WorldWideScience

Sample records for nobel prize ceremony

  1. Nobel Prize ceremony 2013

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    On 10 December 2013 particle physics took central stage at the Nobel ceremony in Stockholm. Among the invitees were Fabiola Gianotti, former ATLAS spokesperson, Joseph Incandela, CMS Spokesperson, and CERN theorist Luis Alvarez-Gaume. They share their feelings of the memorable day with us.   Overview of the 2013 Nobel Prize Award Ceremony at the Stockholm Concert Hall. © Nobel Media AB 2013. Photo: Alex Ljungdahl. Fabiola Gianotti and Joe Incandela, at the Nobel Banquet in the Stockholm City Hall.   "It was an honour and a thrill for us to attend such a memorable Nobel prize ceremony and we are very grateful to Peter Higgs for having included us among his invited guests. The ceremony held some special moments for the LHC. In his speech prior to the award of the Nobel prize to Francois Englert and Peter Higgs by King Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden, Lars Brink (Chair of the Physics Nobel Prize Committee) stressed the importance of the results from the LHC exper...

  2. Polio and Nobel prizes: looking back 50 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norrby, Erling; Prusiner, Stanley B

    2007-05-01

    In 1954, John Enders, Thomas Weller, and Frederick Robbins were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine "for their discovery of the ability of poliomyelitis viruses to grow in cultures of various types of tissue."5370 This discovery provided for the first time opportunities to produce both inactivated and live polio vaccines. By searching previously sealed Nobel Committee archives, we were able to review the deliberations that led to the award. It appears that Sven Gard, who was Professor of Virus Research at the Karolinska Institute and an adjunct member of the Nobel Committee at the time, played a major role in the events leading to the awarding of the Prize. It appears that Gard persuaded the College of Teachers at the Institute to decide not to follow the recommendation by their Nobel Committee to give the Prize to Vincent du Vigneaud. Another peculiar feature of the 1954 Prize is that Weller and Robbins were included based on only two nominations submitted for the first time that year. In his speech at the Nobel Prize ceremony, Gard mentioned the importance of the discovery for the future production of vaccines, but emphasized the implications of this work for growing many different, medically important viruses. We can only speculate on why later nominations highlighting the contributions of scientists such as Jonas Salk, Hilary Koprowski, and Albert Sabin in the development of poliovirus vaccines have not been recognized by a Nobel Prize.

  3. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Marchese, Luana de Decco; Dias, Danielle Warol; Barbeito, Andressa Brasil; Gomes, Jonathan Costa; Muradas, Maria Clara Soares; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg

    2015-01-01

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15%) studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16%) laureates, and two (6%) were women. Fourteen (42%) were American, 15 (45%) Europeans and four (13%) were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male

  4. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Marchese, Luana de Decco; Dias, Danielle Warol; Barbeito, Andressa Brasil; Gomes, Jonathan Costa; Muradas, Maria Clara Soares; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg, E-mail: ronaldo@floralia.com.br [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-08-15

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15%) studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16%) laureates, and two (6%) were women. Fourteen (42%) were American, 15 (45%) Europeans and four (13%) were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male.

  5. Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Educational - Medicine Prize Related The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine has been awarded to people and ... this page MLA style: "The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine – Educational". Nobelprize.org. Nobel Media ...

  6. Vision and the Nobel Prize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Fábio Barreto

    2018-04-01

    The Nobel Prize is the world's foremost honor for scientific advances in medicine and other areas. Founded by Alfred Nobel, the prizes have been awarded annually since 1901. We reviewed the literature on persons who have won or competed for this prize in subjects related to vision and ophthalmology. The topics were divided into vision physiology, diagnostic and therapeutic methods, disease mechanism, and miscellaneous categories. Allvar Gullstrand is the only ophthalmologist to win a Nobel Prize; he is also the only one to receive it for work in ophthalmology. Other ophthalmologists that have been nominated were Hjalmar Schiötz (tonometer), Karl Koller (topical anesthesia), and Jules Gonin (retinal detachment). Other scientists have won the prize for eye-related research: Ragnar Granit, Haldan Hartline and George Wald (chemistry and physiology of vision), and David Hubel and Torsten Wiesel (processing in the visual system). Peter Medawar is the only person born in Brazil to have won the Nobel Prize.

  7. The image of the Nobel Prize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Källstrand, Gustav

    2018-05-01

    This article traces the origins of the Nobel Prize as a ubiquitous symbol of excellence in science. The public image of the Nobel Prize was created and became established quickly, which can be explained by it being such a useful phenomenon for the co-production of other values and ideas such as national prestige. Through being an easily recognizable symbol for excellence, the Nobel Prize is an important factor for the public image of science. And the image of the Nobel Prize is co-produced with several other sets of values and images that range from the large and thematic to the local and specific.

  8. [Surgeons and Neurosurgeons as Nobel Prize Winners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrastina, Jan; Jančálek, Radim; Hrabovský, Dušan; Novák, Zdeněk

    Since 1901 Nobel Prize is awarded for exceptional achievements in physics, chemistry, literature, peace, economy (since 1968) and medicine or physiology. The first aim of the paper is to provide an overview of surgeons - winners of Nobel Prize for medicine or physiology. Although the prominent neurosurgeons were frequently nominated as Nobel Prize candidates, surprisingly no neurosurgeon received this prestigious award so far despite that the results of their research transgressed the relatively narrow limits of neurosurgical speciality.The most prominent leaders in the field of neurosurgery, such as Victor Horsley, Otfrid Foerster, Walter Dandy and Harvey Cushing are discussed from the point of their nominations. The overview of the activity of the Portuguese neurologists and Nobel Prize Winter in 1949 Egas Moniz (occasionally erroneously reported as neurosurgeon) is also provided. Although his work on brain angiography has fundamentally changed the diagnostic possibilities in neurology and neurosurgery, he was eventually awarded Nobel Prize for the introduction of the currently outdated frontal lobotomy.The fact that none of the above mentioned prominent neurosurgeons has not been recognised by Nobel Prize, may be attributed to the fact that their extensive work cannot be captured in a short summary pinpointing its groundbreaking character.

  9. Nobel prize winners from Siemens company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with the history of discoveries and scientists which worked in the Siemens company. First Nobel prize winners from Siemens company was Gustav Ludwig Hertz from Hamburg. In his doctoral dissertation he deals with the study of collisions of electrons with molecules of gases. In the physics this experiment is known as 'Franc and Hertz experiment', which confirmed state of energy in Bohr theory and in 1925 he obtained Nobel prize. In 1945, as a director of the Department of physics in the research laboratories of Siemens, he constructed cyclotron kernel - magnet with mass of 80 tonnes. The second Nobel prize winner was Dennis Gabor worked in the Laboratory for measurement and medicinal technology in Siemensstadt (Berlin). When he tried to increase the resolution of electron microscopy he discovered the holography (method of 3-dimensional imaging). In 1971 he obtained the Nobel prize. The third scientist - Ernst Ruska discovered electron microscope. At Siemens, he was involved in developing the first commercially-produced electron microscope in 1939. In 1986, Ernst Ruska was awarded half of the Nobel Prize in Physics for his many achievements in electron optics.

  10. Nobel prize awards in radiochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adloff, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    In 1996 the Editors of Radiochimica Acta brought out a special volume of the journal to celebrate the hundredth anniversary of the discovery of radioactivity. On the occasion of the 50 th anniversary of Radiochimica Acta, which follows closely upon the centenary of Marie Curie's second Nobel Prize in 1911, the author has the privilege to informally review 'Radiochemistry and Nobel Prize Awards', including discoveries of radioelements and new fields in chemistry based on radiochemical methods. (orig.)

  11. Nobel prize awards in radiochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adloff, J.P. [Strasbourg Univ. (France)

    2012-07-01

    In 1996 the Editors of Radiochimica Acta brought out a special volume of the journal to celebrate the hundredth anniversary of the discovery of radioactivity. On the occasion of the 50{sup th} anniversary of Radiochimica Acta, which follows closely upon the centenary of Marie Curie's second Nobel Prize in 1911, the author has the privilege to informally review 'Radiochemistry and Nobel Prize Awards', including discoveries of radioelements and new fields in chemistry based on radiochemical methods. (orig.)

  12. Synthesis and the Nobel Prize in Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeman, Jeffrey I.

    2017-10-01

    The question often arises as to who may have deserved a Nobel Prize but was not awarded one. Rarely is this discussion extended to who should have received more than one Nobel Prize, but in the field of organic synthesis there are some compelling candidates.

  13. Who can get the next Nobel Prize in infectious diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onder Ergonul

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to deliver a perspective on future Nobel prizes by reviewing the features of Nobel prizes awarded in the infectious diseases-related (IDR field over the last 115 years. Thirty-three out of 106 Nobel prizes (31% in Physiology or Medicine have been awarded for IDR topics. Out of 58 Nobel laureates for IDR topics, two have been female; 67% have been medical doctors. The median age of Nobel laureates in Physiology or Medicine was found to be lower than the median age of laureates in Literature (p < 0.001. Since the Second World War, US-affiliated scientists have dominated the Nobel prizes (53%; however before 1945, German scientists did so (p = 0.005. The new antimicrobials received Nobel prizes until 1960; however no treatment study was awarded the Prize until the discovery of artemisinin and ivermectin, for which the Nobel Prize was awarded in 2015. Collaborative works have increasingly been appreciated. In the future, more female laureates would be expected in the IDR field. Medical graduates and scientists involved in multi-institutional and multidisciplinary collaborative efforts seem to have an advantage.

  14. Nobel Prize for work on broken symmetries

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The 2008 Nobel Prize for Physics goes to three physicists who have worked on broken symmetries in particle physics. The announcement of the 2008 Nobel Prize for physics was transmitted to the Globe of Science and Innovation via webcast on the occasion of the preview of the Nobel Accelerator exhibition.On 7 October it was announced that the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences had awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize for physics to three particle physicists for their fundamental work on the mechanisms of broken symmetries. Half the prize was awarded to Yoichiro Nambu of Fermilab for "the discovery of the mechanism of spontaneous broken symmetry in subatomic physics". The other half is shared by Makato Kobayashi of Japan’s KEK Institute and Toshihide Maskawa of the Yukawa Institute at the University of Kyoto "for the discovery of the origin of the broken symmetry which predicts the existence of at least three families of quarks in Nature". At th...

  15. Nobel prizes 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunbek, W.

    1975-01-01

    The 1975 Nobel prize in physics was awarded to A. Bohr, B. Mottelson and J. Rainwater for their new ideas about the structure of the heavier atomic nuclei and the foundation of the 'unified model' of these nuclei. (orig.) [de

  16. Nobel prizes that changed medicine

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    This book brings together in one volume fifteen Nobel Prize-winning discoveries that have had the greatest impact upon medical science and the practice of medicine during the 20th century and up to the present time. Its overall aim is to enlighten, entertain and stimulate. This is especially so for those who are involved in or contemplating a career in medical research. Anyone interested in the particulars of a specific award or Laureate can obtain detailed information on the topic by accessing the Nobel Foundation's website. In contrast, this book aims to provide a less formal and more personal view of the science and scientists involved, by having prominent academics write a chapter each about a Nobel Prize-winning discovery in their own areas of interest and expertise.

  17. Two Nobel Prize winners in two days

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    Living legend of physics, Professor Chen Ning Yang, delivered his CERN Colloquium in the Main Auditorium on 12th October (see photo). His numerous contributions to physics include the famous Yang-Mills theory, which underlies the Standard Model of particle physics, and the prediction of parity violation in weak interactions, for which he shared the Nobel prize with T. D. Lee in 1957. The day before, another Nobel laureate, Norman Ramsey, gave a TH Exceptional Seminar in the same auditorium. Ramsey shared the Nobel Prize with Hans G. Dehmelt and Wolfgang Paul in 1989 for developments in atomic precision spectroscopy.

  18. Posters of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physics available from the Library

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Library

    2014-01-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences produces three posters annually, each of which explains the motivation for the award of the Nobel prizes in Physics, Chemistry and Economics.   The files of the posters are available here: http://www.kva.se/en/Prizes/Nobel-prizes/Nobel-Posters/ The good news is that the CERN Library has got a stock of posters of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physics. They are available free from the Library (52-1-052).

  19. DOE-Supported Researcher Is Co-Winner of 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    DOE-Supported Researcher Is Co-Winner of 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics October 3, 2006 WASHINGTON, DC Space Flight Center for co-winning the 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics. "I offer my congratulations to with the 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics," Secretary Bodman said. "The groundbreaking work of

  20. Nobel prize-winner Heinrich Rohrer visits CERN

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    The Nobel prize-winner Heinrich Rohrer met young scientists on a recent visit to the Laboratory. From left to right: Xavier Gréhant (CERN Openlab), Ewa Stanecka (ATLAS), Magda Kowalska (ISOLDE), Heinrich Rohrer, Stéphanie Beauceron (CMS) and Ana Gago Da Silva (UNOSAT).Heinrich Rohrer, who shared the 1986 Nobel prize for physics with Gerd Binnig for the design of the scanning tunnelling microscope, visited CERN on 25 June. Welcomed by the Director-General, Robert Aymar, he visited the ATLAS cavern and control room, the Computer Centre, the Unosat project, the Antimatter Decelerator and ISOLDE. At the end of his visit, he voiced his admiration for CERN and its personnel. As a renowned Nobel prize-winner Heinrich Rohrer has the opportunity to pass on his experience and enthusiasm to young scientists. During the evening meal, at which he met five young physicists and computer scientists, who were delighted with the chance to talk to him, he stressed the importance for re...

  1. Koshiba, Tanaka give Nobel lectures

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Masatoshi Kosiba and Koichi Tanaka presented lectures in English on Sunday, touching on topics ranging from particle physics, to teamwork to commemorate their reception of this year's Nobel Prize for Physics and Chemistry. The two will receive their respective prizes in an awards ceremony scheduled for Tuesday (1 page).

  2. 1990 Nobel Prize for the 'discovery' of quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, G.N.

    1991-01-01

    The 1990 Nobel Prize in Physics has been awarded to Jerome I. Friedman, Henry W. Kendall and Richard E. Taylor for pioneering investigations of deep inelastic electron scattering off protons and neutrons, which played a crucial role in the development of quark model in particle physics. This paper is an attempt to present some background to the 1990 Nobel Prize and outlines the consequences of the experiments cited

  3. Nobel physics prize to Charpak for inventing particle detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarzschild, B.

    1993-01-01

    This article describes the work of Georges Charpak of France leading to his receipt of the 1992 Nobel Prize in Physics. The Nobel Prize was awarded to Charpak open-quotes for his invention and development of particle detectors, in particular the multiwire proportional chamber.close quotes Historical aspects of Charpak's life and research are given

  4. Nobel Prize in Chemistry-1997

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 2. Nobel Prize in Chemistry – 1997 The Story of Two Extra-ordinary Enzymes. Subramania Ranganathan. General Article Volume 3 Issue 2 February 1998 pp 45-52 ...

  5. [Women in natural sciences--Nobel Prize winners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuskin, Eugenija; Mustajbegović, Jadranka; Lipozencić, Jasna; Kolcić, Ivana; Spoljar-Vrzina, Sanja; Polasek, Ozren

    2006-01-01

    Alfred Bernhard Nobel was the founder of the Nobel Foundation, which has been awarding world-known scientists since 1901, for their contribution to the welfare of mankind. The life and accomplishments of Alfred Bernhard Nobel are described as well as scientific achivements of 11 women, Nobel prize winners in the field of physics, chemistry, physiology and/or medicine. They are Marie Sklodowska Curie, Maria Goeppert Mayer, Irene Joliot-Curie, Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin, Gerty Theresa Radnitz Cori, Rosalyn Sussman Yalow, Barbara McClintock, Rita Levi-Montalcini, Gertrude Elion, Christine Nusslein-Volhard and Linda B. Buck.

  6. Alfred Nobel and His Prizes: From Dynamite to DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtman, Marshall A

    2017-07-01

    Alfred Nobel was one of the most successful chemists, inventors, entrepreneurs, and businessmen of the late nineteenth century. In a decision later in life, he rewrote his will to leave virtually all his fortune to establish prizes for persons of any nationality who made the most compelling achievement for the benefit of mankind in the fields of chemistry, physics, physiology or medicine, literature, and peace among nations. The prizes were first awarded in 1901, five years after his death. In considering his choice of prizes, it may be pertinent that he used the principles of chemistry and physics in his inventions and he had a lifelong devotion to science, he suffered and died from severe coronary and cerebral atherosclerosis, and he was a bibliophile, an author, and mingled with the literati of Paris. His interest in harmony among nations may have derived from the effects of the applications of his inventions in warfare ("merchant of death") and his friendship with a leader in the movement to bring peace to nations of Europe. After some controversy, including Nobel's citizenship, the mechanisms to choose the laureates and make four of the awards were developed by a foundation established in Stockholm; the choice of the laureate for promoting harmony among nations was assigned to the Norwegian Storting, another controversy. The Nobel Prizes after 115 years remain the most prestigious of awards. This review describes the man, his foundation, and the prizes with a special commentary on the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

  7. Translation, Littérisation, and the Nobel Prize for Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Washbourne

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This work is a cultural economics study of the problem of translation production and assessment in and leading up to the literary Nobel Prize deliberations. I argue that the constraints of assessing an unevenly and partially translated body of literary works, many of them from less common languages, present an unbreachable expertise gap. Translation as a sacralization, or consecration in Casanova’s (2004 term, of a writer’s work is considered in the context of the award. Ultimately the prize is shown to depend upon translations carried out in dissimilar circumstances for each candidate. The award of the Nobel is part of the founder’s call for works to be more widely circulated, not to reward fame; thus a Nobel is more an invitation to translate than a recognition of an author in translation, although evidence suggests that the post-Nobel translational impact may vary by writer and over time. This study sheds light on the degree to which the Prize is an authority-mediated phenomenon, and while critiquing the quixotic task of judging disparate forms and amounts of cultural capital side by side, and never from a point of neutrality, it also attempts to show how translation shapes this symbolic form of prestige in the struggle for existence. I posit that alternative prizes and prize-awarding in general as fraught with similar cross-language challenges. Possibilities for future research, qualitative analysis of the Nobel and translation demand, among other consequences, are briefly sketched.

  8. IAEA Nobel Peace Prize cancer and nutrition fund

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinley, D. III

    2006-05-01

    The Norwegian Nobel Committee awarded the 2005 Nobel Peace Prize to the IAEA and Director General ElBaradei in equal shares. The IAEA and its Director General won the 2005 Peace Prize for their efforts to prevent nuclear energy from being used for military purposes and to ensure that nuclear energy for peaceful purposes is used in the safest possible way. The IAEA Board of Governors subsequently decided that the IAEA's share of the prestigious prize would be used to create a special fund for fellowships and training to improve cancer control and childhood nutrition in the developing world. This fund is known as the 'IAEA Nobel Peace Prize Cancer and Nutrition Fund'. The money will be dedicated to enhancing human resources in developing regions of the world for improved cancer control and childhood nutrition. In the area of cancer control, the money will be spent on establishing regional cancer training institutes for the training of new doctors, medical physicists and technologists in radiation oncology to improve cancer treatment and care, as part of the IAEA's Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy (PACT). In the realm of nutrition, the focus of the Fund will be on capacity building in the use of nuclear techniques to develop interventions to contribute to improved nutrition and health for children in the developing world. Fund-supported fellowship awards will target young professionals, especially women, from Member States, through the IAEA's Technical Cooperation (TC) Programme. Alongside such awards, regional events will be organized in Africa, Asia and Latin America in cancer control and nutrition during 2006. The IAEA Secretariat is encouraging Member States and donors to contribute to the IAEA Nobel Peace Prize Cancer and Nutrition Fund by providing additional resources, in cash and in-kind

  9. ["If Berger had survived the second world war - he certainly would have been a candidate for the Nobel Prize". Hans Berger and the legend of the Nobel Prize].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhard, U-J; Schönberg, A; Blanz, B

    2005-03-01

    The public opinion pays much attention to the Nobel Prize as an indicator for the scientific efficiency of a university or a country in connection with foundation of so-called elite universities. The former holder of the psychiatric chair in Jena and discoverer of the electroencephalogram Hans Berger (1873 - 1941) came into discussion as candidate for the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine. The current medical-historical publications maintain the view that Berger should have received the Nobel Prize in 1936 as well as in 1949. This was prevented in 1936 by an enactment from Hitler, which forbid him to accept the prize, and later in 1949 by Berger's own death. According to documents of the Nobel archives these statements can be disproved. Berger was only nominated three times out of 65 nominations in 1940. Because of his death the other two recommendations in 1942 and 1947 were never evaluated.

  10. The 2009 Nobel Prize in Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 8. The 2009 Nobel Prize in Physics - Honoring Achievements in Optics that have Changed Modern Life. Vasant Natarajan. General Article Volume 15 Issue 8 August 2010 pp 723-732 ...

  11. The Ripple Effect: Citation Chain Reactions of a Nobel Prize

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber Frandsen, Tove; Nicolaisen, Jeppe

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the possible citation chain reactions of a Nobel Prize using the mathematician Robert J. Aumann as a case example. The results show that the award of the Nobel Prize in 2005 affected not only the citations to his work, but also affected the citations to the references in his s...... citation network. The effect is discussed using innovation decision process theory as a point of departure to identify the factors that created a bandwagon effect leading to the reported observations....... scientific oeuvre. The results indicate that the spillover effect is almost as powerful as the effect itself. We are consequently able to document a ripple effect in which the awarding of the Nobel Prize ignites a citation chain reaction to Aumann's scientific ouvre and to the references in its nearest...

  12. Global and local "teachable moments": The role of Nobel Prize and national pride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baram-Tsabari, Ayelet; Segev, Elad

    2018-05-01

    This study examined to what extent Nobel Prize announcements and awards trigger global and local searches or "teachable moments" related to the laureates and their discoveries. We examined the longitudinal trends in Google searches for the names and discoveries of Nobel laureates from 2012 to 2017. The findings show that Nobel Prize events clearly trigger more searches for laureates, but also for their respective discoveries. We suggest that fascination with the Nobel prize creates a teachable moment not only for the underlying science, but also about the nature of science. Locality also emerged as playing a significant role in intensifying interest.

  13. Nobel Prize Honors Autophagy Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Japanese cell biologist Yoshinori Ohsumi, PhD, was awarded this year's Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his discovery of autophagy. His groundbreaking studies in yeast cells illuminated how cells break down and recycle damaged material, a process that is critical to the survival of both normal cells and some cancer cells. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. The 2016 Nobel Prize: Chemistry and Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Maria Filardo Bassalo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we will deal with the 2016 Nobel Prizes: Chemistry and Physics, since they are related to the same theme: nanostructures / molecular machines (conception, fabrication and topological theoretical explanation.

  15. Soviet Union in the context of the Nobel prize

    CERN Document Server

    Blokh, Abram M

    2018-01-01

    The result of meticulous research by Professor Abram Blokh, this book presents facts, documents, thoughts and comments on the system of the Nobel Prize awards to Russian and Soviet scientists. It provides a comprehensive overview of the relationship between the ideas expressed by the Nobel Foundation and those expressed by the autocratic and totalitarian regimes in Russia and the ex-Soviet Union during the 20th century who had the same attitude of revulsion toward the intellectual and humanistic values represented by the Nobel Prizes. To do his research, the author had access to the declassified documents in the archives of the Nobel Foundation for many years. Also included in the book are new materials obtained and developed by the author after the publication of the first two editions (in Russian). This additional information is from the archives of the Soviet Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Russian Academy of Sciences, the Soviet Writers' Union et al. in Moscow and St Petersburg. These documents shed new...

  16. 2008 Nobel prize in Medicine for discoverers of HIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lever, Andrew M. L.; Berkhout, Ben

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Francoise Barre-Sinoussi and Luc Montagnier, codiscoverers of HIV, the causative agent of AIDS, have been awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. They share this prize with Harald zur Hausen who was responsible for establishing the link between human papilloma virus

  17. A Nobel Prize in Czechoslovakia; Yaroslav Geyrovskiy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brabernets, Irzhi

    1960-01-01

    The notification of the awarding of a Nobel Prize to Yaroslav Geyrovskiy in the field of chemistry in l959 came to the scientist while he was at work at the Polarographic Institute of the Czechoslovak...

  18. The 2009 Physics Nobel Prize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Maria Filardo Bassalo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article we will talk about the Nobel Prize in Physics 2009, granted to the physicists north-americans: Charles Kuen Kao (born in China, for its discovery of the process of transmission of light in optical fibers; and Willard Sterling Boyle (born in Canada and George Elwood Smith, for the invention of an imaging semiconductor circuit – the CCD sensor.

  19. 2008 Nobel prize in Medicine for discoverers of HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berkhout Ben

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Françoise Barré-Sinoussi and Luc Montagnier, codiscoverers of HIV, the causative agent of AIDS, have been awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. They share this prize with Harald zur Hausen who was responsible for establishing the link between human papilloma virus infection and cervical carcinoma.

  20. Two paradigms and Nobel prizes in economics : a contradiction or coexistence?

    OpenAIRE

    Levy, Haim; De Giorgi, Enrico; Hens, Thorsten

    2003-01-01

    Markowitz and Sharpe won the Nobel Prize in Economics more than a decade ago for the development of Mean-Variance analysis and the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM). In the year 2002, Kahneman won the Nobel Prize in Economics for the development of Prospect Theory. Can these two apparently contradictory paradigms coexist? In deriving the CAPM, Sharpe, Lintner and Mossin assume expected utility (EU) maximization following the approach proposed by Markowitz, normal distributions and risk avers...

  1. Science Underlying 2008 Nobel Prizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Bernadette A.

    2009-01-01

    JCE offers a wealth of materials for teaching and learning chemistry that you can explore online. In the list below, Bernadette Caldwell of the Editorial Staff suggests additional resources that are available through JCE for teaching the science behind some of the 2008 Nobel Prizes . Discovering and Applying the Chemistry of GFP The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the discovery and development of the green fluorescent protein, GFP to three scientists: Osamu Shimomura, Martin Chalfie, and Roger Y. Tsien. These scientists led the field in discovering and introducing a fluorescing protein from jellyfish into cells and genes under study, which allows researchers to witness biochemistry in action. Now tags are available that emit light in different colors, revealing myriad biological processes and their interactions simultaneously. Identifying HPV and HIV, HIV's Replication Cycle, and HIV Virus-Host Interactions The Nobel Assembly at Karolinska Institutet awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology for their discovery of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) to two scientists: Françoise Barré-Sinoussi and Luc Montagnier; and for his discovery of human papilloma viruses [HPV] causing cervical cancer to one scientist, Harald zur Hausen. Diseases caused by these infectious agents significantly affect global health. While isolating and studying the virus, researchers discovered HIV is an uncommon retrovirus that infects humans and relies on the host to make its viral DNA, infecting and killing the host's white blood cells, ultimately destroying the immune systems of infected humans. Related Resources at JCE Online The Journal has published articles relating to GFP specifically, and more generally to fluorescing compounds applied to biochemistry. The Journal has also published an article and a video on protease inhibition—a strategy to suppress HIV's biological processes. With the video clips, an accompanying guide

  2. Introducing Taiwanese undergraduate students to the nature of science through Nobel Prize stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haim Eshach

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Although there is a broad agreement among scientists and science educators that students should not only learn science, but also acquire some sense of its nature, it has been reported that undergraduate students possess an inadequate grasp of the nature of science (NOS. The study presented here examined the potential and effectiveness of Nobel Prize stories as a vehicle for teaching NOS. For this purpose, a 36-hour course, “Albert Einstein’s Nobel Prize and the Nature of Science,” was developed and conducted in Taiwan Normal University. Ten undergraduate physics students participated in the course. Analysis of the Views of Nature of Science questionnaires completed by the students before and after the course, as well as the students’ own presentations of Nobel Prize stories (with an emphasis on how NOS characteristics are reflected in the story, showed that the students who participated in the course enriched their views concerning all aspects of NOS. The paper concludes with some suggestions for applying the novel idea of using Nobel Prize stories in physics classrooms.

  3. [Commentary on the Nobel Prize that has been granted in Medicine-Physiology, Chemistry and Physics to noteable investigators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zárate, Arturo; Apolinar, Leticia Manuel; Saucedo, Renata; Basurto, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    The Nobel Prize was established by Alfred Nobel in 1901 to award people who have made outstanding achievements in physics, chemistry and medicine. So far, from 852 laureates, 45 have been female. Marie Curie was the first woman to receive the Nobel Prize in 1903 for physics and eight years later also for chemistry It is remarkable that her daughter Irene and her husband also received the Nobel Prize for chemistry in 1935. Other two married couples, Cori and Moser, have also been awarded the Nobel Prize. The present commentary attempts to show the female participation in the progress of scientific activities.

  4. Physics Nobel Prize (PNP in 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Maria Filardo Bassalo

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article we will talk about the Nobel Prize in Physics 2008, granted  to  the Japanese  physicists  Yoichiro  Nambu,  Makoto Kobayashi and Toshihide Maskawa,  for  their  discovery  of  the mechanisms involving strong interactions symmetries (quiral, by Nambu, and in weak interactions (charge-parity, by Kobayashi and Maskawa.

  5. The end of a noble narrative? European integration narratives after the Nobel Peace Prize

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manners, Ian James; Murray, Philomena

    The award of the Nobel Peace Prize 2012 to the European Union (EU) came as a shock and surprise. Not only was the Eurozone economic crisis undermining public support for the EU, but the crisis was also seriously challenging the EU’s image in global politics. Although the Nobel Committee acknowled......The award of the Nobel Peace Prize 2012 to the European Union (EU) came as a shock and surprise. Not only was the Eurozone economic crisis undermining public support for the EU, but the crisis was also seriously challenging the EU’s image in global politics. Although the Nobel Committee...... integration both in the past and in the future. We differentiate between scholarly and policy-oriented narratives in the development of our argument. The critical question is whether these narratives have and should – or could - provide legitimation for the EU after the award of the Nobel Peace Prize....

  6. Briton wins Nobel physics prize for work on superfluids

    CERN Multimedia

    Connor, S

    2003-01-01

    A British born scientist, Anthony Leggett, 65, has jointly won this year's Nobel prize in physics for research into the arcane area of superfluids - when matter behaves in its lowest and most ordered state. He shares the 800,000 pounds prize with two Russian physicists who have worked in the field of superconductivity - when electrical conductors lose resistance (1/2 page).

  7. Herbert A. Simon: Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences, 1978.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahey, Thomas H

    2003-09-01

    In 1978, Herbert A. Simon won the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences, the same Nobel won by Daniel Kahneman in 2002. Simon's work in fact paved the way for Kahneman's Nobel. Although trained in political science and economics rather than psychology, Simon applied psychological ideas to economic theorizing. Classical and neoclassical economic theories assume that people are perfectly rational and strive to optimize economic outcomes. Simon argued that human rationality is constrained, not perfect, and that people seek satisfactory rather than ideal outcomes. Despite his Nobel, Simon felt isolated in economics and ultimately moved into psychology. Nevertheless, his ideas percolated through the economic community, so that Kahneman, whose research advanced Simon's broad perspective, could be the psychologist who won the Nobel in economics.

  8. Cockcroft and Walton. Nobel Prize for Physics (1951)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    In 1951, the Nobel Prize for Physics was shared by researchers John Douglas Cockcroft (1897-1969) and Ernest Thomas Sinton Walton (1903-1995), for their pioneer work on the transmutation of the atomic nuclei by artificial acceleration of atomic particles. (Author)

  9. Nobel laureates in fiction: From La fin du monde to The Big Bang Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodesco, Alberto

    2018-05-01

    The history of the Nobel Prize, since its establishment, interlaces with the history of the public image of science. The aim of this article is to illustrate cinematic scientists, portrayed precisely in their moment of maximum glory. The films and television shows upon which the study is based compose a corpus of 189 media texts. The article identifies three main areas that concern the relation between the Nobel Prize and its audiovisual representations: biopics of real Nobel laureates, the presence of real or fictional Nobel laureates in the film or the show plot, and films and TV series that depict the Nobel ceremony. The article then focuses on four texts that deserve a detailed examination: La fin du monde, The Prize, The Simpsons and The Big Bang Theory. The conclusion compares the representation of the Nobel scientist with general changes in the image of the scientist conveyed by cinema and television.

  10. The History of Molecular Structure Determination Viewed through the Nobel Prizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, William P.; Palenik, Gus J.; Suh, Il-Hwan

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the importance of complex molecular structures. Emphasizes their individual significance through examination of the Nobel Prizes of the 20th century. Highlights prizes awarded to Conrad Rontgen, Francis H.C. Crick, James D. Watson, Maurice H.F. Wilkins, and others. (SOE)

  11. Lord Rutherford of Nelson, his 1908 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, and why he didn't get a second prize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarlskog, Cecilia

    2008-01-01

    'I have dealt with many different transformations with various periods of time, but the quickest that I have met was my own transformation in one moment from a physicist to a chemist.' Ernest Rutherford (Nobel Banquet, 1908) This article is about how Ernest Rutherford (1871-1937) got the 1908 Nobel Prize in Chemistry and why he did not get a second Prize for his subsequent outstanding discoveries in physics, specially the discovery of the atomic nucleus and the proton. Who were those who nominated him and who did he nominate for the Nobel Prizes? In order to put the Prize issue into its proper context, I will briefly describe Rutherford's whereabouts. Rutherford, an exceptionally gifted scientist who revolutionized chemistry and physics, was moulded in the finest classical tradition. What were his opinions on some scientific issues such as Einstein's photon, uncertainty relations and the future prospects for atomic energy? What would he have said about the 'Theory of Everything'? Extended version of an invited talk presented at the conference 'Neutrino 2008', Christchurch, NZ, 25-31 May 2008

  12. Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1999

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 5. Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1999. Utpal Tatu. Research News Volume 5 Issue 5 May 2000 pp 91-95. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/005/05/0091-0095 ...

  13. [On the Awarding of the First Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine to Emil von Behring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Nils; Enke, Ulrike

    2015-12-01

    In his will of 1895, the Swedish inventor Alfred Nobel laid the foundation for prizes in physics, chemistry, physiology or medicine, literature, and peace to those who had "conferred the greatest benefit on mankind" during the last year. The Nobel Prize is today widely considered as the most prestigious international symbol of scientific excellence, but it still is an exciting research question how it gained such prestige. Drawing on files from the Emil von Behring Archive in Marburg, Germany, and the Archive of the Nobel Assembly for Physiology or Medicine in Stockholm this essay aims at shedding light on why the first Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1901 was awarded the German immunologist Emil von Behring, and how this decision was viewed at that time. This study is part of a research project that explores mechanisms leading to scientific recognition by using the example of the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. ["In Stockholm they apparently had some kind of countermovement" - Ferdinand Sauerbruch (1875-1951) and the Nobel prize].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Nils; Schagen, Udo

    2014-01-01

    The archive of the Nobel Assembly for Physiology or Medicine in Solna, Sweden, is a remarkable repository that contains reports and dossiers of the Nobel Prize nominations of senior and junior physicians from around the world. Although this archive has begun to be used more by scholars, it has been insufficiently examined by historians of surgery. No other German surgeon was nominated as often as Ferdinand Sauerbruch for the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in the first half of the 20th century. This contribution reconstructs why and by whom Sauerbruch was nominated, and discusses the Nobel committee evaluations of his work. Political factors did not play an obvious role in the Nobel committee discussions, in spite of the fact that Adolf Hitler in 1937 had prohibited all German citizens to accept the Nobel Prize. The main reasons why Sauerbruch ultimately was not considered prize- worthy were that Sauerbruch's achievements were marked by scientific priority disputes, and that his work was not seen as original enough.

  15. In the service of peace: 2005 Nobel Peace prize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Nobel Citation: The Norwegian Nobel Committee has decided that the Nobel Peace Prize for 2005 is to be shared, in two equal parts, between the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and its Director General, Mohamed ElBaradei, for their efforts to prevent nuclear energy from being used for military purposes and to ensure that nuclear energy for peaceful purposes is used in the safest possible way. At a time when the threat of nuclear arms is again increasing, the Norwegian Nobel Committee wishes to underline that this threat must be met through the broadest possible international cooperation. This principle finds its clearest expression today in the work of the IAEA and its Director General. In the nuclear non-proliferation regime, it is the IAEA which controls that nuclear energy is not misused for military purposes, and the Director General has stood out as an unafraid advocate of new measures to strengthen that regime. At a time when disarmament efforts appear deadlocked, when there is a danger that nuclear arms will spread both to states and to terrorist groups, and when nuclear power again appears to be playing an increasingly significant role, IAEA's work is of incalculable importance. In his will, Alfred Nobel wrote that the Peace Prize should, among other criteria, be awarded to whoever had done most for the abolition or reduction of standing armies. In its application of this criterion in recent decades, the Norwegian Nobel Committee has concentrated on the struggle to diminish the significance of nuclear arms in international politics, with a view to their abolition. That the world has achieved little in this respect makes active opposition to nuclear arms all the more important today. The full Nobel Lecture of the Director General of the IAEA, Mr. Mohamed ElBaradei is given in this paper

  16. The Nobel Prize in the Physics Class: Science, History, and Glamour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshach, Haim

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel strategy for teaching physics: using the Nobel Physics Prize as an organizational theme for high school or even first year university physics, bringing together history, social contexts of science, and central themes in modern physics. The idea underlying the strategy is that the glamour and glitter of the Nobel Prize…

  17. Neutron scattering and the 1994 Nobel Physics Prize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Xiangdong

    1995-01-01

    Neutron scattering is an efficient method for detecting the microstructure of matter by which we can study, for example, details of the phonon spectrum in solids, and the isotopic effect. Bertram N. Brockhouse and Clifford G. Shull earned the Nobel Physics Prize in 1994 for their significant contributions in this domain

  18. Lord Rutherford of Nelson, his 1908 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, and why he didn't get a second prize

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarlskog, Cecilia [Division of Mathematical Physics, LTH, Lund University, Box 118, S-22100 Lund (Sweden)], E-mail: cecilia.jarlskog@matfys.lth.se

    2008-11-01

    'I have dealt with many different transformations with various periods of time, but the quickest that I have met was my own transformation in one moment from a physicist to a chemist.' Ernest Rutherford (Nobel Banquet, 1908) This article is about how Ernest Rutherford (1871-1937) got the 1908 Nobel Prize in Chemistry and why he did not get a second Prize for his subsequent outstanding discoveries in physics, specially the discovery of the atomic nucleus and the proton. Who were those who nominated him and who did he nominate for the Nobel Prizes? In order to put the Prize issue into its proper context, I will briefly describe Rutherford's whereabouts. Rutherford, an exceptionally gifted scientist who revolutionized chemistry and physics, was moulded in the finest classical tradition. What were his opinions on some scientific issues such as Einstein's photon, uncertainty relations and the future prospects for atomic energy? What would he have said about the 'Theory of Everything'? Extended version of an invited talk presented at the conference 'Neutrino 2008', Christchurch, NZ, 25-31 May 2008.

  19. 2016 Nobel Prize in Chemistry: Conferring Molecular Machines as ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the year 2016 was awardedto three illustrious chemists, Professors Jean-Pierre Sauvage,Sir Fraser Stoddart, and Ben Feringa. Pioneering works ofthese chemists on designing molecules, chemically synthesizingthem, and extracting a work out of such designedmoleculesopen-up a new ...

  20. The competition 'First Step to Nobel Prize in Physics'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorzkowski, W; Zuberek, R; Surya, Y

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the history of the competition First Step to Nobel Prize in Physics organized by Poland, its development from a national workshop in 1991/92 to an international competition nowadays and its organization, as well as the results obtained by the participants.

  1. The Competition "First Step to Nobel Prize in Physics"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorzkowski, W.; Surya, Y; Zuberek, R

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the history of the competition First Step to Nobel Prize in Physics organized by Poland, its development from a national workshop in 1991/92 to an international competition nowadays and its organization, as well as the results obtained by the participants. (Contains 1 table.)

  2. Cockcroft and Walton. Nobel Prize for Physics (1951); Cockcroft y Walton. Premio Nobel de Fisica (1951)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    In 1951, the Nobel Prize for Physics was shared by researchers John Douglas Cockcroft (1897-1969) and Ernest Thomas Sinton Walton (1903-1995), for their pioneer work on the transmutation of the atomic nuclei by artificial acceleration of atomic particles. (Author)

  3. Following Zahka: Using Nobel Prize Winners' Speeches and Ideas to Teach Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, Martin P.; Wilson, John K.; Becker, William E.

    2012-01-01

    Over 20 years ago, the late William Zahka (1990, 1998) outlined how the acceptance speeches of those who received the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Science could be used to teach undergraduates. This article updates and expands Zahka's work, identifying some of the issues discussed by recent Nobel Laureates, classifying their speeches by topic…

  4. 'Exhibitions and experiments', in celebration of nobel prize in physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Masahito; Nakanishi, Akira; Nakano, Masahiro

    2010-01-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physics for 2008 was awarded to Professors Yoichiro Nambu, Makoto Kobayashi and Toshihide Maskawa. At this opportunity, we held an exhibition to introduce the achievements of the laureates for 10 days at the Omiya campus in May 2009. With the explanations of elementary particle physics, we prepared several experimental instruments with which visitors could play and learn the spontaneous symmetry breaking, cosmic rays, a circle path of an electron in a magnetic field and so on. Our main purpose of the exhibition was, however, not just to explain the contents of the Nobel Prize in Physics, but also to attract students' interests to physics. More than 800 individual students attended during the period, and the survey of questionnaires shows positive contributions to raise the students' awareness of the excitement of physics. (author)

  5. Paul Krugman : (presque un Nobel de géographie Paul Krugman: A Nobel Prize in geography?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Walther

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Paul Krugman a reçu le Prix Nobel d’économie pour son analyse des modèles du commerce mondial et de la localisation de l’activité économique. Voilà une nouvelle qui devrait réjouir certains géographes.Paul Krugman recently won Nobel Economics Prize for his work on trade patterns and location of economic activities. This sounds like good news for (some geographers.

  6. From the Big Bang to the Nobel Prize and the JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2007-01-01

    I will describe the history of the universe, from the Big Bang to 2013, when the JWST is to be launched to look back towards our beginnings. I will discuss how the COBE results led to the Nobel Prize, how the COBE results have been confirmed and extended, and their implications for future observations. The James Webb Space Telescope will be used to examine every part of our history from the first stars and galaxies to the formation of individual stars and planets and the delivery of life-supporting materials to the Earth. I will describe the plans for the JWST and how observers may use it. With luck, the JWST may produce a Nobel Prize for some discovery we can only guess today.

  7. Norman Ramsey. Nobel Prize Winner in Physics (1989)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Norman Ramsey (Washington 1915) received the Nobel Prize in Physics (shared with con H. G. Dehmelt and W. Paul) for the development of study techniques for Atomic Physics. This tireless researcher participated in the discovery of the Magnetic Resonance Method for Molecular Emission. He invented the hydrogen maser and the hydrogen atomic clock, in addition to being a profile author. (Author)

  8. [The 69th Congress-urologists nominated for the Nobel Prize : Not everyone got a prize: four biographical sketches].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, F H; Halling, T; Krischel, M; Hansson, N; Fangerau, H

    2017-09-01

    Our research group has reconstructed why the board certified urologists Werner Forssmann (1904-1979) and Charles Huggins (1901-1997) received the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine (1956, and 1966, respectively). But the history of "Urology and the Nobel Prize" is in fact more multifaceted than the success stories of these two laureates suggest. James Israel (1848-1926), Berlin, Félix Guyon (1831-1920), Paris, Peter J. Freyer (1852-1921), London and Edwin Beer (1876-1938), New York were nominated for the award during the first three decades of the 20th century. Their candidacies mirror trends among leading urologists during the time when urology became a specialty in its own right.

  9. Urdu literature at the World Forum: Nobel Prize for literature and Urdu/Hindi recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Qadeer, Altaf

    2017-01-01

    Urdu language is well-known for literary beauty and other linguistic as well as social factors. Over centuries Urdu/Hindi has gone through many cultural, political and linguistic changes. Urdu language has also changed in some ways of spoken and written forms. Despite the long history and literary power of Urdu, no Urdu author received a Nobel Prize in literature. Some data is presented about the trends in awarding Nobel Prize for literature. This article analyzes and highlights pathways for ...

  10. CAN WE CONSIDER AS BEING „MIRACULOUS” THE SOLUTIONS SUGGESTED BY THE LAUREATES OF NOBEL PRIZE IN ORDER TO STOP THE WORLD ECONOMICAL CRISIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constanţa ENEA

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Today we are in a global economic crisis. It is not an economic crisis because of scale, for the worst case there was a recession of a few percent of GDP, but rather because it was consistently induced. The best strategies have been proposed so far are essentially neo-Keynesian, as private demand fell, public expenditure can change aggregate demand to provide a stimulus to the economy. At best, this can provide the necessary infrastructure for positive externalities through network effects, at worst, will only serve as a delay tactic, leading to a greater crisis in the near future. Nobel prizes were created by scientist and businessman Alfred Nobel (1833 - 1896, inventor (1867, which, in his will asked that his immense wealth income are offered each year „awards as the which, in the previous year, brought the greatest service of humanity”. Thus, by the will left by Alfred Nobel, Nobel prizes are awarded to institutions: - Swedish Royal Academy of Science: Nobel Prize in Physics, Chemistry Nobel Prize Nobel Prize in Economics; - Carolina Institute in Stockholm: Nobel Prize for Medicine; - Swedish Academy: Nobel Prize for Literature; - Committee composed of five persons of Parliament of Norway: Nobel Peace Prize Nobel prizes are awarded, so in 1901, except for economics, established in 1968 by the Central Bank of Sweden to commemorate the 300th anniversary of the founding of this institution. More specifically, Nobel Prizes have been awarded since December 10, 1901, after their author's death. They consist of: a medal, a diploma and a sum of money, which at first was worth U.S. $ 40,000, then increased to $ 1,000,000. Nobel Prize in cash value increased slightly since 1950, according to the Foundation website. Should mention that The Nobel Foundation has awarded prizes during World War or during World War II. Given these great discoveries of illustrious researchers could find solutions to global economic crisis. If so intense study should find

  11. Artemisinin: The journey from natural product to Nobel Prize ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The 2014 Nobel Prize for Physiology and Medicine was announced on 5th October. One-half ... The novel therapy that was given this huge recognition was artemisinin, a drug (isolated from the plant Artemisia annua) that has saved millions of lives and rekindled the dream of a world where malaria has been eradicated.

  12. E Pluribus Tres: The 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Carter Jr., Charles W.

    2009-01-01

    This year’s Nobel Prize in Chemistry celebrates a multitude of research areas, making the difficult selection of those most responsible for providing atomic details of the nanomachine that makes proteins according to genetic instructions. The Ribosome and RNA polymerase (recognized in 2006) structures highlight a puzzling asymmetry at the origins of biology.

  13. Two Nobel Prizes connected to CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The 2003 Nobel Prizes in Physics and in Physiology or Medicine, announced last week, both have connections with particle physics and CERN. Alexei Abrikosov, Vitaly Ginzburg and Anthony Leggett have received the prize in physics for their "pioneering contributions to the theory of superconductors and superfluids". The most important superconducting materials technically have proved to be those known as type II superconductors, which allow superconductivity and magnetism to exist at the same time and remain superconductive in high magnetic fields. The coils for the superconducting magnets in CERN's Large Hadron Collider are made from niobium-titanium alloy - a type II superconductor. The LHC will operate thanks to magnets made of type II superconductors. Here, superconducting cables for the LHC are on display during a VIP visit.Abrikosov, who is now at the Argonne National Laboratory, was working at the Kapitsa Institute for Physical Problems in his native Moscow when he succeeded in formula...

  14. The 2010 Nobel Prize in physics—ground-breaking experiments on graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancock, Y

    2011-01-01

    The 2010 Nobel Prize in physics was awarded to Professors Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov for their ground-breaking experiments on graphene, a single atomic layer of carbon, and more generally, for their pioneering work in uncovering a new class of materials, namely two-dimensional atomic crystals. This paper gives an accessible account and review of the story of graphene; from its first description in the literature, to the realization and confirmation of its remarkable properties, through to its impressive potential for broad-reaching applications. The story of graphene is written within the context of the enormous impact that Geim and Novoselovs' work has had on this field of research, and recounts their personal pathways of discovery, which ultimately led to their award of the 2010 Nobel Prize. (topical review)

  15. A Nobel Prize winner visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Nobel Prize-winning astrophysicist George Smoot visited CERN on 2 February with a message for particle physicists and cosmologists alike. After a tour of ATLAS and CMS, Smoot gave a talk to a packed Council Chamber about the connections between particle physics and cosmology, and how the two disciplines can help each other to find answers to their cosmic questions. Smoot's group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is currently working on the development of the Max Planck Surveyor, the next generation of satellite to study cosmic microwave background anisotropy, which will teach us about how our universe was formed.

  16. The 2012 Nobel Prize in physics and David Wineland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark, Um; Kihwan, Kim

    2013-01-01

    The 2012 Nobel prize in physics was awarded to David Wineland, together with Serge Haroche. David Wineland received the prize for ground-breaking experimental methods that enabled the measurement and manipulation of individual quantum systems, especially systems with trapped ions. He improved a trapped ion system and opened a new quantum world leading to quantum computation. He also realized optical atomic ion clocks with unprecedented precision through his experimental research. This article briefly reviews the history of trapped ion systems, the development of trapped-ion based quantum computation, and the development of the atomic ion clock, which are closely related to Wineland's achievements. (authors)

  17. The character of scientists in the Nobel Prize speeches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condit, Celeste M

    2018-05-01

    This essay describes the ethos (i.e. the character projected to specific audiences) of the 25 Nobel Lectures in Physics, Chemistry, and Physiology or Medicine given in 2013-2015 and the 15 Presentation Speeches given at the Nobel Banquets between 2011 and 2015. A thematically focused qualitative analysis grounded in theories of epideictic discourse indicates the Nobel speakers demonstrated a range of strategies for and degrees of success in negotiating the tensions created by the implicit demands of ceremonial speeches, the scientific emphasis on didactic style and research content, and the different potential audiences (scientific experts and interested publics). Relatively few speeches explicitly displayed goodwill toward humanity instead of primarily toward the scientific community. Some speakers emphasized qualities of goodness in line with social values shared by broad audiences, but some reinforced stereotypes of scientists as anti-social. Speakers were variable in their ability to bridge the substantial gaps in resources for shared good sense.

  18. Nobel prize women in science their lives, struggles, and momentous discoveries

    CERN Document Server

    McGrayne, Sharon Bertsch

    1993-01-01

    An examination of the lives of Nobel Prize-winning women scientists discusses the work of Marie Curie, Emmy Noether, Lisa Meitner, and others, and explains why more than four hundred men and only nine women have won this prestigious award.

  19. [The Nobel Prize database as an indicator of the internationalization of Brazilian science from 1901 to 1966].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittella, José Eymard Homem

    2018-01-01

    Working with the Nobel Prize database, covering 1901-1966, the article examines the analytical potential of the participation of Brazilians both as nominees for the world's most prestigious award in science, the Nobel Prize, and also as invited nominators. Of the 18 Brazilians nominated for the Nobel, nine were in the category Peace, four in Literature, four in Physiology or Medicine, and one in Physics. The article comments on the nominations of Brazilian scientists in the categories of Physics and Physiology or Medicine, as well as on nominations by Brazilian nominators in these same two categories. It also discusses the process of science evaluation, based on the information attained through analysis of these data on the Nobel award.

  20. The 2010 Chemistry Nobel Prize: Pd(0)-Catalyzed Organic Synthesis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The 2010 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to three scientists, R F ... reactions are scalable to industrial production level and satisfy several 'Green ... Ph Br. H2C CH2. Pd(PPh3)4 or Pd(OAc2). HC CH2. Ph base, solvent, heat. 1. 2. 3. (1).

  1. Norman Ramsey. Nobel Prize Winner in Physics (1989); Norman Ramsey. Premio Nobel de fisica (1989)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    Norman Ramsey (Washington 1915) received the Nobel Prize in Physics (shared with con H. G. Dehmelt and W. Paul) for the development of study techniques for Atomic Physics. This tireless researcher participated in the discovery of the Magnetic Resonance Method for Molecular Emission. He invented the hydrogen maser and the hydrogen atomic clock, in addition to being a profile author. (Author)

  2. On the Human Aspect of Nobel Prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, G.

    1990-10-01

    One night, Nico invited for dinner all his postdoc and graduate students, in a German restaurant close to Harvard Square. Just before we were to pay for our meal, he told us: "Tomorrow, we shall know the Nobel prize winner. Can you people make a guess on his name?" All my colleagues nominated great physicists. In my turn, I suggested naively (and perhaps nationalistically) the name of Alfred Kastler who had been my thesis adviser. "Come on," joked Nico, "I know a lot of physicists who would deserve it much better.."

  3. Autophagy: one more Nobel Prize for yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Zimmermann

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent announcement of the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, awarded to Yoshinori Ohsumi for the discoveries of mechanisms governing autophagy, underscores the importance of intracellular degradation and recycling. At the same time, it further cements yeast, in which this field decisively developed, as a prolific model organism. Here we provide a quick historical overview that mirrors both the importance of autophagy as a conserved and essential process for cellular life and death as well as the crucial role of yeast in its mechanistic characterization.

  4. The discovery, development and future of GMR: The Nobel Prize 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Sarah M

    2008-01-01

    One hundred and one years after J J Thomson was awarded the Nobel Prize for the discovery of the electron, the 2007 Nobel Prize for Physics was awarded to Professors Peter Gruenberg and Albert Fert for the discovery of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) in which the spin as well as the charge of the electron is manipulated and exploited in nanoscale magnetic materials. The journey to GMR started with Lord Kelvin who 150 years ago in 1857 made the first observations of anisotropic magnetoresistance and includes Sir Neville Mott who in 1936 realized that electric current in metals could be considered as two independent spin channels. Modern technology also has a significant role to play in the award of this Nobel Prize: GMR is only manifest in nanoscale materials, and the development of nanotechnology growth techniques was a necessary pre-requisite; further, the considerable demands of the magnetic data storage industry to drive up the data density stored on a hard disk fuelled an enormous international research effort following the initial discovery with the result that more than 5 billion GMR read heads have been manufactured since 1997, ubiquitous in hard disks today. This technology drive continues to inspire exploration of the spin current in the field now known as spintronics, generating new ideas and applications. This review explores the science underpinning GMR and spintronics, the different routes to its discovery taken by Professors Gruenberg and Fert, the new science, materials and applications that the discovery has triggered and the considerable potential for the future. (topical review)

  5. The discovery, development and future of GMR: The Nobel Prize 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Sarah M [Department of Physics, University of York, York, YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2008-05-07

    One hundred and one years after J J Thomson was awarded the Nobel Prize for the discovery of the electron, the 2007 Nobel Prize for Physics was awarded to Professors Peter Gruenberg and Albert Fert for the discovery of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) in which the spin as well as the charge of the electron is manipulated and exploited in nanoscale magnetic materials. The journey to GMR started with Lord Kelvin who 150 years ago in 1857 made the first observations of anisotropic magnetoresistance and includes Sir Neville Mott who in 1936 realized that electric current in metals could be considered as two independent spin channels. Modern technology also has a significant role to play in the award of this Nobel Prize: GMR is only manifest in nanoscale materials, and the development of nanotechnology growth techniques was a necessary pre-requisite; further, the considerable demands of the magnetic data storage industry to drive up the data density stored on a hard disk fuelled an enormous international research effort following the initial discovery with the result that more than 5 billion GMR read heads have been manufactured since 1997, ubiquitous in hard disks today. This technology drive continues to inspire exploration of the spin current in the field now known as spintronics, generating new ideas and applications. This review explores the science underpinning GMR and spintronics, the different routes to its discovery taken by Professors Gruenberg and Fert, the new science, materials and applications that the discovery has triggered and the considerable potential for the future. (topical review)

  6. 2013 Physics Nobel Prize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orloff, J.

    2013-01-01

    The 2013 Physics Nobel Prize was awarded conjointly to Englert F. and Higgs, P.W. for the theoretical discovery of a mechanism that contribute to our understanding of the origin of the mass of subatomic particles and which was recently confirmed by the discovery of the predicted Higgs boson in the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC. The Brout-Englert-Higgs (BEH) mechanism allows the conciliation of finite range interaction and then non-null mass with symmetry through the concept of spontaneous symmetry breaking. As mass and couplings are relativist invariants, they stay unchanged in the rotation of the space for instance, the BEH field must be too and as a consequence must be a scalar field associated with a null spin particle called the Higgs boson. As the BEH mechanism explains the mass of elementary particles, it gives no hint about the reason of the broad range of particle masses we observe. (A.C.)

  7. The competition 'First Step to Nobel Prize in Physics'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorzkowski, W; Zuberek, R [Institute of Physics of the Polish Academy of Science, Warsaw (Poland); Surya, Y [TOFI, Tangerang-Karawaci (Indonesia)

    2011-07-15

    This paper presents the history of the competition First Step to Nobel Prize in Physics organized by Poland, its development from a national workshop in 1991/92 to an international competition nowadays and its organization, as well as the results obtained by the participants.

  8. The 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine: A Soil Bacterium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 21; Issue 4. The 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine: A Soil Bacterium and a Chinese Herb Steal the Show. Pundi N Rangarajan. General Article Volume 21 Issue 4 April 2016 pp 315-326 ...

  9. Sources of funding for Nobel Prize-winning work: public or private?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsioni, Athina; Vavva, Effie; Ioannidis, John P A

    2010-05-01

    Funding is important for scientists' work and may contribute to exceptional research outcomes. We analyzed the funding sources reported in the landmark scientific papers of Nobel Prize winners. Between 2000 and 2008, 70 Nobel laureates won recognition in medicine, physics, and chemistry. Sixty five (70%) of the 93 selected papers related to the Nobel-awarded work reported some funding source including U.S. government sources in 53 (82%), non-U.S. government sources in 19 (29%), and nongovernment sources in 33 (51%). A substantial portion of this exceptional work was unfunded. We contacted Nobel laureates whose landmark papers reported no funding. Thirteen Nobel laureates responded and offered their insights about the funding process and difficulties inherent in funding. Overall, very diverse sources amounting to a total of 64 different listed sponsors supported Nobel-related work. A few public institutions, in particular the U.S. National Institutes of Health (with n=26 funded papers) and the National Science Foundation (with n=17 papers), stood out for their successful record for funding exceptional research. However, Nobel-level work arose even from completely unfunded research, especially when institutions offered a protected environment for dedicated scientists.

  10. A Nobel Prize for empirical macroeconometrics: assessing the contributions of Thomas Sargent and Christopher Sims

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boumans, M.; Sent, E.M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an assessment of the contributions of the 2011 Nobel Prize winners, Thomas Sargent and Christopher Sims. They received the prize ‘for their empirical research on cause and effect in the macroeconomy’. The paper illustrates that Sargent entertained different interpretations of

  11. Exploring the Uses of RNAi — Gene Knockdown and the Nobel Prize

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernards, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded this year to Andrew Fire (Stanford University School of Medicine) and Craig Mello (University of Massachusetts Medical School) for their discovery of a new form of gene silencing.

  12. Nobel Prize winner visits CERN’s superconductors

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    On Wednesday 23 April Georg Bednorz, who won the Nobel Prize for physics in 1987, visited CERN along with 44 of his colleagues from the IBM Zurich Research Laboratory. Georg Bednorz (second from right) with colleagues from the IBM Zurich Research Laboratory in the LHC tunnel. On their arrival, Jos Engelen, the Chief Scientific Officer, gave the IBM group an introduction to CERN. Bednorz came to CERN only recently for the Open Days to give a seminar, but unfortunately did not have time to visit the experiments, so this trip was organised instead. Along with Alex Müller, Bednorz was awarded the Noble Prize for his discovery of superconductivity for the so-called high temperature superconductors, essentially copper-oxide-based compounds showing superconductivity at temperatures much higher than had previously been thought possible. The LHC magnets are built with low-temperature superconductors but many current leads that supply power to the LHC cryostats are made with...

  13. James Chadwick Nobel Prize for Physics 1935. Discovery of the neutron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    James Chadwick (1981-1974) was a key figure in the field of nuclear science. Through his studies, he researched the disintegration of atoms by bombarding alpha particles and proved the existence of neutrons. For this discovery, he was awarded the Nobel Prize for physics in 1935. (Author)

  14. Lecture by the winner of the 2007 Nobel Prize for physics

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Professor Albert Fert, who has just been awarded the Nobel Prize for physics for his work on giant magneto-resistance and spintronics, will give a lecture at the University of Geneva on 16 November on this booming field of science. (c) CNRS Photothèque - C. LebedinskyOn 9 October, the 2007 Nobel Prize for physics was jointly awarded to Albert Fert of the CNRS and Peter Grünberg of the Jülich Research Centre for their simultaneous and independent discovery of giant magneto-resistance (GMR) in 1988. This discovery had a significant impact in the fields of information technology and communications as it was rapidly used to develop extremely sensitive hard disk read-out heads that are capable of reading information stored at very high densities, thereby allowing further progress in the miniaturisation of data-storage devices. Since the first GMR read-out head was launched in 1997, the technology has become the standard in the m...

  15. Discovery of superfluid 3He phases wins 1996 nobel prize in physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Shousheng

    1997-01-01

    The 1996 Nobel prize in physics was awarded to David M. Lee, Douglas D. Osheroff and Robert C. Richardson for their discovery of superfluidity in 3 He in 1971. A short account of the discovery and its importance is given

  16. Marcus wins nobel prize in chemistry for electron transfer theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levi, B.G.

    1993-01-01

    This article describes the work of Rudolf Marcus of Caltech leading to his receipt of the 1992 Nobel Prize in Chemistry open-quotes for his contributions to the theory of electron transfer reactions in chemical systems.close quotes Applications of Marcus' theory include such diverse phenomena as photosynthesis, electrically conducting polymers, chemiluminescence, and corrosion. Historical aspects of his career are given. 10 refs., 1 fig

  17. Multiscale modeling of nerve agent hydrolysis mechanisms: a tale of two Nobel Prizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Martin J.; Wymore, Troy W.

    2014-10-01

    The 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded for the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems, whereas the 2013 Peace Prize was given to the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons for their efforts to eliminate chemical warfare agents. This review relates the two by introducing the field of multiscale modeling and highlighting its application to the study of the biological mechanisms by which selected chemical weapon agents exert their effects at an atomic level.

  18. DOE-Supported Physicists are Co-Winners of 2004 Nobel Prize in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    in Physics WASHINGTON, DC -- "On behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy, I congratulate Frank Wilczek, H. David Politzer and David J. Gross for winning the 2004 Nobel Prize in Physics," said agencies, have been the leading Federal supporter of research in physics, enabling vital advances and

  19. Century of Nobel Prizes:1909 Chemistry Laureate -R-ES-O-N-A-N ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Nobel Prize in 1909 for Chemistry was awarded to Wilhelm. Ostwald, for his pioneering ... It is reported that as an eleven-year old boy, he made his own ... member of the international peace conference and the permanent international ...

  20. Physics Nobel prize 2004: Surprising theory wins physics Nobel

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    From left to right: David Politzer, David Gross and Frank Wilczek. For their understanding of counter-intuitive aspects of the strong force, which governs quarks inside protons and neutrons, on 5 October three American physicists were awarded the 2004 Nobel Prize in Physics. David J. Gross (Kavli Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara), H. David Politzer (California Institute of Technology), and Frank Wilczek (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) made a key theoretical discovery with a surprising result: the closer quarks are together, the weaker the force - opposite to what is seen with electromagnetism and gravity. Rather, the strong force is analogous to a rubber band stretching, where the force increases as the quarks get farther apart. These physicists discovered this property of quarks, known as asymptotic freedom, in 1976. It later became a key part of the theory of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and the Standard Model, the current best theory to describe the interac...

  1. The asymmetry between discoveries and inventions in the Nobel Prize for Physics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartneck, C.; Rauterberg, G.W.M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an empirical study on the frequency of discoveries and inventions that were awarded with the. More than 70 per cent of all Nobel Prizes were given to discoveries. The majority of inventions were awarded at the beginning of the twentieth century and only three inventions had a

  2. The long way to success. Jaroslav Heyrovský and the Nobel Prize

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jindra, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 22, 17/18 (2010), s. 1933-1936 ISSN 1040-0397. [ Modern Electroanalytical Methods 2009. Prague, 09.12.2009-13.12.2009] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z80630520 Keywords : Jaroslav Heyrovský * Nobel Prize for chemistry 1959 Subject RIV: AB - History Impact factor: 2.721, year: 2010

  3. The ozone hole and the 1995 Nobel prize in chemistry; Trou d`ozone et Prix Nobel 1995 de chimie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, A. [Universite Catholique de Louvain (UCL), Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium). Inst. d`Astronomie et de Geophysique G. Lemaitre

    1996-03-01

    To mark to award of the 1995 Nobel Prize in chemistry to three world renowned atmospheric chemists, this paper recalls the history of scientific progress in stratospheric ozone chemistry. Then it summarizes current knowledge of ozone-layer depletion and its impact on climate, vegetation and human health. (author). 21 refs., 12 figs.

  4. Alert with destruction of stratospheric ozone: 95 Nobel Prize Winners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santamaria, J.; Zurita, E.

    1995-01-01

    After briefly summarizing the discoveries of the 95 Nobel Prize Winners in Chemistry related to the threats to the ozone layer by chemical pollutants, we make a soft presentation of the overall problem of stratospheric ozone, starting with the destructive catalytic cycles of the pollutant-based free radicals, following with the diffusion mathematical models in Atmospheric Chemistry, and ending with the increasing annual drama of the ozone hole in the Antarctica. (Author)

  5. On the centenary of the Nobel Prize: Russian laureates in physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhin, Konstantin N; Sustavov, Aleksandr F; Tikhonov, Viktor N

    2003-01-01

    The history and development of the branches of physics which profited significantly from the work of Russian Nobel laureates (P A Cherenkov, I E Tamm, I M Frank, L D Landau, N G Basov, A M Prokhorov, P L Kapitza, and Zh I Alferov) are reviewed in popular form to mark the recent Nobel Foundation centenary. Apart from the Russian prize winners' achievements, the major contributions of their colleagues - Russian and foreign, predecessors and successors - are briefly discussed. The current state of the branches of physics advanced with the participation of Russian laureates is reviewed, and the practical implications of their work for science, technology, and everyday life are discussed. (from the history of physics)

  6. On the centenary of the Nobel Prize: Russian laureates in physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhin, Konstantin N; Sustavov, Aleksandr F; Tikhonov, Viktor N [Institute of General and Nuclear Physics, Russian Research Centre ' Kurchatov Institute' , Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2003-05-31

    The history and development of the branches of physics which profited significantly from the work of Russian Nobel laureates (P A Cherenkov, I E Tamm, I M Frank, L D Landau, N G Basov, A M Prokhorov, P L Kapitza, and Zh I Alferov) are reviewed in popular form to mark the recent Nobel Foundation centenary. Apart from the Russian prize winners' achievements, the major contributions of their colleagues - Russian and foreign, predecessors and successors - are briefly discussed. The current state of the branches of physics advanced with the participation of Russian laureates is reviewed, and the practical implications of their work for science, technology, and everyday life are discussed. (from the history of physics)

  7. The 2017 Nobel Prize in Chemistry: cryo-EM comes of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Peter S

    2018-03-01

    The 2017 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank, and Richard Henderson for "developing cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) for the high-resolution structure determination of biomolecules in solution." This feature article summarizes some of the major achievements leading to the development of cryo-EM and recent technological breakthroughs that have transformed the method into a mainstream tool for structure determination.

  8. Manne Siegbahn and the 1924 Nobel Prize for Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstroem, I.

    1988-01-01

    The Research Institute of Physics celebrates its fiftieth anniversary with a Workshop and Symposium on the Physics of Low-Energy Stored and Trapped Particles. On July 1, 1937, Professor Manne Siegbahn was appointed the first director of the Institute. Because of this celebration a personal account is given of Manne Siegbahn's contribution to atomic structure physics. Comments will also be given on the procedure in the Swedish Academy of Sciences when Siegbahn in 1925 received the 1924 Nobel Prize for Physics 'for his discoveries and research in the field of X-ray spectroscopy'. (orig.)

  9. 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics Supernovae explosions and the Accelerating Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, B.

    2011-01-01

    This year, 2011, the nobel prize in physics is given to three astronomers (Perlmutter, Schmidt, Riess) 'for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe through observations of distant supernovae'. In my seminar talk, I will thus present first some basic astrophysics on supernovae star explosions and the cosmological principle of an expanding Universe. Next, I will summarize the observations and measurements of the two teams behind the noble prize winners and show how the simplest explanations of the unexpected findings lead to the concept of an accelerating Universe. I will end my talk with an outlook on ongoing and future efforts to measure the equation-of-state of the Dark Energy postulated to explain the observations. (author)

  10. James Chadwick Nobel Prize for Physics 1935. Discovery of the neutron; James Chadwick Premio Nobel de Fisica 1935. Descubrimiento del neutron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    James Chadwick (1981-1974) was a key figure in the field of nuclear science. Through his studies, he researched the disintegration of atoms by bombarding alpha particles and proved the existence of neutrons. For this discovery, he was awarded the Nobel Prize for physics in 1935. (Author)

  11. Léon Lederman, Mel Schwartz and Jack Steinberger wre awarded the 1988 Nobel Physics Prize.

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1988-01-01

    Léon Lederman (left), Mel Schwartz (right) and Jack Steinberger were awarded the 1988 Nobel Physics Prize for their 1962 experiment at Brookhaven which showed that neutrinos come in more than one kind.

  12. Chronobiology --2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Li; Li, Yi-Rou; Xu, Xiao-Dong

    2018-01-20

    Chronobiology is a field of biology that examines the generation of biological rhythms in various creatures and in many parts of body, and their adaptive fitness to solar- and lunar-related periodic phenomena. The synchronization of internal circadian clocks with external timing signals confers accurate phase response and tissue homeostasis. Herein we state a series of studies on circadian rhythms and introduce the brief history of chronobiology. We also present a detailed timeline of the discoveries on molecular mechanisms controlling circadian rhythm in Drosophila, which was awarded the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. The latest findings and new perspectives are further summarized to indicate the significance of circadian research.

  13. The Nobel Legacy: A Journey through Chemistry Inspired by the Achievements of Nobel Laureates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novara, Francesca Rita; Ross, Haymo

    2018-03-15

    The Prize is right! Chemistry-A European Journal will start an exciting journey exploring the significance of Nobel Prize awards in Chemistry in the corresponding contemporary chemistry fields. In this new journal feature called "The Nobel Legacy", a recurring series of invited Review-type articles each one connected to a particular Nobel Prize in Chemistry will be published. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. The inner representation of the external world - from conditioned reflexes to high level mental functions in the light of Nobel Prizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szilágyi T.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the seminal results of the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine Laureates are presented. First, a historical review of the development of our knowledge is provided along with the major paradigm shifts, by looking at the Nobel prizes awarded in the field of neuroscience in the last 110 years. We outline the major discoveries that were necessary for humankind to pass through the road leading to the remarkable understanding of high level mental functions, which led to this year’s Nobel Prize award. Next, the ground breaking discoveries of this year Nobel laureates are presented, which provide insights how neural representations of the environment are formed in the association cortices. These cortical areas are many synapses away from sensory receptors and motor outputs, and their activity do not reflect directly the activation patterns of the receptor population, but depends more strongly on intrinsic cortical computations. We also present how ensembles of specialized cells work together to compute complex cognitive functions and behaviour.

  15. Manne Siegbahn and the 1924 Nobel Prize for Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, I.

    1988-01-01

    The Research Institute of Physics celebrates its fiftieth anniversary with a Workshop and Symposium on the Physics of Low-Energy Stored and Trapped Particles. On July 1, 1937, Professor Manne Siegbahn was appointed the first director of the Institute. Because of this celebration a personal account is given of Manne Siegbahn's contribution to atomic structure physics. Comments will also be given on the procedure in the Swedish Academy of Sciences when Siegbahn in 1925 received the 1924 Nobel Prize for Physics 'for his discoveries and research in the field of X-ray spectroscopy'.

  16. Nobel Prize in physics 1985: Quantum Hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, R.

    1986-01-01

    The conditions (like very strong magnetic fields, ultralow temperatures, and occurrence of a two-dimensional electron gas in microelectronic structures) for the measurement of the quantum Hall effect are explained. Two possible measuring methods are described. Measuring results for p-Si-MOSFET, GaAs/AlGaAs heterojuntions and grain boundaries in InSb crystals are reported. Differences between normal (integer) and fractional quantum Hall effect are discussed. One of the important consequences is that by means of the quantum Hall effect the value h/e 2 can be determined with very high accuracy. In 1985 Klaus von Klitzing was awarded the Nobel Prize for his work on the quantum Hall effect

  17. Discovery of the τ lepton and electron antineutrino awarded the 1995 Nobel Physics Prize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Yifan

    1996-01-01

    American physicists Martin Perl and Fredrick Reines shared the 1995 Nobel Prize for physics for the discoveries of two of nature's most remarkable subatomic particles. Their pioneering contributions in lepton physics under-pinned subsequent developments in establishing the present picture of matter at the lepton-quark level

  18. Le Petit Parisien of 10 January 1904 and the 1903 Nobel Prize for Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mould, R. F.; Asselain, B.

    2009-01-01

    This description of the discovery of radium and the award of the 1903 Nobel Prize for Physics is of historical interest as it represents public opinion in France in 1904. It has never previously been translated into English and neither has the French text been republished since 1904. (authors)

  19. A lecture by Saul Perlmutter, winner of the 2011 Nobel prize in physics

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    The CNRS National Institute of Nuclear Physics and Particle Physics (IN2P3), Pierre et Marie Curie University and the Laboratory of Nuclear and High-energy Physics (LPNHE) are happy to invite you to a talk by Nobel laureate Saul Perlmutter.   Perlmutter shared the 2011 Nobel prize in physics "for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe through observations of distant supernovae." He will give a public talk in Paris on 17 December at 5pm: "Supernovae, Dark Energy, and the Accelerating Universe" Amphithéâtre Farabeuf des Cordeliers 21, rue de l’école de Médecine 75006 Paris Free entrance (places are limited) and live translation available.

  20. Paul Ehrlich: the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine 1908.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piro, Anna; Tagarelli, Antonio; Tagarelli, Giuseppe; Lagonia, Paolo; Quattrone, Aldo

    2008-01-01

    We wish to commemorate Paul Ehrlich on the centennial of his being awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1908. His studies are now considered as milestones in immunology: the morphology of leukocytes; his side-chain theory where he defined the cellular receptor for first time; and his clarification of the difference between serum therapy and chemotherapy. Ehrlich also invented the first chemotherapeutic drug: compound 606, or Salvarsan. We have used some original documents from the Royal Society of London, where Ehrlich was a fellow, and from Leipzig University, where he took a degree in medicine.

  1. A nobel house

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The Nobel Prize is awarded annually in recognition of achievements in the fields of medicine, physics, literature, and chemistry, as well as for peace. Since 1901, the best and brightest minds across the globe - 776 of them, in fact - have had the distinct privilege of being honoured by the Swedish Nobel Committee for their work and efforts in these fields. The International Atomic Energy Agency and its Director General, Mohamed ElBaradei, were awarded the 2005 Nobel Peace Prize. Although this is a tremendous achievement for the Agency, it is by no means an isolated one within the UN family. The IAEA award is the eighth time the United Nations or partner international organization has won the Peace Prize. UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan and the UN shared the 2001 prize; the UN Peacekeeping Forces were honored in 1988; the UN Children's Fund (UNICEF) in 1965; the UN High Commissioner for Refugees in 1981 and 1954; and the International Labor Organization in 1969. The late UN Secretary General Dag Hammarskjold won the prize posthumously in 1961

  2. Do Nobel Laureates Create Prize-Winning Networks? An Analysis of Collaborative Research in Physiology or Medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner, Caroline S.; Horlings, Edwin; Whetsell, Travis A.; Mattson, Pauline; Nordqvist, Katarina

    2015-01-01

    Nobel Laureates in Physiology or Medicine who received the Prize between 1969 and 2011 are compared to a matched group of scientists to examine productivity, impact, coauthorship and international collaboration patterns embedded within research networks. After matching for research domain, h-index,

  3. The Beatles, the Nobel Prize, and CT scanning of the chest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Lawrence R

    2010-01-01

    From its first test scan on a mouse, in 1967, to current medical practice, the CT scanner has become a core imaging tool in thoracic diagnosis. Initially financed by money from Beatles' record sales, the first patient scan was performed in 1971. Only 8 years later, a Nobel Prize in Physics and Medicine was awarded to Hounsfield and Cormack for their discovery. This article traces the history of CT scanner development and how each technical advance expanded chest diagnostic frontiers. Chest imaging now accounts for 30% of all CT scanning.

  4. The 2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine: a spatial model for cognitive neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Neil

    2014-12-17

    Understanding how the cognitive functions of the brain arise from its basic physiological components has been an enticing final frontier in science for thousands of years. The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2014 was awarded one half to John O'Keefe, the other half jointly to May-Britt Moser and Edvard I. Moser "for their discoveries of cells that constitute a positioning system in the brain." This prize recognizes both a paradigm shift in the study of cognitive neuroscience, and some of the amazing insights that have followed from it concerning how the world is represented within the brain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Nobel Prize winning physicist to speak at Rensselaer Nov. 20 Leon Lederman to discuss pre college science education

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Leon Lederman, Nobel Prize-winner, will offer some radical ideas for improving pre-college science education when he delivers the annual Robert Resnick Lecture at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute's Russell Sage Laboratory (1/2 page).

  6. Selman A. Waksman, winner of the 1952 Nobel Prize for physiology or medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, H Boyd

    2014-01-01

    The history of the discovery and development of streptomycin is reviewed here from the personal standpoint of a member of Dr. Selman Waksman's antibiotic screening research team. The team approach of eight individuals illustrates how the gradual enhancement of the screening methodology was developed. I illustrate three study periods with key aspects in the development of streptomycin which led to a Nobel Prize being granted to Professor Waksman. One item not previously emphasized is the employment of a submerged culture technique for large-scale production of streptomycin, thus enabling rapid animal testing and human clinical trials with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Another is that purified streptomycin was shown by Dr. Waksman to be distinctly different from the substances called natural products, which are no longer patentable in the United States; therefore, streptomycin was found to be patentable. A third item not previously emphasized is his emphasis on the screening of actinomycetes, including the newly named Streptomyces genus. All of these factors contributed to the success of streptomycin in the treatment of tuberculosis. In combination, their successes led to Dr. Waksman's department becoming a new pharmacological research area, specializing in drug discovery. These unique accomplishments all burnish the prior rationales used by the Karolinska Institute in granting Dr. Waksman alone the 1952 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine.

  7. Another Nobel Prize linked to synchrotron radiation work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasnain, S.

    2009-01-01

    The 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry went to Osamu Shimomura, Martin Chalfie and Roger Tsien 'for the discovery and development of the green fluorescent protein, GFP'. This year's Nobel Prize in Chemistry rewards the initial discovery of GFP and a series of important developments which have led to its use as a tagging tool in bioscience. By using DNA technology, researchers can now connect GFP to other interesting, but otherwise invisible, proteins. This glowing marker allows the movements, positions and interactions of the tagged proteins to be monitored. Osamu Shimomura was the first to isolate GFP from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria, found off the west coast of North America, and discovered the protein's green glow (Shimomura et al. (1962). J. Cell. Comp. Physiol. 59, 223-240). Martin Chalfie demonstrated the value of GFP as a luminous genetic tag. In one of his first experiments he coloured six individual cells in the transparent roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans with the aid of GFP. He had obtained the GFP gene (gfp) clone from Prasher (Prasher et al. (1992). Gene, 111, 229-233) and expressed it in E. coli. The GFP protein displayed a bright green fluorescence in this heterologous organism, suggesting that it could indeed serve as a versatile genetic marker in virtually all organisms. Chalfie transformed C. elegans with gfp under the control of a promoter regulating the expression of β-tubulin, abundant in six touch receptor neurons in C. elegans. The organism subsequently expressed GFP from distinct positions in its body and at distinct times in its development (Chalfie et al. (1994). Science, 263, 802-805). Roger Tsien contributed to the general understanding of how GFP glows by determining the formation of the GFP chromophore, a chemical group that absorbs and emits light. Tsien is best known for extending the colour palette of GFP beyond green, allowing researchers to follow several different biological processes at the same time. According to background on

  8. Nobel Prize Recipient Eric Betzig Presents Lecture on Efforts to Improve High-Resolution Microscopy | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric Betzig, Ph.D., a 2014 recipient of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry and a scientist at Janelia Research Campus (JRC), Howard Hughes Medical Institute, in Ashburn, Va., visited NCI at Frederick on Sept. 10 to present a Distinguished Scientist lecture and discuss the latest high-resolution microscopy techniques. Betzig co-invented photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM)

  9. [From apprenticeship to Nobel Prize: Henri Moissan's fabulous destiny].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafont, O

    2008-01-01

    Born in Paris on September 28, 1852, son of an eastern railways' employee and of a dressmaker, Henri Moissan's secondary schooling in Meaux did not allow him to get access to the sesame diploma "baccalauréat" (GCE). In 1869, he did obtain a special certificate of secondary schooling so that he could become an apprentice in watch making. That could have been the end of the story, but dreadful event for France appeared to have beneficial effects for Moissan. Under the threat of the Prussian army, Moissan's family took refuge near Paris. This gave the young Henri the opportunity to register as a student for the second-class pharmacy diploma, which did not need, at the time, the GCE. Moissan became then a trainee in pharmacy in 1871. Meanwhile, he followed the special schooling of "Ecole de chimie" founded by E. Frémy, and then joined the laboratory of Dehérain at the Museum, where he worked in plant physiology. He finally obtained the famous "baccalauréat" (GCE) and could register as a student in first-class pharmacy. He became a pharmacist as well as a doctor in sciences. In 1883, Moissan was named professor at the school of pharmacy in Paris. In 1886, he isolated fluorine by electrolysis of fluorhydric acid, in the presence of potassium fluoride, at a low temperature. He then studied diamond synthesis and gave a start to high temperature chemistry, designing his famous furnace. These findings and many others allowed Moissan to rise to membership in many learned academies around the world. Crowning achievement, Moissan won the Nobel Prize in 1906. A man of culture, collector of autographs and paintings, he died in 1907. Nothing of that would have been possible if there had not been a second-class pharmacist diploma. The history of Henri Moissan is one of a rise from apprenticeship to the Nobel Prize.

  10. Nobel peace speech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua FRYE

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The Nobel Peace Prize has long been considered the premier peace prize in the world. According to Geir Lundestad, Secretary of the Nobel Committee, of the 300 some peace prizes awarded worldwide, “none is in any way as well known and as highly respected as the Nobel Peace Prize” (Lundestad, 2001. Nobel peace speech is a unique and significant international site of public discourse committed to articulating the universal grammar of peace. Spanning over 100 years of sociopolitical history on the world stage, Nobel Peace Laureates richly represent an important cross-section of domestic and international issues increasingly germane to many publics. Communication scholars’ interest in this rhetorical genre has increased in the past decade. Yet, the norm has been to analyze a single speech artifact from a prestigious or controversial winner rather than examine the collection of speeches for generic commonalities of import. In this essay, we analyze the discourse of Nobel peace speech inductively and argue that the organizing principle of the Nobel peace speech genre is the repetitive form of normative liberal principles and values that function as rhetorical topoi. These topoi include freedom and justice and appeal to the inviolable, inborn right of human beings to exercise certain political and civil liberties and the expectation of equality of protection from totalitarian and tyrannical abuses. The significance of this essay to contemporary communication theory is to expand our theoretical understanding of rhetoric’s role in the maintenance and development of an international and cross-cultural vocabulary for the grammar of peace.

  11. Reflections on the Cultural Background to China's Reaction to the Nobel Prize Award

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar Haaland

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with some complex and controversial issues that arose in connection with the 2010 Nobel Prize Peace award to the Chinese dissident Liu Xiao Bo. These issues involve different levels. On one level it is important not to confuse the Nobel committee’s independence of outside interference from political and other organized agencies, with the question of whether the Nobel Prize committee’s decisions can be ideological or politically unbiased in its decisions. Part of the strong Chinese reaction to the award is related to this issue. Another level deals with the Committee’s widening of the criteria to be taken into account in the selection of candidates from the original criterion focused on direct contribution to reduction of armed conflicts, to the wider issues of indirect contributions like alleviation of poverty, ecological sustainability and most crucial the issue of human rights. The last issue is particularly critical since different states have different perspectives of what constitute human rights, and what rights should be given priority on different levels of the country’s development. The main point of the article is to look at historical events and socio-cultural conditions that shape the Chine Government’s (and many citizens’ reaction to the 2010 award. This is placed in the context of the widening income differences emerging in the modern political economy of China and how these may affect the growth of civil society. The critical question is: will the reward contribute to promotion of civil society or will it lead to increased crackdown on dissident voices. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/dsaj.v5i0.6357 Dhaulagiri Journal of Sociology and Anthropology Vol. 5, 2011: 81-100

  12. Eugene F. Fama: Nobel prize for 2013: Capital market efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelić Svetlana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2013 the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences was awarded to the American economists, Eugene Fama, Lars Peter Hansen and Robert Shiller. The monetarists, Fama and Hansen, from the University of Chicago, and the Neo- Keynesian, Shiller, from the Yale University, according to the Swedish Royal Academy, won this prestigious prize for their research providing mathematical and economic models to determine (irregularities in the stock value trends at the stock exchanges. With his colleagues, in the 1960s Fama established that, in the short term, it is extremely difficult to forecast stock prices, given that new information gets embedded in the prices rather quickly. Shiller, however, determined that, although it is almost impossible to predict the stock prices for a period of few days, this is not true for a period of several years. He discovered that the stock prices fluctuate much more substantially than corporation dividents, and that the relationship between prices and dividends tends to decline when high, and to grow when low. This pattern does not apply only to stocks, but also to bonds and other forms of capital.

  13. Robert J. Shiller: Nobel prize for 2013: Capital market efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelić Svetlana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2013 the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences was awarded to the American economists, Eugene Fama, Lars Peter Hansen and Robert Shiller. The monetarists, Fama and Hansen, from the University of Chicago, and the Neo- Keynesian, Shiller, from the Yale University, according to the Swedish Royal Academy, won this prestigious prize for their research providing mathematical and economic models to determine (irregularities in the stock value trends at the stock exchanges. With his colleagues, in the 1960s Fama established that, in the short term, it is extremely difficult to forecast stock prices, given that new information gets embedded in the prices rather quickly. Shiller, however, determined that, although it is almost impossible to predict the stock prices for a period of few days, this is not true for a period of several years. He discovered that the stock prices fluctuate much more substantially than corporation dividents, and that the relationship between prices and dividends tends to decline when high, and to grow when low. This pattern does not apply only to stocks, but also to bonds and other forms of capital.

  14. Nanoscopy—imaging life at the nanoscale: a Nobel Prize achievement with a bright future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blom, Hans; Bates, Mark

    2015-01-01

    A grand scientific prize was awarded last year to three pioneering scientists, for their discovery and development of molecular ‘ON–OFF’ switching which, when combined with optical imaging, can be used to see the previously invisible with light microscopy. The Royal Swedish Academy of Science announced on October 8th their decision and explained that this achievement—rooted in physics and applied in biology and medicine—was awarded with the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for controlling fluorescent molecules to create images of specimens smaller than anything previously observed with light. The story of how this noble switch in optical microscopy was achieved and how it was engineered to visualize life at the nanoscale is highlighted in this invited comment. (invited comment)

  15. A new window for detecting the universe. The 2002 nobel prize for physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Liming; Lu Tan

    2003-01-01

    The pioneering contributions to X-ray astronomy made by Riccaedo Giacconi who won the 2002 Nobel Prize for Physics are described, with emphasis on his extensive observations of the X-ray universe and development of X-ray imaging. The relationship between the advancement of astrophysics and the development of X-ray space observation is pointed out. The concepts of universal dark matter, binary accretion and X-ray jets are also presented. Finally, the outlook for high energy astrophysics is discussed

  16. Waiting for the new Nobel laureate(s in economic sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelić Svetlana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the start in 1901, with the exception of the war years, the Nobel Prizes have always been awarded on the 10th of December, to mark the day of Alfred Nobel's demise. The exception is the prize for achievements in economic sciences which only started to be awarded in 1969. Since 1995 the Prize in Economic Sciences has been defined as the Prize in Social Sciences, so that the other recognized scientists in these fields, such as political sciences, psychology and sociology, could be awarded. Moreover, it was established that the Prize can be divided among no more than three winners. The Prize in Economic Sciences has been awarded to the total of 76 scientists, most of which, i.e. 52 of them, were the citizens of the USA. The largest number of laureates, i.e. twelve, came from the University of Chicago, six of them from Princeton, and five from Berkley. It was only once, in 2009, that the Nobel Prize in Economics was awarded to a woman - Elinor Ostrom (1933-2012 from the USA, together with Oliver Williamson. The average age of the Nobel Prize winners is about 60 years. The oldest laureate to have ever won the prize was Leonid Hurwicz, who received the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences in 2007 at the age of 90.

  17. Quantum optics and nuclear clocks: a look at the 2012 physics nobel prize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera-Sancho, Oscar-Andrey

    2013-01-01

    Pioneering researches in the field of quantum optics are presented. These have laid the foundation for photonics research, that has grasped the particle properties of light to create new technologies and deepen the understanding of the physical laws. The quantum computation and quantum clocks have been highlighted. Individual particles have managed to manipulate without losing its properties in quantum, using photons to immobilize atoms with electric charges (ions) and study their properties. Researches conducted by the French scientist Serge Haroche and American David Wineland nobel prize winners for Physics 2012, have been commented [es

  18. Cold (and hot) wars: Superconductivity and society, from Weissberg-Cibulsky 1931 to the 2003 Nobel prize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waysand, Georges

    2005-01-01

    Far from being a continous flow from its discovery down to its explanation, the actual history of superconductivity has been affected by numerous socio-political turbulences all along the XXth century, through hot and Cold wars. From the 30's to the 2003 Nobel prize for physics most of these turbulences are overviewed. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. Cold (and hot) wars: Superconductivity and society, from Weissberg-Cibulsky 1931 to the 2003 Nobel prize

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waysand, Georges [Groupe de Physique des Solides, Universites Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6 and Denis Diderot Paris 7, Campus Boucicaut, 140 rue de Lourmel, 75015 Paris (France); Laboratoire Souterrain Bas Bruit de Rustrel-Pays d' Apt (Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis), La Grande Combe, 84400 Rustrel (France)

    2005-03-01

    Far from being a continous flow from its discovery down to its explanation, the actual history of superconductivity has been affected by numerous socio-political turbulences all along the XXth century, through hot and Cold wars. From the 30's to the 2003 Nobel prize for physics most of these turbulences are overviewed. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. Artificial Intelligence to Win the Nobel Prize and Beyond: Creating the Engine for Scientific Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Kitano, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    This article proposes a new grand challenge for AI reasearch: to develop AI system to make major scientific discoveries in biomedical sciences that worth Nobel Prize. There are a series of human cognitive limitations that prevents us from making accerlated scientific discoveries, particularity in biomedical sciences. As a result, scientific discoveries are left behind at the level of cottage industry. AI systems can transform scientific discoveries into highly efficient practice, thereby enab...

  1. Statement on occasion of receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize 2005, 7 October 2005. Nobel Peace Prize awarded to IAEA and Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2005-01-01

    On the occasion of receiving the Nobel Price the Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency, Dr. Mohamed ElBaradei expressed his feeling of gratitude, pride and hope. He stated that with this recognition, the Norwegian Nobel Committee underscores the value and the relevance of the work the IAEA has been doing. It recognizes the urgency of addressing the dangers we face: nuclear proliferation, nuclear armaments, and nuclear terrorism. The award will lend prominence and impetus to the IAEA's ultimate objective - of passing to our children a world free of nuclear weapons - and for that I am deeply grateful. He takes great pride in all the men and women who serve at the International Atomic Energy Agency. The IAEA was founded with a simple credo: 'Atoms for Peace' - meaning that nuclear science should be used safely and securely in the service of humankind - in peaceful applications related to energy production, health, water, agriculture and other aspects of development -- and not for its destruction. More than anything, this award suggests that, almost five decades later, we are still focused unwaveringly on living up to that objective. He believes that the road to international peace and security lies through multilateralism - the collective search by people of all racial, religious, ethnic and national backgrounds to find a common ground, based not on intimidation or rivalry but on understanding and human solidarity. In a practical sense, this means developing a functional system of international security that does not derive from a nuclear weapons deterrent - but rather based on addressing the security concerns of all. The fact that the IAEA was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize gives renewed hope that, working in concert, the international community can achieve this goal. It strengthens both aspects of the Agency's mandate: ensuring that the benefits of nuclear energy are distributed as broadly as possible in the service of humankind, and working

  2. Pavlov and Cajal: Two different pathways to a Nobel Prize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozo, Jairo A; Andrade-Talavera, Yuniesky; Rodríguez-Moreno, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Ivan Pavlov (1849-1936) and Santiago Ramón y Cajal (1852-1934) were two contemporary scientists who not only had a great impact on Russian and Spanish science but also on the international stage. Both shared several common features in their life and work, yet they followed fundamentally different paths during their training as scientists. While Pavlov received his laboratory training under the guidance of Ilya Tsion (1843-1912), Cajal did not receive any formal training within a particular laboratory nor did he have a mentor in the traditional sense, rather he was mainly self-taught, although he was supported by key figures like Maestre de San Juan (1828-1890) and Luis Simarro (1851-1921). In this article, we compare the scientific training of these two Nobel Prize laureates and the influences they received during their scientific lives.

  3. Nobel Connection to the Space Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Edward W.; Nash, Rebecca

    2007-09-01

    The 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics was heralded by some in the press as the "First Nobel Prize for Space Exploration." Indeed the Nobel Foundation's announcement specifically cited the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite launched by NASA in 1989 as the prime-enabling instrument It elaborated further, "The COBE results provided increased support for the Big Bang scenario for the origin of the Universe... These measurements also marked the inception of cosmology as a precise science." NASA also seized this unique moment of fame to honor its favorite son, the first Nobel scientist of the agency, John Mather, of the Goddard Space Flight Center, who shared the honor with Professor G. Smoot of the University of California, the Principal Investigator of the COBE measurement. It is without any dispute that the Nobel Prize is the highest scientific honor and best-known award of admiration and inspiration to the public and educational sectors. Unfortunately in the American culture, youths are mostly exposed to success icons in the sports, entertainment, and business domains. Science icons (of either gender) are largely unknown to them. We sincerely hope that success stories of Nobel scientists will become part of the learning curriculum in the K-16 educational experience. In this paper, we examine the pedigree of a number of Nobel Prizes over the years, and discuss their interactions with, and connections to, the space program. It is advantageous for the context of educational and public outreach to see such connections, because in a number of public surveys, one important customer expectation for the space program is the search for new knowledge, to which the Nobel Prize is a prominent benchmark. We have organized this paper into nine, fairly independent sections for ease of reading: I. "Michael Jordan or Mia Hamm" - Introduction and Background II. "Connecting the Dots Between the Heavens and Earth" - From Newton to Bethe III. "From Cosmic Noise to the Big Bang" - The

  4. Interview with Abel Prize Recipient Srinivasa Varadhan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2008-01-01

    His Majesty King Harald presented the Abel Prize for 2007 to Srinivasa Varadhan at an award ceremony in the University Aula in Oslo on the 22nd May, 2007. The interview was conducted the day before the ceremony.......His Majesty King Harald presented the Abel Prize for 2007 to Srinivasa Varadhan at an award ceremony in the University Aula in Oslo on the 22nd May, 2007. The interview was conducted the day before the ceremony....

  5. Physics Nobel Prize Goes to Tsui, Stormer and Laughlin for the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarzschild, Bertram

    1998-01-01

    This year's Nobel Prize in Physics is shared by Robert Laughlin (Stanford), Horst Stormer (Columbia University and Bell Laboratories) and Daniel Tsui (Princeton), for their roles in the discovery and explanation of the fractional quantum Hall effect. In 1982, when Stormer and Tsui were experimenters at Bell Labs, they and their colleague Arthur Gossard discovered this totally unexpected quantum effect in the transport properties of two‐dimensional electron gases at low temperature in strong magnetic fields.’ (See PHYSICS TODAY, July 1983, page 19.)

  6. Physics Nobel Prize Goes to Tsui, Stormer and Laughlin for the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarzschild, Bertram

    1998-12-15

    This year's Nobel Prize in Physics is shared by Robert Laughlin (Stanford), Horst Stormer (Columbia University and Bell Laboratories) and Daniel Tsui (Princeton), for their roles in the discovery and explanation of the fractional quantum Hall effect. In 1982, when Stormer and Tsui were experimenters at Bell Labs, they and their colleague Arthur Gossard discovered this totally unexpected quantum effect in the transport properties of two‐dimensional electron gases at low temperature in strong magnetic fields.’ (See PHYSICS TODAY, July 1983, page 19.)

  7. An Astrosocial Observation: The Nobel Connection to the Space Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Edward W.; Nash, Rebecca L.

    2007-01-01

    The 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics was heralded by some in the press as the 'First Nobel Prize for Space Exploration.' Indeed the Nobel Foundation's announcement specifically cited the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite launched by NASA in 1989 as the prime-enabling instrument It elaborated further, 'The COBE results provided increased support for the Big Bang scenario for the origin of the Universe... These measurements also marked the inception of cosmology as a precise science.' NASA also seized this unique moment of fame to honor its favorite son, the first Nobel scientist of the agency, John Mather, of the Goddard Space Flight Center, who shared the honor with Professor G. Smoot of the University of California, the Principal Investigator of the COBE measurement. It is without any dispute that the Nobel Prize is the highest scientific honor and best-known award of admiration and inspiration to the public and educational sectors. Unfortunately in the American culture, youths are mostly exposed to success icons in the sports, entertainment, and business domains. Science icons (of either gender) are largely unknown to them. We sincerely hope that success stories of Nobel scientists will become part of the learning curriculum in the K-16 educational experience. In this paper, we examine the pedigree of a number of Nobel Prizes over the years, and discuss their interactions with, and connections to, the space program. It is advantageous for the context of educational and public outreach to see such connections, because in a number of public surveys, one important customer expectation for the space program is the search for new knowledge, to which the Nobel Prize is a prominent benchmark.

  8. The mantle of the heavens: Reflections on the 2014 Nobel Prize for medicine or physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Richard G M

    2015-06-01

    The award of the Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology in 2014 for the discovery of place and grid cells was both a personal award to three great scientists and also a mark of the maturity of systems neuroscience as a discipline. This article offers both personal and scientific reflections on these discoveries, detailing both how getting to know all three winners had an impact on my life and the research questions that we shared in common work together. It ends with brief reflections on three important outstanding questions. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Marie and Irene Curie. The first female Nobel Prize winners; Marie en IreneCurie. De eerste vrouwelijke Nobelprijswinnaars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noordenbos, G. [Joke Smit Instituut voor Vrouwenstudies, Universiteit Leiden, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2003-07-01

    Marie Curie was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1903 and in 1911. Also her daughter, Irene Joliot-Curie, received a Nobel Prize for science in 1935. In this book an overview is given of the academic world at that time: limited access to universities for women, the carriers of both women in physics and their pioneering research and discoveries, the refusal of Marie Curie by the French Academy of Sciences, the awarding of the Nobel Prize and the assignment of Irene Joliot-Curie as the first female minister in France, the impact of the two World Wars, their married and private lives and the constant smear campaign of the press against both women. The lives and works of both women are hold against the light of the present position of women in physical sciences. [Dutch] In 1903, precies honderd jaar geleden, ontving Marie Curie als eerste vrouw de Nobelprijs voor de Wetenschap, gevolgd door een tweede Nobelprijs in 1911. Ook haar dochter Irene Joliot-Curie kreeg de Nobelprijs voor de wetenschap in 1935. Marie and Irene Curie schetst een breed beeld van de academische wereld waarin beide vrouwen zich bewogen: de beperkte toegang van vrouwen tot de universiteit, hun carrisres in de natuurkunde en baanbrekende ontdekkingen, de afwijzing van Marie door de Franse Academie des Sciences, de toekenning van de Nobelprijs en de benoeming van Irene als eerste vrouwelijke minister in Frankrijk, de invloed van de twee Wereldoorlogen, hun huwelijks- en priveleven en de niet aflatende hetze van de pers tegen beiden. In de door mannen gedomineerde wereld van de natuurwetenschappen liep de uitzonderingspositie van beide vrouwen als rode draad door hun curieuze levens. Het leven en werk van de Curies wordt geactualiseerd door deze tegen het licht te houden van de huidige positie van vrouwen in de natuurwetenschappen. Het bereiken van de top van de wetenschap door vrouwen blijkt nog steeds uitzonderlijk.

  10. #FakeNobelDelayReasons

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Tuesday’s hour-long delay of the Nobel Prize in Physics announcement was (and still is) quite the cause for speculation. But on the Twittersphere, it was simply the catalyst for some fantastic puns, so-bad-they're-good physics jokes and other shenanigans. Here are some of our favourite #FakeNobelDelayReasons.    

  11. The Nobel Connection to the Space Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, E. N.; Nash, R. L.

    2007-09-01

    The 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics was heralded by some in the press as the "First Nobel Prize for Space Exploration." Indeed the Nobel Foundation's announcement specifically cited the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite launched by NASA in 1989 as the prime-enabling instrument It elaborated further, "The COBE results provided increased support for the Big Bang scenario for the origin of the Universe. These measurements also marked the inception of cosmology as a precise science." NASA also seized this unique moment of fame to honor its favorite son, the first Nobel scientist of the agency, John Mather, of the Goddard Space Flight Center, who shared the honor with Professor G. Smoot of the University of California, the Principal Investigator of the COBE measurement. It is without any dispute that the Nobel Prize is the highest scientific honor and best-known award of admiration and inspiration to the public and educational sectors. Unfortunately in the American culture, youths are mostly exposed to success icons in the sports, entertainment, and business domains. Science icons are largely unknown to them. We sincerely hope that success stories of Nobel scientists will become part of the learning curriculum in the K-16 educational experience. In this paper, we examine the pedigree of a number of Nobel Prizes over the years, and discuss their interactions with, and connections to, the space program. It is advantageous for the context of educational and public outreach to see such connections, because in a number of public surveys, one important customer expectation for the space program is the search for new knowledge, to which the Nobel Prize is a prominent benchmark. We have organized this lengthy paper into nine, fairly independent sections for ease of reading:1."Michael Jordan or Mia Hamm" - Introduction and Background2."Connecting the Dots Between the Heavens and Earth" - From Newton to Bethe3."From Cosmic Noise to the Big Bang" - The First Nobel

  12. Written on the Writer's Face: Facial Width-to-Height Ratio among Nominees and Laureates of the Nobel Prize in Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebuda, Izabela; Karwowski, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between facial width-to-height ratio (fWHR), an established marker of testosterone level and dominance, and eminent writers' achievement. The fWHR of laureates (N = 39) and nominees (N = 247) of the Nobel Prize in Literature 1901-1950 was measured together with historiometric data. It was demonstrated that…

  13. Nobel Prize in Physics 20161

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    pected behaviour when things are close together, encapsulated in ... ductance, Haldane gap, Chern number. phone, the laptop, the TV display) are; perhaps both. The pio- neering basic research of 2016's Nobel laureates points to a new.

  14. From engaged citizen to lone hero: Nobel Prize laureates on British television, 1962-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouyon, Jean-Baptiste

    2018-05-01

    Between 1962 and 2004, Nobel Prize laureates appear in the British television science programme Horizon in various roles, denoting differing understandings of science in relation to society and culture. These representations are the outcome of an interplay of cultural and institutional factors. They vary with the broadcasting environment. Notably, the article establishes that the choice of presenting scientists as heroic characters in strongly determined storylines from the late-1990s onwards originates in a reaction to institutional imperatives as a means to preserve the existence of the Horizon series. The article shows that exigencies of the institutional context in which media professionals operate are major factors influencing the representation of science in public.

  15. A Nobel prize to public science communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Greco

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The Norwegian Nobel Committee has bestowed the 2007 Nobel Peace Price equally upon the scientists of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC and Al Gore, former vice-President of the United States of America, with the same motivation: «for their efforts to build up and disseminate greater knowledge about man-made climate change, and to lay the foundations for the measures that are needed to counteract such change».

  16. IAEA Nobel Prize money fights cancer crisis in Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    To fight the looming cancer crisis in Africa, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is assembling many of the world's leading cancer experts in Cape Town on 11-16 December. Cancer is a disease that is spreading very fast in the developing world and the IAEA has come to realize that we need to do much more to combat cancer in this part of the world, says IAEA Director General Mohamed ElBaradei in a video address to the conference. I hope this event will be the first of many events that would enable us to work together - national governments, international organisations, civil society - to help combat this dreadful disease and provide quality of life to our fellow human beings. With the support of African Nobel Laureates Nelson Mandela, Archbishop Desmond Tutu and F.W. de Klerk, this unprecedented gathering will bring together senior representatives from major national and international cancer organisations. Together with leading public figures and specialists they will assess the growing cancer burden in Africa and focus on building effective cancer control programmes at the national and regional levels. The IAEA is sponsoring the intensive workshops using funds awarded for the 2005 Nobel Peace Prize. The IAEA's Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy, or 'PACT', was established in 2004 to help achieve these goals. Building on the IAEA's 30 years of expertise in promoting radiotherapy, PACT aims to help get more cancer treatment facilities up and running in the world's developing regions, along with the trained personnel to operate them. 'PACT' is building partnerships with the WHO and other international cancer-control organisations so that the battle against cancer can be waged at country level. This includes cancer prevention, early detection, diagnosis and palliation, and more importantly education and training of professionals, says PACT Head Massoud Samiei. Current estimates suggest that several billion US$ are needed in the next 10 to 15 years if the

  17. AN ANTHOLOGY OF THE DISTINGUISHED ACHIEVEMENTS IN SCIENCE AND TECHNIQUE. PART 39: NOBEL PRIZE LAUREATES IN PHYSICS FOR 2011-2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Baranov

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Implementation of brief analytical review of the distinguished scientific achievements of the world scientists-physicists, awarded the Nobel Prize on physics for the period 2011-2015. Methodology. Scientific methods of collection, analysis and analytical treatment of scientific and technical information of world level in area of astrophysics, physics of elementary particles, physics of high energies, of modern theoretical and experimental physics. Results. The brief analytical review of the scientific openings and distinguished achievements of scientists-physicists is resulted in area of modern physical and technical problems which were marked the Nobel Prizes on physics for the period 2011-2015. Originality. Systematization is executed with exposition in the short concentrated form of the known scientific and technical materials, devoted opening of acceleration of expansion of Universe, creation of breach technologies of manipulation the quantum systems, theoretical discovery of mechanism of origin of mass of under-atomic particles, invention of effective power sources of light − blue light-emitting diodes and opening of neutrino oscillations. Practical value. Popularization and deepening of scientific and technical knowledges for students, engineers and technical specialists and research workers in area of modern theoretical and experimental physics, extending their scientific range of interests and cooperation in further development of scientific and technical progress in human society.

  18. Word from the DG: A Nobel Prize for particle physics

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    I don't know about you, but for me that hour between 11:45 and 12:45 on Tuesday seemed to take a very long time to pass. What was going on in that room in Stockholm we'll never know, but whatever it was, it produced a fantastic result for particle physics. There could be no more deserving laureates than François Englert and Peter Higgs, embodying as they do all the hallmarks of great scientists: brilliance, of course, but also humility and a sense of teamwork.   Nobel Prize celebrations in Building 40.   I remember when they met each other at CERN for the first time on 4 July last year: the pleasure in that meeting was evident, and when Peter Higgs was asked for comment by the dozens of journalists who came to CERN that day, he politely declined, saying that this was a day for the experiments. Well, Peter, Tuesday was your day, and everyone at CERN shares the pride and joy that you and François must have felt, wherever you were! And like I&rs...

  19. Horning cell self-digestion: Autophagy wins the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Yuan Ke

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved process by which eukaryotic cells eliminate intracellular components via the lysosomal degradation process. This cell self-digestion process was first discovered and morphologically characterized in the late 1950s and early 1960s. The genetic screen studies in baker's yeast in the 1990s further identified the essential genes functioning in the autophagic process. In the past two decades, the detailed molecular process involved in the completion of autophagy was delineated. Additionally, autophagy has been implied to function in many aspects of biological processes, including maintenance of organelle integrity, protein quality control, regulation of the stress response, and immunity. In addition to maintain cell homeostasis, autophagy has recently been shown to be modulated and to participate in the pathogenesis of human diseases, such as pathogen infections, neurodegenerative diseases, and tumor development. Overall, the breakthrough in autophagy research relies on the discovery of autophagy-related genes (ATGs using a genetic screening approach in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which was established by Yoshinori Ohsumi. This year the Nobel Committee has awarded Yoshinori Ohsumi the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his remarkable contribution to autophagy research.

  20. The 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry: Thomas A. Steitz and the structure of the ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Peter

    2011-06-01

    Over the past 200 years, there have been countless groundbreaking discoveries in biology and medicine at Yale University. However, one particularly noteworthy discovery with profoundly important and broad consequences happened here in just the past two decades. In 2009, Thomas Steitz, the Sterling Professor of Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry, was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for "studies of the structure and function of the ribosome," along with Venkatraman Ramakrishnan of the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology and Ada E. Yonath of the Weizmann Institute of Science. This article covers the historical context of Steitz's important discovery, the techniques his laboratory used to study the ribosome, and the impact that this research has had, and will have, on the future of biological and medical research.

  1. The fabulous legacy of a Nobel Prize Laureate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitvogel, Laurence; Merad, Miriam; Kroemer, Guido

    2012-01-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medecine 2011 was awarded to Ralph M. Steinman, Jules A. Hoffman and Bruce A. Beutler for the discovery of essential elements of innate immunity, in particular dendritic cells (DCs) and toll-like receptors (TLRs). Antigens become immunogenic and capable of triggering an adaptive immune response involving antigen-specific, MHC- restricted effector T cells, only if they are captured and presented by “accessory” cells. In 1972, Ralph M. Steinman and Zanvil Cohn identified in lymphoid tissues, cells with treelike, arborescent morphology that they named “dendritic cells” (DC) (from the greek word “tree” for tree, δένδρον) with a superior ability to induce alloreactive T cell proliferation in vitro (1978) and to stimulate the rejection of kidney allotransplants in rodents (1982). Thirty years after their discovery, DCare now known to play a seminal role in bridging innate and adaptive immunity, In addition DC are being used in numerous clinical studies all over the world to increase immunity to infectious or tumor-associated antigens. This effort involved the contribution of an international network of basicand clinical scientists spearheaded by Ralph M. Steinman to defineappropriate culture conditions to generate ex vivo DC from circulating or bone marrow precursors, to definefunctionally distinct DC subsets, to identifytheir maturation pathways including those relying on the stimulation of TLRs, and finally to develop DC based-vaccines to immunize patients infected with HIV or affected by cancer. Here, we will detail the history of DC and outline the therapeutic implications of Ralph M. Steinman’s seminal discovery.

  2. AN ANTHOLOGY OF THE DISTINGUISHED ACHIEVEMENTS IN SCIENCE AND TECHNIQUE. PART 35: NOBEL PRIZE LAUREATES IN PHYSICS FOR 1990-1994

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Baranov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Implementation of brief analytical review of the distinguished scientific achievements of the world scientists-physicists, awarded the Nobel Prize in physics for period 1990-1994. Methodology. Scientific methods of collection, analysis and analytical treatment of scientific and technical information of world level in area physics of elementary particles, physics of high energies, of astrophysics, of modern theoretical and experimental physics. Results. The brief analytical review of the scientific openings and distinguished achievements of scientists-physicists is resulted in area of modern physical and technical problems which were marked the Nobel Prize in physics for period 1990-1994. Originality. Systematization is executed with exposition in the short concentrated form of the known scientific and technical materials, devoted pioneer researches results on dispersion of relativism electrons on protons (neutrons, to opening of likenesses of physics of hard matter and physics of the condensed state of matter, creation of revolutionary detector of elementary particles, to opening of new pulsars and new possibilities in the study of gravitation, to creation of neutron spectroscopy and method of neutron diffraction. Practical value. Popularization and deepening of scientific and technical knowledges for students, engineer and technical specialists and research workers in area of modern theoretical and experimental physics, extending their scientific range of interests and cooperant further development of scientific and technical progress in human society.

  3. MIT professor wins major international math prize

    CERN Multimedia

    Allen, S

    2004-01-01

    Mathematicians Isadore Singer of MIT and Sir Michael Francis Atiyah of the University of Edinburgh will share an $875,000 award as winners of the second Abel Prize, which some hope will come to be seen as a Nobel Prize for math.

  4. Nobel Prize in Physics 2006

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    B ut every once in a w hile,these prizes are also given to team lead- ers w ho spearhead a large collaboration w hich .... saying that `the w hole universe is expanding' w ith dis- .... body form was a ¯rm prediction from big bang m odel, it w as im ...

  5. Nobel Prize 1992: Rudolph A. Marcus: theory of electron transfer reactions in chemical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulate Segura, Diego Guillermo

    2011-01-01

    A review of the theory developed by Rudolph A. Marcus is presented, who for his rating to the theory of electron transfer in chemical systems was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1992. Marcus theory has constituted not only a good extension of the use of a spectroscopic principle, but also has provided an energy balance and the application of energy conservation for electron transfer reactions. A better understanding of the reaction coordinate is exposed in terms energetic and establishing the principles that govern the transfer of electrons, protons and some labile small molecular groups as studied at present. Also, the postulates and equations described have established predictive models of reaction time, very useful for industrial environments, biological, metabolic, and others that involve redox processes. Marcus theory itself has also constituted a large contribution to the theory of complex transition [es

  6. The Rolf and Gertrud Dahlgren Prize for 2017 Awarded to Hans Walter Lack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ib

    2018-01-01

    The reasons for awarding the Rolf and Gertrud Dahlgren Prize to Hans Walter Lack are summarised and the prize described. It is also mentioned that Rosén's Linnaeus Medal in Gold was awarded to Arne Strid at the same ceremony.......The reasons for awarding the Rolf and Gertrud Dahlgren Prize to Hans Walter Lack are summarised and the prize described. It is also mentioned that Rosén's Linnaeus Medal in Gold was awarded to Arne Strid at the same ceremony....

  7. Was Muller's 1946 Nobel Prize research for radiation-induced gene mutations peer-reviewed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Edward J

    2018-06-06

    This historical analysis indicates that it is highly unlikely that the Nobel Prize winning research of Hermann J. Muller was peer-reviewed. The published paper of Muller lacked a research methods section, cited no references, and failed to acknowledge and discuss the work of Gager and Blakeslee (PNAS 13:75-79, 1927) that claimed to have induced gene mutation via ionizing radiation six months prior to Muller's non-data Science paper (Muller, Science 66(1699):84-87, 1927a). Despite being well acclimated into the scientific world of peer-review, Muller choose to avoid the peer-review process on his most significant publication. It appears that Muller's actions were strongly influenced by his desire to claim primacy for the discovery of gene mutation. The actions of Muller have important ethical lessons and implications today, when self-interest trumps one's obligations to society and the scientific culture that supports the quest for new knowledge and discovery.

  8. AN ANTHOLOGY OF THE DISTINGUISHED ACHIEVEMENTS IN SCIENCE AND TECHNIQUE. PART 38: NOBEL PRIZE LAUREATES IN PHYSICS FOR 2005-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. Baranov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Implementation of brief analytical review of the distinguished scientific achievements of the world scientists-physicists, awarded the Nobel Prize in physics for period 2005-2010 yy. Methodology. Scientific methods of collection, analysis and analytical treatment of scientific and technical information of world level in area of modern theoretical and experimental physics. Results. The brief analytical review of the scientific openings and distinguished achievements of scientists-physicists is resulted in area of modern physical and technical problems which were marked by the Nobel Prizes in physics for the period 2005-2010. Originality. Systematization is executed with exposition in the short concentrated form of the known scientific and technical materials, devoted creation of quantum theory of optical coherentness by scientists-physicists, development of laser exact spectroscopy, opening form of spectrum for a black body and anisotropy of space microwave base-line radiation, opening of effect of giant magnetoresistance, opening of mechanism of spontaneous violation of symmetry in subatomic physics, development of new technology of transmission of light in optical fibres, invention of a semiconductor circuit for registration of images and results of innovative experiments on research of 2D material of graphen. Practical value. Popularization and deepening of scientific and technical knowledges for students, engineers and technical specialists and research workers in area of modern theoretical and experimental physics, extending their scientific range of interests and collaboration in further development of scientific and technical progress in human society.

  9. Statement on President Obama winning 2009 Nobel Peace Prize, 9 October 2009, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: I am absolutely delighted to learn that President Barack Obama has been awarded the 2009 Nobel Peace Prize. I cannot think of anyone today more deserving of this honour. In less than a year in office, he has transformed the way we look at ourselves and the world we live in and rekindled hope for a world at peace with itself. President Obama has provided outstanding leadership on moving towards a world free of nuclear weapons. He has shown an unshakeable commitment to diplomacy, mutual respect and dialogue as the best means of resolving conflicts. He has reached out across divides and made clear that he sees the world as one human family, regardless of religion, race or ethnicity. President Obama has brought a new vision of a world based on human decency, fairness and freedom which is an inspiration to us all. (IAEA)

  10. The world made by Noble prize : chemistry volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-06-01

    This book contains two parts about items by chemistry. The first part introduces Alfred Bernhard Nodel, Pioneers without Nobel Prize, Garbage Bag, Non-sticky Frying Pan, Nylon Stockings, Plastic Electricity, Synthetic Dyestuff, Gin and Tonic, Soccer Ball, Fertilizer, DDT, Dentifrice, Kimchi, Makgeolli, Ice cream, Anodyne and Firefly. The second part lists PET-MRI, Color photo, Holography, Art diamond Incandescent lamp and Neon Sign, Imitation work, Alchemy, Nuclear Power plant, Synthetic Oil and Sugar, Freon gas, Water Car, Estate agency Mars, and winners of Nobel prize in physics.

  11. The world made by Noble prize : chemistry volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-06-15

    This book contains two parts about items by chemistry. The first part introduces Alfred Bernhard Nodel, Pioneers without Nobel Prize, Garbage Bag, Non-sticky Frying Pan, Nylon Stockings, Plastic Electricity, Synthetic Dyestuff, Gin and Tonic, Soccer Ball, Fertilizer, DDT, Dentifrice, Kimchi, Makgeolli, Ice cream, Anodyne and Firefly. The second part lists PET-MRI, Color photo, Holography, Art diamond Incandescent lamp and Neon Sign, Imitation work, Alchemy, Nuclear Power plant, Synthetic Oil and Sugar, Freon gas, Water Car, Estate agency Mars, and winners of Nobel prize in physics.

  12. IAEA Nobel Peace fund schools for nutrition. Combating child malnutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Dhaka, Bangladesh - Malnutrition remains the world's most serious health problem and the single biggest contributor to child deaths in the developing world, according to the World Bank. Now, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is using its Nobel Peace Prize earnings to promote the use of nuclear techniques to combat malnutrition during the earliest years of life. 'One out of every ten children born in developing countries will die before his or her fifth birthday,' explains IAEA nutrition expert Lena Davidsson. 'That's more than 10 million dead children each year. And the vast majority of these child deaths in developing countries are preventable with a combination of good care, adequate nutrition and appropriate medical treatment,' explains Dr. Davidsson. 'This brings us hope that unacceptably high childhood mortality can be substantially reduced with effective and well-targeted nutritional interventions.' Undernutrition is an important factor in more than half of all child deaths worldwide. The high prevalence of infants born with low birth weight and undernutrition among Asian children, especially in South Asia, emphasizes the urgent need to develop effective nutrition interventions within 'the window of opportunity', i.e., to target young women before pregnancy as well as infants and young children during the first 2 years of life. The IAEA Nobel Peace Prize Fund School for Nutrition for Asia will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh, April 22-26, 2007. It will focus on Interventions to combat undernutrition during early life and seeks to disseminate information about the usefulness of stable isotope techniques in intervention programs that reduce malnutrition, in particular in infants and children. The event is hosted by the Government of Bangladesh through the International Centre for Health and Population Research (ICDDR, B) and the Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC). The IAEA is assisting some of the world's poorest countries in their

  13. Physicists bag Chemistry Nobel for microscopy method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Hamish

    2017-11-01

    The 2017 Nobel Prize for Chemistry has been given to Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson “for developing cryo-electron microscopy for the high-resolution structure determination of biomolecules in solution”.

  14. Do Nobel Laureates Create Prize-Winning Networks? An Analysis of Collaborative Research in Physiology or Medicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline S Wagner

    Full Text Available Nobel Laureates in Physiology or Medicine who received the Prize between 1969 and 2011 are compared to a matched group of scientists to examine productivity, impact, coauthorship and international collaboration patterns embedded within research networks. After matching for research domain, h-index, and year of first of publication, we compare bibliometric statistics and network measures. We find that the Laureates produce fewer papers but with higher average citations. The Laureates also produce more sole-authored papers both before and after winning the Prize. The Laureates have a lower number of coauthors across their entire careers than the matched group, but are equally collaborative on average. Further, we find no differences in international collaboration patterns. The Laureates coauthor network reveals significant differences from the non-Laureate network. Laureates are more likely to build bridges across a network when measuring by average degree, density, modularity, and communities. Both the Laureate and non-Laureate networks have "small world" properties, but the Laureates appear to exploit "structural holes" by reaching across the network in a brokerage style that may add social capital to the network. The dynamic may be making the network itself highly attractive and selective. These findings suggest new insights into the role "star scientists" in social networks and the production of scientific discoveries.

  15. The meaning of the 2006 Nobel Peace Prize. Microcredit evangelism, health, and social policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    The awarding of the 2006 Nobel Peace Prize to Muhammad Yunus, founder of the Grameen Bank, provides an opportunity to consider the use and abuse of microfinancing, especially because credit continues to be touted as a poverty-reduction strategy associated with health education and health care financing strategies. Not only is the Grameen diagnosis of poverty dubious, but many structural problems also plague the model, ranging from financial accounting to market failures. In Southern Africa, to illustrate, microcredit schemes for peasants and small farmers have been attempted for more than 70 years, on the basis that modem capitalism and peasant/informal system gaps can be bridged by an expanded financial system. The results have been disappointing. A critical reading of political economy posits an organic linkage between the "developed" and "underdeveloped" economies that is typically not mitigated by capitalist financial markets, but instead is often exacerbated. When applied to health and social policy, microcredit evangelism becomes especially dangerous.

  16. Shh, Respect Freedom of Speech: The Reasons Why Ngugi wa Thiong’o and Ismail Kadare Have Not Been Awarded the Nobel Prize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edona Llukacaj

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Shh, Respect Freedom of Speech: The Reasons Why Ngugi wa Thiong’o and Ismail Kadare Have Not Been Awarded the Nobel Prize Abstract The terrorist attack on the satirical French magazine, Charlie Hebdo, at the beginning of this year, intensified the unremitting debate over the right to freedom of speech and expression, as well as its limitations. Nonetheless, it was almost unanimously agreed that the human right to express personal beliefs, regardless of the fact that they could be in deep disagreement with or even insulting towards the values of certain individuals, groups, or worldviews, should be defended and promoted by the whole human community. It goes without saying that the role of intellectuals and, especially, that of the academia, in promoting tolerance, diversity, and dialogue is essential. However, this does not seem to have been one of the criteria on which the Swedish Academy based its choices, over the past years, for the awarding of the Noble Prize in Literature. Focusing on the literary contributions of Ngugi wa Thiong’o and Ismail Kadare, two repeated nominees for the Noble Prize, this paper will attempt to shed light on the reasons why these two “heroes” of free speech and representation have not been awarded the prestigious prize.

  17. The 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry The Discovery of Essential Mechanisms that Repair DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Tomas; Modrich, Paul; Sancar, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2015 to Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar for their discoveries in fundamental mechanisms of DNA repair. This pioneering research described three different essential pathways that correct DNA damage, safeguard the integrity of the genetic code to ensure its accurate replication through generations, and allow proper cell division. Working independently of each other, Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar delineated the mechanisms of base excision repair, mismatch repair and nucleotide excision repair, respectively. These breakthroughs challenged and dismissed the early view that the DNA molecule was very stable, paving the way for the discovery of human hereditary diseases associated with distinct DNA repair deficiencies and a susceptibility to cancer. It also brought a deeper understanding of cancer as well as neurodegenerative or neurological diseases, and let to novel strategies to treat cancer.

  18. Santiago Ramón y Cajal and Ivan Petrovic Pavlov: their parallel scientific lives, schools and nobel prizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozo, Jairo A; Rodríguez-Moreno, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Santiago Ramón y Cajal was not only a great scientist but he was also a dedicated teacher who managed to create his own School in Spain. Cajal was active at the end of the XIX and the beginning of the XX century, a period in which Ivan Petrovich Pavlov, another great contemporary scientist, also established a strong School in Russia. While these two acclaimed scientists shared a similar vision on science, a view they also conveyed to their disciples, they applied quite distinct criteria in the way they dealt with their followers. Interestingly, despite the geographic and idiomatic barriers that had to be overcome, the paths of these two great figures of XX century science crossed at least three times. First when they competed for the City of Moscow Prize, second when they both attended the "Congreso Internacional de Medicina de Madrid" (Medicine International Congress in Madrid) in 1903 and finally, they competed on four consecutive occasions for the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Here we discuss their scientific vision, their different attitudes in the interaction with disciples and the distinct circumstances in which their paths crossed.

  19. Santiago Ramón y Cajal and Ivan Petrovic Pavlov: their parallel scientific lives, Schools and Nobel Prizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo Alonso Rozo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Santiago Ramón y Cajal was not only a great scientist but he was also a dedicated teacher who managed to create his own School in Spain. Cajal was active at the end of the XIX and the beginning of the XX century, a period in which Ivan Petrovich Pavlov, another great contemporary scientist, also established a strong School in Russia. While these two acclaimed scientists shared a similar vision on science, a view they also conveyed to their disciples, they applied quite distinct criteria in the way they dealt with their followers. Interestingly, despite the geographic and idiomatic barriers that had to be overcome, the paths of these two great figures of XX century science crossed at least three times. First when they competed for the City of Moscow Prize, second when they both attended the Congreso Internacional de Medicina de Madrid (Medicine International Congress in Madrid in 1903 and finally, they competed on four consecutive occasions for the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Here we discuss their scientific vision, their different attitudes in the interaction with disciples and the distinct circumstances in which their paths crossed.

  20. Nobel 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    There was general jubilation at CERN following the announcement from Stockholm on 17 October that Carlo Rubbia and Simon van der Meer had been nominated for the 1984 Nobel Prize for physics by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences 'for their decisive contributions to the large project which led to the discovery of the field particles W and Z, communicators of the weak interaction'. These discoveries, made last year at CERN, rank among the greatest achievements in the history of science

  1. ALICE physicists receive 2014 Lise Meitner Prize

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2014-01-01

    On Wednesday, 3 September, four ALICE physicists were presented with the European Physical Society's 2014 Lise Meitner Prize for their outstanding contributions to nuclear physics (see here).   ALICE collaboration members Johanna Stachel (Heidelberg University, Germany), Peter Braun-Munzinger (GSI, Germany), Paolo Giubellino (INFN Turin, Italy, and CERN) and Jürgen Schukraft (CERN) were presented with their awards at a private ceremony held in the Globe of Science and Innovation. In addition to members of the ALICE collaboration, the ceremony was attended by members of the CERN Management including the Director-General, Rolf Heuer, as well as the EPS Nuclear Physics Board Chair, Douglas MacGregor, and the EPS Lise Meitner Prize Committee Chair, Victor Zamfir. For more information, please see "EPS honours CERN's heavy-ion researchers".  From left to right: Douglas MacGregor (EPS); Prize recipients Jürgen Schukraft,&a...

  2. Tadeus Reichstein, co-winner of the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine: on the occasion of the 110th anniversary of his birth in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wincewicz, Andrzej; Sulkowska, Mariola; Sulkowski, Stanislaw

    2007-01-01

    Tadeus Reichstein (1897-1996) was the first scientist born in Poland to receive the Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology (1950) for the "discovery of hormones of the adrenal cortex, their structure and biological effects", as stated by the Nobel Prize Committee. His family being deeply devoted to Polish cultural and historical heritage, his first name was given to him after Tadeus Kosciuszko, a chief commander of the 18th century Polish uprising named the Kosciuszko Insurrection. As a child, he emigrated with his family to Switzerland, where he was much later to become involved in numerous research studies on steroids on an international scale. It was Tadeus Reichstein who isolated and synthesized desoxycorticosterone, which still remains the drug of first choice in the treatment of Addison's disease. Additionally, thanks to his strategy for the mass production of Vitamin C, the cost of this agent was drastically reduced thus enabling its widespread therapeutic use. In our divided world so often torn by tremendous conflicts, there is a great need to both remember and commemorate such distinguished people as Tadeus Reichstein who, despite the apparent "borders" between different nationalities and cultures, have demonstrated through their work the huge need for harmonious collaboration in the development of science.

  3. Video of Christian Skau and Martin Raussen's interview with the Abel Prize Winner John Milnor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skau, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The television interview with Abel Laureate John Milnor that was broadcasted on Norwegian television in June is now available on the Abel Prize multimedia page. John Milnor received the Abel Prize «for pioneering discoveries in topology, geometry and algebra» to quote the Abel Committee. King...... Harald presented the Abel Prize to John Milnor at the award ceremony in Oslo, Norway on 24 May. Before the interview there is a short presentation of the award ceremony. John Milnor is interviewed by Martin Raussen and Christian Skau. The Abel Prize that carries a cash award of NOK 6 million (about EUR...

  4. [Ilya Ilich Metchnikov and Paul Ehrlich: 1908 Nobel Prize winners for their research on immunity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokaj, J; John, C

    2008-11-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1908 was awarded to Ilya I. Mechnikov and Paul Ehrlich for recognition of their work on immunity. Mechnikov have discovered phagocytes and phagocytosis as the basis of natural cellular immunity. His ,,phagocytic theory" is the principle of immunological concept "self and not self" as the prerequisition of physiological inflammation, and selfmaintaining of organism. Ehrlich developed the methods for standardization of antibody activity in immune sera, described neutralizing and complement-depending effect of antibodies and enunciated the ,"ide-chain" theory of the formation of antibodies. Their concept of the key-stone of immunity was different, but they expressed the basic paradigma of immunology: immunity imply the protection of identity and guarantee the integrity of organism. Both are the founders of immunology as the scientific discipline. Discoveries and conceptions of I. Mechnikov and P. Ehrlich exceedingly influenced development of immunology and are also applicable, instructive and suggestive in contemporary immunology and microbiology.

  5. Feelings of discomfort in Ōe's “Prize Stock”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen Vilslev, Annette

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the feelings of discomfort in the works of Nobel Prize winner Kenzaburo Ōe. Focusing on Ōe's first short story “Prize Stock”, Shiiku (1957), the article discusses how the incredible event of a black pilot falling from the sky in the mountains near a small Japanese village...

  6. Nobel Lecture: Topological quantum matter*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldane, F. Duncan M.

    2017-10-01

    Nobel Lecture, presented December 8, 2016, Aula Magna, Stockholm University. I will describe the history and background of three discoveries cited in this Nobel Prize: The "TKNN" topological formula for the integer quantum Hall effect found by David Thouless and collaborators, the Chern insulator or quantum anomalous Hall effect, and its role in the later discovery of time-reversal-invariant topological insulators, and the unexpected topological spin-liquid state of the spin-1 quantum antiferromagnetic chain, which provided an initial example of topological quantum matter. I will summarize how these early beginnings have led to the exciting, and currently extremely active, field of "topological matter."

  7. A Nobel prize to public science communication (Italian original version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Greco

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The Norwegian Nobel Committee has bestowed the 2007 Nobel Peace Price equally upon the scientists of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC and Al Gore, former vice-President of the United States of America, with the same motivation: «for their efforts to build up and disseminate greater knowledge about man-made climate change, and to lay the foundations for the measures that are needed to counteract such change».

  8. Professor Richard Feynman colloquium

    CERN Multimedia

    1965-01-01

    Richard P. Feynman received the Nobel Prize for physics in 1965. Following the ceremony in Stockholm, Feynman gave the colloquium "Development of the space-time view of quantum electrodynamics" at CERN on 17th December.

  9. Strong-force theorists scoop Noble Prize

    CERN Multimedia

    Durrani, Matin

    2004-01-01

    Three US theorists have shared the 2004 Nobel Prize in Physics "for the discovery of asymptotic freedom in the theory of the strong interaction". Their theoretical work explains why quarks behave almost as free particles at high energies (½ page)

  10. Nobels attest to emergence of Japan as physics mecca

    CERN Multimedia

    Asaba, M

    2003-01-01

    " The Nobel Prizes in Physics and Chemistry received by two Japanese had the whole nation bubbling with excitement in the face of gloomy news reports that predominated in the second half of last year" (1 page).

  11. 3 scientists win Nobel for physics electric superconductivity, superfluidity work honoured

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences awarded the Nobel prize for physics to Russian Vitaly Ginzburg, 87, and Russian-born American Alexei Abrikosov, 75, for their work on electric superconductivity, and to British-born American Anthony Leggett, 65, for describing how liquid helium can become a "superfluid." The three scientists will split $1.3 million in prize money (1 page).

  12. Quantum mechanics - a key to understanding magnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Vleck, J.H.

    1978-01-01

    A translation is presented of J.H. van Vleck's lecture read at the 1977 Nobel Prize avarding ceremony. The basic results obtained using quantum mechanics in solving the problems of magnetism and especially paramagnetism are chronologically arranged. (Z.J.)

  13. In the service of peace: 2005 Nobel Peace prize[For the efforts to prevent nuclear energy from being used for military purposes and to ensure that nuclear energy for peaceful purposes is used in the safest possible way

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-01-15

    Nobel Citation: The Norwegian Nobel Committee has decided that the Nobel Peace Prize for 2005 is to be shared, in two equal parts, between the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and its Director General, Mohamed ElBaradei, for their efforts to prevent nuclear energy from being used for military purposes and to ensure that nuclear energy for peaceful purposes is used in the safest possible way. At a time when the threat of nuclear arms is again increasing, the Norwegian Nobel Committee wishes to underline that this threat must be met through the broadest possible international cooperation. This principle finds its clearest expression today in the work of the IAEA and its Director General. In the nuclear non-proliferation regime, it is the IAEA which controls that nuclear energy is not misused for military purposes, and the Director General has stood out as an unafraid advocate of new measures to strengthen that regime. At a time when disarmament efforts appear deadlocked, when there is a danger that nuclear arms will spread both to states and to terrorist groups, and when nuclear power again appears to be playing an increasingly significant role, IAEA's work is of incalculable importance. In his will, Alfred Nobel wrote that the Peace Prize should, among other criteria, be awarded to whoever had done most for the abolition or reduction of standing armies. In its application of this criterion in recent decades, the Norwegian Nobel Committee has concentrated on the struggle to diminish the significance of nuclear arms in international politics, with a view to their abolition. That the world has achieved little in this respect makes active opposition to nuclear arms all the more important today. The full Nobel Lecture of the Director General of the IAEA, Mr. Mohamed ElBaradei is given in this paper.

  14. ECONOMICS NOBEL: Dealing With Biases and Discrete Choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seife, C

    2000-10-20

    This year's Bank of Sweden Prize in Economic Sciences, given in honor of Alfred Nobel, goes to two researchers who gave the field of microeconomics--the study of individuals' economic behavior--new tools to help draw conclusions from imperfect data. James Heckman of the University of Chicago wins half of this year's prize for coming up with ways to deal with selection biases. Daniel McFadden of the University of California, Berkeley, tackled a different conundrum: how to quantify discrete choices rather than continuous ones.

  15. The web cast of the Nobel Prize of Physics of 2008, transmitted direct from Stockholm to the Globe of Science at CERN. Followed by a discussion among CERN theorists, with the participation of Jack Steinberger and John Ellis.

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2008-01-01

    The web cast of the Nobel Prize of Physics of 2008, transmitted direct from Stockholm to the Globe of Science at CERN. Followed by a discussion among CERN theorists, with the participation of Jack Steinberger and John Ellis.

  16. Telegramme sent on June 14 1956 from physicists Fred Reines and Clyde Cowan to Wolfgang Pauli announcing the detection, for the first time, of neutrinos. The Physics Nobel Prize in 1995 was awarded to Reines for this discovery.

    CERN Document Server

    Maximiliem Brice

    2006-01-01

    Telegramme sent on June 14 1956 from physicists Fred Reines and Clyde Cowan to Wolfgang Pauli announcing the detection, for the first time, of neutrinos. The Physics Nobel Prize in 1995 was awarded to Reines for this discovery.

  17. AN ANTHOLOGY OF THE DISTINGUISHED ACHIEVEMENTS IN SCIENCE AND TECHNIQUE. PART 37: NOBEL PRIZE LAUREATES IN PHYSICS FOR 2000-2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. Baranov

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Implementation of brief analytical review of the distinguished scientific achievements of the world scientists-physicists, awarded the Nobel bonus on physics for period 2000-2004. Methodology. Scientific methods of collection, analysis and analytical treatment of scientific and technical information of world level in area of modern theoretical and experimental physics. Results. The brief analytical review of the scientific openings and distinguished achievements of scientists-physicists is resulted in area of modern physical and technical problems which were marked the Nobel Prizes on physics for period 2000-2004. Originality. Systematization is executed with exposition in the short concentrated form of the known scientific and technical materials, devoted creation of semiconductor geterostructures scientists-physicists, integral microcircuit, to the receipt of condensation of Boze-Einstein in rarefied gases of alkaline metals, finding out a space neutrino, opening of space sources of X-rays, development of theory of superconductors and superfluid liquids and opening of asymptotic freedom in the theory of strong interactions of elementary particles. Practical value. Popularization and deepening of scientific and technical knowledges for students, engineers and technical specialists and research workers in area of modern theoretical and experimental physics, extending their scientific range of interests and cooperant of further development of scientific and technical progress in human society.

  18. AN ANTHOLOGY OF THE DISTINGUISHED ACHIEVEMENTS IN SCIENCE AND TECHNIQUE. PART 36: NOBEL PRIZE LAUREATES IN PHYSICS FOR 1995-1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. Baranov

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Implementation of brief analytical review of the distinguished scientific achievements of the world scientists-physicists, awarded the Nobel Prize in physics for period 1995-1999. Methodology. Scientific methods of collection, analysis and analytical treatment of scientific and technical information of world level in area of modern theoretical and experimental physics. Results. The brief analytical review of the scientific openings and distinguished achievements of scientists-physicists is resulted in area of modern physical and technical problems which were marked the Nobel bonuses on physics for period 1995-1999. Originality. Systematization is executed with exposition in the short concentrated form of the known scientific and technical materials, devoted opening of tau-lepton, experimental discovery of electronic neutrino, opening of superfluidity of liquid helium-3, creation of methods of cooling and «capture» of atoms by a laser ray, opening of new form of quantum liquid with excitations of fractional electric charge and clearing up of quantum structure of electroweak interactions of elementary particles scientists-physicists. Practical value. Popularization and deepening of scientific and technical knowledges for students, engineer and technical specialists and research workers in area of modern theoretical and experimental physics, extending their scientific range of interests and further development of scientific and technical progress in human society.

  19. A Nobel laureate's formula for the universe

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    A Nobel laureate and a blackboard at CERN is all you need to explain the fundamental physics of the universe. At least, that's what François Englert convinced us of on his visit to CERN on 21 February 2014. Englert shared the 2013 Nobel prize in Physics with Peter Higgs "for the theoretical discovery of a mechanism that contributes to our understanding of the origin of mass of subatomic particles". In the video below, he explains how he and Higgs manipulated equations containing mathematical constructs called scalar fields to predict the existence of the Brout-Englert-Higgs field.   For more information on this topic, click here.

  20. IAEA Nobel Prize money fights cancer crisis in Latin America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Full text: More than 60 of the world's leading cancer experts are being brought together in Buenos Aires, 23-27 April 2007, by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to assess Latin America's growing cancer burden. Poor medical facilities and lack of trained personnel and funding are limiting countries' ability to expand cancer care services and treat patients, while cancer rates are expected to double by 2020. More than 70 per cent of all cancer deaths occur in low and middle income countries and globally cancer kills more people than AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis combined. Through its Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy (PACT) the IAEA is using funds, awarded for the 2005 Nobel Peace Prize, to sponsor training workshops, such as the Buenos Aires event, that alert policy makers and health experts to the pressing need for national cancer control plans and programmes. 'I hope that this event in Latin America is the first of many that will enable us to work together to help combat this dreadful disease and provide quality of life to our fellow human beings,' said Director General of the IAEA, Dr. Mohamed ElBaradei. 'Cancer is a disease that is spreading very fast in the developing world and we have come to realise that we have to do much more to combat it in this part of the world.' In Latin America, there are an estimated 450,000 cancer deaths annually. The most commonly occurring cancers in men are prostate, stomach, lung, and colorectal and in women the most commonly occurring cancers are breast, cervix, stomach and colorectal. Breast and cervical cancer can be prevented through screening and early detection and can be cured in the early stages with effective treatment. The World Health Organization (WHO) warns that cancer will soon reach epidemic proportions, causing up to 10 million deaths a year by 2020. Yet at least one third of all cancers are preventable. A further one third of cases can be effectively treated if detected early. PACT was

  1. IAEA Nobel Prize money fights cancer crisis in Latin America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Full text: More than 60 of the world's leading cancer experts are being brought together in Buenos Aires, 23-27 April 2007, by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to assess Latin America's growing cancer burden. Poor medical facilities and lack of trained personnel and funding are limiting countries' ability to expand cancer care services and treat patients, while cancer rates are expected to double by 2020. More than 70 per cent of all cancer deaths occur in low and middle income countries and globally cancer kills more people than AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis combined. Through its Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy (PACT) the IAEA is using funds, awarded for the 2005 Nobel Peace Prize, to sponsor training workshops, such as the Buenos Aires event, that alert policy makers and health experts to the pressing need for national cancer control plans and programmes. 'I hope that this event in Latin America is the first of many that will enable us to work together to help combat this dreadful disease and provide quality of life to our fellow human beings,' said Director General of the IAEA, Dr. Mohamed ElBaradei. 'Cancer is a disease that is spreading very fast in the developing world and we have come to realise that we have to do much more to combat it in this part of the world.' In Latin America, there are an estimated 450,000 cancer deaths annually. The most commonly occurring cancers in men are prostate, stomach, lung, and colorectal and in women the most commonly occurring cancers are breast, cervix, stomach and colorectal. Breast and cervical cancer can be prevented through screening and early detection and can be cured in the early stages with effective treatment. The World Health Organization (WHO) warns that cancer will soon reach epidemic proportions, causing up to 10 million deaths a year by 2020. Yet at least one third of all cancers are preventable. A further one third of cases can be effectively treated if detected early. PACT was

  2. 'You have to go through the atomic shell'. Conversation with the nuclear physicist and Nobel Prize winner Wolfgang Paul. 'Sie muessen durch die Atomhuelle hindurch'. Gespraech mit dem Kernphysiker und Nobelpreistraeger Wolfgang Paul

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steiner, P.

    1994-01-01

    The contribution reflects an interview with the nuclear physicist Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Paul, to whom the Nobel prize has been awarded for the electro-magnetic trap for loaded and unloaded particles named after him. The centre of the discussion is the professional development with regard to main fields of research. (BWI)

  3. The discoveries of molecular mechanisms for the circadian rhythm: The 2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rong-Chi

    2018-02-01

    Circadian clocks evolved to allow plants and animals to adapt their behaviors to the 24-hr change in the external environment due to the Earth's rotation. While the first scientific observation of circadian rhythm in the plant leaf movement may be dated back to the early 18th century, it took 200 years to realize that the leaf movement is controlled by an endogenous circadian clock. The cloning and characterization of the first Drosophila clock gene period in the early 1980s, independently by Jeffery C. Hall and Michael Rosbash at Brandeis University and Michael Young at Rockefeller University, paved the way for their further discoveries of additional genes and proteins, culminating in establishing the so-called transcriptional translational feedback loop (TTFL) model for the generation of autonomous oscillator with a period of ∼24 h. The 2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to honor their discoveries of molecular mechanisms controlling the circadian rhythm. Copyright © 2018 Chang Gung University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Asymptotic freedom in the theory of the strong interaction. Comment on the nobel prize in physics 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhaoxi

    2005-01-01

    The 2004 Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to David J. Gross, Frank Wilczek and H. David Politzer for their decisive contributions to the theory of the asymptotic freedom of the strong interaction (a fundamental interaction). The fundamental elements of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and the theory of the strong interaction are briefly reviewed in their historical context. How to achieve asymptotic freedom is introduced and its physical meaning explained. The latest experimental tests of asymptotic freedom are presented, and it is shown that the theoretical prediction agrees excellently with the experimental measurements. Perturbative QCD which is based on the asymptotic freedom is outlined. It is pointed out that the theoretical discovery and experimental proof of the asymptotic freedom are crucial for QCD to be the correct theory of strong interaction. Certain frontier research areas of QCD, such as 'color confinement', are mentioned. The discovery and confirmation of asymptotic freedom has indeed deeply affected particle physics, and has led to QCD becoming a main content of the standard model, and to further development of the so-called grand unification theories of interactions. (author)

  5. Pomeranchuk Prize awarded to André Martin

    CERN Multimedia

    Jordan Juras

    2010-01-01

    Professor André Martin has been awarded the I.Ya.Pomeranchuk Prize 2010, alongside Professor Valentine Zakharov.   André Martin, CERN theorist, pictured at the ceremony held in honour of his 80th birthday (August 2009). Established by the Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP) in memory of an outstanding scientist Isaak Yakovlevich Pomeranchuk, the prize is awarded for the study of analytic properties of the scattering amplitude; which lead to the Froissart—Martin bound on the cross section growth with energy. The prize comes as a great honor for Martin, who was in fact a good friend of Mr. Pomeranchuk, "I am surprised and delighted to learn that I will be receiving the 2010 Pomeranchuk Prize. I was an admirer of Pomeranchuk and we shared a great friendship. I met with him for the last time in Erevan (Armenia) in 1965. As a good-bye, he told me, 'Analyticity exists'. This is precisely what I proved to earn the prize"....

  6. ALICE physicists receive 2014 Lise Meitner Prize

    CERN Multimedia

    Jeanneret, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    September 3rd, 2014: ALICE collaboration members Johanna Stachel (Heidelberg University, Germany), Peter Braun-Munzinger (GSI, Germany), Paolo Giubellino (INFN Turin, Italy, and CERN) and Jürgen Schukraft (CERN) were presented the 2014 Lise Meitner Prize at a private ceremony held in the Globe of Science and Innovation.

  7. From the Big Bang to the Nobel Prize and on to the James Webb Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2008-01-01

    The history of the universe in a nutshell, from the Big Bang to now. and on to the future - John Mather will tell the story of how we got here, how the Universe began with a Big Bang, how it could have produced an Earth where sentient beings can live, and how those beings are discovering their history. Mather was Project Scientist for NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite, which measured the spectrum (the color) of the heat radiation from the Big Bang, discovered hot and cold spots in that radiation, and hunted for the first objects that formed after the great explosion. He will explain Einstein's biggest mistake, show how Edwin Hubble discovered the expansion of the univerre, how the COBE mission was built, and how the COBE data support the Big Bang theory. He will also show NASA's plans for the next great telescope in space, the Jarnes Webb Space Telescope. It will look even farther back in time than the Hubble Space Telescope, and will look inside the dusty cocoons where rtars and planets are being born today. Planned for launch in 2013, it may lead to another Nobel Prize for some lucky observer.

  8. From the Big Bang to the Nobel Prize and on to James Webb Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2009-01-01

    The history of the universe in a nutshell, from the Big Bang to now, and on to the future - John Mather will tell the story of how we got here, how the Universe began with a Big Bang, how it could have produced an Earth where sentient beings can live, and how those beings are discovering their history. Mather was Project Scientist for NASA s Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite, which measured the spectrum (the color) of the heat radiation from the Big Bang, discovered hot and cold spots in that radiation, and hunted for the first objects that formed after the great explosion. He will explain Einstein s biggest mistake, show how Edwin Hubble discovered the expansion of the universe, how the COBE mission was built, and how the COBE data support the Big Bang theory. He will also show NASA s plans for the next great telescope in space, the James Webb Space Telescope. It will look even farther back in time than the Hubble Space Telescope, and will look inside the dusty cocoons where stars and planets are being born today. Planned for launch in 2013, it may lead to another Nobel Prize for some lucky observer.

  9. [An illustrious unknown. Giuseppe Levi among science, anti-fascism and Nobel Prizes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grignolio, Andrea; De Sio, Fabio

    2009-01-01

    The anatomist Giuseppe Levi (1872-1965) is unanimously considered one of the major figures of Italian biomedical sciences in the 20th century. His fame, however, is mainly derived from having nurtured three Nobel Prize winners, namely Salvador E. Luria, Rita Levi Montalcini and Renato Dulbecco. In reappraising Levi's role in the development of Italian science and culture in general, this article aims at questioning both the narrowness of earlier accounts and a certain kind of genealogical approach to the history of scientific disciplines and academic schools. We will here consider Giuseppe Levi as an instance of two major cultural phenomena: the development of experimental biology in Italy and continental Europe and the anti-fascist socialist culture expressed by a part of the Italian intellectuals. In so doing, we will reassess the historical specificity of the scientific maturation of Levi's three famous students, on the one hand, while on the other we will consider in some depth the cultural and moral environment in which Levi thrived and his role as a moral example for his students. Such revision, we will argue, have a direct bearing on more general historiographical issues, namely, the need for a stronger contextualization of the birth and consolidation of research traditions, implying a rejection of simplistic genealogical reconstructions, and the role of academic schools and institutional settings in the definition of novel, multidisciplinary scientific approaches. Finally, the following will highlight the importance of a more careful outlook on the master-pupil relationship in academic context, addressing issues of both continuity and rupture. The article is subdivided in two main sections, the first devoted to Levi as a scientist, the second to his Anti-fascism.

  10. Japan-China Relations 2005-2010: Managing Between a Rock and a Hard Place. An Interpretative Essay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    facilities to Malaysia , Vietnam, and Indonesia, not in lieu of continuing to invest in China, but as a risk management strategy. Yet integration of the...Foreign Minister Seiji Maehara told the Diet that China, following the award of the Nobel Peace Prize to detained dissident, Liu Xiabao, had asked Japan to...government instructed its ambassador in Norway to attend the ceremony. Prime Minister Naoto Kan told the Diet that the Nobel was an expression of universal

  11. The world made by Noble prize : chemistry volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-06-01

    This book has two parts of items related chemistry. The contents of the first part are Preface, Alfred Bemhard Nobel, Pioneers without Nobel Prize, Garbage Bag, Non-sticky Frying Pan, Nylon Stockings, Plastic Electricity, Synthetic Dyestuff, Gin and Tonic, Soccer Ball, Fertilizer, DDT, Dentifrice, Kimchi, Makgeolli, Ice cream, Anodyne, and firefly. The contents of the second part are PET-MRI, Color photo, Holography, Art diamond, an incandescent lamp and Neon Sign, Imitation works, Alchemy, Nuclear Power plant, Synthetic Oil and Sugar, Propane gas, Water Car, Estate agency Mars, and reference.

  12. The world made by Noble prize : chemistry volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-06-15

    This book has two parts of items related chemistry. The contents of the first part are Preface, Alfred Bemhard Nobel, Pioneers without Nobel Prize, Garbage Bag, Non-sticky Frying Pan, Nylon Stockings, Plastic Electricity, Synthetic Dyestuff, Gin and Tonic, Soccer Ball, Fertilizer, DDT, Dentifrice, Kimchi, Makgeolli, Ice cream, Anodyne, and firefly. The contents of the second part are PET-MRI, Color photo, Holography, Art diamond, an incandescent lamp and Neon Sign, Imitation works, Alchemy, Nuclear Power plant, Synthetic Oil and Sugar, Propane gas, Water Car, Estate agency Mars, and reference.

  13. Citations Prize 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Simon; Ruffle, Jon

    2014-06-01

    Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB) awards its 'Citations Prize' to the authors of the original research paper that has received the most citations in the preceding five years (according to the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI)). The lead author of the winning paper is presented with the Rotblat Medal (named in honour of Professor Sir Joseph Rotblat, a Nobel Prize winner who also was the second—and longest serving—Editor of PMB, from 1961-1972). The winner of the 2013 Citations Prize for the paper which has received the most citations in the previous five years (2008-2012) is Figure. Figure. Four of the prize winning authors. From left to right: Thomas Istel (Philips), Jens-Peter Schlomka (with medal, MorphoDetection), Ewald Roessl (Philips), and Gerhard Martens (Philips). Title: Experimental feasibility of multi-energy photon-counting K-edge imaging in pre-clinical computed tomography Authors: Jens Peter Schlomka1, Ewald Roessl1, Ralf Dorscheid2, Stefan Dill2, Gerhard Martens1, Thomas Istel1, Christian Bäumer3, Christoph Herrmann3, Roger Steadman3, Günter Zeitler3, Amir Livne4 and Roland Proksa1 Institutions: 1 Philips Research Europe, Sector Medical Imaging Systems, Hamburg, Germany 2 Philips Research Europe, Engineering & Technology, Aachen, Germany 3 Philips Research Europe, Sector Medical Imaging Systems, Aachen, Germany 4 Philips Healthcare, Global Research and Advanced Development, Haifa, Israel Reference: Schlomka et al 2008 Phys. Med. Biol. 53 4031-47 This paper becomes the first to win both this citations prize and also the PMB best paper prize (The Roberts Prize), which it won for the year 2008. Discussion of the significance of the winning paper can be found in this medicalphysicsweb article from the time of the Roberts Prize win (http://medicalphysicsweb.org/cws/article/research/39907). The author's enthusiasm for their prototype spectral CT system has certainly been reflected in the large number of citations the paper subsequently has

  14. I am the smartest man I know a Nobel laureate's difficult journey

    CERN Document Server

    Giaever, Ivar

    2016-01-01

    A unique individual with a fascinating life story, Ivar Giaever is a scientist who won the Nobel Prize in Experimental Physics in 1973. In his own words, Giaever relates an absorbing tale of how important luck and good fortune have been in shaping his life. He narrates the story of an ordinary childhood in Norway and an unremarkable undergraduate career at university. After finishing his engineering degree, he served in the Norwegian army and married his childhood sweetheart, Inger Skramstad. His desire to make a better life for his new family led Ivar to Canada and then to the United States. Even without an advanced degree in a scientific field, Ivar was given the opportunity to work with cutting-edge scientific researchers at General Electric R&D in Schenectady, New York. While there, he completed his PhD at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute — one of the nation's oldest technological universities. His work on superconductivity led to worldwide recognition and the Nobel Prize. This memoire is more than ...

  15. The Nobel Prize winner in physics 2013--Peter Higgs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jinyan

    2014-01-01

    Peter Higgs is a famous English physicist who was known for his works on Higgs mechanism and Higgs particle. He won the 2013 Noble Prize in physics. This paper briefly outlines his life, the proposition of Higgs mechanism and the origin of the name of Higgs particle. The discovery of Higgs particle is also given here. (author)

  16. The manipulation of neutral particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, S.

    1998-01-01

    The article is a translation of the lecture delivered on the occasion of the 1997 Nobel Prize awarding ceremony. The author's personal contribution to the discovery of laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms is described, and applications of this phenomenon in atomic physics are highlighted. The article is completed by Mr. Steven Chu's autobiography

  17. Convergence of The Nobel Fields of Telomere Biology and DNA Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouquerel, Elise; Opresko, Patricia L

    2017-01-01

    The fields of telomere biology and DNA repair have enjoyed a great deal of cross-fertilization and convergence in recent years. Telomeres function at chromosome ends to prevent them from being falsely recognized as chromosome breaks by the DNA damage response and repair machineries. Conversely, both canonical and nonconical functions of numerous DNA repair proteins have been found to be critical for preserving telomere structure and function. In 2009, Elizabeth Blackburn, Carol Greider and Jack Szostak were awarded the Nobel prize in Physiology or Medicine for the discovery of telomeres and telomerase. Four years later, pioneers in the field of DNA repair, Aziz Sancar, Tomas Lindahl and Paul Modrich were recognized for their seminal contributions by being awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry. This review is part of a special issue meant to celebrate this amazing achievement, and will focus in particular on the convergence of nucleotide excision repair and telomere biology, and will discuss the profound implications for human health. © 2016 The American Society of Photobiology.

  18. The discovery of the J particle; a personal recollection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ting, S.C.C.

    1978-01-01

    A translation is presented of the speech given by S.C.C. Ting at the awarding ceremony for the Nobel Prize for physics in 1975. The history is described of the experiment which led to the discovery of the new elementary particle (J particle). The parts and characteristics of the instrument used are described in detail. (Z.J.)

  19. IEEE Milestone at CERN - W Cleon Anderson (right), president of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, unveils the Milestone plaque at CERN, together with Georges Charpak

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    At a ceremony on 26 September at CERN, W Cleon Anderson, president of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), formally dedicated a "Milestone" plaque in recognition of the invention of electronic particle detectors at CERN. The plaque was unveiled by Anderson and Georges Charpak, the Nobel-prize winning inventor of wire-chamber technology at CERN.

  20. Abraham Pais Prize Lecture: Shifting Problems and Boundaries in the History of Modern Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, Mary-Jo

    A long established category of study in the history of science is the ``history of physical sciences.'' It is a category that immediately begs the question of disciplinary boundaries for the problems and subjects addressed in historical inquiry. As a historian of the physical sciences, I often have puzzled over disciplinary boundaries and the means used to create or justify them. Scientists most often have been professionally identified with specific institutionalized fields since the late 19th century, but the questions they ask and the problems they solve are not neatly carved up by disciplinary perimeters. Like institutional departments or professorships, the Nobel Prizes in the 20th century often have delineated the scope of ``Physics'' or ``Chemistry'' (and ``Physiology or Medicine''), but the Prizes do not reflect disciplinary rigidity, despite some standard core subjects. In this paper I examine trends in Nobel Prize awards that indicate shifts in problem solving and in boundaries in twentieth century physics, tying those developments to changing themes in the history of physics and physical science in recent decades.

  1. The laureate as celebrity genius: How Scientific American's John Horgan profiled Nobel Prize winners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahy, Declan

    2018-05-01

    When scientists become Nobel laureates, they become famous in science and public life, but few studies have examined the nature of their scientific celebrity. This article examines how Scientific American portrayed laureates in order to identify and explain core features of Nobel fame. It examines the portrayals of seven laureates - Francis Crick, Linus Pauling, Hans Bethe, Murray Gell-Mann, Brian Josephson, Philip Anderson and Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar - in magazine profiles written between 1992 and 1995 by science writer John Horgan. Its textual analysis finds the scientists are portrayed as combining the sociological characteristics of genius, including enormous productivity and lasting impact, with the representational characteristics of celebrities, such as the merging of public and private lives. Their form of scientific celebrity is grounded in their field-changing research, which is presented as a product of their idiosyncratic personalities. Nobel science is presented as knowledge created by an ultra-elite of exceptional individuals.

  2. First Calderón Prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundell, William; Somersalo, Erkki

    2008-07-01

    The Inverse Problems International Association (IPIA) awarded the first Calderón Prize to Matti Lassas for his outstanding contributions to the field of inverse problems, especially in geometric inverse problems. The Calderón Prize is given to a researcher under the age of 40 who has made distinguished contributions to the field of inverse problems broadly defined. The first Calderón Prize Committee consisted of Professors Adrian Nachman, Lassi Päivärinta, William Rundell (chair), and Michael Vogelius. William Rundell For the Calderón Prize Committee Prize ceremony The ceremony awarding the Calderón Prize. Matti Lassas is on the left. He and William Rundell are on the right. Photos by P Stefanov. Brief Biography of Matti Lassas Matti Lassas was born in 1969 in Helsinki, Finland, and studied at the University of Helsinki. He finished his Master's studies in 1992 in three years and earned his PhD in 1996. His PhD thesis, written under the supervision of Professor Erkki Somersalo was entitled `Non-selfadjoint inverse spectral problems and their applications to random bodies'. Already in his thesis, Matti demonstrated a remarkable command of different fields of mathematics, bringing together the spectral theory of operators, geometry of Riemannian surfaces, Maxwell's equations and stochastic analysis. He has continued to develop all of these branches in the framework of inverse problems, the most remarkable results perhaps being in the field of differential geometry and inverse problems. Matti has always been a very generous researcher, sharing his ideas with his numerous collaborators. He has authored over sixty scientific articles, among which a monograph on inverse boundary spectral problems with Alexander Kachalov and Yaroslav Kurylev and over forty articles in peer reviewed journals of the highest standards. To get an idea of the wide range of Matti's interests, it is enough to say that he also has three US patents on medical imaging applications. Matti is

  3. Manipulating atoms with photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen-Tannoudji, C.N.

    1998-01-01

    The article is a translation of the lecture delivered on the occasion of the 1997 Nobel Prize awarding ceremony. The physical mechanisms which allow manipulating of neutral atoms with laser photons are described. A remark is also made concerning several possible applications of ultra-cool atoms and streams of future research. The article is completed by Prof. Cohen-Tannoudji's autobiography. (Z.J.)

  4. Laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, W.D.

    1998-01-01

    The article is a translation of the lecture given on the occasion of the 1997 Nobel Prize awarding ceremony. The history of the discovery of laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms is described. An explanation of this phenomenon is presented and the author's personal contribution to the discovery is highlighted. The article is completed by Dr. Phillips' autobiography. (Z.J.)

  5. Memorial Meeting for Nobel Laureate Professor Abdus Salam's 90th Birthday

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Abdus Salam was one of the most prolific and exciting scientists of the second half of the last century. From humble beginnings in a village in Pakistan, he rose to become one of the world's most original and influential particle physicists. He shared the 1979 Nobel Prize with Glashow and Weinberg for contributions to electroweak unification, which forms an integral part of the Standard Model. He was the first Pakistani Nobel Laureate and the second only Muslim after Anwar Sadat. After gaining his doctorate in Cambridge, he moved to Imperial College in 1957 where he founded the very successful Theoretical High Energy Physics Group. He remained there as Professor of Physics until his death in 1996.

  6. From fission to fusion: a perspective on the research that won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Krishanu

    2014-03-01

    Secretion is widespread in all eukaryotic cells: all of us experience this in the course of daily life--saliva, mucus, sweat, tears, bile juice, adrenalin, etc.--the list is extremely long. How does a cell manage to repeatedly spit out some stuff without losing the rest? The answer is: through regulated vesicle trafficking within the cell. The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2013 was awarded to Drs Randy Schekman, James E Rothman and Thomas C Südhof for their 'discoveries of machinery regulating vesicle traffic, a major transport system in our cells'. Dr Randy Schekman and his colleagues discovered a number of genes required for vesicle trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi; the James E Rothman group unravelled the protein machinery that allows vesicles to bud off from the membrane and fuse to their targets; and Dr Thomas C Südhof along with his colleagues revealed how calcium ions could instruct vesicles to fuse and discharge their contents with precision. These enabled the biotechnology industry to produce a variety of pharmaceutical and industrial products like insulin and hepatitis B vaccines, in a cost-efficient manner, using yeast and tissue cultured cells.

  7. Causes and Effects in Macroeconomics: 2011 Nobel Prize Lecture in Economic Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shlair Abdulkhaleq Al-Zanganee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Noble Laureates Thomas Sargent and Christopher Sims have been granted the 2011 Noble Prize in economic sciences in appreciation of their empirical research on causes and effects in macroeconomics. The controversy on causality in macroeconomics was discussed in both of Sargent’s and Sims’s 2011 Prize lectures. While Sargent attempts to use the economic theory to interpret some historical events in order to gain insights on some contemporary issues, such as sovereign defaults, federal bailouts, and the coordination of monetary and fiscal policies, Sims is emphasizing the importance of large-scale economic models and calling for more research to be done in that area.

  8. Gore's Nobel May Bring Even More Attention on Campuses to Environmental Issues: Award for Combating Climate Change Implicitly Honors the Work of Academic Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Richard; Monastersky, Richard

    2007-01-01

    When the Norwegian Nobel Committee announced that the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize would be shared by Al Gore, the former U.S. vice president, and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the award implicitly celebrated a third party--academic institutions. Much of the research on global warming has come from university scientists, and higher…

  9. 12 December 2013 - Sir Konstantin Novoselov, Nobel Prize in Physics 2010, signing the guest book with International Relations Adviser E. Tsesmelis; visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with Spokesperson D. Charlton; in the LHC tunnel with Technology Department Head F. Bordry. I. Antoniadis, CERN Theory Group Leader, accompanies throughout.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    12 December 2013 - Sir Konstantin Novoselov, Nobel Prize in Physics 2010, signing the guest book with International Relations Adviser E. Tsesmelis; visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with Spokesperson D. Charlton; in the LHC tunnel with Technology Department Head F. Bordry. I. Antoniadis, CERN Theory Group Leader, accompanies throughout.

  10. EDITORIAL: Nobel Symposium 148: Graphene and Quantum Matter Nobel Symposium 148: Graphene and Quantum Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemi, Antti; Wilczek, Frank; Ardonne, Eddy; Hansson, Hans

    2012-01-01

    The 2010 Nobel Symposium on Graphene and Quantum Matter, was held at the Grand Hotel in Saltsjöbaden south of Stockholm on 27-31 May. The main theme of the meeting was graphene, and the symposium turned out to be very timely: two of the participants, Andre Geim and Kanstantin Novoselov returned to Stockholm less then six months later to receive the 2010 Nobel Prize in Physics. In these proceedings leading experts give up-to-date, historical, experimental, theoretical and technological perspectives on the remarkable material graphene, and several papers also make connections to other states of quantum matter. Saltsjöbaden is beautifully situated in the inner archipelago of Stockholm. It provided a pleasant setting for the talks and the ensuing discussions that took place in an enthusiastic and friendly atmosphere. The social programme included a boat trip in the light summer night and a dinner at the renowned Grand Hotel. These proceedings are ordered thematically, starting with historical overviews, followed by first experimental and then theoretical papers on the physics of graphene. Next are several papers addressing more general topics in quantum matter and finally contributions on the technological applications of graphene. We hope that this volume will serve as a source of knowledge and inspiration for any physicist interested in graphene, and at the same time provide a snapshot of a young field of research that is developing at very high speed. We are grateful to Marja Fahlander for excellent administrative support, and to the Nobel Foundation who funded the symposium.

  11. Climate Change Draws World Attention: The 2007 Nobel Peace Award Goes to Gore and IPCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisland, Beverly Milner; Ahmad, Iftikhar

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, the Nobel Committee awarded their Peace Prize to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (a scientific intergovernmental body set up by the World Meteorological Organization and by the United Nations Environment Program) and to former Vice-President Al Gore, Jr. The committee praised the United Nations panel for creating…

  12. The 2009 Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting: Martin Chalfie, Chemistry 2008

    OpenAIRE

    Chalfie, Martin

    2010-01-01

    American Biologist Martin Chalfie shared the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Roger Tsien and Osamu Shimomura for their discovery and development of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP). Martin Chalfie was born in Chicago in 1947 and grew up in Skokie Illinois. Although he had an interest in science from a young age-- learning the names of the planets and reading books about dinosaurs-- his journey to a career in biological science was circuitous. In high school, Chalfie enjoyed his AP Chemi...

  13. Praise for the prize - Hopes for peace: World leaders react

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This article presents highlights of words of praise and congratulations for the IAEA and its Director General up on the awarding of the 2005 Nobel Peace Prize. The list include Mr. Kofi Annan, the Secretary General of the UN; Mr. Hans Blix, Director General and Chief UN Weapons Inspector in Iraq; Ms. Condoleezza rice, US Secretary of State; Mr. Jacques Chirac, President of France and the European Commission

  14. The Overview of Gifted Education in Israel in Terms of Rate of Receiving International Prizes Israelis and Jews Living Elsewhere?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna DAVID

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the indicators about countries’ quality of education is receiving the international prizes e.g. The Nobel Prize, The Fields Medal, The Turing Award, The IJCAI – Computers and Thought Award, and the Award for Research Excellence according to international criterions. In this study the comparison of prizes that Israelis and Jews living elsewhere Israel has been examined in terms of population of the country where they live, the number of prizes. It is clear that the numbers of prizes that Jewish living elsewhere has won are high in comparison to living in Israel. In this situation, enrichment programs for gifted children practiced for 40 years in Israel should be check out in terms of international criteria.

  15. In vitro fertilization – from concept to first child Commemorating the 2010 Nobel Prize in Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Janežič

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the birth of the world’s first test-tube baby in 1978, more than 4 million babies have been born worldwide with the help of in vitro fertilization (IVF. In Slovenia, the first babies were born in 1984. In 2005, the percentage of babies born with biomedically assisted reproduction was 3.9 % and was the highest in Europe. IVF is nowadays a widely available and accepted method for helping infertile couples. However, the path to success was long and difficult. In this article, we present the development of IVF from the first ideas about fertilizing eggs outside the body from the end of the 19th century, followed by experiments on different animal species, the first human pregnancy and finally the birth of the first child in the United Kingdom. Many pioneers from other countries, particularly Australia and the United States of America, were instrumental in developing IVF as we know it today. Unfortunately, covering the history of IVF would greatly exceed the purpose of this article. During its history, the method was modified with innovative improvements. In its beginnings, there was a great deal of scepticism and opposition from certain public as well as scientific circles, an attitude that changed radically. The fact that the pioneer Robert Edwards received the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 2010 is proof of the growing acceptance of the method. Surely, IVF is a complex medical field, which raised and still raises ethical and legal questions. But from a merely human perspective, it is simply a method which gave infertile couples the opportunity to fulfill their lifetime dream.

  16. Visit of the ATLAS cavern by Prof. Murray Gell-Mann, Physics Nobel 1969. With Dr Peter Jenni and Dr Alison Lister

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    Murray Gell-Mann, well known for proposing the quark model and as a recipient of the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1969, came to CERN on 23 January. During his visit he gave a theoretical physics seminar on decoherent histories in quantum mechanics.

  17. Cosmic Anger Abdus Salam - The First Muslim Nobel Scientist

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, Gordon Murray

    2008-01-01

    This book presents a biography of Abdus Salam, the first Muslim to win a Nobel Prize for Science (Physics 1979), who was nevertheless excommunicated and branded as a heretic in his own country. His achievements are often overlooked, even besmirched. Realizing that the whole world had to be his stage, he pioneered the International Centre for Theoretical Physics in Trieste, a vital focus of Third World science which remains as his monument. A staunch Muslim, he was ashamed of thedecline of science in the heritage of Islam, and struggled doggedly to restore it to its former glory. Undermined by

  18. CERN receives prestigious Milestone recognition from IEEE

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The Nobel prize winner Georges Charpak and W. Cleon Anderson, IEEE President, unveil the Milestone bronze plaques. At a ceremony on 26 September at the Globe of Science and Innovation, Mr W. Cleon Anderson, President of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) formally dedicated Milestone plaques recognising the invention of electronic particle detectors at CERN. The plaque were unveiled by Mr Anderson and Georges Charpak, the Nobel-prize winning inventor of wire chamber technology at CERN in 1968. The IEEE is the world's largest professional association dedicated to the advancement of technology with 365,000 individual members in over 150 countries. Established in 1983, there are currently over 60 Milestones around the world. They honour momentous achievements in the history of electrical and electronics engineering, such as the landing of the first transatlantic cable, code breaking at Bletchley Park during World War II, and the development of the Japanese Bullet train, the Tokaido Shin...

  19. Citations Prize 2009 Citations Prize 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Steve; Harris, Simon

    2009-12-01

    Physics in Medicine & Biology (PMB) awards its 'Citations Prize' to the authors of the original research paper that has received the most citations in the preceding five years (according to the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI)). The lead author of the winning paper is presented with the Rotblat Medal (named in honour of Professor Sir Joseph Rotblat who was the second—and longest serving—Editor of PMB, from 1961-1972). The winning co-authors each receive a certificate. Photograph of the 2009 Citations Prize winners Some of the winning authors with their certificates, and Christian Morel with the Rotblat Medal, at the award ceremony in Orsay, near Paris. From left to right are Corinne Groiselle, Lydia Maigne, David Brasse, Irène Buvat, Dimitris Visvikis, Giovanni Santin, Uwe Pietrzyk, Pierre-François Honore, Christian Morel, Sébastien Jan and Arion Chatziioannou. The winner of the 2009 Citations Prize for the paper which has received the most citations in the previous 5 years (2004-2008) is GATE: a simulation toolkit for PET and SPECT Authors: S Jan, G Santin, D Strul, S Staelens, K Assié, D Autret, S Avner, R Barbier, M Bardiès, P M Bloomfield, D Brasse, V Breton, P Bruyndonckx, I Buvat, A F Chatziioannou, Y Choi, Y H Chung, C Comtat, D Donnarieix, L Ferrer, S J Glick, C J Groiselle, D Guez, P-F Honore, S Kerhoas-Cavata, A S Kirov, V Kohli, M Koole, M Krieguer, D J van der Laan, F Lamare, G Largeron, C Lartizien, D Lazaro, M C Maas, L Maigne, F Mayet, F Melot, C Merheb, E Pennacchio, J Perez, U Pietrzyk, F R Rannou, M Rey, D R Schaart, C R Schmidtlein, L~Simon, T Y Song, J-M Vieira, D Visvikis, R Van de Walle, E Wieörs and C Morel Reference: S Jan et al 2004 Phys. Med. Biol. 49 4543-61 Since its publication in 2004 this article has received over 200 citations. This extremely high figure is a testament to the great influence and usefulness of the work to the nuclear medicine community. More discussion of the winning paper can be found on

  20. Physicians for the prevention of nuclear war. A portrayal of the Nobel prize winner. Betrifft: Aerzte gegen den Atomkrieg. Ein Portraet des Friedensnobelpreistraegers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jogschies, R.

    1986-01-01

    The publication abstracted reports on the history and aims of IPPNW (International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War). In recognition of their continuous and consistent international campaign of enlightenment its 140,000 members were awarded the peace Nobel prize in 1985. Emphasis is placed on the achievements and work of the Western Germany section of ''Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War''. The portrait is the first of its kind to comprehensibly acquaint even non-experts with the background, history and difficulties of the medical resistance to the dangers of nuclear war. Neither stopping at national or at political borders the medical hippocratic mission of fighting against a nuclear holocaust has brought about and developed a professional disinterestedness which is not equalled by any other kind of social and moral devotion. The publication analyses the worldwide threatening situation, the forgotten lesson taught by the past and the chances of medical protest. The result pointed out expresses an optimistic view. Chances are good if IPPNW does not only supply us with facts but also sets an example of modern morality. Interesting rudimentary attempts of initation can already be observed with other professions, for example among journalists.

  1. ¿JUGAMOS EN EL MISMO EQUIPO? LOS NOBEL DE ECONOMÍA Y LA TEORÍA DE JUEGOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca Jiménez Jiménez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is aimed at offering an overview of the major contributions of Game Theory to the understanding of cooperation and conflict in social dilemmas. In particular, we emphasize some studies carried out by the most outstanding researchers who have been recognized with the Nobel Prize in Economics. For that, we use the well known “tragedy of the commons” as our benchmark strategic setting or game.

  2. The 2009 Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting: Peter Agre, Chemistry 2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agre, Peter

    2009-12-09

    Peter Agre, born in 1949 in Northfield Minnesota, shared the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Roderick MacKinnon for his discovery of aquaporins, the channel proteins that allow water to cross the cell membrane. Agre's interest medicine was inspired by the humanitarian efforts of the Medical Missionary program run by the Norwegians of his home community in Minnesota. Hoping to provide new treatments for diseases affecting the poor, he joined a cholera laboratory during medical school at Johns Hopkins. He found that he enjoyed biomedical research, and continued his laboratory studies for an additional year after medical school. Agre completed his clinical training at Case Western Hospitals of Cleveland and the University of North Carolina, and returned to Johns Hopkins in 1981. There, his serendipitous discovery of aquaporins was made while pursuing the identity of the Rhesus (Rh) antigen. For a century, physiologists and biophysicists had been trying to understand the mechanism by which fluid passed across the cell's plasma membrane. Biophysical evidence indicated a limit to passive diffusion of water, suggesting the existence of another mechanism for water transport across the membrane. The putative "water channel," however, could not be identified. In 1988, while attempting to purify the 30 kDa Rh protein, Agre and colleagues began investigating a 28 kDa contaminant that they believed to be a proteolytic fragment of the Rh protein. Subsequent studies over the next 3-4 years revealed that the contaminant was a membrane-spanning oligomeric protein, unrelated to the Rh antigen, and that it was highly abundant in renal tubules and red blood cells. Still, they could not assign a function to it. The breakthrough came following a visit with his friend and former mentor John Parker. After Agre described the properties of the mysterious 28 kDa protein, Parker suggested that it might be the long-sought-after water channel. Agre and colleagues tested this idea by

  3. LHC Nobel Symposium Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekelöf, Tord

    2013-12-01

    In the summer of 2012, a great discovery emerged at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva. A plethora of new precision data had already by then been collected by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at LHC, providing further extensive support for the validity of the Standard Model of particle physics. But what now appeared was the first evidence for what was not only the last unverified prediction of the Standard Model, but also perhaps the most decisive one: the prediction made already in 1964 of a unique scalar boson required by the theory of François Englert and Peter Higgs on how fundamental particles acquire mass. At that moment in 2012, it seemed particularly appropriate to start planning a gathering of world experts in particle physics to take stock of the situation and try to answer the challenging question: what next? By May 2013, when the LHC Nobel Symposium was held at the Krusenberg Mansion outside Uppsala in Sweden, the first signs of a great discovery had already turned into fully convincing experimental evidence for the existence of a scalar boson of mass about 125 GeV, having properties compatible with the 50-year-old prediction. And in October 2013, the evidence was deemed so convincing that the Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics to Englert and Higgs for their pioneering work. At the same time the search at the LHC for other particles, beyond those predicted by the Standard Model, with heavier masses up to—and in some cases beyond—1 TeV, had provided no positive result. The triumph of the Standard Model seems resounding, in particular because the mass of the discovered scalar boson is such that, when identified with the Higgs boson, the Standard Model is able to provide predictions at energies as high as the Planck mass, although at the price of accepting that the vacuum would be metastable. However, even if there were some feelings of triumph, the ambience at the LHC Nobel Symposium was more one of

  4. Nobels Nobels laureates photographed by Peter Badge

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    A unique photographic record of all living Nobel laureates. In this handsome coffee-table book, photographer Peter Badge captures the likeness of every living Nobel laureate in a lasting black-and-white image -- more than 300 striking portraits in all. Brief biographical sketches accompanying the large-scale photographs pay homage to each laureate's singular contribution to science, literature or world peace. Bringing readers face-to-face with Nelson Mandela, Jimmy Carter, the Dalai Lama, James Watson, Gabriel García Márquez, Toni Morrison, Rita Levi-Montalcini, Linda Buck, and Paul Samuelson among many others, NOBELS offers an intimate and compelling look at well-known honorees as well as lesser-known recipients. A fascinating word/image tableau.

  5. Nursing--a new tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, D N

    1989-01-01

    This year's recipient of the prestigious Christiane Reimann Award, the "Nobel Prize of Nursing", was Dame Nita Barrow, Ambassador to the UN from Barbados, who was recognized for her distinguished accomplishments in nursing and health care over decades and continents. She was also the keynote speaker at ICN's 19th Quadrennial Congress in Seoul, Korea, 28 May-2 June 1989, described by Korean Prime Minister Kang Young Hoon in his address at the opening ceremonies as the "festival of peace and friendship for nurses the world over". Below, her keynote address.

  6. Nobel laureate in literature visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2015-01-01

    Gao Xingjian, winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2000, was invited to visit CERN as part of European Researchers’ Night. During his visit to the Laboratory, he took time out to give us a dose of his optimism.   Gao Xingjian in IdeaSquare's bus during his visit to CERN.   “The idea of bringing scientists and artists together is wonderful!” An enthusiastic first-time visitor to the Laboratory, Gao Xingjian regaled his audience with his thoughts on human reality at the conference 'Made of Shadow and Light', in which he took part on 24 September, alongside Sergio Bertolucci, CERN’s Director for Research and Computing. Interested in science since his childhood (his marks in physics and maths at school were excellent, he explains with a smile), he draws an interesting parallel between human consciousness and dark matter: “The concept of dark matter makes complete sense to me,”&nbs...

  7. 100 años de la física y la química españolas Varios Nobel piden, en el congreso conmemorativo, mayor protagonismo social para la ciencia

    CERN Multimedia

    Salomone, Monica

    2003-01-01

    The royal companies which were born together and are separated after, celebrate this year their centenary. In the commemorative congress, celebrated this week in Madrid, six Nobel Prize and a great number of scientists who debated the perspective of science in XXIth Century

  8. Sex, divoce and “machismo”: about Gary Becker, nobel prize of economy 1992

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández-Baca, Jorge

    1992-01-01

    Gary Becker ha dedicado su vida a extender el campo de aplicación de la teoría económica a todas las actividades del ser humano. En su Tratado sobre la Familia, Becker estudia los problemas de la discriminación sexual, la poligamia y la monogamia, la elección de parejas, la demanda de hijos y el divorcio, desde el punto de vista de la inversión en capital humano. Este es posiblemente el trabajo que lo ha llevado a merecer el Premio Nobel de Economía y del cual se ofrece aquí un breve comentar...

  9. The 2008 Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting: Robert Huber, Chemistry 1988. Interview by Klaus J. Korak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Robert

    2008-11-25

    Robert Huber and his colleagues, Johann Deisenhofer and Hartmut Michel, elucidated the three-dimensional structure of the Rhodopseudomonas viridis photosynthetic reaction center. This membrane protein complex is a basic component of photosynthesis - a process fundamental to life on Earth - and for their work, Huber and his colleagues received the 1988 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Because structural information is central to understanding virtually any biological process, Huber likens their discovery to "switching on the light" for scientists trying to understand photosynthesis. Huber marvels at the growth of structural biology since the time he entered the field, when crystallographers worked with hand-made instruments and primitive computers, and only "a handful" of crystallographers would meet annually in the Bavarian Alps. In the "explosion" of structural biology since his early days of research, Huber looks to the rising generation of scientists to solve the remaining mysteries in the field - such as the mechanisms that underlie protein folding. A strong proponent of science mentorship, Huber delights in meeting young researchers at the annual Nobel Laureate Meetings in Lindau, Germany. He hopes that among these young scientists is an "Einstein of biology" who, he says with a twinkle in his eye, "doesn't know it yet." The interview was conducted by JoVE co-founder Klaus J. Korak at the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting 2008 in Lindau, Germany.

  10. Professor Paul Crutzen, the winner of the Nobel prize: The discovery of the ozone hole - knowledge and vision; Nobelpreistraeger Prof. Paul Crutzen: Entdeckung des Ozonlochs - Wissen und Vision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crutzen, P.; Dellert-Ritter, M.

    1997-02-01

    On 10 December 1995, Professor Crutzen was awarded the Nobel prize for his epoch-making achievements in the field of atmospheric chemistry. This award underlines also Professor Crutzen`s commitment to the protection of the atmosphere. The atmospheric researcher discovered how sensitively the ozone layer reacts to air pollution. His work, together with that of others, led to the ban on ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons. As early as in 1970, Professor Crutzen demonstrated that nitrogen oxides react catalytically with ozone. His think tank provided numerous stimuli for further, intense research on atmospheric chemistry, which triggered a debate on the protection of the thinning ozone layer also among politicians. (orig.) [Deutsch] Am 10. Dezember 1995 wurde Prof. Crutzen fuer seine bahnbrechenden Leistungen auf dem Gebiet der Atmosphaerenchemie mit dem Nobelpreis geehrt. Diese Anerkennung unterstreicht auch das Engagement von Prof. Crutzen zum Schutz der Ozonschicht. Der Atmosphaerenforscher Prof. Crutzen entdeckte, wie empfindlich die Ozonschicht auf Luftverunreinigungen reagiert. Seine Arbeiten fuehrten mit zum Verbot der ozonvernichtenden Fluorchlorkohlenwasserstoffe. Bereits 1970 wies Prof. Crutzen nach, dass Stickstoffoxide katalytisch mit Ozon reagieren. Aus der Ideenfabrik von Prof. Crutzen kamen zahlreiche Anregungen fuer weitere intensive Forschungen zur Chemie der Atmosphaere, die auch unter Politikern eine Debatte ueber den Schutz der hauchduennen Ozonschicht ausloeste. (orig.)

  11. In conversation with Nobel Laureate Jack Steinberger

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    Awarded the 1988 Nobel Prize for Physics for his discovery of the muon neutrino, Jack Steinberger has been part of the CERN establishment for almost 50 years. He recently celebrated his 90th birthday and can still be found in his CERN office on an almost daily basis. If you happened to have a coffee with him… this is what he would tell you: his recollections, and thoughts about the present and future of particle physics.   I’ve been at CERN for 45 years, and I’ve seen this organisation go through a lot. Experiments have grown significantly and so have the aspirations of particle physics. When I did my thesis 64 years ago, I could do it alone in just 6 months and I could get worldwide interesting results. Now, experiments at CERN are made up of hundreds, if not thousands of people, working for 20 years to get a result. My thesis advisor was Enrico Fermi, and in 1953 – unless it was 1952, I’d done my thesis a few years before - he was asked to be t...

  12. Alfred Bernhard Nobel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    There are few inventors who could be placed in the same class as. Alfred Nobel. .... Along with the production, the safety concerns were also growing. Nobel continued ... Until World War I most of the world demand for kieselguhr was met by the mines in ... He started expanding the manufacturing activity to other countries by ...

  13. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Admin

    did not get the recognition by way of awards or prizes, least of all the Nobel Prize. ... Nobel Prize evokes aspiration. ... worth of SubbaRow's contributions to the medical world. It is ... It so happened that the next year was his birth centenary.

  14. The life and legacy of Marie Curie.

    OpenAIRE

    Rockwell, Sara

    2003-01-01

    Marie Curie was a remarkable woman whose discoveries broke new ground in physics and chemistry and also opened the door for advances in engineering, biology, and medicine. She broke new ground for women in science: she was, for example, the first woman to receive a doctor of science degree in France, the first woman to win Nobel Prize, the first woman to lecture at the Sorbonne, the first person to win two Nobel Prizes, and the first Nobel Laureate whose child also won a Nobel Prize. Her life...

  15. Nobel prize for the artemisinin and ivermectin discoveries: a great boost towards elimination of the global infectious diseases of poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambo, Ernest; Khater, Emad I M; Chen, Jun-Hu; Bergquist, Robert; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2015-12-28

    The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) made a marked transformation for neglected and vulnerable communities in the developing countries from the start, but infectious diseases of poverty (IDoPs) continue to inflict a disproportionate global public health burden with associated consequences, thereby contributing to the vicious cycle of poverty and inequity. However, the effectiveness and large-scale coverage of artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) have revolutionized malaria treatment just as the control of lymphatic filariasis (LF) and onchocerciasis have benefitted from harnessing the broad-spectrum effect of avermectin-based derivatives. The paradigm shift in therapeutic approach, effected by these two drugs and their impact on community-based interventions of parasitic diseases plaguing the endemic low- and middle-income countries (LIMCs), led to the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2015. However, the story would not be complete without mentioning praziquantel. The huge contribution of this drug in modernizing the control of schistosomiasis and also some intestinal helminth infections had already shifted the focus from control to potential elimination of this disease. Together, these new drugs have provided humankind with powerful new tools for the alleviation of infectious diseases that humans have lived with since time immemorial. These drugs all have broad-spectrum effects, yet they are very safe and can even be packaged together in various combinations. The strong effect on so many of the great infectious scourges in the developing countries has not only had a remarkable influence on many endemic diseases, but also contributed to improving the cost structure of healthcare. Significant benefits include improved quality of preventive and curative medicine, promotion of community-based interventions, universal health coverage and the fostering of global partnerships. The laudable progress and benefits achieved are indispensable in championing

  16. Nobel Prize 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The most prestigious award in physics went this year to Jerome I. Friedman and Henry W. Kendall, both of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and Richard E. Taylor of Stanford 'for their pioneering investigations concerning deep inelastic scattering of electrons on protons and bound neutrons, which have been of essential importance for the development of the quark model in particle physics'

  17. The impossible interview with the man of the hidden biological structures. Interview by Paolo Mazzarello.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golgi, Camillo

    2006-12-01

    This paper presents an "impossible interview" to Professor Camillo Golgi, placed in time in December 1906. The Italian Professor Golgi from Pavia has been awarded the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine ex aequo with the Spanish anatomist Santiago Ramón y Cajal. Both scientists have obtained the award for their work on the anatomy of the nervous system. However, they have opposite views on the mechanisms underlying nervous functions. Golgi believes that the axons stained by his "black reaction" form a continuous anatomical or functional network along which nervous impulses propagate. Ramón y Cajal is the paladin of the neuron theory, a hypothesis questioned by Golgi in his Nobel lecture of Tuesday, December 11. After the ceremony, an independent journalist has interviewed Professor Golgi in the Grand Hotel in Stockholm. Excerpts about his education, his main scientific discoveries, and his personal life are here given (reconstructing the "impossible interview" on the basis of Golgi's original writings).

  18. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    user

    2007 Chemistry Nobel Prize (6) 548 (GA). 2007 Physics Nobel Prize .... Integrated open-ended experiments (1) 54 (GA) ... On the tendency of varieties to depart .... The Scientific Enterprise: Attitudes and ... Undergraduate teaching (3) 272 (CR).

  19. William Henry Bragg, man and scientist, Nobel Laureate and First Professor of Physics, University of Adelaide 1886-1909.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, John; George, Robert

    2018-03-01

    In London, November 1915, a telegram was received at the home of William Henry Bragg from the secretary of the Academy of Science in Stockholm announcing the award of the Nobel Prize in Physics for "the analysis of crystal structures by means of X-rays". A second similar telegram was addressed to his 25 year old son William Lawrence Bragg (Jenkin, 2008). This article commemorates the centenary of that event and the unveiling of a bust of Sir William Bragg alongside that of his son, Sir Lawrence Bragg, on North Terrace in Adelaide where he spent 23 years of his early career. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    world has seen tremendous advances in wireless transmission ... ence won him the Nobel Prize in Physics for the year] 909. He shared the Nobel Prize with Karl. Ferdinand ... George C Verghese in Resonance (Vol.3, No.2) mentions the fact ...

  1. Prize Draw

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

      Prize draw Go Sport vouchers 393 members of the Staff Association participated in our free prize draw in July where they could win one of the thirty Go Sport vouchers of 50 euros. The thirty winners have been contacted and can come and collect their voucher from the Staff Association Secretariat.

  2. From the CERN web: New Year ceremony, new LHC Programme Coordinator, scientific prize and more

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    This section highlights articles, blog posts and press releases published in the CERN web environment over the past weeks. This way, you won’t miss a thing...     CERN DG meets locals and internationals in New Year ceremony 15 January – by James Gillies  In one of her first official duties as CERN Director General, Fabiola Gianotti met representatives of CERN’s local communities and international Geneva in Microcosm on Thursday evening to wish them a Happy New Year 2016, and to express thanks for their support. Photo (left to right): Charlotte Lindberg Warakaulle, Director for International Relations, Martin Steinacher, Director for Finance and Human Resources, Fabiola Gianotti, CERN Director-General, Eckhard Elsen, Director for Research and Computing and Frédérick Bordry, Director for Accelerators and Technology. Continue to read…    Jamie Bo...

  3. Century of Nobel Prizes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    professor of physical chemistry atthe ... tune time to consolidate the foundations of physical chemistry. (called as .... and freezing point depression for a variety of substances. He .... The health of Svante Arrhenius deteriorated slowly after the.

  4. Century of Nobel Prizes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Utrecht, he spent some time at Ecole de Medicine, Paris with. Professor Adolphe ... gestion of the three-dimensional nature of organic molecules. These included .... (1) For biographical information on j H van't Hoff, cf, The van't Hoff. Memorial ...

  5. Message in a medal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mjoel, D.O.

    2006-01-01

    Professor Ole Danbolt Mjoes is Chairman of the Nobel Peace Prize Committee and Professor of Medicine at the University of Tromsoe. He headed the five-member Norwegian committee that deliberated over the choice of 2005's Nobel Peace Prize winner. Professor Mjoes spoke with the IAEA Bulletin to give us a rare glimpse into the decision making process that goes on behind closed doors. In addition to the selection process for peace prize he explained why the IAEA is selected for this prestigious prize and how it would help in its future endeavors

  6. [The man on the portrait].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstrand, A

    1996-01-01

    Marie Curie was awarded the Nobel Prize in chemistry 1911. During the preceding year a rumour had circulated in Stockholm that she had had an affaire with one of her assistants. She received a letter, in which she was told that there had been strong opposition to her election not on scientific but moral grounds, and that she should not go to Stockholm, because nobody could forsee what reactions her appearance at the prize ceremony could evoke. Emil Kleen, a man of violent temper and radical opinions, reacted strongly to these rumours. He wrote a paper, with a violent attack on Gustaf Retzius, previous professor of Histology at Karolinska Institutet. Rightly or wrongly he suspected him to be the author of the infamous letter. Retzius is described as a dilletant in scientific matters, as a "sexual hyena" and a garroulus old man. This portrait of Retzius is of course most unfair, but the portrait of Emil Kleen by the famous swedish artist Bruno Liljefors is a masterpiece and one of the most valuable of the Swedish Medical Association.

  7. Alfred nobel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmin, L R

    1996-10-01

    Alfred Nobel never spoke publicly about his problems of ill health, but a detailed, subjective record has recently been published in the form of 216 letters written to his mistress during an 18-year period. His descriptions of constant pain, debilitating migraine, and "paralyzing" fatigue permit a hypothesis that he might have had a long struggle with fibromyalgia. This does not preclude his having suffered other illnesses as well. He thought he had heart disease, which his physicians denied until his final years, when he was diagnosed with angina pectoris. He died of a cerebral hemorrhage in 1896 at the age of 63. His letters describe a 30-year search for diagnosis from the best physicians in Europe. He was ridiculed by many people as a hypochondriac, and he never received a diagnosis for "the pain that will not go away." This may well have contributed to the bitterness and depression of his final years. Increasing worldwide interest and research in this elusive syndrome will hopefully prevent a repetition of the Nobel story of a century ago.

  8. Changes in spirituality among ayahuasca ceremony novice participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trichter, Stephen; Klimo, Jon; Krippner, Stanley

    2009-06-01

    Ayahuasca, a hallucinogenic plant brew from the Amazon basin used as part of healing ceremonies by the local indigenous people of the region for centuries, is now being consumed by growing numbers of people throughout the world. Anecdotal evidence and previous research suggest that there are spiritual effects experienced among participants who take part in ayahuasca ceremonies. The current study examined whether novice participants' spirituality was affected through participation in an ayahuasca ceremony, and if so, how. A mixed-design method was used, comparing those participating in an ayahuasca ceremony to those who did not participate. This investigation used the Peak Experience Profile, the Spiritual Well-being Scale, and the Mysticism Scale as quantitative measures. Participant interviews and written accounts of ceremony experiences were analyzed. Results showed that neither the SWB score nor the M-Scale score increased significantly after participating in an ayahuasca ceremony. However, it was found that the higher the PEP score, the greater the positive change in SWB and M-Scale scores. Qualitative data revealed common spiritual themes in many of the participants' interviews and written accounts. Experiential differences were displayed within the ayahuasca ceremony group, warranting continued investigation into, and identification of, various confounding variables that prompt reported changes in spirituality within some participants while not in others.

  9. The Discovery of Anti-Matter The Autobiography of Carl David Anderson, the Youngest Man to Win the Nobel Prize

    CERN Document Server

    1999-01-01

    In 1936, at age 31, Carl David Anderson became the second youngest Nobel laureate for his discovery of antimatter when he observed positrons in a cloud chamber.He is responsible for developing rocket power weapons that were used in World War II.He was born in New York City in 1905 and was educated in Los Angeles. He served for many years as a physics professor at California Institute of Technology. Prior to Oppenheimer, Anderson was offered the job of heading the Los Alamos atomic bomb program but could not assume the role because of family obligations.He was a pioneer in studying cosmic rays

  10. 23 years of the discovery of Helicobacter pylori: Is the debate over?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Niyaz

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Gram negative curved bacillus H. pylori has become the prize bug of all times. Barry Marshall and Robin Warren the two discoverers of this organism have been awarded with this year's Nobel Prize. The Nobel committee at the Karolinska Institute of Sweden has selected this paradigm shift discovery of 1982 as the most impacting in medical sciences. This award has surprised many as the Nobel assembly has selected this 'Robert Koch styled medical detective work' for the prize as compared to many outstanding basic research stories on the waitlist. This editorial briefly touches the significant impact of H. pylori on gastroduodenal management and the path forward as the bug has become quite controversial in recent times.

  11. Three high-school students from Fairfield College in Hamilton, New Zealand, visited CERN on 6 June after winning first prize in a scientific-film competition promoted by the Royal Society of New Zealand for World Year of Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    The reward for their documentary on physicist and winner of the Nobel Prize for Medicine, Maurice Wilkins, was a trip to Italy and Switzerland, including a stop at CERN. After breakfast with the director-general, Robert Aymar, the students were shown around the antiproton decelerator and the CMS experiment, accompanied by one of their teachers and a science journalist. Pictures 01, 04, 05, 09 : with their teacher Noema Watene

  12. IAEA Nobel Prize money fights cancer crisis in Latin America; Los fondos provenientes del Premio Nobel otorgado al OIEA se destinan a combatir el cancer en America Latina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-04-18

    Full text: More than 60 of the world's leading cancer experts are being brought together in Buenos Aires, 23-27 April 2007, by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to assess Latin America's growing cancerden. Poor medical facilities and lack of trained personnel and funding are limiting countries' ability to expand cancer care services and treat patients, while cancer rates are expected to double by 2020. More than 70 per cent of all cancer deaths occur in low and middle income countries and globally cancer kills more people than AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis combined. Through its Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy (PACT) the IAEA is using funds, awarded for the 2005 Nobel Peace Prize, to sponsor training workshops, such as the Buenos Aires event, that alert policy makers and health experts to the pressing need for national cancer control plans and programmes. 'I hope that this event in Latin America is the first of many that will enable us to work together to help combat this dreadful disease and provide quality of life to our fellow human beings,' said Director General of the IAEA, Dr. Mohamed ElBaradei. 'Cancer is a disease that is spreading very fast in the developing world and we have come to realise that we have to do much more to combat it in this part of the world.' In Latin America, there are an estimated 450,000 cancer deaths annually. The most commonly occurring cancers in men are prostate, stomach, lung, and colorectal and in women the most commonly occurring cancers are breast, cervix, stomach and colorectal. Breast and cervical cancer can be prevented through screening and early detection and can be cured in the early stages with effective treatment. The World Health Organization (WHO) warns that cancer will soon reach epidemic proportions, causing up to 10 million deaths a year by 2020. Yet at least one third of all cancers are preventable. A further one third of cases can be effectively treated if detected early. PACT was established

  13. 2016 Lush Science Prize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Jenny; McCann, Terry

    2017-11-01

    The Lush Prize supports animal-free testing by awarding monetary prizes totalling £250,000 to the most effective projects and individuals who have been working toward the goal of replacing animals in product or ingredient safety testing. Prizes are awarded for developments in five strategic areas: Science; Lobbying; Training; Public Awareness; and Young Researchers. In the event of a major breakthrough leading to the replacement of animal tests in the area of 21st Century Toxicology, a Black Box Prize (equivalent to the entire annual fund of £250,000) is awarded. The Science Prize is awarded to the researchers whose work the judging panel believe has made the most significant contribution to the replacement of animal testing in the preceding year. This Background Paper outlines the research projects that were shortlisted and presented to the judging panel as potential candidates for the 2016 Lush Science Prize. This process involved reviewing recent work of the relevant scientific institutions and projects in this area, such as the OECD, CAAT, The Hamner Institutes, ECVAM, UK NC3Rs, and the US Tox21 Programme. Recent developments in toxicity testing research were also identified by searching for relevant published papers in the literature, and analysing abstracts from conferences focusing on animal replacement in toxicity testing that had been held in the preceding 12 months - for example the EUSAAT-Linz, Society of Toxicology, and SEURAT-1 conferences. 2017 FRAME.

  14. Patents, Inducement Prizes, and Contestant Strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Jerome; Davis, Lee N.

    2006-01-01

    Debate over the merits of patents versus inducement prizes has tended to ignore the signaling roles of patents, and totally ignores the impact of patent signaling on prize contests. This paper asks: How does patent signaling affect the strategic choices of firms considering entering prize contests......? First, we consider contests that do not allow patenting, then contests that do. If patenting is not allowed, we argue, patent-holders, both internal and external to the contest, can adversely impact prize contests by claiming prize winner violation of their patents, and suing for damages. The likelihood...... of such challenges being made can deter entry, particularly in contests requiring large sunk costs. Furthermore, the firm's decisionmaking process will discriminate against entering prize contests and favor R&D projects with patentable outcomes. Together, these problems may circumscribe any future wider role...

  15. EPS Young Physicist Prize - CORRECTION

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    The original text for the article 'Prizes aplenty in Krakow' in Bulletin 30-31 assigned the award of the EPS HEPP Young Physicist Prize to Maurizio Pierini. In fact he shared the prize with Niki Saoulidou of Fermilab, who was rewarded for her contribution to neutrino physics, as the article now correctly indicates. We apologise for not having named Niki Saoulidou in the original article.

  16. Awarding a Prize

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeran, Brian

    2013-01-01

    This article describes and analyses the selection and prize awarding processes for a biennial ceramics exhibition in Japan. Based on long-term fieldwork in the “art world” (Becker 1982) of contemporary Japanese ceramics, as well as on participant observation of the processes concerned, the article...... addresses and draws upon two sets of sociological writings: one concerned with prizes and awards; the other with evaluative practices....

  17. 28 CFR 551.16 - Marriage ceremony in the institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Marriage ceremony in the institution. 551... MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Marriages of Inmates § 551.16 Marriage ceremony in the institution. (a) The Warden may approve the use of institution facilities for an inmate's marriage ceremony. If a marriage...

  18. Ceremony celebrates 50 years of rocket launches

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Ceremony celebrates 50 years of rocket launches PL00C-10364.12 At the 50th anniversary ceremony celebrating the first rocket launch from pad 3 on what is now Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Norris Gray waves to the audience. Gray was part of the team who successfully launched the first rocket, known as Bumper 8. The ceremony was hosted by the Air Force Space & Missile Museum Foundation, Inc. , and included launch of a Bumper 8 model rocket, presentation of a Bumper Award to Florida Sen. George Kirkpatrick by the National Space Club; plus remarks by Sen. Kirkpatrick, KSC's Center Director Roy Bridges, and the Commander of the 45th Space Wing, Brig. Gen. Donald Pettit. Also attending the ceremony were other members of the original Bumper 8 team. A reception followed at Hangar C. Since 1950 there have been a total of 3,245 launches from Cape Canaveral.

  19. 20 CFR 222.12 - Ceremonial marriage relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ceremonial marriage relationship. 222.12 Section 222.12 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS Relationship as Wife, Husband, or Widow(er) § 222.12 Ceremonial marriage...

  20. Interview with Abel Prize Recipient Lennart Carleson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Lennart Carleson was the recipient of the 2006 Abel Prize. On May 22, 2006, prior to the Abel Prize celebration in Oslo, Carleson was interviewed. The interview was later shown on Norwegian television.......Lennart Carleson was the recipient of the 2006 Abel Prize. On May 22, 2006, prior to the Abel Prize celebration in Oslo, Carleson was interviewed. The interview was later shown on Norwegian television....

  1. Nobel Prize for Physics - 2003 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    namely the free energy2 is written as a function of the order parameter. This kind of ..... We can think of these as two vector quantities. Leggett showed that if ... As an amatuer artist, I also collected their photographs, from. whicQ I would make ...

  2. Interview with John Milnor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2012-01-01

    This interview was given by Professor John Milnor in connection to the Abel Prize 2011 ceremony. Originally the interview appeared in the September issue of the Newsletter of the European Mathematical Society......This interview was given by Professor John Milnor in connection to the Abel Prize 2011 ceremony. Originally the interview appeared in the September issue of the Newsletter of the European Mathematical Society...

  3. Safety Day Prize Competition: results and answers

    CERN Multimedia

    HSE Unit

    2014-01-01

    The three winners of the Safety Day Prize Competition are...   • 1st Prize: Fernando LEITE PEREIRA – smoke detector • 2nd Prize: Thomas DE BORTOLI – water filter jug • 3rd Prize: Matti KALLIOKOSKI – safety goggles Please see the image below for the answers to the questionnaire. If you have any questions regarding the Safety Day, please contact: safety.communication@cern.ch. And again, thank you to all the participants!

  4. DVD Review: "Kuomboka Ceremony" Directed by Maurice Malawo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Distributor: Zambia National Broadcasting Corporation. . ZAR 87.00. Nc'wala Traditional Ceremony (2010). Directed by Moffat Ndhlovu. Producer: Ben Kangwa. Distributor: Zambia National Broadcasting Corporation. . ZAR 87.00. Lwindi Gonde Traditional Ceremony (2010). Directed by Chrispin Nchobeyi. Producer: Ben ...

  5. 20 CFR 404.725 - Evidence of a valid ceremonial marriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Evidence of a valid ceremonial marriage. 404... DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Evidence Evidence of Age, Marriage, and Death § 404.725 Evidence of a valid ceremonial marriage. (a) General. A valid ceremonial marriage is one that follows procedures set by law in...

  6. The Alfred Nobel rocket camera. An early aerial photography attempt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingemar Skoog, A.

    2010-02-01

    Alfred Nobel (1833-1896), mainly known for his invention of dynamite and the creation of the Nobel Prices, was an engineer and inventor active in many fields of science and engineering, e.g. chemistry, medicine, mechanics, metallurgy, optics, armoury and rocketry. Amongst his inventions in rocketry was the smokeless solid propellant ballistite (i.e. cordite) patented for the first time in 1887. As a very wealthy person he actively supported many Swedish inventors in their work. One of them was W.T. Unge, who was devoted to the development of rockets and their applications. Nobel and Unge had several rocket patents together and also jointly worked on various rocket applications. In mid-1896 Nobel applied for patents in England and France for "An Improved Mode of Obtaining Photographic Maps and Earth or Ground Measurements" using a photographic camera carried by a "…balloon, rocket or missile…". During the remaining of 1896 the mechanical design of the camera mechanism was pursued and cameras manufactured. In April 1897 (after the death of Alfred Nobel) the first aerial photos were taken by these cameras. These photos might be the first documented aerial photos taken by a rocket borne camera. Cameras and photos from 1897 have been preserved. Nobel did not only develop the rocket borne camera but also proposed methods on how to use the photographs taken for ground measurements and preparing maps.

  7. Full implementation of rank-dependent prizes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midjord, Rune

    2013-01-01

    A manager/mechanism designer must allocate a set of money prizes ($1,$2,…,$n) between n agents working in a team. The agents know the state, i.e., who contributed most, second most, etc. The agents’ preferences over prizes are state independent. We incorporate the possibility that the manager knows...... the state with a tiny probability and present a simple mechanism that uniquely awards prizes that respect the true state....

  8. Haagen-Smit Prize 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Hanwant

    2017-03-01

    The Executive Editors and the Publisher of Atmospheric Environment take great pleasure in announcing the 2016 "Haagen-Smit Prize", designed to recognize outstanding papers published in Atmospheric Environment. The Prize is named in honor of Prof. Arie Jan Haagen-Smit, a pioneer in the field of air pollution and one of the first editors of the International Journal of Air Pollution, a predecessor to Atmospheric Environment.

  9. Haagen-Smit Prize 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The Executive Editors and the Publisher of Atmospheric Environment take great pleasure in announcing the 2015 ''Haagen-Smit Prize;, designed to recognize outstanding papers published in Atmospheric Environment. The Prize is named in honor of Prof. Arie Jan Haagen-Smit, a pioneer in the field of air pollution and one of the first editors of the International Journal of Air Pollution, a predecessor to Atmospheric Environment.

  10. Haagen-Smit Prize 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    The Executive Editors and the Publisher of Atmospheric Environment take great pleasure in announcing the 2014 ''Haagen-Smit Prize", designed to recognize outstanding papers published in Atmospheric Environment. The Prize is named in honor of Prof. Arie Jan Haagen-Smit, a pioneer in the field of air pollution and one of the first editors of the International Journal of Air Pollution, a predecessor to Atmospheric Environment.

  11. Discovery of the Higgs boson and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godbole, Rohini

    2014-01-01

    This talk is about the Higgs mechanism, the theoretical discovery of which, was awarded the 2013 Nobel Prize. It also discusses the discovery of the Higgs boson at the large hadron collider which provided the experimental proof that made the Nobel prize possible. It covers the implications of these for the quest of unravelling the fundamental laws of nature which seem to govern both, the behavior of the ultra small (subatomic particles) and the ultra large (the cosmos)

  12. Interactive Health Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Q R S T U V W XYZ A Anatomy Body Parts (National Museum of American History) B ... for Disease Control and Prevention) Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine (Nobel Foundation) Sleep for Kids: Games ...

  13. Akzo Nobel Science Award: Svensk upptaeckt botar framtidens cancer

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    'Akzo Nobel Science Award: Svensk upptaeckt botar framtidens cancerStockholm, 27 februari, 2003. Aarets Akzo Nobel Science Award Sweden paa 500 000 kronor gaar till professorn i medicinsk straalningsfysik Anders Brahme. Han prisas foer "sin unika forskargaerning inom straalbehandlingsysiken samt kombinationen av grundforskning, tillaempad forskning och interaktion med industrin"' (1 page).

  14. The Sweat Lodge Ceremony in Challenge/Adventure Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, William J.; Smith, Thomas E.

    This paper advocates the potentials of "sweat lodge" rituals for adventure education programs. Historically, rituals and ceremonies have been instrumental in passing major philosophical and sociological paradigms from one generation to the next. However, there is little theory and research about how ritual and ceremony results in the…

  15. Definitional Ceremonies: Integrating Community into Multicultural Counseling Sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitter, James Robert; Robertson, Patricia E.; Roig, Grace; Disqueact, J. Graham

    2004-01-01

    Definitional Ceremonies are used as a forum for integrating members of diverse cultures into multicultural counseling sessions. The authors provide a philosophical foundation, implementation process, and excerpts from a typescript of a recent definitional ceremony involving a women and her mother, both recently in the United States from Panama.

  16. Honoring our donors: a survey of memorial ceremonies in United States anatomy programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Trahern W; Lachman, Nirusha; Pawlina, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Many anatomy programs that incorporate dissection of donated human bodies hold memorial ceremonies of gratitude towards body donors. The content of these ceremonies may include learners' reflections on mortality, respect, altruism, and personal growth told through various humanities modalities. The task of planning is usually student- and faculty-led with participation from other health care students. Objective information on current memorial ceremonies for body donors in anatomy programs in the United States appears to be lacking. The number of programs in the United States that currently plan these memorial ceremonies and information on trends in programs undertaking such ceremonies remain unknown. Gross anatomy program directors throughout the United States were contacted and asked to respond to a voluntary questionnaire on memorial ceremonies held at their institution. The results (response rate 68.2%) indicated that a majority of human anatomy programs (95.5%) hold memorial ceremonies. These ceremonies are, for the most part, student-driven and nondenominational or secular in nature. Participants heavily rely upon speech, music, poetry, and written essays, with a small inclusion of other humanities modalities, such as dance or visual art, to explore a variety of themes during these ceremonies. © 2013 American Association of Anatomists.

  17. Awards and Honours

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Graphene collects the Nobel prize   Nobel Prize winners Andre Geim (left) and Konstantin Novoselov (right). © Sergeom, Wikimedia Commons, and University of Manchester, UK. The Nobel Prize in Physics for 2010 has been awarded to Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov, both from the University of Manchester, for their “groundbreaking experiments regarding the two-dimensional material graphene”. Graphene has exceptional properties that have made it a micro-laboratory for quantum physics. Not only is graphene the thinnest material ever made, it is also the strongest, as well as being an excellent conductor and almost completely transparent. At a time when many researchers believed that it was impossible for such thin materials to be stable, Geim and Novoselov extracted graphene from a piece of graphite using only normal adhesive tape. Novoselov, 36, first worked with Andre Geim, 51, as a PhD student in the Netherlands. He subsequentl...

  18. CERN honours Carlo Rubbia

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    Carlo Rubbia turned 75 on March 31, and CERN held a symposium to mark his birthday and pay tribute to his impressive contribution to both CERN and science. Carlo Rubbia, 4th from right, together with the speakers at the symposium.On 7 April CERN hosted a celebration marking Carlo Rubbia’s 75th birthday and 25 years since he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics. "Today we will celebrate 100 years of Carlo Rubbia" joked CERN’s Director-General, Rolf Heuer in his opening speech, "75 years of his age and 25 years of the Nobel Prize." Rubbia received the Nobel Prize along with Simon van der Meer for contributions to the discovery of the W and Z bosons, carriers of the weak interaction. During the symposium, which was held in the Main Auditorium, several eminent speakers gave lectures on areas of science to which Carlo Rubbia made decisive contributions. Among those who spoke were Michel Spiro, Director of the French National Insti...

  19. Prizes for innovation of new medicines and vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, James; Hubbard, Tim

    2009-01-01

    This article argues that prizes can help stimulate medical innovation, control costs and ensure greater access to new medicines and vaccines. The authors explore four increasingly ambitious prize options to reward medical innovation, each addressing flaws in the current patent system. The first option promotes innovation through a large prize fund linked to the impact on health outcomes; the second option rewards the sharing of knowledge, data, and technology with open source dividends; the third option awards prizes for interim benchmarks and discrete technical problems; and the final option removes the exclusive right to use patented inventions in upstream research in favor of prizes. The authors conclude that a system of prizes to reward drug development would break the link between R&D incentives and product prices, and that such a reform is needed to improve innovation and access to new medicines and vaccines.

  20. Artemisinin, a miracle of traditional Chinese medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ling Yi; Tan, Ren Xiang

    2015-12-19

    The 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, shared by Professor Youyou Tu, focused worldwide attention on artemisinin, a natural product antimalarial drug inspired by traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). This is the first Nobel Prize in natural sciences presented to a Chinese scientist for her impactful research work in China in collaboration with other Chinese scientists. We are delighted to provide the background and implications of the discovery of artemisinin, along with our personal viewpoints toward the affordability of modern medicines from natural products.

  1. Nobel for a Minus Sign

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Nobel Academy's announcement concludes with the ... elementary particles, the latter being known as force ...... Gross, born in 1941, received his undergraduate education in physics at the Hebrew University, ... Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, and finally to the Masschussetts Institute of Technology in 2000.

  2. Isomo Loruko: The Yoruba Naming Ceremony. Middle Level Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafi, Patricia; Singer, Alan

    1998-01-01

    Presents the Yoruba Naming Ceremony as an activity for a global-studies class that provides an introduction to Nigerian culture. Explains that the ceremony is the time that the family and community welcomes a new child. Gives a list of Yoruba names and discussion questions for classroom use. (CMK)

  3. ACFA and IPAC announce accelerator prizes

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Steve Myers, CERN's Director for Accelerators and Technology. The Asian Committee for Future Accelerators (ACFA) has joined forces with the first International Particle Accelerator Conference, IPAC’10, to award prizes for outstanding work in the field of accelerators. The conference replaces the regional conferences of the Americas, Europe and Asia and will be hosted by the three regions on a rotational basis (see CERN Courier). The ACFA/IPAC’10 Prizes Selection Committee, chaired by Won Namkung of Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, decided on the prizes and the names of the winners at a meeting on 20 January. The awards will be made during IPAC’10, which will be held in Kyoto on 23-28 May. Jie Wei. (Courtesy Tsinghua University.) Steve Myers, Director for Accelerators and Technology at CERN, receives an Achievement Prize for Outstanding Work in the Accelerator Field with no Age Limit “for his numerous outstanding contributions to the design, construction, commissio...

  4. A brief history of macromolecular crystallography, illustrated by a family tree and its Nobel fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaskolski, Mariusz; Dauter, Zbigniew; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2014-09-01

    As a contribution to the celebration of the year 2014, declared by the United Nations to be 'The International Year of Crystallography', the FEBS Journal is dedicating this issue to papers showcasing the intimate union between macromolecular crystallography and structural biology, both in historical perspective and in current research. Instead of a formal editorial piece, by way of introduction, this review discusses the most important, often iconic, achievements of crystallographers that led to major advances in our understanding of the structure and function of biological macromolecules. We identified at least 42 scientists who received Nobel Prizes in Physics, Chemistry or Medicine for their contributions that included the use of X-rays or neutrons and crystallography, including 24 who made seminal discoveries in macromolecular sciences. Our spotlight is mostly, but not only, on the recipients of this most prestigious scientific honor, presented in approximately chronological order. As a summary of the review, we attempt to construct a genealogy tree of the principal lineages of protein crystallography, leading from the founding members to the present generation. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  5. Telomerer og telomerase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Laila; Kølvraa, Steen

    2010-01-01

    In 2009 the Nobel Prize in Medicine was awarded to EH Blackburn, CW Greider and JW Szostak for their work on "How chromosomes are protected by telomeres and the enzyme telomerase". Telomeres are specialized DNA structures localized at the end of linear chromosomes. Telomeres are known as the biol......In 2009 the Nobel Prize in Medicine was awarded to EH Blackburn, CW Greider and JW Szostak for their work on "How chromosomes are protected by telomeres and the enzyme telomerase". Telomeres are specialized DNA structures localized at the end of linear chromosomes. Telomeres are known...

  6. Adventures in theoretical physics selected papers with commentaries

    CERN Document Server

    Adler, Stephen L

    2006-01-01

    Podcast of Frank Wilczek and Betsy Devine's interview with Steve Mirsky of Scientific American The fantastic reality that is modern physics is open for your exploration, guided by one of its primary architects and interpreters, Nobel Prize winner Frank Wilczek.Some jokes, some poems, and extracts from wife Betsy Devine's sparkling chronicle of what it's like to live through a Nobel Prize provide easy entertainment. There's also some history, some philosophy, some exposition of frontier science, and some frontier science, for your lasting edification.49 pieces, including many from Wilczek's awa

  7. Prince of Asturias awards: a cultural programme open to all

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2013-01-01

    On Thursday 24 October, CERN’s Director for Research and Computing Sergio Bertolucci joined Nobel Laureates Peter Higgs and François Englert in meeting with hundreds of students at Oviedo University. A series of exhibitions and events is being organised for the Spanish public through the cultural programme set up by the Prince of Asturias Foundation in the framework of the Prince of Asturias Awards Ceremony.   (From left to right) François Englert, Peter Higgs, Sergio Bertolucci and Rolf Heuer celebrate their prize with students at Oviedo University. The programme for the Awards Week designed by the Prince of Asturias Foundation includes about 20 different cultural activities, including talks, exhibitions, film screening, working meetings and public events held in the capital of Asturias, Oviedo. This year, since CERN is among the laureates of the prestigious award bestowed by the Foundation, the cultural events also featured members of the CERN Dire...

  8. Georges Charpak street sign unveiled

    CERN Multimedia

    Paola Catapano

    2011-01-01

    While it might not be the only French street named in honour of the late Georges Charpak, who passed away in September 2010 at the age of 87, the street chosen by the mayor of Saint-Genis-Pouilly is certainly the only one located directly opposite the CERN "campus". The road overlooks buildings on the CERN Meyrin site, where Georges Charpak spent most of his career as a physicist, conducting the research that won him the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1992.   From left to right: Sigurd Lettow, Dominique Charpak and the mayor of Saint-Genis-Pouilly. The unveiling took place on 17 October and was organised by the mayor of Saint-Genis-Pouilly. George Charpak’s wife, Dominique, and Sigurd Lettow, CERN Director of Administration and General Infrastructure, attended what was an intimate and touching ceremony. The mayor’s speech at the event praised Georges’ commitment to scientific education. The highlight of the event, however, was a witty and humorous ...

  9. iii r r i

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    RESEARCH I NEWS. The 1998 Physics Nobel. Prize. Electrons Behave as if Split into. Three! ... go over some background, starting with the work ofE Hall in ... now exploited all over the world to maintain ... In the same year, the Physics prize ...

  10. Broad Prize: Do the Successes Spread?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    When the Broad Prize for Urban Education was created in 2002, billionaire philanthropist Eli Broad said he hoped the awards, in addition to rewarding high-performing school districts, would foster healthy competition; boost the prestige of urban education, long viewed as dysfunctional; and showcase best practices. Over the 10 years the prize has…

  11. Student inventors to challenge Nobel prize

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yeon Jung

    1997-07-15

    The book introduces the inventions invented by students which are a telephone box which is on automatically, light instead of sound, oil bottle using a milk carton, good bye cockroach, syringe toothpaste, globe using balloons, a grove with magnet, bicycle for two people, a mat with magic tapes, a glass stick which doesn't roll, a eraser both drawing and writing, a color pencil with a square cap, swivel which doesn't tangle, a beaker marked volume, convenient trash can and waterproofing toilet paper holder.

  12. Georges Charpak, Nobel Physics Prize 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Wednesday 14 October looked like being a day like any other for detector specialist Georges Charpak. Except he had an unwelcome appointment with the dentist early that afternoon. Late that morning he was able to telephone to cancel the appointment. 'I have a small problem...', he explained. The problem was the announcement that Georges Charpak receives 1992's most prestigious award for physics

  13. Georges Charpak, Nobel Physics Prize 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1992-12-15

    Wednesday 14 October looked like being a day like any other for detector specialist Georges Charpak. Except he had an unwelcome appointment with the dentist early that afternoon. Late that morning he was able to telephone to cancel the appointment. 'I have a small problem...', he explained. The problem was the announcement that Georges Charpak receives 1992's most prestigious award for physics.

  14. Student inventors to challenge Nobel prize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yeon Jung

    1997-07-01

    The book introduces the inventions invented by students which are a telephone box which is on automatically, light instead of sound, oil bottle using a milk carton, good bye cockroach, syringe toothpaste, globe using balloons, a grove with magnet, bicycle for two people, a mat with magic tapes, a glass stick which doesn't roll, a eraser both drawing and writing, a color pencil with a square cap, swivel which doesn't tangle, a beaker marked volume, convenient trash can and waterproofing toilet paper holder.

  15. 2016 Nobel Prize in Chemistry1

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    open-up a new area of chemistry in a paradigm shifting man- ner. .... tives that undergo facile reactions, in the presence of metal-ion chelation with ... shuttle moves from one station to .... ATP hydrolysis and the rotor action of the enzyme. In the ...

  16. The 2012 Nobel Prize in Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    haps the most defining characteristic of that world is that it is discrete ... The discreteness of the microscopic world was first introduced to science by Planck in 1900 with his .... worldwide (including mine) are doing experiments on. Ca+ ions for ...

  17. 14 Nobel, preocupados por el CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Rivera, A

    2003-01-01

    "E l presidente del Consejo del CERN (Laboratorio Europeo de Fisica de Particulas, junto a Ginebra), Maurice Bourquin, ha recibido una carta firmada por un grupo de cientificos muy especiales: 14 premios Nobel de Fisica" (1 page).

  18. Discoverers of the Neutrino and Tau Recognised

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The 1995 Nobel Prize in Physics is shared by the American ... This year's Nobel award in Physics is in recognition of two landmark ... world of leptons is given in the table below. The ... They have no charge and have no mass. A nd do not ...

  19. Slovak National Prize for Quality 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steflik, Marian

    2009-01-01

    Competition for the Slovak National Prize for Quality is a milestone in the history of the Mochovce NPP. The Mochovce NPP won the prize in 2004. The article describes in detail the preparatory efforts including not only technological issues but also various administrative challenges. The impacts of this achievement on the plant's subsequent development are also highlighted. (orig.)

  20. Ethnobotany in Traditional Ceremony at Kanagarian Sontang Cubadak Padang Gelugur Subdistrict, Pasaman District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Des, M.; Rizki, R.; Hidayati, H.

    2018-04-01

    Kanagarian Sontang Cubadak has two distinct customary cultures namely Minang and Mandailing customs. Each costum has a sequence of processions performed on the customs of marriage, birth, coronation of community elders, the events of new society, salvation and death. In the implementation of the community using plants in the ceremonial procession of the ceremony. To know the types, meanings and ways of using plants in this traditional ceremony, conduct ethnobotany research on traditional ceremonies of marriage, birth, and death. Research conducted in May - June 2016 in Kanagarian Sontang Cubadak Padang Gelugur Subdistrict, Pasaman District, West Sumatra, Indonesia. Sampling using descriptive survey method, by interviewing village elders and the community. The sample identification was done in the botanical laboratory of Universitas Negeri Padang and STKIP PGRI West Sumatra. The results obtained 30 species from 19 family. In the Minang tribe ceremony found 16 species of 10 family, while in the Mandailing tribe 26 species of 18 family. Utilization of plants that eventually found in species Oryza sativa L. with a benefit value of 0.56. The meaning of plants in traditional ceremonies, relationships kinship, related social relations, related prayers and related aesthetics. The use of plants in traditional ceremonies is used in a raw state and some are processed before use.

  1. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    prize ('the Nobel Prize of Mathematics'). Meyer's pivotal work on wavelet theory has led to breakthroughs in a wide spectrum of areas. For instance, some applications of wavelet analysis are in – applied and computational harmonic analysis, data compression, noise reduction, medical imaging, archiving, digital cinema, de-.

  2. Stephen Hawking bags big new 3m physics prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Hamish

    2013-01-01

    A massive 3m in prize money has gone to the British cosmologist Stephen Hawking for his work on black holes, quantum gravity and the early universe. The award is one of two "special fundamental physics prizes" from the Fundamental Physics Prize Foundation, which was set up earlier this year by the Russian physicist-turned-entrepreneur Yuri Milner.

  3. Robert Aumann

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Pelle Guldborg

    2007-01-01

    In this interview Nobel Prize Winner Robert Aumann talks about how he was initially drawn into game theory, when he came to think of formalizing the folk-theorem, the proper role of game theory in relation to other disciplines and why behavioral game theory probably won't last long.......In this interview Nobel Prize Winner Robert Aumann talks about how he was initially drawn into game theory, when he came to think of formalizing the folk-theorem, the proper role of game theory in relation to other disciplines and why behavioral game theory probably won't last long....

  4. Venture Leaders Prize for innovative technology projects

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    In co-operation with the GEBERT RÜF FOUNDATION and the Ernest & Young Entrepreneur of the Year Award, venturelab will be presenting the Venture Leaders Prize. The Venture Leaders Prize, which is the new guise of the NETS (New Entrepreneurs in Technology and Science) Prize, will give twenty research entrepreneurs with projects to develop innovative technologies the opportunity to win the chance of participating in a programme to assist them in starting up their companies. The winners will go to spend 10 days in the Boston area (United States) where they will take part in a development programme for their project, which will include an entrepreneurship course, opportunities to meet start-up companies and financing experts, etc. This prize has already spawned many companies such as id Quantique, Selexis or ABMI which have contributed to the economic development of regions, particularly in French-speaking Switzerland. The competition is open to students and scientists from all fields, who would like to s...

  5. Interview with Abel Prize recipient Lennart Carleson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The interview was conducted in Oslo on May 22nd 2006 prior to the Abel prize celebration and was later shown on Norwegian TV.......The interview was conducted in Oslo on May 22nd 2006 prior to the Abel prize celebration and was later shown on Norwegian TV....

  6. Interview with Abel Prize Recipient Lennart Carleson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Lennart Carleson is the recipient of the 2006 Abel Prize of the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters. On May 22, 2006, prior to the Abel Prize celebration i Oslo, Carleson was interviewed by Martin Raussen of Aalborg University and Christian Skau of the Norwegian University of Science...

  7. What we learn from CMB Anisotropies

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    George Smoot shared the 2006 Nobel Prize with John Mathere for the discovery of the fluctuations of the cosmic microwave background. In this talk (which will not be the same as the Nobel lecture), he will discuss what we have learned about the universe in the recent past from these anisotropies.

  8. World Food Day 2015 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    25 mai 2016 ... Our $124-million Canadian International Food Security Research Fund (CIFSRF) with Global Affairs Canada, and $15-million Cultivating Africa's ... Read the latest results ... Four former IDRC researchers have won the prestigious World Food Prize, also known as the “Nobel Prize for Food and Agriculture.”.

  9. Interview with Abel Prize recipient Lennart Carleson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The interview was conducted in Oslo on May 22nd 2006  prior to the Abel prize celebration and was later shown on Norwegian TV.......The interview was conducted in Oslo on May 22nd 2006  prior to the Abel prize celebration and was later shown on Norwegian TV....

  10. Wolf prize in physics

    CERN Document Server

    Piran, Tsvi

    2016-01-01

    The Wolf Foundation began its activities in 1976, with an initial endowment donated by the Wolf family. Within a very short period of time after its initiation, the Wolf prize has become one of the major signs for recognition of scientific achievements and excellence. This volume is devoted to a selection of Wolf Prize laureates in Physics and each has included two respective major publications as well as a commentary written by the laureate describing his scientific career. Readers around the world are provided a unique opportunity to get a glimpse of how scientific processes work in physics, and to comprehend how these laureates have left an indelible imprint on scientific history.

  11. 20 CFR 219.31 - Evidence of a valid ceremonial marriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Evidence of a valid ceremonial marriage. 219... marriage. (a) Preferred evidence. Preferred evidence of a ceremonial marriage is— (1) A copy of the public record of the marriage, certified by the custodian of the record or by a Board employee; (2) A copy of a...

  12. Jyoti Rao

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Jyoti Rao. Articles written in Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Volume 22 Issue 9 September 2017 pp 829-833 General Article. Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2016 · Shekhar C Mande Jyoti Rao · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. The Nobel ...

  13. 77 FR 36272 - SunShot Prize: America's Most Affordable Rooftop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-18

    ...The Department of Energy (DOE) announces in this notice the release of the SunShot Prize: America's Most Affordable Rooftop Solar for public comment. Interested persons are encouraged to learn about the SunShot Prize: America's Most Affordable Rooftop rules at eere.energy.gov/solar/sunshot/prize.html.

  14. NREL Solar Cell Wins Federal Technology Transfer Prize | News | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solar Cell Wins Federal Technology Transfer Prize News Release: NREL Solar Cell Wins Federal Technology Transfer Prize May 7, 2009 A new class of ultra-light, high-efficiency solar cells developed by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory has been awarded a national prize

  15. Recipients of 2013 EPS High Energy & Particle Physics Prize

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS, Experiment

    2014-01-01

    (From left) Joe Incandela, Peter Higgs, Francois Englert, Tejinder Virdee, Dave Charlton, and Peter Jenni. Higgs and Englert gave the prizes to the recipients of the 2013 European Physical Society's High Energy and Particle Physics Prize, for an outstanding contribution to high energy physics. "For the discovery of a Higgs boson, as predicted by the Brout-Englert-Higgs mechanism," the prize was awarded to the ATLAS and CMS collaborations. Spokesperson for CMS, Incandela, and Spokesperson for ATLAS, Charlton, accepted the awards on their collaborations' behalf. "For their pioneering and outstanding leadership roles in the making of the ATLAS and CMS experiments," the prize was awarded to Jenni, Virdee, and Michel Della Negra (not present). Image: ATLAS

  16. Learning by Viewing - Nobel Labs 360

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2013-01-01

    First of all, my thanks to the Nobel Lindau Foundation for their inspiration and leadership in sharing the excitement of scientific discovery with the public and with future scientists! I have had the pleasure of participating twice in the Lindau meetings, and recently worked with the Nobel Labs 360 project to show how we are building the world's greatest telescope yet, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). For the future, I see the greatest challenges for all the sciences in continued public outreach and inspiration. Outreach, so the public knows why we are doing what we are doing, and what difference it makes for them today and in the long-term future. Who knows what our destiny may be? It could be glorious, or not, depending on how we all behave. Inspiration, so that the most creative and inquisitive minds can pursue the scientific and engineering discoveries that are at the heart of so much of human prosperity, health, and progress. And, of course, national and local security depend on those discoveries too; scientists have been working with "the government" throughout recorded history. For the Lindau Nobel experiment, we have a truly abundant supply of knowledge and excitement, through the interactions of young scientists with the Nobelists, and through the lectures and the video recordings we can now share with the whole world across the Internet. But the challenge is always to draw attention! With 7 billion inhabitants on Earth, trying to earn a living and have some fun, there are plenty of competing opportunities and demands on us all. So what will draw attention to our efforts at Lindau? These days, word of mouth has become word of (computer) mouse, and ideas propagate as viruses ( or memes) across the Internet according to the interests of the participants. So our challenge is to find and match those interests, so that the efforts of our scientists, photographers, moviemakers, and writers are rewarded by our public. The world changes every day, so there

  17. Native American Ceremonial Athletic Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesavento, Wilma J.

    This is a report on the relationship of North American Indian athletic games to ceremonies. Data for this investigation were researched from 48 "Annual Reports of the Bureau of American Ethnology, Smithsonian Institution" published from 1881 to 1933, and the 84 volumes of the "American Anthropologist" published from 1888 to 1974. Observational…

  18. Dannie Heineman Prize for CERN theorist

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    CERN's Gabriele Veneziano, is the recipient of the Dannie Heineman Prize for Mathematical Physics 2004, which he receives "for his pioneering discoveries in dual resonance models which, partly through his own efforts, have developed into string theory and a basis for the quantum theory of gravity". The prize was established in 1959 by the Heineman Foundation for Research, Educational, Charitable, and Scientific Purposes, and is administered jointly by the American Physical Society and the American Institute of Physics.

  19. The Poukai ceremony of the Maori King Movement: An ethnohistorical interpretation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijl, A.H.M. van

    2009-01-01

    The poukai is a ceremonial gathering held on 28 days a year at different Marae [1] or ceremonial centres supporting the K ngitanga, or Maori King Movement, which is largely based within the Tainui confederation of tribes in the Waikato region of New Zealand's North Island. The K ngitanga was

  20. Row bubbles up over particle prize

    CERN Multimedia

    Chalmers, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    "The European Physical Society (EPS) has defended its handling of the 2009 prize for high-energy and particle physics despite complaints that the awarding committee overlooked a vital scientific contribution to the prize-winning work. The biennial award, worth SwFr 5000, was given to collaborators on the Gargamelle bubble-chamber experiment at Cern for their descovery in 1973 of the "weak neutral current" - one of the ways in which the weak nuclear force is mediated between fundamental particles" (0.75 page)

  1. The Abel Prize 2008-2012

    CERN Document Server

    Piene, Ragni

    2014-01-01

    Covering the years 2008-2012, this book profiles the life and work of recent winners of the Abel Prize:   ·         John G. Thompson and Jacques Tits, 2008 ·         Mikhail Gromov, 2009 ·         John T. Tate Jr., 2010 ·         John W. Milnor, 2011 ·         Endre Szemerédi, 2012. The profiles feature autobiographical information as well as a description of each mathematician's work. In addition, each profile contains a complete bibliography, a curriculum vitae, as well as photos — old and new. As an added feature, interviews with the Laureates are presented on an accompanying web site (http://extras.springer.com/).   The book also presents a  history of the Abel Prize written by the historian Kim Helsvig, and includes a facsimile of a letter from Niels Henrik Abel, which is transcribed, translated into English, and placed into historical perspective by Christian Skau.    This book follows on The Abel Prize: 2003-2007, The First Five Years (Springer, 2010),...

  2. Ceremonial en performance de viento teatro: pamuri mahse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Duque Mesa

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Se aborda el Ceremonial en Performance de Viento Teatro: Pamuri Mahse, mito fundacional de los Desana del Vaupés (Colombia, investigación dada desde el Teatro Ceremonial de la Máscara Mítica, mundo de lenguajes inscritos en los imaginarios a través de claves y simbolizaciones de la tierra, el espíritu y el cosmos vueltos a leer e interpretar en el tiempo y en el espacio, a partir de los discursos mágicos y asombrosos de las máscaras, la plástica de las tierras, los movimientos en danza, teatro, música, escenografía y cantos. La performer recuerda el acto fundacional mítico de unas culturas milenarias, quienes profesan las más antiguas y a la vez las más modernas artes, articulando en el performance, artes que no les son extrañas, en el mundo de la creatividad y de la imaginación. Les puede sonar muy extraño el término performance, porque para ellos todo esto es sencillamente un Ceremonial.

  3. El premio Nobel de la Paz 1901-1914. Voluntad o interés

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández García, Eugenio

    2015-01-01

    Los primeros premios Nobel de la Paz, (al igual que los otros premios Nobel), se concedieron en diciembre de 1901, entre esa fecha y el inicio de la I Guerra Mundial en 1914, el premio se consolida, igualmente se sientan las bases de lo que será en el fu

  4. The Abel Prize

    CERN Document Server

    Holden, Helge

    2010-01-01

    Presents the winners of the first five Abel Prizes in mathematics: 2003 - Jean-Pierre Serre; 2004 - Sir Michael Atiyah and Isadore Singer; 2005 - Peter D Lax; 2006 - Lennart Carleson; and 2007 - S R Srinivasa Varadhan. This book provides an autobiography or an interview, a curriculum vitae, and a complete bibliography of each laureate

  5. Nobel 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    The theme of the 1995 Nobel Prize for Physics is leptons, the particles which feel the weak nuclear force, best known in nuclear beta decay. The prestigious award is shared by Frederick Reines of the University of California, Irvine, and by Martin Perl of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Professor Reines' award is in recognition of his epic 1956 discovery, made with Clyde Cowan at the Savannah River reactor in South Carolina, that the neutrino, predicted by Wolfgang Pauli in 1930, is a physically observable particle. Unfortunately Clyde Cowan died in 1974. Professor Perl's discovery of the tau lepton at the SPEAR electron- positron collider in 1976 was less expected, but no less important for today's Standard Model of particle physics. The discovery of the neutrino is traditionally described as an experimental verification of a bold theoretical prediction by Wolfgang Pauli. However Leon Lederman has pointed out that it should be the experimentalists who get the lion's share of the credit. Experiments provided the data which 'made it perfectly obvious' that Pauli had to invent the neutrino! Looking at the same data, Niels Bohr was led to suggest that conservation of energy inside the atom would not be absolute. Pauli only made his suggestion out of desperation, says Lederman, adding 'driving a theorist as good as Pauli to desperation has been the goal of red-blooded experimentalists ever since'. With beta decay experiments reporting a tiny energy imbalance, Pauli was driven in 1930 to suggest that an otherwise invisible particle was emitted along with an electron when a neutron decayed into a proton. At first, he was reluctant to talk about a particle which could not be detected, but by 1934 the neutrino had been incorporated into Enrico Fermi's theory of weak interactions. Hans Bethe and Rudolf Peierls calculated the expected absorption rate of neutrinos by nuclei and concluded such particles would be undetectable

  6. The role of ritualistic ceremonial in removing barriers between subcultures in the National Health Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Ian; Brown, Reva Berman

    2002-05-01

    The role of ritualistic ceremonial in removing barriers between subcultures in the National Health Service Background. One of the ways in which it is possible to achieve successful organizational change is through the elimination of those ceremonies that reinforce or preserve the negative aspects of professional and work group autonomy, thus maintaining the barriers between subcultures. Conversely, the encouraging of ceremonies which reinforce positive aspects is likely to achieve more flexible, team-orientated changes. Aim. The paper considers those ceremonies, which perpetuate barriers in a National Health Service (NHS) Trust, and explores new ceremonies which may question, weaken or eliminate current dysfunctional practices. Design. Our research approach was mainly phenomenological, as we wished to elicit the symbolic significance of organizational routines. The primary source of data was spoken language. The findings are based on purposive sampling of informants by means of semi-structured interview and observation. Other types of information were also collected, including business plans, reports and brochures. Informants included the Chief Executive and four Board members, three consultants, the director of nursing and midwifery, 10 middle managers and eight junior, nonmedical and nonmanagerial employees. Findings. Two broad bands of ceremonies have been identified - those which preserve the existing norms and autonomy of professional and worker groups, which we have named Ceremonies of Preservation, and those which encourage change, which we have called Ceremonies of Change. Considerable data are provided to help to 'tell the story'. Conclusion. The paper argues that attention to ceremonial in the wider change process may facilitate the desired, specific change or changes in practice. It suggests that changes which confront unnecessary demarcation, but which do not undermine professional integrity, can create real benefits for NHS hospitals.

  7. Eight Nobel prizewinners at CERN in 1962

    CERN Multimedia

    1962-01-01

    In 1962, CERN hosted the 11th International Conference on High Energy Physics. Among the distinguished visitors were eight Nobel prizewinners. Left to right: Cecil F Powell, Isidor I Rabi, Werner Heisenberg, Edwin M McMillan, Emile Segre, Tsung Dao Lee, Chen Ning Yang and Robert Hofstadter.

  8. Prehistoric ceremonial warfare: beginning of institutionalized violence

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Turek, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 3 (2017), s. 535-548 ISSN 1555-8622 Institutional support: RVO:67985912 Keywords : human aggression * ceremonial warfare * archery symbolism * Neolithic * Chalcolithic * Europe Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology OBOR OECD: Archaeology

  9. The 2005 Nobel Prize in Physics: Optics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and the Optical Equivalence Theorem, central to quan- tum optics, by E C G ... clear that the combination of statistical ideas and the classical Maxwell descrip- .... in this development, we present in Box 1 the definitions and interpretations of.

  10. Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 20161

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Duve, had discovered cellular compartments, named 'lysosomes', in which most of the ... Mutations in autophagy genes can cause disease, and the autophagic .... organisms, autophagy acts to eliminate the pathogen from the host. Autophagy ...

  11. The Nobel Prize in Physics 1999 -16 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    that they have placed particle physics theory on a firmer math- ematical foundation. .... which point in the universe we choose as the origin of our coor- dinate system. ... of the idea that in electrostatics the electric field and hence the electrostatic ...

  12. 2001 Chemistry N abel Prize

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    a biological process, led to his discovery of microbes, his resolu- tion of sodium ... (Nobel Laureates 1975, stereochemistry of enzymatic and or- ganic reactions), C J ... companies nowadays have to make sure that both enantiomers of a drug are ... Generally, chemical synthesis of asymmetric compounds results in racemic ...

  13. Nobel Lecture: From the Big Bang to the Nobel Prize and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    NASA’s Cosmic Background Explorer satellite mission, the COBE, laid the foundations for modern cosmology by measuring the spectrum and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation and discovering the cosmic infrared background radiation. I describe the history of the COBE project, its scientific context, the people who built it, and the scientific results. The COBE observed the universe on the largest scales possible by mapping the cosmic microwave and infrared background radiation fields and determining their spectra. It produced conclusive evidence that the hot Big Bang theory of the early universe is correct, showed that the early universe was very uniform but not perfectly so, and that the total luminosity of post Big Bang objects is twice as great as previously believed. The COBE concept was developed by a Mission Definition Study Team appointed by NASA in 1976, based on three competing proposals submitted in 1974. The COBE was built in-house by Goddard Space Flight Center, with a helium cryostat provided by Ball Aerospace, and was launched on a Delta rocket built by McDonnell Douglas. It is in a circular orbit 900km above the Earth, in a plane inclined 99° to the equator and roughly perpendicular to the line to the Sun. It carried three instruments, a far infrared absolute spectrophotometer (FIRAS), a differential microwave radiometer with three channels (DMR), and a diffuse infrared background experiment (DIRBE). The helium cryostat cooled the FIRAS and DIRBE for 10months until the helium was exhausted, but operations continued for a total of 4years . Subsequent observations have confirmed the COBE results and led to measurements of the main cosmological parameters with a precision of a few percent.

  14. Recognizing mid-career productivity: the 2008 Retrovirology Prize, call for nomination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeang Kuan-Teh

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A recent analysis suggested a narrow age range for productivity of innovative work by researchers. The Retrovirology Prize seeks to recognize the research of a mid-career retrovirologist between the ages of 45 and 60. The 2007 Retrovirology Prize was awarded to Dr. Karen Beemon. Nominations are being solicited for the 2008 prize.

  15. IEEE Prize for Lucio Rossi

    CERN Multimedia

    IEEE Council on Superconductivity

    2007-01-01

    Lucio Rossi receives his prize from John Spargo, Chairman of the IEEE Council on Superconductivity (left), and Martin Nisenoff, Chairman of the Council on Superconductivity's Awards Committee (right).

  16. Marie Curie - science was her life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolschendorf, K.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper a short survey of the life and the work of Marie Curie is presented. She was born in 1867 in Warsaw/Poland and went to Paris in 1891 to study physics, mathematics, and chemistry. In 1895 the married the physicist Pierre Curie, and together they began research work on radioactivity. For her doctorate she investigated various radiating substances and discovered the radioactive element Radium in 1898. She was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1903, and later on the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1911 for performing pioneering studies with radium and contributing profoundly to the understanding of radioactivity. In 1934 she died in a health resort due to leukemia. (orig.) [de

  17. Through economics to Noble goals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelić Svetlana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The winner of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences, Angus Deaton, is the economist most famous for his work related to health, welfare and economic development. In its press release the Nobel Prize Committee highlighted: 'To design economic policy that promotes welfare and reduces poverty, we must first understand individual consumption choices. More than anyone else, Angus Deaton has enhanced this understanding. By linking detailed individual choices and aggregate outcomes, his research has helped transform the fields of microeconomics, macroeconomics, and development economics. Deaton's focus on household surveys has helped transform development economics from a theoretical field based on aggregate data to an empirical field based on detailed individual data.'.

  18. The aging of biomedical research in the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirstin R W Matthews

    Full Text Available In the past 30 years, the average age of biomedical researchers has steadily increased. The average age of an investigator at the National Institutes of Health (NIH rose from 39 to 51 between 1980 and 2008. The aging of the biomedical workforce was even more apparent when looking at first-time NIH grantees. The average age of a new investigator was 42 in 2008, compared to 36 in 1980. To determine if the rising barriers at NIH for entry in biomedical research might impact innovative ideas and research, we analyzed the research and publications of Nobel Prize winners from 1980 to 2010 to assess the age at which their pioneering research occurred. We established that in the 30-year period, 96 scientists won the Nobel Prize in medicine or chemistry for work related to biomedicine, and that their groundbreaking research was conducted at an average age of 41-one year younger than the average age of a new investigator at NIH. Furthermore, 78% of the Nobel Prize winners conducted their research before the age of 51, the average age of an NIH principal investigator. This suggested that limited access to NIH might inhibit research potential and novel projects, and could impact biomedicine and the next generation scientists in the United States.

  19. QUALITY LEADERS - LEARNING FROM THE DEMING PRIZE WINNERS IN INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Jagadeesh Rajashekharaiah

    2014-01-01

    Different governments and professional agencies have set up a number of awards to recognize and reward quality initiatives. Deming Prize is one such award and ever since it was open for companies from outside Japan, maximum number of winning companies are from India, with 20 companies winning the Deming Prize and four among them also winning the Deming Grand Prize. This paper traces the path taken by these companies to know how these companies embarked a journey of Total Quality Management (T...

  20. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2012 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2012 award winner, Elevance Renewable Sciences, used Nobel-prize-winning metathesis catalysis to produce high-value difunctional chemicals from renewable feedstocks including natural oils.

  1. Projecting Dynastic Majesty: State Ceremony in the Reign of Robert Bruce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucinda Dean

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Following the murder of his rival John Comyn on 10 February at Greyfriars in Dumfries, and the crisis this act incited, Robert the Bruce’s inaugural ceremony took place at Scone in late March 1306. Much about this ceremony is speculative; however, subsequent retrospective legitimisation of the Bruce claims to the royal succession would suggest that all possible means by which Robert’s inauguration could emulate his Canmore predecessors and outline his right to rule on a level playing field with his contemporaries were amplified, particularly where they served the common purpose of legitimising Robert’s highly questioned hold on power. Fourteenth-century Scottish history is inextricably entwined in the Wars of Independence, civil strife and an accelerated struggle for autonomous rule and independence. The historiography of this period is unsurprisingly heavily dominated by such themes and, while this has been offset by works exploring subjects such as the tomb of Bruce and the piety of the Bruce dynasty, the ceremonial history of this era remains firmly in the shadows. This paper will address three key ceremonies through which a king would, traditionally, make powerful statements of royal authority: the inauguration or coronation of Bruce; the marriage of his infant son to the English princess Joan of the Tower in 1328, and his extravagant funeral ceremony in 1329. By focusing thus this paper hopes to shed new light on the ‘dark and drublie days’ of fourteenth-century Scotland and reveal that glory, dynastic majesty and pleasure were as central to the Scottish monarchy in this era as war and political turbulence.

  2. Unclaimed Prize Information Biases Perceptions of Winning in Scratch Card Gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Alexander C; Stange, Madison; Fugelsang, Jonathan A; Koehler, Derek J; Dixon, Mike J

    2018-03-29

    Unclaimed prize information (i.e., the number of prizes still available to be won) is information commonly provided to scratch card gamblers. However, unless the number of tickets remaining to be purchased is also provided, this information is uninformative. Despite its lack of utility in assisting gamblers in choosing the most favourable type of scratch card to play, we hypothesized that unclaimed prize information would bias participants' judgments within a scratch card gambling context. In Experiment 1 (N = 201), we showed that participants are influenced by this information such that they felt more likely to win, were more excited to play, and preferred to hypothetically purchase more of the scratch card with the greatest number of unclaimed prizes. In Experiment 2 (N = 201), we attempted to ameliorate this bias by providing participants with the number of tickets remaining to be purchased and equating the payback percentages of all three games. The bias, although attenuated, still persisted in these conditions. Finally, in Experiment 3 (N = 200), we manipulated the hypothetical scratch cards such that games with the highest number of unclaimed prizes were the least favourable, and vice versa. As in Experiment 2, participants still favoured cards with greater numbers of unclaimed prizes. Possible mechanisms underlying this bias are discussed. In conclusion, across three experiments, we demonstrate that salient unclaimed prize information is capable of exerting a strong effect over judgments related to scratch card games.

  3. Corporate Responsibility as Myth and Ceremony

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack, Patrick; Martignoni, Dirk; Schoeneborn, Dennis

    Organizations adopt corporate responsibility (CR) policies often ceremonially, meaning that policy adoption is not substantive and lacks alignment with actual practice. Prior research in institutional theory has largely assumed as static view of adoption and suggests that a situation of opacity (i...... governance mechanism and (2) the institutional theory concepts of decoupling and (re-)coupling....

  4. Crying for a Vision: The Native American Sweat Lodge Ceremony as Therapeutic Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Michael Tlanusta; Torres-Rivera, Edil; Brubaker, Michael; Portman, Tarrell Awe Agahe; Brotherton, Dale; West-Olatunji, Cirecie; Conwill, William; Grayshield, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    The Native American sweat lodge ceremony or sweat therapy is being used increasingly in various medical, mental health, correctional, and substance abuse treatment centers serving both Native and non-Native clients. This article explores the sweat lodge ceremony's background, elements of Native American spirituality, origin story, cultural…

  5. Saturday Programme for CineGlobe

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcelloni De Oliveira, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    The saturday programme had a special kids session, the kick of the Science Storytelling Hackaton and the Award Ceremony WINNERS 2015 The Jury Prize for documentary: Fecal Matters, Paul Gallasch - AU The Jury Prize for Fiction: Hybris, Arjan Brentjes - NL Award of Excellence in Narrative: Final Draft, Scott Calonico - UK The Audience Award for documentary: Logically policed, Damiano Petrucci - UK The Audience Award for Fiction: Slapkick, Dat Nguyen Chon-- DE The Special Prize "Time Vizualisation": Danielle, Anthony Cerniello - US

  6. 77 FR 58114 - SunShot Prize: Race to the Rooftop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    ...This notice announces the release of the SunShot Prize: Race to the Rooftop competition. This competition offers $10 million in prizes to those who can lower the non-hardware installation cost of rooftop solar energy systems.

  7. Nevill Mott reminiscences and appreciations

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, E A

    1998-01-01

    Sir Nevill Mott was Britain''s last Winner of the Nobel Prize for Physics. This is a tribute to the life and work of Nobel Laureate Nevill Mott, a hugely admired and appreciated man, and one of this countries greatest ever scientists. It includes contributions from over 80 of his friends, family and colleagues, full of anecdotes and appreciations for this collossus of modern physics.

  8. Surgery on Fetus Reduces Complications of Spina Bifida

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Snapshot of Child Development Advances Snapshot of Adult & Family Health Advances NICHD Nobel Prize ... Specific to Pregnant Women and Lactating Women (PRGLAC) Jobs at NICHD Partnering & ...

  9. 3D-modeling and 3D-printing explorations on Japanese tea ceremony utensils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levy, P.D.; Yamada, Shigeru

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we inquire aesthetical aspects of the Japanese tea ceremony, described as the aesthetics in the imperfection, based on novel fabrication technologies: 3D-modeling and 3D-printing. To do so, 3D-printed utensils (chashaku and chasen) were iteratively designed for the ceremony and were

  10. Cigarette makers pioneered many of our black arts of disinformation, including the funding of research to distract from the hazards of smoking. Ten Nobel prizes were the result. By funding distraction research, the cigarette industry became an important source of academic corruption, helping also to forge other forms of denialism on a global scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, R. N.

    2014-12-01

    Cigarette Disinformation: Origins and Global Impact Robert N. Proctor The cigarette is the deadliest artifact in the history of human civilization. And whereas "only" a hundred million people died in the 20th century from smoking, we are presently on a pace to have several times that toll in the present century. Much of that catastrophe would not be possible without a massive campaign of disinformation. The cigarette industry pioneered many of the black arts of disinformation, cleverly exploiting the inherent skepticism of science to claim that "more research" was needed to resolve a purported "cigarette controversy." Cigarette makers funded hundreds of millions of dollars worth of "distraction research," most of which was solid empirical science but off topic, focusing on basic biology and biochemistry, viral and genetic causes of disease, and other "cigarette friendly" topics. At least ten Nobel prizes were the result. Cigarette skepticism was thus more complex than we normally imagine: the tobacco industry corrupted science by funding "alternative causation," meaning anything that could be used to draw attention away from cigarettes as a source of disease. The cigarette industry by this means became the most important source of academic corruption since the Nazi era. That corruption has also helped forge other forms of denialism and corruption on a global scale.

  11. PRIze{sup TM} 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    PRIze{sup TM} 1.2 is a computer program that evaluates the improved oil recovery (IOR) potential of petroleum reservoirs including the use of horizontal wells. It was created in 1992 and has since been used in over 800 reservoir evaluations. The tool provides information on the feasibility of IOR processes based on reservoir parameters. PRIze{sup TM} makes predictions for chemical, gas injection and thermal IOR processes based on both vertical and horizontal wells. The program provides a uniform data entry screen that allows the user to input 42 average values of geological parameters, fluid properties and oil production mechanism information into a data file. The data can be used to provide a production forecast, and enable the user to establish, to a first order approximation, the economic viability of a given process.

  12. Cloak of compassion, or evidence of elitism? An empirical analysis of white coat ceremonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnieli-Miller, Orit; Frankel, Richard M; Inui, Thomas S

    2013-01-01

    White coat ceremonies (WCCs) are widely prevalent as a celebration of matriculation in medical schools. Critics have questioned whether these ceremonies can successfully combine the themes of professionalism and humanism, as well as whether the white coat is an appropriate symbol. This study aimed to add a process of empirical assessment to the discussion of these criticisms by analysing the content and messages communicated during these ceremonies. Multiple qualitative methods were used to discern the core meanings expressed in a sample of 18 ceremonies through the analysis of artefacts, words, phrases, statements and narratives. Out of a stratified random sample of 25 US schools of medicine conducting WCCs in 2009, 18 schools submitted video, audio and written materials. All ceremonies followed the same general format, but varied in their content, messages and context. Ceremonies included five principal descriptions of what is symbolised by the white coat, including: commitment to humanistic professional care; a reminder of obligations and privileges; power; the student's need to 'grow', and the white coat as a mantle. Statements about obligations were made three times more frequently than statements about privileges. Key words or phrases in WCCs mapped to four domains: professionalism; morality; humanism, and spirituality. Spoken narratives focused on humility and generosity. The WCCs studied did not celebrate the status of an elite class, but marked the beginning of educational, personal and professional formation processes and urged matriculants to develop into doctors 'worthy of trust'. The ceremonies centred on the persons entering the vocation, who were invited to affirm its calling and obligations by donning a symbolic garb, and to join an ancient and modern tradition of healing and immersion in their community. The schools' articulated construct of the white coat situated it as a symbol of humanism. This study's findings may clarify and guide schools

  13. Resonance – Journal of Science Education | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016 Nobel Prize in Chemistry: Conferring Molecular Machines as Engines of Creativity ... Science Academies' 92nd Refresher Course in Experimental Physics ... Science Academies' Refresher Course on Advances in Molecular Biology.

  14. The Telomere Effect: A Revolutionary Approach to Living Younger, Healthier, Longer Blackburn Elizabeth and Epel Elissa The Telomere Effect: A Revolutionary Approach to Living Younger, Healthier, Longer 417pp £14.99 Orion Books 9780297609230 0297609238 [Formula: see text].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-28

    Elizabeth Blackburn received a Nobel prize for discovering the molecular nature of telomeres (the ends of our chromosomes that serve as protective caps) and telomerase (the enzyme that maintains telomeres).

  15. The Progressive Insurance Automotive X PRIZE Education Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robyn Ready

    2011-12-31

    The Progressive Insurance Automotive X PRIZE Education Program conducted education and outreach activities and used the competition's technical goals and vehicle demonstrations as a means of attracting students and the public to learn more about advanced vehicle technologies, energy efficiency, climate change, alternative fuels, and the science and math behind efficient vehicle development. The Progressive Insurance Automotive X PRIZE Education Program comprised three integrated components that were designed to educate the general public and create a multi-tiered initiative to engage students and showcase the 21st century skills students will need to compete in our global economy: teamwork, creativity, strong literacy, math and science skills, and innovative thinking. The elements included an Online Experience, a National Student Contest, and in person education events and activites. The project leveraged online connections, strategic partnerships, in-classroom, and beyond-the-classroom initiatives, as well as mainstream media. This education program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) also funded the specification of vehicle telemetry and the full development and operation of an interactive online experience that allowed internet users to follow the Progressive Insurance Automotive X PRIZE vehicles as they performed in real-time during the Progressive Insurance Automotive X PRIZE competition events.

  16. THE WEDDING CEREMONY IN THE TRADITIONAL VILLAGES OF OLTENIA. PRELIMINARY RITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca CEAUŞESCU

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Marriage is the second most significant moment from a man’s life, an event that gives the opportunity of a rich display of folkloric manifestations. The ceremonial complex of the wedding mark, in a festive manner, the passing to another social statute. In Oltenia, it generally has a unitary structure, with small individualising elements, from one village to the other. The nuptial ceremony also presents in its development the three categories of rites, specific to the passing rites, such are: preliminary, liminary, post-liminary. Therefore, the nuptial scenario includes the existence of new rules and a logical succession in the development of the sequences. In the present material, we are going to stop on the customs from the stage that precedes the nuptial ceremony (wooing, discussing the dowry of the girl, the engagement, trying to point towards few dominant element of the phenomenon.

  17. Biochemistry graduate student selected to meet with Nobel Laureates

    OpenAIRE

    Trulove, Susan

    2006-01-01

    January Haile of Athens, Tenn., a Ph.D. student in biochemistry at Virginia Tech has been selected by Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) to attend a meeting of Nobel Laureates in Lindau, Germany, in June.

  18. The discovery of X-ray diffraction by crystals and its great impact on science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mai Zhenhong

    2012-01-01

    In April 1912, Friedrich, Knipping and Laue discovered X-ray diffraction in a CuSO 4 crystal. Later, Laue derived the famous Laue equations which explain the diffraction phenomenon. For this, Laue was awarded a Nobel Prize for Physics in 1914. In 1912 W. H. Bragg and W. L. Bragg received news of Laue 's discovery, and from X-ray diffraction experiments in a ZnS crystal they derived the famous Bragg equation. For this work, father and son were together awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1915, To commemorate the 100th anniversary of the discovery of X-ray diffraction, this article reviews the important contributions of the early pioneers and their historic impact on science and technology worldwide. (author)

  19. The radiating metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moritzberger, L.

    1992-01-01

    This book for young people shows Marie and Pierre Curie living and working together. The reader takes part in their attempts to groping their way towards unknown areas, often going astray, and yet exploring one field after the other. He learns to understand their thinking and share their feelings. Holiday pleasures are described and the birth of the children as well as successful research, the Nobel prize for physics, and the bitter event of Pierre's early death. Marie Curie unswervingly continues on her way, so that in 1911 she is awarded the Nobel prize for chemistry in recognition of her fundamental work. Marie Curie died in the summer of 1934. Radium radiation had damaged her spinal marrow. (orig./HSCH) [de

  20. Modified African Ngoma Healing Ceremony for Stress Reduction: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinesett, Ava LaVonne; Whaley, Riitta Rutanen; Woods-Giscombe, Cheryl; Dennis, Paul; Johnson, Medina; Li, Yin; Mounzeo, Pline; Baegne, Mabiba; Wilson, Kenneth H

    2017-10-01

    Indigenous people's ceremonies using rhythm and dance have been used for countless generations throughout the world for healing, conflict resolution, social bonding, and spiritual experience. A previous study reported that a ceremony based on the Central African ngoma tradition was favorably received by a group of Americans. The present trial compared the effects of the modified ngoma ceremony (Ngoma) with those of mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) in a randomized pilot study. Twenty-one women were randomized to either Ngoma or MBSR. Both groups had sessions on a weekly basis for 8 weeks and completed questionnaires at baseline, week 8, and 1 month after the intervention. Participants completed questionnaires, which included self-report of depressive and anxiety symptoms, health status (e.g., quality of life and functioning), social bonding, and perception of the credibility of the two interventions. Both groups showed improvements in depression, anxiety, emotional well being, and social functioning as measured by respective scales. Social bonding also increased in both groups during the study and may be a mechanism for both interventions. Participants found both interventions credible. In this pilot study, Ngoma showed significant and durable beneficial effects comparable to MBSR. The effects of Ngoma and other indigenous rhythm-dance ceremonies on distress and health status in western culture should be investigated in larger clinical studies.

  1. Nádech nekonvenčnosti. Vzpomínka na setkání se Sydney Brennerem

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jonák, Jiří

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 82, - (2003), s. 132 E-ISSN 1214-4029 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : developmental biology, nobel prize, Caenorhabditis elegans Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  2. Ceremonies of gratitude following the dissection course: A report on procedures in departments of anatomy in German speaking countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabst, R; Schmiedl, A; Schrieber, S; Tschernig, T; Pabst, V C

    2017-03-01

    The departments of anatomy in Germany, Austria and the German-speaking part of Switzerland were sent comprehensive (18 items) questionnaires requesting details on memorial ceremonies held at the close of the dissection course in the medical curriculum, including objectives, organization, number of participants and the role of the medical students. The response rate was very high (95%). In more than 95% of instances a ceremony is held, initiated mainly after 1970. The titles of the ceremony range from commemoration ceremony (42%), service of mourning (19%) memorial service (19%) to ceremony of gratitude (7%). The number of participants exceeds 300 in 15% of these ceremonies. The invitation comes mostly from the student group organizing the ceremony (62%). The ceremony is offered mainly for the students of the course (23%), for student tutors (16%), relatives of the body donors (23%) and scientific staff (15%). The students actively participate with musical contributions (19%), gestures such as candles (17%) and flowers (12%), speeches (17%) and readings (12%). The relevance of the practical dissection course and body donation programs is also discussed. The results are compared to ceremonies in various countries with different religious backgrounds. This dissection course is unique among all courses in the medical curriculum as it obviously also has spiritual aspects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Marriage ceremony: The clash between traditional marriage rites ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Marriage ceremony: The clash between traditional marriage rites and ... and a woman who has agreed to marry, be socially described as a married couple ... People agreed that traditional marriage rites should be compulsory but performance ...

  4. The aims of initiation ceremonies at universities: Comparisons in time and space1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Jansen van Rensburg

    1990-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article initiation practices at South African universities are analysed and compared with initiation ceremonies described in anthropological literature. It is argued that any initiation ceremony has at least the partial aim of preparing initiates for the roles and functions in society or specific organizations. Naturally a reasonable degree of harmony between the intent of initiation on the one hand and the values of an institution on the other hand can be expected. The intention of initiation usually is to prepare one for a position or rote by means of the expression of certain values. On the question whether this harmony between ideas and actions is found in the case of existent initiation ceremonies at South African universities, the answer is negative. These ceremonies do not aim to convey and develop attitudes and values essential to a university and in fact do not prepare first-year students for their new environment and a community of scholars. The way in which universities transcend their authority by condoning and officially allowing the demeaning initiation practices is also questioned.

  5. Graphene prehistory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geim, A K

    2012-01-01

    After the 2010 Nobel Prize recognized the research breakthrough reported by our group in a 2004 paper, I feel that, as my contribution to the proceedings of the Nobel symposium held earlier in 2010, it is both appropriate and important to review pre-2004 scientific literature and acknowledge early ideas. With the benefit of hindsight, I also try to analyze why our first graphene paper has attracted so much interest.

  6. The 2010 Broad Prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Education Digest: Essential Readings Condensed for Quick Review, 2011

    2011-01-01

    A new data analysis, based on data collected as part of The Broad Prize process, provides insights into which large urban school districts in the United States are doing the best job of educating traditionally disadvantaged groups: African-American, Hispanics, and low-income students. Since 2002, The Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation has awarded The…

  7. Pennies from heaven? Conceptions and earmarking of lottery prize money.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedenus, Anna

    2014-06-01

    The source of money has been shown to be important for how money is spent. In addition, sudden wealth is often associated with social and psychological risks. This article investigates if conceptions of lottery prize money--as a special kind of money--imply restrictions on how it can be spent. Analysis of interviews with lottery winners shows that interviewees use earmarking of the prize money as a strategy for avoiding the pitfalls associated with a lottery win. Conceptions of lottery prize money as 'a lot' or as 'a little', as shared or personal, and as an opportunity or a risk, influences the ends for which it is earmarked: for self-serving spending, a 'normal' living standard, paying off loans, saving for designated purposes, or for economic security and independence. Clearly defining and earmarking lottery prize money thus helps lottery winners construe their sudden wealth, not as a risk, but as 'pennies from heaven.' © London School of Economics and Political Science 2014.

  8. QUALITY LEADERS - LEARNING FROM THE DEMING PRIZE WINNERS IN INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagadeesh Rajashekharaiah

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Different governments and professional agencies have set up a number of awards to recognize and reward quality initiatives. Deming Prize is one such award and ever since it was open for companies from outside Japan, maximum number of winning companies are from India, with 20 companies winning the Deming Prize and four among them also winning the Deming Grand Prize. This paper traces the path taken by these companies to know how these companies embarked a journey of Total Quality Management (TQM and reached their goal of winning the prestigious Deming Prize. The common working principles of these companies and the various tools and techniques used by them are described in a concise manner in this paper. Further, the paper highlights the lessons from these companies to inspire others. The data taken from the respective websites of the companies has been used to list out the objectives, methodologies, and the benefits accrued by the companies.

  9. 2014 WSEAT X-Prize

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosiljevac, Thomas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kramer, Sharlotte [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Laing, John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The 2014 WSEAT X-Prize is modeled as a double blind study to challenge the computational and material mechanics communities methodologies to develop better capabilities in modeling and experimentation to predict the failure in ductile metals. The challenge is presented as a distinct, yet relatively, simple geometry with all reported modeling predictions blind to each of the modeling teams. The experimental testing is validated by two independent test labs to confirm the experimentally observed behavior and results are unbiased and repeatable. The WSEAT X-Prize was issued to both external participants and internal participants as the Sandia Fracture Challenge 2 (SFC2) on May 30, 2014. A Challenge Supplemental Information Packet was sent to participants on August 13, 2014 to Prior years SFCs focused on the ability to predict failures under a quasi-static loading condition that focused on either a shear or tensile-dominated failure mode. This year’s challenge focuses on a geometry with a shear and/or tensile-dominated failure mode influenced by a moderate strain-rate ductile fracture in a metallic alloy.

  10. Surgery on Fetus Reduces Complications of Spina Bifida

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Pregnancy & Infant Development Advances Snapshot of Child Development Advances Snapshot of Adult & Family Health Advances NICHD Nobel Prize Winners Leadership & Other Staff Profiles Leadership Biosketches Get to Know ...

  11. Resonance – Journal of Science Education | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    , lysosomes, cell death, protease, autophagosome, neurodegeneration. Abstract. The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2016 was awardedto Yoshinori Ohsumi of the Tokyo Institute of Technology,Japan, for his discoveries of mechanisms ...

  12. IEEE Prize for Lucio Rossi

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Lucio Rossi receives his prize from John Spargo, Chairman of the IEEE Council on Superconductivity (left), and Martin Nisenoff, Chairman of the Council on Superconductivity’s Awards Committee (right). (Photo: IEEE Council on Superconductivity)With the magnets installed in the tunnel and work on the interconnections almost completed, Lucio Rossi has reaped the rewards of fifteen years of work. And yet, when the physicist from Milan arrived to take charge of the group responsible for the superconducting magnets in 2001, success seemed far from assured. Endowed with surprising levels of energy, Lucio Rossi, together with his team, ensured that production of these highly complex magnets got underway. Today, that achievement earns them the recognition not only of CERN but also of the international superconducting community. It is for this achievement that Lucio Rossi was awarded the prize by the IEEE’s (Institute of Electrical an...

  13. Corrections corner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Arthur I.; Shanklin, Jon

    2015-09-01

    In your otherwise informative article on “Curing the Curie complex” (Features, August pp25-28), you wrote “Albert Einstein was awarded a Nobel prize for his discovery of the photoelectric effect”.

  14. Historic physics reprints come home : six boxes of historic reprints have returned home to Pauli's Library

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    The 146 items - preprints by Born, Bohr, Heisenberg and others some with dedications to Pauli from the author - had been part of the personal library of the Nobel prize-winning physicist, Wolfgang Pauli.

  15. Gustav-Hertz-Prize for CERN Physicist

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Klaus Blaum, of GSI Darmstadt and project leader of the ISOLTRAP experiment at CERN, will receive the 2004 Gustav-Hertz-Prize for his outstanding work on the mass determination of unstable atomic nuclei. Blaum extended the measuring capability of the ISOLTRAP experiment at the ISOLDE facility, which studies short-lived isotopes, by installing a source of carbon clusters. Using these carbon clusters as mass reference allows researchers to obtain higher-precision and absolute atomic mass measurements which are important to understand the weak interaction and the synthesis of chemical elements. The Gustav-Hertz-Prize is awarded to outstanding young physicists and is endowed with 7500 euro. It will be awarded at the Spring Conference of the German Physical Society in Munich on 24 March.

  16. Students' participation in Hult Prize and their decision for entrepreneurship: Data gathered from Hult Prize 2018 regional finals in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluwatobi, Stephen; Oshokoya, Damilare; Atayero, Aderemi; Oludayo, Olumuyiwa; Nsofor, Colette; Oyebode, Adeola

    2018-08-01

    This data article is an expression of data that reflects how students' participation in the Hult Prize 2018 regional finals affects their decision to become entrepreneurs. The primary data was sourced using a questionnaire developed with Google doc form. Out of 120 students that participated in the Hult Prize 2018 regional finals in Nigeria, 103 of them responded. Their responses are as presented in this article. Such will be relevant to researchers who want to find out why students desire to become entrepreneurs and the best approach and timing to enable them.

  17. A discourse analysis of Melengkan at a Gayonese wedding ceremony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irama Jaya

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Melengkan is a special form of the Gayonese language which is spoken in poetry, lyrics, and proverbs. This study investigated its use as poetry specifically in wedding ceremonies held in Gayo, Aceh, Indonesia. The data was collected by observations and a video-recording of a traditional Gayonese wedding ceremony, as well as from interviews with melengkan speakers. We described and analyzed the context of the use of melengkan, the form of melengkan, and the cultural values conveyed through melengkan used in the wedding ceremony. The findings showed that there were six types of melengkan: Melengkan Turun Caram, Melengkan Beguru, Melengkan Munyerah Rempele, Melengkan Munerime Rempele, Melengkan Munyerah Munenes and Melengkan Munerime Munenes. The values of melengkan are for remembrance of local knowledge, warnings from customary philosophy, warnings from religion, and also for giving advice and recall the history and beauty of melengkan speech. The context of using melengkan is to perpetuate and reflect cultural values, namely, politeness, respect, speaking softly, friendliness and resoluteness. These findings imply the importance of conserving melengkan as part of the Gayonese culture in every part of their life.

  18. F. Sherwood “Sherry” Rowland (1927-2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Donald R.; Simpson, Isobel J.

    2012-10-01

    Frank Sherwood Rowland, known to his friends and colleagues as Sherry, died at his home in Corona del Mar, Calif., on 10 March 2012. He was 84. A Nobel Prize-winning atmospheric chemist, Sherry codiscovered the role of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) in stratospheric ozone depletion, researched the accumulation of greenhouse gases on a planetary scale, and tirelessly communicated the global consequences of human activity to policy makers and the public. Sherry had a calm, gentle demeanor and was as respected for his integrity and humility as for his groundbreaking scientific achievements. Sherry was a long-time member and Fellow (1980) of AGU and received the AGU Roger Revelle Medal in 1994 for his substantial contributions to the awareness of global change. The following year, he shared the Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Mario Molina and Paul Crutzen for their pioneering contributions to atmospheric chemistry, particularly the formation and decomposition of stratospheric ozone. In its citation, the Nobel Committee commended them for contributing to "our salvation from a global environmental problem that could have catastrophic consequences."

  19. Corrections and clarifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-21

    The Research News article by Faye Flam about the 1993 physics Nobel Prize ("A prize for patient listening," 22 Oct., p. 507), awarded to Joseph Taylor and Russell Hulse for the discovery of a binary pulsar, incorrectly attributed key observations. The measurements implying that the pulsar is emitting gravitational waves were made by Taylor in collaboration with Joel Weisberg, Lee Fowler, and Peter McCulloch, not by Taylor and Hulse.

  20. Heisenberg vortex for light-weight refrigeration of liquid hydrogen

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Only 83 years ago Werner Karl Heisenberg was awarded the Nobel Prize in physics. His work led to the creation of quantum mechanics, the application of which has,...

  1. Imaging gaseous detectors and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Nappi, Eugenio

    2013-01-01

    Covers the detector and imaging technology and their numerous applications in nuclear and high energy physics, astrophysics, medicine and radiation measurements Foreword from G. Charpak, awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for this invention.

  2. Towards Producing Black Nobel Laureates Affiliated with ``African Universities''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenneth, Jude

    While Africa has produced a handful Nobel laureate in literature and peace, it has continued to shy away from producing any in the other categories. The reason is not farfetched; our university system is not up to standard. It is saddening that in this century, African countries place emphasis on certificates and not on knowledge. This has made the continent produce students that lack the intellectual capability, experimental ability, fundamental training, creativity, and motivation to excel except they get a foreign training. It is this backdrop that precipitated the research into the methods of teaching and research in universities across Africa. The study is designed to identify the problems and proffer solution to them. Two important questions immediately come to mind. (1) What factors account for the difficulty in producing Nobel laureates affiliated with African universities? (2) What strategies could be adopted to improve teaching and research in African universities? Several factors were investigated which revolve around funding, the competence of the lecturers, quality of students admitted, attitude of the students, parents and government. Nigerian universities were investigated and important deductions were made. During the study an inquiry was made on the method of instruction at various universities, from result obtained, the study therefore concluded that adequate funding, the presence of erudite scholars and brilliant minds will produce future Nobel laureate affiliated with the continent. The study therefore recommended admission and employment of only students and lecturers who have got a thing for academics into the universities and adequate funding of universities and research centres.

  3. Landmarks in particle physics at Brookhaven National Laboratory: Brookhaven Lecture Series, Number 238

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adair, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    Robert Adair's lecture on Landmarks in Particle Physics at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a commemoration of the 40th Anniversary of Brookhaven National Laboratory. Adair describes ten researches in elementary particle physics at Brookhaven that had a revolutionary impact on the understanding of elementary particles. Two of the discoveries were made in 1952 and 1956 at the Cosmotron, BNL's first proton accelerator. Four were made in 1962 and 1964 at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, the Cosmotron's replacement. Two other discoveries in 1954 and 1956 were theoretical, and strong focusing (1952) is the only technical discovery. One discovery (1958) happened in an old barrack. Four of the discoveries were awarded the Nobel prize in Physics. Adair believes that all of the discoveries are worthy of the Nobel prize. 14 figs

  4. On measurements and models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    The 2011 Nobel Prize for physics was awarded to three astronomers for their measurements that were interpreted as providing evidence of an acceleration in the expansion of the universe rather than a slowing, as had been expected. The subsequent theoretical explanation, or model, of the observed phenomenon led to the postulation of 'dark matter' or 'dark energy'. The implications of this new form of energy are startling to say the least. The following quote came from an article about the Nobel Prize award in the New York Times. If the universe continues accelerating, astronomers say, rather than coasting gently into the night, distant galaxies will eventually be moving apart so quickly that they cannot communicate with one another and all the energy will be sucked out of the universe. (author)

  5. Message from the Worldwide Ahmadiyya Muslim Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Mirza Masroor

    2008-07-01

    Abdus Salam was an Ahmadi Muslim from Pakistan, a renowned theoretical physicist who received the Nobel Prize in 1979 for his work in electroweak theory. Although he was the first Muslim Nobel Laureate, Pakistan's military dictator at that time could not admit that its brilliant scientist was a Muslim citizen. Dr Salam's entire award was devoted to the furtherance of education: he did not spend a penny on himself or his family...

  6. Science literacy in local communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasagawa, Sumiko

    2005-01-01

    The Institute for Environmental Sciences was established in December, 1990 at Rokkasho, Aomori, as a focal point in the research activities necessary to solve the problems between nuclear energy and the environment. In 2001 the Public Relations and Research Information Office was newly organized in the institute in order to facilitate the communication of scientific knowledge and information with the local inhabitants. The office is expected to play a role, as the communication window opens, to the local community neighboring the nuclear fuel cycle facilities as well as other communities in the prefecture. It seems, however, that the methodology for pursuing this aim is not generally provided but needs to be developed on a trial-and-error basis suitable to each situation. The author would like to take this opportunity to consider the given subjects and introduce the experiences, in which the author succeeded in communicating with neighboring people through the common interests regarding the Nobel Prize. The Nobel Prize is recognized as the greatest honor and authority over the world and is awarded to genuine human wisdom. The public with admiration receives the laureates, and their ways of life along with their arts of thinking are always matters which attract the interest of all the citizens. The people, who sometimes easily understand the scientific background behind the Prizes, always accept the stories of the laureates. The Nobel Prize has played an important role, therefore, not only in disseminating scientific knowledge or information so far, but will function also in cultivating the so-called science literacy'' among the public in the future, even in the issues on acceptance of nuclear energy. (author)

  7. Resonance journal of science education

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    347 Impact of Theoretical Chemistry on Chemical and. Biological Sciences. Chemistry Nobel Prize – 2013. Saraswathi Vishveshwara. SERIES ARTICLES. 368 Ecology: From Individuals to Collectives. A Physicist's Perspective on Ecology. Vishwesha Guttal. 310. 368 ...

  8. Umuganda for improved health professions education in Rwanda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: In 2012 the 7-year Human Resources for Health (HRH) program was launched, ... In 2015 several international conferences were organised by the College of Medicine and Health Sciences. ..... ca, 1993 Nobel Peace Prize laureate.

  9. The EJ Curriculum Catalog: A Directory of Units and Electives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Susan, comp.

    1977-01-01

    Describes fourteen innovative high school English units dealing with such subjects as literature (e.g., "Nobel Prize Winning World Literature,""The Eskimo and His Literature," and "Women's Literature"), the mass media, and Greek mythology. (DD)

  10. The Scientific Correspondence of H A Lorentz

    CERN Document Server

    Kox, AJ

    2008-01-01

    Presents a selection of more than 400 letters from and to the Dutch physicist and Nobel Prize winner Hendrik Antoon Lorentz (1853-1928), covering the period from 1883 until a few months before his death.

  11. Prizes for innovation : Impact analysis in the ICT for Education sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Arora (Payal)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe use of prizes to stimulate innovation in education has dramatically increased in recent years, but, to date, no organization has attempted to critically examine the impact these prizes have had on education. This report attempts to fill this gap by conducting a landscape review of

  12. X-Ray Crystallography: One Century of Nobel Prizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Simona

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, the United Nations General Assembly declared 2014 the International Year of Crystallography. Throughout the year 2014 and beyond, all the crystallographic associations and societies active all over the world are organizing events to attract the wider public toward crystallography and the numerous topics to which it is deeply interlinked.…

  13. The 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    The work of Campbell and Omura led to the discovery of Ivermectin, which till date remains .... free-living organisms in aquatic and terrestrial environments as well as parasites in ... herself consumed the extract to prove its safety before demon-.

  14. Special Problems in Teaching Leslie Marmon Silko's "Ceremony."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Paula Gunn

    1990-01-01

    A professor of American Indian literature describes the ethical dilemma she faces when teaching "Ceremony," a novel built around spiritual beliefs and activities at Laguna Pueblo. Her pedagogical duty to provide students with the most complete coherent information possible conflicts directly with respect for the secrecy surrounding…

  15. On superconductivity and superfluidity. A scientific autobiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginzburg, Vitaly L.

    2009-01-01

    This book presents the Nobel Laureate Vitaly Ginzburg's views on the development in the field of superconductivity. It contains a selection of Ginzburg's key writings, including his amended version of the Nobel lecture in Physics 2003. Also included are an expanded autobiography, which was written for the Nobel Committee, an article entitled ''A Scientific Autobiography: An Attempt,'' a fundamental article co-written with L.D. Landau entitled ''To the theory of superconductivity,'' an expanded review article ''Superconductivity and superfluidity (what was done and what was not done),'' and some newly written short articles about superconductivity and related subjects. So, in toto, presented here are the personal contributions of Ginzburg, that resulted in the Nobel Prize, in the context of his scientific biography. (orig.)

  16. On superconductivity and superfluidity a scientific autobiography

    CERN Document Server

    Ginzburg, Vitalii Lazarevich

    2009-01-01

    This book presents the Nobel Laureate Vitaly Ginzburg's views on the development in the field of superconductivity. It contains a selection of Ginzburg's key writings, including his amended version of the Nobel lecture in Physics 2003. Also included are an expanded autobiography, which was written for the Nobel Committee, an article entitled "A Scientific Autobiography: An Attempt," a fundamental article co-written with L.D. Landau entitled "To the theory of superconductivity," an expanded review article "Superconductivity and superfluidity (what was done and what was not done)," and some newly written short articles about superconductivity and related subjects. So, in toto, presented here are the personal contributions of Ginzburg, that resulted in the Nobel Prize, in the context of his scientific biography.

  17. Vitamin B1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prize Alfred Nobel's Life and Work Teachers' Questionnaire Vitamin B1 - About The Chicken Farm educational game and ... the game window. Reading: "Christian Eijkman, Beriberi and Vitamin B1" - Who was Eijkman and why did he ...

  18. Six Nobel de physique réunis à Gardanne

    CERN Multimedia

    Crozel, Jean-Luc

    2008-01-01

    It's a single, exceptional event: six Nobel for Physics to inaugurate the new technological center: a school for engineers in the microelectronics field, amphitheaters for conferences, and a researche center; this will give to Gardanne a key role in the development of the french microelectronic industry. (1 page)

  19. Premio Nobel de ciencias Económicas 1998

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Amartya

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available

    La Academia Real de Ciencias de Suecia ha decidido otorgar el premio Banco de Suecia 1998 en Ciencias Económicas, en Memoria de Alfred Nobel, al Profesor Amartya Sen, del Trinity College, Reino Unido, y ciudadano indio, por sus contribuciones a la economía del bienestar.

     

     

     

  20. Joshua Lederberg – In Memoriam

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    enormous impact in opening up the genetic analysis of bacteria that resulted in other ... genetics, Lederberg shared the 1958 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine ... Stanford that he explored the areas of artificial intelligence, robotics and ...

  1. Slow neutron spectroscopy and the grand atlas of the physical world*

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brockhouse, B.N.

    1995-01-01

    This lecture was delivered 8 December 1994, on the occasion of the presentation of the 1994 Nobel Prize in Physics. This written version covers the same ground, though sometimes in different order, with a little additional material

  2. Renowned European Laboratory turns 50

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    A European Laboratory that was the birthplace of the World Wide Web and home of Nobel prize-winning developments in the quest to understand the makeup of matter wished itself a happy 50th birtheday on Tuesday

  3. Le CERN au féminin Une femme pour 89 hommes....

    CERN Multimedia

    Brouet, Anne-Muriel

    2008-01-01

    How many are they? Two, five, ten, zero? Since3 2902, 178 people received the Nobel Prize for Physics. Among them, two women, Marie Curie in 1903 and Maria Goeppert-Mayer sixty years later. (1/3 page)

  4. Surgery on Fetus Reduces Complications of Spina Bifida

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health Advances NICHD Nobel Prize Winners Leadership & Other Staff Profiles Leadership Biosketches Get to Know NICHD Budget & ... Listservs About NICHD Organization History Accomplishments Leadership & Other Staff Profiles Budget & Appropriations Advisory Groups Jobs at NICHD ...

  5. Surgery on Fetus Reduces Complications of Spina Bifida

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Snapshot of Child Development Advances Snapshot of Adult & Family Health Advances NICHD Nobel Prize Winners Leadership & Other ... development, before and after birth; maternal, child, and family health; reproductive biology and population issues; and medical ...

  6. Surgery on Fetus Reduces Complications of Spina Bifida

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Advances NICHD Nobel Prize Winners Leadership & Other Staff Profiles Leadership Biosketches Get to Know NICHD Budget & Appropriations ... About NICHD Organization History Accomplishments Leadership & Other Staff Profiles Budget & Appropriations Advisory Groups Jobs at NICHD Partnering & ...

  7. IDRC in Bangladesh

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    the 2006 Nobel Peace Prize with the. Grameen Bank he ... out the year by producing food rather than tobacco. ... Some current activities ... this knowledge with policymakers, other researchers, and communities around the world. The result is ...

  8. CSC9000T A Toll Bell to "Sweat Shops"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Yuan

    2007-01-01

    @@ CRS:A New Requirement for All "We cannot simply consider doing business is making more money, that's a humiliation to human being." So said Muhammad Yunus, founder of Grameen Bank and who received Nobel Peace Prize 2006.

  9. Surgery on Fetus Reduces Complications of Spina Bifida

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Information Find a Study Resources and Publications Men's Reproductive Health Condition Information NICHD Research Information Find ... Adult & Family Health Advances NICHD Nobel Prize Winners Leadership & Other Staff Profiles Leadership Biosketches Get to Know ...

  10. LHC INAUGURATION, LHC Fest highlights: exhibition time!

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    David Gross, one of the twenty-one Nobel Laureates who have participated in the project.Tuesday 21 October 2008 Accelerating Nobels Colliding Charm, Atomic Cuisine, The Good Anomaly, A Quark Somewhere on the White Paper, Wire Proliferation, A Tale of Two Liquids … these are just some of the titles given to artworks by Physics Nobel Laureates who agreed to make drawings of their prize-winning discoveries (more or less reluctantly) during a special photo session. Science photographer Volker Steger made portraits of Physics Nobel Laureates and before the photo sessions he asked them to make a drawing of their most important discovery. The result is "Accelerating Nobels", an exhibition that combines unusual portraits of and original drawings by twenty-one Nobel laureates in physics whose work is closely related to CERN and the LHC. This exhibition will be one of the highlights of the LHC celebrations on 21 October in the SM18 hall b...

  11. Accounting for the Poor

    OpenAIRE

    Robert M. Townsend

    2013-01-01

    Economists and other social scientists have long tried to understand the nature of poverty and how poor people make decisions. For example, T.W. Schultz, a Nobel Laureate, former professor of economics at the University of Chicago, and former president of the American Economic Association, spent his career working in development and agricultural economics. In his 1980 Nobel Prize acceptance speech, Schultz suggests that there is some accounting for the behavior of the poor in agriculture. "Fa...

  12. Introduction to the Tinbergen Centennial Issue

    OpenAIRE

    Cornelisse, P.A.; Don, Henk; Dijk, Herman

    2004-01-01

    textabstractOn April 12, 2003 it was hundred years ago that Jan Tinbergen was born. In 1969 he received, together with Ragnar Frisch, the first Nobel Prize in Economics 'for having developed and applied dynamic models for the analysis of economic processes'. In this issue of De Economist, which commemorates Tinbergen's 100th anniversary, three other Nobel laureates, viz. Paul Samuelson, Lawrence Klein and Robert Solow, give their views on this and other contributions by Tinbergen to economic ...

  13. Marie Curie and the 'Science of Radioactivity'; Maria Curie y la 'Ciencia de la Radioactividad'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercader, Roberto C. [UNLP Universidad Nacional de La Plata, La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); CONICET Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2009-07-01

    This article is about Maria Curie, nee Sklodowska, an outstanding mathematician and physicist who managed to counteract the oppressive rules in her Russian occupied Poland that prevented native Polish from taking advanced studies. She went to Paris to study physics and mathematics at the University at the end of the nineteenth century and, notwithstanding the harsh conditions she had to endure, she obtained honors degrees in both disciplines. After marrying her tutor, Pierre Curie, she and her husband were able to get to the core of the problem of {sup r}adioactivity{sup ,} term that she coined. They discovered two new elements, radium and polonium. Jointly with Becquerel, the Curies were awarded the Nobel Prize for physics in 1903. They kept on with their hard work together until the untimely dead of Pierre in 1906. Taking her husband's chair, she became the first female professor at La Sorbonne. In spite of the hostility toward her for sexist and xenophobic prejudices, she obtained a new Nobel Prize, this time for chemistry, in 1911. Her commitment to help the soldiers in the battlefields over the First World War was extraordinary. She developed portable X-ray machines and even drove herself the trucks that carried them to the field hospitals thus changing forever the way that war-inflicted wounds were treated. She founded the Institut du Radium where her daughter Irene obtained the Nobel Prize for physics in 1935 only months after her mother's dead of leukemia in 1934. (author)

  14. Traffic - Special arrangements for the official ceremony on 19th October

    CERN Multimedia

    Relations with the Host States Service

    2004-01-01

    The official ceremony marking CERN's fiftieth anniversary will take place on 19th October 2004 in the presence of Member State delegations and observers. Many VIPs are to attend the ceremony, which will be held in the Globe of Science and Innovation and in the adjacent marquee. The arrival and departure of the official delegations and guests will cause some disruption to traffic on and around the Meyrin site: The Route de Meyrin will probably be closed to traffic by the police between 2.00 p.m. and 3.00 p.m. and between 5.00 p.m. and 7.00 p.m. for the arrival and departure of VIPs. Access to the Saint-Genis-Pouilly roundabout will be difficult between 2.00 p.m. and 2.30 p.m., when the new entrance to the Meyrin site will be inaugurated. Use of the following car parks will be prohibited from 16th to 19th October inclusive (Open day and official ceremony; the appropriate road signs will be erected): the car parks located between the two lines on the drawing below (guests will register in a tent set up oppo...

  15. Work in progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Hours after being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. ElBaradei sat down for a candid conversation with CNN anchor Jonathan Mann whose probing questions spotlighted the world's most contentious problems. Following are excerpts from this CNN broadcast

  16. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    etc, some important international events take place. Of im- mense interest to the majority of the world's citizens is the. Football World Cup. ... Fields medals considered equivalent to the Nobel Prize in mathematics. ... The four winners this year.

  17. Vom work Book Journal, 2011 2nd Edition Victor

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    half life, exposure rate constant and the Annual. Limit on Intake (ALI) for ... In general, some hazards are associated with. Summary ... Nobel Prize for physics in 1901 (Thrall, 1998). Emerging ... nuclear technology after World War II and the.

  18. Interplay of disorder and interaction in two-dimensional electron gas in intense magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsui, D.C.

    1999-01-01

    The article is a translation of the lecture on the title topic, delivered on the occasion of the Noble Prize awarding ceremony in 1998. The outline is completed with the author's autobiography. (P.A.)

  19. The fractional quantum Hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoermer, H.L.

    1999-01-01

    The article is a translation of the lecture on the title topic, delivered on the occasion of the Noble Prize awarding ceremony in 1998. The outline is completed with the author's autobiography. (P.A.)

  20. Fractional quantization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laughlin, R.B.

    1999-01-01

    The article is a translation of the lecture on the title topic, delivered on the occasion of the Noble Prize awarding ceremony in 1998. The outline is completed with the author's autobiography. (P.A.)

  1. Superconductivity. Discoveries and discoverers. Ten physics nobel laureates tell their story

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fossheim, Kristian [Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway). Dept. of Physics

    2013-10-01

    Displays the life and work of 10 Nobel laureates. Presents interesting background information on how great science is achieved. Presents the history of superconductivity through 100 years of progress. 10 great scientists tell their unique stories in their own words. Personal stories of Bednorz, Mueller and 8 other Nobel laureates. This book is about the work of 10 great scientists; who they were and are, their personal background and how they achieved their outstanding results and took their prominent place in science history. We follow one of physics and science history's most enigmatic phenomena, superconductivity, through 100 years, from its discovery in 1911 to the present, not as a history book in the usual sense, but through close ups of the leading characters and their role in that story, the Nobel laureates, who were still among us in the years 2001-2004 when the main round of interviews was carried out. Since then two of them already passed away. For each one of the 10 laureates, the author tells their story by direct quotation from interviews in their own words. Each chapter treats one laureate. The author first gives a brief account of the laureates' scientific background and main contribution. Then each laureate tells his own story in his own words. This book is unique in its approach to science history.

  2. Superconductivity. Discoveries and discoverers. Ten physics nobel laureates tell their story

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fossheim, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Displays the life and work of 10 Nobel laureates. Presents interesting background information on how great science is achieved. Presents the history of superconductivity through 100 years of progress. 10 great scientists tell their unique stories in their own words. Personal stories of Bednorz, Mueller and 8 other Nobel laureates. This book is about the work of 10 great scientists; who they were and are, their personal background and how they achieved their outstanding results and took their prominent place in science history. We follow one of physics and science history's most enigmatic phenomena, superconductivity, through 100 years, from its discovery in 1911 to the present, not as a history book in the usual sense, but through close ups of the leading characters and their role in that story, the Nobel laureates, who were still among us in the years 2001-2004 when the main round of interviews was carried out. Since then two of them already passed away. For each one of the 10 laureates, the author tells their story by direct quotation from interviews in their own words. Each chapter treats one laureate. The author first gives a brief account of the laureates' scientific background and main contribution. Then each laureate tells his own story in his own words. This book is unique in its approach to science history.

  3. W K H Panofsky prize awarded for CP violation

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Italo Mannelli (left) et Heinrich Wahl (right) at CERN after the announcement of the prize. The American Physical Society has recently announced its 2007 winners of the W K H Panofsky prize to CERN's Heinrich Wahl (now at the University of Ferrara), Italo Mannelli from Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa and Bruce Winstein of University of Chicago. These three physicists led experiments that resulted in a multitude of precision measurements of properties of neutral kaons, most notably the discovery of direct CP violation. The W K H Panofsky prize recognizes outstanding achievements in experimental particle physics. Wahl and Mannelli's important work at CERN with CP violation and neutral kaons in the 1970s paved the way for the NA31 experiment in the 1980s. This experiment, of which Wahl was the spokesperson, focused on and found the first evidence for direct CP violation. Mannelli played a leading role, particularly in implementing his knowledge of calorimetry using liquefied noble gases, a technique originally...

  4. Arthur B. McDonald, Physics Nobel Laureate 2015, at CERN colloquium

    CERN Multimedia

    Ordan, Julien Marius

    2017-01-01

    Arthur B. McDonald, Physics Nobel Laureate 2015, photographed at CERN colloquium on the "Science of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) and SNOLAB” given in CERN Main Auditorium on Monday 4 Sep 2017

  5. Analysis of Advancement and Attrition in the Military Ceremonial Units

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hostetler, Elizabeth

    1997-01-01

    ... their normal career progression on hold. Information on individuals who entered the military service during fiscal years 1986 to 1995 and were assigned to one of the ceremonial units was collected...

  6. The LHC's suppliers come up trumps

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Four of the LHC Project's most exceptional suppliers have just been honoured in the fifth Golden Hadron awards ceremony. For the first time, a CERN team was among the prize-winners. The CERN main workshop (Mechanical and Materials Engineering group, TS/MME) received the Golden Hadron Award at the prize-giving ceremony held at the Globe. From left to right, Saïd Atieh (TS/MME), Vincent Vuillemin (TS/MME group leader), Michel Caccioppoli (TS/MME), Lyn Evans (LHC Project Leader), Marc Polini (TS/MME-MS section leader), Jean-Luc Gayraud (Cegelec), Jean-Paul Bacher (TS/MME-AS section leader) and Paolo Ciriani (head of the TS Department). Flexible, responsive, committed... all fitting adjectives to describe the recipients of the fifth Golden Hadron awards. The prizes, designed to honour the LHC Project's best suppliers, were awarded to a total of four suppliers, including two that are involved in the final accelerator assembly work: proof, if it were needed, that the project has now entered its final phase. Drak...

  7. Prizes reward high-energy physics

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The European Physical Society (EPS) has recognized four individuals and a collaboration for their work on charge-parity (CP) violation, gamma-ray astronomy, cosmology and outreach activities. Heinrich Wahl, formerly of CERN, and the NA31 collaboration share the 2005 High Energy and Particle Physics Prize for their work on CP violation at CERN (½ page)

  8. Title Highlight: Scientists respond to climate change challenges at ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-14

    Apr 14, 2016 ... ... Change (UNFCC) conference, to be hosted by France later this year. ... Nobel Prize winner Joseph Stiglitz, a conference keynote speaker, ... to attempt to deal with climate change when the world is recovering, and in some ...

  9. NASA declares no room for antimatter experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Law??, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    "The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is a model of international cooperation, led by a dynamic Nobel Prize winner, and promises to do impressive science in space. But it may never get a chance to do its thing." (1 page)

  10. Early medical scans used animals, too

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Julian

    2013-07-01

    Ian Pykett's letter on "Pioneering veggie MRIs" (May p23) reminded me of something I heard about Sir Godfrey Hounsfield, who shared the 1979 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine for developing the X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner.

  11. Marie Curie: In the laboratory and on the battlefield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badash, Lawrence

    2003-01-01

    This year is the centennial of the Nobel Prize in Physics shared by Henri Becquerel and the Curies for their pioneering work on radioactivity. But Marie Curie's contribution to the medical use of x rays is not widely known

  12. Cellular Reprogramming–Turning the Clock Back

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 6. Cellular Reprogramming - Turning the Clock Back - Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, 2012. Deepa Subramanyam. General Article Volume 18 Issue 6 June 2013 pp 514-521 ...

  13. Physcicists rewarded for 'fractional electrons'

    CERN Multimedia

    Ball, P

    1998-01-01

    The 1998 Nobel prize for physics has been awarded to Horst Stormer, Daniel Tsui and Robert Laughlin.Stormer and Tsui were the first to observe the fractional quantum Hall effect and Laughlin provided the theory shortly afterwards (1 page).

  14. A list of personal perspectives with selected quotations, along with lists of tributes, historical notes, Nobel and Kettering awards related to photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogmann, David W

    2002-01-01

    The history of photosynthesis research can be found in original papers and books. However, a special history is available from the prefatory chapters and the personal perspectives of various researchers who published them in several journals over the last 40 years. We have compiled a list of such perspectives published since 1964. Selection is not easy, especially of authors who were not directly engaged in photosynthesis research; some are included for their special insights related to central issues in the study of photosynthesis. Our journal, Photosynthesis Research, contains other valuable historic data in the occasional tributes, obituaries and historical notes, that have been published. Lists of these items are included. This article ends by listing the Nobel prizes related to photosynthesis and the Kettering Awards for Excellence in Photosynthesis Research. Wherever possible, a web page address is provided. The web page addresses have been taken from the article 'Photosynthesis and the Web: 2001' by Larry Orr and Govindjee, available at http://www.life.uiuc.edu/govindjee/photoweb and at http://photoscience.la.asu.edu/photosyn/ photoweb/default.html.When I find a bit of leisureI trifle with my papers.This is one of the lesserfrailities.'- Horace, Satires I, IV.

  15. O Prêmio Nobel de Física de 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Maria Filardo Bassalo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7941.2011v28n1p205 Neste artigo, trataremos do Prêmio Nobel de Física de 2010, concedido aos físicos, de origem russa, o inglês Konstantin Sergeevich Novoselov e o holandês Andre Konstantinov Geim, pela descoberta do grafeno.

  16. Contestation des Nobel une tradition aussi ancienne que leur attribution

    CERN Document Server

    Sevestre, G

    2003-01-01

    "La contestation des Nobel, avec cette annee la campagne lancee par un Americain afin de faire reconnaitre son role dans la mise au point de l'imagerie a resonance magnetique (IRM), constitue une tradition, quasiment aussi ancienne que l'attribution de ces distinctions" (1 page).

  17. Certainty and Uncertainty in the Practice of Science: Electrons, Muons and Taus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perl, Martin

    1999-01-01

    During the past one hundred years three related elementary particles-the electron, the muon, and the tau-were discovered by very different scientific techniques. The author, who received the Wolf Prize and the Nobel Prize for the discovery of the tau, uses this history to discuss certainty and uncertainty in the practice of science. While the emphasis is on the practice of scientific research, the paper also explains for the non-physicist some basic ideas in elementary particle science

  18. Certainty and Uncertainty in the Practice of Science: Electrons, Muons and Taus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perl, Martin

    1999-01-29

    During the past one hundred years three related elementary particles-the electron, the muon, and the tau-were discovered by very different scientific techniques. The author, who received the Wolf Prize and the Nobel Prize for the discovery of the tau, uses this history to discuss certainty and uncertainty in the practice of science. While the emphasis is on the practice of scientific research, the paper also explains for the non-physicist some basic ideas in elementary particle science.

  19. Bike2Work celebration in honour of the colleagues who registered most kilometers in 2013

    CERN Document Server

    Vigen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Before the 2014 season was officially launched, the CERN bikers took time to celebrate the strong commitment of biking to work in 2013. The celebration took place in front of Restaurant 1. The president of the CERN Bike Club, Henrik Nissen, was the master of ceremonies and presented a set of prizes: The three first prizes, all corresponding to the so-called "Karma Level Sexy Bottom", went to Tim Smith (7182 km), Martial Dujardin (5109 km) and Gabriele Thiede (4326 km). For the remaining group of participants there were seven extra prizes, attributed from a prize draw - where each of their registered kilometers was used as lottery ticket. In addition all got a diploma stating their karma level .

  20. Daniel Kahneman: premio Nobel de Economia 2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo J. Contreras Sosa

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta una retrospección general del perfil del premio Nobel en economía 2002, además se realiza un análisis del llamado “desafío Kahneman-Tversky” y se confrontan los problemas de racionalidad limitada implícitos en el desafío K-T frente a la hipótesis dominante en la teoría económica estándar, acerca de que los agentes formulan expectativas racionales.

  1. On superconductivity and superfluidity. A scientific autobiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginzburg, Vitaly L. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). P.N. Lebedev Physical Inst.

    2009-07-01

    This book presents the Nobel Laureate Vitaly Ginzburg's views on the development in the field of superconductivity. It contains a selection of Ginzburg's key writings, including his amended version of the Nobel lecture in Physics 2003. Also included are an expanded autobiography, which was written for the Nobel Committee, an article entitled 'A Scientific Autobiography: An Attempt,' a fundamental article co-written with L.D. Landau entitled 'To the theory of superconductivity,' an expanded review article 'Superconductivity and superfluidity (what was done and what was not done),' and some newly written short articles about superconductivity and related subjects. So, in toto, presented here are the personal contributions of Ginzburg, that resulted in the Nobel Prize, in the context of his scientific biography. (orig.)

  2. Accélérateur du CERN: et si on ne trouvait rien?

    CERN Multimedia

    Gordon, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    The hunt for the Higgs boson: the "God particle" and the mission chainon of physics; The tower of Babel of the observers of the infinitely small; 60 years marked by bunches of discoveries, Nobel Prize and the creation of the web.

  3. Quantum optics shines in the photon's centenary

    CERN Multimedia

    Cho, Adrian

    2005-01-01

    Hundred years after Einstein's hypothesis, the 2005 Nobel Prize in physics honors three researchers who have pioneered the frontier between the wave and particle views of light and laid the foundation for the field of "quantum optics" (1/2 page)

  4. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    mutation characterized his entire scientific career. The most ... tific work. In 1950 he was nominated by B N Rajewsky,. Director of the Berlin Institute of Biophysics, for the. Nobel Prize in .... days is described in the memoirs of the Russian artist.

  5. Barbara McClintock and the Discovery of Jumping Genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    milind1

    the Nobel Prize in 1983 for her work on genetic instability. (transposition). .... Getting accepted in the male world of science was not easy either. The awe and respect ... instead in the annual reports of the Carnegie Institution or in. Conference ...

  6. SAMJFORUM

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    famous will did not endow a Nobel Prize in mathematics. The salacious stories of ... are awarded at the International Congress of Mathematicians, . held only every 4 ... when he plugged a_350-year-old gap and proved Fermat's Last. Theorem ...

  7. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Admin

    455 The Major Players in Adaptive Immunity. Humoral Immunity. Asama Ahmed, Banishree Saha, Anand Patwardhan,. Shwetha Shivaprasad and Dipankar Nandi. 472 The Saga of the HIV Controversy. Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine – 2008. Udaykumar Ranga. 430. 416. 508 ...

  8. Rosalind Franklin: The Woman Scientist of DNA It is fifty years since ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    milind1

    awarded the Nobel Prize as it is not given posthu- mously. ... photographs are among the most beautiful of any substance ... during World War II, and Franklin investigated why some ... fered her only a three-year fellowship, with nei- ther rank ...

  9. Einstein: I cento anni che sconvolsero il mondo

    CERN Multimedia

    Di Giorgio, Claudia

    2005-01-01

    In 1905, the german physicist published five articles about relativity, a theory which changed for ever our knowledge and our life. This beginning year will be "the mondial Year of Physcis" and the physics Community celebrate the Nobel Prize (⅓ page)

  10. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH

    It was the motivation behind the simultaneous award of the Lasker prize to ..... Coles H 1997 Nobel panel rewards prion theory after years of heated debate ... Gajdusek D C 1967 Slow-virus infections of the nervous system;. New Engl. J. Med.

  11. African Institute for Mathematical Sciences | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Each year, Africa's top students enroll in a rigorous 10-month graduate-level ... all teaching staff are volunteers drawn from some of the world's best universities. Among the professors are Nobel Prize winners and several recipients of the Fields ...

  12. Development | Page 32 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This book describes and analyzes the 3-year-long “L-20” project, whose objective ... in the environment for research and development (R&D) around the world. ... the “capability approach” of economist and Nobel Prize laureate Amartya Sen.

  13. Nigeeria kirjade autorid said Liba-Nobeli kirjanduspreemia

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Liba-Nobeli kirjanduspreemia (Ig Nobel Prize - asutatud 1991) pälvisid aastal 2005 Nigeerias interneti- ettevõtjad, kes levitasid e-posti teel "novelliseeriat" tutvustades nii miljonitele lugejatele tegelaskujusid nagu kindral Sani Abacha, mrs. Mariam Sanni Abacha, advokaat Jon A Mbeki jt.

  14. Neutrinos - the perfect wave. From the Nobel price to the world of Higgs, extra-dimensions and time voyages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paes, Heinrich

    2017-01-01

    This book tells the history of the discoveries, which have led to the physics Nobel price 2015. It explains and speculates completely concretely, how it could continue with the neutrinos, and how radically the Nobel-price crowned discoveries of McDonald and Kajita could change our picture of the universe.

  15. A new prize system for drug innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandjour, Afschin; Chernyak, Nadja

    2011-10-01

    We propose a new prize (reward) system for drug innovation which pays a price based on the value of health benefits accrued over time. Willingness to pay for a unit of health benefit is determined based on the cost-effectiveness ratio of palliative/nursing care. We solve the problem of limited information on the value of health benefits by mathematically relating reward size to the uncertainty of information including information on potential drug overuse. The proposed prize system offers optimal incentives to invest in research and development because it rewards the innovator for the social value of drug innovation. The proposal is envisaged as a non-voluntary alternative to the current patent system and reduces excessive marketing of innovators and generic drug producers. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Spazio ASI, INFN e Nobel Ting a caccia di antimateria

    CERN Document Server

    Boz,

    2003-01-01

    "Una apparecchiatura per la ricerca dell' antimateria che nell'autunno del 2005 sara' installata sulla Stazione Spaziale e' al centro di un accordo di collaborazione tra l'Agenzia Spaziale Italiana e il Nobel Samuel Ting, del Mit e del Cern di Ginevra, firmato oggi a Roma (1 page).

  17. 25 Years of GenBank

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Javascript on. Unique DNA database has helped advance scientific discoveries worldwide Since its origin 25 years ago, the ... Ph.D., a Nobel Prize winner for his discoveries of split genes, and currently Chief Scientific Officer at New England BioLabs Sydney Brenner, Ph. ...

  18. Resonance – Journal of Science Education | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 1. The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2004 - Ubiquitous' Quality Control of Life. Chandrakant S Karigar K R Siddalinga Murthy. General Article Volume 10 Issue 1 January 2005 pp 41-49 ...

  19. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    236 The Central Dogma of Molecular Biology. A Retrospective after Fifty Years. Michel Morange. 248 Chemistry is Evergreen... 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Swagata Dasgupta. 248. 226. Page 2. 215. RESONANCE | March 2009. DEPARTMENTS. Editorial. Biman Nath. Hubble Space Telescope, launched in 1991.

  20. Resonance – Journal of Science Education | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 1. Physics Nobel Prize 2000 goes to Semiconductor Pioneers. V Venkataraman. Research News Volume 6 Issue 1 January 2001 pp 79-83. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  1. Downside Risk And Empirical Asset Pricing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. van Vliet (Pim)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractCurrently, the Nobel prize winning Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM) celebrates its 40th birthday. Although widely applied in financial management, this model does not fully capture the empirical riskreturn relation of stocks; witness the beta, size, value and momentum effects. These

  2. Andrei Dimitrievich Sakharov 1921-1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    Andrei Dimitrievich Sakharov, talented and versatile scientist, fearless activist and staunch proponent of human rights, figurehead for Soviet perestroika, described in the citation for his 1975 Nobel Peace Prize as 'spokesman for the conscience of mankind', died on 14 December

  3. The ch in children stands for cherish

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of the SA position in relation to other countries around the world in the. Global Status ... the same: three children a day (1 200 a year) are murdered.[7]. In the UK .... Nelson Mandela's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech,. 10 December ...

  4. Peter Debye

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hopefully, the new year will bring more good than our little faith allows us ... to such an extent that the Royal Academy of Sciences has awarded you the Nobel Prize ... ended in Europe in 1939, during the turmoil of the Second World War.

  5. Canada is helping to find the next Einstein in Africa | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2012-10-23

    Oct 23, 2012 ... The belief is that the world's next genius could just as easily come from Africa ... one million students graduate from African universities each year, but high-level ... Among the professors are four Nobel Prize winners as well as ...

  6. Resonance – Journal of Science Education | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 7. Nobel Prize 2000 in Physiology or Medicine - Trackers of the Slow Synaptic Phenomena in the Brain. S K Sikdar. General Article Volume 6 Issue 7 July 2001 pp 42-51 ...

  7. Introduction to scanning tunneling microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, C Julian

    2008-01-01

    The scanning tunneling and the atomic force microscope, both capable of imaging individual atoms, were crowned with the Physics Nobel Prize in 1986, and are the cornerstones of nanotechnology today. This is a thoroughly updated version of this 'bible' in the field.

  8. Co-discoverer of evidence for quarks killed in diving accident

    CERN Multimedia

    Nadis, S

    1999-01-01

    Henry Kendall died last week while scuba diving in a Florida lake. He was awarded the Nobel prize in 1990 along with Friedman and Taylor, for their work in the late 1960s that provided the first direct evidence for quarks (1 page).

  9. Bertram Brockhouse, the Triple-axis Spectrometer, and Neutron Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neutron Spectroscopy Resources with Additional Information Bertram Brockhouse Courtesy of McMaster was awarded the 1994 Nobel Prize in Physics for his development of neutron spectroscopy. Bert Physicist, Dies, The New York Times, October 16, 2003 1994: Development of Neutron Spectroscopy, Brookhaven

  10. Embryonic Stem Cells and their Genetic Modification

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 13; Issue 2. Embryonic Stem Cells and their Genetic Modification - The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2007. Mitradas M Panicker. General Article Volume 13 Issue 2 February 2008 pp 172-180 ...

  11. Hazardous Waste Cleanup: Akzo Nobel Polymer Chemicals, LLC, Burt, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akzo Nobel Polymer Chemicals, LLC is located in northern Niagara County, south of Lake Ontario. The facility encompasses 350 acres, of which 30 acres are used for the production of organic peroxides. Eighteen Mile Creek is located immediately west of the

  12. Diagnostic value of NobelGuide to minimize the need for reconstructive surgery of jaws before implant placement: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti, Roberto; Pellegrino, Gerardo; Marchetti, Claudio; Corinaldesi, Guiseppe; Ciocca, Leonardo

    2010-01-01

    To test if using a CAD/CAM system might reduce the necessity of bone augmentation in patients with atrophic maxillary arches before implant therapy. Twenty male and female patients consecutively scheduled for bone augmentation of the jaw before implant surgery were included in this study, with a total of 29 jaws (maxillary and mandibular) to analyze for the implant-supported fixed prosthesis group and 19 maxillary arches for the implant-supported removable prosthesis group. NobelGuide System (Nobel Biocare), Autocad System (Autodesk), and routine manual CT measurements of available bone were used in this study. The total results of the mean values of the fixed prosthesis group plus the mean values of the removable prosthesis group showed a statistically significant difference between the NobelGuide intervention score and both manual (P = .004) and Autocad (P = .001) measurements. The NobelGuide System represents a viable diagnostic device to reduce the entity or avoid bone reconstructive surgery before implant placements in the atrophic maxilla and mandible.

  13. Un Nobel para el tiempo biológico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Golombek

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available El premio Nobel en Fisiología o Medicina de 2017 fue otorgado a tres investigadores norteamericanos pioneros en el descubrimiento del mecanismo de los ritmos circadianos. Ya era hora… y es una excelente excusa para destacar la importancia de la Cronobiología – la ciencia que estudia los ritmos y relojes biológicos - tanto en la vida cotidiana en general como en las ciencias médicas en particular.

  14. MIT Clean Energy Prize: Final Technical Report May 12, 2010 - May 11, 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, Chris [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Campbell, Georgina [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Salony, Jason [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Aulet, Bill [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2011-08-09

    The MIT Clean Energy Prize (MIT CEP) is a venture creation and innovation competition to encourage innovation in the energy space, specifically with regard to clean energy. The Competition invited student teams from any US university to submit student-led ventures that demonstrate a high potential of successfully making clean energy more affordable, with a positive impact on the environment. By focusing on student ventures, the MIT CEP aims to educate the next generation of clean energy entrepreneurs. Teams receive valuable mentoring and hard deadlines that complement the cash prize to accelerate development of ventures. The competition is a year-long educational process that culminates in the selection of five category finalists and a Grand Prize winner and the distribution of cash prizes to each of those teams. Each entry was submitted in one of five clean energy categories: Renewables, Clean Non-Renewables, Energy Efficiency, Transportation, and Deployment.

  15. Stress Testing of the Philips 60W Replacement Lamp L Prize Entry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poplawski, Michael E.; Ledbetter, Marc R.; Smith, Mark

    2012-04-24

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy, worked with Intertek to develop a procedure for stress testing medium screw-base light sources. This procedure, composed of alternating stress cycles and performance evaluation, was used to qualitatively compare and contrast the durability and reliability of the Philips 60W replacement lamp L Prize entry with market-proven compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) with comparable light output and functionality. The stress cycles applied simultaneous combinations of electrical, thermal, vibration, and humidity stresses of increasing magnitude. Performance evaluations measured relative illuminance, x chromaticity and y chromaticity shifts after each stress cycle. The Philips L Prize entry lamps appear to be appreciably more durable than the incumbent energy-efficient technology, as represented by the evaluated CFLs, and with respect to the applied stresses. Through the course of testing, all 15 CFL samples permanently ceased to function as a result of the applied stresses, while only 1 Philips L Prize entry lamp exhibited a failure, the nature of which was minor, non-destructive, and a consequence of a known (and resolved) subcontractor issue. Given that current CFL technology appears to be moderately mature and no Philips L Prize entry failures could be produced within the stress envelope causing 100 percent failure of the benchmark CFLs, it seems that, in this particular implementation, light-emitting diode (LED) technology would be much more durable in the field than current CFL technology. However, the Philips L Prize entry lamps used for testing were carefully designed and built for the competition, while the benchmark CFLs were mass produced for retail sale—a distinction that should be taken into consideration. Further reliability testing on final production samples would be necessary to judge the extent to which the results of this analysis apply to production versions

  16. Roentgen and x-rays: a passage through the memory lane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyer, P.S.

    1995-01-01

    It is now well established that x-rays were accidentally discovered by Prof. Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen on the afternoon of November 8, 1895, when he was experimenting with cathode rays in the Physics Department, University of Wurzburg, Wurzburg, Germany. In spite of suggestions by several of his friends, Roentgen politely declined to patent his discovery. Consequently, x-rays could be put to immediate use for a variety of applications, and primarily in medicine to visualise the internal structures of the human body, as also for diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Roentgen was the first recipient of the Nobel prize in Physics, which was established in 1901. Roentgen donated the entire Nobel prize money to the University of Wurzburg for scientific activities. Such were the greatness and humanitarian approach of Roentgen, and now x-rays have become a household name. (author). 3 refs., 3 ills

  17. Exhibition: Women and Sciences by Fiami

    CERN Multimedia

    Globe Info

    2011-01-01

    The 19-panel exhibition is on display at CERN's Microcosm from Monday to Saturday from 10.00 a.m. to 5.00 p.m.   Marie Curie won the Nobel Prize for Chemistry one hundred years ago. She is the only woman ever to win two Nobel Prizes, which is a testament to her remarkable work. But throughout history, women have played a role in science either in their own right or alongside other scientists. In this special exhibition, the comic-strip artist Fiami takes a look back at the relationship between women and science through his portraits of Mileva Einstein, Marie-Anne Lavoisier and, of course, Marie Curie. Fiami has recently published an entire album devoted to Marie Curie. Texts in French All ages - Entrance free Femmes et Sciences is on display at Microcosm: From Wednesday 21 September 2011 to Tuesday 20 December 2011.

  18. Prize-based contingency management for the treatment of substance abusers: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benishek, Lois A; Dugosh, Karen L; Kirby, Kim C; Matejkowski, Jason; Clements, Nicolle T; Seymour, Brittany L; Festinger, David S

    2014-09-01

    To review randomized controlled trials to assess efficacy of a prize-based contingency management procedure in reducing substance use (where a drug-free breath or urine sample provides a chance of winning a prize). A meta-analysis was conducted on papers published from January 2000 to February 2013 to determine the effect size of studies comparing prize-based contingency management to a treatment-as-usual control condition (k = 19 studies). Parallel analyses evaluated the efficacy of both short- (k = nine studies) and long-term outcomes (k = six studies) of prize-based contingency management. The average end-of-treatment effect size (Cohen's d) was 0.46 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.37, 0.54]. This effect size decreased at the short-term (≤3-month) post-intervention follow-up to 0.33 (95% CI = 0.12, 0.54) and at the 6-month follow-up time-point there was no detectable effect [d = -0.09 (95% CI = -0.28, 0.10)]. Adding prize-based contingency management to behavioral support for substance use disorders can increase short-term abstinence, but the effect does not appear to persist to 6 months. © 2014 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  19. The contribution of several Nobel Laureates in the development of the Theory of general economic equilibrium

    OpenAIRE

    Florentina Xhelili Krasniqi; Rahmie Topxhiu; Donat Rexha

    2016-01-01

    Nobel Laureates with their contributions to the development of the theory of general equilibrium have enabled this theory to be one of the most important for theoretical and practical analysis of the overall economy and the efficient use of economic resources. Results of the research showing that contributions of Nobel Laureates in the economy belong to two main frameworks of development of the general equilibrium theory: one was the mathematical model of general equilibrium developed by J...

  20. The Sweat Lodge Ceremony: A Healing Intervention for Intergenerational Trauma and Substance Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Naseba Marsh

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Many traditional healers and Elders agree that strengthening cultural identity, incorporating traditional healing practices, and encouraging community integration can enhance and improve mental health and reduce substance use disorders (SUD in Indigenous populations. Despite the fact that traditional healing practices have always been valued by Indigenous Peoples, there is very little research on efficacy. Recent research by one of the authors in this group (T. Marsh has shown that the blending of Indigenous traditional healing practices and a Western treatment model, Seeking Safety, resulted in a reduction in intergenerational trauma (IGT symptoms and substance use disorders (SUD. This article focuses on the qualitative evidence concerning the impact of the traditional healing practices, specifically the sweat lodge ceremony. Participants reported an increase in spiritual and emotional well-being that they said was directly attributable to the ceremony. This study demonstrates that it would be beneficial to incorporate Indigenous traditional healing practices, including the sweat lodge ceremony, into Seeking Safety to enhance the health and well-being of Indigenous Peoples with IGT and SUD.