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Sample records for nmr structural investigation

  1. Structural investigations of substituted indolizine derivatives by NMR studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furdui, Bianca; Dinica, Rodica; Demeunynck, Martine; Druta, Ioan

    2008-01-01

    Owing to the increasing importance of indolizine heterocycles in the field of biology and pharmacology we have synthesized and investigated the obtained heterocycles by NMR techniques. In order to investigate the substituent effects on the spectroscopic properties, a series of indolizine derivatives were studied by 1 H-NMR, 13 C-NMR and 2D NMR (GCOSY, GHMBC and GHMQC spectra). (authors)

  2. STRUCTURAL STUDY AND INVESTIGATION OF NMR TENSORS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    theory. The structural and vibrational properties of dopamine-4-N7GUA and ... There is evidence, however, that DA is involved in the ... spectra to the results of ab initio gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) [14-17] and continuous- ..... Nicholls, G. Proteins, transmitter & synapses, Blackwell Scientific Publication: Scotland;.

  3. NMR methods for the investigation of structure and transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, Edme H. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. fuer Mechanische Verfahrenstechnik und Mechanik

    2012-07-01

    Extensive derivations of required fundamental relations for readers with engineering background New applications based on MRI, PGSE-NMR, and low-field NMR New concepts in quantitative data evaluation and image analysis Methods of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are increasingly applied in engineering sciences. The book summarizes research in the field of chemical and process engineering performed at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). Fundamentals of the methods are exposed for readers with an engineering background. Applications cover the fields of mechanical process engineering (filtration, solid-liquid separation, powder mixing, rheometry), chemical process engineering (trickle-bed reactor, ceramic sponges), bioprocess engineering (biofilm growth), and food process engineering (microwave heating, emulsions). Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) as well as low-field NMR are covered with notes on hardware. Emphasis is placed on quantitative data analysis and image processing. (orig.)

  4. NMR methods for the investigation of structure and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, Edme H.

    2012-01-01

    Extensive derivations of required fundamental relations for readers with engineering background New applications based on MRI, PGSE-NMR, and low-field NMR New concepts in quantitative data evaluation and image analysis Methods of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are increasingly applied in engineering sciences. The book summarizes research in the field of chemical and process engineering performed at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). Fundamentals of the methods are exposed for readers with an engineering background. Applications cover the fields of mechanical process engineering (filtration, solid-liquid separation, powder mixing, rheometry), chemical process engineering (trickle-bed reactor, ceramic sponges), bioprocess engineering (biofilm growth), and food process engineering (microwave heating, emulsions). Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) as well as low-field NMR are covered with notes on hardware. Emphasis is placed on quantitative data analysis and image processing. (orig.)

  5. NMR methods for the investigation of structure and transport

    CERN Document Server

    Hardy, Edme H

    2011-01-01

    Methods of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are increasingly applied in engineering sciences. The book summarizes research in the field of chemical and process engineering performed at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). Fundamentals of the methods are exposed for readers with an engineering background. Applications cover the fields of mechanical process engineering (filtration, solid-liquid separation, powder mixing, rheometry), chemical process engineering (trickle-bed reactor, ceramic sponges), bioprocess engineering (biofilm growth), and food process engineering (microwave heating

  6. Structural investigation of e-beam cured epoxy resins through solid state NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alessi, Sabina; Spinella, Alberto; Caponetti, Eugenio; Dispenza, Clelia; Spadaro, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    In this paper the network structure of e-beam cured DGEBF based epoxy resins is investigated. Two epoxy systems, having different reactivity and cured in different process conditions, were analyzed through solid state NMR spectroscopy. The analysis shows that the more reactive system has higher cross-linking density and higher uniformity of network distribution. Similar information were obtained, in a previous work, on the same systems through dynamic mechanical thermal analysis. It is worth noting that unlike DMTA tests, which interfere with the molecular structure of the analyzed material, due to the heating during the analysis itself, more reliable information, without any artefact, are obtained by solid state NMR, carried out at constant room temperature. - Highlights: ► The structure of two e-beam cured epoxy systems is investigated through solid state NMR. ► The aim is to have direct information about the structure without inducing modifications. ► The different molecular structures are able to emphasize the response of solid state NMR. ► T 1 H, T 1ρ H and T CH measurements indicate different cross-linking degrees. ► The NMR results are in agreement with DMTA analysis performed in a previous paper.

  7. Structural Investigations of Portland Cement Components, Hydration, and Effects of Admixtures by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skibsted, Jørgen Bengaard; Andersen, Morten D.; Jakobsen, Hans Jørgen

    2006-01-01

    for the C-S-H phase formed during hydration. It will be demonstrated that Al3+ and flouride guest-ions in the anhydrous and hydrated calcium silicates can be studied in detail by 27Al and 19F MAS NMR, thereby providing information on the local structure and the mechanisms for incorporation of these ions......Solid-state, magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy represents a valuable tool for structural investigations on the nanoscale of the most important phases in anhydrous and hydrated Portland cements and of various admixtures. This is primarily due to the fact that the method reflects the first......- and second-coordination spheres of the spin nucleus under investigation while it is less sensitive to long-range order. Thus, crystalline as well as amorphous phases can be detected in a quantitative manner by solid-state NMR. In particular the structure of the calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H) phase have...

  8. Structural investigation of bistrifluron using x-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and molecular modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Moon, J K; Rhee, S K; Kim, G B; Yun, H S; Chung, B J; Lee, S S; Lim, Y H

    2002-01-01

    A new insecticide, bistrifluron acts as an inhibitor of insect development and interferes with the cuticle formation of insects. Since it shows low acute oral and dermal toxicities, it can be one of potent insecticides. Based on X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling, the structural studies of bistrifluron have been carried out.

  9. Theoretical Investigation on the Molecular Structure, Vibrational and NMR Spectra of N, N, 4-Tri chlorobenzenesulfonamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cinar, M.

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, the structural properties of N,N,4-Tri chlorobenzenesulfonamide have been studied extensively using Density Functional Theory (DFT) employing B3LYP exchange correlation. The geometry of the molecule was fully optimized, vibrational spectrum was calculated and fundamental vibrations were assigned based on the scaled theoretical wavenumbers. The 1 H and 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of the compound were calculated using the Gauge-Invariant Atomic Orbital (GIAO) method. To investigate the basis set effects, calculations were performed at the 6-31G(d,p), 6-311G(d,p), 6-31++G(d,p) and 6-311++G(d,p) levels. Finally, geometric parameters, vibrational bands and isotropic chemical shifts were compared with available experimental data of compound. The fully optimized geometry of the molecule was found to be consistent with the X-ray crystal structure. The observed and calculated frequencies and chemical shifts were found to be in very good agreement. The computed results appear that the basis set has slight effect on the molecular geometry of N,N,4-Tri chlorobenzenesulfonamide

  10. Structural investigation of molten fluorides of nuclear interest by NMR and XAFS spectroscopies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauvert, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    In the frame of the renewal of the different nuclear plans, the molten salt reactor is one of the six concepts of reactors of 4. generation. This reactor has the particularity to use a liquid fuel based on LiF-ThF 4 mixtures. In order to develop and to optimize this concept, it is important to characterize the structure of the melt and to describe its physical and chemical properties. Our work has been based on the study of the system MF-ZrF 4 (M = Li, Na, K) selected as a model of ThF 4 based systems. We have combined two spectroscopic techniques, the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and the X-ray Absorption at high temperature, with molecular dynamics calculations. We particularly focused on the local environments of the fluorine and the zirconium. In order to interpret the NMR data obtain in the molten state, we performed a preliminary study on zirconium halides and rare earth and alkali fluoro zirconates using the 91 Zr solid-state NMR at very high magnetic fields. New correlations between structural parameters and NMR data have been established. At high temperature, in MF-ZrF 4 melts we have shown the coexistence of three different kind of Zr-based complexes with different proportions depending on the amount of ZrF 4 and on the nature of the alkali. Depending on the ZrF 4 content, three kinds of fluorine have been characterized: form free fluorines at low amount of zirconium fluorides, fluorines involved in Zr-based complexes and bridging fluorines at higher ZrF 4 content. This original and innovative approach of molten fluorides mixtures, combining NMR and EXAFS at high temperature with molecular dynamics calculations, is very efficient to describe their speciation and thus their fluoro-acidity. (author)

  11. 13C NMR investigation of the structure of cationic carbonyls in transition metal zeolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Taarit, Y.

    1979-01-01

    13 C NMR spectroscopy was used to investigate the nature of carbon monoxide adsorbed on transition metal ions hosted in a synthetic faujastite type zeolite. The adsorbed CO species was characterised by a highly shielded carbon nucleus. Using the Pople approximation for the paramagnetic shielding term, the observed chemical shift was rationalised assuming the formation of a cationic carbonyl species with an appreciable electronic transfer from the carbon lone pair to the transition metal ion and negligible π back-bonding if at all. (Auth.)

  12. Structural Investigation of the Interaction between LolA and LolB Using NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakada, Shingo; Sakakura, Masayoshi; Takahashi, Hideo; Okuda, Suguru; Tokuda, Hajime; Shimada, Ichio

    2009-01-01

    Lipoproteins that play critical roles in various cellular functions of Gram-negative bacteria are localized in the cells inner and outer membranes. Lol proteins (LolA, LolB, LolC, LolD, and LolE) are involved in the transportation of outer membrane-directed lipoproteins from the inner to the outer membrane. LolA is a periplasmic chaperone that transports lipoproteins, and LolB is an outer membrane receptor that accepts lipoproteins. To clarify the structural basis for the lipoprotein transfer from LolA to LolB, we examined the interaction between LolA and mLolB, a soluble mutant of LolB, using solution NMR spectroscopy. We determined the interaction mode between LolA and mLolB with conformational changes of LolA. Based upon the observations, we propose that the LolA·LolB complex forms a tunnel-like structure, where the hydrophobic insides of LolA and LolB are connected, which enables lipoproteins to transfer from LolA to LolB. PMID:19546215

  13. Tautomerism in o-hydroxyanilino-1,4-naphthoquinone derivatives: Structure, NMR, HPLC and density functional theoretic investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhand, Sujit; Patil, Rishikesh; Shinde, Yogesh; Lande, Dipali N.; Rao, Soniya S.; Kathawate, Laxmi; Gejji, Shridhar P.; Weyhermüller, Thomas; Salunke-Gawali, Sunita

    2016-11-01

    Structure and spectral characteristics of 'Ortho' ((E)-4-hydroxy-2-(2‧-(4‧-R)-hydroxyphenyl)-imino)-naphthalen-1(2H)-one) and 'para' (2-(2‧-(4‧-R)-hydroxyphenyl)-amino)-1,4-naphthoquinone) tautomers of o-hydroxyanilino-1,4-naphthoquinone derivatives (Rdbnd H, 1A; sbnd CH3, 2A; and -Cl, 3A) are investigated using the 1H, 13C, DEPT, gDQCOSY, gHSQCAD NMR, HPLC, cyclic voltammetry techniques combined with the density functional theory. The compound 2A crystallizes in monoclinic space group P21/c. wherein the polymer chain is facilitated via Osbnd H⋯O and Csbnd H⋯O intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Marginal variations in bond distances in quinonoid and aminophenol moieties render structural flexibility to these compounds those in solution exist as exist in 'ortho - para' tautomers. 1H and 13C NMR spectra in DMSO-d6 showed two sets of peaks in all compounds; whereas only the para tautomer of for 1A and 2A, the para tautomer is predominant in CD3CN solution. Further the ortho-para interconversion is accompanied by a large up-field signals for C(3)sbnd H(3) in their 1H and 13C NMR spectra. These inferences are corroborated by the density functional theoretic calculations.

  14. DESI-MS imaging and NMR spectroscopy to investigate the influence of biodiesel in the structure of commercial rubbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Lorena M A; Alves Filho, Elenilson G; Simpson, André J; Monteiro, Marcos R; Cabral, Elaine; Ifa, Demian; Venâncio, Tiago

    2017-10-01

    Biodiesel has been introduced as an energetic matrix in several countries around the world. However, the affinity of biodiesel with the components of petrodiesel engines is a growing concern. In order to obtain information regarding the effect of biodiesel on the rubber structure, nuclear magnetic resonance technics under a new technology named as comprehensive multiphase (CMP NMR) and the imaging through desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS imaging) were used. The 1 H CMP-DOSY NMR showed the entrapped fuel into the rubber cavities, which the higher constraint caused by the rubber structure is related to the smaller diffusion coefficient. The less affected type of rubber by biodiesel was ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM), and the most affected was synthetic rubber nitrile (NBR). The 13 C CMP MAS-SPE experiments also confirmed that the internal region of EPDM was less accessible to the biodiesel molecules (no fuels detected) while other rubbers were more susceptible to the penetration of the fuel. DESI-MS imaging revealed for the first time the topography of the rubbers exposed to fuels. The biodiesel molecules entrapped at the EPDM and NBR pores were in oxidized form, which might degrade the rubber structure at long exposure time. The employed technics enabled the study of dynamic and molecular structure of the mixing complex multiphase. The DOSY under CMP used in this study could prove helpful in assessing the interactions throughout all physical phases (liquid, solid, and gel or semi-solid) by observing swellability caused by the fuel in the rubber. In addition, the DESI-MS was especially valuable to detect the degradation products of biodiesel entangled at the rubber structure. In our knowledge, this was the first report in which chemical changes of commercial rubbers induced by biodiesel and petrodiesel were investigated by means of DESI-MS and DOSY NMR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. NMR investigations of molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Arthur

    2011-03-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful experimental approach for characterizing protein conformational dynamics on multiple time scales. The insights obtained from NMR studies are complemented and by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which provide full atomistic details of protein dynamics. Homologous mesophilic (E. coli) and thermophilic (T. thermophilus) ribonuclease H (RNase H) enzymes serve to illustrate how changes in protein sequence and structure that affect conformational dynamic processes can be monitored and characterized by joint analysis of NMR spectroscopy and MD simulations. A Gly residue inserted within a putative hinge between helices B and C is conserved among thermophilic RNases H, but absent in mesophilic RNases H. Experimental spin relaxation measurements show that the dynamic properties of T. thermophilus RNase H are recapitulated in E. coli RNase H by insertion of a Gly residue between helices B and C. Additional specific intramolecular interactions that modulate backbone and sidechain dynamical properties of the Gly-rich loop and of the conserved Trp residue flanking the Gly insertion site have been identified using MD simulations and subsequently confirmed by NMR spin relaxation measurements. These results emphasize the importance of hydrogen bonds and local steric interactions in restricting conformational fluctuations, and the absence of such interactions in allowing conformational adaptation to substrate binding.

  16. Structural Biology: Practical NMR Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Teng, Quincy

    2005-01-01

    This textbook begins with an overview of NMR development and applications in biological systems. It describes recent developments in instrument hardware and methodology. Chapters highlight the scope and limitation of NMR methods. While detailed math and quantum mechanics dealing with NMR theory have been addressed in several well-known NMR volumes, chapter two of this volume illustrates the fundamental principles and concepts of NMR spectroscopy in a more descriptive manner. Topics such as instrument setup, data acquisition, and data processing using a variety of offline software are discussed. Chapters further discuss several routine stategies for preparing samples, especially for macromolecules and complexes. The target market for such a volume includes researchers in the field of biochemistry, chemistry, structural biology and biophysics.

  17. Structural properties of carbon nanotubes derived from 13C NMR

    KAUST Repository

    Abou-Hamad, E.; Babaa, M.-R.; Bouhrara, M.; Kim, Y.; Saih, Y.; Dennler, S.; Mauri, F.; Basset, Jean-Marie; Goze-Bac, C.; Wå gberg, T.

    2011-01-01

    We present a detailed experimental and theoretical study on how structural properties of carbon nanotubes can be derived from 13C NMR investigations. Magic angle spinning solid state NMR experiments have been performed on single- and multiwalled

  18. Investigation of new NMR methods for structural and dynamic studies in the liquid state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desvaux, H.

    1993-01-01

    After a short presentation of the NMR fundements, three new methods of spin -lattice relaxation in liquids are reported. (1) The method consists of measuring the steady-state nuclear magnetization under strong off-resonance rf irradiation as a function of the angle θ between external field and effective field. For purely dipolar relaxation between homonuclear spins under isotropic Brownian molecular rotation, this variation yields the value of the local correlation time. A departure from the theoretical shape reveals the existence of complex motions or complex relaxation mechanisms. These results have been verified by experimental illustrations. Some numerical simulations have been performed for studying the effects of the distribution of chemical shift and for studying the coherence of the local correlation time concept. (2) The improvements of a modified ROESY experiment are discussed. The use of a time-modulated strong off-resonances rf irradiation permits to suppress totally the problems of the NOESY (suppression of cross-relaxation peaks for molecules where ωτ c ≅ 1.1) and of the ROESY (HOHAHA transfer and angular dispersion due to the chemical shift distribution). The angle θ defined previously can be used as a constraint: either to obtain a ratio of the cross over direct dipolar relaxation rates independent on the correlation time value, or to observe the sole chemical exchange. (3) The difference of the relaxation rates of the coherences at zero and two quanta is always exactly the cross relaxation rates measured by the NOESY experiment. The experimental illustration is presented

  19. Chemical and nanometer-scale structure of kerogen and its change during thermal maturation investigated by advanced solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, J.; Fang, X.; Lan, Y.; Schimmelmann, A.; Mastalerz, Maria; Xu, L.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.

    2010-01-01

    We have used advanced and quantitative solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to investigate structural changes in a series of type II kerogen samples from the New Albany Shale across a range of maturity (vitrinite reflectance R0 from 0.29% to 1.27%). Specific functional groups such as CH3, CH2, alkyl CH, aromatic CH, aromatic C-O, and other nonprotonated aromatics, as well as "oil prone" and "gas prone" carbons, have been quantified by 13C NMR; atomic H/C and O/C ratios calculated from the NMR data agree with elemental analysis. Relationships between NMR structural parameters and vitrinite reflectance, a proxy for thermal maturity, were evaluated. The aromatic cluster size is probed in terms of the fraction of aromatic carbons that are protonated (???30%) and the average distance of aromatic C from the nearest protons in long-range H-C dephasing, both of which do not increase much with maturation, in spite of a great increase in aromaticity. The aromatic clusters in the most mature sample consist of ???30 carbons, and of ???20 carbons in the least mature samples. Proof of many links between alkyl chains and aromatic rings is provided by short-range and long-range 1H-13C correlation NMR. The alkyl segments provide most H in the samples; even at a carbon aromaticity of 83%, the fraction of aromatic H is only 38%. While aromaticity increases with thermal maturity, most other NMR structural parameters, including the aromatic C-O fractions, decrease. Aromaticity is confirmed as an excellent NMR structural parameter for assessing thermal maturity. In this series of samples, thermal maturation mostly increases aromaticity by reducing the length of the alkyl chains attached to the aromatic cores, not by pronounced growth of the size of the fused aromatic ring clusters. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Structural Investigation of the Interaction between LolA and LolB Using NMR

    OpenAIRE

    Nakada, Shingo; Sakakura, Masayoshi; Takahashi, Hideo; Okuda, Suguru; Tokuda, Hajime; Shimada, Ichio

    2009-01-01

    Lipoproteins that play critical roles in various cellular functions of Gram-negative bacteria are localized in the cells inner and outer membranes. Lol proteins (LolA, LolB, LolC, LolD, and LolE) are involved in the transportation of outer membrane-directed lipoproteins from the inner to the outer membrane. LolA is a periplasmic chaperone that transports lipoproteins, and LolB is an outer membrane receptor that accepts lipoproteins. To clarify the structural basis for the lipoprotein transfer...

  1. Structural study and investigation of NMR tensors in interaction of dopamine with Adenine and guanine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingjia Xu

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of dopamine with adenine and guanine were studied at the Hartree-Fock level theory. The structural and vibrational properties of dopamine-4-N7GUA and dopamine-4-N3ADE were studied at level of HF/6-31G*. Interaction energies (ΔE were calculated to be -11.49 and -11.92 kcal/mol, respectively. Some of bond lengths, angels and tortions are compared. NBO studies were performed to the second-order and perturbative estimates of donor-acceptor interaction have been done. The procedures of gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO and continuous-set-of-gauge-transformation (CSGT were employed to calculate isotropic shielding, chemical shifts anisotropy and chemical shifts anisotropy asymmetry and effective anisotropy using 6-31G* basis set. These calculations yielded molecular geometries in good agreement with available experimental data.

  2. NMR investigation of coal extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, I; Sebor, G [Ceskoslovenska Akademie Ved, Prague. Hornicky Ustav; Sebor, G Jr; Hajek, M; Mostecky, J [Vysoka Skola Chemicko-Technologicka, Prague (Czechoslovakia)

    1978-07-01

    Proton NMR spectroscopy was used for the evaluation of 10% coal extract solutions in deuterated pyridine. Four types of Czechoslovak coal were analyzed. Agreement was found between the aromaticity of coal extracts calculated from /sup 1/H NMR data using Brown's method and Ladner's and Williams' method and the characterization of an average molecule of the coal extract by the number of non-bridge carbon atoms of aromatic rings, by the overall number of aromatic ring carbon atoms and the number of aromatic rings, determined by the Williams and Ferris methods. The methods for calculating carbon distribution from /sup 1/H NMR data, however, contain some constants theoretically estimated or experimentally found using the method which still remain to be verified.

  3. A 125Te and 23Na NMR investigation of the structure and crystallisation of sodium tellurite glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, D; Bailey, J; Ward, G; Turner, B; Tierney, P; Dupree, R

    2005-01-01

    125Te static nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and 23Na and 125Te magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR have been used, in conjunction with X-ray diffraction, to examine the structure and crystallisation behaviour of glasses of composition xNa2O.(1-x)TeO2 (0.075 x 0.4). The MAS NMR 23Na spectra from the glasses are broad and featureless but shift by approximately +5 ppm with increased x, i.e. as the system becomes more ionic. The static 125Te NMR spectra show an increase in axial symmetry with increasing x, indicating a shift from predominantly [TeO4] to [TeO3] structural units. The 23Na and 125Te spectra from the crystallised samples have been fitted to obtain information on the sites in the metastable crystal phases, which are the first to form on heating and which are therefore more closely related to the glass structure than thermodynamically stable crystal phases. New sodium tellurite phases are reported, including a sodium stabilised, face centred cubic phase related to delta-TeO2; a metastable form of Na2Te4O9 containing 3 sodium and 4 tellurium sites; and a metastable form of Na2Te2O5 containing 2 sodium sites. There is evidence of oxidation of TeIV to TeVI occurring in glasses with high values of x and, at x=0.40 and 0.50 (outside the glass forming range), some sodium metatellurate (Na2TeO4) is formed at the same time as sodium metatellurite (Na2TeO3). The 125Te shift is very sensitive to environment within the sodium tellurite system, covering more than 320 ppm, with anisotropies varying from 640 to 1540 ppm. The lack of features in the 125Te spectra of the glass phases, combined with the large shift range and high but variable anisotropy, means than it is not possible to obtain a unique fit to any presumed species present. Furthermore, the chemical shift anisotropy parameters for three of the four Te sites in the Na2Te4O9 phase are found to lie outside the range used for previous simulations of glass spectra.

  4. Crystal structure, magnetism, {sup 89}Y solid state NMR, and {sup 121}Sb Moessbauer spectroscopic investigations of YIrSb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benndorf, Christopher [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Universitaet Muenster (Germany); Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Universitaet Muenster (Germany); Heletta, Lukas; Block, Theresa; Poettgen, Rainer [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Universitaet Muenster (Germany); Eckert, Hellmut [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Universitaet Muenster (Germany); Institute of Physics in Sao Carlos, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Carlos (Brazil)

    2017-02-15

    The ternary antimonide YIrSb was synthesized from the binary precursor YIr and elemental antimony by a diffusion controlled solid-state reaction. Single crystals were obtained by a flux technique with elemental bismuth as an inert solvent. The YIrSb structure (TiNiSi type, space group Pnma) was refined from single-crystal X-ray diffractometer data: a = 711.06(9), b = 447.74(5), c = 784.20(8) pm, wR{sub 2} = 0.0455, 535 F{sup 2} values, 20 variables. {sup 89}Y solid state MAS NMR and {sup 121}Sb Moessbauer spectra show single resonance lines in agreement with single-crystal X-ray data. YIrSb is a Pauli paramagnet. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Solution NMR structure determination of proteins revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billeter, Martin; Wagner, Gerhard; Wuethrich, Kurt

    2008-01-01

    This 'Perspective' bears on the present state of protein structure determination by NMR in solution. The focus is on a comparison of the infrastructure available for NMR structure determination when compared to protein crystal structure determination by X-ray diffraction. The main conclusion emerges that the unique potential of NMR to generate high resolution data also on dynamics, interactions and conformational equilibria has contributed to a lack of standard procedures for structure determination which would be readily amenable to improved efficiency by automation. To spark renewed discussion on the topic of NMR structure determination of proteins, procedural steps with high potential for improvement are identified

  6. Structural investigations of borosilicate glasses containing MoO{sub 3} by MAS NMR and Raman spectroscopies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caurant, D., E-mail: daniel-caurant@enscp.f [Laboratoire de Chimie de la Matiere Condensee de Paris, UMR-CNRS 7574, Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Paris (ENSCP, ParisTech), 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75231 Paris (France); Majerus, O.; Fadel, E.; Quintas, A. [Laboratoire de Chimie de la Matiere Condensee de Paris, UMR-CNRS 7574, Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Paris (ENSCP, ParisTech), 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75231 Paris (France); Gervais, C. [Laboratoire de Chimie de la Matiere Condensee de Paris, UMR-CNRS 7574, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 75252 Paris (France); Charpentier, T. [CEA, IRAMIS, Service Interdisciplinaire sur les Systemes Moleculaires et Materiaux, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Neuville, D. [Physique des Mineraux et des Magmas, UMR-CNRS 7047, Institut de Physique du Globe, place Jussieu, 75252 Paris (France)

    2010-01-01

    High molybdenum concentration in glass compositions may lead to alkali and alkaline-earth molybdates crystallization during melt cooling that must be controlled particularly during the preparation of highly radioactive nuclear glassy waste forms. To understand the effect of molybdenum addition on the structure of a simplified nuclear glass and to know how composition changes can affect molybdates crystallization tendency, the structure of two glass series belonging to the SiO{sub 2}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Na{sub 2}O-CaO-MoO{sub 3} system was studied by {sup 29}Si, {sup 11}B, {sup 23}Na MAS NMR and Raman spectroscopies by increasing MoO{sub 3} or B{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations. Increasing MoO{sub 3} amount induced an increase of the silicate network reticulation but no significant effect was observed on the proportion of BO{sub 4}{sup -} units and on the distribution of Na{sup +} cations in glass structure. By increasing B{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration, a strong evolution of the distribution of Na{sup +} cations was observed that could explain the evolution of the nature of molybdate crystals (CaMoO{sub 4} or Na{sub 2}MoO{sub 4}) formed during melt cooling.

  7. Integrating Solid-State NMR and Computational Modeling to Investigate the Structure and Dynamics of Membrane-Associated Ghrelin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Els-Heindl, Sylvia; Chollet, Constance; Scheidt, Holger A.; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G.; Meiler, Jens; Huster, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The peptide hormone ghrelin activates the growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a, also known as the ghrelin receptor. This 28-residue peptide is acylated at Ser3 and is the only peptide hormone in the human body that is lipid-modified by an octanoyl group. Little is known about the structure and dynamics of membrane-associated ghrelin. We carried out solid-state NMR studies of ghrelin in lipid vesicles, followed by computational modeling of the peptide using Rosetta. Isotropic chemical shift data of isotopically labeled ghrelin provide information about the peptide’s secondary structure. Spin diffusion experiments indicate that ghrelin binds to membranes via its lipidated Ser3. Further, Phe4, as well as electrostatics involving the peptide’s positively charged residues and lipid polar headgroups, contribute to the binding energy. Other than the lipid anchor, ghrelin is highly flexible and mobile at the membrane surface. This observation is supported by our predicted model ensemble, which is in good agreement with experimentally determined chemical shifts. In the final ensemble of models, residues 8–17 form an α-helix, while residues 21–23 and 26–27 often adopt a polyproline II helical conformation. These helices appear to assist the peptide in forming an amphipathic conformation so that it can bind to the membrane. PMID:25803439

  8. Integrating solid-state NMR and computational modeling to investigate the structure and dynamics of membrane-associated ghrelin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerrit Vortmeier

    Full Text Available The peptide hormone ghrelin activates the growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a, also known as the ghrelin receptor. This 28-residue peptide is acylated at Ser3 and is the only peptide hormone in the human body that is lipid-modified by an octanoyl group. Little is known about the structure and dynamics of membrane-associated ghrelin. We carried out solid-state NMR studies of ghrelin in lipid vesicles, followed by computational modeling of the peptide using Rosetta. Isotropic chemical shift data of isotopically labeled ghrelin provide information about the peptide's secondary structure. Spin diffusion experiments indicate that ghrelin binds to membranes via its lipidated Ser3. Further, Phe4, as well as electrostatics involving the peptide's positively charged residues and lipid polar headgroups, contribute to the binding energy. Other than the lipid anchor, ghrelin is highly flexible and mobile at the membrane surface. This observation is supported by our predicted model ensemble, which is in good agreement with experimentally determined chemical shifts. In the final ensemble of models, residues 8-17 form an α-helix, while residues 21-23 and 26-27 often adopt a polyproline II helical conformation. These helices appear to assist the peptide in forming an amphipathic conformation so that it can bind to the membrane.

  9. NMR studies of the structure of glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bray, P.J.; Gravina, S.J.; Stallworth, P.E.; Szu, S.P.; Jianhui Zhong

    1988-01-01

    Earlier continuous wave (CW) NMR studies of chemical bonding and structure in glasses are summarized. Examples are given of this use of the quadrupolar interaction and chemical shift to obtain structural information. New NMR data and analyses are presented for alkali borate and gallate glasses. Extensions to other elements (e.g. molybdenum, lanthanum) are suggested. 44 refs. (author)

  10. NMR in structure-based drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Marta G; Ab, Eiso; Theisgen, Stephan; Siegal, Gregg

    2017-11-08

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful technique that can provide valuable structural information for drug discovery endeavors. Here, we discuss the strengths (and limitations) of NMR applications to structure-based drug discovery, highlighting the different levels of resolution and throughput obtainable. Additionally, the emerging field of paramagnetic NMR in drug discovery and recent developments in approaches to speed up and automate protein-observed NMR data collection and analysis are discussed. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  11. 13C-NMR assignment, structure, and dynamics of deoxyoligonucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanatta, N.; Borer, P.N.; Levy, G.C.

    1986-01-01

    The unique spectral properties of 13 C-NMR for studying nucleic acids and some of the important features of 13 C-NMR in oligonucleotide studies are demostrated. The main difficulty in studying oligonucleotides by 13 C-NMR and recent improvements in NMR instrumentation and advances in oligonucleotide synthesis are presented. The high resolution 13 C-NMR spectra, T 1 relaxation times and NOEs were measured for duplex of the self-complementary oligo-DNAs: d(CG) 3 and d(GGTATACC) are studied. The target of this study is to developed a systematic 13 C-NMR spectral assignment and to investigate the structure and dynamics of these two sequences by this techniques. (M.J.C.) [pt

  12. NMR in the SPINE Structural Proteomics project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ab, E; Atkinson, A R; Banci, L; Bertini, I; Ciofi-Baffoni, S; Brunner, K; Diercks, T; Dötsch, V; Engelke, F; Folkers, G E; Griesinger, C; Gronwald, W; Günther, U; Habeck, M; de Jong, R N; Kalbitzer, H R; Kieffer, B; Leeflang, B R; Loss, S; Luchinat, C; Marquardsen, T; Moskau, D; Neidig, K P; Nilges, M; Piccioli, M; Pierattelli, R; Rieping, W; Schippmann, T; Schwalbe, H; Travé, G; Trenner, J; Wöhnert, J; Zweckstetter, M; Kaptein, R

    2006-10-01

    This paper describes the developments, role and contributions of the NMR spectroscopy groups in the Structural Proteomics In Europe (SPINE) consortium. Focusing on the development of high-throughput (HTP) pipelines for NMR structure determinations of proteins, all aspects from sample preparation, data acquisition, data processing, data analysis to structure determination have been improved with respect to sensitivity, automation, speed, robustness and validation. Specific highlights are protonless (13)C-direct detection methods and inferential structure determinations (ISD). In addition to technological improvements, these methods have been applied to deliver over 60 NMR structures of proteins, among which are five that failed to crystallize. The inclusion of NMR spectroscopy in structural proteomics pipelines improves the success rate for protein structure determinations.

  13. NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneeland, J.B.; Lee, B.C.P.; Whalen, J.P.; Knowles, R.J.R.; Cahill, P.T.

    1984-01-01

    Although still quite new, NMR imaging has already emerged as a safe, noninvasive, painless, and effective diagnostic modality requiring no ionizing radiation. Also, NMR appears already to have established itself as the method of choice for the examination of the brain spinal cord (excluding herniated disks). Another area in which NMR excels is in the examination of the pelvis. The use of surface coils offers the promise of visualizing structures with resolution unobtainable by any other means. In addition, NMR, with its superb visualization of vascular structures and potential ability to measure flow, may soon revolutionize the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease. Finally, NMR, through biochemically and physiologically based T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ indices or through spectroscopy, may provide a means of monitoring therapeutic response so as to permit tailoring of treatment to the individual patient. In short, NMR is today probably at the same stage as the x-ray was in Roentgen's day

  14. Exploring the Structure of a DNA Hairpin with the Help of NMR Spin-Spin Coupling Constants: An Experimental and Quantum Chemical Investigation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sychrovský, Vladimír; Vacek, Jaroslav; Hobza, Pavel; Žídek, L.; Sklenář, V.; Cremer, D.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 106, - (2002), s. 10242-10250 ISSN 1089-5639 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : DNA * help of NMR spin-spin coupling constants * quantum chemical investigation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.765, year: 2002

  15. Structural Studies of Biological Solids Using NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2011-03-01

    High-resolution structure and dynamics of biological molecules are important in understanding their function. While studies have been successful in solving the structures of water-soluble biomolecules, it has been proven difficult to determine the structures of membrane proteins and fibril systems. Recent studies have shown that solid-state NMR is a promising technique and could be highly valuable in studying such non-crystalline and non-soluble biosystems. I will present strategies to study the structures of such challenging systems and also about the applications of solid-state NMR to study the modes of membrane-peptide interactions for a better assessment of the prospects of antimicrobial peptides as substitutes to antibiotics in the control of human disease. Our studies on the mechanism of membrane disruption by LL-37 (a human antimicrobial peptide), analogs of the naturally occurring antimicrobial peptide magainin2 extracted from the skin of the African frog Xenopus Laevis, and pardaxin will be presented. Solid-state NMR experiments were used to determine the secondary structure, dynamics and topology of these peptides in lipid bilayers. Similarities and difference in the cell-lysing mechanism, and their dependence on the membrane composition, of these peptides will be discussed. Atomic-level resolution NMR structures of amyloidogenic proteins revealing the misfolding pathway and early intermediates that play key roles in amyloid toxicity will also be presented.

  16. Structures of Biomolecules by NMR Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    an edge over the X-ray method as it can be used to study biomolecules ... currently as an Associate. Professor. ... Such a wealth of data is made available to the NMR ... important step towards structural characterization of a biomolecule. Box 1.

  17. Synthesis, structural and vibrational investigation on 2-phenyl-N-(pyrazin-2-yl)acetamide combining XRD diffraction, FT-IR and NMR spectroscopies with DFT calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukose, Jilu; Yohannan Panicker, C; Nayak, Prakash S; Narayana, B; Sarojini, B K; Van Alsenoy, C; Al-Saadi, Abdulaziz A

    2015-01-25

    The optimized molecular structure, vibrational frequencies, corresponding vibrational assignments of 2-phenyl-N-(pyrazin-2-yl)acetamide have been investigated experimentally and theoretically using Gaussian09 software package. The title compound was optimized by using the HF/6-31G(6D,7F) and B3LYP/6-31G(6D,7F) calculations. The geometrical parameters are in agreement with the XRD data. The stability of the molecule arising from hyper-conjugative interaction and charge delocalization has been analyzed using NBO analysis. Gauge-including atomic orbital (1)H-NMR chemical shifts calculations were carried out and compared with experimental data. The HOMO and LUMO analysis is used to determine the charge transfer within the molecule. Molecular electrostatic potential was performed by the DFT method. First hyperpolarizability is calculated in order to find its role in non linear optics. From the XRD data, in the crystal, molecules are held together by strong C-H⋯O and N-H⋯O intermolecular interactions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Structural biology by NMR: structure, dynamics, and interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phineus R L Markwick

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The function of bio-macromolecules is determined by both their 3D structure and conformational dynamics. These molecules are inherently flexible systems displaying a broad range of dynamics on time-scales from picoseconds to seconds. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR spectroscopy has emerged as the method of choice for studying both protein structure and dynamics in solution. Typically, NMR experiments are sensitive both to structural features and to dynamics, and hence the measured data contain information on both. Despite major progress in both experimental approaches and computational methods, obtaining a consistent view of structure and dynamics from experimental NMR data remains a challenge. Molecular dynamics simulations have emerged as an indispensable tool in the analysis of NMR data.

  19. Structure of high-resolution NMR spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Corio, PL

    2012-01-01

    Structure of High-Resolution NMR Spectra provides the principles, theories, and mathematical and physical concepts of high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectra.The book presents the elementary theory of magnetic resonance; the quantum mechanical theory of angular momentum; the general theory of steady state spectra; and multiple quantum transitions, double resonance and spin echo experiments.Physicists, chemists, and researchers will find the book a valuable reference text.

  20. Automated protein structure calculation from NMR data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, Mike P.; Craven, C. Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    Current software is almost at the stage to permit completely automatic structure determination of small proteins of <15 kDa, from NMR spectra to structure validation with minimal user interaction. This goal is welcome, as it makes structure calculation more objective and therefore more easily validated, without any loss in the quality of the structures generated. Moreover, it releases expert spectroscopists to carry out research that cannot be automated. It should not take much further effort to extend automation to ca 20 kDa. However, there are technological barriers to further automation, of which the biggest are identified as: routines for peak picking; adoption and sharing of a common framework for structure calculation, including the assembly of an automated and trusted package for structure validation; and sample preparation, particularly for larger proteins. These barriers should be the main target for development of methodology for protein structure determination, particularly by structural genomics consortia

  1. 13C solid state NMR investigation of natural resins components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavares, Maria I.B.; Bathista, Andre L.B.S.; Silva, Emerson O.; Priante Filho, Nicolau; Nogueira, Jose S.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this work is to establish and analytical methodology as a routine using solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to investigate the mainly chemical components presented in natural resins in bulk. And also to evaluate the molecular behaviour of these resins. The routine solid state techniques allow us to assign the main compounds presented in the resins. Therefore, applying specialised techniques, like variable contact time, delayed contact time, dephasing time and proton spin lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame (T 1 H ρ), more information about chemical structure and molecular dynamic is available

  2. Structural properties of carbon nanotubes derived from 13C NMR

    KAUST Repository

    Abou-Hamad, E.

    2011-10-10

    We present a detailed experimental and theoretical study on how structural properties of carbon nanotubes can be derived from 13C NMR investigations. Magic angle spinning solid state NMR experiments have been performed on single- and multiwalled carbon nanotubes with diameters in the range from 0.7 to 100 nm and with number of walls from 1 to 90. We provide models on how diameter and the number of nanotube walls influence NMR linewidth and line position. Both models are supported by theoretical calculations. Increasing the diameter D, from the smallest investigated nanotube, which in our study corresponds to the inner nanotube of a double-walled tube to the largest studied diameter, corresponding to large multiwalled nanotubes, leads to a 23.5 ppm diamagnetic shift of the isotropic NMR line position δ. We show that the isotropic line follows the relation δ = 18.3/D + 102.5 ppm, where D is the diameter of the tube and NMR line position δ is relative to tetramethylsilane. The relation asymptotically tends to approach the line position expected in graphene. A characteristic broadening of the line shape is observed with the increasing number of walls. This feature can be rationalized by an isotropic shift distribution originating from different diamagnetic shielding of the encapsulated nanotubes together with a heterogeneity of the samples. Based on our results, NMR is shown to be a nondestructive spectroscopic method that can be used as a complementary method to, for example, transmission electron microscopy to obtain structural information for carbon nanotubes, especially bulk samples.

  3. Structural investigations of flavonol glycosides from sea buckthorn (Hippophaë rhamnoides) pomace by NMR spectroscopy and HPLC-ESI-MS(n).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rösch, Daniel; Krumbein, Angelika; Mügge, Clemens; Kroh, Lothar W

    2004-06-30

    Four flavonol glycosides were isolated from an extract of sea buckthorn pomace (Hippophaë rhamnoides) by Sephadex LH-20 gel chromatography and semipreparative HPLC. Their structures were elucidated by hydrolysis studies, ESI-MS(n), UV, and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. The occurrence of the major flavonol glycoside kaempferol 3-O-beta-sophoroside-7-O-alpha-rhamnoside in sea buckthorn is described here for the first time. A further 21 flavonol glycosides of Sephadex LH-20 fractions of sea buckthorn pomace were characterized by HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS. The characteristic MS-MS and MS(3) fragmentation pattern of flavonol glycosides previously identified in sea buckthorn juice and of flavonol glycosides identified by NMR spectroscopy gave valuable indications for their identification. The results demonstrate that loss of the sugar moiety from C-7 of the aglycon is more favored than fission of the glycosidic linkage at the C-3 position. Thus, most of the compounds identified were 7-rhamnosides of isorhamnetin, kaempferol, and quercetin, which exhibit different substitution patterns at the C-3 position, mainly glucosides, rutinosides, and sophorosides. In addition, numerous flavonol glycosides were detected lacking a sugar moiety at C-7. Finally, eight flavonol derivatives were identified that are acylated by hydroxybenzoic or hydoxycinnamic acids.

  4. Investigation of the spatial structure of des-Gly9-[Arg8]vasopressin by the methods of two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy and theoretical conformational analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shenderovich, M.D.; Sekatsis, I.P.; Liepin'sh, E.E.; Nikiforovich, G.V.; Papsuevich, O.S.

    1986-01-01

    An assignment of the 1 H NMR signals of des-Gly 9 -[Arg 8 ]vasopressin in dimethyl sulfoxide has been made by 2D spectroscopy. The SSCCs and temperature coefficients Δδ/Δ T have been obtained for the amide protons and the system of NOE cross-peaks in the two-dimensional NOESY spectrum has been analyzed. The most important information on the spatial structure of des-Gly 9 -[Arg 8 ]vasopressin is given by the low value of the temperature coefficient Δδ/Δ T of the Asn 5 amide proton and the NOE between the α-protons of Cys 1 and Cys 6 . It is assumed that the screening of the NH proton of the Asn 5 residue from the solvent is connected with a β-bend of the backbone in the 2-5 sequence, and the distance between the C/sup α/H atoms of the Cys 1 and Cys 6 residues does not exceed 4 A. Bearing these limitations in mind, a theoretical conformational analysis of the molecule has been made. The group of low-energy conformations of the backbone obtained has been compared with the complete set of NMR characteristics

  5. Fluorine dynamics in BaF2 superionic conductors investigated by NMR

    OpenAIRE

    Gumann, Patryk

    2008-01-01

    In this work the dynamics of fluorine in solid-state electrolytes having BaF2-structure was investigated using three different NMR-methods: field cycling relaxometry, lineshape analysis, and static field gradient NMR. For this purpose a pure BaF2 crystal, as well as crystals doped with trivalent impurities (LaF3), were studied as a function of temperature. The main goal of this investigation was to utilize the structure information provided by neutron scattering and MAS NMR data in order to s...

  6. Introduction to the conformational investigation of peptides and proteins by using two-dimensional proton NMR experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumann, J.M.; Macquaire, F.

    1991-01-01

    This report presents the elementary bases for an initiation to the conformational study of peptides and proteins by using two-dimensional proton NMR experiments. First, some general features of protein structures are summarized. A second chapter is devoted to the basic NMR experiments and to the spectral parameters which provide a structural information. This description is illustrated by NMR spectra of peptides. The third chapter concerns the most standard two-dimensional proton NMR experiments and their use for a conformational study of peptides and proteins. Lastly, an example of NMR structural investigation of a peptide is reported [fr

  7. NMR investigations of structural and dynamics features of natively unstructured drug peptide - salmon calcitonin: implication to rational design of potent sCT analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, Atul; Kumar, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    Backbone dynamics and conformational properties of drug peptide salmon calcitonin have been studied in aqueous solution using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Although salmon calcitonin (sCT) is largely unfolded in solution (as has been reported in several circular dichroism studies), the secondary H(α) chemical shifts and three bond H(N) -H(α) coupling constants indicated that most of the residues of the peptide are populating the α-helical region of the Ramachandran (ϕ, ψ) map. Further, the peptide in solution has been found to exhibit multiple conformational states exchanging slowly on the NMR timescale (10(2) -10(3)  s(-1) ), inferred by the multiple chemical shift assignments in the region Leu4-Leu12 and around Pro23 (for residues Gln20-Tyr22 and Arg24). Possibly, these slowly exchanging multiple conformational states might inhibit symmetric self-association of the peptide and, in part, may account for its reduced aggregation propensity compared with human calcitonin (which lacks this property). The (15) N NMR-relaxation data revealed (i) the presence of slow (microsecond-to-millisecond) timescale dynamics in the N-terminal region (Cys1-Ser5) and core residues His17 and Asn26 and (ii) the presence of high frequency (nanosecond-to-picosecond) motions in the C-terminal arm. Put together, the various results suggested that (i) the flexible C-terminal of sCT (from Thr25-Thr31) is involved in identification of specific target receptors, (ii) whereas the N-terminal of sCT (from Cys1-Gln20) in solution - exhibiting significant amount of conformational plasticity and strong bias towards biologically active α-helical structure - facilitates favorable conformational adaptations while interacting with the intermembrane domains of these target receptors. Thus, we believe that the structural and dynamics features of sCT presented here will be useful guiding attributes for the rational design of biologically active sCT analogs. Copyright © 2012 European Peptide

  8. Additivity, redundancy, and complementarity between structural information from NMR and SAXS data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Masaki; Nonaka, Takamasa; Morimoto, Yasumasa; Nakagawa, Takashi; Yanagi, Shigeru; Kihara, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    At present protein structure in solution is determined by restrained molecular dynamics with distance restraints mainly derived from NMR. Although the small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) method also confers the structural information, its content is too small to determine the structure by itself. We previously developed a new algorithm that refines the protein structure by restrained molecular dynamics with SAXS constrains. In the present study we performed the protein structure calculation by restrained molecular dynamics with both NMR and SAXS constraints, in order to elucidate the essential structural information that defines the protein architecture. We used RNase T1 as a model protein, which has already been determined by NMR alone. At first we added SAXS constraints (h -1 ) into the original NMR-derived restraints for the calculation. The quality of the structure ensemble was significantly increased. Next we removed the original NMR restraints randomly in order to estimate the redundancy among the NMR-derived information. The essential topology of the resultant structures was hardly changed until the restraints were reduced below the half. Then we added the SAXS constraints into the remaining NMR restraints to expect they could complement the lost structural information. However, the structure was not recovered properly. By removing various types of structural information exclusively from the original NMR data set, we investigated whether the SAXS constraints could complement some kinds of structural information. The results showed that the SAXS could complement the tertiary structure to some extent while it could not secondary structure. (author)

  9. Investigation of zeolites by solid state quadrapole NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssen, R.

    1990-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the NMR investigation of zeolites. The nature and properties of zeolites are discussed. Some of the basic priniples of NMR techniques on quadrupole nuclei are presented. A special technique, namely a two-dimensional nutation experiment is discussed in detail. The theory of the nutation experiment for quadrupole spin species with spin quantum number 3/2 as well as 5/2 is presented. For both spin spcies the theoretical spectra are compared with experimental results. It is also shown that the nutation expeirment can be performed with several pulse schemes. It is shown how phase-sensitive pure-absorption nutation spectra can be obtained and an NMR-probe is presented that is capable of performing NMR experiments at high (up to 500 degree C) temperatures. The two-dimensional nutation NMR technique has been applied to sodium cations in zeolite NaA. For this purpose a numbre of zeolite samples were prepared that contained different amounts of water. With the aid of nutation NMR the hydration of the zeolite can be studied and conclusions can be drawn about the symmetry of the surrounding of the sodium cations. With the aid of an extension of the nutation NMR experiment: Rotary Echo Nutation NMR, it is shown that in zeolite NaA, in various stages of hydration, the sodium cations or water molecules are mobile. Proof is given by means of high-temperature 23 Na-NMR that dehydrates zeolite NaA undergoes a phase transition at ca. 120 degree C. In a high-temperature NMR investigation of zeolite ZSM-5 it is shown that the sodium ions start to execute motions when the temperature is increased. (author). 198 refs.; 72 figs.; 6 tabs

  10. Synergic Investigation Of The Self-Assembly Structure And Mechanism Of Retroviral Capsid Proteins By Solid State NMR, Transmission Electron Microscopy And Multiscale simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-29

    18], a question naturally arises: if our ssNMR constraints actually impart any meaningful differences to the final model. To answer this question...Mitra at University of Auckland. Xin Qiao, Dr. Chen’s student, presented the ssNMR assignment strategy as a poster presentation titled “Methods

  11. NMR data-driven structure determination using NMR-I-TASSER in the CASD-NMR experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Richard [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, School of Software Engineering (China); Wang, Yan [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, School of Life Science and Technology (China); Xue, Zhidong, E-mail: zdxue@hust.edu.cn [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, School of Software Engineering (China); Zhang, Yang, E-mail: zhng@umich.edu [University of Michigan, Department of Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics (United States)

    2015-08-15

    NMR-I-TASSER, an adaption of the I-TASSER algorithm combining NMR data for protein structure determination, recently joined the second round of the CASD-NMR experiment. Unlike many molecular dynamics-based methods, NMR-I-TASSER takes a molecular replacement-like approach to the problem by first threading the target through the PDB to identify structural templates which are then used for iterative NOE assignments and fragment structure assembly refinements. The employment of multiple templates allows NMR-I-TASSER to sample different topologies while convergence to a single structure is not required. Retroactive and blind tests of the CASD-NMR targets from Rounds 1 and 2 demonstrate that even without using NOE peak lists I-TASSER can generate correct structure topology with 15 of 20 targets having a TM-score above 0.5. With the addition of NOE-based distance restraints, NMR-I-TASSER significantly improved the I-TASSER models with all models having the TM-score above 0.5. The average RMSD was reduced from 5.29 to 2.14 Å in Round 1 and 3.18 to 1.71 Å in Round 2. There is no obvious difference in the modeling results with using raw and refined peak lists, indicating robustness of the pipeline to the NOE assignment errors. Overall, despite the low-resolution modeling the current NMR-I-TASSER pipeline provides a coarse-grained structure folding approach complementary to traditional molecular dynamics simulations, which can produce fast near-native frameworks for atomic-level structural refinement.

  12. NMR structural and dynamical investigation of the isolated voltage-sensing domain of the potassium channel KvAP: implications for voltage gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Paramonov, Alexander S; Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N; Shingarova, Lyudmila N; Yakimov, Sergei A; Dubinnyi, Maxim A; Chupin, Vladimir V; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P; Blommers, Marcel J J; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2010-04-28

    The structure and dynamics of the isolated voltage-sensing domain (VSD) of the archaeal potassium channel KvAP was studied by high-resolution NMR. The almost complete backbone resonance assignment and partial side-chain assignment of the (2)H,(13)C,(15)N-labeled VSD were obtained for the protein domain solubilized in DPC/LDAO (2:1) mixed micelles. Secondary and tertiary structures of the VSD were characterized using secondary chemical shifts and NOE contacts. These data indicate that the spatial structure of the VSD solubilized in micelles corresponds to the structure of the domain in an open state of the channel. NOE contacts and secondary chemical shifts of amide protons indicate the presence of tightly bound water molecule as well as hydrogen bond formation involving an interhelical salt bridge (Asp62-R133) that stabilizes the overall structure of the domain. The backbone dynamics of the VSD was studied using (15)N relaxation measurements. The loop regions S1-S2 and S2-S3 were found mobile, while the S3-S4 loop (voltage-sensor paddle) was found stable at the ps-ns time scale. The moieties of S1, S2, S3, and S4 helices sharing interhelical contacts (at the level of the Asp62-R133 salt bridge) were observed in conformational exchange on the micros-ms time scale. Similar exchange-induced broadening of characteristic resonances was observed for the VSD solubilized in the membrane of lipid-protein nanodiscs composed of DMPC, DMPG, and POPC/DOPG lipids. Apparently, the observed interhelical motions represent an inherent property of the VSD of the KvAP channel and can play an important role in the voltage gating.

  13. Comparative NMR investigation of the Re-based borides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lue, C. S.; Tao, Y. F.; Su, T. H.

    2008-07-01

    We report a systematic study of the rhenium-based borides, ReB2 , Re7B3 , and Re3B , by means of the B11 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. While Re7B3 and Re3B are superconductors, ReB2 exhibits no superconducting signature but is of current interest due to its superhard mechanical property. Since the major focus of this investigation is their electronic characteristics in the normal states, we performed the measurements at temperatures between 77 and 295 K. For Re7B3 and Re3B , s -character electrons were found to be responsible for the observed B11 NMR Knight shift and spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T1) . From T1 analysis, we thus deduce the partial Bs Fermi-level density of states (DOS) of both borides. On the other hand, the relaxation rate of ReB2 is mainly associated with p electrons, similar to the cases of OsB2 and RuB2 . In addition, the extracted B2p Fermi-level DOS is in good agreement with the theoretical prediction from band-structure calculations.

  14. NMR investigations of the melting behaviour of mesogen compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limmer, S.; Grande, S.; Loesche, A.

    1977-01-01

    Proton NMR spectra of mesogen compounds in the solid phase are recorded. Between 20 and 40 K and 4 and 12 K below the melting point they exhibit a very narrow central line with a structure caused by the chemical shift, which is superimposed to the broad structureless line normally expected from polycrystalline solid phases. It is concluded that it originates from ''quasi-liquid'' molecules whose intensity grows drastically with increasing temperature and involves a maximum of about 2.5% of the whole intensity of the spectrum. In the region close to the melting point appears another lineshape, the so-called ''super-Lorentzian'' line, whose intensity increases still stronger than that of the narrow line. It can be shown that it is due to the existence of mesomorphic clusters the directors of which are statistically distributed in the sample. The impurity dependence of these effects is investigated and an attempt is made to explain them. (author)

  15. Isotope labeling for NMR studies of macromolecular structure and interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, P.E.

    1994-01-01

    Implementation of biosynthetic methods for uniform or specific isotope labeling of proteins, coupled with the recent development of powerful heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods, has led to a dramatic increase in the size and complexity of macromolecular systems that are now amenable to NMR structural analysis. In recent years, a new technology has emerged that combines uniform 13 C, 15 N labeling with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods to allow NMR structural studies of systems approaching 25 to 30 kDa in molecular weight. In addition, with the introduction of specific 13 C and 15 N labels into ligands, meaningful NMR studies of complexes of even higher molecular weight have become feasible. These advances usher in a new era in which the earlier, rather stringent molecular weight limitations have been greatly surpassed and NMR can begin to address many central biological problems that involve macromolecular structure, dynamics, and interactions

  16. Isotope labeling for NMR studies of macromolecular structure and interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, P.E. [Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Implementation of biosynthetic methods for uniform or specific isotope labeling of proteins, coupled with the recent development of powerful heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods, has led to a dramatic increase in the size and complexity of macromolecular systems that are now amenable to NMR structural analysis. In recent years, a new technology has emerged that combines uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeling with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods to allow NMR structural studies of systems approaching 25 to 30 kDa in molecular weight. In addition, with the introduction of specific {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N labels into ligands, meaningful NMR studies of complexes of even higher molecular weight have become feasible. These advances usher in a new era in which the earlier, rather stringent molecular weight limitations have been greatly surpassed and NMR can begin to address many central biological problems that involve macromolecular structure, dynamics, and interactions.

  17. Structural Characterization of Febuxostat/l-Pyroglutamic Acid Cocrystal Using Solid-State 13C-NMR and Investigational Study of Its Water Solubility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Hun An

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Febuxostat (FB is a poorly water-soluble drug that belongs to BCS class II. The drug is employed for the treatment of inflammatory disease arthritis urica (gout, and the free base, FB form-A, is most preferred for drug formulation. In order to achieve a goal of improving the water solubility of FB form-A, this study was carried out using the cocrystallization technique called the liquid-assisted grinding method to produce FB cocrystals. Here, five amino acids containing amine (NH, oxygen (O, and hydroxyl (OH functional groups, and possessing difference of pKa less than 3 with FB, were selected as coformers. Then, solvents including methanol, ethanol, isopropyl alcohol, n-hexane, dichloromethane, and acetone were used for the cocrystal screening. As a result, a cocrystal was obtained when acetone and l-pyroglutamic acid (PG of 0.5 eq. were employed as solvent and coformer, respectively. The ratio of 2:1, which is the ratio of FB to PG within FB-PG cocrystal, was predicted by means of solid-state CP/MAS 13C-NMR, solution-state NMR (1H, 13C, and 2D and FT-IR. Moreover, Powder X-ray Diffraction (PXRD, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC, and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA were used to investigate the characteristics of FB-PG cocrystal. In addition, comparative solubility tests between FB-PG cocrystal and FB form-A were conducted in deionized water and under simulated gastrointestinal pH (1.2, 4, and 6.8 conditions. The result revealed that FB-PG cocrystal has a solubility of four-fold higher than FB form-A in deionized water and two-fold and five-fold greater than FB form-A at simulated gastrointestinal pH 1.2 and pH 4, respectively. Besides, solubilities of FB-PG cocrystal and FB form-A at pH 6.8 were similar to the results measured in deionized water. Therefore, it is postulated that FB-PG cocrystal has a potential overcoming the limitations related to the low aqueous solubility of FB form-A. Accordingly, FB-PG cocrystal is suggested as an

  18. NMR structural studies of oligosaccharides and other natural products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærulff, Louise

    produce secondary metabolites for signaling and competing against other organisms, and these molecules are important in drug discovery due to their inherent biological activities. From a marine Photobacterium (P. halotolerans) we isolated the solonamides and the ngercheumicins, two families of cyclic...... through the nJCH correlation, this experiment has exciting applications for configurational assignment of e.g. carbohydrates and for residual dipolar couplings. Identification of known molecules and discovery of novel molecules are other important applications of NMR spectroscopy. Bacteria and fungi....... fijiensis, was also investigated for production of novel secondary metabolites, and a new pyranonigrin (E) was isolated and structure elucidated by NMR spectroscopy along with JBIR-74 and decumbenone A, two known metabolites previously isolated from Aspergillus and Penicillium species. Oligosaccharides...

  19. An NMR investigation of the structure, function and role of the hERG channel selectivity filter in the long QT syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravel, Andrée E; Arnold, Alexandre A; Dufourc, Erick J; Marcotte, Isabelle

    2013-06-01

    The human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) voltage-gated K(+) channels are located in heart cell membranes and hold a unique selectivity filter (SF) amino acid sequence (SVGFG) as compared to other K(+) channels (TVGYG). The hERG provokes the acquired long QT syndrome (ALQTS) when blocked, as a side effect of drugs, leading to arrhythmia or heart failure. Its pore domain - including the SF - is believed to be a cardiotoxic drug target. In this study combining solution and solid-state NMR experiments we examine the structure and function of hERG's L(622)-K(638) segment which comprises the SF, as well as its role in the ALQTS using reported active drugs. We first show that the SF segment is unstructured in solution with and without K(+) ions in its surroundings, consistent with the expected flexibility required for the change between the different channel conductive states predicted by computational studies. We also show that the SF segment has the potential to perturb the membrane, but that the presence of K(+) ions cancels this interaction. The SF moiety appears to be a possible target for promethazine in the ALQTS mechanism, but not as much for bepridil, cetirizine, diphenhydramine and fluvoxamine. The membrane affinity of the SF is also affected by the presence of drugs which also perturb model DMPC-based membranes. These results thus suggest that the membrane could play a role in the ALQTS by promoting the access to transmembrane or intracellular targets on the hERG channel, or perturbing the lipid-protein synergy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Electronic structure investigations of 4-aminophthal hydrazide by UV-visible, NMR spectral studies and HOMO-LUMO analysis by ab initio and DFT calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambathkumar, K; Jeyavijayan, S; Arivazhagan, M

    2015-08-05

    Combined experimental and theoretical studies were conducted on the molecular structure and vibrational spectra of 4-AminoPhthalhydrazide (APH). The FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of APH were recorded in the solid phase. The molecular geometry and vibrational frequencies of APH in the ground state have been calculated by using the ab initio HF (Hartree-Fock) and density functional methods (B3LYP) invoking 6-311+G(d,p) basis set. The optimized geometric bond lengths and bond angles obtained by HF and B3LYP method show best agreement with the experimental values. Comparison of the observed fundamental vibrational frequencies of APH with calculated results by HF and density functional methods indicates that B3LYP is superior to the scaled Hartree-Fock approach for molecular vibrational problems. The difference between the observed and scaled wave number values of most of the fundamentals is very small. A detailed interpretation of the NMR spectra of APH was also reported. The theoretical spectrograms for infrared and Raman spectra of the title molecule have been constructed. UV-vis spectrum of the compound was recorded and the electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies, were performed by time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) approach. Finally the calculations results were applied to simulated infrared and Raman spectra of the title compound which show good agreement with observed spectra. And the temperature dependence of the thermodynamic properties of constant pressure (Cp), entropy (S) and enthalpy change (ΔH0→T) for APH were also determined. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The plane-wave DFT investigations into the structure and the 11B solid-state NMR parameters of lithium fluorooxoborates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Czernek, Jiří; Brus, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 666, 1 December (2016), s. 22-27 ISSN 0009-2614 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : NMR * DFT * fluorooxoborates Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.815, year: 2016

  2. 1H NMR and small-angle neutron scattering investigation of the structure and solubilization behavior of three-layer nanoparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kříž, Jaroslav; Pleštil, Josef; Pospíšil, Herman; Kadlec, Petr; Koňák, Čestmír; Almásy, L.; Kuklin, A. I.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 25 (2004), s. 11255-11263 ISSN 0743-7463 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/03/0600 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : nanoparticles * polymer micelles * NMR Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 3.295, year: 2004

  3. Comparison of NMR and crystal structures for the proteins TM1112 and TM1367

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanty, Biswaranjan; Serrano, Pedro; Pedrini, Bill; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Geralt, Michael; Horst, Reto; Herrmann, Torsten; Elsliger, Marc-André; Wilson, Ian A.; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    NMR structures of the proteins TM1112 and TM1367 solved by the JCSG in solution at 298 K could be superimposed with the corresponding crystal structures at 100 K with r.m.s.d. values of <1.0 Å for the backbone heavy atoms. For both proteins the structural differences between multiple molecules in the asymmetric unit of the crystals correlated with structural variations within the bundles of conformers used to represent the NMR solution structures. A recently introduced JCSG NMR structure-determination protocol, which makes use of the software package UNIO for extensive automation, was further evaluated by comparison of the TM1112 structure obtained using these automated methods with another NMR structure that was independently solved in another PSI center, where a largely interactive approach was applied. The NMR structures of the TM1112 and TM1367 proteins from Thermotoga maritima in solution at 298 K were determined following a new protocol which uses the software package UNIO for extensive automation. The results obtained with this novel procedure were evaluated by comparison with the crystal structures solved by the JCSG at 100 K to 1.83 and 1.90 Å resolution, respectively. In addition, the TM1112 solution structure was compared with an NMR structure solved by the NESG using a conventional largely interactive methodology. For both proteins, the newly determined NMR structure could be superimposed with the crystal structure with r.m.s.d. values of <1.0 Å for the backbone heavy atoms, which provided a starting platform to investigate local structure variations, which may arise from either the methods used or from the different chemical environments in solution and in the crystal. Thereby, these comparative studies were further explored with the use of reference NMR and crystal structures, which were computed using the NMR software with input of upper-limit distance constraints derived from the molecular models that represent the results of structure

  4. Guiding automated NMR structure determination using a global optimization metric, the NMR DP score

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yuanpeng Janet, E-mail: yphuang@cabm.rutgers.edu; Mao, Binchen; Xu, Fei; Montelione, Gaetano T., E-mail: gtm@rutgers.edu [Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, and Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium (United States)

    2015-08-15

    ASDP is an automated NMR NOE assignment program. It uses a distinct bottom-up topology-constrained network anchoring approach for NOE interpretation, with 2D, 3D and/or 4D NOESY peak lists and resonance assignments as input, and generates unambiguous NOE constraints for iterative structure calculations. ASDP is designed to function interactively with various structure determination programs that use distance restraints to generate molecular models. In the CASD–NMR project, ASDP was tested and further developed using blinded NMR data, including resonance assignments, either raw or manually-curated (refined) NOESY peak list data, and in some cases {sup 15}N–{sup 1}H residual dipolar coupling data. In these blinded tests, in which the reference structure was not available until after structures were generated, the fully-automated ASDP program performed very well on all targets using both the raw and refined NOESY peak list data. Improvements of ASDP relative to its predecessor program for automated NOESY peak assignments, AutoStructure, were driven by challenges provided by these CASD–NMR data. These algorithmic improvements include (1) using a global metric of structural accuracy, the discriminating power score, for guiding model selection during the iterative NOE interpretation process, and (2) identifying incorrect NOESY cross peak assignments caused by errors in the NMR resonance assignment list. These improvements provide a more robust automated NOESY analysis program, ASDP, with the unique capability of being utilized with alternative structure generation and refinement programs including CYANA, CNS, and/or Rosetta.

  5. Structural studies of SpoIIAA using NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comfort, D.M.

    1998-01-01

    The protein SpoIIAA participates, via phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, in the four-component system that regulates the sporulation sigma factor e. Differential gene expression depends on specialised transcription factors called sigma factors, which direct the RNA polymerase to transcribe specific genes in one or other of the two chambers at various stages of sporulation. The first sporulation-specific sigma factor to be activated is 4 transcription that depends on σ F is essential for the remaining sigma factors to become active in turn. Early in sporulation SpoIIAA is in the phosphorylated state (SpoIIAA-P), as a result of the activity of the ATP-dependent protein kinase, SpoIIAB. About 80 minutes after the initiation of sporulation a specific phosphatase, SpoIIE, begins to hydrolyse SpoIIAA-P, and the resulting SpoIIAA again becomes a substrate for SpoIIAB. SpoIIAB is also an anti-sigma factor which in its free form inhibits a F by binding to it. Competition by SpoIIAA (the anti-anti-sigma factor) for binding to SpoIIAB releases e activity. The three-dimensional structure of SpoIIAA has been determined using high resolution NMR. SpoIIAA has a novel fold, composed of a-helices and P-strand elements. The structural differences between SpoIIAA and its inactive form, SpoIIAA-P, were also investigated by NMR. Tentative evidence points to the observation that phosphorylation of SpoIIAA results in a minor conformational change near the site of phosphorylation, which interferes with the hydrophobic interaction between SpoIIAA and SpoIIAB. Further NMR studies helped to predict the location of SpoIIAA-, GTP-, and ATP-binding sites on the SpoIIAA structure. In addition, the automated iterative NOE assignment algorithm, ARIA, was used to obtain additional NOE-based distance constraints and to calculate a refined structure. (author)

  6. Compatible topologies and parameters for NMR structure determination of carbohydrates by simulated annealing

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Yingang

    2017-01-01

    The use of NMR methods to determine the three-dimensional structures of carbohydrates and glycoproteins is still challenging, in part because of the lack of standard protocols. In order to increase the convenience of structure determination, the topology and parameter files for carbohydrates in the program Crystallography & NMR System (CNS) were investigated and new files were developed to be compatible with the standard simulated annealing protocols for proteins and nucleic acids. Recalculat...

  7. Crystal structure, quantum mechanical investigation, IR and NMR spectroscopy of two new organic salts: (C8H12NO)·[NO3] (I) and (C8H14N4)·[ClO4]2 (II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayar, I.; Khedhiri, L.; Soudani, S.; Lefebvre, F.; Pereira da Silva, P. S.; Ben Nasr, C.

    2018-06-01

    Two new organic-inorganic hybrid materials, 4-methoxybenzylammonium nitrate, (C8H12NO)·[NO3] (I), and 2-(1-piperazinyl)pyrimidinium bis(perchlorate), (C8H14N4)·[ClO4]2(II), have been synthesized by an acid/base reaction at room temperature, their structures were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound (I) crystallizes in the orthorhombic system and Pnma space group with a = 15.7908 (7), b = 6.8032 (3), c = 8.7091 (4) Å, V = 935.60 (7) Å3 with Z = 4. Full-matrix least-squares refinement converged at R = 0.038 and wR(F2) = 0.115. Compound (II) belongs to the monoclinic system, space group P21/c with the following parameters: a = 10.798(2), b = 7.330(1), c = 21.186(2) Å, β = 120.641 (4)°, V = 1442.7 (3) Å3and Z = 4. The structure was refined to R = 0.044, wR(F2) = 0.132. In the structures of (I) and (II), the anionic and cationic entities are interconnected by hydrogen bonding contacts forming three-dimensional networks. Intermolecular interactions were investigated by Hirshfeld surfaces and the contacts of the four different chloride atoms in (II) were compared. The Molecular Electrostatic Potential (MEP) maps and the HOMO and LUMO energy gaps of both compounds were computed. The vibrational absorption bands were identified by infrared spectroscopy. These compounds were also investigated by solid-state 13C, 35Cl and 15N NMR spectroscopy. DFT calculations allowed the attribution of the IR and NMR bands.

  8. Refinement of NMR structures using implicit solvent and advanced sampling techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianhan; Im, Wonpil; Brooks, Charles L

    2004-12-15

    NMR biomolecular structure calculations exploit simulated annealing methods for conformational sampling and require a relatively high level of redundancy in the experimental restraints to determine quality three-dimensional structures. Recent advances in generalized Born (GB) implicit solvent models should make it possible to combine information from both experimental measurements and accurate empirical force fields to improve the quality of NMR-derived structures. In this paper, we study the influence of implicit solvent on the refinement of protein NMR structures and identify an optimal protocol of utilizing these improved force fields. To do so, we carry out structure refinement experiments for model proteins with published NMR structures using full NMR restraints and subsets of them. We also investigate the application of advanced sampling techniques to NMR structure refinement. Similar to the observations of Xia et al. (J.Biomol. NMR 2002, 22, 317-331), we find that the impact of implicit solvent is rather small when there is a sufficient number of experimental restraints (such as in the final stage of NMR structure determination), whether implicit solvent is used throughout the calculation or only in the final refinement step. The application of advanced sampling techniques also seems to have minimal impact in this case. However, when the experimental data are limited, we demonstrate that refinement with implicit solvent can substantially improve the quality of the structures. In particular, when combined with an advanced sampling technique, the replica exchange (REX) method, near-native structures can be rapidly moved toward the native basin. The REX method provides both enhanced sampling and automatic selection of the most native-like (lowest energy) structures. An optimal protocol based on our studies first generates an ensemble of initial structures that maximally satisfy the available experimental data with conventional NMR software using a simplified

  9. Development and Investigation of NMR tools for chiral compound identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Todd Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electronic, Optical and Nano Materials; Lansdon, Rick [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The goal behind the assigned summer project was to investigate the ability of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) to identify enantiomers of select chiral organo-fluorophosphates (OFPs) compounds which are analogs of chemical warfare agents (CWAs, e.g. Sarin). This involved investigations utilizing chiral solvating agents (CSAs) and characterizing the binding phenomena with cyclodextrins. The resolution of OFPs enantiomers using NMR would be useful for research into toxicodynamics and toxicokinetics in biological systems due to the widely differing properties of the CWA enantiomers [1]. The optimization of decontamination abilities in the case of a CWA events, with this method’s potential rapidity and robustness, as well as the development of models correlating chiral compounds with CSAs for optimal resolution are all rational benefits of this research.

  10. De novo protein structure determination using sparse NMR data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowers, Peter M.; Strauss, Charlie E.M.; Baker, David

    2000-01-01

    We describe a method for generating moderate to high-resolution protein structures using limited NMR data combined with the ab initio protein structure prediction method Rosetta. Peptide fragments are selected from proteins of known structure based on sequence similarity and consistency with chemical shift and NOE data. Models are built from these fragments by minimizing an energy function that favors hydrophobic burial, strand pairing, and satisfaction of NOE constraints. Models generated using this procedure with ∼1 NOE constraint per residue are in some cases closer to the corresponding X-ray structures than the published NMR solution structures. The method requires only the sparse constraints available during initial stages of NMR structure determination, and thus holds promise for increasing the speed with which protein solution structures can be determined

  11. Solution 1H NMR investigation of the active site molecular and electronic structures of substrate-bound, cyanide-inhibited HmuO, a bacterial heme oxygenase from Corynebacterium diphtheriae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiming; Syvitski, Ray T; Chu, Grace C; Ikeda-Saito, Masao; Mar, Gerd N La

    2003-02-28

    The molecular structure and dynamic properties of the active site environment of HmuO, a heme oxygenase (HO) from the pathogenic bacterium Corynebacterium diphtheriae, have been investigated by (1)H NMR spectroscopy using the human HO (hHO) complex as a homology model. It is demonstrated that not only the spatial contacts among residues and between residues and heme, but the magnetic axes that can be related to the direction and magnitude of the steric tilt of the FeCN unit are strongly conserved in the two HO complexes. The results indicate that very similar contributions of steric blockage of several meso positions and steric tilt of the attacking ligand are operative. A distal H-bond network that involves numerous very strong H-bonds and immobilized water molecules is identified in HmuO that is analogous to that previously identified in hHO (Li, Y., Syvitski, R. T., Auclair, K., Wilks, A., Ortiz de Montellano, P. R., and La Mar, G. N. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 33018-33031). The NMR results are completely consistent with the very recent crystal structure of the HmuO.substrate complex. The H-bond network/ordered water molecules are proposed to orient the distal water molecule near the catalytically key Asp(136) (Asp(140) in hHO) that stabilizes the hydroperoxy intermediate. The dynamic stability of this H-bond network in HmuO is significantly greater than in hHO and may account for the slower catalytic rate in bacterial HO compared with mammalian HO.

  12. Compatible topologies and parameters for NMR structure determination of carbohydrates by simulated annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yingang

    2017-01-01

    The use of NMR methods to determine the three-dimensional structures of carbohydrates and glycoproteins is still challenging, in part because of the lack of standard protocols. In order to increase the convenience of structure determination, the topology and parameter files for carbohydrates in the program Crystallography & NMR System (CNS) were investigated and new files were developed to be compatible with the standard simulated annealing protocols for proteins and nucleic acids. Recalculating the published structures of protein-carbohydrate complexes and glycosylated proteins demonstrates that the results are comparable to the published structures which employed more complex procedures for structure calculation. Integrating the new carbohydrate parameters into the standard structure calculation protocol will facilitate three-dimensional structural study of carbohydrates and glycosylated proteins by NMR spectroscopy.

  13. Structural study of pyrones by NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandarino, D.G.

    1985-01-01

    Extracts of two species of Aniba, designed Aniba-SA (light petroleum extract) and Aniba-SB (benzene extract), afforded by chromatographic fraccionation some compounds. The isolated compounds were identified using spectrometric data and C 13 -NMR coupled and decompled spectra of pyrones were registered. Measurement of the heteronuclear residual coupling by irradiation proton frequency off-resonance was used for distinguish C-5, C-7 and C-8 carbons of the pyrones SB-1, SB-3, SB-4 and SB-5. (M.J.C.) [pt

  14. Open H-shaped permanent magnet structure for NMR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, V.; Delamare, J.; Yonnet, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    Since NMR imaging at low field is now technically possible, permanent magnets can replace resistive coils or superconducting magnets. This paper reviews most of NMR structures that provide an uniform field using only permanent magnets. We propose a new open H-shaped structure that is simple to manufacture. This structure has been calculated thanks to an optimization program and a calculation method we presente here. It enables to determine with a good accuracy the field created by passive systems composed by permanent magnets and ferromagnetic materials. (author)

  15. Structural studies of SpoIIAA using NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comfort, D.M

    1998-07-01

    The protein SpoIIAA participates, via phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, in the four-component system that regulates the sporulation sigma factor e. Differential gene expression depends on specialised transcription factors called sigma factors, which direct the RNA polymerase to transcribe specific genes in one or other of the two chambers at various stages of sporulation. The first sporulation-specific sigma factor to be activated is 4 transcription that depends on {sigma}{sup F} is essential for the remaining sigma factors to become active in turn. Early in sporulation SpoIIAA is in the phosphorylated state (SpoIIAA-P), as a result of the activity of the ATP-dependent protein kinase, SpoIIAB. About 80 minutes after the initiation of sporulation a specific phosphatase, SpoIIE, begins to hydrolyse SpoIIAA-P, and the resulting SpoIIAA again becomes a substrate for SpoIIAB. SpoIIAB is also an anti-sigma factor which in its free form inhibits a F by binding to it. Competition by SpoIIAA (the anti-anti-sigma factor) for binding to SpoIIAB releases e activity. The three-dimensional structure of SpoIIAA has been determined using high resolution NMR. SpoIIAA has a novel fold, composed of a-helices and P-strand elements. The structural differences between SpoIIAA and its inactive form, SpoIIAA-P, were also investigated by NMR. Tentative evidence points to the observation that phosphorylation of SpoIIAA results in a minor conformational change near the site of phosphorylation, which interferes with the hydrophobic interaction between SpoIIAA and SpoIIAB. Further NMR studies helped to predict the location of SpoIIAA-, GTP-, and ATP-binding sites on the SpoIIAA structure. In addition, the automated iterative NOE assignment algorithm, ARIA, was used to obtain additional NOE-based distance constraints and to calculate a refined structure. (author)

  16. NMR structural studies of peptides and proteins in membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opella, S J [Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1994-12-31

    The use of NMR methodology in structural studies is described as applicable to larger proteins, considering that the majority of membrane proteins is constructed from a limited repertoire of structural and dynamic elements. The membrane associated domains of these proteins are made up of long hydrophobic membrane spanning helices, shorter amphipathic bridging helices in the plane of the bilayer, connecting loops with varying degrees of mobility, and mobile N- and C- terminal sections. NMR studies have been successful in identifying all of these elements and their orientations relative to each other and the membrane bilayer 19 refs., 9 figs.

  17. NMR structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase thumb subdomain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharaf, Naima G. [University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, Department of Structural Biology and Pittsburgh Center for HIV Protein Interactions (United States); Brereton, Andrew E. [Oregon State University, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, 2011 Ag & Life Sciences Bldg (United States); Byeon, In-Ja L. [University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, Department of Structural Biology and Pittsburgh Center for HIV Protein Interactions (United States); Andrew Karplus, P. [Oregon State University, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, 2011 Ag & Life Sciences Bldg (United States); Gronenborn, Angela M., E-mail: amg100@pitt.edu [University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, Department of Structural Biology and Pittsburgh Center for HIV Protein Interactions (United States)

    2016-12-15

    The solution NMR structure of the isolated thumb subdomain of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) has been determined. A detailed comparison of the current structure with dozens of the highest resolution crystal structures of this domain in the context of the full-length enzyme reveals that the overall structures are very similar, with only two regions exhibiting local conformational differences. The C-terminal capping pattern of the αH helix is subtly different, and the loop connecting the αI and αJ helices in the p51 chain of the full-length p51/p66 heterodimeric RT differs from our NMR structure due to unique packing interactions in mature RT. Overall, our data show that the thumb subdomain folds independently and essentially the same in isolation as in its natural structural context.

  18. NMR study of structure of lanthanide complexes in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choppin, G.R.

    1976-01-01

    The diagnostic value PMR studies of diamagnetic lanthanide complexes to define the nature of the species in the lanthanide-pyruvate system is discussed. The use of NMR spectra of both diamagnetic and paramagnetic lanthanide complexes to obtain detailed structural information is reviewed

  19. Investigating sorption on iron-oxyhydroxide soil minerals by solid-state NMR spectroscopy: a 6Li MAS NMR study of adsorption and absorption on goethite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulla Gro; Paik, Younkee; Julmis, Keinia

    2005-01-01

    High-resolution 2H MAS NMR spectra can be obtained for nanocrystalline particles of goethite (alpha-FeOOH, particle size approximately 4-10 nm) at room temperature, facilitating NMR studies of sorption under environmentally relevant conditions. Li sorption was investigated as a function of pH, th...... on the goethite surface. Even larger Li hyperfine shifts (289 ppm) were observed for Li+-exchanged goethite, which contains lithium ions in the tunnels of the goethite structure, confirming the Li assignment of the 145 ppm Li resonance to the surface sites. Udgivelsesdato: 2005-Oct-6...

  20. Structure and Dynamic Properties of Membrane Proteins using NMR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rösner, Heike; Kragelund, Birthe

    2012-01-01

    conformational changes. Their structural and functional decoding is challenging and has imposed demanding experimental development. Solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the techniques providing the capacity to make a significant difference in the deciphering of the membrane protein...... structure-function paradigm. The method has evolved dramatically during the last decade resulting in a plethora of new experiments leading to a significant increase in the scientific repertoire for studying membrane proteins. Besides solving the three-dimensional structures using state-of-the-art approaches......-populated states, this review seeks to introduce the vast possibilities solution NMR can offer to the study of membrane protein structure-function analyses with special focus on applicability. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1491-1539, 2012....

  1. Protein structure estimation from NMR data by matrix completion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhicheng; Li, Yang; Lei, Qiang; Zhao, Qing

    2017-09-01

    Knowledge of protein structures is very important to understand their corresponding physical and chemical properties. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the main methods to measure protein structure. In this paper, we propose a two-stage approach to calculate the structure of a protein from a highly incomplete distance matrix, where most data are obtained from NMR. We first randomly "guess" a small part of unobservable distances by utilizing the triangle inequality, which is crucial for the second stage. Then we use matrix completion to calculate the protein structure from the obtained incomplete distance matrix. We apply the accelerated proximal gradient algorithm to solve the corresponding optimization problem. Furthermore, the recovery error of our method is analyzed, and its efficiency is demonstrated by several practical examples.

  2. Sulfated oligosaccharide structures, as determined by NMR techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noseda, M.D.; Duarte, M.E.R.; Tischer, C.A.; Gorin, P.A.J.; Cerezo, A.S.

    1997-01-01

    Carrageenans are sulfated polysaccharides, produced by red seaweeds (Rhodophyta), that have important biological and physico-chemical properties. Using partial autohydrolysis, we obtained sulfated oligosaccharides from a λ-carrageenan (Noseda and Cerezo, 1993). These oligosaccharides are valuable not only for the study of the structures of the parent carrageenans but also for their possible biological activities. In this work we determined the chemical structure of one of the sulfated oligosaccharides using 1D and 2D NMR techniques. (author)

  3. STRUCTURAL STUDY AND INVESTIGATION OF NMR TENSORS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NBO studies were performed to the second-order and perturbative estimates of donor-acceptor interaction have been done. The procedures of gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) and continuous-set-of-gauge-transformation (CSGT) were employed to calculate isotropic shielding, chemical shifts anisotropy and chemical ...

  4. Renal fine structures detected by NMR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zilch, H.G.

    1986-01-01

    A significantly improved image quality is achieved by the technique described, as compared to the magnetic resonance data obtained so far. The detailed analysis of the kidney goes as deep as into anatomic fine structures, and there is reason to hope for far better diagnostic details. (orig.) [de

  5. NMR investigation and theoretical calculations of the solvent effect on the conformation of valsartan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chashmniam, Saeed; Tafazzoli, Mohsen

    2017-11-01

    Structure and conformational properties of valsartan were studied by advanced NMR techniques and quantum calculation methods. Potential energy scanning using B3LYP/6-311++g** and B3LYP-D3/6-311++g** methods were performed and four conformers (V1-V4) at minimum points of PES diagram were observed. According to the NMR spectra in acetone-d6, there are two conformers (M and m) with m/M = 0.52 ratio simultaneously and energy barriers of the two conformers were predicted from chemical shifts and multiplicities. While, intramolecular hydrogen bond at tetrazole ring and carboxylic groups prevent the free rotation on N6sbnd C11 bond in M-conformer, this bond rotates freely in m-conformer. On the other hand, intramolecular hydrogen bond at carbonyl and carboxylic acid can be observed at m-conformer. So, different intramolecular hydrogen bond is the reason for the stability of both M and m structures. Quite interestingly, 1H NMR spectra in CDCl3 show two distinct conformers (N and n) with unequal ratio which are differ from M-m conformers. Also, intramolecular hydrogen bond seven-member ring involving five-membered tetrazole ring and carboxylic acid group observed in both N and n-conformers Solvent effect, by using a set of polar and non-polar solvents including DMSO-d6, methanol-d4, benzene-d6, THF-d8, nitromethane-d3, methylene chloride-d2 and acetonitrile-d3 were investigated. NMR parameters include chemical shifts and spin-spin coupling constants were obtained from a set of 2D NMR spectra (H-H COSY, HMQC and HMBC). For this purpose, several DFT functionals from LDA, GGA and hybrid categories were used which the hybrid method showed better agreement with experiment values.

  6. The war of tools: how can NMR spectroscopists detect errors in their structures?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saccenti, Edoardo; Rosato, Antonio [University of Florence, Magnetic Resonance Center (Italy)], E-mail: rosato@cerm.unifi.it

    2008-04-15

    Protein structure determination by NMR methods has started in the mid-eighties and has been growing steadily since then. Ca. 14% of the protein structures deposited in the PDB have been solved by NMR. The evaluation of the quality of NMR structures however is still lacking a well-established practice. In this work, we examined various tools for the assessment of structural quality to ascertain the extent to which these tools could be applied to detect flaws in NMR structures. In particular, we investigated the variation in the scores assigned by these programs as a function of the deviation of the structures induced by errors in assignments or in the upper distance limits used. These perturbations did not distort radically the protein fold, but resulted in backbone RMS deviations up to 3 A, which is in line with errors highlighted in the available literature. We found that it is quite difficult to discriminate the structures perturbed because of misassignments from the original ones, also because the spread in score over the conformers of the original bundle is relatively large. {phi}-{psi} distributions and normality scores related to the backbone conformation and to the distribution of side-chain dihedral angles are the most sensitive indicators of flaws.

  7. DNA nanotubes for NMR structure determination of membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellot, Gaëtan; McClintock, Mark A; Chou, James J; Shih, William M

    2013-04-01

    Finding a way to determine the structures of integral membrane proteins using solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has proved to be challenging. A residual-dipolar-coupling-based refinement approach can be used to resolve the structure of membrane proteins up to 40 kDa in size, but to do this you need a weak-alignment medium that is detergent-resistant and it has thus far been difficult to obtain such a medium suitable for weak alignment of membrane proteins. We describe here a protocol for robust, large-scale synthesis of detergent-resistant DNA nanotubes that can be assembled into dilute liquid crystals for application as weak-alignment media in solution NMR structure determination of membrane proteins in detergent micelles. The DNA nanotubes are heterodimers of 400-nm-long six-helix bundles, each self-assembled from a M13-based p7308 scaffold strand and >170 short oligonucleotide staple strands. Compatibility with proteins bearing considerable positive charge as well as modulation of molecular alignment, toward collection of linearly independent restraints, can be introduced by reducing the negative charge of DNA nanotubes using counter ions and small DNA-binding molecules. This detergent-resistant liquid-crystal medium offers a number of properties conducive for membrane protein alignment, including high-yield production, thermal stability, buffer compatibility and structural programmability. Production of sufficient nanotubes for four or five NMR experiments can be completed in 1 week by a single individual.

  8. Investigation of silicate mineral sanidine by vibrational and NMR spectroscopic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbalagan, G.; Sankari, G.; Ponnusamy, S.; kumar, R. Thilak; Gunasekaran, S.

    2009-10-01

    Sanidine, a variety of feldspar minerals has been investigated through optical absorption, vibrational (IR and Raman), EPR and NMR spectroscopic techniques. The principal reflections occurring at the d-spacings, 3.2892, 3.2431, 2.9022 and 2.6041 Å confirm the presence of sanidine structure in the mineral. Sanidine shows five prominent characteristic infrared absorption bands in the region 1200-950, 770-720, 590-540 and 650-640 cm -1. The Raman spectrum shows the strongest band at 512 cm -1 characteristic of the feldspar structure, which contains four membered rings of tetrahedra. The UV-vis-NIR absorption spectrum had strong absorption features at 6757, 5780 and 5181 cm -1 due to the combination of fundamental OH- stretching. The bands at 11236 and 8196 cm -1and the strong, well-defined band at (30303 cm -1 attest the presence of Fe 2+ and Fe 3+, respectively, in the sample. The signals at g = 4.3 and 3.7 are interpreted in terms of Fe 3+ at two distinct tetrahedral positions Tl and T2 of the monoclinic crystal structure The 29Si NMR spectrum shows two peaks at -97 and -101 ppm corresponding to T2 and T1, respectively, and one peak in 27Al NMR for Al(IV).

  9. 133Cs NMR investigation of 2D frustrated Heisenberg antiferromagnet, Cs2CuCl4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachon, M.-A.; Kundhikanjana, W.; Straub, A.; Mitrovic, V. F.; Reyes, A. P.; Kuhns, P.; Coldea, R.; Tylczynski, Z.

    2006-10-01

    We report 133Cs nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements on the 2D frustrated Heisenberg antiferromagnet Cs2CuCl4 down to 2 K and up to 15 T. We show that 133Cs NMR is a good probe of the magnetic degrees of freedom in this material. Cu spin degrees of freedom are sensed through a strong anisotropic hyperfine coupling. The spin excitation gap opens above the critical saturation field. The gap value was determined from the activation energy of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate in a magnetic field applied parallel to the Cu chains (\\skew3\\hat{b} axis). The values of the g-factor and the saturation field are consistent with the neutron-scattering and magnetization results. The measurements of the spin spin relaxation time are exploited to show that no structural changes occur down to the lowest temperatures investigated.

  10. NMR investigation of amine complexes of aluminium borohydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojko, G.N.; Malov, Yu.I.; Semenenko, K.N.; Shilkin, S.P.

    1976-01-01

    Spectra complexes of composition AlI 3 NH 2 Me, AlI 3 .NHMe 2 , AlIsub(3-n)Clsub(n).4N 2 H 4 , where I=BH 4 , where n=0, 1, 2, 3, and AlI 3 .NH 3 were measured on by 11 B-NMR and double resonances 1 H-[ 11 B] and 1 H-[ 27 Al]. In complexes of composition 1:1, the resonance signals of 1 H, 11 B, and 27 Al were shifted to the strong field in comparison with the signal position in free AlI 3 . The strongest changes of shielding were observed for Al due to symmetry changes from the planar in AlI 3 to tetrahedral in complexes. The donor activity of ligands in relation to AlI 3 changes in the order: NMe 3 >NHMe 2 >NH 2 Me>NH 3 . No proof of the existence of a bridge structure in the complexes was obtained. The observed spectra show an equivalence of all H atoms on B. For a temperature decrease, an averaging of the spin-spin interaction of the protons with B and Al was observed. At -80 0 , a narrow singlet is observed showing the equivalance of H atoms in BH 4 - and a full isolation of interactions H-B and H-Al

  11. Fluorine dynamics in BaF2 superionic conductors investigated by NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gumann, Patryk

    2008-01-01

    In this work the dynamics of fluorine in solid-state electrolytes having BaF 2 -structure was investigated using three different NMR-methods: field cycling relaxometry, lineshape analysis, and static field gradient NMR. For this purpose a pure BaF 2 crystal, as well as crystals doped with trivalent impurities (LaF 3 ), were studied as a function of temperature. Using MAS NMR it was possible to identify two lines in Ba 0.9 La 0.1 F 2.1 having different chemical shift, and to refer them to the modified crystal structure. On this basis a model for the fluorine lineshape has been developed, taking into account three motional processes characterized by their correlation times. It includes jump diffusion of the fluorine ions among equivalent sites within two crystallographically distinct sublattices, and inter-lattice exchange processes. By measuring frequency and temperature-dependent spin lattice relaxation times, it was possible to gain information about fluorine dynamics on microscopic length scales. An attempt was also made to analyze the data for pure BaF 2 and low admixture concentration samples with a non-exponential correlation function. (orig.)

  12. Fluorine dynamics in BaF{sub 2} superionic conductors investigated by NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumann, Patryk

    2008-07-01

    In this work the dynamics of fluorine in solid-state electrolytes having BaF{sub 2}-structure was investigated using three different NMR-methods: field cycling relaxometry, lineshape analysis, and static field gradient NMR. For this purpose a pure BaF{sub 2} crystal, as well as crystals doped with trivalent impurities (LaF{sub 3}), were studied as a function of temperature. Using MAS NMR it was possible to identify two lines in Ba{sub 0.9}La{sub 0.1}F{sub 2.1} having different chemical shift, and to refer them to the modified crystal structure. On this basis a model for the fluorine lineshape has been developed, taking into account three motional processes characterized by their correlation times. It includes jump diffusion of the fluorine ions among equivalent sites within two crystallographically distinct sublattices, and inter-lattice exchange processes. By measuring frequency and temperature-dependent spin lattice relaxation times, it was possible to gain information about fluorine dynamics on microscopic length scales. An attempt was also made to analyze the data for pure BaF{sub 2} and low admixture concentration samples with a non-exponential correlation function. (orig.)

  13. Two-dimensional NMR investigations of the dynamic conformations of phospholipids and liquid crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Mei [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Applied Science and Technology

    1996-05-01

    Two-dimensional 13C, 1H, and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are developed and used to study molecular structure and dynamics in liquid-crystalline systems, primarily phospholipids and nematic liquid crystals. NMR spectroscopy characterizes molecular conformation in terms of orientations and distances of molecular segments. In anisotropically mobile systems, this is achieved by measuring motionally-averaged nuclear dipolar couplings and chemical shift anisotropies. The short-range couplings yield useful bond order parameters, while the long-range interactions constrain the overall conformation. In this work, techniques for probing proton dipolar local fields are further developed to obtain highlyresolved dipolar couplings between protons and rare spins. By exploiting variable-angle sample spinning techniques, orientation-sensitive NMR spectra are resolved according to sitespecific isotropic chemical shifts. Moreover, the signs and magnitudes of various short-range dipolar couplings are obtained. They are used in novel theoretical analyses that provide information about segmental orientations and their distributions. Such information is obtained in a model-independent fashion or with physically reasonable assumptions. The structural investigation of phospholipids is focused on the dynam

  14. NMR structure of the glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide fragment, GIP(1-30)amide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alana, Inigo; Hewage, Chandralal M.; G. Malthouse, J. Paul; Parker, Jeremy C.; Gault, Victor A.; O'Harte, Finbarr P.M.

    2004-01-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide is an incretin hormone that stimulates insulin secretion and reduces postprandial glycaemic excursions. The glucose-dependent action of GIP on pancreatic β-cells has attracted attention towards its exploitation as a potential drug for type 2 diabetes. Use of NMR or X-ray crystallography is vital to determine the three-dimensional structure of the peptide. Therefore, to understand the basic structural requirements for the biological activity of GIP, the solution structure of the major biologically active fragment, GIP(1-30)amide, was investigated by proton NMR spectroscopy and molecular modelling. The structure is characterised by a full length α-helical conformation between residues F 6 and A 28 . This structural information could play an important role in the design of therapeutic agents based upon GIP receptor agonists

  15. Sulfated oligosaccharide structures, as determined by NMR techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noseda, M.D.; Duarte, M.E.R.; Tischer, C.A.; Gorin, P.A.J. [Parana Univ., Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. De Bioquimica; Cerezo, A.S. [Buenos Aires Univ. Nacional (Argentina). Dept. de Quimica Organica

    1997-12-31

    Carrageenans are sulfated polysaccharides, produced by red seaweeds (Rhodophyta), that have important biological and physico-chemical properties. Using partial autohydrolysis, we obtained sulfated oligosaccharides from a {lambda}-carrageenan (Noseda and Cerezo, 1993). These oligosaccharides are valuable not only for the study of the structures of the parent carrageenans but also for their possible biological activities. In this work we determined the chemical structure of one of the sulfated oligosaccharides using 1D and 2D NMR techniques. (author) 4 refs., 8 figs., 1 tabs.

  16. Introducing NMR to a General Chemistry Audience: A Structural-Based Instrumental Laboratory Relating Lewis Structures, Molecular Models, and [superscript 13]C NMR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulliam, Curtis R.; Pfeiffer, William F.; Thomas, Alyssa C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a first-year general chemistry laboratory that uses NMR spectroscopy and model building to emphasize molecular shape and structure. It is appropriate for either a traditional or an atoms-first curriculum. Students learn the basis of structure and the use of NMR data through a cooperative learning hands-on laboratory…

  17. Changes in molecular structure and properties of irradiated polymers of different compositions - ESR and NMR study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carswell-Pomerantz, T.; Babanalbandi, A.; Dong, L.; Hill, D.J.T.; Perera, M.C.S.; Pomery, P.J.; Saadat, G.; Whittaker, A.K.

    1999-01-01

    Investigations of molecular structural changes in polymers during exposure to high energy radiation is the long term interest of the Polymer Materials and Radiation Group at the University of Queensland. Recently, the group had looked at a range of polymers including natural and synthetic rubbers, methacrylates and polyesters. The objective of the work has been to investigate the relationships between polymer structure and sensitivity towards high energy radiation, including gamma radiation. This report will focus on the Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) studies of the effects of gamma irradiation on these polymers. Other methods such as Gas Chromatography (GC), Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC), Fourier Transformed Infra Red (FTIR), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) have also been used as these methods combine with ESR and NMR, to provide a more complete picture of the mechanism of the structural changes. (author)

  18. Investigation of Oxidative Degradation in Polymers Using (17)O NMR Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Todd M.; Celina, Mathew; Assink, Roger A.; Clough, Roger L.; Gillen, Kenneth T.; Wheeler David R.

    1999-07-20

    The thermal oxidation of pentacontane (C{sub 50}H{sub 102}), and of the homopolymer polyisoprene, has been investigated using {sup 17}O NMR spectroscopy. By performing the oxidation using {sup 17}O labeled O{sub 2} gas, it is possible to easily identify degradation products, even at relatively low concentrations. It is demonstrated that details of the degradation mechanism can be obtained from analysis of the {sup 17}O NMR spectra as a function of total oxidation. Pentacontane reveals the widest variety of reaction products, and exhibits changes in the relative product distributions with increasing O{sub 2} consumption. At low levels of oxygen incorporation, peroxides are the major oxidation product, while at later stages of degradation these species are replaced by increasing concentrations of ketones, alcohols, carboxylic acids and esters. Analyzing the product distribution can help in identification of the different free-radical decomposition pathways of hydroperoxides, including recombination, proton abstraction and chain scission, as well as secondary reactions. The {sup 17}O NMR spectra of thermally oxidized polyisoprene reveal fewer degradation functionalities, but exhibit an increased complexity in the type of observed degradation species due to structural features such as unsaturation and methyl branching. Alcohols and ethers formed from hydrogen abstraction and free radical termination.

  19. NMR techniques in the study of cardiovascular structure and functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osbakken, M.; Haselgrove, J.

    1987-01-01

    The chapter titles of this book are: Introduction to NMR Techniques;Theory of NMR Probe Design;Overview of Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Study the Cardiovascular System;Vascular Anatomy and Physiology Studied with NMR Techniques;Assessment of Myocardial Ischemia and Infarction by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging;The Use of MRI in Congenital Heart Disease;Cardiomyopathies and Myocarditis Studied with NMR Techniques;Determination of Myocardial Mechanical Function with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques;Determination of Flow Using NMR Techniques;The Use of Contrast Agents in Cardiac MRI;Can Cardiovascular Disease Be Effectively Evaluated with NMR Spectroscopy? NMR Studies of ATP Synthesis Reactions in the Isolated Heart;Studies of Intermediary Metabolism in the Heart by 13C NMR Spectroscopy;23Na and 39K NMR Spectroscopic Studies of the Intact Beating Heart;and Evaluation of Skeletal Muscle Metabolism in Patients with Congestive Heart Failure Using Phosphorus Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

  20. NMR investigation of boron impurities in refined metallurgical grade silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grafe, Hans-Joachim; Loeser, Wolfgang; Schmitz, Steffen; Sakaliyska, Miroslava [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research (IFW), Dresden (Germany); Wurmehl, Sabine [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research (IFW), Dresden (Germany); Institute for Solid State Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden (Germany); Eisert, Stefan; Reichenbach, Birk; Mueller, Tim [Adensis GmbH, Dresden (Germany); Acker, Joerg; Rietig, Anja; Ducke, Jana [Department of Chemistry, Faculty for Natural Sciences, Brandenburg Technical University Cottbus-Senftenberg, Senftenberg (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method was applied for tracking boron impurities in the refining process of metallurgical grade (MG) silicon. From the NMR signal of the {sup 11}B isotope at an operating temperature 4.2 K, the boron concentration can be estimated down to the order of 1-10 wppm B. After melting and resolidification of MG-Si alloyed with Ca and Ti, a major fraction of B impurities remains in the Si solid solution as inferred from the characteristic NMR frequency. The alloying element Ti does not form substantial fractions of TiB{sub 2}. Acid leaching of crushed powders of MG-Si alloyed with Ca and Ti can diminish the initial impurity content of B suggesting its accumulation in the grain boundary phases. NMR signals of TiB{sub 2} at 4.2 K and room temperature (RT), and of poly-Si with different B doping at 4.2 K. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Solution NMR Structures of Oxidized and Reduced Ehrlichia chaffeensis thioredoxin: NMR-Invisible Structure Owing to Backbone Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchko, Garry W.; Hewitt, Stephen N.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Myler, Peter J.

    2018-01-02

    Thioredoxins (Trxs) are small ubiquitous proteins that participate in a diverse variety of redox reactions via the reversible oxidation of two cysteine thiol groups in a structurally conserved active site, CGPC. Here, we describe the NMR solution structures of a Trx from Ehrlichia chaffeensis (Ec-Trx, ECH_0218), the etiological agent responsible for human monocytic ehrlichiosis, in both the oxidized and reduced states. The overall topology of the calculated structures is similar in both redox states and similar to other Trx structures, a five-strand, mixed -sheet (1:3:2:4:5) surrounded by four -helices. Unlike other Trxs studied by NMR in both redox states, the 1H-15N HSQC spectra of reduced Ec-Trx was missing eight amide cross peaks relative to the spectra of oxidized Ec-Trx. These missing amides correspond to residues C32-E39 in the active site containing helix (2) and S72-I75 in a loop near the active site and suggest a substantial change in the backbone dynamics associated with the formation of an intramolecular C32-C35 disulfide bond.

  2. NMR investigations of surfaces and interfaces using spin-polarized xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaede, H.C.; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA

    1995-07-01

    129 Xe NMR is potentially useful for the investigation of material surfaces, but has been limited to high surface area samples in which sufficient xenon can be loaded to achieve acceptable signal to noise ratios. In Chapter 2 conventional 129 Xe NMR is used to study a high surface area polymer, a catalyst, and a confined liquid crystal to determine the topology of these systems. Further information about the spatial proximity of different sites of the catalyst and liquid crystal systems is determined through two dimensional exchange NMR in Chapter 3. Lower surface area systems may be investigated with spin-polarized xenon, which may be achieved through optical pumping and spin exchange. Optically polarized xenon can be up to 10 5 times more sensitive than thermally polarized xenon. In Chapter 4 highly polarized xenon is used to examine the surface of poly(acrylonitrile) and the formation of xenon clathrate hydrates. An attractive use of polarized xenon is as a magnetization source in cross polarization experiments. Cross polarization from adsorbed polarized xenon may allow detection of surface nuclei with drastic enhancements. A non-selective low field thermal mixing technique is used to enhance the 13 C signal of CO 2 of xenon occluded in solid CO 2 by a factor of 200. High-field cross polarization from xenon to proton on the surface of high surface area polymers has enabled signal enhancements of ∼1,000. These studies, together with investigations of the efficiency of the cross polarization process from polarized xenon, are discussed in Chapter 5. Another use of polarized xenon is as an imaging contrast agent in systems that are not compatible with traditional contrast agents. The resolution attainable with this method is determined through images of structured phantoms in Chapter 6

  3. Nucleic acid helix structure determination from NMR proton chemical shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werf, Ramon M. van der; Tessari, Marco; Wijmenga, Sybren S., E-mail: S.Wijmenga@science.ru.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen, Department of Biophysical Chemistry, Institute of Molecules and Materials (Netherlands)

    2013-06-15

    We present a method for de novo derivation of the three-dimensional helix structure of nucleic acids using non-exchangeable proton chemical shifts as sole source of experimental restraints. The method is called chemical shift de novo structure derivation protocol employing singular value decomposition (CHEOPS) and uses iterative singular value decomposition to optimize the structure in helix parameter space. The correct performance of CHEOPS and its range of application are established via an extensive set of structure derivations using either simulated or experimental chemical shifts as input. The simulated input data are used to assess in a defined manner the effect of errors or limitations in the input data on the derived structures. We find that the RNA helix parameters can be determined with high accuracy. We finally demonstrate via three deposited RNA structures that experimental proton chemical shifts suffice to derive RNA helix structures with high precision and accuracy. CHEOPS provides, subject to further development, new directions for high-resolution NMR structure determination of nucleic acids.

  4. Protein NMR Structures Refined with Rosetta Have Higher Accuracy Relative to Corresponding X-ray Crystal Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    We have found that refinement of protein NMR structures using Rosetta with experimental NMR restraints yields more accurate protein NMR structures than those that have been deposited in the PDB using standard refinement protocols. Using 40 pairs of NMR and X-ray crystal structures determined by the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, for proteins ranging in size from 5–22 kDa, restrained Rosetta refined structures fit better to the raw experimental data, are in better agreement with their X-ray counterparts, and have better phasing power compared to conventionally determined NMR structures. For 37 proteins for which NMR ensembles were available and which had similar structures in solution and in the crystal, all of the restrained Rosetta refined NMR structures were sufficiently accurate to be used for solving the corresponding X-ray crystal structures by molecular replacement. The protocol for restrained refinement of protein NMR structures was also compared with restrained CS-Rosetta calculations. For proteins smaller than 10 kDa, restrained CS-Rosetta, starting from extended conformations, provides slightly more accurate structures, while for proteins in the size range of 10–25 kDa the less CPU intensive restrained Rosetta refinement protocols provided equally or more accurate structures. The restrained Rosetta protocols described here can improve the accuracy of protein NMR structures and should find broad and general for studies of protein structure and function. PMID:24392845

  5. Effects of NMR spectral resolution on protein structure calculation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhas Tikole

    Full Text Available Adequate digital resolution and signal sensitivity are two critical factors for protein structure determinations by solution NMR spectroscopy. The prime objective for obtaining high digital resolution is to resolve peak overlap, especially in NOESY spectra with thousands of signals where the signal analysis needs to be performed on a large scale. Achieving maximum digital resolution is usually limited by the practically available measurement time. We developed a method utilizing non-uniform sampling for balancing digital resolution and signal sensitivity, and performed a large-scale analysis of the effect of the digital resolution on the accuracy of the resulting protein structures. Structure calculations were performed as a function of digital resolution for about 400 proteins with molecular sizes ranging between 5 and 33 kDa. The structural accuracy was assessed by atomic coordinate RMSD values from the reference structures of the proteins. In addition, we monitored also the number of assigned NOESY cross peaks, the average signal sensitivity, and the chemical shift spectral overlap. We show that high resolution is equally important for proteins of every molecular size. The chemical shift spectral overlap depends strongly on the corresponding spectral digital resolution. Thus, knowing the extent of overlap can be a predictor of the resulting structural accuracy. Our results show that for every molecular size a minimal digital resolution, corresponding to the natural linewidth, needs to be achieved for obtaining the highest accuracy possible for the given protein size using state-of-the-art automated NOESY assignment and structure calculation methods.

  6. Molecular Structure of Phenytoin: NMR, UV-Vis and Quantum Chemical Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raluca Luchian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to the presence of the carbonyl and imide groups in the structure of 5,5-diphenylhydantoin (DPH, the possibility for this compound to be involved in hydrogen bonding intermolecular interactions is obvious. Even though such interactions are presumably responsible for the mechanism of action of this drug, however, to the best of our knowledge, the self-hydrogen bonding interactions between the DPH monomers have not been addressed till now. Furthermore, studies reporting on the spectroscopic characteristics of this molecule are scarcely reported in the literature. Here we report on the possible dimers of DPH, investigated by quantum chemical calculations at B3LYP/6-31+G(2d,2p level of theory. Twelve unique DPH dimers were structurally optimized in gas-phase, as well as in ethanol and DMSO and then were used to compute the population-averaged UV-Vis and NMR spectra using Boltzmann statistics. UV-Vis and NMR techniques were employed to assess experimentally the spectroscopical response of this compound. DFT calculations are also used to investigate the structural transformations between the solid and liquid phase, as well as for describing the electronic transitions and for the assignment of NMR spectra of DPH.

  7. Enantiodiscrimination of flexible cyclic solutes using NMR spectroscopy in polypeptide chiral mesophases: investigation of cis-decalin and THF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroulanda, Christie; Lafon, Olivier; Lesot, Philippe

    2009-08-06

    The conformational dynamics and orientational behavior of two model cyclic molecules, cis-decalin (cis-dec) and tetrahydrofurane (THF), dissolved in weakly ordering, polypeptidic chiral liquid crystals (CLCs) are theoretically discussed and experimentally investigated using deuterium and carbon-13 NMR spectroscopies. The analysis of enantiomeric and enantiotopic discriminations in these compounds is shown to depend on the rate of conformational exchange regime, slow or fast. The slow exchange regime is illustrated through the case of cis-dec at low temperature (243 K). We show that the deuterium NMR spectra in this regime can be qualitatively and quantitatively interpreted by restricting the conformational pathway of cis-dec to two enantiomeric conformers of C(2)-symmetry. The orientational order parameters of these interconverting enantiomers are calculated by matching the (2)H quadrupolar splittings with calculated conformer structures. The fast exchange regime is investigated through the examples of cis-dec at high temperature (356 K) and THF at room temperature (300 K). The (2)H NMR spectra above the coalescence temperature are analyzed by introducing the concept of "average molecular structure". This fictitious structure allows easily identifying NMR equivalences of solutes dissolved in CLC. However, it cannot be applied to determine consistent orientational order parameters. This study emphasizes that enantiotopic discriminations observed for flexible molecules in the fast exchange regime can be quantitatively interpreted only by considering the orientational order of each conformer.

  8. NMR determination of solvent dependent behavior and XRD structural properties of 4-carboxy phenylboronic acid: A DFT supported study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikmen, Gökhan; Alver, Özgür; Parlak, Cemal

    2018-04-01

    Solvent dependent structural properties of 4-carboxy phenylboronic acid (4-cpba) were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic methods. The molecular structure and geometric parameters were determined by some computational methods such as B3LYP/6-31 + G(3df,p), HF/aug-cc-pvtz and MP2/6-31G(d). Detailed elucidation of the structural and spectroscopic properties of 4-cpba was carried out with 1H, HETCOR and DOSY NMR experiments. Solvent effects on the structural properties were monitored on the changes of 1H NMR spectra by using various solvents and it was observed that 4-cpba shows serious structural preferences depending on the solvent used.

  9. Theoretical investigation on the molecular structure, Infrared, Raman and NMR spectra of para-halogen benzenesulfonamides, 4-X-C 6H 4SO 2NH 2 (X = Cl, Br or F)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabacak, Mehmet; Çınar, Mehmet; Çoruh, Ali; Kurt, Mustafa

    2009-02-01

    In the present study, the structural properties of para-halogen benzenesulfonamides, 4-XC 6H 4SO 2NH 2 (4-chlorobenzenesulfonamide (I), 4-bromobenzenesulfonamide (II) and 4-fluorobenzenesulfonamide (III)) have been studied extensively utilizing ab initio Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional theory (DFT) employing B3LYP exchange correlation. The vibrational frequencies were calculated and scaled values were compared with experimental values. The complete assignments were performed on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method. The effects of the halogen substituent on the characteristic benzenesulfonamides bands in the spectra are discussed. The 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of the molecules were calculated using the Gauge-Invariant Atomic Orbital (GIAO) method. Finally, geometric parameters, vibrational bands and chemical shifts were compared with available experimental data of the molecules. The fully optimized geometries of the molecules were found to be consistent with the X-ray crystal structures. The observed and calculated frequencies and chemical shifts were found to be in very good agreement.

  10. NMR structure of the protein NP-247299.1: comparison with the crystal structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaudzems, Kristaps; Geralt, Michael; Serrano, Pedro; Mohanty, Biswaranjan; Horst, Reto; Pedrini, Bill; Elsliger, Marc-André; Wilson, Ian A.; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    Comparison of the NMR and crystal structures of a protein determined using largely automated methods has enabled the interpretation of local differences in the highly similar structures. These differences are found in segments of higher B values in the crystal and correlate with dynamic processes on the NMR chemical shift timescale observed in solution. The NMR structure of the protein NP-247299.1 in solution at 313 K has been determined and is compared with the X-ray crystal structure, which was also solved in the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG) at 100 K and at 1.7 Å resolution. Both structures were obtained using the current largely automated crystallographic and solution NMR methods used by the JCSG. This paper assesses the accuracy and precision of the results from these recently established automated approaches, aiming for quantitative statements about the location of structure variations that may arise from either one of the methods used or from the different environments in solution and in the crystal. To evaluate the possible impact of the different software used for the crystallographic and the NMR structure determinations and analysis, the concept is introduced of reference structures, which are computed using the NMR software with input of upper-limit distance constraints derived from the molecular models representing the results of the two structure determinations. The use of this new approach is explored to quantify global differences that arise from the different methods of structure determination and analysis versus those that represent interesting local variations or dynamics. The near-identity of the protein core in the NMR and crystal structures thus provided a basis for the identification of complementary information from the two different methods. It was thus observed that locally increased crystallographic B values correlate with dynamic structural polymorphisms in solution, including that the solution state of the protein involves

  11. Rapid NMR screening of RNA secondary structure and binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmling, Christina; Keyhani, Sara; Sochor, Florian; Fürtig, Boris; Hengesbach, Martin; Schwalbe, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Determination of RNA secondary structures by NMR spectroscopy is a useful tool e.g. to elucidate RNA folding space or functional aspects of regulatory RNA elements. However, current approaches of RNA synthesis and preparation are usually time-consuming and do not provide analysis with single nucleotide precision when applied for a large number of different RNA sequences. Here, we significantly improve the yield and 3′ end homogeneity of RNA preparation by in vitro transcription. Further, by establishing a native purification procedure with increased throughput, we provide a shortcut to study several RNA constructs simultaneously. We show that this approach yields μmol quantities of RNA with purities comparable to PAGE purification, while avoiding denaturation of the RNA

  12. Rapid NMR screening of RNA secondary structure and binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmling, Christina; Keyhani, Sara; Sochor, Florian; Fürtig, Boris; Hengesbach, Martin; Schwalbe, Harald, E-mail: schwalbe@nmr.uni-frankfurt.de [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität, Institut für Organische Chemie und Chemische Biologie, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (BMRZ) (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Determination of RNA secondary structures by NMR spectroscopy is a useful tool e.g. to elucidate RNA folding space or functional aspects of regulatory RNA elements. However, current approaches of RNA synthesis and preparation are usually time-consuming and do not provide analysis with single nucleotide precision when applied for a large number of different RNA sequences. Here, we significantly improve the yield and 3′ end homogeneity of RNA preparation by in vitro transcription. Further, by establishing a native purification procedure with increased throughput, we provide a shortcut to study several RNA constructs simultaneously. We show that this approach yields μmol quantities of RNA with purities comparable to PAGE purification, while avoiding denaturation of the RNA.

  13. The structure of phosphate and borosilicate glasses and their structural evolution at high temperatures as studied with solid state NMR spectroscopy: Phase separation, crystallisation and dynamic species exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wegner, S.; Van Wullen, L.; Tricot, G.; Tricot, G.

    2010-01-01

    In this contribution we present an in-depth study of the network structure of different phosphate based and borosilicate glasses and its evolution at high temperatures. Employing a range of advanced solid state NMR methodologies, complemented by the results of XPS, the structural motifs on short and intermediate length scales are identified. For the phosphate based glasses, at temperatures above the glass transition temperature Tg, structural relaxation processes and the devitrification of the glasses were monitored in situ employing MAS NMR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Dynamic species exchange involving rapid P-O-P and P-O-Al bond breaking and reforming was observed employing in situ 27 Al and 31 P MAS NMR spectroscopy and could be linked to viscous flow. For the borosilicate glasses, an atomic scale investigation of the phase separation processes was possible in a combined effort of ex situ NMR studies on glass samples with different thermal histories and in situ NMR studies using high temperature MAS NMR spectroscopy including 11 B MAS, 29 Si MAS and in situ 29 Si{ 11 B} REAPDOR NMR spectroscopy. (authors)

  14. NMR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrew, E.R.

    1983-01-01

    Since hydrogen is the most abundant element in all living organisms, proton NMR lends itself well as a method of investigation in biology and medicine. NMR imaging has some special advantages as a diagnostic tool: no ionizing radiation is used, it is noninvasive; it provides a safer means of imaging than the use of x-rays, gamma rays, positrons, or heavy ions. In contrast with ultrasound, the radiation penetrates the bony structures without attenuation. In additional to morphological information, NMR imaging provides additional diagnostic insights through relaxation parameters, which are not available from other imaging methods. In the decade since the first primitive NMR images were obtained, the quality of images now obtained approaches those from CT x-ray scanners. Prototype instruments are being constructed for clinical evaluation and the first whole-body scanners are beginning to appear on the market at costs comparable to CT scanners. Primary differences in equipment for conventional NMR and NMR imaging are the much larger aperture magnets that are required for the examination of human subjects and the addition of coils to generate field gradients and facilities for manipulating the gradients. Early results from clinical trials in many parts of the world are encouraging, and in a few years, the usefuleness of this modality of medical imaging to the medical profession in diagnosis and treatment of disease will be defined. 10 figures

  15. Unified integration intervals for the structural characterization of oil, coal or fractions there of by 1h NMR and 13c NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avella, Eliseo; Fierro, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    Based on an analysis of publications reported between 1972 and 2006, it became clear that there are inaccuracies in the limits of the ranges of integration that the authors assigned to signals in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to the structural characterization of petroleum, coals and their derived fractions, from their hydrogen (1H NMR) and carbon (13C NMR) spectra. Consequently, consolidated limits were determined for the integration of 1H NMR spectra and 13C NMR of these samples using a statistical treatment applied to the limits of integration intervals already published. With these unified limits, correlation NMR charts were developed that are useful for the allocation of the integral at such intervals, and at smaller intervals defined in terms of the intersection between different assignments. Also raised equations needed to establish the integral attributable to specific fragments in an attempt to make a more accurate structural characterization from NMR spectra of oil, coal or fractions derived.

  16. FT-IR, NMR spectroscopic and quantum mechanical investigations of two ferrocene derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ö. Alver

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available New ferrocene derivatives as N-(3-piperidin-1-ylpropylferrocenamide (Fc-3ppa and N-(pyridine-3-ylmethylferrocenamide (Fc-3pica and structural investigations were carried out with 1H, 13C, DEPT 45 or 135, HETCOR, COSY NMR and FT-IR spectroscopic techniques. Characterization of Fc-3ppa (FeC19H26N2O and Fc-3pica (FeC17H16N2O was also supported by density functional theory (DFT used by B3LYP functional and 6-31G(d or 6-311++G(d,p basis sets. From the combination of all the results, it can be clearly seen that syntheses of Fc-3ppa and Fc-3pica have been successfully achieved. Theoretical values are successfully compared against experimental data and B3LYP method is able to provide satisfactory results for predicting NMR properties and vibrational frequencies of the synthesized ferrocene based systems.

  17. 13C and 29Si NMR as a probe to investigate polysiloxanes used in dental applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Naira Machado da; Tavares, Maria Ines B.

    2001-01-01

    The properties of dental mould polymeric materials are strongly influenced by the chemical structure of both the polymer and the catalyst used in the crosslink reaction between them. In order to characterize and suggest some modifications on the materials interfacial interactions, mixtures of Polymer-catalyst were prepared. The polymer and the catalyst chemical structures were obtained by 13 C, 1 H and 129 Si NMR analysis in solution state. From the solution NMR results it was obtained the structure of the polymer and the catalyst and also the kind of the crosslink reaction taken. The CPMAS 1 '3C NMR analysis in the solid state were used to identify chemical structure of the polymeric dental moulded sample. (author)

  18. Investigation of the dynamic NMR frequency shift for Fe57 in FeBO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bun'kov, Yu.M.; Punkkinen, M.; Yulinen, E.E.

    1978-01-01

    NMR of Fe 57 in FeBO 3 is investigated by pulsed magnetic resonance techniques in the 2 to 70 K temperature range. A dynamic NMR frequency shift is observed which is due to coupling between the NMR oscillations and the low-frequency AFMR mode, the magnitude of which only slightly exceeds the micro-inhomogeneous broadening of the NMR line caused by the spread of the value of hyperfine field at the nuclei. Under these conditions the nuclear spin system possesses a number of unusual properties. Thus, broadening of the magnetic resonance line is uniform, the magnitude of the homogeneous broadening depends on the angle of deviation of the nuclear magnetization from the equilibrium axis, and an echo signal is detected which is similar to the ''solid echo'' in substances with dipole broadening of the magnetic resonance line

  19. Proton NMR studies on Megaphaera elsdenii flavodoxin : structure elucidation by 2D-NMR and implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mierlo, van C.

    1990-01-01

    1H NMR techniques have been applied for a thorough study of the uncrystallizable Megasphaera elsdenii flavodoxin in its three redox states. The aim of the research project described in this thesis was to obtain answers regarding questions

  20. Structure determination of the single glycan of rabbit serotransferrin by methylation analysis and 360 MHz /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leger, D; Tordera, V; Spik, G [Lille-1 Univ., 59 - Villeneuve-d' Ascq (France); Dorland, L; Haverkamp, J; Vliegenthart, J F.G. [Rijksuniversiteit Utrecht (Netherlands)

    1978-09-15

    The glycopeptide fraction of rabbit serotransferrin (STF) has been investigated applying an original method for the determination of glycan primary structure combining monosaccharide determination, permethylation and 360 MHz /sup 1/H NMR. It is concluded that the highly purified rabbit transferrin contains only 1 glycan chain/molecule. A heterogeneity of the glycan moiety in the sialic acid residues was observed on isolation by paper electrophoresis of a disialylglycopeptide G-1 and a monosialylglycopeptide 2. The primary structure of glycopeptide G-1 deduced on the basis of the data of carbohydrate composition, permethylation analysis and 360 MHz /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy is identical to the primary structure of human serotransferrin glycan and the glycopeptide G-2 was shown by /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy, to be a mixture of two isomeric monosialylglycopeptides.

  1. Structure determination of the single glycan of rabbit serotransferrin by methylation analysis and 360 MHz 1H NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leger, D.; Tordera, V.; Spik, G.; Dorland, L.; Haverkamp, J.; Vliegenthart, J.F.G.

    1978-01-01

    The glycopeptide fraction of rabbit serotransferrin (STF) has been investigated applying an original method for the determination of glycan primary structure combining monosaccharide determination, permethylation and 360 MHz 1 H NMR. It is concluded that the highly purified rabbit transferrin contains only 1 glycan chain/molecule. A heterogeneity of the glycan moiety in the sialic acid residues was observed on isolation by paper electrophoresis of a disialylglycopeptide G-1 and a monosialylglycopeptide 2. The primary structure of glycopeptide G-1 deduced on the basis of the data of carbohydrate composition, permethylation analysis and 360 MHz 1 H NMR spectroscopy is identical to the primary structure of human serotransferrin glycan and the glycopeptide G-2 was shown by 1 H NMR spectroscopy, to be a mixture of two isomeric monosialylglycopeptides. (Auth.)

  2. Probing the Structure and Dynamics of Proteins by Combining Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Experimental NMR Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Jane R; Hertig, Samuel; Missimer, John H; Smith, Lorna J; Steinmetz, Michel O; Dolenc, Jožica

    2012-10-09

    NMR experiments provide detailed structural information about biological macromolecules in solution. However, the amount of information obtained is usually much less than the number of degrees of freedom of the macromolecule. Moreover, the relationships between experimental observables and structural information, such as interatomic distances or dihedral angle values, may be multiple-valued and may rely on empirical parameters and approximations. The extraction of structural information from experimental data is further complicated by the time- and ensemble-averaged nature of NMR observables. Combining NMR data with molecular dynamics simulations can elucidate and alleviate some of these problems, as well as allow inconsistencies in the NMR data to be identified. Here, we use a number of examples from our work to highlight the power of molecular dynamics simulations in providing a structural interpretation of solution NMR data.

  3. NMR Structure of the Myristylated Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Matrix Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lola A. Brown

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Membrane targeting by the Gag proteins of the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV types-1 and -2 is mediated by Gag’s N-terminally myristylated matrix (MA domain and is dependent on cellular phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5P2]. To determine if other lentiviruses employ a similar membrane targeting mechanism, we initiated studies of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV, a widespread feline pathogen with potential utility for development of human therapeutics. Bacterial co-translational myristylation was facilitated by mutation of two amino acids near the amino-terminus of the protein (Q5A/G6S; myrMAQ5A/G6S. These substitutions did not affect virus assembly or release from transfected cells. NMR studies revealed that the myristyl group is buried within a hydrophobic pocket in a manner that is structurally similar to that observed for the myristylated HIV-1 protein. Comparisons with a recent crystal structure of the unmyristylated FIV protein [myr(-MA] indicate that only small changes in helix orientation are required to accommodate the sequestered myr group. Depletion of PI(4,5P2 from the plasma membrane of FIV-infected CRFK cells inhibited production of FIV particles, indicating that, like HIV, FIV hijacks the PI(4,5P2 cellular signaling system to direct intracellular Gag trafficking during virus assembly.

  4. NMR structure of the myristylated feline immunodeficiency virus matrix protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lola A; Cox, Cassiah; Baptiste, Janae; Summers, Holly; Button, Ryan; Bahlow, Kennedy; Spurrier, Vaughn; Kyser, Jenna; Luttge, Benjamin G; Kuo, Lillian; Freed, Eric O; Summers, Michael F

    2015-04-30

    Membrane targeting by the Gag proteins of the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV types-1 and -2) is mediated by Gag's N-terminally myristylated matrix (MA) domain and is dependent on cellular phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. To determine if other lentiviruses employ a similar membrane targeting mechanism, we initiated studies of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a widespread feline pathogen with potential utility for development of human therapeutics. Bacterial co-translational myristylation was facilitated by mutation of two amino acids near the amino-terminus of the protein (Q5A/G6S; myrMAQ5A/G6S). These substitutions did not affect virus assembly or release from transfected cells. NMR studies revealed that the myristyl group is buried within a hydrophobic pocket in a manner that is structurally similar to that observed for the myristylated HIV-1 protein. Comparisons with a recent crystal structure of the unmyristylated FIV protein [myr(-)MA] indicate that only small changes in helix orientation are required to accommodate the sequestered myr group. Depletion of PI(4,5)P2 from the plasma membrane of FIV-infected CRFK cells inhibited production of FIV particles, indicating that, like HIV, FIV hijacks the PI(4,5)P2 cellular signaling system to direct intracellular Gag trafficking during virus assembly.

  5. The second round of Critical Assessment of Automated Structure Determination of Proteins by NMR: CASD-NMR-2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosato, Antonio; Vranken, Wim; Fogh, Rasmus H.; Ragan, Timothy J.; Tejero, Roberto; Pederson, Kari; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Prestegard, James H.; Yee, Adelinda; Wu, Bin; Lemak, Alexander; Houliston, Scott; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Kennedy, Michael; Acton, Thomas B.; Xiao, Rong; Liu, Gaohua; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Vuister, Geerten W.

    2015-01-01

    The second round of the community-wide initiative Critical Assessment of automated Structure Determination of Proteins by NMR (CASD-NMR-2013) comprised ten blind target datasets, consisting of unprocessed spectral data, assigned chemical shift lists and unassigned NOESY peak and RDC lists, that were made available in both curated (i.e. manually refined) or un-curated (i.e. automatically generated) form. Ten structure calculation programs, using fully automated protocols only, generated a total of 164 three-dimensional structures (entries) for the ten targets, sometimes using both curated and un-curated lists to generate multiple entries for a single target. The accuracy of the entries could be established by comparing them to the corresponding manually solved structure of each target, which was not available at the time the data were provided. Across the entire data set, 71 % of all entries submitted achieved an accuracy relative to the reference NMR structure better than 1.5 Å. Methods based on NOESY peak lists achieved even better results with up to 100 % of the entries within the 1.5 Å threshold for some programs. However, some methods did not converge for some targets using un-curated NOESY peak lists. Over 90 % of the entries achieved an accuracy better than the more relaxed threshold of 2.5 Å that was used in the previous CASD-NMR-2010 round. Comparisons between entries generated with un-curated versus curated peaks show only marginal improvements for the latter in those cases where both calculations converged

  6. The second round of Critical Assessment of Automated Structure Determination of Proteins by NMR: CASD-NMR-2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosato, Antonio [University of Florence, Department of Chemistry and Magnetic Resonance Center (Italy); Vranken, Wim [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Structural Biology Brussels (Belgium); Fogh, Rasmus H.; Ragan, Timothy J. [University of Leicester, Department of Biochemistry, School of Biological Sciences (United Kingdom); Tejero, Roberto [Universidad de Valencia, Departamento de Química Física (Spain); Pederson, Kari; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Prestegard, James H. [University of Georgia, Complex Carbohydrate Research Center and Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium (United States); Yee, Adelinda; Wu, Bin; Lemak, Alexander; Houliston, Scott; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H. [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Biophysics, Cancer Genomics and Proteomics, Ontario Cancer Institute, Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium (Canada); Kennedy, Michael [Miami University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium (United States); Acton, Thomas B.; Xiao, Rong; Liu, Gaohua; Montelione, Gaetano T., E-mail: guy@cabm.rutgers.edu [The State University of New Jersey, Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Rutgers (United States); Vuister, Geerten W., E-mail: gv29@le.ac.uk [University of Leicester, Department of Biochemistry, School of Biological Sciences (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    The second round of the community-wide initiative Critical Assessment of automated Structure Determination of Proteins by NMR (CASD-NMR-2013) comprised ten blind target datasets, consisting of unprocessed spectral data, assigned chemical shift lists and unassigned NOESY peak and RDC lists, that were made available in both curated (i.e. manually refined) or un-curated (i.e. automatically generated) form. Ten structure calculation programs, using fully automated protocols only, generated a total of 164 three-dimensional structures (entries) for the ten targets, sometimes using both curated and un-curated lists to generate multiple entries for a single target. The accuracy of the entries could be established by comparing them to the corresponding manually solved structure of each target, which was not available at the time the data were provided. Across the entire data set, 71 % of all entries submitted achieved an accuracy relative to the reference NMR structure better than 1.5 Å. Methods based on NOESY peak lists achieved even better results with up to 100 % of the entries within the 1.5 Å threshold for some programs. However, some methods did not converge for some targets using un-curated NOESY peak lists. Over 90 % of the entries achieved an accuracy better than the more relaxed threshold of 2.5 Å that was used in the previous CASD-NMR-2010 round. Comparisons between entries generated with un-curated versus curated peaks show only marginal improvements for the latter in those cases where both calculations converged.

  7. Application of the AMPLE cluster-and-truncate approach to NMR structures for molecular replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bibby, Jaclyn [University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZB (United Kingdom); Keegan, Ronan M. [Research Complex at Harwell, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Mayans, Olga [University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZB (United Kingdom); Winn, Martyn D. [Science and Technology Facilities Council Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Rigden, Daniel J., E-mail: drigden@liv.ac.uk [University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZB (United Kingdom)

    2013-11-01

    Processing of NMR structures for molecular replacement by AMPLE works well. AMPLE is a program developed for clustering and truncating ab initio protein structure predictions into search models for molecular replacement. Here, it is shown that its core cluster-and-truncate methods also work well for processing NMR ensembles into search models. Rosetta remodelling helps to extend success to NMR structures bearing low sequence identity or high structural divergence from the target protein. Potential future routes to improved performance are considered and practical, general guidelines on using AMPLE are provided.

  8. Vivaldi: Visualization and validation of biomacromolecular NMR structures from the PDB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickx, Pieter M S; Gutmanas, Aleksandras; Kleywegt, Gerard J

    2013-01-01

    We describe Vivaldi (VIsualization and VALidation DIsplay; http://pdbe.org/vivaldi), a web-based service for the analysis, visualization, and validation of NMR structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Vivaldi provides access to model coordinates and several types of experimental NMR data using interactive visualization tools, augmented with structural annotations and model-validation information. The service presents information about the modeled NMR ensemble, validation of experimental chemical shifts, residual dipolar couplings, distance and dihedral angle constraints, as well as validation scores based on empirical knowledge and databases. Vivaldi was designed for both expert NMR spectroscopists and casual non-expert users who wish to obtain a better grasp of the information content and quality of NMR structures in the public archive. © Proteins 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23180575

  9. Structural characterization of homogalacturonan by NMR spectroscopy - assignment of reference compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Bent O.; Meier, Sebastian; Duus, Jens Øllgaard

    2008-01-01

    Complete assignment of 1H and 13C NMR of six hexagalactopyranuronic acids with varying degree and pattern of methyl esterification is reported. The NMR experiments were run at room temperature using approximately 2 mg of sample making this method convenient for studying the structure...

  10. Structure and dynamics of paramagnetic transients by pulsed EPR and NMR detection of nuclear resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trifunac, A.D.

    1981-01-01

    Structure and dynamics of transient radicals in pulse radiolysis can be studied by time resolved EPR and NMR techniques. EPR study of kinetics and relaxation is illustrated. The NMR detection of nuclear resonance in transient radicals is a new method which allows the study of hyperfine coupling, population dynamics, radical kinetics, and reaction mechanism. 9 figures

  11. Structure determination of helical filaments by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mumdooh; Spehr, Johannes; König, Renate; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Rand, Ulfert; Lührs, Thorsten; Ritter, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    The controlled formation of filamentous protein complexes plays a crucial role in many biological systems and represents an emerging paradigm in signal transduction. The mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) is a central signal transduction hub in innate immunity that is activated by a receptor-induced conversion into helical superstructures (filaments) assembled from its globular caspase activation and recruitment domain. Solid-state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy has become one of the most powerful techniques for atomic resolution structures of protein fibrils. However, for helical filaments, the determination of the correct symmetry parameters has remained a significant hurdle for any structural technique and could thus far not be precisely derived from ssNMR data. Here, we solved the atomic resolution structure of helical MAVSCARD filaments exclusively from ssNMR data. We present a generally applicable approach that systematically explores the helical symmetry space by efficient modeling of the helical structure restrained by interprotomer ssNMR distance restraints. Together with classical automated NMR structure calculation, this allowed us to faithfully determine the symmetry that defines the entire assembly. To validate our structure, we probed the protomer arrangement by solvent paramagnetic resonance enhancement, analysis of chemical shift differences relative to the solution NMR structure of the monomer, and mutagenesis. We provide detailed information on the atomic contacts that determine filament stability and describe mechanistic details on the formation of signaling-competent MAVS filaments from inactive monomers. PMID:26733681

  12. Structure of Coordination Complexes: The Synergy between NMR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    determined by density functional theory (DFT) methods and the application of the Boltzmann equation, are in ... single crystals suitable for crystallography can be obtained, ...... NMR analysis of bonding in transition metal olefin complexes.

  13. Structural investigations of yeast mannans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rademacher, K.H.

    1983-01-01

    Cell wall mannans were isolated from 8 different Candida species and separated in oligosaccharides by partial acetolysis. After gel chromatography specific acetolysis patterns were obtained. The 13 C NMR spectra of mannans and oligosaccharides were recorded. Signals at delta = 93.1 - 105.4 were assigned to certain chemical structures. Both the spectral patterns and the acetolysis patterns of the yeast mannans can be used for the discrimination of related yeasts. (author)

  14. Accurate protein structure modeling using sparse NMR data and homologous structure information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, James M; Sgourakis, Nikolaos G; Liu, Gaohua; Rossi, Paolo; Tang, Yuefeng; Mills, Jeffrey L; Szyperski, Thomas; Montelione, Gaetano T; Baker, David

    2012-06-19

    While information from homologous structures plays a central role in X-ray structure determination by molecular replacement, such information is rarely used in NMR structure determination because it can be incorrect, both locally and globally, when evolutionary relationships are inferred incorrectly or there has been considerable evolutionary structural divergence. Here we describe a method that allows robust modeling of protein structures of up to 225 residues by combining (1)H(N), (13)C, and (15)N backbone and (13)Cβ chemical shift data, distance restraints derived from homologous structures, and a physically realistic all-atom energy function. Accurate models are distinguished from inaccurate models generated using incorrect sequence alignments by requiring that (i) the all-atom energies of models generated using the restraints are lower than models generated in unrestrained calculations and (ii) the low-energy structures converge to within 2.0 Å backbone rmsd over 75% of the protein. Benchmark calculations on known structures and blind targets show that the method can accurately model protein structures, even with very remote homology information, to a backbone rmsd of 1.2-1.9 Å relative to the conventional determined NMR ensembles and of 0.9-1.6 Å relative to X-ray structures for well-defined regions of the protein structures. This approach facilitates the accurate modeling of protein structures using backbone chemical shift data without need for side-chain resonance assignments and extensive analysis of NOESY cross-peak assignments.

  15. Structure Elucidation of Unknown Metabolites in Metabolomics by Combined NMR and MS/MS Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiteau, Rene M; Hoyt, David W; Nicora, Carrie D; Kinmonth-Schultz, Hannah A; Ward, Joy K; Bingol, Kerem

    2018-01-17

    We introduce a cheminformatics approach that combines highly selective and orthogonal structure elucidation parameters; accurate mass, MS/MS (MS²), and NMR into a single analysis platform to accurately identify unknown metabolites in untargeted studies. The approach starts with an unknown LC-MS feature, and then combines the experimental MS/MS and NMR information of the unknown to effectively filter out the false positive candidate structures based on their predicted MS/MS and NMR spectra. We demonstrate the approach on a model mixture, and then we identify an uncatalogued secondary metabolite in Arabidopsis thaliana . The NMR/MS² approach is well suited to the discovery of new metabolites in plant extracts, microbes, soils, dissolved organic matter, food extracts, biofuels, and biomedical samples, facilitating the identification of metabolites that are not present in experimental NMR and MS metabolomics databases.

  16. An investigation into the effects of pore connectivity on T2 NMR relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghomeshi, Shahin; Kryuchkov, Sergey; Kantzas, Apostolos

    2018-04-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a powerful technique used to characterize fluids and flow in porous media. The NMR relaxation curves are closely related to pore geometry, and the inversion of the NMR relaxometry data is known to give useful information with regards to pore size distribution (PSD) through the relative amplitudes of the fluids stored in the small and large pores. While this information is crucial, the main challenge for the successful use of the NMR measurements is the proper interpretation of the measured signals. Natural porous media patterns consist of complex pore structures with many interconnected or "coupled" regions, as well as isolated pores. This connectivity along the throats changes the relaxation distribution and in order to properly interpret this data, a thorough understanding of the effects of pore connectivity on the NMR relaxation distribution is warranted. In this paper we address two main points. The first pertains to the fact that there is a discrepancy between the relaxation distribution obtained from experiments, and the ones obtained from solving the mathematical models of diffusion process in the digitized images of the pore space. There are several reasons that may attribute to this such as the lack of a proper incorporation of surface roughness into the model. However, here we are more interested in the effects of pore connectivity and to understand why the typical NMR relaxation distribution obtained from experiments are wider, while the numerical simulations predict that a wider NMR relaxation distribution may indicate poor connectivity. Secondly, by not taking into account the pore coupling effects, from our experience in interpreting the data, we tend to underestimate the pore volume of small pores and overestimate the amplitudes in the large pores. The role of pore coupling becomes even more prominent in rocks with small pore sizes such as for example in shales, clay in sandstones, and in the microstructures of

  17. Non-Uniform Sampling and J-UNIO Automation for Efficient Protein NMR Structure Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didenko, Tatiana; Proudfoot, Andrew; Dutta, Samit Kumar; Serrano, Pedro; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2015-08-24

    High-resolution structure determination of small proteins in solution is one of the big assets of NMR spectroscopy in structural biology. Improvements in the efficiency of NMR structure determination by advances in NMR experiments and automation of data handling therefore attracts continued interest. Here, non-uniform sampling (NUS) of 3D heteronuclear-resolved [(1)H,(1)H]-NOESY data yielded two- to three-fold savings of instrument time for structure determinations of soluble proteins. With the 152-residue protein NP_372339.1 from Staphylococcus aureus and the 71-residue protein NP_346341.1 from Streptococcus pneumonia we show that high-quality structures can be obtained with NUS NMR data, which are equally well amenable to robust automated analysis as the corresponding uniformly sampled data. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. 1H NMR study of the solvent THF concerning their structural and dynamical properties in chemically Li-intercalated SWNT

    KAUST Repository

    Schmid, Marc R.

    2011-09-01

    Structural and dynamical properties of the THF solvent in single-walled carbon nanotubes intercalated with lithium are investigated by NMR. 1H NMR experiments reveal the existence of two types of inequivalent THF solvent molecules with different chemical environments and dynamical behavior. At low temperatures THF molecules perpendicularly arranged in between adjacent SWNT presumably exhibit a restricted rotation around their dipolar axis. At higher temperatures THF molecules are isotropically rotating and diffusing along the interstitial channels of the SWNT bundles. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Crystal structure and tautomerism of Pigment Yellow 138 determined by X-ray powder diffraction and solid-state NMR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gumbert, Silke D.; Körbitzer, Meike; Alig, Edith

    2016-01-01

    The crystal structure of C.I. Pigment Yellow 138 was determined from X-ray powder diffraction data using real-space methods with subsequent Rietveld refinements. The tautomeric state was investigated by solid-state 1D and 2D multinuclear NMR experiments. In the crystals, the compound exhibits...... the NH-tautomer with a hydrogen atom situated at the nitrogen of the quinoline moiety. Direct evidence of the presence of the NH-tautomer is provided by 1H–14N HMQC solid-state NMR at very fast MAS. Solid-state dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations with BLYP-D3 confirm...

  20. 1H NMR study of the solvent THF concerning their structural and dynamical properties in chemically Li-intercalated SWNT

    KAUST Repository

    Schmid, Marc R.; Goze-Bac, Christophe; Bouhrara, Mohamed; Saih, Youssef; Mehring, Michael; Abou-Hamad, Edy

    2011-01-01

    Structural and dynamical properties of the THF solvent in single-walled carbon nanotubes intercalated with lithium are investigated by NMR. 1H NMR experiments reveal the existence of two types of inequivalent THF solvent molecules with different chemical environments and dynamical behavior. At low temperatures THF molecules perpendicularly arranged in between adjacent SWNT presumably exhibit a restricted rotation around their dipolar axis. At higher temperatures THF molecules are isotropically rotating and diffusing along the interstitial channels of the SWNT bundles. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Novel NMR tools to study structure and dynamics of biomembranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawrisch, Klaus; Eldho, Nadukkudy V; Polozov, Ivan V

    2002-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies on biomembranes have benefited greatly from introduction of magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR techniques. Improvements in MAS probe technology, combined with the higher magnetic field strength of modern instruments, enables almost liquid-like resolution of lipid resonances. The cross-relaxation rates measured by nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy (NOESY) provide new insights into conformation and dynamics of lipids with atomic-scale resolution. The data reflect the tremendous motional disorder in the lipid matrix. Transfer of magnetization by spin diffusion along the proton network of lipids is of secondary relevance, even at a long NOESY mixing time of 300 ms. MAS experiments with re-coupling of anisotropic interactions, like the 13C-(1)H dipolar couplings, benefit from the excellent resolution of 13C shifts that enables assignment of the couplings to specific carbon atoms. The traditional 2H NMR experiments on deuterated lipids have higher sensitivity when conducted on oriented samples at higher magnetic field strength. A very large number of NMR parameters from lipid bilayers is now accessible, providing information about conformation and dynamics for every lipid segment. The NMR methods have the sensitivity and resolution to study lipid-protein interaction, lateral lipid organization, and the location of solvents and drugs in the lipid matrix.

  2. NMR of unfolded proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2005-01-03

    Jan 3, 2005 ... covering all the systems, so far discovered.5,7,8,12. With the increasing ... Structural investigations on proteins by NMR are, currently ... rapid analysis of unfolded proteins. ...... and hence help in design of drugs against them.

  3. Determination of the structural changes by Raman and {sup 13}C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy on native corn starch with plasticizers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cozar, O. [Academy of Romanian Scientists, Splaiul Independentei 54, 050094, Bucharest, Romania and National Institute of Research-Development for Machines and Installations Designed to Agriculture and Food Industry - INMA Bucureşti - Cluj-Napoca Branch (Romania); Filip, C.; Tripon, C. [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Cioica, N.; Coţa, C.; Nagy, E. M. [National Institute of Research-Development for Machines and Installations Designed to Agriculture and Food Industry - INMA Bucureşti - Cluj-Napoca Branch, RO-400458 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-13

    The plasticizing - antiplasticizing effect of water and glycerol contents on native corn starch samples is investigated by FT-Raman and {sup 13}C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy. The presence of both amorphous and crystalline structural phases was evidenced in pure native corn starch and also in the samples containing plasticizers. Among the crystalline starch structures, the A- and V- types were suggested by CP/MAS NMR spectra.

  4. APPLICATION OF A C-13 NMR TOPOLOGICAL MODEL TO THE STRUCTURE ELUCIDATION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁身刚; 彭琛; 郑崇直

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an approach which can elucidate automatically the structures of simple organic compounds from their C-13 NMR spectral data by using a computer. Based on a substructure/C-13 NMR chemical shift topological correlation model, the approach deduces the candidate substructures and the constraints for the substructure assembling from the molecular formula and C-13 NMR spectral data. Then, candidate structures are generated under these constraints by assembling the candidate substructures in a partial superposition manner. Candidate substructures or structures are evaluated once they are generated in order to eliminate those conflicting with the original data as early as possible. The evaluation of a (sub)structure is mainly carried out by simulating its C-13 NMR (sub) spectrum, which is again based on the model, and comparing the simulated spectrum with the original data.

  5. Solid-state {sup 2}H NMR investigations in guest-host systems and plastic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garibay, J.A.V.

    2004-07-01

    Variable temperature {sup 2}H NMR investigations have been carried out to study the molecular behavior of perdeuterated benzene and pyridine in the inclusion compound with tris-(1,2-dioxyphenyl)-cyclotriphosphazene. Here, a comprehensive variable temperature {sup 2}H NMR study is presented comprising line shape studies and relaxation experiments. The experimental data clearly indicate the presence of highly mobile guest species. Sample cooling gives rise to characteristic line shape effects that can be attributed to a slow-down of the rotational motion. Additional {sup 2}H NMR measurements were performed on the plastic crystal 1,4-diazabicyclo[2,2,2]octane where highly mobile species were observed. A quantitative analysis of the experimental data is achieved by appropriate computer simulations taking into account various molecular motions for each studied system. The analysis of these theoretical data give rise to the kinetic parameters that are in the order of related systems. (orig.)

  6. 17O NMR investigation of oxidative degradation in polymers under γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ALAM, TODD M.; CELINA, MATHIAS C.; ASSINK, ROGER A.; CLOUGH, ROGER LEE; GILLEN, KENNETH T.

    2000-01-01

    The γ-irradiated-oxidation of pentacontane (C 50 H 102 ) and the polymer polyisoprene was investigated as a function of oxidation level using 17 O nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. It is demonstrated that by using 17 O labeled O 2 gas during the γ-irradiation process, details about the oxidative degradation mechanisms can be directly obtained from the analysis of the 17 O NMR spectra. Production of carboxylic acids is the primary oxygen-containing functionality during the oxidation of pentacontane, while ethers and alcohols are the dominant oxidation product observed for polyisoprene. The formation of ester species during the oxidation process is very minor for both materials, with water also being produced in significant amounts during the radiolytic oxidation of polyisoprene. The ability to focus on the oxidative component of the degradation process using 17 O NMR spectroscopy demonstrates the selectivity of this technique over more conventional approaches

  7. Structural analysis of the exopolysaccharide produced by Streptococcus thermophilus ST1 solely by NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saewen, Elin; Huttunen, Eine; Zhang Xue; Yang Zhennai; Widmalm, Goeran

    2010-01-01

    The use of lactic acid bacteria in fermentation of milk results in favorable physical and rheological properties due to in situ exopolysaccharide (EPS) production. The EPS from S. thermophilus ST1 produces highly viscous aqueous solutions and its structure has been investigated by NMR spectroscopy. Notably, all aspects of the elucidation of its primary structure including component analysis and absolute configuration of the constituent monosaccharides were carried out by NMR spectroscopy. An array of techniques was utilized including, inter alia, PANSY and NOESY-HSQC TILT experiments. The EPS is composed of hexasaccharide repeating units with the following structure: → 3)[α-d-Glcp-(1 → 4)]-β-d-Galp-(1 → 4)-β-d-Glcp-(1 → 4)[β-d-Galf-(1 → 6)]-β-d-Glcp-(1 → 6)-β-d-Glcp-(1 → , in which the residues in square brackets are terminal groups substituting backbone sugar residues that consequently are branch-points in the repeating unit of the polymer. Thus, the EPS consists of a backbone of four sugar residues with two terminal sugar residues making up two side-chains of the repeating unit. The molecular mass of the polymer was determined using translational diffusion experiments which resulted in M w = 62 kDa, corresponding to 64 repeating units in the EPS.

  8. Structural analysis of the exopolysaccharide produced by Streptococcus thermophilus ST1 solely by NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saewen, Elin [Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University, Department of Organic Chemistry (Sweden); Huttunen, Eine; Zhang Xue [University of Helsinki, Department of Food Technology (Finland); Yang Zhennai [Northeast Agricultural Research Center of China, Center of Agro-food Technology (China); Widmalm, Goeran, E-mail: gw@organ.su.s [Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University, Department of Organic Chemistry (Sweden)

    2010-06-15

    The use of lactic acid bacteria in fermentation of milk results in favorable physical and rheological properties due to in situ exopolysaccharide (EPS) production. The EPS from S. thermophilus ST1 produces highly viscous aqueous solutions and its structure has been investigated by NMR spectroscopy. Notably, all aspects of the elucidation of its primary structure including component analysis and absolute configuration of the constituent monosaccharides were carried out by NMR spectroscopy. An array of techniques was utilized including, inter alia, PANSY and NOESY-HSQC TILT experiments. The EPS is composed of hexasaccharide repeating units with the following structure: {yields} 3)[{alpha}-d-Glcp-(1 {yields} 4)]-{beta}-d-Galp-(1 {yields} 4)-{beta}-d-Glcp-(1 {yields} 4)[{beta}-d-Galf-(1 {yields} 6)]-{beta}-d-Glcp-(1 {yields} 6)-{beta}-d-Glcp-(1 {sup {yields}}, in which the residues in square brackets are terminal groups substituting backbone sugar residues that consequently are branch-points in the repeating unit of the polymer. Thus, the EPS consists of a backbone of four sugar residues with two terminal sugar residues making up two side-chains of the repeating unit. The molecular mass of the polymer was determined using translational diffusion experiments which resulted in M{sub w} = 62 kDa, corresponding to 64 repeating units in the EPS.

  9. 13C-NMR chemical shift databases as a quick tool to evaluate structural models of humic substances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyrop Albers, Christian; Hansen, Poul Erik

    2010-01-01

    Models for humic and fulvic acids are discussed based on 13C liquid state NMR spectra combined with results from elemental analysis and titration studies. The analysis of NMR spectra is based on a full reconstruction of the NMR spectrum done with help of 13C-NMR data bases by adding up chemical...... side missing structural elements in the models can be suggested. A number of proposed structures for humic and fulvic acids are discussed based on the above analysis....

  10. Determination of the three-dimensional structure for weakly aligned biomolecules by NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahkhatuni, Astghik A; Shahkhatuni, Aleksan G

    2002-01-01

    The key achievements and the potential of NMR spectroscopy for weakly aligned biomolecules are considered. Due to weak alignment, it becomes possible to determine a number of NMR parameters dependent on the orientation of biomolecules, which are averaged to zero in usual isotropic media. The addition of new orientational constraints to standard procedures of 3D structure determination markedly increases the achievable accuracy. The possibility of structure determination for biomolecules using only orientation-dependent parameters without invoking other NMR data is discussed. The methods of orientation, experimental techniques, and calculation methods are systematised. The main results obtained and the prospects of using NMR spectroscopy of weakly aligned systems to study different classes of biomolecules and to solve various problems of molecular biology are analysed. Examples of biomolecules whose structures have been determined using orientation-dependent parameters are given. The bibliography includes 508 references.

  11. Computer-aided structure analysis. Structure identification by infrared and /sup 13/C NMR measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szalontai, G; Simon, Z; Csapo, Z; Farkas, M; Pfeifer, Gy [Nehezvegyipari Kutato Intezet, Veszprem (Hungary)

    1980-01-01

    The results obtained from the computer-aided interpretation of /sup 13/C NMR and IR spectra using the artificial intelligence approach are presented. In its present state the output of the system is a list of functional groups which are resonable candidates for the final structural isomers. The input requires empirical formula, /sup 13/C NMR data (off resonance data also) and IR spectral data. The confirmation of the presence of a functional group is based on comparison of the experimental data with the spectral properties of functional groups stored in a property matrix. If the molecular weight of the compounds studied is less or equal 500, the output contains usually 1.5-2.5 times more groups than really present, in most cases without the loss of the real ones.

  12. CASD-NMR 2: robust and accurate unsupervised analysis of raw NOESY spectra and protein structure determination with UNIO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerry, Paul; Duong, Viet Dung; Herrmann, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    UNIO is a comprehensive software suite for protein NMR structure determination that enables full automation of all NMR data analysis steps involved—including signal identification in NMR spectra, sequence-specific backbone and side-chain resonance assignment, NOE assignment and structure calculation. Within the framework of the second round of the community-wide stringent blind NMR structure determination challenge (CASD-NMR 2), we participated in two categories of CASD-NMR 2, namely using either raw NMR spectra or unrefined NOE peak lists as input. A total of 15 resulting NMR structure bundles were submitted for 9 out of 10 blind protein targets. All submitted UNIO structures accurately coincided with the corresponding blind targets as documented by an average backbone root mean-square deviation to the reference proteins of only 1.2 Å. Also, the precision of the UNIO structure bundles was virtually identical to the ensemble of reference structures. By assessing the quality of all UNIO structures submitted to the two categories, we find throughout that only the UNIO–ATNOS/CANDID approach using raw NMR spectra consistently yielded structure bundles of high quality for direct deposition in the Protein Data Bank. In conclusion, the results obtained in CASD-NMR 2 are another vital proof for robust, accurate and unsupervised NMR data analysis by UNIO for real-world applications

  13. Systematic comparison of crystal and NMR protein structures deposited in the protein data bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikic, Kresimir; Tomic, Sanja; Carugo, Oliviero

    2010-09-03

    Nearly all the macromolecular three-dimensional structures deposited in Protein Data Bank were determined by either crystallographic (X-ray) or Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopic methods. This paper reports a systematic comparison of the crystallographic and NMR results deposited in the files of the Protein Data Bank, in order to find out to which extent these information can be aggregated in bioinformatics. A non-redundant data set containing 109 NMR - X-ray structure pairs of nearly identical proteins was derived from the Protein Data Bank. A series of comparisons were performed by focusing the attention towards both global features and local details. It was observed that: (1) the RMDS values between NMR and crystal structures range from about 1.5 Å to about 2.5 Å; (2) the correlation between conformational deviations and residue type reveals that hydrophobic amino acids are more similar in crystal and NMR structures than hydrophilic amino acids; (3) the correlation between solvent accessibility of the residues and their conformational variability in solid state and in solution is relatively modest (correlation coefficient = 0.462); (4) beta strands on average match better between NMR and crystal structures than helices and loops; (5) conformational differences between loops are independent of crystal packing interactions in the solid state; (6) very seldom, side chains buried in the protein interior are observed to adopt different orientations in the solid state and in solution.

  14. Molecular mobility in Medicago truncatula seed during early stage of germination: Neutron scattering and NMR investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falourd, Xavier [UR1268 Biopolymères Interactions Assemblages, INRA, F-44316 Nantes (France); Natali, Francesca [CNR-IOM-OGG, c/o Institut Laue-Langevin, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Institut Laue-Langevin, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Peters, Judith [Institut Laue-Langevin, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Université Joseph Fourier UFR PhITEM, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Institut de Biologie Structurale, 41 rue Jules Horowitz, 38027 Grenoble Cedex 1 (France); Foucat, Loïc, E-mail: Loic.Foucat@nantes.inra.fr [UR1268 Biopolymères Interactions Assemblages, INRA, F-44316 Nantes (France)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • Neutron scattering and NMR approaches were used to characterize seed germination. • A parallel between macromolecular motions and water dynamics was established. • Freezing/thawing cycle revealed a hysteresis connected to the seed hydration level. - Abstract: First hours of Medicago truncatula (MT) seeds germination were investigated using elastic incoherent neutron scattering (EINS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), to follow respectively how macromolecular motions and water mobility evolve when water permeates into the seed. From EINS results, it was shown that there is an increase in macromolecular mobility with the water uptake. Changes in NMR relaxation parameters reflected microstructural changes associated with the recovery of the metabolic processes. The EINS investigation of the effect of temperature on macromolecular motions showed that there is a relationship between the amount of water in the seeds and the effect of freezing–thawing cycle. The NMR relaxometry results obtained at 253 K allowed establishing possible link between the freezing of water molecules tightly bound to macromolecules and their drastic motion restriction around 250 K, as observed with EINS at the highest water content.

  15. Time-evolution of the entropy of fluctuations in some biological systems as investigated by NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenk, R.

    1979-01-01

    A simple expression for the entropy of fluctuations has been developed, using the tunnelling-effect model. This gives the possibility to estimate the changes and evolution of entropy in non-crystalline and biological samples by NMR investigations. On the other hand, the oscillatory character of the time-evolution of some properties, experimentally found in the investigated samples of plants, is interpreted in terms of the generalized master equation with an exponential memory function. (Auth.)

  16. Structural studies of the activation of the two component receiver domain NTRC by multidimensional heteronuclear NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nohaile, Michael James [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1996-05-01

    Multidimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy was used to investigate the N-terminal domain of the transcriptional enhancer NTRC (NiTrogen Regulatory protein C). This domain belongs to the family of receiver domains of two-component regulatory systems involved in signal transduction. Phosphorylation of NTRC at D54 leads to an activated form of the molecule which stimulates transcription of genes involved in nitrogen regulation. Three and four dimensional NMR techniques were used to determine an intermediate resolution structure of the unphosphorylated, inactive form of the N-terminal domain of NTRC. The structure is comprised of five α-helices and a five-stranded β-sheet in a (β/α)5 topology. Analysis of the backbone dynamics of NTRC indicate that helix 4 and strand 5 are significantly more flexible than the rest of the secondary structure of the protein and that the loops making up the active site are flexible. The short lifetime of phospho-NTRC hampers the study of this form. However, conditions for determining the resonance assignments and, possibly, the three dimensional structure of phosphorylated NTRC have been obtained. Tentative assignments of the phosphorylated form indicate that the majority of the changes that NTRC experiences upon phosphorylation occur in helix 3, strand 4, helix 4, strand 5, and the loop between strand 5 and helix 5 (the 3445 face of NTRC) as well as near the site of phosphorylation. In order to examine a stable, activated form of the protein, constitutively active mutants of NTRC were investigated.

  17. Investigation of a polymer-dispersed liquid crystal system by NMR diffusometry and relaxometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Mingxue

    2013-02-26

    Polymer-dispersed liquid crystals (PDLCs) are polymer composites containing a dispersion of liquid crystal droplets in polymer networks. PDLCs have attracted much attention due to their unique properties and potential usage. The properties of PDLCs depend on the degree of phase separation and the size of liquid crystal droplets. To investigate the structure will help us to better understand and optimize PDLCs.The main aim of this PhD thesis was to investigate PDLCs by NMR techniques. Diffusion constants and spin-lattice relaxation times in the laboratory (T{sub 1}) and rotating frame (T{sub 1{rho}}) were measured for PDLCs as well as precursor mixtures based on the trifunctional monomer trimethylolpropane triacrylate (TMPTA) and the commercial nematic mixture E7. The variation of the main dipolar splitting of {sup 1}H spectra with increasing temperature was analyzed to obtain the nematic-to-isotropic phase transition temperature and the nematic order parameter of E7 and, for comparison, the nematic liquid crystal 5CB.Diffusion constants in TMPTA/E7 mixtures, measured by pulsed-field gradient NMR, increase for both E7 and TMPTA as the mass fraction of E7 increases, due to the lower viscosity of E7. E7 in the PDLC diffuses more slowly than in the bulk because of the hindrance by the polymer matrix. T{sub 1} and T{sub 1{rho}} relaxation times in the liquid or liquid-crystalline phases of TMPTA and bulk E7 are higher than in the PDLC and the pure polymer, due to the lower mobility in the polymer samples. T{sub 1{rho}} in the PDLC is even shorter than in the pure polymer, indicating an anti-softening effect caused by E7 molecules. In bulk E7, the well-ordered rod-like molecules exhibit a unique H-C dipolar coupling, which leads to oscillations in the cross-polarization curve. However, in the PDLC, the anchoring effect at the boundary between the polymer and LC droplets disturbs the molecular order resulting in a smooth cross polarization curve.

  18. Investigation of a polymer-dispersed liquid crystal system by NMR diffusometry and relaxometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Mingxue

    2013-01-01

    Polymer-dispersed liquid crystals (PDLCs) are polymer composites containing a dispersion of liquid crystal droplets in polymer networks. PDLCs have attracted much attention due to their unique properties and potential usage. The properties of PDLCs depend on the degree of phase separation and the size of liquid crystal droplets. To investigate the structure will help us to better understand and optimize PDLCs.The main aim of this PhD thesis was to investigate PDLCs by NMR techniques. Diffusion constants and spin-lattice relaxation times in the laboratory (T 1 ) and rotating frame (T 1ρ ) were measured for PDLCs as well as precursor mixtures based on the trifunctional monomer trimethylolpropane triacrylate (TMPTA) and the commercial nematic mixture E7. The variation of the main dipolar splitting of 1 H spectra with increasing temperature was analyzed to obtain the nematic-to-isotropic phase transition temperature and the nematic order parameter of E7 and, for comparison, the nematic liquid crystal 5CB.Diffusion constants in TMPTA/E7 mixtures, measured by pulsed-field gradient NMR, increase for both E7 and TMPTA as the mass fraction of E7 increases, due to the lower viscosity of E7. E7 in the PDLC diffuses more slowly than in the bulk because of the hindrance by the polymer matrix. T 1 and T 1ρ relaxation times in the liquid or liquid-crystalline phases of TMPTA and bulk E7 are higher than in the PDLC and the pure polymer, due to the lower mobility in the polymer samples. T 1ρ in the PDLC is even shorter than in the pure polymer, indicating an anti-softening effect caused by E7 molecules. In bulk E7, the well-ordered rod-like molecules exhibit a unique H-C dipolar coupling, which leads to oscillations in the cross-polarization curve. However, in the PDLC, the anchoring effect at the boundary between the polymer and LC droplets disturbs the molecular order resulting in a smooth cross polarization curve.

  19. NMR spectroscopy and drug development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craik, D.; Munro, S.

    1990-01-01

    The use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for structural and conformational studies on drug molecules, the three-dimensional investigation of proteins structure and their interactions with ligands are discussed. In-vivo NMR studies of the effects of drugs on metabolism in perfused organs and whole animals are also briefly presented. 5 refs., ills

  20. Solution NMR investigation of the response of the lactose repressor core domain dimer to hydrostatic pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuglestad, Brian; Stetz, Matthew A; Belnavis, Zachary; Wand, A Joshua

    2017-12-01

    Previous investigations of the sensitivity of the lac repressor to high-hydrostatic pressure have led to varying conclusions. Here high-pressure solution NMR spectroscopy is used to provide an atomic level view of the pressure induced structural transition of the lactose repressor regulatory domain (LacI* RD) bound to the ligand IPTG. As the pressure is raised from ambient to 3kbar the native state of the protein is converted to a partially unfolded form. Estimates of rotational correlation times using transverse optimized relaxation indicates that a monomeric state is never reached and that the predominate form of the LacI* RD is dimeric throughout this pressure change. Spectral analysis suggests that the pressure-induced transition is localized and is associated with a volume change of approximately -115mlmol -1 and an average pressure dependent change in compressibility of approximately 30mlmol -1 kbar -1 . In addition, a subset of resonances emerge at high-pressures indicating the presence of a non-native but folded alternate state. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Proton NMR investigation of heme pocket mobility in hemoglobin via hydrogen isotope exchange kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, K.

    1985-01-01

    Dynamic mobility of heme cavity, the active site of Hb, was investigated by analyzing the hydrogen isotope exchange kinetics of the proximal histidyl ring NH of various kinds of Hbs with the aid of the high field Fourier Transform 1 H NMR spectroscopy. The exchange reaction occurs faster in oxy or R-state Hb than in deoxy or T-state Hb and there exists a good correlation between the oxygen affinity of Hb and the heme pocket mobility reflected in the hydrogen exchange rate. The effect of pH on the exchange is dramatically different for the two subunits of Hb A. Studying the exchange characteristics of mutant Hbs and chemically modified Hbs not only showed the existence of three well-defined localized paths for transmission of conformational changes between different heme pockets through a 1 b 2 subunit interface, but also indicated that the heme pocket mobility is regulated by the quaternary state of Hb as well as by the ligation state of Hb. Finally, the effect of the quaternary state on the heme pocket mobility is separated from that of the ligation by following the exchange reactions in Hbs where only their quaternary structure transition can be achieved without changing their ligation states by adjusting experimental conditions such as adding inositol hexaphosphate

  2. Structural analysis of the carbohydrate chains of glycoproteins by 500-MHz 1H-NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutsaers, J.H.G.M.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis deals with the structural analysis by 500-MHz 1 H-NMR spectroscopy of carbohydrate chains obtained from glycoproteins. In the chapters 1 to 6 the structural analysis of N-glycosidically linked carbohydrate chains is described. The chapters 7 to 10 describe the structural analysis of O-glycosidically linked carbohydrate chains. 381 refs.; 44 figs.; 24 tabs.; 7 schemes

  3. Structure Determination of Unknown Organic Liquids Using NMR and IR Spectroscopy: A General Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavel, John T.; Hyde, Erin C.; Bruch, Martha D.

    2012-01-01

    This experiment introduced general chemistry students to the basic concepts of organic structures and to the power of spectroscopic methods for structure determination. Students employed a combination of IR and NMR spectroscopy to perform de novo structure determination of unknown alcohols, without being provided with a list of possible…

  4. Investigations of CuFeS{sub 2} semiconductor mineral from ocean rift hydrothermal vent fields by Cu NMR in a local field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matukhin, V. L.; Pogoreltsev, A. I.; Gavrilenko, A. N., E-mail: ang-2000@mail.ru; Garkavyi, S. O.; Shmidt, E. V. [Kazan State Power University (Russian Federation); Babaeva, S. F. [All-Russia Research Institute of Geology and Mineral Resources of the World Ocean “VNIIOkeangeologiya” (Russian Federation); Sukhanova, A. A. [Saint-Petersburg Mining University (Russian Federation); Terukov, E. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    The results of investigating natural samples of chalcopyrite mineral CuFeS{sub 2} from massive oceanic sulfide ores of the Mid-Atlantic ridge by the {sup 63}Cu nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR {sup 63}Cu) in a local field at room temperature are presented. The significant width of the resonance lines found in the {sup 63}Cu NMR spectrum directly testifies to a wide distribution of local magnetic and electric fields in the investigated chalcopyrite samples. This distribution can be the consequence of an appreciable deviation of the structure of the investigated chalcopyrite samples from the stoichiometric one. The obtained results show that the pulsed {sup 63}Cu NMR can be an efficient method for studying the physical properties of deep-water polymetallic sulfides of the World Ocean.

  5. Complexation of rhodium(II) tetracarboxylates with aliphatic diamines in solution: 1H and 13C NMR and DFT investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaźwiński, Jarosław; Sadlej, Agnieszka

    2013-10-01

    The complexation of rhodium(II) tetraacetate, tetrakistrifluoroaceate and tetrakisoctanoate with a set of diamines (ethane-1,diamine, propane-1,3-diamine and nonane-1,9-diamine) and their N,N'-dimethyl and N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl derivatives in chloroform solution has been investigated by (1) H and (13) C NMR spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) modelling. A combination of two bifunctional reagents, diamines and rhodium(II) tetracarboxylates, yielded insoluble coordination polymers as main products of complexation and various adducts in the solution, being in equilibrium with insoluble material. All diamines initially formed the 2 : 1 (blue), (1 : 1)n oligomeric (red) and 1 : 2 (red) axial adducts in solution, depending on the reagents' molar ratio. Adducts of primary and secondary diamines decomposed in the presence of ligand excess, the former via unstable equatorial complexes. The complexation of secondary diamines slowed down the inversion at nitrogen atoms in NH(CH3 ) functional groups and resulted in the formation of nitrogenous stereogenic centres, detectable by NMR. Axial adducts of tertiary diamines appeared to be relatively stable. The presence of long aliphatic chains in molecules (adducts of nonane-1,9-diamines or rhodium(II) tetrakisoctanoate) increased adduct solubility. Hypothetical structures of the equatorial adduct of rhodium(II) tetraacetate with ethane-1,2-diamine and their NMR parameters were explored by means of DFT calculations. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Structural Studies of Bcl-xL/ligand Complexes using {sup 19}F NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Liping; Hajduk, Philip J.; Mack, Jamey; Olejniczak, Edward T. [GPRD, Abbott Laboratories, Pharmaceutical Discovery Division (United States)], E-mail: Edward.olejniczak@abbott.com

    2006-04-15

    Fluorine atoms are often incorporated into drug molecules as part of the lead optimization process in order to improve affinity or modify undesirable metabolic and pharmacokinetic profiles. From an NMR perspective, the abundance of fluorinated drug leads provides an exploitable niche for structural studies using {sup 19}F NMR in the drug discovery process. As {sup 19}F has no interfering background signal from biological sources, {sup 19}F NMR studies of fluorinated drugs bound to their protein receptors can yield easily interpretable and unambiguous structural constraints. {sup 19}F can also be selectively incorporated into proteins to obtain additional constraints for structural studies. Despite these advantages, {sup 19}F NMR has rarely been exploited for structural studies due to its broad lines in macromolecules and their ligand complexes, leading to weak signals in {sup 1}H/{sup 19}F heteronuclear NOE experiments. Here we demonstrate several different experimental strategies that use {sup 19}F NMR to obtain ligand-protein structural constraints for ligands bound to the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL, a drug target for anti-cancer therapy. These examples indicate the applicability of these methods to typical structural problems encountered in the drug development process.

  7. Comparison of NMR and crystal structures highlights conformational isomerism in protein active sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano, Pedro; Pedrini, Bill; Geralt, Michael; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Mohanty, Biswaranjan; Horst, Reto; Herrmann, Torsten; Elsliger, Marc-André; Wilson, Ian A.; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    Tools for systematic comparisons of NMR and crystal structures developed by the JCSG were applied to two proteins with known functions: the T. maritima anti-σ factor antagonist TM1081 and the mouse γ-glutamylamine cyclotransferase A2LD1 (gi:13879369). In an attempt to exploit the complementarity of crystal and NMR data, the combined use of the two structure-determination techniques was explored for the initial steps in the challenge of searching proteins of unknown functions for putative active sites. The JCSG has recently developed a protocol for systematic comparisons of high-quality crystal and NMR structures of proteins. In this paper, the extent to which this approach can provide function-related information on the two functionally annotated proteins TM1081, a Thermotoga maritima anti-σ factor antagonist, and A2LD1 (gi:13879369), a mouse γ-glutamylamine cyclotransferase, is explored. The NMR structures of the two proteins have been determined in solution at 313 and 298 K, respectively, using the current JCSG protocol based on the software package UNIO for extensive automation. The corresponding crystal structures were solved by the JCSG at 100 K and 1.6 Å resolution and at 100 K and 1.9 Å resolution, respectively. The NMR and crystal structures of the two proteins share the same overall molecular architectures. However, the precision of the structure determination along the amino-acid sequence varies over a significantly wider range in the NMR structures than in the crystal structures. Thereby, in each of the two NMR structures about 65% of the residues have displacements below the average and in both proteins the less well ordered residues include large parts of the active sites, in addition to some highly solvent-exposed surface areas. Whereas the latter show increased disorder in the crystal and in solution, the active-site regions display increased displacements only in the NMR structures, where they undergo local conformational exchange on the

  8. Solution and solid state NMR studies of the structure and dynamics of C60 and C70

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.D.; Yannoni, C.S.; Salem, J.; Meijer, G.; Bethune, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper investigates the structure and dynamics of C 60 and C 70 with 13 C NMR spectroscopy. In solution, high-resolution spectra reveal that C 60 has a single resonance at 143 ppm, indicating a strained, aromatic system with high symmetry. This is strong evidence for a C 60 soccer ball geometry. A 2D NMR INADEQUATE experiment on 13 C-enriched C 70 reveals the bonding connectivity to be a linear string, in firm support of the proposed rugby ball structure with D 5h symmetry, and furnishes resonance assignments. Solid state NMR spectra of C 60 at ambient temperatures yield a narrow resonance, indicative of rapid molecular reorientation. Variable temperature T 1 measurements show that the rotational correlation time is ∼ 10 - 9 s at 230 K. At 77 K, this time increases to more than 1 ms, and the 13 C NMR spectrum of C 60 is a powder pattern due to chemical shift anisotropy (tensor components 220, 186, 40 ppm). At intermediate temperatures a narrow peak is superimposed on the powder pattern, suggesting a distribution of barriers to molecular motion in the sample, or the presence of an additional phase in the solid state. A Carr-Purcell dipolar experiment on C 60 in the solid state allows the first precise determination of the C 60 bond lengths: 1.45 and 1.40 Angstrom

  9. 1H NMR, 13C NMR and Computational Daft Study of the Solution Structure of 2-Formylcyclohexane-1,3-Dione and its Alkali Metal Salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szczecinski, P.; Gryff-Keller, A.; Molchanov, S.

    2005-01-01

    Triketones have been known for many years to be efficient inhibitors of (4-hydroxyphenyl)pyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD), an enzyme very important for plants and animals, which catalyzes the tyrosine catabolism. Inhibition of this process has been used for both herbicidal and medical purposes. The mechanism of inhibition of HPPD by triketones is still under investigation. Recently, an almost complete mechanistic model of interaction between the mentioned enzyme and its inhibitor has been proposed. However, some arguments used by the authors to rationalize the proposed mechanism cannot be accepted. Therefore further developing of the investigation in this field is justified. In the present work the solution structure of 2-formylcyclohexane-1,3-dione, a simple molecular model of HPPD inhibitors, has been investigated using 1 H and 13 C NMR spectroscopic methods and theoretical DFT-based calculations. (author)

  10. Structures of larger proteins in solution: Three- and four-dimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronenborn, A.M.; Clore, G.M. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Complete understanding of a protein`s function and mechanism of action can only be achieved with a knowledge of its three-dimensional structure at atomic resolution. At present, there are two methods available for determining such structures. The first method, which has been established for many years, is x-ray diffraction of protein single crystals. The second method has blossomed only in the last 5 years and is based on the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to proteins in solution. This review paper describes three- and four-dimensional NMR methods applied to protein structure determination and was adapted from Clore and Gronenborn. The review focuses on the underlying principals and practice of multidimensional NMR and the structural information obtained.

  11. Solution structures of α-conotoxin G1 determined by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardi, A.; Galdes, A.; Florance, J.; Maniconte, D.

    1989-01-01

    Two-dimensional NMR data have been used to generate solution structures of α-conotoxin G1, a potent peptide antagonist of the acetylcholine receptor. Structural information was obtained in the form of proton-proton internuclear distance constraints, and initial structures were produced with a distance geometry algorithm. Energetically more favorable structures were generated by using the distance geometry structures as input for a constrained energy minimization program. The results of both of these calculations indicate that the overall backbone conformation of the molecule is well-defined by the NMR data whereas the side-chain conformations are generally less well-defined. The main structural features derived from the NMR data were the presence of tight turns centered on residues Pro 5 and Arg 9 . The solution structures are compared with previous proposed models of conotoxin G1, and the NMR data are interpreted in conjunction with chemical modification studies and structural properties of other antagonists of the acetylcholine receptor to gain insight into structure-activity relationships in these peptide toxins

  12. Structural and Nutritional Properties of Pasta from Triticum monococcum and Triticum durum Species. A Combined ¹H NMR, MRI, and Digestibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasini, Gabriella; Greco, Fulvia; Cremonini, Mauro A; Brandolini, Andrea; Consonni, Roberto; Gussoni, Maristella

    2015-05-27

    The aim of the present study was to characterize the structure of two different types of pasta, namely Triticum turgidum ssp. durum (cv. Saragolla) and Triticum monococcum ssp. monococcum (cv. Monlis), under different processing conditions. MRI analysis and NMR spectroscopy (i.e., T1 and T2 NMR relaxation times and diffusion parameters) were conducted on pasta, and (1)H NMR spectroscopic analysis of the chemical compounds released by pasta samples during the cooking process was performed. In addition, starch digestibility (enzimatically determined) was also investigated. The NMR results indicated that Saragolla pasta has a more compact structure, ascribed to pasta network and in particular to different technological gluten properties, that mainly determine the lower ability of Monlis pasta in binding water. These results correlate well with the lower rate of starch hydrolysis measured for Monlis pasta compared to Saragolla when both are dried at high temperature.

  13. KUJIRA, a package of integrated modules for systematic and interactive analysis of NMR data directed to high-throughput NMR structure studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Naohiro; Iwahara, Junji; Koshiba, Seizo; Tomizawa, Tadashi; Tochio, Naoya; Guentert, Peter; Kigawa, Takanori; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2007-01-01

    The recent expansion of structural genomics has increased the demands for quick and accurate protein structure determination by NMR spectroscopy. The conventional strategy without an automated protocol can no longer satisfy the needs of high-throughput application to a large number of proteins, with each data set including many NMR spectra, chemical shifts, NOE assignments, and calculated structures. We have developed the new software KUJIRA, a package of integrated modules for the systematic and interactive analysis of NMR data, which is designed to reduce the tediousness of organizing and manipulating a large number of NMR data sets. In combination with CYANA, the program for automated NOE assignment and structure determination, we have established a robust and highly optimized strategy for comprehensive protein structure analysis. An application of KUJIRA in accordance with our new strategy was carried out by a non-expert in NMR structure analysis, demonstrating that the accurate assignment of the chemical shifts and a high-quality structure of a small protein can be completed in a few weeks. The high completeness of the chemical shift assignment and the NOE assignment achieved by the systematic analysis using KUJIRA and CYANA led, in practice, to increased reliability of the determined structure

  14. A metal-ion NMR investigation of the antibiotic facilitated transport of monovalent cations through the walls of phospholipid vesicles. II. Sulfur-33 NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buster, D.C.

    1988-01-01

    A technique has been developed to investigate the antibiotic facilitated transmembrane transport of monovalent cations using 23 Na and 7 Li Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy. The initial portion of this thesis outlines the production and characterization of a model lipid system amenable to the NMR detection of cation transport. Large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) have been prepared from a 4:1 mixture of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol. The presence of the anionic chemical shift reagent dysprosium (III) tripolyphosphate, either inside or outside of the vesicles, allows for the spectroscopic separation of the NMR resonances arising from the inter- and extravesicular cation pools. The cation transporting properties of the channel-forming pentadecapeptide, gramicidin D, have been studied using the NMR technique

  15. Methods of NMR structure refinement: molecular dynamics simulations improve the agreement with measured NMR data of a C-terminal peptide of GCN4-p1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolenc, Jozica; Missimer, John H.; Steinmetz, Michel O.; Gunsteren, Wilfred F. van

    2010-01-01

    The C-terminal trigger sequence is essential in the coiled-coil formation of GCN4-p1; its conformational properties are thus of importance for understanding this process at the atomic level. A solution NMR model structure of a peptide, GCN4p16-31, encompassing the GCN4-p1 trigger sequence was proposed a few years ago. Derived using a standard single-structure refinement protocol based on 172 nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) distance restraints, 14 hydrogen-bond and 11 φ torsional-angle restraints, the resulting set of 20 NMR model structures exhibits regular α-helical structure. However, the set slightly violates some measured NOE bounds and does not reproduce all 15 measured 3 J(H N -H Cα )-coupling constants, indicating that different conformers of GCN4p16-31 might be present in solution. With the aim to resolve structures compatible with all NOE upper distance bounds and 3 J-coupling constants, we executed several structure refinement protocols employing unrestrained and restrained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with two force fields. We find that only configurational ensembles obtained by applying simultaneously time-averaged NOE distance and 3 J-coupling constant restraining with either force field reproduce all the experimental data. Additionally, analyses of the simulated ensembles show that the conformational variability of GCN4p16-31 in solution admitted by the available set of 187 measured NMR data is larger than represented by the set of the NMR model structures. The conformations of GCN4p16-31 in solution differ in the orientation not only of the side-chains but also of the backbone. The inconsistencies between the NMR model structures and the measured NMR data are due to the neglect of averaging effects and the inclusion of hydrogen-bond and torsional-angle restraints that have little basis in the primary, i.e. measured NMR data.

  16. Methods of NMR structure refinement: molecular dynamics simulations improve the agreement with measured NMR data of a C-terminal peptide of GCN4-p1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolenc, Jozica; Missimer, John H; Steinmetz, Michel O; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2010-07-01

    The C-terminal trigger sequence is essential in the coiled-coil formation of GCN4-p1; its conformational properties are thus of importance for understanding this process at the atomic level. A solution NMR model structure of a peptide, GCN4p16-31, encompassing the GCN4-p1 trigger sequence was proposed a few years ago. Derived using a standard single-structure refinement protocol based on 172 nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) distance restraints, 14 hydrogen-bond and 11 phi torsional-angle restraints, the resulting set of 20 NMR model structures exhibits regular alpha-helical structure. However, the set slightly violates some measured NOE bounds and does not reproduce all 15 measured (3)J(H(N)-H(Calpha))-coupling constants, indicating that different conformers of GCN4p16-31 might be present in solution. With the aim to resolve structures compatible with all NOE upper distance bounds and (3)J-coupling constants, we executed several structure refinement protocols employing unrestrained and restrained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with two force fields. We find that only configurational ensembles obtained by applying simultaneously time-averaged NOE distance and (3)J-coupling constant restraining with either force field reproduce all the experimental data. Additionally, analyses of the simulated ensembles show that the conformational variability of GCN4p16-31 in solution admitted by the available set of 187 measured NMR data is larger than represented by the set of the NMR model structures. The conformations of GCN4p16-31 in solution differ in the orientation not only of the side-chains but also of the backbone. The inconsistencies between the NMR model structures and the measured NMR data are due to the neglect of averaging effects and the inclusion of hydrogen-bond and torsional-angle restraints that have little basis in the primary, i.e. measured NMR data.

  17. Solution structure of d-GAATTCGAATTC by 2D NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosur, R.V.; Ravikumar, M.; Chary, K.V.R.; Sheth, A.; Govil, G.

    1986-01-01

    A new approach based on the correlated spectroscopy (COSY) in 2D NMR has been described for determination of sugar geometries in oligonucleotides. Under the usual low resolution conditions employed in COSY, the intensities of cross peaks depend on the magnitudes of coupling constants. There are five vicinal coupling constants in a deoxyribose ring which are sensitive to the sugar geometry. The presence, absence and rough comparison of relative intensities of COSY cross peaks arising from such coupling constants enable one to fix the sugar conformation to a fair degree of precision. The methodology has been applied to d-GAATTCGAATTC. It is observed that ten out of the twelve nucleotide units in this sequence exhibit a rare O1'-endo geometry. The EcoRI cleavage sites in the dodecanucleotide show an interesting variation in the conformation with the two sugars attached to the Gs acquiring a geometry between C2'-endo and C4'-endo. (Auth.)

  18. NMR studies of structures of lanthanide dicarboxylate complexes in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choppin, G.R.; Kullberg, L.

    PMR pand 13 C shift data were measured for complexes of Pr(III), Eu(III) and Yb(III) with ethylene 1,2-dioxydiacetate (EDODA), ethylene 1,2-dithiodiacetate (EDSDA), and ethylene, 1,2-diaminodiacetate (EDDA). Solubility problems limited analysis of the EDSDA and EDDA data to qualitative evaluation. In the EDSDA complexes, the data indicate that the sulfur atoms do not participate in bonding to the lanthanide cations. Moreover, both carboxylate groups seem to bind Pr and Eu while Yb interacts with only a single carboxylate group. The EDDA complexes are tetradentate with long lived (NMR scale) Ln-N bonds. Shift theory allowed more quantitative analysis of the EDODA complexes. They are tetradentate with a puckered chelate ring and Ln-O(ether) distances of 2.3 A

  19. Paramagnetic NMR investigation of dendrimer-based host-guest interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Wang

    Full Text Available In this study, the host-guest behavior of poly(amidoamine (PAMAM dendrimers bearing amine, hydroxyl, or carboxylate surface functionalities were investigated by paramagnetic NMR studies. 2,2,6,6-Tetramethylpiperidinyloxy (TEMPO derivatives were used as paramagnetic guest molecules. The results showed that TEMPO-COOH significantly broaden the ¹H NMR peaks of amine- and hydroxyl-terminated PAMAM dendrimers. In comparison, no paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE was observed between TEMPO-NH₂, TEMPO-OH and the three types of PAMAM dendrimers. The PRE phenomenon observed is correlated with the encapsulation of TEMPO-COOH within dendrimer pockets. Protonation of the tertiary amine groups within PAMAM dendrimers plays an important role during this process. Interestingly, the absence of TEMPO-COOH encapsulation within carboxylate-terminated PAMAM dendrimer is observed due to the repulsion of TEMPO-COO- anion and anionic dendrimer surface. The combination of paramagnetic probes and ¹H NMR linewidth analysis can be used as a powerful tool in the analysis of dendrimer-based host-guest systems.

  20. Investigating the Dissolution Performance of Amorphous Solid Dispersions Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Proton NMR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Tres

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the dissolution performance of amorphous solid dispersions of poorly water-soluble bicalutamide in a Kollidon VA64 polymeric matrix as a function of the drug loading (5% vs. 30% bicalutamide. A combined suite of state-of-the-art analytical techniques were employed to obtain a clear picture of the drug release, including an integrated magnetic resonance imaging UV-Vis flow cell system and 1H-NMR. Off-line 1H-NMR was used for the first time to simultaneously measure the dissolution profiles and rates of both the drug and the polymer from a solid dispersion. MRI and 1H-NMR data showed that the 5% drug loading compact erodes linearly, and that bicalutamide and Kollidon VA64 are released at approximately the same rate from the molecular dispersion. For the 30% extrudate, data indicated a slower water ingress into the compact which corresponds to a slower dissolution rate of both bicalutamide and Kollidon VA64.

  1. Containment structure tendon investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulton, J.F.; Murray, K.H.

    1983-01-01

    The paper describes an investigation into the possible causes of lower-than-predicted tendon forces which were measured during past tendon surveillances for a concrete containment. The containment is post tensioned by vertical tendons which are anchored into a rock foundation. The tendons were originally stressed in 1969, and lift-off tests were performed on six occasions subsequent to this date over a period of 11 years. The tendon forces measured in these tests were generally lower than predicted, and by 1979 the prestress level in the containment was only marginally above the design requirement. The tendons were retensioned in 1980, and by this time an investigation into the possible causes was underway. Potential causes investigated include the rock anchors and surrounding rock, elastomeric pad creep, wire stresses, thermal effects, stressing equipment and lift-off procedures, and wire stress relaxation. The investigation activities included stress relaxation testing of wires pulled from actual tendons. The stress relaxation test program included wire specimens at several different temperature and initial stress levels and the effect of a varying temperature history on the stress relaxation property of the wires. For purpose of future force predictions of the retensioned tendons, the test program included tests to determine the effect on stress relaxation due to restressing the wires after they had relaxed for 1000 hours and 10,000 hours. (orig./GL)

  2. Detailed NMR investigation of cyclodextrin-perfluorinated surfactant interactions in aqueous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss-Errico, Mary Jo; O’Shea, Kevin E., E-mail: osheak@fiu.edu

    2017-05-05

    Highlights: • Perfluorochemicals (PFCs) are strongly encapsulated by cyclodextrins (CDs). • Competition studies confirm strong CD:PFC host-guest interactions. • {sup 19}F NMR Spectroscopy demonstrates association constants up to 10{sup 5} M{sup −1}. • Position of CD along PFC chain is elucidated from NMR results. • CD:PFC complex is not disturbed under a variety of water quality conditions. - Abstract: Perfluorochemicals (PFCs) are contaminants of serious concern because of their toxicological properties, widespread presence in drinking water sources, and incredible stability in the environment. To assess the potential application of α-, β-, and γ-cyclodextrins for PFC remediation, we investigated their complexation with linear fluorinated carboxylic acids, sulfonates, and a sulfonamide with carbon backbones ranging from C4-C9. {sup 19}F Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy studies demonstrated β-CD formed the strongest complexes with these PFCs. The polar head group had a modest influence, but for PFCs with backbones longer than six carbons, strong association constants are observed for 1:1 (K{sub 1:1} ∼ 10{sup 5} M{sup −1}) and 2:1 (K{sub 2:1} ∼ 10{sup 3} M{sup −1}) β-CD:PFC complexes. Excess β-CD can be used to complex 99.5% of the longer chain PFCs. Competition studies with adamantane-carboxylic acid and phenol confirmed the nature and persistence of the β-CD:PFC complex. Detailed analyses of the individual NMR chemical shifts and Job plots indicate the favored positions of the β-CD along the PFC chain. Solution pH, ionic strength, and the presence of humic acid have modest influence on the β-CD:PFC complexes. The strong encapsulation of PFCs by β-CD under a variety of water quality conditions demonstrates the tremendous potential of CD-based materials for the environmental remediation of PFCs.

  3. Complete {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR structural assignments for a group of four goyazensolide-type furanoheliangolides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Ana Carolina Ferreira; Silva, Aline Nazare; Matos, Priscilla Mendonca; Silva, Eder Henrique da; Heleno, Vladimir Constantino Gomes [Universidade de Franca, Franca, SP (Brazil). Nucleo de Pesquisas em Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; Lopes, Joao Luis Callegari [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FCFRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Farmaceuticas de Ribeirao Preto. Dept. de Quimica e Fisica; Sass, Daiane Cristina, E-mail: vheleno_05@yahoo.com.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto. Dept. de Quimica

    2012-07-01

    Four goyazensolide-type sesquiterpene lactones - lychnofolide, centratherin, goyazensolide and goyazensolide acetate - were thoroughly studied by NMR experimental techniques. {sup 1}H NMR, {sup 13}C NMR {l_brace}{sup 1}H{r_brace}, COSY, HMQC, HMBC, J-res. and NOE experiments were performed to provide the needed structural information. Complete and unequivocal assignment, including the determination of all multiplicities, was obtained for each structure and the data collections are presented in tables (author)

  4. Crystal structure, quantum mechanical investigation, IR and NMR spectroscopy of two new organic perchlorates: (C6H18N3)·(ClO4)3H2O (I) and (C9H11N2)·ClO4(II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayar, I.; Khedhiri, L.; Soudani, S.; Lefebvre, F.; Ferretti, V.; Ben Nasr, C.

    2018-06-01

    The reaction of perchloric acid with 1-(2-aminoethyl)piperazine or 5,6-dimethyl-benzimidazole results in the formation of 1-(2-amonioethyl)piperazine-1,4-dium triperchlorate hydrate (C6H18N3)·(ClO4)3·H2O (I) or 5,6-dimethyl-benzylimidazolium perchlorate (C9H11N2)·ClO4(II). Both compounds were fully structurally characterized including single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Compound (I) crystallizes in the centrosymmetric triclinic space group P 1 bar with the lattice parameters a = 7.455 (2), b = 10.462 (2), c = 10.824 (2) Å, α = 80.832 (2), β = 88.243 (2), γ = 88.160 (2) °, Z = 2 and V = 832.77 (3) Å3. Compound (II) has been found to belong to the P21/c space group of the monoclinic system, with a = 7.590 (3), b = 9.266 (3), c = 16.503 (6) Å, β = 107.38 (2) °, V = 1107.69 (7) Å3 and Z = 4. The structures of (I) and (II) consist of slightly distorted [ClO4]- tetrahedra anions and 1-(2-amonioethyl)piperazine-1,4-dium trication (I) or 5,6-dimethyl-benzylimidazolium cations (II) and additionally a lattice water in (I). The crystal structures of (I) and (II) exhibit complex three-dimensional networks of H-bonds connecting all their components. In the atomic arrangement of (I), the ClO4- anions form corrugated chains, while in (II) the atomic arrangement exhibits wide pseudo-hexagonal channels of ClO4 tetrahedra including the organic entities. The lattice water serves as a link between pairs of cations and pairs of anions via several Osbnd H⋯O and N-H⋯O interactions in compound (I). The vibrational absorption bands were identified by infrared spectroscopy. These compounds were also investigated by solid-state 13C, 35Cl and 15N NMR spectroscopy. DFT calculations allowed the attribution of the IR and NMR bands. Intermolecular interactions were investigated by Hirshfeld surfaces. Electronic properties such as HOMO and LUMO energies were derived.

  5. A novel strategy for NMR resonance assignment and protein structure determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemak, Alexander; Gutmanas, Aleksandras; Chitayat, Seth; Karra, Murthy; Farès, Christophe; Sunnerhagen, Maria; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.

    2011-01-01

    The quality of protein structures determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is contingent on the number and quality of experimentally-derived resonance assignments, distance and angular restraints. Two key features of protein NMR data have posed challenges for the routine and automated structure determination of small to medium sized proteins; (1) spectral resolution – especially of crowded nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) spectra, and (2) the reliance on a continuous network of weak scalar couplings as part of most common assignment protocols. In order to facilitate NMR structure determination, we developed a semi-automated strategy that utilizes non-uniform sampling (NUS) and multidimensional decomposition (MDD) for optimal data collection and processing of selected, high resolution multidimensional NMR experiments, combined it with an ABACUS protocol for sequential and side chain resonance assignments, and streamlined this procedure to execute structure and refinement calculations in CYANA and CNS, respectively. Two graphical user interfaces (GUIs) were developed to facilitate efficient analysis and compilation of the data and to guide automated structure determination. This integrated method was implemented and refined on over 30 high quality structures of proteins ranging from 5.5 to 16.5 kDa in size.

  6. Investigations of Nuclear Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarantites, Demetrios [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Reviol, W. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2015-07-15

    The proposal addresses studies of nuclear structure at low-energies and development of instrumentation for that purpose. The structure studies deal with features of neutron-rich nuclei with unexplored shapes (football- or pear-shaped nuclei). The regions of interest are: neutron rich nuclei like 132-138Sn, or 48-54Ca, and the Zr, Mo, and Ru isotopes. The tools used can be grouped as follows: either Gammasphere or Gretina multi-gamma detector arrays and auxiliary detectors (Microball, Neutron Shell, and the newly completed Phoswich Wall).The neutron-rich nuclei are accessed by radioactive-beam binary reactions or by 252Cf spontaneous fission. The experiments with heavy radioactive beams aim at exciting the beam nuclei by pick-up or transfer a neutron or a proton from a light target like 13C, 9Be, 11B or 14N .For these binary-reaction studies the Phoswich Wall detector system is essential. It is based on four multi-anode photomultiplier tubes on which CsI and thin fast-timing plastic scintillators are attached. Their signals are digitized with a high density microchip system.

  7. NMR imaging studies of coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Z.R.; Zhang, P.Z.; Ding, G.L.; Li, L.Y.; Ye, C.H. [University of Science and Technology, Beijing (China). Dept. of Chemistry

    1996-06-01

    The permeation transportation and swelling behavior of solvents into coal are investigated by NMR imaging using pyridine-d{sub 5} and acetone-d{sub 6}. Images of coal swollen with deuterated solvents illuminate proton distributions of mobile phases within the coal macromolecular networks. More information about the chemical and physical structure of coal can be obtained using NMR imaging techniques.

  8. Thermal and structural analysis of a cryogenic conduction cooling system for a HTS NMR magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    In, Se Hwan; Hong, Yong Jun; Yeom, Han Kil; Ko, Hyo Bong; Park, Seong Je [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The superconducting NMR magnets have used cryogen such as liquid helium for their cooling. The conduction cooling method using cryocoolers, however, makes the cryogenic cooling system for NMR magnets more compact and user-friendly than the cryogen cooling method. This paper describes the thermal and structural analysis of a cryogenic conduction cooling system for a 400 MHz HTS NMR magnet, focusing on the magnet assembly. The highly thermo-conductive cooling plates between HTS double pancake coils are used to transfer the heat generated in coils, namely Joule heating at lap splice joints, to thermal link blocks and finally the cryocooler. The conduction cooling structure of the HTS magnet assembly preliminarily designed is verified by thermal and structural analysis. The orthotropic thermal properties of the HTS coil, thermal contact resistance and radiation heat load are considered in the thermal analysis. The thermal analysis confirms the uniform temperature distribution for the present thermal design of the NMR magnet within 0.2 K. The mechanical stress and the displacement by the electromagnetic force and the thermal contraction are checked to verify structural stability. The structural analysis indicates that the mechanical stress on each component of the magnet is less than its material yield strength and the displacement is acceptable in comparison with the magnet dimension.

  9. Cotranslational structure acquisition of nascent polypeptides monitored by NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichmann, Cédric; Preissler, Steffen; Riek, Roland; Deuerling, Elke

    2010-05-18

    The folding of proteins in living cells may start during their synthesis when the polypeptides emerge gradually at the ribosomal exit tunnel. However, our current understanding of cotranslational folding processes at the atomic level is limited. We employed NMR spectroscopy to monitor the conformation of the SH3 domain from alpha-spectrin at sequential stages of elongation via in vivo ribosome-arrested (15)N,(13)C-labeled nascent polypeptides. These nascent chains exposed either the entire SH3 domain or C-terminally truncated segments thereof, thus providing snapshots of the translation process. We show that nascent SH3 polypeptides remain unstructured during elongation but fold into a compact, native-like beta-sheet assembly when the entire sequence information is available. Moreover, the ribosome neither imposes major conformational constraints nor significantly interacts with exposed unfolded nascent SH3 domain moieties. Our data provide evidence for a domainwise folding of the SH3 domain on ribosomes without significant population of folding intermediates. The domain follows a thermodynamically favorable pathway in which sequential folding units are stabilized, thus avoiding kinetic traps during the process of cotranslational folding.

  10. Does aluminium bind to histidine? An NMR investigation of amyloid β12 and amyloid β16 fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Priya; Krishnarjuna, Bankala; Vishwanathan, Vinaya; Jagadeesh Kumar, Dasappa; Babu, Sudhir; Ramanathan, Krishna Venkatachala; Easwaran, Kalpathy Ramaier Katchap; Nagendra, Holenarasipur Gundurao; Raghothama, Srinivasarao

    2013-07-01

    Aluminium and zinc are known to be the major triggering agents for aggregation of amyloid peptides leading to plaque formation in Alzheimer's disease. While zinc binding to histidine in Aβ (amyloid β) fragments has been implicated as responsible for aggregation, not much information is available on the interaction of aluminium with histidine. In the NMR study of the N-terminal Aβ fragments, DAEFRHDSGYEV (Aβ12) and DAEFRHDSGYEVHHQK (Aβ16) presented here, the interactions of the fragments with aluminium have been investigated. Significant chemical shifts were observed for few residues near the C-terminus when aluminium chloride was titrated with Aβ12 and Aβ16 peptides. Surprisingly, it is nonhistidine residues which seem to be involved in aluminium binding. Based on NMR constrained structure obtained by molecular modelling, aluminium-binding pockets in Aβ12 were around charged residues such as Asp, Glu. The results are discussed in terms of native structure propagation, and the relevance of histidine residues in the sequences for metal-binding interactions. We expect that the study of such short amyloid peptide fragments will not only provide clues for plaque formation in aggregated conditions but also facilitate design of potential drugs for these targets. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. A robust algorithm for optimizing protein structures with NMR chemical shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berjanskii, Mark; Arndt, David; Liang, Yongjie; Wishart, David S., E-mail: david.wishart@ualberta.ca [University of Alberta, Department of Computing Science (Canada)

    2015-11-15

    Over the past decade, a number of methods have been developed to determine the approximate structure of proteins using minimal NMR experimental information such as chemical shifts alone, sparse NOEs alone or a combination of comparative modeling data and chemical shifts. However, there have been relatively few methods that allow these approximate models to be substantively refined or improved using the available NMR chemical shift data. Here, we present a novel method, called Chemical Shift driven Genetic Algorithm for biased Molecular Dynamics (CS-GAMDy), for the robust optimization of protein structures using experimental NMR chemical shifts. The method incorporates knowledge-based scoring functions and structural information derived from NMR chemical shifts via a unique combination of multi-objective MD biasing, a genetic algorithm, and the widely used XPLOR molecular modelling language. Using this approach, we demonstrate that CS-GAMDy is able to refine and/or fold models that are as much as 10 Å (RMSD) away from the correct structure using only NMR chemical shift data. CS-GAMDy is also able to refine of a wide range of approximate or mildly erroneous protein structures to more closely match the known/correct structure and the known/correct chemical shifts. We believe CS-GAMDy will allow protein models generated by sparse restraint or chemical-shift-only methods to achieve sufficiently high quality to be considered fully refined and “PDB worthy”. The CS-GAMDy algorithm is explained in detail and its performance is compared over a range of refinement scenarios with several commonly used protein structure refinement protocols. The program has been designed to be easily installed and easily used and is available at http://www.gamdy.ca http://www.gamdy.ca.

  12. Comparison of multiple crystal structures with NMR data for engrailed homeodomain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Religa, Tomasz L. [MRC Centre for Protein Engineering (United Kingdom)], E-mail: tlr25@mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk

    2008-03-15

    Two methods are currently available to solve high resolution protein structures-X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Both methods usually produce highly similar structures, but small differences between both solutions are always observed. Here the raw NMR data as well as the solved NMR structure were compared to the multiple crystal structures solved for the WT 60 residue three helix bundle engrailed homeodomain (EnHD) and single point mutants. There was excellent agreement between TALOS-predicted and crystal structure-observed dihedral angles and a good agreement for the {sup 3}J(H{sup N}H{sup {alpha}}) couplings for the multiple crystal structures. Around 1% of NOEs were violated for any crystal structure, but no NOE was inconsistent with all of the crystal structures. Violations usually occurred for surface residues or for residues for which multiple discreet conformations were observed between the crystal structures. Comparison of the disorder shown in the multiple crystal structures shows little correlation with dynamics under native conditions for this protein.

  13. NMR studies of Costa-type organocobalt compounds. Structural characterization of several 1,5,6-trimethylbenzimidazole complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, W.O. Jr.; Zangrando, E.; Bresciani-Pahor, N.; Marzilli, P.A.; Randaccio, E.; Marzilli, L.G.

    1988-01-01

    The structure of L exchange data have been examined for Costa models containing 1,5,6-trimethylbenzimidazole, the base most appropriate for comparison with cobaltamines. The crystal structure and 1 H and 13 C NMR data for the complexes are also presented. The 1 H and 13 C NMR data are compared with data available for cobaloximes. 45 references, 5 figures, 16 tables

  14. Theoretical investigations of quantum correlations in NMR multiple-pulse spin-locking experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasev, S. A.; Fedorova, A. V.; Fel'dman, E. B.; Kuznetsova, E. I.

    2018-04-01

    Quantum correlations are investigated theoretically in a two-spin system with the dipole-dipole interactions in the NMR multiple-pulse spin-locking experiments. We consider two schemes of the multiple-pulse spin-locking. The first scheme consists of π /2-pulses only and the delays between the pulses can differ. The second scheme contains φ-pulses (0Quantum discord is obtained for the first scheme of the multiple-pulse spin-locking experiment at different temperatures.

  15. Blind testing of routine, fully automated determination of protein structures from NMR data.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosato, A.; Aramini, J.M.; Arrowsmith, C.; Bagaria, A.; Baker, D.; Cavalli, A.; Doreleijers, J.; Eletsky, A.; Giachetti, A.; Guerry, P.; Gutmanas, A.; Guntert, P.; He, Y.; Herrmann, T.; Huang, Y.J.; Jaravine, V.; Jonker, H.R.; Kennedy, M.A.; Lange, O.F.; Liu, G.; Malliavin, T.E.; Mani, R.; Mao, B.; Montelione, G.T.; Nilges, M.; Rossi, P.; Schot, G. van der; Schwalbe, H.; Szyperski, T.A.; Vendruscolo, M.; Vernon, R.; Vranken, W.F.; Vries, S.D. de; Vuister, G.W.; Wu, B.; Yang, Y.; Bonvin, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    The protocols currently used for protein structure determination by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) depend on the determination of a large number of upper distance limits for proton-proton pairs. Typically, this task is performed manually by an experienced researcher rather than automatically by

  16. Blind Testing of Routine, Fully Automated Determination of Protein Structures from NMR Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosato, A.; Aramini, J.M.; van der Schot, G.; de Vries, S.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304837717; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/113691238

    2012-01-01

    The protocols currently used for protein structure determination by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) depend on the determination of a large number of upper distance limits for proton-proton pairs. Typically, this task is performed manually by an experienced researcher rather than automatically by

  17. Quinones from plants of northeastern Brazil: structural diversity, chemical transformations, NMR data and biological activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Telma L G; Monte, Francisco J Q; Santos, Allana Kellen L; Fonseca, Aluisio M; Santos, Hélcio S; Oliveira, Mailcar F; Costa, Sonia M O; Pessoa, Otilia D L; Braz-Filho, Raimundo

    2007-05-20

    The present review focus in quinones found in species of Brazilian northeastern Capraria biflora, Lippia sidoides, Lippia microphylla and Tabebuia serratifolia. The review cover ethnopharmacological aspects including photography of species, chemical structure feature, NMR datea and biological properties. Chemical transformations of lapachol to form enamine derivatives and biological activities are discussed.

  18. Structural elucidation and NMR assignments of a new pyrrolizidine alkaloid from Crotalaria vitellina Ker Gawl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casimiro Bezerra, Denise Aline; Fechine Tavares, Josean; dos Santos, Paula Ferreira; Castello Branco, Marianna Vieira Sobral; de Fátima Agra, Maria; Subrinho, Fernanda Lima; Braz-Filho, Raimundo; da Silva, Marcelo Sobral

    2013-08-01

    A new pyrrolizidine alkaloid, named crotavitelin, was isolated from fruits of Crotalaria vitellina, Fabaceae (Papilionoideae). The structure was established by spectroscopic techniques such as one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR, IR, and MS. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Adsorption properties of the molecule resveratrol on CNT(8,0-10) nanotube: Geometry optimization, molecular structure, spectroscopic (NMR, UV/Vis, excited state), FMO, MEP and HOMO-LUMO investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhi, Masoome; Shahab, Siyamak; Khaleghian, Mehrnoosh; Hajikolaee, Fatemeh Haji; Balakhanava, Iryna; Alnajjar, Radwan

    2018-05-01

    In the present work the adsorption properties of the molecule Resveratrol (RSV) (trans-3,5,4‧-Trihydroxystilbene) on CNT(8,0-10) nanotube was investigated by Density Functional Theory (DFT) in the gaseous phase for the first time. The non-bonded interaction effects of compounds RSV and CNT(8,0-10) nanotube on the electronic properties, chemical shift tensors and natural charge were determined and discussed. The electronic spectra of the RSV and the complex CNT(8,0-10)/RSV in the gaseous phase were calculated by Time Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT) for investigation of the maximum wavelength value of the RSV before and after the non-bonded interaction with the CNT(8,0-10) nanotube and molecular orbitals involved in the formation of absorption spectrum of the complex RSV at maximum wavelength.

  20. Identifying secondary structures in proteins using NMR chemical shift 3D correlation maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Amrita; Dorai, Kavita

    2013-06-01

    NMR chemical shifts are accurate indicators of molecular environment and have been extensively used as aids in protein structure determination. This work focuses on creating empirical 3D correlation maps of backbone chemical shift nuclei for use as identifiers of secondary structure elements in proteins. A correlated database of backbone nuclei chemical shifts was constructed from experimental structural data gathered from entries in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) as well as isotropic chemical shift values from the RefDB database. Rigorous statistical analysis of the maps led to the conclusion that specific correlations between triplets of backbone chemical shifts are best able to differentiate between different secondary structures such as α-helices, β-strands and turns. The method is compared with similar techniques that use NMR chemical shift information as aids in biomolecular structure determination and performs well in tests done on experimental data determined for different types of proteins, including large multi-domain proteins and membrane proteins.

  1. Interaction Between New Anti-cancer Drug Syndros and CNT(6,6-6) Nanotube for Medical Applications: Geometry Optimization, Molecular Structure, Spectroscopic (NMR, UV/Vis, Excited state), FMO, MEP and HOMO-LUMO Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhi, Masoome; Shahab, Siyamak; Khaleghian, Mehrnoosh; Kumar, Rakesh

    2018-03-01

    In the present work, Density Functional Theory (DFT) was first time employed to investigate the interaction between new drug (6aR,10aR)-6,6,9-trimethyl-3-pentyl-6a,7,8,10a-tetrahydrobenzo[c]chromen-1-ol (Syndros) and the CNT(6,6-6) Nanotube in the gaseous phase. The interaction effects of compounds Syndros and CNT (6,6-6) nanotube on the electronic properties, chemical shift tensors and natural charge was also determined and discussed. The electronic spectra of the Syndros and the complex CNT(6,6-6)/Syndros in the gas phase were calculated by Time Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT) for the formation of adsorption effect on maximum wavelength of the Syndros. Nucleus-Independent Chemical Shifts (NICS) calculations have also been carried out for the compound Syndors and the complex CNT(6,6-6)/Syndros and the aromaticity of the compound Syndors before and after interaction with the CNT(6,6-6) Nanotube was investigated.

  2. Micro-scale NMR Experiments for Monitoring the Optimization of Membrane Protein Solutions for Structural Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, Reto; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2015-07-20

    Reconstitution of integral membrane proteins (IMP) in aqueous solutions of detergent micelles has been extensively used in structural biology, using either X-ray crystallography or NMR in solution. Further progress could be achieved by establishing a rational basis for the selection of detergent and buffer conditions, since the stringent bottleneck that slows down the structural biology of IMPs is the preparation of diffracting crystals or concentrated solutions of stable isotope labeled IMPs. Here, we describe procedures to monitor the quality of aqueous solutions of [ 2 H, 15 N]-labeled IMPs reconstituted in detergent micelles. This approach has been developed for studies of β-barrel IMPs, where it was successfully applied for numerous NMR structure determinations, and it has also been adapted for use with α-helical IMPs, in particular GPCRs, in guiding crystallization trials and optimizing samples for NMR studies (Horst et al ., 2013). 2D [ 15 N, 1 H]-correlation maps are used as "fingerprints" to assess the foldedness of the IMP in solution. For promising samples, these "inexpensive" data are then supplemented with measurements of the translational and rotational diffusion coefficients, which give information on the shape and size of the IMP/detergent mixed micelles. Using microcoil equipment for these NMR experiments enables data collection with only micrograms of protein and detergent. This makes serial screens of variable solution conditions viable, enabling the optimization of parameters such as the detergent concentration, sample temperature, pH and the composition of the buffer.

  3. Structure and Dynamics Studies of Cytolytic Peptides in Lipid Bilayers using NMR Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sara Krogh

    2015-01-01

    different and cytolytic peptides were investigated in this work. The peptides were SPF-5506-A4 from Trichoderma sp, Conolysin-Mt1 from Conus mustelinus, and Alamethicin from Trichoderma viride. The studies employed solution and solid-state NMR spectroscopy in combination with different biophysical methods...

  4. NMR in a crystallography-based high-throughput protein structure-determination environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wüthrich, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    As an introduction to three papers on comparisons of corresponding crystal and NMR solution structures determined by the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG), an outline is provided of the JCSG strategy for combined use of the two techniques. A special commentary addresses the potentialities of the concept of ‘reference crystal structures’, which is introduced in the following three papers. An introduction is provided to three papers which compare corresponding protein crystal and NMR solution structures determined by the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG). Special mention is made of the JCSG strategy for combined use of the two techniques, and of potential applications of the concept of ‘reference crystal structures’, which is introduced in the following three papers

  5. A structural homologue of colipase in black mamba venom revealed by NMR floating disulphide bridge analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisbouvier, J; Albrand, J P; Blackledge, M; Jaquinod, M; Schweitz, H; Lazdunski, M; Marion, D

    1998-01-01

    The solution structure of mamba intestinal toxin 1 (MIT1), isolated from Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis venom, has been determined. This molecule is a cysteine-rich polypeptide exhibiting no recognised family membership. Resistance to MIT1 to classical specific endoproteases produced contradictory NMR and biochemical information concerning disulphide-bridge topology. We have used distance restraints allowing ambiguous partners between S atoms in combination with NMR-derived structural information, to correctly determine the disulphide-bridge topology. The resultant solution structure of MIT1, determined to a resolution of 0.5 A, reveals an unexpectedly similar global fold with respect to colipase, a protein involved in fatty acid digestion. Colipase exhibits an analogous resistance to endoprotease activity, indicating for the first time the possible topological origins of this biochemical property. The biochemical and structural homology permitted us to propose a mechanically related digestive function for MIT1 and provides novel information concerning snake venom protein evolution. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  6. Investigation of the role of stereoelectronic effects in the conformation of piperidones by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Garcias-Morales

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the synthesis of a series of piperidones 1–8 by the Mannich reaction and analysis of their structures and conformations in solution by NMR and mass spectrometry. The six-membered rings in 2,4,6,8-tetraphenyl-3,7-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonan-9-ones, compounds 1 and 2, adopt a chair–boat conformation, while those in 2,4-diphenyl-3-azabicyclo[3.3.1]nonan-9-ones, compounds 3–8, adopt a chair–chair conformation because of stereoelectronic effects. These stereoelectronic effects were analyzed by the 1JC–H coupling constants, which were measured in the 13C satellites of the 1H NMR spectra obtained with the hetero-dqf pulse sequence. In the solid state, these stereoelectronic effects were investigated by measurement of X-ray diffraction data, the molecular geometry (torsional bond angles and bond distances, and inter- and intramolecular interactions, and by natural bond orbital analysis, which was performed using density functional theory at the ωB97XD/6311++G(d,p level. We found that one of the main factors influencing the conformational stability of 3–8 is the interaction between the lone-pair electrons of nitrogen and the antibonding sigma orbital of C(7–Heq (nN→σ*C–H(7eq, a type of hyperconjugative interaction.

  7. In Situ FTIR and NMR Spectroscopic Investigations on Ruthenium-Based Catalysts for Alkene Hydroformylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubis, Christoph; Profir, Irina; Fleischer, Ivana; Baumann, Wolfgang; Selent, Detlef; Fischer, Christine; Spannenberg, Anke; Ludwig, Ralf; Hess, Dieter; Franke, Robert; Börner, Armin

    2016-02-18

    Homogeneous ruthenium complexes modified by imidazole-substituted monophosphines as catalysts for various highly efficient hydroformylation reactions were characterized by in situ IR spectroscopy under reaction conditions and NMR spectroscopy. A proper protocol for the preformation reaction from [Ru3 (CO)12] is decisive to prevent the formation of inactive ligand-modified polynuclear complexes. During catalysis, ligand-modified mononuclear ruthenium(0) carbonyls were detected as resting states. Changes in the ligand structure have a crucial impact on the coordination behavior of the ligand and consequently on the catalytic performance. The substitution of CO by a nitrogen atom of the imidazolyl moiety in the ligand is not a general feature, but it takes place when structural prerequisites of the ligand are fulfilled. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Confirmation of the definitive structure of Fleishmann's lactone by NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueroa Villar, Jose Daniel

    1993-01-01

    The reaction between 4-hydroxy-6-methyl-pyrone and ethyl-acetic-acetate produces a compound known since the beginning of the century, named Fleishman lactone in honor to its discover. The structure of this compound has been the aim of several researches due to its similarity with several poly-pyrones which are important in synthesis of important products. This work presents the accurate determination of the structure of the Fleishman lactone. The methodology is presented as well as confirmation tests

  9. Computational characterization of 13C NMR lineshapes of carbon dioxide in structure 1 clathrate hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dornan, P.; Woo, T.K. [Ottawa Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry

    2008-07-01

    Nonspherical large cages in structure one clathrates impose non-uniform motion of nonspherical guest molecules and anisotropic lineshapes in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of the guest. This paper presented a general method for calculating the chemical shift lineshape anisotropy of guest molecules in clathrate hydrate compounds from molecular dynamics simulations for the case of weak host, guest dipolar coupling. In order to calculate the cage chemical shielding tensors and the NMR lineshape produced by each guest molecule, the study involved the use of orientational distributions from molecular dynamics simulation along with time and powder angle averaging. The total predicted lineshape anisotropy was calculated from the superposition of the lineshapes of all guests. The approach was applied to calculate the temperature dependent 13C NMR lineshape anisotropy of carbon dioxide in structure 1 clathrates. The paper presented the computational methodology and results and discussion. It was concluded that the resulting lineshapes were in good agreement with the experimental 13C NMR spectrum at each temperature. The method provided a uniform procedure to calculate the lineshapes at different temperatures and no prior assumptions about the nature of the motion of the guest in cages was required. 37 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  10. Amorphous surface layer versus transient amorphous precursor phase in bone - A case study investigated by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Euw, Stanislas; Ajili, Widad; Chan-Chang, Tsou-Hsi-Camille; Delices, Annette; Laurent, Guillaume; Babonneau, Florence; Nassif, Nadine; Azaïs, Thierry

    2017-09-01

    The presence of an amorphous surface layer that coats a crystalline core has been proposed for many biominerals, including bone mineral. In parallel, transient amorphous precursor phases have been proposed in various biomineralization processes, including bone biomineralization. Here we propose a methodology to investigate the origin of these amorphous environments taking the bone tissue as a key example. This study relies on the investigation of a bone tissue sample and its comparison with synthetic calcium phosphate samples, including a stoichiometric apatite, an amorphous calcium phosphate sample, and two different biomimetic apatites. To reveal if the amorphous environments in bone originate from an amorphous surface layer or a transient amorphous precursor phase, a combined solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment has been used. The latter consists of a double cross polarization 1 H→ 31 P→ 1 H pulse sequence followed by a 1 H magnetization exchange pulse sequence. The presence of an amorphous surface layer has been investigated through the study of the biomimetic apatites; while the presence of a transient amorphous precursor phase in the form of amorphous calcium phosphate particles has been mimicked with the help of a physical mixture of stoichiometric apatite and amorphous calcium phosphate. The NMR results show that the amorphous and the crystalline environments detected in our bone tissue sample belong to the same particle. The presence of an amorphous surface layer that coats the apatitic core of bone apatite particles has been unambiguously confirmed, and it is certain that this amorphous surface layer has strong implication on bone tissue biogenesis and regeneration. Questions still persist on the structural organization of bone and biomimetic apatites. The existing model proposes a core/shell structure, with an amorphous surface layer coating a crystalline bulk. The accuracy of this model is still debated because amorphous calcium

  11. Resonance Assignments and Secondary Structure Analysis of Dynein Light Chain 8 by Magic-angle Spinning NMR Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Shangjin; Butterworth, Andrew H.; Paramasivam, Sivakumar; Yan, Si; Lightcap, Christine M.; Williams, John C.; Polenova, Tatyana E.

    2011-08-04

    Dynein light chain LC8 is the smallest subunit of the dynein motor complex and has been shown to play important roles in both dynein-dependent and dynein-independent physiological functions via its interaction with a number of its binding partners. It has also been linked to pathogenesis including roles in viral infections and tumorigenesis. Structural information for LC8-target proteins is critical to understanding the underlying function of LC8 in these complexes. However, some LC8-target interactions are not amenable to structural characterization by conventional structural biology techniques owing to their large size, low solubility, and crystallization difficulties. Here, we report magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR studies of the homodimeric apo-LC8 protein as a first effort in addressing more complex, multi-partner, LC8-based protein assemblies. We have established site-specific backbone and side-chain resonance assignments for the majority of the residues of LC8, and show TALOS+-predicted torsion angles ø and ψ in close agreement with most residues in the published LC8 crystal structure. Data obtained through these studies will provide the first step toward using MAS NMR to examine the LC8 structure, which will eventually be used to investigate protein–protein interactions in larger systems that cannot be determined by conventional structural studies.

  12. Magic Angle Spinning NMR Structure Determination of Proteins from Pseudocontact Shifts

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jianping; Pilla, Kala Bharath; Li, Qingfeng; Zhang, Zhengfeng; Su, Xuncheng; Huber, Thomas; Yang, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Magic angle spinning solid-state NMR is a unique technique to study atomic-resolution structure of biomacromolecules which resist crystallization or are too large to study by solution NMR techniques. However, difficulties in obtaining sufficient number of long-range distance restraints using dipolar coupling based spectra hamper the process of structure determination of proteins in solid-state NMR. In this study it is shown that high-resolution structure of proteins in solid phase can be determined without the use of traditional dipolar-dipolar coupling based distance restraints by combining the measurements of pseudocontact shifts (PCSs) with Rosetta calculations. The PCSs were generated by chelating exogenous paramagnetic metal ions to a tag 4-mercaptomethyl-dipicolinic acid, which is covalently attached to different residue sites in a 56-residue immunoglobulin-binding domain of protein G (GB1). The long-range structural restraints with metal-nucleus distance of up to ∼20 Å are quantitatively extracted from experimentally observed PCSs, and these are in good agreement with the distances back-calculated using an X-ray structure model. Moreover, we demonstrate that using several paramagnetic ions with varied paramagnetic susceptibilities as well as the introduction of paramagnetic labels at different sites can dramatically increase the number of long-range restraints and cover different regions of the protein. The structure generated from solid-state NMR PCSs restraints combined with Rosetta calculations has 0.7 Å root-mean-square deviation relative to X-ray structure. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  13. Magic Angle Spinning NMR Structure Determination of Proteins from Pseudocontact Shifts

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jianping

    2013-06-05

    Magic angle spinning solid-state NMR is a unique technique to study atomic-resolution structure of biomacromolecules which resist crystallization or are too large to study by solution NMR techniques. However, difficulties in obtaining sufficient number of long-range distance restraints using dipolar coupling based spectra hamper the process of structure determination of proteins in solid-state NMR. In this study it is shown that high-resolution structure of proteins in solid phase can be determined without the use of traditional dipolar-dipolar coupling based distance restraints by combining the measurements of pseudocontact shifts (PCSs) with Rosetta calculations. The PCSs were generated by chelating exogenous paramagnetic metal ions to a tag 4-mercaptomethyl-dipicolinic acid, which is covalently attached to different residue sites in a 56-residue immunoglobulin-binding domain of protein G (GB1). The long-range structural restraints with metal-nucleus distance of up to ∼20 Å are quantitatively extracted from experimentally observed PCSs, and these are in good agreement with the distances back-calculated using an X-ray structure model. Moreover, we demonstrate that using several paramagnetic ions with varied paramagnetic susceptibilities as well as the introduction of paramagnetic labels at different sites can dramatically increase the number of long-range restraints and cover different regions of the protein. The structure generated from solid-state NMR PCSs restraints combined with Rosetta calculations has 0.7 Å root-mean-square deviation relative to X-ray structure. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  14. An approach for high-throughput structure determination of proteins by NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medek, Ales; Olejniczak, Edward T.; Meadows, Robert P.; Fesik, Stephen W. [Abbott Laboratories, Pharmaceutical Discovery Division (United States)

    2000-11-15

    An approach is described for rapidly determining protein structures by NMR that utilizes proteins containing {sup 13}C-methyl labeled Val, Leu, and Ile ({delta}1) and protonated Phe and Tyr in a deuterated background. Using this strategy, the key NOEs that define the hydrophobic core and overall fold of the protein are easily obtained. NMR data are acquired using cryogenic probe technology which markedly reduces the spectrometer time needed for data acquisition. The approach is demonstrated by determining the overall fold of the antiapoptotic protein, Bcl-xL, from data collected in only 4 days. Refinement of the Bcl-xL structure to a backbone rmsd of 0.95 A was accomplished with data collected in an additional 3 days. A distance analysis of 180 different proteins and structure calculations using simulated data suggests that our method will allow the global folds of a wide variety of proteins to be determined.

  15. NMR studies on the mechanism of structural destabilization of the globular proteins and DNA by aliphatic alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubas, B.; Witman, B.; Wieniewska, T.; Soltysik, M.

    1977-01-01

    The concept that the mechanism of structural destabilization of the biologically active macromolecules by typical denaturing agents should find a reflection in the NMR spectra of the denaturants themselves has been followed by proton NMR for some aliphatic alcohols in the system containing the serum albumin of DNA. (author)

  16. Studying the molecular determinants of potassium channel structure and function in membranes by solid-state NMR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Cruijsen, Elwin

    2014-01-01

    Solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (ssNMR) has made remarkable progress in the structural characterization of membrane proteins systems at atomic resolution. Such studies can be further aided by the use of molecular dynamic simulations. Moreover, ssNMR data can be directly compared to functional

  17. Methods of NMR structure refinement: molecular dynamics simulations improve the agreement with measured NMR data of a C-terminal peptide of GCN4-p1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolenc, Jozica [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, ETH (Switzerland); Missimer, John H.; Steinmetz, Michel O. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Biomolecular Research (Switzerland); Gunsteren, Wilfred F. van, E-mail: wfvgn@igc.phys.chem.ethz.c [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, ETH (Switzerland)

    2010-07-15

    The C-terminal trigger sequence is essential in the coiled-coil formation of GCN4-p1; its conformational properties are thus of importance for understanding this process at the atomic level. A solution NMR model structure of a peptide, GCN4p16-31, encompassing the GCN4-p1 trigger sequence was proposed a few years ago. Derived using a standard single-structure refinement protocol based on 172 nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) distance restraints, 14 hydrogen-bond and 11 {phi} torsional-angle restraints, the resulting set of 20 NMR model structures exhibits regular {alpha}-helical structure. However, the set slightly violates some measured NOE bounds and does not reproduce all 15 measured {sup 3}J(H{sub N}-H{sub C{alpha}})-coupling constants, indicating that different conformers of GCN4p16-31 might be present in solution. With the aim to resolve structures compatible with all NOE upper distance bounds and {sup 3}J-coupling constants, we executed several structure refinement protocols employing unrestrained and restrained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with two force fields. We find that only configurational ensembles obtained by applying simultaneously time-averaged NOE distance and {sup 3}J-coupling constant restraining with either force field reproduce all the experimental data. Additionally, analyses of the simulated ensembles show that the conformational variability of GCN4p16-31 in solution admitted by the available set of 187 measured NMR data is larger than represented by the set of the NMR model structures. The conformations of GCN4p16-31 in solution differ in the orientation not only of the side-chains but also of the backbone. The inconsistencies between the NMR model structures and the measured NMR data are due to the neglect of averaging effects and the inclusion of hydrogen-bond and torsional-angle restraints that have little basis in the primary, i.e. measured NMR data.

  18. Principal components analysis of protein structure ensembles calculated using NMR data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, Peter W.A.

    2001-01-01

    One important problem when calculating structures of biomolecules from NMR data is distinguishing converged structures from outlier structures. This paper describes how Principal Components Analysis (PCA) has the potential to classify calculated structures automatically, according to correlated structural variation across the population. PCA analysis has the additional advantage that it highlights regions of proteins which are varying across the population. To apply PCA, protein structures have to be reduced in complexity and this paper describes two different representations of protein structures which achieve this. The calculated structures of a 28 amino acid peptide are used to demonstrate the methods. The two different representations of protein structure are shown to give equivalent results, and correct results are obtained even though the ensemble of structures used as an example contains two different protein conformations. The PCA analysis also correctly identifies the structural differences between the two conformations

  19. APSY-NMR for protein backbone assignment in high-throughput structural biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Samit Kumar; Serrano, Pedro; Proudfoot, Andrew; Geralt, Michael [The Scripps Research Institute, Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology (United States); Pedrini, Bill [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), SwissFEL Project (Switzerland); Herrmann, Torsten [Université de Lyon, Institut des Sciences Analytiques, Centre de RMN à Très Hauts Champs, UMR 5280 CNRS, ENS Lyon, UCB Lyon 1 (France); Wüthrich, Kurt, E-mail: wuthrich@scripps.edu [The Scripps Research Institute, Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology (United States)

    2015-01-15

    A standard set of three APSY-NMR experiments has been used in daily practice to obtain polypeptide backbone NMR assignments in globular proteins with sizes up to about 150 residues, which had been identified as targets for structure determination by the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG) under the auspices of the Protein Structure Initiative (PSI). In a representative sample of 30 proteins, initial fully automated data analysis with the software UNIO-MATCH-2014 yielded complete or partial assignments for over 90 % of the residues. For most proteins the APSY data acquisition was completed in less than 30 h. The results of the automated procedure provided a basis for efficient interactive validation and extension to near-completion of the assignments by reference to the same 3D heteronuclear-resolved [{sup 1}H,{sup 1}H]-NOESY spectra that were subsequently used for the collection of conformational constraints. High-quality structures were obtained for all 30 proteins, using the J-UNIO protocol, which includes extensive automation of NMR structure determination.

  20. The structure of poly(carbonsuboxide) on the atomic scale: a solid-state NMR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmedt auf der Günne, Jörn; Beck, Johannes; Hoffbauer, Wilfried; Krieger-Beck, Petra

    2005-07-18

    In this contribution we present a study of the structure of amorphous poly(carbonsuboxide) (C3O2)x by 13C solid-state NMR spectroscopy supported by infrared spectroscopy and chemical analysis. Poly(carbonsuboxide) was obtained by polymerization of carbonsuboxide C3O2, which in turn was synthesized from malonic acid bis(trimethylsilylester). Two different 13C labeling schemes were applied to probe inter- and intramonomeric bonds in the polymer by dipolar solid-state NMR methods and also to allow quantitative 13C MAS NMR spectra. Four types of carbon environments can be distinguished in the NMR spectra. Double-quantum and triple-quantum 2D correlation experiments were used to assign the observed peaks using the through-space and through-bond dipolar coupling. In order to obtain distance constraints for the intermonomeric bonds, double-quantum constant-time experiments were performed. In these experiments an additional filter step was applied to suppress contributions from not directly bonded 13C,13C spin pairs. The 13C NMR intensities, chemical shifts, connectivities and distances gave constraints for both the polymerization mechanism and the short-range order of the polymer. The experimental results were complemented by bond lengths predicted by density functional theory methods for several previously suggested models. Based on the presented evidence we can unambiguously exclude models based on gamma-pyronic units and support models based on alpha-pyronic units. The possibility of planar ladder- and bracelet-like alpha-pyronic structures is discussed.

  1. High-resolution NMR structure of the antimicrobial peptide protegrin-2 in the presence of DPC micelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usachev, K. S., E-mail: k.usachev@kpfu.ru; Efimov, S. V.; Kolosova, O. A.; Filippov, A. V.; Klochkov, V. V. [Kazan Federal University (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-15

    PG-1 adopts a dimeric structure in dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles, and a channel is formed by the association of several dimers but the molecular mechanisms of the membrane damage by non-α-helical peptides are still unknown. The formation of the PG-1 dimer is important for pore formation in the lipid bilayer, since the dimer can be regarded as the primary unit for assembly into the ordered aggregates. It was supposed that only 12 residues (RGGRL-CYCRR-RFCVC-V) are needed to endow protegrin molecules with strong antibacterial activity and that at least four additional residues are needed to add potent antifungal properties. Thus, the 16-residue protegrin (PG-2) represents the minimal structure needed for broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity encompassing bacteria and fungi. As the peptide conformation and peptide-to-membrane binding properties are very sensitive to single amino acid substitutions, the solution structure of PG-2 in solution and in a membrane mimicking environment are crucial. In order to find evidence if the oligomerization state of PG-1 in a lipid environment will be the same or not for another protegrins, we investigate in the present work the PG-2 NMR solution structure in the presence of perdeuterated DPC micelles. The NMR study reported in the present work indicates that PG-2 form a well-defined structure (PDB: 2MUH) composed of a two-stranded antiparallel β-sheet when it binds to DPC micelles.

  2. On the Analytical Superiority of 1D NMR for Fingerprinting the Higher Order Structure of Protein Therapeutics Compared to Multidimensional NMR Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, Leszek; Jordan, John B; Rogers, Gary; Schnier, Paul D

    2015-06-02

    An important aspect in the analytical characterization of protein therapeutics is the comprehensive characterization of higher order structure (HOS). Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is arguably the most sensitive method for fingerprinting HOS of a protein in solution. Traditionally, (1)H-(15)N or (1)H-(13)C correlation spectra are used as a "structural fingerprint" of HOS. Here, we demonstrate that protein fingerprint by line shape enhancement (PROFILE), a 1D (1)H NMR spectroscopy fingerprinting approach, is superior to traditional two-dimensional methods using monoclonal antibody samples and a heavily glycosylated protein therapeutic (Epoetin Alfa). PROFILE generates a high resolution structural fingerprint of a therapeutic protein in a fraction of the time required for a 2D NMR experiment. The cross-correlation analysis of PROFILE spectra allows one to distinguish contributions from HOS vs protein heterogeneity, which is difficult to accomplish by 2D NMR. We demonstrate that the major analytical limitation of two-dimensional methods is poor selectivity, which renders these approaches problematic for the purpose of fingerprinting large biological macromolecules.

  3. NMR investigation of spin flip in TmCrO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karnachev, A.S.; Klechin, Yu.I.; Kovtun, N.M.; Moskvin, A.S.; Solov'ev, E.E.; Tkachenko, A.A.

    1987-01-01

    Spin flip in the rare earth orthochromate TmCrO 3 is studied by the double-pulse NMR technique. It is shown that below 5.6 K spin flip in the absence of an external magnetic field takes place as a first order phase transition from the high temperature phase Γ 2 to the low temperature phase Γ 4 with a region of coexistence of the two phases of more than 3.8 K. The spin flip phase transitions Γ 2 ↔ Γ 4 induced by an external magnetic field and the attendant phenomenon of magnetic and electric nonequivalence of 53 Cr nuclei from different magnetic sublattices are investigated. The anisotropy parameters of the hyperfine interactions and nuclear quadrupole interactions are calculated on the basis of the experimental data

  4. Spectroscopic (vibrational, NMR and UV-vis.) and quantum chemical investigations on 4-hexyloxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Ashgar; Gökce, Halil; Bahçeli, Semiha

    2016-01-05

    In this study, the 4-hexyloxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde compound as one of the derivatives of vanillin which is a well known flavoring agent, C14H20O3, has been investigated by experimentally and extensively utilizing density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level. In this context, the optimized geometry, vibrational frequencies, (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts, UV-vis. (in gas phase and in methanol solvent) spectra, HOMO-LUMO analysis, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), thermodynamic parameters and atomic charges of 4-hexyloxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde have been calculated. In addition, theoretically predicted IR, Raman and UV-vis. (in gas phase and in methanol solvent) spectra of the mentioned molecule have been constructed. The results calculated were compared with the experimental data. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Superconductivity and NMR investigations of amorphous Be-Nb-Zr and Be-Mo-Zr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goebbels, J.; Lueders, K.; Freyhardt, H.C.; Reichelt, J.

    1981-01-01

    9 Be NMR investigations and measurements of the superconducting properties and the resistivity are reported for amorphous Besub(32.5)Nbsub(x)Zrsub(67.5-x) and Besub(32.5)Mosub(x)Zrsub(67.5-x) alloys (x = 2.5; 5; 7). Line width analysis suggests an enlarged Nb concentration around the Be sites for the Be-Nb-Zr alloys. Comparing the two types of alloys the Knight shifts are of the same order of magnitude whereas the Tsub(c) and Bsub(c) 2 (0) values are slightly smaller than for the Nb alloys. For Be-Nb-Zr Tsub(c) and K increases with the Nb content. The results are discussed in connection with the density of states N(Esub(F)). (orig.)

  6. Transformation of meta-stable calcium silicate hydrates to tobermorite: reaction kinetics and molecular structure from XRD and NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the integrity of well-bore systems that are lined with Portland-based cements is critical to the successful storage of sequestered CO2 in gas and oil reservoirs. As a first step, we investigate reaction rates and mechanistic pathways for cement mineral growth in the absence of CO2 by coupling water chemistry with XRD and NMR spectroscopic data. We find that semi-crystalline calcium (alumino-)silicate hydrate (Al-CSH) forms as a precursor solid to the cement mineral tobermorite. Rate constants for tobermorite growth were found to be k = 0.6 (± 0.1) × 10-5 s-1 for a solution:solid of 10:1 and 1.6 (± 0.8) × 10-4 s-1 for a solution:solid of 5:1 (batch mode; T = 150°C). This data indicates that reaction rates for tobermorite growth are faster when the solution volume is reduced by half, suggesting that rates are dependent on solution saturation and that the Gibbs free energy is the reaction driver. However, calculated solution saturation indexes for Al-CSH and tobermorite differ by less than one log unit, which is within the measured uncertainty. Based on this data, we consider both heterogeneous nucleation as the thermodynamic driver and internal restructuring as possible mechanistic pathways for growth. We also use NMR spectroscopy to characterize the site symmetry and bonding environment of Al and Si in a reacted tobermorite sample. We find two [4]Al coordination structures at δiso = 59.9 ppm and 66.3 ppm with quadrupolar product parameters (PQ) of 0.21 MHz and 0.10 MHz (± 0.08) from 27Al 3Q-MAS NMR and speculate on the Al occupancy of framework sites by probing the protonation environment of Al metal centers using 27Al{1H}CP-MAS NMR. PMID:19144195

  7. 1H-NMR/13C-NMR studies of branched structures in PVC obtained at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, D.; Holzer, G.; Hjertberg, T.

    1981-01-01

    The 1 H-NMR-spectra of raw poly (vinyl cloride) obtained at atmospheric pressure (U-PVC) have revealed the presence of high concentrations of branches. The content of labile chlorine was determined by reaction with phenole in order to estimate the branch points with tertiary chlorine. The branch length of reductively dehalogenated U-PVC by 13 C-NMR analysis have provided evidence for both short chain branches including chloromethyl groups and 2.4-dichloro-n-butyl groups and long chain branching. For a number of U-polymers the total amount of branching ranges from 7.5 to 13.5/1000 C. The 13 C-NMR measurements point to a ratio of methyl/butyl branches of 1:1 and short chains/long chains of 6:1. (orig.)

  8. Coordination Structure of Aluminum in Magnesium Aluminum Hydroxide Studied by 27Al NMR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The coordination structure of aluminum in magnesium aluminum hydroxide was studiedby 27Al NMR. The result showed that tetrahedral aluminum (AlⅣ) existed in magnesiumaluminum hydroxide, and the contents of AlⅣ increased with the increase of the ratio of Al/Mg andwith the peptizing temperature. AlⅣ originated from the so-called Al13 polymer with the structureof one Al tetrahedron surrounded by twelve Al octahedrons.

  9. Structure determination of cyclo pentane terpene derivatives by crossed NMR and MS techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pianet, I.; Bourgeois, G. [Bordeaux-1 Univ., 33 - Talence (France); Dolatkhani, M.; Cramail, H.; Deffieux, A. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 33 - Talence (France)

    1995-10-01

    3 of the 4 stereoisomers of the 1-isopropenyl 2,3-dimethylcyclopentane, obtained from the cracking of 3,7-dimethylocta-1,6-diene, were purified and characterized. Dihedral angles, between the protons of the substituted carbons, have been determined by molecular modelling. Analysis of the NMR and mass spectra allowed us to access to the structure of the different isomers. (authors). 6 refs., 2 tabs.

  10. NMR-study of dynamic structural transtions in RNA-molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Fürtig, Boris

    2007-01-01

    The following thesis is concerned with the elucidation of structural changes of RNA molecules during the time course of dynamic processes that are commonly denoted as folding reactions. In contrast to the field of protein folding, the concept of RNA folding comprises not only folding reactions itself but also refolding- or conformational switching- and assembly processes (see chapter III). The method in this thesis to monitor these diverse processes is high resolution liquid-state NMR spectro...

  11. NMR structure of the first Ig module of mouse FGFR1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiselyov, V.V.; Bock, Elisabeth Marianne; Berezin, V.

    2006-01-01

    of this module. We describe here the NMR structure of the Ig1 module of mouse FGFR1. The three-dimensional fold of the module belongs to the intermediate Ig subgroup and can be described as a beta-barrel consisting of two beta-sheets. One sheet is formed by A', G, F, C, and C', and the other by A, B, B', E...

  12. Well-defined azazirconacyclopropane complexes supported on silica structurally determined by 2D NMR comparative elucidation

    KAUST Repository

    El Eter, Mohamad; Hamzaoui, Bilel; Abou-Hamad, Edy; Pelletier, Jeremie; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Grafting of Zr(NMe2)4 on mesoporous silica SBA-15 afforded selectively well-defined surface species SiOZr(NMe2) (η2NMeCH2). 2D solid-state NMR (1H- 13C HETCOR, Multiple Quantum) experiments have shown a unique structural rearrangement occurring on the immobilised zirconium bis methylamido ligand. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2013.

  13. Improved reliability, accuracy and quality in automated NMR structure calculation with ARIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mareuil, Fabien [Institut Pasteur, Cellule d' Informatique pour la Biologie (France); Malliavin, Thérèse E.; Nilges, Michael; Bardiaux, Benjamin, E-mail: bardiaux@pasteur.fr [Institut Pasteur, Unité de Bioinformatique Structurale, CNRS UMR 3528 (France)

    2015-08-15

    In biological NMR, assignment of NOE cross-peaks and calculation of atomic conformations are critical steps in the determination of reliable high-resolution structures. ARIA is an automated approach that performs NOE assignment and structure calculation in a concomitant manner in an iterative procedure. The log-harmonic shape for distance restraint potential and the Bayesian weighting of distance restraints, recently introduced in ARIA, were shown to significantly improve the quality and the accuracy of determined structures. In this paper, we propose two modifications of the ARIA protocol: (1) the softening of the force field together with adapted hydrogen radii, which is meaningful in the context of the log-harmonic potential with Bayesian weighting, (2) a procedure that automatically adjusts the violation tolerance used in the selection of active restraints, based on the fitting of the structure to the input data sets. The new ARIA protocols were fine-tuned on a set of eight protein targets from the CASD–NMR initiative. As a result, the convergence problems previously observed for some targets was resolved and the obtained structures exhibited better quality. In addition, the new ARIA protocols were applied for the structure calculation of ten new CASD–NMR targets in a blind fashion, i.e. without knowing the actual solution. Even though optimisation of parameters and pre-filtering of unrefined NOE peak lists were necessary for half of the targets, ARIA consistently and reliably determined very precise and highly accurate structures for all cases. In the context of integrative structural biology, an increasing number of experimental methods are used that produce distance data for the determination of 3D structures of macromolecules, stressing the importance of methods that successfully make use of ambiguous and noisy distance data.

  14. NMR strategies to support medicinal chemistry workflows for primary structure determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguadinma, Paul; Bilodeau, Francois; LaPlante, Steven R

    2017-01-15

    Central to drug discovery is the correct characterization of the primary structures of compounds. In general, medicinal chemists make great synthetic and characterization efforts to deliver the intended compounds. However, there are occasions which incorrect compounds are presented, such as those reported for Bosutinib and TIC10. This may be due to a variety of reasons such as uncontrolled reaction schemes, reliance on limited characterization techniques (LC-MS and/or 1D 1H NMR spectra), or even the lack of availability or knowledge of characterization strategies. Here, we present practical NMR approaches that support medicinal chemist workflows for addressing compound characterization issues and allow for reliable primary structure determinations. These strategies serve to differentiate between regioisomers and geometric isomers, distinguish between N- versus O-alkyl analogues, and identify rotamers and atropisomers. Overall, awareness and application of these available NMR methods (e.g. HMBC/HSQC, ROESY and VT experiments, to name only a few) should help practicing chemists to reveal chemical phenomena and avoid mis-assignment of the primary structures of compounds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. PINE-SPARKY.2 for automated NMR-based protein structure research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woonghee; Markley, John L

    2018-05-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, along with X-ray crystallography and cryoelectron microscopy, is one of the three major tools that enable the determination of atomic-level structural models of biological macromolecules. Of these, NMR has the unique ability to follow important processes in solution, including conformational changes, internal dynamics and protein-ligand interactions. As a means for facilitating the handling and analysis of spectra involved in these types of NMR studies, we have developed PINE-SPARKY.2, a software package that integrates and automates discrete tasks that previously required interaction with separate software packages. The graphical user interface of PINE-SPARKY.2 simplifies chemical shift assignment and verification, automated detection of secondary structural elements, predictions of flexibility and hydrophobic cores, and calculation of three-dimensional structural models. PINE-SPARKY.2 is available in the latest version of NMRFAM-SPARKY from the National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison (http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/download_packages.html), the NMRbox Project (https://nmrbox.org) and to subscribers to the SBGrid (https://sbgrid.org). For a detailed description of the program, see http://www.nmrfam.wisc.edu/pine-sparky2.htm. whlee@nmrfam.wisc.edu or markley@nmrfam.wisc.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  16. NMR structure analysis of uniformly 13C-labeled carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Carolina; Kovacs, Helena; Widmalm, Göran

    2014-06-01

    In this study, a set of nuclear magnetic resonance experiments, some of them commonly used in the study of (13)C-labeled proteins and/or nucleic acids, is applied for the structure determination of uniformly (13)C-enriched carbohydrates. Two model substances were employed: one compound of low molecular weight [(UL-(13)C)-sucrose, 342 Da] and one compound of medium molecular weight ((13)C-enriched O-antigenic polysaccharide isolated from Escherichia coli O142, ~10 kDa). The first step in this approach involves the assignment of the carbon resonances in each monosaccharide spin system using the anomeric carbon signal as the starting point. The (13)C resonances are traced using (13)C-(13)C correlations from homonuclear experiments, such as (H)CC-CT-COSY, (H)CC-NOESY, CC-CT-TOCSY and/or virtually decoupled (H)CC-TOCSY. Based on the assignment of the (13)C resonances, the (1)H chemical shifts are derived in a straightforward manner using one-bond (1)H-(13)C correlations from heteronuclear experiments (HC-CT-HSQC). In order to avoid the (1) J CC splitting of the (13)C resonances and to improve the resolution, either constant-time (CT) in the indirect dimension or virtual decoupling in the direct dimension were used. The monosaccharide sequence and linkage positions in oligosaccharides were determined using either (13)C or (1)H detected experiments, namely CC-CT-COSY, band-selective (H)CC-TOCSY, HC-CT-HSQC-NOESY or long-range HC-CT-HSQC. However, due to the short T2 relaxation time associated with larger polysaccharides, the sequential information in the O-antigen polysaccharide from E. coli O142 could only be elucidated using the (1)H-detected experiments. Exchanging protons of hydroxyl groups and N-acetyl amides in the (13)C-enriched polysaccharide were assigned by using HC-H2BC spectra. The assignment of the N-acetyl groups with (15)N at natural abundance was completed by using HN-SOFAST-HMQC, HNCA, HNCO and (13)C-detected (H)CACO spectra.

  17. Pulse NMR-spectroscopy of structural changes of chemically modified polypropylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gafarov, A.M.; Galibeev, S.S.; Kochnev, A.M.; Sukhanov, P.P.; Arkhireev, V.P.

    2004-01-01

    The structure of polypropylene compositions is studied by the method of pulse NMR-spectroscopy. The polypropylene compositions are derived by means of the modification by multicomponent systems. The analysis of relaxation times in a wide temperature range is carried out. Character of changes going on at a level of supermolecular structures is described. It is shown that the amplifications that manifest themselves under the polypropylene modification by the mixtures based on 2,4-tolyilendiisocyanate and e-caprolactam, are related to the change in the intermolecular interaction and formation of a more ordered polymer structure. (authors)

  18. NMR spectroscopy: structure elucidation of cycloelatanene A: a natural product case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Sylvia; Dias, Daniel Anthony

    2013-01-01

    The structure elucidation of new secondary metabolites derived from marine and terrestrial sources is frequently a challenging task. The hurdles include the ability to isolate stable secondary metabolites of sufficient purity that are often present in products that the compound may rapidly degrade during and/or after the isolation, due to sensitivity to light, air oxidation, and/or temperature. In this way, precautions need to be taken, as much as possible to avoid any such chemical inter-conversions and/or degradations. Immediately after purification, the next step is to rapidly acquire all analytical spectroscopic data in order to complete the characterization of the isolated secondary metabolite(s), prior to any possible decomposition. The final hurdle in this multiple step process, especially in the acquisition of the NMR spectroscopic and other analytical data (mass spectra, infrared and ultra-violet spectra, optical rotation, etc.), is to assemble the structural moieties/units in an effort to complete the structure elucidation. Often ambiguity with the elucidation of the final structure remains when structural fragments identified are difficult to piece together on the basis of the HMBC NMR correlations or when the relative configuration cannot be unequivocally identified on the basis of NOE NMR enhancements observed. Herein, we describe the methodology used to carry out the structure elucidation of a new C16 chamigrene, cycloelatanene A (5) which was isolated from the southern Australian marine alga Laurencia elata (Rhodomelaceae). The general approach and principles used in the structure determination of this compound can be applied to the structure elucidation of other small molecular weight compounds derived from either natural or synthetic sources.

  19. Theory and Applications of Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy to Biomembrane Structure and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaolin

    Solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is one of the premiere biophysical methods that can be applied for addressing the structure and dynamics of biomolecules, including proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. It illustrates the general problem of determining the average biomolecular structure, including the motional mean-square amplitudes and rates of the fluctuations. Lineshape and relaxtion studies give us a view into the molecular properties under different environments. To help the understanding of NMR theory, both lineshape and relaxation experiments are conducted with hexamethylbezene (HMB). This chemical compound with a simple structure serves as a perfect test molecule. Because of its highly symmetric structure, its motions are not very difficult to understand. The results for HMB set benchmarks for other more complicated systems like membrane proteins. After accumulating a large data set on HMB, we also proceed to develop a completely new method of data analysis, which yields the spectral densities in a body-fixed frame revealing internal motions of the system. Among the possible applications of solid-state NMR spectroscopy, we study the light activation mechanism of visual rhodopsin in lipid membranes. As a prototype of G-protein-coupled receptors, which are a large class of membrane proteins, the cofactor isomerization is triggered by photon absorption, and the local structural change is then propagated to a large-scale conformational change of the protein. Facilitation of the binding of transducin then passes along the visual signal to downstream effector proteins like transducin. To study this process, we introduce 2H labels into the rhodopsin chromophore retinal and the C-terminal peptide of transducin to probe the local structure and dynamics of these two hotspots of the rhodopsin activation process. In addition to the examination of local sites with solid-state 2H NMR spectroscopy, wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) provides us the chance of

  20. Fractional order analysis of Sephadex gel structures: NMR measurements reflecting anomalous diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magin, Richard L.; Akpa, Belinda S.; Neuberger, Thomas; Webb, Andrew G.

    2011-12-01

    We report the appearance of anomalous water diffusion in hydrophilic Sephadex gels observed using pulse field gradient (PFG) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The NMR diffusion data was collected using a Varian 14.1 Tesla imaging system with a home-built RF saddle coil. A fractional order analysis of the data was used to characterize heterogeneity in the gels for the dynamics of water diffusion in this restricted environment. Several recent studies of anomalous diffusion have used the stretched exponential function to model the decay of the NMR signal, i.e., exp[-( bD) α], where D is the apparent diffusion constant, b is determined the experimental conditions (gradient pulse separation, durations and strength), and α is a measure of structural complexity. In this work, we consider a different case where the spatial Laplacian in the Bloch-Torrey equation is generalized to a fractional order model of diffusivity via a complexity parameter, β, a space constant, μ, and a diffusion coefficient, D. This treatment reverts to the classical result for the integer order case. The fractional order decay model was fit to the diffusion-weighted signal attenuation for a range of b-values (0 < b < 4000 s mm -2). Throughout this range of b values, the parameters β, μ and D, were found to correlate with the porosity and tortuosity of the gel structure.

  1. Structural comparison of 1{beta}-Methylcarbapenem, Carbapenem and Penem: NMR studies and theoretical calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunagawa, M.; Sasaki, A.; Igarashi, J.-E.; Nishimura, T. [Research Center, Sumitomo Pharmaceuticals Co., Ltd., 3-1-98 Kasugadenaka, Konohanaku, Osaka (Japan)

    1998-04-01

    Structural comparisons of meropenem (1), desmethyl meropenem (2) and the penem analogue (3) which contain the same side chains at both C-2 and C-6 were performed using {sup 1}H NMR measurements together with 3-21G* level of ab initio MO and molecular mechanics calculations. The ab initio MO calculations reproduced the skeletons of these strained {beta}-lactam rings in good agreement with the crystallographic data. {sup 1}H NMR measurements in aqueous solution together with molecular modeling studies indicated that there were conformational differences of the C-2 and C-6 side chains in this series of compounds. These observations suggested that the conformational differences could affect their biological activities. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  2. Structural comparison of 1β-Methylcarbapenem, Carbapenem and Penem: NMR studies and theoretical calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunagawa, M.; Sasaki, A.; Igarashi, J.-E.; Nishimura, T.

    1998-01-01

    Structural comparisons of meropenem (1), desmethyl meropenem (2) and the penem analogue (3) which contain the same side chains at both C-2 and C-6 were performed using 1 H NMR measurements together with 3-21G* level of ab initio MO and molecular mechanics calculations. The ab initio MO calculations reproduced the skeletons of these strained β-lactam rings in good agreement with the crystallographic data. 1 H NMR measurements in aqueous solution together with molecular modeling studies indicated that there were conformational differences of the C-2 and C-6 side chains in this series of compounds. These observations suggested that the conformational differences could affect their biological activities. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  3. Structural studies of bacterial transcriptional regulatory proteins by multidimensional heteronuclear NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkman, Brian Finley [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to elucidate detailed structural information for peptide and protein molecules. A small peptide was designed and synthesized, and its three-dimensional structure was calculated using distance information derived from two-dimensional NMR measurements. The peptide was used to induce antibodies in mice, and the cross-reactivity of the antibodies with a related protein was analyzed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Two proteins which are involved in regulation of transcription in bacteria were also studied. The ferric uptake regulation (Fur) protein is a metal-dependent repressor which controls iron uptake in bacteria. Two- and three-dimensional NMR techniques, coupled with uniform and selective isotope labeling allowed the nearly complete assignment of the resonances of the metal-binding domain of the Fur protein. NTRC is a transcriptional enhancer binding protein whose N-terminal domain is a "receiver domain" in the family of "two-component" regulatory systems. Phosphorylation of the N-terminal domain of NTRC activates the initiation of transcription of aeries encoding proteins involved in nitrogen regulation. Three- and four-dimensional NMR spectroscopy methods have been used to complete the resonance assignments and determine the solution structure of the N-terminal receiver domain of the NTRC protein. Comparison of the solution structure of the NTRC receiver domain with the crystal structures of the homologous protein CheY reveals a very similar fold, with the only significant difference being the position of helix 4 relative to the rest of the protein. The determination of the structure of the NTRC receiver domain is the first step toward understanding a mechanism of signal transduction which is common to many bacterial regulatory systems.

  4. Structure determination of two new indole-diterpenoids from Penicillium sp. CM-7 by NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Hong; Huang, Sheng-Dong; Pan, Hua-Qi; Bian, Xi-Qing; Wang, Zai-Ying; Han, Ai-Hong; Bai, Jiao

    2014-06-01

    Two new indole-diterpenoids 4b-deoxy-1'-O-acetylpaxilline (1) and 4b-deoxypenijanthine A (2) were isolated from the fermentation broth and the mycelia of the soil fungus Penicillium sp. CM-7, along with three known structurally related compounds, 1'-O-acetylpaxilline (3), paspaline (4) and 3-deoxo-4b-deoxypaxilline (5). The structures of compounds 1 and 2 were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic methods, especially 2D NMR, and their absolute configurations were suggested on the basis of the circular dichroism spectral analysis and the NOESY data. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. 113Cd-NMR investigation of a cadmium-substituted copper, zinc-containing superoxide dismutase from yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofod, Pauli; Bauer, Rogert; Danielsen, Eva

    1991-01-01

    113Cd nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to investigate the metal binding sites of cadmium-substituted copper,zinc-containing superoxide dismutase from baker's yeast. NMR signals were obtained for 113Cd(II) at the Cu site as well as for 113Cd(II) at the Zn site. The two subunits...

  6. Investigation of material properties by NMR in low and high magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rata, D.G.

    2006-01-01

    In this work the experiments have been performed at both low and high field. The experiments cover various domains from simple relaxation experiments in low field to diffusion and spin-diffusion in high field. The applications of low-field investigations are: - quality control of chemical products. - water content determination inside of the walls of buildings. - determination of multilayer polymer coatings on a concrete. In high-field NMR several alkane molecules swollen at equilibrium in cross-linked natural rubber samples have been investigated and analyzed based on the assumptions of the Vrentras theory. A small diffusion anisotropy of the order of 10% has been discovered because of a deformation of free volume under compression. The anisotropy increases with the cross-link density and the compression ratio. The results presented in this study show that the solvent size influences the anisotropy of the diffusion process through the size parameter. The spin-diffusion measurements have been performed on Stanyl samples with different aged samples, at controlled temperature conditions. (orig.)

  7. Investigation of material properties by NMR in low and high magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rata, D.G.

    2006-07-10

    In this work the experiments have been performed at both low and high field. The experiments cover various domains from simple relaxation experiments in low field to diffusion and spin-diffusion in high field. The applications of low-field investigations are: - quality control of chemical products. - water content determination inside of the walls of buildings. - determination of multilayer polymer coatings on a concrete. In high-field NMR several alkane molecules swollen at equilibrium in cross-linked natural rubber samples have been investigated and analyzed based on the assumptions of the Vrentras theory. A small diffusion anisotropy of the order of 10% has been discovered because of a deformation of free volume under compression. The anisotropy increases with the cross-link density and the compression ratio. The results presented in this study show that the solvent size influences the anisotropy of the diffusion process through the size parameter. The spin-diffusion measurements have been performed on Stanyl samples with different aged samples, at controlled temperature conditions. (orig.)

  8. Investigation of sea microorganisms of the genus Alteromonas by 31P-NMR of high resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, E.P.; Isakov, V.V.; Mikhajlov, V.V.; Sokolova, S.V.; Gorshkova, N.M.; Fedosov, Yu.V.; Kiprianova, E.A.

    1993-01-01

    Comparative analysis of the 31 P-NMR spectra of intact cells of bacteria belonging to the genus Alteromonas, the producers of alkaline phosphatase was carried out. Differences in the content of phosphate-containing compounds were detected in individual species of the genus Alteromonas. By comparing the data on 31 P-NMR spectra, the electron micrographs and phosphatase activities, the possibility of revealing the presence of capsules was shown. Peculiar features of the 31 P-NMR spectra of alteromonades, as compared with other taxonomic groups of microorganisms, have been discussed

  9. 13C-NMR Study on Structure Evolution Characteristics of High-Organic-Sulfur Coals from Typical Chinese Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Wei

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The structure evolution characteristics of high-organic-sulfur (HOS coals with a wide range of ranks from typical Chinese areas were investigated using 13C-CP/MAS NMR. The results indicate that the structure parameters that are relevant to coal rank include CH3 carbon (fal*, quaternary carbon, CH/CH2 carbon + quaternary carbon (falH, aliphatic carbon (falC, protonated aromatic carbon (faH, protonated aromatic carbon + aromatic bridgehead carbon (faH+B, aromaticity (faCP, and aromatic carbon (farC. The coal structure changed dramatically in the first two coalification jumps, especially the first one. A large number of aromatic structures condensed, and aliphatic structures rapidly developed at the initial stage of bituminous coal accompanied by remarkable decarboxylation. Compared to ordinary coals, the structure evolution characteristics of HOS coals manifest in three ways: First, the aromatic CH3 carbon, alkylated aromatic carbon (faS, aromatic bridgehead carbon (faB, and phenolic ether (faP are barely relevant to rank, and abundant organic sulfur has an impact on the normal evolution process of coal. Second, the average aromatic cluster sizes of some super-high-organic-sulfur (SHOS coals are not large, and the extensive development of cross bonds and/or bridged bonds form closer connections among the aromatic fringes. Moreover, sulfur-containing functional groups are probably significant components in these linkages. Third, a considerable portion of “oxygen-containing functional groups” in SHOS coals determined by 13C-NMR are actually sulfur-containing groups, which results in the anomaly that the oxygen-containing structures increase with coal rank.

  10. Structure of the charge density wave in cuprate superconductors: Lessons from NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, W. A.; Ufkes, S.; Kampf, A. P.

    2018-03-01

    Using a mix of numerical and analytic methods, we show that recent NMR 17O measurements provide detailed information about the structure of the charge-density wave (CDW) phase in underdoped YBa2Cu3O6 +x . We perform Bogoliubov-de Gennes (BdG) calculations of both the local density of states and the orbitally resolved charge density, which are closely related to the magnetic and electric quadrupole contributions to the NMR spectrum, using a microscopic model that was shown previously to agree closely with x-ray experiments. The BdG results reproduce qualitative features of the experimental spectrum extremely well. These results are interpreted in terms of a generic "hot-spot" model that allows one to trace the origins of the NMR line shapes. We find that four quantities—the orbital character of the Fermi surface at the hot spots, the Fermi surface curvature at the hot spots, the CDW correlation length, and the magnitude of the subdominant CDW component—are key in determining the line shapes.

  11. Structure and motion of phospholipids in human plasma lipoproteins. A 31P NMR study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenske, D.B.; Chana, R.S.; Parmar, Y.I.; Treleaven, W.D.; Cushley, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    The structure and motion of phospholipids in human plasma lipoproteins have been studied by using 31 P NMR. Lateral diffusion coefficients, D T , obtained from the viscosity dependence of the 31 P NMR line widths, were obtained for very low density lipoprotein (VLDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoproteins (HDL 2 , HDL 3 ), and egg PC/TO microemulsions at 25 degree C, for VLDL at 40 degree C, and for LDL at 45 degree C. In order to prove the orientation and/or order of the phospholipid head-group, estimates of the residual chemical shift anistropy, Δσ, have been obtained for all the lipoproteins and the microemulsions from the viscosity and field dependence for the 31 P NMR line widths. These results suggest differences in the orientation and/or ordering of the head-group in the HDLs. The dynamic behavior of the phosphate moiety in LDL and HDL 3 has been obtained from the temperature dependence of the 31 P spin-lattice relaxation rates. Values of the correlation time for phosphate group reorientation and the activation energy for the motion are nearly identical in LDL and HDL 3 and are similar to values obtained for phospholipid bilayers. This argues against long-lived protein-lipid interactions being the source of either the slow diffusion in LDL or the altered head-group orientation in the HDLs

  12. Constructing a folding model for protein S6 guided by native fluctuations deduced from NMR structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammert, Heiko; Noel, Jeffrey K.; Haglund, Ellinor; Onuchic, José N.; Schug, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The diversity in a set of protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structures provides an estimate of native state fluctuations that can be used to refine and enrich structure-based protein models (SBMs). Dynamics are an essential part of a protein’s functional native state. The dynamics in the native state are controlled by the same funneled energy landscape that guides the entire folding process. SBMs apply the principle of minimal frustration, drawn from energy landscape theory, to construct a funneled folding landscape for a given protein using only information from the native structure. On an energy landscape smoothed by evolution towards minimal frustration, geometrical constraints, imposed by the native structure, control the folding mechanism and shape the native dynamics revealed by the model. Native-state fluctuations can alternatively be estimated directly from the diversity in the set of NMR structures for a protein. Based on this information, we identify a highly flexible loop in the ribosomal protein S6 and modify the contact map in a SBM to accommodate the inferred dynamics. By taking into account the probable native state dynamics, the experimental transition state is recovered in the model, and the correct order of folding events is restored. Our study highlights how the shared energy landscape connects folding and function by showing that a better description of the native basin improves the prediction of the folding mechanism

  13. NMR structure of bitistatin – a missing piece in the evolutionary pathway of snake venom disintegrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbajo, Rodrigo J; Sanz, Libia; Perez, Alicia; Calvete, Juan J

    2015-01-01

    Extant disintegrins, as found in the venoms of Viperidae and Crotalidae snakes (vipers and rattlesnakes, represent a family of polypeptides that block the function of β1 and β3 integrin receptors, both potently and with a high degree of selectivity. This toxin family owes its origin to the neofunctionalization of the extracellular region of an ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) molecule recruited into the snake venom gland proteome in the Jurassic. The evolutionary structural diversification of the disintegrin scaffold, from the ancestral long disintegrins to the more recently evolved medium-sized, dimeric and short disintegrins, involved the stepwise loss of pairs of class-specific disulfide linkages and the processing of the N-terminal region. NMR and crystal structures of medium-sized, dimeric and short disintegrins have been solved. However, the structure of a long disintegrin remained unknown. The present study reports the NMR solution structures of two disulfide bond conformers of the long disintegrin bitistatin from the African puff adder Bitis arietans. The findings provide insight into how a structural domain of the extracellular region of an ADAM molecule, recruited into and selectively expressed in the snake venom gland proteome as a PIII metalloprotease in the Jurassic, has subsequently been tranformed into a family of integrin receptor antagonists. © 2014 FEBS.

  14. Structural investigation of a new antimicrobial thiazolidine compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cozar, I. B.; Pîrnău, A. [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath Street, RO-400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Vedeanu, N.; Nastasă, C. [Iuliu Hatieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, RO-400023 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-13

    Thiazoles and their derivatives have attracted the interest over the last decades because of their varied biological activities: antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal, inflammation or in the treatment of allergies. A new synthesized compound 3-[2-(4-Methyl-2-phenyl-thiazol-5-yl)-2-oxo-ethyl]-thazolidine-2,4-dione was investigated by FT-IR, FT-Raman, {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopies and also by DFT calculations at B3LYP/6-31G(d) level of theory. The very good correlation found between the experimental and theoretical data shows that the optimized molecular structure is very close to reality. Also the NMR spectra show a monomeric behaviour of this compound in solutions.

  15. Selective and extensive 13C labeling of a membrane protein for solid-state NMR investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, M.; Jakes, K.

    1999-01-01

    The selective and extensive 13C labeling of mostly hydrophobic amino acid residues in a 25 kDa membrane protein, the colicin Ia channel domain, is reported. The novel 13C labeling approach takes advantage of the amino acid biosynthetic pathways in bacteria and suppresses the synthesis of the amino acid products of the citric acid cycle. The selectivity and extensiveness of labeling significantly simplify the solid-state NMR spectra, reduce line broadening, and should permit the simultaneous measurement of multiple structural constraints. We show the assignment of most 13C resonances to specific amino acid types based on the characteristic chemical shifts, the 13C labeling pattern, and the amino acid composition of the protein. The assignment is partly confirmed by a 2D homonuclear double-quantum-filter experiment under magic-angle spinning. The high sensitivity and spectral resolution attained with this 13C-labeling protocol, which is termed TEASE for ten-amino acid selective and extensive labeling, are demonstrated

  16. Solid-state 27Al and 29Si NMR investigations on Si-substituted hydrogarnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivas Mercury, J.M.; Pena, P.; Aza, A.H. de; Turrillas, X.; Sobrados, I.; Sanz, J.

    2007-01-01

    Partially deuterated Ca 3 Al 2 (SiO 4 ) 3-x (OH) 4x hydrates prepared by a reaction in the presence of D 2 O of synthetic tricalcium aluminate with different amounts of amorphous silica were characterized by 29 Si and 27 Al magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The 29 Si NMR spectroscopy was used for quantifying the non-reacted silica and the resulting hydrated products. The incorporation of Si into Ca 3 Al 2 (SiO 4 ) 3-x (OH) 4x was followed by 27 Al NMR spectroscopy: Si:OH ratios were determined quantitatively from octahedral Al signals ascribed to Al(OH) 6 and Al(OSi)(OH) 5 environments. The NMR data obtained were consistent with the concentrations of the Al and Si species deduced from transmission electron microscopy energy-dispersive spectrometry and Rietveld analysis of both X-ray and neutron diffraction data

  17. NMR of proteins (4Fe-4S): structural properties and intramolecular electron transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, J.G.

    1996-01-01

    NMR started to be applied to Fe-S proteins in the seventies. Its use has recently been enlarged as the problems arising from the paramagnetic polymetallic clusters ware overcome. Applications to [4Fe-4S] are presented herein. The information derived thereof deepens the understanding of the redox properties of these proteins which play a central role in the metabolism of bacterial cells. The secondary structure elements and the overall folding of Chromatium vinosum ferredoxin (Cv Fd) in solution have been established by NMR. The unique features of this sequence have been shown to fold as an α helix at the C-terminus and as a loop between two cysteines ligand of one cluster: these two parts localize in close proximity from one another. The interaction between nuclear and electronic spins is a source of additional structural information for (4Fe-AS] proteins. The conformation of the cysteine-ligands, as revealed by the Fe-(S γ -C β -H β )Cys dihedral angles, is related to the chemical shifts of the signals associated with the protons of these residues. The longitudinal relaxation times of the protons depend on their distance to the cluster. A quantitative relationship has been established and used to show that the solution structure of the high-potential ferredoxin from Cv differs significantly from the crystal structure around Phe-48. Both parameters (chemical shifts and longitudinal relaxation times) give also insight into the electronic and magnetic properties of the [4Fe-4S] clusters. The rate of intramolecular electron transfer between the two [4FE-4S] clusters of ferredoxins has been measured by NMR. It is far slower in the case of Cv Fd than for shorter ferredoxins. The difference may be associated with changes in the magnetic and/or electronic properties of one cluster. The strong paramagnetism of the [4Fe-4S] clusters, which originally limited the applicability of NMR to proteins containing these cofactors, has been proven instrumental in affording new

  18. NMR solution structure of the mitochondrial F1beta presequence from Nicotiana plumbaginifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moberg, Per; Nilsson, Stefan; Ståhl, Annelie; Eriksson, Anna-Carin; Glaser, Elzbieta; Mäler, Lena

    2004-03-05

    We have isolated, characterized and determined the three-dimensional NMR solution structure of the presequence of ATPsynthase F1beta subunit from Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. A general method for purification of presequences is presented. The method is based on overexpression of a mutant precursor containing a methionine residue introduced at the processing site, followed by CNBr-cleavage and purification of the presequence on a cation-exchange column. The F1beta presequence, 53 amino acid residues long, retained its native properties as evidenced by inhibition of in vitro mitochondrial import and processing at micromolar concentrations. CD spectroscopy revealed that the F1beta presequence formed an alpha-helical structure in membrane mimetic environments such as SDS and DPC micelles (approximately 50% alpha-helix), and in acidic phospholipid bicelles (approximately 60% alpha-helix). The NMR solution structure of the F1beta presequence in SDS micelles was determined on the basis of 518 distance and 21 torsion angle constraints. The structure was found to contain two helices, an N-terminal amphipathic alpha-helix (residues 4-15) and a C-terminal alpha-helix (residues 43-53), separated by a largely unstructured 27 residue long internal domain. The N-terminal amphipathic alpha-helix forms the putative Tom20 receptor binding site, whereas the C-terminal alpha-helix is located upstream of the mitochondrial processing peptidase cleavage site.

  19. Structure-activity relations of 2-(methylthio)benzimidazole by FTIR, FT-Raman, NMR, DFT and conceptual DFT methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V; Raj, Arushma; Ravindran, P; Mohan, S

    2014-01-24

    The vibrational fundamental modes of 2-(methylthio)benzimidazole (2MTBI) have been analysed by combining FTIR, FT-Raman and quantum chemical calculations. The structural parameters of the compound are determined from the optimised geometry by B3LYP with 6-31G(∗∗), 6-311++G(∗∗) and cc-pVTZ basis sets and giving energies, harmonic vibrational frequencies, depolarisation ratios, IR intensities and Raman activities. (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra have been analysed and (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts are calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The structure-activity relationship of the compound is also investigated by conceptual DFT methods. The chemical reactivity and site selectivity of the molecule has been determined with the help of global and local reactivity descriptors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Application of Solid-State NMR to Reveal Structural Differences in Cefazolin Sodium Pentahydrate from Different Manufacturing Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ye; Wang, Wei D.; Zou, Wen-Bo; Qian, Jian-Qin; Hu, Chang-Qin

    2018-04-01

    The solid form of an active pharmaceutical ingredient is important when developing a new chemical entity. A solid understanding of the crystal structure and morphology that affect the mechanical and physical characteristics of pharmaceutical powders determines the manufacturing process. Solid-state NMR, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy were combined with theoretical calculation to investigate different crystal packings of α-cefazolin sodium from three different vendors and conformational polymorphism was identified to exist in the α-cefazolin sodium. Marginal differences observed among CEZ-Na pentahydrate 1, 2, and 3 were speculated as the proportion of conformation 2. Understanding the differences in the polymorphic structure of α-cefazolin sodium may help with making modifications to incorporate new knowledge with a product’s development.

  1. Photochemical Degradation of the Anticancer Drug Bortezomib by V-UV/UV (185/254 nm) Investigated by (1)H NMR Fingerprinting: A Way to Follow Aromaticity Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martignac, Marion; Balayssac, Stéphane; Gilard, Véronique; Benoit-Marquié, Florence

    2015-06-18

    We have investigated the removal of bortezomib, an anticancer drug prescribed in multiple myeloma, using the photochemical advanced oxidation process of V-UV/UV (185/254 nm). We used two complementary analytical techniques to follow the removal rate of bortezomib. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a nonselective method requiring no prior knowledge of the structures of the byproducts and permits us to provide a spectral signature (fingerprinting approach). This untargeted method provides clues to the molecular structure changes and information on the degradation of the parent drug during the irradiation process. This holistic NMR approach could provide information for monitoring aromaticity evolution. We use liquid chromatography, coupled with high-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-MS), to correlate results obtained by (1)H NMR and for accurate identification of the byproducts, in order to understand the mechanistic degradation pathways of bortezomib. The results show that primary byproducts come from photoassisted deboronation of bortezomib at 254 nm. A secondary byproduct of pyrazinecarboxamide was also identified. We obtained a reliable correlation between these two analytical techniques.

  2. Deuteron-NMR investigation on the dynamics of supercooled, confined water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sattig, Matthias; Vogel, Michael [TU Darmstadt, Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The dynamical behaviour of water in the regime of the supercooled liquid is a topic of large interest. In particular, the existence of a fragile-to-strong transition (FST) at T=225K related to the transition between two distinct phases of liquid water is controversially discussed. Due to crystallization the temperature range proposed for the FST is hardly accessible in bulk water. Therefore, we confine heavy water to narrow pores in the mesoporous silicate MCM-41. This suppresses the freezing of a substantial fraction of water, enabling direct investigation of the interesting temperatures. Deuteron-NMR methods are utilised to determine the rotational correlation times τ of water on time scales from ns up to s. The spin-lattice-relaxation time T{sub 1} exhibits a typical minimum at about T = 230 K. Above this minimum the correlation times follow a Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann law. Below the minimum, two relaxation processes could be observed. The low-temperature processes show a different temperature dependence, where the curves τ(T) of all processes intersect at about T = 230 K. A comparison with literature data from neutron scattering and dielectric spectroscopy gives rise to the idea that the observed crossover is due to this intersection of processes rather than to a FST. To test this idea studies on water confined to MCM-41 with different pore sizes and fillings are in progress.

  3. Synthesis of Radiation Curable Palm Oil-Based Epoxy Acrylate: NMR and FTIR Spectroscopic Investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Ashraf M; Ahmad, Mansor Bin; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa; Dahlan, Khairul Zaman Hj Mohd; Tajau, Rida; Mahmood, Mohd Hilmi; Yunus, Wan Md Zin Wan

    2015-08-04

    Over the past few decades, there has been an increasing demand for bio-based polymers and resins in industrial applications, due to their potential lower cost and environmental impact compared with petroleum-based counterparts. The present research concerns the synthesis of epoxidized palm oil acrylate (EPOLA) from an epoxidized palm oil product (EPOP) as environmentally friendly material. EPOP was acrylated by acrylic acid via a ring opening reaction. The kinetics of the acrylation reaction were monitored throughout the reaction course and the acid value of the reaction mixture reached 10 mg KOH/g after 16 h, indicating the consumption of the acrylic acid. The obtained epoxy acrylate was investigated intensively by means of FTIR and NMR spectroscopy, and the results revealed that the ring opening reaction was completed successfully with an acrylation yield about 82%. The UV free radical polymerization of EPOLA was carried out using two types of photoinitiators. The radiation curing behavior was determined by following the conversion of the acrylate groups. The cross-linking density and the hardness of the cured EPOLA films were measured to evaluate the effect of the photoinitiator on the solid film characteristics, besides, the thermal and mechanical properties were also evaluated.

  4. Plaster mortars with polymer fibers and additives investigated by 1H NMR relaxometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustea, Andrei; Manea, Daniela L.; Jumate, Elena; Orbán, Yvette A.; Fechete, Radu

    2017-12-01

    Plaster mortars with polypropylene (pp) fibers and/or additives were investigated by 1H NMR relaxometry. Two recipes are proposed and are based on a commercially available mortar or are self-prepared and have different content of polypropylene fibers, which play the role of reinforcement agent, and/or Sika additive which is a waterproofing agent. The distributions of transverse relaxation times, T2 were obtained at 1, 3, 7 and 28 days after preparation. For the majority of T2-distributions four peaks are observed and, are associated with the hydration water (to the mineralogical components) and water in small, medium and large pores. The evolution in time, from 1 to 28 days, of the T2-distributions indicates the effects of pp fibers and Sika additive in the formation of pore microstructure. The degree of homogeneity of prepared receipts was evaluated from the relative peak-width and compared with mechanical measurements. Finally, we shown that the inverse of the transverse relaxation time values, T2-1, characteristic to the hydration water depends linearly on the resistance at compression measured for the 1÷28 days period, proving the important role of hydrations to the mechanical properties of the final product.

  5. NMR Studies of the Structure and Function of the HIV-1 5′-Leader

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah C. Keane

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The 5′-leader of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 genome plays several critical roles during viral replication, including differentially establishing mRNA versus genomic RNA (gRNA fates. As observed for proteins, the function of the RNA is tightly regulated by its structure, and a common paradigm has been that genome function is temporally modulated by structural changes in the 5′-leader. Over the past 30 years, combinations of nucleotide reactivity mapping experiments with biochemistry, mutagenesis, and phylogenetic studies have provided clues regarding the secondary structures of stretches of residues within the leader that adopt functionally discrete domains. More recently, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy approaches have been developed that enable direct detection of intra- and inter-molecular interactions within the intact leader, providing detailed insights into the structural determinants and mechanisms that regulate HIV-1 genome packaging and function.

  6. Tannin structural elucidation and quantitative ³¹P NMR analysis. 1. Model compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melone, Federica; Saladino, Raffaele; Lange, Heiko; Crestini, Claudia

    2013-10-02

    Tannins and flavonoids are secondary metabolites of plants that display a wide array of biological activities. This peculiarity is related to the inhibition of extracellular enzymes that occurs through the complexation of peptides by tannins. Not only the nature of these interactions, but more fundamentally also the structure of these heterogeneous polyphenolic molecules are not completely clear. This first paper describes the development of a new analytical method for the structural characterization of tannins on the basis of tannin model compounds employing an in situ labeling of all labile H groups (aliphatic OH, phenolic OH, and carboxylic acids) with a phosphorus reagent. The ³¹P NMR analysis of ³¹P-labeled samples allowed the unprecedented quantitative and qualitative structural characterization of hydrolyzable tannins, proanthocyanidins, and catechin tannin model compounds, forming the foundations for the quantitative structural elucidation of a variety of actual tannin samples described in part 2 of this series.

  7. Tannin structural elucidation and quantitative ³¹P NMR analysis. 2. Hydrolyzable tannins and proanthocyanidins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melone, Federica; Saladino, Raffaele; Lange, Heiko; Crestini, Claudia

    2013-10-02

    An unprecedented analytical method that allows simultaneous structural and quantitative characterization of all functional groups present in tannins is reported. In situ labeling of all labile H groups (aliphatic and phenolic hydroxyls and carboxylic acids) with a phosphorus-containing reagent (Cl-TMDP) followed by quantitative ³¹P NMR acquisition constitutes a novel fast and reliable analytical tool for the analysis of tannins and proanthocyanidins with significant implications for the fields of food and feed analyses, tannery, and the development of natural polyphenolics containing products.

  8. Probing zeolite internal structures using very low temperature 129Xe NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labouriau, A.; Crawford, S.N.; Earl, W.L.; Pietrass, T.; Weber, W.A.; Panjabi, G.; Gates, B.C.

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, probing pore structure with 129 Xe NMR has received a bad reputation. This is due to the fact that the method is more complex than was originally suggested so the data is somewhat difficult to interpret. The authors find that the use of a wide temperature range (40--350 K) allows them to interpret 129 Xe chemical shifts in terms of van der Waals attraction between the xenon atom and oxygen in zeolite walls. Using rather simple models from the literature, they can extract useful pore size information as well as the van der Waals potential energy

  9. Xenon-129 NMR study of the microporous structure of clays and pillared clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsiao, C.; Carrado, K.A.

    1990-01-01

    129 Xe NMR studies have been carried out using xenon gas adsorbed in clays and pillared clays. Data from the measurements provide information on the pore structure of clays before and after pillaring. The results indicate that the effective pore diameter of montmorillonite increases, for example, from 5.4 Angstrom to 8.0 Angstrom after pillaring cheto-montmorillonite with aluminum polyoxohydroxy Keggin cations. The data are consistent with X-ray powder diffraction results, which show a corresponding increase in the interlamellar gallery height from 5.6 Angstrom to 8.4 Angstrom

  10. The contribution of solid-state NMR spectroscopy to understanding biomineralization: Atomic and molecular structure of bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duer, Melinda J.

    2015-04-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy has had a major impact on our understanding of the structure of mineralized tissues, in particular bone. Bone exemplifies the organic-inorganic composite structure inherent in mineralized tissues. The organic component of the extracellular matrix in bone is primarily composed of ordered fibrils of collagen triple-helical molecules, in which the inorganic component, calcium phosphate particles, composed of stacks of mineral platelets, are arranged around the fibrils. This perspective argues that key factors in our current structural model of bone mineral have come about through NMR spectroscopy and have yielded the primary information on how the mineral particles interface and bind with the underlying organic matrix. The structure of collagen within the organic matrix of bone or any other structural tissue has yet to be determined, but here too, this perspective shows there has been real progress made through application of solid-state NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with other techniques. In particular, NMR spectroscopy has highlighted the fact that even within these structural proteins, there is considerable dynamics, which suggests that one should be cautious when using inherently static structural models, such as those arising from X-ray diffraction analyses, to gain insight into molecular roles. It is clear that the NMR approach is still in its infancy in this area, and that we can expect many more developments in the future, particularly in understanding the molecular mechanisms of bone diseases and ageing.

  11. Sensitivity of ab Initio vs Empirical Methods in Computing Structural Effects on NMR Chemical Shifts for the Example of Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumowski, Chris Vanessa; Hanni, Matti; Schweizer, Sabine; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2014-01-14

    The structural sensitivity of NMR chemical shifts as computed by quantum chemical methods is compared to a variety of empirical approaches for the example of a prototypical peptide, the 38-residue kaliotoxin KTX comprising 573 atoms. Despite the simplicity of empirical chemical shift prediction programs, the agreement with experimental results is rather good, underlining their usefulness. However, we show in our present work that they are highly insensitive to structural changes, which renders their use for validating predicted structures questionable. In contrast, quantum chemical methods show the expected high sensitivity to structural and electronic changes. This appears to be independent of the quantum chemical approach or the inclusion of solvent effects. For the latter, explicit solvent simulations with increasing number of snapshots were performed for two conformers of an eight amino acid sequence. In conclusion, the empirical approaches neither provide the expected magnitude nor the patterns of NMR chemical shifts determined by the clearly more costly ab initio methods upon structural changes. This restricts the use of empirical prediction programs in studies where peptide and protein structures are utilized for the NMR chemical shift evaluation such as in NMR refinement processes, structural model verifications, or calculations of NMR nuclear spin relaxation rates.

  12. Backbone structure of Yersinia pestis Ail determined in micelles by NMR-restrained simulated annealing with implicit membrane solvation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marassi, Francesca M.; Ding, Yi; Schwieters, Charles D.; Tian, Ye; Yao, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The outer membrane protein Ail (attachment invasion locus) is a virulence factor of Yersinia pestis that mediates cell invasion, cell attachment and complement resistance. Here we describe its three-dimensional backbone structure determined in decyl-phosphocholine (DePC) micelles by NMR spectroscopy. The NMR structure was calculated using the membrane function of the implicit solvation potential, eefxPot, which we have developed to facilitate NMR structure calculations in a physically realistic environment. We show that the eefxPot force field guides the protein towards its native fold. The resulting structures provide information about the membrane-embedded global position of Ail, and have higher accuracy, higher precision and improved conformational properties, compared to the structures calculated with the standard repulsive potential

  13. Visualizing the principal component of 1H,15N-HSQC NMR spectral changes that reflect protein structural or functional properties: application to troponin C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, Ian M.; Boyko, Robert F.; Sykes, Brian D.

    2011-01-01

    Laboratories often repeatedly determine the structure of a given protein under a variety of conditions, mutations, modifications, or in a number of states. This approach can be cumbersome and tedious. Given then a database of structures, identifiers, and corresponding 1 H, 15 N-HSQC NMR spectra for homologous proteins, we investigated whether structural information could be ascertained for a new homolog solely from its 1 H, 15 N-HSQC NMR spectrum. We addressed this question with two different approaches. First, we used a semi-automated approach with the program, ORBplus. ORBplus looks for patterns in the chemical shifts and correlates these commonalities to the explicit property of interest. ORBplus ranks resonances based on consistency of the magnitude and direction of the chemical shifts within the database, and the chemical shift correlation of the unknown protein with the database. ORBplus visualizes the results by a histogram and a vector diagram, and provides residue specific predictions on structural similarities with the database. The second method we used was partial least squares (PLS), which is a multivariate statistical technique used to correlate response and predictor variables. We investigated the ability of these methods to predict the tertiary structure of the contractile regulatory protein troponin C. Troponin C undergoes a closed-to-open conformational change, which is coupled to its function in muscle. We found that both ORBplus and PLS were able to identify patterns in the 1 H, 15 N-HSQC NMR data from different states of troponin C that correlated to its conformation.

  14. IRMA iterative relaxation matrix approach for NMR structure determination application to DNA fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koning, M.M.G.

    1990-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the structure determination of DNA molecules in solution with the use of NMR. For this purpose a new relaxation matrix approach is introduced. The emphasis is on the interpretation of nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) in terms of proton-proton distances and related three dimensional structures. The DNA molecules studied are obligonucleotides, unmodifief as well as modified molecules bu UV radiation. From comparison with unmodified molecules it turned out that UV irradiation scarcely influences the helical structure of the DNA string. At one place of the string a nucleotide is rotated towards the high-ANTI conformation which results in a slight unwinding of the DNA string but sufficient for blocking of the normal reading of genetic information. (H.W.). 456 refs.; 50 figs.; 30 tabs

  15. Isotope-edited proton NMR study on the structure of a pepsin/inhibitor complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fesik, S.W.; Luly, J.R.; Erickson, J.W.; Abad-Zapatero, C.

    1988-01-01

    A general approach is illustrated for providing detailed structural information on large enzyme/inhibitor complexes using NMR spectroscopy. The method involves the use of isotopically labeled ligands to simplify two-dimensional NOE spectra of large molecular complexes by isotope-editing techniques. With this approach, the backbone and side-chain conformations (at the P 2 and P 3 sites) of a tightly bound inhibitor of porcine pepsin have bene determined. In addition, structural information on the active site of pepsin has been obtained. Due to the sequence homology between porcine pepsin and human renin, this structural information may prove useful for modeling renin/inhibitor complexes with the ultimate goal of designing more effective renin inhibitors. Moreover, this general approach can be applied to study other biological systems of interest such as other enzyme/inhibitor complexes, ligands bound to soluble receptors, and enzyme/substrate interactions

  16. Solution NMR structure and functional analysis of the integral membrane protein YgaP from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichmann, Cédric; Tzitzilonis, Christos; Bordignon, Enrica; Maslennikov, Innokentiy; Choe, Senyon; Riek, Roland

    2014-08-22

    The solution NMR structure of the α-helical integral membrane protein YgaP from Escherichia coli in mixed 1,2-diheptanoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphocholine/1-myristoyl-2-hydroxy-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'-rac-glycerol) micelles is presented. In these micelles, YgaP forms a homodimer with the two transmembrane helices being the dimer interface, whereas the N-terminal cytoplasmic domain includes a rhodanese-fold in accordance to its sequence homology to the rhodanese family of sulfurtransferases. The enzymatic sulfur transfer activity of full-length YgaP as well as of the N-terminal rhodanese domain only was investigated performing a series of titrations with sodium thiosulfate and potassium cyanide monitored by NMR and EPR. The data indicate the thiosulfate concentration-dependent addition of several sulfur atoms to the catalytic Cys-63, which process can be reversed by the addition of potassium cyanide. The catalytic reaction induces thereby conformational changes within the rhodanese domain, as well as on the transmembrane α-helices of YgaP. These results provide insights into a potential mechanism of YgaP during the catalytic thiosulfate activity in vivo. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Synthesis, characterization, and solid-state NMR investigation of organically modified bentonites and their composites with LDPE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsacchi, Silvia; Sudhakaran, Umayal; Geppi, Marco; Ricci, Lucia; Liuzzo, Vincenzo; Ruggeri, Giacomo

    2013-07-23

    Polymer/clay nanocomposites show remarkably improved properties (mechanical properties, as well as decreased gas permeability and flammability, etc.) with respect to their microscale counterparts and pristine polymers. Due to the substantially apolar character of most of the organic polymers, natural occurring hydrophilic clays are modified into organophilic clays with consequent increase of the polymer/clay compatibility. Different strategies have been developed for the preparation of nanocomposites with improved properties, especially aimed at achieving the best dispersion of clay platelets in the polymer matrix. In this paper we present the preparation and characterization of polymer/clay nanocomposites composed of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) and natural clay, montmorillonite-containing bentonite. Two different forms of the clay have been considered: the first, a commercial organophilic bentonite (Nanofil 15), obtained by exchanging the natural cations with dimethyldioctadecylammonium (2C18) cations, and the second, obtained by performing a grafting reaction of an alkoxysilane containing a polymerizable group, 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate (TSPM), onto Nanofil 15. Both the clays and LDPE/clay nanocomposites were characterized by thermal, FT-IR, and X-ray diffraction techniques. The samples were also investigated by means of (29)Si, (13)C, and (1)H solid-state NMR, obtaining information on the structural properties of the modified clays. Moreover, by exploiting the effect of bentonite paramagnetic (Fe(3+)) ions on proton spin-lattice relaxation times (T1's), useful information about the extent of the polymer-clay dispersion and their interfacial interactions could be obtained.

  18. FTIR, FT-Raman, FT-NMR, UV-visible and quantum chemical investigations of 2-amino-4-methylbenzothiazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V; Sakiladevi, S; Rani, T; Mythili, C V; Mohan, S

    2012-03-01

    The FT-IR (4000-400 cm(-1)) and FT-Raman (4000-100 cm(-1)) spectral measurements and complete assignments of the observed spectra of 2-amino-4-methylbenzothiazole (2A4MBT) have been proposed. Ab initio and DFT calculations have been performed and the structural parameters of the compound were determined from the optimised geometry with 6-31G(d,p), 6-311++G(d,p) and cc-pVDZ basis sets and giving energies, harmonic vibrational frequencies, depolarisation ratios, IR intensities and Raman activities. (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra were recorded and (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. UV-visible spectrum of the compound was also recorded and the electronic properties, such as HOMO, LUMO and band gap energies were measured by time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) approach. The geometric parameters, energies, harmonic vibrational frequencies, IR intensities, Raman activities chemical shifts and absorption wavelengths were compared with the available experimental data of the molecule. The influences of methyl and amino groups on the skeletal modes and on the proton chemical shifts have been investigated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. NMR study on the network structure of a mixed gel of kappa and iota carrageenans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bingjie; Du, Lei; Matsukawa, Shingo

    2016-10-05

    The temperature dependencies of the (1)H T2 and diffusion coefficient (D) of a mixed solution of kappa-carrageenan and iota-carrageenan were measured by NMR. Rheological and NMR measurements suggested an exponential formation of rigid aggregates of kappa-carrageenan and a gradual formation of fine aggregates of iota-carrageenan during two step increases of G'. The results also suggested that longer carrageenan chains are preferentially involved in aggregation, thus resulting in a decrease in the average Mw of solute carrageenans. The results of diffusion measurements for poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) suggested that kappa-carrageenan formed thick aggregates that decreased hindrance to PEO diffusion by decreasing the solute kappa-carrageenan concentration in the voids of the aggregated chains, and that iota-carrageenan formed fine aggregates that decreased the solute iota-carrageenan concentration less. DPEO in a mixed solution of kappa-carrageenan and iota-carrageenan suggested two possibilities for the microscopic network structure: an interpenetrating network structure, or micro-phase separation. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. NMR structure of the N-terminal domain of the replication initiator protein DnaA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wemmer, David E.; Lowery, Thomas J.; Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Chandonia, John-Marc; Kim, Rosalind; Yokota, Hisao; Wemmer, David E.

    2007-08-07

    DnaA is an essential component in the initiation of bacterial chromosomal replication. DnaA binds to a series of 9 base pair repeats leading to oligomerization, recruitment of the DnaBC helicase, and the assembly of the replication fork machinery. The structure of the N-terminal domain (residues 1-100) of DnaA from Mycoplasma genitalium was determined by NMR spectroscopy. The backbone r.m.s.d. for the first 86 residues was 0.6 +/- 0.2 Angstrom based on 742 NOE, 50 hydrogen bond, 46 backbone angle, and 88 residual dipolar coupling restraints. Ultracentrifugation studies revealed that the domain is monomeric in solution. Features on the protein surface include a hydrophobic cleft flanked by several negative residues on one side, and positive residues on the other. A negatively charged ridge is present on the opposite face of the protein. These surfaces may be important sites of interaction with other proteins involved in the replication process. Together, the structure and NMR assignments should facilitate the design of new experiments to probe the protein-protein interactions essential for the initiation of DNA replication.

  1. The AUDANA algorithm for automated protein 3D structure determination from NMR NOE data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Woonghee; Petit, Chad M.; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Stark, Jaime L.; Markley, John L.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce AUDANA (Automated Database-Assisted NOE Assignment), an algorithm for determining three-dimensional structures of proteins from NMR data that automates the assignment of 3D-NOE spectra, generates distance constraints, and conducts iterative high temperature molecular dynamics and simulated annealing. The protein sequence, chemical shift assignments, and NOE spectra are the only required inputs. Distance constraints generated automatically from ambiguously assigned NOE peaks are validated during the structure calculation against information from an enlarged version of the freely available PACSY database that incorporates information on protein structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). This approach yields robust sets of distance constraints and 3D structures. We evaluated the performance of AUDANA with input data for 14 proteins ranging in size from 6 to 25 kDa that had 27–98 % sequence identity to proteins in the database. In all cases, the automatically calculated 3D structures passed stringent validation tests. Structures were determined with and without database support. In 9/14 cases, database support improved the agreement with manually determined structures in the PDB and in 11/14 cases, database support lowered the r.m.s.d. of the family of 20 structural models.

  2. The AUDANA algorithm for automated protein 3D structure determination from NMR NOE data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Woonghee, E-mail: whlee@nmrfam.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison and Biochemistry Department (United States); Petit, Chad M. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics (United States); Cornilescu, Gabriel; Stark, Jaime L.; Markley, John L., E-mail: markley@nmrfam.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison and Biochemistry Department (United States)

    2016-06-15

    We introduce AUDANA (Automated Database-Assisted NOE Assignment), an algorithm for determining three-dimensional structures of proteins from NMR data that automates the assignment of 3D-NOE spectra, generates distance constraints, and conducts iterative high temperature molecular dynamics and simulated annealing. The protein sequence, chemical shift assignments, and NOE spectra are the only required inputs. Distance constraints generated automatically from ambiguously assigned NOE peaks are validated during the structure calculation against information from an enlarged version of the freely available PACSY database that incorporates information on protein structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). This approach yields robust sets of distance constraints and 3D structures. We evaluated the performance of AUDANA with input data for 14 proteins ranging in size from 6 to 25 kDa that had 27–98 % sequence identity to proteins in the database. In all cases, the automatically calculated 3D structures passed stringent validation tests. Structures were determined with and without database support. In 9/14 cases, database support improved the agreement with manually determined structures in the PDB and in 11/14 cases, database support lowered the r.m.s.d. of the family of 20 structural models.

  3. 139La and 63Cu NMR investigation of charge order in La2CuO4 +y (Tc=42 K)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, T.; Lee, Y. S.

    2018-03-01

    We report 139La and 63Cu NMR investigation of the successive charge order, spin order, and superconducting transitions in superoxygenated La2CuO4 +y single crystal with stage-4 excess oxygen order at Tstage≃290 K. We show that the stage-4 order induces tilting of CuO6 octahedra below Tstage, which in turn causes 139La NMR line broadening. The structural distortion continues to develop far below Tstage, and completes at Tcharge≃60 K, where charge order sets in. This sequence is reminiscent of the the charge-order transition in Nd codoped La1.88Sr0.12CuO4 that sets in once the low-temperature tetragonal phase is established. We also show that the paramagnetic 63Cu NMR signals are progressively wiped out below Tcharge due to enhanced low-frequency spin fluctuations in charge-ordered domains, but the residual 63Cu NMR signals continue to exhibit the characteristics expected for optimally doped superconducting CuO2 planes. This indicates that charge order in La2CuO4 +y does not take place uniformly in space. In addition, unlike the typical second-order magnetic phase transitions, low-frequency Cu spin fluctuations as probed by 139La nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate do not exhibit critical divergence at Tspin(≃Tc ) =42 K. These findings, including the spatially inhomogeneous nature of the charge-ordered state, are qualitatively similar to the case of La1.885Sr0.115CuO4 [Imai et al., Phys. Rev. B 96, 224508 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevB.96.224508 and Arsenault et al., Phys. Rev. B 97, 064511 (2018), 10.1103/PhysRevB.97.064511], but both charge and spin order take place more sharply in the present case.

  4. Influence of water on stability of geopolymers investigated by NMR solid state spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kobera, Libor; Brus, Jiří; Urbanová, Martina; Slavík, R.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 33, - (2008), s. 86 ISSN 1896-2203. [Mid-European Clay Conference MECC 08 /4./. 22.09.2008-27.09.2008, Zakopane] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400500602 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : stability * NMR * solid state spectroscopy * geopolymer Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  5. Role of hydration in the phase transition of polypeptides investigated by NMR and Raman spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dybal, Jiří; Schmidt, Pavel; Kříž, Jaroslav; Kurková, Dana; Rodriguez-Cabello, J. C.; Alonso, M.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 205, - (2004), s. 143-150 ISSN 1022-1360 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4050208 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : NMR * quantum chemistry * Raman spectroscopy Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.691, year: 2004

  6. Solid state NMR investigations and MD simulations of triblock copolymers in lipid bilayers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Baerenwald, R.; Ferreira, T. M.; Ollila, Samuli; Saalwaechter, K.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 46, Suppl 1 (2017), S117 ISSN 0175-7571. [IUPAB congress /19./ and EBSA congress /11./. 16.07.2017-20.07.2017, Edinburgh] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : solid state NMR * molecular dynamic simulations Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  7. Structural elucidation of the Brucella melitensis M antigen by high-resolution NMR at 500 MHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bundle, D.R.; Cherwonogrodzky, J.W.; Perry, M.B.

    1987-01-01

    The Brucella M antigen from the species type strain Brucella melitensis 16M has been identified as a component of the cell wall lipopolysaccharide (LPS). O polysaccharide liberated from this LPS by mild acid hydrolysis exhibited M activity in serological tests and was shown to be a homopolymer of 4-formamido-4,6-dideoxy-α-D-mannopyranosyl residues arranged in an oligosaccharide repeating unit as judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the native lipopolysaccharide. Structural analysis of the O polysaccharide by NMR methods was difficult due to apparent microheterogeneity of the repeating unit, which was in fact caused by the presence of rotational isomers of the N-formyl moiety. This problem was resolved by chemical modification of the polysaccharide to its amino and N-acetyl derivatives, the 500-MHz 1 H and 125-MHz 13 C NMR spectra of which could be analyzed in terms of a unique structure through application of pH-dependent β-shifts and two-dimensional techniques that included COSY, relayed COSY, and NOESY experiments together with heteronuclear C/H shift correlation spectroscopy. On the basis of these experiments and supported by methylation and periodate oxidation data, the structure of the M polysaccharide was determined as a linear polymer of unbranched pentasaccharide repeating units consisting of four 1,2-linked and one 1,3-lined 4,6-dideoxy-4-formamido-α-D-mannopyranosyl residues. The marked structural similarity of the M antigen and the A antigen, which is known to be a 1,2-linked homopolysaccharide of 4,6-dideoxy-4-formamido-α-D-mannopyranosyl units, accounts for cross-serological reactions of the two and the long-standing confusion surrounding the nature of their antigenic determinants

  8. Novel sst2-selective somatostatin agonists. Three-dimensional consensus structure by NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Christy Rani R.; Erchegyi, Judit; Koerber, Steven C.; Reubi, Jean Claude; Rivier, Jean; Riek, Roland

    2008-01-01

    The three-dimensional NMR structures of six octapeptide agonist analogues of somatostatin (SRIF) in the free form are described. These analogues, with the basic sequence H-DPhe/Phe2-c[Cys3-Xxx7-DTrp8-Lys9-Thr10-Cys14]-Thr-NH2 (the numbering refers to the position in native SRIF), with Xxx7 being Ala/Aph, exhibit potent and highly selective binding to human SRIF type 2 (sst2) receptors. The backbone of these sst2-selective analogues have the usual type-II’ β-turn reported in the literature for sst2/3/5-subtype-selective analogues. Correlating biological results and NMR studies led to the identification of the side chains of DPhe2, DTrp8 and Lys9 as the necessary components of the sst2 pharmacophore. This is the first study to show that the aromatic ring at position 7 (Phe7) is not critical for sst2 binding and that it plays an important role in sst3 and sst5 binding. This pharmacophore is therefore different from that proposed by others for sst2/3/5 analogues. PMID:16854054

  9. Assessment of the structure of pegylated-recombinant protein therapeutics by the NMR fingerprint assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Derek J; Aubin, Yves

    2017-05-10

    A number of recombinant protein therapeutic products, such as filgrastim (methionyl granulocyte colony stimulating factor [Met-GCSF] used to boost the immune system in chemotherapy treated cancer patients), and interferon alpha-2 (used for the treatment of various viral infections), have been chemically modified with the addition of a polyethylene glycol (PEG) chain. This modification prolongs residency of the drug in the body and reduces metabolic degradation, which allows less frequent administration of the products. Here we show how NMR spectroscopy methods can assess the higher order structure (HOS) of pegylated-filgrastim (Neulasta®), pegylated interferon-α2a (Pegasys®) pegylated interferon-α2b (PEG-Intron®) purchased from the marketplace. The addition of the PEG moiety effectively doubles the molecular weight of the three products. This presents a significant challenge for the application of NMR techniques. Nevertheless, the results showed that high-resolution spectra could be recorded for two of the three products. Comparison of the spectra of the pegylated protein and the non-pegylated protein shows that the chemical modification did not alter the HOS of these proteins. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Structure and dynamics of cationic membrane peptides and proteins: Insights from solid-state NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Mei; Su, Yongchao

    2011-01-01

    Many membrane peptides and protein domains contain functionally important cationic Arg and Lys residues, whose insertion into the hydrophobic interior of the lipid bilayer encounters significant energy barriers. To understand how these cationic molecules overcome the free energy barrier to insert into the lipid membrane, we have used solid-state NMR spectroscopy to determine the membrane-bound topology of these peptides. A versatile array of solid-state NMR experiments now readily yields the conformation, dynamics, orientation, depth of insertion, and site-specific protein–lipid interactions of these molecules. We summarize key findings of several Arg-rich membrane peptides, including β-sheet antimicrobial peptides, unstructured cell-penetrating peptides, and the voltage-sensing helix of voltage-gated potassium channels. Our results indicate the central role of guanidinium-phosphate and guanidinium-water interactions in dictating the structural topology of these cationic molecules in the lipid membrane, which in turn account for the mechanisms of this functionally diverse class of membrane peptides. PMID:21344534

  11. Recommendations for the presentation of NMR structures of proteins and nucleic acids - IUPAC-IUBMB-IUPAB Inter-Union Task Group on the Standardization of Data Bases of Protein and Nucleic Acid Structures Determined by NMR Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markley, John L.; Bax, Ad; Arata, Yoji; Hilbers, C. W.; Kaptein, Robert; Sykes, Brian D.; Wright, Peter E.; Wuethrich, Kurt

    1998-01-01

    The recommendations presented here are designed to support easier communication of NMR data and NMR structures of proteins and nucleic acids through unified nomenclature and reporting standards. Much of this document pertains to the reporting of data in journal articles; however, in the interest of the future development of structural biology, it is desirable that the bulk of the reported information be stored in computer-accessible form and be freely accessible to the scientific community in standardized formats for data exchange. These recommendations stem from an IUPAC-IUBMB-IUPAB inter-union venture with the direct involvement of ICSU and CODATA. The Task Group has reviewed previous formal recommendations and has extended them in the light of more recent developments in the field of biomolecular NMR spectroscopy. Drafts of the recommendations presented here have been examined critically by more than 50 specialists in the field and have gone through two rounds of extensive modification to incorporate suggestions and criticisms

  12. Compact NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bluemich, Bernhard; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Zia, Wasif [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Technische und Makromolekulare Chemie (ITMC)

    2014-06-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the most popular method for chemists to analyze molecular structures, while Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive diagnostic tool for medical doctors that provides high-contrast images of biological tissue. In both applications, the sample (or patient) is positioned inside a large, superconducting magnet to magnetize the atomic nuclei. Interrogating radio-frequency pulses result in frequency spectra that provide the chemist with molecular information, the medical doctor with anatomic images, and materials scientist with NMR relaxation parameters. Recent advances in magnet technology have led to a variety of small permanent magnets to allow compact and low-cost instruments. The goal of this book is to provide an introduction to the practical use of compact NMR at a level nearly as basic as the operation of a smart phone.

  13. Solid-state NMR of inorganic semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesinowski, James P

    2012-01-01

    Studies of inorganic semiconductors by solid-state NMR vary widely in terms of the nature of the samples investigated, the techniques employed to observe the NMR signal, and the types of information obtained. Compared with the NMR of diamagnetic non-semiconducting substances, important differences often result from the presence of electron or hole carriers that are the hallmark of semiconductors, and whose theoretical interpretation can be involved. This review aims to provide a broad perspective on the topic for the non-expert by providing: (1) a basic introduction to semiconductor physical concepts relevant to NMR, including common crystal structures and the various methods of making samples; (2) discussions of the NMR spin Hamiltonian, details of some of the NMR techniques and strategies used to make measurements and theoretically predict NMR parameters, and examples of how each of the terms in the Hamiltonian has provided useful information in bulk semiconductors; (3) a discussion of the additional considerations needed to interpret the NMR of nanoscale semiconductors, with selected examples. The area of semiconductor NMR is being revitalized by this interest in nanoscale semiconductors, the great improvements in NMR detection sensitivity and resolution that have occurred, and the current interest in optical pumping and spintronics-related studies. Promising directions for future research will be noted throughout.

  14. Structural diversity of solid dispersions of acetylsalicylic acid as seen by solid-state NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Policianova, Olivia; Brus, Jiri; Hruby, Martin; Urbanova, Martina; Zhigunov, Alexander; Kredatusova, Jana; Kobera, Libor

    2014-02-03

    Solid dispersions of active pharmaceutical ingredients are of increasing interest due to their versatile use. In the present study polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), poly[N-(2-hydroxypropyl)-metacrylamide] (pHPMA), poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline) (PEOx), and polyethylene glycol (PEG), each in three Mw, were used to demonstrate structural diversity of solid dispersions. Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) was used as a model drug. Four distinct types of the solid dispersions of ASA were created using a freeze-drying method: (i) crystalline solid dispersions containing nanocrystalline ASA in a crystalline PEG matrix; (ii) amorphous glass suspensions with large ASA crystallites embedded in amorphous pHPMA; (iii) solid solutions with molecularly dispersed ASA in rigid amorphous PVP; and (iv) nanoheterogeneous solid solutions/suspensions containing nanosized ASA clusters dispersed in a semiflexible matrix of PEOx. The obtained structural data confirmed that the type of solid dispersion can be primarily controlled by the chemical constitutions of the applied polymers, while the molecular weight of the polymers had no detectable impact. The molecular structure of the prepared dispersions was characterized using solid-state NMR, wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). By applying various (1)H-(13)C and (1)H-(1)H correlation experiments combined with T1((1)H) and T1ρ((1)H) relaxation data, the extent of the molecular mixing was determined over a wide range of distances, from intimate intermolecular contacts (0.1-0.5 nm) up to the phase-separated nanodomains reaching ca. 500 nm. Hydrogen-bond interactions between ASA and polymers were probed by the analysis of (13)C and (15)N CP/MAS NMR spectra combined with the measurements of (1)H-(15)N dipolar profiles. Overall potentialities and limitations of individual experimental techniques were thoroughly evaluated.

  15. Analysis of the structural quality of the CASD-NMR 2013 entries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragan, Timothy J.; Fogh, Rasmus H. [University of Leicester, Department of Biochemistry, School of Biological Sciences (United Kingdom); Tejero, Roberto [Universidad de Valencia, Departamento de Química Física (Spain); Vranken, Wim [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Structural Biology Brussels (Belgium); Montelione, Gaetano T. [Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, and Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium (United States); Rosato, Antonio [University of Florence, Magnetic Resonance Center, Department of Chemistry (Italy); Vuister, Geerten W., E-mail: gv29@le.ac.uk [University of Leicester, Department of Biochemistry, School of Biological Sciences (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    We performed a comprehensive structure validation of both automated and manually generated structures of the 10 targets of the CASD-NMR-2013 effort. We established that automated structure determination protocols are capable of reliably producing structures of comparable accuracy and quality to those generated by a skilled researcher, at least for small, single domain proteins such as the ten targets tested. The most robust results appear to be obtained when NOESY peak lists are used either as the primary input data or to augment chemical shift data without the need to manually filter such lists. A detailed analysis of the long-range NOE restraints generated by the different programs from the same data showed a surprisingly low degree of overlap. Additionally, we found that there was no significant correlation between the extent of the NOE restraint overlap and the accuracy of the structure. This result was surprising given the importance of NOE data in producing good quality structures. We suggest that this could be explained by the information redundancy present in NOEs between atoms contained within a fixed covalent network.

  16. Molecular dynamics re-refinement of two different small RNA loop structures using the original NMR data suggest a common structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriksen, Niel M.; Davis, Darrell R.; Cheatham, Thomas E. III

    2012-01-01

    Restrained molecular dynamics simulations are a robust, though perhaps underused, tool for the end-stage refinement of biomolecular structures. We demonstrate their utility—using modern simulation protocols, optimized force fields, and inclusion of explicit solvent and mobile counterions—by re-investigating the solution structures of two RNA hairpins that had previously been refined using conventional techniques. The structures, both domain 5 group II intron ribozymes from yeast ai5γ and Pylaiella littoralis, share a nearly identical primary sequence yet the published 3D structures appear quite different. Relatively long restrained MD simulations using the original NMR restraint data identified the presence of a small set of violated distance restraints in one structure and a possibly incorrect trapped bulge nucleotide conformation in the other structure. The removal of problematic distance restraints and the addition of a heating step yielded representative ensembles with very similar 3D structures and much lower pairwise RMSD values. Analysis of ion density during the restrained simulations helped to explain chemical shift perturbation data published previously. These results suggest that restrained MD simulations, with proper caution, can be used to “update” older structures or aid in the refinement of new structures that lack sufficient experimental data to produce a high quality result. Notable cautions include the need for sufficient sampling, awareness of potential force field bias (such as small angle deviations with the current AMBER force fields), and a proper balance between the various restraint weights.

  17. Molecular dynamics re-refinement of two different small RNA loop structures using the original NMR data suggest a common structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriksen, Niel M.; Davis, Darrell R.; Cheatham, Thomas E. III, E-mail: tec3@utah.edu [College of Pharmacy, University of Utah, Department of Medicinal Chemistry (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Restrained molecular dynamics simulations are a robust, though perhaps underused, tool for the end-stage refinement of biomolecular structures. We demonstrate their utility-using modern simulation protocols, optimized force fields, and inclusion of explicit solvent and mobile counterions-by re-investigating the solution structures of two RNA hairpins that had previously been refined using conventional techniques. The structures, both domain 5 group II intron ribozymes from yeast ai5{gamma} and Pylaiella littoralis, share a nearly identical primary sequence yet the published 3D structures appear quite different. Relatively long restrained MD simulations using the original NMR restraint data identified the presence of a small set of violated distance restraints in one structure and a possibly incorrect trapped bulge nucleotide conformation in the other structure. The removal of problematic distance restraints and the addition of a heating step yielded representative ensembles with very similar 3D structures and much lower pairwise RMSD values. Analysis of ion density during the restrained simulations helped to explain chemical shift perturbation data published previously. These results suggest that restrained MD simulations, with proper caution, can be used to 'update' older structures or aid in the refinement of new structures that lack sufficient experimental data to produce a high quality result. Notable cautions include the need for sufficient sampling, awareness of potential force field bias (such as small angle deviations with the current AMBER force fields), and a proper balance between the various restraint weights.

  18. Structural characterization of supramolecular assemblies by {sup 13}C spin dilution and 3D solid-state NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam, E-mail: adla@nmr.mpibpc.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Department of NMR-based Structural Biology (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    {sup 13}C spin diluted protein samples can be produced using [1-{sup 13}C] and [2-{sup 13}C]-glucose (Glc) carbon sources in the bacterial growth medium. The {sup 13}C spin dilution results in favorable {sup 13}C spectral resolution and polarization transfer behavior. We recently reported the combined use of [1-{sup 13}C]- and [2-{sup 13}C]-Glc labeling to facilitate the structural analysis of insoluble and non-crystalline biological systems by solid-state NMR (ssNMR), including sequential assignment, detection of long-range contacts and structure determination of macromolecular assemblies. In solution NMR the beneficial properties of sparsely labeled samples using [2-{sup 13}C]-glycerol ({sup 13}C labeled C{alpha} sites on a {sup 12}C diluted background) have recently been exploited to provide a bi-directional assignment method (Takeuchi et al. in J Biomol NMR 49(1):17-26, 2011 ). Inspired by this approach and our own recent results using [2-{sup 13}C]-Glc as carbon sources for the simplification of ssNMR spectra, we present a strategy for a bi-directional sequential assignment of solid-state NMR resonances and additionally the detection of long-range contacts using the combination of {sup 13}C spin dilution and 3D NMR spectroscopy. We illustrate our results with the sequential assignment and the collection of distance restraints on an insoluble and non-crystalline supramolecular assembly, the Salmonella typhimurium type III secretion system needle.

  19. Resolution-by-proxy: a simple measure for assessing and comparing the overall quality of NMR protein structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berjanskii, Mark; Zhou Jianjun; Liang Yongjie; Lin Guohui; Wishart, David S.

    2012-01-01

    In protein X-ray crystallography, resolution is often used as a good indicator of structural quality. Diffraction resolution of protein crystals correlates well with the number of X-ray observables that are used in structure generation and, therefore, with protein coordinate errors. In protein NMR, there is no parameter identical to X-ray resolution. Instead, resolution is often used as a synonym of NMR model quality. Resolution of NMR structures is often deduced from ensemble precision, torsion angle normality and number of distance restraints per residue. The lack of common techniques to assess the resolution of X-ray and NMR structures complicates the comparison of structures solved by these two methods. This problem is sometimes approached by calculating “equivalent resolution” from structure quality metrics. However, existing protocols do not offer a comprehensive assessment of protein structure as they calculate equivalent resolution from a relatively small number (<5) of protein parameters. Here, we report a development of a protocol that calculates equivalent resolution from 25 measurable protein features. This new method offers better performance (correlation coefficient of 0.92, mean absolute error of 0.28 Å) than existing predictors of equivalent resolution. Because the method uses coordinate data as a proxy for X-ray diffraction data, we call this measure “Resolution-by-Proxy” or ResProx. We demonstrate that ResProx can be used to identify under-restrained, poorly refined or inaccurate NMR structures, and can discover structural defects that the other equivalent resolution methods cannot detect. The ResProx web server is available at http://www.resprox.cahttp://www.resprox.ca.

  20. {sup 103}Rh NMR investigation of the superconductor Rh{sub 17}S{sub 15}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyama, T., E-mail: t-koyama@sci.u-hyogo.ac.j [Graduate School of Material Science, University of Hyogo, Kamigori, Hyogo 678-1297 (Japan); Kanda, K.; Motoyama, G.; Ueda, K.; Mito, T.; Kohara, T. [Graduate School of Material Science, University of Hyogo, Kamigori, Hyogo 678-1297 (Japan); Nakamura, H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2010-12-15

    We present {sup 103}Rh NMR studies for the superconductor Rh{sub 17}S{sub 15} (T{sub c} 5.4 K). We have identified the observed NMR lines corresponding to four different Rh sites in the cubic unit cell and deduced the temperature (T) dependence of the Knight shift components in Rh 24m site whose point symmetry is not axial. The isotropic part of the Knight shift K decreases with T in the normal state, indicating the negative hyperfine coupling and the enhancement of the spin susceptibility at lower T. The sudden change of K below T{sub c} is an indication of the spin-singlet Cooper paring.

  1. 1H CSA parameters by ultrafast MAS NMR: Measurement and applications to structure refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Habeeba K; Cresswell, Rosalie; Iuga, Dinu; Titman, Jeremy J

    2017-10-01

    A 1 H anisotropic-isotropic chemical shift correlation experiment which employs symmetry-based recoupling sequences to reintroduce the chemical shift anisotropy in ν 1 and ultrafast MAS to resolve 1 H sites in ν 2 is described. This experiment is used to measure 1 H shift parameters for L-ascorbic acid, a compound with a relatively complex hydrogen-bonding network in the solid. The 1 H CSAs of hydrogen-bonded sites with resolved isotropic shifts can be extracted directly from the recoupled lineshapes. In combination with DFT calculations, hydrogen positions in crystal structures obtained from X-ray and neutron diffraction are refined by comparison with simulations of the full two-dimensional NMR spectrum. The improved resolution afforded by the second dimension allows even unresolved hydrogen-bonded sites 1 H to be assigned and their shift parameters to be obtained. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Synthesis, vibrational, NMR, quantum chemical and structure-activity relation studies of 2-hydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V; Devi, L; Subbalakshmi, R; Rani, T; Mohan, S

    2014-09-15

    The stable geometry of 2-hydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone is optimised by DFT/B3LYP method with 6-311++G(∗∗) and cc-pVTZ basis sets. The structural parameters, thermodynamic properties and vibrational frequencies of the optimised geometry have been determined. The effects of substituents (hydroxyl, methoxy and acetyl groups) on the benzene ring vibrational frequencies are analysed. The vibrational frequencies of the fundamental modes of 2-hydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone have been precisely assigned and analysed and the theoretical results are compared with the experimental vibrations. 1H and 13C NMR isotropic chemical shifts are calculated and assignments made are compared with the experimental values. The energies of important MO's, the total electron density and electrostatic potential of the compound are determined. Various reactivity and selectivity descriptors such as chemical hardness, chemical potential, softness, electrophilicity, nucleophilicity and the appropriate local quantities are calculated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Structural Elucidation of Metabolites of Synthetic Cannabinoid UR-144 by Cunninghamella elegans Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shimpei; Kuzhiumparambil, Unnikrishnan; Fu, Shanlin

    2018-03-08

    The number of new psychoactive substances keeps on rising despite the controlling efforts by law enforcement. Although metabolism of the newly emerging drugs is continuously studied to keep up with the new additions, the exact structures of the metabolites are often not identified due to the insufficient sample quantities for techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The aim of the study was to characterise several metabolites of the synthetic cannabinoid (1-pentyl-1H-indol-3-yl) (2,2,3,3-tetramethylcyclopropyl) methanone (UR-144) by NMR spectroscopy after the incubation with the fungus Cunninghamella elegans. UR-144 was incubated with C. elegans for 72 h, and the resulting metabolites were chromatographically separated. Six fractions were collected and analysed by NMR spectroscopy. UR-144 was also incubated with human liver microsomes (HLM), and the liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry analysis was performed on the HLM metabolites with the characterised fungal metabolites as reference standards. Ten metabolites were characterised by NMR analysis including dihydroxy metabolites, carboxy and hydroxy metabolites, a hydroxy and ketone metabolite, and a carboxy and ketone metabolite. Of these metabolites, dihydroxy metabolite, carboxy and hydroxy metabolites, and a hydroxy and ketone metabolite were identified in HLM incubation. The results indicate that the fungus is capable of producing human-relevant metabolites including the exact isomers. The capacity of the fungus C. elegans to allow for NMR structural characterisation by enabling production of large amounts of metabolites makes it an ideal model to complement metabolism studies.

  4. NMR-based Structural Analysis of Threonylcarbamoyl-AMP Synthase and Its Substrate Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Kimberly A; Bobay, Benjamin G; Sarachan, Kathryn L; Sims, Alexis F; Bilbille, Yann; Deutsch, Christopher; Iwata-Reuyl, Dirk; Agris, Paul F

    2015-08-14

    The hypermodified nucleoside N(6)-threonylcarbamoyladenosine (t(6)A37) is present in many distinct tRNA species and has been found in organisms in all domains of life. This post-transcriptional modification enhances translation fidelity by stabilizing the anticodon/codon interaction in the ribosomal decoding site. The biosynthetic pathway of t(6)A37 is complex and not well understood. In bacteria, the following four proteins have been discovered to be both required and sufficient for t(6)A37 modification: TsaC, TsaD, TsaB, and TsaE. Of these, TsaC and TsaD are members of universally conserved protein families. Although TsaC has been shown to catalyze the formation of L-threonylcarbamoyl-AMP, a key intermediate in the biosynthesis of t(6)A37, the details of the enzymatic mechanism remain unsolved. Therefore, the solution structure of Escherichia coli TsaC was characterized by NMR to further study the interactions with ATP and L-threonine, both substrates of TsaC in the biosynthesis of L-threonylcarbamoyl-AMP. Several conserved amino acids were identified that create a hydrophobic binding pocket for the adenine of ATP. Additionally, two residues were found to interact with L-threonine. Both binding sites are located in a deep cavity at the center of the protein. Models derived from the NMR data and molecular modeling reveal several sites with considerable conformational flexibility in TsaC that may be important for L-threonine recognition, ATP activation, and/or protein/protein interactions. These observations further the understanding of the enzymatic reaction catalyzed by TsaC, a threonylcarbamoyl-AMP synthase, and provide structure-based insight into the mechanism of t(6)A37 biosynthesis. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Microsolvation of methylmercury: structures, energies, bonding and NMR constants ((199)Hg, (13)C and (17)O).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flórez, Edison; Maldonado, Alejandro F; Aucar, Gustavo A; David, Jorge; Restrepo, Albeiro

    2016-01-21

    Hartree-Fock (HF) and second order perturbation theory (MP2) calculations within the scalar and full relativistic frames were carried out in order to determine the equilibrium geometries and interaction energies between cationic methylmercury (CH3Hg(+)) and up to three water molecules. A total of nine structures were obtained. Bonding properties were analyzed using the Quantum Theory of Atoms In Molecules (QTAIM). The analyses of the topology of electron densities reveal that all structures exhibit a partially covalent HgO interaction between methylmercury and one water molecule. Consideration of additional water molecules suggests that they solvate the (CH3HgOH2)(+) unit. Nuclear magnetic shielding constants σ((199)Hg), σ((13)C) and σ((17)O), as well as indirect spin-spin coupling constants J((199)Hg-(13)C), J((199)Hg-(17)O) and J((13)C-(17)O), were calculated for each one of the geometries. Thermodynamic stability and the values of NMR constants correlate with the ability of the system to directly coordinate oxygen atoms of water molecules to the mercury atom in methylmercury and with the formation of hydrogen bonds among solvating water molecules. Relativistic effects account for 11% on σ((13)C) and 14% on σ((17)O), which is due to the presence of Hg (heavy atom on light atom, HALA effect), while the relativistic effects on σ((199)Hg) are close to 50% (heavy atom on heavy atom itself, HAHA effect). J-coupling constants are highly influenced by relativity when mercury is involved as in J((199)Hg-(13)C) and J((199)Hg-(17)O). On the other hand, our results show that the values of NMR constants for carbon and oxygen, atoms which are connected through mercury (C-HgO), are highly correlated and are greatly influenced by the presence of water molecules. Water molecules introduce additional electronic effects to the relativistic effects due to the mercury atom.

  6. High quality NMR structures: a new force field with implicit water and membrane solvation for Xplor-NIH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Ye [Sanford-Burnham-Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (United States); Schwieters, Charles D. [National Institutes of Health, Center for Information Technology (United States); Opella, Stanley J. [University of California San Diego, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Marassi, Francesca M., E-mail: fmarassi@sbmri.org [Sanford-Burnham-Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Structure determination of proteins by NMR is unique in its ability to measure restraints, very accurately, in environments and under conditions that closely mimic those encountered in vivo. For example, advances in solid-state NMR methods enable structure determination of membrane proteins in detergent-free lipid bilayers, and of large soluble proteins prepared by sedimentation, while parallel advances in solution NMR methods and optimization of detergent-free lipid nanodiscs are rapidly pushing the envelope of the size limit for both soluble and membrane proteins. These experimental advantages, however, are partially squandered during structure calculation, because the commonly used force fields are purely repulsive and neglect solvation, Van der Waals forces and electrostatic energy. Here we describe a new force field, and updated energy functions, for protein structure calculations with EEFx implicit solvation, electrostatics, and Van der Waals Lennard-Jones forces, in the widely used program Xplor-NIH. The new force field is based primarily on CHARMM22, facilitating calculations with a wider range of biomolecules. The new EEFx energy function has been rewritten to enable OpenMP parallelism, and optimized to enhance computation efficiency. It implements solvation, electrostatics, and Van der Waals energy terms together, thus ensuring more consistent and efficient computation of the complete nonbonded energy lists. Updates in the related python module allow detailed analysis of the interaction energies and associated parameters. The new force field and energy function work with both soluble proteins and membrane proteins, including those with cofactors or engineered tags, and are very effective in situations where there are sparse experimental restraints. Results obtained for NMR-restrained calculations with a set of five soluble proteins and five membrane proteins show that structures calculated with EEFx have significant improvements in accuracy, precision

  7. Zero in on Key Open Problems in Automated NMR Protein Structure Determination

    KAUST Repository

    Abbas, Ahmed

    2015-11-12

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is one of the main approaches for protein struc- ture determination. The biggest advantage of this approach is that it can determine the three-dimensional structure of the protein in the solution phase. Thus, the natural dynamics of the protein can be studied. However, NMR protein structure determina- tion is an expertise intensive and time-consuming process. If the structure determi- nation process can be accelerated or even automated by computational methods, that will significantly advance the structural biology field. Our goal in this dissertation is to propose highly efficient and error tolerant methods that can work well on real and noisy data sets of NMR. Our first contribution in this dissertation is the development of a novel peak pick- ing method (WaVPeak). First, WaVPeak denoises the NMR spectra using wavelet smoothing. A brute force method is then used to identify all the candidate peaks. Af- ter that, the volume of each candidate peak is estimated. Finally, the peaks are sorted according to their volumes. WaVPeak is tested on the same benchmark data set that was used to test the state-of-the-art method, PICKY. WaVPeak shows significantly better performance than PICKY in terms of recall and precision. Our second contribution is to propose an automatic method to select peaks pro- duced by peak picking methods. This automatic method is used to overcome the limitations of fixed number-based methods. Our method is based on the Benjamini- Hochberg (B-H) algorithm. The method is used with both WaVPeak and PICKY to automatically select the number of peaks to return from out of hundreds of candidate peaks. The volume (in WaVPeak) and the intensity (in PICKY) are converted into p-values. Peaks that have p-values below some certain threshold are selected. Ex- perimental results show that the new method is better than the fixed number-based method in terms of recall. To improve precision, we tried to eliminate false peaks using

  8. Graphical analysis of NMR structural quality and interactive contact map of NOE assignments in ARIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malliavin Thérèse E

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Ambiguous Restraints for Iterative Assignment (ARIA approach is widely used for NMR structure determination. It is based on simultaneously calculating structures and assigning NOE through an iterative protocol. The final solution consists of a set of conformers and a list of most probable assignments for the input NOE peak list. Results ARIA was extended with a series of graphical tools to facilitate a detailed analysis of the intermediate and final results of the ARIA protocol. These additional features provide (i an interactive contact map, serving as a tool for the analysis of assignments, and (ii graphical representations of structure quality scores and restraint statistics. The interactive contact map between residues can be clicked to obtain information about the restraints and their contributions. Profiles of quality scores are plotted along the protein sequence, and contact maps provide information of the agreement with the data on a residue pair level. Conclusion The graphical tools and outputs described here significantly extend the validation and analysis possibilities of NOE assignments given by ARIA as well as the analysis of the quality of the final structure ensemble. These tools are included in the latest version of ARIA, which is available at http://aria.pasteur.fr. The Web site also contains an installation guide, a user manual and example calculations.

  9. NMR structure of temporin-1 ta in lipopolysaccharide micelles: mechanistic insight into inactivation by outer membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathi Saravanan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs play important roles in the innate defense mechanism. The broad spectrum of activity of AMPs requires an efficient permeabilization of the bacterial outer and inner membranes. The outer leaflet of the outer membrane of Gram negative bacteria is made of a specialized lipid called lipopolysaccharide (LPS. The LPS layer is an efficient permeability barrier against anti-bacterial agents including AMPs. As a mode of protection, LPS can induce self associations of AMPs rendering them inactive. Temporins are a group of short-sized AMPs isolated from frog skin, and many of them are inactive against Gram negative bacteria as a result of their self-association in the LPS-outer membrane. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using NMR spectroscopy, we have determined atomic resolution structure and characterized localization of temporin-1Ta or TA (FLPLIGRVLSGIL-amide in LPS micelles. In LPS micelles, TA adopts helical conformation for residues L4-I12, while residues F1-L3 are found to be in extended conformations. The aromatic sidechain of residue F1 is involved in extensive packing interactions with the sidechains of residues P3, L4 and I5. Interestingly, a number of long-range NOE contacts have been detected between the N-terminal residues F1, P3 with the C-terminal residues S10, I12, L13 of TA in LPS micelles. Saturation transfer difference (STD NMR studies demonstrate close proximity of residues including F1, L2, P3, R7, S10 and L13 with the LPS micelles. Notably, the LPS bound structure of TA shows differences with the structures of TA determined in DPC and SDS detergent micelles. SIGNIFICANCE: We propose that TA, in LPS lipids, forms helical oligomeric structures employing N- and C-termini residues. Such oligomeric structures may not be translocated across the outer membrane; resulting in the inactivation of the AMP. Importantly, the results of our studies will be useful for the development of antimicrobial agents with a

  10. Structural biology of the sequestration and transport of heavy metal toxins: NMR structure determination of proteins containing the -Cys-X-Y-Cys-metal binding motifs. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opella, S.J.

    1998-01-01

    'The overall goal of the research is to apply the methods of structural biology, which have been previously used primarily in biomedical applications, to bioremediation. The authors are doing this by using NMR spectroscopy to determine the structures of proteins involved in the bacterial mercury detoxification system. The research is based on the premise that the proteins encoded in the genes of the bacterial detoxification system are an untapped source of reagents and, more fundamentally, chemical strategies that can be used to remove heavy metal toxins from the environment. The initial goals are to determine the structures of the proteins of the bacterial mercury detoxification systems responsible for the sequestration and transport of the Hg(II) ions in to the cell where reduction to Hg(O) occurs. These proteins are meP, which is water soluble and can be investigated with multidimensional solution NMR methods, and merT, the transport protein in the membrane that requires solid-state NMR methods. As of June 1998, this report summarizes work after about one and half years of the three-year award. The authors have made significant accomplishments in three aspects of the NMR studies of the proteins of the bacterial mercury detoxification system.'

  11. Structural investigation of an extracellular polysaccharide produced by the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans strain UA159

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Bo; Dobruchowska, Justyna M.; Hoogenkamp, Michel A.; Gerwig, Gerrit J.

    2012-01-01

    The structure of an extracellular polysaccharide EPS159 produced from sucrose by Streptococcus mutans UA159 was investigated through the main oligosaccharides obtained from partial acid hydrolysis, monosaccharide/methylation analysis, and 1D/2D H-1 NMR spectroscopy. The results showed that EPS159

  12. The influence of the pore structure on the moisture transport in lime plaster-brick systems as studied by NMR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nunes, C.; Pel, L.; Kunecký, J.; Slížková, Z.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental analysis of the porous structure and drying kinetics of lime-based plasters and plaster-brick systems using different methods. The effect of adding a water-repellent admixture (linseed oil) to the plasters was also evaluated. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) was

  13. NMR Structure and Action on Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors of Water-soluble Domain of Human LYNX1

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lyukmanova, E. N.; Shenkarev, Z. O.; Shulepko, M. A.; Mineev, K. S.; D´Hoedt, D.; Kasheverov, I. E.; Filkin, S. Yu.; Krivolapova, A. P.; Janíčková, Helena; Doležal, Vladimír; Dolgikh, D. A.; Arseniev, A. S.; Bertrand, D.; Tsetlin, V.I.; Kirpichnikov, M. P.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 286, č. 12 (2011), s. 10618-10627 ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0681 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : NMR structure * nicotinic acetylcholine receptor * water-soluble domain Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 4.773, year: 2011

  14. NMR and IR Spectroscopy for the Structural Characterization of Edible Fats and Oils: An Instrumental Analysis Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Molly W.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an upper-level instrumental laboratory for undergraduates that explores the complementary nature of IR and NMR spectroscopy for analysis of several edible fats and oils that are structurally similar but differ in physical properties and health implications. Five different fats and oils are analyzed for average chain length,…

  15. Solid-State NMR Investigation of Drug-Excipient Interactions and Phase Behavior in Indomethacin-Eudragit E Amorphous Solid Dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubach, Joseph W; Hau, Jonathan

    2018-02-20

    To investigate the nature of drug-excipient interactions between indomethacin (IMC) and methacrylate copolymer Eudragit® E (EE) in the amorphous state, and evaluate the effects on formulation and stability of these amorphous systems. Amorphous solid dispersions containing IMC and EE were spray dried with drug loadings from 20% to 90%. PXRD was used to confirm the amorphous nature of the dispersions, and DSC was used to measure glass transition temperatures (T g ). 13 C and 15 N solid-state NMR was utilized to investigate changes in local structure and protonation state, while 1 H T 1 and T 1ρ relaxation measurements were used to probe miscibility and phase behavior of the dispersions. T g values for IMC-EE solid dispersions showed significant positive deviations from predicted values in the drug loading range of 40-90%, indicating a relatively strong drug-excipient interaction. 15 N solid-state NMR exhibited a change in protonation state of the EE basic amine, with two distinct populations for the EE amine at -360.7 ppm (unprotonated) and -344.4 ppm (protonated). Additionally, 1 H relaxation measurements showed phase separation at high drug load, indicating an amorphous ionic complex and free IMC-rich phase. PXRD data showed all ASDs up to 90% drug load remained physically stable after 2 years. 15 N solid-state NMR experiments show a change in protonation state of EE, indicating that an ionic complex indeed forms between IMC and EE in amorphous solid dispersions. Phase behavior was determined to exhibit nanoscale phase separation at high drug load between the amorphous ionic complex and excess free IMC.

  16. Structural Analysis of N- and O-glycans Using ZIC-HILIC/Dialysis Coupled to NMR Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Yi; Feng, Ju; Deng, Shuang; Cao, Li; Zhang, Qibin; Zhao, Rui; Zhang, Zhaorui; Jiang, Yuxuan; Zink, Erika M.; Baker, Scott E.; Lipton, Mary S.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Hu, Jian Z.; Wu, Si

    2014-11-19

    Protein glycosylation, an important and complex post-translational modification (PTM), is involved in various biological processes including the receptor-ligand and cell-cell interaction, and plays a crucial role in many biological functions. However, little is known about the glycan structures of important biological complex samples, and the conventional glycan enrichment strategy (i.e., size-exclusion column [SEC] separation,) prior to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) detection is time-consuming and tedious. In this study, we employed SEC, Zwitterionic hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (ZIC-HILIC), and ZIC-HILIC coupled with dialysis strategies to enrich the glycopeptides from the pronase E digests of RNase B, followed by NMR analysis of the glycoconjugate. Our results suggest that the ZIC-HILIC enrichment coupled with dialysis is the most efficient, which was thus applied to the analysis of biological complex sample, the pronase E digest of the secreted proteins from the fungi Aspergillus niger. The NMR spectra revealed that the secreted proteins from A. niger contain both N-linked glycans with a high-mannose core and O-linked glycans bearing mannose and glucose with 1->3 and 1->6 linkages. In all, our study provides compelling evidence that ZIC-HILIC separation coupled to dialysis is superior to the commonly used SEC separation to prepare glycopeptides for the downstream NMR analysis, which could greatly facilitate the future NMR-based glycoproteomics research.

  17. General method of preparation of uniformly 13C, 15N-labeled DNA fragments for NMR analysis of DNA structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rene, Brigitte; Masliah, Gregoire; Zargarian, Loussine; Mauffret, Olivier; Fermandjian, Serge

    2006-01-01

    Summary 13 C, 15 N labeling of biomolecules allows easier assignments of NMR resonances and provides a larger number of NMR parameters, which greatly improves the quality of DNA structures. However, there is no general DNA-labeling procedure, like those employed for proteins and RNAs. Here, we describe a general and widely applicable approach designed for preparation of isotopically labeled DNA fragments that can be used for NMR studies. The procedure is based on the PCR amplification of oligonucleotides in the presence of labeled deoxynucleotides triphosphates. It allows great flexibility thanks to insertion of a short DNA sequence (linker) between two repeats of DNA sequence to study. Size and sequence of the linker are designed as to create restriction sites at the junctions with DNA of interest. DNA duplex with desired sequence and size is released upon enzymatic digestion of the PCR product. The suitability of the procedure is validated through the preparation of two biological relevant DNA fragments

  18. Perturbations of Native Membrane Protein Structure in Alkyl Phosphocholine Detergents: A Critical Assessment of NMR and Biophysical Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Membrane proteins perform a host of vital cellular functions. Deciphering the molecular mechanisms whereby they fulfill these functions requires detailed biophysical and structural investigations. Detergents have proven pivotal to extract the protein from its native surroundings. Yet, they provide a milieu that departs significantly from that of the biological membrane, to the extent that the structure, the dynamics, and the interactions of membrane proteins in detergents may considerably vary, as compared to the native environment. Understanding the impact of detergents on membrane proteins is, therefore, crucial to assess the biological relevance of results obtained in detergents. Here, we review the strengths and weaknesses of alkyl phosphocholines (or foscholines), the most widely used detergent in solution-NMR studies of membrane proteins. While this class of detergents is often successful for membrane protein solubilization, a growing list of examples points to destabilizing and denaturing properties, in particular for α-helical membrane proteins. Our comprehensive analysis stresses the importance of stringent controls when working with this class of detergents and when analyzing the structure and dynamics of membrane proteins in alkyl phosphocholine detergents. PMID:29488756

  19. {sup 1}H NMR investigation of self-association of vanillin in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogdan, Mircea; Floare, Calin G; PIrnau, Adrian, E-mail: mircea.bogdan@itim-cj.r [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2009-08-01

    A self-association of vanillin have been studied by {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy using the analysis of proton chemical shifts changes in aqueous solution as a function of concentration. The experimental results have been analysed using indefinite non-cooperative and cooperative models of molecular self-association, enabling the determination of equilibrium constants, parameters of cooperativity and the limiting values of vanillin proton chemical shifts in the complex. It was found that the dimer formation creates energetically favourable conditions for subsequent molecular association.

  20. 1H NMR investigation of self-association of vanillin in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdan, Mircea; Floare, Calin G; PIrnau, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    A self-association of vanillin have been studied by 1 H NMR spectroscopy using the analysis of proton chemical shifts changes in aqueous solution as a function of concentration. The experimental results have been analysed using indefinite non-cooperative and cooperative models of molecular self-association, enabling the determination of equilibrium constants, parameters of cooperativity and the limiting values of vanillin proton chemical shifts in the complex. It was found that the dimer formation creates energetically favourable conditions for subsequent molecular association.

  1. Hydroxy protons as structural probes to reveal hydrogen bonding properties of polyols in aqueous solution by NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oruc, Gizem; Varnali, Tereza; Bekiroglu, Somer

    2018-05-01

    The solution properties of ethylene glycol (ethane-1,2-diol), glycerol (propane-1,2,3-triol), erythritol ((2R,3S)-butane-1,2,3,4-tetraol), D-xylitol ((2R,3r,4S)-pentane-1,2,3,4,5-pentaol), D-mannitol ((2R,3R,4R,5R)-hexane-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexaol), and D-sorbitol ((2S,3R,4R,5R)-hexane-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexaol), constituting a subgroup of polyalcohols/polyols of maximum six carbon atoms have been investigated using 1H NMR chemical shifts, coupling constants, temperature coefficients, and chemical exchange rates of hydroxy protons in aqueous medium. Relative within a molecule, minimum two-fold difference in rate of exchange values and higher temperature dependence of chemical shifts of the hydroxy protons on terminal carbon atoms confirm that sustainable hydrogen bonding interactions is accentuated for the hydroxyl groups on secondary carbons. Compared to the primary carbons i.e. terminal ones, the hydroxy protons on second and third carbon atoms exhibit much lower rate of exchange and smaller temperature coefficients, indicating that they are further involved in transient hydrogen bonding interactions. Scalar 3JOH,CH-couplings ranging between 3.9 and 7.2 Hz imply that the hydroxyl groups are practically in free rotation regime. Examination of the chemical shift differences with respect to the shift of glycol hydroxy proton reveals that the disparity between terminal and inner hydroxyl groups disclosed by the exchange rates and temperature coefficients is sustained with the exception of 0.003 and 0.053 ppm for O(3)H of mannitol and O(5)H of sorbitol respectively. The experimental findings have been augmented by quantum chemical calculations targeting theoretical NMR chemical shifts, as well as the conformational analysis of the structures.

  2. Structural basis for TatA oligomerization: an NMR study of Escherichia coli TatA dimeric structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhang

    Full Text Available Many proteins are transported across lipid membranes by protein translocation systems in living cells. The twin-arginine transport (Tat system identified in bacteria and plant chloroplasts is a unique system that transports proteins across membranes in their fully-folded states. Up to date, the detailed molecular mechanism of this process remains largely unclear. The Escherichia coli Tat system consists of three essential transmembrane proteins: TatA, TatB and TatC. Among them, TatB and TatC form a tight complex and function in substrate recognition. The major component TatA contains a single transmembrane helix followed by an amphipathic helix, and is suggested to form the translocation pore via self-oligomerization. Since the TatA oligomer has to accommodate substrate proteins of various sizes and shapes, the process of its assembly stands essential for understanding the translocation mechanism. A structure model of TatA oligomer was recently proposed based on NMR and EPR observations, revealing contacts between the transmembrane helices from adjacent subunits. Herein we report the construction and stabilization of a dimeric TatA, as well as the structure determination by solution NMR spectroscopy. In addition to more extensive inter-subunit contacts between the transmembrane helices, we were also able to observe interactions between neighbouring amphipathic helices. The side-by-side packing of the amphipathic helices extends the solvent-exposed hydrophilic surface of the protein, which might be favourable for interactions with substrate proteins. The dimeric TatA structure offers more detailed information of TatA oligomeric interface and provides new insights on Tat translocation mechanism.

  3. The NMR structure of human obestatin in membrane-like environments: insights into the structure-bioactivity relationship of obestatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alén, Begoña O; Nieto, Lidia; Gurriarán-Rodríguez, Uxía; Mosteiro, Carlos S; Álvarez-Pérez, Juan C; Otero-Alén, María; Camiña, Jesús P; Gallego, Rosalía; García-Caballero, Tomás; Martín-Pastor, Manuel; Casanueva, Felipe F; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Pazos, Yolanda

    2012-01-01

    The quest for therapeutic applications of obestatin involves, as a first step, the determination of its 3D solution structure and the relationship between this structure and the biological activity of obestatin. On this basis, we have employed a combination of circular dichroism (CD), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and modeling techniques to determine the solution structure of human obestatin (1). Other analogues, including human non-amidated obestatin (2) and the fragment peptides (6-23)-obestatin (3), (11-23)-obestatin (4), and (16-23)-obestatin (5) have also been scrutinized. These studies have been performed in a micellar environment to mimic the cell membrane (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS). Furthermore, structural-activity relationship studies have been performed by assessing the in vitro proliferative capabilities of these peptides in the human retinal pigmented epithelial cell line ARPE-19 (ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation, Ki67 expression, and cellular proliferation). Our findings emphasize the importance of both the primary structure (composition and size) and particular segments of the obestatin molecule that posses significant α-helical characteristics. Additionally, details of a species-specific role for obestatin have also been hypothesized by comparing human and mouse obestatins (1 and 6, respectively) at both the structural and bioactivity levels.

  4. The NMR structure of human obestatin in membrane-like environments: insights into the structure-bioactivity relationship of obestatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Begoña O Alén

    Full Text Available The quest for therapeutic applications of obestatin involves, as a first step, the determination of its 3D solution structure and the relationship between this structure and the biological activity of obestatin. On this basis, we have employed a combination of circular dichroism (CD, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy, and modeling techniques to determine the solution structure of human obestatin (1. Other analogues, including human non-amidated obestatin (2 and the fragment peptides (6-23-obestatin (3, (11-23-obestatin (4, and (16-23-obestatin (5 have also been scrutinized. These studies have been performed in a micellar environment to mimic the cell membrane (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS. Furthermore, structural-activity relationship studies have been performed by assessing the in vitro proliferative capabilities of these peptides in the human retinal pigmented epithelial cell line ARPE-19 (ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation, Ki67 expression, and cellular proliferation. Our findings emphasize the importance of both the primary structure (composition and size and particular segments of the obestatin molecule that posses significant α-helical characteristics. Additionally, details of a species-specific role for obestatin have also been hypothesized by comparing human and mouse obestatins (1 and 6, respectively at both the structural and bioactivity levels.

  5. A Solid-State NMR Experiment: Analysis of Local Structural Environments in Phosphate Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Stanley E.; Saiki, David; Eckert, Hellmut; Meise-Gresch, Karin

    2004-01-01

    An experiment that can be used to directly study the local chemical environments of phosphorus in solid amorphous materials is demonstrated. The experiment aims at familiarizing the students of chemistry with the principles of solid-state NMR, by having them synthesize a simple phosphate glass, and making them observe the (super 31)P NMR spectrum,…

  6. Uncovering Key Structural Features of an Enantioselective Peptide-Catalyzed Acylation Utilizing Advanced NMR Techniques

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Procházková, Eliška; Kolmer, A.; Ilgen, J.; Schwab, M.; Kaltschnee, L.; Fredersdorf, M.; Schmidts, V.; Wende, R. C.; Schreiner, P. R.; Thiele, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 51 (2016), s. 15754-15759 ISSN 1433-7851 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : conformational analysis * enantioselective acylations * NMR spectroscopy * pure shift NMR * RDCs Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 11.994, year: 2016

  7. NMR and Electrochemical Investigation of the Transport Properties of Methanol and Water in Nafion and Clay-Nanocomposites Membranes for DMFCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Baglio

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Water and methanol transport behavior, solvents adsorption and electrochemical properties of filler-free Nafion and nanocomposites based on two smectite clays, were investigated using impedance spectroscopy, DMFC tests and NMR methods, including spin-lattice relaxation and pulsed-gradient spin-echo (PGSE diffusion under variable temperature conditions. Synthetic (Laponite and natural (Swy-2 smectite clays, with different structural and physical parameters, were incorporated into the Nafion for the creation of exfoliated nanocomposites. Transport mechanism of water and methanol appears to be influenced from the dimensions of the dispersed platelike silicate layers as well as from their cation exchange capacity (CEC. The details of the NMR results and the effect of the methanol solution concentration are discussed. Clays particles, and in particular Swy-2, demonstrate to be a potential physical barrier for methanol cross-over, reducing the methanol diffusion with an evident blocking effect yet nevertheless ensuring a high water mobility up to 130 °C and for several hours, proving the exceptional water retention property of these materials and their possible use in the DMFCs applications. Electrochemical behavior is investigated by cell resistance and polarization measurements. From these analyses it is derived that the addition of clay materials to recast Nafion decreases the ohmic losses at high temperatures extending in this way the operating range of a direct methanol fuel cell.

  8. NMR approaches in structure-based lead discovery: recent developments and new frontiers for targeting multi-protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, David M; Ciulli, Alessio

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a pivotal method for structure-based and fragment-based lead discovery because it is one of the most robust techniques to provide information on protein structure, dynamics and interaction at an atomic level in solution. Nowadays, in most ligand screening cascades, NMR-based methods are applied to identify and structurally validate small molecule binding. These can be high-throughput and are often used synergistically with other biophysical assays. Here, we describe current state-of-the-art in the portfolio of available NMR-based experiments that are used to aid early-stage lead discovery. We then focus on multi-protein complexes as targets and how NMR spectroscopy allows studying of interactions within the high molecular weight assemblies that make up a vast fraction of the yet untargeted proteome. Finally, we give our perspective on how currently available methods could build an improved strategy for drug discovery against such challenging targets. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. N-acetylglyoxylic amide bearing a nitrophenyl group as anion receptors: NMR and X-ray investigations on anion binding and selectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryanti, Venty; Bhadbhade, Mohan; Black, David StC; Kumar, Naresh

    2017-10-01

    N-Nitrophenylglyoxylic amides 1 and 2 in presence of tetrabutylammonium cation (TBA) act as receptors for anions HSO4-, Cl-, Br- and NO3- as investigated by NMR studies. The receptors formed 1:1 host-guest complexes in solution. X-ray structure of 1 along with TBA that bind a chloride anion is reported. Molecule 1 showed the highest selectivity for HSO4- anion over others measured. X-ray structure of the bound Cl- revealed a pocket containing the anion making strong (Nsbnd H⋯Cl) and weak hydrogen bonds (Csbnd H⋯Cl) that contribute to the recognition of the chloride anion. Nsbnd H and Csbnd H hydrogen bonds resulted in a relatively strong binding for chloride ions.

  10. NMR investigation of the effect of hydrostate pressure on the local magnetic fields in Y6Fe23

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'kovskij, V.A.; Bartashevich, M.I.; Gorlenko, A.A.; Kovtun, N.M.; Kupriyanov, A.K.

    1990-01-01

    The local magnetic fields at the Y 89 and Fe 57 nuclei in the intermetallic compound Y 6 Fe 23 and their shift induced by pressure are investigated by the NMR technique. The results are discussed on the basis of a model in which the atomic magnetic moment for iron includes the moment of polarized collectivized electrons responsible for the chemical bond between yttrium and iron. It is shown that with decreasing concentration of yttrium in the Y x Fe y compounds delocalization of the iron magnetic electrons occurs

  11. MAS NMR of HIV-1 protein assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suiter, Christopher L.; Quinn, Caitlin M.; Lu, Manman; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-04-01

    The negative global impact of the AIDS pandemic is well known. In this perspective article, the utility of magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy to answer pressing questions related to the structure and dynamics of HIV-1 protein assemblies is examined. In recent years, MAS NMR has undergone major technological developments enabling studies of large viral assemblies. We discuss some of these evolving methods and technologies and provide a perspective on the current state of MAS NMR as applied to the investigations into structure and dynamics of HIV-1 assemblies of CA capsid protein and of Gag maturation intermediates.

  12. A new Schiff base compound N,N'-(2,2-dimetylpropane)-bis(dihydroxylacetophenone): synthesis, experimental and theoretical studies on its crystal structure, FTIR, UV-visible, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saheb, Vahid; Sheikhshoaie, Iran

    2011-10-15

    The Schiff base compound, N,N'-(2,2-dimetylpropane)-bis(dihydroxylacetophenone) (NDHA) is synthesized through the condensation of 2-hydroxylacetophenone and 2,2-dimethyl 1,3-amino propane in methanol at ambient temperature. The yellow crystalline precipitate is used for X-ray single-crystal determination and measuring Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), UV-visible, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectra. Electronic structure calculations at the B3LYP, PBEPBE and PW91PW91 levels of theory are performed to optimize the molecular geometry and to calculate the FTIR, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectra of the compound. Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) method is used to calculate the UV-visible spectrum of NDHA. Vibrational frequencies are determined experimentally and compared with those obtained theoretically. Vibrational assignments and analysis of the fundamental modes of the compound are also performed. All theoretical methods can well reproduce the structure of the compound. The (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR chemical shifts calculated by all DFT methods are consistent with the experimental data. However, the NMR shielding tensors computed at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory are in better agreement with experimental (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectra. The electronic absorption spectrum calculated at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level by using TD-DFT method is in accordance with the observed UV-visible spectrum of NDHA. In addition, some quantum descriptors of the molecule are calculated and conformational analysis is performed and the results were compared with the crystallographic data. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Application of nonlinear EPR and NMR responses on spin systems in structure and relaxation structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyakov, A.I.; Ryabikin, Yu.A.; Bitenbaev, M.M.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: In this work results of investigation of paramagnetic systems (irradiated polymers and crystals, plastic-deformed metals, systems with strong exchange interaction, etc.) by methods of nonlinear relaxation spectroscopy (NRS) are presented. The NRS theoretical grounds were developed in the earlier works. Later the technique was applied successfully to relaxation studies and when analyzing magnetic resonance complicated overlapping spectra. As in course of polymer system irradiation, basically, several type of paramagnetic defects are formed with close values of the g factors, these materials can be used to exemplify NRS capabilities. In this work we use samples of irradiated PMMA copolymers. Analysis of the PMMA spectra shows that several types of paramagnetic defects strongly differing in the spin-lattice relaxation times are formed in irradiated PMMA-based polymer composites. It is found that degradation of the composite physical and engineering characteristics is caused, mainly, by radiation-induced disintegration of macromolecules, following the chain reaction, which can be revealed by occurring lattice radical states. Another portion of work is devoted to NRS application to deterring influence of structural defects (impurity, dislocation, etc.) on variation in times of nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in metal systems. At this stage we managed, for the first time, to separate the distribution functions for spin-lattice relaxation (T l ) and relaxation of nuclear spin dipole-dipole interaction (T d ). It is shown that one can assess an extent of crystal defect by the dependence of T d =f(c). Also in this work the NRS methods are applied to analyze EPR spectra of polycrystalline solid systems where exchange interaction is strong. It is shown that these systems, as a rule, contain a complete set of spin assemblies having different relaxation times, and the spin assembly distribution over the relaxation time depends on the defect number and type in solid

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance structure investigations on crosslinked polyesters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grobelny, J.

    1999-01-01

    Styrene-crosslinked mixed polyesters derived from maleic anhydride, 2,2-di(4-hydroxypropoxyphenyl)propane, oligo(propylene oxide) and 1,2-propylene glycol were investigated by high-resolution solid-state 13 C NMR spectroscopy. The structural modifications accompanying crosslinking were characterized in terms of spin-lattice relaxation times as a function of unsaturated polyester composition. Copolymerization and crosslinking effects were individually evaluated and the latter effect was related to variations in crosslinking density associated with the chemical structure of the unsaturated prepolymer. As the crosslinking effect is suppressed, the mechanical properties undergo expected changes, e.g., impact strength is increased and modulus of elasticity in tension is decreased. (author)

  15. Structural characterization by NMR of a double phosphorylated chimeric peptide vaccine for treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Gualito, Karla; Richter, Monique; Matzapetakis, Manolis; Singer, David; Berger, Stefan

    2013-04-26

    Rational design of peptide vaccines becomes important for the treatment of some diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related disorders. In this study, as part of a larger effort to explore correlations of structure and activity, we attempt to characterize the doubly phosphorylated chimeric peptide vaccine targeting a hyperphosphorylated epitope of the Tau protein. The 28-mer linear chimeric peptide consists of the double phosphorylated B cell epitope Tau₂₂₉₋₂₃₇[pThr231/pSer235] and the immunomodulatory T cell epitope Ag85B₂₄₁₋₂₅₅ originating from the well-known antigen Ag85B of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis, linked by a four amino acid sequence -GPSL-. NMR chemical shift analysis of our construct demonstrated that the synthesized peptide is essentially unfolded with a tendency to form a β-turn due to the linker. In conclusion, the -GPSL- unit presumably connects the two parts of the vaccine without transferring any structural information from one part to the other. Therefore, the double phosphorylated epitope of the Tau peptide is flexible and accessible.

  16. Characterization of coal structure by CP/MAS carbon-13 NMR spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, T.; Maekawa, Y.

    1987-01-01

    Cross-polarization (CP)/magic angle spinning (MAS) carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (n.m.r.) spectrometry has been applied to the analysis of the whole structures of different ranks of coal. Three basic structural parameters, namely carbon aromaticity fa, new carbon aromaticity fa', and atomic H/C ratio for the hypothetical unsubstituted aromatic nuclei Haru/Car, were derived from the combined data of ultimate analysis, the distributions of carbon and oxygen functional groups obtained from the spectrum and the distribution of four types of methylene carbon groups in coal. Both fa and fa' values generally increased with coal rank and ranged from 0.51 to 0.71 and from 0.62 to 0.76, respectively. Haru/Car value tended to decrease with coal rank although the value was greatly affected by the types of hydroaromatic methylene carbons to aromatic rings. The values indicated that lower-rank coals consisted mainly of 1-3 aromatic rings, and higher-rank coals, 3-5 aromatic rings. 24 refs.; 5 figs.; 4 tabs

  17. Application of 1D- and 2D-NMR techniques for the structural studies of glycoprotein-derived carbohydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breg, J.N.

    1989-01-01

    The first part of this thesis (Chapters 1 to 4) describe the determination of the primary structure for a large number of oligosaccharide-alditols obtained from bronchial sputum of cystic fibrosis patients suffering from chronic bronchitis. The second part (Chapters 5 to 8) is devoted to the application of two-dimensional NMR methods for the structural analysis of oligosaccharides. (H.W.). 163 refs.; 50 figs.; 25 tabs

  18. Sequence-specific 1H NMR assignments and secondary structure of the Arc repressor of bacteriophage P22, as determined by two-dimensional 1H NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breg, J.N.; Boelens, R.; George, A.V.E.; Kaptein, R.

    1989-01-01

    The Arc repressor of bacteriophage P22 is a DNA binding protein that does not belong to any of the known classes of such proteins. The authors have undertaken a 1 H NMR study of the protein with the aim of elucidating its three-dimensional structure in solution and its mode of binding of operator DNA. Here the authors present the 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) assignments of all backbone protons an most of the side-chain protons of Arc repressor. Elements of secondary structure have been identified on the basis of networks of characteristics sequential and medium-range nuclear Overhauser enhancements (NOEs). Two α-helical regions have been found in the peptide regions 16-29 and 35-45. The ends of the helices could not yet be firmly established and could extend to residue 31 for the first helix and to residue 49 for the second. Immediately before the first helix, between residues 8 and 14, a region is present with β-sheet characteristics dominated by a close proximity of the α-protons of residues 9 and 13. Because of the dimeric nature of the protein there are still two possible ways in which the NOEs in the β-sheet region can be interpreted. While the data presently do not allow an unambiguous choice between these two possibilities, some evidence is discussed that favors the latter (β-sheet between monomers). Since the N-terminal region of Arc is responsible for the sequence-specific recognition of its operator, the findings suggest the existence of a DNA binding motif in which a β-sheet region is present

  19. Synthesis, three-dimensional structure, conformation and correct chemical shift assignment determination of pharmaceutical molecules by NMR and molecular modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azeredo, Sirlene O.F. de; Sales, Edijane M.; Figueroa-Villar, José D., E-mail: jdfv2009@gmail.com [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Grupo de Ressonância Magnética Nuclear e Química Medicinal

    2017-07-01

    This work includes the synthesis of phenanthrenequinone guanylhydrazone and phenanthro[9,10-e][1,2,4]triazin-3-amine to be tested as intercalate with DNA for treatment of cancer. The other synthesized product, 2-[(4-chlorophenylamino)methylene]malononitrile, was designed for future determination of its activity against leishmaniasis. A common problem about some articles on the literature is that some previously published compounds display error of their molecular structures. In this article it is shown the application of several procedures of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to determine the complete molecular structure and the non questionable chemical shift assignment of the synthesized compounds, and also their analysis by molecular modeling to confirm the NMR results. To determine the capacity of pharmacological compounds to interact with biological targets is determined by docking. This work is to motivate the application of NMR and molecular modeling on organic synthesis, being a process that is very important for the study of the prepared compounds as interactions with biological targets by NMR. (author)

  20. Synthesis, three-dimensional structure, conformation and correct chemical shift assignment determination of pharmaceutical molecules by NMR and molecular modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azeredo, Sirlene O.F. de; Sales, Edijane M.; Figueroa-Villar, José D.

    2017-01-01

    This work includes the synthesis of phenanthrenequinone guanylhydrazone and phenanthro[9,10-e][1,2,4]triazin-3-amine to be tested as intercalate with DNA for treatment of cancer. The other synthesized product, 2-[(4-chlorophenylamino)methylene]malononitrile, was designed for future determination of its activity against leishmaniasis. A common problem about some articles on the literature is that some previously published compounds display error of their molecular structures. In this article it is shown the application of several procedures of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to determine the complete molecular structure and the non questionable chemical shift assignment of the synthesized compounds, and also their analysis by molecular modeling to confirm the NMR results. To determine the capacity of pharmacological compounds to interact with biological targets is determined by docking. This work is to motivate the application of NMR and molecular modeling on organic synthesis, being a process that is very important for the study of the prepared compounds as interactions with biological targets by NMR. (author)

  1. On the use of atomistic simulations to aid bulk metallic glasses structural elucidation with solid-state NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Ary R; Rino, José P

    2017-08-24

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) experimental 27 Al metallic shifts reported in the literature for bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) were revisited in the light of state-of-the-art atomistic simulations. In a consistent way, the Gauge-Including Projector Augmented-Wave (GIPAW) method was applied in conjunction with classical molecular dynamics (CMD). A series of Zr-Cu-Al alloys with low Al concentrations were selected as case study systems, for which realistic CMD derived structural models were used for a short- and medium-range order mining. That initial procedure allowed the detection of trends describing changes on the microstructure of the material upon Al alloying, which in turn were used to guide GIPAW calculations with a set of abstract systems in the context of ssNMR. With essential precision and accuracy, the ab initio simulations also yielded valuable trends from the electronic structure point of view, which enabled an overview of the bonding nature of Al-centered clusters as well as its influence on the experimental ssNMR outcomes. The approach described in this work might promote the use of ssNMR spectroscopy in research on glassy metals. Moreover, the results presented demonstrate the possibility to expand the applications of this technique, with deeper insight into nuclear interactions and less speculative assignments.

  2. Structural study of the membrane protein MscL using cell-free expression and solid-state NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdine, Alaa; Verhoeven, Michiel A.; Park, Kyu-Ho; Ghazi, Alexandre; Guittet, Eric; Berrier, Catherine; Van Heijenoort, Carine; Warschawski, Dror E.

    2010-05-01

    High-resolution structures of membrane proteins have so far been obtained mostly by X-ray crystallography, on samples where the protein is surrounded by detergent. Recent developments of solid-state NMR have opened the way to a new approach for the study of integral membrane proteins inside a membrane. At the same time, the extension of cell-free expression to the production of membrane proteins allows for the production of proteins tailor made for NMR. We present here an in situ solid-state NMR study of a membrane protein selectively labeled through the use of cell-free expression. The sample consists of MscL (mechano-sensitive channel of large conductance), a 75 kDa pentameric α-helical ion channel from Escherichia coli, reconstituted in a hydrated lipid bilayer. Compared to a uniformly labeled protein sample, the spectral crowding is greatly reduced in the cell-free expressed protein sample. This approach may be a decisive step required for spectral assignment and structure determination of membrane proteins by solid-state NMR.

  3. Probing membrane protein structure using water polarization transfer solid-state NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jonathan K; Hong, Mei

    2014-10-01

    Water plays an essential role in the structure and function of proteins, lipid membranes and other biological macromolecules. Solid-state NMR heteronuclear-detected (1)H polarization transfer from water to biomolecules is a versatile approach for studying water-protein, water-membrane, and water-carbohydrate interactions in biology. We review radiofrequency pulse sequences for measuring water polarization transfer to biomolecules, the mechanisms of polarization transfer, and the application of this method to various biological systems. Three polarization transfer mechanisms, chemical exchange, spin diffusion and NOE, manifest themselves at different temperatures, magic-angle-spinning frequencies, and pulse irradiations. Chemical exchange is ubiquitous in all systems examined so far, and spin diffusion plays the key role in polarization transfer within the macromolecule. Tightly bound water molecules with long residence times are rare in proteins at ambient temperature. The water polarization-transfer technique has been used to study the hydration of microcrystalline proteins, lipid membranes, and plant cell wall polysaccharides, and to derive atomic-resolution details of the kinetics and mechanism of ion conduction in channels and pumps. Using this approach, we have measured the water polarization transfer to the transmembrane domain of the influenza M2 protein to obtain information on the structure of this tetrameric proton channel. At short mixing times, the polarization transfer rates are site-specific and depend on the pH, labile protons, sidechain conformation, as well as the radial position of the residues in this four-helix bundle. Despite the multiple dependences, the initial transfer rates reflect the periodic nature of the residue positions from the water-filled pore, thus this technique provides a way of gleaning secondary structure information, helix tilt angle, and the oligomeric structure of membrane proteins. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All

  4. Investigating the Mechanisms of Amylolysis of Starch Granules by Solution-State NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Starch is a prominent component of the human diet and is hydrolyzed by α-amylase post-ingestion. Probing the mechanism of this process has proven challenging, due to the intrinsic heterogeneity of individual starch granules. By means of solution-state NMR, we demonstrate that flexible polysaccharide chains protruding from the solvent-exposed surfaces of waxy rice starch granules are highly mobile and that during hydrothermal treatment, when the granules swell, the number of flexible residues on the exposed surfaces increases by a factor of 15. Moreover, we show that these flexible chains are the primary substrates for α-amylase, being cleaved in the initial stages of hydrolysis. These findings allow us to conclude that the quantity of flexible α-glucan chains protruding from the granule surface will greatly influence the rate of energy acquisition from digestion of starch. PMID:25815624

  5. Investigation into state of phosphomolybdovanadic heteropolyacids in aqueous solutions by the NMR method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksimovskaya, R.I.; Fedotov, M.A.; Mastikhin, V.M.; Kuznetsova, L.I.; Matveev, K.I.

    1978-01-01

    The methods of 31 P, 51 V, and 17 O NMR have been used for studying the solutions of phospho-molybdenum-vanadium heteropolyacids (HPA) with x=0,1,2,3 (HPA-x) and their mixture with changing concentration, acidity, temperature, and upon partial reduction for separating the lines corresponding to HPA with a certain x. It has been found that in aqueous solutions HPA is present as a mixture of HPA of different compositions; the relationship has been observed between chemical shifts of the lines and the solution acidity which is of a different character for HPA with different x. This allows to make a conclusion about the mechanism of HPA protonation

  6. FTIR, FT-Raman, FT-NMR and quantum chemical investigations of 3-acetylcoumarin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V.; Sakiladevi, S.; Marchewka, M. K.; Mohan, S.

    2013-05-01

    3-Acetylcoumarin (3AC) was synthesised by a Knoevenagel reaction. Conformational analysis using the B3LYP method was also carried out to determine the most stable conformation of the compound. FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of 3AC have been recorded in the range 4000-400 and 4000-100 cm-1, respectively. 1H and 13C NMR spectra have also been recorded. The complete vibrational assignment and analysis of the fundamental modes of the compound were carried out using the experimental FTIR and FT-Raman data and quantum mechanical studies. The experimental vibrational frequencies were compared with the wavenumbers obtained theoretically from the DFT-B3LYP/B3PW91 gradient calculations employing the standard 6-31G**, high level 6-311++G** and cc-pVTZ basis sets for optimised geometry of the compound. The frontier molecular orbital energies of the compound are determined by DFT method.

  7. Application of nonlinear EPR and NMR responses on spin systems in structure and relaxation structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyakov, A I; Ryabikin, Yu A; Bitenbaev, M M [Inst. of Physics and Technology, Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2004-07-01

    Full text: In this work results of investigation of paramagnetic systems (irradiated polymers and crystals, plastic-deformed metals, systems with strong exchange interaction, etc.) by methods of nonlinear relaxation spectroscopy (NRS) are presented. The NRS theoretical grounds were developed in the earlier works. Later the technique was applied successfully to relaxation studies and when analyzing magnetic resonance complicated overlapping spectra. As in course of polymer system irradiation, basically, several type of paramagnetic defects are formed with close values of the g factors, these materials can be used to exemplify NRS capabilities. In this work we use samples of irradiated PMMA copolymers. Analysis of the PMMA spectra shows that several types of paramagnetic defects strongly differing in the spin-lattice relaxation times are formed in irradiated PMMA-based polymer composites. It is found that degradation of the composite physical and engineering characteristics is caused, mainly, by radiation-induced disintegration of macromolecules, following the chain reaction, which can be revealed by occurring lattice radical states. Another portion of work is devoted to NRS application to deterring influence of structural defects (impurity, dislocation, etc.) on variation in times of nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in metal systems. At this stage we managed, for the first time, to separate the distribution functions for spin-lattice relaxation (T{sub l}) and relaxation of nuclear spin dipole-dipole interaction (T{sub d}). It is shown that one can assess an extent of crystal defect by the dependence of T{sub d}=f(c). Also in this work the NRS methods are applied to analyze EPR spectra of polycrystalline solid systems where exchange interaction is strong. It is shown that these systems, as a rule, contain a complete set of spin assemblies having different relaxation times, and the spin assembly distribution over the relaxation time depends on the defect number and

  8. Composition of mortar as a function of distance to the brick-mortar interface : A study on the formation of cured mortar structure in masonry using NMR, PFM and XRD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brocken, H.J.P.; Larbi, J.A.; Pel, L.; Pers, N.M. van der

    1999-01-01

    The formation of cured mortar structure in masonry was studied using multiple experimental techniques. Starting with fresh mortar, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was used to measure the water extraction during brick laying. After curing, the composition of cured mortar was investigated with

  9. Parallel β-Sheet Structure of Alanine Tetrapeptide in the Solid State As Studied by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Tetsuo; Horiguchi, Kumiko; Aoki, Akihiro; Tasei, Yugo; Naito, Akira

    2016-09-01

    The structural analysis of alanine oligopeptides is important for understanding the crystalline region in silks from spiders and wild silkworms and also the mechanism of cellular toxicity of human diseases arising from expansion in polyalanine sequences. The atomic-level structures of alanine tripeptide and tetrapeptide with antiparallel β-sheet structures (AP-Ala3 and AP-Ala4, respectively) together with alanine tripeptide with parallel β-sheet structures (P-Ala3) have been determined, but alanine tetrapeptide with a parallel β-sheet structure (P-Ala4) has not been reported yet. In this article, first, we established the preparation protocol of P-Ala4 from more stable AP-Ala4. Second, complete assignments of the (13)C, (15)N, and (1)H solid-state NMR spectra were performed with (13)C- and (15)N-labeled Ala4 samples using several solid-state NMR techniques. Then, the structural constraints were obtained, for example, the amide proton peaks of P-Ala4 in the (1)H double-quantum magic-angle spinning NMR spectrum were heavily overlapped and observed at about 7.4 ppm, which was a much higher field than that of 8.7-9.1 ppm observed for AP-Ala4, indicating that the intermolecular hydrogen-bond lengths across strands (N-H···O═C) were considerably longer for P-Ala4, that is, 2.21-2.34 Å, than those reported for AP-Ala4, that is, 1.8-1.9 Å. The structural model was proposed for P-Ala4 by NMR results and MD calculations.

  10. Structure and function of the Juxta membrane domain of the human epidermal growth factor receptor by NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choowongkomon, Kiattawee; Carlin, Cathleen; Sonnichsen, Frank D.

    2005-10-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a member of the receptor tyrosine kinase family involved in the regulation of cellular proliferation and differentiation. Its juxta membrane domain (JX), the region located between the transmembrane and kinase domains, plays important roles in receptor trafficking since both basolateral sorting in polarized epithelial cells and lysosomal sorting signals are identified in this region. In order to understand the regulation of these signals, we characterized the structural properties of recombinant JX domain in dodecyl phosphocholine detergent (DPC) by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In DPC micelles, structures derived from NMR data showed three amphipathic, helical segments. Two equivalent average structural models on the surface of micelles were obtained that differ only in the relative orientation between the first and second helices. Our data suggests that the activity of sorting signals may be regulated by their membrane association and restricted accessibility in the intact receptor

  11. Structural analysis of flavonoids in solution through DFT 1H NMR chemical shift calculations: Epigallocatechin, Kaempferol and Quercetin

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Souza, Leonardo A.; Tavares, Wagner M. G.; Lopes, Ana Paula M.; Soeiro, Malucia M.; De Almeida, Wagner B.

    2017-05-01

    In this work, we showed that comparison between experimental and theoretical 1H NMR chemical shift patterns, calculated using Density Functional Theory (DFT), can be used for the prediction of molecular structure of flavonoids in solution, what is experimentally accessible for gas phase (electron diffraction methods) and solid samples (X-ray diffraction). The best match between B3LYP/6-31G(d,p)-PCM 1H NMR calculations for B ring rotated structures and experimental spectra can provide information on the conformation adopted by polyphenols in solution (usually DMSO-d6, acetone-d6 as solvents), which may differ from solid state and gas phase observed structures, and also DFT optimized geometry in the vacuum.

  12. Structure and dynamics of paramagnetic transients by pulsed EPR and NMR detection of nuclear resonance. [Pulse radiolysis of methanol in D/sub 2/O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trifunac, A.D.

    1981-01-01

    Structure and dynamics of transient radicals in pulse radiolysis can be studied by time resolved EPR and NMR techniques. EPR study of kinetics and relaxation is illustrated. The NMR detection of nuclear resonance in transient radicals is a new method which allows the study of hyperfine coupling, population dynamics, radical kinetics, and reaction mechanism. 9 figures.

  13. Heparin sodium compliance to USP monograph: structural elucidation of an atypical 2.18 ppm NMR signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourier, Pierre A J; Guichard, Olivier Y; Herman, Fréderic; Viskov, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The ¹H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) acceptance criteria in the new heparin US Pharmacopeia (USP) monograph do not take into account potential structural modifications responsible for any extra signals observed in ¹H NMR spectra, some purified heparins may be non-compliant under the proposed new USP guidelines and incorrectly classified as unsuitable for pharmaceutical use. Heparins from the "ES" source, containing an extra signal at 2.18 ppm, were depolymerized under controlled conditions using heparinases I, II, and III. The oligosaccharides responsible for the 2.18 ppm signal were enriched using orthogonal chromatographic techniques. After multiple purification steps, we obtained an oligosaccharide mixture containing a highly enriched octasaccharide bearing the structural modification responsible for the extra signal. Following heparinase I depolymerization, a pure tetrasaccharide containing the fingerprint structural modification was isolated for full structural determination. Using 1D and 2D ¹H NMR spectroscopy, the structural moiety responsible for the extra signal at 2.18 ppm was identified as an acetyl group on the heparin backbone, most likely resulting from a very minor manufacturing process side reaction that esterifies the uronic acid at position 3. Such analytical peculiarity has always been present in this heparin source and it was used safety over the years. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Structure and assembly of the mouse ASC inflammasome by combined NMR spectroscopy and cryo-electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sborgi, Lorenzo; Ravotti, Francesco; Dandey, Venkata P.; Dick, Mathias S.; Mazur, Adam; Reckel, Sina; Chami, Mohamed; Scherer, Sebastian; Huber, Matthias; Böckmann, Anja; Egelman, Edward H.; Stahlberg, Henning; Broz, Petr; Meier, Beat H.; Hiller, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Inflammasomes are multiprotein complexes that control the innate immune response by activating caspase-1, thus promoting the secretion of cytokines in response to invading pathogens and endogenous triggers. Assembly of inflammasomes is induced by activation of a receptor protein. Many inflammasome receptors require the adapter protein ASC [apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase-recruitment domain (CARD)], which consists of two domains, the N-terminal pyrin domain (PYD) and the C-terminal CARD. Upon activation, ASC forms large oligomeric filaments, which facilitate procaspase-1 recruitment. Here, we characterize the structure and filament formation of mouse ASC in vitro at atomic resolution. Information from cryo-electron microscopy and solid-state NMR spectroscopy is combined in a single structure calculation to obtain the atomic-resolution structure of the ASC filament. Perturbations of NMR resonances upon filament formation monitor the specific binding interfaces of ASC-PYD association. Importantly, NMR experiments show the rigidity of the PYD forming the core of the filament as well as the high mobility of the CARD relative to this core. The findings are validated by structure-based mutagenesis experiments in cultured macrophages. The 3D structure of the mouse ASC-PYD filament is highly similar to the recently determined human ASC-PYD filament, suggesting evolutionary conservation of ASC-dependent inflammasome mechanisms. PMID:26464513

  15. Carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy of biological systems

    CERN Document Server

    Beckmann, Nicolau

    1995-01-01

    This book is intended to provide an in-depth understanding of 13C NMR as a tool in biological research. 13C NMR has provided unique information concerning complex biological systems, from proteins and nucleic acids to animals and humans. The subjects addressed include multidimensional heteronuclear techniques for structural studies of molecules in the liquid and solid states, the investigation of interactions in model membranes, the elucidation of metabolic pathwaysin vitro and in vivo on animals, and noninvasive metabolic studies performed on humans. The book is a unique mix of NMR methods and biological applications which makes it a convenient reference for those interested in research in this interdisciplinary area of physics, chemistry, biology, and medicine.Key Features* An interdisciplinary text with emphasis on both 13C NMR methodology and the relevant biological and biomedical issues* State-of-the-art 13C NMR techniques are described; Whenever possible, their advantages over other approaches are empha...

  16. Structure investigations of electrodeposited nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertes, A.; Czako-Nagy, I.; Lakatos-Varsanyi, M.; Brauer, G.; Leidheiser, H. Jr

    1981-01-01

    Electrodeposited nickel samples were investigated by positron annihilation (lifetime and Doppler-broadening), Moessbauer effect and X-ray diffraction measurements. Two-component positron lifetime spectra were obtained. The first component is thought to result from bulk annihilation and trapping at single trapping centres (TC), their concentrations are obtained from the trapping model. The second one possibly denotes annihilation at voids, the number of which is dependent on the stress in the deposit. The Moessbauer results show differences in the magnetic orientation in the three samples examined. (author)

  17. Natural abundance 15N NMR assignments delineate structural differences between intact and reactive-site hydrolyzed Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthi, R; Nemmers, S; Tobias, B

    1992-06-15

    15N NMR assignments were made to the backbone amide nitrogen atoms at natural isotopic abundance of intact and reactive-site (Arg5-Ile6) hydrolyzed Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor III (CMTI-III and CMTI-III*, respectively) by means of 2D proton-detected heteronuclear single bond chemical shift correlation (HSBC) spectroscopy, utilizing the previously made sequence-specific 1H NMR assignments (Krishnamoorthi et al. (1992) Biochemistry 31, 898-904). Comparison of the 15N chemical shifts of the two forms of the inhibitor molecule revealed significant changes not only for residues located near the reactive-site region, but also for those distantly located. Residues Cys3, Arg5, Leu7, Met8, Cys10, Cys16, Glu19, His25, Tyr27, Cys28 and Gly29 showed significant chemical shift changes ranging from 0.3 to 6.1 ppm, thus indicating structural perturbations that were transmitted throughout the molecule. These findings confirm the earlier conclusions based on 1H NMR investigations.

  18. Reduced dimensionality (3,2)D NMR experiments and their automated analysis: implications to high-throughput structural studies on proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Jithender G; Kumar, Dinesh; Hosur, Ramakrishna V

    2015-02-01

    Protein NMR spectroscopy has expanded dramatically over the last decade into a powerful tool for the study of their structure, dynamics, and interactions. The primary requirement for all such investigations is sequence-specific resonance assignment. The demand now is to obtain this information as rapidly as possible and in all types of protein systems, stable/unstable, soluble/insoluble, small/big, structured/unstructured, and so on. In this context, we introduce here two reduced dimensionality experiments – (3,2)D-hNCOcanH and (3,2)D-hNcoCAnH – which enhance the previously described 2D NMR-based assignment methods quite significantly. Both the experiments can be recorded in just about 2-3 h each and hence would be of immense value for high-throughput structural proteomics and drug discovery research. The applicability of the method has been demonstrated using alpha-helical bovine apo calbindin-D9k P43M mutant (75 aa) protein. Automated assignment of this data using AUTOBA has been presented, which enhances the utility of these experiments. The backbone resonance assignments so derived are utilized to estimate secondary structures and the backbone fold using Web-based algorithms. Taken together, we believe that the method and the protocol proposed here can be used for routine high-throughput structural studies of proteins. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. A novel tridentate Schiff base dioxo-molybdenum(VI) complex: synthesis, experimental and theoretical studies on its crystal structure, FTIR, UV-visible, ¹H NMR and ¹³C NMR spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saheb, Vahid; Sheikhshoaie, Iran; Stoeckli-Evans, Helen

    2012-09-01

    A new dioxo-molybdenum(VI) complex [MoO(2)(L)(H(2)O)] has been synthesized, using 5-methoxy 2-[(2-hydroxypropylimino)methyl]phenol as tridentate ONO donor Schiff base ligand (H(2)L) and MoO(2)(acac)(2). The yellow crystals of the compound are used for single-crystal X-ray analysis and measuring Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), UV-visible, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectra. Electronic structure calculations at the B3LYP and PW91PW91 levels of theory are performed to optimize the molecular geometry and to calculate the UV-visible, FTIR, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectra of the compound. Vibrational assignments and analysis of the fundamental modes of the compound are performed. Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) method is used to calculate the electronic transitions of the complex. All theoretical methods can well reproduce the structure of the compound. The (1)H NMR shielding tensors computed at the B3LYP/DGDZVP level of theory is in agreement with experimental (1)H NMR spectra. However, the (13)C NMR shielding tensors computed at the B3LYP level, employing a combined basis set of DGDZVP for Mo and 6-31+G(2df,p) for other atoms, are in better agreement with experimental (13)C NMR spectra. The electronic transitions calculated at the B3LYP/DGDZVP level by using TD-DFT method is in accordance with the observed UV-visible spectrum of the compound. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Which kind of aromatic structures are produced during biomass charring? New insights provided by modern solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knicker, Heike; Paneque-Carmona, Marina; Velasco-Molina, Marta; de la Rosa, José Maria; León-Ovelar, Laura Regina; Fernandez-Boy, Elena

    2017-04-01

    Intense research on biochar and charcoal of the last years has revealed that depending on the production conditions, the chemical and physical characteristics of their aromatic network can greatly vary. Since such variations are determining the behavior and stability of charred material in soils, a better understanding of the structural changes occurring during their heating and the impact of those changes on their function is needed. One method to characterize pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM) represents solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy applying the cross polarization (CP) magic angle spinning technique (MAS). A drawback of this technique is that the quantification of NMR spectra of samples with highly condensed and proton-depleted structures is assumed to be bias. Typical samples with such attributes are charcoals produced at temperatures above 700°C under pyrolytic conditions. Commonly their high condensation degree leads to graphenic structures that are not only reducing the CP efficiency but create also a conductive lattice which acts as a shield and prevents the entering of the excitation pulse into the sample during the NMR experiments. Since the latter can damage the NMR probe and in the most cases the obtained NMR spectra show only one broad signal assignable to aromatic C, this technique is rarely applied for characterizing high temperature chars or soot. As a consequence, a more detailed knowledge of the nature of the aromatic ring systems is still missing. The latter is also true for the aromatic domains of PyOM produced at lower temperatures, since older NMR instruments operating at low magnetic fields deliver solid-state 13C NMR spectra with low resolution which turns a more detailed analysis of the aromatic chemical shift region into a challenging task. In order to overcome this disadvantages, modern NMR spectroscopy offers not only instruments with greatly improved resolution but also special pulse sequences for NMR experiments which allow a more

  1. Three-dimensional solution structure of Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor-V determined by NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, M; Gong, Y; Kao, J L; Krishnamoorthi, R

    1995-04-18

    The solution structure of Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor-V (CMTI-V), which is also a specific inhibitor of the blood coagulation protein, factor XIIa, was determined by 1H NMR spectroscopy in combination with a distance-geometry and simulated annealing algorithm. Sequence-specific resonance assignments were made for all the main-chain and most of the side-chain hydrogens. Stereospecific assignments were also made for some of the beta-, gamma-, delta-, and epsilon-hydrogens and valine methyl hydrogens. The ring conformations of all six prolines in the inhibitor were determined on the basis of 1H-1H vicinal coupling constant patterns; most of the proline ring hydrogens were stereospecifically assigned on the basis of vicinal coupling constant and intraresidue nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) patterns. Distance constraints were determined on the basis of NOEs between pairs of hydrogens. Dihedral angle constraints were determined from estimates of scalar coupling constants and intraresidue NOEs. On the basis of 727 interproton distance and 111 torsion angle constraints, which included backbone phi angles and side-chain chi 1, chi 2, chi 3, and chi 4 angles, 22 structures were calculated by a distance geometry algorithm and refined by energy minimization and simulated annealing methods. Both main-chain and side-chain atoms are well-defined, except for a loop region, two terminal residues, and some side-chain atoms located on the molecular surface. The average root mean squared deviation in the position for equivalent atoms between the 22 individual structures and the mean structure obtained by averaging their coordinates is 0.58 +/- 0.06 A for the main-chain atoms and 1.01 +/- 0.07 A for all the non-hydrogen atoms of residues 3-40 and 49-67. These structures were compared to the X-ray crystallographic structure of another protein of the same inhibitor family-chymotrypsin inhibitor-2 from barley seeds [CI-2; McPhalen, C. A., & James, M. N. G. (1987) Biochemistry 26

  2. Towards fully automated structure-based NMR resonance assignment of 15N-labeled proteins from automatically picked peaks

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Richard; Gao, Xin; Li, Ming

    2011-01-01

    In NMR resonance assignment, an indispensable step in NMR protein studies, manually processed peaks from both N-labeled and C-labeled spectra are typically used as inputs. However, the use of homologous structures can allow one to use only N-labeled NMR data and avoid the added expense of using C-labeled data. We propose a novel integer programming framework for structure-based backbone resonance assignment using N-labeled data. The core consists of a pair of integer programming models: one for spin system forming and amino acid typing, and the other for backbone resonance assignment. The goal is to perform the assignment directly from spectra without any manual intervention via automatically picked peaks, which are much noisier than manually picked peaks, so methods must be error-tolerant. In the case of semi-automated/manually processed peak data, we compare our system with the Xiong-Pandurangan-Bailey- Kellogg's contact replacement (CR) method, which is the most error-tolerant method for structure-based resonance assignment. Our system, on average, reduces the error rate of the CR method by five folds on their data set. In addition, by using an iterative algorithm, our system has the added capability of using the NOESY data to correct assignment errors due to errors in predicting the amino acid and secondary structure type of each spin system. On a publicly available data set for human ubiquitin, where the typing accuracy is 83%, we achieve 91% accuracy, compared to the 59% accuracy obtained without correcting for such errors. In the case of automatically picked peaks, using assignment information from yeast ubiquitin, we achieve a fully automatic assignment with 97% accuracy. To our knowledge, this is the first system that can achieve fully automatic structure-based assignment directly from spectra. This has implications in NMR protein mutant studies, where the assignment step is repeated for each mutant. © Copyright 2011, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  3. Towards fully automated structure-based NMR resonance assignment of 15N-labeled proteins from automatically picked peaks

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Richard

    2011-03-01

    In NMR resonance assignment, an indispensable step in NMR protein studies, manually processed peaks from both N-labeled and C-labeled spectra are typically used as inputs. However, the use of homologous structures can allow one to use only N-labeled NMR data and avoid the added expense of using C-labeled data. We propose a novel integer programming framework for structure-based backbone resonance assignment using N-labeled data. The core consists of a pair of integer programming models: one for spin system forming and amino acid typing, and the other for backbone resonance assignment. The goal is to perform the assignment directly from spectra without any manual intervention via automatically picked peaks, which are much noisier than manually picked peaks, so methods must be error-tolerant. In the case of semi-automated/manually processed peak data, we compare our system with the Xiong-Pandurangan-Bailey- Kellogg\\'s contact replacement (CR) method, which is the most error-tolerant method for structure-based resonance assignment. Our system, on average, reduces the error rate of the CR method by five folds on their data set. In addition, by using an iterative algorithm, our system has the added capability of using the NOESY data to correct assignment errors due to errors in predicting the amino acid and secondary structure type of each spin system. On a publicly available data set for human ubiquitin, where the typing accuracy is 83%, we achieve 91% accuracy, compared to the 59% accuracy obtained without correcting for such errors. In the case of automatically picked peaks, using assignment information from yeast ubiquitin, we achieve a fully automatic assignment with 97% accuracy. To our knowledge, this is the first system that can achieve fully automatic structure-based assignment directly from spectra. This has implications in NMR protein mutant studies, where the assignment step is repeated for each mutant. © Copyright 2011, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  4. Organometallic derivatives of furan. LII. Synthesis of carbofunctional furylsilanes and their 1H, 13C, and 29Si NMR spectroscopic and quantum-chemical investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukevits, E.; Erchak, N.P.; Castro, I.; Popelis, Yu.Yu.; Kozyrev, A.K.; Anoshkin, V.I.; Kovalev, I.F.

    1986-01-01

    Under the standard conditions for the synthesis of furan compounds it is possible to obtain the carbofunctional derivatives of silylated furfural with retention of the trimethylsilyl group in the ring. By NMR and CNDO/2 LCAO MO methods and also as a result of the investigation of the chemical characteristics of silylated furfural and its carbofunctional derivatives it was established that the introduction of a trimethylsilyl group at position 5 of the furan ring does not change the reactivity of the carbofunctional substituents at position 2. The electronic effects of the substituents are hardly transmitted through the furan ring at all. The effect of substituents in the carbofunctional furylsilanes on the electronic structure of the ring is additive

  5. FTIR, FT-Raman, FT-NMR and quantum chemical investigations of 3-acetylcoumarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V; Sakiladevi, S; Marchewka, M K; Mohan, S

    2013-05-15

    3-Acetylcoumarin (3AC) was synthesised by a Knoevenagel reaction. Conformational analysis using the B3LYP method was also carried out to determine the most stable conformation of the compound. FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of 3AC have been recorded in the range 4000-400 and 4000-100 cm(-1), respectively. (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra have also been recorded. The complete vibrational assignment and analysis of the fundamental modes of the compound were carried out using the experimental FTIR and FT-Raman data and quantum mechanical studies. The experimental vibrational frequencies were compared with the wavenumbers obtained theoretically from the DFT-B3LYP/B3PW91 gradient calculations employing the standard 6-31G(**), high level 6-311++G(**) and cc-pVTZ basis sets for optimised geometry of the compound. The frontier molecular orbital energies of the compound are determined by DFT method. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Structure and dynamics of porcine submaxillary mucin as determined by natural abundance carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerken, T.A.; Jentoft, N.

    1987-01-01

    Nearly all of the resonances in the 13 C NMR spectrum of porcine submaxillary mucin glycoprotein (PSM) have been assigned to the peptide core carbons and to the carbons in the eight different oligosaccharide side chains that arise from the incomplete biosynthesis of the sialylated A blood group pentasaccharide. By use of these assignments, a nearly complete structural analysis of intact PSM has been performed without resorting to degradative chemical methods. Considerable structural variability in the carbohydrate side chains was observed between mucins obtained from different animals, while no variability was observed between glands in a single animal. The dynamics of the PSM core and carbohydrate side chains were examined by using the carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times and nuclear Overhauser enhancements of each assigned carbon resonance. The peptide core of PSM exhibits internal segmental flexibility that is virtually identical with that of ovine submaxillary mucin (OSM), whose carbohydrate side chain consists of the α-NeuNAc(2-6)α-Ga1NAc disaccharide. These results differ from most reports of glycoprotein dynamics, which typically find the terminal carbohydrate residues to be undergoing rapid internal rotation about their terminal glycosidic bonds. The results reported here are consistent with previous studies on the conformations of the A and H determinants derived from model oligosaccharides and further indicate that the conformations of these determinants are unchanged when covalently bound to the mucin peptide core. In spite of their carbohydrate side-chain heterogeneity, mucins appear to be ideal glycoproteins for the study of O-linked oligosaccharide conformation and dynamics and for the study of the effects of glycosylation on polypeptide conformation and dynamics

  7. Magnetic and structural properties of an octanuclear Cu(II) S=1/2 mesoscopic ring: Susceptibility and NMR measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lascialfari, A.; Jang, Z. H.; Borsa, F.; Gatteschi, D.; Cornia, A.; Rovai, D.; Caneschi, A.; Carretta, P.

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility, 1 H NMR and 63 Cu NMR-NQR experiments on two slightly different species of the molecular S=1/2 antiferromagnetic (AF) ring Cu8, [Cu 8 (dmpz) 8 (OH) 8 ]·2C 5 H 5 N (Cu8P) and [Cu 8 (dmpz) 8 (OH) 8 ]·2C 5 H 5 NO 2 (Cu8N), are presented. The magnetic energy levels are calculated exactly for an isotropic Heisenberg model Hamiltonian in zero magnetic field. From the magnetic susceptibility measurements we estimate the AF exchange coupling constant J∼1000 K and the resulting gap Δ∼500 K between the S T =0 ground state and the S T =1 first excited state. The 63,65 Cu NQR spectra indicate the presence of four crystallographically inequivalent copper nuclei in each ring. From the combination of the 63 Cu NQR spectra and of the 63 Cu NMR spectra at high magnetic field, we estimate the quadrupole coupling constant v Q of each site and the average asymmetry parameter η of the electric-field gradient tensor. The nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (NSLR) decreases exponentially on decreasing temperature for all nuclei investigated. The gap parameter extracted from 63 Cu NQR-NSLR is the same as for the susceptibility while a smaller value is obtained from the 63 Cu NMR-NSLR in an external magnetic field of 8.2 T. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  8. Broadband cross-polarization-based heteronuclear dipolar recoupling for structural and dynamic NMR studies of rigid and soft solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharkov, B. B.; Chizhik, V. I.; Dvinskikh, S. V.

    2016-01-01

    Dipolar recoupling is an essential part of current solid-state NMR methodology for probing atomic-resolution structure and dynamics in solids and soft matter. Recently described magic-echo amplitude- and phase-modulated cross-polarization heteronuclear recoupling strategy aims at efficient and robust recoupling in the entire range of coupling constants both in rigid and highly dynamic molecules. In the present study, the properties of this recoupling technique are investigated by theoretical analysis, spin-dynamics simulation, and experimentally. The resonance conditions and the efficiency of suppressing the rf field errors are examined and compared to those for other recoupling sequences based on similar principles. The experimental data obtained in a variety of rigid and soft solids illustrate the scope of the method and corroborate the results of analytical and numerical calculations. The technique benefits from the dipolar resolution over a wider range of coupling constants compared to that in other state-of-the-art methods and thus is advantageous in studies of complex solids with a broad range of dynamic processes and molecular mobility degrees

  9. Application of high-field n.m.r. spectroscopy to the structural elucidation of natural products. The structure of rubellin, a noval bufadienolide glycoside from Urginea rubella

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steyn, P.S.; Van Heerden, F.R.; Vleggaar, R.

    1986-01-01

    The structure and absolute configuration of rubellin, the major toxic principle of Urginea rubella, was determined by application of high-field 1 H n.m.r. spectroscopy. Rubellin proved to be a bufadienolide glycoside with the carbohydrate moiety doubly linked to the aglycone at the 2α- and 3β- positions

  10. NMR study of heteroligand lanthanide complexes. Structure and stoichiometry of chelates of cerium subgroup with 18-member polyethers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajbalov, S.P.; Kriger, Yu.G.

    1993-01-01

    Different ligand complexes of lanthanides were studied by the method of 1 H NMR, the results being presented. The literature data on the study of complexes of the class in solution were generalized. Detection of lanthanide-induced splitting of group CH 2 diastereotopic proton signals of macrocyclic polyethers in the complexes is enough to identify kinetically stable complexes, having inclusive type structure. 16 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Structural determination of abutilins A and B, new flavonoids from Abutilon pakistanicum, by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Bakhat; Imran, Muhammad; Hussain, Riaz; Ahmed, Zaheer; Malik, Abdul

    2010-02-01

    Two new flavonoids, abutilin A and B, were isolated from the chloroform soluble fraction of Abutilon pakistanicum and their structures assigned from (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra, DEPT and by 2D COSY, HMQC and HMBC experiments. Ferulic acid (3), (E)-cinnamic acid (4), 5-hydroxy-4',6,7,8-tetramethoxyflavone (5), kaempferol (6), luteolin (7) and luteolin 7-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (8) have also been reported from this species. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Structural modeling of the distamycin A-d(CGCGAATTCGCG)2 complex using 2D NMR and molecular mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelton, J.G.; Wemmer, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    The structure of the distamycin A-d(CGCGAATTCGCG) 2 complex has been determined through a combination of SKEWSY and NOESY 2D NMR experiments and molecular mechanics calculations. NMR data provided upper bounds on many proton-proton pairs. The advantage of the SKEWSY/NOESY method is that small groups of strongly coupled spins can be treated accurately as isolated systems. The AMBER molecular mechanics package, modified to include the NMR constraints, was used in energy refinements. Distamycin A fits snugly into the 5'-AATT-3' minor-groove binding site. Structural analysis revealed van der Waals contacts between A5, A6, and A18 C2H and drug H3 protons, potential three-center hydrogen bonding between drug amide protons and adenine N3 and thymine O2 atoms analogous to the spine of hydration in the crystal structure of the free DNA, and stacking of the sugar O1' atoms of A6-C21, T7-T20, and T8-T19, over drug pyrrole rings 1, 2, and 3, respectively. In addition to hydrophobic effects, hydrogen bonding, and electrostatic interactions proposed by others, it is suggested that stacking interactions between DNA sugar O ' atoms and the three drug pyrrole rings contribute to the stability of the complex

  13. NMR studies of chemical structural variation of insoluble organic matter from different carbonaceous chondrite groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, George D.; Alexander, Conel M. O.'D.

    2005-02-01

    Solid-state 1H and 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopic experiments have been performed on isolated meteoritic Insoluble Organic Matter (IOM) spanning four different carbonaceous chondrite meteorite groups; a CR2 (EET92042), a CI1 (Orgueil), a CM2 (Murchison), and the unique C2 meteorite, Tagish Lake. These solid state NMR experiments reveal considerable variation in bulk organic composition across the different meteorite group's IOM. The fraction of aromatic carbon increases as CR2 meteorite groups. Single pulse (SP) 13C magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR experiments reveal the presence of nanodiamonds with an apparent concentration ranking in the IOM of CR2 IOM of all four meteoritic IOM fractions are highly substituted. Fast spinning SP 1H MAS NMR spectral data combined with other NMR experimental data reveal that the average hydrogen content of sp 3 bonded carbon functional groups is low, requiring a high degree of aliphatic chain branching in each IOM fraction. The variation in chemistry across the meteorite groups is consistent with alteration by low temperature chemical oxidation. It is concluded that such chemistry principally affected the aliphatic moieties whereas the aromatic moieties and nanodiamonds may have been largely unaffected.

  14. Protein energetic conformational analysis from NMR chemical shifts (PECAN) and its use in determining secondary structural elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eghbalnia, Hamid R.; Wang Liya; Bahrami, Arash [National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison, Biochemistry Department (United States); Assadi, Amir [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Mathematics Department (United States); Markley, John L. [National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison, Biochemistry Department (United States)], E-mail: eghbalni@nmrfam.wisc.edu

    2005-05-15

    We present an energy model that combines information from the amino acid sequence of a protein and available NMR chemical shifts for the purposes of identifying low energy conformations and determining elements of secondary structure. The model ('PECAN', Protein Energetic Conformational Analysis from NMR chemical shifts) optimizes a combination of sequence information and residue-specific statistical energy function to yield energetic descriptions most favorable to predicting secondary structure. Compared to prior methods for secondary structure determination, PECAN provides increased accuracy and range, particularly in regions of extended structure. Moreover, PECAN uses the energetics to identify residues located at the boundaries between regions of predicted secondary structure that may not fit the stringent secondary structure class definitions. The energy model offers insights into the local energetic patterns that underlie conformational preferences. For example, it shows that the information content for defining secondary structure is localized about a residue and reaches a maximum when two residues on either side are considered. The current release of the PECAN software determines the well-defined regions of secondary structure in novel proteins with assigned chemical shifts with an overall accuracy of 90%, which is close to the practical limit of achievable accuracy in classifying the states.

  15. Protein energetic conformational analysis from NMR chemical shifts (PECAN) and its use in determining secondary structural elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eghbalnia, Hamid R.; Wang Liya; Bahrami, Arash; Assadi, Amir; Markley, John L.

    2005-01-01

    We present an energy model that combines information from the amino acid sequence of a protein and available NMR chemical shifts for the purposes of identifying low energy conformations and determining elements of secondary structure. The model ('PECAN', Protein Energetic Conformational Analysis from NMR chemical shifts) optimizes a combination of sequence information and residue-specific statistical energy function to yield energetic descriptions most favorable to predicting secondary structure. Compared to prior methods for secondary structure determination, PECAN provides increased accuracy and range, particularly in regions of extended structure. Moreover, PECAN uses the energetics to identify residues located at the boundaries between regions of predicted secondary structure that may not fit the stringent secondary structure class definitions. The energy model offers insights into the local energetic patterns that underlie conformational preferences. For example, it shows that the information content for defining secondary structure is localized about a residue and reaches a maximum when two residues on either side are considered. The current release of the PECAN software determines the well-defined regions of secondary structure in novel proteins with assigned chemical shifts with an overall accuracy of 90%, which is close to the practical limit of achievable accuracy in classifying the states

  16. Mn55 NMR investigation of the correlation between antiferromagnetism and ferroelectricity in TbMn2O5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, S.-H.; Reyes, A. P.; Hoch, M. J. R.; Moulton, W. G.; Kuhns, P. L.; Harter, A. G.; Hur, N.; Cheong, S.-W.

    2006-10-01

    The correlation between antiferromagnetism and ferroelectricity in magnetoelectric multiferroic TbMn2O5 has been investigated by zero-field Mn55 NMR. Antiferromagnetic transition near 40K is found to be first order. When an external field up to 7T is applied along the easy a axis, a dramatic change in the signal intensity is observed which is hysteretic in nature. Such effects are absent for H along the b and c axes. The observed field-induced signal enhancement is attributed to antiferromagnetic domain walls which are strongly coupled to ferroelectric domain walls. Experimental data suggest that this may be related to the field-induced ferromagnetic ordering of the Tb ion.

  17. Structural variation study of cobalt nanoparticles synthesized by co-precipitation method using 59Co NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjunatha, M.; Kumar, Rajeev; B. M., Siddesh; Sahoo, Balaram; Damle, R.; Ramesh, K. P.

    2018-04-01

    We have synthesized cobalt nanoparticles using co-precipitation method. Further, the two phases of the cobalt is monitored by varying the synthesis parameters. 59Co NMR and XRD are used as characterization tools to study the phase variation in the cobalt samples. XRD and NMR results show a remarkable correlation in the two samples (Co-1 and Co-2). Co-2 has predominant fcc and hcp phases, whereas, Co-1 has fcc phase with lower amount of hcp. Both the samples show same saturation magnetization (Ms) but there is a remarkable difference in the phase composition. Thus, 59Co NMR appears to be a good tool to identify the phase purity of the ferromagnetic cobalt samples.

  18. A protocol for the refinement of NMR structures using simultaneously pseudocontact shift restraints from multiple lanthanide ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sala, Davide; Giachetti, Andrea; Luchinat, Claudio, E-mail: luchinat@cerm.unifi.it; Rosato, Antonio, E-mail: rosato@cerm.unifi.it [University of Florence, Magnetic Resonance Center (CERM) (Italy)

    2016-11-15

    The binding of paramagnetic metal ions to proteins produces a number of different effects on the NMR spectra of the system. In particular, when the magnetic susceptibility of the metal ion is anisotropic, pseudocontact shifts (PCSs) arise and can be easily measured. They constitute very useful restraints for the solution structure determination of metal-binding proteins. In this context, there has been great interest in the use of lanthanide(III) ions to induce PCSs in diamagnetic proteins, e.g. through the replacement native calcium(II) ions. By preparing multiple samples in each of which a different ion of the lanthanide series is introduced, it is possible to obtain multiple independent PCS datasets that can be used synergistically to generate protein structure ensembles (typically called bundles). For typical NMR-based determination of protein structure, it is necessary to perform an energetic refinement of such initial bundles to obtain final structures whose geometric quality is suitable for deposition in the PDB. This can be conveniently done by using restrained molecular dynamics simulations (rMD) in explicit solvent. However, there are no available protocols for rMD using multiple PCS datasets as part of the restraints. In this work, we extended the PCS module of the AMBER MD package to handle multiple datasets and tuned a previously developed protocol for NMR structure refinement to achieve consistent convergence with PCS restraints. Test calculations with real experimental data show that this new implementation delivers the expected improvement of protein geometry, resulting in final structures that are of suitable quality for deposition. Furthermore, we observe that also initial structures generated only with traditional restraints can be successfully refined using traditional and PCS restraints simultaneously.

  19. Satelite structure in 59Co NMR spectrum of magnetically ordered Dysub(1-x)Ysub(x)Co2 intermetallic compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, Kazuyoshi; Hirosawa, Satoshi; Nakamura, Yoji

    1984-01-01

    The magnetic environment effect of cobalt in Dysub(1-x)Ysub(x)Co 2 has been studied by means of bulk magnetization and 59 Co spin-echo NMR measurements at 4.2K. Clearly resolved satellite structures of the NMR spectra have been observed. The hyperfine field distributions of 59 Co are decomposed into contributions of Co atoms in various nearest neighbor configurations of rare earth atoms. In this analysis the dipole field due to nearest neighbor rare earth moments plays an important role. The result indicates that the magnetic moment of Co in the RCo 2 cubic Laves phase pseudobinary compounds is quite sensitive to the nearest neighbor rare earth environment. (author)

  20. Structure of pyridine and quinoline vinyl ethers according to data from 1H and 13C NMR spectra and quantum-chemical calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afonin, A.V.; Voronov, V.K.; Andriankov, M.A.; Danovich, D.K.

    1987-01-01

    A systematic investigation of the structure of the vinyl ethers of heterocyclic compounds has not been undertaken. The present work was devoted to investigation of the stereochemical and electronic structure of the vinyl ethers of pyridine and quinoline. The PMR spectra of the samples were recorded for 5% solutions in deuterochloroform on a Tesla BS-497 spectrometer at 100 MHz. The 13 C NMR spectra were recorded on a Tesla BS-567A spectrometer at 25.1 MHz in deuterochloroform with the samples at concentrations of 30%. The internal standard was HMDS. The vinyl ethers of pyridine and quinoline exist preferentially in the nonplanar S-trans conformation. In the vinyl esters of pyridine and quinoline the p-π conjugation is concurrent in nature and depends on the position of the vinyloxy group in the heterocycle

  1. Experimental investigation of the lithium transport mechanisms in cementitious materials by NMR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venglovska, S.; Pel, L.; Adan, O.C.G.; Bakker, J.; Frangopol, D.M.; van Breugel, K.

    2017-01-01

    Lithium hydroxide can help to reduce and control the expansion of concrete caused by Alkalisilica reaction. In new concrete structures the lithium ions can be introduced as admixture to prevent ASR deleterious expansion. In existing structures the lithium ions need to be transported into the

  2. Two-dimensional NMR studies of squash family inhibitors. Sequence-specific proton assignments and secondary structure of reactive-site hydrolyzed Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krisnamoorthi, R.; Yuxi Gong; Chanlan Sun Lin (Kansas State Univ., Manhattan (United States)); VanderVelde, D. (Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence (United States))

    1992-01-28

    The solution structure of reactive-site hydrolyzed Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor III (CMTI-III*) was investigated by two-dimensional proton nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) spectroscopy. CMTI-III*, prepared by reacting CMTI-III with trypsin which cleaved the Arg5-Ile6 peptide bond, had the two fragments held together by a disulfide linkage. Sequence-specific {sup 1}H NMR resonance assignments were made for all the 29 amino acid residues of the protein. The secondary structure of CMTI-III*, as deduced from NOESY cross peaks and identification of slowly exchanging hydrogens, contains two turns, a 3{sub 10}-helix, and a triple-stranded {beta}-sheet. Sequential proton assignments were also made for the virgin inhibitor, CMTI-III, at pH 4.71, 30C. Comparison of backbone hydrogen chemical shifts of CMTI-III and CMTI-III* revealed significant changes for residues located far away from the reactive-site region as well as for those located near it, indicating tertiary structural changes that are transmitted through most of the 29 residues of the inhibitor protein. These chemical shift changes were relatively small compared to changes that occurred upon hydrolysis of the reactive-site peptide bond between Arg 5 and Ile6 in CMTI-III.

  3. 1H NMR structural characterization of a recombinant kringle 2 domain from human tissue-type plasminogen activator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byeon, I.J.L.; Llinas, M.; Kelley, R.F.

    1989-01-01

    The kringle 2 domain of human tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) has been characterized via 1 H NMR spectroscopy at 300 and 620 MHz. The experiments were performed on the isolated domain obtained by expression of the 174-263 portion of t-PA in Escherichia coli. The spectrum of t-Pa kringle 2 is characteristic of a globular structure and shows overall similarity to that of the plasminogen (PGN) kringle 4. Spectral comparison with human and bovine PGN kringle 4 identified side-chain resonances from Leu 46 , which afford a fingerprint of kringle folding, and from most of the aromatic ring spin systems. Ligand-binding studies confirm that t-PA kringle 2 binds L-lysine with an association constant K a ∼ 11.9 mM -1 . The data indicate that homologous or conserved residues relative to those that compose the lysine-binding sites of PGN kringles 1 and 4 are involved in the binding of L-lysine to t-PA kringle 2. These include Tyr 36 and, within the kringle inner loop, Trp 62 , His 64 , Trp 72 , and Tyr 74 . Several labile NH protons of t-PA kringle 2 exhibit retarded H-exchange kinetics, requiring more than a week in 2 H 2 O for full deuteration in the presence of L-lysine at 37 degree C. This reveals that kringle 2 is endowed with a compact, dynamically stable conformation. Proton Overhauser experiments in 1 H 2 O, centered on well-resolved NH resonances between 9.8 and 12 ppm, identify signals arising from the His 48a imidazole NH3 proton and the three Trp indole NH1 protons. Overall, the data indicate a highly structured conformation for the recombinant t-PA kringle 2 that is closely related to that of the previously investigated PGN kringles 1, 4, and 5

  4. NMR structure of the Arctic mutation of the Alzheimer's Aβ(1-40) peptide docked to SDS micelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usachev, K. S.; Filippov, A. V.; Khairutdinov, B. I.; Antzutkin, O. N.; Klochkov, V. V.

    2014-11-01

    The “Arctic” point mutation of the Alzheimer's amyloid β-peptide is a rare mutation leading to an early onset of Alzheimer's disease. The peptide may interact with neuronal membranes, where it can provide its toxic effects. We used 2D NMR spectroscopy to investigate the conformation of the “Arctic” mutant of Aβ1-40 Alzheimer's amyloid peptide in sodium dodecyl sulfate micelle solutions, which are the type of amphiphilic structures mimicking some properties of biomembranes. The study showed that the Arctic mutant of Aβ1-40 interacts with the surface of SDS micelles mainly through the Leu17-Asn27 310-helical region, while the Ile31-Val40 region is buried in the hydrophobic interior of the micelle. In contrast, wild-type Aβ1-40 interacts with SDS micelles through the Lys16-Asp23 α-helical region and Gly29-Met35. Both the Arctic mutant and the wild-type Aβ1-40 peptides interactions with SDS micelles are hydrophobic in nature. Aβ peptides are thought to be capable of forming pores in biomembranes that can cause changes in neuronal and endothelial cell membrane permeability. It has also been shown that Aβ peptides containing the “Arctic” mutation are more neurotoxic and aggregate more readily than the wild-type Aβ peptides at physiological conditions. Here, we propose that the extension of the helical structure of Leu17-Asn27 and a high aliphaticity (neutrality) of the C-terminal region in the Arctic Aβ peptides are consistent with the idea that formation of ion-permeable pores by Aβ oligomers may be one of prevailing mechanisms of a larger neuronal toxicity of the Arctic Aβ compared to the wild-type Aβ peptides, independent of oxidative damage and lipid peroxidation.

  5. Local electronic structure of TM-based alloys: a pulsed NMR study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerra, D.A.

    1984-01-01

    A pulsed NMR study on several transition metal + metalloid amorphous alloys is reported. The analisis of Knight shifts and nuclear spin-lattice relaxation of metalloids indicates a dominant contribution of p-electrons in the Fermi level density of state, supporting the existence of a p-d hibridization. (author) [pt

  6. Synthesis of Zinc Diethyldithiocarbamate (ZDEC) and Structure Characterization using Decoupling 1H NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sujarit, Jenjira; Phutdhawong, Weerachai

    2003-10-01

    A synthesis of zinc diethyldithiocarbamate (ZDEC) has been studied. The optimization mole ratio of the synthetic process was 2: 2: 2: 1 of diethylamine, carbondisulfide, sodium hydroxide, and zinc chloride. Characterization was carried out mainly by analyzing its spectroscopic properties especially decoupling 1 H NMR technique. ZDEC was obtained in 48.5% yield

  7. Determination of the Nucleic Acid Adducts Structure at the Nucleoside/Nucleotide Level by NMR Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dračínský, Martin; Pohl, Radek

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 2 (2015), s. 155-165 ISSN 0893-228X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-24880S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : NMR spectroscopy * nucleic acids * nucleotides Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.025, year: 2015

  8. Investigation on water status and distribution in broccoli and the effects of drying on water status using NMR and MRI methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Fangfang; Jin, Xin; Zhang, Lu; Chen, Xiao Dong

    2017-01-01

    Many quality attributes of food products are influenced by the water status and the microstructure. Low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods are applied to non-destructively monitor the water status and structure of food. The aim of this study is to

  9. HPLC-NMR INVESTIGATION OF THE ISOMERIZATION OF ALACHLOR-ETHANE SULFONIC ACID. (R829008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  10. Investigation of tautomeric transformations of adducts of 7,8-dicarba-nido-undecaborana(11) with derivatives of pyridine by 11B NMR spectroscopy method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, O.V.; Il'inchik, E.A.; Volkov, V.V.

    1999-01-01

    Tautomeric transformations are investigated in solutions of o-carborane(12) derivatives 7,8-C 2 B 9 H 11 ·Py(X), where Py(X)=4-picoline (4-CH 3 -C 5 H 4 N), 3-picoline (3-CH 3 -C 5 H 4 N), 4-stilbazol (4-C 6 H 5 -C 2 H 2 -C 5 H 4 N), 3-bromopyridine (3-Br-C 5 H 4 N) and 7,8-C 2 B 9 H 10 I·C 5 H 5 N. Uncovered tautomeric transformations are bound with migration of bridge hydrogen of C 2 B 9 H 11 cluster assisting in structure of these compounds. Signal of boron nuclei in 11 B NMR spectra is observed in the region of high field of spectrum if the nearest two atoms of boron are bounded by bridge hydrogen additionally. That permits to fix happening dynamic structural transformations of adducts investigated. The dependence of tautomeric equilibrium on nature of substituents introduced in heterocyclic ligand and carborane cluster. Increase of electron-acceptor properties of substituent induces displacement of equilibrium in the direction of tautomer bridge hydrogen in which is removed from boron atom bounded with substituent [ru

  11. IR, 1H NMR, mass, XRD and TGA/DTA investigations on the ciprofloxacin/iodine charge-transfer complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refat, Moamen S; El-Hawary, W F; Moussa, Mohamed A A

    2011-05-01

    The charge-transfer complex (CTC) of ciprofloxacin drug (CIP) as a donor with iodine (I(2)) as a sigma acceptor has been studied spectrophotometrically in CHCl(3). At maximum absorption bands, the stoichiometry of CIP:iodine system was found to be 1:1 ratio according to molar ratio method. The essential spectroscopic data like formation constant (K(CT)), molar extinction coefficient (ɛ(CT)), standard free energy (ΔG°), oscillator strength (f), transition dipole moment (μ), resonance energy (R(N)) and ionization potential (I(D)) were estimated. The spectroscopic techniques such as IR, (1)H NMR, mass and UV-vis spectra and elemental analyses (CHN) as well as TG-DTG and DTA investigations were used to characterize the chelating behavior of CIP/iodine charge-transfer complex. The iodine CT interaction was associated with a presence of intermolecular hydrogen bond. The X-ray investigation was carried out to investigate the iodine doping in the synthetic CT complex. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Solution structure of the 3'-5' cyclic dinucleotide d. A combined NMR, UV melting, and molecular mechanics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blommers, M.J.J.; Haasnoot, C.A.G.; Walters, J.A.L.I.; van der Marel, G.A.; van Boom, J.H.; Hilbers, C.W.

    1988-01-01

    The 3'-5' cyclic dinucleotide d 1 H and 13 C NMR experiments, UV-melting experiments, and molecular mechanics calculations. The 1 H and 13 C NMR spectra were analyzed by means of 2-dimensional NMR experiments. J-Coupling analysis of the 1D and 2D 1 H and 13 C spectra was used to determine the conformation of the ring systems in the molecule. It appeared that at low temperature (283 K) the deoxyribose sugars adopt a N-type conformation. The geometry is best described by an intermediate between the 3 2 T and 3 E forms. In addition, the authors were able to derive all other torsion angles in the phosphate backbone ring system, i.e., α + , β/sup t/, γ + , δ (=89/degrees/), ε/sup t/ and /zeta/ + . When the molecule is subjected to an energy minimization procedure (using the program AMBER), the sugar ring system retains, practically speaking, the torsion angles found from the NMR experiments, while the torsion angles around the glycosidic bond adopt a value of 175/degrees/ in the minimum energy conformation. UV-melting experiments indicate that two molecules can form a dimer in which the adenine bases are intercalated. The feasibility of this structure is indicated by molecular mechanics calculations. At higher temperatures the dimer is converted into separate monomers. In the monomer form the sugars exhibit S-pucker 20% of the time. Concomitantly with the conversion of the N- to the S-conformation, the torsion angles α and γ change

  13. Flow-through lipid nanotube arrays for structure-function studies of membrane proteins by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekmenev, Eduard Y; Gor'kov, Peter L; Cross, Timothy A; Alaouie, Ali M; Smirnov, Alex I

    2006-10-15

    A novel method for studying membrane proteins in a native lipid bilayer environment by solid-state NMR spectroscopy is described and tested. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) substrates with flow-through 175 nm wide and 60-mum-long nanopores were employed to form macroscopically aligned peptide-containing lipid bilayers that are fluid and highly hydrated. We demonstrate that the surfaces of both leaflets of such bilayers are fully accessible to aqueous solutes. Thus, high hydration levels as well as pH and desirable ion and/or drug concentrations could be easily maintained and modified as desired in a series of experiments with the same sample. The method allows for membrane protein NMR experiments in a broad pH range that could be extended to as low as 1 and as high as 12 units for a period of up to a few hours and temperatures as high as 70 degrees C without losing the lipid alignment or bilayers from the nanopores. We demonstrate the utility of this method by a solid-state 19.6 T (17)O NMR study of reversible binding effects of mono- and divalent ions on the chemical shift properties of the Leu(10) carbonyl oxygen of transmembrane pore-forming peptide gramicidin A (gA). We further compare the (17)O shifts induced by binding metal ions to the binding of protons in the pH range from 1 to 12 and find a significant difference. This unexpected result points to a difference in mechanisms for ion and proton conduction by the gA pore. We believe that a large number of solid-state NMR-based studies, including structure-function, drug screening, proton exchange, pH, and other titration experiments, will benefit significantly from the method described here.

  14. Computational NMR, IR/RAMAN calculations in sodium pravastatin: Investigation of the Self-Assembled Nanostructure of Pravastatin-LDH (Layered Double Hydroxides) Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Philippe; Cunha, Vanessa; Gonçalves, Marcos; Petrilli, Helena; Constantino, Vera; Instituto de Física, Departamento de Física de Materiais e Mecânica Team; Instituto de Química, Departamento de Química Fundamental Team

    2013-03-01

    Layered double hydroxides (LDH) can be used as nanocontainers for immobilization of Pravastatin, in order to obtain suitable drug carriers. The material's structure and spectroscopic properties were analyzed by NMR, IR/RAMAN and supported by theoretical calculations. Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations were performed using the Gaussian03 package. The geometry optimizations were performed considering the single crystal X-ray diffraction data of tert-octylamonium salt of Pravastatin. Tetramethylsilane (TMS), obtained with the same basis set, was used as reference for calculating the chemical shift of 13C. A scaling factor was used to compare theoretical and experimental harmonic vibrational frequencies. Through the NMR and IR/RAMAN spectra, we were able to make precise assignments of the NMR and IR/RAMAN of Sodium Pravastatin. We acknowledge support from CAPES, INEO and CNPQ.

  15. A primer to nutritional metabolomics by NMR spectroscopy and chemometrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savorani, Francesco; Rasmussen, Morten Arendt; Mikkelsen, Mette Skau

    2013-01-01

    This paper outlines the advantages and disadvantages of using high throughput NMR metabolomics for nutritional studies with emphasis on the workflow and data analytical methods for generation of new knowledge. The paper describes one-by-one the major research activities in the interdisciplinary...... metabolomics platform and highlights the opportunities that NMR spectra can provide in future nutrition studies. Three areas are emphasized: (1) NMR as an unbiased and non-destructive platform for providing an overview of the metabolome under investigation, (2) NMR for providing versatile information and data...... structures for multivariate pattern recognition methods and (3) NMR for providing a unique fingerprint of the lipoprotein status of the subject. For the first time in history, by combining NMR spectroscopy and chemometrics we are able to perform inductive nutritional research as a complement to the deductive...

  16. X-ray and 1H-NMR spectroscopic studies of the structures and conformations of the new nootropic agents RU-35929, RU-47010 and RU-35965

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Maria E.; Bandoli, Giuliano; Casellato, Umberto; Pappalardo, Giuseppe C.; Toja, Emilio

    1990-10-01

    The crystal and molecular structures of the nootropics (±)1-benzenesulphonyl-2-oxo-5-ethoxypyrrolidine ( 1), (±)1-(3-pyridinylsulphonyl)-2-oxo-5-ethoxypyrrolidine ( 2) and (±)1-benzenesulphonyl-2-oxo-5-isopropyloxypyrrolidine ( 3) have been determined by X-ray analysis. The solution conformation of 1, 2 and 3 has been investigated by 1H NMR spectroscopy. In the solid state, the main feature consists of the similar structural parameters and conformations, with the exception of the conformation adopted by the 5-ethoxy moiety which changes on passing from 1 to 2. The solid state overall enveloped conformation of the 2-pyrrolidinone ring for the three nootropics is found to be retained in solution on the basis of NMR evidence. Comparison between calculated and experimental coupling constant values shows that one of the two possible puckered opposite conformational isomers (half-chair shapes) occurs in solution. The relative pharmacological potencies of 1, 2 and 3 cannot therefore be interpreted in terms of the different conformation features presently detectable by available experimental methods.

  17. High-performance liquid chromatography on-line coupled to high-field NMR and mass spectrometry for structure elucidation of constituents of Hypericum perforatum L

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, S. H.; Jensen, A. G.; Cornett, Claus

    1999-01-01

    The on-line separation and structure elucidation of naphthodianthrones, flavonoids, and other constituents of an extract from Hypericum perforatum L, using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled on-line with ultraviolet-visible, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and mass spectrometry...... (MS) is described. A conventional reversed-phase HPLC system using ammonium acetate as the buffer substance in the eluent tvas used, and proton NMR spectra were obtained on a 500 MHz NMR instrument. The MS and MS/MS analyses were performed using negative electrospray ionization, In the present study...

  18. Segmental isotope labeling of proteins for NMR structural study using a protein S tag for higher expression and solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Swapna, G. V. T.; Wu, Kuen-Phon; Afinogenova, Yuliya; Conover, Kenith; Mao, Binchen; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Inouye, Masayori

    2012-01-01

    A common obstacle to NMR studies of proteins is sample preparation. In many cases, proteins targeted for NMR studies are poorly expressed and/or expressed in insoluble forms. Here, we describe a novel approach to overcome these problems. In the protein S tag-intein (PSTI) technology, two tandem 92-residue N-terminal domains of protein S (PrS 2 ) from Myxococcus xanthus is fused at the N-terminal end of a protein to enhance its expression and solubility. Using intein technology, the isotope-labeled PrS 2 -tag is replaced with non-isotope labeled PrS 2 -tag, silencing the NMR signals from PrS 2 -tag in isotope-filtered 1 H-detected NMR experiments. This method was applied to the E. coli ribosome binding factor A (RbfA), which aggregates and precipitates in the absence of a solubilization tag unless the C-terminal 25-residue segment is deleted (RbfAΔ25). Using the PrS 2 -tag, full-length well-behaved RbfA samples could be successfully prepared for NMR studies. PrS 2 (non-labeled)-tagged RbfA (isotope-labeled) was produced with the use of the intein approach. The well-resolved TROSY-HSQC spectrum of full-length PrS 2 -tagged RbfA superimposes with the TROSY-HSQC spectrum of RbfAΔ25, indicating that PrS 2 -tag does not affect the structure of the protein to which it is fused. Using a smaller PrS-tag, consisting of a single N-terminal domain of protein S, triple resonance experiments were performed, and most of the backbone 1 H, 15 N and 13 C resonance assignments for full-length E. coli RbfA were determined. Analysis of these chemical shift data with the Chemical Shift Index and heteronuclear 1 H– 15 N NOE measurements reveal the dynamic nature of the C-terminal segment of the full-length RbfA protein, which could not be inferred using the truncated RbfAΔ25 construct. CS-Rosetta calculations also demonstrate that the core structure of full-length RbfA is similar to that of the RbfAΔ25 construct.

  19. Structure of the interleukin-2 tyrosine kinase Src homology 2 domain; comparison between X-ray and NMR-derived structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, Raji E.; Ginder, Nathaniel D.; Hoy, Julie A.; Nix, Jay C.; Fulton, D. Bruce; Honzatko, Richard B.; Andreotti, Amy H.

    2012-01-01

    The interleukin-2 tyrosine kinase Src homology 2 domain was crystallized and its structure was solved to 2.35 Å resolution. The structure reveals a domain-swapped dimer that is related to other dimeric SH2 domains solved previously. The cis–trans-prolyl isomerization that is evident from solution studies of Itk SH2 cannot be observed in the crystal structure. The crystal structure of the interleukin-2 tyrosine kinase Src homology domain (Itk SH2) is described and it is found that unlike in studies of this domain using NMR spectroscopy, cis–trans-prolyl isomerization is not readily detected in the crystal structure. Based on similarities between the Itk SH2 crystal form and the cis form of the Itk SH2 NMR structure, it is concluded that it is likely that the prolyl imide bond at least in part adopts the cis conformation in the crystal form. However, the lack of high-resolution data and the dynamic nature of the proline-containing loop mean that the precise imide-bond conformation cannot be determined and prolyl cis–trans isomerization in the crystal cannot be ruled out. Given the preponderance of structures that have been solved by X-ray crystallography in the Protein Data Bank, this result supports the notion that prolyl isomerization in folded proteins has been underestimated among known structures. Interestingly, while the precise status of the proline residue is ambiguous, Itk SH2 crystallizes as a domain-swapped dimer. The domain-swapped structure of Itk SH2 is similar to the domain-swapped SH2 domains of Grb2 and Nck, with domain swapping occurring at the β-meander region of all three SH2 domains. Thus, for Itk SH2 structural analysis by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography revealed very different structural features: proline isomerization versus domain-swapped dimerization, respectively

  20. Structural investigation of biogenic ferrihydrite nanoparticles dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasoiu, M.; Ishchenko, L.A.; Stolyar, S.V.; Iskhakov, R.S.; Rajkher, Yu.L.; Kuklin, A.I.; Solov'ev, D.V.; Arzumanyan, G.M.; Kurkin, T.S.; Aranghel, D.

    2010-01-01

    Structural properties of biogenic ferrihydrite nanoparticles produced by bacteria Klebsiella oxytoca are investigated. Investigations of morphology and size of particles dispersed in water by means of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and small angle X-ray scattering measurements were performed. By model calculations followed by fitting procedure the structural parameters of a cylinder of radius R = (4.87 ± 0.02) nm and height L = (2.12 ± 0.04) nm are obtained

  1. Magnetic and structural properties of an octanuclear Cu(II) S=1/2 mesoscopic ring: Susceptibility and NMR measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lascialfari, A. [Department of Physics ' ' A. Volta' ' and Unita INFM, University of Pavia, Via Bassi 6, I-27100 Pavia, (Italy); Jang, Z. H. [Ames Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Borsa, F. [Department of Physics ' ' A. Volta' ' and Unita INFM, University of Pavia, Via Bassi 6, I-27100 Pavia, (Italy); Ames Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Gatteschi, D. [Department of Chemistry, University of Florence, Via Maragliano 77, I-50144 Florence, (Italy); Cornia, A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Modena, Via Campi 183, I-41100 Modena, (Italy); Rovai, D. [Department of Chemistry, University of Florence, Via Maragliano 77, I-50144 Florence, (Italy); Caneschi, A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Florence, Via Maragliano 77, I-50144 Florence, (Italy); Carretta, P. [Department of Physics ' ' A. Volta' ' and Unita INFM, University of Pavia, Via Bassi 6, I-27100 Pavia, (Italy)

    2000-03-01

    Magnetic susceptibility, {sup 1}H NMR and {sup 63}Cu NMR-NQR experiments on two slightly different species of the molecular S=1/2 antiferromagnetic (AF) ring Cu8, [Cu{sub 8}(dmpz){sub 8}(OH){sub 8}]{center_dot}2C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N (Cu8P) and [Cu{sub 8}(dmpz){sub 8}(OH){sub 8}]{center_dot}2C{sub 5}H{sub 5}NO{sub 2} (Cu8N), are presented. The magnetic energy levels are calculated exactly for an isotropic Heisenberg model Hamiltonian in zero magnetic field. From the magnetic susceptibility measurements we estimate the AF exchange coupling constant J{approx}1000 K and the resulting gap {delta}{approx}500 K between the S{sub T}=0 ground state and the S{sub T}=1 first excited state. The {sup 63,65}Cu NQR spectra indicate the presence of four crystallographically inequivalent copper nuclei in each ring. From the combination of the {sup 63}Cu NQR spectra and of the {sup 63}Cu NMR spectra at high magnetic field, we estimate the quadrupole coupling constant v{sub Q} of each site and the average asymmetry parameter {eta} of the electric-field gradient tensor. The nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (NSLR) decreases exponentially on decreasing temperature for all nuclei investigated. The gap parameter extracted from {sup 63}Cu NQR-NSLR is the same as for the susceptibility while a smaller value is obtained from the {sup 63}Cu NMR-NSLR in an external magnetic field of 8.2 T. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  2. Solution NMR structure of the V27A drug resistant mutant of influenza A M2 channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pielak, Rafal M. [Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Program in Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Chou, James J., E-mail: chou@cmcd.hms.harvard.edu [Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} This paper reports the structure of the V27A drug resistant mutant of the M2 channel of influenza A virus. {yields} High quality NMR data allowed a better-defined structure for the C-terminal region of the M2 channel. {yields} Using the structure, we propose a proton transfer pathway during M2 proton conduction. {yields} Structural comparison between the wildtype, V27A and S31N variants allowed an in-depth analysis of possible modes of drug resistance. {yields} Distinct feature of the V27A channel pore also provides an explanation for its faster rate of proton conduction. -- Abstract: The M2 protein of influenza A virus forms a proton-selective channel that is required for viral replication. It is the target of the anti-influenza drugs, amantadine and rimantadine. Widespread drug resistant mutants, however, has greatly compromised the effectiveness of these drugs. Here, we report the solution NMR structure of the highly pathogenic, drug resistant mutant V27A. The structure reveals subtle structural differences from wildtype that maybe linked to drug resistance. The V27A mutation significantly decreases hydrophobic packing between the N-terminal ends of the transmembrane helices, which explains the looser, more dynamic tetrameric assembly. The weakened channel assembly can resist drug binding either by destabilizing the rimantadine-binding pocket at Asp44, in the case of the allosteric inhibition model, or by reducing hydrophobic contacts with amantadine in the pore, in the case of the pore-blocking model. Moreover, the V27A structure shows a substantially increased channel opening at the N-terminal end, which may explain the faster proton conduction observed for this mutant. Furthermore, due to the high quality NMR data recorded for the V27A mutant, we were able to determine the structured region connecting the channel domain to the C-terminal amphipathic helices that was not determined in the wildtype structure. The new structural

  3. Determination of structural topology of a membrane protein in lipid bilayers using polarization optimized experiments (POE) for static and MAS solid state NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mote, Kaustubh R. [University of Minnesota, Department of Chemistry (United States); Gopinath, T. [University of Minnesota, Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics (United States); Veglia, Gianluigi, E-mail: vegli001@umn.edu [University of Minnesota, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2013-10-15

    The low sensitivity inherent to both the static and magic angle spinning techniques of solid-state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy has thus far limited the routine application of multidimensional experiments to determine the structure of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers. Here, we demonstrate the advantage of using a recently developed class of experiments, polarization optimized experiments, for both static and MAS spectroscopy to achieve higher sensitivity and substantial time-savings for 2D and 3D experiments. We used sarcolipin, a single pass membrane protein, reconstituted in oriented bicelles (for oriented ssNMR) and multilamellar vesicles (for MAS ssNMR) as a benchmark. The restraints derived by these experiments are then combined into a hybrid energy function to allow simultaneous determination of structure and topology. The resulting structural ensemble converged to a helical conformation with a backbone RMSD {approx}0.44 A, a tilt angle of 24 Degree-Sign {+-} 1 Degree-Sign , and an azimuthal angle of 55 Degree-Sign {+-} 6 Degree-Sign . This work represents a crucial first step toward obtaining high-resolution structures of large membrane proteins using combined multidimensional oriented solid-state NMR and magic angle spinning solid-state NMR.

  4. Myristoylation as a general method for immobilization and alignment of soluble proteins for solid-state NMR structural studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesleh, M.F.; Valentine, K.G.; Opella, S.J.; Louis, J.M.; Gronenborn, A.M.

    2003-01-01

    N-terminal myristoylation of the immunoglobulin-binding domain of protein G (GB1) from group G Streptococcus provides the means to bind the protein to aligned phospholipid bilayers for solid-state NMR structural studies. The myristoylated protein is immobilized by its interactions with bilayers, and the sample alignment enables orientationally dependent 15 N chemical shifts and 1 H- 15 N-dipolar couplings to be measured. Spectra calculated for the average solution NMR structure of the protein at various orientations with respect to the magnetic field direction were compared to the experimental spectrum. The best fit identified the orientation of the myristoylated protein on the lipid bilayers, and demonstrated that the protein adopts a similar structure in both its myristoylated and non-myristoylated forms, and that the structure is not grossly distorted by its interaction with the phosholipid bilayer surface or by its location in the restricted aqueous space between bilayer leaflets. The protein is oriented such that its charged sides face the phosphatidylcholine headgroups of the lipids with the single amphiphilic helix running parallel to the bilayer surface

  5. What Is the True Color of Fresh Meat? A Biophysical Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment Investigating the Effects of Ligand Binding on Myoglobin Using Optical, EPR, and NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linenberger, Kimberly; Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Crowder, Michael W.; McCarrick, Robert; Lorigan, Gary A.; Tierney, David L.

    2011-01-01

    With an increased focus on integrated upper-level laboratories, we present an experiment integrating concepts from inorganic, biological, and physical chemistry content areas. Students investigate the effects of ligand strength on the spectroscopic properties of the heme center in myoglobin using UV-vis, [superscript 1]H NMR, and EPR…

  6. Binding of Mn(II) ions to lecithin bilayers as determined by ESR and NMR investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabatini, G.; Tiezzi, E.; Valensin, G.

    1983-01-01

    The Mn(II)-lecithin system was investigated by means of paramagnetic relaxation studies. Unsonicated and sonicated aqueous dispersions were considered at various temperatures and pH values. Information was derived from both the frequency dependence of the ESR line shape and the paramagnetic contributions to the water proton relaxation rates. A dynamic equilibrium was suggested, by taking into account the role of the through-water cation binding in the metal-lipid interaction

  7. NMR Investigation of the complexation of (S-2-isopropyl- 1-(o-nitrophenylsulfonylaziridine with -cyclodextrin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Z. Sliman

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aziridines are known to undergo hydrolysis in the presence of cyclodextrins, whereas the latter are largely investigated as potential vectors of biologically active compounds. Despite this easy cyclodextrin-induced cleavage of aziridines in aqueous medium, it was of interest to find out a model aziridine derivative that would be sufficiently water-stable and form a stable complex with b-cyclodextrin in aqueous medium, so that it could be used as a reference in future formulations or vectorization work. Among compounds we have investigated, we found out that only (S-2-isopropyl-1-(o-nitrophenylsulfonylaziridine complied with the above-mentioned solubility and stability requirements. NMR studies of the inclusion complex of this derivative with b-cyclodextrin provided useful parameters related to the stoichiometry of the complex and the association constant Ka. The geometry of the complex was assessed by 2D-ROESY experiments, suggesting a deep insertion of the aziridine into the cavity of b-cyclodextrin.

  8. Vibrational, NMR and UV-visible spectroscopic investigation and NLO studies on benzaldehyde thiosemicarbazone using computational calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorthy, N.; Prabakar, P. C. Jobe; Ramalingam, S.; Pandian, G. V.; Anbusrinivasan, P.

    2016-04-01

    In order to investigate the vibrational, electronic and NLO characteristics of the compound; benzaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (BTSC), the XRD, FT-IR, FT-Raman, NMR and UV-visible spectra were recorded and were analysed with the calculated spectra by using HF and B3LYP methods with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The XRD results revealed that the stabilized molecular systems were confined in orthorhombic unit cell system. The cause for the change of chemical and physical properties behind the compound has been discussed makes use of Mulliken charge levels and NBO in detail. The shift of molecular vibrational pattern by the fusing of ligand; thiosemicarbazone group with benzaldehyde has been keenly observed. The occurrence of in phase and out of phase molecular interaction over the frontier molecular orbitals was determined to evaluate the degeneracy of the electronic energy levels. The thermodynamical studies of the temperature region 100-1000 K to detect the thermal stabilization of the crystal phase of the compound were investigated. The NLO properties were evaluated by the determination of the polarizability and hyperpolarizability of the compound in crystal phase. The physical stabilization of the geometry of the compound has been explained by geometry deformation analysis.

  9. {sup 119}Sn NMR investigations on superconducting Ca{sub 3}Ir{sub 4}Sn{sub 13}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, Rajib; Brueckner, Felix; Guenther, Marco; Klauss, Hans-Henning [IFP, TU Dresden (Germany); Petrovic, Cedomir; Wang, Kefeng [CMPMS, BNL, Upton, NY (United States); Luetkens, Hubertus; Biswas, Pabitra; Morenzoni, Elvezio; Amato, Alex [PSI, Villigen (Switzerland)

    2014-07-01

    Ca{sub 3}Ir{sub 4}Sn{sub 13} was found to exhibit superconducting transition with T{sub c} ∼ 7 K. It received considerable attention due to the possible coexistence of superconductivity and ferromagnetic spin fluctuation as well as the three-dimensional charge density wave (CDW) from the superlattice transition. While thermal, transport, and thermodynamic characterization of Ca{sub 3}Ir{sub 4}Sn{sub 13} single crystals suggest that it is a weakly correlated nodeless superconductor, recent μSR investigation reveals that the electron-phonon pairing interaction is in the strong-coupling limit. Here we present {sup 119}Sn NMR investigations on Ca{sub 3}Ir{sub 4}Sn{sub 13} polycrystalline samples and discuss the symmetry of the superconducting order parameter together with the normal state properties. Our preliminary results of spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T{sub 1}) indicate that this is a BCS superconductor with weak-coupling limit.

  10. Communication: Proton NMR dipolar-correlation effect as a method for investigating segmental diffusion in polymer melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lozovoi, A.; Mattea, C.; Stapf, S.; Herrmann, A.; Rössler, E. A.; Fatkullin, N.

    2016-01-01

    A simple and fast method for the investigation of segmental diffusion in high molar mass polymer melts is presented. The method is based on a special function, called proton dipolar-correlation build-up function, which is constructed from Hahn Echo signals measured at times t and t/2. The initial rise of this function contains additive contributions from both inter- and intramolecular magnetic dipole-dipole interactions. The intermolecular contribution depends on the relative mean squared displacements (MSDs) of polymer segments from different macromolecules, while the intramolecular part reflects segmental reorientations. Separation of both contributions via isotope dilution provides access to segmental displacements in polymer melts at millisecond range, which is hardly accessible by other methods. The feasibility of the method is illustrated by investigating protonated and deuterated polybutadiene melts with molecular mass 196 000 g/mol at different temperatures. The observed exponent of the power law of the segmental MSD is close to 0.32 ± 0.03 at times when the root MSD is in between 45 Å and 75 Å, and the intermolecular proton dipole-dipole contribution to the total proton Hahn Echo NMR signal is larger than 50% and increases with time.

  11. Computer-aided structure elucidation Pt. 2. /sup 1/H-NMR data interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szalontai, G; Recsey, Zs; Csapo, Z [Nehezvegyipari Kutato Intezet, Veszprem (Hungary)

    1982-01-01

    A computerized /sup 1/H-NMR data interpretation system has been developed using the artificial intelligence approach. An attempt has been made to overcome the difficulties of interpreting higher order spin systems. Proton-containing functional groups are divided into subgroups according to their spectroscopic behaviour and the information they bear. Spin simulation is used to study the effect of substituents on the higher order splitting patterns. Illustrative examples are given.

  12. Functional Group and Structural Characterization of Unmodified and Functionalized Lignin by Titration, Elemental Analysis, 1H NMR and FTIR Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Bairami Habashi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Lignin is the second most abundant polymer in the world after cellulose. Therefore, characterization of the structure and functional groups of lignin in order to assess its potential applications in various technical fields has become a necessity. One of the major problems related to the characterization of lignin is the lack of well-defined protocols and standards. In this paper, systematic studies have been done to characterize the structure and functional groups of lignin quantitatively using different techniques such as elemental analysis, titration and 1H NMR and FTIR techniques. Lignin as a black liquor was obtained from Choka Paper Factory and it was purified before any test. The lignin was reacted with α-bromoisobutyryl bromide to calculate the number of hydroxyl and methoxyl moles. Using 1H NMR spectroscopic method on α-bromoisobutyrylated lignin (BiBL in the presence of a given amount of N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF as an internal standard, the number of moles of hydroxyl and methoxyl groups per gram of lignin was found to be 6.44 mmol/g and 6.64 mmol/g, respectively. Using aqueous titration, the number of moles of phenolic hydroxyl groups and carboxyl groups of the lignin were calculated as 3.13 mmol/g and 2.84 mmol/g, respectively. The findings obtained by 1H NMR and elemental analysis indicated to phenyl propane unit of the lignin with C9 structural formula as C9 HAl 3.84HAr2.19S0.2O0.8(OH1.38(OCH31.42. Due to poor solubility of the lignin in tetrahydrofuran (THF, acetylated lignin was used in the GPC analysis, by which number-average molecular weight  of the lignin was calculated as 992 g/mol.

  13. NMR study of local diamagnetic properties of carbon structures with multiwalled nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaev, E.G.; Omel'yanovsky, O.E.; Prudkovsky, V.S.; Sadakov, A.V.; Tsebro, V.I.

    2009-01-01

    The reasons for the high diamagnetic susceptibility of carbon columns, which are covered with a nanotube mesh, from the interior part of cathode deposits have been studied by means of NMR. A comparative study is made of the 13 C NMR spectra and the magnetic susceptibility of carbon columns before and after ultrasonic processing as well as of finely dispersed material, obtained as a result of such processing, enriched with multilayer nanotubes. The strong diamagnetism of the carbon columns is apparently associated with a quite dense conglomerate of graphite particles, nanotubes, and multilayer polyhedral particles present in their core and not with the surface mesh of multilayer nanotubes. To make a more accurate determination of the character of the anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility of multilayer carbon nanotubes, the form of the 13 C NMR spectra of samples enriched with multilayer nanotubes, where the nanotubes are either not oriented or only partially oriented, is analyzed. It is shown that the diamagnetic susceptibility of multilayer carbon nanotubes is highest when the magnetic field is oriented perpendicular to their axis

  14. Structural Characterization of MAO and Related Aluminum Complexes. 1. Solid-State 27 Al NMR with Comparison to EFG Tensors from ab Initio Molecular Orbital Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, Pamela L.; Harwell, Chris; Mrse, Anthony A.; Emery, Earl F.; Gan, Zhedong; Caldwell, Tod; Reyes, Arneil P.; Kuhns, Philip; Hoyt, David W.; Simeral, Larry S.; Hall, Randall W.; Butler, Leslie G.

    2001-11-07

    Aminato and propanolato aluminum clusters with 3-, 4-, and 6-coordinate aluminum sites are studied with three 27Al NMR techniques optimized for large 27Al Quadrupole coupling constants: field-swept, frequency-stepped, and high-field MAS NMR. The 27Al quadrupole coupling constants and asymmetry parameters of molecular species, both experimental and derived from ab initio molecular orbital calculations, are correlated with structure.

  15. **1**5N-NMR INVESTIGATION OF HYDROXYLAMINE DERIVATIZED HUMIC SUBSTANCES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Arterburn, Jeffrey B.; Mikita, Michael A.

    1986-01-01

    Humic substances are the most abundant naturally occurring refactory organic compounds in soils and water. They have a broad range of physical, chemical and physiological properties. In soils, humic substances contribute to the cation exchange capacity, help maintain the physical structure, and play a role in plant growth and nutrition. In aquatic systems, humic substances serve to regulate the levels of inorganic constituents, yield trihalomethanes upon chlorination, and transport or concentrate organic and inorganic pollutants. The oxygen containing functional groups of humic and fulvic acids are believed to play a key role in the chemical properties of humic substances. This study was undertaken to gain additional information on the specific types of oxygen functionalities in humic substances. Since the analysis of hydroxyl moieties had been earlier established, we focused our attention on the analysis of ketone and aldehyde functional groups in humic substances.

  16. NMR structure of the N-terminal domain of capsid protein from the Mason-Pfizer monkey virus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macek, Pavel; Chmelík, Josef; Křížová, Ivana; Kadeřávek, P.; Padrta, P.; Žídek, L.; Wildová, Marcela; Hadravová, Romana; Chaloupková, R.; Pichová, Iva; Ruml, T.; Rumlová, Michaela; Sklenář, V.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 392, č. 1 (2009), s. 100-114 ISSN 0022-2836 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC545; GA MŠk 1M0508; GA ČR GA204/09/1388; GA ČR GESCO/06/E001 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520; MŠk(CZ) LC06030 Program:1M; LC Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : M-PMV * betaretroviruses * capsid protein * NMR structure * internal dynamics Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.871, year: 2009

  17. On the structure of amorphous calcium carbonate--a detailed study by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebel, Holger; Neumann, Markus; Mayer, Christian; Epple, Matthias

    2008-09-01

    The calcium carbonate phases calcite, aragonite, vaterite, monohydrocalcite (calcium carbonate monohydrate), and ikaite (calcium carbonate hexahydrate) were studied by solid-state NMR spectroscopy ( (1)H and (13)C). Further model compounds were sodium hydrogencarbonate, potassium hydrogencarbonate, and calcium hydroxide. With the help of these data, the structure of synthetically prepared additive-free amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) was analyzed. ACC contains molecular water (as H 2O), a small amount of mobile hydroxide, and no hydrogencarbonate. This supports the concept of ACC as a transient precursor in the formation of calcium carbonate biominerals.

  18. Bentonite pore structure based on SAXS, chloride exclusion and NMR studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muurinen, A.; Carlsson, T.

    2013-11-01

    Water-saturated bentonite is planned to be used in many countries as an important barrier component in high-level nuclear waste (HLW) repositories. Knowledge about the microstructure of the bentonite and the distribution of water between interlayer and non-interlayer pores is important for modelling of long-term processes. In this work the microstructure of water-saturated samples prepared from Na montmorillonite, Ca-montmorillonite, sodium bentonite MX-80 and calcium bentonite Deponit CaN were studied with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and small-angle xray scattering spectroscopy (SAXS). The sample dry densities ranged between 0.3 and 1.6 g/cm 3 . The NMR technique was used to get information about the volumes of different water types in the bentonite samples. The results were obtained using 1H NMR spin-lattice T 1ρ relaxation time measurements using the short inter-pulse method. The interpretation of the NMR results was made by fitting distributions of exponentials to observed decay curves. The SAXS measurements were used to get information about the size distribution of the interlayer distance of montmorillonite. The chloride porosity measurements and Donnan exclusion calculations were used together with the SAXS results for evaluation of the bentonite microstructure. The NMR studies and SAXS studies coupled with Cl porosity measurements provided very similar pictures of how the porewater is divided in interlayer and non-interlayer water in MX-80 bentonite. In the case where MX-80 of a dry density 1.6 g/cm 3 was equilibrated with 0.1 M NaCl solution, the results indicated an interlayer porosity of 30 % and non-interlayer porosity of 12 %. The interlayer space mainly contained two water layers but also spaces with more water layers were present. The average size of the non-interlayer pores was evaluated to be 120 - 150 A. From the montmorillonite surface area 98 % was interlayer and 2 % non-interlayer. Evaluation of the interlayer and non

  19. Setting the anomeric effect against steric effects in simple acyclic acetals. Non-anomeric non-classical conformations. An n.m.r. and molecular mechanics investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, J. Edgar; Heki, Katsuhiko; Hirota, Minoru

    1987-01-01

    N.m.r. parameters for a series of simple aliphatic acetals indicate that the preferred conformation changes from the anomeric one found in formaldehyde dimethyl acetal (formal), to a new one whose structure is suggested by molecular mechanics calculations.......N.m.r. parameters for a series of simple aliphatic acetals indicate that the preferred conformation changes from the anomeric one found in formaldehyde dimethyl acetal (formal), to a new one whose structure is suggested by molecular mechanics calculations....

  20. H and C NMR investigations of Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 thin-film precursor solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assink, R.A.; Schwartz, R.W.

    1993-01-01

    Solvent reactions, ligand substitutions, and the oligomer/polymer backbone structure are important factors in the solution preparation of ceramic films. In this study the authors have used H and C NMR spectroscopy to characterize solvent and ligand effects in precursor solutions used for the deposition of ferroelectric PZT (lead zirconate titanate) thin films. Solutions were prepared by a sequential precursor addition method from carboxylate and alkoxide precursors of the three cations, and the solvent, acetic acid, methanol, and water. The results indicate that acetic acid was a key component in the solution preparation process. As observed previously for single metallic component systems, its presence resulted in esterification reactions, leading in the present case to the formation of methyl, isopropyl, and n-butyl acetates. Second, acetic acid functioned as a chemical modifier, or chelating agent, replacing essentially all of the alkoxy ligands of the original precursors. Since alkoxy replacement appeared to be complete, we may describe the PZT species formed in solution as oxo acetate in nature. Finally, the solvent and ligand behavior of a solution prepared by an inverted mixing order was compared to the behavior of the solution prepared by a sequential precursor addition. The spectra for the two solutions were similar, and only differences in the relative intensities of the ester and alcoholic resonances were observed. 29 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  1. 1H NMR studies of plastocyanin from Scenedesmus obliquus: Complete sequence-specific assignment, secondary structure analysis, and global fold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, J.M.; Chazin, W.J.; Wright, P.E.; Powls, R.

    1988-01-01

    Two-dimensional 1 H NMR methods have been used to make sequence-specific resonance assignments for the 97 amino acid residues of the plastocyanin from the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus. Assignments were obtained for all backbone protons and the majority of the side-chain protons. Spin system identification relied heavily on the observation of relayed connectivities to the backbone amide proton. Sequence-specific assignments were made by using the sequential assignment procedure. During this process, an extra valine residue was identified that had not been detected in the original amino acid sequence. Elements of regular secondary structure were identified from characteristic NOE connectivities between backbone protons, coupling constant values, and the observation of slowly exchanging amide protons. The protein in solution contains eight β-strands, one short segment of helix, five reverse turns, and five loops. The β-strands may be arranged into two βsheets on the basis of extensive cross-strand NOE connectivities. The chain-folding topology determined from the NMR experiments is that of a Greek key β-barrel and is similar to that observed for French bean plastocyanin in solution and poplar plastocyanin in the crystalline state. While the overall structures are similar, several differences in local structure between the S. obliquus and higher plant plastocyanins have been identified

  2. Vibrational, NMR and quantum chemical investigations of acetoacetanilde, 2-chloroacetoacetanilide and 2-methylacetoacetanilide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V; Kalaivani, M; Senthilkumari, S; Mohan, S

    2013-11-01

    The vibrational assignment and analysis of the fundamental modes of the compounds acetoacetanilide (AAA), 2-chloroacetoacetanilide (2CAAA) and 2-methylacetoacetanilide (2MAAA) have been performed. Density functional theory studies have been carried out with B3LYP method utilising 6-311++G(**) and cc-pVTZ basis sets to determine structural, thermodynamic and vibrational characteristics of the compounds and also to understand the influence of chloro and methyl groups on the characteristic frequencies of amide (CONH) group. Intramolecular hydrogen bond exists in acetoacetanilide and o-substituted acetoacetanilide molecules and the N⋯O distance is found to be around 2.7Å. The (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of the molecules were determined and the same have been calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The energies of the frontier molecular orbitals have been determined. In AAA, 2CAAA and 2MAAA molecules, the nN→πCO(∗) interaction between the nitrogen lone pair and the amide CO antibonding orbital gives strong stabilization of 64.75, 62.84 and 64.18kJmol(-1), respectively. The blue shift in amide-II band of 2MAAA is observed by 45-50cm(-1) than that of AAA. The steric effect of ortho methyl group significantly operating on the NH bond properties. The amide-III, the CN stretching mode of methyl and chloro substituted acetoacetanilide compounds are not affected by the substitution while the amide-V band, the NH out of plane bending mode of 2-chloroacetoacetanilide compound is shifted to a higher frequency than that of AAA. The substituent chlorine plays significantly and the blue shift in o-substituted compounds than the parent in the amide-V vibration is observed. The amide-VI, CO out of plane bending modes of 2MAAA and 2CAAA are significantly raised than that of AAA. A blue shift of amide-VI, CO out of plane bending modes of 2MAAA and 2CAAA than AAA is observed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  3. Primary structure determination of five sialylated oligosaccharides derived from bronchial- mucus glycoproteins of patients suffering from cystic fibrosis. The occurrence of the NeuAcα(2→3)Galα(1→4)[Fucα(1→3)]GlcNAcα(1→.) structural element revealed by 500-MHz 1H NMR spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Lamblin, G.; Boersma, A.; Klein, A.; Roussel, P.; Halbeek, H. van

    1984-01-01

    The structure of sialylated carbohydrate units of bronchial mucins obtained from cystic fibrosis patients was investigated by 500-MHz 1H NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with sugar analysis. After subjecting the mucins to alkaline borohydride degradation, sialylated oligosaccharide-alditols were

  4. Solution NMR structure of the HLTF HIRAN domain: a conserved module in SWI2/SNF2 DNA damage tolerance proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korzhnev, Dmitry M.; Neculai, Dante; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Bezsonova, Irina

    2016-01-01

    HLTF is a SWI2/SNF2-family ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzyme that acts in the error-free branch of DNA damage tolerance (DDT), a cellular mechanism that enables replication of damaged DNA while leaving damage repair for a later time. Human HLTF and a closely related protein SHPRH, as well as their yeast homologue Rad5, are multi-functional enzymes that share E3 ubiquitin-ligase activity required for activation of the error-free DDT. HLTF and Rad5 also function as ATP-dependent dsDNA translocases and possess replication fork reversal activities. Thus, they can convert Y-shaped replication forks into X-shaped Holliday junction structures that allow error-free replication over DNA lesions. The fork reversal activity of HLTF is dependent on 3′-ssDNA-end binding activity of its N-terminal HIRAN domain. Here we present the solution NMR structure of the human HLTF HIRAN domain, an OB-like fold module found in organisms from bacteria (as a stand-alone domain) to plants, fungi and metazoan (in combination with SWI2/SNF2 helicase-like domain). The obtained structure of free HLTF HIRAN is similar to recently reported structures of its DNA bound form, while the NMR analysis also reveals that the DNA binding site of the free domain exhibits conformational heterogeneity. Sequence comparison of N-terminal regions of HLTF, SHPRH and Rad5 aided by knowledge of the HLTF HIRAN structure suggests that the SHPRH N-terminus also includes an uncharacterized structured module, exhibiting weak sequence similarity with HIRAN regions of HLTF and Rad5, and potentially playing a similar functional role.

  5. Solution NMR structure of the HLTF HIRAN domain: a conserved module in SWI2/SNF2 DNA damage tolerance proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korzhnev, Dmitry M. [University of Connecticut Health, Department of Molecular Biology and Biophysics (United States); Neculai, Dante [Zhejiang University, School of Medicine (China); Dhe-Paganon, Sirano [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Department of Cancer Biology (United States); Arrowsmith, Cheryl H. [University of Toronto, Structural Genomics Consortium (Canada); Bezsonova, Irina, E-mail: bezsonova@uchc.edu [University of Connecticut Health, Department of Molecular Biology and Biophysics (United States)

    2016-11-15

    HLTF is a SWI2/SNF2-family ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzyme that acts in the error-free branch of DNA damage tolerance (DDT), a cellular mechanism that enables replication of damaged DNA while leaving damage repair for a later time. Human HLTF and a closely related protein SHPRH, as well as their yeast homologue Rad5, are multi-functional enzymes that share E3 ubiquitin-ligase activity required for activation of the error-free DDT. HLTF and Rad5 also function as ATP-dependent dsDNA translocases and possess replication fork reversal activities. Thus, they can convert Y-shaped replication forks into X-shaped Holliday junction structures that allow error-free replication over DNA lesions. The fork reversal activity of HLTF is dependent on 3′-ssDNA-end binding activity of its N-terminal HIRAN domain. Here we present the solution NMR structure of the human HLTF HIRAN domain, an OB-like fold module found in organisms from bacteria (as a stand-alone domain) to plants, fungi and metazoan (in combination with SWI2/SNF2 helicase-like domain). The obtained structure of free HLTF HIRAN is similar to recently reported structures of its DNA bound form, while the NMR analysis also reveals that the DNA binding site of the free domain exhibits conformational heterogeneity. Sequence comparison of N-terminal regions of HLTF, SHPRH and Rad5 aided by knowledge of the HLTF HIRAN structure suggests that the SHPRH N-terminus also includes an uncharacterized structured module, exhibiting weak sequence similarity with HIRAN regions of HLTF and Rad5, and potentially playing a similar functional role.

  6. Structural changes in C–S–H gel during dissolution: Small-angle neutron scattering and Si-NMR characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trapote-Barreira, Ana, E-mail: anatrapotebarreira@gmail.com [Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA), Barcelona 08034, Catalonia (Spain); Porcar, Lionel [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Large Scale Structure Group, Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble (France); Cama, Jordi; Soler, Josep M. [Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA), Barcelona 08034, Catalonia (Spain); Allen, Andrew J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Flow-through experiments were conducted to study the calcium–silicate–hydrate (C–S–H) gel dissolution kinetics. During C–S–H gel dissolution the initial aqueous Ca/Si ratio decreases to reach the stoichiometric value of the Ca/Si ratio of a tobermorite-like phase (Ca/Si = 0.83). As the Ca/Si ratio decreases, the solid C–S–H dissolution rate increases from (4.5 × 10{sup −} {sup 14} to 6.7 × 10{sup −} {sup 12}) mol m{sup −} {sup 2} s{sup −} {sup 1}. The changes in the microstructure of the dissolving C–S–H gel were characterized by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and {sup 29}Si magic-angle-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 29}Si-MAS NMR). The SANS data were fitted using a fractal model. The SANS specific surface area tends to increase with time and the obtained fit parameters reflect the changes in the nanostructure of the dissolving solid C–S–H within the gel. The {sup 29}Si MAS NMR analyses show that with dissolution the solid C–S–H structure tends to a more ordered tobermorite structure, in agreement with the Ca/Si ratio evolution.

  7. Two-dimensional NMR studies of squash family inhibitors. Sequence-specific proton assignments and secondary structure of reactive-site hydrolyzed Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthi, R; Gong, Y X; Lin, C L; VanderVelde, D

    1992-01-28

    The solution structure of reactive-site hydrolyzed Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor III (CMTI-III*) was investigated by two-dimensional proton nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) spectroscopy. CMTI-III*, prepared by reacting CMTI-III with trypsin which cleaved the Arg5-Ile6 peptide bond, had the two fragments held together by a disulfide linkage. Sequence-specific 1H NMR resonance assignments were made for all the 29 amino acid residues of the protein. The secondary structure of CMTI-III*, as deduced from NOESY cross peaks and identification of slowly exchanging hydrogens, contains two turns (residues 8-12 and 24-27), a 3(10)-helix (residues 13-16), and a triple-stranded beta-sheet (residues 8-10, 29-27, and 21-25). This secondary structure is similar to that of CMTI-I [Holak, T. A., Gondol, D., Otlewski, J., & Wilusz, T. (1989) J. Mol. Biol. 210, 635-648], which has a Glu instead of a Lys at position 9. Sequential proton assignments were also made for the virgin inhibitor, CMTI-III, at pH 4.71, 30 degrees C. Comparison of backbone hydrogen chemical shifts of CMTI-III and CMTI-III* revealed significant changes for residues located far away from the reactive-site region as well as for those located near it, indicating tertiary structural changes that are transmitted through most of the 29 residues of the inhibitor protein. Many of these residues are functionally important in that they make contact with atoms of the enzyme in the trypsin-inhibitor complex, as revealed by X-ray crystallography [Bode, W., Greyling, H. J., Huber, R., Otlewski, J., & Wilusz, T. (1989) FEBS Lett. 242, 285-292].(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy links structural moieties of soil organic matter to the temperature sensitivity of its decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soucemarianadin, Laure; Erhagen, Björn; Öquist, Mats; Nilsson, Mats; Schleucher, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) represents a huge carbon pool, specifically in boreal ecosystems. Warming-induced release of large amounts of CO2 from the soil carbon pool might become a significant exacerbating feedback to global warming, if decomposition rates of boreal soils were more sensitive to increased temperatures. Despite a large number of studies dedicated to the topic, it has proven difficult to elucidate how the organo-chemical composition of SOM influences its decomposition, or its quality as a substrate for microbial metabolism. A great part of this challenge results from our inability to achieve a detailed characterization of the complex composition of SOM on the level of molecular structural moieties. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a common tool to characterize SOM. However, SOM is a very complex mixture and the chemical shift regions distinguished in the 13C NMR spectra often represent many different molecular fragments. For example, in the carbohydrates region, signals of all monosaccharides present in many different polymers overlap. This overlap thwarts attempts to identify molecular moieties, resulting in insufficient information to characterize SOM composition. We applied two-dimensional (2D) NMR to characterize SOM with highly increased resolution. We directly dissolved finely ground litters and forest floors'fibric and humic horizons'of both coniferous and deciduous boreal forests in dimethyl sulfoxide and analyzed the resulting solution with a 2D 1H-13C NMR experiment. In the 2D planes of these spectra, signals of CH groups can be resolved based on their 13C and 1H chemical shifts, hence the resolving power and information content of these NMR spectra is hugely increased. The 2D spectra indeed resolved overlaps observed in 1D 13C spectra, so that hundreds of distinct CH groups could be observed and many molecular fragments could be identified. For instance, in the aromatics region, signals from individual lignin units could

  9. Secondary structure determination of human. beta. -endorphin by /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichtarge, O.; Jardetzky, O.; Li, C.H.

    1987-09-08

    The /sup 1/H NMR spectra of human ..beta..-endorphin indicate that the peptide exists in random-coil form in aqueous solution but becomes helical in mixed solvent. Thermal denaturation NMR experiments show that in water there is no transition between 24 and 75/sup 0/C, while a slow noncooperative thermal unfolding is observed in a 60% methanol-40% water mixed solvent in the same temperature range. These findings are consistent with circular dichroism studies by other workers concluding that ..beta..-endorphin is a random coil in water but that it forms 50% ..cap alpha..-helix or more in mixed solvents. The peptide in the mixed water-methanol solvent was further studied by correlated spectroscopy (COSY) and nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) experiments. These allow a complete set of assignments to be made and establish two distinct stretches over which the solvent induces formation of ..cap alpha..-helices: the first occurs between Tyr-1 and Thr-12 and the second between Leu-14 and extending to Lys-28. There is evidence that the latter is capped by a turn occurring between Lys-28 and Glu-31. These helices form at the enkephalin receptor binding site, which is at the amino terminus, and at the morphine receptor binding site, located at the carboxyl terminus. The findings suggest that these two receptors may specifically recognize ..cap alpha..-helices.

  10. NMR Pore Structure and Dynamic Characteristics of Sandstone Caused by Ambient Freeze-Thaw Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Ke

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For a deeper understanding of the freeze-thaw weathering effects on the microstructure evolution and deterioration of dynamic mechanical properties of rock, the present paper conducted the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR tests and impact loading experiments on sandstone under different freeze-thaw cycles. The results of NMR test show that, with the increase of freeze-thaw cycles, the pores expand and pores size tends to be uniform. The experimental results show that the stress-strain curves all go through four stages, namely, densification, elasticity, yielding, and failure. The densification curve is shorter, and the slope of elasticity curve decreases as the freeze-thaw cycles increase. With increasing freeze-thaw cycles, the dynamic peak stress decreases and energy absorption of sandstone increases. The dynamic failure form is an axial splitting failure, and the fragments increase and the size diminishes with increasing freeze-thaw cycles. The higher the porosity is, the more severe the degradation of dynamic characteristics is. An increase model for the relationships between the porosity or energy absorption and freeze-thaw cycles number was built to reveal the increasing trend with the freeze-thaw cycles increase; meanwhile, a decay model was built to predict the dynamic compressive strength degradation of rock after repeated freeze-thaw cycles.

  11. Structure and equilibria of Ca 2+-complexes of glucose and sorbitol from multinuclear ( 1H, 13C and 43Ca) NMR measurements supplemented with molecular modelling calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallagi, A.; Dudás, Cs.; Csendes, Z.; Forgó, P.; Pálinkó, I.; Sipos, P.

    2011-05-01

    Ca 2+-complexation of D-glucose and D-sorbitol have been investigated with the aid of multinuclear ( 1H, 13C and 43Ca) NMR spectroscopy and ab initio quantum chemical calculations. Formation constants of the forming 1:1 complexes have been estimated from one-dimensional 13C NMR spectra obtained at constant ionic strength (1 M NaCl). Binding sites were identified from 2D 1H- 43Ca NMR spectra. 2D NMR measurements and ab initio calculations indicated that Ca 2+ ions were bound in a tridentate manner via the glycosidic OH, the ethereal oxygen in the ring and the OH on the terminal carbon for the α- and β-anomers of glucose and for sorbitol simultaneous binding of four hydroxide moieties (C1, C2, C4 and C6) was suggested.

  12. Characterizing the Secondary Protein Structure of Black Widow Dragline Silk Using Solid-State NMR & X-ray Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Janelle E.; Sampath, Sujatha; Butler, Emily; Kim, Jihyun; Henning, Robert W.; Holland, Gregory P.; Yarger, Jeffery L.

    2013-01-01

    This study provides a detailed secondary structural characterization of major ampullate dragline silk from Latrodectus hesperus (black widow) spiders. X-ray diffraction results show that the structure of black widow major ampullate silk fibers is comprised of stacked β-sheet nanocrystallites oriented parallel to the fiber axis and an amorphous region with oriented (anisotropic) and isotropic components. The combination of two-dimensional (2D) 13C-13C through-space and through-bond solid-state NMR experiments provide chemical shifts that are used to determine detailed information about amino acid motif secondary structure in black widow spider dragline silk. Individual amino acids are incorporated into different repetitive motifs that make up the majority of this protein-based biopolymer. From the solid-state NMR measurements, we assign distinct secondary conformations to each repetitive amino acid motif and hence to the amino acids that make up the motifs. Specifically, alanine is incorporated in β-sheet (poly(Alan) and poly(Gly-Ala)), 31-helix (poly(Gly-Gly-Xaa), and α-helix (poly(Gln-Gln-Ala-Tyr)) components. Glycine is determined to be in β-sheet (poly(Gly-Ala)) and 31-helical (poly(Gly-Gly-Xaa)) regions, while serine is present in β-sheet (poly(Gly-Ala-Ser)), 31-helix (poly(Gly-Gly-Ser)), and β-turn (poly(Gly-Pro-Ser)) structures. These various motif-specific secondary structural elements are quantitatively correlated to the primary amino acid sequence of major ampullate spidroin 1 and 2 (MaSp1 and MaSp2) and are shown to form a self-consistent model for black widow dragline silk. PMID:24024617

  13. Solution NMR structure and inhibitory effect against amyloid-β fibrillation of Humanin containing a D-isomerized serine residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alsanousi, Nesreen [Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University, 3-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Sugiki, Toshihiko, E-mail: sugiki@protein.osaka-u.ac.jp [Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University, 3-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Furuita, Kyoko; So, Masatomo; Lee, Young-Ho; Fujiwara, Toshimichi [Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University, 3-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kojima, Chojiro, E-mail: kojima-chojiro-xk@ynu.ac.jp [Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University, 3-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering, Yokohama National University, Tokiwadai 79-5, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan)

    2016-09-02

    Humanin comprising 24 amino acid residues is a bioactive peptide that has been isolated from the brain tissue of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Humanin reportedly suppressed aging-related death of various cells due to amyloid fibrils and oxidative stress. There are reports that the cytoprotective activity of Humanin was remarkably enhanced by optical isomerization of the Ser14 residue from L to D form, but details of the molecular mechanism remained unclear. Here we demonstrated that Humanin D-Ser14 exhibited potent inhibitory activity against fibrillation of amyloid-β and remarkably higher binding affinity for amyloid-β than that of the Humanin wild-type and S14G mutant. In addition, we determined the solution structure of Humanin D-Ser14 by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and showed that D-isomerization of the Ser14 residue enables drastic conformational rearrangement of Humanin. Furthermore, we identified an amyloid-β-binding site on Humanin D-Ser14 at atomic resolution by NMR. These biophysical and high-resolution structural analyses clearly revealed structure–function relationships of Humanin and explained the driving force of the drastic conformational change and molecular basis of the potent anti-amyloid-β fibrillation activity of Humanin caused by D-isomerization of the Ser14 residue. This is the first study to show correlations between the functional activity, tertiary structure, and partner recognition mode of Humanin and may lead to elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of the cytoprotective activity of Humanin. - Highlights: • Humanin D-Ser14 showed the strongest inhibitory activity against Aβ40 fibrillation. • NMR structure of Humanin D-Ser14 was determined in alcohol/water mixture solution. • Humanin D-Ser14 directly bound Aβ40 stronger than Humanin wild-type and Humanin S14G. • Aβ40 and zinc ion binding sites of Humanin D-Ser14 were identified. • Structure around Ser14 of Humanin is critical for Aβ40 binding and

  14. New organic single crystal of (benzylthio)acetic acid: Synthesis, crystal structure, spectroscopic (ATR-FTIR, 1H and 13C NMR) and thermal characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sienkiewicz-Gromiuk, Justyna; Tarasiuk, Bogdan; Mazur, Liliana

    2016-04-01

    (Benzylthio)acetic acid (Hbta) was synthesized with 78% yield from benzyl chloride and thiourea as substrates. Well-shaped crystals of Hbta were grown by slow solvent evaporation technique from pure methanol. The compound was investigated by single-crystal X-ray and powder diffraction techniques and was also characterized by other analytical methods, like ATR-FTIR, 1H and 13C NMR and TG/DSC. The acid molecule adopts bent conformation in the solid state. The crystal structure of Hbta is stabilized by numerous intermolecular interactions, including O-H···O, C-H···O, C-H···S and C-H···π contacts. Thermal decomposition of the obtained material takes place above 150 °C.

  15. Structural investigations of some metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sietsma, J.

    1987-03-01

    Metallic glasses were prepared by the melt spinning technique from iron and nickel alloys (Fe-Ni-P; Fe-B; Ni-Nb; Ni-B). Structure investigations were made by means of neutron diffraction experiments. Distribution functions and range orders were determined. (Auth.)

  16. Simultaneous use of solution NMR and X-ray data in REFMAC5 for joint refinement/detection of structural differences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinaldelli, Mauro; Ravera, Enrico; Calderone, Vito; Parigi, Giacomo [University of Florence, Via L. Sacconi 6, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Finland) (Italy); University of Florence, Via della Lastruccia 3, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Finland) (Italy); Murshudov, Garib N., E-mail: garib@mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk [MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Francis Crick Avenue, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge CB2 0QH (United Kingdom); Luchinat, Claudio, E-mail: garib@mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk [University of Florence, Via L. Sacconi 6, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Finland) (Italy); University of Florence, Via della Lastruccia 3, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Finland) (Italy)

    2014-04-01

    Paramagnetic NMR data (pseudocontact shifts and self-orientation residual dipolar couplings) and diamagnetic residual dipolar couplings can now be used in the program REFMAC5 from CCP4 as structural restraints together with X-ray crystallographic data. These NMR restraints can reveal differences between solid state and solution conformations of molecules or, in their absence, can be used together with X-ray crystallographic data for structural refinement. The program REFMAC5 from CCP4 was modified to allow the simultaneous use of X-ray crystallographic data and paramagnetic NMR data (pseudocontact shifts and self-orientation residual dipolar couplings) and/or diamagnetic residual dipolar couplings. Incorporation of these long-range NMR restraints in REFMAC5 can reveal differences between solid-state and solution conformations of molecules or, in their absence, can be used together with X-ray crystallographic data for structural refinement. Since NMR and X-ray data are complementary, when a single structure is consistent with both sets of data and still maintains reasonably ‘ideal’ geometries, the reliability of the derived atomic model is expected to increase. The program was tested on five different proteins: the catalytic domain of matrix metalloproteinase 1, GB3, ubiquitin, free calmodulin and calmodulin complexed with a peptide. In some cases the joint refinement produced a single model consistent with both sets of observations, while in other cases it indicated, outside the experimental uncertainty, the presence of different protein conformations in solution and in the solid state.

  17. Modeling an in-register, parallel "iowa" aβ fibril structure using solid-state NMR data from labeled samples with rosetta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgourakis, Nikolaos G; Yau, Wai-Ming; Qiang, Wei

    2015-01-06

    Determining the structures of amyloid fibrils is an important first step toward understanding the molecular basis of neurodegenerative diseases. For β-amyloid (Aβ) fibrils, conventional solid-state NMR structure determination using uniform labeling is limited by extensive peak overlap. We describe the characterization of a distinct structural polymorph of Aβ using solid-state NMR, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Rosetta model building. First, the overall fibril arrangement is established using mass-per-length measurements from TEM. Then, the fibril backbone arrangement, stacking registry, and "steric zipper" core interactions are determined using a number of solid-state NMR techniques on sparsely (13)C-labeled samples. Finally, we perform Rosetta structure calculations with an explicitly symmetric representation of the system. We demonstrate the power of the hybrid Rosetta/NMR approach by modeling the in-register, parallel "Iowa" mutant (D23N) at high resolution (1.2Å backbone rmsd). The final models are validated using an independent set of NMR experiments that confirm key features. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Simultaneous use of solution NMR and X-ray data in REFMAC5 for joint refinement/detection of structural differences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinaldelli, Mauro; Ravera, Enrico; Calderone, Vito; Parigi, Giacomo; Murshudov, Garib N.; Luchinat, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Paramagnetic NMR data (pseudocontact shifts and self-orientation residual dipolar couplings) and diamagnetic residual dipolar couplings can now be used in the program REFMAC5 from CCP4 as structural restraints together with X-ray crystallographic data. These NMR restraints can reveal differences between solid state and solution conformations of molecules or, in their absence, can be used together with X-ray crystallographic data for structural refinement. The program REFMAC5 from CCP4 was modified to allow the simultaneous use of X-ray crystallographic data and paramagnetic NMR data (pseudocontact shifts and self-orientation residual dipolar couplings) and/or diamagnetic residual dipolar couplings. Incorporation of these long-range NMR restraints in REFMAC5 can reveal differences between solid-state and solution conformations of molecules or, in their absence, can be used together with X-ray crystallographic data for structural refinement. Since NMR and X-ray data are complementary, when a single structure is consistent with both sets of data and still maintains reasonably ‘ideal’ geometries, the reliability of the derived atomic model is expected to increase. The program was tested on five different proteins: the catalytic domain of matrix metalloproteinase 1, GB3, ubiquitin, free calmodulin and calmodulin complexed with a peptide. In some cases the joint refinement produced a single model consistent with both sets of observations, while in other cases it indicated, outside the experimental uncertainty, the presence of different protein conformations in solution and in the solid state

  19. An NMR-based quenched hydrogen exchange investigation of model amyloid fibrils formed by cold shock protein A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrescu, A T

    2001-01-01

    Acid-denatured cold shock protein A (CspA) self-assembles into polymers with properties typical of amyloid fibrils. In the present work, a quenched hydrogen exchange experiment was used to probe the interactions of CspA fibrils with solvent. Exchange was initiated by incubating suspensions of fibrils in D2O, and quenched by flash freezing. Following lyophilization, exchange-quenched samples were dissolved in 90% DMSO/10% D2O, giving DMSO-denatured monomers. Intrinsic exchange rates for denatured CspA in 90% DMSO/10% D2O (pH* 4.5) were sufficiently slow (approximately 1 x 10(-3) min-1) to enable quantification of NMR signal intensity decays due to H/D exchange in the fibrils. Hydrogen exchange rate constants for CspA fibrils were found to vary less than 3-fold from a mean value of 5 x 10(-5) min-1. The uniformity of rate constants suggests that exchange is in the EX1 limit, and that the mechanism of exchange involves a cooperative dissociation of CspA monomers from fibrils, concomitant with unfolding. Previous studies indicated that the highest protection factors in native CspA are approximately 10(3), and that protection factors for the acid-denatured monomer precursors of CspA fibrils are close to unity. Because exchange in is in the EX1 regime, it is only possible to place a lower limit of at least 10(5) on protection factors in CspA fibrils. The observation that all amide protons are protected from exchange indicates that the entire CspA polypeptide chain is structured in the fibrils.

  20. Automated NMR structure determination of stereo-array isotope labeled ubiquitin from minimal sets of spectra using the SAIL-FLYA system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeya, Teppei [Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Institute of Biophysical Chemistry, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (Germany); Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Yoshida, Hitoshi; Terauchi, Tsutomu; Jee, Jun-Goo; Kainosho, Masatsune [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Graduate School of Science (Japan)], E-mail: kainosho@nmr.chem.metro-u.ac.jp; Guentert, Peter [Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Institute of Biophysical Chemistry, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (Germany)], E-mail: guentert@em.uni-frankfurt.de

    2009-08-15

    Stereo-array isotope labeling (SAIL) has been combined with the fully automated NMR structure determination algorithm FLYA to determine the three-dimensional structure of the protein ubiquitin from different sets of input NMR spectra. SAIL provides a complete stereo- and regio-specific pattern of stable isotopes that results in sharper resonance lines and reduced signal overlap, without information loss. Here we show that as a result of the superior quality of the SAIL NMR spectra, reliable, fully automated analyses of the NMR spectra and structure calculations are possible using fewer input spectra than with conventional uniformly {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-labeled proteins. FLYA calculations with SAIL ubiquitin, using a single three-dimensional 'through-bond' spectrum (and 2D HSQC spectra) in addition to the {sup 13}C-edited and {sup 15}N-edited NOESY spectra for conformational restraints, yielded structures with an accuracy of 0.83-1.15 A for the backbone RMSD to the conventionally determined solution structure of SAIL ubiquitin. NMR structures can thus be determined almost exclusively from the NOESY spectra that yield the conformational restraints, without the need to record many spectra only for determining intermediate, auxiliary data of the chemical shift assignments. The FLYA calculations for this report resulted in 252 ubiquitin structure bundles, obtained with different input data but identical structure calculation and refinement methods. These structures cover the entire range from highly accurate structures to seriously, but not trivially, wrong structures, and thus constitute a valuable database for the substantiation of structure validation methods.

  1. Automated NMR structure determination of stereo-array isotope labeled ubiquitin from minimal sets of spectra using the SAIL-FLYA system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeya, Teppei; Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Yoshida, Hitoshi; Terauchi, Tsutomu; Jee, Jun-Goo; Kainosho, Masatsune; Guentert, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Stereo-array isotope labeling (SAIL) has been combined with the fully automated NMR structure determination algorithm FLYA to determine the three-dimensional structure of the protein ubiquitin from different sets of input NMR spectra. SAIL provides a complete stereo- and regio-specific pattern of stable isotopes that results in sharper resonance lines and reduced signal overlap, without information loss. Here we show that as a result of the superior quality of the SAIL NMR spectra, reliable, fully automated analyses of the NMR spectra and structure calculations are possible using fewer input spectra than with conventional uniformly 13 C/ 15 N-labeled proteins. FLYA calculations with SAIL ubiquitin, using a single three-dimensional 'through-bond' spectrum (and 2D HSQC spectra) in addition to the 13 C-edited and 15 N-edited NOESY spectra for conformational restraints, yielded structures with an accuracy of 0.83-1.15 A for the backbone RMSD to the conventionally determined solution structure of SAIL ubiquitin. NMR structures can thus be determined almost exclusively from the NOESY spectra that yield the conformational restraints, without the need to record many spectra only for determining intermediate, auxiliary data of the chemical shift assignments. The FLYA calculations for this report resulted in 252 ubiquitin structure bundles, obtained with different input data but identical structure calculation and refinement methods. These structures cover the entire range from highly accurate structures to seriously, but not trivially, wrong structures, and thus constitute a valuable database for the substantiation of structure validation methods

  2. Automated NMR structure determination of stereo-array isotope labeled ubiquitin from minimal sets of spectra using the SAIL-FLYA system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeya, Teppei; Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Yoshida, Hitoshi; Terauchi, Tsutomu; Jee, Jun-Goo; Kainosho, Masatsune; Güntert, Peter

    2009-08-01

    Stereo-array isotope labeling (SAIL) has been combined with the fully automated NMR structure determination algorithm FLYA to determine the three-dimensional structure of the protein ubiquitin from different sets of input NMR spectra. SAIL provides a complete stereo- and regio-specific pattern of stable isotopes that results in sharper resonance lines and reduced signal overlap, without information loss. Here we show that as a result of the superior quality of the SAIL NMR spectra, reliable, fully automated analyses of the NMR spectra and structure calculations are possible using fewer input spectra than with conventional uniformly 13C/15N-labeled proteins. FLYA calculations with SAIL ubiquitin, using a single three-dimensional "through-bond" spectrum (and 2D HSQC spectra) in addition to the 13C-edited and 15N-edited NOESY spectra for conformational restraints, yielded structures with an accuracy of 0.83-1.15 A for the backbone RMSD to the conventionally determined solution structure of SAIL ubiquitin. NMR structures can thus be determined almost exclusively from the NOESY spectra that yield the conformational restraints, without the need to record many spectra only for determining intermediate, auxiliary data of the chemical shift assignments. The FLYA calculations for this report resulted in 252 ubiquitin structure bundles, obtained with different input data but identical structure calculation and refinement methods. These structures cover the entire range from highly accurate structures to seriously, but not trivially, wrong structures, and thus constitute a valuable database for the substantiation of structure validation methods.

  3. Predicting the crystal structure of decitabine by powder NMR crystallography: influence of long-range molecular packing symmetry on NMR parameters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brus, Jiří; Czernek, Jiří; Kobera, Libor; Urbanová, Martina; Abbrent, Sabina; Husak, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 12 (2016), s. 7102-7111 ISSN 1528-7483 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-03636S; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-04109S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : NMR crystalography * decitabine * drug delivery Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 4.055, year: 2016

  4. An NMR-based metabolomic approach to investigate the effects of supplementation with glutamic acid in piglets challenged with deoxynivalenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Miaomiao; Xiao, Hao; Ren, Wenkai; Yin, Jie; Hu, Jiayu; Duan, Jielin; Liu, Gang; Tan, Bie; Xiong, Xia; Oso, Abimbola Oladele; Adeola, Olayiwola; Yao, Kang; Yin, Yulong; Li, Tiejun

    2014-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) has various toxicological effects in humans and pigs that result from the ingestion of contaminated cereal products. This study was conducted to investigate the protective effects of dietary supplementation with glutamic acid on piglets challenged with DON. A total of 20 piglets weaned at 28 d of age were randomly assigned to receive 1 of 4 treatments (5 piglets/treatment): 1) basal diet, negative control (NC); 2) basal diet +4 mg/kg DON (DON); 3) basal diet +2% (g/g) glutamic acid (GLU); 4) basal diet +4 mg/kg DON +2% glutamic acid (DG). A 7-d adaptation period was followed by 30 days of treatment. A metabolite analysis using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-NMR)-based metabolomic technology and the determination of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities for plasma, as well as the activity of Caspase-3 and the proliferation of epithelial cells were conducted. The results showed that contents of low-density lipoprotein, alanine, arginine, acetate, glycoprotein, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), glycine, lactate, and urea, as well as the glutamate/creatinine ratio were higher but high-density lipoprotein, proline, citrate, choline, unsaturated lipids and fumarate were lower in piglets of DON treatment than that of NC treatment (Pglutamic acid increased the plasma concentrations of proline, citrate, creatinine, unsaturated lipids, and fumarate, and decreased the concentrations of alanine, glycoprotein, TMAO, glycine, and lactate, as well as the glutamate/creatinine ratio (Pglutamic acid to DON treatment increased the plasma activities of SOD and GSH-Px and the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) labeling indexes for the jejunum and ileum (Pglutamic acid has the potential to repair the injuries associated with oxidative stress as well as the disturbances of energy and amino acid metabolism induced by DON.

  5. Investigation of the chemomarkers correlated with flower colour in different organs of Catharanthus roseus using NMR-based metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Qifang; Dai, Yuntao; Nuringtyas, Tri Rini; Mustafa, Natali Rianika; Schulte, Anna Elisabeth; Verpoorte, Robert; Choi, Young Hae

    2014-01-01

    Flower colour is a complex phenomenon that involves a wide range of secondary metabolites of flowers, for example phenolics and carotenoids as well as co-pigments. Biosynthesis of these metabolites, though, occurs through complicated pathways in many other plant organs. The analysis of the metabolic profile of leaves, stems and roots, for example, therefore may allow the identification of chemomarkers related to the final expression of flower colour. To investigate the metabolic profile of leaves, stems, roots and flowers of Catharanthus roseus and the possible correlation with four flower colours (orange, pink, purple and red). (1) H-NMR and multivariate data analysis were used to characterise the metabolites in the organs. The results showed that flower colour is characterised by a special pattern of metabolites such as anthocyanins, flavonoids, organic acids and sugars. The leaves, stems and roots also exhibit differences in their metabolic profiles according to the flower colour. Plants with orange flowers featured a relatively high level of kaempferol analogues in all organs except roots. Red-flowered plants showed a high level of malic acid, fumaric acid and asparagine in both flowers and leaves, and purple and pink flowering plants exhibited high levels of sucrose, glucose and 2,3-dihydroxy benzoic acid. High concentrations of quercetin analogues were detected in flowers and leaves of purple-flowered plants. There is a correlation between the metabolites specifically associated to the expression of different flower colours and the metabolite profile of other plant organs and it is therefore possible to predict the flower colours by detecting specific metabolites in leaves, stems or roots. This may have interesting application in the plant breeding industry. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Relation Between Acid and Catalytic Properties of Chlorinated Gamma-Alumina. a 31p Mas Nmr and Ftir Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume D.

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have studied the effect of chlorine on the surface properties of gamma-alumina, especially on their acid properties. The use of FTIR spectroscopy and 31P MAS NMR of adsorbed trimethylphosphine allows to propose a chlorination mechanism. To correlate the surface properties of these chlorinated gamma-alumina with their catalytic properties, we have used a model reaction, the cracking of n-heptane under reforming conditions. The analysis of the correlation between acid properties determined by 31P MAS NMR and the catalytic results (in terms of activities and selectivities allows to identify which sites are involved in the cracking reaction.

  7. NMR-Assisted Structure Elucidation of an Anticancer Steroid-β-Enaminone Derivative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Poirier

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The fortuitous modification of a quinoline-proline-piperazine side chain linked to a steroid in the presence of lithium (trimethylsilyl acetylide has generated an unknown product that is more active than its precursor. After having characterized two β-enaminones (two-carbon homologation compounds that were generated from a simplified model side chain, we have identified the unknown product as being the β-enaminone steroid derivative 1. NMR analysis, especially two-dimensional (2D experiments (correlation spectroscopy (COSY, NOE spectroscopy (NOESY, heteronuclear single-quantum correlation (HSQC and heteronuclear multiple-bond correlation (HMBC provided crucial information that was found essential in the characterization of enaminone 1. We also proposed a mechanism to rationalize the formation of this biologically active compound.

  8. J-UNIO protocol used for NMR structure determination of the 206-residue protein NP-346487.1 from Streptococcus pneumoniae TIGR4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaudzems, Kristaps [Latvian Institute of Organic Synthesis (Latvia); Pedrini, Bill [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), SwissFEL Project (Switzerland); Geralt, Michael; Serrano, Pedro; Wüthrich, Kurt, E-mail: wuthrich@scripps.edu [The Scripps Research Institute, Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology (United States)

    2015-01-15

    The NMR structure of the 206-residue protein NP-346487.1 was determined with the J-UNIO protocol, which includes extensive automation of the structure determination. With input from three APSY-NMR experiments, UNIO-MATCH automatically yielded 77 % of the backbone assignments, which were interactively validated and extended to 97 %. With an input of the near-complete backbone assignments and three 3D heteronuclear-resolved [{sup 1}H,{sup 1}H]-NOESY spectra, automated side chain assignment with UNIO-ATNOS/ASCAN resulted in 77 % of the expected assignments, which was extended interactively to about 90 %. Automated NOE assignment and structure calculation with UNIO-ATNOS/CANDID in combination with CYANA was used for the structure determination of this two-domain protein. The individual domains in the NMR structure coincide closely with the crystal structure, and the NMR studies further imply that the two domains undergo restricted hinge motions relative to each other in solution. NP-346487.1 is so far the largest polypeptide chain to which the J-UNIO structure determination protocol has successfully been applied.

  9. Structural studies of the 5'-phenazinium-tethered matched and G-A-mismatched DNA duplexes by NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltseva, T; Sandström, A; Ivanova, I M; Sergeyev, D S; Zarytova, V F; Chattopadhyaya, J

    1993-05-01

    The mechanism through which modified oligo-DNA analogues act as antisense repressors at the transcriptional and translational level of gene expression is based on the information content in the nucleotide sequence which is determined by the specific base pairing. The efficiency of such action is largely determined by the stability of the duplex formed between the oligonucleotide reagent and the target sequence and also by the mismatched base pairing, such as G-A, that occurs during replication or recombination. We herein report that the phenazinium (Pzn)-tethered matched duplex p(d(TGTTTGGC)):(Pzn)-p(d(CCAAACA)) (III) (Tm = 50 degrees C) has a much larger stability than the parent matched duplex p(d(TGTTTGGC)):p(d(CCAAACA)) (I) (Tm = 30 degrees C). On the other hand, the Pzn-tethered G-A-mismatched duplex p(d(TGTTTGGC)):(Pzn)-p(d(ACAAACA)) (IV) (Tm = 34 degrees C) is only slightly more stable than its parent mismatched duplex p(d(TGTTTGGC)):p(d(ACAAACA)) (Tm = 25 degrees C). A detailed 500 MHz NMR study and constrained MD refinements of NMR-derived structures have been undertaken for the DNA duplexes (I), (II), (III) and (IV) in order to understand the structural basis of stabilization of Pzn-tethered matched DNA duplex (delta Tm = 20 degrees C) compared to mismatched duplex (delta Tm = 9 degrees C). Assignment of the 1H-NMR (500 MHz) spectra of the duplexes has been carried out by 2D NOESY, HOHAHA and DQF-COSY experiments. The torsion angles have been extracted from the J-coupling constants obtained by simulation of most of the DQF-COSY cross-peaks using program SMART. The solution structure of the duplexes were assessed by an iterative hybride relaxation matrix method (MORASS) combined with NOESY distances and torsion angles restrained molecular dynamics (MD) using program Amber 4.0. The standard Amber 4.0 force-field parameters were used for the oligonucleotide in conjunction with the new parameters for Pzn residue which was obtained by full geometry

  10. Structure of Lipid Nanoparticles Containing siRNA or mRNA by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization-Enhanced NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viger-Gravel, Jasmine; Schantz, Anna; Pinon, Arthur C; Rossini, Aaron J; Schantz, Staffan; Emsley, Lyndon

    2018-02-22

    Here, we show how dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR spectroscopy experiments permit the atomic level structural characterization of loaded and empty lipid nanoparticles (LNPs). The LNPs used here were synthesized by the microfluidic mixing technique and are composed of ionizable cationic lipid (DLin-MC3-DMA), a phospholipid (distearoylphosphatidylcholine, DSPC), cholesterol, and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) (dimyristoyl phosphatidyl ethanolamine (DMPE)-PEG 2000), as well as encapsulated cargoes that are either phosphorothioated siRNA (50 or 100%) or mRNA. We show that LNPs form physically stable complexes with bioactive drug siRNA for a period of 94 days. Relayed DNP experiments are performed to study 1 H- 1 H spin diffusion and to determine the spatial location of the various components of the LNP by studying the average enhancement factors as a function of polarization time. We observe a striking feature of LNPs in the presence and in the absence of encapsulating siRNA or mRNA by comparing our experimental results to numerical spin-diffusion modeling. We observe that LNPs form a layered structure, and we detect that DSPC and DMPE-PEG 2000 lipids form a surface rich layer in the presence (or absence) of the cargoes and that the cholesterol and ionizable cationic lipid are embedded in the core. Furthermore, relayed DNP 31 P solid-state NMR experiments allow the location of the cargo encapsulated in the LNPs to be determined. On the basis of the results, we propose a new structural model for the LNPs that features a homogeneous core with a tendency for layering of DSPC and DMPE-PEG at the surface.

  11. NMR structure calculation for all small molecule ligands and non-standard residues from the PDB Chemical Component Dictionary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, Emel Maden; Güntert, Peter, E-mail: guentert@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance, Institute of Biophysical Chemistry (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    An algorithm, CYLIB, is presented for converting molecular topology descriptions from the PDB Chemical Component Dictionary into CYANA residue library entries. The CYANA structure calculation algorithm uses torsion angle molecular dynamics for the efficient computation of three-dimensional structures from NMR-derived restraints. For this, the molecules have to be represented in torsion angle space with rotations around covalent single bonds as the only degrees of freedom. The molecule must be given a tree structure of torsion angles connecting rigid units composed of one or several atoms with fixed relative positions. Setting up CYANA residue library entries therefore involves, besides straightforward format conversion, the non-trivial step of defining a suitable tree structure of torsion angles, and to re-order the atoms in a way that is compatible with this tree structure. This can be done manually for small numbers of ligands but the process is time-consuming and error-prone. An automated method is necessary in order to handle the large number of different potential ligand molecules to be studied in drug design projects. Here, we present an algorithm for this purpose, and show that CYANA structure calculations can be performed with almost all small molecule ligands and non-standard amino acid residues in the PDB Chemical Component Dictionary.

  12. Preliminary investigation of the NMR, optical and x-ray CT dose-response of polymer gel dosimeters with cosolvents and increased crosslinker levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeva, V I; McAuley, K B; Jirasek, A; Schreiner, L J

    2009-01-01

    Three co-solvents (glycerol, N-propanol and isopropanol) have been investigated for increasing the solubility of N,N'-methylene-bisacrylamide (Bis) crosslinker in polymer gel dosimeter recipes. Using isopropanol, the crosslinker solubility increased from approximately from 3 to 10% by weight, enabling the manufacture of polymer gel dosimeters with higher levels of crosslinking than was previously possible. The new dosimeter recipes can be imaged effectively using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), optical and x-ray Computed Tomography (CT) techniques.

  13. Preliminary investigation of the NMR, optical and x-ray CT dose-response of polymer gel dosimeters with cosolvents and increased crosslinker levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koeva, V I; McAuley, K B [Chemical Engineering Department, Queen' s University, Kingston, K7L 3N6 (Canada); Jirasek, A [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, V8W 6V5 (Canada); Schreiner, L J [Cancer Centre of Southeastern Ontario, Kingston, K7L 5P9 (Canada)], E-mail: Kim.McAuley@chee.queensu.ca

    2009-05-01

    Three co-solvents (glycerol, N-propanol and isopropanol) have been investigated for increasing the solubility of N,N'-methylene-bisacrylamide (Bis) crosslinker in polymer gel dosimeter recipes. Using isopropanol, the crosslinker solubility increased from approximately from 3 to 10% by weight, enabling the manufacture of polymer gel dosimeters with higher levels of crosslinking than was previously possible. The new dosimeter recipes can be imaged effectively using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), optical and x-ray Computed Tomography (CT) techniques.

  14. A Preliminary Investigation of NSCL/P Plasma and Urine in Guizhou Province in China Using NMR-Based Metabonomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Huang Guang; Hong, Luo; Kun, Song Ju; Hai, Yin Xin; Dong, Wang Ya; Ke, Zhao; Ping, Xu; Hao, Chen

    2013-09-01

    Objective : To assess the feasibility of metabonomics in clinical studies. This is a pilot study introducing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabonomics to elucidate and compare the metabolism of patients with nonsyndromic cleft lip and/or palate (NSCL/P) and children without orofacial clefts. Methods : High-resolution (1)H NMR spectroscopy was performed on plasma and urine samples obtained from NSCL/P and healthy children. The (1)H NMR spectra were further analyzed with principal component analysis. Results : Compared to the control group, the level of low-molecular-weight metabolites in plasma such as asparagine was higher in NSCL/P patients, while arginine, lysine, acetate, lactate, proline, glutamine, pyruvate, creatinine, choline, and β-glucose were lower. The carnitine, citrate, and formate excretion in urine appeared to be higher in the healthy children, while the NSCL/P group excreted higher concentrations of aspartic acid and phenylalanine in urine. Conclusion : The present study clearly demonstrated the great potential of NMR-based metabonomics in elucidating NSCL/P plasma metabolism and the possible application of this technology in clinical diagnosis and screening.

  15. Solid-state {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si NMR investigations on Si-substituted hydrogarnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivas Mercury, J.M. [Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio, CSIC, Kelsen, 5, 28049 Cantoblanco-Madrid (Spain); Pena, P. [Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio, CSIC, Kelsen, 5, 28049 Cantoblanco-Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: ppena@icv.csic.es; Aza, A.H. de [Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio, CSIC, Kelsen, 5, 28049 Cantoblanco-Madrid (Spain); Turrillas, X. [Instituto de Ciencias de la Construccion Eduardo Torroja, CSIC, Serrano Galvache, 4, 28033 Madrid (Spain); Sobrados, I. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales, CSIC, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, 3, 28049 Cantoblanco-Madrid (Spain); Sanz, J. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales, CSIC, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, 3, 28049 Cantoblanco-Madrid (Spain)

    2007-02-15

    Partially deuterated Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 3-x}(OH){sub 4x} hydrates prepared by a reaction in the presence of D{sub 2}O of synthetic tricalcium aluminate with different amounts of amorphous silica were characterized by {sup 29}Si and {sup 27}Al magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The {sup 29}Si NMR spectroscopy was used for quantifying the non-reacted silica and the resulting hydrated products. The incorporation of Si into Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 3-x}(OH){sub 4x} was followed by {sup 27}Al NMR spectroscopy: Si:OH ratios were determined quantitatively from octahedral Al signals ascribed to Al(OH){sub 6} and Al(OSi)(OH){sub 5} environments. The NMR data obtained were consistent with the concentrations of the Al and Si species deduced from transmission electron microscopy energy-dispersive spectrometry and Rietveld analysis of both X-ray and neutron diffraction data.

  16. Investigating the reactivity of pMDI with wood cell walls using high-resolution solution-state NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Yelle; John Ralph; Charles R. Frihart

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study are the following: (1) Use solution-state NMR to assign contours in HSQC spectra of the reaction products between pMDI model compounds and: (a) lignin model compounds, (b) milled-wood lignin, (c) ball-milled wood, (d) microtomed loblolly pine; (2) Determine where and to what degree urethane formation occurs with loblolly pine cell wall...

  17. Experimental investigations of the nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gromov, K.Ya.

    1989-01-01

    The problem of experimental investigation into atomic nucleus structure is discussed. Examples of studying the properties of low-lying nucleus states using cyclotron-type accelerators for their production are presented. The consideration is conducted on the base of the Idisol experimental complex created at the Finland. Results of measuring masses of neutron-redundant rubidium nuclei are presented. Schemes of 160 Er and 108 In decay are presented. 12 refs.; 6 figs

  18. Correlative Structural Biology: How to Investigate the Fine Details of Viral Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth R. Wright

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Commentary on Byeon, I.J.; Meng, X.; Jung, J.; Zhao, G.; Yang, R.; Ahn, J.; Shi, J.; Concel, J.; Aiken, C.; Zhang, P.; Gronenborn, A.M. Structural convergence between Cryo-EM and NMR reveals intersubunit interactions critical for HIV-1 capsid function. Cell 2009, 139, 780-790.

  19. Structure and dynamics of a [1:1] drug-DNA complex: Analysis of 2D NMR data using molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarma, R.H.; Sarma, M.H.; Umemoto, K.

    1990-01-01

    1D/2D NMR studies are reported for a [1:1] complex of d(GA 4 T 4 C) 2 and Dst2 (an analogue of distamycin A). Full- Matrix NOESY Simulations, Molecular Mechanics and Molecular Dynamics Calculations are performed to analyze the NMR data. Results show that drug-DNA complex formation is driven by static features like H-bonding and steric interactions in the minor-groove of DNA. As a consequence of drug binding, a non-linear oscillatory mode is activated. In this mode the molecule samples equilibrium structural states of difference degrees of bending. It is noted that these structures belong to three distinctly different energy wells that satisfy the same NMR data. 14 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  20. NMR structural refinement of a tandem G·A mismatched decamer d(CCAAGATTGG)2 via the hybrid matrix procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikonowicz, E.P.; Meadows, R.P.; Fagan, P.; Gorenstein, D.G.

    1991-01-01

    A complete relaxation matrix approach employing a matrix eigenvalue/eigenvector solution to the Bloch equations is used to evaluate the NMR solution structure of a tandemly positioned G·A double mismatch decamer oligodeoxyribonucleotide duplex, d(CCAAGATTGG) 2 . An iterative refinement method using a hybrid relaxation matrix combined with restrained molecular dynamics calculations is shown to provide structures having good agreement with the experimentally derived structures. Distances incorporated into the MD simulations have been calculated from the relaxation rate matrix evaluated from a hybrid NOESY volume matrix whose elements are obtained from the merging of experimental and calculated NOESY intensities. Starting from both A- and B-DNA and mismatch syn and anti models, it is possible to calculate structures that are in good atomic RMS agreement with each other ( 3.6 angstrom). Importantly, the hybrid matrix derived structures are in excellent agreement with the experimental solution conformation as determined by comparison of the 200-ms simulated and experimental NOESY spectra, while the crystallographic data provide spectra that are grossly different

  1. Application of 13C-labeling and 13C-13C COSY NMR experiments in the structure determination of a microbial natural product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yun; Park, Sunghyouk; Shin, Jongheon; Oh, Dong-Chan

    2014-08-01

    The elucidation of the structures of complex natural products bearing many quaternary carbons remains challenging, even in this advanced spectroscopic era. (13)C-(13)C COSY NMR spectroscopy shows direct couplings between (13)C and (13)C, which comprise the backbone of a natural product. Thus, this type of experiment is particularly useful for natural products bearing consecutive quaternary carbons. However, the low sensitivity of (13)C-based NMR experiments, due to the low natural abundance of the (13)C nucleus, is problematic when applying these techniques. Our efforts in the (13)C labeling of a microbial natural product, cyclopiazonic acid (1), by feeding (13)C-labeled glucose to the fungal culture, enabled us to acquire (13)C-(13)C COSY NMR spectra on a milligram scale that clearly show the carbon backbone of the compound. This is the first application of (13)C-(13)C COSY NMR experiments for a natural product. The results suggest that (13)C-(13)C COSY NMR spectroscopy can be routinely used for the structure determination of microbial natural products by (13)C-enrichment of a compound with (13)C-glucose.

  2. CSI 3.0: a web server for identifying secondary and super-secondary structure in proteins using NMR chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafsa, Noor E; Arndt, David; Wishart, David S

    2015-07-01

    The Chemical Shift Index or CSI 3.0 (http://csi3.wishartlab.com) is a web server designed to accurately identify the location of secondary and super-secondary structures in protein chains using only nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) backbone chemical shifts and their corresponding protein sequence data. Unlike earlier versions of CSI, which only identified three types of secondary structure (helix, β-strand and coil), CSI 3.0 now identifies total of 11 types of secondary and super-secondary structures, including helices, β-strands, coil regions, five common β-turns (type I, II, I', II' and VIII), β hairpins as well as interior and edge β-strands. CSI 3.0 accepts experimental NMR chemical shift data in multiple formats (NMR Star 2.1, NMR Star 3.1 and SHIFTY) and generates colorful CSI plots (bar graphs) and secondary/super-secondary structure assignments. The output can be readily used as constraints for structure determination and refinement or the images may be used for presentations and publications. CSI 3.0 uses a pipeline of several well-tested, previously published programs to identify the secondary and super-secondary structures in protein chains. Comparisons with secondary and super-secondary structure assignments made via standard coordinate analysis programs such as DSSP, STRIDE and VADAR on high-resolution protein structures solved by X-ray and NMR show >90% agreement between those made with CSI 3.0. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Combining automated peak tracking in SAR by NMR with structure-based backbone assignment from 15N-NOESY

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Richard; Gao, Xin; Li, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Background: Chemical shift mapping is an important technique in NMR-based drug screening for identifying the atoms of a target protein that potentially bind to a drug molecule upon the molecule's introduction in increasing concentrations. The goal is to obtain a mapping of peaks with known residue assignment from the reference spectrum of the unbound protein to peaks with unknown assignment in the target spectrum of the bound protein. Although a series of perturbed spectra help to trace a path from reference peaks to target peaks, a one-to-one mapping generally is not possible, especially for large proteins, due to errors, such as noise peaks, missing peaks, missing but then reappearing, overlapped, and new peaks not associated with any peaks in the reference. Due to these difficulties, the mapping is typically done manually or semi-automatically, which is not efficient for high-throughput drug screening.Results: We present PeakWalker, a novel peak walking algorithm for fast-exchange systems that models the errors explicitly and performs many-to-one mapping. On the proteins: hBclXL, UbcH5B, and histone H1, it achieves an average accuracy of over 95% with less than 1.5 residues predicted per target peak. Given these mappings as input, we present PeakAssigner, a novel combined structure-based backbone resonance and NOE assignment algorithm that uses just 15N-NOESY, while avoiding TOCSY experiments and 13C-labeling, to resolve the ambiguities for a one-to-one mapping. On the three proteins, it achieves an average accuracy of 94% or better.Conclusions: Our mathematical programming approach for modeling chemical shift mapping as a graph problem, while modeling the errors directly, is potentially a time- and cost-effective first step for high-throughput drug screening based on limited NMR data and homologous 3D structures. 2012 Jang et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  4. NMR Insights into the Structure-Function Relationships in the Binding of Melanocortin Analogues to the MC1R Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Maurício; Zamora-Carreras, Héctor; Raposinho, Paula D; Oliveira, Maria Cristina; Pantoja-Uceda, David; Correia, João D G; Jiménez, M Angeles

    2017-07-15

    Linear and cyclic analogues of the α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) targeting the human melanocortin receptor 1 (MC1R) are of pharmacological interest for detecting and treating melanoma. The central sequence of α-MSH (His-Phe-Arg-Trp) has been identified as being essential for receptor binding. To deepen current knowledge on the molecular basis for α-MSH bioactivity, we aimed to understand the effect of cycle size on receptor binding. To that end, we synthesised two macrocyclic isomeric α-MSH analogues, c[NH-NO₂-C₆H₃-CO-His-DPhe-Arg-Trp-Lys]-Lys-NH₂ ( CycN-K6 ) and c[NH-NO₂-C₆H₃-CO-His-DPhe-Arg-Trp-Lys-Lys]-NH₂ ( CycN-K7 ). Their affinities to MC1R receptor were determined by competitive binding assays, and their structures were analysed by ¹H and 13 C NMR. These results were compared to those of the previously reported analogue c[S-NO₂-C₆H₃-CO-His-DPhe-Arg-Trp-Cys]-Lys-NH₂ ( CycS-C6 ). The MC1R binding affinity of the 22-membered macrocyclic peptide CycN-K6 (IC 50 = 155 ± 16 nM) is higher than that found for the 25-membered macrocyclic analogue CycN-K7 (IC 50 = 495 ± 101 nM), which, in turn, is higher than that observed for the 19-membered cyclic analogue CycS-C6 (IC 50 = 1770 ± 480 nM). NMR structural study indicated that macrocycle size leads to changes in the relative dispositions of the side chains, particularly in the packing of the Arg side chain relative to the aromatic rings. In contrast to the other analogues, the 22-membered cycle's side chains are favorably positioned for receptor interaction.

  5. Combining automated peak tracking in SAR by NMR with structure-based backbone assignment from 15N-NOESY

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Richard

    2012-03-21

    Background: Chemical shift mapping is an important technique in NMR-based drug screening for identifying the atoms of a target protein that potentially bind to a drug molecule upon the molecule\\'s introduction in increasing concentrations. The goal is to obtain a mapping of peaks with known residue assignment from the reference spectrum of the unbound protein to peaks with unknown assignment in the target spectrum of the bound protein. Although a series of perturbed spectra help to trace a path from reference peaks to target peaks, a one-to-one mapping generally is not possible, especially for large proteins, due to errors, such as noise peaks, missing peaks, missing but then reappearing, overlapped, and new peaks not associated with any peaks in the reference. Due to these difficulties, the mapping is typically done manually or semi-automatically, which is not efficient for high-throughput drug screening.Results: We present PeakWalker, a novel peak walking algorithm for fast-exchange systems that models the errors explicitly and performs many-to-one mapping. On the proteins: hBclXL, UbcH5B, and histone H1, it achieves an average accuracy of over 95% with less than 1.5 residues predicted per target peak. Given these mappings as input, we present PeakAssigner, a novel combined structure-based backbone resonance and NOE assignment algorithm that uses just 15N-NOESY, while avoiding TOCSY experiments and 13C-labeling, to resolve the ambiguities for a one-to-one mapping. On the three proteins, it achieves an average accuracy of 94% or better.Conclusions: Our mathematical programming approach for modeling chemical shift mapping as a graph problem, while modeling the errors directly, is potentially a time- and cost-effective first step for high-throughput drug screening based on limited NMR data and homologous 3D structures. 2012 Jang et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  6. Two-dimensional NMR and photo-CIDNP studies of the insulin monomer: Assignment of aromatic resonances with application to protein folding, structure, and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, M.A.; Shoelson, S.E.; Nguyen, D.T.; O'Shea, E.; Karplus, M.; Khait, I.; Neuringer, L.J.; Inouye, K.; Frank, B.H.; Beckage, M.

    1989-01-01

    The aromatic 1 H NMR resonances of the insulin monomer are assigned at 500 MHz by comparative studies of chemically modified and genetically altered variants, including a mutant insulin (PheB25 → Leu) associated with diabetes mellitus. The two histidines, three phenylalanines, and four tyrosines are observed to be in distinct local environments; their assignment provides sensitive markers for studies of tertiary structure, protein dynamics, and protein folding. The environments of the tyrosine residues have also been investigated by photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) and analyzed in relation to packing constrains in the crystal structures of insulin. Dimerization involving specific B-chain interactions is observed with increasing protein concentration and is shown to depend on temperature, pH, and solvent composition. The differences between proinsulin and mini-proinsulin suggest a structural mechanism for the observation that the fully reduced B29-A1 analogue folds more efficiently than proinsulin to form the correct pattern of disulfide bonds. These results are discussed in relation to molecular mechanics calculations of insulin based on the available crystal structures

  7. Fine hierarchy of the V-O bonds by advanced solid state NMR: novel Pb4(VO2)(PO4)3 structure as a textbook case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricot, Grégory; Mentré, Olivier; Cristol, Sylvain; Delevoye, Laurent

    2012-12-17

    We report here a complete structural characterization of a new lead Pb(4)(VO(2))(PO(4))(3) vanadophosphate compound by single crystal X-ray diffraction and (51)V and (31)P solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Although structural data are commonly used for the estimation of bond lengths and further delimitation of the true coordination number (e.g., octahedral: 6 versus 5 + 1 versus 4 + 2), we show here for the first time by solid-state NMR a more accurate appreciation of the V-O bonding scheme in this complex oxide which appears well adapted to the full series of vanado-phosphate materials. The direct characterization of V-O-P bridges through the J-mediated correlation (51)V{(31)P} heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (J-HMQC) technique allows a contrasted hierarchy of the V-O electronic delocalization and indirectly supports the presence or not of the V-O bond. In the reported lead vanado-phosphate structure, the two vanadium polyhedra that have been assigned to octahedra from a bond length point of view have been finally reclassified as tetra- and penta-coordinated units on the basis of the solid-state NMR results. More generally, we believe that the improved characterization of interatomic bonds in various vanado-phosphate structures by solid-state NMR will contribute to a better understanding of the structure/property relationships in this important class of materials.

  8. Direct methods and residue type specific isotope labeling in NMR structure determination and model-driven sequential assignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schedlbauer, Andreas; Auer, Renate; Ledolter, Karin; Tollinger, Martin; Kloiber, Karin; Lichtenecker, Roman; Ruedisser, Simon; Hommel, Ulrich; Schmid, Walther; Konrat, Robert; Kontaxis, Georg

    2008-01-01

    Direct methods in NMR based structure determination start from an unassigned ensemble of unconnected gaseous hydrogen atoms. Under favorable conditions they can produce low resolution structures of proteins. Usually a prohibitively large number of NOEs is required, to solve a protein structure ab-initio, but even with a much smaller set of distance restraints low resolution models can be obtained which resemble a protein fold. One problem is that at such low resolution and in the absence of a force field it is impossible to distinguish the correct protein fold from its mirror image. In a hybrid approach these ambiguous models have the potential to aid in the process of sequential backbone chemical shift assignment when 13 C β and 13 C' shifts are not available for sensitivity reasons. Regardless of the overall fold they enhance the information content of the NOE spectra. These, combined with residue specific labeling and minimal triple-resonance data using 13 C α connectivity can provide almost complete sequential assignment. Strategies for residue type specific labeling with customized isotope labeling patterns are of great advantage in this context. Furthermore, this approach is to some extent error-tolerant with respect to data incompleteness, limited precision of the peak picking, and structural errors caused by misassignment of NOEs

  9. Defining the Structural Basis for Allosteric Product Release from E. coli Dihydrofolate Reductase Using NMR Relaxation Dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyen, David; Fenwick, R Bryn; Aoto, Phillip C; Stanfield, Robyn L; Wilson, Ian A; Dyson, H Jane; Wright, Peter E

    2017-08-16

    The rate-determining step in the catalytic cycle of E. coli dihydrofolate reductase is tetrahydrofolate (THF) product release, which can occur via an allosteric or an intrinsic pathway. The allosteric pathway, which becomes accessible when the reduced cofactor NADPH is bound, involves transient sampling of a higher energy conformational state, greatly increasing the product dissociation rate as compared to the intrinsic pathway that obtains when NADPH is absent. Although the kinetics of this process are known, the enzyme structure and the THF product conformation in the transiently formed excited state remain elusive. Here, we use side-chain proton NMR relaxation dispersion measurements, X-ray crystallography, and structure-based chemical shift predictions to explore the structural basis of allosteric product release. In the excited state of the E:THF:NADPH product release complex, the reduced nicotinamide ring of the cofactor transiently enters the active site where it displaces the pterin ring of the THF product. The p-aminobenzoyl-l-glutamate tail of THF remains weakly bound in a widened binding cleft. Thus, through transient entry of the nicotinamide ring into the active site, the NADPH cofactor remodels the enzyme structure and the conformation of the THF to form a weakly populated excited state that is poised for rapid product release.

  10. SAXS and TEM Investigation of Bentonite Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matusewicz, Michal; Liljestroem, Ville; Muurinen, Arto; Serimaa, Ritva

    2013-01-01

    A preliminary investigation of bentonite structure using Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) is presented. Three types of clay were used: unchanged MX-80 bentonite and purified clays with sodium or calcium ions. Quantitative information in nano-scale - basal spacing, mean crystallite size - was obtained from SAXS, which was complemented by TEM to give qualitative information from micron to nanometre scale. SAXS seems to be a more reliable source of quantitative data than TEM. SAXS gives the averaged information about basal spacing. TEM in this study gives more qualitative information, but in a greater resolution range. The presented work is a starting point to combine more methods to obtain a better idea of bentonite structure. (authors)

  11. Investigation of Sc(3) state in nonaqueous solutions by the 45Sc NMR method of high permission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buslaev, Yu.A.; Kirakosyan, G.A.; Tarasov, V.P.

    1980-01-01

    The ScCl 3 + CH 3 CN and ScCl 3 + KNCS + CH 3 CN solutions have been studied by a high-resolution NMR 45 Sc method. It has been estimated that in acetonitrile solutions, with competing ligands of Cl - and NCS - being available, hexacoordination Sc(3) complexes of various compositions are formed, and solvent molecules also take part in formation of the coordination sphere of scandium. Chemical shifts in NMR 45 Sc signals depend linearly on the number of chlor- or NCS - ions bound to scandium(3). This made it possible to determine the value of chemical shifts in signals of all 28 potential complexes formed in a system with three competing ligands

  12. Investigation of the redox-dependent modulation of structure and dynamics in human cytochrome c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imai, Mizue [Graduate School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Saio, Tomohide [Graduate School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Kumeta, Hiroyuki [Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0021 (Japan); Uchida, Takeshi [Graduate School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Inagaki, Fuyuhiko [Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0021 (Japan); Ishimori, Koichiro, E-mail: koichiro@sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Graduate School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)

    2016-01-22

    Redox-dependent changes in the structure and dynamics of human cytochrome c (Cyt c) were investigated by solution NMR. We found significant structural changes in several regions, including residues 23–28 (loop 3), which were further corroborated by chemical shift differences between the reduced and oxidized states of Cyt c. These differences are essential for discriminating redox states in Cyt c by cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) during electron transfer reactions. Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion experiments identified that the region around His33 undergoes conformational exchanges on the μs-ms timescale, indicating significant redox-dependent structural changes. Because His33 is not part of the interaction site for CcO, our data suggest that the dynamic properties of the region, which is far from the interaction site for CcO, contribute to conformational changes during electron transfer to CcO. - Highlights: • Solution structure and dynamics analysis for human Cyt c by NMR. • Structural changes responsible for the discrimination of the redox state in Cyt c. • Conformational exchange in the region outside of the interaction site for CcO. • Less flexibility and rigid structure of the interaction site on Cyt c for CcO.

  13. 15N NMR spectroscopic investigation of nitrous and nitric acids in sulfuric acid solutions of varying acidities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, G.K.S.; Heiliger, L.; Olah, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    Both nitrous and nitric acids were studied in sulfuric acid solutions of varying acid strengths by 15 N NMR spectroscopy. The study gives new insights into the nature of intermediates present at different acid strengths. Furthermore, we have also discovered a novel redox reaction between NO 2 + and NO + ions involving the intermediacy of their respective acids. A mechanism is proposed to explain the observed results. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  14. A Hybrid Solid-State NMR and Electron Microscopy Structure-Determination Protocol for Engineering Advanced para-Crystalline Optical Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, Brijith; Rombouts, Jeroen; Oostergetel, Gert T.; Gupta, Karthick B.S.S.; Buda, Francesco; Lammertsma, Koop; Orru, Romano; de Groot, Huub J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy and TEM were demonstrated for de novo structure determination of para-crystalline materials with a bioinspired fused naphthalene diimide (NDI)–salphen–phenazine prototype light-harvesting compound. Starting from chiral building blocks with C2

  15. Halogen effect on structure and 13C NMR chemical shift of 3,6-disubstituted-N-alkyl carbazoles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radula-Janik, Klaudia; Kupka, Teobald; Ejsmont, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Structures of selected 3,6-dihalogeno-N-alkyl carbazole derivatives were calculated at the B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2pd) level of theory and their 13C NMR isotropic nuclear shieldings were predicted using density functional theory (DFT). The model compounds contained 9H-, N-methyl and N-ethyl derivatives...

  16. Chemical structure changes in coals after low-temperature oxidation and demineralization by acid treatment as revealed by high resolution solid state 13C NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tekely, P.; Nicole, D.; Delpuech, J.-J.; Totino, E.; Muller, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    13 C CP/MAS NMR has been used for characterization of chemical structure changes in coals after low-temperature oxidation and prolonged demineralization by acid treatment. In both cases the changes take place mainly in the aliphatic part of coal molecules. 21 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs

  17. Traditional biomolecular structure determination by NMR spectroscopy allows for major errors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nabuurs, S.B.; Spronk, C.A.E.M.; Vuister, G.W.; Vriend, G.

    2006-01-01

    One of the major goals of structural genomics projects is to determine the three-dimensional structure of representative members of as many different fold families as possible. Comparative modeling is expected to fill the remaining gaps by providing structural models of homologs of the

  18. Solution structure of the 45-residue ATP-binding peptide of adenylate kinase as determined by 2-D NMR, FTIR, and CD spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, D.C.; Byler, D.M.; Susi, H.; Brown, E.M.; Kuby, S.A.; Mildyan, A.S.

    1986-01-01

    In the X-ray structure of adenylate kinase residues 1-45 exist as 47% α-helix, 29% β-structure (strands and turns) and 24% coil. The solution structure of a synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 1-45, which constitutes the MgATP binding site was studied by 3 independent spectroscopic methods. Globularity of the peptide was shown by its broad NMR resonances which narrow upon denaturation, and by its ability to bind MgATP with similar affinity and conformation as the intact enzyme does. COSY and NOESY NMR methods at 250 and 500 MHz reveal proximities among NH, Cα, and Cβ protons indicative of >20% α-helix, and >20% β-structure. Correlation of regions of secondary structure with the primary sequence by 2D NMR indicates at least one α-helix (res. 23 to 29) and two β-strands (res. 12 to 15 and 34 to 38). The broad amide I band in the deconvoluted FTIR spectrum could be fit as the sum of 4 peaks due to specific secondary structures, yielding ≤=45% α-helix, ≤=40% β-structure and ≥=15% coil. The CD spectrum, from 185-250 nm, interpreted with a 3-parameter basis set, yielded 20 +/- 5% α=helix, and ≤=20% β-structure. The solution structure of peptide 1-45 thus approximates that of residues 1-45 in the crystal

  19. Structural analysis of alanine tripeptide with antiparallel and parallel beta-sheet structures in relation to the analysis of mixed beta-sheet structures in Samia cynthia ricini silk protein fiber using solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Tetsuo; Okonogi, Michi; Nakazawa, Yasumoto; Yamauchi, Kazuo

    2006-05-10

    The structural analysis of natural protein fibers with mixed parallel and antiparallel beta-sheet structures by solid-state NMR is reported. To obtain NMR parameters that can characterize these beta-sheet structures, (13)C solid-state NMR experiments were performed on two alanine tripeptide samples: one with 100% parallel beta-sheet structure and the other with 100% antiparallel beta-sheet structure. All (13)C resonances of the tripeptides could be assigned by a comparison of the methyl (13)C resonances of Ala(3) with different [3-(13)C]Ala labeling schemes and also by a series of RFDR (radio frequency driven recoupling) spectra observed by changing mixing times. Two (13)C resonances observed for each Ala residue could be assigned to two nonequivalent molecules per unit cell. Differences in the (13)C chemical shifts and (13)C spin-lattice relaxation times (T(1)) were observed between the two beta-sheet structures. Especially, about 3 times longer T(1) values were obtained for parallel beta-sheet structure as compared to those of antiparallel beta-sheet structure, which could be explicable by the difference in the hydrogen-bond networks of both structures. This very large difference in T(1) becomes a good measure to differentiate between parallel or antiparallel beta-sheet structures. These differences in the NMR parameters found for the tripeptides may be applied to assign the parallel and antiparallel beta-sheet (13)C resonances in the asymmetric and broad methyl spectra of [3-(13)C]Ala silk protein fiber of a wild silkworm, Samia cynthia ricini.

  20. Polysaccharides of algae. Pt. 37. Characterization of hybrid structure of substituted agarose from Polysiphonia morrowii (Rhodophyta, Rhodomelaceae) using. beta. -agarase and /sup 13/C-NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usov, A.I.; Ivanova, E.G.

    1987-09-01

    Structure of gel-forming galactan from Polysiphonia morrowii was analysed using bacterial ..beta..-agarase and /sup 13/C-nuclear magnetic resonance (/sup 13/C-NMR) spectroscopy. The polysaccharide was shown to contain: a) blocks composed of agarobiose residues, partly 6-O-methylated and 6-sulfated, which are sensitive to enzymolysis; b) extended blocks composed of agarobiose 6-sulfate residues, which are resistant to ..beta..-agarase action. The latter blocks contain also ..beta..-D-galactopyranosyl-(1->4)-..cap alpha..-L-galactopyranose 6.6'-disulfate residues (biogenetic precursors of agarobiose 6-sulfate), which are hardly detectable by /sup 13/C-NMR spectrum of the starting polysaccharide. Action of alkali on the enzyme-resistant fraction afforded a polysaccharide preparation having /sup 13/C-NMR spectrum of agarose 6-sulfate.

  1. Crystal and NMR Structures of a Peptidomimetic β-Turn That Provides Facile Synthesis of 13-Membered Cyclic Tetrapeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Alan J; Squire, Christopher J; Edwards, Patrick J B; Harjes, Elena; Sarojini, Vijayalekshmi

    2017-12-14

    Herein we report the unique conformations adopted by linear and cyclic tetrapeptides (CTPs) containing 2-aminobenzoic acid (2-Abz) in solution and as single crystals. The crystal structure of the linear tetrapeptide H 2 N-d-Leu-d-Phe-2-Abz-d-Ala-COOH (1) reveals a novel planar peptidomimetic β-turn stabilized by three hydrogen bonds and is in agreement with its NMR structure in solution. While CTPs are often synthetically inaccessible or cyclize in poor yield, both 1 and its N-Me-d-Phe analogue (2) adopt pseudo-cyclic frameworks enabling near quantitative conversion to the corresponding CTPs 3 and 4. The crystal structure of the N-methylated peptide (4) is the first reported for a CTP containing 2-Abz and reveals a distinctly planar 13-membered ring, which is also evident in solution. The N-methylation of d-Phe results in a peptide bond inversion compared to the conformation of 3 in solution. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR): principles and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quibilan, E.I.

    The basis for the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is the ability of certain nuclei possessing both intrinsic angular momentum or ''spin'' I and magnetic moment to absorb electromagnetic energy in the radio frequency range. In principle, there are approximately 200 nuclei which may be investigated using the NMR technique. The NMR spectrum consists of intensity peaks along an axis calibrated in terms of the steady magnetic field or the frequency of the radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation. Analysis of the number, spacing, position and intensity of the lines in an NMR spectrum consists of intensity peaks along an axis calibrated in terms of the steady magnetic field or the frequency of the radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation. Analysis of the number, spacing, position and intensity of the lines in an NMR spectrum provides a variety of qualitative and quantitative analytical applications. The most obvious applications consist of the measurements of nuclear properties, such as spin number and nuclear magnetic moment. In liquids, the fine structure of resonance spectra provides a tool for chemical identification and molecular structure analysis. Other applications include the measurements of self-diffusion coefficients, magnetic fields and field homogeneity, inter-nuclear distances, and, in some cases, the water content of biological materials. (author)

  3. Solution structure and backbone dynamics of recombinant Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor-V determined by NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J; Prakash, O; Cai, M; Gong, Y; Huang, Y; Wen, L; Wen, J J; Huang, J K; Krishnamoorthi, R

    1996-02-06

    The solution structure of recombinant Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor-V (rCMTI-V), whose N-terminal is unacetylated and carries an extra glycine residue, was determined by means of two-dimensional (2D) homo and 3D hetero NMR experiments in combination with a distance geometry and simulated annealing algorithm. A total of 927 interproton distances and 123 torsion angle constraints were utilized to generate 18 structures. The root mean squared deviation (RMSD) of the mean structure is 0.53 A for main-chain atoms and 0.95 A for all the non-hydrogen atoms of residues 3-40 and 49-67. The average structure of rCMTI-V is found to be almost the same as that of the native protein [Cai, M., Gong, Y., Kao, J.-L., & Krishnamoorthi, R. (1995) Biochemistry 34, 5201-5211]. The backbone dynamics of uniformly 15N-labeled rCMTI-V were characterized by 2D 1H-15N NMR methods. 15N spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation rate constants (R1 and R2, respectively) and [1H]-15N steady-state heteronuclear Overhauser effect enhancements were measured for the peptide NH units and, using the model-free formalism [Lipari, G., & Szabo, A. (1982) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 104, 4546-4559, 4559-4570], the following parameters were determined: overall tumbling correlation time for the protein molecule (tau m), generalized order parameters for the individual N-H vectors (S2), effective correlation times for their internal motions (tau e), and terms to account for motions on a slower time scale (second) due to chemical exchange and/or conformational averaging (R(ex)). Most of the backbone NH groups of rCMTI-V are found to be highly constrained ((S2) = 0.83) with the exception of those in the binding loop (residues 41-48, (S2) = 0.71) and the N-terminal region ((S2) = 0.73). Main-chain atoms in these regions show large RMSD values in the average NMR structure. Residues involved in turns also appear to have more mobility ((S2) = 0.80). Dynamical properties of rCMTI-V were compared with those of two other

  4. Use of hydrogen-deuterium exchange for contrast in {sup 1}H NMR microscopy investigations of an operating PEM fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feindel, Kirk W.; Bergens, Steven H.; Wasylishen, Roderick E. [Department of Chemistry, Gunning/Lemieux Chemistry Centre, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alta. T6G 2G2 (Canada)

    2007-11-08

    The use of hydrogen-deuterium (H-D) exchange as a method to introduce contrast in {sup 1}H NMR microscopy images and to investigate the dynamic distribution of water throughout an operating H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell, PEMFC, is demonstrated. Cycling D{sub 2}O(l) through the flow channels of a PEMFC causes H-D exchange with water in the PEM to result in a D{sub 2}O-saturated PEM and thus concomitant removal of the {sup 1}H NMR signal. Subsequent operation of the PEMFC with H{sub 2}(g) enables visualization of the redistribution of water from wet or flooded conditions as H-D exchange occurs with D{sub 2}O in the PEM and results in recovery of the {sup 1}H NMR signal. Alternating between H{sub 2}(g) and D{sub 2}(g) as fuel allows observation of water distributions in the PEM while the cell is operating at a steady-state under low relative humidity. At similar currents, the rate of observable H-D exchange in the PEM during fuel cell operation was faster when the PEM was saturated with water than when under low relative humidity. These results are consistent with the known proportions of the conductive hydrophilic and nonconductive hydrophobic domains of Nafion when exposed to different relative humidities. (author)

  5. Cotton fibers encapsulated with homo- and block copolymers: synthesis by the atom transfer radical polymerization grafting-from technique and solid-state NMR dynamic investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelvetro, Valter; Geppi, Marco; Giaiacopi, Simone; Mollica, Giulia

    2007-02-01

    Cotton fibers were modified by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization of ethyl acrylate (EA) followed by copolymerization with styrene. Either ethyl 2-bromopropionate as a sacrificial free initiator or Cu(II) as a deactivator was used to optimize the EA grafting yield and to preserve the livingness of the chain ends for the subsequent growth of a poly(styrene) (PSty) block from the poly(ethyl acrylate) (PEA) grafts. The polymer-encapsulated cotton fibers were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis, and solid-state NMR (high-resolution 13C cross-polarization magic angle spinning, 1H spin-lattice relaxation times, and 1H free induction decay analysis NMR). The latter allowed the detection of the dynamic modifications associated with the presence of homo- and block copolymer grafts. In particular, the results of the DSC and NMR investigations suggest a heterogeneous morphology of the g-PEA-b-PSty grafted skin, which could be described as an inner layer of g-PEA sandwiched between the semicrystalline cellulose of the core fiber and the high glass transition temperature PSty of the covalently linked outer layer. Such morphology results in a reduced molecular mobility of the PEA chains.

  6. A rapid NMR-based method for discrimination of strain-specific cell wall teichoic acid structures reveals a third backbone type in Lactobacillus plantarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Satoru; Tanaka, Naoto; Okada, Sanae

    2017-03-01

    The lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus plantarum is capable of producing strain-specific structures of cell wall teichoic acid (WTA), an anionic polysaccharide found in the Gram-positive bacterial cell wall. In this study, we established a rapid, NMR-based procedure to discriminate WTA structures in this species, and applied it to 94 strains of L. plantarum. Six previously reported glycerol- and ribitol-containing WTA subtypes were successfully identified from 78 strains, suggesting that these were the dominant structures. However, the level of structural variety differed markedly among bacterial sources, possibly reflecting differences in strain-level microbial diversity. WTAs from eight strains were not identified based on NMR spectra and were classified into three groups. Structural analysis of a partial degradation product of an unidentified WTA produced by strain TUA 1496L revealed that the WTA was 1-O-β-d-glucosylglycerol. Two-dimensional NMR analysis of the polymer structure showed phosphodiester bonds between C-3 and C-6 of the glycerol and glucose residues, suggesting a polymer structure of 3,6΄-linked poly(1-O-β-d-glucosyl-sn-glycerol phosphate). This is the third WTA backbone structure in L. plantarum, following 3,6΄-linked poly(1-O-α-d-glucosyl-sn-glycerol phosphate) and 1,5-linked poly(ribitol phosphate). © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Combined Approach for the Structural Characterization of Alkali Fluoroscandates: Solid-State NMR, Powder X-ray Diffraction, and Density Functional Theory Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhmatullin, Aydar; Polovov, Ilya B; Maltsev, Dmitry; Allix, Mathieu; Volkovich, Vladimir; Chukin, Andrey V; Boča, Miroslav; Bessada, Catherine

    2018-02-05

    The structures of several fluoroscandate compounds are presented here using a characterization approach combining powder X-ray diffraction and solid-state NMR. The structure of K 5 Sc 3 F 14 was fully determined from Rietveld refinement performed on powder X-ray diffraction data. Moreover, the local structures of NaScF 4 , Li 3 ScF 6 , KSc 2 F 7 , and Na 3 ScF 6 compounds were studied in detail from solid-state 19 F and 45 Sc NMR experiments. The 45 Sc chemical shift ranges for six- and seven-coordinated scandium environments were defined. The 19 F chemical shift ranges for bridging and terminal fluorine atoms were also determined. First-principles calculations of the 19 F and 45 Sc NMR parameters were carried out using plane-wave basis sets and periodic boundary conditions (CASTEP), and the results were compared with the experimental data. A good agreement between the calculated shielding constants and experimental chemical shifts was obtained. This demonstrates the good potential of computational methods in spectroscopic assignments of solid-state 45 Sc NMR spectroscopy.

  8. High-Resolution Magic-Angle-Spinning NMR and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Spectroscopies Distinguish Metabolome and Structural Properties of Maize Seeds from Plants Treated with Different Fertilizers and Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzei, Pierluigi; Cozzolino, Vincenza; Piccolo, Alessandro

    2018-03-21

    Both high-resolution magic-angle-spinning (HRMAS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) NMR spectroscopies were applied here to identify the changes of metabolome, morphology, and structural properties induced in seeds (caryopses) of maize plants grown at field level under either mineral or compost fertilization in combination with the inoculation by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). The metabolome of intact caryopses was examined by HRMAS-NMR, while the morphological aspects, endosperm properties and seed water distribution were investigated by MRI. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to evaluate 1 H CPMG (Carr-Purcel-Meiboom-Gill) HRMAS spectra as well as several MRI-derived parameters ( T 1 , T 2 , and self-diffusion coefficients) of intact maize caryopses. PCA score-plots from spectral results indicated that both seeds metabolome and structural properties depended on the specific field treatment undergone by maize plants. Our findings show that a combination of multivariate statistical analyses with advanced and nondestructive NMR techniques, such as HRMAS and MRI, enables the evaluation of the effects induced on maize caryopses by different fertilization and management practices at field level. The spectroscopic approach adopted here may become useful for the objective appraisal of the quality of seeds produced under a sustainable agriculture.

  9. Structural Masquerade of Plesiomonas shigelloides Strain CNCTC 78/89 O-Antigen-High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning NMR Reveals the Modified d-galactan I of Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucieklak, Karolina; Koj, Sabina; Pawelczyk, Damian; Niedziela, Tomasz

    2017-11-29

    The high-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HR-MAS NMR) analysis of Plesiomonas shigelloides 78/89 lipopolysaccharide directly on bacteria revealed the characteristic structural features of the O -acetylated polysaccharide in the NMR spectra. The O -antigen profiles were unique, yet the pattern of signals in the, spectra along with their ¹H, 13 C chemical shift values, resembled these of d-galactan I of Klebsiella pneumoniae . The isolated O- specific polysaccharide (O-PS) of P. shigelloides strain CNCTC 78/89 was investigated by ¹H and 13 C NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and chemical methods. The analyses demonstrated that the P. shigelloides 78/89 O- PS is composed of →3)-α-d-Gal p -(1→3)-β-d-Gal f 2OAc-(1→ disaccharide repeating units. The O- acetylation was incomplete and resulted in a microheterogeneity of the O- antigen. This O- acetylation generates additional antigenic determinants within the O- antigen, forms a new chemotype, and contributes to the epitopes recognized by the O- serotype specific antibodies. The serological cross-reactivities further confirmed the inter-specific structural similarity of these O- antigens.

  10. Determination of structure of oriented samples using two-dimensional solid state NMR techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Hong; Harbison, G.S.

    1990-01-01

    One dimensional and two-dimensional MAS techniques can give detailed information about the structure and dynamics of oriented systems. We describe the application of such techniques to the liquid-crystalline polymer poly(p-phenyleneterphtalimide) (PPTA), and thence deduce the solid-state structure of the material. (author). 9 refs.; 6 figs

  11. Combining NMR and small angle X-ray and neutron scattering in the structural analysis of a ternary protein-RNA complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennig, Janosch; Wang, Iren; Sonntag, Miriam; Gabel, Frank; Sattler, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Many processes in the regulation of gene expression and signaling involve the formation of protein complexes involving multi-domain proteins. Individual domains that mediate protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions are typically connected by flexible linkers, which contribute to conformational dynamics and enable the formation of complexes with distinct binding partners. Solution techniques are therefore required for structural analysis and to characterize potential conformational dynamics. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) provides such information but often only sparse data are obtained with increasing molecular weight of the complexes. It is therefore beneficial to combine NMR data with additional structural restraints from complementary solution techniques. Small angle X-ray/neutron scattering (SAXS/SANS) data can be efficiently combined with NMR-derived information, either for validation or by providing additional restraints for structural analysis. Here, we show that the combination of SAXS and SANS data can help to refine structural models obtained from data-driven docking using HADDOCK based on sparse NMR data. The approach is demonstrated with the ternary protein-protein-RNA complex involving two RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains of Sex-lethal, the N-terminal cold shock domain of Upstream-to-N-Ras, and msl-2 mRNA. Based on chemical shift perturbations we have mapped protein-protein and protein-RNA interfaces and complemented this NMR-derived information with SAXS data, as well as SANS measurements on subunit-selectively deuterated samples of the ternary complex. Our results show that, while the use of SAXS data is beneficial, the additional combination with contrast variation in SANS data resolves remaining ambiguities and improves the docking based on chemical shift perturbations of the ternary protein-RNA complex.

  12. Combining NMR and small angle X-ray and neutron scattering in the structural analysis of a ternary protein-RNA complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennig, Janosch; Wang, Iren; Sonntag, Miriam [Institute of Structural Biology, Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen (Germany); Gabel, Frank [Extremophiles and Large Molecular Assemblies Group (ELMA), Institut de Biologie Structurale (IBS) CEA-CNRS-UJF (France); Sattler, Michael, E-mail: sattler@helmholtz-muenchen.de [Institute of Structural Biology, Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    Many processes in the regulation of gene expression and signaling involve the formation of protein complexes involving multi-domain proteins. Individual domains that mediate protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions are typically connected by flexible linkers, which contribute to conformational dynamics and enable the formation of complexes with distinct binding partners. Solution techniques are therefore required for structural analysis and to characterize potential conformational dynamics. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) provides such information but often only sparse data are obtained with increasing molecular weight of the complexes. It is therefore beneficial to combine NMR data with additional structural restraints from complementary solution techniques. Small angle X-ray/neutron scattering (SAXS/SANS) data can be efficiently combined with NMR-derived information, either for validation or by providing additional restraints for structural analysis. Here, we show that the combination of SAXS and SANS data can help to refine structural models obtained from data-driven docking using HADDOCK based on sparse NMR data. The approach is demonstrated with the ternary protein-protein-RNA complex involving two RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains of Sex-lethal, the N-terminal cold shock domain of Upstream-to-N-Ras, and msl-2 mRNA. Based on chemical shift perturbations we have mapped protein-protein and protein-RNA interfaces and complemented this NMR-derived information with SAXS data, as well as SANS measurements on subunit-selectively deuterated samples of the ternary complex. Our results show that, while the use of SAXS data is beneficial, the additional combination with contrast variation in SANS data resolves remaining ambiguities and improves the docking based on chemical shift perturbations of the ternary protein-RNA complex.

  13. Identification of ten new designer drugs by GC-MS, UPLC-QTOF-MS, and NMR as part of a police investigation of a Danish internet company

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reitzel, Lotte A; Dalsgaard, Petur Weihe; Müller, Irene B

    2012-01-01

    -QTOF-MS analyses were supplemented by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra for the structural elucidation of p-fluoroamphetamine, mephedrone (4-methylmethcathinone), flephedrone (4-fluoromethcathinone), PPP (a-pyrrolidinopropiophenone), MDPV (3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone), Bk-MBDB (2-methylamino-1......-(3,4-methylenedioxyphenyl)butan-1-one), pFBT (3-(pfluorobenzoyl)-tropane), and JWH-073 (1-butyl-3-(1-naphthoyl)indol), whereas methylone (3,4-methylenedioxymethcathinone) and N-ethylcathinone matched electron impact-mass spectrometry (EI-MS) library spectra and therefore the screenings were considered sufficient. EI...

  14. Cross-correlative 3D micro-structural investigation of human bone processed into bone allografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Atul Kumar; Gajiwala, Astrid Lobo; Rai, Ratan Kumar; Khan, Mohd Parvez; Singh, Chandan; Barbhuyan, Tarun; Vijayalakshmi, S.; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya; Sinha, Neeraj; Kumar, Ashutosh; Bellare, Jayesh R.

    2016-01-01

    Bone allografts (BA) are a cost-effective and sustainable alternative in orthopedic practice as they provide a permanent solution for preserving skeletal architecture and function. Such BA however, must be processed to be disease free and immunologically safe as well as biologically and clinically useful. Here, we have demonstrated a processing protocol for bone allografts and investigated the micro-structural properties of bone collected from osteoporotic and normal human donor samples. In order to characterize BA at different microscopic levels, a combination of techniques such as Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (ssNMR), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), micro-computed tomography (μCT) and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) were used for delineating the ultra-structural property of bone. ssNMR revealed the extent of water, collagen fine structure and crystalline order in the bone. These were greatly perturbed in the bone taken from osteoporotic bone donor. Among the processing methods analyzed, pasteurization at 60 °C and radiation treatment appeared to substantially alter the bone integrity. SEM study showed a reduction in Ca/P ratio and non-uniform distribution of elements in osteoporotic bones. μ-CT and MIMICS® (Materialize Interactive Medical Image Control System) demonstrated that pasteurization and radiation treatment affects the BA morphology and cause a shift in the HU unit. However, the combination of all these processes restored all-important parameters that are critical for BA integrity and sustainability. Cross-correlation between the various probes we used quantitatively demonstrated differences in morphological and micro-structural properties between BA taken from normal and osteoporotic human donor. Such details could also be instrumental in designing an appropriate bone scaffold. For the best restoration of bone microstructure and to be used as a biomaterial allograft, a step-wise processing method is recommended that preserves all

  15. Cross-correlative 3D micro-structural investigation of human bone processed into bone allografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Atul Kumar [Centre for Research in Nanotechnology & Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Gajiwala, Astrid Lobo [Tissue Bank, Tata Memorial Hospital, Parel, Mumbai 400012 (India); Rai, Ratan Kumar [Centre of Biomedical Research, SGPGIMS Campus, Lucknow 226014 (India); Khan, Mohd Parvez [Division of Endocrinology, Center for Research in Anabolic Skeletal Targets in Health and Illness (ASTHI) CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226031 (India); Singh, Chandan [Centre of Biomedical Research, SGPGIMS Campus, Lucknow 226014 (India); Barbhuyan, Tarun [Division of Endocrinology, Center for Research in Anabolic Skeletal Targets in Health and Illness (ASTHI) CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226031 (India); Vijayalakshmi, S. [Centre for Research in Nanotechnology & Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Chattopadhyay, Naibedya [Division of Endocrinology, Center for Research in Anabolic Skeletal Targets in Health and Illness (ASTHI) CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226031 (India); Sinha, Neeraj, E-mail: neerajcbmr@gmail.com [Centre of Biomedical Research, SGPGIMS Campus, Lucknow 226014 (India); Kumar, Ashutosh, E-mail: ashutoshk@iitb.ac.in [Department of Biosciences and Bioengineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Bellare, Jayesh R., E-mail: jb@iitb.ac.in [Centre for Research in Nanotechnology & Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India)

    2016-05-01

    Bone allografts (BA) are a cost-effective and sustainable alternative in orthopedic practice as they provide a permanent solution for preserving skeletal architecture and function. Such BA however, must be processed to be disease free and immunologically safe as well as biologically and clinically useful. Here, we have demonstrated a processing protocol for bone allografts and investigated the micro-structural properties of bone collected from osteoporotic and normal human donor sam