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Sample records for nocardiosis updated clinical

  1. Clinical spectrum and outcome of pulmonary nocardiosis: 5-year experience

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    Akashdeep Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pulmonary nocardiosis is a rare but a life-threatening infection caused by Nocardia spp. The diagnosis is often missed and delayed resulting in delay in appropriate treatment and thus higher mortality. Aim: In this study, we aim to evaluate the clinical spectrum and outcome of patients with pulmonary nocardiosis. Methods: A retrospective, 5-year (2009-2014 review of demographic profile, risk factors, clinical manifestations, imaging findings, treatment, and outcome of patients with pulmonary nocardiosis admitted to a tertiary care hospital. Results: The median age of the study subjects was 54 years (range, 16-76 and majority of them (75% were males. The risk factors for pulmonary nocardiosis identified in our study were long-term steroid use (55.6%, chronic lung disease (52.8%, diabetes (27.8%, and solid-organ transplantation (22.2%. All the patients were symptomatic, and the most common symptoms were cough (91.7%, fever (78%, and expectoration (72%. Almost two-third of the patients were initially misdiagnosed and the alternative diagnosis included pulmonary tuberculosis (n = 7, community-acquired pneumonia (n = 5, lung abscess (n = 4, invasive fungal infection (n = 3, lung cancer (n = 2, and Wegener′s granulomatosis (n = 2. The most common radiographic features were consolidation (77.8% and nodules (56%. The mortality rate for indoor patients was 33% despite treatment. Higher mortality rate was observed among those who had brain abscess (100.0%, HIV positivity (100%, need for mechanical ventilation (87.5%, solid-organ transplantation (50%, and elderly (age > 60 years patients (43%. Conclusion: The diagnosis of pulmonary nocardiosis is often missed and delayed resulting in delay in appropriate treatment and thus high mortality. A lower threshold for diagnosing pulmonary nocardiosis needs to be exercised, in chest symptomatic patients with underlying chronic lung diseases or systemic immunosuppression, for the early diagnosis, and

  2. Molecular Identification of Nocardia Isolates from Clinical Samples and an Overview of Human Nocardiosis in Brazil

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    Baio, Paulo Victor Pereira; Ramos, Juliana Nunes; dos Santos, Louisy Sanches; Soriano, Morgana Fonseca; Ladeira, Elisa Martins; Souza, M?nica Cristina; Camello, Thereza Cristina Ferreira; Ribeiro, Marcio Garcia; Hirata Junior, Raphael; Vieira, Ver?nica Viana; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana Lu?za

    2013-01-01

    BackgroundNocardia sp. causes a variety of clinical presentations. The incidence of nocardiosis varies geographically according to several factors, such as the prevalence of HIV infections, transplants, neoplastic and rheumatic diseases, as well as climate, socio-economic conditions and laboratory procedures for Nocardia detection and identification. In Brazil the paucity of clinical reports of Nocardia infections suggests that this genus may be underestimated as a cause of human diseases and...

  3. Clinical and microbiological characteristics of Nocardiosis including those caused by emerging Nocardia species in Taiwan, 1998-2008.

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    Tan, C-K; Lai, C-C; Lin, S-H; Liao, C-H; Chou, C-H; Hsu, H-L; Huang, Y-T; Hsueh, P-R

    2010-07-01

    The genus of Nocardia is rapidly expanding and the species distribution varies with different geographical locations. We retrospectively reviewed the laboratory records of the bacteriology laboratory at National Taiwan University Hospital from January 1998 to June 2008 to identify patients with nocardiosis. During the study period, 164 isolates of Nocardia spp. were identified from 134 patients but only 113 patients had Nocardia infection. Nocardia brasiliensis (n = 54) was the most common pathogen, followed by N. asteroides (n = 36), N. farcinica (n = 7), N. flavorosea (n = 4), N. otitidiscaviarum (n = 3), N. nova (n = 3), N. beijingensis (n = 2) and one each of N. puris, N. jinanensis and N. takedensis. The major types of infection were cutaneous infection (56.6%), pulmonary infection (33.6%) and disseminated infection (7.1%). Eighty-eight patients received sulfonamide-containing antibiotic and eight of 100 patients with available data on outcomes died during the episode of nocardiosis. In conclusion, the clinical and microbiological manifestations of Nocardiosis vary with the different Nocardia species. Accurate identification of the species is crucial to make the diagnosis.

  4. Breast nocardiosis: case report

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    Kim, Min Ju; Kim, Sun Mi; Park, Jeong Mi [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-11-01

    Nocardiosis is an opportunistic infection occurring in immunocompromised patients. Worldwidely, about four cases of nocardiosis of the breast have been previously reported, but none of these were in Korea. We describe a case of breast nocardiosis associated with pulmonary infection in a patient with Cushing's disease. In our patient, multiple, well-defined, conglomerated, tubular-shaped, isodense mass was revealed at mammography, and an irregular-shaped, ill-defined, heterogeneous echoic mass with movable debris at ultrasonography.

  5. Epidemiology of Nocardiosis -A six years study from Northern India

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    Reetika Dawar, Ruchi Girotra, Seema Quadri, Firdaus Imdadi, Leena Mendiratta, Hena Rani, Avdesh Bansal, Raman Sardana

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To isolate and speciate Nocardia species from clinical samples and to study their antimicrobial susceptibility pattern to different antimicrobials. Various risk factors associated with nocardiosis were also studied. Methods: 32 clinical specimens with clinical history of pneumonia, abscesses, or disseminated infections were collected over a period of 6 years (2009-2014 from Inpatient and Outpatient departments and processed for Nocardia cultures and sensitivity. Results: Twelve cases of nocardiosis were reported out of 32 clinically suspected cases. The mean age of presentation in our study was 57.9 years. Pneumonia was the most common clinical presentation followed by primary cutaneous disease and one case of disseminated disease. 8/ 10 patients with nocardiosis were immunocompromised with history of organ transplantation, use of immunosuppressive agents or steroids. Based on biochemical reactions 5 of the isolates were identified as N. asteroides, 3 N. brasiliensis, 2 N. farcinica and 1 each were N. transvalensis, & N. nova. All were sensitive to linezolid followed by cotrimoxazole (91.6% Conclusions: With increasing number of immunocompromised patients and an increased incidence of nocardiosis, diagnosis of Nocardia infections should always be kept in mind as it can present with nonspecific symptoms and can mimic confused with other diseases. Linezolid, Cotrimoxazole, imipenem and minocycline were found to be very effective, in vitro, against most Nocardia species. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2016;6(2: 60-64

  6. Scabies: A clinical update.

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    Hardy, Myra; Engelman, Daniel; Steer, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Scabies is a common, yet neglected, skin disease. Scabies occurs across Australia, but most frequently in socioeconomically disadvantaged populations in tropical regions, including in remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. In temperate settings, the disease clusters in institutional care facilities. The objective of this article is to provide updates on the clinical diagnosis and treatment approaches for scabies in Australia. Clinical examination remains the mainstay of diagnosis, although dermatoscopy is a useful adjunct. Scabies presents with severe itch and a papular rash, with a predilection for the hands, feet and genitalia. The distribution may be more widespread in infants and older people. Secondary bacterial infection is also common in patients with scabies. Crusted scabies is a rare but highly infectious variant. Topical permethrin is highly effective for individual treatment, but less practical for treatment of asymptomatic contacts and control of outbreaks. Oral ivermectin is a safe and effective alternative, and is now listed on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme as a third-line treatment.

  7. Nocardiosis in the south of France over a 10-years period, 2004–2014

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    Delphine Haussaire

    2017-04-01

    Conclusions: The clinical presentation and outcome of nocardiosis depend on the patient’s initial immune status and underlying pulmonary condition. Severe forms were all iatrogenic, occurring after treatments altering the immune system.

  8. [Pulmonary nocardiosis. A case report (author's transl)].

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    García Rodríguez, J A; Martín Luengo, F; Villar Galán, J L

    1979-06-25

    Within the genus Nocardia three species are at present considered to have human pathologic interest: N. asteroides, N. brasiliensis, and N. caviae. These species are usually the etiologic agents of at least two clinical pictures: nocardiosis and actinomycetoma. A case of pulmonar nocardiosis in a 62-year-old male is reported. The patient had asthmatic episodes and on several occasions received treatment with corticoids. The clinical picture basically consisted of an impairment of the general condition with respiratory symptomatology and fever of 38 to 39 degrees C. An opaque pleuropulmonary image was observed on the chest X-ray film, and the diagnosis of tuberculosis was initially established. The correct diagnosis was confirmed through the bacteriological examination of the transtracheal aspirate with the isolation of N. asteroides. Treatment with streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim achieved the clinical and roentgenologic cure of the patient. After 2 months of treatment the clinical manifestations had disappeared and after 5 months the chest X-ray was normal. Some epidemiologic data are reviewed.

  9. Sporotrichoid pattern of cutaneous nocardiosis

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    Inamadar A

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A young male patient, having linearly arranged nodular lesions on lower extremity was diagnosed to have lymphocutaneous variety of cutaneous nocardiosis. This is a rare entity and has to be differentiated form other causes of nodular lymphangitis. The patient responded dramatically to Cotrimoxazole therapy.

  10. Nocardiosis in the south of France over a 10-years period, 2004–2014

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    Delphine Haussaire; Pierre-Edouard Fournier; Karamoko Djiguiba; Valerie Moal; Tristan Legris; Rajsingh Purgus; Jeremy Bismuth; Xavier Elharrar; Martine Reynaud-Gaubert; Henri Vacher-Coponat

    2017-01-01

    Background: Nocardiosis is a rare disease with polymorphic presentations. The epidemiology and clinical presentation could change with the increasing number of immunocompromised patients. Methods: The medical records and microbiological data of patients affected by nocardiosis and treated at the university hospitals of Marseille between 2004 and 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. Results: The cases of 34 patients infected by Nocardia spp during this period were analyzed. The main under...

  11. VIIP 2017 Clinical Update

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    Tarver, William

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: NASA's Space Medicine community knowledge regarding the "Vision Impairment Intracranial Pressure", or VIIP.has been evolving over time.. Various measures of occupational health related to this condition had to be determined and then plans/processes put into place. The most robust of these processes were inititated in 2010. This presentation will provide a clinic update of the astronaut occupational health data related to VIIP. METHODS: NASA and its international partners require its astronauts to undergo routine health measures deemed important to monitoring VIIP. The concern is that the spaceflight environment aboard ISS could cause some astronauts to have physiologic changes detrimental to either ongoing mission operations or long-term health related to the ocular system and possibly the CNS. Specific medical tests include but are not limited to brain/orbit MRI (NASA unique protocol), OCT, fundoscopy and ocular ultrasound. Measures are taken prior to spaceflight, in-flight and post-flight. Measures to be reported include incidence of disc edema, globe flattening, choroidal folds, ONSD and change in refractive error. RESULTS: 73 ISS astronauts have been evaluated at least partially for VIIP related measures. Of these individuals, approximately 1 in 7 have experienced disc edema. The prevalence of the other findings is more complicated as the medical testing has changed over time. Overall, 26 separate individuals have experienced at least one of the findings NASA has associated with VIIP Another confounding factor is most of the astronauts have prior spaceflight experience at the time of the "pre-flight" testing. DISCUSSION: In 2010 NASA and its US operating segment (USOS) partners (CSA, ESA and JAXA) began routine occupational monitoring and data collection for most VIIP related changes. Interpretation of that data is extremely challenging for several reasons. For example, the determination of disc edema is the most complete finding as we have had

  12. Hypokalemia: a clinical update

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    Efstratios Kardalas

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Hypokalemia is a common electrolyte disturbance, especially in hospitalized patients. It can have various causes, including endocrine ones. Sometimes, hypokalemia requires urgent medical attention. The aim of this review is to present updated information regarding: (1 the definition and prevalence of hypokalemia, (2 the physiology of potassium homeostasis, (3 the various causes leading to hypokalemia, (4 the diagnostic steps for the assessment of hypokalemia and (5 the appropriate treatment of hypokalemia depending on the cause. Practical algorithms for the optimal diagnostic, treatment and follow-up strategy are presented, while an individualized approach is emphasized.

  13. Current knowledge of nocardiosis in teleost fish.

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    Maekawa, S; Yoshida, T; Wang, P-C; Chen, S-C

    2018-03-01

    Nocardia sp. is the causative agent of nocardiosis, a lethal granulomatous disease of the skin, muscle, and various inner tissues affecting various teleost and shellfish. Four species of Nocardia have been isolated from diseased fish and shellfish, namely Nocardia asteroides, Nocardia seriolae, Nocardia salmonicida and Nocardia crassostreae. Therefore, in fish aquaculture, nocardiosis has caused severe economic losses, especially in the Asian region. Considerable research has been performed, since the first report of identified Nocardia sp. in fish, to characterize Nocardia sp. and identify rapid detection techniques, immune response against infection and prophylactic approaches. In this review, the current state of knowledge about nocardiosis in fish has been presented, including the pathogenesis, diagnosis, host immune response and vaccine development. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. A cluster of cases of Nocardiosis

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    Rabindranath Misra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Human Nocardiosis has become more common in last two decades due to increase in the number of immunocompromised states of patients and the availability of better detection methods. We report three cases of Nocardiosis in which one was a renal allograft recipient who had developed pneumonia due to a relatively uncommon pathogen Nocardia brasiliensis. Other two cases were seen in immunocompetent hosts where ophthalmic infection due to Nocardia farcinica and subcutaneous infection in the leg due to N. brasiliensis were reported. The patients responded well to treatment. High level of suspicion helped in the detection of these cases.

  15. Lymphocutaneous type of nocardiosis caused by Nocardia brasiliensis: a case report and review of primary cutaneous nocardiosis caused by N. brasiliensis reported in Japan.

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    Fukuda, Hidetsugu; Saotome, Atsuko; Usami, Nao; Urushibata, Osamu; Mukai, Hideki

    2008-06-01

    Nocardiosis is a mixed suppurative and granulomatous inflammatory disease caused by infection with Nocardia organisms, a group of aerobic actinomycetes. We recently encountered a 25-year-old woman with posttraumatic nocardiosis of the lower extremities. The clinical symptoms noted during her first visit included erythematous swelling of the right knee accompanied by white maceration of the center of the knee and erosions, shallow ulcers and satellite pustules. In addition, multiple erythematous areas (up to the size of the tip of the thumb) were linearly distributed on the right thigh. These lesions were painful, and right inguinal lymphadenopathy was also noted. No lesion was found in internal organs such as the lungs. Histopathologically, signs of nonspecific granulomatous inflammation were observed, as well as several filamentous branching bacilli positive on Grocott stain. The organisms isolated from culture of pus were acid-fast, Gram-positive long rods. The isolated strain was finally identified as Nocardia brasiliensis. The patient was therefore diagnosed with lymphocutaneous type of primary cutaneous nocardiosis caused by N. brasiliensis. Drip infusion of flomoxef sodium was initially performed to treat her condition. Because of exacerbation of erythematous swelling of the right knee and an increase in number of pustules, treatment was switched to oral minocycline hydrochloride therapy. The disease healed 9 weeks after the start of oral minocycline hydrochloride therapy. Our patient was free of systemic immunosuppression and was neither under 10 nor over 65 years of age. She may therefore be considered a rare case of lymphocutaneous type of nocardiosis. We present this case and discuss reported cases of primary cutaneous nocardiosis due to N. brasiliensis in Japan.

  16. Nocardiosis in the south of France over a 10-years period, 2004-2014.

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    Haussaire, Delphine; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Djiguiba, Karamoko; Moal, Valerie; Legris, Tristan; Purgus, Rajsingh; Bismuth, Jeremy; Elharrar, Xavier; Reynaud-Gaubert, Martine; Vacher-Coponat, Henri

    2017-04-01

    Nocardiosis is a rare disease with polymorphic presentations. The epidemiology and clinical presentation could change with the increasing number of immunocompromised patients. The medical records and microbiological data of patients affected by nocardiosis and treated at the university hospitals of Marseille between 2004 and 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. The cases of 34 patients infected by Nocardia spp during this period were analyzed. The main underlying conditions were transplantation (n=15), malignancy (n=9), cystic fibrosis (n=4), and immune disease (n=3); no immunodeficiency condition was observed for three patients. No case of AIDS was observed. At diagnosis, 61.8% had received steroids for over 3 months. Four clinical presentations were identified, depending on the underlying condition: the disseminated form (50.0%) and the visceral isolated form (26.5%) in severely immunocompromised patients, the bronchial form (14.7%) in patients with chronic lung disease, and the cutaneous isolated form (8.8%) in immunocompetent patients. Nocardia farcinica was the main species identified (26.5%). Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was prescribed in 68.0% of patients, and 38.0% underwent surgery. Mortality was 11.7%, and the patients who died had disseminated or visceral nocardiosis. The clinical presentation and outcome of nocardiosis depend on the patient's initial immune status and underlying pulmonary condition. Severe forms were all iatrogenic, occurring after treatments altering the immune system. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Vasectomy reversal: a clinical update

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    Abhishek P Patel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vasectomy is a safe and effective method of contraception used by 42-60 million men worldwide. Approximately 3%-6% of men opt for a vasectomy reversal due to the death of a child or divorce and remarriage, change in financial situation, desire for more children within the same marriage, or to alleviate the dreaded postvasectomy pain syndrome. Unlike vasectomy, vasectomy reversal is a much more technically challenging procedure that is performed only by a minority of urologists and places a larger financial strain on the patient since it is usually not covered by insurance. Interest in this procedure has increased since the operating microscope became available in the 1970s, which consequently led to improved patency and pregnancy rates following the procedure. In this clinical update, we discuss patient evaluation, variables that may influence reversal success rates, factors to consider in choosing to perform vasovasostomy versus vasoepididymostomy, and the usefulness of vasectomy reversal to alleviate postvasectomy pain syndrome. We also review the use of robotics for vasectomy reversal and other novel techniques and instrumentation that have emerged in recent years to aid in the success of this surgery.

  18. Stuttering: Clinical and research update.

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    Perez, Hector R; Stoeckle, James H

    2016-06-01

    To provide an update on the epidemiology, genetics, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of developmental stuttering. The MEDLINE and Cochrane databases were searched for past and recent studies on the epidemiology, genetics, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of developmental stuttering. Most recommendations are based on small studies, limited-quality evidence, or consensus. Stuttering is a speech disorder, common in persons of all ages, that affects normal fluency and time patterning of speech. Stuttering has been associated with differences in brain anatomy, functioning, and dopamine regulation thought to be due to genetic causes. Attention to making a correct diagnosis or referral in children is important because there is growing consensus that early intervention with speech therapy for children who stutter is critical. For adults, stuttering can be associated with substantial psychosocial morbidity including social anxiety and low quality of life. Pharmacologic treatment has received attention in recent years, but clinical evidence is limited. The mainstay of treatment for children and adults remains speech therapy. A growing body of research has attempted to uncover the pathophysiology of stuttering. Referral for speech therapy remains the best option for children and adults. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  19. Comparative pathology of nocardiosis in marine mammals.

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    St Leger, J A; Begeman, L; Fleetwood, M; Frasca, S; Garner, M M; Lair, S; Trembley, S; Linn, M J; Terio, K A

    2009-03-01

    Nocardia spp. infections in mammals cause pyogranulomatous lesions in a variety of organs, most typically the lung. Members of the Nocardia asteroides complex are the most frequently recognized pathogens. Nine cases of nocardiosis in free-ranging pinnipeds and 10 cases of nocardiosis in cetaceans were evaluated. Host species included the hooded seal (Cystophora cristata, n = 8), leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx, n = 1), Atlantic bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus, n = 4), beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas, n = 4), and killer whale (Orcinus orca, n = 2). The most common presentation of nocardiosis in both pinnipeds and cetaceans was the systemic form, involving 2 or more organs. Organs most frequently affected were lung and thoracic lymph nodes in 7 of 9 cases in pinnipeds and 8 of 10 cases in cetaceans. Molecular identification and bacterial isolation demonstrated a variety of pathogenic species. N. asteroides, N. farcinica, N. brasiliensis, and N. otitisdiscaviarum are pathogenic for pinnipeds. In cetaceans N. asteroides, N. farcinica, N. brasiliensis, N. cyriacigeorgica, and N. levis are pathogenic. Hematoxylin and eosin and acid fast staining failed to reveal bacteria in every case, whereas modified acid fast and Grocott's methenamine silver consistently demonstrated the characteristic organisms. In both pinnipeds and cetaceans, juvenile animals were affected more often than adults. Hooded seals demonstrated more cases of nocardiosis than other pinnipeds.

  20. Lymphocutaneous nocardiosis due to Nocardia brasiliensis.

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    Maraki, Sofia; Scoulica, Efstathia; Alpantaki, Kalliopi; Dialynas, Michael; Tselentis, Yannis

    2003-09-01

    Nocardia species are Gram-positive bacteria responsible for systemic or cutaneous infections in humans. Nocardia brasiliensis is the most common infective agent in the cutaneous form of nocardiosis. We describe a case of a previously healthy man, who presented with lymphocutaneous Nocardia brasiliensis infection, and was successfully treated with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. The identification of the isolate was confirmed by nucleotide sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene.

  1. Disseminated Nocardiosis caused by Nocardia concava with acute respiratory failure and central nervous system involvement treated with linezolid.

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    Kobayashi, Naomi; Sueoka-Aragane, Naoko; Naganobu, Natsuko; Umeguchi, Hitomi; Kusaba, Koji; Nagasawa, Zenzo; Yazawa, Katsukiyo; Gonoi, Tohru; Kimura, Shinya; Hayashi, Shinichiro

    2012-01-01

    Nocardia concava was identified as a new species in 2005; however, the clinical manifestations of Nocardia concava infection have yet to be clarified. We herein present the case of an immunosuppressed patient who developed disseminated nocardiosis caused by N. concava with multiple abscesses in the lungs, cutis, subcutaneous tissue, skeletal muscles and kidneys accompanied by central nervous system involvement, including meningitis and ventriculitis. The patient was cured with appropriate treatment including linezolid after testing for susceptibility. Linezolid should be considered as an alternative agent for treating disseminated nocardiosis because of its effective distribution to multiple sites.

  2. Nocardiosis in freshwater reared Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha).

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    Brosnahan, C L; Humphrey, S; Knowles, G; Ha, H J; Pande, A; Jones, J B

    2017-07-01

    An investigation was conducted to identify the cause of mortalities in freshwater reared Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). Mortalities occurred in juvenile salmon, at a salmon rearing facility in the South Island of New Zealand. The affected fish were from a pen inside the facility with no surrounding pens or other year classes affected. Clinically affected fish presented with skin lesions. The majority of skin lesions were unruptured, boil-like, raised circular masses up to 4 cm in diameter, particularly on the dorsolateral aspects and the flank. A number of fish presented with large ulcers resulting from rupturing of the raised lesions described above. This clinical presentation showed similarities to that of furunculosis caused by typical Aeromonas salmonicida, a bacterium exotic to New Zealand. Samples were taken from two representative fish in the field for histopathology, bacterial culture and molecular testing. Histopathological findings included granulomatous lesions in the kidney, liver, spleen and muscle. When stained with Fite-Faraco modified acid fast stain filamentous branching rods were identified within these granulomas. Following bacterial culture of kidney swabs pure growth of small white matt adherent colonies was observed. This isolate was identified as a Nocardia species by biochemical testing and nucleotide sequencing of the partial 16S rRNA gene. All samples were negative for A. salmonicida based on bacterial culture and PCR testing. Nocardiosis caused by a Nocardia species. Nocardiosis in these fish was caused by a previously undescribed Nocardia species that differs from the species known to be pathogenic to fish: N. asteroides, N. salmonicida and N. seriole. This bacterium is likely to be a new or unnamed environmental species of Nocardia that has the potential to cause disease in Chinook salmon under certain conditions. The clinical presentation of this Nocardia species manifested as raised, boil-like skin lesions which has

  3. Clinical update on contact allergy

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    Uter, Wolfgang; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Orton, David I

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The aim of this article is to review recent findings in contact allergy, regarding clinical research. RECENT FINDINGS: The biocide methyldibromo glutaronitrile was identified to be an important sensitizer. Subsequently, it was banned from leave-on cosmetics in the European Union...... studies have demonstrated broad individual variation of elicitation thresholds, dependent on the allergen concentration during induction, and other factors. Some unsuspected routes of exposure to allergens include oral, inhalational, connubial or airborne contact. Experimental studies provide...

  4. Clinical applications of immunoglobulin: update

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    Marcia Cristina Zago Novaretti

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Human immunoglobulin is the most used blood product in the clinical practice. Immunoglobulin applications have increased quickly since the elucidation of its immunomodulatory and antiinflammatory properties which turned this blood product into a precious tool in the treatment of numerous diseases that present with humoral immune deficiency or that cause immune system dysfunction. Currently, the approved indications for Ig are: primary immunodeficiencies, secondary immunodeficiencies (multiple myeloma or chronic lymphoid leukemia, Kawasaki syndrome, immune thrombocytopenic purpura, Guillain Barré syndrome, graft-versus-host disease following bone marrow transplantation and repeat infections in HIV children. On the other hand, there are numerous "off-label" indications of immunoglobulin, which represent 20-60% of all clinical applications of this drug. It is important to study all these indications and, above all, the scientific evidence for its use, in order to provide patients with a new therapeutic option without burdening the health system. This review results from a wide selection of papers identified in the Pubmed and Lilacs scientific electronic databases. A group of descriptors were used from human immunoglobulin to the names of each disease that immunoglobulin is clinically applied. Our main objective is to list the numerous indications of immunoglobulin, both authorized and "off-label" and to analyze these indications in the light of the most recent scientific evidence.

  5. Clinical update on contact allergy

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    Uter, Wolfgang; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Orton, David I

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The aim of this article is to review recent findings in contact allergy, regarding clinical research. RECENT FINDINGS: The biocide methyldibromo glutaronitrile was identified to be an important sensitizer. Subsequently, it was banned from leave-on cosmetics in the European Union......, and cutting fluid components. SUMMARY: Constant awareness for new allergens, confirmed by critical evaluation, standardization of patch test materials, and the identification of temporal patterns and subgroups at risk will improve both the diagnosis and prevention of allergic contact dermatitis....

  6. Primary lymphocutaneous nocardiosis in an immunocompetent patient

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    Tselentis Yannis

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nocardia brasiliensis is a rare human pathogen usually associated with localized cutaneous infections. Case Presentation We report a case of primary lymphocutaneous Nocardia brasiliensis infection developed after a bone fracture of the left hand of an otherwise healthy 32-year-old man. Treatment with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole given for a total of three months combined with surgical debridement resulted in complete resolution of the infection. Conclusion Nocardiosis should be part of the differential diagnosis in patients with sporotrichoid infection, particularly those with a history of outdoor injury. Culture of the affected tissue and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of the isolate should be performed for diagnosis and treatment.

  7. Gestational diabetes: A clinical update

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    Kampmann, Ulla; Madsen, Lene Ring; Skajaa, Gitte Oeskov

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is increasing in prevalence in tandem with the dramatic increase in the prevalence of overweight and obesity in women of childbearing age. Much controversy surrounds the diagnosis and management of gestational diabetes, emphasizing the importance and relevance...... an overview of clinical issues related to GDM, including the challenges of screening and diagnosis, the pathophysiology behind GDM, the treatment and prevention of GDM and the long and short term consequences of gestational diabetes for both mother and offspring....... of clarity and consensus. If newly proposed criteria are adopted universally a significantly growing number of women will be diagnosed as having GDM, implying new therapeutic challenges to avoid foetal and maternal complications related to the hyperglycemia of gestational diabetes. This review provides...

  8. Marfan Syndrome: A Clinical Update.

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    Bitterman, Adam D; Sponseller, Paul D

    2017-09-01

    Marfan syndrome is a connective tissue disorder that can affect many organ systems. Affected patients present with orthopaedic manifestations of the syndrome during all phases of life. Pain caused by musculoskeletal abnormalities often requires definitive orthopaedic treatment. Orthopaedic surgeons must understand the phenotypes of Marfan syndrome so they can recognize when screening is warranted and can appropriately address the skeletal manifestations. Through medical advancements, patients with Marfan syndrome are living longer and more active lives. Knowledge of the latest diagnostic criteria for the disorder, as well as of advances in understanding the skeletal phenotype, clinical trials of medication therapy, and lifestyle considerations is important for orthopaedic surgeons who treat these patients because these clinicians often are the first to suspect Marfan syndrome and recommend screening.

  9. Clinical update on scorpion envenoming

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    Palmira Cupo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Scorpion stings are currently the leading cause of venom-related injury to humans in Brazil and are a significant public health problem globally. Only scorpions of the Tityus genus are of medical importance in Brazil, and Tityus serrulatus is responsible for the most serious envenomations and deaths. The toxic effects of scorpion envenomation are due to a massive release of sympathetic and parasympathetic neurotransmitters; the severity is related to cardiac and hemodynamic changes, with cardiogenic shock and pulmonary edema contributing to the main causes of death. The pathophysiology of cardiac involvement has been discussed for decades and has been attributed to adrenergic discharge and a possible toxic effect of venom on the myocardium, while acute pulmonary edema may have a cardiogenic and/or non-cardiogenic origin. Currently, the clinical data point to catecholamine excess as the cause for reversible scorpion cardiomyopathy . These data include electrocardiographic changes, profiling of cardiac enzymes and troponin I, echocardiographic data with global or regional left ventricle dysfunction, and myocardial perfusion alterations compatible with spasm in the coronary microcirculation. Furthermore, recent data on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging findings, which are similar to those observed for stress-induced cardiomyopathy, have also been linked to catecholamine excess. The efficiency of antivenom serum treatment is controversial in the literature. Our experience in Brazil is that the management of patients with systemic manifestations of scorpion stings is based on three approaches, all of which are extremely important. These include symptomatic treatment, antivenom serum, and cardiorespiratory support.

  10. Clinical update on metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Diego Hernández-Camacho

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome has been defined as a global issue since it affects a lot of people. Numerous factors are involved in metabolic syndrome development. It has been described that metabolic syndrome has negative consequences on health. Consequently, a lot of treatments have been proposed to palliate it such as drugs, surgery or life style changes where nutritional habits have shown to be an important point in its management. The current study reviews the literature existing about the actual epidemiology of metabolic syndrome, the components involucrate in its appearance and progression, the clinical consequences of metabolic syndrome and the nutritional strategies reported in its remission. A bibliographic search in PubMed and Medline was performed to identify eligible studies. Authors obtained that metabolic syndrome is present in population from developed and undeveloped areas in a huge scale. Environmental and genetic elements are involucrate in metabolic syndrome development. Metabolic syndrome exponentially increased risk of cardiovascular disease, some types of cancers, diabetes mellitus type 2, sleep disturbances, etc. Nutritional treatments play a crucial role in metabolic syndrome prevention, treatment and recovery.

  11. Cutaneous Nocardiosis Simulating Cutaneous Lymphatic Sporotrichosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secchin, Pedro; Trope, Beatriz Moritz; Fernandes, Larissa Araujo; Barreiros, Glória; Ramos-E-Silva, Marcia

    2017-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is the subcutaneous mycosis caused by several species of the Sporothrix genus. With worldwide occurrence, the State of Rio de Janeiro is presently undergoing a zoonotic sporotrichosis epidemic. The form of lymphocutaneous nocardiosis is rare, being caused especially by Nocardia brasiliensis. It appears as a nodular or ulcerated lesion, with multiple painful erythematous nodules or satellite pustules distributed along the lymphatic tract, similar to the lymphocutaneous variant of sporotrichosis. We present a 61-year-old man who, after an insect bite in the left leg, developed an ulcerated lesion associated with ascending lymphangitis, nonresponsive to previous antibiotic therapies. The patient was admitted for investigation, based on the main diagnostic hypothesis of lymphatic cutaneous sporotrichosis entailed by the highly suggestive morphology, associated with the epidemiologic information that he is a resident of the city of Rio de Janeiro. While culture results were being awaited, the patient was medicated with sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim to cover CA-MRSA and evolved with total healing of the lesions. After hospital discharge, using an ulcer fragment, an Actinomyces sp. was cultivated and N. brasiliensis was identified by molecular biology. The objective of this report is to demonstrate a case of lymphocutaneous nocardiosis caused by N. brasiliensis after a probable insect bite. Despite the patient being a resident of the State of Rio de Janeiro (endemic region for sporotrichosis), it is highlighted that it is necessary to be aware of the differential diagnoses of an ulcerated lesion with lymphangitis, favoring an early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of the illness.

  12. Update in clinical allergy and immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Gunten, S; Marsland, B J; von Garnier, C; Simon, D

    2012-12-01

    In the recent years, a tremendous body of studies has addressed a broad variety of distinct topics in clinical allergy and immunology. In this update, we discuss selected recent data that provide clinically and pathogenetically relevant insights or identify potential novel targets and strategies for therapy. The role of the microbiome in shaping allergic immune responses and molecular, as well as cellular mechanisms of disease, is discussed separately and in the context of atopic dermatitis, as an allergic model disease. Besides summarizing novel evidence, this update highlights current areas of uncertainties and debates that, as we hope, shall stimulate scientific discussions and research activities in the field. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. An Unusual Case of Pulmonary Nocardiosis in Immunocompetent Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Yaşar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary nocardiosis is a subacute or chronic necrotizing pneumonia caused by aerobic actinomycetes of the genus Nocardia and rare in immune-competent patients. A 35-year-old male, who had treated with antituberculosis drugs, presented with cough, dyspnea, and expectoration with episodes of hemoptysis with purulent sputum. The diagnosis of nocardiosis was made by microscopic examination of the surgically resected portion of the lung and revealed filamentous Gram-positive bacteria.

  14. Cutaneous Nocardiosis Simulating Cutaneous Lymphatic Sporotrichosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Secchin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Sporotrichosis is the subcutaneous mycosis caused by several species of the Sporothrix genus. With worldwide occurrence, the State of Rio de Janeiro is presently undergoing a zoonotic sporotrichosis epidemic. The form of lymphocutaneous nocardiosis is rare, being caused especially by Nocardia brasiliensis. It appears as a nodular or ulcerated lesion, with multiple painful erythematous nodules or satellite pustules distributed along the lymphatic tract, similar to the lymphocutaneous variant of sporotrichosis. We present a 61-year-old man who, after an insect bite in the left leg, developed an ulcerated lesion associated with ascending lymphangitis, nonresponsive to previous antibiotic therapies. The patient was admitted for investigation, based on the main diagnostic hypothesis of lymphatic cutaneous sporotrichosis entailed by the highly suggestive morphology, associated with the epidemiologic information that he is a resident of the city of Rio de Janeiro. While culture results were being awaited, the patient was medicated with sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim to cover CA-MRSA and evolved with total healing of the lesions. After hospital discharge, using an ulcer fragment, an Actinomyces sp. was cultivated and N. brasiliensis was identified by molecular biology. The objective of this report is to demonstrate a case of lymphocutaneous nocardiosis caused by N. brasiliensis after a probable insect bite. Despite the patient being a resident of the State of Rio de Janeiro (endemic region for sporotrichosis, it is highlighted that it is necessary to be aware of the differential diagnoses of an ulcerated lesion with lymphangitis, favoring an early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of the illness.

  15. Development of Vaccines Against Nocardiosis in Fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Sukanta K; Nakanishi, Teruyuki

    2016-01-01

    Nocardiosis, one of the most systemic and devastating diseases, is currently emerging as an important disease of cultured marine and freshwater fishes. The causative agent of this disease is Nocardia seriolae, a Gram-positive acid-fast bacterium. An effective vaccine/vaccination strategy against this pathogen is necessary to control the significant loss in aquaculture practices. In this chapter, we present the vaccination/immunization protocol in fish against both live (sublethal) and inactivated form of N. seriolae using ginbuna crucian carp (Carassius auratus langsdorfii) as a model. N. seriolae either in live (sublethal) form or inactivated antigenic form is found to elevate immunity in ginbuna and also can induce protective immunity upon challenge. In order to develop live vaccine, determination of sublethal dose is critical and needs to be established in the host fish species through pathogenicity and persistence studies. Herein for ginbuna, a sublethal dose of 10(6) CFU/mL was determined by pathogenicity study through a series of challenge doses followed by pathogen persistence study by microbiological and molecular techniques. On the other hand, for inactivated antigenic form, the concentration of the N. seriolae was approximately 10(8) CFU/mL. Although this study showed significant potential of both the forms of N. seriolae as candidate for vaccination, factors such as dose, duration and form need to be optimized in individual fish species.

  16. Pulmonary nocardiosis caused by Nocardia otitidiscaviarum in an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pulmonary nocardiosis caused by Nocardia otitidiscaviarum in an adult asthmatic female patient: The presence of acid-fast branching filaments is always significant. A Mahgoub, S A Gumaa, M R P Joseph, M S Saleh, A H A Elsheikh, A I Elkhalifa, E Elhaj, R R M Salih, M E Hamid ...

  17. CASE REPORT: Primary Cutaneous Nocardiosis of Axillary Region: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basavaraj V. Peerapur

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nocardiosis is an uncommon but world-wide infection caused by several species of soil-borne aerobic bacteria belonging to the genus Nocardia. Primary cutaneous nocardiosis (PCN is an uncommon entity. It usually occurs among immunocompetent but occupationally predisposed individuals. Clinically, it can present as acute infection (abscess or cellulitis, mycetoma, or sporotrichoid infection [1]. Here we are reporting a case of PCN presented as mycetoma in axilla which is a rare site. Case History: The patient had extensive lesions in and around the axilla, which could be attributed to the fact that the patient, being an agriculturist, had been exposed to recurrent trauma while carrying firewood and soiled sacks. Single lesion initiated four years ago, progressed to multiple lesions with few healed scars. Despite the treatment in several hospitals, lesions recurred. The present patient was diagnosed as PCN caused by Nocardia brasiliensis and appropriately treated. Conclusion: Nocardia infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a supportive and granulomatous dermatitis that presents clinically as multiple discharging sinuses with papules and nodules in and around axilla apart from tuberculosis.

  18. A clinical update on paediatric lupus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords were the following: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; SLE;. Children; Update ... Systemic lupus erythematosus in children is a life-threatening chronic disease that is being increasingly recognised. More black African children .... oral corticosteroids in conjunction with disease-modifying agents as discussed above.

  19. Detection of fish nocardiosis by loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itano, T; Kawakami, H; Kono, T; Sakai, M

    2006-06-01

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a novel method that amplifies DNA with high specificity and rapidity under isothermal conditions. In this study, using the LAMP method, a protocol for detecting Nocardia seriolae which is a causative agent of fish nocardiosis, was designed. A set of four primers, two inner and two outer, were designed based on the sequence of the 16S-23S ribosomal RNA internal transcribed spacer region of N. seriolae. Time and temperature conditions for detection of N. seriolae were optimized for 60 min at 65 degrees C. Other fish pathogen was not amplified by this LAMP system. The detection of N. seriola using LAMP was found to be more sensitive than that by polymerase chain reaction. LAMP is a highly sensitive and rapid diagnostic procedure for detection of N. seriolae. LAMP is a useful diagnostic method for fish nocardiosis.

  20. Nocardia brasiliensis primary pulmonary nocardiosis with subcutaneous involvement in an immunocompetent patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amatya, R; Koirala, R; Khanal, B; Dhakal, S S

    2011-01-01

    This is a report of an unusual case of Nocardia brasiliensis causing primary pulmonary nocardiosis with disseminated subcutaneous lesions in an immunocompetent patient. This case highlights the importance of considering nocardiosis as a differential diagnosis in patients with pulmonary and cutaneous lesions and the need for vigorous management for complete cure.

  1. Nocardia brasiliensis primary pulmonary nocardiosis with subcutaneous involvement in an immunocompetent patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Amatya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a report of an unusual case of Nocardia brasiliensis causing primary pulmonary nocardiosis with disseminated subcutaneous lesions in an immunocompetent patient. This case highlights the importance of considering nocardiosis as a differential diagnosis in patients with pulmonary and cutaneous lesions and the need for vigorous management for complete cure.

  2. THERAPIES FOR CROHN'S DISEASE: a clinical update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Walter SOBRADO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The main objectives of clinical therapy in Crohn's disease are clinical and endoscopic remission without the use of corticosteroids for long periods of time, prevention of hospitalization and surgery, and improvement of quality of life. The main limitation of drug therapy is the loss of response over the long term, which makes incorporation of new drugs to the therapeutic arsenal necessary. This review analyses the main drugs currently used in clinical treatment of Crohn's disease.

  3. Primary cutaneous nocardiosis caused by Nocardia brasiliensis following a wasp sting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, L; Xu, X; Ran, Y

    2017-04-10

    We report a case of an 87-year-old woman who presented with painful erythema of her right forearm 10 days after she had been stung by a wasp on her right hand. The lesion had rapidly deteriorated during the week before presentation, and treatment with antibiotics and glucocorticoids did not improve the condition. After careful evaluation, we performed cultures from the lesion aspiration, and morphological and genetic analysis of bacteria cultures confirmed a bacterial infection with Nocardia brasiliensis. The patient recovered after 3 weeks. Primary cutaneous nocardiosis due to Nocardia spp. is relatively uncommon in clinics, but it was the distance of the lesions from the affected area of the wasp sting that has made this an even rarer case and of interest to report. © 2017 British Association of Dermatologists.

  4. Clinical Practice Guideline: Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (Update) Executive Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Neil; Gubbels, Samuel P; Schwartz, Seth R; Edlow, Jonathan A; El-Kashlan, Hussam; Fife, Terry; Holmberg, Janene M; Mahoney, Kathryn; Hollingsworth, Deena B; Roberts, Richard; Seidman, Michael D; Prasaad Steiner, Robert W; Tsai Do, Betty; Voelker, Courtney C J; Waguespack, Richard W; Corrigan, Maureen D

    2017-03-01

    The American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation has published a supplement to this issue of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery featuring the "Clinical Practice Guideline: Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (Update)." To assist in implementing the guideline recommendations, this article summarizes the rationale, purpose, and key action statements. The 14 recommendations developed emphasize diagnostic accuracy and efficiency, reducing the inappropriate use of vestibular suppressant medications, decreasing the inappropriate use of ancillary testing, and increasing the appropriate therapeutic repositioning maneuvers. An updated guideline is needed due to new clinical trials, new systematic reviews, and the lack of consumer participation in the initial guideline development group.

  5. Pediatric Oxygen Therapy: A Clinical Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Anwarul; Rizvi, Munaza; Arif, Fehmina

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen therapy is a life-saving, medical intervention in the management of hospitalized children. The goal of oxygen therapy is to prevent or treat tissue hypoxia. Oxygen should be prescribed according to the principles of drug prescription, however, use of oxygen in clinical practice is often inappropriate without knowledge of its potential risks and benefits. This article summarizes practical aspects of clinical use of oxygen in terms of indication, administration, and monitoring, weaning, discontinuation and oxygen toxicity to rationalize therapy and achieve maximum benefits.

  6. A clinical update on paediatric lupus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    proteins in the cell nucleus. Recent evidence is emerging to illustrate the intertwined roles of the adaptive and innate immune system in this disease, and type 1 interferon has been shown to play a prominent role in the development of SLE.[8]. What diagnostic criteria exist? SLE is diagnosed clinically and in the laboratory.

  7. Experimental Granulomatous Pulmonary Nocardiosis in BALB/C Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mifuji Lira, Roque M.; Limón Flores, Alberto Yairh; Salinas Carmona, Mario César

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary nocardiosis is a granulomatous disease with high mortality that affects both immunosuppressed and immunocompetent patients. The mechanisms leading to the establishment and progression of the infection are currently unknown. An animal model to study these mechanisms is sorely needed. We report the first in vivo model of granulomatous pulmonary nocardiosis that closely resembles human pathology. BALB/c mice infected intranasally with two different doses of GFP-expressing Nocardia brasiliensis ATCC700358 (NbGFP), develop weight loss and pulmonary granulomas. Mice infected with 109 CFUs progressed towards death within a week while mice infected with 108 CFUs died after five to six months. Histological examination of the lungs revealed that both the higher and lower doses of NbGFP induced granulomas with NbGFP clearly identifiable at the center of the lesions. Mice exposed to 108 CFUs and subsequently to 109 CFUs were not protected against disease severity but had less granulomas suggesting some degree of protection. Attempts to identify a cellular target for the infection were unsuccessful but we found that bacterial microcolonies in the suspension used to infect mice were responsible for the establishment of the disease. Small microcolonies of NbGFP, incompatible with nocardial doubling times starting from unicellular organisms, were identified in the lung as early as six hours after infection. Mice infected with highly purified unicellular preparations of NbGFP did not develop granulomas despite showing weight loss. Finally, intranasal delivery of nocardial microcolonies was enough for mice to develop granulomas with minimal weight loss. Taken together these results show that Nocardia brasiliensis microcolonies are both necessary and sufficient for the development of granulomatous pulmonary nocardiosis in mice. PMID:27303806

  8. Experimental Granulomatous Pulmonary Nocardiosis in BALB/C Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roque M Mifuji Lira

    Full Text Available Pulmonary nocardiosis is a granulomatous disease with high mortality that affects both immunosuppressed and immunocompetent patients. The mechanisms leading to the establishment and progression of the infection are currently unknown. An animal model to study these mechanisms is sorely needed. We report the first in vivo model of granulomatous pulmonary nocardiosis that closely resembles human pathology. BALB/c mice infected intranasally with two different doses of GFP-expressing Nocardia brasiliensis ATCC700358 (NbGFP, develop weight loss and pulmonary granulomas. Mice infected with 109 CFUs progressed towards death within a week while mice infected with 108 CFUs died after five to six months. Histological examination of the lungs revealed that both the higher and lower doses of NbGFP induced granulomas with NbGFP clearly identifiable at the center of the lesions. Mice exposed to 108 CFUs and subsequently to 109 CFUs were not protected against disease severity but had less granulomas suggesting some degree of protection. Attempts to identify a cellular target for the infection were unsuccessful but we found that bacterial microcolonies in the suspension used to infect mice were responsible for the establishment of the disease. Small microcolonies of NbGFP, incompatible with nocardial doubling times starting from unicellular organisms, were identified in the lung as early as six hours after infection. Mice infected with highly purified unicellular preparations of NbGFP did not develop granulomas despite showing weight loss. Finally, intranasal delivery of nocardial microcolonies was enough for mice to develop granulomas with minimal weight loss. Taken together these results show that Nocardia brasiliensis microcolonies are both necessary and sufficient for the development of granulomatous pulmonary nocardiosis in mice.

  9. SnET2: clinical update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razum, Nicholas J.; Snyder, Albert B.; Doiron, Daniel R.

    1996-04-01

    Tin Ethyl Etiopurpurin, SnET2, is a synthetic chlorin analog presently in Phase-II/III clinical trials for the treatment of cutaneous cancers. Trials to date include the treatment of basal cell carcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas, breast adenocarcinomas metastatic to the chest wall and cutaneous Kaposi's sarcomas in AIDS patients. Results to date have shown significant clinical responses for drug doses between 1.0 mg/kg and 1.6 mg/kg, with the threshold for Kaposi's sarcoma being slightly higher than in other indications. Light doses from 100 J/cm2 to 300 J/cm2 were delivered from 24 to 72 hours post SnET2 infusion. Induced transient skin photosensitivity at the lower therapeutic doses has been mild, lasting approximately a week. Results of the Phase I and II trials are presented.

  10. Biosensors in clinical chemistry - 2011 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Orazio, Paul

    2011-09-18

    Research activity and applications of biosensors for measurement of analytes of clinical interest over the last eight years are reviewed. Nanotechnology has been applied to improve performance of biosensors using electrochemical, optical, mechanical and physical modes of transduction, and to allow arrays of biosensors to be constructed for parallel sensing. Biosensors have been proposed for measurement of cancer biomarkers, cardiac biomarkers as well as biomarkers for autoimmune disease, infectious disease and for DNA analysis. Novel applications of biosensors include measurements in alternate sample types, such as saliva. Biosensors based on immobilized whole cells have found new applications, for example to detect the presence of cancer and to monitor the response of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents. The number of research reports describing new biosensors for analytes of clinical interest continues to increase; however, movement of biosensors from the research laboratory to the clinical laboratory has been slow. The greatest impact of biosensors will be felt at point-of-care testing locations without laboratory support. Integration of biosensors into reliable, easy-to-use and rugged instrumentation will be required to assure success of biosensor-based systems at the point-of-care. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. PRP and Articular Cartilage: A Clinical Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Marmotti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The convincing background of the recent studies, investigating the different potentials of platelet-rich plasma, offers the clinician an appealing alternative for the treatment of cartilage lesions and osteoarthritis. Recent evidences in literature have shown that PRP may be helpful both as an adjuvant for surgical treatment of cartilage defects and as a therapeutic tool by intra-articular injection in patients affected by osteoarthritis. In this review, the authors introduce the trophic and anti-inflammatory properties of PRP and the different products of the available platelet concentrates. Then, in a complex scenario made of a great number of clinical variables, they resume the current literature on the PRP applications in cartilage surgery as well as the use of intra-articular PRP injections for the conservative treatment of cartilage degenerative lesions and osteoarthritis in humans, available as both case series and comparative studies. The result of this review confirms the fascinating biological role of PRP, although many aspects yet remain to be clarified and the use of PRP in a clinical setting has to be considered still exploratory.

  12. Management of ulcerative colitis: a clinical update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Vieira Teixeira

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the consensus of expert societies and published guidelines on the management of ulcerative colitis, and to compare with the experience of the authors, in order to standardize procedures that would help the reasoning and decision-making process of the physician. A search was performed in scientific literature, specifically in electronic databases: Medline/Pubmed, SciELO, EMBASE and Cochrane, and the following descriptors were used: ulcerative colitis, acute colitis, clinical treatment, surgery and randomized trial. It can be concluded that the goals of therapy in ulcerative colitis are clinical and endoscopic remission, deep, sustained remission without corticosteroids, prevention of hospitalizations and surgeries, and improved quality of life. The surgical indications are reserved for selected cases, ranging from medical intractability, complications (severe refractory acute colitis, toxic megacolon, perforation and hemorrhage and malignancy. Information in this review article must be submitted to evaluation and criticism of the specialist responsible for the conduct to be followed, in the face of his/her reality and the clinical status of each patient.The degree of recommendation and strength of evidence were based using the GRADE system (The Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation described below:1. A: Experimental or observational studies of higher consistency.2. B: Experimental or observational studies of lower consistency.3. C: Case reports (non-controlled studies.4. D: Opinion without critical evaluation, based on consensus, physiological studies or animal models. Resumo: O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar os consensos de sociedades de especialistas e guidelines publicados sobre o manejo da retocolite ulcerativa, e confrontar com a experiência dos autores, a fim de padronizar condutas que auxiliem o raciocínio e a tomada de decisão do médico. Foi realizada busca

  13. Validation, updating and impact of clinical prediction rules: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toll, D B; Janssen, K J M; Vergouwe, Y; Moons, K G M

    2008-11-01

    To provide an overview of the research steps that need to follow the development of diagnostic or prognostic prediction rules. These steps include validity assessment, updating (if necessary), and impact assessment of clinical prediction rules. Narrative review covering methodological and empirical prediction studies from primary and secondary care. In general, three types of validation of previously developed prediction rules can be distinguished: temporal, geographical, and domain validations. In case of poor validation, the validation data can be used to update or adjust the previously developed prediction rule to the new circumstances. These update methods differ in extensiveness, with the easiest method a change in model intercept to the outcome occurrence at hand. Prediction rules -- with or without updating -- showing good performance in (various) validation studies may subsequently be subjected to an impact study, to demonstrate whether they change physicians' decisions, improve clinically relevant process parameters, patient outcome, or reduce costs. Finally, whether a prediction rule is implemented successfully in clinical practice depends on several potential barriers to the use of the rule. The development of a diagnostic or prognostic prediction rule is just a first step. We reviewed important aspects of the subsequent steps in prediction research.

  14. Methylmalonic and Propionic Acidemias: Clinical Management Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Jamie L.; Venditti, Charles P.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review Recent clinical studies and management guidelines for the treatment of the organic acidopathies methylmalonic acidemia (MMA) and propionic acidemia (PA) address the scope of interventions to maximize health and quality of life. Unfortunately, these disorders continue to cause significant morbidity and mortality due to acute and chronic systemic and end-organ injury. Recent findings Dietary management with medical foods has been a mainstay of therapy for decades, yet well controlled patients can manifest growth, development, cardiac, ophthalmological, renal and neurological complications. Patients with organic acidopathies suffer metabolic brain injury which targets specific regions of the basal ganglia in a distinctive pattern, and these injuries may occur even with optimal management during metabolic stress. Liver transplantation has improved quality of life and metabolic stability, yet transplantation in this population does not entirely prevent brain injury or the development of optic neuropathy and cardiac disease. Summary Management guidelines should identify necessary screening for patients with MMA and PA, and improve anticipatory management of progressive end-organ disease. Liver transplantation improves overall metabolic control, but injury to non-regenerative tissues may not be mitigated. Continued use of medical foods in these patients requires prospective studies to demonstrate evidence of benefit in a controlled manner. PMID:27653704

  15. Methylmalonic and propionic acidemias: clinical management update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Jamie L; Venditti, Charles P

    2016-12-01

    Recent clinical studies and management guidelines for the treatment of the organic acidopathies methylmalonic acidemia (MMA) and propionic acidemia address the scope of interventions to maximize health and quality of life. Unfortunately, these disorders continue to cause significant morbidity and mortality due to acute and chronic systemic and end-organ injury. Dietary management with medical foods has been a mainstay of therapy for decades, yet well controlled patients can manifest growth, development, cardiac, ophthalmological, renal, and neurological complications. Patients with organic acidopathies suffer metabolic brain injury that targets specific regions of the basal ganglia in a distinctive pattern, and these injuries may occur even with optimal management during metabolic stress. Liver transplantation has improved quality of life and metabolic stability, yet transplantation in this population does not entirely prevent brain injury or the development of optic neuropathy and cardiac disease. Management guidelines should identify necessary screening for patients with methylmalonic acidemia and propionic acidemia, and improve anticipatory management of progressive end-organ disease. Liver transplantation improves overall metabolic control, but injury to nonregenerative tissues may not be mitigated. Continued use of medical foods in these patients requires prospective studies to demonstrate evidence of benefit in a controlled manner.

  16. Nuclear medicine in clinical neurology: an update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oldendorf, W.H.

    1981-01-01

    Isotope scanning using technetium 99m pertechnetate has fallen into disuse since the advent of x-ray computerized tomography. Regional brain blood flow studies have been pursued on a research basis. Increased regional blood flow during focal seizure activity has been demonstrated and is of use in localizing such foci. Cisternography as a predictive tool in normal pressure hydrocephalus is falling into disuse. Positron tomographic scanning is a potent research tool that can demonstrate both regional glycolysis and blood flow. Unfortunately, it is extremely expensive and complex to apply in a clinical setting. With support from the National Institutes of Health, seven extramural centers have been funded to develop positron tomographic capabilities, and they will greatly advance our knowledge of stroke pathophysiology, seizure disorders, brain tumors, and various degenerative diseases. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging is a potentially valuable tool since it creates tomographic images representing the distribution of brain water. No tissue ionization is produced, and images comparable to second-generation computerized tomographic scans are already being produced in humans

  17. Partial updating of clinical practice guidelines often makes more sense than full updating: a systematic review on methods and the development of an updating procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Monika; Neugebauer, Edmund A M; Eikermann, Michaela

    2014-01-01

    To conduct a systematic review of the methods used to determine when and how to update clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) and develop a procedure for updating CPGs. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane Methodology Register for methodological publications on updating CPGs. Guideline development manuals were obtained from the Web sites of guideline-developing organizations. Using the information obtained from these records, a procedure for updating CPGs was developed. A total of 5,116 journal articles were screened, and seven articles met the criteria for inclusion. Forty-seven manuals were included; of these, eight included details about the methods used to update the guidelines. Most of the included publications focused on assessing whether the CPGs needed updating and not on how to update them. The developed procedure includes a systematic monitoring system and a scheduled process for updating the CPGs, which includes guidance on how to determine the type and scope of an update. Partial updating often makes more sense than updating the whole CPG because topics and recommendations differ in terms of the need for updating. Guideline developers should implement a systematic updating procedure that includes an ongoing monitoring system that is appropriate for the nature of the guideline topics and the capabilities of the developers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Fatal nocardiosis in a dog caused by multiresistant Nocardia veterana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhde, Ann-Kathrin; Kilwinski, Jochen; Peters, Martin; Verspohl, Jutta; Feßler, Andrea T; Schwarz, Stefan; Wohlsein, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Among pathogenic Nocardia species in humans and animals, infections caused by Nocardia (N.) veterana have rarely been described and so far, all non-human cases are linked to bovine mastitis in Brazil. The aim of this study was to identify the causative microorganism involved in the death of a three-month-old dog suffering from dyspnea and neurological deficits ante mortem. Pathomorphological investigation revealed (pyo-)granulomatous lesions in various organs. Bacteriological examination was performed and the respective bacteria were subjected to matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), 16S rDNA sequencing, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing by broth microdilution. Gram-staining and colony morphology suggested the presence of an actinomycete which was identified as N. veterana by MALDI-TOF MS. This identification was confirmed by 16S rDNA sequence analysis. Distemper-associated immunosuppression may have played a role in the pathogenesis of systemic nocardiosis in this dog. Retrospective analysis of the antimicrobial susceptibility status showed that the N. veterana isolate was multiresistant and displayed high minimal inhibitory concentrations to all antimicrobial agents used for the dog's therapy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a systemic nocardiosis caused by N. veterana in a dog with a concurrent canine distemper virus infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Clinical Practice Guideline: Otitis Media with Effusion Executive Summary (Update).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Richard M; Shin, Jennifer J; Schwartz, Seth R; Coggins, Robyn; Gagnon, Lisa; Hackell, Jesse M; Hoelting, David; Hunter, Lisa L; Kummer, Ann W; Payne, Spencer C; Poe, Dennis S; Veling, Maria; Vila, Peter M; Walsh, Sandra A; Corrigan, Maureen D

    2016-02-01

    The American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation has published a supplement to this issue of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery featuring the updated "Clinical Practice Guideline: Otitis Media with Effusion." To assist in implementing the guideline recommendations, this article summarizes the rationale, purpose, and key action statements. The 18 recommendations developed emphasize diagnostic accuracy, identification of children who are most susceptible to developmental sequelae from otitis media with effusion, and education of clinicians and patients regarding the favorable natural history of most otitis media with effusion and the lack of efficacy for medical therapy (eg, steroids, antihistamines, decongestants). An updated guideline is needed due to new clinical trials, new systematic reviews, and the lack of consumer participation in the initial guideline development group. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  20. Antiemetics: American Society of Clinical Oncology Focused Guideline Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesketh, Paul J; Bohlke, Kari; Lyman, Gary H; Basch, Ethan; Chesney, Maurice; Clark-Snow, Rebecca Anne; Danso, Michael A; Jordan, Karin; Somerfield, Mark R; Kris, Mark G

    2016-02-01

    To update a key recommendation of the American Society of Clinical Oncology antiemetic guideline. This update addresses the use of the oral combination of netupitant (a neurokinin 1 [NK1] receptor antagonist) and palonosetron (a 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 [5-HT3] receptor antagonist) for the prevention of acute and delayed nausea and vomiting in patients receiving chemotherapy. An update committee conducted a targeted systematic literature review and identified two phase III clinical trials and a randomized phase II dose-ranging study. In one phase III trial, the oral combination of netupitant and palonosetron was associated with higher complete response rates (no emesis and no rescue medications) compared with palonosetron alone in patients treated with anthracycline plus cyclophosphamide chemotherapy (74% v 67% overall; P = .001). In another phase III trial, the oral combination of netupitant and palonosetron was safe and effective across multiple cycles of moderately or highly emetogenic chemotherapies. In the phase II dose-ranging study, each dose of netupitant (coadministered with palonosetron 0.50 mg) produced higher complete response rates than palonosetron alone among patients receiving cisplatin-based chemotherapy. The highest dose of netupitant (ie, 300 mg) was most effective. All patients who receive highly emetogenic chemotherapy regimens (including anthracycline plus cyclophosphamide) should be offered a three-drug combination of an NK1 receptor antagonist, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, and dexamethasone. The oral combination of netupitant and palonosetron plus dexamethasone is an additional treatment option in this setting. The remaining recommendations from the 2011 ASCO guideline are unchanged pending a full update. Additional information is available at www.asco.org/guidelines/antiemetics and www.asco.org/guidelineswiki. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  1. Clinical update: communication issues and advance care planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Crystal Dea; Reynolds, Ashley M

    2013-11-01

    To provide a clinical update on practical strategies to enhance the quality of communication in the palliative and end-of-life medical care settings. Published articles, textbooks, reports, and clinical experience. The components of effective and compassionate care throughout the advanced illness trajectory require thoughtful and strategic communication with patients, families, and members of the health care team. Unfortunately, few health care professionals are formally trained in communication skills. Nurses who possess self-awareness and are skilled in effective communication practices are integral to the provision of high-quality palliative care for patients and families coping with advanced malignancies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Nocardia nova causing pulmonary nocardiosis of black crakes (Limnocorax flavirostra).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacciarini, L N; Posthaus, H; Pagan, O; Miserez, R

    1999-07-01

    Natural nocardial infection has been reported in many different species including mammals and fish, but reports in birds remain uncommon. Eight juvenile Black Crakes (Limnocoraxflavirostra) died unexpectedly at the Basle Zoo. Necropsy revealed disseminated white, firm nodules, 1-3 mm in diameter, throughout the lung parenchyma. Histologically, the lungs contained multiple, often confluent granulomas with central necrosis. Delicate, gram-positive, 0.5- to 1.0-microm-wide, branching, occasionally beaded, filamentous organisms were visible in necrotic centers. These organisms were acid fast when stained with Fite-Faraco. No histologic lesions were seen in other organs. Nocardia nova was isolated from liver, spleen, kidney, and lung. Granulomatous and necrotizing nocardial pneumonia with agonal septicemia was diagnosed, suggesting an aerogenous infection. To our knowledge, this is the first reported epizootic outbreak of nocardiosis in birds, which is additionally unusual because it was caused by N. nova.

  3. Liposomal Formulations in Clinical Use: An Updated Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upendra Bulbake

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Liposomes are the first nano drug delivery systems that have been successfully translated into real-time clinical applications. These closed bilayer phospholipid vesicles have witnessed many technical advances in recent years since their first development in 1965. Delivery of therapeutics by liposomes alters their biodistribution profile, which further enhances the therapeutic index of various drugs. Extensive research is being carried out using these nano drug delivery systems in diverse areas including the delivery of anti-cancer, anti-fungal, anti-inflammatory drugs and therapeutic genes. The significant contribution of liposomes as drug delivery systems in the healthcare sector is known by many clinical products, e.g., Doxil®, Ambisome®, DepoDur™, etc. This review provides a detailed update on liposomal technologies e.g., DepoFoam™ Technology, Stealth technology, etc., the formulation aspects of clinically used products and ongoing clinical trials on liposomes.

  4. Nocardiose torácica Thoracic nocardiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cidália Rodrigues

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available A nocardiose é uma infecção oportunista, que ocorre sobretudo em individuos imunocomprometidos. A apresentação pulmonar é a mais frequente, no entanto pode atingir e disseminar-se para outros locais do organismo. O tratamento antibiotico é habitualmente prolongado, de forma a evitar recidivas. Os autores apresentam o caso clinico de um doente a fazer terapeutica imunossupressora prolongada por artrite psoriatica, com queixas de toracalgia direita com um mês de evolução.Testicular tuberculosis is rare, occurring in approximately 3% of patients with genital tuberculosis. It is often clinically indistinguishable from lesions such as testicular tumour and infarction and may even mimic testicular torsion. Men aged 20-50 years old are most commonly affected and often present with painful or painless enlargement of the scrotum. Ultrasound (US is currently the best technique for imaging the scrotum and its contents and for diagnosing testicular lesions. We present the case of a 58 year-old male, followed in pneumology for pulmonary tuberculosis, who complained of pain and right scrotum enlargement in the second month of anti-tuberculosis chemotherapy. First assessment, seconded by US, suggested a neoplasic lesion, and the final diagnosis revealed testicular tuberculosis.

  5. Nocardiosis: an overview and additional report of 28 cases in cattle and dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Márcio Garcia; Salerno, Tatiana; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana Luiza de; Camello, Thereza Cristina Ferreira; Langoni, Hélio; Siqueira, Amanda Keller; Paes, Antonio Carlos; Fernandes, Marta Catarina; Lara, Gustavo Henrique Batista

    2008-01-01

    Phenotypic characteristics, antimicrobial susceptibility profile, and clinical-epidemiological features of 28 Nocardia strains isolated from 19 cases of bovine mastitis, eight cutaneous-subcutaneous lesions and one case of pneumonia in dogs were evaluated. Microbiological, biochemical, cytological and scanning electron microscopy methods were used in diagnosis. Nocardia asteroides type IV, Nocardia otitidiscaviarum,Nocardia nova (type III) and Nocardia farcinica (type V) were isolated from bovine milk, bronchial lavage and/or cutaneous-subcutaneous abscesses in dogs. Nocardial bovine mastitis was diagnosed predominantly in clinical cases, in dairy herds with poor environmental hygienic conditions between milking and inappropriate intramammary therapy. Canine nocardiosis was observed commonly in animals co-infected with distemper virus. Sulphamethoxazole-trimethoprim (92.8%), amikacin (92.8%) and ceftiofur (92.8%) were the most effective drugs in 28 isolates. Multiple drug resistance to three or more and five or more antimicrobials was observed in ten (35.7%) and three (10.7%) strains, respectively, predominantly with use of cloxaxillin, cefoperazone and ampicillin. The species (type) classification, clinical-epidemiological characteristics, diagnosis, multiple-drug resistance and public health considerations in Nocardia strains isolated from cattle and dogs in Brazil are discussed, with special reference to report of bovine mastitis by N. otitidiscaviarum by first time in Brazil and the similarity between Nocardia species isolated from human and animal origin.

  6. Fetal neuroimaging: an update on technical advances and clinical findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Ashley J; Ederies, M Ashraf

    2018-04-01

    This paper is based on a literature review from 2011 to 2016. The paper is divided into two main sections. The first section relates to technical advances in fetal imaging techniques, including fetal motion compensation, imaging at 3.0 T, 3-D T2-weighted MRI, susceptibility-weighted imaging, computed tomography, morphometric analysis, diffusion tensor imaging, spectroscopy and fetal behavioral assessment. The second section relates to clinical updates, including cerebral lamination, migrational anomalies, midline anomalies, neural tube defects, posterior fossa anomalies, sulcation/gyration and hypoxic-ischemic insults.

  7. An update survey of academic radiologists' clinical productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ying; Zhao, Shoujun; Chu, Philip W; Arenson, Ronald L

    2008-07-01

    The total number of procedures and their relative value units (RVUs) were used to measure the productivity of radiologists. Besides variations in productivity due to differences in the percentage of clinical effort, baseline productivity also varies among clinical subspecialty sections. The authors' previous research used the full-time equivalent (FTE) as the unit to adjust for differences in the percentage of clinical effort and a set of adjustment factors (or calibration constants) to modify the default work RVUs according to types of procedures. These adjustments led to comparable average productivity measurements across subspecialty sections. Since 2003, radiology practice has continued to change, including the introduction of positron emission tomography/computed tomography into clinical practice, suggesting a need to update the understanding of clinical productivity and refine the authors' adjustment procedure. In this study, the authors analyzed the most recent survey of academic departments and derived updated adjustment factors for differences in workload among subspecialty sections. The results can be used to determine faculty staffing requirements and evaluate radiologists' performance. A survey performed by the Society of Chairmen of Academic Radiology Departments collected data in 2006 for 1,134 radiologists in 24 departments, including 10 departments that also reported productivity in an earlier 2003 survey. These data included the numbers of procedures (represented by Current Procedural Terminology [CPT] codes) performed by radiologists, percentage clinical effort, subspecialty sections, and the number of clinical days. The numbers of CPT codes were converted into total work RVUs per FTE faculty member. By grouping the CPT codes into 6 prespecified examination categories, adjustment factors were created to adjust the RVUs for CPT categories to ensure that the median total adjusted work RVUs from different subspecialty sections were comparable

  8. Experimental induction of nocardiosis in yellowtail, Seriola quinqueradiata Temminck and Schlegel by artificial challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itano, T; Kawakami, H; Kono, T; Sakai, M

    2006-09-01

    Challenge methods for inducing nocardiosis, caused by Nocardia seriolae in yellowtail, Seriola quinqueradiata, were evaluated. The first method involved intraperitoneal injection of 1.1 x 10(2), x 10(3) and x 10(4) cfu of N. seriolae; the second was by bath immersion with three different concentrations of bacterial suspension for 10 min; the third was by intradermal injection using a multipuncture device; the fourth was by oral administration using a tube; the fifth was based on the co-habitation of uninfected fish with others that had been artificially infected, i.e. intraperitoneally or by immersion for 10 min. The LD(50) values for the infection trials were 1.9 x 10(2) (intraperitoneal injection), 1.5 x 10(4) mL(-1) (immersion), 4.3 x 10(6) (intradermal injection) and 1.7 x 10(7) (oral administration). In the co-habitation challenge, mortalities were 70% and 50% in groups of non-infected fish mixed with fish infected by the i.p. injection and immersion methods, respectively. Fish challenged by intraperitoneal injection developed adhesions. Fish challenged by other methods did not show any gross clinical signs and moribund fish were similar to natural infection.

  9. Ipilimumab in the treatment of advanced melanoma - a clinical update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Won; Trinh, Van Anh; Hwu, Wen-Jen

    2014-11-01

    Ipilimumab has become an important treatment option for patients with advanced melanoma; however, active research perseveres to resolve many clinical practice issues and to further improve the therapeutic index of this agent. This article aims to provide an update on long-term data, current challenge and recent progress relating to the clinical application of ipilimumab in the treatment of advanced melanoma. A literature search using PubMed database was conducted using search words ipilimumab, melanoma, treatment sequencing, adjuvant therapy, combination therapy, and biomarkers. Data were also obtained from meeting abstracts and clinical trial registries. Signal of clinical activity as adjuvant therapy in patients with resected high-risk melanoma begins to emerge, but longer follow-up is required for confirmation. Many issues, such as optimal dosing schedules and therapeutic sequences, remain unraveled. At present, treatment should be individualized based on patient- and disease-specific factors. Immunotherapy like ipilimumab still represents the best treatment option for durable remission; however, targeted therapies are more appropriate for patients with BRAF V600-mutated tumor who are symptomatic or have rapidly growing disease. With novel therapeutic options in the pipeline, the role of ipilimumab continues to evolve in the rapidly changing treatment landscape of advanced melanoma. Most likely, this agent will be utilized in combinatorial or sequential approach.

  10. Updates on the Clinical Evidenced Herb-Warfarin Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beikang Ge

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing and inadvertent use of herbs makes herb-drug interactions a focus of research. Concomitant use of warfarin, a highly efficacious oral anticoagulant, and herbs causes major safety concerns due to the narrow therapeutic window of warfarin. This paper presents an update overview of clinical findings regarding herb-warfarin interaction, highlighting clinical outcomes, severity of documented interactions, and quality of clinical evidence. Among thirty-eight herbs, Cannabis, Chamomile, Cranberry, Garlic, Ginkgo, Grapefruit, Lycium, Red clover, and St. John’s wort were evaluated to have major severity interaction with warfarin. Herbs were also classified on account of the likelihood of their supporting evidences for interaction. Four herbs were considered as highly probable to interact with warfarin (level I, three were estimated as probable (level II, and ten and twenty-one were possible (level III and doubtful (level IV, respectively. The general mechanism of herb-warfarin interaction almost remains unknown, yet several pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic factors were estimated to influence the effectiveness of warfarin. Based on limited literature and information reported, we identified corresponding mechanisms of interactions for a small amount of “interacting herbs.” In summary, herb-warfarin interaction, especially the clinical effects of herbs on warfarin therapy should be further investigated through multicenter studies with larger sample sizes.

  11. Updates on the clinical evidenced herb-warfarin interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Beikang; Zhang, Zhen; Zuo, Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Increasing and inadvertent use of herbs makes herb-drug interactions a focus of research. Concomitant use of warfarin, a highly efficacious oral anticoagulant, and herbs causes major safety concerns due to the narrow therapeutic window of warfarin. This paper presents an update overview of clinical findings regarding herb-warfarin interaction, highlighting clinical outcomes, severity of documented interactions, and quality of clinical evidence. Among thirty-eight herbs, Cannabis, Chamomile, Cranberry, Garlic, Ginkgo, Grapefruit, Lycium, Red clover, and St. John's wort were evaluated to have major severity interaction with warfarin. Herbs were also classified on account of the likelihood of their supporting evidences for interaction. Four herbs were considered as highly probable to interact with warfarin (level I), three were estimated as probable (level II), and ten and twenty-one were possible (level III) and doubtful (level IV), respectively. The general mechanism of herb-warfarin interaction almost remains unknown, yet several pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic factors were estimated to influence the effectiveness of warfarin. Based on limited literature and information reported, we identified corresponding mechanisms of interactions for a small amount of "interacting herbs." In summary, herb-warfarin interaction, especially the clinical effects of herbs on warfarin therapy should be further investigated through multicenter studies with larger sample sizes.

  12. Summary of the Update Session of Clinical Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinyavat, Teeda; Warner, David O.; Flick, Randall P.; McCann, Mary Ellen; Andropoulos, Dean B.; Hu, Danquig; Sall, Jeffrey W.; Spann, Marisa N.; Ing, Caleb

    2016-01-01

    During the Fifth Pediatric Anesthesia Neurodevelopmental Assessment (PANDA) Symposium, experts and stakeholders met to present and discuss recent advances made in the study of neurodevelopmental outcomes following exposure to anesthetic drugs in infants and children. This article summarizes the update of five ongoing clinical studies: General Anesthesia compared to Spinal Anesthesia (GAS), Toxicity of Remifentanil and Dexmedetomidine (T-Rex), Mayo Anesthesia Safety in Kids (MASK), the UCSF (University of California San Francisco) human cohort study, and Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) Neonatal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) study. The purpose of this summary is to discuss the contributions and limitations of these studies, how they fit into the published literature, and what questions remain to be answered. PMID:27768673

  13. Update on the clinical utility and optimal use of cefditoren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barberán J

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available José Barberán,1 Lorenzo Aguilar,2 María-José Giménez21Infectious Diseases Department, Hospital Central de la Defensa Gomez Ulla, 2Microbiology Department, School of Medicine, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, SpainAbstract: This article reviews and updates published data on cefditoren. The in vitro activity of cefditoren and its potential pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic adequacy to cover emerging resistance phenotypes in the present decade is reviewed. Cefditoren's in vitro activity against most prevalent bacterial respiratory pathogens in the community and its pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile suggests a significant role for cefditoren in the treatment of respiratory tract infections. Clinical trials (in acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, community-acquired pneumonia, pharyngotonsillitis, and sinusitis performed during clinical development outside Japan, mainly in adults, are reviewed, together with new clinical studies in the treatment of pharyngotonsillitis, sinusitis, and otitis media in children, mainly in Japan, for efficacy and safety assessment. The results of these studies support the adequacy of cefditoren for the treatment of community-acquired respiratory tract infections with a safety profile similar to previous oral antibiotics. From the data reviewed, it is concluded that cefditoren is an adequate option for the treatment of mild-to-moderate community-acquired respiratory infections, especially in geographical areas with a reported prevalence of phenotypes exhibiting nonsusceptibility to common oral antibiotics.Keywords: acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, community-acquired pneumonia, pharyngotonsillitis, sinusitis, otitis media

  14. Clinical Practice Guideline: Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (Update).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Neil; Gubbels, Samuel P; Schwartz, Seth R; Edlow, Jonathan A; El-Kashlan, Hussam; Fife, Terry; Holmberg, Janene M; Mahoney, Kathryn; Hollingsworth, Deena B; Roberts, Richard; Seidman, Michael D; Steiner, Robert W Prasaad; Do, Betty Tsai; Voelker, Courtney C J; Waguespack, Richard W; Corrigan, Maureen D

    2017-03-01

    Objective This update of a 2008 guideline from the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation provides evidence-based recommendations to benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), defined as a disorder of the inner ear characterized by repeated episodes of positional vertigo. Changes from the prior guideline include a consumer advocate added to the update group; new evidence from 2 clinical practice guidelines, 20 systematic reviews, and 27 randomized controlled trials; enhanced emphasis on patient education and shared decision making; a new algorithm to clarify action statement relationships; and new and expanded recommendations for the diagnosis and management of BPPV. Purpose The primary purposes of this guideline are to improve the quality of care and outcomes for BPPV by improving the accurate and efficient diagnosis of BPPV, reducing the inappropriate use of vestibular suppressant medications, decreasing the inappropriate use of ancillary testing such as radiographic imaging, and increasing the use of appropriate therapeutic repositioning maneuvers. The guideline is intended for all clinicians who are likely to diagnose and manage patients with BPPV, and it applies to any setting in which BPPV would be identified, monitored, or managed. The target patient for the guideline is aged ≥18 years with a suspected or potential diagnosis of BPPV. The primary outcome considered in this guideline is the resolution of the symptoms associated with BPPV. Secondary outcomes considered include an increased rate of accurate diagnoses of BPPV, a more efficient return to regular activities and work, decreased use of inappropriate medications and unnecessary diagnostic tests, reduction in recurrence of BPPV, and reduction in adverse events associated with undiagnosed or untreated BPPV. Other outcomes considered include minimizing costs in the diagnosis and treatment of BPPV, minimizing potentially unnecessary return physician visits, and maximizing

  15. A life-threatening case of disseminated nocardiosis due to Nocardia brasiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramythiotou, Elisabeth; Papadomichelakis, Evangelos; Vrioni, Georgia; Pappas, Georgios; Pantelaki, Maria; Kontos, Fanourios; Zerva, Loukia; Armaganidis, Apostolos

    2012-10-01

    Nocardiosis is a rare disease caused by infection with Nocardia species, aerobic actinomycetes with a worldwide distribution. A rare life-threatening disseminated Nocardia brasiliensis infection is described in an elderly, immunocompromised patient. Microorganism was recovered from bronchial secretions and dermal lesions, and was identified using molecular assays. Prompt, timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment ensured a favorable outcome.

  16. Fertility Preservation for Patients With Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loren, Alison W.; Mangu, Pamela B.; Beck, Lindsay Nohr; Brennan, Lawrence; Magdalinski, Anthony J.; Partridge, Ann H.; Quinn, Gwendolyn; Wallace, W. Hamish; Oktay, Kutluk

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To update guidance for health care providers about fertility preservation for adults and children with cancer. Methods A systematic review of the literature published from March 2006 through January 2013 was completed using MEDLINE and the Cochrane Collaboration Library. An Update Panel reviewed the evidence and updated the recommendation language. Results There were 222 new publications that met inclusion criteria. A majority were observational studies, cohort studies, and case series or reports, with few randomized clinical trials. After review of the new evidence, the Update Panel concluded that no major, substantive revisions to the 2006 American Society of Clinical Oncology recommendations were warranted, but clarifications were added. Recommendations As part of education and informed consent before cancer therapy, health care providers (including medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, gynecologic oncologists, urologists, hematologists, pediatric oncologists, and surgeons) should address the possibility of infertility with patients treated during their reproductive years (or with parents or guardians of children) and be prepared to discuss fertility preservation options and/or to refer all potential patients to appropriate reproductive specialists. Although patients may be focused initially on their cancer diagnosis, the Update Panel encourages providers to advise patients regarding potential threats to fertility as early as possible in the treatment process so as to allow for the widest array of options for fertility preservation. The discussion should be documented. Sperm and embryo cryopreservation as well as oocyte cryopreservation are considered standard practice and are widely available. Other fertility preservation methods should be considered investigational and should be performed by providers with the necessary expertise. PMID:23715580

  17. Clinical Practice Guideline: Otitis Media with Effusion (Update).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Richard M; Shin, Jennifer J; Schwartz, Seth R; Coggins, Robyn; Gagnon, Lisa; Hackell, Jesse M; Hoelting, David; Hunter, Lisa L; Kummer, Ann W; Payne, Spencer C; Poe, Dennis S; Veling, Maria; Vila, Peter M; Walsh, Sandra A; Corrigan, Maureen D

    2016-02-01

    This update of a 2004 guideline codeveloped by the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the American Academy of Family Physicians, provides evidence-based recommendations to manage otitis media with effusion (OME), defined as the presence of fluid in the middle ear without signs or symptoms of acute ear infection. Changes from the prior guideline include consumer advocates added to the update group, evidence from 4 new clinical practice guidelines, 20 new systematic reviews, and 49 randomized control trials, enhanced emphasis on patient education and shared decision making, a new algorithm to clarify action statement relationships, and new and expanded recommendations for the diagnosis and management of OME. The purpose of this multidisciplinary guideline is to identify quality improvement opportunities in managing OME and to create explicit and actionable recommendations to implement these opportunities in clinical practice. Specifically, the goals are to improve diagnostic accuracy, identify children who are most susceptible to developmental sequelae from OME, and educate clinicians and patients regarding the favorable natural history of most OME and the clinical benefits for medical therapy (eg, steroids, antihistamines, decongestants). Additional goals relate to OME surveillance, hearing and language evaluation, and management of OME detected by newborn screening. The target patient for the guideline is a child aged 2 months through 12 years with OME, with or without developmental disabilities or underlying conditions that predispose to OME and its sequelae. The guideline is intended for all clinicians who are likely to diagnose and manage children with OME, and it applies to any setting in which OME would be identified, monitored, or managed. This guideline, however, does not apply to patients 12 years old. The update group made strong recommendations that clinicians (1) should document

  18. 2011 Focused Update of 2009 American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update on Chemotherapy for Stage IV Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzoli, Christopher G.; Temin, Sarah; Aliff, Timothy; Baker, Sherman; Brahmer, Julie; Johnson, David H.; Laskin, Janessa L.; Masters, Gregory; Milton, Daniel; Nordquist, Luke; Pao, William; Pfister, David G.; Piantadosi, Steven; Schiller, Joan H.; Smith, Reily; Smith, Thomas J.; Strawn, John R.; Trent, David; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Purpose An American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) focused update updates a single recommendation (or subset of recommendations) in advance of a regularly scheduled guideline update. This document updates one recommendation of the ASCO Guideline Update on Chemotherapy for Stage IV Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) regarding switch maintenance chemotherapy. Clinical Context Recent results from phase III clinical trials have demonstrated that in patients with stage IV NSCLC who have received four cycles of first-line chemotherapy and whose disease has not progressed, an immediate switch to alternative, single-agent chemotherapy can extend progression-free survival and, in some cases, overall survival. Because of limitations in the data, delayed treatment with a second-line agent after disease progression is also acceptable. Recent Data Seven randomized controlled trials of carboxyaminoimidazole, docetaxel, erlotinib, gefitinib, gemcitabine, and pemetrexed have evaluated outcomes in patients who received an immediate, non–cross resistant alternative therapy (switch maintenance) after first-line therapy. Recommendation In patients with stage IV NSCLC, first-line cytotoxic chemotherapy should be stopped at disease progression or after four cycles in patients whose disease is stable but not responding to treatment. Two-drug cytotoxic combinations should be administered for no more than six cycles. For those with stable disease or response after four cycles, immediate treatment with an alternative, single-agent chemotherapy such as pemetrexed in patients with nonsquamous histology, docetaxel in unselected patients, or erlotinib in unselected patients may be considered. Limitations of this data are such that a break from cytotoxic chemotherapy after a fixed course is also acceptable, with initiation of second-line chemotherapy at disease progression. PMID:21900105

  19. EFSUMB Guidelines and Recommendations on the Clinical Use of Liver Ultrasound Elastography, Update 2017 (Short Version)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, Christoph F; Bamber, Jeffrey; Berzigotti, Annalisa

    2017-01-01

    We present here the first update of the 2013 EFSUMB (European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology) Guidelines and Recommendations on the clinical use of elastography with a focus on the assessment of diffuse liver disease. The short version provides clinical information...... and in several clinical scenarios is also discussed. All of the recommendations are judged with regard to their evidence-based strength according to the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine Levels of Evidence. This updated document is intended to act as a reference and to provide a practical guide for both...

  20. The updating of clinical practice guidelines: insights from an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Martínez García, Laura; Carrasco, José Miguel; Solà, Ivan; Qureshi, Safia; Burgers, Jako S

    2011-09-13

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) have become increasingly popular, and the methodology to develop guidelines has evolved enormously. However, little attention has been given to the updating process, in contrast to the appraisal of the available literature. We conducted an international survey to identify current practices in CPG updating and explored the need to standardize and improve the methods. We developed a questionnaire (28 items) based on a review of the existing literature about guideline updating and expert comments. We carried out the survey between March and July 2009, and it was sent by email to 106 institutions: 69 members of the Guidelines International Network who declared that they developed CPGs; 30 institutions included in the U.S. National Guideline Clearinghouse database that published more than 20 CPGs; and 7 institutions selected by an expert committee. Forty-four institutions answered the questionnaire (42% response rate). In the final analysis, 39 completed questionnaires were included. Thirty-six institutions (92%) reported that they update their guidelines. Thirty-one institutions (86%) have a formal procedure for updating their guidelines, and 19 (53%) have a formal procedure for deciding when a guideline becomes out of date. Institutions describe the process as moderately rigorous (36%) or acknowledge that it could certainly be more rigorous (36%). Twenty-two institutions (61%) alert guideline users on their website when a guideline is older than three to five years or when there is a risk of being outdated. Twenty-five institutions (64%) support the concept of "living guidelines," which are continuously monitored and updated. Eighteen institutions (46%) have plans to design a protocol to improve their guideline-updating process, and 21 (54%) are willing to share resources with other organizations. Our study is the first to describe the process of updating CPGs among prominent guideline institutions across the world, providing a

  1. Increasing Rural Health Clinic Utilization with SMS Updates: Evidence from a Randomized Evaluation in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Chicoine, Luke E.; Guzman, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines an alternative to monitoring staff at a public health clinic in rural Uganda. The program sent SMS updates regarding confirmed attendance of clinic staff and activities to randomly selected cell phone-owning households in the local community. A difference-in-difference approach is used to evaluate the impact of the SMS program, and finds the messages led to an increase in clinic attendance, the receipt of medicine, and reduced duration of illness for young children aged si...

  2. Update on the Clinical Development of Candidate Malaria Vaccines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ballou, W. R; Arevalo-Herrera, Myriam; Carucci, Daniel; Richie, Thomas L; Corradin, Giampietro; Diggs, Carter; Druilhe, Pierre; Giersing, Birgitte K; Saul, Allan; Heppner, D. G

    2004-01-01

    ... powerful driver for stimulating clinical development of candidate vaccines for malaria. This new way forward promises to greatly increase the likelihood of bringing a safe and effective vaccine to licensure...

  3. Paracoccidioidomycosis: epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic and treatment up-dating *

    OpenAIRE

    Marques, Silvio Alencar

    2013-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis is an acute - to chronic systemic mycosis caused by fungi of the genus Paracoccidioides. Due to its frequent tegument clinical expression, paracoccidioidomycosis is an important disease for dermatologists, who must be up-to-date about it. This article focuses on recent epidemiological data and discusses the new insights coming from molecular studies, as well as those related to clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects. In the latter section, we give particular atten...

  4. Sporotrichosis: an update on epidemiology, etiopathogenesis, laboratory and clinical therapeutics*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orofino-Costa, Rosane; de Macedo, Priscila Marques; Rodrigues, Anderson Messias; Bernardes-Engemann, Andréa Reis

    2017-01-01

    In the late 90's there was a change in both the route of transmission and the people at risk for sporotrichosis. This zoonotic cat-man alternative transmission route elicited changes in strategies to control the epidemic. There was a progressive increase in the number of cases involving especially children and the elderly. In addition to becoming hyperendemic, uncommon clinical pictures like immunoreactive clinical presentations or severe systemic cases have emerged. New species were identified and classified through molecular tools using more virulent clinical isolates, like S. brasiliensis, compared to the environmental isolates. Likewise, different species of Sporothrix have been associated with different geographic regions. The serological and molecular techniques are used as an auxiliary tool for the diagnosis and/or for species identification, although the isolation and the identification of Sporothrix spp. in clinical specimen is still the gold standard. Currently sporotrichosis epidemics requires the knowledge of the epidemiological-molecular profile to control the disease and the specific treatment. Itraconazole, potassium iodide, terfinafine, and amphotericin B are the available drugs in Brazil to treat sporotrichosis. The drug of choice, its posology, and treatment duration vary according to the clinical presentation, the Sporothrix species, and host immune status. New treatment choices, including a vaccine, are being developed; nevertheless, more clinical trials are required to confirm its efficacy. PMID:29166494

  5. Analysis of the complete genome sequence of Nocardia seriolae UTF1, the causative agent of fish nocardiosis: The first reference genome sequence of the fish pathogenic Nocardia species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuike, Motoshige; Nishiki, Issei; Iwasaki, Yuki; Nakamura, Yoji; Fujiwara, Atushi; Shimahara, Yoshiko; Kamaishi, Takashi; Yoshida, Terutoyo; Nagai, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Takanori; Katoh, Masaya

    2017-01-01

    Nocardiosis caused by Nocardia seriolae is one of the major threats in the aquaculture of Seriola species (yellowtail; S. quinqueradiata, amberjack; S. dumerili and kingfish; S. lalandi) in Japan. Here, we report the complete nucleotide genome sequence of N. seriolae UTF1, isolated from a cultured yellowtail. The genome is a circular chromosome of 8,121,733 bp with a G+C content of 68.1% that encodes 7,697 predicted proteins. In the N. seriolae UTF1 predicted genes, we found orthologs of virulence factors of pathogenic mycobacteria and human clinical Nocardia isolates involved in host cell invasion, modulation of phagocyte function and survival inside the macrophages. The virulence factor candidates provide an essential basis for understanding their pathogenic mechanisms at the molecular level by the fish nocardiosis research community in future studies. We also found many potential antibiotic resistance genes on the N. seriolae UTF1 chromosome. Comparative analysis with the four existing complete genomes, N. farcinica IFM 10152, N. brasiliensis HUJEG-1 and N. cyriacigeorgica GUH-2 and N. nova SH22a, revealed that 2,745 orthologous genes were present in all five Nocardia genomes (core genes) and 1,982 genes were unique to N. seriolae UTF1. In particular, the N. seriolae UTF1 genome contains a greater number of mobile elements and genes of unknown function that comprise the differences in structure and gene content from the other Nocardia genomes. In addition, a lot of the N. seriolae UTF1-specific genes were assigned to the ABC transport system. Because of limited resources in ocean environments, these N. seriolae UTF1 specific ABC transporters might facilitate adaptation strategies essential for marine environment survival. Thus, the availability of the complete N. seriolae UTF1 genome sequence will provide a valuable resource for comparative genomic studies of N. seriolae isolates, as well as provide new insights into the ecological and functional diversity of

  6. EFSUMB Guidelines and Recommendations on the Clinical Use of Liver Ultrasound Elastography, Update 2017 (Long Version)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, Christoph F; Bamber, Jeffrey; Berzigotti, Annalisa

    2017-01-01

    We present here the first update of the 2013 EFSUMB (European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology) Guidelines and Recommendations on the clinical use of elastography, focused on the assessment of diffuse liver disease. The first part (long version) of these Guidelines...... and Recommendations deals with the basic principles of elastography and provides an update of how the technology has changed. The practical advantages and disadvantages associated with each of the techniques are described, and guidance is provided regarding optimization of scanning technique, image display, image...... Levels of Evidence. This updated document is intended to act as a reference and to provide a practical guide for both beginners and advanced clinical users....

  7. Update on basic and clinical aspects of eosinophilic oesophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straumann, Alex; Schoepfer, Alain

    2014-08-01

    The identification of a distinct syndrome, designated eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE), with its own clinical and histopathological characteristics, was first described in the early 1990s. Meanwhile intense research has uncovered many molecular, immunological and clinical aspects of this chronic-inflammatory disorder. This article focuses exclusively on basic and clinical insights of EoE gathered during the last few years. Regarding aetiopathogenesis it has become clear that EoE is a food-triggered disease with milk and wheat as the dominant culprit food categories. However, it is still debated whether a disturbed mucosal integrity allowing allergens to cross the mucosal barrier, or changes in wheat and milk manufacturing might induce these inflammatory responses. Furthermore, basic science and clinical studies have accordingly confirmed that a chronic eosinophilic inflammation leads to a remodelling of the oesophagus with micro- and macro-morphological alterations, ending in a strictured oesophagus with impaired function. Fortunately, long-term therapeutic trials, using either topical corticosteroids or dietary allergen avoidance, have demonstrated that this sequela can be prevented or even reversed. This finding is of clinical relevance as it supports the initiation of a consistent anti-inflammatory therapy. Nevertheless, EoE is still an enigmatic disease and the long list of unanswered questions will certainly stimulate further research. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. CANVAS an update: clinical presentation, investigation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szmulewicz, David J; McLean, Catriona A; MacDougall, Hamish G; Roberts, Leslie; Storey, Elsdon; Halmagyi, G Michael

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar Ataxia with Neuropathy and bilateral Vestibular Areflexia Syndrome (CANVAS) is a multi-system ataxia which results in cerebellar ataxia, a bilateral vestibulopathy and a somatosensory deficit. This sensory deficit has recently been shown to be a neuronopathy, with marked dorsal root ganglia neuronal loss. The characteristic oculomotor clinical sign is an abnormal visually enhanced vestibulo-ocular reflex. To outline the expanding understanding of the pathology in this condition, as well as diagnostic and management issues encountered in clinical practice. Retrospective data on 80 CANVAS patients is reviewed. In addition to the triad of cerebellar impairment, bilateral vestibulopathy and a somatosensory deficit, CANVAS patients may also present with orthostatic hypotension, a chronic cough and neuropathic pain. Management of falls risk and dysphagia is a major clinical priority. CANVAS is an increasingly recognised cause of late-onset ataxia and disequilibrium, and is likely to be a recessive disorder.

  9. An update on probiotics, prebiotics and symbiotics in clinical nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olveira, Gabriel; González-Molero, Inmaculada

    2016-11-01

    The concept of prebiotics, probiotics, and symbiotics and their use in different situations of daily clinical practice related to clinical nutrition is reviewed, as well as their role in the treatment/prevention of diarrhea (acute, induced by antibiotics, secondary to radiotherapy), inflammatory bowel disease (ulcerative colitis and pouchitis), in colonic health (constipation, irritable bowel), in liver disease (steatosis and minimum encephalopathy), and in intensive care, surgical, and liver transplantation. While their effectiveness for preventing antibiotic-induced diarrhea and pouchitis in ulcerative colitis appears to be shown, additional studies are needed to establish recommendations in most clinical settings. The risk of infection associated to use of probiotics is relatively low; however, there are selected groups of patients in whom they should be used with caution (as jejunum infusion). Copyright © 2016 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Paracoccidioidomycosis: epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic and treatment up-dating*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Silvio Alencar

    2013-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis is an acute - to chronic systemic mycosis caused by fungi of the genus Paracoccidioides. Due to its frequent tegument clinical expression, paracoccidioidomycosis is an important disease for dermatologists, who must be up-to-date about it. This article focuses on recent epidemiological data and discusses the new insights coming from molecular studies, as well as those related to clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects. In the latter section, we give particular attention to the guideline on paracoccidioidomycosis organized by specialists in this subject. PMID:24173174

  11. Paracoccidioidomycosis: epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic and treatment up-dating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Silvio Alencar

    2013-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis is an acute - to chronic systemic mycosis caused by fungi of the genus Paracoccidioides. Due to its frequent tegument clinical expression, paracoccidioidomycosis is an important disease for dermatologists, who must be up-to-date about it. This article focuses on recent epidemiological data and discusses the new insights coming from molecular studies, as well as those related to clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects. In the latter section, we give particular attention to the guideline on paracoccidioidomycosis organized by specialists in this subject.

  12. Updated clinical diagnostic criteria for sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Zerr; K. Kallenberg; D.M. Summers; C. Romero; A. Taratuto; U. Heinemann; M. Breithaupt; D. Varges; B. Meissner; A. Ladogana (Anna); M. Schuur (Maaike); S. Haik; S.J. Collins (Steven); G.H. Jansen (Gerard); G.B. Stokin; J. Pimentel; E. Hewer; D. Collie; P. Smith; H. Roberts; J.P. Brandel; P. Tikka-Kleemola (Päivi); M. Pocchiari (Maurizio); C. Begue; P. Cras (Patrick); R.G. Will; P. Sanchez-Juan (Pascual)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractSeveral molecular subtypes of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease have been identified and electroencephalogram and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers have been reported to support clinical diagnosis but with variable utility according to subtype. In recent years, a series of publications

  13. Update on Clinical Features and Brain Abnormalities in Neurogenetics Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackowski, Andrea Parolin; Laureano, Maura Regina; Del'Aquilla, Marco Antonio; de Moura, Luciana Monteiro; Assuncao, Idaiane; Silva, Ivaldo; Schwartzman, Jose Salomao

    2011-01-01

    Neuroimaging methods represent a critical tool in efforts to join the study of the neurobiology of genes with the neurobiology of behaviour, and to understand the neurodevelopmental pathways that give rise to cognitive and behavioural impairments. This article reviews the clinical features and highlights studies with a focus on the relevant…

  14. Prostate specific antigen - brief update on its clinical use

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in 1979.3,4 During the 1980s it was realised that serum PSA levels correlate with the tumour burden in men with prostate ... it has become the most clinically useful of all serum tumour markers. It has a higher specificity for prostate cancer than ..... (It can be found by simply typing. “prostate cancer risk calculator” into a search ...

  15. Clinical Trials With Mesenchymal Stem Cells: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squillaro, Tiziana; Peluso, Gianfranco; Galderisi, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    In the last year, the promising features of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), including their regenerative properties and ability to differentiate into diverse cell lineages, have generated great interest among researchers whose work has offered intriguing perspectives on cell-based therapies for various diseases. Currently the most commonly used adult stem cells in regenerative medicine, MSCs, can be isolated from several tissues, exhibit a strong capacity for replication in vitro, and can differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes. However, heterogeneous procedures for isolating and cultivating MSCs among laboratories have prompted the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) to issue criteria for identifying unique populations of these cells. Consequently, the isolation of MSCs according to ISCT criteria has produced heterogeneous, nonclonal cultures of stromal cells containing stem cells with different multipotent properties, committed progenitors, and differentiated cells. Though the nature and functions of MSCs remain unclear, nonclonal stromal cultures obtained from bone marrow and other tissues currently serve as sources of putative MSCs for therapeutic purposes, and several findings underscore their effectiveness in treating different diseases. To date, 493 MSC-based clinical trials, either complete or ongoing, appear in the database of the US National Institutes of Health. In the present article, we provide a comprehensive review of MSC-based clinical trials conducted worldwide that scrutinizes biological properties of MSCs, elucidates recent clinical findings and clinical trial phases of investigation, highlights therapeutic effects of MSCs, and identifies principal criticisms of the use of these cells. In particular, we analyze clinical trials using MSCs for representative diseases, including hematological disease, graft-versus-host disease, organ transplantation, diabetes, inflammatory diseases, and diseases in the liver, kidney

  16. Cardiovascular Risk of Stimulant Treatment in Pediatric Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Update and Clinical Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerness, Paul G.; Perrin, James M.; Shelley-Abrahamson, Rachel; Wilens, Timothy E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This review provides an update on the cardiovascular impact of therapeutic stimulant-class medication for children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method: Relevant clinical literature was ascertained using PubMed searches limited to human studies and the English language as of May 2011. Current…

  17. American Society of Clinical Oncology 2011 CNS tumors update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Manmeet S

    2011-10-01

    A number of important studies were presented at the CNS tumors section of the 2011 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting. There was particular interest in RTOG 0525, a Phase III study of newly diagnosed glioblastoma treated with different schedules of temozolomide. Prognostic factors for response, survival and chemotherapy-related toxicity in primary CNS lymphoma from the German randomized Phase III trial in newly diagnosed primary CNS lymphoma were also presented.

  18. Update on contemporary management of clinically localized renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorns, J J; Thiel, D D; Castle, E P

    2012-12-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) continues to increase in incidence with the largest increase manifesting in small, organ-confined tumors. This review outlines the epidemiology and current data pertaining to the management of clinically-localized RCC. In this manuscript, the current data outlining the benefit of nephron sparing to the overall survival of the patient is described. The data pertaining to minimally invasive nephron sparing is also explained in detail. From laparoscopic and robotic partial nephrectomy to watchful waiting and percutaneous ablation, the urologist is continually assaulted with new data for the management of clinically-localized RCC. The data can be confusing, and much of it is conflicting. The addition of new scoring systems or nomograms may aid in predicting which therapy would be most beneficial in certain patient groups. New scoring systems may also predict the difficulty of surgical resection and predict surgical complications. The limitations of the data pertaining to the management of clinically-localized RCC are also outlined.

  19. Update on lichen planus and its clinical variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian Weston, MSIII

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Lichen planus (LP is an inflammatory skin condition with characteristic clinical and histopathological findings. Classic LP typically presents as pruritic, polygonal, violaceous flat-topped papules and plaques; many variants in morphology and location also exist, including oral, nail, linear, annular, atrophic, hypertrophic, inverse, eruptive, bullous, ulcerative, lichen planus pigmentosus, lichen planopilaris, vulvovaginal, actinic, lichen planus-lupus erythematosus overlap syndrome, and lichen planus pemphigoides. Clinical presentation of the rarer variant lesions may be largely dissimilar to classic LP and therefore difficult to diagnose based solely on clinical examination. However, histopathological examination of LP and LP-variant lesions reveal similar features, aiding in the proper diagnosis of the disease. Management of LP and LP variants aims to control symptoms and to decrease time from onset to resolution; it often involves topical corticosteroids, but varies depending on the severity and location of the lesion. The literature contains an array of reports on the variations in presentation and successful management of LP and its variants. A familiarity with LP and its variants is important in achieving timely recognition and management of the disease.

  20. Clinical Update on Epidemiology, Pathogenesis, and Nonpharmacological Treatment of Insomnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Kahriman

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Scientific background: Insomnia is by far the most common form of sleep disturbance. Most typically, insomnia has been defined as the symptom of difficulty initiating or maintaining sleep and more rarely as an inability to obtain restorative sleep. Insomnia disorders are most often classified as either primary or secondary to other sleep, psychiatric, or medical conditions, although it is often difficult in practice to determine true causality of insomnia or there may be more than one cause (comorbid conditions. Increasing age, female sex, and psychiatric and medical disorders are consistent risk factors for insomnia. Insomnia is associated with significant social, medical, and financial consequences including impaired social functioning and quality of life, increased risk for psychiatric disorders, and increased health care costs. The clinical assessment of insomnia is based on a careful clinical interview, often supplemented by sleep questionnaires, sleep logs, and psychological testing. Polysomnography is indicated only in selected cases when specific sleep pathologies are suspected. Assessment: A large proportion of insomnia sufferers go undiagnosed, and therefore untreated, by their doctors, and many of these patients incur considerable personal, vocational, and health-related consequences as a result. Insomnia can be triggered by a variety of precipitating events, but when it becomes a chronic problem, psychological and behavioral factors are almost always involved in perpetuating or exacerbating sleep disturbances over time. Psychological and behavioral therapies for primary insomnia include sleep restriction, stimulus control therapy, relaxation training, cognitive strategies, and a combination of those methods, referred to as cognitive behavior therapy of insomnia. Results of the controlled clinical trials indicate that 70% to 80% of patients with primary insomnia partially benefit from cognitive behavior therapy. Although only 20% to

  1. Update on the treatment of narcolepsy: clinical efficacy of pitolisant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calik MW

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Michael W Calik1,2 1Department of Biobehavioral Health Science, 2Center for Narcolepsy, Sleep and Health Research, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States Abstract: Narcolepsy is a neurological disease that affects 1 in 2,000 individuals and is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS. In 60–70% of individuals with narcolepsy, it is also characterized by cataplexy or a sudden loss of muscle tone that is triggered by positive or negative emotions. Narcolepsy decreases the quality of life of the afflicted individuals. Currently used drugs treat EDS alone (modafinil/armodafinil, methylphenidate, and amphetamine, cataplexy alone (“off-label” use of antidepressants, or both EDS and cataplexy (sodium oxybate. These drugs have abuse, tolerability, and adherence issues. A greater diversity of drug options is needed to treat narcolepsy. The small molecule drug, pitolisant, acts as an inverse agonist/antagonist at the H3 receptor, thus increasing histaminergic tone in the wake promoting system of the brain. Pitolisant has been studied in animal models of narcolepsy and used in clinical trials as a treatment for narcolepsy. A comprehensive search of online databases (eg, Medline, PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library Database, Ovid MEDLINE, Europe PubMed Central, EBSCOhost CINAHL, ProQuest Research Library, Google Scholar, and ClinicalTrials.gov was performed. Nonrandomized and randomized studies were included. This review focuses on the outcomes of four clinical trials of pitolisant to treat narcolepsy. These four trials show that pitolisant is an effective drug to treat EDS and cataplexy in narcolepsy. Keywords: narcolepsy, pitolisant, histamine

  2. 2015 Clinical trials update in sickle cell anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Natasha; Galacteros, Frédéric; Brugnara, Carlo

    2017-01-01

    Polymerization of HbS and cell sickling are the prime pathophysiological events in sickle cell disease (SCD). Over the last 30 years, a substantial understanding at the molecular level has been acquired on how a single amino acid change in the structure of the beta chain of hemoglobin leads to the explosive growth of the HbS polymer and the associated changes in red cell morphology. O2 tension and intracellular HbS concentration are the primary molecular drivers of this process, and are obvious targets for developing new therapies. However, polymerization and sickling are driving a complex network of associated cellular changes inside and outside of the erythrocyte, which become essential components of the inflammatory vasculopathy and result in a large range of potential acute and chronic organ damages. In these areas, a multitude of new targets for therapeutic developments have emerged, with several ongoing or planned new therapeutic interventions. This review outlines the key points of SCD pathophysiology as they relate to the development of new therapies, both at the pre-clinical and clinical levels. PMID:26178236

  3. Updated clinical diagnostic criteria for sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallenberg, K.; Summers, D. M.; Romero, C.; Taratuto, A.; Heinemann, U.; Breithaupt, M.; Varges, D.; Meissner, B.; Ladogana, A.; Schuur, M.; Haik, S.; Collins, S. J.; Jansen, Gerard H.; Stokin, G. B.; Pimentel, J.; Hewer, E.; Collie, D.; Smith, P.; Roberts, H.; Brandel, J. P.; van Duijn, C.; Pocchiari, M.; Begue, C.; Cras, P.; Will, R. G.; Sanchez-Juan, P.

    2009-01-01

    Several molecular subtypes of sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease have been identified and electroencephalogram and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers have been reported to support clinical diagnosis but with variable utility according to subtype. In recent years, a series of publications have demonstrated a potentially important role for magnetic resonance imaging in the pre-mortem diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease. Magnetic resonance imaging signal alterations correlate with distinct sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease molecular subtypes and thus might contribute to the earlier identification of the whole spectrum of sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease cases. This multi-centre international study aimed to provide a rationale for the amendment of the clinical diagnostic criteria for sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease. Patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease and fluid attenuated inversion recovery or diffusion-weight imaging were recruited from 12 countries. Patients referred as ‘suspected sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease’ but with an alternative diagnosis after thorough follow up, were analysed as controls. All magnetic resonance imaging scans were assessed for signal changes according to a standard protocol encompassing seven cortical regions, basal ganglia, thalamus and cerebellum. Magnetic resonance imaging scans were evaluated in 436 sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease patients and 141 controls. The pattern of high signal intensity with the best sensitivity and specificity in the differential diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease was identified. The optimum diagnostic accuracy in the differential diagnosis of rapid progressive dementia was obtained when either at least two cortical regions (temporal, parietal or occipital) or both caudate nucleus and putamen displayed a high signal in fluid attenuated inversion recovery or diffusion-weight imaging magnetic resonance imaging. Based on our analyses, magnetic

  4. Optical coherence tomography a clinical and technical update

    CERN Document Server

    Cunha-Vaz, José

    2012-01-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography represents the ultimate noninvasive  ocular imaging technique although being in the field for over two-decades. This book encompasses both medical and technical developments and recent achievements. Here, the authors cover the field of application from the anterior to the posterior ocular segments (Part I) and present a comprehensive review on the development of OCT. Important developments towards  clinical applications are covered in Part II, ranging from the adaptive optics to the integration on a slit-lamp, and passing through new structural  and functional information extraction from OCT data. The book is intended to be informative, coherent and comprehensive for both the medical and technical communities and aims at easing the communication between the two fields and bridging the gap between the two scientific communities.

  5. Clinical presentation and management of neonatal abstinence syndrome: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ordean A

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Alice Ordean,1 Brian C Chisamore21Department of Family Medicine, 2Department of Pediatrics, St Joseph's Health Centre, and University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, CanadaAbstract: Exposure to prescription medications and illicit drug use during pregnancy has been associated with neonatal abstinence syndrome. The clinical presentation consists of neurological respiratory, gastrointestinal, and vasomotor disturbances. All infants require observation and supportive care to ensure appropriate adaptation and growth in the newborn period. A smaller percentage may also require additional pharmacotherapy, depending on the specific gestational substance exposure. Women should be counseled antenatally about the possible neonatal effects, and mother–baby dyad care should be implemented for this particular patient population.Keywords: neonatal withdrawal, opioids, marijuana, cocaine, benzodiazepines, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors

  6. Review of clinical trials: update on oral insulin spray formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzilli, Paolo; Raskin, Philip; Parkin, Christopher G

    2010-02-01

    Large clinical trials have shown that improving glycaemic control significantly reduces the risk of long-term microvascular complications in type 1 (T1DM) and type 2 (T2DM) diabetes. Achieving optimal glycaemic control often requires the use of multiple daily insulin injections. Current approaches to insulin administration are less than optimal; many T2DM patients view insulin therapy as inconvenient and uncomfortable and may delay starting insulin therapy because of this. A new oral insulin spray formulation and delivery system provides an alternative to injectable and inhaled insulin. The system allows a liquid oral spray insulin formulation to be delivered into the mouth via an aerosolized spray. The oral insulin spray is a tasteless liquid aerosol mist formulation that is administered to the buccal mucosa using a proprietary delivery system. The active pharmaceutical ingredient is recombinant human insulin; however, the formulation behaves in a fashion more similar to the synthetic fast-acting insulin analogues. In clinical studies of healthy subjects and subjects with T1DM and T2DM, investigators have shown that the oral insulin spray was absorbed in direct relation to the amount given and had a faster onset and a shorter duration of action when compared with regular insulin given subcutaneously. In all of the studies conducted, the oral insulin spray was generally well tolerated. Some healthy individuals and subjects with T1DM experienced transient (1-2 min) mild dizziness during dosing; these symptoms were mild and self-limited. No changes in vital signs, laboratory values or physical examination results were noted. The ease of use of the insulin spray formulation may increase patient acceptance and treatment compliance, thereby potentially reducing complications and improving quality of life for patients with insulin-dependent diabetes. This article provides an overview of the safety profile and proposed mechanism of action of this insulin formulation and

  7. Suanzaoren Formulae for Insomnia: Updated Clinical Evidence and Possible Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi-Hui Zhou

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Insomnia disorder is a widespread and refractory disease. Semen Ziziphi Spinosae, Suanzaoren, a well-known Chinese herbal medicine, has been used for treating insomnia for thousands of years. Here, we aimed to assess the available evidence of Chinese herbal formulae that contains Suanzaoren (FSZR for insomnia according to high-quality randomized controlled trials (RCTs and reviewed their possible mechanisms based on animal-based studies. Electronic searches were performed in eight databases from inception to November 2016. The primary outcome measures were polysomnography index and Pittsburgh sleep quality index. The secondary outcome measures were clinical effective rate and adverse events. The methodological quality of RCTs was assessed by Cochrane's collaboration tool, and only RCTs with positive for 4 out of 7 for the Cochrane risk of bias domains were included in analyses. Thirteen eligible studies with 1,454 patients were identified. Meta-analysis of high-quality RCTs showed that FSZR monotherapy was superior to placebo (P < 0.01; FSZR plus Diazepam was superior to Diazepam alone (P < 0.05; there were mixed results comparing FSZR with Diazepam (P > 0.05 or P < 0.05. Furthermore, FSZR caused fewer side effects than that of Diazepam. Suanzaoren contains complex mixtures of phytochemicals including sanjoinine A, Jujuboside A, spinosin and other flavonoids, which has sedative and hypnotic functions primarily mediated by the GABAergic and serotonergic system. In conclusion, the findings of present study supported that FSZR could be an alternative treatment for insomnia in clinic. FSZR exerted sedative and hypnotic actions mainly through the GABAergic and serotonergic system.

  8. Systemic nocardiosis in a Mediterranean population of cultured meagre, Argyrosomus regius Asso (Perciformes: Sciaenidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkesh, A; Kantham, K P L; Shinn, A P; Crumlish, M; Richards, R H

    2013-02-01

    Marine cultured meagre, Argyrosomus regius Asso, in central and western Greece were affected by an outbreak of systemic granulomatous disease subsequently demonstrated to be nocardiosis. The fish were originally imported as juveniles from hatcheries in France and Italy and on-grown in Greece, the latter also providing broodstock for a small number of local Greek hatcheries for the production of second-generation juveniles. The disease in cage reared fish had been present throughout the year, particularly in the 1+ and 2+ year old fish with a low to variable morbidity and 1-4% total mortality. Multiple lesions were visible externally on the skin of affected fish, with severe ulcerations and necrosis. Internally, multifocal yellowish-white nodules, 0.1-0.5 cm in diameter, were visible on the surface of several internal organs. Histopathology revealed systemic granulomatous inflammation. Fite-Faraco staining clearly demonstrated the presence of Nocardia-like organisms which were Gram-positive, long, rod to beaded filamentous bacteria. Nocardia genus-specific 16s RNA primers NG1 and NG2 were used to generate a 600 bp fragment recovered from affected tissue, confirming the diagnosis of Nocardia spp. To our knowledge, this is the first report of nocardiosis in meagre. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Worldwide clinical safety assessment of gadoteridol injection: an update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Runge, V.M. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Parker, J.R. [Department of Medical and Scientific Affairs, Bracco Diagnostics, Inc., P. O. Box 5225, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Gadoteridol injection is a low molecular weight chelate complex of gadolinium (III) which is useful as a contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging. A total of 2481 adult and pediatric subjects were studied with gadoteridol at doses from 0.025 to 0.3 mmol/kg in phase I-IIIb clinical trials in Europe and the United States. The study population had a mean age of 49 years, and included 119 patients under 18 years of age and 747 patients over 60 years of age. After 2656 administered injections of gadoteridol a total of 233 adverse events were recorded in 176 exposures, an incidence rate of 6.6 % irrespective of relationship to drug administration. The most frequently reported adverse events were nausea (1.5 %), taste perversion (0.9 %), and headache (0.6 %). All other adverse events occurred with an incidence of 0.5 % or less. This report confirms the excellent safety profile of gadoteridol in healthy subjects and patients with a variety of known or suspected pathologies. (orig.) With 3 tabs., 10 refs.

  10. Cerebral venous thrombosis: Update on clinical manifestations, diagnosis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leys Didier

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT has a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations that may mimic many other neurological disorders and lead to misdiagnoses. Headache is the most common symptom and may be associated with other symptoms or remain isolated. The other frequent manifestations are focal neurological deficits and diffuse encephalopathies with seizures. The key to the diagnosis is the imaging of the occluded vessel or of the intravascular thrombus, by a combination of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and magnetic resonance venography (MRV. Causes and risk factors include medical, surgical and obstetrical causes of deep vein thrombosis, genetic and acquired prothrombotic disorders, cancer and hematological disorders, inflammatory systemic disorders, pregnancy and puerperium, infections and local causes such as tumors, arteriovenous malformations, trauma, central nervous system infections and local infections. The breakdown of causes differs in different parts of the world. A meta-analysis of the most recent prospectively collected series showed an overall 15% case-fatality or dependency rate. Heparin therapy is the standard therapy at the acute stage, followed by 3-6 months of oral anticoagulation. Patients with isolated intracranial hypertension may require a lumbar puncture to remove cerebrospinal fluid before starting heparin when they develop a papilloedema that may threaten the visual acuity or decompressive hemicraniectomy. Patients who develop seizures should receive antiepileptic drugs. Cerebral venous thrombosis - even pregnancy-related - should not contraindicate future pregnancies. The efficacy and safety of local thrombolysis and decompressive hemicraniectomy should be tested

  11. Osteoarthritis: an update with relevance for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijlsma, Johannes W J; Berenbaum, Francis; Lafeber, Floris P J G

    2011-06-18

    Osteoarthritis is thought to be the most prevalent chronic joint disease. The incidence of osteoarthritis is rising because of the ageing population and the epidemic of obesity. Pain and loss of function are the main clinical features that lead to treatment, including non-pharmacological, pharmacological, and surgical approaches. Clinicians recognise that the diagnosis of osteoarthritis is established late in the disease process, maybe too late to expect much help from disease-modifying drugs. Despite efforts over the past decades to develop markers of disease, still-imaging procedures and biochemical marker analyses need to be improved and possibly extended with more specific and sensitive methods to reliably describe disease processes, to diagnose the disease at an early stage, to classify patients according to their prognosis, and to follow the course of disease and treatment effectiveness. In the coming years, a better definition of osteoarthritis is expected by delineating different phenotypes of the disease. Treatment targeted more specifically at these phenotypes might lead to improved outcomes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. eHealth in cardiovascular medicine: A clinical update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saner, Hugo; van der Velde, Enno

    2016-10-01

    Demographic changes, progress in medicine technology and regional problems in providing healthcare to low density populations are posing great challenges to our healthcare systems. Rapid progress in computer sciences and information technologies have a great impact on the way healthcare will be delivered in the near future. This article describes opportunities and challenges of eHealth and telemedicine in the framework of our health systems and, in particular, in the context of today's cardiology services. The most promising applications of eHealth and telemedicine include: (a) prevention and lifestyle interventions; (b) chronic disease management including hypertension, diabetes and heart failure; (c) arrhythmia detection including early detection of atrial fibrillation and telemonitoring of devices such as pacemaker, internal cardioverter defibrillators and implantable rhythm monitoring devices; (d) telerehabilitation. Major obstacles to the integration of eHealth and telemedicine into daily clinical practice include limited large-scale evidence, in particular, for cost-effectiveness, as well as lack of interoperability, inadequate or fragmented legal frameworks and lack of reimbursement. An important challenge for those involved in these new technologies will be to keep the main focus on patient's individual needs and to carefully evaluate the evidence behind the practice. © The European Society of Cardiology 2016.

  13. Hypertensive crisis: an update on clinical approach and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipek, Emrah; Oktay, Ahmet Afşin; Krim, Selim R

    2017-07-01

    Here, we review current concepts on hypertensive crisis (HTN-C) with a focus on epidemiology, causes, pathophysiology and prognosis. We also offer a practical approach to the management of HTN-C. HTN-C is characterized by a severe and abrupt increase in blood pressure (BP) with impending or progressive acute end-organ damage (EOD). HTN-C can be divided into hypertensive emergency (HTN-E) and hypertensive urgency (HTN-U) based on the presence or absence of acute EOD, respectively. Recent retrospective studies have demonstrated that emergency department (ED) referrals from an outpatient clinic or rapid BP-lowering strategies in the ED do not lead to improved outcomes in patients with HTN-U. HTN-C can be a de-novo manifestation or a complication of essential or secondary HTN. The presence of acute EOD is a major poor prognostic indicator in HTN-C. The main objectives of the management of HTN-C are distinction of HTN-E from HTN-U and appropriate risk stratification, prevention or regression of acute EOD due to severely elevated BP, prevention of recurrence of HTN-C with an effective long-term management plan and avoidance of rapid lowering of BP except in some special circumstances. The majority of patients with asymptomatic HTN-U can be safely managed in the outpatient setting without exposing them to the risks of aggressive BP lowering. However, patients with HTN-E require hospitalization, prompt treatment and close monitoring.

  14. Female sterilization: update on clinical efficacy, side effects and contraindications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizzo, Salvatore; Bertocco, Anna; Saccardi, Carlo; Di Gangi, Stefania; Litta, Pietro Salvatore; D'antona, Donato; Nardelli, Giovanni Battista

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this review is to compare studies concerning female sterilization in order to define the most suitable approach and device for each patient considering timing, safety, cost-effectiveness, failure rate, complication rate and patient satisfaction. A systematic literature search was conducted in electronic databases MEDLINE-EMBASE-Sciencedirect and Cochrane Library between 2000 and 2012. All original descriptions, case reports, retrospective and review articles on tubal sterilization methods have been considered. Outcome measures were effectiveness, tolerability, procedure complications and female satisfaction. The ideal female sterilization system should be a simple, safe, highly efficient, easily learned, inexpensive, one-time procedure without negative side-effects. Nowadays, the trans-cervical approach is associated with minimal postoperative pain, allowing short hospitalization and fast resumption of daily activities. Laparoscopic and laparotomic approaches are considered second choices, since, particularly in developing countries, the transcervical hysteroscopic methods will increasingly spread within gynaecological clinical practice. Safety issues, hospital stay, costs and surgeons' experience are important factors in decision-making of the method for female sterilization. Hysteroscopic devices should be preferred when possible. The counselling time remains a fundamental step in choice. The decision concerning method depends on the setting, the surgeon's experience, the country's economical development and the woman's preference.

  15. European recommendations for the clinical use of HIV drug resistance testing: 2011 update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Camacho, Ricardo J; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca

    2011-01-01

    is needed after treatment failure. The Panel recommends genotyping in most situations, using updated and clinically evaluated interpretation systems. It is mandatory that laboratories performing HIV resistance tests take part regularly in external quality assurance programs, and that they consider storing...... samples in situations where resistance testing cannot be performed as recommended. Similarly, it is necessary that HIV clinicians and virologists take part in continuous education and discuss problematic clinical cases. Indeed, resistance test results should be used in the context of all other clinically......The European HIV Drug Resistance Guidelines Panel, established to make recommendations to clinicians and virologists, felt that sufficient new information has become available to warrant an update of its recommendations, explained in both pocket guidelines and this full paper. The Panel makes...

  16. [Update of clinical programs using hadrontherapy 2008-2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habrand, J-L; Datchary, J; Alapetite, C; Bolle, S; Calugaru, V; Feuvret, L; Helfre, S; Stefan, D; Delacroix, S; Demarzi, L; Dendale, R

    2013-10-01

    Hadrontherapy, a type of radiation therapy dealing with heavy charged particles, has become for the past decade one of the most sophisticated and attractive approach in the management of cancer. This is related with major technological innovations that have made available, at a relatively cheap cost, compact proton accelerators equipped with rotational gantries. The implementation of pencil beam scanning should also make treatment planning and delivery much easier and faster than conventional approaches. Until now, approximately 100,000 patients have been treated with protons worldwide. Due to more complex technological and biological challenges, light ion therapy - mainly carbon ions - has developed at a lower pace, except in Japan where most of the 15,000 treated patients have been enrolled. Current indications for protons include firstly, locally aggressive tumours non or incompletely resected, that are located close to critical normal structures: ocular melanomas, skull base and spinal canal low grade sarcomas, selected ENT carcinomas (like adenoid cystic); secondly, improvement of tolerance to radiations: delayed, mainly in paediatric malignancies, due to the exquisite sensitivity of organs under development (including to carcinogenesis); immediate, on bone marrow, mucosae… mainly in concomitant radiation-chemotherapy interactions (tested in esophagus, and lung). Most promising indications for carbon ions include inoperable highly radioresistant primaries, such as mucosal melanomas, high grade bone and soft part sarcomas, and pancreatic carcinomas. Altered fractionations are also of interests that could translate in clinical and economical benefits. Controversies have risen whether more common indications, like prostate, should also be explored. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  17. Update on clinical trials in home mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Luke E; Murphy, Patrick B

    2016-02-01

    Home mechanical ventilation (HMV) is an increasingly common intervention and is initiated for a range of pathological processes, including neuromuscular disease (NMD), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and obesity related respiratory failure. There have been important recent data published in this area, which helps to guide practice by indicating which populations may benefit from this intervention and the optimum method of setting up and controlling sleep disordered breathing. Recent superficially conflicting data has been published regarding HMV in COPD, with a trial in post-exacerbation patients suggesting no benefit, but in stable chronic hypercapnic patients suggesting a clear and sustained mortality benefit. The two studies are critiqued and the potential reasons for the differing results are discussed. Early and small trial data is frequently contradicted with larger randomised controlled trials and this has been the case with diaphragm pacing being shown to be potentially harmful in the latest data, confirming the importance of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in NMD such as motor neurone disease. Advances in ventilator technology have so far appeared quicker than the clinical data to support their use; although small and often unblinded, the current data suggests equivalence to standard modes of NIV, but with potential comfort benefits that may enhance adherence. The indications for NIV have expanded since its inception, with an effort to treat sleep disordered breathing as a result of chronic heart failure (HF). The SERVE-HF trial has recently demonstrated no clear advantage to this technology and furthermore detected a potentially deleterious effect, with a worsening of all cause and cardiovascular mortality in the treated group compared to controls. The review serves to provide the reader with a critical review of recent advances in the field of sleep disordered breathing and HMV.

  18. Inborn errors of purine metabolism: clinical update and therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniam, Shanti; Duley, John A; Christodoulou, John

    2014-09-01

    Inborn errors of purine metabolism exhibit broad neurological, immunological, haematological and renal manifestations. Limited awareness of the phenotypic spectrum, the recent descriptions of newer disorders and considerable genetic heterogeneity, have contributed to long diagnostic odysseys for affected individuals. These enzymes are widely but not ubiquitously distributed in human tissues and are crucial for synthesis of essential nucleotides, such as ATP, which form the basis of DNA and RNA, oxidative phosphorylation, signal transduction and a range of molecular synthetic processes. Depletion of nucleotides or accumulation of toxic intermediates contributes to the pathogenesis of these disorders. Maintenance of cellular nucleotides depends on the three aspects of metabolism of purines (and related pyrimidines): de novo synthesis, catabolism and recycling of these metabolites. At present, treatments for the clinically significant defects of the purine pathway are restricted: purine 5'-nucleotidase deficiency with uridine; familial juvenile hyperuricaemic nephropathy (FJHN), adenine phosphoribosyl transferase (APRT) deficiency, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) deficiency and phosphoribosyl-pyrophosphate synthetase superactivity (PRPS) with allopurinol; adenosine deaminase (ADA) and purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) deficiencies have been treated by bone marrow transplantation (BMT), and ADA deficiency with enzyme replacement with polyethylene glycol (PEG)-ADA, or erythrocyte-encapsulated ADA; myeloadenylate deaminase (MADA) and adenylosuccinate lyase (ADSL) deficiencies have had trials of oral ribose; PRPS, HPRT and adenosine kinase (ADK) deficiencies with S-adenosylmethionine; and molybdenum cofactor deficiency of complementation group A (MOCODA) with cyclic pyranopterin monophosphate (cPMP). In this review we describe the known inborn errors of purine metabolism, their phenotypic presentations, established diagnostic methodology and recognised

  19. MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE SEVERE ULCERATIVE COLITIS: A CLINICAL UPDATE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrado, Carlos Walter; Sobrado, Lucas Faraco

    2016-01-01

    Acute severe colitis is a potentially lethal medical emergency and, even today, its treatment remains a challenge for clinicians and surgeons. Intravenous corticoid therapy, which was introduced into the therapeutic arsenal in the 1950s, continues to be the first-line treatment and, for patients who are refractory to this, the rescue therapy may consist of clinical measures or emergency colectomy. To evaluate the indications for and results from drug rescue therapy (cyclosporine, infliximab and tacrolimus), and to suggest a practical guide for clinical approaches. The literature was reviewed using the Medline/PubMed, Cochrane library and SciELO databases, and additional information from institutional websites of interest, by cross-correlating the following keywords: acute severe colitis, fulminating colitis and treatment. Treatments for acute severe colitis have avoided colectomy in 60-70% of the cases, provided that they have been started early on, with multidisciplinary follow-up. Despite the adverse effects of intravenous cyclosporine, this drug has been indicated in cases of greater severity with an imminent risk of colectomy, because of its fast action, short half-life and absence of increased risk of surgical complications. Therapy using infliximab has been reserved for less severe cases and those in which immunosuppressants are being or have been used (AZA/6-MP). Indication of biological agents has recently been favored because of their ease of therapeutic use, their good short and medium-term results, the possibility of maintenance therapy and also their action as a "bridge" for immunosuppressant action (AZA/6-MP). Colectomy has been reserved for cases in which there is still no response five to seven days after rescue therapy and in cases of complications (toxic megacolon, profuse hemorrhage and perforation). Patients with a good response to rescue therapy who do not undergo emergency operations should be considered for maintenance therapy using

  20. MO-F-BRCD-01: Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: Updates on Clinical, Biological, and Physics/QA:SBRT (Part 1): Biological and Clinical Updates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, P

    2012-06-01

    Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) is an important form of cancer therapy with increasingly broad application across a spectrum of tumor types in primary and metastatic settings. In this presentation the radiation biology, clinical experience from various trials, and cautionary updates on normal tissue tolerances will be presented. The effective radiobiology of SBRT and hypofractionated courses of therapy has become more evident with the increasing reports of retrospective clinical outcomes and prospective clinical trial results. Current open multi-institutional national cooperative trials will be reviewed. Accumulating clinical experiences are yielding new insights into practical aspects of tumor and normal tissue responses to high dose per fraction treatment. Indeed, SBRT has produced profound tumoricidal and ablative effects, however there is potential for grave toxicity and this demands that clinicians be knowledgeable regarding normal tissue tolerances for various hypofractionated courses. As a final note, the technology associated with SBRT has evolved remarkably in the last decade, and procedures that originally required hours to plan, with cumbersome quality assurance methods, arduous set-up times, and long protracted deliveries can now be performed in ever shorter time periods. Given these technology improvements and recognizing the great palliative potential of hypofractionated radiation therapy to relieve cancer symptoms quickly and efficiently, a new strategy to deliver SBRT in a single session called STAT RAD is presented for discussion. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  1. Case report of disseminated nocardiosis during immunosppressive treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Gallo

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Infection caused by Nocardia spp. Is unusual and presents with a variety of clinical manifestations in both immunocompromised patients and in immunocompetent hosts.The diagnosis of Nocardia is often difficult, and further hampered by the absence of specific clinical symptoms.A man, 63 years old, caring for about a month from multiple erosions of the oral cavity and Inca intergluteale associated with blisters and erosions scattered in the face, scalp and trunk.The routine laboratory tests, including serological testing for HIV and the determination of circulating CD4 lymphocytes, were negative.The chest X-ray was also negative. Due to the diagnostic suspicion of Pemphigus vulgaris (PV, therapy with methylprednisolone and azathioprine was initiated. After 15 days the patient’s condition worsened and it became necessary hospitalization in intensive care. A CT scan found: pleural empyema, abscess, and paravertebral muscle abscess. The cultural examination of pleural fluid and synovial fluid gave positive results for Nocardia asteroides. On this basis, sulphamethoxazole was administered in association with trimethoprim for 2 months, with a complete remission of the symptoms.At a median follow up of 2 years the patient’s general condition was excellent, without residual signs of infection.The cultured samples from pleural and synovial fluids gave a clear positivity after 5 days of incubation at 37 ° C on blood agar and chocolate agar plates; the colonies showed chalky and thin filaments, slide as branched Gram-positives and appeared partially acid-alcohol resistant by modified Kinyoun staining (1% H2SO4. The presumptive identification of Nocardia spp. was additionally confirmed by biochemical tests for the identification of species with the following results: catalase test positive, oxidase test negative, aesculin hydrolysis, reduction of nitrite to nitrate and urease test positive. Given the low incidence of Nocardia spp. infection, and the non

  2. European recommendations for the clinical use of HIV drug resistance testing: 2011 update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Camacho, Ricardo J; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca

    2011-01-01

    is needed after treatment failure. The Panel recommends genotyping in most situations, using updated and clinically evaluated interpretation systems. It is mandatory that laboratories performing HIV resistance tests take part regularly in external quality assurance programs, and that they consider storing......The European HIV Drug Resistance Guidelines Panel, established to make recommendations to clinicians and virologists, felt that sufficient new information has become available to warrant an update of its recommendations, explained in both pocket guidelines and this full paper. The Panel makes...... the following recommendations concerning the indications for resistance testing: for HIV-1 (i) test earliest sample for protease and reverse transcriptase drug resistance in drug-naive patients with acute or chronic infection; (ii) test protease and reverse transcriptase drug resistance at virologic failure...

  3. Neurostimulation in clinical and sub-clinical eating disorders: a systematic update of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Bethan; Bartholdy, Savani; Campbell, Iain C; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2018-01-07

    Whilst psychological therapies are the main approach to treatment of eating disorders (EDs), advances in aetiological research suggest the need for the development of more targeted, brain-focused treatments. A range of neurostimulation approaches, most prominently repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and deep brain stimulation (DBS), are rapidly emerging as potential novel interventions. We have previously reviewed these techniques as potential treatments of EDs. To provide an update of the literature examining the effects of DBS, rTMS and tDCS on eating behaviours, body weight and associated symptoms in people with EDs and relevant analogue populations. Using PRISMA guidelines, we reviewed articles in PubMed, Web of Science, and PsycINFO from 1st January 2013 until 14th August 2017, to update our earlier search. Studies assessing the effects of neurostimulation techniques on eating and weight-related outcomes in people with EDs and relevant analogue populations were included. Data from both searches were combined. We included a total of 32 studies (526 participants); of these, 18 were newly identified by our update search. Whilst findings are somewhat mixed for bulimia nervosa, neurostimulation techniques have shown potential in the treatment of other EDs, in terms of reduction of ED and associated symptoms. Studies exploring cognitive, neural, and hormonal correlates of these techniques are also beginning to appear. Neurostimulation approaches show promise as treatments for EDs. As yet, large well-conducted randomised controlled trials are lacking. More information is needed about treatment targets, stimulation parameters and mechanisms of action. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Soil-acquired cutaneous nocardiosis on the forearm of a healthy male contracted in a swamp in rural eastern Virginia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmieri JR

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available James R Palmieri,1 Arben Santo,2 Shawn E Johnson1 1Department of Microbiology, Infectious and Emerging Diseases, 2Department of Pathology, Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine, Virginia Campus, Blacksburg, VA, USA Abstract: A 45-year-old man complained of pain and swelling on his right wrist after receiving a scratch while playing paintball in a swampy area of eastern Virginia. Two weeks later, he noticed a pimple-like lesion developing, which quickly grew in size and then ulcerated. Because of the severity of his condition, the patient was taken to the emergency room where surgical drainage of the abscess was carried out and the pus was sent for culture and sensitivity testing. Enlarged and tender lymph nodes were palpable going up the arm and surrounding the right axillary area. Three days following culture of pus from his lesion, colonies of Nocardia brasiliensis were isolated. He was successfully treated with an extended regimen of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Because of its low incidence, nocardiosis is usually not considered in the initial diagnosis. The rapidity with which his infection developed from a pimple-like lesion into an extensive ulcerated area, the involvement of his lymphatic system, the extended time needed to successfully treat his infection, and the potential for infection to rapidly disseminate, reinforces the necessity for laboratory identification and immediate treatment of severe pyogenic cutaneous lesions. Keywords: actinomycetes, cutaneous nocardiosis, immunocompromised, mycetoma, Nocardia brasiliensis, nocardiosis, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole

  5. Updating to the WAIS-III and WMS-III: considerations for research and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulsky, David S; Ledbetter, Mark F

    2000-09-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R) and the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (WMS-R) are the most commonly used intelligence and memory scales in both clinical and neuropsychology. In 1997, updated versions of these instruments (the WAIS-III and WMS-III) were published. Because of the extensive use of the WAIS-R and WMS-R in the field and the body of accumulated research, there is naturally some reluctance by clinicians and researchers to update to the new versions. It is sometimes difficult for clinicians who test individuals on repeated occasions to switch over to the new versions of the scales because of the difficulty of interpreting score discrepancy between the 2 versions. Researchers, especially those conducting longitudinal research, have a similar difficulty in changing measurement devices because of the possible threat of internal validity. This article reviews the substantive revisions of the scales and outlines those issues that users should take into consideration when updating to the new versions.

  6. Updated concepts on the pathophysiology and the clinical management of trauma hemorrhage and coagulopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Maegele

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Uncontrolled hemorrhage and subsequent trauma-induced coagulopathy (TIC are still the principle causes for preventable death after trauma and early detection and aggressive management have been associated with reduced mortality. Despite increasing knowledge about trauma resuscitation, best practice to treat this newly defined entity is still under debate. A synopsis of best current knowledge with reference to the updated European trauma guideline on the management of severe trauma hemorrhage and TIC is presented. The implementation of evidence-based local protocols and algorithms including clinical quality and safety management systems together with parameters to assess key measures of bleeding control and outcome is advocated.

  7. American Society of Clinical Oncology Policy Statement Update: Genetic and Genomic Testing for Cancer Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Mark E; Bradbury, Angela R; Arun, Banu; Domchek, Susan M; Ford, James M; Hampel, Heather L; Lipkin, Stephen M; Syngal, Sapna; Wollins, Dana S; Lindor, Noralane M

    2015-11-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has long affirmed that the recognition and management of individuals with an inherited susceptibility to cancer are core elements of oncology care. ASCO released its first statement on genetic testing in 1996 and updated that statement in 2003 and 2010 in response to developments in the field. In 2014, the Cancer Prevention and Ethics Committees of ASCO commissioned another update to reflect the impact of advances in this area on oncology practice. In particular, there was an interest in addressing the opportunities and challenges arising from the application of massively parallel sequencing-also known as next-generation sequencing-to cancer susceptibility testing. This technology introduces a new level of complexity into the practice of cancer risk assessment and management, requiring renewed effort on the part of ASCO to ensure that those providing care to patients with cancer receive the necessary education to use this new technology in the most effective, beneficial manner. The purpose of this statement is to explore the challenges of new and emerging technologies in cancer genetics and provide recommendations to ensure their optimal deployment in oncology practice. Specifically, the statement makes recommendations in the following areas: germline implications of somatic mutation profiling, multigene panel testing for cancer susceptibility, quality assurance in genetic testing, education of oncology professionals, and access to cancer genetic services. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  8. Methamphetamine: An Update on Epidemiology, Pharmacology, Clinical Phenomenology, and Treatment Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Kelly E.; Ray, Lara A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite initial reports of a decline in use in the early 2000s, methamphetamine remains a significant public health concern with known neurotoxic and neurocognitive effects to the user. The goal of this review is to update the literature on methamphetamine use and addiction since its assent to peak popularity in 1990s. Methods Specifically, we first review recent epidemiological reports with a focus on methamphetamine accessibility, changes in use and disorder prevalence rates over time, and accurate estimates of the associated burden of care to the individual and society. Second, we review methamphetamine pharmacology literature with emphasis on the structural and functional neurotoxic effects associated with repeated use of the drug. Third, we briefly outline the findings on methamphetamine-related neurocognitive deficits as assessed via behavioral and neuroimaging paradigms. Lastly, we review the clinical presentation of methamphetamine addiction and the evidence supporting the available psychosocial and pharmacological treatments within the context of an addiction biology framework. Conclusion Taken together, this review provides a broad-based update of the available literature covering methamphetamine research over the past two decades and concludes with recommendations for future research. PMID:25176528

  9. Update of the International Consensus on Palliative Radiotherapy Endpoints for Future Clinical Trials in Bone Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, Edward; Hoskin, Peter; Mitera, Gunita; Zeng Liang; Lutz, Stephen; Roos, Daniel; Hahn, Carol; Linden, Yvette van der; Hartsell, William; Kumar, Eshwar

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To update the international consensus on palliative radiotherapy endpoints for future clinical trials in bone metastases by surveying international experts regarding previous uncertainties within the 2002 consensus, changes that may be necessary based on practice pattern changes and research findings since that time. Methods and Materials: A two-phase survey was used to determine revisions and new additions to the 2002 consensus. A total of 49 experts from the American Society for Radiation Oncology, the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, the Faculty of Radiation Oncology of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists, and the Canadian Association of Radiation Oncology who are directly involved in the care of patients with bone metastases participated in this survey. Results: Consensus was established in areas involving response definitions, eligibility criteria for future trials, reirradiation, changes in systemic therapy, radiation techniques, parameters at follow-up, and timing of assessments. Conclusion: An outline for trials in bone metastases was updated based on survey and consensus. Investigators leading trials in bone metastases are encouraged to adopt the revised guideline to promote consistent reporting. Areas for future research were identified. It is intended for the consensus to be re-examined in the future on a regular basis.

  10. Methamphetamine: an update on epidemiology, pharmacology, clinical phenomenology, and treatment literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Kelly E; Ray, Lara A

    2014-10-01

    Despite initial reports of a decline in use in the early 2000s, methamphetamine remains a significant public health concern with known neurotoxic and neurocognitive effects to the user. The goal of this review is to update the literature on methamphetamine use and addiction since its assent to peak popularity in 1990s. We first review recent epidemiological reports with a focus on methamphetamine accessibility, changes in use and disorder prevalence rates over time, and accurate estimates of the associated burden of care to the individual and society. Second, we review methamphetamine pharmacology literature with emphasis on the structural and functional neurotoxic effects associated with repeated use of the drug. Third, we briefly outline the findings on methamphetamine-related neurocognitive deficits as assessed via behavioral and neuroimaging paradigms. Lastly, we review the clinical presentation of methamphetamine addiction and the evidence supporting the available psychosocial and pharmacological treatments within the context of an addiction biology framework. Taken together, this review provides a broad-based update of the available literature covering methamphetamine research over the past two decades and concludes with recommendations for future research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. FDI World Dental Federation: clinical criteria for the evaluation of direct and indirect restorations-update and clinical examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickel, Reinhard; Peschke, Arnd; Tyas, Martin; Mjör, Ivar; Bayne, Stephen; Peters, Mathilde; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Randall, Ross; Vanherle, Guido; Heintze, Siegward D

    2010-08-01

    In 2007, new clinical criteria were approved by the FDI World Dental Federation and simultaneously published in three dental journals. The criteria were categorized into three groups: esthetic parameters (four criteria), functional parameters (six criteria) and biological parameters (six criteria). Each criterion can be expressed with five scores, three for acceptable and two for non-acceptable (one for reparable and one for replacement). The criteria have been used in several clinical studies since 2007, and the resulting experience in their application has led to a requirement to modify some of the criteria and scores. The two major alterations involve staining and approximal contacts. As staining of the margins and the surface has different causes, both phenomena do not appear simultaneously. Thus, staining has been differentiated into marginal staining and surface staining. The approximal contact now appears under the name "approximal anatomic form" as the approximal contour is a specific, often non-esthetic issue that cannot be integrated into the criterion "esthetic anatomical form". In 2008, a web-based training and calibration tool called e-calib ( www.e-calib.info ) was made available. Clinical investigators and other research workers can train and calibrate themselves interactively by assessing clinical cases of posterior restorations which are presented as high-quality pictures. Currently, about 300 clinical cases are included in the database which is regularly updated. Training for eight of the 16 clinical criteria is available in the program: "Surface lustre"; "Staining (surface, margins)"; "Color match and translucency"; Esthetic anatomical form"; "Fracture of material and retention"; "Marginal adaptation"; "Recurrence of caries, erosion, abfraction"; and "Tooth integrity (enamel cracks, tooth fractures)". Typical clinical cases are presented for each of these eight criteria and their corresponding five scores.

  12. FDI World Dental Federation - clinical criteria for the evaluation of direct and indirect restorations. Update and clinical examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickel, Reinhard; Peschke, Arnd; Tyas, Martin; Mjör, Ivar; Bayne, Stephen; Peters, Mathilde; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Randall, Ross; Vanherle, Guido; Heintze, Siegward D

    2010-08-01

    In 2007, new clinical criteria were approved by the FDI World Dental Federation and simultaneously published in three dental journals. The criteria were categorized into three groups: esthetic parameters (four criteria), functional parameters (six criteria), and biological parameters (six criteria). Each criterion can be expressed with five scores, three for acceptable and two for non-acceptable (one for reparable and one for replacement). The criteria have been used in several clinical studies since 2007, and the resulting experience in their application has led to a requirement to modify some of the criteria and scores. The two major alterations involve staining and approximal contacts. As staining of the margins and the surface have different causes, both phenomena do not appear simultaneously. Thus, staining has been differentiated into marginal staining and surface staining. The approximal contact now appears under the name "approximal anatomic form" as the approximal contour is a specific, often non-esthetic issue that cannot be integrated into the criterion "esthetic anatomical form". In 2008, a web-based training and calibration tool called e-calib (www.e-calib.info) was made available. Clinical investigators and other research workers can train and calibrate themselves interactively by assessing clinical cases of posterior restorations, which are presented as high quality pictures. Currently, about 300 clinical cases are included in the database which is regularly updated. Training for 8 of the 16 clinical criteria is available in the program: "Surface luster"; "Staining (surface, margins)"; "Color match and translucency"; "Esthetic anatomical form"; "Fracture of material and retention"; "Marginal adaptation"; "Recurrence of caries, erosion, abfraction"; and "Tooth integrity (enamel cracks, tooth fractures)". Typical clinical cases are presented for each of these eight criteria and their corresponding five scores.

  13. Systemic Therapy for Stage IV Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Gregory A.; Temin, Sarah; Azzoli, Christopher G.; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Baker, Sherman; Brahmer, Julie R.; Ellis, Peter M.; Gajra, Ajeet; Rackear, Nancy; Schiller, Joan H.; Smith, Thomas J.; Strawn, John R.; Trent, David; Johnson, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To provide evidence-based recommendations to update the American Society of Clinical Oncology guideline on systemic therapy for stage IV non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods An Update Committee of the American Society of Clinical Oncology NSCLC Expert Panel based recommendations on a systematic review of randomized controlled trials from January 2007 to February 2014. Results This guideline update reflects changes in evidence since the previous guideline. Recommendations There is no cure for patients with stage IV NSCLC. For patients with performance status (PS) 0 to 1 (and appropriate patient cases with PS 2) and without an EGFR-sensitizing mutation or ALK gene rearrangement, combination cytotoxic chemotherapy is recommended, guided by histology, with early concurrent palliative care. Recommendations for patients in the first-line setting include platinum-doublet therapy for those with PS 0 to 1 (bevacizumab may be added to carboplatin plus paclitaxel if no contraindications); combination or single-agent chemotherapy or palliative care alone for those with PS 2; afatinib, erlotinib, or gefitinib for those with sensitizing EGFR mutations; crizotinib for those with ALK or ROS1 gene rearrangement; and following first-line recommendations or using platinum plus etoposide for those with large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma. Maintenance therapy includes pemetrexed continuation for patients with stable disease or response to first-line pemetrexed-containing regimens, alternative chemotherapy, or a chemotherapy break. In the second-line setting, recommendations include docetaxel, erlotinib, gefitinib, or pemetrexed for patients with nonsquamous cell carcinoma; docetaxel, erlotinib, or gefitinib for those with squamous cell carcinoma; and chemotherapy or ceritinib for those with ALK rearrangement who experience progression after crizotinib. In the third-line setting, for patients who have not received erlotinib or gefitinib, treatment with erlotinib is

  14. Clinical Update: The Risk of Opioid Toxicity and Naloxone Use in Operational K9s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Lee E; Gautier, Anais

    The increasing use of opioids (e.g., fentanyl, carfentanil) for illicit drug manufacturing poses a potential life-threatening hazard to law enforcement officers and first responders (e.g., EMS, fire and rescue) who may unknowingly come into contact with these drugs during the course of their daily activities. Similarly, Operational canines (OpK9s) of all disciplines-detection (drug, explosive, accelerant), patrol, tracking, search and rescue, and others-are at risk for accidental illicit opioid exposure. The most serious adverse effect of opioid exposure is respiratory depression leading to slow, shallow breathing or complete cessation of voluntary breathing (respiratory arrest). Naloxone, an opioid antagonist, is the antidote for reversing the effects of an opioid overdose in both humans and OpK9s. This clinical update describes the potential risks associated with opioid exposure as well as the use of naloxone as it pertains to the OpK9. 2017.

  15. Managing Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Clinical Updates and Three Strategic Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodara, Ann M; Wattiaux, Aimée; Bartels, Christie M

    2017-04-01

    ᅟ: The increase in cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is well known; however, appropriate management of this elevated risk in rheumatology clinics is less clear. By critically reviewing literature published within the past 5 years, we aim to clarify current knowledge and gaps regarding CVD risk management in RA. We examine recent guidelines, recommendations, and evidence and discuss three approaches: (1) RA-specific management including treat-to-target and medication management, (2) assessment of comprehensive individual risk, and (3) targeting traditional CVD risk factors (hypertension, smoking, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, obesity, and physical inactivity) at a population level. Considering that 75% of US RA visits occur in specialty clinics, further research is needed regarding evidence-based strategies to manage and reduce CVD risk in RA. This review highlights clinical updates including US cardiology and international professional society guidelines, successful evidence-based population approaches from primary care, and novel opportunities in rheumatology care to reduce CVD risk in RA.

  16. Dendritic cell-based vaccine in advanced melanoma: update of clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridolfi, Laura; Petrini, Massimiliano; Fiammenghi, Laura; Granato, Anna Maria; Ancarani, Valentina; Pancisi, Elena; Brolli, Claudia; Selva, Mirna; Scarpi, Emanuela; Valmorri, Linda; Nicoletti, Stefania Vittoria Luisa; Guidoboni, Massimo; Riccobon, Angela; Ridolfi, Ruggero

    2011-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are unique specialized antigen-presenting cells capable of priming naive T cells and inducing antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. This study presents an update of clinical results from a DC-based phase I-II clinical vaccine trial in stage IV melanoma. From 2003 to 2010, 27 patients with metastatic melanoma were treated with mature DCs pulsed with autologous tumor lysate and keyhole limpet hemocyanin and with subcutaneous low-dose interleukin-2. Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) tests for in-vivo immunomonitoring were performed at baseline and every four vaccinations thereafter. Two complete, two mixed and six partial responses, and five stable diseases were observed (overall response, 37.0%; clinical benefit, 55.5%). All 15 responders showed DTH positivity. A median overall survival of 22.9 months [95% confidence interval (CI): 13.4-61.3] for DTH-positive patients (19) and 4.8 months (95% CI: 3.9-11.9) for DTH-negative patients (8; log rank=7.26; P=0.007) was observed. The overall median overall survival was 16 months (95% CI: 9-33). Our results would seem to highlight a relationship between positive-DTH test and an improved survival.

  17. Update on clinical trials of growth factors and anabolic steroids in cachexia and wasting1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullett, Norleena P; Hebbar, Gautam

    2010-01-01

    This article and others that focused on the clinical features, mechanisms, and epidemiology of skeletal muscle loss and wasting in chronic diseases, which include chronic kidney disease, cancer, and AIDS, were presented at a symposium entitled "Cachexia and Wasting: Recent Breakthroughs in Understanding and Opportunities for Intervention," held at Experimental Biology 2009. The clinical and anabolic efficacy of specific growth factors and anabolic steroids (eg, growth hormone, testosterone, megestrol acetate) in malnutrition and other catabolic states has been the subject of considerable research during the past several decades. Research on the effects of these agents in cachexia or wasting conditions, characterized by progressive loss of skeletal muscle and adipose tissue, focused on patients with AIDS in the early 1990s, when the devastating effects of the loss of body weight, lean body mass, and adipose tissue were recognized as contributors to these patients' mortality. These same agents have also been studied as methods to attenuate the catabolic responses observed in cancer-induced cachexia and in wasting induced by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure, renal failure, and other conditions. This article provides an updated review of recent clinical trials that specifically examined the potential therapeutic roles of growth hormone, testosterone, oxandrolone, and megestrol acetate and emerging data on the orexigenic peptide ghrelin, in human cachexia and wasting. PMID:20164318

  18. An update on Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology: Something old, something new, something borrowed, something green?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoops, William W

    2018-02-01

    In this editorial, the author provides an update on Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology in several areas. First, the journal will continue to accept original research reports and full reviews as it has in past years. The author hopes to still receive outstanding manuscripts in the journal's primary areas of strength, such as clinical research on alcohol use and cigarette smoking. The journal will also continue to publish an annual special issue on a current topic in the field. Second, the journal now accepts brief communications, brief reviews, and case reports. The authors sees these new formats as opportunities to publish cutting edge, novel findings that may not be suitable as original research reports or full reviews-such work would previously not have fit with the journal. Third, the author has borrowed an idea from colleagues who serve as editors for other journals in the field: the addition of an editorial fellowship at Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology . Finally, the "something green" part of the title refers to the new, bright green cover color of the print version of the journal. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Schizotypal personality questionnaire--brief revised (updated): An update of norms, factor structure, and item content in a large non-clinical young adult sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Charlie A; Hoffman, Lesa; Spaulding, William D

    2016-04-30

    This study updates and provides evidence for the dimensionality, reliability, and validity of a standard instrument for detection and measurement of schizotypy in non-clinical young adults. Schizotypy represents a set of traits on which both nonclinical and schizophrenia-spectrum populations vary meaningfully. These traits are linked to biological, cognitive, and social dimensions of serious mental illness (SMI), to clinical and subclinical variation in personal and social functioning, and to risk for SMI. Reliable and valid identification of schizotypal traits has important implications for clinical practice and research. Four consecutive independent samples of undergraduates were administered the SPQ-BR (N=2552). Confirmatory factor analyses suggested a minor item wording change improved reliability, and this Updated questionnaire was implemented for three-quarters of the sample (SPQ-BRU). A, single-order, nine-factor structure had acceptable psychometric properties. The best fitting second-order structure included four higher-order factors that distinguished Social Anxiety and Interpersonal factors. This differentiation was supported by differential relationships with treatment history. The Disorganized factor had the greatest unique relationship with personal and family treatment history. With few exceptions, factor loadings showed stability across samples. Overall, the higher-order and lower-order factors of schizotypy demonstrated reliability and convergent and discriminant validity; detailed psychometric data are presented in a supplement. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  20. Clinical practice guidelines for the management of candidiasis: 2009 update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pappas, P.G.; Kauffman, C.A.; Andes, D.; Benjamin Jr., D.K.; Calandra, T; Edwards, J.E.; Filler, S.G.; Fisher, J.F.; Kullberg, B.J.; Ostrosky-Zeichner, L.; Reboli, A.C.; Rex, J.H.; Walsh, T.J.; Sobel, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    Guidelines for the management of patients with invasive candidiasis and mucosal candidiasis were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. These updated guidelines replace the previous guidelines published in the 15 January 2004 issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases

  1. The Dissociative Subtype of Post-traumatic Stress Disorder: Research Update on Clinical and Neurobiological Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Huijstee, Jytte; Vermetten, Eric

    2017-10-21

    Recently, a dissociative subtype of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been included in the DSM-5. This review focuses on the clinical and neurobiological features that distinguish the dissociative subtype of PTSD from non-dissociative PTSD. Clinically, the dissociative subtype of PTSD is associated with high PTSD severity, predominance of derealization and depersonalization symptoms, a more significant history of early life trauma, and higher levels of comorbid psychiatric disorders. Furthermore, PTSD patients with dissociative symptoms exhibit different psychophysiological and neural responses to the recall of traumatic memories. While individuals with non-dissociative PTSD exhibit an increased heart rate, decreased activation of prefrontal regions, and increased activation of the amygdala in response to traumatic reminders, individuals with the dissociative subtype of PTSD show an opposite pattern. It has been proposed that dissociation is a regulatory strategy to restrain extreme arousal in PTSD through hyperinhibition of limbic regions. In this research update, promises and pitfalls in current research studies on the dissociative subtype of PTSD are listed. Inclusion of the dissociative subtype of PTSD in the DSM-5 stimulates research on the prevalence, symptomatology, and neurobiology of the dissociative subtype of PTSD and poses a challenge to improve treatment outcome in PTSD patients with dissociative symptoms.

  2. Hepatitis C virus drug resistance associated substitutions and their clinical relevance: Update 2018.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorbo, Maria C; Cento, Valeria; Di Maio, Velia C; Howe, Anita Y M; Garcia, Federico; Perno, Carlo F; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca

    2018-03-01

    Nowadays, due to the development of potent Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents (DAAs) that specifically target NS3, NS5A and NS5B viral proteins, several new and highly efficacious options to treat chronic Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are available. The natural presence of resistance associated substitutions (RASs), as well as their rapid emergence during incomplete drug-pressure, are intrinsic characteristics of HCV that greatly affect treatment outcome and the chances to achieve a virolgical cure. To date, a high number of RASs in NS3, NS5A, and NS5B have been associated in vivo and/or in vitro with reduced susceptibility to DAAs, but no comprehensive RASs list is available. This review thus provides an updated, systematic overview of the role of RASs to currently approved DAAs or in phase II/III of clinical development against HCV-infection, discriminating their impact in different HCV-genotypes and DAAs, providing assistance for a fruitful use of HCV resistance testing in clinical practice. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Basic Technology and Clinical Applications of the Updated Model of Laser Speckle Flowgraphy to Ocular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Sugiyama

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG allows for quantitative estimation of blood flow in the optic nerve head (ONH, choroid and retina, utilizing the laser speckle phenomenon. The basic technology and clinical applications of LSFG-NAVI, the updated model of LSFG, are summarized in this review. For developing a commercial version of LSFG, the special area sensor was replaced by the ordinary charge-coupled device camera. In LSFG-NAVI, the mean blur rate (MBR has been introduced as a new parameter. Compared to the original LSFG model, LSFG-NAVI demonstrates a better spatial resolution of the blood flow map of human ocular fundus. The observation area is 24 times larger than the original system. The analysis software can separately calculate MBRs in the blood vessels and tissues (capillaries of an entire ONH and the measurements have good reproducibility. The absolute values of MBR in the ONH have been shown to linearly correlate with the capillary blood flow. The Analysis of MBR pulse waveform provides parameters including skew, blowout score, blowout time, rising and falling rates, flow acceleration index, acceleration time index, and resistivity index for comparing different eyes. Recently, there have been an increasing number of reports on the clinical applications of LSFG-NAVI to ocular diseases, including glaucoma, retinal and choroidal diseases.

  4. Multiple Myeloma: Clinical Updates From the American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terpos, Evangelos

    2017-06-01

    The novel clinical data for plasma cell neoplasms (smoldering myeloma, multiple myeloma (MM) and AL-amyloidosis) that were presented in the 2016 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology are summarized here. Data from large phase 3 studies for newly diagnosed MM patients who are eligible for autologous transplantation (EMN02, MRC XI and StaMINA trials) are described along with the results of phase 2 studies using novel anti-myeloma drug combinations for induction, consolidation and maintenance as first line therapy. Recent updates of previous important studies in the field of both newly diagnosed (FIRST) and relapsed/refractory MM (POLLUX, CASTOR) are also reported. Moreover, the results of clinical studies with the use of anti-myeloma drugs with new mechanisms of action, including pembrolizumab, selinexor, venetoclax and monoclonal antibodies, are discussed. All these data provide the basis for possible changes in the way we manage myeloma in the near future trying to "cure" the disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. An Update on Candida tropicalis Based on Basic and Clinical Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuza-Alves, Diana L.; Silva-Rocha, Walicyranison P.; Chaves, Guilherme M.

    2017-01-01

    Candida tropicalis has emerged as one of the most important Candida species. It has been widely considered the second most virulent Candida species, only preceded by C. albicans. Besides, this species has been recognized as a very strong biofilm producer, surpassing C. albicans in most of the studies. In addition, it produces a wide range of other virulence factors, including: adhesion to buccal epithelial and endothelial cells; the secretion of lytic enzymes, such as proteinases, phospholipases, and hemolysins, bud-to-hyphae transition (also called morphogenesis) and the phenomenon called phenotypic switching. This is a species very closely related to C. albicans and has been easily identified with both phenotypic and molecular methods. In addition, no cryptic sibling species were yet described in the literature, what is contradictory to some other medically important Candida species. C. tropicalis is a clinically relevant species and may be the second or third etiological agent of candidemia, specifically in Latin American countries and Asia. Antifungal resistance to the azoles, polyenes, and echinocandins has already been described. Apart from all these characteristics, C. tropicalis has been considered an osmotolerant microorganism and this ability to survive to high salt concentration may be important for fungal persistence in saline environments. This physiological characteristic makes this species suitable for use in biotechnology processes. Here we describe an update of C. tropicalis, focusing on all these previously mentioned subjects. PMID:29081766

  6. Clinical guidelines for interstitial cystitis and hypersensitive bladder updated in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homma, Yukio; Ueda, Tomohiro; Tomoe, Hikaru; Lin, Alex Tl; Kuo, Hann-Chorng; Lee, Ming-Huei; Oh, Seung-June; Kim, Joon Chul; Lee, Kyu-Sung

    2016-07-01

    Clinical guidelines for interstitial cystitis and hypersensitive bladder have been updated as of 2015. The guidelines define interstitial cystitis by the presence of hypersensitive bladder symptoms (discomfort, pressure or pain in the bladder usually associated with urinary frequency and nocturia) and bladder pathology, after excluding other diseases explaining symptoms. Interstitial cystitis is further classified by bladder pathology; either Hunner type interstitial cystitis with Hunner lesions or non-Hunner type interstitial cystitis with mucosal bleeding after distension in the absence of Hunner lesions. Hypersensitive bladder refers to a condition, where hypersensitive bladder symptoms are present, but bladder pathology or other explainable diseases are unproven. Interstitial cystitis and hypersensitive bladder severely affect patients' quality of life as a result of disabling symptoms and/or comorbidities. Reported prevalence suggestive of these disorders varies greatly from 0.01% to >6%. Pathophysiology would be an interaction of multiple factors including urothelial dysfunction, inflammation, neural hyperactivity, exogenous substances and extrabladder disorders. Definite diagnosis of interstitial cystitis and hypersensitive bladder requires cystoscopy with or without hydrodistension. Most of the therapeutic options lack a high level of evidence, leaving a few as recommended therapeutic options. © 2016 The Japanese Urological Association.

  7. Clinical Case Definitions for Classification of Intrathoracic Tuberculosis in Children: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Stephen M; Cuevas, Luis E; Jean-Philippe, Patrick; Browning, Renee; Casenghi, Martina; Detjen, Anne K; Gnanashanmugam, Devasena; Hesseling, Anneke C; Kampmann, Beate; Mandalakas, Anna; Marais, Ben J; Schito, Marco; Spiegel, Hans M L; Starke, Jeffrey R; Worrell, Carol; Zar, Heather J

    2015-10-15

    Consensus case definitions for childhood tuberculosis have been proposed by an international expert panel, aiming to standardize the reporting of cases in research focusing on the diagnosis of intrathoracic tuberculosis in children. These definitions are intended for tuberculosis diagnostic evaluation studies of symptomatic children with clinical suspicion of intrathoracic tuberculosis, and were not intended to predefine inclusion criteria into such studies. Feedback from researchers suggested that further clarification was required and that these case definitions could be further improved. Particular concerns were the perceived complexity and overlap of some case definitions, as well as the potential exclusion of children with acute onset of symptoms or less severe disease. The updated case definitions proposed here incorporate a number of key changes that aim to reduce complexity and improve research performance, while maintaining the original focus on symptomatic children suspected of having intrathoracic tuberculosis. The changes proposed should enhance harmonized classification for intrathoracic tuberculosis disease in children across studies, resulting in greater comparability and the much-needed ability to pool study results. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Nocardiose pulmonar em paciente com síndrome da imunodeficiência adquirida: relato de caso Pulmonary nocardiosis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carina Gamboa da Silva

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Os autores descrevem um caso de nocardiose pulmonar em um homem de 37 anos de idade com a síndrome da imunodeficiência adquirida, em tratamento com anti-retrovirais, cujos sintomas de apresentação foram tosse com expectoração, hemoptóicos e emagrecimento progressivo. Foi realizada radiografia do tórax, que demonstrou consolidação no lobo superior do pulmão direito, e tomografia computadorizada do tórax, que evidenciou consolidação pulmonar com áreas escavadas. Diante dos achados radiológicos inespecíficos, foi realizada broncoscopia com lavado broncoalveolar, evidenciando estruturas filamentosas Gram-positivas compatíveis com Nocardia sp. O tratamento utilizado foi sulfametoxazol-trimetoprim, com remissão completa do quadro respiratório. Após revisão da literatura, foram discutidos os principais aspectos radiológicos desta doença.The authors describe a case of pulmonary nocardiosis in a 37-year-old man with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in treatment with antiretroviral drugs. Clinical symptoms were productive cough, hemoptysis and progressive weight loss. A chest x-ray film showed a right upper lobe consolidation while the computed tomography demonstrated consolidation and areas of cavitation. The radiologic findings were unspecific. Consequently, a bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage was performed, revealing filamentous Gram-positive bacteria (Nocardia sp. Treatment with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resulted in complete remission of the respiratory symptoms. The authors review the literature and discuss the main radiological features of this disease.

  9. Memory updating in sub-clinical eating disorder: differential effects with food and body shape words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Olivia; Ecker, Ullrich K H

    2015-04-01

    The present study investigated how eating disorder (ED) relevant information is updated in working memory in people with high vs. low scores on a measure of eating disorder pathology (the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire, EDE-Q). Participants performed two memory updating tasks. One was a neutral control task using digits; the other task involved food words and words relating to body-shape, and provided measures of updating speed and post-updating recall. We found that high EDE-Q participants (1) showed no sign of general memory updating impairment as indicated by performance in the control task; (2) showed a general recall deficit in the task involving ED-relevant stimuli, suggesting a general distraction of cognitive resources in the presence of ED-related items; (3) showed a relative facilitation in the recall of food words; and (4) showed quicker updating toward food words and relatively slower updating toward body-shape-related words. Results are discussed in the context of cognitive theories of eating disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update on Chemotherapy for Stage IV Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Azzoli, Christopher G.; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Temin, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    ASCO published a guideline on use of chemotherapy in advanced stage non–small-cell lung cancer in 1997. The latest update covers treatment with chemotherapy and biologic agents and reviews literature from 2002 to 2009.

  11. An Update on Safety and Side Effects of Cannabidiol: A Review of Clinical Data and Relevant Animal Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Iffland, Kerstin; Grotenhermen, Franjo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: This literature survey aims to extend the comprehensive survey performed by Bergamaschi et al. in 2011 on cannabidiol (CBD) safety and side effects. Apart from updating the literature, this article focuses on clinical studies and CBD potential interactions with other drugs. Results: In general, the often described favorable safety profile of CBD in humans was confirmed and extended by the reviewed research. The majority of studies were performed for treatment of epileps...

  12. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY POSITION STATEMENT ON MENOPAUSE-2017 UPDATE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobin, Rhoda H; Goodman, Neil F

    2017-07-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE)/American College of Endocrinology (ACE) Position Statement is designed to update the previous menopause clinical practice guidelines published in 2011 but does not replace them. The current document reviews new clinical trials published since then as well as new information regarding possible risks and benefits of therapies available for the treatment of menopausal symptoms. AACE reinforces the recommendations made in its previous guidelines and provides additional recommendations on the basis of new data. A summary regarding this position statement is listed below: New information available from randomized clinical trials and epidemiologic studies reported after 2011 was critically reviewed. No previous recommendations from the 2011 menopause clinical practice guidelines have been reversed or changed. Newer information enhances AACE's guidance for the use of hormone therapy in different subsets of women. Newer information helps to support the use of various types of estrogens, selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs), and progesterone, as well as the route of delivery. Newer information supports the previous recommendation against the use of bioidentical hormones. The use of nonhormonal therapies for the symptomatic relief of menopausal symptoms is supported. Newer information enhances AACE's guidance for the use of hormone therapy in different subsets of women. Newer information helps to support the use of various types of estrogens, SERMs, and progesterone, as well as the route of delivery. Newer information supports the previous recommendation against the use of bioidentical hormones. The use of nonhormonal therapies for the symptomatic relief of menopausal symptoms is supported. New recommendations in this position statement include: 1. the use of menopausal hormone therapy in symptomatic postmenopausal women should be based on consideration of all risk factors for

  13. Update on value of the anion gap in clinical diagnosis and laboratory evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lolekha, P H; Vanavanan, S; Lolekha, S

    2001-05-01

    Anion gap (AG) is a calculated value commonly used in clinical practice. It approximates the difference between the concentration of unmeasured anions (UA) and unmeasured cations (UC) in serum. At present, the reference range of anion gap has been lowered from 8-16 to 3-11 mmol/l because of the changes in technique for measuring electrolyte. However, clinicians and textbooks still refer and use the old reference value of 8-16 mmol/l. This may lead to misinterpretation of the value of anion gap. Our study updated the value of anion gap in clinical diagnosis and laboratory evaluation. Criteria for using anion gap were also suggested. We analyzed serum electrolyte using the Beckman Synchron CX5. The anion gap was calculated from the formula: [Na(+)-(Cl(-)+HCO(3)(-))]. We estimated the reference range using the non-parametric percentile estimation method. The reference range of anion gap obtained from 124 healthy volunteers was 5-12 mmol/l, which was low and confirmed the reports from other studies (3-11 mmol/l) using ion-selective electrode. From the retrospective study on the 6868 sets of serum electrolyte among hospitalized patients, we found the incidences of normal, increased, and decreased anion gaps were 59.5%, 37.6%, and 2.9%, respectively. The mean and central 90% range of increased anion gap were 16 and 13-20 mmol/l, which was lower than those reported in previous study (25 and 19-28 mmol/l). Anion gap exceeding 24 mmol/l was rare. The mean and central 90% range of decreased anion gap were 3 and 2-4 mmol/l, which were lower than those reported in previous study (6 and 3-8 mmol/l). The value of less than 2 mmol/l was rare. The most common causes of increased anion gap (hypertensive disease, chronic renal failure, malignant neoplasms, diabetes mellitus and heart diseases) and decreased anion gap (liver cirrhosis and nephrotic syndrome) in this study were similar to those in previous studies. We found two cases of IgG multiple myeloma with anion gap of 2 mmol

  14. Endobronchial Enigma: A Clinically Rare Presentation of Nocardia beijingensis in an Immunocompetent Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader Abdel-Rahman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nocardiosis is an opportunistic infection caused by the Gram-positive weakly acid-fast, filamentous aerobic Actinomycetes. The lungs are the primary site of infection mainly affecting immunocompromised patients. In rare circumstances even immunocompetent hosts may also develop infection. Diagnosis of pulmonary nocardiosis is usually delayed due to nonspecific clinical and radiological presentations which mimic fungal, tuberculous, or neoplastic processes. The present report describes a rare bronchoscopic presentation of an endobronchial nocardial mass in a 55-year-old immunocompetent woman without underlying lung disease. The patient exhibited signs and symptoms of unresolving community-acquired pneumonia with a computed tomography (CT scan that showed a space-occupying lesion and enlarged paratracheal lymph node. This patient represents the unusual presentation of pulmonary Nocardia beijingensis as an endobronchial mass. Pathology obtained during bronchoscopy demonstrated polymerase chain reaction (PCR confirmation of nocardiosis. Symptoms and clinical findings improved with antibiotic treatment. This patient emphasizes the challenge in making the diagnosis of pulmonary nocardiosis, especially in a low risk host. A literature review presents the difficulties and pitfalls in the clinical assessment of such an individual.

  15. Development of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for rapid detection of Nocardia salmonicida, the causative agent of nocardiosis in fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Liqun; Zhang, Honglian; Lu, Yishan; Cai, Jia; Wang, Bei; Jian, Jichang

    2015-03-01

    Nocardia salmonicida is one of the main pathogens of fish nocardiosis. The purpose of this study was to build a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method for the rapid and sensitive detection of N. salmonicida. A set of four primers were designed from the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region of N. salmonicida, and conditions for LAMP were optimized as incubating all the reagents for 60 min at 64°C. LAMP products were judged with agar gel electrophoresis as well as with the naked eye after the addition of SYBR Green I. Results showed the sensitivity of the LAMP assay was 1.68 × 10(3) CFU/ml (16.8 CFU per reaction) and 10-fold higher than that of PCR. The LAMP method was also effectively applied to detect N. salmonicida in diseased fish samples, and it may potentially facilitate the surveillance and early diagnosis of fish nocardiosis.

  16. Impact of updated European Consensus Guidelines on the management of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome on clinical outcome of preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolarova, S; Kocvarova, L; Matasova, K; Zibolen, M; Calkovska, A

    2015-01-01

    European Consensus Guidelines (ECG) on the management of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) have been developed and updated twice since 2007 reflecting changes in practice as new evidence emerges. The aim of this study was to evaluate the progress in clinical outcome of babies after the implementation of the updated ECG in 2010. Forty-eight neonates born in 2002-2003 (Group 02/03; n = 15) and in 2012-2013 (Group 12/13; n = 33) at gestational age of 26.2 ± 1.7 weeks were included into this retrospective study. Resuscitation procedures, ventilation support, and postnatal administration of surfactant were assessed. In Group 12/13, compared with Group 02/03, there was a higher rate of maternal corticosteroid prophylactic treatment (33 % vs. 0 %, p newborns improved considerably over the decade resulting in a significant reduction of mortality and morbidity.

  17. Guidelines and good clinical practice recommendations for Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) in the liver - update 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claudon, Michel; Dietrich, Christoph F; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2013-01-01

    Initially, a set of guidelines for the use of ultrasound contrast agents was published in 2004 dealing only with liver applications. A second edition of the guidelines in 2008 reflected changes in the available contrast agents and updated the guidelines for the liver, as well as implementing some...

  18. Myelosuppression-sparing treatment of central nervous system nocardiosis in a multiple myeloma patient utilizing a tedizolid-based regimen: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matin, Aasiya; Sharma, Smriti; Mathur, Pankaj; Apewokin, Senu K

    2017-04-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) nocardiosis is a recognised opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patients. Treatment involves prolonged institution of antibiotics, making oral agents a convenient and desired option. Unfortunately, devising an effective, well-tolerated antimicrobial for the duration required to treat CNS nocardiosis is challenging owing to treatment intolerance and toxicities. This report highlights myelosuppression-sparing treatment with an oral tedizolid-based regimen following a complicated course with standard agents. A 68-year-old female from Florida (USA) with low-risk lambda light chain multiple myeloma complicated by persistently low CD4 counts, absolute neutrophil counts and IgG levels presented 18 months after diagnosis with fever, pneumonia, new-onset atrial fibrillation, right-sided hemiparesis, encephalopathy and slurred speech. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed numerous ring-enhancing lesions, and blood cultures were positive for Nocardia farcinica. The patient failed initial therapy with trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (SXT), linezolid and imipenem plus surgical debridement of the frontal lobe abscess. Intraoperative cultures were positive for N. farcinica. The treatment course was also complicated by steadily declining white blood cell and platelet counts despite receiving filgrastim. She was therefore placed on SXT and tedizolid for 6 months. Subsequent brain MRI showed complete resolution of the lesions and thus chemotherapy for multiple myeloma was re-initiated. In conclusion, tedizolid-based regimens may be an option for patients with myelosuppression requiring prolonged antibiotic therapy for CNS nocardiosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  19. Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Perioperative Nutritional, Metabolic, and Nonsurgical Support of the Bariatric Surgery Patient—2013 Update: Cosponsored by American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, The Obesity Society, and American Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery*

    OpenAIRE

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I.; Youdim, Adrienne; Jones, Daniel B.; Garvey, W. Timothy; Hurley, Daniel L.; McMahon, Molly; Heinberg, Leslie J.; Kushner, Robert; Adams, Ted D.; Shikora, Scott; Dixon, John B.; Brethauer, Stacy

    2013-01-01

    The development of these updated guidelines was commissioned by the AACE, TOS, and ASMBS Board of Directors and adheres to the AACE 2010 protocol for standardized production of clinical practice guidelines (CPG). Each recommendation was re-evaluated and updated based on the evidence and subjective factors per protocol. Examples of expanded topics in this update include: the roles of sleeve gastrectomy, bariatric surgery in patients with type-2 diabetes, bariatric surgery for patients with mil...

  20. CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINES FOR THE PERIOPERATIVE NUTRITIONAL, METABOLIC, AND NONSURGICAL SUPPORT OF THE BARIATRIC SURGERY PATIENT—2013 UPDATE: COSPONSORED BY AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS, THE OBESITY SOCIETY, AND AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR METABOLIC & BARIATRIC SURGERY★

    OpenAIRE

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I.; Youdim, Adrienne; Jones, Daniel B.; Garvey, W. Timothy; Hurley, Daniel L.; McMahon, M. Molly; Heinberg, Leslie J.; Kushner, Robert; Adams, Ted D.; Shikora, Scott; Dixon, John B.; Brethauer, Stacy

    2013-01-01

    The development of these updated guidelines was commissioned by the AACE, TOS, and ASMBS Board of Directors and adheres to the AACE 2010 protocol for standardized production of clinical practice guidelines (CPG). Each recommendation was re-evaluated and updated based on the evidence and subjective factors per protocol. Examples of expanded topics in this update include: the roles of sleeve gastrectomy, bariatric surgery in patients with type-2 diabetes, bariatric surgery for patients with mil...

  1. Progress in the clinical development and utilization of vision prostheses: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandli, Alice; Luu, Chi D; Guymer, Robyn H; Ayton, Lauren N

    2016-01-01

    Vision prostheses, or "bionic eyes", are implantable medical bionic devices with the potential to restore rudimentary sight to people with profound vision loss or blindness. In the past two decades, this field has rapidly progressed, and there are now two commercially available retinal prostheses in the US and Europe, and a number of next-generation devices in development. This review provides an update on the development of these devices and a discussion on the future directions for the field.

  2. Invasive candidiasis in critical care setting, updated recommendations from “Invasive Fungal Infections-Clinical Forum”, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhoufi, Ashraf; Ahmadi, Arezoo; Asnaashari, Amir Mohammad Hashem; Davarpanah, Mohammad Ali; Bidgoli, Behrooz Farzanegan; Moghaddam, Omid Moradi; Torabi-Nami, Mohammad; Abbasi, Saeed; El-Sobky, Malak; Ghaziani, Ali; Jarrahzadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Shahrami, Reza; Shirazian, Farzad; Soltani, Farhad; Yazdinejad, Homeira; Zand, Farid

    2014-01-01

    Invasive candidiasis (IC) bears a high risk of morbidity and mortality in the intensive care units (ICU). With the current advances in critical care and the use of wide-spectrum antibiotics, invasive fungal infections (IFIs) and IC in particular, have turned into a growing concern in the ICU. Further to blood cultures, some auxiliary laboratory tests and biomarkers are developed to enable an earlier detection of infection, however these test are neither consistently available nor validated in our setting. On the other hand, patients’ clinical status and local epidemiology data may justify the empiric antifungal approach using the proper antifungal option. The clinical approach to the management of IC in febrile, non-neutropenic critically ill patients has been defined in available international guidelines; nevertheless such recommendations need to be customized when applied to our local practice. Over the past three years, Iranian experts from intensive care and infectious diseases disciplines have tried to draw a consensus on the management of IFI with a particular focus on IC in the ICU. The established IFI-clinical forum (IFI-CF), comprising the scientific leaders in the field, has recently come up with and updated recommendation on the same (June 2014). The purpose of this review is to put together literature insights and Iranian experts’ opinion at the IFI-CF, to propose an updated practical overview on recommended approaches for the management of IC in the ICU. PMID:25374806

  3. Nocardiose pulmonar em portador de doença pulmonar obstrutiva crônica e bronquiectasias Pulmonary nocardiosis in a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchiectasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Abidon Aidê

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Relatamos o caso de um paciente com doença pulmonar obstrutiva crônica e bronquiectasias, em uso crônico de corticosteróides, que desenvolveu nocardiose pulmonar, sob a forma de múltiplos nódulos pulmonares escavados. Os sintomas principais foram a tosse produtiva com escarro purulento, febre e dispnéia A radiografia simples e a tomografia computadorizada do tórax mostravam nódulos em ambos os pulmões, alguns escavados. O exame direto de escarro e a cultura mostraram a presença de Nocardia spp. A paciente foi tratada com imipenem e cilastatina, com excelente resposta clínica.We report the case of a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchiectasis, chronically using corticosteroids, who acquired pulmonary nocardiosis, which presented as multiple cavitated nodules. The principal symptoms were fever, dyspnea and productive cough with purulent sputum. Chest X-ray and computed tomography of the chest revealed nodules, some of which were cavitated, in both lungs. Sputum smear microscopy and culture revealed the presence of Nocardia spp. The patient was treated with imipenem and cilastatin, which produced an excellent clinical response.

  4. Multiple sclerosis in children: an update on clinical diagnosis, therapeutic strategies, and research

    OpenAIRE

    Waldman, Amy; Ghezzi, Angelo; Bar-Or, Amit; Mikaeloff, Yann; Tardieu, Marc; Banwell, Brenda

    2014-01-01

    The clinical features, diagnostic challenges, neuroimaging appearance, therapeutic options, and pathobiological research progress in childhood—and adolescent—onset multiple sclerosis have been informed by many new insights in the past 7 years. National programmes in several countries, collaborative research efforts, and an established international paediatric multiple sclerosis study group have contributed to revised clinical diagnostic definitions, identified clinical features of multiple sc...

  5. Progress in the clinical development and utilization of vision prostheses: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandli A

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Alice Brandli, Chi D Luu, Robyn H Guymer, Lauren N Ayton Centre for Eye Research Australia, Department of Surgery (Ophthalmology, The University of Melbourne, Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Abstract: Vision prostheses, or “bionic eyes”, are implantable medical bionic devices with the potential to restore rudimentary sight to people with profound vision loss or blindness. In the past two decades, this field has rapidly progressed, and there are now two commercially available retinal prostheses in the US and Europe, and a number of next-generation devices in development. This review provides an update on the development of these devices and a discussion on the future directions for the field. Keywords: vision prostheses, bionic eye, vision restoration, blindness, medical bionics, retinitis pigmentosa

  6. Acute colonic diverticulitis: an update on clinical classification and management with MDCT correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barat, Maxime; Dohan, Anthony; Pautrat, Karine; Boudiaf, Mourad; Dautry, Raphael; Guerrache, Youcef; Pocard, Marc; Hoeffel, Christine; Eveno, Clarisse; Soyer, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    Currently, the most commonly used classification of acute colonic diverticulitis (ACD) is the modified Hinchey classification, which corresponds to a slightly more complex classification by comparison with the original description. This modified classification allows to categorize patients with ACD into four major categories (I, II, III, IV) and two additional subcategories (Ia and Ib), depending on the severity of the disease. Several studies have clearly demonstrated the impact of this classification for determining the best therapeutic approach and predicting perioperative complications for patients who need surgery. This review provides an update on the classification of ACD along with a special emphasis on the corresponding MDCT features of the different categories and subcategories. This modified Hinchey classification should be known by emergency physicians, radiologists, and surgeons in order to improve patient care and management because each category has a specific therapeutic approach.

  7. Molecular mechanisms and clinical applications of nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) and its derivatives: An update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Jian-Ming; Nurko, Jacobo; Weakley, Sarah M.; Jiang, Jun; Kougias, Panagiotis; Lin, Peter H.; Yao, Qizhi; Chen, Changyi

    2010-01-01

    Summary Creosote bush, Larrea tridentata, is known as chaparral or greasewood in the United States and as gobernadora or hediondilla in Mexico. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), the main metabolite of the creosote bush, has been shown to have promising applications in the treatment of multiple diseases, including cardiovascular diseases, neurological disorders and cancers. Creosote bush is a promising agent of North American herbal medicine, and it has extensive pharmacological effects and specific mechanisms of actions. This review provides an update of recent in vitro and in vivo research about NDGA and describes experimental studies using NDGA as antioxidant. Also, potential medical uses based on the effects of NDGA on the cardiovascular, immune and neurological systems; cancer; tissue engineering; as well as pharmacokinetics and toxicity are discussed. PMID:20424564

  8. The impact of marijuana policies on youth: clinical, research, and legal update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammerman, Seth; Ryan, Sheryl; Adelman, William P

    2015-03-01

    This technical report updates the 2004 American Academy of Pediatrics technical report on the legalization of marijuana. Current epidemiology of marijuana use is presented, as are definitions and biology of marijuana compounds, side effects of marijuana use, and effects of use on adolescent brain development. Issues concerning medical marijuana specifically are also addressed. Concerning legalization of marijuana, 4 different approaches in the United States are discussed: legalization of marijuana solely for medical purposes, decriminalization of recreational use of marijuana, legalization of recreational use of marijuana, and criminal prosecution of recreational (and medical) use of marijuana. These approaches are compared, and the latest available data are presented to aid in forming public policy. The effects on youth of criminal penalties for marijuana use and possession are also addressed, as are the effects or potential effects of the other 3 policy approaches on adolescent marijuana use. Recommendations are included in the accompanying policy statement. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  9. A systematic decision-making process on the need for updating clinical practice guidelines proved to be feasible in a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Monika; Jaschinski, Thomas; Eikermann, Michaela; Mathes, Tim; Bühn, Stefanie; Koppert, Wolfgang; Leffler, Andreas; Neugebauer, Edmund; Pieper, Dawid

    2018-04-01

    The objective of this study was to test and evaluate a new decision-making process on the need for updating within the update of a German clinical practice guideline (CPG). The pilot study comprised (1) limited searches in Pubmed to identify new potentially relevant evidence, (2) an online survey among the members of the CPG group to assess the need for update, and (3) a consensus conference for determination and prioritization of guideline sections with a high need for update. Subsequently, we conducted a second online survey to evaluate the procedure. The searches resulted in 902 abstracts that were graded as new potentially relevant evidence. Twenty five of 39 members of the CPG group (64%) participated in the online survey. Seventy six percent of those took part in the second online survey. The evaluation study found on average a grade of support of the procedure regarding the determination of the need for update of 3.65 (standard deviation: 0.76) on a likert scale with 1 = "no support" to 5 = "very strong support." The conducted procedure presents a systematic approach for assessing whether and to what extent a CPG requires updating and enables setting priorities for which particular guideline section to update within a CPG. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Clinical applications of scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis in dermatology--an up-date

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forslind, B.

    1988-01-01

    Dermatological papers comprising scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis data published 1983 through 1986 in international journals are reviewed, as an update to our 1984 paper on Clinical applications of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis in dermatology. The present paper not only deals with a review of recent publications in this area but also presents the application of microincineration to hair and cryosectioned freeze-dried skin specimens. Examples of the increased contrast obtained in hair cross sections are presented and a discussion on the feasibility of microincineration at analysis of hair and skin cross sections is given. Particle probe analysis (EDX: energy dispersive X-ray analysis and PMP: proton microprobe analysis) as applied to hair and skin samples are presented with stress put on the proton probe analysis. The complementarity of EDX and PMP is demonstrated and future applications are suggested. 75 references

  11. An Updated Review of Ciguatera Fish Poisoning: Clinical, Epidemiological, Environmental, and Public Health Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Melissa A.; Fernandez, Mercedes; Backer, Lorraine C.; Dickey, Robert W.; Bernstein, Jeffrey; Schrank, Kathleen; Kibler, Steven; Stephan, Wendy; Gribble, Matthew O.; Bienfang, Paul; Bowen, Robert E.; Degrasse, Stacey; Flores Quintana, Harold A.; Loeffler, Christopher R.; Weisman, Richard; Blythe, Donna; Berdalet, Elisa; Ayyar, Ram; Clarkson-Townsend, Danielle; Swajian, Karen; Benner, Ronald; Brewer, Tom; Fleming, Lora E.

    2017-01-01

    Ciguatera Fish Poisoning (CFP) is the most frequently reported seafood-toxin illness in the world. It causes substantial human health, social, and economic impacts. The illness produces a complex array of gastrointestinal, neurological and neuropsychological, and cardiovascular symptoms, which may last days, weeks, or months. This paper is a general review of CFP including the human health effects of exposure to ciguatoxins (CTXs), diagnosis, human pathophysiology of CFP, treatment, detection of CTXs in fish, epidemiology of the illness, global dimensions, prevention, future directions, and recommendations for clinicians and patients. It updates and expands upon the previous review of CFP published by Friedman et al. (2008) and addresses new insights and relevant emerging global themes such as climate and environmental change, international market issues, and socioeconomic impacts of CFP. It also provides a proposed universal case definition for CFP designed to account for the variability in symptom presentation across different geographic regions. Information that is important but unchanged since the previous review has been reiterated. This article is intended for a broad audience, including resource and fishery managers, commercial and recreational fishers, public health officials, medical professionals, and other interested parties. PMID:28335428

  12. An Updated Review of Ciguatera Fish Poisoning: Clinical, Epidemiological, Environmental, and Public Health Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa A. Friedman

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Ciguatera Fish Poisoning (CFP is the most frequently reported seafood-toxin illness in the world. It causes substantial human health, social, and economic impacts. The illness produces a complex array of gastrointestinal, neurological and neuropsychological, and cardiovascular symptoms, which may last days, weeks, or months. This paper is a general review of CFP including the human health effects of exposure to ciguatoxins (CTXs, diagnosis, human pathophysiology of CFP, treatment, detection of CTXs in fish, epidemiology of the illness, global dimensions, prevention, future directions, and recommendations for clinicians and patients. It updates and expands upon the previous review of CFP published by Friedman et al. (2008 and addresses new insights and relevant emerging global themes such as climate and environmental change, international market issues, and socioeconomic impacts of CFP. It also provides a proposed universal case definition for CFP designed to account for the variability in symptom presentation across different geographic regions. Information that is important but unchanged since the previous review has been reiterated. This article is intended for a broad audience, including resource and fishery managers, commercial and recreational fishers, public health officials, medical professionals, and other interested parties.

  13. The impact of marijuana policies on youth: clinical, research, and legal update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This policy statement is an update of the American Academy of Pediatrics policy statement "Legalization of Marijuana: Potential Impact on Youth," published in 2004. Pediatricians have special expertise in the care of children and adolescents and may be called on to advise legislators about the potential impact of changes in the legal status of marijuana on adolescents. Parents also may look to pediatricians for advice as they consider whether to support state-level initiatives that propose to legalize the use of marijuana for medical and nonmedical purposes or to decriminalize the possession of small amounts of marijuana. This policy statement provides the position of the American Academy of Pediatrics on the issue of marijuana legalization. The accompanying technical report reviews what is currently known about the relationships of marijuana use with health and the developing brain and the legal status of marijuana and adolescents' use of marijuana to better understand how change in legal status might influence the degree of marijuana use by adolescents in the future. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  14. Challenges in translating plasma proteomics from bench to bedside: update from the NHLBI Clinical Proteomics Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Gerszten, Robert E.; Accurso, Frank; Bernard, Gordon R.; Caprioli, Richard M.; Klee, Eric W.; Klee, George G.; Kullo, Iftikhar; Laguna, Theresa A.; Roth, Frederick P.; Sabatine, Marc; Srinivas, Pothur; Wang, Thomas J.; Ware, Lorraine B.

    2008-01-01

    The emerging scientific field of proteomics encompasses the identification, characterization, and quantification of the protein content or proteome of whole cells, tissues, or body fluids. The potential for proteomic technologies to identify and quantify novel proteins in the plasma that can function as biomarkers of the presence or severity of clinical disease states holds great promise for clinical use. However, there are many challenges in translating plasma proteomics from bench to bedsid...

  15. AntiPhospholipid Syndrome Alliance for Clinical Trials and InternatiOnal Networking (APS ACTION): 5-Year Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbhaiya, Medha; Andrade, Danieli; Erkan, Doruk

    2016-10-01

    Antiphospholipid Syndrome Alliance for Clinical Trials and International Networking (APS ACTION) is the first-ever international network created to design and conduct large-scale, multicenter clinical trials and research in persistently antiphospholipid antibody (aPL)-positive patients. Since its inception in 2010, the APS ACTION has made important strides toward our goal of international research collaboration and data sharing. Through the dedication and hard work of 50 APS ACTION members, collaborative international projects are currently underway including a multicenter web-based registry and repository of aPL-positive patients, a randomized controlled clinical trial assessing the efficacy of hydroxychloroquine for primary thrombosis prevention in persistently aPL-positive but thrombosis-free patients, standardization of aPL testing through the use of core laboratories worldwide, identification of the limitations in the existing aPL/APS literature, and conducting observational research studies to further our understanding of the disease. Thus far, APS ACTION has held annual workshops and summits with the aim of facilitating international collaboration and developing initiatives to recruit young scholars to APS research. This paper describes updates related to the organization's structure, ongoing research efforts, and recent accomplishments and discusses future directions.

  16. An Update on Safety and Side Effects of Cannabidiol: A Review of Clinical Data and Relevant Animal Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iffland, Kerstin; Grotenhermen, Franjo

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: This literature survey aims to extend the comprehensive survey performed by Bergamaschi et al. in 2011 on cannabidiol (CBD) safety and side effects. Apart from updating the literature, this article focuses on clinical studies and CBD potential interactions with other drugs. Results: In general, the often described favorable safety profile of CBD in humans was confirmed and extended by the reviewed research. The majority of studies were performed for treatment of epilepsy and psychotic disorders. Here, the most commonly reported side effects were tiredness, diarrhea, and changes of appetite/weight. In comparison with other drugs, used for the treatment of these medical conditions, CBD has a better side effect profile. This could improve patients' compliance and adherence to treatment. CBD is often used as adjunct therapy. Therefore, more clinical research is warranted on CBD action on hepatic enzymes, drug transporters, and interactions with other drugs and to see if this mainly leads to positive or negative effects, for example, reducing the needed clobazam doses in epilepsy and therefore clobazam's side effects. Conclusion: This review also illustrates that some important toxicological parameters are yet to be studied, for example, if CBD has an effect on hormones. Additionally, more clinical trials with a greater number of participants and longer chronic CBD administration are still lacking.

  17. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy in retinal and optic nerve diseases: An update of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrador-Velandia, Sonia; Alonso-Alonso, María Luz; Alvarez-Sanchez, Sara; González-Zamora, Jorge; Carretero-Barrio, Irene; Pastor, José Carlos; Fernandez-Bueno, Iván; Srivastava, Girish Kumar

    2016-11-26

    Retinal and optic nerve diseases are degenerative ocular pathologies which lead to irreversible visual loss. Since the advanced therapies availability, cell-based therapies offer a new all-encompassing approach. Advances in the knowledge of neuroprotection, immunomodulation and regenerative properties of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been obtained by several preclinical studies of various neurodegenerative diseases. It has provided the opportunity to perform the translation of this knowledge to prospective treatment approaches for clinical practice. Since 2008, several first steps projecting new treatment approaches, have been taken regarding the use of cell therapy in patients with neurodegenerative pathologies of optic nerve and retina. Most of the clinical trials using MSCs are in I/II phase, recruiting patients or ongoing, and they have as main objective the safety assessment of MSCs using various routes of administration. However, it is important to recognize that, there is still a long way to go to reach clinical trials phase III-IV. Hence, it is necessary to continue preclinical and clinical studies to improve this new therapeutic tool. This paper reviews the latest progress of MSCs in human clinical trials for retinal and optic nerve diseases.

  18. Neuroimaging in psychiatry: an update on neuroimaging in the clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Brian D; Nguyen, T; Hayhow, B; Looi, Jcl

    2016-04-01

    We offered guidance on the role of structural and functional neuroimaging modalities for the general psychiatrist and for trainees in the clinical setting. We outlined the utility of neuroimaging modalities in the clinical setting, specifically with a view to understanding the pathophysiology of manifestations of disease. Both structural and functional neuroimaging modalities have a clear role in diagnostic evaluation in the spectrum of neurodegenerative disorders. Whilst the role of neuroimaging in patients with mood, anxiety and psychotic disorders is less clear, structural and functional imaging modalities have utility in the clinical setting in the form of diagnostic refinement and in understanding the pathophysiology of disorders, towards explaining manifestations and planning treatment. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  19. Diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas: A systematic update on clinical trials and biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, M. H. A.; van Vuurden, D. G.; Vandertop, W. P.; Kaspers, G. J. L.

    2012-01-01

    Patients with diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPG) have a poor prognosis. Although DIPG constitute only 10-15% of all pediatric brain tumors, they are the main cause of death in this group. Despite 26 clinical trials in newly diagnosed DIPG in the past 5 years (including several targeted

  20. Cartilage repair by mesenchymal stem cells: Clinical trial update and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Yuk-wai Lee

    2017-04-01

    The translational potential of this article: This review summarises recent MSC-related clinical research that focuses on cartilage repair. We also propose a novel possible translational direction for hyaline cartilage formation and a new paradigm making use of extra-cellular signalling and epigenetic regulation in the application of MSCs for cartilage repair.

  1. Adjuvant effect of recombinant interleukin-12 in the Nocardiosis formalin-killed vaccine of the amberjack Seriola dumerili.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Megumi; Araki, Kyosuke; Hayashi, Kazuma; Takeuchi, Yutaka; Shiozaki, Kazuhiro; Suetake, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Atsushi

    2017-08-01

    Nocardiosis causes serious economic damage in the fish farming of Japanese yellowtail fish. Nocardia seriolae identified as pathogenic bacterium is an intracellular-pathogen. In general, induction of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) is effective in infection defense against intracellular-pathogen. However, the conventional formalin-killed N. seriolae (FKC) vaccine induces humoral immunity. Interleukin-12 (IL-12) is Th1 type heterodimeric cytokine and induces cell differentiation in mammals. Our previous study showed that recombinant amberjack IL-12 has a role in CMI induction in vitro and could be a possible CMI inducing adjuvant. However, its adjuvant effect of fish IL-12 was not studied. In the present study, six types of amberjack recombinant IL-12 (rIL-12) were mixed and injected into amberjack with FKC. Firstly, we analyzed Th1- and Th2- related gene expression and monitored Th1/Th2 status followed by investigation of antibody titer. As a result, Th1-type immunity was induced in FKC + rIL-12 vaccinated fish. Secondly, we checked Th1/Th2 status of vaccinated fish after 10 days of N. seriolae infection using the expression of related genes. High T-bet/GATA-3 ratio was observed in FKC + rIL-12 vaccinated fish, suggesting that Th1 cells possesing antigen memory were induced against N. seriolae infection. Finally, the survival rate in challenge test showed that 88% of FKC + rIL-12 vaccinated fish was survived at 34 days after N. seriolae injection whereas PBS (control) and FKC only were exterminated. These result suggest that i) rIL-12 is viable CMI inducible adjuvant and ii) production of Th1 cells having antigen memory resulting from activation of IL-12 signaling pathway is important for defense against N. seriolae infection. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Malaria Vaccine Adjuvants: Latest Update and Challenges in Preclinical and Clinical Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Mata

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There is no malaria vaccine currently available, and the most advanced candidate has recently reported a modest 30% efficacy against clinical malaria. Although many efforts have been dedicated to achieve this goal, the research was mainly directed to identify antigenic targets. Nevertheless, the latest progresses on understanding how immune system works and the data recovered from vaccination studies have conferred to the vaccine formulation its deserved relevance. Additionally to the antigen nature, the manner in which it is presented (delivery adjuvants as well as the immunostimulatory effect of the formulation components (immunostimulants modulates the immune response elicited. Protective immunity against malaria requires the induction of humoral, antibody-dependent cellular inhibition (ADCI and effector and memory cell responses. This review summarizes the status of adjuvants that have been or are being employed in the malaria vaccine development, focusing on the pharmaceutical and immunological aspects, as well as on their immunization outcomings at clinical and preclinical stages.

  3. Malaria vaccine adjuvants: latest update and challenges in preclinical and clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Elena; Salvador, Aiala; Igartua, Manoli; Hernández, Rosa María; Pedraz, José Luis

    2013-01-01

    There is no malaria vaccine currently available, and the most advanced candidate has recently reported a modest 30% efficacy against clinical malaria. Although many efforts have been dedicated to achieve this goal, the research was mainly directed to identify antigenic targets. Nevertheless, the latest progresses on understanding how immune system works and the data recovered from vaccination studies have conferred to the vaccine formulation its deserved relevance. Additionally to the antigen nature, the manner in which it is presented (delivery adjuvants) as well as the immunostimulatory effect of the formulation components (immunostimulants) modulates the immune response elicited. Protective immunity against malaria requires the induction of humoral, antibody-dependent cellular inhibition (ADCI) and effector and memory cell responses. This review summarizes the status of adjuvants that have been or are being employed in the malaria vaccine development, focusing on the pharmaceutical and immunological aspects, as well as on their immunization outcomings at clinical and preclinical stages.

  4. Clinical Use and Mechanisms of Infliximab Treatment on Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Recent Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuan; Lu, Nonghua; Bai, Aiping

    2013-01-01

    The pathogenesis and treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have been recently advanced, while it is still challenged with high morbidity and poor prognosis. Infliximab, a monoclonal antibody of tumor necrosis factor (TNF), has emerged as an efficient treatment with many clinical benefits such as quick disease activity reduction and IBD patient life quality improvement. However, the biological effects of infliximab on IBD need to be elucidated. This paper reviewed the clinical use and recently advanced biological action of infliximab on IBD. By forming the stable complex with the soluble or the membrane form of TNF in fluid environment or on cell surface of immune cell, fibroblast, endothelium, and epithelium, infliximab quenches TNF activity and performs the important biological actions which lead to amelioration and remission of immune responses. The mechanisms of infliximab treatment for IBD were intensively discussed. The recent advances on two topics including predictors and side effects of infliximab treatment were also reviewed. PMID:23484133

  5. Azelaic Acid: Evidence-based Update on Mechanism of Action and Clinical Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Brian C; Wu, Wesley; Rosen, Ted

    2015-09-01

    Azelaic acid is a complex molecule with many diverse activities. The latter include anti-infective and anti-inflammatory action. The agent also inhibits follicular keratinization and epidermal melanogenesis. Due to the wide variety of biological activities, azelaic acid has been utilized as a management tool in a broad spectrum of disease states and cutaneous disorders. This paper reviews the clinical utility of azelaic acid, noting the quality of the evidence supporting each potential use.

  6. Clinical review: Update on neurally adjusted ventilatory assist - report of a round-table conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Conventional mechanical ventilators rely on pneumatic pressure and flow sensors and controllers to detect breaths. New modes of mechanical ventilation have been developed to better match the assistance delivered by the ventilator to the patient's needs. Among these modes, neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) delivers a pressure that is directly proportional to the integral of the electrical activity of the diaphragm recorded continuously through an esophageal probe. In clinical settings, NAVA has been chiefly compared with pressure-support ventilation, one of the most popular modes used during the weaning phase, which delivers a constant pressure from breath to breath. Comparisons with proportional-assist ventilation, which has numerous similarities, are lacking. Because of the constant level of assistance, pressure-support ventilation reduces the natural variability of the breathing pattern and can be associated with asynchrony and/or overinflation. The ability of NAVA to circumvent these limitations has been addressed in clinical studies and is discussed in this report. Although the underlying concept is fascinating, several important questions regarding the clinical applications of NAVA remain unanswered. Among these questions, determining the optimal NAVA settings according to the patient's ventilatory needs and/or acceptable level of work of breathing is a key issue. In this report, based on an investigator-initiated round table, we review the most recent literature on this topic and discuss the theoretical advantages and disadvantages of NAVA compared with other modes, as well as the risks and limitations of NAVA. PMID:22715815

  7. [Functional neuroimaging in the diagnosis of patients with Parkinsonism: Update and recommendations for clinical use].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbizu, J; Luquin, M R; Abella, J; de la Fuente-Fernández, R; Fernandez-Torrón, R; García-Solís, D; Garrastachu, P; Jiménez-Hoyuela, J M; Llaneza, M; Lomeña, F; Lorenzo-Bosquet, C; Martí, M J; Martinez-Castrillo, J C; Mir, P; Mitjavila, M; Ruiz-Martínez, J; Vela, L

    2014-01-01

    Functional Neuroimaging has been traditionally used in research for patients with different Parkinsonian syndromes. However, the emergence of commercial radiotracers together with the availability of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and, more recently, positron emission tomography (PET) have made them available for clinical practice. Particularly, the development of clinical evidence achieved by functional neuroimaging techniques over the past two decades have motivated a progressive inclusion of several biomarkers in the clinical diagnostic criteria for neurodegenerative diseases that occur with Parkinsonism. However, the wide range of radiotracers designed to assess the involvement of different pathways in the neurodegenerative process underlying Parkinsonian syndromes (dopaminergic nigrostriatal pathway integrity, basal ganglia and cortical neuronal activity, myocardial sympathetic innervation), and the different neuroimaging techniques currently available (scintigraphy, SPECT and PET), have generated some controversy concerning the best neuroimaging test that should be indicated for the differential diagnosis of Parkinsonism. In this article, a panel of nuclear medicine and neurology experts has evaluated the functional neuroimaging techniques emphazising practical considerations related to the diagnosis of patients with uncertain origin parkinsonism and the assessment Parkinson's disease progression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  8. Update on Clinical Trials in Dry Age-related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskintuna, Ibrahim; Elsayed, M. E. A. Abdalla; Schatz, Patrik

    2016-01-01

    This review article summarizes the most recent clinical trials for dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common cause of vision loss in the elderly in developed countries. A literature search through websites https://www.pubmed.org and https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/, both accessed no later than November 04, 2015, was performed. We identified three Phase III clinical trials that were completed over the recent 5 years Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 (AREDS2), implantable miniature telescope and tandospirone, and several other trials targeting a variety of mechanisms including, oxidative stress, complement inhibition, visual cycle inhibition, retinal and choroidal blood flow, stem cells, gene therapy, and visual rehabilitation. To date, none of the biologically oriented therapies have resulted in improved vision. Vision improvement was reported with an implantable mini telescope. Stem cells therapy holds a potential for vision improvement. The AREDS2 formulas did not add any further reduced risk of progression to advanced AMD, compared to the original AREDS formula. Several recently discovered pathogenetic mechanisms in dry AMD have enabled development of new treatment strategies, and several of these have been tested in recent clinical trials and are currently being tested in ongoing trials. The rapid development and understanding of pathogenesis holds promise for the future. PMID:26957835

  9. Multiple sclerosis in children: an update on clinical diagnosis, therapeutic strategies, and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, Amy; Ghezzi, Angelo; Bar-Or, Amit; Mikaeloff, Yann; Tardieu, Marc; Banwell, Brenda

    2014-09-01

    The clinical features, diagnostic challenges, neuroimaging appearance, therapeutic options, and pathobiological research progress in childhood-and adolescent-onset multiple sclerosis have been informed by many new insights in the past 7 years. National programmes in several countries, collaborative research efforts, and an established international paediatric multiple sclerosis study group have contributed to revised clinical diagnostic definitions, identified clinical features of multiple sclerosis that differ by age of onset, and made recommendations regarding the treatment of paediatric multiple sclerosis. The relative risks conveyed by genetic and environmental factors to paediatric multiple sclerosis have been the subject of several large cohort studies. MRI features have been characterised in terms of qualitative descriptions of lesion distribution and applicability of MRI aspects to multiple sclerosis diagnostic criteria, and quantitative studies have assessed total lesion burden and the effect of the disease on global and regional brain volume. Humoral-based and cell-based assays have identified antibodies against myelin, potassium-channel proteins, and T-cell profiles that support an adult-like T-cell repertoire and cellular reactivity against myelin in paediatric patients with multiple sclerosis. Finally, the safety and efficacy of standard first-line therapies in paediatric multiple sclerosis populations are now appreciated in more detail, and consensus views on the future conduct and feasibility of phase 3 trials for new drugs have been proposed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Update on Electronic Dental Record and Clinical Computing Adoption Among Dental Practices in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Amit; Schroeder, Dixie; Schwei, Kelsey; Chyou, Po-Huang

    2017-12-01

    This study sought to re-characterize trends and factors affecting electronic dental record (EDR) and technologies adoption by dental practices and the impact of the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) act on adoption rates through 2012. A 39-question survey was disseminated nationally over 3 months using a novel, statistically-modeled approach informed by early response rates to achieve a predetermined sample. EDR adoption rate for clinical support was 52%. Adoption rates were higher among: (1) younger dentists; (2) dentists ≤ 15 years in practice; (3) females; and (4) group practices. Top barriers to adoption were EDR cost/expense, cost-benefit ratio, electronic format conversion, and poor EDR usability. Awareness of the Federal HITECH incentive program was low. The rate of chairside computer implementation was 72%. Adoption of EDR in dental offices in the United States was higher in 2012 than electronic health record adoption rates in medical offices and was not driven by the HITECH program. Patient portal adoption among dental practices in the United States remained low. © 2017 Marshfield Clinic.

  11. The Clinical Diagnosis and Management of Kawasaki Disease: a Review and Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Frank H; Ang, Jocelyn Y

    2016-09-01

    Kawasaki disease is an acute, self-limited vasculitis of childhood and has become the leading cause of acquired pediatric heart disease in the USA. Prompt treatment is essential in reducing cardiac-related morbidity and mortality. The underlying etiology remains unknown. The disease itself may be the characteristic manifestation of a common pathway of immune-mediated vascular inflammation in susceptible hosts. The characteristic clinical features of fever for at least 5 days with bilateral nonpurulent conjunctivitis, rash, changes in lips and oral cavity, changes in peripheral extremities, and cervical lymphadenopathy remain the mainstay of diagnosis. Supplementary laboratory criteria can aid in the diagnosis, particularly in cases of incomplete clinical presentation. Diagnosis of Kawasaki disease can be challenging as the clinical presentation can be mistaken for a variety of other pediatric illnesses. Standard of care consists of intravenous immune globulin and aspirin. Corticosteroids, infliximab, and cyclosporine A have been used as adjunct therapy for Kawasaki disease refractory to initial treatment. There is ongoing research into the use of these agents in the initial therapy of Kawasaki disease.

  12. Update for 2014 on clinical cardiology, geriatric cardiology, and heart failure and transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barón-Esquivias, Gonzalo; Manito, Nicolás; López Díaz, Javier; Martín Santana, Antonio; García Pinilla, José Manuel; Gómez Doblas, Juan José; Gómez Bueno, Manuel; Barrios Alonso, Vivencio; Lambert, José Luis

    2015-04-01

    In the present article, we review publications from the previous year in the following 3 areas: clinical cardiology, geriatric cardiology, and heart failure and transplantation. Among the new developments in clinical cardiology are several contributions from Spanish groups on tricuspid and aortic regurgitation, developments in atrial fibrillation, syncope, and the clinical characteristics of heart disease, as well as various studies on familial heart disease and chronic ischemic heart disease. In geriatric cardiology, the most relevant studies published in 2014 involve heart failure, degenerative aortic stenosis, and data on atrial fibrillation in the geriatric population. In heart failure and transplantation, the most noteworthy developments concern the importance of multidisciplinary units and patients with preserved systolic function. Other notable publications were those related to iron deficiency, new drugs, and new devices and biomarkers. Finally, we review studies on acute heart failure and transplantation, such as inotropic drugs and ventricular assist devices. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Multiple sclerosis in children: an update on clinical diagnosis, therapeutic strategies, and research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, Amy; Ghezzi, Angelo; Bar-Or, Amit; Mikaeloff, Yann; Tardieu, Marc; Banwell, Brenda

    2015-01-01

    The clinical features, diagnostic challenges, neuroimaging appearance, therapeutic options, and pathobiological research progress in childhood—and adolescent—onset multiple sclerosis have been informed by many new insights in the past 7 years. National programmes in several countries, collaborative research efforts, and an established international paediatric multiple sclerosis study group have contributed to revised clinical diagnostic definitions, identified clinical features of multiple sclerosis that differ by age of onset, and made recommendations regarding the treatment of paediatric multiple sclerosis. The relative risks conveyed by genetic and environmental factors to paediatric multiple sclerosis have been the subject of several large cohort studies. MRI features have been characterised in terms of qualitative descriptions of lesion distribution and applicability of MRI aspects to multiple sclerosis diagnostic criteria, and quantitative studies have assessed total lesion burden and the effect of the disease on global and regional brain volume. Humoral-based and cell-based assays have identified antibodies against myelin, potassium-channel proteins, and T-cell profiles that support an adult-like T-cell repertoire and cellular reactivity against myelin in paediatric patients with multiple sclerosis. Finally, the safety and efficacy of standard first-line therapies in paediatric multiple sclerosis populations are now appreciated in more detail, and consensus views on the future conduct and feasibility of phase 3 trials for new drugs have been proposed. PMID:25142460

  14. Clinical review: Update on neurally adjusted ventilatory assist--report of a round-table conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzi, Nicolas; Piquilloud, Lise; Rozé, Hadrien; Mercat, Alain; Lofaso, Frédéric; Delisle, Stéphane; Jolliet, Philippe; Sottiaux, Thierry; Tassaux, Didier; Roesler, Jean; Demoule, Alexandre; Jaber, Samir; Mancebo, Jordi; Brochard, Laurent; Richard, Jean-Christophe Marie

    2012-06-20

    Conventional mechanical ventilators rely on pneumatic pressure and flow sensors and controllers to detect breaths. New modes of mechanical ventilation have been developed to better match the assistance delivered by the ventilator to the patient's needs. Among these modes, neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) delivers a pressure that is directly proportional to the integral of the electrical activity of the diaphragm recorded continuously through an esophageal probe. In clinical settings, NAVA has been chiefly compared with pressure-support ventilation, one of the most popular modes used during the weaning phase, which delivers a constant pressure from breath to breath. Comparisons with proportional-assist ventilation, which has numerous similarities, are lacking. Because of the constant level of assistance, pressure-support ventilation reduces the natural variability of the breathing pattern and can be associated with asynchrony and/or overinflation. The ability of NAVA to circumvent these limitations has been addressed in clinical studies and is discussed in this report. Although the underlying concept is fascinating, several important questions regarding the clinical applications of NAVA remain unanswered. Among these questions, determining the optimal NAVA settings according to the patient's ventilatory needs and/or acceptable level of work of breathing is a key issue. In this report, based on an investigator-initiated round table, we review the most recent literature on this topic and discuss the theoretical advantages and disadvantages of NAVA compared with other modes, as well as the risks and limitations of NAVA.

  15. Clinical and preclinical treatment of urologic diseases with phosphodiesterase isoenzymes 5 inhibitors: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Hao Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Phosphodiesterase isoenzymes 5 inhibitors (PDE5-Is are the first-line therapy for erectile dysfunction (ED. The constant discoveries of nitric oxide (NO/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP cell-signaling pathway for smooth muscle (SM control in other urogenital tracts (UGTs make PDE5-Is promising pharmacologic agents against other benign urological diseases. This article reviews the literature and contains some previously unpublished data about characterizations and activities of PDE5 and its inhibitors in treating urological disorders. Scientific discoveries have improved our understanding of cell-signaling pathway in NO/cGMP-mediated SM relaxation in UGTs. Moreover, the clinical applications of PDE5-Is have been widely recognized. On-demand PDE5-Is are efficacious for most cases of ED, while daily-dosing and combination with testosterone are recommended for refractory cases. Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC stimulators also have promising role in the management of severe ED conditions. PDE5-Is are also the first rehabilitation strategy for postoperation or postradiotherapy ED for prostate cancer patients. PDE5-Is, especially combined with α-adrenoceptor antagonists, are very effective for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH except on maximum urinary flow rate (Q max with tadalafil recently proved for BPH with/without ED. Furthermore, PDE5-Is are currently under various phases of clinical or preclinical researches with promising potential for other urinary and genital illnesses, such as priapism, premature ejaculation, urinary tract calculi, overactive bladder, Peyronie′s disease, and female sexual dysfunction. Inhibition of PDE5 is expected to be an effective strategy in treating benign urological diseases. However, further clinical studies and basic researches investigating mechanisms of PDE5-Is in disorders of UGTs are required.

  16. U.S. High-Level Isolation Unit Clinical Laboratory Capabilities Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herstein, Jocelyn J; Iwen, Peter C; Jelden, Katelyn C; Biddinger, Paul D; Gibbs, Shawn G; Le, Aurora B; Hewlett, Angela L; Lowe, John J

    2018-02-01

    In late 2014, 56 hospitals in the United States were designated by state and federal public health authorities as specially designed high-level isolation units (HLIUs) equipped with advanced infrastructure, laboratory capabilities, and trained staff to care for patients with highly hazardous communicable diseases (HHCDs), such as Ebola virus disease. This survey describes the clinical laboratory support capabilities of U.S. HLIUs, including the specific test menus that HLIUs have identified to safely manage HHCD patients and the locations where such testing would be performed. In spring 2016, a survey was electronically distributed, as a fillable pdf file, to the 56 U.S. HLIUs. Site representatives completed the surveys, and data were coded and analyzed in an electronic spreadsheet, using descriptive statistics. Thirty-six HLIUs (64%) responded, and 33 completed the laboratory capabilities section. Thirty-one HLIUs (94%) had performed risk analyses for all laboratory procedures and equipment. Twenty-nine (88%) had decontamination procedures specified for all laboratory equipment used for patients with suspected or confirmed HHCDs. On-site laboratories in 27 HLIUs (81%) had the capacity to inventory and to securely store HHCD patient specimens. Ten HLIUs (31%) had at least one test they would conduct within the patient isolation room. The high-risk nature of HHCDs and the occupational exposures that may occur in clinical laboratories demand advanced preparation and risk assessment of work practices, laboratory equipment, and instrumentation by HLIU laboratories. Although risk analyses of clinical laboratory testing and equipment that HLIUs have conducted have likely focused on those for Ebola virus, HLIUs must be prepared to revise their current procedures for other HHCDs. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  17. Emotional Processes in Borderline Personality Disorder: An Update for Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon-Gordon, Katherine L.; Peters, Jessica R.; Fertuck, Eric A.; Yen, Shirley

    2016-01-01

    Despite prior assumptions about poor prognosis, the surge in research on borderline personality disorder (BPD) over the past several decades shows that it is treatable and can have a good prognosis. Prominent theories of BPD highlight the importance of emotional dysfunction as core to this disorder. However, recent empirical research suggests a more nuanced view of emotional dysfunction in BPD. This research is reviewed in the present article, with a view towards how these laboratory-based findings can influence clinical work with individuals suffering from BPD. PMID:29527105

  18. Radotinib and its clinical potential in chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskazan, Ahmet Emre; Keskin, Dilek

    2017-09-01

    Although imatinib has dramatically improved major outcomes in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), there are newer tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) approved worldwide for the treatment of resistant cases, and two second-generation TKIs (dasatinib, nilotinib) are approved in some nations for treating patients in the upfront setting. Radotinib (IY5511HCL, Supect® ) is a novel and selective second-generation BCR-ABL1 TKI, which is currently approved in Korea for the treatment of patients with CML both in the upfront and salvage settings. This review mainly focuses on the clinical potential of radotinib in patients with CML in chronic phase in terms of efficacy and safety.

  19. Severe sepsis and septic shock: clinical overview and update on management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawcutt, Kelly A; Peters, Steve G

    2014-11-01

    Sepsis is among the oldest themes in medicine; however, despite modern advances, it remains a leading cause of death in the United States. Every clinician should be able to recognize the signs and symptoms of sepsis, along with early management strategies, to expeditiously provide appropriate care and decrease resultant morbidity and mortality. This review addresses the definitions, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, management, and outcomes of patients with sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock. Copyright © 2014 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. An update of human mesenchymal stem cell biology and their clinical uses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaher, Walid; Harkness, Linda; Kermani, Abbas Jafari

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade, an increasing urge to develop new and novel methods for the treatment of degenerative diseases where there is currently no effective therapy has lead to the emerging of the cell therapy or cellular therapeutics approach for the management of those conditions where organ...... and in vivo. Consequently, stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (MSCs) are being introduced into many clinical trials due to their ease of isolation and efficacy in treating a number of disease conditions in animal preclinical disease models. The aim of this review is to revise MSC biology, their potential...

  1. GM1 gangliosidosis and Morquio B disease: an update on genetic alterations and clinical findings

    OpenAIRE

    Caciotti, Anna; Garman, Scott C; Rivera-Colón, Yadilette; Procopio, Elena; Catarzi, Serena; Ferri, Lorenzo; Guido, Carmen; Martelli, Paola; Parini, Rossella; Antuzzi, Daniela; Battini, Roberta; Sibilio, Michela; Simonati, Alessandro; Fontana, Elena; Salviati, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    Abstract GM1 gangliosidosis and Morquio B syndrome, both arising from beta-galactosidase (GLB1) deficiency, are very rare lysosomal storage diseases with an incidence of about 1:100,000- 1:200,000 live births worldwide. Here we report the beta-galactosidase gene (GLB1) mutation analysis of 21 unrelated GM1 gangliosidosis patients, and of 4 Morquio B patients, of whom two are brothers. Clinical features of the patients were collected and compared with those in literature. In silico ...

  2. Richter syndrome in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: updates on biology, clinical features and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamroziak, Krzysztof; Tadmor, Tamar; Robak, Tadeusz; Polliack, Aaron

    2015-07-01

    Richter syndrome (RS) or Richter transformation is the development of secondary aggressive lymphoma in the setting of underlying chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL). Most frequently CLL transforms into diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) (90%) and rarely (10%) into Hodgkin lymphoma, termed Hodgkin variant of Richter syndrome (HvRS). RS is generally characterized by an aggressive clinical course and poor prognosis. In recent years, major advances have been made in understanding genetic events which relate to the progression of CLL or transformation into RS. Better understanding of the molecular pathways has revealed that RS is not a single homogeneous entity. The majority of cases are clonally related to the original CLL clone, while a minority develop from an unrelated clone. This review summarizes new data relating to the molecular biology and the genetic/epigenetic changes occurring during Richter transformation, and also considers the clinical features and therapy for both DLBCL-RS and Hodgkin variant-RS.

  3. Update on oral Chagas disease outbreaks in Venezuela: epidemiological, clinical and diagnostic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noya, Belkisyolé Alarcón de; Díaz-Bello, Zoraida; Colmenares, Cecilia; Ruiz-Guevara, Raiza; Mauriello, Luciano; Muñoz-Calderón, Arturo; Noya, Oscar

    2015-05-01

    Orally transmitted Chagas disease has become a matter of concern due to outbreaks reported in four Latin American countries. Although several mechanisms for orally transmitted Chagas disease transmission have been proposed, food and beverages contaminated with whole infected triatomines or their faeces, which contain metacyclic trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi, seems to be the primary vehicle. In 2007, the first recognised outbreak of orally transmitted Chagas disease occurred in Venezuela and largest recorded outbreak at that time. Since then, 10 outbreaks (four in Caracas) with 249 cases (73.5% children) and 4% mortality have occurred. The absence of contact with the vector and of traditional cutaneous and Romana's signs, together with a florid spectrum of clinical manifestations during the acute phase, confuse the diagnosis of orally transmitted Chagas disease with other infectious diseases. The simultaneous detection of IgG and IgM by ELISA and the search for parasites in all individuals at risk have been valuable diagnostic tools for detecting acute cases. Follow-up studies regarding the microepidemics primarily affecting children has resulted in 70% infection persistence six years after anti-parasitic treatment. Panstrongylus geniculatus has been the incriminating vector in most cases. As a food-borne disease, this entity requires epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches that differ from those approaches used for traditional direct or cutaneous vector transmission.

  4. Update on oral Chagas disease outbreaks in Venezuela: epidemiological, clinical and diagnostic approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Noya, Belkisyolé Alarcón; Díaz-Bello, Zoraida; Colmenares, Cecilia; Ruiz-Guevara, Raiza; Mauriello, Luciano; Muñoz-Calderón, Arturo; Noya, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Orally transmitted Chagas disease has become a matter of concern due to outbreaks reported in four Latin American countries. Although several mechanisms for orally transmitted Chagas disease transmission have been proposed, food and beverages contaminated with whole infected triatomines or their faeces, which contain metacyclic trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi, seems to be the primary vehicle. In 2007, the first recognised outbreak of orally transmitted Chagas disease occurred in Venezuela and largest recorded outbreak at that time. Since then, 10 outbreaks (four in Caracas) with 249 cases (73.5% children) and 4% mortality have occurred. The absence of contact with the vector and of traditional cutaneous and Romana’s signs, together with a florid spectrum of clinical manifestations during the acute phase, confuse the diagnosis of orally transmitted Chagas disease with other infectious diseases. The simultaneous detection of IgG and IgM by ELISA and the search for parasites in all individuals at risk have been valuable diagnostic tools for detecting acute cases. Follow-up studies regarding the microepidemics primarily affecting children has resulted in 70% infection persistence six years after anti-parasitic treatment. Panstrongylus geniculatus has been the incriminating vector in most cases. As a food-borne disease, this entity requires epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches that differ from those approaches used for traditional direct or cutaneous vector transmission. PMID:25946155

  5. Update on the clinical use of the low-molecular-weight heparin, parnaparin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Camporese

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Camporese1, Enrico Bernardi2, Franco Noventa31Unit of Angiology and 3Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Epidemiology Group, University Hospital of Padua, Italy; 2Department of Emergency and Accident Medicine, Hospital of Conegliano Veneto, ItalyAbstract: Parnaparin is a low-molecular-weight heparin that has widely shown its efficacy and safety in prevention of venous thromboembolism, in the treatment of chronic venous disorders, and in the treatment of venous and arterial (stable and unstable angina, acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction thrombosis. Parnaparin at the respective dosages of 3200, 4250, 6400, or 12800 IUaXa for a period ranging from 3 to 5 days to 6 months, is usually administered subcutaneously by means of once-daily regimen and is better tolerated than unfractionated heparin at the injection site. In the variety of commercially available low-molecular-weight heparins, parnaparin represents a useful therapeutic option, even though little evidence is available comparing the superiority or the equivalent efficacy and safety of parnaparin to that of the unfractionated heparin or placebo. This review summarizes the available literature on the use of parnaparin in different settings of cardiovascular diseases, including papers published during the past year and ongoing studies.Keywords: low-molecular-weight heparin, heparin, parnaparin, acute coronary syndromes, venous thromboembolism

  6. Update on oral Chagas disease outbreaks in Venezuela: epidemiological, clinical and diagnostic approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belkisyolé Alarcón de Noya

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Orally transmitted Chagas disease has become a matter of concern due to outbreaks reported in four Latin American countries. Although several mechanisms for orally transmitted Chagas disease transmission have been proposed, food and beverages contaminated with whole infected triatomines or their faeces, which contain metacyclic trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi, seems to be the primary vehicle. In 2007, the first recognised outbreak of orally transmitted Chagas disease occurred in Venezuela and largest recorded outbreak at that time. Since then, 10 outbreaks (four in Caracas with 249 cases (73.5% children and 4% mortality have occurred. The absence of contact with the vector and of traditional cutaneous and Romana’s signs, together with a florid spectrum of clinical manifestations during the acute phase, confuse the diagnosis of orally transmitted Chagas disease with other infectious diseases. The simultaneous detection of IgG and IgM by ELISA and the search for parasites in all individuals at risk have been valuable diagnostic tools for detecting acute cases. Follow-up studies regarding the microepidemics primarily affecting children has resulted in 70% infection persistence six years after anti-parasitic treatment. Panstrongylus geniculatus has been the incriminating vector in most cases. As a food-borne disease, this entity requires epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches that differ from those approaches used for traditional direct or cutaneous vector transmission.

  7. 2013 update on congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, heart failure, and heart transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subirana, M Teresa; Barón-Esquivias, Gonzalo; Manito, Nicolás; Oliver, José M; Ripoll, Tomás; Lambert, Jose Luis; Zunzunegui, José L; Bover, Ramon; García-Pinilla, José Manuel

    2014-03-01

    This article presents the most relevant developments in 2013 in 3 key areas of cardiology: congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, and heart failure and transplant. Within the area of congenital heart disease, we reviewed contributions related to sudden death in adult congenital heart disease, the importance of specific echocardiographic parameters in assessing the systemic right ventricle, problems in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot and indication for pulmonary valve replacement, and confirmation of the role of specific factors in the selection of candidates for Fontan surgery. The most recent publications in clinical cardiology include a study by a European working group on correct diagnostic work-up in cardiomyopathies, studies on the cost-effectiveness of percutaneous aortic valve implantation, a consensus document on the management of type B aortic dissection, and guidelines on aortic valve and ascending aortic disease. The most noteworthy developments in heart failure and transplantation include new American guidelines on heart failure, therapeutic advances in acute heart failure (serelaxin), the management of comorbidities such as iron deficiency, risk assessment using new biomarkers, and advances in ventricular assist devices. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Fluoride Rinses, Gels and Foams: An Update of Controlled Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twetman, Svante; Keller, Mette K

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this conference paper was to systematically review the quality of evidence and summarize the findings of clinical trials published after 2002 using fluoride mouth rinses, fluoride gels or foams for the prevention of dental caries. Relevant papers were selected after an electronic search for literature published in English between 2003 and 2014. The included papers were assessed for their risk of bias and the results were narratively synthesized due to study heterogeneity. The quality of evidence was expressed according to GRADE. A total of 19 papers were included (6 on fluoride mouth rinse, 10 on fluoride gel and 3 on fluoride foam); 6 had a low risk of bias while 2 had a moderate risk. All fluoride measures appeared to be beneficial in preventing crown caries and reversing root caries, but the quality of evidence was graded as low for fluoride mouth rinse, moderate for fluoride gel and very low for acidulated fluoride foam. No conclusions could be drawn on the cost-effectiveness. This review, covering the recent decade, has further substantiated the evidence for a caries-preventive effect of fluoride mouth rinse, fluoride gel and foam, previously established in systematic reviews. The lack of clinical trials free from bias is, however, still a concern, especially for fluoride mouth rinses and fluoride foam. There is also a scientific knowledge gap on the benefit and optimal use of these fluoride supplements in combination with daily tooth brushing with fluoride toothpaste. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Oral Lichen Planus: An Update on Etiology, Pathogenesis, Clinical Presentation, Diagnosis and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sonia; Jawanda, Manveen Kaur

    2015-01-01

    The mouth is a mirror of health or disease, a sentinel or early warning system. The oral cavity might well be thought as a window to the body because oral manifestations accompany many systemic diseases. In many instances, oral involvement precedes the appearance of other symptoms or lesions at other locations. Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic mucocutaneous disorder of stratified squamous epithelium of uncertain etiology that affects oral and genital mucous membranes, skin, nails, and scalp. LP is estimated to affect 0.5% to 2.0% of the general population. This disease has most often been reported in middle-aged patients with 30-60 years of age and is more common in females than in males. The disease seems to be mediated by an antigen-specific mechanism, activating cytotoxic T cells, and non-specific mechanisms like mast cell degranulation and matrix metalloproteinase activation. A proper understanding of the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis of the disease becomes important for providing the right treatment. This article discusses the prevalence, etiology, clinical features, oral manifestations, diagnosis, complications and treatment of oral LP. PMID:26120146

  10. MLL-Rearranged Leukemias-An Update on Science and Clinical Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Amanda C; Bernt, Kathrin M

    2017-01-01

    The mixed-lineage leukemia 1 (MLL1) gene (now renamed Lysine [K]-specific MethylTransferase 2A or KMT2A ) on chromosome 11q23 is disrupted in a unique group of acute leukemias. More than 80 different partner genes in these fusions have been described, although the majority of leukemias result from MLL1 fusions with one of about six common partner genes. Approximately 10% of all leukemias harbor MLL1 translocations. Of these, two patient populations comprise the majority of cases: patients younger than 1 year of age at diagnosis (primarily acute lymphoblastic leukemias) and young- to-middle-aged adults (primarily acute myeloid leukemias). A much rarer subgroup of patients with MLL1 rearrangements develop leukemia that is attributable to prior treatment with certain chemotherapeutic agents-so-called therapy-related leukemias. In general, outcomes for all of these patients remain poor when compared to patients with non- MLL1 rearranged leukemias. In this review, we will discuss the normal biological roles of MLL1 and its fusion partners, how these roles are hypothesized to be dysregulated in the context of MLL1 rearrangements, and the clinical manifestations of this group of leukemias. We will go on to discuss the progress in clinical management and promising new avenues of research, which may lead to more effective targeted therapies for affected patients.

  11. MLL-Rearranged Leukemias—An Update on Science and Clinical Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Amanda C.; Bernt, Kathrin M.

    2017-01-01

    The mixed-lineage leukemia 1 (MLL1) gene (now renamed Lysine [K]-specific MethylTransferase 2A or KMT2A) on chromosome 11q23 is disrupted in a unique group of acute leukemias. More than 80 different partner genes in these fusions have been described, although the majority of leukemias result from MLL1 fusions with one of about six common partner genes. Approximately 10% of all leukemias harbor MLL1 translocations. Of these, two patient populations comprise the majority of cases: patients younger than 1 year of age at diagnosis (primarily acute lymphoblastic leukemias) and young- to-middle-aged adults (primarily acute myeloid leukemias). A much rarer subgroup of patients with MLL1 rearrangements develop leukemia that is attributable to prior treatment with certain chemotherapeutic agents—so-called therapy-related leukemias. In general, outcomes for all of these patients remain poor when compared to patients with non-MLL1 rearranged leukemias. In this review, we will discuss the normal biological roles of MLL1 and its fusion partners, how these roles are hypothesized to be dysregulated in the context of MLL1 rearrangements, and the clinical manifestations of this group of leukemias. We will go on to discuss the progress in clinical management and promising new avenues of research, which may lead to more effective targeted therapies for affected patients. PMID:28232907

  12. Gelastic seizures associated with hypothalamic hamartomas. An update in the clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José F. Tellez-Zenteno

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available José F. Tellez-Zenteno1, Cesar Serrano-Almeida2, Farzad Moien-Afshari11Division of Neurology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada; 2Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, CanadaAbstract: Gelastic seizures are epileptic events characterized by bouts of laughter. Laughter-like vocalization is usually combined with facial contraction in the form of a smile. Autonomic features such as flushing, tachycardia, and altered respiration are widely recognized. Conscious state may not be impaired, although this is often difficult to asses particularly in young children. Gelastic seizures have been associated classically to hypothalamic hamartomas, although different extrahypothalamic localizations have been described. Hypothalamic hamartomas are rare congenital lesions presenting with the classic triad of gelastic epilepsy, precocious puberty and developmental delay. The clinical course of patients with gelastic seizures associated with hypothalamic hamartomas is progressive, commencing with gelastic seizures in infancy, deteriorating into more complex seizure disorder resulting in intractable epilepsy. Electrophysiological, radiological, and pathophysiological studies have confirmed the intrinsic epileptogenicity of the hypothalamic hamartoma. Currently the most effective surgical approach is the trancallosal anterior interforniceal approach, however newer approaches including the endoscopic and other treatment such as radiosurgery and gamma knife have been used with success. This review focuses on the syndrome of gelastic seizures associated with hypothalamic hamartomas, but it also reviews other concepts such as status gelasticus and some aspects of gelastic seizures in other locations.Keywords: epilepsy, gelastic seizures, epilepsy surgery, hypothalamic hamartoma, intractable epilepsy

  13. A Clinical Update on Delirium: From Early Recognition to Effective Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim Cerejeira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Delirium is a neuropsychiatric syndrome characterized by altered consciousness and attention with cognitive, emotional and behavioural symptoms. It is particularly frequent in elderly people with medical or surgical conditions and is associated with adverse outcomes. Predisposing factors render the subject more vulnerable to a congregation of precipitating factors which potentially affect brain function and induce an imbalance in all the major neurotransmitter systems. Early diagnosis of delirium is crucial to improve the prognosis of patients requiring the identification of subtle and fluctuating signs. Increased awareness of clinical staff, particularly nurses, and routine screening of cognitive function with standardized instruments, can be decisive to increase detection rates of delirium. General measures to prevent delirium include the implementation of protocols to systematically identify and minimize all risk factors present in a particular clinical setting. As soon as delirium is recognized, prompt removal of precipitating factors is warranted together with environmental changes and early mobilization of patients. Low doses of haloperidol or olanzapine can be used for brief periods, for the behavioural control of delirium. All of these measures are a part of the multicomponent strategy for prevention and treatment of delirium, in which the nursing care plays a vital role.

  14. An Update of Patents, Preclinical and Clinical Outcomes of Lipid Nanoparticulate Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Kamla; Shankar, Ravi; Joshi, Monika

    2017-11-21

    Lipid nanoparticles have attracted increased degree of scientific and commercial attention in the last decade. The lipidic nanoparticles have emerged as a potential alternative to other nano-scale systems due to their various advantages over them and also due to overcoming the shortcomings of the already available colloidal systems like liposomes, niosomes and polymeric nanoparticles. These have been investigated for delivery of macromolecules, genes, siRNA and other therapeutic agents for oral, topical, parenteral administration and target site specific delivery for various diseases like cancer, ocular diseases and brain disorders. The lipid nanoparticles have evolved from SLNs, then NLCs and lipid drug conjugates overcoming any issues related to production and formulation and adding advantages, if any. The current review article focuses on the lipid nanoparticles, their formulation approaches and current advancements in the field through recent clinical trials and patents. This manuscript embodies various patents, preclinical and clinical aspects related to the lipidic nanocarriers. Over the years the lipidic nanoparticulate systems have evolved as significant carriers for improved therapeutics and in diagnostic field. The large number of patents and preclinical trials in the recent years suggests that these systems will find immense potential in near future. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Mantle cell lymphoma: 2017 update on diagnosis, risk-stratification, and clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vose, Julie M

    2017-08-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a non-Hodgkin lymphoma characterized by involvement of the lymph nodes, spleen, blood and bone marrow with a short remission duration to standard therapies and a median overall survival (OS) of 4-5 years. Diagnosis is based on lymph node, bone marrow, or tissue morphology of centrocytic lymphocytes, small cell type, or blastoid variant cells. A chromosomal translocation t (11:14) is the molecular hallmark of MCL, resulting in the overexpression of cyclin D1. Cyclin D1 is detected by immunohistochemistry in 98% of cases. The absence of SOX-11 or a low Ki-67 may correlate with a more indolent form of MCL. The differential diagnosis of MCL includes small lymphocytic lymphoma, marginal zone lymphoma, and follicular lymphoma. The MCL International Prognostic Index (MIPI) is the prognostic model most often used and incorporates ECOG performance status, age, leukocyte count, and lactic dehydrogenase. A modification of the MIPI also adds the Ki-67 proliferative index if available. The median OS for the low-risk group was not reached (5-year OS of 60%). The median OS for the intermediate risk group was 51 months and 29 months for the high risk group. For selected indolent, low MIPI MCL patients, initial observation may be appropriate therapy. For younger patients with intermediate or high risk MIPI MCL, aggressive therapy with a cytotoxic Regimen followed by autologous stem cell transplantation should be considered. Rituximab maintenance after autologous stem cell transplantation has also improved the progression-free and overall survival. For older symptomatic MCL patients with intermediate or high risk MIPI, combination chemotherapy with R-CHOP, R-Bendamustine, or a clinical trial should be considered. In addition, rituximab maintenance therapy may prolong the progression-free survival. At the time of relapse, agents directed at activated pathways in MCL cells such as bortezomib (NFkB inhibitor), lenalidamide (anti-angiogenesis) and

  16. Mantle cell lymphoma: 2015 update on diagnosis, risk-stratification, and clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vose, Julie M

    2015-08-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a non-Hodgkin lymphoma characterized by involvement of the lymph nodes, spleen, blood and bone marrow with a short remission duration to standard therapies and a median overall survival (OS) of 4-5 years. Diagnosis is based on lymph node, bone marrow, or tissue morphology of centrocytic lymphocytes, small cell type, or blastoid variant cells. A chromosomal translocation t (11:14) is the molecular hallmark of MCL, resulting in the overexpression of cyclin D1. Cyclin D1 is detected by immunohistochemistry in 98% of cases. The absence of SOX-11 or a low Ki-67 may correlate with a more indolent form of MCL. The differential diagnosis of MCL includes small lymphocytic lymphoma, marginal zone lymphoma, and follicular lymphoma. The MCL International Prognostic Index (MIPI) is the prognostic model most often used and incorporates ECOG performance status, age, leukocyte count, and lactic dehydrogenase. A modification of the MIPI also adds the Ki-67 proliferative index if available. The median OS for the low-risk group was not reached (5-year OS of 60%). The median OS for the intermediate risk group was 51 months and 29 months for the high risk group. For selected indolent, low MIPI MCL patients, initial observation may be appropriate therapy. For younger patients with intermediate or high risk MIPI MCL, aggressive therapy with a cytotoxic regimen ± autologous stem cell transplantation should be considered. For older MCL patients with intermediate or high risk MIPI, combination chemotherapy with R-CHOP, R-Bendamustine, or a clinical trial should be considered. In addition, rituximab maintenance therapy may prolong the progression-free survival. At the time of relapse, agents directed at activated pathways in MCL cells such as bortezomib (NFkB inhibitor), lenalidamide (anti-angiogenesis) and Ibruitinib (Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase [BTK] inhibitor) have demonstrated excellent clinical activity in MCL patients. Autologous or allogeneic stem cell

  17. Mantle cell lymphoma: 2013 Update on diagnosis, risk-stratification, and clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vose, Julie M

    2013-12-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a non-Hodgkin lymphoma characterized by involvement of the lymph nodes, spleen, blood, and bone marrow with a short remission duration to standard therapies and a median overall survival of 4-5 years. Diagnosis is based on lymph node, bone marrow, or tissue morphology of centrocytic lymphocytes, small cell type, or blastoid variant cells. A chromosomal translocation t(11:14) is the molecular hallmark of MCL, resulting in the overexpression of cyclin D1. Cyclin D1 is detected by immunohistochemistry in 98% of cases. The absence of SOX-11 or a low Ki-67 may correlate with a more indolent form of MCL. The differential diagnosis of MCL includes small lymphocytic lymphoma, marginal zone lymphoma, and follicular lymphoma. The Mantle Cell Lymphoma International Prognostic Index (MIPI) is the prognostic model most often used and incorporates ECOG performance status, age, leukocyte count, and lactic dehydrogenase. A modification of the MIPI also adds the Ki-67 proliferative index if available. The median overall survival (OS) for the low risk group was not reached (5-year OS of 60%). The median OS for the intermediate risk group was 51 months and 29 months for the high risk group. For selected indolent, low MIPI MCL patients, initial observation may be appropriate therapy. For younger patients with intermediate or high risk MIPI MCL, aggressive therapy with a cytarabine containing regimen ± autologous stem cell transplantation should be considered. For older MCL patients with intermediate or high risk MIPI, combination chemotherapy with R-CHOP, R-Bendamustine, or a clinical trial should be considered. At the time of relapse, agents directed at activated pathways in MCL cells such as bortezomib (NFkB inhibitor) or lenalidamide (anti-angiogenesis) are approved agents. Clinical trials with Ibruitinib (Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase inhibitor) or Idelalisib (PI3K inhibitor) have demonstrated excellent clinical activity in MCL patients. Autologous or

  18. Clinical Options in Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma: An Updated Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Fedele

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hodgkin lymphoma (HL is a potentially curable lymphoma, and modern therapy is expected to successfully cure more than 80% of the patients. Second-line salvage high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (auto-SCT have an established role in the management of refractory and relapsed HL, leading to long-lasting responses in approximately 50% of relapsed patients and a minority of refractory patients. Patients progressing after intensive treatments, such as auto-SCT, have a very poor outcome. Allogeneic SCT represents the only strategy with a curative potential for these patients; however, its role is controversial. Based on recent knowledge of HL pathology, biology, and immunology, antibody-drug conjugates targeting CD30, small molecule inhibitors of cell signaling, and antibodies that inhibit immune checkpoints are currently explored. This review will discuss the clinical results regarding auto-SCT and allo-SCT as well as the current role of emerging new treatment strategies.

  19. An Update on Hidradenitis Suppurativa (Part I): Epidemiology, Clinical Aspects, and Definition of Disease Severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martorell, A; García-Martínez, F J; Jiménez-Gallo, D; Pascual, J C; Pereyra-Rodriguez, J; Salgado, L; Vilarrasa, E

    2015-11-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa is a chronic inflammatory disorder that has attracted increasing attention in recent years due to underestimations of prevalence and the considerable impact of the condition on interpersonal relationships, physical appearance, self-esteem, and body image. Although hidradenitis suppurative has a significant psychological impact on patients and can even cause physical limitations when thick scarring results in limb mobility limitation, until very recently little evidence was available relating to its epidemiology, etiology, or pathogenesis. In this review, we highlight the latest advances in our understanding of the epidemiological and clinical aspects of hidradenitis suppurativa. We will also look at the different classification systems for hidradenitis suppurativa and discuss the emergence of skin ultrasound as a promising technique for monitoring the course of this chronic inflammatory disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  20. Left Ventricular Hypertrophy: Major Risk Factor in Patients with Hypertension: Update and Practical Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard E. Katholi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Left ventricular hypertrophy is a maladaptive response to chronic pressure overload and an important risk factor for atrial fibrillation, diastolic heart failure, systolic heart failure, and sudden death in patients with hypertension. Since not all patients with hypertension develop left ventricular hypertrophy, there are clinical findings that should be kept in mind that may alert the physician to the presence of left ventricular hypertrophy so a more definitive evaluation can be performed using an echocardiogram or cardiovascular magnetic resonance. Controlling arterial pressure, sodium restriction, and weight loss independently facilitate the regression of left ventricular hypertrophy. Choice of antihypertensive agents may be important when treating a patient with hypertensive left ventricular hypertrophy. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers followed by calcium channel antagonists most rapidly facilitate the regression of left ventricular hypertrophy. With the regression of left ventricular hypertrophy, diastolic function and coronary flow reserve usually improve, and cardiovascular risk decreases.

  1. Feline bacterial urinary tract infections: An update on an evolving clinical problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litster, Annette; Thompson, Mary; Moss, Susan; Trott, Darren

    2011-01-01

    Although feline urine is increasingly submitted for bacterial culture and susceptibility testing as part of a more general diagnostic work-up for a range of presentations in veterinary practice, bacterial urinary tract infections (UTIs) are relatively uncommon due to a variety of physical and immunological barriers to infection. Culture positive urine is most often obtained from older female cats and the clinical history may include hematuria, dysuria and pollakiuria, or the infection may be occult. Urinalysis usually reveals hematuria and pyuria, and Escherichia coli and Gram-positive cocci are cultured most frequently. Most feline UTIs can be successfully treated using oral amoxicillin or amoxicillin/clavulanic acid administered for at least 14days, but the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance amongst infecting bacterial species is a growing concern. There is currently no conclusive information on the safety and efficacy of alternative therapeutic agents for the treatment of feline UTIs. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. An Updated Review on the Phytochemistry, Pharmacology, and Clinical Trials ofSalacia oblonga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushwaha, Priya Singh; Singh, Ashok K; Keshari, Amit K; Maity, Siddhartha; Saha, Sudipta

    2016-01-01

    Salacia oblonga ( S. oblonga ), a perennial herb, has been used for thousands of years in ayurvedic medicine and is closely associated with prevention, treatment, and cure of various human ailments such as obesity and diabetes. A vast and wide range of chemical compounds such as polyphenols, friedelane-type triterpenes, norfriedelane-type triterpenes, eudesmane-type sesquiterpenes including various glycosides had been isolated from this plant. This review is aimed to survey the literature covering the phytochemistry and pharmacology of S. oblonga and to review the scientific data including active components and their multi-targeted mechanisms of action against various metabolic syndromes. We also included clinical trials related to this plant in this review. The overview would assist researchers to gather scientific information related to S. oblonga in future.

  3. Mantle cell lymphoma: 2012 update on diagnosis, risk-stratification, and clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vose, Julie M

    2012-06-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a non-Hodgkin lymphoma characterized by involvement of the lymph nodes, spleen, blood, and bone marrow with a short remission duration to standard therapies and a median overall survival of 4-5 years. Diagnosis is based on lymph node, bone marrow, or tissue morphology of centrocytic lymphocytes, small cell type, or blastoid variant cells. A chromosomal translocation t(11:14) is the molecular hallmark of MCL, resulting in the overexpression of cyclin D1. Cyclin D1 is detected by immunohistochemistry in 98% of cases. The absence of SOX-11 or a low Ki-67 may correlate with a more indolent form of MCL. The differential diagnosis of MCL includes small lymphocytic lymphoma, marginal zone lymphoma, and follicular lymphoma. The mantle cell lymphoma international prognostic index (MIPI) is the prognostic model most often used and incorporates ECOG performance status, age, leukocyte count, and lactic dehydrogenase. A modification of the MIPI also adds the Ki-67 proliferative index if available. The median overall survival (OS) for the low-risk group was not reached (5-year OS of 60%). The median OS for the intermediate risk group was 51 and 29 months for the high-risk group. For selected indolent, low MIPI MCL patients, initial observation may be appropriate therapy. For younger patients with intermediate or high risk MIPI MCL, aggressive therapy with a cytarabine containing regimen ± autologous stem cell transplantation should be considered. For older MCL patients with intermediate or high risk MIPI, combination chemotherapy with R-CHOP, R-Bendamustine, or a clinical trial should be considered. At the time of relapse, agents directed at activated pathways in MCL cells such as bortezomib (NFkB inhibitor), BTK inhibitors or CAL-101 (B-cell receptor inhibitors) or lenalidamide (antiangiogenesis) have clinical activity in MCL patients. Autologous or allogeneic stem cell transplantation can also be considered in young patients. Copyright © 2012

  4. Optical diagnostics based on elastic scattering: An update of clinical demonstrations with the Optical Biopsy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigio, I.J.; Boyer, J.; Johnson, T.M.; Lacey, J.; Mourant, J.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Conn, R. [Lovelace Medical Center, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bohorfoush, A. [Wisconsin Medical School, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    1994-10-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory has continued the development of the Optical Biopsy System (OBS) for noninvasive, real-time in situ diagnosis of tissue pathologies. Our clinical studies have expanded since the last Biomedical Optics Europe conference (Budapest, September 1993), and we report here on the latest results of clinical tests in gastrointestinal tract. The OBS invokes a unique approach to optical diagnosis of tissue pathologies based on the elastic scattering properties, over a wide range of wavelengths, of the tissue. The use of elastic scattering as the key to optical tissue diagnostics in the OBS is based on the fact that many tissue pathologies, including a majority of cancer forms, manifest significant architectural changes at the cellular and sub-cellular level. Since the cellular components that cause elastic scattering have dimensions typically on the order of visible to near-IR wavelengths, the elastic (Mie) scattering properties will be wavelength dependent. Thus, morphology and size changes can be expected to cause significant changes in an optical signature that is derived from the wavelength-dependence of elastic scattering. The OBS employs a small fiberoptic probe that is amenable to use with any endoscope or catheter, or to direct surface examination. The probe is designed to be used in optical contact with the tissue under examination and has separate illuminating and collecting fibers. Thus, the light that is collected and transmitted to the analyzing spectrometer must first scatter through a small volume of the tissue before entering the collection fiber(s). Consequently, the system is also sensitive to the optical absorption spectrum of the tissue, over an effective operating range of <300 to 950 nm, and such absorption adds valuable complexity to the scattering spectral signature.

  5. Treatment of diverticular disease: an update on latest evidence and clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilia Carabotti

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diverticular disease (DD is a common condition, especially in Western countries. In about 80% of patients, colonic diverticula remain asymptomatic (diverticulosis, while approximately 20% of patients may develop abdominal symptoms (symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease, SUDD and, eventually complications as acute diverticulitis (AD. The management of this condition has been improved, and in the last five years European countries and the USA have published guidelines and recommendations. Scope: To summarize the latest evidence and clinical implication in treatment of DD focusing the attention either on the treatment of diverticulosis, SUDD and AD together with the primary and secondary prevention of diverticulitis. Findings: The present review was based on the latest evidence in the treatment of DD in the last 10 years. In the last 5 years, six countries issued guidelines on DD with differences regarding covered topics and recommendations regarding treatments. At present there is a lack of rationale for drug use in patients with asymptomatic diverticulosis, but there are limited indications to suggest an increase in dietary fibre to reduce risk of DD. To achieve symptomatic relief in SUDD patients, several therapeutic strategies with fibre, probiotics, rifaximin and mesalazine have been proposed even if a standard therapeutic approach remained to be defined. Agreement has been reached for the management of AD, since recent guidelines showed that antibiotics can be used selectively, rather than routinely in uncomplicated AD, although use of antibiotics remained crucial in the management of complicated cases. With regard to treatment for the primary and secondary prevention of AD, the efficacy of rifaximin and mesalazine has been proposed although with discordant recommendations among guidelines. Conclusion: Treatment of DD represented an important challenge in clinical practice, especially concerning management of SUDD and the

  6. Treatment of diverticular disease: an update on latest evidence and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabotti, Marilia; Annibale, Bruno

    2018-01-01

    Diverticular disease (DD) is a common condition, especially in Western countries. In about 80% of patients, colonic diverticula remain asymptomatic (diverticulosis), while approximately 20% of patients may develop abdominal symptoms (symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease, SUDD) and, eventually complications as acute diverticulitis (AD). The management of this condition has been improved, and in the last five years European countries and the USA have published guidelines and recommendations. To summarize the latest evidence and clinical implication in treatment of DD focusing the attention either on the treatment of diverticulosis, SUDD and AD together with the primary and secondary prevention of diverticulitis. The present review was based on the latest evidence in the treatment of DD in the last 10 years. In the last 5 years, six countries issued guidelines on DD with differences regarding covered topics and recommendations regarding treatments. At present there is a lack of rationale for drug use in patients with asymptomatic diverticulosis, but there are limited indications to suggest an increase in dietary fibre to reduce risk of DD. To achieve symptomatic relief in SUDD patients, several therapeutic strategies with fibre, probiotics, rifaximin and mesalazine have been proposed even if a standard therapeutic approach remained to be defined. Agreement has been reached for the management of AD, since recent guidelines showed that antibiotics can be used selectively, rather than routinely in uncomplicated AD, although use of antibiotics remained crucial in the management of complicated cases. With regard to treatment for the primary and secondary prevention of AD, the efficacy of rifaximin and mesalazine has been proposed although with discordant recommendations among guidelines. Treatment of DD represented an important challenge in clinical practice, especially concerning management of SUDD and the primary and secondary prevention of AD.

  7. An update on the clinical trial of BNCT at the BMRR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, R.; Capala, J.; Chanana, A.D.; Coderre, J.A.; Diaz, A.Z.

    1999-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was proposed more than six decades ago. It is a binary treatment modality that requires selective delivery of a 10 B-labeled compound to a tumor and slow neutron irradiation of the tumor-bearing tissues. In order to improve the penetration of the neutron beam, an epithermal neutron beam was developed at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). This epithermal neutron beam can deliver relatively high thermal neutron fluence at depth without severe skin damage. Boronophenylalanine-fructose (BPA-F), a nontoxic boron carrier, was found to preferentially accumulate in tumor cells following intravenous infusion in patients with GBM. In preclinical BNCT studies in rats bearing 9L gliosarcoma, BPA-mediated BNCT was shown to be more efficacious than photon irradiation. In 1994, improvements in the neutron beam and in the understanding of the radiobiology of BPA-mediated BNCT led to the initiation of BNCT trials for human GBM at BMRR using BPA-F and epithermal neutrons. The primary objective of the phase I/II clinical trial of BPA-mediated BNCT at BMRR is to evaluate the safety of the BPA-F-mediated BNCT using epithermal neutrons in patients with GBM at a series of escalating BNCT doses. An incidental objective is to evaluate the therapeutic effectiveness of BNCT at each dose level. For each dose escalation group, the average brain dose (ABD) is escalated, as well as the minimum tumor dose. In summary, the BNCT procedure employed in the phase I/II clinical trial of BPA-F-mediated BNCT for GBM at BNL was found to be safe in all patients. The palliation afforded by a single session of BNCT compares favorably with palliation provided by fractionated photon therapy and adjuvant chemotherapy. If no evidence of radiation-induced brain toxicity is found in the current protocol, BNCT radiation dose will be further escalated

  8. Neuropathic pain: an updated grading system for research and clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnerup, Nanna B.; Haroutounian, Simon; Kamerman, Peter; Baron, Ralf; Bennett, David L.H.; Bouhassira, Didier; Cruccu, Giorgio; Freeman, Roy; Hansson, Per; Nurmikko, Turo; Raja, Srinivasa N.; Rice, Andrew S.C.; Serra, Jordi; Smith, Blair H.; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Jensen, Troels S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The redefinition of neuropathic pain as “pain arising as a direct consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system,” which was suggested by the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) Special Interest Group on Neuropathic Pain (NeuPSIG) in 2008, has been widely accepted. In contrast, the proposed grading system of possible, probable, and definite neuropathic pain from 2008 has been used to a lesser extent. Here, we report a citation analysis of the original NeuPSIG grading paper of 2008, followed by an analysis of its use by an expert panel and recommendations for an improved grading system. As of February, 2015, 608 eligible articles in Scopus cited the paper, 414 of which cited the neuropathic pain definition. Of 220 clinical studies citing the paper, 56 had used the grading system. The percentage using the grading system increased from 5% in 2009 to 30% in 2014. Obstacles to a wider use of the grading system were identified, including (1) questions about the relative significance of confirmatory tests, (2) the role of screening tools, and (3) uncertainties about what is considered a neuroanatomically plausible pain distribution. Here, we present a revised grading system with an adjusted order, better reflecting clinical practice, improvements in the specifications, and a word of caution that even the “definite” level of neuropathic pain does not always indicate causality. In addition, we add a table illustrating the area of pain and sensory abnormalities in common neuropathic pain conditions and propose areas for further research. PMID:27115670

  9. GM1 gangliosidosis and Morquio B disease: an update on genetic alterations and clinical findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caciotti, Anna; Garman, Scott C; Rivera-Colón, Yadilette; Procopio, Elena; Catarzi, Serena; Ferri, Lorenzo; Guido, Carmen; Martelli, Paola; Parini, Rossella; Antuzzi, Daniela; Battini, Roberta; Sibilio, Michela; Simonati, Alessandro; Fontana, Elena; Salviati, Alessandro; Akinci, Gulcin; Cereda, Cristina; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Deodato, Francesca; d'Amico, Adele; d'Azzo, Alessandra; Bertini, Enrico; Filocamo, Mirella; Scarpa, Maurizio; di Rocco, Maja; Tifft, Cynthia J; Ciani, Federica; Gasperini, Serena; Pasquini, Elisabetta; Guerrini, Renzo; Donati, Maria Alice; Morrone, Amelia

    2011-07-01

    GM1 gangliosidosis and Morquio B syndrome, both arising from beta-galactosidase (GLB1) deficiency, are very rare lysosomal storage diseases with an incidence of about 1:100,000-1:200,000 live births worldwide. Here we report the beta-galactosidase gene (GLB1) mutation analysis of 21 unrelated GM1 gangliosidosis patients, and of 4 Morquio B patients, of whom two are brothers. Clinical features of the patients were collected and compared with those in literature. In silico analyses were performed by standard alignments tools and by an improved version of GLB1 three-dimensional models. The analysed cohort includes remarkable cases. One patient with GM1 gangliosidosis had a triple X syndrome. One patient with juvenile GM1 gangliosidosis was homozygous for a mutation previously identified in Morquio type B. A patient with infantile GM1 gangliosidosis carried a complex GLB1 allele harbouring two genetic variants leading to p.R68W and p.R109W amino acid changes, in trans with the known p.R148C mutation. Molecular analysis showed 27 mutations, 9 of which are new: 5 missense, 3 microdeletions and a nonsense mutation. We also identified four new genetic variants with a predicted polymorphic nature that was further investigated by in silico analyses. Three-dimensional structural analysis of GLB1 homology models including the new missense mutations and the p.R68W and p.R109W amino acid changes showed that all the amino acid replacements affected the resulting protein structures in different ways, from changes in polarity to folding alterations. Genetic and clinical associations led us to undertake a critical review of the classifications of late-onset GM1 gangliosidosis and Morquio B disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Transcatheter embolization therapy in liver cancer: an update of clinical evidences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wáng, Yì-Xiáng J; De Baere, Thierry; Idée, Jean-Marc; Ballet, Sébastien

    2015-04-01

    Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) is a form of intra-arterial catheter-based chemotherapy that selectively delivers high doses of cytotoxic drug to the tumor bed combining with the effect of ischemic necrosis induced by arterial embolization. Chemoembolization and radioembolization are at the core of the treatment of liver hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients who cannot receive potentially curative therapies such as transplantation, resection or percutaneous ablation. TACE for liver cancer has been proven to be useful in local tumor control, to prevent tumor progression, prolong patients' life and control patient symptoms. Recent evidence showed in patients with single-nodule HCC of 3 cm or smaller without vascular invasion, the 5-year overall survival (OS) with TACE was similar to that with hepatic resection and radiofrequency ablation. Although being used for decades, Lipiodol(®) (Lipiodol(®) Ultra Fluid(®), Guerbet, France) remains important as a tumor-seeking and radio-opaque drug delivery vector in interventional oncology. There have been efforts to improve the delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to tumors. Drug-eluting bead (DEB) is a relatively novel drug delivery embolization system which allows for fixed dosing and the ability to release the anticancer agents in a sustained manner. Three DEBs are available, i.e., Tandem(®) (CeloNova Biosciences Inc., USA), DC-Beads(®) (BTG, UK) and HepaSphere(®) (BioSphere Medical, Inc., USA). Transarterial radioembolization (TARE) technique has been developed, and proven to be efficient and safe in advanced liver cancers and those with vascular complications. Two types of radioembolization microspheres are available i.e., SIR-Spheres(®) (Sirtex Medical Limited, Australia) and TheraSphere(®) (BTG, UK). This review describes the basic procedure of TACE, properties and efficacy of some chemoembolization systems and radioembolization agents which are commercially available and/or currently under clinical

  11. Clinical Practice Guideline for the Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Snoring with Oral Appliance Therapy: An Update for 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramar, Kannan; Dort, Leslie C.; Katz, Sheri G.; Lettieri, Christopher J.; Harrod, Christopher G.; Thomas, Sherene M.; Chervin, Ronald D.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Since the previous parameter and review paper publication on oral appliances (OAs) in 2006, the relevant scientific literature has grown considerably, particularly in relation to clinical outcomes. The purpose of this new guideline is to replace the previous and update recommendations for the use of OAs in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and snoring. Methods: The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) and American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine (AADSM) commissioned a seven-member task force. A systematic review of the literature was performed and a modified Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) process was used to assess the quality of evidence. The task force developed recommendations and assigned strengths based on the quality of the evidence counterbalanced by an assessment of the relative benefit of the treatment versus the potential harms. The AASM and AADSM Board of Directors approved the final guideline recommendations. Recommendations: We recommend that sleep physicians prescribe oral appliances, rather than no therapy, for adult patients who request treatment of primary snoring (without obstructive sleep apnea). (STANDARD) When oral appliance therapy is prescribed by a sleep physician for an adult patient with obstructive sleep apnea, we suggest that a qualified dentist use a custom, titratable appliance over non-custom oral devices. (GUIDELINE) We recommend that sleep physicians consider prescription of oral appliances, rather than no treatment, for adult patients with obstructive sleep apnea who are intolerant of CPAP therapy or prefer alternate therapy. (STANDARD) We suggest that qualified dentists provide oversight— rather than no follow-up—of oral appliance therapy in adult patients with obstructive sleep apnea, to survey for dental-related side effects or occlusal changes and reduce their incidence. (GUIDELINE) We suggest that sleep physicians conduct follow-up sleep testing

  12. Role of Bone-Modifying Agents in Metastatic Breast Cancer: An American Society of Clinical Oncology-Cancer Care Ontario Focused Guideline Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Poznak, Catherine; Somerfield, Mark R; Barlow, William E; Biermann, J Sybil; Bosserman, Linda D; Clemons, Mark J; Dhesy-Thind, Sukhbinder K; Dillmon, Melissa S; Eisen, Andrea; Frank, Elizabeth S; Jagsi, Reshma; Jimenez, Rachel; Theriault, Richard L; Vandenberg, Theodore A; Yee, Gary C; Moy, Beverly

    2017-12-10

    Purpose To update, in collaboration with Cancer Care Ontario (CCO), key recommendations of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) guideline on the role of bone-modifying agents (BMAs) in metastatic breast cancer. This focused update addressed the new data on intervals between dosing and the role of BMAs in control of bone pain. Methods A joint ASCO-CCO Update Committee conducted targeted systematic literature reviews to identify relevant studies. Results The Update Committee reviewed three phase III noninferiority trials of dosing intervals, one systematic review and meta-analysis of studies of de-escalation of BMAs, and two randomized trials of BMAs in control of pain secondary to bone metastases. Recommendations Patients with breast cancer who have evidence of bone metastases should be treated with BMAs. Options include denosumab, 120 mg subcutaneously, every 4 weeks; pamidronate, 90 mg intravenously, every 3 to 4 weeks; or zoledronic acid, 4 mg intravenously every 12 weeks or every 3 to 4 weeks. The analgesic effects of BMAs are modest, and they should not be used alone for bone pain. The Update Committee recommends that the current standard of care for supportive care and pain management-analgesia, adjunct therapies, radiotherapy, surgery, systemic anticancer therapy, and referral to supportive care and pain management-be applied. Evidence is insufficient to support the use of one BMA over another. Additional information is available at www.asco.org/breast-cancer-guidelines and www.asco.org/guidelineswiki .

  13. Soy and Health Update: Evaluation of the Clinical and Epidemiologic Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Messina

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Soyfoods have long been recognized as sources of high-quality protein and healthful fat, but over the past 25 years these foods have been rigorously investigated for their role in chronic disease prevention and treatment. There is evidence, for example, that they reduce risk of coronary heart disease and breast and prostate cancer. In addition, soy alleviates hot flashes and may favorably affect renal function, alleviate depressive symptoms and improve skin health. Much of the focus on soyfoods is because they are uniquely-rich sources of isoflavones. Isoflavones are classified as both phytoestrogens and selective estrogen receptor modulators. Despite the many proposed benefits, the presence of isoflavones has led to concerns that soy may exert untoward effects in some individuals. However, these concerns are based primarily on animal studies, whereas the human research supports the safety and benefits of soyfoods. In support of safety is the recent conclusion of the European Food Safety Authority that isoflavones do not adversely affect the breast, thyroid or uterus of postmenopausal women. This review covers each of the major research areas involving soy focusing primarily on the clinical and epidemiologic research. Background information on Asian soy intake, isoflavones, and nutrient content is also provided.

  14. Soy and Health Update: Evaluation of the Clinical and Epidemiologic Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Mark

    2016-11-24

    Soyfoods have long been recognized as sources of high-quality protein and healthful fat, but over the past 25 years these foods have been rigorously investigated for their role in chronic disease prevention and treatment. There is evidence, for example, that they reduce risk of coronary heart disease and breast and prostate cancer. In addition, soy alleviates hot flashes and may favorably affect renal function, alleviate depressive symptoms and improve skin health. Much of the focus on soyfoods is because they are uniquely-rich sources of isoflavones. Isoflavones are classified as both phytoestrogens and selective estrogen receptor modulators. Despite the many proposed benefits, the presence of isoflavones has led to concerns that soy may exert untoward effects in some individuals. However, these concerns are based primarily on animal studies, whereas the human research supports the safety and benefits of soyfoods. In support of safety is the recent conclusion of the European Food Safety Authority that isoflavones do not adversely affect the breast, thyroid or uterus of postmenopausal women. This review covers each of the major research areas involving soy focusing primarily on the clinical and epidemiologic research. Background information on Asian soy intake, isoflavones, and nutrient content is also provided.

  15. Heart regeneration for clinical application update 2016: from induced pluripotent stem cells to direct cardiac reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains a major cause of death for which current therapeutic regimens are limited. Following myocardial injury, endogenous cardiac fibroblasts, which account for more than half of the cells in the heart, proliferate and synthesize extracellular matrix, leading to fibrosis and heart failure. As terminally differentiated cardiomyocytes have little regenerative capacity following injury, the development of cardiac regenerative therapy is highly desired. Embryonic stem and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are promising tools for regenerative medicine. However, these stem cells demonstrate variable cardiac differentiation efficiency and tumorigenicity, which must be resolved prior to clinical regenerative applications. Until the last decade, an established theory was that cardiomyocytes could only be produced from fibroblasts through iPS cell generation. In 2010, we first reported cardiac differentiation from fibroblasts by direct reprogramming, and we demonstrated that various cardiac reprogramming pathways exist. This review summarizes the latest trends in stem cell and regenerative research regarding iPS cells, a partial reprogramming strategy, and direct cardiac reprogramming. We also examine the many recent advances in direct cardiac reprogramming and explore the suitable utilization of these methods for regenerative medicine in the cardiovascular field.

  16. Clinical efficacy issues in the treatment of multiple sclerosis: update of natalizumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Patti

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Francesco Patti, Angelo PappalardoMultiple Sclerosis Center, University of Catania, Catania, Italy; Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Unit, Hospital of Acireale, Catania, ItalyAbstract: Multiple sclerosis is a frequent neurologic disease, which causes sensory impairment, fatigue, cognitive deficits, imbalance, loss of mobility, spasticity, and bladder and bowel dysfunction. Several new therapies have been introduced in the past decade, but additional drugs are needed to slow disease progression and reduce disability. Natalizumab (NA is an α4 integrin antagonist, effective in decreasing the development of brain lesions in experimental models and in several studies of patients with MS. Six randomized controlled trials of NA in MS have been published in the last 10 years. Overall, 2,688 relapsing-remitting MS subjects have been enrolled in these studies. Hence, there are already sufficient data to draw some conclusions about the effectiveness of NA in the treatment of MS, although for definitive considerations it would be reasonable to wait for the observational phase IV studies of clinical practice to complete. Moreover, the medical community is concerned with the safety of NA, particularly with the risk of developing progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy while on NA therapy. From the analyses of the six cases, it seems that the overall risk is around 1/1,000 and could increase with the number of NA infusions.Keywords: multiple sclerosis, disease-modifying drugs, natalizumab, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy

  17. Soy and Health Update: Evaluation of the Clinical and Epidemiologic Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Soyfoods have long been recognized as sources of high-quality protein and healthful fat, but over the past 25 years these foods have been rigorously investigated for their role in chronic disease prevention and treatment. There is evidence, for example, that they reduce risk of coronary heart disease and breast and prostate cancer. In addition, soy alleviates hot flashes and may favorably affect renal function, alleviate depressive symptoms and improve skin health. Much of the focus on soyfoods is because they are uniquely-rich sources of isoflavones. Isoflavones are classified as both phytoestrogens and selective estrogen receptor modulators. Despite the many proposed benefits, the presence of isoflavones has led to concerns that soy may exert untoward effects in some individuals. However, these concerns are based primarily on animal studies, whereas the human research supports the safety and benefits of soyfoods. In support of safety is the recent conclusion of the European Food Safety Authority that isoflavones do not adversely affect the breast, thyroid or uterus of postmenopausal women. This review covers each of the major research areas involving soy focusing primarily on the clinical and epidemiologic research. Background information on Asian soy intake, isoflavones, and nutrient content is also provided. PMID:27886135

  18. Clinical Update on Dengue, Chikungunya, and Zika: What We Know at the Time of Article Submission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liang E; Dehning, Meaghan; Phipps, Ashley; Swienton, Ray E; Harris, Curtis A; Klein, Kelly R

    2017-06-01

    Mosquito-borne diseases pose a threat to individual health and population health on both a local and a global level. The threat is even more exaggerated during disasters, whether manmade or environmental. With the recent Zika virus outbreak, it is important to highlight other infections that can mimic the Zika virus and to better understand what can be done as public health officials and health care providers. This article reviews the recent literature on the Zika virus as well as chikungunya virus and dengue virus. The present findings give a better understanding of the similarities and differences between the 3 infections in terms of their characteristics, clinical presentation, diagnosis methodology, and treatment and what can be done for prevention. Additionally, the article highlights a special population that has received much focus in the latest outbreak, the pregnant individual. Education and training are instrumental in controlling the outbreak, and early detection can be lifesaving. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2017;11:290-299).

  19. Clinical uses of GM-CSF, a critical appraisal and update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Arellano

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Martha Arellano, Sagar LonialEmory University, Winship Cancer Institute, Atlanta, GA, USAAbstract: The role of granulocyte-macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF in the supportive care of cancer patients has been evaluated with promising results. More recently, GM-CSF has been added to regimens for the mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. An expanding role for GM-CSF in regulating immune responses has been recognized based upon its activity on the development and maturation of antigen presenting cells and its capability for skewing the immune system toward Th1-type responses. GM-CSF has been shown to preferentially enhance both the numbers and activity of type 1 dendritic cells (DC1, the subsets of dendritic cells responsible for initiating cytotoxic immune responses. The increase in DC1 content and activity following local and systemic GM-CSF administration support a role for GM-CSF as an immune stimulant and vaccine adjuvant in cancer patients. GM-CSF has shown clinical activity as an immune stimulant in tumor cell and dendritic cell vaccines, and may increase antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. The successful use of myeloid acting cytokines to enhance anti-tumor responses will likely require the utilization of GM-CSF in combination with cytotoxic or other targeted therapies.Keywords: GM-CSF, G-CSF, cancer, hematopoietic cytokines

  20. Clinical update on linezolid in the treatment of Gram-positive bacterial infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ager S

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Sally Ager, Kate GouldDepartment of Microbiology, Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals Trust, Freeman Hospital, High Heaton, Newcastle upon Tyne, UKAbstract: Gram-positive pathogens are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in both community and health care settings. Glycopeptides have traditionally been the antibiotics of choice for multiresistant Gram-positive pathogens but there are problems with their use, including the emergence of glycopeptide-resistant strains, tissue penetration, and achieving and monitoring adequate serum levels. Newer antibiotics such as linezolid, a synthetic oxazolidinone, are available for the treatment of resistant Gram-positive bacteria. Linezolid is active against a wide range of Gram-positive bacteria and has been generally available for the treatment of Gram-positive infections since 2000. There are potential problems with linezolid use, including its bacteriostatic action and the relatively high incidence of reported adverse effects, particularly with long-term use. Long-term use may also be complicated by the development of resistance. However, linezolid has been shown to be clinically useful in the treatment of several serious infections where traditionally bacteriocidal agents have been required and many of its adverse effects are reversible on cessation. It has also been shown to be a cost-effective treatment option in several studies, with its high oral bioavailability allowing an early change from intravenous to oral formulations with consequent earlier patient discharge and lower inpatient costs.Keywords: linezolid, oxazolidinone, multi-resistant, gram-positive, MRSA, VRE, cost-benefit

  1. Controversy clarified: an updated review of clinical psychology and tele-health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perle, Jonathan G; Langsam, Leah C; Nierenberg, Barry

    2011-12-01

    One of the most controversial topics in the field of clinical psychology, online tele-health, or the integration of computers and the internet with therapeutic techniques, remains at the forefront of many debates. Despite potential interest, there are numerous factors that a psychologist must consider before integrating an online tele-health intervention into their own practice. This article outlines literature pertinent to the debate. The article begins with a brief history of the use of non-face-to-face interventions as well as the earliest recorded use of "tele-health" before discussing the modern benefits and risks associated with usage. Considerations for the psychologist as well as the client are detailed; incorporating ethical implications. The authors conclude that the utilization of tele-health interventions is an exponentially expanding field that should continue to be explored. Despite many well-conceived studies, a psychologist should educate themselves in all aspects of the new modes of intervention (e.g., ethical, legal, evidence-based treatments) before attempting to implement them into everyday practice. The article ends with a discussion on the acceptance among psychologists, as well as the outlook for the future. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [Definition, classification, clinical diagnosis and prognosis of fibromyalgia syndrome : Updated guidelines 2017 and overview of systematic review articles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eich, W; Bär, K-J; Bernateck, M; Burgmer, M; Dexl, C; Petzke, F; Sommer, C; Winkelmann, A; Häuser, W

    2017-06-01

    The regular update of the guidelines on fibromyalgia syndrome, AWMF number 145/004, was scheduled for April 2017. The guidelines were developed by 13 scientific societies and 2 patient self-help organizations coordinated by the German Pain Society. Working groups (n =8) with a total of 42 members were formed balanced with respect to gender, medical expertise, position in the medical or scientific hierarchy and potential conflicts of interest. A systematic search of the literature from December 2010 to May 2016 was performed in the Cochrane library, MEDLINE, PsycINFO and Scopus databases. Levels of evidence were assigned according to the classification system of the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine version 2009. The strength of recommendations was achieved by multiple step formalized procedures to reach a consensus. The guidelines were reviewed and approved by the board of directors of the societies engaged in the development of the guidelines. The clinical diagnosis of fibromyalgia syndrome can be established by the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 1990 classification criteria (with examination of tender points) or without the examination of tender points by the modified preliminary diagnostic ACR 2010 or 2011 criteria.

  3. Update on the clinical utility of once-daily tacrolimus in the management of transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revollo J

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Jane Revollo Department of Pharmacy, Jackson Memorial Hospital, University of Miami Leonard M Miller School of Medicine Miami, FL, USAThe review by Posadas Salas and Srinivas of the clinical utility of once-daily tacrolimus formulations in the management of transplant patients1 was timely and relevant. It is worth noting, however, the data were presented in a way that overlooked several key differences between two distinct once-daily tacrolimus formulations. These formulations differ in bioavailability, Cmax, Tmax, dose required to achieve target trough levels, and time to reach target trough. The specific formulation and dosing information of one product was detailed in this review (described as modified release 4 [MR-4]; Astagraf®, Astellas Pharma Inc., Tokyo, Japan, but no formulation or dosing details were provided for a very different once-daily tacrolimus formulation (LCP-Tacro™; Veloxis Pharmaceuticals A/S, Hørsholm, Denmark for which a thorough review was recently published.2 The latter product is currently approved in Europe and under review by the US Food and Drug Administration in the US. In presenting data in this review, the authors did not identify which product was investigated in each of the studies discussed. This could easily lead to misinterpretation of results or erroneous conclusions, ie, that both once-daily formulations are the same. In fact, a careful parsing of the data clearly demonstrates that they are not equivalent. Misunderstanding of this point could have a potentially serious impact on appropriate dosing, safety, and patient management in the post-transplant setting. Differentiation between the two products is needed to clarify what appear to be conflicting results of the studies presented in this review.View original paper by Posadas Salas and Srinivas

  4. [Li-Fraumeni syndrome: update, new data and guidelines for clinical management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frebourg, T; Abel, A; Bonaiti-Pellie, C; Brugières, L; Berthet, P; Bressac-de Paillerets, B; Chevrier, A; Chompret, A; Cohen-Haguenauer, O; Delattre, O; Feingold, J; Feunteun, J; Frappaz, D; Fricker, J P; Gesta, P; Jonveaux, P; Kalifa, C; Lasset, C; Leheup, B; Limacher, J M; Longy, M; Nogues, C; Oppenheim, D; Sommelet, D; Soubrier, F; Stoll, C; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D; Tristant, H

    2001-06-01

    The Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is an inherited form of cancer, affecting children and young adults, and characterized by a wide spectrum of tumors, including soft-tissue and bone sarcomas, brain tumours, adenocortical tumours and premenopausal breast cancers. In most of the families, LFS results from germline mutations of the tumor suppressor TP53 gene encoding a transcriptional factor able to regulate cell cycle and apoptosis when DNA damage occurs. Recently, germline mutations of hCHK2 encoding a kinase, regulating cell cycle via Cdc25C and TP53, were identified in affected families. The LFS working group recommendations are the following: (i) positive testing (screening for a germline TP53 mutation in a patient with a tumor) can be offered both to children and adults in the context of genetic counseling associated to psychological support, to confirm the diagnosis of LFS on a molecular basis. This will allow to offer to the patient a regular clinical review in order to avoid a delay to the diagnosis of another tumor; (ii) the 3 indications for positive testing are: a proband with a tumor belonging to the narrow LFS spectrum and developed before age 36 and, at least, first- or second-degree relative with a LFS spectrum tumor, before age 46, or a patient with multiple primary tumors, 2 of which belonging to the narrow LFS spectrum, the first being developed before 36 or a child with an adenocortical tumour; (iii) presymptomatic testing must be restricted to adults; (iv) the young age of onset of the LFS tumors the prognosis of some tumors, the impossibility to ensure an efficient early detection and the risk for mutation carriers to develop multiple primary tumors justify that prenatal diagnosis might be considered in affected families.

  5. Clinical Practice Guideline for the Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Snoring with Oral Appliance Therapy: An Update for 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramar, Kannan; Dort, Leslie C; Katz, Sheri G; Lettieri, Christopher J; Harrod, Christopher G; Thomas, Sherene M; Chervin, Ronald D

    2015-07-15

    Since the previous parameter and review paper publication on oral appliances (OAs) in 2006, the relevant scientific literature has grown considerably, particularly in relation to clinical outcomes. The purpose of this new guideline is to replace the previous and update recommendations for the use of OAs in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and snoring. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) and American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine (AADSM) commissioned a seven-member task force. A systematic review of the literature was performed and a modified Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) process was used to assess the quality of evidence. The task force developed recommendations and assigned strengths based on the quality of the evidence counterbalanced by an assessment of the relative benefit of the treatment versus the potential harms. The AASM and AADSM Board of Directors approved the final guideline recommendations. 1. We recommend that sleep physicians prescribe oral appliances, rather than no therapy, for adult patients who request treatment of primary snoring (without obstructive sleep apnea). (STANDARD) 2. When oral appliance therapy is prescribed by a sleep physician for an adult patient with obstructive sleep apnea, we suggest that a qualified dentist use a custom, titratable appliance over non-custom oral devices. (GUIDELINE) 3. We recommend that sleep physicians consider prescription of oral appliances, rather than no treatment, for adult patients with obstructive sleep apnea who are intolerant of CPAP therapy or prefer alternate therapy. (STANDARD) 4. We suggest that qualified dentists provide oversight—rather than no follow-up—of oral appliance therapy in adult patients with obstructive sleep apnea, to survey for dental-related side effects or occlusal changes and reduce their incidence. (GUIDELINE) 5. We suggest that sleep physicians conduct follow-up sleep testing to improve or confirm

  6. Conflicts of Interest in Clinical Guidelines: Update of U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Policies and Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo-Metzger, Quyen; Moyer, Virginia; Grossman, David; Ebell, Mark; Woo, Meghan; Miller, Therese; Brummer, Tana; Chowdhury, Joya; Kato, Elisabeth; Siu, Albert; Phillips, William; Davidson, Karina; Phipps, Maureen; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten

    2018-01-01

    The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) provides independent, objective, and scientifically rigorous recommendations for clinical preventive services. A primary concern is to avoid even the appearance of members having special interests that might influence their ability to judge evidence and formulate unbiased recommendations. The conflicts of interest policy for the USPSTF is described, as is the formal process by which best practices were incorporated to update the policy. The USPSTF performed a literature review, conducted key informant interviews, and reviewed conflicts of interest policies of ten similar organizations. Important findings included transparency and public accessibility; full disclosure of financial relationships; disclosure of non-financial relationships (that create the potential for bias and compromise a member's objective judgment); disclosure of family members' conflicts of interests; and establishment of appropriate reporting periods. Controversies in best practices include the threshold of financial disclosures, ease of access to conflicts of interest policies and declarations, vague definition of non-financial biases, and request for family members' conflicts of interests (particularly those that are non-financial in nature). The USPSTF conflicts of interest policy includes disclosures for immediate family members, a clear non-financial conflicts of interest definition, long look-back period and application of the policy to prospective members. Conflicts of interest is solicited from all members every 4 months, formally reviewed, adjudicated, and made publicly available. The USPSTF conflicts of interest policy is publicly available as part of the USPSTF Procedure Manual. A continuous improvement process can be applied to conflicts of interest policies to enhance public trust in members of panels, such as the USPSTF, that produce clinical guidelines and recommendations. Copyright © 2018 American Journal of Preventive Medicine

  7. Phospholipase C zeta (PLCζ) and male infertility: Clinical update and topical developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amdani, Siti Nornadhirah; Yeste, Marc; Jones, Celine; Coward, Kevin

    2016-05-01

    The development of a mammalian embryo is initiated by a sequence of molecular events collectively referred to as 'oocyte activation' and regulated by the release of intracellular calcium in the ooplasm. Over the last decade, phospholipase C zeta (PLCζ), a sperm protein introduced into the oocyte upon gamete fusion, has gained almost universal acceptance as the protein factor responsible for initiating oocyte activation. A large body of consistent and reproducible evidence, from both biochemical and clinical settings, confers support for the role of PLCζ in this fundamental biological context, which has significant ramifications for the management of human male infertility. Oocyte activation deficiency (OAD) and total fertilisation failure (TFF) are known causes of infertility and have both been linked to abnormalities in the structure, expression, and localisation pattern of PLCζ in human sperm. Assisted oocyte activators (AOAs) represent the only therapeutic option available for OAD at present, although these agents have been the source of much debate recently, particularly with regard to their potential epigenetic effects upon the embryo. Consequently, there is much interest in the deployment of sensitive PLCζ assays as prognostic/diagnostic tests and human recombinant PLCζ protein as an alternative form of therapy. Although PLCζ deficiency has been directly linked to a cohort of infertile cases, we have yet to identify the specific causal mechanisms involved. While two genetic mutations have been identified which link defective PLCζ protein to an infertile phenotype, both were observed in the same patient, and have yet to be described in other patients. Consequently, some researchers are investigating the possibility that genetic variations in the form of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) could provide some explanation, especially since >6000 SNPs have been identified in the PLCζ gene. As yet, however, there is no consistent data to suggest that any

  8. Bisphosphonates, atherosclerosis and vascular calcification: update and systematic review of clinical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caffarelli C

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Carla Caffarelli,1 Andrea Montagnani,2 Ranuccio Nuti,1 Stefano Gonnelli1 1Department of Medicine, Surgery and Neuroscience, University of Siena, Italy; 2Division of Internal Medicine, General Hospital Misericordia, Grosseto, Italy Background: Epidemiologic and clinical data have suggested the existence of a biologic linkage between the bone system and the vascular system. Bisphosphonates (BPs are effective inhibitors of bone resorption and are currently considered the drugs of choice for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis and related fractures. Data from several publications have suggested that BPs may also be effective in reducing the atherosclerotic process and vascular calcification, but the results of these studies are contrasting. This review aimed to allow a better understanding of the relationships between BPs and atherosclerosis in humans.Materials and methods: Electronic databases of Pubmed-Medline, Cochrane Library and SCOPUS from inception to June 30, 2016 were searched. The full texts of the articles potentially eligible were carefully assessed and reviewed. Finally, 20 studies were found to be eligible and were included in the systematic review. All included studies were published between 2000 and 2014.Results: In several studies, etidronate limited the progression of aortic and coronary calcification in hemodialysis patients, whereas the nitrogen-containing-BPs given orally did not significantly reduce vascular calcifications in patients with chronic kidney disease, kidney trasplant or in those with osteoporosis. Nitrogen-containing-BPs present favorable effects both on vessel wall thickness and on arterial elasticity due to both a reduction in serum lipids and the interaction of BPs with the bone tissue, with the consequent release of bone turnover markers and cytokines into the bloodstream.Conclusion: To sum up, the BPs seem to have the potential of influencing atherosclerosis and calcium homeostasis at the level of

  9. Update on the renal toxicity of iodinated contrast drugs used in clinical medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreucci M

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Michele Andreucci,1 Teresa Faga,1 Raffaele Serra,2 Giovambattista De Sarro,3 Ashour Michael1 1Renal Unit, Department of Health Sciences, 2Interuniversity Center of Phlebolymphology (CIFL, International Research and Educational Program in Clinical and Experimental Biotechnology, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, 3Pharmacology Unit, Department of Health Sciences, Magna Graecia University, Catanzaro, Italy Abstract: An important side effect of diagnostic contrast drugs is contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI; a sudden decrease in renal function occurring 48–72 hours after injection of a contrast drug that cannot be attributed to other causes. Its existence has recently been challenged, because of some retrospective studies in which the incidence of AKI was not different between subjects who received a contrast drug and those who did not, even using propensity score matching to prevent selection bias. For some authors, only patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate <30 mL/min/1.73 m2 are at significant risk of CI-AKI. Most agree that when renal function is normal, there is no CI-AKI risk. Many experimental studies, however, are in favor of the existence of CI-AKI. Contrast drugs have been shown to cause the following changes: renal vasoconstriction, resulting in a rise in intrarenal resistance (decrease in renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate and medullary hypoxia; epithelial vacuolization and dilatation and necrosis of proximal tubules; potentiation of angiotensin II effects, reducing nitric oxide (NO and causing direct constriction of descending vasa recta, leading to formation of reactive oxygen species in isolated descending vasa recta of rats microperfused with a solution of iodixanol; increasing active sodium reabsorption in the thick ascending limbs of Henle’s loop (increasing O2 demand and consequently medullary hypoxia; direct cytotoxic effects on endothelial and tubular epithelial cells (decrease

  10. Nocardiosis: an overview and additional report of 28 cases in cattle and dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro,Márcio Garcia; Salerno,Tatiana; Mattos-Guaraldi,Ana Luiza de; Camello,Thereza Cristina Ferreira; Langoni,Hélio; Siqueira,Amanda Keller; Paes,Antonio Carlos; Fernandes,Marta Catarina; Lara,Gustavo Henrique Batista

    2008-01-01

    Phenotypic characteristics, antimicrobial susceptibility profile, and clinical-epidemiological features of 28 Nocardia strains isolated from 19 cases of bovine mastitis, eight cutaneous-subcutaneous lesions and one case of pneumonia in dogs were evaluated. Microbiological, biochemical, cytological and scanning electron microscopy methods were used in diagnosis. Nocardia asteroides type IV, Nocardia otitidiscaviarum,Nocardia nova (type III) and Nocardia farcinica (type V) were isolated from bo...

  11. A 2011 Updated Systematic Review and Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Malignant Extradural Spinal Cord Compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loblaw, D. Andrew; Mitera, Gunita; Ford, Michael; Laperriere, Normand J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To update the 2005 Cancer Care Ontario practice guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of adult patients with a suspected or confirmed diagnosis of extradural malignant spinal cord compression (MESCC). Methods: A review and analysis of data published from January 2004 to May 2011. The systematic literature review included published randomized control trials (RCTs), systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and prospective/retrospective studies. Results: An RCT of radiation therapy (RT) with or without decompressive surgery showed improvements in pain, ambulatory ability, urinary continence, duration of continence, functional status, and overall survival. Two RCTs of RT (30 Gy in eight fractions vs. 16 Gy in two fractions; 16 Gy in two fractions vs. 8 Gy in one fraction) in patients with a poor prognosis showed no difference in ambulation, duration of ambulation, bladder function, pain response, in-field failure, and overall survival. Retrospective multicenter studies reported that protracted RT schedules in nonsurgical patients with a good prognosis improved local control but had no effect on functional or survival outcomes. Conclusions: If not medically contraindicated, steroids are recommended for any patient with neurologic deficits suspected or confirmed to have MESCC. Surgery should be considered for patients with a good prognosis who are medically and surgically operable. RT should be given to nonsurgical patients. For those with a poor prognosis, a single fraction of 8 Gy should be given; for those with a good prognosis, 30 Gy in 10 fractions could be considered. Patients should be followed up clinically and/or radiographically to determine whether a local relapse develops. Salvage therapies should be introduced before significant neurologic deficits occur.

  12. A 2011 Updated Systematic Review and Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Malignant Extradural Spinal Cord Compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loblaw, D. Andrew, E-mail: andrew.loblaw@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Mitera, Gunita [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Ford, Michael [Division of Orthopedic Surgery, Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Laperriere, Normand J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To update the 2005 Cancer Care Ontario practice guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of adult patients with a suspected or confirmed diagnosis of extradural malignant spinal cord compression (MESCC). Methods: A review and analysis of data published from January 2004 to May 2011. The systematic literature review included published randomized control trials (RCTs), systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and prospective/retrospective studies. Results: An RCT of radiation therapy (RT) with or without decompressive surgery showed improvements in pain, ambulatory ability, urinary continence, duration of continence, functional status, and overall survival. Two RCTs of RT (30 Gy in eight fractions vs. 16 Gy in two fractions; 16 Gy in two fractions vs. 8 Gy in one fraction) in patients with a poor prognosis showed no difference in ambulation, duration of ambulation, bladder function, pain response, in-field failure, and overall survival. Retrospective multicenter studies reported that protracted RT schedules in nonsurgical patients with a good prognosis improved local control but had no effect on functional or survival outcomes. Conclusions: If not medically contraindicated, steroids are recommended for any patient with neurologic deficits suspected or confirmed to have MESCC. Surgery should be considered for patients with a good prognosis who are medically and surgically operable. RT should be given to nonsurgical patients. For those with a poor prognosis, a single fraction of 8 Gy should be given; for those with a good prognosis, 30 Gy in 10 fractions could be considered. Patients should be followed up clinically and/or radiographically to determine whether a local relapse develops. Salvage therapies should be introduced before significant neurologic deficits occur.

  13. Clinical Voices - an update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusaroli, Riccardo; Weed, Ethan

    Anomalous aspects of speech and voice, including pitch, fluency, and voice quality, are reported to characterise many mental disorders. However, it has proven difficult to quantify and explain this oddness of speech by employing traditional statistical methods. In this talk we will show how the t...... the temporal dynamics of the voice in Asperger's patients enable us to automatically reconstruct the diagnosis, and assess the Autism quotient score. We then generalise the findings to Danish and American children with autism....

  14. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS, AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY, AND ASSOCIAZIONE MEDICI ENDOCRINOLOGI MEDICAL GUIDELINES FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE FOR THE DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF THYROID NODULES--2016 UPDATE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharib, Hossein; Papini, Enrico; Garber, Jeffrey R; Duick, Daniel S; Harrell, R Mack; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Paschke, Ralf; Valcavi, Roberto; Vitti, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    malignant or suspicious nodules. The present document updates previous guidelines released in 2006 and 2010 by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE), American College of Endocrinology (ACE) and Associazione Medici Endocrinologi (AME).

  15. Clinical practice guidelines for the perioperative nutritional, metabolic, and nonsurgical support of the bariatric surgery patient--2013 update: cosponsored by American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, the Obesity Society, and American Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I; Youdim, Adrienne; Jones, Daniel B; Garvey, W Timothy; Hurley, Daniel L; McMahon, M Molly; Heinberg, Leslie J; Kushner, Robert; Adams, Ted D; Shikora, Scott; Dixon, John B; Brethauer, Stacy

    2013-01-01

    The development of these updated guidelines was commissioned by the AACE, TOS, and ASMBS Board of Directors and adheres to the AACE 2010 protocol for standardized production of clinical practice guidelines (CPG). Each recommendation was re-evaluated and updated based on the evidence and subjective factors per protocol. Examples of expanded topics in this update include: the roles of sleeve gastrectomy, bariatric surgery in patients with type-2 diabetes, bariatric surgery for patients with mild obesity, copper deficiency, informed consent, and behavioral issues. There are 74 recommendations (of which 56 are revised and 2 are new) in this 2013 update, compared with 164 original recommendations in 2008. There are 403 citations, of which 33 (8.2%) are EL 1, 131 (32.5%) are EL 2, 170 (42.2%) are EL 3, and 69 (17.1%) are EL 4. There is a relatively high proportion (40.4%) of strong (EL 1 and 2) studies, compared with only 16.5% in the 2008 AACE-TOS-ASMBS CPG. These updated guidelines reflect recent additions to the evidence base. Bariatric surgery remains a safe and effective intervention for select patients with obesity. A team approach to perioperative care is mandatory with special attention to nutritional and metabolic issues.

  16. CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINES FOR THE PERIOPERATIVE NUTRITIONAL, METABOLIC, AND NONSURGICAL SUPPORT OF THE BARIATRIC SURGERY PATIENT—2013 UPDATE: COSPONSORED BY AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS, THE OBESITY SOCIETY, AND AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR METABOLIC & BARIATRIC SURGERY★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I.; Youdim, Adrienne; Jones, Daniel B.; Garvey, W. Timothy; Hurley, Daniel L.; McMahon, M. Molly; Heinberg, Leslie J.; Kushner, Robert; Adams, Ted D.; Shikora, Scott; Dixon, John B.; Brethauer, Stacy

    2014-01-01

    The development of these updated guidelines was commissioned by the AACE, TOS, and ASMBS Board of Directors and adheres to the AACE 2010 protocol for standardized production of clinical practice guidelines (CPG). Each recommendation was re-evaluated and updated based on the evidence and subjective factors per protocol. Examples of expanded topics in this update include: the roles of sleeve gastrectomy, bariatric surgery in patients with type-2 diabetes, bariatric surgery for patients with mild obesity, copper deficiency, informed consent, and behavioral issues. There are 74 recommendations (of which 56 are revised and 2 are new) in this 2013 update, compared with 164 original recommendations in 2008. There are 403 citations, of which 33 (8.2%) are EL 1, 131 (32.5%) are EL 2, 170 (42.2%) are EL 3, and 69 (17.1%) are EL 4. There is a relatively high proportion (40.4%) of strong (EL 1 and 2) studies, compared with only 16.5% in the 2008 AACE- TOS-ASMBS CPG. These updated guidelines reflect recent additions to the evidence base. Bariatric surgery remains a safe and effective intervention for select patients with obesity. A team approach to perioperative care is mandatory with special attention to nutritional and metabolic issues. PMID:23529351

  17. Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Perioperative Nutritional, Metabolic, and Nonsurgical Support of the Bariatric Surgery Patient—2013 Update: Cosponsored by American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, The Obesity Society, and American Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I.; Youdim, Adrienne; Jones, Daniel B.; Garvey, W. Timothy; Hurley, Daniel L.; McMahon, Molly; Heinberg, Leslie J.; Kushner, Robert; Adams, Ted D.; Shikora, Scott; Dixon, John B.; Brethauer, Stacy

    2014-01-01

    The development of these updated guidelines was commissioned by the AACE, TOS, and ASMBS Board of Directors and adheres to the AACE 2010 protocol for standardized production of clinical practice guidelines (CPG). Each recommendation was re-evaluated and updated based on the evidence and subjective factors per protocol. Examples of expanded topics in this update include: the roles of sleeve gastrectomy, bariatric surgery in patients with type-2 diabetes, bariatric surgery for patients with mild obesity, copper deficiency, informed consent, and behavioral issues. There are 74 recommendations (of which 56 are revised and 2 are new) in this 2013 update, compared with 164 original recommendations in 2008. There are 403 citations, of which 33 (8.2%) are EL 1, 131 (32.5%) are EL 2, 170 (42.2%) are EL 3, and 69 (17.1%) are EL 4. There is a relatively high proportion (40.4%) of strong (EL 1 and 2) studies, compared with only 16.5% in the 2008 AACE-TOS-ASMBS CPG. These updated guidelines reflect recent additions to the evidence base. Bariatric surgery remains a safe and effective intervention for select patients with obesity. A team approach to perioperative care is mandatory with special attention to nutritional and metabolic issues. PMID:23529939

  18. Diagnosis, Evaluation, Prevention, and Treatment of Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral and Bone Disorder: Synopsis of the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes 2017 Clinical Practice Guideline Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketteler, Markus; Block, Geoffrey A; Evenepoel, Pieter; Fukagawa, Masafumi; Herzog, Charles A; McCann, Linda; Moe, Sharon M; Shroff, Rukshana; Tonelli, Marcello A; Toussaint, Nigel D; Vervloet, Marc G; Leonard, Mary B

    2018-02-20

    The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) 2017 Clinical Practice Guideline Update for the Diagnosis, Evaluation, Prevention, and Treatment of Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral and Bone Disorder (CKD-MBD) is a selective update of the prior CKD-MBD guideline published in 2009. The guideline update and the original publication are intended to assist practitioners caring for adults with CKD and those receiving long-term dialysis. Development of the guideline update followed an explicit process of evidence review and appraisal. The approach adopted by the Work Group and the evidence review team was based on systematic reviews of relevant trials, appraisal of the quality of the evidence, and rating of the strength of recommendations according to the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) approach. Searches of the English-language literature were conducted through September 2015 and were supplemented with targeted searches through February 2017. Final modification of the guidelines was informed by a public review process involving numerous stakeholders, including patients, subject matter experts, and industry and national organizations. The update process resulted in the revision of 15 recommendations. This synopsis focuses primarily on recommendations for diagnosis of and testing for CKD-MBD and treatment of CKD-MBD that emphasizes decreasing phosphate levels, maintaining calcium levels, and addressing elevated parathyroid hormone levels in adults with CKD stage G3a to G5 and those receiving dialysis. Key elements include basing treatment on trends in laboratory values rather than a single abnormal result and being cautious to avoid hypercalcemia when treating secondary hyperparathyroidism.

  19. Future considerations for clinical dermatology in the setting of 21st century American policy reform: The Relative Value Scale Update Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, John S; Nguyen, Harrison P; Forman, Howard P; Bolognia, Jean L; Collins, Scott A B

    2018-04-01

    The American Medical Association-Specialty Society Relative Value Scale Update Committee, also known as the RUC, plays a critical role in assessing the relative value of physician services and procedures. This committee provides access for all physicians, including dermatologists, to the reimbursement process. Since the introduction of the Resource-Based Relative Value Scale by Medicare, the RUC has done important work to evaluate and refine reimbursement for physician services. The RUC recommendations have also led the Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) Editorial Panel to develop additional reimbursement codes as new procedures and services are developed. In this article (from the series Future Considerations for Clinical Dermatology in the Setting of 21st Century American Policy Reform), we will review the RUC, including its history and membership, the RUC update process, and a brief discussion of a few issues of particular importance to dermatologists. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. An Update on Neurofibromatosis Type 1: Not Just Café-au-Lait Spots, Freckling, and Neurofibromas. An Update. Part I. Dermatological Clinical Criteria Diagnostic of the Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Martín, A; Duat-Rodríguez, A

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is the most common neurocutaneous syndrome and probably the one best known to dermatologists, who are generally the first physicians to suspect its diagnosis. Although the genetic locus of NF1 was identified on chromosome 17 in 1987, diagnosis of the disease is still mainly based on clinical observations and the diagnostic criteria of the National Institute of Health, dating from 1988. Cutaneous manifestations are particularly important because café-au-lait spots, freckling on flexural areas, and cutaneous neurofibromas comprise 3 of the 7 clinical diagnostic criteria. However, café-au-lait spots and freckling can also be present in other diseases. These manifestations are therefore not pathognomonic and are insufficient for definitive diagnosis in the early years of life. NF1 is a multisystemic disease associated with a predisposition to cancer. A multidisciplinary follow-up is necessary and dermatologists play an important role. Copyright © 2016 AEDV. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinical practice parameters for hemodynamic support of pediatric and neonatal septic shock: 2007 update from the American College of Critical Care Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brierley, Joe; Carcillo, Joseph A.; Choong, Karen; Cornell, Tim; DeCaen, Allan; Deymann, Andreas; Doctor, Allan; Davis, Alan; Duff, John; Dugas, Marc-Andre; Duncan, Alan; Evans, Barry; Feldman, Jonathan; Felmet, Kathryn; Fisher, Gene; Frankel, Lorry; Jeffries, Howard; Greenwald, Bruce; Gutierrez, Juan; Hall, Mark; Han, Yong Y.; Hanson, James; Hazelzet, Jan; Hernan, Lynn; Kiff, Jane; Kissoon, Niranjan; Kon, Alexander; Irazusta, Jose; Lin, John; Lorts, Angie; Mariscalco, Michelle; Mehta, Renuka; Nadel, Simon; Nguyen, Trung; Nicholson, Carol; Peters, Mark; Okhuysen-Cawley, Regina; Poulton, Tom; Relves, Monica; Rodriguez, Agustin; Rozenfeld, Ranna; Schnitzler, Eduardo; Shanley, Tom; Skache, Sara; Skippen, Peter; Torres, Adalberto; von Dessauer, Bettina; Weingarten, Jacki; Yeh, Timothy; Zaritsky, Arno; Stojadinovic, Bonnie; Zimmerman, Jerry; Zuckerberg, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    Background The Institute of Medicine calls for the use of clinical guidelines and practice parameters to promote “best practices” and to improve patient outcomes. Objective 2007 update of the 2002 American College of Critical Care Medicine Clinical Guidelines for Hemodynamic Support of Neonates and Children with Septic Shock. Participants Society of Critical Care Medicine members with special interest in neonatal and pediatric septic shock were identified from general solicitation at the Society of Critical Care Medicine Educational and Scientific Symposia (2001–2006). Methods The Pubmed/MEDLINE literature database (1966–2006) was searched using the keywords and phrases: sepsis, septicemia, septic shock, endotoxemia, persistent pulmonary hypertension, nitric oxide, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), and American College of Critical Care Medicine guidelines. Best practice centers that reported best outcomes were identified and their practices examined as models of care. Using a modified Delphi method, 30 experts graded new literature. Over 30 additional experts then reviewed the updated recommendations. The document was subsequently modified until there was greater than 90% expert consensus. Results The 2002 guidelines were widely disseminated, translated into Spanish and Portuguese, and incorporated into Society of Critical Care Medicine and AHA sanctioned recommendations. Centers that implemented the 2002 guidelines reported best practice outcomes (hospital mortality 1%–3% in previously healthy, and 7%– 10% in chronically ill children). Early use of 2002 guidelines was associated with improved outcome in the community hospital emergency department (number needed to treat = 3.3) and tertiary pediatric intensive care setting (number needed to treat = 3.6); every hour that went by without guideline adherence was associated with a 1.4-fold increased mortality risk. The updated 2007 guidelines continue to recognize an increased likelihood that

  2. Updating protocols prodigy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, Kate

    2005-04-01

    If you are updating protocols, why not try the Prodigy website, at www.prodigy.nhs.uk ? It is a source of clinical knowledge on a range oftopics that is based on best evidence and organised to support clinical decision making.

  3. 2011 update to the Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists blood conservation clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, Victor A; Brown, Jeremiah R; Despotis, George J; Hammon, John W; Reece, T Brett; Saha, Sibu P; Song, Howard K; Clough, Ellen R; Shore-Lesserson, Linda J; Goodnough, Lawrence T; Mazer, C David; Shander, Aryeh; Stafford-Smith, Mark; Waters, Jonathan; Baker, Robert A; Dickinson, Timothy A; FitzGerald, Daniel J; Likosky, Donald S; Shann, Kenneth G

    2011-03-01

    Practice guidelines reflect published literature. Because of the ever changing literature base, it is necessary to update and revise guideline recommendations from time to time. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons recommends review and possible update of previously published guidelines at least every three years. This summary is an update of the blood conservation guideline published in 2007. The search methods used in the current version differ compared to the previously published guideline. Literature searches were conducted using standardized MeSH terms from the National Library of Medicine PUBMED database list of search terms. The following terms comprised the standard baseline search terms for all topics and were connected with the logical 'OR' connector--Extracorporeal circulation (MeSH number E04.292), cardiovascular surgical procedures (MeSH number E04.100), and vascular diseases (MeSH number C14.907). Use of these broad search terms allowed specific topics to be added to the search with the logical 'AND' connector. In this 2011 guideline update, areas of major revision include: 1) management of dual anti-platelet therapy before operation, 2) use of drugs that augment red blood cell volume or limit blood loss, 3) use of blood derivatives including fresh frozen plasma, Factor XIII, leukoreduced red blood cells, platelet plasmapheresis, recombinant Factor VII, antithrombin III, and Factor IX concentrates, 4) changes in management of blood salvage, 5) use of minimally invasive procedures to limit perioperative bleeding and blood transfusion, 6) recommendations for blood conservation related to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and cardiopulmonary perfusion, 7) use of topical hemostatic agents, and 8) new insights into the value of team interventions in blood management. Much has changed since the previously published 2007 STS blood management guidelines and this document contains new and revised recommendations. Copyright © 2011 The Society of Thoracic

  4. Clinical and microbiological characteristics of infections caused by various Nocardia species in Taiwan: a multicenter study from 1998 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W L; Lai, C C; Ko, W C; Chen, Y H; Tang, H J; Huang, Y L; Huang, Y T; Hsueh, P R

    2011-11-01

    This multicenter study in Taiwan investigated the clinical presentations of various Nocardia species infections based on 16S rRNA sequence analysis. Patients with nocardiosis in four large medical centers from 1998 to 2010 were included. A total of 100 preserved nonduplicate isolates causing human infection were identified as Nocardia species. Sequencing analysis of 16S rRNA confirmed that 35 of 36 N. asteroides isolates identified by conventional tests were non-asteroides Nocardia species, and that two of 50 N. brasiliensis isolates had also been initially misidentified. N. brasiliensis (50%) was the most common pathogen, followed by N. cyriacigeorgica (18%). In addition, several rare pathogens were identified, including N. asiatica, N. rhamnosiphila, N. abscessus, N. transvalensis, N. elegans, and N. carnea. Primary cutaneous infection was the most common presentation, noted in 55 (55%) patients, while pulmonary infection presented in 26 (26%) patients. The crude mortality rate was 6.7% (6/89), and was lowest for primary cutaneous infection (2.2%) and highest for disseminated disease and pulmonary infection (16.7%). In conclusion, N. brasiliensis and N. cyriacigeorgica were the most common pathogens causing nocardiosis in Taiwan. Molecular methods for identifying Nocardia to the species level are mandatory for better understanding the epidemiology and clinical characteristics of patients with nocardiosis.

  5. 2016 Updated American Society of Clinical Oncology/Oncology Nursing Society Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards, Including Standards for Pediatric Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuss, Michael N; Gilmore, Terry R; Belderson, Kristin M; Billett, Amy L; Conti-Kalchik, Tara; Harvey, Brittany E; Hendricks, Carolyn; LeFebvre, Kristine B; Mangu, Pamela B; McNiff, Kristen; Olsen, MiKaela; Schulmeister, Lisa; Von Gehr, Ann; Polovich, Martha

    2016-12-01

    Purpose To update the ASCO/Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards and to highlight standards for pediatric oncology. Methods The ASCO/ONS Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards were first published in 2009 and updated in 2011 to include inpatient settings. A subsequent 2013 revision expanded the standards to include the safe administration and management of oral chemotherapy. A joint ASCO/ONS workshop with stakeholder participation, including that of the Association of Pediatric Hematology Oncology Nurses and American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, was held on May 12, 2015, to review the 2013 standards. An extensive literature search was subsequently conducted, and public comments on the revised draft standards were solicited. Results The updated 2016 standards presented here include clarification and expansion of existing standards to include pediatric oncology and to introduce new standards: most notably, two-person verification of chemotherapy preparation processes, administration of vinca alkaloids via minibags in facilities in which intrathecal medications are administered, and labeling of medications dispensed from the health care setting to be taken by the patient at home. The standards were reordered and renumbered to align with the sequential processes of chemotherapy prescription, preparation, and administration. Several standards were separated into their respective components for clarity and to facilitate measurement of adherence to a standard. Conclusion As oncology practice has changed, so have chemotherapy administration safety standards. Advances in technology, cancer treatment, and education and training have prompted the need for periodic review and revision of the standards. Additional information is available at http://www.asco.org/chemo-standards .

  6. Nocardiose pulmonar em paciente usuário crônico de corticóides Pulmonary nocardiosis in a patient who was a chronic corticosteroid user

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Maria Ferreira Brasileiro

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Nocardiose pulmonar é uma infecção grave e incomum causada pela Nocardia ssp, microorganismos que podem se comportar tanto como oportunistas quanto patógenos primários e que pode se apresentar como desordem aguda ou crônica supurativa. Relata-se o caso de um paciente de 49 anos, portador de púrpura trombocitopênica idiopática em tratamento com corticóides que desenvolveu infecção pulmonar por Nocardia farcinica, isolada em hemocultura. Apesar de tratamento correto com sulfametoxazol-trimetoprim, o paciente morreu após três meses de instituída terapia.Pulmonary nocardiosis is an infrequent and severe infection caused by Nocardia spp. These are microorganisms that may behave both as opportunists and as primary pathogens, and they may present as either acute or suppurative chronic disorders. We report on the case of a 49-year-old man with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura that was being treated with corticosteroids. He developed pulmonary infection due to Nocardia farcinica, which was isolated from blood cultures. Despite correct treatment with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, the patient died three months after this therapy was instituted.

  7. Circular Updates

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Circular Updates are periodic sequentially numbered instructions to debriefing staff and observers informing them of changes or additions to scientific and specimen...

  8. User involvement in a Cochrane systematic review: using structured methods to enhance the clinical relevance, usefulness and usability of a systematic review update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Alex; Campbell, Pauline; Baer, Gillian; Choo, Pei Ling; Morris, Jacqui; Forster, Anne

    2015-04-20

    This paper describes the structured methods used to involve patients, carers and health professionals in an update of a Cochrane systematic review relating to physiotherapy after stroke and explores the perceived impact of involvement. We sought funding and ethical approval for our user involvement. We recruited a stakeholder group comprising stroke survivors, carers, physiotherapists and educators and held three pre-planned meetings during the course of updating a Cochrane systematic review. Within these meetings, we used formal group consensus methods, based on nominal group techniques, to reach consensus decisions on key issues relating to the structure and methods of the review. The stakeholder group comprised 13 people, including stroke survivors, carers and physiotherapists with a range of different experience, and either 12 or 13 participated in each meeting. At meeting 1, there was consensus that methods of categorising interventions that were used in the original Cochrane review were no longer appropriate or clinically relevant (11/13 participants disagreed or strongly disagreed with previous categories) and that international trials (which had not fitted into the original method of categorisation) ought to be included within the review (12/12 participants agreed or strongly agreed these should be included). At meeting 2, the group members reached consensus over 27 clearly defined treatment components, which were to be used to categorise interventions within the review (12/12 agreed or strongly agreed), and at meeting 3, they agreed on the key messages emerging from the completed review. All participants strongly agreed that the views of the group impacted on the review update, that the review benefited from the involvement of the stakeholder group, and that they believed other Cochrane reviews would benefit from the involvement of similar stakeholder groups. We involved a stakeholder group in the update of a Cochrane systematic review, using clearly

  9. Adjuvant Systemic Therapy and Adjuvant Radiation Therapy for Stage I to IIIA Completely Resected Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancers: American Society of Clinical Oncology/Cancer Care Ontario Clinical Practice Guideline Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kris, Mark G; Gaspar, Laurie E; Chaft, Jamie E; Kennedy, Erin B; Azzoli, Christopher G; Ellis, Peter M; Lin, Steven H; Pass, Harvey I; Seth, Rahul; Shepherd, Frances A; Spigel, David R; Strawn, John R; Ung, Yee C; Weyant, Michael

    2017-09-01

    Purpose The panel updated the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) adjuvant therapy guideline for resected non-small-cell lung cancers. Methods ASCO convened an update panel and conducted a systematic review of the literature, investigating adjuvant therapy in resected non-small-cell lung cancers. Results The updated evidence base covered questions related to adjuvant systemic therapy and included a systematic review conducted by Cancer Care Ontario current to January 2016. A recent American Society for Radiation Oncology guideline and systematic review, previously endorsed by ASCO, was used as the basis for recommendations for adjuvant radiation therapy. An update of these systematic reviews and a search for studies related to radiation therapy found no additional randomized controlled trials. Recommendations Adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy is recommended for routine use in patients with stage IIA, IIB, or IIIA disease who have undergone complete surgical resections. For individuals with stage IB, adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy is not recommended for routine use. However, a postoperative multimodality evaluation, including a consultation with a medical oncologist, is recommended to assess benefits and risks of adjuvant chemotherapy for each patient. The guideline provides information on factors other than stage to consider when making a recommendation for adjuvant chemotherapy, including tumor size, histopathologic features, and genetic alterations. Adjuvant chemotherapy is not recommended for patients with stage IA disease. Adjuvant radiation therapy is not recommended for patients with resected stage I or II disease. In patients with stage IIIA N2 disease, adjuvant radiation therapy is not recommended for routine use. However, a postoperative multimodality evaluation, including a consultation with a radiation oncologist, is recommended to assess benefits and risks of adjuvant radiation therapy for each patient with N2 disease. Additional

  10. 2017 Position Paper of the Italian Society for Cardiovascular Prevention (SIPREC) for an Updated Clinical Management of Hypercholesterolemia and Cardiovascular Risk: Executive Document.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, Massimo; Volpe, Roberto; Gallo, Giovanna; Presta, Vivianne; Tocci, Giuliano; Folco, Emanuela; Peracino, Andrea; Tremoli, Elena; Trimarco, Bruno

    2017-09-01

    The benefits achieved by implementing cardiovascular prevention strategies in terms of reduced incidence of atherosclerotic diseases and mortality are accepted, worldwide. In particular, the clinical management of hypercholesterolemia has a fundamental role for all preventive strategies, both in primary and secondary prevention, at each stage of cardiovascular risk. Since the net clinical benefit of lipid-lowering therapy largely depends on baseline individual cardiovascular risk profile, the assessment of individual risk is essential to establish type and intensity of both preventive and therapeutic strategies. Thus, the real challenge in a setting of clinical practice is not only to identify whom to treat among individuals at low-to-moderate risk, but mostly how much and how long to treat high or very-high risk patients. This manuscript, which reflects concepts and positions that have been published in a more extensive document of the Italian Society for Cardiovascular Prevention (SIPREC), deals with the diagnostic and therapeutic management of patients with dyslipidaemia, with an evidence-based approach adapted and updated from recent guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology and very recent results of randomized clinical trials. The purpose is to suggest a multidimensional and integrated actions aimed at eliminating or minimizing the impact of cardiovascular diseases and their related disabilities and mortality in patients with hypercholesterolemia.

  11. A Clinical Practice Update on the Latest AAOS/ADA Guideline (December 2012) on Prevention of Orthopaedic Implant Infection in Dental Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedani, Sh

    2013-03-01

    The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) and the American Dental Association (ADA), along with 10 other academic associations and societies recently (December 2012) published their mutual clinical practice guideline "Prevention of Orthopaedic Implant Infection in Patients Undergoing Dental Procedures." This evidence-based guideline ,detailed in 325 pages, has three recommendations and substitutes the previous AAOS guideline. The new published clinical guideline is a protocol to prevent patients undertaking dental procedures from orthopaedic implant infection. The guideline is developed on the basis of a collaborative systematic review to provide practical advice for training clinicians, dentists and any qualified physicians who need to consider prevention of orthopaedic implant (prosthesis) infection in their patients. This systematic review found no explicit evidence of cause-and-effect relationship between dental procedures and periprosthetic joint infection (PJI). This LTTE wishes to present a vivid summary of AAOS/ADA clinical practice guideline as a clinical update and an academic implementation to inform and assist Iranian competent clinicians and dentists in the course of their treatment decisions, to enrich the value and quality of health care on the latest international basis.

  12. Update of the Grupo Español de Leucemia Linfocítica Crónica clinical guidelines of the management of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Marco, José A; Delgado, Julio; Hernández-Rivas, José A; Ramírez Payer, Ángel; Loscertales Pueyo, Javier; Jarque, Isidro; Abrisqueta, Pau; Giraldo, Pilar; Martínez, Rafael; Yáñez, Lucrecia; Terol, Mª José; González, Marcos; Bosch, Francesc

    2017-04-21

    The broad therapeutic arsenal and the biological heterogeneity of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) makes it difficult to standardize treatment for CLL patients with specific clinical settings in routine clinical practice. These considerations prompted us to elaborate the present consensus document, which constitutes an update of the previous version published in 2013, mainly focusing on novel treatment strategies that have been developed over last 5 years, namely B-cell receptor inhibitors (ibrutinib and idelalisib), anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (ofatumumab and obinutuzumab), and Bcl-2 inhibitors (venetoclax). A group of experts from the Spanish Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Group reviewed all published literature from January 2010 to January 2016, in order to provide recommendations based on clinical evidence. For those areas without strong scientific evidence, the panel of experts established consensus criteria based on their clinical experience. The project has resulted in several practical recommendations that will facilitate the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of patients with CLL. There are many controversial issues in the management of CLL with no appropriate studies for making consensus recommendations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. 2013 updated American Society of Clinical Oncology/Oncology Nursing Society chemotherapy administration safety standards including standards for the safe administration and management of oral chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuss, Michael N; Polovich, Martha; McNiff, Kristen; Esper, Peg; Gilmore, Terry R; LeFebvre, Kristine B; Schulmeister, Lisa; Jacobson, Joseph O

    2013-05-01

    In 2009, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) published standards for the safe use of parenteral chemotherapy in the outpatient setting, including issues of practitioner orders, preparation, and administration of medication. In 2011, these were updated to include inpatient facilities. In December 2011, a multistakeholder workgroup met to address the issues associated with orally administered antineoplastics, under the leadership of ASCO and ONS. The workgroup participants developed recommended standards, which were presented for public comment. Public comments informed final edits, and the final standards were reviewed and approved by the ASCO and ONS Boards of Directors. Significant newly identified recommendations include those associated with drug prescription and the necessity of ascertaining that prescriptions are filled. In addition, the importance of patient and family education regarding administration schedules, exception procedures, disposal of unused oral medication, and aspects of continuity of care across settings were identified. This article presents the newly developed standards.

  14. 2016 update on eating disorders in athletes: A comprehensive narrative review with a focus on clinical assessment and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Elizabeth; Kussman, Andrea; Nattiv, Aurelia

    2016-02-01

    Eating disorders, such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, can have devastating effects on both the health and performance of athletes. Compared to non-athletes, both female and male athletes are at higher risk of developing an eating disorder. This is especially true for athletes participating in sports where low body weight or leanness confers a competitive advantage. Screening for disordered eating behaviours, eating disorders and for related health consequences should be a standard component of preparticipation examinations, and team physicians should be knowledgeable of the updated diagnostic criteria for eating disorders in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual-V. Athletes with eating disorders should undergo thorough evaluation and treatment by an experienced multidisciplinary team. Team physicians play a critical role in decision-making on clearance for participation and return to play. Using evidence-based guidelines for clearance and return to play encourages transparency and accountability between the sports medicine care team and the athlete. Efforts to prevent eating disorders should be aimed at athletes, coaches, parents and athletic administrators, and focused on expanding knowledge of healthy nutrition in support of sport performance and health. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. Nocardiosis: an overview and additional report of 28 cases in cattle and dogs Nocardiose: visão geral e relato de 28 casos em vacas e cães

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Garcia Ribeiro

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypic characteristics, antimicrobial susceptibility profile, and clinical-epidemiological features of 28 Nocardia strains isolated from 19 cases of bovine mastitis, eight cutaneous-subcutaneous lesions and one case of pneumonia in dogs were evaluated. Microbiological, biochemical, cytological and scanning electron microscopy methods were used in diagnosis. Nocardia asteroides type IV, Nocardia otitidiscaviarum,Nocardia nova (type III and Nocardia farcinica (type V were isolated from bovine milk, bronchial lavage and/or cutaneous-subcutaneous abscesses in dogs. Nocardial bovine mastitis was diagnosed predominantly in clinical cases, in dairy herds with poor environmental hygienic conditions between milking and inappropriate intramammary therapy. Canine nocardiosis was observed commonly in animals co-infected with distemper virus. Sulphamethoxazole-trimethoprim (92.8%, amikacin (92.8% and ceftiofur (92.8% were the most effective drugs in 28 isolates. Multiple drug resistance to three or more and five or more antimicrobials was observed in ten (35.7% and three (10.7% strains, respectively, predominantly with use of cloxaxillin, cefoperazone and ampicillin. The species (type classification, clinical-epidemiological characteristics, diagnosis, multiple-drug resistance and public health considerations in Nocardia strains isolated from cattle and dogs in Brazil are discussed, with special reference to report of bovine mastitis by N. otitidiscaviarum by first time in Brazil and the similarity between Nocardia species isolated from human and animal origin.A caracterização fenotípica, perfil de sensibilidade aos antimicrobianos e aspectos clínico-epidemiológicos foram avaliados em 28 linhagens de Nocardia isoladas de 19 casos de mastite, oito lesões tegumentares e um caso de pneumonia em cão. Foram utilizados no diagnóstico métodos microbiológicos, bioquímicos, citológicos e microscopia eletrônica de varredura. Nocardia asteroides tipo

  16. Guidelines for seizure management in palliative care: Proposal for an updated clinical practice model based on a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León Ruiz, M; Rodríguez Sarasa, M L; Sanjuán Rodríguez, L; Pérez Nieves, M T; Ibáñez Estéllez, F; Arce Arce, S; García-Albea Ristol, E; Benito-León, J

    2017-02-27

    Very little has been written on seizure management in palliative care (PC). Given this situation, and considering the forthcoming setting up of the Palliative Care Unit at our neurorehabilitation centre, the Clínica San Vicente, we decided to establish a series of guidelines on the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) for handling seizures in PC. We conducted a literature search in PubMed to identify articles, recent manuals, and clinical practice guidelines on seizure management in PC published by the most relevant scientific societies. Clinical practice guidelines are essential to identify patients eligible for PC, manage seizures adequately, and avoid unnecessary distress to these patients and their families. Given the profile of these patients, we recommend choosing AEDs with a low interaction potential and which can be administered by the parenteral route, preferably intravenously. Diazepam and midazolam appear to be the most suitable AEDs during the acute phase whereas levetiracetam, valproic acid, and lacosamide are recommended for refractory cases and long-term treatment. These guidelines provide general recommendations that must be adapted to each particular clinical case. Nevertheless, we will require further well-designed randomised controlled clinical trials including large samples of patients eligible for PC to draft a consensus document recommending adequate, rational, and effective use of AEDs, based on a high level of evidence, in this highly complex area of medical care. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Candidiasis: 2016 Update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Peter G.; Kauffman, Carol A.; Andes, David R.; Clancy, Cornelius J.; Marr, Kieren A.; Ostrosky-Zeichner, Luis; Reboli, Annette C.; Schuster, Mindy G.; Vazquez, Jose A.; Walsh, Thomas J.; Zaoutis, Theoklis E.; Sobel, Jack D.

    2016-01-01

    It is important to realize that guidelines cannot always account for individual variation among patients. They are not intended to supplant physician judgment with respect to particular patients or special clinical situations. IDSA considers adherence to these guidelines to be voluntary, with the ultimate determination regarding their application to be made by the physician in the light of each patient's individual circumstances. PMID:26679628

  18. Aarskog-Scott syndrome: clinical update and report of nine novel mutations of the FGD1 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orrico, A; Galli, L; Faivre, L

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the FGD1 gene have been shown to cause Aarskog-Scott syndrome (AAS), or facio-digito-genital dysplasia (OMIM#305400), an X-linked disorder characterized by distinctive genital and skeletal developmental abnormalities with a broad spectrum of clinical phenotypes. To date, 20 distinct ...

  19. Clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of acute otitis media (AOM) in children in Japan - 2013 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Ken; Iino, Yukiko; Kamide, Yosuke; Kudo, Fumiyo; Nakayama, Takeo; Suzuki, Kenji; Taiji, Hidenobu; Takahashi, Haruo; Yamanaka, Noboru; Uno, Yoshifumi

    2015-04-01

    To (1) indicate methods of diagnosis and testing for childhood (otitis media (AOM) and (2) recommend methods of treatment in accordance with the evidence-based consensus reached by the Subcommittee of Clinical Practice Guideline for Diagnosis and Management of AOM in Children (Subcommittee of Clinical Practice Guideline), in light of the causative bacteria and their drug sensitivity of AOM in Japan. We investigated the most recently detected bacteria causing childhood AOM in Japan as well as antibacterial sensitivity and the worldwide distinct progress of vaccination, produced Clinical Questions concerning the diagnosis, testing methods, and treatment of AOM, searched literature published during 2000-2004, and issued the 2006 Guidelines. In the 2009 and 2013 Guidelines, we performed the same investigation with the addition of literature, which were not included in the 2006 Guidelines and published during 2005-2008 and during 2009-2012, respectively. We categorized AOM as mild, moderate, or severe on the basis of tympanic membrane findings and clinical symptoms, and presented recommended treatment for each degree of severity. Accurate assessment of tympanic membrane findings is important for judging the degree of severity and selecting a method of treatment. Some of new antimicrobial agents and pneumococcal vaccination are recommended as new treatment options. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Update and clinical utility of alcaftadine ophthalmic solution 0.25% in the treatment of allergic conjunctivitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chigbu DI

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available DeGaulle I Chigbu, Alissa M Coyne Pennsylvania College of Optometry Salus University, Elkins Park, PA, USA Abstract: Allergic disorders of the ocular surface are primarily characterized as IgE- and/or T-lymphocyte-mediated disorders that affect the cornea, conjunctiva, and eyelid. Approximately 40% of individuals in the developed countries have allergic conjunctivitis, and as such, it is the most common form of ocular allergy. Seasonal allergic conjunctivitis is the most prevalent type of allergic conjunctivitis that impacts the quality of life of patients. This article reviews the pharmacology, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, clinical trials, clinical efficacy, and safety of alcaftadine. Histamine and the pathological mechanism of ocular allergy will be briefly reviewed with the intent of providing a background for the detailed discussion on the clinical utility of alcaftadine in allergic conjunctivitis. The Medline PubMed, Elsevier Science Direct, and Google Scholar databases were used to search for evidence-based literature on histamine and immunopathological mechanism of allergic conjunctivitis, as well as on pharmacology, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, clinical trials, and clinical efficacy of alcaftadine. The treatment and management goals of allergic conjunctivitis are to prevent or minimize the inflammatory cascade associated with allergic response in the early stages of the pathological mechanism. It is of note that activation of histamine receptors on immune and nonimmune cells are associated with allergen-induced inflammation of the conjunctiva and its associated ocular allergic manifestations, including itching, edema, hyperemia, and tearing. Alcaftadine is an efficacious multiple action antiallergic therapeutic agent with inverse agonist activity on H1, H2, and H4 receptors, as well as anti-inflammatory and mast cell stabilizing effects that could provide therapeutic benefits to patients with allergic conjunctivitis

  1. Female Obesity and Clinical Outcomes of Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART): an Updated Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Heidar Heidari Khoei

    2016-01-01

    Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) has been developed to be used for reproductive-age women with primary and secondary infertilities. Obesity is a worldwide epidemic for both women and men and a major global health concern. The direct effect of Body Mass Index (BMI) increase on the outcomes of ART is still unclear. This study aimed to carry out a systematic review of the available scientific evidence to assess the effects of obesity on the clinical outcome of ART treatment. Numerous studi...

  2. Noninvasive FFR derived from coronary CT angiography in the management of coronary artery disease: technology and clinical update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakanishi R

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Rine Nakanishi, Mathew J Budoff Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA, USA Abstract: After a decade of clinical use of coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA to evaluate the anatomic severity of coronary artery disease, new methods of deriving functional information from CCTA have been developed. These methods utilize the anatomic information provided by CCTA in conjunction with computational fluid dynamics to calculate fractional flow reserve (FFR values from CCTA image data sets. Computed tomography-derived FFR (CT-FFR enables the identification of lesion-specific drop noninvasively. A three-dimensional CT-FFR modeling technique, which provides FFR values throughout the coronary tree (HeartFlow FFRCT analysis, has been validated against measured FFR and is now approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for clinical use. This technique requires off-site supercomputer analysis. More recently, a one-dimensional computational analysis technique (Siemens cFFR, which can be performed on on-site workstations, has been developed and is currently under investigation. This article reviews CT-FFR technology and clinical evidence for its use in stable patients with suspected coronary artery disease. Keywords: fractional flow reserve, coronary computed tomographic angiography, FFRCT, cFFR

  3. Intracoronary stem cell infusion after acute myocardial infarction: a meta-analysis and update on clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Renate; Houtgraaf, Jaco H; Samiei, Sanaz; Boersma, Eric; Duckers, Henricus J

    2014-04-01

    Several cell-based therapies for adjunctive treatment of acute myocardial infarction have been investigated in multiple clinical trials, but the benefits still remain controversial. This meta-analysis aims to evaluate the efficacy of bone marrow-derived mononuclear cell (BMMNC) therapy in patients with acute myocardial infarction, but also explores the effect of newer generations of stem cells. A random-effects meta-analysis was performed on randomized controlled trials investigating the effects of stem cell therapy in patients with acute myocardial infarction that were published between January 2002 and September 2013. The defined end points were left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction, LV end-systolic and end-diastolic volumes, infarct size, and major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular event rates. Also, several subgroup analyses were performed on BMMNC trials. Overall, combining the results of 22 randomized controlled trials (RCTs), LV ejection fraction increased by +2.10% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.68-3.52; P=0.004) in the BMMNC group as compared with controls, evoked by a preservation of LV end-systolic volume (-4.05 mL; 95% CI, -6.91 to -1.18; P=0.006) and a reduction in infarct size (-2.69%; 95% CI, -4.83 to -0.56; P=0.01). However, there is no effect on cardiac function, volumes, or infarct size, when only RCTs (n=9) that used MRI-derived end points were analyzed. Moreover, no beneficial effect could be detected on major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular event rates after BMMNC infusion after a median follow-up duration of 6 months. Intracoronary infusion of BMMNC is safe, but does not enhance cardiac function on MRI-derived parameters, nor does it improve clinical outcome. New and possibly more potent stem cells are emerging in the field, but their clinical efficacy still needs to be defined in future trials.

  4. Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Candidiasis: 2016 Update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Peter G; Kauffman, Carol A; Andes, David R; Clancy, Cornelius J; Marr, Kieren A; Ostrosky-Zeichner, Luis; Reboli, Annette C; Schuster, Mindy G; Vazquez, Jose A; Walsh, Thomas J; Zaoutis, Theoklis E; Sobel, Jack D

    2016-02-15

    It is important to realize that guidelines cannot always account for individual variation among patients. They are not intended to supplant physician judgment with respect to particular patients or special clinical situations. IDSA considers adherence to these guidelines to be voluntary, with the ultimate determination regarding their application to be made by the physician in the light of each patient's individual circumstances. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Mineral trioxide aggregate and other bioactive endodontic cements: an updated overview - part II: other clinical applications and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabinejad, M; Parirokh, M; Dummer, P M H

    2018-03-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is a dental material used extensively for vital pulp therapies (VPT), protecting scaffolds during regenerative endodontic procedures, apical barriers in teeth with necrotic pulps and open apices, perforation repairs as well as root canal filling and root-end filling during surgical endodontics. A number of bioactive endodontic cements (BECs) have recently been introduced to the market. Most of these materials have calcium and silicate in their compositions; however, bioactivity is a common property of these cements. These materials include the following: BioAggregate, Biodentine, BioRoot RCS, calcium-enriched mixture cement, Endo-CPM, Endocem, EndoSequence, EndoBinder, EndoSeal MTA, iRoot, MicroMega MTA, MTA Bio, MTA Fillapex, MTA Plus, Neo MTA Plus, Ortho MTA, Quick-Set, Retro MTA, Tech Biosealer, and TheraCal LC. It has been claimed that these materials have properties similar to those of MTA but without the drawbacks. In Part I of this review, the available information on the chemical composition of the materials listed above was reviewed and their applications for VPT was discussed. In this article, the clinical applications of MTA and other BECs will be reviewed for apexification, regenerative endodontics, perforation repair, root canal filling, root-end filling, restorative procedures, periodontal defects and treatment of vertical and horizontal root fractures. In addition, the literature regarding the possible drawbacks of these materials following their clinical applications is reviewed. These drawbacks include their discolouration potential, systemic effects and retreatability following use as a root filling material. Based on selected keywords, all publications were searched regarding the use of MTA as well as BECs for the relevant clinical applications. Numerous publications were found regarding the use of BECs for various endodontic applications. The majority of these investigations compared BECs with MTA. Despite

  6. Recent advances in gastrointestinal oncology - updates and insights from the 2009 annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsueh Chung-Tsen

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have reviewed the pivotal presentations related to gastrointestinal malignancies from 2009 annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology with the theme of "personalizing cancer care". We have discussed the scientific findings and the impact on practice guidelines and ongoing clinical trials. Adding trastuzumab to chemotherapy improved the survival of patients with advanced gastric cancer overexpressing human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. Gemcitabine plus cisplatin has become a new standard for first-line treatment of advanced biliary cancer. Octreotide LAR significantly lengthened median time to tumor progression compared with placebo in patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumors of the midgut. Addition of oxaliplatin to fluoropyrimidines for preoperative chemoradiotherapy in patients with stage II or III rectal cancer did not improve local tumor response but increased toxicities. Bevacizumab did not provide additional benefit to chemotherapy in adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II or III colon cancer. In patients with resected stage II colon cancer, recurrence score estimated by multigene RT-PCR assay has been shown to provide additional risk stratification. In stage IV colorectal cancer, data have supported the routine use of prophylactic skin treatment in patients receiving antibody against epidermal growth factor receptor, and the use of upfront chemotherapy as initial management in patients with synchronous metastasis without obstruction or bleeding from the primary site.

  7. Muscles, Ligaments and Tendons Journal – Basic principles and recommendations in clinical and field Science Research: 2016 Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padulo, Johnny; Oliva, Francesco; Frizziero, Antonio; Maffulli, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Summary The proper design and implementation of a study as well as a balanced and well-supported evaluation and interpretation of its main findings are of crucial importance when reporting and disseminating research. Also accountability, funding acknowledgement and adequately declaring any conflict of interest play a major role in science. Since the Muscles, Ligaments and Tendons Journal (MLTJ) is committed to the highest scientific and ethical standards, we encourage all Authors to take into account and to comply, as much as possible, to the contents and issues discussed in this official editorial. This could be useful for improving the quality of the manuscripts, as well as to stimulate interest and debate and to promote constructive change, reflecting upon uses and misuses within our disciplines belonging to the field of “Clinical and Sport - Science Research”. PMID:27331026

  8. Muscles, Ligaments and Tendons Journal - Basic principles and recommendations in clinical and field Science Research: 2016 Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padulo, Johnny; Oliva, Francesco; Frizziero, Antonio; Maffulli, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    The proper design and implementation of a study as well as a balanced and well-supported evaluation and interpretation of its main findings are of crucial importance when reporting and disseminating research. Also accountability, funding acknowledgement and adequately declaring any conflict of interest play a major role in science. Since the Muscles, Ligaments and Tendons Journal (MLTJ) is committed to the highest scientific and ethical standards, we encourage all Authors to take into account and to comply, as much as possible, to the contents and issues discussed in this official editorial. This could be useful for improving the quality of the manuscripts, as well as to stimulate interest and debate and to promote constructive change, reflecting upon uses and misuses within our disciplines belonging to the field of "Clinical and Sport - Science Research".

  9. Effect of resveratrol on lipid profile: An updated systematic review and meta-analysis on randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighatdoost, Fahimeh; Hariri, Mitra

    2018-03-01

    Despite the notion that resveratrol can significantly reduce plasma lipids, the result of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) on resveratrol effect and the serum lipid profile are contradictory. Our objective was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis on randomized clinical trials (RCTs) and assess the effect of resveratrol on lipids. ISI web of science, Ovid, PubMed/Medline, SCOPUS, and Google Scholar data bases were searched up to Jun 2017. RCTs that assessed resveratrol effects on lipid profile among adult participants were chosen. Treatment effects were considered as weighted mean difference (WMD) and the corresponding standard error (SE) in concentrations of serum lipids. To estimate the overall summary effect, we used random-effects model. The protocol was registered with PROSPERO (No. CRD42017072365). This meta-analysis was performed on twenty-one trials. Our results indicated that resveratrol can't significantly change total cholesterol (TC) (WMD = -0.08 mmol/l, 95% CI: -0.23, 0.08; P = .349, I 2  = 87.8%), low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C) (WMD: -0.04 mmol/l, 95% CI: -0.21, 0.12; P = .620, I 2  = 93.4%), and high density lipoprotein (HDL-C) (WMD: -0.01 mmol/l, 95% CI: -0.04, 0.02; P = .269, I 2  = 88.6%). Its effect on triacylglycerol (TG) (WMD: 0.58 mmol/l, 95% CI: 0.34, 0.82; P resveratrol dosage, and intervention duration could not change the results. We conclude that resveratrol does not change lipid profile concentration. Confirmation of this conclusion will require more studies exclusively on dyslipidemic patients in which the intake of lipid lowering agents is among the exclusion criteria. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Patent Foramen Ovale Closure for Secondary Prevention of Cryptogenic Stroke: Updated Meta-Analysis of Randomized Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Qamar, Arman; Gupta, Ankur; Bajaj, Navkaranbir; Golwala, Harsh B; Pandey, Ambarish; Bhatt, Deepak L

    2017-12-08

    Patent foramen ovale closure represents a potential secondary prevention strategy for cryptogenic stroke, but available trials have varied by size, device studied, and follow-up. We conducted a systematic search of published randomized clinical trials evaluating patent foramen ovale closure versus medical therapy in patients with recent stroke or transient ischemic attack using PubMED, EMBASE, and Cochrane through September 2017. Weighting was by random effects models. Of 480 studies screened, we included 5 randomized clinical trials in the meta-analysis in which 3440 patients were randomized to patent foramen ovale closure (n = 1829) or medical therapy (n = 1611) and followed for an average of 2.0 to 5.9 years. Index stroke/transient ischemic attack occurred within 6 to 9 months of randomization. The primary end point was composite stroke/transient ischemic attack and death (in 3 trials) or stroke alone (in 2 trials). Patent foramen ovale closure reduced the primary end point (0.70 vs 1.48 events per 100 patient-years; risk ratio [RR], 0.52 [0.29-0.91]; I 2  = 55.0%) and stroke/transient ischemic attack (1.04 vs 2.00 events per 100 patient-years; RR, 0.55 [0.37-0.82]; I 2  = 42.2%) with modest heterogeneity compared with medical therapy. Procedural bleeding was not different between study arms (1.8% vs 1.8%; RR, 0.94 [0.49-1.83]; I 2  = 29.2%), but new-onset atrial fibrillation/flutter was increased with patent foramen ovale closure (6.6% vs 0.7%; RR, 4.69 [2.17-10.12]; I 2  = 29.3%). In patients with recent cryptogenic stroke, patent foramen ovale closure reduces recurrent stroke/transient ischemic attack compared with medical therapy, but is associated with a higher risk of new-onset atrial fibrillation/flutter. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The TVT-obturator surgical procedure for the treatment of female stress urinary incontinence: a clinical update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltregny, David; de Leval, Jean

    2009-03-01

    Six years ago, the inside-out transobturator tape TVT-O procedure was developed for the surgical treatment of female stress urinary incontinence (SUI) with the aim of minimizing the risk of urethra and bladder injuries and ensuring minimal tissue dissection. Initial feasibility and efficacy studies suggested that the TVT-O procedure is associated with high SUI cure rates and low morbidity at short term. A recent analysis of medium-term results indicated that the TVT-O procedure is efficient, with maintenance, after a 3-year minimum follow-up, of cure rates comparing favorably with those reported for TVT. No late complications were observed. As of July 2008, more than 35 clinical papers, including ten randomized trials and two national registries, have been published on the outcome of the TVT-O surgery. Results from these studies have confirmed that the TVT-O procedure is safe and as efficient as the TVT procedure, at least in the short/medium term.

  12. Updates on breast cancer genetics: Clinical implications of detecting syndromes of inherited increased susceptibility to breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobain, Erin F; Milliron, Kara J; Merajver, Sofia D

    2016-10-01

    Since the initial discovery that pathogenic germline alterations in BRCA 1/2 increase susceptibility to breast and ovarian cancer, many additional genes have now been discovered that also increase breast cancer risk. Given that several more genes have now been implicated in hereditary breast cancer syndromes, there is increased clinical use of multigene panel testing to evaluate patients with a suspected genetic predisposition to breast cancer. While this is most certainly a cost-effective approach, broader testing strategies have resulted in a higher likelihood of identifying moderate-penetrance genes, for which management guidelines regarding breast cancer risk reduction have not been firmly established. In addition, the testing of more genes has led to increased detection of variants of uncertain significance. We review the current knowledge regarding both high- and moderate-risk hereditary breast cancer syndromes, as well as additional genes implicated in hereditary breast cancer for which there is limited data. Furthermore, strategies for cancer risk reduction in mutation carriers as well as therapeutic implications for those patients who harbor pathogenic germline alterations are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Oncological Safety of Lipofilling in Patients with Breast Cancer: A Meta-analysis and Update on Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wazir, Umar; El Hage Chehade, Hiba; Headon, Hannah; Oteifa, Medhat; Kasem, Abdul; Mokbel, Kefah

    2016-09-01

    Lipofilling is an increasingly popular technique for breast reconstruction following both mastectomy and breast-conserving surgery (BCS). However, concerns remain over its oncological safety and its effect on cancer recurrence. A systematic literature review and meta-analysis was carried out. Patients who had undergone mastectomy or BCS were investigated separately in order to find out whether the addition of lipofilling had a significant effect on locoregional recurrence rate. Eleven studies were used in the analysis, yielding a total of 2,382 patients. For patients undergoing mastectomy (mean follow-up=36.2 months, range=12-90 months) or BCS (mean follow-up=30.2 months, range=12-60 months), the addition of lipofilling was not found to significantly affect the locoregional recurrence rate. This meta-analysis demonstrates that lipofilling is an oncologically safe procedure to be incorporated into breast reconstruction following either mastectomy or BCS for breast cancer. However, a careful oncological follow-up is recommended. In the future, more adequately powered controlled clinical trials are needed in order to fully understand long-term outcomes after lipofilling. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  14. Clinical neuropathology practice news 3-2012: the "ABC" in AD-revised and updated guideline for the neuropathologic assessment of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Gabor G; Gelpi, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    The two major approaches for the neuropathological assessment of Alzheimer's disease (AD) related pathology have been based on the assessment of neuritic plaques (CERAD) and neurofibrillary pathology (Braak and Braak). In 1997 these two approaches were integrated in the criteria and recommendations of the National Institute on Aging and the Reagan Institute Working group. Recently a new guideline has been published by the National Institute on Aging-Alzheimer's Association. This new guideline recognizes the existence of a pre-clinical stage of AD as part of continuous neuropathological changes in the background of the disease process, and it fosters the assessment of amyloid-beta phases in addition to neurofibrillary degeneration and neuritic plaques following an "ABC" score. Further, it suggests protocols for the neuropathological assessment of additional/concomitant neurodegenerative and vascular pathologies. Altogether, the new guideline responds to the need for an update of the existing "1997 criteria" for AD. Continued studies will have to assess the added value of the new approach and the influence of interlaboratory and/or methodological differences on the implementation of these new recommendations.

  15. Clinical Practice Update: The Use of Per-Oral Endoscopic Myotomy in Achalasia: Expert Review and Best Practice Advice From the AGA Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahrilas, Peter J; Katzka, David; Richter, Joel E

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this review is to describe a place for per-oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) among the currently available robust treatments for achalasia. The recommendations outlined in this review are based on expert opinion and on relevant publications from PubMed and EMbase. The Clinical Practice Updates Committee of the American Gastroenterological Association proposes the following recommendations: 1) in determining the need for achalasia therapy, patient-specific parameters (Chicago Classification subtype, comorbidities, early vs late disease, primary or secondary causes) should be considered along with published efficacy data; 2) given the complexity of this procedure, POEM should be performed by experienced physicians in high-volume centers because an estimated 20-40 procedures are needed to achieve competence; 3) if the expertise is available, POEM should be considered as primary therapy for type III achalasia; 4) if the expertise is available, POEM should be considered as treatment option comparable with laparoscopic Heller myotomy for any of the achalasia syndromes; and 5) post-POEM patients should be considered high risk to develop reflux esophagitis and advised of the management considerations (potential indefinite proton pump inhibitor therapy and/or surveillance endoscopy) of this before undergoing the procedure. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Fragile X-Associated Tremor Ataxia Syndrome: The Expanding Clinical Picture, Pathophysiology, Epidemiology, and Update on Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah A. Hall

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS is a progressive degenerative movement disorder characterized by kinetic tremor, cerebellar gait ataxia, parkinsonism, and cognitive decline. This disorder occurs in both males and females, frequently in families with children who have fragile X syndrome. The clinical features of this disorder, both classic and newly described, are summarized in this paper. In screening studies, fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1 gene premutation (55–200 CGG expansions are most frequently seen in men with ataxia who have tested negative for spinocerebellar ataxias. Since the original description, the classic FXTAS phenotype has now been reported in females and in carriers of smaller (45–54 CGG and larger (>200 CGG expansions in FMR1. Premutation carriers may present with a Parkinson disease phenotype or hypotension, rather than with tremor and/or ataxia. Parkinsonism and gait ataxia may also be seen in individuals with gray zone (41–54 CGG expansions. Studies regarding medication to treat the symptoms in FXTAS are few in number and suggest that medications targeted to specific symptoms, such as kinetic tremor or gait ataxia, may be most beneficial. Great progress has been made in regards to FXTAS research, likely given the readily available gene test and the screening of multiple family members, including parents and grandparents, of fragile X syndrome children. Expansion of genotypes and phenotypes in the disorder may suggest that a broader disease definition might be necessary in the future.

  17. Update on the pathological processes, molecular biology, and clinical utility of N-acetylcysteine in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tse HN

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Hoi Nam Tse, Cee Zhung Steven TsengMedical and Geriatric Department, Kwong Wah Hospital, Hong Kong Special Administrative RegionAbstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a common and morbid disease characterized by high oxidative stress. Its pathogenesis is complex, and involves excessive oxidative stress (redox imbalance, protease/antiprotease imbalance, inflammation, apoptosis, and autoimmunity. Among these, oxidative stress has a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of COPD by initiating and mediating various redox-sensitive signal transduction pathways and gene expression. The protective physiological mechanisms of the redox balance in the human body, their role in the pathogenesis of COPD, and the clinical correlation between oxidative stress and COPD are reviewed in this paper. N-acetylcysteine (NAC is a mucolytic agent with both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. This paper also reviews the use of NAC in patients with COPD, especially the dose-dependent properties of NAC, eg, its effects on lung function and the exacerbation rate in patients with the disease. Earlier data from BRONCUS (the Bronchitis Randomized on NAC Cost-Utility Study did not suggest that NAC was beneficial in patients with COPD, only indicating that it reduced exacerbation in an "inhaled steroid-naïve" subgroup. With regard to the dose-dependent properties of NAC, two recent randomized controlled Chinese trials suggested that high-dose NAC (1,200 mg daily can reduce exacerbations in patients with COPD, especially in those with an earlier (moderately severe stage of disease, and also in those who are at high risk of exacerbations. However, there was no significant effect on symptoms or quality of life in patients receiving NAC. Further studies are warranted to investigate the effect of NAC at higher doses in non-Chinese patients with COPD.Keywords: N-acetylcysteine, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

  18. Pneumococcal Bacteremia Requiring Hospitalization in Rural Thailand: An Update on Incidence, Clinical Characteristics, Serotype Distribution, and Antimicrobial Susceptibility, 2005-2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Rhodes

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in Southeast Asia, but regional data is limited. Updated burden estimates are critical as pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV is highly effective, but not yet included in the Expanded Program on Immunization of Thailand or neighboring countries.We implemented automated blood culture systems in two rural Thailand provinces as part of population-based surveillance for bacteremia. Blood cultures were collected from hospitalized patients as clinically indicated.From May 2005- March 2010, 196 cases of pneumococcal bacteremia were confirmed in hospitalized patients. Of these, 57% had clinical pneumonia, 20% required mechanical ventilation, and 23% (n = 46 died. Antibiotic use before blood culture was confirmed in 25% of those with blood culture. Annual incidence of hospitalized pneumococcal bacteremia was 3.6 per 100,000 person-years; rates were higher among children aged <5 years at 11.7 and adults ≥65 years at 14.2, and highest among infants <1 year at 33.8. The median monthly case count was higher during December-March compared to the rest of the year 6.0 vs. 1.0 (p<0.001. The most common serotypes were 23F (16% and 14 (14%; 61% (74% in patients <5 years were serotypes in the 10-valent PCV (PCV 10 and 82% (92% in <5 years in PCV 13. All isolates were sensitive to penicillin, but non-susceptibility was high for co-trimoxazole (57%, erythromycin (30%, and clindamycin (20%.We demonstrated a high pneumococcal bacteremia burden, yet underestimated incidence because we captured only hospitalized cases, and because pre-culture antibiotics were frequently used. Our findings together with prior research indicate that PCV would likely have high serotype coverage in Thailand. These findings will complement ongoing cost effectiveness analyses and support vaccine policy evaluation in Thailand and the region.

  19. A Clinical Update of the Hb Siirt [β27(B9)Ala→Gly; HBB: c.83C>G] Hemoglobin Variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappabianca, Maria Pia; Colosimo, Alessia; Sabatucci, Annalaura; Dainese, Enrico; Di Biagio, Paola; Piscitelli, Roberta; Sarra, Ofelia; Zei, Daniela; Amato, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    We report a clinical update of the hemoglobin (Hb) variant [β27(B9)Ala→Gly; HBB: c.83C>G], named Hb Siirt, that was previously described as a silent variant in a 23-year-old Kurdish female. The patient was also a carrier of the codon 5 (-CT) (HBB: c.17_18delCT) frameshift mutation and of the ααα anti 3.7 triplication. Her initial moderate β-thalassemia intermedia (β-TI) phenotype worsened with time, causing the patient to become a transfusion-dependent subject at the age of ∼40 years. Subsequent molecular characterization of both parents revealed that the Hb Siirt variant was inherited by the mother, while the other two globin alterations (HBB: c.17_18delCT and ααα anti 3.7 triplication) were genetically transmitted by the father. The latter remained a carrier of a mild β-TI phenotype throughout his life, at least until the age of 65 years. We hypothesize that the worsened clinical conditions in the daughter were due to the additional, maternally inherited Hb Siirt variant. However, protein 3D conformational analysis did not seem to reveal substantial overall structural changes. Among the other three described variants [Hb Volga (HBB: c.83C>A), Hb Knossos (HBB: c.82 G>T), Hb Grange-Blanche (HBB: c.83C>T] that are due to nucleotide substitutions at codon 27 of the β-globin gene; only Hb Knossos causes a β + -thalassemia (β + -thal) phenotype.

  20. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS, AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY, AND ASSOCIAZIONE MEDICI ENDOCRINOLOGI MEDICAL GUIDELINES FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE FOR THE DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF THYROID NODULES - 2016 UPDATE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gharib, Hossein; Papini, Enrico; Garber, Jeffrey R

    2016-01-01

    as diagnostic cornerstones. The key issues discussed in these guidelines are as follows: (1) US-based categorization of the malignancy risk and indications for US-guided FNA (henceforth, FNA), (2) cytologic classification of FNA samples, (3) the roles of immunocytochemistry and molecular testing applied...... to thyroid FNA, (4) therapeutic options, and (5) follow-up strategy. Thyroid nodule management during pregnancy and in children are also addressed. On the basis of US features, thyroid nodules may be categorized into 3 groups: low-, intermediate-and high-malignancy risk. FNA should be considered for nodules...... lesions are further subdivided into 2 subclasses to more accurately stratify the risk of malignancy. At present, no single cytochemical or genetic marker can definitely rule out malignancy in indeterminate nodules. Nevertheless, these tools should be considered together with clinical data, US signs...

  1. Non-invasive electrical and magnetic stimulation of the brain, spinal cord, roots and peripheral nerves: Basic principles and procedures for routine clinical and research application. An updated report from an I.F.C.N. Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossini, P M; Burke, D; Chen, R; Cohen, L G; Daskalakis, Z; Di Iorio, R; Di Lazzaro, V; Ferreri, F; Fitzgerald, P B; George, M S; Hallett, M; Lefaucheur, J P; Langguth, B; Matsumoto, H; Miniussi, C; Nitsche, M A; Pascual-Leone, A; Paulus, W; Rossi, S; Rothwell, J C; Siebner, H R; Ugawa, Y; Walsh, V; Ziemann, U

    2015-06-01

    These guidelines provide an up-date of previous IFCN report on "Non-invasive electrical and magnetic stimulation of the brain, spinal cord and roots: basic principles and procedures for routine clinical application" (Rossini et al., 1994). A new Committee, composed of international experts, some of whom were in the panel of the 1994 "Report", was selected to produce a current state-of-the-art review of non-invasive stimulation both for clinical application and research in neuroscience. Since 1994, the international scientific community has seen a rapid increase in non-invasive brain stimulation in studying cognition, brain-behavior relationship and pathophysiology of various neurologic and psychiatric disorders. New paradigms of stimulation and new techniques have been developed. Furthermore, a large number of studies and clinical trials have demonstrated potential therapeutic applications of non-invasive brain stimulation, especially for TMS. Recent guidelines can be found in the literature covering specific aspects of non-invasive brain stimulation, such as safety (Rossi et al., 2009), methodology (Groppa et al., 2012) and therapeutic applications (Lefaucheur et al., 2014). This up-dated review covers theoretical, physiological and practical aspects of non-invasive stimulation of brain, spinal cord, nerve roots and peripheral nerves in the light of more updated knowledge, and include some recent extensions and developments. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Intra-abdominal hypertension and the abdominal compartment syndrome: updated consensus definitions and clinical practice guidelines from the World Society of the Abdominal Compartment Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkpatrick, Andrew W; Roberts, Derek J; De Waele, Jan; Jaeschke, Roman; Malbrain, Manu LNG; De Keulenaer, Bart; Duchesne, Juan; Bjorck, Martin; Leppaniemi, Ari; Ejike, Janeth C; Sugrue, Michael; Cheatham, Michael; Ivatury, Rao; Ball, Chad G; Reintam Blaser, Annika

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To update the World Society of the Abdominal Compartment Syndrome (WSACS) consensus definitions and management statements relating to intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) and the abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS). Methods We conducted systematic or structured reviews to identify relevant studies relating to IAH or ACS. Updated consensus definitions and management statements were then derived using a modified Delphi method and the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, a...

  3. Freedom from local and regional failure of contralateral neck with ipsilateral neck radiotherapy for node-positive tonsil cancer: updated results of an institutional clinical management approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Tu D; Raben, David; Schneider, Charles J; Hockstein, Neil G; Witt, Robert L; Dzeda, Michael; Cormier, Jennifer F; Raben, Adam

    2015-06-01

    To update the outcomes of an institutional clinical management approach using ipsilateral neck radiotherapy in the treatment of node-positive squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil with a well-lateralized primary lesion. Between August 2003 and April 2014, 61 consecutive patients with ipsilateral node-positive squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil without involvement of the base of the tongue or midline soft palate were treated at a community hospital-based cancer center with radiotherapy to the primary site and ipsilateral neck. Overall survival, disease-free survival and freedom from contralateral failure were calculated. Median follow up was 37.2months (range 4-121months). Freedom from contralateral nodal failure at 5years was 98% with one contralateral nodal failure noted. The patient underwent a salvage neck dissection and was treated with post-operative radiotherapy with no evidence of disease to date. 5-year overall survival (OS) was 92.4% and 5year disease-free survival (DFS) was 86.7%. This represents the single largest series reported from a community hospital-based cancer center in which lateralized tonsil cancers with N+ disease were treated with ipsilateral neck radiotherapy. In this carefully selected cohort of patients with well-lateralized tonsil cancers, the risk of contralateral nodal failure appears to be <5%, suggesting that prophylactic radiation of the contralateral neck may not be necessary. Future planned studies will focus on prospectively selecting subgroups of patients eligible for treatment de-intensification as survivorship issues in excellent prognosis HPV positive patients are increasingly becoming relevant. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A systematic review of management strategies for children's mental health care in the emergency department: update on evidence and recommendations for clinical practice and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Amanda S; Hartling, Lisa; Soleimani, Amir; Kirkland, Scott; Dyson, Michele P; Cappelli, Mario

    2017-06-01

    Children with mental health crises require access to specialised resources and services which are not yet standard in general and paediatric EDs. In 2010, we published a systematic review that provided some evidence to support the use of specialised care models to reduce hospitalisation, return ED visits and length of ED stay. We perform a systematic review to update the evidence base and inform current policy statements. Twelve databases and the grey literature were searched up to January 2015. Seven studies were included in the review (four newly identified studies). These studies compared ED-based strategies designed to assess, treat and/or therapeutically support or manage a mental health presentation. The methodological quality of six studies was assessed using the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organization of Care Risk of Bias tool (one interrupted time series study) and a modified Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (three retrospective cohort and two before-after studies). The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system was applied to rate overall evidence quality (high, moderate, low or very low) for individual outcomes from these six studies. An additional study evaluated the psychometric properties of a clinical instrument and was assessed using criteria developed by the Society of Pediatric Psychology Assessment Task Force (well-established, approaching well-established or promising assessment). There is low to very low overall evidence quality that: (1) use of screening laboratory tests to medically clear mental health patients increases length of ED stay and costs, but does not increase the risk of clinical management or disposition change if not conducted; and (2) specialised models of ED care reduce lengths of ED stay, security man-hours and restraint orders. One mental health assessment tool of promising quality, the home, education, activities and peers, drugs and alcohol, suicidality, emotions and behaviour, discharge

  5. Amblyopia update: new treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagge, Aldo; Nelson, Leonard B

    2016-09-01

    This review article is an update on the current treatments for amblyopia. In particular, the authors focus on the concepts of brain plasticity and their implications for novel treatment strategies for both children and adults affected by amblyopia. A variety of strategies has been developed to treat amblyopia in children and adults. New evidence on the pathogenesis of amblyopia has been obtained both in animal models and in clinical trials. Mainly, these studies have challenged the classical concept that amblyopia becomes untreatable after the 'end' of the sensitive or critical period of visual development, because of a lack of sufficient plasticity in the adult brain. New treatments for amblyopia in children and adults are desirable and should be encouraged. However, further studies should be completed before such therapies are widely accepted into clinical practice.

  6. Updating systematic reviews: an international survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantelle Garritty

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Systematic reviews (SRs should be up to date to maintain their importance in informing healthcare policy and practice. However, little guidance is available about when and how to update SRs. Moreover, the updating policies and practices of organizations that commission or produce SRs are unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The objective was to describe the updating practices and policies of agencies that sponsor or conduct SRs. An Internet-based survey was administered to a purposive non-random sample of 195 healthcare organizations within the international SR community. Survey results were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The completed response rate was 58% (n = 114 from across 26 countries with 70% (75/107 of participants identified as producers of SRs. Among responders, 79% (84/107 characterized the importance of updating as high or very-high and 57% (60/106 of organizations reported to have a formal policy for updating. However, only 29% (35/106 of organizations made reference to a written policy document. Several groups (62/105; 59% reported updating practices as irregular, and over half (53/103 of organizational respondents estimated that more than 50% of their respective SRs were likely out of date. Authors of the original SR (42/106; 40% were most often deemed responsible for ensuring SRs were current. Barriers to updating included resource constraints, reviewer motivation, lack of academic credit, and limited publishing formats. Most respondents (70/100; 70% indicated that they supported centralization of updating efforts across institutions or agencies. Furthermore, 84% (83/99 of respondents indicated they favoured the development of a central registry of SRs, analogous to efforts within the clinical trials community. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Most organizations that sponsor and/or carry out SRs consider updating important. Despite this recognition, updating practices are not regular, and many organizations lack

  7. Systematic review and evidence based recommendations on texture modified foods and thickened liquids for adults (above 17 years) with oropharyngeal dysphagia - An updated clinical guideline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Anne Marie; Kjærsgaard, Annette; Hansen, Tina

    2017-01-01

    to three critical outcomes (aspiration, pneumonia and death) and seven important outcomes (dehydration, weight loss, mealtime performance, patient preferences, intervention adherence and quality of life). METHODS: Three steps were used. First: An updated systematic literature search. Second: An assessment......: The body of evidence consisted of two RCTs for review question 1 both using nectar thickened liquids or honey-thickened liquids. No evidence was found for two important outcomes, mealtime performance and quality of life. With regard to risk of pneumonia, death, aspiration, dehydration, weight loss...

  8. Recommendations for the clinical practice: Standards, options and recommendations 2003 for the use of recombinant erythropoietin (alpha and beta epoetine, alpha darbepoetine, EPO) in the taking charge of anemia in oncology for the patients treated by radiotherapy, update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchal, Ch.; Spaeth, C.; Casadevall, N.; Daouphars, M.; Marec-Berard, P.; Fabre, N.; Haugh, M.

    2004-01-01

    Standards, Options and Recommendations for the use of recombinant erythropoietin (epoietin alpha and beta darbepoietin alpha, EPO) in the management of anaemia in oncology for patient undergoing radiotherapy - UPDATE 2003. Context. - 'The Standards, Options and Recommendations' (SOR) project, started in 1993, is a collaboration between the Federation of French Cancer Centres (FNCLCC), the twenty French cancer centres, and specialists from French public universities, general hospitals and private clinics. The main objective is the development of clinical practice guidelines to improve the quality of health care and the outcome of cancer patients. The methodology is based on a literature review and critical appraisal by a multidisciplinary group of experts, with feedback from specialists in cancer care delivery. Objectives. - To update the Standards, Options and Recommendations clinical practice guidelines for the use of recombinant erythropoietin (epoietin alpha and beta darbepoietin-alpha, EPO) in the management of anaemia in oncology for patient undergoing radiotherapy. Methods. - The working group identified the questions requiring up-dating from the previous guideline. Medline and Embase were searched using specific search strategies from January 1999 to October 2002. Literature monitoring was performed to identify randomized clinical trials published between October 2002 to November 2003. In addition several Internet sites were searched in October 2002. Results. - There is no standard attitude for use of rHuEPO in patients undergoing radiotherapy. There is no evidence to support use of rHuEPO in patients with ENT cancer receiving radiotherapy alone. In patients undergoing curative radiotherapy, it is recommended to correct anaemia under 10 g/dL using transfusion rather than rHuEPO. When the haemoglobin concentration is between 12 g/dL and 14 g/dL initial use of rHuEPO can be an option under certain conditions for radio-chemotherapy if the risk of anaemia is

  9. Updates in ophthalmic pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Pia R; Grossniklaus, Hans E

    2017-05-01

    Ophthalmic pathology has a long history and rich heritage in the field of ophthalmology. This review article highlights updates in ophthalmic pathology that have developed significantly through the years because of the efforts of committed individuals and the confluence of technology such as molecular biology and digital pathology. This is an exciting period in the history of ocular pathology, with cutting-edge techniques paving the way for new developments in diagnostics, therapeutics, and research. Collaborations between ocular oncologists and pathologists allow for improved and comprehensive patient care. Ophthalmic pathology continues to be a relevant specialty that is important in the understanding and clinical management of ocular disease, education of eye care providers, and overall advancement of the field.

  10. Updates in ophthalmic pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia R Mendoza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ophthalmic pathology has a long history and rich heritage in the field of ophthalmology. This review article highlights updates in ophthalmic pathology that have developed significantly through the years because of the efforts of committed individuals and the confluence of technology such as molecular biology and digital pathology. This is an exciting period in the history of ocular pathology, with cutting-edge techniques paving the way for new developments in diagnostics, therapeutics, and research. Collaborations between ocular oncologists and pathologists allow for improved and comprehensive patient care. Ophthalmic pathology continues to be a relevant specialty that is important in the understanding and clinical management of ocular disease, education of eye care providers, and overall advancement of the field.

  11. [Update Chagas disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Israel; Salvador, Fernando; Sánchez-Montalvá, Adrián

    2016-02-01

    The constant migration flows have favored the presence of people with Chagas disease in regions traditionally regarded as non-endemic, such as North America, Europe, Asia and Oceania. This has forced both health authorities and professionals to be updated in order to respond to such a demand for assistance. Recent years have led to significant progress in the field of diagnosis and treatment of Chagas disease, one of the most neglected tropical diseases. Recent clinical trials are providing new evidence that makes the management of these patients, a constant challenge for the professionals involved. Innovative diagnostic tools and therapeutic regimens, allow us to face the future of Chagas disease with optimism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  12. Update on equine allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadok, Valerie A

    2013-12-01

    Horses develop many skin and respiratory disorders that have been attributed to allergy. These disorders include pruritic skin diseases, recurrent urticaria, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, and reactive airway disease. Allergen-specific IgE has been detected in these horses, and allergen-specific immunotherapy is used to ameliorate clinical signs. The best understood atopic disease in horses is insect hypersensitivity, but the goal of effective treatment with allergen-specific immunotherapy remains elusive. In this review, updates in pathogenesis of allergic states and a brief mention of the new data on what is known in humans and dogs and how that relates to equine allergic disorders are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Disseminated nocardiosis due to Nocardia farcinica: diagnosis by thyroid abscess culture Nocardiose disseminada por Nocardia farcinica diagnosticada através do cultivo de abscesso da tireóide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília Bittencourt Severo

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A previously healthy 75-year-old white male dentist presented with a 6-month history of low-back pain treated with chronic steroid therapy had a Nocardia farcinica infection diagnosed by aspirate of thyroid abscess and six blood cultures. Despite the treatment with parenteral combination of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, the patient failed to respond and died after two days of therapy. Autopsy revealed disseminated nocardiosis, involving lungs with pleural purulent exudate in both sides, heart, thyroid, kidneys, brain, bones, and lumbosacral soft tissue with destruction of L2-L4.Paciente previamente hígido, homem de 75 anos, branco, dentista, apresentou história de seis meses de dor lombar, fez uso crônico de corticoterapia e teve diagnóstico de infecção por Nocardia farcinica através do aspirado de abscesso da tireóide e seis hemocultivos positivos. Apesar do tratamento com a combinação de sulfametoxazol/trimetoprim, o paciente não respondeu indo a óbito dois dias após. A necropsia revelou nocardiose disseminada, envolvendo ambos os pulmões, empiema bilateral, coração, tireóide, rins, cérebro, ossos, e tecidos moles lombossacrais, com destruição da L2-L4.

  14. Post-contrast acute kidney injury - Part 1: Definition, clinical features, incidence, role of contrast medium and risk factors : Recommendations for updated ESUR Contrast Medium Safety Committee guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Molen, Aart J; Reimer, Peter; Dekkers, Ilona A; Bongartz, Georg; Bellin, Marie-France; Bertolotto, Michele; Clement, Olivier; Heinz-Peer, Gertraud; Stacul, Fulvio; Webb, Judith A W; Thomsen, Henrik S

    2018-02-09

    The Contrast Media Safety Committee (CMSC) of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) has updated its 2011 guidelines on the prevention of post-contrast acute kidney injury (PC-AKI). The results of the literature review and the recommendations based on it, which were used to prepare the new guidelines, are presented in two papers. AREAS COVERED IN PART 1: Topics reviewed include the terminology used, the best way to measure eGFR, the definition of PC-AKI, and the risk factors for PC-AKI, including whether the risk with intravenous and intra-arterial contrast medium differs. • PC-AKI is the preferred term for renal function deterioration after contrast medium. • PC-AKI has many possible causes. • The risk of AKI caused by intravascular contrast medium has been overstated. • Important patient risk factors for PC-AKI are CKD and dehydration.

  15. 2013 updated American Society of Clinical Oncology/Oncology Nursing Society chemotherapy administration safety standards including standards for the safe administration and management of oral chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuss, Michael N; Polovich, Martha; McNiff, Kristen; Esper, Peg; Gilmore, Terry R; LeFebvre, Kristine B; Schulmeister, Lisa; Jacobson, Joseph O

    2013-03-01

    In 2009, ASCO and the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) published standards for the safe use of parenteral chemotherapy in the outpatient setting, including issues of practitioner orders, preparation, and administration of medication. In 2011, these were updated to include inpatient facilities. In December 2011, a multistakeholder workgroup met to address the issues associated with orally administered antineoplastics, under the leadership of ASCO and ONS. The workgroup participants developed recommended standards, which were presented for public comment. Public comments informed final edits, and the final standards were reviewed and approved by the ASCO and ONS Boards of Directors. Significant newly identified recommendations include those associated with drug prescription and the necessity of ascertaining that prescriptions are filled. In addition, the importance of patient and family education regarding administration schedules, exception procedures, disposal of unused oral medication, and aspects of continuity of care across settings were identified. This article presents the newly developed standards.

  16. Evidence-Based Recommendations for Short- and Long-Term Management of Uninvestigated Dyspepsia in Primary Care: An Update of the Canadian Dyspepsia Working Group (CanDys Clinical Management Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander JO Veldhuyzen van Zanten

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper is an update to and extension of the previous systematic review on the primary care management of patients with uninvestigated dyspepsia (UD. The original publication of the clinical management tool focused on the initial four- to eight-week assessment of UD. This update is based on new data from systematic reviews and clinical trials relevant to UD. There is now direct clinical evidence supporting a test-and-treat approach in patients with nondominant heartburn dyspepsia symptoms, and head-to-head comparisons show that use of a proton pump inhibitor is superior to the use of H2-receptor antagonists (H2RAs in the initial treatment of Helicobacter pylori-negative dyspepsia patients. Cisapride is no longer available as a treatment option and evidence for other prokinetic agents is lacking. In patients with long-standing heartburn-dominant (ie, gastroesophageal reflux disease and nonheartburn-dominant dyspepsia, a once-in-a-lifetime endoscopy is recommended. Endoscopy should also be considered in patients with new-onset dyspepsia that develops after the age of 50 years. Conventional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, acetylsalicylic acid and cyclooxygenase-2-selective inhibitors can all cause dyspepsia. If their use cannot be discontinued, cotherapy with either a proton pump inhibitor, misoprostol or high-dose H2RAs is recommended, although the evidence is based on ulcer data and not dyspepsia data. In patients with nonheartburn-dominant dyspepsia, noninvasive testing for H pylori should be performed and treatment given if positive. When starting nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for a prolonged course, testing and treatment with H2RAs are advised if patients have a history of previous ulcers or ulcer bleeding.

  17. Recommendations for reporting of secondary findings in clinical exome and genome sequencing, 2016 update (ACMG SF v2.0): a policy statement of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalia, Sarah S; Adelman, Kathy; Bale, Sherri J; Chung, Wendy K; Eng, Christine; Evans, James P; Herman, Gail E; Hufnagel, Sophia B; Klein, Teri E; Korf, Bruce R; McKelvey, Kent D; Ormond, Kelly E; Richards, C Sue; Vlangos, Christopher N; Watson, Michael; Martin, Christa L; Miller, David T

    2017-02-01

    Disclaimer: These recommendations are designed primarily as an educational resource for medical geneticists and other healthcare providers to help them provide quality medical services. Adherence to these recommendations is completely voluntary and does not necessarily assure a successful medical outcome. These recommendations should not be considered inclusive of all proper procedures and tests or exclusive of other procedures and tests that are reasonably directed toward obtaining the same results. In determining the propriety of any specific procedure or test, the clinician should apply his or her own professional judgment to the specific clinical circumstances presented by the individual patient or specimen. Clinicians are encouraged to document the reasons for the use of a particular procedure or test, whether or not it is in conformance with this statement. Clinicians also are advised to take notice of the date this statement was adopted and to consider other medical and scientific information that becomes available after that date. It also would be prudent to consider whether intellectual property interests may restrict the performance of certain tests and other procedures.To promote standardized reporting of actionable information from clinical genomic sequencing, in 2013, the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) published a minimum list of genes to be reported as incidental or secondary findings. The goal was to identify and manage risks for selected highly penetrant genetic disorders through established interventions aimed at preventing or significantly reducing morbidity and mortality. The ACMG subsequently established the Secondary Findings Maintenance Working Group to develop a process for curating and updating the list over time. We describe here the new process for accepting and evaluating nominations for updates to the secondary findings list. We also report outcomes from six nominations received in the initial 15 months after

  18. Update on the molecular pathogenesis and clinical treatment of mantle cell lymphoma : report of the 10th annual conference of the European Mantle Cell Lymphoma Network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreyling, Martin; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; Bea, Silvia; Hartmann, Elena; Salaverria, Itziar; Hutter, Grit; Perez-Galan, Patricia; Roue, Gael; Pott, Christiane; Le Gouill, Steven; Cortelazzo, Sergio; Rule, Simon; Hess, Georg; Zaja, Francesco; Vitolo, Umberto; Szymczyk, Michal; Walewski, Jan; Ribrag, Vincent; Unterhalt, Michael; Hermine, Olivier; Hoster, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a distinct subtype of malignant lymphoma characterized by the chromosomal translocation t(11;14)(q13;q32), resulting in constitutional overexpression of cyclin D1 and cell cycle dysregulation in virtually all cases. Clinically, MCL shows an aggressive clinical course

  19. Evidence-based clinical practice update: practice guidelines for anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation based on a systematic review and multidisciplinary consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melick, N. van; Cingel, R.E. van; Brooijmans, F.; Neeter, C.; Tienen, T. van; Hullegie, W.; Sanden, M.W. van der

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The Royal Dutch Society for Physical Therapy (KNGF) instructed a multidisciplinary group of Dutch anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) experts to develop an evidence statement for rehabilitation after ACL reconstruction. DESIGN: Clinical practice guideline underpinned by systematic review and

  20. A Clinical Practice Update on the Latest AAOS/ADA Guideline (December 2012) on Prevention of Orthopaedic Implant Infection in Dental Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hamedani, Sh

    2013-01-01

    The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) and the American Dental Association (ADA), along with 10 other academic associations and societies recently (December 2012) published their mutual clinical practice guideline “Prevention of Orthopaedic Implant Infection in Patients Undergoing Dental Procedures.” This evidence-based guideline ,detailed in 325 pages, has three recommendations and substitutes the previous AAOS guideline. The new published clinical guideline is a protocol to pre...

  1. Five-grass pollen immunotherapy tablet: an update on the latest findings from clinical trials: an interview with Olivier de Beaumont.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beaumont, Olivier; Wilkinson, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Interview by Jonathan Wilkinson (Managing Commissioning Editor, Future Science Group). Olivier de Beaumont became Doctor of Medicine at the University of Paris Descartes in 1993. In the same year, he also took a Master of Health Economics degree at Paris Dauphine University. He is also a Master of Business Administration, ESCP Paris, 1999. At Stallergenes, he has been serving as Vice President/Head of Corporate Clinical Development since 2005, responsible for the clinical development plan, clinical operations, biometry and pharmacovigilance. In 2011, he took the responsibility of Senior Vice President Global Medical Affairs responsible for medical information and education, medical communication and nonregistration clinical studies. In 2014 he became Senior Vice President Global Scientific and Medical Affairs. From 2002 to 2005 he led the European business development of the world's leading clinical research organization Quintiles, developing Phase I-IV clinical trial programs for pharmaceutical companies. Previous roles included: Chief Scientific Officer and cofounder of Direct Medica (2000-2002), product champion and lifecycle management at Aventis (1998-2000), medical affairs manager in oncology and respiratory diseases at corporate Rhone-Poulenc Rorer (1993-1998).

  2. An Update on Memory Reconsolidation Updating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan L C; Nader, Karim; Schiller, Daniela

    2017-07-01

    The reactivation of a stored memory in the brain can make the memory transiently labile. During the time it takes for the memory to restabilize (reconsolidate) the memory can either be reduced by an amnesic agent or enhanced by memory enhancers. The change in memory expression is related to changes in the brain correlates of long-term memory. Many have suggested that such retrieval-induced plasticity is ideally placed to enable memories to be updated with new information. This hypothesis has been tested experimentally, with a translational perspective, by attempts to update maladaptive memories to reduce their problematic impact. We review here progress on reconsolidation updating studies, highlighting their translational exploitation and addressing recent challenges to the reconsolidation field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Guidelines for the treatment of invasive fungal disease by Aspergillus spp. and other fungi issued by the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC). 2011 Update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortún, Jesús; Carratalá, Jordi; Gavaldá, Joan; Lizasoain, Manuel; Salavert, Miguel; de la Cámara, Rafael; Borges, Marcio; Cervera, Carlos; Garnacho, José; Lassaleta, Álvaro; Lumbreras, Carlos; Sanz, Miguel Ángel; Ramos, José T; Torre-Cisneros, Julián; Aguado, José M; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    The guidelines on the treatment of invasive fungal disease by Aspergillus spp. and other fungi issued by the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC) are presented. These recommendations are focused on four clinical categories: oncology-haematology patients, solid organ transplant recipients, patients admitted to intensive care units, and children. An extensive review is made of therapeutical advances and scientific evidence in these settings. These guidelines have been prepared according the SEIMC consensus rules by a working group composed of specialists in infectious diseases, clinical microbiology, critical care medicine, paediatrics and oncology-haematology. Specific recommendations on the prevention of fungal infections in these patients are included. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  4. Update on the molecular pathogenesis and clinical treatment of mantle cell lymphoma : report of the 11th annual conference of the European Mantle Cell Lymphoma Network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreyling, Martin; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; Bea, Silvia; Klapper, Wolfram; Vogt, Niclas; Delfau-Larue, Marie-Helene; Hutter, Grit; Cheah, Chan; Chiappella, Annalisa; Cortelazzo, Sergio; Pott, Christiane; Hess, Georg; Visco, Carlo; Vitolo, Umberto; Klener, Pavel; Aurer, Igor; Unterhalt, Michael; Ribrag, Vincent; Hoster, Eva; Hermine, Olivier

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a distinct subtype of malignant lymphoma characterized by the chromosomal translocation t(11;14)(q13;q32), resulting in constitutional overexpression of cyclin D1 and cell cycle dysregulation in virtually all cases. Clinically, MCL displays an aggressive course, with a

  5. Unexpected High Response Rate to Traditional Therapy after Dendritic Cell-Based Vaccine in Advanced Melanoma: Update of Clinical Outcome and Subgroup Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Ridolfi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We reviewed the clinical results of a dendritic cell-based phase II clinical vaccine trial in stage IV melanoma and analyzed a patient subgroup treated with standard therapies after stopping vaccination. From 2003 to 2009, 24 metastatic melanoma patients were treated with mature dendritic cells pulsed with autologous tumor lysate and keyhole limpet hemocyanin and low-dose interleukin-2. Overall response (OR to vaccination was 37.5% with a clinical benefit of 54.1%. All 14 responders showed delayed type hypersensitivity positivity. Median overall survival (OS was 15 months (95% CI, 8–33. Eleven patients underwent other treatments (3 surgery, 2 biotherapy, 2 radiotherapy, 2 chemotherapy, and 4 biochemotherapy after stopping vaccination. Of these, 2 patients had a complete response and 5 a partial response, with an OR of 63.6%. Median OS was 34 months (range 16–61. Our results suggest that therapeutic DC vaccination could favor clinical response in patients after more than one line of therapy.

  6. Unexpected high response rate to traditional therapy after dendritic cell-based vaccine in advanced melanoma: update of clinical outcome and subgroup analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridolfi, Laura; Petrini, Massimiliano; Fiammenghi, Laura; Granato, Anna Maria; Ancarani, Valentina; Pancisi, Elena; Scarpi, Emanuela; Guidoboni, Massimo; Migliori, Giuseppe; Sanna, Stefano; Tauceri, Francesca; Verdecchia, Giorgio Maria; Riccobon, Angela; Valmorri, Linda; Ridolfi, Ruggero

    2010-01-01

    We reviewed the clinical results of a dendritic cell-based phase II clinical vaccine trial in stage IV melanoma and analyzed a patient subgroup treated with standard therapies after stopping vaccination. From 2003 to 2009, 24 metastatic melanoma patients were treated with mature dendritic cells pulsed with autologous tumor lysate and keyhole limpet hemocyanin and low-dose interleukin-2. Overall response (OR) to vaccination was 37.5% with a clinical benefit of 54.1%. All 14 responders showed delayed type hypersensitivity positivity. Median overall survival (OS) was 15 months (95% CI, 8-33). Eleven patients underwent other treatments (3 surgery, 2 biotherapy, 2 radiotherapy, 2 chemotherapy, and 4 biochemotherapy) after stopping vaccination. Of these, 2 patients had a complete response and 5 a partial response, with an OR of 63.6%. Median OS was 34 months (range 16-61). Our results suggest that therapeutic DC vaccination could favor clinical response in patients after more than one line of therapy.

  7. A revised glossary of terms most commonly used by clinical electroencephalographers and updated proposal for the report format of the EEG findings : Revision 2017

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kane, Nick; Acharya, Jayant; Benickzy, Sandor; Caboclo, Luis; Finnigan, Simon; Kaplan, Peter W.; Shibasaki, Hiroshi; Pressler, Ronit; van Putten, Michel J.A.M.

    2017-01-01

    This glossary includes the terms most commonly used in clinical EEG. It is based on the previous proposals (Chatrian et al., 1974; Noachtar et al., 1999) and includes terms necessary to describe the EEG and to generate the EEG report. All EEG phenomena should be described as precisely as possible in

  8. Critical appraisal and update on the clinical utility of agomelatine, a melatonergic agonist, for the treatment of major depressive disease in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H Howland

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Robert H HowlandUniversity of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh PA, USAAbstract: This article describes the pharmacology of the novel atypical antidepressant drug agomelatine, critically reviews and evaluates its clinical use for the treatment of major depression, and suggests areas for further research. Agomelatine is a synthetic analog of the hormone melatonin. It stimulates the activity of melatonin MT1 and MT2 receptors and inhibits the activity of serotonin 5HT-2C receptor subtypes. Three acute trials demonstrated clinically modest, but statistically significant benefits over placebo. Three acute trials did not find agomelatine more effective than placebo. A meta-analysis of these six trials demonstrated a small, statistically significant, marginally clinically relevant difference between agomelatine and placebo. The only placebo-controlled study in elderly patients did not demonstrate a significant benefit for agomelatine. It was more effective than placebo in only one of two relapse prevention studies. Agomelatine was generally well tolerated compared to placebo. Its side-effect profile is different than and compares favorably to other antidepressant drugs. The overall tolerability of agomelatine in head-to-head comparisons was not substantially better than active drug comparators. Agomelatine is contraindicated in patients with impaired liver function and in patients taking drugs that potently inhibit CYP-1A2 metabolic enzymes. Because elevated liver enzymes are common, and there is a rare risk of more serious liver reactions, routine laboratory monitoring of liver function is recommended periodically throughout treatment. Agomelatine does not have clinically significant advantages compared to other antidepressant drugs, and it has certain limitations and disadvantages. Because of its unique pharmacology and relatively benign tolerability profile

  9. Herpes Labialis: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Alexander K C; Barankin, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    Herpes labialis is characterized by recurrent vesicular eruptions primarily on the lips and perioral skin. The condition is contagious, can cause significant discomfort/pain, and can have an adverse effect on the quality of life. To update the evaluation and treatment of herpes labialis. A PubMed search was completed in Clinical Queries using the key term "herpes labialis". Patents were searched using the key term "herpes labialis" from www.freepatentsonline.com. The diagnosis of herpes labialis is mainly clinical based on classic grouped lesions (papules, vesicles, ulcers) on the lip. Antiviral therapy shortens the duration of pain and discomfort, hastens healing, and reduces viral shedding. Thus, episodic treatment is warranted, especially if the patient desires treatment for cosmetic purposes or for relief of pain. Such treatment needs to be initiated promptly, ideally in the prodromal stage and no later than 48 hours from the onset of lesions to achieve optimal results. Chronic suppressive therapy with oral antiviral agents should be considered for patients with severe or frequent (six or more episodes per year) recurrences. Recent patents related to the management of herpes labialis are also discussed. For episodic treatment, oral antiviral agents, such as acyclovir (Zovirax), valacyclovir (Valtrex) and famciclovir (Famvir), are superior to topical antiviral therapy. Valacyclovir and famciclovir have greater oral bioavailability and are better absorbed than acyclovir, require less frequent dosing, but are more expensive and are not approved for children. Topical antiviral agents such as 5% acyclovir cream/ointment (Zovirax) ± hydrocortisone (Xerese), 1% penciclovir (Denavir) cream, and 50 mg Buccal Adhesive Tablet (ABT-50 mg) can also be used for episodic treatment of herpes labialis. These topical agents are not effective in the prevention of recurrent herpes labialis. For chronic daily suppressive therapy, oral antivirals are the treatment of choice

  10. Ultrasound Risk Categories for Thyroid Nodules and Cytology Results: A Single Institution's Experience after the Adoption of the 2016 Update of Medical Guidelines by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and Associazione Medici Endocrinologi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negro, Roberto; Greco, Gabriele; Colosimo, Ermenegildo

    2017-01-01

    In 2016, the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) and Associazione Medici Endocrinologi (AME) released updated guidelines for the diagnosis and management of thyroid nodules. The aim of this study was to evaluate the AACE/AME recommendations for FNA in clinical practice, by comparing the (US) stratification risk and indications for FNA with cytologic results. From May to December 2016, we collected the cytologic results from FNAs of nodules that were classified using a three-tier US category system (low, intermediate, and high risk). We obtained 859 FNAs from 598 patients: 341 (39.7%) from low, 489 (56.9%) from intermediate, and 29 (3.4%) from high risk nodules. Of these, 88.5% and 74.9% of low and intermediate risk nodules, respectively, were cytologically benign, whereas 84.6% of high risk nodules had a moderate-to-elevated risk of malignancy or were malignant. If FNAs had been limited to intermediate risk nodules >20 mm, we would have missed 13/17 (76.5%) nodules that had moderate-to-elevated risk of malignancy or were malignant (11/13 were malignant based on histology). A nonnegligible number of cytologically malignant nodules or nodules that were suspected to be malignant would be missed if intermediate US risk nodules <20 mm were not biopsied.

  11. Male and Couple Fertility Impairment due to HPV-DNA Sperm Infection: Update on Molecular Mechanism and Clinical Impact—Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Gizzo, Salvatore; Ferrari, Bruno; Noventa, Marco; Ferrari, Emanuele; Patrelli, Tito Silvio; Gangemi, Michele; Nardelli, Giovanni Battista

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidences identify Human Papillomavirus (HPV) sperm infection as a possible cause of male and couple infertility. It acts through different mechanisms at various steps of human conception and early gestational development. We performed a systematic review to assess the role of HPV semen infection on male and couple infertility. Analysis of available and eligible data does not permit us to fund clear evidences about clinical impact of HPV infection on fertility, although sperm parameter...

  12. Clinical, developmental and molecular update on Cornelia de Lange syndrome and the cohesin complex: abstracts from the 2014 Scientific and Educational Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Antonie D; Calof, Anne L; Lander, Arthur D; Gerton, Jennifer L; Krantz, Ian D; Dorsett, Dale; Deardorff, Matthew A; Blagowidow, Natalie; Yokomori, Kyoko; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Santos, Rosaysela; Woodman, Julie; Megee, Paul C; O'Connor, Julia T; Egense, Alena; Noon, Sarah; Belote, Maurice; Goodban, Marjorie T; Hansen, Blake D; Timmons, Jenni Glad; Musio, Antonio; Ishman, Stacey L; Bryan, Yvon; Wu, Yaning; Bettini, Laura R; Mehta, Devanshi; Zakari, Musinu; Mills, Jason A; Srivastava, Siddharth; Haaland, Richard E

    2015-06-01

    Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) is the most common example of disorders of the cohesin complex, or cohesinopathies. There are a myriad of clinical issues facing individuals with CdLS, particularly in the neurodevelopmental system, which also have implications for the parents and caretakers, involved professionals, therapists, and schools. Basic research in developmental and cell biology on cohesin is showing significant progress, with improved understanding of the mechanisms and the possibility of potential therapeutics. The following abstracts are presentations from the 6th Cornelia de Lange Syndrome Scientific and Educational Symposium, which took place on June 25-26, 2014, in conjunction with the Cornelia de Lange Syndrome Foundation National Meeting in Costa Mesa, CA. The Research Committee of the CdLS Foundation organizes the meeting, reviews and accepts abstracts, and subsequently disseminates the information to the families through members of the Clinical Advisory Board. In addition to the scientific and clinical discussions, there were educationally focused talks related to practical aspects of behavior and development. AMA CME credits were provided by Greater Baltimore Medical Center, Baltimore, MD. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type (ENKTL-NT): An update on epidemiology, clinical presentation, and natural history in North American and European cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverkos, Bradley M.; Pan, Zenggang; Gru, Alejandro A.; Freud, Aharon G.; Rabinovitch, Rachel; Xu-Welliver, Meng; Otto, Brad; Barrionuevo, Carlos; Baiocchi, Robert A.; Rochford, Rosemary; Porcu, Pierluigi

    2016-01-01

    Extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type (ENKTL-NT) is an aggressive extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphoma most commonly occurring in East Asia and Latin America but with increasing incidence in the U.S. Data on epidemiology, disease presentation, and outcome for European and North American (“Western”) cases are very limited. We review published landmark clinical studies on ENKTL-NT in the West and report in detail recent data, including our institutional experience. We highlight key observations in its epidemiology, natural history, and trends in clinical management. In the U.S., ENKTL-NT is more common among Asian Pacific Islanders (API) and Hispanics compared to non-Hispanic whites. Published studies indicate less heterogeneity in clinical presentation in Western ENKTL-NT compared to Asian patients. While there is variation in age at diagnosis, presence of antecedent lymphoproliferative disorders, and outcomes among racial/ethnic groups, the universal association of ENKTL-NT with EBV and the poor response of this neoplasm to anthracycline-based therapy are consistent across all geographic areas. PMID:27778143

  14. Clinical and radiological profile of ameloblastic fibro-odontoma: an update on an uncommon odontogenic tumor based on a critical analysis of 114 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchner, Amos; Kaffe, Israel; Vered, Marilena

    2013-03-01

    Ameloblastic fibro-odontoma is an uncommon benign tumor of the jaws that belongs to the group of mixed odontogenic tumors. The descriptions of its clinical and radiological features in the literature are not always accurate and sometimes even contradictory. The aim of the present study was to critically evaluate their clinical and radiological features as reported in the English-language literature. A total of 114 well-documented cases of ameloblastic fibro-odontomas (103 from publications and 11 of our own new cases) were analyzed. The patients' age ranged from 8 months to 26 years (mean 9.6). There were 74 (65 %) males, with a male-to-female ratio of 1.85:1 (P = 0.001). The mandible was involved in 74 (65 %) cases, and the mandible-to-maxilla ratio was 1.85:1 (P odontomas are significantly more common in males and in the mandible, and that multilocular lesions are uncommon. It also revealed that, based on their clinical and radiological features, some of them are probably true neoplasms while others appear to be developing odontomas (hamartomas).

  15. Update in Infectious Diseases 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candel, F J; Peñuelas, M; Lejárraga, C; Emilov, T; Rico, C; Díaz, I; Lázaro, C; Viñuela-Prieto, J M; Matesanz, M

    2017-09-01

    Antimicrobial resistance in complex models of continuous infection is a current issue. The update 2017 course addresses about microbiological, epidemiological and clinical aspects useful for a current approach to infectious disease. During the last year, nosocomial pneumonia approach guides, recommendations for management of yeast and filamentous fungal infections, review papers on the empirical approach to peritonitis and extensive guidelines on stewardship have been published. HIV infection is being treated before and more intensively. The implementation of molecular biology, spectrometry and inmunology to traditional techniques of staining and culture achieve a better and faster microbiological diagnosis. Finally, the infection is increasingly integrated, assessing non-antibiotic aspects in the treatment.

  16. Primary Anorectal Melanoma: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Carcoforo, M.T Raiji, G.M Palini, M Pedriali, U Maestroni, G Soliani, A Detroia, M.V Zanzi, A.L Manna, J.G Crompton, R.C Langan, A Stojadinovic, I Avital

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The anorectum is a rare anatomic location for primary melanoma. Mucosal melanoma is a distinct biological and clinical entity from the more common cutaneous melanoma. It portrays worse prognosis than cutaneous melanoma, with distant metastases being the overwhelming cause of morbidity and mortality. Surgery is the treatment of choice, but significant controversy exists over the extent of surgical resection. We present an update on the state of the art of anorectal mucosal melanoma. To illustrate the multimodality approach to anorectal melanoma, we present a typical patient.

  17. Cushing syndrome: update on testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raff, Hershel

    2015-03-01

    Endogenous hypercortisolism (Cushing syndrome) is one of the most enigmatic diseases in clinical medicine. The diagnosis and differential diagnosis of Cushing syndrome depend on proper laboratory evaluation. In this review, an update is provided on selected critical issues in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of Cushing syndrome: the use of late-night salivary cortisol in initial diagnosis and for postoperative surveillance, and the use of prolactin measurement to improve the performance of inferior petrosal sinus sampling to distinguish Cushing disease from ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) syndrome during differential diagnosis of ACTH-dependent Cushing syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical psychopharmacology of borderline personality disorder: an update on the available evidence in light of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders - 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripoll, Luis H

    2012-01-01

    Clinical considerations for evidence-based treatment of borderline personality disorder (BPD) are outlined in the context of the best available evidence, discussed with reference to BPD traits currently identified in the upcoming Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders - 5 (DSM-5) revision. The DSM-5 will highlight refractory affective, interpersonal, and identity symptoms in BPD as potential treatment targets. In addition to providing a framework for clinical decision-making, future research strategies will also focus on neurotransmitter systems of greater relevance to understanding overall personality functioning. Although only a few randomized controlled trials of psychopharmacological treatments for BPD have been published recently, several meta-analyses and systematic reviews converge on the consensus effectiveness of lamotrigine, topiramate, valproate, aripiprazole, olanzapine, and omega-3 fatty acid supplementation. Stronger evidence exists for treating disinhibition and antagonism than negative affectivity, particularly interpersonal facets of such traits. In addition, basic research suggests a future role for modifying glutamatergic, opioid, and oxytocinergic neurotransmitter systems to treat BPD. Clinicians should utilize omega-3, anticonvulsants, and atypical antipsychotic agents in treating specific DSM-5 BPD traits, notably disinhibition, antagonism, and some aspects of negative affectivity. Future research will focus on normalizing opioid and oxytocin dysregulation, as an adjunct to evidence-based psychotherapy, in an effort to improve interpersonal functioning.

  19. Red Hill Updates

    Science.gov (United States)

    This and other periodic updates are intended to keep the public informed on major progress being made to protect public health and the environment at the Red Hill Underground Fuel Storage Facility in Hawaii.

  20. Safety and efficacy of second-generation drug-eluting stents compared with bare-metal stents: An updated meta-analysis and regression of 9 randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Ahmed N; Shah, Nikhil H; Elgendy, Islam Y; Agarwal, Nayan; Elgendy, Akram Y; Mentias, Amgad; Barakat, Amr F; Mahtta, Dhruv; David Anderson, R; Bavry, Anthony A

    2018-01-01

    The efficacy of second-generation drug-eluting stents (DES; eg, everolimus and zotarolimus) compared with bare-metal stents (BMS) in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention was challenged recently by new evidence from large clinical trials. Thus, we aimed to conduct an updated systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) evaluating the efficacy and safety of second-generation DES compared with BMS. Electronic databases were systematically searched for all RCTs comparing second-generation DES with BMS and reporting clinical outcomes. The primary efficacy outcome was major adverse cardiac events (MACE); the primary safety outcome was definite stent thrombosis. The DerSimonian and Laird method was used for estimation of summary risk ratios (RR). A total of 9 trials involving 17 682 patients were included in the final analysis. Compared with BMS, second-generation DES were associated with decreased incidence of MACE (RR: 0.78, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.69-0.88), driven by the decreased incidence of myocardial infarction (MI) (RR: 0.67, 95% CI: 0.48-0.95), target-lesion revascularization (RR: 0.47, 95% CI: 0.42-0.53), definite stent thrombosis (RR: 0.57, 95% CI: 0.41-0.78), and definite/probable stent thrombosis (RR: 0.54, 95% CI: 0.38-0.80). The incidence of all-cause mortality was similar between groups (RR: 0.94, 95% CI: 0.79-1.10). Meta-regression showed lower incidences of MI with DES implantation in elderly and diabetic patients (P = 0.026 and P DES appear to be associated with a lower incidence of MACE, mainly driven by lower rates of target-lesion revascularization, MI, and stent thrombosis. However, all-cause mortality appears similar between groups. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Evidence-based clinical practice update: practice guidelines for anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation based on a systematic review and multidisciplinary consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Melick, Nicky; van Cingel, Robert E H; Brooijmans, Frans; Neeter, Camille; van Tienen, Tony; Hullegie, Wim; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G

    2016-12-01

    The Royal Dutch Society for Physical Therapy (KNGF) instructed a multidisciplinary group of Dutch anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) experts to develop an evidence statement for rehabilitation after ACL reconstruction. Clinical practice guideline underpinned by systematic review and expert consensus. A multidisciplinary working group and steering group systematically reviewed the literature and wrote the guideline. MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library were searched for meta-analyses, systematic reviews, randomised controlled trials and prospective cohort studies published between January 1990 and June 2015. Included literature must have addressed 1 of 9 predetermined clinical topics: (1) preoperative predictors for postoperative outcome, (2) effectiveness of physical therapy, (3) open and closed kinetic chain quadriceps exercises, (4) strength and neuromuscular training, (5) electrostimulation and electromyographic feedback, (6) cryotherapy, (7) measurements of functional performance, (8) return to play and (9) risk for reinjury. Ninety studies were included as the basis for the evidence statement. Rehabilitation after ACL injury should include a prehabilitation phase and 3 criterion-based postoperative phases: (1) impairment-based, (2) sport-specific training and (3) return to play. A battery of strength and hop tests, quality of movement and psychological tests should be used to guide progression from one rehabilitation stage to the next. Postoperative rehabilitation should continue for 9-12 months. To assess readiness to return to play and the risk for reinjury, a test battery, including strength tests, hop tests and measurement of movement quality, should be used. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  2. Paracoccidioidomicose: atualização epidemiológica, clínica e terapêutica Paracoccidioidomycosis: epidemiological, clinical and treatment up-date

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Alencar Marques

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available São apresentados dados de atualização epidemiológica, clínica, diagnóstica e terapêutica relativos à paracoccidioidomicose. Discute-se a importância epidemiológica resultante do isolamento do Paracoccidioides brasiliensis a partir do tatu (Dasypus novemcinctus em regiões do Brasil e Colômbia, assim como dos resultados de inquéritos soroepidemiológicos em cães e do surgimento do primeiro caso de paracoccidioidomicose doença em cão. As dificuldades de isolamento do fungo a partir do solo são correlacionadas com novos informes de investigação epidemiológica. São apresentados aspectos clínicos das manifestações da forma aguda da doença, assim como das manifestações da neuroparacoccidioidomicose e da enfermidade associada à infecção pelo HIV. Discute-se o papel da sorologia e da técnica da PCR no diagnóstico e dos possíveis avanços no tratamento da paracoccidioidomicose com os novos derivados triazólicos.The present report provides new data related to the epidemiology, clinical aspects and treatment of paracoccidioidomycosis. The epidemiological impact of the isolation of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis from the armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus in areas of Brazil and Columbia, the results from seroepidemiologic study in dogs and the first case of paracoccidioidomycosis-disease on a dog are presented. New insights related to the classical difficulties of isolation of the fungus from soil are correlated with epidemiological data. Clinical manifestation of the acute form of the disease as well as aspects of the neuroparacoccidioidomycosis, and aspects of the association of the disease with the HIV infection are considered. The role of serology and PCR in the diagnosis, as well as the possible advances in the treatment of paracoccidioidomycosis with the new triazole derivatives are discussed.

  3. Updates on Therapeutics in Clinical Trials for Spinal Cord Injuries: Key Translational Applications of Human Embryonic Stem Cells-Derived Neural Progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeb, Habiba; Khan, Ishaq Nasib; Munir, Iqbal; Ramadan, Wafaa Saadeldin; Ahmad, Mian Afaq; Hussein, Deema; Kamal, Mohammad Amjad; Al Karim, Saleh

    2016-01-01

    Injuries to the spinal cord often have devastating physiological impacts due to the organ's vital role in neuro-impulse communications between muscles and the brain. Spinal Cord Injuries (SCIs) have recently been estimated to affect up to 80,000 individuals per year worldwide, with most occurring following a traumatic event. Unfortunately, effective treatments standardised globally for patients with SCIs have not yet been established. For many years, inadequate understanding of the complexities of the Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems and Neurogenesis has limited progression towards effective cures. However, in the last century, scientific advancements have generated new paradigms for medical treatments of SCIs. Basic as well as translational studies have progressed to such an extent that many kinds of protective and regenerative therapeutics are available in clinical trials. In particular, uncovering the mechanisms responsible for controlling the pluripotent state of Human Embryonic Stem Cells (hESCs) was proved vital for recognizing the prospective role in regenerative medicine for SCIs. Elucidating knowledge of neurogenesis alongside hESCs in relation to SCIs has been crucial for critical assessments of the existing translational therapeutic strategies for SCIs.

  4. From Bench to Bedside to Bug: An Update of Clinically Relevant Advances in the Care of Persons with Helicobacter pylori Associated Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Chiba

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available In-depth meetings of the XIth International Workshop on Gastroduodenal Pathology and Helicobacter pylori led to the presentation and discussion of extensive new data on H pylori and its diseases. The mode of transmission of H pylori remains unclear, and it remains unknown why only a small proportion of infected individuals develop duodenal or gastric ulcer disease and even fewer develop gastric cancer. The role of H pylori eradication in persons with uninvestigated dyspepsia remains controversial. New clinical trials of H pylori treatment show symptom relief and improvement in the quality of life of persons with functional dyspepsia, especially in those with ulcer-like or reflux-like dyspepsia. Clearly the move is toward symptom-based management of persons with dyspepsia, with fewer endoscopies being needed in the otherwise healthy young dyspeptic patients. It remains controversial whether eradicating H pylori in duodenal ulcer or functional dyspepsia increases the risk of subsequent development of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The one-week proton pump inhibitor-based triple regimens remain the gold standard of H pylori therapy, but some of the ranitidine bismuth citrate plus two antibiotic regimens also achieve an 80% H pylori eradication rate on an intention-to-treat basis. While the urea breath test remains the noninvasive test of choice, interesting new data are available on the use of stool antigen testing to diagnose H pylori infection. The number of H pylori-associated gastroduodenal diseases grows to include possible liver, vascular, immune and skin conditions.

  5. Clinical Neuropathology Practice News 3-2012: the “ABC” in AD – revised and updated guideline for the neuropathologic assessment of Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Gabor G; Gelpi, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    The two major approaches for the neuropathological assessment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) related pathology have been based on the assessment of neuritic plaques (CERAD) and neurofibrillary pathology (Braak and Braak). In 1997 these two approaches were integrated in the criteria and recommendations of the National Institute on Aging and the Reagan Institute Working group. Recently a new guideline has been published by the National Institute on Aging-Alzheimer’s Association. This new guideline recognizes the existence of a pre-clinical stage of AD as part of continuous neuropathological changes in the background of the disease process, and it fosters the assessment of amyloid-b phases in addition to neurofibrillary degeneration and neuritic plaques following an “ABC” score. Further, it suggests protocols for the neuropathological assessment of additional/concomitant neurodegenerative and vascular pathologies. Altogether, the new guideline responds to the need for an update of the existing “1997 criteria” for AD. Continued studies will have to assess the added value of the new approach and the influence of interlaboratory and/or methodological differences on the implementation of these new recommendations. PMID:22551914

  6. Prescriptive amplification recommendations for hearing losses with a conductive component and their impact on the required maximum power output: an update with accompanying clinical explanation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Earl E

    2013-06-01

    Hearing aid prescriptive recommendations for hearing losses having a conductive component have received less clinical and research interest than for losses of a sensorineural nature; as a result, much variation remains among current prescriptive methods in their recommendations for conductive and mixed hearing losses (Johnson and Dillon, 2011). The primary intent of this brief clinical note is to demonstrate differences between two algebraically equivalent expressions of hearing loss, which have been approaches used historically to generate a prescription for hearing losses with a conductive component. When air and bone conduction thresholds are entered into hearing aid prescriptions designed for nonlinear hearing aids, it was hypothesized that that two expressions would not yield equivalent amounts of prescribed insertion gain and output. These differences are examined for their impact on the maximum power output (MPO) requirements of the hearing aid. Subsequently, the MPO capabilities of two common behind-the-ear (BTE) receiver placement alternatives, receiver-in-aid (RIA) and receiver-in-canal (RIC), are examined. The two expressions of hearing losses examined were the 25% ABG + AC approach and the 75% ABG + BC approach, where ABG refers to air-bone gap, AC refers to air-conduction threshold, and BC refers to bone-conduction threshold. Example hearing loss cases with a conductive component are sampled for calculations. The MPO capabilities of the BTE receiver placements in commercially-available products were obtained from hearing aids on the U.S. federal purchasing contract. Prescribed gain and the required MPO differs markedly between the two approaches. The 75% ABG + BC approach prescribes a compression ratio that is reflective of the amount of sensorineural hearing loss. Not all hearing aids will have the MPO capabilities to support the output requirements for fitting hearing losses with a large conductive component particularly when combined with

  7. An update on the clinical diagnostic value of β-hCG and αFP for intracranial germ cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Mingming; Guan, Hongzhi; Lau, Ching C; Terashima, Keita; Jin, Zimeng; Cui, Liying; Wang, Yuzhou; Li, Guilin; Yao, Yong; Guo, Yi; Li, Yan Michael; Zhong, Dingrong; Xiao, Juan; Wan, Xirun; Lian, Xin; Feng, Feng; Ren, Haitao; Zhao, Yanhuan; Cheng, Xinqi; Gu, Feng

    2016-03-12

    Pathological examination combined with tumor markers has become a standard for the diagnosis of intracranial germ cell tumors (ICGCTs), but the current concept of 'secreting germ cell tumors' and three empirically highly specific diagnostic criteria (β-hCG ≥ 50 IU/L or αFP ≥ 10 ng/mL; β-hCG ≥ 100 IU/L or αFP ≥ 50 ng/mL; β-hCG > 50 IU/L or αFP > 25 ng/mL) are not based upon pathology examination or CSF cytology. Further investigation is needed to re-evaluate their value. A multidisciplinary diagnostic team was created. Valid β-hCG/αFP data were collected from cases of ICGCTs confirmed by pathology and CSF cytology (n = 58) between 1991 and 2012, and from suspected ICGCTs cases (n = 17) between 2011 and 2012 as controls [Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), n = 12; and other intracranial tumor (ICT), n = 5]. The cut-off points for β-hCG and αFP were calculated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. This study clarifies the relative rationality of one criteria (β-hCG > 50 IU/L and αFP > 25 ng/mL); confirms new β-hCG diagnostic cut-off points: CSF β-hCG ≥ 8.2 IU/L and serum β-hCG ≥ 2.5 IU/L (sensitivity of 47 and 34%, respectively, specificity of 100%, both; P hCG exceeds 90%). Subtype diagnosis improved with αFP in 16.7% of non-geminomatous germ cell tumor cases. New evidence-based criteria of β-hCG and αFP can help improving early and formal diagnosis of ICGCTs, and is of great clinical significance.

  8. Update on abusive head trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaahinfar, Ashkon; Whitelaw, Kevin D; Mansour, Karim M

    2015-06-01

    This article provides an update on abusive head trauma (AHT), focusing on new developments most salient to the emergency medicine clinician, including epidemiology, clinical recognition, diagnostic work-up, management of neurologic injury, and public health implications. The recent literature has focused on honing the clinician's ability to recognize AHT and its immediate sequelae, to more accurately distinguish between abusive and accidental head injuries by patterns of neuroimaging and retinal hemorrhages, and to appreciate the long-term impacts. Specifically, both a clinical prediction rule and biomarker show promise, and new research advocates for the early identification of subclinical seizures as well as cervical spine injuries. The emergency medicine provider must be able to recognize and manage children who may have AHT and to appreciate when the diagnostic findings warrant consultation with a child protection team. These authors summarize the recent and notable advances in our understanding of AHT.

  9. Cost-utility analysis of Palivizumab for Respiratory Syncytial Virus infection prophylaxis in preterm infants: update based on the clinical evidence in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Luna, M; Burgos-Pol, R; Oyagüez, I; Figueras-Aloy, J; Sánchez-Solís, M; Martinón-Torres, F; Carbonell-Estrany, X

    2017-10-17

    This study aimed at estimating the efficiency of palivizumab in the prevention of Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) infection and its sequelae in preterm infants (32 day 1 -35 day 0 weeks of gestational age -wGA-) in Spain. A decision-tree model was developed to compare health benefits (Quality Adjusted Life Years-QALYs) and costs of palivizumab versus a non-prophylaxis strategy over 6 years. A hypothetical cohort of 1,000 preterm infants, 32 day 1 -35 day 0 wGA (4.356 kg average weight) at the beginning of the prophylaxis (15 mg/kg of palivizumab; 3.88 average number of injections per RSV season) was analysed. The model considered the most recent evidence from Spanish observational and epidemiological studies on RSV infection: the FLIP II study provided hospital admission and Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission rates; in-hospital mortality rate was drawn from an epidemiological study from 2004 to 2012; recurrent wheezing rates associated to RSV infection from SPRING study were adjusted by the evidence on the palivizumab effect from clinical trials. Quality of life baseline value, number of hospitalized infants and the presence of recurrent wheezing over time were granted to estimate QALYs. National Health Service and societal perspective (included also recurrent wheezing indirect cost) were analysed. Total costs (€, 2016) included pharmaceutical and administration costs, hospitalization costs and recurrent wheezing management annual costs. A discount rate of 3.0% was applied annually for both costs and health outcomes. Over 6 years, the base case analysis showed that palivizumab was associated to an increase of 0.0731 QALYs compared to non-prophylaxis. Total costs were estimated in €2,110.71 (palivizumab) and €671.68 (non-prophylaxis) from the National Health System (NHS) perspective, resulting in an incremental cost utility ratio (ICUR) of €19,697.69/QALYs gained (prophylaxis vs non-prophylaxis). Results derived from the risk-factors population

  10. Update of European bioethics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rendtorff, Jacob Dahl

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an update of the research on European bioethics undertaken by the author together with Professor Peter Kemp since the 1990s, on Basic ethical principles in European bioethics and biolaw. In this European approach to basic ethical principles in bioethics and biolaw......, the principles of autonomy, dignity, integrity and vulnerability are proposed as the most important ethical principles for respect for the human person in biomedical and biotechnological development. This approach to bioethics and biolaw is presented here in a short updated version that integrates the earlier...... research in a presentation of the present understanding of the basic ethical principles in bioethics and biolaw....

  11. Updating action domain descriptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiter, Thomas; Erdem, Esra; Fink, Michael; Senko, Ján

    2010-10-01

    Incorporating new information into a knowledge base is an important problem which has been widely investigated. In this paper, we study this problem in a formal framework for reasoning about actions and change. In this framework, action domains are described in an action language whose semantics is based on the notion of causality. Unlike the formalisms considered in the related work, this language allows straightforward representation of non-deterministic effects and indirect effects of (possibly concurrent) actions, as well as state constraints; therefore, the updates can be more general than elementary statements. The expressivity of this formalism allows us to study the update of an action domain description with a more general approach compared to related work. First of all, we consider the update of an action description with respect to further criteria, for instance, by ensuring that the updated description entails some observations, assertions, or general domain properties that constitute further constraints that are not expressible in an action description in general. Moreover, our framework allows us to discriminate amongst alternative updates of action domain descriptions and to single out a most preferable one, based on a given preference relation possibly dependent on the specified criteria. We study semantic and computational aspects of the update problem, and establish basic properties of updates as well as a decomposition theorem that gives rise to a divide and conquer approach to updating action descriptions under certain conditions. Furthermore, we study the computational complexity of decision problems around computing solutions, both for the generic setting and for two particular preference relations, viz. set-inclusion and weight-based preference. While deciding the existence of solutions and recognizing solutions are PSPACE-complete problems in general, the problems fall back into the polynomial hierarchy under restrictions on the additional

  12. BI-RADS update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado, Cecilia L

    2014-05-01

    The updated American College of Radiology (ACR) Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) has been newly released. This article summarizes the changes and updates that have been made to BI-RADS. The goal of the revised edition continues to be the same: to improve clarification in image interpretation, maintain reporting standardization, and simplify the monitoring of outcomes. The new BI-RADS also introduces new terminology to provide a more universal lexicon across all 3 imaging modalities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Proposal for an Update of the Definition and Scope of Behavioral Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Dekker, Joost; Stauder, Adrienne; Penedo, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We aim to provide an update of the definition and scope of behavioral medicine in the Charter of ISBM, as the present version was developed more than 25?years ago. Methods We identify issues which need clarification or updating. This leads us to propose an update of the definition and scope of behavioral medicine. Results Issues in need of clarification or updating include the scope of behavioral medicine (biobehavioral mechanisms, clinical diagnosis and intervention, and prevention a...

  14. Supreme Court Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Kelley R.

    2009-01-01

    "Chief Justice Flubs Oath." "Justice Ginsburg Has Cancer Surgery." At the start of this year, those were the news headlines about the U.S. Supreme Court. But January 2009 also brought news about key education cases--one resolved and two others on the docket--of which school administrators should take particular note. The Supreme Court updates on…

  15. Update: Biological Nitrogen Fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Alan; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Updates knowledge on nitrogen fixation, indicating that investigation of free-living nitrogen-fixing organisms is proving useful in understanding bacterial partners and is expected to lead to development of more effective symbioses. Specific areas considered include biochemistry/genetics, synthesis control, proteins and enzymes, symbiotic systems,…

  16. Liver transplantation : an update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdonk, R. C.; Van den Berg, A. P.; Slooff, M. J. H.; Porte, R. J.; Haagsma, E. B.

    2007-01-01

    Liver transplantation has been an accepted treatment for end-stage liver disease since the 1980s. Currently it is a highly successful treatment for this indication. The aim of this review is to give a general update on recent developments in the field of liver transplantation. In the last decades

  17. Phaeochromocytoma – an update

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    but has been advocated as the test of choice in many studies. The management of a phaeochromocytoma is mainly surgical and requires careful patient preparation to avoid catecholamine-induced complications during surgery. This review provides an update on phaeochromocytomas. Genetics. 68. J e. MDS a. November ...

  18. Update of telephone exchange

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    As part of the upgrade of telephone services, the CERN switching centre will be updated on Monday 3 July between 8.00 p.m. and 3.00 a.m. Telephone services may be disrupted and possibly even interrupted during this operation.We apologise in advance for any inconvenience this may cause. CERN TELECOM Service

  19. Update of telephone exchange

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    As part of the upgrade of telephone services, the CERN switching centre will be updated on between Monday 23 October 8.00 p.m. and Tuesday 24 October 2.00 a.m. Telephone services may be disrupted and possibly even interrupted during this operation. We apologise in advance for any inconvenience this may cause. CERN TELECOM Service

  20. Update of telephone exchange

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    As part of the upgrade of telephone services, the CERN switching centre will be updated on Monday 3 July between 8.00 p.m. and 3.00 a.m. Telephone services may be disrupted and possibly even interrupted during this operation. We apologise in advance for any inconvenience this may cause. CERN TELECOM Service

  1. Update of telephone exchange

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    As part of the upgrade of telephone services, the CERN switching centre will be updated on Wednesday 14 June between 8.00 p.m. and midnight. Telephone services may be disrupted and possibly even interrupted during this operation. We apologise in advance for any inconvenience this may cause. CERN TELECOM Service

  2. Modern Endodontic Microsurgery Concepts: A Clinical Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floratos, Spyros; Kim, Syngcuk

    2017-01-01

    Increased use of the surgical operating microscope in endodontic surgery has elucidated many shortcomings of previous techniques and along with microsurgical instruments and new more biologically acceptable root-end filling materials has started the new microsurgical era in surgical endodontics. Endodontic microsurgery is a minimally invasive technique that results in less postoperative pain and edema and faster wound healing. It offers a significantly higher success rate than traditional apical surgery technique. The components, key concepts and procedural steps of endodontic microsurgery as well as the prognosis and predictability of modern root-end procedures are presented in this review. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Radiation induced liver disease: A clinical update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, R.; Madan, R.; Chander, S.; Kilambi, R.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) or radiation hepatitis is a sub-acute form of liver injury due to radiation. It is one of the most dreaded complications of radiation which prevents radiation dose escalation and re irradiation for hepatobiliary or upper gastrointestinal malignancies. This complication should be kept in mind whenever a patient is planned for irradiation of these malignancies. Although, incidence of RILD is decreasing due to better knowledge of liver tolerance, improved investigation modalities and modern radiation delivery techniques, treatment options are still limited. In this review article, we have focussed on pathophysiology, risk factors, prevention and management of RILD

  4. Laser tattoo removal: A clinical update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie GY Ho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Techniques for tattoo removal have evolved significantly over the years. The commonly used Quality-switched (QS ruby, alexandrite, and Nd:YAG lasers are the traditional workhorses for tattoo removal. Newer strategies using combination laser treatments, multi-pass treatments, and picosecond lasers offer promising results. The tattoo color and skin type of the patient are important considerations when choosing the appropriate laser. Standard protocols can be developed for the effective and safe treatment of tattoos.

  5. Laser Tattoo Removal: A Clinical Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Stephanie GY; Goh, Chee Leok

    2015-01-01

    Techniques for tattoo removal have evolved significantly over the years. The commonly used Quality-switched (QS) ruby, alexandrite, and Nd:YAG lasers are the traditional workhorses for tattoo removal. Newer strategies using combination laser treatments, multi-pass treatments, and picosecond lasers offer promising results. The tattoo color and skin type of the patient are important considerations when choosing the appropriate laser. Standard protocols can be developed for the effective and safe treatment of tattoos. PMID:25949017

  6. Treatment of Panic Disorder: A Clinical Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beamish, Patricia M.; Belcastro, Amy L.; Granello, Darcy Haag

    This article presents specific, practical information to guide mental health counselors in treating individuals who meet the criteria for panic disorder. It delineates the specific strategies identified in the research literature for use by mental health counselors. Full resolution of panic attacks by one form of treatment may not always be…

  7. Posaconazole: An Update of Its Clinical Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Leung

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Posaconazole (PCZ is a relatively new addition to the azole antifungals. It has fungicidal activities against Aspergillus fumigatus, Blastomyces dermatitidis, selected Candida species, Crytopcoccus neoformans, and Trichosporon. PCZ also has fungistatic activities against Candida, Coccidioides, selected Fusarium spp., Histoplasma, Scedosporium and Zygomycetes. In addition, combining the drug with caspofungin or amphotericin B results in a synergistic interaction against A. fumigatus, C. glabrata and C. neoformans. The absorption of PCZ suspension is enhanced when given with food, nutritional supplements, and carbonated beverages. Oral administration of PCZ in divided doses also increases its bioavailability. PCZ has a large volume of distribution and is highly protein bound (>95%. The main elimination route of PCZ is fecal. PCZ is an inhibitor of the CYP3A4 enzyme; therefore, monitoring for drug-drug interactions is warranted with other CYP3A4 substrates/inhibitors/inducers. The most common adverse effects include headache, fatigue, nausea, vomiting and elevated hepatic enzymes. PCZ, with its unique antifungal activities, expands the azole class of antifungal agents. Because of its limit in formulation, PCZ oral suspension is recommended in immunocompromised patients with functional gastrointestinaltracts who fail conventional antifungal therapies or who are suspected to have a breakthrough fungal infection. However, a delayed-release tablet formulation and intravenous (IV injection became available in 2014, expanding the use of PCZ in other patient populations, including individuals who are unable to take oral formulations.

  8. Localized scleroderma: clinical spectrum and therapeutic update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Careta, Mariana Figueiroa; Romiti, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Scleroderma is a rare connective tissue disease that is manifested by cutaneous sclerosis and variable systemic involvement. Two categories of scleroderma are known: systemic sclerosis, characterized by cutaneous sclerosis and visceral involvement, and localized scleroderma or morphea which classically presents benign and self-limited evolution and is confined to the skin and/or underlying tissues. Localized scleroderma is a rare disease of unknown etiology. Recent studies show that the localized form may affect internal organs and have variable morbidity. Treatment should be started very early, before complications occur due to the high morbidity of localized scleroderma. In this review, we report the most important aspects and particularities in the treatment of patients diagnosed with localized scleroderma.

  9. Localized scleroderma: clinical spectrum and therapeutic update*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Careta, Mariana Figueiroa; Romiti, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Scleroderma is a rare connective tissue disease that is manifested by cutaneous sclerosis and variable systemic involvement. Two categories of scleroderma are known: systemic sclerosis, characterized by cutaneous sclerosis and visceral involvement, and localized scleroderma or morphea which classically presents benign and self-limited evolution and is confined to the skin and/or underlying tissues. Localized scleroderma is a rare disease of unknown etiology. Recent studies show that the localized form may affect internal organs and have variable morbidity. Treatment should be started very early, before complications occur due to the high morbidity of localized scleroderma. In this review, we report the most important aspects and particularities in the treatment of patients diagnosed with localized scleroderma. PMID:25672301

  10. Immune thrombocytopenia: pathophysiologic and clinical update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasi, Roberto

    2012-07-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by both reduced platelet survival and suppression of megakaryocyte and platelet development. It can either be primary or secondary to other autoimmune disorders, infections, vaccines, lymphoproliferative disorders, and drugs. Antibodies reacting against platelet glycoproteins are typical of ITP; these antibodies can mediate destruction of platelets by the monocyte-macrophage system as well as suppress megakaryocyte proliferation and maturation. Abnormalities of cell-mediated immunity are known to contribute to the pathologic process. Like many other autoimmune diseases, ITP has a T helper cell type 1 bias and a reduced activity of T-regulatory cells. Cytotoxic T cells may directly lyse platelets and possibly suppress megakaryopoiesis. Recent studies suggest that mesenchymal stem cells are dysfunctional in ITP and may contribute to an aberrant amplification of the autoimmune response. Significant advances in the treatment of chronic ITP have been witnessed in the past decade, first with the introduction of rituximab and more recently with the thrombopoietin-receptor agonists. While splenectomy is still considered the gold standard in this setting, effective medical therapy is now available for patients in whom surgery is not an option. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  11. Brief update on endometriosis treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moamar Al-Jefout

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Endometriosis is a chronic debilitating disease with features of chronic inflammation. Endometriosis is defined as the presence of endometrial like stroma and glands outside the uterine cavity (1. Medical professionals dealing with endometriosis face a lot of problems; in diagnosis, treatment and follow up of patients. Recent advances in molecular and clinical sciences offered a wide range of modalities for treatment. However, up to date there is no single very successful option for the ultimate treatment. In this review I have searched the literature using Medline, Pubmed, text books and other search engines to look for the most updated modalities for the treatment of endometriosis both surgical and medical ones. It seems to be that for fertility purposes surgical treatment followed by ART is the best available most beneficial way of dealing with endometriosis, while medical treatment is the best way to treat pain symptoms associated with endometriosis.

  12. Methodological update in Medicina Intensiva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Garmendia, J L

    2018-04-01

    Research in the critically ill is complex by the heterogeneity of patients, the difficulties to achieve representative sample sizes and the number of variables simultaneously involved. However, the quantity and quality of records is high as well as the relevance of the variables used, such as survival. The methodological tools have evolved to offering new perspectives and analysis models that allow extracting relevant information from the data that accompanies the critically ill patient. The need for training in methodology and interpretation of results is an important challenge for the intensivists who wish to be updated on the research developments and clinical advances in Intensive Medicine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  13. [An update on myasthenia gravis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Torre, S; Gómez Molinero, I; Martínez Girón, R

    2018-03-16

    Myasthenia gravis is one of the most common disorders that affect neuromuscular transmission. It is currently one of the most understood and characterised autoimmune disorders Its typical symptoms are fluctuating weakness and fatigue that affects a combination of ocular muscles, bulbar functions, as well as limb and respiratory muscles, which are due to an immune attack against the postsynaptic membrane of the neuromuscular junction. The diagnosis of myasthenia gravis is based on clinical and serological test. It is a disease that can be effectively controlled with the current therapeutic lines, even achieving a complete remission. An update of this interesting disorder is now presented. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Update on research and clinical translation on specific clinical areas: From bench to bedside: How insight in immune pathogenesis can lead to precision medicine of severe juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vastert, Sebastiaan; Prakken, Berent

    2014-04-01

    Despite the enormous progress in the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), innovations based on true bench-to-bedside research, performed in JIA patients, are still scarce. This chapter describes novel developments in which clinical innovations go hand in hand with basic discoveries. For the purpose of this review, we will mainly focus on developments in severe forms of JIA, most notably systemic JIA and polyarticular JIA. However, also in less severe forms of JIA, such as oligoarticular JIA, better insight will help to improve diagnosis and treatment. Facilitating the transition from bench to bedside will prove crucial for addressing the major challenges in JIA management. If successful, it will set new standards for a safe, targeted and personalized therapeutic approach for children with JIA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Sequence History Update Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanampompan, Teerapat; Gladden, Roy; Fisher, Forest; DelGuercio, Chris

    2008-01-01

    The Sequence History Update Tool performs Web-based sequence statistics archiving for Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). Using a single UNIX command, the software takes advantage of sequencing conventions to automatically extract the needed statistics from multiple files. This information is then used to populate a PHP database, which is then seamlessly formatted into a dynamic Web page. This tool replaces a previous tedious and error-prone process of manually editing HTML code to construct a Web-based table. Because the tool manages all of the statistics gathering and file delivery to and from multiple data sources spread across multiple servers, there is also a considerable time and effort savings. With the use of The Sequence History Update Tool what previously took minutes is now done in less than 30 seconds, and now provides a more accurate archival record of the sequence commanding for MRO.

  16. Net Zero Water Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-12

    Update 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7...Opened to Collect Supplemental Data from Candidate Installations 15 Mar 11 Supplemental Data received from Army Commands 16-31 Mar 11 DOE...hierarchy (reduction, re-purpose, recycling & composting , energy recovery, and disposal) • Complied with Net Zero definitions • Demonstrated

  17. Ontario Hydro's DSP update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Ontario Hydro's Demand/Supply Plan (DSP), the 25 year plan which was submitted in December 1989, is currently being reviewed by the Environmental Assessment Board (EAB). Since 1989 there have been several changes which have led Ontario Hydro to update the original Demand/Supply Plan. This information sheet gives a quick overview of what has changed and how Ontario Hydro is adapting to that change

  18. Time to update and quantitative changes in the results of cochrane pregnancy and childbirth reviews.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanlop Jaidee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The recommended interval between updates for systematic reviews included in The Cochrane Library is 2 years. However, it is unclear whether this interval is always appropriate. Whereas excessive updating wastes time and resources, insufficient updating allows out-of-date or incomplete evidence to guide clinical decision-making. We set out to determine, for Cochrane pregnancy and childbirth reviews, the frequency of updates, factors associated with updating, and whether updating frequency was appropriate. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cochrane pregnancy and childbirth reviews published in Issue 3, 2007 of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were retrieved, and data were collected from their original and updated versions. Quantitative changes were determined for one of the primary outcomes (mortality, or the outcome of greatest clinical significance. Potential factors associated with time to update were assessed using the Cox proportional hazard model. Among the 101 reviews in our final sample, the median time before the first update was 3.3 years (95% CI 2.7-3.8. Only 32.7% had been updated within the recommended interval of 2 years. In 75.3% (76/101, a median of 3 new trials with a median of 576 additional participants were included in the updated versions. There were quantitative changes in 71% of the reviews that included new trials (54/76: the median change in effect size was 18.2%, and the median change in 95% CI width was 30.8%. Statistical significance changed in 18.5% (10/54 of these reviews, but conclusions were revised in only 3.7% (2/54. A shorter time to update was associated with the same original review team at updating. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Most reviews were updated less frequently than recommended by Cochrane policy, but few updates had revised conclusions. Prescribed time to update should be reconsidered to support improved decision-making while making efficient use of limited resources.

  19. Atomic spectrometry update : a review of advances in environmental analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Butler, Owen T.; Cairns, Warren R. L.; Cook, Jennifer M.; Davidson, Christine M.

    2016-01-01

    This is the 31st annual review of the application of atomic spectrometry to the chemical analysis of environmental samples. This update refers to papers published approximately between August 2014 and July 2015 and continues the series of Atomic Spectrometry Updates (ASUs) in Environmental Analysis that should be read in conjunction with other related ASUs in the series, namely: clinical and biological materials, foods and beverages; advances in atomic spectrometry and related techniques; ele...

  20. Allergic Broncho Pulmonary Aspergillosis Complicated by Nocardiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brijesh Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a 70-year-old male with a history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and asthma who presented with increasing breathlessness for 5 months. He was diagnosed to have allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA by serological and radiographic criteria. He was treated with steroids and itraconazole. After initial improvement, he developed fever with cough and mucopurulent sputum. X-ray chest revealed multiple cavities with air fluid level. Patient was treated with antibiotics without any response. Sputum was negative for acid fast bacilli (AFB. Sputum culture for bacteria and fungus did not reveal any significant growth; however a delayed growth of Nocardia was noted on fungal plates. Modified Ziehl Nelsen stain was positive for AFB. Patient was treated with cotrimoxazole. We discuss the serological and radiological criteria of ABPA, presentation and treatment of nocardia pulmonary infection and other possible causes of necrotizing pneumonia in immunocompromised settings.

  1. Web Browser Security Update Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duebendorfer, Thomas; Frei, Stefan

    We analyze the effectiveness of different Web browser update mechanisms on various operating systems; from Google Chrome's silent update mechanism to Opera's update requiring a full re-installation. We use anonymized logs from Google's world wide distributed Web servers. An analysis of the logged HTTP user-agent strings that Web browsers report when requesting any Web page is used to measure the daily browser version shares in active use. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first global scale measurement of Web browser update effectiveness comparing four different Web browser update strategies including Google Chrome. Our measurements prove that silent updates and little dependency on the underlying operating system are most effective to get users of Web browsers to surf the Web with the latest browser version.

  2. Astrophysics Update 2

    CERN Document Server

    Mason, John W

    2006-01-01

    "Astrophysics Updates" is intended to serve the information needs of professional astronomers and postgraduate students about areas of astronomy, astrophysics and cosmology that are rich and active research spheres. Observational methods and the latest results of astronomical research are presented as well as their theoretical foundations and interrelations. The contributed commissioned articles are written by leading exponents in a format that will appeal to professional astronomers and astrophysicists who are interested in topics outside their own specific areas of research. This collection of timely reviews may also attract the interest of advanced amateur astronomers seeking scientifically rigorous coverage.

  3. Radiotherapy: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikrant Kasat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy is the art of using ionizing radiation to destroy malignant cells while minimizing damage to normal tissue. Radiotherapy has become a standard treatment option for a wide range of malignancies. Several new imaging techniques, both anatomical and functional are currently being evaluated as well as practiced for treatment planning of cancer. These recent developments have allowed radiation oncologists to escalate the dose of radiation delivered to tumors while minimizing the dose delivered to surrounding normal tissue. In this update, we attempt to pen down important aspects of radiotherapy.

  4. Context updates are hierarchical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Karl Ingason

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This squib studies the order in which elements are added to the shared context of interlocutors in a conversation. It focuses on context updates within one hierarchical structure and argues that structurally higher elements are entered into the context before lower elements, even if the structurally higher elements are pronounced after the lower elements. The crucial data are drawn from a comparison of relative clauses in two head-initial languages, English and Icelandic, and two head-final languages, Korean and Japanese. The findings have consequences for any theory of a dynamic semantics.

  5. WIMS Library updating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravnik, M.; Trkov, A.; Holubar, A.

    1992-01-01

    At the end of 1990 the WIMS Library Update Project (WLUP) has been initiated at the International Atomic Energy Agency. The project was organized as an international research project, coordinated at the J. Stefan Institute. Up to now, 22 laboratories from 19 countries joined the project. Phase 1 of the project, which included WIMS input optimization for five experimental benchmark lattices, has been completed. The work presented in this paper describes also the results of Phase 2 of the Project, in which the cross sections based on ENDF/B-IV evaluated nuclear data library have been processed. (author) [sl

  6. Cutaneous leishmaniasis in Sudan: an update | El Hassan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis due to L.major is now endemic in many parts of the northern Sudan. In this up-date we discuss the clinical manifestations of cutaneous leishmaniasis, its diagnosis and treatment. The most common clinical forms are nodular, noduloulcerative and ulcerative lesions. Less common forms are ...

  7. Dutch Venous Ulcer guideline update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maessen-Visch, M Birgitte; de Roos, Kees-Peter

    2014-05-01

    The revised guideline of 2013 is an update of the 2005 guideline "venous leg ulcer". In this special project four separate guidelines (venous leg ulcer, varicose veins, compression therapy and deep venous disorders) were revised and developed simultaneously. A meeting was held including representatives of any organisation involved in venous disease management including patient organizations and health insurance companies. Eighteen clinical questions where defined, and a new strategy was used to accelerate the process. This resulted in two new and two revised guidelines within one year. The guideline committee advises use of the C of the CEAP classification as well as the Venous Clinical Severity Score (VCSS) and a Quality of life (QoL) score in the assessment of clinical signs. These can provide insight into the burden of disease and the effects of treatment as experienced by the patient. A duplex ultrasound should be performed in every patient to establish the underlying aetiology and to evaluate the need for treatment (which is discussed in a separate guideline). The use of the TIME model for describing venous ulcers is recommended. There is no evidence for antiseptic or antibiotic wound care products except for a Cochrane review in which some evidence is presented for cadexomer iodine. Signs of infection are the main reason for the use of oral antibiotics. When the ulcer fails to heal the use of oral aspirin and pentoxifylline can be considered as an adjunct. For the individual patient, the following aspects should be considered: the appearance of the ulcer (amount of exudate) according to the TIME model, the influence of wound care products on moisturising the wound, frequency of changing compression bandages, pain and allergies. The cost of the dressings should also be considered. Education and training of patients t improves compliance with compression therapy but does not influence wound healing rates. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  8. Memory Updating and Mental Arithmetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Cheng-Ching; Yang, Tsung-Han; Lin, Chia-Yuan; Yen, Nai-Shing

    2016-01-01

    Is domain-general memory updating ability predictive of calculation skills or are such skills better predicted by the capacity for updating specifically numerical information? Here, we used multidigit mental multiplication (MMM) as a measure for calculating skill as this operation requires the accurate maintenance and updating of information in addition to skills needed for arithmetic more generally. In Experiment 1, we found that only individual differences with regard to a task updating numerical information following addition (MUcalc) could predict the performance of MMM, perhaps owing to common elements between the task and MMM. In Experiment 2, new updating tasks were designed to clarify this: a spatial updating task with no numbers, a numerical task with no calculation, and a word task. The results showed that both MUcalc and the spatial task were able to predict the performance of MMM but only with the more difficult problems, while other updating tasks did not predict performance. It is concluded that relevant processes involved in updating the contents of working memory support mental arithmetic in adults.

  9. Memory updating and mental arithmetic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Ching eHan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Is domain-general memory updating ability predictive of calculation skills or are such skills better predicted by the capacity for updating specifically numerical information? Here, we used multidigit mental multiplication (MMM as a measure for calculating skill as this operation requires the accurate maintenance and updating of information in addition to skills needed for arithmetic more generally. In Experiment 1, we found that only individual differences with regard to a task updating numerical information following addition (MUcalc could predict the performance of MMM, perhaps owing to common elements between the task and MMM. In Experiment 2, new updating tasks were designed to clarify this: a spatial updating task with no numbers, a numerical task with no calculation, and a word task. The results showed that both MUcalc and the spatial task were able to predict the performance of MMM but only with the more difficult problems, while other updating tasks did not predict performance. It is concluded that relevant processes involved in updating the contents of working memory support mental arithmetic in adults.

  10. Geothermal Greenhouse Development Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lienau, Paul J.

    1997-01-01

    Greenhouse heating is one of the popular applications of low-to moderated-temperature geothermal resources. Using geothermal energy is both an economical and efficient way to heat greenhouses. Greenhouse heating systems can be designed to utilize low-temperature (>50oC or 122oF) resources, which makes the greenhouse an attractive application. These resources are widespread throughout the western states providing a significant potential for expansion of the geothermal greenhouse industry. This article summarizes the development of geothermal heated greenhouses, which mainly began about the mid-1970's. Based on a survey (Lienau, 1988) conducted in 1988 and updated in 1997, there are 37 operators of commercial greenhouses. Table 1 is a listing of known commercial geothermal greenhouses, we estimate that there may be an additional 25% on which data is not available.

  11. Y2K UPDATE

    CERN Multimedia

    Sverre JARP

    1999-01-01

    Concerning Y2K preparation, please note the following:Everybody, who has a NICE installation on his/her PC, needs to log in to NICE at least once before Xmas to get the Y2K update installed. This applies especially to dual boot systems.The test schedule on Y2Kplus.cern.ch will be prolonged. The last restart took place on 10 November and two more will take place on 24 November and 8 December, respectively. The Oracle users responsible for the maintenance of Oracle Forms applications which include PL/SQL blocks where date fields are handled with the default format are requested to contact oracle.support@cern.ch at their earliest convenience.Sverre Jarp (CERN Y2K co-ordinator, phone: 74944)

  12. Update in urethral stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahouth, Z; Meyer, G; Yildiz, G; Nativ, O; Moskovitz, B

    2016-10-01

    Urethral stents were first introduced in 1988, and since then, they have undergone significant improvements. However, they did not gain a wide popularity and their use is limited to a small number of centers around the world. Urethral stents can be used in the entire urethra and for various and diverse indications. In the anterior urethra, it can be used to treat urethral strictures. In the prostatic urethra, they can be used for the treatment of prostatic obstruction, including benign, malignant and iatrogenic prostatic obstruction. Moreover, although not widely used, it can be also applied for the treatment of posterior urethral stricture and bladder neck contracture, usually resulting in urinary incontinence and the need for subsequent procedures. Our main experience are with Allium urethral stents, and as such, we provide the latest updates in urethral stents with special emphasis on the various types of Allium urethral stents: bulbar, prostatic and bladder neck stents.

  13. AOS clearwater project update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmgren, Claes [Alberta Oilsands Inc (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    The Athabasca oil sands, located in northeastern Alberta, are one of the largest deposits of bitumen in the world. In this presentation Alberta Oilsands Inc. provides an update of their two phase Clearwater project which aims at using an SLP-SAGD system to recover Athabasca bitumen. The Clearwater project site is located nearby the Fort McMurray regional airport. The idea behind the project is to utilize a low pressure SAGD system in combination with a co-injected solvent in order to extract the bitumen. The injected solvent mixes with the bitumen, decreasing its viscosity and improving its ability to flow. This type of system requires only 1000 kPa of operating pressure which leads to a lower steam to oil ratio. By the end of phase one, the Clearwater project aims at bringing in 4,500 barrels of oil per day (BOPD) and 15,000 to 25,000 BOPD by the end of phase two.

  14. Cohort Profile Update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Omland, Lars Haukali; Ahlström, Magnus Glindvad; Obel, Niels

    2014-01-01

    of Causes of Death, the Danish National Prescription Registry, the Attainment Register and the Integrated Database for Labour Market Research to get information on vital status, migration, cancer, hospital contacts, causes of death, dispensed prescriptions, education and employment. Using this design, rates......The DHCS is a cohort of all HIV-infected individuals seen in one of the eight Danish HIV centres after 31 December 1994. Here we update the 2009 cohort profile emphasizing the development of the cohort. Every 12-24 months, DHCS is linked with the Danish Civil Registration System (CRS) in order...... to extract an age- and sex-matched comparison cohort from the general population, as well as cohorts of family members of the HIV-infected patients and of the comparison cohort. The combined cohort is linked with CRS, the Danish Cancer Registry, the Danish National Hospital Registry, the Danish Registry...

  15. ADAS Update and Maintainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Leela R.

    2010-01-01

    Since 2000, both the National Weather Service Melbourne (NWS MLB) and the Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) have used a local data integration system (LOIS) as part of their forecast and warning operations. The original LOIS was developed by the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) in 1998 (Manobianco and Case 1998) and has undergone subsequent improvements. Each has benefited from three-dimensional (3-D) analyses that are delivered to forecasters every 15 minutes across the peninsula of Florida. The intent is to generate products that enhance short-range weather forecasts issued in support of NWS MLB and SMG operational requirements within East Central Florida. The current LDIS uses the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) Data Analysis System (AD AS) package as its core, which integrates a wide variety of national, regional, and local observational data sets. It assimilates all available real-time data within its domain and is run at a finer spatial and temporal resolution than current national or regional-scale analysis packages. As such, it provides local forecasters with a more comprehensive understanding of evolving fine-scale weather features. Over the years, the LDIS has become problematic to maintain since it depends on AMU-developed shell scripts that were written for an earlier version of the ADAS software. The goals of this task were to update the NWS MLB/SMG LDIS with the latest version of ADAS, incorporate new sources of observational data, and upgrade and modify the AMU-developed shell scripts written to govern the system. In addition, the previously developed ADAS graphical user interface (GUI) was updated. Operationally, these upgrades will result in more accurate depictions of the current local environment to help with short-range weather forecasting applications, while also offering an improved initialization for local versions of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model used by both groups.

  16. Oil sands development update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    A detailed review and update of oil sands development in Alberta are provided covering every aspect of the production and economic aspects of the industry. It is pointed out that at present oil sands account for 28 per cent of Canadian crude oil production, expected to reach 50 per cent by 2005. Based on recent announcements, a total of 26 billion dollars worth of projects are in progress or planned; 20 billion dollars worth of this development is in the Athabasca area, the remainder in Cold Lake and other areas. The current update envisages up to 1,800,000 barrels per day by 2008, creating 47,000 new jobs and total government revenues through direct and indirect taxes of 118 billion dollars. Provinces other than Alberta also benefit from these development, since 60 per cent of all employment and income created by oil sands production is in other parts of Canada. Up to 60 per cent of the expansion is for goods and services and of this, 50 to 55 per cent will be purchased from Canadian sources. The remaining 40 per cent of the new investment is for engineering and construction of which 95 per cent is Canadian content. Aboriginal workforce by common consent of existing operators matches regional representation (about 13 per cent), and new developers are expected to match these standards. Planned or ongoing development in environmental protection through improved technologies and optimization, energy efficiency and improved tailings management, and active support of flexibility mechanisms such as emission credits trading, joint implementation and carbon sinks are very high on the industry's agenda. The importance of offsets are discussed extensively along with key considerations for international negotiations, as well as further research of other options such as sequestration, environmentally benign disposal of waste, and enhanced voluntary action

  17. Obesity management: update on orlistat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Belinda S; Dixon, Andrew F; Dixon, John B

    2007-01-01

    Over the past 20 years obesity has become a worldwide concern of frightening proportion. The World Health Organization estimates that there are over 400 million obese and over 1.6 billion overweight adults, a figure which is projected to almost double by 2015. This is not a disease restricted to adults - at least 20 million children under the age of 5 years were overweight in 2005 (WHO 2006). Overweight and obesity lead to serious health consequences including coronary artery disease, stroke, type-2 diabetes, heart failure, dyslipidemia, hypertension, reproductive and gastrointestinal cancers, gallstones, fatty liver disease, osteoarthritis and sleep apnea (Padwal et al 2003). Modest weight loss in the obese of between 5% and 10% of bodyweight is associated with improvements in cardiovascular risk profiles and reduced incidence of type 2 diabetes (Goldstein 1992; Avenell et al 2004; Padwal and Majumdar 2007). Orlistat, a gastric and pancreatic lipase inhibitor that reduces dietary fat absorption by approximately 30%, has been approved for use for around ten years (Zhi et al 1994; Hauptman 2000). There is now a growing body of evidence to suggest that Orlistat assists weight loss and that it may also have additional benefits. The aim of this review is to provide a brief update on the current literature studying the efficacy, safety and significance of the use of Orlistat in clinical practice.

  18. Updating of the bovine neosporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Martínez Contreras

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In the fields of Medicine and bovine production, there is a wide variety of diseases affecting reproduction, in relation to the number of live births, the interval between births and open days, among others. Some of these diseases produce abortions and embryonic death, which explain the alteration of reproductive parameters. Many of these diseases have an infectious origin, such as parasites, bacteria, viruses and fungi, which are transmitted among animals. Besides, some of them have zoonotic features that generate problems to human health. Among these agents, the Neospora caninum, protozoan stands out. Its life cycle is fulfilled in several species of animals like the dog and the coyote. These two act as its definitive hosts and the cattle as its intermediary host. The Neospora caninum causes in the infected animals, reproductive disorders, clinical manifestations and decreased production which affects productivity of small, medium and large producers. Because of this, diagnostic techniques that allow understanding the epidemiological behavior of this disease have been developed. However in spite of being a major agent in the bovine reproductive health, few studies have been undertaken to determine the prevalence of this agent around the world. Therefore, the objective of this review was to collect updated information on the behavior of this parasite, targeting its epidemiology, its symptoms, its impact on production and the methods of its control and prevention.

  19. Diuretics: a review and update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roush, George C; Kaur, Ramdeep; Ernst, Michael E

    2014-01-01

    Diuretics have been recommended as first-line treatment of hypertension and are also valuable in the management of hypervolemia and electrolyte disorders. This review summarizes the key features of the most commonly used diuretics. We then provide an update of clinical trials for diuretics during the past 5 years. Compared to other classes of medications, thiazide diuretics are at least as effective in reducing cardiovascular events (CVEs) in patients with hypertension and are more effective than β-blockers and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in reducing stroke. Observational cohort data and a network analysis have shown that CVEs are lowered by one-fifth from chlorthalidone when compared to the commonly used thiazide, hydrochlorothiazide. Relative to placebo, chlorthalidone increases life expectancy. In those aged 80 years and older, the diuretic, indapamide, lowers CVEs relative to placebo. The aldosterone antagonist, eplerenone, lowers total mortality in early congestive heart failure. The benefit of eplerenone following acute myocardial infarction (MI) is limited to administration within 3 to 6 days post-MI. Aldosterone antagonists have been shown to lower the incidence of sudden cardiac death and to reduce proteinuria. In the setting of heart failure, long acting loop diuretics azosemide and torasemide are more effective in improving heart failure outcomes than the far more commonly used short acting furosemide. Evening dosing of diuretics appears to lower CVEs relative to morning dosing. In conclusion, diuretics are a diverse class of drugs that remain extremely important in the management of hypertension and hypervolemic states.

  20. Update of CERN exchange network

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    An update of the CERN exchange network will be done next April. Disturbances or even interruptions of telephony services may occur from 4th to 24th April during evenings from 18:30 to 00:00 but will not exceed more than 4 consecutive hours (see tentative planning below). CERN divisions are invited to avoid any change requests (set-ups, move or removals) of telephones and fax machines from 4th to 25th April. Everything will be done to minimize potential inconveniences which may occur during this update. There will be no loss of telephone functionalities. CERN GSM portable phones won't be affected by this change. Should you need more details, please send us your questions by email to Standard.Telephone@cern.ch. DateChange typeAffected areas April 11 Update of switch in LHC 4 LHC 4 Point April 14 Update of switch in LHC 5 LHC 5 Point April 15 Update of switches in LHC 3 and LHC 2 Points LHC 3 and LHC 2 April 22 Update of switch N4 Meyrin Ouest April 23 Update of switch  N6 Prévessin Site Ap...

  1. Multiplicative updates for the LASSO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Morten; Clemmensen, Line Katrine Harder

    2007-01-01

    .e. least squares minimization with $L_1$-norm regularization, since the multiplicative updates (MU) can efficiently exploit the structure of the problem traditionally solved using quadratic programming (QP). We derive an algorithm based on MU for the LASSO and compare the performance to Matlabs standard QP......Multiplicative updates have proven useful for non-negativity constrained optimization. Presently, we demonstrate how multiplicative updates also can be used for unconstrained optimization. This is for instance useful when estimating the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO), i...

  2. Updating optical pseudoinverse associative memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telfer, B; Casasent, D

    1989-07-01

    Selected algorithms for adding to and deleting from optical pseudoinverse associative memories are presented and compared. New realizations of pseudoinverse updating methods using vector inner product matrix bordering and reduced-dimensionality Karhunen-Loeve approximations (which have been used for updating optical filters) are described in the context of associative memories. Greville's theorem is reviewed and compared with the Widrow-Hoff algorithm. Kohonen's gradient projection method is expressed in a different form suitable for optical implementation. The data matrix memory is also discussed for comparison purposes. Memory size, speed and ease of updating, and key vector requirements are the comparison criteria used.

  3. Coxarthrosis - an update; Koxarthrose - ein Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imhof, H.; Noebauer-Huhmann, I.; Trattnig, S. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Wien (Austria)

    2009-05-15

    Degenerative osteoarthritis of the hip joint (coxarthrosis) is the most common disease of the hip joint in adults. The diagnosis is based on a combination of radiographic findings and characteristic clinical symptoms. The lack of a radiographic consensus definition has seemingly resulted in a variation of the published incidences and prevalence of degenerative osteoarthritis of the hip joint. The chronological sequence of degeneration includes the following basic symptoms on conventional radiographs and CT: joint space narrowing, development of osteophytes, subchondral demineralisation/sclerosis and cyst formation, as well as loose bodies, joint malalignment and deformity. MR imaging allows additional visualization of early symptoms and/or activity signs such as cartilage edema, cartilage tears and defects, subchondral bone marrow edema, synovial edema and thickening, joint effusion and muscle atrophy. The scientific dispute concerns the significance of (minimal) joint malalignment (e.g. impingement, dysplasia etc.) and forms of malpositioning which as possible prearthrosis have a high probability of leading to degenerative osteoarthritis. Moreover, without any question, the preservation of joint containment and gender differences are important additional basic diagnostic principles, which have gained great interest in recent years. In research different MR procedures such as Na and H spectroscopy, T2*-mapping etc. with ultrahigh field MR allow cartilage metabolism and its changes in early degenerative osteoarthritis (''biochemical imaging'') to be studied. There is no doubt that even in a few years new profound knowledge is to be expected in this field. (orig.) [German] Die Hueftgelenkarthrose ist im Erwachsenenalter die haeufigste Erkrankung des Hueftgelenks. Die fehlende Konsensusdefinition dieser Erkrankung fuehrt zu einer scheinbar breiten Varianz bzgl. Inzidenz und Praevalenz. Die Diagnose wird aufgrund des radiologischen Befundes und der

  4. The UCSC Cancer Genomics Browser: update 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Mary; Craft, Brian; Swatloski, Teresa; Ellrott, Kyle; Cline, Melissa; Diekhans, Mark; Ma, Singer; Wilks, Chris; Stuart, Josh; Haussler, David; Zhu, Jingchun

    2013-01-01

    The UCSC Cancer Genomics Browser (https://genome-cancer.ucsc.edu/) is a set of web-based tools to display, investigate and analyse cancer genomics data and its associated clinical information. The browser provides whole-genome to base-pair level views of several different types of genomics data, including some next-generation sequencing platforms. The ability to view multiple datasets together allows users to make comparisons across different data and cancer types. Biological pathways, collections of genes, genomic or clinical information can be used to sort, aggregate and zoom into a group of samples. We currently display an expanding set of data from various sources, including 201 datasets from 22 TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas) cancers as well as data from Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia and Stand Up To Cancer. New features include a completely redesigned user interface with an interactive tutorial and updated documentation. We have also added data downloads, additional clinical heatmap features, and an updated Tumor Image Browser based on Google Maps. New security features allow authenticated users access to private datasets hosted by several different consortia through the public website.

  5. Fatigue in Multiple Sclerosis: (An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Zarei

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND:To study the dimensions of fatigue in multiple sclerosis, its pathophysiology, the efficacy, tolerability and safety of drug and non-drug treatments and measurement of fatigue. METHODS: Relevant articles from PubMed and Google scholar search engines from January 1987 until September 2006 were studied to compose a short clinical update (not a systematic review and make the required clinical information available for the clinicians. RESULTS: There is evidence that fatigue is very common in all types and stages of multiple sclerosis, but its pathophysiology is not well explained. Consequently, few drug options have been offered for its treatment. Amantadine is the bestknown drug, though its efficacy and duration of action are limited. Pemoline and modafinil are alternatives and have
    some effects on fatigue. DAP (diaminopyridine, ASA (acetylsalicylic acid, methylphenidate and fluoxetine are other possible options but await further confirmation. Neurorehabilitation, regular exercise and cooling are confirmed to be of value in MS treatment. Measurement of fatigue is a complicated issue. At present fatigue does not have a laboratory marker. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this short clinical update provide guidelines for diagnosing MS-related fatigue and differentiating
    it from other similar physical and psychological conditions. It also examines prescription drug options and other therapies for MS patients with fatigue.
    KEYWORDS: Multiple sclerosis, fatigue, pathophysiology, treatment, measurement.

  6. An update on inflammatory breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Thapaliya

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory breast cancer is one of the most aggressive forms of breast cancer. Once considered to be a uniformly fatal disease, treatment of this entity has evolved significantly over the last two decades. In this article, we review the epidemiology, pathology, biologic underpinnings, radiologic advances, and treatment modalities for inflammatory breast cancer. Updates in surgical therapy, medical oncologic therapy and radiation therapy are reviewed. Emphasis is on cutting edge information regarding inflammatory breast cancer. The management of inflammatory breast cancer is best served by a multidisciplinary team. Continued research into molecular pathways and potential targets is imperative. Future clinical trials should include evaluation of conventional therapy with targeted therapies.

  7. Autoimmune pancreatitis. An update; Autoimmunpankreatitis. Ein Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmberger, T. [Klinikum Bogenhausen, Staedt. Klinikum, Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Neuroradiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Muenchen (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare disease, the pathophysiological understanding of which has been greatly improved over the last years. The most common form, type 1 AIP belongs to the IgG4-related diseases and must be distinguished from type 2 AIP, which is a much rarer entity associated with chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Clinically, there is an overlap with pancreatic cancer. Imaging and further criteria, such as serological and histological parameters are utilized for a differentiation between both entities in order to select the appropriate therapy and to avoid the small but ultimately unnecessary number of pancreatectomies. The diagnostics of AIP are complex, whereby the consensus criteria of the International Association of Pancreatology have become accepted as the parameters for discrimination. These encompass five cardinal criteria and one therapeutic criterion. By applying these criteria AIP can be diagnosed with a sensitivity of 84.9 %, a specificity of 100 % and an accuracy of 93.8 %. The diagnosis of AIP is accomplished by applying several parameters of which two relate to imaging. As for the routine diagnostics of the pancreas these are ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Important for the differential diagnosis is the exclusion of signs of local and remote tumor spread for which CT and MRI are established. The essential diagnostic parameter of histology necessitates sufficient sample material, which cannot usually be acquired by a fine needle biopsy. CT or MRI are the reference standard methods for identification of the optimal puncture site and imaging-assisted (TruCut) biopsy. In patients presenting with unspecific upper abdominal pain, painless jaundice combined with the suspicion of a pancreatic malignancy in imaging but a mismatch of secondary signs of malignancy, AIP should also be considered as a differential diagnosis. As the diagnosis of AIP only partially relies on imaging radiologists also

  8. Tetraplegia Management Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridén, Jan; Gohritz, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Tetraplegia is a profound impairment of mobility manifesting as a paralysis of all 4 extremities owing to cervical spinal cord injury. The purpose of this article is to provide an update and analyze current management, treatment options, and outcomes of surgical reconstruction of arm and hand function. Surgical restoration of elbow and wrist extension or handgrip has tremendous potential to improve autonomy, mobility, and critical abilities, for example, eating, personal care, and self-catheterization and productive work in at least 70% of tetraplegic patients. Tendon and nerve transfers, tenodeses, and joint stabilizations reliably enable improved arm and hand usability, reduce muscle imbalance and pain in spasticity, and prevent joint contractures. One-stage combined procedures have proven considerable advantages over traditional multistage approaches. Immediate activation of transferred muscles reduces the risk of adhesions, facilitates relearning, avoids adverse effects of immobilization, and enhances functional recovery. Transfer of axillary, musculocutaneous, and radial nerve fascicles from above the spinal cord injury are effective and promising options to enhance motor outcome and sensory protection, especially in groups with limited resources. Improved communication between medical disciplines, therapists, patients, and their relatives should help that more individuals can benefit from these advances and could empower many thousands tetraplegic individuals "to take life into their own hands" and live more independently. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Updates on obesity pharmacotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, Amanda; Apovian, Caroline M

    2018-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic, relapsing disease that necessitates a multidisciplinary approach to management. Behavioral changes are the foundation to management, but adjunctive therapy is often warranted, including pharmacologic therapies and/or bariatric surgery. Until recently, treatment options included only short-term therapy (≤12 weeks), and paths beyond that schedule were challenging, as knowledge of the biology of obesity was lacking. With increased recognition of obesity as a chronic, complex medical disease, newer agents have been approved as long-term therapy, and the cornerstone of treatment is chronic behavior and lifestyle change. In the last decade, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved several new weight loss medications for the chronic management of obesity. In this review paper, we provide the latest updates on obesity pharmacotherapy. The main areas we will cover include (1) pharmacological management of obesity, (2) a review of FDA-approved weight loss medications, (3) comanagement of obesity and its metabolic sequelae (type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia), and (4) obesity-centric prescribing for mental illness, neurological disorders, and contraceptive planning. © 2018 New York Academy of Sciences.

  10. Peritoneal dialysis update 1994.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nolph K

    1994-07-01

    Full Text Available Each year there are over 400 papers published in the field of peritoneal dialysis. In this review I have touched on only a few highlights of some of the more active areas of investigation and development. The advances in controlling peritonitis rates with the Y-set have been dramatic and have resulted in peritonitis rates in many centers less than one episode per 24 patient months. Technique survivals have also improved with lower peritonitis rates. The enormous literature on new approaches to treatment and new understandings of host defenses are beyond the scope of this review. There are also many advances in peritoneal access. We now have many new types of catheters under investigation such as the Swan-Neck Missouri catheter and the Moncrief-Popovich catheter, with complete burial of the catheter until eventual externalization for CAPD training. There have been major advances in understanding the normal healing of exit sites and the early diagnosis and treatment of exit-site infections. All the extensive literature on catheter development in the management of exit sites will be reviewed elsewhere. I have focused primarily on an update of worldwide demographics, some of the new findings in peritoneal transport, the use of low-calcium solutions, experiences with EPO, new thinking about adequacy and nutrition, and finally, on recent comparisons of CAPD and hemodialysis.

  11. Dali server update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Liisa; Laakso, Laura M

    2016-07-08

    The Dali server (http://ekhidna2.biocenter.helsinki.fi/dali) is a network service for comparing protein structures in 3D. In favourable cases, comparing 3D structures may reveal biologically interesting similarities that are not detectable by comparing sequences. The Dali server has been running in various places for over 20 years and is used routinely by crystallographers on newly solved structures. The latest update of the server provides enhanced analytics for the study of sequence and structure conservation. The server performs three types of structure comparisons: (i) Protein Data Bank (PDB) search compares one query structure against those in the PDB and returns a list of similar structures; (ii) pairwise comparison compares one query structure against a list of structures specified by the user; and (iii) all against all structure comparison returns a structural similarity matrix, a dendrogram and a multidimensional scaling projection of a set of structures specified by the user. Structural superimpositions are visualized using the Java-free WebGL viewer PV. The structural alignment view is enhanced by sequence similarity searches against Uniprot. The combined structure-sequence alignment information is compressed to a stack of aligned sequence logos. In the stack, each structure is structurally aligned to the query protein and represented by a sequence logo. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Genomics and Health Impact Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alzheimer’s Disease Autism Breast Cancer Cardiomyopathy Colorectal Cancer Diabetes Familial Hypercholesterolemia Heart Disease Hepatitis HIV/AIDS Influenza Listeriosis Lynch Syndrome Malaria Osteoporosis Sudden Death Tuberculosis Zika Virus Updates on Specific Topics Big Data ...

  13. Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Update '92

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosing, M.; Balka, L.; Chojnacki, E.; Gai, W.; Ho, C.; Konecny, R.; Power, J.; Schoessow, P.; Simpson, J.

    1992-01-01

    The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) is an experiment designed to test various ideas related to wakefield technology. Construction is now underway for a 100 nC electron beam in December of 1992. This report updates this progress

  14. Updating the OMERACT filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirwan, John R; Boers, Maarten; Hewlett, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Filter provides guidelines for the development and validation of outcome measures for use in clinical research. The "Truth" section of the OMERACT Filter presupposes an explicit framework for identifying the relevant core outcomes that are......OBJECTIVE: The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Filter provides guidelines for the development and validation of outcome measures for use in clinical research. The "Truth" section of the OMERACT Filter presupposes an explicit framework for identifying the relevant core outcomes...

  15. Efficient Synthesis of Network Updates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-17

    Pavol Černý CU Boulder pavol.cerny@colorado.edu Nate Foster Cornell University jnfoster@cs.cornell.edu Abstract Software-defined networking ( SDN ...is revolutionizing the net- working industry, but current SDN programming platforms do not provide automated mechanisms for updating global...configurations on the fly. Implementing updates by hand is challenging for SDN programmers because networks are distributed systems with hun- dreds or thousands

  16. Communication technology update and fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Grant, August E

    2010-01-01

    New communication technologies are being introduced at an astonishing rate. Making sense of these technologies is increasingly difficult. Communication Technology Update and Fundamentals is the single best source for the latest developments, trends, and issues in communication technology. Featuring the fundamental framework along with the history and background of communication technologies, Communication Technology Update and Fundamentals, 12th edition helps you stay ahead of these ever-changing and emerging technologies.As always, every chapter ha

  17. Communication technology update and fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Grant, August E

    2008-01-01

    New communication technologies are being introduced at an astonishing rate. Making sense of these technologies is increasingly difficult. Communication Technology Update is the single best source for the latest developments, trends, and issues in communication technology. Now in its 11th edition, Communication Technology Update has become an indispensable information resource for business, government, and academia. As always, every chapter has been completely rewritten to reflect the latest developments and market statistics, and now covers mobile computing, dig

  18. Decentralized Consistent Updates in SDN

    KAUST Repository

    Nguyen, Thanh Dang

    2017-04-10

    We present ez-Segway, a decentralized mechanism to consistently and quickly update the network state while preventing forwarding anomalies (loops and blackholes) and avoiding link congestion. In our design, the centralized SDN controller only pre-computes information needed by the switches during the update execution. This information is distributed to the switches, which use partial knowledge and direct message passing to efficiently realize the update. This separation of concerns has the key benefit of improving update performance as the communication and computation bottlenecks at the controller are removed. Our evaluations via network emulations and large-scale simulations demonstrate the efficiency of ez-Segway, which compared to a centralized approach, improves network update times by up to 45% and 57% at the median and the 99th percentile, respectively. A deployment of a system prototype in a real OpenFlow switch and an implementation in P4 demonstrate the feasibility and low overhead of implementing simple network update functionality within switches.

  19. Update on TROG trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, D.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Validation of treatment methodologies can only be achieved in the context of unambiguous, efficiently managed, randomised and controlled clinical trials. Since 1991, the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) has coordinated over 29 protocols in radiation oncology, including several key randomised controlled trials. The impetus behind TROG is the establishment of an evidence base for particular approaches to radiotherapy and its adjunct use with alternative and complementary treatment methods. As the level of technology incorporated into radiotherapy continues to increase, as the need for improved accuracy in dose assessment increases and as the requirements of realistic quality assurance (QA) for clinical trials becomes more demanding it is imperative that all professionals involved in radiotherapy, including physicists, become actively involved in the QA of trials. This is particularly important for large scale multi-centre trials which intend to prove the benefits of particular treatment approaches on a national or international stage rather then in the context of a single clinic. This talk will: 1. Examine the outcomes of TROG trials to date in terms of the information obtained. 2. Briefly consider current and impending TROG trials and their requirements in terms of clinical and physics input. 3. Examine the results of international clinical trials in terms of the influence they have had on radiotherapy practice and health outcomes, and the advantages they have obtained by consistent co-operation between clinical and technological staff. 4. Consider the benefits of multi-centre clinical trials and the QA controls that are necessary to ensure accuracy of resulting recommendations. Copyright (2001) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  20. Nova Scotia electricity update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crandlemire, A.L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides an update of electricity issues concerning Nova Scotia such as supply, capacity, emission commitments, as well as co-generation and the Electricity Marketplace Governance Committee (EMGC). The goals of the strategy were reliability combined with competitive prices and greater environmental responsibility. The scope of these objectives included new capacity, transmission, renewables and co-generation. Other objectives included encouraging wholesale market competition; meeting reciprocity requirements; and a 50 MW renewable energy target. Recommendations of the EMGC included wholesale market competition; a broader market scope with a cost benefit analysis; Open Access Transmission Tariff (OATT); a scheduling and information system; network integration and a point to point service; and a separation of transmission and generation business units. Other recommendations included an open competitive process for new generation; a consideration of emissions and overall efficiency; a Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard (RPS) to start in 2006; the separation of RPS tags from electricity; and net metering of renewables. These recommendations were accepted in 2003, followed by the new Electricity Act in 2004, which made OATT mandatory, established RPS and opened to the wholesale market. Capacity at present was considered to be tight, with preparations for the new regulations under way. Reductions in air pollution were reported at 25 per cent, with renewable energy projects such as 2 windmills currently under way, as well as various other projects. Opportunities for provincial Atlantic cooperation were identified as being management of reserve requirements; trading of lowest cost electricity; new generation on a regional scale; stronger transmission ties; a system operator; a regional approach to RPS; regional management of air emissions; and regional opportunities for Carbon dioxide reductions. tabs., figs

  1. NB market update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, W. K.

    2004-01-01

    The 2004 New Brunswick proclamation introduced several changes to the industry. This paper presents an update of the current New Brunswick electricity market from the perspective of the recently created New Brunswick System Operator (NBSO). A comparison was made between the modified industry and the previous industry structure. Significant changes included: corporate restructuring and market implementation; the formation of the independent system operator; and an increase in Public Utilities Board regulatory authority. The main objectives of the NBSO were reviewed, including its intention to reliably plan and operate the integrated power system as well as facilitating and operating the electricity market. Details of directors and officers were provided along with a list of legislated functions which included entering agreements with transmitters; provision and procurement of ancillary services; maintenance of integrated system; coordination of external activities; participation with standards authorities; planning and development of transmission; and the facilitation of a competitive market. An outline of the NBSO, Transco and Public Utilities Board relationships were presented. Details of the market advisory committee were outlined, with information concerning contracts, operations and services agreements. Transmission and ancillary services were also discussed, as well as issues concerning interruptible load agreements. A chart of the New Brunswick electricity market structure was presented, along with a market overview including details of capacity, ancillary services and suppliers. Market rules and amendments were presented, as well as market participation guides. Details of generation resource adequacy requirements and the imposition of penalties were outlined. Scheduling and dispatch issues were overviewed, as well as settlement processes, inputs and their sources, including settlements for variances. Future development possibilities included an expansion of

  2. Obesity management: Update on orlistat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda S Drew

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Belinda S Drew, Andrew F Dixon, John B DixonCentre for Obesity Research and Education, Monash University, Melbourne, AustraliaAbstract: Over the past 20 years obesity has become a worldwide concern of frightening proportion. The World Health Organization estimates that there are over 400 million obese and over 1.6 billion overweight adults, a figure which is projected to almost double by 2015. This is not a disease restricted to adults – at least 20 million children under the age of 5 years were overweight in 2005 (WHO 2006. Overweight and obesity lead to serious health consequences including coronary artery disease, stroke, type-2 diabetes, heart failure, dyslipidemia, hypertension, reproductive and gastrointestinal cancers, gallstones, fatty liver disease, osteoarthritis and sleep apnea (Padwal et al 2003.Modest weight loss in the obese of between 5% and 10% of bodyweight is associated with improvements in cardiovascular risk profiles and reduced incidence of type 2 diabetes (Goldstein 1992; Avenell et al 2004; Padwal and Majumdar 2007. Orlistat, a gastric and pancreatic lipase inhibitor that reduces dietary fat absorption by approximately 30%, has been approved for use for around ten years (Zhi et al 1994; Hauptman 2000. There is now a growing body of evidence to suggest that Orlistat assists weight loss and that it may also have additional benefits. The aim of this review is to provide a brief update on the current literature studying the efficacy, safety and significance of the use of Orlistat in clinical practice.Keywords: obese, weight, diet, orlistat, hypertension, cholesterol

  3. Critical appraisal: dental amalgam update--part II: biological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Michael J; Swift, Edward J

    2013-12-01

    Dental amalgam restorations have been controversial for over 150 years. In Part I of this Critical Appraisal, the clinical efficacy of dental amalgam was updated. Here in Part II, the biological effects of dental amalgam are addressed. © 2013 The Authors.Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Colorectal Carcinoma: An Update of Current Trends in Accra ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Clinical experience and earlier studies indicate that the number of colorectal cancer cases seen annually in the Accra metropolis is increasing. OBJECTIVE: This study was aimed at providing a current update on colorectal cancer in Accra, Ghana. METHODS: A prospective study of confirmed cases of ...

  5. Circumplex model of marital and family systems: VI. Theoretical update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, D H; Russell, C S; Sprenkle, D H

    1983-03-01

    This paper updates the theoretical work on the Circumplex Model and provides revised and new hypotheses. Similarities and contrasts to the Beavers Systems Model are made along with comments regarding Beavers and Voeller's critique. FACES II, a newly revised assessment tool, provides both "perceived" and "ideal" family assessment that is useful empirically and clinically.

  6. Prostate imaging. An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franiel, T.; Teichgraeber, U.; Asbach, P.; Hamm, B.; Foller, S.

    2015-01-01

    New technical and clinical developments of sonography and magnetic resonance imaging include improved detection, localization and staging as well as active surveillance of prostate cancer. Multiparametric MRI can best answer these typical clinical questions. However, ultrasound elastography seems to be suitable for the detection of significant prostate cancer as well. The structured reporting system for multiparametric MRI of the prostate according to PI-RADS Version 1 led to improved and reproducible diagnosis of prostate cancer. The new PI-RADS Version 2 aims to minimize the limitations of Version 1 and make PI-RADS standardization more globally acceptable.

  7. Infected Cardiac Myxoma: an Updated Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shi-Min

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to present an updated clinical picture of the infected cardiac myxoma. Revankar & Clark made a systematic review of infected cardiac myxoma based on the literature before 1998. Since then, there has not been any updated information describing its recent changing trends. A comprehensive literature search of infected cardiac myxoma was conducted on MEDLINE, Highwire Press and Google between 1998 and 2014. In comparison with Revankar & Clark's series, the present series disclosed a significantly decreased overall mortality. It is believed that refinement of the prompt diagnosis and timely management (use of sensitive antibiotics and surgical resection of the infected myxoma) have resulted in better outcomes of such patients. The present series of infected cardiac myxoma illustrated some aggravated clinical manifestations (relative more occasions of high-grade fever, multiple embolic events and the presence of refractory microorganisms), which should draw enough attention to careful diagnosis and treatment. In general, the prognosis of infected cardiac myxoma is relatively benign and the long-term survival is always promising.

  8. Infected Cardiac Myxoma: an Updated Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Min Yuan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: This study aims to present an updated clinical picture of the infected cardiac myxoma. Revankar & Clark made a systematic review of infected cardiac myxoma based on the literature before 1998. Since then, there has not been any updated information describing its recent changing trends. METHODS: A comprehensive literature search of infected cardiac myxoma was conducted on MEDLINE, Highwire Press and Google between 1998 and 2014. RESULTS: In comparison with Revankar & Clark's series, the present series disclosed a significantly decreased overall mortality. It is believed that refinement of the prompt diagnosis and timely management (use of sensitive antibiotics and surgical resection of the infected myxoma have resulted in better outcomes of such patients. CONCLUSION: The present series of infected cardiac myxoma illustrated some aggravated clinical manifestations (relative more occasions of high-grade fever, multiple embolic events and the presence of refractory microorganisms, which should draw enough attention to careful diagnosis and treatment. In general, the prognosis of infected cardiac myxoma is relatively benign and the long-term survival is always promising.

  9. Updated treatment algorithm of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiè, Nazzareno; Corris, Paul A; Frost, Adaani; Girgis, Reda E; Granton, John; Jing, Zhi Cheng; Klepetko, Walter; McGoon, Michael D; McLaughlin, Vallerie V; Preston, Ioana R; Rubin, Lewis J; Sandoval, Julio; Seeger, Werner; Keogh, Anne

    2013-12-24

    The demands on a pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) treatment algorithm are multiple and in some ways conflicting. The treatment algorithm usually includes different types of recommendations with varying degrees of scientific evidence. In addition, the algorithm is required to be comprehensive but not too complex, informative yet simple and straightforward. The type of information in the treatment algorithm are heterogeneous including clinical, hemodynamic, medical, interventional, pharmacological and regulatory recommendations. Stakeholders (or users) including physicians from various specialties and with variable expertise in PAH, nurses, patients and patients' associations, healthcare providers, regulatory agencies and industry are often interested in the PAH treatment algorithm for different reasons. These are the considerable challenges faced when proposing appropriate updates to the current evidence-based treatment algorithm.The current treatment algorithm may be divided into 3 main areas: 1) general measures, supportive therapy, referral strategy, acute vasoreactivity testing and chronic treatment with calcium channel blockers; 2) initial therapy with approved PAH drugs; and 3) clinical response to the initial therapy, combination therapy, balloon atrial septostomy, and lung transplantation. All three sections will be revisited highlighting information newly available in the past 5 years and proposing updates where appropriate. The European Society of Cardiology grades of recommendation and levels of evidence will be adopted to rank the proposed treatments. Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Clinical Practice Guideline for the Treatment of Intrinsic Circadian Rhythm Sleep-Wake Disorders: Advanced Sleep-Wake Phase Disorder (ASWPD), Delayed Sleep-Wake Phase Disorder (DSWPD), Non-24-Hour Sleep-Wake Rhythm Disorder (N24SWD), and Irregular Sleep-Wake Rhythm Disorder (ISWRD). An Update for 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auger, R. Robert; Burgess, Helen J.; Emens, Jonathan S.; Deriy, Ludmila V.; Thomas, Sherene M.; Sharkey, Katherine M.

    2015-01-01

    A systematic literature review and meta-analyses (where appropriate) were performed and the GRADE approach was used to update the previous American Academy of Sleep Medicine Practice Parameters on the treatment of intrinsic circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders. Available data allowed for positive endorsement (at a second-tier degree of confidence) of strategically timed melatonin (for the treatment of DSWPD, blind adults with N24SWD, and children/ adolescents with ISWRD and comorbid neurological disorders), and light therapy with or without accompanying behavioral interventions (adults with ASWPD, children/adolescents with DSWPD, and elderly with dementia). Recommendations against the use of melatonin and discrete sleep-promoting medications are provided for demented elderly patients, at a second- and first-tier degree of confidence, respectively. No recommendations were provided for remaining treatments/ populations, due to either insufficient or absent data. Areas where further research is needed are discussed. Citation: Auger RR, Burgess HJ, Emens JS, Deriy LV, Thomas SM, Sharkey KM. Clinical practice guideline for the treatment of intrinsic circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders: advanced sleep-wake phase disorder (ASWPD), delayed sleep-wake phase disorder (DSWPD), non-24-hour sleep-wake rhythm disorder (N24SWD), and irregular sleep-wake rhythm disorder (ISWRD). An update for 2015. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(10):1199–1236. PMID:26414986

  11. Applying new strategies for the national adaptation, updating, and dissemination of trustworthy guidelines: results from the Norwegian adaptation of the Antithrombotic Therapy and the Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th Ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansen, Annette; Brandt, Linn; Agoritsas, Thomas; Akl, Elie A; Berge, Eivind; Flem Jacobsen, Anne; Granan, Lars-Petter; Halvorsen, Sigrun; Guyatt, Gordon; Vandvik, Per Olav

    2014-09-01

    The Antithrombotic Therapy and the Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th Edition: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines (AT9) represent trustworthy international guidelines for antithrombotic treatment and thromboprophylaxis. We describe major changes to the format and content resulting from applying new strategies for guideline adaptation and dissemination. A Norwegian guideline panel of 46 experts completed a structured and systematic adaptation process, updated the recommendations based on new evidence, and rewrote the recommendations in an electronic multilayered presentation format. We published the adapted guideline using the web-based Making GRADE the Irresistible Choice Guideline Authoring and Publication Platform. We applied a novel presentation format to 333 recommendations from 11 of the 15 management chapters in AT9 and condensed and restructured them into 249 recommendations in a multilayered format. We added additional relevant information, such as 29 best-practice statements about new oral anticoagulants and practical information sections for 121 recommendations. Common reasons for modifications included feasibility of the recommendations in a national context, disagreement with applied baseline risk estimates, and reevaluation of the balance between the benefits and harms of interventions in relation to assumed typical patient preferences and values. The adapted guideline was published and disseminated online in November 2013. New strategies for adapting, updating, and disseminating trustworthy guidelines proved feasible and will provide Norwegian health-care professionals and patients with up-to-date guidance tailored to national circumstances.

  12. Dental Anomalies: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Jahanimoghadam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental anomalies are usual congenital malformation that can happen either as isolated findings or as a part of a syndrome. Developmental anomalies influencing the morphology exists in both deciduous and permanent dentition and shows different forms such as gemination, fusion, concrescence, dilaceration, dens evaginatus (DE, enamel pearls, taurodontism or peg-shaped laterals. All These anomalies have clinical significance concerning aesthetics, malocclusion and more necessary preparing of the development of dental decays and oral diseases. Through a search in PubMed, Google, Scopus and Medline, a total of eighty original research papers during 1928-2016 were found with the keywords such as dental anomaly, syndrome, tooth and hypodontia. One hundred review titles were identified, eighty reviews were retrieved that were finally included as being relevant and of sufficient quality. In this review, dental anomalies including gemination, fusion, concrescence, dilaceration, dens invaginatus, DE, taurodontism, enamel pearls, fluorosis, peg-shaped laterals, dentinal dysplasia, regional odontodysplasia and hypodontia are discussed. Diagnosing dental abnormality needs a thorough evaluation of the patient, involving a medical, dental, familial and clinical history. Clinical examination and radiographic evaluation and in some of the cases, specific laboratory tests are also needed. Developmental dental anomalies require careful examination and treatment planning. Where one anomaly is present, clinicians should suspect that other anomalies may also be present. Moreover, careful clinical and radiographical examination is required. Furthermore, more complex cases need multidisciplinary planning and treatment.

  13. Liver Transplantation Update: 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Serkan; Gurakar, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    of organs donated after cardiac death. Herein, we briefly summarize recent advances in knowledge related to LT. We also report common causes of death after liver transplant, including the recurrence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) and its management, and coronary artery disease (CAD), including the role of the cardiac calcium score in identifying occult CAD. Dogan S, Gurakar A. Liver Transplantation Update: 2014. Euroasian J Hepato-Gastroenterol 2015;5(2):98-106.

  14. Coccidioidomycosis: Recent Updates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twarog, Meryl; Thompson, George R

    2015-10-01

    Coccidioidomycosis manifests as a variety of clinical manifestations and ranges in severity from asymptomatic exposure with resultant immunity to reinfection, to fulminant, and life-threatening disseminated disease. Primary coccidioidal pneumonia represents the most common clinical form of infection, and the incidence continues to increase. Within the endemic region, primary pulmonary coccidioidomycosis represents up to 29% of all community-acquired pneumonia emphasizing the frequency with which clinicians encounter this endemic mycosis. Chronic infection develops in 3 to 5% of patients, and almost all morbidity and mortality observed in coccidioidomycosis occur in these forms (e.g., chronic pulmonary disease, extrapulmonary manifestations). This review summarizes the ecology, epidemiology, manifestations of disease, and treatment options currently available for coccidioidomycosis. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  15. THALASSAEMIA INTERMEDIA : AN UPDATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Taher

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of the molecular and pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the disease process in patients with thalassaemia intermedia (TI has substantially increased over the past decade. TI encompasses a wide clinical spectrum of beta-thalassaemia phenotypes. Some TI patients are asymptomatic until adult life, whereas others are symptomatic from as young as 2 years of age. A number of clinical complications commonly associated with TI are rarely seen in thalassaemia major, including extramedullary hematopoiesis, leg ulcers, gallstones, thrombosis and pulmonary hypertension. There are a number of options currently available for managing patients with TI, including transfusion therapy, iron chelation therapy, modulation of foetal haemoglobin production and haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. However, at present, there are no clear guidelines for an orchestrated optimal treatment plan.

  16. Tenofovir Nephrotoxicity: 2011 Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Fernandez-Fernandez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tenofovir is an acyclic nucleotide analogue reverse-transcriptase inhibitor structurally similar to the nephrotoxic drugs adefovir and cidofovir. Tenofovir is widely used to treat HIV infection and approved for treatment of hepatitis B virus. Despite initial cell culture and clinical trials results supporting the renal safety of tenofovir, its clinical use is associated with a low, albeit significant, risk of kidney injury. Proximal tubular cell secretion of tenofovir explains the accumulation of the drug in these mitochondria-rich cells. Tenofovir nephrotoxicity is characterized by proximal tubular cell dysfunction that may be associated with acute kidney injury or chronic kidney disease. Withdrawal of the drug leads to improvement of analytical parameters that may be partial. Understanding the risk factors for nephrotoxicity and regular monitoring of proximal tubular dysfunction and serum creatinine in high-risk patients is required to minimize nephrotoxicity. Newer, structurally similar molecular derivatives that do not accumulate in proximal tubules are under study.

  17. Lupus nephritis: current update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Lupus nephritis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. The general consensus is that 60% of lupus patients will develop clinically relevant nephritis at some time in the course of their illness. Prompt recognition and treatment of renal disease is important, as early response to therapy is correlated with better outcome. The present review summarizes our current understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying lupus nephritis and how the disease is currently diagnosed and treated. PMID:22078716

  18. Updates in immunoassays: parasitology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josko, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    Although most clinical laboratories use microscopy and routine O&P procedures when identifying parasitic infections, there are several parasites that are better detected through serological means. Toxoplasma, Giardia, and Cryptosporidium were discussed along with immunoassays used for their detection. Immunoassays provide quick results and are less labor intensive than specimen concentration and slide preparation for microscopic examination. These assays are easy to use and provide sensitive and specific results. Some clinical laboratories no longer perform O&Ps in house and refer specimens to reference laboratories for evaluation. By using immunoassays, some of the more common parasites can be identified in a timely manner reducing turn-around times. Some controversy exists over the use of IIF and EIA tests used for ANA testing along with measuring CRPs and PCT as predictors of bacterial sepsis and septic shock. Regardless of the methodology discussed in this series of articles, there are pros and cons to the various immunoassays available. Determining the most appropriate assay based on patient population and volume is governed by the institution and its patients' needs. In conclusion, immunoassays, whether manual or automated, are easy to use, cost effective and allow the medical laboratory professional to provide quick and accurate results to the clinician so the most appropriate treatment can be administered to the patient. The ultimate goal of healthcare professionals is to provide the highest quality of medical care in a timely manner. The use of immunoassays in the clinical laboratory allows the healthcare team to successfully achieve this goal.

  19. Probiotics: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenplas, Yvan; Huys, Geert; Daube, Georges

    2015-01-01

    Triggered by the growing knowledge on the link between the intestinal microbiome and human health, the interest in probiotics is ever increasing. The authors aimed to review the recent literature on probiotics, from definitions to clinical benefits, with emphasis on children. Relevant literature from searches of PubMed, CINAHL, and recent consensus statements were reviewed. While a balanced microbiome is related to health, an imbalanced microbiome or dysbiosis is related to many health problems both within the gastro-intestinal tract, such as diarrhea and inflammatory bowel disease, and outside the gastro-intestinal tract such as obesity and allergy. In this context, a strict regulation of probiotics with health claims is urgent, because the vast majority of these products are commercialized as food (supplements), claiming health benefits that are often not substantiated with clinically relevant evidence. The major indications of probiotics are in the area of the prevention and treatment of gastro-intestinal related disorders, but more data has become available on extra-intestinal indications. At least two published randomized controlled trials with the commercialized probiotic product in the claimed indication are a minimal condition before a claim can be sustained. Today, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Saccharomyces boulardii are the best-studied strains. Although adverse effects have sporadically been reported, these probiotics can be considered as safe. Although regulation is improving, more stringent definitions are still required. Evidence of clinical benefit is accumulating, although still missing in many areas. Misuse and use of products that have not been validated constitute potential drawbacks. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Probiotics: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvan Vandenplas

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Triggered by the growing knowledge on the link between the intestinal microbiome and human health, the interest in probiotics is ever increasing. The authors aimed to review the recent literature on probiotics, from definitions to clinical benefits, with emphasis on children. SOURCES: Relevant literature from searches of PubMed, CINAHL, and recent consensus statements were reviewed. SUMMARY OF THE FINDINGS: While a balanced microbiome is related to health, an imbalanced microbiome or dysbiosis is related to many health problems both within the gastro-intestinal tract, such as diarrhea and inflammatory bowel disease, and outside the gastro-intestinal tract such as obesity and allergy. In this context, a strict regulation of probiotics with health claims is urgent, because the vast majority of these products are commercialized as food (supplements, claiming health benefits that are often not substantiated with clinically relevant evidence. The major indications of probiotics are in the area of the prevention and treatment of gastro-intestinal related disorders, but more data has become available on extra-intestinal indications. At least two published randomized controlled trials with the commercialized probiotic product in the claimed indication are a minimal condition before a claim can be sustained. Today, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Saccharomyces boulardii are the best-studied strains. Although adverse effects have sporadically been reported, these probiotics can be considered as safe. CONCLUSIONS: Although regulation is improving, more stringent definitions are still required. Evidence of clinical benefit is accumulating, although still missing in many areas. Misuse and use of products that have not been validated constitute potential drawbacks.

  1. Update on Wilson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Annu; Bhatt, Mohit

    2013-01-01

    Wilson disease (WD) is an inherited disorder of chronic copper toxicosis characterized by excessive copper deposition in the body, primarily in the liver and the brain. It is a progressive disease and fatal if untreated. Excessive copper accumulation results from the inability of liver to excrete copper in bile. Copper is an essential trace metal and has a crucial role in many metabolic processes. Almost all of the body copper is protein bound. In WD, the slow but relentless copper accumulation overwhelms the copper chaperones (copper-binding proteins), resulting in high levels of free copper and copper-induced tissue injury. Liver is the central organ for copper metabolism, and copper is initially accumulated in the liver but over time spills to other tissues. WD has protean clinical manifestations mainly attributable to liver, brain, and osseomuscular impairment. Diagnosis of WD is challenging and based on combination of clinical features and laboratory tests. Identification of various high-frequency mutations identified in different population studies across the world has revived interest in developing DNA chips for rapid genetic diagnosis of WD. All symptomatic and all presymptomatic patients require lifelong decoppering with careful clinical tracking. Decoppering ensures that presymptomatic individuals remain symptom free. With judicious decoppering, given time, even patients with severe neurological disability improve and can return to normal life and resume school or work at par with their peers. Treatment regimens and tracking patients using the WD-specific Global Assessment Scale for WD (GAS for WD) are discussed. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Treatment update on acromegaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Hotimsky Millner

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Pegvisomant is a new drug that blocks growth hormone peripheralreceptors, allowing normalization of insulin-like growth factor-1levels and consequently of clinical symptoms, reducing morbidityand mortality associated with acromegaly in almost all patients.Its introduction made us review the literature aiming to comparethe currently available therapies for acromegaly and theirrespective advantages and disadvantages. The treatmentalgorithms for this disease were reviewed considering that thedifferent existing therapies allow more adequate individualizationto each specific case, and addressing cost, availability, efficacyand safety.

  3. Seborrheic dermatitis: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukvić Mokos, Zrinka; Kralj, Martina; Basta-Juzbašić, Aleksandra; Lakoš Jukić, Ines

    2012-01-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis is a chronic relapsing inflammatory skin disorder clinically characterized by scaling and poorly defined erythematous patches. The prevalence of adult seborrheic dermatitis is estimated at 5%. Although the exact cause of seborrheic dermatitis has yet to be understood, Malassezia yeasts, hormones (androgens), sebum levels and immune response are known to play important roles in its development. Additional factors including drugs, winter temperatures and stress may exacerbate seborrheic dermatitis. A variety of treatment modalities are available, including antifungal agents, topical low-potency steroids and calcineurin inhibitors (immunomodulators). This review summarizes current knowledge on the etiopathogenesis and therapy of adult seborrheic dermatitis.

  4. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis: epidemiology update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marckmann, P.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose of review The aim of this article is to outline the history of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, a new and serious disease of patients with renal failure, and to give an update on its aetiology and prevalence. Recent findings Epidemiological and histochemical studies demonstrated that gadoli......Purpose of review The aim of this article is to outline the history of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, a new and serious disease of patients with renal failure, and to give an update on its aetiology and prevalence. Recent findings Epidemiological and histochemical studies demonstrated...

  5. UPDATE: Applications of Research in Music Education. UPDATE Yearbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowman & Littlefield Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The Fall 2004 and Spring 2005 issues of "UPDATE: Applications of Research in Music Education," in one print volume, presents hard facts and statistical data in a style that can be easily understood and appreciated by music researchers, teachers, graduates, and undergraduates alike. Includes advice to first-year music teachers, instrument…

  6. Postoperative pulmonary complications updating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langeron, O; Carreira, S; le Saché, F; Raux, M

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs) are a major contributor to the overall risk of surgery. PPCs affect the length of hospital stay and are associated with a higher in-hospital mortality. PPCs are even the leading cause of death either in cardiothoracic surgery but also in non-cardiothoracic surgery. Thus, reliable PPCs risk stratification tools are the key issue of clinical decision making in the perioperative period. When the risk is clearly identified related to the patient according the ARISCAT score and/or the type of surgery (mainly thoracic and abdominal), low-cost preemptive interventions improve outcomes and new strategies can be developed to prevent this risk. The EuSOS, PERISCOPE and IMPROVE studies demonstrated this care optimization by risk identification first, then risk stratification and new care (multifaceted) strategies implementation allowing a decrease in PPCs mortality by optimizing the clinical path of the patient and the care resources. Copyright © 2014 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Hepatorenal syndrome: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tércio Genzini

    Full Text Available Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS is the development of renal failure in patients with chronic previous liver disease, without clinical or laboratory evidence of previous kidney disease. It affects up to 18% of cirrhotic patients with ascites during the first year of follow-up, reaching 39% in five years and presenting a survival of about two weeks after its establishment. HRS diagnosis is based on clinical and laboratory data. The occurrence of this syndrome is related to the mechanism for ascites development, involving vasoconstriction, low renal perfusion, water and sodium retention, increased plasma volume, and consequent overflow at the splanchnic level. Renal vasoactive mediators like endothelin 1, thromboxane A2, and leukotrienes are also involved in the genesis of this syndrome, which culminates in functional renal insufficiency. The treatment of choice can be pharmacological or surgical, although liver transplantation is the only permanent and effective treatment, with a four-year survival rate of up to 60%. Liver function recovery is usually followed by renal failure reversion. Early diagnosis and timely therapeutics can increase life expectancy for these patients while they are waiting for liver transplantation as a definitive treatment.

  8. [An update on measles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caseris, M; Burdet, C; Lepeule, R; Houhou, N; Yeni, P; Yazdanpanah, Y; Joly, V

    2015-05-01

    Measles is a highly contagious infectious disease, which needs more than 95% worldwide vaccination coverage of 2 doses to be eradicated. Despite an important involvement of the WHO for massive immunization, goals have not bean reached, and outbreaks can occur at any time in many countries, including Western Europe. In France, 22,000 cases were identified between 2009 and 2011, mainly in infants and young adults, which are not or not enough vaccinated (one dose). In 2012, even though the number of cases has drastically decreased, the outbreak is still going on, especially in South of France. That is why every clinician needs to be concerned about the clinical manifestations of the disease, and its complications. Besides a febrile rash, measles is often responsible of pneumonia and biologic hepatitis in adults. Hepatitis does not seem frequent in children. Clinicians need to be aware of specific complications, like encephalitis in case of cellular immunodepression, high risk of pneumonia in pregnant women. In patients previously vaccinated, incidence of complications is the same but patients are not contagious. Even if measles diagnosis is clinical, blood confirmation by serology is recommended in France when possible. Outcome is mainly favourable, but measles is not well-tolerated with high levels of hospitalisation even without any complication. Vaccination is the only way to protect against it. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  9. [Cervical lift: An update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbé, D; Guerreschi, P

    2017-10-01

    The neck is an aesthetic unit for which a rejuvenation request is sometimes very targeted or ore often encompassed in a global surgical project of face-lift. To obtain a long lasting outcome, the plastic surgeon has to make a full, detailed, and exhaustive analysis of the neck in order to choose the best indication within the multiple surgical tools. A full clinical examination is the key point, every aspects are outlined. The numerous surgical choices are described, illustrated, and sometimes revisited in the light of targeted anatomical studies. A didactic and graduated way is used to explain the recent evolutions of the surgical tools of the cervical lifting. Complications and insufficiencies in outcomes must be identified and explained. Finally, we illustrate this development by clinical cases. The surgical improvement of the cervical region is, for us, centered on the reconstruction of a cervical retaining structure: the Cervico-Mandibular Angle Suspensor (CMAS) ligament. This element makes it possible to understand and integrate the large number of technical proposals for cervical lifting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. THALASSAEMIA INTERMEDIA : AN UPDATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Domenica Cappellini

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Our understanding of the molecular and pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the disease process in patients with thalassaemia intermedia (TI has substantially increased over the past decade. TI encompasses a wide clinical spectrum of beta-thalassaemia phenotypes. Some TI patients are asymptomatic until adult life, whereas others are symptomatic from as young as 2 years of age. A number of clinical complications commonly associated with TI are rarely seen in thalassaemia major, including extramedullary hematopoiesis, leg ulcers, gallstones, thrombosis and pulmonary hypertension. There are a number of options currently available for managing patients with TI, including transfusion therapy, iron chelation therapy, modulation of foetal haemoglobin production and haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. However, at present, there are no clear guidelines for an orchestrated optimal treatment plan.

  11. Cardiology update 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Verma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the latter half of 2016, the Danish study evaluated the need of automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator in nonischemic cardiomyopathies group of heart failure population. HOPE-3 in 2016 expanded the dimension of statin use. Novel age, biomarker, and clinical history stroke risk score for atrial fibrillation was validated. Success of Phase 2b clinical trial for CSL112 was one more step to reduce the ischemic events in the postmyocardial infarction period. On the one hand, NORSTENT study compared the bare-metal stents with drug-eluting stent, and on the other hand, 3-year follow-up data of ABSORB II trail discussed the performance of bioresorbable scaffolds. NOBLE and EXCEL trials evaluated the coronary intervention with coronary artery bypass graft in the left main coronary artery disease. Reduction of major adverse cardiac event with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol <50 mg/dl was analyzed with alirocumab. Fractional flow reserve was tested as a tool to decide treatment modality in patients with stable coronary artery disease. Natural history of rheumatic heart disease in the current era was described in REMEDY study. A few technological advancements in cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator technology were also approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Birth prevalence and pattern of congenital heart disease in North India were presented.

  12. POEMS SYNDROME: AN UPDATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Nozza

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available POEMS syndrome is a rare, chronic and disabling condition. The causes of this condition remain unknown; however, chronic overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines appears to be a major contributor. Early diagnosis is essential to start treatment before the clinical condition of the patient becomes compromised. A complete evaluation of the disease at its onset is essential for treatment decision. In localized disease, curative doses of radiation (50 Gy is the recommended therapy. On the other hand, patients with disseminated disease should be given systemic therapy. Treatment-related morbidity can be minimized by an effective induction therapy that modifies the cytokine status, improving clinical condition and control disease severity before mobilization and transplantation. Patients not suitable for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT are usually treated with alkylator-based therapy. Novel agents may also offer benefits to patients with a poor performance status or renal dysfunction, and induce transplantation eligibility. Given the biological characteristics of POEMS, immunomodulatory effects and the absence of neurotoxicity, lenalidomide appears to be an effective therapy for the treatment of POEMS, both as short induction therapy before PBSCT and in non-transplant eligible patients, as it showed high response rate and long lasting responses. At present, however, guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of POEMS are not available and appear advocated.  Keywords: POEMS, plasma cell dyscrasia; Osteosclerosis; neuropathy

  13. Update on Biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Paul A; Giori, Nicholas J; Lavernia, Carlos J; Villa, Jesus M; Greenwald, A Seth

    2016-01-01

    Biomaterials are essential to the use and development of successful treatments for orthopaedic patients. Orthopaedic surgeons need to understand the expected clinical performance and the effects of implants in patients. Recent attempts to improve implant durability have resulted in adverse effects related to biomaterials and their relationship to patients. Examples of these adverse effects in hip arthroplasty include wear and corrosion of metal-on-metal bearings, trunnions, and tapered modular neck junctions. Conversely, polymers and ceramics have shown substantial improvements in durability. Improved implant compositions and manufacturing processes have resulted in ceramic head and acetabular liners with improved material properties and the avoidance of voids, which have, in the past, caused catastrophic fractures. Cross-linking of polyethylene with radiation and doping with antioxidants has substantially increased implant durability and is increasingly being used in joint prostheses other than the hip. Additive manufacturing is potentially a transformative process; it can lead to custom and patient-specific implants and to improvements in material properties, which can be optimized to achieve desired bone responses. Orthopaedic surgeons must understand the material properties and the biologic effects of new or altered biomaterials and manufacturing processes before use. In addition, a clear benefit to the patient must be proven based on superior preclinical results and high-quality clinical investigations before orthopaedic surgeons use new or altered biomaterials.

  14. Neck lift my way: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Joel J

    2014-12-01

    The author updates prior descriptions of an approach to the surgical neck lift that aims for a maximum degree of control over the size, shape, and position of every anatomical feature of the neck that is negatively affecting its appearance. A 38-year clinical experience guided the development of the operative tactics that define the strategy. Data collected from a records review of 522 consecutive neck lifts performed during the 10-year period 2004 through 2013 further inform the report. The approach has eight features: (1) nearly routine use of open submental access to all tissue layers of the central neck, including a regimen that curbed the problems that may attend an extensive tissue dissection; (2) management of lax neck skin by lateral excision using a specific postauricular incision, or by using the nonexcisional method of redistribution; (3) open lipectomy for precise removal of excess subcutaneous neck and jawline fat; (4) individualized modifications to subplatysmal fat, perihyoid fascia, and anterior digastric muscles; (5) treatment of large, ptotic, or malpositioned submandibular salivary glands by partial excision using a transcutaneous traction suture; (6) the current version of the corset platysmaplasty, which is used to treat static paramedian platysma muscle bands, and to avoid contour imperfections following subplatysmal maneuvers; (7) an approach that facilitates an isolated neck lift; and (8) durable results. Case examples demonstrate outcomes. Although the updated approach remains relatively complex and invasive, the author believes that the ends justify the means.

  15. Mediastinal tumors. Update 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, D.E.; Thomas, C.R. Jr.

    1995-01-01

    This volume represents the premier work devoted solely to the complex myriad of mediastinal tumors. The contributors to the state-of-the-art text are clinical investigators of international renown. The diagnosis, natural history, and therapeutic strategies in respect of all mediastinal tumors are thoroughly addressed in a concise and logical manner. An emphasis on the multidisciplinary nature of mediastinal tumors is thematic throughout the text. Moreover, the combined-modality treatment schemes that have been increasingly developed worldwide are analyzed. This textbook will prove of value to all general surgeons, thoracic surgeons, medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, pulmonologists, and endocrinologists, as well as to nursing and medical students, residents and fellows-in training. (orig.). 55 figs., 21 tabs

  16. New updating into hemoglobinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucharoen, S; Winichagoon, P

    2012-12-01

    Thalassemia and abnormal hemoglobin are the most common genetic disorders and are considered health problems in many developing countries. In the last few years, there has been much progress in laboratory diagnosis, treatment and control of thalassemia. The variation in the clinical severity in both α- and β-thalassemia reflects a genotype-phenotype interaction. This is important for future therapeutic intervention and should be well characterized in each population. The quality of life of the patients is much improved with regular blood transfusion and novel iron chelators. The cure for thalassemia is possible by stem cell transplantation and future gene therapy. It is expected that under multinational collaboration the prevention of thalassemia will happen worldwide. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Bone scintiscanning updated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentle, B C; Russell, A S; Percy, J S; Scott, J R; Jackson, F I

    1976-03-01

    Use of modern materials and methods has given bone scintiscanning a larger role in clinical medicine, The safety and ready availability of newer agents have led to its greater use in investigating both benign and malignant disease of bone and joint. Present evidence suggests that abnormal accumulation of 99mTc-polyphosphate and its analogues results from ionic deposition at crystal surfaces in immature bone, this process being facilitated by an increase in bone vascularity. There is, also, a component of matrix localization. These factors are in keeping with the concept that abnormal scintiscan sites represent areas of increased osteoblastic activity, although this may be an oversimplification. Increasing evidence shows that the bone scintiscan is more sensitive than conventional radiography in detecting focal disease of bone, and its ability to reflect the immediate status of bone further complements radiographic findings. The main limitation of this method relates to nonspecificity of the results obtained.

  18. Update in adolescent dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Arthur N; Shwayder, Tor A

    2013-04-01

    This dermatology article serves as a quick reference for the physician treating adolescents. We first review the diagnostic approach to a dermatologic problem: configuration, color, pattern, and distribution. The next section discusses diagnosis and management of the most common clinical situations encountered in everyday practice, including skin infections, infestations, dermatitis, hypersensitivity reactions, and papulosquamous disorders. The following section covers conditions that should be managed with the help of a dermatologist, including difficult acute situations such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis, and necrotizing fasciitis; other chronic situations, including refractory common conditions such as acne and psoriasis, are also considered. We then discuss conditions that should be managed exclusively by a dermatologist, including malignancies, bullous disorders, and less common types of ichthyosis. The final section alerts the physician to dermatologic conditions that may be manifestations of other disorders, necessitating appropriate referral to a different specialist. Examples are immunologic and endocrine disorders, inflammatory bowel disease, collagen vascular disease, and malignancies.

  19. Updating the OMERACT filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tugwell, Peter; Boers, Maarten; D'Agostino, Maria-Antonietta

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Filter provides guidelines for the development and validation of outcome measures for use in clinical research. The "Truth" section of the OMERACT Filter requires that criteria be met to demonstrate that the outcome instrument meets...... the criteria for content, face, and construct validity. METHODS: Discussion groups critically reviewed a variety of ways in which case studies of current OMERACT Working Groups complied with the Truth component of the Filter and what issues remained to be resolved. RESULTS: The case studies showed...... that there is broad agreement on criteria for meeting the Truth criteria through demonstration of content, face, and construct validity; however, several issues were identified that the Filter Working Group will need to address. CONCLUSION: These issues will require resolution to reach consensus on how Truth...

  20. [Ocular melanomas : An update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalirai, H; Müller, P L; Jaehne, D; Coupland, S E

    2017-11-01

    Melanoma is the most common type of primary cancer to affect the adult eye. Approximately 95% of ocular melanomas are intraocular and arise from the uvea (i. e. iris, ciliary body, and choroid), while the remaining 5% are located in the conjunctiva. Although both uveal and conjunctival melanomas are thought to derive from malignantly transformed melanocytes, uveal melanoma is clinically and biologically distinct from conjunctival melanoma, and indeed from its more common cutaneous counterpart. Intense efforts have been recently made to understand the molecular biology involved in the development of ocular melanomas, and in their progression. Molecular advances, particularly for uveal melanoma, have enhanced prognostication and the identification of rational therapeutic targets for disseminated disease. In this review, recent advances in the molecular characterisation of both uveal and conjunctival melanomas are discussed, and how these may be used to develop personalised therapeutic strategies.

  1. Nummular headache update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Juan A; Montojo, Teresa; Alvarez, Mónica

    2012-04-01

    Nummular headache is characterized by head pain exclusively felt in a rounded or elliptical area, typically 1 to 6 cm in diameter. The pain remains confined to the same symptomatic area, which does not change in shape or size with time. The symptomatic area may be localized in any part of the head but mostly in the parietal region. Rarely, the disorder may be multifocal, each symptomatic area keeping all the characteristics of nummular headache. The pain is generally mild or moderate, commonly described as oppressive or stabbing, and lasting minutes, hours, or days, with a remitting or unremitting pattern. Superimposed on the baseline pain, there may be spontaneous or triggered exacerbations. During and between symptomatic periods, the affected area may show variable combinations of hypoesthesia, dysesthesia, paresthesia, tenderness, and trophic changes. Nummular headache emerges as a primary disorder with a clear-cut clinical picture developed in a unique topography.

  2. Update on Hippocampal Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutra, Juliana R; Cortés, Etty P; Vonsattel, Jean Paul G

    2015-10-01

    The diagnostic hallmarks of hippocampal sclerosis (HS) are severe volume loss of the hippocampus, severe neuronal loss, and reactive gliosis involving primarily two especially vulnerable fields, CA1 and the subiculum. Occasionally, HS may be the only neuropathological change detected in older individuals with dementia and is known as pure HS. In the majority of cases, HS occurs in the setting of other degenerative changes, usually Alzheimer's disease (AD). In these cases, it is classified as combined HS. Although a clinical profile for HS has been identified, its similarities with AD make the diagnosis during life quite challenging; thus, the diagnosis is often made postmortem. The pathogenesis of HS is not completely understood, but the strong association with transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43), in approximately 90%, and the recent discovery of genetic risk factors are important contributions to a better understanding of the disease process.

  3. [Necrotizing fasciitis. 2011 update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, M; Grabein, B; Palm, H-G; Efinger, K; Riesner, H-J; Friemert, B; Willy, C

    2011-03-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis belongs to a group of complicated soft tissue infections that can be even life threatening. Despite growing knowledge about its etiology, predictors, and the clinical progression, the mortality remains at a high level with 20%. A relevant reduction can be achieved only by an early diagnosis followed by consistent therapy. The clinical findings in about 75% of the cases are pain out of proportion, edema and tenderness, blisters, and erythema. It is elementary to differentiate a necrotizing or a non-necrotizing soft tissue infection early. In uncertain cases it can be necessary to perform a surgical exploration to confirm the diagnosis. The histopathologic characteristics are the fascial necrosis, vasculitis, thrombosis of perforating veins, the presence of the disease-causing bacteria as well as inflammatory cells like macrophages and polymorphonuclear granulocytes. Secondly, both the cutis and the muscle can be affected. In many cases there is a disproportion of the degree of local and systemic symptoms. Depending on the infectious agents there are two main types: type I is a polymicrobial infection and type II is a more invasive, serious, and fulminant monomicrobial infection mostly caused by group A Streptococcus pyogenes.Invasive, severe forms of streptococcal infections seem to occur more often in recent years. Multimodal and interdisciplinary therapy should be based on radical surgical débridement, systemic antibiotic therapy as well as enhanced intensive care therapy, which is sometimes combined with immunoglobulins (in streptococcal or staphylococcal infections) or hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT, in clostridial infections). For wound care of extensive soft tissue defects vacuum-assisted closure has shown its benefit.

  4. Treatment of spasticity: an update

    OpenAIRE

    TEIVE, HÉLIO A.G.; ZONTA, MARISE; KUMAGAI, YUMI

    1998-01-01

    Apresentamos revisão sobre o tratamento atual da espasticidade, enfocando a terapêutica farmacológica, fisioterápica e através da utilização de toxina botulínica.We present an update about the treatment of spasticity, stressing the pharmacological treatment, physical therapy and botulinum toxin therapy.

  5. Treatability study sample exemption: update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This document is a RCRA Information Brief intended to update the information in the 1991 Small-Scale Treatability Study Information Brief, and to address questions about the waste and treatability study sample exemptions that have arisen since References 3 and 5 were published

  6. Internet Journal of Medical Update

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arun Kumar Agnihotri

    The two surveys on 'Gambling Addiction' published in this issue of the Internet Journal of. Medical Update recommend that there is a need to improve training of psychiatrists in India as regards identification, assessment and treatment of gambling addicts. I think the findings will inform the development and implementation of ...

  7. Financial Sector Assessment Update : Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2005-01-01

    A joint International Monetary Fund-World Bank team conducted an assessment update of Uganda's financial system in connection with the Financial Sector Assessment Program (FSAP) in November, 2004. The purpose of the mission was to help the Ugandan authorities identify financial system strengths and weaknesses with a view to implementing an action plan to increase the system's contribution ...

  8. Upgrade trigger: Biannual performance update

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Couturier, Ben; Esen, Sevda; De Cian, Michel; De Vries, Jacco Andreas; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fontana, Marianna; Grillo, Lucia; Hasse, Christoph; Jones, Christopher Rob; Le Gac, Renaud; Matev, Rosen; Neufeld, Niko; Nikodem, Thomas; Polci, Francesco; Del Buono, Luigi; Quagliani, Renato; Schwemmer, Rainer; Seyfert, Paul; Stahl, Sascha; Szumlak, Tomasz; Vesterinen, Mika Anton; Wanczyk, Joanna; Williams, Mark Richard James; Yin, Hang; Zacharjasz, Emilia Anna

    2017-01-01

    This document presents the performance of the LHCb Upgrade trigger reconstruction sequence, incorporating changes to the underlying reconstruction algorithms and detector description since the Trigger and Online Upgrade TDR. An updated extrapolation is presented using the most recent example of an Event Filter Farm node.

  9. AMDIS and CHART update. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, I.; Kato, T. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Igarashi, A. [Miyazaki Univ., Miyazaki (JP)] [and others

    2002-10-01

    A working group for updating atomic and molecular collision data in the NIFS database AMDIS (electron scattering) and CHART (ion scattering) has been organized. This group has searched and reviewed literatures for collecting relevant atomic data with are to be included into the database. This is a summary report of the activities of this working group. (author)

  10. National Educators' Workshop: Update 1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, James E.; Freeman, Ginger L.; Jacobs, James; Parkin, Don M.

    1997-01-01

    This document contains a collection of experiments presented and demonstrated at the National Educators' Workshop: Update 96, held at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico on October 27-30, 1996. The experiments related to the nature and properties of engineering materials and provided information to assist in teaching about materials in the education community.

  11. Update of CERN exchange network

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    An update of the CERN exchange network will be done next April. Disturbances or even interruptions of telephony services may occur from 4th to 24th April during evenings from 18:30 to 00:00 but will not exceed more than 4 consecutive hours (see tentative planning below). In addition, the voice messaging system will be shut down on March, 26th April from 18:00 to 00:00. Calls supposed to be routed to the voice messaging system will not be possible during the shutdown. CERN divisions are invited to avoid any change requests (set-ups, move or removals) of telephones and fax machines from 4th to 25th April. Everything will be done to minimize potential inconveniences which may occur during this update. There will be no loss of telephone functionalities. CERN GSM portable phones won't be affected by this change. Should you need more details, please send us your questions by email to Standard.Telephone@cern.ch. Date Change type Affected areas April 8 Update of switch in LHC 7 LHC 7 Point April 9 Update of...

  12. Update of CERN exchange network

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    An update of the CERN exchange network will be done next April. Disturbances or even interruptions of telephony services may occur from 4th to 24th April during evenings from 18:30 to 00:00 but will not exceed more than 4 consecutive hours (see tentative planning below). In addition, the voice messaging system will be shut down on March, 26th April from 18:00 to 00:00. Calls supposed to be routed to the voice messaging system will not be possible during the shutdown. CERN divisions are invited to avoid any change requests (set-ups, move or removals) of telephones and fax machines from 4th to 25th April. Everything will be done to minimize potential inconveniences which may occur during this update. There will be no loss of telephone functionalities. CERN GSM portable phones won't be affected by this change. Should you need more details, please send us your questions by email to Standard.Telephone@cern.ch. DateChange typeAffected areas March 26Update of the voice messaging systemAll CERN sites April 4Updat...

  13. Wind turbine reliability database update.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Valerie A.; Hill, Roger Ray; Stinebaugh, Jennifer A.; Veers, Paul S.

    2009-03-01

    This report documents the status of the Sandia National Laboratories' Wind Plant Reliability Database. Included in this report are updates on the form and contents of the Database, which stems from a fivestep process of data partnerships, data definition and transfer, data formatting and normalization, analysis, and reporting. Selected observations are also reported.

  14. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis: epidemiology update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marckmann, P.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose of review The aim of this article is to outline the history of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, a new and serious disease of patients with renal failure, and to give an update on its aetiology and prevalence. Recent findings Epidemiological and histochemical studies demonstrated that gadoli...

  15. Model validation: Correlation for updating

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Imperial College of Science, ... If we are unable to obtain a satisfactory degree of correlation between the initial theoretical model and the test data, then it is extremely unlikely that any form of model updating (correcting the model to match the test data) will succeed. Thus, a successful ...

  16. Archives: Internet Journal of Medical Update - EJOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 23 of 23 ... Archives: Internet Journal of Medical Update - EJOURNAL. Journal Home > Archives: Internet Journal of Medical Update - EJOURNAL. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  17. Breast Cancer and Estrogen-Alone Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Research News From NIH Breast Cancer and Estrogen-Alone Update Past Issues / Summer 2006 ... hormone therapy does not increase the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women, according to an updated analysis ...

  18. Program Updates - San Antonio River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page will house updates for this urban waters partnership location. As projects progress, status updates can be posted here to reflect the ongoing work by partners in San Antonio working on the San Antonio River Basin.

  19. Acute ischemic stroke update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Kathleen; Orr, Sean; Briand, Mary; Piazza, Carolyn; Veydt, Annita; McCoy, Stacey

    2010-05-01

    Stroke is the third most common cause of death in the United States and is the number one cause of long-term disability. Legislative mandates, largely the result of the American Heart Association, American Stroke Association, and Brain Attack Coalition working cooperatively, have resulted in nationwide standardization of care for patients who experience a stroke. Transport to a skilled facility that can provide optimal care, including immediate treatment to halt or reverse the damage caused by stroke, must occur swiftly. Admission to a certified stroke center is recommended for improving outcomes. Most strokes are ischemic in nature. Acute ischemic stroke is a heterogeneous group of vascular diseases, which makes targeted treatment challenging. To provide a thorough review of the literature since the 2007 acute ischemic stroke guidelines were developed, we performed a search of the MEDLINE database (January 1, 2004-July 1, 2009) for relevant English-language studies. Results (through July 1, 2009) from clinical trials included in the Internet Stroke Center registry were also accessed. Results from several pivotal studies have contributed to our knowledge of stroke. Additional data support the efficacy and safety of intravenous alteplase, the standard of care for acute ischemic stroke since 1995. Due to these study results, the American Stroke Association changed its recommendation to extend the time window for administration of intravenous alteplase from within 3 hours to 4.5 hours of symptom onset; this recommendation enables many more patients to receive the drug. Other findings included clinically useful biomarkers, the role of inflammation and infection, an expanded role for placement of intracranial stents, a reduced role for urgent carotid endarterectomy, alternative treatments for large-vessel disease, identification of nontraditional risk factors, including risk factors for women, and newly published pediatric stroke guidelines. In addition, new devices for

  20. Autoimmune pancreatitis. An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmberger, T.

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare disease, the pathophysiological understanding of which has been greatly improved over the last years. The most common form, type 1 AIP belongs to the IgG4-related diseases and must be distinguished from type 2 AIP, which is a much rarer entity associated with chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Clinically, there is an overlap with pancreatic cancer. Imaging and further criteria, such as serological and histological parameters are utilized for a differentiation between both entities in order to select the appropriate therapy and to avoid the small but ultimately unnecessary number of pancreatectomies. The diagnostics of AIP are complex, whereby the consensus criteria of the International Association of Pancreatology have become accepted as the parameters for discrimination. These encompass five cardinal criteria and one therapeutic criterion. By applying these criteria AIP can be diagnosed with a sensitivity of 84.9 %, a specificity of 100 % and an accuracy of 93.8 %. The diagnosis of AIP is accomplished by applying several parameters of which two relate to imaging. As for the routine diagnostics of the pancreas these are ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Important for the differential diagnosis is the exclusion of signs of local and remote tumor spread for which CT and MRI are established. The essential diagnostic parameter of histology necessitates sufficient sample material, which cannot usually be acquired by a fine needle biopsy. CT or MRI are the reference standard methods for identification of the optimal puncture site and imaging-assisted (TruCut) biopsy. In patients presenting with unspecific upper abdominal pain, painless jaundice combined with the suspicion of a pancreatic malignancy in imaging but a mismatch of secondary signs of malignancy, AIP should also be considered as a differential diagnosis. As the diagnosis of AIP only partially relies on imaging radiologists also

  1. Update on fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiola Atzeni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionFibromyalgia (FM is a chronic pain syndrome characterized by widespread pain, fatigue, sleep alterations, and distress. It affects at least 2% of the adult population. The etiology of FM is not completely understood, and the syndrome is influenced by stress, physical illness, and a variety of pain conditions. Emerging evidence indicates that augmented pain processing within the central nervous system plays a primary role in the pathophysiology of this disorder. Diagnosis may be difficult because of the multifaceted nature of the syndrome and its overlap with other chronically painful conditions. This article reviews the most recent data in the literature on FM.Materials and methodsThere are currently no instrumental tests or specific diagnostic markers for FM. In fact, many of the existing indicators are regarded as significant for research purposes only.ResultsDifferential diagnosis requires an extensive clinical examination and complete patient history. Chest-X-rays and abdominal ultrasonography are the first steps in the general evaluation of a patient with suspected FM.ConclusionsA variety of pharmacological treatments have been used to treat FM, including antidepressants, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, opioids, sedatives, muscle relaxants, and antiepileptics. Physical exercise and multimodal cognitive-behavioral therapy seem to be the most widely accepted and beneficial forms of non-pharmacological therapy.

  2. Update on Pediatric Cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantar, Ahmad

    2016-02-01

    Despite the high prevalence of cough in children, the topic has been poorly researched. Although pediatricians recognize that chronic cough in children is different from that in adults, this difference seems less recognizable to other health professionals. During childhood, the respiratory tract and nervous system undergo a series of anatomical and physiological maturation processes that influence the cough reflex. Additionally, immunological responses undergo developmental and memorial processes that make infection and congenital abnormalities the overwhelming cause of cough in children. The lack of comprehensive clinical data regarding chronic cough in children has initially required pediatricians to adopt an adult approach to the problem. In the last 10 years, however, research has led to the reconsideration of the etiology of chronic cough in children. Currently, attention has focused on protracted bacterial bronchitis as a major cause of chronic cough in preschool-aged children and as a possible precursor of bronchiectasis. New research horizons are emerging for both the treatment and prevention of particular causes of chronic cough in children.

  3. Coxarthrosis - an update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imhof, H.; Noebauer-Huhmann, I.; Trattnig, S.

    2009-01-01

    Degenerative osteoarthritis of the hip joint (coxarthrosis) is the most common disease of the hip joint in adults. The diagnosis is based on a combination of radiographic findings and characteristic clinical symptoms. The lack of a radiographic consensus definition has seemingly resulted in a variation of the published incidences and prevalence of degenerative osteoarthritis of the hip joint. The chronological sequence of degeneration includes the following basic symptoms on conventional radiographs and CT: joint space narrowing, development of osteophytes, subchondral demineralisation/sclerosis and cyst formation, as well as loose bodies, joint malalignment and deformity. MR imaging allows additional visualization of early symptoms and/or activity signs such as cartilage edema, cartilage tears and defects, subchondral bone marrow edema, synovial edema and thickening, joint effusion and muscle atrophy. The scientific dispute concerns the significance of (minimal) joint malalignment (e.g. impingement, dysplasia etc.) and forms of malpositioning which as possible prearthrosis have a high probability of leading to degenerative osteoarthritis. Moreover, without any question, the preservation of joint containment and gender differences are important additional basic diagnostic principles, which have gained great interest in recent years. In research different MR procedures such as Na and H spectroscopy, T2*-mapping etc. with ultrahigh field MR allow cartilage metabolism and its changes in early degenerative osteoarthritis (''biochemical imaging'') to be studied. There is no doubt that even in a few years new profound knowledge is to be expected in this field. (orig.) [de

  4. Hamstring injuries: update article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucio Ernlund

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Hamstring (HS muscle injuries are the most common injury in sports. They are correlated to long rehabilitations and have a great tendency to recur. The HS consist of the long head of the biceps femoris, semitendinosus, and semimembranosus. The patient's clinical presentation depends on the characteristics of the lesion, which may vary from strain to avulsions of the proximal insertion. The most recognized risk factor is a previous injury. Magnetic resonance imaging is the method of choice for the injury diagnosis and classification. Many classification systems have been proposed; the current classifications aim to describe the injury and correlate it to the prognosis. The treatment is conservative, with the use of anti-inflammatory drugs in the acute phase followed by a muscle rehabilitation program. Proximal avulsions have shown better results with surgical repair. When the patient is pain free, shows recovery of strength and muscle flexibility, and can perform the sport's movements, he/she is able to return to play. Prevention programs based on eccentric strengthening of the muscles have been indicated both to prevent the initial injury as well as preventing recurrence.

  5. [Preoperative fasting. An update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spies, C D; Breuer, J P; Gust, R; Wichmann, M; Adolph, M; Senkal, M; Kampa, U; Weissauer, W; Schleppers, A; Soreide, E; Martin, E; Kaisers, U; Falke, K J; Haas, N; Kox, W J

    2003-11-01

    In Germany the predominant standard of preoperative care for elective surgery is fasting after midnight, with the aim of reducing the risk of pulmonary aspiration. However, for the past several years the scientific evidence supporting such a practice has been challenged. Experimental and clinical studies prove a reliable gastric emptying within 2 h suggesting that, particularly for limited intake of clear fluids up to 2 h preoperatively, there would be no increased risk for the patient. In addition, the general incidence of pulmonary aspiration during general anaesthesia (before induction, during surgery and during recovery) is extremely low, has a good prognosis and is more a consequence of insufficient airway protection and/or inadequate anaesthetic depth rather than due to the patient's fasting state. Therefore, primarily to decrease perioperative discomfort for patients, several national anaesthesia societies have changed their guidelines for preoperative fasting. They recommend a more liberal policy regarding per os intake of both liquid and solid food, with consideration of certain conditions and contraindications. The following article reviews the literature and gives an overview of the scientific background on which the national guidelines are based. The intention of this review is to propose recommendations for preoperative fasting regarding clear fluids for Germany as well.

  6. Endocrinology Update: Testicular Hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidelbaugh, Joel J

    2016-12-01

    Testicular hypogonadism, or androgen deficiency, is defined as a clinical condition resulting from failure of the testes to produce physiologic levels of testosterone and a normal number of spermatozoa because of disruption of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Testosterone deficiency (TD) is defined as a serum level less than 300 ng/dL on a morning total testosterone test. It is estimated that more than one-third of men 45 years and older have testosterone deficiency. Associated symptoms include decreased libido, erectile dysfunction, decreased physical stamina and strength, depressed mood, fatigue, increased visceral adiposity, sleep disturbance, and/or poor concentration and memory. These conditions have a direct relationship with cardiometabolic parameters, including insulin resistance, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and endothelial dysfunction in aging men. No single sign or symptom defines TD. Controversy exists relative to the benefits versus risks of testosterone replacement therapy in men with testicular hypogonadism. Benefits include improvements in the symptoms related to deficiency as well as cardiometabolic parameters, yet recent retrospective and observational trials have suggested an increased risk of cardiovascular mortality without a proven direct cause-and-effect relationship. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  7. Teen pregnancy: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCracken, Katherine A; Loveless, Meredith

    2014-10-01

    To provide clinicians with a review of recent research and clinically applicable tools regarding teen pregnancy. Teen pregnancy rates have declined but still remain a significant problem in the USA. Teen pregnancy prevention was identified by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as one of its top six priorities, which is increasing research and intervention data. Long-acting contraceptive methods are acceptable to teens and have been shown to reduce teen birth rates. Pregnant teens need special attention to counseling on pregnancy options and reducing risk during pregnancy with regular prenatal care. Postpartum teens should be encouraged and supported to breastfeed, monitored for depression, and have access to reliable contraception to avoid repeat undesired pregnancy. This review highlights important issues for all providers caring for female adolescents and those who may encounter teen pregnancy. Foremost prevention of teen pregnancy by comprehensive sexual education and access to contraception is the priority. Educating patients and healthcare providers about safety and efficacy of long-acting reversible contraception is a good step to reducing undesired teen pregnancies. Rates of postpartum depression are greater in adolescents than in adults, and adolescent mothers need to be screened and monitored for depression. Strategies to avoid another undesired pregnancy shortly after delivery should be implemented.

  8. [Dermatomyositis-update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volc-Platzer, B

    2015-08-01

    Dermatomyositis is a rare idiopathic inflammatory myopathy that affects adults and children, mostly female. Hallmarks of the disease are myositis with necrosis, regeneration and perifascicular atrophy accompanied by a typical skin rash with heliotrope erythema, Gottron's sign, Gottron's papules and nail fold changes with splinter hemorrhage. Typical skin symptoms may appear 6 months up to 2 years before muscle involvement (amyopathic dermatomyositis). New myositis-specific antibodies may allow clinicoserologic correlations within a heterogeneous clinical spectrum. Autoantibody profiles, subtype of myositis, overlap with other collagen vascular disorders and/or malignancy (paraneoplastic dermatomyositis) as well as age of the patients all have a considerable impact on course and prognosis. Infections, drugs and tumors may trigger activation of T and B cells, plasmacytoid dendritic cells, overproduction of type I interferons and complement-mediated endothelial cell damage resulting in vasculopathy. UV radiation may also trigger dermatomyositis. Oral corticosteroids (1.5-2.0 mg/kg body weight/day) are the mainstay of treatment until improvement of muscle symptoms and/or normalization of muscle enzymes with subsequent slow tapering. Corticosteroids may be given as monotherapy or combined with steroid-sparing immunosuppressive agents' i.e. azathioprine, methotrexate, mycophenolate mofetil or high-dose intravenous immunoglobulins. Prognosis has improved considerably since use of high-dose corticosteroids, from 50 to 90% response rate. New therapies with biologicals (anti-CD20-, anti-TNFalpha-, anti-interferon antibodies) and Janus kinase inhibitors are currently being evaluated.

  9. [Resistant hypertension: An update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renna, N F

    2018-01-31

    An estimated 10% to 20% of hypertensive patients could be considered resistant to treatment (RH). These are patients who are not controlled using three drugs, at the maximum tolerated doses, including a diuretic, as well as those with high blood pressure controlled using four or more drugs. The term is used to identify patients that might benefit from special diagnostic and/or therapeutic consideration. The term 'refractory hypertension' has recently been proposed as a novel phenotype of antihypertensive failure. It refers to patients whose blood pressure cannot be controlled with maximum treatment. The first studies of this phenotype indicate that it is rare and affects less than 5% of patients with RH. Adherence to or compliance with medical treatment is key to defining resistant hypertension. Closer attention has been paid to clinical and experimental research since the first scientific statement for the diagnosis, assessment and treatment of RH from the American Heart Association, and in the European guidelines, was published in 2008. This review will set out the concepts relating to prevalence, prognosis and compliance and cover the latest developments on this subject. Copyright © 2018 SEH-LELHA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. [Ebola virus disease: Update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Calle-Prieto, Fernando; Arsuaga-Vicente, Marta; Mora-Rillo, Marta; Arnalich-Fernandez, Francisco; Arribas, Jose Ramon

    2016-01-01

    The first known Ebola outbreak occurred in 1976. Since then, 24 limited outbreaks had been reported in Central Africa, but never affecting more than 425 persons. The current outbreak in Western Africa is the largest in history with 28,220 reported cases and 11,291 deaths. The magnitude of the epidemic has caused worldwide alarm. For the first time, evacuated patients were treated outside Africa, and secondary cases have occurred in Spain and the United States. Since the start of the current epidemic, our knowledge about the epidemiology, clinical picture, laboratory findings, and virology of Ebola virus disease has considerably expanded. For the first time, experimental treatment has been tried, and there have been spectacular advances in vaccine development. A review is presented of these advances in the knowledge of Ebola virus disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  11. Ludwig's angina: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, H C; Kelly, J H; Strome, M

    1982-04-01

    Despite a reduction in preantibiotic mortality rates that exceeded 50%, Ludwig's angina remains a potentially lethal entity primarily because of rapidly progressive airway obstruction. Since the reports of several large series in the 1940's, there have been put sporadic case reports because of widespread use of antibiotics in orodental infection, improved dental care, as well as adherence to strict diagnostic criteria. Since this entity is now uncommon, unnecessary delay in diagnosis and management may occur and may result in serious complications. This presentation will consist of an historical review, discussion of pathogenesis followed by clinical presentation, bacteriology and treatment, as well as a detailed analysis of our most recent 20 cases. There were no complications and no deaths. The infection resolved with medical therapy in 11 patients, while 9 patients required surgical procedures. Penicillin, clindamycin or chloramphenicol were started initially in all cases. Four of these 9 patients developed a localized abscess, while on antibiotics, which required drainage. Tracheotomy or intubation was necessary in 7 patients. Early and aggressive use of appropriate antibiotics and protection of the airway are the mainstays of a successful treatment regimen. Judicious surgical intervention is indicated in those patients who develop localized abscesses while on antibiotics or are unresponsive to medical management.

  12. 75 FR 81037 - Waste Confidence Decision Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 51 [NRC-2008-0482] Waste Confidence Decision Update AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Update and final revision of Waste Confidence Decision. SUMMARY: The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC or Commission) is updating its Waste Confidence...

  13. Sleep bruxism. Conceptual review and update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Hoz-Aizpurua, José-Luis; Díaz-Alonso, Esperanza; LaTouche-Arbizu, Roy; Mesa-Jiménez, Juan

    2011-03-01

    Sleep bruxism (SB) is a parafunctional oromotor habit that can sometimes pose a threat to the integrity of the structures of the masticatory system if the magnitude and direction of the forces exerted exceed the system 's adaptive capacity. Over the years science has tried to provide a consistent explanation of the etiopathogenesis and physiopathology of SB, although the pathophysiological mechanisms are even now not yet fully understood. There is at present no specific, effective treatment to eliminate the habit of bruxism permanently. There are only palliative therapeutic alternatives steered at preventing the pathological effects of SB on the stomatognathic system and alleviating the negative clinical consequences of the habit. The objective of this article is to review and update the fundamental scientific concepts of SB and to furnish an approach to the main types of therapy used, based on the scientific literature.

  14. Updates in fetal spina bifida repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenfeld, Yair J; Belfort, Michael A

    2018-04-01

    To examine updates in fetal spina bifida surgical repair, as well as promising results emerging from translational medicine. Although the Management of Myelomeningocele Study sponsored by the National Institutes of Health helped establish the neonatal benefits of prenatal spina bifida repair via uterine hysterotomy, also known as 'open' fetal surgery, fetoscopic approaches may yield better maternal and obstetric outcomes. Spina bifida is a severe congenital malformation associated with significant neonatal and childhood morbidity and mortality. Although 'open' fetal spina bifida repair has become the standard prenatal surgical approach due to proven neonatal benefit, this approach is associated with significant maternal and obstetric risks. Recent developments from multidisciplinary clinical and translational research have highlighted the potential for novel fetoscopic surgical approaches to decrease maternal morbidity and reduce obstetric risks. Moreover, novel stem cell therapies coupled with in-utero medical approaches targeting the pathophysiological pathways associated with spina bifida are likely to make additional significant impact.

  15. Transfusion medicine in trauma patients: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthi, Sarah B; Stansbury, Lynn G; Dutton, Richard P; Edelman, Bennett B; Scalea, Thomas M; Hess, John R

    2011-10-01

    In 2008, we reviewed the practical interface between transfusion medicine and the surgery and critical care of severely injured patients. Reviewed topics ranged from epidemiology of trauma to patterns of resuscitation to the problems of transfusion reactions. In the interim, trauma specialists have adopted damage control resuscitation and become much more knowledgeable and thoughtful about the use of blood products. This new understanding and the resulting changes in clinical practice have raised new concerns. In this update, we focus on which patients need damage control resuscitation, current views on the optimal form of damage control resuscitation with blood products, the roles of newer blood products, and appropriate transfusion triggers in the postinjury setting. We will also review the role of new technology in patient assessment, therapy and monitoring.

  16. [Update of hidradenitis suppurativa in Primary Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Martínez, F J; Pascual, J C; López-Martín, I; Pereyra-Rodríguez, J J; Martorell Calatayud, A; Salgado-Boquete, L; Labandeira-García, J

    Hidradenitis suppurativa is a prevalent disease that is noted for its clinical variability and by its severe impact on quality of life. A meticulous scientific literature review is presented in this article in order to give an update on what is known on this condition. Primary Care physicians obviously play an important role in the early diagnosis and management of hidradenitis suppurativa. This review aims to provide a current and practical overview about this disease in order to optimise the healthcare for these patients by making the best use of available resources. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Updated prostate imaging reporting and data system (PIRADS v2) recommendations for the detection of clinically significant prostate cancer using multiparametric MRI: critical evaluation using whole-mount pathology as standard of reference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, H.A.; Hoetker, A.M.; Woo, S.; Sala, E.; Hricak, H.; Goldman, D.A.; Moskowitz, C.S.; Gondo, T.; Matsumoto, K.; Ehdaie, B.; Fine, S.W.; Reuter, V.E.

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the recommendations for multiparametric prostate MRI (mp-MRI) interpretation introduced in the recently updated Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System version 2 (PI-RADSv2), and investigate the impact of pathologic tumour volume on prostate cancer (PCa) detectability on mpMRI. This was an institutional review board (IRB)-approved, retrospective study of 150 PCa patients who underwent mp-MRI before prostatectomy; 169 tumours ≥0.5-mL (any Gleason Score [GS]) and 37 tumours <0.5-mL (GS ≥4+3) identified on whole-mount pathology maps were located on mp-MRI consisting of T2-weighted imaging (T2WI), diffusion-weighted (DW)-MRI, and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI. Corresponding PI-RADSv2 scores were assigned on each sequence and combined as recommended by PI-RADSv2. We calculated the proportion of PCa foci on whole-mount pathology correctly identified with PI-RADSv2 (dichotomized scores 1-3 vs. 4-5), stratified by pathologic tumour volume. PI-RADSv2 allowed correct identification of 118/125 (94 %; 95 %CI: 90-99 %) peripheral zone (PZ) and 42/44 (95 %; 95 %CI: 89-100 %) transition zone (TZ) tumours ≥0.5 mL, but only 7/27 (26 %; 95 %CI: 10-42 %) PZ and 2/10 (20 %; 95 %CI: 0-52 %) TZ tumours with a GS ≥4+3, but <0.5 mL. DCE-MRI aided detection of 4/125 PZ tumours ≥0.5 mL and 0/27 PZ tumours <0.5 mL. PI-RADSv2 correctly identified 94-95 % of PCa foci ≥0.5 mL, but was limited for the assessment of GS ≥4+3 tumours ≤0.5 mL. DCE-MRI offered limited added value to T2WI+DW-MRI. (orig.)

  18. PCP (phencyclidine): an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garey, R E

    1979-01-01

    The steady rise in the promiscuous use of phencyclidine (PCP) as a "recreational" drug has recently gained nationwide attention because of the numerous violent and/or bizarre incidents caused by the use of this drug. Because the media often exaggerate reports of bizarre and violent behavior to make a "good" story, the potential PCP user may be tempted to ignore the media warnings. In the case of PCP, however exaggerated the story, a real danger does exist. So, despite numerous newspaper, radio and television warnings about the possible consequences of PCP use and abuse, the incidence of toxic reactions continues to climb. In many cases PCP is sold as other drugs, particularly THC, and in various colored capsules, tablets, liquids and crystals which may explain the increased usage despite the numerous warnings against its use. The advances in laboratory techniques and chemical processess have enabled the clandestine chemist to prepare relatively pure PCP and thus eliminate many of the toxic side effects due to impurities in the drug. In addition, 30 or more psychoactive PCP analogues have been developed and are starting to make an appearance on the street. PCP is perhaps the most potent psychotomimetic compound known at the present time and is capable of inducing a psychosis which is clinically indistinguishable from schizophrenia. The psychosis-producing effects of PCP are the most common toxic effects seen in hospital emergency rooms; but as the amount of PCP taken and/or the simultaneous involvement of other drugs, particularly barbiturates, occurs, severe medical problems (e.g., coma, seizures, respiratory arrest) begin to appear. Death from high doses of PCP or PCP plus other drugs does occur, but the principal cause of death from PCP abuse is due to trauma, homicide or suicide (usually of the bizarre or violent form). Young adult males, persons predisposed to mental illness and naive drug users appear to be the most susceptible to the adverse effects of PCP

  19. Hepatopulmonary syndrome: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Gonçalves de Macêdo

    Full Text Available Hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS is a clinical threesome composed of liver disease, intrapulmonary vascular dilatation (IPVD and arterial gas abnormalities. Its occurrence has been described in up to 32% of cirrhotic candidates for liver transplantation. It also affects non-cirrhotic patients with portal hypertension. Its pathogenesis is not well defined, but an association of factors such as imbalance in the endothelin receptor response, pulmonary microvascular remodeling and genetic predisposition is thought to lead to IPVD. Diagnosis is based on imaging methods that identify these dilatations, such as contrast echocardiography or perfusion scintigraphy with 99mTc, as well as analysis of arterial gases to identify elevated alveolar-arterial differences in O2 or hypoxemia. There is no effective pharmacological treatment and complete resolution only occurs through liver transplantation. The importance of diagnosing HPS lies in prioritizing transplant candidates, since presence of HPS is associated with worse prognosis. The aim of this paper was to review the pathogenetic theories and current diagnostic criteria regarding HPS, and to critically analyze the prioritization of patients with HPS on the liver transplant waiting list. Searches were carried out in the Medline (Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online via PubMed, Cochrane Library and Lilacs (Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde databases for articles published between January 2002 and December 2007 involving adults and written either in English or in Portuguese, using the term hepatopulmonary syndrome. The studies of greatest relevance were included in the review, along with text books and articles cited in references that were obtained through the review.

  20. Hepatopulmonary syndrome: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macêdo, Liana Gonçalves de; Lopes, Edmundo Pessoa de Almeida

    2009-07-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) is a clinical threesome composed of liver disease, intrapulmonary vascular dilatation (IPVD) and arterial gas abnormalities. Its occurrence has been described in up to 32% of cirrhotic candidates for liver transplantation. It also affects non-cirrhotic patients with portal hypertension. Its pathogenesis is not well defined, but an association of factors such as imbalance in the endothelin receptor response, pulmonary microvascular remodeling and genetic predisposition is thought to lead to IPVD. Diagnosis is based on imaging methods that identify these dilatations, such as contrast echocardiography or perfusion scintigraphy with 99mTc, as well as analysis of arterial gases to identify elevated alveolar-arterial differences in O2 or hypoxemia. There is no effective pharmacological treatment and complete resolution only occurs through liver transplantation. The importance of diagnosing HPS lies in prioritizing transplant candidates, since presence of HPS is associated with worse prognosis. The aim of this paper was to review the pathogenetic theories and current diagnostic criteria regarding HPS, and to critically analyze the prioritization of patients with HPS on the liver transplant waiting list. Searches were carried out in the Medline (Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online) via PubMed, Cochrane Library and Lilacs (Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde) databases for articles published between January 2002 and December 2007 involving adults and written either in English or in Portuguese, using the term hepatopulmonary syndrome. The studies of greatest relevance were included in the review, along with text books and articles cited in references that were obtained through the review.