WorldWideScience

Sample records for no-carrier-added radioactive scandium

  1. No-carrier-added [1.sup.11 c]putrescine

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Daniel W.; Fowler, Joanna S.; Wolf, Alfred P.

    1989-01-01

    The invention relates to a new radiolabeled imaging agent, no-carrier-added [1-.sup.11 C]putrescine, and to the use of this very pure material as a radiotracer with positron emission tomography for imaging brain tumors. The invention further relates to the synthesis of no-carrier-added [1-.sup.11 C]putrescine based on the Michael addition of potassium .sup.11 C-labeled cyanide to acrylonitrile followed by reduction of the .sup.11 C-labeled dinitrile. The new method is rapid and efficient and provides radiotracer with a specific activity greater than 1.4 curies per millimol and in a purity greater than 95%.

  2. Automated production of no carrier added holmium-166

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izard, M.E.; Dadchova, E.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: An automated system has been developed to produce no carrier added 166 Ho from the decay of 166 Dy produced by neutron activation of 164 Dy 2 O 3 . Targets consisting of 5-10 mg of 164 Dy 2 O 3 are irradiated in HIFAR at 5 x 10 13 n.s -1 .cm -2 for 12h then allowed to cool for 2 days. The irradiation can is then transferred to the automated system located in a 'hot' cell in the radiopharmaceutical research building. A two dimension robotic arm encompassing a grab and motorized screwdriver is used to open the irradiation can. A second arm carrying a teflon tube introduces 9M HCI into the can to dissolve the target. A second tube carries the dissolved target via a peristaltic pump to a heated vial where it is evaporated to dryness under a flow of N 2 . A Peltier cooled trap is used to prevent release of HCl fumes into the cell. A motorized syringe pump dispenses 1 mL of 0.1 M HNO 3 to redissolve the digest which is then transferred by peristaltic pump via a hollow fibre filter and auto injector into an Aminex- A5 HPLC column. 166 Dy is eluted from the column in 0.132 M α-HIBA into a heated cyclone flask and evaporated to dryness under a stream of N 2 heated to about 50 deg C. After two days the evaporated Dy/ 166 Ho digest is dissolved in another 1 mL of 0.1 M HNO 3 and injected onto the HPLC column. 166 Ho is collected in 20-25 mL of α-HIBA and evaporated to dryness as before at about 400 C to ensure complete decomposition of the α-HIBA. The product is finally dissolved in about I mL of 0.1 M HCI and pumped through a 0.22 μM filter to a product vial

  3. Separation of no-carrier-added 66,67Ga from bulk cobalt by a biopolymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Anupam; Nayak, Dalia; Lahiri, Susanta

    2007-01-01

    Heavy ion activation of natural cobalt foil with 80.5MeV 12 C results in the formation of no-carrier-added 66,67 As radionuclides, along with their corresponding decay products, 66,67 Ge and 66,67 Ga in the matrix. Attempt has been made to separate the no-carrier-added gallium radionuclides from the target matrix cobalt using a biopolymer, Fe doped calcium alginate (Fe-CA) beads. A complete separation was achieved by adsorbing 66,67 Ga and lesser amount of bulk Co at pH3 followed by washing the beads with 0.4M NaNO. (author)

  4. Direct no-carrier-added {sup 18}F-labelling of arenes via nucleophilic substitution on aryl(2-thienyl)iodonium salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, T.L.

    2006-01-15

    For in vivo imaging of molecular processes via positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers of high specific activity are demanded. In case of the most commonly used positron emitter fluorine-18, this is only achievable with no-carrier-added [{sup 18}F]fluoride, which implies nucleophilic methods of {sup 18}F-substitution. Whereas electron deficient aromatic groups can be labelled in one step using no-carrier-added [{sup 18}F]fluoride, electron rich {sup 18}F-labelled aromatic molecules are only available by multi-step radiosyntheses or carrier-added electrophilic reactions. Here, diaryliodonium salts represent an alternative, since they have been proven as potent precursor for a direct nucleophilic {sup 18}F-introduction into aromatic molecules. Furthermore, as known from non-radioactive studies, the highly electron rich 2-thienyliodonium leaving group leads to a high regioselectivity in nucleophilic substitution reactions. Consequently, a direct nucleophilic no-carrier-added {sup 18}F-labelling of electron rich arenes via aryl(2-thienyl)iodonium precursors was developed in this work. The applicability of direct nucleophilic {sup 18}F-labelling was examined in a systematic study on eighteen aryl(2-thienyl)iodonium salts. As electron rich precursors the ortho-, meta- and para-methoxyphenyl(2-thienyl)iodonium bromides, iodides, tosylates and triflates were synthesised. In addition, para-substituted (R=BnO, CH{sub 3}, H, Cl, Br, I) aryl(2-thienyl)iodonium bromides were prepared as precursors with a systematically varying electron density. As first approach, the general reaction conditions of the nucleophilic {sup 18}F-substitution procedure were optimised. The best conditions for direct nucleophilic no-carrier-added {sup 18}F-labelling via aryl(2-thienyl)iodonium salts were found with dimethylformamide as solvent, a reaction temperature of 130{+-}3 C and 25 mmol/l as concentration of the precursor. (orig.)

  5. Direct no-carrier-added 18F-labelling of arenes via nucleophilic substitution on aryl(2-thienyl)iodonium salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, T.L.

    2006-01-01

    For in vivo imaging of molecular processes via positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers of high specific activity are demanded. In case of the most commonly used positron emitter fluorine-18, this is only achievable with no-carrier-added [ 18 F]fluoride, which implies nucleophilic methods of 18 F-substitution. Whereas electron deficient aromatic groups can be labelled in one step using no-carrier-added [ 18 F]fluoride, electron rich 18 F-labelled aromatic molecules are only available by multi-step radiosyntheses or carrier-added electrophilic reactions. Here, diaryliodonium salts represent an alternative, since they have been proven as potent precursor for a direct nucleophilic 18 F-introduction into aromatic molecules. Furthermore, as known from non-radioactive studies, the highly electron rich 2-thienyliodonium leaving group leads to a high regioselectivity in nucleophilic substitution reactions. Consequently, a direct nucleophilic no-carrier-added 18 F-labelling of electron rich arenes via aryl(2-thienyl)iodonium precursors was developed in this work. The applicability of direct nucleophilic 18 F-labelling was examined in a systematic study on eighteen aryl(2-thienyl)iodonium salts. As electron rich precursors the ortho-, meta- and para-methoxyphenyl(2-thienyl)iodonium bromides, iodides, tosylates and triflates were synthesised. In addition, para-substituted (R=BnO, CH 3 , H, Cl, Br, I) aryl(2-thienyl)iodonium bromides were prepared as precursors with a systematically varying electron density. As first approach, the general reaction conditions of the nucleophilic 18 F-substitution procedure were optimised. The best conditions for direct nucleophilic no-carrier-added 18 F-labelling via aryl(2-thienyl)iodonium salts were found with dimethylformamide as solvent, a reaction temperature of 130±3 C and 25 mmol/l as concentration of the precursor. (orig.)

  6. Synthesis of no-carrier-added radiobrominated n-alkylated analogues of spiperone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moerlein, S.M.; Laufer, P.; Stoecklin, G.

    1985-01-01

    The synthesis of a series of p-bromo-3-N-alkyl spiperone analogues is described. N-alkylation was achieved via reaction of the potassium salt of the spiperone lactam ring with alkyl iodide; subsequent reactions with elemental bromine gave the p-brominated isomers. Optimization studies using no-carrier-added (n.c.a.) 77 Br - indicated that radio-bromination of N-alkyl spiperone analogues occurs with higher yields and in shorter reaction times when dichloramine-T (DCT) is used rather than H 2 0 2 /acetic acid as an oxidant. The production of the title compounds in high effective specific activity with radiochemical yields of 20-30 % using n.c.a. 77 Br - and DCT is reported. (author)

  7. Synthesis of no-carrier-added [{sup 18}F]fluoroacetate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaemin Jeong; Dongsoo Lee; Junekey Chung; Myungchul Lee; Changsoon Koh [Seoul National Univ. Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Dept., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Samsik Kang [Seoul National Univ. Hospital, Natural Products Research Inst., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-05-01

    To synthesize no-carrier-added potassium [{sup 18}F]fluoroacetate, Omesyl glycolate ethyl ester and O-tosyl glycolate ethyl ester were synthesized as prescursors. These precursors were radiolabeled by reacting with dried tetrabutylammonium [{sup 18}F]fluoride in the presence of tetrabutylammonium bicarbonate. O-Mesyl glycolate ethyl ester showed higher {sup 18}F incorporation (77.6% at 100{sup o}C) than O-tosyl glycolate ethyl ester (63.2% at 100{sup o}C). Resulting [{sup 18}F]fluoroacetate ethyl ester was hydrolyzed quantitatively by heating in 1 M potassium hydroxide solution. The [{sup 18}F]fluoroacetate was adsorbed to strong anion exchange resin and washed with excess water. Following elution with 1 M sodium bicarbonate solution and passing through Sep-Pak neutral aluminia column, the [{sup 18}F]fluoroacetate was obtained with 24.5% recovery (non-decay-corrected). Total labelling time from drying {sup 18}F to final product was 70 to 90 min. (author).

  8. Speciation of no-carrier-added 68Ga prior to its labeling for PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamalika Sen; Breeman, W.A.P.; Wolterbeek, H.Th.

    2012-01-01

    The present article describes the probable speciation of 68 Ga radionuclide just before labeling to DOTA peptides for PET imaging. The 68 Ga eluted from an anion exchange column after its purification was analyzed for its elemental composition and pH at several stages. Neutron activation analysis of the eluted fractions yields the concentrations of Na and Cl, pH measurements indicate the concentration of free H + ions in the medium and specific activity calculations indicate the concentration of 68 Ga in the solution. Using all these information we get the idea of speciation of no carrier added Ga in the eluted fractions from CHEAQS programme. The estimations indicate that Ga is mostly present as GaCl 2+ in the total MiliQ eluate. However, just before labeling of DOTA the pH of the Ga-containing eluate is adjusted to ∼3.5 using HEPES buffer and at that condition Ga remains as Ga 3+ species which is responsible for a successful and efficient labeling. The MilliQ eluate collected before actual labeling was estimated for trace elements using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry was found to contain a few ppb of Al, Co, Pd and Pt that did not interfere in the actual labeling. A clear idea about the prerequisite of 68 Ga species before labeling to a peptide might be of special interest for its judicious application as a radiopharmaceutical. (author)

  9. New separation method of no-carrier-added {sup 47}Sc from titanium targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartos, B.; Majkowska, A.; Kasperek, A.; Krajewski, S.; Bilewicz, A. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warszawa (Poland). Nuclear Chemistry and Radiochemistry Center

    2012-07-01

    Radionuclides with medium energy beta emission and a several day half-life are attractive candidates for radioimmunotherapy. Among the most promising in this category is {sup 47}Sc produced by fast neutron irradiation (E{sub n} > 1 MeV) of titanium target with high energy neutrons in {sup 47}Ti(n,p){sup 47}Sc nuclear reaction. In the previously reported production scheme the dissolution of the TiO{sub 2} target in hot concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and evaporation of the resulting solution were the most time-consuming steps. The present paper describes new, simple and efficient production method of {sup 47}Sc, where the slow dissolution of the target is avoided. After irradiation in fast neutron flux {sup 47}TiO{sub 2} and Li{sub 2}{sup 47}TiF{sub 6} targets were dissolved in HF solutions. Next {sup 47}Sc was separated from the target using anion exchange resin Dowex 1 with 0.4 M HF + 0.06 M HNO{sub 3} solution as eluent. The eluted {sup 47}Sc was adsorbed on cation exchange resin and eluted with 0.5 M of ammonium acetate. The 47Sc separation yield in the proposed procedure is about 90% with the separation time less than 2 h. The obtained no-carrier-added {sup 47}Sc was used to label DOTATATE conjugate with 96% labeling yield. (orig.)

  10. Reactor production and separation of no-carrier added 32P for medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vimalnath, K.V.; Shetty, P.; Rajeswari, A.; Chirayil, V.; Chakraborty, S.; Dash, A.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorous-32 is an attractive and widely used therapeutic radionuclide owing to its favorable nuclear characteristics. The major application of 32 P is the treatment option for a distinct subgroup of elderly patients with polycythemia vera and leukemia. The tremendous prospects associated with the use of 32 P along with the challenge of providing 32 P of acceptable specific activity and purity amenable for in vivo therapy, led to development of a 32 P production strategy. The 32 S(n,p) 32 P route of production provide the scope of obtaining high specific activities or no carrier added (NCA) 32 P. In a typical batch of 14 nos. of neutron irradiated Al containers, each containing 18 g of sulphur, were processed. In the quest for an effective separation method to isolate micro gram of 32 P formed during the neutron irradiation of sulphur, the prospect of using distillation under reduced pressure to achieve complete removal of sulfur seemed to be an effective proposition and motivated us to adopt. The experimental parameters that influence the distillation were identified and a careful control has been exercised to ensure complete removal of sulphur from 32 P within reasonable time period. The 32 P remained in the distillation flask was quantitatively collected by leaching with 0.05 N HCl with gentle heating at 80℃ for 3 hours. In the light of the perceived need to remove cationic impurities from the 32 P leachate, it was passed through an ion-exchange chromatography column containing a cation exchange resin (Dowex 50 x 8 H + , 100-200 mesh) wherein all the cationic impurities get trapped and H 3 32 PO 4 solution was collected as effluent. Recognizing the fact that H 3 32 PO 4 produced is to be used for clinical applications, a thorough quality assessment was carried out. Radionuclidic purity was ascertained by a measurement of its half-life. In order to establish the absence of extraneous gamma emitting radionuclide impurities, gamma spectrum of the appropriately

  11. Fluorine-18 labeling of small molecules: the use of 18F-labeled aryl fluorides derived from no-carrier-added [18F]fluoride as labeling precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuest, F

    2007-01-01

    The favourable long-half life, the ease of production and the low energy of the emitted positron make 18F an ideal radionuclide for PET imaging. Radiochemistry of 18F basically relies on two distinctive types of reactions: nucleophilic and electrophilic reactions. All syntheses of 18F-labeled radiotracers are based on either [18F]fluoride ion or [18F]fluorine gas as simple primary labeling precursors which are obtained directly from the cyclotron. They can be applied either directly to the radiosynthesis or they can be transformed into more complex labeling precursors enabling the multi-step build-up of organic tracer molecules. The topic of this review is a survey on the application of several 18F-labeled aryl fluorides as building blocks derived from no-carrier-added (n.c.a.) [18F] fluoride to build up small monomeric PET radiotracers at high specific radioactivity by multi-step synthesis procedures.

  12. Separation of no-carrier-added 107,109Cd from proton induced silver target. Classical chemistry still relevant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moumita Maiti; Susanta Lahiri; Tomar, B.S.

    2011-01-01

    The classical chemistry like precipitation technique is relevant even in modern days trans-disciplinary research from the view point of green chemistry. A definite demand of no-carrier-added (nca) cadmium tracers, namely, 107,109 Cd, has been realized for diverse applications. Development of efficient separation technique is therefore important to address the purity of the tracers for various applications. No-carrier-added 107,109 Cd radionuclides were produced by bombarding natural silver target matrix with 13 MeV protons, which gave ∼15 MBq/μA h yield for nca 107 Cd. The nca cadmium radionuclides were separated from the natural silver target matrix by precipitating Ag as AgCl. The developed method is an example wherein green chemistry is used in trans-disciplinary research. The method is also simple, fast, cost effective and environmentally benign. (author)

  13. A new, simple, high-yield synthesis of 'no-carrier-added' 11C-labelled DMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diksic, M.; McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes a fast (20 min), convenient and high yield synthesis of ''no-carrier-added'' 11 C-labelled 5,5-dimethyloxazoladine-2,4-dione (DMO). During the synthesis [ 11 C]phosgene is reacted in situ with 2-hydroxy-2-methylpropionamide in the presence of KOH for 20 min in a -5 0 C bath and then for 5 min at room temperature. Filtration through a reverse-phase (C 18 ) Sep-Pack column purifies the final product. This synthesis yields about 40 mCi of 11 C-labelled DMO (radiochemical yield 40-60%) with a chemical purity exceeding 98% and a radiochemical purity exceeding 99%. The specific activity at the end of the synthesis is 80 Ci/mmol. (author)

  14. Separation of no-carrier-added Cu-64 from a proton irradiated Ni-64 enriched nickel target

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Xiaolin; Jacobsen, U.; Jørgensen, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    An ion exchange method has been developed to separate no-carrier-added Cu-64 from irradiated Ni target. The target is first dissolved in nitric acid and the solution is evaporated to dryness and the residue is dissolved in an ethanol-HCl solution. Cu, Co and Ni in ethanol-HCl solution...... are then absorbed on an anion exchange column. Co and Ni are removed from the column by eluting with 72% ethanol-0.3mol/l HCl. Finally, the Cu-64 is eluted with water. For separating Ni from Co isotopes and recovering the Ni-64 target, the eluate of 72% ethanol-0.3 mol/l HCl is evaporated to dryness, the residue...

  15. Automated chemoenzymatic synthesis of no-carrier-added [carbonyl-{sup 11}C]propionyl L-carnitine for pharmacokinetic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davenport, R.J.; Pike, V.W.; Dowsett, K.; Turton, D.R.; Poole, K. [Hammersmith Hospital, London (United Kingdom). MRC Cyclotron Unit

    1997-07-30

    Propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC) is under development as a therapeutic for the treatment of peripheral artery disease, coronary heart disease and chronic heart failure. Three methods were examined for labelling PLC in its propionyl group with positron-emitting carbon-11 (t{sub 1/2} = 20.3 min), one chemical and two chemoenzymatic. The former was based on the preparation of [{sup 11}C]propionyl chloride as labelling agent via {sup 11}C-carboxylation of ethylmagnesium bromide with cyclotron-produced [{sup 11}C]carbon dioxide and subsequent chlorination. Reaction of carrier-added [{sup 11}C]propionyl chloride with L-carnitine in trifluoroacetic acid gave [{sup 11}C]PLC in 12% radiochemical yield (decay-corrected) from cyclotron-produced [{sup 11}C]carbon dioxide. However, the radiosynthesis was unsuccessful at the no-carrier added (NCA) level of specific radioactivity. [{sup 11}C]Propionate, as a radioactive precursor for chemoenzymatic routes, was prepared via carboxylation of ethylmagnesium bromide with [{sup 11}C]carbon dioxide and hydrolysis. NCA [{sup 11}C]PLC was prepared in 68 min in 14% radiochemical yield (decay-corrected) from [{sup 11}C]propionate via sequential conversions catalysed by acetate kinase, phosphotransacetylase and carnitine acetyltransferase. A superior chemoenzymatic synthesis of NCA [{sup 11}C]PLC was developed, based on the use of a novel supported Grignard reagent for the synthesis of [{sup 11}C]propionate and conversions by S-acetyl-CoA synthetase and carnitine acetyltransferase. This gave an overall radiochemical yield of 30-48% (decay-corrected). This synthesis was automated for radiation safety and provides pure NCA [{sup 11}C]PLC in high radioactivities ready for intravenous administration within 25 min from radionuclide production. The [{sup 11}C]PLC is suitable for pharmacokinetic studies in human subjects with PET and the elucidation of the fate of the propionyl group of PLC in vivo. (Author).

  16. A novel no-carrier-added submicromolar scale radiosynthesis of [S-methyl-14C]-florfenicol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, G; Prabhakar, G; Unny, V K P; Sudhakar, K; Mukkanti, K; Choudary, B M

    2013-06-30

    In this paper is reported a novel reaction scheme for the no-carrier-added submicromolar scale radiosynthesis of [S-methyl-(14)C]-florfenicol that has been newly designed, developed and employed by us successfully. The [(14)C]-product was obtained in an overall radiochemical yield of 30% based on [(14)C]-methyl iodide taken for the reaction with a radiochemical purity of more than 96%. The specific activity of the product was ~50 mCi (1.85 GBq)/mmol. Chlorosulfonation of compound I was followed by sodium salt formation in situ and it was succeeded by the introduction of [(14)C]-methyl group by coupling with [(14)C]-CH3 I. Subsequently, the oxazolidin-2-one protecting group was opened up by a reaction with sulfuric acid in dioxane and later, the amino group was dichloroacetylated with methyl-2,2-dichloroacetate in triethylamine to obtain [S-methyl-(14)C]-florfenicol. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Separation and purification of no-carrier-added arsenic from bulk amounts of germanium for use in radiopharmaceutical labelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahn, M.; Radchenko, V.; Roesch, F.; Jennewein, M. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Nuclear Chemsistry; Filosofov, D. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation). Lab. of Nuclear Problems; Hauser, H.; Eisenhut, M. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany). Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry

    2010-07-01

    Radioarsenic labelled radiopharmaceuticals could add special features to molecular imaging with positron emission tomography (PET). For example the long physical half-lives of {sup 72}As (T{sub 1/2}=26 h) and {sup 74}As (T{sub 1/2}=17.8 d) in conjunction with their high positron branching rates of 88% and 29%, respectively, allow the investigation of slow physiological or metabolical processes, like the enrichment and biodistribution of monoclonal antibodies in tumour tissue or the characterization of stem cell trafficking. A method for separation and purification of no-carrier-added (nca) arsenic from irradiated metallic germanium targets based on distillation and anion exchange is developed. It finally converts the arsenic into an {sup *}As(III) synthon in PBS buffer and pH 7 suitable for labelling of proteins via As-S bond formations. The method delivers radioarsenic in high purity with separation factors of 10{sup 6} from germanium and an overall yield from target to labelling synthon of > 40%. In a proof-of-principle experiment, the monoclonal antibody Bevacizumab, directed against the human VEGF receptor, was labelled with a radiochemical yield > 90% within 1 h at room temperature with nca {sup 72/74/77}As. (orig.)

  18. Production and separation of no-carrier-added thallium isotopes from proton irradiated (nat)Hg₂Cl₂ matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Binita; Maiti, Moumita; Lahiri, Susanta

    2011-10-01

    For the first time, (nat)Hg₂Cl₂ target has been used to produce no-carrier-added-NCA (197,198,198m,199,200,201)Tl radionuclides using (nat)Hg(p,xn) reaction. Liquid-liquid extraction technique was employed in order to separate radiothallium from the bulk mercury matrix using liquid anion exchanger trioctylamine (TOA) dissolved in cyclohexane. In order to verify the presence of stable Hg in Tl fraction, the entire process was repeated with stable salts of Hg and Tl and the extent of separation was examined by Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES). High separation factors were observed both by radiometric and ICP-OES technique when 0.1 M HNO³ and 0.1M TOA were used as aqueous and organic phase, respectively. The Hg contamination was less than 0.3 ppm in the aqueous phase containing Tl after three times of extraction at the optimal condition. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Green methods for the radiochemical separations of no-carrier-added 61Cu, 62Zn from 7Li irradiated cobalt target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moumita Maiti; Kaustab Ghosh; Susanta Lahiri

    2015-01-01

    A nat Co target was irradiated with 47 MeV 7 Li beam to produce no-carrier-added 61 Cu, 62 Zn in the target matrix. Two new green radiochemical methods were developed for separation of 61 Cu and 62 Zn from the target matrix, (i) liquid-liquid extraction (LLX) technique using room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([C 4 mim][PF 6 ]) and ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) (ii) adsorption on calcium alginate beads. (author)

  20. Separation of no-carrier-added 66,67Ga produced in heavy ion-induced cobalt target using alginate biopolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayak, Dalia; Banerjee, Anupam; Lahiri, Susanta

    2007-01-01

    Heavy ion activation of natural cobalt foil with 84 MeV 12 C results in the formation of no-carrier-added (nca) 66,67 As radionuclides, along with their corresponding decay products, 66,67 Ge and 66,67 Ga, in the matrix. Because arsenic and germanium radionuclides are short-lived, after a cooling period of 10 h only nca gallium radionuclides remain in the matrix. We attempted to separate the nca gallium radionuclides from the target matrix cobalt by biopolymeric calcium alginate (CA) and Fe-doped calcium alginate (Fe-CA) beads. A complete separation has been achieved by adsorbing 66,67 Ga and a lesser amount of bulk cobalt at pH 3 on Fe-CA beads, followed by desorbing cobalt from the beads with 0.4 M NaNO 2

  1. Ionic Liquid-salt based aqueous biphasic system for quick separation of no-carrier-added 203Pb from proton irradiated natTl2CO3 target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhury, Dibyasree; Ghosh, Kaustab; Lahiri, Susanta; Sarkar, Kangkana; Naskar, Nabanita

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, no-carrier-added (NCA) 203 Pb was radiochemically separated from bulk Tl target applying the ABS composing of 4 M K 2 HPO 4 and 0.1 mL of different strengths of IL (bmim)Cl ranging from 40% to 80% (w/v). Bulk Tl was spiked with 200Tl (T 1/2 = 26.1 h). A separation condition was achieved with 70% IL concentration and with 10 min shaking and 10 min settling time, where ∼84% of NCA 203 Pb was extracted into the IL rich phase with ∼10% contamination from bulk Tl. Therefore, further studies, i.e. variation in shaking and settling time were carried out keeping the concentration of IL fixed at 70%

  2. No-carrier-added (NCA) N-(3-( sup 18 F)fluoropropyl)-N-norbuprenorphine and N-(3-( sup 18 F)fluoropropyl)-N-nordiprenorphine -synthesis, anatomical distribution in mice and rats, and tomographic studies in a baboon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanqin Bai; Renrui Teng; Chyngyann Shiue; Wolf, A.P.; Dewey, S.L. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Holland, M.J.; Simon, E.J. (New York Univ., NY (USA). Medical Center)

    1990-01-01

    N-(3-Fluoropropyl)-N-norbuprenorphine (3a) and N-(3-fluoropropyl)-N-nordiprenorphine (4a) were synthesized by N-alkylation of norbuprenorphine (1) and nordiprenorphine (2) with 1-bromo-3-fluoropropane. The corresponding no-carrier-added (NCA) N-(3-({sup 18}F)fluoropropyl)-N-norbuprenorphine (3b) and N-(3-({sup 18}F)fluoropropyl)-N-nordiprenorphine (4b) were synthesized by N-alkylation of 1 and 2 with NCA 1-({sup 18}F)fluoro-3-iodopropane. In vitro studies indicate that in the absence of sodium chloride, compounds 3a, 4a, N-propyl-N-norbuprenorphine (5), buprenorphine and diprenorphine are reasonably comparable in binding affinity for opioid receptors. In the presence of 100 mM sodium chloride, however, compounds 3a, 4a and 5, are clearly less potent than buprenorphine and diprenorphine. The anatomical distribution study of compound 3b in mice shows radioactivity accumulating in bone. Rat studies of both compounds 3b and 4b indicate the specific distribution of these two radioligands within certain cortical and subcortical regions of rat brain. However, the absolute uptake of compound 4b in rat brain was only half that of compound 3b. PET studies of 3b in a baboon revealed specific binding of compound 3b in striatum and cerebellum. At 1 h after injection, ratios of specific/non-specific binding of 3b in striatum and cerebellum of a baboon were 1.9 and 1.7 respectively. (author).

  3. Synthesis of no carrier added F-18 16-fluorohexadecanoic acid (FHDA) and investigation of its labeled metabolites and its kinetics in the heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeGrado, T.R.; Bernstein, D.R.; Gatley, S.J.; Ng, C.K.; Holden, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    No carrier added FHDA was prepared via saponification of the product of silver oxide assisted reaction of near-anhydrous tetraethylammonium fluoride with methyl 16-iodohexadecanoate. The labeled fatty acid was injected into isolated perfused rat hearts. Coronary perfusate was collected for 4-9 minutes, when hearts were chilled and homogenized. F-18 in perfusate was analysed by HPLC (NH column; 50mM amm. acetate in 50% acetonitrile). Material with the same retention time as F-18 fluoroacetate (prepared by F-for-I exchange with ethyl iodoacetate) was found. Some F-18 stuck permanently to the column and was assigned as fluoride since the same fraction of label in perfusate was retained on alumina columns eluted with water. Anion exchange HPLC (SAX column; 20mM pot. phosphate, pH 7) of homogenates gave peaks corresponding to fluoroacetate plus fluoride and minor peaks which could be fluoroacetylCoA and fluorocitrate. The authors interpret their data as follows. Beta-oxidation of FHDA results in fluoroacetylCoA which either undergoes ''lethal synthesis'' to fluorocitrate or is hydrolysed to fluoroacetate which diffuses out of the heart. The source of the fluoride is not yet clear, but could complicate interpretation of FHDA kinetics measured in vivo with positron tomography. Clearance of label from FHDA in isolated perfused hearts was faster than for labeled 16-iodohexadecanoic acid, indicating that the F-18 tracer may be a more sensitive probe of myocardial fatty acid metabolism.

  4. Scandium phosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mel'nikov, P.P.; Komissarova, L.N.

    1988-01-01

    The review deals with scandium phosphates known by now, including mono- and condensed phosphates (di-, tri-, tetra phosphates and more condensed forms). Phosphates with complex cation and anion parts are also considered. The methods of preparation, structural types, structure peculiarities, physicochemical characteristics are generalized and application fields of the compounds mentioned are indicated

  5. Improved synthesis of no-carrier-added p-[{sup 124}I]iodo-L-phenylalanine and p-[{sup 131}I]iodo-L-phenylalanine for nuclear medicine applications in malignant gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Israel, Ina [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saarland University Medical Center, D-66421 Homburg (Germany); Brandau, Wolfgang [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Essen, D-45122 Essen (Germany); Farmakis, Georgios [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saarland University Medical Center, D-66421 Homburg (Germany); Samnick, Samuel [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saarland University Medical Center, D-66421 Homburg (Germany)], E-mail: rassam@uniklinikum-saarland.de

    2008-04-15

    This work describes the synthesis and the tumor affinity testing of no-carrier-added (n.c.a.) p-[{sup 124}I]iodo-L-phenyalanine ([{sup 124}I]IPA) and n.c.a. p-[{sup 131}I]iodo-L-phenyalanine ([{sup 131}I]IPA) as radiopharmaceuticals for imaging brain tumors with PET and for radionuclid-based therapy, respectively. Parameters for labeling were optimized with regard to the amount of precursor, temperature and time. Thereafter, n.c.a. [{sup 124}I]IPA and n.c.a. [{sup 131}I]IPA were investigated in rat F98 glioma and in primary human A1207 and HOM-T3868 glioblastoma cells in vitro, followed by an in vivo evaluation in CD1 nu/nu mice engrafted with human glioblastoma. No-carrier-added [{sup 124}I]IPA and n.c.a. [{sup 131}I]IPA were obtained in 90{+-}6% radiochemical yield and >99% radiochemical purity by iododestannylation of N-Boc-4-(tri-n-butylstannyl)-L-phenylalanine methylester in the presence of chloramine-T, followed by hydrolysis of the protecting groups. The total synthesis time, including the HPLC separation and pharmacological formulation, was less than 60 min and compatible with a clinical routine production. Both amino acid tracers accumulated intensively in rat and in human glioma cells. The radioactivity incorporation in tumor cells following a 15-min incubation at 37 {sup o}C/pH 7.4 varied from 25% to 42% of the total loaded activity per 10{sup 6} tumor cells (296-540 cpm/1000 cells). Inhibition experiments confirmed that n.c.a. [{sup 124}I]IPA and n.c.a. [{sup 131}I]IPA were taken up into tumor by the sodium-independent L- and ASC-type transporters. Biodistribution and whole-body imaging by a gamma-camera and a PET scanner demonstrated a high targeting level and a prolonged retention of n.c.a. [{sup 124}I]IPA and n.c.a. [{sup 131}I]IPA within the xenotransplanted human glioblastoma and a primarily renal excretion. However, an accurate delineation of the tumors in mice was not possible by our imaging systems. Radioactivity accumulation in the thyroid and

  6. Synthesis of a Potent Aminopyridine-Based nNOS-Inhibitor by Two Recent No-Carrier-Added 18F-Labelling Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Drerup

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO, an important multifunctional signaling molecule, is produced by three isoforms of NO-synthase (NOS and has been associated with neurodegenerative disorders. Selective inhibitors of the subtypes iNOS (inducible or nNOS (neuronal are of great interest for decoding neurodestructive key factors, and 18F-labelled analogues would allow investigating the NOS-function by molecular imaging with positron emission tomography. Especially, the highly selective nNOS inhibitor 6-((3-((3-fluorophenethylaminomethylphenoxymethyl-4-methylpyridin-2-amine (10 lends itself as suitable compound to be 18F-labelled in no-carrier-added (n.c.a. form. For preparation of the 18F-labelled nNOS-Inhibitor [18F]10 a “build-up” radiosynthesis was developed based on a corresponding iodonium ylide as labelling precursor. The such activated phenethyl group of the compound was efficiently and regioselectively labelled with n.c.a. [18F]fluoride in 79% radiochemical yield (RCY. After conversion by reductive amination and microwave assisted displacement of the protecting groups, the desired nNOS-inhibitor was obtained in about 15% total RCY. Alternatively, for a simplified “late-stage” 18F-labelling procedure a corresponding boronic ester precursor was synthesized and successfully used in a newer, copper(II mediated n.c.a. 18F-fluoro-deboroniation reaction, achieving the same total RCY. Thus, both methods proved comparatively suited to provide the highly selective NOS-inhibitor [18F]10 as probe for preclinical in vivo studies.

  7. Automated no-carrier-added synthesis of [1-11C]-labeled D- and L-enantiomers of lactic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drandarov, Konstantin; Schubiger, P. August; Westera, Gerrit

    2006-01-01

    The first purely chemical method for automated no-carrier-added synthesis of [1- 11 C]-labeled D(R)- and L(S)-2-hydroxypropanoic acid (lactic acid) was developed for experimental neurophysiology studies and position emission tomography (PET) diagnosis. Starting from sodium 1-hydroxyethanesulfonate and [ 11 C]HCN (trapped as [ 11 C]KCN) the intermediate DL-(R,S)-[1- 11 C]-2-hydroxypropanenitrile was prepared. Its rapid acid hydrolysis gave DL-(R,S)-[1- 11 C]lactic acid, which was isolated by preparative reversed phase HPLC and automatically injected on a second preparative C 18 HPLC column coated with a chiral selector, where both [1- 11 C]lactic acid enantiomers were separated by chiral ligand-exchange chromatography. Two novel chiral selectors for HPLC enantiomeric separation of α-hydroxy acids, namely D(R)- or L(S)-2-amino-3-methyl-3-(5-phenylpentylsulfanyl)-butanoic acid were utilized for the preparative HPLC separation of the [1- 11 C]lactic acid enantiomers. The preparation of the selectors and the coating procedure for the manufacturing of the preparative chiral HPLC columns are described. A highly efficient trap for [ 11 C]HCN is presented. The whole radiosynthesis is automated, takes about 45 min and leads to more than 80% decay corrected overall radiochemical yield of each enantiomer (up to 2.5 GBq) with over 99% radiochemical, chemical and enantiomeric purity. The specific activity at the end of the synthesis is about 400 GBq/μmol

  8. A facile and improved synthesis of 17[alpha]-[l brace]2-(E)-[[sup 125]I]-iodovinyl[r brace]-19-nortestosterone, a no-carrier-added ligand for progesterone receptor analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damodaran, K.M. (Pittsburgh Cancer Inst., PA (United States)); Epperly, M.W.; Pillai, K.M.R.; Bloomer, W.D. (Pittsburgh Univ., PA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology Pittsburgh Cancer Inst., PA (United States))

    1994-01-01

    We have synthesized the no-carrier-added progesterone receptor ligand 17[alpha]-[l brace]2-(E)-[[sup 125]I]-iodovinyl[r brace]-19-nortestosterone (E-[sup 125]IVNNT) by a simple and high yielding method, and determined its uptake and specific progesterone receptor binding in vitro using T47D human breast carcinoma cells. (Author).

  9. Studies on low-carrier radiofluorination of non-active aromatics with no-carrier-added [{sup 18}F]fluoride; Untersuchungen zur traegerarmen Radiofluorierung nicht-aktiver Aromaten mit n.c.a. [{sup 18}F]Fluorid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardinale, Jens

    2013-01-15

    In vivo imaging with positron emission tomography generally demands radiotracers with a high specific activity. In case of fluorine-18 the required no-carrier-added (n.c.a.) starting material is only available in form of fluoride. This and the short half-life of 109.7 minutes of the radionuclide lead to the demand of special methods for radiosyntheses. The only practical procedure for manufacturing n.c.a. [{sup 18}F]fluoro-compounds is therefore nucleophilic substitution. There is, however, still a lack of effective procedures for the labelling of electron rich aromatic molecules starting from n.c.a. [{sup 18}F]fluoride. A process for n.c.a. radiofluorination of these compounds is offered by the reaction of iodonium compounds as starting materials. In this study modern procedures for the synthesis of iodoniumsalts and -ylides were investigated. Several precursor molecules for the versatile synthetic building block 4-[{sup 18}F]fluoroiodobenzene were synthesised. In this course, a new one-pot procedure for the synthesis of iodoniumylides was developed. Further on, the syntheses of suitable iodonium precursors for two fluorophenoxy-derivatives, which are possible antidepressants, were investigated. Due to their binding profile these compounds can be considered as ligands for the serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT) and the norepinephrin reuptake transporter (NET), respectively. The preparation of appropriate iodonium salts proved to be too problematic, while the synthesis of suitable iodoniumylides could be accomplished with satisfactory yields of about 30% and 40 %, respectively. Both compounds were labelled with n.c.a. [{sup 18}F]fluoride and deprotected to the desired target compounds 4-((3-[{sup 18}F]fluorophenoxy)(phenyl)methyl)piperidine and 4-((4-[{sup 18}F]fluorophenoxy)(phenyl)methyl)piperidine in radiochemical yields of about 40 % and 25 %, respectively. Those are now available for preclinical evaluation studies. Furthermore, a process for the palladium

  10. Scandium fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melnikov, P.; Nalin, M.; Messaddeq, Y.

    1997-01-01

    A new modification of scandium fluoride has been synthesised. The compound is deficient in fluorine, with the composition ScF 2.76 . It belongs to the tetragonal system, lattice parameters being a=3.792 and c=6.740 A and may be obtained at low temperatures by the decomposition of the precursor NH 4 ScF 4 . The reaction is topotactic, tetragonal parameters of the precursor are a=4.021 and c=6.744 A. Structural relationships with various fluorides and ammonium aminofluorides are discussed. This synthesis route with IR-assisted decomposition should be considered as a soft-chemistry approach. (orig.)

  11. Preparation of no-carrier-added [1-11C]ethylene and [1-11C]1,2-dibromoethane as new labelling agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, F.; Pike, V.W.; Dowsett, K.

    1997-01-01

    A method is described for the preparation of NCA [1- 11 C] ethylene based on the passage of [1- 11 C]ethanol over heated (550 o C) quartz glass in a stainless steel tube (in preference to dehydration by catalysis on γ-alumina or pyrolysis). The [1- 11 C]ethanol is prepared from cyclotron-produced NCA [ 11 C]carbon dioxide by 11 C-carboxylation of methylmagnesium bromide, freshly prepared in dibutyl ether, and reduction of the adduct with lithium aluminium hydride in diglyme. The use of involatile solvents avoids the formation of carrier ethylene and radioactive and stable diethyl ether by cracking processes over the heated catalyst. The preparation takes 21 min from the end of radionuclide production and has a radiochemical yield of 44%, decay-corrected from [ 11 C]carbon dioxide. NCA [1- 11 C] ethylene is converted quantitatively into [1- 11 C]1,2-dibromoethane when collected in a solution of bromine in carbon tetrachloride. The NCA [1- 11 C]ethylene and [1- 11 C]1,2-dibromoethane may serve as new and useful labelling agents. (Author)

  12. Ion exchange purification of scandium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herchenroeder, L.A.; Burkholder, H.R.

    1990-10-23

    An improvement in purification of scandium through ion exchange chromatography is disclosed in which the oxidation potential of the eluting solution is altered by the addition of potassium chlorate or ammonium chloride so that removal of contaminants is encouraged. The temperature, pH and concentration of the eluent HEDTA are controlled in order to maintain the scandium in the column while minimizing dilution of the scandium band. Recovery of scandium is improved by pumping dilute scandium over the column prior to stripping the scandium and precipitation. This eliminates the HEDTA ion and other monovalent cations contaminating the scandium band. This method maximizes recovery of scandium while maintaining purity. 2 figs.

  13. No-carrier-added synthesis of 3-[18F]fluoro-1-(2-nitro-1-imidazolyl)-2-propanol. A potential PET agent for detecting hypoxic but viable tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, D.-R.; Dence, C.S.; Bonasera, T.A.; Welch, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    Four different approaches towards the synthesis of [ 18 F]FMISO have been studied. The first approach was based on the reaction of epoxide and [ 18 F]fluoride. Both specific activity and radiochemical yield ( 18 F]FMISO were low. Two new approaches, failed to give [ 18 F]FMISO. The fourth approach, based on the reaction of [ 18 F]epifluorohydrin, prepared from Tosylate and [ 18 F]KF/Kryptofix 222, has provided a reliable, no-carrier added synthesis of [ 18F ]FMISO. The product was obtained in a radiochemical yield of 7-12% at end-of-synthesis (based on [ 18 F]fluoride) with a specific activity of >400 Ci/mmol and a synthesis time of 1.5 h. Preliminary PET studies suggest that [ 18 F]FMISO may be a promising tracer for delineation of ischemic but viable myocardium. (author)

  14. In vitro evaluation of no carrier added, carrier added and cross-complexed [{sup 9}Y]-EDTMP provides evidence for a novel 'foreign carrier theory'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toegel, Stefan [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna A-1090 (Austria); Institute of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmaceutics, University of Vienna, Vienna A-1090 (Austria); Mien, Leonhard-Key [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna A-1090 (Austria); Institute of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmaceutics, University of Vienna, Vienna A-1090 (Austria); Wadsak, Wolfgang [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna A-1090 (Austria); Department of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Vienna, Vienna A-1090 (Austria); Ludwig-Boltzmann-Institute for Nuclear Medicine, Vienna A-1090 (Austria); Eidherr, Harald [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna A-1090 (Austria); Institute of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmaceutics, University of Vienna, Vienna A-1090 (Austria); Viernstein, Helmut [Institute of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmaceutics, University of Vienna, Vienna A-1090 (Austria); Kluger, Rainer [Department of Orthopaedics, Donauspital, Vienna A-1090 (Austria); Ettlinger, Dagmar [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna A-1090 (Austria); Kletter, Kurt [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna A-1090 (Austria); Dudczak, Robert [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna A-1090 (Austria); Ludwig-Boltzmann-Institute for Nuclear Medicine, Vienna A-1090 (Austria); Mitterhauser, Markus [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna A-1090 (Austria) and Institute of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmaceutics, University of Vienna, Vienna A-1090 (Austria) and Hospital Pharmacy of the General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna A-1090 (Austria)]. E-mail: markus.mitterhauser@meduniwlan.ac.at

    2006-01-15

    The present study focused on the preparation of novel bone tracers containing yttrium as radionuclide or carrier. Moreover, these preparations were comparatively evaluated in vitro on the basis of a recently presented pre vivo model comprising binding studies on synthetic and human bone powder. It was shown that among the therapeutic radionuclides, no carrier added [{sup 9}Y]-EDTMP exceeded [{sup 188}Re]-EDTMP while yielding lower binding values than [{sup 153}Sm]-EDTMP. Furthermore, the authors investigated the influence of 'foreign' carriers added to [{sup 9}Y]-EDTMP, [{sup 99m}Tc]-EDTMP and [{sup 111}In]-EDTMP by the method of cross-complexation. The findings reveal a new paradigm: a carrier more foreign to the complexed radionuclide causes a higher binding increase on human bone matrices in vitro than a more 'related' carrier.

  15. Method for chromatographically recovering scandium and yttrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, T.S.; Stoltz, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a method for chromatographically recovering scandium and yttrium from the residue of a sand chlorinator. It comprises: providing a residue from a sand chlorinator, the residue containing scandium, yttrium, sodium, calcium and at least one radioactive metal of the group consisting of radium, thorium and uranium; digesting the residue with an acid to produce an aqueous liquid containing scandium, yttrium, sodium, calcium and at least one radioactive metal of the group consisting of radium, thorium and uranium; feeding the metal containing liquid through a cation exchanger; eluding the cation exchanger with an acid eluant to to produce: a first eluate containing at least half of the total weight of the calcium and sodium in the feed liquid; a second eluate containing at least half of the total weight of the one or more radioactive metals in the feed liquid; a third eluate containing at least half of the yttrium in the feed liquid, and a fourth eluate containing at least half of the weight of the scandium in the feed liquid

  16. Production of 93mMo through natY(7Li, 3n) reaction and subsequent studies on separation and extraction behaviour of no-carrier-added 93mMo from an yttrium target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayak, Dalia; Lahiri, Susanta

    2008-01-01

    The present work reports heavy-ion-assisted production of 93m Mo from a natural yttrium target using the 89 Y( 7 Li, 3n) 93m Mo reaction. Three different methodologies based on liquid-liquid extraction (LLX), aqueous biphasic extraction and precipitation, have been developed for separation and extraction of no-carrier-added (nca) 93m Mo (T 1/2 =6.85 h) radionuclide from bulk yttrium target. Complete separation of nca Mo from the target Y has been achieved by employing LLX technique with 0.1 M trioctylamine (TOA) dissolved in cyclohexane and 8 M HCl. Quantitative separation of 93m Mo from the yttrium target is also possible by precipitating bulk yttrium with 1 M oxalic acid. However, for this particular case, studies have shown that the aqueous biphasic extraction is not the method of choice for separation of nca Mo. Nevertheless, the extraction pattern is important in the context of simulation experiments for studying the behaviour of 106 Sg. Similarity or dissimilarity between the extraction patterns in various analytical systems will be helpful to decisively place Sg in the right position in the periodic table

  17. Scandium pertechnetate and its crystallohydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajtseva, L.L.; Velichko, A.V.; Demin, A.V.; Sukhikh, A.I.

    1982-01-01

    Scandium pertechnetate has been singled out for the first time and its composition, corresponding to the formula Sc(TcO 4 ) 3 x3H 2 O, has been determined. Mechanism of dehydration of scandium pertechnetate trihydrate, similar to the process of perrhenate dehydration is established and stability boundaries of crystallohydrates and anhydrous salt are determined. Phases of tri-, monohydrate and anhydrous scandium pertechnetate are identified using the methods of chemical analysis and IR spectroscopy

  18. Adsorption and desorption of hydrolyzed metal ions. 3. Scandium and chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, B.; Matijevic, E.; Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY

    1987-01-01

    Adsorption of scandium(III) and chromium(III) species on a PVC latex was measured using radioactive isotopes; the uptake increased with increasing pH. The data were interpreted by combining aspects of the models of James and Healy and also of Anderson and Bockris. The experimental and calculated results agree quite well for scandium, but not for chromium. The deviation in the latter case is believed to be due to polymerization of the hydrolyzed chromium cations and to the interaction of chromium with the anionic surface groups of the latex. Neither of these interactions occur with scandium. Hydrolyzed scandium species adsorbed on the latex were removed by acidifying the dispersion, while chromium complexes were not, substantiating the proposed difference in the chemical nature of chromium and scandium species at the solid/solution interface. 32 refs.; 8 figs.; 8 tabs

  19. On scandium selenites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Znamenskaya, A.S.; Komissarova, L.N.; Petrov, K.I.

    1979-01-01

    Using the methods of IR and PMR spectroscopy the structures of Sc 2 O(SeO 3 )x3H 2 O, Sc 2 (SeO 3 ) 3 x5H 2 O, ScH(SeO 3 ) 2 xH 2 O, Sc(HSeO 3 ) 3 and Sc 2 (Se 2 O 5 ) 3 are investigated. OH-groups are absent in the composition of the main selenite. Acid proton in ScH(SeO 3 ) 2 xH 2 O is delocalized and belongs to both selenite groups, and Sc(HSeO 3 ) 3 presents typical compound with acid stable anion. Distortion degree of SeO 3 group depends on the composition of compounds and differences in their coordination grow with the increase of their number. For scandium pyroselenite the presence of bridge group Se-O-Se is characteristic. Deuteration of the compounds showed that the band in the range of 500 cm -1 belongs to oscillation as to the bound Sc-O. As a result of coordination bond formation and also proton addition the symmetry of SeO 3 group is reduced. Scandium complex selenites MSc(SeO 3 ) 2 xH 2 O are built according to the type ScH(SeO 3 ) 2 xH 2 O. For all the compounds the presence of hydrogen bonds is characteristic except for Sc 2 (Se 2 O 5 ) 3

  20. Scandium Cluster and Metallocene Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Demir, Selvan

    2010-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the synthesis and characterization of scandium compounds. One goal was to investigate the solution reactivity of {CSc6}I12Sc, which resulted in the isolation of a molecular scandium nitride, [(C5H5)2ScNSc(C5H5)(THF)]2, and a scandium propoxide complex, [(C5H5)2Sc(µ-OPr)]2. Besides this, priority was given to the synthesis and characterization of the first scandium dinitrogen complex, [(C5Me4H)2Sc]2(µ-η2:η2-N2), along with its precursor compounds: (C5Me4H)2ScCl(THF), (C5...

  1. Scandium Terminal Imido Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Erli; Chu, Jiaxiang; Chen, Yaofeng

    2018-02-20

    Research into transition metal complexes bearing multiply bonded main-group ligands has developed into a thriving and fruitful field over the past half century. These complexes, featuring terminal M═E/M≡E (M = transition metal; E = main-group element) multiple bonds, exhibit unique structural properties as well as rich reactivity, which render them attractive targets for inorganic/organometallic chemists as well as indispensable tools for organic/catalytic chemists. This fact has been highlighted by their widespread applications in organic synthesis, for example, as olefin metathesis catalysts. In the ongoing renaissance of transition metal-ligand multiple-bonding chemistry, there have been reports of M═E/M≡E interactions for the majority of the metallic elements of the periodic table, even some actinide metals. In stark contrast, the largest subgroup of the periodic table, rare-earth metals (Ln = Sc, Y, and lanthanides), have been excluded from this upsurge. Indeed, the synthesis of terminal Ln═E/Ln≡E multiple-bonding species lagged behind that of the transition metal and actinide congeners for decades. Although these species had been pursued since the discovery of a rare-earth metal bridging imide in 1991, such a terminal (nonpincer/bridging hapticities) Ln═E/Ln≡E bond species was not obtained until 2010. The scarcity is mainly attributed to the energy mismatch between the frontier orbitals of the metal and the ligand atoms. This renders the putative terminal Ln═E/Ln≡E bonds extremely reactive, thus resulting in the formation of aggregates and/or reaction with the ligand/environment, quenching the multiple-bond character. In 2010, the stalemate was broken by the isolation and structural characterization of the first rare-earth metal terminal imide-a scandium terminal imide-by our group. The double-bond character of the Sc═N bond was unequivocally confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Theoretical investigations revealed the presence

  2. Organomercury derivatives of androstene and pregenenolone. Simple no-carrier-added syntheses of 6-iodoandrost-5-en-3β,17β-diol, 6-iodoandrost-5-en-3β-ol,17-one, 6-iodopregn-5-en-3β-ol-20-one and 6-iodopregn-5-en-3β,20-diol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flanagan, R.J.; Somayaji, V.V.; Wiebe, L.I.; Alberta Univ., Edmonton

    1986-01-01

    As part of an ongoing program to prepare radiolabelled steroids for steroid receptor mapping we required certain high specific activity no-carrier-added iodinated steroids. The design of these steroids was based on a combination of structure activity relationships and the requirements for the in vivo stability of the label. The latter consideration precluded the use of aliphatic iodides and obliged us to use vinylic iodides. Such vinylic iodides are, in general, difficult to prepare especially in high specific activity. We chose to prepare these molecules using precursors in which the labelling position is activated with mercury towards electrophilic substitution by radiohalogens. We have prepared a number of chloromercury analogues of androstene and pregenenolone. These chloromercury compounds undergo smooth reaction with [ 131 I]-iodine monochloride in ethanol to give the corresponding iodinated product. (author)

  3. Low temperature heat capacity of scandium and alloys of scandium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, T.W.E.

    1977-12-01

    The heat capacity of three electrotransport purified scandium samples has been measured from 1 to 20 0 K. The resultant electronic specific heat constant and Debye temperature are 10.337 +- 0.015 mJ/gm-atom K 2 and 346.7 +- 0.8 0 K respectively, and these values are believed to be truly representative of intrinsic scandium. Alloying studies have also been carried out to investigate the band structure of scandium based on the rigid band model, with zirconium to raise the electron concentration and magnesium to lower it. The results are then compared to the theoretical band structure calculations. Low temperature heat capacity measurements have also been made on some dilute Sc-Fe alloys. An anomaly is observed in the C/T vs. T 2 plot, but the C vs. T curve shows no evidence of magnetic ordering down to 1 0 K, and electrical resistance measurement from 4 to 0.3 0 K also indicates that no magnetic ordering took place

  4. Stability constants of scandium complexes, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Hisako; Itoh, Naomi; Suzuki, Yasuo

    1984-01-01

    The stability constants of scandium complexes with some carboxylate ligands were determined potentiometrically at 25.0 and 40.0 0 C and at an ionic strength of 0.10 with potassium nitrate as supporting electrolyte. The constants of the scandium complexes were appreciably greater than those of the corresponding lanthanoid complexes, as expected. The changes in free energy, enthalpy, and entropy for the formation of the scandium complexes were calculated from the stability constants at two temperatures. (author)

  5. Extraction of scandium by aromatic carboxylic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamenev, V.F.; Fadeeva, V.I.

    1977-01-01

    Extraction of complex compounds af scandium with salicylic, phenyl- and diphenylacetic acids with chloroform solutions of tetraethyldiamideheptylphosphate as a donor-active additive in relation to the pH and reagent concentration has been studied. Extraction of salicylates of some elements (Ta, Nb, Zr, Hf, Mo) by solutions of tetraethyldiamideheptylphosphate in chloroform has been investigated, and the possibility of their extraction separation from scandium is shown

  6. A basic evaluated neutronic data file for elemental scandium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.B.; Meadows, J.W.; Howerton, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    This report documents an evaluated neutronic data file for elemental scandium, presented in the ENDF/B-VI format. This file should provide basic nuclear data essential for neutronic calculations involving elemental scandium. No equivalent file was previously available

  7. Pilot-scale recovery of rare earths and scandium from phosphogypsum and uranium leachates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashkovtsev Maxim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ural Federal University (UrFU and VTT have performed joint research on development of industrial technologies for the extraction of REM and Scandium compounds from phosphogypsum and Uranium ISL leachate solutions. Leaching-absorption experiments at UrFU have been supported with multicomponent solution modelling by VTT. The simulations have been performed with VTT’s ChemSheet/Balas program and can be used for speciation calculations in the lixiviant solution. The experimental work combines solvent extraction with advanced ion exchange methodology in a pilot facility capable of treating 5 m3 solution per hour. Currently, the plant produces cerium carbonate, lanthanum oxide, neodymium oxide and concentrate of heavy rare earth metals. A batch of 45 t solids has been processed with the gain of 100 kg’s of REM concentrate. A mini-pilot plant with productivity above 50 liters per hour has been applied to recover scandium oxide and REE concentrates from the uranium ISL solution. As the preliminary product contains radioactivity (mainly strontium, an additional decontamination and cleaning of both concentrates by extraction has rendered a necessity. Finally a purified 99% concentrate of scandium oxide as well as 99% rare earth concentrate are received.

  8. Radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This pedagogical document presents the origin, effects and uses of radioactivity: where does radioactivity comes from, effects on the body, measurement, protection against radiations, uses in the medical field, in the electric power industry, in the food (ionization, radio-mutagenesis, irradiations) and other industries (radiography, gauges, detectors, irradiations, tracers), and in research activities (dating, preservation of cultural objects). The document ends with some examples of irradiation levels (examples of natural radioactivity, distribution of the various sources of exposure in France). (J.S.)

  9. Radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    Tables are presented of trends in annual emissions of radioactive gaseous effluents at sites of civil establishments in the U.K. Trends in the discharge to surface and coastal water sites in the U.K. and trends in the radioactivity of solid wastes dumped in the N.E. Atlantic and in the volume and activity level of wastes disposed at sites in the U.K. are presented. Tables of radioactivity in samples of fish and shellfish at selected sites are presented. Radioactivity from global fallout and the annual mean ratio of 90 Sr to calcium, and concentrations of 137 Cs in milk are given. Trends in estimated collective doses from the consumption of fish and shellfish in the U.K. and Europe are presented. (U.K.)

  10. Ternary scandium and transition metals germanides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotur, B.Ya.

    1992-01-01

    Brief review of data on phase diagram of ternary Sc-Me-Ge systems (Me-d - , f-transition element) is given. Isothermal sections at 870 and 1070 K of 17 ternary systems are plotted. Compositions and their structural characteristics are presented. Variability of crystal structure is typical for ternary scandium germanides: 70 compounds with the studied structure belong to 23 structural types. Ternary germanides isostructural to types of Sm 4 Ge 4 , ZrCrSi 2 , ZrNiAl, ScCeSi, TiNiSi U 4 Re 7 Si 6 145 compounds from 70 under investigation are mostly formed in studied systems

  11. Extractive Separation of Scandium from Rare Earth Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlobina Elena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The extractive separation of scandium and rare earth metals (REM was studied. The extractants used are trialkylbenzylammonium di-2-ethylhexylphosphate (TABAC-D2EHPA, binary extractant and trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO. The effect of concentration and nature of mineral acids on the scandium recovery was studied. Changing the HNO3 concentration in the range of 0.01 – 2.0 mol/L does not affect the extraction of metals by binary extractant, extraction corresponds to the following row: La, Eu, Gd < Tb scandium from rare earth metals by single extraction. Extraction of scandium by trioctylphosphineoxide from HCl solution proceeds quantitatively in the range of 0.5 – 7.0 mol/L, an increased HNO3 concentration leads to the decrease in scandium extraction. The conditions for the extractive separation of scandium and REM using TOPO solution were determined: scandium can be isolated selectively at the HNO3 concentration of 0.5 mol/L REM are transferred into the organic phase at the HNO3 concentration of 5.0 mol/L. It was determined that the organic phase extracts the compounds of the following composition: (ScA3 + R3R′NCl (HA - D2EHPA, R3R'NCl - TABAC and [Sc(NO33·3TOPO].

  12. Lifetime measurements and oscillator strengths in singly ionized scandium and the solar abundance of scandium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehlivan Rhodin, A.; Belmonte, M. T.; Engström, L.; Lundberg, H.; Nilsson, H.; Hartman, H.; Pickering, J. C.; Clear, C.; Quinet, P.; Fivet, V.; Palmeri, P.

    2017-12-01

    The lifetimes of 17 even-parity levels (3d5s, 3d4d, 3d6s and 4p2) in the region 57 743-77 837 cm-1 of singly ionized scandium (Sc II) were measured by two-step time-resolved laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Oscillator strengths of 57 lines from these highly excited upper levels were derived using a hollow cathode discharge lamp and a Fourier transform spectrometer. In addition, Hartree-Fock calculations where both the main relativistic and core-polarization effects were taken into account were carried out for both low- and high-excitation levels. There is a good agreement for most of the lines between our calculated branching fractions and the measurements of Lawler & Dakin in the region 9000-45 000 cm-1 for low excitation levels and with our measurements for high excitation levels in the region 23 500-63 100 cm-1. This, in turn, allowed us to combine the calculated branching fractions with the available experimental lifetimes to determine semi-empirical oscillator strengths for a set of 380 E1 transitions in Sc II. These oscillator strengths include the weak lines that were used previously to derive the solar abundance of scandium. The solar abundance of scandium is now estimated to logε⊙ = 3.04 ± 0.13 using these semi-empirical oscillator strengths to shift the values determined by Scott et al. The new estimated abundance value is in agreement with the meteoritic value (logεmet = 3.05 ± 0.02) of Lodders, Palme & Gail.

  13. Size Effects on Deformation and Fracture of Scandium Deuteride Films.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teresi, C. S. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Hintsala, E. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Hysitron, Inc., Eden Prairie, MN (United States); Adams, David P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Yang, Nancy Y. C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kammler, Daniel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Moody, N. R. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Gerberich, W. W. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Metal hydride films have been observed to crack during production and use, prompting mechanical property studies of scandium deuteride films. The following focuses on elastic modulus, fracture, and size effects observed in the system for future film mechanical behavior modeling efforts. Scandium deuteride films were produced through the deuterium charging of electron beam evaporated scandium films using X-ray diffraction, scanning Auger microscopy, and electron backscatter diffraction to monitor changes in the films before and after charging. Scanning electron microscopy, nanoindentation, and focused ion beam machined micropillar compression tests were used for mechanical characterization of the scandium deuteride films. The micropillars showed a size effect for flow stress, indicating that film thickness is a relevant tuning parameter for film performance, and that fracture was controlled by the presence of grain boundaries. Elastic modulus was determined by both micropillar compression and nanoindentation to be approximately 150 GPa, Fracture studies of bulk film channel cracking as well as compression induced cracks in some of the pillars yielded a fracture toughness around 1.0 MPa-m1/2. Preliminary Weibull distributions of fracture in the micropillars are provided. Despite this relatively low value of fracture toughness, scandium deuteride micropillars can undergo a large degree of plasticity in small volumes and can harden to some degree, demonstrating the ductile and brittle nature of this material

  14. Clinical evaluation of no-carrier-added meta-[123I]iodobenzylguanidine for myocardial scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knickmeier, M.; Matheja, P.; Schaefers, K.P.; Schober, O.; Schaefers, M.; Kies, P.; Breithardt, G.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical value of myocardial scintigraphy with n.c.a. [ 123 I]MIBG in patients with tachyarrhythmias. The study population comprised 24 patients with tachyarrhythmogenic diseases routinely studied by cardiac single-photon emission tomography (SPET) with [ 123 I]MIBG. Twelve of the 24 patients were studied with c.a. [ 123 I]MIBG (seven females and five males; mean age 42±13 years, range 20-60 years), whereas the other 12 were studied with n.c.a. [ 123 I]MIBG (ten females, two males; mean age 41±11 years, range 18-60 years, P=NS). For quantification of the specific uptake in the different organs, count ratios were calculated on SPET images acquired 4 h p.i. Visual analysis of all [ 123 I]MIBG scans showed improved image quality (improved contrast between heart and neighbouring organs) in n.c.a. studies as compared with c.a. studies. A significantly higher heart/left atrial blood ratio was found in the n.c.a. studies as compared with the c.a. studies (10.3±3.2 vs 5.3±1.3, P=0.0003); furthermore, significantly higher heart/lung and heart/liver ratios (2.5±0.6 vs 1.5±0.3, P=0.0002, and 0.8±0.2 vs 0.6±0.1, P=0.0006, respectively) were obtained in the c.a. studies, whereas lung/left atrial blood and liver/left atrial blood ratios showed no significant differences (4.2±1.3 vs 3.6±1.1, P=0.39, and 13.7±5.2 vs 9.6±2.2, P=0.21, respectively). In conclusion, the use of n.c.a. [ 123 I]MIBG yields a significantly higher myocardial uptake associated with improvement in contrast between the heart and neighbouring organs and is therefore superior to the commercially available c.a. [ 123 I]MIBG for use in clinical and research studies of the myocardial presynaptic sympathetic nervous system. Furthermore, our data indicate that for quantification the use of a left atrial blood reference region of interest, which is only available on SPET studies, is to be recommended.(orig./MG) (orig.)

  15. Synthesis and biodistribution of no-carrier-added [1-/sup 11/C]putrescine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McPherson, D.W.; Fowler, J.S.; Wolf, A.P.; Arnett, C.D.; Brodie, J.D.; Volkow, N.

    1985-01-01

    Recent studies using [/sup 3/H] and [/sup 14/C]putrescine have demonstrated the feasibility of using [/sup 11/C]putrescine as a selective metabolic tracer both for imaging brain tumors and, with the appropriate tracer kinetic model, for the quantitation tumor growth rate in humans using PET. The development of this new PET method requires, among other things, that the synthesis of the /sup 11/C-putrescine provide the labeled compound in sufficiently high specific activity that the normally low endogeneous levels of the diamine are not perturbed on administration of the tracer. Since a previous method for synthesis of [/sup 11/C]putrescine was not applicable to the NCA synthesis a new synthesis was developed. The synthesis of NCA [1-/sup 11/C]putrescine was based on the Michael addition of [/sup 11/C]cyanide to acrylonitrile followed by reduction of the /sup 11/C-labeled dinitrile with borane-methylsulfide complex. Radiochemical yield was 20%, synthesis time was 50 minutes and specific activity was > 1.4 Ci/μmol (EOB). This represents the first example of the use of the Michael addition reaction in the synthesis of a C-11 labeled compound. Tissue distribution in normal mice at 5, 30 and 60 minutes showed the expected low uptake in normal brain

  16. Smelting of Scandium by Microwave Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Fujii

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Scandium is being explored as an alloying element for aluminum alloys, which are gaining importance as high-performance lightweight structural alloys in the transportation industry. A few years ago, Sc was also found to be suitable for use in electrical devices. High-Sc-content ScAlN thin films have attracted significant attention because of their strong piezoelectricity. The piezoelectric response of ScAlN suggests that ScAlN thin films formed on a hard substrate would be suitable surface acoustic wave wideband filters for next-generation wireless communication systems. However, it is often difficult to use ScAlN thin films in MEMS devices—including acoustic ones—because of the extremely high price of metallic Sc, given the difficulty associated with smelting it. Here, we propose a novel process for smelting Sc metal by microwave irradiation. Sc metal was able to be obtained successfully from ScF3 through a microwave-irradiation-based carbon reduction reaction. The reaction temperature for this reduction process was approximately 880°C, which is half of that for the conventional smelting process involving reduction with Ca. Thus, the proposed microwave irradiation process has significant potential for use in the smelting of Sc metal.

  17. Formation of scandium carbides and scandium oxycarbide from the elements at high-(P, T) conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juarez-Arellano, Erick A.; Winkler, Bjoern; Bayarjargal, Lkhamsuren; Friedrich, Alexandra; Milman, Victor; Kammler, Daniel R.; Clark, Simon M.; Yan Jinyuan; Koch-Mueller, Monika; Schroeder, Florian; Avalos-Borja, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    Synchrotron diffraction experiments with in situ laser heated diamond anvil cells and multi-anvil press synthesis experiments have been performed in order to investigate the reaction of scandium and carbon from the elements at high-(P,T) conditions. It is shown that the reaction is very sensitive to the presence of oxygen. In an oxygen-rich environment the most stable phase is ScO x C y , where for these experiments x=0.39 and y=0.50-0.56. If only a small oxygen contamination is present, we have observed the formation of Sc 3 C 4 , Sc 4 C 3 and a new orthorhombic ScC x phase. All the phases formed at high pressures and temperatures are quenchable. Experimentally determined elastic properties of the scandium carbides are compared to values obtained by density functional theory based calculations. - Graphical Abstract Legend (TOC Figure): Table of Contents Figure Selected images recorded with a MAR345 image plate detector show the reaction of α-Sc and graphite at high-(P,T) conditions. Left: mixture of α-Sc and graphite. Right: recovered sample after laser heated the diamond anvil cell.

  18. High pressure-phases in the scandium-gallium system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popova, S.V.; Fomicheva, L.N.; Putro, V.G.

    1980-01-01

    Investigated are the crystalline structure and composition of scandium-gallium alloys, which can be prepared under high pressure. Scandium gallide synthesis has been carried out under 77 kbar constant pressure, the temperature has been changed from 200 to 1000 deg C. It is shown, that high pressure effect causes complication of state diagram of the scandium-gallium system. Three intermediate phases are found in the system at p=77 kbar within the range from 200 to 1000 deg C :Sc 5 Ga 3 (Mn 5 Si 3 type)- stable under atmospheric pressure and ScGa 2 gallides, metastable under normal conditions (ZrGa 2 type), and ScGa 3 (Cu 3 Au type)

  19. Scandium and zirconium ion complexing with salicylic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadeeva, V.I.; Kochetkova, S.K.

    1979-01-01

    A study has been made of the extraction of complexes containing scandium and zirconium compounds and salicylic acid by using benzene, nitrobenzene, chloroform and isoamyl alcohol. It is shown that in the metal concentration range 10 -5 -10 -3 mole/l scandium forms mononuclear complexes composed of Sc(HSal) 3 (pH 2 (pH>4), zirconium - polynuclear complexes Zrsub(x)(OH)sub(y)(HSal)sub(n), where the x:n ratio varies from 0.5 to 1.5. Stability constants have been calculated for the salicylate scandium complexes in aqueous solution, equal to β 1 =(3+-1)x10 2 ; β 2 =(5.0+-0.6)x10 4 ; β 3 =(5.3+-0.3)x10 6

  20. Scandium/carbon filters for soft x rays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Artioukov, IA; Kasyanov, YS; Kopylets, IA; Pershin, YP; Romanova, SA

    2003-01-01

    This Note deals with thin-film soft x-ray filters for operation at the wavelengths near carbon K edge (similar to4.5 nm). The filters were fabricated by magnetron sputtering deposition of thin layers of scandium (total thickness 0.1-0.2 mum) onto films of polypropylene (thickness 1.5 mum) and

  1. Heat capacity and solid solubility of iron in scandium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, T.-W.E.

    1981-01-01

    The maximum solid solubility of iron in scandium was determined to be between 50 and 85 at.ppm in the as-cast condition. As the concentration of iron increases, it segregates along the grain boundary, as is evident from optical metallography and electron microprobe examinations. Annealing also causes the iron dissolved in scandium to separate out and cluster along the grain boundary. Heat capacity measurements show an anomaly in the C/T versus T 2 plots for iron concentrations of 19 at.ppm or greater. For iron dissolved in solid scandium the excess entropy due to the iron impurity is in agreement with the theoretical prediction of ck ln(2S + 1) for an impurity-conduction electron (Kondo) interaction, but is 4 - 8 times larger than the theoretical prediction when iron segregates along the grain boundary. Furthermore, our results suggest that most of the previously reported low temperature physical properties of scandium are probably in error because of either iron impurity-conduction electron interactions or Fe-Fe interactions in the precipitated second-phase Sc-Fe compound. (Auth.)

  2. Thermoelectric material comprising scandium doped zinc cadmium oxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    There is presented a composition of scandium doped Zinc Cadmium Oxide with the general formula ZnzCdxScyO which the inventors have prepared, and for which material the inventors have made the insight that it is particularly advantageous as an n-type oxide material, such as particularly advantageous...

  3. Thermodynamic calculations of the interaction of scandium halides with aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubin, A. B.; Shunyaev, K. Yu.

    2010-12-01

    The fundamental characteristics of the reduction of scandium trifluoride and trichloride with aluminum were studied by thermodynamic modeling over wide temperature and pressure ranges (1100-1400 K and 1-106 Pa for ScF3 and 800-1200 K and 1-105 Pa for ScCl3). Calculations of the equilibrium compositions of the systems were performed to draw conclusions about the contents of condensed and gaseous components and determine the temperatures of the complete reduction of trihalides with the formation of a two-phase alloy containing a saturated solution of scandium in aluminum and the Al3Sc intermetallic compound. The results of modeling were in agreement with the available experimental data.

  4. Scandium extraction by methyltrialkylammonium nitrate from nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanov, S.I.; Kiyatkina, N.G.; Fedotov, O.N.

    1987-01-01

    Chemistry of scandium extraction by methyltrialkylammonium (MTAA) nitrate in toluene from nitrate solutions is studied. Methods of saturation, equilibrium shift, physicochemical analysis, isomolar series and UV-spectroscopy are used to determine the composition of extracted complexes. It is shown that with low saturation degrees of extractant (R 4 N) 6 Sc(NO 3 ) 9 complex is formed in organic phase and with saturation - (R 4 N) 3 xSc(NO 3 ) 6 complex

  5. The characteristics of aluminum-scandium alloys processed by ECAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkateswarlu, K.; Rajinikanth, V.; Ray, Ajoy Kumar; Xu Cheng; Langdon, Terence G.

    2010-01-01

    Aluminum-scandium alloys were prepared having different scandium additions of 0.2, 1.0 and 2.0 wt.% and these alloys were processed by equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) at 473 K. The results show the grain refinement of the aluminum matrix and the morphology of the Al 3 Sc precipitates depends strongly on the scandium concentration. The tensile properties were evaluated after ECAP by pulling to failure at initial strain rates from 1.0 x 10 -3 to 1.0 x 10 -1 s -1 . The Al-1% Sc alloy exhibited the highest tensile strength of ∼250 MPa at a strain rate of 1.0 x 10 -1 s -1 . This alloy also exhibited a superior grain refinement of ∼0.4 μm after ECAP where this is attributed to a smaller initial grain size and an optimum volume fraction of dispersed Al 3 Sc precipitates having both micrometer and nanometer sizes.

  6. Determination of scandium concentrate composition by WD-XRF and ICP-MS methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkisova, A. S.; Shibitko, A. O.; Abramov, A. V.; Rebrin, O. I.; Bunkov, G. M.; Lisienko, D. G.

    2017-09-01

    WD-XRF spectroscopy was applied for determining composition of scandium concentrate (ScC) containing 70 % scandium fluoride. Determination of ScC composition was performed using 6 glass beads reference materials produced by fusing synthesized mixture of analyte compounds with the lithium-borate flux in the ratio of 1:10. ScC powder with the known composition was then used as a powder pellet reference material to analyze scandium concentrate from technological line by external standard method. ICP-MS method was employed to control the ScC composition. The statistical data processing and metrological parameters evaluation of the analytical technique developed were carried out.

  7. Stereocontrolled glycoside synthesis by activation of glycosyl sulfone donors with scandium(iii) triflate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xolin, Amandine; Losa, Romain; Kaid, Aicha; Tresse, Cédric; Beau, Jean-Marie; Boyer, François-Didier; Norsikian, Stéphanie

    2018-01-03

    The activation of aryl glycosyl sulfone donors has been achieved using scandium(iii) triflate and has led to the selective preparation of α-mannosides resulting from a post-glycosylation anomerization.

  8. Spectrophotometric determination of scandium with Chromal Blue G in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uesugi, Katsuya; Miyawaki, Mitsuo.

    1978-01-01

    A method of spectrophotometric determination of microgram amounts of scandium with Chromal Blue G (CBG) in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTMA) was investigated. The sensitivity of color reaction between scandium and CBG has been greatly increased by the sensitizing action of CTMA. Scandium reacts with CBG in the presence of CTMA at pH 5.2 -- 5.8 to form a colored complex having an absorption maximum at 644 nm, which can be used for the determination of scandium. The determination procedure is as follows: Transfer the sample solution containing (0.5 -- 8)μg of scandium to a 50-ml Erlen-meyer flask. Add 3.0 ml of 3 x 10 -3 M CTMA solution, 1.0 ml of 0.1% CBG solution, 5 ml of 0.2 M acetate buffer solution (pH 5.3), and a small amount of water to make the volume about 20 ml. Heat the solution in a water-bath at (60 -- 70) 0 C for 5 min. After cooling to room temperature, transfer to a 25-ml volumetric flask, dilute to the mark with distilled water, and measure the absorbance of the solution at 644 nm against a reference solution containing the same amounts of reagents. Beer's law is obeyed up to the concentration of 0.32 μg/ml of scandium. The apparent molar absorptivity of the complex is 1.65 x 10 5 l mol -1 cm -1 at 644 nm, and the sensitivity of the reaction is 2.7 x 10 -4 μg Sc/cm 2 per 0.001 of an absorbance. The mole ratio of scandium and CBG in the complex was estimated to be 1 : 3. Beryllium, copper(II), aluminum, iron(III), and gallium seriously interfere with the determination of scandium. (auth.)

  9. Tin etching from metallic and oxidized scandium thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pachecka

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The role of oxide on Sn adhesion to Sc surfaces was studied with in-situ ellipsometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary electron microscopy. Sn etching with hydrogen radicals was performed on metallic Sc, metallic Sc with a native oxide, and a fully oxidized Sc layer. The results show that Sn adsorbs rather weakly to a non-oxidized Sc surface, and is etched relatively easily by atomic hydrogen. In contrast, the presence of native oxide on Sc allows Sn to adsorb more strongly to the surface, slowing the etching. Furthermore, thinner layers of scandium oxide result in weaker Sn adsorption, indicating that the layer beneath the oxide plays a significant role in determining the adsorption strength. Unexpectedly, for Sn on Sc2O3, and, to a lesser extent, for Sn on Sc, the etch rate shows a variation over time, which is explained by surface restructuring, temperature change, and hydrogen adsorption saturation.

  10. Analogs of N-cynnamoylphenylhydroxylamine as reagents for amperometric determination of scandium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shvedene, N.V.; Gallaj, Z.A.; Sheina, N.M.; Zujkova, N.V.

    1978-01-01

    To decrease the detection limit of scandium and increase selectivity of amperometric determination, oxidation of 2-furylacryloyl-N-p-chlorophenylhydroxylamine (FACPhHA) and 3-styrylacryloyl-N-phenylhydroxylamine (SAPhHA) on a graphite electrode has been studied by volt-amperometry. The possibility has been established of using the oxidation current of the reagent for plotting the titration curves. The solubility of scandium complexes with FACPhHA and SAPhHA under conditions of titration against the background with pH 6.0 has been determined and equals (2.1+-0.3)x10 -6 and (5.3+-0.3)x10 -7 , respectively. The methods have been developed of amperometric determination of scandium with the use of the considered reagents against backgrounds with pH 5.5-6.5. The use of SAPhHA has decreased the limit of scandium detection down to 0.1 mgk/ml. Besides, the amperometric method makes it possible to titrate in turbid and coloured media what is an advantage of this method. The developed method is used for determination of scandium in scandium silicide

  11. Direct flow separation strategy, to isolate no-carrier-added {sup 90}Nb from irradiated Mo or Zr targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radchenko, Valery; Roesch, Frank [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Nuclear Chemistry; Filosofov, Dmitry V.; Dadakhanov, Jakhongir [Joint Institute of Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation). Dzhelepov Laboratory of Nuclear Problems; Karaivanov, Dimitar V. [Joint Institute of Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation). Dzhelepov Laboratory of Nuclear Problems; Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy; Marinova, Atanaska [Joint Institute of Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation). Dzhelepov Laboratory of Nuclear Problems; Sofia Univ. (Bulgaria). Faculty of Chemistry and Pharmacy; Baimukhanova, Ayagoz [Joint Institute of Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation). Dzhelepov Laboratory of Nuclear Problems; Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Republic of Kazakhstan, Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2016-11-01

    {sup 90}Nb has an intermediate half-life of 14.6 h, a high positron branching of 53% and optimal β{sup +} emission energy of only E{sub mean} 0.35 MeV per decay. These favorable characteristics suggest it may be a potential candidate for application in immuno-PET. Our recent aim was to conduct studies on distribution coefficients for Zr{sup IV} and Nb{sup V} in mixtures of HCl/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and HCl/oxalic acid for anion exchange resin (AG 1 x 8) and UTEVA resin to develop a ''direct flow'' separation strategy for {sup 90}Nb. The direct flow concept refers to a separation accomplished using a single eluent on multiple columns, effectively streamlining the separation process and increasing the time efficiency. Finally, we also demonstrated that this separation strategy is applicable to the production of the positron emitter {sup 90}Nb via the irradiation of molybdenum targets and isolation of {sup 90}Nb from the irradiated molybdenum target.

  12. Production and separation of no-carrier-added 123I produced by heavy ion irradiation of antimony oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maji, Samir; Lahiri, Susanta

    2006-01-01

    The radioisotope 123 I (T 1/2 = 13.2h) plays important roles in diagnostic nuclear medicine, especially in Single Photon Emission Tomography (SPET). The special affinity of 123 I for the thyroid makes it most useful for imaging and treatment of this gland. 123 I possesses distinct advantages over existing iodine isotopes, permitting high resolution imaging whilst delivering a low integrated radiation dose. There are several routes for the production of 123 I. However, up until now, no report has been found on production of radioiodine by heavy ion reactions. In the present paper we report 7 Li induced production of 123 I and its subsequent separation from Sb 2 O 3 target matrix

  13. PRODUCTION OF HIGHLY PURE NO-CARRIER ADDED ZR-89 FOR THE LABELING OF ANTIBODIES WITH A POSITRON EMITTER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MEIJS, WE; HERSCHEID, JDM; Haisma, Hidde; WIJBRANDTS, R; VANLANGEVELDE, F; VANLEUFFEN, PJ; MOOY, R; PINEDO, HM

    1994-01-01

    Zr-89 was produced in high amounts (130 mCi/h) via a (p,n) reaction on Y-89. The Zr-89-isotope was purified using a hydroxamate column. More than 95% of the Zr was eluted with 1 mt of 1 M oxalic acid. The radionuclidic purity was over 99.99%. The isolated Zr-89 quantitatively formed complexes with

  14. Concentration and Separation of Scandium from Ni Laterite Ore Processing Streams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şerif Kaya

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The presence of a considerable amount of scandium in lateritic nickel-cobalt ores necessitates the investigation of possible processing alternatives to recover scandium as a byproduct during nickel and cobalt production. Therefore, in this study, rather than interfering with the main nickel-cobalt production circuit, the precipitation-separation behavior of scandium during a pH-controlled precipitation process from a synthetically prepared solution was investigated to adopt the Sc recovery circuit into an already existing hydrometallurgical nickel-cobalt hydroxide processing plant. The composition of the synthetic solution was determined according to the hydrometallurgical nickel laterite ore processing streams obtained from a HPAL (high-pressure sulphuric acid leaching process. In order to selectively precipitate and concentrate scandium with minimum nickel and cobalt co-precipitation, the pH of the solution was adjusted by CaCO3, MgO, Na2CO3, and NaOH. It was found that precipitation with MgO or Na2CO3 is more advantageous to obtain a precipitate containing higher amounts of scandium with minimum mass when compared to the CaCO3 route, which makes further processing more viable. As a result of this study, it is proposed that by a simple pH-controlled precipitation process, scandium can be separated from the nickel and cobalt containing process solutions as a byproduct without affecting the conventional nickel-cobalt hydroxide production. By further processing this scandium-enriched residue by means of leaching, SX (solvent extraction, and precipitation, an intermediate (NH42NaScF6 product can be obtained.

  15. Solvent extraction of scandium from lateritic nickel- cobalt ores using different organic reagents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferizoğlu Ece

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Scandium is the most important and strategic metal that can be recovered as a by-product from lateritic nickel-cobalt ores. In this research, different extractants were investigated in order to extract scandium from a sulfate medium by a using a solvent extraction method. Generally, the organic extractants are classified as acidic, neutral and basic organophosphorus compounds. However, in solvent extraction of scandium, the acidic and neutral organophosphorus compounds are preferred due to their higher extraction efficiencies. Thus, the aim of the present study was to compare the scandium extraction efficiencies of some acidic and neutral organic reagents. For this reason, Ionquest 290 (Bis(2,4,4-trimethylpenthyl phosphonic acid, DEHPA (Di(2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid, Cyanex 272 ((Bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl phosphinic acid which are acidic organophosphorus compounds, and Cyanex 923 (Trialkylphosphine oxide, which is a neutral organophosphorus compound, were used. The extraction capacities of these organics were studied with respect to the extractant concentration at same pH and phase ratio. As a result of the study, DEHPA was found to have higher scandium extraction efficiency with lower iron extraction at pH = 0.55 at a phase ratio of 10:1 = A:O.

  16. Association between toenail scandium levels and risk of acute myocardial infarction in European men: The EURAMIC and Heavy Metals Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gómez-Aracena, J.; Martin-Moreno, J.M.; Riemersma, R.A.; Bode, P.; Gutiérrez-Bedmar, M.; Gorgojo, L.; Kark, J.D.; Garcia-Rodríguez, A.; Gomez-Gracia, E.; Kardinaal, A.F.M.; Aro, A.; Veer, P. van 't; Wedel, H.; Kok, F.J.; Fernández-Crehuet, J.

    2002-01-01

    The association between scandium status and risk of acute myocardial infarction (MI) was examined in a multicentre case control study in 10 centres from Europe and Israel. Scandium in toenails was assessed in 684 cases and 724 controls less than 70 years of age. Mean concentrations of toenail

  17. The enthalpy of solid scandium in the temperature range 406 - 1812 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyapunov, K.M.; Baginskij, A.V.; Stankus, S.V.

    2001-01-01

    Enthalpy of pure scandium was measured on massive calorimeter in the range from 406 to 1812 K by mixing method. The enthalpy of face centered close cubic lattice - body centered cubic lattice transformation is equal to ΔH t 4068 J/mol. Obtained value within the limits of error is compatible with the results given earlier (4009 J/mol). The dependence of the middle specific heat of scandium C p (T) on the temperature was shown in correlation with the results of other works. The results of the conducted experiments reinforce the conclusion made earlier about an absence (or a little) in the decomposition of an anharmonic component of the oscillation specific heat of scandium C p a (T) members proportional to the first or the second degrees of temperature [ru

  18. Biamperometric analysis of nonaqueous scandium solutions containing lanthanides, lead and thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gevorgyan, A.M.; Talipov, Sh.T.; Kostylev, V.S.; Khadeev, V.A.; Nadol'skij, M.Ya.

    1978-01-01

    Investigated was a possibility of direct scandium titration in the presence of large rare earth quantities, and also a possibility of complexonometric scandium and rare earth sum determination at their joint presence in non-aqueous acetic acid solution. The titration was carried out at electrode voltage of 0.95V, background electrolyte concentration of lithium perchlorate being 0.2M. Non-aqueous magnesium complexonate was used as titrating reagent. Th and Pb complexonates are shown to be less stable as compared to Sc complexonate, and consequently, Th and Pb ions must not interfere with biamperometric titration of Sc ion. A method applied to analysis of binary mixture, containing scandium, and a method for model alloy and thortveitite mineral was developed. Well reproducible and precise enough results are obtained in all the cases. Ions of Bi, Cu, Cd, Zn, In, Ga and Ti interfere with determination

  19. Methods for chemical recovery of non-carrier-added radioactive tin from irradiated intermetallic Ti-Sb targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapshina, Elena V [Troitsk, RU; Zhuikov, Boris L [Troitsk, RU; Srivastava, Suresh C [Setauket, NY; Ermolaev, Stanislav V [Obninsk, RU; Togaeva, Natalia R [Obninsk, RU

    2012-01-17

    The invention provides a method of chemical recovery of no-carrier-added radioactive tin (NCA radiotin) from intermetallide TiSb irradiated with accelerated charged particles. An irradiated sample of TiSb can be dissolved in acidic solutions. Antimony can be removed from the solution by extraction with dibutyl ether. Titanium in the form of peroxide can be separated from tin using chromatography on strong anion-exchange resin. In another embodiment NCA radiotin can be separated from iodide solution containing titanium by extraction with benzene, toluene or chloroform. NCA radiotin can be finally purified from the remaining antimony and other impurities using chromatography on silica gel. NCA tin-117m can be obtained from this process. NCA tin-117m can be used for labeling organic compounds and biological objects to be applied in medicine for imaging and therapy of various diseases.

  20. Structural differences of half-sandwich complexes of scandium and yttrium containing bulky substituents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fridrichová, Adéla; Růžička, A.; Lamač, Martin; Horáček, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 76, FEB 2017 (2017), s. 62-66 ISSN 1387-7003 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/12/2368 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : scandium * yttrium * half-sandwich Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 1.640, year: 2016

  1. Structural differences of half-sandwich complexes of scandium and yttrium containing bulky substituents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fridrichová, Adéla; Růžička, A.; Lamač, Martin; Horáček, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 76, FEB 2017 (2017), s. 62-66 ISSN 1387-7003 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/12/2368 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : scandium * yttrium * half- sandwich Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 1.640, year: 2016

  2. Microdomain fluctuations in lead scandium tantalate (PST) observed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bursill, L.A.; Peng, Julin.

    1992-01-01

    The value of the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and dark-field imaging techniques for obtaining nanocrystalline structural information is demonstrated for lead scandium tantalite (PST). Chemical domain textures, polar domain fluctuations and HRTEM images of disordered and ordered PTS are discussed. 5 refs., 5 figs

  3. Effects of erbium‑and chromium‑doped yttrium scandium gallium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of erbium‑and chromium‑doped yttrium scandium gallium garnet and diode lasers on the surfaces of restorative dental materials: A scanning electron microscope study. ... Four cylindrical samples (8 mm diameter, 2 mm height) were prepared for each restorative material. In addition, four freshly extracted, sound ...

  4. The effects of aluminum or scandium on the toughness, density and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of the substitution of aluminum or scandium on the density, toughness as well as the stability of the phases formed by such an addition on platinum, iridium, rhodium and palladium metals were evaluated with the density functional quantum mechanical calculation methods. All the metals had four atoms per ...

  5. Scandium-doped zinc cadmium oxide as a new stable n-type oxide thermoelectric material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Li; Christensen, Dennis Valbjørn; Bhowmik, Arghya

    2016-01-01

    Scandium-doped zinc cadmium oxide (Sc-doped ZnCdO) is proposed as a new n-type oxide thermoelectric material. The material is sintered in air to maintain the oxygen stoichiometry and avoid instability issues. The successful alloying of CdO with ZnO at a molar ratio of 1 : 9 significantly reduced...

  6. Precipitation behaviour and recrystallisation resistance in aluminum alloys with additions of hafnium, scandium and zirconium

    OpenAIRE

    Hallem, Håkon

    2005-01-01

    The overall objective of this work has been to develop aluminium alloys, which after hot and cold deformation are able to withstand high temperatures without recrystallising. This has been done by investigating aluminium alloys with various additions of hafnium, scandium and zirconium, with a main focus on Hf and to which extent it may partly substitute or replace Zr and/or Sc as a dispersoid forming elements in these alloys. What is the effect of hafnium, alone and in combination with Zr...

  7. An Overview on the Possibility of Scandium and REE Occurrence in Sulawesi, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Maulana

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available DOI:10.17014/ijog.3.2.139-147The development in modern-high technology application is growing rapidly, resulting in the constant supply of critical metal and rare earth elements (REE. Currently, resources of these elements are restricted and new source of these elements need to be discovered accordingly. Scandium (Sc as one of critical metals is an important metal for electrolyte of solid oxide fuel cells and other advance technology. In addition, REE are the important elements in the use of permanent magnets and rechargeable batteries. This manuscript reports an overview on the possibility of scandium and rare earth element occurrences in Sulawesi. Sc is concentrated in limonite layers in Soroako ultramafic rocks as a result of Fe3+ site substitution of mafic minerals (pyroxene, amphibole, etc. during a laterization process. REE are enriched in association with clay minerals in B horizon from heavily weathered granitic rocks in Palu and Masamba, suggesting the possibility of ion-adsorption style mineralization. The lateritic soil of the ultramafic rocks and the weathered crusts of the granitic rocks in Sulawesi could be the potential sources of scandium and rare earth elements, respectively.

  8. Influence of scandium on the pitting behaviour of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wloka, J. [Department of Materials Sciences, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Martensstrasse 7, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Virtanen, S. [Department of Materials Sciences, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Martensstrasse 7, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany)], E-mail: virtanen@ww.uni-erlangen.de

    2007-11-15

    In this paper the influence of small scandium additions (<0.26 wt.%) on the corrosion properties of the high-strength Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy AA7010 is investigated. The addition of scandium (in combination with the grain refiner Zr) leads to the formation of Al{sub 3}Sc{sub x}Zr{sub 1-x} phases. These coarse particles disturb the grain structure near the particle/matrix interface, which facilitates the initiation of localized corrosion in potentio-dynamic scans. Microelectrochemical investigations revealed a slightly cathodic character of these particles and a passive range beyond the breakdown potential of the matrix. Mass loss measurements show that the addition of scandium increases the mass loss during the initial period. The corrosion morphology was investigated with optical and scanning electron microscopy. The composition of the phases was determined with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. Micro-capillary measurements were performed to investigate the electrochemical properties of single phases surrounded by matrix.

  9. Solvent extraction of tricomponent complexes of zirconium and scandium with salicylic acid and collidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochetkova, S.K.; Fadeeva, V.I.; Kalistratova, V.P.

    1976-01-01

    Extraction of tricomponent compounds of zirconium and scandium with salicylic acid (Sal) and collidine (Col) has been studied. Addition of Col widens considerably the pH range of maximum extraction of zirconium salicylate and makes it possible to extract quantitatively both zirconium and scandium in the following pH range: scandium at pH 3.8-5.2; zirconium at pH 2-4. Optimum concentrations of salicylic acid and collidine are 0.05 mol/l and 0.375 mol/l, respectively. The composition of the complexes being extracted has been studied by the shift equilibrium method. Chloroform extracts complexes having the ratio Zr:Sal:Col=1:2:1(pH=3); Sc:Sal:Col=1:3:1(pH=4), and 1:2:1(pH=5). The composition of the complexes being formed is assumed to be [Zr(OH) 3 (HSal) 2 ] - [ColH + ] (pH=3); Sc(HSal) 3 xCol (pH=4.0); Sc(OH)(HSal) 2 xCol (pH=5.0). Extraction of collidine-salicylate complexes of Hf, Th, La, and Y under the conditions of optimum extraction of zirconium and scandium has been investigated when concentration of Zr and Sc in the solution is 3.0.10μ- 5 -1.37.10 -4 mol/l, respectively. It has been shown that hafnium is extracted quantitatively (95-100%) at pH 2.3-4.6; thorium at pH 3.0-6.4; 60% of yttrium is extracted at pH 4.0-4.8; 25% of lanthanum is extracted at pH 3.3-4.9. At pH 2.0 it is possible to separate Zr from Sc,Y, and La; at pH 1.4-1.5 from small amounts of Hf and Tn. Separation of zirconium, from small amounts of hafnium, 10-fold amounts of thorium, 100-fold amounts of scandium and lanthanum is also possible

  10. The effect of scandium, transition metals and in purities on hardening of aluminium alloys upon decomposition of solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakharov, V.V.; Rostova, T.D.

    2007-01-01

    Strengthening of aluminum alloys of the Al-Sc system in ingots due to decomposition of the solid solution of scandium in aluminum is studied as a function of the content of scandium (varied from 0.14 to 0.55%), the presence of Zr, Ti, Hf, V, and Co additives at the same content of scandium (0.2%), of the Sc/Zr proportion at the same total content of Sc + Zr, and as a function of iron and silicon admixtures. Zirconium addition produces the highest effect, increasing the hardness and stabilizing the strengthening, extending it to a wider temperature range of aging. Additions of Ti, Hf produce a similar, though a less pronounced effect. Vanadium addition decreases the hardness of Al-0.2%Sc alloy. The presence of zirconium neutralizes the negative effect of vanadium. Cobalt addition does not effect the hardness of Al-0.2%Sc. The greatest strengthening during decomposition of solid solution in the Al-Sc-Zr system alloys is achieved at equal content of Sc and Zr. In this case, the maximum saturation of the solid solution with scandium and zirconium occurs during melting of ingots and as a result of subsequent heating, judging by the alloy location in the phase diagram, the phase Al 3 (Sc 1-x , Zr x ), where scandium atoms are replaced with zirconium atoms to utmost extent, is separated [ru

  11. Recovery of Scandium from Leachate of Sulfation-Roasted Bayer Red Mud by Liquid-Liquid Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaobo; Li, Hongxu; Jing, Qiankun; Zhang, Mingming

    2017-11-01

    The leachate obtained from sulfation-roasted Bayer red mud is suitable for extraction of scandium by liquid-liquid solvent extraction because it contains trace amounts of Fe3+ and Si4+. In this study, a completely new metallurgical process for selective recovery of scandium from Bayer red mud was proposed. The extraction performances of Sc3+, Fe3+, Al3+, Si4+, Ca2+, and Na+ from synthetic leachate of sulfation-roasted red mud were first investigated using organophosphorus extractants (di-2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid P204 and 2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester P507) and carboxylic acid extractant (Versatic acid 10). It shows that P204 has an excellent extraction ability and that it can be applied to the scandium recovery. P507 and Versatic acid 10 are much poorer in performance for selective extraction of scandium. In the leachate of sulfation-roasted red mud, approximately 97% scandium can be recovered using a P204/sulfonated kerosene (1% v/v) extraction system under the condition of an organic-to-aqueous phase ratio of 10:1 and with an extraction temperature of 15°C.

  12. Radioactive Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radioactive decay is the emission of energy in the form of ionizing radiation. Example decay chains illustrate how radioactive atoms can go through many transformations as they become stable and no longer radioactive.

  13. Potential for photocatalytic degradation of the potassic diclofenac using scandium and silver modified titanium dioxide thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciola, R.A.; Oliveira, C.T.; Lopes, S.A.; Cavalheiro, A.A.

    2011-01-01

    The potential for photocatalytic degradation of the potassic diclofenac drug was investigated using titanium dioxide thin films modified with two modifier types, scandium and silver, both prepared by Sol-Gel method. It was demonstrated by UVVis spectroscopy analysis of the solutions containing the drug, under UV-A light irradiation that the degradation efficiency of the titanium dioxide photocatalyst is dependent of the semiconductor nature and that the scandium accelerates the first step of the degradation when compared to the silver. This result seems to be related to the redox potential of the electron-hole pair, once the scandium modifying sample generates a p type semiconductor that reduces the band gap. The extra holes attract more strongly the chorine ion present in diclofenac and leading to the releasing more easily. However, after the first byproducts degradation the following steps are not facilitated, making the silver modifying more advantageous. (author)

  14. Microstructural characterization and grain refinement of AA6082 gas tungsten arc welds by scandium modified fillers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babu, N. Kishore, E-mail: nkishorebabu@gmail.com [Joining Technology Group, Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, 71 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 638075 (Singapore); Talari, Mahesh Kumar [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam (Malaysia); Pan, D.; Sun, Z.; Wei, J. [Joining Technology Group, Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, 71 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 638075 (Singapore); Sivaprasad, K. [Advanced Materials Processing Laboratory, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirapalli 620015, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2012-12-14

    The refinement in weld metal grain size and shape results in both improved mechanical properties (ductility and toughness) as well as a significant improvement in weldability. In the present study, the influence of scandium (Sc) additions to the fillers on the structure and mechanical properties of AA6082 gas tungsten arc (GTA) weldments were investigated. Controlled amounts of scandium as grain refiner were introduced into the molten pool of AA6082 by pre-deposited cast inserts (AA4043 and AA5356) by GTA welding. Full penetration GTA welds were prepared using alternating current (AC). It was observed that grain size decreased with increasing amounts of scandium. The grain refinement is mainly caused by the Al{sub 3}Sc particles, which act as heterogeneous nucleation of {alpha}-Al grains. It has been shown that welds prepared with AA5356 cast insert exhibited high strength and ductility when compared with other welds. The observed grain refinement was shown to result in an appreciable increase in fusion zone hardness, strength and ductility. Post-weld aging treatment resulted in improved tensile strength and hardness of the weldments and this aging response could be attributed to the weld dilution from the base metal. The slow diffusion of Sc in Al matrix and stability of Al{sub 3}Sc precipitates at elevated temperatures were suggested to be responsible for the improved high temperature yield strength of welds made from Sc modified fillers. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Primary Al{sub 3}Sc particles resulted in grain refinement by heterogeneous nucleation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Weld metal strength and hardness improved due to grain refinement caused by Sc. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Weld metal responded to post-weld aging treatment due to dilution from base metal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sc addition improved the high temperature mechanical properties of welds.

  15. Production and purification of Scandium-47: A potential radioisotope for cancer theranostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deilami-Nezhad, Leila; Moghaddam-Banaem, Leila; Sadeghi, Mahdi; Asgari, Mehdi

    2016-12-01

    In this study, production of 47 Sc radionuclide by irradiating the natural titanium dioxide powder (TiO 2 ) in the fast neutron flux (~3*10 13 ncm -2 s -1 ) for 4 days in Tehran Research Reactor (TRR, Iran) and separation from titanium target was investigated. The study showed the feasibility of production 47 Sc by TRR. The separation efficiency and radiochemical purity (ScCl 3 ) of radio-scandium, 47 Sc radionuclide purity were obtained 98%, 99% and 88% respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Radioactive aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamberlain, A.C.

    1991-01-01

    Radon. Fission product aerosols. Radioiodine. Tritium. Plutonium. Mass transfer of radioactive vapours and aerosols. Studies with radioactive particles and human subjects. Index. This paper explores the environmental and health aspects of radioactive aerosols. Covers radioactive nuclides of potential concern to public health and applications to the study of boundary layer transport. Contains bibliographic references. Suitable for environmental chemistry collections in academic and research libraries

  17. Radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boegly, W.J.; Alexander, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    A literature review on studies concerning radioactive wastes is presented. Literature on radioactive wastes available from the National Technical Information Service, Washington, DC, was not included in the review. Studies were reviewed that dealt with general programs for radioactive wastes; isolation of radioactive wastes; waste management; waste storage; environmental transport; transportation; risk assessment; and remedial action are reviewed

  18. Using radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-10-01

    The leaflet discusses the following: radioactivity; radioisotopes; uses of ionising radiations; radioactivity from (a) naturally occurring radioactive elements, and (b) artificially produced radioisotopes; uses of radioactivity in medicine, (a) clinical diagnostic, (b) therapeutic (c) sterilization of medical equipment and materials; environmental uses as tracers; industrial applications, e.g. tracers and radiography; ensuring safety. (U.K.)

  19. A solid-phase technique for preparation of no-carrier-added technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals: application to the streptavidin/biotin system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn-Dufault, Robert; Pollak, Alfred; Fitzgerald, Jane; Thornback, John R.; Ballinger, James R.

    2000-01-01

    A high effective specific activity (HESA) formulation of a biotin-containing 99m Tc ligand [RP488: dimethyl-Gly-Ser-Cys(Acm)-Lys(Biotin)-Gly] conveniently prepared from solid phase was compared to a typical low effective specific activity (LESA) solution formulation to demonstrate improved targeting to streptavidin in an in vitro assay and in an in vivo rat model. RP488 was coupled to a maleimide-functionalized polyethylene glycol resin via a thiol ether linkage and labeled with 99m Tc-gluconate at room temperature, followed by elution of the HESA 99m Tc-RP488 in saline (minimum specific activity ∼ 1000 TBq/mmol by amino acid analysis). Both HESA and LESA 99m Tc-RP488 labeled at > 90% purity. In vitro, HESA 99m Tc-RP488 incubated with streptavidin-agarose was bound quantitatively, but there was competition from addition of increasing amounts of cold RP488. In rats, radiotracer uptake was evident at the site of implantation of streptavidin-agarose beads for the HESA dose, less uptake of low effective specific activity (LESA) material, and no appreciable uptake in the control rats of the LESA or HESA dose. The target-to-background ratio for HESA 99m Tc-RP488 was 5.4 times that of the control. The solid-phase technology offers a convenient way to prepare high specific activity receptor-targeting 99m Tc radiopharmaceuticals

  20. Quality control of no-carrier-added (YCl3)-Y-90 by estimating the labeling efficiency using its reaction with DOTATOC

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eigner-Henke, Kateřina; Beran, Miloš; Šrank, Jiří; Melichar, František

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 278, č. 1 (2008), s. 25-29 ISSN 0236-5731 R&D Projects: GA MPO FT-TA2/081 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : TERNARY COMPLEX-FORMATION * NEUROENDOCRINE TUMORS * SOMATOSTATIN ANALOGS Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 0.659, year: 2008

  1. Regio- and stereospecific living polymerization and copolymerization of (E)-1,3-pentadiene with 1,3-butadiene by half-sandwich scandium catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishii, Kei; Kang, Xiaohui; Nishiura, Masayoshi; Luo, Yi; Hou, Zhaomin

    2013-07-07

    The living isospecific-cis-1,4-polymerization and block-copolymerization of (E)-1,3-pentadiene with 1,3-butadiene have been achieved for the first time by using cationic half-sandwich scandium catalysts.

  2. Recovery of Scandium(III) from Aqueous Solutions by Solvent Extraction with the Functionalized Ionic Liquid Betainium Bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide

    OpenAIRE

    Onghena, Bieke; Binnemans, Koen

    2015-01-01

    The ionic liquid betainium is(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide [Hbet][Tf2N] was used for the extraction of scandium from aqueous solutions. The influence of several extraction parameters on the extraction efficiency was investigated, including the initial metal concentration, phase ratio, and pH. The extraction kinetics was examined, and a comparison was made between conventional liquid−liquid extraction and homogeneous liquid−liquid extraction (HLLE). The stoichiometry of the extracted scandium...

  3. Influence of scandium on the microstructure and mechanical properties of A319 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emadi, Daryoush; Rao, A.K. Prasada; Mahfoud, Musbah

    2010-01-01

    Recycling of aluminum scrap alloys by melting is gaining its importance in foundry sector. During recycling, some of the alloying elements present in scrap alloys eventually become trace/tramp impurities in the recycled alloy. These elements could potentially affect the alloy's microstructure and hence its mechanical properties. In the present work, an attempt has been made to investigate the effect of one of such trace elements on the microstructure and mechanical properties of A319 alloy. The element chosen for the present investigation is scandium (Sc). This paper discusses the effects of the additions of trace amount of Sc on the microstructure and mechanical properties of A319 alloy in as-cast, T6 and T7 heat treated conditions.

  4. Radioactive battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deaton, R.L.; Silver, G.L.

    1975-01-01

    A radioactive battery is described that is comprised of a container housing an electrolyte, two electrodes immersed in the electrolyte and insoluble radioactive material disposed adjacent one electrode. Insoluble radioactive material of different intensity of radioactivity may be disposed adjacent the second electrode. If hydrobromic acid is used as the electrolyte, Br 2 will be generated by the radioactivity and is reduced at the cathode: Br 2 + 2e = 2 Br - . At the anode Br - is oxidized: 2Br - = Br 2 + 2e. (U.S.)

  5. Removal of acidic or basic α-amino acids in water by poorly water soluble scandium complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Nobuyuki; Jin, Shigeki; Ujihara, Tomomi

    2012-11-02

    To recognize α-amino acids with highly polar side chains in water, poorly water soluble scandium complexes with both Lewis acidic and basic portions were synthesized as artificial receptors. A suspension of some of these receptor molecules in an α-amino acid solution could remove acidic and basic α-amino acids from the solution. The compound most efficient at preferentially removing basic α-amino acids (arginine, histidine, and lysine) was the receptor with 7,7'-[1,3-phenylenebis(carbonylimino)]bis(2-naphthalenesulfonate) as the ligand. The neutral α-amino acids were barely removed by these receptors. Removal experiments using a mixed amino acid solution generally gave results similar to those obtained using solutions containing a single amino acid. The results demonstrated that the scandium complex receptors were useful for binding acidic and basic α-amino acids.

  6. Entwicklung von Methoden zur selektiven Trennung von Scandium, Zirkonium und Zinn für radiopharmazeutische Anwendungen

    OpenAIRE

    Dirks-Fandrei, Carina

    2014-01-01

    Die vorliegende Arbeit befasst sich mit der Entwicklung von schnellen und hoch selektiven Methoden für die Trennung und Aufreinigung von Scandium, Zirkonium und Zinn. Diese Radionuklide können aus potentiellen Targetmaterialien gewonnen werden und können Anwendung in der Nuklearmedizin finden. Es wurden verschiedene Resins (von TrisKem International) auf ihre Extraktionsfähigkeit im Hinblick auf eine breite Anzahl von Kat...

  7. Radioactivity. Centenary of radioactivity discovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpak, G.; Tubiana, M.; Bimbot, R.

    1997-01-01

    This small booklet was edited for the occasion of the exhibitions of the celebration of the centenary of radioactivity discovery which took place in various locations in France from 1996 to 1998. It recalls some basic knowledge concerning radioactivity and its applications: history of discovery, atoms and isotopes, radiations, measurement of ionizing radiations, natural and artificial radioactivity, isotope dating and labelling, radiotherapy, nuclear power and reactors, fission and fusion, nuclear wastes, dosimetry, effects and radioprotection. (J.S.)

  8. Preparation of highly specific radioactivity [18F]flumazenil and its evaluation in cynomolgus monkey by positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryzhikov, Nikolaj N.; Seneca, Nicholas; Krasikova, Raisa N.; Gomzina, Natalia A.; Shchukin, Evgeny; Fedorova, Olga S.; Vassiliev, Dmitrij A.; Gulyas, Balazs; Hall, Hakan; Savic, Ivanka; Halldin, Christer

    2005-01-01

    A straightforward method for the preparation of no-carrier-added (n.c.a.) [ 18 F]flumazenil via standard nucleophilic radiofluorination of the corresponding nitro-analog Ro 15-2344 has been developed. The labeling was performed by employing the K 18 F/kryptofix complex in DMF at 160 deg. C for 30 min and equimolar ratio [K/K2.2.2] +18 F - /precursor. Under these conditions, an 18 F incorporation rate into flumazenil was in the range of 55-60%. The final product was isolated by HPLC purification within a total synthesis time of 75 min and a radiochemical yield of about 30% (EOB). Human post-mortem whole-hemisphere autoradiography of brain sections demonstrated selective uptake of the radioligand in the areas of high density of the central benzodiazepine receptors (BZR). PET studies in a cynomolgus monkey and metabolite studies by HPLC demonstrated similar results by [ 18 F]flumazenil as for [ 11 C]flumazenil. In blocking experiments, almost all radioactivity was inhibited by the addition of unlabeled flumazenil. [ 18 F]Flumazenil is a suitable radioligand for PET assessment of the BZR

  9. Adsorption of Scandium and Neodymium on Biochar Derived after Low-Temperature Pyrolysis of Sawdust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Komnitsas

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the adsorption of two rare earth elements (REEs, namely scandium (Sc and neodymium (Nd, on biochar produced after low temperature pyrolysis (350 °C of wood sawdust. The biochar was characterized with the use of several analytical techniques, namely X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and thermogravimetric (TG analysis, while the pH at point of zero charge (pHPZC was also determined. The experimental conditions were: absorbent concentration 1–10 g·L−1, REE concentration in solution 20 mg·L−1, contact time for equilibrium 24 h, temperature 25 °C and stirring speed 350 rpm. The efficiency of biochar was compared to that of a commercial activated carbon. Geochemical modelling was carried out to determine speciation of Nd and Sc species in aqueous solutions using PHREEQC-3 equipped with the llnl database. The experimental results indicated the potential of low temperature produced biochar, even though inferior to that of activated carbon, to adsorb efficiently both REEs. The equilibrium adsorption data were very well fitted into the Freundlich isotherm model, while kinetic data suggested that the removal of both REEs follows the pseudo-second order kinetic reaction. Finally, the most probable adsorption mechanisms are discussed.

  10. Chromium/scandium multilayer mirrors for isolated attosecond pulses at 145  eV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guggenmos, Alexander; Jobst, Michael; Ossiander, Marcus; Radünz, Stefan; Riemensberger, Johann; Schäffer, Martin; Akil, Ayman; Jakubeit, Clemens; Böhm, Philip; Noever, Simon; Nickel, Bert; Kienberger, Reinhard; Kleineberg, Ulf

    2015-06-15

    Recent advances in the development of attosecond soft x-ray sources toward photon wavelengths below 10 nm are also driving the development of suited broadband multilayer optics for steering and shaping attosecond pulses. We demonstrate that current attosecond experiments in the sub-200-eV range benefit from these improved optics. We present our achievements in utilizing ion-beam-deposited chromium/scandium (Cr/Sc) multilayer mirrors, optimized by tailored material dependent deposition and interface polishing, for the generation of single attosecond pulses from a high-harmonic cut-off spectrum at a central energy of 145 eV. Isolated attosecond pulses have been measured by soft x-ray-pump/NIR-probe electron streaking experiments and characterized using frequency-resolved optical gating for complete reconstruction of attosecond bursts (FROG/CRAB). The results demonstrate that Cr/Sc multilayer mirrors can be used as efficient attosecond optics for reflecting 600-attosecond pulses at a photon energy of 145 eV, which is a prerequisite for present and future attosecond experiments in this energy range.

  11. Microstructure and age-hardening effects of aluminium alloys with additions of scandium and zirconium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galun, R.; Mordike, B.L. [Inst. fuer Werkstoffkunde und Werkstofftechnik, Technische Univ. Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Maiwald, T.; Smola, B. [Zentrum fuer Funktionswerkstoffe GmbH, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Mergen, R.; Manner, M.; Uitz, W. [Miba Gleitlager GmbH, Laakirchen (Australia)

    2004-12-01

    The aim of the work presented in this report was to produce age-hardenable aluminium alloys containing scandium and zirconium by a casting process with similar cooling conditions like an industrial casting process. Microstructure, precipitation structure and age-hardening response of different alloys with up to 0.4 wt.% Sc and Zr were investigated. Age-hardening experiments from the as-cast condition without solution annealing showed a significant increase of hardness of about 100% for Sc-rich alloys and of 50% for Zr-rich alloys compared to the as-cast condition. TEM investigations revealed the formation of precipitates of ternary Al{sub 3}(Sc{sub x}Zr{sub 1-x}) phases with a cubic cP4 crystal structure. In addition to the strengthening effect, a high thermal stability especially of the precipitates in Zr-rich alloys up to 400 C let these alloys look very promising for high-temperature applications. (orig.)

  12. Adsorption of hydrogen in Scandium/Titanium decorated nitrogen doped carbon nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mananghaya, Michael, E-mail: mikemananghaya@gmail.com [De La Salle University, 2401 Taft Ave, 0922, Manila (Philippines); DLSU STC Laguna Boulevard, LTI Spine Road Barangays Biñan and Malamig, Biñan City, Laguna (Philippines); DOST-ASTHRDP, PCIEERD, Gen. Santos Ave., Bicutan, Taguig City 1631 (Philippines); Belo, Lawrence Phoa; Beltran, Arnel [De La Salle University, 2401 Taft Ave, 0922, Manila (Philippines); DLSU STC Laguna Boulevard, LTI Spine Road Barangays Biñan and Malamig, Biñan City, Laguna (Philippines)

    2016-09-01

    Nitrogen doped Carbon Nanotube with divacancy (4ND-CN{sub x}NT) that is decorated with Scandium and Titanium as potential hydrogen storage medium using the pseudo potential density functional method was investigated. Highly localized states near the Fermi level, which are derived from the nitrogen defects, contribute to strong Sc and Ti bindings, which prevent metal aggregation and improve the material stability. A detailed Comparison of the Hydrogen adsorption capability with promising system-weight efficiency of Sc over Ti was elucidated when functionalized with 4ND-CN{sub x}NT. Finally, the (Sc/4ND){sub 10}-CN{sub x}CNT composite material has a thermodynamically favorable adsorption and consecutive adsorption energy for ideal reversible adsorption and desorption of hydrogen at room temperature such that it can hold at least 5.8 wt% hydrogen molecules at the LDA and GGA level. - Highlights: • Carbon Nanotube with divacancy (4ND-CN{sub x}NT) decorated with Sc and Ti. • Nitrogen defects, contribute to strong Sc and Ti bindings. • H{sub 2} and (Sc/4ND){sub 10}-CN{sub x}CNT has a favorable adsorption. • 5.8 wt% adsorption at the LDA and GGA level.

  13. Simulated Radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettler, James L.

    1972-01-01

    Describes the errors in the sugar-cube experiment related to radioactivity as described in Project Physics course. The discussion considers some of the steps overlooked in the experiment and generalizes the theory beyond the sugar-cube stage. (PS)

  14. Concentrating Radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Richard A.

    1974-01-01

    By concentrating radioactivity contained on luminous dials, a teacher can make a high reading source for classroom experiments on radiation. The preparation of the source and its uses are described. (DT)

  15. Laboratory studies into the use of the scandium-46-EDTA complex as a tracer for groundwater flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, H.; Nixon, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    Gamma ray emitting metal radionuclides, when complexed with an appropriate complexing agent, provide a wide choice of water tracers particularly for groundwater studies where a radionuclide of appropriate half-life suited to the particular study can be selected. Scandium-46 has easily detectable gamma emission and a suitable half-life (84 days) for medium term studies. It has been widely and successfully used as a tracer in studies of sediment movement but has not yet been introduced as a groundwater tracer. In our experiments the chemical aspects of the preparation of Sc-46-EDTA were studied in some detail and its behaviour in various mineralogical environments was evaluated with reference to the standard tracer, tritiated water. The experimental results have shown that the scandium cation can be easily complexed with EDTA to form soluble SC-EDTA. The complex is very stable in a wide range of pH; the adsorptive properties of Sc-EDTA in the batch studies and the retardation and recovery in the column tests in comparison with tritiated water are quite satisfactory. In general Sc-46-EDTA is a promising tracer for groundwater studies. In the report the appropriate conditions, procedures and some rational and efficient methods for testing the purity of Sc-46-EDTA in the preparation of the tracer solution of Sc-46-EDTA are described. In addition, it has been found that the formation of the metal hydroxide colloids is the major reason for the great loss in groundwater aquifers of most trivalent metal nuclide tracers in the cationic form including scandium-46. (author). 29 refs, 11 figs, 12 tabs

  16. Interaction of scandium and titanium atoms with a carbon surface containing five- and seven-membered rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnov, P. O.; Eliseeva, N. S.; Kuzubov, A. A.

    2012-01-01

    The use of carbon nanotubes coated by atoms of transition metals to store molecular hydrogen is associated with the problem of the aggregation of these atoms, which leads to the formation of metal clusters. The quantum-chemical simulation of cluster models of the carbon surface of a graphene type with scandium and titanium atoms has been performed. It has been shown that the presence of five- and seven-membered rings, in addition to six-membered rings, in these structures makes it possible to strongly suppress the processes of the migration of metal atoms over the surface, preventing their clustering.

  17. Optical Fluoride Sensor Based on Monomer-Dimer Equilibrium of Scandium(III)-Octaethylporphyrin in a Plasticized Polymeric Film

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Youngjea; Kampf, Jeff W.; Meyerhoff, Mark E.

    2007-01-01

    A fluoride-selective optical sensor based on scandium(III) octaethylporphyrin (Sc(III)OEP) as an ionophore within a plasticized PVC film is described. The presence of fluoride ion in the aqueous sample phase increases the formation of a difluoro-bridged Sc(III)OEP dimer species in the polymer film. The ability of the Sc(III) porphyrin to form the dimeric structure in the presence of fluoride is confirmed by UV-Vis spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. For more practical sensing applications...

  18. Characterisation of the appearance of radioactive metabolites in monkey and human plasma from the 5-HT1A receptor radioligand, [carbonyl-11C]WAY-100635 - explanation of high signal contrast in PET and an aid to biomathematical modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, Safiye; Lundkvist, Camilla; Pike, Victor W.; Halldin, Christer; McCarron, Julie A.; Swahn, Carl-Gunnar; Farde, Lars; Ginovart, Nathalie; Luthra, Sajinder K.; Gunn, Roger N.; Bench, Christopher J.; Sargent, Peter A.; Grasby, Paul M.

    1998-01-01

    N-(2-(4-(2-Methoxy-phenyl)-1-piperazin-1-yl)ethyl)-N-(2-pyridyl) cyclohexanecarboxamide (WAY-100635), labelled in its amido carbonyl group with 11 C (t 1/2 = 20.4 min), is a promising radioligand for the study of brain 5-HT 1A receptors with positron emission tomography (PET). Thus, in PET experiments in six cynomolgus monkeys and seven healthy male volunteers, [carbonyl- 11 C]WAY-100635 was taken up avidly by brain. Radioactivity was retained in regions rich in 5-HT 1A receptors, such as occipital cortex, temporal cortex and raphe nuclei, but cleared rapidly from cerebellum, a region almost devoid of 5-HT 1A receptors. [Carbonyl- 11 C]WAY-100635 provides about 3- and 10-fold higher signal contrast (receptor-specific to nonspecific binding) than [O-methyl- 11 C]WAY-100635 in receptor-rich areas of monkey and human brain, respectively. To elucidate the effect of label position on radioligand behaviour and to aid in the future biomathematical interpretation of the kinetics of regional cerebral radioactivity uptake in terms of receptor-binding parameters, HPLC was used to measure [carbonyl- 11 C]WAY-100635 and its radioactive metabolites in plasma at various times after intravenous injection. Radioactivity cleared rapidly from monkey and human plasma. Parent radioligand represented 19% of the radioactivity in monkey plasma at 47 min and 8% of the radioactivity in human plasma at 40 min. [Carbonyl- 11 C]desmethyl-WAY-100635 was below detectable limits in monkey plasma and at most a very minor radioactive metabolite in human plasma. [ 11 C]Cyclohexanecarboxylic acid was identified as a significant radioactive metabolite. In human plasma this maximally represented 21% of the radioactivity at 10 min after radioligand injection. All other major radioactive metabolites in monkey and human plasma were even more polar. No-carrier-added [carbonyl- 11 C]cyclohexanecarboxylic acid was prepared in the laboratory and after intravenous administration into cynomolgus monkey was

  19. Selective recovery of vanadium and scandium by ion exchange with D201 and solvent extraction using P507 from hydrochloric acid leaching solution of red mud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaobo; Li, Wang; Tang, Sen; Zeng, Majian; Bai, Pengyuan; Chen, Lunjian

    2017-05-01

    D201 resin and P507 extractant diluted with sulfonated kerosene were used to respectively separate vanadium and scandium, and impurity ions from hydrochloric acid leaching solution of red mud. More than 99% of vanadium was selectively adsorbed from the hydrochloric acid leaching solution under the conditions of pH value of 1.8, volume ratio of leaching solution to resin of 10, and flow rate of 3.33 mL/min. Maximum extraction and separation of scandium was observed from the acid leaching solution at an aqueous pH value of 0.2. More than 99% of scandium can be selectively extracted using 15% P507, 5% TBP at the aqueous solution/organic phase (A/O) ratio of 10:1 for 6 min. The loaded organic phase was washed with 0.3 mol/L sulfuric acid, wherein most impurities were removed. After the process of desorption or stripping, precipitation, and roasting, high-purity V 2 O 5 and Sc 2 O 3 were obtained. Finally, a conceptual flow sheet was established to separate and recover vanadium and scandium from red mud hydrochloric acid leaching solution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkhout, F.

    1991-01-01

    Focusing on radioactive waste management and disposal policies in the United Kingdom, Sweden and the Federal Republic of Germany, this book gives a detailed historical account of the policy process in these three countries, and draws out the implications for theory and public policy. This comparative approach underlines how profoundly different the policy process has been in different countries. By comparing the evolution of policy in three countries, fundamental questions about the formation and resolution of technical decisions under uncertainty are clarified. The analysis of nuclear strategy, the politics of nuclear power, and the shifting emphasis of government regulation redefines the issue of radwaste management and sets it at the heat of the current debate about power, the environment and society. The combination of up-to-date technological assessment with an account of the social and political implications of radwaste management makes'Radioactive Waste'particularly useful to students of environmental studies, geography and public administration. (author)

  1. Radioactive transformations

    CERN Document Server

    Rutherford, Ernest

    2012-01-01

    Radioactive Transformations describes Ernest Rutherford's Nobel Prize-winning investigations into the mysteries of radioactive matter. In this historic work, Rutherford outlines the scientific investigations that led to and coincided with his own research--including the work of Wilhelm Rӧntgen, J. J. Thomson, and Marie Curie--and explains in detail the experiments that provided a glimpse at special relativity, quantum mechanics, and other concepts that would shape modern physics. This new edition features a comprehensive introduction by Nobel Laureate Frank Wilczek which engagingly explains how Rutherford's early research led to a better understanding of topics as diverse as the workings of the atom's nucleus, the age of our planet, and the fusion in stars.

  2. Radioactive alchemy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2014-07-15

    For any entity involved in radioactive waste management, turning lead into gold means succeeding with minimising the volumes and optimizing the long-term containment of ultimate waste to be disposed of. With this purpose, they perform R and D on different sorting, treatment and disposal technology, as explained by Frederic Plas from Andra (France), Jan Deckers from Belgoprocess (Belgium) and Wilhelm Bollingerfehr from DBE Technology (Germany). (orig.)

  3. Radioactive hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gill, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    The use of radioactive substances in hospital laboratories is discussed and the attendant hazards and necessary precautions examined. The new legislation under the Health and Safety at Work Act which, it is proposed, will replace existing legal requirements in the field of health and safety at work by a system of regulations and approved codes of practice designed to maintain or improve the standards of health, safety and welfare already established, is considered with particular reference to protection against ionising radiations. (UK)

  4. Self-Assembled Nanocomposite Organic Polymers with Aluminum and Scandium as Heterogeneous Water-Compatible Lewis Acid Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamura, Hiroyuki; Sonoyama, Arisa; Hayrapetyan, Davit; Kobayashi, Shū

    2015-09-01

    While water-compatible Lewis acids have great potential as accessible and environmentally benign catalysts for various organic transformations, efficient immobilization of such Lewis acids while keeping high activity and without leaching of metals even under aqueous conditions is a challenging task. Self-assembled nanocomposite catalysts of organic polymers, carbon black, aluminum reductants, and scandium salts as heterogeneous water-compatible Lewis acid catalysts are described. These catalysts could be successfully applied to various C-C bond-forming reactions without leaching of metals. Scanning transmission electron microscopy analyses revealed that the nanocomposite structure of Al and Sc was fabricated in these heterogeneous catalysts. It is noted that Al species, which are usually decomposed rapidly in the presence of water, are stabilized under aqueous conditions. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. First-principles relativistic theory of the magnetic response of paramagnetic metals: Application to yttrium and scandium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakor, V.; Staunton, J. B.; Poulter, J.; Ostanin, S.; Ginatempo, B.; Bruno, Ezio

    2003-10-01

    We describe a first-principles theoretical formalism for the magnetic response of paramagnetic metals in which all relativistic effects such as spin-orbit coupling are included. In particular, the easy axis and dependence upon wave vector q of the paramagnetic spin susceptibility χ(q) can be calculated. To illustrate we apply the method to two transition metals, yttrium and scandium. In each case we find χ(q) to peak at a wave vector q=(0,0,0.57)π/c, coincident with a Fermi surface nesting vector, and to have an easy axis perpendicular to q. Since χ(q) plays a key role in determining the interaction between magnetic impurities in these metals, these results are consistent with the helical antiferromagnetic order found in many dilute rare-earth Y alloys. Conversely, the easy axis for the response to a uniform magnetic field, q=0, lies along the c axis.

  6. Modification of radiation sensitivity by salts of the metals beryllium and indium and the rare earths cerium, lanthanum and scandium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floersheim, G.L.

    1995-01-01

    The LD 50 of 46 salts of metals and rare earths (lanthanoids) was determined in mice. Half the LD 50 of the compounds was then combined with lethal radiation (10.5 Gy) and the modification of survival time was scored. Only the metals beryllium and indium and the rare earths cerium, lanthanum and scandium displayed activity in our assay. There were then tested at a wider range of lower doses and reduced survival time in a dose-dependent fashion. This appears to be compatible with enhancement of radiation sensitivity. The interaction of these metals and rare earths with radiation adds a new facet to their toxicological spectrum and, by enhancing radiation effects, may influence estimates of risk. On the other hand, radiosensitizing properties of the metals may be useful for further development of compounds to be used as adjuncts in specific situations of cancer radiotherapy. 31 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  7. Quantitative determination of sediment movement at the landward spoil ground in the Yangtze Estuary with radioactive tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhangsu

    1993-01-01

    A radioactive tracer experiment was carried out at the landward spoil ground of the North Passage in the Yangtze Estuary in June of 1991. The scandium-46 was selected as the tracer, the total activity released is 17.95 x 10 10 Bq(4.85 Ci), the amount of the scandium-46 glass is 495 g. The purpose of the experiment is to determine the sediment movement direction, path, velocity and transport rate. The experiment provides the direct evidence for using the landward spoil ground in the future. The experiment results show the sediment movement was governed by the ebb tide current during the period of middle and neap tides when the radioactive tracer was injected both on the flood and ebb tides, and the sediment moved from the injection points to the middle of the North Passage near the navigation buoy No. 269. The direction of the sediment movement is 110 degree, the particle velocity is 758 m/d, and the sediment transport rate per unit width is 47.8 m 3 /md

  8. Radioactivity telemetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouras, Florent; Legrand, Bernard; Montigaud, Jean-Marie; Grandin, Marc

    1969-05-01

    The authors present an assembly which aims at radio-transmitting from mobile stations information on radioactivity. It comprises 20 mobile stations which can be located within the Cadarache Centre or outside of it within a 10 km radius, and a central station which centralises information. The report proposes a general presentation of these stations, their characteristics and principles of operation. It describes operation sequences, central station functions (call programmer, address and memory management, recording, peripherals) and its energy supply, and mobile station functions. The last part presents the installation, its start-up and exploitation, its threshold devices and its safety device

  9. The first solution heats and primary curvature of formation enthalpy isotherms of liquid binary iron alloys with scandium, yttrium, lanthanum and cerium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esin, Yu.O.; Valishev, M.G.; Ermakov, A.F.; Demin, S.E.; Gel'd, P.V.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental values of the first solution heats Δ anti Hsub(i)sup(0) and initial curvature Δ 2 anti Hsub(i)sup(0) of formation enthalpy isotherms of alloys for diluted iron alloys with scandium, yttrium, lanthanum and cerium are discussed. The first partial enthalpy of liquid scandium dissolution in liquid iron is shown to be equal to - (42.3+-3) kJ/g-at. The minimum value of integral formation enthalpy, as calculated by means of a polynomial approximating the experimental data, makes up - (8+-1) kJ/g-at. at 29 at.% Sc. The value Δsup(2)anti Hsub(Sc)sup(0) turned out to be equal to 46+-20 kJ/g-at. The considered electronic structure model correctly reflects basic features of the alloy formation energetics in the investigated systems

  10. Radioactive colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergqvist, L.

    1987-01-01

    Different techniques for the characterization of radioactive colloids, used in nuclear medicine, have been evaluated and compared. Several radioactive colloids have been characterized in vitro and in vivo and tested experimentally. Colloid biokinetics following interstitial or intravenous injection were evaluated with a scintillation camera technique. Lymphoscintigraphy with a Tc-99-labelled antimony sulphur colloid was performed in 32 patients with malignant melanoma in order to evaluate the technique. Based on the biokinetic results, absorbed doses in tissues and organs were calculated. The function of the reticuloendothelial system has been evaluated in rats after inoculation with tumour cells. Microfiltration and photon correlation spectroscopy were found to be suitable in determining activity-size and particle size distributions, respectively. Maximal lymph node uptake following subcutaneous injection was found to correspond to a colloid particle size between 10 and 50 nm. Lymphoscintigraphy was found to be useful in the study of lymphatic drainage from the primary tumour site in patients with malignant melanoma on the trunk. Quantitative analysis of ilio-inguinal lymph node uptake in patients with malignant melanoma on the lower extremities was, however, found to be of no value for the detection of metastatic disease in lymph nodes. High absorbed doses may be received in lymph nodes (up to 1 mGy/MBq) and at the injection site (about 10 mGy/MBq). In an experimental study it was found that the relative colloid uptake in bone marrow and spleen depended on the total number of intravenously injected particles. This may considerably affect the absorbed dose in these organs. (author)

  11. Highly hydrated cations: deficiency, mobility, and coordination of water in crystalline nonahydrated scandium(III), yttrium(III), and lanthanoid(III) trifluoromethanesulfonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Alireza; Lindqvist-Reis, Patric; Eriksson, Lars; Sandström, Dick; Lidin, Sven; Persson, Ingmar; Sandström, Magnus

    2005-07-04

    Trivalent lanthanide-like metal ions coordinate nine water oxygen atoms, which form a tricapped trigonal prism in a large number of crystalline hydrates. Water deficiency, randomly distributed over the capping positions, was found for the smallest metal ions in the isomorphous nonahydrated trifluoromethanesulfonates, [M(H2O)n](CF3SO3)3, in which M = Sc(III), Lu(III), Yb(III), Tm(III) or Er(III). The hydration number n increases (n = 8.0(1), 8.4(1), 8.7(1), 8.8(1) and 8.96(5), respectively) with increasing ionic size. Deuterium (2H) solid-state NMR spectroscopy revealed fast positional exchange between the coordinated capping and prism water molecules; this exchange started at temperatures higher than about 280 K for lutetium(III) and below 268 K for scandium(III). Similar positional exchange for the fully nonahydrated yttrium(III) and lanthanum(III) compounds started at higher temperatures, over about 330 and 360 K, respectively. An exchange mechanism is proposed that can exchange equatorial and capping water molecules within the restrictions of the crystal lattice, even for fully hydrated lanthanoid(III) ions. Phase transitions occurred for all the water-deficient compounds at approximately 185 K. The hydrated scandium(III) trifluoromethanesulfonate transforms reversibly (DeltaH degrees = -0.80(1) kJ mol(-1) on cooling) to a trigonal unit cell that is almost nine times larger, with the scandium ion surrounded by seven fully occupied and two partly occupied oxygen atom positions in a distorted capped trigonal prism. The hydrogen bonding to the trifluoromethanesulfonate anions stabilises the trigonal prism of water ligands, even for the crowded hydration sphere of the smallest metal ions in the series. Implications for the Lewis acid catalytic activity of the hydrated scandium(III) and lanthanoid(III) trifluoromethanesulfonates for organic syntheses performed in aqueous media are discussed.

  12. Development of methods for the selective separation of scandium, zirconium and tin for radiopharmaceutical applications; Entwicklung von Methoden zur selektiven Trennung von Scandium, Zirkonium und Zinn fuer radiopharmazeutische Anwendungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dirks-Fandrei, Carina

    2014-07-01

    The subject of the present work is the development of fast and highly selective methods for the separation and purification of scandium, zirconium and tin radionuclides from potential target materials for use in nuclear medicine. A number of selected resins (TrisKem International) were first characterized with respect to their extraction behaviour towards a large number of cations. Characterization studies were performed in batch experiments by determination of weight distribution ratios D{sub w} and further the influence of interferences on the uptake of these elements was evaluated. Weight distribution ratios were determined in different acids and acid concentrations with main focus on scandium, tin or zirconium. The interference of macro amounts of Calcium and Ti on the Sc extraction was evaluated as well as the interference of macro amounts of Y on the Zr extraction. Best suited uptake conditions were found for Scandium on DGA were determined to be 2.5 M HNO{sub 3} for Ti-Targets and 0.1 M HNO{sub 3} for Calcium-Targets. Otherwise it is also possible to extract Sc with TRU Resin. High uptakes were obtained at 2.5 M HNO{sub 3} for simulated Ti- and Calcium-targets. Separation methods were developed using elution studies; employed conditions were chosen according to parameters evaluated in the batch-experiment. The developed methods allowed separating Sc very rapidly in high purity very rapidly from Ti- or Calcium-targets. For Zr a separation method based on UTEVA Resin has been developed. Following results of batch experiments simulated Y-target solution were loaded onto a UTEVA resin column from 6 M HNO{sub 3}; the elution of Zr could be performed in 0.01 M oxalic acid. Decontamination factors in the order of 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} could be obtained applying the developed method; the method thus allowed separating Zr in a high purity. Initial testing of a method for the separation of Sn from Cd targets based on the use of TBP Resin showed that the TBP resin seems

  13. Environmental radioactivity. Measurement and monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-11-01

    The contribution on environmental radioactivity covers the following issues: natural and artificial radioactivity; continuous monitoring of radioactivity; monitoring authorities and measurement; radioactivity in the living environment; radioactivity in food and feeding stuff; radioactivity of game meat and wild-growing mushrooms; radioactivity in mines; radioactivity in the research center Rossendorf.

  14. Disposal of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomeke, J.O.

    1979-01-01

    Radioactive waste management and disposal requirements options available are discussed. The possibility of beneficial utilization of radioactive wastes is covered. Methods of interim storage of transuranium wastes are listed. Methods of shipment of low-level and high-level radioactive wastes are presented. Various methods of radioactive waste disposal are discussed

  15. Radioactive pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohl, R.O.

    1976-01-01

    The widely published claims that the public health effects resulting from routine emissions are between 0.01 and 0.1 serious health effects per gigawattyear, and hence are at least a thousand times smaller than those resulting from air pollution by the burning of coal, cannot be true, for two reasons. The authors of these claims have ignored at least two of the more important isotopes, radon-222 and carbon-14, which are presently released to the environment, and thus contribute greatly to the health impact of nuclear energy. The health effects calculated in the earlier work cover only those which occur during the year in which the energy is generated. This means, figuratively speaking, that the authors have confused an annual installment payment with the full cost. This is unacceptable. The contribution to the health impact of nuclear energy arising from the single isotopic species radon-222 emanating from the mill tailings is estimated to 400 lung cancer deaths/GW(e)y, larger even than the most pessimistic estimates of the health impact of energy from coal through atmospheric pollution. We have no assurance that other long-lived isotopes do not contribute comparable amounts to the health impact of nuclear energy. The discussion of the health impact of radon-222 raises the fundamental moral question--how far into the future our responsibility extends. If such a long-termresponsibility is rejected, then we must at least try to predict the environmental buildup of radioactive pollutants, in order to avoid unacceptable and irreversible levels of radiation dose rate. The potential health consequences from long-lived radioisotopes seem to have been largely ignored so far, and should be explored in detail

  16. Optical fluoride sensor based on monomer-dimer equilibrium of scandium(III)-octaethylporphyrin in a plasticized polymeric film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Youngjea; Kampf, Jeff W. [Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1055 (United States); Meyerhoff, Mark E. [Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1055 (United States)], E-mail: mmeyerho@umich.edu

    2007-08-29

    A fluoride-selective optical sensor based on scandium(III)-octaethylporphyrin (Sc(III)OEP) as an ionophore within a plasticized PVC film is described. The presence of fluoride ion in the aqueous sample phase increases the formation of a difluoro-bridged Sc(III)OEP dimer species in the polymer film. The ability of the Sc(III) porphyrin to form the dimeric structure in the presence of fluoride is confirmed by UV-vis spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. For more practical sensing applications, a pH chromoionophore (ETH 7075) is added to the plasticized PVC film along with Sc(III)OEP and the observed optical response is based on coextraction of protons with sample phase fluoride to create the dimeric porphyrin and a protonated chromoionophore species. The selectivity pattern observed is F{sup -} >> ClO{sub 4}{sup -}, SCN{sup -}, NO{sub 3}{sup -} > Br{sup -}, Cl{sup -}. Only organic salicylate is a significant interferent. Fast and reversible fluoride response is observed over the range of 10{sup -4} to 10{sup -2} M fluoride, allowing use of the sensing film in a waveguide configuration for flow-injection measurements.

  17. Scandium and Titanium Containing Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Hydrogen Storage: a Thermodynamic and First Principle Calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mananghaya, Michael; Yu, Dennis; Santos, Gil Nonato; Rodulfo, Emmanuel

    2016-06-15

    The generalized gradient approximation (GGA) to density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the highly localized states derived from the defects of nitrogen doped carbon nanotube with divacancy (4ND-CNxNT) contribute to strong Sc and Ti bindings, which prevent metal aggregation. Comparison of the H2 adsorption capability of Sc over Ti-decorated 4ND-CNxNT shows that Ti cannot be used for reversible H2 storage due to its inherent high adsorption energy. The Sc/4ND-CNxNT possesses favorable adsorption and consecutive adsorption energy at the local-density approximation (LDA) and GGA level. Molecular dynamics (MD) study confirmed that the interaction between molecular hydrogen and 4ND-CNxNT decorated with scandium is indeed favorable. Simulations indicate that the total amount of adsorption is directly related to the operating temperature and pressure. The number of absorbed hydrogen molecules almost logarithmically increases as the pressure increases at a given temperature. The total excess adsorption of hydrogen on the (Sc/4ND)10-CNxNT arrays at 300 K is within the range set by the department of energy (DOE) with a value of at least 5.85 wt%.

  18. The impact of an erbium, chromium:yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet laser with radial-firing tips on endodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoop, U; Barylyak, A; Goharkhay, K; Beer, F; Wernisch, J; Georgopoulos, A; Sperr, W; Moritz, A

    2009-01-01

    Radial-firing tips should allow a more homogeneous laser irradiation of root canal walls. The aim of the study was to assess the effects of erbium, chromium:yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser irradiation in conjunction with those newly designed tips. The investigation comprised bacteriology, morphological evaluations and temperature measurements. Root canals were inoculated with two test strains and laser irradiated with power settings of 0.6 W and 0.9 W and a repetition rate of 20 Hz. Subsequently, the samples were subjected to microbiological evaluation. The morphological changes of the canal walls were assessed by scanning electron microscopy. To reveal possible thermal side effects, we carried out temperature measurements. The bacteriological evaluation revealed a decisive disinfectant effect. Scanning electron microscopy showed the homogeneous removal of smear layer from the root canal walls. The temperature rise at the root surface during the irradiation was moderate, yielding 1.3 degrees C for the 0.6 W setting and 1.6 degrees C for the 0.9 W setting. The investigations indicated that the Er,Cr:YSGG laser, in conjunction with radial-firing tips, is a suitable tool for the elimination of bacteria in root canals and for the removal of smear layer.

  19. Optical fluoride sensor based on monomer-dimer equilibrium of scandium(III)-octaethylporphyrin in a plasticized polymeric film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Youngjea; Kampf, Jeff W; Meyerhoff, Mark E

    2007-08-29

    A fluoride-selective optical sensor based on scandium(III)-octaethylporphyrin (Sc(III)OEP) as an ionophore within a plasticized PVC film is described. The presence of fluoride ion in the aqueous sample phase increases the formation of a difluoro-bridged Sc(III)OEP dimer species in the polymer film. The ability of the Sc(III) porphyrin to form the dimeric structure in the presence of fluoride is confirmed by UV-vis spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. For more practical sensing applications, a pH chromoionophore (ETH 7075) is added to the plasticized PVC film along with Sc(III)OEP and the observed optical response is based on coextraction of protons with sample phase fluoride to create the dimeric porphyrin and a protonated chromoionophore species. The selectivity pattern observed is F- > ClO4(-), SCN-, NO3(-) > Br-, Cl-. Only organic salicylate is a significant interferent. Fast and reversible fluoride response is observed over the range of 10(-4) to 10(-2) M fluoride, allowing use of the sensing film in a waveguide configuration for flow-injection measurements.

  20. Influence of Scandium Addition on Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility of Al-Zn-Mg Alloy in Different Corrosive Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoming Li

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Stress corrosion cracking (SCC susceptibilities of Al-Zn-Mg alloys without and with Scandium addition were evaluated in 3.5% NaCl solution at different pH and different strain rate, using slow strain rate test technique. The results indicate that Sc addition reduces grain size and width of precipitation free zones, and transforms grain boundary precipitates from continuous distribution into interrupted distribution by inhibiting recrystallization. In solution at pH 1, pH 3 and pH 7, Sc addition reduces the degree of localized corrosion of alloy surface and SCC susceptibility of Al-Zn-Mg alloy. However, in solution at pH 10 and pH 12, grain refinement significantly promotes the diffusion of hydrogen atoms into matrix, thus Sc addition increases SCC susceptibility of Al-Zn-Mg alloy. Under different strain rate conditions, Sc addition can all reduce SCC susceptibility of Al-Zn-Mg alloy in solution at pH 1, pH 3 and pH 7, and can all increase SCC susceptibility of Al-Zn-Mg alloy in solution at pH 10 and pH 12. As a result, Sc modified Al-Zn-Mg alloy in practical applications should be avoided in alkaline environments.

  1. Potential for photocatalytic degradation of the potassic diclofenac using scandium and silver modified titanium dioxide thin films; Potencial de degradacao fotocatalitica do diclofenaco potassico utilizando filmes finos de dioxido de titanio modificado com escandio e prata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciola, R.A.; Oliveira, C.T.; Lopes, S.A.; Cavalheiro, A.A., E-mail: rafaelciola@hotmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Mato Grosso do Sul (UFMS), Navirai, MS (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas Tecnologicas em Recursos Naturais

    2011-07-01

    The potential for photocatalytic degradation of the potassic diclofenac drug was investigated using titanium dioxide thin films modified with two modifier types, scandium and silver, both prepared by Sol-Gel method. It was demonstrated by UVVis spectroscopy analysis of the solutions containing the drug, under UV-A light irradiation that the degradation efficiency of the titanium dioxide photocatalyst is dependent of the semiconductor nature and that the scandium accelerates the first step of the degradation when compared to the silver. This result seems to be related to the redox potential of the electron-hole pair, once the scandium modifying sample generates a p type semiconductor that reduces the band gap. The extra holes attract more strongly the chorine ion present in diclofenac and leading to the releasing more easily. However, after the first byproducts degradation the following steps are not facilitated, making the silver modifying more advantageous. (author)

  2. Synthesis and in vitro evaluation of no-carrier-added 2-(3-(4-(4-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzyl)piperazin-1-yl)propyl)benzo[d]thiazole, a potential dopamine D{sub 4} receptor radioligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Gu-Cai; Zhang, Ru [Hunan Institute of Engineering, Hunan Xiangtan (China). College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering; Xia, Jiao-yun [Changsha Univ. of Science and Technology (China). School of Chemistry and Biology Engineering

    2016-07-01

    The dopamine D{sub 4} receptor has been shown to play important roles in some central nervous system pathologies. Specific radioligands for the D{sub 4} receptor may be useful to understand the function of the D{sub 4} receptor and its correlations with various disorders. 2-(3-(4-(4-[{sup 18}F]Fluorobenzyl)piperazin-1-yl)propyl)benzo[d]thiazole ([{sup 18}F]4) was synthesized through a one-pot two-step procedure with total yield 18.6% (decay corrected). The specific activity of the radioligand was 112 GBq/μmol and its radiochemical purity was >95.0%. Its affinity and selectivity for dopamine D{sub 2}-like receptors were measured through in vitro receptor binding evaluation and the K{sub i} value for the D{sub 4} receptor was determined to be 2.9±0.2 nM, and its selectivity for the dopamine D{sub 4} receptor is 709-fold versus D{sub 2long} receptor, 823-fold versus D{sub 3} receptor. The partition coefficient (Log D) of it was determined to be 2.6±0.1 through octanol-water partition experiment. The ligand presents desirable combination of lipophilicity, affinity and selectivity for the dopamine D{sub 4} receptor. The results suggested that the radioligand shows promises for the in vivo study of the dopamine D{sub 4} receptor.

  3. Separation of no-carrier-added {sup 203}Pb, a surrogate radioisotope, from proton irradiated {sup nat}Tl{sub 2}CO{sub 3} target using calcium alginate hydrogel beads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, Kangkana; Sen, Kamalika [Univ. of Calcutta, Kolkata (India). Dept. of Chemistry; Lahiri, Susanta [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata (India)

    2016-07-01

    {sup 203}Pb is a promising radioisotope in the field of medical science as an imaging surrogate of {sup 212}Pb. In the present investigation {sup 203}Pb was produced by proton irradiation of natural Tl{sub 2}CO{sub 3} target and was separated from the bulk Tl target using calcium alginate (CA) hydrogel beads with a high separation factor (3.8 x 10{sup 4} at 10{sup -3} M HNO{sub 3}). During the separation process {sup 203}Pb was encapsulated in CA beads and desorption of the radioisotope could only be achieved in 1M HNO{sub 3}. Possibility of Tl uptake was also checked in Fe doped CA (Fe-CA) beads after oxidation of Tl(I) to Tl(III) by sodium bismuthate. No significant uptake of Tl(III) was noticed in the Fe-CA beads. The matrix is therefore suitable for isolation of {sup 203}Pb from the target as well as its storage in the bead for therapeutic as well as diagnostic purpose.

  4. Radioactivity and geophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radvanyi, P.

    1992-01-01

    The paper recalls a few steps of the introduction of radioactivity in geophysics and astrophysics: contribution of radioelements to energy balance of the Earth, age of the Earth based on radioactive disintegration and the discovery of cosmic radiations

  5. Radioactive waste in perspective

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2010-01-01

    ... radioactive. While disposal options for hazardous wastes are generally well established, some types of hazardous waste face issues similar to those for radioactive waste and also require long-term disposal arrangements...

  6. Radioactive Waste Management Strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This strategy defines methods and means how collect, transport and bury radioactive waste safely. It includes low level radiation waste and high level radiation waste. In the strategy are foreseen main principles and ways of storage radioactive waste

  7. Radioactivity in consumer products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moghissi, A.A.; Paras, P.; Carter, M.W.; Barker, R.F. (eds.)

    1978-08-01

    Papers presented at the conference dealt with regulations and standards; general and biological risks; radioluminous materials; mining, agricultural, and construction materials containing radioactivity; and various products containing radioactive sources.

  8. Determination of rare-earth elements, yttrium and scandium in manganese nodules by inductively-coupled argon-plastma emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, T.; Lamothe, P.J.; Pesek, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    A sequential-scanning, inductively-coupled argon plasma emission spectrometer is used for the determination of the rare-earth elements, plus yttrium and scandium, in manganese nodules. Wavelength selection is optimized to minimize spectral interferences from manganese nodule components. Samples are decomposed with mixed acids in a sealed polycarbonate vessel, and elements are quantified without further treatment. Results for U.S. Geological Survey manganese nodule standards A-1 and P-1 had average relative standard deviations of 6.8% and 8.1%, respectively, and results were in good agreement with those obtained by other methods. ?? 1984.

  9. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balek, V.

    1994-01-01

    This booklet is a publication by International Atomic Energy Agency for general awareness of citizens and policy-makers to clarify their concept of nuclear wastes. In a very simple way it tells what is radioactivity, radiations and radioactive wastes. It further hints on various medial and industrial uses of radiations. It discusses about different types of radioactive wastes and radioactive waste management. Status of nuclear power plants in Central and Eastern European countries are also discussed

  10. Radioactive consumer products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Otomaru

    1981-01-01

    Present situation of utilizing the radioactive consumer products and exposure dose were reviewed with published data. Practically, consumer products are divided into three categories, (1) radioactive nuclides intentionally incorporated into radioluminous dye, ionization chambers for smoke detector, eliminator of static electricity, and glow lamp (2) natural radioactive nuclides contained in false teeth, porcelain, glass, and gas mantle (3) natural radioactive nuclides accumulated as industrial waste at the consumption of coal, petroleum, and natural gas or in fertilizer and materials for construction. (Nakanishi, T.)

  11. Scandium complexes: physico-chemical study and evaluation of stability in vitro and in vivo for nuclear medicine application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerdjoudj, Rabha

    2014-01-01

    Among the different isotopes of Scandium that can be used in nuclear medicine may be mentioned the 47 Sc and 44 Sc. The first decays by emitting an electron associated with a 159 keV gamma can thus be used either for radiotherapy or TEMP imaging. The 44 Sc (3.97 h) decays in 94.27% in case by emitting a positron, with a γ photon energy equal to 1.157 MeV. This isotope is then an ideal candidate for applications in PET imaging. Currently, the Cyclotron of high energy and high intensity ARRONAX produce 44 Sc and co-produces the isomeric state the 44m Sc (2.44 d). The 44m Sc has properties (E(γ) = 270 keV, 98.8%), which allows to consider its use as a potential in vivo generator. Previous work had demonstrated that the DOTA ligand is most suitable and stable for Sc. This thesis aims; make in evidence the feasibility of the in vivo 44m / 44 Sc generator. Initially a procedure was optimized and validated for the production of 44m / 44 Sc with a high specific activity and chemical purity. Radiolabeling of DOTA conjugated peptides was then developed and optimized. Theoretical and experimental studies have been performed in order to demonstrate the feasibility of 44m / 44 Sc as a potential in vivo generator. Finally, in vitro stability studies on radiolabeled 44m / 44 Sc complexes were performed, followed by biodistribution studies and PET imaging. (author)

  12. Investigation of the separation of scandium and rare earth elements from red mud by use of reversed-phase HPLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsakanika, Lambrini V; Ochsenkühn-Petropoulou, Maria Th; Mendrinos, Leonidas N

    2004-07-01

    A chromatographic method has been developed for separation and determination of scandium (Sc) and rare earth elements (REEs) in samples from a red mud (RM)-utilization process. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) with post-column derivatization using 4-(2-pyridylazo)-resorcinol (PAR) and UV-visible detection at 520 nm was tested using different gradient elution profiles and pH values to optimize separation and recovery, primarily for Sc but also for yttrium and the individual lanthanides, from iron present in the samples. The separation was performed in less than 20 min by use of a mobile phase gradient. The concentration of alpha-hydroxyisobutyric acid ( alpha-HIBA), as eluent, was altered from 0.06 to 0.4 mol L(-1) (pH 3.7) and 0.01 mol L(-1) sodium salt n-octane sulfonic acid (OS) was used as modifier. Very low detection limits in the nanogram range and a good resolution for Sc and REEs except for Y/Dy were achieved. Before application of the method to the red mud samples and to the corresponding bauxites, Sc and REEs were leached from red mud with 0.6 mol L(-1) HNO(3) and mostly separated, as a group, from the main elements by ion exchange/selective elution (6 mol L(-1) HNO(3)) in accordance with a pilot-plant process developed in this laboratory. After evaporation of the eluent to dryness the extracted elements were re-dissolved in the mobile phase. By use of this chromatographic method Sc, which is the most expensive of the elements investigated and occurs in economically interesting concentrations in red mud, could be separated not only from co-existing Fe but also from Y/Dy, Yb, Er, Ho, Gd, Eu, Sm, Nd, Pr, Ce and La. All the elements investigated were individually recovered. Their recoveries were found to be nearly quantitative.

  13. Determination of scandium in acid mine drainage by ICP-OES with flow injection on-line preconcentration using oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerez, Javier; Isaguirre, Andrea C; Bazán, Cristian; Martinez, Luis D; Cerutti, Soledad

    2014-06-01

    An on-line scandium preconcentration and determination system implemented with inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry associated with flow injection was studied. Trace amounts of scandium were preconcentrated by sorption on a minicolumn packed with oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes, at pH 1.5. The retained analyte was removed from the minicolumn with 30% (v/v) nitric acid. A total enrichment factor of 225-fold was obtained within a preconcentration time of 300 s (for a 25 mL sample volume). The overall time required for preconcentration and elution of 25 mL of sample was about 6 min; the throughput was about 10 samples per hour. The value of the detection limit was 4 ng L(-1) and the precision for 10 replicate determinations at 100 ng L(-1) Sc level was 5% relative standard deviation, calculated from the peak heights obtained. The calibration graph using the preconcentration system was linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.9996 at levels near the detection limits up to at least 10 mg L(-1). After optimization, the method was successfully applied to the determination of Sc in an acid drainage from an abandoned mine located in the province of San Luis, Argentina. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Proton-induced production and radiochemical isolation of44Ti from scandium metal targets for44Ti/44Sc generator development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radchenko, Valery; Engle, Jonathan W; Medvedev, Dmitri G; Maassen, Joel M; Naranjo, Cleo M; Unc, George A; Meyer, Catherine A L; Mastren, Tara; Brugh, Mark; Mausner, Leonard; Cutler, Cathy S; Birnbaum, Eva R; John, Kevin D; Nortier, F Meiring; Fassbender, Michael E

    2017-07-01

    Scandium-44g (half-life 3.97h) shows promise for application in positron emission tomography (PET), due to favorable decay parameters. One of the sources of 44g Sc is the 44 Ti/ 44g Sc generator, which can conveniently provide this radioisotope on a daily basis at a diagnostic facility. Titanium-44 (half-life 60.0 a), in turn, can be obtained via proton irradiation of scandium metal targets. A substantial 44 Ti product batch, however, requires high beam currents, long irradiation times and an elaborate chemical procedure for 44 Ti isolation and purification. This study describes the production of a combined 175MBq (4.7mCi) batch yield of 44 Ti in week long proton irradiations at the Los Alamos Isotope Production Facility (LANL-IPF) and the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BNL-BLIP). A two-step ion exchange chromatography based chemical separation method is introduced: first, a coarse separation of 44 Ti via anion exchange sorption in concentrated HCl results in a 44 Tc/Sc separation factor of 10 2 -10 3 . A second, cation exchange based step in HCl media is then applied for 44 Ti fine purification from residual Sc mass. In summary, this method yields a 90-97% 44 Ti recovery with an overall Ti/Sc separation factor of ≥10 6 . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of scandium and zirconium combination alloying on as-cast microstructure and mechanical properties of Al-4Cu-1.5Mg alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Qingchun

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The influences of minor scandium and zirconium combination alloying on the as-cast microstructure and mechanical properties of Al-4Cu-1.5Mg alloy have been experimentally investigated. The experimental results show that when the minor elements of scandium and zirconium are simultaneously added into the Al-4Cu-1.5Mg alloy, the as-cast microstructure of the alloy is effectively modified and the grains of the alloy are greatly refined. The coarse dendrites in the microstructure of the alloy without Sc and Zr additions are refined to the uniform and fine equiaxed grains. As the additions of Sc and Zr are 0.4% and 0.2%, respectively, the tensile strength, yield strength and elongation of the alloy are relatively better, which are 275.0 MPa, 176.0 MPa and 8.0% respectively. The tensile strength is increased by 55.3%, and the elongation is nearly raised three times, compared with those of the alloy without Sc and Zr additions.

  16. Radioactivity and food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olszyna-Marzys, A.E.

    1990-01-01

    Two topics relating to radioactivity and food are discussed: food irradiation for preservation purposes, and food contamination from radioactive substances. Food irradiation involves the use of electromagnetic energy (x and gamma rays) emitted by radioactive substances or produced by machine in order to destroy the insects and microorganisms present and prevent germination. The sanitary and economic advantages of treating food in this way are discussed. Numerous studies have confirmed that under strictly controlled conditions no undesirable changes take place in food that has been irradiated nor is radioactivity induced. Reference is made to the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station, which aroused public concern about irradiated food. The events surrounding the accident are reviewed, and its consequences with regard to contamination of different foods with radioactive substances, particularly iodine-131 and cesium-137, are described. Also discussed are the steps that have been taken by different international organizations to set limits on acceptable radioactivity in food.15 references

  17. Radioactive air sampling methods

    CERN Document Server

    Maiello, Mark L

    2010-01-01

    Although the field of radioactive air sampling has matured and evolved over decades, it has lacked a single resource that assimilates technical and background information on its many facets. Edited by experts and with contributions from top practitioners and researchers, Radioactive Air Sampling Methods provides authoritative guidance on measuring airborne radioactivity from industrial, research, and nuclear power operations, as well as naturally occuring radioactivity in the environment. Designed for industrial hygienists, air quality experts, and heath physicists, the book delves into the applied research advancing and transforming practice with improvements to measurement equipment, human dose modeling of inhaled radioactivity, and radiation safety regulations. To present a wide picture of the field, it covers the international and national standards that guide the quality of air sampling measurements and equipment. It discusses emergency response issues, including radioactive fallout and the assets used ...

  18. Drainage of radioactive areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-04-01

    This Code of Practice covers all the drainage systems which may occur in the radioactive classified area of an establishment, namely surface water, foul, process and radioactive drainage. It also deals with final discharge lines. The Code of Practice concentrates on those aspects of drainage which require particular attention because the systems are in or from radioactive areas and typical illustrations are given in appendices. The Code makes references to sources of information on conventional aspects of drainage design. (author)

  19. Learning more about radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This digest brochure explains what radioactivity is, where it comes from, how it is measured, what are its effects on the body and the way to protect it against these effects, the uses of radioactivity (In the medical field, In industry, In the food industry, and In the cultural world). It ends with some examples of irradiation levels, of natural radioactivity and with the distribution in France of various sources of exposure. (J.S.)

  20. Handling of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanhueza Mir, Azucena

    1998-01-01

    Based on characteristics and quantities of different types of radioactive waste produced in the country, achievements in infrastructure and the way to solve problems related with radioactive waste handling and management, are presented in this paper. Objectives of maintaining facilities and capacities for controlling, processing and storing radioactive waste in a conditioned form, are attained, within a great range of legal framework, so defined to contribute with safety to people and environment (au)

  1. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Almost all IAEA Member States use radioactive sources in medicine, industry, agriculture and scientific research, and countries remain responsible for the safe handling and storage of all radioactively contaminated waste that result from such activities. In some cases, waste must be specially treated or conditioned before storage and/or disposal. The Department of Technical Co-operation is sponsoring a programme with the support of the Nuclear Energy Department aimed at establishing appropriate technologies and procedures for managing radioactive wastes. (IAEA)

  2. Radioactivity and its measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Mann, W B; Garfinkel, S B

    1980-01-01

    Begins with a description of the discovery of radioactivity and the historic research of such pioneers as the Curies and Rutherford. After a discussion of the interactions of &agr;, &bgr; and &ggr; rays with matter, the energetics of the different modes of nuclear disintegration are considered in relation to the Einstein mass-energy relationship as applied to radioactive transformations. Radiation detectors and radioactivity measurements are also discussed

  3. Radioactive Waste Management Basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, B.K.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

  4. Radioactive measurements in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozsa, S.

    1979-01-01

    The book reviews the industrial applications of radioactive isotopes. The introduction refreshes the reader's knowledge of radioactive decay, radioactive radiations and measuring techniques. Then the special problems of threshold detection, level indication, thickness measurements, measurements of layer thickness applying beta-reflexion, density measurements, humidity measurements, and the determination of the composition of different materials are detailed. In each chapter the principle of a given technique, the available equipment, the possibilities of controlling systems and results of concrete measurements are discussed. The last chapter deals with the practical aspects of the industrial installation of radioactive measuring systems. (L.E.)

  5. Radioactive Plumes Monitoring Simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapelushnik, I.; Sheinfeld, M.; Avida, R.; Kadmon, Y.; Ellenbogen, M.; Tirosh, D.

    1999-01-01

    The Airborne Radiation Monitoring System (ARMS) monitors air or ground radioactive contamination. The contamination source can be a radioactive plume or an area contaminated with radionuclides. The system is based on two major parts, an airborne unit carried by a helicopter and a ground station carried by a truck. The system enables real time measurement and analysis of radioactive plumes as well as post flight processing. The Radioactive Plumes Monitoring Simulator purpose is to create a virtual space where the trained operators experience full radiation field conditions, without real radiation hazard. The ARMS is based on a flying platform and hence the simulator allows a significant reduction of flight time costs

  6. Radioactivity in cigaratte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uslu, I.; Tanker, E.; Aksu, M. L.

    1998-01-01

    Cigaratte is known to be hazardous to health due to nicotine and tar it contains.This is indicated on cigaratte packets by health warnings.However there is less known hazard of smoking due to intake of radioactive compounds by inhalation. This study dwells upon the radioactive hazard of smoking

  7. Radioactive krypton gas separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    Radioactive krypton is separated from a gas mixture comprising nitrogen and traces of carbon dioxide and radioactive krypton by selective adsorption and then cryogenic distillation of the prepurified gas against nitrogen liquid to produce krypton bottoms concentrate liquid, using the nitrogen gas from the distillation for two step purging of the adsorbent. 16 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures

  8. Radioactive krypton gas separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    Radioactive krypton is separated from a gas mixture comprising nitrogen and traces of carbon dioxide and radioactive krypton by first selective adsorption and then cryogenic distillation of the prepurified gas against nitrogen liquid to produce krypton bottoms concentrate liquid, using the nitrogen gas from the distillation for two step purging of the adsorbent. 6 claims, 8 drawing figures

  9. Radioactive Wastes. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Charles H.

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. This booklet deals with the handling, processing and disposal of radioactive wastes. Among the topics discussed are: The Nature of Radioactive Wastes; Waste Management; and Research and Development. There are…

  10. Radioactive waste management policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, R.W.

    1983-06-01

    The speaker discusses the development of government policy regarding radioactive waste disposal in Canada, indicates overall policy objectives, and surveys the actual situation with respect to radioactive wastes in Canada. He also looks at the public perceptions of the waste management situation and how they relate to the views of governmental decision makers

  11. Sealed radioactive sources toolkit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mac Kenzie, C.

    2005-09-01

    The IAEA has developed a Sealed Radioactive Sources Toolkit to provide information to key groups about the safety and security of sealed radioactive sources. The key groups addressed are officials in government agencies, medical users, industrial users and the scrap metal industry. The general public may also benefit from an understanding of the fundamentals of radiation safety

  12. Management of Radioactive Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tchokosa, P.

    2010-01-01

    Management of Radioactive Wastes is to protect workers and the public from the radiological risk associated with radioactive waste for the present and future. It application of the principles to the management of waste generated in a radioisotope uses in the industry. Any material that contains or is contaminated with radionuclides at concentrations or radioactivity levels greater than ‘exempt quantities’ established by the competent regulatory authorities and for which no further use is foreseen or intended. Origin of the Radioactive Waste includes Uranium and Thorium mining and milling, nuclear fuel cycle operations, Operation of Nuclear power station, Decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities and Institutional uses of isotopes. There are types of radioactive waste: Low-level Waste (LLW) and High-level Waste. The Management Options for Radioactive Waste Depends on Form, Activity, Concentration and half-lives of the radioactive waste, Storage and disposal methods will vary according to the following; the radionuclides present, and their concentration, and radio toxicity. The contamination results basically from: Contact between radioactive materials and any surface especially during handling. And it may occur in the solid, liquid or gas state. Decontamination is any process that will either reduce or completely remove the amount of radionuclides from a contaminated surface

  13. K. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Radioactive waste management is a controversial and emotive subject. This report discusses radioactivity hazards which arise from each stage of the fuel cycle and then relates these hazards to the New Zealand situation. There are three appendices, two of which are detailed considerations of a paper by Dr. B.L.Cohen

  14. Induced radioactivity at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    1970-01-01

    A description of some of the problems and some of the advantages associated with the phenomenon of induced radioactivity at accelerator centres such as CERN. The author has worked in this field for several years and has recently written a book 'Induced Radioactivity' published by North-Holland.

  15. A Remote Radioactivity Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jona, Kemi; Vondracek, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Imagine a high school with very few experimental resources and limited budgets that prevent the purchase of even basic laboratory equipment. For example, many high schools do not have the means of experimentally studying radioactivity because they lack Geiger counters and/or good radioactive sources. This was the case at the first high school one…

  16. Objectives for radioactive waste packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flowers, R.H.

    1982-04-01

    The report falls under the headings: introduction; the nature of radioactive wastes; how to manage radioactive wastes; packaging of radioactive wastes (supervised storage; disposal); waste form evaluation and test requirements (supervised storage; disposal); conclusions. (U.K.)

  17. EPA's Radioactive Source Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopsick, D.

    2004-01-01

    The US EPA is the lead Federal agency for emergency responses to unknown radiological materials, not licensed, owned or operated by a Federal agency or an Agreement state (Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan, 1996). The purpose of EPA's clean materials programme is to keep unwanted and unregulated radioactive material out of the public domain. This is achieved by finding and securing lost sources, maintaining control of existing sources and preventing future losses. The focus is on both, domestic and international fronts. The domestic program concentrates on securing lost sources, preventing future losses, alternative technologies like tagging of radioactive sources in commerce, pilot radioactive source roundup, training programs, scrap metal and metal processing facilities, the demolition industry, product stewardship and alternatives to radioactive devices (fewer radioactive source devices means fewer orphan sources). The international program consists of securing lost sources, preventing future losses, radiation monitoring of scrap metal at ports and the international scrap metal monitoring protocol

  18. Radioactivity and wildlife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, V.H.; Horrill, A.D.; Livens, F.R.

    1990-01-01

    The official assumption is that if levels of radioactivity are safe for humans, they are safe for wildlife too. NCC sponsored a research project by the Institute of Terrestrial Ecology to find out what was known in this field. It appears that the assumption is justified to a certain extent in that mammals are identified as the organisms most vulnerable to the damaging effects of radioactivity. Other general principles are put forward: where there are radioactive discharges to the marine environment, coastal muds and saltmarshes can be particularly contaminated; upland habitats, with low nutrient status and subject to high rainfall, are likely to accumulate radioactivity from atmospheric discharges (e.g. Chernobyl, the wildlife effects of which are reported here). The document concludes that no deleterious effects of radioactivity on wild plants and animals have been detected in the UK, but acknowledges that there are still many gaps in our knowledge of the behaviour of radioisotopes in the natural environment. (UK)

  19. Radioactive wastes. Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillaumont, R.

    2001-01-01

    Many documents (journal articles, book chapters, non-conventional documents..) deal with radioactive wastes but very often this topic is covered in a partial way and sometimes the data presented are contradictory. The aim of this article is to precise the definition of radioactive wastes and the proper terms to describe this topic. It describes the main guidelines of the management of radioactive wastes, in particular in France, and presents the problems raised by this activity: 1 - goal and stakes of the management; 2 - definition of a radioactive waste; 3 - radionuclides encountered; 4 - radio-toxicity and radiation risks; 5 - French actors of waste production and management; 6 - French classification and management principles; 7 - wastes origin and characteristics; 8 - status of radioactive wastes in France per categories; 9 - management practices; 10 - packages conditioning and fabrication; 11 - storage of wastes; 12 - the French law from December 30, 1991 and the opportunities of new ways of management; 13 - international situation. (J.S.)

  20. Chemical insights into the synthesis and properties of polycrystalline and single crystal iron scandium sulfide (FeSc2S4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morey, Jennifer R.; Plumb, Kemp W.; Koohpayeh, Seyed M.; Broholm, Collin L.; McQueen, Tyrel M.

    Iron scandium sulfide, FeSc2S4, has recently attracted significant theoretical and experimental interest as a candidate spin-orbital liquid. An AB2X4 spinel, FeSc2S4 (space group Fd-3m, No. 227) features a high degree of frustration associated with the Fe2+, which occupies the A-site diamond sublattice and is tetrahedrally coordinated by sulfur. The Fe2+ ion is in a high spin (S =2) state, resulting in orbital degeneracy due to a single hole on the e orbitals. We report the strides we have made to produce material in powder and single crystal form, and the relationship between the chemistry and the structural, magnetic, and thermodynamic properties of FeSc2S4. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Material Sciences and Engineering, under Grant No. DEFG02-08ER46544.

  1. Two anionically derivatized scandium oxoselenates(IV): ScF[SeO3] and Sc2O2[SeO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, Stefan; Chou, Sheng-Chun; Schleid, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    Scandium fluoride oxoselenate(IV) ScF[SeO3] and scandium oxide oxoselenate(IV) Sc2O2[SeO3] could be synthesized through solid-state reactions. ScF[SeO3] was obtained phase-pure, by reacting mixtures of Sc2O3, ScF3 and SeO2 (molar ratio: 1:1:3) together with CsBr as fluxing agent in corundum crucibles embedded into evacuated glassy silica ampoules after firing at 700 °C for seven days. Sc2O2[SeO3] first emerged as by-product during the attempts to synthesize ScCl[SeO3] following aforementioned synthesis route and could later be reproduced from appropriate Sc2O3/SeO3 mixtures. ScF[SeO3] crystallizes monoclinically in space group P21/m with a=406.43(2), b =661.09(4), c=632.35(4) pm, β=93.298(3)° and Z=2. Sc2O2[SeO3] also crystallizes in the monoclinic system, but in space group P21/n with a=786.02(6), b=527.98(4), c=1086.11(8) pm, β=108.672(3)° for Z=4. The crystal structures of both compounds are strongly influenced by the stereochemically active lone pairs of the ψ1-tetrahedral [SeO3]2- anions. They also show partial structures, where the derivatizing F- or O2- anions play an important role. For ScF[SeO3] chains of the composition 2+∞ 1[FS c 2 / 2 ] form from connected [FSc2]5+ dumbbells, while [OSc3]7+ pyramids and [OSc4]10+ tetrahedra units are condensed to layers according to 2+ ∞ 2[O2Sc2 ] in Sc2O2[SeO3].

  2. Copper scandium zirconium phosphate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bond, Andrew David; Warner, Terence Edwin

    2013-01-01

    The title compound, with nominal formula Cu(2)ScZr(PO(4))(3), has a beige coloration and displays fast Cu(+) cation conduction at elevated temperatures. It adopts a NASICON-type structure in the space group R3c. The examined crystal was an obverse-reverse twin with approximately equal twin...... components. The [Sc(III)Zr(IV)(PO(4))(3)](2-) framework is composed of corner-sharing Sc/ZrO(6) octahedra and PO(4) tetrahedra. The Sc and Zr atoms are disordered on one atomic site on a crystallographic threefold axis. The P atom of the phosphate group lies on a crystallographic twofold axis. Nonframework...... Cu(+) cations occupy three positions. Two of the Cu(+) positions generate an approximately circular distribution around a site of 3 symmetry, referred to as the M1 site in the NASICON-type structure. The other Cu(+) position is situated close to the twofold symmetric M2 site, displaced...

  3. Radioactivity; La radioactivite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This pedagogical document presents the origin, effects and uses of radioactivity: where does radioactivity comes from, effects on the body, measurement, protection against radiations, uses in the medical field, in the electric power industry, in the food (ionization, radio-mutagenesis, irradiations) and other industries (radiography, gauges, detectors, irradiations, tracers), and in research activities (dating, preservation of cultural objects). The document ends with some examples of irradiation levels (examples of natural radioactivity, distribution of the various sources of exposure in France). (J.S.)

  4. Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulikas, V.

    2006-01-01

    After the Law of the Republic of Lithuania was passed on Radioactive Waste Management on May 20, 1999, much more attention is being given to the disposal of this kind of waste in our country and especially at Ignalina NPP, the facility that generates most of it. The key principle of radioactive waste management is to manage it in such a manner that it would pose no danger to the public and the environment, and would not become an additional burden to future generations. This principle is followed in managing radioactive waste in Lithuania too. (author)

  5. Natural radioactive phon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birjukovs, V.; Birjukov, P.

    2004-01-01

    The natural radiating phon is determined by radioactive isotopes of elements which time of half-decay is commensurable in due course existence of the Earth, dispersing in rocks, ground, water and air, and also space radiation. (authors)

  6. Radioactivity content of books

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalit, B.Y.; Shukla, V.K.; Ramachandran, T.V.

    1981-01-01

    The natural and fallout radioactivity was measured in a large number of books produced in various countries after 1955. Results of these measurements showed that the books contained radioactivity due to fallout 137 Cs and 226 Ra, 228 Th and 40 K radioisotopes of primordial origin. Books printed in the U.S.A. had low radioactivity of 40K and 226 Ra origin compared to books printed in the European subcontinent. Books printed during high fallout rate (1962-64) or thereafter did not exhibit any significantly higher 137 Cs levels. The maximum radiation dose to the eyes calculated for the radioactivity content of the books was 0.8 μR/hr and the minimum was 0.07 μR/hr; most of the books were in the range 0.3-0.5 μR/hr. (U.K.)

  7. Classification of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Radioactive wastes are generated in a number of different kinds of facilities and arise in a wide range of concentrations of radioactive materials and in a variety of physical and chemical forms. To simplify their management, a number of schemes have evolved for classifying radioactive waste according to the physical, chemical and radiological properties of significance to those facilities managing this waste. These schemes have led to a variety of terminologies, differing from country to country and even between facilities in the same country. This situation makes it difficult for those concerned to communicate with one another regarding waste management practices. This document revises and updates earlier IAEA references on radioactive waste classification systems given in IAEA Technical Reports Series and Safety Series. Guidance regarding exemption of materials from regulatory control is consistent with IAEA Safety Series and the RADWASS documents published under IAEA Safety Series. 11 refs, 2 figs, 2 tab

  8. Understanding radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, R.L.

    1981-12-01

    This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes). (ATT)

  9. Law of radioactive minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Legal device done in order to standardize and promote the exploration and explotation of radioactive minerals by peruvian and foreign investors. This device include the whole process, since the prospection until the development, after previous auction given by IPEN

  10. Storage of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, B.L.

    1981-01-01

    Several factors are cited which would make the underground storage of radioactive wastes a safe technology: the rock or salt formation containing the waste would require a very long time for dissolution by ground water. Moreover, the backfill material, namely clay, would swell when wet to provide a tight seal, as well as to filter out leaked materials. In addition, casing materials are available which would not dissolve for a million years. A further protection is that the waste itself will be a glass-like material resistant to dissolution. Also, ground water carrying radioactive material would take about 1,000 years to travel 2,000 ft to the surface. Once on the surface, any radioactive leakage can readily be detected. It is concluded that radioactive wastes do not represent a serious problem to health

  11. Hydrodynamics and radioactive tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margrita, R.; Santos-Cottin, H.

    1987-01-01

    Use of radioactive tracers for the description of fluid flow in chemical reactors is exposed. Method and operation are briefly described and examples of applications are given for different industries [fr

  12. Advance in radioactive decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basteris M, J. A.; Farrera V, R.

    2010-09-01

    The objective of the present work was to determine if the application of the Na hypochlorite has some utility in the radioactive decontamination, in comparison with the water, detergent and alcohol. Several methods were compared for decontaminate the iodine 131 and technetium 99, the work table and the skin it was carried out an initial count with the Geiger Muller. Later on, in a single occasion, the areas were washed with abundant water, alcohol, clothes detergent and sodium hypochlorite (used commercially as domestic bleacher) without diluting. Observing that the percentage in the decrease of the counted radioactivity by the Geiger Muller, decreased in the following way: It was demonstrated that the Na hypochlorite presents the highest index of radioactive decontamination with 100% of effectiveness. The Na hypochlorite is an excellent substance that can be used with effectiveness and efficiency like decontamination element in the accident cases of radioactive contamination in the clinical laboratories of nuclear medicine. (Author)

  13. Understanding radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, R.L.

    1981-12-01

    This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes)

  14. Radioactive Material Containment Bags

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    The audit was requested by Senator Joseph I. Lieberman based on allegations made by a contractor, Defense Apparel Services, about the Navy's actions on three contracts for radioactive material containment bags...

  15. Environmental radioactivity survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H.G.; Lee, K.K.

    1981-01-01

    A systematic survey on the environmental radioactivity at Chosun University and its surrounding areas during the year of 1981 was carried out through various environmental samples, which were precipitation, surface soil, stream water, pine needles, and others. Out of these samples natural background radiation was surveyed. No significant radioactive materials from the Atomic Energy Research Institute attached to Chosun University and the Radioisotopes Laboratory of Chosun University Hospital were detected during this period. (author)

  16. Radioactive materials transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talbi, B.

    1996-01-01

    The development of peaceful applications of nuclear energy results in the increase of transport operations of radioactive materials. Therefore strong regulations on transport of radioactive materials turns out to be a necessity in Tunisia. This report presents the different axes of regulations which include the means of transport involved, the radiation protection of the carriers, the technical criteria of security in transport, the emergency measures in case of accidents and penalties in case of infringement. (TEC). 12 refs., 1 fig

  17. Radioactive Substances Act 1960

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1960-01-01

    This Act regulates the keeping and use of radioactive material and makes provision for the disposal and storage of radioactive waste in the United Kingdom. It provides for a licensing system for such activities and for exemptions therefrom, in particular as concerns the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority. The Act repeals Section 4(5) of the Atomic Energy Authority Act, 1954 which made temporary provision for discharge of waste on or from premises occupied by the Authority. (NEA) [fr

  18. Radiation and environmental radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhamat Omar; Ismail Sulaiman; Zalina Laili

    2015-01-01

    This book is written based on 25 years authors experience especially in scientifc research of radiation and environmental radioactivity field at Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuklear Malaysia). Interestingly, from the authors experience in managing the services and consultancies for radiological environmental monitoring, it is also helpful in preparing the ideas for this book. Although this book focuses on Malaysian radiation information environmental radioactivity, but the data collected by the international bodies are also included in this book.

  19. Temporary Personal Radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Fred

    2012-01-01

    As part of a bone scan procedure to look for the spread of prostate cancer, I was injected with radioactive technetium. In an effort to occupy/distract my mind, I used a Geiger counter to determine if the radioactive count obeyed the inverse-square law as a sensor was moved away from my bladder by incremental distances. (Contains 1 table and 2…

  20. Radioactive sources service

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Dear Users, A new web interface is now available for requesting radioactive sources: http://cern.ch/rp-sources/request This link is also available from the radioactive sources service main page: http://cern.ch/rp-sources From now on, please submit your request via the above interface, which has been developed in order to improve the service. Thank you in advance for your collaboration!

  1. Radioactivity in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Niello, Jorge

    2005-01-01

    The book summarizes general concepts on radiation, nuclear structure, radioactivity and the interaction of the nuclear radiation with matter. It describes also the basic principles of radio dosimetry. Natural and artificial sources of radiation are reviewed as well as the effects of radiation in man. Medical and industrial applications of ionizing radiation and the pollution produced by the discharge of radioactive materials are outlined. A short review is made of the safety rules and the regulations concerning the protection of the environment [es

  2. Transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    The purpose of this Norm is to establish, relating to the TRANSPORT OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS, safety and radiological protection requirements to ensure an adequate control level of the eventual exposure of persons, properties and environment to the ionizing radiation comprising: specifications on radioactive materials for transport; package type selection; specification of the package design and acceptance test requirements; arrangements relating to the transport itself; administrative requirements and responsibilities. (author)

  3. Environmental radioactivity Ispra 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominici, G.

    1990-01-01

    In this report there are briefly described the measurements of environmental radioactivity performed during 1989 by the site survey group of the Radioprotection Division at the Joint Research Centre Ispra Establishment. Data are given on the concentrations of Sr-90, Cs-137, and other radionuclides in precipitation, air, waters, herbage, milk and radioactive effluents. The environmental contamination is mainly a consequence of the nuclear accident of Chernobyl

  4. Environmental radioactivity Ispra 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominici, G.

    1988-01-01

    In this report there are briefly described the measurements of environmental radioactivity performed during 1987 by the site survey group of the Radioprotection Division at the Joint Research Centre Ispra Establishment. Data are given on the concentrations of Sr-90, Cs-137, and other radionuclides in precipitation, air, waters, herbage, milk and radioactive effluents. The environmental contamination is mainly a consequence of the nuclear accident of Chernobyl

  5. Radioactive gold ring dermatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.A.; Aldrich, J.E. (Dalhousie Univ., Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada))

    1990-08-01

    A superficial squamous cell carcinoma developed in a woman who wore a radioactive gold ring for more than 30 years. Only part of the ring was radioactive. Radiation dose measurements indicated that the dose to basal skin layer was 2.4 Gy (240 rad) per week. If it is assumed that the woman continually wore her wedding ring for 37 years since purchase, she would have received a maximum dose of approximately 4600 Gy.

  6. Dynamic radioactive particle source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Murray E; Gauss, Adam Benjamin; Justus, Alan Lawrence

    2012-06-26

    A method and apparatus for providing a timed, synchronized dynamic alpha or beta particle source for testing the response of continuous air monitors (CAMs) for airborne alpha or beta emitters is provided. The method includes providing a radioactive source; placing the radioactive source inside the detection volume of a CAM; and introducing an alpha or beta-emitting isotope while the CAM is in a normal functioning mode.

  7. Radioactive gold ring dermatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.A.; Aldrich, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    A superficial squamous cell carcinoma developed in a woman who wore a radioactive gold ring for more than 30 years. Only part of the ring was radioactive. Radiation dose measurements indicated that the dose to basal skin layer was 2.4 Gy (240 rad) per week. If it is assumed that the woman continually wore her wedding ring for 37 years since purchase, she would have received a maximum dose of approximately 4600 Gy

  8. Radioactive waste disposal policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neilson, H.R.

    1982-01-01

    The responsibilities of the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food and Ministry policy on radioactive waste disposal are described. The disposal of solid radioactive waste at sea is subject to detailed safeguards developed within two international agreements to which the United Kingdom is a contracting party. The agreements are discussed together with a research and monitoring programme to provide scientific data for informed decisions on waste disposal authorisations and dumping licences. (U.K.)

  9. Management on radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balu, K.; Bhatia, S.C.

    1979-01-01

    The basic philosophy governing the radioactive waste management activities in India is to concentrate and contain as much activity as possible and to discharge to the environment only such of these streams that have radioactive content much below the nationally and internationally accepted standards. The concept of ''Zero Release'' is also kept in view. At Tarapur, the effluents are discharged into coastal waters after the radioactivity of the effluents is brought down by a factor 100. The effluents fΩm Rajasthan reactors are discharged into a lake keeping their radioactivity well within permissible limits and a solar evaporation plant is being set up. The plant, when it becomes operational, will be a step towards the concept of ''Zero Release''. At Kalpakkam, the treated wastes are proposed to be diluted by circulating sea water and discharged away from the shore through a long pipe. At Narora, ion exchange followed by chemical precipitation is to be employed to treat effluents and solar evaporation process for total containment. Solid wastes are stored/dispsed in the concrete trenches, underground with the water proofing of external surfaces and the top of the trench is covered with concrete. Highly active wastes are stored/disposed in tile holes which are vaults made of steel-lined, reinforced concrete pipes. Gas cleaning, dilution and dispersion techniques are adopted to treat gaseous radioactive wastes. (M.G.B.)

  10. Radioactivity in food crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drury, J.S.; Baldauf, M.F.; Daniel, E.W.; Fore, C.S.; Uziel, M.S.

    1983-05-01

    Published levels of radioactivity in food crops from 21 countries and 4 island chains of Oceania are listed. The tabulation includes more than 3000 examples of 100 different crops. Data are arranged alphabetically by food crop and geographical origin. The sampling date, nuclide measured, mean radioactivity, range of radioactivities, sample basis, number of samples analyzed, and bibliographic citation are given for each entry, when available. Analyses were reported most frequently for /sup 137/Cs, /sup 40/K, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 226/Ra, /sup 228/Ra, plutonium, uranium, total alpha, and total beta, but a few authors also reported data for /sup 241/Am, /sup 7/Be, /sup 60/Co, /sup 55/Fe, /sup 3/H, /sup 131/I, /sup 54/Mn, /sup 95/Nb, /sup 210/Pb, /sup 210/Po, /sup 106/Ru, /sup 125/Sb, /sup 228/Th, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 95/Zr. Based on the reported data it appears that radioactivity from alpha emitters in food crops is usually low, on the order of 0.1 Bq.g/sup -1/ (wet weight) or less. Reported values of beta radiation in a given crop generally appear to be several orders of magnitude greater than those of alpha emitters. The most striking aspect of the data is the great range of radioactivity reported for a given nuclide in similar food crops with different geographical origins.

  11. The ''invisible'' radioactive scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoernstad, T.; Ramsoey, T.

    1999-04-01

    Production and up-concentration of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) in the petroleum industry has attracted steadily increasing attention during the last 15 years. Most production engineers today associate this radioactivity with precipitates (scales) and sludges in production tubing, pumps, valves, separators, settling tanks etc., wherever water is being transported or treated. 226 Ra and 228 Ra are the most well known radioactive constituents in scale. Surprisingly little known is the radioactive contamination by 210 Pb and progeny 210 Bi and 210 Po. These are found in combination with 226 Ra in ordinary scale, often in layer of non-radioactive metallic lead in water transportation systems, but also in pure gas and condensate handling systems ''unsupported'' by 226 Ra, but due to transportation and decay of the noble gas 222 Rn in NG/LNG. This latter contamination may be rather thin, in some cases virtually invisible. When, in addition, the radiation energies are low enough for not being detectable on the equipment outer surface, its existence has for most people in the industry been a secret. The report discusses transportation and deposition mechanisms, detection methods and provides some examples of measured results from the North Sea on equipment sent for maintenance. It is concluded that a regular measurement program for this type of contamination should be mandatory under all dismantling processes of transportation and fluid handling equipment for fluids and gases offshore and onshore

  12. Radioactivity in food crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drury, J.S.; Baldauf, M.F.; Daniel, E.W.; Fore, C.S.; Uziel, M.S.

    1983-05-01

    Published levels of radioactivity in food crops from 21 countries and 4 island chains of Oceania are listed. The tabulation includes more than 3000 examples of 100 different crops. Data are arranged alphabetically by food crop and geographical origin. The sampling date, nuclide measured, mean radioactivity, range of radioactivities, sample basis, number of samples analyzed, and bibliographic citation are given for each entry, when available. Analyses were reported most frequently for 137 Cs, 40 K, 90 Sr, 226 Ra, 228 Ra, plutonium, uranium, total alpha, and total beta, but a few authors also reported data for 241 Am, 7 Be, 60 Co, 55 Fe, 3 H, 131 I, 54 Mn, 95 Nb, 210 Pb, 210 Po, 106 Ru, 125 Sb, 228 Th, 232 Th, and 95 Zr. Based on the reported data it appears that radioactivity from alpha emitters in food crops is usually low, on the order of 0.1 Bq.g -1 (wet weight) or less. Reported values of beta radiation in a given crop generally appear to be several orders of magnitude greater than those of alpha emitters. The most striking aspect of the data is the great range of radioactivity reported for a given nuclide in similar food crops with different geographical origins

  13. Lewis Acid-Induced Change from Four- to Two-Electron Reduction of Dioxygen Catalyzed by Copper Complexes Using Scandium Triflate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuda, Saya; Rolle, Clarence; Ohkubo, Kei; Siegler, Maxime A.; Karlin, Kenneth D.; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2015-01-01

    Mononuclear copper complexes, [(tmpa)CuII(CH3CN)](ClO4)2 (1, tmpa = tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine) and [(BzQ)CuII(H2O)2](ClO4)2 (2, BzQ = bis(2-quinolinylmethyl)benzylamine)], act as efficient catalysts for the selective two-electron reduction of O2 by ferrocene derivatives in the presence of scandium triflate (Sc(OTf)3), in acetone, whereas 1 catalyzes the four-electron reduction of O2 by the same reductant in the presence of Brønsted acids such as triflic acid. Following formation of the peroxo-bridged dicopper(II) complex [(tmpa)CuII(O2)CuII(tmpa)]2+, the two-electron reduced product of O2 with Sc3+ is observed to be scandium peroxide ([Sc3+(O22−)]+). In the presence of three equiv of hexamethylphosphoric triamide (HMPA), [Sc3+(O22−)]+ was oxidized by [Fe(bpy)3]3+ (bpy = 2,2′-bipyridine) to the known superoxide species [(HMPA)3Sc3+(O2•−)]2+ as detected by EPR spectroscopy. A kinetic study revealed that the rate-determining step of the catalytic cycle for the two-electron reduction of O2 with 1 is electron transfer from Fc* to 1 to give a cuprous complex which is highly reactive toward O2, whereas the rate-determining step with 2 is changed to the reaction of the cuprous complex with O2 following electron transfer from ferrocene derivatives to 2. The explanation for the change in catalytic O2-reaction stoichiometry from four-electron with Brønsted acids to two-electron reduction in the presence of Sc3+ and also for the change in the rate-determining step is clarified based on a kinetics interrogation of the overall catalytic cycle as well as each step of the catalytic cycle with study of the observed effects of Sc3+ on copper-oxygen intermediates. PMID:25659416

  14. Doses from radioactive methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phipps, A.W.; Kendall, G.M.; Fell, T.P.; Harrison, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    A possible radiation hazard arises from exposure to methane labelled with either a 3 H or a 14 C nuclide. This radioactive methane could be released from a variety of sources, e.g. land burial sites containing radioactive waste. Standard assumptions adopted for vapours would not apply to an inert alkane like methane. This paper discusses mechanisms by which radioactive methane would irradiate tissues and provides estimates of doses. Data on skin thickness and metabolism of methane are discussed with reference to these mechanisms. It is found that doses are dominated by dose from the small fraction of methane which is inhaled and metabolised. This component of dose has been calculated under rather conservative assumptions. (author)

  15. Radioactive waste removing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Takuhiko.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To cleanup primary coolants for LMFBR type reactors by magnetically generating a high speed rotational flow in the flow of liquid metal, and adsorbing radioactive corrosion products and fission products onto capturing material of a complicated shape. Constitution: Three-phase AC coils for generating a rotational magnetic field are provided to the outside of a container through which liquid sodium is passed to thereby generate a high speed rotational stream in the liquid sodium flowing into the container. A radioactive substance capturing material made of a metal plate such as of nickel and stainless steel in the corrugated shape with shape edges is secured within a flow channel. Magnetic field at a great slope is generated in the flow channel by the capturing material to adsorb radioactive corrosion products and fission products present in the liquid sodium onto the capturing material and removing therefrom. This enables to capture the ferri-magnetic impurities by adsorption. (Moriyama, K.)

  16. Radioactive aerosol inhalation apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordoni, M.E.; Lieberman, E.

    1987-01-01

    An aerosol inhalation apparatus for supplying an aerosol mist containing radioactive tagged particles to a subject is described comprising a reusable radiation-shielding container having lid means. The contents of the container are readily accessible. A radioactive aerosol inhalation device includes first and second conduit means in the container and passing therethrough, means for communicating with an air passageway of a subject connected to the first and second conduit means externally of the container. Valve means control exhalation from the second conduit means. A nebulizer is within the container connected to the first conduit means. Means are positioned at least in part within the container and in fluid communication with the nebulizer for allowing introduction of radioactive solution from outside the container into the nebulizer

  17. Radioactive waste processing field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Minoru.

    1993-01-01

    Storing space for radioactive wastes (storage tunnels) are formed underground of the sea bottom along coast. A plurality of boreholes through which sea water flows are pored vertically in a direction intersecting underground streams of brine in the ground between the tunnels and seaside. Sea water introduction pipes are joined to the upper side walls of the boreholes. The sea water introduction pipes have introduction ports protruded under the sea level of the coastal sea area region. Since sea water flows from the introduction ports to the boreholes passing through the sea water introduction pipes, sea water is always filled in the boreholes. Therefore, brine is sufficiently supplied toward the land by sea water from the boreholes, the underground stream of brine is negligibly small. This can prevent radioactive contamination due to flow of the underground water when radioactive wastes are buried in the underground near coast. (I.N.)

  18. Radioactive mixed waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jasen, W.G.; Erpenbeck, E.G.

    1993-02-01

    Various types of waste have been generated during the 50-year history of the Hanford Site. Regulatory changes in the last 20 years have provided the emphasis for better management of these wastes. Interpretations of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (AEA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA), and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) have led to the definition of radioactive mixed wastes (RMW). The radioactive and hazardous properties of these wastes have resulted in the initiation of special projects for the management of these wastes. Other solid wastes at the Hanford Site include low-level wastes, transuranic (TRU), and nonradioactive hazardous wastes. This paper describes a system for the treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) of solid radioactive waste

  19. Handling of radioactive sources in Ecuador

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benitez, Manuel

    2000-01-01

    This document describes the following aspects: sealed and unsealed radioactive sources, radiation detectors, personnel and area monitoring, surface pollution, radioactive wastes control and radioactive sources transferring. (The author)

  20. Radioactive wastes of Nuclear Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This conference studies the radioactive waste of nuclear industry. Nine articles and presentations are exposed here; the action of the direction of nuclear installations safety, the improvement of industrial proceedings to reduce the waste volume, the packaging of radioactive waste, the safety of radioactive waste disposal and environmental impact studies, a presentation of waste coming from nuclear power plants, the new waste management policy, the international panorama of radioactive waste management, the international transport of radioactive waste, finally an economic analysis of the treatment and ultimate storage of radioactive waste. (N.C.)

  1. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-07-01

    The purpose of this document is to set out the Government's current strategy for the long term in the management of radioactive wastes. It takes account of the latest developments, and will be subject to review in the light of future developments and studies. The subject is discussed under the headings: what are radioactive wastes; who is responsible; what monitoring takes place; disposal as the objective; low-level wastes; intermediate-level wastes; discharges from Sellafield; heat generating wastes; how will waste management systems and procedures be assessed; how much more waste is there going to be in future; conclusion. (U.K.)

  2. Radioactive mixed waste storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennig, J.M.; Jasen, W.G.; Hamilton, W.H.

    1992-08-01

    Various types of waste have been generated during the 50-year history of the Hanford Site. Regulatory changes in the last 20 years have provided the emphasis for better management of these wastes. Interpretations of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (AEA) (reference 1) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) (reference 2) have led to the definition of a group of wastes called radioactive mixed wastes (RMW). As a result of the radioactive and hazardous properties of these wastes, special projects have been initiated for the management of RMW. This paper addresses the storage of solid RMW. The management of bulk liquid RMW will not be described

  3. Radioactivity and plumbum pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Huishan

    2006-01-01

    This paper first indicates the five aspects to understand correctly the poisoning by radioactive plumbum: milling of nonferrous metal, development of mines, production of accumulator, discharge of waste gas from vehicles and radiation from building materials, as well as 'rubbish' from manufacture of plumbiferous equipment, and analyzes the seriousness of plumbum pollution (especially for children) along with the feature and symptom to plumbism. Then a lot of cases about the radioactive plumbum pollution are expounded so as to make a deeper understanding of plumbum pollution. Finally, some needed recognitions and prevention measures are put forward in different ways. (authors)

  4. Your radioactive garden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, W.G.

    1986-01-01

    The booklet on radiation risks from nuclear waste is based on lectures given by the author at Westminster School (United Kingdom) and elsewhere during 1986. A description is given of naturally-occurring radioactivity, and the health risks due to this radiation. The types of radioactive wastes produced by the nuclear industry are described, including low-level wastes, short-lived and long-lived intermediate-level wastes, and high level wastes. These wastes are discussed with respect to their potential health risks and their disposal underground. (U.K.)

  5. Radioactive wastes in Oklo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balcazar, M.; Flores R, J.H.; Pena, P.; Lopez, A.

    2006-01-01

    The acceptance of the Nuclear Energy as electric power supply implies to give answer to the population on the two main challenges to conquer in the public opinion: the nuclear accidents and the radioactive wastes. Several of the questions that are made on the radioactive wastes, its are the mobility migration of them, the geologic stability of the place where its are deposited and the possible migration toward the aquifer mantels. Since the half lives of the radioactive waste of a Nuclear Reactor are of several hundred of thousands of years, the technical explanations to the previous questions little convince to the public in general. In this work summary the results of the radioactive waste generated in a natural reactor, denominated Oklo effect that took place in Gabon, Africa, it makes several thousands of millions of years, a lot before the man appeared in the Earth. The identification of at least 17 reactors in Oklo it was carried out thanks to the difference in the concentrations of Uranium 235 and 238 prospective, and to the analysis of the non-mobility of the radioactive waste in the site. It was able by this way to determine that the reactors with sizes of hardly some decimeter and powers of around 100 kilowatts were operating in intermittent and spontaneous form for space of 150,000 years, with operation cycles of around 30 minutes. Recent studies have contributed information valuable on the natural confinement of the radioactive waste of the Oklo reactors in matrixes of minerals of aluminum phosphate that caught and immobilized them for thousands of millions of years. This extracted information from the nature contributes guides and it allows 'to verify' the validity of the current proposals on the immobilization of radioactive wastes of a nuclear reactor. This work presents in clear and accessible form to the public in general on the secure 'design', operation, 'decommissioning' and 'storage' of the radioactive waste of the reactors that the nature put

  6. Environmental Radioactivity, Temperature, and Precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riland, Carson A.

    1996-01-01

    Reports that environmental radioactivity levels vary with temperature and precipitation and these effects are due to radon. Discusses the measurement of this environmental radioactivity and the theory behind it. (JRH)

  7. Radioactive substance removing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Jun; Tayama, Ryuichi; Teruyama, Hidehiko; Hikichi, Takayoshi.

    1992-01-01

    If inert gases are jetted from a jetting device to liquid metals in a capturing vessel, the inert gases are impinged on the inner wall surface of the capturing vessel, to reduce the thickness of a boundary layer as a diffusion region of radioactive materials formed between the inner wall surface of the capturing vessel and the liquid metals. Further, a portion of the boundary layer is peeled off to increase the adsorption amount of radioactive materials by the capturing vessel. When the inert gases are jetted on the inner or outer circumference of the capturing vessel to rotate the capturing vessel, the flow of the liquid metals is formed along with the rotation, and the thickness of the boundary layer is reduced or the boundary layer is peeled off to increase the absorption amount of the radioactive materials. If gas bubbles are formed in the liquid metals by the inert gases, the liquid metals are stirred by the gas bubbles to reduce the thickness of the boundary layer or peel it off, thereby enabling to increase the adsorption amount of the radioactive materials. Since it is not necessary to pass through the rotational member to the wall surface of the vessel, safety and reliability can be improved. (N.H.)

  8. Radioactive Substances Act 1948

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1948-01-01

    This Act regulates the use of radioactive substances and radiation producing devices in the United Kingdom. It provides for the control of import, export, sale, supply etc. of such substances and devices and lays down the safety regulations to be complied with when dealing with them. (NEA) [fr

  9. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosovs'kij, A.V.; Aljeksjejeva, Z.M.; Borozenets', G.P.; Vasilenko, T.M.; Vasil'chenko, V.M.; Pavlenko, A.O.

    2007-01-01

    The main issues of the radioactive waste safe management are covered in the monograph. The international knowledge, as well as the national experience in this field are summarized. The technologies and methods used for the safety objective achievement are described. The main attention is paid to the safety norms and rules, to the descriptions of the radwaste management facilities under operation

  10. Fallout Radioactivity and Epiphytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. T. Odum; George Ann Briscoe; C. B. Briscoe

    1970-01-01

    After relatively high levels of fallout retention were dicovered in the epiphytic mossy forest of the Luquillo Mountains durin 1962, a survey of the distribution of radioactivity in the rain forest system was made with beta counting of 1500 samples supplemented with gamma spectra. High levels, up to 4138 counts per minute per gram, were found mainly in or on green...

  11. Environmental radioactivity in foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, E.; Jakubick, V.; Kalus, W.; Mueller, H.

    1978-01-01

    This part of the bibliography series, which has changed its name with issue no. 24 (formerly: 'Contamination and decontamination of foods') lists 208 pieces of literature, mainly of the last two years. The literature is classified according to the following main fields. General aspects, environmental radioactivity, radioecology, and radionuclides in foods. (MG) [de

  12. TABLE OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOLDEN,N.E.

    2001-06-29

    For those chemical elements which have no stable nuclides with a terrestrial isotopic composition, the data on radioactive half-lives and relative atomic masses for the nuclides of interest and importance have been evaluated and the recommended values and uncertainties are listed.

  13. Radioactivity of household water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The guide presents the safety requirements to limit the radiation exposure due to the radioactive nuclides in household water. The requirements does not apply during extraordinary circumstances, as during fallout due to an accident at a nuclear power station. (2 refs., 1 tab.)

  14. Radioactivity and foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olszyna Marzys, A.E.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe and contrast two relationships between radiation and food-on the one hand, beneficial preservation of food by controlled exposure to ionizing radiation; and, on the other, contamination of food by accidental incorporation of radioactive nuclides within the food itself. In food irradiation, electrons or electromagnetic radiation is used to destroy microorganisms and insects or prevent seed germination. The economic advantages and health benefits of sterilizing food in this manner are clear, and numerous studies have confirmed that under strictly controlled conditions no undesirable changes or induced radioactivity is produced in the irradiated food. An altogether different situation is presented by exposure of food animals and farming areas to radioactive materials, as occurred after the major Soviet nuclear reactor accident at Chernobyl. This article furnishes the basic information needed to understand the nature of food contamination associated with that event and describes the work of international organizations seeking to establish appropriate safe limits for levels of radioactivity in foods. 14 refs, 4 tabs

  15. SHIPPING OF RADIOACTIVE ITEMS

    CERN Multimedia

    TIS/RP Group

    2001-01-01

    The TIS-RP group informs users that shipping of small radioactive items is normally guaranteed within 24 hours from the time the material is handed in at the TIS-RP service. This time is imposed by the necessary procedures (identification of the radionuclides, determination of dose rate and massive objects require a longer procedure and will therefore take longer.

  16. Environmental radioactivity in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, J.; Predmerszky, T.

    1979-01-01

    A comprehensive examination of radioactive contamination in air, soil, surface waters and food products, and of natural radioactiviy in air, soil, and building materials has been carried out. The investigated factors were as follows: a) air samples: yearly and monthly beta- and gamma activities of fallout, precipitation and aerosols in the period 1955-1976 in Budapest and some other towns; b) soil samples: 90 Sr concentration of soils of different quality and cultivation originating from sixteen regions of Hungary measured in the period 1974-1976; c) surface waters: annual mean beta activity of five rivers and of the Lake Balaton in the period 1965-1976, 3 H, 137 Cs and 90 Sr activity of the Danube in the year 1976; d) food products: radioactive contamination of spinach, lettuce and oxalis, originating from three different regions in the period 1959-1976 and mean radioactivity of fodder, corn, tobacco, milk, fish and animal bones in a period of 5-10 years; e) natural radioactivity: radon- and toron concentration of air, activity of 226 Ra fallout of the soil in the vicinity of power plants, 226 Ra, 228 Th and 40 K activity of different building materials, radiation doses inside buildings constructed by different technics. (L.E.)

  17. Lower fungi and radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamek, M.

    1989-01-01

    Sorption activities for radioactive elements were observed in molds Penicillinum muszynsky, Aspergillus versicolor and Alternaria tenius. Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus niger were isolated in laboratory and cultivated on a modified substrate containing uranyl nitrate and uranyl acetate. They were found to be capable of absorbing in the biomass some members of the uranium decay series. (E.J.). 4 tabs., 11 refs

  18. Radioactivity in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costello, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Radioactivity is a natural phenomenon. Out of 1700 known isotopes of 104 chemical elements, only about 16 per cent are stable. Seventy-three radioactive isotopes of 39 elements occur naturally in the terrestrial environment. The significance of environmental radioactivity lies in the contribution to the annual exposure of the general population to ionising radiation. This exposure results largely from natural sources of radioactivity and radiation together with applications of radiation in medicine. Minor contributions are from nuclear weapons tests, nuclear power production and the nuclear fuel cycle, and consumer products including luminous clocks and watches, television receivers and smoke detectors. The natural background radiation level varies substantially with altitude and geographic location. Although no satisfactory evidence is available that natural variations in background radiation levels are detrimental to humans, upper limits of risk have been estimated for possible somatic and genetic effects from these levels of radiation. Contributory sources of and variability in the radiation background are reviewed and the relation between effective dose equivalent and associated detriment outlined. The risk from exposure to an average level of background radiation is compared with risks from other human activities

  19. Radioactivity in foodstuffs 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The average radioactivity dose level to which the Norwegian population was exposed through the ingestion of food in 1988 was between 0.10 and 0.15 mSv. This was about the same as in 1987. The radioactivity dose to which individuals with certain special dietary habits (large proportions of freshwater fish and reindeer meat in the diet) were exposed, was, however, up to three times higher in 1988 than in 1987. This was due firstly to the fact that reindeer meat which had been produced prior to the Chernobyl accident was no longer available, and secondly, to dietary advice not being followed as closely as before. The cost-benefit ratio of the measures introduced to reduce radioactivity levels in food, i.e. resources employed compared with the actual reduction in radioactivity levels achieved, has proved to be reasonably satisfactory, both in 1987 and 1988. Action levels and dietary advice remained unchanged in 1988. The present report summarizes results of analyses performed in 1988, and describes the measures introduced concerning various categorites of foods. Measures introduced were, as in 1987, primarily focused on the production of sheep meat (mutton/lamb) and on reindeer farming. 4 figs., 1 tab

  20. Abscess scan - radioactive

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood cells are tagged with a radioactive substance ( radioisotope ) called indium. The cells are then injected back ... you have or had any of the following medical conditions, procedures, or treatments, as they can interfere with ... Often, other imaging tests such as an ultrasound or CT scan ...

  1. The radioactive paradise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heussler, H.

    1980-01-01

    Most of us will still remember with horror: In March 1954, a US H-bomb exploded directly over Bikini atoll. What has become of this island that used to be so romantic. And what has become of Eniwetok and all the small Robinson islands which are radioactive today. Can people live there again. A scientific investigation now destroys all illusions. (orig.) [de

  2. Encapsulation of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pordes, O.; Plows, J.P.

    1980-01-01

    A method is described for encapsulating a particular radioactive waste which consists of suspending the waste in a viscous liquid encapsulating material, of synthetic resin monomers or prepolymers, and setting the encapsulating material by addition or condensation polymerization to form a solid material in which the waste is dispersed. (author)

  3. Viewer Makes Radioactivity "Visible"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, L. I.

    1983-01-01

    Battery operated viewer demonstrates feasibility of generating threedimensional visible light simulations of objects that emit X-ray or gamma rays. Ray paths are traced for two pinhold positions to show location of reconstructed image. Images formed by pinholes are converted to intensified visible-light images. Applications range from radioactivity contamination surveys to monitoring radioisotope absorption in tumors.

  4. AIR RADIOACTIVITY MONITOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, R.L.; Thomas, J.W.

    1961-04-11

    The monitor is designed to minimize undesirable background buildup. It consists of an elongated column containing peripheral electrodes in a central portion of the column, and conduits directing an axial flow of radioactively contaminated air through the center of the column and pure air through the annular portion of the column about the electrodes. (AEC)

  5. Radioactivity: A Natural Phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronneau, C.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is misinformation people have on the subject of radiation. The importance of comparing artificial source levels of radiation to natural levels is emphasized. Measurements of radioactivity, its consequences, and comparisons between the risks induced by radiation in the environment and from artificial sources are included. (KR)

  6. MODEL RADIOACTIVE RADON DECAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.I. Parovik

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In a model of radioactive decay of radon in the sample (222Rn. The model assumes that the probability of the decay of radon and its half-life depends on the fractal properties of the geological environment. The dependencies of the decay parameters of the fractal dimension of the medium.

  7. Radioactivity in foodstuffs 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The average intake of radioactivity via foodstuffs remained relatively constant at about 10000 Bq per annum during the entire period elapsing since the Chernobyl accident. However, the dose received by especially exposed population groups has been considerably higher. In particular, the intake of radioactivity through the consumption of reindeer meat and freshwater fish has been high among certain groups (hunters and angler, and Sami reindeer herdsmen in southern and mid-Norway). Studies show that their dietary radionuclide exposure was highest during the second year post Cernobyl. The existing intervention levels were also applied in 1989. These are, with the exception of the limit of 6000 Bq/kg for reindeer meat, game meat and freshwater fish, identical with the maximum levels laid down by the EC. The present report reviews the data concerning radioactivity levels in dairy products, meat and fish recorded during 1989. Overall, it may be concluded that levels were considerable lower than the previous year. An important reason for this was the almost complete absence, in outlying pastures, of various types of fungi eaten by grazing livestock, such fungi being a major source of radioactivity. 4 figs., 3 tabs

  8. Sampling airborne radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, B.S.

    1988-01-01

    Radioactive contaminants have historically been considered apart from chemical contaminants because it is their radiological properties that determine their biological and environmental impact. Additionally they have been regulated by special government agencies concerned with radiological protection. Radioactive contaminants are also distinguished by the specialized and very sensitive methods available for the detection of radioactivity. Measurements of a few thousand atoms per liter are not uncommon. Radiation detectors in common use are gas filled chambers, scintillation and semiconductor detectors, and the more recently developed thermoluminescent and etched track detectors. Solid-state nuclear track detectors consist of a large group of inorganic and organic dielectrics which register tracks when traversed by heavy charged particles. They do not respond to light, beta particles or gamma ray photons and thus provide a very low background system for the detection of extremely low levels of radioactivity. In addition, no power source or electronic equipment is required. Cellulose nitrate detectors are currently in use for long term integrated sampling of environmental radon. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TID's) are crystalline materials, in which electrons which have been displaced by an interaction with ionizing radiation become trapped at an elevated energy level and emit visible light when released from that energy level. As which etched-track detectors no power or electronic equipment is needed for the TID's at a measurement site, but they respond to alpha, beta and gamma radiation. Thermoluminescent dosimeters are useful for long term environmental monitoring, and have also been newly incorporated into integrating radon detection systems

  9. Radioactivity and foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olszyna-Marzys, A.E.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe and contrast two relationships between radiation and food on the one hand, beneficial preservation of food by controlled exposure to ionizing radiation; and, on the other, contamination of food by accidental incorporation of radioactive nuclides within the food itself. In food irradiation, electrons or electromagnetic radiation is used to destroy microorganisms and insects or prevent seed germination. The economic advantages and health benefits of sterilizing food in this manner are clear, and numerous studies have confirmed that under strictly controlled conditions no undesirable changes or induced radioactivity is produced in the irradiated food. An altogether different situation is presented by exposure of food animals and farming areas to radioactive materials, as occurred after the major Soviet nuclear reactor accident at Chernobyl. This article furnishes the basic information needed to understand the nature of food contamination associated with that event and describes the work of international organizations seeking to establish appropriate safe limits for levels of radioactivity in foods

  10. Serum sample levels of bromine, iron, scandium and zinc in preschool children of Atayal and Bunun aborigines living in central Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chien-Yi Chen; Ding-Bang Lin; Yuan-Yaw Wei

    2006-01-01

    This study determined bromine, iron, scandium and zinc serum levels in Taiwanese aboriginal preschool children living in remote mountainous areas to increase the understanding of the social, cultural, nutrient and ethnic background of the Taiwanese children. Seventy-three serum samples were taken from two ethnic groups of preschool children, Atayal aborigines (AAPC) and Bunun aborigines (BAPC). Sera of these children were freeze dried. Trace elements in sera were identified by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). The accuracy and precision of INAA was evaluated using certified reference materials: Tomato Leaves (NIST-SRM 1570a) and Lichen (IAEA-336). Statistical analysis identified several different patterns for ethnic groups, gender and age via the two-tailed Student's t-test. Analytical results showed that the ranges of Br, Fe, Sc and Zn in sera were somewhat wide. The Zn serum levels (p < 0.05) and Br serum levels (p < 0.01) in the AAPC were significantly lower than those in the BAPC. However, there were no significant differences in Fe or Sc serum levels between the two groups. Analytical results were compared to published data for different counties. This study is the first investigating trace elements in Taiwanese aborigines and can be used to establish a much-needed serum element database. (author)

  11. Aluminum-Scandium Alloys: Material Characterization, Friction Stir Welding, and Compatibility With Hydrogen Peroxide (MSFC Center Director's Discretionary Fund Final Report, Proj. No. 04-14)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. A.; Chen, P. S.

    2004-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum describes the development of several high-strength aluminum (Al) alloys that are compatible with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) propellant for NASA Hypersonic-X (Hyper-X) vehicles fuel tanks and structures. The yield strengths for some of these Al-magnesium-based alloys are more than 3 times stronger than the conventional 5254-H112 Al alloy, while maintaining excellent H2O2 compatibility similar to class 1 5254 alloy. The alloy development strategy is to add scandium, zirconium, and other transitional metals with unique electrochemical properties, which will not act as catalysts, to decompose the highly concentrated 90 percent H2O2. Test coupons are machined from sheet metals for H2O2 long-term exposure testing and mechanical properties testing. In addition, the ability to weld the new alloys using friction stir welding has also been explored. The new high-strength alloys could represent an enabling material technology for Hyper-X vehicles, where flight weight reduction is a critical requirement.

  12. The use of the erbium, chromium:yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet laser in endodontic treatment: the results of an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoop, Ulrich; Goharkhay, Kawe; Klimscha, Johannes; Zagler, Manuela; Wernisch, Johann; Georgopoulos, Apostolos; Sperr, Wolfgang; Moritz, Andreas

    2007-07-01

    The use of the erbium, chromium:yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser has become accepted in the field of cavity preparation. The development of miniaturized and flexible fiber tips has allowed this device to be used in endodontics. The authors conducted an in vitro study to assess the effects of Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation on root canals. The authors inoculated root canals with two bacteria, laser irradiated them at two power settings and subjected them to a quantitative microbiological evaluation. They used scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to assess morphological changes in endodontically processed and laser-irradiated root canal walls. They measured temperature increases on the root surface to determine possible thermal side effects. The bacteriological evaluation revealed a disinfecting effect in the root dentin samples that was dependent on the output power but not specific for the bacterial species investigated. SEM showed the removal of the smear layer from the root canal walls and the exposure of dentinal tubules. The temperature rise during irradiation was moderate when standardized power settings were used. The Er,Cr:YSGG laser can be used to eliminate bacteria in root canals. It also effectively removes smear layer and debris from the canal wall. Practitioners can use the Er,Cr:YSGG laser to prepare root canals for endodontic therapy.

  13. Evaluation of microtensile and tensile bond strength tests determining effects of erbium, chromium: yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet laser pulse frequency on resin-enamel bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, T; Ayar, M K; Yesilyurt, C; Kilic, S

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare two different bond strength test methods (tensile and microtensile) in investing the influence of erbium, chromium: yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er, Cr: YSGG) laser pulse frequency on resin-enamel bonding. One-hundred and twenty-five bovine incisors were used in the present study. Two test methods were used: Tensile bond strength (TBS; n = 20) and micro-TBS (μTBS; n = 5). Those two groups were further split into three subgroups according to Er, Cr: YSGG laser frequency (20, 35, and 50 Hz). Following adhesive procedures, microhybrid composite was placed in a custom-made bonding jig for TBS testing and incrementally for μTBS testing. TBS and μTBS tests were carried out using a universal testing machine and a microtensile tester, respectively. Analysis of TBS results showed that means were not significantly different. For μTBS, the Laser-50 Hz group showed the highest bond strength (P tests, the μTBS results showed higher means and lower standard deviations. It was demonstrated that increasing μTBS pulse frequency significantly improved immediate bond strength while TBS showed no significant effect. It can, therefore, be concluded that test method may play a significant role in determining optimum laser parameters for resin bonding.

  14. Impact of layer and substrate properties on the surface acoustic wave velocity in scandium doped aluminum nitride based SAW devices on sapphire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillinger, M., E-mail: manuel.gillinger@tuwien.ac.at; Knobloch, T.; Schneider, M.; Schmid, U. [Institute of Sensor and Actuator Systems, TU Wien, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Shaposhnikov, K.; Kaltenbacher, M. [Institute of Mechanics and Mechatronics, TU Wien, 1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2016-06-06

    This paper investigates the performance of surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices consisting of reactively sputter deposited scandium doped aluminum nitride (Sc{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}N) thin films as piezoelectric layers on sapphire substrates for wireless sensor or for RF-MEMS applications. To investigate the influence of piezoelectric film thickness on the device properties, samples with thickness ranging from 500 nm up to 3000 nm are fabricated. S{sub 21} measurements and simulations demonstrate that the phase velocity is predominantly influenced by the mass density of the electrode material rather than by the thickness of the piezoelectric film. Additionally, the wave propagation direction is varied by rotating the interdigital transducer structures with respect to the crystal orientation of the substrate. The phase velocity is about 2.5% higher for a-direction compared to m-direction of the sapphire substrate, which is in excellent agreement with the difference in the anisotropic Young's modulus of the substrate corresponding to these directions.

  15. The effect of scandium addition on microstructure and mechanical properties of Al–Si–Mg alloy: A multi-refinement modifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Cong, E-mail: xucong55555@gmail.com [Key Laboratory of Aerospace Advanced Materials and Performance of Ministry of Education, School of Material Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Xiao, Wenlong, E-mail: wlxiao@buaa.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Aerospace Advanced Materials and Performance of Ministry of Education, School of Material Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Hanada, Shuji [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Yamagata, Hiroshi [Center for Advanced Die Engineering and Technology, Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu City, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan); Ma, Chaoli [Key Laboratory of Aerospace Advanced Materials and Performance of Ministry of Education, School of Material Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Effect of scandium (Sc) additions on the microstructure, mechanical properties and fracture behavior of Al–Si–Mg casting alloy (F357) were systematically investigated. It was found that Sc addition caused a multi-refining efficiency on the microstructure of as-cast F357 alloy, including refinement of grains and secondary dendrite arm spacing (SDAS), modification of eutectic Si and harmless disposal of β-Al{sub 5}FeSi phase. Subsequent T6 heat treatment had further induced the complete spheroidization of eutectic Si and precipitation of fine secondary Al{sub 3}Sc dispersoids in the Sc modified alloys. Thus the mechanical properties, especially the ductility, were significantly enhanced by the addition of Sc combined with the heat treatment. The highest ultimate tensile strength, yield strength and elongation were achieved in 0.8 wt.% Sc modified F357 alloy combined with T6 heat treatment. Furthermore, fractographic examinations indicated that the ductile fracture mechanism served as a dominate role in the modified alloys due to the formation of fine, deep and uniformly distributed dimples. - Highlights: • Detailed characterization of the multi-refining microstructure of Sc modified F357 alloy was performed. • The multi-refinement was proposed to refine grain and SDAS, modify eutectic Si and β-phase. • Sc modifier combined with T6 treatment is effective in improving tensile properties. • Modification of eutectic Si in F357 alloy with Sc is consistent with the IIT mechanism.

  16. The transport of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appleton, P.R.; Poulter, D.R.

    1989-01-01

    Regulations have been developed to ensure the safe transport of all radioactive materials by all modes (road, rail, sea and air). There are no features of radioactive waste which set it aside from other radioactive materials for transport, and the same regulations control all radioactive material transport. These regulations and their underlying basis are described in this paper, and their application to waste transport is outlined. (author)

  17. Argentina's radioactive waste disposal policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios, E.

    1986-01-01

    The Argentina policy for radioactive waste disposal from nuclear facilities is presented. The radioactive wastes are treated and disposed in confinement systems which ensure the isolation of the radionucles for an appropriate period. The safety criteria adopted by Argentina Authorities in case of the release of radioactive materials under normal conditions and in case of accidents are analysed. (M.C.K.) [pt

  18. Radioactive waste management in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paredes, L.; Reyes L, J.; Jimenez D, J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the radioactive waste management in Mexico, particularly the activities that the National Institute of Nuclear Research (NINR) is undertaking in this field. Classification and annual generation of radioactive waste, together with practices and facilities relating to the management of radioactive waste are addressed. The respective national legal framework and policy are outlined. (author)

  19. Nuclear physics with radioactive beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bimbot, R.

    1994-01-01

    Radioactive beam production through two different mechanisms: acceleration of radioactive nuclei, and production of secondary beams from projectile fragmentation is overviewed. Some topics of the applications of radioactive beams in nuclear physics, such as identification and study of exotic nuclei, neutron halos, nuclear astrophysics and medical applications are discussed. (K.A.). 24 refs., 8 figs

  20. Fusion reactor radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaser, J.D.; Postma, A.K.; Bradley, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    Quantities and compositions of non-tritium radioactive waste are estimated for some current conceptual fusion reactor designs, and disposal of large amounts of radioactive waste appears necessary. Although the initial radioactivity of fusion reactor and fission reactor wastes are comparable, the radionuclides in fusion reactor wastes are less hazardous and have shorter half-lives. Areas requiring further research are discussed

  1. Radioactive waste management; Gerencia de rejeitos radioativos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-11-15

    This eighth chapter presents the radioactive wastes and waste disposal; classification of radioactive wastes; basis requests of the radioactive waste management; conditions for a radioactive waste disposal; registers and inventories; transport of radioactive wastes from a facility to another and the radioactive waste management plan.

  2. Perspectives concerning radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noynaert, L.

    2013-01-01

    The article presents a general overview of the principles of radioactive waste management as established by the International Atomic Energy Agency. Subsequently, research and development related to radioactive waste management at the Belgian Nuclear Research Center SCK·CEN is discussed. Different topical areas are treated including radioactive waste characterisation, decontamination and the long-term management of radioactive waste. The decommissioning of the BR3 reactor and the construction and the exploitation of the underground research laboratory HADES are cited as examples of the pioneering role that SCK·CEN has played in radioactive waste management.

  3. A radioactive controversy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engler, Veronica

    2002-01-01

    During 2002, the National Congress of Argentina began discussing the 'Agreement between the Republic of Argentina and Australia on cooperation in the peaceful uses of the nuclear energy'. This document has revived the debate regarding development of a national nuclear industry. The debate was spurred by a commercial contract signed in 2000 by INVAP, an Argentinean company who sold a nuclear reactor to the ANSTO, Australian Nuclear and Technology Organization. More than sixty non-governmental organizations are opposed to the ratification of the agreement, because they interpret that the text leaves the door wide open for the transport and deposit of Australian nuclear waste to Argentina, to be processed in national territory. Article 41 of the Argentinean National Constitution, explicitly prohibits the generation of any income from 'radioactive residues'. Those who support the agreement say that it does not promote the deposit of nuclear waste in Argentina, and argue that environmentalists are hampering efforts of this advanced technological industry to flourish in Argentina. The point of conflict in the agreement lies in article 12, which states that Argentina will continue the process of reactor-driven irradiated fuel outside Argentina. Once the treatment is completed, the fuel conditioned and the resulting waste must return to the country of origin for their storage. The possibility of spent fuel being sent to Argentina lies in the hypothetical case that the French company Cogema, which currently holds treatment responsibility, stops treatment sometime within the next fifteen years, when the fuel must be treated. The non-ratification of the agreement on Argentina part will not imply any sort of impediment in the realization of the reactor, it will only put on hold the possibility that the Australians spent fuels will complete treatment in Argentina. The constitutionality of the agreement lies in the question of waste, but this too is not a simple question. The

  4. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsoulfanidis, N.

    1991-01-01

    The management of radioactive waste is a very important part of the nuclear industry. The future of the nuclear power industry depends to a large extent on the successful solution of the perceived or real problems associated with the disposal of both low-level waste (LLW) and high-level waste (HLW). All the activities surrounding the management of radioactive waste are reviewed. The federal government and the individual states are working toward the implementation of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act and the Low-Level Waste Policy Act. The two congressional acts are reviewed and progress made as of early 1990 is presented. Spent-fuel storage and transportation are discussed in detail as are the concepts of repositories for HLW. The status of state compacts for LLW is also discussed. Finally, activities related to the decommissioning of nuclear facilities are also described

  5. Monitoring of environmental radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The results are described of monitoring radioactivity of atmospheric fallout, surface waters, soils, plant feeds, cereals, and other agricultural produce. The results were obtained over a long time period. Radioactivity was also measured of milk, milk products, vegetables and fruits, meat and hen eggs, flour and bakery products with a view to radionuclide migration in the food chain. The daily intake of 90 Sr and 137 Cs from food was determined from the values obtained and the consumption of the individual types of food. Strontium-90 distribution was studied in the bones and the teeth of the population in Slovakia. With the commissioning of nuclear power plants, emissions and liquid wastes were monitored and their environmental impact assessed. (E.S.)

  6. Handbook of radioactivity analysis

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The updated and much expanded Third Edition of the "Handbook of Radioactivity Analysis" is an authoritative reference providing the principles, practical techniques, and procedures for the accurate measurement of radioactivity from the very low levels encountered in the environment to higher levels measured in radioisotope research, clinical laboratories, biological sciences, radionuclide standardization, nuclear medicine, nuclear power, fuel cycle facilities and in the implementation of nuclear forensic analysis and nuclear safeguards. The Third Edition contains seven new chapters providing a reference text much broader in scope than the previous Second Edition, and all of the other chapters have been updated and expanded many with new authors. The book describes the basic principles of radiation detection and measurement, the preparation of samples from a wide variety of matrices, assists the investigator or technician in the selection and use of appropriate radiation detectors, and presents state-of-the-ar...

  7. Radioactive gas processing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kita, Kaoru; Minemoto, Masaki; Takezawa, Kazuaki; Okazaki, Akira; Kumagaya, Koji.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To simplify the structure of a gas processing system which has hitherto been much complicated by the recyclic use of molecular sieve regeneration gas, by enabling to release the regeneration gas to outside in a once-through manner. Constitution: The system comprises a cooler for receiving and cooling gases to be processed containing radioactive rare gases, moisture-removing pipelines each connected in parallel to the exit of the cooler and having switching valves and a moisture removing column disposed between the valves and a charcoal absorber in communication with the moisture removing pipelines. Pipelines for flowing regeneration heating gases are separately connected to the moisture removing columns, and molecular sieve is charged in the moisture removing column by the amount depending on the types of the radioactive rare gases. (Aizawa, K.)

  8. Forest decline through radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichelt, G.; Kollert, R.

    1985-01-01

    Is more serious damage of forest observed in the vicinity of nuclear reactors. How are those decline patterns to be explained. Does the combined effect of radioactivity and different air pollutants (such as nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, oxidants etc.) have an influence in the decline of the forest. In what way do synergisms, i.e. mutually enhanced effects, participate. How does natural and artificial radioactivity affect the chemistry of air in the polluted atmosphere. What does this mean for the extension of nuclear energy, especially for the reprocessing plant planned. Damage in the forests near nuclear and industrial plants was mapped and the resulting hypotheses on possible emittors were statistically verified. Quantitative calculations as to the connection between nuclear energy and forest decline were carried through: they demand action. (orig./HP) [de

  9. Radioactive thickness gauge (1962)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guizerix, J.

    1962-01-01

    The author describes a thickness gauge in which the scintillating crystal detector alternately 'sees' a radioactive source through the material which is to be measured and then a control source of the same material; the radiations are separated in time by an absorbing valve whose sections are alternately full and hollow. The currents corresponding to the two sources are separated beyond the photomultiplier tube by a detector synchronized with the rotation of the valve. The quotient of these two currents is then obtained with a standard recording potentiometer. It is found that the average value of the response which is in the form G = f(I 1 /I 2 ) is not affected by decay of the radioactive sources, and that it is little influenced by variations of high tension, temperature, or properties of the air in the source detector interval. The performance of the gauge is given. (author) [fr

  10. Radioactive nuclide adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima, Kimichika.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the efficiency of a radioactive nuclide adsorption device by applying a nickel plating on a nickel plate to render the surface active. Constitution: A capturing device for radioactive nuclide such as manganese 54, cobalt 60, 58 and the like is disposed to the inside of a pipeway provided on the upper portion of fuel assemblies through which liquid sodium as the coolant for LMFBR type reactor is passed. The device comprises a cylindrical adsorption body and spacers. The adsorption body is made of nickel and applied with a nickel plating on the surface thereof. The surface of the adsorption body is unevened to result in disturbance in the coolant and thereby improve the adsorptive efficiency. (Kawakami, Y.)

  11. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kizawa, Hideo

    1982-01-01

    A system of combining a calciner for concentrated radioactive liquid waste and an incinerator for miscellaneous radioactive solid waste is being developed. Both the calciner and the incinerator are operated by fluidized bed method. The system features the following points: (1) Inflammable miscellaneous solids and concentrated liquid can be treated in combination to reduce the volume. (2) Used ion-exchange resin can be incinerated. (3) The system is applicable even if any final waste disposal method is adopted; calcinated and incinerated solids obtained as intermediate products are easy to handle and store. (4) The system is readily compatible with other waste treatment systems to form optimal total system. The following matters are described: the principle of fluidized-bed furnaces, the objects of treatment, system constitution, the features of the calciner and incinerator, and the current status of development. (J.P.N.)

  12. Decontamination of radioactive isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despotovic, R.; Music, S.; Subotic, B.; Wolf, R.H.H.

    1979-01-01

    Removal of radioactive isotopes under controlled conditions is determined by a number of physical and chemical properties considered radiocontaminating and by the characteristics of the contaminated object. Determination of quantitative and qualitative factors for equilibrium in a contamination-decontamination system provides the basis for rational and successful decontamination. The decontamination of various ''solid/liquid'' systems is interesting from the scientific and technological point of view. These systems are of great importance in radiation protection (decontamination of various surfaces, liquids, drinking water, fixation or collection of radiocontaminants). Different types of decontamination systems are discussed. The dependence of rate and efficiency of the preparation conditions and on the ageing of the scavenger is described. The influence of coagulating electrolyte on radioactive isotope fixation efficiency was also determined. The fixation of fission radionuclide on oxide scavengers has been studied. The connection between fundamental investigations and practical decontamination of the ''solid/liquid'' systems is discussed. (author)

  13. Resuspension of radioactivity induced

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehmel, G.A.; Orgill, M.M.

    1975-01-01

    Airborne particulates from burning fields outside the Hanford reservation were sampled with an aircraft-mounted air filter. Radioactivity concentrations in air samples collected from the smoke plume were compared to concentrations in ambient background air samples. Airborne concentrations of 7 Be and 95 Zr-Nb in the smoke were 1.2 to 4.6 times ambient background levels. (U.S.)

  14. Radioactive material air transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pader y Terry, Claudio Cosme

    2002-01-01

    As function of the high aggregated value, safety regulations and the useful life time, the air transportation has been used more regularly because is fast, reliable, and by giving great security to the cargo. Based on the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the IATA (International Air Transportation Association) has reproduced in his dangerous goods manual (Dangerous Goods Regulations - DGR IATA), the regulation for the radioactive material air transportation. Those documents support this presentation

  15. Radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burton, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    Radioactive waste of two different activity levels is buried on the same site. The high level waste e.g. intermediate level waste may be in a trench or cells in a trench bottom, and be surmounted by a layer of concrete surmounted by an intrusion barrier comprising drums containing an aggregate of cement and the lower level activity waste, the whole having a substantially impermeable cap. (author)

  16. Radioactive tracers in Sedimentology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, H.T.

    1973-01-01

    First is given a broad description of the uses of radioactive tracers in Sedimentology. The general method is established, including determinations of probability and standard deviation. Following are determined: the response law of the detector, the minimum mass for statistical detection, and the minimum mass for dynamic detection. The granularity is an important variable in these calculations. Final conclusions are given, and results are compared with existing theories

  17. Radioactive gas inhalator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeMon, D.E.

    1975-01-01

    An ''inhalator'', or more particularly an apparatus for permitting a patient to inhale a radioactive gas in order to provide a diagnostic test of the patient's lung area, is described. The disclosed apparatus provides a simple, trouble-free mechanism for achieving this result; and, furthermore, provides an improved testing method. Moreover, the disclosed apparatus has the capability of gradually introducing the test condition in a manner that makes it easy for the patient to become acclimated to it. (U.S.)

  18. SHIPPING OF RADIOACTIVE ITEMS

    CERN Document Server

    TIS/RP Group

    2001-01-01

    The TIS-RP group informs users that shipping of small radioactive items is normally guaranteed within 24 hours from the time the material is handed in at the TIS-RP service. This time is imposed by the necessary procedures (identification of the radionuclides, determination of dose rate, preparation of the package and related paperwork). Large and massive objects require a longer procedure and will therefore take longer.

  19. The radioactive grasshopper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1966-01-01

    Full text: Grasshoppers are 'tagged' with radiation in order to trace their movements for purposes of agricultural research. They are fed on young wheat containing iridium-192; the radioactivity taken up by the grasshoppers can then be observed by a portable scintillation counter. Laboratory tests have shown the biological period of the iridium to be of the order of seven days, and that about one microcurie per insect is needed to enable them to be traced during two months. (author)

  20. Transport of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombard, J.

    1996-01-01

    This work deals with the transport of radioactive materials. The associated hazards and potential hazards are at first described and shows the necessity to define specific safety regulations. The basic principles of radiological protection and of the IAEA regulations are given. The different types of authorized packages and of package labelling are explained. The revision, updating and the monitoring of the regulations effectiveness is the subject of the last part of this conference. (O.M.)

  1. Radioactive waste storage issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunz, Daniel E. [Colorado Christian Univ., Lakewood, CO (United States)

    1994-08-15

    In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state`s boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected.

  2. Security of Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldammer, W.

    2003-01-01

    Measures to achieve radioactive waste security are discussed. Categorization of waste in order to implement adequate and consistent security measures based on potential consequences is made. The measures include appropriate treatment/storage/disposal of waste to minimize the potential and consequences of malicious acts; management of waste only within an authorised, regulated, legal framework; management of the security of personnel and information; measures to minimize the acquisition of radioactive waste by those with malicious intent. The specific measures are: deter unauthorized access to the waste; detect any such attempt or any loss or theft of waste; delay unauthorized access; provide timely response to counter any attempt to gain unauthorised access; measures to minimize acts of sabotage; efforts to recover any lost or stolen waste; mitigation and emergency plans in case of release of radioactivity. An approach to develop guidance, starting with the categorisation of sources and identification of dangerous sources, is presented. Dosimetric criteria for internal and external irradiation are set. Different exposure scenarios are considered. Waste categories and security categories based on the IAEA INFCIRC/225/Rev.4 are presented

  3. Natural radioactivity of wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zak, A.; Isajenko, K.; Piotrowska, B.; Kuczbajska, M.; Zabek, A.; Szczygielski, T.

    2010-01-01

    By-products of the combustion of coal (wastes) are often used for various types of construction (dwellings, roads, etc.). The legal regulations (The Ordinance of the Council of Ministers of 2 January 2007 'On the requirements for the content of natural radioactive isotopes of potassium K-40, radium Ra-226 and thorium Th-228 in raws and materials used in buildings for the residence of people and livestock, as well as in the industrial by-products used in the construction, and the control of the content of the aforementioned isotopes' - Law Gazette no. 4/2007 item 29) are in force in Poland. The regulations permit the possibility of utilization of raws and by-products basing upon the level of the natural radioactivity of the examined raws and materials. The article is a survey of the results obtained during the measurements of many types of raws and building materials for almost 30 years by the network of the laboratories in Poland. It is based upon the results stored in the database of the Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection (CLRP), Warsaw. The article tends to outline the radioactivity of the waste materials with respect to other raws and materials used in the construction industry. The article shows the possibilities for the use of by-products originating in the power stations and heat- and power stations (mainly ashes, slag and hinter) in the construction of dwellings and roads. (authors)

  4. Radioactive waste storage issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunz, D.E.

    1994-01-01

    In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state's boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected

  5. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strohl, P.

    1985-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) attaches considerable importance to its cooperation with Japan. It was said in the annual conference in 1977 that the presentation of the acceptable policy regarding radioactive waste management is the largest single factor for gaining public confidence when nuclear power is adopted with assurance. The risk connected with radioactive wastes was often presented as the major obstacle to the development of nuclear energy, however, an overall impression of optimism and confidence prevailed by the technical appraisal of the situation in this field by the committee of the NEA. This evolution can be easily explained by the significant progress achieved in radioactive waste management both at the technical level and with respect to the implementation of special legislation and the establishment of specialized institutions and financing schemes. More research will focus on the optimization of the technical, safety and economic aspects of specific engineering designs at specific sites on the long term isolation of wastes, and the NEA contributes to this general effort. The implementation of disposal programs is also in progress. (Kako, I.)

  6. Radioactive waste management glossary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-04-01

    Terminology used in documents published by the IAEA is frequently defined in glossaries in the separate documents so that understanding is enhanced, particularly for terms having unique meanings in the field of radioactive waste management. This has been found to be a good practice but frequently a burdensome one, too. In addition, terms in various documents occasionally were used differently. Thus, a common glossary of terms for radioactive waste management documents is believed to have merit. This glossary has been developed for use in IAEA documentation on radioactive waste management topics. The individual items have been compiled by selecting terms and definitions from thirty sources, listed on the next page, and numerous people. An effort has been made to use the definitions in internationally-accepted glossaries (e.g. ICRP, ICRU, ISO), with minimum modification; similarly, definitions in recently published IAEA documents have been respected. Nevertheless, when modifications were believed appropriate, they have been made. The glossary, stored on magnetic tape, is intended to be used as a standard for terminology for IAEA use; it is hoped that some benefits of common international terminology may result from its use in IAEA documentation

  7. ASSESSMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINANTS FOUND IN LOW LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE STREAMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R.H. Little, P.R. Maul, J.S.S. Penfoldag

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes and presents the findings from two studies undertaken for the European Commission to assess the long-term impact upon the environment and human health of non-radioactive contaminants found in various low level radioactive waste streams. The initial study investigated the application of safety assessment approaches developed for radioactive contaminants to the assessment of nonradioactive contaminants in low level radioactive waste. It demonstrated how disposal limits could be derived for a range of non-radioactive contaminants and generic disposal facilities. The follow-up study used the same approach but undertook more detailed, disposal system specific calculations, assessing the impacts of both the non-radioactive and radioactive contaminants. The calculations undertaken indicated that it is prudent to consider non-radioactive, as well as radioactive contaminants, when assessing the impacts of low level radioactive waste disposal. For some waste streams with relatively low concentrations of radionuclides, the potential post-closure disposal impacts from non-radioactive contaminants can be comparable with the potential radiological impacts. For such waste streams there is therefore an added incentive to explore options for recycling the materials involved wherever possible

  8. Treatment outcome following use of the erbium, chromium:yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet laser in the non-surgical management of peri-implantitis: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Falaki, R; Cronshaw, M; Hughes, F J

    2014-10-01

    To date there is no consensus on the appropriate usage of lasers in the management of peri-implantitis. Our aim was to conduct a retrospective clinical analysis of a case series of implants treated using an erbium, chromium:yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet laser. Twenty-eight implants with peri-implantitis in 11 patients were treated with an Er,Cr:YSGG laser (68 sites >4 mm), using a 14 mm, 500 μm diameter, 60° (85%) radial firing tip (1.5 W, 30 Hz, short (140 μs) pulse, 50 mJ/pulse, 50% water, 40% air). Probing depths were recorded at baseline after 2 months and 6 months, along with the presence of bleeding on probing. The age range was 27-69 years (mean 55.9); mean pocket depth at baseline was 6.64 ± SD 1.48 mm (range 5-12 mm),with a mean residual depth of 3.29 ± 1.02 mm (range 1-6 mm) after 2 months, and 2.97 ± 0.7 mm (range 1-9 mm) at 6 months. Reductions from baseline to both 2 and 6 months were highly statistically significant (P <0.001). Patient level reduction in bleeding from baseline to both 2 and 6 months were statistically significant (P <0.001). In view of the positive findings in this pilot study, well-designed randomised controlled trials of the use of Er,Cr:YSGG laser in the non-surgical management of peri-implantitis are required to validate our clinical findings.

  9. The influence of cation ordering, oxygen vacancy distribution and proton siting on observed properties in ceramic electrolytes: the case of scandium substituted barium titanate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torino, Nico; Henry, Paul F; Knee, Christopher S; Bjørheim, Tor Svendsen; Rahman, Seikh M H; Suard, Emma; Giacobbe, Carlotta; Eriksson, Sten G

    2017-07-04

    The origin of the 2-order of magnitude difference in the proton conductivity of the hydrated forms of hexagonal and cubic oxygen deficient BaSc x Ti 1-x O 3-δ (x = 0.2 and x = 0.7) was probed using a combination of neutron diffraction and density functional theory techniques to support published X-ray diffraction, conductivity, thermogravimetric and differential scanning calorimetry studies. Cation ordering is found in the 6H structure type (space group P6 3 /mmc) adopted by BaSc 0.2 Ti 0.8 O 3-δ with scandium preferentially substituting in the vertex sharing octahedra (2a crystallographic site) and avoiding the face-sharing octahedra (4f site). This is coupled with oxygen vacancy ordering in the central plane of the face-sharing octahedra (O1 site). In BaSc 0.7 Ti 0.3 O 3-δ a simple cubic perovskite (space group Pm3[combining macron]m) best represents the average structure from Rietveld analysis with no evidence of either cation ordering or oxygen vacancy ordering. Significant diffuse scattering is observed, indicative of local order. Hydration in both cases leads to complete filling of the available oxygen vacancies and permits definition of the proton sites. We suggest that the more localised nature of the proton sites in the 6H structure is responsible for the significantly lower proton conduction observed in the literature. Within the 6H structure type final model, proton diffusion requires a 3-step process via higher energy proton sites that are unoccupied at room temperature and is also likely to be anisotropic whereas the highly disordered cubic perovskite proton position allows 3-dimensional diffusion by well-described modes. Finally, we propose how this knowledge can be used to further materials design for ceramic electrolytes for proton conducting fuel cells.

  10. Leak detector for radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Masataka; Yamaga, Satoru.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the detection sensitivity for radioactive substances leaking from pipeways or the likes in nuclear reactors. Constitution: A monitoring center s disposed apart from a chamber for which the leakage of radioactive substances is to be detected and the chamber to be detected and the monitoring center are connected by way of pipeways through which airs from the chamber to be detected are introduced into the monitoring center by way of a suction pump. The airs thus introduced are passed through air filters to remove dusts and the radioactivity of which is measured in a first radioactivity monitoring instrument. Then, the radioactivity of the airs removed with the dusts is measured by a second instrument. Since the detection is carried out by measuring the radioactive substances released into airs not by direct detection for the leaked fluid, the detection sensitivity can be improved. (Ikeda, J.)

  11. Transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huck, W.

    1992-01-01

    The book presents a systematic survey of the legal provisions governing the transport of radioactive materials, placing emphasis on the nuclear licensing provisions of sections 4, 4b of the Atomic Energy, Act (AtG) and sections 8-10 of the Radiation Protection Ordinance (StrlSchV), also considering the provisions of the traffic law governing the carriage of hazardous goods. The author's goal is to establish a systematic basis by comparative analysis of the licensing regulations under atomic energy law, for the purpose of formulating a proposed amendment to the law, for the sake of clarity. The author furthermore looks for and develops criteria that can be of help in distinguishing the regulations governing the carriage of hazardous goods from the nuclear regulatory provisions. He also examines whether such a differentiation is detectable, particularly in those amendments to the StrlSchV which came after the Act on Carriage of Hazardous Goods. The regulations governing the transport of radioactive materials under the AtG meet with the problem of different classification systems being applied, to radioactive materials in the supervisory regulations on the one hand, and to nuclear materials in Annex 1 to the AtG on the other hand. A classification of natural, non-nuclear grade uranium e.g. by the financial security provisions is difficult as a result of these differences in the laws. The author shows that the transport regulations of the StrlSchV represent an isolated supervisory instrument that has no connecting factor to the sections 28 ff StrlSchV, as radiation protection is provided for by the regulations of the Act on Carriage of Hazardous Goods. The author suggests an amendment of existing law incorporating the legal intent of sections 8-10 StrlSchV and of sections 4, 4b AtG into two sections, and abolishing the supervisory provisions of the StrlSchV altogether. (orig./HP) [de

  12. Radioactive ion microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, S.A.

    1980-01-01

    A novel approach has been studied for the characterization of specimens with a spatial resolution at the micron level. The technique dubbed Radioactive Ion Microscopy, (RIM) uses a beam of radioactive ions, specifically tritium ions, of sufficient energy to pass through a thick specimen (e.g. greater than or equal to 10 μm). After passage through the object, the ions are implanted in a stack of thin mylar sheets (1.5 microns thick). Their rest position is proportional to the thickness and the density of the sample transversed. The location of the radioactive species can be pinpointed by autoradiographing the successive mylar foils. The radiographs are photographed and converted into digital data which is used to generate a density map of the object. From these plots, physical and chemical features may be deduced. The feasibility of RIM has been demonstrated with specimen images obtained from different objects exposed to a 3 MeV 3 H + beam. The specimens used included metal grids to examine spatial resolution and a series of biological samples (cork, wood, mosquito wing) to explore the performance and applicability of RIM. On these samples, which were 10 to 30 microns thick with surface areas of up to 1 cm 2 , a lateral resolution of approx. 1.5 microns was achieved. A depth resolution or sensitivity to density gradients of 0.2 mg/cm 2 was obtained. These detailed specimen images can be obtained with low beam exposures, e.g., in the case of tritium approx. 6 x 10 10 ions/cm 2 must be implanted, which corresponds to an irradiation of approx. 10 pA/cm 2 for 1000 s. The corresponding low radiation doses and minimal heat dissipation render RIM well suited for biological specimens. In comparison to light microscopy, RIM features enhanced microscopic capabilities as it can handle objects that are at the same time opaque to light, thick (up to tens of microns), and fragile

  13. Chapter 7. Radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The inspection and assessment activities of Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD) focused on minimization of activity and the quantity of produced radioactive waste (RAW), and on increasing safety of waste management. The general scheme of rad-waste management in the Slovak Republic is presented. The radioactive wastes produced during the operation of NPP V-1, NPP V-2 and NPP Mochovce in 1999 are listed.Liquid RAW was treated and conditioned into a solid form at the nuclear facility Technology for treatment and conditioning of RAW. In 1999 combustible solid waste was treated at the nuclear facility Incinerator of VUJE Trnava. Produced liquid and solid RAW are stored at designed equipment at individual nuclear installations (in case of NPP V-1, NPP V-2 Bohunice and NPP Mochovce in compliance with the Regulation No. 67/1987 Coll. law).The status of free capacity of these storages as of 31.121999 is presented. Storage solidified product built the SE-VYZ was fully filled at the end of 1999. In 1999 there was a significant improvement in the process of radioactive waste management by: (A) issuing approval for commissioning the National Repository for RAW, (B) issuing approval for commissioning the Treatment and Conditioning Center for RAW, (C) having the application for approval to transport conditioned RAW to the National repository Mochovce in the final stage of evaluation. At the beginning of 2000 it is realistic to expect that RAW conditioned in the Conditioning center of RAW will start to be disposed at the National repository of RAW in Mochovce

  14. Radioactivity measurements principles and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Mann, W B; Spernol, A

    2012-01-01

    The authors have addressed the basic need for internationally consistent standards and methods demanded by the new and increasing use of radioactive materials, radiopharmaceuticals and labelled compounds. Particular emphasis is given to the basic and practical problems that may be encountered in measuring radioactivity. The text provides information and recommendations in the areas of radiation protection, focusing on quality control and the precautions necessary for the preparation and handling of radioactive substances. New information is also presented on the applications of both traditiona

  15. National inventory of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    There are in France 1064 sites corresponding to radioactive waste holders that appear in this radioactive waste inventory. We find the eighteen sites of E.D.F. nuclear power plants, The Cogema mine sites, the Cogema reprocessing plants, The Cea storages, the different factories and enterprises of nuclear industry, the sites of non nuclear industry, the Andra centers, decommissioned installations, disposals with low level radioactive wastes, sealed sources distributors, national defence. (N.C.)

  16. Determination of rare and radioactive elements in raw materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zemtsova, L.I.; Stepanova, N.A.; Zheleznova, E.M.

    1983-01-01

    A methodical guidance on determination of scandium, rare earth elements, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, tungsten, rhenium, uranium, radium, thorium in mineral raw materials is presented. Geological mineralogical and analytical characteristics are presented for each of these elements. Modern methods of their determination in different geological objects are described. Optimum spheres of application of each method are pointed out

  17. Radioactive Ion Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Stora, T

    2013-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the basic requirements for ion sources designed and operated in radioactive ion beam facilities. The facilities where these sources are operated exploit the isotope separation online (ISOL) technique, in which a target is combined with an ion source to maximize the secondary beam intensity and chemical element selectivity. Three main classes of sources are operated, namely surface-type ion sources, arc discharge-type ion sources, and finally radio-frequency-heated plasma-type ion sources.

  18. Material for radioactive protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, R.S.; Boyer, N.W.

    A boron containing burn resistant, low-level radiation protection material useful, for example, as a liner for radioactive waste disposal and storage, a component for neutron absorber, and a shield for a neutron source is described. The material is basically composed of borax in the range of 25 to 50%, coal tar in the range of 25 to 37.5%, with the remainder being an epoxy resin mix. A preferred composition is 50% borax, 25% coal tar and 25% epoxy resin. The material is not susceptible to burning and is about 1/5 the cost of existing radiation protection material utilized in similar applications.

  19. 3. Radioactive pharmaceutical medications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    In the chapter common definitions of for radio-pharmacy are given. Radio-pharmacy medications are pharmacy medications which contain minor amount of one or several radionuclides (radioactive tracers), those radiation ability is applying in diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. At the same time radionuclides with more short life time, which are ether gamma-radiators or beta-radiators are applying. The following items for such radioisotopes production; radionuclides applying in nuclear medicine; radio-pharmaceutics; radio-toxicity; quality insurance; order for 18 F-PDG production; radionuclide analysis are considered

  20. Radioactive labelled orgotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The preparation and use of radioactively labelled orgotein, i.e. water-soluble protein congeners in pure, injectable form, is described. This radiopharmaceutical is useful in scintigraphy, especially for visualization of the kidneys where the orgotein is rapidly concentrated. Details of the processes for labelling bovine orgotein with sup(99m)Tc, 60 Co, 125 I or 131 I are specified. The pharmaceutical preparation of the labelled orgotein for intravenous and parenteral administration is also described. Examples using either sup(99m)TC or 125 I-orgotein in scintiscanning dogs' kidneys are given. (UK)

  1. Radioactivity and fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, H.

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear fusion is expected to give an ultimate solution to energy problems over the long term. From recent progress in developing technology for fusion reactors, we can anticipate a prototype fusion reactor by 2030. This review article describes the present status of nuclear fusion research, including muon catalyzed fusion (μCF) which attracts quite new physical interest. Tritium is an essential component of fusion reactors, because the first-stage fusion reactors will utilize a mixture of deuterium and tritium as their fuel. The knowledge about tritium as well as the fusion-neutron induced radioactivity is summarized in terms of nuclear fusion research. (orig.)

  2. Radioactivity and fussion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, H.

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear fusion is expected to give an ultimate solution to energy problems over the long term. From recent progress in developing technology for fusion reactors, we can anticipate a prototype fusion reactor by 2030. This review article describes the present status of nuclear fusion research, including muon catalyzed fusion (mu CF) which attracts quite new physical interest. Tritium is an essential component of fusion reactors, because the first-stage fusion reactors will utilize a mixture of deuterium and tritium as their fuel. The knowledge about tritium as well as the fusion-neutron induced radioactivity is summarized in terms of nuclear fusion research. (author)

  3. Transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamel, P.E.

    In Canada, large numbers of packages containing radioactive materials are shipped for industrial, medical and commercial purposes. The nature of the hazards and the associated risks are examined; the protection measures and regulatory requirements are indicated. The result of a survey on the number of packages being shipped is presented; a number of incidents are analyzed as a function of their consequences. Measures to be applied in the event of an emergency and the responsibility for the preparation of contingency plans are considered. (author) [fr

  4. Irish Sea: British radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, Aongus

    1985-01-01

    British Nuclear Fuels Ltd. (BNFL) have recently taken the decision to invest several hundred million pounds in reducing the discharges from the Sellafield reprocessing plant into the Irish Sea. This report outlines the history of the plant and its operation up to the present day and its plans for the future. The attitude of the Irish regulatory authorities and of the public to the radioactive discharges is presented and the incidence of Downs Syndrome and certain specific cancer types on both sides of the Irish Sea is discussed

  5. Radioactive waste processing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Takashi; Funabashi, Kiyomi; Chino, Koichi.

    1992-01-01

    In a waste processing device for solidifying, pellets formed by condensing radioactive liquid wastes generated from a nuclear power plant, by using a solidification agent, sodium chloride, sodium hydroxide or sodium nitrate is mixed upon solidification. In particular, since sodium sulfate in a resin regenerating liquid wastes absorbs water in the cement upon cement solidification, and increases the volume by expansion, there is a worry of breaking the cement solidification products. This reaction can be prevented by the addition of sodium chloride and the like. Accordingly, integrity of the solidification products can be maintained for a long period of time. (T.M.)

  6. Aqueous radioactive waste bituminization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, A.S.

    1980-08-01

    The bituminzation of decontamination and ion exchange resin stripping wastes with four grades of asphalt was investigated to determine the effects of asphalt type on the properties of the final products. All waste forms deformed readily under light loads indicating they would flow if not restrained. It was observed in all cases that product leaching rates increased as the hardness of the asphalt used to treat the waste increased. If bituminization is adopted for any Ontario Hydro aqueous radioactive wastes they should be treated with soft asphalt to obtain optimum leaching resistance and mechanical stability during interim storage should be provided by a corrosion resistant container

  7. Uranium and radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eschnauer, H.

    1974-01-01

    The article gives results of investigations on uranium content and the proportion of induced and natural radioactivity in wines of different vines and regions. The ecological chain of ground, vine, grape, grape-juice, and wine is described, and the author shows that 14 C and T measurements can be used to determine the age of wines with the aim of detecting adulterated vintages and blends of different years. The 14 C and T content also indicates a direct connection with nuclear explosions. (RB/AK) [de

  8. Treatment of radioactive sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, W.; Payne, B.J.; Pegler, G.E.

    1979-01-01

    Radioactive sludge e.g. that which may accumulate in irradiated nuclear fuel element storage ponds, is treated by pumping it from a settling tank to a particle separator, conveniently a hydrocyclone and a sloping plate separator, the liquid being returned to the settling tank and the solids being metered into a drum pre-lined with dry cement. The drums are in a containment box in which they are transferred to a mixing station where the particles and cement are mixed and thence to a curing station. After curing the drums are embedded in cement in outer containers for transport to a long-term storage site. (author)

  9. Radioactive cloud dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Healy, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    Radiological dosage principles, as well as methods for calculating external and internal dose rates, following dispersion and deposition of radioactive materials in the atmosphere are described. Emphasis has been placed on analytical solutions that are appropriate for hand calculations. In addition, the methods for calculating dose rates from ingestion are discussed. A brief description of several computer programs are included for information on radionuclides. There has been no attempt to be comprehensive, and only a sampling of programs has been selected to illustrate the variety available

  10. Are mushrooms radioactive?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randa, Z.; Benada, J.; Singert, M.; Horyna, J.

    1988-01-01

    Tabulated is the content of 137 Cs in dry matter of higher mushrooms collected in the years 1986 to 1987. The radioactive level of mushrooms collected in Czechoslovakia such as Boletus badius and B. chrysenteron reached 20 to 50 kBq/kg of dry matter. The individual dose at mean consumption of these mushrooms was estimated at 0.2 to 0.3 mSv/year which amounted to 20 to 30% of the dose from the natural background. (J.B.). 1 tab

  11. Radioactive waste management glossary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The Waste Management Glossary defines over 300 terms in the English language that have special meanings when they are used in the context of radioactive waste management. The Glossary is intended to provide a consistent reference for these terms for specialists in this field. It also will assist non-specialists who read IAEA reports dealing with waste management. This is the second edition of the Glossary. It is intended to update and replace its predecessor, TECDOC-264, that was issued in 1982. (author)

  12. Radioactive contamination monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Toru; Hashimoto, Tadao; Hashimoto, Manabu

    2007-01-01

    In order to prevent radioactive materials from spreading contamination from nuclear power plants outside the radiation control area, the surface contamination of all material transferred outside from the control area is monitored. This paper presents an overview and describes features of: (1) personnel surface contamination monitoring assemblies for measuring the surface contamination on workers, (2) article surface contamination monitoring assemblies for measuring the surface contamination on articles, (3) laundry monitors for measuring the surface contamination on worker clothes worn inside the control area, and (4) hand-foot-clothing contamination monitors for measuring the surface contamination on hands, feet and clothing. (author)

  13. Radioactive waste management in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ik Hwan

    1997-01-01

    In order to meet the increasing energy demand in Korea, continuous promotion of nuclear power program will be inevitable in the future. However, the use of nuclear energy eventually requires effective and reliable radioactive waste management. For the safe and economical management of radioactive waste, first of all, volume reduction is essentially required and hence the development of related technologies continuously be pursued. A site for overall radioactive waste management has to be secured in Korea. KEPCO-NETEC will improve public understanding by reinforcing PA and will maintain transparency of radioactive waste management. (author). 1 fig

  14. Radioactivity a very short introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Tuniz, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Radioactivity: A Very Short Introduction explains radioactivity and discusses its fundamental role in nature. Radioactivity remains misunderstood and feared perhaps because nuclear radiation cannot be detected by human senses, and can undoubtedly do great harm if appropriate precautions are not taken. Radioactivity in the stars and in the Earth and its wide range of applications in biomedicine, science, industry, agriculture are described, as well as the mechanisms of nuclear fission and fusion, and the harnessing of nuclear power. The issues surrounding safety and security and the increasing concerns about nuclear terrorism are also considered.

  15. Services for a radioactive environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, D.; Brown, P.E.

    1981-01-01

    Services for a radioactive environment are introduced through a plug in an enclosure for the radioactive environment. The plug is connectable to the enclosure by means of a double door unit so that removal of the plug can be effected without disturbing the integrity of the radioactive environment. To enable the plug to be removed, one of the doors is used to seal the enclosure, and the other door used to cover that portion of the plug that has been exposed to the radioactive environment. (author)

  16. Elements to diminish radioactive accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortes I, M.E.; Ramirez G, F.P.

    1998-01-01

    In this work it is presented an application of the cause-effect diagram method or Ichikawa method identifying the elements that allow to diminish accidents when the radioactive materials are transported. It is considered the transport of hazardous materials which include radioactive materials in the period: December 1996 until March 1997. Among the identified elements by this method it is possible to mention: the road type, the radioactive source protection, the grade driver responsibility and the preparation that the OEP has in the radioactive material management. It is showed the differences found between the country inner roads and the Mexico City area. (Author)

  17. Radioactive Waste Repositories Administration - SURAO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucerka, M.

    1998-01-01

    The Atomic Act specifies, among other things, responsibilities of the government in the field of safe disposal of radioactive wastes. To satisfy this responsibility, the Ministry of Industry and Trade has established the Radioactive Waste Repositories Administration (SURAO). SURAO's major responsibilities include: (a) the preparation, construction, commissioning, operation, and decommissioning of radioactive waste repositories and the monitoring of their environmental impacts; (b) radioactive waste management; (c) spent or irradiated nuclear fuel processing into a form suitable for storage/disposal or reuse; (d) record-keeping of received radioactive wastes and their producers; (e) administration of fund transfers as stipulated by the Atomic Act, Article 27; (f) development of proposals for specification of fees to be paid to the Nuclear Account; (g) responsibility for and coordination of research and development in the field of radioactive waste handling and management; (h) supervision of licensees' margin earmarked for the decommissioning of their facilities; (i) providing services in radioactive waste handling and management; (j) handling and management of radioactive wastes that have been transferred to the Czech Republic from abroad and cannot be sent back; (k) interim administration of radioactive wastes that have become state property. The Statute of the Administration is reproduced in full. (P.A.)

  18. Low-level Radioactive waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This meeting describes low-level radioactive waste management problems and contains 8 papers: 1 Low-level radioactive waste management: exemption concept and criteria used by international organizations. 2 Low-level radioactive waste management: french and foreign regulations 3 Low-level radioactive waste management in EDF nuclear power plants (FRANCE) 4 Low-level radioactive waste management in COGEMA (FRANCE) 5 Importance of low-level radioactive wastes in dismantling strategy in CEA (FRANCE) 6 Low-level radioactive waste management in hospitals 7 Low-level radioactive waste disposal: radiation protection laws 8 Methods of low-level radioactive materials measurements during reactor dismantling or nuclear facilities demolition (FRANCE)

  19. Management of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The law from December 30, 1991, precisely defines 3 axes of researches for the management of high level and long-lived radioactive wastes: separation/transmutation, surface storage and underground disposal. A global evaluation report about these researches is to be supplied in 2006 by the French government to the Parliament. A first synthesis of the knowledge gained after 14 years of research has led the national commission of the public debate (CNDP) to organize a national debate about the general options of management of high-level and long-lived radioactive wastes before the 2006 date line. The debate comprises 4 public hearings (September 2005: Bar-le-Duc, Saint-Dizier, Pont-du-Gard, Cherbourg), 12 round-tables (October and November 2005: Paris, Joinville, Caen, Nancy, Marseille), a synthesis meeting (December 2005, Dunkerque) and a closing meeting (January 2006, Lyon). This document is the synthesis of the round table debates which took place at Joinville, i.e. in the same area as the Bure underground laboratory of Meuse/Haute-Marne. Therefore, the discussion focuses more on the local impacts of the setting up of a waste disposal facility (environmental aspects, employment, economic development). (J.S.)

  20. Radioactive waste management profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    In 1989, the International Atomic Energy Agency began development of the Waste Management Data Base (WMDB) to, primarily, establish a mechanism for the collection, integration, storage, and retrieval of information relevant to radioactive waste management in Member States. This report is a summary and compilation of the information contained in the data base. The WMDB contains information and data on several aspects of waste management and offer a ready source of information on such activities as R and D efforts, waste disposal plans and programmes, important programme milestones, waste volume projections, and national and regulatory policies. This report is divided into two parts. Part one describes the Waste Management Data Base system and the type of information it contains. The second part contains data provided by Member States between August 1989 and December 1990 in response to a questionnaire sent by the Agency. However, if a Member State did not respond to the questionnaire, data from IAEA sources, such as technical assistance mission reports, were used - where such data exist. The WMDB system became operational in January 1991. The type of information contained in the data base includes radioactive waste management plans, policies and activities in Member States

  1. Analysis of radioactive strontium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    In environmental radiation survey, radioactive strontium has been analyzed in compliance with the manual ''Analyzing methods for radioactive strontium'' published in 1960 by the Science and Technology Agency, Japan, and revised in 1963. However, in a past decade, progress and development in analyzing methods and measuring equipments have been significant, therefore the manual was revised in 1974. Major revisions are as follows. (1) Analysis of 90 Sr with long half life was changed to the main theme and that of 89 Sr with short half life became a subordinate one. (2) Measuring criteria and sampling volume were revised. (3) Sample collection method was unified. (4) Analyzing method for soil was improved to NaOH-HCl method which has good recovery rate. (5) 90 Y separation method of simple operation was added for sea water analysis besides EDTA and fuming nitric acid methods. (6) Flame spectrometry for quantitative analysis of stable strontium was revised to atomic absorption spectrometry. The contents of the manual comprises 11 chapters describing introduction, measuring criteria for 90 Sr ( 89 Sr), rain and dust, land water, sea water, soil, sea bottom and river bottom sediments (changed from human urine and human bones), crops, milk (the previous one chapter was divided into two), marine organisms, and everyday foods, respectively. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  2. Radioactive waste computerized management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Communaux, M.; Lantes, B.

    1993-01-01

    Since December 31, 1990, the management of the nuclear wastes for all the power stations has been computerized, using the DRA module of the Power Generation and Transmission Group's data processing master plan. So now EDF has a software package which centralizes all the data, enabling it to declare the characteristics of the nuclear wastes which are to be stored on the sites operated by the National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (ANDRA). Among other uses, this application makes it possible for EDF, by real time data exchange with ANDRA, to constitute an inventory of validated, shippable packs. It also constitutes a data base for all the wastes produced on the various sites. This application was developed to meet the following requirements: give the producers of radioactive waste a means to fully manage all the characteristics and materials that are necessary to condition their waste correctly; guarantee the traceability and safety of data and automatically assure the transmission of this data in real time between the producers and the ANDRA; give the Central Services of EDF an operation and statistical tool permitting an experienced feed-back based on the complete national production (single, centralized data base); and integrate the application within the products of the processing master plan in order to assure its maintenance and evolution

  3. Radioactivity in food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alwan, I.H.; Khneiser, L.; Naji, A.; Khudair, M.; Motcher, Z.; Fadel, T.; Ali, M.; Fadel, M.

    2010-01-01

    Radioactivity was measured for about 405 samples of various imported foodstuffs and local communities through May 2007, 2008 and received by the health control at the Ministry of Health within the private sector imports, As well as through the Ministry of Agriculture through the purchase of food from local markets within the decision of the Advisory Body on Food campaign to control food, in addition to the ration card items. The samples included models (milk and milk products, red meat and Al da, beans, flour, cereals, oils, soft drinks, juices, tea, sugar and other materials. A 3 * 3 s odium iodide Scintillation detector with multichannel analyzer (MCA) was used to measure the activity of samples. The energy calibration was performed using a set of standard gamma ray calibration sources Eu-152. The results show the presence of radioactivity due to K-4-0 isotope in all samples of food. In addition it was noted also the presence of low due to 2 26 Ra isotope, in raw milk samples, and no fumbles device-to-peer Cesium -137 Was calculated radiation doses resulting from eating food imported and domestic as they hit the annual radiation dose of the Iraqi people (0.3) mSv / year is still within the allowable annual limit of exposure of members of the public recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency, which amounts to (1 mSv / year).

  4. Radioactivity in the oceans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Templeton, W.L.

    1979-01-01

    While the revised ''Definition and Recommendations'' of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) restricts the dumping of the radioactive wastes that exceed specified concentration/mass limits, the acceptance of the concept of applying the release rate limits as developed by the IAEA provides a rational basis for further considering the emplacement of radioactive wastes in seabed as an attractive and acceptable alternative to terrestrial geological repositories. The technical basis for the present radiological assessment is on release rate limits and not on dumping rates. However, to meet the present requirements of the London Convention, it is necessary to express to Definition in terms of the concentration in a single site and the assumed upper limit on mass dumping rate at a single site of 100,000 tons/year with the added proviso of release rate limits for the finite ocean volume of 10 17 m 3 . This results in the concentration limits of a) 1 Ci/ton for α-emitters but limited to 10 -1 Ci/ton 226 Ra and supported 210 Po; b) 10 2 Ci/ton for β/γ-emitters with half-lives of at least 0.5 yr (excluding 3 H) and the mixtures of β/γ-emitters of unknown half-lives; and c) 10 6 Ci/ton for 3 H and the β/γ-emitters with half-lives less than 0.5 yr. (Yamashita, S.)

  5. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfredson, P.G.; Levins, D.M.

    1975-08-01

    Present and future methods of managing radioactive wastes in the nuclear industry are reviewed. In the stages from uranium mining to fuel fabrication, the main purpose of waste management is to limit and control dispersal into the environment of uranium and its decay products, particularly radium and radon. Nuclear reactors produce large amounts of radioactivity but release rates from commercial power reactors have been low and well within legal limits. The principal waste from reprocessing is a high activity liquid containing essentially all the fission products along with the transuranium elements. Most high activity wastes are currently stored as liquids in tanks but there is agreement that future wastes must be converted into solids. Processes to solidify wastes have been demonstrated in pilot plant facilities in the United States and Europe. After solidification, wastes may be stored for some time in man-made structures at or near the Earth's surface. The best method for ultimate disposal appears to be placing solid wastes in a suitable geological formation on land. (author)

  6. Stigma and radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    Stigma is a special impact of radioactive waste disposal resulting from the perceptions of risk people have of nuclear waste. In this case, stigma is the devaluing or discrediting of a person, group, or geographical area because of proximity to a nuclear waste disposal site, resulting in negative consequences for the individual and collective (e.g., local economy, community relations, perceived quality of life). As part of a social and economic impact assessment of the proposed HLWR at Hanford Site, WA for Washington State, focus groups were conducted in the Tri-Cities near Hanford to identify stigma effects. Results from the groups showed strong evidence of individual impacts of stigmatization: local residents described prejudice towards them because they live near Hanford which appeared to affect their self-respect, the use of the phrase glowing in the dark by outsiders to symbolize the stigma, and showed concern about the possibility that local products might suffer from reduced demand because of products becoming associated with radioactivity in the public's mind. These results indicate that stigma effects are real and should be studied in research and assessments

  7. Public debate - radioactive wastes management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Between September 2005 and January 2006 a national debate has been organized on the radioactive wastes management. This debate aimed to inform the public and to allow him to give his opinion. This document presents, the reasons of this debate, the operating, the synthesis of the results and technical documents to bring information in the domain of radioactive wastes management. (A.L.B.)

  8. Radioactive beams and their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudchik, A.T.

    1992-01-01

    The proceedings contain lectures and contributed papers submitted to the second INR (Kiev's) International School on Nuclear Physics (Kiev, June 25 -July 2, 1991). The following sections were included in the Proceedings: Radioactive Beam Facilities, Application of Radioactive Beams in the Investigations of Nuclear Reactions, Exotic Nuclei and Clusters, Polarization Phenomena, Astrophysics and Others

  9. Radioactive isotopes on the Moon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, R. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A limited review of experiments and studies of radioactivity and isotope ratios in lunar materials is given. Observations made on the first few millimeters of the surface where the effects of solar flare particles are important, some measurements on individual rocks, and some studies of radioactivities produced deep in the lunar soil by galactic cosmic rays, are among the experiments discussed

  10. Radioactive wastes. Their industrial management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavie, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    This paper introduces a series that will review the present situation in the field of long-term management of radioactive wastes. Both the meaning and the purposes of an industrial management of radioactive wastes are specified. This short introduction is complemented by outline of data on the French problem [fr

  11. Neutronic measurements of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perot, B.

    1997-01-01

    This document presents the general matters involved in the radioactive waste management and the different non destructive assays of radioactivity. The neutronic measurements used in the characterization of waste drums containing emitters are described with more details, especially the active neutronic interrogation assays with prompt or delayed neutron detection: physical principle, signal processing and evaluation of the detection limit. (author)

  12. Handling of disused radioactive materials in Ecuador

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benitez, Manuel

    1999-10-01

    This paper describes the handling of disused radioactive sources. It also shows graphic information of medical and industrial equipment containing radioactive sources. This information was prepared as part of a training course on radioactive wastes. (The author)

  13. Natural radioactivity in water supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horner, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    This book outlines the scientific aspects of the control of natural radioactivity in water supplies, as well as the labyrinthine uncertainties in water quality regulation concerning natural radiocontamination of water. The author provides an introduction to the theory of natural radioactivity; addresses risk assessment, sources of natural radiocontamination of water, radiobiology of natural radioactivity in water, and federal water law concerning natural radiocontamination. It presents an account of how one city dealt with the perplexes that mark the rapidly evolving area of water quality regulation. The contents include: radioactivity and risk; an introduction to the atomic theory; an introduction to natural radioactivity; risk assessment; uranium and radium contamination of water; radiobiology of uranium and radium in water. Determination of risk from exposure to uranium and radium in water; the legal milieu; one city's experience; and summary: the determinants of evolving regulation

  14. Low-level Radioactivity Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churtgen, C.

    2007-01-01

    The low-level radioactivity measurements service performs measurements of alpha or beta emitters on various types of low-radioactivity samples (biological and environmental) from internal and external clients. to maintain and develop techniques concerning the measurement of low-level radioactivity of alpha and beta emitting radionuclides in environmental or biological samples; to measure these samples by means of low-background counters (liquid scintillators, proportional counters, ZnS counters and alpha-spectrometers); to support and advise the nuclear and non-nuclear industry on problems of radioactive contamination or low level radioactivity measurements; to maintain the quality assurance system according to the ISO17025 standard for which we obtained the Beltest accreditation in 1998; to assess the internal dose from occupational intakes of radionuclides for workers of the nuclear industry;

  15. A radioactive football world cup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorin, F.

    2014-01-01

    The organization of the 2014 football world cup by Brazil is an opportunity to recall how the level of natural radioactivity can change from a country to another. Brazil is with Iran and India one of the 3 countries where the level of natural radioactivity is the highest. In Brazil the average value for natural radioactivity is about 10 mSv/year but you can find spots on the Brazilian 'planalto' where natural radioactivity ranges from 10 to a few tens of mSv/year. The mean value of natural radioactivity at the world scale is about 2.5 mSv/year. The value of 10 mSv/year is the radiation threshold that may trigger the evacuation of the local population in case of a nuclear accident in France. These various figures show that radiation dose limits are very low and should not be considered as representative of actual health hazards. (A.C.)

  16. Non-radioactive stand-in for radioactive contamination. I. Non-radioactive tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohe, M.J.; Rankin, W.N.; Postles, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Candidate non-radioactive materials for use as a stand-in for radioactive contamination during application of a high-pressure, hot water decontamination were identified and evaluated. A stand-in for radioactive contamination is needed to evaluate the decontaminability of replacement canyon cranes at the manufacturers location where actual radioactive contamination cannot be used. This evaluation was conducted using high-pressure, hot-water at 420 psi, 190 0 F, and 20 gal/min through a 1/8-in.-diam nozzle, the decontamination technique preferred by SRP Separations Department for this application. A non-radioactive stand-in for radioactive contamination was desired that would be removed by direct blast stream contact but would remain intact on surfaces where direct contact does not occur. This memorandum describes identification of candidate non-radioactive stand-in materials and evaluation of these materials in screening tests and tests with high-pressure, hot-water blasting. The following non-radioactive materials were tested: carpenter's line chalk; typing correction fluid; dye penetrant developer; latex paint with attapulyite added; unaltered latex paint; gold enamel; layout fluid; and black enamel. Results show that blue layout fluid and gold enamel have similar adherence that is within the range expected for actual radioactive contamination. White latex paint has less adherence than expected for actual radioactive contamination. The film was removed at a rate of 2 . Black enamel has more adherence than expected from actual radioactive contamination. In these tests ASTM No. 2B surfaces were harder to clean than either ASTM No. 1 or electropolished surfaces which had similar cleaning properties. A 90 0 blast angle was more effective than a 45 0 blast angle. In these tests there was no discernible effect of blast distance between 1 and 3 ft

  17. Management of radioactive waste: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Paulo Sant'ana; Taynara Cristina Cordeiro

    2016-01-01

    The issue of disposal of radioactive waste around the world is not solved by now and the principal reason is the lack of an efficient technologic system. The fact that radioactive waste decays of radioactivity with time are the main reasons for setting nuclear or radioactive waste apart from the other common hazardous wastes management. Radioactive waste can be classified according to the state of matter and level of radioactivity and this classification can be differently interpreted from co...

  18. Management situation and prospect of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Pil Jun

    1985-04-01

    This book tell US that management situation and prospect of radioactive waste matter, which includes importance of energy, independence, limitation of fossil fuel energy, density of nuclear energy, strategy of supply of energy resource in Korea, nuclear energy development and radioactive waste matter, summary of management of radioactive waste, statistics of radioactive waste, disposal principle of radioactive waste, management on radioactive waste after using, disposal of Trench, La Marche in French, and Asse salt mine in Germany.

  19. Radioactivity in Tatras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rencko, A.; Spalkova, M.; Strecanska, A.; Danova, D.; Toropila, M.; Cipakova, A.; Vrabel, V.

    2012-01-01

    In our study we compared the amount of radioactive isotopes of elements of rock samples from the peaks of the High Tatras and tarns with samples of the rocks from the Low Tatras. We determined the natural radioisotopes 40 K, 226 Ra, 232 Th, but also artificial isotope 137 Cs. We found in the study during the measurements that the highest values of natural radionuclides among the measured samples are in the samples from the Low Tatras. However, there is fourfold less artificial radionuclide 137 Cs than in the High Tatras. We also found elevated levels of natural radionuclides in the Tatras's tarns compared to the relatively close shields. This finding is also true for 226 Ra in Vrbicke pleso in the Low Tatras, but also in the High Tatras for 226 Ra and 232 Th in Velke zabie pleso. (authors)

  20. Acceleration of radioactive ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laxdal, R.E.

    2003-01-01

    There is an intense interest world-wide in the use of radioactive ion beams (RIBs) for experiment. In many existing or proposed facilities ions are produced or collected at source potential, ionized and re-accelerated. Within the past year three new ISOL based facilities have added dedicated post-accelerators to deliver accelerated RIBs to experiment. The paper gives an overview of RIB accelerators present and future, and explores the inherent features in the various acceleration methods with an emphasis on heavy ion linacs. The ISAC-I and ISAC-II post-accelerators are discussed as examples. Commissioning results and initial operating experience with ISAC-I will be presented

  1. Supercompaction [of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naughton, M.D.

    1991-01-01

    Public concern over the disposal of radioactive wastes has severely limited the number of disposal sites available and promoted the development of advanced volume reduction technologies. The development of supercompactors is traced with particular reference to the press, hydraulic system and control systems. Experience in the nuclear industry over the past ten years has shown that supercompaction is an effective means of waste volume reduction. Some of the lessons learned and necessary changes in the base process are outlined. The relative merits of central and mobile supercompaction systems are discussed. Supercompactors are not limited to low activity waste although the handling of higher activity waste requires more stringent monitoring and contamination control. Personnel exposure associated with the operation of supercompactors has been low. (UK)

  2. Radioactive waste treatment apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrams, R.F.; Chellis, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    Radioactive waste treatment apparatus is disclosed in which the waste is burned in a controlled combustion process, the ash residue from the combustion process is removed and buried, the gaseous effluent is treated in a scrubbing solution the pH of which is maintained constant by adding an alkaline compound to the solution while concurrently extracting a portion of the scrubbing solution, called the blowdown stream. The blowdown stream is fed to the incinerator where it is evaporated and the combustibles in the blowdown stream burned and the gaseous residue sent to the scrubbing solution. Gases left after the scrubbing process are treated to remove iodides and are filtered and passed into the atmosphere

  3. Making radioactivity visible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braux, B.

    2003-01-01

    Cartogram is a device able to localize contaminated zones in nuclear facilities. It is made up of a single camera responsive to both light photons and gamma radiations, a hardened transportable computer and a specially designed software. Cartogram achieves in a few minutes'time the superimposition of the real picture of the zone with the map of the gamma contamination. Radioactivity is represented by different colours according to the value of the gamma dose rate detected. A single cable links the camera to the computer (maximal length: 200 m), the camera can be remotely handled through the computer. Cea, Cogema and the French company: Canberra-Eurisys have worked on this project and today 12 Cartogram have already be sold. The price of such a camera varies from 150.000 to 200.000 Euros according to the optional specificities. (A.C.)

  4. Radioactivity, radionuclides, radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Magill, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    RADIOACTIVITY – RADIONUCLIDES – RADIATION is suitable for a general audience interested in topical environmental and human health radiological issues such as radiation exposure in aircraft, food sterilisation, nuclear medicine, radon gas, radiation dispersion devices ("dirty bombs")… It leads the interested reader through the three Rs of nuclear science, to the forefront of research and developments in the field. The book is also suitable for students and professionals in the related disciplines of nuclear and radiochemistry, health physics, environmental sciences, nuclear and astrophysics. Recent developments in the areas of exotic decay modes (bound beta decay of ‘bare’ or fully ionized nuclei), laser transmutation, nuclear forensics, radiation hormesis and the LNT hypothesis are covered. Atomic mass data for over 3000 nuclides from the most recent (2003) evaluation are included.

  5. Radioactive raw material deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danchev, V.I.; Lapinskaya, T.A.

    1980-01-01

    Presented are the data on radioactive elements of the Earth, migration conditions and concentrations of uranium, radium and thorium. Briefly considered are the problems of radiogenic heat of the Earth, as well as the main methods of determining the absolute age of minerals and rocks. The main minerals of uranium and thorium are characterized, classification of their deposits is given. Primary attention is paid to the description of uranium deposits as the main sources of raw material for nuclear industry and nuclear power engineering. Among them in detail characterized are the exogenic deposits, confined mainly to sedimentary and sedimentary - metamorphized rocks as well as endogenic deposits, mainly hydrothermal ones, giving an essential part of commercial uranium. Special sections of the book deal with the problems of uranium bonds with coaly and bitumen materials, as well as the processes of ore-forming processes with the stages of ore-bearing rock formation

  6. History of radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minder, W.

    1981-01-01

    The author describes the historical development of the physics of atoms and nuclei. After a consideration of the ancient Greek philosophy concerning atoms the behaviour of gases is discussed with regards to statistical mechanics. Then the developement of chemistry from alchemy is described. Thereafter the early studies of gas discharges are described with regards to the electronic structure of atoms. In this connection the periodic system of elements is considered. Then the detection of the α-radiation of Uranium by Becquerel and the detections of M. and P. Curie are described. Thereafter the radiactive decay of nuclei is discussed. Then a popular introduction into nuclear structure is given with special regards to artificial radioactivity and nuclear fission. Finally nuclear reactors, the atomic bombs, applications of radionuclides, and problems of radiation protection are described. (HSI) [de

  7. Incineration of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eid, C.

    1985-01-01

    The incineration process currently seems the most appropriate way to solve the problems encountered by the increasing quantities of low and medium active waste from nuclear power generation waste. Although a large number of incinerators operate in the industry, there is still scope for the improvement of safety, throughput capacity and reduction of secondary waste. This seminar intends to give opportunity to scientists working on the different aspects of incineration to present their most salient results and to discuss the possibilities of making headway in the management of LL/ML radioactive waste. These proceedings include 17 contributions ranging over the subjects: incineration of solid β-γ wastes; incineration of other radwastes; measurement and control of wastes; off-gas filtration and release. (orig./G.J.P.)

  8. Radioactive waste sealing container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tozawa, S.; Kitamura, T.; Sugimoto, S.

    1984-01-01

    A low- to medium-level radioactive waste sealing container is constructed by depositing a foundation coating consisting essentially of zinc, cadmium or a zinc-aluminum alloy over a steel base, then coating an organic synthetic resin paint containing a metal phosphate over the foundation coating, and thereafter coating an acryl resin, epoxy resin, and/or polyurethane paint. The sealing container can consist of a main container body, a lid placed over the main body, and fixing members for clamping and fixing the lid to the main body. Each fixing member may consist of a material obtained by depositing a coating consisting essentially of cadmium or a zinc-aluminum alloy over a steel base

  9. PERSPECTIVE: Fireworks and radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitenecker, Katharina

    2009-09-01

    both reaction products and unburnt constituents of a pyrotechnic mixture. One major environmental concern in pyrotechnics focuses on the emission of heavy metals. This is the topic discussed in the article by Georg Steinhauser and Andreas Musilek in this issue [4]. A possible interrelationship between respiratory effects and fireworks emissions of barium-rich aerosols was also raised last year [5]. In recent years the potential hazard of naturally occurring radioactive material has become of importance to the scientific community. Naturally occurring radionuclides can be of terrestrial or cosmological origin. Terrestrial radionuclides were present in the presolar cloud that later contracted in order to build our solar system. These radionuclides—mainly heavy metals—and their non-radioactive isotopes are nowadays fixed in the matrix of the Earth's structure. Usually, their percentage is quite small compared to their respective stable isotopes—though there are exceptions like in the case of radium. The problem with environmental pollution due to naturally occurring radioactive material begins when this material is concentrated due to mining and milling, and later further processed [6]. Environmental pollution due to radioactive material goes back as far as the Copper and Iron Ages, when the first mines were erected in order to mine ores (gold, silver, copper, iron, etc), resulting in naturally occurring radioactive material being set free with other dusts into the atmosphere. So where is the link between pyrotechnics and radioactivity? In this article presented by Georg Steinhauser and Andreas Musilek [4], the pyrotechnic ingredients barium nitrate and strontium nitrate are explored with respect to their chemical similarities to radium. The fundamental question, therefore, was whether radium can be processed together with barium and strontium. If so, the production and ignition of these pyrotechnic ingredients could cause atmospheric pollution with radium aerosols

  10. Radioactive waste management policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werthamer, N.R.

    1977-01-01

    The State of New York, some 15 years ago, became a party to an attempt to commercialize the reprocessing and storage of spent nuclear fuels at the West Valley Reprocessing Facility operated by Nuclear Fuel Services, Inc. (NFS). That attempted commercialization, and the State of New York, have fallen victim to changing Federal policies in the United States, leaving an outstanding and unique radioactive waste management problem unresolved. At the beginning of construction in 1963, the AEC assured both NFS and New York State of the acceptability of long-term liquid tank storage for high level wastes, and New York State ERDA therefore agreed to become the responsible long-lived stable institution whose oversight was needed. It was understood that perpetual care and maintenance of the wastes, as liquid, in on-site underground tanks, would provide for safe and secure storage in perpetuity. All that was thought to be required was the replacement of the tanks near the end of their 40-year design life, and the transferring of the contents; for this purpose, a perpetual care trust fund was established. In March of 1972, NFS shut West Valley down for physical expansion, requiring a new construction permit from the AEC. After four years of administrative proceedings, NFS concluded that changes in Federal regulations since the original operating license had been issued would require about 600 million dollars if operations were to resume. In the fall of 1976, NFS informed the NRC, of its intention of closing the reprocessing business. The inventories of wastes left are listed. The premises upon which the original agreements were based are no longer valid. Federal responsibilities for radioactive wastes require Federal ownership of the West Valley site. The views of New York State ERDA are discussed in detail

  11. Effects of erbium-and chromium-doped yttrium scandium gallium garnet and diode lasers on the surfaces of restorative dental materials: a scanning electron microscope study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatipoglu, M; Barutcigil, C

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential effects of laser irradiation, which is commonly performed in periodontal surgery, on the surfaces of restorative materials. Five different restorative dental materials were used in this study, as follows: (1) Resin composite, (2) poly acid-modified resin composite (compomer), (3) conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC), (4) resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC), and (5) amalgam. Four cylindrical samples (8 mm diameter, 2 mm height) were prepared for each restorative material. In addition, four freshly extracted, sound human incisors teeth were selected. Two different laser systems commonly used in periodontal surgery were examined in this study: A 810 nm diode laser at a setting of 1 W with continuous-phase laser irradiation for 10 s, and an erbium-and chromium-doped yttrium scandium gallium garnet (Er, Cr: YSGG) laser at settings of 2.5 W, 3.25 W, and 4 W with 25 Hz laser irradiation for 10 s. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis was performed to evaluate the morphology and surface deformation of the restorative materials and tooth surfaces. According to the SEM images, the Er, Cr: YSGG laser causes irradiation markings that appear as demineralized surfaces on tooth samples. The Er, Cr: YSGG laser also caused deep defects on composite, compomer, and RMGIC surfaces because of its high power, and the ablation was deeper for these samples. High-magnification SEM images of GIC samples showed the melting and combustion effects of the Er, Cr: YSGG laser, which increased as the laser power was increased. In amalgam samples, neither laser left significant harmful effects at the lowest power setting. The diode laser did cause irradiation markings, but they were insignificant compared with those left by the Er, Cr: YSGG laser on the surfaces of the different materials and teeth. Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that Er, Cr: YSGG laser irradiation could cause distortions of the surfaces

  12. Method of processing radioactive laundry wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirai, Takamori; Suzuki, Takeo; Takahara, Toshio.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the processing performance of radioactive laundry waste processing device, as well as improve the working life of back osmotic membranes to be secondary wastes. Method: Upon removal of radioactive nucleids in radioactive laundry wastes by separation, radioactive nuclides-containing solids contained in the radioactive laundry wastes are separated and removed in a separation plate type centrifugal cleaner. Then, solid radioactive nuclides and ionized radioactive nuclides remained in the radioactive laundry wastes from which the solids have been removed by separation are separated and removed in a back osmotic membrane processing device. (Aizawa, K.)

  13. Radioactive contamination in imported foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, Kimiko; Maki, Toshio; Nagayama, Toshihiro; Hashimoto, Hideki; Kawai, Yuka; Kobayashi, Maki; Shioda, Hiroko; Nishima, Taichiro

    1990-01-01

    On April 26, 1986, explosion occurred in Chernobyl nuclear power station in USSR, and radioactivity contamination was brought about in almost all countries in the world. In European countries, crops were contaminated directly with radioactive fallout to high concentration. Also in Japan, after one week the radioactivity higher than usual was detected in environment, and also in vegetables, milk, tea leaves and others. Thereafter, in order to cope with the import of contaminated foods, inspection and watch system was strengthened by deciding the interim limit of radioactive concentration. However the cases of exceeding the interim limit were often reported. In order to remove the harmful foods due to radioactive contamination and to meet the fear of consumers, the authors measured the radioactive concentration in foods distributed in Tokyo and investigated the actual state of contamination. The samples were 920 imported foods. The experimental method, the preparation of samples, the method of analysis and the results are reported. The samples in which the radioactive concentration exceeding 50 Bq/kg was detected were 25 cases. The food having the high frequency of detection was flavors. (K.I.)

  14. Dossier: transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mignon, H.; Brachet, Y.; Turquet de Beauregard, G.; Mauny, G.; Robine, F.; Plantet, F.; Pestel Lefevre, O.; Hennenhofer, G.; Bonnemains, J.

    1997-01-01

    This dossier is entirely devoted to the transportation of radioactive and fissile materials of civil use. It comprises 9 papers dealing with: the organization of the control of the radioactive materials transport safety (safety and security aspects, safety regulations, safety analysis and inspection, emergency plans, public information), the technical aspects of the regulation concerning the transport of radioactive materials (elaboration of regulations and IAEA recommendations, risk assessments, defense in depth philosophy and containers, future IAEA recommendations, expertise-research interaction), the qualification of containers (regulations, test facilities), the Transnucleaire company (presentation, activity, containers for spent fuels), the packages of radioactive sources for medical use (flux, qualification, safety and transport), an example of accident during radioactive materials transportation: the Apach train derailment (February 4, 1997), the sea transport of radioactive materials (international maritime organization (OMI), international maritime dangerous goods (IMDG) code, irradiated nuclear fuel (INF) safety rules), the transport of radioactive materials in Germany, and the point of view from an external observer. (J.S.)

  15. Radioactive liquid waste filtering device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inami, Ichiro; Tabata, Masayuki; Kubo, Koji.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent clogging in filter materials and improve the filtration performance for radioactive liquid wastes without increasing the amount of radioactive wastes. Constitution: In a radioactive waste filtering device, a liquid waste recycling pipe and a liquid recycling pump are disposed for recycling the radioactive liquid wastes in a liquid wastes vessel. In this case, the recycling pipe and the recycling pump are properly selected so as to satisfy the conditions capable of making the radioactive liquid wastes flowing through the pipe to have the Reynolds number of 10 4 - 10 5 . By repeating the transportation of radioactive liquid wastes in the liquid waste vessel through the liquid waste recycling pipe by the liquid waste recycling pump and then returning them to the liquid waste vessel again, particles of fine grain size in the suspended liquids are coagulated with each other upon collision to increase the grain size of the suspended particles. In this way, clogging of the filter materials caused by the particles of fine grain size can be prevented, thereby enabling to prevent the increase in the rising rate of the filtration differential pressure, reduce the frequency for the occurrence of radioactive wastes such as filter sludges and improve the processing performance. (Kamimura, M.)

  16. Regulation of radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This bulletin contains information about activities of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD). In this leaflet the regulation of radioactive waste management of the UJD are presented. Radioactive waste (RAW) is the gaseous, liquid or solid material that contains or is contaminated with radionuclides at concentrations or activities greater than clearance levels and for which no use is foreseen. The classification of radioactive waste on the basis of type and activity level is: - transition waste; - short lived low and intermediate level waste (LlLW-SL); - long lived low and intermediate level waste (LlLW-LL); - high level waste. Waste management (in accordance with Act 130/98 Coll.) involves collection, sorting, treatment, conditioning, transport and disposal of radioactive waste originated by nuclear facilities and conditioning, transport to repository and disposal of other radioactive waste (originated during medical, research and industrial use of radioactive sources). The final goal of radioactive waste management is RAW isolation using a system of engineered and natural barriers to protect population and environment. Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic regulates radioactive waste management in accordance with Act 130/98 Coll. Inspectors regularly inspect and evaluate how the requirements for nuclear safety at nuclear facilities are fulfilled. On the basis of safety documentation evaluation, UJD issued permission for operation of four radioactive waste management facilities. Nuclear facility 'Technologies for treatment and conditioning contains bituminization plants and Bohunice conditioning centre with sorting, fragmentation, evaporation, incineration, supercompaction and cementation. Final product is waste package (Fibre reinforced container with solidified waste) acceptable for near surface repository in Mochovce. Republic repository in Mochovce is built for disposal of short lived low and intermediate level waste. Next

  17. Radioactive waste management in Tanzania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banzi, F.P.; Bundala, F.M.; Nyanda, A.M.; Msaki, P.

    2002-01-01

    Radioactive waste, like many other hazardous wastes, is of great concern in Tanzania because of its undesirable health effects. The stochastic effects due to prolonged exposure to ionizing radiation produce cancer and hereditary effects. The deterministic effects due to higher doses cause vomiting, skin reddening, leukemia, and death to exposed victims. The aim of this paper is to give an overview of the status of radioactive wastes in Tanzania, how they are generated and managed to protect humans and the environment. As Tanzania develops, it is bound to increase the use of ionizing radiation in research and teaching, industry, health and agriculture. Already there are more than 42 Centers which use one form of radioisotopes or another for these purposes: Teletherapy (Co-60), Brach-therapy (Cs-137, Sr-89), Nuclear Medicine (P-32, Tc-99m, 1-131, 1-125, Ga-67, In-111, Tl-206), Nuclear gauge (Am-241, Cs- 137, Sr-90, Kr-85), Industrial radiography (Am-241, C-137, Co-60, lr-92), Research and Teaching (1-125, Am241/Be, Co-60, Cs-137, H-3 etc). According to IAEA definition, these radioactive sources become radioactive waste if they meet the following criteria: if they have outlived their usefulness, if they have been abandoned, if they have been displaced without authorization, and if they contaminate other substances. Besides the origin of radioactive wastes, special emphasis will also be placed on the existing radiation regulations that guide disposal of radioactive waste, and the radioactive infrastructure Tanzania needs for ultimate radioactive waste management. Specific examples of incidences (theft, loss, abandonment and illegal possession) of radioactive waste that could have led to serious deterministic radiation effects to humans will also be presented. (author)

  18. Measurement of liquid radioactive materials for monitoring radioactive emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    This draft regulation applies to measuring equipment for liquid radioactive materials for the monitoring of the radioactive discharges from stationary nuclear power plants with LWR and HTR reactors. Demands made on the measuring procedure, methods of concentration determination, balancing, indication of limiting values, and inspections are layed down. The draft regulation deals with: 1) Monitoring liquid radioactive discharges: Water and similar systems; radionuclides and their detection limits, radioactively contaminated water (waste water); secondary cooling water; power house cooling water; primary cooling water; flooding water; 2) Layout of the measuring and sampling equipment and demands made on continuous and discontinuous measuring equipment; demands made on discontinuous α and β measuring equipment; 3) Maintenance and repair work; inspections; repair of defects; 4) Demands made on documentation; reports to authorities; 5) Supplement: List of general and reference regulations. (orig./HP) [de

  19. Guidance on accidents involving radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This annex contains advice to Health Authorities on their response to accidents involving radioactivity. The guidance is in six parts:-(1) planning the response required to nuclear accidents overseas, (2) planning the response required to UK nuclear accidents a) emergency plans for nuclear installations b) nuclear powered satellites, (3) the handling of casualties contaminated with radioactive substances, (4) background information for dealing with queries from the public in the event of an accident, (5) the national arrangements for incident involving radioactivity (NAIR), (6) administrative arrangements. (author)

  20. Developing radioactive waste management policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gichana, Z.

    2012-04-01

    A policy for radioactive waste management with defined goals and requirements is needed as a basis for the preparation of legislation, review or revision of related legislation and to define roles and responsibilities for ensuring the safe management of radioactive waste. A well defined policy and associated strategies are useful in promoting consistency of emphasis and direction within all of the sectors involved in radioactive waste management. The absence of policy and strategy can lead to confusion or lack of coordination and direction. A policy and/or strategy may sometimes be needed to prevent inaction on a particular waste management issue or to resolve an impasse. (author)

  1. Customs control of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Causse, B.

    1998-01-01

    Customs officers take part in the combat against illicit traffic od radioactive materials by means of different regulations dealing with nuclear materials, artificial radiation sources or radioactive wastes. The capability of customs officers is frequently incomplete and difficult to apply due to incompatibility of the intervention basis. In case of contaminated materials, it seems that the customs is not authorised directly and can only perform incidental control. In order to fulfil better its mission of fighting against illicit traffic of radioactive materials customs established partnership with CEA which actually includes practical and theoretical training meant to augment the capabilities of customs officers

  2. Rain scavenging of radioactive particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, A.L.

    1975-01-01

    An assessment is made of the rainout of airborne radioactive particles from a nuclear detonation with emphasis on the microphysical removal processes. For submicron particles the scavenging processes examined are Brownian and turbulent diffusion to cloud droplets. For particles larger than 1 μm radius, nucleation scavenging is examined. For various particle size and radioactivity distributions, it is found that from 27 to 99 percent of the radioactivity is attached to cloud droplets and subject to rapid removal by rain. (U.S.)

  3. Treatment of Radioactive Gaseous Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-07-01

    Radioactive waste, with widely varying characteristics, is generated from the operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants, nuclear fuel cycle facilities, research laboratories and medical facilities. The waste needs to be treated and conditioned as necessary to provide waste forms acceptable for safe storage and disposal. Although radioactive gaseous radioactive waste does not constitute the main waste flow stream at nuclear fuel cycle and radioactive waste processing facilities, it represents a major source for potential direct environmental impact. Effective control and management of gaseous waste in both normal and accidental conditions is therefore one of the main issues of nuclear fuel cycle and waste processing facility design and operation. One of the duties of an operator is to take measures to avoid or to optimize the generation and management of radioactive waste to minimize the overall environmental impact. This includes ensuring that gaseous and liquid radioactive releases to the environment are within authorized limits, and that doses to the public and the effects on the environment are reduced to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable. Responsibilities of the regulatory body include the removal of radioactive materials within authorized practices from any further regulatory control — known as clearance — and the control of discharges — releases of gaseous radioactive material that originate from regulated nuclear facilities during normal operation to the environment within authorized limits. These issues, and others, are addressed in IAEA Safety Standards Series Nos RS-G-1.7, WS-G-2.3 and NS-G-3.2. Special systems should be designed and constructed to ensure proper isolation of areas within nuclear facilities that contain gaseous radioactive substances. Such systems consist of two basic subsystems. The first subsystem is for the supply of clean air to the facility, and the second subsystem is for the collection, cleanup and

  4. Radioactive materials transport; Le transport des matieres radioactives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talbi, B.

    1996-10-01

    The development of peaceful applications of nuclear energy results in the increase of transport operations of radioactive materials. Therefore strong regulations on transport of radioactive materials turns out to be a necessity in Tunisia. This report presents the different axes of regulations which include the means of transport involved, the radiation protection of the carriers, the technical criteria of security in transport, the emergency measures in case of accidents and penalties in case of infringement. (TEC). 12 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Management of radioactive wastes produced by users of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This report is intended as a document to provide guidance for regulatory, administrative and technical authorities who are responsible for, or are involved in, planning, approving, executing and reviewing national waste management programmes related to the safe use of radioactive materials in hospitals, research laboratories, industrial and agricultural premises and the subsequent disposal of the radioactive wastes produced. It provides information and guidance for waste management including treatment techniques that may be available to establishments and individual users

  6. Radioactive Waste Management Objectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    considered and the specific goals to be achieved at different stages of implementation, all of which are consistent with the Basic Principles. The four Objectives publications include Nuclear General Objectives, Nuclear Power Objectives, Nuclear Fuel Cycle Objectives, and Radioactive Waste Management and Decommissioning Objectives. This publication sets out the objectives that need to be achieved in the area of radioactive waste management, including decommissioning and environmental remediation, to ensure that the Nuclear Energy Basic Principles are satisfied.

  7. Radioactive waste melting furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Junpei.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a radioactive waste melting furnace excellent in heat insulating property, capable of exchanging only refractory materials with lesser amount of contamination. Namely, an heat insulation layer is disposed on the outer wall of the melting furnace. A refractory layer is disposed on the inner wall being in contact with molten materials in the melting furnace. A metal vessel covering the refractory layer is interposed between the heat insulation layer and the refractory layer. In addition, a metal outer shell covering the heat insulation layer is disposed on the heat insulation layer on the outer wall of the melting furnace. Bricks comprising, for example, alumina, carbon, zircon, magnesia or chromia having a low heat conductivity are used for the outer wall heat insulation layer irrespective of the melting performance. The refractory layer on the inner wall is made of bricks comprising chromia, alumina and zircon as molten materials of low basicity and chromia and magnesia as molten materials of high basicity. The materials of the metal vessel may be ordinary carbon steels, cast irons, or stainless steels. The refractory layer is taken out from the melting furnace together with the metal vessel, and only the refractory layer can be removed. Radiation contamination is eliminated. The metal vessel can be used again. (I.S.)

  8. Radioactivity for man's benefit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Heerden, P.D.R.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear medicine is the application of radionuclides in the diagnosis and treatment of disease. The workhorse of nuclear medicine is the artificially produced radionuclide technetium-99m (Tc-99m). Tc-99m is employed as a radioactive label for many different compounds used to study various organs. Using these compounds it has become possible to image organ structure, organ function and the disturbance of organ function. The utilization of radionuclides in medical research in the Republic of South Africa has been actively supported since 1959 by mainly three organizations, namely the South African Medical Research Council, the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research and the Atomic Energy Corporation of South Africa. This support, together with the consistency of the production of valuable radionuclides, has made it possible for those centres which have nuclear medicine facilities to conduct research of international standing. This research includes studies on cancer, liver and kidney transplants, the heart, diabetes and blood platelet kinetics. The National Accelerator Centre at Faure in the Cape is now poised to produce radionuclides hetherto unavailable in the Republic of South Africa. This will enable exciting new techniques such as Positron emission tomography to become a reality. 1 fig

  9. Storage of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    Even if the best waste minimization measures are undertaken throughout radioisotope production or usage, significant radioactive wastes arise to make management measures essential. For developing countries with low isotope usage and little or no generation of nuclear materials, it may be possible to handle the generated waste by simply practicing decay storage for several half-lives of the radionuclides involved, followed by discharge or disposal without further processing. For those countries with much larger facilities, longer lived isotopes are produced and used. In this situation, storage is used not only for decay storage but also for in-process retention steps and for the key stage of interim storage of conditioned wastes pending final disposal. The report will serve as a technical manual providing reference material and direct step-by-step know-how to staff in radioisotope user establishments and research centres in the developing Member States without nuclear power generation. Considerations are limited to the simpler storage facilities. The restricted quantities and low activity associated with the relevant wastes will generally permit contact-handling and avoid the need for shielding requirements in the storage facilities or equipment used for handling. A small quantity of wastes from some radioisotope production cells and from reactor cooling water treatment may contain sufficient short lived activity from activated corrosion products to require some separate decay storage before contact-handling is suitable. 16 refs, 12 figs, 8 tabs

  10. Radioactive decay data tables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1981-01-01

    The estimation of radiation dose to man from either external or internal exposure to radionuclides requires a knowledge of the energies and intensities of the atomic and nuclear radiations emitted during the radioactive decay process. The availability of evaluated decay data for the large number of radionuclides of interest is thus of fundamental importance for radiation dosimetry. This handbook contains a compilation of decay data for approximately 500 radionuclides. These data constitute an evaluated data file constructed for use in the radiological assessment activities of the Technology Assessments Section of the Health and Safety Research Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The radionuclides selected for this handbook include those occurring naturally in the environment, those of potential importance in routine or accidental releases from the nuclear fuel cycle, those of current interest in nuclear medicine and fusion reactor technology, and some of those of interest to Committee 2 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection for the estimation of annual limits on intake via inhalation and ingestion for occupationally exposed individuals.

  11. Radioactive waste equivalence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlowski, S.; Schaller, K.H.

    1990-01-01

    The report reviews, for the Member States of the European Community, possible situations in which an equivalence concept for radioactive waste may be used, analyses the various factors involved, and suggests guidelines for the implementation of such a concept. Only safety and technical aspects are covered. Other aspects such as commercial ones are excluded. Situations where the need for an equivalence concept has been identified are processes where impurities are added as a consequence of the treatment and conditioning process, the substitution of wastes from similar waste streams due to the treatment process, and exchange of waste belonging to different waste categories. The analysis of factors involved and possible ways for equivalence evaluation, taking into account in particular the chemical, physical and radiological characteristics of the waste package, and the potential risks of the waste form, shows that no simple all-encompassing equivalence formula may be derived. Consequently, a step-by-step approach is suggested, which avoids complex evaluations in the case of simple exchanges

  12. Researching radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feates, F.; Keen, N.

    1976-01-01

    At present it is planned to use the vitrification process to convert highly radioactive liquid wastes, arising from nuclear power programme, into glass which will be contained in steel cylinders for storage. The UKAEA in collaboration with other European countries is currently assessing the relative suitability of various natural geological structures as final repositories for the vitrified material. The Institute of Geological Sciences has been commissioned to specify the geological criteria that should be met by a rock structure if it is to be used for the construction of a repository though at this stage disposal sites are not being sought. The current research programme aims to obtain basic geological data about the structure of the rocks well below the surface and is expected to continue for at least three years. The results in all the European countries will then be considered so that the United Kingdom can choose a preferred method for isolating their wastes. It is only at that stage that a firm commitment may be made to select a site for a potential repository, when a far more detailed scientific research study will be instituted. Heat transfer problems and chemical effects which may occur within and around repositories are being investigated and a conceptual design study for an underground repository is being prepared. (U.K.)

  13. Environmental radioactivity in Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twining, John [Environmental Science Division, ANSTO, Menai (Australia)

    2002-06-01

    Environmental research mainly carried out at Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO) related to nuclear activities in Australia such as uranium mining, transfer factor studies related to U- and Th-series radionuclides, dose assessment modelling, radiation monitoring, and nuclear waste repository, is outlined. Many aspects of radioecology, marine and freshwater geochemistry and radiochemical dating techniques; bioaccumulation including archival monitoring and kinetics, ground water studies, atmospheric issues including climate change and geomorphology are being studied with the help of a high neutron flux reactor, a cyclotron and a tandem accelerator as well as modern analytical equipment. Only a very small number of examples of radioactivity applications are presented: Microbiotic crusts covering up to 50% of the soil surface at Maralinga nuclear test site where more than 80% of the residual Am-241 was found to retain within the top 5 mm after 30 years. SIMS analysis of crocodile bones indicating that the only metal affected by U mining in Kakadu region was lead (Pb). In mineral sands such as zircon, U(VI) is more stable than U(IV) as evidenced by ion beam and SEM imaging and XANES analysis. Use of radioisotopes in atmospheric and climate studies, terrestrial studies particularly in dating techniques, and aquatic-continental and aquatic-ocean waters, and in biological studies such as biokinetics of copper metabolism in rainbow fishes living downstream of a mine are presented. (S. Ohno)

  14. Radioactivity in foodstuffs 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The average per capita radiation dose received by the Norwegian population due to intake of foodstuffs in 1990 was between 0.03 and 0.06 mSv. This was about the same level as in previous years since the Chernobyl accident. Certain individuals with special dietary habits (consumption of large amounts of freshwater fish and reindeer), and who live in heavily contaminated areas, received higher doses (appr. 1 mSv). In 1990 dietary advice was maintained with regard to people consuming large amounts of reindeer meat and/or game and freshwater fish. The aim is still that no person shall be exposed to an annual dose of more than 1 mSv through food. The present report reviews the data concerning radioactivity levels in dairy products, meat and fish for 1990. Levels were similar to those recorded in the previous year, but considerably lower than those in 1988. The report also presents some data from a 5-year radio-ecological research programme carried out by the Norwegian Institute of Nature Research (NINA). In general, levels in wild fish and game were below the intervention limit of 6000 Bq/kg, apart from a few reindeer herds and fish from a few localities. 8 figs. 6 tabs

  15. Radioactive waste solidifying material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Keiichi; Sakai, Etsuro.

    1989-01-01

    The solidifying material according to this invention comprises cement material, superfine powder, highly water reducing agent, Al-containing rapid curing material and coagulation controller. As the cement material, various kinds of quickly hardening, super quickly hardening and white portland cement, etc. are usually used. As the superfine powder, those having average grain size smaller by one order than that of the cement material are desirable and silica dusts, etc. by-produced upon preparing silicon, etc. are used. As the highly water reducing agent, surface active agents of high decomposing performance and comprising naphthalene sulfonate, etc. as the main ingredient are used. As the Al-containing rapidly curing material, calcium aluminate, etc. is used in an amount of less than 10 parts by weight based on 100 parts by weight of the powdery body. As the coagulation controller, boric acid etc. usually employed as a retarder is used. This can prevent dissolution or collaption of pellets and reduce the leaching of radioactive material. (T.M.)

  16. Environmental radioactivity survey in Suwon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Won Keun; Park, Jong Mi [Kyunghee Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-15

    The project is carried out to monitor the change of environmental radioactivity in Suwon, and to provide a systematic data for radiation monitoring and counter measurement at a radiological emergency situation. Also the survey of natural environmental radioactivities in the samples was conducted to make the reliable data base for evaluation of internal exposure and environmental contamination of radiation. This report contains the data of gamma exposure rates and radioactivities of airborne dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water which were analyzed periodically by Suwon regional monitoring station m 2003. Also it contains the data of natural radioactivity levels of environmental samples such as soil, drinking water, indicator plant(mugwort, pine-needle), agricultural and forest products, and processed food(tea)

  17. Method of solidifying radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Mihara, Shigeru; Yamashita, Koji; Sauda, Kenzo.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain satisfactory plastic solidification products rapidly and more conveniently from radioactive wastes. Method: liquid wastes contain, in addition to sodium sulfate as the main ingredient, nitrates hindering the polymerizing curing reactions and various other unknown ingredients, while spent resins contain residual cationic exchange groups hindering the polymerizing reaction. Generally, as the acid value of unsaturated liquid polyester resins is lower, the number of terminal alkyd resins is small, formation of nitrates is reduced and the polymerizing curing reaction is taken place more smoothly. In view of the above, radioactive wastes obtained by dry powderization or dehydration of radioactive liquid wastes or spent resins are polymerized with unsaturated liquid polyester resins with the acid value of less than 13 to obtain plastic solidification. Thus, if the radioactive wastes contain a great amount of polymerization hindering material such as NaNO 2 , they can be solidified rapidly and conveniently with no requirement for pre-treatment. (Kamimura, Y.)

  18. Radioactive waste management in Belgium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detilleux, E.

    1984-01-01

    The first part of this paper briefly describes the nuclear industry in Belgium and the problem of radioactive wastes with regard to their quality and quantity. The second part emphasizes the recent guidelines regarding the management of the nuclear industry in general and the radioactive wastes in particular. In this respect, important tasks are the reinforcement of administrative structures with regard to the supervision and the control of nuclear activities, the establishment of a mixed company entrusted with the covering of the needs of nuclear plants in the field of nuclear fuels and particularly the setting up of a public autonomous and specialized organization, the 'Public Organization for the Management of Radioactive Waste and Fissile Materials', in short 'O.N.D.R.A.F.'. This organization is in charge of the management of the transport, the conditioning, the storage and the disposal of radioactive wastes. (Auth.)

  19. Gaseous radioactive waste processing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onizawa, Hideo.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To prevent explosion of hydrogen gas within gaseous radioactive waste by removing the hydrogen gas by means of a hydrogen absorber. Structure: A coolant extracted from a reactor cooling system is sprayed by nozzle into a gaseous phase (hydrogen) portion within a tank, thus causing slipping of radioactive rare gas. The gaseous radioactive waste rich in hydrogen, which is purged in the tank, is forced by a waste gas compressor into a hydrogen occlusion device. The hydrogen occlusion device is filled with hydrogen occluding agents such as Mg, Mg-Ni alloy, V-Nb alloy, La-Ni alloy and so forth, and hydrogen in the waste gas is removed through reaction to produce hydrogen metal. The gaseous radioactive waste, which is deprived of hydrogen and reduced in volume, is stored in an attenuation tank. The hydrogen stored in the hydrogen absorber is released and used again as purge gas. (Horiuchi, T.)

  20. Radioactive waste processing and disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This compilation contains 4144 citations of foreign and domestic reports, journal articles, patents, conference proceedings, and books pertaining to radioactive waste processing and disposal. Five indexes are provided: Corporate Author, Personal Author, Subject, Contract Number, and Report Number

  1. National radioactive waste management strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syed Abd Malik Syed Zain

    1985-01-01

    This article briefs out the strategic management of radioactive wastes in Malaysia. The criteria and methods discussed are those promoted by UTN (Nuclear Energy Unit) which has been given the authority to carry out local research programs in nuclear energy

  2. Radioactive waste gas processing systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kita, Kaoru; Minemoto, Masaki; Takezawa, Kazuaki.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To effectively separate and remove only hydrogen from hydrogen gas-containing radioactive waste gases produced from nuclear power plants without using large scaled facilities. Constitution: From hydrogen gas-enriched waste gases which contain radioactive rare gases (Kr, Xe) sent from the volume control tank of a chemical volume control system, only the hydrogen is separated in a hydrogen separator using palladium alloy membrane and rare gases are concentrated, volume-decreased and then stored. In this case, an activated carbon adsorption device is connected at its inlet to the radioactive gas outlet of the hydrogen separator and opened at its outlet to external atmosphere. In this system, while only the hydrogen gas permeates through the palladium alloy membrane, other gases are introduced, without permeation, into the activated carbon adsorption device. Then, the radioactive rare gases are decayed by the adsorption on the activated carbon and then released to the external atmosphere. (Furukawa, Y.)

  3. Laser traps for radioactive isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voytas, P.A.; Behr, J.A.; Ghosh, A.; Gwinner, G.; Orozco, L.A.; Simsarian, J.E.; Sprouse, G.D.; Xu, F.

    1996-01-01

    The techniques of laser cooling and trapping now make it possible to observe large samples of stable atoms in a small volume at low temperature. This capability was recently extended to radioactive isotopes. This opens up new opportunities for the investigation of fundamental symmetries through measurements using radioactive atoms. In this paper we will discuss several fundamental measurements in atomic systems and how the ability to trap radioactive atoms will play an important role in improving the precision of such measurements. Measurements of the effects of the weak interaction are of particular note since they are becoming quite precise. In particular, we will describe in detail the system developed at Stony Brook to trap radioactive alkali atoms and measure weak interaction effects in francium isotopes. (orig.)

  4. Progresses in proton radioactivity studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, L. S., E-mail: flidia@ist.utl.pt [Center of Physics and Engineering of Advanced Materials, CeFEMA and Departamento de Física, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Avenida Rovisco Pais, P1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Maglione, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia “G. Galilei”, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova, Italy and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Padova (Italy)

    2016-07-07

    In the present talk, we will discuss recent progresses in the theoretical study of proton radioactivity and their impact on the present understanding of nuclear structure at the extremes of proton stability.

  5. Radioactive waste management in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawley, N.J.

    1979-09-01

    Reports and other Canadian literature on radioactive waste processing and disposal covering the period 1953-1979 are listed. A selected list of international conferences relating to waste management (1959-1979) is attached. (LL)

  6. World ocean and radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiknadze, O.E.; Sivintsev, Yu.V.

    2000-01-01

    The radioecological situation that took shape in the Arctic, North Atlantic Ocean and Far East regions as a result of radioactive waste marine disposal was assessed. Accurate account of radionuclides formation and decay in submerged water-water reactors of nuclear submarines suggests that total activity of radioactive waste disposed near the Novaya Zemlya amounted to 107 kCi by the end of 1999. Activity of radioactive waste disposed in the North Atlantic currently is not in excess of 430 kCi. It is pointed out that the Far East region heads the list in terms of total activity disposed (529 kCi). Effective individual dose for critical groups of population in the Arctic, North Atlantic and Far East regions was determined. The conclusion was made that there is no detrimental effect of the radioactive waste disposed on radioecological situation in the relevant areas [ru

  7. Method of solidifying radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukazawa, Tetsuo; Ootsuka, Masaharu; Uetake, Naoto; Ozawa, Yoshihiro.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To prepare radioactive solidified wastes excellent in strength, heat resistance, weather-proof, water resistance, dampproof and low-leaching property. Method: A hardening material reactive with alkali silicates to form less soluble salts is used as a hardener for alkali silicates which are solidification filler for the radioactive wastes, and mixed with cement as a water absorbent and water to solidify the radioactive wastes. The hardening agent includes, for example, CaCO 3 , Ca(ClO 4 ) 2 , CaSiF 6 and CaSiO 3 . Further, in order to reduce the water content in the wastes and reduce the gap ratio in the solidification products, the hardener adding rate, cement adding rate and water content are selected adequately. As the result, solidification products can be prepared with no deposition of easily soluble salts to the surface thereof, with extremely low leaching of radioactive nucleides. (Kamimura, M.)

  8. Radioactive waste management in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradel, J.

    1975-01-01

    The different stages of radioactive waste production are examined: ore production, reactor operation, reprocessing plants. The treatment and storage methods used and the French realizations relative to these problems are described [fr

  9. Mental Models of Radioactivity and Attitudes towards Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeleznik, N.

    2010-01-01

    Siting of a radioactive waste repository presents a great problem in almost every country that produces such waste. The main problem is not a technical one, but socio-psychological, namely the acceptability of this kind of repository. Previous research on people's perception of the LILW repository construction, their attitudes towards radioactive waste, their willingness to accept it, indicated significant differences in answers of experts and lay persons, mainly regarding evaluation of the consequences of repository construction. Based on the findings of pilot investigations a mental model approach to the radioactivity, radioactive waste and repository was used as a method for development better risk communication strategies with local communities. The mental models were obtained by adjustment of the method developed by Morgan and co-workers where expert model of radioactivity is compared with mental model of lay people obtained through individual opened interviews. Additional information on trust, risk perception, role of main actors in the site selection process and their credibility was gained with the overall questionnaire on the representative sample of Slovenian population. Results of the survey confirm some already known findings, in addition we gained new cognitions and with analyses obtained the relationships and ratios between different factors, which are characteristics both for the general public and for the public, which is involved in the site selection process for a longer period and has been living beside a nuclear power plant for one generation. People have in general negative associations regarding the repository, the perceived risk for nuclear facilities is high, and trust in representatives of governmental institutions is low. Mental models of radioactivity, radioactive waste and the LILW repository are mostly irregular and differ from the experts' models. This is particularly valid for the models of radioactivity and the influences of

  10. Radioactive waste problems in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridges, O.; Bridges, J.W.

    1995-01-01

    The collapse of the former Soviet Union, with the consequent shift to a market driven economy and demilitarisation, has had a profound effect on the nuclear and associated industries. The introduction of tighter legislation to control the disposal of radioactive wastes has been delayed and the power and willingness of the various government bodies responsible for its regulation is in doubt. Previously secret information is becoming more accessible and it is apparent that substantial areas of Russian land and surface waters are contaminated with radioactive material. The main sources of radioactive pollution in Russia are similar to those in many western countries. The existing atomic power stations already face problems in the storage and safe disposal of their wastes. These arise because of limited on site capacity for storage and the paucity of waste processing facilities. Many Russian military nuclear facilities also have had a sequence of problems with their radioactive wastes. Attempts to ameliorate the impacts of discharges to important water sources have had variable success. Some of the procedures used have been technically unsound. The Russian navy has traditionally dealt with virtually all of its radioactive wastes by disposal to sea. Many areas of the Barents, Kola and the Sea of Japan are heavily contaminated. To deal with radioactive wastes 34 large and 257 small disposal sites are available. However, the controls at these sites are often inadequate and illegal dumps of radioactive waste abound. Substantial funding will be required to introduce the necessary technologies to achieve acceptable standards for the storage and disposal of radioactive wastes in Russia. (author)

  11. Radioactive waste engineering and management

    CERN Document Server

    Nakayama, Shinichi

    2015-01-01

    This book describes essential and effective management for reliably ensuring public safety from radioactive wastes in Japan. This is the first book to cover many aspects of wastes from the nuclear fuel cycle to research and medical use, allowing readers to understand the characterization, treatment and final disposal of generated wastes, performance assessment, institutional systems, and social issues such as intergenerational ethics. Exercises at the end of each chapter help to understand radioactive waste management in context.

  12. Nuclear physics with radioactive beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bimbot, R.

    1994-01-01

    Radioactive beams can be produced through two different and complementary ways:i. the production at rest of radioactive nuclei, followed by their acceleration using conventional techniques.This method is the best for producing low energy radioactive beams. ii. the fragmentation of high energy heavy ion beams ( over 30 MeV/u), followed by the selection and purification of a given secondary beam using magnetic spectrometers. This technique leads to high energy radioactive beams. Both methods have now been used in several laboratories in the world. Examples of the corresponding experimental equipment will be presented, and especially Lise 3, Sissi, and the spiral project at GANIL. Radioactive beams have used for several purposes in nuclear physics: i. they constitute the fastest technique ever used for transferring exotic nuclei from the production point to a well shielded place where detectors can be operated for studying their properties in good conditions. At the same time, they can be identified using solid state detectors and the time-of-flight/energy-loss technique. Illustrations of the results obtained in this domain (mass and half-life measurements, recent identification of the isotope sup 1 sup 0 sup 0 Sn) is given. ii. they are used to induce nuclear reactions which may bring new information on nuclear structure. For example, the measurement of total reaction cross-sections for many radioactive projectiles revealed the existence of halo nuclei such as sup 1 sup 1 Li and sup 1 sup 1 Be. Beams of these isotopes have been extensively used to precise their structure.iii. in the domain of nuclear astrophysics, radioactive beams are used to measure, through direct or indirect methods, the cross sections for reactions of crucial interest in nucleosynthesis. Finally, radioactive beams of light positron emitters, such as sup 1 sup 9 Ne have considerable interest for medical purposes and especially in the growing field of heavy-ion radiotherapy. 8 figs., 24 refs

  13. Environmental radioactivity measurement. Ispra 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominici, G.; Risposi, L.

    1992-01-01

    In this report there are briefly described the measurements of environmental radioactivity performed during 1990 by the site survey group of the Radioprotection Division at the Joint Research Centre Ispra Establishment. Data are give on the concentrations of Sr-90, Cs-137, HTO and other radionuclides in precipitation, air, waters, herbage, milk and radioactive effluents. The environmental contamination is mainly a consequence of the nuclear accident of Chernobyl

  14. Radioactivity of the Cooling Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigner, E. P.

    1943-03-01

    The most important source of radioactivity at the exit manifold of the pile will be due to O{sup 19}, formed by neutron absorption of O{sup 18}. A recent measurement of Fermi and Weil permits to estimate that it will be safe to stay about 80 minutes daily close to the exit manifolds without any shield. Estimates are given for the radioactivities from other sources both in the neighborhood and farther away from the pile.

  15. The administration of radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourdillon, P.J.; Godfrey, B.E.; O'Brien, R.

    1983-01-01

    A brief history is given of the evolution of a system to approve the licensing of doctors and dentists to use radioactive medicinal products in man. Currently, the Administration of Radioactive Substances Advisory Committee (ARSAC) is appointed by UK Health Ministers to advise them on the granting, renewal, suspension, revocation and variation of certificates. The type of information requested on the application form for a certificate is outlined. (UK)

  16. Method of removing radioactive contaminations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ota, Katsumasa.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To conduct the decontaminating operation for radioactive contamination by distinctly indicating the contaminated range visually and while judging the residual range of the radioactive contamination visually. Method: Pigments are coated over a range where radioactive contaminations are detected and, after pigmenting the contaminated range, decontaminations are repeated by a wet decontaminating process till the pigments are reduced to a predetermined amount thereby eliminating the radioactive materials. The pigments within the grain size ranging from 1 to 10 μm is adequate, since this is substantially the same as the grain size of the radioactive cruds from nuclear power plant and exhibits the similar physical behaviors. Further, when an organic pigment is used in admixture with water, the pigments are not secured to the coating surface but can removed by waste cloth wiping easily. Thus, the radioactivity can be eliminated to a detectable limit by merely taking notice of the residual amount of the pigments thereby making it possible to improve the working efficiency, decrease the radiation dose and save the inspection frequency. (Kamimura, M.)

  17. The radioactivity of the sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, M.I.; Rose, K.S.B.

    1990-01-01

    The radioactivity in the world's surface sea water averages 13.6 Bq/kg of water. Over 88% of this activity arises from a single natural radionuclide, 40 K, and 7% of the remainder results from nuclear weapon test fallout. Variations in the radioactivity occur due to changes in salinity, weapon test fallout and discharges of artificial radionuclides, and are examined here on the basis of published measurements. The most radioactive sea identified by these measurements is the Dead Sea, which averages 178 Bq/kg due to its high salinity. Other enclosed, highly saline waters can be expected to have similar levels. The radioactivity in open seas varies within a much narrower range, generally within 20% of the world average. The highest averages are found in the Persian Gulf (22 Bq/kg), the Red Sea (15 Bq/kg) and the Eastern Mediterranean (14.6 Bq/kg). The Irish Sea averaged 13.7 Bq/kg in 1987, with the effect of the Sellafield discharges being partly offset by lower than average salinity. Although higher levels occurred in the Irish Sea during the 1970s when the Sellafield discharges were higher, the average level has always been much less than that in the Dead Sea, so that the Irish Sea has never been the most radioactive sea in the world. Exceptionally low levels of radioactivity (4 Bq/kg) occur in the Baltic Sea due to dilution by fresh water. (author)

  18. Storage depot for radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szulinski, M.J.

    1983-01-01

    Vertical drilling of cylindrical holes in the soil, and the lining of such holes, provides storage vaults called caissons. A guarded depot is provided with a plurality of such caissons covered by shielded closures preventing radiation from penetrating through any linear gap to the atmosphere. The heat generated by the radioactive material is dissipated through the vertical liner of the well into the adjacent soil and thus to the ground surface so that most of the heat from the radioactive material is dissipated into the atmosphere in a manner involving no significant amount of biologically harmful radiation. The passive cooling of the radioactive material without reliance upon pumps, personnel, or other factor which might fail, constitutes one of the most advantageous features of this system. Moreover this system is resistant to damage from tornadoes or earthquakes. Hermetically sealed containers of radioactive material may be positioned in the caissons. Loading vehicles can travel throughout the depot to permit great flexibility of loading and unloading radioactive materials. Radioactive material can be shifted to a more closely spaced caisson after ageing sufficiently to generate much less heat. The quantity of material stored in a caisson is restricted by the average capacity for heat dissipation of the soil adjacent such caisson

  19. Radioactivity in the hydrologic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, L.B.

    1969-01-01

    Certain proposed uses of nuclear explosives for peaceful purposes will introduce radioactive debris into the natural hydrologic environment. Consideration must therefore be given in each situation to the extent and significance to man of resulting radioactively contaminated water. For contained underground detonations, space-time - concentration predictions of radioactive materials in ground water are dependent on several factors: radionuclide production and initial distribution, radioactive decay, sorption on geologic materials, and dispersion during hydrologic transport. For uncontained (cratering) detonations, other aspects of the hydrologic cycle, particularly rainfall, and watershed characteristics must be considered. Programs sponsored principally by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission have investigated these factors. Examination of their net effects on radioactivity concentration in water shows that areas if any, underlain by water exceeding permissible concentrations tend first to increase in size, then decrease, and finally disappear. Hydrologic processes at the surface remove or redistribute radioactive debris deposited on a watershed to other locations. Where sufficient information is available, predictions of location and concentration of radionuclides in natural waters can be made. Any potentially hazardous conditions arising from a particular detonation can then be evaluated. (author)

  20. Radioactive gaseous waste processing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuhara, Yuka.

    1991-01-01

    Radioactive gaseous wastes are introduced to a cooling tower and cooled by cooling water discharged from a cooling water discharging nozzle. Cooled radioactive gaseous wastes are cleaned by cleaning water in the cleaning tower and introduced accompanied with water to a condenser. Water in the gases is condensed in a condenser and gathered in a condensated water receiving tank. Water-removed gases are removed with fine particles by way of filters and then released out of the system by using a blower. Further, water used for cleaning the radioactive gaseous wastes in the cleaning tower is gathered to the liquid wastes receiving tank and sent to a radioactive liquid wastes processing device. On the other hand, condensates collected to the condensates receiving tank are returned to a cooling water discharging nozzle by a pump and re-utilized as cooling water. This can reduce the amount of radioactive liquid wastes, to reduce the processing amount of the radioactive liquid waste processing devices. (I.N.)

  1. Radioactive rare gas recoverying device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasai, Shigeo

    1989-01-01

    The apparatus of the present invention comprises a vessel for containing coolants, an introduction valve and an introduction pipe for introducing radioactive rare gases and an adsorption floor disposed in the coolants. A josephson device is disposed being immersed in the coolants between a radiation detector for detecting the radioactive level adsorbed to the adsorption floor and a driving section for driving the introduction valve by the signal from the detector. With this constitution, radioactive rare gases introduced into the coolants and then cooled and liquefied are recovered by the adsorption floor. As the adsorption proceeds and when the radioactivity level exceeds a maximum level in the effective shielding range of the recovery apparatus, the signal current from the radiation detector also exceeds a predetermined level. If radioactivity exceeds the maximum level, the electrical resistance of the josephson device is increased infinitely by the josephson effect to close the introduction valve. Accordingly, the radioactivity is not absorbed beyond the effective shielding range. (I.S.)

  2. Categorizing operational radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-04-01

    The primary objective of this publication is to improve communications among waste management professionals and Member States relative to the properties and status of radioactive waste. This is accomplished by providing a standardized approach to operational waste categorization using accepted industry practices and experience. It is a secondary objective to draw a distinction between operational waste categorization and waste disposal classification. The approach set forth herein is applicable to waste generation by mature (major, advanced) nuclear programmes, small-to-medium sized nuclear programmes, and programmes with waste from other nuclear applications. It can be used for planning, developing or revising categorization methodologies. For existing categorization programmes, the approach set forth in this publication may be used as a validation and evaluation tool for assessing communication effectiveness among affected organizations or nations. This publication is intended for use by waste management professionals responsible for creating, implementing or communicating effective categorization, processing and disposal strategies. For the users of this publication, it is important to remember that waste categorization is a communication tool. As such, the operational waste categories are not suitable for regulatory purposes nor for use in health and safety evaluations. Following Section 1 (Introduction) Section 2 of this publication defines categorization and its relationship to existing waste classification and management standards, regulations and practices. It also describes the benefits of a comprehensive categorization programme and fundamental record considerations. Section 3 provides an overview of the categorization process, including primary categories and sub-categories. Sections 4 and 5 outline the specific methodology for categorizing unconditioned and conditioned wastes. Finally, Section 6 provides a brief summary of critical considerations that

  3. Radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, J.C.

    1998-04-01

    A deep gap, reflecting a persisting fear, separates the viewpoints of the experts and that of the public on the issue of the disposal of nuclear WASTES. The history of this field is that of the proliferation with time of spokesmen who pretend to speak in the name of the both humans and non humans involved. Three periods can be distinguished: 1940-1970, an era of contestation and confusion when the experts alone represents the interest of all; 1970-1990, an era of contestation and confusion when spokespersons multiply themselves, generating the controversy and the slowing down of most technological projects; 1990-, an era of negotiation, when viewpoints, both technical and non technical, tend to get closer and, let us be optimistic, leading to the overcome of the crisis. We show that, despite major differences, the options and concepts developed by the different actors are base on two categories of resources, namely Nature and Society, and that the consensus is built up through their 'hydridation'. we show in this part that the perception of nuclear power and, in particular of the underground disposal of nuclear wastes, involves a very deep psychological substrate. Trying to change mentalities in the domain by purely scientific and technical arguments is thus in vain. The practically instinctive fear of radioactivity, far from being due only to lack of information (and education), as often postulated by scientists and engineers, is rooted in archetypical structures. These were, without doubt, reactivated in the 40 s by the traumatizing experience of the atomic bomb. In addition, anthropological-linked considerations allow us to conclude that he underground disposal of wastes is seen as a 'rape' and soiling of Mother Earth. This contributes to explaining, beyond any rationality, the refusal of this technical option by some persons. However, it would naturally be simplistic and counter-productive to limit all controversy in this domain to these psychological aspects

  4. Mosses in Radioactive Monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marovic, G.; Franic, Z.; Sencar, J.

    2008-01-01

    Mosses, lichens and perennial plants, all characterized by slow growth, are able to efficiently accumulate different radionuclides from their environment to a much higher degree than other vegetation. Consequently, they are sensitive bio indicators of radioactive contamination for various ecosystems. Results of systematic, long-term measurements of 137Cs activities in mosses for the period 1986-2007 are summarized. The study was conducted in the Radiation Protection Unit of the Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health in Zagreb, as a part of an extensive monitoring program of the Croatian environment. In the overall observed period the highest activity concentration of 137Cs deposited by fallout has been recorded in 1986, which is the year of Chernobyl accident, causing peak 137Cs activity concentration in moss of 8800 Bqkg -1 in May 1986. Mean value for period 1986 - 1990 was 3423 Bqkg -1 . For comparison, in the same period mean 137Cs activity concentration in grass was 390 Bqkg -1 . In 1990s, ten year after Chernobyl accident, mean 137Cs activity concentration in moss was 1345 Bqkg -1 , with maximum value of 3940 Bqkg -1 (December 1994). In 2000s, mean 137Cs activity concentration in mosses was 172 Bqkg -1 with maximum value of 955 Bqkg -1 (July 2002). Fitting the measured 137Cs activity concentrations to the theoretical curve (1) the ecological half-life of 137Cs in moss was found to be about 978 days, while in grass was found to be about 126 days in the period 1986 - 1990. The ecological half-life of 137Cs in grass after 1991 was found to be about 2503 days. The ecological half-life of 137Cs in moss is about eight times higher than 137Cs ecological half-life observed in grass in the first period after the Chernobyl accident.(author)

  5. A novel boron-rich quaternary scandium borocarbosilicide Sc3.67-xB41.4-y-zC0.67+zSi0.33-w

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Takaho; Yamamoto, Akiji; Sato, Akira

    2004-01-01

    A novel quaternary scandium borocarbosilicide Sc 3.67-x B 41.4-y-z C 0.67+z Si 0.33-w was found. Single crystallites were obtained as an intergrowth phase in the float-zoned single crystal of Sc 0.83-x B 10.0-y C 0.17+y Si 0.083-z that has a face-centered cubic crystal structure. Single crystal structure analysis revealed that the compound has a hexagonal structure with lattice constants a = b = 1.43055(8) nm and c = 2.37477(13) nm and space group P6-barm2 (No. 187). The crystal composition calculated from the structure analysis for the crystal with x = 0.52, y = 1.42, z = 1.17, and w = 0.02 was ScB 12.3 C 0.58 Si 0.10 and that agreed rather well with the composition of ScB 11.5 C 0.61 Si 0.04 measured by EPMA. In the crystal structure that is a new structure type of boron-rich borides, there are 79 structurally independent atomic sites, 69 boron and/or carbon sites, two silicon sites and eight scandium sites. Boron and carbon form seven structurally independent B 12 icosahedra, one B 9 polyhedron, one B 10 polyhedron, one irregularly shaped B 16 polyhedron in which only 10.7 boron atoms are available because of partial occupancies and 10 bridging sites. All polyhedron units and bridging site atoms interconnect each other forming a three-dimensional boron framework structure. Sc atoms reside in the open spaces in the boron framework structure

  6. Radioactivity handbook. Volume 2: radioactive disintegrations, radiations-matter interactions, applications of radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foos, J.; Bonfand, E.; Rimbert, J.N.

    1994-01-01

    This volume is the second one of a group of three. The first one exposed nuclides, with neutrons and protons in a stable building: atomic nucleus. Here is the second one with unstable, radioactive nucleus. After the description of different kinds of disintegrations, it is justified to follow radiations in matter and modifications attached to them; different uses of radioactivity are developed in medicine, age determination, industrial utilization and biology

  7. Surveillance of the environmental radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Th.; Gitzinger, C.; Jaunet, P.; Eberbach, F.; Clavel, B.; Hemidy, P.Y.; Perrier, G.; Kiper, Ch.; Peres, J.M.; Josset, M.; Calvez, M.; Leclerc, M.; Leclerc, E.; Aubert, C.; Levelut, M.N.; Debayle, Ch.; Mayer, St.; Renaud, Ph.; Leprieur, F.; Petitfrere, M.; Catelinois, O.; Monfort, M.; Baron, Y.; Target, A.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of these days was to present the organisation of the surveillance of the environmental radioactivity and to allow an experience sharing and a dialog on this subject between the different actors of the radiation protection in france. The different presentations were as follow: evolution and stakes of the surveillance of radioactivity in environment; the part of the European commission, regulatory aspects; the implementation of the surveillance: the case of Germany; Strategy and logic of environmental surveillance around the EDF national centers of energy production; environmental surveillance: F.B.F.C. site of Romans on Isere; steps of the implementation 'analysis for release decree at the F.B.F.C./C.E.R.C.A. laboratory of Romans; I.R.S.N. and the environmental surveillance: situation and perspectives; the part of a non institutional actor, the citizenship surveillance done by A.C.R.O.; harmonization of sampling methods: the results of inter operators G.T. sampling; sustainable observatory of environment: data traceability and samples conservation; inter laboratories tests of radioactivity measurements; national network of environmental radioactivity measurement: laboratories agreements; the networks of environmental radioactivity telemetry: modernization positioning; programme of observation and surveillance of surface environment and installations of the H.A.-M.A.V.L. project (high activity and long life medium activity); Evolution of radionuclides concentration in environment and adaptation of measurements techniques to the surveillance needs; the national network of radioactivity measurement in environment; modes of data restoration of surveillance: the results of the Loire environment pilot action; method of sanitary impacts estimation in the area of ionizing radiations; the radiological impact of atmospheric nuclear tests in French Polynesia; validation of models by the measure; network of measurement and alert management of the atmospheric

  8. Management of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mawson, C.A.

    1967-01-01

    When I first became concerned with radioactive waste management, in the early 1950's, very little was really known about the subject. There was a general feeling that it was a serious 'problem'. Articles were appearing in the press and talks were being given on the radio suggesting that the wastes generated by the proposed nuclear power reactors might be a serious menace to humanity. The prophets pointed with alarm to the enormous quantities of fission products that would accumulate steadily over the years in tank farms associated with reactor fuel reprocessing plants, and calculations were made of the possible results from rupture of the tanks due to corrosion, earthquakes or enemy attack. Responsible people suggested seriously that the waste disposal problem might be fatal to the development of a nuclear power industry, and this attitude was reinforced by the popular outcry that arose from experience with fallout from nuclear weapons testing. The Canadian nuclear power industry was not critically involved in this controversy because our heavy-water reactors are fuelled with natural uranium, and reprocessing of the fuel is not necessary. The spent fuel contains plutonium, a potential fuel, but the cost of recovering it was such that it was not competitive with natural uranium, which is not in short supply in Canada. Our spent fuel is not dissolved in acid - it is stored. still in its zirconium cladding, under water at the reactor site, or placed in sealed concrete-and-steel pipes below ground. If the price of uranium rises sufficiently it will become profitable to recover the plutonium, and only then shall we have an appreciable amount of waste from this source. However. during the first five or six years of research and development at Chalk River we did investigate fuel processing methods, and like everybody else we grad stainless steel tanks containing high and medium level wastes. These were located quite close to the Ottawa River, and we worried about what

  9. Radioactive liquid waste processing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, Tetsuya; Kuramitsu, Kiminori; Ishii, Tomoharu.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a system for processing radioactive liquid wastes containing laundry liquid wastes, shower drains or radioactive liquid wastes containing chemical oxygen demand (COD) ingredients and oil content generated from a nuclear power plant. Namely, a collecting tank collects radioactive liquid wastes. A filtering device is connected to the exit of the collective tank. A sump tank is connected to the exit of the filtering device. A powdery active carbon supplying device is connected to the collecting tank. A chemical fluid tank is connected to the collecting tank and the filtering device by way of chemical fluid injection lines. Backwarding pipelines connect a filtered water flowing exit of the filtering device and the collecting tank. The chemical solution is stored in the chemical solution tank. Then, radioactive materials in radioactive liquid wastes generated from a nuclear power plant are removed by the filtering device. The water quality standard specified in environmental influence reports can be satisfied. In the filtering device, when the filtering flow rate is reduced, the chemical fluid is supplied from the chemical fluid tank to the filtering device to recover the filtering flow rate. (I.S.)

  10. Radioactive waste below regulatory concern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuder, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published two notices in the Federal Register concerning radioactive waste below regulatory concern. The first, a Commission Policy Statement and Implementation Plan published August 29, 1986, concerns petition to exempt specific radioactive waste streams from the regulations. The second, an Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking published Decemger 2, 1986, addresses the concept of generic rulemaking by the NRC on radioactive wastes that are below regulatory concern. Radioactive waste determined to be below regulatory concern would not be subject to regulatory control and would not need to go to a licensed low-level radioactive waste disposal site. The Policy Statement and Implementation Plan describe (1) the information a petitioner should file in support of a petition to exempt a specific waste stream, (2) the decision criteria the Commission intends to use for judging the petition, and (3) the internal administrative procedures to use be followed in order to permit the Commission to act upon the petition in an expedited manner

  11. The hell of a radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, G.

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear accident, contaminations, pollutions and never-ending hazards: nuclear energy and especially radioactivity frightens the collective unconscious in an unreasoned way. The object of this book is to explain in a simple manner the bases and real values of natural radioactivity, nuclear energy and even of nuclear bombs. Without any will of proselytism, but with all the necessary scientific exactness, the author uses a novel style and the fancied story of a young couple for the exploration of the industrial and natural environment of radioactivity. From field measurements to laboratory visits, the reader, whatever his scientific culture, will be able to make his own opinion about this important question of science and society. (J.S.)

  12. Radioactive wastes and their disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumann, L.

    1984-01-01

    The classification of radioactive wastes is given and the achievements evaluated in the disposal of radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants. An experimental pilot unit was installed at the Jaslovske Bohunice nuclear power plant for the bituminization of liquid radioactive wastes. UJV has developed a mobile automated high-output unit for cementation. In 1985 the unit will be tested at the Jaslovske Bohunice and the Dukovany nuclear power plants. A prototype press for processing solid wastes was manufactured which is in operation at the Jaslovske Bohunice plant. A solidification process for atypical wastes from long-term storage of spent fuel elements has been developed to be used for the period of nuclear power plant decommissioning. (E.S.)

  13. Final disposal of radioactive waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freiesleben H.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the origin and properties of radioactive waste as well as its classification scheme (low-level waste – LLW, intermediate-level waste – ILW, high-level waste – HLW are presented. The various options for conditioning of waste of different levels of radioactivity are reviewed. The composition, radiotoxicity and reprocessing of spent fuel and their effect on storage and options for final disposal are discussed. The current situation of final waste disposal in a selected number of countries is mentioned. Also, the role of the International Atomic Energy Agency with regard to the development and monitoring of international safety standards for both spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste management is described.

  14. Standardization of radioactive waste categories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    A large amount of information about most aspects of radioactive waste management has been accumulated and made available to interested nations in recent years. The efficiency of this service has been somewhat hampered because the terminology used to describe the different types of radioactive waste has varied from country to country and indeed from installation to installation within a given country. This publication is the outcome of a panel meeting on Standardization of Radioactive Waste Categories. It presents a simple standard to be used as a common language between people working in the field of waste management at nuclear installations. The purpose of the standard is only to act as a practical tool for increasing efficiency in communicating, collecting and assessing technical and economical information in the common interest of all nations and the developing countries in particular. 20 refs, 1 fig., 3 tabs

  15. Environmental radioactivity in Canada 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The radiological surveillance program of the Department of National Health and Welfare is conducted for the purpose of determining levels of environmental radioactivity in Canada and assessing the resulting population exposures. During 1986 the program was strongly influenced by radioactive fallout on Canada resulting from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident on April 26, 1986 in the Soviet Ukraine. The Environmental Radiation Hazards Division (ERHD) increased its frequency of analyses of environmental samples immediately following the accident. Interim screening limits for foodstuffs were developed. A measurement program for radioactivity in domestic and imported foods was implemented. The ERHD measurement program was supplemented by additional measurements conducted by many other private and government laboratories. Radiation doses to Canadian from Chernobyl fallout were extremely low with no group in the population receiving more than 10 microsieverts

  16. Underground radioactive waste disposal concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frgic, L.; Tor, K.; Hudec, M.

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents some solutions for radioactive waste disposal. An underground disposal of radioactive waste is proposed in deep boreholes of greater diameter, fitted with containers. In northern part of Croatia, the geological data are available on numerous boreholes. The boreholes were drilled during investigations and prospecting of petroleum and gas fields. The available data may prove useful in defining safe deep layers suitable for waste repositories. The paper describes a Russian disposal design, execution and verification procedure. The aim of the paper is to discuss some earlier proposed solutions, and present a solution that has not yet been considered - lowering of containers with high level radioactive waste (HLW) to at least 500 m under the ground surface.(author)

  17. Plastic solidification of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriyama, Noboru

    1981-01-01

    Over 20 years have elapsed after the start of nuclear power development, and the nuclear power generation in Japan now exceeds the level of 10,000 MW. In order to meet the energy demands, the problem of the treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes produced in nuclear power stations must be solved. The purpose of the plastic solidification of such wastes is to immobilize the contained radionuclides, same as other solidification methods, to provide the first barrier against their move into the environment. The following matters are described: the nuclear power generation in Japan, the radioactive wastes from LWR plants, the position of plastic solidification, the status of plastic solidification in overseas countries and in Japan, the solidification process for radioactive wastes with polyethylene, and the properties of solidified products, and the leachability of radionuclides in asphalt solids. (J.P.N.)

  18. Radioactive liquid waste processing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, Osamu; Kitamura, Masahiro.

    1992-01-01

    In a radioactive liquid waste processing device comprising a freeze-drying vessel for freezing and then vacuum drying acidic liquid wastes containing radioactive materials and a cold trap condensing steams evaporated in the freeze-drying vessel, a dust collecting electrode of an electric dust collector is disposed in the freeze-drying vessel for capturing fine solid particles and inorganic salts in steams. With such a constitution, upon sublimation of the water content contained in a freezing product of an acidic solution, since fine solid particles and inorganic salts entrained by steams are collected by the dust collecting electrode, radioactive materials entrained by recovered steams are almost eliminated, decontamination efficiency of the liquid waste processing device can be increased. Further, heat for the sublimation can be supplied to the solution-freezing product by a radiation heat caused by electric discharge of the dust collecting electrode, thereby enabling to eliminate the heater which was unnecessary so far. (T.M.)

  19. Low-level Radioactivity Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurtgen, C.

    2001-01-01

    The objectives of the research performed in the area of low-level radioactivity measurements are (1) to maintain and develop techniques for the measurement of low-level environmental and biological samples, (2) to measure these samples by means of low-background counters (liquid scintillators, proportional counters, ZnS counters, alpha spectrometry), (3) to support and advice the nuclear and non-nuclear industry in matters concerning radioactive contamination and/or low-level radioactivity measurements; (4) to maintain the quality assurance system according to the EN45001/ISO17025 standard; and (5) to assess the internal dose from occupational intakes of radionuclides of workers of the nuclear industry. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2000 are reported

  20. Environmental radioactivity survey in Andong

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Zi Hong; Jo, Kum Ju [Andong Regional Radioactivity Monitoring Station, Andong National Univ., Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-15

    The objectives of the project are to monitor an abnormal level in Andong area and to provide a base-line data on environmental radiation/radioactivity levels in case of any radiological emergency situation. The project is important in view of protecting the public health from the potential hazards of radiation and keeping up the clean environment. This report summarizes and interprets environmental radiation/radioactivity monitoring samples Gamma exposure rates, airborne dust, precipitation, fall-out and drinking-water. Environmental samples 2 kinds of indicator plant, 4 kinds of mushroom, 7 kinds of nut and seeds, and drinking waters. Among the all 2002 radiological monitoring and environmental data in Andong area were not found the extraordinary data. And a nation-wide environmental radiation/radioactivity level survey results were all background levels attributed to terrestrial and cosmic radiation.

  1. High Level Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The proceedings of the second annual international conference on High Level Radioactive Waste Management, held on April 28--May 3, 1991, Las Vegas, Nevada, provides information on the current technical issue related to international high level radioactive waste management activities and how they relate to society as a whole. Besides discussing such technical topics as the best form of the waste, the integrity of storage containers, design and construction of a repository, the broader social aspects of these issues are explored in papers on such subjects as conformance to regulations, transportation safety, and public education. By providing this wider perspective of high level radioactive waste management, it becomes apparent that the various disciplines involved in this field are interrelated and that they should work to integrate their waste management activities. Individual records are processed separately for the data bases

  2. Radioactive waste management in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, K.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of radioactive waste management is both scientifically and technically complex and also deeply emotional issue. In the last twenty years the first two aspects have been mostly resolved up to the point of safe implementation. In the Republic of Slovenia, certain fundamentalist approaches in politics and the use of radioactive waste problem as political marketing tool, make things even more complex. Public involvement in planning and development of radioactive waste management program must be perceived as essential for the success of the program. Education is a precursor to public comprehension and confidence which lead to adequate waste management decisions that will protect the public health, safety and environment without jeopardizing further progress and development. (author) [sl

  3. Electronic sorting of radioactive ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandier, J.

    1958-01-01

    Electronic sorting of radioactive ores consists in passing the rock lumps, after sieving, one by one in front of radioactivity detectors; these detectors command electromechanical systems which class the ores according to their radioactivity level. This note sets on the state of progress of the work going on at the D.R.E.M.: use of scintillometers for γ-ray detection, with circuits carrying magnetic memories to improve their operation; results of laboratory and semi-industrial tests on several deposits; description of the material, data on the first factory project; notes on the financial returns of the process. A description is also given of the electronic sorting material used skip by skip for a first rough classification of the ores according to their content, as they leave the shaft. (author) [fr

  4. Radioactivity. Death prinicple in nature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, W.; Russell, L.

    2006-01-01

    Walter Russell's knowledge of the two basic Principles of the material universe, concentration and radiation, strongly suggests that the radioactivity is the ''death principle'' of creation. In its natural environment, radioactive radiation is vital for the overall balance, however, when spread out across the entire world, it causes massive global warming and turns planet earth into a hot desert. Part I: What is Atomic Energy?; How Radioactivity Kills; The World Voice. Part II: The True Nature of This Mind and Motion Universe; Prelude - The Transformation of Man; We Define God; The True Nature of Electricity and Gravitation; Our Eternal Universe; The Oneness of Gravity and Magnetism; The Mind Nucleus of the Atom; The Material Nucleus of the Atom. Part III: The Bridge Between Man and God. (orig./GL)

  5. Public debate on radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The definition and implementation of safe and perennial solutions for the management of radioactive wastes is a necessity from the point of view of both the nuclear industrialists and the public authorities, but also of the overall French citizens. For the low- or medium-level or short living radioactive wastes, some solutions have been defined are are already implemented. On the other hand, no decision has been taken so far for the long living medium to high-level radioactive wastes. Researches are in progress in this domain according to 3 ways of research defined by the law from December 30, 1991: separation-transmutation, disposal in deep underground, and long duration surface or sub-surface storage. This paper presents in a digest way, the principle, the results obtained so far, and the perspectives of each of the three solutions under study. (J.S.)

  6. Method of solidifying radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Masahiko; Kira, Satoshi; Watanabe, Naotoshi; Nagaoka, Takeshi; Akane, Junta.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain solidification products of radioactive wastes having sufficient monoaxial compression strength and excellent in water durability upon ocean disposal of the wastes. Method: Solidification products having sufficient strength and filled with a great amount of radioactive wastes are obtained by filling and solidifying 100 parts by weight of chlorinated polyethylene resin and 100 - 500 parts by weight of particular or powderous spent ion exchange resin as radioactive wastes. The chlorinated polyethylene resin preferably used herein is prepared by chlorinating powderous or particulate polyethylene resin in an aqueous suspending medium or by chlorinating polyethylene resin dissolved in an organic solvent capable of dissolving the polyethylene resin, and it is crystalline or non-crystalline chlorinated polyethylene resin comprising 20 - 50% by weight of chlorine, non-crystalline resin with 25 - 40% by weight of chlorine being particularly preferred. (Horiuchi, T.)

  7. Overview of radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, G.L.

    1980-01-01

    The question of what to do with radioactive wastes is discussed. The need to resolve this issue promptly is pointed out. Two significant events which have occurred during the Carter administration are discussed. An Interagency Review Group (IRG) on waste management was formed to formulate recommendations leading to the establishment of a National policy for managing radioactive wastes. The technical findings in the IRG report are listed. The author points out some issues not addressed by the report. President Carter issued a national policy statement on Radioactive Waste Management in February 1980. The most significant elements of this statement are summarized. The cancellation of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is currently meeting opposition in Congress. This and other items in the National Policy Statement are discussed

  8. Radioactive liquid waste processing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Makoto; Tamada, Shin; Oura, Masato; Sawa, Toshio.

    1991-01-01

    This invention is intended for preventing degradation of an evaporation permeable membrane in a facility for processing radioactive liquid wastes generated in a nuclear power plant, while taking advantages of a film evaporation and concentration system. That is, surface active agents, oils and solids are removed by a pre-filter before sending the radioactive liquid wastes to a liquid wastes processing device (membrane evaporation concentration device) comprising an evaporation permeable membrane. Active carbon or active silica is preferably used for the pre-filter. This can prevent the reduction of surface tension of the radioactive liquid wastes caused by the surface active agents and the destruction of the hydrophobic property of the membrane due to the deposition of the surface active agents to the evaporation permeable membrane in the membrane evaporation and concentration device, that is a back-filter. (T.M.)

  9. Radioactive Waste Management Program Activities in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matanic, R.

    2000-01-01

    The concept of radioactive waste management in Croatia comprises three major areas: management of low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILRW), spent fuel management and decommissioning. All the work regarding radioactive waste management program is coordinated by Hazardous Waste Management Agency (APO) and Croatian Power Utility (HEP) in cooperation with other relevant institutions. Since the majority of work has been done in developing low and intermediate level radioactive waste management program, the paper will focus on this part of radioactive waste management, mainly on issues of site selection and characterization, repository design, safety assessment and public acceptance. A short description of national radioactive waste management infrastructure will also be presented. (author)

  10. Measurement of radioactivity in steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachtendonk, H.-J. von; Luengen, S.; Wilke, N.

    1999-01-01

    Even after the control of scrap deliveries, there remains a small risk that the radioactive contaminated scrap passes the detecting devices. Therefore, the chemical laboratory takes a role to measure each heat for the absence of artificial radioactive nuclides with a gamma spectrometer equipped with NaI-detector. As the measurement must be performed in sequence with the steel production process, the allowable time for the measurement is quite limited. On the other hand, there could be still some possibility that background radiation might be present as the samples may contain some natural radioactivity. The task is how to differentiate the nature of radioactivity between naturally remaining radioactivity within safe limit and artificial nuclides present in the sample at a low level even though a very small amount of radioactivity could be detected in short time in both cases. We have set the alarm limit to 0.1 Bq/g for Co-60 as indicating nuclide. This limit is set more than 4 s (s = standard deviation) from the average background radiation. Therefore, false alarms are quite improbable. Strategy: The NaI gamma spectrometer performs a gross gamma measurement but it can not differentiate the nature of the nuclides present. If the alarm limit is hurt, the sample is measured on a high resolution gamma spectrometer with Ge-detector for identification of the gamma emitting nuclides. Calibration: Even though no appropriate international standards are adapted and no commercial measuring equipment is commercially available, the desired standard should contain Co-60 in the order of 1 to 100 Bq/g. The presence of other gamma emitting nuclides is desirable. In the Workshop we will present how to surmount this difficulty. (author)

  11. Environmental radioactivity in Canada - 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tracey, B.L.

    1984-01-01

    The radiological surveillance program of the Department of National Health and Welfare is conducted for the purpose of determining levels of environmental radioactivity in Canada and assessing the resulting population exposures. Special investigations were carried out during 1982 on metabolism of natural radionuclides and on the accumulation of radon in energy-efficient homes. The pre-operational phase of the monitoring program at the Point Lepreau Nuclear Generating Station was completed. Dose commitments have been estimated for the ongoing natural radioactivity, fallout and reactor studies. All measurements made during the year are below the limits recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection

  12. Environmental radioactivity in Canada, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGregor, R.G.; Quinn, J.M.; Tracy, B.L.

    1983-01-01

    The radiological surveillance program of the Department of National Health and Welfare is conducted for the purpose of determining levels of environmental radioactivity in Canada and assessing the resulting population exposures. Special investigations were carried out during 1981 on bottled mineral waters and in conjunction with unusual occurences at nuclear reactor sites and a uranium refinery. Dose commitments have been estimated for the ongoing natural radioactivity, fallout and reactor studies. All measurements made during the year are below the limits recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection

  13. Radioactive dating of the elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, John J.; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl; Truran, James W.

    1991-01-01

    The extent to which an accurate determination of the age of the Galaxy, and thus a lower bound on the age of the universe, can be obtained from radioactive dating is discussed. Emphasis is given to the use of the long-lived radioactive nuclei Re-187, Th-232, U-238, and U-235. The nature of the production sites of these and other potential Galactic chronometers is examined along with their production ratios. Age determinations from models of nucleocosmochronology are reviewed and compared with age determination from stellar sources and age constraints form cosmological considerations.

  14. Artificial radioactivity in Lough Foyle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, J.D.; Ryan, T.P.; Lyons, S.; Smith, V.; McGarry, A.; Mitchell, P.I.; Leon Vintro, L.; Larmour, R.A.; Ledgerwood, F.K.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the extent to which the marine environment of Lough Foyle, situated on the north coast of Ireland, has been affected by artificial radioactivity released from Sellafield. Although traces of plutonium, americium and radiocaesium from Sellafield are detectable in Lough Foyle, the concentrations in various marine media are significantly lower than those found along the NE coast of Ireland and in the western Irish Sea. The minute quantities of artificial radioactivity found in Lough Foyle are of negligible radiological significance

  15. Radioactive waste integrated management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, D. Y.; Choi, S. S.; Han, B. S.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we present an integrated management system for radioactive waste, which can keep watch on the whole transporting process of each drum from nuclear power plant temporary storage house to radioactive waste storage house remotely. Our approach use RFID(Radio Frequency Identification) system, which can recognize the data information without touch, GSP system, which can calculate the current position precisely using the accurate time and distance measured from satellites, and the spread spectrum technology CDMA, which is widely used in the area of mobile communication

  16. Innocuous management of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, C.

    1997-01-01

    The relations between peaceful uses and bellicose uses of the nuclear energy are complexes in relation to international establishment of norms to control the destiny of the radioactive materials, above all in the context of the existing international legislation of respect to the autonomy of the countries, and in the determination of the institution or institutions upon the ones that would fall on. The nuclear safeguards of materials and the possibilities of performing their function. Important efforts have been done to unify, to help and to impose international measures on the behalf of an environmentally harmless processing of the radioactive wastes [es

  17. Dose dispenser for radioactive gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwitz, N.H.; Gutkowski, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    An activity metering apparatus for metering predetermined activities of radioactive gas from a supply ampul to dose vials is described. The apparatus includes a shielded ampul housing, a fine metering valve communicating with the ampul housing chamber, a shielded vial housing and a hypodermic needle communicating with the metering valve and received through an opening in the vial housing. A Geiger-Muller tube is adjustably supported opposite an opening in the vial housing, whereby the activity of the radioactive gas dispensed to a partially evacuated vial within the vial chamber may be read directly by a standard laboratory rate meter

  18. Geologic disposal of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tassoni, E.; Giulianelli, G.; Testa, L.; Bocola, W.; Girolimetti, G.; Giacani, G.

    1983-01-01

    The heat dissipation arising from the radioactive decay constitutes an important problem of the geological disposal of high level radioactive waste. A heating experiment was carried out in a clay quarry near Monterotondo (Rome), at 6.4 M in depth by means of a heater whose thermal power ranged from 250 to 500 watt. The experimental results fit well the theoretical values and show that the clay is a homogeneous and isotropic medium. The clay thermal conductivity, which was deducted by means of the ''curve fitting'' method, ranges from 0.015 to 0.017 watt/C

  19. Radioactive sources in chemical laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janzekovic, H.; Krizman, M.

    2007-01-01

    Radioactive sources including all radioactive materials exceeding exemption levels have to be registered in national databases according to international standards based on the recommendations ICRP 60 and a proper licensing should take place as described for example in the 96/29/EURATOM. In spite of that, unregistered sources could be found, usually due to the fact that the owner is not aware of radiation characteristics of sources. The material inventories of chemical laboratories are typical and most frequent example where radioactive sources could be found. Five different types of sources could be identified. The most frequent type are chemicals, namely thorium and uranium compounds. They are used not due to their radioactivity but due to their chemical properties. As for all other sources a stringent control is necessary in order to assure their safe use. Around hundred of stored radioactive chemical items were found during inspections of such laboratories performed by the Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration or qualified experts in a period December 2006 - July 2007. Users of such chemicals are usually not aware that thorium and uranium chemicals are radioactive and, as unsealed sources, they could be easily spilled out and produce contamination of persons, surfaces, equipment etc. The external exposure as well as the internal exposure including exposure due to inhalation could be present. No knowledge about special precautions is usually present in laboratories and leads to underestimating of a potential risk and unintentional exposure of the laboratory personnel, students etc. Due to the long decay times in decay series of Th -232, U-238 and U- 235 the materials are also radioactive today. Even more, in case of thorium chemicals the radioactivity increased substantially from the time of their production. The implementation of safety measures has been under way and includes a survey of the qualified experts, establishment of organizational structure in a

  20. Induced radioactivity in LDEF components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, B. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Parnell, T. A.; Laird, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    A systematic study of the induced radioactivity of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) is being carried out in order to gather information about the low earth orbit radiation environment and its effects on materials. The large mass of the LDEF spacecraft, its stabilized configuration, and long mission duration have presented an opportunity to determine space radiation-induced radioactivities with a precision not possible before. Data presented include preliminary activities for steel and aluminum structural samples, and activation subexperiment foils. Effects seen in the data show a clear indication of the trapped proton anisotropy in the South Atlantic Anomaly and suggest contributions from different sources of external radiation fluxes.

  1. Solidification of radioactive liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Tadamasa; Sano, Katsunori.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the amount of surface active agents required for solidifying sodium sulfate-containing concentrated radioactive liquid wastes with asphalts. Method: Water soluble calcium compounds (calcium nitrate, etc.) are added to alkaline radioactive concentrated liquid wastes essentially consisting of sodium sulfate to adjust the pH value of the liquid wastes to 4.5 - 8.5. The addition amount of the water soluble calcium compounds (based on the weight of the calcium ions) is set to about 2 - 5% of the sulfate ions in the liquid wastes. Then, surface active agents are added by 3 - 10 weight % to the solid contents in the liquid wastes. (Ikeda, J.)

  2. Radioactive Ion Beams and Radiopharmaceuticals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laxdal, R. E.; Morton, A. C.; Schaffer, P.

    2014-02-01

    Experiments performed at radioactive ion beam facilities shed new light on nuclear physics and nuclear structure, as well as nuclear astrophysics, materials science and medical science. The many existing facilities, as well as the new generation of facilities being built and those proposed for the future, are a testament to the high interest in this rapidly expanding field. The opportunities inherent in radioactive beam facilities have enabled the search for radioisotopes suitable for medical diagnosis or therapy. In this article, an overview of the production techniques and the current status of RIB facilities and proposals will be presented. In addition, accelerator-generated radiopharmaceuticals will be reviewed.

  3. Two scandium-biuret complexes: [Sc(C2H5N3O2)(H2O)5]Cl3 x H2O and [Sc(C2H5N3O2)4](NO3)3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, William T A

    2008-05-01

    The scandium(III) cations in the structures of pentaaqua(biuret-kappa(2)O,O')scandium(III) trichloride monohydrate, [Sc(C(2)H(5)N(3)O(2))(H(2)O)(5)]Cl(3) x H(2)O, (I), and tetrakis(biuret-kappa(2)O,O')scandium(III) trinitrate, [Sc(C(2)H(5)N(3)O(2))(4)](NO(3))(3), (II), are found to adopt very different coordinations with the same biuret ligand. The roles of hydrogen bonding and the counter-ion in the establishment of the structures are described. In (I), the Sc(3+) cation adopts a fairly regular pentagonal bipyramidal coordination geometry arising from one O,O'-bidentate biuret molecule and five water molecules. A dense network of N-H...Cl, O-H...O and O-H...Cl hydrogen bonds help to establish the packing, resulting in dimeric associations of two cations and two water molecules. In (II), the Sc(3+) cation (site symmetry 2) adopts a slightly squashed square-antiprismatic geometry arising from four O,O'-bidentate biuret molecules. A network of N-H...O hydrogen bonds help to establish the packing, which features [010] chains of cations. One of the nitrate ions is disordered about an inversion centre. Both structures form three-dimensional hydrogen-bond networks.

  4. The limitation of radioactive wastes from hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuurman, B.; IJtsma, D.; Zwigt, A.

    1987-01-01

    Interviews were made with radiation experts working at hospitals about the treatment and limiting of radioactive wastes. The authors conclude that with the aid of hospital personnel a decrease of the volume of radioactive waste is possible. 25 refs

  5. TENORM (Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the beginning of time, naturally occurring. radionuclides or radioactive elements as they occur in nature, such as radium , uranium , thorium , potassium, and their radioactive decay products decay products The atoms formed and ...

  6. The radioactivity of house-building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sos, K.

    2007-01-01

    The paper compares the natural radioactivity and radon emission properties of different building materials like bricks, concretes, cements, sands, limes, marmors of different origin. A description of the radioactive model of apartments is also given. (TRA)

  7. In vivo biodistribution of no-carrier-added 6-18F-fluoro-3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (18F-DOPA), produced by a new nucleophilic substitution approach, compared with carrier-added 18F-DOPA, prepared by conventional electrophilic substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuik, Willem-Jan; Kema, Ido P; Brouwers, Adrienne H; Zijlma, Rolf; Neumann, Kiel D; Dierckx, Rudi A J O; DiMagno, Stephen G; Elsinga, Philip H

    2015-01-01

    A novel synthetic approach to 6-(18)F-fluoro-3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine ((18)F-DOPA), involving the nucleophilic substitution of a diaryliodonium salt precursor with non-carrier-added (18)F-fluoride, yielded a product with a specific activity that was 3 orders of magnitude higher than the product of the conventional synthesis method, involving an electrophilic substitution of a trialkylstannane precursor with (18)F2. We performed a direct comparison of high- and low-specific-activity (18)F-DOPA in a neuroendocrine tumor model to determine whether this difference in specific activity has implications for the biologic behavior and imaging properties of (18)F-DOPA. (18)F-DOPA was produced via the novel synthesis method, yielding (18)F-DOPA-H with a high specific activity (35,050 ± 4,000 GBq/mmol). This product was compared in several experiments with conventional (18)F-DOPA-L with a low specific activity (11 ± 2 GBq/mmol). In vitro accumulation experiments with the human pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor cell line BON-1 were performed at both 0 °C and 37 °C and at 37 °C in the presence of pharmacologic inhibitors of proteins involved in the uptake mechanism of (18)F-DOPA. Small-animal PET experiments were performed in athymic nude mice bearing a BON-1 tumor xenograft. At 37 °C, the uptake of both (18)F-DOPA-H and (18)F-DOPA-L did not differ significantly during a 60-min accumulation experiment in BON-1 cells. At 0 °C, the uptake of (18)F-DOPA-L was significantly decreased, whereas the lower temperature did not alter the uptake of (18)F-DOPA-H. The pharmacologic inhibitors carbidopa and tetrabenazine also revealed differential effects between the 2 types of (18)F-DOPA in the 60-min accumulation experiment. The small-animal PET experiments did not show any significant differences in distribution and metabolism of (18)F-DOPA-H and (18)F-DOPA-L in carbidopa-pretreated mice. The advantages of the novel synthesis of (18)F-DOPA, which relies on nucleophilic fluorination of a diaryliodonium salt precursor, lie in the simplicity of the synthesis method, compared with the conventional, electrophilic approach and in the reduced mass of administered, pharmacologically active (19)F-DOPA. (18)F-DOPA-H demonstrated comparable imaging properties in an in vivo model for neuroendocrine tumors, despite the fact that the injected mass of material was 3 orders of magnitude less than (18)F-DOPA-L. © 2015 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  8. No-carrier-added (NCA) synthesis of 6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-L-DOPA using 3,5,6,7,8,8a-hexahydro-7,7,8a-trimethyl-[6S-(6{alpha}, 8{alpha}, 8{alpha}{beta})]-6,8-methano-2H-1,4-benzoxazin-2-one

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horti, A. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). School of Medicine]|[Yale Univ., West Haven, CT (United States). PET Center; Redmond, D.E. Jr. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). School of Medicine; Soufer, R. [Yale Univ., West Haven, CT (United States). PET Center

    1995-12-31

    3,5,6,7,8,8a-Hexahydro-7,7,8a-trimethyl-[6S-(6{alpha},8{alpha} , 8{alpha}{beta})]-6,8-methano-2H-1,4-benzoxazino-2-one (2) was investigated as chiral auxiliary for asymmetric NCA nucleophilic synthesis of 6-[{sup 18}F]Fluoro-L-DOPA. Direct condensation of 3,4-dimethoxy-2-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzaldehyde (1a) or 6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-piperonal (1b) in the presence of NaH with 2 gave the corresponding [{sup 18}F]-3-[(2-fluorophenyl)methylene]-3,5,6,7,8,8a-hexahydro-7,7,8 a-trimethyl-[6S-(3Z,3{alpha},6{alpha},8{alpha},8{alpha}{beta})]-6, 8-methano-2H-1,4-benzoxazin-2-one derivative 3a or 3b as a single stereoisomer. L-Selectride promoted hydrogenation of the olefinic double bond of these derivatives, in presence of tertbutyl alcohol, afforded the corresponding [{sup 18}F]-3-[(2-fluorophenyl) methyl]-3,5,6,7,8,8a-hexahydro-7,7,8a-trimethyl-[3S-(3{alpha}, 6{alpha}, 8{alpha}8{alpha}{beta})]-6,8-methano-2H-1,4-benzoxazin-2-one derivatives (4a,b) without affecting the orientation of diasterofacial discrimination. Deprotection of the derivatives 4a,b yielded 6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-L-DOPA (e.e. >90%, 3% radiochemical yield (EOB), total synthesis time 125 min, specific activity >2000 mCi/{mu}mol). Direct deprotection/reduction of the compounds 3a,b provides the enantiomeric mixture of 6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-D,L-DOPA (10-12% radiochemical yield) and, after chiral separation, 6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-L-DOPA (e.e. 98%, 4-5% radiochemical yield). (author).

  9. No-carrier-added (NCA) synthesis of 6-[18F]fluoro-L-DOPA using 3,5,6,7,8,8a-hexahydro-7,7,8a-trimethyl-[6S-(6α, 8α, 8αβ)]-6,8-methano-2H-1,4-benzoxazin-2-one

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horti, A.; Yale Univ., West Haven, CT; Redmond, D.E. Jr.; Soufer, R.

    1995-01-01

    3,5,6,7,8,8a-Hexahydro-7,7,8a-trimethyl-[6S-(6α,8α , 8αβ)]-6,8-methano-2H-1,4-benzoxazino-2-one (2) was investigated as chiral auxiliary for asymmetric NCA nucleophilic synthesis of 6-[ 18 F]Fluoro-L-DOPA. Direct condensation of 3,4-dimethoxy-2-[ 18 F]fluorobenzaldehyde (1a) or 6-[ 18 F]fluoro-piperonal (1b) in the presence of NaH with 2 gave the corresponding [ 18 F]-3-[(2-fluorophenyl)methylene]-3,5,6,7,8,8a-hexahydro-7,7,8 a-trimethyl-[6S-(3Z,3α,6α,8α,8αβ)]-6, 8-methano-2H-1,4-benzoxazin-2-one derivative 3a or 3b as a single stereoisomer. L-Selectride promoted hydrogenation of the olefinic double bond of these derivatives, in presence of tertbutyl alcohol, afforded the corresponding [ 18 F]-3-[(2-fluorophenyl) methyl]-3,5,6,7,8,8a-hexahydro-7,7,8a-trimethyl-[3S-(3α, 6α, 8α8αβ)]-6,8-methano-2H-1,4-benzoxazin-2-one derivatives (4a,b) without affecting the orientation of diasterofacial discrimination. Deprotection of the derivatives 4a,b yielded 6-[ 18 F]fluoro-L-DOPA (e.e. >90%, 3% radiochemical yield (EOB), total synthesis time 125 min, specific activity >2000 mCi/μmol). Direct deprotection/reduction of the compounds 3a,b provides the enantiomeric mixture of 6-[ 18 F]fluoro-D,L-DOPA (10-12% radiochemical yield) and, after chiral separation, 6-[ 18 F]fluoro-L-DOPA (e.e. 98%, 4-5% radiochemical yield). (author)

  10. Cementation of liquid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efremenkov, V.

    2004-01-01

    The cementation methods for immobilisation of radioactive wastes are discussed in terms of methodology, chemistry and properties of the different types of cements as well as the worldwide experience in this field. Two facilities for cementation - DEWA and MOWA - are described in details

  11. Statistical aspects in radioactivity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoetzl, H.

    1979-10-01

    This report contains a summary of basic concepts and formulae important for the treatment of errors and for calculating lower limits of detection in radioactivity measurements. Special attention has been paid to practical application and examples which are of interest for scientists working in this field. (orig./HP) [de

  12. Radioactivity in Dutch consumer products

    CERN Document Server

    Janssen, M P M

    2002-01-01

    This study took place within the framework of a general update of the average radiation dose for the Dutch population. It focuses on consumer products in which radionuclides have been intentionally incorporated and on radiation-emitting devices that can be supplied to members of the public without special surveillance. Eleven consumer products were studied in more detail. The radiation from these products determined 90% of the total collective dose due to consumer products in the Netherlands in 1988. Individual and collective doses are presented here for each product. The total collective dose has decreased from 130 personSv in 1988 to 4.6 personSv at present. This reduction was attributed to: a decrease in the number of radioactive products (gas mantles), lower estimates of the number of radioactive products present in the Netherlands thanks to new information (camera lenses, smoke detectors containing Ra-226), replacement of radioactive by non-radioactive products (gas mantles, dental protheses), and a lowe...

  13. Discarding system for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinbori, Kuniaki; Komura, Shiro.

    1992-01-01

    Radiation contamination dose on the surface and permeation extent of contamination are measured relative to the surfaces to be measured, such as of floors, walls, ceilings of concrete building structures in an administration area after removing equipments and pipelines disposed so far in a nuclear power facility. Then, it is judged as to whether they are radioactive or not. If the surfaces to be measured are judged radioactive, it is further judged if radioactive contamination is present only on the surfaces or it permeates from the surfaces to the inner side, or it intrudes into cracks present on the surfaces. Then, decontamination methods are applied depending on the states of respective modes of contamination, to decontaminate each of the portions. Decontamination liquid wastes are classified depending on the level of the radioactivity contained therein, and then packed in containers. A confirmation measurement is conducted again to the surfaces to be measured from which the contaminated portions were removed. With such procedures, the operation time is shortened, as well as it can remarkably contribute to the reduction of the radiation dose and greatly reduce the waste processing cost. (T.M.)

  14. Report on radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The safe management of radioactive wastes constitutes an essential part of the IAEA programme. A large number of reports and conference proceedings covering various aspects of the subject have been issued. The Technical Review Committee on Underground Disposal (February 1988) recommended that the Secretariat issue a report on the state of the art of underground disposal of radioactive wastes. The Committee recommended the need for a report that provided an overview of the present knowledge in the field. This report covers the basic principles associated with the state of the art of near surface and deep geological radioactive waste disposal, including examples of prudent practice, and basic information on performance assessment methods. It does not include a comprehensive description of the waste management programmes in different countries nor provide a textbook on waste disposal. Such books are available elsewhere. Reviewing all the concepts and practices of safe radioactive waste disposal in a document of reasonable size is not possible; therefore, the scope of this report has been limited to cover essential parts of the subject. Exotic disposal techniques and techniques for disposing of uranium mill tailings are not covered, and only brief coverage is provided for disposal at sea and in the sea-bed. The present report provides a list of references to more specialized reports on disposal published by the IAEA as well as by other bodies, which may be consulted if additional information is sought. 108 refs, 22 figs, 2 tabs

  15. Radioactive waste management at AECL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadsby, R.D.; Allan, C.J.

    2003-01-01

    AECL has maintained an active program in radioactive waste management since 1945, when the Canadian nuclear program commenced activities at the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL). Waste management activities have included operation of waste management storage and processing facilities at AECL's CRL and Whiteshell Laboratories (WL); operation of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Management Office on behalf of Natural Resources Canada to resolve historic radioactive waste problems (largely associated with radioactive ore recovery, transport and processing operations) that are the responsibility of the Federal Government; development of the concept and related technology for geological disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste; development of the Intrusion-Resistant Underground Structure (IRUS) disposal concept for low-level nuclear waste; development of dry storage technology for the interim storage of used fuel; and development and assessment of waste processing technology for application in CANDU nuclear power plants and at CRL and WL. Today these activities are continuing. In addition, AECL is: preparing to decommission the nuclear facilities at WL; carrying out a number of smaller decommissioning projects at CRL; putting in place projects to upgrade the low-level liquid waste processing capabilities of the CRL Waste Treatment Centre, recover and process highly active liquid wastes currently in storage, and recover, condition and improve the storage of selected fuel wastes currently stored in below-ground standpipes in the CRL waste management areas; and assessing options for additional remediation projects to improve the management of other wastes currently in storage and to address environmental contamination from past practices. (author)

  16. Radioactive waste management for reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodger, W.A.

    1974-01-01

    Radioactive waste management practices at nuclear power plants are summarized. The types of waste produced and methods for treating various types of wastes are described. The waste management systems, including simplified flow diagrams, for typical boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors are discussed. (U.S.)

  17. Ambiant natural radioactivity and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saumande, P.

    1989-01-01

    Measures made in France have showed that γ radioactivity and indoor radon concentration were more important in country with granitic soil. As long as radon was more particularly admitted to be inducer of broncho-pulmonary cancer by inhalation, epidemiologic inquiries were made. The results do not reveal any excess death caused by cancer in these countries selected because of their granitic soil [fr

  18. High-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grissom, M.C.

    1982-10-01

    This bibliography contains 812 citations on high-level radioactive wastes included in the Department of Energy's Energy Data Base from January 1981 through July 1982. These citations are to research reports, journal articles, books, patents, theses, and conference papers from worldwide sources. Five indexes are provided: Corporate Author, Personal Author, Subject, Contract Number, and Report Number

  19. Chemical decontamination of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, H.I.

    2006-01-01

    Radioactive wastes are generated in a number of different kinds of facilities and arise in a wide range of concentrations of radioactive materials and in a variety of physical and chemical forms. There is also a variety of alternatives for treatment and conditioning of the wastes prior disposal. The importance of treatment of radioactive waste for protection of human and environment has long been recognized and considerable experience has gained in this field. Generally, the methods used for treatment of radioactive wastes can be classified into three type's biological, physical and chemical treatment this physical treatment it gives good result than biological treatment. Chemical treatment is fewer hazards and gives good result compared with biological and physical treatments. Chemical treatment is fewer hazards and gives good result compared with biological and physical treatments. In chemical treatment there are different procedures, solvent extraction, ion exchange, electro dialysis but solvent extraction is best one because high purity can be optioned on the other hand the disadvantage that it is expensive. Beside the solvent extraction technique one can be used is ion exchange which gives reasonable result, but requires pretreatment that to avoid in closing of column by colloidal and large species. Electro dialysis technique gives quite result but less than solvent extraction and ion exchange technique the advantage is a cheep.(Author)

  20. The radioactive waste management conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fareeduddin, S.; Hirling, J.

    1983-01-01

    The international conference on radioactive waste management was held in Seattle, Washington, from 16 to 20 May 1983. The response was gratifying, reflecting world-wide interest: it was attended by 528 participants from 29 Member States of the IAEA and eight international organizations. The conference programme was structured to permit reviews and presentation of up-to-date information on five major topics: - waste management policy and its implementation: national and international approaches; legal, economic, environmental, and social aspects (four sessions with 27 papers from 16 countries and four international organizations); - handling, treatment, and conditioning of wastes from nuclear facilities, nuclear power plants and reprocessing plants, including the handling and treatment of gaseous wastes and wastes of specific types (five sessions with 35 papers); - storage and underground disposal of radioactive wastes: general, national concepts, underground laboratories, and designs of repositories for high-level, and low- and intermediate-level waste disposal (five sessions with 35 papers); - environmental and safety assessment of waste management systems: goals methodologies, assessments for geological repositories, low- and intermediate-level wastes, and mill tailings (four sessions with 26 papers); - radioactive releases to the environment from nuclear operations: status and perspectives, environmental transport processes, and control of radioactive waste disposal into the environment (three sessions with 23 papers)

  1. Method of disposing radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isozaki, Kei.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose : To enable safety ocean disposal of radioactive wastes by decreasing the leaching rate of radioactive nucleides, improving the quick-curing nature and increasing the durability. Method : A mixture comprising 2 - 20 parts by weight of alkali metal hydroxide and 100 parts by weight of finely powdered aqueous slags from a blast furnace is added to radioactive wastes to solidify them. In the case of medium or low level radioactive wastes, the solidification agent is added by 200 parts by weight to 100 parts by weight of the wastes and, in the case of high level wastes, the solidification agent is added in such an amount that the wastes occupy about 20% by weight in the total of the wastes and the solidification agent. Sodium hydroxide used as the alkali metal hydroxide is partially replaced with sodium carbonate, a water-reducing agent such as lignin sulfonate is added to improve the fluidity and suppress the leaching rate and the wastes are solidified in a drum can. In this way, corrosions of the vessel can be suppressed by the alkaline nature and the compression strength, heat stability and the like of the product also become excellent. (Sekiya, K.)

  2. Device for encapsulating radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suthanthiran, K.

    1994-01-01

    A capsule for encapsulating radioactive material for radiation treatment comprising two or more interfitting sleeves, wherein each sleeve comprises a closed bottom portion having a circumferential wall extending therefrom, and an open end located opposite the bottom portion. The sleeves are constructed to fit over one another to thereby establish an effectively sealed capsule container. 3 figs

  3. Safe disposal of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooker, P.; Metcalfe, R.; Milodowski, T.; Holliday, D.

    1997-01-01

    A high degree of international cooperation has characterized the two studies reported here which aim to address whether radioactive waste can be disposed of safely. Using hydrogeochemical and mineralogical surveying techniques earth scientists from the British Geological Survey have sought to identify and characterise suitable disposal sites. Aspects of the studies are explored emphasising their cooperative nature. (UK)

  4. Radioactive waste management in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawley, N.J.

    1986-09-01

    This bibliography is an up-date to AECL-6186(Rev 3), 1952-1982, 'Radioactive Waste Management in Canada AECL Publications and Other Literature' compiled by Dianne Wallace. Canadian publications from outside contractors concerning the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program are included in addition to Atomic Energy of Canada Limited reports and papers. 252 refs

  5. Environmental radioactivity in Greenland 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aarkrog, A.; Lippert, J.

    1978-07-01

    Measurements of fallout radioactivity in Greenland in 1977 are reported. Strontium-90 (and Cesium-137 in most cases) was determined in samples of precipitation, sea water, vegetation, animals, and drinking water. Estimates are given of the mean contents of 90 Sr and 137 Cs in the human diet in Greenland in 1977. (author)

  6. Monitoring of radioactivity in 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data are given on the monitoring of radioactive contamination of air and some food stuffe at world locations throughout Western South America, South Pacific and Africa during 1979. Data are included on the total β and γ activity and radionuclide content in air, milk and other environmental samples ( 131 I, 90 Sr, 137 Cs) [fr

  7. Monitoring of radioactivity in 1973

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data are presented on the monitoring of radioactive contamination of air and some foodstuffs at world (locations throughout Western South America, South Pacific, Africa during 1973. Data are included on the total β and γ activity and content of radionuclides found in fallout in air, milk and other environmental samples ( 131 I, 90 Sr, 137 Cs) [fr

  8. Monitoring of radioactivity in 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data are presented on the monitoring of the radioactive contamination of air and some foodstuffs at world locations throughout Western South America, South Pacific, Africa, during 1974. Data are included on the total β and γ activity and content of radionuclides found in fallout in air, milk and other environmental samples ( 131 I, 90 Sr, 137 Cs) [fr

  9. General Atomic's radioactive gas recovery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahn, J.A.; Perry, C.A.

    1975-01-01

    General Atomic Company has developed a Radioactive Gas Recovery System for the HTGR which separates, for purposes of retention, the radioactive components from the non-radioactive reactor plant waste gases. This provides the capability for reducing to an insignificant level the amount of radioactivity released from the gas waste system to the atmosphere--a most significant improvement in reducing total activity release to the environment. (U.S.)

  10. Water Radioactive Pollution and Related Environmental Aspects

    OpenAIRE

    , Lucia Bonavigo; , Massimo Zucchetti; , Hysen Mankolli

    2009-01-01

    Radioactivity present in surface continental waters is mainly due to the presence of radioactive elements in the earth’s crust. Other artiŞcial radionuclides have appeared due to such human activities as nuclear power plants, nuclear weapons testing and manufacture and use of radioactive sources. There are two sources of radioactive contamination in drinking water. The Şrst is naturally occurring radionuclides that are contained in the soil that water moves through. Some areas are susceptible...

  11. Radioactive waste management regulatory framework in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barcenas, M.; Mejia, M.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the current regulatory framework concerning the radioactive waste management in Mexico. It is intended to show regulatory historical antecedents, the legal responsibilities assigned to institutions involved in the radioactive waste management, the sources of radioactive waste, and the development and preparation of national standards for fulfilling the legal framework for low level radioactive waste. It is at present the most important matter to be resolved. (author)

  12. State planning council on radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    This report contains the findings and policy resolutions resulting from the Council's meeting. The texts of policy resolutions on radioactive waste transport, spent fuel storage, and high-level radioactive waste disposal test facilities are included. A draft legislation statement is presented in support of the establishment of a clear national policy for high-level radioactive waste disposal and management. A status report containing a summary of regional activities in the field of low-level radioactive wastes is presented

  13. The application of spectrographic analysis to the radioisotope production control. II. Analysis of calcium-45, scandium-46, nickel-63, and copper-64 solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capdevila, C.; Roca, M.

    1972-01-01

    Semi-quantitative and quantitative determinations of both the radioactive and the target element in each radioisotope are described. The copper-spark technique was used except for Cu determinations, that need silver or.graphite electro des. Inter-element effects and their compensation through the use of Bi, 6a, In, Ho, Pd, TI and Y as reference elements was examined. For the determination of Ca in Ca-45 samples, Ba, La, Li and Sr were also tested. Good results are achieved with Li for Ca, Y for Sc,Ti and Ni, and either In or Y for Cu and Zn. (Author) 7 refs

  14. Geomechanical problems in study of radioactive wastes disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yixing

    1987-01-01

    Methods for both low-intermediate level radioactive wastes disposal and high level radioactive waste disposal were introduced briefly. Geomechanical problems in radioactive wastes disposal were discussed. Some suggestions were proposed for the radioactive wastes disposal in China

  15. Radioactive waste management: Spanish experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beceiro, A. R.

    1996-01-01

    Radioactive waste generation began in Spain during the 1950's, in association with the first applications of radioactive isotopes in industry, medicine and research. Spain's first nuclear power plant began its operations in 1968. At present, there are in operation some one thousand installations possessing the administrative authorization required to use radioactive isotopes (small producers), nine nuclear groups and a tenth is now entering the dismantling phase. There are also activities and installations pertaining to the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle (mining, milling and the manufacturing of fuel elements). Until 1985, the research center Junta de Energia Nuclear (now CIEMAT) rendered radioactive waste removal, and subsequent conditioning and temporary storage services to the small producers. Since the beginning of their operations the nuclear power plants and fuel cycle facilities have had the capacity to condition and temporarily store their own radioactive wastes. ENRESA (Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radiactivos, S. A.) began its operations in the second half of 1985. It is a state-owned company created by the Government in accordance with a previous parliamentary resolution and commissioned to establish a system for management of such wastes throughout Spain, being in charge also of the dismantling of nuclear power plants and other major installations at the end of their operating lifetimes. Possibly the most outstanding characteristic of ENRESA's evolution over these last seven years has been the need to bring about a compromise between solving the most immediate and pressing day-to-day problems of operation (the first wastes were removed at the beginning of 1986) and establishing the basic organization, resources, technology and installations required for ENRESA to operate efficiently in the long term. (author)

  16. Krsko NPP radioactive waste characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skanata, D.; Kroselj, V.; Jankovic, M.

    2007-01-01

    In May 2005 Krsko NPP initiated the Radioactive Waste Characterization Project and commissioned its realization to the consulting company Enconet International, Zagreb. The Agency for Radwaste Management was invited to participate on the Project. The Project was successfully closed out in August 2006. The main Project goal consisted of systematization the existing and gathering the missing radiological, chemical, physical, mechanical, thermal and biological information and data on radioactive waste. In a general perspective, the Project may also be considered as a part of broader scope of activities to support state efforts to find a disposal solution for radioactive waste in Slovenia. The operational low and intermediate level radioactive waste has been structured into 6 waste streams that contain evaporator concentrates and tank sludges, spent ion resins, spent filters, compressible and non-compressible waste as well as specific waste. For each of mentioned waste streams, process schemes have been developed including raw waste, treatment and conditioning technologies, waste forms, containers and waste packages. In the paper the main results of the Characterization Project will be briefly described. The results will indicate that there are 17 different types of raw waste that have been processed by applying 9 treatment/conditioning technologies. By this way 18 different waste forms have been produced and stored into 3 types of containers. Within each type of container several combinations should be distinguished. Considering all of this, there are 34 different types of waste packages altogether that are currently stored in the Solid Radwaste Storage Facility at the Krsko NPP site. Because of these findings a new identification system has been recommended and consequently the improvement of the existing database on radioactive waste has been proposed. The potential areas of further in depth characterization are indicated. In the paper a brief description on the

  17. Radioactive Waste and Clean-up Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collard, G.

    2001-01-01

    The main objectives of the Radioactive Waste and Clean-up division of SCK-CEN are outlined. The division's programme consists of research, development and demonstration projects and aims to contribute to the objectives of Agenda 21 on sustainable development in the field of radioactive waste and rehabilitation of radioactively contaminated sites

  18. Coal combustion ashes: A radioactive Waste?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michetti, F.P.; Tocci, M.

    1992-01-01

    The radioactive substances naturally hold in fossil fuels, such as Uranium and Thorium, after the combustion, are subjected to an increase of concentration in the residual combustion products as flying ashes or as firebox ashes. A significant percentage of the waste should be classified as radioactive waste, while the political strategies seems to be setted to declassify it as non-radioactive waste. (Author)

  19. Radioactivity in the Marine Environment. Chapter 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zal U'yun Wan Mahmood; Abdul Kadir Ishak; Norfaizal Mohamad; Wo, Y.M.; Kamarudin Samuding

    2015-01-01

    Radionuclide (radioactive isotopes or radioisotopes is widely distributed on the ground primarily in marine environments. Nowadays, more than 340 isotopes has been identified exist in our earth especially in marine environment. From that total, 80 isotopes was radioactive. The existence of radioactivity in the marine environment is through the direct and indirect distribution of radionuclides

  20. 49 CFR 175.705 - Radioactive contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radioactive contamination. 175.705 Section 175.705... Regulations Applicable According to Classification of Material § 175.705 Radioactive contamination. (a) A... (radioactive) materials that may have been released from their packagings. (b) When contamination is present or...

  1. National Syrian Program for Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othman, I.; Takriti, S.

    2009-06-01

    A national plan for radioactive waste management has been presented. It includes identifying, transport, recording, classifying, processing and disposal. It is an important reference for radioactive waste management for those dealing with radioactive waste, and presents a complete protection to environemnt and people. (author)

  2. Radioactive Waste and Clean-up: Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collard, G.

    2000-01-01

    SCK-CEN's Radioactive Waste and Clean-up Division performs studies and develops strategies, techniques and technologies in the area of radioactive waste management, the decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear installations and the remediation of radioactive-contaminated sites. These activities are performed in the context of our responsibility towards the safety of present and future generations and contribute to achieve intrageneration equity

  3. Labelling of olive oil with radioactive iodine and radioactive technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Dayel, O.A.F.

    1988-03-01

    Investigates labelling of olive oil with 125 iodine and with the radioactive 99mTC. A radio analytical study for 99Mo-99mTC generator is also presented. Iodine monochloride and chlormine-T methods are used for labelling olive oil and oleic acid with radioactive iodine. Diethyl ether, benzene and n-heptane have been used as solvents, with diethyl ether giving best results using iodine monochloride method. Infrared spectroscopic studies show that labelling took place at the double bond. Use of milked 99mTc gave very low yield only. A fairly higher labelling yield was achieved when 20 mg of tin chloride has been added in acetone medium than diethyl ether medium. Thin layer chromatography and paper chromatography technique were used as quality control systems. The labelled oil can be used for diagnostic and study purposes. 140 Ref

  4. Radioactive Substances Regulations, 1959 under the Radioactive Substances Act 1957

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    These Regulations as amended lay down maximum permissible concentrations and doses and prescribe radiation protection measures for personnel. They provide for the licensing procedures for radioactive materials and irradiating apparatus and the conditions to be complied with for their handling, packaging, transport and disposal. The Schedules to the Regulations contain tables of maximum permissible radionuclide concentrations, models of licence application forms and labels. (NEA) [fr

  5. Management of Radioactive Wastes in Developing Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel Ghani, A.H.

    1999-01-01

    The management of radioactive wastes is one area of increasing interest especially in developing countries having more and more activities in the application of radioisotopes in medicine, research and industry. For a better understanding of radioactive waste management in developing countries this work will discuss the following items:Classification of countries with respect to waste management programs. Principal Radionuclides used in medicine, biological research and others and the range of radioactivity commonly used. Estimation of radioactive waste volumes and activities. Management of liquid wastes Collection. Treatment. Management of small volumes of organic liquid waste. Collection Treatment. Packaging and storage of radioactive wastes

  6. Tobacco radioactivity and cancer in smokers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martell, E.A.

    1975-01-01

    The recent finding that 210 Pb, which also is present in inhaled mainstream smoke, is highly concentrated in a small number of insoluble smoke particles changes the whole complexion of the problem of possible health effects of the inhaled radioactivity in cigarette smoke. Because 210 Pb has a radioactive half-life of 22 years, the body burden of the radioactive 210 Pb and its radioactive daughter products 210 Bi and 210 Po can continue to build up throughout the period of smoking. Alpha interactions with chromosomes of cells surrounding these insoluble radioactive smoke particles may cause cancer and contribute to early atherosclerosis development in cigarette smokers. (U.S.)

  7. Radioactive Waste Management BasisApril 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, B K

    2011-08-31

    This Radioactive Waste Management Basis (RWMB) documents radioactive waste management practices adopted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) pursuant to Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

  8. Croatian radioactive waste management program: Current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matanic, R.; Lebegner, J.

    2001-01-01

    Croatia has a responsibility to develop a radioactive waste management program partly due to co-ownership of Krsko nuclear power plant (Slovenia) and partly because of its own medical and industrial radioactive waste. The total amount of generated radioactive waste in Croatia is stored in temporary storages located at two national research institutes, while radioactive waste from Krsko remains in temporary storage on site. National power utility Hrvatska Elektroprivreda (HEP) and Hazardous Waste Management Agency (APO) coordinate the work regarding decommissioning, spent fuel management and low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILRW) management in Croatia. Since the majority of work has been done in developing the LILRW management program, the paper focuses on this part of radioactive waste management. Issues of site selection, repository design, safety assessment and public acceptance are being discussed. A short description of the national radioactive waste management infrastructure has also been presented. (author)

  9. Development of radioactive seawater monitors, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima, Masanori

    1989-01-01

    Applicability of some adsorptive materials to monitoring of radioactive seawater is generalized. Studied techniques that allow utilization of adsorptive materials in monitoring radioactive seawater are the substitute methods using sampled seawater or indicator plants such as gulfweed and the method using adsorptive materials for continuous monitoring of underwater radioactivity, the method using them for field measurement of under water radioactivity from a boat, and the method using an adsorptive material moored underwater for integration monitoring of underwater radioactivity. Selected adsorptive materials that were judged suitable for monitoring radioactive seawater is the one composed of some kind of adsorptive compound (manganese dioxide or ferrocyan cobalt potassium) fixed to crylic cellulose. This adsorptive material permits selective scavenging radioactive Cs, Mn, Co, Zn, Ce, Fe, Ru, Ra Th, Pu and Am from seawater. (aurhor)

  10. CEA and its radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marano, S.

    1999-01-01

    CEA annually produces about 3500 tons of radioactive wastes in its 43 basic nuclear installations. CEA ranks third behind EDF and Cogema. Low-level wastes (A wastes) are sent to ANDRA (national agency for the management of nuclear wastes)whereas medium-level wastes (B wastes) are stored by CEA itself. CEA has checked off its storing places and has set up an installation Cedra to process and store ancient and new nuclear wastes. 3 other installations are planned to operate within 6 years: Agate (Cadarache) will treat liquid effluents, Stella (Saclay) will process liquid wastes that are beta or gamma emitters, and Atena (Marcoule) will treat and store radioactive sodium coming from Phenix reactor and IPSN laboratories. The use of plasma torch for vitrifying wastes is detailed, the management of all the nuclear wastes produced by CEA laboratories and installations is presented. (A.C.)

  11. Shielding container for radioactive isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumi, Tetsuo; Tosa, Masayoshi; Hatogai, Tatsuaki.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To effect opening and closing bidirectional radiation used particularly for a gamma densimeter or the like by one operation. Structure: This device comprises a rotatable shielding body for receiving radioactive isotope in the central portion thereof and having at least two radiation openings through which radiation is taken out of the isotope, and a shielding container having openings corresponding to the first mentioned radiation openings, respectively. The radioactive isotope is secured to a rotational shaft of the shielding body, and the shielding body is rotated to register the openings of the shielding container with the openings of the shielding body or to shield the openings, thereby effecting radiation and cut off of gamma ray in the bidirection by one operation. (Kamimura, M.)

  12. Truck transportation of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madsen, M.M.; Wilmot, E.L.

    1983-01-01

    Analytical models in RADTRAN II are used to calculate risks to population subgroups such as people along transport routes, people at stops, and crewman. The stops model, which calculates the dose to persons adjacent to the transport vehicle while it is stopped, frequently provides the largest contribution to incident-free radiological impacts. Components such as distances from the vehicle containing radioactive material to nearby people at stops, stop duration, and number of crew members are required for the stops model as well as other incident-free models. To provide supporting data for RADTRAN II based on operational experience, selected truck shipments of radioactive material were observed from origin to destination. Other important aspects of this program were to correlate package size to effective shipment transport index (TI) using radiological surveys and to characterize population distributions and proximities of people to the shipment at a generic truck stop

  13. Radioactive waste disposal in Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive waste is any material which contains or is contaminated by radionuclides and for which no use is foreseen. According to this definition, a large number of sources, solid, liquid and gaseous, within the Greek territory can be - and, actually, is - declared as waste. The types of such solid sources are presented. It is estimated that these solid sources represent above 90% of all disused sources in Greece. The medical sources of Co-60 and Cs-137 were used in Teletherapy units, while the Ra-226 ones are in the form of needles or tubes used in Brachytherapy. All the industrial sources had been used for measuring moisture, density, thickness, elementary composition, etc. The small sources used by research labs are mainly in the form of discs. The above sources had been imported a long time ago (even 3 decades ago), had been used, and then stored as useless inside the user's premises. Since 1990 all the users of radioactive sources are obliged to return them back to the suppliers when they are no longer in use. In fact, no source is imported unless there is a written declaration of acceptance by its producer. A project concerning the export of all disused sealed sources is in progress. For every source a certificate will be issued, proper container will be purchased and all the necessary documents will be prepared so that it can be transported for final disposal or reuse in a foreign repository facility. Apart from this 'old generated' waste, unsealed radionuclides have always been used in nuclear medicine producing waste. The above radionuclides are used either in vivo (injected or ingested by patients) or in vitro (labeling of blood and other cells). Both uses leave some radioactive waste inside the needles, the tubes, or other material. Since 1991, Greece has a well-established regulatory system for controlling waste from nuclear medicine labs, so that disposing such solid or liquid waste does no harm to the environment. A revision of these regulations has

  14. Method for burning radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Akinori; Tejima, Takaya.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To completely process less combustible radioactive wastes with no excess loads on discharge gas processing systems and without causing corrosions to furnace walls. Method: Among combustible radioactive wastes, chlorine-containing less combustible wastes such as chlorine-containing rubbers and vinyl chlorides, and highly heat generating wastes not containing chloride such as polyethylene are selectively packed into packages. While on the other hand, packages of less combustible wastes are charged into a water-cooled jacket type incinerator intermittently while controlling the amount and the interval of charging so that the temperature in the furnace will be kept to lower than 850 deg C for burning treatment. Directly after the completion of the burning, the packed highly heat calorie producing wastes are charged and subjected to combustion treatment. (Yoshihara, H.)

  15. Low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaren, L.H.

    1983-03-01

    This bibliography contains information on low-level radioactive waste included in the Department of Energy's Energy Data Base for January through December 1982. The abstracts are grouped by subject category as shown in the table of contents. Entries in the subject index also facilitate access by subject, e.g., Low-Level Radioactive Wastes/Transport. Within each category the arrangement is by report number for reports, followed by nonreports in reverse chronological order. These citations are to research reports, journal articles, books, patents, theses, and conference papers from worldwide sources. Five indexes, each proceded by a brief description, are provided: Corporate Author, Personal Author, Subject, Contract Number, and Report Number. 492 references

  16. Simple description of cluster radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavares, O.A.P.; Medeiros, E.L.

    2012-05-01

    The partial half-life of radioactive decay of nuclei by the emission of fragments heavier than the alpha particle, such as the emission of carbon, oxygen, neon, magnesium, and silicon isotopes from translead nuclei (known as cluster radioactivity), is re-evaluated in the framework of a semiempirical, one-parameter model based on the quantum mechanical tunneling mechanism through a potential barrier where the Coulomb, centrifugal, and overlapping contributions to the barrier are considered within the spherical nucleus approximation. This treatment has shown not only very adequate to t all the existing half-life data, but also to give more reliable half-life predictions for new, yet unmeasured cases of spontaneous emission of massive nuclear fragments both from heavy and intermediate-mass parent nuclei as well. (author)

  17. Neutral atom traps of radioactives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behr, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Neutral atoms trapped with modern laser cooling techniques offer the promise of improving several broad classes of experiments with radioactive isotopes. In nuclear β decay, neutrino spectroscopy from beta-recoil coincidences, along with highly polarized samples, enable experiments to search for non-Standard Model interactions, test whether parity symmetry is maximally violated, and search for new sources of time reversal violation. Ongoing efforts at TRIUMF, Los Alamos and Berkeley will be highlighted. The traps also offer bright sources for Doppler-free spectroscopy, particularly in high-Z atoms where precision measurements could measure the strength of weak neutral nucleon-nucleon and electron-nucleon interactions. Physics with francium atoms has been vigorously pursued at Stony Brook. Several facilities plan work with radioactive atom traps; concrete plans and efforts at KVI Groningen and Legnaro will be among those summarized. Contributions to the multidisciplinary field of trace analysis will be left up to other presenters

  18. Neutral atom traps of radioactives

    CERN Document Server

    Behr, J A

    2003-01-01

    Neutral atoms trapped with modern laser cooling techniques offer the promise of improving several broad classes of experiments with radioactive isotopes. In nuclear beta decay, neutrino spectroscopy from beta-recoil coincidences, along with highly polarized samples, enable experiments to search for non-Standard Model interactions, test whether parity symmetry is maximally violated, and search for new sources of time reversal violation. Ongoing efforts at TRIUMF, Los Alamos and Berkeley will be highlighted. The traps also offer bright sources for Doppler-free spectroscopy, particularly in high-Z atoms where precision measurements could measure the strength of weak neutral nucleon-nucleon and electron-nucleon interactions. Physics with francium atoms has been vigorously pursued at Stony Brook. Several facilities plan work with radioactive atom traps; concrete plans and efforts at KVI Groningen and Legnaro will be among those summarized. Contributions to the multidisciplinary field of trace analysis will be left...

  19. Radioactive wastes: underground laboratories implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bataille, Ch.

    1997-01-01

    This article studies the situation of radioactive waste management, more especially the possible storage in deep laboratories. In front of the reaction of public opinion relative to the nuclear waste question, it was essential to begin by a study on the notions of liability, transparence and democracy. At the beginning, it was a matter of underground researches with a view to doing an eventual storage of high level radioactive wastes. The Parliament had to define, through the law, a behaviour able to come to the fore for anybody. A behaviour which won recognition from authorities, from scientists, from industrial people, which guarantees the rights of populations confronted to a problem whom they were not informed, on which they received only few explanations. (N.C.)

  20. Method of processing radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Susumu; Moriya, Tetsuo; Ishibashi, Tadashi; Kariya, Masahiro.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To improve contamination proofness, water proofness, close bondability and stretching performance of strippable paints coated to substrates liable to be contaminated with radioactive materials. Method: Strippable paints are previously coated on substrates which may possibly be contaminated with radioactive materials. After the contamination, the coated membranes are stripped and removed. Alternatively, the strippable paints may be coated on the already contaminated substrates and, after drying, the paints are stripped and removed. The strippable paints used herein have a composition comprising a styrene-butadiene block copolymer containing from 60 to 80 wt% of styrene as a main ingredient and from 0.3 to 5 % by weight of a higher alkyl amine compound having 12 to 18 carbon atoms blended with the copolymer. (Ikeda, J.)