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Sample records for no-carrier-added radioactive scandium

  1. Production of no carrier added residue free /sup 22/Na

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britto, J L.Q. de; Bastos, M A.V.; Silva, R.F. da; Silva, A.G. da

    1988-05-02

    A method for the production of no carrier added and residue free /sup 22/Na, was developed via the /sup 24/Mg(d,..cap alpha..)/sup 22/Na nuclear reaction applying 14 MeV deuterons and a high current MG-Cu target. The yield for the reaction was measured and the chemical separation was performed using a Dowex 50WX8 resin in H/sup +/ form. The overall yield was higher than 98%. Residue could not be detected. All experiments were carried out at IEN's CV-28 cyclotron. (author) 13 refs.; 2 figs.

  2. Automated production of no carrier added holmium-166

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izard, M.E.; Dadchova, E.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: An automated system has been developed to produce no carrier added 166 Ho from the decay of 166 Dy produced by neutron activation of 164 Dy 2 O 3 . Targets consisting of 5-10 mg of 164 Dy 2 O 3 are irradiated in HIFAR at 5 x 10 13 n.s -1 .cm -2 for 12h then allowed to cool for 2 days. The irradiation can is then transferred to the automated system located in a 'hot' cell in the radiopharmaceutical research building. A two dimension robotic arm encompassing a grab and motorized screwdriver is used to open the irradiation can. A second arm carrying a teflon tube introduces 9M HCI into the can to dissolve the target. A second tube carries the dissolved target via a peristaltic pump to a heated vial where it is evaporated to dryness under a flow of N 2 . A Peltier cooled trap is used to prevent release of HCl fumes into the cell. A motorized syringe pump dispenses 1 mL of 0.1 M HNO 3 to redissolve the digest which is then transferred by peristaltic pump via a hollow fibre filter and auto injector into an Aminex- A5 HPLC column. 166 Dy is eluted from the column in 0.132 M α-HIBA into a heated cyclone flask and evaporated to dryness under a stream of N 2 heated to about 50 deg C. After two days the evaporated Dy/ 166 Ho digest is dissolved in another 1 mL of 0.1 M HNO 3 and injected onto the HPLC column. 166 Ho is collected in 20-25 mL of α-HIBA and evaporated to dryness as before at about 400 C to ensure complete decomposition of the α-HIBA. The product is finally dissolved in about I mL of 0.1 M HCI and pumped through a 0.22 μM filter to a product vial

  3. Synthesis of no-carrier-added alpha-[11C]methyl-L-tryptophan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaly, T.; Diksic, M.

    1988-01-01

    Described here is a synthesis of no-carrier-added alpha-[ 11 C]methyl-L-tryptophan based on alkylation with 11 CH 3 I of an anion generated by reacting the Schiff base of L-tryptophan methyl ester with di-isopropylamine. The synthesis requires approximately 30 min after the end of 11 CO 2 collection and gives alpha-[ 11 C]methyl-L-tryptophan in a 20-25% radiochemical yield calculated at the end of the synthesis and without correction for radioactive decay. The specific activity of the final radiopharmaceutical, measured at the end of the synthesis, was around 2000 Ci/mmol. Data confirming the stereospecificity of the synthesis are also presented

  4. Production of no-carrier-added 64Cu from zinc metal irradiated under boron shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinn, K R; Chaudhuri, T R; Cheng, T P; Morris, J S; Meyer, W A

    1994-02-01

    Positron emission tomography offers advantages for radioimmunodiagnosis of cancer but requires radionuclides of appropriate half-life that have high specific activity and high radio-purity. This work was designed to develop a viable method to produce and purify 64Cu, which has high specific activity, for positron emission tomography. 64Cu was produced at the University of Missouri Research Reactor by the nuclear reaction, 64Zn(n,p)64Cu. Highly pure zinc metal (99.9999%) was irradiated in a specially designed boron nitrite lined container, which minimized thermal neutron reactions during irradiation. A new two-step procedure was developed to chemically separate the no-carrier-added 64Cu from the zinc metal target. 64Cu recovery for 24 runs averaged 0.393 (+/- 0.007) mCi per milligram of zinc irradiated. The boron-lined irradiation container reduced unwanted zinc radionuclides 14.3-fold. Zinc radionuclides and non-radioactive zinc were separated successfully from the 64Cu. The new separation technique was fast (2 hours total time) and highly efficient for removing the zinc. The zinc separation factor for this technique averaged 8.5 x 10(-8), indicating less than 0.0000085% of the zinc remained after separation. Thus far, the highest 64Cu specific activity at end of irradiation was 683 Ci/mg Cu, with an average of 512 Ci/mg Cu for the last six analyzed runs. The boron-lined irradiation container has sufficient capacity for 75-fold larger-sized zinc targets (up to 45 g). The new separation technique was excellent for separating 64Cu, which appears to be a radionuclide with great potential for positron emission tomography.

  5. Synthesis of no-carrier-added fluorine-18 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tewson, T.J.

    1983-01-01

    A new synthetic procedure for the preparation of fluorine-18 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose has been developed. This procedure offers the advantages of flexibility in the source of the fluorine-18, high yields, and short synthesis times. The procedure works at the no-carrier-added level and gives a product of very high specific activity

  6. Species dependent studies of no-carrier-added 93mMo: A green method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, Swadesh; Nayak, Dalia

    2010-01-01

    The present paper reports a combination of radioanalytical and green methodology for the ultra-trace scale speciation of molybdenum. The differential attitude of iron-doped calcium alginate (Fe-CA) and chitosan biopolymers towards no-carrier-added 93m Mo radionuclide was studied to develop environmentally sustainable speciation methodology in ultra-trace scale. The affinity of 93m Mo towards the Fe-CA beads is greater than that of chitosan. Species information was obtained by comparing the adsorption profile of 93m Mo on Fe-CA and chitosan biopolymer with the software code CHEAQS PRO program. From the experimental results it is concluded that no-carrier-added 93m Mo radionuclide form mononuclear species instead of polynuclear species in aqueous solution. Use of biodegradable, non-toxic biopolymer makes this method a step forward towards green chemistry.

  7. An 131I iodotamoxifen: no carrier added iodination via a diazonium salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, D.H.; Strickland, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    An 131 I-labeled iodotamoxifen has been prepared by a ''no carrier added'' procedure in a 40% radiochemical yield via an aryl diazonium ion salt intermediate. Two approaches were used to produce high specific activity iodotamoxifen: nonaqueous solvents and copper catalysis. The use of the nonaqueous solvent acetonitrile has proved successful while neither copper powder, copper-bronze, copper(I)oxide nor Cu(II) sulphate showed any catalytic effects. (author)

  8. Synthesis of no-carrier-added L- and D-[1-11C]-DOPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolster, J.M.; Vaalburg, W.; Veen, W. van; Dijk, Th. van; Molen, H.D. van der; Wynberg, H.; Woldring, M.G.; Rijksuniversiteit Groningen

    1983-01-01

    No-carrier-added DL-[1- 11 C]-DOPA has been synthesized by carboxylation of an α-lithioisocyanide with a radiochemical yield of up to 15% without correction for decay. The total synthesis time is 30 min. The resolution of the D- and L-isomers was accomplished within 16 min by HPLC using a chiral stationary phase and a phosphate buffer of pH 4.5 as eluent. (author)

  9. No-carrier-added labeling of the neuroprotective Ebselen with selenium-73 and selenium-75.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfer, Andreas; Ermert, Johannes; Humpert, Sven; Coenen, Heinz H

    2015-03-01

    Selenium-73 is a positron emitting non-standard radionuclide, which is suitable for positron emission tomography. A copper-catalyzed reaction allowed no-carrier-added labeling of the anti-inflammatory seleno-organic compound Ebselen with (73) Se and (75) Se under addition of sulfur carrier in a one-step reaction. The new authentically labeled radioselenium molecule is thus available for preclinical evaluation and positron emission tomography studies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. The synthesis of no-carrier-added DL-4-[18F]fluorodeprenyl via the nucleophilic aromatic substitution reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plenevaux, Alain; Guillaume, Marcel

    1991-01-01

    No-carrier-added DL-α-methyl-β-4-[ 18 F]fluorophenyl-N-methyl-N-propynylethylamine (DL-4-[ 18 F]fluorodeprenyl) was synthesized via a 3-step procedure. The overall yield was 11%, the synthesis time was 90 min and the specific activity >0.57 Ci/μmol (end of synthesis). This synthesis approach, the conversion of an aromatic aldehyde to a homologous methyl ketone, extends the flexibility of the nucleophilic aromatic substitution reaction by applying it to the synthesis of radiotracers which do not bear electron-withdrawing activating groups on the aromatic ring. The tissue distribution of DL-4-[ 18 F]fluorodeprenyl in mice at 1, 10 and 50 min was also measured and showed that metabolic defluorination was not significant. Clearance or radioactivity from brain after injection of DL-4-[ 18 F]fluorodeprenyl was more rapid than that previously observed for [ 11 C]L-deprenyl. (author)

  11. New syntheses of No-carrier-added 123I-labeled agents via organoborane chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabalka, G.W.

    1985-01-01

    No-carrier-added 123 I-labeled agents are readily prepared via the reaction of organoboranes with sodium iodide- 123 I in the presence of mild oxidizing agents. The reactions are rapid and regiospecific, and they produce excellent yields of the labeled products. The organoboranes are readily prepared from alkenes and alkynes via the hydroboration reaction. A wide variety of functional groups are tolerated by the hydroboration-iodination sequence. The sequence has been utilized to prepare 123 I-labeled steroids and fatty acids, as well as a number of labeled esters, and aromatic derivatives

  12. Preparation and in vitro evaluation of ''no-carrier-added'' 18F-labeled biotin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najafi, A.; Peterson, A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper will describe the preparation of ''no-carrieradded'' 18 F-labeled biotin where the radiolabel bound to an aromatic moiety is described. This has been accomplished by preparation of [ 18 F]fluoro-benzylbromide (yield 20-30%) and its reaction with biotin-LC-hydrazide. This yielded ''no-carrier-added'' radiolabeled biotin (5-10%) which was then purified by reversed phase HPLC. The pure product was found to bind to avidin, thereby demonstrating retention of its biological integrity. Thus this product is potentially useful for imaging tumor tissue following injection of avidin coupled MoAbs. (author)

  13. Direct no-carrier-added 18F-labelling of arenes via nucleophilic substitution on aryl(2-thienyl)iodonium salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, T.L.

    2006-01-01

    For in vivo imaging of molecular processes via positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers of high specific activity are demanded. In case of the most commonly used positron emitter fluorine-18, this is only achievable with no-carrier-added [ 18 F]fluoride, which implies nucleophilic methods of 18 F-substitution. Whereas electron deficient aromatic groups can be labelled in one step using no-carrier-added [ 18 F]fluoride, electron rich 18 F-labelled aromatic molecules are only available by multi-step radiosyntheses or carrier-added electrophilic reactions. Here, diaryliodonium salts represent an alternative, since they have been proven as potent precursor for a direct nucleophilic 18 F-introduction into aromatic molecules. Furthermore, as known from non-radioactive studies, the highly electron rich 2-thienyliodonium leaving group leads to a high regioselectivity in nucleophilic substitution reactions. Consequently, a direct nucleophilic no-carrier-added 18 F-labelling of electron rich arenes via aryl(2-thienyl)iodonium precursors was developed in this work. The applicability of direct nucleophilic 18 F-labelling was examined in a systematic study on eighteen aryl(2-thienyl)iodonium salts. As electron rich precursors the ortho-, meta- and para-methoxyphenyl(2-thienyl)iodonium bromides, iodides, tosylates and triflates were synthesised. In addition, para-substituted (R=BnO, CH 3 , H, Cl, Br, I) aryl(2-thienyl)iodonium bromides were prepared as precursors with a systematically varying electron density. As first approach, the general reaction conditions of the nucleophilic 18 F-substitution procedure were optimised. The best conditions for direct nucleophilic no-carrier-added 18 F-labelling via aryl(2-thienyl)iodonium salts were found with dimethylformamide as solvent, a reaction temperature of 130±3 C and 25 mmol/l as concentration of the precursor. (orig.)

  14. Direct no-carrier-added {sup 18}F-labelling of arenes via nucleophilic substitution on aryl(2-thienyl)iodonium salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, T L

    2006-01-15

    For in vivo imaging of molecular processes via positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers of high specific activity are demanded. In case of the most commonly used positron emitter fluorine-18, this is only achievable with no-carrier-added [{sup 18}F]fluoride, which implies nucleophilic methods of {sup 18}F-substitution. Whereas electron deficient aromatic groups can be labelled in one step using no-carrier-added [{sup 18}F]fluoride, electron rich {sup 18}F-labelled aromatic molecules are only available by multi-step radiosyntheses or carrier-added electrophilic reactions. Here, diaryliodonium salts represent an alternative, since they have been proven as potent precursor for a direct nucleophilic {sup 18}F-introduction into aromatic molecules. Furthermore, as known from non-radioactive studies, the highly electron rich 2-thienyliodonium leaving group leads to a high regioselectivity in nucleophilic substitution reactions. Consequently, a direct nucleophilic no-carrier-added {sup 18}F-labelling of electron rich arenes via aryl(2-thienyl)iodonium precursors was developed in this work. The applicability of direct nucleophilic {sup 18}F-labelling was examined in a systematic study on eighteen aryl(2-thienyl)iodonium salts. As electron rich precursors the ortho-, meta- and para-methoxyphenyl(2-thienyl)iodonium bromides, iodides, tosylates and triflates were synthesised. In addition, para-substituted (R=BnO, CH{sub 3}, H, Cl, Br, I) aryl(2-thienyl)iodonium bromides were prepared as precursors with a systematically varying electron density. As first approach, the general reaction conditions of the nucleophilic {sup 18}F-substitution procedure were optimised. The best conditions for direct nucleophilic no-carrier-added {sup 18}F-labelling via aryl(2-thienyl)iodonium salts were found with dimethylformamide as solvent, a reaction temperature of 130{+-}3 C and 25 mmol/l as concentration of the precursor. (orig.)

  15. Carrier-added and no-carrier-added syntheses of [18F]spiroperidol and [18F]haloperidol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilbourn, M.R.; Welch, M.J.; Dence, C.S.; Tewson, T.J.; Saji, H.; Maeda, M.

    1984-01-01

    Syntheses of [ 18 F]haloperidol and [ 18 F]spiroperidol in both no-carrier-added and carrier-added forms have been accomplished. The no-carrier-added [ 18 F]butyrophenone neuroleptics were prepared in low ( 18 F-neuroleptics were prepared in better (5-17%) yields by 18 F-for- 19 F nucleophilic aromatic substitution. The preparation of all synthetic precursors, and procedures for radiolabeling are fully described. (author)

  16. Synthesis of no-carrier-added radiobrominated n-alkylated analogues of spiperone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moerlein, S.M.; Laufer, P.; Stoecklin, G.

    1985-01-01

    The synthesis of a series of p-bromo-3-N-alkyl spiperone analogues is described. N-alkylation was achieved via reaction of the potassium salt of the spiperone lactam ring with alkyl iodide; subsequent reactions with elemental bromine gave the p-brominated isomers. Optimization studies using no-carrier-added (n.c.a.) 77 Br - indicated that radio-bromination of N-alkyl spiperone analogues occurs with higher yields and in shorter reaction times when dichloramine-T (DCT) is used rather than H 2 0 2 /acetic acid as an oxidant. The production of the title compounds in high effective specific activity with radiochemical yields of 20-30 % using n.c.a. 77 Br - and DCT is reported. (author)

  17. Complexation study on no-carrier-added astatine with insulin: A candidate radiopharmaceutical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahiri, Susanta [Chemical Sciences Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)], E-mail: susanta.lahiri@saha.ac.in; Roy, Kamalika [Chemical Sciences Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Sen, Souvik [Berhampur Sadar Hospital, Berhampur, Murshidabad 742 101 (India)

    2008-12-15

    No-carrier-added astatine radionuclides produced in the {sup 7}Li-irradiated lead matrix were separated from bulk lead nitrate target by complexing At with insulin, followed by dialysis. The method offers simultaneous separation of At from lead as well as its complexation with insulin. The At-insulin complex might be a potential radiopharmaceutical in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. The stability of At-insulin complex was checked by dialysis against deionized water and Ringer lactate (RL) solution. It has been found that the half-life of At-insulin complex is about {approx}12 h, when dialyzed against deionized water and is only 6 h, when dialyzed against RL solution having the same composition as blood serum. The 6 h half-life of this Insulin-At complex is perfect for killing cancer cells from external cell surfaces as the half-life of internalization of insulin molecule inside the cell is 7-12 h.

  18. Cu(I) assisted radioiodination of hippuran with no carrier added [sup 131]I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Kolaly, M T; El-Bayoumy, S; Raieh, M; El-Mothy, A [Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt). Dept. of Radioisotope Production and Labelled Compounds

    1993-11-01

    A study on the labeling of hippuran with no-carrier-added [sup 131]I assisted by Cu(I) and excess of ascorbic acids is described. The role of ascorbic acid is to prevent the oxidation of Cu(I) to Cu(II) which activates the hydrolysis of o-iodohippuric acid to o-iodobenzoic acid. The use of Cu(I) allows an almost quantitative (97-99%) labeling yield to be obtained within 10-15 minutes at 100 deg C. The reaction is assumed to take place via the formation of an organocopper complex favoring the exchange reaction between radioiodine and inactive iodine in the hippuran molecule. The activation energy of the reaction was calculated to be E = 12.2 kcal/mol. (author) 21 refs.; 8 figs.

  19. Cu(I) assisted radioiodination of hippuran with no carrier added 131I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Kolaly, M.T.; El-Bayoumy, S.; Raieh, M.; El-Mothy, A.

    1993-01-01

    A study on the labeling of hippuran with no-carrier-added 131 I assisted by Cu(I) and excess of ascorbic acids is described. The role of ascorbic acid is to prevent the oxidation of Cu(I) to Cu(II) which activates the hydrolysis of o-iodohippuric acid to o-iodobenzoic acid. The use of Cu(I) allows an almost quantitative (97-99%) labeling yield to be obtained within 10-15 minutes at 100 deg C. The reaction is assumed to take place via the formation of an organocopper complex favoring the exchange reaction between radioiodine and inactive iodine in the hippuran molecule. The activation energy of the reaction was calculated to be E = 12.2 kcal/mol. (author) 21 refs.; 8 figs

  20. Synthesis of 'no-carrier-added' sup(11)C-labelled nitrosoureas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diksic, M.; Farrokhzad, S.; Yamamoto, Y.L.; Feindel, W. (Montreal Neurological Inst., Quebec (Canada))

    1985-03-01

    Syntheses for sup(11)C-labelled chemotherapeutic drugs CCNU, BFNU and CFNU (analogs of BCNU) as well as an improved synthesis for sup(11)C-BCNU are described. The procedures for the separation of dual isomers in the case of sup(11)C-labelled CCNU and CFNU are discussed. The specific activity of these 'no-carrier-added' radiopharmaceuticals was approximately 10sup(4) lower than expected for a carrier-free product. The syntheses were normally finished 20-25 min after the end of the collection of sup(11)C-COClsub(2). Chemical and radiochemical purity of the final products as determined by HPLC and TLRC, respectively, was at least 98%. The syntheses yielded 10-25 mCi of nitrosourea ready for use in PET studies.

  1. Synthesis of 'no-carrier-added' sup(11)C-labelled nitrosoureas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diksic, M.; Farrokhzad, S.; Yamamoto, Y.L.; Feindel, W.

    1985-01-01

    Syntheses for sup(11)C-labelled chemotherapeutic drugs CCNU, BFNU and CFNU (analogs of BCNU) as well as an improved synthesis for sup(11)C-BCNU are described. The procedures for the separation of dual isomers in the case of sup(11)C-labelled CCNU and CFNU are discussed. The specific activity of these 'no-carrier-added' radiopharmaceuticals was approximately 10sup(4) lower than expected for a carrier-free product. The syntheses were normally finished 20-25 min after the end of the collection of sup(11)C-COClsub(2). Chemical and radiochemical purity of the final products as determined by HPLC and TLRC, respectively, was at least 98%. The syntheses yielded 10-25 mCi of nitrosourea ready for use in PET studies. (author)

  2. Complexation study on no-carrier-added astatine with insulin: A candidate radiopharmaceutical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahiri, Susanta; Roy, Kamalika; Sen, Souvik

    2008-01-01

    No-carrier-added astatine radionuclides produced in the 7 Li-irradiated lead matrix were separated from bulk lead nitrate target by complexing At with insulin, followed by dialysis. The method offers simultaneous separation of At from lead as well as its complexation with insulin. The At-insulin complex might be a potential radiopharmaceutical in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. The stability of At-insulin complex was checked by dialysis against deionized water and Ringer lactate (RL) solution. It has been found that the half-life of At-insulin complex is about ∼12 h, when dialyzed against deionized water and is only 6 h, when dialyzed against RL solution having the same composition as blood serum. The 6 h half-life of this Insulin-At complex is perfect for killing cancer cells from external cell surfaces as the half-life of internalization of insulin molecule inside the cell is 7-12 h

  3. Automated chemoenzymatic synthesis of no-carrier-added [carbonyl-11C]propionyl L-carnitine for pharmacokinetic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davenport, R.J.; Pike, V.W.; Dowsett, K.; Turton, D.R.; Poole, K.

    1997-01-01

    Propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC) is under development as a therapeutic for the treatment of peripheral artery disease, coronary heart disease and chronic heart failure. Three methods were examined for labelling PLC in its propionyl group with positron-emitting carbon-11 (t 1/2 = 20.3 min), one chemical and two chemoenzymatic. The former was based on the preparation of [ 11 C]propionyl chloride as labelling agent via 11 C-carboxylation of ethylmagnesium bromide with cyclotron-produced [ 11 C]carbon dioxide and subsequent chlorination. Reaction of carrier-added [ 11 C]propionyl chloride with L-carnitine in trifluoroacetic acid gave [ 11 C]PLC in 12% radiochemical yield (decay-corrected) from cyclotron-produced [ 11 C]carbon dioxide. However, the radiosynthesis was unsuccessful at the no-carrier added (NCA) level of specific radioactivity. [ 11 C]Propionate, as a radioactive precursor for chemoenzymatic routes, was prepared via carboxylation of ethylmagnesium bromide with [ 11 C]carbon dioxide and hydrolysis. NCA [ 11 C]PLC was prepared in 68 min in 14% radiochemical yield (decay-corrected) from [ 11 C]propionate via sequential conversions catalysed by acetate kinase, phosphotransacetylase and carnitine acetyltransferase. A superior chemoenzymatic synthesis of NCA [ 11 C]PLC was developed, based on the use of a novel supported Grignard reagent for the synthesis of [ 11 C]propionate and conversions by S-acetyl-CoA synthetase and carnitine acetyltransferase. This gave an overall radiochemical yield of 30-48% (decay-corrected). This synthesis was automated for radiation safety and provides pure NCA [ 11 C]PLC in high radioactivities ready for intravenous administration within 25 min from radionuclide production. The [ 11 C]PLC is suitable for pharmacokinetic studies in human subjects with PET and the elucidation of the fate of the propionyl group of PLC in vivo. (Author)

  4. New separation method of no-carrier-added {sup 47}Sc from titanium targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartos, B.; Majkowska, A.; Kasperek, A.; Krajewski, S.; Bilewicz, A. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warszawa (Poland). Nuclear Chemistry and Radiochemistry Center

    2012-07-01

    Radionuclides with medium energy beta emission and a several day half-life are attractive candidates for radioimmunotherapy. Among the most promising in this category is {sup 47}Sc produced by fast neutron irradiation (E{sub n} > 1 MeV) of titanium target with high energy neutrons in {sup 47}Ti(n,p){sup 47}Sc nuclear reaction. In the previously reported production scheme the dissolution of the TiO{sub 2} target in hot concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and evaporation of the resulting solution were the most time-consuming steps. The present paper describes new, simple and efficient production method of {sup 47}Sc, where the slow dissolution of the target is avoided. After irradiation in fast neutron flux {sup 47}TiO{sub 2} and Li{sub 2}{sup 47}TiF{sub 6} targets were dissolved in HF solutions. Next {sup 47}Sc was separated from the target using anion exchange resin Dowex 1 with 0.4 M HF + 0.06 M HNO{sub 3} solution as eluent. The eluted {sup 47}Sc was adsorbed on cation exchange resin and eluted with 0.5 M of ammonium acetate. The 47Sc separation yield in the proposed procedure is about 90% with the separation time less than 2 h. The obtained no-carrier-added {sup 47}Sc was used to label DOTATATE conjugate with 96% labeling yield. (orig.)

  5. Speciation of no-carrier-added 68Ga prior to its labeling for PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamalika Sen; Breeman, W.A.P.; Wolterbeek, H.Th.

    2012-01-01

    The present article describes the probable speciation of 68 Ga radionuclide just before labeling to DOTA peptides for PET imaging. The 68 Ga eluted from an anion exchange column after its purification was analyzed for its elemental composition and pH at several stages. Neutron activation analysis of the eluted fractions yields the concentrations of Na and Cl, pH measurements indicate the concentration of free H + ions in the medium and specific activity calculations indicate the concentration of 68 Ga in the solution. Using all these information we get the idea of speciation of no carrier added Ga in the eluted fractions from CHEAQS programme. The estimations indicate that Ga is mostly present as GaCl 2+ in the total MiliQ eluate. However, just before labeling of DOTA the pH of the Ga-containing eluate is adjusted to ∼3.5 using HEPES buffer and at that condition Ga remains as Ga 3+ species which is responsible for a successful and efficient labeling. The MilliQ eluate collected before actual labeling was estimated for trace elements using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry was found to contain a few ppb of Al, Co, Pd and Pt that did not interfere in the actual labeling. A clear idea about the prerequisite of 68 Ga species before labeling to a peptide might be of special interest for its judicious application as a radiopharmaceutical. (author)

  6. Solvent extraction of no-carrier-added 103Pd from irradiated rhodium target with α-furyldioxime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahdi Sadeghi; Behrouz Shirazi; Nami Shadanpour

    2006-01-01

    Solvent extraction of no-carrier-added 103 Pd was investigated from irradiated rhodium target with a-furyldioxime in chloroform from diluted hydrochloric acid. Extraction yield was 85.3% for a single extraction from 0.37M HCl and 103 Pd purity was better than 99%. (author)

  7. Studies on low-carrier radiofluorination of non-active aromatics with no-carrier-added [18F]fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardinale, Jens

    2013-01-01

    In vivo imaging with positron emission tomography generally demands radiotracers with a high specific activity. In case of fluorine-18 the required no-carrier-added (n.c.a.) starting material is only available in form of fluoride. This and the short half-life of 109.7 minutes of the radionuclide lead to the demand of special methods for radiosyntheses. The only practical procedure for manufacturing n.c.a. [ 18 F]fluoro-compounds is therefore nucleophilic substitution. There is, however, still a lack of effective procedures for the labelling of electron rich aromatic molecules starting from n.c.a. [ 18 F]fluoride. A process for n.c.a. radiofluorination of these compounds is offered by the reaction of iodonium compounds as starting materials. In this study modern procedures for the synthesis of iodoniumsalts and -ylides were investigated. Several precursor molecules for the versatile synthetic building block 4-[ 18 F]fluoroiodobenzene were synthesised. In this course, a new one-pot procedure for the synthesis of iodoniumylides was developed. Further on, the syntheses of suitable iodonium precursors for two fluorophenoxy-derivatives, which are possible antidepressants, were investigated. Due to their binding profile these compounds can be considered as ligands for the serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT) and the norepinephrin reuptake transporter (NET), respectively. The preparation of appropriate iodonium salts proved to be too problematic, while the synthesis of suitable iodoniumylides could be accomplished with satisfactory yields of about 30% and 40 %, respectively. Both compounds were labelled with n.c.a. [ 18 F]fluoride and deprotected to the desired target compounds 4-((3-[ 18 F]fluorophenoxy)(phenyl)methyl)piperidine and 4-((4-[ 18 F]fluorophenoxy)(phenyl)methyl)piperidine in radiochemical yields of about 40 % and 25 %, respectively. Those are now available for preclinical evaluation studies. Furthermore, a process for the palladium catalysed synthesis of 18

  8. Reactor production and separation of no-carrier added 32P for medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vimalnath, K.V.; Shetty, P.; Rajeswari, A.; Chirayil, V.; Chakraborty, S.; Dash, A.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorous-32 is an attractive and widely used therapeutic radionuclide owing to its favorable nuclear characteristics. The major application of 32 P is the treatment option for a distinct subgroup of elderly patients with polycythemia vera and leukemia. The tremendous prospects associated with the use of 32 P along with the challenge of providing 32 P of acceptable specific activity and purity amenable for in vivo therapy, led to development of a 32 P production strategy. The 32 S(n,p) 32 P route of production provide the scope of obtaining high specific activities or no carrier added (NCA) 32 P. In a typical batch of 14 nos. of neutron irradiated Al containers, each containing 18 g of sulphur, were processed. In the quest for an effective separation method to isolate micro gram of 32 P formed during the neutron irradiation of sulphur, the prospect of using distillation under reduced pressure to achieve complete removal of sulfur seemed to be an effective proposition and motivated us to adopt. The experimental parameters that influence the distillation were identified and a careful control has been exercised to ensure complete removal of sulphur from 32 P within reasonable time period. The 32 P remained in the distillation flask was quantitatively collected by leaching with 0.05 N HCl with gentle heating at 80℃ for 3 hours. In the light of the perceived need to remove cationic impurities from the 32 P leachate, it was passed through an ion-exchange chromatography column containing a cation exchange resin (Dowex 50 x 8 H + , 100-200 mesh) wherein all the cationic impurities get trapped and H 3 32 PO 4 solution was collected as effluent. Recognizing the fact that H 3 32 PO 4 produced is to be used for clinical applications, a thorough quality assessment was carried out. Radionuclidic purity was ascertained by a measurement of its half-life. In order to establish the absence of extraneous gamma emitting radionuclide impurities, gamma spectrum of the appropriately

  9. Separation of no-carrier-added 107,109Cd from proton induced silver target. Classical chemistry still relevant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moumita Maiti; Susanta Lahiri; Tomar, B.S.

    2011-01-01

    The classical chemistry like precipitation technique is relevant even in modern days trans-disciplinary research from the view point of green chemistry. A definite demand of no-carrier-added (nca) cadmium tracers, namely, 107,109 Cd, has been realized for diverse applications. Development of efficient separation technique is therefore important to address the purity of the tracers for various applications. No-carrier-added 107,109 Cd radionuclides were produced by bombarding natural silver target matrix with 13 MeV protons, which gave ∼15 MBq/μA h yield for nca 107 Cd. The nca cadmium radionuclides were separated from the natural silver target matrix by precipitating Ag as AgCl. The developed method is an example wherein green chemistry is used in trans-disciplinary research. The method is also simple, fast, cost effective and environmentally benign. (author)

  10. Production of no-carrier-added {sup 123}I via heavy-ion activation of natural antimony oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maji, S. [The Univ. of Burdwan (India). Dept. of Chemistry; Lahiri, S. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata (India). Chemical Sciences Div.

    2007-07-01

    Activation of natural Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} with 48 MeV {sup 7}Li{sup 3+} beam results in the formation of no-carrier-added {sup 123}I in the matrix along with the radionuclides {sup 123,125}Xe and {sup 122}Sb. The {sup 123}I yield amounts to about 400 kBq/{mu}Ah and the radionuclidic impurity of {sup 124}I to {proportional_to}1.2% of {sup 123}I. Attempts to separate no-carrier-added iodine from bulk antimony target involved liquid-liquid extraction with TOA and HDEHP as well as precipitation of Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} with thioacetamide. The precipitation technique was found to be the most effective for quantitative separation of {sup 123}I from the bulk antimony oxide target. (orig.)

  11. Standard test of labelling efficiency for quality control of no carrier added 90YCl3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beran, M.; Eigner Henke, K.; Srank, J.; Melichar, F.

    2007-01-01

    Particle emitting radionuclides (e.g. beta-emitters 90 Y and 177 Lu, alpha-emitter 211 At, Auger electron emitter 165 Er or positron emitter 86 Y) are beeing more and more frequently used in research and clinical practice for imaging and targeted therapy in nuclear medicine. This radiometals, altogether three valent lanthanides or actinides with high specific radioactivity, coupled to biomolecule carriers (peptides or monoclonal antibodies) through chelating link (e.g. DTPA or DOTA) are targeted against specific antigens and receptors of diseased tissues in order to obtain their image or to cause their radiation ablation. The radionuclide precursor 90 YCl 3 (solution of hard β-emitter 90 Y in a diluted HCl) with high purity and specific activity is already commercially produced and successfully used in nuclear medicine, e.g. for radioimmunotherapy of Lymphoma. Specification and purity of our product obtained by extraction 90 Sr/ 90 Y generator (using technology of centrifuge extractors with di-2-ethylhexylphosphoric acid) is examined and compared to other similar products in this contribution. A standard method for determination of labelling efficiency of the precursor with DOTA Octreotide (DOTATATE) using ITLC/SG chromatography is also described and proposed for quality assesment. (Author)

  12. Automated chemoenzymatic synthesis of no-carrier-added [carbonyl-{sup 11}C]propionyl L-carnitine for pharmacokinetic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davenport, R.J.; Pike, V.W.; Dowsett, K.; Turton, D.R.; Poole, K. [Hammersmith Hospital, London (United Kingdom). MRC Cyclotron Unit

    1997-07-30

    Propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC) is under development as a therapeutic for the treatment of peripheral artery disease, coronary heart disease and chronic heart failure. Three methods were examined for labelling PLC in its propionyl group with positron-emitting carbon-11 (t{sub 1/2} = 20.3 min), one chemical and two chemoenzymatic. The former was based on the preparation of [{sup 11}C]propionyl chloride as labelling agent via {sup 11}C-carboxylation of ethylmagnesium bromide with cyclotron-produced [{sup 11}C]carbon dioxide and subsequent chlorination. Reaction of carrier-added [{sup 11}C]propionyl chloride with L-carnitine in trifluoroacetic acid gave [{sup 11}C]PLC in 12% radiochemical yield (decay-corrected) from cyclotron-produced [{sup 11}C]carbon dioxide. However, the radiosynthesis was unsuccessful at the no-carrier added (NCA) level of specific radioactivity. [{sup 11}C]Propionate, as a radioactive precursor for chemoenzymatic routes, was prepared via carboxylation of ethylmagnesium bromide with [{sup 11}C]carbon dioxide and hydrolysis. NCA [{sup 11}C]PLC was prepared in 68 min in 14% radiochemical yield (decay-corrected) from [{sup 11}C]propionate via sequential conversions catalysed by acetate kinase, phosphotransacetylase and carnitine acetyltransferase. A superior chemoenzymatic synthesis of NCA [{sup 11}C]PLC was developed, based on the use of a novel supported Grignard reagent for the synthesis of [{sup 11}C]propionate and conversions by S-acetyl-CoA synthetase and carnitine acetyltransferase. This gave an overall radiochemical yield of 30-48% (decay-corrected). This synthesis was automated for radiation safety and provides pure NCA [{sup 11}C]PLC in high radioactivities ready for intravenous administration within 25 min from radionuclide production. The [{sup 11}C]PLC is suitable for pharmacokinetic studies in human subjects with PET and the elucidation of the fate of the propionyl group of PLC in vivo. (Author).

  13. Separation and purification of no-carrier-added arsenic from bulk amounts of germanium for use in radiopharmaceutical labelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahn, M.; Radchenko, V.; Roesch, F.; Jennewein, M. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Nuclear Chemsistry; Filosofov, D. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation). Lab. of Nuclear Problems; Hauser, H.; Eisenhut, M. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany). Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry

    2010-07-01

    Radioarsenic labelled radiopharmaceuticals could add special features to molecular imaging with positron emission tomography (PET). For example the long physical half-lives of {sup 72}As (T{sub 1/2}=26 h) and {sup 74}As (T{sub 1/2}=17.8 d) in conjunction with their high positron branching rates of 88% and 29%, respectively, allow the investigation of slow physiological or metabolical processes, like the enrichment and biodistribution of monoclonal antibodies in tumour tissue or the characterization of stem cell trafficking. A method for separation and purification of no-carrier-added (nca) arsenic from irradiated metallic germanium targets based on distillation and anion exchange is developed. It finally converts the arsenic into an {sup *}As(III) synthon in PBS buffer and pH 7 suitable for labelling of proteins via As-S bond formations. The method delivers radioarsenic in high purity with separation factors of 10{sup 6} from germanium and an overall yield from target to labelling synthon of > 40%. In a proof-of-principle experiment, the monoclonal antibody Bevacizumab, directed against the human VEGF receptor, was labelled with a radiochemical yield > 90% within 1 h at room temperature with nca {sup 72/74/77}As. (orig.)

  14. Production of no-carrier-added 139Pr via precursor decay in the proton bombardment of natPr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steyn, G.F.; Vermeulen, C.; Nortier, F.M.; Szelecsenyi, F.; Kovacs, Z.; Qaim, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    Excitation functions and production rates are presented for various Pr and Nd radionuclides formed in the bombardment of Pr with protons, from their respective thresholds up to 100 MeV. The indirect production route 141 Pr(p, 3n) 139m Nd → 139 Pr is investigated as an alternative to the direct production route 140 Ce(p, 2n) 139 Pr for producing no-carrier-added 139 Pr of high radionuclidic purity. The simultaneous production of 139 Pr and 140 Nd using Pr as target is investigated. The advantages and disadvantages of both production routes are discussed. Experimental thick-target production rates are presented for selected Pr radionuclides formed in the bombardment of nat Ce with protons at incident energies of 20, 26 and 32 MeV. All the experimental excitation functions obtained in this work are compared with theoretical predictions by means of the geometry-dependent hybrid (GDH) model as implemented in the code ALICE-IPPE. The results of this work are also compared with previous literature experimental data, if available

  15. Production and separation of no-carrier-added 73As and 75Se from 7Li irradiated germanium oxide target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, A.; Lahiri, S.

    2012-01-01

    This work reports for the first time 7 Li-induced accelerator based production of 71,72,73,74 As, 75,76,77 Br and 73,75 Se radionuclides in their no-carrier-added (nca) state. After the decay of all short-lived radionuclides 75 Se and 73 As were only existing radionuclides in germanium oxide target, which were subsequently separated by liquid-liquid extraction (LLX) using trioctylamine (TOA) dissolved in cyclohexane as liquid ion exchanger. The presence of stable germanium in various fractions was examined by Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Spectrometry (ICP-OES). At 0.1 M TOA and 10 M HCl concentration, 75 Se and stable Ge were extracted into the organic phase leaving 73 As in the aqueous phase. The bulk Ge was stripped back to the aqueous phase by 1 M NaOH, keeping 75 Se in the organic phase. Therefore complete separation between 73 As, 75 Se and bulk Ge was achieved. (orig.)

  16. Bottom sediment transport study at Haiphong port using radioactive scandium as tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham Ngoc Chuong; Phan Son Hai; Pham Duy Hien

    1993-01-01

    A radioisotope tracer experiment was performed for investigating the bedload movement at the site near the access channel to Haiphong port, North Vietnam. The scandium glass and a number of mechanical devices were manufactured locally for the experiment. Simple and safe procedures were adopted for the production, transportation and injection of radioactive tracer materials. Five tracking experiments were carried out covering the period of 84 days in winter 1992-1993. The experimental results provide a firm basis for elaborating appropriate measures against the siltation problem at Haiphong port, especially for the design of a new access channel with a better orientation with respect to the directions of the water flow and bedload transport, as proposed recently by the Port Authority. (Author). 2 refs, 4 figs

  17. Carrier-added and no-carrier-added syntheses of (/sup 18/F)spiroperidol and (/sub 18/F)haloperidol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilbourn, M R; Welch, M J; Dence, C S; Tewson, T J; Saji, H; Maeda, M

    1984-07-01

    Syntheses of (18F)haloperidol and (18F)spiroperidol in both no-carrier-added and carrier-added forms have been accomplished. The no-carrier-added (18F)butyrophenone neuroleptics were prepared in low (less than 2%) yield by acid decomposition of aryl piperidine triazenes. Carrier-added 18F-neuroleptics were prepared in better (5-17%) yields by 18F-for-19F nucleophilic aromatic substitution. The preparation of all synthetic precursors, and procedures for radiolabeling are fully described.

  18. Carrier-added and no-carrier-added syntheses of (/sup 18/F)spiroperidol and (/sup 18/F)haloperidol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilbourn, M R; Welch, M J; Dence, C S; Tewson, T J; Saji, H; Maeda, M [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (USA). Edward Mallinckrodt Inst. of Radiology

    1984-07-01

    Syntheses of (/sup 18/F)haloperidol and (/sup 18/F)spiroperidol in both no-carrier-added and carrier-added forms have been accomplished. The no-carrier-added (/sup 18/F)butyrophenone neuroleptics were prepared in low (<2%) yield by acid decomposition of aryl piperidine triazenes. Carrier-added /sup 18/F-neuroleptics were prepared in better (5-17%) yields by /sup 18/F-for-/sup 19/F nucleophilic aromatic substitution. The preparation of all synthetic precursors, and procedures for radiolabeling are fully described.

  19. An electro-amalgamation approach to isolate no-carrier-added 177Lu from neutron irradiated Yb for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakravarty, Rubel; Das, Tapas; Dash, Ashutosh; Venkatesh, Meera

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: A novel two-step separation process for the production of no-carrier-added (NCA) 177 Lu from neutron irradiated Yb target through an electrochemical pathway employing mercury-pool cathode has been developed. Methods: A two-cycle electrolysis procedure was adopted for separation of 177 Lu from 177 Lu/Yb mixture in lithium citrate medium. The influence of different experimental parameters on the separation process was investigated and optimized for the quantitative deposition of Yb in presence of 177 Lu. The first electrolysis was performed for 50 min in the 177 Lu/Yb feed solution at pH 6 applying a potential of 8 V using platinum electrode as anode and mercury as the cathode. The second electrolysis was performed under the same conditions using fresh electrodes. The radionuclidic and chemical purity of 177 Lu was determined by using gamma ray spectrometry and atomic absorption spectrometry. The suitability of 177 Lu for biomedical applications was ascertained by labeling 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid D-Phe 1 -Tyr 3 -octreotate(DOTA-TATE) with 177 Lu. Results: This process could provide NCA 177 Lu with >99.99% radionuclidic purity and an overall separation yield of ∼99% was achieved within 3-4 h. The Hg content in the product was determined to be 98% was obtained with DOTA-TATE under the optimized reaction conditions. Conclusions: An efficient strategy for the separation of NCA 177 Lu, suitable for biomedical applications, has been developed.

  20. An electro-amalgamation approach to isolate no-carrier-added 177Lu from neutron irradiated Yb for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Rubel; Das, Tapas; Dash, Ashutosh; Venkatesh, Meera

    2010-10-01

    A novel two-step separation process for the production of no-carrier-added (NCA) (177)Lu from neutron irradiated Yb target through an electrochemical pathway employing mercury-pool cathode has been developed. A two-cycle electrolysis procedure was adopted for separation of (177)Lu from (177)Lu/Yb mixture in lithium citrate medium. The influence of different experimental parameters on the separation process was investigated and optimized for the quantitative deposition of Yb in presence of (177)Lu. The first electrolysis was performed for 50 min in the (177)Lu/Yb feed solution at pH 6 applying a potential of 8 V using platinum electrode as anode and mercury as the cathode. The second electrolysis was performed under the same conditions using fresh electrodes. The radionuclidic and chemical purity of (177)Lu was determined by using gamma ray spectrometry and atomic absorption spectrometry. The suitability of (177)Lu for biomedical applications was ascertained by labeling 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid D-Phe(1)-Tyr(3)-octreotate(DOTA-TATE) with (177)Lu. This process could provide NCA (177)Lu with >99.99% radionuclidic purity and an overall separation yield of ∼99% was achieved within 3-4 h. The Hg content in the product was determined to be 98% was obtained with DOTA-TATE under the optimized reaction conditions. An efficient strategy for the separation of NCA (177)Lu, suitable for biomedical applications, has been developed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Green methods for the radiochemical separations of no-carrier-added 61Cu, 62Zn from 7Li irradiated cobalt target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moumita Maiti; Kaustab Ghosh; Susanta Lahiri

    2015-01-01

    A nat Co target was irradiated with 47 MeV 7 Li beam to produce no-carrier-added 61 Cu, 62 Zn in the target matrix. Two new green radiochemical methods were developed for separation of 61 Cu and 62 Zn from the target matrix, (i) liquid-liquid extraction (LLX) technique using room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([C 4 mim][PF 6 ]) and ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) (ii) adsorption on calcium alginate beads. (author)

  2. Use of liquid chromatography for separation and determination of carrier species associated with the synthesis of no carrier-added sup(11)C labelled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emran, Ali M.; Boothe, Th.E.; Finn, R.D.; Vora, M.M.; Kothari, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    An analytical technique using reversed-phase liquid chromatography was developed for the determination of urea at quantities as low as 1 ng to quantitate the amount of non-labelled urea produced during the synthesis of no-carrier-added [sup(11)C] urea starting from sup(11)CNsup(-). As a result, the specific activity of the [sup(11)C] urea thus prepared was calculated to be as high as 3.5+-0.8 Ci/μmol. (author)

  3. Alternative labelling of the cocaine analogue isomers α-CIT and β-CIT by direct iodination with no-carrier-added Na125I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, L.; Foged, C.; Halldin, C.; Swahn, C.-G.

    1994-01-01

    An alternative labelling of the cocaine analogue isomers α-CIT and β-CIT with no-carrier-added 125 I by direct iodination of 2α- and 2β-carbomethoxy-3β-phenyltropane with Na 125 I/sulfuric acid/nitric acid/acetic acid and peracetic acid under different reaction conditions, is described. The maximum radiolabelling yield obtained with the two isomers was 48% for [ 125 I]α-CIT and 28% for [ 125 I]β-CIT. (author)

  4. The synthesis of no-carrier-added [11C]urea from [11C]carbon dioxide and application to [11C]uracil synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, P.K.; Mangner, T.J.; Chugani, H.T.

    1997-01-01

    No-carrier-added [ 11 C]urea has been synthesized by bubbling cyclotron-produced [ 11 C]-carbon dioxide directly into a tetrahydrofuran solution of lithium bis(trimethylsilyl)amide, followed by hydrolysis of the C-11 labeled adduct with aqueous ammonium chloride. Using this simple, one-pot method, [ 11 C]urea was produced in 55-70% radiochemical yield (decay-corrected) in 16 min following end-of-bombardment (or in 10 min following the introduction of the [ 11 C]carbon dioxide. The [ 11 C]urea thus produced was converted to [ 11 C]uracil (carrier-added) in 40-75% decay-corrected radiochemical yield by condensation with diethyl malate in presence of fuming sulfuric acid. (author)

  5. Fission neutron spectrum averaged cross sections of some threshold reactions on cadmium: production feasibility of no-carrier-added 103Pd in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbasi, I.A.; Subhani, M.S.; Zaidi, J.H.; Arif, M.

    2006-01-01

    Systematic studies on fission neutron spectrum averaged cross sections of some threshold reactions like (n, p) and (n, α) on cadmium were carried out using the activation technique in combination with radiochemical separations and high-resolution γ-ray spectroscopy. Special attention was paid to the formation of 103 Pd via the 106 Cd(n,a α) 103 Pd reaction since it is an important therapeutic radionuclide. At a fast flux neutron density of 7.5 x 10 13 cm 2 s -1 and an irradiation time of 120 h, using 100% enriched 106 Cd target 340 MBq of no-carrier-added 103 Pd per batch could be produced. The method is thus suitable for medium-scale production of this radionuclide. (orig.)

  6. Ionic Liquid-salt based aqueous biphasic system for quick separation of no-carrier-added 203Pb from proton irradiated natTl2CO3 target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhury, Dibyasree; Ghosh, Kaustab; Lahiri, Susanta; Sarkar, Kangkana; Naskar, Nabanita

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, no-carrier-added (NCA) 203 Pb was radiochemically separated from bulk Tl target applying the ABS composing of 4 M K 2 HPO 4 and 0.1 mL of different strengths of IL (bmim)Cl ranging from 40% to 80% (w/v). Bulk Tl was spiked with 200Tl (T 1/2 = 26.1 h). A separation condition was achieved with 70% IL concentration and with 10 min shaking and 10 min settling time, where ∼84% of NCA 203 Pb was extracted into the IL rich phase with ∼10% contamination from bulk Tl. Therefore, further studies, i.e. variation in shaking and settling time were carried out keeping the concentration of IL fixed at 70%

  7. Conversion of no-carrier-added [11C]carbon dioxide to [11C]carbon monoxide on molybdenum for the synthesis of 11C-labelled aromatic ketones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeisler, S.K.; Nader, M.; Theobald, A.; Oberdorfer, F.

    1997-01-01

    A new method for the efficient conversion of no-carrier-added [ 11 C]carbon dioxide into [ 11 C]carbon monoxide is described. [ 11 C]Carbon dioxide produced by proton bombardment of ultra high purity nitrogen is pre-concentrated in a cryo trap and then passed through a quartz tube filled with a mesh of thin molybdenum wire heated to 850 o C. [ 11 C]Carbon dioxide readily reacts with molybdenum to form [ 11 C]carbon monoxide and molybdenum(IV) oxide. The latter also reduces carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide and helps improve the performance of the converter. [ 11 C]Carbon monoxide is purified from remaining [ 11 C]carbon dioxide and collected in a small silica trap from which it is eluted into a reaction mixture for the palladium-mediated synthesis of a 11 C-labelled aromatic ketone. Radiochemical yields of up to 81% (decay-corrected) for [ 11 C]carbon monoxide were obtained. Radiochemical purity and specific radioactivity of both [ 11 C]carbon monoxide and the 11 C-labelled ketone are sufficient for nuclear medical studies with PET. (Author)

  8. No-carrier-added (NCA) N-(3-( sup 18 F)fluoropropyl)-N-norbuprenorphine and N-(3-( sup 18 F)fluoropropyl)-N-nordiprenorphine -synthesis, anatomical distribution in mice and rats, and tomographic studies in a baboon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Lanqin; Teng, Renrui; Shiue, Chyngyann; Wolf, A P; Dewey, S L [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA); Holland, M J; Simon, E J [New York Univ., NY (USA). Medical Center

    1990-01-01

    N-(3-Fluoropropyl)-N-norbuprenorphine (3a) and N-(3-fluoropropyl)-N-nordiprenorphine (4a) were synthesized by N-alkylation of norbuprenorphine (1) and nordiprenorphine (2) with 1-bromo-3-fluoropropane. The corresponding no-carrier-added (NCA) N-(3-({sup 18}F)fluoropropyl)-N-norbuprenorphine (3b) and N-(3-({sup 18}F)fluoropropyl)-N-nordiprenorphine (4b) were synthesized by N-alkylation of 1 and 2 with NCA 1-({sup 18}F)fluoro-3-iodopropane. In vitro studies indicate that in the absence of sodium chloride, compounds 3a, 4a, N-propyl-N-norbuprenorphine (5), buprenorphine and diprenorphine are reasonably comparable in binding affinity for opioid receptors. In the presence of 100 mM sodium chloride, however, compounds 3a, 4a and 5, are clearly less potent than buprenorphine and diprenorphine. The anatomical distribution study of compound 3b in mice shows radioactivity accumulating in bone. Rat studies of both compounds 3b and 4b indicate the specific distribution of these two radioligands within certain cortical and subcortical regions of rat brain. However, the absolute uptake of compound 4b in rat brain was only half that of compound 3b. PET studies of 3b in a baboon revealed specific binding of compound 3b in striatum and cerebellum. At 1 h after injection, ratios of specific/non-specific binding of 3b in striatum and cerebellum of a baboon were 1.9 and 1.7 respectively. (author).

  9. No-carrier-added (NCA) N-(3-[18F]fluoropropyl)-N-norbuprenorphine and N-(3-[18F]fluoropropyl)-N-nordiprenorphine -synthesis, anatomical distribution in mice and rats, and tomographic studies in a baboon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanqin Bai; Renrui Teng; Chyngyann Shiue; Wolf, A.P.; Dewey, S.L.; Holland, M.J.; Simon, E.J.

    1990-01-01

    N-(3-Fluoropropyl)-N-norbuprenorphine (3a) and N-(3-fluoropropyl)-N-nordiprenorphine (4a) were synthesized by N-alkylation of norbuprenorphine (1) and nordiprenorphine (2) with 1-bromo-3-fluoropropane. The corresponding no-carrier-added (NCA) N-(3-[ 18 F]fluoropropyl)-N-norbuprenorphine (3b) and N-(3-[ 18 F]fluoropropyl)-N-nordiprenorphine (4b) were synthesized by N-alkylation of 1 and 2 with NCA 1-[ 18 F]fluoro-3-iodopropane. In vitro studies indicate that in the absence of sodium chloride, compounds 3a, 4a, N-propyl-N-norbuprenorphine (5), buprenorphine and diprenorphine are reasonably comparable in binding affinity for opioid receptors. In the presence of 100 mM sodium chloride, however, compounds 3a, 4a and 5, are clearly less potent than buprenorphine and diprenorphine. The anatomical distribution study of compound 3b in mice shows radioactivity accumulating in bone. Rat studies of both compounds 3b and 4b indicate the specific distribution of these two radioligands within certain cortical and subcortical regions of rat brain. However, the absolute uptake of compound 4b in rat brain was only half that of compound 3b. PET studies of 3b in a baboon revealed specific binding of compound 3b in striatum and cerebellum. At 1 h after injection, ratios of specific/non-specific binding of 3b in striatum and cerebellum of a baboon were 1.9 and 1.7 respectively. (author)

  10. Automated radiosynthesis of no-carrier-added 4-[18F]fluoroiodobenzene: a versatile building block in 18F radiochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Way, Jenilee Dawn; Wuest, Frank

    2014-02-01

    4-[18F]Fluoroiodobenzene ([18F]FIB) is a versatile building block in 18F radiochemistry used in various transition metal-mediated C-C and C-N cross-coupling reactions and [18F]fluoroarylation reactions. Various synthesis routes have been described for the preparation of [18F]FIB. However, to date, no automated synthesis of [18F]FIB has been reported to allow access to larger amounts of [18F]FIB in high radiochemical and chemical purity. Herein, we describe an automated synthesis of no-carrier-added [18F]FIB on a GE TRACERlab™ FX automated synthesis unit starting from commercially available(4-iodophenyl)diphenylsulfonium triflate as the labelling precursor. [18F]FIB was prepared in high radiochemical yields of 89 ± 10% (decay-corrected, n = 7) within 60 min, including HPLC purification. The radiochemical purity exceeded 95%, and specific activity was greater than 40 GBq/μmol. Typically, from an experiment, 6.4 GBq of [18F]FIB could be obtained starting from 10.4 GBq of [18F]fluoride.

  11. Synthesis of no carrier added F-18 16-fluorohexadecanoic acid (FHDA) and investigation of its labeled metabolites and its kinetics in the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeGrado, T.R.; Bernstein, D.R.; Gatley, S.J.; Ng, C.K.; Holden, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    No carrier added FHDA was prepared via saponification of the product of silver oxide assisted reaction of near-anhydrous tetraethylammonium fluoride with methyl 16-iodohexadecanoate. The labeled fatty acid was injected into isolated perfused rat hearts. Coronary perfusate was collected for 4-9 minutes, when hearts were chilled and homogenized. F-18 in perfusate was analysed by HPLC (NH column; 50mM amm. acetate in 50% acetonitrile). Material with the same retention time as F-18 fluoroacetate (prepared by F-for-I exchange with ethyl iodoacetate) was found. Some F-18 stuck permanently to the column and was assigned as fluoride since the same fraction of label in perfusate was retained on alumina columns eluted with water. Anion exchange HPLC (SAX column; 20mM pot. phosphate, pH 7) of homogenates gave peaks corresponding to fluoroacetate plus fluoride and minor peaks which could be fluoroacetylCoA and fluorocitrate. The authors interpret their data as follows. Beta-oxidation of FHDA results in fluoroacetylCoA which either undergoes ''lethal synthesis'' to fluorocitrate or is hydrolysed to fluoroacetate which diffuses out of the heart. The source of the fluoride is not yet clear, but could complicate interpretation of FHDA kinetics measured in vivo with positron tomography. Clearance of label from FHDA in isolated perfused hearts was faster than for labeled 16-iodohexadecanoic acid, indicating that the F-18 tracer may be a more sensitive probe of myocardial fatty acid metabolism

  12. An electro-amalgamation approach to isolate no-carrier-added {sup 177}Lu from neutron irradiated Yb for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakravarty, Rubel; Das, Tapas [Radiopharmaceuticals Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Dash, Ashutosh, E-mail: adash@barc.gov.i [Radiopharmaceuticals Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Venkatesh, Meera [Radiopharmaceuticals Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2010-10-15

    Introduction: A novel two-step separation process for the production of no-carrier-added (NCA) {sup 177}Lu from neutron irradiated Yb target through an electrochemical pathway employing mercury-pool cathode has been developed. Methods: A two-cycle electrolysis procedure was adopted for separation of {sup 177}Lu from {sup 177}Lu/Yb mixture in lithium citrate medium. The influence of different experimental parameters on the separation process was investigated and optimized for the quantitative deposition of Yb in presence of {sup 177}Lu. The first electrolysis was performed for 50 min in the {sup 177}Lu/Yb feed solution at pH 6 applying a potential of 8 V using platinum electrode as anode and mercury as the cathode. The second electrolysis was performed under the same conditions using fresh electrodes. The radionuclidic and chemical purity of {sup 177}Lu was determined by using gamma ray spectrometry and atomic absorption spectrometry. The suitability of {sup 177}Lu for biomedical applications was ascertained by labeling 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid D-Phe{sup 1}-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotate(DOTA-TATE) with {sup 177}Lu. Results: This process could provide NCA {sup 177}Lu with >99.99% radionuclidic purity and an overall separation yield of {approx}99% was achieved within 3-4 h. The Hg content in the product was determined to be <1 ppm. Radiolabeling yield of >98% was obtained with DOTA-TATE under the optimized reaction conditions. Conclusions: An efficient strategy for the separation of NCA {sup 177}Lu, suitable for biomedical applications, has been developed.

  13. Synthesis of a Potent Aminopyridine-Based nNOS-Inhibitor by Two Recent No-Carrier-Added 18F-Labelling Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Drerup

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO, an important multifunctional signaling molecule, is produced by three isoforms of NO-synthase (NOS and has been associated with neurodegenerative disorders. Selective inhibitors of the subtypes iNOS (inducible or nNOS (neuronal are of great interest for decoding neurodestructive key factors, and 18F-labelled analogues would allow investigating the NOS-function by molecular imaging with positron emission tomography. Especially, the highly selective nNOS inhibitor 6-((3-((3-fluorophenethylaminomethylphenoxymethyl-4-methylpyridin-2-amine (10 lends itself as suitable compound to be 18F-labelled in no-carrier-added (n.c.a. form. For preparation of the 18F-labelled nNOS-Inhibitor [18F]10 a “build-up” radiosynthesis was developed based on a corresponding iodonium ylide as labelling precursor. The such activated phenethyl group of the compound was efficiently and regioselectively labelled with n.c.a. [18F]fluoride in 79% radiochemical yield (RCY. After conversion by reductive amination and microwave assisted displacement of the protecting groups, the desired nNOS-inhibitor was obtained in about 15% total RCY. Alternatively, for a simplified “late-stage” 18F-labelling procedure a corresponding boronic ester precursor was synthesized and successfully used in a newer, copper(II mediated n.c.a. 18F-fluoro-deboroniation reaction, achieving the same total RCY. Thus, both methods proved comparatively suited to provide the highly selective NOS-inhibitor [18F]10 as probe for preclinical in vivo studies.

  14. Synthesis of a Potent Aminopyridine-Based nNOS-Inhibitor by Two Recent No-Carrier-Added (18)F-Labelling Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drerup, Christian; Ermert, Johannes; Coenen, Heinz H

    2016-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), an important multifunctional signaling molecule, is produced by three isoforms of NO-synthase (NOS) and has been associated with neurodegenerative disorders. Selective inhibitors of the subtypes iNOS (inducible) or nNOS (neuronal) are of great interest for decoding neurodestructive key factors, and (18)F-labelled analogues would allow investigating the NOS-function by molecular imaging with positron emission tomography. Especially, the highly selective nNOS inhibitor 6-((3-((3-fluorophenethylamino)methyl)phenoxy)methyl)-4-methylpyridin-2-amine (10) lends itself as suitable compound to be (18)F-labelled in no-carrier-added (n.c.a.) form. For preparation of the (18)F-labelled nNOS-Inhibitor [(18)F]10 a "build-up" radiosynthesis was developed based on a corresponding iodonium ylide as labelling precursor. The such activated phenethyl group of the compound was efficiently and regioselectively labelled with n.c.a. [(18)F]fluoride in 79% radiochemical yield (RCY). After conversion by reductive amination and microwave assisted displacement of the protecting groups, the desired nNOS-inhibitor was obtained in about 15% total RCY. Alternatively, for a simplified "late-stage" (18)F-labelling procedure a corresponding boronic ester precursor was synthesized and successfully used in a newer, copper(II) mediated n.c.a. (18)F-fluoro-deboroniation reaction, achieving the same total RCY. Thus, both methods proved comparatively suited to provide the highly selective NOS-inhibitor [(18)F]10 as probe for preclinical in vivo studies.

  15. Automated no-carrier-added synthesis of [1-{sup 11}C]-labeled D- and L-enantiomers of lactic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drandarov, Konstantin [Center for Radiopharmaceutical Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, University Hospital Zuerich, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Schubiger, P. August [Center for Radiopharmaceutical Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, University Hospital Zuerich, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Westera, Gerrit [Center for Radiopharmaceutical Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, University Hospital Zuerich, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland) and Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland)]. E-mail: gerrit.westera@usz.ch

    2006-12-15

    The first purely chemical method for automated no-carrier-added synthesis of [1-{sup 11}C]-labeled D(R)- and L(S)-2-hydroxypropanoic acid (lactic acid) was developed for experimental neurophysiology studies and position emission tomography (PET) diagnosis. Starting from sodium 1-hydroxyethanesulfonate and [{sup 11}C]HCN (trapped as [{sup 11}C]KCN) the intermediate DL-(R,S)-[1-{sup 11}C]-2-hydroxypropanenitrile was prepared. Its rapid acid hydrolysis gave DL-(R,S)-[1-{sup 11}C]lactic acid, which was isolated by preparative reversed phase HPLC and automatically injected on a second preparative C{sub 18} HPLC column coated with a chiral selector, where both [1-{sup 11}C]lactic acid enantiomers were separated by chiral ligand-exchange chromatography. Two novel chiral selectors for HPLC enantiomeric separation of {alpha}-hydroxy acids, namely D(R)- or L(S)-2-amino-3-methyl-3-(5-phenylpentylsulfanyl)-butanoic acid were utilized for the preparative HPLC separation of the [1-{sup 11}C]lactic acid enantiomers. The preparation of the selectors and the coating procedure for the manufacturing of the preparative chiral HPLC columns are described. A highly efficient trap for [{sup 11}C]HCN is presented. The whole radiosynthesis is automated, takes about 45 min and leads to more than 80% decay corrected overall radiochemical yield of each enantiomer (up to 2.5 GBq) with over 99% radiochemical, chemical and enantiomeric purity. The specific activity at the end of the synthesis is about 400 GBq/{mu}mol.

  16. Automated no-carrier-added synthesis of [1-11C]-labeled D- and L-enantiomers of lactic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drandarov, Konstantin; Schubiger, P. August; Westera, Gerrit

    2006-01-01

    The first purely chemical method for automated no-carrier-added synthesis of [1- 11 C]-labeled D(R)- and L(S)-2-hydroxypropanoic acid (lactic acid) was developed for experimental neurophysiology studies and position emission tomography (PET) diagnosis. Starting from sodium 1-hydroxyethanesulfonate and [ 11 C]HCN (trapped as [ 11 C]KCN) the intermediate DL-(R,S)-[1- 11 C]-2-hydroxypropanenitrile was prepared. Its rapid acid hydrolysis gave DL-(R,S)-[1- 11 C]lactic acid, which was isolated by preparative reversed phase HPLC and automatically injected on a second preparative C 18 HPLC column coated with a chiral selector, where both [1- 11 C]lactic acid enantiomers were separated by chiral ligand-exchange chromatography. Two novel chiral selectors for HPLC enantiomeric separation of α-hydroxy acids, namely D(R)- or L(S)-2-amino-3-methyl-3-(5-phenylpentylsulfanyl)-butanoic acid were utilized for the preparative HPLC separation of the [1- 11 C]lactic acid enantiomers. The preparation of the selectors and the coating procedure for the manufacturing of the preparative chiral HPLC columns are described. A highly efficient trap for [ 11 C]HCN is presented. The whole radiosynthesis is automated, takes about 45 min and leads to more than 80% decay corrected overall radiochemical yield of each enantiomer (up to 2.5 GBq) with over 99% radiochemical, chemical and enantiomeric purity. The specific activity at the end of the synthesis is about 400 GBq/μmol

  17. Synthesis and characterization of scandium oxide microspheres for their application in radioactive particle tracking experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goswami, Sunil; Biswal, Jayashree; Pant, H.J.; Pillai, K.T.; Bamankar, Y.R.

    2012-01-01

    Radioactive particle tracking (RPT) technique, proposed by Lin et al., is a noble technique for understanding mixing mechanisms of fluids and; evaluation and improvement of design of multiphase flow systems. In RPT technique the motion of a single radioactive particle is tracked in a flow system using an array of strategically mounted NaI(Tl) scintillation detectors around the system. The gamma emitting radioactive tracer particle being tracked is designed to be hydrodynamically similar to that of the phase being traced

  18. Studies on low-carrier radiofluorination of non-active aromatics with no-carrier-added [{sup 18}F]fluoride; Untersuchungen zur traegerarmen Radiofluorierung nicht-aktiver Aromaten mit n.c.a. [{sup 18}F]Fluorid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardinale, Jens

    2013-01-15

    In vivo imaging with positron emission tomography generally demands radiotracers with a high specific activity. In case of fluorine-18 the required no-carrier-added (n.c.a.) starting material is only available in form of fluoride. This and the short half-life of 109.7 minutes of the radionuclide lead to the demand of special methods for radiosyntheses. The only practical procedure for manufacturing n.c.a. [{sup 18}F]fluoro-compounds is therefore nucleophilic substitution. There is, however, still a lack of effective procedures for the labelling of electron rich aromatic molecules starting from n.c.a. [{sup 18}F]fluoride. A process for n.c.a. radiofluorination of these compounds is offered by the reaction of iodonium compounds as starting materials. In this study modern procedures for the synthesis of iodoniumsalts and -ylides were investigated. Several precursor molecules for the versatile synthetic building block 4-[{sup 18}F]fluoroiodobenzene were synthesised. In this course, a new one-pot procedure for the synthesis of iodoniumylides was developed. Further on, the syntheses of suitable iodonium precursors for two fluorophenoxy-derivatives, which are possible antidepressants, were investigated. Due to their binding profile these compounds can be considered as ligands for the serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT) and the norepinephrin reuptake transporter (NET), respectively. The preparation of appropriate iodonium salts proved to be too problematic, while the synthesis of suitable iodoniumylides could be accomplished with satisfactory yields of about 30% and 40 %, respectively. Both compounds were labelled with n.c.a. [{sup 18}F]fluoride and deprotected to the desired target compounds 4-((3-[{sup 18}F]fluorophenoxy)(phenyl)methyl)piperidine and 4-((4-[{sup 18}F]fluorophenoxy)(phenyl)methyl)piperidine in radiochemical yields of about 40 % and 25 %, respectively. Those are now available for preclinical evaluation studies. Furthermore, a process for the palladium

  19. Scandium fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melnikov, P.; Nalin, M.; Messaddeq, Y.

    1997-01-01

    A new modification of scandium fluoride has been synthesised. The compound is deficient in fluorine, with the composition ScF 2.76 . It belongs to the tetragonal system, lattice parameters being a=3.792 and c=6.740 A and may be obtained at low temperatures by the decomposition of the precursor NH 4 ScF 4 . The reaction is topotactic, tetragonal parameters of the precursor are a=4.021 and c=6.744 A. Structural relationships with various fluorides and ammonium aminofluorides are discussed. This synthesis route with IR-assisted decomposition should be considered as a soft-chemistry approach. (orig.)

  20. Preparation of no-carrier-added [1-11C]ethylene and [1-11C]1,2-dibromoethane as new labelling agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, F.; Pike, V.W.; Dowsett, K.

    1997-01-01

    A method is described for the preparation of NCA [1- 11 C] ethylene based on the passage of [1- 11 C]ethanol over heated (550 o C) quartz glass in a stainless steel tube (in preference to dehydration by catalysis on γ-alumina or pyrolysis). The [1- 11 C]ethanol is prepared from cyclotron-produced NCA [ 11 C]carbon dioxide by 11 C-carboxylation of methylmagnesium bromide, freshly prepared in dibutyl ether, and reduction of the adduct with lithium aluminium hydride in diglyme. The use of involatile solvents avoids the formation of carrier ethylene and radioactive and stable diethyl ether by cracking processes over the heated catalyst. The preparation takes 21 min from the end of radionuclide production and has a radiochemical yield of 44%, decay-corrected from [ 11 C]carbon dioxide. NCA [1- 11 C] ethylene is converted quantitatively into [1- 11 C]1,2-dibromoethane when collected in a solution of bromine in carbon tetrachloride. The NCA [1- 11 C]ethylene and [1- 11 C]1,2-dibromoethane may serve as new and useful labelling agents. (Author)

  1. Ion exchange purification of scandium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herchenroeder, Laurie A.; Burkholder, Harvey R.

    1990-10-23

    An improvement in purification of scandium through ion exchange chromatography is disclosed in which the oxidation potential of the eluting solution is altered by the addition of potassium chlorate or ammonium chloride so that removal of contaminants is encouraged. The temperature, pH and concentration of the eluent HEDTA are controlled in order to maintain the scandium in the column while minimizing dilution of the scandium band. Recovery of scandium is improved by pumping dilute scandium over the column prior to stripping the scandium and precipitation. This eliminates the HEDTA ion and other monovalent cations contaminating the scandium band. This method maximizes recovery of scandium while maintaining purity.

  2. Method for chromatographically recovering scandium and yttrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, T.S.; Stoltz, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a method for chromatographically recovering scandium and yttrium from the residue of a sand chlorinator. It comprises: providing a residue from a sand chlorinator, the residue containing scandium, yttrium, sodium, calcium and at least one radioactive metal of the group consisting of radium, thorium and uranium; digesting the residue with an acid to produce an aqueous liquid containing scandium, yttrium, sodium, calcium and at least one radioactive metal of the group consisting of radium, thorium and uranium; feeding the metal containing liquid through a cation exchanger; eluding the cation exchanger with an acid eluant to to produce: a first eluate containing at least half of the total weight of the calcium and sodium in the feed liquid; a second eluate containing at least half of the total weight of the one or more radioactive metals in the feed liquid; a third eluate containing at least half of the yttrium in the feed liquid, and a fourth eluate containing at least half of the weight of the scandium in the feed liquid

  3. Chemical processing for production of no-carrier-added selenium-73 from germanium and arsenic targets and synthesis of L-2-amino-4-([73Se]methylseleno) butyric acid (L-[73Se]selenomethionine)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plenevaux, A.; Guillaume, M.; Brihaye, C.; Lemaire, C.; Cantineau, R.

    1990-01-01

    The Ge( 4 He,xn) and 75 As(p,3n) reactions were compared as the best potential routes for routine production of selenium-73 ( 73 Se) for medical applications. With 26 MeV α particles, available with compact cyclotrons, the first reaction required an enriched 70 Ge target of sodium metagermanate to give a production yield of 1 mCi/μAh (0.037 GBq/μAh) in a 105 mg/cm 2 target. With 55 MeV protons the As(p,3n) reaction on natural arsenic yielded 20 mCi/μAh (0.74 GBq/μAh) in a 685 mg/cm 2 target. A simple method was developed and optimized for both targets in order to isolate and purify the no-carrier-added selenium in the elemental form with a radiochemical yield greater than 75% in less than 90 min. An automated radiochemical processing unit has been designed for the routine production of 100-150 mCi(3.7-5.5 GBq) batches of carrier-free 73 Se ready for radiopharmaceutical labeling. 30 mCi (1.11 GBq) (EOS) of L-2-amino-4-([ 73 Se]methylseleno) butyric acid (L-[ 73 Se]selenomethionine) ready for injection with a specific activity of 5 Ci/mmol (185 GBq/mmol) (EOS) were obtained through a fast chemical synthesis. Radiation absorbed dose estimates for L-[ 73 Se ]selenomethionine have been determined. A value of 0.70 rem/mCi (0.19 mSv/MBq) administered was calculated for the risk from irradiation in man. The first human PET investigation with [ 73 Se]selenomethionine showed a very good delineation between liver and pancreas. (author)

  4. Characterization and excitation behaviour studies of radionuclide (scandium) in glass matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehana, Ishrat; Shahid, K.A.; Husain, S.; Muhammad, Din

    1999-01-01

    Directional movements of bed load in marine sediments are studied using a radioactive tracer, scandium, similar to the natural sediment in the area. Scandium glass prepared for this purpose was analyzed by atomic emission spectrography for quality assurance purposes. A buffer composed of graphite with 5% germanium oxide was used for accurate and reproducible analyses. The role of this buffer in the excitation behavior of scandium and variations in spectral line intensity with respect to various influencing parameters are reported. Volatilization of scandium was observed using the moving plate technique, with a dc-arc as the excitation source

  5. Adsorption and desorption of hydrolyzed metal ions. 3. Scandium and chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, B.; Matijevic, E.; Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY

    1987-01-01

    Adsorption of scandium(III) and chromium(III) species on a PVC latex was measured using radioactive isotopes; the uptake increased with increasing pH. The data were interpreted by combining aspects of the models of James and Healy and also of Anderson and Bockris. The experimental and calculated results agree quite well for scandium, but not for chromium. The deviation in the latter case is believed to be due to polymerization of the hydrolyzed chromium cations and to the interaction of chromium with the anionic surface groups of the latex. Neither of these interactions occur with scandium. Hydrolyzed scandium species adsorbed on the latex were removed by acidifying the dispersion, while chromium complexes were not, substantiating the proposed difference in the chemical nature of chromium and scandium species at the solid/solution interface. 32 refs.; 8 figs.; 8 tabs

  6. PET studies of potential chemotherapeutic agents: Pt. 10; Synthesis of ''no-carrier-added'' ( sup 11 C)-HECNU: the hydroxyethyl analog of the chemotherapeutic agent BCNU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conway, T.; Diksic, M. (Montreal Neurological Inst. and Hospital, PQ (Canada). McConnell Brain Imaging Centre McGill Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Neurology and Neurosurgery)

    1991-01-01

    Carbon-11-labeled HECNU (1-(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitroso-3-(2-hydroxyethyl) urea) a potential chemotherapeutic agent, has been prepared by the nitrosation of the corresponding carbon-11-labeled urea, HECU, (1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-(2-hydroxyethyl) urea). The isomeric byproduct of nitrosation, 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-nitroso-3-(2-hydroxyethyl) urea can be efficiently removed by preparative scale HPLC on a Partisil column. ({sup 11}C)-HECU was prepared by reacting ethanolamine with ({sup 11}C)-2-chloroethyl-isocyanate which was itself prepared by reacting ({sup 11}C)-phosgene with 2-chloroethylamine hydrochloride suspended in dioxane at 60-65{sup o}C. This synthesis yielded ({sup 11}C)-HECNU with an average radiochemical purity of 98% in an average radiochemical yield of 18% relative to the radioactivity measured at the end of the {sup 11}C-phosgene introduction. (author).

  7. Scandium, yttrium and the lanthanides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, F.A.

    1987-01-01

    This chapter on the chemistry of the coordination complexes of scandium, yttrium and the lanthanides includes sections on the nitrogen and oxygen donor ligands and complex halides of scandium, and the phosphorus and sulfur donor ligands of yttrium and the lanthanides. Complexes with the macrocylic ligands and with halides are also discussed. Sections on the NMR and electronic spectra of the lanthanides are also included. (UK)

  8. Scandium Terminal Imido Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Erli; Chu, Jiaxiang; Chen, Yaofeng

    2018-02-20

    Research into transition metal complexes bearing multiply bonded main-group ligands has developed into a thriving and fruitful field over the past half century. These complexes, featuring terminal M═E/M≡E (M = transition metal; E = main-group element) multiple bonds, exhibit unique structural properties as well as rich reactivity, which render them attractive targets for inorganic/organometallic chemists as well as indispensable tools for organic/catalytic chemists. This fact has been highlighted by their widespread applications in organic synthesis, for example, as olefin metathesis catalysts. In the ongoing renaissance of transition metal-ligand multiple-bonding chemistry, there have been reports of M═E/M≡E interactions for the majority of the metallic elements of the periodic table, even some actinide metals. In stark contrast, the largest subgroup of the periodic table, rare-earth metals (Ln = Sc, Y, and lanthanides), have been excluded from this upsurge. Indeed, the synthesis of terminal Ln═E/Ln≡E multiple-bonding species lagged behind that of the transition metal and actinide congeners for decades. Although these species had been pursued since the discovery of a rare-earth metal bridging imide in 1991, such a terminal (nonpincer/bridging hapticities) Ln═E/Ln≡E bond species was not obtained until 2010. The scarcity is mainly attributed to the energy mismatch between the frontier orbitals of the metal and the ligand atoms. This renders the putative terminal Ln═E/Ln≡E bonds extremely reactive, thus resulting in the formation of aggregates and/or reaction with the ligand/environment, quenching the multiple-bond character. In 2010, the stalemate was broken by the isolation and structural characterization of the first rare-earth metal terminal imide-a scandium terminal imide-by our group. The double-bond character of the Sc═N bond was unequivocally confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Theoretical investigations revealed the presence

  9. Synthesis of 'no carrier added' carbon-11 fotemustine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasne, M.C.; Piarraud, A.; Lalaoui, K.; Barre, L.; Derlon, J.M.; Giroux, B.

    1990-01-01

    Nitrosoureas are commonly used for chemotherapeutic treatment of some tumors and the search for new drugs less toxic amd more selective is always under investigation. Efficacy of fotemustine, a nitrosourea type compound in the treatment of malignant gliomas prompted us to label it with carbon-11 so that its pharmacokinetics and metabolic behavior in human brain tumors could be studied in vivo using PET. The synthetic pathway for labelling with carbon-11 is outlined

  10. Stability constants of scandium complexes, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Hisako; Itoh, Naomi; Suzuki, Yasuo

    1984-01-01

    The stability constants of scandium complexes with some carboxylate ligands were determined potentiometrically at 25.0 and 40.0 0 C and at an ionic strength of 0.10 with potassium nitrate as supporting electrolyte. The constants of the scandium complexes were appreciably greater than those of the corresponding lanthanoid complexes, as expected. The changes in free energy, enthalpy, and entropy for the formation of the scandium complexes were calculated from the stability constants at two temperatures. (author)

  11. Low temperature heat capacity of scandium and alloys of scandium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsang, T. W.E.

    1977-12-01

    The heat capacity of three electrotransport purified scandium samples has been measured from 1 to 20/sup 0/K. The resultant electronic specific heat constant and Debye temperature are 10.337 +- 0.015 mJ/gm-atom K/sup 2/ and 346.7 +- 0.8/sup 0/K respectively, and these values are believed to be truly representative of intrinsic scandium. Alloying studies have also been carried out to investigate the band structure of scandium based on the rigid band model, with zirconium to raise the electron concentration and magnesium to lower it. The results are then compared to the theoretical band structure calculations. Low temperature heat capacity measurements have also been made on some dilute Sc-Fe alloys. An anomaly is observed in the C/T vs. T/sup 2/ plot, but the C vs. T curve shows no evidence of magnetic ordering down to 1/sup 0/K, and electrical resistance measurement from 4 to 0.3/sup 0/K also indicates that no magnetic ordering took place.

  12. Extraction of scandium by organic substance melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladyshev, V.P.; Lobanov, F.I.; Zebreva, A.I.; Andreeva, N.N.; Manuilova, O.A.; Il'yukevich, Yu.A.

    1984-01-01

    Regularities of scandium extraction by the melts of octadecanicoic acid, n-carbonic acids of C 17 -C 20 commerical fraction and mixtures of tributylphosphate (TBP) with paraffin at (70+-1) deg C have been studied. The optimum conditions for scandium extraction in the melt of organic substances are determined. A scheme of the extraction by the melts of higher carbonic acids at ninitial metal concentrations of 10 -5 to 10 -3 mol/l has been suggested. The scandium compound has been isolated in solid form, its composition having been determined. The main advantages of extraction by melts are as follows: a possibility to attain high distribution coefficients, distinct separation of phases after extraction, the absence of emulsions, elimination of employing inflammable and toxic solvents, a possibility of rapid X-ray fluorescence determinatinon of scandium directly in solid extract

  13. Scandium, yttrium and the lanthanide metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Paul L.; Ekberg, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The hydroxide and oxide phases that exist for scandium(III) include scandium hydroxide, which likely has both amorphous and crystalline forms, ScOOH(s), and scandium oxide. This chapter presents the data selected for the stability constants of the polymeric hydrolysis species of scandium at zero ionic strength. The behaviour of yttrium, and the lanthanide metals, in the environment is largely dependent on their solution equilibria. Hydrolysis and other complexation reactions of yttrium and the lanthanide metals are important in the disposal of nuclear waste. The trivalent lanthanide metals include lanthanum(III) through lutetium(III). A number of studies have reported a tetrad effect for the geochemical behaviour of the lanthanide series, including stability constants and distribution coefficients. The solubility of many of the lanthanide hydroxide phases has been studied at fixed ionic strength. In studying the hydrolysis of cerium(IV), a number of studies have utilised oxidation-reduction reactions in determining the relevant stability constants.

  14. Extraction of scandium by aromatic carboxylic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamenev, V.F.; Fadeeva, V.I.

    1977-01-01

    Extraction of complex compounds af scandium with salicylic, phenyl- and diphenylacetic acids with chloroform solutions of tetraethyldiamideheptylphosphate as a donor-active additive in relation to the pH and reagent concentration has been studied. Extraction of salicylates of some elements (Ta, Nb, Zr, Hf, Mo) by solutions of tetraethyldiamideheptylphosphate in chloroform has been investigated, and the possibility of their extraction separation from scandium is shown

  15. Extraction of scandium by aromatic carboxylic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamenev, V F; Fadeeva, V I [Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR)

    1977-04-01

    Extraction of complex compounds af scandium with salicylic, phenyl- and diphenylacetic acids with chloroform solutions of tetraethyldiamideheptylphosphate as a donor-active additive in relation to the pH and reagent concentration has been studied. Extraction of salicylates of some elements (Ta, Nb, Zr, Hf, Mo) by solutions of tetraethyldiamideheptylphosphate in chloroform has been investigated, and the possibility of their extraction separation from scandium is shown.

  16. A basic evaluated neutronic data file for elemental scandium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.B.; Meadows, J.W.; Howerton, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    This report documents an evaluated neutronic data file for elemental scandium, presented in the ENDF/B-VI format. This file should provide basic nuclear data essential for neutronic calculations involving elemental scandium. No equivalent file was previously available

  17. Complexometric determination of scandium and aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tikhonov, V.N.

    1980-01-01

    Described is the complexometric determination of scandium and aluminium by the method of reverse titration of EDTA excess by indium salt solution in the presence of the xylenol orange indicator. For the method selectivity increase fluorides are used as a camouflage substance at low pH values (2.5-3.0). The excess fluoride-ions preventing titration are bound by boric acid. Y, Tb, Ti, Zr, Cu, Zn, V, Mo, Co, Cr prevent the determination of Sc and Al

  18. Pilot-scale recovery of rare earths and scandium from phosphogypsum and uranium leachates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashkovtsev Maxim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ural Federal University (UrFU and VTT have performed joint research on development of industrial technologies for the extraction of REM and Scandium compounds from phosphogypsum and Uranium ISL leachate solutions. Leaching-absorption experiments at UrFU have been supported with multicomponent solution modelling by VTT. The simulations have been performed with VTT’s ChemSheet/Balas program and can be used for speciation calculations in the lixiviant solution. The experimental work combines solvent extraction with advanced ion exchange methodology in a pilot facility capable of treating 5 m3 solution per hour. Currently, the plant produces cerium carbonate, lanthanum oxide, neodymium oxide and concentrate of heavy rare earth metals. A batch of 45 t solids has been processed with the gain of 100 kg’s of REM concentrate. A mini-pilot plant with productivity above 50 liters per hour has been applied to recover scandium oxide and REE concentrates from the uranium ISL solution. As the preliminary product contains radioactivity (mainly strontium, an additional decontamination and cleaning of both concentrates by extraction has rendered a necessity. Finally a purified 99% concentrate of scandium oxide as well as 99% rare earth concentrate are received.

  19. Ternary scandium and transition metals germanides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotur, B.Ya.

    1992-01-01

    Brief review of data on phase diagram of ternary Sc-Me-Ge systems (Me-d - , f-transition element) is given. Isothermal sections at 870 and 1070 K of 17 ternary systems are plotted. Compositions and their structural characteristics are presented. Variability of crystal structure is typical for ternary scandium germanides: 70 compounds with the studied structure belong to 23 structural types. Ternary germanides isostructural to types of Sm 4 Ge 4 , ZrCrSi 2 , ZrNiAl, ScCeSi, TiNiSi U 4 Re 7 Si 6 145 compounds from 70 under investigation are mostly formed in studied systems

  20. Extraction of scandium salicylate by tetraethyldiamidoheptyl phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamenev, V F; Fadeeva, V I; Zyk, N V [Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR). Kafedra Analiticheskoj Khimii

    1976-11-01

    Scandium salicylate is extracted with chloroform in a narrow pH range 3-4 and at the maximum concentration of salicylic acid (H/sub 2/A) in an organic phase, the distribution coefficient reaches 0.1. In the presence of tetraethyldiamideheptylphosphate (DAHP) the zone of maximum extraction grows and the distribution coefficient increases. The ratio of the components in the complex extracted is Sc:H/sub 2/A:DAHPh=1:3:2. The extraction constant is Ksub(ex)=(2.00+-0.02).

  1. Scandium: its occurrence, chemistry, physics, metallurgy, biology, and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horovitz, C.T.

    1975-01-01

    This book describes the following aspects of scandium: discovery and history, occurrence in nature, geochemistry and mineralogy, chemical, physical and technological properties, fabrication and metallurgy, its biological significance and toxicology, and its uses. (Extensive references for each chapter)

  2. Synthesis of no-carrier-added and carrier-added YF-labelled haloperidol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrokhzad, S; Diksic, M

    1985-07-01

    Fluorine-18 labelled haloperidol ( YF-HP) was synthesized by a fluorine-fluorine exchange reaction on haloperidol, fluorine-chlorine exchange on a chloro-analog of haloperidol, and from YF-labelled p-fluorobenzonitrile prepared by two different exchange reactions. Nucleophilic fluorine was used in the form of tetra n-butylammonium fluoride. The overall radiochemical yield, expressed at the end of syntheses was 5% for exchange in haloperidol and about 2%-3% for exchange in chloroanalog in a 40 min synthesis (from the end of the irradiation). Specific activities up to 1 Ci/mmol for haloperidol and up to 5000 Ci/mmol for chloro-analog as substrates were obtained. The syntheses using p-substituted chloro-and nitro-benzonitriles as starting materials for the exchange reaction gave a product with an average specific activity of about 2000 Ci/mmol and in general an overall radiochemical yield of 5%-10%. Purification of ( YF)haloperidol was done by HPLC on a C-18 column. The radiochemical purity as assessed by thin layer radiochromatography (TLRC) of the final product was at least 95%, with high chemical purity.

  3. The synthesis of no-carrier-added and carrier-added 18F-labelled haloperidol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrokhzad, S.; Diksic, M.

    1985-01-01

    Fluorine-18 labelled haloperidol ( 18 F-HP) was synthesized by a fluorine-fluorine exchange reaction on haloperidol, fluorine-chlorine exchange on a chloro-analog of haloperidol, and from 18 F-labelled p-fluorobenzonitrile prepared by two different exchange reactions. Nucleophilic fluorine was used in the form of tetra n-butylammonium fluoride. The overall radiochemical yield, expressed at the end of syntheses was 5% for exchange in haloperidol and about 2%-3% for exchange in chloroanalog in a 40 min synthesis (from the end of the irradiation). Specific activities up to 1 Ci/mmol for haloperidol and up to 5000 Ci/mmol for chloro-analog as substrates were obtained. The syntheses using p-substituted chloro-and nitro-benzonitriles as starting materials for the exchange reaction gave a product with an average specific activity of about 2000 Ci/mmol and in general an overall radiochemical yield of 5%-10%. Purification of [ 18 F]haloperidol was done by HPLC on a C-18 column. The radiochemical purity as assessed by thin layer radiochromatography (TLRC) of the final product was at least 95%, with high chemical purity. (author)

  4. Enantioselective synthesis of no-carrier added (NCA) 6-[18F]Fluoro-L-Dopa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duanzhi Yin; Lan Zhang; Yongxian Wang; Ganghua Tang; First Military Medical Univ., Guangzhou; Xiaolan Tang

    2003-01-01

    6-[ 18 F]Fluoro-L-Dopa (6-FDOPA) is the analogue of L-Dopa, the biosynthesis precursor for dopamine. As a PET tracer, it was widely applied for the presynaptic dopamine function studies in human brain. The application of a chiral phase-transfer-catalyst (PTC) in enantioselective synthesis of N.C.A. 6-[ 18 F]Fluoro-L-Dopa has been developed recently. An improved procedure was described. The labeling precursor (6-Trimethylammoniumveratraldehyde Triflate) and PTC (O-Allyl-N-(9)-anthracenylcinchonidinium Bromide) were synthesized. A successful synthesis route was developed for the preparation of 6-[ 18 F]Fluoro-L-Dopa with high radiochemical yields (4-9%, decay uncorrected) and short synthesis time(80min). The radiochemical purity was over 99% and no D-isomer was detected by HPLC analysis using a chiral mobile phase. (author)

  5. Synthesis of ''no carrier added'' 1,3-bis-(2-chloroethyl)nitrosourea (BCNU)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diksic, M.; Farrokhzad, S.; Yamamoto, L.; Feindel, W.

    1982-01-01

    A chemotherapeutic agent, C-11-labeled BCNU, has been prepared by nitrosation of C-11-labeled BCU, which was synthesized by reacting C-11-labeled phosgene with ethylenimine. Two methods of nitrosation are outlined and the results of both are discussed. The specific activity of C-11 BCNU was about 85 Ci/mmole at the end of bombardment and 30 Ci/mmole at the time of administration. Chemical and radiochemical purity of the final material was at least 98%

  6. Preparation and in vitro evaluation of ''no-carrier-added'' 18F-labeled biotin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najafi, A.; Peterson, A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper will describe the preparation of ''no-carrieradded'' 18 F-labeled biotin where the radiolabel bound to an aromatic moiety is described. This has been accomplished by preparation of [ 18 F]fluorobenzylbromide (yield 20-30%) and its reaction with biotin-LC-hydrazide. This yielded ''nocarrier-added'' radiolabeled biotin(5-10%) which was then purified by reversed phase HPLC. The pure product was found to bind to avidin, thereby demonstrating retention of its biological integrity. Thus this product is potentially useful for imaging tumor tissue following injection of avidin coupled MoAbs. (Author)

  7. A new approach to the synthesis of no-carrier-added fluorine-18 labeled fluorocatechols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, P.K.; Kilbourn, M.R.

    1990-01-01

    A new method of synthesizing fluorine-18 labelled fluorocatechols has been developed using a salicylaldehyde as a 'synthon' for a catechol. 2-Methoxy-4-nitrobenzaldehyde was treated with [ 18 F]fluoride ion, followed by cleavage of the anisole to yield the free phenol. The phenol was oxidized to the desired fluorocatechol

  8. Interaction of scandium sesquioxide with carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vodop'yanov, A.G.; Zakharov, R.G.

    1986-01-01

    In the range of 2350-2470 degrees K at a PCO = 0.0 MPa, interaction in Sc 2 O 3 with carbon mixtures initially occurs by CO chemisorption at the scandium oxide surface and disproportionation into CO 2 and C, with subsequent replacement of oxygen in the oxide anion sublattice by carbon to form ScC. The carbide melt, creating a contact between the reagents, then transforms the process to a diffusion-based one. At 1820-2220 K in vacuum, reduction of the studied mixtures occurs by dissociative vaporization of the oxide, with precipitation of ScC at the carbon surface and generation of CO. The appearance of CO in the vapors of mixture leads to formation of an oxycarbide phase and to the partial occurrence of oxide dissociation

  9. The crystal structure of scandium dyhydrate triglycolate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dukareva, L.M.; Antishkina, A.S.; Porai-Koshits, M.A.; Ostrikova, V.N.; Arkhangel'skij, I.V.; Amanov, A.Z.

    1978-01-01

    The structure of colorless crystals of scandium glycolate dehydrate Sc(CH 2 OHCOO) 3 x2H 2 O, synthesized at the chemical department of MSU has been investigated. Parameters of the monoclinic lattice are determined according to roentgenograms of swing and Kforograms and are specified using the DRON-1 diffractor: a=14.624-+0.005 A; b=13.052-+0.003 A; c=5.730+-0.003 A; γ=96.26 deg+-0.01 deg; rhosub(exper.)=1.09 g/cm 3 ; Z=4; Sp.=P 2/b. Experimental photographic data are obtained using the KFOR chamber. Scannings of the layer lines h anti Ko-h anti K4, containing 742 independent reflexes are taken. Deciphering of the structure is carried out by means of analysis of the Paterson functions distribution and conventional and differential electron densities. Description of the system is presented

  10. Lifetime measurements and oscillator strengths in singly ionized scandium and the solar abundance of scandium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehlivan Rhodin, A.; Belmonte, M. T.; Engström, L.; Lundberg, H.; Nilsson, H.; Hartman, H.; Pickering, J. C.; Clear, C.; Quinet, P.; Fivet, V.; Palmeri, P.

    2017-12-01

    The lifetimes of 17 even-parity levels (3d5s, 3d4d, 3d6s and 4p2) in the region 57 743-77 837 cm-1 of singly ionized scandium (Sc II) were measured by two-step time-resolved laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Oscillator strengths of 57 lines from these highly excited upper levels were derived using a hollow cathode discharge lamp and a Fourier transform spectrometer. In addition, Hartree-Fock calculations where both the main relativistic and core-polarization effects were taken into account were carried out for both low- and high-excitation levels. There is a good agreement for most of the lines between our calculated branching fractions and the measurements of Lawler & Dakin in the region 9000-45 000 cm-1 for low excitation levels and with our measurements for high excitation levels in the region 23 500-63 100 cm-1. This, in turn, allowed us to combine the calculated branching fractions with the available experimental lifetimes to determine semi-empirical oscillator strengths for a set of 380 E1 transitions in Sc II. These oscillator strengths include the weak lines that were used previously to derive the solar abundance of scandium. The solar abundance of scandium is now estimated to logε⊙ = 3.04 ± 0.13 using these semi-empirical oscillator strengths to shift the values determined by Scott et al. The new estimated abundance value is in agreement with the meteoritic value (logεmet = 3.05 ± 0.02) of Lodders, Palme & Gail.

  11. Radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelet, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The beginning of this book explains the why and how of the radioactivity, with a presentation of the different modes of disintegration. Are tackled the reports between radioactivity and time before explaining how the mass-energy equivalence appears during disintegrations. Two chapters treat natural radioisotopes and artificial ones. This book makes an important part to the use of radioisotopes in medicine (scintigraphy, radiotherapy), in archaeology and earth sciences (dating) before giving an inventory of radioactive products that form in the nuclear power plants. (N.C.)

  12. Radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This pedagogical document presents the origin, effects and uses of radioactivity: where does radioactivity comes from, effects on the body, measurement, protection against radiations, uses in the medical field, in the electric power industry, in the food (ionization, radio-mutagenesis, irradiations) and other industries (radiography, gauges, detectors, irradiations, tracers), and in research activities (dating, preservation of cultural objects). The document ends with some examples of irradiation levels (examples of natural radioactivity, distribution of the various sources of exposure in France). (J.S.)

  13. Highly sensitive luminescence method of scandium determination in the products of metallurgical reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matveets, M.A.; Akhmetova, S.D.

    1988-01-01

    Highly sensitive reaction of scandium with 1,10-phenanthroline and eosin is used for the development of luminescence method of its determination in metallurgical products. The effect of interfering elements is eliminated by scandium extraction with monocarboxylic acids. The method permits to determine scandium content from 5 x 10 -5 % (Sr 0.15 - 0.25)

  14. Size Effects on Deformation and Fracture of Scandium Deuteride Films.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teresi, C. S. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Hintsala, E. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Hysitron, Inc., Eden Prairie, MN (United States); Adams, David P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Yang, Nancy Y. C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kammler, Daniel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Moody, N. R. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Gerberich, W. W. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Metal hydride films have been observed to crack during production and use, prompting mechanical property studies of scandium deuteride films. The following focuses on elastic modulus, fracture, and size effects observed in the system for future film mechanical behavior modeling efforts. Scandium deuteride films were produced through the deuterium charging of electron beam evaporated scandium films using X-ray diffraction, scanning Auger microscopy, and electron backscatter diffraction to monitor changes in the films before and after charging. Scanning electron microscopy, nanoindentation, and focused ion beam machined micropillar compression tests were used for mechanical characterization of the scandium deuteride films. The micropillars showed a size effect for flow stress, indicating that film thickness is a relevant tuning parameter for film performance, and that fracture was controlled by the presence of grain boundaries. Elastic modulus was determined by both micropillar compression and nanoindentation to be approximately 150 GPa, Fracture studies of bulk film channel cracking as well as compression induced cracks in some of the pillars yielded a fracture toughness around 1.0 MPa-m1/2. Preliminary Weibull distributions of fracture in the micropillars are provided. Despite this relatively low value of fracture toughness, scandium deuteride micropillars can undergo a large degree of plasticity in small volumes and can harden to some degree, demonstrating the ductile and brittle nature of this material

  15. Formation of scandium carbides and scandium oxycarbide from the elements at high-(P, T) conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juarez-Arellano, Erick A.; Winkler, Bjoern; Bayarjargal, Lkhamsuren; Friedrich, Alexandra; Milman, Victor; Kammler, Daniel R.; Clark, Simon M.; Yan Jinyuan; Koch-Mueller, Monika; Schroeder, Florian; Avalos-Borja, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    Synchrotron diffraction experiments with in situ laser heated diamond anvil cells and multi-anvil press synthesis experiments have been performed in order to investigate the reaction of scandium and carbon from the elements at high-(P,T) conditions. It is shown that the reaction is very sensitive to the presence of oxygen. In an oxygen-rich environment the most stable phase is ScO x C y , where for these experiments x=0.39 and y=0.50-0.56. If only a small oxygen contamination is present, we have observed the formation of Sc 3 C 4 , Sc 4 C 3 and a new orthorhombic ScC x phase. All the phases formed at high pressures and temperatures are quenchable. Experimentally determined elastic properties of the scandium carbides are compared to values obtained by density functional theory based calculations. - Graphical Abstract Legend (TOC Figure): Table of Contents Figure Selected images recorded with a MAR345 image plate detector show the reaction of α-Sc and graphite at high-(P,T) conditions. Left: mixture of α-Sc and graphite. Right: recovered sample after laser heated the diamond anvil cell.

  16. Smelting of Scandium by Microwave Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Fujii

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Scandium is being explored as an alloying element for aluminum alloys, which are gaining importance as high-performance lightweight structural alloys in the transportation industry. A few years ago, Sc was also found to be suitable for use in electrical devices. High-Sc-content ScAlN thin films have attracted significant attention because of their strong piezoelectricity. The piezoelectric response of ScAlN suggests that ScAlN thin films formed on a hard substrate would be suitable surface acoustic wave wideband filters for next-generation wireless communication systems. However, it is often difficult to use ScAlN thin films in MEMS devices—including acoustic ones—because of the extremely high price of metallic Sc, given the difficulty associated with smelting it. Here, we propose a novel process for smelting Sc metal by microwave irradiation. Sc metal was able to be obtained successfully from ScF3 through a microwave-irradiation-based carbon reduction reaction. The reaction temperature for this reduction process was approximately 880°C, which is half of that for the conventional smelting process involving reduction with Ca. Thus, the proposed microwave irradiation process has significant potential for use in the smelting of Sc metal.

  17. Scandium and zirconium ion complexing with salicylic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadeeva, V.I.; Kochetkova, S.K.

    1979-01-01

    A study has been made of the extraction of complexes containing scandium and zirconium compounds and salicylic acid by using benzene, nitrobenzene, chloroform and isoamyl alcohol. It is shown that in the metal concentration range 10 -5 -10 -3 mole/l scandium forms mononuclear complexes composed of Sc(HSal) 3 (pH 2 (pH>4), zirconium - polynuclear complexes Zrsub(x)(OH)sub(y)(HSal)sub(n), where the x:n ratio varies from 0.5 to 1.5. Stability constants have been calculated for the salicylate scandium complexes in aqueous solution, equal to β 1 =(3+-1)x10 2 ; β 2 =(5.0+-0.6)x10 4 ; β 3 =(5.3+-0.3)x10 6

  18. Scandium and zirconium ion complexing with salicylic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fadeeva, V I; Kochetkova, S K [Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR)

    1979-08-01

    A study has been made of the extraction of complexes containing scandium and zirconium compounds and salicylic acid by using benzene, nitrobenzene, chloroform and isoamyl alcohol. It is shown that in the metal concentration range 10/sup -5/-10/sup -3/ mole/l scandium forms mononuclear complexes composed of Sc(HSal)/sub 3/ (pH<=4) and Sc(OH)(HSal)/sub 2/ (pH>4), zirconium - polynuclear complexes Zrsub(x)(OH)sub(y)(HSal)sub(n), where the x:n ratio varies from 0.5 to 1.5. Stability constants have been calculated for the salicylate scandium complexes in aqueous solution, equal to ..beta../sub 1/=(3+-1)x10/sup 2/; ..beta../sub 2/=(5.0+-0.6)x10/sup 4/; ..beta../sub 3/=(5.3+-0.3)x10/sup 6/.

  19. Scandium/carbon filters for soft x rays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Artioukov, IA; Kasyanov, YS; Kopylets, IA; Pershin, YP; Romanova, SA

    2003-01-01

    This Note deals with thin-film soft x-ray filters for operation at the wavelengths near carbon K edge (similar to4.5 nm). The filters were fabricated by magnetron sputtering deposition of thin layers of scandium (total thickness 0.1-0.2 mum) onto films of polypropylene (thickness 1.5 mum) and

  20. Heat capacity and solid solubility of iron in scandium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, T.-W.E.

    1981-01-01

    The maximum solid solubility of iron in scandium was determined to be between 50 and 85 at.ppm in the as-cast condition. As the concentration of iron increases, it segregates along the grain boundary, as is evident from optical metallography and electron microprobe examinations. Annealing also causes the iron dissolved in scandium to separate out and cluster along the grain boundary. Heat capacity measurements show an anomaly in the C/T versus T 2 plots for iron concentrations of 19 at.ppm or greater. For iron dissolved in solid scandium the excess entropy due to the iron impurity is in agreement with the theoretical prediction of ck ln(2S + 1) for an impurity-conduction electron (Kondo) interaction, but is 4 - 8 times larger than the theoretical prediction when iron segregates along the grain boundary. Furthermore, our results suggest that most of the previously reported low temperature physical properties of scandium are probably in error because of either iron impurity-conduction electron interactions or Fe-Fe interactions in the precipitated second-phase Sc-Fe compound. (Auth.)

  1. Thermoelectric material comprising scandium doped zinc cadmium oxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    There is presented a composition of scandium doped Zinc Cadmium Oxide with the general formula ZnzCdxScyO which the inventors have prepared, and for which material the inventors have made the insight that it is particularly advantageous as an n-type oxide material, such as particularly advantageous...

  2. Synthesis and properties of scandium ortho-phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eshchenko, L.S.; Pechkovskij, V.V.; Dvoskina, R.N.

    1979-01-01

    With the aim to elucidate the influence of synthesis conditions on the chemical composition and properties of orthophosphates of scandium, the interaction of orthophosphoric acid and scandium-containing component (oxide or salt) was studied under various conditions. In the interaction of scandium salt, phosphoric acid and ammonia at room temperature and pH 3.0; 5.0; 7.0 and 9.0 amorphous scandium phosphates have been obtained with the composition of x Sc 2 O 3 xY P 2 O 5 xz NH 3 xn H 2 O. After prolonged staying in mother liquor, roentgenoamorphous precipitates of phosphates transform into the crystalline state. The dependences are studied of the specific surface of amorphous phosphates on pH of precipitation and temperature of the heat treatment (200-800 deg C). Precipitates obtained in a neutral medium at 400 deg C temperature of thermal treatment, show a maximum specific surface. At a temperature of 820-840 deg C the crystallization of amorphous phase occurs followed by the recrystallization and formation of anhydrous SePO 4 of zircon type

  3. Scandium - problem of ultra-trace-element essentiality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kist, A.A.; Zkuk, L.I.; Danilova, E.A.; Makhmudov, E.A.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Role of constitutional and essential elements in Life is known quite well. It is also well known that all chemical elements present in the living matter. Nevertheless essentiality of at least 55 chemical elements (more than a half of number of natural elements) is still not accepted. In many cases these elements presumably play important role in the Life. On the other hand their essentiality is still under doubt. One of the 'strange' elements in this connection is scandium. Scandium is an element which is very 'simple' for instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). For many years in our laboratory were carried out studies on animals and human tissues and fluids elemental composition using INAA in which data for scandium were obtained as 'redundant' information. Essentiality of scandium was newer proven using accepted criteria of elements. Nevertheless in our studies were found various regularities, statistically significant inter-elemental correlations and correlations between elements in tissues and fluids versus clinic and biochemical data. There are some examples. There were found correlations of scandium hair concentration and blood glucose (r=0.68±0.13), body mass index (r=0.86±0.07), leukocyte with phagocytic activity migration inhibition test (r=0.68±0.18), size of cavity of the left heart auricle (r=-0.65±0.16), final systolic bulk (r=0.80±0.12), stroke output of heart (r=-0.79±0.12), final diastolic bulk (0.88±0.0080) etc. In addition using gel filtration in rat liver cytosol was found peak of scandium in elution curve. Examples and correlations given in the paper say in favor that scandium may play quite important role in biological processes and that the biological role of scandium should be studied more intensive. The most important criterion is an appearance of the organism dysfunction in case of removal of the studied elements from the diet (intake) which in all other sides remains completely valuable and disappearance of all

  4. Complexing of scandium with eriochromecyanine R and cetyltrimethylammonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tikhonov, V.N.; Samarkina, T.V.

    1978-01-01

    Complexing of scandium with eriochromecyanine R (ECC) in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium (CTA) is studied. At optimum value of pH 6.2 a three-component complex of blue colour is forming with the Sc:ECC:CTA = 1:3:5 relation of compounds. Lambdasub(max) for the complex varies from 585 to 615 nm, molarabsorption coefficient is equal to (1.48+-0.02)x10 5 . A method of photometric determination of Sc with ECC and CTA is suggested. Even considerable quantities of Mg, Ca, Sr, Zn, Cd, La, Mn, Ni do not affect the Sc determination, whereas Cu, Be, Al, Ga, Fe(3) and Pd(2) affect it to a great degree even in relation of 1:1. Camouflaging substances such as fluorides, citrates, tartrates and EDTA prevent from scandium complexing, that is why they should not be used to increase the determination selectivity

  5. Incommensurate composite crystal structure of scandium-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujihisa, Hiroshi; Gotoh, Yoshito; Yamawaki, Hiroshi; Sakashita, Mami; Takeya, Satoshi; Honda, Kazumasa; Akahama, Yuichi; Kawamura, Haruki

    2005-01-01

    The long-unknown crystal structure of the high pressure phase scandium-II was solved by powder x-ray diffraction and was found to have tetragonal host channels along the c axis and guest chains that are incommensurate with the host, as well as the high pressure phases of Ba, Sr, Bi, and Sb. The pressure dependences of the lattice constants, the incommensurability, the atomic distances, and the atomic volume were investigated

  6. Tetragonal ternary borides: superconductivity, ferromagnetism and the role of scandium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthias, B.T.; Patel, C.K.N.; Barz, H.; Corenzwit, E.; Vandenberg, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    The authors report and discuss two discoveries made while studying the condensation phenomena of ternary rhodium borides, MRh 4 B 4 . M is generally a trivalent transition metal, usually a rare earth element RE. An exception is scandium which by itself does not form an isomorphous boride, but in combination with many other elements will do just that. A suprising correlation between ferromagnetic and superconducting transition temperatures has been found. (Auth.)

  7. Determination of scandium with salicylaldehyde and 2-aminobenzenearsonic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farias, P.A.M.; Hainberger, L.; Andrade, H.A.S.

    1984-01-01

    A new method for the spectrophotometric determination of scandium by means of a coloured complex formed with salicylaldehyde and 2-aminobenzenearsonic acid is described. Lambert-Beer's law is followed in the range of 0.2 - 2.0 μg/ml of the final solution. The maximum amounts of 39 ions that may be present without interfering in the method are listed. (Author) [pt

  8. The characteristics of aluminum-scandium alloys processed by ECAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkateswarlu, K.; Rajinikanth, V.; Ray, Ajoy Kumar; Xu Cheng; Langdon, Terence G.

    2010-01-01

    Aluminum-scandium alloys were prepared having different scandium additions of 0.2, 1.0 and 2.0 wt.% and these alloys were processed by equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) at 473 K. The results show the grain refinement of the aluminum matrix and the morphology of the Al 3 Sc precipitates depends strongly on the scandium concentration. The tensile properties were evaluated after ECAP by pulling to failure at initial strain rates from 1.0 x 10 -3 to 1.0 x 10 -1 s -1 . The Al-1% Sc alloy exhibited the highest tensile strength of ∼250 MPa at a strain rate of 1.0 x 10 -1 s -1 . This alloy also exhibited a superior grain refinement of ∼0.4 μm after ECAP where this is attributed to a smaller initial grain size and an optimum volume fraction of dispersed Al 3 Sc precipitates having both micrometer and nanometer sizes.

  9. A new model for prediction of dispersoid precipitation in aluminium alloys containing zirconium and scandium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robson, J.D.

    2004-01-01

    A model has been developed to predict precipitation of ternary Al 3 (Sc, Zr) dispersoids in aluminium alloys containing zirconium and scandium. The model is based on the classical numerical method of Kampmann and Wagner, extended to predict precipitation of a ternary phase. The model has been applied to the precipitation of dispersoids in scandium containing AA7050. The dispersoid precipitation kinetics and number density are predicted to be sensitive to the scandium concentration, whilst the dispersoid radius is not. The dispersoids are predicted to enrich in zirconium during precipitation. Coarsening has been investigated in detail and it has been predicted that a steady-state size distribution is only reached once coarsening is well advanced. The addition of scandium is predicted to eliminate the dispersoid free zones observed in scandium free 7050, greatly increasing recrystallization resistance

  10. Kinetics and mechanism of hydrolysis of scandium sulfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshchej, E.V.; Stryapkov, A.V.; Podosenov, D.E.; Makarov, G.V.; Razdobreev, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    The Sc 2 (SO 4 ) 3 -H 2 SO 4 -H 2 O system is studied through the methods of pH-potentiometry, conductometry and turbidimetry at 298 and 318 K and ion force 0.01, 0.1 and 1.0. The hydrolysis mechanism including the processes in the system homogenous and heterogeneous constituents. The hydrolysis rates of scandium salts and their dependences on OH-ions concentration, solution ions force and temperature are found; the constants of the processes rate with participation of OH - and SO 4 2- ions and constants of the solid phase formation rate are calculated [ru

  11. Vibrational spectra of double oxides of calcium and scandium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porotnikov, N.V.; Kondratov, O.I.; Petrov, K.I.; Olikov, I.I.

    1981-01-01

    The vibrational spectra of calcium and scandium double oxides 40 CaSc 2 O 4 and 44 CaSc 2 O 4 in the range of 30-1000 cm -1 are studied. In the approximation of the polymer chains of the method of valent-force field the calculation of the theoretical vibrational spectrum of isotope-substituted compounds is made, the attribution of the experimental spectra is suggested, the frequency branches of the vibrations of periodic chains are built, the force field of crystals is evaluated [ru

  12. Study on the coextraction of scandium-yttrium-lumogallion complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, T.; Shimoishi, Y.; Miyata, H.; Toei, K.

    1977-01-01

    The coextraction of scandium-yttrium-lumogallion [LMG;4-chloro-6-(2,4-dihydroxyphenylazo)-1-hydroxybenzene-2-sulfonic acid] into diethyl ether has been studied. The acid dissociation constants of LMG, pKsub(a2) and pKsub(a3), were estimated to be 6.24 and 8.05 respectively. The composition of the complex extracted was determined by using the radioisotopes 46 Sc and 90 Y and by spectrophotometry of LMG and the ratio of the components was Sc:Y:LMG = 1:1:3. The coextraction scheme was discussed briefly. (author)

  13. Direct flow separation strategy, to isolate no-carrier-added {sup 90}Nb from irradiated Mo or Zr targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radchenko, Valery; Roesch, Frank [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Nuclear Chemistry; Filosofov, Dmitry V.; Dadakhanov, Jakhongir [Joint Institute of Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation). Dzhelepov Laboratory of Nuclear Problems; Karaivanov, Dimitar V. [Joint Institute of Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation). Dzhelepov Laboratory of Nuclear Problems; Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy; Marinova, Atanaska [Joint Institute of Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation). Dzhelepov Laboratory of Nuclear Problems; Sofia Univ. (Bulgaria). Faculty of Chemistry and Pharmacy; Baimukhanova, Ayagoz [Joint Institute of Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation). Dzhelepov Laboratory of Nuclear Problems; Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Republic of Kazakhstan, Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2016-11-01

    {sup 90}Nb has an intermediate half-life of 14.6 h, a high positron branching of 53% and optimal β{sup +} emission energy of only E{sub mean} 0.35 MeV per decay. These favorable characteristics suggest it may be a potential candidate for application in immuno-PET. Our recent aim was to conduct studies on distribution coefficients for Zr{sup IV} and Nb{sup V} in mixtures of HCl/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and HCl/oxalic acid for anion exchange resin (AG 1 x 8) and UTEVA resin to develop a ''direct flow'' separation strategy for {sup 90}Nb. The direct flow concept refers to a separation accomplished using a single eluent on multiple columns, effectively streamlining the separation process and increasing the time efficiency. Finally, we also demonstrated that this separation strategy is applicable to the production of the positron emitter {sup 90}Nb via the irradiation of molybdenum targets and isolation of {sup 90}Nb from the irradiated molybdenum target.

  14. Scandium effect on mechanical properties of Al-6.5 % Mg alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drits, M.E.; Toropova, L.S.; Bykov, Yu.G.

    1982-01-01

    Quantitative evaluation of influence of small scandium additions (up to 0.5 wt%) on properties of Al-6.5% Mg binary alloy are carried out depending on test temperature in the range of -196 to 310 deg C. Alloys were tested on ''Instron'' machine at 1.3x10 - 3 s - 1 strain rate. Scandium additions are shown to increase plasticity at -196 deg C. Yield strength also increases with introduction of 0.2% Sc if deformation temperature does not exceed 250 deg C. The growth of ultimate strength is less significant. Elevated strength properties of alloys with scandium additions can be explained by a fine-grained structure

  15. Effect of scandium additions on microstructure and mechanical properties of Al-Zn-Mg alloy welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dev, Selvi; Stuart, A. Archibald; Kumaar, R.C. Ravi Dev; Murty, B.S.; Rao, K. Prasad

    2007-01-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of fusion zones of medium strength Al-Zn-Mg alloy (RDE-40) welds obtained by using different fillers containing various amount of scandium was investigated. It was observed that addition of scandium led to very significant grain refinement in the fusion zone especially for scandium levels greater than the eutectic composition (0.55 wt%). The grain refinement led to the reduction in solidification cracking and improved the tensile properties of fusion zone compared to the ones obtained by the commercial AA5556 filler

  16. Complexonometric photometric titration of scandium in the presence of xylenol orange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornev, V.I.

    1977-01-01

    Possibility has been studied of using xylenol orange (XO) for chelatometric determination of scandium by means of various chelates with the aid of photometric techniques. It has been established that the chelates applicable for the purpose are ethylenediamineteraacetic acid (EDTA), diethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (DEDTA), diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DETPA), upon introducing of which into a solution containing a complex of scandium with XO (maximum light adsorption at 550 nm) the optical density gradually diminishes. Weakening of the light absorption is, evidently, associated with the destruction of the scandium complex with XO and formation of a colourless chelate acetate with one of the chelates. Chelatometric determination of scandium, using EDTA, DEDTA and DEPTA solutions with XO should be carried out in an acidic medium at pH=2.5-3.0. In this range of pH values interferences caused by the appearance of the Sc-XO complex in the solution are insignificant

  17. Knight shift in scandium and its alloys with hafnium and titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chachkhiani, Z.B.; Chechernikov, V.I.; Martynova, L.F.; Nidel'ko, V.I.; Chachkhiani, L.G.; Georgadze, G.S.

    1981-01-01

    Results of the investigation of NMR on 45 Sc nuclei and magnetic susceptibility of scandium and its solid solutions with titanium and hafnium are presented. It is shown that the existing hybridization of S and d zones in pure scandium and its alloys with titanium and hafnium affects the Knight shift reducing the value of the contact contribution. The temperature behaviour of the Knight shift from the temperature dependence and spin susceptibility of collectivized d electrons [ru

  18. Use of scandium ionic associates with salicylic- or 2-phenylquinoline-4-carboxylic acid and rhodamine C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kononenko, L.I.; Bel' tyukova, S V; Drobyazko, V N; Poluehktov, N S [AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Obshchej i Neorganicheskoj Khimii; AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Odessa. Inst. Obshchej i Neorganicheskoj Khimii)

    1975-09-01

    With salicylic or 2-phenylquinoline-4-carboxylic acid and rhodamine C scandium forms ion associations whose benzene solutions are capable of luminescence. Optimum conditions for the formation of complexes and the composition of the complex with the ratio of Sc:acid:rhodamine C = 1:2:1 are established. A possibility of luminescence determination of scandium in the presence of rare earths is shown.

  19. Analogs of N-cynnamoylphenylhydroxylamine as reagents for amperometric determination of scandium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shvedene, N.V.; Gallaj, Z.A.; Sheina, N.M.; Zujkova, N.V.

    1978-01-01

    To decrease the detection limit of scandium and increase selectivity of amperometric determination, oxidation of 2-furylacryloyl-N-p-chlorophenylhydroxylamine (FACPhHA) and 3-styrylacryloyl-N-phenylhydroxylamine (SAPhHA) on a graphite electrode has been studied by volt-amperometry. The possibility has been established of using the oxidation current of the reagent for plotting the titration curves. The solubility of scandium complexes with FACPhHA and SAPhHA under conditions of titration against the background with pH 6.0 has been determined and equals (2.1+-0.3)x10 -6 and (5.3+-0.3)x10 -7 , respectively. The methods have been developed of amperometric determination of scandium with the use of the considered reagents against backgrounds with pH 5.5-6.5. The use of SAPhHA has decreased the limit of scandium detection down to 0.1 mgk/ml. Besides, the amperometric method makes it possible to titrate in turbid and coloured media what is an advantage of this method. The developed method is used for determination of scandium in scandium silicide

  20. Effect of composition on the superplasticity of aluminium scandium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, E.L. III; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Several aluminum alloys have been shown to exhibit superplasticty in the as-rolled condition. Previous work has shown that aluminum-scandium alloys also exhibit this behavior, but only with the addition of ternary alloying elements such as lithium and magnesium. These additions raised the strain-rate sensitivity of these alloys to 0.4-0.5 for selected strain rates at temperatures above 400 degrees C. A systematic study was undertaken of five Al-Sc alloys with varying lithium and magnesium concentrations in order to fully characterize the high temperature deformation mechanism. Specimens were deformed at a constant strain rate to predetermined true strains for textural and microstructural characterization. In this paper work is presented that will elucidate the effect of these different ternary additives on the superplastic deformation mechanism in these alloys

  1. Application of scandium oxide in an electron emission material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suqiu, Y.; Zhizheng, Z.; Yongde, W.

    1985-01-01

    Modern microwave devices impose a number of harsh requirements on the cathodes. For instance, they require cathodes having low working temperature, high emissive current density, slow evaporation rate of the emissive-active material, long lifetime, quick heating and so on. The commercial B-cathode is no longer able to meet these requirements completely. A scandate cathode may be a promising one for use in these devices. Adding rare-earth elements in the electron emission material has been reported in many papers. Based on a B-cathode we add a little amount of scandium oxide (about 3%) into emission material to manufacture a scandate cathode. The emission property of such a cathode has been improved greatly. If the composition is controlled correctly, the emission level of such a cathode may be five times more as high as the B-cathode

  2. Order-disorder phenomenon in lead scandium tantalate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.C.; Schulze, W.A.

    1990-01-01

    Lead scandium tatalate (PST) is a ferroelectric relaxor with the perovskite structure of A(B'B double-prime)O 3 . By suitable heat treatment, the B-site cations can be brought from a structurally disordered state into various degree of ordering. The degree of ordering is strongly affected by the amount of vacancies present in the materials. To suppress PbO loss during the sintering or annealing process, a PbO-rich atmosphere is supplied by materials having high PbO vapor pressure, such as PbZrO 3 . For PST ceramics with nearly zero weight loss, very long annealing times and higher annealing temperatures are required for ordering. The higher PbO-loss materials are found to be easily ordered. The introduction of a reducing atmosphere during annealing enhances the ordering process. The ordering process is characterized quantitatively by X-ray diffraction and qualitatively by Raman spectroscopy

  3. Concentration and Separation of Scandium from Ni Laterite Ore Processing Streams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şerif Kaya

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The presence of a considerable amount of scandium in lateritic nickel-cobalt ores necessitates the investigation of possible processing alternatives to recover scandium as a byproduct during nickel and cobalt production. Therefore, in this study, rather than interfering with the main nickel-cobalt production circuit, the precipitation-separation behavior of scandium during a pH-controlled precipitation process from a synthetically prepared solution was investigated to adopt the Sc recovery circuit into an already existing hydrometallurgical nickel-cobalt hydroxide processing plant. The composition of the synthetic solution was determined according to the hydrometallurgical nickel laterite ore processing streams obtained from a HPAL (high-pressure sulphuric acid leaching process. In order to selectively precipitate and concentrate scandium with minimum nickel and cobalt co-precipitation, the pH of the solution was adjusted by CaCO3, MgO, Na2CO3, and NaOH. It was found that precipitation with MgO or Na2CO3 is more advantageous to obtain a precipitate containing higher amounts of scandium with minimum mass when compared to the CaCO3 route, which makes further processing more viable. As a result of this study, it is proposed that by a simple pH-controlled precipitation process, scandium can be separated from the nickel and cobalt containing process solutions as a byproduct without affecting the conventional nickel-cobalt hydroxide production. By further processing this scandium-enriched residue by means of leaching, SX (solvent extraction, and precipitation, an intermediate (NH42NaScF6 product can be obtained.

  4. Analysis of separation quality of scandium-46 and titanium using silica gel column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhamad Basit Febrian; Yanuar Setiadi; Duyeh Setiawan; Titin Sri Mulyati; Nana Suherman

    2015-01-01

    In this study, quality test of scandium and titanium mixture separation system using a silica gel column has been conducted. This system will be used in the separation of medical radioisotopes of 47 Sc from TiO 2 enriched targets. 20 mg of TiO 2 and 5 mg of Sc 2 O 3 dissolved using 0.5 mL of 50% HF solvent with gentle heating at 60°C - 80°C for 1 hour then 4.5 mL H 2 O was added. Sc and Ti mixture is separated by passing it through a column of silica gel. In the determination of scandium released from silica gel, Sc-46 radiotracer was used. Only 51.60 ± 4.5% of 5 mg of scandium could be retained in the silica gel column. From 51.60% of absorbed scandium in the column, 98.29 ± 3.4% were eluted with 5 mL of H 2 O eluent. During elution of scandium from silica gel column, 2.81 grams of 20 mg of titanium came apart as breakthrough. In determination of recovery of titanium from silica gel, 51.76 ± 5.5% of the 20 mg Ti can be recovered from silica gel column using 5M HCl eluent, whereas remaining Ti were eluted using 40 ml of HCl 5M. Based on those result, it can be concluded that there are still titanium portion in scandium after the separation using a silica gel column. Further purification step using fresh silica gel column, can separate escaped titanium from scandium. (author)

  5. Effects of iron on intermetallic compound formation in scandium modified Al–Si–Mg Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patakham, Ussadawut [National Metal and Materials Technology Center, National Science and Technology Development Agency, 114 Thailand Science Park, Klong Nueng, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Limmaneevichitr, Chaowalit, E-mail: chaowalit.lim@mail.kmutt.ac.th [Production Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkut’s University of Technology Thonburi, 126 Pracha-Utid Rd., Bangmod, Tungkhru, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Iron reduces the modification effects of scandium in Al–Si–Mg alloys. • Morphologies of Sc-rich intermetallic phases vary with Fe and Sc contents and the cooling rates. • Sc neutralizes effects of Fe by changing Fe-rich intermetallic phases from platelets to more cubic. - Abstract: In general, iron has a strong tendency to dissolve in molten aluminum. Iron has very low solid solubility in aluminum–silicon casting alloys, so it will form intermetallic compounds that cause detrimental effects on mechanical properties. In this work, the effects of iron on intermetallic compound formations in scandium modified Al–Si–Mg alloys were studied. There were two levels of iron addition (0.2 and 0.4 wt.%) and two levels of scandium addition (0.2 and 0.4 wt.%). We found that the effects of scandium modification decreased with increasing iron addition. The morphologies of the complex intermetallic compounds were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) techniques. It was found that scandium changes the morphology of Fe-rich intermetallic compounds from β-phase (plate-like) to α-phase, which reduces the harmful effects of β-phase.

  6. Thermodynamic and kinetic study of scandium(III) complexes of DTPA and DOTA: a step toward scandium radiopharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pniok, Miroslav; Kubíček, Vojtěch; Havlíčková, Jana; Kotek, Jan; Sabatie-Gogová, Andrea; Plutnar, Jan; Huclier-Markai, Sandrine; Hermann, Petr

    2014-06-23

    Diethylenetriamine-N,N,N',N'',N''-pentaacetic acid (DTPA) and 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) scandium(III) complexes were investigated in the solution and solid state. Three (45)Sc NMR spectroscopic references suitable for aqueous solutions were suggested: 0.1 M Sc(ClO4)3 in 1 M aq. HClO4 (δSc =0.0 ppm), 0.1 M ScCl3 in 1 M aq. HCl (δSc =1.75 ppm) and 0.01 M [Sc(ox)4](5-) (ox(2-) = oxalato) in 1 M aq. K2C2O4 (δSc =8.31 ppm). In solution, [Sc(dtpa)](2-) complex (δSc = 83 ppm, Δν = 770 Hz) has a rather symmetric ligand field unlike highly unsymmetrical donor atom arrangement in [Sc(dota)](-) anion (δSc = 100 ppm, Δν = 4300 Hz). The solid-state structure of K8[Sc2(ox)7]⋅13 H2O contains two [Sc(ox)3](3-) units bridged by twice "side-on" coordinated oxalate anion with Sc(3+) ion in a dodecahedral O8 arrangement. Structures of [Sc(dtpa)](2-) and [Sc(dota)](-) in [(Hguanidine)]2[Sc(dtpa)]⋅3 H2O and K[Sc(dota)][H6 dota]Cl2⋅4 H2O, respectively, are analogous to those of trivalent lanthanide complexes with the same ligands. The [Sc(dota)](-) unit exhibits twisted square-antiprismatic arrangement without an axial ligand (TSA' isomer) and [Sc(dota)](-) and (H6 dota)(2+) units are bridged by a K(+) cation. A surprisingly high value of the last DOTA dissociation constant (pKa =12.9) was determined by potentiometry and confirmed by using NMR spectroscopy. Stability constants of scandium(III) complexes (log KScL 27.43 and 30.79 for DTPA and DOTA, respectively) were determined from potentiometric and (45)Sc NMR spectroscopic data. Both complexes are fully formed even below pH 2. Complexation of DOTA with the Sc(3+) ion is much faster than with trivalent lanthanides. Proton-assisted decomplexation of the [Sc(dota)](-) complex (τ1/2 =45 h; 1 M aq. HCl, 25 °C) is much slower than that for [Ln(dota)](-) complexes. Therefore, DOTA and its derivatives seem to be very suitable ligands for scandium

  7. Double tungstates of metals of scandium and ammonium subgroups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maksin, V I [AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Kolloidnoj Khimii i Khimii Vody

    1980-06-01

    The methods of pH-potentiometry, conductometry, determination of residual concentrations of liquid phases and precipitations, selected by chemical analysis have been used for investigation R(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/-(NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/WO/sub 2/-H/sub 2/O systems, (where R=Sc, Y, La). The formation of double tungstates NH/sub 4/R(WO/sub 4/)/sub 2/xnH/sub 2/O is established. The NH/sub 4/Sc(WO/sub 4/)/sub 2/x4.5H/sub 2/O, NH/sub 4/Yx(WO/sub 4/)/sub 2/x3H/sub 2/O, NH/sub 4/La(WO/sub 4/)/sub 2/x1.5H/sub 2/O compounds are synthesized in individual form. Precipitation conditions (pH, concentration ratio) and composition of the solid phase are determined. The behaviour of synthesized slats at thermolysis up to 880 deg C is studied. Physicochemical properties (color, solubility of the simple and double tungstates of scandium, yttrium and lanthanum with ammonium) is studied. IR spectra and X-ray diffraction analysis give idea about double salts structural transformations.

  8. Hydrogen storage in thin film magnesium-scandium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niessen, R.A. H.; Notten, P.H. L.

    2005-01-01

    Thorough electrochemical materials research has been performed on thin films of novel magnesium-scandium hydrogen storage alloys. It was found that palladium-capped thin films of Mg x Sc (1-x) with different compositions (ranging from x=0.50 -0.90) show an increase in hydrogen storage capacity of more than 5-20% as compared to their bulk equivalents using even higher discharge rates. The maximum reversible hydrogen storage capacity at the optimal composition (Mg 80 Sc 20 ) amounts to 1795-bar mAh/g corresponding to a hydrogen content of 2.05 H/M or 6.7-bar wt.%, which is close to five times that of the commonly used hydride-forming materials in commercial NiMH batteries. Galvanostatic intermittent titration technique (GITT) measurements show that the equilibrium pressure during discharge is lower than that of bulk powders by one order of magnitude (10 -7 -bar mbar versus 10 -6 -bar mbar, respectively)

  9. The spectrum of four times ionized scandium, Sc V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smitt, R.; Ekberg, J.O.

    1985-01-01

    The spectrum of four times ionized scandium emitted from a sliding spark discharge has been observed using a 3 m normal incidence spectrograph and a 5 m grazing incidence spectrograph. About 450 lines in the wavelength region 160 A to 220 A have been identified as combinations between 46 odd levels belonging to the 3s 2 3p 5 , 3s 2 3p 4 4p and 3s3p 5 3d configurations and 72 even levels of the 3s3p 6 , 3s 2 3p 4 3d, 4d, 4s and 5s configurations. Of the previous identifications we have confirmed 18 levels. The level structure of the observed configurations has been theoretically interpreted by including configuration interaction effects. The inclusion of 3s 2 3p 3 3d 2 in the calculations of the odd parity configurations is found to be important. Almost all levels of 3s3p 5 3d show a considerable mixing with levels of 3s 2 3p 3 3d 2 , in some cases by as much as 50%. The energy parameters determined from least-squares fits to the observed level values are compared with Hartree-Fock calculations. The ionization energy is estimated to be 739 500 +- 1000 cm -1 . (91.65 +- 0,12 eV). (orig.)

  10. Aluminum-Scandium: A Material for Semiconductor Packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, Ute; Thomas, Sven; Schneider-Ramelow, Martin; Mukhopadhyay, Biswajit; Lang, Klaus-Dieter

    2016-10-01

    A well-known aluminum-scandium (Al-Sc) alloy, already used in lightweight sports equipment, is about to be established for use in electronic packaging. One application for Al-Sc alloy is manufacture of bonding wires. The special feature of the alloy is its ability to harden by precipitation. The new bonding wires with electrical conductivity similar to pure Al wires can be processed on common wire bonders for aluminum wedge/wedge (w/w) bonding. The wires exhibit very fine-grained microstructure. Small Al3Sc particles are the main reason for its high strength and prevent recrystallization and grain growth at higher temperatures (>150°C). After the wire-bonding process, the interface is well closed. Reliability investigations by active power cycling demonstrated considerably improved lifetime compared with pure Al heavy wires. Furthermore, the Al-Sc alloy was sputter-deposited onto silicon wafer to test it as chip metallization in copper (Cu) ball/wedge bonding technology. After deposition, the layers exhibited fine-grained columnar structure and small coherent Al3Sc particles with dimensions of a few nanometers. These particles inhibit softening processes such as Al splashing in fine wire bonding processes and increase the thickness of remnant Al under the copper balls to 85% of the initial thickness.

  11. Thermomechanical treatment of welded joints of aluminum-lithium alloys modified by scandium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malikov, A. G.

    2017-12-01

    At present, the aeronautical equipment manufacture involves up-to-date high-strength aluminum alloys of decreased density resulting from the lithium admixture. Various technologies of fusible welding of these alloys are being developed. The paper presents experimental investigations of the optimization of the laser welding of aluminum alloys with the scandium-modified welded joint after thermomechanical treatment. The effect of scandium on the micro- and macrostructure is studied along with strength characteristics of the welded joint. It is found that thermomechanical treatment allows us to obtain the strength of the welded joint 0.89 for the Al-Mg-Li system and 0.99 for the Al-Cu-Li system with the welded joint modified by scandium in comparison with the base alloy after treatment.

  12. The enthalpy of solid scandium in the temperature range 406 - 1812 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyapunov, K.M.; Baginskij, A.V.; Stankus, S.V.

    2001-01-01

    Enthalpy of pure scandium was measured on massive calorimeter in the range from 406 to 1812 K by mixing method. The enthalpy of face centered close cubic lattice - body centered cubic lattice transformation is equal to ΔH t 4068 J/mol. Obtained value within the limits of error is compatible with the results given earlier (4009 J/mol). The dependence of the middle specific heat of scandium C p (T) on the temperature was shown in correlation with the results of other works. The results of the conducted experiments reinforce the conclusion made earlier about an absence (or a little) in the decomposition of an anharmonic component of the oscillation specific heat of scandium C p a (T) members proportional to the first or the second degrees of temperature [ru

  13. Biamperometric analysis of nonaqueous scandium solutions containing lanthanides, lead and thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gevorgyan, A.M.; Talipov, Sh.T.; Kostylev, V.S.; Khadeev, V.A.; Nadol'skij, M.Ya.

    1978-01-01

    Investigated was a possibility of direct scandium titration in the presence of large rare earth quantities, and also a possibility of complexonometric scandium and rare earth sum determination at their joint presence in non-aqueous acetic acid solution. The titration was carried out at electrode voltage of 0.95V, background electrolyte concentration of lithium perchlorate being 0.2M. Non-aqueous magnesium complexonate was used as titrating reagent. Th and Pb complexonates are shown to be less stable as compared to Sc complexonate, and consequently, Th and Pb ions must not interfere with biamperometric titration of Sc ion. A method applied to analysis of binary mixture, containing scandium, and a method for model alloy and thortveitite mineral was developed. Well reproducible and precise enough results are obtained in all the cases. Ions of Bi, Cu, Cd, Zn, In, Ga and Ti interfere with determination

  14. Pressure-induced structural change from hexagonal to fcc metal lattice in scandium trihydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmura, A.; Machida, A.; Watanuki, T.; Aoki, K.; Nakano, S.; Takemura, K.

    2007-01-01

    We synthesized scandium hydrides by hydrogenation of a scandium foil with hydrogen fluid under high pressure at ambient temperature. Scandium dihydride (ScH 2 ) and trihydride (ScH 3 ) were prepared near 4 and 5 GPa, respectively. The hydrogenation process and pressure-induced structural changes in ScH 3 were investigated by synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction measurements up to 54.7 GPa. A structural transition from hexagonal to the fcc lattice began at 30 GPa and was completed at 46 GPa via an intermediate state similar to those reported for other hexagonal trihydrides. The intermediate state was not interpreted in terms of a coexisting state for the low-pressure hexagonal and the high-pressure fcc structures. The onset transition pressure of ScH 3 supported the previously proposed relation that the hexagonal-fcc transition pressure is inversely proportional to the ionic radius of the trihydride

  15. Massless radioactivity: a medical must?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolterbeek, H.Th

    2013-01-01

    Full text: The authoritative body in the field of nomenclature for radiochemistry is the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC). The concepts of specific activity, radioactivity concentration, carrier, carrier-free, and no-carrier-added have been) and are also recently discussed as to their correctness, relevance, clarity and consistency. Here, specific activity (sa) is suggested as to be defined as the activity (a) of a specified radioisotope in an amount of substance divided by the mass (m) of the total number of atoms (sa=a/m). Qaim, in a recent review of the future of medical radionuclides, justly argues that both yield, radionuclide purity and specific activity should be increased: here, again, however, the term specific activity deserves attention. What should be the goal in increasing specific activity? Up to as near as possible to massless? Approaching massless in terms of the smallest achievable m value? Taking the radionuclide n X, in physics specific activity is defined as both activity and mass related to n X, in radiochemistry specific activity is defined as the activity of n X related to the mass of all X, but in nuclear medicine most interest is in what IUPAC calls activity concentration, that is, the activity of n X in relation to the mass or volume of the material in which n X is present. This means that, apparently, nuclear medicine asks for high activity concentration of n X in non-isotopic carriers. Does this always imply the highest possible n X specific activity? The presentation focuses on this issue: examples are given that show both the absence of any need for the highest possible specific activity (e.g. 99 Mo, 166 Ho) and the need for 'as-near-as-possible to massless' (e.g. 99m Tc, 177 Lu, α-particles), in all cases in dependence of the radionuclide's position in the production chain and its eventual application in nuclear diagnostics or - therapy

  16. Scandium complexes with the tetraphenylethylene and anthracene dianions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, John E; Minyaev, Mikhail E; Nifant'ev, Ilya E; Churakov, Andrei V

    2018-06-01

    The structural study of Sc complexes containing dianions of anthracene and tetraphenylethylene should shed some light on the nature of rare-earth metal-carbon bonding. The crystal structures of (18-crown-6)bis(tetrahydrofuran-κO)sodium bis(η 6 -1,1,2,2-tetraphenylethenediyl)scandium(III) tetrahydrofuran disolvate, [Na(C 4 H 8 O) 2 (C 12 H 24 O 6 )][Sc(C 26 H 20 ) 2 ]·2C 4 H 8 O or [Na(18-crown-6)(THF) 2 ][Sc(η 6 -C 2 Ph 4 ) 2 ]·2(THF), (1b), (η 5 -1,3-diphenylcyclopentadienyl)(tetrahydrofuran-κO)(η 6 -1,1,2,2-tetraphenylethenediyl)scandium(III) toluene hemisolvate, [Sc(C 17 H 13 )(C 26 H 20 )(C 4 H 8 O)]·0.5C 7 H 8 or [(η 5 -1,3-Ph 2 C 5 H 3 )Sc(η 6 -C 2 Ph 4 )(THF)]·0.5(toluene), (5b), poly[[(μ 2 -η 3 :η 3 -anthracenediyl)bis(η 6 -anthracenediyl)bis(η 5 -1,3-diphenylcyclopentadienyl)tetrakis(tetrahydrofuran)dipotassiumdiscandium(III)] tetrahydrofuran monosolvate], {[K 2 Sc 2 (C 14 H 10 ) 3 (C 17 H 13 ) 2 (C 4 H 8 O) 4 ]·C 4 H 8 O} n or [K(THF) 2 ] 2 [(1,3-Ph 2 C 5 H 3 ) 2 Sc 2 (C 14 H 10 ) 3 ]·THF, (6), and 1,4-diphenylcyclopenta-1,3-diene, C 17 H 14 , (3a), have been established. The [Sc(η 6 -C 2 Ph 4 ) 2 ] - complex anion in (1b) contains the tetraphenylethylene dianion in a symmetrical bis-η 3 -allyl coordination mode. The complex homoleptic [Sc(η 6 -C 2 Ph 4 ) 2 ] - anion retains its structure in THF solution, displaying hindered rotation of the coordinated phenyl rings. The 1D 1 H and 13 C{ 1 H}, and 2D COSY 1 H- 1 H and 13 C- 1 H NMR data are presented for M[Sc(Ph 4 C 2 ) 2 ]·xTHF [M = Na and x = 4 for (1a); M = K and x = 3.5 for (2a)] in THF-d 8 media. Complex (5b) exhibits an unsymmetrical bis-η 3 -allyl coordination mode of the dianion, but this changes to a η 4 coordination mode for (1,3-Ph 2 C 5 H 3 )Sc(Ph 4 C 2 )(THF) 2 , (5a), in THF-d 8 solution. A 45 Sc NMR study of (2a) and UV-Vis studies of (1a), (2a) and (5a) indicate a significant covalent contribution to the Sc-Ph 4 C 2 bond character. The unique Sc ate complex, (6

  17. Bonding in scandium monosulfide a NaCl crystal type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrick, J.A.

    1980-08-01

    The transition temperature of an order-disorder transition in Sc 0 81 S (R anti 3m to Fm3m) occurs at 700 0 C. A group of ordered sublattices on the NaCl-type lattice (Fm3m) was generated and a Madelung energy and configurational entropy were calculated for each sublattice assuming the ions to be Sc 2 48+ and S 2- . Mean field and pair interaction approximations were used to model long-range and short-range orderings, respectively. The electrostatic model fails to predict the observed short-range and long-range orderings. The high temperature vaporization of ScP was investigated by mass spectrometry and target collection Knudsen effusion at 1767 to 2209K. The composition ScP 1 00 vaporizes congruently to the gaseous species Sc, P, and P 2 . A temperature independent third law enthalpy of atomization (ΔH 0 /sub atom,298/ = 252.2 +- 2.8 kcal mole -1 ) has a value approx. 12 kcal larger than that reported for ScS. Nonrelativistic, nonself-consistent LAPW band structure calculations are reported for ScS. XPS and UPS measurements are reported for Sc 2 S 3 and several compositions Sc/sub 1-x/S (0.0 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 0.2). The Sc and S 2p binding energies (XPS) obtained for the defect scandium monosulfides are very close to those found in the pure elements, suggesting covalent bonding. The Sc 2p energy region has an interesting satellite structure

  18. Methods for chemical recovery of non-carrier-added radioactive tin from irradiated intermetallic Ti-Sb targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapshina, Elena V [Troitsk, RU; Zhuikov, Boris L [Troitsk, RU; Srivastava, Suresh C [Setauket, NY; Ermolaev, Stanislav V [Obninsk, RU; Togaeva, Natalia R [Obninsk, RU

    2012-01-17

    The invention provides a method of chemical recovery of no-carrier-added radioactive tin (NCA radiotin) from intermetallide TiSb irradiated with accelerated charged particles. An irradiated sample of TiSb can be dissolved in acidic solutions. Antimony can be removed from the solution by extraction with dibutyl ether. Titanium in the form of peroxide can be separated from tin using chromatography on strong anion-exchange resin. In another embodiment NCA radiotin can be separated from iodide solution containing titanium by extraction with benzene, toluene or chloroform. NCA radiotin can be finally purified from the remaining antimony and other impurities using chromatography on silica gel. NCA tin-117m can be obtained from this process. NCA tin-117m can be used for labeling organic compounds and biological objects to be applied in medicine for imaging and therapy of various diseases.

  19. The effects of aluminum or scandium on the toughness, density and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of the substitution of aluminum or scandium on the density, toughness as well as the stability of the phases formed by such an addition on platinum, iridium, rhodium and palladium metals were evaluated with the density functional quantum mechanical calculation methods. All the metals had four atoms per ...

  20. Study of competitive complexing in scandium(3)-xylenol-orange-hydroxyethyliminodiacetic acid system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornev, V.I.; Mukanov, I.P.; Artem'eva, O.A.

    1976-01-01

    The competitive complexing in the system scandium(3)-xylene orange (XO)-hydroxyethyliminodiacetic acid (H 3 L) has been studied. Ligands act as competitive particles. It has been established preliminarily that introduction of H 3 L into the solution containing a mixture of Sc and Xo changes considerably the absorption spectra of the coloured complex. Weakening of light absorption indicates that the coloured complex with XO is destructed and colourless hydroxyethyliminodiacetate of scandium is formed. The formation of scandium hydroxyethyliminoacetate has been studied spectrophotometrically by equilibrium between the complexes. The dependence of optical density on pH, when the concentrations of reagents are constant, as well as on concetration of H 3 L has been studied. The composition of the complex (1:1) formed at pH 3.2 has been established graphically and the constant of the complex ScHL + instability has been calculated (PKsub(H)=10.69+-0.45). It has been shown that H 3 L, when interacting with scandium, behaves as dibasic ligand. It is most probable that during complex formation the hydrogen ion of the hydroxygroup is not replaced, although the participation of hydroxygroup in coordination is possible due to a donor-acceptor bond

  1. Structural differences of half-sandwich complexes of scandium and yttrium containing bulky substituents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fridrichová, Adéla; Růžička, A.; Lamač, Martin; Horáček, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 76, FEB 2017 (2017), s. 62-66 ISSN 1387-7003 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/12/2368 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : scandium * yttrium * half-sandwich Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 1.640, year: 2016

  2. In situ observation of the reaction of scandium and carbon by neutron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juarez-Arellano, Erick A., E-mail: eajuarez@unpa.edu.m [Institut fuer Geowissenschaften, Universitaet Frankfurt, Altenhoeferallee 1, 60438 Frankfurt a.M. (Germany); Universidad del Papaloapan, Circuito Central 200, Parque Industrial, Tuxtepec 68301 (Mexico); Winkler, Bjorn [Institut fuer Geowissenschaften, Universitaet Frankfurt, Altenhoeferallee 1, 60438 Frankfurt a.M. (Germany); Vogel, Sven C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lujan Center. Mail Stop H805, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Senyshyn, Anatoliy [Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II), Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lichtenbergstr. 1, D-85747 Garching (Germany); Materialwissenschaft, TU Darmstadt, Petersensstr. 23, D-64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Kammler, Daniel R. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Avalos-Borja, Miguel [CNyN, UNAM, A. Postal 2681, Ensenada, B.C. (Mexico)

    2011-01-05

    Research highlights: {yields} Exist two ScC cubic phases with B1-structure type differing in site occupancy of C. {yields} A new orthorhombic scandium carbide phase is formed at 1473(50) K. {yields} The recrystallization of alpha-Sc occurs between 1000 and 1223 K. - Abstract: The formation of scandium carbides by reaction of the elements has been investigated by in situ neutron diffraction up to 1823 K. On heating, the recrystallization of {alpha}-Sc occurs between 1000 and 1223 K. The formation of Sc{sub 2}C and ScC (NaCl-B1 type structure) phases has been detected at 1323 and 1373 K, respectively. The formation of a new orthorhombic scandium carbide phase was observed at 1473(50) K. Once the scandium carbides are formed they are stable upon heating or cooling. No other phases were detected in the present study, in which the system was always carbon saturated. The thermal expansion coefficients of all phases have been determined, they are constant throughout the temperature interval studied.

  3. Process Design Aspects for Scandium-Selective Leaching of Bauxite Residue with Sulfuric Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Konstantinos Hatzilyberis; Theopisti Lymperopoulou; Lamprini-Areti Tsakanika; Klaus-Michael Ochsenkühn; Paraskevas Georgiou; Nikolaos Defteraios; Fotios Tsopelas; Maria Ochsenkühn-Petropoulou

    2018-01-01

    Aiming at the industrial scale development of a Scandium (Sc)-selective leaching process of Bauxite Residue (BR), a set of process design aspects has been investigated. The interpretation of experimental data for Sc leaching yield, with sulfuric acid as the leaching solvent, has shown significant impact from acid feed concentration, mixing time, liquid to solids ratio (L/S), and number of cycles of leachate re-usage onto fresh BR. The thin film diffusion model, as the fundamental theory for l...

  4. Diagrammatic Representation of Electronic Correlations in Photoionization Process: Application to Scandium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Mengmeng; Ma Xiaoguang

    2011-01-01

    The conversion rules under which an algebraic expression can be obtained from a corresponding photoionization Goldstone diagram have been given systematically in the present work. The electronic correlations in the photoionization processes then could be studied diagrammatically. The application to atomic scandium shows that the present theoretical scheme can give reasonable photoionization cross sections, which agree well with the experimental results. (atomic and molecular physics)

  5. Effect of scandium on the phase composition and mechanical properties of ABM alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molchanova, L. V.

    2010-09-01

    The effect of scandium on the composition and mechanical properties of ABM-1 alloys (Al-30% Be-5% Mg) is studied. The scandium content is varied from 0.1 to 0.5 wt %. It is established that, in the studied part of the Al-Be-Mg-Sc system, an aluminum solid solution (Al) and the ScBe13 compound are in equilibrium with a beryllium solid solution (Be). Magnesium dissolves in both the aluminum component and the ScBe13 compound. The strengthening effect related to the decomposition of the solid solution and the precipitation of Al3Sc cannot be extended to the strengthening of ABM-type alloys. Additions of 0.1-0.15 wt % Sc only weakly improve the mechanical properties of the alloys due to the refinement of beryllium-component grains. At high scandium contents, the strength increases insignificantly due to primary precipitation of ScBe13 and the plasticity decreases simultaneously.

  6. Influence of scandium on the pitting behaviour of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wloka, J. [Department of Materials Sciences, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Martensstrasse 7, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Virtanen, S. [Department of Materials Sciences, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Martensstrasse 7, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany)], E-mail: virtanen@ww.uni-erlangen.de

    2007-11-15

    In this paper the influence of small scandium additions (<0.26 wt.%) on the corrosion properties of the high-strength Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy AA7010 is investigated. The addition of scandium (in combination with the grain refiner Zr) leads to the formation of Al{sub 3}Sc{sub x}Zr{sub 1-x} phases. These coarse particles disturb the grain structure near the particle/matrix interface, which facilitates the initiation of localized corrosion in potentio-dynamic scans. Microelectrochemical investigations revealed a slightly cathodic character of these particles and a passive range beyond the breakdown potential of the matrix. Mass loss measurements show that the addition of scandium increases the mass loss during the initial period. The corrosion morphology was investigated with optical and scanning electron microscopy. The composition of the phases was determined with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. Micro-capillary measurements were performed to investigate the electrochemical properties of single phases surrounded by matrix.

  7. Solvent extraction of tricomponent complexes of zirconium and scandium with salicylic acid and collidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochetkova, S.K.; Fadeeva, V.I.; Kalistratova, V.P.

    1976-01-01

    Extraction of tricomponent compounds of zirconium and scandium with salicylic acid (Sal) and collidine (Col) has been studied. Addition of Col widens considerably the pH range of maximum extraction of zirconium salicylate and makes it possible to extract quantitatively both zirconium and scandium in the following pH range: scandium at pH 3.8-5.2; zirconium at pH 2-4. Optimum concentrations of salicylic acid and collidine are 0.05 mol/l and 0.375 mol/l, respectively. The composition of the complexes being extracted has been studied by the shift equilibrium method. Chloroform extracts complexes having the ratio Zr:Sal:Col=1:2:1(pH=3); Sc:Sal:Col=1:3:1(pH=4), and 1:2:1(pH=5). The composition of the complexes being formed is assumed to be [Zr(OH) 3 (HSal) 2 ] - [ColH + ] (pH=3); Sc(HSal) 3 xCol (pH=4.0); Sc(OH)(HSal) 2 xCol (pH=5.0). Extraction of collidine-salicylate complexes of Hf, Th, La, and Y under the conditions of optimum extraction of zirconium and scandium has been investigated when concentration of Zr and Sc in the solution is 3.0.10μ- 5 -1.37.10 -4 mol/l, respectively. It has been shown that hafnium is extracted quantitatively (95-100%) at pH 2.3-4.6; thorium at pH 3.0-6.4; 60% of yttrium is extracted at pH 4.0-4.8; 25% of lanthanum is extracted at pH 3.3-4.9. At pH 2.0 it is possible to separate Zr from Sc,Y, and La; at pH 1.4-1.5 from small amounts of Hf and Tn. Separation of zirconium, from small amounts of hafnium, 10-fold amounts of thorium, 100-fold amounts of scandium and lanthanum is also possible

  8. Solvent extraction of tricomponent complexes of zirconium and scandium with salicylic acid and collidine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kochetkova, S K; Fadeeva, V I; Kalistratova, V P [Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR)

    1976-01-01

    Extraction of tricomponent compounds of zirconium and scandium with salicylic acid (Sal) and collidine (Col) has been studied. Addition of Col widens considerably the pH range of maximum extraction of zirconium salicylate and makes it possible to extract quantitatively both zirconium and scandium in the following pH range: scandium at pH 3.8-5.2; zirconium at pH 2-4. Optimum concentrations of salicylic acid and collidine are 0.05 mol/l and 0.375 mol/l, respectively. The composition of the complexes being extracted has been studied by the shift equilibrium method. Chloroform extracts complexes having the ratio Zr:Sal:Col=1:2:1(pH=3); Sc:Sal:Col=1:3:1(pH=4), and 1:2:1(pH=5). The composition of the complexes being formed is assumed to be (Zr(OH)/sub 3/(HSal)/sub 2/)/sup -/(ColH/sup +/) (pH=3); Sc(HSal)/sub 3/xCol (pH=4.0); Sc(OH)(HSal)/sub 2/xCol (pH=5.0). Extraction of collidine-salicylate complexes of Hf, Th, La, and Y under the conditions of optimum extraction of zirconium and scandium has been investigated when concentration of Zr and Sc in the solution is 3.0.10..mu..-/sup 5/-1.37.10/sup -4/ mol/l, respectively. It has been shown that hafnium is extracted quantitatively (95-100%) at pH 2.3-4.6; thorium at pH 3.0-6.4; 60% of yttrium is extracted at pH 4.0-4.8; 25% of lanthanum is extracted at pH 3.3-4.9. At pH 2.0 it is possible to separate Zr from Sc,Y, and La; at pH 1.4-1.5 from small amounts of Hf and Tn. Separation of zirconium, from small amounts of hafnium, 10-fold amounts of thorium, 100-fold amounts of scandium and lanthanum is also possible.

  9. Hardening mechanisms of spray formed Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys with scandium and other elemental additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, M.M.; Amateau, M.F.; Eden, T.J.

    2006-01-01

    The hardening mechanisms in spray formed Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys with additions of chromium, zinc and scandium were studied. The microstructure of the spray formed alloys was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. A range of tensile strengths were achieved, and varied based on elemental additions, and second phase particle strengthening. To explain the significantly higher strength in one alloy with scandium, theoretical results due to the yield stress of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys as a function of volume fraction and precipitate particle size, were compared to experimental data. Both the possibilities of coherency and order strengthening are examined. The significant additional hardening achieved in the alloy with scandium is attributed to small ordered particles of Al 3 Sc, which precipitated during aging

  10. Potential for photocatalytic degradation of the potassic diclofenac using scandium and silver modified titanium dioxide thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciola, R.A.; Oliveira, C.T.; Lopes, S.A.; Cavalheiro, A.A.

    2011-01-01

    The potential for photocatalytic degradation of the potassic diclofenac drug was investigated using titanium dioxide thin films modified with two modifier types, scandium and silver, both prepared by Sol-Gel method. It was demonstrated by UVVis spectroscopy analysis of the solutions containing the drug, under UV-A light irradiation that the degradation efficiency of the titanium dioxide photocatalyst is dependent of the semiconductor nature and that the scandium accelerates the first step of the degradation when compared to the silver. This result seems to be related to the redox potential of the electron-hole pair, once the scandium modifying sample generates a p type semiconductor that reduces the band gap. The extra holes attract more strongly the chorine ion present in diclofenac and leading to the releasing more easily. However, after the first byproducts degradation the following steps are not facilitated, making the silver modifying more advantageous. (author)

  11. Quality control of no-carrier-added (YCl3)-Y-90 by estimating the labeling efficiency using its reaction with DOTATOC

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eigner-Henke, Kateřina; Beran, Miloš; Šrank, Jiří; Melichar, František

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 278, č. 1 (2008), s. 25-29 ISSN 0236-5731 R&D Projects: GA MPO FT-TA2/081 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : TERNARY COMPLEX-FORMATION * NEUROENDOCRINE TUMORS * SOMATOSTATIN ANALOGS Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 0.659, year: 2008

  12. Synthesis of a Potent Aminopyridine-Based nNOS-Inhibitor by Two Recent No-Carrier-Added $^{18}$F-Labelling Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Drerup, Christian; Ermert, Johannes; Coenen, Heinrich Hubert

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), an important multifunctional signaling molecule, is produced by three isoforms of NO-synthase (NOS) and has been associated with neurodegenerative disorders. Selective inhibitors of the subtypes iNOS (inducible) or nNOS (neuronal) are of great interest for decoding neurodestructive key factors, and 18F-labelled analogues would allow investigating the NOS-function by molecular imaging with positron emission tomography. Especially, the highly selective nNOS inhibitor 6-((3-((...

  13. A solid-phase technique for preparation of no-carrier-added technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals: application to the streptavidin/biotin system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn-Dufault, Robert; Pollak, Alfred; Fitzgerald, Jane; Thornback, John R.; Ballinger, James R.

    2000-01-01

    A high effective specific activity (HESA) formulation of a biotin-containing 99m Tc ligand [RP488: dimethyl-Gly-Ser-Cys(Acm)-Lys(Biotin)-Gly] conveniently prepared from solid phase was compared to a typical low effective specific activity (LESA) solution formulation to demonstrate improved targeting to streptavidin in an in vitro assay and in an in vivo rat model. RP488 was coupled to a maleimide-functionalized polyethylene glycol resin via a thiol ether linkage and labeled with 99m Tc-gluconate at room temperature, followed by elution of the HESA 99m Tc-RP488 in saline (minimum specific activity ∼ 1000 TBq/mmol by amino acid analysis). Both HESA and LESA 99m Tc-RP488 labeled at > 90% purity. In vitro, HESA 99m Tc-RP488 incubated with streptavidin-agarose was bound quantitatively, but there was competition from addition of increasing amounts of cold RP488. In rats, radiotracer uptake was evident at the site of implantation of streptavidin-agarose beads for the HESA dose, less uptake of low effective specific activity (LESA) material, and no appreciable uptake in the control rats of the LESA or HESA dose. The target-to-background ratio for HESA 99m Tc-RP488 was 5.4 times that of the control. The solid-phase technology offers a convenient way to prepare high specific activity receptor-targeting 99m Tc radiopharmaceuticals

  14. The influence of the diluent nature on scandium extraction by the phenol-formaldehyde resol oligomer yarrezin B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semenov, S.A.; Valkina, E.M.; Reznik, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    The paper studies the effect of diluent nature on scandium extraction by Yarrezin B phenol-formaldehyde resol oligomer using n-octan, toluene, chloroform, n-octanol and kerosene as an example. Correlation coefficients of dependences of scandium distribution factor on some parameters of diluents are calculated. Possibility to use some parameters of diluents to predict their effect on extraction indices is determined. Hildebrandt solubility parameter of extracting agent and parameters of extracting agent-diluent interaction according to Flory-Haggins are calculated. 13 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  15. Determination of aluminium, scandium and rare earth elements by emission flame spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otruba, V.; Sommer, L.

    1989-01-01

    Emission spectrometry in nitrous oxide-acetylene flames in combination with a highly resolving double monochromator and sensitive detecting system enables simple, sensitive and selective determinations of aluminium, scandium and all rare earth elements with exception of cerium in complicated matrices. Calibration plots are linear for a large concentration interval (≤ 100 μgxml -1 ), detection limits are in ngxml -1 level and RSD does not exceed 3% on the optimal concentration level of the particular element. The determination of Al, Sc, Eu and Yb showed particular advantages as to methods using ICP-spectrometry. (orig.)

  16. 3He release characteristics of metal tritides and scandium--tritium solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, W.G.; Kass, W.J.; Beavis, L.C.

    1975-01-01

    Tritides of such metals as scandium, titanium, and erbium are useful materials for determining the effects of helium accumulation in metallic solids, for example, CTR first wall materials. Such effects include lattice strain and gross deformation, as reported elsewhere, which are related to 3 He retention and ultimate release. Long term gas release studies have indicated that, during the early life of a metal ditritide, a large fraction of the 3 He is retained in the solid. At more advanced ages (2 to 4 years, depending on the parent metal), the 3 He release rate becomes comparable to the generation rate. Statistical analysis of the data indicates that the acceleration in 3 He release rate depends on accumulated 3 He concentration rather than strictly on age. 3 He outgassing results are presented for thin films of ScT 2 , TiT 2 , and ErT 2 , and the critical 3 He concentrations are discussed in terms of a percolation model. Phase transformations which occur on tritide formation cast some doubt on the validity of extrapolating results obtained for metal tritides to predictions regarding the accumulation of helium in metals. Scandium is unique among the early transition and rare-earth metals in that the metal exhibits a very high room temperature tritium solubility (T/Sc = 0.4) with no phase transformation. Indeed, even the lattice parameters of the hcp scandium lattice are only minimally changed by tritium solution, and we have succeeded in obtaining single crystal ScT 0 . 3 samples in two crystallographic orientations. Using a very sensitive technique, we have measured 3 He emission from both these samples, as well as from fine-grained thin film scandium-tritium solid solution samples (ScT 0 . 3 - 0 . 4 ). The fine-grained film samples release 3 He at 2 to 3 percent of the generation rate, while the emission rate from the single-crystal samples is approximately 0.05 percent of the generation rate, indicating a strong grain size effect

  17. Scandium-doped zinc cadmium oxide as a new stable n-type oxide thermoelectric material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Li; Christensen, Dennis Valbjørn; Bhowmik, Arghya

    2016-01-01

    Scandium-doped zinc cadmium oxide (Sc-doped ZnCdO) is proposed as a new n-type oxide thermoelectric material. The material is sintered in air to maintain the oxygen stoichiometry and avoid instability issues. The successful alloying of CdO with ZnO at a molar ratio of 1 : 9 significantly reduced...... is a good candidate for improving the overall conversion efficiencies in oxide thermoelectric modules. Meanwhile, Sc-doped ZnCdO is robust in air at high temperatures, whereas other n-type materials, such as Al-doped ZnO, will experience rapid degradation of their electrical conductivity and ZT....

  18. Scandium sorption by immobilized microdispersed forms of phosporus-containing ion exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolova, Yu.V.; Kurdyumov, G.M.; Smirnov, A.V.; Mezhirov, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    The possibility to improve considerably kinetics of scandium sorption by phosphate ion exchangers, immobilized into polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fibers, as compared with granular samples of ion exchangers, was shown. The influence of dispersion degree of immobilized ionite particles on sorption rate was studied. It is ascertained that the ionite grinding to the particle size ≤ 52 μm is sufficient for the rate increase by 1-1.5 orders. A lower swelling of the immobilized ion exchanger is its additional advantage as compared with granular form

  19. Why does the lumen maintenance of sodium-scandium metal halide lamps improve by VHF operation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Erk, W; Luijks, G M J F; Hitchcock, W

    2011-01-01

    Lifetime experiments show that sodium-scandium metal halide lamps perform better on very high frequency (VHF) drivers than on low frequency (LF) constant wattage autotransformer (CWA) ballasts. The question why, will be addressed with focus on arc tube aspects. It is argued that at high frequency operation sodium loss is less, and that the absence of thermal fluctuations in the electrode tip causes less damage and cracking to this part of the electrode. Sudden lm W -1 drops, observed with CWA-operated lamps, most probably occur when the arc attaches on such a corroded and cracked surface. Thorium is effective as an emitter both in the CWA and the VHF operation mode, despite the absence of cataphoretic transport to the cathode in the VHF case.

  20. Why does the lumen maintenance of sodium-scandium metal halide lamps improve by VHF operation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Erk, W [Philips Lighting, Sondervick 47, 5505 NB Veldhoven (Netherlands); Luijks, G M J F [Advanced Development Lighting, Philips Lighting, PO Box 80020, 5600 JM Eindhoven (Netherlands); Hitchcock, W, E-mail: Gerard.luijks@philips.com [Philips Lighting Company, 7265 Route 54, Bath, NY 14810 (United States)

    2011-06-08

    Lifetime experiments show that sodium-scandium metal halide lamps perform better on very high frequency (VHF) drivers than on low frequency (LF) constant wattage autotransformer (CWA) ballasts. The question why, will be addressed with focus on arc tube aspects. It is argued that at high frequency operation sodium loss is less, and that the absence of thermal fluctuations in the electrode tip causes less damage and cracking to this part of the electrode. Sudden lm W{sup -1} drops, observed with CWA-operated lamps, most probably occur when the arc attaches on such a corroded and cracked surface. Thorium is effective as an emitter both in the CWA and the VHF operation mode, despite the absence of cataphoretic transport to the cathode in the VHF case.

  1. Influence of scandium on the microstructure and mechanical properties of A319 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emadi, Daryoush; Rao, A.K. Prasada; Mahfoud, Musbah

    2010-01-01

    Recycling of aluminum scrap alloys by melting is gaining its importance in foundry sector. During recycling, some of the alloying elements present in scrap alloys eventually become trace/tramp impurities in the recycled alloy. These elements could potentially affect the alloy's microstructure and hence its mechanical properties. In the present work, an attempt has been made to investigate the effect of one of such trace elements on the microstructure and mechanical properties of A319 alloy. The element chosen for the present investigation is scandium (Sc). This paper discusses the effects of the additions of trace amount of Sc on the microstructure and mechanical properties of A319 alloy in as-cast, T6 and T7 heat treated conditions.

  2. Thermodynamic study of sublimation, melting and vaporization of scandium(III) dipivaloylmethanate derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zherikova, Kseniya V.; Zelenina, Ludmila N.; Chusova, Tamara P.; Gelfond, Nikolay V.; Morozova, Natalia B.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal properties of two volatile fluorinated Sc(III) beta-diketonates were studied. • Saturated and unsaturated vapor pressures were measured. • DSC analysis was carried out. • Sublimation, evaporation and melting enthalpies and entropies were derived. • Effect of fluorine introduction on volatility and thermal stability was established. - Abstract: The present work deals with the investigation of thermal properties of two volatile scandium(III) beta-diketonates with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-fluoro-3,5-heptanedione and 1,1,1-trifluoro-5,5-dimethyl-2,4-hexanedione which have been synthesized and purified. Using the static method with glass membrane gauge-manometer the temperature dependencies of saturated and unsaturated vapor pressure were measured for the first time. The temperatures and enthalpies of melting were measured for these compounds by differential scanning calorimetry. The standard thermodynamic characteristics of enthalpy and entropy for sublimation, vaporization and melting processes were derived.

  3. Dielectric matrix, dynamical matrix and phonon dispersion in hcp transition metal scandium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Joginder; Singh, Natthi; Prakash, S.

    1976-01-01

    Complete dielectric matrix is evaluated for hcp transition metal scandium using the non-interacting s- and d-band model. The local field corrections which are consequence of the non-diagonal part of the dielectric matrix are calculated explicitly. The free electron approximation is used for the s-electrons and the simple tight-binding approximation is used for the d-electrons. The theory developed by Singh and others is used to invert the dielectric matrix and the explicit expressions for the dynamical matrix are obtained. The phonon dispersion relations are investigated by using the renormalized Animalu transition metal model potential (TMMP) for bare ion potential. The contribution due to non-central forces which arise due to local fields is found to be 20%. The results are found in resonably good agreement with the experimental values. (author)

  4. A new method for the labelling of proteins with radioactive arsenic isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennewein, M. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry, Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Fritz-Strassmann-Weg 2, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Hermanne, A. [VUB Cyclotron, University of Brussels, Laarbeeklaan 103, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Mason, R.P. [Department of Radiology, Advanced Radiological Sciences, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, Texas (United States); Thorpe, P.E. [Department of Pharmacology and Simmons and Hamon Cancer Centers, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX (United States); Roesch, F. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry, Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Fritz-Strassmann-Weg 2, 55128 Mainz (Germany)]. E-mail: frank.roesch@uni-mainz.de

    2006-12-20

    Radioarsenic labelled radiopharmaceuticals could be a valuable asset to positron emission tomography. In particular, the long half-lives of {sup 72}As (T{sub 1/2}=26h) and {sup 74}As (T{sub 1/2}=17.8d) allow to investigate slow physiological or metabolical processes, like the enrichment and distribution of monoclonal antibodies (mab) in tumour tissue. In this work, a new method for the labelling of proteins with various radioactive arsenic isotopes was developed. For this purpose, two proteins, namely a chimeric IgG{sub 3} monoclonal antibody, ch3G4, directed against anionic phospholipids, and Rituxan (Rituximab), were labelled as a proof of principle with no-carrier-added radioarsenic isotopes ({sup 74}As and {sup 77}As). The developed labelling chemistry gives high yields (>99.9%), is reliable and could easily be transferred to automated labelling systems in a clinical environment. At least for the mab used in this work, this route of radioarsenic labelling does not affect the immunoreactivity of the product. The arsenic label stays stable for up to 72h at the molecular mass of the monoclonal antibody, which is in particular relevant to follow the pharmacology and pharmacokinetics of the labelled mab for several days.

  5. Modification mechanism of eutectic silicon in Al–6Si–0.3Mg alloy with scandium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patakham, Ussadawut [Manufacturing and Systems Engineering Program, Department of Production Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkut’s University of Technology Thonburi, 126 Pracha-Utid Rd., Bangmod, Tungkhru, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand); Kajornchaiyakul, Julathep [National Metal and Material Technology Center, National Science and Technology Development Agency, 114 Thailand Science Park, Klong Nueng, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Limmaneevichitr, Chaowalit, E-mail: chaowalit.lim@kmutt.ac.th [Manufacturing and Systems Engineering Program, Department of Production Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkut’s University of Technology Thonburi, 126 Pracha-Utid Rd., Bangmod, Tungkhru, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand)

    2013-10-25

    Highlights: •Morphologies and growth of Sc and Sr-modified eutectic silicon resemble those of dendrites. •Crystal orientation of eutectic aluminum depends on growth characteristics of eutectic silicon. •We report strong evidence of the occurrence of an impurity-induced twinning mechanism. -- Abstract: The modification mechanism of eutectic silicon in Al–6Si–0.3Mg alloy with scandium was studied. The crystallographic orientation relationships between primary dendrites and the eutectic phase of unmodified and modified Al–6Si–0.3 Mg alloys were determined using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The orientation of aluminum modified with scandium in the eutectic phase was different from that of the neighboring primary dendrites. This result implies that eutectic aluminum grows epitaxially from the surrounding primary aluminum dendrites in the unmodified alloy and that eutectic aluminum grows competitively from the surrounding primary aluminum dendrites in the modified alloy. The pole figure maps of eutectic Si in the [1 0 0], [1 1 0] and [1 1 1] axes of the unmodified and Sc-modified alloys were different, suggesting that the eutectic Al and Si crystals in modified alloy growth are more isotropic and cover a larger set of directions. The lattice fringes of Si of the alloys with and without Sc modification were different in the TEM results. The lattice fringes of Si in modified alloy were found to be multiple twins. However, this was not observed in the unmodified alloy. The growth characteristic of eutectic Si crystal in modified alloy suggests the occurrence of multiple twinning reactions and the formation of a high density of twins. This modification mechanism by Sc is explained by the results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis, which provide strong evidence of the occurrence of the impurity-induced twinning (IIT) mechanism.

  6. Insights into the mantle geochemistry of scandium from a meta-analysis of garnet data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassé, Mathieu; Griffin, William L.; Alard, Olivier; O'Reilly, Suzanne Y.; Calas, Georges

    2018-06-01

    The meta-analysis of about 13,000 analyses of scandium content in garnet grains shows that, below the spinel-garnet transition, this phase carries about three-quarters of the Sc budget of the mantle, indicating its control on Sc mobility. The Sc content of garnets in mafic rocks is low, due to a dilution effect resulting from their high modal content in garnet. Garnets from ultramafic rocks exhibit a wider range of Sc concentrations. We assess the relative influence of thermobarometry, crystal chemistry and fluid-related events on the distribution of Sc in garnet from such rocks to improve the tracking of geochemical processes in the mantle. Pressure and temperature of equilibration in the mantle are second-order factors influencing the Sc content of garnet, while crystal chemistry, in particular Cr/Cr+Al and Ca/Ca+Mg, is the main parameter controlling the compatibility of Sc. Scandium is incorporated in both X and Y sites of Cr-Ca-rich garnets, resulting in a behaviour intermediate between rare-earth elements, incorporated in the X site, and trivalent transition elements, occupying the Y site. This affinity for both sites results in a mild compatibility of Sc in the garnet stability field of the mantle; hence Sc concentration in garnet increases with melt extraction and can be reduced by silicate-melt metasomatism. In contrast, metasomatism by volatile-rich fluids increases the Sc concentration in garnet. The control of garnet on the compatibility of Sc in deep lithospheric rocks demonstrates the potential of using Sc to track the conditions of formation of magmas and their residual rocks, as well as the origin and nature of metasomatic fluids.

  7. Radioactive Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radioactive decay is the emission of energy in the form of ionizing radiation. Example decay chains illustrate how radioactive atoms can go through many transformations as they become stable and no longer radioactive.

  8. Multiscale Study of Hydrogen Adsorption on Six Designed Covalent Organic Frameworks Based on Porphyrazine, Cyclobutane and Scandium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Le-Le; Gao Teng-Fei; Zhang Ruan-Yu; Zhang Hong

    2014-01-01

    The first-principles method of hydrogen adsorption is used to investigate the interaction of H_2 with the scandium-porphyrazine (Sc-Pz) and porphyrazine (Pz) clusters. The result shows that the interaction of H_2 with Sc-Pz is stronger than with Pz. Then grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations are used to investigate hydrogen adsorption in six designed covalent organic frameworks (COFs), which are designed based on porphyrazine, cyclobutane and scandium. When the pressure is from 0.1 to 100 bar and the temperature is 298 K and 77 K, the hydrogen adsorption capacities of the six COFs are calculated. We further study the importance of Sc and fillers to improve the H_2 uptake in the modified COFs by analyzing the isosteric heat of hydrogen adsorption. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  9. Scandium interaction with diantipyrylmethane homologues and 2-(n-sulphophenylazo)-1,8-dihydroxynaphthalene-3,6 sodium disulphonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganago, L I; Alinovskaya, L A [AN Belorusskoj SSR, Minsk. Inst. Fiziki Tverdogo Tela i Poluprovodnikov

    1979-01-01

    The reactions of scandium with homologs of diantipyrilmethane (DAM)-propyldiantipyrilmethane (PDAM) and phenyldiantipyrilmethane (PhDAM) - are studied. The relationship of components in the complexes formed is found, and chemism of their formation is established. The complexes Sc-SPADNE (sodium salt 2-(n-sulphophenylazo)-1,8-dioxynaphthalene-3,6-disulphonic acid) are shown to form within a wide pH range. The maximum yield of complexes is observed at 6.0-7.5 pH. By the ion-exchange method the anion character of heteroligand scandium complexes is established. The complex Sc-SPADNE-PDAM is faster as compared with the complexes Sc-SPADNE-DAM and Sc-SPADNE-PhDAM. The decrease in amine excess and increase in the sensitivity of heteroligand formation of the complexes of scandium with SPADNE and PDAM make them better suited for analysis. The technique is developed for the determination of Sc/sub 2/O/sub 3/ in perovskites using the complete differential spectrophotometry method.

  10. Using radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-10-01

    The leaflet discusses the following: radioactivity; radioisotopes; uses of ionising radiations; radioactivity from (a) naturally occurring radioactive elements, and (b) artificially produced radioisotopes; uses of radioactivity in medicine, (a) clinical diagnostic, (b) therapeutic (c) sterilization of medical equipment and materials; environmental uses as tracers; industrial applications, e.g. tracers and radiography; ensuring safety. (U.K.)

  11. Radioactive aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamberlain, A.C.

    1991-01-01

    Radon. Fission product aerosols. Radioiodine. Tritium. Plutonium. Mass transfer of radioactive vapours and aerosols. Studies with radioactive particles and human subjects. Index. This paper explores the environmental and health aspects of radioactive aerosols. Covers radioactive nuclides of potential concern to public health and applications to the study of boundary layer transport. Contains bibliographic references. Suitable for environmental chemistry collections in academic and research libraries

  12. Preparation of highly specific radioactivity [18F]flumazenil and its evaluation in cynomolgus monkey by positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryzhikov, Nikolaj N.; Seneca, Nicholas; Krasikova, Raisa N.; Gomzina, Natalia A.; Shchukin, Evgeny; Fedorova, Olga S.; Vassiliev, Dmitrij A.; Gulyas, Balazs; Hall, Hakan; Savic, Ivanka; Halldin, Christer

    2005-01-01

    A straightforward method for the preparation of no-carrier-added (n.c.a.) [ 18 F]flumazenil via standard nucleophilic radiofluorination of the corresponding nitro-analog Ro 15-2344 has been developed. The labeling was performed by employing the K 18 F/kryptofix complex in DMF at 160 deg. C for 30 min and equimolar ratio [K/K2.2.2] +18 F - /precursor. Under these conditions, an 18 F incorporation rate into flumazenil was in the range of 55-60%. The final product was isolated by HPLC purification within a total synthesis time of 75 min and a radiochemical yield of about 30% (EOB). Human post-mortem whole-hemisphere autoradiography of brain sections demonstrated selective uptake of the radioligand in the areas of high density of the central benzodiazepine receptors (BZR). PET studies in a cynomolgus monkey and metabolite studies by HPLC demonstrated similar results by [ 18 F]flumazenil as for [ 11 C]flumazenil. In blocking experiments, almost all radioactivity was inhibited by the addition of unlabeled flumazenil. [ 18 F]Flumazenil is a suitable radioligand for PET assessment of the BZR

  13. Preparation of highly specific radioactivity [{sup 18}F]flumazenil and its evaluation in cynomolgus monkey by positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryzhikov, Nikolaj N. [Institute of Human Brain, Russian Academy of Science, 9, Pavlov str, 197376, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Seneca, Nicholas [Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden); National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, Molecular Imaging Branch, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Krasikova, Raisa N. [Institute of Human Brain, Russian Academy of Science, 9, Pavlov str, 197376, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Gomzina, Natalia A. [Institute of Human Brain, Russian Academy of Science, 9, Pavlov str, 197376, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Shchukin, Evgeny [Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden); Fedorova, Olga S. [Institute of Human Brain, Russian Academy of Science, 9, Pavlov str, 197376, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Vassiliev, Dmitrij A. [Institute of Human Brain, Russian Academy of Science, 9, Pavlov str, 197376, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Gulyas, Balazs [Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden); Hall, Hakan [Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden); Savic, Ivanka [Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden); Halldin, Christer [Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden)]. E-mail: christer.halldin@cns.ki.se

    2005-02-01

    A straightforward method for the preparation of no-carrier-added (n.c.a.) [{sup 18}F]flumazenil via standard nucleophilic radiofluorination of the corresponding nitro-analog Ro 15-2344 has been developed. The labeling was performed by employing the K{sup 18}F/kryptofix complex in DMF at 160 deg. C for 30 min and equimolar ratio [K/K2.2.2]{sup +18}F{sup -}/precursor. Under these conditions, an {sup 18}F incorporation rate into flumazenil was in the range of 55-60%. The final product was isolated by HPLC purification within a total synthesis time of 75 min and a radiochemical yield of about 30% (EOB). Human post-mortem whole-hemisphere autoradiography of brain sections demonstrated selective uptake of the radioligand in the areas of high density of the central benzodiazepine receptors (BZR). PET studies in a cynomolgus monkey and metabolite studies by HPLC demonstrated similar results by [{sup 18}F]flumazenil as for [{sup 11}C]flumazenil. In blocking experiments, almost all radioactivity was inhibited by the addition of unlabeled flumazenil. [{sup 18}F]Flumazenil is a suitable radioligand for PET assessment of the BZR.

  14. Phenomenological theory of the dielectric response of lead magnesium niobate and lead scandium tantalate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian, H.; Bursill, L.A.

    1997-01-01

    The influence of the random field effects originating from charges chemical defects and non-domain textures of the formation and dynamics of polar clusters is analyzed. The spatial distribution of the local fields is not totally random but contains some correlations in direction and strength. Polar clusters are classified to be dynamic or frozen according to their dynamic characteristics in the random fields. The relaxation formula of a dipolar moment in an anisotropic double-well potential is deduced. Two percolation models are introduced, one to account for frustration effects associated with multiple orientations of polar clusters, which results in a broad diffuse dielectric response and the second to account for the case whereby there may be a phase transition to a ferroelectric state. The dielectric permittivity and dissipation factor of the typical relaxors lead magnesium niobate and lead scandium tantalate are predicted as a function of both temperature and frequency, which results are in good agreement with the experimental measurements. 30 refs., 9 figs

  15. Microstructure and age-hardening effects of aluminium alloys with additions of scandium and zirconium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galun, R.; Mordike, B.L. [Inst. fuer Werkstoffkunde und Werkstofftechnik, Technische Univ. Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Maiwald, T.; Smola, B. [Zentrum fuer Funktionswerkstoffe GmbH, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Mergen, R.; Manner, M.; Uitz, W. [Miba Gleitlager GmbH, Laakirchen (Australia)

    2004-12-01

    The aim of the work presented in this report was to produce age-hardenable aluminium alloys containing scandium and zirconium by a casting process with similar cooling conditions like an industrial casting process. Microstructure, precipitation structure and age-hardening response of different alloys with up to 0.4 wt.% Sc and Zr were investigated. Age-hardening experiments from the as-cast condition without solution annealing showed a significant increase of hardness of about 100% for Sc-rich alloys and of 50% for Zr-rich alloys compared to the as-cast condition. TEM investigations revealed the formation of precipitates of ternary Al{sub 3}(Sc{sub x}Zr{sub 1-x}) phases with a cubic cP4 crystal structure. In addition to the strengthening effect, a high thermal stability especially of the precipitates in Zr-rich alloys up to 400 C let these alloys look very promising for high-temperature applications. (orig.)

  16. Partitioning of Iron and Scandium in Soils Having Water Drainage Limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aide, M.; Braden, I.; Mueller, W.

    2010-01-01

    Soil chemistry of Fe includes weathering reactions, adsorption, hydrolysis, complexation, and oxidation-reduction reactions. Soil chemistry for scandium (Sc) is similar, but Sc does not include oxidation-reduction reactions. To determine if geochemical analysis may be used to identify Sc partitioning with respect to Fe among the particle size fractions, two Alfisol and two Ultisol soils were assessed using an aqua-regia digestion to estimate Sc and Fe concentrations for whole soil and particle size separates. Aqua-regia digestion data showed Sc depletion relative to Fe in sand separate. Sand separate is largely composed on quartz sand and Fe-Mn-bearing nodules, which are redoximorphic features produced by alternating oxic and suboxic/anoxic conditions associated with seasonally fluctuating water tables. Relative partitioning of Fe and Sc in these soils warrants further study to assess if selective extractions could quantify the extent of modern or ancestral oxidation-reduction processes responsible in some soil features involved in soil genesis.

  17. Effect of Aqueous Media on the Recovery of Scandium by Selective Precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bengi Yagmurlu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This research presents a novel precipitation method for scandium (Sc concentrate refining from bauxite residue leachates and the effect of aqueous media on this triple-stage successive precipitation process. The precipitation pattern and the precipitation behavior of the constituent elements was investigated using different precipitation agents in three major mineral acid media, namely, H2SO4, HNO3, and HCl in a comparative manner. Experimental investigations showed behavioral similarities between HNO3 and HCl media, while H2SO4 media was different from them because of the nature of the formed complexes. NH4OH was found to be the best precipitation agent in every leaching media to remove Fe(III with low Sc co-precipitation. To limit Sc loss from the system, Fe(III removal was divided into two steps, leading to more than 90% of Fe(III removal at the end of the process. Phosphate concentrates were produced in the final step of the precipitation process with dibasic phosphates which have a strong affinity towards Sc. Concentrates containing more than 50% of ScPO4 were produced in each case from the solutions after Fe(III removal, as described. A flow diagram of the selective precipitation process is proposed for these three mineral acid media with their characteristic parameters.

  18. Adsorption of hydrogen in Scandium/Titanium decorated nitrogen doped carbon nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mananghaya, Michael, E-mail: mikemananghaya@gmail.com [De La Salle University, 2401 Taft Ave, 0922, Manila (Philippines); DLSU STC Laguna Boulevard, LTI Spine Road Barangays Biñan and Malamig, Biñan City, Laguna (Philippines); DOST-ASTHRDP, PCIEERD, Gen. Santos Ave., Bicutan, Taguig City 1631 (Philippines); Belo, Lawrence Phoa; Beltran, Arnel [De La Salle University, 2401 Taft Ave, 0922, Manila (Philippines); DLSU STC Laguna Boulevard, LTI Spine Road Barangays Biñan and Malamig, Biñan City, Laguna (Philippines)

    2016-09-01

    Nitrogen doped Carbon Nanotube with divacancy (4ND-CN{sub x}NT) that is decorated with Scandium and Titanium as potential hydrogen storage medium using the pseudo potential density functional method was investigated. Highly localized states near the Fermi level, which are derived from the nitrogen defects, contribute to strong Sc and Ti bindings, which prevent metal aggregation and improve the material stability. A detailed Comparison of the Hydrogen adsorption capability with promising system-weight efficiency of Sc over Ti was elucidated when functionalized with 4ND-CN{sub x}NT. Finally, the (Sc/4ND){sub 10}-CN{sub x}CNT composite material has a thermodynamically favorable adsorption and consecutive adsorption energy for ideal reversible adsorption and desorption of hydrogen at room temperature such that it can hold at least 5.8 wt% hydrogen molecules at the LDA and GGA level. - Highlights: • Carbon Nanotube with divacancy (4ND-CN{sub x}NT) decorated with Sc and Ti. • Nitrogen defects, contribute to strong Sc and Ti bindings. • H{sub 2} and (Sc/4ND){sub 10}-CN{sub x}CNT has a favorable adsorption. • 5.8 wt% adsorption at the LDA and GGA level.

  19. Influence of scandium on the microstructure and strength properties of the welded joint at the laser welding of aluminum-lithium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malikov, A. G.; Golyshev, A. A.; Ivanova, M. Yu.

    2017-10-01

    Today, aeronautical equipment manufacture involves up-to-date high-strength aluminum alloys of decreased density resulting from lithium admixture. Various technologies of fusible welding of these alloys are being developed. Serious demands are imposed to the welded joints of aluminum alloys in respect to their strength characteristics. The paper presents experimental investigations of the optimization of the laser welding of aluminum alloys with the scandium-modified welded joint. The effect of scandium on the micro-and macro-structure has been studied as well as the strength characteristics of the welded joint. It has been found that scandium under in the laser welding process increases the welded joint elasticity for the system Al-Mg-Li, aluminum alloy 1420 by 20 %, and almost doubles the same for the system Al-Cu-Li, aluminum alloy 1441.

  20. Radioactive source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drabkina, L.E.; Mazurek, V.; Myascedov, D.N.; Prokhorov, P.; Kachalov, V.A.; Ziv, D.M.

    1976-01-01

    A radioactive layer in a radioactive source is sealed by the application of a sealing layer on the radioactive layer. The sealing layer can consist of a film of oxide of titanium, tin, zirconium, aluminum, or chromium. Preferably, the sealing layer is pure titanium dioxide. The radioactive layer is embedded in a finish enamel which, in turn, is on a priming enamel which surrounds a substrate

  1. Radioactivity metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legrand, J.

    1979-01-01

    Some aspects of the radioactivity metrology are reviewed. Radioactivity primary references; absolute methods of radioactivity measurements used in the Laboratoire de Metrologie des Rayonnements Ionisants; relative measurement methods; traceability through international comparisons and interlaboratory tests; production and distribution of secondary standards [fr

  2. Radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teillac, J.

    1988-01-01

    This study of general interest is an evaluation of the safety of radioactive waste management and consequently the preservation of the environment for the protection of man against ionizing radiations. The following topics were developed: radiation effects on man; radioactive waste inventory; radioactive waste processing, disposal and storage; the present state and future prospects [fr

  3. Laboratory studies into the use of the scandium-46-EDTA complex as a tracer for groundwater flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, H.; Nixon, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    Gamma ray emitting metal radionuclides, when complexed with an appropriate complexing agent, provide a wide choice of water tracers particularly for groundwater studies where a radionuclide of appropriate half-life suited to the particular study can be selected. Scandium-46 has easily detectable gamma emission and a suitable half-life (84 days) for medium term studies. It has been widely and successfully used as a tracer in studies of sediment movement but has not yet been introduced as a groundwater tracer. In our experiments the chemical aspects of the preparation of Sc-46-EDTA were studied in some detail and its behaviour in various mineralogical environments was evaluated with reference to the standard tracer, tritiated water. The experimental results have shown that the scandium cation can be easily complexed with EDTA to form soluble SC-EDTA. The complex is very stable in a wide range of pH; the adsorptive properties of Sc-EDTA in the batch studies and the retardation and recovery in the column tests in comparison with tritiated water are quite satisfactory. In general Sc-46-EDTA is a promising tracer for groundwater studies. In the report the appropriate conditions, procedures and some rational and efficient methods for testing the purity of Sc-46-EDTA in the preparation of the tracer solution of Sc-46-EDTA are described. In addition, it has been found that the formation of the metal hydroxide colloids is the major reason for the great loss in groundwater aquifers of most trivalent metal nuclide tracers in the cationic form including scandium-46. (author). 29 refs, 11 figs, 12 tabs

  4. Radioactive battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deaton, R.L.; Silver, G.L.

    1975-01-01

    A radioactive battery is described that is comprised of a container housing an electrolyte, two electrodes immersed in the electrolyte and insoluble radioactive material disposed adjacent one electrode. Insoluble radioactive material of different intensity of radioactivity may be disposed adjacent the second electrode. If hydrobromic acid is used as the electrolyte, Br 2 will be generated by the radioactivity and is reduced at the cathode: Br 2 + 2e = 2 Br - . At the anode Br - is oxidized: 2Br - = Br 2 + 2e. (U.S.)

  5. Interaction of scandium and titanium atoms with a carbon surface containing five- and seven-membered rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnov, P. O.; Eliseeva, N. S.; Kuzubov, A. A.

    2012-01-01

    The use of carbon nanotubes coated by atoms of transition metals to store molecular hydrogen is associated with the problem of the aggregation of these atoms, which leads to the formation of metal clusters. The quantum-chemical simulation of cluster models of the carbon surface of a graphene type with scandium and titanium atoms has been performed. It has been shown that the presence of five- and seven-membered rings, in addition to six-membered rings, in these structures makes it possible to strongly suppress the processes of the migration of metal atoms over the surface, preventing their clustering.

  6. Complexometric determination of aluminium and scandium using fluorides as masking agent at low pH value

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tikhonov, V.N.

    1978-01-01

    A complexometric method is suggested to determine Al and Sc by back titration of Bi(NO 3 ) 3 solution with xylenol orange indicator at low pH values. To increase selectivity fluoride additions were used which were masked by boron acid at the end titration point. EDTA was used as a complexing agent. Metals which create at low pH values stable complexes with EDTA undestroyed by fluoride, do not interfere with Al and Sc determination. Scandium is shown to be determined more selectively than aluminium

  7. Magnetic susceptibility of scandium-hydrogen and lutetium-hydrogen solid-solution alloys from 2 to 3000K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stierman, R.J.

    1982-12-01

    Results for pure Sc show that the maximum and minimum in the susceptibility discovered earlier are enhanced as the impurity level of iron in scandium decreases. The Stoner enhancement factor, calculated from low-temperature heat capacity data, susceptibility data, and band-structure calculations show Sc to be a strongly enhanced paramagnet. Below 2 0 K, the magnetic anisotropy between the hard and easy directions of scandium decreases linearly with decreasing temperature, tending toward zero at 0 K. The large increase in the susceptibility of Sc at lower temperatures indicates magnetic ordering. Pure Lu and Lu-H alloys showed an anisotropy in susceptibility vs orientation; thus the samples were not random polycrystalline samples. Pure Lu shows the shallow maximum and minimum, but the increase in susceptibility at low temperatures is larger than previously observed. The susceptibility-composition dependence of the Lu-H alloys also did not match other data. The susceptibility-composition dependence does not match the composition dependence of the electronic specific heat constant below 150 K, showing the electronic specific heat is being affected by terms other than phonon-electron and pure electron-electron interactions

  8. New radioactivities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiner, W.; Sandulescu, A.

    1996-01-01

    Some atomic nuclei reorganize their structure by ejection of big protons and neutrons aggregates. The observation of these new radioactivities specifies the theories of the nuclear dynamics. (authors)

  9. Radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiura, Yoshio; Shimizu, Makoto.

    1975-01-01

    The problems of radioactivity in the ocean with marine life are various. Activities in this field, especially the measurements of the radioactivity in sea water and marine life are described. The works first started in Japan concerning nuclear weapon tests. Then the port call to Japan by U.S. nuclear-powered naval ships began. On the other hand, nuclear power generation is advancing with its discharge of warm water. The radioactive pollution of sea water, and hence the contamination of marine life are now major problems. Surveys of the sea areas concerned and study of the radioactivity intake by fishes and others are carried out extensively in Japan. (Mori, K.)

  10. Radioactivity Handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firestone, R.B.; Browne, E.

    1985-01-01

    The Radioactivity Handbook will be published in 1985. This handbook is intended primarily for applied users of nuclear data. It will contain recommended radiation data for all radioactive isotopes. Pages from the Radioactivity Handbook for A = 221 are shown as examples. These have been produced from the LBL Isotopes Project extended ENDSF data-base. The skeleton schemes have been manually updated from the Table of Isotopes and the tabular data are prepared using UNIX with a phototypesetter. Some of the features of the Radioactivity Handbook are discussed here

  11. Radioactivity. Centenary of radioactivity discovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpak, G.; Tubiana, M.; Bimbot, R.

    1997-01-01

    This small booklet was edited for the occasion of the exhibitions of the celebration of the centenary of radioactivity discovery which took place in various locations in France from 1996 to 1998. It recalls some basic knowledge concerning radioactivity and its applications: history of discovery, atoms and isotopes, radiations, measurement of ionizing radiations, natural and artificial radioactivity, isotope dating and labelling, radiotherapy, nuclear power and reactors, fission and fusion, nuclear wastes, dosimetry, effects and radioprotection. (J.S.)

  12. Characterisation of the appearance of radioactive metabolites in monkey and human plasma from the 5-HT1A receptor radioligand, [carbonyl-11C]WAY-100635 - explanation of high signal contrast in PET and an aid to biomathematical modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, Safiye; Lundkvist, Camilla; Pike, Victor W.; Halldin, Christer; McCarron, Julie A.; Swahn, Carl-Gunnar; Farde, Lars; Ginovart, Nathalie; Luthra, Sajinder K.; Gunn, Roger N.; Bench, Christopher J.; Sargent, Peter A.; Grasby, Paul M.

    1998-01-01

    N-(2-(4-(2-Methoxy-phenyl)-1-piperazin-1-yl)ethyl)-N-(2-pyridyl) cyclohexanecarboxamide (WAY-100635), labelled in its amido carbonyl group with 11 C (t 1/2 = 20.4 min), is a promising radioligand for the study of brain 5-HT 1A receptors with positron emission tomography (PET). Thus, in PET experiments in six cynomolgus monkeys and seven healthy male volunteers, [carbonyl- 11 C]WAY-100635 was taken up avidly by brain. Radioactivity was retained in regions rich in 5-HT 1A receptors, such as occipital cortex, temporal cortex and raphe nuclei, but cleared rapidly from cerebellum, a region almost devoid of 5-HT 1A receptors. [Carbonyl- 11 C]WAY-100635 provides about 3- and 10-fold higher signal contrast (receptor-specific to nonspecific binding) than [O-methyl- 11 C]WAY-100635 in receptor-rich areas of monkey and human brain, respectively. To elucidate the effect of label position on radioligand behaviour and to aid in the future biomathematical interpretation of the kinetics of regional cerebral radioactivity uptake in terms of receptor-binding parameters, HPLC was used to measure [carbonyl- 11 C]WAY-100635 and its radioactive metabolites in plasma at various times after intravenous injection. Radioactivity cleared rapidly from monkey and human plasma. Parent radioligand represented 19% of the radioactivity in monkey plasma at 47 min and 8% of the radioactivity in human plasma at 40 min. [Carbonyl- 11 C]desmethyl-WAY-100635 was below detectable limits in monkey plasma and at most a very minor radioactive metabolite in human plasma. [ 11 C]Cyclohexanecarboxylic acid was identified as a significant radioactive metabolite. In human plasma this maximally represented 21% of the radioactivity at 10 min after radioligand injection. All other major radioactive metabolites in monkey and human plasma were even more polar. No-carrier-added [carbonyl- 11 C]cyclohexanecarboxylic acid was prepared in the laboratory and after intravenous administration into cynomolgus monkey was

  13. Self-Assembled Nanocomposite Organic Polymers with Aluminum and Scandium as Heterogeneous Water-Compatible Lewis Acid Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamura, Hiroyuki; Sonoyama, Arisa; Hayrapetyan, Davit; Kobayashi, Shū

    2015-09-01

    While water-compatible Lewis acids have great potential as accessible and environmentally benign catalysts for various organic transformations, efficient immobilization of such Lewis acids while keeping high activity and without leaching of metals even under aqueous conditions is a challenging task. Self-assembled nanocomposite catalysts of organic polymers, carbon black, aluminum reductants, and scandium salts as heterogeneous water-compatible Lewis acid catalysts are described. These catalysts could be successfully applied to various C-C bond-forming reactions without leaching of metals. Scanning transmission electron microscopy analyses revealed that the nanocomposite structure of Al and Sc was fabricated in these heterogeneous catalysts. It is noted that Al species, which are usually decomposed rapidly in the presence of water, are stabilized under aqueous conditions. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Scandium doping brings speed improvement in Sb2Te alloy for phase change random access memory application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Zheng, Yonghui; Zhu, Min; Ren, Kun; Wang, Yong; Li, Tao; Liu, Guangyu; Guo, Tianqi; Wu, Lei; Liu, Xianqiang; Cheng, Yan; Song, Zhitang

    2018-05-01

    Phase change random access memory (PCRAM) has gained much attention as a candidate for nonvolatile memory application. To develop PCRAM materials with better properties, especially to draw closer to dynamic random access memory (DRAM), the key challenge is to research new high-speed phase change materials. Here, Scandium (Sc) has been found it is helpful to get high-speed and good stability after doping in Sb 2 Te alloy. Sc 0.1 Sb 2 Te based PCRAM cell can achieve reversible switching by applying even 6 ns voltage pulse experimentally. And, Sc doping not only promotes amorphous stability but also improves the endurance ability comparing with pure Sb 2 Te alloy. Moreover, according to DFT calculations, strong Sc-Te bonds lead to the rigidity of Sc centered octahedrons, which may act as crystallization precursors in recrystallization process to boost the set speed.

  15. Random-field Potts model for the polar domains of lead magnesium niobate and lead scandium tantalate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, H.; Bursill, L.A

    1997-06-01

    A random filed Potts model is used to establish the spatial relationship between the nanoscale distribution of charges chemical defects and nanoscale polar domains for the perovskite-based relaxor materials lead magnesium niobate (PMN) and lead scandium tantalate (PST). The random fields are not set stochastically but are determined initially by the distribution of B-site cations (Mg, Nb) or (Sc, Ta) generated by Monte Carlo NNNI-model simulations for the chemical defects. An appropriate random field Potts model is derived and algorithms developed for a 2D lattice. It is shown that the local fields are strongly correlated with the chemical domain walls and that polar domains as a function of decreasing temperature is simulated for the two cases of PMN and PST. The dynamics of the polar clusters is also discussed. 33 refs., 9 figs.

  16. Modification of radiation sensitivity by salts of the metals beryllium and indium and the rare earths cerium, lanthanum and scandium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floersheim, G.L.

    1995-01-01

    The LD 50 of 46 salts of metals and rare earths (lanthanoids) was determined in mice. Half the LD 50 of the compounds was then combined with lethal radiation (10.5 Gy) and the modification of survival time was scored. Only the metals beryllium and indium and the rare earths cerium, lanthanum and scandium displayed activity in our assay. There were then tested at a wider range of lower doses and reduced survival time in a dose-dependent fashion. This appears to be compatible with enhancement of radiation sensitivity. The interaction of these metals and rare earths with radiation adds a new facet to their toxicological spectrum and, by enhancing radiation effects, may influence estimates of risk. On the other hand, radiosensitizing properties of the metals may be useful for further development of compounds to be used as adjuncts in specific situations of cancer radiotherapy. 31 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  17. Simulated Radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettler, James L.

    1972-01-01

    Describes the errors in the sugar-cube experiment related to radioactivity as described in Project Physics course. The discussion considers some of the steps overlooked in the experiment and generalizes the theory beyond the sugar-cube stage. (PS)

  18. Concentrating Radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Richard A.

    1974-01-01

    By concentrating radioactivity contained on luminous dials, a teacher can make a high reading source for classroom experiments on radiation. The preparation of the source and its uses are described. (DT)

  19. Radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grass, F.

    1982-01-01

    Following a definition of the term 'radioactive waste', including a discussion of possible criteria allowing a delimitation of low-level radioactive against inactive wastes, present techniques of handling high-level, intermediate-level and low-level wastes are described. The factors relevant for the establishment of definitive disposals for high-level wastes are discussed in some detail. Finally, the waste management organization currently operative in Austria is described. (G.G.)

  20. Radioactive pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, R.

    1987-01-01

    In the wake of the Chernobyl reactor accident on April 26, 1986, many individual values for radioactivity in the air, in foodstuffs and in the soil were measured and published. Prof. Dr. Rolf Steiner, Wiesbaden, the author of this paper, evaluated the host of data - mostly official pollution data -, drew conclusions regarding the radioactivity actually released at Chernobyl, and used the data to test the calculation model adotped by the Radiation Protection Ordinance. (orig./RB) [de

  1. Radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuis, M.C.

    2007-01-01

    Managing radioactive wastes used to be a peripheral activity for the French atomic energy commission (Cea). Over the past 40 years, it has become a full-fledged phase in the fuel cycle of producing electricity from the atom. In 2005, the national radioactive waste management agency (ANDRA) presented to the government a comprehensive overview of the results drawn from 15 years of research. This landmark report has received recognition beyond France's borders. By broadening this agency's powers, an act of 28 June 2006 acknowledges the progress made and the quality of the results. It also sets an objective for the coming years: work out solutions for managing all forms of radioactive wastes. The possibility of recovering wastes packages from the disposal site must be assured as it was asked by the government in 1998. The next step will be the official demand for the creation of a geological disposal site in 2016

  2. Quantitative determination of sediment movement at the landward spoil ground in the Yangtze Estuary with radioactive tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhangsu

    1993-01-01

    A radioactive tracer experiment was carried out at the landward spoil ground of the North Passage in the Yangtze Estuary in June of 1991. The scandium-46 was selected as the tracer, the total activity released is 17.95 x 10 10 Bq(4.85 Ci), the amount of the scandium-46 glass is 495 g. The purpose of the experiment is to determine the sediment movement direction, path, velocity and transport rate. The experiment provides the direct evidence for using the landward spoil ground in the future. The experiment results show the sediment movement was governed by the ebb tide current during the period of middle and neap tides when the radioactive tracer was injected both on the flood and ebb tides, and the sediment moved from the injection points to the middle of the North Passage near the navigation buoy No. 269. The direction of the sediment movement is 110 degree, the particle velocity is 758 m/d, and the sediment transport rate per unit width is 47.8 m 3 /md

  3. Study of strength properties of semi-finished products from economically alloyed high-strength aluminium-scandium alloys for application in automobile transport and shipbuilding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, Vladimir; Sidelnikov, Sergey; Zenkin, Evgeny; Frolov, Viktor; Voroshilov, Denis; Yakivyuk, Olga; Konstantinov, Igor; Sokolov, Ruslan; Belokonova, Irina

    2018-04-01

    The results of a study on the strength of rolled products from aluminium alloys doped with scandium under various processing conditions of hot and cold rolling are presented. The regularities of metal flow and the level of strength of deformed semi-finished products from aluminum-scandium alloys are established, depending on the total degree of deformation and the various modes of single reduction during rolling. It is shown that when using one heating of a cast billet to obtain high-quality semi-finished products, the temperature during the rolling process should not be lower than 350-370°, and the total degree of deformation does not exceed 50-60%. It was found that the semi-finished products from alloys with a content of scandium in the range 0.11-0.12% in the deformed state had elevated values of ultimate tensile strength and yield strength of the metal, which allows them to be recommended for industrial production of sheet metal products.

  4. Development of methods for the selective separation of scandium, zirconium and tin for radiopharmaceutical applications; Entwicklung von Methoden zur selektiven Trennung von Scandium, Zirkonium und Zinn fuer radiopharmazeutische Anwendungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dirks-Fandrei, Carina

    2014-07-01

    The subject of the present work is the development of fast and highly selective methods for the separation and purification of scandium, zirconium and tin radionuclides from potential target materials for use in nuclear medicine. A number of selected resins (TrisKem International) were first characterized with respect to their extraction behaviour towards a large number of cations. Characterization studies were performed in batch experiments by determination of weight distribution ratios D{sub w} and further the influence of interferences on the uptake of these elements was evaluated. Weight distribution ratios were determined in different acids and acid concentrations with main focus on scandium, tin or zirconium. The interference of macro amounts of Calcium and Ti on the Sc extraction was evaluated as well as the interference of macro amounts of Y on the Zr extraction. Best suited uptake conditions were found for Scandium on DGA were determined to be 2.5 M HNO{sub 3} for Ti-Targets and 0.1 M HNO{sub 3} for Calcium-Targets. Otherwise it is also possible to extract Sc with TRU Resin. High uptakes were obtained at 2.5 M HNO{sub 3} for simulated Ti- and Calcium-targets. Separation methods were developed using elution studies; employed conditions were chosen according to parameters evaluated in the batch-experiment. The developed methods allowed separating Sc very rapidly in high purity very rapidly from Ti- or Calcium-targets. For Zr a separation method based on UTEVA Resin has been developed. Following results of batch experiments simulated Y-target solution were loaded onto a UTEVA resin column from 6 M HNO{sub 3}; the elution of Zr could be performed in 0.01 M oxalic acid. Decontamination factors in the order of 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} could be obtained applying the developed method; the method thus allowed separating Zr in a high purity. Initial testing of a method for the separation of Sn from Cd targets based on the use of TBP Resin showed that the TBP resin seems

  5. Radioactivity measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohme, R.F.; Lazerson, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    A problem with ore sorting arrangements is that radiation is difficult to measure accurately while particles are moving at speed past the detector. This is particulary so when dealing with ores such as gold ores which have weak emissions. A method of measuring radioactive emissions from moving radioactive material includes the steps of shielding the radiation detector(s) so that the angle of acceptance of the receptor surface is restricted, and further shielding the shielded portion of the detector with a second material which is less radiation emissive than the material of the first shield. This second shield is between the first shield and the detector

  6. Synthesis and in vitro evaluation of no-carrier-added 2-(3-(4-(4-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzyl)piperazin-1-yl)propyl)benzo[d]thiazole, a potential dopamine D{sub 4} receptor radioligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Gu-Cai; Zhang, Ru [Hunan Institute of Engineering, Hunan Xiangtan (China). College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering; Xia, Jiao-yun [Changsha Univ. of Science and Technology (China). School of Chemistry and Biology Engineering

    2016-07-01

    The dopamine D{sub 4} receptor has been shown to play important roles in some central nervous system pathologies. Specific radioligands for the D{sub 4} receptor may be useful to understand the function of the D{sub 4} receptor and its correlations with various disorders. 2-(3-(4-(4-[{sup 18}F]Fluorobenzyl)piperazin-1-yl)propyl)benzo[d]thiazole ([{sup 18}F]4) was synthesized through a one-pot two-step procedure with total yield 18.6% (decay corrected). The specific activity of the radioligand was 112 GBq/μmol and its radiochemical purity was >95.0%. Its affinity and selectivity for dopamine D{sub 2}-like receptors were measured through in vitro receptor binding evaluation and the K{sub i} value for the D{sub 4} receptor was determined to be 2.9±0.2 nM, and its selectivity for the dopamine D{sub 4} receptor is 709-fold versus D{sub 2long} receptor, 823-fold versus D{sub 3} receptor. The partition coefficient (Log D) of it was determined to be 2.6±0.1 through octanol-water partition experiment. The ligand presents desirable combination of lipophilicity, affinity and selectivity for the dopamine D{sub 4} receptor. The results suggested that the radioligand shows promises for the in vivo study of the dopamine D{sub 4} receptor.

  7. Low temperature synthesis of no-carrier-added [{sup 11}C]formaldehyde with metal hydrides and preparation of [1-{sup 11}C]1,2,3,4-Tetrahydro-{beta}-Carboline Derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nader, M.W.; Zeisler, S.K.; Theobald, A.; Oberdorfer, F

    1998-12-01

    A comparative study has been performed on the selective reduction of cyclotron-produced [{sup 11}C]carbon dioxide to [{sup 11}C]formaldehyde with solutions of various complex metal hydrides at temperatures between -52 and +25 deg. C. Under optimal reaction conditions, lithium tetrahydridoaluminate gave the highest yield of [{sup 11}C]formaldehyde (58%, decay-corrected), followed by lithium triethylhydridoborate (34%) and sodium tetrahydridoborate (22%). Radiochemically pure [{sup 11}C]formaldehyde could be obtained with lithium tetrahydridoaluminate and sodium tetrahydridoborate, but not with lithium triethyl hydridoborate. The produced [{sup 11}C]formaldehyde was used for the synthesis of [1-{sup 11}C]1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-{beta}-carboline derivatives by the Pictet-Spengler reaction.

  8. Radioactive Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaylock, B. G.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of radioactive waste disposal, covering publications of 1976-77. Some of the studies included are: (1) high-level and long-lived wastes, and (2) release and burial of low-level wastes. A list of 42 references is also presented. (HM)

  9. Radioactivity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwach, G.

    1986-01-01

    This is an overview of radioactivity monitoring work done in the Austrian Research Centre Seibersdorf in the wake of the Chernobyl accident. It consists of air, rainwater, food and personnel monitoring. Additional services to the public are: information and development of a database and a computer code for predicting future radionuclide concentration in air, soil, water and food. (G.Q.)

  10. Disposal of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dlouhy, Z.

    1982-01-01

    This book provides information on the origin, characteristics and methods of processing of radioactive wastes, as well as the philosophy and practice of their storage and disposal. Chapters are devoted to the following topics: radioactive wastes, characteristics of radioactive wastes, processing liquid and solid radioactive wastes, processing wastes from spent fuel reprocessing, processing gaseous radioactive wastes, fixation of radioactive concentrates, solidification of high-level radioactive wastes, use of radioactive wastes as raw material, radioactive waste disposal, transport of radioactive wastes and economic problems of radioactive wastes disposal. (C.F.)

  11. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This eighth chapter presents the radioactive wastes and waste disposal; classification of radioactive wastes; basis requests of the radioactive waste management; conditions for a radioactive waste disposal; registers and inventories; transport of radioactive wastes from a facility to another and the radioactive waste management plan

  12. Radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkhout, F.

    1991-01-01

    Focusing on radioactive waste management and disposal policies in the United Kingdom, Sweden and the Federal Republic of Germany, this book gives a detailed historical account of the policy process in these three countries, and draws out the implications for theory and public policy. This comparative approach underlines how profoundly different the policy process has been in different countries. By comparing the evolution of policy in three countries, fundamental questions about the formation and resolution of technical decisions under uncertainty are clarified. The analysis of nuclear strategy, the politics of nuclear power, and the shifting emphasis of government regulation redefines the issue of radwaste management and sets it at the heat of the current debate about power, the environment and society. The combination of up-to-date technological assessment with an account of the social and political implications of radwaste management makes'Radioactive Waste'particularly useful to students of environmental studies, geography and public administration. (author)

  13. Radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkhout, F

    1991-01-01

    Focusing on radioactive waste management and disposal policies in the United Kingdom, Sweden and the Federal Republic of Germany, this book gives a detailed historical account of the policy process in these three countries, and draws out the implications for theory and public policy. This comparative approach underlines how profoundly different the policy process has been in different countries. By comparing the evolution of policy in three countries, fundamental questions about the formation and resolution of technical decisions under uncertainty are clarified. The analysis of nuclear strategy, the politics of nuclear power, and the shifting emphasis of government regulation redefines the issue of radwaste management and sets it at the heat of the current debate about power, the environment and society. The combination of up-to-date technological assessment with an account of the social and political implications of radwaste management makes'Radioactive Waste'particularly useful to students of environmental studies, geography and public administration. (author).

  14. Radioactive transformations

    CERN Document Server

    Rutherford, Ernest

    2012-01-01

    Radioactive Transformations describes Ernest Rutherford's Nobel Prize-winning investigations into the mysteries of radioactive matter. In this historic work, Rutherford outlines the scientific investigations that led to and coincided with his own research--including the work of Wilhelm Rӧntgen, J. J. Thomson, and Marie Curie--and explains in detail the experiments that provided a glimpse at special relativity, quantum mechanics, and other concepts that would shape modern physics. This new edition features a comprehensive introduction by Nobel Laureate Frank Wilczek which engagingly explains how Rutherford's early research led to a better understanding of topics as diverse as the workings of the atom's nucleus, the age of our planet, and the fusion in stars.

  15. Radioactive hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gill, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    The use of radioactive substances in hospital laboratories is discussed and the attendant hazards and necessary precautions examined. The new legislation under the Health and Safety at Work Act which, it is proposed, will replace existing legal requirements in the field of health and safety at work by a system of regulations and approved codes of practice designed to maintain or improve the standards of health, safety and welfare already established, is considered with particular reference to protection against ionising radiations. (UK)

  16. Radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, G.C.; Hyslop, C.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to show how to assess the detriment resulting from the release of radioactive materials to the environment. The minimum information required for the assessments is given for seven radionuclides of interest from the point of view of environmental contamination. The seven radionuclides are tritium, krypton-85, strontium-90, iodine-131, cesium-137, radium-226 and plutonium-239. Information is given on the radiation doses and the radiation effects on man due to these radioisotopes. (AN)

  17. Radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devarakonda, M.S.; Melvin, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper is part of the Annual Literature Review issue of Water Environment Research. The review attempts to provide a concise summary of important water-related environmental science and engineering literature of the past year, of which 40 separate topics are discussed. On the topic of radioactive wastes, the present paper deals with the following aspects: national programs; waste repositories; mixed wastes; waste processing and decommissioning; environmental occurrence and transport of radionuclides; and remedial actions and treatment. 178 refs

  18. Thermal, spectroscopic and laser properties of Nd3+ in gadolinium scandium gallium garnet crystal produced by optical floating zone method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Li; Wang, Shuxian; Wu, Kui; Wang, Baolin; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Cai, Huaqiang; Huang, Hui

    2013-12-01

    A neodymium-doped gadolinium scandium gallium garnet (Nd:GSGG) single crystal with dimensions of Φ 5 × 20 mm2 has been grown by means of optical floating zone (OFZ). X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) result shows that the as-grown Nd:GSGG crystal possesses a cubic structure with space group Ia3d and a cell parameter of a = 1.2561 nm. Effective elemental segregation coefficients of the Nd:GSGG as-grown crystal were calculated by using X-ray fluorescence (XRF). The thermal properties of the Nd:GSGG crystal were systematically studied by measuring the specific heat, thermal expansion and thermal diffusion coefficient, and the thermal conductivity of this crystal was calculated. The absorption and luminescence spectra of Nd:GSGG were measured at room temperature (RT). By using the Judd-Ofelt (J-O) theory, the theoretical radiative lifetime was calculated and compared with the experimental result. Continuous wave (CW) laser performance was achieved with the Nd:GSGG at the wavelength of 1062 nm when it was pumped by a laser diode (LD). A maximum output power of 0.792 W at 1062 nm was obtained with a slope efficiency of 11.89% under a pump power of 7.36 W, and an optical-optical conversion efficiency of 11.72%.

  19. Potential for photocatalytic degradation of the potassic diclofenac using scandium and silver modified titanium dioxide thin films; Potencial de degradacao fotocatalitica do diclofenaco potassico utilizando filmes finos de dioxido de titanio modificado com escandio e prata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciola, R.A.; Oliveira, C.T.; Lopes, S.A.; Cavalheiro, A.A., E-mail: rafaelciola@hotmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Mato Grosso do Sul (UFMS), Navirai, MS (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas Tecnologicas em Recursos Naturais

    2011-07-01

    The potential for photocatalytic degradation of the potassic diclofenac drug was investigated using titanium dioxide thin films modified with two modifier types, scandium and silver, both prepared by Sol-Gel method. It was demonstrated by UVVis spectroscopy analysis of the solutions containing the drug, under UV-A light irradiation that the degradation efficiency of the titanium dioxide photocatalyst is dependent of the semiconductor nature and that the scandium accelerates the first step of the degradation when compared to the silver. This result seems to be related to the redox potential of the electron-hole pair, once the scandium modifying sample generates a p type semiconductor that reduces the band gap. The extra holes attract more strongly the chorine ion present in diclofenac and leading to the releasing more easily. However, after the first byproducts degradation the following steps are not facilitated, making the silver modifying more advantageous. (author)

  20. Radioactivity telemetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouras, Florent; Legrand, Bernard; Montigaud, Jean-Marie; Grandin, Marc

    1969-05-01

    The authors present an assembly which aims at radio-transmitting from mobile stations information on radioactivity. It comprises 20 mobile stations which can be located within the Cadarache Centre or outside of it within a 10 km radius, and a central station which centralises information. The report proposes a general presentation of these stations, their characteristics and principles of operation. It describes operation sequences, central station functions (call programmer, address and memory management, recording, peripherals) and its energy supply, and mobile station functions. The last part presents the installation, its start-up and exploitation, its threshold devices and its safety device

  1. Environmental Radioactivity. Chapter 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhamat Omar; Ismail Sulaiman; Zalina Laili

    2015-01-01

    This chapter explains several things which consist radioactivity measurements, regular and high background radioactivity, radioactive contaminated soil and radioactivity in fertilizers, rocks, building materials, food, water, environments, sediments, flora and fauna. Besides, the natural radioactive gas concentration of radon and toron in the environment also been discussed specifically in this chapter.

  2. Radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straub, C.P.

    1975-01-01

    A review is presented on the environmental behavior of radioactive wastes. The management of high-level wastes and waste disposal methods were discussed. Some topics included were ore processing, coagulation, absorption and ion exchange, fixation, ground disposal, flotation, evaporation, transmutation and extraterrestrial disposal. Reports were given of the 226 Ra, 224 Ra and tritium activity in hot springs, 90 Sr concentrations in the groundwater and in White Oak Creek, radionuclide content of algae, grasses and plankton, radionuclides in the Danube River, Hudson River, Pacific Ocean, Atlantic Ocean, Lake Michigan, Columbia River and other surface waters. Analysis showed that 239 Pu was scavenged from Lake Michigan water by phytoplankton and algae by a concentration factor of up to 10,000. Benthic invertebrates and fish showed higher 239 Pu concentrations than did their pelagic counterparts. Concentration factors are also given for 234 Th, 60 Co, Fe and Mr in marine organisms. Two models for predicting the impact of radioactivity in the food chain on man were mentioned. In an accidental release from a light-water power reactor to the ocean, the most important radionuclides discharged were found to be 90 Sr, 137 Cs, 239 Pu and activation products 65 Zr, 59 Fe, and 95 Zr

  3. Determination of rare-earth elements, yttrium and scandium in manganese nodules by inductively-coupled argon-plastma emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, T.; Lamothe, P.J.; Pesek, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    A sequential-scanning, inductively-coupled argon plasma emission spectrometer is used for the determination of the rare-earth elements, plus yttrium and scandium, in manganese nodules. Wavelength selection is optimized to minimize spectral interferences from manganese nodule components. Samples are decomposed with mixed acids in a sealed polycarbonate vessel, and elements are quantified without further treatment. Results for U.S. Geological Survey manganese nodule standards A-1 and P-1 had average relative standard deviations of 6.8% and 8.1%, respectively, and results were in good agreement with those obtained by other methods. ?? 1984.

  4. Structural characteristics and physical properties of diortho(pyro)silicate crystals of lanthanides yttrium and scandium grown by the Czochralski technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anan' eva, G.V.; Karapetyan, V.E.; Korovkin, A.M.; Merkulyaeva, T.I.; Peschanskaya, I.A.; Savinova, I.P.; Feofilov, P.P. (Gosudarstvennyj Opticheskij Inst., Leningrad (USSR))

    1982-03-01

    Optically uniform monocrystals of diortho (pyro) silicates of lanthanides, yttrium, and scandium were grown by the Czochralski technique. Four structural types of Ln/sub 2/(Si/sub 2/O/sub 7/) crystals were determined by the roentgenographic method. The presence of structural subgroups was also supported by the method of spectroscopic probes. Structural parameters were determined and data on certain physical properties (fusion temperature, density, refractive indices, transparency) of investigated crystals were presented. The generation of induced emission at lambda=1.057 ..mu..m was obtained in La/sub 2/(Si/sub 2/O/sub 7/)-Nd/sup 3 +/ crystal.

  5. Scandium complexes: physico-chemical study and evaluation of stability in vitro and in vivo for nuclear medicine application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerdjoudj, Rabha

    2014-01-01

    Among the different isotopes of Scandium that can be used in nuclear medicine may be mentioned the 47 Sc and 44 Sc. The first decays by emitting an electron associated with a 159 keV gamma can thus be used either for radiotherapy or TEMP imaging. The 44 Sc (3.97 h) decays in 94.27% in case by emitting a positron, with a γ photon energy equal to 1.157 MeV. This isotope is then an ideal candidate for applications in PET imaging. Currently, the Cyclotron of high energy and high intensity ARRONAX produce 44 Sc and co-produces the isomeric state the 44m Sc (2.44 d). The 44m Sc has properties (E(γ) = 270 keV, 98.8%), which allows to consider its use as a potential in vivo generator. Previous work had demonstrated that the DOTA ligand is most suitable and stable for Sc. This thesis aims; make in evidence the feasibility of the in vivo 44m / 44 Sc generator. Initially a procedure was optimized and validated for the production of 44m / 44 Sc with a high specific activity and chemical purity. Radiolabeling of DOTA conjugated peptides was then developed and optimized. Theoretical and experimental studies have been performed in order to demonstrate the feasibility of 44m / 44 Sc as a potential in vivo generator. Finally, in vitro stability studies on radiolabeled 44m / 44 Sc complexes were performed, followed by biodistribution studies and PET imaging. (author)

  6. Radioactive colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergqvist, L.

    1987-01-01

    Different techniques for the characterization of radioactive colloids, used in nuclear medicine, have been evaluated and compared. Several radioactive colloids have been characterized in vitro and in vivo and tested experimentally. Colloid biokinetics following interstitial or intravenous injection were evaluated with a scintillation camera technique. Lymphoscintigraphy with a Tc-99-labelled antimony sulphur colloid was performed in 32 patients with malignant melanoma in order to evaluate the technique. Based on the biokinetic results, absorbed doses in tissues and organs were calculated. The function of the reticuloendothelial system has been evaluated in rats after inoculation with tumour cells. Microfiltration and photon correlation spectroscopy were found to be suitable in determining activity-size and particle size distributions, respectively. Maximal lymph node uptake following subcutaneous injection was found to correspond to a colloid particle size between 10 and 50 nm. Lymphoscintigraphy was found to be useful in the study of lymphatic drainage from the primary tumour site in patients with malignant melanoma on the trunk. Quantitative analysis of ilio-inguinal lymph node uptake in patients with malignant melanoma on the lower extremities was, however, found to be of no value for the detection of metastatic disease in lymph nodes. High absorbed doses may be received in lymph nodes (up to 1 mGy/MBq) and at the injection site (about 10 mGy/MBq). In an experimental study it was found that the relative colloid uptake in bone marrow and spleen depended on the total number of intravenously injected particles. This may considerably affect the absorbed dose in these organs. (author)

  7. Determination of scandium in acid mine drainage by ICP-OES with flow injection on-line preconcentration using oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerez, Javier; Isaguirre, Andrea C; Bazán, Cristian; Martinez, Luis D; Cerutti, Soledad

    2014-06-01

    An on-line scandium preconcentration and determination system implemented with inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry associated with flow injection was studied. Trace amounts of scandium were preconcentrated by sorption on a minicolumn packed with oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes, at pH 1.5. The retained analyte was removed from the minicolumn with 30% (v/v) nitric acid. A total enrichment factor of 225-fold was obtained within a preconcentration time of 300 s (for a 25 mL sample volume). The overall time required for preconcentration and elution of 25 mL of sample was about 6 min; the throughput was about 10 samples per hour. The value of the detection limit was 4 ng L(-1) and the precision for 10 replicate determinations at 100 ng L(-1) Sc level was 5% relative standard deviation, calculated from the peak heights obtained. The calibration graph using the preconcentration system was linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.9996 at levels near the detection limits up to at least 10 mg L(-1). After optimization, the method was successfully applied to the determination of Sc in an acid drainage from an abandoned mine located in the province of San Luis, Argentina. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of scandium and zirconium combination alloying on as-cast microstructure and mechanical properties of Al-4Cu-1.5Mg alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Qingchun

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The influences of minor scandium and zirconium combination alloying on the as-cast microstructure and mechanical properties of Al-4Cu-1.5Mg alloy have been experimentally investigated. The experimental results show that when the minor elements of scandium and zirconium are simultaneously added into the Al-4Cu-1.5Mg alloy, the as-cast microstructure of the alloy is effectively modified and the grains of the alloy are greatly refined. The coarse dendrites in the microstructure of the alloy without Sc and Zr additions are refined to the uniform and fine equiaxed grains. As the additions of Sc and Zr are 0.4% and 0.2%, respectively, the tensile strength, yield strength and elongation of the alloy are relatively better, which are 275.0 MPa, 176.0 MPa and 8.0% respectively. The tensile strength is increased by 55.3%, and the elongation is nearly raised three times, compared with those of the alloy without Sc and Zr additions.

  9. Synthesis, structures, and electroluminescent properties of scandium N,O-chelated complexes toward near-white organic light-emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katkova, Marina A; Balashova, Tatyana V; Ilichev, Vasilii A; Konev, Alexey N; Isachenkov, Nikolai A; Fukin, Georgy K; Ketkov, Sergey Yu; Bochkarev, Mikhail N

    2010-06-07

    Three members of a new class of electroluminescent, neutral, and monomeric scandium N,O-chelate complexes, namely, Sc(III)-tris-2-(2-benzoimidazol-2-yl)phenolate (1), Sc(III)-tris-2-(2-benzoxyazol-2-yl)phenolate (2), and Sc(III)-tris-2-(2-benzothiazol-2-yl)phenolate (3), have been prepared and X-ray characterized. DFT calculations have been performed. In contrast to the most frequently applied dual or multiple dopants in multilayer white OLED devices, all our simpler devices with the configuration of indium tin oxide/N,N'-bis(3-methylphenyl)-N,N'-diphenylbenzidine/neat scandium complex/Yb exhibit close to near-white emission with a blue hue (CIE(x,y) = 0.2147, 0.2379) in the case of 1, a cyan hue (0.2702, 0.3524) in the case of 2, and a yellowish hue (0.3468; 0.4284) in the case of 3.

  10. Environmental radioactivity. Measurement and monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-11-01

    The contribution on environmental radioactivity covers the following issues: natural and artificial radioactivity; continuous monitoring of radioactivity; monitoring authorities and measurement; radioactivity in the living environment; radioactivity in food and feeding stuff; radioactivity of game meat and wild-growing mushrooms; radioactivity in mines; radioactivity in the research center Rossendorf.

  11. Environmental radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Outline summary of a report prepared under contract to the DOE: Research Priorities and UK Estuaries: An Overview identifying Research Requirements. Topics considered include the study of radionuclides released into the NE Irish Sea from BNFL, Sellafields, differences in the isotopic composition of stable lead in various sediments, the concentration and distribution of 'hot particles' derived from BNFL in the Irish Sea and adjacent areas, together with attempts to separate hot particles from sediments, and the composition and properties of marine surfaces in relation to uptake and loss of radionuclides, particularly in relation to the common mussel, Mytilus edulis. The problem of the presence of transuranic radionuclides in the bottom sediments of the NE Irish Sea is considered. Profiles of radioactivity are being developed at the shelf-break in order to determine the transfer of radionuclides from the sea surface to the deep sea and to coastal waters; organisms examined include phytoplankton, zooplankton and crustacea (shrimps). Organisms such as Acantharia have been examined to determine transfer of elements and radionuclides to skeletal structures eg Sr, Ba and Si. (U.K.)

  12. Disposal of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomeke, J.O.

    1979-01-01

    Radioactive waste management and disposal requirements options available are discussed. The possibility of beneficial utilization of radioactive wastes is covered. Methods of interim storage of transuranium wastes are listed. Methods of shipment of low-level and high-level radioactive wastes are presented. Various methods of radioactive waste disposal are discussed

  13. Transport of radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-12-01

    The report on the transport of radioactive substances covers the following topics: facts on radioactive materials transport, safety of the transport of radioactive substances, legal regulations and guidelines: a multiform but consistent system, transport of nuclear fuels, safety during the transport of nuclear fuel, future transport of spent fuel elements and high-level radioactive wastes in Germany.

  14. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakami, Yutaka

    2008-01-01

    Radioactive waste generated from utilization of radioisotopes and each step of the nuclear fuel cycle and decommissioning of nuclear facilities are presented. On the safe management of radioactive waste management, international safety standards are established such as ''The Principles of Radioactive Waste Management (IAEA)'' and T he Joint Convention on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management . Basic steps of radioactive waste management consist of treatment, conditioning and disposal. Disposal is the final step of radioactive waste management and its safety is confirmed by safety assessment in the licensing process. Safety assessment means evaluation of radiation dose rate caused by radioactive materials contained in disposed radioactive waste. The results of the safety assessment are compared with dose limits. The key issues of radioactive waste disposal are establishment of long term national strategies and regulations for safe management of radioactive waste, siting of repository, continuity of management activities and financial bases for long term, and security of human resources. (Author)

  15. Radioactive pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohl, R.O.

    1976-01-01

    The widely published claims that the public health effects resulting from routine emissions are between 0.01 and 0.1 serious health effects per gigawattyear, and hence are at least a thousand times smaller than those resulting from air pollution by the burning of coal, cannot be true, for two reasons. The authors of these claims have ignored at least two of the more important isotopes, radon-222 and carbon-14, which are presently released to the environment, and thus contribute greatly to the health impact of nuclear energy. The health effects calculated in the earlier work cover only those which occur during the year in which the energy is generated. This means, figuratively speaking, that the authors have confused an annual installment payment with the full cost. This is unacceptable. The contribution to the health impact of nuclear energy arising from the single isotopic species radon-222 emanating from the mill tailings is estimated to 400 lung cancer deaths/GW(e)y, larger even than the most pessimistic estimates of the health impact of energy from coal through atmospheric pollution. We have no assurance that other long-lived isotopes do not contribute comparable amounts to the health impact of nuclear energy. The discussion of the health impact of radon-222 raises the fundamental moral question--how far into the future our responsibility extends. If such a long-termresponsibility is rejected, then we must at least try to predict the environmental buildup of radioactive pollutants, in order to avoid unacceptable and irreversible levels of radiation dose rate. The potential health consequences from long-lived radioisotopes seem to have been largely ignored so far, and should be explored in detail

  16. Natural atmospheric radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renoux, A.

    1986-01-01

    After having summed up the different old or new units, used in radioactivity and radioprotection, the origins of atmospheric radioactivity are reported. Next the authors deal with the air content in radon, thoron and their radioactive descendants, insisting on the variations of the radon air content and on the radioactive balance between radon and its descendants. Then a few notions concerning the natural radioactive aerosol are developed: electric charge state, granulometric distribution. The possible effects of natural atmospheric radioactivity on man are studied with a distinction between inner irradiation and outer irradiation, an average assessment is shown. Finally the important problem of radon in inhabitations is approached [fr

  17. Two anionically derivatized scandium oxoselenates(IV): ScF[SeO3] and Sc2O2[SeO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, Stefan; Chou, Sheng-Chun; Schleid, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    Scandium fluoride oxoselenate(IV) ScF[SeO3] and scandium oxide oxoselenate(IV) Sc2O2[SeO3] could be synthesized through solid-state reactions. ScF[SeO3] was obtained phase-pure, by reacting mixtures of Sc2O3, ScF3 and SeO2 (molar ratio: 1:1:3) together with CsBr as fluxing agent in corundum crucibles embedded into evacuated glassy silica ampoules after firing at 700 °C for seven days. Sc2O2[SeO3] first emerged as by-product during the attempts to synthesize ScCl[SeO3] following aforementioned synthesis route and could later be reproduced from appropriate Sc2O3/SeO3 mixtures. ScF[SeO3] crystallizes monoclinically in space group P21/m with a=406.43(2), b =661.09(4), c=632.35(4) pm, β=93.298(3)° and Z=2. Sc2O2[SeO3] also crystallizes in the monoclinic system, but in space group P21/n with a=786.02(6), b=527.98(4), c=1086.11(8) pm, β=108.672(3)° for Z=4. The crystal structures of both compounds are strongly influenced by the stereochemically active lone pairs of the ψ1-tetrahedral [SeO3]2- anions. They also show partial structures, where the derivatizing F- or O2- anions play an important role. For ScF[SeO3] chains of the composition 2+∞ 1[FS c 2 / 2 ] form from connected [FSc2]5+ dumbbells, while [OSc3]7+ pyramids and [OSc4]10+ tetrahedra units are condensed to layers according to 2+ ∞ 2[O2Sc2 ] in Sc2O2[SeO3].

  18. Radioactivity and geophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radvanyi, P.

    1992-01-01

    The paper recalls a few steps of the introduction of radioactivity in geophysics and astrophysics: contribution of radioelements to energy balance of the Earth, age of the Earth based on radioactive disintegration and the discovery of cosmic radiations

  19. Radioactive Waste Management Strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This strategy defines methods and means how collect, transport and bury radioactive waste safely. It includes low level radiation waste and high level radiation waste. In the strategy are foreseen main principles and ways of storage radioactive waste

  20. Radioactivity in consumer products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moghissi, A.A.; Paras, P.; Carter, M.W.; Barker, R.F. (eds.)

    1978-08-01

    Papers presented at the conference dealt with regulations and standards; general and biological risks; radioluminous materials; mining, agricultural, and construction materials containing radioactivity; and various products containing radioactive sources.

  1. Radioactivity of bone cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherer, M.A.; Winkler, R.; Ascherl, R.; Lenz, E.

    1993-01-01

    A total of 14 samples of different types of bone cement from five different manufacturers were examined for their radioactivity. Each of the investigated bone cements showed a low radioactivity level, i.e. between [de

  2. Immersed radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-03-01

    This document presents a brief overview of immersed radioactive wastes worldwide: historical aspects, geographical localization, type of wastes (liquid, solid), radiological activity of immersed radioactive wastes in the NE Atlantic Ocean, immersion sites and monitoring

  3. Transport of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuller, C.

    2003-01-01

    In this article author describes the system of transport and processing of radioactive wastes from nuclear power of Slovenske elektrarne, plc. It is realized the assurance of transport of liquid and solid radioactive wastes to processing links from places of their formation, or of preliminary storage and consistent transports of treated radioactive wastes fixed in cement matrix of fibre-concrete container into Rebublic storage of radioactive wastes in Mochovce

  4. Polarized secondary radioactive beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaika, N.I.

    1992-01-01

    Three methods of polarized radioactive nuclei beam production: a) a method nuclear interaction of the non-polarized or polarized charged projectiles with target nuclei; b) a method of polarization of stopped reaction radioactive products in a special polarized ion source with than following acceleration; c) a polarization of radioactive nuclei circulating in a storage ring are considered. Possible life times of the radioactive ions for these methods are determined. General schemes of the polarization method realizations and depolarization problems are discussed

  5. Management of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neerdael, B.; Marivoet, J.; Put, M.; Van Iseghem, P.; Volckaert, G.; Wacquier, W.

    1998-09-01

    The document gives an overview of of different aspects of radioactive waste management in Belgium. The document discusses the radioactive waste inventory in Belgium, the treatment and conditioning of radioactive waste as well as activities related to the characterisation of different waste forms. A separate chapter is dedicated to research and development regarding deep geological disposal of radioactive waste. In the Belgian waste management programme, particular emphasis is on studies for disposal in clay. Main results of these studies are highlighted and discussed

  6. Focus on radioactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, M

    1989-01-01

    Written for children, this book looks at the nature of radioactive materials, how they were discovered, what they are used for and how they affect the environment around us. The emphasis is on the benefits of radioactive materials, particularly in nuclear power stations, in medical diagnostics and radiotherapy, in industry and in agriculture. Nuclear fission and fusion are explained, how radioactive materials are handled and naturally occurring radioactivity are included. (UK).

  7. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balek, V.

    1994-01-01

    This booklet is a publication by International Atomic Energy Agency for general awareness of citizens and policy-makers to clarify their concept of nuclear wastes. In a very simple way it tells what is radioactivity, radiations and radioactive wastes. It further hints on various medial and industrial uses of radiations. It discusses about different types of radioactive wastes and radioactive waste management. Status of nuclear power plants in Central and Eastern European countries are also discussed

  8. Radioactive consumer products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Otomaru

    1981-01-01

    Present situation of utilizing the radioactive consumer products and exposure dose were reviewed with published data. Practically, consumer products are divided into three categories, (1) radioactive nuclides intentionally incorporated into radioluminous dye, ionization chambers for smoke detector, eliminator of static electricity, and glow lamp (2) natural radioactive nuclides contained in false teeth, porcelain, glass, and gas mantle (3) natural radioactive nuclides accumulated as industrial waste at the consumption of coal, petroleum, and natural gas or in fertilizer and materials for construction. (Nakanishi, T.)

  9. Aspects of radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutoiu, Dan

    2003-01-01

    The origin and types of radioactive waste, the objective and the fundamental principles of radioactive waste management and the classification of radioactive waste are presented. Problems of the radioactive waste management are analyzed. (authors)

  10. Understanding radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    This book discusses the sources and health effects of radioactive wastes. It reveals the techniques to concentrate and immobilize radioactivity and examines the merits of various disposal ideas. The book, which is designed for the lay reader, explains the basic science of atoms,nuclear particles,radioactivity, radiation and health effects

  11. Transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This ninth chapter presents de CNEN-NE--5.01 norm 'Transport of radioactive material'; the specifications of the radioactive materials for transport; the tests of the packages; the requests for controlling the transport and the responsibilities during the transport of radioactive material

  12. Radioactivity in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Illustrated by drawings, this publication briefly describes radioactive exposure modalities (external or internal irradiation), the ways they are measured and assessed (doses, units), the different natural radioactivity origins, the different radioactivity origins related to human activity, the share of each origin in population exposures

  13. Copper scandium zirconium phosphate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bond, Andrew David; Warner, Terence Edwin

    2013-01-01

    The title compound, with nominal formula Cu(2)ScZr(PO(4))(3), has a beige coloration and displays fast Cu(+) cation conduction at elevated temperatures. It adopts a NASICON-type structure in the space group R3c. The examined crystal was an obverse-reverse twin with approximately equal twin compon...

  14. Zeeman spectrum of scandium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lulu, B.A.

    1980-09-01

    The spectra of Sc I, Sc II, Sc III, and Sc IV are analyzed through the use of the Zeeman effect. A sliding spark of the author's design is used in conjunction with a 27 kilogauss electromagnet. The spectra have (reciprocal) dispersions of 0.2 to 0.5 A/mm. 10 Sc I levels, 16 Sc II levels and 5 Sc III levels show Zeeman splitting. No Sc IV Zeeman patterns were observed. 2 Sc I, 4 Sc II, and all of the Sc III level data are new

  15. Treating radioactive effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkham, I.A.

    1981-01-01

    In the treatment of radioactive effluent it is known to produce a floc being a suspension of precipitates carrying radioactive species in a mother liquor containing dissolved non-radioactive salts. It is also known and accepted practice to encapsulate the floc in a solid matrix by treatment with bitumen, cement and the like. In the present invention the floc is washed with water prior to encapsulation in the solid matrix whereby to displace the mother liquor containing the dissolved non-radioactive salts. This serves to reduce the final amount of solidified radioactive waste with consequent advantages in the storage and disposal thereof. (author)

  16. Radioactive waste management solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siemann, Michael

    2015-01-01

    One of the more frequent questions that arise when discussing nuclear energy's potential contribution to mitigating climate change concerns that of how to manage radioactive waste. Radioactive waste is produced through nuclear power generation, but also - although to a significantly lesser extent - in a variety of other sectors including medicine, agriculture, research, industry and education. The amount, type and physical form of radioactive waste varies considerably. Some forms of radioactive waste, for example, need only be stored for a relatively short period while their radioactivity naturally decays to safe levels. Others remain radioactive for hundreds or even hundreds of thousands of years. Public concerns surrounding radioactive waste are largely related to long-lived high-level radioactive waste. Countries around the world with existing nuclear programmes are developing longer-term plans for final disposal of such waste, with an international consensus developing that the geological disposal of high-level waste (HLW) is the most technically feasible and safe solution. This article provides a brief overview of the different forms of radioactive waste, examines storage and disposal solutions, and briefly explores fuel recycling and stakeholder involvement in radioactive waste management decision making

  17. Radioactivity and food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olszyna-Marzys, A.E.

    1990-01-01

    Two topics relating to radioactivity and food are discussed: food irradiation for preservation purposes, and food contamination from radioactive substances. Food irradiation involves the use of electromagnetic energy (x and gamma rays) emitted by radioactive substances or produced by machine in order to destroy the insects and microorganisms present and prevent germination. The sanitary and economic advantages of treating food in this way are discussed. Numerous studies have confirmed that under strictly controlled conditions no undesirable changes take place in food that has been irradiated nor is radioactivity induced. Reference is made to the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station, which aroused public concern about irradiated food. The events surrounding the accident are reviewed, and its consequences with regard to contamination of different foods with radioactive substances, particularly iodine-131 and cesium-137, are described. Also discussed are the steps that have been taken by different international organizations to set limits on acceptable radioactivity in food.15 references

  18. Radioactive air sampling methods

    CERN Document Server

    Maiello, Mark L

    2010-01-01

    Although the field of radioactive air sampling has matured and evolved over decades, it has lacked a single resource that assimilates technical and background information on its many facets. Edited by experts and with contributions from top practitioners and researchers, Radioactive Air Sampling Methods provides authoritative guidance on measuring airborne radioactivity from industrial, research, and nuclear power operations, as well as naturally occuring radioactivity in the environment. Designed for industrial hygienists, air quality experts, and heath physicists, the book delves into the applied research advancing and transforming practice with improvements to measurement equipment, human dose modeling of inhaled radioactivity, and radiation safety regulations. To present a wide picture of the field, it covers the international and national standards that guide the quality of air sampling measurements and equipment. It discusses emergency response issues, including radioactive fallout and the assets used ...

  19. ORNL radioactive waste operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sease, J.D.; King, E.M.; Coobs, J.H.; Row, T.H.

    1982-01-01

    Since its beginning in 1943, ORNL has generated large amounts of solid, liquid, and gaseous radioactive waste material as a by-product of the basic research and development work carried out at the laboratory. The waste system at ORNL has been continually modified and updated to keep pace with the changing release requirements for radioactive wastes. Major upgrading projects are currently in progress. The operating record of ORNL waste operation has been excellent over many years. Recent surveillance of radioactivity in the Oak Ridge environs indicates that atmospheric concentrations of radioactivity were not significantly different from other areas in East Tennesseee. Concentrations of radioactivity in the Clinch River and in fish collected from the river were less than 4% of the permissible concentration and intake guides for individuals in the offsite environment. While some radioactivity was released to the environment from plant operations, the concentrations in all of the media sampled were well below established standards

  20. Drainage of radioactive areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-04-01

    This Code of Practice covers all the drainage systems which may occur in the radioactive classified area of an establishment, namely surface water, foul, process and radioactive drainage. It also deals with final discharge lines. The Code of Practice concentrates on those aspects of drainage which require particular attention because the systems are in or from radioactive areas and typical illustrations are given in appendices. The Code makes references to sources of information on conventional aspects of drainage design. (author)

  1. Radioactivity and its measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Mann, W B; Garfinkel, S B

    1980-01-01

    Begins with a description of the discovery of radioactivity and the historic research of such pioneers as the Curies and Rutherford. After a discussion of the interactions of &agr;, &bgr; and &ggr; rays with matter, the energetics of the different modes of nuclear disintegration are considered in relation to the Einstein mass-energy relationship as applied to radioactive transformations. Radiation detectors and radioactivity measurements are also discussed

  2. Radioactive wastes and discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The guide sets out the radiation safety requirements and limits for the treatment of radioactive waste. They shall be observed when discharging radioactive substances into the atmosphere or sewer system, or when delivering solid, low-activity waste to a landfill site without a separate waste treatment plan. The guide does not apply to the radioactive waste resulting from the utilisation of nuclear energy or natural resources.

  3. Learning more about radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This digest brochure explains what radioactivity is, where it comes from, how it is measured, what are its effects on the body and the way to protect it against these effects, the uses of radioactivity (In the medical field, In industry, In the food industry, and In the cultural world). It ends with some examples of irradiation levels, of natural radioactivity and with the distribution in France of various sources of exposure. (J.S.)

  4. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Almost all IAEA Member States use radioactive sources in medicine, industry, agriculture and scientific research, and countries remain responsible for the safe handling and storage of all radioactively contaminated waste that result from such activities. In some cases, waste must be specially treated or conditioned before storage and/or disposal. The Department of Technical Co-operation is sponsoring a programme with the support of the Nuclear Energy Department aimed at establishing appropriate technologies and procedures for managing radioactive wastes. (IAEA)

  5. Handling of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanhueza Mir, Azucena

    1998-01-01

    Based on characteristics and quantities of different types of radioactive waste produced in the country, achievements in infrastructure and the way to solve problems related with radioactive waste handling and management, are presented in this paper. Objectives of maintaining facilities and capacities for controlling, processing and storing radioactive waste in a conditioned form, are attained, within a great range of legal framework, so defined to contribute with safety to people and environment (au)

  6. Radioactive wastes and discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The guide sets out the radiation safety requirements and limits for the treatment of radioactive waste. They shall be observed when discharging radioactive substances into the atmosphere or sewer system, or when delivering solid, low-activity waste to a landfill site without a separate waste treatment plan. The guide does not apply to the radioactive waste resulting from the utilisation of nuclear energy or natural resources

  7. Radioactive Waste Management Basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, B.K.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

  8. Radioactive Plumes Monitoring Simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapelushnik, I.; Sheinfeld, M.; Avida, R.; Kadmon, Y.; Ellenbogen, M.; Tirosh, D.

    1999-01-01

    The Airborne Radiation Monitoring System (ARMS) monitors air or ground radioactive contamination. The contamination source can be a radioactive plume or an area contaminated with radionuclides. The system is based on two major parts, an airborne unit carried by a helicopter and a ground station carried by a truck. The system enables real time measurement and analysis of radioactive plumes as well as post flight processing. The Radioactive Plumes Monitoring Simulator purpose is to create a virtual space where the trained operators experience full radiation field conditions, without real radiation hazard. The ARMS is based on a flying platform and hence the simulator allows a significant reduction of flight time costs

  9. Controlling radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurtinger, W.

    1992-01-01

    The guideline of the Ministry for Environmental Protection for controlling radioactive waste with a negligible development of heat defines in detail what data are relevant to the control of radioactive waste and should be followed up on and included in a system of documentation. By introducing the AVK (product control system for tracing the course of waste disposal) the operators of German nuclear power plants have taken the requirements of this guideline into account. In particular, possibilities for determining the degree of radioactivity of radioactive waste, which the BMU-guidelines call for, were put into practice by means of the programming technology of the product control system's module MOPRO. (orig.) [de

  10. Environmental radioactivity 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Environmental Radioactivity in New Zealand and Rarotonga : annual report 1996 was published in May this year. The 1996 environmental radioactivity monitoring programme included, as usual, measurements in New Zealand and the Cook Islands of atmospheric, deposited and dairy product radioactivity. The environment in the New Zealand and Cook Island regions has now virtually returned to the situation in the 'pre-nuclear' era. The contination of monitoring, although at a reduced level of intensity, is basically to ensure that any change from the present state, due to any source of radioactivity does not go undetected or unquestioned. (author)

  11. Radioactive Wastes. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Charles H.

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. This booklet deals with the handling, processing and disposal of radioactive wastes. Among the topics discussed are: The Nature of Radioactive Wastes; Waste Management; and Research and Development. There are…

  12. Radioactive waste disposal package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampe, Robert F.

    1986-11-04

    A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

  13. Radioactivity in cigaratte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uslu, I.; Tanker, E.; Aksu, M. L.

    1998-01-01

    Cigaratte is known to be hazardous to health due to nicotine and tar it contains.This is indicated on cigaratte packets by health warnings.However there is less known hazard of smoking due to intake of radioactive compounds by inhalation. This study dwells upon the radioactive hazard of smoking

  14. Transport of Radioactive Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This address overviews the following aspects: concepts on transport of radioactive materials, quantities used to limit the transport, packages, types of packages, labeling, index transport calculation, tags, labeling, vehicle's requirements and documents required to authorize transportation. These requirements are considered in the regulation of transport of radioactive material that is in drafting step

  15. Management of Radioactive Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tchokosa, P.

    2010-01-01

    Management of Radioactive Wastes is to protect workers and the public from the radiological risk associated with radioactive waste for the present and future. It application of the principles to the management of waste generated in a radioisotope uses in the industry. Any material that contains or is contaminated with radionuclides at concentrations or radioactivity levels greater than ‘exempt quantities’ established by the competent regulatory authorities and for which no further use is foreseen or intended. Origin of the Radioactive Waste includes Uranium and Thorium mining and milling, nuclear fuel cycle operations, Operation of Nuclear power station, Decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities and Institutional uses of isotopes. There are types of radioactive waste: Low-level Waste (LLW) and High-level Waste. The Management Options for Radioactive Waste Depends on Form, Activity, Concentration and half-lives of the radioactive waste, Storage and disposal methods will vary according to the following; the radionuclides present, and their concentration, and radio toxicity. The contamination results basically from: Contact between radioactive materials and any surface especially during handling. And it may occur in the solid, liquid or gas state. Decontamination is any process that will either reduce or completely remove the amount of radionuclides from a contaminated surface

  16. Induced radioactivity at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    1970-01-01

    A description of some of the problems and some of the advantages associated with the phenomenon of induced radioactivity at accelerator centres such as CERN. The author has worked in this field for several years and has recently written a book 'Induced Radioactivity' published by North-Holland.

  17. A Remote Radioactivity Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jona, Kemi; Vondracek, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Imagine a high school with very few experimental resources and limited budgets that prevent the purchase of even basic laboratory equipment. For example, many high schools do not have the means of experimentally studying radioactivity because they lack Geiger counters and/or good radioactive sources. This was the case at the first high school one…

  18. Radioactive waste management policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, R.W.

    1983-06-01

    The speaker discusses the development of government policy regarding radioactive waste disposal in Canada, indicates overall policy objectives, and surveys the actual situation with respect to radioactive wastes in Canada. He also looks at the public perceptions of the waste management situation and how they relate to the views of governmental decision makers

  19. Sealed radioactive sources toolkit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mac Kenzie, C.

    2005-09-01

    The IAEA has developed a Sealed Radioactive Sources Toolkit to provide information to key groups about the safety and security of sealed radioactive sources. The key groups addressed are officials in government agencies, medical users, industrial users and the scrap metal industry. The general public may also benefit from an understanding of the fundamentals of radiation safety

  20. K. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Radioactive waste management is a controversial and emotive subject. This report discusses radioactivity hazards which arise from each stage of the fuel cycle and then relates these hazards to the New Zealand situation. There are three appendices, two of which are detailed considerations of a paper by Dr. B.L.Cohen

  1. Radioactive krypton gas separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    Radioactive krypton is separated from a gas mixture comprising nitrogen and traces of carbon dioxide and radioactive krypton by selective adsorption and then cryogenic distillation of the prepurified gas against nitrogen liquid to produce krypton bottoms concentrate liquid, using the nitrogen gas from the distillation for two step purging of the adsorbent. 16 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures

  2. Objectives for radioactive waste packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flowers, R.H.

    1982-04-01

    The report falls under the headings: introduction; the nature of radioactive wastes; how to manage radioactive wastes; packaging of radioactive wastes (supervised storage; disposal); waste form evaluation and test requirements (supervised storage; disposal); conclusions. (U.K.)

  3. Radioactive Iodine Treatment for Hyperthyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Balance › Radioactive Iodine for Hyperthyroidism Fact Sheet Radioactive Iodine for Hyperthyroidism April, 2012 Download PDFs English Zulu ... prepare for RAI or surgery. How does radioactive iodine treatment work? Iodine is important for making thyroid ...

  4. Impact of layer and substrate properties on the surface acoustic wave velocity in scandium doped aluminum nitride based SAW devices on sapphire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillinger, M., E-mail: manuel.gillinger@tuwien.ac.at; Knobloch, T.; Schneider, M.; Schmid, U. [Institute of Sensor and Actuator Systems, TU Wien, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Shaposhnikov, K.; Kaltenbacher, M. [Institute of Mechanics and Mechatronics, TU Wien, 1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2016-06-06

    This paper investigates the performance of surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices consisting of reactively sputter deposited scandium doped aluminum nitride (Sc{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}N) thin films as piezoelectric layers on sapphire substrates for wireless sensor or for RF-MEMS applications. To investigate the influence of piezoelectric film thickness on the device properties, samples with thickness ranging from 500 nm up to 3000 nm are fabricated. S{sub 21} measurements and simulations demonstrate that the phase velocity is predominantly influenced by the mass density of the electrode material rather than by the thickness of the piezoelectric film. Additionally, the wave propagation direction is varied by rotating the interdigital transducer structures with respect to the crystal orientation of the substrate. The phase velocity is about 2.5% higher for a-direction compared to m-direction of the sapphire substrate, which is in excellent agreement with the difference in the anisotropic Young's modulus of the substrate corresponding to these directions.

  5. The effect of scandium addition on microstructure and mechanical properties of Al–Si–Mg alloy: A multi-refinement modifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Cong, E-mail: xucong55555@gmail.com [Key Laboratory of Aerospace Advanced Materials and Performance of Ministry of Education, School of Material Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Xiao, Wenlong, E-mail: wlxiao@buaa.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Aerospace Advanced Materials and Performance of Ministry of Education, School of Material Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Hanada, Shuji [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Yamagata, Hiroshi [Center for Advanced Die Engineering and Technology, Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu City, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan); Ma, Chaoli [Key Laboratory of Aerospace Advanced Materials and Performance of Ministry of Education, School of Material Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Effect of scandium (Sc) additions on the microstructure, mechanical properties and fracture behavior of Al–Si–Mg casting alloy (F357) were systematically investigated. It was found that Sc addition caused a multi-refining efficiency on the microstructure of as-cast F357 alloy, including refinement of grains and secondary dendrite arm spacing (SDAS), modification of eutectic Si and harmless disposal of β-Al{sub 5}FeSi phase. Subsequent T6 heat treatment had further induced the complete spheroidization of eutectic Si and precipitation of fine secondary Al{sub 3}Sc dispersoids in the Sc modified alloys. Thus the mechanical properties, especially the ductility, were significantly enhanced by the addition of Sc combined with the heat treatment. The highest ultimate tensile strength, yield strength and elongation were achieved in 0.8 wt.% Sc modified F357 alloy combined with T6 heat treatment. Furthermore, fractographic examinations indicated that the ductile fracture mechanism served as a dominate role in the modified alloys due to the formation of fine, deep and uniformly distributed dimples. - Highlights: • Detailed characterization of the multi-refining microstructure of Sc modified F357 alloy was performed. • The multi-refinement was proposed to refine grain and SDAS, modify eutectic Si and β-phase. • Sc modifier combined with T6 treatment is effective in improving tensile properties. • Modification of eutectic Si in F357 alloy with Sc is consistent with the IIT mechanism.

  6. Serum sample levels of bromine, iron, scandium and zinc in preschool children of Atayal and Bunun aborigines living in central Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chien-Yi Chen; Ding-Bang Lin; Yuan-Yaw Wei

    2006-01-01

    This study determined bromine, iron, scandium and zinc serum levels in Taiwanese aboriginal preschool children living in remote mountainous areas to increase the understanding of the social, cultural, nutrient and ethnic background of the Taiwanese children. Seventy-three serum samples were taken from two ethnic groups of preschool children, Atayal aborigines (AAPC) and Bunun aborigines (BAPC). Sera of these children were freeze dried. Trace elements in sera were identified by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). The accuracy and precision of INAA was evaluated using certified reference materials: Tomato Leaves (NIST-SRM 1570a) and Lichen (IAEA-336). Statistical analysis identified several different patterns for ethnic groups, gender and age via the two-tailed Student's t-test. Analytical results showed that the ranges of Br, Fe, Sc and Zn in sera were somewhat wide. The Zn serum levels (p < 0.05) and Br serum levels (p < 0.01) in the AAPC were significantly lower than those in the BAPC. However, there were no significant differences in Fe or Sc serum levels between the two groups. Analytical results were compared to published data for different counties. This study is the first investigating trace elements in Taiwanese aborigines and can be used to establish a much-needed serum element database. (author)

  7. Comparative microstructure and electrical property studies of lead scandium tantalate thin films as prepared by LDCVD, sol-gel and sputtering techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Z; Donohue, P P; Zhang, Q; Williams, D J; Anthony, C J; Whatmore, R W; Todd, M A

    2003-01-01

    Lead scandium tantalate (PST) thin films for uncooled infrared (IR) detector applications have been deposited by liquid delivery chemical vapour deposition (LDCVD), sputtering and sol-gel techniques. The sol-gel and sputtered films were deposited at low temperature into a non-ferroelectric phase with the required perovskite structure being formed using a high temperature rapid thermal anneal (RTA). In contrast to this, the LDCVD films were deposited at high temperature directly into the perovskite phase but were found to still require a high temperature RTA step to optimize their merit for IR detection. Detailed structural and electrical characterization of the PST films deposited by these different methods have revealed that there is no simple relationship between microstructure and electrical properties. The sol-gel and LDCVD techniques produce thin films with excellent microstructures, as determined by x-ray diffraction analysis and transmission electron microscopy, but inferior electrical properties and relatively low merit figures. By contrast, the sputtered and then rapid thermal annealed films have inferior microstructures, characterized by extensive voiding, but excellent electrical properties and high merit figures

  8. Comparative evaluation of surface topography of tooth prepared using erbium, chromium: Yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet laser and bur and its clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Mahesh; Kumari, Pooja; Gupta, Rekha; Gill, Shubhra; Gupta, Ankur

    2015-01-01

    Erbium, chromium: Yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet (Er, Cr: YSGG) laser has been successfully used in the ablation of dental hard and soft tissues. It has been reported that this system is also useful for preparing tooth surfaces and etching, but no consensus exist in the literature regarding the advantage of lasers over conventional tooth preparation technique. Labial surfaces of 25 extracted human maxillary central incisors were divided into two halves. Right half was prepared with diamond bur and left half with Er, Cr; YSGG laser and a reduction of 0.3-0.5 mm was carried out. Topography of prepared surfaces of five teeth were examined under scanning electron microscope (SEM). The remaining samples were divided into 4 groups of 10 specimens each based on the surface treatment received: One group was acid etched and other was nonetched. Composite resin cylinders were bonded on prepared surfaces and shear bond strength was assessed using a universal testing machine. The SEM observation revealed that the laser prepared surfaces were clean, highly irregular and devoid of a smear layer. Bur prepared surfaces were relatively smooth but covered with smear layer. Highest bond strength was shown by laser prepared acid etched group, followed by bur prepared the acid etched group. The bur prepared nonacid etched group showed least bond strength. Er, Cr: YSGG laser can be used for preparing tooth and bond strength value achieved by laser preparation alone without surface treatment procedure lies in the range of clinical acceptability.

  9. Aluminum-Scandium Alloys: Material Characterization, Friction Stir Welding, and Compatibility With Hydrogen Peroxide (MSFC Center Director's Discretionary Fund Final Report, Proj. No. 04-14)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. A.; Chen, P. S.

    2004-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum describes the development of several high-strength aluminum (Al) alloys that are compatible with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) propellant for NASA Hypersonic-X (Hyper-X) vehicles fuel tanks and structures. The yield strengths for some of these Al-magnesium-based alloys are more than 3 times stronger than the conventional 5254-H112 Al alloy, while maintaining excellent H2O2 compatibility similar to class 1 5254 alloy. The alloy development strategy is to add scandium, zirconium, and other transitional metals with unique electrochemical properties, which will not act as catalysts, to decompose the highly concentrated 90 percent H2O2. Test coupons are machined from sheet metals for H2O2 long-term exposure testing and mechanical properties testing. In addition, the ability to weld the new alloys using friction stir welding has also been explored. The new high-strength alloys could represent an enabling material technology for Hyper-X vehicles, where flight weight reduction is a critical requirement.

  10. Investigation of concentration-dependence of thermodynamic properties of lanthanum, yttrium, scandium and terbium in eutectic LiCl-KCl molten salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yafei; Zhou, Wentao; Zhang, Jinsuo, E-mail: zhang.3558@osu.edu

    2016-09-15

    Thermodynamic properties of rare earth metals in LiCl-KCl molten salt electrolyte are crucial to the development of electrochemical separation for the treatment of used nuclear fuels. In the present study, activity coefficient, apparent potential, and diffusion coefficient of lanthanum, yttrium, scandium, and terbium in the molten salt (58 at% LiCl and 42 at% KCl) were calculated by the method of molecular dynamics simulation up to a concentration around 3 at% at temperatures of 723 K and 773 K. It was found that the activity coefficient and the apparent potential increase with the species concentration while diffusion coefficient shows a trend of increase followed by decrease. The calculated results were validated by available measurement data of dilution cases. This research extends the range of data to a wide component and would provide further insight to the pyroprocessing design and safeguards. - Highlights: • Investigation of activity coefficient, apparent potential and diffusion coefficient at different concentrations. • MD simulation was studied for the calculation of thermodynamic properties of rare earth elements in molten salt. • The present study is a pioneering work focusing on the concentration dependence of thermodynamic properties.

  11. Radioactivity and wildlife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, V.H.; Horrill, A.D.; Livens, F.R.

    1990-01-01

    The official assumption is that if levels of radioactivity are safe for humans, they are safe for wildlife too. NCC sponsored a research project by the Institute of Terrestrial Ecology to find out what was known in this field. It appears that the assumption is justified to a certain extent in that mammals are identified as the organisms most vulnerable to the damaging effects of radioactivity. Other general principles are put forward: where there are radioactive discharges to the marine environment, coastal muds and saltmarshes can be particularly contaminated; upland habitats, with low nutrient status and subject to high rainfall, are likely to accumulate radioactivity from atmospheric discharges (e.g. Chernobyl, the wildlife effects of which are reported here). The document concludes that no deleterious effects of radioactivity on wild plants and animals have been detected in the UK, but acknowledges that there are still many gaps in our knowledge of the behaviour of radioisotopes in the natural environment. (UK)

  12. Radioactive wastes. Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillaumont, R.

    2001-01-01

    Many documents (journal articles, book chapters, non-conventional documents..) deal with radioactive wastes but very often this topic is covered in a partial way and sometimes the data presented are contradictory. The aim of this article is to precise the definition of radioactive wastes and the proper terms to describe this topic. It describes the main guidelines of the management of radioactive wastes, in particular in France, and presents the problems raised by this activity: 1 - goal and stakes of the management; 2 - definition of a radioactive waste; 3 - radionuclides encountered; 4 - radio-toxicity and radiation risks; 5 - French actors of waste production and management; 6 - French classification and management principles; 7 - wastes origin and characteristics; 8 - status of radioactive wastes in France per categories; 9 - management practices; 10 - packages conditioning and fabrication; 11 - storage of wastes; 12 - the French law from December 30, 1991 and the opportunities of new ways of management; 13 - international situation. (J.S.)

  13. EPA's Radioactive Source Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopsick, D.

    2004-01-01

    The US EPA is the lead Federal agency for emergency responses to unknown radiological materials, not licensed, owned or operated by a Federal agency or an Agreement state (Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan, 1996). The purpose of EPA's clean materials programme is to keep unwanted and unregulated radioactive material out of the public domain. This is achieved by finding and securing lost sources, maintaining control of existing sources and preventing future losses. The focus is on both, domestic and international fronts. The domestic program concentrates on securing lost sources, preventing future losses, alternative technologies like tagging of radioactive sources in commerce, pilot radioactive source roundup, training programs, scrap metal and metal processing facilities, the demolition industry, product stewardship and alternatives to radioactive devices (fewer radioactive source devices means fewer orphan sources). The international program consists of securing lost sources, preventing future losses, radiation monitoring of scrap metal at ports and the international scrap metal monitoring protocol

  14. Method of storing radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Toshio; Hiratake, Susumu.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the radiation doses externally irradiated from treated radioactive waste and also reduce the separation of radioactive nuclide due to external environmental factors such as air, water or the like. Method: Radioactive waste adhered with radioactive nuclide to solid material is molten to mix and submerge the radioactive nuclide adhered to the surface of the solid material into molten material. Then, the radioactive nuclide thus mixed is solidified to store the waste in solidified state. (Aizawa, K.)

  15. Consumer Products Containing Radioactive Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact Sheet Adopted: February 2010 Health Physics Society Specialists in Radiation Safety Consumer Products Containing Radioactive Materials Everything we encounter in our daily lives contains some radioactive material, ...

  16. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomek, D.

    1980-01-01

    The prospects of nuclear power development in the USA up to 2000 and the problems of the fuel cycle high-level radioactive waste processing and storage are considered. The problems of liquid and solidified radioactive waste transportation and their disposal in salt deposits and other geologic formations are discussed. It is pointed out that the main part of the high-level radioactive wastes are produced at spent fuel reprocessing plants in the form of complex aqueous mixtures. These mixtures contain the decay products of about 35 isotopes which are the nuclear fuel fission products, about 18 actinides and their daughter products as well as corrosion products of fuel cans and structural materials and chemical reagents added in the process of fuel reprocessing. The high-level radioactive waste management includes the liquid waste cooling which is necessary for the short and middle living isotope decay, separation of some most dangerous components from the waste mixture, waste solidification, their storage and disposal. The conclusion is drawn that the seccessful solution of the high-level radioactive waste management problem will permit to solve the problem of the fuel cycle radioactive waste management as a whole. The salt deposits, shales and clays are the most suitable for radioactive waste disposal [ru

  17. Radioactive Waste in Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Large volumes of hazardous wastes are produced each year, however only a small proportion of them are radioactive. While disposal options for hazardous wastes are generally well established, some types of hazardous waste face issues similar to those for radioactive waste and also require long-term disposal arrangements. The objective of this NEA study is to put the management of radioactive waste into perspective, firstly by contrasting features of radioactive and hazardous wastes, together with their management policies and strategies, and secondly by examining the specific case of the wastes resulting from carbon capture and storage of fossil fuels. The study seeks to give policy makers and interested stakeholders a broad overview of the similarities and differences between radioactive and hazardous wastes and their management strategies. Contents: - Foreword; - Key Points for Policy Makers; - Executive Summary; - Introduction; - Theme 1 - Radioactive and Hazardous Wastes in Perspective; - Theme 2 - The Outlook for Wastes Arising from Coal and from Nuclear Power Generation; - Risk, Perceived Risk and Public Attitudes; - Concluding Discussion and Lessons Learnt; - Strategic Issues for Radioactive Waste; - Strategic Issues for Hazardous Waste; - Case Studies - The Management of Coal Ash, CO 2 and Mercury as Wastes; - Risk and Perceived Risk; - List of Participants; - List of Abbreviations. (authors)

  18. Management of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendee, W.R.

    1984-01-01

    The disposal of radioactive wastes is perhaps the most controversial and least understood aspect of the use of nuclear materials in generating electrical power, the investigation of biochemical processes through tracer kinetics, and the diagnosis and treatment of disease. In the siting of nuclear power facilities, the disposal of radioactive wastes is invariably posed as the ultimate unanswerable question. In the fall of 1979, biochemical and physiologic research employing radioactive tracers was threatened with a slowdown resulting from temporary closure of sites for disposal of low-level radioactive wastes (LLW). Radioactive pharmaceuticals used extensively for diagnosis and treatment of human disease have increased dramatically in price, partly as a result of the escalating cost of disposing of radioactive wastes created during production of the labeled pharmaceuticals. These problems have resulted in identification of the disposal of LLW as the most pressing issue in the entire scheme of management of hazardous wastes. How this issue as well as the separate issue of disposal of high-level radioactive wastes (HLW) are being addressed at both national and state levels is the subject of this chapter

  19. Atmospheric natural radioactivity outdoors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renoux, A.

    1985-01-01

    Following a short account of natural atmospheric radioactivity, radon concentrations are given as well as their variations with time obtained by means of a original apparatus developped in Brest. The radioactive equilibrium of radon and its daughters is then considered, many experiments demonstrating that equilibrium is seldom reached even for 218 Po (RaA). Finally, some characteristics of natural radioactive aerosols are studied: charge, particle size distribution (demonstrating they are fine aerosols since only 30 per cent are made of particles with radii exceeding 0,1 μm) [fr

  20. Predisposal Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Recognition of the importance of the safe management of radioactive waste means that, over the years, many well-established and effective techniques have been developed, and the nuclear industry and governments have gained considerable experience in this field. Minimization of waste is a fundamental principle underpinning the design and operation of all nuclear operations, together with waste reuse and recycling. For the remaining radioactive waste that will be produced, it is essential that there is a well defined plan (called a waste treatment path) to ensure the safe management and ultimately the safe disposal of radioactive waste so as to guarantee the sustainable long term deployment of nuclear technologies

  1. Radioactive waste (disposal)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkin, P.

    1985-01-01

    The disposal of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes was discussed. The following aspects were covered: public consultation on the principles for assessing disposal facilities; procedures for dealing with the possible sites which the Nuclear Industry Radioactive Waste Executive (NIREX) had originally identified; geological investigations to be carried out by NIREX to search for alternative sites; announcement that proposal for a site at Billingham is not to proceed further; NIREX membership; storage of radioactive wastes; public inquiries; social and environmental aspects; safety aspects; interest groups; public relations; government policies. (U.K.)

  2. Radioactivity; La radioactivite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This pedagogical document presents the origin, effects and uses of radioactivity: where does radioactivity comes from, effects on the body, measurement, protection against radiations, uses in the medical field, in the electric power industry, in the food (ionization, radio-mutagenesis, irradiations) and other industries (radiography, gauges, detectors, irradiations, tracers), and in research activities (dating, preservation of cultural objects). The document ends with some examples of irradiation levels (examples of natural radioactivity, distribution of the various sources of exposure in France). (J.S.)

  3. Radioactive waste processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dejonghe, P.

    1978-01-01

    This article gives an outline of the present situation, from a Belgian standpoint, in the field of the radioactive wastes processing. It estimates the annual quantity of various radioactive waste produced per 1000 MW(e) PWR installed from the ore mining till reprocessing of irradiated fuels. The methods of treatment concentration, fixation, final storable forms for liquid and solid waste of low activity and for high level activity waste. The storage of radioactive waste and the plutonium-bearing waste treatement are also considered. The estimated quantity of wastes produced for 5450 MW(e) in Belgium and their destination are presented. (A.F.)

  4. Radioactive waste containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beranger, J.-C.

    1978-01-01

    The problem of confining the radioactive wastes produced from the nuclear industry, after the ore concentration stage, is envisaged. These residues being not released into the environment are to be stored. The management policy consists in classifying them in view of adapting to each type of treatment, the suitable conditioning and storage. This classification is made with taking account of the following data: radioactivity (weak, medium or high) nature and lifetime of this radioactivity (transuranians) physical nature and volume. The principles retained are those of volume reduction and shaping into insoluble solids (vitrification) [fr

  5. Radioactivity of fish II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obo, F; Wakamatsu, C; Hiwatashi, Y; Tamari, T; Yoshitake, N; Tajima, D

    1955-01-01

    Various tissues of fish captured east of Formosa after the Bikini H-Bomb experiment had radioactivities (detected on May 27, 1954) in counts/min/ash from 5 g. fresh tissues: blood 2414, eyeball 49, heart muscle 111, white muscle 11, red muscle (chiai) 123, bone 46, skin 28, pancreas 131, liver 522, stomach muscle 106, stomach contents 52, spermatozoa 47, and spleen 504. High radioactivities in blood and blood synthesizing organs (liver and spleen) were emphasized. The radioactivity in the blood had a half-life of 34 to 35 days and the maximum energy of ..beta..-ray of approximate 0.4 m.e.v.

  6. Radioactive facilities classification criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briso C, H.A.; Riesle W, J.

    1992-01-01

    Appropriate classification of radioactive facilities into groups of comparable risk constitutes one of the problems faced by most Regulatory Bodies. Regarding the radiological risk, the main facts to be considered are the radioactive inventory and the processes to which these radionuclides are subjected. Normally, operations are ruled by strict safety procedures. Thus, the total activity of the radionuclides existing in a given facility is the varying feature that defines its risk. In order to rely on a quantitative criterion and, considering that the Annual Limits of Intake are widely accepted references, an index based on these limits, to support decisions related to radioactive facilities, is proposed. (author)

  7. Radioactivity in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornaro, Laura

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this practical work is to familiarize the student with radioactivity measures in environmental samples. For that were chosen samples a salt of natural potassium, a salt of uranium or torio and a sample of drinkable water

  8. Radioactivity content of books

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalit, B.Y.; Shukla, V.K.; Ramachandran, T.V.

    1981-01-01

    The natural and fallout radioactivity was measured in a large number of books produced in various countries after 1955. Results of these measurements showed that the books contained radioactivity due to fallout 137 Cs and 226 Ra, 228 Th and 40 K radioisotopes of primordial origin. Books printed in the U.S.A. had low radioactivity of 40K and 226 Ra origin compared to books printed in the European subcontinent. Books printed during high fallout rate (1962-64) or thereafter did not exhibit any significantly higher 137 Cs levels. The maximum radiation dose to the eyes calculated for the radioactivity content of the books was 0.8 μR/hr and the minimum was 0.07 μR/hr; most of the books were in the range 0.3-0.5 μR/hr. (U.K.)

  9. Law of radioactive minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Legal device done in order to standardize and promote the exploration and explotation of radioactive minerals by peruvian and foreign investors. This device include the whole process, since the prospection until the development, after previous auction given by IPEN

  10. Radioactive contamination of environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chytil, I.

    1981-01-01

    A computer model is discussed describing radioactivity transport between the source and the organism. The model is to be applied in assessing the effect of a nuclear installation on the organism. Fortran and Pascal appear to be the most appropriate computer languages. With respect to internal memory requirements, the program file is estimated to consist of a control program and a number of subprograms. Upon setting the radioactivity transport and the output requirements the control program should recall the necessary subprograms. The program file should allow the complete data file and the solutions of all possible radioactivity transport variants to be inputted. It is envisaged that several subprograms will be available for one type of radioactivity transport, this depending on different accuracy of the transport description. Thus, the requirements for input data will also differ. (Z.M.)

  11. Radioactive labelling of insects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thygesen, Th.

    Experiments are described with the internal contamination of insects with phosphorus 32 introduced previously in plants of the brassica type using three different techniques. The intake of radioactivity from the plants to the insects is shown. (L.O.)

  12. Radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohm, H.; Closs, K.D.; Kuhn, K.

    1981-01-01

    The solutions to the technical problem of the disposal of radioactive waste are limited by a) the state of knowledge of reprocessing possibilites, b) public acceptance of the use of those techniques which are known, c) legislative procedures linking licensing of new nuclear power plants to the solution of waste problems, and d) other political constraints. Wastes are generated in the mining and enriching of radioactive elements, and in the operation of nuclear power plants as well as in all fields where radioactive substances may be used. Waste management will depend on the stability and concentration of radioactive materials which must be stored, and a resolution of the tension between numerous small storage sites and a few large ones, which again face problems of public acceptability

  13. Miniature radioactive light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffarella, T.E.; Radda, G.J.; Dooley, H.H.

    1980-01-01

    A miniature radioactive light source for illuminating digital watches is described consisting of a glass tube with improved laser sealing and strength containing tritium gas and a transducer responsive to the gas. (U.K.)

  14. Advance in radioactive decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basteris M, J. A.; Farrera V, R.

    2010-09-01

    The objective of the present work was to determine if the application of the Na hypochlorite has some utility in the radioactive decontamination, in comparison with the water, detergent and alcohol. Several methods were compared for decontaminate the iodine 131 and technetium 99, the work table and the skin it was carried out an initial count with the Geiger Muller. Later on, in a single occasion, the areas were washed with abundant water, alcohol, clothes detergent and sodium hypochlorite (used commercially as domestic bleacher) without diluting. Observing that the percentage in the decrease of the counted radioactivity by the Geiger Muller, decreased in the following way: It was demonstrated that the Na hypochlorite presents the highest index of radioactive decontamination with 100% of effectiveness. The Na hypochlorite is an excellent substance that can be used with effectiveness and efficiency like decontamination element in the accident cases of radioactive contamination in the clinical laboratories of nuclear medicine. (Author)

  15. Radioactive pollution, ch. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Disposal of radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants into surface waters as well as the atmosphere is discussed. Man-rem data are compared and expected quantities for disposal by power plants in the Netherlands are tabulated

  16. Radioactive Material Containment Bags

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    The audit was requested by Senator Joseph I. Lieberman based on allegations made by a contractor, Defense Apparel Services, about the Navy's actions on three contracts for radioactive material containment bags...

  17. Understanding radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, R.L.

    1981-12-01

    This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes)

  18. Radioactivity and environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivedi, R N [Fertilizer Association of India, New Delhi

    1977-12-01

    Power generation from radioisotopes is one of the major applications of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes and is in practice in over twenty countries including India. Other well-known applications of radioactive substances are in medicine, industry, scientific and industrial research programs, and nuclear weapons. The only serious disadvantage with the radioisotopes and their waste products is the constant release of radiation energy which contaminates the environment and endangers the life. An attempt has been made to identify the major sources of radioactivity in the environment and assess its potential impact on the environment. Recent developments in safety measures for prevention of contamination and control of radioactivity and in radioactive wastes management are also discussed.

  19. Classification of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Radioactive wastes are generated in a number of different kinds of facilities and arise in a wide range of concentrations of radioactive materials and in a variety of physical and chemical forms. To simplify their management, a number of schemes have evolved for classifying radioactive waste according to the physical, chemical and radiological properties of significance to those facilities managing this waste. These schemes have led to a variety of terminologies, differing from country to country and even between facilities in the same country. This situation makes it difficult for those concerned to communicate with one another regarding waste management practices. This document revises and updates earlier IAEA references on radioactive waste classification systems given in IAEA Technical Reports Series and Safety Series. Guidance regarding exemption of materials from regulatory control is consistent with IAEA Safety Series and the RADWASS documents published under IAEA Safety Series. 11 refs, 2 figs, 2 tab

  20. Radioactive wastes and discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    According to the Section 24 of the Finnish Radiation Decree (1512/91), the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety shall specify the concentration and activity limits and principles for the determination whether a waste can be defined as a radioactive waste or not. The radiation safety requirements and limits for the disposal of radioactive waste are given in the guide. They must be observed when discharging radioactive waste into the atmosphere or sewer system, or when delivering solid low-activity waste to a landfill site without a separate waste disposal plan. The guide does not apply to the radioactive waste resulting from the utilization of nuclear energy of natural resources. (4 refs., 1 tab.)

  1. Internal radioactive contamination treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobajas, L. M.

    1998-01-01

    In a radiological emergency, the internal radioactive contamination becomes a therapeutic urgency and must be established as fast as possible. Just when a radioactive contamination accident occurs, it is difficult to know exactly the amount of radioactive materials absorbed and to estimate the dose received.. The decision to be taken after the incorporation of the radioactive material depends on the method and on the Radiological Protection Department collaboration. Any treatment achieving a reduction of the doses received or expected will be useful. The International Radiological Protection Commission doesn't recommend the use of the dose limit, to decide about the intervention necessity. However the LIA can be used as the reference point to establish the necessity and reach of the treatment. The object of the present work, is to introduce the general principles to carry out the internal people decontamination, under the last international recommendations. (Author) 4 refs

  2. Understanding radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, R.L.

    1981-12-01

    This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes). (ATT)

  3. Radioactivity of tobacco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nashawati, A.; Al-Dalal, Z.; Al-Akel, B.; Al-Masri, M. S.

    2002-04-01

    This report shows the results of studies related to radioactivity in tobacco and its pathways to human being. Tobacco contains high concentrations of natural radioactive materials especially polonium 210 and lead 210, which may reach a value of 27 mBq/g. The amount of polonium 210 in tobacco is related to the concentration of radon (the main source of polonium 210 in the agricultural areas) in addition to the over use of phosphate fertilizers for tobacco plantation. Radioactive materials present in tobacco enter the human body through smoking where 210 Po concentrates in the Alveolar lung; this may cause health risks including lung cancer. In addition, radiation doses due to smoking have been reported and some results of the studies carried out for radioactivity in tobacco at the Syrian Atomic Energy Commission. (author)

  4. Radioactive pollution in rainfall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jemtland, R.

    1985-01-01

    Routine measurements of radioactivity in rainfall are carried out at the National Institute for Radiation Hygiene, Norway. The report discusses why the method of ion exchange was selected and gives details on how the measurements are performed

  5. Radioactive gas solidification apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Yoshihiro; Seki, Eiji; Yabu, Tomohiko; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki.

    1990-01-01

    Handling of a solidification container from the completion for the solidifying processing to the storage of radioactive gases by a remote control equipment such as a manipulator requires a great cost and is difficult to realize. In a radioactive gas solidification device for injection and solidification in accumulated layers of sputtered metals by glow discharge, radiation shieldings are disposed surrounding the entire container, and cooling water is supplied to a cooling vessel formed between the container and the shielding materials. The shielding materials are divided into upper and lower shielding materials, so that solidification container can be taken out from the shielding materials. As a result, the solidification container after the solidification of radioactive gases can be handled with ease. Further, after-heat can be removed effectively from the ion injection electrode upon solidifying treatment upon storage, to attain a radioactive gas solidifying processing apparatus which is safe, economical and highly reliable. (N.H.)

  6. Transporting radioactive rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearce, G.

    1990-01-01

    The case is made for exempting geological specimens from the IAEA Regulations for Safer Transport of Radioactive Materials. It is pointed out that many mineral collectors in Devon and Cornwall may be unwittingly infringing these regulations by taking naturally radioactive rocks and specimens containing uranium ores. Even if these collectors are aware that these rocks are radioactive, and many are not, few have the necessary equipment to monitor the activity levels. If the transport regulations were to be enforced alarm could be generated and the regulations devalued in case of an accident. The danger from a spill of rock specimens is negligible compared with an accident involving industrial or medical radioactive substances yet would require similar special treatment. (UK)

  7. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syed Abdul Malik Syed Zain

    2005-01-01

    This chapter discussed the basic subjects covered in the radioactive waste management. The subjects are policy and legislation, pre-treatment, classification, segregation, treatment, conditioning, storage, siting and disposal, and quality assurance

  8. Radioactivity of building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terpakova, E.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper the gamma-spectrometric determination of natural radioactivity in the different building materials and wares applied in Slovakia was performed. The specific activities for potassium-40, thorium, radium as well as the equivalent specific activities are presented

  9. Transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    The purpose of this Norm is to establish, relating to the TRANSPORT OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS, safety and radiological protection requirements to ensure an adequate control level of the eventual exposure of persons, properties and environment to the ionizing radiation comprising: specifications on radioactive materials for transport; package type selection; specification of the package design and acceptance test requirements; arrangements relating to the transport itself; administrative requirements and responsibilities. (author)

  10. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This book highlights the main issues of public concern related to radioactive waste management and puts them into perspective. It provides an overview of radioactive waste management covering, among other themes, policies, implementation and public communication based on national experiences. Its purpose is to assists in increasing the understanding of radioactive waste management issues by public and national authorities, organizations involved in radioactive waste management and the nuclear industry; it may also serve as a source book for those who communicate with the public. Even in the unlikely event that nuclear power does not further develop around the world, the necessity for dealing with nuclear waste from past usages, from uranium mining and milling, decontamination and decommissioning of existing nuclear facilities and from the uses of radioactive materials in medicine, industry and research would still exist. In many countries, radioactive waste management planning involves making effective institutional arrangements in which responsibilities and liabilities are well established for the technical operation and long term surveillance of disposal systems. Financing mechanisms are part of the arrangements. Continuous quality assurance and quality control, at all levels of radioactive waste management, are essential to ensure the required integrity of the system. As with any other human activity, improvements in technology and economics may be possible and secondary problems avoided. Improvements and confirmation of the efficiency of processes and reduction of uncertainties can only be achieved by continued active research, development and demonstration, which are the goals of many national programmes. International co-operation, also in the form of reviews, can contribute to increasing confidence in the ongoing work. The problem of radioactive wastes is not a unique one; it may be compared with other problems of toxic wastes resulting from many other

  11. Radioactivity in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Niello, Jorge

    2005-01-01

    The book summarizes general concepts on radiation, nuclear structure, radioactivity and the interaction of the nuclear radiation with matter. It describes also the basic principles of radio dosimetry. Natural and artificial sources of radiation are reviewed as well as the effects of radiation in man. Medical and industrial applications of ionizing radiation and the pollution produced by the discharge of radioactive materials are outlined. A short review is made of the safety rules and the regulations concerning the protection of the environment [es

  12. Foodstuffs (radioactive contamination)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Donald; Taylor, Teddy; Campbell-Savours, D.N.

    1987-01-01

    The proceedings are given of the debate in the UK House of Commons on the maximum permitted radioactivity levels for foodstuffs, feeding stuffs and drinking water in the case of abnormal levels of radioactivity or of a nuclear accident. The motion takes note of European Community Document no. 7183/87 and urges the Community to assure a common standard of health protection by adopting a rational set of scientifically based intervention levels for foodstuffs. (UK)

  13. Radiation and environmental radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhamat Omar; Ismail Sulaiman; Zalina Laili

    2015-01-01

    This book is written based on 25 years authors experience especially in scientifc research of radiation and environmental radioactivity field at Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuklear Malaysia). Interestingly, from the authors experience in managing the services and consultancies for radiological environmental monitoring, it is also helpful in preparing the ideas for this book. Although this book focuses on Malaysian radiation information environmental radioactivity, but the data collected by the international bodies are also included in this book.

  14. Environmental radioactivity Ispra 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominici, G.

    1988-01-01

    In this report there are briefly described the measurements of environmental radioactivity performed during 1987 by the site survey group of the Radioprotection Division at the Joint Research Centre Ispra Establishment. Data are given on the concentrations of Sr-90, Cs-137, and other radionuclides in precipitation, air, waters, herbage, milk and radioactive effluents. The environmental contamination is mainly a consequence of the nuclear accident of Chernobyl

  15. Radioactivity in fine papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, H.W.; Singh, B.

    1993-01-01

    The radioactivity of fine papers has been studied through γ-ray spectroscopy with an intrinsic Ge detector. Samples of paper from European and North American sources were found to contain very different amounts of 226 Ra and 232 Th. The processes which introduce radionuclides into paper are discussed. The radioactivity from fine papers makes only a small contribution to an individual's annual radiation dose; nevertheless it is easily detectable and perhaps, avoidable. (Author)

  16. Radioactive materials transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talbi, B.

    1996-01-01

    The development of peaceful applications of nuclear energy results in the increase of transport operations of radioactive materials. Therefore strong regulations on transport of radioactive materials turns out to be a necessity in Tunisia. This report presents the different axes of regulations which include the means of transport involved, the radiation protection of the carriers, the technical criteria of security in transport, the emergency measures in case of accidents and penalties in case of infringement. (TEC). 12 refs., 1 fig

  17. Temporary Personal Radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Fred

    2012-01-01

    As part of a bone scan procedure to look for the spread of prostate cancer, I was injected with radioactive technetium. In an effort to occupy/distract my mind, I used a Geiger counter to determine if the radioactive count obeyed the inverse-square law as a sensor was moved away from my bladder by incremental distances. (Contains 1 table and 2…

  18. Environmental radioactivity Ispra 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominici, G.

    1990-01-01

    In this report there are briefly described the measurements of environmental radioactivity performed during 1989 by the site survey group of the Radioprotection Division at the Joint Research Centre Ispra Establishment. Data are given on the concentrations of Sr-90, Cs-137, and other radionuclides in precipitation, air, waters, herbage, milk and radioactive effluents. The environmental contamination is mainly a consequence of the nuclear accident of Chernobyl

  19. Radioactive Substances Act 1960

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1960-01-01

    This Act regulates the keeping and use of radioactive material and makes provision for the disposal and storage of radioactive waste in the United Kingdom. It provides for a licensing system for such activities and for exemptions therefrom, in particular as concerns the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority. The Act repeals Section 4(5) of the Atomic Energy Authority Act, 1954 which made temporary provision for discharge of waste on or from premises occupied by the Authority. (NEA) [fr

  20. Radioactive aerosols. [In Russian

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natanson, G L

    1956-01-01

    Tabulations are given presenting various published data on safe atmospheric concentrations of various radioactive and non-radioactive aerosols. Methods of determination of active aerosol concentrations and dispersion as well as the technical applications of labeled aerosols are discussed. The effect of atomic explosions are analyzed considering the nominal atomic bomb based on /sup 235/U and /sup 232/Pu equivalent to 20,000 tons of TNT.

  1. Radioactivity and nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saas, A.

    1996-01-01

    Radioactive wastes generated by nuclear activities must be reprocessed using specific treatments before packaging, storage and disposal. This digest paper gives first a classification of radioactive wastes according to their radionuclides content activity and half-life, and the amount of wastes from the different categories generated each year by the different industries. Then, the radiotoxicity of nuclear wastes is evaluated according to the reprocessing treatments used and to their environmental management (surface storage or burial). (J.S.)

  2. Sellafield (release of radioactivity)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, J; Goodlad, A; Morris, M

    1986-02-06

    A government statement is reported, about the release of plutonium nitrate at the Sellafield site of British Nuclear Fuels plc on 5 February 1986. Matters raised included: details of accident; personnel monitoring; whether radioactive material was released from the site; need for public acceptance of BNFL activities; whether plant should be closed; need to reduce level of radioactive effluent; number of incidents at the plant.

  3. Radioactive certified reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Kazuo

    2010-01-01

    Outline of radioactive certified reference materials (CRM) for the analysis of nuclear materials and radioactive nuclides were described. The nuclear fuel CRMs are supplied by the three institutes: NBL in the US, CETAMA in France and IRMM in Belgium. For the RI CRMs, the Japan Radioisotope Association is engaged in activities concerning supply. The natural-matrix CRMs for the analysis of trace levels of radio-nuclides are prepared and supplied by NIST in the US and the IAEA. (author)

  4. Radioactive gold ring dermatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.A.; Aldrich, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    A superficial squamous cell carcinoma developed in a woman who wore a radioactive gold ring for more than 30 years. Only part of the ring was radioactive. Radiation dose measurements indicated that the dose to basal skin layer was 2.4 Gy (240 rad) per week. If it is assumed that the woman continually wore her wedding ring for 37 years since purchase, she would have received a maximum dose of approximately 4600 Gy

  5. On new ternary equiatomic scandium transition metal aluminum compounds ScTAl with T = Cr, Ru, Ag, Re, Pt, and Au

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radzieowski, Mathis; Janka, Oliver [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie; Benndorf, Christopher [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie; Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physikalische Chemie; Haverkamp, Sandra [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physikalische Chemie; Eckert, Hellmut [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physikalische Chemie; University of Sao Paulo, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. of Physics

    2016-08-01

    The new equiatomic scandium transition metal aluminides ScTAl for T = Cr, Ru, Ag, Re, Pt, and Au were obtained by arc-melting of the elements followed by subsequent annealing for crystal growth. The samples were studied by powder and single crystal X-ray diffraction. The structures of three compounds were refined from single crystal X-ray diffractometer data: ScCrAl, MgZn{sub 2} type, P6{sub 3}/mmc, a = 525.77(3), c = 858.68(5) pm, R{sub 1} = 0.0188, wR{sub 2} = 0.0485, 204 F{sup 2} values, 13 variables, ScPtAl, TiNiSi type, Pnma, a = 642.83(4), b = 428.96(2), c = 754.54(5) pm, R{sub 1} = 0.0326, wR{sub 2} = 0.0458, 448 F{sup 2} values, 20 variables and ScAuAl, HfRhSn type, P anti 62c, a = 722.88(4), c = 724.15(4) pm, R{sub 1} = 0.0316, wR{sub 2} = 0.0653, 512 F{sup 2} values, 18 variables. Phase pure samples of all compounds were furthermore investigated by magnetic susceptibility measurements, and Pauli-paramagnetism but no superconductivity was observed down to 2.1 K for all of them. The local structural features and disordering phenomena have been characterized by {sup 27}Al and {sup 45}Sc magic angle spinning (MAS) and static NMR spectroscopic investigations.

  6. Comparative study of the shear bond strength of composite resin bonded to enamel treated with acid etchant and erbium, chromium: Yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Sulaiman Alagl

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this investigation is in vitro comparison of the shear bond strength (SBS of composite resin bonded to enamel pretreated with an acid etchant against enamel etched with erbium, chromium: yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet (Er, Cr:YSGG laser. Materials and Methods: Sixty premolars were sectioned mesiodistally and these 120 specimens were separated into two groups of 60 each (Groups A and B. In Group A (buccal surfaces, enamel surface was etched using 37% phosphoric acid for 15 s. In Group B (lingual surfaces, enamel was laser-etched at 2W for 10 s by Er, Cr:YSGG laser operational at 2780 nm with pulse duration of 140 μs and a frequency of 20 Hz. After application of bonding agent on all test samples, a transparent plastic cylinder of 1.5 mm × 3 mm was loaded with composite and bonded by light curing for 20 s. All the samples were subjected to SBS analysis using Instron Universal testing machine. Failure modes were observed under light microscope and grouped as adhesive, cohesive, and mixed. Failure mode distributions were compared using the Chi-square test. Results: SBS values obtained for acid-etched enamel were in the range of 7.12–28.36 megapascals (MPa and for laser-etched enamel were in the range of 6.23–23.35 MPa. Mean SBS for acid-etched enamel was 15.77 ± 4.38 MPa, which was considerably greater (P < 0.01 than laser-etched enamel 11.24 ± 3.76 MPa. The Chi-square test revealed that the groups showed no statistically significant differences in bond failure modes. Conclusions: We concluded that the mean SBS of composite with acid etching is significantly higher as compared to Er, Cr: YSGG (operated at 2W for 10 s laser-etched enamel.

  7. Radioactivity in food crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drury, J.S.; Baldauf, M.F.; Daniel, E.W.; Fore, C.S.; Uziel, M.S.

    1983-05-01

    Published levels of radioactivity in food crops from 21 countries and 4 island chains of Oceania are listed. The tabulation includes more than 3000 examples of 100 different crops. Data are arranged alphabetically by food crop and geographical origin. The sampling date, nuclide measured, mean radioactivity, range of radioactivities, sample basis, number of samples analyzed, and bibliographic citation are given for each entry, when available. Analyses were reported most frequently for 137 Cs, 40 K, 90 Sr, 226 Ra, 228 Ra, plutonium, uranium, total alpha, and total beta, but a few authors also reported data for 241 Am, 7 Be, 60 Co, 55 Fe, 3 H, 131 I, 54 Mn, 95 Nb, 210 Pb, 210 Po, 106 Ru, 125 Sb, 228 Th, 232 Th, and 95 Zr. Based on the reported data it appears that radioactivity from alpha emitters in food crops is usually low, on the order of 0.1 Bq.g -1 (wet weight) or less. Reported values of beta radiation in a given crop generally appear to be several orders of magnitude greater than those of alpha emitters. The most striking aspect of the data is the great range of radioactivity reported for a given nuclide in similar food crops with different geographical origins

  8. The ''invisible'' radioactive scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoernstad, T.; Ramsoey, T.

    1999-04-01

    Production and up-concentration of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) in the petroleum industry has attracted steadily increasing attention during the last 15 years. Most production engineers today associate this radioactivity with precipitates (scales) and sludges in production tubing, pumps, valves, separators, settling tanks etc., wherever water is being transported or treated. 226 Ra and 228 Ra are the most well known radioactive constituents in scale. Surprisingly little known is the radioactive contamination by 210 Pb and progeny 210 Bi and 210 Po. These are found in combination with 226 Ra in ordinary scale, often in layer of non-radioactive metallic lead in water transportation systems, but also in pure gas and condensate handling systems ''unsupported'' by 226 Ra, but due to transportation and decay of the noble gas 222 Rn in NG/LNG. This latter contamination may be rather thin, in some cases virtually invisible. When, in addition, the radiation energies are low enough for not being detectable on the equipment outer surface, its existence has for most people in the industry been a secret. The report discusses transportation and deposition mechanisms, detection methods and provides some examples of measured results from the North Sea on equipment sent for maintenance. It is concluded that a regular measurement program for this type of contamination should be mandatory under all dismantling processes of transportation and fluid handling equipment for fluids and gases offshore and onshore

  9. Management on radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balu, K.; Bhatia, S.C.

    1979-01-01

    The basic philosophy governing the radioactive waste management activities in India is to concentrate and contain as much activity as possible and to discharge to the environment only such of these streams that have radioactive content much below the nationally and internationally accepted standards. The concept of ''Zero Release'' is also kept in view. At Tarapur, the effluents are discharged into coastal waters after the radioactivity of the effluents is brought down by a factor 100. The effluents fΩm Rajasthan reactors are discharged into a lake keeping their radioactivity well within permissible limits and a solar evaporation plant is being set up. The plant, when it becomes operational, will be a step towards the concept of ''Zero Release''. At Kalpakkam, the treated wastes are proposed to be diluted by circulating sea water and discharged away from the shore through a long pipe. At Narora, ion exchange followed by chemical precipitation is to be employed to treat effluents and solar evaporation process for total containment. Solid wastes are stored/dispsed in the concrete trenches, underground with the water proofing of external surfaces and the top of the trench is covered with concrete. Highly active wastes are stored/disposed in tile holes which are vaults made of steel-lined, reinforced concrete pipes. Gas cleaning, dilution and dispersion techniques are adopted to treat gaseous radioactive wastes. (M.G.B.)

  10. Radioactivity in food crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drury, J.S.; Baldauf, M.F.; Daniel, E.W.; Fore, C.S.; Uziel, M.S.

    1983-05-01

    Published levels of radioactivity in food crops from 21 countries and 4 island chains of Oceania are listed. The tabulation includes more than 3000 examples of 100 different crops. Data are arranged alphabetically by food crop and geographical origin. The sampling date, nuclide measured, mean radioactivity, range of radioactivities, sample basis, number of samples analyzed, and bibliographic citation are given for each entry, when available. Analyses were reported most frequently for /sup 137/Cs, /sup 40/K, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 226/Ra, /sup 228/Ra, plutonium, uranium, total alpha, and total beta, but a few authors also reported data for /sup 241/Am, /sup 7/Be, /sup 60/Co, /sup 55/Fe, /sup 3/H, /sup 131/I, /sup 54/Mn, /sup 95/Nb, /sup 210/Pb, /sup 210/Po, /sup 106/Ru, /sup 125/Sb, /sup 228/Th, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 95/Zr. Based on the reported data it appears that radioactivity from alpha emitters in food crops is usually low, on the order of 0.1 Bq.g/sup -1/ (wet weight) or less. Reported values of beta radiation in a given crop generally appear to be several orders of magnitude greater than those of alpha emitters. The most striking aspect of the data is the great range of radioactivity reported for a given nuclide in similar food crops with different geographical origins.

  11. Solvent extraction of anionic chelate complexes of lanthanum(III), europium(III), lutetium(III), scandium(III), and indium(III) with 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone as ion-pairs with tetrabutylammonium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noro, Junji; Sekine, Tatsuya.

    1992-01-01

    The solvent extraction of lanthanum(III), europium(III), lutetium(III), scandium(III), and indium(III) in 0.1 mol dm -3 sodium nitrate solutions with 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone (Htta) in the absence and presence of tetrabutylammonium ions (tba + ) into carbon tetrachloride was measured. The extraction of lanthanum(III), europium(III), and lutetium(III) was greatly enhanced by the addition of tba + ; this could be explained in terms of the extraction of a ternary complex, M(tta) 4 - tba + . However, the extractions of scandium(III) and indium(III) were nearly the same when tba + was added. The data were treated on the basis of the formation equilibrium of the ternary complex from the neutral chelate, M(tta) 3 , with the extracted ion-pairs of the reagents, tta - tba + , in the organic phase. It was concluded that the degree of association of M(tta) 3 with the ion-pair, tta - tba + , is greater in the order La(tta) 3 ≅ Eu(tta) 3 > Lu(tta) 3 , or that the stability of the ternary complex in the organic phase is higher in the order La(tta) 4 - tba + ≅ Eu(tta) 4 - tba + > Lu(tta) 4 - tba + . This is similar to those of adduct metal chelates of Htta with tributylphosphate (TBP) in synergistic extraction systems. (author)

  12. Transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-07-01

    The norm which establishes the requirements of radiation protection and safety related to the transport of radioactive materials, aiming to keep a suitable control level of eventual exposure of personnels, materials and environment of ionizing radiation, including: specifications on radioactive materials for transport, selection of package type; specification of requirements of the design and assays of acceptance of packages; disposal related to the transport; and liability and administrative requirements, are presented. This norm is applied to: truckage, water carriage and air service; design, fabrication, assays and mantenaince of packages; preparation, despatching, handling, loading storage in transition and reception in the ultimate storage of packages; and transport of void packages which have been contained radioactive materials. (M.C.K.) [pt

  13. Radioactive mixed waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jasen, W.G.; Erpenbeck, E.G.

    1993-02-01

    Various types of waste have been generated during the 50-year history of the Hanford Site. Regulatory changes in the last 20 years have provided the emphasis for better management of these wastes. Interpretations of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (AEA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA), and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) have led to the definition of radioactive mixed wastes (RMW). The radioactive and hazardous properties of these wastes have resulted in the initiation of special projects for the management of these wastes. Other solid wastes at the Hanford Site include low-level wastes, transuranic (TRU), and nonradioactive hazardous wastes. This paper describes a system for the treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) of solid radioactive waste

  14. Radioactive waste processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtiss, D.H.; Heacock, H.W.

    1976-01-01

    The description is given of a process for treating radioactive waste whereby a mud of radioactive waste and cementing material is formed in a mixer. This mud is then transferred from the mixer to a storage and transport container where it is allowed to harden. To improve transport efficiency an alkali silicate or an alkaline-earth metal silicate is added to the mud. For one hundred parts by weight of radioactive waste in the mud, twenty to one hundred parts by weight of cementing material are added and five to fifty parts by weight of silicate, the amount of waste in the mud exceeding the combined amount of cementing and silicate material [fr

  15. Doses from radioactive methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phipps, A.W.; Kendall, G.M.; Fell, T.P.; Harrison, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    A possible radiation hazard arises from exposure to methane labelled with either a 3 H or a 14 C nuclide. This radioactive methane could be released from a variety of sources, e.g. land burial sites containing radioactive waste. Standard assumptions adopted for vapours would not apply to an inert alkane like methane. This paper discusses mechanisms by which radioactive methane would irradiate tissues and provides estimates of doses. Data on skin thickness and metabolism of methane are discussed with reference to these mechanisms. It is found that doses are dominated by dose from the small fraction of methane which is inhaled and metabolised. This component of dose has been calculated under rather conservative assumptions. (author)

  16. Radioactivity - superstition and science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinsch, Hermann

    2010-01-01

    Fairy-tales, myths, superstition - how was it fair, when we could still be afraid for witches and goblins. Where demons floated and nicks danced, the dry science has spreaded and disenchanted the life. If there would not be things like radioactivity, against which can be struggled in the collective well being. Then it is bad, clear, or good, it heals sicks, also clear. But what is now correct? In his usual humorous way the author, Dr. Hermann Hinsch, explains by means of numerous examples the phenomenon ''radioactivity'' and its effects on life. Provocantly but illustratively he illuminates, which position radioactive radiation has in our life and how and where we have already met it wantedly or unwantedly. Perhaps we must then something less shudder, but something more realism at such theme is surely not harmful.

  17. Radioactivity of Consumer Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, David; Jokisch, Derek; Fulmer, Philip

    2006-11-01

    A variety of consumer products and household items contain varying amounts of radioactivity. Examples of these items include: FiestaWare and similar glazed china, salt substitute, bananas, brazil nuts, lantern mantles, smoke detectors and depression glass. Many of these items contain natural sources of radioactivity such as Uranium, Thorium, Radium and Potassium. A few contain man-made sources like Americium. This presentation will detail the sources and relative radioactivity of these items (including demonstrations). Further, measurements of the isotopic ratios of Uranium-235 and Uranium-238 in several pieces of china will be compared to historical uses of natural and depleted Uranium. Finally, the presenters will discuss radiation safety as it pertains to the use of these items.

  18. Trapping radioactive ions

    CERN Document Server

    Kluge, Heinz-Jürgen

    2004-01-01

    Trapping devices for atomic and nuclear physics experiments with radioactive ions are becoming more and more important at accelerator facilities. While about ten years ago only one online Penning trap experiment existed, namely ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN, meanwhile almost every radioactive beam facility has installed or plans an ion trap setup. This article gives an overview on ion traps in the operation, construction or planing phase which will be used for fundamental studies with short-lived radioactive nuclides such as mass spectrometry, laser spectroscopy and nuclear decay spectroscopy. In addition, this article summarizes the use of gas cells and radiofrequency quadrupole (Paul) traps at different facilities as a versatile tool for ion beam manipulation like retardation, cooling, bunching, and cleaning.

  19. Radioactive waste processing field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Minoru.

    1993-01-01

    Storing space for radioactive wastes (storage tunnels) are formed underground of the sea bottom along coast. A plurality of boreholes through which sea water flows are pored vertically in a direction intersecting underground streams of brine in the ground between the tunnels and seaside. Sea water introduction pipes are joined to the upper side walls of the boreholes. The sea water introduction pipes have introduction ports protruded under the sea level of the coastal sea area region. Since sea water flows from the introduction ports to the boreholes passing through the sea water introduction pipes, sea water is always filled in the boreholes. Therefore, brine is sufficiently supplied toward the land by sea water from the boreholes, the underground stream of brine is negligibly small. This can prevent radioactive contamination due to flow of the underground water when radioactive wastes are buried in the underground near coast. (I.N.)

  20. Disposal of Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This Safety Requirements publication applies to the disposal of radioactive waste of all types by means of emplacement in designed disposal facilities, subject to the necessary limitations and controls being placed on the disposal of the waste and on the development, operation and closure of facilities. The classification of radioactive waste is discussed. This Safety Requirements publication establishes requirements to provide assurance of the radiation safety of the disposal of radioactive waste, in the operation of a disposal facility and especially after its closure. The fundamental safety objective is to protect people and the environment from harmful effects of ionizing radiation. This is achieved by setting requirements on the site selection and evaluation and design of a disposal facility, and on its construction, operation and closure, including organizational and regulatory requirements.

  1. Reloadable radioactive generator system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colombetti, L.G.

    1977-01-01

    A generator system that can be reloaded with an elutable radioactive material, such as 99 molybdenum, a multiple number of times is described. The system basically comprises a column filled with alumina, a loading vial containing a predetermined amount of the elutable radioactive material, and a rinsing vial containing a sterile solution. The two vials are connected by a conduit so that when communication is achieved between the column and loading vial and an evacuated vial is placed in communication with the bottom of the column, the predetermined amount of the radioactive material in the loading vial will be transferred to the column. The procedure can be repeated as the elutable material in the column is dissipated

  2. Radioactive waste removing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Takuhiko.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To cleanup primary coolants for LMFBR type reactors by magnetically generating a high speed rotational flow in the flow of liquid metal, and adsorbing radioactive corrosion products and fission products onto capturing material of a complicated shape. Constitution: Three-phase AC coils for generating a rotational magnetic field are provided to the outside of a container through which liquid sodium is passed to thereby generate a high speed rotational stream in the liquid sodium flowing into the container. A radioactive substance capturing material made of a metal plate such as of nickel and stainless steel in the corrugated shape with shape edges is secured within a flow channel. Magnetic field at a great slope is generated in the flow channel by the capturing material to adsorb radioactive corrosion products and fission products present in the liquid sodium onto the capturing material and removing therefrom. This enables to capture the ferri-magnetic impurities by adsorption. (Moriyama, K.)

  3. Radioactive liquid containing vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurada, Tetsuo; Kawamura, Hironobu.

    1993-01-01

    Cooling jackets are coiled around the outer circumference of a container vessel, and the outer circumference thereof is covered with a surrounding plate. A liquid of good conductivity (for example, water) is filled between the cooling jackets and the surrounding plate. A radioactive liquid is supplied to the container vessel passing through a supply pipe and discharged passing through a discharge pipe. Cooling water at high pressure is passed through the cooling water jackets in order to remove the heat generated from the radioactive liquid. Since cooling water at high pressure is thus passed through the coiled pipes, the wall thickness of the container vessel and the cooling water jackets can be reduced, thereby enabling to reduce the cost. Further, even if the radioactive liquid is leaked, there is no worry of contaminating cooling water, to prevent contamination. (I.N.)

  4. Radioactivity leakage monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Takuichiro; Noguchi, Noboru.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain a device for detecting the leakage ratio of a primary coolant by utilizing the variation in the radioactivity concentration in a reactor container when the coolant is leaked. Constitution: A measurement signal is produced from a radioactivity measuring instrument, and is continuously input to a malfunction discriminator. The discriminator inputs a measurement signal to a concentration variation discriminator when the malfunction is recognized and simultaneously inputs a measurement starting time from the inputting time to a concentration measuring instrument. On the other hand, reactor water radioactivity concentration data obtained by sampling the primary coolant is input to a concentration variation computing device. A comparator obtains the ratio of the measurement signal from the measuring instrument and the computed data signal from the computing device at the same time and hence the leakage rate, indicates the average leakage rate by averaging the leakage rate signals and also indicates the total leakage amount. (Yoshihara, H.)

  5. Radioactivity in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valkovic, V.

    2000-01-01

    Numerous sources of ionizing radiation can lead to human exposure: natural sources, nuclear explosions, nuclear power generation, use of radiation in medical, industrial and research purposes, and radiation emitting consumer products. Before assessing the radiation dose to a population one requires a precise knowledge of the activity of a number of radionuclides. The basis for the assessment of the dose to a population from a release of radioactivity to the environment, the estimation of the potential clinical heath effects due to the dose received and, ultimately, the implementation of countermeasures to protect the population, is the measurement of radioactive contamination in the environment after the release. It is the purpose of this book to present the facts about the presence of radionuclides in the environment, natural and man made. There is no aspect of radioactivity, which has marked the passing century, not mentioned or discussed in this book. refs

  6. Trapping radioactive ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluge, H.-J.; Blaum, K.

    2004-01-01

    Trapping devices for atomic and nuclear physics experiments with radioactive ions are becoming more and more important at accelerator facilities. While about ten years ago only one online Penning trap experiment existed, namely ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN, meanwhile almost every radioactive beam facility has installed or plans an ion trap setup. This article gives an overview on ion traps in the operation, construction or planing phase which will be used for fundamental studies with short-lived radioactive nuclides such as mass spectrometry, laser spectroscopy and nuclear decay spectroscopy. In addition, this article summarizes the use of gas cells and radiofrequency quadrupole (Paul) traps at different facilities as a versatile tool for ion beam manipulation like retardation, cooling, bunching, and cleaning

  7. Handling of radioactive sources in Ecuador

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benitez, Manuel

    2000-01-01

    This document describes the following aspects: sealed and unsealed radioactive sources, radiation detectors, personnel and area monitoring, surface pollution, radioactive wastes control and radioactive sources transferring. (The author)

  8. Radioactive wastes of Nuclear Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This conference studies the radioactive waste of nuclear industry. Nine articles and presentations are exposed here; the action of the direction of nuclear installations safety, the improvement of industrial proceedings to reduce the waste volume, the packaging of radioactive waste, the safety of radioactive waste disposal and environmental impact studies, a presentation of waste coming from nuclear power plants, the new waste management policy, the international panorama of radioactive waste management, the international transport of radioactive waste, finally an economic analysis of the treatment and ultimate storage of radioactive waste. (N.C.)

  9. Radioactivity and Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez Leon, J.G.

    1993-01-01

    Radioactivity is one of the most studied natural phenomena. Most of irradiation suffered by the human being is produced by natural sources. The second source in order of importance is nuclear medicine. The average level of radiation received by the man is 2.4 mSv/year and this value can be modified naturally in 20-30%. The author provides a review on radioactivity sources like natural (cosmic rays, extraterrestrial radiation, internal earth radiation, radon) and artificial (Nuclear explosions, professional exposure, nuclear medicine, nuclear power plants and accidents)

  10. Transport of radioactive materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1960-04-15

    The increasing use of radioactive substances, not only in reactor operations but also in medicine, industry and other fields, is making the movement of these materials progressively wider, more frequent and larger in volume. Although regulations for the safe transport of radioactive materials have been in existence for many years, it has now become necessary to modify or supplement the existing provisions on an international basis. It is essential that the regulations should be applied uniformly by all countries. It is also desirable that the basic regulations should be uniform for all modes of transport so as to simplify the procedures to be complied with by shippers and carriers

  11. Radioactive wastes in Oklo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balcazar, M.; Flores R, J.H.; Pena, P.; Lopez, A.

    2006-01-01

    The acceptance of the Nuclear Energy as electric power supply implies to give answer to the population on the two main challenges to conquer in the public opinion: the nuclear accidents and the radioactive wastes. Several of the questions that are made on the radioactive wastes, its are the mobility migration of them, the geologic stability of the place where its are deposited and the possible migration toward the aquifer mantels. Since the half lives of the radioactive waste of a Nuclear Reactor are of several hundred of thousands of years, the technical explanations to the previous questions little convince to the public in general. In this work summary the results of the radioactive waste generated in a natural reactor, denominated Oklo effect that took place in Gabon, Africa, it makes several thousands of millions of years, a lot before the man appeared in the Earth. The identification of at least 17 reactors in Oklo it was carried out thanks to the difference in the concentrations of Uranium 235 and 238 prospective, and to the analysis of the non-mobility of the radioactive waste in the site. It was able by this way to determine that the reactors with sizes of hardly some decimeter and powers of around 100 kilowatts were operating in intermittent and spontaneous form for space of 150,000 years, with operation cycles of around 30 minutes. Recent studies have contributed information valuable on the natural confinement of the radioactive waste of the Oklo reactors in matrixes of minerals of aluminum phosphate that caught and immobilized them for thousands of millions of years. This extracted information from the nature contributes guides and it allows 'to verify' the validity of the current proposals on the immobilization of radioactive wastes of a nuclear reactor. This work presents in clear and accessible form to the public in general on the secure 'design', operation, 'decommissioning' and 'storage' of the radioactive waste of the reactors that the nature put

  12. Radioactive material generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czaplinski, T.V.; Bolter, B.J.; Heyer, R.E.; Bruno, G.A.

    1975-01-01

    A radioactive material generator includes radioactive material in a column, which column is connected to inlet and outlet conduits, the generator being embedded in a lead casing. The inlet and outlet conduits extend through the casing and are topped by pierceable closure caps. A fitting, containing means to connect an eluent supply and an eluate container, is adapted to pierce the closure caps. The lead casing and the fitting are compatibly contoured such that they will fit only if properly aligned with respect to each other

  13. Radioactive waste processing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakuramoto, Naohiko.

    1992-01-01

    When granular materials comprising radioactive wastes containing phosphorus are processed at first in a fluidized bed type furnace, if the granular materials are phosphorus-containing activated carbon, granular materials comprising alkali compound such as calcium hydroxide and barium hydroxide are used as fluidizing media. Even granular materials of slow burning speed can be burnt stably in a fluidizing state by high temperature heat of the fluidizing media, thereby enabling to take a long burning processing time. Accordingly, radioactive activated carbon wastes can be processed by burning treatment. (T.M.)

  14. Radioactive waste processing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Makoto; Kamiya, Kunio; Yusa, Hideo.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To form radioactive wastes into a pellet-like solid body having high strength. Structure: Liquid waste containing a radioactive material is heated into a powdery body. Granular solid matter such as sand greater in diameter than grain size of the powdery body are mixed into the powdery body, and thereafter the mixture is formed by a granulator into a pellet-like solid body. The thus formed material is introduced into a drum can, into which a thermoplastic material such as asphalt is poured into the can and cooled so that the asphalt is impregnated inside the pellet to obtain a solid having high strength. (Furukawa, Y.)

  15. Amersham's high radioactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caulkin, S

    1984-11-01

    An account is given of the history, organisation and work of Amersham International, to produce radioactive and other products for use in medical diagnosis and therapy, in research in the life sciences, and in industrial processes and control systems. The account covers the developments from the war-time work of Thorium Ltd., on naturally occurring radioactive materials, through the post-war expansion into the field of artificial radioisotopes, as the Radiochemical Centre (part of the UK Atomic Energy Authority), to the recent reorganisation and privatization. The width of the range of activities and products available is emphasised, with examples.

  16. Radioactive waste processing container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizaki, Kanjiro; Koyanagi, Naoaki; Sakamoto, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Ikuo.

    1992-01-01

    A radioactive waste processing container used for processing radioactive wastes into solidification products suitable to disposal such as underground burying or ocean discarding is constituted by using cements. As the cements, calcium sulfoaluminate clinker mainly comprising calcium sulfoaluminate compound; 3CaO 3Al 2 O 3 CaSO 4 , Portland cement and aqueous blast furnace slug is used for instance. Calciumhydroxide formed from the Portland cement is consumed for hydration of the calcium sulfoaluminate clinker. According, calcium hydroxide is substantially eliminated in the cement constituent layer of the container. With such a constitution, damages such as crackings and peelings are less caused, to improve durability and safety. (I.N.)

  17. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-07-01

    The purpose of this document is to set out the Government's current strategy for the long term in the management of radioactive wastes. It takes account of the latest developments, and will be subject to review in the light of future developments and studies. The subject is discussed under the headings: what are radioactive wastes; who is responsible; what monitoring takes place; disposal as the objective; low-level wastes; intermediate-level wastes; discharges from Sellafield; heat generating wastes; how will waste management systems and procedures be assessed; how much more waste is there going to be in future; conclusion. (U.K.)

  18. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morley, F.

    1980-01-01

    A summary is given of the report of an Expert Group appointed in 1976 to consider the 1959 White Paper 'The Control of Radioactive Wastes' in the light of the changes that have taken place since it was written and with the extended remit of examining 'waste management' rather than the original 'waste disposal'. The Group undertook to; review the categories and quantities present and future of radioactive wastes, recommend the principles for the proper management of these wastes, advise whether any changes in practice or statutory controls are necessary and make recommendations. (UK)

  19. Your radioactive garden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, W.G.

    1986-01-01

    The booklet on radiation risks from nuclear waste is based on lectures given by the author at Westminster School (United Kingdom) and elsewhere during 1986. A description is given of naturally-occurring radioactivity, and the health risks due to this radiation. The types of radioactive wastes produced by the nuclear industry are described, including low-level wastes, short-lived and long-lived intermediate-level wastes, and high level wastes. These wastes are discussed with respect to their potential health risks and their disposal underground. (U.K.)

  20. Amersham's high radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caulkin, S.

    1984-01-01

    An account is given of the history, organisation and work of Amersham International, to produce radioactive and other products for use in medical diagnosis and therapy, in research in the life sciences, and in industrial processes and control systems. The account covers the developments from the war-time work of Thorium Ltd., on naturally occurring radioactive materials, through the post-war expansion into the field of artificial radioisotopes, as the Radiochemical Centre (part of the UK Atomic Energy Authority), to the recent reorganisation and privatization. The width of the range of activities and products available is emphasised, with examples. (U.K.)

  1. Underground storage of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietz, D.N.

    1977-01-01

    An introductory survey of the underground disposal of radioactive wastes is given. Attention is paid to various types of radioactive wastes varying from low to highly active materials, as well as mining techniques and salt deposits

  2. Environmental Radioactivity, Temperature, and Precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riland, Carson A.

    1996-01-01

    Reports that environmental radioactivity levels vary with temperature and precipitation and these effects are due to radon. Discusses the measurement of this environmental radioactivity and the theory behind it. (JRH)

  3. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Y.S.; Saling, J.H.

    1990-01-01

    The purposes of the book are: To create a general awareness of technologies and programs of radioactive waste management. To summarize the current status of such technologies, and to prepare practicing scientists, engineers, administrative personnel, and students for the future demand for a working team in such waste management

  4. Radioactivity and foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olszyna Marzys, A.E.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe and contrast two relationships between radiation and food-on the one hand, beneficial preservation of food by controlled exposure to ionizing radiation; and, on the other, contamination of food by accidental incorporation of radioactive nuclides within the food itself. In food irradiation, electrons or electromagnetic radiation is used to destroy microorganisms and insects or prevent seed germination. The economic advantages and health benefits of sterilizing food in this manner are clear, and numerous studies have confirmed that under strictly controlled conditions no undesirable changes or induced radioactivity is produced in the irradiated food. An altogether different situation is presented by exposure of food animals and farming areas to radioactive materials, as occurred after the major Soviet nuclear reactor accident at Chernobyl. This article furnishes the basic information needed to understand the nature of food contamination associated with that event and describes the work of international organizations seeking to establish appropriate safe limits for levels of radioactivity in foods. 14 refs, 4 tabs

  5. Radioactive action code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    A new coding system, 'Hazrad', for buildings and transportation containers for alerting emergency services personnel to the presence of radioactive materials has been developed in the United Kingdom. The hazards of materials in the buildings or transport container, together with the recommended emergency action, are represented by a number of codes which are marked on the building or container and interpreted from a chart carried as a pocket-size guide. Buildings would be marked with the familiar yellow 'radioactive' trefoil, the written information 'Radioactive materials' and a list of isotopes. Under this the 'Hazrad' code would be written - three symbols to denote the relative radioactive risk (low, medium or high), the biological risk (also low, medium or high) and the third showing the type of radiation emitted, alpha, beta or gamma. The response cards indicate appropriate measures to take, eg for a high biological risk, Bio3, the wearing of a gas-tight protection suit is advised. The code and its uses are explained. (U.K.)

  6. Radioactivity and foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olszyna-Marzys, A.E.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe and contrast two relationships between radiation and food on the one hand, beneficial preservation of food by controlled exposure to ionizing radiation; and, on the other, contamination of food by accidental incorporation of radioactive nuclides within the food itself. In food irradiation, electrons or electromagnetic radiation is used to destroy microorganisms and insects or prevent seed germination. The economic advantages and health benefits of sterilizing food in this manner are clear, and numerous studies have confirmed that under strictly controlled conditions no undesirable changes or induced radioactivity is produced in the irradiated food. An altogether different situation is presented by exposure of food animals and farming areas to radioactive materials, as occurred after the major Soviet nuclear reactor accident at Chernobyl. This article furnishes the basic information needed to understand the nature of food contamination associated with that event and describes the work of international organizations seeking to establish appropriate safe limits for levels of radioactivity in foods

  7. Radioactivity and you

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    What does it mean when radiation levels are said to have risen? How do we measure radioactivity? Where do we get our exposure to radiation from? This programme, examines the risks we incur through radiation exposure, explains the basic science of radiation measurement, looks at the contributions of natural and man made sources. (author)

  8. SHIPPING OF RADIOACTIVE ITEMS

    CERN Multimedia

    TIS/RP Group

    2001-01-01

    The TIS-RP group informs users that shipping of small radioactive items is normally guaranteed within 24 hours from the time the material is handed in at the TIS-RP service. This time is imposed by the necessary procedures (identification of the radionuclides, determination of dose rate and massive objects require a longer procedure and will therefore take longer.

  9. Monitoring of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houriet, J.Ph.

    1982-08-01

    The estimation of risks presented by final disposal of radioactive wastes depends, among other things, on what is known of their radioisotope content. The first aim of this report is to present the current state of possibilities for measuring (monitoring) radionuclides in wastes. The definition of a global monitoring system in the framework of radioactive waste disposal has to be realized, based on the information presented here, in accordance with the results of work to come and on the inventory of wastes to be stored. Designed for direct measurement of unpackaged wastes and for control of wastes ready to be stored, the system would ultimately make it possible to obtain all adaquate information about their radioisotope content with regard to the required disposal safety. The second aim of this report is to outline the definition of such a global system of monitoring. Designed as a workbase and reference source for future work by the National Cooperative for the Storage of Radioactive Waste on the topic of radioactive waste monitoring, this report describes the current situation in this field. It also makes it possible to draw some preliminary conclusions and to make several recommendations. Centered on the possibilities of current and developing techniques, it makes evident that a global monitoring system should be developed. However, it shows that the monitoring of packaged wastes will be difficult, and should be avoided as far as possible, except for control measurements

  10. Transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenail, B.

    1984-01-01

    Transport of radioactive materials is dependent of transport regulations. In practice integrated doses for personnel during transport are very low but are more important during loading or unloading a facility (reactor, plant, laboratory, ...). Risks occur also if packagings are used outside specifications. Recommendations to avoid these risks are given [fr

  11. Environmental radioactivity in foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, E.; Jakubick, V.; Kalus, W.; Mueller, H.

    1978-01-01

    This part of the bibliography series, which has changed its name with issue no. 24 (formerly: 'Contamination and decontamination of foods') lists 208 pieces of literature, mainly of the last two years. The literature is classified according to the following main fields. General aspects, environmental radioactivity, radioecology, and radionuclides in foods. (MG) [de

  12. Fallout Radioactivity and Epiphytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. T. Odum; George Ann Briscoe; C. B. Briscoe

    1970-01-01

    After relatively high levels of fallout retention were dicovered in the epiphytic mossy forest of the Luquillo Mountains durin 1962, a survey of the distribution of radioactivity in the rain forest system was made with beta counting of 1500 samples supplemented with gamma spectra. High levels, up to 4138 counts per minute per gram, were found mainly in or on green...

  13. Radioactivity: A Natural Phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronneau, C.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is misinformation people have on the subject of radiation. The importance of comparing artificial source levels of radiation to natural levels is emphasized. Measurements of radioactivity, its consequences, and comparisons between the risks induced by radiation in the environment and from artificial sources are included. (KR)

  14. AIR RADIOACTIVITY MONITOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, R.L.; Thomas, J.W.

    1961-04-11

    The monitor is designed to minimize undesirable background buildup. It consists of an elongated column containing peripheral electrodes in a central portion of the column, and conduits directing an axial flow of radioactively contaminated air through the center of the column and pure air through the annular portion of the column about the electrodes. (AEC)

  15. Viewer Makes Radioactivity "Visible"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, L. I.

    1983-01-01

    Battery operated viewer demonstrates feasibility of generating threedimensional visible light simulations of objects that emit X-ray or gamma rays. Ray paths are traced for two pinhold positions to show location of reconstructed image. Images formed by pinholes are converted to intensified visible-light images. Applications range from radioactivity contamination surveys to monitoring radioisotope absorption in tumors.

  16. Radioactivity in foodstuffs 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The average intake of radioactivity via foodstuffs remained relatively constant at about 10000 Bq per annum during the entire period elapsing since the Chernobyl accident. However, the dose received by especially exposed population groups has been considerably higher. In particular, the intake of radioactivity through the consumption of reindeer meat and freshwater fish has been high among certain groups (hunters and angler, and Sami reindeer herdsmen in southern and mid-Norway). Studies show that their dietary radionuclide exposure was highest during the second year post Cernobyl. The existing intervention levels were also applied in 1989. These are, with the exception of the limit of 6000 Bq/kg for reindeer meat, game meat and freshwater fish, identical with the maximum levels laid down by the EC. The present report reviews the data concerning radioactivity levels in dairy products, meat and fish recorded during 1989. Overall, it may be concluded that levels were considerable lower than the previous year. An important reason for this was the almost complete absence, in outlying pastures, of various types of fungi eaten by grazing livestock, such fungi being a major source of radioactivity. 4 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Radioactive substance removing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Jun; Tayama, Ryuichi; Teruyama, Hidehiko; Hikichi, Takayoshi.

    1992-01-01

    If inert gases are jetted from a jetting device to liquid metals in a capturing vessel, the inert gases are impinged on the inner wall surface of the capturing vessel, to reduce the thickness of a boundary layer as a diffusion region of radioactive materials formed between the inner wall surface of the capturing vessel and the liquid metals. Further, a portion of the boundary layer is peeled off to increase the adsorption amount of radioactive materials by the capturing vessel. When the inert gases are jetted on the inner or outer circumference of the capturing vessel to rotate the capturing vessel, the flow of the liquid metals is formed along with the rotation, and the thickness of the boundary layer is reduced or the boundary layer is peeled off to increase the absorption amount of the radioactive materials. If gas bubbles are formed in the liquid metals by the inert gases, the liquid metals are stirred by the gas bubbles to reduce the thickness of the boundary layer or peel it off, thereby enabling to increase the adsorption amount of the radioactive materials. Since it is not necessary to pass through the rotational member to the wall surface of the vessel, safety and reliability can be improved. (N.H.)

  18. Sampling airborne radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, B.S.

    1988-01-01

    Radioactive contaminants have historically been considered apart from chemical contaminants because it is their radiological properties that determine their biological and environmental impact. Additionally they have been regulated by special government agencies concerned with radiological protection. Radioactive contaminants are also distinguished by the specialized and very sensitive methods available for the detection of radioactivity. Measurements of a few thousand atoms per liter are not uncommon. Radiation detectors in common use are gas filled chambers, scintillation and semiconductor detectors, and the more recently developed thermoluminescent and etched track detectors. Solid-state nuclear track detectors consist of a large group of inorganic and organic dielectrics which register tracks when traversed by heavy charged particles. They do not respond to light, beta particles or gamma ray photons and thus provide a very low background system for the detection of extremely low levels of radioactivity. In addition, no power source or electronic equipment is required. Cellulose nitrate detectors are currently in use for long term integrated sampling of environmental radon. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TID's) are crystalline materials, in which electrons which have been displaced by an interaction with ionizing radiation become trapped at an elevated energy level and emit visible light when released from that energy level. As which etched-track detectors no power or electronic equipment is needed for the TID's at a measurement site, but they respond to alpha, beta and gamma radiation. Thermoluminescent dosimeters are useful for long term environmental monitoring, and have also been newly incorporated into integrating radon detection systems

  19. Radioactive Sources Service

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    Please note that the radioactive sources service will be open by appointment only every Monday, Wednesday and Friday during CERN working hours (instead of alternate weeks). In addition, please note that our 2007 schedule is available on our web site: http://cern.ch/service-rp-sources

  20. Radioactive Substances Act 1948

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1948-01-01

    This Act regulates the use of radioactive substances and radiation producing devices in the United Kingdom. It provides for the control of import, export, sale, supply etc. of such substances and devices and lays down the safety regulations to be complied with when dealing with them. (NEA) [fr

  1. Encapsulation of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pordes, O.; Plows, J.P.

    1980-01-01

    A method is described for encapsulating a particular radioactive waste which consists of suspending the waste in a viscous liquid encapsulating material, of synthetic resin monomers or prepolymers, and setting the encapsulating material by addition or condensation polymerization to form a solid material in which the waste is dispersed. (author)

  2. Storage of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pittman, F.K.

    1974-01-01

    Four methods for managing radioactive waste in order to protect man from its potential hazards include: transmutation to convert radioisotopes in waste to stable isotopes; disposal in space; geological disposal; and surface storage in shielded, cooled, and monitored containers. A comparison of these methods shows geologic disposal in stable formations beneath landmasses appears to be the most feasible with today's technology. (U.S.)

  3. The radioactive paradise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heussler, H.

    1980-01-01

    Most of us will still remember with horror: In March 1954, a US H-bomb exploded directly over Bikini atoll. What has become of this island that used to be so romantic. And what has become of Eniwetok and all the small Robinson islands which are radioactive today. Can people live there again. A scientific investigation now destroys all illusions. (orig.) [de

  4. Radioactivity and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, J.; Kuczera, B.

    2001-05-01

    The terms radioactivity and nuclear energy, which have become words causing irritation in the political sphere, actually represent nothing but a large potential for innovative exploitation of natural resources. The contributions to this publication of the Karlsruhe Research Center examine more closely three major aspects of radioactivity and nuclear energy. The first paper highlights steps in the history of the discovery of radioactivity in the natural environment and presents the state of the art in health physics and research into the effects of exposure of the population to natural or artificial radionuclides. Following contributions focus on: Radiochemical methods applied in the medical sciences (diagnostic methods and devices, therapy). Nuclear energy and electricity generation, and the related safety policies, are an important subject. In this context, the approaches and pathways taken in the field of nuclear science and technology are reported and discussed from the angle of nuclear safety science, and current trends are shown in the elaboration of advanced safety standards relating to nuclear power plant operation and ultimate disposal of radioactive wastes. Finally, beneficial aspects of nuclear energy in the context of a sustainable energy policy are emphasized. In particular, the credentials of nuclear energy in the process of building an energy economy based on a balanced energy mix which combines economic and ecologic advantages are shown. (orig./CB) [de

  5. Environmental radioactivity in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, J.; Predmerszky, T.

    1979-01-01

    A comprehensive examination of radioactive contamination in air, soil, surface waters and food products, and of natural radioactiviy in air, soil, and building materials has been carried out. The investigated factors were as follows: a) air samples: yearly and monthly beta- and gamma activities of fallout, precipitation and aerosols in the period 1955-1976 in Budapest and some other towns; b) soil samples: 90 Sr concentration of soils of different quality and cultivation originating from sixteen regions of Hungary measured in the period 1974-1976; c) surface waters: annual mean beta activity of five rivers and of the Lake Balaton in the period 1965-1976, 3 H, 137 Cs and 90 Sr activity of the Danube in the year 1976; d) food products: radioactive contamination of spinach, lettuce and oxalis, originating from three different regions in the period 1959-1976 and mean radioactivity of fodder, corn, tobacco, milk, fish and animal bones in a period of 5-10 years; e) natural radioactivity: radon- and toron concentration of air, activity of 226 Ra fallout of the soil in the vicinity of power plants, 226 Ra, 228 Th and 40 K activity of different building materials, radiation doses inside buildings constructed by different technics. (L.E.)

  6. Radii of radioactive nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittig, W.; Plagnol, E.; Schutz, Y.

    1989-11-01

    A new simple direct method for the measurement of the total reaction cross section (σ R ) for several light radioactive nuclei (A≤40) is developed. From that, the reduced strong absorption radii (r o 2 ) are obtained. A comparison is made with data obtained by other techniques. A strong isospin dependence of the nuclear radii is observed. (L.C.) [pt

  7. MODEL RADIOACTIVE RADON DECAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.I. Parovik

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In a model of radioactive decay of radon in the sample (222Rn. The model assumes that the probability of the decay of radon and its half-life depends on the fractal properties of the geological environment. The dependencies of the decay parameters of the fractal dimension of the medium.

  8. Radioactivity in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costello, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Radioactivity is a natural phenomenon. Out of 1700 known isotopes of 104 chemical elements, only about 16 per cent are stable. Seventy-three radioactive isotopes of 39 elements occur naturally in the terrestrial environment. The significance of environmental radioactivity lies in the contribution to the annual exposure of the general population to ionising radiation. This exposure results largely from natural sources of radioactivity and radiation together with applications of radiation in medicine. Minor contributions are from nuclear weapons tests, nuclear power production and the nuclear fuel cycle, and consumer products including luminous clocks and watches, television receivers and smoke detectors. The natural background radiation level varies substantially with altitude and geographic location. Although no satisfactory evidence is available that natural variations in background radiation levels are detrimental to humans, upper limits of risk have been estimated for possible somatic and genetic effects from these levels of radiation. Contributory sources of and variability in the radiation background are reviewed and the relation between effective dose equivalent and associated detriment outlined. The risk from exposure to an average level of background radiation is compared with risks from other human activities

  9. Radioactivity in foodstuffs 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The average radioactivity dose level to which the Norwegian population was exposed through the ingestion of food in 1988 was between 0.10 and 0.15 mSv. This was about the same as in 1987. The radioactivity dose to which individuals with certain special dietary habits (large proportions of freshwater fish and reindeer meat in the diet) were exposed, was, however, up to three times higher in 1988 than in 1987. This was due firstly to the fact that reindeer meat which had been produced prior to the Chernobyl accident was no longer available, and secondly, to dietary advice not being followed as closely as before. The cost-benefit ratio of the measures introduced to reduce radioactivity levels in food, i.e. resources employed compared with the actual reduction in radioactivity levels achieved, has proved to be reasonably satisfactory, both in 1987 and 1988. Action levels and dietary advice remained unchanged in 1988. The present report summarizes results of analyses performed in 1988, and describes the measures introduced concerning various categorites of foods. Measures introduced were, as in 1987, primarily focused on the production of sheep meat (mutton/lamb) and on reindeer farming. 4 figs., 1 tab

  10. Lower fungi and radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamek, M.

    1989-01-01

    Sorption activities for radioactive elements were observed in molds Penicillinum muszynsky, Aspergillus versicolor and Alternaria tenius. Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus niger were isolated in laboratory and cultivated on a modified substrate containing uranyl nitrate and uranyl acetate. They were found to be capable of absorbing in the biomass some members of the uranium decay series. (E.J.). 4 tabs., 11 refs

  11. Radioactive waste management and regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willrich, M.

    1976-12-01

    The following conclusions are reached: (1) safe management of post-fission radioactive waste is already a present necessity and an irreversible long-term commitment; (2) basic goals of U.S. radioactive waste policy are unclear; (3) the existing organization for radioactive waste management is likely to be unworkable if left unchanged; and (4) the existing framework for radioactive waste regulation is likely to be ineffective if left unchanged

  12. The transport of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appleton, P.R.; Poulter, D.R.

    1989-01-01

    Regulations have been developed to ensure the safe transport of all radioactive materials by all modes (road, rail, sea and air). There are no features of radioactive waste which set it aside from other radioactive materials for transport, and the same regulations control all radioactive material transport. These regulations and their underlying basis are described in this paper, and their application to waste transport is outlined. (author)

  13. Sealed radioactive source management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Sealed radioactive sources have been used in a wide range of application in medicine, agriculture, geology, industry and other fields. Since its utilization many sources have become out of use and became waste but no proper management. This has lead to many accidents causing deaths and serious radiation injuries worldwide. Spent sources application is expanding but their management has seen little improvements. Sealed radioactive sources have become a security risk calling for prompt action. Source management helps to maintain sources in a good physical status and provide means of source tracking and control. It also provides a well documented process of the sources making any future management options safe, secure and cost effective. Last but not least good source management substantially reduces the risk of accidents and eliminates the risk of malicious use. The International Atomic Energy Agency assists Member States to build the infrastructure to properly manage sealed radioactive sources. The assistance includes training of national experts to handle, condition and properly store the sources. For Member States that do not have proper facilities, we provide the technical assistance to design a proper facility to properly manage the radioactive sources and provide for their proper storage. For Member States that need to condition their sources properly but don't have the required infrastructure we provide direct assistance to physically help them with source recovery and provide an international expert team to properly condition their sources and render them safe and secure. We offer software (Radioactive Waste Management Registry) to properly keep a complete record on the sources and provide for efficient tracking. This also helps with proper planning and decision making for long term management

  14. The radioactive earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plant, J.A.; Saunders, A.D.

    1996-01-01

    Uranium, thorium and potassium are the main elements contributing to natural terrestrial radioactivity. The isotopes 238 U, 235 U, 232 Th and 40 K decay with half-lives so long that significant amounts remain in the earth, providing a continuing source of heat. The slow decay of these isotopes also provides the basis for radiometric age dating and isotopic modelling of the evolution of the earth and its crust. There is a complex interplay between their heat production and the processes involved in crust formation. Phenomena such as volcanism, earthquakes, and large-scale hydrothermal activity associated with ore deposition reflect the dissipation of heat energy from the earth, much of which is derived from natural radioactivity. The higher levels of radioactive elements during the early history of the earth resulted in higher heat flow. All three of the radioactive elements are strongly partitioned into the continental crust, but within the crust their distribution is determined by their different chemical properties. The behaviour of U, which has two commonly occurring oxidation states, is more complex than that of Th and K. Uranium deposits are diverse, and are mostly associated with granites, acid volcanics, or detrital sedimentary rocks. The most important U deposits economically are unconformity-type ores of Proterozoic age, in which U is enriched by up to 5 x 10 6 with respect to bulk earth values. In some cases natural radioactivity can be of environmental concern. The most significant risk is posed by accumulations of radon, the gaseous daughter product of U. (author)

  15. Radioactive waste management in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paredes, L.; Reyes L, J.; Jimenez D, J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the radioactive waste management in Mexico, particularly the activities that the National Institute of Nuclear Research (NINR) is undertaking in this field. Classification and annual generation of radioactive waste, together with practices and facilities relating to the management of radioactive waste are addressed. The respective national legal framework and policy are outlined. (author)

  16. Fusion reactor radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaser, J.D.; Postma, A.K.; Bradley, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    Quantities and compositions of non-tritium radioactive waste are estimated for some current conceptual fusion reactor designs, and disposal of large amounts of radioactive waste appears necessary. Although the initial radioactivity of fusion reactor and fission reactor wastes are comparable, the radionuclides in fusion reactor wastes are less hazardous and have shorter half-lives. Areas requiring further research are discussed

  17. Radioactively labelled vitamin B12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlton, J.C.; Hamilton, A.L.

    1978-01-01

    The application concerns the manufacture of radioactive forms of vitamin B-12 in which the cobalt atom present in the vitamin B-12 molecule is replaced with a radioactive isotope of cobalt, usually cobalt-57 or cobalt-58. Such radioactive forms of B-12 are used extensively in the diagnosis of B-12 deficiency states

  18. Radioactive decay and labeled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    This chapter on radioactive decay and labeled compounds has numerous intext equations and worked, sample problems. Topics covered include the following: terms and mathematics of radioactive decay; examples of calculations; graphs of decay equations; radioactivity or activity; activity measurements; activity decay; half-life determinations; labeled compounds. A 20 problem set is also included. 1 ref., 4 figs., 1 tab

  19. Method for calcining radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjorklund, W.J.; McElroy, J.L.; Mendel, J.E.

    1979-01-01

    A method for the preparation of radioactive wastes in a low leachability form involves calcining the radioactive waste on a fluidized bed of glass frit, removing the calcined waste to melter to form a homogeneous melt of the glass and the calcined waste, and then solidifying the melt to encapsulate the radioactive calcine in a glass matrix

  20. Argentina's radioactive waste disposal policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios, E.

    1986-01-01

    The Argentina policy for radioactive waste disposal from nuclear facilities is presented. The radioactive wastes are treated and disposed in confinement systems which ensure the isolation of the radionucles for an appropriate period. The safety criteria adopted by Argentina Authorities in case of the release of radioactive materials under normal conditions and in case of accidents are analysed. (M.C.K.) [pt

  1. Natural radioactivity and public health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The radioactivity have been existing everywhere in the nature for the night of times. The most radioactive places such Guarapari in Brazil or Ramsar in Iran or springs of Bad Gastein in Austria do not reveal more cancers linked to radioactivity than everywhere else. Only the important radiation doses over 100 MSv received in one time are dangerous for health. (N.C.)

  2. Counting statistics in radioactivity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.

    1975-01-01

    The application of statistical methods to radioactivity measurement problems is analyzed in several chapters devoted successively to: the statistical nature of radioactivity counts; the application to radioactive counting of two theoretical probability distributions, Poisson's distribution law and the Laplace-Gauss law; true counting laws; corrections related to the nature of the apparatus; statistical techniques in gamma spectrometry [fr

  3. A radioactive controversy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engler, Veronica

    2002-01-01

    During 2002, the National Congress of Argentina began discussing the 'Agreement between the Republic of Argentina and Australia on cooperation in the peaceful uses of the nuclear energy'. This document has revived the debate regarding development of a national nuclear industry. The debate was spurred by a commercial contract signed in 2000 by INVAP, an Argentinean company who sold a nuclear reactor to the ANSTO, Australian Nuclear and Technology Organization. More than sixty non-governmental organizations are opposed to the ratification of the agreement, because they interpret that the text leaves the door wide open for the transport and deposit of Australian nuclear waste to Argentina, to be processed in national territory. Article 41 of the Argentinean National Constitution, explicitly prohibits the generation of any income from 'radioactive residues'. Those who support the agreement say that it does not promote the deposit of nuclear waste in Argentina, and argue that environmentalists are hampering efforts of this advanced technological industry to flourish in Argentina. The point of conflict in the agreement lies in article 12, which states that Argentina will continue the process of reactor-driven irradiated fuel outside Argentina. Once the treatment is completed, the fuel conditioned and the resulting waste must return to the country of origin for their storage. The possibility of spent fuel being sent to Argentina lies in the hypothetical case that the French company Cogema, which currently holds treatment responsibility, stops treatment sometime within the next fifteen years, when the fuel must be treated. The non-ratification of the agreement on Argentina part will not imply any sort of impediment in the realization of the reactor, it will only put on hold the possibility that the Australians spent fuels will complete treatment in Argentina. The constitutionality of the agreement lies in the question of waste, but this too is not a simple question. The

  4. Perspectives concerning radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noynaert, L.

    2013-01-01

    The article presents a general overview of the principles of radioactive waste management as established by the International Atomic Energy Agency. Subsequently, research and development related to radioactive waste management at the Belgian Nuclear Research Center SCK·CEN is discussed. Different topical areas are treated including radioactive waste characterisation, decontamination and the long-term management of radioactive waste. The decommissioning of the BR3 reactor and the construction and the exploitation of the underground research laboratory HADES are cited as examples of the pioneering role that SCK·CEN has played in radioactive waste management.

  5. Becquerel and natural origin radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    After a brief presentation of the Becquerel as radioactivity measurement unit, this document briefly explains the origin of natural radioactivity (Earth formation and cosmic rays), gives and comments the evolution of radioactivity of some radionuclides (U 238 and descendants, Th 232 and descendants, K 40 ) between 4.5 billions yeas ago and nowadays. It also gives assessments of natural radioactivity due to radon in the atmosphere and in the soil, of natural radioactivity in building materials, coals, ashes, seawater and food. Some remarkable figures are then given

  6. Dynamics of radioactive waste generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogaru, Daniela; Virtopeanu, Cornelia; Ivan, Alexandrina

    2008-01-01

    In Romania there are in operation three facilities licensed for collection, treatment and storage of radioactive waste resulted from industry, research, medicine, and agriculture, named institutional radioactive waste. The repository, which is of near surface type, is designed for disposing institutional radioactive waste. The institutional radioactive wastes generated are allowed to be disposed into repository according to the waste acceptance criteria, defined for the disposal facility. The radioactive wastes which are not allowed for disposal are stored on the site of each facility which is special authorised for this. The paper describes the dynamics of generation of institutional waste in Romania, both for radioactive waste which are allowed to be disposed into repository and for radioactive waste which are not allowed to be disposed of. (authors)

  7. Decontaminating method for radioactive contaminant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Ken-ichi.

    1994-01-01

    After decontamination of radioactive contaminates with d-limonene, a radioactive material separating agent not compatible with liquid wastes caused by decontamination is added to the liquid wastes. Then after stirring, they are stood still to be separated into two phases, and the radioactive materials in the liquid waste phase caused by decontamination are transferred to the phase of the radioactive material separating agent. With such procedures, they can satisfactorily be separated into two phases of d-limonene and the radioactive material separating agent. Further, d-limonene remaining after the separation can be used again as a decontaminating agent for radioactive contaminates. Therefore, the amount of d-limonene to be used can be reduced, to lower the cost for cleaning, thereby enabling to reduce the amount of radioactive wastes formed. (T.M.)

  8. Ventilation of radioactive enclosures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caminade, F.; Laurent, H.

    1957-01-01

    Mechanical, physical and chemical manipulations on radioactive products must be carried out in properly ventilated enclosed places. The air extracted can only be discharged into the atmosphere after a correct filtration. The power of the ventilation systems is a function of the dimensions and purpose of the enclosure? The choice of types of filter is determined by the physical state and chemical nature of the radioactive materials to be manipulated. This study deals with the individual equipment of small installations: glove boxes, manipulation boxes with outside control and, if necessary, production chambers (maximum useful volume: 5 m 3 ). The performances of three types of 'ventilators', and the modifications provided by the addition of filters, are measured and compared. (author) [fr

  9. Microfiltration of radioactive contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, L P; Slade, J A; Vijayan, S; Wong, C F

    1993-04-01

    Cross-flow microfiltration processing of radioactive liquids has been in use at Chalk River Laboratories for about four years. The separation process removes suspended particles from radioactive waste solutions. The clean liquid can then be treated with conventional reverse osmosis membranes to achieve volume reduction factors approaching 100. Microfiltration removes particles below the rating of 0.2 microns, in part from particle agglomeration. Operating experience relating to a 15 USGPM unit is presented. Coupling microfiltration technology with chemical treatment enhances the removal of soluble species. Research and development experience with the removal of soluble contaminants found in ground water and waste water will be discussed. The technology has advantages over other membrane technologies, namely lower energy costs, a lesser degree of fouling, and a higher recovery of processed solution. Future applications of the technology are addressed. (author). 10 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs.

  10. Radioactive waste solidification material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishihara, Yukio; Wakuta, Kuniharu; Ishizaki, Kanjiro; Koyanagi, Naoaki; Sakamoto, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Ikuo.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention concerns a radioactive waste solidification material containing vermiculite cement used for a vacuum packing type waste processing device, which contains no residue of calcium hydroxide in cement solidification products. No residue of calcium hydroxide means, for example, that peak of Ca(OH) 2 is not recognized in an X ray diffraction device. With such procedures, since calcium sulfoaluminate clinker and Portland cement themselves exhibit water hardening property, and slugs exhibit hydration activity from the early stage, the cement exhibits quick-hardening property, has great extension of long term strength, further, has no shrinking property, less dry- shrinkage, excellent durability, less causing damages such as cracks and peeling as processing products of radioactive wastes, enabling to attain highly safe solidification product. (T.M.)

  11. Radioactive wastes eliminating device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsutsuka, Norimasa.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate impurities and radioactive wastes by passing liquid sodium in a cold trap and an adsorption device. Constitution: Heated sodium is partially extracted from the core of a nuclear reactor by way of a pump, flown into and cooled in heat exchangers and then introduced into a cold trap for removal of impurities. The liquid sodium eliminated with impurities is introduced into an adsorption separator and purified by the elimination of radioactive wastes. The purified sodium is returned to the nuclear reactor. A heater is provided between the cold trap and the adsorption separator, so that the temperature of the liquid sodium introduced into the adsorption separator is not lower than the minimum temperature in the cold trap to thereby prevent deposition of impurities in the adsorption separator. (Kawakami, Y.)

  12. Microfiltration of radioactive contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckley, L.P.; Slade, J.A.; Vijayan, S.; Wong, C.F.

    1993-04-01

    Cross-flow microfiltration processing of radioactive liquids has been in use at Chalk River Laboratories for about four years. The separation process removes suspended particles from radioactive waste solutions. The clean liquid can then be treated with conventional reverse osmosis membranes to achieve volume reduction factors approaching 100. Microfiltration removes particles below the rating of 0.2 microns, in part from particle agglomeration. Operating experience relating to a 15 USGPM unit is presented. Coupling microfiltration technology with chemical treatment enhances the removal of soluble species. Research and development experience with the removal of soluble contaminants found in ground water and waste water will be discussed. The technology has advantages over other membrane technologies, namely lower energy costs, a lesser degree of fouling, and a higher recovery of processed solution. Future applications of the technology are addressed. (author). 10 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs

  13. Radioactivity and health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stannard, J.N.; Baalman, R.W. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    This book details the knowledge of the biological effects of ionizing radiation from the discovery of radium to about 1980. Research findings and conclusions are presented largely as the investigators saw and reported them except where the work under discussion was markedly iconoclastic and obviously wrong according to the author's comments. Findings from over 100 personal interviews and literature searches including unpublished or little-known materials are summarized. The material in the book is divided into six sections. The first section deals with naturally occurring radioactive elements. The next section covers material on man-made radioisotopes. Inhalation toxicology (radioactive dusts and particles and respirable gases) is the subject of Section 3. Section 4 deals with environmental matters - radioecology, fallout from nuclear weapons tests, transport of radionuclides, testing and standard settings, and Section 5 consists of information on laboratory and field instrumentation. The development of the therapy for exposure and of nuclear medicine is traced in the final section

  14. Decontamination of radioactive isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despotovic, R.; Music, S.; Subotic, B.; Wolf, R.H.H.

    1979-01-01

    Removal of radioactive isotopes under controlled conditions is determined by a number of physical and chemical properties considered radiocontaminating and by the characteristics of the contaminated object. Determination of quantitative and qualitative factors for equilibrium in a contamination-decontamination system provides the basis for rational and successful decontamination. The decontamination of various ''solid/liquid'' systems is interesting from the scientific and technological point of view. These systems are of great importance in radiation protection (decontamination of various surfaces, liquids, drinking water, fixation or collection of radiocontaminants). Different types of decontamination systems are discussed. The dependence of rate and efficiency of the preparation conditions and on the ageing of the scavenger is described. The influence of coagulating electrolyte on radioactive isotope fixation efficiency was also determined. The fixation of fission radionuclide on oxide scavengers has been studied. The connection between fundamental investigations and practical decontamination of the ''solid/liquid'' systems is discussed. (author)

  15. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahissa Campa, Jaime; Pahissa, Marta H. de

    2000-01-01

    Throughout this century, the application of nuclear energy has produced many benefits, in industry, in research, in medicine, and in the generation of electricity. These activities generate wastes in the same way as do other human activities. The primary objective of radioactive waste management is to protect human health and environment now and in the future without imposing undue burden on future generations, through sound, safe and efficient radioactive waste management. This paper briefly describes the different steps of the management of short lived low and intermediate level wastes, and presents and overview of the state of art in countries involved in nuclear energy, describing their organizations, methodologies used in the processing of these wastes and the final disposal concepts. It also presents the Argentine strategy, its technical and legal aspects. Worldwide experience during the past 50 years has shown that short lived low and intermediate level wastes can be successfully isolated from human and environment in near surface disposal facilities. (author)

  16. Radioactive gas processing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kita, Kaoru; Minemoto, Masaki; Takezawa, Kazuaki; Okazaki, Akira; Kumagaya, Koji.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To simplify the structure of a gas processing system which has hitherto been much complicated by the recyclic use of molecular sieve regeneration gas, by enabling to release the regeneration gas to outside in a once-through manner. Constitution: The system comprises a cooler for receiving and cooling gases to be processed containing radioactive rare gases, moisture-removing pipelines each connected in parallel to the exit of the cooler and having switching valves and a moisture removing column disposed between the valves and a charcoal absorber in communication with the moisture removing pipelines. Pipelines for flowing regeneration heating gases are separately connected to the moisture removing columns, and molecular sieve is charged in the moisture removing column by the amount depending on the types of the radioactive rare gases. (Aizawa, K.)

  17. Radioactive substance solidifying device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakoda, Kotaro.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To easily solidify radioactive substances adhering to the surfaces of solid wastes without scattering in the circumference by paints, and further to reduce surface contamination concentrations. Constitution: Solid wastes are placed on a hanging plate, and dipped in paints within a paint dipping treatment tank installed at the lower part of a treatment tank by means of a monorail hoist, and the surfaces of said solid wastes are coated with paints, thereby to solidify the radioactivity on the surfaces of the solid wastes. After dipping, the solid wastes are suspended up to a paint spraying tank to dry the paints. After drying, non-contaminated paints are atomized to apply through an atomizing tube onto the solid wastes. After drying the atomized paints, the solid wastes are carried outside the treatment tank by means of the monorail hoist. (Yoshino, Y.)

  18. Radioactive thickness gauge (1962)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guizerix, J.

    1962-01-01

    The author describes a thickness gauge in which the scintillating crystal detector alternately 'sees' a radioactive source through the material which is to be measured and then a control source of the same material; the radiations are separated in time by an absorbing valve whose sections are alternately full and hollow. The currents corresponding to the two sources are separated beyond the photomultiplier tube by a detector synchronized with the rotation of the valve. The quotient of these two currents is then obtained with a standard recording potentiometer. It is found that the average value of the response which is in the form G = f(I 1 /I 2 ) is not affected by decay of the radioactive sources, and that it is little influenced by variations of high tension, temperature, or properties of the air in the source detector interval. The performance of the gauge is given. (author) [fr

  19. Radioactive nuclide adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima, Kimichika.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the efficiency of a radioactive nuclide adsorption device by applying a nickel plating on a nickel plate to render the surface active. Constitution: A capturing device for radioactive nuclide such as manganese 54, cobalt 60, 58 and the like is disposed to the inside of a pipeway provided on the upper portion of fuel assemblies through which liquid sodium as the coolant for LMFBR type reactor is passed. The device comprises a cylindrical adsorption body and spacers. The adsorption body is made of nickel and applied with a nickel plating on the surface thereof. The surface of the adsorption body is unevened to result in disturbance in the coolant and thereby improve the adsorptive efficiency. (Kawakami, Y.)

  20. Radioactive waste processing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Shuji.

    1992-01-01

    Liquid wastes are supplied to a ceramic filter to conduct filtration. In this case, a device for adding a powdery inorganic ion exchanger is disposed to the upstream of the ceramic filter. When the powdery inorganic ion exchanger is charged to the addition device, it is precoated to the surface of the ceramic filter, to conduct separation of suspended matters and separation of ionic nuclides simultaneously. Liquid wastes returned to a collecting tank are condensed while being circulated between the ceramic filter and the tank and then contained in a condensation liquid waste tank. With such a constitution, both of radioactive nuclides accompanied by suspended matters in the radioactive liquid wastes and ionic nuclides can be captured efficiently. (T.M.)

  1. Handbook of radioactivity analysis

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The updated and much expanded Third Edition of the "Handbook of Radioactivity Analysis" is an authoritative reference providing the principles, practical techniques, and procedures for the accurate measurement of radioactivity from the very low levels encountered in the environment to higher levels measured in radioisotope research, clinical laboratories, biological sciences, radionuclide standardization, nuclear medicine, nuclear power, fuel cycle facilities and in the implementation of nuclear forensic analysis and nuclear safeguards. The Third Edition contains seven new chapters providing a reference text much broader in scope than the previous Second Edition, and all of the other chapters have been updated and expanded many with new authors. The book describes the basic principles of radiation detection and measurement, the preparation of samples from a wide variety of matrices, assists the investigator or technician in the selection and use of appropriate radiation detectors, and presents state-of-the-ar...

  2. Forest decline through radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichelt, G.; Kollert, R.

    1985-01-01

    Is more serious damage of forest observed in the vicinity of nuclear reactors. How are those decline patterns to be explained. Does the combined effect of radioactivity and different air pollutants (such as nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, oxidants etc.) have an influence in the decline of the forest. In what way do synergisms, i.e. mutually enhanced effects, participate. How does natural and artificial radioactivity affect the chemistry of air in the polluted atmosphere. What does this mean for the extension of nuclear energy, especially for the reprocessing plant planned. Damage in the forests near nuclear and industrial plants was mapped and the resulting hypotheses on possible emittors were statistically verified. Quantitative calculations as to the connection between nuclear energy and forest decline were carried through: they demand action. (orig./HP) [de

  3. Monitoring of environmental radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The results are described of monitoring radioactivity of atmospheric fallout, surface waters, soils, plant feeds, cereals, and other agricultural produce. The results were obtained over a long time period. Radioactivity was also measured of milk, milk products, vegetables and fruits, meat and hen eggs, flour and bakery products with a view to radionuclide migration in the food chain. The daily intake of 90 Sr and 137 Cs from food was determined from the values obtained and the consumption of the individual types of food. Strontium-90 distribution was studied in the bones and the teeth of the population in Slovakia. With the commissioning of nuclear power plants, emissions and liquid wastes were monitored and their environmental impact assessed. (E.S.)

  4. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsoulfanidis, N.

    1991-01-01

    The management of radioactive waste is a very important part of the nuclear industry. The future of the nuclear power industry depends to a large extent on the successful solution of the perceived or real problems associated with the disposal of both low-level waste (LLW) and high-level waste (HLW). All the activities surrounding the management of radioactive waste are reviewed. The federal government and the individual states are working toward the implementation of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act and the Low-Level Waste Policy Act. The two congressional acts are reviewed and progress made as of early 1990 is presented. Spent-fuel storage and transportation are discussed in detail as are the concepts of repositories for HLW. The status of state compacts for LLW is also discussed. Finally, activities related to the decommissioning of nuclear facilities are also described

  5. Hyperthyroidism and radioactive iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corstens, F.H.M.

    1980-01-01

    The study details the results of treatment of patients with hyperthyroidism using a combination of fractionated low doses radioactive iodine and anthithyroid drug therapy. The patients studied were treated according to this regimen after August 1968 and all reached euthyroidism before March 1979. None of the patients had been treated with radioactive iodine prior to the start of the protocol. A subgroup of the patients had received an unsuccessfull course with antithyroid drug therapy and, or, surgical therapy before the start of the protocol. Patients who had never been treated for hyperthyroidism were given antithyroid drug therapy for at least 6 months in an attempt to reach euthryroidism without the use of 131 I therapy. Therefore, all patients had experienced a course of unsuccessfull therapy prior to the start of the treatment protocol using combined fractionated low doses of 131 I and antithyroid drug therapy. (Auth.)

  6. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kizawa, Hideo

    1982-01-01

    A system of combining a calciner for concentrated radioactive liquid waste and an incinerator for miscellaneous radioactive solid waste is being developed. Both the calciner and the incinerator are operated by fluidized bed method. The system features the following points: (1) Inflammable miscellaneous solids and concentrated liquid can be treated in combination to reduce the volume. (2) Used ion-exchange resin can be incinerated. (3) The system is applicable even if any final waste disposal method is adopted; calcinated and incinerated solids obtained as intermediate products are easy to handle and store. (4) The system is readily compatible with other waste treatment systems to form optimal total system. The following matters are described: the principle of fluidized-bed furnaces, the objects of treatment, system constitution, the features of the calciner and incinerator, and the current status of development. (J.P.N.)

  7. PROCESSING OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, B.M. Jr.; Barton, G.B.

    1961-11-14

    A process for treating radioactive waste solutions prior to disposal is described. A water-soluble phosphate, borate, and/or silicate is added. The solution is sprayed with steam into a space heated from 325 to 400 deg C whereby a powder is formed. The powder is melted and calcined at from 800 to 1000 deg C. Water vapor and gaseous products are separated from the glass formed. (AEC)

  8. Transport of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombard, J.

    1996-01-01

    This work deals with the transport of radioactive materials. The associated hazards and potential hazards are at first described and shows the necessity to define specific safety regulations. The basic principles of radiological protection and of the IAEA regulations are given. The different types of authorized packages and of package labelling are explained. The revision, updating and the monitoring of the regulations effectiveness is the subject of the last part of this conference. (O.M.)

  9. Radioactive material air transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pader y Terry, Claudio Cosme

    2002-01-01

    As function of the high aggregated value, safety regulations and the useful life time, the air transportation has been used more regularly because is fast, reliable, and by giving great security to the cargo. Based on the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the IATA (International Air Transportation Association) has reproduced in his dangerous goods manual (Dangerous Goods Regulations - DGR IATA), the regulation for the radioactive material air transportation. Those documents support this presentation

  10. The radioactive grasshopper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1966-06-15

    Full text: Grasshoppers are 'tagged' with radiation in order to trace their movements for purposes of agricultural research. They are fed on young wheat containing iridium-192; the radioactivity taken up by the grasshoppers can then be observed by a portable scintillation counter. Laboratory tests have shown the biological period of the iridium to be of the order of seven days, and that about one microcurie per insect is needed to enable them to be traced during two months. (author)

  11. SHIPPING OF RADIOACTIVE ITEMS

    CERN Multimedia

    TIS/RP Group

    2001-01-01

    The TIS-RP group informs users that shipping of small radioactive items is normally guaranteed within 24 hours from the time the material is handed in at the TIS-RP service. This time is imposed by the necessary procedures (identification of the radionuclides, determination of dose rate, preparation of the package and related paperwork). Large and massive objects require a longer procedure and will therefore take longer.

  12. The radioactive grasshopper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1966-01-01

    Full text: Grasshoppers are 'tagged' with radiation in order to trace their movements for purposes of agricultural research. They are fed on young wheat containing iridium-192; the radioactivity taken up by the grasshoppers can then be observed by a portable scintillation counter. Laboratory tests have shown the biological period of the iridium to be of the order of seven days, and that about one microcurie per insect is needed to enable them to be traced during two months. (author)

  13. Disposal of radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1960-11-15

    A discussion on the disposal of radioactive wastes was held in Vienna on 20 September 1960. The three scientists who participated in the discussion were Mr. Harry Brynielsson (Sweden), Head of the Swedish Atomic Energy Company; Mr. H. J. Dunster (United Kingdom), Health Physics Adviser to the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority; and Mr. Leslie Silverman (United States), Professor of Harvard University, and Chairman of the US AEC Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards, as well as consultant on air cleaning

  14. Radioactive material transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, M.C.

    1979-10-01

    All movements of radioactive materials in Canada are governed by a comprehensive body of regqlations, both national and international. These regulations are designed to maximize shielding to the public and transport workers, allow for heat dissipation, and to prevent criticality accidents, by prescribing specific packaging arrangements, administrative controls, labelling and storage measures. This report describes in some detail specific requirements and summarizes some incidents that occurred between 1974 and 1978

  15. Radioactive gas inhalator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeMon, D.E.

    1975-01-01

    An ''inhalator'', or more particularly an apparatus for permitting a patient to inhale a radioactive gas in order to provide a diagnostic test of the patient's lung area, is described. The disclosed apparatus provides a simple, trouble-free mechanism for achieving this result; and, furthermore, provides an improved testing method. Moreover, the disclosed apparatus has the capability of gradually introducing the test condition in a manner that makes it easy for the patient to become acclimated to it. (U.S.)

  16. Disposal of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmude, J.

    1976-01-01

    Speech on the 18th March 1976 in the Bundestag by the parliamentary Secretary of State, Dr. Juergen Schmude, to substantiate the Federal government's draft to a Fourth Act amending the Atomic Energy Act. The draft deals mainly with the final storage of radioactive wastes and interrelated questions concerning waste treatment and waste collection, and with several ordinance empowerments in order to improve licensing and supervisory procedures. (orig./LN) [de

  17. Transportation of radioactive elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thubert, Francis; Rentien, Guy; Jacquet, Michel

    1981-01-01

    The production and marketing of artificial radioactive elements engaged in by the 'Office des Rayonnements Ionisants' requires the use of specially designed packagings and assorted means of transport. The authors begin by describing the different kinds of products involved and the forms of packagings needed, and go on to discuss the various means of transport used, underlining the fact that, in terms of number and gravity, the incidents that have occurred to date have indeed been few and far between [fr

  18. Radioactive sources in brachytherapy:

    OpenAIRE

    Burger, Janez

    2003-01-01

    Background. In modern brachytherapy, a greast step forward was made in the 1960s in France with the introduction of new radioactive isotopes and new techniques. These innovations spread rapidly across Europe, though no single dosimetry standard had been set by then. In the new millennium, the advances in brachytherapy are further stimulated by the introduction of 3-D imaging techniques and the latest after loading irradiation equipment that use point sources. The international organiyation IC...

  19. Radioactive marine pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pontavice, E. du

    1976-01-01

    Certain provision in international law aim to prevent radioactive marine pollution and others concern compensation of damage from nuclear pollution. Prevention requires regulation of the disposal of wastes from nuclear industry from the operation of nuclear powered ships and from transport of fissile materials. As regards damage, if the measures to limit the extent of the damage come under the law of the sea, the priority of nuclear law over maritime law is clear in respect of financial compensation. (Auth) [fr

  20. Disposal of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Critchley, R.J.; Swindells, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for charging radioactive waste into a disposable steel drum having a plug type lid. The drum is sealed to a waste dispenser and the dispenser closure and lid are withdrawn into the dispenser in back-to-back manner. Before reclosing the dispenser the drum is urged closer to it so that on restoring the dispenser closure to the closed position the lid is pressed into the drum opening

  1. Radioactive mineral deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1948-01-01

    This publication was designed as a guide for uranium and thorium prospectors in Australia. Physical properties, such as color, streak, luster, hardness, fracture, and specific gravity of the uranium and thorium-bearing minerals are summarized and the various methods suitable for detecting radioactivity in minerals are described. Two colored plates show samples of pitchblende (uraninite), autunite, carnotite, monazite, and others of the most important minerals sources of uranium and thorium.

  2. CERN: Producing radioactive beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Accelerating radioactive beams has long been of interest at CERN's ISOLDE on-line isotope separator - the possibility was discussed at a CERN Workshop on intermediate energy physics as early as 1977. Meanwhile, as was highlighted in the 1991 report of the Nuclear Physics European Collaboration Committee, widespread scientific interest in these beams has developed and a range of projects are proposed, under construction or operational throughout the world

  3. Radioactive waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alter, U.

    1988-01-01

    For the Federal Government the safe disposal of waste from nuclear power plants constitutes the precondition for their further operation. The events in the year 1987 about the conditioning and transport of low activity waste and medium activity waste made it clear that it was necessary to intensify state control and to examine the structures in the field of waste disposal. A concept for the control of radioactive waste with negligible heat development (LAW) from nuclear installations is presented. (DG) [de

  4. Radioactive tracers in Sedimentology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, H.T.

    1973-01-01

    First is given a broad description of the uses of radioactive tracers in Sedimentology. The general method is established, including determinations of probability and standard deviation. Following are determined: the response law of the detector, the minimum mass for statistical detection, and the minimum mass for dynamic detection. The granularity is an important variable in these calculations. Final conclusions are given, and results are compared with existing theories

  5. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strohl, P.

    1985-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) attaches considerable importance to its cooperation with Japan. It was said in the annual conference in 1977 that the presentation of the acceptable policy regarding radioactive waste management is the largest single factor for gaining public confidence when nuclear power is adopted with assurance. The risk connected with radioactive wastes was often presented as the major obstacle to the development of nuclear energy, however, an overall impression of optimism and confidence prevailed by the technical appraisal of the situation in this field by the committee of the NEA. This evolution can be easily explained by the significant progress achieved in radioactive waste management both at the technical level and with respect to the implementation of special legislation and the establishment of specialized institutions and financing schemes. More research will focus on the optimization of the technical, safety and economic aspects of specific engineering designs at specific sites on the long term isolation of wastes, and the NEA contributes to this general effort. The implementation of disposal programs is also in progress. (Kako, I.)

  6. Defense radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindman, T.B. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The Office of Defense Programs (DP), U.S. Department of Energy, is responsible for the production of nuclear weapons and materials for national defense. Pursuant to this mission, DP operates a large industrial complex that employs over 60,000 people at various installations across the country. As a byproduct of their activities, these installations generate radioactive, hazardous, or mixed wastes that must be managed in a safe and cost-effective manner in compliance with all applicable Federal and STate environmental requirements. At the Federal level such requirements derive primarily from the Atomic Energy Act, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA). Responsibility for DP activities in connection with the disposal of defense wastes is consolidated within the Office of Defense Waste and Transportation Management (DWTM). This paper discusses these activities which consist of five principal elements: the environmental restoration of inactive DP facilities and sites, the processing storage and disposal of wastes associated with ongoing operations at active DP facilities, research and development directed toward the long-term disposal of radioactive, hazardous, mixed wastes, technology development directly supporting regulatory compliance, and the development of policies, procedures, and technologies for assuring the safe transportation of radioactive and hazardous materials

  7. Radioactive waste management glossary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-04-01

    Terminology used in documents published by the IAEA is frequently defined in glossaries in the separate documents so that understanding is enhanced, particularly for terms having unique meanings in the field of radioactive waste management. This has been found to be a good practice but frequently a burdensome one, too. In addition, terms in various documents occasionally were used differently. Thus, a common glossary of terms for radioactive waste management documents is believed to have merit. This glossary has been developed for use in IAEA documentation on radioactive waste management topics. The individual items have been compiled by selecting terms and definitions from thirty sources, listed on the next page, and numerous people. An effort has been made to use the definitions in internationally-accepted glossaries (e.g. ICRP, ICRU, ISO), with minimum modification; similarly, definitions in recently published IAEA documents have been respected. Nevertheless, when modifications were believed appropriate, they have been made. The glossary, stored on magnetic tape, is intended to be used as a standard for terminology for IAEA use; it is hoped that some benefits of common international terminology may result from its use in IAEA documentation

  8. Radioactivity monitoring in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandrescu, M.; Milu, C.

    1996-01-01

    Radioactivity monitoring in Romania is based on National Regulations for Radiation Protection enforced in 1976, on other environment protection laws enforced in the last years and on the recommendations of IAEA. Accordingly two systems of radioactive monitoring are to date operational in this field: the first one is the self-control of the radioactive emissions in the environment generated by the own nuclear activities (of nuclear units like the Cernavoda NPP, the Institute of Atomic Physics at Magurele-Bucharest, the Institute for Nuclear Research at Pitesti, the R Plant at Feldioara, Uranium mining units, etc.), while the other is based on two national agencies (the National Network of Environment Radiation Monitoring of the Ministry of Waters, Forests and Environment Protection and the Network of Radiation Hygiene Laboratories of the Health Ministry). The authors review and discuss the radiation protection legislation, the structure and the organizational operations of the national monitoring systems and the co-operation of the national monitoring systems with international authorities or programmes. 3 Figs., 1 tab., 11 refs

  9. Radioactive waste storage issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunz, D.E.

    1994-01-01

    In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state's boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected

  10. Radioactivity in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    In this report different aspects of the radioactivity in the environment of the Slovak Republic for the period of 2004 - 2006 years are reported. This report is published only on the Enviroportal.sk. The following aspects of the radioactivity in the environment are reviewed there: Electricity production in nuclear power plants and their consumption; Natural sources of ionisation radiation; Man-made sources of ionisation radiation; Safety of exploitation of the nuclear power plants on the territory of the Slovak Republic; International Nuclear Event Scale; Basic information about influence of radiation on health of population and about evaluation methods; Influence of physical risk factors (including of ionisation radiation) in the working environment on formation of occupation diseases; Collective doses of occupation in NPPs; Health state of population in the locality of the NPP Mochovce; Food contamination by ionisation radiation; Radiation monitoring network; Legislative directives about population health protection against ionisation radiation action; Decommissioning of the NPP Jaslovske Bohunice (EBO V-1); Conception of the back fuel cycle and treatment of spent fuels and high-level radioactive wastes; Project of territorial-economic development of the Trnava region after decommissioning of the Jaslovske Bohunice NPP

  11. Radioactive substance separation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Takuhiko.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To enable separation of fission products, radioactive corrosion products and the likes in primary coolants with no requirement for the replacement of separation system during plant service life, by providing protruded magnetic pole plates in a liquid metal flow channel to thereby form slopes magnetic fields. Constitution: A plurality of magnetic pole plates are disposed vertically in a comb-like arrangement so as not to contact with each other along the direction of flow in a rectangular primary coolant pipeway at the exit of the reactor core in an LMFBR type reactor. Large magnetic poles are provided to the upper and lower sides of the pipeway and coils are wound on the side opposed to the pipeway. When electrical current is supplied to the coils, the magnetic pole is magnetized intensely and thus the magnetic pole plates are also magnetized intensely and thus the magnetic pole plates are also magnetized intensely to form large gradient in the magnetic fields between the upper and lower magnetic plates, whereby ferromagnetic and ferrimagnetic fission products and radioactive corrosion products in the coolants are intensely adsorbed and not detached by the flow of the coolants. Accordingly, the fission products and the radioactive corrosion products can surely be removed with no requirement for the exchange of separation system during plant service life. (Horiuchi, T.)

  12. Released radioactivity reducing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Takeaki.

    1992-01-01

    Upon occurrence of a reactor accident, penetration portions of a reactor container, as a main leakage source from a reactor container, are surrounded by a plurality of gas-tight chambers, the outside of which is surrounded by highly gas-tightly buildings. Branched pipelines of an emergency gas processing system are introduced to each of the gas-tight chambers and they are joined and in communication with an emergency gas processing device. With such a constitution, radioactive materials are prevented from leaking directly from the buildings. Further, pipeline openings of the emergency gas processing facility are disposed in the plurality highly gas-tight penetration chambers. If the radioactive materials are leaked from the reactor to elevate the pressure in the penetration chambers, the radioactive materials are introduced to a filter device in the emergency gas processing facility by way of the branched pipelines, filtered and then released to the atmosphere. Accordingly, the reliability and safety of the system can be improved. (T.M.)

  13. Analysis of radioactive cobalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This is a manual published by Science and Technology Agency, Japan, which prescribes on the analysis method for radioactive cobalt which is a typical indexing nuclide among the radioactive nuclides released from nuclear facilities. Since the released cobalt is mainly discharged to coastal region together with waste water, this manual is written for samples of sea water, sea bottom sediments and marine organisms. Radioactive cobalt includes the nuclides of 57 co, 58 Co, 60 Co, etc., the manual deals with them as a whole as 60 Co of long half life. Though 60 Co analysis has become feasible comparatively simply due to scintillation or semi-conductor spectrometry, trace 60 Co analysis is performed quantitatively by co-precipitation or collection into alumina and scintillation spectrometry. However, specific collecting operation and γ-γ coincidence measurement have been required so far. This manual employs 60 Co collection by means of ion-exchange method and measurement with low background GM counting system, to analyze quantitatively and rapidly low level 60 Co. It is primarily established as the standard analyzing method for the survey by local autonomous bodies. It is divided into 4 chapters including introduction sea water, marine organisms, and sea bottom sediments. List of required reagents is added in appendix. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  14. Radioactive wastes handling facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Emiko; Inaguma, Masahiko; Ozaki, Shigeru; Matsumoto, Kaname.

    1997-01-01

    There are disposed an area where a conveyor is disposed for separating miscellaneous radioactive solid wastes such as metals, on area for operators which is disposed in the direction vertical to the transferring direction of the conveyor, an area for receiving the radioactive wastes and placing them on the conveyor and an area for collecting the radioactive wastes transferred by the conveyor. Since an operator can conduct handling while wearing a working cloth attached to a partition wall as he wears his ordinary cloth, the operation condition can be improved and the efficiency for the separating work can be improved. When the area for settling conveyors and the area for the operators is depressurized, cruds on the surface of the wastes are not released to the outside and the working clothes can be prevented from being involved. Since the wastes are transferred by the conveyor, the operator's moving range is reduced, poisonous materials are fallen and moved through a sliding way to an area for collecting materials to be separated. Accordingly, the materials to be removed can be accumulated easily. (N.H.)

  15. Security of Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldammer, W.

    2003-01-01

    Measures to achieve radioactive waste security are discussed. Categorization of waste in order to implement adequate and consistent security measures based on potential consequences is made. The measures include appropriate treatment/storage/disposal of waste to minimize the potential and consequences of malicious acts; management of waste only within an authorised, regulated, legal framework; management of the security of personnel and information; measures to minimize the acquisition of radioactive waste by those with malicious intent. The specific measures are: deter unauthorized access to the waste; detect any such attempt or any loss or theft of waste; delay unauthorized access; provide timely response to counter any attempt to gain unauthorised access; measures to minimize acts of sabotage; efforts to recover any lost or stolen waste; mitigation and emergency plans in case of release of radioactivity. An approach to develop guidance, starting with the categorisation of sources and identification of dangerous sources, is presented. Dosimetric criteria for internal and external irradiation are set. Different exposure scenarios are considered. Waste categories and security categories based on the IAEA INFCIRC/225/Rev.4 are presented

  16. Analysis of radioactive ruthenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This manual explains the procedures of analysis of radioactive ruthenium in the drain water from atomic energy plants. The most important radioactive ruthenium is 106 Ru, and the method of measurement described in this manual is to measure the beta ray of the daughter nuclide 106 Rh. The samples to be measured are collected from seawater, marine living things, and sediment of sea bottom near atomic energy plants. In case of sea water, the ruthenium is separated by the co-precipitation with magnesium hydroxide and distillation or the extraction with carbon tetrachloride, reduction and precipitation. The beta ray of the obtained sample is measured by a gas-flow type low background β counting system. Alkali dissolution-distillation or nitric acid extraction-distillation, reduction and precipitation are applied for marine living things. The sediment of sea bottom is treated with nitric acid or strong phosphoric acid, and distilled then the ruthenium is reduced and precipitated, and the beta-counting of the precipitation is made. The method to fix radioactive ruthenium on polyethylene films after the co-precipitation is also described for reference. The detectable levels by the present methods are 0.05 pCi/l for sea water, 0.1 pCi/g for marine living things, and 20 pCi/kg for the sediment of sea bottom. (Kato, T.)

  17. ASSESSMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINANTS FOUND IN LOW LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE STREAMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R.H. Little, P.R. Maul, J.S.S. Penfoldag

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes and presents the findings from two studies undertaken for the European Commission to assess the long-term impact upon the environment and human health of non-radioactive contaminants found in various low level radioactive waste streams. The initial study investigated the application of safety assessment approaches developed for radioactive contaminants to the assessment of nonradioactive contaminants in low level radioactive waste. It demonstrated how disposal limits could be derived for a range of non-radioactive contaminants and generic disposal facilities. The follow-up study used the same approach but undertook more detailed, disposal system specific calculations, assessing the impacts of both the non-radioactive and radioactive contaminants. The calculations undertaken indicated that it is prudent to consider non-radioactive, as well as radioactive contaminants, when assessing the impacts of low level radioactive waste disposal. For some waste streams with relatively low concentrations of radionuclides, the potential post-closure disposal impacts from non-radioactive contaminants can be comparable with the potential radiological impacts. For such waste streams there is therefore an added incentive to explore options for recycling the materials involved wherever possible

  18. Binary and ternary chelates of scandium (III), Yttrium (III) and lanthanum (III) with ethyleneglycol-bis(. beta. -aminoethylether)-tetraacetic acid as primary and substituted salicylic acids as secondary ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, A K; Chandra, M; Agarwala, B V; Dey, A K [Allahabad Univ. (India). Chemical Labs.

    1980-01-01

    Formation constants of binary and ternary complexes of the systems of the type: M-L and M-egta-L (M = scandium(III), yttrium(III) and lanthanum(III), egta = ethylene glycol-bis(..beta..-aminoethylether)-tetra acetic acid, L = o-cresotic acid (o-ca), m-cresotic acid (m-ca), 5-chlorosalicyclic acid(csa), and 3,5-dibromosalicylic acid (dbsa)) have been determined pH-metrically at 25deg and ..mu.. = 0.1M (KNO/sub 3/) in 50% (v/v) aqueous-ethanol medium. The order of stabilities of ternary complexes has been compared with those of corresponding binary complexes, and results discussed on the basis of coulombic interactions.

  19. No-carrier-added (NCA) synthesis of 6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-L-DOPA using 3,5,6,7,8,8a-hexahydro-7,7,8a-trimethyl-[6S-(6{alpha}, 8{alpha}, 8{alpha}{beta})]-6,8-methano-2H-1,4-benzoxazin-2-one

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horti, A. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). School of Medicine]|[Yale Univ., West Haven, CT (United States). PET Center; Redmond, D.E. Jr. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). School of Medicine; Soufer, R. [Yale Univ., West Haven, CT (United States). PET Center

    1995-12-31

    3,5,6,7,8,8a-Hexahydro-7,7,8a-trimethyl-[6S-(6{alpha},8{alpha} , 8{alpha}{beta})]-6,8-methano-2H-1,4-benzoxazino-2-one (2) was investigated as chiral auxiliary for asymmetric NCA nucleophilic synthesis of 6-[{sup 18}F]Fluoro-L-DOPA. Direct condensation of 3,4-dimethoxy-2-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzaldehyde (1a) or 6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-piperonal (1b) in the presence of NaH with 2 gave the corresponding [{sup 18}F]-3-[(2-fluorophenyl)methylene]-3,5,6,7,8,8a-hexahydro-7,7,8 a-trimethyl-[6S-(3Z,3{alpha},6{alpha},8{alpha},8{alpha}{beta})]-6, 8-methano-2H-1,4-benzoxazin-2-one derivative 3a or 3b as a single stereoisomer. L-Selectride promoted hydrogenation of the olefinic double bond of these derivatives, in presence of tertbutyl alcohol, afforded the corresponding [{sup 18}F]-3-[(2-fluorophenyl) methyl]-3,5,6,7,8,8a-hexahydro-7,7,8a-trimethyl-[3S-(3{alpha}, 6{alpha}, 8{alpha}8{alpha}{beta})]-6,8-methano-2H-1,4-benzoxazin-2-one derivatives (4a,b) without affecting the orientation of diasterofacial discrimination. Deprotection of the derivatives 4a,b yielded 6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-L-DOPA (e.e. >90%, 3% radiochemical yield (EOB), total synthesis time 125 min, specific activity >2000 mCi/{mu}mol). Direct deprotection/reduction of the compounds 3a,b provides the enantiomeric mixture of 6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-D,L-DOPA (10-12% radiochemical yield) and, after chiral separation, 6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-L-DOPA (e.e. 98%, 4-5% radiochemical yield). (author).

  20. No-carrier-added (NCA) synthesis of 6-[18F]fluoro-L-DOPA using 3,5,6,7,8,8a-hexahydro-7,7,8a-trimethyl-[6S-(6α, 8α, 8αβ)]-6,8-methano-2H-1,4-benzoxazin-2-one

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horti, A.; Yale Univ., West Haven, CT; Redmond, D.E. Jr.; Soufer, R.

    1995-01-01

    3,5,6,7,8,8a-Hexahydro-7,7,8a-trimethyl-[6S-(6α,8α , 8αβ)]-6,8-methano-2H-1,4-benzoxazino-2-one (2) was investigated as chiral auxiliary for asymmetric NCA nucleophilic synthesis of 6-[ 18 F]Fluoro-L-DOPA. Direct condensation of 3,4-dimethoxy-2-[ 18 F]fluorobenzaldehyde (1a) or 6-[ 18 F]fluoro-piperonal (1b) in the presence of NaH with 2 gave the corresponding [ 18 F]-3-[(2-fluorophenyl)methylene]-3,5,6,7,8,8a-hexahydro-7,7,8 a-trimethyl-[6S-(3Z,3α,6α,8α,8αβ)]-6, 8-methano-2H-1,4-benzoxazin-2-one derivative 3a or 3b as a single stereoisomer. L-Selectride promoted hydrogenation of the olefinic double bond of these derivatives, in presence of tertbutyl alcohol, afforded the corresponding [ 18 F]-3-[(2-fluorophenyl) methyl]-3,5,6,7,8,8a-hexahydro-7,7,8a-trimethyl-[3S-(3α, 6α, 8α8αβ)]-6,8-methano-2H-1,4-benzoxazin-2-one derivatives (4a,b) without affecting the orientation of diasterofacial discrimination. Deprotection of the derivatives 4a,b yielded 6-[ 18 F]fluoro-L-DOPA (e.e. >90%, 3% radiochemical yield (EOB), total synthesis time 125 min, specific activity >2000 mCi/μmol). Direct deprotection/reduction of the compounds 3a,b provides the enantiomeric mixture of 6-[ 18 F]fluoro-D,L-DOPA (10-12% radiochemical yield) and, after chiral separation, 6-[ 18 F]fluoro-L-DOPA (e.e. 98%, 4-5% radiochemical yield). (author)

  1. A novel boron-rich quaternary scandium borocarbosilicide Sc3.67-xB41.4-y-zC0.67+zSi0.33-w

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Takaho; Yamamoto, Akiji; Sato, Akira

    2004-01-01

    A novel quaternary scandium borocarbosilicide Sc 3.67-x B 41.4-y-z C 0.67+z Si 0.33-w was found. Single crystallites were obtained as an intergrowth phase in the float-zoned single crystal of Sc 0.83-x B 10.0-y C 0.17+y Si 0.083-z that has a face-centered cubic crystal structure. Single crystal structure analysis revealed that the compound has a hexagonal structure with lattice constants a = b = 1.43055(8) nm and c = 2.37477(13) nm and space group P6-barm2 (No. 187). The crystal composition calculated from the structure analysis for the crystal with x = 0.52, y = 1.42, z = 1.17, and w = 0.02 was ScB 12.3 C 0.58 Si 0.10 and that agreed rather well with the composition of ScB 11.5 C 0.61 Si 0.04 measured by EPMA. In the crystal structure that is a new structure type of boron-rich borides, there are 79 structurally independent atomic sites, 69 boron and/or carbon sites, two silicon sites and eight scandium sites. Boron and carbon form seven structurally independent B 12 icosahedra, one B 9 polyhedron, one B 10 polyhedron, one irregularly shaped B 16 polyhedron in which only 10.7 boron atoms are available because of partial occupancies and 10 bridging sites. All polyhedron units and bridging site atoms interconnect each other forming a three-dimensional boron framework structure. Sc atoms reside in the open spaces in the boron framework structure

  2. Disposal method of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uetake, Naoto; Fukazawa, Tetsuo.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the safety of underground disposal of radioactive wastes for a long period of time by surrounding the periphery of the radioactive wastes with materials that can inhibit the migration of radioactive nuclides and are physically and chemically stable. Method: Hardening products prepared from a water-hardenable calcium silicate compound and an aqueous solution of alkali silicate have compression strength as comparable with that of concretes, high water tightness and adsorbing property to radioactive isotopes such as cobalt similar to that of concretes and they also show adsorption to cesium which is not adsorbed to concretes. Further, the kneaded slurry thereof is excellent in the workability and can be poured even into narrow gaps. Accordingly, by alternately charging granular radioactive wastes and this slurry before hardening into the ground, the radioactive wastes can be put to underground disposal stably with simple procedures. (Kamimura, M.)

  3. radioactive waste disposal standards abroad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Yan; Xin Pingping; Wu Jian; Zhang Xue

    2012-01-01

    With the world focus on human health and environmental protection, the problem of radioactive waste disposal has gradually become a global issue, and the focus of attention of public. The safety of radioactive waste disposal, is not only related to human health and environmental safety, but also an important factor of affecting the sustainable development of nuclear energy. In recent years the formulation of the radioactive waste disposal standards has been generally paid attention to at home and abroad, and it has made great progress. In China, radioactive waste management standards are being improved, and there are many new standards need to be developed. The revised task of implement standards is very arduous, and there are many areas for improvement about methods and procedures of the preparation of standards. This paper studies the current situation of radioactive waste disposal standards of the International Atomic Energy Agency, USA, France, Britain, Russia, Japan, and give some corresponding recommendations of our radioactive waste disposal standards. (authors)

  4. Disposal facility for radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsunomiya, Toru.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To remove heat generated from radioactive wastes thereby prevent the working circumstances from being worsened in a disposal-facility for radioactive wastes. Constitution: The disposal-facility comprises a plurality of holes dug out into the ground inside a tunnel excavated for the storage of radioactive wastes. After placing radioactive wastes into the shafts, re-filling materials are directly filled with a purpose of reducing the dosage. Further, a plurality of heat pipes are inserted into the holes and embedded within the re-filling materials so as to gather heat from the radioactive wastes. The heat pipes are connected to a heat exchanger disposed within the tunnel. As a result, heating of the solidified radioactive wastes itself or the containing vessel to high temperature can be avoided, as well as thermal degradation of the re-filling materials and the worsening in the working circumstance within the tunnel can be overcome. (Moriyama, K.)

  5. Transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huck, W.

    1992-01-01

    The book presents a systematic survey of the legal provisions governing the transport of radioactive materials, placing emphasis on the nuclear licensing provisions of sections 4, 4b of the Atomic Energy, Act (AtG) and sections 8-10 of the Radiation Protection Ordinance (StrlSchV), also considering the provisions of the traffic law governing the carriage of hazardous goods. The author's goal is to establish a systematic basis by comparative analysis of the licensing regulations under atomic energy law, for the purpose of formulating a proposed amendment to the law, for the sake of clarity. The author furthermore looks for and develops criteria that can be of help in distinguishing the regulations governing the carriage of hazardous goods from the nuclear regulatory provisions. He also examines whether such a differentiation is detectable, particularly in those amendments to the StrlSchV which came after the Act on Carriage of Hazardous Goods. The regulations governing the transport of radioactive materials under the AtG meet with the problem of different classification systems being applied, to radioactive materials in the supervisory regulations on the one hand, and to nuclear materials in Annex 1 to the AtG on the other hand. A classification of natural, non-nuclear grade uranium e.g. by the financial security provisions is difficult as a result of these differences in the laws. The author shows that the transport regulations of the StrlSchV represent an isolated supervisory instrument that has no connecting factor to the sections 28 ff StrlSchV, as radiation protection is provided for by the regulations of the Act on Carriage of Hazardous Goods. The author suggests an amendment of existing law incorporating the legal intent of sections 8-10 StrlSchV and of sections 4, 4b AtG into two sections, and abolishing the supervisory provisions of the StrlSchV altogether. (orig./HP) [de

  6. Study of proton radioactivities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davids, C.N.; Back, B.B.; Henderson, D.J. [and others

    1995-08-01

    About a dozen nuclei are currently known to accomplish their radioactive decay by emitting a proton. These nuclei are situated far from the valley of stability, and mark the very limits of existence for proton-rich nuclei: the proton drip line. A new 39-ms proton radioactivity was observed following the bombardment of a {sup 96}Ru target by a beam of 420-MeV {sup 78}Kr. Using the double-sided Si strip detector implantation system at the FMA, a proton group having an energy of 1.05 MeV was observed, correlated with the implantation of ions having mass 167. The subsequent daughter decay was identified as {sup 166}Os by its characteristic alpha decay, and therefore the proton emitter is assigned to the {sup 167}Ir nucleus. Further analysis showed that a second weak proton group from the same nucleus is present, indicating an isomeric state. Two other proton emitters were discovered recently at the FMA: {sup 171}Au and {sup 185}Bi, which is the heaviest known proton radioactivity. The measured decay energies and half-lives will enable the angular momentum of the emitted protons to be determined, thus providing spectroscopic information on nuclei that are beyond the proton drip line. In addition, the decay energy yields the mass of the nucleus, providing a sensitive test of mass models in this extremely proton-rich region of the chart of the nuclides. Additional searches for proton emitters will be conducted in the future, in order to extend our knowledge of the location of the proton drip line.

  7. Chapter 7. Radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The inspection and assessment activities of Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD) focused on minimization of activity and the quantity of produced radioactive waste (RAW), and on increasing safety of waste management. The general scheme of rad-waste management in the Slovak Republic is presented. The radioactive wastes produced during the operation of NPP V-1, NPP V-2 and NPP Mochovce in 1999 are listed.Liquid RAW was treated and conditioned into a solid form at the nuclear facility Technology for treatment and conditioning of RAW. In 1999 combustible solid waste was treated at the nuclear facility Incinerator of VUJE Trnava. Produced liquid and solid RAW are stored at designed equipment at individual nuclear installations (in case of NPP V-1, NPP V-2 Bohunice and NPP Mochovce in compliance with the Regulation No. 67/1987 Coll. law).The status of free capacity of these storages as of 31.121999 is presented. Storage solidified product built the SE-VYZ was fully filled at the end of 1999. In 1999 there was a significant improvement in the process of radioactive waste management by: (A) issuing approval for commissioning the National Repository for RAW, (B) issuing approval for commissioning the Treatment and Conditioning Center for RAW, (C) having the application for approval to transport conditioned RAW to the National repository Mochovce in the final stage of evaluation. At the beginning of 2000 it is realistic to expect that RAW conditioned in the Conditioning center of RAW will start to be disposed at the National repository of RAW in Mochovce

  8. Background radioactivity in environmental materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maul, P.R.; O'Hara, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a literature search to identify information on concentrations of 'background' radioactivity in foodstuffs and other commonly available environmental materials. The review has concentrated on naturally occurring radioactivity in foods and on UK data, although results from other countries have also been considered where appropriate. The data are compared with established definitions of a 'radioactive' substance and radionuclides which do not appear to be adequately covered in the literature are noted. (author)

  9. The control of water radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bovard, P.; Graubey, A.

    1962-01-01

    This report presents the different apparatuses and devices used to control and adjust routine releases, to detect accidental pollutions, and to identify the origins of an increased radioactivity. The objective is to perform permanent and continuous sampling and measurement. Samplers and measurement devices (Geiger probes, resin-based integrators, dry aerosol radioactivity recorders and dry sample radioactivity recorders) are presented. Water control stations are presented: these stations are either fixed, or mobile or floating

  10. Levels of radioactivity in Qatar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Thani, A.A.; Abdul-Majid, S.; Mohammed, K.

    1995-01-01

    The levels of natural and man-made radioactivity in soil and seabed were measured in Qatar to assess radiation exposure levels and to evaluate any radioactive contamination that may have reached the country from fallout or due to the Chernobyl accident radioactivity release. Qatar peninsula is located on the Arabian Gulf, 4500 km from Chernobyl, and has an area of ∼11,600 km 2 and a population of ∼600,000

  11. Radioactive wastes - inventories and classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennecke, P.; Hollmann, A.

    1992-01-01

    A survey is given of the origins, types, conditioning, inventories, and expected abundance of radioactive wastes in the future in the Federal Republic of Germany. The Federal Government's radioactive waste disposal scheme provides that radioactive wastes be buried in deep geological formations which are expected to ensure a maintenance-free, unlimited and safe disposal without intentional excavation of the wastes at a later date. (orig./BBR) [de

  12. Management of hospital radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantrana, D.

    1986-01-01

    The general structure of a regulatory scheme for the management of hospital radioactive wastes is presented. The responsabilities of an institution in the radioactive waste management, and storage conditions are defined. The radioactive wastes are classified in physical terms, and the criteria for evaluating the activity of solid wastes are described. The container characteristics and, the types of treatments given to the wastes are specified. (M.C.K.) [pt

  13. National inventory of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    There are in France 1064 sites corresponding to radioactive waste holders that appear in this radioactive waste inventory. We find the eighteen sites of E.D.F. nuclear power plants, The Cogema mine sites, the Cogema reprocessing plants, The Cea storages, the different factories and enterprises of nuclear industry, the sites of non nuclear industry, the Andra centers, decommissioned installations, disposals with low level radioactive wastes, sealed sources distributors, national defence. (N.C.)

  14. Radioactivity measurements principles and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Mann, W B; Spernol, A

    2012-01-01

    The authors have addressed the basic need for internationally consistent standards and methods demanded by the new and increasing use of radioactive materials, radiopharmaceuticals and labelled compounds. Particular emphasis is given to the basic and practical problems that may be encountered in measuring radioactivity. The text provides information and recommendations in the areas of radiation protection, focusing on quality control and the precautions necessary for the preparation and handling of radioactive substances. New information is also presented on the applications of both traditiona

  15. Radioactive waste material disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, Charles W.; Beahm, Edward C.; Parker, George W.

    1995-01-01

    The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide.

  16. Absolute radioactivity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, H.M.

    1983-01-01

    The radioactivity of a thin specimen can be determined directly, i.e. without reference to a standard and without knowing decay data, except for half-life, by means of counting at a given solid angle and by 4 πβ-γ coincidence measurement. In accordance with section 7 of the law on units, it is the task of PTB not only to represent the units and its derivation, but also to work out methods of adjusting national prototypes and normals to international prototypes and etalons in accordance with the international metre convention. (DG) [de

  17. Radioactive waste processing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Takashi; Funabashi, Kiyomi; Chino, Koichi.

    1992-01-01

    In a waste processing device for solidifying, pellets formed by condensing radioactive liquid wastes generated from a nuclear power plant, by using a solidification agent, sodium chloride, sodium hydroxide or sodium nitrate is mixed upon solidification. In particular, since sodium sulfate in a resin regenerating liquid wastes absorbs water in the cement upon cement solidification, and increases the volume by expansion, there is a worry of breaking the cement solidification products. This reaction can be prevented by the addition of sodium chloride and the like. Accordingly, integrity of the solidification products can be maintained for a long period of time. (T.M.)

  18. Radioactive waste processing vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Masaru; Suzuki, Osamu; Ishizaki, Kanjiro.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain a vessel of a reduced weight and with no external leaching of radioactive materials. Constitution: The vessel main body is constituted, for example, with light weight concretes or foamed concretes, particularly, foamed concretes containing fine closed bubbles in the inside. Then, layers having dense texture made of synthetic resin such as polystylene, vinylchloride resin, etc. or metal plate such as stainless plate are integrally disposed to the inner surface of the vessel main body. The cover member also has the same structure. (Sekiya, K.)

  19. Safety against radioactive contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    The ALWIT anticontamination suit is briefly described, consisting of lasting antistatic ''NDMEX III''. It was specially developed for the fire brigade who are exposed to a particular kind of contamination while carrying out radiation measurements during fire fighting, rescue and clearing up work. The ALWIT suit reliably prevents radioactive contamination of the surface of the body while wearing a breathing apparatus, independent of the ambient air. Tightly fitting cuffs on the neck, arms and legs together with zippers placed behind prevent contamination even with extreme movement. (P.F.K.)

  20. Heavy fragment radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silisteanu, I.

    1991-06-01

    The effect of collective mode excitation in heavy fragment radioactivity (HFR) is explored and discussed in the light of current experimental data. It is found that the coupling and resonance effects in fragment interaction and also the proper angular momentum effects may lead to an important enhancing of the emission process. New useful procedures are proposed for the study of nuclear decay properties. The relations between different decay processes are investigated in detail. We are also trying to understand and explain in a unified way the reaction mechanisms in decay phenomena. (author). 17 refs, 4 figs, 3 tabs