaki; Ueda, Toru; Miya, Kenzo

    1994-01-01

    Measurement of the bunch structure of a pico-second single bunch was performed using a femto-second streak camera at the S-band linear accelerator of the University of Tokyo. The aim of this research is to investigate the feasibility of the generation of a femto-second single bunch at the S-band linac. The details of the bunch structure and energy spectrum of an original single bunch were precisely investigated in several operation modes where the RF phases in accelerating tubes and a prebuncher were varied. The femto-second streak camera was utilized to measure the bunch structure by one shot via Cherenkov radiation emitted by the electrons in the bunch. Next, an experiment for magnetic pulse compression of the original single bunch was carried out. Pulse shapes of the compressed bunchs for different energy modulation were also obtained by measuring Cherenkov radiation by one shot using the femto-second streak camera. Prior to the experiment, numerical tracking analysis to determine operating parameters for the magnetic pulse compression was also done. Measured pulse widths were compared with calculated ones. Finally, a 2 ps (full width at half maximum; FWHM) single bunch with an electric charge of 0.3 nC could be generated by the magnetic pulse compression. ((orig.))

  14. Hypersonic modulation of light in three-dimensional photonic and phononic band-gap materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimov, A V; Tanaka, Y; Pevtsov, A B; Kaplan, S F; Golubev, V G; Tamura, S; Yakovlev, D R; Bayer, M

    2008-07-18

    The elastic coupling between the a-SiO2 spheres composing opal films brings forth three-dimensional periodic structures which besides a photonic stop band are predicted to also exhibit complete phononic band gaps. The influence of elastic crystal vibrations on the photonic band structure has been studied by injection of coherent hypersonic wave packets generated in a metal transducer by subpicosecond laser pulses. These studies show that light with energies close to the photonic band gap can be efficiently modulated by hypersonic waves.

  15. L-band passively harmonic mode-locked fiber laser based on a graphene saturable absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, J; Zhang, S M; Li, H F; Meng, Y C; Li, X L; Hao, Y P

    2012-01-01

    We have proposed and demonstrated an L-band passively harmonic mode-locked fiber laser based on a graphene saturable absorber (SA). By adjusting the pump power and the polarization controller, we have experimentally observed L-band fundamental and harmonic mode-locked optical pulses. The fundamental optical pulse has the duration of 1.3 ps, and the maximum average output power of 13.16 mW at the incident pump power of 98.8 mW. The order of the harmonic mode-locked optical pulses can be changed over the range from the second to the fourth. From the experimental results, we deduced that the likely origin of the harmonic mode-locked self-stabilization was the result of global and local soliton interactions induced by the unstability continuous wave (CW) components

  16. Digital signal processing for the Johnson noise thermometry: a time series analysis of the Johnson noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Byung Soo; Hwang, In Koo; Chung, Chong Eun; Kwon, Kee Choon; David, E. H.; Kisner, R.A.

    2004-06-01

    In this report, we first proved that a random signal obtained by taking the sum of a set of signal frequency signals generates a continuous Markov process. We used this random signal to simulate the Johnson noise and verified that the Johnson noise thermometry can be used to improve the measurements of the reactor coolant temperature within an accuracy of below 0.14%. Secondly, by using this random signal we determined the optimal sampling rate when the frequency band of the Johnson noise signal is given. Also the results of our examination on how good the linearity of the Johnson noise is and how large the relative error of the temperature could become when the temperature increases are described. Thirdly, the results of our analysis on a set of the Johnson noise signal blocks taken from a simple electric circuit are described. We showed that the properties of the continuous Markov process are satisfied even when some channel noises are present. Finally, we describe the algorithm we devised to handle the problem of the time lag in the long-term average or the moving average in a transient state. The algorithm is based on the Haar wavelet and is to estimate the transient temperature that has much smaller time delay. We have shown that the algorithm can track the transient temperature successfully

  17. Banded all-optical OFDM super-channels with low-bandwidth receivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Binhuang; Zhu, Chen; Corcoran, Bill; Zhuang, Leimeng; Lowery, Arthur James

    2016-08-08

    We propose a banded all-optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (AO-OFDM) transmission system based on synthesising a number of truncated sinc-shaped subcarriers for each sub-band. This approach enables sub-band by sub-band reception and therefore each receiver's electrical bandwidth can be significantly reduced compared with a conventional AO-OFDM system. As a proof-of-concept experiment, we synthesise 6 × 10-Gbaud subcarriers in both conventional and banded AO-OFDM systems. With a limited receiver electrical bandwidth, the experimental banded AO-OFDM system shows 2-dB optical signal to noise ratio (OSNR) benefit over conventional AO-OFDM at the 7%-overhead forward error correction (FEC) threshold. After transmission over 800-km of single-mode fiber, ≈3-dB improvement in Q-factor can be achieved at the optimal launch power at a cost of increasing the spectral width by 14%.

  18. Objective and subjective rating of tonal noise radiated from UK wind farms: Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This final report provides data on the assessment of tonal noise radiation from wind turbines in the United Kingdom. Both objective and subjective assessments of the noise pollution from various wind farms are incorporated in the study. Previous subjective tests are verified here using a larger subject and sample size compared to the initial study. The study also aims to produce an objective automatic tonal assessment procedure which identifies tones and broad band masking noise in wind farm radiated noise spectra. (UK)

  19. Pulsed cathodoluminescence of nanoscale aluminum oxide with different phase compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kortov, V.S.; Zvonarev, S.V.; Medvedev, A.I.

    2011-01-01

    The methods of pulsed cathodoluminescence have been used to study compacted powders and ceramics containing different phases of aluminum oxide. An intensive luminescence of the samples under study in the visible, NIR, and UV regions of the spectrum has been found. The luminescence bands are very broad and include a few components. The number of the bands depends on the phase composition of the samples. The oxygen vacancies, which capture one or two electrons, produce luminescence centers in the near UV region. The most probable in the visible region is the luminescence of aggregate defects, impurities, and surface centers. - Highlights: → We investigate pulsed cathodoluminescence spectra of nanoscale alumina. → We found the intensive luminescence in the visible, NIR, and UV regions. → The transformation of R-line structure depends on phase composition of alumina. → We substantiate the relation of luminescence bands with concrete centers.

  20. Noise figure of amplified dispersive Fourier transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goda, Keisuke; Jalali, Bahram

    2010-01-01

    Amplified dispersive Fourier transformation (ADFT) is a powerful tool for fast real-time spectroscopy as it overcomes the limitations of traditional optical spectrometers. ADFT maps the spectrum of an optical pulse into a temporal waveform using group-velocity dispersion and simultaneously amplifies it in the optical domain. It greatly simplifies spectroscopy by replacing the diffraction grating and detector array in the conventional spectrometer with a dispersive fiber and single-pixel photodetector, enabling ultrafast real-time spectroscopic measurements. Following our earlier work on the theory of ADFT, here we study the effect of noise on ADFT. We derive the noise figure of ADFT and discuss its dependence on various parameters.

  1. Volkov transform generalized projection algorithm for attosecond pulse characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keathley, P D; Bhardwaj, S; Moses, J; Laurent, G; Kärtner, F X

    2016-01-01

    An algorithm for characterizing attosecond extreme ultraviolet pulses that is not bandwidth-limited, requires no interpolation of the experimental data, and makes no approximations beyond the strong-field approximation is introduced. This approach fully incorporates the dipole transition matrix element into the retrieval process. Unlike attosecond retrieval methods such as phase retrieval by omega oscillation filtering (PROOF), or improved PROOF, it simultaneously retrieves both the attosecond and infrared (IR) pulses, without placing fundamental restrictions on the IR pulse duration, intensity or bandwidth. The new algorithm is validated both numerically and experimentally, and is also found to have practical advantages. These include an increased robustness to noise, and relaxed requirements for the size of the experimental dataset and the intensity of the streaking pulse. (paper)

  2. A multi-channel S-band FMCW radar front-end

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, A.P.M.; Vliet, F.E. van

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of a low-cost synthesized FMCW radar module, operating in S band. The bi-layer PCB contains a frequency-agile low phase-noise synthesizer and three identical coherent receive-channels. The transmit channel has an automatic power control system that

  3. Robustness of digitally modulated signal features against variation in HF noise model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoaib Mobien

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract High frequency (HF band has both military and civilian uses. It can be used either as a primary or backup communication link. Automatic modulation classification (AMC is of an utmost importance in this band for the purpose of communications monitoring; e.g., signal intelligence and spectrum management. A widely used method for AMC is based on pattern recognition (PR. Such a method has two main steps: feature extraction and classification. The first step is generally performed in the presence of channel noise. Recent studies show that HF noise could be modeled by Gaussian or bi-kappa distributions, depending on day-time. Therefore, it is anticipated that change in noise model will have impact on features extraction stage. In this article, we investigate the robustness of well known digitally modulated signal features against variation in HF noise. Specifically, we consider temporal time domain (TTD features, higher order cumulants (HOC, and wavelet based features. In addition, we propose new features extracted from the constellation diagram and evaluate their robustness against the change in noise model. This study is targeting 2PSK, 4PSK, 8PSK, 16QAM, 32QAM, and 64QAM modulations, as they are commonly used in HF communications.

  4. FPGA-based design and implementation of arterial pulse wave generator using piecewise Gaussian-cosine fitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Xu, Lisheng; Zhao, Dazhe; Yao, Yang; Song, Dan

    2015-04-01

    Because arterial pulse waves contain vital information related to the condition of the cardiovascular system, considerable attention has been devoted to the study of pulse waves in recent years. Accurate acquisition is essential to investigate arterial pulse waves. However, at the stage of developing equipment for acquiring and analyzing arterial pulse waves, specific pulse signals may be unavailable for debugging and evaluating the system under development. To produce test signals that reflect specific physiological conditions, in this paper, an arterial pulse wave generator has been designed and implemented using a field programmable gate array (FPGA), which can produce the desired pulse waves according to the feature points set by users. To reconstruct a periodic pulse wave from the given feature points, a method known as piecewise Gaussian-cosine fitting is also proposed in this paper. Using a test database that contains four types of typical pulse waves with each type containing 25 pulse wave signals, the maximum residual error of each sampling point of the fitted pulse wave in comparison with the real pulse wave is within 8%. In addition, the function for adding baseline drift and three types of noises is integrated into the developed system because the baseline occasionally wanders, and noise needs to be added for testing the performance of the designed circuits and the analysis algorithms. The proposed arterial pulse wave generator can be considered as a special signal generator with a simple structure, low cost and compact size, which can also provide flexible solutions for many other related research purposes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The influence of subway station design on noise levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ravi R; Suen, Jonathan J; Cellum, Ilana P; Spitzer, Jaclyn B; Lalwani, Anil K

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the impact of subway station design on platform noise levels. Observational. Continuous A-weighted decibel (dBA) sound levels were recorded in 20 New York City subway stations, where trains entered on either a straight track or curved track in 10 stations each. Equivalent continuous noise levels (L eq ) at various locations on the boarding platform (inbound end, midplatform, and outbound end) during train entry and exit were compared between the straight and curved stations in broadband as well as narrow one-third octave bands. Overall, curved stations trended louder than straight stations, although the difference in broadband L eq did not reach statistical significance (curve, 83.4 dBA; straight, 82.6 dBA; P = .054). Noise levels were significantly louder at the inbound end of the platform during train entry (inbound, 89.7 dBA; mid, 85.5 dBA; outbound, 78.7 dBA; P < .001) and at the outbound end during train exit (inbound, 79.7 dBA; mid, 85.3 dBA; outbound, 89.1 dBA; P < .001). Narrow band analysis showed that curved stations were significantly louder than straight stations at 100 Hz and high frequencies from 8 to 20 kHz. Peak impact levels ranged from 104 to 121 dBA. Curved stations have a different noise profile compared to straight stations and are significantly louder than straight stations at high frequencies. Designing stations with straight tracks within the platform can help reduce commuter noise exposure. NA Laryngoscope, 127:1169-1174, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  6. Optimum design of band-gap beam structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olhoff, Niels; Niu, Bin; Cheng, Gengdong

    2012-01-01

    The design of band-gap structures receives increasing attention for many applications in mitigation of undesirable vibration and noise emission levels. A band-gap structure usually consists of a periodic distribution of elastic materials or segments, where the propagation of waves is impeded...... or significantly suppressed for a range of external excitation frequencies. Maximization of the band-gap is therefore an obvious objective for optimum design. This problem is sometimes formulated by optimizing a parameterized design model which assumes multiple periodicity in the design. However, it is shown...... in the present paper that such an a priori assumption is not necessary since, in general, just the maximization of the gap between two consecutive natural frequencies leads to significant design periodicity. The aim of this paper is to maximize frequency gaps by shape optimization of transversely vibrating...

  7. Comparison of Model Prediction with Measurements of Galactic Background Noise at L-Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeVine, David M.; Abraham, Saji; Kerr, Yann H.; Wilson, Willam J.; Skou, Niels; Sobjaerg, S.

    2004-01-01

    The spectral window at L-band (1.413 GHz) is important for passive remote sensing of surface parameters such as soil moisture and sea surface salinity that are needed to understand the hydrological cycle and ocean circulation. Radiation from celestial (mostly galactic) sources is strong in this window and an accurate accounting for this background radiation is often needed for calibration. Modem radio astronomy measurements in this spectral window have been converted into a brightness temperature map of the celestial sky at L-band suitable for use in correcting passive measurements. This paper presents a comparison of the background radiation predicted by this map with measurements made with several modem L-band remote sensing radiometers. The agreement validates the map and the procedure for locating the source of down-welling radiation.

  8. Performance of Traffic Noise Barriers with Varying Cross-Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Grubeša

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of noise barriers largely depends on their geometry. In this paper, the performance of noise barriers was simulated using the numerical Boundary Element Method (BEM. Traffic noise was particularly considered with its standardized noise spectrum adapted to human hearing. The cross-section of the barriers was varied with the goal of finding the optimum shape in comparison to classical rectangular barriers. The barrier performance was calculated at different receiver points for a fixed barrier height and source position. The magnitude of the insertion loss parameter was used to evaluate the performance change, both in one-third octave bands and as the broadband mean insertion loss value. The proposed barriers of varying cross-section were also compared with a typical T-shape barrier of the same height.

  9. Operation of transition-edge sensors with excess thermal noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maasilta, I J; Kinnunen, K M; Nuottajaervi, A K; Leppaeniemi, J; Luukanen, A

    2006-01-01

    The superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) is currently one of the most attractive choices for ultra-high resolution calorimetry in the keV x-ray band, and is being considered for future ESA and NASA missions. We have performed a study on the noise characteristics of Au/Ti bilayer TESs, at operating temperatures around ∼100 mK, with the SQUID readout at 1.5 K. Experimental results indicate that without modifications the back-action noise from the SQUID chip degrades the noise characteristics significantly. We present a simple and effective solution to the problem: by installing an extra shunt resistor which absorbs the excess radiation from the SQUID input, we have reduced the excess thermal (photon) noise power down by approximately a factor of five, allowing high resolution operation of the sensors

  10. Polarization extinction ratio and polarization dependent intensity noise in long-pulse supercontinuum generation (Conference Presentation)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chin, Catherine; Engelsholm, Rasmus Dybbro; Moselund, Peter Morten

    2017-01-01

    to 2200 nm, and fast photo detectors, to record 800 consecutive pulses. Peaks from these pulses are first extracted, then distribution of their pulse height histogram (PHH) is constructed. Analysis using higher-order moments about the mean (variance, skewness and kurtosis) showed that: (1) around the pump...

  11. Out-of-band and adjacent-channel interference reduction by analog nonlinear filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, Alexei V.; Davidchack, Ruslan L.; Smith, Jeffrey E.

    2015-12-01

    In a perfect world, we would have `brick wall' filters, no-distortion amplifiers and mixers, and well-coordinated spectrum operations. The real world, however, is prone to various types of unintentional and intentional interference of technogenic (man-made) origin that can disrupt critical communication systems. In this paper, we introduce a methodology for mitigating technogenic interference in communication channels by analog nonlinear filters, with an emphasis on the mitigation of out-of-band and adjacent-channel interference. Interference induced in a communications receiver by external transmitters can be viewed as wide-band non-Gaussian noise affecting a narrower-band signal of interest. This noise may contain a strong component within the receiver passband, which may dominate over the thermal noise. While the total wide-band interference seen by the receiver may or may not be impulsive, we demonstrate that the interfering component due to power emitted by the transmitter into the receiver channel is likely to appear impulsive under a wide range of conditions. We give an example of mechanisms of impulsive interference in digital communication systems resulting from the nonsmooth nature of any physically realizable modulation scheme for transmission of a digital (discontinuous) message. We show that impulsive interference can be effectively mitigated by nonlinear differential limiters (NDLs). An NDL can be configured to behave linearly when the input signal does not contain outliers. When outliers are encountered, the nonlinear response of the NDL limits the magnitude of the respective outliers in the output signal. The signal quality is improved in excess of that achievable by the respective linear filter, increasing the capacity of a communications channel. The behavior of an NDL, and its degree of nonlinearity, is controlled by a single parameter in a manner that enables significantly better overall suppression of the noise-containing impulsive components

  12. MICROCALORIMETER SPECTROSCOPY AT HIGH PULSE RATES: A MULTI-PULSE FITTING TECHNIQUE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, J. W.; Alpert, B. K.; Doriese, W. B.; Joe, Y. I.; O’Neil, G. C.; Swetz, D. S.; Ullom, J. N. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 325 Broadway MS 686.02, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Fischer, D. A.; Jaye, C. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Brookhaven National Lab, Brookhaven, NY (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Transition Edge Sensor microcalorimeters can measure X-ray and gamma-ray energies with very high energy resolution and high photon-collection efficiency. For this technology to reach its full potential in future X-ray observatories, each sensor must be able to measure hundreds or even thousands of photon energies per second. Current “optimal filtering” approaches to achieve the best possible energy resolution work only for photons that are well isolated in time, a requirement which is in direct conflict with the need for high-rate measurements. We describe a new analysis procedure to allow fitting for the pulse height of all photons even in the presence of heavy pulse pile-up. In the limit of isolated pulses, the technique reduces to standard optimal filtering with long records. We employ reasonable approximations to the noise covariance function in order to render this procedure computationally viable even for very long data records. The technique is employed to analyze X-ray emission spectra at 600 eV and 6 keV at rates up to 250 counts s{sup −1} in microcalorimeters having exponential signal decay times of approximately 1.2 ms.

  13. Measurements of picosecond pulses of a high-current electron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheltov, K.A.; Petrenko, A.N.; Turundaevskaya, I.G.; Shalimanov, V.F.

    1997-01-01

    The duration of a picosecond high-current accelerator electron beam pulse duration is measured and its shape is determined using a measuring line, comprising a Faraday cup, a radiofrequency cable of minor length and a wide-band SRG-7 oscillograph. The procedure of data reconstruction according to regularization method is applied to determine the actual shape of the pulse measured

  14. Frequency Stepped Pulse Train Modulated Wind Sensing Lidar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anders Sig; Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2011-01-01

    of frequency shifts corresponding to a specific distance. The spatial resolution depends on the repetition rate of the pulses in the pulse train. Directional wind measurements are shown and compared to a CW lidar measurement. The carrier to noise ratio of the FSPT lidar compared to a CW lidar is discussed......In this paper a wind sensing lidar utilizing a Frequency Stepped Pulse Train (FSPT) is demonstrated. One of the advantages in the FSTP lidar is that it enables direct measurement of wind speed as a function of distance from the lidar. Theoretically the FSPT lidar continuously produces measurements...... as is the case with a CW lidar, but at the same time with a spatial resolution, and without the range ambiguity originating from e.g. clouds. The FSPT lidar utilizes a frequency sweeping source for generation of the FSPT. The source generates a pulse train where each pulse has an optical carrier frequency...

  15. High power tests of X-band RF windows at KEK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otake, Yuji [Earthquake Research Inst., Tokyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan); Tokumoto, Shuichi; Kazakov, Sergei Yu.; Odagiri, Junichi; Mizuno, Hajime

    1997-04-01

    Various RF windows comprising a short pill-box, a long pill-box, a TW (traveling wave)-mode and three TE11-mode horn types have been developed for an X-band high-power pulse klystron with two output windows for JLC (Japan Linear Collider). The output RF power of the klystron is designed to be 130 MW with the 800 ns pulse duration. Since this X-band klystron has two output windows, the maximum RF power of the window must be over 85 MW. The design principle for the windows is to reduce the RF-power density and/or the electric-field strength at the ceramic part compared with that of an ordinary pill-box-type window. Their reduction is effective to increase the handling RF power of the window. To confirm that the difference among the electric-field strengths depends on their RF structures, High-power tests of the above-mentioned windows were successfully carried out using a traveling-wave resonator (TWR) for the horns and the TW-mode type and, installing them directly to klystron output waveguides for the short and long pill-box type. Based upon the operation experience of S-band windows, two kinds of ceramic materials were used for these tests. The TE11-mode 1/2{lambda}g-1 window was tested up to the RF peak-power of 84 MW with the 700 ns pulse duration in the TWR. (J.P.N)

  16. A Coherent Compton Backscattering High Gain FEL using an X-Band Microwave Undulator

    CERN Document Server

    Pellegrini, C; Travish, G

    2005-01-01

    We describe a proposed high-gain FEL using an X-band microwave undulator and operating at a wavelength of about 0.5 μm. The FEL electron beam energy is 65 MeV. The beam is produced by the NLCTA X-band linac at SLAC, using an S-band high-brightness photoinjector. The undulator consists of a circular waveguide with an rf wave counter-propagating with respect to the electron beam. The undulator is powered with two high-power X-band klystrons and a dual-moded pulse compressor recently developed at SLAC. This system is capable of delivering flat-top rf pulses of up to 400 ns and a few hundred megawatts. The equivalent undulator period is 1.4 cm, the radius of the circular pipe is 1 cm, and the undulator parameter is about 0.4 for a helical undulator configuration, obtained using two cross-polarized TE modes, or larger for a planar configuration, using one rf polarization. The undulator is about four meters long. The FEL will reach saturation within this distance when operated in a SASE mode. We describe t...

  17. Runs 800, 813, 842 and physics runs from 18.1.77 to 21.5.77, Development of a new set-up for working line measurements including a Fast Fourier Transform Spectrum Analyser and using weak beam excitiation with broad-band noise

    CERN Document Server

    Borer, J

    1977-01-01

    Runs 800, 813, 842 and physics runs from 18.1.77 to 21.5.77, Development of a new set-up for working line measurements including a Fast Fourier Transform Spectrum Analyser and using weak beam excitiation with broad-band noise

  18. Beat Noise Cancellation in 2-D Optical Code-Division Multiple-Access Systems Using Optical Hard-Limiter Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Ngoc T.; Pham, Anh T.; Cheng, Zixue

    We analyze the beat noise cancellation in two-dimensional optical code-division multiple-access (2-D OCDMA) systems using an optical hard-limiter (OHL) array. The Gaussian shape of optical pulse is assumed and the impact of pulse propagation is considered. We also take into account the receiver noise and multiple access interference (MAI) in the analysis. The numerical results show that, when OHL array is employed, the system performance is greatly improved compared with the cases without OHL array. Also, parameters needed for practical system design are comprehensively analyzed.

  19. Charge pulse preamplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libs, Gerard.

    1973-01-01

    A charge pulse preamplifier with very low background noise is described. The inlet stage of that preamplifier comprises a cooled field-effect transistor receiving the signal to be amplified at its gate input. Preferably, the charge resistor of said transistor is a field effect transistor, the source inlet of which is connected to the drain inlet of the former transistor through a self-induction coil and a resistor mounted in series. This can be applied to the treatment of the signals delivered by a particle detector in the form of a semi-conductor [fr

  20. Noise and pile-up in liquid sampling calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franzini, P.

    1988-01-01

    The design and construction of detectors for the SSC presents new challenges and requires electronics of priorly unavailable performance. Most detector elements produce minute signals which can be lost in the ever present noise from thermal fluctuation and the finite charge of the electron. The author presents in these notes a pedagogical introduction to noise and pile-up, as applicable to liquid sampling calorimeters, beginning with a brief, only descriptive, introduction to amplifiers and the physical origins of noise. He then studies the particular case of noise in charge measurements, in particular for calorimeters, where parallel noise is usually negligible. By a physical example he discusses optimal filtering, proving that gaussian filters are not optimal. The scaling laws of noise versus source capacitance and filter bandwidth or shaping time, are emphasized. An explicit example for pulse shapes peaking at 1 μs is computed and extrapolated to 0.1 μs, more appropriate for an SSC detector. Solutions for the several problems arising at short shaping times are discussed and the conditions for optimal preamp-detector matching (for minimum noise) are derived. He also briefly discusses pile-up and its scaling laws. Correlations between signal samples at different times are considered and computed for an example. Correlations are necessary to compute the noise in signals reconstructed from sampling

  1. Narrowband noise study of sliding charge density waves in NbSe3 nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Seita; Jamei, Mehdi; Zettl, Alex

    2017-02-01

    Transport properties (dc electrical resistivity, threshold electric field, and narrow-band noise) are reported for nanoribbon specimens of NbSe3 with thicknesses as low as 18 nm. As the sample thickness decreases, the resistive anomalies characteristic of the charge density wave (CDW) state are suppressed and the threshold fields for nonlinear CDW conduction apparently diverge. Narrow-band noise measurements allow determination of the concentration of carriers condensed in the CDW state n c , reflective of the CDW order parameter Δ. Although the CDW transition temperatures are relatively independent of sample thickness, in the lower CDW state Δ decreases dramatically with decreasing sample thickness.

  2. Experimental research on Ku-band magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Jiande; He, Juntao; Li, Zhiqiang; Ling, Junpu [College of Optoelectric Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Hunan 410073 (China)

    2015-10-15

    An improved Ku-band magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator is proposed and investigated experimentally. In the particle-in-cell simulation, the Ku-band MILO generates the microwave with a power of 1.62 GW and a frequency of 13 GHz at the input voltage of 474 kV. The device is fabricated based on the simulation results, and an experiment system is designed. In the preliminary experiments, output microwave with frequency of 13.02 GHz, power of 150 MW, and pulse width of 17 ns is generated, under the diode voltage of 450 kV. Analysis on the experiment results shows that plasma produced due to the large current hitting to the outside of the collection tank is the essential cause for the low amplitude of the microwave power and short pulse width.

  3. High Energy, Short Pulse Fiber Injection Lasers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, J W; Messerly, M J; Phan, H H; Crane, J K; Beach, R J; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2008-09-10

    A short pulse fiber injection laser for the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has been developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This system produces 100 {micro}J pulses with 5 nm of bandwidth centered at 1053 nm. The pulses are stretched to 2.5 ns and have been recompressed to sub-ps pulse widths. A key feature of the system is that the pre-pulse power contrast ratio exceeds 80 dB. The system can also precisely adjust the final recompressed pulse width and timing and has been designed for reliable, hands free operation. The key challenges in constructing this system were control of the signal to noise ratio, dispersion management and managing the impact of self phase modulation on the chirped pulse.

  4. A modified LLCL-filter with the reduced conducted EMI noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Weimin; Sun, Yunjie; Lin, Zhe

    2013-01-01

    For a transformerless grid-tied converter using Pulse Width Modulation (PWM), the harmonics of grid-injected current, the leakage current and the Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) noise are three important issues during design of the output filter. In this paper, the Common-Mode (CM...

  5. Evaluation of real-time digital pulse shapers with various HPGe and silicon radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menaa, N.; D'Agostino, P.; Zakrzewski, B.; Jordanov, V.T.

    2011-01-01

    Real-time digital pulse shaping techniques allow synthesis of pulse shapes that have been difficult to realize using the traditional analog methods. Using real-time digital shapers, triangular/trapezoidal filters can be synthesized in real time. These filters exhibit digital control on the rise time, fall time, and flat-top of the trapezoidal shape. Thus, the trapezoidal shape can be adjusted for optimum performance at different distributions of the series and parallel noise. The trapezoidal weighting function (WF) represents the optimum time-limited pulse shape when only parallel and series noises are present in the detector system. In the presence of 1/F noise, the optimum WF changes depending on the 1/F noise contribution. In this paper, we report on the results of the evaluation of new filter types for processing signals from CANBERRA high purity germanium (HPGe) and passivated, implanted, planar silicon (PIPS) detectors. The objective of the evaluation is to determine improvements in performance over the current trapezoidal (digital) filter. The evaluation is performed using a customized CANBERRA digital signal processing unit that is fitted with new FPGA designs and any required firmware modifications to support operation of the new filters. The evaluated filters include the Cusp, one-over-F (1/F), and pseudo-Gaussian filters. The results are compared with the CANBERRA trapezoidal shaper.

  6. A Study of New Pulse Auscultation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Yun Chen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a new type of pulse auscultation system, which uses a condenser microphone to measure pulse sound waves on the wrist, captures the microphone signal for filtering, amplifies the useful signal and outputs it to an oscilloscope in analog form for waveform display and storage and delivers it to a computer to perform a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT and convert the pulse sound waveform into a heartbeat frequency. Furthermore, it also uses an audio signal amplifier to deliver the pulse sound by speaker. The study observed the principles of Traditional Chinese Medicine’s pulsing techniques, where pulse signals at places called “cun”, “guan” and “chi” of the left hand were measured during lifting (100 g, searching (125 g and pressing (150 g actions. Because the system collects the vibration sound caused by the pulse, the sensor itself is not affected by the applied pressure, unlike current pulse piezoelectric sensing instruments, therefore, under any kind of pulsing pressure, it displays pulse changes and waveforms with the same accuracy. We provide an acquired pulse and waveform signal suitable for Chinese Medicine practitioners’ objective pulse diagnosis, thus providing a scientific basis for this Traditional Chinese Medicine practice. This study also presents a novel circuit design using an active filtering method. An operational amplifier with its differential features eliminates the interference from external signals, including the instant high-frequency noise. In addition, the system has the advantages of simple circuitry, cheap cost and high precision.

  7. Noise Budget and Interstellar Medium Mitigation Advances in the NANOGrav Pulsar Timing Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolch, T.; NANOGrav Collaboration; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Demorest, P. B.; Ellis, J. A.; Jones, M. L.; Lam, M. T.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Levin, L.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Palliyaguru, N. T.; Stinebring, D. R.

    2018-02-01

    Gravitational wave (GW) detection with pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) requires accurate noise characterization. The noise of our Galactic-scale GW detector has been systematically evaluated by the Noise Budget and Interstellar Medium Mitigation working groups within the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) collaboration. Intrinsically, individual radio millisecond pulsars (MSPs) used by NANOGrav can have some degree of achromatic red spin noise, as well as white noise due to pulse phase jitter. Along any given line-of-sight, the ionized interstellar medium contributes chromatic noise through dispersion measure (DM) variations, interstellar scintillation, and scattering. These effects contain both red and white components. In the future, with wideband receivers, the effects of frequency-dependent DM will become important. Having anticipated and measured these diverse sources of detector noise, the NANOGrav PTA remains well-poised to detect low-frequency GWs.

  8. A low-phase-noise wide-band CMOS quadrature VCO for multi-standard RF front-ends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fard, Ali; Andreani, Pietro

    2005-01-01

    structures. The QVCO is compared to a double cross-coupled LC-tank differential oscillator, both in theory and experiments, for evaluation of its phase noise, providing a good insight into its performance. The measured data displays up to 2 dBc/Hz lower phase noise in the 1/f2 region for the QVCO, when...

  9. Enhancement of high-order harmonic generation in the presence of noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yavuz, I; Altun, Z [Department of Physics, Marmara University, 34722 Ziverbey, Istanbul (Turkey); Topcu, T, E-mail: ilhan.yavuz@marmara.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Auburn University, AL 36849-5311 (United States)

    2011-07-14

    We report on our simulations of the generation of high-order harmonics from atoms driven by an intense femtosecond laser field in the presence of noise. We numerically solve the non-perturbative stochastic time-dependent Schroedinger equation and observe how varying noise levels affect the frequency components of the high harmonic spectrum. Our calculations show that when an optimum amount of noise is present in the driving laser field, roughly a factor of 45 net enhancement can be achieved in high-order harmonic yield, especially, around the cut-off region. We observe that, for a relatively weak noise, the enhancement mechanism is sensitive to the carrier-envelope phase. We also investigate the possibility of generating ultra-short intense attosecond pulses by combining the laser field and noise and observe that a roughly four orders of magnitude enhanced isolated attosecond burst can be generated.

  10. Enhancement of high-order harmonic generation in the presence of noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yavuz, I; Altun, Z; Topcu, T

    2011-01-01

    We report on our simulations of the generation of high-order harmonics from atoms driven by an intense femtosecond laser field in the presence of noise. We numerically solve the non-perturbative stochastic time-dependent Schroedinger equation and observe how varying noise levels affect the frequency components of the high harmonic spectrum. Our calculations show that when an optimum amount of noise is present in the driving laser field, roughly a factor of 45 net enhancement can be achieved in high-order harmonic yield, especially, around the cut-off region. We observe that, for a relatively weak noise, the enhancement mechanism is sensitive to the carrier-envelope phase. We also investigate the possibility of generating ultra-short intense attosecond pulses by combining the laser field and noise and observe that a roughly four orders of magnitude enhanced isolated attosecond burst can be generated.

  11. Noise characterization of oil and gas operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Cameron; Autenrieth, Daniel A; Lipsey, Tiffany; Brazile, William J

    2017-08-01

    In cooperation with The Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, researchers at Colorado State University performed area noise monitoring at 23 oil and gas sites throughout Northern Colorado. The goals of this study were to: (1) measure and compare the noise levels for the different phases of oil and gas development sites; (2) evaluate the effectiveness of noise barriers; and (3) determine if noise levels exceeded the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission noise limits. The four phases of oil and gas development include drilling, hydraulic fracturing, completion and production. Noise measurements were collected using the A- and C-weighted sound scales. Octave band analysis was also performed to characterize the frequency spectra of the noise measurements.  Noise measurements were collected using noise dosimeters and a hand-held sound-level meter at specified distances from the development sites in each cardinal direction. At 350 ft (107 m), drilling, hydraulic fracturing, and completion sites without noise barriers exceeded the maximum permissible noise levels for residential and commercial zones (55 dBA and 60 dBA, respectively). In addition, drilling and hydraulic fracturing sites with noise barriers exceeded the maximum permissible noise level for residential zones (55 dBA). However, during drilling, hydraulic fracturing, and completion operations, oil producers are allowed an exception to the noise permissible limits in that they only must comply with the industrial noise limit (80 dBA). It is stated in Rule 604.c.(2)A. that: "Operations involving pipeline or gas facility installation or maintenance, the use of a drilling rig, completion rig, workover rig, or stimulation is subject to the maximum permissible noise levels for industrial zones (80dBA)." [8] Production sites were within the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission permissible noise level criteria for all zones. At 350 ft (107 m) from the noise source, all drilling

  12. Low-frequency noise from large wind turbines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Henrik; Pedersen, Christian Sejer

    2011-06-01

    As wind turbines get larger, worries have emerged that the turbine noise would move down in frequency and that the low-frequency noise would cause annoyance for the neighbors. The noise emission from 48 wind turbines with nominal electric power up to 3.6 MW is analyzed and discussed. The relative amount of low-frequency noise is higher for large turbines (2.3-3.6 MW) than for small turbines (≤ 2 MW), and the difference is statistically significant. The difference can also be expressed as a downward shift of the spectrum of approximately one-third of an octave. A further shift of similar size is suggested for future turbines in the 10-MW range. Due to the air absorption, the higher low-frequency content becomes even more pronounced, when sound pressure levels in relevant neighbor distances are considered. Even when A-weighted levels are considered, a substantial part of the noise is at low frequencies, and for several of the investigated large turbines, the one-third-octave band with the highest level is at or below 250 Hz. It is thus beyond any doubt that the low-frequency part of the spectrum plays an important role in the noise at the neighbors. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  13. Threshold-based system for noise detection in multilead ECG recordings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jekova, Irena; Krasteva, Vessela; Christov, Ivaylo; Abächerli, Roger

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a system for detection of the most common noise types seen on the electrocardiogram (ECG) in order to evaluate whether an episode from 12-lead ECG is reliable for diagnosis. It implements criteria for estimation of the noise corruption level in specific frequency bands, aiming to identify the main sources of ECG quality disruption, such as missing signal or limited dynamics of the QRS components above 4 Hz; presence of high amplitude and steep artifacts seen above 1 Hz; baseline drift estimated at frequencies below 1 Hz; power–line interference in a band ±2 Hz around its central frequency; high-frequency and electromyographic noises above 20 Hz. All noise tests are designed to process the ECG series in the time domain, including 13 adjustable thresholds for amplitude and slope criteria which are evaluated in adjustable time intervals, as well as number of leads. The system allows flexible extension toward application-specific requirements for the noise levels in acceptable quality ECGs. Training of different thresholds’ settings to determine different positive noise detection rates is performed with the annotated set of 1000 ECGs from the PhysioNet database created for the Computing in Cardiology Challenge 2011. Two implementations are highlighted on the receiver operating characteristic (area 0.968) to fit to different applications. The implementation with high sensitivity (Se = 98.7%, Sp = 80.9%) appears as a reliable alarm when there are any incidental problems with the ECG acquisition, while the implementation with high specificity (Sp = 97.8%, Se = 81.8%) is less susceptible to transient problems but rather validates noisy ECGs with acceptable quality during a small portion of the recording. (paper)

  14. Vibration-induced electrical noise in a cryogen-free dilution refrigerator: Characterization, mitigation, and impact on qubit coherence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalra, Rachpon; Laucht, Arne; Dehollain, Juan Pablo; Bar, Daniel; Freer, Solomon; Simmons, Stephanie; Muhonen, Juha T.; Morello, Andrea, E-mail: a.morello@unsw.edu.au [Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications, UNSW Australia, Sydney NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2016-07-15

    Cryogen-free low-temperature setups are becoming more prominent in experimental science due to their convenience and reliability, and concern about the increasing scarcity of helium as a natural resource. Despite not having any moving parts at the cold end, pulse tube cryocoolers introduce vibrations that can be detrimental to the experiments. We characterize the coupling of these vibrations to the electrical signal observed on cables installed in a cryogen-free dilution refrigerator. The dominant electrical noise is in the 5–10 kHz range and its magnitude is found to be strongly temperature dependent. We test the performance of different cables designed to diagnose and tackle the noise, and find triboelectrics to be the dominant mechanism coupling the vibrations to the electrical signal. Flattening a semi-rigid cable or jacketing a flexible cable in order to restrict movement within the cable, successfully reduces the noise level by over an order of magnitude. Furthermore, we characterize the effect of the pulse tube vibrations on an electron spin qubit device in this setup. Coherence measurements are used to map out the spectrum of the noise experienced by the qubit, revealing spectral components matching the spectral signature of the pulse tube.

  15. Tinnitus and leisure noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Warwick; Carter, Lyndal

    2017-04-01

    To study the relationship of life-time noise exposure and experience of tinnitus. Audiometric measures included otoscopy, pure tone air- and bone-conduction hearing threshold levels (HTL) and otoacoustic emissions (OAEs). Participants completed questionnaires including demographic information, past hearing health, history of participation in loud leisure activities, and attitudes to noise. A representative sample (1435) of the young (11-35 years old) Australian population. Of the sample, 63% indicated they experienced tinnitus in some form. There was no correlation of tinnitus experience with HTL or OAE amplitudes. Although median octave band HTLs for those who experienced tinnitus "all the time" were slightly higher for those who did not, neither group exhibited HTLs outside clinically-normal values. Of those who experienced tinnitus a direct correlation was found between frequency of experience of tinnitus and increasing cumulative, life-time noise exposure. Those who experienced tinnitus were more likely to report noticing deterioration in their hearing ability over time and to report difficulty hearing in quiet and/or noisy situations. Experience of tinnitus was found throughout this young population but not associated with HTLs or variation in OAE amplitudes. Males experienced 'permanent' tinnitus at significantly greater rate than females.

  16. Noise, a tool for analysis of neutronic impact noise; Noise, Una herramienta para el analisis del impacto del ruido neutronico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez Escobar, A.; Lopez Cedillo, A.; Ortego Inigo, A.; Ortega Pascual, F.

    2013-07-01

    The NOISE application is an off-line tool developed by TECNATOM for Trillo, which simulates the power calculation circuit protection system and L-RELEB system function limitation. It is fed with real data of neutron flux with a frequency of 100 Hz and is designed for predictive analysis system alarms limitation as a result of the oscillations of neutron flux measurements. Addition is to be used as a tool for engineering support to adjust the effective value of the dead band surround filters preventing possible system alarms cause impact on the operation.

  17. Efficient frequency downconversion at the single photon level from the red spectral range to the telecommunications C-band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaske, Sebastian; Lenhard, Andreas; Becher, Christoph

    2011-06-20

    We report on single photon frequency downconversion from the red part of the spectrum (738 nm) to the telecommunications C-band. By mixing attenuated laser pulses with an average photon number per pulse telecommunications wavelengths.

  18. Noise Exposure of Teachers in Nursery Schools-Evaluation of Measures for Noise Reduction When Dropping DUPLO Toy Bricks into Storage Cases by Sound Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebauer, Konstanze; Scharf, Thomas; Baumann, Uwe; Groneberg, David A; Bundschuh, Matthias

    2016-07-04

    Although noise is one of the leading work-related health risk factors for teachers, many nursery schools lack sufficient noise reduction measures. This intervention study evaluated the noise exposure of nursery school teachers when dropping DUPLO toy bricks into storage cases. Sound analyses of the impact included assessment of the maximum sound pressure level (LAFmax) as well as frequency analyses with 1/3 octave band filter. For the purpose of standardization, a customized gadget was developed. Recordings were performed in 11 cases of different materials and designs to assess the impact on sound level reduction. Thereby, the acoustic effects of three damping materials (foam rubber, carpet, and PU-foam) were investigated. The lowest LAFmax was measured in cases consisting of "metal grid" (90.71 dB) or of a woven willow "basket" (91.61 dB), whereas a case of "aluminium" (103.34 dB) generated the highest impact LAFmax. The frequency analyses determined especially low LAFmax in the frequency bands between 80 and 2500 Hz in cases designs "metal grid" and "basket". The insertion of PU-foam achieved the most significant attenuation of LAFmax (-13.88 dB) and, in the frequency analyses, the best sound damping. The dropping of DUPLO bricks in cases contributes to the high noise level in nursery schools, but measured LAFmax show no evidence for the danger of acute hearing loss. However, continuous exposure may lead to functional impairment of the hair cells and trigger stress reactions. We recommend noise reduction by utilizing cases of woven "basket" with an insert of PU-foam.

  19. A modified LLCL-filter with the reduced conducted EMI noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Weimin; Sun, Yunjie; Lin, Zhe

    2014-01-01

    For a transformerless grid-tied converter using pulse width modulation, the harmonics of grid-injected current, the leakage current, and the electromagnetic interference (EMI) noise are three important issues during designing of the output filter. In this paper, the common mode and the differential...

  20. The Israeli EA-FEL Upgrade Towards Long Pulse Operation for Ultra-High Resolution Single Pulse Coherent Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Gover, A; Kanter, M; Kapilevich, B; Litvak, B; Peleg, S; Socol, Y; Volshonok, M

    2005-01-01

    The Israeli Electrostatic Accelerator FEL (EA-FEL) is now being upgraded towards long pulse (1005s) operation and ultra-high resolution (10(-6)) single pulse coherent spectroscopy. We present quantitative estimations regarding the applications of controlled radiation chirp for spectroscopic applications with pulse-time Fourier Transform limited spectral resolution. Additionally, we describe a novel extraction-efficiency-improving scheme based on increase of accelerating voltage (boosting) after saturation is achieved. The efficiency of the proposed scheme is confirmed by theoretical and numerical calculations. The latter are performed using software, based on 3D space-frequency domain model. The presentation provides an overview of the upgrade status: the high-voltage terminal is being reconfigured to accept the accelerating voltage boost system; a new broad band low-loss resonator is being manufactured; multi-stage depressed collector is assembled.

  1. High brightness photonic band crystal semiconductor lasers in the passive mode locking regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosales, R.; Kalosha, V. P.; Miah, M. J.; Bimberg, D.; Posilović, K.; Pohl, J.; Weyers, M.

    2014-01-01

    High brightness photonic band crystal lasers in the passive mode locking regime are presented. Optical pulses with peak power of 3 W and peak brightness of about 180 MW cm −2  sr −1 are obtained on a 5 GHz device exhibiting 15 ps pulses and a very low beam divergence in both the vertical and horizontal directions.

  2. S-band 45 MW peak power test facility at RRCAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanmode, A. Yashwant; Reddy, Sivananda; Mulchandani, J.; Mohania, Praveen; Shrivastava, B. Purushottam

    2015-01-01

    RRCAT is engaged in the design and development of high energy electron LINAC as future injectors for the Booster Synchrotron for Indus-1 and Indus-2 SRS. The high energy LINAC will need microwave power over 30 MW depending on the number of structures to be energized. In order to have advance preparations for this development a 45 MW S-Band test facility has been designed and developed at RRCAT. The test stand is built around a 45 MW peak power S-band pulsed klystron, A conventional pulse forming network based modulator for klystron has been designed and developed. The WR-284 waveguide transmission system consisting of dual directional couplers, SF 6 gas pressurization unit, high power waveguide load and arc sensor has been developed and interfaced with the klystron. The klystron has been successfully tested up to 30 MW peak power at 2856 MHz on SF 6 pressurized waveguide line. A solid state S Band driver amplifier up to 1 kW output power was designed developed for driving the klystron. This paper describes the results of 30 MW peak power test of this facility. (author)

  3. Electronic transport properties of Ti-impurity band in Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olea, J; Gonzalez-Diaz, G; Pastor, D; Martil, I [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada III (Electricidad y Electronica), Facultad de Ciencias, Fisicas, Universidad Complutense, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-04-21

    In this paper we show that pulsed laser melted high dose implantation of Ti in Si, above the Mott transition, produces an impurity band (IB) in this semiconductor. Using the van der Pauw method and Hall effect measurements we find strong laminated conductivity at the implanted layer and a temperature dependent decoupling between the Ti implanted layer (TIL) and the substrate. The conduction mechanism from the TIL to the substrate shows blocking characteristics that could be well explained through IB theory. Using the ATLAS code we can estimate the energetic position of the IB at 0.36 eV from the conduction band, the density of holes in this band which is closely related to the Ti atomic density and the hole mobility in this band. Band diagrams of the structure at low and high temperatures are also simulated in the ATLAS framework. The simulation obtained is fully coherent with experimental results.

  4. Electronic transport properties of Ti-impurity band in Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olea, J; Gonzalez-Diaz, G; Pastor, D; Martil, I

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we show that pulsed laser melted high dose implantation of Ti in Si, above the Mott transition, produces an impurity band (IB) in this semiconductor. Using the van der Pauw method and Hall effect measurements we find strong laminated conductivity at the implanted layer and a temperature dependent decoupling between the Ti implanted layer (TIL) and the substrate. The conduction mechanism from the TIL to the substrate shows blocking characteristics that could be well explained through IB theory. Using the ATLAS code we can estimate the energetic position of the IB at 0.36 eV from the conduction band, the density of holes in this band which is closely related to the Ti atomic density and the hole mobility in this band. Band diagrams of the structure at low and high temperatures are also simulated in the ATLAS framework. The simulation obtained is fully coherent with experimental results.

  5. A low-power current-reuse dual-band analog front-end for multi-channel neural signal recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepehrian, H; Gosselin, B

    2014-01-01

    Thoroughly studying the brain activity of freely moving subjects requires miniature data acquisition systems to measure and wirelessly transmit neural signals in real time. In this application, it is mandatory to simultaneously record the bioelectrical activity of a large number of neurons to gain a better knowledge of brain functions. However, due to limitations in transferring the entire raw data to a remote base station, employing dedicated data reduction techniques to extract the relevant part of neural signals is critical to decrease the amount of data to transfer. In this work, we present a new dual-band neural amplifier to separate the neuronal spike signals (SPK) and the local field potential (LFP) simultaneously in the analog domain, immediately after the pre-amplification stage. By separating these two bands right after the pre-amplification stage, it is possible to process LFP and SPK separately. As a result, the required dynamic range of the entire channel, which is determined by the signal-to-noise ratio of the SPK signal of larger bandwidth, can be relaxed. In this design, a new current-reuse low-power low-noise amplifier and a new dual-band filter that separates SPK and LFP while saving capacitors and pseudo resistors. A four-channel dual-band (SPK, LFP) analog front-end capable of simultaneously separating SPK and LFP is implemented in a TSMC 0.18 μm technology. Simulation results present a total power consumption per channel of 3.1 μw for an input referred noise of 3.28 μV and a NEF for 2.07. The cutoff frequency of the LFP band is fc=280 Hz, and fL=725 Hz and fL=11.2 KHz for SPK, with 36 dB gain for LFP band 46 dB gain for SPK band.

  6. Studies on multiplication effect of noises of PPDs, and a proposal of a new structure to improve the performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oide, H.; Murase, T.; Otono, H.; Yamashita, S.

    2010-01-01

    Pixelated Photon Detectors (PPDs) are arrayed APDs operated in Geiger-mode. Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC) is a PPD produced by Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. Test of dark noise rate of a 1600 pixel MPPC as a function of over-voltage at room temperature indicates that the over-voltage is limited up to a few volts because of explosive increase of noise rate. The over-voltage dependence of random noise rate is nevertheless mostly linear. We confirmed this is due to multiplication effect of noises because of after-pulsing and crosstalk. Over-voltage dependence of random noise and photon detection efficiency are qualitatively different. Considering the electric field structure of MPPC (p-on-n type) and Geiger-efficiency as a function of the position of initial pair creation, these characteristics are possible to be understood. One suggestion for p-on-n type PPD from these results is narrowing the depletion layer below the multiplication layer to reduce random noise and after-pulsing. Another proposal is to put additional buffer capacitance parallel to the diode to accomplish higher gain with lower over-voltage simultaneously with lower noise rate.

  7. Studies on multiplication effect of noises of PPDs, and a proposal of a new structure to improve the performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oide, H., E-mail: oide@icepp.s.u-tokyo.ac.j [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo (Japan); Murase, T.; Otono, H. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo (Japan); Yamashita, S. [ICEPP, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    2010-01-21

    Pixelated Photon Detectors (PPDs) are arrayed APDs operated in Geiger-mode. Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC) is a PPD produced by Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. Test of dark noise rate of a 1600 pixel MPPC as a function of over-voltage at room temperature indicates that the over-voltage is limited up to a few volts because of explosive increase of noise rate. The over-voltage dependence of random noise rate is nevertheless mostly linear. We confirmed this is due to multiplication effect of noises because of after-pulsing and crosstalk. Over-voltage dependence of random noise and photon detection efficiency are qualitatively different. Considering the electric field structure of MPPC (p-on-n type) and Geiger-efficiency as a function of the position of initial pair creation, these characteristics are possible to be understood. One suggestion for p-on-n type PPD from these results is narrowing the depletion layer below the multiplication layer to reduce random noise and after-pulsing. Another proposal is to put additional buffer capacitance parallel to the diode to accomplish higher gain with lower over-voltage simultaneously with lower noise rate.

  8. Improved virtual channel noise model for transform domain Wyner-Ziv video coding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Xin; Forchhammer, Søren

    2009-01-01

    Distributed video coding (DVC) has been proposed as a new video coding paradigm to deal with lossy source coding using side information to exploit the statistics at the decoder to reduce computational demands at the encoder. A virtual channel noise model is utilized at the decoder to estimate...... the noise distribution between the side information frame and the original frame. This is one of the most important aspects influencing the coding performance of DVC. Noise models with different granularity have been proposed. In this paper, an improved noise model for transform domain Wyner-Ziv video...... coding is proposed, which utilizes cross-band correlation to estimate the Laplacian parameters more accurately. Experimental results show that the proposed noise model can improve the rate-distortion (RD) performance....

  9. Design and analysis of an energy-efficient O-QPSK coherent IR-UWB transceiver with a 0.52° RMS phase-noise fractional synthesizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Yutong; Lin, Fujiang; Bai, Xuefei

    2018-03-01

    This paper explores an energy-efficient pulsed ultra-wideband (UWB) radio-frequency (RF) front-end chip fabricated in 0.18-μm CMOS technology, including a transmitter, receiver, and fractional synthesizer. The transmitter adopts a digital offset quadrature phase-shift keying (O-QPSK) modulator and passive direct-phase multiplexing technology, which are energy- and hardware-efficient, to enhance the data rate for a given spectrum. A passive mixer and a capacitor cross-coupled (CCC) source-follower driving amplifier (DA) are also designed for the transmitter to further reduce the low power consumption. For the receiver, a power-aware low-noise amplifier (LNA) and a quadrature mixer are applied. The LNA adopts a CCC boost common-gate amplifier as the input stage, and its current is reused for the second stage to save power. The mixer uses a shared amplification stage for the following passive IQ mixer. Phase noise suppression of the phase-locked loop (PLL) is achieved by utilizing an even-harmonics-nulled series-coupled quadrature oscillator (QVCO) and an in-band noise-aware charge pump (CP) design. The transceiver achieves a measured data rate of 0.8 Gbps with power consumption of 16 mW and 31.5 mW for the transmitter and the receiver, respectively. The optimized integrated phase noise of the PLL is 0.52° at 4.025 GHz. Project supported by the National Science and Technology Major Project of China (No. 2011ZX03004-002-01).

  10. Energy detection UWB system based on pulse width modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Cui

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A new energy detection ultra-wideband system based on pulse width modulation is proposed. The bit error rate (BER performance of this new system is slightly worst than that of a pulse position modulation (PPM system in additive white Gaussian noise channels. In multipath channels, this system does not suffer from cross-modulation interference as PPM, so it can achieve better BER performance than PPM when cross-modulation interference occurs. In addition, when synchronisation errors occur, this system is more robust than PPM.

  11. Seismic Linear Noise Attenuation with Use of Radial Transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymańska-Małysa, Żaneta

    2018-03-01

    One of the goals of seismic data processing is to attenuate the recorded noise in order to enable correct interpretation of the image. Radial transform has been used as a very effective tool in the attenuation of various types of linear noise, both numerical and real (such as ground roll, direct waves, head waves, guided waves etc). The result of transformation from offset - time (X - T) domain into apparent velocity - time (R - T) domain is frequency separation between reflections and linear events. In this article synthetic and real seismic shot gathers were examined. One example was targeted at far offset area of dataset where reflections and noise had similar apparent velocities and frequency bands. Another example was a result of elastic modelling where linear artefacts were produced. Bandpass filtering and scaling operation executed in radial domain attenuated all discussed types of linear noise very effectively. After noise reduction all further processing steps reveal better results, especially velocity analysis, migration and stacking. In all presented cases signal-to-noise ratio was significantly increased and reflections covered previously by noise were revealed. Power spectra of filtered seismic records preserved real dynamics of reflections.

  12. Multi-band transmission color filters for multi-color white LEDs based visible light communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qixia; Zhu, Zhendong; Gu, Huarong; Chen, Mengzhu; Tan, Qiaofeng

    2017-11-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) based visible light communication (VLC) can provide license-free bands, high data rates, and high security levels, which is a promising technique that will be extensively applied in future. Multi-band transmission color filters with enough peak transmittance and suitable bandwidth play a pivotal role for boosting signal-noise-ratio in VLC systems. In this paper, multi-band transmission color filters with bandwidth of dozens nanometers are designed by a simple analytical method. Experiment results of one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) tri-band color filters demonstrate the effectiveness of the multi-band transmission color filters and the corresponding analytical method.

  13. Characteristics of Love and Rayleigh waves in ambient noise: wavetype ratio, source location and seasonal behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juretzek, C.; Perleth, M.; Hadziioannou, C.

    2015-12-01

    Ambient seismic noise has become an important source of signal for tomography and monitoring purposes. Better understanding of the noise field characteristics is crucial to further improve noise applications. Our knowledge about the common and different origins of Love and Rayleigh waves in the microseism bands is still limited. This applies in particular to constraints on source locations and source mechanisms of Love waves. Here, 3-component beamforming is used to distinguish between the differently polarized wave types present in the noise field recorded at several arrays across Europe. The focus lies on frequencies around the primary and secondary microseismic bands. We compare characteristics of Love and Rayleigh wave noise, such as source directions and frequency content. Further, Love to Rayleigh wave ratios are measured at each array, and a dependence on direction is observed. We constrain the corresponding source regions of both wave types by backprojection. By using a full year of data in 2013, we are able to track the seasonal changes in our observations of Love-to-Rayleigh ratio and source locations.

  14. Fabrication and Characterisation of Low-noise Monolithic Mode-locked Lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, David

    2007-01-01

    This thesis deals with the fabrication and characterisation of monolithic semiconductor mode-locked lasers for use in optical communication systems. Other foreseeable applications may be as sources in microwave photonics and optical sampling. The thesis also deals with the design and fabrication...... of intracavity monolithically integrated filters. The common dnominator among the diffrent parts of the thesis is how to achieve and measure the lowest possible noise. Achieving low noise has been pinpointed as one of the most important and difficult challenges for semiconductor mode-locked lasers. The main...... result of this thesis are a fabrication process of a monolithic and deeply etched distributed Bragg reflector and a characterisation system for measurement of quantum limitid timing noise at high repetition rates. The Bragg reflector is a key component in achieving transform limited pulses with low noise...

  15. Stationary response of multi-degree-of-freedom vibro-impact systems to Poisson white noises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Y.; Zhu, W.Q.

    2008-01-01

    The stationary response of multi-degree-of-freedom (MDOF) vibro-impact (VI) systems to random pulse trains is studied. The system is formulated as a stochastically excited and dissipated Hamiltonian system. The constraints are modeled as non-linear springs according to the Hertz contact law. The random pulse trains are modeled as Poisson white noises. The approximate stationary probability density function (PDF) for the response of MDOF dissipated Hamiltonian systems to Poisson white noises is obtained by solving the fourth-order generalized Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov (FPK) equation using perturbation approach. As examples, two-degree-of-freedom (2DOF) VI systems under external and parametric Poisson white noise excitations, respectively, are investigated. The validity of the proposed approach is confirmed by using the results obtained from Monte Carlo simulation. It is shown that the non-Gaussian behaviour depends on the product of the mean arrival rate of the impulses and the relaxation time of the oscillator

  16. Noise exposure levels for musicians during rehearsal and performance times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlvaine, Devon; Stewart, Michael; Anderson, Robert

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine daily noise doses and 8-hour time weighted averages for rock band musicians, crew members, and spectators during a typical rehearsal and performance using both Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) measurement criteria. Personal noise dosimetry was completed on five members of a rock band during one 2-hr rehearsal and one 4-hr performance. Time-weighted averages (TWA) and daily dose values were calculated using both OSHA and NIOSH criteria and compared to industry guidelines for enrollment in hearing conservation programs and the use of hearing protection devices. TWA values ranged from 84.3 to 90.4 dBA (OSHA) and from 90.0 to 96.4 dBA (NIOSH) during the rehearsal. The same values ranged from 91.0 to 99.7 dBA (OSHA) and 94.0 to 102.8 dBA (NIOSH) for the performance. During the rehearsal, daily noise doses ranged from 45.54% to 106.7% (OSHA) and from 317.74% to 1396.07% (NIOSH). During the performance, doses ranged from 114.66% to 382.49% (OSHA) and from 793.31% to 5970.15% (NIOSH). The musicians in this study were exposed to dangerously high levels of noise and should be enrolled in a hearing conservation programs. Hearing protection devices should be worn, especially during performances. The OSHA measurement criteria yielded values significantly more conservative than those produced by NIOSH criteria. Audiologists should counsel musician-patients about the hazards of excessive noise (music) exposure and how to protect their hearing.

  17. Pulsed Traveling-wave Quadrature Squeezing Using Quasi-phase Matched Lithium Niobate Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao-Hsiang

    Interests in generating higher quantum noise squeezing in order to develop methods to enhance optical measurement below the shot-noise limit in various applications has grown in recent years. The noise suppression from squeezing can improve the SNR in coherent optical systems when the returning signal power is weak, such as optical coherence tomography, LADAR, confocal microscopy and low-light coherent imaging. Unlike the generation of squeezing with a continuous wave, which is currently developed mainly for gravitational wave detection in LIGO project, the study of pulsed-traveling waves is focused on industrial, medical and other commercial interests. This dissertation presents the experimental results of pulsed traveling wave squeezing. The intention of the study is to explore the possibility of using quasi-phase matched crystals to generate the highest possible degree of quadrature squeezing. In order to achieve this goal, efforts to test the various effects from spatial Gaussian modes and relative beam waist placement for the second-harmonic pump were carried out in order to further the understanding of limiting factors to pulsed traveling wave squeezing. 20mm and 30mm-long periodically poled lithium noibate (PPLN) crystals were used in the experiment to generate a squeezed vacuum state. A maximum of 4.2+/-0.2dB quadrature squeezing has been observed, and the measured anti-squeezing exceeds 20dB.The phase sensitive amplification (PSA) gain and de-gain performance were also measured to compare the results of measured squeezing. The PPLN crystals can produce high conversion efficiency of second-harmonic generation (SHG) without a cavity. When a long PPLN crystal is used in a squeezer, the beam propagation in the nonlinear medium does not follow the characteristics in thin crystals. Instead, it is operated under the long-crystal criteria, which the crystal length is multiple times longer than the Rayleigh range of the injected beam i n the crystals. Quasi

  18. A Wide-Band High-Gain Compact SIS Receiver Utilizing a 300-μW SiGe IF LNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montazeri, Shirin; Grimes, Paul K.; Tong, Cheuk-Yu Edward; Bardin, Joseph C.

    2017-06-01

    Low-power low-noise amplifiers integrated with superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) mixers are required to enable implementation of large-scale focal plane arrays. In this work, a 220-GHz SIS mixer has been integrated with a high-gain broad-band low-power IF amplifier into a compact receiver module. The low noise amplifier (LNA) was specifically designed to match to the SIS output impedance and contributes less than 7 K to the system noise temperature over the 4-8 GHz IF frequency range. A receiver noise temperature of 30-45 K was measured for a local oscillator frequency of 220 GHz over an IF spanning 4-8 GHz. The LNA power dissipation was only 300-μW. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the lowest power consumption reported for a high-gain wide-band LNA directly integrated with an SIS mixer.

  19. Safety and shielding management for pulse power lab at IPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhyay, Shweta; Faldu, Akash; Koshti, Rahul; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Experiments in pulsed power lab works with very high voltage and high current regime for the nanosecond to microsecond time scale. This produces lot of electromagnetic noise, which can cause interference or malfunctioning of equipment. Laboratory Safety and protection are a very important aspect of science and engineering. Without it, practical performance could result in very serious injury, if not death. To reduce its effect electromagnetic shielding and grounding has to be enforced effectively. Pulse power lab deals with many safety issues like Radiation safety (shielding), High voltage safety, electrical and mechanical safety, etc. In this paper radiation all the safety aspects in pulse power lab is described. (author)

  20. Intra-pulse Cavity Enhanced Measurements of Carbon Monoxide in a Rapid Compression Machine

    KAUST Repository

    Nasir, Ehson Fawad

    2018-05-07

    A laser absorption sensor for carbon monoxide concentration was developed for combustion studies in a rapid compression machine using a pulsed quantum cascade laser near 4.89 μm. Cavity enhancement reduced minimum detection limit down to 2.4 ppm at combustion relevant conditions. Off-axis alignment and rapid intra-pulse down-chirp resulted in effective suppression of cavity noise.

  1. Wavelength selection method with standard deviation: application to pulse oximetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Jaccaud, Camille; Paez, Gonzalo; Strojnik, Marija

    2011-07-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy provides useful biological information after the radiation has penetrated through the tissue, within the therapeutic window. One of the significant shortcomings of the current applications of spectroscopic techniques to a live subject is that the subject may be uncooperative and the sample undergoes significant temporal variations, due to his health status that, from radiometric point of view, introduce measurement noise. We describe a novel wavelength selection method for monitoring, based on a standard deviation map, that allows low-noise sensitivity. It may be used with spectral transillumination, transmission, or reflection signals, including those corrupted by noise and unavoidable temporal effects. We apply it to the selection of two wavelengths for the case of pulse oximetry. Using spectroscopic data, we generate a map of standard deviation that we propose as a figure-of-merit in the presence of the noise introduced by the living subject. Even in the presence of diverse sources of noise, we identify four wavelength domains with standard deviation, minimally sensitive to temporal noise, and two wavelengths domains with low sensitivity to temporal noise.

  2. Theory of deep level trap effects on generation-recombination noise in HgCdTe photoconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iverson, A.E.; Smith, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    We present a theory of the effect of deep level centers on the generation-recombination (g-r) noise and responsivity of an intrinsic photoconductor. The deep level centers can influence the g-r noise and responsivity in three main ways: (i) they can shorten the bulk carrier lifetime by Shockley--Read--Hall recombination; (ii) for some values of the capture cross sections, deep level densities, and temperature, the deep levels can trap a significant fraction of the photogenerated minority carriers. This trapping reduces the effective minority carrier mobility and diffusivity and thus reduces the effect of carrier sweep out on both g-r noise and responsivity; (iii) the deep level centers add a new thermal noise source, which results from fluctuations between bound and free carriers. The strength of this new noise source decreases with decreasing temperature at a slower rate than band-to-band thermal g-r noise. Calculations have been performed for a X = 0.21, n-type Hg/sub 1-x/Cd/sub x/Te photoconductor using the parameters of a commonly occurring deep level center in this material. We find that for typical operating conditions photoconductive detector performance begins to degrade as the deep level density begins to exceed 10 16 cm -3

  3. The noise analysis and optimum filtering techniques for a two-dimensional position sensitive orthogonal strip gamma ray detector employing resistive charge division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, M.S.; Muller, D.W.

    1976-01-01

    The analysis of an orthogonal strip, two-dimensional position sensitive high purity germanium gamma ray detector is discussed. Position sensitivity is obtained by connecting each electrode strip on the detector to a resistor network. Charge, entering the network, divides in relation to the resistance between its entry point and the virtual earth points of the charge sensitive preamplifiers located at the end of each resistor network. The difference of the voltage pulses at the output of each preamplifier is proportional to the position at which the charge entered the resistor network and the sum of the pulse is proportional to the energy of the detected gamma ray. The analysis and spatial noise resolution is presented for this type of position sensitive detector. The results of the analysis show that the position resolution is proportional to the square root of the filter amplifier's output pulse time constant and that for energy measurement the resolution is maximized at the filter amplifier's noise corner time constant. The design of the electronic noise filtering system for the prototype gamma ray camera was based on the mathematical energy and spatial resolution equations. For the spatial channel a Gaussian trapezoidal filtering system was developed. Gaussian filtering was used for the energy channel. The detector noise model was verified by taking rms noise measurements of the filtered energy and spatial pulses from resistive readout charge dividing detectors. These measurements were within 10% of theory. (Auth.)

  4. Pulse-duration discrimination for increasing counting characteristic plateau and for improving counting rate stability of a scintillation counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuz'min, M.G.

    1977-01-01

    For greater stability of scintillation counters operation, discussed is the possibility for increasing the plateau and reducing its slope. Presented is the circuit for discrimination of the signal pulses from input pulses of a photomultiplier. The counting characteristics have been measured with the scintillation detectors being irradiated by different gamma sources ( 60 Co, 137 Cs, 241 Am) and without the source when the scintillation detector is shielded by a tungsten cylinder with a wall thickness of 23 mm. The comparison has revealed that discrimination in duration increase the plateau and reduces its slope. Proceeding from comparison of the noise characteristics, the relationship is found between the noise pulse number and gamma radiation energy. For better stability of the counting rate it is suggested to introduce into the scintillation counter the circuit for duration discrimination of the output pulses of a photomultiplier

  5. High brightness photonic band crystal semiconductor lasers in the passive mode locking regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosales, R.; Kalosha, V. P.; Miah, M. J.; Bimberg, D. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstrasse 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Posilović, K. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstrasse 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); PBC Lasers GmbH, Hardenbergstrasse 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Pohl, J.; Weyers, M. [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz-Institut für Höchstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 4, Berlin 12489 (Germany)

    2014-10-20

    High brightness photonic band crystal lasers in the passive mode locking regime are presented. Optical pulses with peak power of 3 W and peak brightness of about 180 MW cm{sup −2} sr{sup −1} are obtained on a 5 GHz device exhibiting 15 ps pulses and a very low beam divergence in both the vertical and horizontal directions.

  6. Ultraviolet out-of-band radiation studies in laser tin plasma sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parchamy, Homaira; Szilagyi, John; Masnavi, Majid; Richardson, Martin

    2017-11-01

    Out-of-band long wavelength emission measurements from high power, high-repetition-rate extreme-ultra-violet lithography (EUVL) laser plasma sources are imperative to estimating heat deposition in EUV mirrors, and the impact of short wavelength light transported through the imaging system to the wafer surface. This paper reports a series of experiments conducted to measure the absolute spectral irradiances of laser-plasmas produced from planar tin targets over the wavelength region of 124 to 164 nm by 1.06 μm wavelength, 10 ns full-width-at-half-maximum Gaussian laser pulses. The use of spherical targets is relevant to the EUVL source scenario. Although plasmas produced from planar surfaces evolve differently, there is a close similarity to the evolution of current from 10.6 μm CO2 laser EUVL sources, which use a pre-pulse from a lower energy solid-state laser to melt and reform an initial spherical droplet into a thin planar disc target. The maximum of radiation conversion efficiency in the 124-164 nm wavelength band (1%/2πsr) occurs at the laser intensity of 1010 W cm-2. A developed collisional-radiative model reveals the strong experimental spectra that originate mainly from the 4d105p2-4d105s5p, 4d105p-4d105s resonance lines, and 4d95p-4d95s unresolved transition arrays from Sn III, Sn IV, and Sn V ions, respectively. The calculated conversion efficiencies using a 2D radiation-hydrodynamics model are in agreement with the measurements. The model predicts the out-of-band (100-400 nm) radiation conversion efficiencies generated by both 1.06 and 10.6 μm pulses. The 10.6 μm laser pulse produces a higher conversion efficiency (12%/2πsr) at the lower laser intensity of 109 W cm-2.

  7. Performance of horn-coupled transition edge sensors for L- and S-band optical detection on the SAFARI instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldie, D. J.; Glowacka, D. M.; Withington, S.; Chen, Jiajun; Ade, P. A. R.; Morozov, D.; Sudiwala, R.; Trappe, N. A.; Quaranta, O.

    2016-07-01

    We describe the geometry, architecture, dark- and optical performance of ultra-low-noise transition edge sensors as THz detectors for the SAFARI instrument. The TESs are fabricated from superconducting Mo/Au bilayers coupled to impedance-matched superconducting β-phase Ta thin-film absorbers. The detectors have phonon-limited dark noise equivalent powers of order 0.5 - 1.0 aW/ √ Hz and saturation powers of order 20 - 40 fW. The low temperature test configuration incorporating micro-machined backshorts is also described, and construction and typical performance characteristics for the optical load are shown. We report preliminary measurements of the optical performance of these TESs for two SAFARI bands; L-band at 110 - 210 μm and S-band 34 - 60 μm .

  8. The assessment and evaluation of low-frequency noise near the region of infrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Ziaran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this paper is to present recent knowledge about the assessment and evaluation of low-frequency sounds (noise and infrasound, close to the threshold of hearing, and identify their potential effect on human health and annoyance. Low-frequency noise generated by air flowing over a moving car with an open window was chosen as a typical scenario which can be subjectively assessed by people traveling by automobile. The principle of noise generated within the interior of the car and its effects on the comfort of the driver and passengers are analyzed at different velocities. An open window of a car at high velocity behaves as a source of specifically strong tonal low-frequency noise which is generally perceived as annoying. The interior noise generated by an open window of a passenger car was measured under different conditions: Driving on a highway and driving on a typical roadway. First, an octave-band analysis was used to assess the noise level and its impact on the driver′s comfort. Second, a fast Fourier transform (FFT analysis and one-third octave-band analysis were used for the detection of tonal low-frequency noise. Comparison between two different car makers was also done. Finally, the paper suggests some possibilities for scientifically assessing and evaluating low-frequency sounds in general, and some recommendations are introduced for scientific discussion, since sounds with strong low-frequency content (but not only strong engender greater annoyance than is predicted by an A-weighted sound pressure level.

  9. Toeless pulse shaping with a single delay-line network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tauhata, L.; Binns, D.C.

    1976-04-01

    New unipolar delay-line clippers producing negligible cancellation remnant have been developed. Near perfect clipping is achieved using a combination of several types of coaxial cable tranformers working as a phase inverter, a new pulse adder, or an impedance transformer. Only passive elements are used in the bridge network. The construction is simple and the performance is extremely stable and wide in dynamic range and frequency band width. Completely symmetrical bipolar pulses are also easily obtained using this technique

  10. Clustered DPCM with removing noise spectra for the lossless compression of hyperspectral images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiaji; Xu, Jianglei

    2013-10-01

    The clustered DPCM (C-DPCM) lossless compression method by Jarno et al. for hyperspectral images achieved a good compression effect. It can be divided into three components: clustering, prediction, and coding. In the prediction part, it solves a multiple linear regression model for each of the clusters in every band. Without considering the effect of noise spectra, there is still room for improvement. This paper proposes a C-DPCM method with Removing Noise Spectra (C-DPCM-RNS) for the lossless compression of hyperspectral images. C-DPCM-RNS's prediction part consists of two-times trainings. The prediction coefficients obtained from the first training will be used in the linear predictor to compute all the predicted values and then the difference between original and predicted values in current band of current class. Only the non-noise spectra are used in the second training. The resulting prediction coefficients from the second training will be used for prediction and sent to the decoder. The two-times trainings remove part of the interference of noise spectra, and reaches a better compression effect than other methods based on regression prediction.

  11. Generation of frequency-chirped optical pulses with felix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knippels, G.M.H.; Meer, A.F.G. van der; Mols, R.F.X.A.M. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics, Nieuwegein (Netherlands)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Frequency-chirped optical pulses have been produced in the picosecond regime by varying the energy of the electron beam on a microsecond time scale. These pulses were then compressed close to their bandwidth limit by an external pulse compressor. The amount of chirp can be controlled by varying the sweep rate on the electron beam energy and by cavity desynchronisation. To examine the generated chirp we used the following diagnostics: a pulse compressor, a crossed beam autocorrelator, a multichannel electron spectrometer and multichannel optical spectrometer. The compressor is build entirely using reflective optics to permit broad band operation. The autocorrelator is currently operating from 6 {mu}m to 30 {mu}m with one single crystal. It has been used to measure pulses as short as 500 fs. All diagnostics are evacuated to prevent pulse shape distortion or pulse lengthening caused by absorption in ambient water vapour. Pulse length measurements and optical spectra will be presented for different electron beam sweep rates, showing the presence of a frequency chirp. Results on the compression of the optical pulses to their bandwidth limit are given for different electron sweep rates. More experimental results showing the dependence of the amount of chirp on cavity desynchronisation will be presented.

  12. Development and testing of Band 10 receivers for the ALMA project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uzawa, Y.; Fujii, Y.; Gonzalez, A.; Kaneko, K.; Kroug, M.; Kojima, T.; Kuroiwa, K.; Miyachi, A.; Saito, S.; Makise, K.; Wang, Z.; Asayama, S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •The ALMA Band 10 (787–950 GHz) SIS receivers have been developed. •The complex conductivity of NbTiN was measured by a THz-TDS for the mixer design. •Tens of Band 10 receivers have been produced and their performance was quite well. •The best achieved receiver noise temperature was 125 K corresponding to 3hf/k B . •Band 10 receiver installed in the ALMA antenna captured astronomical signals. -- Abstract: The production model of a dual polarization heterodyne receiver for the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimteter Array (ALMA) telescope has been developed to operate in the 787–950 GHz frequency band. The receiver uses two double sideband (DSB) waveguide mixers with Nb/AlOx/Nb tunnel junctions and NbTiN/SiO 2 /Al microstrip tuning circuits on quartz substrate. A terahertz time domain spectrometer was used to characterize our NbTiN film for the tuning circuit design, which revealed that the complex conductivity of the film is described by the Mattis-Bardeen theory including a finite scattering time of 15 fs and a superconducting gap with a gap ratio 2Δ/k B T C ∼ 4.0. Tens of these receivers (out of the total production number of 73) have been successfully produced, and their performance is well within the stringent ALMA requirements. The best achieved DSB receiver noise temperature is 125 K, corresponding to about 3hf/k B for 4 K operation. One of Band 10 receivers has successfully been installed in the ALMA antenna for a test observation

  13. High intensity interior aircraft noise increases the risk of high diastolic blood pressure in Indonesian Air Force pilots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minarma Siagian

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To analyze the effects of aircraft noise, resting pulse rate, and other factors on the risk of high diastolic blood pressure (DBP in Indonesian Air Force pilots.Methods: A nested case-control study was conducted using data extracted from annual medical check-ups indoctrination aerophysiologic training records at the Saryanto Aviation and Aerospace Health Institute (LAKESPRA in Jakarta from January 2003 – September 2008. For analysis of DBP: the case group with DBP ≥ 90 mmHg were compared with contral group with DBP < 79 mmHG. One case matched to 12 controls.Results: Out of 567 pilots, 544 (95.9% had complete medical records. For this analysis there were 40 cases of high DBP and 480 controls for DBP. Pilots exposed to aircraft noise 90-95 dB rather than 70-80 dB had a 2.7-fold increase for high DBP [adjusted odds ratio (ORa = 2.70; 95% confi dence interval (CI = 1.05-6.97]. Pilots with resting pulse rates of ≥ 81/minute rather than ≤ 80/minute had a 2.7-fold increase for high DBP (ORa = 2.66; 95% CI = 1.26-5.61. In terms of total fl ight hours, pilots who had 1401-11125 hours rather than 147-1400 hours had a 3.2-fold increase for high DBP (ORa = 3.18; 95% CI = 1.01-10.03.Conclusion: High interior aircraft noise, high total flight hours,  and high resting pulse rate, increased risk for high DBP. Self assessment of resting pulse rate can be used to control the risk of high DBP. (Med J Indones 2009; 276: 276-82Keywords: diastolic blood pressure, aircraft noise, resting pulse rate, military pilots

  14. Femtosecond Pulse Characterization as Applied to One-Dimensional Photonic Band Edge Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fork, Richard L.; Gamble, Lisa J.; Diffey, William M.

    1999-01-01

    The ability to control the group velocity and phase of an optical pulse is important to many current active areas of research. Electronically addressable one-dimensional photonic crystals are an attractive candidate to achieve this control. This report details work done toward the characterization of photonic crystals and improvement of the characterization technique. As part of the work, the spectral dependence of the group delay imparted by a GaAs/AlAs photonic crystal was characterized. Also, a first generation an electrically addressable photonic crystal was tested for the ability to electronically control the group delay. The measurement technique, using 100 femtosecond continuum pulses was improved to yield high spectral resolution (1.7 nanometers) and concurrently with high temporal resolution (tens of femtoseconds). Conclusions and recommendations based upon the work done are also presented.

  15. Noise Exposure of Teachers in Nursery Schools—Evaluation of Measures for Noise Reduction When Dropping DUPLO Toy Bricks into Storage Cases by Sound Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstanze Gebauer

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although noise is one of the leading work-related health risk factors for teachers, many nursery schools lack sufficient noise reduction measures. Methods: This intervention study evaluated the noise exposure of nursery school teachers when dropping DUPLO toy bricks into storage cases. Sound analyses of the impact included assessment of the maximum sound pressure level (LAFmax as well as frequency analyses with 1/3 octave band filter. For the purpose of standardization, a customized gadget was developed. Recordings were performed in 11 cases of different materials and designs to assess the impact on sound level reduction. Thereby, the acoustic effects of three damping materials (foam rubber, carpet, and PU-foam were investigated. Results: The lowest LAFmax was measured in cases consisting of “metal grid” (90.71 dB or of a woven willow “basket” (91.61 dB, whereas a case of “aluminium” (103.34 dB generated the highest impact LAFmax. The frequency analyses determined especially low LAFmax in the frequency bands between 80 and 2500 Hz in cases designs “metal grid” and “basket”. The insertion of PU-foam achieved the most significant attenuation of LAFmax (−13.88 dB and, in the frequency analyses, the best sound damping. Conclusion: The dropping of DUPLO bricks in cases contributes to the high noise level in nursery schools, but measured LAFmax show no evidence for the danger of acute hearing loss. However, continuous exposure may lead to functional impairment of the hair cells and trigger stress reactions. We recommend noise reduction by utilizing cases of woven “basket” with an insert of PU-foam.

  16. Dolphins adjust species-specific frequency parameters to compensate for increasing background noise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Papale

    Full Text Available An increase in ocean noise levels could interfere with acoustic communication of marine mammals. In this study we explored the effects of anthropogenic and natural noise on the acoustic properties of a dolphin communication signal, the whistle. A towed array with four elements was used to record environmental background noise and whistles of short-beaked common-, Atlantic spotted- and striped-dolphins in the Canaries archipelago. Four frequency parameters were measured from each whistle, while Sound Pressure Levels (SPL of the background noise were measured at the central frequencies of seven one-third octave bands, from 5 to 20 kHz. Results show that dolphins increase the whistles' frequency parameters with lower variability in the presence of anthropogenic noise, and increase the end frequency of their whistles when confronted with increasing natural noise. This study provides the first evidence that the synergy among SPLs has a role in shaping the whistles' structure of these three species, with respect to both natural and anthropogenic noise.

  17. Dolphins adjust species-specific frequency parameters to compensate for increasing background noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papale, Elena; Gamba, Marco; Perez-Gil, Monica; Martin, Vidal Martel; Giacoma, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    An increase in ocean noise levels could interfere with acoustic communication of marine mammals. In this study we explored the effects of anthropogenic and natural noise on the acoustic properties of a dolphin communication signal, the whistle. A towed array with four elements was used to record environmental background noise and whistles of short-beaked common-, Atlantic spotted- and striped-dolphins in the Canaries archipelago. Four frequency parameters were measured from each whistle, while Sound Pressure Levels (SPL) of the background noise were measured at the central frequencies of seven one-third octave bands, from 5 to 20 kHz. Results show that dolphins increase the whistles' frequency parameters with lower variability in the presence of anthropogenic noise, and increase the end frequency of their whistles when confronted with increasing natural noise. This study provides the first evidence that the synergy among SPLs has a role in shaping the whistles' structure of these three species, with respect to both natural and anthropogenic noise.

  18. Dolphins Adjust Species-Specific Frequency Parameters to Compensate for Increasing Background Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papale, Elena; Gamba, Marco; Perez-Gil, Monica; Martin, Vidal Martel; Giacoma, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    An increase in ocean noise levels could interfere with acoustic communication of marine mammals. In this study we explored the effects of anthropogenic and natural noise on the acoustic properties of a dolphin communication signal, the whistle. A towed array with four elements was used to record environmental background noise and whistles of short-beaked common-, Atlantic spotted- and striped-dolphins in the Canaries archipelago. Four frequency parameters were measured from each whistle, while Sound Pressure Levels (SPL) of the background noise were measured at the central frequencies of seven one-third octave bands, from 5 to 20 kHz. Results show that dolphins increase the whistles’ frequency parameters with lower variability in the presence of anthropogenic noise, and increase the end frequency of their whistles when confronted with increasing natural noise. This study provides the first evidence that the synergy among SPLs has a role in shaping the whistles' structure of these three species, with respect to both natural and anthropogenic noise. PMID:25853825

  19. Type 2 solar radio burst with the reverse frequency drift on the background of a noise storm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korolev, O.S.; Fomichev, V.V.; Chertok, I.M.

    1979-01-01

    Discussed are the main peculiarities of solar radio burst of the 2nd type recorded on November, 19, 1975 in 11sup(h)02sup(m)-11sup(h)06sup(m)UT in the 45-90 MHz range. The burst considered occurred at the background of the developed noise storm with continuum radiation chearacteristic of it and narrow band. Short-term burst of the first type. The burst band drift was accompanied by the successive cessation of noise storm radiation at frequencies of 50-70 MHz. This phenomenon is interpreted as the result of the interaction between the shock wave spreading in the direction of increasing electron density, and the source of noise storm in coronal plasma. Estimated is the shock wave rate and the paremeters of coronal plasma in the direction of its spreading. A mechanism of interaction between the shock wave and the noise storm source is studied. The observed cessation of noise storm generation is explained by violation of conditions of development of instabilities, in particular, with the isotropization of electrons in the radiation source

  20. Measurement and analysis of self-noise in hybrid-driven underwater gliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Lu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Hybrid-driven Underwater Glider (HUG is a new type of submersible vehicle which combines the functions of traditional Autonomous Underwater Vehicles(AUVand Autonomous Underwater Gliders(AUG. In order to study its noise source distribution and basic self-noise characteristics, a self-noise acquisition system based on the HUG was designed and developed, and a noise analysis test carried out in a free-field pool. In August 2016, the sea trial of the Petrel II glider was conducted in the South China Sea, with observation data at a depth range of 1 000 m as the research object. The self-noise data of the glider platform under different working conditions was obtained through the step-by-step operation method. The experimental analysis and results show that the self-noise acquisition system is stable. The contribution of mechanical noise to self-noise is greatest when the glider works in the gliding mode, while the self-noise band above 500 Hz is closely related to the work of the buoyancy adjustment unit, and peaks at 1 kHz. According to the analysis of the basic characteristics of self-noise, this provides some guidance for the implementation of vibration and noise reduction.