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Sample records for nmr signal detection

  1. Enhanced NMR signal detection of imino protons in RNA molecules containing 3' dangling nucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amborski, Andrew N.; Johnson, Philip E.

    2008-01-01

    We present a method for improving the quality of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra involving exchangeable protons near the base of the stem of RNA hairpin molecules. NMR spectra of five different RNA hairpins were compared. These hairpins consisted of a native RNA structure and four molecules each having different unpaired, or dangling, nucleotides at the 3' end. NMR experiments were acquired in water for each construct and the quality of the imino proton spectral regions were examined. The imino resonances near the base of the stem of the wild type RNA structure were not observed due to breathing motions. However, a significant increase in spectral quality for molecules with dangling 3' adenosine or guanosine nucleotides was observed, with imino protons detected in these constructs that were not observed in the wild type construct. A modest improvement in spectral quality was seen for the construct with a 3' unpaired uridine, whereas no significant improvement was observed for a 3' unpaired cytidine. This improvement in NMR spectral quality mirrors the increased thermodynamic stability observed for 3' unpaired nucleotides which is dependant on the stacking interactions of these nucleotides against the base of the stem. The use of a dangling 3' adenosine nucleotide represents an easy method to significantly improve the quality of NMR spectra of RNA molecules

  2. Nano-mole scale sequential signal assignment by 1 H-detected protein solid-state NMR

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Songlin

    2015-01-01

    We present a 3D 1H-detected solid-state NMR (SSNMR) approach for main-chain signal assignments of 10-100 nmol of fully protonated proteins using ultra-fast magic-angle spinning (MAS) at ∼80 kHz by a novel spectral-editing method, which permits drastic spectral simplification. The approach offers ∼110 fold time saving over a traditional 3D 13C-detected SSNMR approach. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015.

  3. Signal detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tholomier, M.

    1985-01-01

    In a scanning electron microscope, whatever is the measured signal, the same set is found: incident beam, sample, signal detection, signal amplification. The resulting signal is used to control the spot luminosity with the observer cathodoscope. This is synchronized with the beam scanning on the sample; on the cathodoscope, the image in secondary electrons, backscattered electrons,... of the sample surface is reconstituted. The best compromise must be found between a register time low enough to remove eventual variations (under the incident beam) of the nature of the observed phenomenon, and a good spatial resolution of the image and a signal-to-noise ratio high enough. The noise is one of the basic limitations of the scanning electron microscope performance. The whose measurement line must be optimized to reduce it [fr

  4. Proton detection for signal enhancement in solid-state NMR experiments on mobile species in membrane proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Meaghan E.; Ritz, Emily [University of Guelph, Department of Physics (Canada); Ahmed, Mumdooh A. M. [Suez University, The Department of Physics, Faculty of Science (Egypt); Bamm, Vladimir V.; Harauz, George [University of Guelph, Biophysics Interdepartmental Group (Canada); Brown, Leonid S.; Ladizhansky, Vladimir, E-mail: vladizha@uoguelph.ca [University of Guelph, Department of Physics (Canada)

    2015-12-15

    Direct proton detection is becoming an increasingly popular method for enhancing sensitivity in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Generally, these experiments require extensive deuteration of the protein, fast magic angle spinning (MAS), or a combination of both. Here, we implement direct proton detection to selectively observe the mobile entities in fully-protonated membrane proteins at moderate MAS frequencies. We demonstrate this method on two proteins that exhibit different motional regimes. Myelin basic protein is an intrinsically-disordered, peripherally membrane-associated protein that is highly flexible, whereas Anabaena sensory rhodopsin is composed of seven rigid transmembrane α-helices connected by mobile loop regions. In both cases, we observe narrow proton linewidths and, on average, a 10× increase in sensitivity in 2D insensitive nuclear enhancement of polarization transfer-based HSQC experiments when proton detection is compared to carbon detection. We further show that our proton-detected experiments can be easily extended to three dimensions and used to build complete amino acid systems, including sidechain protons, and obtain inter-residue correlations. Additionally, we detect signals which do not correspond to amino acids, but rather to lipids and/or carbohydrates which interact strongly with membrane proteins.

  5. Nano-Mole Scale Side-Chain Signal Assignment by 1H-Detected Protein Solid-State NMR by Ultra-Fast Magic-Angle Spinning and Stereo-Array Isotope Labeling

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Songlin

    2015-04-09

    We present a general approach in 1H-detected 13C solid-state NMR (SSNMR) for side-chain signal assignments of 10-50 nmol quantities of proteins using a combination of a high magnetic field, ultra-fast magic-angle spinning (MAS) at ~80 kHz, and stereo-array-isotope-labeled (SAIL) proteins [Kainosho M. et al., Nature 440, 52–57, 2006]. First, we demonstrate that 1H indirect detection improves the sensitivity and resolution of 13C SSNMR of SAIL proteins for side-chain assignments in the ultra-fast MAS condition. 1H-detected SSNMR was performed for micro-crystalline ubiquitin (~55 nmol or ~0.5mg) that was SAIL-labeled at seven isoleucine (Ile) residues. Sensitivity was dramatically improved by 1H-detected 2D 1H/13C SSNMR by factors of 5.4-9.7 and 2.1-5.0, respectively, over 13C-detected 2D 1H/13C SSNMR and 1D 13C CPMAS, demonstrating that 2D 1H-detected SSNMR offers not only additional resolution but also sensitivity advantage over 1D 13C detection for the first time. High 1H resolution for the SAIL-labeled side-chain residues offered reasonable resolution even in the 2D data. A 1H-detected 3D 13C/13C/1H experiment on SAIL-ubiquitin provided nearly complete 1H and 13C assignments for seven Ile residues only within ~2.5 h. The results demonstrate the feasibility of side-chain signal assignment in this approach for as little as 10 nmol of a protein sample within ~3 days. The approach is likely applicable to a variety of proteins of biological interest without any requirements of highly efficient protein expression systems.

  6. Cell signaling, post-translational protein modifications and NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theillet, Francois-Xavier [In-cell NMR Group, Department of NMR-Supported Structural Biology, Leibniz Institute of Molecular Pharmacology (FMP Berlin) (Germany); Smet-Nocca, Caroline [Universite Lille Nord de France, CNRS UMR 8576 (France); Liokatis, Stamatios; Thongwichian, Rossukon; Kosten, Jonas [In-cell NMR Group, Department of NMR-Supported Structural Biology, Leibniz Institute of Molecular Pharmacology (FMP Berlin) (Germany); Yoon, Mi-Kyung; Kriwacki, Richard W. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Structural Biology (United States); Landrieu, Isabelle; Lippens, Guy [Universite Lille Nord de France, CNRS UMR 8576 (France); Selenko, Philipp, E-mail: selenko@fmp-berlin.de [In-cell NMR Group, Department of NMR-Supported Structural Biology, Leibniz Institute of Molecular Pharmacology (FMP Berlin) (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    Post-translationally modified proteins make up the majority of the proteome and establish, to a large part, the impressive level of functional diversity in higher, multi-cellular organisms. Most eukaryotic post-translational protein modifications (PTMs) denote reversible, covalent additions of small chemical entities such as phosphate-, acyl-, alkyl- and glycosyl-groups onto selected subsets of modifiable amino acids. In turn, these modifications induce highly specific changes in the chemical environments of individual protein residues, which are readily detected by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. In the following, we provide a concise compendium of NMR characteristics of the main types of eukaryotic PTMs: serine, threonine, tyrosine and histidine phosphorylation, lysine acetylation, lysine and arginine methylation, and serine, threonine O-glycosylation. We further delineate the previously uncharacterized NMR properties of lysine propionylation, butyrylation, succinylation, malonylation and crotonylation, which, altogether, define an initial reference frame for comprehensive PTM studies by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy.

  7. Methods for Signal Filtering in NMR Tomography

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gescheidtová, E.; Kubásek, R.; Bartušek, Karel

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 1 (2006), 3404:1-10 ISSN 1738-9682 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : FID signal * pre-emphasis * gradient pulse * bank of digital filters * threshold Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  8. Portable microcoil NMR detection coupled to capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diekmann, Joana; Adams, Kristl L; Klunder, Gregory L; Evans, Lee; Steele, Paul; Vogt, Carla; Herberg, Julie L

    2011-02-15

    High-efficiency separation techniques, such as capillary electrophoresis (CE), coupled to a nondestructive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer offer the ability to separate, chemically identify, and provide structural information on analytes in small sample volumes. Previous CE-NMR coupled systems utilized laboratory-scale NMR magnets and spectrometers, which require very long separation capillaries. New technological developments in electronics have reduced the size of the NMR system, and small 1-2 T permanent magnets provide the possibilities of a truly portable NMR. The microcoils used in portable and laboratory-scale NMR may offer the advantage of improved mass sensitivity because the limit of detection (LOD) is proportional to the coil diameter. In this work, CE is coupled with a portable, briefcase-sized NMR system that incorporates a microcoil probe and a 1.8 T permanent magnet to measure (19)F NMR spectra. Separations of fluorinated molecules are demonstrated with stopped- and continuous-flow NMR detection. The results demonstrate that coupling CE to a portable NMR instrument is feasible and can provide a low-cost method to obtain structural information on microliter samples. An LOD of 31.8 nmol for perfluorotributylamine with a resolution of 4 ppm has been achieved with this system.

  9. Non-Invasive Detection of Adulterated Olive Oil in Full Bottles Using Time-Domain NMR Relaxometry

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Poliana M.; Kock, Flávio Vinicius C.; Santos, Maiara S.; Lobo, Carlos Manuel S.; Carvalho, André S.; Colnago, Luiz Alberto

    2017-01-01

    A fast procedure using time-domain nuclear magnetic resonance (TD-NMR) to detect olive oil adulteration with polyunsaturated vegetable oils in filled bottles is proposed. The 1H transverse relaxation times (T2) of 37 commercial samples were measured using low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (LF-NMR) spectrometer and a unilateral nuclear magnetic resonance (UNMR) sensor. Results obtained with LF-NMR revealed better feasibility when compared with the UNMR sensor, with higher signal-to-noise (S...

  10. Chirp echo Fourier transform EPR-detected NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wili, Nino; Jeschke, Gunnar

    2018-04-01

    A new ultra-wide band (UWB) pulse EPR method is introduced for observing all nuclear frequencies of a paramagnetic center in a single shot. It is based on burning spectral holes with a high turning angle (HTA) pulse that excites forbidden transitions and subsequent detection of the hole pattern by a chirp echo. We term this method Chirp Echo Epr SpectroscopY (CHEESY)-detected NMR. The approach is a revival of FT EPR-detected NMR. It yields similar spectra and the same type of information as electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR)-detected NMR, but with a multiplex advantage. We apply CHEESY-detected NMR in Q band to nitroxides and correlate the hyperfine spectrum to the EPR spectrum by varying the frequency of the HTA pulse. Furthermore, a selective π pulse before the HTA pulse allows for detecting hyperfine sublevel correlations between transitions of one nucleus and for elucidating the coupling regime, the same information as revealed by the HYSCORE experiment. This is demonstrated on hexaaquamanganese(II). We expect that CHEESY-detected NMR is generally applicable to disordered systems and that our results further motivate the development of EPR spectrometers capable of coherent UWB excitation and detection, especially at higher fields and frequencies.

  11. Noninvasive detection of nanoparticle clustering by water proton NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taraban, Marc B.; Truong, Huy C.; Ilavsky, Jan; DePaz, Roberto A.; Lobo, Brian; Yu, Y. Bruce

    2017-06-01

    It is shown that water proton NMR can detect uncontrolled clustering of inert nanoparticles (NPs) formulated as aqueous suspensions. The clustering of NPs causes the compartmentalization of water molecules, leading to accelerated proton spin de-coherence, and hence, much faster water transverse relaxation rates. The results suggest that water proton NMR can be used to noninvasively inspect NP products by commercial end users and researchers.

  12. Detection of Virgin Olive Oil Adulteration Using Low Field Unilateral NMR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection of adulteration in edible oils is a concern in the food industry, especially for the higher priced virgin olive oils. This article presents a low field unilateral nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR method for the detection of the adulteration of virgin olive oil that can be performed through sealed bottles providing a non-destructive screening technique. Adulterations of an extra virgin olive oil with different percentages of sunflower oil and red palm oil were measured with a commercial unilateral instrument, the profile NMR-Mouse. The NMR signal was processed using a 2-dimensional Inverse Laplace transformation to analyze the transverse relaxation and self-diffusion behaviors of different oils. The obtained results demonstrated the feasibility of detecting adulterations of olive oil with percentages of at least 10% of sunflower and red palm oils.

  13. Detection of signals in noise

    CERN Document Server

    Whalen, Anthony D; Declaris, Nicholas

    1971-01-01

    Detection of Signals in Noise serves as an introduction to the principles and applications of the statistical theory of signal detection. The book discusses probability and random processes; narrowband signals, their complex representation, and their properties described with the aid of the Hilbert transform; and Gaussian-derived processes. The text also describes the application of hypothesis testing for the detection of signals and the fundamentals required for statistical detection of signals in noise. Problem exercises, references, and a supplementary bibliography are included after each c

  14. Detection of the sulfhydryl groups in proteins with slow hydrogen exchange rates and determination of their proton/deuteron fractionation factors using the deuterium-induced effects on the 13C(beta) NMR signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Jee, JunGoo; Terauchi, Tsutomu; Kainosho, Masatsune

    2010-05-05

    A method for identifying cysteine (Cys) residues with sulfhydryl (SH) groups exhibiting slow hydrogen exchange rates has been developed for proteins in aqueous media. The method utilizes the isotope shifts of the C(beta) chemical shifts induced by the deuteration of the SH groups. The 18.2 kDa E. coli peptidyl prolyl cis-trans isomerase b (EPPIb), which was selectively labeled with [3-(13)C;3,3-(2)H(2)]Cys, showed much narrower line widths for the (13)C(beta) NMR signals, as compared to those of the proteins labeled with either [3-(13)C]Cys or (3R)-[3-(13)C;3-(2)H]Cys. The (13)C(beta) signals of the two Cys residues of EPPIb, i.e. Cys-31 and Cys-121, labeled with [3-(13)C;3,3-(2)H(2)]Cys, split into four signals in H(2)O/D(2)O (1:1) at 40 degrees C and pH 7.5, indicating that the exchange rates of the side-chain SH's and the backbone amides are too slow to average the chemical shift differences of the (13)C(beta) signals, due to the two- and three-bond isotope shifts. By virtue of the well-separated signals, the proton/deuteron fractional factors for both the SH and amide groups of the two Cys residues in EPPIb could be directly determined, as approximately 0.4-0.5 for [SD]/[SH] and 0.9-1.0 for [ND]/[NH], by the relative intensities of the NMR signals for the isotopomers. The proton NOE's of the two slowly exchanging SH's were clearly identified in the NOESY spectra and were useful for the determining the local structure of EPPIb around the Cys residues.

  15. Statistical theory of signal detection

    CERN Document Server

    Helstrom, Carl Wilhelm; Costrell, L; Kandiah, K

    1968-01-01

    Statistical Theory of Signal Detection, Second Edition provides an elementary introduction to the theory of statistical testing of hypotheses that is related to the detection of signals in radar and communications technology. This book presents a comprehensive survey of digital communication systems. Organized into 11 chapters, this edition begins with an overview of the theory of signal detection and the typical detection problem. This text then examines the goals of the detection system, which are defined through an analogy with the testing of statistical hypotheses. Other chapters consider

  16. Direct 13C NMR Detection in HPLC Hyphenation Mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wubshet, Sileshi Gizachew; Johansen, Kenneth; Nyberg, Nils

    2012-01-01

    is indubitable in simplifying structural elucidations. In the current study, we demonstrated direct (13)C NMR detection of triterpenoids from a Ganoderma lucidum extract in hyphenation mode. The combined advantage of a cryogenically cooled probe, miniaturization, and multiple trapping enabled the first reported...

  17. The characterization of NMR signal for blood pressure monitoring system and its testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Murdaka Eka Jati

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT A blood monitoring system based on NMR method has been designed on constructed. This set-up of equipment used magnetic permanent, radio frequency (RF, receiver coil (RC, function generator (FG, amplifier which included the filter, as well as the oscilloscope digital storage. The background of this research was based on the sensitivity of NMR signal. The signal must be separated from signals background. This method was done by adjusting the frequency on FG, which was connected to radio frequency (RF coil, on empty sample. Subsequently, NMR signal was received by RC, and that signal could be shown on oscilloscope at resonance condition. The true frequency on NMR signal was Larmor frequency, and the other was background. The two variables of this experiment were the position of RF coil and the location temperature (20 up to 30oC. In conclusion, the resonance frequency of NMR signal (as Larmor frequency was 4.7 MHz (at static magnetic field of 1,600 gauss and it could be separated from background signals (3.4 and 6.2 MHz, and that signal was almost constant to room temperature. The equipment was used for sample testing. It gave systole/diastole data of 110/70 mmHg (on sphygmomanometer that was similar to 17/9 mV (on NMR signal. ABSTRAK Telah dikembangkan alat pemantauan tekanan darah berdasar prinsip NMR.

  18. Direct 13C-detected NMR experiments for mapping and characterization of hydrogen bonds in RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fürtig, Boris; Schnieders, Robbin; Richter, Christian; Zetzsche, Heidi; Keyhani, Sara; Helmling, Christina; Kovacs, Helena; Schwalbe, Harald

    2016-01-01

    In RNA secondary structure determination, it is essential to determine whether a nucleotide is base-paired and not. Base-pairing of nucleotides is mediated by hydrogen bonds. The NMR characterization of hydrogen bonds relies on experiments correlating the NMR resonances of exchangeable protons and can be best performed for structured parts of the RNA, where labile hydrogen atoms are protected from solvent exchange. Functionally important regions in RNA, however, frequently reveal increased dynamic disorder which often leads to NMR signals of exchangeable protons that are broadened beyond 1 H detection. Here, we develop 13 C direct detected experiments to observe all nucleotides in RNA irrespective of whether they are involved in hydrogen bonds or not. Exploiting the self-decoupling of scalar couplings due to the exchange process, the hydrogen bonding behavior of the hydrogen bond donor of each individual nucleotide can be determined. Furthermore, the adaption of HNN-COSY experiments for 13 C direct detection allows correlations of donor–acceptor pairs and the localization of hydrogen-bond acceptor nucleotides. The proposed 13 C direct detected experiments therefore provide information about molecular sites not amenable by conventional proton-detected methods. Such information makes the RNA secondary structure determination by NMR more accurate and helps to validate secondary structure predictions based on bioinformatics.

  19. Early non-destructive biofouling detection in spiral wound RO Membranes using a mobile earth's field NMR

    KAUST Repository

    Fridjonsson, E.O.

    2015-04-20

    We demonstrate the use of Earth\\'s field (EF) Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) to provide early non-destructive detection of active biofouling of a commercial spiral wound reverse osmosis (RO) membrane module. The RO membrane module was actively biofouled to different extents, by the addition of biodegradable nutrients to the feed stream, as revealed by a subtle feed-channel pressure drop increase. Easily accessible EF NMR parameters (signal relaxation parameters T1, T2 and the total NMR signal modified to be sensitive to stagnant fluid only) were measured and analysed in terms of their ability to detect the onset of biofouling. The EF NMR showed that fouling near the membrane module entrance significantly distorted the flow field through the whole membrane module. The total NMR signal is shown to be suitable for non-destructive early biofouling detection of spiral wound membrane modules, it was readily deployed at high (operational) flow rates, was particularly sensitive to flow field changes due to biofouling and could be deployed at any position along the membrane module axis. In addition to providing early fouling detection, the mobile EF NMR apparatus could also be used to (i) evaluate the production process of spiral wound membrane modules, and (ii) provide an in-situ determination of module cleaning process efficiency.

  20. NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneeland, J.B.; Lee, B.C.P.; Whalen, J.P.; Knowles, R.J.R.; Cahill, P.T.

    1984-01-01

    Although still quite new, NMR imaging has already emerged as a safe, noninvasive, painless, and effective diagnostic modality requiring no ionizing radiation. Also, NMR appears already to have established itself as the method of choice for the examination of the brain spinal cord (excluding herniated disks). Another area in which NMR excels is in the examination of the pelvis. The use of surface coils offers the promise of visualizing structures with resolution unobtainable by any other means. In addition, NMR, with its superb visualization of vascular structures and potential ability to measure flow, may soon revolutionize the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease. Finally, NMR, through biochemically and physiologically based T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ indices or through spectroscopy, may provide a means of monitoring therapeutic response so as to permit tailoring of treatment to the individual patient. In short, NMR is today probably at the same stage as the x-ray was in Roentgen's day

  1. Signal anomaly detection and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgenstern, V.M.; Upadhyaya, B.R.; Gloeckler, O.

    1988-08-01

    As part of a comprehensive signal validation system, we have developed a signal anomaly detector, without specifically establishing the cause of the anomaly. A signal recorded from process instrumentation is said to have an anomaly, if during steady-state operation, the deviation in the level of the signal, its root-mean-square (RMS) value, or its statistical distribution changes by a preset value. This deviation could be an unacceptable increase or a decrease in the quantity being monitored. An anomaly in a signal may be characterized by wideband or single-frequency noise, bias error, pulse-type error, nonsymmetric behavior, or a change in the signal bandwidth. Various signatures can be easily computed from data samples and compared against specified threshold values. We want to point out that in real processes, pulses can appear with different time widths, and at different rates of change of the signal. Thus, in characterizing an anomaly as a pulse-type, the fastest pulse width is constrained by the signal sampling interval. For example, if a signal is sampled at 100 Hz, we will not be able to detect pulses occurring at kHz rates. Discussion with utility and Combustion Engineering personnel indicated that it is not practical to detect pulses having a narrow time width. 9 refs., 11 figs., 8 tabs

  2. Detection of signals in noise

    CERN Document Server

    McDonough, Robert N

    1995-01-01

    The Second Edition is an updated revision to the authors highly successful and widely used introduction to the principles and application of the statistical theory of signal detection. This book emphasizes those theories that have been found to be particularly useful in practice including principles applied to detection problems encountered in digital communications, radar, and sonar.Detection processing based upon the fast Fourier transform

  3. Earth's field NMR detection of oil under arctic ice-water suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conradi, Mark S.; Altobelli, Stephen A.; Sowko, Nicholas J.; Conradi, Susan H.; Fukushima, Eiichi

    2018-03-01

    Earth's field NMR has been developed to detect oil trapped under or in Arctic sea-ice. A large challenge, addressed here, is the suppression of the water signal that dominates the oil signal. Selective suppression of water is based on relaxation time T1 because of the negligible chemical shifts in the weak earth's magnetic field, making all proton signals overlap spectroscopically. The first approach is inversion-null recovery, modified for use with pre-polarization. The requirements for efficient inversion over a wide range of B1 and subsequent adiabatic reorientation of the magnetization to align with the static field are stressed. The second method acquires FIDs at two durations of pre-polarization and cancels the water component of the signal after the data are acquired. While less elegant, this technique imposes no stringent requirements. Similar water suppression is found in simulations for the two methods. Oil detection in the presence of water is demonstrated experimentally with both techniques.

  4. Development of 19F-NMR chemical shift detection of DNA B-Z equilibrium using 19F-NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, S; Yang, H; Hirata, C; Kersaudy, F; Fujimoto, K

    2017-06-28

    Various DNA conformational changes are in correlation with biological events. In particular, DNA B-Z equilibrium showed a high correlation with translation and transcription. In this study, we developed a DNA probe containing 5-trifluoromethylcytidine or 5-trifluoromethylthymidine to detect DNA B-Z equilibrium using 19 F-NMR. Its probe enabled the quantitative detection of B-, Z-, and ss-DNA based on 19 F-NMR chemical shift change.

  5. EUROmediCAT signal detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Given, Joanne E; Loane, Maria; Luteijn, Johannes Michiel

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate congenital anomaly (CA)-medication exposure associations produced by the new EUROmediCAT signal detection system and determine which require further investigation. METHODS: Data from 15 EUROCAT registries (1995-2011) with medication exposures at the chemical substance (5th level...... persisted after data validation, a literature review was conducted for prior evidence of human teratogenicity. RESULTS: Thirteen out of 27 CA-medication exposure signals, based on 389 exposed cases, passed data validation. There was some prior evidence in the literature to support six signals (gastroschisis...

  6. 33S NMR cryogenic probe for taurine detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobo, Fumio; Takahashi, Masato; Maeda, Hideaki

    2009-03-01

    With the goal of a S33 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe applicable to in vivo NMR on taurine-biological samples, we have developed the S33 NMR cryogenic probe, which is applicable to taurine solutions. The NMR sensitivity gain relative to a conventional broadband probe is as large as 3.5. This work suggests that improvements in the preamplifier could allow NMR measurements on 100 μM taurine solutions, which is the level of sensitivity necessary for biological samples.

  7. I. Advances in NMR Signal Processing. II. Spin Dynamics in Quantum Dissipative Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yung-Ya [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-11-01

    Part I. Advances in IVMR Signal Processing. Improvements of sensitivity and resolution are two major objects in the development of NMR/MRI. A signal enhancement method is first presented which recovers signal from noise by a judicious combination of a priordmowledge to define the desired feasible solutions and a set theoretic estimation for restoring signal properties that have been lost due to noise contamination. The effect of noise can be significantly mitigated through the process of iteratively modifying the noisy data set to the smallest degree necessary so that it possesses a collection of prescribed properties and also lies closest to the original data set. A novel detection-estimation scheme is then introduced to analyze noisy and/or strongly damped or truncated FIDs. Based on exponential modeling, the number of signals is detected based on information estimated using the matrix pencil method. theory and the spectral parameters are Part II. Spin Dynamics in body dipole-coupled systems Quantum Dissipative Systems. Spin dynamics in manyconstitutes one of the most fundamental problems in magnetic resonance and condensed-matter physics. Its many-spin nature precludes any rigorous treatment. ‘Therefore, the spin-boson model is adopted to describe in the rotating frame the influence of the dipolar local fields on a tagged spin. Based on the polaronic transform and a perturbation treatment, an analytical solution is derived, suggesting the existence of self-trapped states in the. strong coupling limit, i.e., when transverse local field >> longitudinal local field. Such nonlinear phenomena originate from the joint action of the lattice fluctuations and the reaction field. Under semiclassical approximation, it is found that the main effect of the reaction field is the renormalization of the Hamiltonian of interest. Its direct consequence is the two-step relaxation process: the spin is initially localized in a quasiequilibrium state, which is later detrapped by

  8. β -detected NMR spin relaxation in a thin film heterostructure of ferromagnetic EuO

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacFarlane, W. A.; Song, Q.; Ingle, N. J. C.; Chow, K. H.; Egilmez, M.; Fan, I.; Hossain, M. D.; Kiefl, R. F.; Levy, C. D. P.; Morris, G. D.; Parolin, T. J.; Pearson, M. R.; Saadaoui, H.; Salman, Z.; Wang, D.

    2015-08-01

    We present β -detected NMR measurements of the spin-lattice relaxation of +8Li implanted into an epitaxial heterostructure based on a 100 nm thick film of ferromagnetic (FM) EuO as a function of temperature through its FM transition. In the FM state, the spin-lattice relaxation rate follows the same temperature dependence, determined by magnon scattering mechanisms, observed in the bulk by 153Eu NMR, but above 40 K, the signal is wiped out. We also find that +8Li stopped in material adjacent to the magnetic layer exhibits spin relaxation related to the critical slowing of the Eu spins. A particularly strong relaxation in the Au overlayer suggests an unusual strong nonlocal coupling mechanism to 8Li in the metal.

  9. Subgraph detection using graph signals

    KAUST Repository

    Chepuri, Sundeep Prabhakar

    2017-03-06

    In this paper we develop statistical detection theory for graph signals. In particular, given two graphs, namely, a background graph that represents an usual activity and an alternative graph that represents some unusual activity, we are interested in answering the following question: To which of the two graphs does the observed graph signal fit the best? To begin with, we assume both the graphs are known, and derive an optimal Neyman-Pearson detector. Next, we derive a suboptimal detector for the case when the alternative graph is not known. The developed theory is illustrated with numerical experiments.

  10. Irreversible catalyst activation enables hyperpolarization and water solubility for NMR signal amplification by reversible exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Milton L; Shi, Fan; He, Ping; Yuan, Bingxin; Plunkett, Kyle N; Coffey, Aaron M; Shchepin, Roman V; Barskiy, Danila A; Kovtunov, Kirill V; Koptyug, Igor V; Waddell, Kevin W; Goodson, Boyd M; Chekmenev, Eduard Y

    2014-12-04

    Activation of a catalyst [IrCl(COD)(IMes)] (IMes = 1,3-bis(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)imidazol-2-ylidene; COD = cyclooctadiene)] for signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE) was monitored by in situ hyperpolarized proton NMR at 9.4 T. During the catalyst-activation process, the COD moiety undergoes hydrogenation that leads to its complete removal from the Ir complex. A transient hydride intermediate of the catalyst is observed via its hyperpolarized signatures, which could not be detected using conventional nonhyperpolarized solution NMR. SABRE enhancement of the pyridine substrate can be fully rendered only after removal of the COD moiety; failure to properly activate the catalyst in the presence of sufficient substrate can lead to irreversible deactivation consistent with oligomerization of the catalyst molecules. Following catalyst activation, results from selective RF-saturation studies support the hypothesis that substrate polarization at high field arises from nuclear cross-relaxation with hyperpolarized (1)H spins of the hydride/orthohydrogen spin bath. Importantly, the chemical changes that accompanied the catalyst's full activation were also found to endow the catalyst with water solubility, here used to demonstrate SABRE hyperpolarization of nicotinamide in water without the need for any organic cosolvent--paving the way to various biomedical applications of SABRE hyperpolarization methods.

  11. NMR signal analysis in the large COMPASS $^{14}$NH$_{3}$ target

    CERN Document Server

    Koivuniemi, J; Hess, C; Kisselev, Y U; Meyer, W; Radtke, E; Reicherz, G; Doshita, N; Iwata, T; Kondo, K; Michigami, T

    2009-01-01

    In the large COMPASS polarized proton target the 1508 cm$^{3}$ of irradiated granular ammonia is polarized with dynamic nuclear polarization method using 4 mm microwaves in 2.5 T eld. The nuclear polarization up to 90 - 93 % is determined with cw NMR. The properties of the observed ammonia proton signals are described and spin thermodynamics in high elds is presented. Also the second moment of the NMR line is estimated.

  12. Method for acoustic signal detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blalock, S.E.

    1980-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a method and apparatus for acoustic signal detection, adapted for use in acoustic velocity well logging to measure the difference in transit times of an acoustic signal between a transmitter and two or more receivers. In a preferred embodiment of the present invention two timing measurements of the signal arriving at each of two receivers may be made by activating zero crossing detectors at the arrival of the first negative and first positive half-cycles at each receiver. A transit time is calculated from the zero crossing times following the first negative half-cycle. This first transit time may be checked for accuracy by comparing the first transit time with a second transit time calculated from zero crossing times following the first positive half-cycles, by comparing the first transit time to a previously measured transit time and/or by detecting the order of arrival of the negative and positive half-cycles to determine whether the half-cycles have been detected out of sequence at either receiver. Should the first transit time be determined to be inaccurate, the previously measured transit time or the second transit time may be substituted therefor

  13. Lithological control on gas hydrate saturation as revealed by signal classification of NMR logging data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Klaus; Kulenkampff, Johannes; Henninges, Jan; Spangenberg, Erik

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) downhole logging data are analyzed with a new strategy to study gas hydrate-bearing sediments in the Mackenzie Delta (NW Canada). In NMR logging, transverse relaxation time (T2) distribution curves are usually used to determine single-valued parameters such as apparent total porosity or hydrocarbon saturation. Our approach analyzes the entire T2 distribution curves as quasi-continuous signals to characterize the rock formation. We apply self-organizing maps, a neural network clustering technique, to subdivide the data set of NMR curves into classes with a similar and distinctive signal shape. The method includes (1) preparation of data vectors, (2) unsupervised learning, (3) cluster definition, and (4) classification and depth mapping of all NMR signals. Each signal class thus represents a specific pore size distribution which can be interpreted in terms of distinct lithologies and reservoir types. A key step in the interpretation strategy is to reconcile the NMR classes with other log data not considered in the clustering analysis, such as gamma ray, hydrate saturation, and other logs. Our results defined six main lithologies within the target zone. Gas hydrate layers were recognized by their low signal amplitudes for all relaxation times. Most importantly, two subtypes of hydrate-bearing shaly sands were identified. They show distinct NMR signals and differ in hydrate saturation and gamma ray values. An inverse linear relationship between hydrate saturation and clay content was concluded. Finally, we infer that the gas hydrate is not grain coating, but rather, pore filling with matrix support is the preferred growth habit model for the studied formation.

  14. Expert AE signal arrival detection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chlada, Milan; Převorovský, Zdeněk

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 6, 3/4 (2011), s. 191-205 ISSN 1741-8410. [NDT in PROGRESS /4./. Praha, 05.11.2007-07.11.2007] R&D Projects: GA MPO(CZ) FR-TI1/274; GA ČR GA101/07/1518 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : acoustic emission * signal arrival detection Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics http://www.inderscience.com/search/index.php?mainAction=search&action=record&rec_id=43215&prevQuery=&ps=10&m=or

  15. A high speed digital signal averager for pulsed NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Ramakrishna, J.; Ra agopalan, S.R.

    1978-01-01

    A 256-channel digital signal averager suitable for pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is described. It implements 'stable averaging' algorithm and hence provides a calibrated display of the average signal at all times during the averaging process on a CRT. It has a maximum sampling rate of 2.5 μ sec and a memory capacity of 256 x 12 bit words. Number of sweeps is selectable through a front panel control in binary steps from 2 3 to 2 12 . The enhanced signal can be displayed either on a CRT or by a 3.5-digit LED display. The maximum S/N improvement that can be achieved with this instrument is 36 dB. (auth.)

  16. Detection of Taurine in Biological Tissues by 33S NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musio, Roberta; Sciacovelli, Oronzo

    2001-12-01

    The potential of 33S NMR spectroscopy for biochemical investigations on taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid) is explored. It is demonstrated that 33S NMR spectroscopy allows the selective and unequivocal identification of taurine in biological samples. 33S NMR spectra of homogenated and intact tissues are reported for the first time, together with the spectrum of a living mollusc. Emphasis is placed on the importance of choosing appropriate signal processing methods to improve the quality of the 33S NMR spectra of biological tissues.

  17. Robust NMR water signal suppression for demanding analytical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Juan A; Kenwright, Simon J

    2016-01-07

    We describe the design and application of robust, general-purpose water signal suppression pulse sequences well suited to chemometric work. Such pulse sequences need to deal well with pulse mis-calibrations, radiation damping, chemical exchange, and the presence of sample inhomogeneities, as well as with significant variations in sample characteristics such as pH, ionic strength, relaxation characteristics and molecular weight. Of course, such pulse sequences should produce un-distorted lineshapes and baselines and work well both under automation and in the hands of non-experts. As an example, one such pulse sequences, Robust-5, will be presented. This new pulse sequence meets those criteria and is able to reduce a 50 M proteo water signal down to a 0.9 mM level, without fine tuning, and under automation, and it is therefore well suited to the most demanding of analytical applications.

  18. Combined use of filtered and edited 1 H NMR spectroscopy to detect 13 C-enriched compounds in complex mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, P W A; Ament, Z; Knowles, K; Griffin, J L; Wright, J

    2012-11-01

    In conventional metabolism and pharmacokinetic studies, radioactive isotopes are used to identify and quantify the breakdown products of xenobiotics. However, the stable isotope (13) C provides a cheaper and less hazardous alternative. Metabolites of (13) C-enriched xenobiotics can be detected, quantified and identified by (13) C-filtered NMR spectroscopy. However, one obstacle to using (13) C is its 1.1% natural abundance that produces a background signal in (13) C-filtered NMR spectra of crude biological extracts. The signal makes it difficult to distinguish between (13) C-enriched xenobiotics resonances from endogenous metabolites unrelated to the xenobiotic. This study proposes that the (13) C background signal can be distinguished from resonances of (13) C-enriched xenobiotics by the absence of a (12) C component in the xenobiotic. This is detected by combined analysis of (13) C-filtered and -edited NMR spectra. The theory underlying the approach is described and the method is demonstrated by the detection of sub-microgram amounts of (13) C-enriched phenacetin in crude extracts of hepatocyte microsomes. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Nonstationary weak signal detection based on normalization ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... than the traditional stochastic resonance. The method develops the area of time-varying signal detection with stochastic resonance and presents new strategy for detection and denoising of a time-varying signal. It can be expected to be widely used in the areas of aperiodic signal processing, radar communication,etc ...

  20. Studies of metal-biomolecule systems in liquids with beta-detected NMR

    CERN Document Server

    Walczak, Michal

    2017-01-01

    My internship took place within a small research team funded via the European Research Council (ERC Starting Grant: Beta-Drop NMR) at ISOLDE. It was devoted to laser spin-polarization and beta-detected NMR techniques and their future applications in chemistry and biology. I was involved in the design and tests of the beta-NMR spectrometer which will be used in the upcoming experiments. In this way I have been exposed to many topics in physics (atomic and nuclear physics), experimental techniques (vacuum technology, lasers, beta detectors, electronics, DAQ software), as well as chemistry and biology (NMR on metal ions, metal ion binding to biomolecules, quantum chemistry calculations).

  1. EPR and NMR detection of transient radicals and reaction products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trifunac, A.D.

    1981-01-01

    Magnetic resonance methods in radiation chemistry are illustrated. The most recent developments in pulsed EPR and NMR studies in pulse radiolysis are outlined with emphasis on the study of transient radicals and their reaction products. 12 figures

  2. Detection of Transient Signals in Doppler Spectra

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Signal processing is used to detect transient signals in the presence of noise. Two embodiments are disclosed. In both embodiments, the time series from a remote...

  3. Pore size distribution calculation from 1H NMR signal and N2 adsorption-desorption techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, Jamal

    2012-01-01

    The pore size distribution (PSD) of nano-material MCM-41 is determined using two different approaches: N 2 adsorption-desorption and 1 H NMR signal of water confined in silica nano-pores of MCM-41. The first approach is based on the recently modified Kelvin equation [J.V. Rocha, D. Barrera, K. Sapag, Top. Catal. 54(2011) 121-134] which deals with the known underestimation in pore size distribution for the mesoporous materials such as MCM-41 by introducing a correction factor to the classical Kelvin equation. The second method employs the Gibbs-Thompson equation, using NMR, for melting point depression of liquid in confined geometries. The result shows that both approaches give similar pore size distribution to some extent, and also the NMR technique can be considered as an alternative direct method to obtain quantitative results especially for mesoporous materials. The pore diameter estimated for the nano-material used in this study was about 35 and 38 Å for the modified Kelvin and NMR methods respectively. A comparison between these methods and the classical Kelvin equation is also presented.

  4. Nonuniform sampling and non-Fourier signal processing methods in multidimensional NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobli, Mehdi; Hoch, Jeffrey C

    2014-11-01

    Beginning with the introduction of Fourier Transform NMR by Ernst and Anderson in 1966, time domain measurement of the impulse response (the free induction decay, FID) consisted of sampling the signal at a series of discrete intervals. For compatibility with the discrete Fourier transform (DFT), the intervals are kept uniform, and the Nyquist theorem dictates the largest value of the interval sufficient to avoid aliasing. With the proposal by Jeener of parametric sampling along an indirect time dimension, extension to multidimensional experiments employed the same sampling techniques used in one dimension, similarly subject to the Nyquist condition and suitable for processing via the discrete Fourier transform. The challenges of obtaining high-resolution spectral estimates from short data records using the DFT were already well understood, however. Despite techniques such as linear prediction extrapolation, the achievable resolution in the indirect dimensions is limited by practical constraints on measuring time. The advent of non-Fourier methods of spectrum analysis capable of processing nonuniformly sampled data has led to an explosion in the development of novel sampling strategies that avoid the limits on resolution and measurement time imposed by uniform sampling. The first part of this review discusses the many approaches to data sampling in multidimensional NMR, the second part highlights commonly used methods for signal processing of such data, and the review concludes with a discussion of other approaches to speeding up data acquisition in NMR. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Sensitive Infrared Signal Detection by Upconversion Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Teh-Hwa; Yu, Jirong; Bai, Yingxin; Johnson, William; Chen, Songsheng; Petros, Mulugeta; Singh, Upendra N.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrated upconversion assisted detection of a 2.05-micron signal by sum frequency generation to generate a 700-nm light using a bulk periodically poled lithium niobate crystal. The achieved 94% intrinsic upconversion efficiency and 22.58% overall detection efficiency at a pW level of 2.05 micron pave the path to detect extremely weak infrared (IR) signals for remote sensing applications.

  6. Seizure detection algorithms based on EMG signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa

    Background: the currently used non-invasive seizure detection methods are not reliable. Muscle fibers are directly connected to the nerves, whereby electric signals are generated during activity. Therefore, an alarm system on electromyography (EMG) signals is a theoretical possibility. Objective......: to show whether medical signal processing of EMG data is feasible for detection of epileptic seizures. Methods: EMG signals during generalised seizures were recorded from 3 patients (with 20 seizures in total). Two possible medical signal processing algorithms were tested. The first algorithm was based...... the frequency-based algorithm was efficient for detecting the seizures in the third patient. Conclusion: Our results suggest that EMG signals could be used to develop an automatic seizuredetection system. However, different patients might require different types of algorithms /approaches....

  7. Practical aspects of NMR signal assignment in larger and challenging proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frueh, Dominique P.

    2014-01-01

    NMR has matured into a technique routinely employed for studying proteins in near physiological conditions. However, applications to larger proteins are impeded by the complexity of the various correlation maps necessary to assign NMR signals. This article reviews the data analysis techniques traditionally employed for resonance assignment and describes alternative protocols necessary for overcoming challenges in large protein spectra. In particular, simultaneous analysis of multiple spectra may help overcome ambiguities or may reveal correlations in an indirect manner. Similarly, visualization of orthogonal planes in a multidimensional spectrum can provide alternative assignment procedures. We describe examples of such strategies for assignment of backbone, methyl, and nOe resonances. We describe experimental aspects of data acquisition for the related experiments and provide guidelines for preliminary studies. Focus is placed on large folded monomeric proteins and examples are provided for 37, 48, 53, and 81 kDa proteins. PMID:24534088

  8. NMR parallel Q-meter with double-balanced-mixer detection for polarized target experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boissevain, J.; Tippens, W.B.

    1983-01-01

    A constant-voltage, parallel-tuned nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) circuit, patterned after a Liverpool design, has been developed for polarized target experiments. Measuring the admittance of the resonance circuit allows advantageous use of double-balanced mixer detection. The resonant circuit is tolerant of stray capacitance between the NMR coil and the target cavity, thus easing target-cell-design constraints. The reference leg of the circuit includes a voltage-controlled attenuator and phase shifter for ease of tuning. The NMR output features a flat background and has good linearity and stability

  9. EUROmediCAT signal detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luteijn, Johannes Michiel; Morris, Joan K; Garne, Ester

    2016-01-01

    ). CONCLUSIONS: Medication exposure data in the EUROmediCAT central database can be analyzed systematically to determine a manageable set of associations for validation and then testing in independent datasets. Detection of teratogens depends on frequency of exposure, level of risk and teratogenic specificity....

  10. Signal detection by means of orthogonal decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajdu, C. F.; Dabóczi, T.; Péceli, G.; Zamantzas, C.

    2018-03-01

    Matched filtering is a well-known method frequently used in digital signal processing to detect the presence of a pattern in a signal. In this paper, we suggest a time variant matched filter, which, unlike a regular matched filter, maintains a given alignment between the input signal and the template carrying the pattern, and can be realized recursively. We introduce a method to synchronize the two signals for presence detection, usable in case direct synchronization between the signal generator and the receiver is not possible or not practical. We then propose a way of realizing and extending the same filter by modifying a recursive spectral observer, which gives rise to orthogonal filter channels and also leads to another way to synchronize the two signals.

  11. Nonstationary weak signal detection based on normalization ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Haibin Zhang

    Time-varying signal; weak signal detection; varying parameters; stochastic resonance. 1. Introduction. In general view, noise ..... the numerical solution for the typical first-order differential equation as Eq. (2). The discrete fourth-rank Runge–Kutta method [27] as follows is applied to solve the equation numerically. x. 0 ¼ dx dt.

  12. Indirectly detected chemical shift correlation NMR spectroscopy in solids under fast magic angle spinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Kanmi [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    on decoupling efficiency as well as scaling factors. Indirect detection with assistance of PMLGm$\\bar{x}$ during INEPTR transfer proved to offer the highest sensitivity gains of 3-10. In addition, the CRAMPS sequence was applied under fast MAS to increase the 1H resolution during t1 evolution in the traditional, 13C detected HETCOR scheme. Two naturally abundant solids, tripeptide N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (f-MLF-OH) and brown coal, with well ordered and highly disordered structures, respectively, are studied to confirm the capabilities of these techniques. Concomitantly, a simple optimization of 1H homonuclear dipolar decoupling at MAS rates exceeding 10 kHz was developed (Chapter 4). The fine-tuned decoupling efficiency can be obtained by minimizing the signal loss due to transverse relaxation in a simple spin-echo experiment, using directly the sample of interest. The excellent agreement between observed decoupling pattern and earlier theoretical predictions confirmed the utility of this strategy. The properties of naturally abundant surface-bound fluorocarbon groups in mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) were investigated by the above-mentioned multidimensional solid-state NMR experiments and theoretical modeling (Chapter 5). Two conformations of (pentafluorophenyl)propyl groups (abbreviated as PFP) were determined as PFP-prone and PFP-upright, whose aromatic rings are located above the siloxane bridges and in roughly upright position, respectively. Several 1D and 2D NMR techniques were implemented in the characterizations, including indirectly detected 1H{l_brace}13C{r_brace} and 19F{l_brace}13C{r_brace} 2D HETCOR, Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) assisted 29Si direct polarization and 29Si19F 2D experiments, 2D double-quantum (DQ) 19F MAS NMR spectra and spin-echo measurements

  13. NMR detection and characterization of sialylated glycoproteins and cell surface polysaccharides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barb, Adam W. [University of Georgia, Complex Carbohydrate Research Center (United States); Freedberg, Daron I.; Battistel, Marcos D. [Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Laboratory of Bacterial Polysaccharides (United States); Prestegard, James H., E-mail: jpresteg@ccrc.uga.edu [University of Georgia, Complex Carbohydrate Research Center (United States)

    2011-09-15

    Few solution NMR pulse sequences exist that are explicitly designed to characterize carbohydrates (glycans). This is despite the essential role carbohydrate motifs play in cell-cell communication, microbial pathogenesis, autoimmune disease progression and cancer metastasis, and despite that fact that glycans, often shed to extra-cellular fluids, can be diagnostic of disease. Here we present a suite of two dimensional coherence experiments to measure three different correlations (H3-C2, H3-C1, and C1-C2) on sialic acids, a group of nine-carbon carbohydrates found on eukaryotic cell surfaces that often play a key role in disease processes. The chemical shifts of the H3, C2, and C1 nuclei of sialic acids are sensitive to carbohydrate linkage, linkage conformation, and ionization state of the C1 carboxylate. The experiments reported include rigorous filter elements to enable detection and characterization of isotopically labeled sialic acids with high sensitivity in living cells and crude isolates with minimal interference from unwanted signals arising from the {approx}1% {sup 13}C-natural abundance of cellular metabolites. Application is illustrated with detection of sialic acids on living cells, in unpurified mixtures, and at the terminus of the N-glycan on the 55 kDa immunoglobulin G Fc.

  14. NMR detection and characterization of sialylated glycoproteins and cell surface polysaccharides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barb, Adam W.; Freedberg, Darón I.; Battistel, Marcos D.; Prestegard, James H.

    2011-01-01

    Few solution NMR pulse sequences exist that are explicitly designed to characterize carbohydrates (glycans). This is despite the essential role carbohydrate motifs play in cell–cell communication, microbial pathogenesis, autoimmune disease progression and cancer metastasis, and despite that fact that glycans, often shed to extra-cellular fluids, can be diagnostic of disease. Here we present a suite of two dimensional coherence experiments to measure three different correlations (H3–C2, H3–C1, and C1–C2) on sialic acids, a group of nine-carbon carbohydrates found on eukaryotic cell surfaces that often play a key role in disease processes. The chemical shifts of the H3, C2, and C1 nuclei of sialic acids are sensitive to carbohydrate linkage, linkage conformation, and ionization state of the C1 carboxylate. The experiments reported include rigorous filter elements to enable detection and characterization of isotopically labeled sialic acids with high sensitivity in living cells and crude isolates with minimal interference from unwanted signals arising from the ∼1% 13 C-natural abundance of cellular metabolites. Application is illustrated with detection of sialic acids on living cells, in unpurified mixtures, and at the terminus of the N-glycan on the 55 kDa immunoglobulin G Fc.

  15. Infrared Signal Detection by Upconversion Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Teh-Hwa; Yu, Jirong; Bai, Yingxin; Johnson, William E.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrated up-conversion assisted detection of a 2.05-micron signal by using a bulk periodically poled Lithium niobate crystal. The 94% intrinsic up-conversion efficiency and 22.58% overall detection efficiency at pW level of 2.05-micron was achieved.

  16. Detecting gas hydrate behavior in crude oil using NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shuqiang; House, Waylon; Chapman, Walter G

    2006-04-06

    Because of the associated experimental difficulties, natural gas hydrate behavior in black oil is poorly understood despite its grave importance in deep-water flow assurance. Since the hydrate cannot be visually observed in black oil, traditional methods often rely on gas pressure changes to monitor hydrate formation and dissociation. Because gases have to diffuse through the liquid phase for hydrate behavior to create pressure responses, the complication of gas mass transfer is involved and hydrate behavior is only indirectly observed. This pressure monitoring technique encounters difficulties when the oil phase is too viscous, the amount of water is too small, or the gas phase is absent. In this work we employ proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to observe directly the liquid-to-solid conversion of the water component in black oil emulsions. The technique relies on two facts. The first, well-known, is that water becomes essentially invisible to liquid state NMR as it becomes immobile, as in hydrate or ice formation. The second, our recent finding, is that in high magnetic fields of sufficient homogeneity, it is possible to distinguish water from black oil spectrally by their chemical shifts. By following changes in the area of the water peak, the process of hydrate conversion can be measured, and, at lower temperatures, the formation of ice. Taking only seconds to accomplish, this measurement is nearly direct in contrast to conventional techniques that measure the pressure changes of the whole system and assume these changes represent formation or dissociation of hydrates - rather than simply changes in solubility. This new technique clearly can provide accurate hydrate thermodynamic data in black oils. Because the technique measures the total mobile water with rapidity, extensions should prove valuable in studying the dynamics of phase transitions in emulsions.

  17. Microprocessorized NMR measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rijllart, A.

    1984-01-01

    An MC68000 CAMAC microprocessor system for fast and accurate NMR signal measurement will be presented. A stand-alone CAMAC microprocessor system (MC68000 STAC) with a special purpose interface sweeps a digital frequency synthesizer and digitizes the NMR signal with a 16-bit ADC of 17 μs conversion time. It averages the NMR signal data over many sweeps and then transfers it through CAMAC to a computer for calculation of the signal parameters. The computer has full software control over the timing and sweep settings of this signal averager, and thus allows optimization of noise suppression. Several of these processor systems can be installed in the same crate for parallel processing, and the flexibility of the STAC also allows easy adaptation to other applications such as transient recording or phase-sensitive detection. (orig.)

  18. UTOPIA NMR: activating unexploited magnetization using interleaved low-gamma detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viegas, Aldino; Viennet, Thibault [Heinrich-Heine-University, Institute of Physical Biology (Germany); Yu, Tsyr-Yan [Academia Sinica, Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences (China); Schumann, Frank [Bruker BioSpin GmbH (Switzerland); Bermel, Wolfgang [Bruker BioSpin GmbH (Germany); Wagner, Gerhard [Harvard Medical School, Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology (United States); Etzkorn, Manuel, E-mail: manuel.etzkorn@hhu.de [Heinrich-Heine-University, Institute of Physical Biology (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    A growing number of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic studies are impaired by the limited information content provided by the standard set of experiments conventionally recorded. This is particularly true for studies of challenging biological systems including large, unstructured, membrane-embedded and/or paramagnetic proteins. Here we introduce the concept of unified time-optimized interleaved acquisition NMR (UTOPIA-NMR) for the unified acquisition of standard high-γ (e.g. {sup 1}H) and low-γ (e.g. {sup 13}C) detected experiments using a single receiver. Our aim is to activate the high level of polarization and information content distributed on low-γ nuclei without disturbing conventional magnetization transfer pathways. We show that using UTOPIA-NMR we are able to recover nearly all of the normally non-used magnetization without disturbing the standard experiments. In other words, additional spectra, that can significantly increase the NMR insights, are obtained for free. While we anticipate a broad range of possible applications we demonstrate for the soluble protein Bcl-x{sub L} (ca. 21 kDa) and for OmpX in nanodiscs (ca. 160 kDa) that UTOPIA-NMR is particularly useful for challenging protein systems including perdeuterated (membrane) proteins.

  19. UTOPIA NMR: activating unexploited magnetization using interleaved low-gamma detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viegas, Aldino; Viennet, Thibault; Yu, Tsyr-Yan; Schumann, Frank; Bermel, Wolfgang; Wagner, Gerhard; Etzkorn, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    A growing number of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic studies are impaired by the limited information content provided by the standard set of experiments conventionally recorded. This is particularly true for studies of challenging biological systems including large, unstructured, membrane-embedded and/or paramagnetic proteins. Here we introduce the concept of unified time-optimized interleaved acquisition NMR (UTOPIA-NMR) for the unified acquisition of standard high-γ (e.g. 1 H) and low-γ (e.g. 13 C) detected experiments using a single receiver. Our aim is to activate the high level of polarization and information content distributed on low-γ nuclei without disturbing conventional magnetization transfer pathways. We show that using UTOPIA-NMR we are able to recover nearly all of the normally non-used magnetization without disturbing the standard experiments. In other words, additional spectra, that can significantly increase the NMR insights, are obtained for free. While we anticipate a broad range of possible applications we demonstrate for the soluble protein Bcl-x L (ca. 21 kDa) and for OmpX in nanodiscs (ca. 160 kDa) that UTOPIA-NMR is particularly useful for challenging protein systems including perdeuterated (membrane) proteins

  20. UTOPIA NMR: activating unexploited magnetization using interleaved low-gamma detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, Aldino; Viennet, Thibault; Yu, Tsyr-Yan; Schumann, Frank; Bermel, Wolfgang; Wagner, Gerhard; Etzkorn, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    A growing number of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic studies are impaired by the limited information content provided by the standard set of experiments conventionally recorded. This is particularly true for studies of challenging biological systems including large, unstructured, membrane-embedded and/or paramagnetic proteins. Here we introduce the concept of unified time-optimized interleaved acquisition NMR (UTOPIA-NMR) for the unified acquisition of standard high-γ (e.g. (1)H) and low-γ (e.g. (13)C) detected experiments using a single receiver. Our aim is to activate the high level of polarization and information content distributed on low-γ nuclei without disturbing conventional magnetization transfer pathways. We show that using UTOPIA-NMR we are able to recover nearly all of the normally non-used magnetization without disturbing the standard experiments. In other words, additional spectra, that can significantly increase the NMR insights, are obtained for free. While we anticipate a broad range of possible applications we demonstrate for the soluble protein Bcl-xL (ca. 21 kDa) and for OmpX in nanodiscs (ca. 160 kDa) that UTOPIA-NMR is particularly useful for challenging protein systems including perdeuterated (membrane) proteins.

  1. On greenhouse gas signal detection strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, T.P.; Schlesinger, M.E.; Xingjian Jiang

    1990-01-01

    Important elements of a greenhouse gas signal detection strategy are discussed and demonstrated with both model and observed data. The analysis also demonstrates the high level of unexplained interdecadal variability that occurs naturally in the climate system and how this noise will greatly complicate any detection strategy. The indisputable detection of a greenhouse gas signal in the global climate system will be a true decision point for mankind. Yet, at this stage of knowledge, the details of an appropriate detection strategy are only beginning to be developed. Two key elements in the eventual strategy are the subject of this report: (1) what variables should be monitored in a detection program, and (2) the comparison of the equilibrium versus transient climate system response. Subsequent sections consider these items in turn, while a final section summarizes the main conclusion of the study

  2. Tornado Detection Based on Seismic Signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatom, Frank B.; Knupp, Kevin R.; Vitton, Stanley J.

    1995-02-01

    At the present time the only generally accepted method for detecting when a tornado is on the ground is human observation. Based on theoretical considerations combined with eyewitness testimony, there is strong reason to believe that a tornado in contact with the ground transfers a significant amount of energy into the ground. The amount of energy transferred depends upon the intensity of the tornado and the characteristics of the surface. Some portion of this energy takes the form of seismic waves, both body and surface waves. Surface waves (Rayleigh and possibly Love) represent the most likely type of seismic signal to be detected. Based on the existence of such a signal, a seismic tornado detector appears conceptually possible. The major concerns for designing such a detector are range of detection and discrimination between the tornadic signal and other types of surface waves generated by ground transportation equipment, high winds, or other nontornadic sources.

  3. The first successful observation of in-cell NMR signals of DNA and RNA in living human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoki, Yudai; Kiyoishi, Ayaka; Miyake, Masayuki; Kano, Fumi; Murata, Masayuki; Nagata, Takashi; Katahira, Masato

    2018-01-31

    In order to understand intracellular biological events, information on the structure, dynamics and interaction of proteins and nucleic acids in living cells is of crucial importance. In-cell NMR is a promising method to obtain this information. Although NMR signals of proteins in human cells have been reported, those of nucleic acids were reported only in Xenopus laevis oocytes, i.e., not in human cells. Here, DNA and RNA were introduced into human cells by means of pore formation by bacterial toxin streptolysin O and subsequent resealing. Then, NMR signals of DNA and RNA were successfully observed for the first time in living human cells. The observed signals directly suggested the formation of DNA and RNA hairpin structures in living human cells.

  4. {sup 13}C-direct detected NMR experiments for the sequential J-based resonance assignment of RNA oligonucleotides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, Christian [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Frankfurt, Institute for Organic Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (Germany); Kovacs, Helena [Bruker BioSpin AG (Switzerland); Buck, Janina; Wacker, Anna [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Frankfurt, Institute for Organic Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (Germany); Fuertig, Boris [Max F. Perutz Laboratories (Austria); Bermel, Wolfgang [Bruker BioSpin GmbH (Germany); Schwalbe, Harald, E-mail: schwalbe@nmr.uni-frankfurt.d [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Frankfurt, Institute for Organic Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    We present here a set of {sup 13}C-direct detected NMR experiments to facilitate the resonance assignment of RNA oligonucleotides. Three experiments have been developed: (1) the (H)CC-TOCSY-experiment utilizing a virtual decoupling scheme to assign the intraresidual ribose {sup 13}C-spins, (2) the (H)CPC-experiment that correlates each phosphorus with the C4' nuclei of adjacent nucleotides via J(C,P) couplings and (3) the (H)CPC-CCH-TOCSY-experiment that correlates the phosphorus nuclei with the respective C1',H1' ribose signals. The experiments were applied to two RNA hairpin structures. The current set of {sup 13}C-direct detected experiments allows direct and unambiguous assignment of the majority of the hetero nuclei and the identification of the individual ribose moieties following their sequential assignment. Thus, {sup 13}C-direct detected NMR methods constitute useful complements to the conventional {sup 1}H-detected approach for the resonance assignment of oligonucleotides that is often hindered by the limited chemical shift dispersion. The developed methods can also be applied to large deuterated RNAs.

  5. Working Group 3: Greenhouse signal detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, T.; Ellsaesser, H.; Groisman, P.Ya.; Grotch, S.; Jenkins, G.; Karoly, D.; Riches, M.; Santer, B.; Schoenwiese, C.; Vinnikov, K.; Zwiers, F.

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative efforts to detect the greenhouse-gas signal (GHG) in nature are in their infancy. The reasons for this state of affairs are numerous. It is only in the last few years that GCMs have advanced to the point where their simulations of GHG signals might be marginally believable. Without reasonably good a priori predictions of expected GHG signals from the models, the detection problem is moot. The observational data sets describing changes in the global climate system over the last 50-100 years needed for adequate detection studies have also only come into existence in the last five years. Finally, no coherent, generally-agreed-on detection strategy has been developed by the scientific community interested in the GHG problem. The lack of adequate model predictions and observational sets are largely responsible for this latter condition. The rudimentary detection efforts that have been conducted have generally been based on recognizing the fingerprint of GHG signals in the oceans and atmosphere. GCM results for 1 x 2 x CO 2 equilibrium runs have been used to search for GHG effects induced in tropospheric air and ocean surface temperature fields since the early 1900s. No significant effect has been found

  6. NMR detection of short-lived β-emitter 12N implanted in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugihara, T.; Mihara, M.; Shimaya, J.; Matsuta, K.; Fukuda, M.; Ohno, J.; Tanaka, M.; Yamaoka, S.; Watanabe, K.; Iwakiri, S.; Yanagihara, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Du, H.; Onishi, K.; Kambayashi, S.; Minamisono, T.; Nishimura, D.; Izumikawa, T.; Ozawa, A.; Ishibashi, Y.; Kitagawa, A.; Sato, S.; Torikoshi, M.; Momota, S.

    2017-11-01

    The beta-detected nuclear magnetic resonance ( β-NMR) in liquid H2O has been observed for the first time using a short-lived β-ray emitter 12N ( I π = 1+, T 1/2=11 ms). A nuclear spin polarized 12N beam with an energy of about 20 MeV/nucleon was implanted into an enclosed water sample. About 50 % of implanted 12N ions maintained nuclear polarization and exhibited a β-NMR spectrum. The chemical shift of 12N in H2O relative to 12N in Pt was deduced to be -(3.6±0.5) × 102 ppm.

  7. Signal processing aspects of windshear detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalfs, David D.; Baxa, Ernest G., Jr.; Bracalente, Emedio M.

    1993-01-01

    Low-altitude windshear (LAWS) has been identified as a major hazard to aircraft, particularly during takeoff and landing. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has been involved with developing technology to detect LAWS. A key element in this technology is high resolution pulse Doppler weather radar equipped with signal and data processing to provide timely information about possible hazardous conditions.

  8. Automatic Smoker Detection from Telephone Speech Signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alavijeh, Amir Hossein Poorjam; Hesaraki, Soheila; Safavi, Saeid

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes an automatic smoking habit detection from spontaneous telephone speech signals. In this method, each utterance is modeled using i-vector and non-negative factor analysis (NFA) frameworks, which yield low-dimensional representation of utterances by applying factor analysis on G...

  9. Detecting Impulses in Mechanical Signals by Wavelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang W-X

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of periodical or nonperiodical impulses in vibration signals often indicates the occurrence of machine faults. This knowledge is applied to the fault diagnosis of such machines as engines, gearboxes, rolling element bearings, and so on. The development of an effective impulse detection technique is necessary and significant for evaluating the working condition of these machines, diagnosing their malfunctions, and keeping them running normally over prolong periods. With the aid of wavelet transforms, a wavelet-based envelope analysis method is proposed. In order to suppress any undesired information and highlight the features of interest, an improved soft threshold method has been designed so that the inspected signal is analyzed in a more exact way. Furthermore, an impulse detection technique is developed based on the aforementioned methods. The effectiveness of the proposed technique on the extraction of impulsive features of mechanical signals has been proved by both simulated and practical experiments.

  10. A general framework to quantify the effect of restricted diffusion on the NMR signal with applications to double pulsed field gradient NMR experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozarslan, Evren; Shemesh, Noam; Basser, Peter J

    2009-03-14

    Based on a description introduced by Robertson, Grebenkov recently introduced a powerful formalism to represent the diffusion-attenuated NMR signal for simple pore geometries such as slabs, cylinders, and spheres analytically. In this work, we extend this multiple correlation function formalism by allowing for possible variations in the direction of the magnetic field gradient waveform. This extension is necessary, for example, to incorporate the effects of imaging gradients in diffusion-weighted NMR imaging scans and in characterizing anisotropy at different length scales via double pulsed field gradient (PFG) experiments. In cylindrical and spherical pores, respectively, two- and three-dimensional vector operators are employed whose form is deduced from Grebenkov's results via elementary operator algebra for the case of cylinders and the Wigner-Eckart theorem for the case of spheres. The theory was validated by comparison with known findings and with experimental double-PFG data obtained from water-filled microcapillaries.

  11. A general framework to quantify the effect of restricted diffusion on the NMR signal with applications to double pulsed field gradient NMR experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özarslan, Evren; Shemesh, Noam; Basser, Peter J.

    2009-03-01

    Based on a description introduced by Robertson, Grebenkov recently introduced a powerful formalism to represent the diffusion-attenuated NMR signal for simple pore geometries such as slabs, cylinders, and spheres analytically. In this work, we extend this multiple correlation function formalism by allowing for possible variations in the direction of the magnetic field gradient waveform. This extension is necessary, for example, to incorporate the effects of imaging gradients in diffusion-weighted NMR imaging scans and in characterizing anisotropy at different length scales via double pulsed field gradient (PFG) experiments. In cylindrical and spherical pores, respectively, two- and three-dimensional vector operators are employed whose form is deduced from Grebenkov's results via elementary operator algebra for the case of cylinders and the Wigner-Eckart theorem for the case of spheres. The theory was validated by comparison with known findings and with experimental double-PFG data obtained from water-filled microcapillaries.

  12. Ultraviolet radiation induces stress in etiolated Landoltia punctata, as evidenced by the presence of alanine, a universal stress signal: a ¹⁵N NMR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monselise, E B-I; Levkovitz, A; Kost, D

    2015-01-01

    Analysis with (15) N NMR revealed that alanine, a universal cellular stress signal, accumulates in etiolated duckweed plants exposed to 15-min pulsed UV light, but not in the absence of UV irradiation. The addition of 10 mm vitamin C, a radical scavenger, reduced alanine levels to zero, indicating the involvement of free radicals. Free D-alanine was detected in (15) N NMR analysis of the chiral amino acid content, using D-tartaric acid as solvent. The accumulation of D-alanine under stress conditions presents a new perspective on the biochemical processes taking place in prokaryote and eukaryote cells. © 2014 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  13. Complete NMR Assignment of Succinimide and Its Detection and Quantification in Peptides and Intact Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Luigi; Regl, Christof; Wildner, Sabrina; Gadermaier, Gabriele; Huber, Christian G; Cabrele, Chiara; Schubert, Mario

    2017-11-21

    Detecting and quantifying post-translational modifications (PTMs) in full-length proteins is a challenge, especially in the case of spontaneously occurring, nonenzymatic PTMs. Such a PTM is the formation of succinimide (Snn) in a protein that occurs spontaneously in prone primary sequences and leads typically to an equilibrium between Snn and its hydrolysis products isoaspartate (isoAsp) and aspartate. In order to detect these modifications in proteins by NMR spectroscopy, chemical shift assignments of reference compounds are required. We used peptide synthesis and 2D NMR spectroscopy to assign all 1 H and 13 C chemical shifts of Snn and isoAsp and found characteristic chemical shift correlations. To provide chemical shift reference data suitable for comparison with data of denatured proteins, we repeated the assignment in 7 M urea (pH 2.3) and in DMSO. Most characteristic of Snn are the two downfield shifted carbonyl chemical shifts, the chemical shift correlations of Cβ-Hβ of Snn and Cα-Hα of the succeeding residue which are clearly distinct from random coil chemical shift correlations. The characteristic 2D NMR fingerprints of Snn were used to detect and quantify this PTM in the model protein lysozyme, the biotherapeutic filgrastim, and the Fc part of immunoglobulin G1. Mass spectrometry (MS) was applied as an additional independent method. The orthogonality of the NMR and MS techniques allows cross-validation, which is especially important to search for subtle PTMs in proteins. Studying PTMs by NMR spectroscopy is a promising method to analyze proteins and peptides from natural sources, recombinant expression, or chemical synthesis.

  14. Line-narrowing in proton-detected nitrogen-14 NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavadini, Simone; Vitzthum, Veronika; Ulzega, Simone; Abraham, Anuji; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2010-01-01

    In solids spinning at the magic angle, the indirect detection of single-quantum (SQ) and double-quantum (DQ) 14N spectra ( I = 1) via spy nuclei S = 1/2 such as protons can be achieved in the manner of heteronuclear single- or multiple-quantum correlation (HSQC or HMQC) spectroscopy. The HMQC method relies on the excitation of two-spin coherences of the type T11IT11S and T21IT11S at the beginning of the evolution interval t1. The spectra obtained by Fourier transformation from t1 to ω1 may be broadened by the homogenous decay of the transverse terms of the spy nuclei S. This broadening is mostly due to homonuclear dipolar S- S' interactions between the proton spy nuclei. In this work we have investigated the possibility of inserting rotor-synchronized symmetry-based C or R sequences and decoupling schemes such as Phase-Modulated Lee-Goldburg (PMLG) sequences in the evolution period. These schemes reduce the homonuclear proton-proton interactions and lead to an enhancement of the resolution of both SQ and DQ proton-detected 14N HMQC spectra. In addition, we have investigated the combination of HSQC with symmetry-based sequences and PMLG and shown that the highest resolution in the 14N dimension is achieved by using HSQC in combination with symmetry-based sequences of the R-type. We show improvements in resolution in samples of L-alanine and the tripeptide ala-ala-gly (AAG). In particular, for L-alanine the width of the 14N SQ peak is reduced from 2 to 1.2 kHz, in agreement with simulations. We report accurate measurements of quadrupolar coupling constants and asymmetry parameters for amide 14N in AAG peptide bonds.

  15. Detection and Localization of Random Signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sporring, Jon; Olsen, Niels Holm; Nielsen, Mads

    2003-01-01

    Object detection and localization are common tasks in image analysis. Correlation based detection algorithms are known to work well, when dealing with objects with known geometry in Gaussianly distributed additive noise. In the Bayes’ view, correlation is linearly related to the logarithm...... filtering techniques. It is therefore interesting to extend the application to objects with many but small degrees of freedom in their geometry. These geometric variations deteriorate the linear correlation signal, both regarding its strength and localization with multiple peaks from a single object....... Localization is typically preferred over detection, and Bayesian localization may be obtained as local integration of the probability density. In this work, Gaussian kernels of the exponentiated correlation are studied, and the use of Linear Scale-Space allows us to extend the Bayes detection with a well...

  16. Automatic Smoker Detection from Telephone Speech Signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alavijeh, Amir Hossein Poorjam; Hesaraki, Soheila; Safavi, Saeid

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes an automatic smoking habit detection from spontaneous telephone speech signals. In this method, each utterance is modeled using i-vector and non-negative factor analysis (NFA) frameworks, which yield low-dimensional representation of utterances by applying factor analysis...... on Gaussian mixture model means and weights respectively. Each framework is evaluated using different classification algorithms to detect the smoker speakers. Finally, score-level fusion of the i-vector-based and the NFA-based recognizers is considered to improve the classification accuracy. The proposed...... method is evaluated on telephone speech signals of speakers whose smoking habits are known drawn from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) 2008 and 2010 Speaker Recognition Evaluation databases. Experimental results over 1194 utterances show the effectiveness of the proposed approach...

  17. Photochemical generation and 1H NMR detection of alkyl allene oxides in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breen, L.E.; Schepp, N.P.; Tan, C.-H.E.

    2005-01-01

    Irradiation of substituted 5-alkyl-4,5-epoxyvalerophenones leads to the formation of alkyl allene oxides that, in some cases, are sufficiently long-lived to be detected at room temperature by 1 H NMR spectroscopy. Absolute lifetime measurements show that the size of the alkyl group has a significant influence on the reactivity of the allene oxide, with tert-butyl allene oxide having a lifetime of 24 h in CD 3 CN at room temperature that is considerably longer than the 1.5 h lifetime of the ethyl allene oxide. The allene oxides react rapidly with water to give α-hydroxyketones. The mechanism involves nucleophilic attack to the epoxide carbon to give an enol, which can also be detected as an intermediate by 1 H NMR spectroscopy. (author)

  18. NMR detects molecular interactions of graphene with aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichenkova, Elena V.; Raju, Arun P. A.; Burusco, Kepa K.; Kinloch, Ian A.; Novoselov, Kostya S.; Clarke, David J.

    2018-03-01

    Polyaromatic carbon is widely held to be strongly diamagnetic and hydrophobic, with textbook van der Waals and ‘π-stacked’ binding of hydrocarbons, which disrupt their self-assembled supramolecular structures. The NMR of organic molecules sequestered by polyaromatic carbon is expected to be dominated by shielding from the orbital diamagnetism of π electrons. We report the first evidence of very different polar and magnetic behavior in water, wherein graphene remained well-dispersed after extensive dialysis and behaved as a 1H-NMR-silent ghost. Magnetic effects dominated the NMR of organic structures which interacted with graphene, with changes in spin-spin coupling, vast increase in relaxation, line broadening and decrease in NMR peak heights when bound to graphene. However, the interactions were weak, reversible and did not disrupt organic self-assemblies reliant on hydrophobic ‘π-stacking’, even when substantially sequestered on the surface of graphene by the high surface area available. Interacting assemblies of aromatic molecules retained their strongly-shielded NMR signals and remained within self-assembled structures, with slower rates of diffusion from association with graphene, but with no further shielding from graphene. Binding to graphene was selective for positively-charged organic assemblies, weaker for non-aromatic and negligible for strongly-negatively-charged molecules, presumably repelled by a negative zeta potential of graphene in water. Stronger binders, or considerable excess of weaker binders readily reversed physisorption, with no evidence of structural changes from chemisorption. The fundamental nature of these different electronic interactions between organic and polyaromatic carbon is considered with relevance to electronics, charge storage, sensor, medical, pharmaceutical and environmental research.

  19. PFG-assisted selection and suppression of 1H NMR signals in the solid state under fast MAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischbach, Ingrid; Thieme, Karena; Hoffmann, Anke; Hehn, Manfred; Schnell, Ingo

    2003-11-01

    Under fast MAS conditions, techniques for 1H signal selection and suppression, which have originally been developed for solution-state NMR, become applicable to solids. In this work, we describe how WATERGATE and DANTE pulse sequences can be used under MAS to selectively excite or suppress peaks in 1H solid-state spectra. As known from the liquid-state analogues, signal selection and/or suppression is supported by pulsed-field gradients which selectively dephase and rephase transverse magnetisation. Under MAS, the required field gradients are provided by a simple pair of coils which have been built into a standard fast-MAS probe. PFG-assisted techniques enable efficient selection or suppression of 1H peaks in a single transient of the pulse sequence without the need for phase cycles. Therefore, these tools can readily be incorporated into solid-state MAS NMR experiments, which is demonstrated here for 1H- 1H double-quantum NMR spectra of supramolecular systems. In the examples presented here, the 1H signals of interest are relatively weak and need to be observed despite the presence of the strong 1H signal of long alkyl sidechains. PFG-assisted suppression of this strong perturbing signal is shown to be particularly useful for obtaining unambiguous results.

  20. Application of NMR Methods to Identify Detection Reagents for Use in the Development of Robust Nanosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cosman, M; Krishnan, V V; Balhorn, R

    2004-04-29

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a powerful technique for studying bi-molecular interactions at the atomic scale. Our NMR lab is involved in the identification of small molecules, or ligands that bind to target protein receptors, such as tetanus (TeNT) and botulinum (BoNT) neurotoxins, anthrax proteins and HLA-DR10 receptors on non-Hodgkin's lymphoma cancer cells. Once low affinity binders are identified, they can be linked together to produce multidentate synthetic high affinity ligands (SHALs) that have very high specificity for their target protein receptors. An important nanotechnology application for SHALs is their use in the development of robust chemical sensors or biochips for the detection of pathogen proteins in environmental samples or body fluids. Here, we describe a recently developed NMR competition assay based on transferred nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (trNOESY) that enables the identification of sets of ligands that bind to the same site, or a different site, on the surface of TeNT fragment C (TetC) than a known ''marker'' ligand, doxorubicin. Using this assay, we can identify the optimal pairs of ligands to be linked together for creating detection reagents, as well as estimate the relative binding constants for ligands competing for the same site.

  1. NMR detection of short-lived β-emitter {sup 12}N implanted in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugihara, T., E-mail: sugihara@vg.phys.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp; Mihara, M.; Shimaya, J.; Matsuta, K.; Fukuda, M.; Ohno, J.; Tanaka, M.; Yamaoka, S.; Watanabe, K.; Iwakiri, S.; Yanagihara, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Du, H.; Onishi, K.; Kambayashi, S.; Minamisono, T. [Osaka University, Department of Physics (Japan); Nishimura, D. [Tokyo University of Science, Department of Physics (Japan); Izumikawa, T. [Niigata University, Radioisotope Center (Japan); Ozawa, A. [University of Tsukuba, Department of Physics (Japan); Ishibashi, Y. [RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science (Japan); and others

    2017-11-15

    The beta-detected nuclear magnetic resonance (β-NMR) in liquid H{sub 2}O has been observed for the first time using a short-lived β-ray emitter {sup 12}N (I{sup π} = 1{sup +},T{sub 1/2}=11 ms). A nuclear spin polarized {sup 12}N beam with an energy of about 20 MeV/nucleon was implanted into an enclosed water sample. About 50 % of implanted {sup 12}N ions maintained nuclear polarization and exhibited a β-NMR spectrum. The chemical shift of {sup 12}N in H{sub 2}O relative to {sup 12}N in Pt was deduced to be −(3.6±0.5) × 10{sup 2} ppm.

  2. 13C-detected NMR experiments for automatic resonance assignment of IDPs and multiple-fixing SMFT processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dziekański, Paweł; Grudziąż, Katarzyna; Jarvoll, Patrik; Koźmiński, Wiktor; Zawadzka-Kazimierczuk, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) have recently attracted much interest, due to their role in many biological processes, including signaling and regulation mechanisms. High-dimensional 13 C direct-detected NMR experiments have proven exceptionally useful in case of IDPs, providing spectra with superior peak dispersion. Here, two such novel experiments recorded with non-uniform sampling are introduced, these are 5D HabCabCO(CA)NCO and 5D HNCO(CA)NCO. Together with the 4D (HACA)CON(CA)NCO, an extension of the previously published 3D experiments (Pantoja-Uceda and Santoro in J Biomol NMR 59:43–50, 2014. doi: 10.1007/s10858-014-9827-1 10.1007/s10858-014-9827-1 ), they form a set allowing for complete and reliable resonance assignment of difficult IDPs. The processing is performed with sparse multidimensional Fourier transform based on the concept of restricting (fixing) some of spectral dimensions to a priori known resonance frequencies. In our study, a multiple-fixing method was developed, that allows easy access to spectral data. The experiments were tested on a resolution-demanding alpha-synuclein sample. Due to superior peak dispersion in high-dimensional spectrum and availability of the sequential connectivities between four consecutive residues, the overwhelming majority of resonances could be assigned automatically using the TSAR program

  3. Solid-state NMR analysis of membrane proteins and protein aggregates by proton detected spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Donghua H.; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J.; Berthold, Deborah A.; Comellas, Gemma; Sperling, Lindsay J.; Tang, Ming; Shah, Gautam J.; Brea, Elliott J.; Lemkau, Luisel R.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2012-01-01

    Solid-state NMR has emerged as an important tool for structural biology and chemistry, capable of solving atomic-resolution structures for proteins in membrane-bound and aggregated states. Proton detection methods have been recently realized under fast magic-angle spinning conditions, providing large sensitivity enhancements for efficient examination of uniformly labeled proteins. The first and often most challenging step of protein structure determination by NMR is the site-specific resonance assignment. Here we demonstrate resonance assignments based on high-sensitivity proton-detected three-dimensional experiments for samples of different physical states, including a fully-protonated small protein (GB1, 6 kDa), a deuterated microcrystalline protein (DsbA, 21 kDa), a membrane protein (DsbB, 20 kDa) prepared in a lipid environment, and the extended core of a fibrillar protein (α-synuclein, 14 kDa). In our implementation of these experiments, including CONH, CO(CA)NH, CANH, CA(CO)NH, CBCANH, and CBCA(CO)NH, dipolar-based polarization transfer methods have been chosen for optimal efficiency for relatively high protonation levels (full protonation or 100 % amide proton), fast magic-angle spinning conditions (40 kHz) and moderate proton decoupling power levels. Each H–N pair correlates exclusively to either intra- or inter-residue carbons, but not both, to maximize spectral resolution. Experiment time can be reduced by at least a factor of 10 by using proton detection in comparison to carbon detection. These high-sensitivity experiments are especially important for membrane proteins, which often have rather low expression yield. Proton-detection based experiments are expected to play an important role in accelerating protein structure elucidation by solid-state NMR with the improved sensitivity and resolution.

  4. BURAR: Detection and signal processing capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghica, Daniela; Radulian, Mircea; Popa, Mihaela

    2004-01-01

    Since July 2002, a new seismic monitoring station, the Bucovina Seismic Array (BURAR), has been installed in the northern part of Romania, in a joint effort of the Air Force Technical Applications Center, USA, and the National Institute for Earth Physics (NIEP), Romania. The array consists of 10 seismic sensors (9 short-period and one broad band) located in boreholes and distributed in a 5 x 5 km 2 area. At present, the seismic data are continuously recorded by BURAR and transmitted in real-time to the Romanian National Data Centre (ROM N DC), in Bucharest and to the National Data Center of USA, in Florida. The statistical analysis for the seismic information gathered at ROM N DC by the BURAR in the August 2002 - December 2003 time interval points out a much better efficiency of the BURAR system in detecting teleseismic events and local events occurred in the N-NE part of Romanian territory, in comparison with the actual Romanian Telemetered Network. Furthermore, the BURAR monitoring system has proven to be an important source of reliable data for NIEP efforts in issuing the seismic bulletins. Signal processing capability of the system provides useful information in order to improve the location of the local seismic events, using the array beamforming procedure. This method increases significantly the signal-to-noise ratio by summing up the coherent signals from the array components. In this way, possible source nucleation phases can be detected. At the same time, using the slowness and back azimuth estimations by f-k analysis, locations for the seismic events can be established based only on the information recorded by the BURAR array, acting like a single seismic station recording system. (authors)

  5. Chemical tagging of chlorinated phenols for their facile detection and analysis by NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdez, Carlos A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Leif, Roald N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-03-22

    A derivatization method that employs diethyl (bromodifluoromethyl) phosphonate (DBDFP) to efficiently tag the endocrine disruptor pentachlorophenol (PCP) and other chlorinated phenols (CPs) along with their reliable detection and analysis by NMR is presented. The method accomplishes the efficient alkylation of the hydroxyl group in CPs with the difluoromethyl (CF2H) moiety in extremely rapid fashion (5 min), at room temperature and in an environmentally benign manner. The approach proved successful in difluoromethylating a panel of 18 chlorinated phenols, yielding derivatives that displayed unique 1H, 19F NMR spectra allowing for the clear discrimination between isomerically related CPs. Due to its biphasic nature, the derivatization can be applied to both aqueous and organic mixtures where the analysis of CPs is required. Furthermore, the methodology demonstrates that PCP along with other CPs can be selectively derivatized in the presence of other various aliphatic alcohols, underscoring the superiority of the approach over other general derivatization methods that indiscriminately modify all analytes in a given sample. The present work demonstrates the first application of NMR on the qualitative analysis of these highly toxic and environmentally persistent species.

  6. Improving resolution in multidimensional NMR using random quadrature detection with compressed sensing reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostock, M J; Holland, D J; Nietlispach, D

    2017-06-01

    NMR spectroscopy is central to atomic resolution studies in biology and chemistry. Key to this approach are multidimensional experiments. Obtaining such experiments with sufficient resolution, however, is a slow process, in part since each time increment in every indirect dimension needs to be recorded twice, in quadrature. We introduce a modified compressed sensing (CS) algorithm enabling reconstruction of data acquired with random acquisition of quadrature components in gradient-selection NMR. We name this approach random quadrature detection (RQD). Gradient-selection experiments are essential to the success of modern NMR and with RQD, a 50 % reduction in the number of data points per indirect dimension is possible, by only acquiring one quadrature component per time point. Using our algorithm (CS RQD ), high quality reconstructions are achieved. RQD is modular and combined with non-uniform sampling we show that this provides increased flexibility in designing sampling schedules leading to improved resolution with increasing benefits as dimensionality of experiments increases, with particular advantages for 4- and higher dimensional experiments.

  7. Detection of Apoptosis and Necrosis in Normal Human Lung Cells Using 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Chwen-Ming; Ko, Wun-Chang; Yang, Liang-Yo; Lin, Chien-Ju; Wu, Jui-Sheng; Lo, Tsui-Yun; Wang, Shwu-Huey; Chen, Chien-Tsu

    2005-05-01

    This study aimed to detect apoptosis and necrosis in MRC-5, a normal human lung cell line, by using noninvasive proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR). Live MRC-5 cells were processed first for 1H NMR spectroscopy; subsequently their types and the percentage of cell death were assessed on a flow cytometer. Cadmium (Cd) and mercury (Hg) induced apoptosis and necrosis in MRC-5 cells, respectively, as revealed by phosphatidylserine externalization on a flow cytometer. The spectral intensity ratio of methylene (CH2) resonance (at 1.3 ppm) to methyl (CH3) resonance (at 0.9 ppm) was directly proportional to the percentage of apoptosis and strongly and positively correlated with PI staining after Cd treatment (r2 = 0.9868, P In contrast, this ratio only increased slightly within 2-h Hg treatment, and longer Hg exposure failed to produce further increase. Following 2-h Hg exposure, the spectral intensity of choline resonance (at 3.2 ppm) was abolished, but this phenomenon was absent in Cd-induced apoptosis. These findings together demonstrate that 1H NMR is a novel tool with a quantitative potential to distinguish apoptosis from necrosis as early as the onset of cell death in normal human lung cells.

  8. Hyperfine fields in thin Pd films by beta-detected NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parolin, T. J.; Salman, Z.; Chakhalian, J.; Song, Q.; Chow, K. H.; Morris, G. D.; Egilmez, M.; Fan, I.; Hossain, M. D.; Keeler, T. A.; Kiefl, R. F.; Kreitzman, S. R.; Levy, C. D. P.; Mansour, A. I.; Miller, R. I.; Pearson, M. R.; Saadaoui, H.; Smadella, M.; Wang, D.; Xu, M.; MacFarlane, W. A.

    2009-04-01

    Using low energy beta-detected nuclear magnetic resonance (βNMR), the Knight shift and spin-lattice relaxation rate of dilute 8Li+ implanted into a 28 nm Pd film on a MgO substrate were studied as a function of temperature. The shift of the resonance is negative, but much smaller in magnitude than observed in two other much thicker samples. The corresponding spin-lattice relaxation rates are found to be linear with temperature T, but are roughly 50% slower than the rates measured in a Pd foil. Potential explanations are discussed.

  9. NMR-based detection of hydrogen/deuterium exchange in liposome-embedded membrane proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuejun Yao

    Full Text Available Membrane proteins play key roles in biology. Determination of their structure in a membrane environment, however, is highly challenging. To address this challenge, we developed an approach that couples hydrogen/deuterium exchange of membrane proteins to rapid unfolding and detection by solution-state NMR spectroscopy. We show that the method allows analysis of the solvent protection of single residues in liposome-embedded proteins such as the 349-residue Tom40, the major protein translocation pore in the outer mitochondrial membrane, which has resisted structural analysis for many years.

  10. Hyperfine fields in thin Pd films by beta-detected NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parolin, T.J. [Department of Chemistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Salman, Z. [Department of Physics, Oxford University, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Chakhalian, J. [Department of Physics, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Song, Q. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Chow, K.H. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2G7 (Canada); Morris, G.D. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Egilmez, M.; Fan, I. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2G7 (Canada); Hossain, M.D.; Keeler, T.A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Kiefl, R.F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, Toronto, ON, M5G 1Z8 (Canada); Kreitzman, S.R.; Levy, C.D.P. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Mansour, A.I. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2G7 (Canada); Miller, R.I.; Pearson, M.R. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Saadaoui, H.; Smadella, M.; Wang, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Xu, M. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada)

    2009-04-15

    Using low energy beta-detected nuclear magnetic resonance (betaNMR), the Knight shift and spin-lattice relaxation rate of dilute {sup 8}Li{sup +} implanted into a 28 nm Pd film on a MgO substrate were studied as a function of temperature. The shift of the resonance is negative, but much smaller in magnitude than observed in two other much thicker samples. The corresponding spin-lattice relaxation rates are found to be linear with temperature T, but are roughly 50% slower than the rates measured in a Pd foil. Potential explanations are discussed.

  11. Detecting Gravitational Wave Memory without Parent Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, Lucy O; Thrane, Eric; Lasky, Paul D

    2017-05-05

    Gravitational-wave memory manifests as a permanent distortion of an idealized gravitational-wave detector and arises generically from energetic astrophysical events. For example, binary black hole mergers are expected to emit memory bursts a little more than an order of magnitude smaller in strain than the oscillatory parent waves. We introduce the concept of "orphan memory": gravitational-wave memory for which there is no detectable parent signal. In particular, high-frequency gravitational-wave bursts (≳kHz) produce orphan memory in the LIGO/Virgo band. We show that Advanced LIGO measurements can place stringent limits on the existence of high-frequency gravitational waves, effectively increasing the LIGO bandwidth by orders of magnitude. We investigate the prospects for and implications of future searches for orphan memory.

  12. Detection the nonlinear ultrasonic signals based on modified Duffing equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhua Zhang

    Full Text Available The nonlinear ultrasonic signals, like second harmonic generation (SHG signals, could reflect the nonlinearity of material induced by fatigue damage in nonlinear ultrasonic technique which are weak nonlinear signals and usually submerged by strong background noise. In this paper the modified Duffing equations are applied to detect the SHG signals relating to the fatigue damage of material. Due to the Duffing equation could only detect the signal with specific frequency and initial phase, firstly the frequency transformation is carried on the Duffing equation which could detect the signal with any frequency. Then the influence of initial phases of to-be-detected signal and reference signal on the detection result is studied in detail, four modified Duffing equations are proposed to detect actual engineering signals with any initial phase. The relationship between the response amplitude and the total driving force is applied to estimate the amplitude of weak periodic signal. The detection results show the modified Duffing equations could effectively detect the second harmonic in SHG signals. When the SHG signals include strong background noise, the noise doesn’t change the motion state of Duffing equation and the second harmonic signal could be detected until the SNR of noisy SHG signals are −26.3, yet the frequency spectrum method could only identify when the SNR is greater than 0.5. When estimation the amplitude of second harmonic signal, the estimation error of Duffing equation is obviously less than the frequency spectrum analysis method under the same noise level, which illustrates the Duffing equation has the noise immune capacity. The presence of the second harmonic signal in nonlinear ultrasonic experiments could provide an insight about the early fatigue damage of engineering components. Keywords: Modified Duffing equations, SHG signals, Amplitude estimation, Second harmonic signal detection

  13. A fast random walk algorithm for computing diffusion-weighted NMR signals in multi-scale porous media: A feasibility study for a Menger sponge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebenkov, Denis S.; Nguyen, Hang T.; Li, Jing-Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    A fast random walk (FRW) algorithm is adapted to compute diffusion-weighted NMR signals in a Menger sponge which is formed by multiple channels of broadly distributed sizes and often considered as a model for soils and porous materials. The self-similar structure of a Menger sponge allows for rapid simulations that were not feasible by other numerical techniques. The role of multiple length scales on diffusion-weighted NMR signals is investigated. (authors)

  14. Analog Filtering of Large Solvent Signals for Improved Dynamic Range in High-Resolution NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfield, A. G.; Kunz, S. D.

    1998-01-01

    The large solvent signal from samples in H2O solvent still challenges the dynamic range capability of any spectrometer. The solvent signal can be largely removed with a pair of simple resistor-capacitor (RC) high-pass filters when the solvent frequency is set at center band (zero frequency) using quadrature detection, withRC∼ 0.5 ms. However, an ∼0.5-ms transient remains at initial time, which we reduce fourfold for a short time only, just before the A/D converter, by means of a variable-gain amplifier, and later restore with software. This modification can result in a nearly fourfold increase in dynamic range. When we converted to a frequency-shifted mode (A. G. Redfield and S. D. Kunz, 1994,J. Magn. Reson. A108, 234-237) we replaced theRChigh-pass filter with a quadrature feedback notch filter tuned to the solvent frequency (5.06 kHz). This filter is an example of a class of two-input/two-output filters which maintain the spectral integrity (image-free character) of quadrature signals. Digital filters of the same type are also considered briefly. We discuss the implications of these ideas for spectrometer input design, including schemes for elimination of radiation damping, and effects of probe bandwidth on extreme oversampling.

  15. Detecting Seismic Infrasound Signals on Balloon Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy, S.; Komjathy, A.; Cutts, J. A.; Pauken, M.; Garcia, R.; Mimoun, D.; Jackson, J. M.; Kedar, S.; Smrekar, S. E.; Hall, J. L.

    2017-12-01

    The determination of the interior structure of a planet requires detailed seismic investigations - a process that entails the detection and characterization of seismic waves due to geological activities (e.g., earthquakes, volcanoes, etc.). For decades, this task has primarily been performed on Earth by an ever-expanding network of terrestrial seismic stations. However, on planets such as Venus, where the surface pressure and temperature can reach as high as 90 atmospheres and 450 degrees Celsius respectively, placing seismometers on the planet's surface poses a vexing technological challenge. However, the upper layers of the Venusian atmosphere are more benign and capable of hosting geophysical payloads for longer mission lifetimes. In order to achieve the aim of performing geophysical experiments from an atmospheric platform, JPL and its partners (ISAE-SUPAERO and California Institute of Technology) are in the process of developing technologies for detection of infrasonic waves generated by earthquakes from a balloon. The coupling of seismic energy into the atmosphere critically depends on the density differential between the surface of the planet and the atmosphere. Therefore, the successful demonstration of this technique on Earth would provide ample reason to expect success on Venus, where the atmospheric impedance is approximately 60 times that of Earth. In this presentation, we will share results from the first set of Earth-based balloon experiments performed in Pahrump, Nevada in June 2017. These tests involved the generation of artificial sources of known intensity using a seismic hammer and their detection using a complex network of sensors, including highly sensitive micro-barometers suspended from balloons, GPS receivers, geophones, microphones, and seismometers. This experiment was the first of its kind and was successful in detecting infrasonic waves from the earthquakes generated by the seismic hammer. We will present the first comprehensive analysis

  16. 1H-Detected Solid-State NMR Studies of Water-Inaccessible Proteins In Vitro and In Situ

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medeiros-Silva, João; Mance, Deni; Daniëls, Mark; Jekhmane, Miranda; Houben, Klaartje; Baldus, Marc; Weingarth, Markus

    2016-01-01

    1H detection can significantly improve solid-state NMR spectral sensitivity and thereby allows studying more complex proteins. However, the common prerequisite for 1H detection is the introduction of exchangeable protons in otherwise deuterated proteins, which has thus far significantly hampered

  17. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR Study for the Detection and Quantitation of Cholesterol in HSV529 Therapeutic Vaccine Candidate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahima Khatun

    Full Text Available This study describes the NMR-based method to determine the limit of quantitation (LOQ and limit of detection (LOD of cholesterol, a process-related impurity in the replication-deficient Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV type 2 candidate vaccine HSV529. Three signature peaks from the 1D 1H NMR of a cholesterol reference spectrum were selected for the identification of cholesterol. The LOQ for a cholesterol working standard was found to be 1 μg/mL, and the LOD was found to be 0.1 μg/mL. The identity of cholesterol, separated from the formulation of growth supplement by thin layer chromatography (TLC, was confirmed by 1D 1H NMR and 2D 1H-13C HSQC NMR. The three signature peaks of cholesterol were detected only in a six-times concentrated sample of HSV529 candidate vaccine sample and not in the single dose HSV529 vaccine sample under similar experimental conditions. Taken together, the results demonstrated that NMR is a direct method that can successfully identify and quantify cholesterol in viral vaccine samples, such as HSV529, and as well as in the growth supplement used during the upstream stages of HSV529 manufacturing. Keywords: Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2, Viral vaccine, NMR, Residuals, LOD and LOQ, TLC, Growth supplement

  18. Subaperture clutter filter with CFAR signal detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormesher, Richard C.; Naething, Richard M.

    2016-08-30

    The various technologies presented herein relate to the determination of whether a received signal comprising radar clutter further comprises a communication signal. The communication signal can comprise of a preamble, a data symbol, communication data, etc. A first portion of the radar clutter is analyzed to determine a radar signature of the first portion of the radar clutter. A second portion of the radar clutter can be extracted based on the radar signature of the first portion. Following extraction, any residual signal can be analyzed to retrieve preamble data, etc. The received signal can be based upon a linear frequency modulation (e.g., a chirp modulation) whereby the chirp frequency can be determined and the frequency of transmission of the communication signal can be based accordingly thereon. The duration and/or bandwidth of the communication signal can be a portion of the duration and/or the bandwidth of the radar clutter.

  19. Beta-detected NMR study of the local magnetic field in epitaxial GaAs:Mn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Q.; Chow, K. H.; Miller, R. I.; Fan, I.; Hossain, M. D.; Kiefl, R. F.; Kreitzman, S. R.; Levy, C. D. P.; Parolin, T. J.; Pearson, M. R.; Salman, Z.; Saadaoui, H.; Smadella, M.; Wang, D.; Yu, K. M.; Liu, X.; Furdyna, J. K.; MacFarlane, W. A.

    2009-04-01

    A low energy beam of spin polarized 8Li + has been employed to study the magnetic field distribution in an epitaxial thin film of 5.4% Mn doped GaAs(180 nm) on a (1 0 0) GaAs substrate via beta-detected NMR. The spectrum is a strong function of the implantation energy in the range 28-3 keV. In the magnetic layer, there is no indication of a missing fraction, and even more remarkable, there is a broad negatively shifted resonance. The spin lattice relaxation rate is, however, much faster in the Mn doped layer than in the substrate. A sharp peak characteristic of nonmagnetic GaAs is observed down to the lowest implantation energy, for which none of the Li should reach the substrate. This unexpected depth dependence is discussed.

  20. Detection of counterfeit brand spirits using 1H NMR fingerprints in comparison to sensory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuballa, Thomas; Hausler, Thomas; Okaru, Alex O; Neufeld, Maria; Abuga, Kennedy O; Kibwage, Isaac O; Rehm, Jürgen; Luy, Burkhard; Walch, Stephan G; Lachenmeier, Dirk W

    2018-04-15

    Beverage fraud involving counterfeiting of brand spirits is an increasing problem not only due to deception of the consumer but also because it poses health risks e.g. from possible methanol admixture. Suspicious spirit samples from Russia and Kenya were analysed using 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in comparison to authentic products. Using linear regression analysis of spectral integral values, 4 counterfeited samples from Russia and 2 from Kenya were easily identifiable with R 2  counterfeited and authentic samples but the assessors were unable to correctly identify the counterfeited product in the majority of cases. An important conclusion is that consumers cannot assumed to be self-responsible when consuming counterfeit alcohol because there is no general ability to organoleptically detect counterfeit alcohol. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Beta-detected NMR study of the local magnetic field in epitaxial GaAs:Mn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Q., E-mail: susan@phas.ubc.c [Department of Physics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Chow, K.H. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2G7 (Canada); Miller, R.I. [TRIMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Fan, I. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2G7 (Canada); Hossain, M.D. [Department of Physics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Kiefl, R.F. [Department of Physics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Canadian Institute of Advanced Research (Canada); Kreitzman, S.R.; Levy, C.D.P. [TRIMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Parolin, T.J. [Chemistry Department, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Pearson, M.R.; Salman, Z. [TRIMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Saadaoui, H.; Smadella, M.; Wang, D. [Department of Physics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Yu, K.M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Liu, X.; Furdyna, J.K. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); MacFarlane, W.A. [Chemistry Department, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

    2009-04-15

    A low energy beam of spin polarized {sup 8}Li{sup +} has been employed to study the magnetic field distribution in an epitaxial thin film of 5.4% Mn doped GaAs(180 nm) on a (1 0 0) GaAs substrate via beta-detected NMR. The spectrum is a strong function of the implantation energy in the range 28-3 keV. In the magnetic layer, there is no indication of a missing fraction, and even more remarkable, there is a broad negatively shifted resonance. The spin lattice relaxation rate is, however, much faster in the Mn doped layer than in the substrate. A sharp peak characteristic of nonmagnetic GaAs is observed down to the lowest implantation energy, for which none of the Li should reach the substrate. This unexpected depth dependence is discussed.

  2. Improving EEG signal peak detection using feature weight learning ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Asrul Adam

    Neural network with random weights (NNRW); feature weight learning (FWL); electroencephalogram (EEG); peak detection algorithm; pattern recognition; particle swarm optimization (PSO). 1. Introduction. The utilization of peak detection algorithms has emerged as a useful tool in several physiological signal applications,.

  3. Ehrlich and sarcoma 180 tumour characterisation and early detection by {sup 1}H NMR-based metabonomics of mice serum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandizoli, Caroline W.P. da S.; Simonelli, Fabio; Nagata, Noemi; Barison, Andersson, E-mail: andernmr@ufpr.br [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Carrenho, Luise Z.B.; Francisco, Thais M.G. de; Campos, Francinete R. [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Farmacia; Santana Filho, Arquimedes P. de; Sassaki, Guilherme L. [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Bioquimica; Kreuger, Maria R.O. [Universidade do Vale do Itajai (UNIVALI), (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias da Saude

    2014-05-15

    The success of cancer treatment is directly related to early detection before symptoms emerge, although nowadays few cancers can be detected early. In this sense, {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H NMR)-based metabonomics was used to identify metabolic changes in biofluid as a consequence of tumours growing in mice. Through partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) analysis of {sup 1}H NMR spectra from serum samples it was possible to diagnose Ehrlich ascites and Sarcoma 180 tumours five and ten days after cell inoculation, respectively. Lipids, lipoproteins and lactate were the main biomarkers at onset as well as in the progress of carcinogenic process. Thus, NMR-based metabonomics can be a valuable tool to study the effects of tumour establishment on the chemical composition of biofluids. (author)

  4. Non-targeted detection of chemical contamination in carbonated soft drinks using NMR spectroscopy, variable selection and chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Adrian J; Robb, Paul; Donarski, James A; Godward, John

    2008-06-23

    An efficient method for detecting malicious and accidental contamination of foods has been developed using a combined 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and chemometrics approach. The method has been demonstrated using a commercially available carbonated soft drink, as being capable of identifying atypical products and to identify contaminant resonances. Soft-independent modelling of class analogy (SIMCA) was used to compare 1H NMR profiles of genuine products (obtained from the manufacturer) against retail products spiked in the laboratory with impurities. The benefits of using feature selection for extracting contaminant NMR frequencies were also assessed. Using example impurities (paraquat, p-cresol and glyphosate) NMR spectra were analysed using multivariate methods resulting in detection limits of approximately 0.075, 0.2, and 0.06 mM for p-cresol, paraquat and glyphosate, respectively. These detection limits are shown to be approximately 100-fold lower than the minimum lethal dose for paraquat. The methodology presented here is used to assess the composition of complex matrices for the presence of contaminating molecules without a priori knowledge of the nature of potential contaminants. The ability to detect if a sample does not fit into the expected profile without recourse to multiple targeted analyses is a valuable tool for incident detection and forensic applications.

  5. Non-targeted detection of chemical contamination in carbonated soft drinks using NMR spectroscopy, variable selection and chemometrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charlton, Adrian J. [Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, Central Science Laboratory, Sand Hutton, York YO41 1LZ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: adrian.charlton@csl.gov.uk; Robb, Paul; Donarski, James A.; Godward, John [Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, Central Science Laboratory, Sand Hutton, York YO41 1LZ (United Kingdom)

    2008-06-23

    An efficient method for detecting malicious and accidental contamination of foods has been developed using a combined {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and chemometrics approach. The method has been demonstrated using a commercially available carbonated soft drink, as being capable of identifying atypical products and to identify contaminant resonances. Soft-independent modelling of class analogy (SIMCA) was used to compare {sup 1}H NMR profiles of genuine products (obtained from the manufacturer) against retail products spiked in the laboratory with impurities. The benefits of using feature selection for extracting contaminant NMR frequencies were also assessed. Using example impurities (paraquat, p-cresol and glyphosate) NMR spectra were analysed using multivariate methods resulting in detection limits of approximately 0.075, 0.2, and 0.06 mM for p-cresol, paraquat and glyphosate, respectively. These detection limits are shown to be approximately 100-fold lower than the minimum lethal dose for paraquat. The methodology presented here is used to assess the composition of complex matrices for the presence of contaminating molecules without a priori knowledge of the nature of potential contaminants. The ability to detect if a sample does not fit into the expected profile without recourse to multiple targeted analyses is a valuable tool for incident detection and forensic applications.

  6. Detection of Noise in Composite Step Signal Pattern by Visualizing Signal Waveforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaman Verma

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The Step Composite Signals is the combination of vital informative signals that are compressed and coded to produce a predefined test image on a display device. It carries the desired sequence of information from source to destination. This information may be transmitted as digital signal, video information or data signal required as an input for the destination module. For testing of display panels, Composite Test Signals are the most important attribute of test signal transmission system. In the current research paper we present an approach for the noise detection in Composite Step Signal by analysing Composite Step Signal waveforms. The analysis of the signal waveforms reveals that the noise affected components of the signal and subsequently noise reduction process is initiated which targets noisy signal component only. Thus the quality of signal is not compromised during noise reduction process.

  7. Inositol phosphates from barley low-phytate grain mutants analysed by metal-dye detection HPLC and NMR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatzack, F.; Hübel, F.; Zhang, W.

    2001-01-01

    Inositolphosphates from barley low-phytate grain mutants and their parent variety were analysed by metal-dye detection HPLC and NMR. Compound assignment was carried out by comparison of retention times using a chemical hydrolysate of phytate [Ins(1,2,3,4,5,6)P(6)] as a reference; Co...

  8. Traffic Flow Detection Using GNSS-R Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Lei

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to detect traffic conditions effectively, a new method of traffic flow detection using GNSS-R (Global Navigation Satellite System-Reflected signals is proposed. In this method, the direct signals and reflected signals of GNSS are received by two types of antennas respectively and collected by an universal receiver.After signal processing in a SDR(Software Defined Receiver, the correlated power of direct channel and reflected channel, and also the satellites' elevation angles can be obtained. Then vehicles can be detected by the method of dielectric constant retrieving.Test results show that vehicles in the area can be detected effectively using this method, and prove the feasibility of traffic flow detection using GNSS-R signals.

  9. Solid and liquid 129Xe NMR signals enhanced by spin-exchange optical pumping under flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xin; Luo Jun; Sun Xianping; Zeng Xizhi; Liu Maili; Liu Wuyang

    2002-01-01

    Laser-polarized 129 Xe gas was produced by spin-exchange with Cs atom optically pumped with diode laser array in a low field under flow. The nuclear spin polarizations of the solid and liquid 129 Xe frozen from the laser-polarized 129 Xe gas were 2.16% and 1.45% respectively in the SY-80M NMR spectrometer, which corresponded to the enhancements of 6000 and 5000 compared to those without optical pumping under the same conditions. It could provide the base and possibility for quantum computers using laser-enhanced solid and liquid 129 Xe. Polarization loss of transport and state change was also discussed

  10. GNSS Spoofing Detection Based on Signal Power Measurements: Statistical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Dehghanian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A threat to GNSS receivers is posed by a spoofing transmitter that emulates authentic signals but with randomized code phase and Doppler values over a small range. Such spoofing signals can result in large navigational solution errors that are passed onto the unsuspecting user with potentially dire consequences. An effective spoofing detection technique is developed in this paper, based on signal power measurements and that can be readily applied to present consumer grade GNSS receivers with minimal firmware changes. An extensive statistical analysis is carried out based on formulating a multihypothesis detection problem. Expressions are developed to devise a set of thresholds required for signal detection and identification. The detection processing methods developed are further manipulated to exploit incidental antenna motion arising from user interaction with a GNSS handheld receiver to further enhance the detection performance of the proposed algorithm. The statistical analysis supports the effectiveness of the proposed spoofing detection technique under various multipath conditions.

  11. Solid-state NMR of inorganic semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesinowski, James P

    2012-01-01

    Studies of inorganic semiconductors by solid-state NMR vary widely in terms of the nature of the samples investigated, the techniques employed to observe the NMR signal, and the types of information obtained. Compared with the NMR of diamagnetic non-semiconducting substances, important differences often result from the presence of electron or hole carriers that are the hallmark of semiconductors, and whose theoretical interpretation can be involved. This review aims to provide a broad perspective on the topic for the non-expert by providing: (1) a basic introduction to semiconductor physical concepts relevant to NMR, including common crystal structures and the various methods of making samples; (2) discussions of the NMR spin Hamiltonian, details of some of the NMR techniques and strategies used to make measurements and theoretically predict NMR parameters, and examples of how each of the terms in the Hamiltonian has provided useful information in bulk semiconductors; (3) a discussion of the additional considerations needed to interpret the NMR of nanoscale semiconductors, with selected examples. The area of semiconductor NMR is being revitalized by this interest in nanoscale semiconductors, the great improvements in NMR detection sensitivity and resolution that have occurred, and the current interest in optical pumping and spintronics-related studies. Promising directions for future research will be noted throughout.

  12. Nonstationary weak signal detection based on normalization ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Haibin Zhang

    Kutta numerical method as well as the normalized transformation of a bistable stochastic resonance system. The model performs well in the ... For the SNR in fractional domain in literature. [25], it can be only used in the LFM signal .... the numerical solution for the typical first-order differential equation as Eq. (2). The discrete ...

  13. SPE-NMR metabolite sub-profiling of urine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, D.M.; Spiesser, L.; Garnier, M.; Roo, de N.; Dorsten, van F.; Hollebrands, B.; Velzen, van E.; Draijer, R.; Duynhoven, van J.P.M.

    2012-01-01

    NMR-based metabolite profiling of urine is a fast and reproducible method for detection of numerous metabolites with diverse chemical properties. However, signal overlap in the (1)H NMR profiles of human urine may hamper quantification and identification of metabolites. Therefore, a new method has

  14. Continuous emotion detection using EEG signals and facial expressions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soleymani, Mohammad; Asghari-Esfeden, Sadjad; Pantic, Maja; Fu, Yun

    Emotions play an important role in how we select and consume multimedia. Recent advances on affect detection are focused on detecting emotions continuously. In this paper, for the first time, we continuously detect valence from electroencephalogram (EEG) signals and facial expressions in response to

  15. Study of the direct detection of crosslinking in hydrocarbons by 13C-NMR. II. Identification of crosslink in model compound and application to irradiate paraffins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, R.L.; Keller, A.; Stejny, H.H.; Murray, M.

    1976-01-01

    A 13 C-NMR investigation was carried out in aid of direct detection of crosslinks in hydrocarbons with the future objective of studying radiation-induced crosslinking in polyethylene by a direct method. The resonance signal due to a tertiary carbon atom appropriate to a crosslink far remote from molecular ends has been identified in a definitive manner with the aid of the H-shaped model compound 1,1,2,2-tetra(tridecyl)ethane synthetized in Part I of this study. This identification was then put to use in the examination of the irradiated linear paraffins n-hexadecane and n-eicosane, where it enabled the detection of radiation-induced crosslinks. This crosslinking could then be associated with corresponding changes in molecular weight (dimer, trimer formation) as revealed by discrete peaks in the gel-permeation chromatograms of the same samples and randomness of the crosslinking process in the liquid state of these compounds being inferred

  16. Detection of magnetic resonance signals using a magnetoresistive sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budker, Dmitry; Pines, Alexander; Xu, Shoujun; Hilty, Christian; Ledbetter, Micah P; Bouchard, Louis S

    2013-10-01

    A method and apparatus are described wherein a micro sample of a fluidic material may be assayed without sample contamination using NMR techniques, in combination with magnetoresistive sensors. The fluidic material to be assayed is first subject to pre-polarization, in one embodiment, by passage through a magnetic field. The magnetization of the fluidic material is then subject to an encoding process, in one embodiment an rf-induced inversion by passage through an adiabatic fast-passage module. Thereafter, the changes in magnetization are detected by a pair of solid-state magnetoresistive sensors arranged in gradiometer mode. Miniaturization is afforded by the close spacing of the various modules.

  17. Advancements in Bio-radar Speech Signal Detection Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Fuming

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Speech signal acquisition is of great significance for human communication. Bio-radar technology has many advantages, such as it is noncontact, noninvasive, safe, highly directional, highly sensitivity, immune to strong acoustical disturbance and penetrable. This technology has important applications in the field of speech detection. In this paper, we first review the developmental history of speech detection technology, and then summarize the status of bio-radar speech detection technology. The basic principles of a bio-radar in detecting speech signals are given, and the performance of three types of bio-radar speech detection systems are compared in this paper. Finally, the potential applications of bio-radar speech signal detection technology are prospected.

  18. ECG Signal Analysis and Arrhythmia Detection using Wavelet Transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Inderbir; Rajni, Rajni; Marwaha, Anupma

    2016-12-01

    Electrocardiogram (ECG) is used to record the electrical activity of the heart. The ECG signal being non-stationary in nature, makes the analysis and interpretation of the signal very difficult. Hence accurate analysis of ECG signal with a powerful tool like discrete wavelet transform (DWT) becomes imperative. In this paper, ECG signal is denoised to remove the artifacts and analyzed using Wavelet Transform to detect the QRS complex and arrhythmia. This work is implemented in MATLAB software for MIT/BIH Arrhythmia database and yields the sensitivity of 99.85 %, positive predictivity of 99.92 % and detection error rate of 0.221 % with wavelet transform. It is also inferred that DWT outperforms principle component analysis technique in detection of ECG signal.

  19. β-detected NMR of Li in Ga1-xMnxAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Q.; Chow, K. H.; Salman, Z.; Saadaoui, H.; Hossain, M. D.; Kiefl, R. F.; Levy, C. D. P.; Pearson, M. R.; Parolin, T. J.; Smadella, M.; Wang, D.; Yu, K. M.; Liu, X.; Furdyna, J. K.; Macfarlane, W. A.

    2011-08-01

    The magnetic properties of a 180-nm-thick epitaxial film of the dilute magnetic semiconductor Ga1-xMnxAs with x=0.054 are investigated using beta-detected NMR of low-energy implanted 8Li+. There is a broad distribution of local magnetic fields in the Ga1-xMnxAs layer, reflecting the magnetic inhomogeneity of the system. The resonance (representing the local magnetic field distribution) is followed as a function of temperature through the ferromagnetic transition. The average hyperfine field at the 8Li nucleus is measured to be positive and on the order of 150 G at low temperature, implying a negative hyperfine coupling of the 8Li to the delocalized holes and suggesting that the holes are better described by an Mn-derived impurity band. The spin-lattice relaxation of 8Li shows a remarkably weak feature at the phase transition and no Korringa behavior despite metallic conductivity. No evidence is found of the microscopic magnetic phase separation that has been suggested by some low-energy muon spin-rotation measurements.

  20. β-detected NMR Study of Semi-Insulating GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Q.; Chow, K. H.; Hossain, M. D.; Kiefl, R. F.; Morris, G. D.; Levy, C. D. P.; Saadaoui, H.; Smadella, M.; Wang, D.; Kardasz, B.; Heinrich, B.; MacFarlane, W. A.

    A beta-detected NMR experiment is carried out on a semi-insulating GaAs crystal using a low energy spin polarized 8Li+ beam to investigate the magnetic properties as a function of temperature and depth. The range of depths probed, from ˜137 nm down to ˜17 nm, coincides with the region of electronic band-bending due to the surface. We find a resonance broadened by the host nuclear dipoles, consistent with an earlier report[6], but using a pulsed radio frequency scheme, we are able to make higher resolution measurements. We find a small negative shift of the resonance (relative to an MgO reference) at room temperature that is independent of depth. Remarkably, as the temperature is reduced below about 150 K, the resonance shifts negatively and becomes depth dependent, with a larger negative shift deeper into the sample. This shift saturates below 10 K, i.e. it does not follow a Curie's law that might be expected for dilute magnetic impurities. Possible origins are discussed.

  1. Detection of Anisotropy in Cartilage Using 2H Double-Quantum-Filtered NMR-Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharf, Y.; Eliav, U.; Shinar, H.; Navon, G.

    Double-quantum-filtered (DQF) NMR spectroscopy of I = 1 spin systems is a diagnostic tool for the detection of anisotropy in macroscopically disordered systems. For deuterium, this method reveals the presence of a residual quadrupolar interaction for D 2O in bovine nasal cartilage. This tissue is not macroscopically ordered and the quadrupolar splitting is not resolved. Fitting the calculated spectral lineshapes to the experimental results was possible only when a distribution of the residual quadrupolar interaction, omega(q), was assumed. The series of DQF lineshapes obtained for different creation times in the DQF experiment could be fitted using a single set of three parameters: the average residual quadrupolar interaction overlineω q/2π = 110 Hz, its standard deviation Δω q/2π = 73 Hz, and the transverse relaxation rate of 63 s -1. Separate deuterium DQF measurements for the constituents of the cartilage, collagen, and chondroitin sulfate indicated that the DQF spectra of cartilage are the result of anisotropic motion of D 2O due to binding to the fibrous collagen in the tissue.

  2. Understanding driver behavior at grade crossings through signal detection theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This report uses signal detection theory (SDT) to model motorists decisionmaking strategies at grade crossings in order to understand the factors that influence such decisions and to establish a framework for evaluating the impact of proposed coun...

  3. Weak signal detection: A discrete window of opportunity for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    weak signal detection' as a potential opportunity to fill this void. Method: Combining futures and complexity theory, we reflect on two pilot case studies that involved the Archetype Extraction technique and the SenseMakerw CollectorTM tool.

  4. Understanding driver behavior at grade crossings through signal detection theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    This report uses signal detection theory (SDT) to model motorists decisionmaking strategies at grade crossings in order to understand the factors that influence such decisions and to establish a framework for evaluating the impact of proposed coun...

  5. Signal Detection Framework Using Semantic Text Mining Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudarsan, Sithu D.

    2009-01-01

    Signal detection is a challenging task for regulatory and intelligence agencies. Subject matter experts in those agencies analyze documents, generally containing narrative text in a time bound manner for signals by identification, evaluation and confirmation, leading to follow-up action e.g., recalling a defective product or public advisory for…

  6. Wideband Array Signal Detection Algorithm Based on Power Focusing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong Bin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at the requirement of real-time signal detection in the passive surveillance system, a wideband array signal detection algorithm is proposed based on the concept of power focusing. By making use of the phase difference of the signal received by a uniform linear array, the algorithm makes the power of the received signal focused in the Direction Of Arrival (DOA with improved cascade FFT. Subsequently, the probability density function of the output noise at each angle is derived. Furthermore, a Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR test statistic and the corresponding detection threshold are constructed. The theoretical probability of detection is also derived for different false alarm rate and Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR. The proposed algorithm is computationally efficient, and the detection process is independent of the prior information. Meanwhile, the results can act as the initial value for other algorithms with higher precision. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm achieves good performance for weak signal detection.

  7. Signal processing techniques for sodium boiling noise detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-05-01

    At the Specialists' Meeting on Sodium Boiling Detection organized by the International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR) of the International Atomic Energy Agency at Chester in the United Kingdom in 1981 various methods of detecting sodium boiling were reported. But, it was not possible to make a comparative assessment of these methods because the signal condition in each experiment was different from others. That is why participants of this meeting recommended that a benchmark test should be carried out in order to evaluate and compare signal processing methods for boiling detection. Organization of the Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on signal processing techniques for sodium boiling noise detection was also recommended at the 16th meeting of the IWGFR. The CRP on Signal Processing Techniques for Sodium Boiling Noise Detection was set up in 1984. Eight laboratories from six countries have agreed to participate in this CRP. The overall objective of the programme was the development of reliable on-line signal processing techniques which could be used for the detection of sodium boiling in an LMFBR core. During the first stage of the programme a number of existing processing techniques used by different countries have been compared and evaluated. In the course of further work, an algorithm for implementation of this sodium boiling detection system in the nuclear reactor will be developed. It was also considered that the acoustic signal processing techniques developed for boiling detection could well make a useful contribution to other acoustic applications in the reactor. This publication consists of two parts. Part I is the final report of the co-ordinated research programme on signal processing techniques for sodium boiling noise detection. Part II contains two introductory papers and 20 papers presented at four research co-ordination meetings since 1985. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these 22 papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  8. Islanding detection scheme based on adaptive identifier signal estimation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshi, M; Noroozian, R; Gharehpetian, G B

    2017-11-01

    This paper proposes a novel, passive-based anti-islanding method for both inverter and synchronous machine-based distributed generation (DG) units. Unfortunately, when the active/reactive power mismatches are near to zero, majority of the passive anti-islanding methods cannot detect the islanding situation, correctly. This study introduces a new islanding detection method based on exponentially damped signal estimation method. The proposed method uses adaptive identifier method for estimating of the frequency deviation of the point of common coupling (PCC) link as a target signal that can detect the islanding condition with near-zero active power imbalance. Main advantage of the adaptive identifier method over other signal estimation methods is its small sampling window. In this paper, the adaptive identifier based islanding detection method introduces a new detection index entitled decision signal by estimating of oscillation frequency of the PCC frequency and can detect islanding conditions, properly. In islanding conditions, oscillations frequency of PCC frequency reach to zero, thus threshold setting for decision signal is not a tedious job. The non-islanding transient events, which can cause a significant deviation in the PCC frequency are considered in simulations. These events include different types of faults, load changes, capacitor bank switching, and motor starting. Further, for islanding events, the capability of the proposed islanding detection method is verified by near-to-zero active power mismatches. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Spectral Correlation of Multicarrier Modulated Signals and Its Application for Signal Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Haijian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Spectral correlation theory for cyclostationary time-series signals has been studied for decades. Explicit formulas of spectral correlation function for various types of analog-modulated and digital-modulated signals are already derived. In this paper, we investigate and exploit the cyclostationarity characteristics for two kinds of multicarrier modulated (MCM signals: conventional OFDM and filter bank based multicarrier (FBMC signals. The spectral correlation characterization of MCM signal can be described by a special linear periodic time-variant (LPTV system. Using this LPTV description, we have derived the explicit theoretical formulas of nonconjugate and conjugate cyclic autocorrelation function (CAF and spectral correlation function (SCF for OFDM and FBMC signals. According to theoretical spectral analysis, Cyclostationary Signatures (CS are artificially embedded into MCM signal and a low-complexity signature detector is, therefore, presented for detecting MCM signal. Theoretical analysis and simulation results demonstrate the efficiency and robustness of this CS detector compared to traditionary energy detector.

  10. NMR detected metabolites in complex natural fluids. Quinic acid in apple juice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailiesei Gabriela Liliana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Different types of 1D and 2D NMR experiments were used to completely characterize quinic acid and demonstrate its presence in complex mixtures. The identification of quinic acid in apple juice was done without any separation step. The NMR experiments presented in this study can be used to analyze other metabolites in different complex natural fluids, of vegetal or biological origin.

  11. Subsurface Event Detection and Classification Using Wireless Signal Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Suk-Un; Ghazanfari, Ehsan; Cheng, Liang; Pamukcu, Sibel; Suleiman, Muhannad T.

    2012-01-01

    Subsurface environment sensing and monitoring applications such as detection of water intrusion or a landslide, which could significantly change the physical properties of the host soil, can be accomplished using a novel concept, Wireless Signal Networks (WSiNs). The wireless signal networks take advantage of the variations of radio signal strength on the distributed underground sensor nodes of WSiNs to monitor and characterize the sensed area. To characterize subsurface environments for event detection and classification, this paper provides a detailed list and experimental data of soil properties on how radio propagation is affected by soil properties in subsurface communication environments. Experiments demonstrated that calibrated wireless signal strength variations can be used as indicators to sense changes in the subsurface environment. The concept of WSiNs for the subsurface event detection is evaluated with applications such as detection of water intrusion, relative density change, and relative motion using actual underground sensor nodes. To classify geo-events using the measured signal strength as a main indicator of geo-events, we propose a window-based minimum distance classifier based on Bayesian decision theory. The window-based classifier for wireless signal networks has two steps: event detection and event classification. With the event detection, the window-based classifier classifies geo-events on the event occurring regions that are called a classification window. The proposed window-based classification method is evaluated with a water leakage experiment in which the data has been measured in laboratory experiments. In these experiments, the proposed detection and classification method based on wireless signal network can detect and classify subsurface events. PMID:23202191

  12. Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer in Chemical Reactions: A Mechanistic Tool for NMR Detection and Characterization of Transient Intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokesh, N; Seegerer, Andreas; Hioe, Johnny; Gschwind, Ruth M

    2018-02-07

    The low sensitivity of NMR and transient key intermediates below detection limit are the central problems studying reaction mechanisms by NMR. Sensitivity can be enhanced by hyperpolarization techniques such as dynamic nuclear polarization or the incorporation/interaction of special hyperpolarized molecules. However, all of these techniques require special equipment, are restricted to selective reactions, or undesirably influence the reaction pathways. Here, we apply the chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) technique for the first time to NMR detect and characterize previously unobserved transient reaction intermediates in organocatalysis. The higher sensitivity of CEST and chemical equilibria present in the reaction pathway are exploited to access population and kinetics information on low populated intermediates. The potential of the method is demonstrated on the proline-catalyzed enamine formation for unprecedented in situ detection of a DPU stabilized zwitterionic iminium species, the elusive key intermediate between enamine and oxazolidinones. The quantitative analysis of CEST data at 250 K revealed the population ratio of [Z-iminium]/[exo-oxazolidinone] 0.02, relative free energy +8.1 kJ/mol (calculated +7.3 kJ/mol), and free energy barrier of +45.9 kJ/mol (ΔG ⧧ calc. (268 K) = +42.2 kJ/mol) for Z-iminium → exo-oxazolidinone. The findings underpin the iminium ion participation in enamine formation pathway corroborating our earlier theoretical prediction and help in better understanding. The reliability of CEST is validated using 1D EXSY-build-up techniques at low temperature (213 K). The CEST method thus serves as a new tool for mechanistic investigations in organocatalysis to access key information, such as chemical shifts, populations, and reaction kinetics of intermediates below the standard NMR detection limit.

  13. Using Complementary NMR Data Sets To Detect Inconsistencies and Model Flaws in the Structure Determination of Human Interleukin-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lorna J; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F; Hansen, Niels

    2017-07-27

    The derivation of protein structure from values of observable quantities measured in NMR experiments is a rather nontrivial task due to (i) the limited number of data compared to degrees of freedom of a protein, (ii) the uncertainty inherent to the function connecting an observable quantity to molecular structure, (iii) the finite quality of biomolecular models and force fields used in structure refinement, and (iv) the conformational freedom of a protein in aqueous solution, which requires extensive conformational sampling and appropriate conformational averaging when calculating or restraining to sets of NMR data. The protein interleukin-4 (IL-4) has been taken as a test case using NOE distances, S 2 order parameters, and 3 J-couplings as test data and the former two types of data as restraints. It is shown that, by combining sets of different, complementary NMR data as restraints in MD simulations, inconsistencies in the data or flaws in the model and procedures used to derive protein structure from NMR data can be detected. This leads to an improved structural interpretation of such data particularly in more mobile loop regions.

  14. Advancements in Bio-radar Speech Signal Detection Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Fuming; Li Sheng; An Qiang; Zhang Ziqi; Wang Jianqi

    2016-01-01

    Speech signal acquisition is of great significance for human communication. Bio-radar technology has many advantages, such as it is noncontact, noninvasive, safe, highly directional, highly sensitivity, immune to strong acoustical disturbance and penetrable. This technology has important applications in the field of speech detection. In this paper, we first review the developmental history of speech detection technology, and then summarize the status of bio-radar speech detection technolog...

  15. Signal detection in post-marketing surveillance for controlled substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Nabarun; Schnoll, Sidney H

    2009-12-01

    Signal detection for pharmaceutical controlled substances presents unique challenges compared to other pharmacovigilance programs because risks are present in the patient and non-patient populations. Defining signals for controlled substances has been difficult because no specific empirical criteria have been established through regulatory actions or guidances. We start with a review of data sources available for decision making to regulators and industry. In this paper we present a framework for processing signals received during post-marketing surveillance: signal identification, verification and assessment, followed by intervention and evaluation. Signal identification involves processing qualitative and quantitative information in order to generate hypotheses describing concerns with controlled substances. Integration of heterogeneous data sources makes this process difficult and we describe multiple approaches utilized in practice today. Signal verification currently relies heavily on telephone interviews with stakeholders in local communities. Once information on a potential signal has been gathered signal assessment is a higher order process conducted with an eye towards broader societal expectations and the ability to intervene or further study the problem. Intervention and evaluation complete the cycle of signal assessment and triage. This paper is intended as a primer of the current practice of signal assessment in the post-marketing surveillance for controlled substances.

  16. MICROSLEEPS AND THEIR DETECTION FROM THE BIOLOGICAL SIGNALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Holub

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Microsleeps (MS are a frequently discussed topic due to their fatal consequences. Their detection is necessary for the purpose of sleep laboratories, where they provide an option for the quantifying rate of sleep deprivation level and objective evaluation of subjective sleepiness. Many studies are dealing with this topic for automotive usage to design a fatigue countermeasure device. We made a research of recent attitude to the development of the automated MS detection methods. We created an overview of several MS detection approaches based on the measurement of biological signals. We also summarized the changes in EEG, EOG and ECG signals, which have been published over the last few years. The reproducible changes in the entire EEG spectrum, primarily with the increased activity of delta and theta, were noticed during a transition to fatigue. There were observed changes of blinking rate and reduction of eye movements during the fatigue tasks. MS correspond with variations in the autonomic regulation of the cardiovascular function, which can be quantified by HRV parameters. The decrease in HR, VLF, and LF/HF before falling asleep was revealed. EEG signal, especially its slow wave activity, considered to be the most predictive and reliable for the level of alertness. In spite of the detection from EEG signal is the most common method, EOG based approaches can also be very efficient and more driver-friendly. Besides, the signal processing in the time domain can improve the detection accuracy of the short events like MS.

  17. Development Of Signal Detection For Radar Navigation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theingi Win Hlaing

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to evaluate the performance of target detection in the presence of sea clutter. Radar detection of a background of unwanted clutter due to echoes from sea clutter or land is a problem of interest in the radar field. Radar detector has been developed by assuming the radar clutter is Gaussian distributed. However as technology emerges the radar distribution is seen to deviates from the Gaussian assumption. Thus detectors designs based on Gaussian assumption are no longer optimum for detection in non-Gaussian nature. The theory of target detection in Gaussian distributed clutter has been well established and the closed form of the detection performances can be easily obtained. However that is not the case in non-Gaussian clutter distributions. The operation of radar detection is determined by radar detection theory with different types of Swerling target models such as Swerling I II III IV and V. By using MATLAB these signal detection techniques are developed.

  18. Active elimination of radio frequency interference for improved signal-to-noise ratio for in-situ NMR experiments in strong magnetic field gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, M.; Pardi, C. I.; Brown, T. W. C.; McDonald, P. J.

    2018-02-01

    Improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) systems may be achieved either by increasing the signal amplitude or by decreasing the noise. The noise has multiple origins - not all of which are strictly "noise": incoherent thermal noise originating in the probe and pre-amplifiers, probe ring down or acoustic noise and coherent externally broadcast radio frequency transmissions. The last cannot always be shielded in open access experiments. In this paper, we show that pulsed, low radio-frequency data communications are a significant source of broadcast interference. We explore two signal processing methods of de-noising short T2∗ NMR experiments corrupted by these communications: Linear Predictive Coding (LPC) and the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT). Results are shown for numerical simulations and experiments conducted under controlled conditions with pseudo radio frequency interference. We show that both the LPC and DWT methods have merit.

  19. Tuning positive feedback for signal detection in noisy dynamic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Anders; Ramsch, Kai; Middendorf, Martin; Sumpter, David J T

    2012-09-21

    Learning from previous actions is a key feature of decision-making. Diverse biological systems, from neuronal assemblies to insect societies, use a combination of positive feedback and forgetting of stored memories to process and respond to input signals. Here we look how these systems deal with a dynamic two-armed bandit problem of detecting a very weak signal in the presence of a high degree of noise. We show that by tuning the form of positive feedback and the decay rate to appropriate values, a single tracking variable can effectively detect dynamic inputs even in the presence of a large degree of noise. In particular, we show that when tuned appropriately a simple positive feedback algorithm is Fisher efficient, in that it can track changes in a signal on a time of order L(h)=(|h|/σ)(-2), where |h| is the magnitude of the signal and σ the magnitude of the noise. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. [Detection of peranesthetic malignant hyperthermia by muscle contracture tests and NMR spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak-Reiss, G; Gascard, J P; Redouane-Bénichou, K

    1986-01-01

    To diagnose malignant hyperthermia susceptibility (MHS), caffeine and halothane contracture tests were performed on six patients. One of them, who presented a peroperative crisis, was recognized as MHS; the five others were negative (MHN). By means of 31P-NMR spectroscopy, the muscular energetic metabolism of these patients was studied during and after moderate exercise in normal and moderate ischaemic conditions. Metabolic abnormalities appeared in the MHS patient. It must be concluded therefore that malignant hyperthermia is a latent myopathy. 31P-NMR spectroscopy appeared to be a useful non-invasive tool for screening for this affliction.

  1. Stochastic model for detection of signals in noise

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, Stanley A.; Levi, Dennis M.

    2009-01-01

    Fifty years ago Birdsall, Tanner, and colleagues made rapid progress in developing signal detection theory into a powerful psychophysical tool. One of their major insights was the utility of adding external noise to the signals of interest. These methods have been enhanced in recent years by the addition of multipass and classification-image methods for opening up the black box. There remain a number of as yet unresolved issues. In particular, Birdsall developed a theorem that large amounts o...

  2. Incorporating signal-dependent noise for hyperspectral target detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morman, Christopher J.; Meola, Joseph

    2015-05-01

    The majority of hyperspectral target detection algorithms are developed from statistical data models employing stationary background statistics or white Gaussian noise models. Stationary background models are inaccurate as a result of two separate physical processes. First, varying background classes often exist in the imagery that possess different clutter statistics. Many algorithms can account for this variability through the use of subspaces or clustering techniques. The second physical process, which is often ignored, is a signal-dependent sensor noise term. For photon counting sensors that are often used in hyperspectral imaging systems, sensor noise increases as the measured signal level increases as a result of Poisson random processes. This work investigates the impact of this sensor noise on target detection performance. A linear noise model is developed describing sensor noise variance as a linear function of signal level. The linear noise model is then incorporated for detection of targets using data collected at Wright Patterson Air Force Base.

  3. Study of the fluorescence signal for gastrointestinal dysplasia detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenta, S.; Castanheira, E. M. S.; Minas, G.

    2014-08-01

    The detection of cancer at the dysplasia stage is one of the most important goals in biomedical research. Optical techniques, specifically diffuse reflectance and intrinsic fluorescence, may improve the ability to detect gastrointestinal (GI) cancers, since they have exquisite sensitivity to some intrinsic biomarkers present on the tissues. This work follows the research that has been done towards the implementation of a spectroscopy microsystem for the early detection of GI cancers. For that purpose, the behavior of the fluorescence signal, at different temperatures and considering the most important biomarkers in GI malignancy detection, was studied and presented.

  4. Integrated Giant Magnetoresistance Technology for Approachable Weak Biomagnetic Signal Detections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hui-Min; Hu, Liang; Fu, Xin

    2018-01-07

    With the extensive applications of biomagnetic signals derived from active biological tissue in both clinical diagnoses and human-computer-interaction, there is an increasing need for approachable weak biomagnetic sensing technology. The inherent merits of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) and its high integration with multiple technologies makes it possible to detect weak biomagnetic signals with micron-sized, non-cooled and low-cost sensors, considering that the magnetic field intensity attenuates rapidly with distance. This paper focuses on the state-of-art in integrated GMR technology for approachable biomagnetic sensing from the perspective of discipline fusion between them. The progress in integrated GMR to overcome the challenges in weak biomagnetic signal detection towards high resolution portable applications is addressed. The various strategies for 1/ f noise reduction and sensitivity enhancement in integrated GMR technology for sub-pT biomagnetic signal recording are discussed. In this paper, we review the developments of integrated GMR technology for in vivo/vitro biomagnetic source imaging and demonstrate how integrated GMR can be utilized for biomagnetic field detection. Since the field sensitivity of integrated GMR technology is being pushed to fT/Hz 0.5 with the focused efforts, it is believed that the potential of integrated GMR technology will make it preferred choice in weak biomagnetic signal detection in the future.

  5. Advanced radar detection schemes under mismatched signal models

    CERN Document Server

    Bandiera, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    Adaptive detection of signals embedded in correlated Gaussian noise has been an active field of research in the last decades. This topic is important in many areas of signal processing such as, just to give some examples, radar, sonar, communications, and hyperspectral imaging. Most of the existing adaptive algorithms have been designed following the lead of the derivation of Kelly's detector which assumes perfect knowledge of the target steering vector. However, in realistic scenarios, mismatches are likely to occur due to both environmental and instrumental factors. When a mismatched signal

  6. Generation and coherent detection of QPSK signal using a novel method of digital signal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuan; Hu, Bingliang; He, Zhen-An; Xie, Wenjia; Gao, Xiaohui

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrate an optical quadrature phase-shift keying (QPSK) signal transmitter and an optical receiver for demodulating optical QPSK signal with homodyne detection and digital signal processing (DSP). DSP on the homodyne detection scheme is employed without locking the phase of the local oscillator (LO). In this paper, we present an extracting one-dimensional array of down-sampling method for reducing unwanted samples of constellation diagram measurement. Such a novel scheme embodies the following major advantages over the other conventional optical QPSK signal detection methods. First, this homodyne detection scheme does not need strict requirement on LO in comparison with linear optical sampling, such as having a flat spectral density and phase over the spectral support of the source under test. Second, the LabVIEW software is directly used for recovering the QPSK signal constellation without employing complex DSP circuit. Third, this scheme is applicable to multilevel modulation formats such as M-ary PSK and quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) or higher speed signals by making minor changes.

  7. Direct detection of carbon and nitrogen nuclei for high-resolution analysis of intrinsically disordered proteins using NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, E B; Kriwacki, R W

    2018-01-16

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) is a powerful technique for characterizing the structural and dynamic properties of intrinsically disordered proteins and protein regions (IDPs & IDRs). However, the application of NMR to IDPs has been limited by poor chemical shift dispersion in two-dimensional (2D) 1 H- 15 N heteronuclear correlation spectra. Among the various detection schemes available for heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy, 13 C direct-detection has become a mainstay for investigations of IDPs owing to the favorable chemical shift dispersion in 2D 13 C'- 15 N correlation spectra. Recent advances in cryoprobe technology have enhanced the sensitivity for direct detection of both 13 C and 15 N resonances at high magnetic field strengths, thus prompting the development of 15 N direct-detect experiments to complement established 13 C-detection experiments. However, the application of 15 N-detection has not been widely explored for IDPs. Here we compare 1 H, 13 C, and 15 N detection schemes for a variety of 2D heteronuclear correlation spectra and evaluate their performance on the basis of resolution, chemical shift dispersion, and sensitivity. We performed experiments with a variety of disordered systems ranging in size and complexity; from a small IDR (99 amino acids), to a large low complexity IDR (185 amino acids), and finally a ∼73 kDa folded homopentameric protein that also contains disordered regions (133 amino acids/monomer). We conclude that, while requiring high sample concentration and long acquisition times, 15 N-detection often offers enhanced resolution over other detection schemes in studies of disordered protein regions with low complexity sequences. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. NMR Detection of Semi-Specific Antibody Interactions in Serum Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeko Yanaka

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Although antibody functions are executed in heterogeneous blood streams characterized by molecular crowding and promiscuous intermolecular interaction, detailed structural characterizations of antibody interactions have thus far been performed under homogeneous in vitro conditions. NMR spectroscopy potentially has the ability to study protein structures in heterogeneous environments, assuming that the target protein can be labeled with NMR-active isotopes. Based on our successful development of isotope labeling of antibody glycoproteins, here we apply NMR spectroscopy to characterize antibody interactions in heterogeneous extracellular environments using mouse IgG-Fc as a test molecule. In human serum, many of the HSQC peaks originating from the Fc backbone exhibited attenuation in intensity of various magnitudes. Similar spectral changes were induced by the Fab fragment of polyclonal IgG isolated from the serum, but not by serum albumin, indicating that a subset of antibodies reactive with mouse IgG-Fc exists in human serum without preimmunization. The metaepitopes recognized by serum polyclonal IgG cover the entire molecular surface of Fc, including the binding sites to Fc receptors and C1q. In-serum NMR observation will offer useful tools for the detailed characterization of biopharamaceuticals, including therapeutic antibodies in physiologically relevant heterogeneous environments, also giving deeper insight into molecular recognition by polyclonal antibodies in the immune system.

  9. Use of Hybrid Capillary Tube Apparatus on 400 MHz NMR for Quantitation of Crucial Low-Quantity Metabolites Using aSICCO Signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Ranjeet; Ahire, Deepak; Kumar, Hemantha; Sinha, Sarmistha; Chauthe, Siddheshwar Kisan; Subramanian, Murali; Iyer, Ramaswamy; Sarabu, Ramakanth; Bajpai, Lakshmikant

    2017-12-01

    Metabolites of new chemical entities can influence safety and efficacy of a molecule and often times need to be quantified in preclinical studies. However, synthetic standards of metabolites are very rarely available in early discovery. Alternate approaches such as biosynthesis need to be explored to generate these metabolites. Assessing the quantity and purity of these small amounts of metabolites with a nondestructive analytical procedure becomes crucial. Quantitative NMR becomes the method of choice for these samples. Recent advances in high-field NMR (>500 MHz) with the use of cryoprobe technology have helped to improve sensitivity for analysis of small microgram quantity of such samples. However, this type of NMR instrumentation is not routinely available in all laboratories. To analyze microgram quantities of metabolites on a routine basis with lower-resolution 400 MHz NMR instrument fitted with a broad band fluorine observe room temperature probe, a novel hybrid capillary tube setup was developed. To quantitate the metabolite in the sample, an artificial signal insertion for calculation of concentration observed (aSICCO) method that introduces an internally calibrated mathematical signal was used after acquiring the NMR spectrum. The linearity of aSICCO signal was established using ibuprofen as a model analyte. The limit of quantification of this procedure was 0.8 mM with 10 K scans that could be improved further with the increase in the number of scans. This procedure was used to quantify three metabolites-phenytoin from fosphenytoin, dextrophan from dextromethorphan, and 4-OH-diclofenac from diclofenac-and is suitable for minibiosynthesis of metabolites from in vitro systems. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  10. Point of care assessment of melanoma tumor signaling and metastatic burden from μNMR analysis of tumor fine needle aspirates and peripheral blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Michael S; Ghazani, Arezou A; Haq, Rizwan; Wargo, Jennifer A; Sebas, Matthew; Sullivan, Ryan J; Lee, Hakho; Weissleder, Ralph

    2017-04-01

    This study evaluates μNMR technology for molecular profiling of tumor fine needle aspirates and peripheral blood of melanoma patients. In vitro assessment of melanocyte (MART-1, HMB45) and MAP kinase signaling (pERK, pS6K) molecule expression was performed in human cell lines, while clinical validation was performed in an IRB-approved study of melanoma patients undergoing biopsy and blood sampling. Tumor FNA and blood specimens were compared with BRAF genetic analysis and cross-sectional imaging. μNMR in vitro analysis showed increased expression of melanocyte markers in melanoma cells as well as increased expression of phosphorylated MAP kinase targets in BRAF-mutant melanoma cells. Melanoma patient FNA samples showed increased pERK and pS6K levels in BRAF mutant compared with BRAF WT melanomas, with μNMR blood circulating tumor cell level increased with higher metastatic burden visible on imaging. These results indicate that μNMR technology provides minimally invasive point-of-care evaluation of tumor signaling and metastatic burden in melanoma patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cophylogenetic signal is detectable in pollination interactions across ecological scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Matthew C; Cagua, Edgar Fernando; Stouffer, Daniel B

    2017-10-01

    That evolutionary history can influence the way that species interact is a basic tenet of evolutionary ecology. However, when the role of evolution in determining ecological interactions is investigated, focus typically centers on just one side of the interaction. A cophylogenetic signal, the congruence of evolutionary history across both sides of an ecological interaction, extends these previous explorations and provides a more complete picture of how evolutionary patterns influence the way species interact. To date, cophylogenetic signal has most typically been studied in interactions that occur between fine taxonomic clades that show high intimacy. In this study, we took an alternative approach and made an exhaustive assessment of cophylogeny in pollination interactions. To do so, we assessed the strength of cophylogenetic signal at four distinct scales of pollination interaction: (1) across plant-pollinator associations globally, (2) in local pollination communities, (3) within the modular structure of those communities, and (4) in individual modules. We did so using a globally distributed dataset comprised of 54 pollination networks, over 4000 species, and over 12,000 interactions. Within these data, we detected cophylogenetic signal at all four scales. Cophylogenetic signal was found at the level of plant-pollinator interactions on a global scale and in the majority of pollination communities. At the scale defined by the modular structure within those communities, however, we observed a much weaker cophylogenetic signal. Cophylogenetic signal was detectable in a significant proportion of individual modules and most typically when within-module phylogenetic diversity was low. In sum, the detection of cophylogenetic signal in pollination interactions across scales provides a new dimension to the story of how past evolution shapes extant pollinator-angiosperm interactions. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  12. Advanced Statistical Signal Processing Techniques for Landmine Detection Using GPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-12

    Processing Techniques for Landmine Detection Using GPR The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author(s) and should not...310 Jesse Hall Columbia, MO 65211 -1230 654808 633606 ABSTRACT Advanced Statistical Signal Processing Techniques for Landmine Detection Using GPR Report...Aggregation Operator For Humanitarian Demining Using Hand- Held GPR , , (01 2008): . doi: D. Ho, P. Gader, J. Wilson, H. Frigui. Subspace Processing

  13. Carbon Flux Signal Detection for the ASCENDS mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerling, D.; Michalak, A. M.; Kawa, S. R.; Doney, S. C.; Schaefer, K. M.

    2012-12-01

    Emerging satellite observations of carbon dioxide (CO2) offer novel and distinctive opportunities for quantifying the carbon cycle, which is an important scientific and societal challenge with anthropogenic CO2 emissions and accumulation rates in the atmosphere still on the rise. One mission in the planning stage is the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission, which is a laser CO2 sensing mission with an anticipated launch date around 2022. Notable features of this mission include the ability to sample at night and at high latitudes, which passive missions cannot do because of their reliance on reflected sunlight. In this work we present findings from signal detection studies, i.e. experiments that investigate if perturbations in carbon fluxes can be detected in the ASCENDS observations of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. The experiments employ a realistic synthetic-data setup using the PCTM/GEOS-5/CASA GFED CO2 flux and transport model in combination with CALIPSO and MODIS measurements. The signal detection approach applied uses a geostatistical mapping methodology that can leverage the information content of nearby observations, thereby potentially facilitating enhanced signal detection. The specific perturbation scenarios investigated are: carbon release from the melting of permafrost in the high Northern latitudes, the shifting of fossil fuel emissions from Europe to P.R. China, and natural variability in the CO2 fluxes in the Southern Ocean. Results indicate that the permafrost carbon release is comparatively easy to detect, while the Southern Ocean change is more challenging. The ability to detect a shift in fossil fuel emissions strongly depends on its magnitude: a 50% decrease in Europe is easily detectible, while a 20% decrease is only marginally so. A key conclusion is that the optimal signal detection strategy is intrinsically linked to how the carbon flux perturbations translate into atmospheric CO2 concentrations

  14. Separation of components of a broad 1H-NMR composite signal by means of nutation experiments under low amplitude radiofrequency fields. Application to the water signal in synthetic clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trausch, G.

    2006-11-01

    Nowadays, geologic nuclear waste storage is envisioned according to a multi-layer model which implies clays. The latter exhibit retention capacities and low permeability to water; that is why they are considered as a good candidate for engineered barriers to radioactive waste disposal. The present work here aims at studying transport phenomena which involve water molecules in three samples of synthetic clays (two of them exhibiting a Pake doublet) by means of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). The first chapter describes structural properties of clays and presents the state-of-art of NMR and other experimental techniques used for such systems. The second chapter deals with the interpretation and the simulation of each conventional proton spectrum. These simulations allow us to evidence and to characterize a chemical exchange phenomenon. The third chapter is dedicated to original nutation experiments performed under low radiofrequency field in the case of broad NMR signal. It is shown that this type of NMR experiment can yield the number and the proportion of each species contributing to the whole signal. These results are exploited in the fourth chapter for processing relaxation and diffusion experiments. Finally, the diffusion coefficients obtained by NMR are divided by a factor 4 with respect to pure water while relaxation rates are two orders of magnitude greater. (author)

  15. RMOD: a tool for regulatory motif detection in signaling network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinki Kim

    Full Text Available Regulatory motifs are patterns of activation and inhibition that appear repeatedly in various signaling networks and that show specific regulatory properties. However, the network structures of regulatory motifs are highly diverse and complex, rendering their identification difficult. Here, we present a RMOD, a web-based system for the identification of regulatory motifs and their properties in signaling networks. RMOD finds various network structures of regulatory motifs by compressing the signaling network and detecting the compressed forms of regulatory motifs. To apply it into a large-scale signaling network, it adopts a new subgraph search algorithm using a novel data structure called path-tree, which is a tree structure composed of isomorphic graphs of query regulatory motifs. This algorithm was evaluated using various sizes of signaling networks generated from the integration of various human signaling pathways and it showed that the speed and scalability of this algorithm outperforms those of other algorithms. RMOD includes interactive analysis and auxiliary tools that make it possible to manipulate the whole processes from building signaling network and query regulatory motifs to analyzing regulatory motifs with graphical illustration and summarized descriptions. As a result, RMOD provides an integrated view of the regulatory motifs and mechanism underlying their regulatory motif activities within the signaling network. RMOD is freely accessible online at the following URL: http://pks.kaist.ac.kr/rmod.

  16. Fast optical signal not detected in awake behaving monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Harsha; Vanduffel, Wim; Deng, Hong Ping; Ekstrom, Leeland; Boas, David A; Franceschini, Maria Angela

    2009-04-01

    While the ability of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to measure cerebral hemodynamic evoked responses (slow optical signal) is well established, its ability to measure non-invasively the 'fast optical signal' is still controversial. Here, we aim to determine the feasibility of performing NIRS measurements of the 'fast optical signal' or Event-Related Optical Signals (EROS) under optimal experimental conditions in awake behaving macaque monkeys. These monkeys were implanted with a 'recording well' to expose the dura above the primary visual cortex (V1). A custom-made optical probe was inserted and fixed into the well. The close proximity of the probe to the brain maximized the sensitivity to changes in optical properties in the cortex. Motion artifacts were minimized by physical restraint of the head. Full-field contrast-reversing checkerboard stimuli were presented to monkeys trained to perform a visual fixation task. In separate sessions, two NIRS systems (CW4 and ISS FD oximeter), which previously showed the ability to measure the fast signal in human, were used. In some sessions EEG was acquired simultaneously with the optical signal. The increased sensitivity to cortical optical changes with our experimental setup was quantified with 3D Monte Carlo simulations on a segmented MRI monkey head. Averages of thousands of stimuli in the same animal, or grand averages across the two animals and across repeated sessions, did not lead to detection of the fast optical signal using either amplitude or phase of the optical signal. Hemodynamic responses and visual evoked potentials were instead always detected with single trials or averages of a few stimuli. Based on these negative results, despite the optimal experimental conditions, we doubt the usefulness of non-invasive fast optical signal measurements with NIRS.

  17. An Alternative Method for Tilecal Signal Detection and Amplitude Estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Sotto-Maior Peralva, B; The ATLAS collaboration; Manhães de Andrade Filho, L; Manoel de Seixas, J

    2011-01-01

    The Barrel Hadronic calorimeter of ATLAS (Tilecal) is a detector used in the reconstruction of hadrons, jets, muons and missing transverse energy from the proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). It comprises 10,000 channels in four readout partitions and each calorimeter cell is made of two readout channels for redundancy. The energy deposited by the particles produced in the collisions is read out by the several readout channels and its value is estimated by an optimal filtering algorithm, which reconstructs the amplitude and the time of the digitized signal pulse sampled every 25 ns. This work deals with signal detection and amplitude estimation for the Tilecal under low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) conditions. It explores the applicability (at the cell level) of a Matched Filter (MF), which is known to be the optimal signal detector in terms of the SNR. Moreover, it investigates the impact of signal detection when summing both signals from the same cell before estimating the amplitude, ...

  18. Joint Iterative Carrier Synchronization and Signal Detection Employing Expectation Maximization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibar, Darko; de Carvalho, Luis Henrique Hecker; Estaran Tolosa, Jose Manuel

    2014-01-01

    . The algorithm is tested in a mixed line rate optical transmission scenario employing dual polarization 448 Gb/s 16-QAM signal surrounded by eight on-off keying channels in a 50 GHz grid. It is shown that joint carrier synchronization and data detection are more robust towards optical transmitter impairments...

  19. Detection of visual signals by rats: A computational model

    Science.gov (United States)

    We applied a neural network model of classical conditioning proposed by Schmajuk, Lam, and Gray (1996) to visual signal detection and discrimination tasks designed to assess sustained attention in rats (Bushnell, 1999). The model describes the animals’ expectation of receiving fo...

  20. Aiding the Detection of QRS Complex in ECG Signals by Detecting S Peaks Independently.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabherwal, Pooja; Singh, Latika; Agrawal, Monika

    2018-03-30

    In this paper, a novel algorithm for the accurate detection of QRS complex by combining the independent detection of R and S peaks, using fusion algorithm is proposed. R peak detection has been extensively studied and is being used to detect the QRS complex. Whereas, S peaks, which is also part of QRS complex can be independently detected to aid the detection of QRS complex. In this paper, we suggest a method to first estimate S peak from raw ECG signal and then use them to aid the detection of QRS complex. The amplitude of S peak in ECG signal is relatively weak than corresponding R peak, which is traditionally used for the detection of QRS complex, therefore, an appropriate digital filter is designed to enhance the S peaks. These enhanced S peaks are then detected by adaptive thresholding. The algorithm is validated on all the signals of MIT-BIH arrhythmia database and noise stress database taken from physionet.org. The algorithm performs reasonably well even for the signals highly corrupted by noise. The algorithm performance is confirmed by sensitivity and positive predictivity of 99.99% and the detection accuracy of 99.98% for QRS complex detection. The number of false positives and false negatives resulted while analysis has been drastically reduced to 80 and 42 against the 98 and 84 the best results reported so far.

  1. Automatic detection of service initiation signals used in bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian eLoth

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Recognising the intention of others is important in all social interactions, especially in the service domain. Enabling a bartending robot to serve customers is particularly challenging as the system has to recognise the social signals produced by customers and respond appropriately. Detecting whether a customer would like to order is essential for the service encounter to succeed. This detection is particularly challenging in a noisy environment with multiple customers. Thus, a bartending robot has to be able to distinguish between customers intending to order, chatting with friends or just passing by. In order to study which signals customers use to initiate a service interaction in a bar, we recorded real-life customer-staff interactions in several German bars. These recordings were used to generate initial hypotheses about the signals customers produce when bidding for the attention of bar staff. Two experiments using snapshots and short video sequences then tested the validity of these hypothesised candidate signals. The results revealed that bar staff responded to a set of two non-verbal signals: first, customers position themselves directly at the bar counter and, secondly, they look at a member of staff. Both signals were necessary and, when occurring together, sufficient. The participants also showed a strong agreement about when these cues occurred in the videos. Finally, a signal detection analysis revealed that ignoring a potential order is deemed worse than erroneously inviting customers to order. We conclude that a these two easily recognisable actions are sufficient for recognising the intention of customers to initiate a service interaction, but other actions such as gestures and speech were not necessary, and b the use of reaction time experiments using natural materials is feasible and provides ecologically valid results.

  2. Automatic detection of service initiation signals used in bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loth, Sebastian; Huth, Kerstin; De Ruiter, Jan P

    2013-01-01

    Recognizing the intention of others is important in all social interactions, especially in the service domain. Enabling a bartending robot to serve customers is particularly challenging as the system has to recognize the social signals produced by customers and respond appropriately. Detecting whether a customer would like to order is essential for the service encounter to succeed. This detection is particularly challenging in a noisy environment with multiple customers. Thus, a bartending robot has to be able to distinguish between customers intending to order, chatting with friends or just passing by. In order to study which signals customers use to initiate a service interaction in a bar, we recorded real-life customer-staff interactions in several German bars. These recordings were used to generate initial hypotheses about the signals customers produce when bidding for the attention of bar staff. Two experiments using snapshots and short video sequences then tested the validity of these hypothesized candidate signals. The results revealed that bar staff responded to a set of two non-verbal signals: first, customers position themselves directly at the bar counter and, secondly, they look at a member of staff. Both signals were necessary and, when occurring together, sufficient. The participants also showed a strong agreement about when these cues occurred in the videos. Finally, a signal detection analysis revealed that ignoring a potential order is deemed worse than erroneously inviting customers to order. We conclude that (a) these two easily recognizable actions are sufficient for recognizing the intention of customers to initiate a service interaction, but other actions such as gestures and speech were not necessary, and (b) the use of reaction time experiments using natural materials is feasible and provides ecologically valid results.

  3. Simulation of NMR signals through the Bloch equations; Simulação de sinais de RMN através das equações de Bloch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraes, Tiago Bueno, E-mail: tiagobuemoraes@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Física; Colnago, Luiz Alberto, E-mail: tiagobuemoraes@gmail.com [Embrapa Instrumentação, São Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this paper was to present a simple and fast way of simulating Nuclear Magnetic Resonance signals using the Bloch equations. These phenomenological equations describe the classical behavior of macroscopic magnetization and are easily simulated using rotation matrices. Many NMR pulse sequences can be simulated with this formalism, allowing a quantitative description of the influence of many experimental parameters. Finally, the paper presents simulations of conventional sequences such as Single Pulse, Inversion Recovery, Spin Echo and CPMG. (author)

  4. Arresting Consecutive Steps of a Photochromic Reaction: Studies of β-Thioxoketones Combining Laser Photolysis with NMR Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pietrzak, Mariusz; Dobkowski, Jacek; Gorski, Alexandr

    2014-01-01

    of the back reaction. These observations, along with the data obtained using electronic and vibrational spectroscopies for rare gas matrix-isolated samples, glasses, polymers, and solutions, as well as the results of quantum-chemical calculations, provide insight into the stepwise mechanism...... depends on the excitation wavelength. Analysis of the mechanisms of the photochromic processes indicates a state-specific precursor: chelated thione–enol form in the excited S2(ππ*) electronic state. The results show the potential of using laser photolysis coupled with NMR detection for the identification...

  5. Parametric roll resonance monitoring using signal-based detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galeazzi, Roberto; Blanke, Mogens; Falkenberg, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Extreme roll motion of ships can be caused by several phenomena, one of which is parametric roll resonance. Several incidents occurred unexpectedly around the millennium and caused vast fiscal losses on large container vessels. The phenomenon is now well understood and some consider parametric roll...... algorithms in real conditions, and to evaluate the frequency of parametric roll events on the selected vessels. Detection performance is scrutinised through the validation of the detected events using owners’ standard methods, and supported by available wave radar data. Further, a bivariate statistical...... analysis of the outcome of the signal-based detectors is performed to assess the real life false alarm probability. It is shown that detection robustness and very low false warning rates are obtained. The study concludes that small parametric roll events are occurring, and that the proposed signal...

  6. Sphenoid sinus carcinoma with isolated sixth nerve palsy detected by NMR-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimuta, Mari; Kunita, Masanori; Kawai, Kazushige; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi

    1985-01-01

    Early diagnosis of nasopharingeal malignancies is difficult and often fails to demonstrate any abnomality upon various types of radiological evaluation. A 38-year old male with chronic isolated abducens palsy showed no abnomality on radiological examinations including computed tomography (CT). He was examined with a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) scanner. His posterior wall of nasopharynx showed an increase from T 1 to T 2 . Transnasal biopsy of the sphenoid sinus confirmed the diagnosis of anaplastic carcinoma. (author)

  7. The Geometry of Signal Detection with Applications to Radar Signal Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongqiang Cheng

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The problem of hypothesis testing in the Neyman–Pearson formulation is considered from a geometric viewpoint. In particular, a concise geometric interpretation of deterministic and random signal detection in the philosophy of information geometry is presented. In such a framework, both hypotheses and detectors can be treated as geometrical objects on the statistical manifold of a parameterized family of probability distributions. Both the detector and detection performance are geometrically elucidated in terms of the Kullback–Leibler divergence. Compared to the likelihood ratio test, the geometric interpretation provides a consistent but more comprehensive means to understand and deal with signal detection problems in a rather convenient manner. Example of the geometry based detector in radar constant false alarm rate (CFAR detection is presented, which shows its advantage over the classical processing method.

  8. Validation of New Signal Detection Methods for Web Query Log Data Compared to Signal Detection Algorithms Used With FAERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colilla, Susan; Tov, Elad Yom; Zhang, Ling; Kurzinger, Marie-Laure; Tcherny-Lessenot, Stephanie; Penfornis, Catherine; Jen, Shang; Gonzalez, Danny S; Caubel, Patrick; Welsh, Susan; Juhaeri, Juhaeri

    2017-05-01

    Post-marketing drug surveillance is largely based on signals found in spontaneous reports from patients and healthcare providers. Rare adverse drug reactions and adverse events (AEs) that may develop after long-term exposure to a drug or from drug interactions may be missed. The US FDA and others have proposed that web-based data could be mined as a resource to detect latent signals associated with adverse drug reactions. Recently, a web-based search query method called a query log reaction score (QLRS) was developed to detect whether AEs associated with certain drugs could be found from search engine query data. In this study, we compare the performance of two other algorithms, the proportional query ratio (PQR) and the proportional query rate ratio (Q-PRR) against that of two reference signal-detection algorithms (SDAs) commonly used with the FDA AE Reporting System (FAERS) database. In summary, the web query methods have moderate sensitivity (80%) in detecting signals in web query data compared with reference SDAs in FAERS when the web query data are filtered, but the query metrics generate many false-positives and have low specificity compared with reference SDAs in FAERS. Future research is needed to find better refinements of query data and/or the metrics to improve the specificity of these web query log algorithms.

  9. QPSK Carrier Signal Detection Based on Double Duffing Oscillators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongfeng WU

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposed a new method for the detection of QPSK carrier signal that based on double duffing oscillator to solve the problems as high attenuation and strong noise interference in the QPSK carrier communication of low voltage power line. This method has making use of the different phase of QPSK carrier signal to stimulate the double duffing oscillators to enter different states and through the judgment of the state of the double duffing oscillators to detect the phase information that the QPSK carrier signal carries. At the same time, through the study of the system solutions of duffing oscillator, obtained the change rule of them, based on these rules, the paper proposed a discriminant algorithm that used the difference distribution, and this algorithm is characterized by small calculating amount and low error judgment rate. The numerical simulation and experimental test show that the double duffing oscillator method can detect the phase information of QPSK carrier signal in low voltage power line accurately with the low SNR environment.

  10. Differential detectability of polymorphic warning signals under varying light environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Bibiana; Rautiala, Petri; Mappes, Johanna

    2014-11-01

    The striking colour-pattern variation of some aposematic species is paradoxical because selection by predators is expected to favour signal uniformity. Although the mechanisms allowing for the maintenance of such variation are not well understood, possible explanations include both non-adaptive processes like drift and gene flow; and adaptive processes, such as an interaction between natural and sexual selection, spatial and temporal variation in selection, a link between behaviour or other fitness-related traits and phenotype, and predators' ability to generalise among different signals. Here we test whether warning-signal polymorphisms, such as that of dyeing poison frogs (Dendrobates tinctorius), could be maintained by differences in detectability among morphs. We did experiments in the wild using wax models with different aposematic colour patterns vs. cryptic ones, and examined the attack rates by wild predators over time. We also tested the detectability of different aposematic morphs by 'human predators' under different light environments. We found that cryptic frog models were attacked more than aposematic models, but there were no differences in bird attack rates towards the different aposematic morphs. However, we found that detectability of different morphs depends both on predator experience and light environment. We suggest that the interaction between differential detectability and signal efficiency among morphs in different light conditions could be a mechanism aiding to the maintenance of warning-signal polymorphisms. Our results highlight the importance of considering the light environment at which predators have their first encounters with aposematic prey for future studies on predation in the wild. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Early detection of structual changes in random signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, Yoshiteru; Yokota, Katsuhiro

    1981-01-01

    Early detection of structual changes in observed random signal is very important from the point of system diagnosis. In this paper, the following procedures are applied to this problem and the results are compared. (1) auto-regressive model to random signal to calculate the prediction error, i.e., the defference between observed and predicted values. (2) auto-regressive method to caluculate the sum of the prediction error. (3) a method is based on AIC (Akaike Information Criterion). Simulation is made of these procedures, indicating their merits and demerits as a diagostic tools. (author)

  12. Developmental hypothyroidism disrupts visual signal detection performance in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Masashi; Wada, Hiromi

    2013-03-15

    Thyroid hormones (THs) are essential for proper brain development in mammals. TH insufficiency during early development causes structural and functional abnormalities in brain leading to cognitive dysfunction. The specific effects of developmental hypothyroidism on attention have not been well characterized in animal models. The present study was conducted to characterize the effects of developmental hypothyroidism on attention in rats, and tested the hypothesis that the hypothyroidism has adverse impacts on attention by means of a visual signal detection task. Pregnant rats were exposed to the anti-thyroid drug, methimazole (0.02% w/v) via drinking water from gestational day 15 through postnatal day (PND) 21 to induce maternal and neonatal hypothyroidism. Male offspring served as subjects for the task started on PND 90. A light stimulus (500 ms, 250 ms or 50 ms) was presented in signal trials and not in blank trials. The offspring were required to discriminate these signal events, and subsequently press the correct lever. The correct response for signal and non-signal events was considered as hit and correct rejection, respectively. The hypothyroid offspring exhibited a decreased hit response for short signals (250 ms and 50 ms) which requires the higher attentional demand. The total number of lever responses during inter-trial interval (ITI) was also increased in the hypothyroid group. The number of lever responses was negatively correlated with a hit response at 50 ms, not at 250 ms. These results suggest that developmental hypothyroidism disrupts signal detection performance via impairment of visual attention and the altered lever response behavior. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Signal Detection and Monitoring Based on Longitudinal Healthcare Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Pigeot

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Post-marketing detection and surveillance of potential safety hazards are crucial tasks in pharmacovigilance. To uncover such safety risks, a wide set of techniques has been developed for spontaneous reporting data and, more recently, for longitudinal data. This paper gives a broad overview of the signal detection process and introduces some types of data sources typically used. The most commonly applied signal detection algorithms are presented, covering simple frequentistic methods like the proportional reporting rate or the reporting odds ratio, more advanced Bayesian techniques for spontaneous and longitudinal data, e.g., the Bayesian Confidence Propagation Neural Network or the Multi-item Gamma-Poisson Shrinker and methods developed for longitudinal data only, like the IC temporal pattern detection. Additionally, the problem of adjustment for underlying confounding is discussed and the most common strategies to automatically identify false-positive signals are addressed. A drug monitoring technique based on Wald’s sequential probability ratio test is presented. For each method, a real-life application is given, and a wide set of literature for further reading is referenced.

  14. Hall Sensor Output Signal Fault-Detection & Safety Implementation Logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee SangHun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently BLDC motors have been popular in various industrial applications and electric mobility. Recently BLDC motors have been popular in various industrial applications and electric mobility. In most brushless direct current (BLDC motor drives, there are three hall sensors as a position reference. Low resolution hall effect sensor is popularly used to estimate the rotor position because of its good comprehensive performance such as low cost, high reliability and sufficient precision. Various possible faults may happen in a hall effect sensor. This paper presents a fault-tolerant operation method that allows the control of a BLDC motor with one faulty hall sensor and presents the hall sensor output fault-tolerant control strategy. The situations considered are when the output from a hall sensor stays continuously at low or high levels, or a short-time pulse appears on a hall sensor signal. For fault detection, identification of a faulty signal and generating a substitute signal, this method only needs the information from the hall sensors. There are a few research work on hall effect sensor failure of BLDC motor. The conventional fault diagnosis methods are signal analysis, model based analysis and knowledge based analysis. The proposed method is signal based analysis using a compensation signal for reconfiguration and therefore fault diagnosis can be fast. The proposed method is validated to execute the simulation using PSIM.

  15. Enhancing the detection of edges and non-differentiable points in an NMR spectrum using delayed-acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhaoyuan; Walls, Jamie D.

    2018-02-01

    Delayed-acquisition, which is a common technique for improving spectral resolution in Fourier transform based spectroscopies, typically relies upon differences in T2 relaxation rates that are often due to underlying differences in dynamics and/or complexities of the spin systems being studied. After an acquisition delay, the broad signals from fast T2 -relaxing species are more suppressed relative to the sharp signals from slow T2 -relaxing species. In this paper, an alternative source of differential "dephasing" under delayed-acquisition is demonstrated that is based solely upon the mathematical properties of the line shape and is independent of the underlying spin dynamics and/or complexity. Signals associated with frequencies where the line shape either changes sharply and/or is non-differentiable at some finite order dephase at a much slower rate than those signals associated with frequencies where the line shape is smooth. Experiments employing delayed-acquisition to study interfaces in biphasic samples, to measure spatially-dependent longitudinal relaxation, and to highlight sharp features in NMR spectra are presented.

  16. β-Detected NMR Search for Magnetic Phase Separation in Epitaxial GaAs:Mn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Q.; Chow, K. H.; Miller, R. I.; Fan, I.; Hossain, M. D.; Kiefl, R. F.; Morris, G. D.; Kreitzman, S. R.; Levy, C. D. P.; Parolin, T. J.; Pearson, M. R.; Salman, Z.; Saadaoui, H.; Smadella, M.; Wang, D.; Yu, K. M.; Liu, X.; Furdyna, J. K.; MacFarlane, W. A.

    To test for the microscopic magnetic phase separation in the dilute magnetic semiconductor Ga1-xMnxAs sug-gested by low energy muon spin rotation measurements[1], we present a detailed analysis of the amplitudes of the 8Li β-detected nuclear magnetic resonance in an epitaxially grown thin film of x = 5.4% Mn doped GaAs on a semi-insulating GaAs substrate with magnetic transition temperature TC =72 K. The spectrum at 100 K corresponds to 73% of the full room temperature amplitude, and at 60 K to about 62%. The 11% loss of signal through the magnetic tran-sition is much smaller than that ∼ 50% found by low energy μSR[1], and may be entirely due to an amplitude change intrinsic to GaAs. This lack of evidence for phase separation is, however, consistent with the full volume fraction magnetism found by a second low energy μSR measurement on a different sample using weak transverse field[2].

  17. Improving the performance of cardiac abnormality detection from PCG signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujit, N. R.; Kumar, C. Santhosh; Rajesh, C. B.

    2016-03-01

    The Phonocardiogram (PCG) signal contains important information about the condition of heart. Using PCG signal analysis prior recognition of coronary illness can be done. In this work, we developed a biomedical system for the detection of abnormality in heart and methods to enhance the performance of the system using SMOTE and AdaBoost technique have been presented. Time and frequency domain features extracted from the PCG signal is input to the system. The back-end classifier to the system developed is Decision Tree using CART (Classification and Regression Tree), with an overall classification accuracy of 78.33% and sensitivity (alarm accuracy) of 40%. Here sensitivity implies the precision obtained from classifying the abnormal heart sound, which is an essential parameter for a system. We further improve the performance of baseline system using SMOTE and AdaBoost algorithm. The proposed approach outperforms the baseline system by an absolute improvement in overall accuracy of 5% and sensitivity of 44.92%.

  18. Sound Event Detection for Music Signals Using Gaussian Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo A. Alvarado-Durán

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a new methodology for detecting sound events in music signals using Gaussian Processes. Our method firstly takes a time-frequency representation, i.e. the spectrogram, of the input audio signal. Secondly the spectrogram dimension is reduced translating the linear Hertz frequency scale into the logarithmic Mel frequency scale using a triangular filter bank. Finally every short-time spectrum, i.e. every Mel spectrogram column, is classified as “Event” or “Not Event” by a Gaussian Processes Classifier. We compare our method with other event detection techniques widely used. To do so, we use MATLAB® to program each technique and test them using two datasets of music with different levels of complexity. Results show that the new methodology outperforms the standard approaches, getting an improvement by about 1.66 % on the dataset one and 0.45 % on the dataset two in terms of F-measure.

  19. Confidence Measurement in the Light of Signal Detection Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien eMassoni

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We compare three alternative methods for eliciting retrospective confidence in the context of a simple perceptual task: the Simple Confidence Rating (a direct report on a numerical scale, the Quadratic Scoring Rule (a post-wagering procedure and the Matching Probability (a generalization of the no-loss gambling method. We systematically compare the results obtained with these three rules to the theoretical confidence levels that can be inferred from performance in the perceptual task using Signal Detection Theory. We find that the Matching Probability provides better results in that respect. We conclude that Matching Probability is particularly well suited for studies of confidence that use Signal Detection Theory as a theoretical framework.

  20. Interpreting Dust Impact Signals Detected by the STEREO Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, E.; Sternovsky, Z.; Malaspina, D. M.

    2017-12-01

    There is no comprehensive understanding yet of how dust impacts on spacecraft (SC) generate signals detected by antenna instruments. The high sensitivity of the S/WAVES instrument and the large number and high diversity of dust impacts detected make the STEREO mission particularly well suited for a closer investigation. A floating perturbation model (FPP) was recently proposed to explain the characteristic shape of dust impact signals with an overshoot. The FPP model posits that the overshoot is due to the different discharge time constant of the SC and the individual antennas. Kinetic simulations are performed to demonstrate that, contrary to common belief, antennas are inefficient collectors of charged particles from impact plasmas. The collection efficiency is small, only 0.1-1%, varying weakly with the bias potential between the antenna and the SC, and more strongly with impact location. The low recollection efficiencies and an analysis of the shapes and scaling of typical and atypical signals recorded by S/WAVES suggest that, besides the mechanism described by the FPP model, there is another, possibly stronger mechanism that is responsible for generating the characteristic overshoot for most dust impact signals observed by STEREO.

  1. Complexity of visual icons studied via signal detection theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repperger, Daniel W; Aleva, Denise L; Thomas, Gina; Miller, Janet E; Fullenkamp, Stephen C

    2007-08-01

    Two investigations on how humans perceive information from visually rendered complex objects, such as military icons (glyphs) were conducted. A signal detection theory framework was employed to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of human subject performance. The 6 adults tested showed that as complexity increased, their accuracy in performance decreased. Study 1 showed that complex dimensions (features) could not be assigned arbitrarily. Study 2 developed a rank ordering for features of an iconic object.

  2. Optimal BLS: Optimizing transit-signal detection for Keplerian dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofir, Aviv

    2015-08-01

    Transit surveys, both ground- and space-based, have already accumulated a large number of light curves that span several years. We optimize the search for transit signals for both detection and computational efficiencies by assuming that the searched systems can be described by Keplerian, and propagating the effects of different system parameters to the detection parameters. Importnantly, we mainly consider the information content of the transit signal and not any specific algorithm - and use BLS (Kovács, Zucker, & Mazeh 2002) just as a specific example.We show that the frequency information content of the light curve is primarily determined by the duty cycle of the transit signal, and thus the optimal frequency sampling is found to be cubic and not linear. Further optimization is achieved by considering duty-cycle dependent binning of the phased light curve. By using the (standard) BLS, one is either fairly insensitive to long-period planets or less sensitive to short-period planets and computationally slower by a significant factor of ~330 (for a 3 yr long dataset). We also show how the physical system parameters, such as the host star's size and mass, directly affect transit detection. This understanding can then be used to optimize the search for every star individually.By considering Keplerian dynamics explicitly rather than implicitly one can optimally search the transit signal parameter space. The presented Optimal BLS enhances the detectability of both very short and very long period planets, while allowing such searches to be done with much reduced resources and time. The Matlab/Octave source code for Optimal BLS is made available.

  3. Proton-detected MAS NMR experiments based on dipolar transfers for backbone assignment of highly deuterated proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevelkov, Veniamin; Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2014-05-01

    Proton-detected solid-state NMR was applied to a highly deuterated insoluble, non-crystalline biological assembly, the Salmonella typhimurium type iii secretion system (T3SS) needle. Spectra of very high resolution and sensitivity were obtained at a low protonation level of 10-20% at exchangeable amide positions. We developed efficient experimental protocols for resonance assignment tailored for this system and the employed experimental conditions. Using exclusively dipolar-based interspin magnetization transfers, we recorded two sets of 3D spectra allowing for an almost complete backbone resonance assignment of the needle subunit PrgI. The additional information provided by the well-resolved proton dimension revealed the presence of two sets of resonances in the N-terminal helix of PrgI, while in previous studies employing 13C detection only a single set of resonances was observed.

  4. Target-specific NMR detection of protein-ligand interactions with antibody-relayed 15N-group selective STD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetényi, Anasztázia; Hegedűs, Zsófia; Fajka-Boja, Roberta; Monostori, Éva; Kövér, Katalin E; Martinek, Tamás A

    2016-12-01

    Fragment-based drug design has been successfully applied to challenging targets where the detection of the weak protein-ligand interactions is a key element. 1 H saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy is a powerful technique for this work but it requires pure homogeneous proteins as targets. Monoclonal antibody (mAb)-relayed 15 N-GS STD spectroscopy has been developed to resolve the problem of protein mixtures and impure proteins. A 15 N-labelled target-specific mAb is selectively irradiated and the saturation is relayed through the target to the ligand. Tests on the anti-Gal-1 mAb/Gal-1/lactose system showed that the approach is experimentally feasible in a reasonable time frame. This method allows detection and identification of binding molecules directly from a protein mixture in a multicomponent system.

  5. Electronic characterization of lithographically patterned microcoils for high sensitivity NMR detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demas, Vasiliki; Bernhardt, Anthony; Malba, Vince; Adams, Kristl L; Evans, Lee; Harvey, Christopher; Maxwell, Robert S; Herberg, Julie L

    2009-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) offers a non-destructive, powerful, structure-specific analytical method for the identification of chemical and biological systems. The use of radio frequency (RF) microcoils has been shown to increase the sensitivity in mass-limited samples. Recent advances in micro-receiver technology have further demonstrated a substantial increase in mass sensitivity [D.L. Olson, T.L. Peck, A.G. Webb, R.L. Magin, J.V. Sweedler, High-resolution microcoil H-1-NMR for mass-limited, nanoliter-volume samples, Science 270 (5244) (1995) 1967-1970]. Lithographic methods for producing solenoid microcoils possess a level of flexibility and reproducibility that exceeds previous production methods, such as hand winding microcoils. This paper presents electrical characterizations of RF microcoils produced by a unique laser lithography system that can pattern three dimensional surfaces and compares calculated and experimental results to those for wire wound RF microcoils. We show that existing optimization conditions for RF coil design still hold true for RF microcoils produced by lithography. Current lithographic microcoils show somewhat inferior performance to wire wound RF microcoils due to limitations in the existing electroplating technique. In principle, however, when the pitch of the RF microcoil is less than 100mum lithographic coils should show comparable performance to wire wound coils. In the cases of larger pitch, wire cross sections can be significantly larger and resistances lower than microfabricated conductors.

  6. Improving Signal Detection using Allan and Theo Variances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Andrew; Broering, Mark; Korsch, Wolfgang

    2017-09-01

    Precision measurements often deal with small signals buried within electronic noise. Extracting these signals can be enhanced through digital signal processing. Improving these techniques provide signal to noise ratios. Studies presently performed at the University of Kentucky are utilizing the electro-optic Kerr effect to understand cell charging effects within ultra-cold neutron storage cells. This work is relevant for the neutron electric dipole moment (nEDM) experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These investigations, and future investigations in general, will benefit from the illustrated improved analysis techniques. This project will showcase various methods for determining the optimum duration that data should be gathered for. Typically, extending the measuring time of an experimental run reduces the averaged noise. However, experiments also encounter drift due to fluctuations which mitigate the benefits of extended data gathering. Through comparing FFT averaging techniques, along with Allan and Theo variance measurements, quantifiable differences in signal detection will be presented. This research is supported by DOE Grants: DE-FG02-99ER411001, DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  7. SIDRA: a blind algorithm for signal detection in photometric surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mislis, D.; Bachelet, E.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bramich, D. M.; Parley, N.

    2016-01-01

    We present the Signal Detection using Random-Forest Algorithm (SIDRA). SIDRA is a detection and classification algorithm based on the Machine Learning technique (Random Forest). The goal of this paper is to show the power of SIDRA for quick and accurate signal detection and classification. We first diagnose the power of the method with simulated light curves and try it on a subset of the Kepler space mission catalogue. We use five classes of simulated light curves (CONSTANT, TRANSIT, VARIABLE, MLENS and EB for constant light curves, transiting exoplanet, variable, microlensing events and eclipsing binaries, respectively) to analyse the power of the method. The algorithm uses four features in order to classify the light curves. The training sample contains 5000 light curves (1000 from each class) and 50 000 random light curves for testing. The total SIDRA success ratio is ≥90 per cent. Furthermore, the success ratio reaches 95-100 per cent for the CONSTANT, VARIABLE, EB and MLENS classes and 92 per cent for the TRANSIT class with a decision probability of 60 per cent. Because the TRANSIT class is the one which fails the most, we run a simultaneous fit using SIDRA and a Box Least Square (BLS)-based algorithm for searching for transiting exoplanets. As a result, our algorithm detects 7.5 per cent more planets than a classic BLS algorithm, with better results for lower signal-to-noise light curves. SIDRA succeeds to catch 98 per cent of the planet candidates in the Kepler sample and fails for 7 per cent of the false alarms subset. SIDRA promises to be useful for developing a detection algorithm and/or classifier for large photometric surveys such as TESS and PLATO exoplanet future space missions.

  8. Integrated Heterodyne MOEMS for detection of low intensity signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elman, Noel M.; Krylov, Slava; Sternheim, Marek; Shacham-Diamand, Yosi

    2006-01-01

    A novel MEMS-based modulation scheme is presented as a method to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of silicon photodiodes adapted for the detection of light-emitting bio-reporter signals. Photodiodes are an attractive photodetector choice because they are VLSI compatible, easily miniaturized, highly scalable, and inexpensive. Silicon photodiodes exhibit a wide response range extending from the ultraviolet (UV) to the near infrared (IR) part of the spectrum, which in principle is appropriate for sensing low intensity optical signals. Silicon photodiodes, however, exhibit limited sensitivity to optical dc signals, as the magnitude of the low frequency noise is comparable to signal magnitude. Optical modulation prior to photodetection overcomes the inherent low frequency noise of photodetectors and system detection circuits. The enhancement scheme is based on a design of high frequency optical modulators that operate in the 1-2 kHz range in order to overcome the low frequency spectral noise. We have denominated this MEMS-based scheme Integrated Heterodyne Optical System (IHOS). The modulation efficiency of the proposed architecture can reach up to 50 percent. In order to implement the MOEMS optical modulators, a new two-mask fabrication process was developed that combines high-aspect ratio and low aspect ratio structures at the same device layer (aspect ratio is defined as a ratio between the structure height to its width). Long stroke electrostatic combdrive actuators integrated with folded flexures (high aspect-ratio) were fabricated together to drive large aperture shutters (low aspect ratio). We have denominated this process MASIS (Multiple Aspect Ratio Structural Integration). Under resonant excitation at approximately 1 kHz, MOEMS modulators demonstrated maximum displacement of about 40 microns at an actuation voltage of 15 V peak in air, and 3.5 V peak in vacuum (8 mTorr). Results of analytical solutions and finite element analysis (FEA) simulations are

  9. Tunneling splitting of magnetic levels in Fe8 detected by 1H NMR cross relaxation

    OpenAIRE

    Furukawa, Y.; Aizawa, K.; Kumagai, K.; Ullu, R.; Lascialfari, A.; Borsa, F.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of proton NMR and the spin lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 in the octanuclear iron (III) cluster [Fe8(N3C6H15)6O2(OH)12][Br8 9H2O], in short Fe8, have been performed at 1.5 K in a powder sample aligned along the main anisotropy z axis, as a function of a transverse magnetic field (i.e., perpendicular to the main easy axis z). A big enhancement of 1/T1 is observed over a wide range of fields (2.5-5 T), which can be attributed to the tunneling dynamics; in fact, when the tunneling spl...

  10. Efficient method for events detection in phonocardiographic signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Alajarin, Juan; Ruiz-Merino, Ramon

    2005-06-01

    The auscultation of the heart is still the first basic analysis tool used to evaluate the functional state of the heart, as well as the first indicator used to submit the patient to a cardiologist. In order to improve the diagnosis capabilities of auscultation, signal processing algorithms are currently being developed to assist the physician at primary care centers for adult and pediatric population. A basic task for the diagnosis from the phonocardiogram is to detect the events (main and additional sounds, murmurs and clicks) present in the cardiac cycle. This is usually made by applying a threshold and detecting the events that are bigger than the threshold. However, this method usually does not allow the detection of the main sounds when additional sounds and murmurs exist, or it may join several events into a unique one. In this paper we present a reliable method to detect the events present in the phonocardiogram, even in the presence of heart murmurs or additional sounds. The method detects relative maxima peaks in the amplitude envelope of the phonocardiogram, and computes a set of parameters associated with each event. Finally, a set of characteristics is extracted from each event to aid in the identification of the events. Besides, the morphology of the murmurs is also detected, which aids in the differentiation of different diseases that can occur in the same temporal localization. The algorithms have been applied to real normal heart sounds and murmurs, achieving satisfactory results.

  11. A Signal Detection Theory Approach to Evaluating Oculometer Data Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorella, Kara; Lynn, William, III; Barry, John S.; Kelly, Lon; Shih, Ming-Yun

    2013-01-01

    Currently, data quality is described in terms of spatial and temporal accuracy and precision [Holmqvist et al. in press]. While this approach provides precise errors in pixels, or visual angle, often experiments are more concerned with whether subjects'points of gaze can be said to be reliable with respect to experimentally-relevant areas of interest. This paper proposes a method to characterize oculometer data quality using Signal Detection Theory (SDT) [Marcum 1947]. SDT classification results in four cases: Hit (correct report of a signal), Miss (failure to report a ), False Alarm (a signal falsely reported), Correct Reject (absence of a signal correctly reported). A technique is proposed where subjects' are directed to look at points in and outside of an AOI, and the resulting Points of Gaze (POG) are classified as Hits (points known to be internal to an AOI are classified as such), Misses (AOI points are not indicated as such), False Alarms (points external to AOIs are indicated as in the AOI), or Correct Rejects (points external to the AOI are indicated as such). SDT metrics describe performance in terms of discriminability, sensitivity, and specificity. This paper presentation will provide the procedure for conducting this assessment and an example of data collected for AOIs in a simulated flightdeck environment.

  12. Irrigation Signals Detected From SMAP Soil Moisture Retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawston, Patricia M.; Santanello, Joseph A.; Kumar, Sujay V.

    2017-12-01

    Irrigation can influence weather and climate, but the magnitude, timing, and spatial extent of irrigation are poorly represented in models, as are the resulting impacts of irrigation on the coupled land-atmosphere system. One way to improve irrigation representation in models is to assimilate soil moisture observations that reflect an irrigation signal to improve model states. Satellite remote sensing is a promising avenue for obtaining these needed observations on a routine basis, but to date, irrigation detection in passive microwave satellites has proven difficult. In this study, results show that the new enhanced soil moisture product from the Soil Moisture Active Passive satellite is able to capture irrigation signals over three semiarid regions in the western United States. This marks an advancement in Earth-observing satellite skill and the ability to monitor human impacts on the water cycle.

  13. Acoustic Aspects of Photoacoustic Signal Generation and Detection in Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklós, A.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper photoacoustic signal generation and detection in gases is investigated and discussed from the standpoint of acoustics. Four topics are considered: the effect of the absorption-desorption process of modulated and pulsed light on the heat power density released in the gas; the generation of the primary sound by the released heat in an unbounded medium; the excitation of an acoustic resonator by the primary sound; and finally, the generation of the measurable PA signal by a microphone. When light is absorbed by a molecule and the excess energy is relaxed by collisions with the surrounding molecules, the average kinetic energy, thus also the temperature of an ensemble of molecules (called "particle" in acoustics) will increase. In other words heat energy is added to the energy of the particle. The rate of the energy transfer is characterized by the heat power density. A simple two-level model of absorption-desorption is applied for describing the heat power generation process for modulated and pulsed illumination. Sound generation by a laser beam in an unbounded medium is discussed by means of the Green's function technique. It is shown that the duration of the generated sound pulse depends mostly on beam geometry. A photoacoustic signal is mostly detected in a photoacoustic cell composed of acoustic resonators, buffers, filters, etc. It is not easy to interpret the measured PA signal in such a complicated acoustic system. The acoustic response of a PA detector to different kinds of excitations (modulated cw, pulsed, periodic pulse train) is discussed. It is shown that acoustic resonators respond very differently to modulated cw excitation and to excitation by a pulse train. The microphone for detecting the PA signal is also a part of the acoustic system; its properties have to be taken into account by the design of a PA detector. The moving membrane of the microphone absorbs acoustic energy; thus, it may influence the resonance frequency and

  14. Correntropy measures to detect daytime sleepiness from EEG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melia, Umberto; Guaita, Marc; Vallverdú, Montserrat; Montserrat, Josep M; Vilaseca, Isabel; Salamero, Manel; Gaig, Carles; Caminal, Pere; Santamaria, Joan

    2014-10-01

    Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is one of the main symptoms of several sleep related disorders and has a great impact on patients' lives. While many studies have been carried out in order to assess daytime sleepiness, automatic EDS detection still remains an open problem. In this work, a novel approach to this issue based on correntropy function analysis of EEG signals was proposed in order to detect patients suffering from EDS. Multichannel EEG signals were recorded during five Maintenance of Wakefulness Tests (MWT) and Multiple Sleep Latency Tests (MSLT) alternated throughout the day for patients suffering from sleep disordered breathing (SDB). A group of 20 patients with EDS was compared with a group of 20 patients without daytime sleepiness (WDS), by analyzing 60 s EEG windows in a waking state. Measures obtained from the cross-correntropy function (CCORR) and auto-correntropy function (ACORR) were calculated in the EEG frequency bands: δ, 0.1-4 Hz; θ, 4-8 Hz; α, 8-12 Hz; β, 12-30 Hz; total band TB, 0.1-45 Hz. These functions permitted the quantification of complex signal properties and the non-linear couplings between different areas of the scalp. Statistical differences between EDS and WDS groups were mainly found in the β band during MSLT events (p-value < 0.0001). The WDS group presented more complexity in the occipital zone than the EDS group, while a stronger nonlinear coupling between the occipital and frontal regions was detected in EDS patients than in the WDS group. At best, ACORR and CCORR measures yielded sensitivity and specificity above 80% and the area under ROC curve (AUC) was above 0.85 in classifying EDS and WDS patients. These performances represent an improvement with respect to classical EEG indices applied in the same database (sensitivity and specificity were never above 80% and AUC was under 0.75).

  15. Confidence measurement in the light of signal detection theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massoni, Sébastien; Gajdos, Thibault; Vergnaud, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    We compare three alternative methods for eliciting retrospective confidence in the context of a simple perceptual task: the Simple Confidence Rating (a direct report on a numerical scale), the Quadratic Scoring Rule (a post-wagering procedure), and the Matching Probability (MP; a generalization of the no-loss gambling method). We systematically compare the results obtained with these three rules to the theoretical confidence levels that can be inferred from performance in the perceptual task using Signal Detection Theory (SDT). We find that the MP provides better results in that respect. We conclude that MP is particularly well suited for studies of confidence that use SDT as a theoretical framework. PMID:25566135

  16. Stochastic Resonance in Signal Detection and Human Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-05

    area of research which has received little attention . It remains as an important research topic for the Phase II effort. In Chapter 2, a novel... hTa + fI h(w)p, (w)dw = hTX-lb + fJh(w)pw(w)dw [h(w-) h(w+)] f h(w)p+(w)dw W+ w-ww, wd - [w+h(Twý)-w(w+) h(w+) - h(w-) I[ -, I Pw(w)dw + fh(w)p,(w)dw...additive SR noise. Nonparametric detectors have received considerable attention in signal detection problems [Kassam 1980]. An important feature of such

  17. Modeling inter-signal arrival times for accurate detection of CAN bus signal injection attacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Michael Roy [ORNL; Bridges, Robert A [ORNL; Combs, Frank L [ORNL; Starr, Michael S [ORNL; Prowell, Stacy J [ORNL

    2017-01-01

    Modern vehicles rely on hundreds of on-board electronic control units (ECUs) communicating over in-vehicle networks. As external interfaces to the car control networks (such as the on-board diagnostic (OBD) port, auxiliary media ports, etc.) become common, and vehicle-to-vehicle / vehicle-to-infrastructure technology is in the near future, the attack surface for vehicles grows, exposing control networks to potentially life-critical attacks. This paper addresses the need for securing the CAN bus by detecting anomalous traffic patterns via unusual refresh rates of certain commands. While previous works have identified signal frequency as an important feature for CAN bus intrusion detection, this paper provides the first such algorithm with experiments on five attack scenarios. Our data-driven anomaly detection algorithm requires only five seconds of training time (on normal data) and achieves true positive / false discovery rates of 0.9998/0.00298, respectively (micro-averaged across the five experimental tests).

  18. Leak detection in pipelines through spectral analysis of pressure signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza A.L.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The development and test of a technique for leak detection in pipelines is presented. The technique is based on the spectral analysis of pressure signals measured in pipeline sections where the formation of stationary waves is favoured, allowing leakage detection during the start/stop of pumps. Experimental tests were performed in a 1250 m long pipeline for various operational conditions of the pipeline (liquid flow rate and leakage configuration. Pressure transients were obtained by four transducers connected to a PC computer. The obtained results show that the spectral analysis of pressure transients, together with the knowledge of reflection points provide a simple and efficient way of identifying leaks during the start/stop of pumps in pipelines.

  19. Tunneling splitting of magnetic levels in Fe8 detected by 1H NMR cross relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Y.; Aizawa, K.; Kumagai, K.; Ullu, R.; Lascialfari, A.; Borsa, F.

    2003-05-01

    Measurements of proton NMR and the spin lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 in the octanuclear iron (III) cluster [Fe8(N3C6H15)6O2(OH)12]ṡ[Br8ṡ9H2O], in short Fe8, have been performed at 1.5 K in a powder sample aligned along the main anisotropy z axis, as a function of a transverse magnetic field (i.e., perpendicular to the main easy axis z). A big enhancement of 1/T1 is observed over a wide range of fields (2.5-5 T), which can be attributed to the tunneling dynamics; in fact, when the tunneling splitting of the pairwise degenerate m=±10 states of the Fe8 molecule becomes equal to the proton Larmor frequency a very effective spin lattice relaxation channel for the nuclei is opened. The experimental results are explained satisfactorily by considering the distribution of tunneling splitting resulting from the distribution of the angles in the hard xy plane for the aligned powder, and the results of the direct diagonalization of the model Hamiltonian.

  20. Recent developments in combining LODESR imaging with proton NMR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholson, I.; Robb, F.J.L.; McCallum, S.J.; Koptioug, A.; Lurie, D.J. [Department of Biomedical Physics and Bioengineering, University of Aberdeen, Foresterhill, Aberdeen AB25 2ZD (United Kingdom)

    1998-07-01

    We have designed and constructed RF coil assemblies and the appropriate instrumentation for combining proton NMR imaging with LODESR imaging. This has enabled us to collect sequential images from the same sample using both methods. The coil assembly consists of a crossed ellipse coil for LODESR and proton NMR signal detection and a saddle coil for excitation of the ESR resonance. Images have been collected of phantoms containing copper sulphate and Tempol solutions. NMR images were collected (4.3 min) and within 30 s LODESR data collection started (collection time 2.5 min). Only the Tempol solutions are visible in the LODESR images. (author)

  1. How to detect a cuckoo egg : A signal-detection theory model for recognition and learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez-Girones, MA; Lotem, A

    This article presents a model of egg rejection in cases of brood parasitism. The model is developed in three stages in the framework of signal-detection theory. We first assume that the behavior of host females is adapted to the relevant parameters concerning the appearance of the eggs they lay. In

  2. A deafening flash! Visual interference of auditory signal detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassnidge, Christopher; Cecconi Marcotti, Claudia; Freeman, Elliot

    2017-03-01

    In some people, visual stimulation evokes auditory sensations. How prevalent and how perceptually real is this? 22% of our neurotypical adult participants responded 'Yes' when asked whether they heard faint sounds accompanying flash stimuli, and showed significantly better ability to discriminate visual 'Morse-code' sequences. This benefit might arise from an ability to recode visual signals as sounds, thus taking advantage of superior temporal acuity of audition. In support of this, those who showed better visual relative to auditory sequence discrimination also had poorer auditory detection in the presence of uninformative visual flashes, though this was independent of awareness of visually-evoked sounds. Thus a visually-evoked auditory representation may occur subliminally and disrupt detection of real auditory signals. The frequent natural correlation between visual and auditory stimuli might explain the surprising prevalence of this phenomenon. Overall, our results suggest that learned correspondences between strongly correlated modalities may provide a precursor for some synaesthetic abilities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Suggestibility and signal detection performance in hallucination-prone students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alganami, Fatimah; Varese, Filippo; Wagstaff, Graham F; Bentall, Richard P

    2017-03-01

    Auditory hallucinations are associated with signal detection biases. We examine the extent to which suggestions influence performance on a signal detection task (SDT) in highly hallucination-prone and low hallucination-prone students. We also explore the relationship between trait suggestibility, dissociation and hallucination proneness. In two experiments, students completed on-line measures of hallucination proneness (the revised Launay-Slade Hallucination Scale; LSHS-R), trait suggestibility (Inventory of Suggestibility) and dissociation (Dissociative Experiences Scale-II). Students in the upper and lower tertiles of the LSHS-R performed an auditory SDT. Prior to the task, suggestions were made pertaining to the number of expected targets (Experiment 1, N = 60: high vs. low suggestions; Experiment 2, N = 62, no suggestion vs. high suggestion vs. no voice suggestion). Correlational and regression analyses indicated that trait suggestibility and dissociation predicted hallucination proneness. Highly hallucination-prone students showed a higher SDT bias in both studies. In Experiment 1, both bias scores were significantly affected by suggestions to the same degree. In Experiment 2, highly hallucination-prone students were more reactive to the high suggestion condition than the controls. Suggestions may affect source-monitoring judgments, and this effect may be greater in those who have a predisposition towards hallucinatory experiences.

  4. Hyperpolarized NMR Probes for Biological Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Meier

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, the development of nuclear spin polarization enhanced (hyperpolarized molecular probes has opened up new opportunities for studying the inner workings of living cells in real time. The hyperpolarized probes are produced ex situ, introduced into biological systems and detected with high sensitivity and contrast against background signals using high resolution NMR spectroscopy. A variety of natural, derivatized and designed hyperpolarized probes has emerged for diverse biological studies including assays of intracellular reaction progression, pathway kinetics, probe uptake and export, pH, redox state, reactive oxygen species, ion concentrations, drug efficacy or oncogenic signaling. These probes are readily used directly under natural conditions in biofluids and are often directly developed and optimized for cellular assays, thus leaving little doubt about their specificity and utility under biologically relevant conditions. Hyperpolarized molecular probes for biological NMR spectroscopy enable the unbiased detection of complex processes by virtue of the high spectral resolution, structural specificity and quantifiability of NMR signals. Here, we provide a survey of strategies used for the selection, design and use of hyperpolarized NMR probes in biological assays, and describe current limitations and developments.

  5. PVT Degradation Studies: NMR Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Herman M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kouzes, Richard T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-06-06

    Under certain environmental conditions, polyvinyl toluene (PVT) plastic scintillator has been observed to undergo internal fogging. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to elucidate the state of water inside the PVT. The deuterium NMR results show that water absorbed by PVT under warm, humid conditions enters several distinct environments, and when the PVT is transferred from incubation to ambient temperature and humidity the water is lost on a time scale of a few hours from these samples. Most of the deuterium NMR peaks can be assigned to bulk liquid water, but almost 35% of the detected signal intensity is contained in a resonance that resembles spectra of water contained in nanometer-scale pores in mesoporous carbon.

  6. Using the PLUM procedure of SPSS to fit unequal variance and generalized signal detection models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCarlo, Lawrence T

    2003-02-01

    The recent addition of aprocedure in SPSS for the analysis of ordinal regression models offers a simple means for researchers to fit the unequal variance normal signal detection model and other extended signal detection models. The present article shows how to implement the analysis and how to interpret the SPSS output. Examples of fitting the unequal variance normal model and other generalized signal detection models are given. The approach offers a convenient means for applying signal detection theory to a variety of research.

  7. Hydrogen bond strength in membrane proteins probed by time-resolved 1 H-detected solid-state NMR and MD simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medeiros-silva, João; Jekhmane, Miranda; Baldus, Marc; Weingarth, Markus

    2017-01-01

    1H-detected solid-state NMR in combination with 1H/2D exchange steps allows for the direct identification of very strong hydrogen bonds in membrane proteins. On the example of the membrane-embedded potassium channel KcsA, we quantify the longevity of such very strong hydrogen bonds by combining

  8. Development of a triple hyphenated HPLC-radical scavenging detection-DAD-SPE-NMR system for the rapid identification of antioxidants in complex plant extracts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pukalskas, A.; Beek, van T.A.; Waard, de P.

    2005-01-01

    A rapid method for the simultaneous detection and identification of radical scavenging compounds in plant extracts was developed by combining an HPLC with on-line radical scavenging using DPPH as a model radical and an HPLC¿DAD¿SPE¿NMR system. Using this method a commercial rosemary extract was

  9. Sensitivity of Quantitative Signal Detection in Regards to Pharmacological Neuroenhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian Gahr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacological neuroenhancement (PNE is a form of abuse and has not yet been addressed by methods of pharmacovigilance. In the present study, we tested if quantitative signal detection may be sensitive in regards to PNE. We evaluated the risk of drug abuse and dependence (DAAD related to substances that are known to be used for PNE and divided this group into agents with (methylphenidate and without a known abuse potential outside the field of PNE (atomoxetine, modafinil, acetylcholine esterase inhibitors, and memantine. Reporting odds ratios (RORs were calculated using a case/non-case approach based on global and country-specific drug safety data from the Uppsala Monitoring Centre (UMC. Both control substances (diazepam and lorazepam and methylphenidate were statistically associated with DAAD in all datasets (except methylphenidate in Italy. Modafinil was associated with DAAD in the total dataset (ROR, 2.7 (95% confidence interval (CI, 2.2–3.3, Germany (ROR, 4.6 (95% CI, 1.8–11.5, and the USA (ROR, 2.0 (95% CI, 1.6–2.5. Atomoxetine was associated with DAAD in the total dataset (ROR, 1.3 (95% CI, 1.2–1.5 and in the UK (ROR, 3.3 (95% CI, 1.8–6.1. Apart from memantine, which was associated with DAAD in Germany (ROR, 1.8 (95% CI, 1.0–3.2, no other antidementia drug was associated with DAAD. Quantitative signal detection is suitable to detect agents with a risk for DAAD. Its sensitivity regarding PNE is limited, although atomoxetine and modafinil, which do not have a known abuse potential outside PNE, and no antidementia drugs, whose use in PNE is presumably low, were associated with DAAD in our analysis.

  10. 1H-detected MAS solid-state NMR experiments enable the simultaneous mapping of rigid and dynamic domains of membrane proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, T.; Nelson, Sarah E. D.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2017-12-01

    Magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy is emerging as a unique method for the atomic resolution structure determination of native membrane proteins in lipid bilayers. Although 13C-detected ssNMR experiments continue to play a major role, recent technological developments have made it possible to carry out 1H-detected experiments, boosting both sensitivity and resolution. Here, we describe a new set of 1H-detected hybrid pulse sequences that combine through-bond and through-space correlation elements into single experiments, enabling the simultaneous detection of rigid and dynamic domains of membrane proteins. As proof-of-principle, we applied these new pulse sequences to the membrane protein phospholamban (PLN) reconstituted in lipid bilayers under moderate MAS conditions. The cross-polarization (CP) based elements enabled the detection of the relatively immobile residues of PLN in the transmembrane domain using through-space correlations; whereas the most dynamic region, which is in equilibrium between folded and unfolded states, was mapped by through-bond INEPT-based elements. These new 1H-detected experiments will enable one to detect not only the most populated (ground) states of biomacromolecules, but also sparsely populated high-energy (excited) states for a complete characterization of protein free energy landscapes.

  11. Detecting Anthropogenic Impacts on Lightning: Is There an Obvious Signal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Walter A.; Carey, L. D.

    2009-01-01

    Bell et al. inferred the presence of increased (decreased) summer rainfall and storm heights over the southern tier (off the east coast) of the continental U.S. (CONUS) during the midweek. Amongst other data sources, the Bell et al. study employed Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) passive microwave and precipitation radar data to reach these conclusions. Importantly, to explain the midweek increases in rainfall and storm echo top heights Bell et al. invoked the presence of anthropogenic influences via increased aerosol loading present in the middle of the work week. Conversely, Schultz et al. argue against the Bell et al. findings, noting that no significant trend in rainfall (amount or occurrence) can be detected in rain gauge data collected from 219 surface observing stations over a 42 year period. Based on previously suggested impacts of enhanced aerosol concentrations on precipitation microphysics and in particular, the ice phase, the results of Bell et al. suggest that in addition to the rainfall signal there may be a detectable response in lightning frequency (to the extent that the aerosol hypothesis invoked is valid). This study examines TRMM Lightning Imaging Sensor observations to detect both daily increases and decreases of lightning over the CONUS and neighboring ocean regions and further examines the possibility (through observations) of systematic direct impacts on lightning activity associated with large city locations.

  12. Correntropy measures to detect daytime sleepiness from EEG signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melia, Umberto; Vallverdú, Montserrat; Caminal, Pere; Guaita, Marc; Montserrat, Josep M; Vilaseca, Isabel; Salamero, Manel; Gaig, Carles; Santamaria, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is one of the main symptoms of several sleep related disorders and has a great impact on patients’ lives. While many studies have been carried out in order to assess daytime sleepiness, automatic EDS detection still remains an open problem. In this work, a novel approach to this issue based on correntropy function analysis of EEG signals was proposed in order to detect patients suffering from EDS. Multichannel EEG signals were recorded during five Maintenance of Wakefulness Tests (MWT) and Multiple Sleep Latency Tests (MSLT) alternated throughout the day for patients suffering from sleep disordered breathing (SDB). A group of 20 patients with EDS was compared with a group of 20 patients without daytime sleepiness (WDS), by analyzing 60 s EEG windows in a waking state. Measures obtained from the cross-correntropy function (CCORR) and auto-correntropy function (ACORR) were calculated in the EEG frequency bands: δ, 0.1–4 Hz; θ, 4–8 Hz; α, 8–12 Hz; β, 12–30 Hz; total band TB, 0.1–45 Hz. These functions permitted the quantification of complex signal properties and the non-linear couplings between different areas of the scalp. Statistical differences between EDS and WDS groups were mainly found in the β band during MSLT events (p-value < 0.0001). The WDS group presented more complexity in the occipital zone than the EDS group, while a stronger nonlinear coupling between the occipital and frontal regions was detected in EDS patients than in the WDS group. At best, ACORR and CCORR measures yielded sensitivity and specificity above 80% and the area under ROC curve (AUC) was above 0.85 in classifying EDS and WDS patients. These performances represent an improvement with respect to classical EEG indices applied in the same database (sensitivity and specificity were never above 80% and AUC was under 0.75). (paper)

  13. Detection of phloridzin in strawberries (Fragaria x ananassa Duch.) by HPLC-PDA-MS/MS and NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilt, Petra; Schieber, Andreas; Yildirim, Caner; Arnold, Gabi; Klaiber, Iris; Conrad, Jürgen; Beifuss, Uwe; Carle, Reinhold

    2003-05-07

    The phenolic profile of strawberry fruits (Fragaria x ananassa Duch., Rosaceae) was investigated by high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection. A peak displaying retention time and UV spectral data identical to those of phloridzin (phloretin 2'-O-beta-d-glucoside), a dihydrochalcone glucoside so far considered characteristic of apples, was monitored. For further characterization, crude extracts of strawberries were purified on polyamide, and the target compound was isolated by preparative and analytical HPLC. Structure elucidation was performed on the basis of APCI- and ESI-MS in the negative ion mode as well as by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy using authentic phloridzin for comparison. The d-configuration of the sugar moiety was established by HPLC analysis of the corresponding acyclic 1-deoxy-1-(N-acetyl-alpha-methylbenzylamino)alditol acetate. Apart from its chemotaxonomic relevance, this first report on the occurrence of phloridzin in strawberries is of particular interest for the authenticity control of strawberry products such as juices, jams, and fruit preparations since phloridzin has so far been used for the detection of fraudulent admixtures.

  14. Infrasonic detection performance in presence of nuisance signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbit, Maurice; Arrowsmith, Stephen; Che, Il-young; Le Pichon, Alexis; Nouvellet, Adrien; Park, Junghyun; Roueff, Francois

    2014-05-01

    The infrasound network of the International Monitoring System (IMS) consists of sixty stations deployed all over the World by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO). The IMS has been designed to reliably detect, at least by two stations, an explosion greater than 1 kiloton located anywhere on the Earth [1]. Each station is an array of at least four microbarometers with an aperture of 1 to 3 km. The first important issue is to detect the presence of the signal of interest (SOI) embedded in noise. The detector is commonly based on the property that the SOI provides coherent observations on the sensors but not the noise. The statistic of test, called F-stat [2], [5], [6] , calculated in a time cell a few seconds, is commonly used for this purpose. In this paper, we assume that a coherent source is permanently present arriving from an unknown direction of arrivals (DOA). The typical case is the presence of microbaroms or the presence of wind. This source is seen as a nuisance signal (NS). In [4], [3] authors assume that a time cell without the SOI (CH0) is available, whereas a following time cell is considered as the cell under test (CUT). Therefore the DOA and the SNR of the NS can be estimated. If the signal-to-noise ration SNR of the NS is large enough, the distribution of the F-stat under the absence of SOI is known to be a non central Fisher. It follows that the threshold can be performed from a given value of the FAR. The major drawback to keep the NS is that the NS could hide the SOI, this phenomena is similar to the leakage which is a well-known phenomena in the Fourier analysis. An other approach consists to use the DOA estimate of the NS to mitigate the NS by spatial notch filter in the frequency domain. On this approach a new algorithm is provided. To illustrate, numerical results on synthetical and real data are presented, in term of Receiver Operating Characteristic ROC curves. REFERENCES [1] Christie D.R. and Campus P., The IMS

  15. Detecting malicious chaotic signals in wireless sensor network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Ranjit Kumar; Kumari, Sangeeta

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, an e-epidemic Susceptible-Infected-Vaccinated (SIV) model has been proposed to analyze the effect of node immunization and worms attacking dynamics in wireless sensor network. A modified nonlinear incidence rate with cyrtoid type functional response has been considered using sleep and active mode approach. Detailed stability analysis and the sufficient criteria for the persistence of the model system have been established. We also established different types of bifurcation analysis for different equilibria at different critical points of the control parameters. We performed a detailed Hopf bifurcation analysis and determine the direction and stability of the bifurcating periodic solutions using center manifold theorem. Numerical simulations are carried out to confirm the theoretical results. The impact of the control parameters on the dynamics of the model system has been investigated and malicious chaotic signals are detected. Finally, we have analyzed the effect of time delay on the dynamics of the model system.

  16. Detecting Parkinson's disease from sustained phonation and speech signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evaldas Vaiciukynas

    Full Text Available This study investigates signals from sustained phonation and text-dependent speech modalities for Parkinson's disease screening. Phonation corresponds to the vowel /a/ voicing task and speech to the pronunciation of a short sentence in Lithuanian language. Signals were recorded through two channels simultaneously, namely, acoustic cardioid (AC and smart phone (SP microphones. Additional modalities were obtained by splitting speech recording into voiced and unvoiced parts. Information in each modality is summarized by 18 well-known audio feature sets. Random forest (RF is used as a machine learning algorithm, both for individual feature sets and for decision-level fusion. Detection performance is measured by the out-of-bag equal error rate (EER and the cost of log-likelihood-ratio. Essentia audio feature set was the best using the AC speech modality and YAAFE audio feature set was the best using the SP unvoiced modality, achieving EER of 20.30% and 25.57%, respectively. Fusion of all feature sets and modalities resulted in EER of 19.27% for the AC and 23.00% for the SP channel. Non-linear projection of a RF-based proximity matrix into the 2D space enriched medical decision support by visualization.

  17. DETECT: a MATLAB toolbox for event detection and identification in time series, with applications to artifact detection in EEG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawhern, Vernon; Hairston, W David; Robbins, Kay

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in sensor and recording technology have allowed scientists to acquire very large time-series datasets. Researchers often analyze these datasets in the context of events, which are intervals of time where the properties of the signal change relative to a baseline signal. We have developed DETECT, a MATLAB toolbox for detecting event time intervals in long, multi-channel time series. Our primary goal is to produce a toolbox that is simple for researchers to use, allowing them to quickly train a model on multiple classes of events, assess the accuracy of the model, and determine how closely the results agree with their own manual identification of events without requiring extensive programming knowledge or machine learning experience. As an illustration, we discuss application of the DETECT toolbox for detecting signal artifacts found in continuous multi-channel EEG recordings and show the functionality of the tools found in the toolbox. We also discuss the application of DETECT for identifying irregular heartbeat waveforms found in electrocardiogram (ECG) data as an additional illustration.

  18. DETECT: a MATLAB toolbox for event detection and identification in time series, with applications to artifact detection in EEG signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon Lawhern

    Full Text Available Recent advances in sensor and recording technology have allowed scientists to acquire very large time-series datasets. Researchers often analyze these datasets in the context of events, which are intervals of time where the properties of the signal change relative to a baseline signal. We have developed DETECT, a MATLAB toolbox for detecting event time intervals in long, multi-channel time series. Our primary goal is to produce a toolbox that is simple for researchers to use, allowing them to quickly train a model on multiple classes of events, assess the accuracy of the model, and determine how closely the results agree with their own manual identification of events without requiring extensive programming knowledge or machine learning experience. As an illustration, we discuss application of the DETECT toolbox for detecting signal artifacts found in continuous multi-channel EEG recordings and show the functionality of the tools found in the toolbox. We also discuss the application of DETECT for identifying irregular heartbeat waveforms found in electrocardiogram (ECG data as an additional illustration.

  19. Detection of oscillatory components in noise signals and its application to fast detection of sodium boiling in LMFBR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrhardt, J.

    1975-09-01

    In general, the surveillance of technical plants is performed by observating the mean value of measured signals. In this method not all information included in these signals is used. On the other hand - for example in a reactor - disturbances are possible which generate small oscillatory components in the measured signals. In general, these oscillatory components do not influence the mean value of the signals and consequently do not activate the conventional control system; however they can be found by analysis of the signal's noise component. For the detection of these oscillatory signals the observation of the frequency spectra of the noise signals is particularly advantageous because they produce peaks at the oscillation frequencies. In this paper a new detection system for the fast detection of suddenly appearing peaks in the frequency spectra of noise signals is presented. The prototype of a compact detection unit was developed which continuously computes the power spectral density (PSD) of noise signals and simultaneously supervises the PSD for peaks in the relevant frequency range. The detection method is not affected by the frequency dependance of the PSD and is applicable to any noise signal. General criteria were developed to enable the determination of the optimal detection system and its sensitivity. The upper limits of false alarm rate and detection time were taken into account. The detection criteria are applicable to all noise signals with approximately normally distributed amplitudes. Theoretical results were confirmed in a number of experiments; special experimental and theoretical parameter studies were done for the optimal detection of sodium boiling in LMFBR's. Computations based on these results showed that local and integral sodium boiling can be detected in a wide core range of SNR 300 by observing fluctuations of the neutron flux. In this connection it is important to point out that no additional core instrumentation is necessary because the

  20. Determination of the 14N quadrupole coupling constant of nitroxide spin probes by W-band ELDOR-detected NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florent, Marc; Kaminker, Ilia; Nagarajan, Vijayasarathi; Goldfarb, Daniella

    2011-06-01

    Nitroxide spin probe electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) has proven to be a very successful method to probe local polarity and solvent hydrogen bonding properties at the molecular level. The g xx and the 14N hyperfine A zz principal values are the EPR parameters of the nitroxide spin probe that are sensitive to these properties and are therefore monitored experimentally. Recently, the 14N quadrupole interaction of nitroxides has been shown to be also highly sensitive to polarity and H-bonding (A. Savitsky et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 112 (2008) 9079). High-field electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) was used successfully to determine the P xx and P yy principal components of the 14N quadrupole tensor. The P zz value was calculated from the traceless character of the quadrupole tensor. We introduce here high-field (W-band, 95 GHz, 3.5 T) electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR)-detected NMR as a method to obtain the 14N P zz value directly, together with A zz. This is complemented by W-band hyperfine sublevel correlation (HYSCORE) measurements carried out along the g xx direction to determine the principal P xx and P yy components. Through measurements of TEMPOL dissolved in solvents of different polarities, we show that A zz increases, while | P zz| decreases with polarity, as predicted by Savitsky et al.

  1. Ultra-low field NMR for detection and characterization of 235 UF6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espy, Michelle A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Magnelind, Per E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Matlashov, Andrei N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Urbaitis, Algis V [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Volegov, Petr L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We have demonstrated the first ultra-low field (ULF) nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}), both depleted and 70% enriched, which is used in the uranium enrichment process. A sensitive non-invasive detection system would have an important role in non-proliferation surveillance. A two-frequency technique was employed to remove the transients induced by rapidly switching off the 50 mT pre-polarization field. A mean transverse relaxation time T{sub 2} of 24 ms was estimated for the un-enriched UF{sub 6} sample measured at a mean temperature of 80 C. Nuclear magnetic resonance at ULF has several advantages including the ability to measure through metal, such as pipes, and simple magnetic field generation hardware. We present here recent data and discuss the potential for non-proliferation monitoring of enrichment and flow velocity.

  2. A signal processing method for the friction-based endpoint detection system of a CMP process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Chi; Guo Dongming; Jin Zhuji; Kang Renke

    2010-01-01

    A signal processing method for the friction-based endpoint detection system of a chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) process is presented. The signal process method uses the wavelet threshold denoising method to reduce the noise contained in the measured original signal, extracts the Kalman filter innovation from the denoised signal as the feature signal, and judges the CMP endpoint based on the feature of the Kalman filter innovation sequence during the CMP process. Applying the signal processing method, the endpoint detection experiments of the Cu CMP process were carried out. The results show that the signal processing method can judge the endpoint of the Cu CMP process. (semiconductor technology)

  3. The research of faintness nuclear signal coherent detecting and rectifying technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Chunkai

    2010-01-01

    The Essential features of the nuclear signal were analyzed, two aspect shortcomings to output electric signal were summarized, and put up with resolving scheme to them: adopting coherent detecting technology to improve signal noise ratio, clear up noise; adopting signal amplification and rectifying to mending, processing, at last, output signal become quasi gauss pulse signal,it is propitious to further processed by the back multi-channel pulse amplitude analyzer. We combine two equipment together, called signal processing (including coherent detecting, clear up noise, amplifying, rectifying), So as to achieve the purpose of accurate collection and analysis. (author)

  4. NMR imaging of the spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, J.S. (Case Western Reserve Univ. School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH); Kaufman, B.; El Yousef, S.J.; Benson, J.E.; Bonstelle, C.T.; Alfidi, R.J.; Haaga, J.R.; Yeung, H.; Huss, R.G.

    1983-12-01

    The usefulness of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) images in the evaluation of spinal disorders below the craniocervical junction was studied. Six normal subjects and 41 patients with various spinal abnormalities were examined. NMR proved capable of demonstrating important normal and pathologic anatomic structures; it was useful in the evaluation of syringohydromyelia and cystic spinal cord tumors, and the bright signal intensity of lipoma was quite impressive. In the evaluation of herniated disk, NMR images offered a new perspective by visualizing abnormal degradation of the signal intensity of the nucleus pulposus itself. NMR images were least valuable in the evaluation of spondylosis and spinal stenosis. Although NMR imaging of the spine is still in a very early developmental stage, the absence of both ionizing radiation and risks associated with contrast material makes it especially attractive as a new diagnostic method. This limited experience with currently available equipment suggests that, with technical refinement, the efficacy of NMR of the spine will increase.

  5. Detecting plant-climate interactions over decades-millennia using NMR isotopomer analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Ina; Augusti, Angela; Köhler, Iris; Wieloch, Thomas; Zuidema, Pieter; Robertson, Iain; Nilsson, Mats; Marshall, John; Schleucher, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    . The smaller suppression of photorespiration in trees may be explained by increases in leaf temperature, suggesting that increasing temperatures may already be reducing the CO2 fertilization effect on the global scale. These results may explain the discrepancy between strong CO2 fertilization inferred from 13C measurements yet lack of biomass increases. Finally, we will stress advantages of isotopomers for studies of plant metabolism on millennial time scales: First, isotopomers multiply the information content, because glucose contains seven deuterium and six 13C isotopomers. Second, RATIOS of isotopomers are independent of the isotope compositions of a plant's substrates H2O and CO2, which often are poorly constrained over paleo time scales. Third, because isotopomer abundances are set by specific biochemical reactions, very strong correlations between isotopomers and environmental variables are observed. Forth, parallel reconstructions of physiological and climate signals from the same samples may inform analyses of plant-climate interactions (Augusti et al., Chem. Geol 2008).

  6. Directionality and signal amplification in cryogenic dark matter detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More, T.

    1996-05-01

    A mounting body of evidence suggests that most of the mass in our universe is not contained in stars, but rather exists in some non- luminous form. The evidence comes independently from astronomical observation, cosmological theory, and particle physics. All of this missing mass is collectively referred to as dark matter. In this thesis we discuss two ways to improve the performance of dark matter detectors based on the measurement of ballistic phonons. First, we address the issue of signal identification through solitons. Secondly, we discuss a method for lowering the detection threshold and improving the energy sensitivity: amplifying phonons through the evaporation of helium atoms from a superfluid film coating the target and the adsorption of the evaporated atoms onto a helium-free substrate. A phonon amplifier would also be of use in many other applications in which a few phonons are to be measured at low temperatures. Factors contributing to the low amplifier gains achieved thus far are described and proposals for avoiding them are analyzed and discussed. 101 refs., 30 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Evaluating Classifiers to Detect Arm Movement Intention from EEG Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Planelles

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a methodology to detect the intention to make a reaching movement with the arm in healthy subjects before the movement actually starts. This is done by measuring brain activity through electroencephalographic (EEG signals that are registered by electrodes placed over the scalp. The preparation and performance of an arm movement generate a phenomenon called event-related desynchronization (ERD in the mu and beta frequency bands. A novel methodology to characterize this cognitive process based on three sums of power spectral frequencies involved in ERD is presented. The main objective of this paper is to set the benchmark for classifiers and to choose the most convenient. The best results are obtained using an SVM classifier with around 72% accuracy. This classifier will be used in further research to generate the control commands to move a robotic exoskeleton that helps people suffering from motor disabilities to perform the movement. The final aim is that this brain-controlled robotic exoskeleton improves the current rehabilitation processes of disabled people.

  8. Measuring Social Motivation Using Signal Detection and Reward Responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevallier, Coralie; Tonge, Natasha; Safra, Lou; Kahn, David; Kohls, Gregor; Miller, Judith; Schultz, Robert T

    2016-01-01

    Recent trends in psychiatry have emphasized the need for a shift from categorical to dimensional approaches. Of critical importance to this transformation is the availability of tools to objectively quantify behaviors dimensionally. The present study focuses on social motivation, a dimension of behavior that is central to a range of psychiatric conditions but for which a particularly small number of assays currently exist. In Study 1 (N = 48), healthy adults completed a monetary reward task and a social reward task, followed by completion of the Chapman Physical and Social Anhedonia Scales. In Study 2 (N = 26), an independent sample was recruited to assess the robustness of Study 1's findings. The reward tasks were analyzed using signal detection theory to quantify how much reward cues bias participants' responses. In both Study 1 and Study 2, social anhedonia scores were negatively correlated with change in response bias in the social reward task but not in the monetary reward task. A median split on social anhedonia scores confirmed that participants with high social anhedonia showed less change in response bias in the social reward task compared to participants with low social anhedonia. This study confirms that social anhedonia selectively affects how much an individual changes their behavior based on the presence of socially rewarding cues and establishes a tool to quantify social reward responsiveness dimensionally.

  9. Hydrogen bond strength in membrane proteins probed by time-resolved1H-detected solid-state NMR and MD simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros-Silva, João; Jekhmane, Shehrazade; Baldus, Marc; Weingarth, Markus

    2017-10-01

    1 H-detected solid-state NMR in combination with 1 H/ 2 D exchange steps allows for the direct identification of very strong hydrogen bonds in membrane proteins. On the example of the membrane-embedded potassium channel KcsA, we quantify the longevity of such very strong hydrogen bonds by combining time-resolved 1 H-detected solid-state NMR experiments and molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, we show that the carboxyl-side chain of the highly conserved residue Glu51 is involved in ultra-strong hydrogen bonds, which are fully-water-exposed and yet stable for weeks. The astonishing stability of these hydrogen bonds is important for the structural integrity of potassium channels, which we further corroborate by computational studies. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Direct detection and characterization of bioinorganic peroxo moieties in a vanadium complex by17O solid-state NMR and density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rupal; Stringer, John; Struppe, Jochem; Rehder, Dieter; Polenova, Tatyana

    2018-07-01

    Electronic and structural properties of short-lived metal-peroxido complexes, which are key intermediates in many enzymatic reactions, are not fully understood. While detected in various enzymes, their catalytic properties remain elusive because of their transient nature, making them difficult to study spectroscopically. We integrated 17 O solid-state NMR and density functional theory (DFT) to directly detect and characterize the peroxido ligand in a bioinorganic V(V) complex mimicking intermediates non-heme vanadium haloperoxidases. 17 O chemical shift and quadrupolar tensors, measured by solid-state NMR spectroscopy, probe the electronic structure of the peroxido ligand and its interaction with the metal. DFT analysis reveals the unusually large chemical shift anisotropy arising from the metal orbitals contributing towards the magnetic shielding of the ligand. The results illustrate the power of an integrated approach for studies of oxygen centers in enzyme reaction intermediates. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Performance Analysis of Recurrence Matrix Statistics for the Detection of Deterministic Signals in Noise

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Michalowicz, Joseph V; Nichols, Jonathan M; Bucholtz, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the limitations to detecting deterministic signals in the presence of noise, especially additive, white Gaussian noise, is of importance for the design of LPI systems and anti-LPI signal defense...

  12. A Novel Approach of Sensitive Infrared Signal Detection for Space Applications

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop an innovative frequency up-conversion device that will efficiently convert the infrared signals into visible/near-infrared signals to enable detection of...

  13. A signal-detection-based diagnostic-feature-detection model of eyewitness identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wixted, John T; Mickes, Laura

    2014-04-01

    The theoretical understanding of eyewitness identifications made from a police lineup has long been guided by the distinction between absolute and relative decision strategies. In addition, the accuracy of identifications associated with different eyewitness memory procedures has long been evaluated using measures like the diagnosticity ratio (the correct identification rate divided by the false identification rate). Framed in terms of signal-detection theory, both the absolute/relative distinction and the diagnosticity ratio are mainly relevant to response bias while remaining silent about the key issue of diagnostic accuracy, or discriminability (i.e., the ability to tell the difference between innocent and guilty suspects in a lineup). Here, we propose a signal-detection-based model of eyewitness identification, one that encourages the use of (and helps to conceptualize) receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis to measure discriminability. Recent ROC analyses indicate that the simultaneous presentation of faces in a lineup yields higher discriminability than the presentation of faces in isolation, and we propose a diagnostic feature-detection hypothesis to account for that result. According to this hypothesis, the simultaneous presentation of faces allows the eyewitness to appreciate that certain facial features (viz., those that are shared by everyone in the lineup) are non-diagnostic of guilt. To the extent that those non-diagnostic features are discounted in favor of potentially more diagnostic features, the ability to discriminate innocent from guilty suspects will be enhanced.

  14. Method and apparatus for automatically detecting patterns in digital point-ordered signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brudnoy, D.M.

    1998-10-20

    The present invention is a method and system for detecting a physical feature of a test piece by detecting a pattern in a signal representing data from inspection of the test piece. The pattern is detected by automated additive decomposition of a digital point-ordered signal which represents the data. The present invention can properly handle a non-periodic signal. A physical parameter of the test piece is measured. A digital point-ordered signal representative of the measured physical parameter is generated. The digital point-ordered signal is decomposed into a baseline signal, a background noise signal, and a peaks/troughs signal. The peaks/troughs from the peaks/troughs signal are located and peaks/troughs information indicating the physical feature of the test piece is output. 14 figs.

  15. Machine Learning Techniques for Optical Performance Monitoring from Directly Detected PDM-QAM Signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Jakob; Wass, Jesper; Piels, Molly

    2017-01-01

    Linear signal processing algorithms are effective in dealing with linear transmission channel and linear signal detection, while the nonlinear signal processing algorithms, from the machine learning community, are effective in dealing with nonlinear transmission channel and nonlinear signal...... detection. In this paper, a brief overview of the various machine learning methods and their application in optical communication is presented and discussed. Moreover, supervised machine learning methods, such as neural networks and support vector machine, are experimentally demonstrated for in-band optical...

  16. A Novel Voice Sensor for the Detection of Speech Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun-Ching Wang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to develop a novel voice sensor to detect human voices, the use of features which are more robust to noise is an important issue. Voice sensor is also called voice activity detection (VAD. Due to that the inherent nature of the formant structure only occurred on the speech spectrogram (well-known as voiceprint, Wu et al. were the first to use band-spectral entropy (BSE to describe the characteristics of voiceprints. However, the performance of VAD based on BSE feature was degraded in colored noise (or voiceprint-like noise environments. In order to solve this problem, we propose the two-dimensional part-band energy entropy (TD-PBEE parameter based on two variables: part-band partition number upon frequency index and long-term window size upon time index to further improve the BSE-based VAD algorithm. The two variables can efficiently represent the characteristics of voiceprints on each critical frequency band and use long-term information for noisy speech spectrograms, respectively. The TD-PBEE parameter can be regarded as a PBEE parameter over time. First, the strength of voiceprints can be partly enhanced by using four entropies applied to four part-bands. We can use the four part-band energy entropies for describing the voiceprints in detail. Due to the characteristics of non-stationary for speech and various noises, we will then use long-term information processing to refine the PBEE, so the voice-like noise can be distinguished from noisy speech through the concept of PBEE with long-term information. Our experiments show that the proposed feature extraction with the TD-PBEE parameter is quite insensitive to background noise. The proposed TD-PBEE-based VAD algorithm is evaluated for four types of noises and five signal-to-noise ratio (SNR levels. We find that the accuracy of the proposed TD-PBEE-based VAD algorithm averaged over all noises and all SNR levels is better than that of other considered VAD algorithms.

  17. A novel voice sensor for the detection of speech signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun-Ching

    2013-12-02

    In order to develop a novel voice sensor to detect human voices, the use of features which are more robust to noise is an important issue. Voice sensor is also called voice activity detection (VAD). Due to that the inherent nature of the formant structure only occurred on the speech spectrogram (well-known as voiceprint), Wu et al. were the first to use band-spectral entropy (BSE) to describe the characteristics of voiceprints. However, the performance of VAD based on BSE feature was degraded in colored noise (or voiceprint-like noise) environments. In order to solve this problem, we propose the two-dimensional part-band energy entropy (TD-PBEE) parameter based on two variables: part-band partition number upon frequency index and long-term window size upon time index to further improve the BSE-based VAD algorithm. The two variables can efficiently represent the characteristics of voiceprints on each critical frequency band and use long-term information for noisy speech spectrograms, respectively. The TD-PBEE parameter can be regarded as a PBEE parameter over time. First, the strength of voiceprints can be partly enhanced by using four entropies applied to four part-bands. We can use the four part-band energy entropies for describing the voiceprints in detail. Due to the characteristics of non-stationary for speech and various noises, we will then use long-term information processing to refine the PBEE, so the voice-like noise can be distinguished from noisy speech through the concept of PBEE with long-term information. Our experiments show that the proposed feature extraction with the TD-PBEE parameter is quite insensitive to background noise. The proposed TD-PBEE-based VAD algorithm is evaluated for four types of noises and five signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) levels. We find that the accuracy of the proposed TD-PBEE-based VAD algorithm averaged over all noises and all SNR levels is better than that of other considered VAD algorithms.

  18. Measures of metacognition on signal-detection theoretic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Adam B; Dienes, Zoltan; Seth, Anil K

    2013-12-01

    Analyzing metacognition, specifically knowledge of accuracy of internal perceptual, memorial, or other knowledge states, is vital for many strands of psychology, including determining the accuracy of feelings of knowing and discriminating conscious from unconscious cognition. Quantifying metacognitive sensitivity is however more challenging than quantifying basic stimulus sensitivity. Under popular signal-detection theory (SDT) models for stimulus classification tasks, approaches based on Type II receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves or Type II d-prime risk confounding metacognition with response biases in either the Type I (classification) or Type II (metacognitive) tasks. A new approach introduces meta-d': The Type I d-prime that would have led to the observed Type II data had the subject used all the Type I information. Here, we (a) further establish the inconsistency of the Type II d-prime and ROC approaches with new explicit analyses of the standard SDT model and (b) analyze, for the first time, the behavior of meta-d' under nontrivial scenarios, such as when metacognitive judgments utilize enhanced or degraded versions of the Type I evidence. Analytically, meta-d' values typically reflect the underlying model well and are stable under changes in decision criteria; however, in relatively extreme cases, meta-d' can become unstable. We explore bias and variance of in-sample measurements of meta-d' and supply MATLAB code for estimation in general cases. Our results support meta-d' as a useful measure of metacognition and provide rigorous methodology for its application. Our recommendations are useful for any researchers interested in assessing metacognitive accuracy. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  19. Detection and processing of phase modulated optical signals at 40 Gbit/s and beyond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geng, Yan

    This thesis addresses demodulation in direct detection systems and signal processing of high speed phase modulated signals in future all-optical wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) communication systems where differential phase shift keying (DPSK) or differential quadrature phase shift keying...... detection and all-optical signal processing -including optical labeling, wavelength conversion and signal regeneration- that already have been studied intensively for signals using conventional on-off keying (OOK) format, can also be successfully implemented for high-speed phase modulated signals...... (DQPSK) are used to transport information. All-optical network functionalities -such as optical labeling, wavelength conversion and signal regeneration- are experimentally investigated. Direct detection of phase modulated signals requires phase-to-intensity modulation conversion in a demodulator...

  20. A Spectrum Detection Approach for Bearing Fault Signal Based on Spectral Kurtosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfeng Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the similarity between Morlet wavelet and fault signal and the sensitive characteristics of spectral kurtosis for the impact signal, a new wavelet spectrum detection approach based on spectral kurtosis for bearing fault signal is proposed. This method decreased the band-pass filter range and reduced the wavelet window width significantly. As a consequence, the bearing fault signal was detected adaptively, and time-frequency characteristics of the fault signal can be extracted accurately. The validity of this method was verified by the identifications of simulated shock signal and test bearing fault signal. The method provides a new understanding of wavelet spectrum detection based on spectral kurtosis for rolling element bearing fault signal.

  1. Driver behavior at rail-highway grade crossings : a signal detection theory analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Signal Detection Theory (SDT) is often used in studies of sensory psychology and perception to describe laboratory experiments in which subjects are asked to detect small changes in very wellcontrolled, precisely defined stimuli such as the intensity...

  2. Residual signal feature extraction for gearbox planetary stage fault detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skrimpas, Georgios Alexandros; Ursin, Thomas; Sweeney, Christian Walsted

    2017-01-01

    , statistical features measuring the signal energy and Gaussianity are calculated from the residual signals between each pair from the first to the fifth tooth mesh frequency of the meshing process in a multi-stage wind turbine gearbox. The suggested algorithm includes resampling from time to angular domain...

  3. Fourier Analysis and Structure Determination. Part II: Pulse NMR and NMR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesick, John P.

    1989-01-01

    Uses simple pulse NMR experiments to discuss Fourier transforms. Studies the generation of spin echoes used in the imaging procedure. Shows that pulse NMR experiments give signals that are additions of sinusoids of differing amplitudes, frequencies, and phases. (MVL)

  4. Mycosporine-like Amino Acids and Other Phytochemicals Directly Detected by High-Resolution NMR on Klamath (Aphanizomenon flos-aquae) Blue-Green Algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righi, Valeria; Parenti, Francesca; Schenetti, Luisa; Mucci, Adele

    2016-09-07

    This study describes for the first time the use of high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) on Klamath (Aphanizomenon flos-aquae, AFA) blue-green algae directly on powder suspension. These algae are considered to be a "superfood", due to their complete nutritional profile that has proved to have important therapeutic effects. The main advantage of NMR spectroscopy is that it permits the detection of a number of metabolites all at once. The Klamath alga metabolome was revealed to be quite complex, and the most peculiar phytochemicals that can be detected directly on algae by NMR are mycosporine-like amino acids (porphyra-334, P334; shinorine, Shi) and low molecular weight glycosides (glyceryl β-d-galactopyranoside, GalpG; glyceryl 6-amino-6-deoxy-α-d-glucopyranoside, ADG), all compounds with a high nutraceutical value. The presence of cis-3,4-DhLys was revealed for the first time. This molecule could be involved in the anticancer properties ascribed to AFA.

  5. Detection test of wireless network signal strength and GPS positioning signal in underground pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Zhang, Yunwei; Chen, Ling

    2018-03-01

    In order to solve the problem of selecting positioning technology for inspection robot in underground pipeline environment, the wireless network signal strength and GPS positioning signal testing are carried out in the actual underground pipeline environment. Firstly, the strength variation of the 3G wireless network signal and Wi-Fi wireless signal provided by China Telecom and China Unicom ground base stations are tested, and the attenuation law of these wireless signals along the pipeline is analyzed quantitatively and described. Then, the receiving data of the GPS satellite signal in the pipeline are tested, and the attenuation of GPS satellite signal under underground pipeline is analyzed. The testing results may be reference for other related research which need to consider positioning in pipeline.

  6. Push-through Direction Injectin NMR Automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) are the two major spectroscopic techniques successfully used in metabolomics studies. The non-invasive, quantitative and reproducible characteristics make NMR spectroscopy an excellent technique for detection of endogeno...

  7. Dynamic domains of amyloid fibrils can be site-specifically assigned with proton detected 3D NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, Alexander S.; Siemer, Ansgar B.

    2016-01-01

    Several amyloid fibrils have cores framed by highly dynamic, intrinsically disordered, domains that can play important roles for function and toxicity. To study these domains in detail using solid-state NMR spectroscopy, site-specific resonance assignments are required. Although the rapid dynamics of these domains lead to considerable averaging of orientation-dependent NMR interactions and thereby line-narrowing, the proton linewidths observed in these samples is far larger than what is regularly observed in solution. Here, we show that it is nevertheless possible to record 3D HNCO, HNCA, and HNcoCA spectra on these intrinsically disordered domains and to obtain site-specific assignments.

  8. Dynamic domains of amyloid fibrils can be site-specifically assigned with proton detected 3D NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falk, Alexander S.; Siemer, Ansgar B., E-mail: asiemer@usc.edu [Keck School of Medicine of USC, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Zilkha Neurogenetic Institute (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Several amyloid fibrils have cores framed by highly dynamic, intrinsically disordered, domains that can play important roles for function and toxicity. To study these domains in detail using solid-state NMR spectroscopy, site-specific resonance assignments are required. Although the rapid dynamics of these domains lead to considerable averaging of orientation-dependent NMR interactions and thereby line-narrowing, the proton linewidths observed in these samples is far larger than what is regularly observed in solution. Here, we show that it is nevertheless possible to record 3D HNCO, HNCA, and HNcoCA spectra on these intrinsically disordered domains and to obtain site-specific assignments.

  9. Development of Two-Dimensional NMR

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    The development of Fourier transform NMR in the mid. 1960's, did parallel processing of the collection of NMR data, increased the signal/noise ratio by two orders of magnitude and made it possible to record the proton NMR spectra of small proteins which contain hundreds of resonances. The assignment of these ...

  10. Detection of transient disturbing signals on PC boards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Korte

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows a possibility to visualize signal propagation in electronic circuits. Instead of using various galvanic measurement points all over the circuit, a test method is shown which measures the radiated field of the printed circuit board. By use of a 2-dimensional positionable field probe it is possible to get an overview over the signals running on the different parts of the PCB. In order to measure transient disturbing signals and distinguish them from normal device operation, problems of probe design and triggering need to be discussed.

  11. [Optimization of experimental parameters for quantitative NMR (qNMR) and its application in quantitative analysis of traditional Chinese medicines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao-Li; Zou, Ping-Ping; Lei, Wei; Tu, Peng-Fei; Jiang, Yong

    2014-09-01

    Quantitative NMR (qNMR) is a technology based on the principle of NMR. This technology does not need the references of the determined components, which supplies a solution for the problem of reference scarcity in the quantitative analysis of traditional Chinese medicines. Moreover, this technology has the advantages of easy operation, non-destructiveness for the determined sample, high accuracy and repeatability, in comparison with HPLC, LC-MS and GC-MS. NMR technology has achieved quantum leap in sensitivity and accuracy with the development of NMR hardware. In addition, the choice of appropriate experimental parameters of the pre-treatment and measurement procedure as well as the post-acquisition processing is also important for obtaining high-quality and reproducible NMR spectra. This review summarizes the principle of qHNMR, the various experimental parameters affecting the accuracy and the precision of qHNMR, such as signal to noise ratio, relaxation delay, pulse width, acquisition time, window function, phase correction and baseline correction, and their corresponding optimized methods. Moreover, the application of qHNMR in the fields of quantitation of single or multi-components of traditional Chinese medicines, the purity detection of references, and the quality analysis of foods has been discussed. In addition, the existing questions and the future application prospects of qNMR in natural product areas are also presented.

  12. Automated feature detection and identification in digital point-ordered signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenlander, Jane E.; Loomis, Kent C.; Brudnoy, David M.; Levy, Arthur J.

    1998-01-01

    A computer-based automated method to detect and identify features in digital point-ordered signals. The method is used for processing of non-destructive test signals, such as eddy current signals obtained from calibration standards. The signals are first automatically processed to remove noise and to determine a baseline. Next, features are detected in the signals using mathematical morphology filters. Finally, verification of the features is made using an expert system of pattern recognition methods and geometric criteria. The method has the advantage that standard features can be, located without prior knowledge of the number or sequence of the features. Further advantages are that standard features can be differentiated from irrelevant signal features such as noise, and detected features are automatically verified by parameters extracted from the signals. The method proceeds fully automatically without initial operator set-up and without subjective operator feature judgement.

  13. An attempt to detect the greenhouse-gas signal in a transient GCM simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, T.P.

    1990-01-01

    Results from the GISS model forced by transient greenhouse-gas (GHG) increases are used to demonstrate methods of detecting the theoretically predicted GHG signal. The signal predicted to occur in the surface temperature of the world's ocean since 1958 is not found in the observations but this is not surprising since the signal was small in the first place. The main result of the study is to demonstrate many of the key issues/difficulties that attend the detection problem

  14. DETECTION OF POTENTIAL TRANSIT SIGNALS IN THE FIRST 12 QUARTERS OF KEPLER MISSION DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenenbaum, Peter; Jenkins, Jon M.; Seader, Shawn; Burke, Christopher J.; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Rowe, Jason F.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Li, Jie; Quintana, Elisa V.; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Thompson, Susan E.; Twicken, Joseph D. [SETI Institute/NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94305 (United States); Borucki, William J.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Cote, Miles T.; Haas, Michael R.; Hunter, Roger C.; Sanderfer, Dwight T. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94305 (United States); Girouard, Forrest R., E-mail: peter.tenenbaum@nasa.gov [Orbital Sciences Corporation/NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94305 (United States); and others

    2013-05-01

    We present the results of a search for potential transit signals in the first three years of photometry data acquired by the Kepler mission. The targets of the search include 112,321 targets that were observed over the full interval and an additional 79,992 targets that were observed for a subset of the full interval. From this set of targets we find a total of 11,087 targets that contain at least one signal that meets the Kepler detection criteria: periodicity of the signal, an acceptable signal-to-noise ratio, and three tests that reject false positives. Each target containing at least one detected signal is then searched repeatedly for additional signals, which represent multi-planet systems of transiting planets. When targets with multiple detections are considered, a total of 18,406 potential transiting planet signals are found in the Kepler mission data set. The detected signals are dominated by events with relatively low signal-to-noise ratios and by events with relatively short periods. The distribution of estimated transit depths appears to peak in the range between 20 and 30 parts per million, with a few detections down to fewer than 10 parts per million. The detections exhibit signal-to-noise ratios from 7.1{sigma}, which is the lower cutoff for detections, to over 10,000{sigma}, and periods ranging from 0.5 days, which is the shortest period searched, to 525 days, which is the upper limit of achievable periods given the length of the data set and the requirement that all detections include at least three transits. The detected signals are compared to a set of known transit events in the Kepler field of view, many of which were identified by alternative methods; the comparison shows that the current search recovery rate for targets with known transit events is 98.3%.

  15. Interaction of epothilone B (patupilone) with microtubules as detected by two-dimensional solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, A.; Heise, H.; Blommers, M. J. J.; Krastel, P.; Schmitt, E.; Petersen, F.; Jeganathan, S.; Mandelkow, E. -M; Carlomagno, T.; Griesinger, C.; Baldus, M.

    2010-01-01

    Solid evidence: Induction of the polymerization of β-tubulin dimers into microtubules by epothilones, such as patupilone, by an as yet unknown mechanism leads to the apoptosis of cancer cells. Solid-state NMR spectroscopy of patupilone bound to microtubules has now enabled the identification of

  16. A Universal Fast Colorimetric Method for DNA Signal Detection with DNA Strand Displacement and Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA or gene signal detection is of great significance in many fields including medical examination, intracellular molecular monitoring, and gene disease signal diagnosis, but detection of DNA or gene signals in a low concentration with instant visual results remains a challenge. In this work, a universal fast and visual colorimetric detection method for DNA signals is proposed. Specifically, a DNA signal amplification “circuit” based on DNA strand displacement is firstly designed to amplify the target DNA signals, and then thiol modified hairpin DNA strands and gold nanoparticles are used to make signal detection results visualized in a colorimetric manner. If the target DNA signal exists, the gold nanoparticles aggregate and settle down with color changing from dark red to grey quickly; otherwise, the gold nanoparticles’ colloids remain stable in dark red. The proposed method provides a novel way to detect quickly DNA or gene signals in low concentrations with instant visual results. When applied in real-life, it may provide a universal colorimetric method for gene disease signal diagnosis.

  17. Study of cultured fibroblasts in vivo using NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karczmar, G.S.

    1984-08-01

    The goal was to study the compartmentation of phosphorylated glycolytic intermediates in intact Chicken Embryo Fibroblasts (CEFs) using /sup 31/P NMR at 109 MHz. A technique for maintaining functional cells at high densities in an NMR magnet is described. Signals were detected from cytoplasmic inorganic phosphate (P/sub i/), ATP, NAD, NADH, phosphorylcholine and phosphorylethanolamine. The effect of external glucose on cytoplasmic pools of phosphates was studied. When cells were perfused with glucose-free medium the rate of glycolysis decreased, the amplitudes of the ATP resonances decreased, and the P/sub i/ intensity increased. The quantity of NMR-detectable P/sub i/ produced was significantly greater than the quantity of NMR-detectable ATP which was lost. Experiments with /sup 32/P labeled P/sub i/ showed that as the concentration of glucose in the medium was increase, the amount of phosphate sequestered in the cells increased. We conclude that there is a pool of P/sub i/ which is not detected by high resolution NMR and that the size of this pool increases as the rate of glycolysis increase. Longtitudinal relaxation times of intracellular phosphates in normal, transformed, and primary CEFs were measured. The results demonstrate that relaxation times of phosphates are sensitive to structural and metabolic changes which occur when cells are grown in culture. 59 references. 31 figures.

  18. DETECTION OF POTENTIAL TRANSIT SIGNALS IN 16 QUARTERS OF KEPLER MISSION DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenenbaum, Peter; Jenkins, Jon M.; Seader, Shawn; Burke, Christopher J.; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Rowe, Jason F.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Coughlin, Jeffrey L.; Li, Jie; Quintana, Elisa V.; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Thompson, Susan E.; Twicken, Joseph D. [SETI Institute/NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94305 (United States); Haas, Michael R.; Henze, Christopher E.; Hunter, Roger C.; Sanderfer, Dwight T. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94305 (United States); Campbell, Jennifer R.; Girouard, Forrest R., E-mail: peter.tenenbaum@nasa.gov [Orbital Sciences Corporation/NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94305 (United States); and others

    2014-03-01

    We present the results of a search for potential transit signals in 4 yr of photometry data acquired by the Kepler mission. The targets of the search include 111,800 stars which were observed for the entire interval and 85,522 stars which were observed for a subset of the interval. We found that 9743 targets contained at least one signal consistent with the signature of a transiting or eclipsing object where the criteria for detection are periodicity of the detected transits, adequate signal-to-noise ratio, and acceptance by a number of tests which reject false positive detections. When targets that had produced a signal were searched repeatedly, an additional 6542 signals were detected on 3223 target stars, for a total of 16,285 potential detections. Comparison of the set of detected signals with a set of known and vetted transit events in the Kepler field of view shows that the recovery rate for these signals is 96.9%. The ensemble properties of the detected signals are reviewed.

  19. Sparsity Adaptive Matching Pursuit Detection Algorithm Based on Compressed Sensing for Radar Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yanbo; Lu, Zhizhong; Yuan, Gannan; Fang, Zhao; Huang, Yu

    2017-05-13

    In this paper, the application of the emerging compressed sensing (CS) theory and the geometric characteristics of the targets in radar images are investigated. Currently, the signal detection algorithms based on the CS theory require knowing the prior knowledge of the sparsity of target signals. However, in practice, it is often impossible to know the sparsity in advance. To solve this problem, a novel sparsity adaptive matching pursuit (SAMP) detection algorithm is proposed. This algorithm executes the detection task by updating the support set and gradually increasing the sparsity to approximate the original signal. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm, the data collected in 2010 at Pingtan, which located on the coast of the East China Sea, were applied. Experiment results illustrate that the proposed method adaptively completes the detection task without knowing the signal sparsity, and the similar detection performance is close to the matching pursuit (MP) and orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP) detection algorithms.

  20. Detectability of CO2 Flux Signals by a Space-Based Lidar Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerling, Dorit M.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Schaefer, Kevin; Doney, Scott; Michalak, Anna M.

    2015-01-01

    Satellite observations of carbon dioxide (CO2) offer novel and distinctive opportunities for improving our quantitative understanding of the carbon cycle. Prospective observations include those from space-based lidar such as the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. Here we explore the ability of such a mission to detect regional changes in CO2 fluxes. We investigate these using three prototypical case studies, namely the thawing of permafrost in the Northern High Latitudes, the shifting of fossil fuel emissions from Europe to China, and changes in the source-sink characteristics of the Southern Ocean. These three scenarios were used to design signal detection studies to investigate the ability to detect the unfolding of these scenarios compared to a baseline scenario. Results indicate that the ASCENDS mission could detect the types of signals investigated in this study, with the caveat that the study is based on some simplifying assumptions. The permafrost thawing flux perturbation is readily detectable at a high level of significance. The fossil fuel emission detectability is directly related to the strength of the signal and the level of measurement noise. For a nominal (lower) fossil fuel emission signal, only the idealized noise-free instrument test case produces a clearly detectable signal, while experiments with more realistic noise levels capture the signal only in the higher (exaggerated) signal case. For the Southern Ocean scenario, differences due to the natural variability in the ENSO climatic mode are primarily detectable as a zonal increase.

  1. Lithium diffusion in spinel Li4Ti5O12 and LiTi2O4 films detected with 8Liβ -NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Jun; Umegaki, Izumi; Uyama, Takeshi; McFadden, Ryan M. L.; Shiraki, Susumu; Hitosugi, Taro; Salman, Zaher; Saadaoui, Hassan; Morris, Gerald D.; MacFarlane, W. Andrew; Kiefl, Robert F.

    2017-09-01

    Diffusion of Li+ in (111) oriented thin films of the spinels Li4Ti5O12 and LiTi2O4 has been studied with 8Liβ -detected NMR in the temperature range between 5 and 310 K. In Li4Ti5O12 , the spin-lattice relaxation rate (1 /T1 ) versus temperature shows a clear maximum around 100 K (=Tmax ) which we attribute to magnetic freezing of dilute Ti3 + local magnetic moments, consistent with the results of magnetization and muon spin relaxation (μ+SR ) measurements. The decrease in 1 /T1 with temperature above Tmax indicates that Li+ starts to diffuse with a thermal activation energy (Ea) of 0.11(1) eV. In LiTi2O4 , on the contrary, as temperature increases from 200 K, 1 /T1 increases monotonically up to 310 K. This suggests that Li also starts to diffuse above 200 K with Ea=0.16 (2 ) eV in LiTi2O4 . Comparison with conventional Li-NMR on Li4Ti5O12 implies that both β -NMR and μ+SR sense short-range Li motion, i.e., a jump diffusion of Li+ to the nearest neighboring sites.

  2. Weak Intermolecular Hydrogen Bonds with Fluorine: Detection and Implications for Enzymatic/Chemical Reactions, Chemical Properties, and Ligand/Protein Fluorine NMR Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalvit, Claudio; Vulpetti, Anna

    2016-05-23

    It is known that strong hydrogen-bonding interactions play an important role in many chemical and biological systems. However, weak or very weak hydrogen bonds, which are often difficult to detect and characterize, may also be relevant in many recognition and reaction processes. Fluorine serving as a hydrogen-bond acceptor has been the subject of many controversial discussions and there are different opinions about it. It now appears that there is compelling experimental evidence for the involvement of fluorine in weak intramolecular or intermolecular hydrogen bonds. Using established NMR methods, we have previously characterized and measured the strengths of intermolecular hydrogen-bond complexes involving the fluorine moieties CH2 F, CHF2 , and CF3 , and have compared them with the well-known hydrogen-bond complex formed between acetophenone and the strong hydrogen-bond donor p-fluorophenol. We now report evidence for the formation of hydrogen bonds involving fluorine with significantly weaker donors, namely 5-fluoroindole and water. A simple NMR method is proposed for the simultaneous measurement of the strengths of hydrogen bonds between an acceptor and a donor or water. Important implications of these results for enzymatic/chemical reactions involving fluorine, for chemical and physical properties, and for ligand/protein (19) F NMR screening are analyzed through experiments and theoretical simulations. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Separation of components of a broad 1H-NMR composite signal by means of nutation experiments under low amplitude radiofrequency fields. Application to the water signal in synthetic clays; Developpement et mise en oeuvre d'une nouvelle methode fondee sur le phenomene de nutation pour la decomposition d'un signal composite de resonance magnetique nucleaire. Application au signal 1h de l'eau dans des argiles synthetiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trausch, G

    2006-11-15

    Nowadays, geologic nuclear waste storage is envisioned according to a multi-layer model which implies clays. The latter exhibit retention capacities and low permeability to water; that is why they are considered as a good candidate for engineered barriers to radioactive waste disposal. The present work here aims at studying transport phenomena which involve water molecules in three samples of synthetic clays (two of them exhibiting a Pake doublet) by means of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). The first chapter describes structural properties of clays and presents the state-of-art of NMR and other experimental techniques used for such systems. The second chapter deals with the interpretation and the simulation of each conventional proton spectrum. These simulations allow us to evidence and to characterize a chemical exchange phenomenon. The third chapter is dedicated to original nutation experiments performed under low radiofrequency field in the case of broad NMR signal. It is shown that this type of NMR experiment can yield the number and the proportion of each species contributing to the whole signal. These results are exploited in the fourth chapter for processing relaxation and diffusion experiments. Finally, the diffusion coefficients obtained by NMR are divided by a factor 4 with respect to pure water while relaxation rates are two orders of magnitude greater. (author)

  4. Towards the use of learned dictionaries and compressive sensing in wideband signal detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreon, Jerry A.; Cabrera, Sergio D.

    2013-05-01

    Detection and estimation of wideband radio frequency signals are major functions of persistent surveillance systems and rely heavily on high sampling rates dictated by the Nyquist-Shannon sampling theorem. In this paper we address the problem of detecting wideband signals in the presence of AWGN and interference with a fraction of the measurements produced by traditional sampling protocols. Our approach uses learned dictionaries in order to work with less restriction on the class of signals to be analyzed and Compressive Sensing (CS) to reduce the number of samples required to process said signals. We apply the K-SVD technique to design a dictionary, reconstruct using a recently developed signal-centric reconstruction algorithm (SSCoSaMP), then use maximum likelihood estimation to detect and estimate the carrier frequencies of wideband RF signals while assuming no prior knowledge of the frequency location. This solution relaxes the assumption that signals are sparse in a fixed/predetermined orthonormal basis and reduces the number of measurements required to detect wideband signals all while having comparable error performance to traditional detection schemes. Simulations of frequency hopping signals corrupted by additive noise and chirp interference are presented. Other experimental results are included to illustrate the flexibility of learned dictionaries whereby the roles of the chirps and the sinusoids are reversed.

  5. A new phase modulated binomial-like selective-inversion sequence for solvent signal suppression in NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Johnny; Zheng, Gang; Price, William S

    2017-02-01

    A new 8-pulse Phase Modulated binomial-like selective inversion pulse sequence, dubbed '8PM', was developed by optimizing the nutation and phase angles of the constituent radio-frequency pulses so that the inversion profile resembled a target profile. Suppression profiles were obtained for both the 8PM and W5 based excitation sculpting sequences with equal inter-pulse delays. Significant distortions were observed in both profiles because of the offset effect of the radio frequency pulses. These distortions were successfully reduced by adjusting the inter-pulse delays. With adjusted inter-pulse delays, the 8PM and W5 based excitation sculpting sequences were tested on an aqueous lysozyme solution. The 8 PM based sequence provided higher suppression selectivity than the W5 based sequence. Two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy experiments were also performed on the lysozyme sample with 8PM and W5 based water signal suppression. The 8PM based suppression provided a spectrum with significantly increased (~ doubled) cross-peak intensity around the suppressed water resonance compared to the W5 based suppression. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. DETECTION OF POTENTIAL TRANSIT SIGNALS IN THE FIRST THREE QUARTERS OF Kepler MISSION DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenenbaum, Peter; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Rowe, Jason F.; Seader, Shawn; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Li, Jie; Quintana, Elisa V.; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Stumpe, Martin C.; Thompson, Susan E.; Twicken, Joseph D.; Van Cleve, Jeffrey [SETI Institute/NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94305 (United States); Borucki, William J.; Cote, Miles T.; Haas, Michael R.; Sanderfer, Dwight T. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94305 (United States); Girouard, Forrest R.; Klaus, Todd C., E-mail: peter.tenenbaum@nasa.gov [Orbital Sciences Corporation/NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94305 (United States); and others

    2012-03-01

    We present the results of a search for potential transit signals in the first three quarters of photometry data acquired by the Kepler mission. The targets of the search include 151,722 stars which were observed over the full interval and an additional 19,132 stars which were observed for only one or two quarters. From this set of targets we find a total of 5392 detections which meet the Kepler detection criteria: those criteria are periodicity of signal, an acceptable signal-to-noise ratio, and a composition test which rejects spurious detections which contain non-physical combinations of events. The detected signals are dominated by events with relatively low signal-to-noise ratio and by events with relatively short periods. The distribution of estimated transit depths appears to peak in the range between 40 and 100 parts per million, with a few detections down to fewer than 10 parts per million. The detections exhibit signal-to-noise ratios from 7.1{sigma}, which is the lower cutoff for detections, to over 10,000{sigma}, and periods ranging from 0.5 days, which is the lower cutoff used in the procedure, to 109 days, which is the upper limit of achievable periods given the length of the data set and the criteria used for detections. The detected signals are compared to a set of known transit events in the Kepler field of view which were derived by a different method using a longer data interval; the comparison shows that the current search correctly identified 88.1% of the known events. A tabulation of the detected transit signals, examples which illustrate the analysis and detection process, a discussion of future plans and open, potentially fruitful, areas of further research are included.

  7. Relaxation-compensated difference spin diffusion NMR for detecting 13C–13C long-range correlations in proteins and polysaccharides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Tuo; Williams, Jonathan K.; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus; Hong, Mei

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of long-range distances remains a challenge in solid-state NMR structure determination of biological macromolecules. In 2D and 3D correlation spectra of uniformly 13 C-labeled biomolecules, inter-residue, inter-segmental, and intermolecular 13 C– 13 C cross peaks that provide important long-range distance constraints for three-dimensional structures often overlap with short-range cross peaks that only reflect the covalent structure of the molecule. It is therefore desirable to develop new approaches to obtain spectra containing only long-range cross peaks. Here we show that a relaxation-compensated modification of the commonly used 2D 1 H-driven spin diffusion (PDSD) experiment allows the clean detection of such long-range cross peaks. By adding a z-filter to keep the total z-period of the experiment constant, we compensate for 13 C T 1 relaxation. As a result, the difference spectrum between a long- and a scaled short-mixing time spectrum show only long-range correlation signals. We show that one- and two-bond cross peaks equalize within a few tens of milliseconds. Within ∼200 ms, the intensity equilibrates within an amino acid residue and a monosaccharide to a value that reflects the number of spins in the local network. With T 1 relaxation compensation, at longer mixing times, inter-residue and inter-segmental cross peaks increase in intensity whereas intra-segmental cross-peak intensities remain unchanged relative to each other and can all be subtracted out. Without relaxation compensation, the difference 2D spectra exhibit both negative and positive intensities due to heterogeneous T 1 relaxation in most biomolecules, which can cause peak cancellation. We demonstrate this relaxation-compensated difference PDSD approach on amino acids, monosaccharides, a crystalline model peptide, a membrane-bound peptide and a plant cell wall sample. The resulting difference spectra yield clean multi-bond, inter-residue and intermolecular correlation peaks

  8. Alternative vehicle detection technologies for traffic signal systems : technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    Due to the well-documented problems associated with inductive loops, most jurisdictions have : replaced many intersection loops with video image vehicle detection systems (VIVDS). While VIVDS : have overcome some of the problems with loops such as tr...

  9. Application of Trend Detection Methods in Monitoring Physiological Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William W. Melek

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comparative study of various trend detection methods developed using fuzzy logic, statistical, and regression techniques. A new method that uses noise rejection fuzzy clustering is also proposed in the paper to enhance the performance of trend detection methodologies. The comparative investigation has produced systematic guidelines for the selection of a proper trend detection method for different application requirements. This paper has resulted from work on military applications of on-line trend analysis, such as monitoring of wounded soldiers by first-response medical staff at the battlefield and high-acceleration protection of fighter jet pilots. Efficient trend detection methods can provide early warnings, severity assessments of a subject's physiological state, and decision support for firstresponse medical attendants. Representative physiological variables such as blood pressure, heartbeat rate, and ear opacity are considered in this paper.

  10. Development Of Signal Detection For Radar Navigation System

    OpenAIRE

    Theingi Win Hlaing; Hla Myo Tun; Zaw Min Naing; Win Khaing Moe

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to evaluate the performance of target detection in the presence of sea clutter. Radar detection of a background of unwanted clutter due to echoes from sea clutter or land is a problem of interest in the radar field. Radar detector has been developed by assuming the radar clutter is Gaussian distributed. However as technology emerges the radar distribution is seen to deviates from the Gaussian assumption. Thus detectors designs based on Gaussian assumption are no longer optimum...

  11. Detection of olive oil adulteration by low-field NMR relaxometry and UV-Vis spectroscopy upon mixing olive oil with various edible oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ok

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Adulteration of olive oil using unhealthy substitutes is considered a threat for public health. Low-field (LF proton (1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR relaxometry and ultra-violet (UV visible spectroscopy are used to detect adulteration of olive oil. Three different olive oil with different oleoyl acyl contents were mixed with almond, castor, corn, and sesame oils with three volumetric ratios, respectively. In addition, Arbequina olive oil was mixed with canola, flax, grape seed, peanut, soybean, and sunflower seed oils with three volumetric ratios. Transverse magnetization relaxation time (T2 curves were fitted with bi-exponential decaying functions. T2 times of each mixture of olive oils and castor oils, and olive oils and corn oils changed systematically as a function of volumetric ratio. To detect the adulteration in the mixtures with almond and sesame oils, both LF 1H NMR relaxometry and UV-Vis spectroscopy were needed, where UV-Vis-spectroscopy detected the adulteration qualitatively. In the mixtures of Arbequina olive oil and flax, peanut, soybean, and sunflower seed oils, both T21 and T22 values became longer systematically as the content of the olive oil was decreased. The unique UV-Vis maximum absorbance of flax oil at 320.0 nm shows the adulteration of olive oil qualitatively.

  12. Detection of olive oil adulteration by low-field NMR relaxometry and UV-Vis spectroscopy upon mixing olive oil with various edible oils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ok, S.

    2017-01-01

    Adulteration of olive oil using unhealthy substitutes is considered a threat for public health. Low-field (LF) proton (1H) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry and ultra-violet (UV) visible spectroscopy are used to detect adulteration of olive oil. Three different olive oil with different oleoyl acyl contents were mixed with almond, castor, corn, and sesame oils with three volumetric ratios, respectively. In addition, Arbequina olive oil was mixed with canola, flax, grape seed, peanut, soybean, and sunflower seed oils with three volumetric ratios. Transverse magnetization relaxation time (T2) curves were fitted with bi-exponential decaying functions. T2 times of each mixture of olive oils and castor oils, and olive oils and corn oils changed systematically as a function of volumetric ratio. To detect the adulteration in the mixtures with almond and sesame oils, both LF 1H NMR relaxometry and UV-Vis spectroscopy were needed, where UV-Vis-spectroscopy detected the adulteration qualitatively. In the mixtures of Arbequina olive oil and flax, peanut, soybean, and sunflower seed oils, both T21 and T22 values became longer systematically as the content of the olive oil was decreased. The unique UV-Vis maximum absorbance of flax oil at 320.0 nm shows the adulteration of olive oil qualitatively. [es

  13. Colorless detection of NRZ-DPSK signals using electro-optic clock re-modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zsigri, Beata; Tokle, Torger; Peucheret, Christophe

    2010-01-01

    Wavelength-independent detection of NRZ-DPSK signals is proposed and demonstrated at 43 Gbit/s. The scheme relies on re-modulation of the incoming NRZ-DPSK signal with a recovered electrical clock. Good performance is obtained after dispersion managed transmission.......Wavelength-independent detection of NRZ-DPSK signals is proposed and demonstrated at 43 Gbit/s. The scheme relies on re-modulation of the incoming NRZ-DPSK signal with a recovered electrical clock. Good performance is obtained after dispersion managed transmission....

  14. Nontargeted nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis to detect hazardous substances including methanol in unrecorded alcohol from Novosibirsk, Russia

    OpenAIRE

    Hausler, Thomas; Okaru,  Alex O.; Neufeld, Maria; Rehm, Jürgen; Kuballa, Thomas; Luy, Burkhard; Lachenmeier, Dirk W.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was applied to the analysis of alcoholic products in the context of health and safety control. A total of 86 samples of unrecorded alcohol were collected in Novosibirsk and nearby cities in Russia. Sampling was based on interviews with alcohol dependent patients, and unrecorded alcohol thus defined included illegally or informally produced alcoholic products (e.g., counterfeit or home-made alcoholic beverages) or surrogate alcohol in the form of c...

  15. {sup 1}H NMR-based spectroscopy detects metabolic alterations in serum of patients with early-stage ulcerative colitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ying; Lin, Lianjie [Second Department of Gastroenterology, Shengjing Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Xu, Yanbin [Wanlei Life Sciences (Shenyang) Co., Ltd., Shenyang 110179 (China); Lin, Yan; Jin, Yu [Second Department of Gastroenterology, Shengjing Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Zheng, Changqing, E-mail: changqing_zheng@126.com [Second Department of Gastroenterology, Shengjing Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang 110004 (China)

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Twenty ulcerative colitis patients and nineteen healthy controls were enrolled. •Increased 3-hydroxybutyrate, glucose, phenylalanine, and decreased lipid were found. •We report early stage diagnosis of ulcerative colitis using NMR-based metabolomics. -- Abstract: Ulcerative colitis (UC) has seriously impaired the health of citizens. Accurate diagnosis of UC at an early stage is crucial to improve the efficiency of treatment and prognosis. In this study, proton nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H NMR)-based metabolomic analysis was performed on serum samples collected from active UC patients (n = 20) and healthy controls (n = 19), respectively. The obtained spectral profiles were subjected to multivariate data analysis. Our results showed that consistent metabolic alterations were present between the two groups. Compared to healthy controls, UC patients displayed increased 3-hydroxybutyrate, β-glucose, α-glucose, and phenylalanine, but decreased lipid in serum. These findings highlight the possibilities of NMR-based metabolomics as a non-invasive diagnostic tool for UC.

  16. Multiple active site histidine protonation states in Acetobacter aceti N5-carboxyaminoimidazole ribonucleotide mutase detected by REDOR NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Jacob; Jiang, Hong; Ransome, Aaron E; Kappock, T Joseph

    2007-08-21

    Class I PurE (N5-carboxyaminoimidazole mutase) catalyzes a chemically unique mutase reaction. A working mechanistic hypothesis involves a histidine (His45 in Escherichia coli PurE) functioning as a general acid, but no evidence for multiple protonation states has been obtained. Solution NMR is a peerless tool for this task but has had limited application to enzymes, most of which are larger than its effective molecular size limit. Solid-state NMR is not subject to this limit. REDOR NMR studies of a 151 kDa complex of uniformly 15N-labeled Acetobacter aceti PurE (AaPurE) and the active site ligand [6-13C]citrate probed a single ionization equilibrium associated with the key histidine (AaPurE His59). In the AaPurE complex, the citrate central carboxylate C6 13C peak moves upfield, indicating diminution of negative charge, and broadens, indicating heterogeneity. Histidine 15N chemical shifts indicate His59 exists in approximately equimolar amounts of an Ndelta-unprotonated (pyridine-like) form and an Ndelta-protonated (pyrrole-like) form, each of which is approximately 4 A from citrate C6. The spectroscopic data are consistent with proton transfers involving His59 Ndelta that are invoked in the class I PurE mechanism.

  17. Stone porosity, wettability changes and other features detected by MRI and NMR relaxometry: a more than 15-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camaiti, Mara; Bortolotti, Villiam; Fantazzini, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Scientists applying magnetic resonance techniques to cultural heritage are now a quite vast and international community, even if these applications are not yet well known outside this community. Not only laboratory experiments but also measurements in the field are now possible, with the use of portable nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) instruments that enable non-invasive and non-destructive studies on items of any size, of high artistic and historical value as well as diagnosis of their conservation state. The situation was completely different in the second half of the 1990s when our group started working on applications of NMR to cultural heritage, by combining the knowledge of NMR for fluids in porous media at the University of Bologna, with the skilfulness of the chemists for cultural heritage of CNR and University of Florence, and Safeguarding Cultural Heritage Department of Aosta. Since then, our interest has been mainly devoted to develop methods to study the structure of pore space and their changes as a result of the decay, as well as to evaluate performance of the protective and conservative treatments of porous materials like stone, ceramic, cements and wood. In this paper, we will review the pathway that led us from the first tentative experiments, in the second half of the 1990s to the current work on these topics. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Targeted Molecular Imaging of Cancer Cells Using MS2-Based 129 Xe NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Keunhong [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Netirojjanakul, Chawita [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Munch, Henrik K. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Sun, Jinny [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Finbloom, Joel A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Wemmer, David E. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Physical Biosciences Division; Pines, Alexander [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Francis, Matthew B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division

    2016-07-25

    Targeted, selective, and highly sensitive 129Xe NMR nanoscale biosensors have been synthesized using a spherical MS2 viral capsid, Cryptophane A molecules, and DNA aptamers. The biosensors showed strong binding specificity toward targeted lymphoma cells (Ramos line). Hyperpolarized 129Xe NMR signal contrast and hyper-CEST 129Xe MRI image contrast indicated its promise as highly sensitive hyperpolarized 129Xe NMR nanoscale biosensor for future applications in cancer detection in vivo.

  19. A new ultrasonic signal amplification method for detection of bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, Shiva Kant; López, Pablo Resa; Sánchez, Carlos Sierra; Segura, Luis Elvira; Urréjola, José

    2012-01-01

    A new method is presented that increases the sensitivity of ultrasound-based techniques for detection of bacteria. The technique was developed for the detection of catalase-positive microorganisms. It uses a bubble trapping medium containing hydrogen peroxide that is mixed with the sample for microbiological evaluation. The enzyme catalase is present in catalase-positive bacteria, which induces a rapid hydrolysis of hydrogen peroxide, forming bubbles which remain in the medium. This reaction results in the amplification of the mechanical changes that the microorganisms produce in the medium. The effect can be detected by means of ultrasonic wave amplitude continuous measurement since the bubbles increase the ultrasonic attenuation significantly. It is shown that microorganism concentrations of the order of 10 5 cells ml −1 can be detected using this method. This allows an improvement of three orders of magnitude in the ultrasonic detection threshold of microorganisms in conventional culture media, and is competitive with modern rapid microbiological methods. It can also be used for the characterization of the enzymatic activity. (paper)

  20. A new ultrasonic signal amplification method for detection of bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant Shukla, Shiva; Resa López, Pablo; Sierra Sánchez, Carlos; Urréjola, José; Segura, Luis Elvira

    2012-10-01

    A new method is presented that increases the sensitivity of ultrasound-based techniques for detection of bacteria. The technique was developed for the detection of catalase-positive microorganisms. It uses a bubble trapping medium containing hydrogen peroxide that is mixed with the sample for microbiological evaluation. The enzyme catalase is present in catalase-positive bacteria, which induces a rapid hydrolysis of hydrogen peroxide, forming bubbles which remain in the medium. This reaction results in the amplification of the mechanical changes that the microorganisms produce in the medium. The effect can be detected by means of ultrasonic wave amplitude continuous measurement since the bubbles increase the ultrasonic attenuation significantly. It is shown that microorganism concentrations of the order of 105 cells ml-1 can be detected using this method. This allows an improvement of three orders of magnitude in the ultrasonic detection threshold of microorganisms in conventional culture media, and is competitive with modern rapid microbiological methods. It can also be used for the characterization of the enzymatic activity.

  1. Computer-aided design of fragment mixtures for NMR-based screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, Xavier; Goldflam, Michael; Feliz, Miguel; Belda, Ignasi; Giralt, Ernest

    2013-01-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery is widely applied both in industrial and in academic screening programs. Several screening techniques rely on NMR to detect binding of a fragment to a target. NMR-based methods are among the most sensitive techniques and have the further advantage of yielding a low rate of false positives and negatives. However, NMR is intrinsically slower than other screening techniques; thus, to increase throughput in NMR-based screening, researchers often assay mixtures of fragments, rather than single fragments. Herein we present a fast and straightforward computer-aided method to design mixtures of fragments taken from a library that have minimized NMR signal overlap. This approach enables direct identification of one or several active fragments without the need for deconvolution. Our approach entails encoding of NMR spectra into a computer-readable format that we call a fingerprint, and minimizing the global signal overlap through a Monte Carlo algorithm. The scoring function used favors a homogenous distribution of the global signal overlap. The method does not require additional experimental work: the only data required are NMR spectra, which are generally recorded for each compound as a quality control measure before its insertion into the library.

  2. Spontaneous Alpha Power Lateralization Predicts Detection Performance in an Un-Cued Signal Detection Task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Boncompte

    Full Text Available Focusing one's attention by external guiding stimuli towards a specific area of the visual field produces systematical neural signatures. One of the most robust is the change in topological distribution of oscillatory alpha band activity across parieto-occipital cortices. In particular, decreases in alpha activity over contralateral and/or increases over ipsilateral scalp sites, respect to the side of the visual field where attention was focused. This evidence comes mainly from experiments where an explicit cue informs subjects where to focus their attention, thus facilitating detection of an upcoming target stimulus. However, recent theoretical models of attention have highlighted a stochastic or non-deterministic component related to visuospatial attentional allocation. In an attempt to evidence this component, here we analyzed alpha activity in a signal detection paradigm in the lack of informative cues; in the absence of preceding information about the location (and time of appearance of target stimuli. We believe that the unpredictability of this situation could be beneficial for unveiling this component. Interestingly, although total alpha power did not differ between Seen and Unseen conditions, we found a significant lateralization of alpha activity over parieto-occipital electrodes, which predicted behavioral performance. This effect had a smaller magnitude compared to paradigms in which attention is externally guided (cued. However we believe that further characterization of this spontaneous component of attention is of great importance in the study of visuospatial attentional dynamics. These results support the presence of a spontaneous component of visuospatial attentional allocation and they advance pre-stimulus alpha-band lateralization as one of its neural signatures.

  3. Resonance detection of EEG signals using two-layer wavelet analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdallah, H. M; Odeh, F.S.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the hybrid quadrature mirror filter (HQMF) algorithm applied to the electroencephalogram (EEG) signal during mental activity. The information contents of this signal, i.e., its medical diagnosis, lie in its power spectral density (PSD). The HQMF algorithm is a modified technique that is based on the shape and the details of the signal. If applied efficiently, the HQMF algorithm will produce much better results than conventional wavelet methods in detecting (diagnosing) the information of the EEG signal from its PSD. This technique is applicable not only to EEG signals, but is highly recommended to compression analysis and de noising techniques. (authors). 16 refs., 9 figs

  4. {beta}-nmr of Palladium foil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parolin, T.J. [Department of Chemistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Salman, Z. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Chakhalian, J. [Max-Plank Institute for Solid State Research, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Wang, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Keeler, T.A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Hossain, Md. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Kiefl, R.F. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (Canada); Chow, K.H. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2J1 (Canada); Morris, G.D. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Miller, R.I. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); MacFarlane, W.A. [Department of Chemistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada)]. E-mail: wam@chem.ubc.ca

    2006-03-31

    Beta-detected NMR ({beta}-nmr) of low-energy implanted {sup 8}Li{sup +} was studied in metallic palladium. The resonance was found to have a large negative shift with respect to the reference signal in the cubic insulator MgO. This shift exhibited significant temperature dependence on cooling below room temperature, approximately proportionate to the temperature-dependent spin susceptibility of pure Pd. Thus it is tentatively attributed to a Knight shift (K) caused by a large negative hyperfine coupling; a phenomenon common in transition metal ions, but not in alkalis. However, the spin-lattice relaxation of {sup 8}Li is much slower than expected from the Korringa law for such a large K. We compare results from samples of very different thicknesses: 12.5{mu}m foil and a 100nm thin film.

  5. Robust detection of heartbeats using association models from blood pressure and EEG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Taegyun; Yu, Jongmin; Pedrycz, Witold; Jeon, Moongu; Lee, Boreom; Lee, Byeongcheol

    2016-01-15

    The heartbeat is fundamental cardiac activity which is straightforwardly detected with a variety of measurement techniques for analyzing physiological signals. Unfortunately, unexpected noise or contaminated signals can distort or cut out electrocardiogram (ECG) signals in practice, misleading the heartbeat detectors to report a false heart rate or suspend itself for a considerable length of time in the worst case. To deal with the problem of unreliable heartbeat detection, PhysioNet/CinC suggests a challenge in 2014 for developing robust heart beat detectors using multimodal signals. This article proposes a multimodal data association method that supplements ECG as a primary input signal with blood pressure (BP) and electroencephalogram (EEG) as complementary input signals when input signals are unreliable. If the current signal quality index (SQI) qualifies ECG as a reliable input signal, our method applies QRS detection to ECG and reports heartbeats. Otherwise, the current SQI selects the best supplementary input signal between BP and EEG after evaluating the current SQI of BP. When BP is chosen as a supplementary input signal, our association model between ECG and BP enables us to compute their regular intervals, detect characteristics BP signals, and estimate the locations of the heartbeat. When both ECG and BP are not qualified, our fusion method resorts to the association model between ECG and EEG that allows us to apply an adaptive filter to ECG and EEG, extract the QRS candidates, and report heartbeats. The proposed method achieved an overall score of 86.26 % for the test data when the input signals are unreliable. Our method outperformed the traditional method, which achieved 79.28 % using QRS detector and BP detector from PhysioNet. Our multimodal signal processing method outperforms the conventional unimodal method of taking ECG signals alone for both training and test data sets. To detect the heartbeat robustly, we have proposed a novel multimodal data

  6. Comparison of digital signal-signal beat interference compensation techniques in direct-detection subcarrier modulation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhe; Erkilinc, M Sezer; Galdino, Lidia; Shi, Kai; Thomsen, Benn C; Bayvel, Polina; Killey, Robert I

    2016-12-12

    Single-polarization direct-detection transceivers may offer advantages compared to digital coherent technology for some metro, back-haul, access and inter-data center applications since they offer low-cost and complexity solutions. However, a direct-detection receiver introduces nonlinearity upon photo detection, since it is a square-law device, which results in signal distortion due to signal-signal beat interference (SSBI). Consequently, it is desirable to develop effective and low-cost SSBI compensation techniques to improve the performance of such transceivers. In this paper, we compare the performance of a number of recently proposed digital signal processing-based SSBI compensation schemes, including the use of single- and two-stage linearization filters, an iterative linearization filter and a SSBI estimation and cancellation technique. Their performance is assessed experimentally using a 7 × 25 Gb/s wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) single-sideband 16-QAM Nyquist-subcarrier modulation system operating at a net information spectral density of 2.3 (b/s)/Hz.

  7. Signal analysis and anomaly detection for flood early warning systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pyayt, A.L.; Kozionov, A.P.; Kusherbaeva, V.T.; Mokhov, I.I.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V.V.; Broekhuijsen, B.J.; Meijer, R.J.; Sloot, P.M.A.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the detection methods and the results of anomalous conditions in dikes (earthen dams/levees) based on a simultaneous processing of several data streams originating from sensors installed in these dikes. Applied methods are especially valuable in cases where lack of information or

  8. Signal Detection using ICA: Application to Chat Room Topic Spotting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolenda, Thomas; Hansen, Lars Kai; Larsen, Jan

    2001-01-01

    of components is significant relative to a ``white noise'' null hypothesis. It was recently proposed to use the so-called Bayesian information criterion (BIC) approximation, for estimation of such probabilities of competing hypotheses. Here, we apply this approach to the understanding of chat. We show that ICA...... can detect meaningful context structures in a chat room log file....

  9. Detection of Epileptic Seizures with Multi-modal Signal Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa

    The main focus of this dissertation lies within the area of epileptic seizure detection. Medically refractory epileptic patients suffer from the unawareness of when the next seizure sets in, and what the consequences will be. A wearable device based on uni- or multi-modalities able to detect and ...... implemented in a wireless sEMG device. A double-blind test on patients in the clinic, showed 100 % reliability for three of four patients, whereas it failed for the last patient, who had atypical GTC seizures....... and alarm whenever a seizure starts is of great importance to these patients and their relatives, in the sense, that the alert of the seizure will make them feel more safe. Thus the objective of the project is to investigate the movements of convulsive epileptic seizures and design seizure detection...... methods have been applied in different studies in order to achieve the goal of reliable seizure detection. In the first study we present a method where the support vector machine classifier is applied on features based on wavelet bands. This was used on multi-modal data from control subjects...

  10. Static corrections for enhanced signal detection at IMS seismic arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Neil; Wookey, James; Selby, Neil

    2016-04-01

    Seismic monitoring forms an important part of the International Monitoring System (IMS) for verifying the Comprehensive nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). Analysis of seismic data can be used to discriminate between nuclear explosions and the tens of thousands of natural earthquakes of similar magnitude that occur every year. This is known as "forensic seismology", and techniques include measuring the P-to-S wave amplitude ratio, the body-to-surface wave magnitude ratio (mb/Ms), and source depth. Measurement of these seismic discriminants requires very high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) data, and this has led to the development and deployment of seismic arrays as part of the IMS. Array processing methodologies such as stacking can be used, but optimum SNR improvement needs an accurate estimate of the arrival time of the particular seismic phase. To enhance the imaging capability of IMS arrays, we aim to develop site-specific static corrections to the arrival time as a function of frequency, slowness and backazimuth. Here, we present initial results for the IMS TORD array in Niger. Vespagrams are calculated for various events using the F-statistic to clearly identify seismic phases and measure their arrival times. Observed arrival times are compared with those predicted by 1D and 3D velocity models, and residuals are calculated for a range of backazimuths and slownesses. Finally, we demonstrate the improvement in signal fidelity provided by these corrections.

  11. High resolution NMR theory and chemical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Edwin D

    1969-01-01

    High Resolution NMR: Theory and Chemical Applications focuses on the applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), as well as chemical shifts, lattices, and couplings. The book first offers information on the theory of NMR, including nuclear spin and magnetic moment, spin lattice relaxation, line widths, saturation, quantum mechanical description of NMR, and ringing. The text then ponders on instrumentation and techniques and chemical shifts. Discussions focus on the origin of chemical shifts, reference compounds, empirical correlations of chemical shifts, modulation and phase detection,

  12. Detecting impact signal in mechanical fault diagnosis under chaotic and Gaussian background noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jinfeng; Duan, Jie; Chen, Zhuo; Li, Huiyong; Xie, Julan; Chen, Hanwen

    2018-01-01

    In actual fault diagnosis, useful information is often submerged in heavy noise, and the feature information is difficult to extract. Traditional methods, such like stochastic resonance (SR), which using noise to enhance weak signals instead of suppressing noise, failed in chaotic background. Neural network, which use reference sequence to estimate and reconstruct the background noise, failed in white Gaussian noise. To solve these problems, a novel weak signal detection method aimed at the problem of detecting impact signal buried under heavy chaotic and Gaussian background noise is proposed. First, the proposed method obtains the virtual reference sequence by constructing the Hankel data matrix. Then an M-order optimal FIR filter is designed, which can minimize the output power of background noise and pass the weak periodic signal undistorted. Finally, detection and reconstruction of the weak periodic signal are achieved from the output SBNR (signal to background noise ratio). The simulation shows, compared with the stochastic resonance (SR) method, the proposed method can detect the weak periodic signal in chaotic noise background while stochastic resonance (SR) method cannot. Compared with the neural network method, (a) the proposed method does not need a reference sequence while neural network method needs one; (b) the proposed method can detect the weak periodic signal in white Gaussian noise background while the neural network method fails, in chaotic noise background, the proposed method can detect the weak periodic signal under a lower SBNR (about 8-17 dB lower) than the neural network method; (c) the proposed method can reconstruct the weak periodic signal precisely.

  13. Time-Frequency Analysis of Terahertz Radar Signals for Rapid Heart and Breath Rate Detection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Massar, Melody L

    2008-01-01

    We develop new time-frequency analytic techniques which facilitate the detection of a person's heart and breath rates from the Doppler shift the movement of their body induces in a terahertz radar signal...

  14. An application of signal detection theory for understanding driver behavior at highway-rail grade crossings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-19

    We used signal detection theory to examine if grade crossing warning devices were effective because they increased drivers' sensitivity to a train's approach or because they encouraged drivers to stop. We estimated d' and a for eight warning devices ...

  15. Evaluating the impact of grade crossing safety factors through signal detection theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-22

    The purpose of this effort was to apply signal detection theory to descriptively model the impact : of five grade crossing safety factors to understand their effect on driver decision making. The : safety factors consisted of: improving commercial mo...

  16. Detection of non-stationary leak signals at NPP primary circuit by cross-correlation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimanskij, S.B.

    2007-01-01

    A leak-detection system employing high-temperature microphones has been developed for the RBMK and ATR (Japan) reactors. Further improvement of the system focused on using cross-correlation analysis of the spectral components of the signal to detect a small leak at an early stage of development. Since envelope processes are less affected by distortions than are wave processes, they give a higher-degree of correlation and can be used to detect leaks with lower signal-noise ratios. Many simulation tests performed at nuclear power plants have shown that the proposed methods can be used to detect and find the location of a small leak [ru

  17. Proximity-dependent protein detection based on enzyme-assisted fluorescence signal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yuyu; Guo, Qiuping; Zhao, Xiayu; Yang, Xiaohai; Wang, Kemin; Huang, Jin; Zhou, Yu

    2014-01-15

    In this paper, we develop a sensitive fluorescence method for protein detection based on proximity extension and enzyme-assisted signal amplification. In this novel method, pairs of proximity probes are designed, and the recognition elements are integrated into the proximity probes. Then proteins are detected by transforming aptamer or antibody-protein binding signals into DNA detection based on proximity effect. In addition, nick sites are introduced into the proximity probes to amplify the detectable signal. As proof of concept, detection of human α-thrombin and human IgG are demonstrated in this study. The aptamers and antibodies are coupled in the proximity probes as recognition elements for human α-thrombin and human IgG respectively. In the presence of target protein, aptamer or antibody-protein binding signals are transformed into detectable signals by the proximity effect, and can be further amplified by enzyme-assisted strand displacement. The above mentioned strategies consequently bring the limit of detection (LOD) to as low as 1 pM for human α-thrombin and 6 pM for human IgG. Furthermore, this method might be extended to sensitive detection of other proteins by changing recognition elements of proximity probes. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Wavelet transform for real-time detection of action potentials in neural signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam eQuotb

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a study on wavelet detection methods of neuronal Action Potentials (APs. Our final goal is to implement the selected algorithms on custom integrated electronics for on-line processing of neural signals; therefore we take real-time computing as a hard specification and silicon area as a price to pay. Using simulated neural signals including APs, we characterize an efficient wavelet method for action potential extraction by evaluating its detection rate and its implementation cost. We compare software implementation for three methods: adaptive threshold, Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT and Stationary Wavelet Transform (SWT. We evaluate detection rate and implementation cost for detection functions dynamically comparing a signal with an adaptive threshold proportional to its standard deviation, where the signal is the raw neural signal, respectively: i non processed; ii processed by a Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT; iii processed by a Stationary Wavelet Transform (SWT. We also use different mother wavelets and test different data formats to set an optimal compromise between accuracy and silicon cost. Detection accuracy is evaluated together with false negative and false positive detections. Simulation results show that for on-line AP detection implemented on a configurable digital integrated circuit, APs underneath the noise level can be detected using SWT with a well-selected mother wavelet, combined to an adaptive threshold.

  19. Detection of random signals in dependent Gaussian noise

    CERN Document Server

    Gualtierotti, Antonio F

    2015-01-01

    The book presents the necessary mathematical basis to obtain and rigorously use likelihoods for detection problems with Gaussian noise. To facilitate comprehension the text is divided into three broad areas –  reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces, Cramér-Hida representations and stochastic calculus – for which a somewhat different approach was used than in their usual stand-alone context. One main applicable result of the book involves arriving at a general solution to the canonical detection problem for active sonar in a reverberation-limited environment. Nonetheless, the general problems dealt with in the text also provide a useful framework for discussing other current research areas, such as wavelet decompositions, neural networks, and higher order spectral analysis. The structure of the book, with the exposition presenting as many details as necessary, was chosen to serve both those readers who are chiefly interested in the results and those who want to learn the material from scratch. Hence, the text...

  20. Signal processing for solar array monitoring, fault detection, and optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, Henry; Spanias, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Although the solar energy industry has experienced rapid growth recently, high-level management of photovoltaic (PV) arrays has remained an open problem. As sensing and monitoring technology continues to improve, there is an opportunity to deploy sensors in PV arrays in order to improve their management. In this book, we examine the potential role of sensing and monitoring technology in a PV context, focusing on the areas of fault detection, topology optimization, and performance evaluation/data visualization. First, several types of commonly occurring PV array faults are considered and detection algorithms are described. Next, the potential for dynamic optimization of an array's topology is discussed, with a focus on mitigation of fault conditions and optimization of power output under non-fault conditions. Finally, monitoring system design considerations such as type and accuracy of measurements, sampling rate, and communication protocols are considered. It is our hope that the benefits of monitoring presen...

  1. Ultra Wideband Signal Detection with a Schottky Diode Based Envelope Detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rommel, Simon; Cimoli, Bruno; Valdecasa, Guillermo Silva

    . The receiver is able to detect an ultra-wideband signal compliant with the Federal Communications Commission (fcc) regulations for uwb transmission and consisting of a 2.5 Gbit/s non-return-to-zero (nrz) data signal on a 6.9 GHz carrier after 20 cm wireless transmission. Bit error rates (ber) below the forward...

  2. Optically envelope detected QAM and QPSK RF modulated signals in hybrid wireless-fiber systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso; Prince, Kamau; Seoane, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate optical envelope detection of 40 Mbaud 16-QAM and QPSK RF modulated signals. The proposed system employs an electro-absorption modulator performing the function of an optical halfwave rectifier. In this experiment, the QAM and QPSK signals are frequency down converted...

  3. Heterodyne detection of CPFSK signals with and without wavelength conversion up to 5 Gb/s

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rune Johan Skullerud; Ebskamp, F.; Mikkelsen, Benny

    1993-01-01

    Detection of wavelength converted signals by a coherent continuous-phase frequency-shift-keying receiver is reported. The signals are wavelength converted over 35 nm, and record receiver sensitivities of -38.7 dBm at 4.0Gb/s and -35.6 dBm at 4.8Gb/s are obtained. Comparison between results...

  4. Catalytic signal amplification using [Fe(III)(biuret-amide)]-mesoporous silica nanoparticles: visual cyanide detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Chakadola; Dhar, Basab B; Malvi, Bharmana; Bhattacharjee, Yudhajit; Gupta, Sayam Sen

    2013-03-18

    Catalytic signal amplification was used for the colorimetric detection of CN(-) in aqueous media by using the enzyme catalase in tandem with mesoporous silica nanoparticle based synthetic HRP enzyme mimic Fe-MSNs. Signal amplification up to a maximum of eight fold was observed for the reporter "oxidized TMB" with respect to the added CN(-) ion.

  5. Criteria for assessing the quality of signal processing techniques for acoustic leak detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhakar, R.; Singh, O.P.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper the criteria used in the first IAEA coordinated research programme to assess the quality of signal processing techniques for sodium boiling noise detection are highlighted. Signal processing techniques, using new features sensitive to boiling and a new approach for achieving higher reliability of detection, which were developed at Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research are also presented. 10 refs, 3 figs, 2 tabs

  6. Detecting signals of seasonal influenza severity through age dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Elizabeth C.; Viboud, Cécile; Simonsen, Lone

    2015-01-01

    stages of an outbreak. To address the limitations of traditional indicators, we propose a novel severity index based on influenza age dynamics estimated from routine physician diagnosis data that can be used retrospectively and for early warning. METHODS: We developed a quantitative 'ground truth......' severity benchmark that synthesizes multiple traditional severity indicators from publicly available influenza surveillance data in the United States. Observing that the age distribution of cases may signal severity early in an epidemic, we constructed novel retrospective and early warning severity indexes....... The retrospective index was well correlated with the severity benchmark and correctly identified the two most severe seasons. The early warning index performance varied, but it projected 2007-08 as relatively severe 10 weeks prior to the epidemic peak. Influenza severity varied significantly among states within...

  7. Heat Shock Proteins as Danger Signals for Cancer Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seigneuric, Renaud; Mjahed, Hajare; Gobbo, Jessica; Joly, Anne-Laure; Berthenet, Kevin; Shirley, Sarah; Garrido, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    First discovered in 1962, heat shock proteins (HSPs) are highly studied with about 35,500 publications on the subject to date. HSPs are highly conserved, function as molecular chaperones for a large panel of “client” proteins and have strong cytoprotective properties. Induced by many different stress signals, they promote cell survival in adverse conditions. Therefore, their roles have been investigated in several conditions and pathologies where HSPs accumulate, such as in cancer. Among the diverse mammalian HSPs, some members share several features that may qualify them as cancer biomarkers. This review focuses mainly on three inducible HSPs: HSP27, HPS70, and HSP90. Our survey of recent literature highlights some recurring weaknesses in studies of the HSPs, but also identifies findings that indicate that some HSPs have potential as cancer biomarkers for successful clinical applications.

  8. Target-specific NMR detection of protein–ligand interactions with antibody-relayed {sup 15}N-group selective STD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hetényi, Anasztázia [University of Szeged, Department of Medical Chemistry (Hungary); Hegedűs, Zsófia [University of Szeged, SZTE-MTA Lendület Foldamer Research Group, Institute of Pharmaceutical Analysis Department (Hungary); Fajka-Boja, Roberta; Monostori, Éva [Biological Research Center of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Lymphocyte Signal Transduction Laboratory, Institute of Genetics (Hungary); Kövér, Katalin E. [University of Debrecen, Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry (Hungary); Martinek, Tamás A., E-mail: martinek@pharm.u-szeged.hu [University of Szeged, SZTE-MTA Lendület Foldamer Research Group, Institute of Pharmaceutical Analysis Department (Hungary)

    2016-12-15

    Fragment-based drug design has been successfully applied to challenging targets where the detection of the weak protein–ligand interactions is a key element. {sup 1}H saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy is a powerful technique for this work but it requires pure homogeneous proteins as targets. Monoclonal antibody (mAb)-relayed {sup 15}N-GS STD spectroscopy has been developed to resolve the problem of protein mixtures and impure proteins. A {sup 15}N-labelled target-specific mAb is selectively irradiated and the saturation is relayed through the target to the ligand. Tests on the anti-Gal-1 mAb/Gal-1/lactose system showed that the approach is experimentally feasible in a reasonable time frame. This method allows detection and identification of binding molecules directly from a protein mixture in a multicomponent system.

  9. Automatic detecting method of LED signal lamps on fascia based on color image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiaoling; Hou, Wenguang; Ding, Mingyue

    2009-10-01

    Instrument display panel is one of the most important parts of automobiles. Automatic detection of LED signal lamps is critical to ensure the reliability of automobile systems. In this paper, an automatic detection method was developed which is composed of three parts in the automatic detection: the shape of LED lamps, the color of LED lamps, and defect spots inside the lamps. More than hundreds of fascias were detected with the automatic detection algorithm. The speed of the algorithm is quite fast and satisfied with the real-time request of the system. Further, the detection result was demonstrated to be stable and accurate.

  10. Detection of Terrorist Preparations by an Artificial Intelligence Expert System Employing Fuzzy Signal Detection Theory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Koltko-Rivera, Mark E

    2004-01-01

    ...). As the name suggests, FUSEDOT applies artificial intelligence expert system technology to the fuzzy signals presented by certain anomalous data, such as interpersonal relationships, financial...

  11. MMSE-based algorithm for joint signal detection, channel and noise variance estimation for OFDM systems

    CERN Document Server

    Savaux, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    This book presents an algorithm for the detection of an orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signal in a cognitive radio context by means of a joint and iterative channel and noise estimation technique. Based on the minimum mean square criterion, it performs an accurate detection of a user in a frequency band, by achieving a quasi-optimal channel and noise variance estimation if the signal is present, and by estimating the noise level in the band if the signal is absent. Organized into three chapters, the first chapter provides the background against which the system model is pr

  12. Detection of Potential Transit Signals in the First Three Quarters of Kepler Mission Data

    OpenAIRE

    Tenenbaum, Peter; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Rowe, Jason F.; Seader, Shawn; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Li, Jie; Quintana, Elisa V.; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Stumpe, Martin C.; Thompson, Susan E.; Twicken, Joseph D.; Van Cleve, Jeffrey; Borucki, William J.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a search for potential transit signals in the first three quarters of photometry data acquired by the Kepler Mission. The targets of the search include 151,722 stars which were observed over the full interval and an additional 19,132 stars which were observed for only 1 or 2 quarters. From this set of targets we find a total of 5,392 detections which meet the Kepler detection criteria: those criteria are periodicity of the signal, an acceptable signal-to-noise ratio,...

  13. Adaptive endpoint detection of seismic signal based on auto-correlated function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Wanchun; Shi Ren

    2001-01-01

    Based on the analysis of auto-correlation function, the notion of the distance between auto-correlation function was quoted, and the characterization of the noise and the signal with noise were discussed by using the distance. Then, the method of auto- adaptable endpoint detection of seismic signal based on auto-correlated similarity was summed up. The steps of implementation and determining of the thresholds were presented in detail. The experimental results that were compared with the methods based on artificial detecting show that this method has higher sensitivity even in a low signal with noise ratio circumstance

  14. Detectability of CO2 flux signals by a space-based lidar mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerling, Dorit M.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Schaefer, Kevin; Doney, Scott; Michalak, Anna M.

    2015-03-01

    Satellite observations of carbon dioxide (CO2) offer novel and distinctive opportunities for improving our quantitative understanding of the carbon cycle. Prospective observations include those from space-based lidar such as the active sensing of CO2 emissions over nights, days, and seasons (ASCENDS) mission. Here we explore the ability of such a mission to detect regional changes in CO2 fluxes. We investigate these using three prototypical case studies, namely, the thawing of permafrost in the northern high latitudes, the shifting of fossil fuel emissions from Europe to China, and changes in the source/sink characteristics of the Southern Ocean. These three scenarios were used to design signal detection studies to investigate the ability to detect the unfolding of these scenarios compared to a baseline scenario. Results indicate that the ASCENDS mission could detect the types of signals investigated in this study, with the caveat that the study is based on some simplifying assumptions. The permafrost thawing flux perturbation is readily detectable at a high level of significance. The fossil fuel emission detectability is directly related to the strength of the signal and the level of measurement noise. For a nominal (lower) fossil fuel emission signal, only the idealized noise-free instrument test case produces a clearly detectable signal, while experiments with more realistic noise levels capture the signal only in the higher (exaggerated) signal case. For the Southern Ocean scenario, differences due to the natural variability in the El Niño-Southern Oscillation climatic mode are primarily detectable as a zonal increase.

  15. Compressive Sensing of Roller Bearing Faults via Harmonic Detection from Under-Sampled Vibration Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Gang; Hou, Wei; Wang, Huaqing; Luo, Ganggang; Ma, Jianwei

    2015-10-09

    The Shannon sampling principle requires substantial amounts of data to ensure the accuracy of on-line monitoring of roller bearing fault signals. Challenges are often encountered as a result of the cumbersome data monitoring, thus a novel method focused on compressed vibration signals for detecting roller bearing faults is developed in this study. Considering that harmonics often represent the fault characteristic frequencies in vibration signals, a compressive sensing frame of characteristic harmonics is proposed to detect bearing faults. A compressed vibration signal is first acquired from a sensing matrix with information preserved through a well-designed sampling strategy. A reconstruction process of the under-sampled vibration signal is then pursued as attempts are conducted to detect the characteristic harmonics from sparse measurements through a compressive matching pursuit strategy. In the proposed method bearing fault features depend on the existence of characteristic harmonics, as typically detected directly from compressed data far before reconstruction completion. The process of sampling and detection may then be performed simultaneously without complete recovery of the under-sampled signals. The effectiveness of the proposed method is validated by simulations and experiments.

  16. Detection of weak transitions in signal dynamics using recurrence time statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, J.B.; Cao Yinhe; Gu Lingyun; Harris, J.G.; Principe, J.C.

    2003-01-01

    Signal detection in noisy and nonstationary environments is very challenging. In this Letter, we study why the two types of recurrence times [Phys. Rev. Lett. 83 (1999) 3178] may be very useful for detecting weak transitions in signal dynamics. We particularly emphasize that the recurrence times of the second type may be more powerful in detecting transitions with very low energy. These features are illustrated by studying a number of speech signals with fricatives and plosives. We have also shown that the recurrence times of the first type, nevertheless, has the distinguished feature of being more robust to the noise level and less sensitive to the parameter change of the algorithm. Since throughout our study, we have not explored any features unique to the speech signals, the results shown here may indicate that these tools may be useful in many different applications

  17. Signal detection theory with finite mixture distributions: theoretical developments with applications to recognition memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCarlo, Lawrence T

    2002-10-01

    An extension of signal detection theory (SDT) that incorporates mixtures of the underlying distributions is presented. The mixtures can be motivated by the idea that a presentation of a signal shifts the location of an underlying distribution only if the observer is attending to the signal; otherwise, the distribution is not shifted or is only partially shifted. Thus, trials with a signal presentation consist of a mixture of 2 (or more) latent classes of trials. Mixture SDT provides a general theoretical framework that offers a new perspective on a number of findings. For example, mixture SDT offers an alternative to the unequal variance signal detection model; it can also account for nonlinear normal receiver operating characteristic curves, as found in recent research.

  18. NMR investigation of actinide (4) beta-diketonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shcherbakova, L.L.; Mishin, V.Ya.; Rubtsov, E.M.

    1984-01-01

    NMR spectra of dipivaloylmethanates (DPM) of tetravalent thorium, uranium, neptunium and plutonium in various solvents in the 153-353 K temperature range have been studied. The mentioned coordination compounds, as well as acetylacetonates, in solution have coordination number eight and do not form solvates with polar molecules. They are stable to hydrolysis and to moderate radiation loads. In the case of uranium- and neptunium compounds a photochemical instability is detected, which could be used for synthesis of previously unknown actinyl dipivaloylmethanates. According to low-temperature NMR spectra two types of stoichiometric softness of the compounds studied are found. A problem of contact and pseudocontact contributions to the paramagnetic shifts in actinide (4) β-diketonates is discussed. An exact characteristic behaviour of the NMR-shifts of signals of DPM tret-butyl groups of the β-diketonates under considerafion is of interest from the analytical viewpoint

  19. Application of quantitative signal detection in the Dutch spontaneous reporting system for adverse drug reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Puijenbroek, Eugène; Diemont, Willem; van Grootheest, Kees

    2003-01-01

    The primary aim of spontaneous reporting systems (SRSs) is the timely detection of unknown adverse drug reactions (ADRs), or signal detection. Generally this is carried out by a systematic manual review of every report sent to an SRS. Statistical analysis of the data sets of an SRS, or quantitative

  20. A feasibility assessment of automated FISH image and signal analysis to assist cervical cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingwei; Li, Yuhua; Liu, Hong; Li, Shibo; Zhang, Roy R.; Zheng, Bin

    2012-02-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technology provides a promising molecular imaging tool to detect cervical cancer. Since manual FISH analysis is difficult, time-consuming, and inconsistent, the automated FISH image scanning systems have been developed. Due to limited focal depth of scanned microscopic image, a FISH-probed specimen needs to be scanned in multiple layers that generate huge image data. To improve diagnostic efficiency of using automated FISH image analysis, we developed a computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme. In this experiment, four pap-smear specimen slides were scanned by a dual-detector fluorescence image scanning system that acquired two spectrum images simultaneously, which represent images of interphase cells and FISH-probed chromosome X. During image scanning, once detecting a cell signal, system captured nine image slides by automatically adjusting optical focus. Based on the sharpness index and maximum intensity measurement, cells and FISH signals distributed in 3-D space were projected into a 2-D con-focal image. CAD scheme was applied to each con-focal image to detect analyzable interphase cells using an adaptive multiple-threshold algorithm and detect FISH-probed signals using a top-hat transform. The ratio of abnormal cells was calculated to detect positive cases. In four scanned specimen slides, CAD generated 1676 con-focal images that depicted analyzable cells. FISH-probed signals were independently detected by our CAD algorithm and an observer. The Kappa coefficients for agreement between CAD and observer ranged from 0.69 to 1.0 in detecting/counting FISH signal spots. The study demonstrated the feasibility of applying automated FISH image and signal analysis to assist cyto-geneticists in detecting cervical cancers.

  1. Modelling of polysomnographic respiratory measurements for artefact detection and signal restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathnayake, S I; Abeyratne, U R; Hukins, C; Duce, B

    2008-01-01

    Polysomnography (PSG), which incorporates measures of sleep with measures of EEG arousal, air flow, respiratory movement and oxygenation, is universally regarded as the reference standard in diagnosing sleep-related respiratory diseases such as obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome. Over 15 channels of physiological signals are measured from a subject undergoing a typical overnight PSG session. The signals often suffer from data losses, interferences and artefacts. In a typical sleep scoring session, artefact-corrupted signal segments are visually detected and removed from further consideration. This is a highly time-consuming process, and subjective judgement is required for the job. During typical sleep scoring sessions, the target is the detection of segments of diagnostic interest, and signal restoration is not utilized for distorted segments. In this paper, we propose a novel framework for artefact detection and signal restoration based on the redundancy among respiratory flow signals. We focus on the air flow (thermistor sensors) and nasal pressure signals which are clinically significant in detecting respiratory disturbances. The method treats the respiratory system and other organs that provide respiratory-related inputs/outputs to it (e.g., cardiovascular, brain) as a possibly nonlinear coupled-dynamical system, and uses the celebrated Takens embedding theorem as the theoretical basis for signal prediction. Nonlinear prediction across time (self-prediction) and signals (cross-prediction) provides us with a mechanism to detect artefacts as unexplained deviations. In addition to detection, the proposed method carries the potential to correct certain classes of artefacts and restore the signal. In this study, we categorize commonly occurring artefacts and distortions in air flow and nasal pressure measurements into several groups and explore the efficacy of the proposed technique in detecting/recovering them. The results we obtained from a database of clinical

  2. Factors Affecting the Timing of Signal Detection of Adverse Drug Reactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Hashiguchi

    Full Text Available We investigated factors affecting the timing of signal detection by comparing variations in reporting time of known and unknown ADRs after initial drug release in the USA. Data on adverse event reactions (AERs submitted to U.S. FDA was used. Six ADRs associated with 6 drugs (rosuvastatin, aripiprazole, teriparatide, telithromycin, exenatide, varenicline were investigated: Changes in the proportional reporting ratio, reporting odds ratio, and information component as indexes of signal detection were followed every 3 months after each drugs release, and the time for detection of signals was investigated. The time for the detection of signal to be detected after drug release in the USA was 2-10 months for known ADRs and 19-44 months for unknown ones. The median lag time for known and unknown ADRs was 99.0-122.5 days and 185.5-306.0 days, respectively. When the FDA released advisory information on rare but potentially serious health risks of an unknown ADR, the time lag to report from the onset of ADRs to the FDA was shorter. This study suggested that one factor affecting signal detection time is whether an ADR was known or unknown at release.

  3. Tables of square-law signal detection statistics for Hann spectra with 50 percent overlap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deans, Stanley R.; Cullers, D. Kent

    1991-01-01

    The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, currently being planned by NASA, will require that an enormous amount of data be analyzed in real time by special purpose hardware. It is expected that overlapped Hann data windows will play an important role in this analysis. In order to understand the statistical implication of this approach, it has been necessary to compute detection statistics for overlapped Hann spectra. Tables of signal detection statistics are given for false alarm rates from 10(exp -14) to 10(exp -1) and signal detection probabilities from 0.50 to 0.99; the number of computed spectra ranges from 4 to 2000.

  4. Detection of multicomponent signals: effect of difference in level between components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Françoise; Meunier, Sabine; Rabau, Guy; Poisson, Franck; Guyader, Gaël

    2011-11-01

    The detection of multicomponent signals for which the components are not equidetectable is precisely investigated as a function of the level difference ΔL(i∕j) between components. The detection thresholds are determined for a seven-tone complex signal with random starting phases masked by white noise. Level differences between the components are examined. A model for non-equidetectable conditions based on the statistical summation model is described. The improvement in detection is calculated from the level difference between components that is related to the thresholds for single components. The model predictions are in accordance with the experimental results.

  5. Small Displacement Detection of Biological Signals Using the Cyclic Frequency Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new signal processing method called the Cyclic Frequency method is proposed for small displacement detection of vital signals such as heart rate and respiration using the CW radar method. We have presented experimental results of small displacement detection to confirm the validity of the method. The displacement amplitude 2.5 mm can be detected with a propagation frequency of 24.15 GHz. We may increase the propagation frequency for smaller displacement amplitude or target velocity.

  6. The detection of cavitation in hydraulic machines by use of ultrasonic signal analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruber, P; Odermatt, P; Etterlin, M; Lerch, T; Frei, M; Farhat, M

    2014-01-01

    This presentation describes an experimental approach for the detection of cavitation in hydraulic machines by use of ultrasonic signal analysis. Instead of using the high frequency pulses (typically 1MHz) only for transit time measurement different other signal characteristics are extracted from the individual signals and its correlation function with reference signals in order to gain knowledge of the water conditions. As the pulse repetition rate is high (typically 100Hz), statistical parameters can be extracted of the signals. The idea is to find patterns in the parameters by a classifier that can distinguish between the different water states. This classification scheme has been applied to different cavitation sections: a sphere in a water flow in circular tube at the HSLU in Lucerne, a NACA profile in a cavitation tunnel and a Francis model test turbine both at LMH in Lausanne. From the signal raw data several statistical parameters in the time and frequency domain as well as from the correlation function with reference signals have been determined. As classifiers two methods were used: neural feed forward networks and decision trees. For both classification methods realizations with lowest complexity as possible are of special interest. It is shown that three signal characteristics, two from the signal itself and one from the correlation function are in many cases sufficient for the detection capability. The final goal is to combine these results with operating point, vibration, acoustic emission and dynamic pressure information such that a distinction between dangerous and not dangerous cavitation is possible

  7. An energy kurtosis demodulation technique for signal denoising and bearing fault detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wilson; Lee, Hewen

    2013-01-01

    Rolling element bearings are commonly used in rotary machinery. Reliable bearing fault detection techniques are very useful in industries for predictive maintenance operations. Bearing fault detection still remains a very challenging task especially when defects occur on rotating bearing components because the fault-related features are non-stationary in nature. In this work, an energy kurtosis demodulation (EKD) technique is proposed for bearing fault detection especially for non-stationary signature analysis. The proposed EKD technique firstly denoises the signal by using a maximum kurtosis deconvolution filter to counteract the effect of signal transmission path so as to highlight defect-associated impulses. Next, the denoised signal is modulated over several frequency bands; a novel signature integration strategy is proposed to enhance feature characteristics. The effectiveness of the proposed EKD fault detection technique is verified by a series of experimental tests corresponding to different bearing conditions. (paper)

  8. Compressed sensing: Radar signal detection and parameter measurement for EW applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M. Sreenivasa; Naik, K. Krishna; Reddy, K. Maheshwara

    2016-09-01

    State of the art system development is very much required for UAVs (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) and other airborne applications, where miniature, lightweight and low-power specifications are essential. Currently, the airborne Electronic Warfare (EW) systems are developed with digital receiver technology using Nyquist sampling. The detection of radar signals and parameter measurement is a necessary requirement in EW digital receivers. The Random Modulator Pre-Integrator (RMPI) can be used for matched detection of signals using smashed filter. RMPI hardware eliminates the high sampling rate analog to digital computer and reduces the number of samples using random sampling and detection of sparse orthonormal basis vectors. RMPI explore the structural and geometrical properties of the signal apart from traditional time and frequency domain analysis for improved detection. The concept has been proved with the help of MATLAB and LabVIEW simulations.

  9. β-detected NMR of 8Li in the normal state of 2H- NbSe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D.; Hossain, M. D.; Salman, Z.; Arseneau, D.; Chow, K. H.; Daviel, S.; Keeler, T. A.; Kiefl, R. F.; Kreitzman, S. R.; Levy, C. D. P.; Morris, G. D.; Miller, R. I.; MacFarlane, W. A.; Parolin, T. J.; Saadaoui, H.

    2006-03-01

    β-NMR of isolated 8Li has been investigated in the normal state of 2H- NbSe2. In a high magnetic field of 3 T a single resonance is observed with a Gaussian line width of 3.5 kHz. The line shape varies weakly as function of magnetic field and temperature but has a strong orientation dependence. The nuclear electric quadrupole splitting is unresolved implying that the electric field gradients are 10-100 times smaller than in other non-cubic crystals. The nuclear spin relaxation rate is also anomalously small but varies linearly with temperature as expected for Korringa relaxation in a metal. These results suggest that Li adopts an interstitial position between the weakly coupled NbSe2 layers and away from the conduction band.

  10. {beta}-detected NMR of {sup 8}Li in the normal state of 2H-NbSe{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of B.C., Vancouver, V6T1Z1 (Canada); Hossain, M.D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of B.C., Vancouver, V6T1Z1 (Canada); Salman, Z. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, University of B.C., Vancouver, V6T2A3 (Canada); Arseneau, D. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, University of B.C., Vancouver, V6T2A3 (Canada); Chow, K.H. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton Alberta, T6G2J1 (Canada); Daviel, S. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, University of B.C., Vancouver, V6T2A3 (Canada); Keeler, T.A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of B.C., Vancouver, V6T1Z1 (Canada); Kiefl, R.F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of B.C., Vancouver, V6T1Z1 (Canada)]. E-mail: kiefl@triumf.ca; Kreitzman, S.R. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, University of B.C., Vancouver, V6T2A3 (Canada); Levy, C.D.P. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, University of B.C., Vancouver, V6T2A3 (Canada); Morris, G.D. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, University of B.C., Vancouver, V6T2A3 (Canada); Miller, R.I. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, University of B.C., Vancouver, V6T2A3 (Canada); MacFarlane, W.A. [Department of Chemistry, University of B.C., Vancouver, V6T1Z1 (Canada); Parolin, T.J. [Department of Chemistry, University of B.C., Vancouver, V6T1Z1 (Canada); Saadaoui, H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of B.C., Vancouver, V6T1Z1 (Canada)

    2006-03-31

    {beta}-NMR of isolated {sup 8}Li has been investigated in the normal state of 2H-NbSe{sub 2}. In a high magnetic field of 3T a single resonance is observed with a Gaussian line width of 3.5kHz. The line shape varies weakly as function of magnetic field and temperature but has a strong orientation dependence. The nuclear electric quadrupole splitting is unresolved implying that the electric field gradients are 10-100 times smaller than in other non-cubic crystals. The nuclear spin relaxation rate is also anomalously small but varies linearly with temperature as expected for Korringa relaxation in a metal. These results suggest that Li adopts an interstitial position between the weakly coupled NbSe{sub 2} layers and away from the conduction band.

  11. Evaluation of bistable systems versus matched filters in detecting bipolar pulse signals

    OpenAIRE

    Duan, Fabing; Abbott, Derek; Gao, Qisheng

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a thorough evaluation of a bistable system versus a matched filter in detecting bipolar pulse signals. The detectability of the bistable system can be optimized by adding noise, i.e. the stochastic resonance (SR) phenomenon. This SR effect is also demonstrated by approximate statistical detection theory of the bistable system and corresponding numerical simulations. Furthermore, the performance comparison results between the bistable system and the matched filter show that...

  12. Quantitative produced water analysis using mobile 1H NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Lisabeth; Kalli, Chris; Fridjonsson, Einar O.; May, Eric F.; Stanwix, Paul L.; Graham, Brendan F.; Carroll, Matthew R. J.; Johns, Michael L.

    2016-10-01

    Measurement of oil contamination of produced water is required in the oil and gas industry to the (ppm) level prior to discharge in order to meet typical environmental legislative requirements. Here we present the use of compact, mobile 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, in combination with solid phase extraction (SPE), to meet this metrology need. The NMR hardware employed featured a sufficiently homogeneous magnetic field, such that chemical shift differences could be used to unambiguously differentiate, and hence quantitatively detect, the required oil and solvent NMR signals. A solvent system consisting of 1% v/v chloroform in tetrachloroethylene was deployed, this provided a comparable 1H NMR signal intensity for the oil and the solvent (chloroform) and hence an internal reference 1H signal from the chloroform resulting in the measurement being effectively self-calibrating. The measurement process was applied to water contaminated with hexane or crude oil over the range 1-30 ppm. The results were validated against known solubility limits as well as infrared analysis and gas chromatography.

  13. Simultaneous Life Detection and Localization Using a Wideband Chaotic Signal with an Embedded Tone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Liu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid life detection radar system which transmits a wideband chaotic signal containing an embedded single-tone is proposed. The chaotic signal is used for target localization by the time-domain correlation method and synthetic aperture technique, and the single-tone signal is used to measure the frequencies of breathing and heartbeat based on an on-chip split-ring integrated sensor and Michelson interference principle. Experimental results in free space and in through-wall scenarios demonstrate that the system can realize human detection and localization simultaneously with high range resolution, high sensitivity, and large dynamic range without complex signal processing. The range resolution is about 10 cm, and the dynamic range is 35 dB for the respiration signal detection and 25 dB for the heartbeat signal detection. Due to its good immunity to interference/jamming and high spectrum efficiency, the proposed system is suitable for post-disaster rescue, elder/infant/patient vitality monitoring, and anti-terrorism enforcement applications.

  14. Detection and classification of cardiac ischemia using vectorcardiogram signal via neural network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Mehri Dehnavi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Various techniques are used in diagnosing cardiac diseases. The electrocardiogram is one of these tools in common use. In this study vectorcardiogram (VCG signals are used as a tool for detection of cardiac ischemia. Methods: VCG signals used in this study were obtained form 60 patients suspected to have ischemia disease and 10 normal candidates. Verification of the ischemia had done by the cardiologist during strain test by the evaluation of electrocardiogram (ECG records and patient′s clinical history. The recorder device was Cardiax digital recorder system. The VCG signals were recorded in Frank lead configuration system. Results: Extracted ischemia VCG signals have been configured with 22 features. Feature dimensionalities were reduced by the use of Independent Components Analysis and Principal Component Analysis tools. Results obtained from strain test indicated that among 60 subjects, 50 had negative results and 10 had positive results. Ischemia detection of neural network using VCG parameters indicates 86% accuracy. Classification result on neural network using ECG ischemia detection parameters is 73% accurate. Accumulative evaluation including VCG analysis and strain test indicates 90% consistency. Conclusions: Regarding the obtained results in this study, VCG has higher accuracy than ECG, so that in cases which ECG signal cannot provide certain diagnosis of existence or non-existence of ischemia, VCG signal can help in a wider range. We suggest the use of VCG as an auxiliary low cost tool in ischemia detection.

  15. Fault detection of a spur gear using vibration signal with multivariable statistical parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songpon Klinchaeam

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a condition monitoring technique of a spur gear fault detection using vibration signal analysis based on time domain. Vibration signals were acquired from gearboxes and used to simulate various faults on spur gear tooth. In this study, vibration signals were applied to monitor a normal and various fault conditions of a spur gear such as normal, scuffing defect, crack defect and broken tooth. The statistical parameters of vibration signal were used to compare and evaluate the value of fault condition. This technique can be applied to set alarm limit of the signal condition based on statistical parameter such as variance, kurtosis, rms and crest factor. These parameters can be used to set as a boundary decision of signal condition. From the results, the vibration signal analysis with single statistical parameter is unclear to predict fault of the spur gears. The using at least two statistical parameters can be clearly used to separate in every case of fault detection. The boundary decision of statistical parameter with the 99.7% certainty ( 3   from 300 referenced dataset and detected the testing condition with 99.7% ( 3   accuracy and had an error of less than 0.3 % using 50 testing dataset.

  16. ROC analyses of the signal detection on CRT-displayed radiographs after digitalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Kazuya; Inamoto, Kazuo; Morikawa, Kaoru

    1986-01-01

    In the present paper, we have described experimental evaluation studies using the ROC analysis on displayed images of the radiographs converted after digitization. Two types of images were used in these studies : one was signal images composed of 2 mm diameter beads disseminated (absorbed images) and another was 2 mm diameter cavities (penetrated images). The psychophysical experiment was carried out using the rating experiment of obtaining the ROC curve based on the signal detection theory. The detectability was evaluated by the maximum transmitted information. The results were summarized as follows: (1) The detectabilities of the images on the CRT were significantly lower than those of the original ones. The decreasing rate of information was 67.8 % in the bead signal images and 65.6 % in the cavity signal images. (2) However, the detectability of the cavity signal images was two times better than that of the bead. (3) Detectabilities could be improved to 98.9 % by double gradient processing and 70.1 % by quadruple gradient processing in the studies of the bead images. (author)

  17. The application of in vivo 19F-NMR to biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higuchi, Toshihiro

    1989-01-01

    The potential application of in vivo F-19 NMR spectroscopy in the clinical setting was evaluated with Wistar rats and Mongolian gerbils. Halothane was inhalated and perfluorochemical (FC-43) was administered to rats. Fluorine-19 NMR spectra from halothane were obtained in both the brain and liver 5 min after inhalation, and the signal intensity increased with time. Although the intensity decreased immediately after cessation of inhalation, it was detectable even at 24 hr. The signal intensity from the liver was twice that from the brain. As for FC-43, the signal intensity was 8 times larger in the liver than the brain. At 24 hr after administration of FC-43, FC-43 spectra from the liver were increased, while those from the brain were decreased. An experiment with gerbils with experimentally induced cerebral ischemia revealed a definitive correlation between brain energy metabolism disorder as measured by p-31 NMR spectra and a decreased signal intensity for FC-43 as measured by F-19 NMR spectra. FC-43 signal intesntity obtained from the ischemic brain was reduced to 60-64% of the level of the normal brain. A linear correlation between 1/T1 and PO2 was reconfirmed by in vitro studies of T1 measurements of FC-43 mixed in human blood. In vivo F-19 NMR spectroscopy has potential for non-invasive evaluation not only of pharmacokinetics of administered fluoric compounds, but also of cerebral circulation or cerebral blood volume and tissue PO2. (Namekawa, K)

  18. Application of signal processing techniques for islanding detection of distributed generation in distribution network: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raza, Safdar; Mokhlis, Hazlie; Arof, Hamzah; Laghari, J.A.; Wang, Li

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Pros & cons of conventional islanding detection techniques (IDTs) are discussed. • Signal processing techniques (SPTs) ability in detecting islanding is discussed. • SPTs ability in improving performance of passive techniques are discussed. • Fourier, s-transform, wavelet, HHT & tt-transform based IDTs are reviewed. • Intelligent classifiers (ANN, ANFIS, Fuzzy, SVM) application in SPT are discussed. - Abstract: High penetration of distributed generation resources (DGR) in distribution network provides many benefits in terms of high power quality, efficiency, and low carbon emissions in power system. However, efficient islanding detection and immediate disconnection of DGR is critical in order to avoid equipment damage, grid protection interference, and personnel safety hazards. Islanding detection techniques are mainly classified into remote, passive, active, and hybrid techniques. From these, passive techniques are more advantageous due to lower power quality degradation, lower cost, and widespread usage by power utilities. However, the main limitations of these techniques are that they possess a large non detection zones and require threshold setting. Various signal processing techniques and intelligent classifiers have been used to overcome the limitations of passive islanding. Signal processing techniques, in particular, are adopted due to their versatility, stability, cost effectiveness, and ease of modification. This paper presents a comprehensive overview of signal processing techniques used to improve common passive islanding detection techniques. A performance comparison between the signal processing based islanding detection techniques with existing techniques are also provided. Finally, this paper outlines the relative advantages and limitations of the signal processing techniques in order to provide basic guidelines for researchers and field engineers in determining the best method for their system

  19. Magnetic-Field Effects on the Size of Vortices below the Surface of NbSe2 Detected Using Low Energy β-NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Z.; Wang, D.; Chow, K. H.; Hossain, M. D.; Kreitzman, S. R.; Keeler, T. A.; Levy, C. D. P.; Macfarlane, W. A.; Miller, R. I.; Morris, G. D.; Parolin, T. J.; Saadaoui, H.; Smadella, M.; Kiefl, R. F.

    2007-04-01

    A low energy radioactive beam of polarized Li8 has been used to observe the vortex lattice near the surface of superconducting NbSe2. The inhomogeneous magnetic-field distribution associated with the vortex lattice was measured using depth-resolved β-detected NMR. Below Tc, one observes the characteristic line shape for a triangular vortex lattice which depends on the magnetic penetration depth and vortex core radius. The size of the vortex core varies strongly with the magnetic field. In particular, in a low field of 10.8 mT, the core radius is much larger than the coherence length. The possible origin of these giant vortices is discussed.

  20. Magnetic-field effects on the size of vortices below the surface of NbSe2 detected using low energy beta-NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Z; Wang, D; Chow, K H; Hossain, M D; Kreitzman, S R; Keeler, T A; Levy, C D P; MacFarlane, W A; Miller, R I; Morris, G D; Parolin, T J; Saadaoui, H; Smadella, M; Kiefl, R F

    2007-04-20

    A low energy radioactive beam of polarized 8Li has been used to observe the vortex lattice near the surface of superconducting NbSe2. The inhomogeneous magnetic-field distribution associated with the vortex lattice was measured using depth-resolved beta-detected NMR. Below Tc, one observes the characteristic line shape for a triangular vortex lattice which depends on the magnetic penetration depth and vortex core radius. The size of the vortex core varies strongly with the magnetic field. In particular, in a low field of 10.8 mT, the core radius is much larger than the coherence length. The possible origin of these giant vortices is discussed.

  1. Specific 13C labeling of leucine, valine and isoleucine methyl groups for unambiguous detection of long-range restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasshuber, Hannes Klaus; Demers, Jean-Philippe; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2015-03-01

    Here we present an isotopic labeling strategy to easily obtain unambiguous long-range distance restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies. The method is based on the inclusion of two biosynthetic precursors in the bacterial growth medium, α-ketoisovalerate and α-ketobutyrate, leading to the production of leucine, valine and isoleucine residues that are exclusively 13C labeled on methyl groups. The resulting spectral simplification facilitates the collection of distance restraints, the verification of carbon chemical shift assignments and the measurement of methyl group dynamics. This approach is demonstrated on the type-three secretion system needle of Shigella flexneri, where 49 methyl-methyl and methyl-nitrogen distance restraints including 10 unambiguous long-range distance restraints could be collected. By combining this labeling scheme with ultra-fast MAS and proton detection, the assignment of methyl proton chemical shifts was achieved.

  2. Matched signal detection on graphs: Theory and application to brain imaging data classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chenhui; Sepulcre, Jorge; Johnson, Keith A; Fakhri, Georges E; Lu, Yue M; Li, Quanzheng

    2016-01-15

    Motivated by recent progress in signal processing on graphs, we have developed a matched signal detection (MSD) theory for signals with intrinsic structures described by weighted graphs. First, we regard graph Laplacian eigenvalues as frequencies of graph-signals and assume that the signal is in a subspace spanned by the first few graph Laplacian eigenvectors associated with lower eigenvalues. The conventional matched subspace detector can be applied to this case. Furthermore, we study signals that may not merely live in a subspace. Concretely, we consider signals with bounded variation on graphs and more general signals that are randomly drawn from a prior distribution. For bounded variation signals, the test is a weighted energy detector. For the random signals, the test statistic is the difference of signal variations on associated graphs, if a degenerate Gaussian distribution specified by the graph Laplacian is adopted. We evaluate the effectiveness of the MSD on graphs both with simulated and real data sets. Specifically, we apply MSD to the brain imaging data classification problem of Alzheimer's disease (AD) based on two independent data sets: 1) positron emission tomography data with Pittsburgh compound-B tracer of 30 AD and 40 normal control (NC) subjects, and 2) resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI) data of 30 early mild cognitive impairment and 20 NC subjects. Our results demonstrate that the MSD approach is able to outperform the traditional methods and help detect AD at an early stage, probably due to the success of exploiting the manifold structure of the data. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Trade-offs and noise tolerance in signal detection by genetic circuits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Guantes

    Full Text Available Genetic circuits can implement elaborated tasks of amplitude or frequency signal detection. What type of constraints could circuits experience in the performance of these tasks, and how are they affected by molecular noise? Here, we consider a simple detection process-a signal acting on a two-component module-to analyze these issues. We show that the presence of a feedback interaction in the detection module imposes a trade-off on amplitude and frequency detection, whose intensity depends on feedback strength. A direct interaction between the signal and the output species, in a type of feed-forward loop architecture, greatly modifies these trade-offs. Indeed, we observe that coherent feed-forward loops can act simultaneously as good frequency and amplitude noise-tolerant detectors. Alternatively, incoherent feed-forward loop structures can work as high-pass filters improving high frequency detection, and reaching noise tolerance by means of noise filtering. Analysis of experimental data from several specific coherent and incoherent feed-forward loops shows that these properties can be realized in a natural context. Overall, our results emphasize the limits imposed by circuit structure on its characteristic stimulus response, the functional plasticity of coherent feed-forward loops, and the seemingly paradoxical advantage of improving signal detection with noisy circuit components.

  4. Trade-offs and noise tolerance in signal detection by genetic circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guantes, Raúl; Estrada, Javier; Poyatos, Juan F

    2010-08-26

    Genetic circuits can implement elaborated tasks of amplitude or frequency signal detection. What type of constraints could circuits experience in the performance of these tasks, and how are they affected by molecular noise? Here, we consider a simple detection process-a signal acting on a two-component module-to analyze these issues. We show that the presence of a feedback interaction in the detection module imposes a trade-off on amplitude and frequency detection, whose intensity depends on feedback strength. A direct interaction between the signal and the output species, in a type of feed-forward loop architecture, greatly modifies these trade-offs. Indeed, we observe that coherent feed-forward loops can act simultaneously as good frequency and amplitude noise-tolerant detectors. Alternatively, incoherent feed-forward loop structures can work as high-pass filters improving high frequency detection, and reaching noise tolerance by means of noise filtering. Analysis of experimental data from several specific coherent and incoherent feed-forward loops shows that these properties can be realized in a natural context. Overall, our results emphasize the limits imposed by circuit structure on its characteristic stimulus response, the functional plasticity of coherent feed-forward loops, and the seemingly paradoxical advantage of improving signal detection with noisy circuit components.

  5. Stochastic Resonance Phenomenon of Two-coupled Duffing Oscillator and its Application on Weak Signal Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongfeng Wu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available By taking two-coupled duffing oscillator system as the research object, the study found under the synergistic effect of weak periodic signal and noise, the two-coupled duffing oscillator system has typical stochastic resonance and even could achieve better output of stochastic resonance than single duffing oscillator. Based on this phenomenon, this paper proposes a new method to detect the weak periodic signal through the stochastic resonance of two-coupled duffing oscillator. The experimental study indicates that we could achieve excellent detection effect by using the method we mentioned in this paper at low SNR (signal-to-noise ratios, especially, it has excellent filter effect for filtering and shaping of weak square signals and has potential values in the application of digital communications.

  6. Signal Detection of Multi-Channel Capillary Electrophoresis Chip Based on CCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Hongfeng; Yan, Weiping; Yang, Xiaobo; Li, Jiechao; Zhu, Jieying

    2012-12-01

    A kind of multi-channel capillary electrophoresis (CE) chip signal detection system based on CCD was developed. The output signal of the CCD sensor was processed by a series of pre-processing circuits and ADC, and then it was collected by the Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) chip which communicated with a host computer. The core in FPGA was designed to control the signal flow of the CCD and transfer the data to PC based on a Nios II embedded soft-processor. The application of PC was used to store the data and demonstrate the curve. The measurement of the fluorescent signals for different concentration Rhodamine B dyes is presented and the comparison with other detection systems is also discussed.

  7. Fractal dimension analysis for spike detection in low SNR extracellular signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmasi, Mehrdad; Büttner, Ulrich; Glasauer, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    Many algorithms have been suggested for detection and sorting of spikes in extracellular recording. Nevertheless, it is still challenging to detect spikes in low signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). We propose a spike detection algorithm that is based on the fractal properties of extracellular signals and can detect spikes in low SNR regimes. Semi-intact spikes are low-amplitude spikes whose shapes are almost preserved. The detection of these spikes can significantly enhance the performance of multi-electrode recording systems. Semi-intact spikes are simulated by adding three noise components to a spike train: thermal noise, inter-spike noise, and spike-level noise. We show that simulated signals have fractal properties which make them proper candidates for fractal analysis. Then we use fractal dimension as the main core of our spike detection algorithm and call it fractal detector. The performance of the fractal detector is compared with three frequently used spike detectors. We demonstrate that in low SNR, the fractal detector has the best performance and results in the highest detection probability. It is shown that, in contrast to the other three detectors, the performance of the fractal detector is independent of inter-spike noise power and that variations in spike shape do not alter its performance. Finally, we use the fractal detector for spike detection in experimental data and similar to simulations, it is shown that the fractal detector has the best performance in low SNR regimes. The detection of low-amplitude spikes provides more information about the neural activity in the vicinity of the recording electrodes. Our results suggest using the fractal detector as a reliable and robust method for detecting semi-intact spikes in low SNR extracellular signals.

  8. Signal coverage approach to the detection probability of hypothetical extraterrestrial emitters in the Milky Way

    OpenAIRE

    Claudio Grimaldi

    2017-01-01

    The lack of evidence for the existence of extraterrestrial life, even the simplest forms of animal life, makes it is difficult to decide whether the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) is more a high-risk, high-payoff endeavor than a futile attempt. Here we insist that even if extraterrestrial civilizations do exist and communicate, the likelihood of detecting their signals crucially depends on whether the Earth lies within a region of the galaxy covered by such signals. By consid...

  9. Time-varying subspace dimensionality: Useful as a seismic signal detection method?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, C. A.; Stead, R. J.; Begnaud, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    We explore the application of dimensional analysis to the problem of anomaly detection in multichannel time series. These techniques, which have been used for real-time load management in large computer systems, revolve around the time-varying dimensionality estimates of the signal subspace. Our application is to multiple channels of incoming seismic waveform data, as from a large array or across a network. Subspace analysis has been applied to seismic data before, but the routine use of the method is for the identification of a particular signal type, and requires a priori information about the range of signals for which the algorithm is searching. In this paradigm, a known but variable source (such as a mining region or aftershock sequence) provides known waveforms that are assumed to span the space occupied by incoming events of interest. Singular value decomposition or principal components analysis of the identified waveforms will allow for the selection of basis vectors that define the subspace onto which incoming signals are projected, to determine whether they belong to the source population of interest. In our application we do not seek to compare incoming signals to previously identified waveforms, but instead we seek to detect anomalies from the background behavior across an array or network. The background seismic levels will describe a signal space whose dimension may change markedly when an earthquake or other signal of interest occurs. We explore a variety of means by which we can evaluate the time-varying dimensionality of the signal space, and we compare the detection performance to other standard event detection methods.

  10. Detection of directional eye movements based on the electrooculogram signals through an artificial neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erkaymaz, Hande; Ozer, Mahmut; Orak, İlhami Muharrem

    2015-01-01

    The electrooculogram signals are very important at extracting information about detection of directional eye movements. Therefore, in this study, we propose a new intelligent detection model involving an artificial neural network for the eye movements based on the electrooculogram signals. In addition to conventional eye movements, our model also involves the detection of tic and blinking of an eye. We extract only two features from the electrooculogram signals, and use them as inputs for a feed-forwarded artificial neural network. We develop a new approach to compute these two features, which we call it as a movement range. The results suggest that the proposed model have a potential to become a new tool to determine the directional eye movements accurately

  11. Movement and respiration detection using statistical properties of the FMCW radar signal

    KAUST Repository

    Kiuru, Tero

    2016-07-26

    This paper presents a 24 GHz FMCW radar system for detection of movement and respiration using change in the statistical properties of the received radar signal, both amplitude and phase. We present the hardware and software segments of the radar system as well as algorithms with measurement results for two distinct use-cases: 1. FMCW radar as a respiration monitor and 2. a dual-use of the same radar system for smart lighting and intrusion detection. By using change in statistical properties of the signal for detection, several system parameters can be relaxed, including, for example, pulse repetition rate, power consumption, computational load, processor speed, and memory space. We will also demonstrate, that the capability to switch between received signal strength and phase difference enables dual-use cases with one requiring extreme sensitivity to movement and the other robustness against small sources of interference. © 2016 IEEE.

  12. Detection of the ODMR signal of a nitrogen vacancy centre in nanodiamond in propagating surface plasmons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Baiaty, Zahraa; Cumming, Benjamin P.; Gan, Xiaosong; Gu, Min

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrate that the optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) signal of a nitrogen vacancy (NV) centre can be coupled to propagating surface plasmons for the detection of the NV centre spin states, and of external magnetic fields. By coupling the spin dependent luminescence signal of a NV centre in a nanodiamond (ND) to a chemically synthesized silver nanowire, we demonstrate the readout of the ODMR signal as a reduction in the surface plasmon polariton intensity, with improved contrast in comparison to the emission from the NV centre. Furthermore, on the application of a permanent magnetic field from zero to 13 G, we demonstrate that the Zeeman splitting of the magnetic spin states of the nitrogen vacancy centre ground states can also be detected in the coupled surface plasmons. This is an important step in the development of a compact on-chip information processing system utilizing the nitrogen vacancy in nanodiamond as an on-chip source with efficient magnetometry sensing properties.

  13. Model observer design for multi-signal detection in the presence of anatomical noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Gezheng; Markey, Mia K.; Park, Subok

    2017-02-01

    As psychophysical studies are resource-intensive to conduct, model observers are commonly used to assess and optimize medical imaging quality. Model observers are typically designed to detect at most one signal. However, in clinical practice, there may be multiple abnormalities in a single image set (e.g. multifocal multicentric (MFMC) breast cancer), which can impact treatment planning. Prevalence of signals can be different across anatomical regions, and human observers do not know the number or location of signals a priori. As new imaging techniques have the potential to improve multiple-signal detection (e.g. digital breast tomosynthesis may be more effective for diagnosis of MFMC than mammography), image quality assessment approaches addressing such tasks are needed. In this study, we present a model observer to detect multiple signals in an image dataset. A novel implementation of partial least squares (PLS) was developed to estimate different sets of efficient channels directly from the images. The PLS channels are adaptive to the characteristics of signals and the background, and they capture the interactions among signal locations. Corresponding linear decision templates are employed to generate both image-level and location-specific scores on the presence of signals. Our results show that: (1) the model observer can achieve high performance with a reasonably small number of channels; (2) the model observer with PLS channels outperforms that with benchmark modified Laguerre-Gauss channels, especially when realistic signal shapes and complex background statistics are involved; (3) the tasks of clinical interest, and other constraints such as sample size would alter the optimal design of the model observer.

  14. Stochastic resonance in an underdamped system with FitzHug-Nagumo potential for weak signal detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Cristian; Zhong, Wei; Lu, Siliang; Cong, Feiyun; Cortese, Ignacio

    2017-12-01

    Vibration signals are widely used for bearing fault detection and diagnosis. When signals are acquired in the field, usually, the faulty periodic signal is weak and is concealed by noise. Various de-noising methods have been developed to extract the target signal from the raw signal. Stochastic resonance (SR) is a technique that changed the traditional denoising process, in which the weak periodic fault signal can be identified by adding an expression, the potential, to the raw signal and solving a differential equation problem. However, current SR methods have some deficiencies such us limited filtering performance, low frequency input signal and sequential search for optimum parameters. Consequently, in this study, we explore the application of SR based on the FitzHug-Nagumo (FHN) potential in rolling bearing vibration signals. Besides, we improve the search of the SR optimum parameters by the use of particle swarm optimization (PSO). The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by using both simulated and real bearing data sets.

  15. {sup 13}C NMR detects conformational change in the 100-kD membrane transporter ClC-ec1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraham, Sherwin J.; Cheng, Ricky C.; Chew, Thomas A.; Khantwal, Chandra M. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Molecular & Cellular Physiology (United States); Liu, Corey W. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford Magnetic Resonance Laboratory (United States); Gong, Shimei; Nakamoto, Robert K. [University of Virginia, Department of Molecular Physiology and Biological Physics (United States); Maduke, Merritt, E-mail: maduke@stanford.edu [Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Molecular & Cellular Physiology (United States)

    2015-04-15

    CLC transporters catalyze the exchange of Cl{sup −} for H{sup +} across cellular membranes. To do so, they must couple Cl{sup −} and H{sup +} binding and unbinding to protein conformational change. However, the sole conformational changes distinguished crystallographically are small movements of a glutamate side chain that locally gates the ion-transport pathways. Therefore, our understanding of whether and how global protein dynamics contribute to the exchange mechanism has been severely limited. To overcome the limitations of crystallography, we used solution-state {sup 13}C-methyl NMR with labels on methionine, lysine, and engineered cysteine residues to investigate substrate (H{sup +}) dependent conformational change outside the restraints of crystallization. We show that methyl labels in several regions report H{sup +}-dependent spectral changes. We identify one of these regions as Helix R, a helix that extends from the center of the protein, where it forms the part of the inner gate to the Cl{sup −}-permeation pathway, to the extracellular solution. The H{sup +}-dependent spectral change does not occur when a label is positioned just beyond Helix R, on the unstructured C-terminus of the protein. Together, the results suggest that H{sup +} binding is mechanistically coupled to closing of the intracellular access-pathway for Cl{sup −}.

  16. 13C NMR detects conformational change in the 100-kD membrane transporter ClC-ec1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham, Sherwin J.; Cheng, Ricky C.; Chew, Thomas A.; Khantwal, Chandra M.; Liu, Corey W.; Gong, Shimei; Nakamoto, Robert K.; Maduke, Merritt

    2015-01-01

    CLC transporters catalyze the exchange of Cl − for H + across cellular membranes. To do so, they must couple Cl − and H + binding and unbinding to protein conformational change. However, the sole conformational changes distinguished crystallographically are small movements of a glutamate side chain that locally gates the ion-transport pathways. Therefore, our understanding of whether and how global protein dynamics contribute to the exchange mechanism has been severely limited. To overcome the limitations of crystallography, we used solution-state 13 C-methyl NMR with labels on methionine, lysine, and engineered cysteine residues to investigate substrate (H + ) dependent conformational change outside the restraints of crystallization. We show that methyl labels in several regions report H + -dependent spectral changes. We identify one of these regions as Helix R, a helix that extends from the center of the protein, where it forms the part of the inner gate to the Cl − -permeation pathway, to the extracellular solution. The H + -dependent spectral change does not occur when a label is positioned just beyond Helix R, on the unstructured C-terminus of the protein. Together, the results suggest that H + binding is mechanistically coupled to closing of the intracellular access-pathway for Cl −

  17. Detection of Butter Adulteration with Lard by Employing (1)H-NMR Spectroscopy and Multivariate Data Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadzillah, Nurrulhidayah Ahmad; Man, Yaakob bin Che; Rohman, Abdul; Rosman, Arieff Salleh; Ismail, Amin; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Khatib, Alfi

    2015-01-01

    The authentication of food products from the presence of non-allowed components for certain religion like lard is very important. In this study, we used proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ((1)H-NMR) spectroscopy for the analysis of butter adulterated with lard by simultaneously quantification of all proton bearing compounds, and consequently all relevant sample classes. Since the spectra obtained were too complex to be analyzed visually by the naked eyes, the classification of spectra was carried out.The multivariate calibration of partial least square (PLS) regression was used for modelling the relationship between actual value of lard and predicted value. The model yielded a highest regression coefficient (R(2)) of 0.998 and the lowest root mean square error calibration (RMSEC) of 0.0091% and root mean square error prediction (RMSEP) of 0.0090, respectively. Cross validation testing evaluates the predictive power of the model. PLS model was shown as good models as the intercept of R(2)Y and Q(2)Y were 0.0853 and -0.309, respectively.

  18. Effect of sample storage time on detection of hybridization signals in Checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Nascimento, Cássio; Muller, Katia; Sato, Sandra; Albuquerque Junior, Rubens Ferreira

    2012-04-01

    Long-term sample storage can affect the intensity of the hybridization signals provided by molecular diagnostic methods that use chemiluminescent detection. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different storage times on the hybridization signals of 13 bacterial species detected by the Checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization method using whole-genomic DNA probes. Ninety-six subgingival biofilm samples were collected from 36 healthy subjects, and the intensity of hybridization signals was evaluated at 4 different time periods: (1) immediately after collecting (n = 24) and (2) after storage at -20 °C for 6 months (n = 24), (3) for 12 months (n = 24), and (4) for 24 months (n = 24). The intensity of hybridization signals obtained from groups 1 and 2 were significantly higher than in the other groups (p  0.05). The Checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization method was suitable to detect hybridization signals from all groups evaluated, and the intensity of signals decreased significantly after long periods of sample storage.

  19. An Alternative Method for TileCal Signal Detection and Amplitude Estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Sotto-Maior Peralva, B; The ATLAS collaboration; Manhães de Andrade Filho, L; Manoel de Seixas, J

    2011-01-01

    The Tile Barrel Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of ATLAS. It is a key detector for the reconstruction of hadrons, jets, taus and missing ET and it assists the muon measurements due to a low signal-to-noise ratio. The energy deposited in each cell is read out by two electronic channels for redundancy and is estimated by reconstructing the amplitude of the digitized signal pulse sampled every 25 ns. This work presents an alternative approach for TileCal signal detection and amplitude estimation under low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) conditions, exploring the applicability of a Matched Filter. The proposed method is compared to the Optimal Filter algorithm, that is currently been used at TileCal for energy reconstruction. The results for a simulated data set showed that for conditions where the signal pedestal could be considered stationary, the proposed method achieves a better SNR performance than the Optimal Filter technique.

  20. Analog CMOS design for optical coherence tomography signal detection and processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Mathine, David L; Barton, Jennifer K

    2008-02-01

    A CMOS circuit was designed and fabricated for optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal detection and processing. The circuit includes a photoreceiver, differential gain stage and lock-in amplifier based demodulator. The photoreceiver consists of a CMOS photodetector and low noise differential transimpedance amplifier which converts the optical interference signal into a voltage. The differential gain stage further amplifies the signal. The in-phase and quadrature channels of the lock-in amplifier each include an analog mixer and switched-capacitor low-pass filter with an external mixer reference signal. The interferogram envelope and phase can be extracted with this configuration, enabling Doppler OCT measurements. A sensitivity of -80 dB is achieved with faithful reproduction of the interferometric signal envelope. A sample image of finger tip is presented.

  1. Onset Detection in Surface Electromyographic Signals: A Systematic Comparison of Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus Flachenecker

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Various methods to determine the onset of the electromyographic activity which occurs in response to a stimulus have been discussed in the literature over the last decade. Due to the stochastic characteristic of the surface electromyogram (SEMG, onset detection is a challenging task, especially in weak SEMG responses. The performance of the onset detection methods were tested, mostly by comparing their automated onset estimations to the manually determined onsets found by well-trained SEMG examiners. But a systematic comparison between methods, which reveals the benefits and the drawbacks of each method compared to the other ones and shows the specific dependence of the detection accuracy on signal parameters, is still lacking. In this paper, several classical threshold-based approaches as well as some statistically optimized algorithms were tested on large samples of simulated SEMG data with well-known signal parameters. Rating between methods is performed by comparing their performance to that of a statistically optimal maximum likelihood estimator which serves as reference method. In addition, performance was evaluated on real SEMG data obtained in a reaction time experiment. Results indicate that detection behavior strongly depends on SEMG parameters, such as onset rise time, signal-to-noise ratio or background activity level. It is shown that some of the threshold-based signal-power-estimation procedures are very sensitive to signal parameters, whereas statistically optimized algorithms are generally more robust.

  2. Development of an apnea detection algorithm based on temporal analysis of thoracic respiratory effort signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Aquila, C. R.; Cañadas, G. E.; Correa, L. S.; Laciar, E.

    2016-04-01

    This work describes the design of an algorithm for detecting apnea episodes, based on analysis of thorax respiratory effort signal. Inspiration and expiration time, and range amplitude of respiratory cycle were evaluated. For range analysis the standard deviation statistical tool was used over respiratory signal temporal windows. The validity of its performance was carried out in 8 records of Apnea-ECG database that has annotations of apnea episodes. The results are: sensitivity (Se) 73%, specificity (Sp) 83%. These values can be improving eliminating artifact of signal records.

  3. Signal-based Gas Leakage Detection for Fluid Power Accumulators in Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liniger, Jesper; Sepehri, Nariman; N. Soltani, Mohsen

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the development and application of a signal-based fault detection method for identifying gas leakage in hydraulic accumulators used in wind turbines. The method uses Multiresolution Signal Decomposition (MSD) based on wavelets for feature extraction from a~single fluid pressure...... measurement located close to the accumulator. Gas leakage is shown to create increased variations in this pressure signal. The Root Mean Square (RMS) of the detail coefficient Level 9 from the MSD is found as the most sensitive and robust fault indicator of gas leakage. The method is verified...

  4. Unambiguous metabolite identification in high-throughput metabolomics by hybrid 1D 1 H NMR/ESI MS 1 approach: Hybrid 1D 1 H NMR/ESI MS 1 metabolomics method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Lawrence R. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Hoyt, David W. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Walker, S. Michael [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Kansas, Lawrence KS 66045 USA; Ward, Joy K. [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Kansas, Lawrence KS 66045 USA; Nicora, Carrie D. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Bingol, Kerem [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA

    2016-09-16

    We present a novel approach to improve accuracy of metabolite identification by combining direct infusion ESI MS1 with 1D 1H NMR spectroscopy. The new approach first applies standard 1D 1H NMR metabolite identification protocol by matching the chemical shift, J-coupling and intensity information of experimental NMR signals against the NMR signals of standard metabolites in metabolomics library. This generates a list of candidate metabolites. The list contains false positive and ambiguous identifications. Next, we constrained the list with the chemical formulas derived from high-resolution direct infusion ESI MS1 spectrum of the same sample. Detection of the signals of a metabolite both in NMR and MS significantly improves the confidence of identification and eliminates false positive identification. 1D 1H NMR and direct infusion ESI MS1 spectra of a sample can be acquired in parallel in several minutes. This is highly beneficial for rapid and accurate screening of hundreds of samples in high-throughput metabolomics studies. In order to make this approach practical, we developed a software tool, which is integrated to Chenomx NMR Suite. The approach is demonstrated on a model mixture, tomato and Arabidopsis thaliana metabolite extracts, and human urine.

  5. Theory and method for weak signal detection in engineering practice based on stochastic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenli; Wang, Linze; Fan, Jian

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, the Kramers rate was derived using the Fokker-Planck (FP) equation with the condition of adiabatic approximation (the amplitude and frequency of signal detected are small ≪ 1) and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was proved by means of Fourier transform and the power spectrum in bistable system. This is a concise and superior method to demonstrate the Kramers rate and SNR compared to the past methods. It is convenient for readers to understand. The SNR of the bistable system obtained shows that stochastic resonance (SR) can be used to realize energy transition from noise to a periodic signal under the adiabatic approximation condition. Therefore, SR could enhance the SNR of the output signal. The signal modulation technique was employed to transform the large frequency components into a small parameter signal to meet the adiabatic approximation requirement. Furthermore, we have designed the model of modulator. The simulation results show that the modulation method can generate SR in a bistable system and detect weak signals with large parameters from strong noise background.

  6. Detection of epileptiform activity in EEG signals based on time-frequency and nonlinear analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragoljub eGajic

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a new technique for detection of epileptiform activity in EEG signals. After preprocessing of EEG signals we extract representative features in time, frequency and time-frequency domain as well as using nonlinear analysis. The features are extracted in a few frequency sub-bands of clinical interest since these sub-bands showed much better discriminatory characteristics compared with the whole frequency band. Then we optimally reduce the dimension of feature space to two using scatter matrices. A decision about the presence of epileptiform activity in EEG signals is made by quadratic classifiers designed in the reduced two-dimensional feature space. The accuracy of the technique was tested on three sets of electroencephalographic (EEG signals recorded at the University Hospital Bonn: surface EEG signals from healthy volunteers, intracranial EEG signals from the epilepsy patients during the seizure free interval from within the seizure focus and intracranial EEG signals of epileptic seizures also from within the seizure focus. An overall detection accuracy of 98.7% was achieved.

  7. High resolution deuterium NMR studies of bacterial metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguayo, J.B.; Gamcsik, M.P.; Dick, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    High resolution deuterium NMR spectra were obtained from suspensions of five bacterial strains: Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, and Staphylococcus aureus. Deuterium-labeled D-glucose at C-1, C-2, and C-6 was used to monitor dynamically anaerobic metabolism. The flux of glucose through the various bacterial metabolic pathways could be determined by following the disappearance of glucose and the appearance of the major end products in the 2H NMR spectrum. The presence of both labeled and unlabeled metabolites could be detected using 1H NMR spectroscopy since the proton resonances in the labeled species are shifted upfield due to an isotopic chemical shift effect. The 1H-1H scalar coupling observed in both the 2H and 1H NMR spectra was used to assign definitively the resonances of labeled species. An increase in the intensity of natural abundance deuterium signal of water can be used to monitor pathways in which a deuteron is lost from the labeled metabolite. The steps in which label loss can occur are outlined, and the influence these processes have on the ability of 2H NMR spectroscopy to monitor metabolism are assessed

  8. Fission signal detection using helium-4 gas fast neutron scintillation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, J. M., E-mail: lewisj@ufl.edu; Kelley, R. P.; Jordan, K. A. [Nuclear Engineering Program, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Murer, D. [Arktis Radiation Detectors Ltd., 8045 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-07-07

    We demonstrate the unambiguous detection of the fission neutron signal produced in natural uranium during active neutron interrogation using a deuterium-deuterium fusion neutron generator and a high pressure {sup 4}He gas fast neutron scintillation detector. The energy deposition by individual neutrons is quantified, and energy discrimination is used to differentiate the induced fission neutrons from the mono-energetic interrogation neutrons. The detector can discriminate between different incident neutron energies using pulse height discrimination of the slow scintillation component of the elastic scattering interaction between a neutron and the {sup 4}He atom. Energy histograms resulting from this data show the buildup of a detected fission neutron signal at higher energies. The detector is shown here to detect a unique fission neutron signal from a natural uranium sample during active interrogation with a (d, d) neutron generator. This signal path has a direct application to the detection of shielded nuclear material in cargo and air containers. It allows for continuous interrogation and detection while greatly minimizing the potential for false alarms.

  9. Fission signal detection using helium-4 gas fast neutron scintillation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, J. M.; Kelley, R. P.; Murer, D.; Jordan, K. A.

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate the unambiguous detection of the fission neutron signal produced in natural uranium during active neutron interrogation using a deuterium-deuterium fusion neutron generator and a high pressure 4He gas fast neutron scintillation detector. The energy deposition by individual neutrons is quantified, and energy discrimination is used to differentiate the induced fission neutrons from the mono-energetic interrogation neutrons. The detector can discriminate between different incident neutron energies using pulse height discrimination of the slow scintillation component of the elastic scattering interaction between a neutron and the 4He atom. Energy histograms resulting from this data show the buildup of a detected fission neutron signal at higher energies. The detector is shown here to detect a unique fission neutron signal from a natural uranium sample during active interrogation with a (d, d) neutron generator. This signal path has a direct application to the detection of shielded nuclear material in cargo and air containers. It allows for continuous interrogation and detection while greatly minimizing the potential for false alarms.

  10. Observer performance in dynamic displays: effect of frame rate on visual signal detection in noisy images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiting, James S.; Honig, David A.; Carterette, Edward; Eigler, Neal L.

    1991-06-01

    An observer's ability to detect low contrast features (signals) within an image is an important measure of image quality. A theory exists for describing the relationship between measurable image parameters and the detectability of simple visual signals such as squares or disks in single images. This signal detection theory has been successfully applied to many practical visual tasks yielding fundamental re'ationships between noise, contrast, and the effect on detectability of intensifying screen/x-ray film combinations in conventional radiology2, and quantization noise,3 image processing,4 and window/level settings5'6 in digital displays. We are aware of no studies examining signal detectability in dynamically displayed medical images, despite the importance of these displays for many imaging modalities. Examples of dynamic displays in medical imaging include x-ray fluoroscopy, cardiac cineangiography, real-time two-dimensional ultrasound (2D-Echo), rapid-sequence nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (cine MRI), radioisotope ventriculography, and ultrafast computed tomography (UFCT) . The goal of the present study was to quantify the psychophysical parameters which affect observer performance in dynamically displayed sequences of noisy images.

  11. Comparison of the Signal Processing Methodologies for a Leak Detection of the LMR Steam Generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae-Joon; Jeong, Ji-Young; Kim, Byung-Ho

    2006-01-01

    The successful protection of a water/steam into a sodium leak in the LMR SG at an early phase of a leak origin depends on the fast response and sensitivity of a leak detection system. The control time for the protection of the LMR SG is several seconds. Subject of this study is to introduce the detection performance of the acoustic leak detection system discriminated by a back-propagation neural network according to a preprocessing of the FFT power spectrum analysis and the Octave band analysis, and to introduce the status of the development of the acoustic leak detection at KAERI. It was used for the acoustic signals from the injected Argon gas into water experiments at KAERI, the acoustic signals injected from the water into the sodium obtained in IPPE, and the background noise of the PFR superheater

  12. Adaptive endpoint detection of seismic signal based on auto-correlated function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Wanchun; Shi Ren

    2000-01-01

    There are certain shortcomings for the endpoint detection by time-waveform envelope and/or by checking the travel table (both labelled as the artificial detection method). Based on the analysis of the auto-correlation function, the notion of the distance between auto-correlation functions was quoted, and the characterizations of the noise and the signal with noise were discussed by using the distance. Then, the method of auto-adaptable endpoint detection of seismic signal based on auto-correlated similarity was summed up. The steps of implementation and determining of the thresholds were presented in detail. The experimental results that were compared with the methods based on artificial detecting show that this method has higher sensitivity even in a low SNR circumstance

  13. Isoelectric focusing purity criteria and 1H NMR detectable spectroscopic heterogeneity in the major isolated monomer hemoglobins from Glycera dibranchiata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantinidis, I.; Satterlee, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    Three major monomeric hemoglobins have been isolated from the erythrocytes of Glycera dibranchiata. Their importance to structure-function studies of heme proteins lies in the fact that they have been shown to possess an exceptional amino acid substitution. In these proteins, the E-7 position is occupied by leucine rather than the more common distal histidine. This substitution alters the polarity of the heme ligand binding environment compared to myoglobin. Due to this, the G. dibranchiata monomer hemoglobins are attracting much attention. However, until now no purity criterion has been developed. Here the authors demonstrate that, for all of the Glycera momomer hemoglobins, multiple line patterns are shown on high-voltage isoelectric focusing (IEF) gels. Most of these lines are shown to be a consequence of heme-related phenomena and can be understood on the basis of changes in oxidation and ligation state of the heme iron. The multiple line pattern does not indicate significant impurities in the monomer hemoglobin preparation. The multiple line patterns on IEF gels disappear when gels of the apoproteins alone are focused. Single bands occur in this case for all of the monomer hemoglobins except component II, which displays two bands, one major and one minor. The minor band is found to be a modified apoprotein form. It is sensitive to apoprotein handling prior to focusing and depends upon whether the IEF gel is prefocused or not. From this analysis, IEF is shown to be a valuable purity criterion, and the purity of our monomer hemoglobin component II preparation is 97% one globin. The NMR results show that two types of spectroscopic heterogeneity are also present in component II, and these are unrelated to the protein purity

  14. Early detection of pharmacovigilance signals with automated methods based on false discovery rates: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ismaïl; Thiessard, Frantz; Miremont-Salamé, Ghada; Haramburu, Françoise; Kreft-Jais, Carmen; Bégaud, Bernard; Tubert-Bitter, Pascale

    2012-06-01

    Improving the detection of drug safety signals has led several pharmacovigilance regulatory agencies to incorporate automated quantitative methods into their spontaneous reporting management systems. The three largest worldwide pharmacovigilance databases are routinely screened by the lower bound of the 95% confidence interval of proportional reporting ratio (PRR₀₂.₅), the 2.5% quantile of the Information Component (IC₀₂.₅) or the 5% quantile of the Gamma Poisson Shrinker (GPS₀₅). More recently, Bayesian and non-Bayesian False Discovery Rate (FDR)-based methods were proposed that address the arbitrariness of thresholds and allow for a built-in estimate of the FDR. These methods were also shown through simulation studies to be interesting alternatives to the currently used methods. The objective of this work was twofold. Based on an extensive retrospective study, we compared PRR₀₂.₅, GPS₀₅ and IC₀₂.₅ with two FDR-based methods derived from the Fisher's exact test and the GPS model (GPS(pH0) [posterior probability of the null hypothesis H₀ calculated from the Gamma Poisson Shrinker model]). Secondly, restricting the analysis to GPS(pH0), we aimed to evaluate the added value of using automated signal detection tools compared with 'traditional' methods, i.e. non-automated surveillance operated by pharmacovigilance experts. The analysis was performed sequentially, i.e. every month, and retrospectively on the whole French pharmacovigilance database over the period 1 January 1996-1 July 2002. Evaluation was based on a list of 243 reference signals (RSs) corresponding to investigations launched by the French Pharmacovigilance Technical Committee (PhVTC) during the same period. The comparison of detection methods was made on the basis of the number of RSs detected as well as the time to detection. Results comparing the five automated quantitative methods were in favour of GPS(pH0) in terms of both number of detections of true signals and

  15. Detection of auditory signals in quiet and noisy backgrounds while performing a visuo-spatial task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishakha W Rawool

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The ability to detect important auditory signals while performing visual tasks may be further compounded by background chatter. Thus, it is important to know how task performance may interact with background chatter to hinder signal detection. Aim: To examine any interactive effects of speech spectrum noise and task performance on the ability to detect signals. Settings and Design: The setting was a sound-treated booth. A repeated measures design was used. Materials and Methods: Auditory thresholds of 20 normal adults were determined at 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 kHz in the following conditions presented in a random order: (1 quiet with attention; (2 quiet with a visuo-spatial task or puzzle (distraction; (3 noise with attention and (4 noise with task. Statistical Analysis: Multivariate analyses of variance (MANOVA with three repeated factors (quiet versus noise, visuo-spatial task versus no task, signal frequency. Results: MANOVA revealed significant main effects for noise and signal frequency and significant noise–frequency and task–frequency interactions. Distraction caused by performing the task worsened the thresholds for tones presented at the beginning of the experiment and had no effect on tones presented in the middle. At the end of the experiment, thresholds (4 kHz were better while performing the task than those obtained without performing the task. These effects were similar across the quiet and noise conditions. Conclusion: Detection of auditory signals is difficult at the beginning of a distracting visuo-spatial task but over time, task learning and auditory training effects can nullify the effect of distraction and may improve detection of high frequency sounds.

  16. EU-ADR healthcare database network vs. spontaneous reporting system database: preliminary comparison of signal detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifirò, Gianluca; Patadia, Vaishali; Schuemie, Martijn J; Coloma, Preciosa M; Gini, Rosa; Herings, Ron; Hippisley-Cox, Julia; Mazzaglia, Giampiero; Giaquinto, Carlo; Scotti, Lorenza; Pedersen, Lars; Avillach, Paul; Sturkenboom, Miriam C J M; van der Lei, Johan; Eu-Adr Group

    2011-01-01

    The EU-ADR project aims to exploit different European electronic healthcare records (EHR) databases for drug safety signal detection. In this paper we report the preliminary results concerning the comparison of signal detection between EU-ADR network and two spontaneous reporting databases, the Food and Drug Administration and World Health Organization databases. EU-ADR data sources consist of eight databases in four countries (Denmark, Italy, Netherlands, and United Kingdom) that are virtually linked through distributed data network. A custom-built software (Jerboa©) elaborates harmonized input data that are produced locally and generates aggregated data which are then stored in a central repository. Those data are subsequently analyzed through different statistics (i.e. Longitudinal Gamma Poisson Shrinker). As potential signals, all the drugs that are associated to six events of interest (bullous eruptions - BE, acute renal failure - ARF, acute myocardial infarction - AMI, anaphylactic shock - AS, rhabdomyolysis - RHABD, and upper gastrointestinal bleeding - UGIB) have been detected via different data mining techniques in the two systems. Subsequently a comparison concerning the number of drugs that could be investigated and the potential signals detected for each event in the spontaneous reporting systems (SRSs) and EU-ADR network was made. SRSs could explore, as potential signals, a larger number of drugs for the six events, in comparison to EU-ADR (range: 630-3,393 vs. 87-856), particularly for those events commonly thought to be potentially drug-induced (i.e. BE: 3,393 vs. 228). The highest proportion of signals detected in SRSs was found for BE, ARF and AS, while for ARF, and UGIB in EU-ADR. In conclusion, it seems that EU-ADR longitudinal database network may complement traditional spontaneous reporting system for signal detection, especially for those adverse events that are frequent in general population and are not commonly thought to be drug

  17. Synthesis and NMR Elucidation of Novel Pentacycloundecane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Herein we report the synthesis and NMR elucidation of five novel pentacycloundecane (PCU)-derived short peptides as potential HIV protease inhibitors. 1H and 13C spectral analysis show major overlapping of methine resonance of the PCU 'cage' thereby making it extremely difficult to assign the NMR signals. Attachment ...

  18. Multi-Phenomenology Explosion Monitoring (Multi-PEM). Signal Detection. Research to target smaller sources for tomorrow’s missions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmichael, Joshua Daniel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-12

    This a guide on how to detect and identify explosions from various sources. For example, nuclear explosions produce acoustic, optical, and EMP outputs. Each signal can be buried in noise, but fusing detection statistics from seismic, acoustic, and electromagnetic signals results in clear detection otherwise unobtainable.

  19. The use of balanced homodyne and squeezed states for detecting weak optical signals in a Michelson interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Aryeh, Y.

    2011-01-01

    The possibility of using squeezed states and balanced homodyne detection of optical signals in a Michelson interferometer is discussed. The present analysis describes photon statistics measurements effects related to quadrature balanced homodyne detection showing the advantage of using this scheme for detecting weak optical signals.

  20. NMR and MRI obtained with high transition temperature dc SQUIDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza R.E. de

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We have measured nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR signals from several samples at room temperature in magnetic fields ranging from about 0.05 mT to 2 mT using a spectrometer based on a high-Tc dc SQUID (high transition temperature dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device. We are able to observe proton signals from 1 mL of mineral oil in 2 mT in a single transient. The sensitivity of this system has also allowed the detection of proton NMR at magnetic fields as low as 0.059 mT, which is comparable to the Earth?s field. Such results make possible a number of new experiments in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. We present a two-dimensional image of a phantom filled with mineral oil obtained in a field of 2 mT.

  1. Picoliter NMR spectroscopy using nitrogen-vacancy centers in nanofabricated diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehayias, Pauli; Jarmola, Andrey; Mosavian, Nazanin; Fescenko, Ilja; Benito, Francisco; Laraoui, Abdelghani; Smits, Janis; Bougas, Lykourgos; Budker, Dmitry; Neumann, Alex; Brueck, Steven; Acosta, Victor

    2017-04-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool for analytical chemistry, though one drawback is that its utility can be limited by poor sensitivity. This makes NMR characterization challenging for samples with few nuclear spins. Building on the recent advances of using nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers in diamond for NMR spectroscopy, we used an NV ensemble (a few-nm layer at the diamond surface) to improve sensitivity, which we further enhance by nanofabricating gratings for greater surface area. With nanofabricated diamond chips we detected the NMR signal from 1 molar 19F in glycerol in a 1 pL volume with nearly 100 × improvement in concentration sensitivity compared to previous reported works. We will present details on our recent findings and ongoing attempts to use this technique in practical applications.

  2. Metabolite profiling of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) using 1H NMR spectroscopy as a tool to detect potential unintended effects following a genetic modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gall, Gwénaëlle; Colquhoun, Ian J; Davis, Adrienne L; Collins, Geoff J; Verhoeyen, Martine E

    2003-04-23

    The maize transcription factors LC and C1 were simultaneously overexpressed in tomato with the aim of producing lines with increased amounts of flavonols. The metabolite composition of these genetically modified tomatoes has been compared with that of azygous (nonmodified) controls grown side-by-side under the same conditions. It has been possible to observe metabolic changes in both types at different stages of maturity. (1)H NMR spectra showed that the levels of glutamic acid, fructose, and some nucleosides and nucleotides gradually increase from the immature to the ripe stage, whereas some amino acids such as valine and gamma-aminobutyric acid were present in higher amounts in unripe tomatoes. Apart from the significantly increased content of six main flavonoid glycosides (mainly kaempferol-3-O-rutinoside, with additional increases in kaempferol-3,7-di-O-glucoside (1), kaempferol-3-O-rutinoside-7-O-glucoside (2), kaempferol-3-O-glucoside, a dihydrokaempferol-O-hexoside (3), and naringenin-7-O-glucoside), the levels of at least 15 other metabolites were found to be different between the two types of red tomato. Among them were citric acid, sucrose, phenylalanine, and trigonelline. However, although statistically significant, these changes in mean values were relatively minor (less than 3-fold) and within the natural variation that would be observed in a field-grown crop. Nevertheless, this study clearly showed that NMR combined with chemometrics and univariate statistics can successfully trace even small differences in metabolite levels between plants and therefore represents a powerful tool to detect potential unintended effects in genetically modified crops.

  3. NMR SLIC Sensing of Hydrogenation Reactions Using Parahydrogen in Low Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Parahydrogen-induced polarization (PHIP) is an NMR hyperpolarization technique that increases nuclear spin polarization by orders of magnitude, and it is particularly well-suited to study hydrogenation reactions. However, the use of high-field NMR spectroscopy is not always possible, especially in the context of potential industrial-scale reactor applications. On the other hand, the direct low-field NMR detection of reaction products with enhanced nuclear spin polarization is challenging due to near complete signal cancellation from nascent parahydrogen protons. We show that hydrogenation products prepared by PHIP can be irradiated with weak (on the order of spin–spin couplings of a few hertz) alternating magnetic field (called Spin-Lock Induced Crossing or SLIC) and consequently efficiently detected at low magnetic field (e.g., 0.05 T used here) using examples of several types of organic molecules containing a vinyl moiety. The detected hyperpolarized signals from several reaction products at tens of millimolar concentrations were enhanced by 10000-fold, producing NMR signals an order of magnitude greater than the background signal from protonated solvents. PMID:28066517

  4. Bat detective-Deep learning tools for bat acoustic signal detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Aodha, Oisin; Gibb, Rory; Barlow, Kate E; Browning, Ella; Firman, Michael; Freeman, Robin; Harder, Briana; Kinsey, Libby; Mead, Gary R; Newson, Stuart E; Pandourski, Ivan; Parsons, Stuart; Russ, Jon; Szodoray-Paradi, Abigel; Szodoray-Paradi, Farkas; Tilova, Elena; Girolami, Mark; Brostow, Gabriel; Jones, Kate E

    2018-03-01

    Passive acoustic sensing has emerged as a powerful tool for quantifying anthropogenic impacts on biodiversity, especially for echolocating bat species. To better assess bat population trends there is a critical need for accurate, reliable, and open source tools that allow the detection and classification of bat calls in large collections of audio recordings. The majority of existing tools are commercial or have focused on the species classification task, neglecting the important problem of first localizing echolocation calls in audio which is particularly problematic in noisy recordings. We developed a convolutional neural network based open-source pipeline for detecting ultrasonic, full-spectrum, search-phase calls produced by echolocating bats. Our deep learning algorithms were trained on full-spectrum ultrasonic audio collected along road-transects across Europe and labelled by citizen scientists from www.batdetective.org. When compared to other existing algorithms and commercial systems, we show significantly higher detection performance of search-phase echolocation calls with our test sets. As an example application, we ran our detection pipeline on bat monitoring data collected over five years from Jersey (UK), and compared results to a widely-used commercial system. Our detection pipeline can be used for the automatic detection and monitoring of bat populations, and further facilitates their use as indicator species on a large scale. Our proposed pipeline makes only a small number of bat specific design decisions, and with appropriate training data it could be applied to detecting other species in audio. A crucial novelty of our work is showing that with careful, non-trivial, design and implementation considerations, state-of-the-art deep learning methods can be used for accurate and efficient monitoring in audio.

  5. Improved Heart Sound Detection and Signal-to-Noise Estimation Using a Low-Mass Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semmlow, John L

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to improve the detection of high-frequency sounds from the heart for better identification of turbulent blood flow in partially occluded coronary arteries. This paper also describes a method for the quantitative assessment of data quality. A very light-weight dual accelerometer has been developed that places a small mechanical load on the chest. When used in conjunction with a novel correlation-based analysis, this dual-signal transducer provides an estimate to the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the acoustic signal. The new transducer has significantly better SNR properties than the traditional cardiac microphones. This improvement is due to increased sensitivity to high-frequency signals not a reduction in noise and is likely the result of reduced mechanical loading on the chest. Substantial improvement in the detection of high-frequency heart sounds is possible as is quantitative assessment of data quality. The new transducer and analysis will lead to substantial improvements in the acoustic detection of partially occluded arteries associated with coronary artery disease. It is finally possible to obtain a measurement of the quality of heart sound signals as they are being recorded.

  6. Detection of driving fatigue by using noncontact EMG and ECG signals measurement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Rongrong; Wang, Hong

    2014-05-01

    Driver fatigue can be detected by constructing a discriminant mode using some features obtained from physiological signals. There exist two major challenges of this kind of methods. One is how to collect physiological signals from subjects while they are driving without any interruption. The other is to find features of physiological signals that are of corresponding change with the loss of attention caused by driver fatigue. Driving fatigue is detected based on the study of surface electromyography (EMG) and electrocardiograph (ECG) during the driving period. The noncontact data acquisition system was used to collect physiological signals from the biceps femoris of each subject to tackle the first challenge. Fast independent component analysis (FastICA) and digital filter were utilized to process the original signals. Based on the statistical analysis results given by Kolmogorov-Smirnov Z test, the peak factor of EMG (p fatigue of drivers. The discriminant criterion of fatigue was obtained from the training samples by using Mahalanobis distance, and then the average classification accuracy was given by 10-fold cross-validation. The results showed that the method proposed in this paper can give well performance in distinguishing the normal state and fatigue state. The noncontact, onboard vehicle drivers' fatigue detection system was developed to reduce fatigue-related risks.

  7. Detecting and Predicting Muscle Fatigue during Typing By SEMG Signal Processing and Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Ghoochani

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Repetitive strain injuries are one of the most prevalent problems in occupational diseases. Repetition, vibration and bad postures of the extremities are physical risk factors related to work that can cause chronic musculoskeletal disorders. Repetitive work on a computer with low level contraction requires the posture to be maintained for a long time, which can cause muscle fatigue. Muscle fatigue in shoulders and neck is one of the most prevalent problems reported with computer users especially during typing. Surface electromyography (SEMG signals are used for detecting muscle fatigue as a non-invasive method. Material and Methods: Nine healthy females volunteered for signal recoding during typing. EMG signals were recorded from the trapezius muscle, which is subjected to muscle fatigue during typing.  After signal analysis and feature extraction, detecting and predicting muscle fatigue was performed by using the MLP artificial neural network. Results: Recorded signals were analyzed in time and frequency domains for feature extraction. Results of classification showed that the MLP neural network can detect and predict muscle fatigue during typing with 80.79 % ± 1.04% accuracy. Conclusion: Intelligent classification and prediction of muscle fatigue can have many applications in human factors engineering (ergonomics, rehabilitation engineering and biofeedback equipment for mitigating the injuries of repetitive works.

  8. ECG Signal Denoising and QRS Complex Detection by Wavelet Transform Based Thresholding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati BANERJEE

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Biomedical signals like heart waves commonly change their statistical property over time and are highly non stationary signals. For the analysis of this kind of signals wavelet transform is a powerful tool. Electrocardiogram (ECG is one of the most widely used diagnostic tools for heart disease. Automatic detection of R peaks in a QRS complex is a fundamental requirement for automatic disease identification. This paper presents a novel algorithm and its implementation details for denoising an ECG signal along with accurate detection of R peaks and hence the QRS complex using Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT where db6 is selected as the mother wavelet for analysis as it is found to be most similar to the morphology of QRS complexes. Decomposition and selective reconstruction by elimination of higher scale details from the signal, denoises it considerably. Thresholding along with slope inversion method is used for detection of QRS complex. The performance of the system is validated using the 12-lead ECG recordings collected from physionet PTB diagnostic database giving a sensitivity of 99.4 %.

  9. CHIRP-Like Signals: Estimation, Detection and Processing A Sequential Model-Based Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candy, J. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-08-04

    Chirp signals have evolved primarily from radar/sonar signal processing applications specifically attempting to estimate the location of a target in surveillance/tracking volume. The chirp, which is essentially a sinusoidal signal whose phase changes instantaneously at each time sample, has an interesting property in that its correlation approximates an impulse function. It is well-known that a matched-filter detector in radar/sonar estimates the target range by cross-correlating a replicant of the transmitted chirp with the measurement data reflected from the target back to the radar/sonar receiver yielding a maximum peak corresponding to the echo time and therefore enabling the desired range estimate. In this application, we perform the same operation as a radar or sonar system, that is, we transmit a “chirp-like pulse” into the target medium and attempt to first detect its presence and second estimate its location or range. Our problem is complicated by the presence of disturbance signals from surrounding broadcast stations as well as extraneous sources of interference in our frequency bands and of course the ever present random noise from instrumentation. First, we discuss the chirp signal itself and illustrate its inherent properties and then develop a model-based processing scheme enabling both the detection and estimation of the signal from noisy measurement data.

  10. Conceptualization of the Complex Outcomes of Sexual Abuse: A Signal Detection Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechtel, Pia; Evans, Ian M.; Podd, John V.

    2011-01-01

    Eighty-five New Zealand based practitioners experienced in treating adults with a history of child sexual abuse participated in an online judgment study of child sexual abuse outcomes using signal detection theory methodology. Participants' level of sensitivity was assessed independent of their degree of response bias when discriminating (a) known…

  11. Effects of Point-Loss Punishers on Human Signal-Detection Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lie, Celia; Alsop, Brent

    2009-01-01

    Three experiments using human participants varied the distribution of point-gain reinforcers or point-loss punishers in two-alternative signal-detection procedures. Experiment 1 varied the distribution of point-gain reinforcers for correct responses (Group A) and point-loss punishers for errors (Group B) across conditions. Response bias varied…

  12. Stimulus Disparity and Punisher Control of Human Signal-Detection Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lie, Celia; Alsop, Brent

    2010-01-01

    The present experiment examined the effects of varying stimulus disparity and relative punisher frequencies on signal detection by humans. Participants were placed into one of two groups. Group 3 participants were presented with 1:3 and 3:1 punisher frequency ratios, while Group 11 participants were presented with 1:11 and 11:1 punisher frequency…

  13. A Signal Detection Analysis of the Effects of Alcohol on Visual Contrast Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timney, Brian; Ferreira, Melissa; Matson, Steven

    2016-07-06

    Numerous studies have shown that acute ethanol consumption can reduce visual contrast sensitivity when measured using traditional psychophysical methods. However, no consideration has been given to whether nonsensory factors may also play a role. The present study used both traditional techniques and signal detection procedures to evaluate this possibility. In three within-subject experiments, 41 observers (19 Females and 22 Males) were presented with faint, contrast-modulated, visual patterns and asked to say if they had seen them. In Experiment 1, contrast thresholds were measured using a randomly interleaved staircase procedure, and the data confirmed an increase in threshold following alcohol. In Experiment 2, using similar stimuli, but applying a signal detection analysis, we found that sensitivity, as reflected in d', did not change following alcohol. However, participants became more conservative in their response criterion. The third experiment was designed to allow thresholds to be measured directly with a conventional psychophysical procedure while permitting a signal detection analysis to be performed on the same data. The conventional psychophysical task showed an increase in contrast threshold, while the signal detection analysis showed no change in sensitivity, but a shift to a more conservative criterion. These data highlight the importance of taking into account alcohol's effects on cognitive processes, even when assessing basic sensory function. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. Signal Detection Analysis of Factors Associated with Diabetes among Semirural Mexican American Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanni, K. D.; Ahn, D. A.; Winkleby, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Signal detection analysis was used to evaluate a combination of sociodemographic, acculturation, mental health, health care, and chronic disease risk factors potentially associated with diabetes in a sample of 4,505 semirural Mexican American adults. Overall, 8.9% of adults had been diagnosed with diabetes. The analysis resulted in 12 mutually…

  15. A common signal detection model accounts for both perception and discrimination of the watercolor effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devinck, Frédéric; Knoblauch, Kenneth

    2012-03-21

    Establishing the relation between perception and discrimination is a fundamental objective in psychophysics, with the goal of characterizing the neural mechanisms mediating perception. Here, we show that a procedure for estimating a perceptual scale based on a signal detection model also predicts discrimination performance. We use a recently developed procedure, Maximum Likelihood Difference Scaling (MLDS), to measure the perceptual strength of a long-range, color, filling-in phenomenon, the Watercolor Effect (WCE), as a function of the luminance ratio between the two components of its generating contour. MLDS is based on an equal-variance, gaussian, signal detection model and yields a perceptual scale with interval properties. The strength of the fill-in percept increased 10-15 times the estimate of the internal noise level for a 3-fold increase in the luminance ratio. Each observer's estimated scale predicted discrimination performance in a subsequent paired-comparison task. A common signal detection model accounts for both the appearance and discrimination data. Since signal detection theory provides a common metric for relating discrimination performance and neural response, the results have implications for comparing perceptual and neural response functions.

  16. UV-B detected by the UVR8 photoreceptor antagonizes auxin signaling and plant shade avoidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Scott; Velanis, Christos N; Jenkins, Gareth I; Franklin, Keara A

    2014-08-12

    Plants detect different facets of their radiation environment via specific photoreceptors to modulate growth and development. UV-B is perceived by the photoreceptor UV RESISTANCE LOCUS 8 (UVR8). The molecular mechanisms linking UVR8 activation to plant growth are not fully understood, however. When grown in close proximity to neighboring vegetation, shade-intolerant plants initiate dramatic stem elongation to overtop competitors. Here we show that UV-B, detected by UVR8, provides an unambiguous sunlight signal that inhibits shade avoidance responses in Arabidopsis thaliana by antagonizing the phytohormones auxin and gibberellin. UV-B triggers degradation of the transcription factors PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR 4 and PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR 5 and stabilizes growth-repressing DELLA proteins, inhibiting auxin biosynthesis via a dual mechanism. Our findings show that UVR8 signaling is closely integrated with other photoreceptor pathways to regulate auxin signaling and plant growth in sunlight.

  17. A Modified Adaptive Stochastic Resonance for Detecting Faint Signal in Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hengwei Li

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an approach is presented to detect faint signals with strong noises in sensors by stochastic resonance (SR. We adopt the power spectrum as the evaluation tool of SR, which can be obtained by the fast Fourier transform (FFT. Furthermore, we introduce the adaptive filtering scheme to realize signal processing automatically. The key of the scheme is how to adjust the barrier height to satisfy the optimal condition of SR in the presence of any input. For the given input signal, we present an operable procedure to execute the adjustment scheme. An example utilizing one audio sensor to detect the fault information from the power supply is given. Simulation results show that th

  18. Image processing for an automatic detection of defect signals from electromagnetic cartographies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benoist, B.; Marqueste, L.; Birac, C.

    1993-01-01

    As the population of nuclear power plants ages, new defects are appearing in steam reactor tubes (stress corrosion, corrosion pitting and intergranular corrosion). For more sophisticated expert appraisal of these defects, tubes can be examined by multifrequency eddy-current testing with an absolute coil (diameter value of 1 mm). A device, consisting of a push-puller mechanism and a motor-driven probe carrying this absolute coil, gives a helical movement to scan the inner surface of the tube. The signals obtained can be represented in the form of cartographies (3D representation in which the coordinates are the circumference, the length and amplitude of the X or Y component at a given frequency). The detection of defect signals by visual examination of these eddy-current cartographies is not always reproducible. The article describes an image processing procedure for the detection of defect signals which leads to better reproducibility for more safety. (authors). 3 refs., 7 figs

  19. Image processing for an automatic detection of defect signals from electromagnetic cartographies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benoist, B.; Marqueste, L.; Birac, C.

    1994-01-01

    As the population of nuclear power plants ages, new defects are appearing in steam generator tubes (stress corrosion, corrosion pitting and intergranular corrosion). For more sophisticated expert appraisal of these defects, tubes can be examined by multifrequency eddy-current testing with an absolute coil (diameter value of 1 mm). A device, consisting of a push-puller mechanism and a motor-driven probe carrying this absolute coil, gives a helical movement to scan the inner surface of the tube. The signals obtained can be represented in the form of cartographies (3D representation in which the coordinates are the circumference, the length and amplitude of the X or Y component at a given frequency). The detection of defect signals by visual examination of these eddy-current cartographies is not always reproducible. The article describes an image processing procedure for the detection of defect signals which leads to a better reproductibility for more safety

  20. Mine detection using SF-GPR: A signal processing approach for resolution enhancement and clutter reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Brian; Jakobsen, Kaj Bjarne; Larsen, Jan

    2001-01-01

    is presented, and the effects of combining clutter reduction with resolution enhancement are examined using simulated SF-GPR data examples. The resolution enhancement method is based on methods from optical signal processing and is largely carried out in the frequency domain to reduce the computational burden......Proper clutter reduction is essential for Ground Penetrating Radar data since low signal-to-clutter ratio prevent correct detection of mine objects. A signal processing approach for resolution enhancement and clutter reduction used on Stepped-Frequency Ground Penetrating Radar (SF-GPR) data....... The clutter reduction method is based on basis function decomposition of the SF-GPR time-series from which the clutter and the signal are separated....

  1. Detecting missing signals in multichannel recordings by using higher order statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halabi, R; Diab, M O; Moslem, B; Khalil, M; Marque, C

    2012-01-01

    In real world applications, a multichannel acquisition system is susceptible of having one or many of its sensors displaced or detached, leading therefore to the loss or corruption of the recorded signals. In this paper, we present a technique for detecting missing or corrupted signals in multichannel recordings. Our approach is based on Higher Order Statistics (HOS) analysis. Our approach is tested on real uterine electromyogram (EMG) signals recorded by 4×4 electrode grid. Results have shown that HOS descriptors can discriminate between the two classes of signals (missing vs. non-missing). These results are supported by statistical analysis using the t-test which indicated good statistical significance of 95% confidence level.

  2. Microwave vector signal transmission over an optical fiber based on IQ modulation and coherent detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Shao, Tong; Wen, Aijun; Yao, Jianping

    2014-03-15

    A novel approach to transmitting two vector signals using a single optical carrier based on IQ modulation and coherent detection is proposed and demonstrated. In the proposed system, two quadrature phase-shift keying (QPSK) signals are IQ modulated on an optical carrier with one polarization state using a dual-parallel Mach-Zehnder modulator (DP-MZM). The optical carrier with an orthogonal polarization state is not modulated but transmitted with the modulated optical wave. At the receiver, the two orthogonally polarized light waves are separated and sent to a coherent detector, where the two QPSK signals are separated and demodulated. An experiment is performed. The transmission of two QPSK signals at 2 GHz with a data rate of 1 Gbps is implemented over a 25 km single-mode fiber. The performance of the transmission in terms of error vector magnitude is evaluated.

  3. Detection and structural identification of dissolved organic matter in Antarctic glacial ice at natural abundance by SPR-W5-WATERGATE 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pautler, Brent G; Simpson, André J; Simpson, Myrna J; Tseng, Li-Hong; Spraul, Manfred; Dubnick, Ashley; Sharp, Martin J; Fitzsimons, Sean J

    2011-06-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is ubiquitous in aquatic ecosystems and is derived from various inputs that control its turnover. Glaciers and ice sheets are the second largest water reservoir in the global hydrologic cycle, but little is known about glacial DOM composition or contributions to biogeochemical cycling. Here we employ SPR-W5-WATERGATE (1)H NMR spectroscopy to elucidate and quantify the chemical structures of DOM constituents in Antarctic glacial ice as they exist in their natural state (average DOC of 8 mg/L) without isolation or preconcentration. This Antarctic glacial DOM is predominantly composed of a mixture of small recognizable molecules differing from DOM in marine, lacustrine, and other terrestrial environments. The major constituents detected in three distinct types of glacial ice include lactic and formic acid, free amino acids, and a mixture of simple sugars and amino sugars with concentrations that vary between ice types. The detection of free amino acid and amino sugar monomer components of peptidoglycan within the ice suggests that Antarctic glacial DOM likely originates from in situ microbial activity. As these constituents are normally considered to be biologically labile (fast cycling) in nonglacial environments, accelerated glacier melt and runoff may result in a flux of nutrients into adjacent ecosystems.

  4. Application of {sup 1}H-NMR-based metabolomics for detecting injury induced by long-term microwave exposure in Wistar rats' urine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Li-Feng; Peng, Rui-Yun; Wang, Shui-Ming; Gao, Ya-Bing; Dong, Ji; Zhao, Li; Li, Xiang; Zuo, Hong-Yan; Wang, Chang-Zhen [Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Laboratory of Pathology, Beijing (China); Hu, Xiang-Jun [Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing (China); Gao, Rong-Lian [Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Laser Medicine, Beijing (China); Su, Zhen-Tao [Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Radiation Protection, Beijing (China); Feng, Xin-Xing [Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Endocrine and Cardiovascular Center, Fuwai Hospital and Cardiovascular Institute, Beijing (China)

    2012-07-15

    There has been growing public concern regarding exposure to microwave fields as a potential human health hazard. This study aimed to identify sensitive biochemical indexes for the detection of injury induced by microwave exposure. Male Wistar rats were exposed to microwaves for 6 min per day, 5 days per week over a period of 1 month at an average power density of 5 mW/cm{sup 2} (specific absorption rate of 2.1 W/kg). Urine specimens were collected over 24 h in metabolic cages at 7 days, 21 days, 2 months, and 6 months after exposure. {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy data were analyzed using multivariate statistical techniques. Urine metabolic profiles of rats after long-term microwave exposure were significantly differentiated from those of sham-treated controls using principal component analysis or partial least squares discriminant analysis. Significant differences in low molecular weight metabolites (acetate, succinate, citrate, ketoglutarate, glucose, taurine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, and hippurate) were identified in the 5 mW/cm{sup 2} microwave exposure group compared with the sham-treated controls at 7 days, 21 days, and 2 months. Metabolites returned to normal levels by 6 months after exposure. These data indicated that these metabolites were related to the perturbations of energy metabolism particularly in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and the metabolism of amino acids, monoamines, and choline in urine represent potential indexes for the detection of injury induced by long-term microwave exposure. (orig.)

  5. NMR of 19F emulsions: methodological developments and application to evaluation of oxi-metry and dynamic biodistribution in the liver and spleen and to detection of tumor angiogenesis in the rodent brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraudeau, C.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed at developing a method for detection of brain tumors at 7 tesla thanks to 19 F MRI contrast agents. We particularly assessed the potential of this method to highlight tumor angiogenesis with RGD-functionalized contrast agents targeting αvβ3integrin, a bio-marker over-expressed at the surface of new capillary blood vessels. Owing to low local concentrations in contrast agent, the first step consisted in optimizing a multi spin echo sequence dedicated to a well-known biocompatible per-fluorocarbon, perfluoro-octylbromide (PFOB). We show that careful adjustment of sequence parameters allows cancellation of J-modulation and T2 enhancement, and yields an excellent sensitivity in vitro. Our sequence was then tested for oxygenation measurements in the mouse liver and spleen after injection of a PFOB emulsion. The results demonstrate very good accuracy of the measurements after one single infusion of emulsion. We also perform a dynamic biodistribution study in order to monitor emulsion nano-particle uptake in the liver and spleen. Moreover, we show that stealth of emulsions grafted with different quantities of polyethylene glycol (PEG) can be assessed by fitting experimental data with a pharmacokinetic empirical model. Our sequence was finally used to visualize αvβ3-targeted nano-particles in a U87 glioblastoma mouse model. Concentrations found in tumors after injection of an RGD-functionalized emulsion and a control emulsion are compared. Concentrations are found to be significantly higher with the RGD emulsion than with the control emulsion, suggesting specific binding of functionalized nano-particles with αvβ3 integrin. The last part is dedicated to a new diffusion-weighted 19 F NMR spectroscopy sequence. This method aims at suppressing vascular signal coming from circulating PFOB nano-particles in order to evaluate signal coming from bound nano-particles only. (author) [fr

  6. Detection of chaotic dynamics in human gait signals from mobile devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelMarco, Stephen; Deng, Yunbin

    2017-05-01

    The ubiquity of mobile devices offers the opportunity to exploit device-generated signal data for biometric identification, health monitoring, and activity recognition. In particular, mobile devices contain an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) that produces acceleration and rotational rate information from the IMU accelerometers and gyros. These signals reflect motion properties of the human carrier. It is well-known that the complexity of bio-dynamical systems gives rise to chaotic dynamics. Knowledge of chaotic properties of these systems has shown utility, for example, in detecting abnormal medical conditions and neurological disorders. Chaotic dynamics has been found, in the lab, in bio-dynamical systems data such as electrocardiogram (heart), electroencephalogram (brain), and gait data. In this paper, we investigate the following question: can we detect chaotic dynamics in human gait as measured by IMU acceleration and gyro data from mobile phones? To detect chaotic dynamics, we perform recurrence analysis on real gyro and accelerometer signal data obtained from mobile devices. We apply the delay coordinate embedding approach from Takens' theorem to reconstruct the phase space trajectory of the multi-dimensional gait dynamical system. We use mutual information properties of the signal to estimate the appropriate delay value, and the false nearest neighbor approach to determine the phase space embedding dimension. We use a correlation dimension-based approach together with estimation of the largest Lyapunov exponent to make the chaotic dynamics detection decision. We investigate the ability to detect chaotic dynamics for the different one-dimensional IMU signals, across human subject and walking modes, and as a function of different phone locations on the human carrier.

  7. A Detection Algorithm for the BOC Signal Based on Quadrature Channel Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Qian

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to solve the problem of detecting a BOC signal, which uses a long-period pseudo random sequence, an algorithm is presented based on quadrature channel correlation. The quadrature channel correlation method eliminates the autocorrelation component of the carrier wave, allowing for the extraction of the absolute autocorrelation peaks of the BOC sequence. If the same lag difference and height difference exist for the adjacent peaks, the BOC signal can be detected effectively using a statistical analysis of the multiple autocorrelation peaks. The simulation results show that the interference of the carrier wave component is eliminated and the autocorrelation peaks of the BOC sequence are obtained effectively without demodulation. The BOC signal can be detected effectively when the SNR is greater than −12 dB. The detection ability can be improved further by increasing the number of sampling points. The higher the ratio of the square wave subcarrier speed to the pseudo random sequence speed is, the greater the detection ability is with a lower SNR. The algorithm presented in this paper is superior to the algorithm based on the spectral correlation.

  8. Detection and Classification of Low Probability of Intercept Radar Signals Using Parallel Filter Arrays and Higher Order Statistics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Taboada, Fernando

    2002-01-01

    ... intercept devices such as radar warning, electronic support and electronic intelligence receivers, In order to detect LPI radar waveforms new signal processing techniques are required This thesis first...

  9. A low noise photoelectric signal acquisition system applying in nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qilin; Zhang, Xian; Zhao, Xinghua; Yang, Dan; Zhou, Binquan; Hu, Zhaohui

    2017-10-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope serves as a new generation of strong support for the development of high-tech weapons, it solves the core problem that limits the development of the long-playing seamless navigation and positioning. In the NMR gyroscope, the output signal with atomic precession frequency is detected by the probe light, the final crucial photoelectric signal of the probe light directly decides the quality of the gyro signal. But the output signal has high sensitivity, resolution and measurement accuracy for the photoelectric detection system. In order to detect the measured signal better, this paper proposed a weak photoelectric signal rapid acquisition system, which has high SNR and the frequency of responded signal is up to 100 KHz to let the weak output signal with high frequency of the NMR gyroscope can be detected better.

  10. High-Performance Signal Detection for Adverse Drug Events using MapReduce Paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Kai; Sun, Xingzhi; Tao, Ying; Xu, Linhao; Wang, Chen; Mao, Xianling; Peng, Bo; Pan, Yue

    2010-11-13

    Post-marketing pharmacovigilance is important for public health, as many Adverse Drug Events (ADEs) are unknown when those drugs were approved for marketing. However, due to the large number of reported drugs and drug combinations, detecting ADE signals by mining these reports is becoming a challenging task in terms of computational complexity. Recently, a parallel programming model, MapReduce has been introduced by Google to support large-scale data intensive applications. In this study, we proposed a MapReduce-based algorithm, for common ADE detection approach, Proportional Reporting Ratio (PRR), and tested it in mining spontaneous ADE reports from FDA. The purpose is to investigate the possibility of using MapReduce principle to speed up biomedical data mining tasks using this pharmacovigilance case as one specific example. The results demonstrated that MapReduce programming model could improve the performance of common signal detection algorithm for pharmacovigilance in a distributed computation environment at approximately liner speedup rates.

  11. High efficiency processing for reduced amplitude zones detection in the HRECG signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugarte, N.; Álvarez, A.; Balacco, J.; Mercado, G.; Gonzalez, A.; Dugarte, E.; Olivares, A.

    2016-04-01

    Summary - This article presents part of a more detailed research proposed in the medium to long term, with the intention of establishing a new philosophy of electrocardiogram surface analysis. This research aims to find indicators of cardiovascular disease in its early stage that may go unnoticed with conventional electrocardiography. This paper reports the development of a software processing which collect some existing techniques and incorporates novel methods for detection of reduced amplitude zones (RAZ) in high resolution electrocardiographic signal (HRECG).The algorithm consists of three stages, an efficient processing for QRS detection, averaging filter using correlation techniques and a step for RAZ detecting. Preliminary results show the efficiency of system and point to incorporation of techniques new using signal analysis with involving 12 leads.

  12. An application of signal detection theory with finite mixture distributions to source discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCarlo, Lawrence T

    2003-09-01

    A mixture extension of signal detection theory is applied to source discrimination. The basic idea of the approach is that only a portion of the sources (say A or B) of items to be discriminated is encoded or attended to during the study period. As a result, in addition to 2 underlying probability distributions associated with the 2 sources, there is a 3rd distribution that represents items for which sources were not attended to. Thus, over trials, the observed response results from a mixture of an attended (A or B) distribution and a nonattended distribution. The situation differs in an interesting way from detection in that, for detection, there is mixing only on signal trials and not on noise trials, whereas for discrimination, there is mixing on both A and B trials. Predictions of the mixture model are examined for data from several recent studies and in a new experiment. (c) 2003 APA, all rights reserved

  13. Analysis Spectrum of ECG Signal and QRS Detection during Running on Treadmill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agung Suhendra, M.; Ilham R., M.; Simbolon, Artha I.; Faizal A., M.; Munandar, A.

    2018-03-01

    The heart is an important organ in our metabolism in which it controls circulatory and oxygen. The heart exercise is needed one of them using the treadmill to prevent health. To analysis, it using electrocardiograph (ECG) to investigating and diagnosing anomalies of the heart. In this paper, we would like to analysis ECG signals during running on the treadmill with kinds of speeds. There are two analysis ECG signals i.e. QRS detection and power spectrum density (PSD). The result of PSD showed that subject 3 has highly for all subject and the result of QRS detection using pan Tomkins algorithm that a percentage of failed detection is an approaching to 0 % for all subject.

  14. Proceedings of the GERM's thematic conference on Detection and acquisition in magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marion, Dominique; Brutscher, B.; Pelupessy, Philippe; Heise, Bert; Merlet, Denis; Bonny, J.M.; Kupce, Eriks; Poirier-Quinot, Marie; Ginefri, Jean-Christophe; De Paepe, Gael; Aussenac, Fabien; Pannetier-Lecoeur, Myriam; Dyvorne, Hadrien; Sergeeva-Chollet, Natalia; Cannies, Gregory; Fermon, Claude; Piotto, M.; Mueller, Norbert; Schlagnitweit, Judith; Jerschow, Alexej; Nausner, Martin; Man, Pascal P.; Costa Torro; Millot, Yannick; Bonhomme, Christian; Babonneau, Florence; Giraudeau, Patrick; Akoka, Serge; Jeannerat, Damien; Foroozandeh, Mohammadali; Shivapurkar, Rupali; Bayiha Ba Njocka, Gaetan; Gobet, Mallory; Sarou-Kanian, Vincent; Bessada, Catherine; Rollet, Anne-Laure; Boutin, L.; Tassali, C.N.; Leonce, E.; Huber, G.; Desvaux, H.; Carriere, M.; Berthault, P.; Pavilla, A.; Ciobanu, L.; Leteurte, F.; Jamin, N.; Boulard, Y.; Stopin, A.; Brotin, T.; Dutasta, J.P.; Steiner, Emilie; Yemloul, Mehdi; Robert, Anthony; Canet, Daniel; Bouguet-Bonnet, S.; Guendouz, Laoues; Leclerc, Sebastien; Mispelter, Joel; Lupu, Mihaela; Meudal, Herve; Delmas, Agnes; Nys, Yves; Landon, Celine; Herve-Grepinet, Virgine; LABAS, Valerie; Bouhrara, M.; Damez, J.L.; Clerjon, S.; Chevarin, C.; Benmoussa, A.; Bonny, J.M; Coelho-Diogo, Cristina; Babonneau, Florence; Flambard, A.; Lescouazec, R.; Laurent, G.; Leclerc, Sebastien; Trausch, Gregory; Cordier, Benoit; Grandclaude, Denis; Retournard, Alain; Fraissard, Jacques; Allix, F.; Jamart, B.; Lameiras, Pedro; Renault, Jean-Hugues; Nuzillard, Jean-Marc; Mouloungui, Zephirin; Tanty, M.; Delsuc, M.A.; Pate, F.; Guillon, V.; Bauer, D.; Fleury, M.; Neel, M.C.; Moussaed, Georges; Rollet, Anne-Laure; Gobet, Mallory; Sarou-kanian, Vincent; Bessada, Catherine; Salanne, Mathieu; Simon, Christian; Rollet, Anne-Laure; Deschamps, Michael; Porion, Patrice; Pucheault, Mathieu; Tassali, Nawal; Boutin, Celine; Huber, Gaspard; Desvaux, Herve; Leonce, Estelle; Berthault, Patrick; Ciobanu, Luisa; Pavilla, Aude; Boulard, Yves; Jamin, N.; Stopin, Antoine; Brotin, Thierry; Dutasta, Jean-Pierre; Placial, Jean-Pierre; Vincent, Bruno; Lescop, Ewen; Guittet, Eric; Van Heijenoort, Carine; Vaultier, Michel

    2010-05-01

    The contributions of this conference addressed the following topics: From spins to analogic signal in the field of detection; Signal, noise and sensitivity; NMR signal processing; Single scan multidimensional NMR; Principles and benefits of the direct digital receiver; Approaches to a fast acquisition of multidimensional spectra and their application in bio-molecular NMR; Parallel acquisitions in new NMR methods for the studies of small molecules in solution; Overview of coding in imagery; NMR with multiple receivers; RF antennas in the NMR acquisition chain; Concepts and applications in high field dynamic nuclear polarization; NMR of solids and Dynamic Nuclear Polarization at 263 GHz; General principles and biomedical applications of cooled antennas in MRI; Low field MRI; Hyper-polarisation by using para-hydrogen with the method of Signal Amplification By Reversible Exchange (SABRE); Spin noise detection; Application of Single Value Decomposition method to reduce noises in a time signal; A low-pass digital filter for the processing of truncated NMR signals; Optimisation of ultra-fast 2D NMR for the structural analysis of organic molecules; Spectral aliasing of Carbon 13 dimension as a powerful tool to study mixtures of small molecules using HSQC-based experiments; Challenges and stakes of the measurement of self-diffusion coefficients by NMR in extreme conditions; Vectorization of hyper-polarized Xe 129 (from the design of bio-probes to in-vivo imagery); NMR relaxometry (spin-lattice relaxation times in the laboratory frame versus the spin-lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame); A toolbox to design and build a NMR probe; First 3D structure of an egg beta-defensin; NMR monitoring of water expulsion from the muscle during heating; Improvements in solid-state NMR for materials characterization; Technological advances in NMR at the benefit of the study of a paramagnetic cyanided precursor; Chemical shift imaging by precise object displacement; Spin relaxation

  15. Study of cultured fibroblasts in vivo using NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karczmar, G.S.

    1984-01-01

    The goal of this thesis was to study the compartmentation of phosphorylated glycolytic intermediates in intact Chicken Embryo Fibroblasts (CEFs) using /sup 31/P NMR at 109 MHz. Because glycolysis is regulated differently in normal and virally transformed CEFs, NMR experiments were performed on both types of cells. A technique for maintaining functional cells at high densities in an NMR magnet is described. Signals were detected from cytoplasmic inorganic phosphate (P/sub i/), ATP, NAD, NADH, phosphorylcholine and phosphorylethanolamine. The effect of external glucose on cytoplasmic pools of phosphates was studied. However, experiments with /sup 32/P labelled P/sub i/ showed that as the concentration of glucose in the medium was increased, the amount of phosphate sequestered in the cells increased. They conclude that there is a pool of P/sub i/ which is not detected by high resolution of NMR and that the size of this pool increases as the rate of glycolysis increases. These effects were found only in cultured cells; the data for transformed and normal cells were similar. Longitudinal relaxation times of intracellular phosphates in normal, transformed, and primary CEFs were measured.

  16. Automatic detection of noisy channels in fNIRS signal based on correlation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Mosquera, Carlos; Borragán, Guillermo; Peigneux, Philippe

    2016-09-15

    fNIRS signals can be contaminated by distinct sources of noise. While most of the noise can be corrected using digital filters, optimized experimental paradigms or pre-processing methods, few approaches focus on the automatic detection of noisy channels. In the present study, we propose a new method that detect automatically noisy fNIRS channels by combining the global correlations of the signal obtained from sliding windows (Cui et al., 2010) with correlation coefficients extracted experimental conditions defined by triggers. The validity of the method was evaluated on test data from 17 participants, for a total of 16 NIRS channels per subject, positioned over frontal, dorsolateral prefrontal, parietal and occipital areas. Additionally, the detection of noisy channels was tested in the context of different levels of cognitive requirement in a working memory N-back paradigm. Bad channels detection accuracy, defined as the proportion of bad NIRS channels correctly detected among the total number of channels examined, was close to 91%. Under different cognitive conditions the area under the Receiver Operating Curve (AUC) increased from 60.5% (global correlations) to 91.2% (local correlations). Our results show that global correlations are insufficient for detecting potentially noisy channels when the whole data signal is included in the analysis. In contrast, adding specific local information inherent to the experimental paradigm (e.g., cognitive conditions in a block or event-related design), improved detection performance for noisy channels. Also, we show that automated fNIRS channel detection can be achieved with high accuracy at low computational cost. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Physical fatigue and the perception of differences in load: a signal detection approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blitz, P S; Van Moorst, A

    1978-06-01

    Workload is an important factor related to perception of physical fatigue. Because a person engaged in physical activity eventually leading to painful exhaustion is in a pay-off situation, the paradigm of signal detection might be applicable to the perception of differences in load. Two male track and field athletes, aged 22 and 24 yr., participated in two experiments. In Exp. 1 difference threshold were determined with 25%, 50%, 60%, 65% and 70% of VO2 max as basic loads on a bicycle ergometer. Results showed a decreasing k over increasing work loads, contrary to Weber's law. In Exp. 2 a non-parametric signal detection procedure was used, with 25%, 40%, 50% and 60% of VO2 max as noise levels and a signal intensity of 1.5 watt in every condition. A chi 2 test for a 2-factor design showed only an effect of noise level. The converging results of both experiments led to the conclusion of a relative increasing sensitivity across increasing work loads. The main goal for future research will be to develop the signal detection method as a framework for research on fatigue.

  18. Fault Detection in High Speed Helical Gears Considering Signal Processing Method in Real Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Ali Tabatabai Adnani

    Full Text Available Abstract In the present study, in order to detect the fault of the gearmeshs, two engaged gears based on research department of a major automotive company have been modeled. First off, by using the CATIA software the fault was induced to the output gear. Then, the faulty gearmesh and non-faulty gearmesh is modeled to find the fault pattern to predict and estimate the failure of the gearmesh. The induced defect is according to the frequently practical fault that takes place to the teeth of gears. In order to record the acceleration signals to calculate the decomposition algorithm, mount the accelerometer on accessible place of the output shaft to recognize the pattern. Then, for more realistic simulation, noise is added to the output signal. At the first step by means of Butterworth low pass digital, the noise has to be removed from signals after that by using the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD, signals have decomposed into the Instinct Mode Function (IMF and every IMF were tested by using the Instantaneous Frequency (IF in way of Hillbert Transform (HT. For this purpose a code was developed in MATLAB software. Then, in order to detect the presence of the fault the frequency spectrum of IMF's are created and defect is detected in gearmesh frequency of the spectrum.

  19. A capillary-based probe for in situ detection of enhanced fluorescence signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, F.; Xiao, R.; Zhu, A. N.; Shi, H. C.; Wang, S. Q.

    2013-07-01

    A simple, compact, and high sensitivity capillary-based probe for the in situ detection of fluorescence signals with high sensitivity is demonstrated. A home-made single-multi-mode fiber coupler that is coaxially aligned with the capillary-based probe provides for the transmission of excitation light and the collection and transmission of fluorescence. We propose a conceptually straightforward theoretical model to optimize the factors affecting the fluorescence-capture capability of the capillary-based probe. The fluorescence signal detected by fiber-optic spectroscopy non-linearly increases with the length of the capillary-based probe. In addition, the thicker the capillary tube wall is, the less the fluorescence signals determined are. The performance of the proposed probe is evaluated experimentally by measuring the fluorescence spectra of Cy5.5 dye and blue-green algae. The experimental results show that the proposed probe provides more than a ten-fold increase in fluorescence signal compared with direct measurements by a flat-tipped multi-mode fiber probe. The advantages of the capillary-based probe, which include its simple and compact structure, excellent light collection efficiency, requirement of small sample volume, and recoverability of samples, allow its wide application to in situ detection in the medical, forensic, biological, geological, and environmental fields with high sensitivity.

  20. Methodology for fault detection in induction motors via sound and vibration signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Arredondo, Paulo Antonio; Morinigo-Sotelo, Daniel; Osornio-Rios, Roque Alfredo; Avina-Cervantes, Juan Gabriel; Rostro-Gonzalez, Horacio; Romero-Troncoso, Rene de Jesus

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, timely maintenance of electric motors is vital to keep up the complex processes of industrial production. There are currently a variety of methodologies for fault diagnosis. Usually, the diagnosis is performed by analyzing current signals at a steady-state motor operation or during a start-up transient. This method is known as motor current signature analysis, which identifies frequencies associated with faults in the frequency domain or by the time-frequency decomposition of the current signals. Fault identification may also be possible by analyzing acoustic sound and vibration signals, which is useful because sometimes this information is the only available. The contribution of this work is a methodology for detecting faults in induction motors in steady-state operation based on the analysis of acoustic sound and vibration signals. This proposed approach uses the Complete Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition for decomposing the signal into several intrinsic mode functions. Subsequently, the frequency marginal of the Gabor representation is calculated to obtain the spectral content of the IMF in the frequency domain. This proposal provides good fault detectability results compared to other published works in addition to the identification of more frequencies associated with the faults. The faults diagnosed in this work are two broken rotor bars, mechanical unbalance and bearing defects.

  1. An Advanced Detecting Scheme against a Signal Distortion with a Smart Transmitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Jun Young; Kim, Young Mi

    2013-01-01

    The analog signal distortion could be detected. Also the data integrity for information security could be provided. The assurance of the integrity in digital information as well as analog signals is necessary. The above proposed schemes can be utilized for detecting the modification of the digital information or analog signal distortion without any of authentication. These effects have merits of the defenses for analog signals and cyber security in terms of information integrity. There are many kinds of measuring nuclear I and C system. Thus, the applicable algorithms may be different according to the lightness or the level of the security in each measuring system. In the future, finding and applying the efficient algorithms in each measuring systems in the nuclear power plant should be studied. As the I and C system will be gradually digitalized, the requirements for basic security concepts should be considered and applied. As IT technology has been much developed, measuring nuclear I and C (Instrument and Control) systems also is going to be evolving. At this point, the smart transmitter has been developed and tried to be applied. Recently, constructed nuclear power plants in Korea have adopted the smart meters. In case of Shin-Kori unit 3, about 59 safety grade smart transmitters and about 180 non-safety grade smart transmitters are used for measuring various signals. In the field of measuring nuclear I and C (Instrument and Control) systems, the cyber security problems can happen more. Thus, providing defense methods against possible cyber attacks are essential. In particular, the defense schemes for providing data information integrity will be essential. In addition, it is necessary to detect the analog signal distortion between the host smart transmitters and the client cabinet. In this paper, applicable one of directions and methods against the above two problems are proposed

  2. Signal subspace change detection in averaged multi-look SAR imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranney, Kenneth; Soumekh, Mehrdad

    2005-05-01

    Modern Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) signal processing algorithms could retrieve accurate and subtle information regarding a scene that is being interrogated by an airborne radar system. An important reconnaissance problem that is being studied via the use of SAR systems and their sophisticated signal processing methods involves detecting changes in an imaged scene. In these problems, the user interrogates a scene with a SAR system at two different time points (e.g. different days); the resultant two SAR databases that we refer to as reference and test data, are used to determine where targets have entered or left the imaged scene between the two data acquisitions. For instance, X band SAR systems have the potential to become a potent tool to determine whether mines have been recently placed in an area. This paper describes an algorithm for detecting changes in averaged multi-look SAR imagery. Averaged multi-look SAR images are preferable to full aperture SAR reconstructions when the imaging algorithm is approximation based (e.g. polar format processing), or motion data are not accurate over a long full aperture. We study the application of a SAR detection method, known as Signal Subspace Processing, that is based on the principles of 2D adaptive filtering. We identify the change detection problem as a binary hypothesis-testing problem, and identify an error signal and its normalized version to determine whether i) there is no change in the imaged scene; or ii) a target has been added to the imaged scene. A statistical analysis of the error signal is provided to show its properties and merits. Results are provided for data collected by an X band SAR platform and processed to form non-coherently look-averaged SAR images.

  3. Detecting and characterizing N-acyl-homoserine lactone signal molecules by thin-layer chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Paul D.; Ping, Gao; Daly, Sean L.; Cha, Chung; Cronan, John E.; Rinehart, Kenneth L.; Farrand, Stephen K.

    1997-01-01

    Many Gram-negative bacteria regulate gene expression in response to their population size by sensing the level of acyl-homoserine lactone signal molecules which they produce and liberate to the environment. We have developed an assay for these signals that couples separation by thin-layer chromatography with detection using Agrobacterium tumefaciens harboring lacZ fused to a gene that is regulated by autoinduction. With the exception of N-butanoyl-l-homoserine lactone, the reporter detected acyl-homoserine lactones with 3-oxo-, 3-hydroxy-, and 3-unsubstituted side chains of all lengths tested. The intensity of the response was proportional to the amount of the signal molecule chromatographed. Each of the 3-oxo- and the 3-unsubstituted derivatives migrated with a unique mobility. Using the assay, we showed that some bacteria produce as many as five detectable signal molecules. Structures could be assigned tentatively on the basis of mobility and spot shape. The dominant species produced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci chromatographed with the properties of N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone, a structure that was confirmed by mass spectrometry. An isolate of Pseudomonas fluorescens produced five detectable species, three of which had novel chromatographic properties. These were identified as the 3-hydroxy- forms of N-hexanoyl-, N-octanoyl-, and N-decanoyl-l-homoserine lactone. The assay can be used to screen cultures of bacteria for acyl-homoserine lactones, for quantifying the amounts of these molecules produced, and as an analytical and preparative aid in determining the structures of these signal molecules. PMID:9177164

  4. New techniques in NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, C.E.

    1998-10-01

    In 1989, Soerensen introduced a method, the unitary bound, for calculating the maximum efficiencies of coherence transfer processes in NMR. This thesis applies this method to quadrupolar nuclei, an area not investigated by Soerensen. In doing so, several questions are raised, and answered, as to the implications of the unitary bound for coherence transfer processes in all areas of NMR. These include discussions of when such processes can be reversed without loss of signal and when sequential coherence transfer steps can be carried out with both steps having the maximum efficiency. One area of NMR of quadrupolar nuclei which has attracted some interest over the past few years has been the selective excitation of 23 Na nuclei in ordered environments. This was hinted at by Jaccard et al. in 1986 and demonstrated in biological systems by Eliav et al. in 1992, who achieved the selective excitation using a double-quantum filtration (DQF) experiment. The following year, Kemp-Harper and Wimperis demonstrated that the Jeener-Broekaert experiment could be used to achieve the same selectivity through excitation of quadrupolar order. The unitary bound shows that neither of these experiments achieve the maximum coherence transfer efficiency. This thesis sets out to improve upon the efficiency of these two experiments. Two multiple-pulse experiments are investigated. One seeks to improve upon the efficiency of the Jeener-Broekaert experiment for spin I = 3/2 nuclei by 33% to achieve the unitary bound efficiency. The other seeks to improve the efficiency of the selective DQF experiment by 41% to achieve the bound for spin I= 3/2 nuclei. 23 Na NMR spectra of cartilage and a lyotropic liquid crystal are presented which show that, although the new version of the Jeener-Broekaert experiment achieves no greater efficiency in practical application than the original, the new DQF experiment produces up to half of the expected improvement in efficiency. Alternative techniques to the

  5. Detection and Elimination of Oncogenic Signaling Networks in Premalignant and Malignant Cells with Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Molecular Subtype Cell Line Luminal MCF7 T-47D HER2 BT474M1 KPL4 Triple Negative MDA-MB-468 MDA-MB-231 DCIS MCF10.DCIS.COM SUM225 GEMM MMTV...tumor model. 51 LUMINAL TYPE BREAST CANCER MCF-7 Tumor Figure 42A Figure 42A. MCF7 tumor imaging with HS-118 and HS165: nIR Signals. HS118 or...nm channel) from tumor area were detected by Pearl Imager. Figure 42B Figure 42B. Over time change of nIR signals from MCF7 Tumors: HS118 vs. HS165

  6. Detection and Elimination of Oncogenic Signalling Networks in Premalignant and Malignant Cells with Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Molecular Subtype Cell Line Luminal MCF7 T-47D HER2 BT474M1 KPL4 Triple Negative MDA-MB-468 MDA-MB-231 DCIS MCF10.DCIS.COM SUM225 GEMM MMTV...tumor model. 51 LUMINAL TYPE BREAST CANCER MCF-7 Tumor Figure 42A Figure 42A. MCF7 tumor imaging with HS-118 and HS165: nIR Signals. HS118 or...nm channel) from tumor area were detected by Pearl Imager. Figure 42B Figure 42B. Over time change of nIR signals from MCF7 Tumors: HS118 vs. HS165

  7. Stream computing for biomedical signal processing: A QRS complex detection case-study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, B M; O'Driscoll, C; Boylan, G B; Lightbody, G; Marnane, W P

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in "Big Data" have brought significant gains in the ability to process large amounts of data on commodity server hardware. Stream computing is a relatively new paradigm in this area, addressing the need to process data in real time with very low latency. While this approach has been developed for dealing with large scale data from the world of business, security and finance, there is a natural overlap with clinical needs for physiological signal processing. In this work we present a case study of streams processing applied to a typical physiological signal processing problem: QRS detection from ECG data.

  8. An Algorithm for Detection of DVB-T Signals Based on Their Second-Order Statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jallon Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We propose in this paper a detection algorithm based on a cost function that jointly tests the correlation induced by the cyclic prefix and the fact that this correlation is time-periodic. In the first part of the paper, the cost function is introduced and some analytical results are given. In particular, the noise and multipath channel impacts on its values are theoretically analysed. In a second part of the paper, some asymptotic results are derived. A first exploitation of these results is used to build a detection test based on the false alarm probability. These results are also used to evaluate the impact of the number of cycle frequencies taken into account in the cost function on the detection performances. Thanks to numerical estimations, we have been able to estimate that the proposed algorithm detects DVB-T signals with an SNR of  dB. As a comparison, and in the same context, the detection algorithm proposed by the 802.22 WG in 2006 is able to detect these signals with an SNR of  dB.

  9. An Algorithm for Detection of DVB-T Signals Based on Their Second-Order Statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Jallon

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available We propose in this paper a detection algorithm based on a cost function that jointly tests the correlation induced by the cyclic prefix and the fact that this correlation is time-periodic. In the first part of the paper, the cost function is introduced and some analytical results are given. In particular, the noise and multipath channel impacts on its values are theoretically analysed. In a second part of the paper, some asymptotic results are derived. A first exploitation of these results is used to build a detection test based on the false alarm probability. These results are also used to evaluate the impact of the number of cycle frequencies taken into account in the cost function on the detection performances. Thanks to numerical estimations, we have been able to estimate that the proposed algorithm detects DVB-T signals with an SNR of −12 dB. As a comparison, and in the same context, the detection algorithm proposed by the 802.22 WG in 2006 is able to detect these signals with an SNR of −8 dB.

  10. Computer-aided detection of microcalcifications in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT): a multichannel signal detection approach on projection views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jun; Chan, Heang-Ping; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Helvie, Mark A.; Zhou, Chuan; Lu, Yao

    2012-03-01

    DBT is one of the promising imaging modalities that may improve the sensitivity and specificity for breast cancer detection. We are developing a computer-aided detection (CADe) system for clustered microcalcifications (MC) in DBT. A data set of two-view DBTs from 42 breasts was collected with a GE prototype system. We investigated a 2D approach to MC detection using projection view (PV) images rather than reconstructed 3D DBT volume. Our 2D approach consisted of two major stages: 1) detecting individual MC candidates on each PV, and 2) correlating the MC candidates from the different PVs and detecting clusters in the breast volume. With the MC candidates detected by prescreening on PVs, a trained multi-channel (MCH) filter bank was used to extract signal response from each MC candidate. A ray-tracing process was performed to fuse the MCH responses and localize the MC candidates in 3D using the geometrical information of the DBT system. Potential MC clusters were then identified by dynamic clustering of the MCs in 3D. A two-fold cross-validation method was used to train and test the CADe system. The detection performance of clustered MCs was assessed by free receiver operating characteristic (FROC) analysis. It was found that the CADe system achieved a case-based sensitivity of 90% at an average false positive rate of 2.1 clusters per DBT volume. Our study demonstrated that the CADe system using 2D MCH filter bank is promising for detection of clustered MCs in DBT.

  11. Enhancement of the conductivity detection signal in capillary electrophoresis systems using neutral cyclodextrins as sweeping agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boublík, Milan; Riesová, Martina; Dubský, Pavel; Gaš, Bohuslav

    2018-02-16

    Conductivity detection is a universal detection technique often encountered in electrophoretic separation systems, especially in modern chip-electrophoresis based devices. On the other hand, it is sparsely combined with another contemporary trend of enhancing limits of detection by means of various preconcentration strategies. This can be attributed to the fact that a preconcentration experimental setup usually brings about disturbances in a conductivity baseline. Sweeping with a neutral sweeping agent seems a good candidate for overcoming this problem. A neutral sweeping agent does not hinder the conductivity detection while a charged analyte may preconcentrate on its boundary due to a decrease in its effective mobility. This study investigates such sweeping systems theoretically, by means of computer simulations, and experimentally. A formula is provided for the reliable estimation of the preconcentration factor. Additionally, it is demonstrated that the conductivity signal can significantly benefit from slowing down the analyte and thus the overall signal enhancement can easily overweight amplification caused solely by the sweeping process. The overall enhancement factor can be deduced a priori from the linearized theory of electrophoresis implemented in the PeakMaster freeware. Sweeping by neutral cyclodextrin is demonstrated on an amplification of a conductivity signal of flurbiprofen in a real drug sample. Finally, a possible formation of unexpected system peaks in systems with a neutral sweeping agent is revealed by the computer simulation and confirmed experimentally. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Underwater Cylindrical Object Detection Using the Spectral Features of Active Sonar Signals with Logistic Regression Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoojeong Seo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The issue of detecting objects bottoming on the sea floor is significant in various fields including civilian and military areas. The objective of this study is to investigate the logistic regression model to discriminate the target from the clutter and to verify the possibility of applying the model trained by the simulated data generated by the mathematical model to the real experimental data because it is not easy to obtain sufficient data in the underwater field. In the first stage of this study, when the clutter signal energy is so strong that the detection of a target is difficult, the logistic regression model is employed to distinguish the strong clutter signal and the target signal. Previous studies have found that if the clutter energy is larger, false detection occurs even for the various existing detection schemes. For this reason, the discrete Fourier transform (DFT magnitude spectrum of acoustic signals received by active sonar is applied to train the model to distinguish whether the received signal contains a target signal or not. The goodness of fit of the model is verified in terms of receiver operation characteristic (ROC, area under ROC curve (AUC, and classification table. The detection performance of the proposed model is evaluated in terms of detection rate according to target to clutter ratio (TCR. Furthermore, the real experimental data are employed to test the proposed approach. When using the experimental data to test the model, the logistic regression model is trained by the simulated data that are generated based on the mathematical model for the backscattering of the cylindrical object. The mathematical model is developed according to the size of the cylinder used in the experiment. Since the information on the experimental environment including the sound speed, the sediment type and such is not available, once simulated data are generated under various conditions, valid simulated data are selected using 70% of the

  13. Fuzzy approximate entropy analysis of chaotic and natural complex systems: detecting muscle fatigue using electromyography signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hong-Bo; Guo, Jing-Yi; Zheng, Yong-Ping

    2010-04-01

    In the present contribution, a complexity measure is proposed to assess surface electromyography (EMG) in the study of muscle fatigue during sustained, isometric muscle contractions. Approximate entropy (ApEn) is believed to provide quantitative information about the complexity of experimental data that is often corrupted with noise, short data length, and in many cases, has inherent dynamics that exhibit both deterministic and stochastic behaviors. We developed an improved ApEn measure, i.e., fuzzy approximate entropy (fApEn), which utilizes the fuzzy membership function to define the vectors' similarity. Tests were conducted on independent, identically distributed (i.i.d.) Gaussian and uniform noises, a chirp signal, MIX processes, Rossler equation, and Henon map. Compared with the standard ApEn, the fApEn showed better monotonicity, relative consistency, and more robustness to noise when characterizing signals with different complexities. Performance analysis on experimental EMG signals demonstrated that the fApEn significantly decreased during the development of muscle fatigue, which is a similar trend to that of the mean frequency (MNF) of the EMG signal, while the standard ApEn failed to detect this change. Moreover, fApEn of EMG demonstrated a better robustness to the length of the analysis window in comparison with the MNF of EMG. The results suggest that the fApEn of an EMG signal may potentially become a new reliable method for muscle fatigue assessment and be applicable to other short noisy physiological signal analysis.

  14. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raftery, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping 129 Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the 131 Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen

  15. Digital coherent detection of multi-gigabit 40 GHz carrier frequency radio-over-fibre signals using photonic downconversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caballero Jambrina, Antonio; Zibar, Darko; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2010-01-01

    Detection of high-speed radio signals is a challenge for next generation radio-over-fibre links, requiring high bandwidth and linearity in the receiver. By using photonic downconversion in a coherent receiver, detection of high bit-rate 16-QAM signals, up to 4 Gbit/s, at a 40 GHz carrier frequency...

  16. Digital coherent detection of multi-gigabit 40 GHz carrier frequency radio-over-fiber signals using photonic downconversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caballero Jambrina, Antonio; Zibar, Darko; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    Detection of high speed radio signals is a challenge for next generation radio-over-fiber links, requiring high bandwidth and linearity in the receiver. By using photonic downconversion in a coherent receiver, it is possible to detect signals exceeding the electrical bandwidth of the receiver...

  17. All-Optical envelope detection and fiber transmission of wireless signals by external injection of a DFB laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prince, Kamau; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2008-01-01

    We outline a novel method for all-optical envelope detection of wireless signals by exploiting cross-gain modulation effects in a distributed feedback laser operating with optical injection. We successfully demonstrate envelope detection of a 20-GHz carrier amplitude-shift-keying modulated signal...

  18. Bearing fault detection using motor current signal analysis based on wavelet packet decomposition and Hilbert envelope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imaouchen Yacine

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To detect rolling element bearing defects, many researches have been focused on Motor Current Signal Analysis (MCSA using spectral analysis and wavelet transform. This paper presents a new approach for rolling element bearings diagnosis without slip estimation, based on the wavelet packet decomposition (WPD and the Hilbert transform. Specifically, the Hilbert transform first extracts the envelope of the motor current signal, which contains bearings fault-related frequency information. Subsequently, the envelope signal is adaptively decomposed into a number of frequency bands by the WPD algorithm. Two criteria based on the energy and correlation analyses have been investigated to automate the frequency band selection. Experimental studies have confirmed that the proposed approach is effective in diagnosing rolling element bearing faults for improved induction motor condition monitoring and damage assessment.

  19. Signal Detection for QPSK Based Cognitive Radio Systems using Support Vector Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Mushtaq

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive radio based network enables opportunistic dynamic spectrum access by sensing, adopting and utilizing the unused portion of licensed spectrum bands. Cognitive radio is intelligent enough to adapt the communication parameters of the unused licensed spectrum. Spectrum sensing is one of the most important tasks of the cognitive radio cycle. In this paper, the auto-correlation function kernel based Support Vector Machine (SVM classifier along with Welch's Periodogram detector is successfully implemented for the detection of four QPSK (Quadrature Phase Shift Keying based signals propagating through an AWGN (Additive White Gaussian Noise channel. It is shown that the combination of statistical signal processing and machine learning concepts improve the spectrum sensing process and spectrum sensing is possible even at low Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR values up to -50 dB.

  20. Detection of coherent beam-beam modes with digitized beam position monitor signals

    CERN Document Server

    Stancari, G.; White, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    A system for bunch-by-bunch detection of transverse proton and antiproton coherent oscillations in the Fermilab Tevatron collider is described. It is based on the signal from a single beam-position monitor located in a region of the ring with large amplitude functions. The signal is digitized over a large number of turns and Fourier-analyzed offline with a dedicated algorithm. To enhance the signal, band-limited noise is applied to the beam for about 1 s. This excitation does not adversely affect the circulating beams even at high luminosities. The device has a response time of a few seconds, a frequency resolution of $1.6\\times 10^{-5}$ in fractional tune, and it is sensitive to oscillation amplitudes of 60 nm. It complements Schottky detectors as a diagnostic tool for tunes, tune spreads, and beam-beam effects. Measurements of coherent mode spectra are presented and compared with models of beam-beam oscillations.

  1. Detection of GNSS Signals Propagation in Urban Canyos Using 3D City Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Pisova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents one of the solutions to the problem of multipath propagation and effects on Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS signals in urban canyons. GNSS signals may reach a receiver not only through Line-of-Sight (LOS paths, but they are often blocked, reflected or diffracted from tall buildings, leading to unmodelled GNSS errors in position estimation. Therefore in order to detect and mitigate the impact of multipath, a new ray-tracing model for simulation of GNSS signals reception in urban canyons is proposed - based on digital 3D maps information, known positions of GNSS satellites and an assumed position of a receiver. The model is established and validated using experimental, as well as real data. It is specially designed for complex environments and situations where positioning with highest accuracy is required - a typical example is navigation for blind people.

  2. Characterization of Signal Quality Monitoring Techniques for Multipath Detection in GNSS Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirsiavash, Ali; Broumandan, Ali; Lachapelle, Gérard

    2017-07-05

    The performance of Signal Quality Monitoring (SQM) techniques under different multipath scenarios is analyzed. First, SQM variation profiles are investigated as critical requirements in evaluating the theoretical performance of SQM metrics. The sensitivity and effectiveness of SQM approaches for multipath detection and mitigation are then defined and analyzed by comparing SQM profiles and multipath error envelopes for different discriminators. Analytical discussions includes two discriminator strategies, namely narrow and high resolution correlator techniques for BPSK(1), and BOC(1,1) signaling schemes. Data analysis is also carried out for static and kinematic scenarios to validate the SQM profiles and examine SQM performance in actual multipath environments. Results show that although SQM is sensitive to medium and long-delay multipath, its effectiveness in mitigating these ranges of multipath errors varies based on tracking strategy and signaling scheme. For short-delay multipath scenarios, the multipath effect on pseudorange measurements remains mostly undetected due to the low sensitivity of SQM metrics.

  3. A methodology for combustion detection in diesel engines through in-cylinder pressure derivative signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luján, José M.; Bermúdez, Vicente; Guardiola, Carlos; Abbad, Ali

    2010-10-01

    In-cylinder pressure measurement has historically been used for off-line combustion diagnosis, but online application for real-time combustion control has become of great interest. This work considers low computing-cost methods for analysing the instant variation of the chamber pressure, directly obtained from the electric signal provided by a traditional piezoelectric sensor. Presented methods are based on the detection of sudden changes in the chamber pressure, which are amplified by the pressure derivative, and which are due to thermodynamic phenomena within the cylinder. Signal analysis tools both in time and in time-frequency domains are used for detecting the start of combustion, the end of combustion and the heat release peak. Results are compared with classical thermodynamic analysis and validated in several turbocharged diesel engines.

  4. Low modulation index RF signal detection for a passive UHF RFID transponder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhongqi; Zhang Chun; Li Yongming; Wang Zhihua

    2009-01-01

    In a typical RFID system the reader transmits modulated RF power to provide both data and energy for the passive transponder. Low modulation index RF energy is preferable for an adequate tag power supply and increase in communication range but gives rise to difficulties for near-field conventional demodulation. Therefore, a novel ASK demodulator for minimum 20% modulation index RF signal detection over a range of 23 dB is presented. Thanks to the proposed innovative divisional linear conversion from the power into voltage signal, the detection sensitivity is ensured over a wide power range with low power consumption of 8.6 μW. The chip is implemented in UMC 0.18 μm mix-mode CMOS technology, and the chip area is 0.06 mm 2 .

  5. Bilinear Time-frequency Analysis for Lamb Wave Signal Detected by Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenxiu; Liu, Guoqiang; Xia, Hui; Xia, Zhengwu

    2018-03-01

    Accurate acquisition of the detection signal travel time plays a very important role in cross-hole tomography. The experimental platform of aluminum plate under the perpendicular magnetic field is established and the bilinear time-frequency analysis methods, Wigner-Ville Distribution (WVD) and the pseudo-Wigner-Ville distribution (PWVD), are applied to analyse the Lamb wave signals detected by electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT). By extracting the same frequency component of the time-frequency spectrum as the excitation frequency, the travel time information can be obtained. In comparison with traditional linear time-frequency analysis method such as short-time Fourier transform (STFT), the bilinear time-frequency analysis method PWVD is more appropriate in extracting travel time and recognizing patterns of Lamb wave.

  6. Performance of Narrowband Signal Detection under Correlated Rayleigh Fading Based on Synthetic Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Broumandan

    2009-01-01

    design parameters of probability of detection (Pd and probability of false alarm (Pfa. An optimum detector based on Estimator-Correlator (EC is developed, and its performance is compared with that of suboptimal Equal-Gain (EG combiner in different channel correlation scenarios. It is shown that in moderate channel correlation scenarios the detection performance of EC and EG is identical. The sensitivity of the proposed method to knowledge of motion parameters is also investigated. An extensive set of measurements based on CDMA-2000 pilot signals using the static antenna and synthetic array are used to experimentally verify these theoretical findings.

  7. Three-Phase Multiple Harmonic Sequence Detection Based on Generalized Delayed Signal Superposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Yong; Xiao, Guochun; Wang, Xiongfei

    2016-01-01

    Grid synchronization has always been an important challenge for three-phase grid-connected converters under unbalanced and distorted grid conditions. Moreover, how to quickly and accurately extract multiple harmonic sequence information is essential for control systems. In this paper, a three......-phase multiple harmonic sequence detection method is proposed for estimating both the fundamental and harmonic sequence components under adverse grid conditions. This detection method is denoted as MG DSS-PLL since it contains Multiple Generalized Delayed Signal Superposition operators and a Phase-Locked Loop...

  8. Detection method of nonlinearity errors by statistical signal analysis in heterodyne Michelson interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Juju; Hu, Haijiang; Ji, Yinghua

    2010-03-15

    Periodic nonlinearity that ranges from tens of nanometers to a few nanometers in heterodyne interferometer limits its use in high accuracy measurement. A novel method is studied to detect the nonlinearity errors based on the electrical subdivision and the analysis method of statistical signal in heterodyne Michelson interferometer. Under the movement of micropositioning platform with the uniform velocity, the method can detect the nonlinearity errors by using the regression analysis and Jackknife estimation. Based on the analysis of the simulations, the method can estimate the influence of nonlinearity errors and other noises for the dimensions measurement in heterodyne Michelson interferometer.

  9. Exploiting Wireless Received Signal Strength Indicators to Detect Evil-Twin Attacks in Smart Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanyong Tang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Evil-Twin is becoming a common attack in smart home environments where an attacker can set up a fake AP to compromise the security of the connected devices. To identify the fake APs, The current approaches of detecting Evil-Twin attacks all rely on information such as SSIDs, the MAC address of the genuine AP, or network traffic patterns. However, such information can be faked by the attacker, often leading to low detection rates and weak protection. This paper presents a novel Evil-Twin attack detection method based on the received signal strength indicator (RSSI. Our approach considers the RSSI as a fingerprint of APs and uses the fingerprint of the genuine AP to identify fake ones. We provide two schemes to detect a fake AP in two different scenarios where the genuine AP can be located at either a single or multiple locations in the property, by exploiting the multipath effect of the Wi-Fi signal. As a departure from prior work, our approach does not rely on any professional measurement devices. Experimental results show that our approach can successfully detect 90% of the fake APs, at the cost of a one-off, modest connection delay.

  10. Signal-Amplified Lateral Flow Test Strip for Visual Detection of Cu2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulong Wang

    Full Text Available A signal-amplified lateral flow test strip (SA-LFTS for the detection of Cu2+ in aqueous solution was constructed based on Cu+-catalyzed click chemistry and hybridization of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA. Alkyne and azide modified ssDNA acted as specific elements for Cu2+ recognition, and a chemical ligation product formed through Cu+-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition. Hybridization of ssDNA-labeled gold nanoparticles resulted in high sensitivity, and the output signal could be observed directly by the naked eye. Using the developed SA-LFTS under optimal conditions, Cu2+ could be detected rapidly with limit of detections of 5 nM and 4.2 nM by visual observation and quantitative analysis, respectively. The sensitivity (i.e. the visual limit of detection of the SA-LFTS was 80-times higher than that of traditional LFTS. The SA-LFTS was applied to the determination of Cu2+ in municipal water and river water samples with the results showing good recovery and accuracy. The developed test strip is promising for point-of-care applications and detection of Cu2+ in the field.

  11. Three different signal amplification strategies for the impedimetric sandwich detection of thrombin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocaña, Cristina; Valle, Manel del, E-mail: manel.delvalle@uab.cat

    2016-03-17

    In this work, we report a comparative study on three highly specific amplification strategies for the ultrasensitive detection of thrombin with the use of aptamer sandwich protocol. The protocol consisted on the use of a first thrombin aptamer immobilized on the electrode surface, the recognition of thrombin protein, and the reaction with a second biotinylated thrombin aptamer forming the sandwich. Through the exposed biotin end, three variants have been tested to amplify the electrochemical impedance signal. The strategies included (a) silver enhancement treatment, (b) gold enhancement treatment and (c) insoluble product produced by the combination of the enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and 3-amino-9-ethylcarbazole (AEC). The properties of the sensing surface were probed by electrochemical impedance measurements in the presence of the ferrocyanide/ferricyanide redox marker. Insoluble product strategy and silver enhancement treatment resulted in the lowest detection limit (0.3 pM), while gold enhancement method resulted in the highest reproducibility, 8.8% RSD at the pM thrombin concentration levels. Results of silver and gold enhancement treatment also permitted direct inspection by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). - Highlights: • Aptasensor to detect thrombin reaching the femtomolar level. • Biosensing protocol employs two thrombin aptamers in a sandwich capture scheme. • Use of second biotinylated aptamer allows many amplification and detection variants. • Precipitation reaction provides the highest signal amplification of ca. 3 times. • Double recognition event improves remarkably selectivity for thrombin detection.

  12. Switching Kalman filter based methods for apnea bradycardia detection from ECG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montazeri Ghahjaverestan, Nasim; Shamsollahi, Mohammad B; Ge, Di; Hernández, Alfredo I

    2015-09-01

    Apnea bradycardia (AB) is an outcome of apnea occurrence in preterm infants and is an observable phenomenon in cardiovascular signals. Early detection of apnea in infants under monitoring is a critical challenge for the early intervention of nurses. In this paper, we introduce two switching Kalman filter (SKF) based methods for AB detection using electrocardiogram (ECG) signal.The first SKF model uses McSharry's ECG dynamical model integrated in two Kalman filter (KF) models trained for normal and AB intervals. Whereas the second SKF model is established by using only the RR sequence extracted from ECG and two AR models to be fitted in normal and AB intervals. In both SKF approaches, a discrete state variable called a switch is considered that chooses one of the models (corresponding to normal and AB) during the inference phase. According to the probability of each model indicated by this switch, the model with larger probability determines the observation label at each time instant.It is shown that the method based on ECG dynamical model can be effectively used for AB detection. The detection performance is evaluated by comparing statistical metrics and the amount of time taken to detect AB compared with the annotated onset. The results demonstrate the superiority of this method, with sensitivity and specificity 94.74[Formula: see text] and 94.17[Formula: see text], respectively. The presented approaches may therefore serve as an effective algorithm for monitoring neonates suffering from AB.

  13. Signal-Amplified Lateral Flow Test Strip for Visual Detection of Cu2+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Juanjuan; Dong, Jinbo; Cai, Jia; Hua, Xiude; Wang, Minghua; Zhang, Cunzheng; Liu, Fengquan

    2017-01-01

    A signal-amplified lateral flow test strip (SA-LFTS) for the detection of Cu2+ in aqueous solution was constructed based on Cu+-catalyzed click chemistry and hybridization of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). Alkyne and azide modified ssDNA acted as specific elements for Cu2+ recognition, and a chemical ligation product formed through Cu+-catalyzed alkyne–azide cycloaddition. Hybridization of ssDNA-labeled gold nanoparticles resulted in high sensitivity, and the output signal could be observed directly by the naked eye. Using the developed SA-LFTS under optimal conditions, Cu2+ could be detected rapidly with limit of detections of 5 nM and 4.2 nM by visual observation and quantitative analysis, respectively. The sensitivity (i.e. the visual limit of detection) of the SA-LFTS was 80-times higher than that of traditional LFTS. The SA-LFTS was applied to the determination of Cu2+ in municipal water and river water samples with the results showing good recovery and accuracy. The developed test strip is promising for point-of-care applications and detection of Cu2+ in the field. PMID:28072878

  14. Weak signal detection: A discrete window of opportunity for achieving 'Vision 90:90:90'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burman, Christopher J; Aphane, Marota; Delobelle, Peter

    2016-01-01

    UNAIDS' Vision 90:90:90 is a call to 'end AIDS'. Developing predictive foresight of the unpredictable changes that this journey will entail could contribute to the ambition of 'ending AIDS'. There are few opportunities for managing unpredictable changes. We introduce 'weak signal detection' as a potential opportunity to fill this void. Combining futures and complexity theory, we reflect on two pilot case studies that involved the Archetype Extraction technique and the SenseMaker(®) Collector(™) tool. Both the piloted techniques have the potentials to surface weak signals--but there is room for improvement. A management response to a complex weak signal requires pattern management, rather than an exclusive focus on behaviour management. Weak signal detection is a window of opportunity to improve resilience to unpredictable changes in the HIV/AIDS landscape that can both reduce the risk that emerges from the changes and increase the visibility of opportunities to exploit the unpredictable changes that could contribute to 'ending AIDS'.

  15. Computer program for analysis of impedance cardiography signals enabling manual correction of points detected automatically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleksiak, Justyna; Cybulski, Gerard

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this work was to create a computer program, written in LabVIEW, which enables the visualization and analysis of hemodynamic parameters. It allows the user to import data collected using ReoMonitor, an ambulatory monitoring impedance cardiography (AICG) device. The data include one channel of the ECG and one channel of the first derivative of the impedance signal (dz/dt) sampled at 200Hz and the base impedance signal (Z0) sampled every 8s. The program consist of two parts: a bioscope allowing the presentation of traces (ECG, AICG, Z0) and an analytical portion enabling the detection of characteristic points on the signals and automatic calculation of hemodynamic parameters. The detection of characteristic points in both signals is done automatically, with the option to make manual corrections, which may be necessary to avoid "false positive" recognitions. This application is used to determine the values of basic hemodynamic variables: pre-ejection period (PEP), left ventricular ejection time (LVET), stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO), and heart rate (HR). It leaves room for further development of additional features, for both the analysis panel and the data acquisition function.

  16. Endogenous field feedback promotes the detectability for exogenous electric signal in the hybrid coupled population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Xile; Zhang, Danhong; Wang, Jiang; Yu, Haitao, E-mail: htyu@tju.edu.cn [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Process Measurement and Control, School of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Lu, Meili [School of Informational Technology and Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology and Education, Tianjin 300222 (China); Che, Yanqiu [School of Automation and Electrical Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology and Education, Tianjin 300222 (China)

    2015-01-15

    This paper presents the endogenous electric field in chemical or electrical synaptic coupled networks, aiming to study the role of endogenous field feedback in the signal propagation in neural systems. It shows that the feedback of endogenous fields to network activities can reduce the required energy of the noise and enhance the transmission of input signals in hybrid coupled populations. As a common and important nonsynaptic interactive method among neurons, particularly, the endogenous filed feedback can not only promote the detectability of exogenous weak signal in hybrid coupled neural population but also enhance the robustness of the detectability against noise. Furthermore, with the increasing of field coupling strengths, the endogenous field feedback is conductive to the stochastic resonance by facilitating the transition of cluster activities from the no spiking to spiking regions. Distinct from synaptic coupling, the endogenous field feedback can play a role as internal driving force to boost the population activities, which is similar to the noise. Thus, it can help to transmit exogenous weak signals within the network in the absence of noise drive via the stochastic-like resonance.

  17. Endogenous field feedback promotes the detectability for exogenous electric signal in the hybrid coupled population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Xile; Zhang, Danhong; Wang, Jiang; Yu, Haitao; Lu, Meili; Che, Yanqiu

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the endogenous electric field in chemical or electrical synaptic coupled networks, aiming to study the role of endogenous field feedback in the signal propagation in neural systems. It shows that the feedback of endogenous fields to network activities can reduce the required energy of the noise and enhance the transmission of input signals in hybrid coupled populations. As a common and important nonsynaptic interactive method among neurons, particularly, the endogenous filed feedback can not only promote the detectability of exogenous weak signal in hybrid coupled neural population but also enhance the robustness of the detectability against noise. Furthermore, with the increasing of field coupling strengths, the endogenous field feedback is conductive to the stochastic resonance by facilitating the transition of cluster activities from the no spiking to spiking regions. Distinct from synaptic coupling, the endogenous field feedback can play a role as internal driving force to boost the population activities, which is similar to the noise. Thus, it can help to transmit exogenous weak signals within the network in the absence of noise drive via the stochastic-like resonance

  18. Automatic detection of the unknown number point targets in FMICW radar signals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rejfek, L.; Mošna, Zbyšek; Beran, L.; Fišer, O.; Dobrovolný, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 11 (2017), s. 116-120 ISSN 2313-626X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-24688S Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : FMICW radar * 2D FFT * signal filtration * taraget detection * target parameter estimation Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology OBOR OECD: Meteorology and atmospheric sciences http://science-gate.com/IJAAS/ Articles /2017-4-11/18%202017-4-11-pp.116-120.pdf

  19. Analysis of Parametric Adaptive Signal Detection with Applications to Radars and Hyperspectral Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    training, thus rendering covariance matrix based techniques inapplicable. The problem of target detection with limited training data support has gained...estimation of the space-time covariance matrix. Then, a test statistic is formed and compared with a test threshold. Thus, it renders the detectors...imaging. Traditional approaches to the so-called subpixel target signal detec- tion problem are training-inefficient due to the need for an estimate of

  20. A signal detection-item response theory model for evaluating neuropsychological measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Michael L; Brown, Gregory G; Gur, Ruben C; Moore, Tyler M; Patt, Virginie M; Risbrough, Victoria B; Baker, Dewleen G

    2018-02-05

    Models from signal detection theory are commonly used to score neuropsychological test data, especially tests of recognition memory. Here we show that certain item response theory models can be formulated as signal detection theory models, thus linking two complementary but distinct methodologies. We then use the approach to evaluate the validity (construct representation) of commonly used research measures, demonstrate the impact of conditional error on neuropsychological outcomes, and evaluate measurement bias. Signal detection-item response theory (SD-IRT) models were fitted to recognition memory data for words, faces, and objects. The sample consisted of U.S. Infantry Marines and Navy Corpsmen participating in the Marine Resiliency Study. Data comprised item responses to the Penn Face Memory Test (PFMT; N = 1,338), Penn Word Memory Test (PWMT; N = 1,331), and Visual Object Learning Test (VOLT; N = 1,249), and self-report of past head injury with loss of consciousness. SD-IRT models adequately fitted recognition memory item data across all modalities. Error varied systematically with ability estimates, and distributions of residuals from the regression of memory discrimination onto self-report of past head injury were positively skewed towards regions of larger measurement error. Analyses of differential item functioning revealed little evidence of systematic bias by level of education. SD-IRT models benefit from the measurement rigor of item response theory-which permits the modeling of item difficulty and examinee ability-and from signal detection theory-which provides an interpretive framework encompassing the experimentally validated constructs of memory discrimination and response bias. We used this approach to validate the construct representation of commonly used research measures and to demonstrate how nonoptimized item parameters can lead to erroneous conclusions when interpreting neuropsychological test data. Future work might include the

  1. Detection of the Vibration Signal from Human Vocal Folds Using a 94-GHz Millimeter-Wave Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuming Chen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The detection of the vibration signal from human vocal folds provides essential information for studying human phonation and diagnosing voice disorders. Doppler radar technology has enabled the noncontact measurement of the human-vocal-fold vibration. However, existing systems must be placed in close proximity to the human throat and detailed information may be lost because of the low operating frequency. In this paper, a long-distance detection method, involving the use of a 94-GHz millimeter-wave radar sensor, is proposed for detecting the vibration signals from human vocal folds. An algorithm that combines empirical mode decomposition (EMD and the auto-correlation function (ACF method is proposed for detecting the signal. First, the EMD method is employed to suppress the noise of the radar-detected signal. Further, the ratio of the energy and entropy is used to detect voice activity in the radar-detected signal, following which, a short-time ACF is employed to extract the vibration signal of the human vocal folds from the processed signal. For validating the method and assessing the performance of the radar system, a vibration measurement sensor and microphone system are additionally employed for comparison. The experimental results obtained from the spectrograms, the vibration frequency of the vocal folds, and coherence analysis demonstrate that the proposed method can effectively detect the vibration of human vocal folds from a long detection distance.

  2. Detection of the Vibration Signal from Human Vocal Folds Using a 94-GHz Millimeter-Wave Radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fuming; Li, Sheng; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Jianqi

    2017-03-08

    The detection of the vibration signal from human vocal folds provides essential information for studying human phonation and diagnosing voice disorders. Doppler radar technology has enabled the noncontact measurement of the human-vocal-fold vibration. However, existing systems must be placed in close proximity to the human throat and detailed information may be lost because of the low operating frequency. In this paper, a long-distance detection method, involving the use of a 94-GHz millimeter-wave radar sensor, is proposed for detecting the vibration signals from human vocal folds. An algorithm that combines empirical mode decomposition (EMD) and the auto-correlation function (ACF) method is proposed for detecting the signal. First, the EMD method is employed to suppress the noise of the radar-detected signal. Further, the ratio of the energy and entropy is used to detect voice activity in the radar-detected signal, following which, a short-time ACF is employed to extract the vibration signal of the human vocal folds from the processed signal. For validating the method and assessing the performance of the radar system, a vibration measurement sensor and microphone system are additionally employed for comparison. The experimental results obtained from the spectrograms, the vibration frequency of the vocal folds, and coherence analysis demonstrate that the proposed method can effectively detect the vibration of human vocal folds from a long detection distance.

  3. Damage detection using the signal entropy of an ultrasonic sensor network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, E.; Baltazar, A.; Loh, K. J.

    2015-07-01

    Piezoelectric ultrasonic sensors used to propagate guided waves can potentially be implemented to inspect large areas in engineering structures. However, the inherent dispersion and noise of guided acoustic signals, multiple echoes in the structure, as well as a lack of an approximate or exact model, limit their use as a continuous structural health monitoring system. In this work, the implementation of a network of piezoelectric sensors randomly placed on a plate-like structure to detect and locate artificial damage is studied. A network of macro fiber composite (MFC) sensors working in a pitch-catch configuration was set on an aluminum thin plate 1.9 mm in thickness. Signals were analyzed in the time-scale domain using the discrete wavelet transform. The objectives of this work were threefold, namely to first develop a damage index based on the entropy distribution using short time wavelet entropy of the ultrasonic waves generated by a sensor network, second to determine the performance of an array of spare MFC sensors to detect artificial damage, and third to implement a time-of-arrival (TOA) algorithm on the gathered signals for damage location of an artificial circular discontinuity. Our preliminary test results show that the proposed methodology provides sufficient information for damage detection, which, once combined with the TOA algorithm, allows localization of the damage.

  4. Processing of Instantaneous Angular Speed Signal for Detection of a Diesel Engine Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Charchalis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuous monitoring of diesel engine performance under its operating is critical for the prediction of malfunction development and subsequently functional failure detection. Analysis of instantaneous angular speed (IAS of the crankshaft is considered as one of the nonintrusive and effective methods of the detection of combustion quality deterioration. In this paper results of experimental verification of fuel system's malfunction detecting, using optical encoder for IAS recording are presented. The implemented method relies on the comparison of measurement results, recorded under healthy and faulty conditions of the engine. Elaborated dynamic model of angular speed variations enables us to build templates of engine behavior. Recorded during experiment, values of cylinder pressure were taken for the approximation of pressure basic waveform. The main task of data processing is smoothing the raw angular speed signal. The noise is due to sensor mount vibrations, signal emitter machining, engine body vibrations, and crankshaft torsional vibrations. Smoothing of the measurement data was carried out by the implementation of the Savitzky-Golay filter. Measured signal after smoothing was compared with the model of IAS run.

  5. Novel Signal-Enhancing Approaches for Optical Detection of Nucleic Acids—Going beyond Target Amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Miotke

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Detection of low-abundance nucleic acids is a challenging task, which over the last two decades has been solved using enzymatic target amplification. Enzymatic synthesis enhances the signal so that diverse, scientifically and clinically relevant molecules can be identified and studied, including cancer DNA, viral nucleic acids, and regulatory RNAs. However, using enzymes increases the detection time and cost, not to mention the high risk of mistakes with amplification and data alignment. These limitations have stimulated a growing interest in enzyme-free methods within researchers and industry. In this review we discuss recent advances in signal-enhancing approaches aimed at nucleic acid diagnostics that do not require target amplification. Regardless of enzyme usage, signal enhancement is crucial for the reliable detection of nucleic acids at low concentrations. We pay special attention to novel nanomaterials, fluorescence microscopy, and technical advances in detectors for optical assessment. We summarize sensitivity parameters of the currently available assays and devices which makes this review relevant to the broad spectrum of researchers working in fields from biophysics, to engineering, to synthetic biology and bioorganic chemistry.

  6. Merging Infrasound and Electromagnetic Signals as a Means for Nuclear Explosion Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenazy, Joseph; Lipshtat, Azi; Kesar, Amit S.; Pistinner, Shlomo; Ben Horin, Yochai

    2016-04-01

    The infrasound monitoring network of the CTBT consists of 60 stations. These stations are capable of detecting atmospheric events, and may provide approximate location within time scale of a few hours. However, the nature of these events cannot be deduced from the infrasound signal. More than two decades ago it was proposed to use the electromagnetic pulse (EMP) as a means of discriminating nuclear explosion from other atmospheric events. An EMP is a unique signature of nuclear explosion and is not detected from chemical ones. Nevertheless, it was decided to exclude the EMP technology from the official CTBT verification regime, mainly because of the risk of high false alarm rate, due to lightning electromagnetic pulses [1]. Here we present a method of integrating the information retrieved from the infrasound system with the EMP signal which enables us to discriminate between lightning discharges and nuclear explosions. Furthermore, we show how spectral and other characteristics of the electromagnetic signal emitted from a nuclear explosion are distinguished from those of lightning discharge. We estimate the false alarm probability of detecting a lightning discharge from a given area of the infrasound event, and identifying it as a signature of a nuclear explosion. We show that this probability is very low and conclude that the combination of infrasound monitoring and EMP spectral analysis may produce a reliable method for identifying nuclear explosions. [1] R. Johnson, Unfinished Business: The Negotiation of the CTBT and the End of Nuclear Testing, United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research, 2009.

  7. Customized Multiwavelets for Planetary Gearbox Fault Detection Based on Vibration Sensor Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hailiang; Zi, Yanyang; He, Zhengjia; Yuan, Jing; Wang, Xiaodong; Chen, Lue

    2013-01-01

    Planetary gearboxes exhibit complicated dynamic responses which are more difficult to detect in vibration signals than fixed-axis gear trains because of the special gear transmission structures. Diverse advanced methods have been developed for this challenging task to reduce or avoid unscheduled breakdown and catastrophic accidents. It is feasible to make fault features distinct by using multiwavelet denoising which depends on the feature separation and the threshold denoising. However, standard and fixed multiwavelets are not suitable for accurate fault feature detections because they are usually independent of the measured signals. To overcome this drawback, a method to construct customized multiwavelets based on the redundant symmetric lifting scheme is proposed in this paper. A novel indicator which combines kurtosis and entropy is applied to select the optimal multiwavelets, because kurtosis is sensitive to sharp impulses and entropy is effective for periodic impulses. The improved neighboring coefficients method is introduced into multiwavelet denoising. The vibration signals of a planetary gearbox from a satellite communication antenna on a measurement ship are captured under various motor speeds. The results show the proposed method could accurately detect the incipient pitting faults on two neighboring teeth in the planetary gearbox. PMID:23334609

  8. Structure of the 30 kDa HIV-1 RNA Dimerization Signal by a Hybrid Cryo-EM, NMR, and Molecular Dynamics Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kaiming; Keane, Sarah C; Su, Zhaoming; Irobalieva, Rossitza N; Chen, Muyuan; Van, Verna; Sciandra, Carly A; Marchant, Jan; Heng, Xiao; Schmid, Michael F; Case, David A; Ludtke, Steven J; Summers, Michael F; Chiu, Wah

    2018-03-06

    Cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy are routinely used to determine structures of macromolecules with molecular weights over 65 and under 25 kDa, respectively. We combined these techniques to study a 30 kDa HIV-1 dimer initiation site RNA ([DIS] 2 ; 47 nt/strand). A 9 Å cryo-EM map clearly shows major groove features of the double helix and a right-handed superhelical twist. Simulated cryo-EM maps generated from time-averaged molecular dynamics trajectories (10 ns) exhibited levels of detail similar to those in the experimental maps, suggesting internal structural flexibility limits the cryo-EM resolution. Simultaneous inclusion of the cryo-EM map and 2 H-edited NMR-derived distance restraints during structure refinement generates a structure consistent with both datasets and supporting a flipped-out base within a conserved purine-rich bulge. Our findings demonstrate the power of combining global and local structural information from these techniques for structure determination of modest-sized RNAs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Coherent spectral amplitude coded label detection for DQPSK payload signals in packet-switched metropolitan area networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osadchiy, Alexey Vladimirovich; Guerrero Gonzalez, Neil; Jensen, Jesper Bevensee

    2011-01-01

    We report on an experimental demonstration of a frequency swept local oscillator-based spectral amplitude coding (SAC) label detection for DQPSK signals after 40km of fiber transmission. Label detection was performed for a 10.7Gbaud DQPSK signal labeled with a SAC label composed of four-frequency......-frequency tones with 500MHz spectral separation. Successful label detection and recognition is achieved with the aid of digital signal processing that allows for substantial reduction of the complexity of the detection optical front-end....

  10. Nonparametric signal processing validation in T-wave alternans detection and estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goya-Esteban, R; Barquero-Pérez, O; Blanco-Velasco, M; Caamaño-Fernández, A J; García-Alberola, A; Rojo-Álvarez, J L

    2014-04-01

    Although a number of methods have been proposed for T-Wave Alternans (TWA) detection and estimation, their performance strongly depends on their signal processing stages and on their free parameters tuning. The dependence of the system quality with respect to the main signal processing stages in TWA algorithms has not yet been studied. This study seeks to optimize the final performance of the system by successive comparisons of pairs of TWA analysis systems, with one single processing difference between them. For this purpose, a set of decision statistics are proposed to evaluate the performance, and a nonparametric hypothesis test (from Bootstrap resampling) is used to make systematic decisions. Both the temporal method (TM) and the spectral method (SM) are analyzed in this study. The experiments were carried out in two datasets: first, in semisynthetic signals with artificial alternant waves and added noise; second, in two public Holter databases with different documented risk of sudden cardiac death. For semisynthetic signals (SNR = 15 dB), after the optimization procedure, a reduction of 34.0% (TM) and 5.2% (SM) of the power of TWA amplitude estimation errors was achieved, and the power of error probability was reduced by 74.7% (SM). For Holter databases, appropriate tuning of several processing blocks, led to a larger intergroup separation between the two populations for TWA amplitude estimation. Our proposal can be used as a systematic procedure for signal processing block optimization in TWA algorithmic implementations.

  11. Reliable motion detection of small targets in video with low signal-to-clutter ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, S.A.; Naylor, R.B.

    1995-07-01

    Studies show that vigilance decreases rapidly after several minutes when human operators are required to search live video for infrequent intrusion detections. Therefore, there is a need for systems which can automatically detect targets in live video and reserve the operator`s attention for assessment only. Thus far, automated systems have not simultaneously provided adequate detection sensitivity, false alarm suppression, and ease of setup when used in external, unconstrained environments. This unsatisfactory performance can be exacerbated by poor video imagery with low contrast, high noise, dynamic clutter, image misregistration, and/or the presence of small, slow, or erratically moving targets. This paper describes a highly adaptive video motion detection and tracking algorithm which has been developed as part of Sandia`s Advanced Exterior Sensor (AES) program. The AES is a wide-area detection and assessment system for use in unconstrained exterior security applications. The AES detection and tracking algorithm provides good performance under stressing data and environmental conditions. Features of the algorithm include: reliable detection with negligible false alarm rate of variable velocity targets having low signal-to-clutter ratios; reliable tracking of targets that exhibit motion that is non-inertial, i.e., varies in direction and velocity; automatic adaptation to both infrared and visible imagery with variable quality; and suppression of false alarms caused by sensor flaws and/or cutouts.

  12. Automatic Change Detection for Real-Time Monitoring of EEG Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Gao

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, automatic change detection for real-time monitoring of electroencephalogram (EEG signals has attracted widespread interest with a large number of clinical applications. However, it is still a challenging problem. This paper presents a novel framework for this task where joint time-domain features are firstly computed to extract temporal fluctuations of a given EEG data stream; and then, an auto-regressive (AR linear model is adopted to model the data and temporal anomalies are subsequently calculated from that model to reflect the possibilities that a change occurs; a non-parametric statistical test based on Randomized Power Martingale (RPM is last performed for making change decision from the resulting anomaly scores. We conducted experiments on the publicly-available Bern-Barcelona EEG database where promising results for terms of detection precision (96.97%, detection recall (97.66% as well as computational efficiency have been achieved. Meanwhile, we also evaluated the proposed method for real detection of seizures occurrence for a monitoring epilepsy patient. The results of experiments by using both the testing database and real application demonstrated the effectiveness and feasibility of the method for the purpose of change detection in EEG signals. The proposed framework has two additional properties: (1 it uses a pre-defined AR model for modeling of the past observed data so that it can be operated in an unsupervised manner, and (2 it uses an adjustable threshold to achieve a scalable decision making so that a coarse-to-fine detection strategy can be developed for quick detection or further analysis purposes.

  13. Digitally generated excitation and near-baseband quadrature detection of rapid scan EPR signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseitlin, Mark; Yu, Zhelin; Quine, Richard W; Rinard, George A; Eaton, Sandra S; Eaton, Gareth R

    2014-12-01

    The use of multiple synchronized outputs from an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) provides the opportunity to perform EPR experiments differently than by conventional EPR. We report a method for reconstructing the quadrature EPR spectrum from periodic signals that are generated with sinusoidal magnetic field modulation such as continuous wave (CW), multiharmonic, or rapid scan experiments. The signal is down-converted to an intermediate frequency (IF) that is less than the field scan or field modulation frequency and then digitized in a single channel. This method permits use of a high-pass analog filter before digitization to remove the strong non-EPR signal at the IF, that might otherwise overwhelm the digitizer. The IF is the difference between two synchronized X-band outputs from a Tektronix AWG 70002A, one of which is for excitation and the other is the reference for down-conversion. To permit signal averaging, timing was selected to give an exact integer number of full cycles for each frequency. In the experiments reported here the IF was 5kHz and the scan frequency was 40kHz. To produce sinusoidal rapid scans with a scan frequency eight times IF, a third synchronized output generated a square wave that was converted to a sine wave. The timing of the data acquisition with a Bruker SpecJet II was synchronized by an external clock signal from the AWG. The baseband quadrature signal in the frequency domain was reconstructed. This approach has the advantages that (i) the non-EPR response at the carrier frequency is eliminated, (ii) both real and imaginary EPR signals are reconstructed from a single physical channel to produce an ideal quadrature signal, and (iii) signal bandwidth does not increase relative to baseband detection. Spectra were obtained by deconvolution of the reconstructed signals for solid BDPA (1,3-bisdiphenylene-2-phenylallyl) in air, 0.2mM trityl OX63 in water, 15 N perdeuterated tempone, and a nitroxide with a 0.5G partially-resolved proton

  14. Intrusion detection on oil pipeline right of way using monogenic signal representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Binu M.; Santhaseelan, Varun; Cui, Chen; Asari, Vijayan K.

    2013-05-01

    We present an object detection algorithm to automatically detect and identify possible intrusions such as construction vehicles and equipment on the regions designated as the pipeline right-of-way (ROW) from high resolution aerial imagery. The pipeline industry has buried millions of miles of oil pipelines throughout the country and these regions are under constant threat of unauthorized construction activities. We propose a multi-stage framework which uses a pyramidal template matching scheme in the local phase domain by taking a single high resolution training image to classify a construction vehicle. The proposed detection algorithm makes use of the monogenic signal representation to extract the local phase information. Computing the monogenic signal from a two dimensional object region enables us to separate out the local phase information (structural details) from the local energy (contrast) thereby achieving illumination invariance. The first stage involves the local phase based template matching using only a single high resolution training image in a local region at multiple scales. Then, using the local phase histogram matching, the orientation of the detected region is determined and a voting scheme gives a certain weightage to the resulting clusters. The final stage involves the selection of clusters based on the number of votes attained and using the histogram of oriented phase feature descriptor, the object is located at the correct orientation and scale. The algorithm is successfully tested on four different datasets containing imagery with varying image resolution and object orientation.

  15. The impact of exposure model misspecification on signal detection in prospective pharmacovigilance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gaalen, Rolina D; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Buckeridge, David L

    2015-05-01

    Pharmacovigilance monitors the safety of drugs after their approval and marketing. Timely detection of adverse effects is important. The true relationship between time-varying drug use and the adverse event risk is typically unknown. Yet, most current pharmacovigilance studies rely on arbitrarily chosen exposure metrics such as current exposure or use in the past 3 months. The authors used simulations to assess the impact of a misspecified exposure model on the timeliness of adverse effect detection. Prospective pharmacovigilance studies were simulated assuming different true relationships between time-varying drug use and the adverse event hazard. Simulated data were analyzed by fitting conventional parametric and more complex spline-based estimation models at multiple, pre-specified testing times. The 'signal' was generated on the basis of the corrected model-specific p-value selected to ensure a 5% probability of incorrectly rejecting the null hypothesis of no association. Results indicated that use of an estimation model that diverged substantially from the true underlying association-reduced sensitivity and increased the time to detection of a clinically important association. Time to signal detection in pharmacovigilance may depend strongly on the method chosen to model the exposure. No single estimation model performed optimally across different simulated scenarios, suggesting the need for data-dependent criteria to select the model most appropriate for a given study. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. FAULT DETECTION AND LOCALIZATION IN MOTORCYCLES BASED ON THE CHAIN CODE OF PSEUDOSPECTRA AND ACOUSTIC SIGNALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. S. Anami

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Vehicles produce sound signals with varying temporal and spectral properties under different working conditions. These sounds are indicative of the condition of the engine. Fault diagnosis is a significantly difficult task in geographically remote places where expertise is scarce. Automated fault diagnosis can assist riders to assess the health condition of their vehicles. This paper presents a method for fault detection and location in motorcycles based on the chain code of the pseudospectra and Mel-frequency cepstral coefficient (MFCC features of acoustic signals. The work comprises two stages: fault detection and fault location. The fault detection stage uses the chain code of the pseudospectrum as a feature vector. If the motorcycle is identified as faulty, the MFCCs of the same sample are computed and used as features for fault location. Both stages employ dynamic time warping for the classification of faults. Five types of faults in motorcycles are considered in this work. Observed classification rates are over 90% for the fault detection stage and over 94% for the fault location stage. The work identifies other interesting applications in the development of acoustic fingerprints for fault diagnosis of machinery, tuning of musical instruments, medical diagnosis, etc.

  17. Joint digital signal processing of Nyquist-wavelength division multiplexing superchannel with group detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianyun; Yao, Shuchang; Fu, Songnian; Tang, Ming; Liu, Deming

    2014-12-01

    To relax the limited sampling rate of an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) and to reduce the complexity of conventional fiber-optical superchannel coherent detection, we propose and demonstrate a joint digital signal processing (DSP) technique of Nyquist-wavelength division multiplexing superchannel with group detection. At the receiver side, three Nyquist-spaced channels with 12.5 Gbaud polarization multiplexing-quadrature phase shift keying signals are group detected with a sampling rate per channel of 1.33 times over the normal sampling rate. A modified carrier separation technique is then put forward to retrieve the high-frequency interference component of both the designated channel and its adjacent channels, which can subsequently be used to recover the designated channel with new constant modulus algorithm-based joint multiinput-multioutput equalizers. The results show that the proposed group detection and joint DSP algorithm can simultaneously improve the transmission performance and reduce the complexity of both the transmitter and receiver, regardless of bandwidth restrictions from the waveshaper, ADC module, and coherent receiver.

  18. Gold nanoparticle-based exonuclease III signal amplification for highly sensitive colorimetric detection of folate receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinjian; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2014-02-01

    By combining terminal protection of small molecule (folate)-capped DNA probes, exonuclease III signal amplification and gold nanoparticles, we developed a simple and label-free colorimetric assay for highly sensitive detection of folate receptor (FR). A detection limit of 50 fM FR was obtained using UV-vis spectrometry and 10 pM FR could be visualized by the naked eye.By combining terminal protection of small molecule (folate)-capped DNA probes, exonuclease III signal amplification and gold nanoparticles, we developed a simple and label-free colorimetric assay for highly sensitive detection of folate receptor (FR). A detection limit of 50 fM FR was obtained using UV-vis spectrometry and 10 pM FR could be visualized by the naked eye. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, salt and DNA-2 effects on the stability of the AuNP solution. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr06139f

  19. Novel ST-MUSIC-based spectral analysis for detection of ULF geomagnetic signals anomalies associated with seismic events in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Omar Chavez; Juan Pablo Amezquita-Sanchez; Martin Valtierra-Rodriguez; Jose Antonio Cruz-Abeyro; Anatoliy Kotsarenko; Jesus Roberto Millan-Almaraz; Aurelio Dominguez-Gonzalez; Eduardo Rojas

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the analysis of ultra-low-frequency (ULF) geomagnetic signals in order to detect seismic anomalies has been reported in several works. Yet, they, although having promising results, present problems for their detection since these anomalies are generally too much weak and embedded in high noise levels. In this work, a short-time multiple signal classification (ST-MUSIC), which is a technique with high-frequency resolution and noise immunity, is proposed for the detection of seismic a...

  20. Risk of hepatotoxicity associated with the use of telithromycin: a signal detection using data mining algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Guo, Jeff J; Healy, Daniel P; Lin, Xiaodong; Patel, Nick C

    2008-12-01

    With the exception of case reports, limited data are available regarding the risk of hepatotoxicity associated with the use of telithromycin. To detect the safety signal regarding the reporting of hepatotoxicity associated with the use of telithromycin using 4 commonly employed data mining algorithms (DMAs). Based on the Adverse Events Reporting System (AERS) database of the Food and Drug Administration, 4 DMAs, including the reporting odds ratio (ROR), the proportional reporting ratio (PRR), the information component (IC), and the Gamma Poisson Shrinker (GPS), were applied to examine the association between the reporting of hepatotoxicity and the use of telithromycin. The study period was from the first quarter of 2004 to the second quarter of 2006. The reporting of hepatotoxicity was identified using the preferred terms indexed in the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities. The drug name was used to identify reports regarding the use of telithromycin. A total of 226 reports describing hepatotoxicity associated with the use of telithromycin were recorded in the AERS. A safety problem of telithromycin associated with increased reporting of hepatotoxicity was clearly detected by 4 algorithms as early as 2005, signaling the problem in the first quarter by the ROR and the IC, in the second quarter by the PRR, and in the fourth quarter by the GPS. A safety signal was indicated by the 4 DMAs suggesting an association between the reporting of hepatotoxicity and the use of telithromycin. Given the wide use of telithromycin and serious consequences of hepatotoxicity, clinicians should be cautious when selecting telithromycin for treatment of an infection. In addition, further observational studies are required to evaluate the utility of signal detection systems for early recognition of serious, life-threatening, low-frequency drug-induced adverse events.

  1. DETECT: A MATLAB Toolbox for Event Detection and Identification in Time Series, with Applications to Artifact Detection in EEG Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-24

    electrocardiogram (ECG) data, which was obtained freely from the online PhysioNet database [18]. For our analysis, we downloaded the data in EDF format from...certainty threshold of 0.8 was used. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0062944.t004 Figure 9. DETECT labeling of ECG data obtained from the PhysioNet online...Amaral LAN, Glass L, Hausdorff JM, Ivanov PC, et al. (2000) PhysioBank, PhysioToolkit, and PhysioNet Components of a New Research Resource for

  2. Photonic Ultra-Wideband 781.25-Mb/s Signal Generation and Transmission Incorporating Digital Signal Processing Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gibbon, Timothy Braidwood; Yu, Xianbin; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2009-01-01

    The generation of photonic ultra-wideband (UWB) impulse signals using an uncooled distributed-feedback laser is proposed. For the first time, we experimentally demonstrate bit-for-bit digital signal processing (DSP) bit-error-rate measurements for transmission of a 781.25-Mb/s photonic UWB signal...

  3. Mental-disorder detection using chaos and nonlinear dynamical analysis of photoplethysmographic signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham, Tuan D.; Thang, Truong Cong; Oyama-Higa, Mayumi; Sugiyama, Masahide

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Chaos and nonlinear dynamical analysis are applied for mental-disorder detection. • Experimental results show significant detection improvement with feature synergy. • Proposed approach is effective for analysis of photoplethysmographic signals. • Proposed approach is promising for developing automated mental-health systems. -- Abstract: Mental disorder can be defined as a psychological disturbance of thought or emotion. In particular, depression is a mental disease which can ultimately lead to death from suicide. If depression is identified, it can be treated with medication and psychotherapy. However, the diagnosis of depression is difficult and there are currently no any quick and reliable medical tests to detect if someone is depressed. This is because the exact cause of depression is still unknown given the belief that depression results in chemical brain changes, genetic disorder, stress, or the combination of these problems. Photoplethysmography has recently been realized as a non-invasive optical technique that can give new insights into the physiology and pathophysiology of the central and peripheral nervous systems. We present in this paper an automated mental-disorder detection approach in a general sense based on a novel synergy of chaos and nonlinear dynamical methods for the analysis of photoplethysmographic finger pulse waves of mental and control subjects. Such an approach can be applied for automated detection of depression as a special case. Because of the computational effectiveness of the studied methods and low cost of generation of the physiological signals, the proposed automated detection of mental illness is feasible for real-life applications including self-assessment, self-monitoring, and computerized health care

  4. A neuronal MCT2 knockdown in the rat somatosensory cortex reduces both the NMR lactate signal and the BOLD response during whisker stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazuel, Leslie; Blanc, Jordy; Repond, Cendrine; Bouchaud, Véronique; Raffard, Gérard; Déglon, Nicole; Bonvento, Gilles; Pellerin, Luc; Bouzier-Sore, Anne-Karine

    2017-01-01

    Although several in vitro and ex vivo evidence support the existence of lactate exchange between astrocytes and neurons, a direct demonstration in vivo is still lacking. In the present study, a lentiviral vector carrying a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) was used to downregulate the expression of the monocarboxylate transporter type 2 (MCT2) in neurons of the rat somatosensory cortex (called S1BF) by ~ 25%. After one hour of whisker stimulation, HRMAS 1H-NMR spectroscopy analysis of S1BF perchloric acid extracts showed that while an increase in lactate content is observed in both uninjected and shRNA-control injected extracts, such an effect was abrogated in shMCT2 injected rats. A 13C-incorporation analysis following [1-13C]glucose infusion during the stimulation confirmed that the elevated lactate observed during activation originates from newly synthesized [3-13C]lactate, with blood-derived [1-13C]glucose being the precursor. Moreover, the analysis of the 13C-labeling of glutamate in position C3 and C4 indicates that upon activation, there is an increase in TCA cycle velocity for control rats while a decrease is observed for MCT2 knockdown animals. Using in vivo localized 1H-NMR spectroscopy, an increase in lactate levels is observed in the S1BF area upon whisker stimulation for shRNA-control injected rats but not for MCT2 knockdown animals. Finally, while a robust BOLD fMRI response was evidenced in control rats, it was absent in MCT2 knockdown rats. These data not only demonstrate that glucose-derived lactate is locally produced following neuronal activation but also suggest that its use by neurons via MCT2 is probably essential to maintain synaptic activity within the barrel cortex.

  5. Reference set for performance testing of pediatric vaccine safety signal detection methods and systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauchli Pernus, Yolanda; Nan, Cassandra; Verstraeten, Thomas; Pedenko, Mariia; Osokogu, Osemeke U; Weibel, Daniel; Sturkenboom, Miriam; Bonhoeffer, Jan

    2016-12-12

    Safety signal detection in spontaneous reporting system databases and electronic healthcare records is key to detection of previously unknown adverse events following immunization. Various statistical methods for signal detection in these different datasources have been developed, however none are geared to the pediatric population and none specifically to vaccines. A reference set comprising pediatric vaccine-adverse event pairs is required for reliable performance testing of statistical methods within and across data sources. The study was conducted within the context of the Global Research in Paediatrics (GRiP) project, as part of the seventh framework programme (FP7) of the European Commission. Criteria for the selection of vaccines considered in the reference set were routine and global use in the pediatric population. Adverse events were primarily selected based on importance. Outcome based systematic literature searches were performed for all identified vaccine-adverse event pairs and complemented by expert committee reports, evidence based decision support systems (e.g. Micromedex), and summaries of product characteristics. Classification into positive (PC) and negative control (NC) pairs was performed by two independent reviewers according to a pre-defined algorithm and discussed for consensus in case of disagreement. We selected 13 vaccines and 14 adverse events to be included in the reference set. From a total of 182 vaccine-adverse event pairs, we classified 18 as PC, 113 as NC and 51 as unclassifiable. Most classifications (91) were based on literature review, 45 were based on expert committee reports, and for 46 vaccine-adverse event pairs, an underlying pathomechanism was not plausible classifying the association as NC. A reference set of vaccine-adverse event pairs was developed. We propose its use for comparing signal detection methods and systems in the pediatric population. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. The impact of database restriction on pharmacovigilance signal detection of selected cancer therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauben, Manfred; Hung, Eric; Wood, Jennifer; Soitkar, Amit; Reshef, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether database restriction can improve oncology drug pharmacovigilance signal detection performance. We used spontaneous adverse event (AE) reports in the United States (US) Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) database. Positive control (PC) drug medical concept (DMC) pairs were selected from safety information not included in the product's first label but subsequently added as label changes. These medical concepts (MCs) were mapped to the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA) preferred terms (PTs) used in FAERS to code AEs. Negative controls (NC) were MCs with circumscribed PTs not included in the corresponding US package insert (USPI). We calculated shrinkage-adjusted observed-to-expected (O/E) reporting frequencies for the aforementioned drug-PT pairs. We also formulated an adjudication framework to calculate performance at the MC level. Performance metrics [sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value (PPV, NPV), signal/noise (S/N), F and Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC)] were calculated for each analysis and compared. The PC reference set consisted of 11 drugs, 487 PTs, 27 MCs, 37 drug-MC combinations and 638 drug-event combinations (DECs). The NC reference set consisted of 11 drugs, 9 PTs, 5 MCs, 40 drug-MC combinations and 67 DECs. Most drug-event pairs were not highlighted by either analysis. A small percentage of signals of disproportionate reporting were lost, more noise than signal, with no gains. Specificity and PPV improved whereas sensitivity, NPV, F and MCC decreased, but all changes were small relative to the decrease in sensitivity. The overall S/N improved. This oncology drug restricted analysis improved the S/N ratio, removing proportionately more noise than signal, but with significant credible signal loss. Without broader experience and a calculus of costs and utilities of correct versus incorrect classifications in

  7. An optimized image analysis algorithm for detecting nuclear signals in digital whole slides for histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulik, Róbert; Micsik, Tamás; Kiszler, Gábor; Kaszál, Péter; Székely, János; Paulik, Norbert; Várhalmi, Eszter; Prémusz, Viktória; Krenács, Tibor; Molnár, Béla

    2017-06-01

    Nuclear estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and Ki-67 protein positive tumor cell fractions are semiquantitatively assessed in breast cancer for prognostic and predictive purposes. These biomarkers are usually revealed using immunoperoxidase methods resulting in diverse signal intensity and frequent inhomogeneity in tumor cell nuclei, which are routinely scored and interpreted by a pathologist during conventional light-microscopic examination. In the last decade digital pathology-based whole slide scanning and image analysis algorithms have shown tremendous development to support pathologists in this diagnostic process, which can directly influence patient selection for targeted- and chemotherapy. We have developed an image analysis algorithm optimized for whole slide quantification of nuclear immunostaining signals of ER, PR, and Ki-67 proteins in breast cancers. In this study, we tested the consistency and reliability of this system both in a series of brightfield and DAPI stained fluorescent samples. Our method allows the separation of overlapping cells and signals, reliable detection of vesicular nuclei and background compensation, especially in FISH stained slides. Detection accuracy and the processing speeds were validated in routinely immunostained breast cancer samples of varying reaction intensities and image qualities. Our technique supported automated nuclear signal detection with excellent efficacy: Precision Rate/Positive Predictive Value was 90.23 ± 4.29%, while Recall Rate/Sensitivity was 88.23 ± 4.84%. These factors and average counting speed of our algorithm were compared with two other open source applications (QuPath and CellProfiler) and resulted in 6-7% higher Recall Rate, while 4- to 30-fold higher processing speed. In conclusion, our image analysis algorithm can reliably detect and count nuclear signals in digital whole slides or any selected large areas i.e. hot spots, thus can support pathologists in assessing

  8. Implementing wavelet packet transform for valve failure detection using vibration and acoustic emission signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, H Y; Ramli, R; Abdullah, M A K

    2012-01-01

    The efficiency of reciprocating compressors relies heavily on the health condition of its moving components, most importantly its valves. Previous studies showed good correlation between the dynamic response and the physical condition of the valves. These can be achieved by employing vibration technique which is capable of monitoring the response of the valve, and acoustic emission technique which is capable of detecting the valves' material deformation. However, the relationship/comparison between the two techniques is rarely investigated. In this paper, the two techniques were examined using time-frequency analysis. Wavelet packet transform (WPT) was chosen as the multi-resolution analysis technique over continuous wavelet transform (CWT), and discrete wavelet transform (DWT). This is because WPT could overcome the high computational time and high redundancy problem in CWT and could provide detailed analysis of the high frequency components compared to DWT. The features of both signals can be extracted by evaluating the normalised WPT coefficients for different time window under different valve conditions. By comparing the normalised coefficients over a certain time frame and frequency range, the feature vectors revealing the condition of valves can be constructed. One way analysis of variance was employed on these feature vectors to test the significance of data under different valve conditions. It is believed that AE signals can give a better representation of the valve condition as it can detect both the fluid motion and material deformation of valves as compared to the vibration signals.

  9. A Feasibility Study on Detection of Insider Threats based on Human Bio-signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Young A; Yim, Man-Sung [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The insider threat means that trusted workers in an organization might carry out harmful acts from the negligent use of classified data to potentially sabotage the workplace. Surveys and studies conducted over the last decade have consistently shown the critical nature of the insider threats problem, in both government and private sectors. The shortcomings of existing systems, such as mental self-assessment and peer review, are very subjective, biased-assessments and employed infrequently. To overcome these limitations, this study investigates the feasibility of detecting and predicting an insider threat by using human biodata, from smart wearable devices. This paper showed the feasibility of predicting and detecting insider threats using EEG, GSR and ECG signals. In the section 2.1, two research hypotheses were established to identify the significant difference on EEG, GSR and ECG signals when the subject decided bad action and is the placed in deceit situation. These hypotheses were tested using two kinds of pilot experiments in the form of input (stimulus) and output (checking response of physiological signals and reaction time)

  10. A chemical approach for site-specific identification of NMR signals from protein side-chain NH₃⁺ groups forming intermolecular ion pairs in protein-nucleic acid complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kurtis M; Nguyen, Dan; Esadze, Alexandre; Zandrashvili, Levani; Gorenstein, David G; Iwahara, Junji

    2015-05-01

    Protein-nucleic acid interactions involve intermolecular ion pairs of protein side-chain and DNA or RNA phosphate groups. Using three protein-DNA complexes, we demonstrate that site-specific oxygen-to-sulfur substitution in phosphate groups allows for identification of NMR signals from the protein side-chain NH3 (+) groups forming the intermolecular ion pairs. A characteristic change in their (1)H and (15)N resonances upon this modification (i.e., substitution of phosphate to phosphorodithioate) can represent a signature of an intermolecular ion pair. Hydrogen-bond scalar coupling between protein side-chain (15)N and DNA phosphorodithiaote (31)P nuclei provides direct confirmation of the intermolecular ion pair. The same approach is likely applicable to protein-RNA complexes as well.

  11. A chemical approach for site-specific identification of NMR signals from protein side-chain NH3+ groups forming intermolecular ion pairs in protein–nucleic acid complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Kurtis M.; Nguyen, Dan; Esadze, Alexandre; Zandrashvili, Levani; Gorenstein, David G.; Iwahara, Junji

    2015-01-01

    Protein–nucleic acid interactions involve intermolecular ion pairs of protein side-chain and DNA or RNA phosphate groups. Using three protein–DNA complexes, we demonstrate that site-specific oxygen-to-sulfur substitution in phosphate groups allows for identification of NMR signals from the protein side-chain NH 3 + groups forming the intermolecular ion pairs. A characteristic change in their 1 H and 15 N resonances upon this modification (i.e., substitution of phosphate to phosphorodithioate) can represent a signature of an intermolecular ion pair. Hydrogen-bond scalar coupling between protein side-chain 15 N and DNA phosphorodithiaote 31 P nuclei provides direct confirmation of the intermolecular ion pair. The same approach is likely applicable to protein–RNA complexes as well

  12. A chemical approach for site-specific identification of NMR signals from protein side-chain NH{sub 3}{sup +} groups forming intermolecular ion pairs in protein–nucleic acid complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Kurtis M. [University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Department of NanoMedicine and Biomedical Engineering and Institute of Molecular Medicine (United States); Nguyen, Dan; Esadze, Alexandre; Zandrashvili, Levani [University of Texas Medical Branch, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Sealy Center for Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics (United States); Gorenstein, David G. [University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Department of NanoMedicine and Biomedical Engineering and Institute of Molecular Medicine (United States); Iwahara, Junji, E-mail: juiwahar@utmb.edu, E-mail: j.iwahara@utmb.edu [University of Texas Medical Branch, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Sealy Center for Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Protein–nucleic acid interactions involve intermolecular ion pairs of protein side-chain and DNA or RNA phosphate groups. Using three protein–DNA complexes, we demonstrate that site-specific oxygen-to-sulfur substitution in phosphate groups allows for identification of NMR signals from the protein side-chain NH{sub 3}{sup +} groups forming the intermolecular ion pairs. A characteristic change in their {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N resonances upon this modification (i.e., substitution of phosphate to phosphorodithioate) can represent a signature of an intermolecular ion pair. Hydrogen-bond scalar coupling between protein side-chain {sup 15}N and DNA phosphorodithiaote {sup 31}P nuclei provides direct confirmation of the intermolecular ion pair. The same approach is likely applicable to protein–RNA complexes as well.

  13. Detection and Correction of Under-/Overexposed Optical Soundtracks by Coupling Image and Audio Signal Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taquet, Jonathan; Besserer, Bernard; Hassaine, Abdelali; Decenciere, Etienne

    2008-12-01

    Film restoration using image processing, has been an active research field during the last years. However, the restoration of the soundtrack has been mainly performed in the sound domain, using signal processing methods, despite the fact that it is recorded as a continuous image between the images of the film and the perforations. While the very few published approaches focus on removing dust particles or concealing larger corrupted areas, no published works are devoted to the restoration of soundtracks degraded by substantial underexposure or overexposure. Digital restoration of optical soundtracks is an unexploited application field and, besides, scientifically rich, because it allows mixing both image and signal processing approaches. After introducing the principles of optical soundtrack recording and playback, this contribution focuses on our first approaches to detect and cancel the effects of under and overexposure. We intentionally choose to get a quantification of the effect of bad exposure in the 1D audio signal domain instead of 2D image domain. Our measurement is sent as feedback value to an image processing stage where the correction takes place, building up a "digital image and audio signal" closed loop processing. The approach is validated on both simulated alterations and real data.

  14. Research and Analysis Laser Target Optics Characteristics and Signal Recognition Processing in Detection Screen System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanshan LI

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the measurement accuracy of the laser measurement distance system, this paper study the laser target optics characteristics based on the laser detection principle in the laser measurement distance system. A calculation model of laser reflective echo signal is put forward by analyzing the influence factors on the detector output value, and discuss the relationship between the distance from the detector to the target, the laser wavelength, the Transmission power of laser and the detector output power, the radiation intensity, and use the Fisher identification and modulus maxima method based on wavelet analysis to distinguish and identify the received echo signals. By the theoretical calculation and experimentation, the result shows the laser target optics characteristics are consistent with the calculation method of radiation. The real reflective signal can be identified by using wavelet transform, and the numerical value of the distance between the target and the detector is larger, the numerical value of echo signal will be smaller.

  15. Detection and Correction of Under-/Overexposed Optical Soundtracks by Coupling Image and Audio Signal Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne Decenciere

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Film restoration using image processing, has been an active research field during the last years. However, the restoration of the soundtrack has been mainly performed in the sound domain, using signal processing methods, despite the fact that it is recorded as a continuous image between the images of the film and the perforations. While the very few published approaches focus on removing dust particles or concealing larger corrupted areas, no published works are devoted to the restoration of soundtracks degraded by substantial underexposure or overexposure. Digital restoration of optical soundtracks is an unexploited application field and, besides, scientifically rich, because it allows mixing both image and signal processing approaches. After introducing the principles of optical soundtrack recording and playback, this contribution focuses on our first approaches to detect and cancel the effects of under and overexposure. We intentionally choose to get a quantification of the effect of bad exposure in the 1D audio signal domain instead of 2D image domain. Our measurement is sent as feedback value to an image processing stage where the correction takes place, building up a “digital image and audio signal” closed loop processing. The approach is validated on both simulated alterations and real data.

  16. Using Signal Envelope Detection for Online and Offline RF MEMS Switch Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Simeu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The test of radiofrequency (RF integrated circuits at their ever-increasing operating frequency range requires sophisticated test equipment and is time-consuming and, therefore, very expensive. This paper introduces a new method combining low-frequency actuation signal as test stimuli and signal envelope detection applied on the RF output signal in order to provide a low-cost mean for production testing of RF MEMS switches embedded in system-in-package (SiP devices. The proposed approach uses the principle of alternate test that replaces conventional specification-based testing procedures. The basic idea is to extract the high-frequency characteristics of the switch from the signal envelope of the response. Output parameters like “on” and “off” transition time are extracted at low frequency and used in a regression process to predict RF conventional specifications like S-parameters. The paper also provides a set of recursive estimation algorithms suitable for online testing. In this context, “on” and “off” transition time estimated from the output low-frequency envelope is used as test metrics and is concurrently updated using recursive algorithms. Validation results obtained on a capacitive RF switch model are presented.

  17. "Perfecting" WATERGATE: clean proton NMR spectra from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Ralph W; Holroyd, Chloe M; Aguilar, Juan A; Nilsson, Mathias; Morris, Gareth A

    2013-01-14

    A simple modification of the WATERGATE solvent suppression method greatly improves the quality of (1)H NMR spectra obtainable from samples in H(2)O. The new method allows (1)H signals to be measured even when close in chemical shift to the signal of water, as for example in the NMR spectra of carbohydrates.

  18. A new colorimetric and fluorescent bis(coumarin)methylene probe for fluoride ion detection based on the proton transfer signaling mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahapatra, Ajit Kumar; Maiti, Kalipada; Sahoo, Prithidipa; Nandi, Prasanta Kumar

    2013-01-01

    A new turn-on fluorescent and colorimetric sensor, oxidized bis(coumarin)methane (1) for fluoride in acetonitrile was designed and synthesized. The binding ability evaluated by UV–vis and fluorescence titration experiments reveals that 1 can selectively interact with fluoride. Upon addition of fluoride to receptor 1 in acetonitrile solution, the appearance of a new absorption band around 349 nm showed a color change from colorless to yellow, which can provide a way of ‘naked eye’ detection of fluorides. The spectral change of 1 is due to the anion induced deprotonation and hence an increase in charge density and rigidity of the receptor molecule. Furthermore, the binding mode with fluoride was investigated by 1 H NMR titration experiments. Again, the deprotonation of oxidized bis(coumarin)methane 1 is responsible for the color change. -- Graphical abstract: A new colorimetric and fluorescent bis(coumarin)methylene probe for fluoride ion detection based on the proton transfer signaling mode. Highlights: • The first report of conjugated biscoumarin-based colorimetric chemosensor. • Oxidized bis(coumarin)methane acts as colorimetric reporter. • The oxidized coumarin moiety might modulate the internal charge transfer (ICT). • Fluorescence turn-on sensing of fluoride

  19. Ternary surface monolayers for ultrasensitive (zeptomole) amperometric detection of nucleic acid hybridization without signal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jie; Campuzano, Susana; Halford, Colin; Haake, David A; Wang, Joseph

    2010-11-01

    A ternary surface monolayer, consisting of coassembled thiolated capture probe, mercaptohexanol and dithiothreitol, is shown to offer dramatic improvements in the signal-to-noise characteristics of electrochemical DNA hybridization biosensors based on common self-assembled monolayers. Remarkably low detection limits down to 40 zmol (in 4 μL samples) as well as only 1 CFU Escherichia coli per sensor are thus obtained without any additional amplification step in connection to the commonly used horseradish peroxidase/3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine system. Such dramatic improvements in the detection limits (compared to those of common binary alkanethiol interfaces and to those of most electrochemical DNA sensing strategies without target or signal amplification) are attributed primarily to the remarkably higher resistance to nonspecific adsorption. This reflects the highly compact layer (with lower pinhole density) produced by the coupling of the cyclic- and linear-configuration "backfillers" that leads to a remarkably low background noise even in the presence of complex sample matrixes. A wide range of surface compositions have been investigated, and the ternary mixed monolayer has been systematically optimized. Detailed impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetric studies shed useful insights into the surface coverage. The impressive sensitivity and high specificity of the simple developed methodology indicate great promise for a wide range of nucleic acid testing, including clinical diagnostics, biothreat detection, food safety, and forensic analysis.

  20. Ternary Surface Monolayers for Ultrasensitive (Zeptomole) Amperometric Detection of Nucleic-Acid Hybridization without Signal Amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jie; Campuzano, Susana; Halford, Colin; Haake, David A.; Wang, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    A ternary surface monolayer, consisting of co-assembled thiolated capture probe (SHCP) mercaptohexanol (MCH) and dithiothreitol (DTT), is shown to offer dramatic improvements in the signal-to-noise characteristics of electrochemical DNA hybridization biosensors based on common self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). Remarkably low detection limits down to 40 zmole (in 4 μL samples) as well as only 1 CFU E. coli per sensor are thus obtained without any additional amplification step in connection to the commonly used horseradish peroxidase/3,3′,5,5′-tetramethylbenzidine (HRP/TMB) system. Such dramatic improvements in the detection limits (compared to common binary alkanethiol interfaces and to most electrochemical DNA sensing strategies without target or signal amplification) are attributed primarily to the remarkably higher resistance to non-specific adsorption. This reflects the highly compact layer (with lower pinhole density) produced by the coupling of the cyclic- and linear-configuration ‘backfillers’ that leads to a remarkably low background noise even in the presence of complex sample matrices. A wide range of surface compositions have been investigated and the ternary mixed monolayer has been systematically optimized. Detailed impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetric studies shed useful insights into the surface coverage. The impressive sensitivity and high specificity of the simple developed methodology indicate great promise for a wide range of nucleic acid testing, including clinical diagnostics, biothreat detection, food safety and forensic analysis. PMID:20883023