WorldWideScience

Sample records for nm region observed

  1. Full Stokes observations in the He I 1083 nm spectral region covering an M3.2 flare

    CERN Document Server

    Kuckein, C; Sainz, R Manso; Ramos, A Asensio

    2015-01-01

    We present an exceptional data set acquired with the Vacuum Tower Telescope (Tenerife, Spain) covering the pre-flare, flare, and post-flare stages of an M3.2 flare. The full Stokes spectropolarimetric observations were recorded with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter in the He I 1083.0 nm spectral region. The object under study was active region NOAA 11748 on 2013 May 17. During the flare the chomospheric He I 1083.0 nm intensity goes strongly into emission. However, the nearby photospheric Si I 1082.7 nm spectral line profile only gets shallower and stays in absorption. Linear polarization (Stokes Q and U) is detected in all lines of the He I triplet during the flare. Moreover, the circular polarization (Stokes V) is dominant during the flare, being the blue component of the He I triplet much stronger than the red component, and both are stronger than the Si I Stokes V profile. The Si I inversions reveal enormous changes of the photospheric magnetic field during the flare. Before the flare magnetic field conc...

  2. Chromospheric polarimetry through multi-line observations of the 850 nm spectral region

    CERN Document Server

    Noda, C Quintero; Katsukawa, Y; Rodriguez, J de la Cruz; Carlsson, M; Anan, T; Oba, T; Ichimoto, K; Suematsu, Y

    2016-01-01

    Future solar missions and ground-based telescopes aim to understand the magnetism of the solar chromosphere. We performed a supporting study in Quintero Noda et al. (2016) focused on the infrared Ca II 8542 A line and we concluded that is one of the best candidates because it is sensitive to a large range of atmospheric heights, from the photosphere to the middle chromosphere. However, we believe that it is worth to try improving the results produced by this line observing additional spectral lines. In that regard, we examined the neighbour solar spectrum looking for spectral lines that could increase the sensitivity to the atmospheric parameters. Interestingly, we discovered several photospheric lines that greatly improve the photospheric sensitivity to the magnetic field vector. Moreover, they are located close to a second chromospheric line that also belongs to the Ca II infrared triplet, i.e. the Ca II 8498 A line, and enhances the sensitivity to the atmospheric parameters at chromospheric layers. We conc...

  3. Chromospheric polarimetry through multiline observations of the 850-nm spectral region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero Noda, C.; Shimizu, T.; Katsukawa, Y.; de la Cruz Rodríguez, J.; Carlsson, M.; Anan, T.; Oba, T.; Ichimoto, K.; Suematsu, Y.

    2017-02-01

    Future solar missions and ground-based telescopes aim to understand the magnetism of the solar chromosphere. We performed a supporting study in Quintero Noda et al. focused on the infrared Ca II 8542 Å line and we concluded that it is one of the best candidates because it is sensitive to a large range of atmospheric heights, from the photosphere to the middle chromosphere. However, we believe that it is worth trying to improve the results produced by this line observing additional spectral lines. In that regard, we examined the neighbourhood solar spectrum looking for spectral lines which could increase the sensitivity to the atmospheric parameters. Interestingly, we discovered several photospheric lines which greatly improve the photospheric sensitivity to the magnetic field vector. Moreover, they are located close to a second chromospheric line which also belongs to the Ca II infrared triplet, i.e. the Ca II 8498 Å line, and enhances the sensitivity to the atmospheric parameters at chromospheric layers. We conclude that the lines in the vicinity of the Ca II 8542 Å line not only increase its sensitivity to the atmospheric parameters at all layers, but also they constitute an excellent spectral window for chromospheric polarimetry.

  4. The first coordinated observations of mid-latitude E-region quasi-periodic radar echoes and lower thermospheric 557.7-nm airglow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yamamoto

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available We present the first coordinated observations of quasi-periodic (QP radar echoes from sporadic-E (Es field-aligned irregularities (FAIs, OI 557.7-nm airglow, and neutral winds in a common volume over Shigaraki, Japan (34.9° N, 136.1° E on the night of 5 August 2002 during the SEEK-2 campaign. QP echo altitudes of 90-110 km were lower than usual by 10 km, enabling us to make a detailed comparison among QP echoes, airglow intensity, and neutral wind at around 96 km altitude. Eastward movement of the QP echo regions is consistent with the motions of neutral winds, airglow structures, and FAIs, suggesting that the electrodynamics of Es-layers is fundamentally controlled by the neutral atmospheric dynamics. During the QP echo event, the echo altitudes clearly went up (down in harmony with an airglow enhancement (subsidence that also moved to the east. This fact suggests that the eastward-moving enhanced airglow region included an upward (downward component of neutral winds to raise (lower the altitude of the wind-shear node responsible for the Es formation. The airglow intensity, echo intensity, and Doppler velocity of FAIs at around 96 km altitude fluctuated with periods from 10 min to 1h, indicating that these parameters were modulated with short-period atmospheric disturbances. Some QP echo regions below 100km altitude contained small-scale QP structures in which very strong neutral winds exceeding 100 m/s existed. The results are compared with recent observations, theories, and simulations of QP echoes. Keywords. Ionosphere (Ionosphere-atmosphere interactions; Ionospheric irregularities; Mid-latitude ionosphere

  5. Sounding Rocket Observations of Active Region Soft X-Ray Spectra Between 0.5 and 2.5 nm Using a Modified SDO/EVE Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieman, Seth; Didkovsky, Leonid; Woods, Thomas; Jones, Andrew; Moore, Christopher

    2016-12-01

    Spectrally resolved measurements of individual solar active regions (ARs) in the soft X-ray (SXR) range are important for studying dynamic processes in the solar corona and their associated effects on the Earth's upper atmosphere. They are also a means of evaluating atomic data and elemental abundances used in physics-based solar spectral models. However, very few such measurements are available. We present spectral measurements of two individual ARs in the 0.5 to 2.5 nm range obtained on the NASA 36.290 sounding rocket flight of 21 October 2013 (at about 18:30 UT) using the Solar Aspect Monitor (SAM), a channel of the Extreme Ultaviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) payload designed for underflight calibrations of the orbital EVE on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The EVE rocket instrument is a duplicate of the EVE on SDO, except the SAM channel on the rocket version was modified in 2012 to include a freestanding transmission grating to provide spectrally resolved images of the solar disk with the best signal to noise ratio for the brightest features, such as ARs. Calibrations of the EVE sounding rocket instrument at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility (NIST/SURF) have provided a measurement of the SAM absolute spectral response function and a mapping of wavelength separation in the grating diffraction pattern. We discuss techniques (incorporating the NIST/SURF data) for determining SXR spectra from the dispersed AR images as well as the resulting spectra for NOAA ARs 11877 and 11875 observed on the 2013 rocket flight. In comparisons with physics-based spectral models using the CHIANTI v8 atomic database we find that both AR spectra are in good agreement with isothermal spectra (4 MK), as well as spectra based on an AR differential emission measure (DEM) included with the CHIANTI distribution, with the exception of the relative intensities of strong Fe xvii lines associated with 2p6-2p53{s} and 2p6-2p

  6. Regional National Cooperative Observer

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA publication dedicated to issues, news and recognition of observers in the National Weather Service Cooperative Observer program. Issues published regionally...

  7. Discussion of vicarious calibration of GOSAT/TANSO-CAI UV-band (380nm) and aerosol retrieval in wildfire region in the OCO-2 and GOSAT observation campaign at Railroad Valley in 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, M.; Kuze, A.; Bruegge, C. J.; Shiomi, K.; Kataoka, F.; Kikuchi, N.; Arai, T.; Kasai, K.; Nakajima, T.

    2016-12-01

    The GOSAT (Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite) / TANSO-CAI (Cloud and Aerosol Imager, CAI) is an imaging sensor to measure cloud and aerosol properties and observes reflected sunlight from the atmosphere and surface of the ground. The sensor has four bands from near ultraviolet (near-UV) to shortwave infrared, 380, 674, 870 and 1600nm. The field of view size is 0.5 km for band-1 through band-3, and 1.5km for band-4. Band-1 (380nm) is one of unique function of the CAI. The near-UV observation offers several advantages for the remote sensing of aerosols over land: Low reflectance of most surfaces; Sensitivity to absorbing aerosols; Absorption of trace gases is weak (Höller et al., 2004). CAI UV-band is useful to distinguish absorbing aerosol (smoke) from cloud. GOSAT-2/TANSO-CAI-2 that will be launched in the future also has UV-bands, 340 and 380nm. We carried out an experiment to calibrate CAI UV-band radiance using data taken in a field campaign of OCO-2 and GOSAT at Railroad Valley in 2016. The campaign period is June 27 to July 3 in 2016. We measured surface reflectance by using USB4000 Spectrometer with 74-UV collimating lens (Ocean Optics) and Spectralon (Labsphere). USB4000 is a UV spectrometer, and its measurement range from 300 to 520nm. We simulated CAI UV-band radiance using a vector type of radiation transfer code, i.e. including polarization calculation, pstar3 (Ota et al., 2010) using measured surface reflectance and atmospheric data, pressure and relative humidity by radiosonde in the same campaign, and aerosol optical depth by AERONET, etc. Then, we evaluated measured UV radiances with the simulated data. We show the result of vicarious calibration of CAI UV-band in the campaign, and discuss about this method for future sensor, CAI-2. Around the campaign period, there was wildfire around Los Angeles, and aerosol optical thickness (AOT) observed by AERONET at Rail Road valley and Caltech sites is also high. We tried to detect and retrieve aerosol

  8. Laser produced spectrum of Si(2) molecule in the region of 540-1010 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, K S; Gopal, R

    2008-12-01

    The laser produced spectrum of Si(2) molecule is recorded for the first time using laser ablation technique in the region of 540-1010 nm. About 110 bands are observed in the entire spectral region and all these bands are classified into three band systems, viz. E-X, F-X and G-X of Si(2) molecule lying in the region of 814-1010 nm, 630-900 nm and 546-710 nm, respectively. All these electronic transitions take place from ground state X(3)Sigma(g)(-) state. The molecular constants of all these states have been determined.

  9. Observation of Quiet Limb in He I 1083.0 nm, H Paschen alpha1281.8 nm and H Brackett gamma 2166.1 nm lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad Choudhary, Debi

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we shall present the results of an observational study of the quiet solar limb in the near infrared lines using the New IR Array Camera (NAC) and the vertical spectrograph at the focal plane of McMath-Pierce telescope. The NAC, at the exit port of the spectrograph, was used to record the limb spectrum in HeI 1083.0 nm, Hydrogen Paschen 1281.8 nm and Brackett 2165.5 nm wavelength regions. The NAC is a 1024x1024 InSb Alladin III Detector operating over 1-5 micron range with high density sampling at 0.018 arc second/pixel. The all-reflective optical train minimizes number of surfaces and eliminates ghosts leading to low scatter, ghost-free optics. The close-cycle cryogenic provides a stable cooling environment over six hour period with an accuracy of 0.01K leading to low dark current. The low read out noise combined with low scattered light and dark current makes NAC an ideal detector for making high quality infrared spectral observations of solar limb. The limb spectrums were obtained by placing the spectrograph slit perpendicular to the limb at an interval of 10 degrees around the solar disk. We shall report the intensity profile, line-of-sight velocity and line width distribution around the sun derived from the spectra along the slit.

  10. Optical coherence tomography based imaging of dental demineralisation and cavity restoration in 840 nm and 1310 nm wavelength regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damodaran, Vani; Rao, Suresh Ranga; Vasa, Nilesh J.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a study of in-house built optical coherence tomography (OCT) system with a wavelength of 840 nm for imaging of dental caries, progress in demineralisation and cavity restoration is presented. The caries when imaged with the 840 nm OCT system showed minute demineralisation in the order of 5 μm. The OCT system was also proposed to study the growth of lesion and this was demonstrated by artificially inducing caries with a demineralisation solution of pH 4.8. The progress of carious lesion to a depth of about 50-60 μm after 60 hours of demineralisation was clearly observed with the 840 nm OCT system. The tooth samples were subjected to accelerated demineralisation condition at pH of approximately 2.3 to study the adverse effects and the onset of cavity formation was clearly observed. The restoration of cavity was also studied by employing different restorative materials (filled and unfilled). In the case of restoration without filler material (unfilled), the restoration boundaries were clearly observed. Overall, results were comparable with that of the widely used 1310 nm OCT system. In the case of restoration with filler material, the 1310 nm OCT imaging displayed better imaging capacity due to lower scattering than 840 nm imaging.

  11. Internetwork magnetic field distribution from simultaneous 1.56 micron and 630 nm observations

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, M J Martinez; Cobo, B Ruiz; Beck, C

    2007-01-01

    We study the contradictory magnetic field strength distributions retrieved from independent analyses of spectropolarimetric observations in the near-infrared (1.56 micron) and in the visible (630 nm) at internetwork regions. In order to solve this apparent controversy, we present simultaneous and co-spatial 1.56 micron and 630 nm observations of an internetwork area. The properties of the circular and linear polarization signals, as well as the Stokes V area and amplitude asymmetries, are discussed. As a complement, inversion techniques are also used to infer the physical parameters of the solar atmosphere. As a first step, the infrared and visible observations are analysed separately to check their compatibility. Finally, the simultaneous inversion of the two data sets is performed. The magnetic flux densities retrieved from the individual analysis of the infrared and visible data sets are strongly correlated. The polarity of the Stokes V profiles is the same at co-spatial pixels in both wavelength ranges. T...

  12. A reflectivity profilometer for the optical characterisation of grade reflectivity mirrors in the 250 nm - 1100 nm spectral region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colucci, Alessandro; Nichelatti, Enrico [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Innovazione

    1998-04-01

    It`s developed the prototype of an instrument that can be used for the optical characterisation of graded reflectivity mirrors at any wavelength in the spectral region from 250 nm to 1100 nm. The instrument utilises a high-pressure Xe arc lamp as light source. Light is spectrally filtered by means of a grating monochromator. The sample is illuminated with an image of the monochromator exit slit. After reflection from the sample, this image is projected onto a 1024-elements charge-coupled device linear array driven by a digital frame board and interfaced with a personal computer. It`s tested the instrument accuracy by comparing measurement results with the corresponding ones obtained by means of a laser scanning technique. Measurement Rms repeatability has been estimated to be approximately of 0.8%. [Italiano] E` stato sviluppato il prototipo di uno strumento per la catatterizzazione ottica di specchi a riflettivita` variabile, operante a qualsiasi lunghezza d`onda nell`intervallo spettrale da 250 nm a 1100 nm. La sorgente dello strumento e` una lampada ad arco allo Xenon ad alta pressione. La luce e` filtrata spettralmente per mezzo di un monocromatore a reticolo. Il campione viene illuminato da un`immagine della fenditura d`uscita del monocromatore. Dopo essere stata riflessa dal campione, questa immagine viene proiettata su un array CCD lineare a 1024 elementi, connesso elettronicamente a una scheda digitale e interfacciato a un personal computer. L`accuratezza dello strumento e` stata verificata confrontando alcune misure con le corrispondenti misure ottenute mediante una tecnica a scansione laser. La ripetibilita` RMS delle misure e` stata stimata essere circa dello 0.8%.

  13. 77 FR 59703 - Environmental Impact Statement; Taos Regional Airport, Taos, NM

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Environmental Impact Statement; Taos Regional Airport, Taos, NM AGENCY...) for the ``Taos Regional Airport, Airport Layout Plan Improvements'' Environmental Impact Statement... requested the FAA to approve revisions to its Airport Layout Plan (ALP) to reflect and allow construction...

  14. Magnetic fields of an active region filament from full Stokes analysis of Si I 1082.7 nm and He I 1083.0 nm

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Z; Solanki, S; Liu, Y

    2012-01-01

    Vector magnetic fields of an active region filament in the photosphere and upper chromosphere are obtained from spectro-polarimetric observations recorded with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter (TIP II) at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT). We apply Milne-Eddington inversions on full Stokes vectors of the photospheric Si I 1082.7 nm and the upper chromospheric He I triplet at 1083.0 nm to obtain magnetic field vector and velocity maps in two atmosphere layers. We find that: (1)A complete filament was already present in H$\\alpha$ at the beginning of the TIP II data acquisition. Only a partially formed one, composed of multiple small threads, was present in He I. (2) The AR filament comprises two sections. One shows strong magnetic field intensities, about 600 - 800 G in the upper chromosphere and 800 - 1000 G in the photosphere. The other exhibits only comparatively weak magnetic field strengths in both layers. (3) The Stokes V signal is indicative of a dip in the magnetic field strength close to the chr...

  15. Al-free active region laser diodes at 894 nm for compact Cesium atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Bandel, N.; Bébé Manga Lobé, J.; Garcia, M.; Larrue, A.; Robert, Y.; Vinet, E.; Lecomte, M.; Drisse, O.; Parillaud, O.; Krakowski, M.

    2015-03-01

    Time-frequency applications are in need of high accuracy and high stability clocks. Compact industrial Cesium atomic clocks optically pumped is a promising area that could satisfy these demands. However, the stability of these clocks relies, among others, on the performances of laser diodes that are used for atomic pumping. This issue has led the III-V Lab to commit to the European Euripides-LAMA project that aims to provide competitive compact optical Cesium clocks for earth applications. This work will provide key experience for further space technology qualification. We are in charge of the design, fabrication and reliability of Distributed-Feedback diodes (DFB) at 894nm (D1 line of Cesium) and 852nm (D2 line). The use of D1 line for pumping will provide simplified clock architecture compared to D2 line pumping thanks to simpler atomic transitions and larger spectral separation between lines in the 894nm case. Also, D1 line pumping overcomes the issue of unpumped "dark states" that occur with D2 line. The modules should provide narrow linewidth (<1MHz), very good reliability in time and, crucially, be insensitive to optical feedback. The development of the 894nm wavelength is grounded on our previous results for 852nm DFB. Thus, we show our first results from Al-free active region with InGaAsP quantum well broad-area lasers (100μm width, with lengths ranging from 2mm to 4mm), for further DFB operation at 894nm. We obtained low internal losses below 2cm-1, the external differential efficiency is 0.49W/A with uncoated facets and a low threshold current density of 190A/cm², for 2mm lasers at 20°C.

  16. Direct Observation of Tunnelling through 100-nm-Wide All Metal Magnetic Junction into Si

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nam n. KIM; WANG Ke-Qiang; ZHANG Yu; WANG Jian-Qing

    2008-01-01

    @@ Nanoscaled spin-dependent tunnelling lines were patterned on doped Si and studied for tunnelling from the SDT ferromagnetic layer through an insulating barrier into Si. The injection contacts have the form of long strips with width and separation, ranging from 100 nm to 2 μm, and are patterned using e-beam lithography. The measured Ⅰ-Ⅴ characteristics versus temperature (80 to 300 K) on the 100 nm scaled devices between the layered-magnetic metals and the semiconductor clearly showed ballistic tunnelling, with weak dependence on the temperature.This is qualitatively different, at elevated temperatures, from 2-μm-wide scaled-up spin-dependent tunnelling structures, where thermal-ionic emission was observed to dominate carrier transport.

  17. Drain current local variability from linear to saturation region in 28 nm bulk NMOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatsori, T. A.; Theodorou, C. G.; Haendler, S.; Dimitriadis, C. A.; Ghibaudo, G.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we investigate the impact of the source - drain series resistance mismatch on the drain current variability in 28 nm bulk MOSFETs. For the first time, a mismatch model including the local fluctuations of the threshold voltage (Vt), the drain current gain factor (β) and the source - drain series resistance (RSD) in both linear and saturation regions is presented. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the influence of the source - drain series resistance mismatch is attenuated in the saturation region, due to the weaker sensitivity of the drain current variability on the series resistance variation. The experimental results were further verified by numerical simulations of the drain current characteristics with sensitivity analysis of the MOSFET parameters Vt, β and RSD.

  18. Lower Troposphere Observation over Urban Area with Lidar at 1064 nm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atanaska Deleva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An episode of relatively thick (till ∼3 km aerosol formation over the urban area of Sofia city was observed by lidar at a wavelength of 1064 nm. The lidar is part of Sofia lidar station at the Institute of Electronics of Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. Analysis of the weather conditions during the measurement period explains the stable persistence of such formation of human-activity aerosol over the town for the days of observation 20, 21, 23, and 24 June, 2011. The estimated top of the Planetary Boundary Layer for the measurement dated 23 June showed unusually high altitude ∼2200 m above ground. The results are presented in terms of vertical atmospheric backscatter coefficient profiles and color maps of the aerosol stratification evolution.

  19. Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of the SL9 Impact Sites. I. The 175-230 nm Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelle, Roger V.; McGrath, Melissa A.

    1996-01-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of spectra in the 175-230 nm wavelength region obtained by the Faint Object Spectrograph of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to determine the abundance of molecular species in the vicinity of the G and L impact sites. Data were obtained on July 18, roughly 3 hr after the G impact, on August 9, and on August 23. All spectra clearly show signatures of aerosols and gaseous CS2and NH3. The spectra obtained on July 18 also show the spectral signature of H2S. To determine the abundance of gases and aerosols we compare the observations with calculations based on the scattering properties of three-layer models for the atmosphere. We are able to fit the aerosol-dominated portions of the spectra with aerosol distributions similar to those derived from HST imaging observations by Westet al.(Science,267, 1296-1301, 1995). On all three dates we find that CS2resides at lower pressures than H2S, NH3, and the bulk of the aerosols. The CS2column abundance is approximately 10-7g-cm-2on July 18, a factor of 2-3 less on August 9, and another factor of 2 less on August 23. NH3is confined to pressures greater than 5 mbar with a mole fraction of 1 × 10-7on July 18 and August 9, decreasing to 3 × 10-8on August 23. H2S is also confined to pressures greater than 5 mbar with a mole fraction of 5 × 10-8on July 18. These mole fractions depend upon assumptions about the aerosol distribution and are derived from models with an aerosol column density of 2 × 109cm-2.Using different aerosol models, it is possible to obtain adequate fits to the spectra with mole fractions of H2S and NH3that are 2.5 and 7.5 times smaller. The spectra show no evidence for SO2absorption and we derive an upper limit of 10-7g-cm-2for the July 18 spectrum, assuming that SO2has the same altitude distribution as CS2. Using the same assumptions we derive upper limits of 10-6and 3 × 10-8for OCS and SO. There is no compelling evidence for either H2O or C2H2but both can be tolerated with

  20. Observing coronal nanoflares in active region moss

    OpenAIRE

    Testa, Paola; De Pontieu, Bart; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; DeLuca, Ed; Hansteen, Viggo; Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Golub, Leon; Kobayashi, Ken; Korreck, Kelly; Kuzin, Sergey; Walsh, Robert; DeForest, Craig; Title, Alan; Weber, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) has provided Fe XII 193A images of the upper transition region moss at an unprecedented spatial (~0.3-0.4 arcsec) and temporal (5.5s) resolution. The Hi-C observations show in some moss regions variability on timescales down to ~15s, significantly shorter than the minute scale variability typically found in previous observations of moss, therefore challenging the conclusion of moss being heated in a mostly steady manner. These rapid variability moss r...

  1. Global Observations of the 630-nm Nightglow and Patterns of Brightness Measured by ISUAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Yu Chiang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the distributions and occurrence mechanisms of the global local-midnight airglow brightness through FORMOSAT-2/ISUAL satellite imaging observations. We focus on the OI 630.0 nm nightglow emission at altitudes of ~250 km along equatorial space. The database used in this study included data from 2007 to 2008 under solar minimum conditions. The data were classified into four specified types in the statistical study. We found that the occurrence of equatorial brightness was often in the vicinity of the geographic equator and mostly at equinoxes with a tendency to move toward the summer hemisphere as the season changes. Conjugate brightness occurring simultaneously on both sides of the geomagnetic equator was observed predominantly in the northern winter. Furthermore, midnight brightness appeared to have lower luminosity from May to July. We suggest that the global midnight brightness associated with the locations and seasons was the result of several effects which include the influence of the thermospheric midnight temperature maximum (MTM, summer-to-winter neutral wind, and ionospheric anomalies.

  2. Regional and local new particle formation events observed in the Yangtze River Delta region, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Liang; Wang, Honglei; Zhou, Luyu; An, Junlin; Tang, Lili; Lu, Chunsong; Yan, Wenlian; Liu, Ruiyang; Kong, Shaofei; Chen, Mindong; Lee, Shanhu; Yu, Huan

    2017-02-01

    To study the spatial inhomogeneity of new particle formation (NPF) in the polluted atmosphere of China, we conducted simultaneous measurements at an urban site near a petrochemical industrial area and a regional background site in the Yangtze River Delta region from September to November 2015. At the urban site we observed a type of local NPF event (number of events: n = 5), in which nucleation was limited to a small area but persisted for 6.8 h on average during the daytime. Formation rates of 5 nm particles (J5) were found to be correlated positively with the H2SO4 proxy (log J5 versus log[H2SO4] slope near 1) in both local and regional events. Furthermore, J5 was enhanced by the anthropogenic volatile organic carbon (VOC) plumes from nearby industrial area in the local events compared to the regional events. Size-dependent aerosol dynamics calculation showed that in comparison with the observed regional events, the local events were featured with high nucleation rate (J1.3 > 1000 cm-3 s-1), high growth rate of sub-3 nm particles (GRsub-3 > 20 nm h-1), and high number concentration of nucleation mode particles (mean peak N5-20: 6 × 104 cm-3). Considering these features, the local NPF events of anthropogenic origin may also be an important contributor to cloud condensation nuclei concentrations in urban and regional scales. In addition, the comparison of simultaneous regional NPF events between the two sites (number of events: n = 7) suggested that regional NPF intensity may be underestimated by the single-point measurement at an urban site, due to the heterogeneity of air masses.

  3. OBSERVING CORONAL NANOFLARES IN ACTIVE REGION MOSS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Testa, Paola; DeLuca, Ed; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Weber, Mark [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden street, MS 58, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); De Pontieu, Bart; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; Title, Alan [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab, Org. A021S, Bldg. 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Hansteen, Viggo [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Kobayashi, Ken [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ZP 13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Kuzin, Sergey [P. N. Lebedev Physical institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii prospekt, 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Walsh, Robert [University of Central Lancashire, Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); DeForest, Craig, E-mail: ptesta@cfa.harvard.edu [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States)

    2013-06-10

    The High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) has provided Fe XII 193A images of the upper transition region moss at an unprecedented spatial ({approx}0.''3-0.''4) and temporal (5.5 s) resolution. The Hi-C observations show in some moss regions variability on timescales down to {approx}15 s, significantly shorter than the minute-scale variability typically found in previous observations of moss, therefore challenging the conclusion of moss being heated in a mostly steady manner. These rapid variability moss regions are located at the footpoints of bright hot coronal loops observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in the 94 A channel, and by the Hinode/X-Ray Telescope. The configuration of these loops is highly dynamic, and suggestive of slipping reconnection. We interpret these events as signatures of heating events associated with reconnection occurring in the overlying hot coronal loops, i.e., coronal nanoflares. We estimate the order of magnitude of the energy in these events to be of at least a few 10{sup 23} erg, also supporting the nanoflare scenario. These Hi-C observations suggest that future observations at comparable high spatial and temporal resolution, with more extensive temperature coverage, are required to determine the exact characteristics of the heating mechanism(s).

  4. Semiconductor lasers with a continuous tuning range above 100 nm in the nearest IR spectral region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostin, Yu O; Lobintsov, A A; Shramenko, M V [OOO ' Opton' , Moscow (Russian Federation); Ladugin, M A; Marmalyuk, A A [Open Joint-Stock Company M.F. Stel' makh Polyus Research Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Chamorovsky, A Yu [Superlum Ltd., Unit B3, Fota Point Enterprise Park, Carrigtwohill, Co Cork (Ireland); Yakubovich, S D [Moscow State Institute of Radio-Engineering, Electronics and Automation (Technical University), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-31

    We have developed two new types of lasers based on quantum-confined semiconductor optical amplifiers with an acousto-optic tunable filter in an external fibre ring cavity. The lasers offer continuous wavelength tuning ranges from 780 to 885 and from 880 to 1010 nm, 20 mW of cw output power, and a tuning rate up to 10{sup 4} nm s{sup -1} at an instantaneous spectral linewidth less than 0.1 nm. (lasers)

  5. Photolysis of NO2 at multiple wavelengths in the spectral region 200-205 nm - A velocity map imaging study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coroiu, A.M.; Parker, D.H.; Groenenboom, G.C.; Barr, J.; Novalbos, I.T.; Whitaker, B.J.

    2006-01-01

    A study of the photodissociation dynamics of NO2 in the 200-205 nm region using resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) in conjunction with the velocity map imaging technique is presented. We chose this region because it allowed the use of a single laser to photodissociate the NO2 molecule

  6. Observing coronal nanoflares in active region moss

    CERN Document Server

    Testa, Paola; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; DeLuca, Ed; Hansteen, Viggo; Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Golub, Leon; Kobayashi, Ken; Korreck, Kelly; Kuzin, Sergey; Walsh, Robert; DeForest, Craig; Title, Alan; Weber, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) has provided Fe XII 193A images of the upper transition region moss at an unprecedented spatial (~0.3-0.4 arcsec) and temporal (5.5s) resolution. The Hi-C observations show in some moss regions variability on timescales down to ~15s, significantly shorter than the minute scale variability typically found in previous observations of moss, therefore challenging the conclusion of moss being heated in a mostly steady manner. These rapid variability moss regions are located at the footpoints of bright hot coronal loops observed by SDO/AIA in the 94A channel, and by Hinode/XRT. The configuration of these loops is highly dynamic, and suggestive of slipping reconnection. We interpret these events as signatures of heating events associated with reconnection occurring in the overlying hot coronal loops, i.e., coronal nanoflares. We estimate the order of magnitude of the energy in these events to be of at least a few $10^{23}rg, also supporting the nanoflare scenario. These Hi-C...

  7. Electronic Bands of ScC in the Region 620 - 720 NM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chiao-Wei; Merer, Anthony; Hsu, Yen-Chu

    2016-06-01

    ScC molecules have been observed by laser-induced fluorescence, following the reaction of laser-ablated scandium metal with acetylene under supersonic jet-cooled conditions. Rotational analyses have been carried out for about 40 bands of Sc{}12C and Sc{}13C in the region 14000 - 16000 cm-1. Two lower states are found, with Ω = 3/2 and 5/2, indicating that the ground state is ^4Π_i or ^2Δ. As yet we cannot distinguish between these alternatives, but note that the ground state of the isoelectronic YC molecule is ^4Π_i. The ground state bond length in ScC is 1.95{}_5 Å, and the vibrational frequency is 712 cm-1. At least eight electronic transitions occur in the region studied, the majority obeying the selection rule ΔΩ = +1. Rotational perturbations are widespread, consistent with a high density of excited electronic states. B. Simard, P.A. Hackett and W.J. Balfour, Chem. Phys. Lett., 230, 103 (1994).

  8. Observation of the 717 nm electric quadrupole transition in triply charged thorium

    CERN Document Server

    Radnaev, A G; Kuzmich, A

    2012-01-01

    We excite the 717 nm electric quadrupole 6$D_{3/2} $ $\\leftrightarrow$ 7$S_{1/2}$ transition in a laser-cooled $^{232}$Th$^{3+}$ ion crystal. The transition frequency and the lifetime of the metastable 7$S_{1/2}$ level are measured to be 417 845 964(30) MHz and 0.60(7) s, respectively. We subsequently employ the 7$S_{1/2}$ level to drive the ions with nanosecond-long 269 nm laser pulses into the 7$P_{1/2}$ level. The latter is connected to the 7$S_{1/2}$ electronic level within the $^{229}$Th nuclear isomer manifold by the strongest available electron-bridge transition, forming a basis for its laser excitation.

  9. UV spectroscopy of Titan's atmosphere, planetary organic chemistry and prebiological synthesis. II - Interpretation of new IUE observations in the 220-335 nm range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtin, Regis; Wagener, Richard; Mckay, Christopher P.; Caldwell, John; Fricke, Karl-Heinrich

    1991-01-01

    The theoretical model developed by McKay et al. (1989) to characterize the size distribution, thermal structure, and chemical composition of the stratospheric haze of Titan is applied to new 220-335-nm albedo measurements obtained with the long-wavelength prime camera of the IUE during August 1987. Data and model predictions are presented in extensive graphs and discussed in detail. It is shown that a simple model with particles of one size at a given altitude does not accurately reproduce the observed features in all spectral regions, but that good general agreement is obtained using a model with a uniformly mixed layer at 150-600 km and a bimodal distribution of small 'polymer' haze particles (radius less than 20 nm) and larger haze particles (radius 100-500 nm). The number densities implied by this model require, however, a mechanism such as electrostatic charging or reaction kinetics to inhibit coagulation of the smaller particles.

  10. First observation of self-amplified spontaneous emission in a free-electron laser at 109 nm wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldin; Sandner; Sanok; Schlarb; Schmidt; Schmuser; Schneider; Schneidmiller; Schreiber; Schreiber; Schutt; Sekutowicz; Serafini; Sertore; Setzer; Simrock; Sonntag; Sparr; Stephan; Sytchev; Tazzari; Tazzioli; Tigner; Timm; Tonutti; Trakhtenberg

    2000-10-30

    We present the first observation of self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) in a free-electron laser (FEL) in the vacuum ultraviolet regime at 109 nm wavelength (11 eV). The observed free-electron laser gain (approximately 3000) and the radiation characteristics, such as dependency on bunch charge, angular distribution, spectral width, and intensity fluctuations, are all consistent with the present models for SASE FELs.

  11. Observation of the 1154.9 nm transition of antiprotonic helium

    CERN Document Server

    Kobayashi, Takumi; Hayano, Ryugo; Murakami, Yohei; Todoroki, Koichi; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Dax, Andreas; Venturelli, Luca; Zurlo, Nicola; Horvath, Dezso; Aghai-Khozani, Hossein; Soter, Anna; Hori, Masaki

    2013-01-01

    The resonance transition $(n,l)=(40,36)\\to(41,35)$ of the antiprotonic helium ($\\overline{\\mathrm{p}}^{4}$He$^{+}$) isotope at a wavelength of 1154.9 nm was detected by laser spectroscopy. The population of $\\overline{\\mathrm{p}}^{4}$He$^{+}$ occupying the resonance parent state $(40,36)$ was found to decay at a rate of $0.45\\pm0.04$ $\\mu$s$^{-1}$, which agreed with the theoretical radiative rate of this state. This implied that very few long-lived $\\overline{\\mathrm{p}}^{4}$He$^{+}$ are formed in the higher-lying states with principal quantum number $n\\ge41$, in agreement with the results of previous experiments.

  12. Three spacecraft observe Jupiter's glowing polar regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-09-01

    also privileged to be the last observer with IUE" says Rene Prang of Orsay, France, who was in charge of the Jupiter programme. "At the end it provided us wit 800 observations of Jupiter, so it was still doing important work at the leading edge of planetary astronomy and space research". Created jointly by NASA, the UK government and ESA, IUE was supposed to last for three years, when it was launched on 26 January 1978. Instead, the 700-kilogram spacecraft went on supplying astronomers with ultraviolet spectroscopic information available from no other spacecraft until the launch of the Hubble Space Telescope in 1990. As the only space observatory offering them a hands-on mode of operation, at ESA's ground station at Villafranca near Madrid, IUE was a favourite with astronomers. An astounding total of 114,000 individual observations of planets, stars, galaxies and quasars assures the spacecraft a cherished place in the history of astronomy. IUE supplied the bedrock ultraviolet data on top events during its lifetime. These included the apparition of Halley's Comet in 1986. At the comet's approach in September 1985, IUE detected the ultraviolet signature of water molecules, and regular observations thereafter showed that the comet shed 300 million tonnes of water during its visit to the Sun's vicinity. With the explosion of a star in the Large Magellan Cloud, as Supernova 1987A, IUE was trained instantly on the scene. Comparisons with previous IUE observations of the same region revealed exactly which star had blown up. The characteristic emissions of chemical elements flung into space by the explosion were also identified, IUE's detection of a delayed light echo, from a ring of dust surrounding the defunct star, later enabled the Hubble Space Telescope to measure the distance to Supernova 1987A precisely. Eruptions in the nuclei of active galaxies were a prominent theme in IUE's work throughout its lifetime. Intensive studies of selected galaxies, sometimes in concert

  13. Locating the Polar Cap Boundary of Postnoon Sector from Observations of 630.0 nm Auroral Emission at Zhongshan Station

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    We studied the ground observations of 630. 0 nm auroral emission at Zhongshan Station to de-termine the polar cap boundary with the latitudinal profile of emission intensity. The open-closed field lineboundary is assumed to lie at the boundary between polar rain and plasma sheet precipitation. We assumethat nonprecipitation-dependent sources of 630. 0 nm emission cause a spatially uniform luminosity in thepolar cap and that auroral zone luminosity is also spatially uniform. Therefore we determine the locationof the polar cap boundary of postnoon sector from the auroral emission data each time by finding the bestfit of the observations to a step function in latitude and we produce a time series of the location of the polarcap boundary. The average error of the practice in the paper is less than 0. 8 degree.

  14. A upper limit for water dimer absorption in the 750 nm spectral region and a revised water line list

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. L. Shillings

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The absorption of solar radiation by water dimer molecules in the Earth's atmosphere can potentially act as a positive feedback effect for climate change. There seems little doubt from the results of previous laboratory and theoretical studies that significant concentrations of the water dimer should be present in the atmosphere, yet attempts to detect water dimer absorption signatures in atmospheric field studies have so far yielded inconclusive results. Here we report spectral measurements in the near-infrared in the expected region of the third overtone of the water dimer hydrogen-bonded OHb stretching vibration around 750 nm. The results were obtained using broadband cavity ringdown spectroscopy (BBCRDS, a methodology that allows absorption measurements to be made under controlled laboratory conditions but over absorption path lengths representative of atmospheric conditions. In order to account correctly and completely for overlapping absorption of monomer molecules in the same spectral region, we have also constructed a new list of spectral data (UCL08 for the water monomer in the 750–20 000 cm−1 (13 μm–500 nm range.

    Our results show that the additional lines included in the UCL08 spectral database provide a substantially improved representation of the measured water monomer absorption in the 750 nm region, particularly at wavelengths dominated by weak monomer absorption features. No absorption features which could not be attributed to the water monomer were detected in the BBCRDS experiments up to water mixing ratios more than an order of magnitude greater than those in the ambient atmosphere. The absence of detectable water dimer features leads us to conclude that, in the absence of significant errors in calculated dimer oscillator strengths or monomer/dimer equilibrium constants, the widths of water dimer features present around 750 nm must be substantially greater (~100 cm−1 HWHM than

  15. Aerosol Optical Depth measurements at 340 nm with a Brewer spectrophotometer and comparison with Cimel sunphotometer observations at Uccle, Belgium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. De Bock

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The Langley Plot Method (LPM is adapted for the retrieval of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD values at 340 nm from Brewer#178 sun scan measurements between 335 and 345 nm (convoluted with the band pass function of the Cimel sunphotometer filter at 340 nm performed in Uccle, Belgium. The use of sun scans instead of direct sun measurements simplifies the comparison of the AOD values with quasi-simultaneous Cimel sunphotometer values. Also, the irradiance at 340 nm is larger than the one at 320.1 nm due to lower ozone absorption, thus improving the signal to noise ratio. For the selection of the cloudless days (from now on referred to as calibration quality clear days, a new set of criteria is proposed. With the adapted method, individual clear sky AOD values, for which the selection criteria are also presented in this article, are calculated for a period from September 2006 until the end of August 2010. These values are then compared to quasi-simultaneous Cimel sunphotometer measurements, showing a very good agreement (the correlation coefficient, the slope and the intercept of the regression line are respectively 0.974, 0.968 and 0.011, which proves that good quality observations can be obtained from Brewer sun scan measurements at 340 nm. The analysis of the monthly and seasonal Brewer AODs at Uccle is consistent with studies at other sites reporting on the seasonal variation of AODs in Europe. The highest values can be observed in summer and spring, whereas more than 50% of the winter AODs are lower than 0.3. On a monthly scale, the lowest AOD are observed in December and the highest values occur in June and April. No clear weekly cycle is observed for Uccle. The current cloud-screening algorithm is still an issue, which means that some AOD values can still be influenced by scattered clouds. This effect can be seen when comparing the calculated monthly mean values of the Brewer with the AERONET measurements.

  16. Optical emission from a small scale model electric arc furnace in 250-600 nm region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkinen, A; Niskanen, J; Tikkala, H; Aksela, H

    2013-04-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy has been for long proposed for monitoring and studying industrial steel making processes. Whereas the radiative decay of thermal excitations is always taking place in high temperatures needed in steel production, one of the most promising environment for such studies are electric arc furnaces, creating plasma in excited electronic states that relax with intense characteristic emission in the optical regime. Unfortunately, large industrial scale electric arc furnaces also present a challenging environment for optical emission studies and application of the method is not straightforward. To study the usability of optical emission spectroscopy in real electric arc furnaces, we have developed a laboratory scale DC electric arc furnace presented in this paper. With the setup, optical emission spectra of Fe, Cr, Cr2O3, Ni, SiO2, Al2O3, CaO, and MgO were recorded in the wavelength range 250-600 nm and the results were analyzed with the help of reference data. The work demonstrates that using characteristic optical emission, obtaining in situ chemical information from oscillating plasma of electric arc furnaces is indeed possible. In spite of complications, the method could possibly be applied to industrial scale steel making process in order to improve its efficiency.

  17. High Power 940 nm Al-free Active Region Laser Diodes and Bars with a Broad Waveguide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Gaozhan; XIAO Jianwei; MA Xiaoyu; XU Zuntu; ZHANG Jinming; TAN Manqing; LIU Zongshun; LIU Suping; FENG Xiaoming

    2002-01-01

    The 940 nm Al-free active region laser diodes and bars with a broad waveguide were designed and fabricated. The stuctures were grown by metal organic chemical vapour deposition. The devices show excellent performances. The maximum output power of 6.7 W in the 100 μm broad-area laser diodes has been measured, and is 2.5 times higher than that in the Al-containing active region laser diodes with a narrow waveguide and 1.7 times higher than that in Al-free active region laser diodes with a narrow waveguide. The 19% fill-factor laser diode bars emit 33 W, and they can operate at 15W with low degradation rates.

  18. Water-vapor line broadening and shifting by air, nitrogen, oxygen, and argon in the 720-nm wavelength region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, Benoist E.; Browell, Edward V.

    1989-01-01

    High-resolution spectroscopic measurements of H2O vapor in the 720-nm wavelength region were conducted to investigate the broadening and shifting of H2O lines by air, nitrogen, oxygen, and argon over a wide range of pressures and temperatures. For each of the buffer gases under study, a linear relationship was found between the widths and the shifts, with the broader lines having the smaller pressure shifts. The pressure shifts measured compared favorably with theoretical values reported by Bykov et al. (1988). The temperature-dependence exponents for air-broadening were found to be J-dependent, with the lower-J lines having the higher exponents.

  19. Deep green emission at 570nm from InGaN/GaN MQW active region grown on bulk AlN substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahedipour-Sandvik, F.; Grandusky, J. R.; Jamil, M.; Jindal, V.; Schujman, S. B.; Schowalter, L. J.; Liu, R.; Ponce, F. A.; Cheung, M.; Cartwright, A.

    2005-09-01

    Relatively intense deep-green/yellow photoluminescence emission at ~600 nm is observed for InGaN/GaN multi quantum well (MQW) structures grown on bulk AlN substrates, demonstrating the potential to extend commercial III-Nitride LED technology to longer wavelengths. Optical spectroscopy has been performed on InGaN MQWs with an estimated In concentration of greater than 50% grown by metalorganic chemical vapor phase epitaxy at 750oC. Temperature- and power-dependence, time-resolved photoluminescence as well as spatially resolved cathodoluminescence measurements and transmission electron microscopy have been applied to understand and elucidate the nature of the mechanism responsible for radiative recombination at 600nm as well as higher energy emission band observed in the samples. A comparison between samples grown on bulk AlN and sapphire substrates indicate a lower degree of compositional and/or thickness fluctuation in the latter case. Our results indicate the presence of alloy compositional fluctuation in the active region despite the lower strain expected in the structure contrary to that of low In composition active regions deposited on bulk GaN substrates. Transient photoluminescence measurements signify a stretched exponential followed by a power decay to best fit the luminescence decay indicative of carrier hopping in the active region. Our results point to the fact that at such high In composition (>30%) InGaN compositional fluctuation is still a dominant effect despite lower strain at the substrate-epi interface.

  20. Observation of ferroelectricity at room temperature in ~1 nm thick conducting BaTiO3-δ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungran; Baasanforj, L.; Chang, Jungwon; Hwang, Inwoong; Kim, Jungrae; Shim, Seungbo; Song, Jonghyun; Kim, Jinhee

    Efforts to search for new and multi-functionalities in thin-film systems have led important findings of unknown phenomena and functionality which do not appear in bulk systems. As film growth technique is advanced, one can decrease the film thickness even thinner down to ~ nm, its unique physical properties are still appearing. For example, the superconducting metallic state of an LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (LAO/STO) heterostructure was found where LAO is about 3-4 unit cells (uc). An SrRuO3 film exhibited its ferromagnetic metallicity down to 4-6 uc; a few years later, its ferromagnetism was found to be disappeared at 2-3 uc. Meanwhile, theoretical methods have predicted existence of ferroelectrical properties mostly in prototype ferroelectric BaTiO3 (BTO): 3-6 uc. However, experimental verification to find such predicted thickness was hindered by large leakage current. Here we observed that ~1 nm-thick conducting BTO fillms show ferroelectric switching at room temperature (RT), and BTO films are fully-strained on LAO/STO heterostructures thicker than 5 nm thickness. Our experimental results will enlarge applicable functional oxide devices for future applications.

  1. An upper limit for water dimer absorption in the 750 nm spectral region and a revised water line list

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. L. Shillings

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Absorption of solar radiation by water dimer molecules in the Earth's atmosphere has the potential to act as a positive feedback effect for climate change. There seems little doubt from the results of previous laboratory and theoretical studies that significant concentrations of the water dimer should be present in the atmosphere, yet attempts to detect water dimer absorption signatures in atmospheric field studies have so far yielded inconclusive results. Here we report spectral measurements in the near-infrared around 750 nm in the expected region of the | 0〈f | 4〉b|0 〉 overtone of the water dimer's hydrogen-bonded OH stretching vibration. The results were obtained using broadband cavity ringdown spectroscopy (BBCRDS, a methodology that allows absorption measurements to be made under controlled laboratory conditions but over absorption path lengths representative of atmospheric conditions. In order to account correctly and completely for the overlapping absorption of monomer molecules in the same spectral region, we have also constructed a new list of spectral data (UCL08 for the water monomer in the 750–20 000 cm−1 (13 μm–500 nm range.

    Our results show that the additional lines included in the UCL08 spectral database provide an improved representation of the measured water monomer absorption in the 750 nm region. No absorption features other than those attributable to the water monomer were detected in BBCRDS experiments performed on water vapour samples containing dimer concentrations up to an order of magnitude greater than expected in the ambient atmosphere. The absence of detectable water dimer features leads us to conclude that, in the absence of significant errors in calculated dimer oscillator strengths or monomer/dimer equilibrium constants, the widths of any water dimer absorption features present around 750 nm are of the order of 100 cm−1 HWHM, and certainly greater

  2. Regional gravity field modelling from GOCE observables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitoňák, Martin; Šprlák, Michal; Novák, Pavel; Tenzer, Robert

    2017-01-01

    In this article we discuss a regional recovery of gravity disturbances at the mean geocentric sphere approximating the Earth over the area of Central Europe from satellite gravitational gradients. For this purpose, we derive integral formulas which allow converting the gravity disturbances onto the disturbing gravitational gradients in the local north-oriented frame (LNOF). The derived formulas are free of singularities in case of r ≠ R . We then investigate three numerical approaches for solving their inverses. In the initial approach, the integral formulas are firstly modified for solving individually the near- and distant-zone contributions. While the effect of the near-zone gravitational gradients is solved as an inverse problem, the effect of the distant-zone gravitational gradients is computed by numerical integration from the global gravitational model (GGM) TIM-r4. In the second approach, we further elaborate the first scenario by reducing measured gravitational gradients for gravitational effects of topographic masses. In the third approach, we apply additional modification by reducing gravitational gradients for the reference GGM. In all approaches we determine the gravity disturbances from each of the four accurately measured gravitational gradients separately as well as from their combination. Our regional gravitational field solutions are based on the GOCE EGG_TRF_2 gravitational gradients collected within the period from November 1 2009 until January 11 2010. Obtained results are compared with EGM2008, DIR-r1, TIM-r1 and SPW-r1. The best fit, in terms of RMS (2.9 mGal), is achieved for EGM2008 while using the third approach which combine all four well-measured gravitational gradients. This is explained by the fact that a-priori information about the Earth's gravitational field up to the degree and order 180 was used.

  3. Observations of Transient Active Region Heating with Hinode

    OpenAIRE

    Warren, Harry P.; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Brooks, David H.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Williams, David R.; Harra, Hirohisa

    2007-01-01

    We present observations of transient active region heating events observed with the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and X-ray Telescope (XRT) on Hinode. This initial investigation focuses on NOAA active region 10940 as observed by Hinode on February 1, 2007 between 12 and 19 UT. In these observations we find numerous examples of transient heating events within the active region. The high spatial resolution and broad temperature coverage of these instruments allows us to track t...

  4. Can a regional climate model reproduce observed extreme temperatures?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter F. Craigmile

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Using output from a regional Swedish climate model and observations from the Swedish synoptic observational network, we compare seasonal minimum temperatures from model output and observations using marginal extreme value modeling techniques. We make seasonal comparisons using generalized extreme value models and empirically estimate the shift in the distribution as a function of the regional climate model values, using the Doksum shift function. Spatial and temporal comparisons over south central Sweden are made by building hierarchical Bayesian generalized extreme value models for the observed minima and regional climate model output. Generally speaking the regional model is surprisingly well calibrated for minimum temperatures. We do detect a problem in the regional model to produce minimum temperatures close to 0◦C. The seasonal spatial effects are quite similar between data and regional model. The observations indicate relatively strong warming, especially in the northern region. This signal is present in the regional model, but is not as strong.

  5. The oxygen red OI 630.0 nm line nightglow intensity as an indicator of atmospheric waves propagation in the mid-latitude ionosphere F2 region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javakhishvili, Giorgi; Didebulidze, Goderdzi; Gudadze, Nikoloz; Toriashvili, Lexo

    2016-04-01

    The behavior of the oxygen red OI 630.0 nm line nightglow intensity under influence of atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs) is considered, taking into account nightly changes of the thermosphere meridional wind by observations from Abastumani (41.75 N; 42.82 E). The vortical type perturbations, which can be in situ excited, are also considered. On the basis of theoretical model, the 630.0 nm line integral intensity variations are estimated taking into account thermosphere wind field changes and atmospheric waves propagation influence on the nighttime ionosphere F2 layer. A possibility of identification of waves propagation from polar and equatorial regions during various helio-geophysical conditions is noted. The cases of detected large scale traveling ionosphere disturbances -TIDs (mostly generated in the polar regions) and traveling atmospheric disturbances -TADs (which can be generated both in polar and equatorial regions) are demonstrated. Acknowledgements: This work has been supported by Shota Rustaveli National Science Foundation Grant no. 31/56.

  6. Absolute absorption cross sections of ozone at 300 K, 228 K and 195 K in the wavelength region 185-240 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, K.; Parkinson, W. H.; Freeman, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    An account is given of progress of work on absorption cross section measurements of ozone at 300 K, 228 K and 195 K in the wavelength region 185-240 nm. In this wavelength region, the penetration of solar radiation into the Earth's atmosphere is controlled by O2 and O3. The transmitted radiation is available to dissociate trace species such as halocarbons and nitrous oxide. We have recently measured absolute absorption cross sections of O3 in the wavelength region 240-350 nm (Freeman et al., 1985; Yoshino et al., 1988). We apply these proven techniques to the determination of the absorption cross section of O3 at 300 K, 228 K and 195 K throughout the wavelength region 185-240 nm. A paper titled 'Absolute Absorption Cross Section Measurements of Ozone in the Wavelength Region 185-254 nm and the Temperature Dependence' has been submitted for publication in the Journal of Geophysical Research.

  7. Development of a passive doas system to retrieve atmospheric pollution columns in the 200 to 355 nm region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mejía Rubén Galicia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In recent years several techniques have been developed to measure and monitor the pollution of the air. Among these techniques, remote sensing using optical methods stands out due to several advantages for air quality control applications. A Passive Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy system that uses the ultraviolet region from 200 to 355 nm of the solar radiation is presented. The developed system is portable; therefore it is practical for real time and in situ measurements. The enhanced wavelength range of the system is intended to detect the ultraviolet light penetration in the Mexican Valley considering the solar zenith angle and the altitude. The system was applied to retrieve atmospheric SO2 columns emitted either by anthropogenic (power plant or natural sources (volcano, reaching a detection limit of about 1 ppm. The measurement of the penetrating solar radiation on the earth surface at the UVC range is presented and the possibility to measure pollution traces of some contaminants as O3, NO2 and aromatic compounds in real time and in situ in the ultraviolet region is discussed.

  8. Development of a Passive Doas System to Retrieve Atmospheric Pollution Columns in the 200 to 355 nm Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Galicia Mejía

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years several techniques have been developed to measure and monitor the pollution of the air. Among these techniques, remote sensing using optical methods stands out due to several advantages for air quality control applications. A Passive Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy system that uses the ultraviolet region from 200 to 355 nm of the solar radiation is presented. The developed system is portable; therefore it is practical for real time and in situ measurements. The enhanced wavelength range of the system is intended to detect the ultraviolet light penetration in the Mexican Valley considering the solar zenith angle and the altitude. The system was applied to retrieve atmospheric SO2 columns emitted either by anthropogenic (power plant or natural sources (volcano, reaching a detection limit of about 1 ppm. The measurement of the penetrating solar radiation on the earth surface at the UVC range is presented and the possibility to measure pollution traces of some contaminants as O3, NO2 and aromatic compounds in real time and in situ in the ultraviolet region is discussed.

  9. WSRT observations of the Hubble Deep Field region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garrett, MA; de Bruyn, AG; Giroletti, M; Baan, WA; Schilizzi, RT

    We present deep WSRT 1.4 GHz observations of the Hubble Deep Field region. At the 5 sigma level, the WSRT clearly detects 85 regions of radio emission in a 10' x 10' field centred on the HDF Eight of these regions fall within the HDF itself, four of these are sources that have not previously been

  10. Laser diodes with several emitting regions ({lambda} = 800-1100 nm) on the basis of epitaxially integrated heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marmalyuk, A. A., E-mail: A.Marmalyuk@siplus.ru; Davydova, E. I.; Zverkov, M. V.; Konyaev, V. P.; Krichevsky, V. V.; Ladugin, M. A.; Lebedeva, E. I.; Petrov, S. V.; Sapozhnikov, S. M.; Simakov, V. A.; Uspenskiy, M. B.; Yarotskaya, I. V. [Stel' makh Research and Development Institute ' Polyus' (Russian Federation); Pikhtin, N. A.; Tarasov, I. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2011-04-15

    The results of a series of studies concerned with formation of epitaxially integrated InGaAs/AlGaAs and AlGaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures with several emitting regions and with investigation of properties of laser diodes based on the above structures operating in the spectral ranges {lambda} = 800-810, 890-910, and 1040-1060 nm are summarized. It is shown that the suggested approach to integration of individual laser structures by the method of the MOVPE epitaxy operates efficiently in fabrication of laser diodes for a wide spectral range on the basis of various types of heterostructures. This approach made it possible to efficiently increase the output power of the laser diodes practically without variation in their mass-and-dimension characteristics. The main advantages of this approach and its limitations are outlined. Epitaxial integration of two laser heterostructures made it possible to increase the differential quantum efficiency by 1.7-2.0 times, while integration of three laser heterostructures increases the differential quantum efficiency by a factor of 2.5-3.0.

  11. Optical Observation of Oxygen Ion Upflow in the Cusp/Cleft Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, S.; Yamazaki, A.; Yoshikawa, I.; Takizawa, Y.; Ogawa, Y.; Miyake, W.; Nakamura, M.

    2002-12-01

    We built the Extreme ultraviolet scanner (XUV) for imaging oxygen ions to outflow from the polar ionosphere into the magnetosphere. The XUV onboard a sounding rocket SS-520-2 imaged the oxygen ions above 1000 km altitude near the polar cusp on December 4, 2000. The XUV is a normal incidence telescope that has a peak sensitivity at the wavelength 83.4 nm of OII emission and consists of a Mo coated mirror, a band pass filter and a channel electron multiplier. The band pass filter selectively transmits OII emission and eliminates background emissions such as HeI emission at the 30.4 nm, HeII emission at the 58.4 nm, and HI emission at the 121.6 nm. The observed OII emission intensity is proportional to the ion density integrated along the line of sight. Therefore the observed OII emission intensity distribution makes possible to determine the oxygen ion distribution. After 0928UT, the sudden increase in the OII emission intensity was observed from the cusp region identified by the radar observation. In this presentation, we will discuss the cause of the sudden increase in the OII emission intensity in comparison with the result of ground-based observations.

  12. Observation of enhanced ozone in an electrically active storm over Socorro, NM: Implications for ozone production from corona discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minschwaner, K.; Kalnajs, L. E.; Dubey, M. K.; Avallone, L. M.; Sawaengphokai, P. C.; Edens, H. E.; Winn, W. P.

    2008-09-01

    Enhancements in ozone were observed between about 3 and 10 km altitude within an electrically active storm in central New Mexico. Measurements from satellite sensors and ground-based radar show cloud top pressures between 300 and 150 mb in the vicinity of an ozonesonde launched from Socorro, NM, and heavy precipitation with radar reflectivities exceeding 50 dBZ. Data from a lightning mapping array and a surface electric field mill show a large amount of electrical activity within this thunderstorm. The observed ozone enhancements are large (50% above the mean) and could have resulted from a number of possible processes, including the advection of polluted air from the urban environments of El Paso and Juarez, photochemical production by lightning-generated NOx from aged thunderstorm outflow, downward mixing of stratospheric air, or local production from within the thunderstorm. We find that a large fraction of the ozone enhancement is consistent with local production from corona discharges, either from cloud particles or by corona associated with lightning. The implied global source of ozone from thunderstorm corona discharge is estimated to be 110 Tg O3 a-1 with a range between 40 and 180 Tg O3 a-1. This value is about 21% as large as the estimated ozone production rate from lightning NOx, and about 3% as large as the total chemical production rate of tropospheric ozone. Thus while the estimated corona-induced production of ozone may be significant on local scales, it is unlikely to be as important to the global ozone budget as other sources.

  13. Evaluation of a flat-field grazing incidence spectrometer for highly charged ion plasma emission in soft x-ray spectral region from 1 to 10 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Thanh Hung; Kondo, Yoshiki; Tamura, Toshiki; Ono, Yuichi; Hara, Hiroyuki; Oikawa, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Yoichi; Ishino, Masahiko; Nishikino, Masaharu; Makimura, Tetsuya; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Ohta, Shigeru; Kitano, Ken; Ejima, Takeo; Tadashi, Hatano; Higashiguchi, Takeshi

    2016-12-01

    A flat-field grazing incidence spectrometer operating on the spectral region from 1 to 10 nm was built for research on physics of high temperature and high energy density plasmas. It consists of a flat-field grating with 2400 lines/mm as a dispersing element and an x-ray charged coupled device (CCD) camera as the detector. The diffraction efficiency of the grating and the sensitivity of the CCD camera were directly measured by use of synchrotron radiation at the BL-11D beamline of the Photon Factory (PF). The influence of contamination to the spectrometer also was characterized. This result enables us to evaluate the absolute number of photons in a wide range wavelength between 1 and 10 nm within an acquisition. We obtained absolutely calibrated spectra from highly charged ion plasmas of Gd, from which a maximum energy conversion efficiency of 0.26% was observed at a Nd:YAG laser intensity of 3 × 1012 W/cm2.

  14. Western Pond Turtle Observations - Region 1 [ds313

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This dataset was developed in an effort to compile Western Pond Turtle (Clemmys marmorata) observations in CDFG Region 1. Steve Burton (CDFG Staff Environmental...

  15. Relationship between shelf-life and optical properties of Yuanhuang pear in the region of 400-1150 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xueming; Fu, Xiaping; Rao, Xiuqin; Fang, Zhenhuan

    2016-05-01

    The main goals of this study are to investigate the potential of absorption coefficient for the prediction of water contents in `Yuanhuang' pear and analyze the relationship between the shelf-life and bulk optical properties in the range of 900-1050 nm. An automated integrating sphere (AIS) system was used to measure the total reflectance, total transmittance of pear flesh tissues in visible-Near infrared (Vis-NIR) range. These two measurements were used to estimate the absorption coefficient μa and reduced scattering coefficient μ's of pear samples by using an inverse adding doubling (IAD) light propagation model. The detection accuracy of the AIS system was verified by using both liquid (Intralipid-20% as scatterer) and solid phantom (TiO2 as scatterer, carbon black as absorber). The relative error of measurement of μ's of liquid phantom with four different concentration (0.5%,1%,1.5%,2%) at 632.8 nm, 751 nm, 833 nm are less than 10% except for 2% concentration at 833 nm, and the relative error of measurement μa and μ's of solid phantom at 525.4 nm, 632.1 nm, 710.3 nm and 780.1 nm are less than 5% except for the μa at 525.4 nm. A total of 140 samples were used to conduct the moisture measurement, and drying method was used. Predictive models for moisture content from μa data were constructed using partial least squares regression (PLSR). The coefficient of correlation of calibration set (Rc) and validation set (Rp) were 0.50 and 0.45 respectively. The relationship between the shelf-life and optical properties was analyzed by dividing pear samples into three categories according to the actual shelf-life, and calculating classification accuracy by using actual and calculated shelf-life grade.

  16. Atmospheric Gravity Wave Properties for TOMEX as Observed With Na wind/temperature Lidar and Airglow Instrumentation From Albuquerque, NM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, F.; Tang, J.; Liu, A.; Swenson, G.; Gardner, C.

    2002-12-01

    On the night of October 26, 2000, the TOMEX sounding rocket was launched from White Sands rocket range ~5 hours after sunset. Na lidar, airglow imagers, and a Michelson interferometer observed the perturbations in the mesosphere. In addition, the Na lidar measured the winds which were applied to the observed motion field from which intrinsic wave speeds were resolved. The extracted wave field from combined lidar and airglow observations included waves with periods of 5 hours, 1.5 hours, and 13 minutes present for the period leading to, and during the rocket launch. The vertical structures of the 13-minute and 1.5-hour period waves were determined primarily by the thermal structure, which was characterized by a small Brunt-Vaisala frequency between 90 km and 92 km with a strong gradient above and below. The 5-hour period waves exhibited a standing wave pattern, indicative of strong wave reflection in the mesopause region. In addition to the intrinsic wave parameters, the vertical flux of horizontal momentum and acceleration rate as a function of altitude was calculated for each of the waves. Momentum fluxes and accelerations were dominated by contributions from the 13-minute period waves.

  17. IRIS Observation of a Sunspot and the Surrounding Plage Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    TIAN, H.; DeLuca, E. E.; Mcintosh, S. W.; Reeves, K. K.; McKillop, S.; Weber, M.; Saar, S.; Golub, L.; Testa, P.

    2013-12-01

    NASA's IRIS mission is providing high-cadence and high-resolution observations of the solar transition region and chromosphere. We present preliminary results from IRIS observation of a sunspot and the surrounding plage region. The major findings in this observation can be summarized as following: (1) The slit jaw images in the filters of 1400Å and 1330Å reveal the presence of many rapidly evolving fibril-like structures in the transition region for the first time. These thin and long structures mainly reside in the plage region. They could be strands of low-lying cool transition region loops or the transition region counterpart of chromospheric spicules. (2) The C II and Mg II line profiles are almost Gaussian in the sunspot umbra and clearly exhibit a deep reversal at the line center in the plage region, suggesting a greatly reduced opacity in the sunspot atmosphere. (3) Bidirectional jets are frequently occurring mainly in the plage region immediately outside the sunspot throughout the observation. Triple or double Gaussian fit to the line profiles of Si IV suggests a velocity as high as 100 km/s. These velocity values are of the same order of the Alfven speed in the transition region. (4)Three-minute oscillation is clearly present in the sunspot umbra. The oscillation is identified in not only the slit jaw images of 2796Å, 1400Å and 1330Å, but also in spectra of the bright Mg II, C II and Si IV lines. Strong non-linearity is clearly seen in the intensity and Doppler shift oscillations. Interestingly, the obvious increase of the line width only occurs at the times of largest blue shift. The correlated change of the intensity and Doppler shift suggests an upward propagating magneto-acoustic shock wave.

  18. Development of a unique laboratory standard: Indium gallium arsenide detector for the 500-1700 nm spectral region

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    A planar (5 mm diameter) indium gallium arsenide detector having a high (greater than 50 pct) quantum efficiency from the visible into the infrared spectrum (500 to 1700 nm) was fabricated. Quantum efficiencies as high as 37 pct at 510 nm, 58 pct at 820 nm and 62 pct at 1300 nm and 1550 nm were measured. A planar InP/InGaAs detector structure was also fabricated using vapor phase epitaxy to grow device structures with 0, 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 micrometer thick InP caps. Quantum efficiency was studied as a function of cap thickness. Conventional detector structures were also used by completely etching off the InP cap after zinc diffusion. Calibrated quantum efficiencies were measured. Best results were obtained with devices whose caps were completely removed by etching. Certain problems still remain with these detectors including non-uniform shunt resistance, reproducibility, contact resistance and narrow band anti-reflection coatings.

  19. Lidar Observation of Tropopause Ozone Profiles in the Equatorial Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Yasukuni; Nagasawa, Chikao; Abo, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    Tropospheric ozone in the tropics zone is significant in terms of the oxidizing efficiency and greenhouse effect. However, in the upper troposphere, the ozone budget in the tropics has not been fully understood yet because of the sparsity of the range-resolved observations of vertical ozone concentration profiles. A DIAL (differential absorption lidar) system for vertical ozone profiles have been installed in the equatorial tropopause region over Kototabang, Indonesia (100.3E, 0.2S). We have observed large ozone enhancement in the upper troposphere, altitude of 13 - 17 km, concurring with a zonal wind oscillation associated with the equatorial Kelvin wave around the tropopause at equatorial region.

  20. Observations of Transient Active Region Heating with Hinode

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Harry P; Brooks, David H; Cirtain, Jonathan W; Williams, David R; Harra, Hirohisa

    2007-01-01

    We present observations of transient active region heating events observed with the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and X-ray Telescope (XRT) on Hinode. This initial investigation focuses on NOAA active region 10940 as observed by Hinode on February 1, 2007 between 12 and 19 UT. In these observations we find numerous examples of transient heating events within the active region. The high spatial resolution and broad temperature coverage of these instruments allows us to track the evolution of coronal plasma. The evolution of the emission observed with XRT and EIS during these events is generally consistent with loops that have been heated and are cooling. We have analyzed the most energetic heating event observed during this period, a small GOES B-class flare, in some detail and present some of the spectral signatures of the event, such as relative Doppler shifts at one of the loop footpoints and enhanced line widths during the rise phase of the event. While the analysis of these transient even...

  1. High Resolution CO Observations of Massive Star Forming Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Klaassen, P D; Keto, E R; Zhang, Q; Galván-Madrid, R; Liu, H-Y B

    2011-01-01

    Context. To further understand the processes involved in the formation of massive stars, we have undertaken a study of the gas dynamics surrounding three massive star forming regions. By observing the large scale structures at high resolution, we are able to determine properties such as driving source, and spatially resolve the bulk dynamical properties of the gas such as infall and outflow. Aims. With high resolution observations, we are able to determine which of the cores in a cluster forming massive stars is responsible for the large scale structures. Methods. We present CO observations of three massive star forming regions with known HII regions and show how the CO traces both infall and outflow. By combining data taken in two SMA configurations with JCMT observations, we are able to see large scale structures at high resolution. Results. We find large (0.26-0.40 pc), massive (2-3 M_sun) and energetic (13-17 \\times 10^44 erg) outflows emanating from the edges of two HII regions suggesting they are being ...

  2. Diagnostic Modeling of PAMS VOC Observation on Regional Scale Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S.; Liu, T.; Chen, T.; Ou Yang, C.; Wang, J.; Chang, J. S.

    2008-12-01

    While a number of gas-phase chemical mechanisms, such as CBM-Z, RADM2, SAPRC-07 had been successful in studying gas-phase atmospheric chemical processes they all used some lumped organic species to varying degrees. Photochemical Assessment Monitoring Stations (PAMS) has been in use for over ten years and yet it is not clear how the detailed organic species measured by PAMS compare to the lumped model species under regional-scale transport and chemistry interactions. By developing a detailed mechanism specifically for the PAMS organics and embedding this diagnostic model within a regional-scale transport and chemistry model we can then directly compare PAMS observation with regional-scale model simulations. We modify one regional-scale chemical transport model (Taiwan Air Quality Model, TAQM) by adding a submodel with chemical mechanism for interactions of the 56 species observed by PAMS. This submodel then calculates the time evolution of these 56 PAMS species within the environment established by TAQM. It is assumed that TAQM can simulate the overall regional-scale environment including impact of regional-scale transport and time evolution of oxidants and radicals. Therefore we can scale these influences to the PAMS organic species and study their time evolution with their species-specific source functions, meteorological transport, and chemical interactions. Model simulations of each species are compared with PAMS hourly surface measurements. A case study located in a metropolitan area in central Taiwan showed that with wind speeds lower than 3 m/s, when meteorological simulation is comparable with observation, the diurnal pattern of each species performs well with PAMS data. It is found that for many observations meteorological transport is an influence and that local emissions of specific species must be represented correctly. At this time there are still species that cannot be modeled properly. We suspect this is mostly due to lack of information on local

  3. UV spectroscopy of Titan's atmosphere, planetary organic chemistry and prebiological synthesis. II. Interpretation of new IUE observations in the 220-335 nm range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtin, R; Wagener, R; McKay, C P; Caldwell, J; Fricke K-H; Raulin, F; Bruston, P

    1991-01-01

    We report on new observations of Titan with the International Ultraviolet Explorer in the mid-UV range (lambda approximately 220-335 nm). We use these data to determine upper limits for the abundances of simple organic compounds in the gas phase and to further constrain the properties of the high altitude haze on Titan. As a baseline, we adopted the parametrized microphysical model of McKay et al. (1989) which is successful at reproducing Titan's thermal structure while satisfying several other observational constraints in the visible and IR regions. However, we find that such a model--in which all particles at a given altitude are assumed to have the same size--cannot match simultaneously the IUE observations and the visible/IR data, even when allowance is made for a wide range of values in the adjustable parameters. On the other hand, a good overall agreement is obtained when considering a biomodal size distribution, with small haze particles or "polymers" (r UV, visible, and IR regions. This approach is consistent with the results of several previous investigations of the properties of Titan's haze, although our preferred vertical structure for the haze + polymer material somewhat differs from earlier solutions. On the basis of simple dynamical considerations, we adopted a uniformly mixed layer between 150 and 600 km. The IUE data allow us to place fairly stringent constraints on the abundance of the Rayleigh absorbers, if we assume that their optical properties are similar to those of laboratory-synthesized "tholins": The column-mass density of this material--the essential observable that can be determined from our study--is of the order of 5 micrograms cm-2. This would correspond to number-densities between 10(3) and 10(7) cm-3 in the 150-600 km altitude range, if the average particle radius is between 0.001 and 0.02 micrometer. Such high number densities are a priori at odds with the estimated coagulation lifetime for particles of that size. Thus, our

  4. Observation of isotropic electron temperature in the turbulent E region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Saito

    Full Text Available Using EISCAT radar data, we find that electrons are strongly heated in the magnetic field-line direction during high electric field events. The remote site data show that the electron temperature increases in almost the same way in the field-perpendicular direction; electron heating by E region plasma turbulence is isotropic. We discuss the implications of our observation for the "plasmon"-electron as well as the wave Joule heating models of the anomalous electron heating in the E region.

    Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; plasma temperature and density; plasma waves and instabilities

  5. Airborne differential absorption lidar for water vapour measurements in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere in the spectral region around 940 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poberaj, G.

    2000-07-01

    Two all-solid-state laser systems were developed and studied in detail to optimise their performance for an airborne water vapour differential absorption lidar (DIAL). Their special features are high average output powers and excellent spectral properties in the 940-nm spectral region relevant for monitoring very low water vapour contents in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. One system is an injection-seeded pulsed Ti:sapphire ring laser with a spectral bandwidth of 105 MHz and an average power of 1.1 W. The other system is an injection-seeded optical parametric oscillator (OPO) in a ring configuration. Using KTP as nonlinear crystal, a signal output with a spectral bandwidth of 140 MHz and an average power of 1.2 W was achieved. Both systems, the Ti:sapphire ring laser and the KTP OPO, possess spectral purity values higher than 99%. The pump source for these systems is a frequency doubled diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser operating at a repetition rate of 100 Hz. The KTP OPO system has been used as a transmitter in a new airborne water vapour DIAL instrument. For the first time, measurements of two-dimensional water vapour distributions with a high vertical (500 m) and horizontal (20 km) resolution across several potential vorticity streamers were performed. Very low water vapour mixing ratios (10-50 ppmv) and strong gradients were observed in the tropopause region. The sensitivity of the DIAL instrument in the centre of a stratospheric intrusion ranges from 3% in the near field to 12% in the far field (4 km). The first comparison experiments with in situ measuring instruments show a good agreement. Considerable differences are found between DIAL measurements and data obtained from the ECMWF operational analyses and a mesoscale numerical model. (orig.)

  6. Electron acceleration in the reconnection diffusion region: Cluster observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, S. Y.; Vaivads, A.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Zhou, M.; Fu, H. S.; Retinò, A.; Deng, X. H.; André, M.; Cully, C. M.; He, J. S.; Sahraoui, F.; Yuan, Z. G.; Pang, Y.

    2012-06-01

    We present one case study of magnetic islands and energetic electrons in the reconnection diffusion region observed by the Cluster spacecraft. The cores of the islands are characterized by strong core magnetic fields and density depletion. Intense currents, with the dominant component parallel to the ambient magnetic field, are detected inside the magnetic islands. A thin current sheet is observed in the close vicinity of one magnetic island. Energetic electron fluxes increase at the location of the thin current sheet, and further increase inside the magnetic island, with the highest fluxes located at the core region of the island. We suggest that these energetic electrons are firstly accelerated in the thin current sheet, and then trapped and further accelerated in the magnetic island by betatron and Fermi acceleration.

  7. Estimating the Economic Benefits of Regional Ocean Observing Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-01

    Approved for Distribution: Andrew Solow , Director Marine Policy Center Estimating the Economic Benefits of Regional Ocean Observing Systems Report to...models that produce "nowcasts" or forecasts. See R. Adams, M. Brown, C. Colgan, N. Flemming, H. Kite-Powell, B. McCarl, J. Mjelde, A. Solow , T...like to acknowledge helpful discussions held with the following personnel: Ken Schaudt, Marathon; Norman Guinasso, Jr., Texas A&M University; Robert

  8. Enhancing Earth Observation Capacity in the Himalayan Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, B. R.

    2012-12-01

    Earth observations bear special significance in the Himalayan Region owing to the fact that routine data collections are often hampered by highly inaccessible terrain and harsh climatic conditions. The ongoing rapid environmental changes have further emphasized its relevance and use for informed decision-making. The International Center for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD), with a regional mandate is promoting the use of earth observations in line with the GEOSS societal benefit areas. ICIMOD has a proven track record to utilize earth observations notably in the areas of understanding glaciers and snow dynamics, disaster risk preparedness and emergency response, carbon estimation for community forestry user groups, land cover change assessment, agriculture monitoring and food security analysis among others. This paper presents the challenges and lessons learned as a part of capacity building of ICIMOD to utilize earth observations with the primary objectives to empower its member countries and foster regional cooperation. As a part of capacity building, ICIMOD continues to make its efforts to augment as a regional resource center on earth observation and geospatial applications for sustainable mountain development. Capacity building possesses multitude of challenges in the region: the complex geo-political reality with differentiated capacities of member states, poorer institutional and technical infrastructure; addressing the needs for multiple user and target groups; integration with different thematic disciplines; and high resources intensity and sustainability. A capacity building framework was developed based on detailed needs assessment with a regional approach and strategy to enhance capability of ICIMOD and its network of national partners. A specialized one-week training course and curriculum have been designed for different thematic areas to impart knowledge and skills that include development practitioners, professionals, researchers and

  9. Design and Performance Analysis of 1-Bit FinFET Full Adder Cells for Subthreshold Region at 16 nm Process Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ‘Aqilah binti Abdul Tahrim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The scaling process of the conventional 2D-planar metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET is now approaching its limit as technology has reached below 20 nm process technology. A new nonplanar device architecture called FinFET was invented to overcome the problem by allowing transistors to be scaled down into sub-20 nm region. In this work, the FinFET structure is implemented in 1-bit full adder transistors to investigate its performance and energy efficiency in the subthreshold region for cell designs of Complementary MOS (CMOS, Complementary Pass-Transistor Logic (CPL, Transmission Gate (TG, and Hybrid CMOS (HCMOS. The performance of 1-bit FinFET-based full adder in 16-nm technology is benchmarked against conventional MOSFET-based full adder. The Predictive Technology Model (PTM and Berkeley Shortchannel IGFET Model-Common Multi-Gate (BSIM-CMG 16 nm low power libraries are used. Propagation delay, average power dissipation, power-delay-product (PDP, and energy-delay-product (EDP are analysed based on all four types of full adder cell designs of both FETs. The 1-bit FinFET-based full adder shows a great reduction in all four metric performances. A reduction in propagation delay, PDP, and EDP is evident in the 1-bit FinFET-based full adder of CPL, giving the best overall performance due to its high-speed performance and good current driving capabilities.

  10. Determining the 630nm emission altitude using modelling and observations from a tristatic configuration of Fabry-Perot Interferometers and EISCAT radars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aruliah, Anasuya; Kosch, Michael

    Anasuya Aruliah, a.aruliah@ucl.ac.uk University College London, London, United Kingdom Michael Kosch, m.kosch@lancaster.ac.uk Lancaster University, Lancaster, United Kingdom Tristatic team Anasuya Aruliah,Ho-Ching Iris Yiu,Ian McWhirter, Michael Kosch,Kazuo Shiokawa,Shin-ichiro Oyama,Satonori Nozawa,Vikki Howells,Ian McCrea During early February 2010 a tristatic FPI-EISCAT experiment was run in order to investigate the peak emission altitude of the 630nm airglow and auroral emission in the region of the auroral oval. Two UCL Fabry-Perot Interferometers and a new STEL FPI have been located close to the three EISCAT radars at Tromsø, Kiruna and Sodankylü. The radars were pointed a at a common volume seen by all three FPIs, on assuming a peak emission height of 235km. This altitude is generally assumed to be fairly steady for FPI studies probing the behaviour of the upper atmosphere, though the height is a little different at other latitudes. The smoothing effect of the large viscosity of the upper thermosphere is invoked as a reason why the actual altitude is not too important, and there has been little investigation of the appropriateness of this assumption. However, mesoscale variability in the ionosphere has now been identified as producing a similar quantity of heating as does steady state convection; and FPIs and the CHAMP satellite have shown mesoscale structure in the high-latitude thermosphere. This indicates a need to revisit old assumptions that were based on the premise of thermospheric variability being large-scale. The STEL FPI at Ramfjord has a fully variable pointing direction mechanism and was programmed to point rapidly at successive volumes that would overlap the UCL KEOPS/Kiruna FPI look direction if the emission volume was 195km, 215km, 235km and 255km. Cross-correlation of the temperatures and intensity measurements would then identify the peak emission height. The EISCAT radar provided ionospheric parameters to model the 630nm emission profile

  11. Spectro-polarimetric observation in UV with CLASP to probe the chromosphere and transition region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Ryouhei; Ishikawa, Ryohko; Winebarger, Amy R.; Auchère, Frédéric; Trujillo Bueno, Javier; Narukage, Noriyuki; Kobayashi, Ken; Bando, Takamasa; Katsukawa, Yukio; Kubo, Masahito; Ishikawa, Shin-Nosuke; Giono, Gabriel; Hara, Hirohisa; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Shimizu, Toshifumi; Sakao, Taro; Tsuneta, Saku; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Goto, Motoshi; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; De Pontieu, Bart; Casini, Roberto; Manso Sainz, Rafael; Asensio Ramos, Andres; Stepan, Jiri; Belluzzi, Luca; Carlsson, Mats

    2016-05-01

    The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) is a NASA sounding-rocket experiment that was performed in White Sands in the US on September 3, 2015. During its 5-minute ballistic flight, CLASP successfully made the first spectro-polarimetric observation in the Lyman-alpha line (121.57 nm) originating in the chromosphere and transition region. Since the Lyman-alpha polarization is sensitive to magnetic field of 10-100 G by the Hanle effect, we aim to infer the magnetic field information in such upper solar atmosphere with this experiment.The obtained CLASP data showed that the Lyman-alpha scattering polarization is about a few percent in the wings and the order of 0.1% in the core near the solar limb, as it had been theoretically predicted, and that both polarization signals have a conspicuous spatio-temporal variability. CLASP also observed another upper-chromospheric line, Si III (120.65 nm), whose critical field strength for the Hanle effect is 290 G, and showed a measurable scattering polarization of a few % in this line. The polarization properties of the Si III line could facilitate the interpretation of the scattering polarization observed in the Lyman-alpha line.In this presentation, we would like to show how the upper chromosphere and transition region are seen in the polarization of these UV lines and discuss the possible source of these complicated polarization signals.

  12. A Method of Inversing the Peak Density of Atomic Oxygen Vertical Distribution in the MLT Region From the OI (557.7nm) Night Airglow Intensity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. Gao; J.Y. Xu; W. Yuan

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, using the MSISE-90 model as the reference atmosphere, we discuss the feasibility and method of deducing the peak densities of the undisturbed atomic oxygen profiles in the MLT region (the mesosphere and lower thermosphere region) from OI (557.7 nm) night airglow intersities. The peak densities for different seasons, latitudes and longitudes are deduced from OI (557.7nm) airglow intensities through this expression. We analyze the features of inversion relative errors and discuss the influence of the variations in temperature on inversion errors. The results indicate that all inversion errors are less than 5% except for those at high altitudes in the summer hemisphere. And the impact of the variations in temperature on errors is not significant.

  13. Climate Outreach Using Regional Coastal Ocean Observing System Portals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D. M.; Hernandez, D. L.; Wakely, A.; Bochenek, R. J.; Bickel, A.

    2015-12-01

    Coastal oceans are dynamic, changing environments affected by processes ranging from seconds to millennia. On the east and west coast of the U.S., regional observing systems have deployed and sustained a remarkable diverse array of observing tools and sensors. Data portals visualize and provide access to real-time sensor networks. Portals have emerged as an interactive tool for educators to help students explore and understand climate. Bringing data portals to outreach events, into classrooms, and onto tablets and smartphones enables educators to address topics and phenomena happening right now. For example at the 2015 Charleston Science Technology Engineering and Math (STEM) Festival, visitors navigated the SECOORA (Southeast Coastal Ocean Observing regional Association) data portal to view the real-time marine meteorological conditions off South Carolina. Map-based entry points provide an intuitive interface for most students, an array of time series and other visualizations depict many of the essential principles of climate science manifest in the coastal zone, and data down-load/ extract options provide access to the data and documentation for further inquiry by advanced users. Beyond the exposition of climate principles, the portal experience reveals remarkable technologies in action and shows how the observing system is enabled by the activity of many different partners.

  14. Entangled two photon absorption cross section on the 808 nm region for the common dyes Zinc tetraphenylporphyrin and Rhodamine B

    CERN Document Server

    Villabona-Monsalve, Juan P; Portela, Mayerlin Nuñez; Valencia, Alejandra

    2016-01-01

    We report the measurement of the entangled two photon absorption cross section, $\\sigma_E$, at 808 nm on organic chromophores in solution in a low photon flux regime. We performed measurements on Zinc tetraphenylporphyrin (ZnTPP) in Toluene and Rhodamine B (RhB) in Methanol. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first time that $\\sigma_E$ is measured for RhB. Additionally, we report a systematic study of the dependence of $\\sigma_E$ on the molecular concentration for both molecular systems. In contrast to previous experiments, our measurements are based on detecting the pairs of photons that are transmitted by the molecular system. By using a coincidence count circuit it was possible to improve the signal to noise ratio. This type of work is important for the development of spectroscopic and microscopic techniques using entangled photons.

  15. Atmospheric aerosol layers over Bangkok Metropolitan Region from CALIPSO observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridhikitti, Arika

    2013-06-01

    Previous studies suggested that aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the Earth Observing System satellite retrievals could be used for inference of ground-level air quality in various locations. This application may be appropriate if pollution in elevated atmospheric layers is insignificant. This study investigated the significance of elevated air pollution layers over the Bangkok Metropolitan Region (BMR) from all available aerosol layer scenes taken from Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) for years 2007 to 2011. The results show that biomass burning smoke layers alone were the most frequently observed. The smoke layers accounted for high AOD variations and increased AOD levels. In the dry seasons, the smoke layers alone with high AOD levels were likely brought to the BMR via northeasterly to easterly prevailing winds and found at altitudes above the typical BMR mixing heights of approximately 0.7 to 1.5 km. The smoke should be attributed to biomass burning emissions outside the BMR.

  16. Spectroscopic Observations of the Star Formation Regions in Nearby Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, KONG; Lin, LIN; Jin-rong, LI; Xu, ZHOU; Hu, ZOU; Hong-yu, LI; Fu-zhen, CHEN; Wei, DU; Zhou, FAN; Ye-wei, MAO; Jing, WANG; Yi-nan, ZHU; Zhi-min, ZHOU

    2014-10-01

    In recent years the number of worldwide 8∼10 m-class ground-based telescopes is continually increased, the 4 m-diameter or smaller telescopes have become the small and medium-sized telescopes. In order to obtain some noticeable scientific results by using these existing small and medium-sized telescopes, we have to consider very carefully what we can do, and what we can not. For this reason, the Time Allocation Committee of the 2.16 m telescope of the National Astronomical observatories of China (NAOC) has decided to support some key projects since 2013. The long-term project “Spectroscopic Observations of the Star Formation Regions in Nearby Galaxies” proposed by us is one of three key projects, it is supported by the committee with 30 dark/grey nights in each of three years. The primary goal of this project is to make the spectroscopic observations of the star formation regions along the directions parallel and perpendicular to the main-axes of 20 nearby galaxies with the NAO 2.16 m telescope and the Hec-tospec multi-fiber spectrograph on the 6.5 m MMT (Multiple Mirror Telescope) via the Telescope Access Program (TAP). With the spectra of a large sample of star formation regions, combining with the exising multi-wavelength data from UV to IR, we can study the galaxy dust extinction, star formation rate, metal abundance, and the two-dimensional distributions of stellar population proper-ties, as well as the relationships of the galaxy two-dimensional properties with the galaxy morphologies and environments. As the first paper of this project, we describe here the scientific objectives, sample selection, observation strategy, and present the preliminary result of the spectroscopic observation towards the galaxy NGC 2403.

  17. Herschel observations of the Galactic H II region RCW 79

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong-Li; Figueira, Miguel; Zavagno, Annie; Hill, Tracey; Schneider, Nicola; Men'shchikov, Alexander; Russeil, Delphine; Motte, Frédérique; Tigé, Jérémy; Deharveng, Lise; Anderson, Loren D.; Li, Jin-Zeng; Wu, Yuefang; Yuan, Jing-Hua; Huang, Maohai

    2017-06-01

    Context. Triggered star formation around H II regions could be an important process. The Galactic H II region RCW 79 is a prototypical object for triggered high-mass star formation. Aims: We aim to obtain a census of the young stellar population observed at the edges of the H II region and to determine the properties of the young sources in order to characterize the star formation processes that take place at the edges of this ionized region. Methods: We take advantage of Herschel data from the surveys HOBYS, "Evolution of Interstellar Dust", and Hi-Gal to extract compact sources. We use the algorithm getsources. We complement the Herschel data with archival 2MASS, Spitzer, and WISE data to determine the physical parameters of the sources (e.g., envelope mass, dust temperature, and luminosity) by fitting the spectral energy distribution. Results: We created the dust temperature and column density maps along with the column density probability distribution function (PDF) for the entire RCW 79 region. We obtained a sample of 50 compact sources in this region, 96% of which are situated in the ionization-compressed layer of cold and dense gas that is characterized by the column density PDF with a double-peaked lognormal distribution. The 50 sources have sizes of 0.1-0.4 pc with a typical value of 0.2 pc, temperatures of 11-26 K, envelope masses of 6-760 M⊙, densities of 0.1-44 × 105 cm-3, and luminosities of 19-12 712 L⊙. The sources are classified into 16 class 0, 19 intermediate, and 15 class I objects. Their distribution follows the evolutionary tracks in the diagram of bolometric luminosity versus envelope mass (Lbol-Menv) well. A mass threshold of 140 M⊙, determined from the Lbol-Menv diagram, yields 12 candidate massive dense cores that may form high-mass stars. The core formation efficiency (CFE) for the 8 massive condensations shows an increasing trend of the CFE with density. This suggests that the denser the condensation, the higher the fraction of its

  18. A submllimeter observation and study of star-forming regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Using the 3-m radio telescope of KOSMA, we mapped 12CO (J = 3-2) lines for three molecular clouds, B35, S146 and TMC-2A. High-velocity molecular outflows are found in all these regions. The physical and dynamical parameters of the outflows are derived, and their shapes and driving sources are analyzed. Contour maps of center velocities show that the large scale systematic gradients exist in the three clouds. These observed motions are best explained by rotation after excluding the cause of outflows. Furthermore, in the core region of TMC-2A there is a velocity gradient in opposite direction from that of the large scale. It may be caused by magnetic braking. Finally, angular velocities of the clouds are calculated, and the effects of rotation against gravity and lowering the star-formation rate are also analyzed.

  19. Coronal loops above an Active Region - observation versus model

    CERN Document Server

    Bourdin, Philippe-A; Peter, Hardi

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a high-resolution numerical simulation of the solar corona above a stable active region. The aim is to test the field-line braiding mechanism for a sufficient coronal energy input. We also check the applicability of scaling laws for coronal loop properties like the temperature and density. Our 3D-MHD model is driven from below by Hinode observations of the photosphere, in particular a high-cadence time series of line-of-sight magnetograms and horizontal velocities derived from the magnetograms. This driving applies stress to the magnetic field and thereby delivers magnetic energy into the corona, where currents are induced that heat the coronal plasma by Ohmic dissipation. We compute synthetic coronal emission that we directly compare to coronal observations of the same active region taken by Hinode. In the model, coronal loops form at the same places as they are found in coronal observations. Even the shapes of the synthetic loops in 3D space match those found from a stereoscopic reconstruction ...

  20. 7 mm continuum observations of ultra compact HII regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leto, P.; Umana, G.; Trigilio, C.; Buemi, C. S.; Dolei, S.; Manzitto, P.; Cerrigone, L.; Siringo, C.

    2009-12-01

    Aims: Ultra compact HII (UCHII) regions are indicators of high-mass star formation sites and are distributed mainly in the Galactic plane. They exhibit a broad band spectrum with significant emission between near-IR and radio wavelengths. We intend to investigate the possible contribution of the forthcoming ESA Planck mission to the science of UCHII regions by evaluating the possibility of detecting UCHIIs that are bright in the radio regime. Methods: We performed new 7 mm observations of a sample of UCHII regions. The observations were designed to acquire high-frequency radio spectra. For each source in our sample, the free-free radio spectrum has been modeled. Along with far-IR measurements, our spectra allow us to estimate the flux densities of the sources in the millimeter and sub-millimeter bands. We extrapolated and summed the ionized-gas (free-free radio emission) and dust (thermal emission) contributions in the afore mentioned wavelength ranges. The possibility of Planck detecting the selected sources can be assessed by comparing the estimated flux densities to the expected sensitivity in each Planck channel. To obtain a realistic estimation of the noise produced by the Galactic emission, the Planck sky model software package was used. Results: For each target source, from our new 7 mm data and other radio measurements from the literature, important physical parameters such as electron density and their spatial distribution, source geometry and emission measure were derived. We conclude that, in the case of the present sample, located close to the Galactic center, Planck will have a very low detection rate. In contrast, assuming that our sample is representative of the whole UCHII-region population, we derive a very high probability of detecting this kind of source with Planck if located instead close to the anticenter. From the analysis of the ionized-gas properties, we suggest that the selected sample could also be contaminated by other kinds of Galactic

  1. ON THE ACTIVE REGION BRIGHT GRAINS OBSERVED IN THE TRANSITION REGION IMAGING CHANNELS OF IRIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skogsrud, H.; Voort, L. Rouppe van der; Pontieu, B. De [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway)

    2016-02-01

    The Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) provides spectroscopy and narrow band slit-jaw (SJI) imaging of the solar chromosphere and transition region at unprecedented spatial and temporal resolutions. Combined with high-resolution context spectral imaging of the photosphere and chromosphere as provided by the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope (SST), we can now effectively trace dynamic phenomena through large parts of the solar atmosphere in both space and time. IRIS SJI 1400 images from active regions, which primarily sample the transition region with the Si iv 1394 and 1403 Å lines, reveal ubiquitous bright “grains” which are short-lived (two to five minute) bright roundish small patches of sizes 0.″5–1.″7 that generally move limbward with velocities up to about 30 km s{sup −1}. In this paper, we show that many bright grains are the result of chromospheric shocks impacting the transition region. These shocks are associated with dynamic fibrils (DFs), most commonly observed in Hα. We find that the grains show the strongest emission in the ascending phase of the DF, that the emission is strongest toward the top of the DF, and that the grains correspond to a blueshift and broadening of the Si iv lines. We note that the SJI 1400 grains can also be observed in the SJI 1330 channel which is dominated by C ii lines. Our observations show that a significant part of the active region transition region dynamics is driven from the chromosphere below rather than from coronal activity above. We conclude that the shocks that drive DFs also play an important role in the heating of the upper chromosphere and lower transition region.

  2. SPI/INTEGRAL observation of the Cygnus region

    OpenAIRE

    Bouchet, L.; Jourdain, E; Roques, JP; Mandrou, P.; von Ballmoos, P.; Boggs, S; Caraveo, P.; Casse, M.; Cordier, B.; Diehl, R.; Durouchoux, P.; von Kienlin, A.; Knodlseder, J.; Jean, P.; Leleux, Pierre

    2003-01-01

    We present the analysis of the first observations of the Cygnus region by the SPI spectrometer onboard the Integral Gamma Ray Observatory, encompassing similar to600 ks of data. Three sources namely Cyg X-1, Cyg X-3 and EXO 2030+375 were clearly detected. Our data illustrate the temporal variability of Cyg X-1 in the energy range from 20 keV to 300 keV. The spectral analysis shows a remarkable stability of the Cyg X-1 spectra when averaged over one day timescale. The other goal of these obser...

  3. A temperature-induced absorption band centered in the region of 666 nm related to the configuration of the active site in frozen cytochrome oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, M; Clore, G M

    1979-03-15

    The existence of a temperature-induced absorption band centred in the region of 666 nm is demonstrated for both membrane-bound and soluble cytochrome oxidase in the frozen state. The 666 nm band is generated solely by an increase in temperature of both fully reduced and mixed valence state cytochrome oxidase in the presence of CO or O2 within the 'pocket' containing the active site; it is not formed in the absence of both CO and O2 from the sample. The formation of the 666 nm band is entirely reversible when the temperature is decreased again and its formation is not dependent on the presence of liganded CO at the sixth coordination site of haem a3 in the low temperature range (below --120 degrees C) prior to photolysis. The shape and intensity of the 666 nm band are not affected by the extent of CO recombination following flash and photolysis and temperature increase and are not affected by changes in the valence states of the four metal centres when the O2 reaction is in progress.

  4. SPI/INTEGRAL observation of the Cygnus region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchet, L.; Jourdain, E.; Roques, J. P.; Mandrou, P.; von Ballmoos, P.; Boggs, S.; Caraveo, P.; Cassé, M.; Cordier, B.; Diehl, R.; Durouchoux, P.; von Kienlin, A.; Knodlseder, J.; Jean, P.; Leleux, P.; Lichti, G. G.; Matteson, J.; Sanchez, F.; Schanne, S.; Schoenfelder, V.; Skinner, G.; Strong, A.; Teegarden, B.; Vedrenne, G.; Wunderer, C.

    2003-11-01

    We present the analysis of the first observations of the Cygnus region by the SPI spectrometer onboard the Integral Gamma Ray Observatory, encompassing ~600 ks of data. Three sources namely Cyg X-1, Cyg X-3 and EXO 2030+375 were clearly detected. Our data illustrate the temporal variability of Cyg X-1 in the energy range from 20 keV to 300 keV. The spectral analysis shows a remarkable stability of the Cyg X-1 spectra when averaged over one day timescale. The other goal of these observations is SPI inflight calibration and performance verification. The latest objective has been achieved as demonstrated by the results presented in this paper.

  5. Observational Evidence of Magnetic Reconnection for Brightenings and Transition Region Arcades in IRIS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jie; Schmieder, Brigitte; Li, Hui; Pariat, Etienne; Zhu, Xiaoshuai; Feng, Li; Grubecka, Michalina

    2017-02-01

    By using a new method of forced-field extrapolation, we study the emerging flux region AR11850 observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph and Solar Dynamical Observatory. Our results suggest that the bright points (BPs) in this emerging region exhibit responses in lines formed from the upper photosphere to the transition region, which have relatively similar morphologies. They have an oscillation of several minutes according to the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly data at 1600 and 1700 Å. The ratio between the BP intensities measured in 1600 and 1700 Å filtergrams reveals that these BPs are heated differently. Our analysis of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager vector magnetic field and the corresponding topology in AR11850 indicates that the BPs are located at the polarity inversion line and most of them are related to magnetic reconnection or cancelation. The heating of the BPs might be different due to different magnetic topology. We find that the heating due to the magnetic cancelation would be stronger than the case of bald patch reconnection. The plasma density rather than the magnetic field strength could play a dominant role in this process. Based on physical conditions in the lower atmosphere, our forced-field extrapolation shows consistent results between the bright arcades visible in slit-jaw image 1400 Å and the extrapolated field lines that pass through the bald patches. It provides reliable observational evidence for testing the mechanism of magnetic reconnection for the BPs and arcades in the emerging flux region, as proposed in simulation studies.

  6. First observation of top quark production in the forward region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; d'Argent, P; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Bel, L J; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bertolin, A; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Birnkraut, A; Bizzeti, A; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Braun, S; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Capriotti, L; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carniti, P; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cavallero, G; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collazuol, G; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Crocombe, A; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Dean, C-T; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Demmer, M; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Di Ruscio, F; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dufour, L; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferrari, F; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fohl, K; Fol, P; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gastaldi, U; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gazzoni, G; Geraci, A; Gerick, D; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Girard, O G; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadavizadeh, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Humair, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Kenzie, M; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozeiha, M; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kuonen, A K; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Liu, X; Loh, D; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lucchesi, D; Lucio Martinez, M; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Maguire, K; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Manning, P; Mapelli, A; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martin, M; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathad, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matthieu, K; Mauri, A; Maurin, B; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Melnychuk, D; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Mitzel, D S; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, J; Müller, K; Müller, V; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nandi, A; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Ninci, D; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, C J G; Osorio Rodrigues, B; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Otto, A; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Pappenheimer, C; Parkes, C; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perret, P; Pescatore, L; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Petruzzo, M; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Piucci, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Poikela, T; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polyakov, I; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Price, J D; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Quagliani, R; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; Dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Lopez, J A; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Ronayne, J W; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santimaria, M; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmelzer, T; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schubiger, M; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Semennikov, A; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skillicorn, I; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, I T; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Sterpka, F; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Tekampe, T; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Todd, J; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Trabelsi, K; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Trisovic, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Weiden, A; Whitehead, M; Wiedner, D; Wilkinson, G; Wilkinson, M; Williams, M; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Williams, T; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yu, J; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L

    2015-09-11

    Top quark production in the forward region in proton-proton collisions is observed for the first time. The W+b final state with W→μν is reconstructed using muons with a transverse momentum, p_{T}, larger than 25 GeV in the pseudorapidity range 2.020  GeV. The results are based on data corresponding to integrated luminosities of 1.0 and 2.0  fb^{-1} collected at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV by LHCb. The inclusive top quark production cross sections in the fiducial region are σ(top)[7  TeV]=239±53(stat)±33(syst)±24(theory)  fb,σ(top)[8  TeV]=289±43(stat)±40(syst)±29(theory)  fb.These results, along with the observed differential yields and charge asymmetries, are in agreement with next-to-leading order standard model predictions.

  7. Regional Scaling of Airborne Eddy Covariance Flux Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, T.; Serafimovich, A.; Metzger, S.; Kohnert, K.; Hartmann, J.

    2014-12-01

    The earth's surface is tightly coupled to the global climate system by the vertical exchange of energy and matter. Thus, to better understand and potentially predict changes to our climate system, it is critical to quantify the surface-atmosphere exchange of heat, water vapor, and greenhouse gases on climate-relevant spatial and temporal scales. Currently, most flux observations consist of ground-based, continuous but local measurements. These provide a good basis for temporal integration, but may not be representative of the larger regional context. This is particularly true for the Arctic, where site selection is additionally bound by logistical constraints, among others. Airborne measurements can overcome this limitation by covering distances of hundreds of kilometers over time periods of a few hours. The Airborne Measurements of Methane Fluxes (AIRMETH) campaigns are designed to quantitatively and spatially explicitly address this issue: The research aircraft POLAR 5 is used to acquire thousands of kilometers of eddy-covariance flux data. During the AIRMETH-2012 and AIRMETH-2013 campaigns we measured the turbulent exchange of energy, methane, and (in 2013) carbon dioxide over the North Slope of Alaska, USA, and the Mackenzie Delta, Canada. Here, we present the potential of environmental response functions (ERFs) for quantitatively linking flux observations to meteorological and biophysical drivers in the flux footprints. We use wavelet transforms of the original high-frequency data to improve spatial discretization of the flux observations. This also enables the quantification of continuous and biophysically relevant land cover properties in the flux footprint of each observation. A machine learning technique is then employed to extract and quantify the functional relationships between flux observations and the meteorological and biophysical drivers. The resulting ERFs are used to extrapolate fluxes over spatio-temporally explicit grids of the study area. The

  8. Earth observation for regional scale environmental and natural resources management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernknopf, R.; Brookshire, D.; Faulkner, S.; Chivoiu, B.; Bridge, B.; Broadbent, C.

    2013-12-01

    Earth observations (EO) provide critical information to natural resource assessment. Three examples are presented: conserving potable groundwater in intense agricultural regions, maximizing ecosystem service benefits at regional scales from afforestation investment and management, and enabling integrated natural and behavioral sciences for resource management and policy analysis. In each of these cases EO of different resolutions are used in different ways to help in the classification, characterization, and availability of natural resources and ecosystem services. To inform decisions, each example includes a spatiotemporal economic model to optimize the net societal benefits of resource development and exploitation. 1) EO is used for monitoring land use in intensively cultivated agricultural regions. Archival imagery is coupled to a hydrogeological process model to evaluate the tradeoff between agrochemical use and retention of potable groundwater. EO is used to couple individual producers and regional resource managers using information from markets and natural systems to aid in the objective of maximizing agricultural production and maintaining groundwater quality. The contribution of EO is input to a nitrate loading and transport model to estimate the cumulative impact on groundwater at specified distances from specific sites (wells) for 35 Iowa counties and two aquifers. 2) Land use/land cover (LULC) derived from EO is used to compare biological carbon sequestration alternatives and their provisioning of ecosystem services. EO is used to target land attributes that are more or less desirable for enhancing ecosystem services in two parishes in Louisiana. Ecological production functions are coupled with value data to maximize the expected return on investment in carbon sequestration and other ancillary ecosystem services while minimizing the risk. 3) Environmental and natural resources management decisions employ probabilistic estimates of yet-to-find or yet

  9. Anti-Stokes effect CCD camera and SLD based optical coherence tomography for full-field imaging in the 1550nm region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kredzinski, Lukasz; Connelly, Michael J.

    2012-06-01

    Full-field Optical coherence tomography is an en-face interferometric imaging technology capable of carrying out high resolution cross-sectional imaging of the internal microstructure of an examined specimen in a non-invasive manner. The presented system is based on competitively priced optical components available at the main optical communications band located in the 1550 nm region. It consists of a superluminescent diode and an anti-stokes imaging device. The single mode fibre coupled SLD was connected to a multi-mode fibre inserted into a mode scrambler to obtain spatially incoherent illumination, suitable for OCT wide-field modality in terms of crosstalk suppression and image enhancement. This relatively inexpensive system with moderate resolution of approximately 24um x 12um (axial x lateral) was constructed to perform a 3D cross sectional imaging of a human tooth. To our knowledge this is the first 1550 nm full-field OCT system reported.

  10. Observation of coupled vortex gyrations by 70-ps-time and 20-nm-space- resolved full-field magnetic transmission soft x-ray microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hyunsung; Yu, Young-Sang; Lee, Ki-Suk; Im, Mi-Young; Fischer, Peter; Bocklage, Lars; Vogel, Andreas; Bolte, Markus; Meier, Guido; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2010-09-01

    We employed time-and space-resolved full-field magnetic transmission soft x-ray microscopy to observe vortex-core gyrations in a pair of dipolar-coupled vortex-state Permalloy (Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20}) disks. The 70 ps temporal and 20 nm spatial resolution of the microscope enabled us to simultaneously measure vortex gyrations in both disks and to resolve the phases and amplitudes of both vortex-core positions. We observed their correlation for a specific vortex-state configuration. This work provides a robust and direct method of studying vortex gyrations in dipolar-coupled vortex oscillators.

  11. The SMM UV observations of Active Region 5395

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Stephen A.; Gurman, Joseph B.

    1989-01-01

    The Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter (UVSP) on the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) spacecraft was used extensively to study the spatial morphology and time variability of solar active regions in the far UV (at approx. wavelength of 1370 A) since July 1985. The normal spatial resolution of UVSP observations in this 2nd-order mode is 10 sec., and the highest temporal resolution is 64 milliseconds. To make a full-field, 4 min. by 4 min. image this wavelength using 5 sec. raster steps takes about 3 minutes. UVSP can also make observations of the Sun at approx. wavelength of 2790 with 3 sec. spatial resolution when operated in its 1st-order mode; a full-field image at this wavelength (a so-called SNEW image) takes about 8 minutes. UVSP made thousands of observations (mostly in 2nd-order) of AR 5395 during its transit across the visible solar hemisphere (from 7 to 19 March, inclusive). During this period, UVSP's duty cycle for observing AR 5395 was roughly 40 percent, with the remaining 60 percent of the time being fairly evenly divided between aeronomy studies of the Earth's atmosphere and dead time due to Earth occultation of the Sun. UVSP observed many of the flares tagged to AR 5395, including 26 GOES M-level flares and 3 X-level flares, one of which produced so much UV emission that the safety software of UVSP turned off the detector to avoid damage due to saturation. Images and light curves of some of the more spectacular of the AR 5395 events are presented.

  12. Database of the Operational Drifter Observations in the Arctic Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.M. Bayankina

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The database (formed in MHI for 22 drifters deployed in the Arctic region in 2012 – 2016 is represented. The most intensive drifter observations were performed in the Beaufort Sea (the Canada Basin and in the Central Arctic. According to the data of temperature-profiling drifters, ∼ 2 million temperature profiles (including the ones acquired under the ice formations and ∼ 120.000 atmospheric pressure measurements were obtained. Total life time of drifters as at August 2016 exceeded 7000 days. General information and technical characteristics of BTC60/GPS/ice/1ps, BTC60/GPS/ice/3ps, SVP-BTC80/GPS temperature-profiling drifters are given. Features of drifter information primary preparation are enumerated and the technique of database quality assessment is shown. The studies have shown that temperature-profiling data provides the assessment of the ice thickness and its spatial-temporal variability in the region. The results of the experiments carried out in the Arctic reveal the fact that autonomous temperature-profiling “ice” drifters are an effective instrument for studying the Arctic region. According to the results of the experiments carried out in the Arctic and verification of data quality in the formed database, the drifters showed the reliability of operational characteristics. This is confirmed by failure-free operation of IMEI 245950/WMO 48541 drifter which had been performed the measurements during 1.083 days. The obtained unique long-term series of systematic operational data can be applied for clarifying the concepts of thermal processes variability in the upper ocean layer (including the under-ice one, the dynamics of ice fields and air pressure fields in a wide range of spatial-temporal scales as well as for refining the concept of interaction processes in the Atmosphere – Ice – Ocean system.

  13. Impact of Asymmetric Dual-k Spacer in the Underlap Regions of Sub 20 nm NMOSFET with Gate Stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Shramana; Dasgupta, Arpan; Das, Rahul; Kundu, Atanu; Sarkar, Chandan K.

    2016-10-01

    This paper shows the systematic study of underlap double gate (U-DG) NMOSFETs with Gate Stack (GS) under the influence of dual-k spacers at the different underlap regions. In highly scaled devices, underlap is used at the Source and Drain side so as to reduce the short channel effects (SCE's) but at the cost of low on current (ION) and increased channel resistance. The high-k spacers are used to counter this problem. The ION is improved but at the cost of highly enhanced parasitic capacitances. This paper explores the possibility of using asymmetric dual-k spacer at the source underlap side so as to counter the shortcomings of high-k spacers in highly scaled devices on the basis of analog parameters: ION, gm, gm/ID, and intrinsic gain, gmRo and RF performance in terms of parasitic gate capacitance (Cgs, Cgd and Cgg),gate to source/drain resistances (Rgs and Rgd), transport delay (τm), the unity current gain cut-off frequency (fT) and the maximum frequency of oscillation (fmax). A single stage amplifier performance is also analyzed where it has been seen that the asymmetric dual-k spacer at the source underlap side gives better performance as compared to the other devices under comparison.

  14. On the Active Region Bright Grains Observed in the Transition Region Imaging Channels of IRIS

    CERN Document Server

    Skogsrud, H; De Pontieu, B

    2015-01-01

    The Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) provides spectroscopy and narrow band slit-jaw (SJI) imaging of the solar chromosphere and transition region at unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. Combined with high-resolution context spectral imaging of the photosphere and chromosphere as provided by the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope (SST), we can now effectively trace dynamic phenomena through large parts of the solar atmosphere in both space and time. IRIS SJI 1400 images from active regions, which primarily sample the transition region with the Si IV 1394 and 1403 {\\AA} lines, reveal ubiquitous bright "grains" which are short-lived (2-5 min) bright roundish small patches of sizes 0.5-1.7" that generally move limbward with velocities up to about 30 km s$^{-1}$. In this paper we show that many bright grains are the result of chromospheric shocks impacting the transition region. These shocks are associated with dynamic fibrils (DFs), most commonly observed in H{\\alpha}. We find that the grains show ...

  15. Ionospheric scintillation observations over Kenyan region - Preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olwendo, O. J.; Xiao, Yu; Ming, Ou

    2016-11-01

    Ionospheric scintillation refers to the rapid fluctuations in the amplitude and phase of a satellite signal as it passes through small-scale plasma density irregularities in the ionosphere. By analyzing ionospheric scintillation observation datasets from satellite signals such as GPS signals we can study the morphology of ionospheric bubbles. At low latitudes, the diurnal behavior of scintillation is driven by the formation of large-scale equatorial density depletions which form one to two hours after sunset via the Rayleigh-Taylor instability mechanism near the magnetic equator. In this work we present ionospheric scintillation activity over Kenya using data derived from a newly installed scintillation monitor developed by CRIRP at Pwani University (39.78°E, 3.24°S) during the period August to December, 2014. The results reveal the scintillation activity mainly occurs from post-sunset to post-midnight hours, and ceases around 04:00 LT. We also found that the ionospheric scintillation tends to appear at the southwest and northwest of the station. These locations coincide with the southern part of the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly crest over Kenya region. The occurrence of post-midnight L-band scintillation events which are not linked to pre-midnight scintillation observations raises fundamental question on the mechanism and source of electric fields driving the plasma depletion under conditions of very low background electron density.

  16. Observational and Numerical Diagnostics of Galaxy Cluster Outer Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, D.; Vazza, F.; Ettori, S.; Molendi, S.; Nagai, D.; Lau, E.; Roncarelli, M.; Rossetti, M.; Snowden, S. L.; Gastaldello, F.

    2011-01-01

    Aims. We present the analysis of a local (z = 0.04 - 0.2) sample of 31 galaxy clusters with the aim of measuring the density of the X-ray emitting gas in cluster outskirts. We compare our results with numerical simulations to set constraints on the azimuthal symmetry and gas clumping in the outer regions of galaxy clusters. Methods. We exploit the large field-of-view and low instrumental background of ROSAT/PSPC to trace the density of the intracluster gas out to the virial radius. We perform a stacking of the density profiles to detect a signal beyond r(sub 200) and measure the typical density and scatter in cluster outskirts. We also compute the azimuthal scatter of the profiles with respect to the mean value to look for deviations from spherical symmetry. Finally, we compare our average density and scatter profiles with the results of numerical simulations. Results. As opposed to several recent results, we observe a steepening of the density profiles beyond approximately 0.3r(sub 500). Comparing our density profiles with simulations, we find that non-radiative runs predict too steep density profiles, whereas runs including additional physics and/or gas clumping are in better agreement with the observed gas distribution. We note a systematic difference between cool-core and non-cool core clusters beyond approximately 0.3r(sub 200), which we explain by a different distribution of the gas in the two classes. Beyond approximately r(sub 500), galaxy clusters deviate significantly from spherical symmetry, with only little differences between relaxed and disturbed systems. We find good agreement between the observed and predicted scatter profiles, but only when the 1% densest clumps are filtered out in the simulations. Conclusions. The general trend of steepening density around the virial radius indicates that the shallow density profiles found in several recent works were probably obtained along particular directions (e.g., filaments) and are not representative of the

  17. Observational and Numerical Diagnostics of Galaxy Cluster Outer Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, D.; Vazza, F.; Ettori, S.; Molendi, S.; Nagai, D.; Lau, E.; Roncarelli, M.; Rossetti, M.; Snowden, S. L.; Gastaldello, F.

    2011-01-01

    Aims. We present the analysis of a local (z = 0.04 - 0.2) sample of 31 galaxy clusters with the aim of measuring the density of the X-ray emitting gas in cluster outskirts. We compare our results with numerical simulations to set constraints on the azimuthal symmetry and gas clumping in the outer regions of galaxy clusters. Methods. We exploit the large field-of-view and low instrumental background of ROSAT/PSPC to trace the density of the intracluster gas out to the virial radius. We perform a stacking of the density profiles to detect a signal beyond r(sub 200) and measure the typical density and scatter in cluster outskirts. We also compute the azimuthal scatter of the profiles with respect to the mean value to look for deviations from spherical symmetry. Finally, we compare our average density and scatter profiles with the results of numerical simulations. Results. As opposed to several recent results, we observe a steepening of the density profiles beyond approximately 0.3r(sub 500). Comparing our density profiles with simulations, we find that non-radiative runs predict too steep density profiles, whereas runs including additional physics and/or gas clumping are in better agreement with the observed gas distribution. We note a systematic difference between cool-core and non-cool core clusters beyond approximately 0.3r(sub 200), which we explain by a different distribution of the gas in the two classes. Beyond approximately r(sub 500), galaxy clusters deviate significantly from spherical symmetry, with only little differences between relaxed and disturbed systems. We find good agreement between the observed and predicted scatter profiles, but only when the 1% densest clumps are filtered out in the simulations. Conclusions. The general trend of steepening density around the virial radius indicates that the shallow density profiles found in several recent works were probably obtained along particular directions (e.g., filaments) and are not representative of the

  18. Promoting discovery and access to real time observations produced by regional coastal ocean observing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D. M.; Snowden, D. P.; Bochenek, R.; Bickel, A.

    2015-12-01

    In the U.S. coastal waters, a network of eleven regional coastal ocean observing systems support real-time coastal and ocean observing. The platforms supported and variables acquired are diverse, ranging from current sensing high frequency (HF) radar to autonomous gliders. The system incorporates data produced by other networks and experimental systems, further increasing the breadth of the collection. Strategies promoted by the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) ensure these data are not lost at sea. Every data set deserves a description. ISO and FGDC compliant metadata enables catalog interoperability and record-sharing. Extensive use of netCDF with the Climate and Forecast convention (identifying both metadata and a structured format) is shown to be a powerful strategy to promote discovery, interoperability, and re-use of the data. To integrate specialized data which are often obscure, quality control protocols are being developed to homogenize the QC and make these data more integrate-able. Data Assembly Centers have been established to integrate some specialized streams including gliders, animal telemetry, and HF radar. Subsets of data that are ingested into the National Data Buoy Center are also routed to the Global Telecommunications System (GTS) of the World Meteorological Organization to assure wide international distribution. From the GTS, data are assimilated into now-cast and forecast models, fed to other observing systems, and used to support observation-based decision making such as forecasts, warnings, and alerts. For a few years apps were a popular way to deliver these real-time data streams to phones and tablets. Responsive and adaptive web sites are an emerging flexible strategy to provide access to the regional coastal ocean observations.

  19. Observational studies of regions of massive star formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Heather Danielle Blythe

    2013-03-01

    Massive stars have a profound influence on their surroundings. However, relatively little is known about their formation. The study of massive star formation is hindered by a lack of observational evidence, primarily due to difficulties observing massive stars at early stages in their development. The Red MSX Source survey (RMS survey) is a valuable tool with which to address these issues. Near-infrared H- and K-band spectra were taken for 247 candidate massive young stellar objects (MYSOs), selected from the RMS survey. 195 (∼80%) of the targets are YSOs, of which 131 are massive YSOs (LBOL>5E3L⊙, M>8 M⊙). This is the largest spectroscopic study of massive YSOs to date. This study covers minimally obscured objects right through to very red, dusty sources. Almost all YSOs show some evidence for emission lines, though there is a wide variety of observed properties, with HI, H2 Fe II, and CO among the most commonly observed lines. Evidence for disks and outflows was frequently seen. Comparisons of Brγ and H2 emission with low mass YSOs suggest that the emission mechanism for these lines is the same for low-, intermediate-, and high-mass YSOs, i.e. high-mass YSOs appear to resemble scaled-up versions of low-mass YSOs. It was found that the YSOs form an evolutionary sequence, based on their spectra, consistent with the existing theoretical models. Type I YSOs have strong H2 emission, no ionized lines, and are redder than the other two subtypes. As such, these are considered to be the youngest sources. The Type III sources are bluest, and therefore considered to be the oldest subtype. They have strong H I lines and fluorescent Fe II 1.6878 μm emission. They may also have weak H2 emission. Type III sources may even be beginning to form a mini-H II region. XSHOOTER data from 10 Herbig Be stars were analysed. The evidence suggests that winds and disks are common among Herbig stars, as they are among their main sequence classical Be star counterparts. Line

  20. Observation and Measurement of Temperature Rise and Distribution on GaAs Photo-cathode Wafer with a 532nm Drive Laser and a Thermal Imaging Camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukui Zhang, Stephen Benson, Carlos Hernandez-Garcia

    2011-03-01

    Significant temperature rise and gradient are observed from a GaAs photo-cathode wafer irradiated at various power levels with over 20W laser power at 532nm wavelength. The laser power absorption and dissipated thermal distribution are measured. The result shows a clear indication that proper removal of laser induced heat from the cathode needs to be considered seriously when designing a high average current or low quantum efficiency photo-cathode electron gun. The measurement method presented here provides a useful way to obtain information about both temperature and thermal profiles, it also applies to cathode heating study with other heating devices such as electrical heaters.

  1. Observing the reconnection region in a transequatorial loop system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui Liu; Tong-Jiang Wang; Jeongwoo Lee; Guillermo Stenborg; Chang Liu; Sung-Hong Park; Hai-Min Wang

    2011-01-01

    A vertical current sheet is a crucial element in many flare/coronal mass ejection (CME) models.For the first time,Liu et al.reported a vertical current sheet directly imaged during the flare rising phase with the EUV Imaging Telescope (EIT) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO).As a follow-up study,here we present the comprehensive analysis and detailed physical interpretation of the observation.The current sheet formed due to the gradual rise of a transequatorial loop system.As the loop legs approached each other,plasma flew at ~6 km s-1 into a local area where a cusp-shaped flare loop subsequently formed and the current sheet was seen as a bright,collimated structure of global length (≥ 0.25 R(@)) and macroscopic width ((5-10)× 103 km),extending from 50 Mm above the flaring loop to the border of the EIT field of view (FOV).The reconnection rate in terms of the Alfvén Mach number is estimated to be only 0.005-0.009,albeit a halo CME was accelerated from ~ 400 km s- 1 to ~ 1300 km s- 1 within the coronagraph FOV.Drifting pulsating structures at metric frequencies were recorded during the impulsive phase,implying tearing of the current sheet in the high corona.A radio Type Ⅲ burst occurred when the current sheet was clearly seen in EUV,indicative of accelerated electrons beaming upward from the upper tip of the current sheet.A cusp-shaped dimming region was observed to be located above the post-flare arcade during the decay phase in EIT;both the arcade and the dimming expanded with time.With the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) aboard SOHO,a clear signature of chromospheric evaporation was seen during the decay phase,i.e.,the cusp-shaped dimming region was associated with plasma upflows detected with EUV hot emission lines,while the post-flare loop was associated with downflows detected with cold lines.This event provides a comprehensive view of the reconnection geometry and dynamics in the solar corona.

  2. Cool transition region loops observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Zhenghua; Li, Bo; Madjarska, Maria S

    2015-01-01

    We report on the first Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) study of cool transition region loops. This class of loops has received little attention in the literature. A cluster of such loops was observed on the solar disk in active region NOAA11934, in the Si IV 1402.8 \\AA\\ spectral raster and 1400 \\AA\\ slit-jaw (SJ) images. We divide the loops into three groups and study their dynamics and interaction. The first group comprises relatively stable loops, with 382--626\\,km cross-sections. Observed Doppler velocities are suggestive of siphon flows, gradually changing from -10 km/s at one end to 20 km/s at the other end of the loops. Nonthermal velocities from 15 to 25 km/s were determined. These physical properties suggest that these loops are impulsively heated by magnetic reconnection occurring at the blue-shifted footpoints where magnetic cancellation with a rate of $10^{15}$ Mx/s is found. The released magnetic energy is redistributed by the siphon flows. The second group corresponds to two footpoin...

  3. A Regional CO2 Observing System Simulation Experiment Using ASCENDS Observations and WRF-STILT Footprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, James S.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Eluszkiewicz, Janusz; Collatz, G. J.; Mountain, Marikate; Henderson, John; Nehrkorn, Thomas; Aschbrenner, Ryan; Zaccheo, T. Scott

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the spatiotemporal variations in emissions and uptake of CO2 is hampered by sparse measurements. The recent advent of satellite measurements of CO2 concentrations is increasing the density of measurements, and the future mission ASCENDS (Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days and Seasons) will provide even greater coverage and precision. Lagrangian atmospheric transport models run backward in time can quantify surface influences ("footprints") of diverse measurement platforms and are particularly well suited for inverse estimation of regional surface CO2 fluxes at high resolution based on satellite observations. We utilize the STILT Lagrangian particle dispersion model, driven by WRF meteorological fields at 40-km resolution, in a Bayesian synthesis inversion approach to quantify the ability of ASCENDS column CO2 observations to constrain fluxes at high resolution. This study focuses on land-based biospheric fluxes, whose uncertainties are especially large, in a domain encompassing North America. We present results based on realistic input fields for 2007. Pseudo-observation random errors are estimated from backscatter and optical depth measured by the CALIPSO satellite. We estimate a priori flux uncertainties based on output from the CASA-GFED (v.3) biosphere model and make simple assumptions about spatial and temporal error correlations. WRF-STILT footprints are convolved with candidate vertical weighting functions for ASCENDS. We find that at a horizontal flux resolution of 1 degree x 1 degree, ASCENDS observations are potentially able to reduce average weekly flux uncertainties by 0-8% in July, and 0-0.5% in January (assuming an error of 0.5 ppm at the Railroad Valley reference site). Aggregated to coarser resolutions, e.g. 5 degrees x 5 degrees, the uncertainty reductions are larger and more similar to those estimated in previous satellite data observing system simulation experiments.

  4. New laboratory intercomparison of the ozone absorption coefficients in the mid-infrared (10 μm) and ultraviolet (300-350 nm) spectral regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratien, A; Picquet-Varrault, B; Orphal, J; Doussin, J-F; Flaud, J-M

    2010-09-23

    Knowing the ozone absorption cross sections in the ultraviolet and infrared spectral range, with an accuracy of better than 1%, is of the utmost importance for atmospheric remote-sensing applications. For this reason, various ozone intensity intercomparisons and measurements have been published these last years. However, the corresponding results proved not to be consistent and thus have raised a controversial discussion in the community of atmospheric remote-sensing. This study, where great care has been taken to avoid any possible error, reports a new laboratory intercomparison of the ozone absorption coefficients in the mid-infrared (10 μm) and ultraviolet (300-350 nm) spectral regions. It gives a new piece of information to the puzzling problem concerning the ozone IR and UV cross sections and confirms that the IR and UV cross sections recommended in the literature are in disagreement of about 4%.

  5. Thermospheric atomic oxygen concentrations from WINDII O+(2P→2D) 732 nm emission: Comparisons with the NRLMSISE-00 and C-IAM models and with GUVI observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Gordon G.; Cho, Young-Min; Fomichev, Victor I.; Martynenko, Oleg V.

    2016-09-01

    Thermospheric atomic oxygen concentrations have been retrieved from observations by the Wind Imaging Interferometer (WINDII) O+(2P→2D) 732 and 733 nm emissions and are compared with results obtained by the Global Ultraviolet Imager (GUVI). Although the observations compared were taken ten years apart, the periods were selected on the basis of solar activity, using the Canadian Ionosphere and Atmosphere Model (C-IAM) to bridge the time gap. Results from all of these were compared with those from the Naval Research Laboratory Mass Spectrometer and Incoherent Scatter (NRLMSISE-00) model. Comparisons were made on the basis of F10.7 solar flux, day of year, local time, season, latitude and longitude. The WINDII local time variations showed enhanced values for the Northern spring season. Latitude and longitude plots showed smooth variations for NRLMSISE-00 and large variations for both WINDII and GUVI observations; in particular a depression in atomic oxygen concentration around 40 °S latitude and 100 °E longitude that is tentatively identified with a longitudinal wave 1 that does not propagate in local time but has an annual variation. The averaged values showed the WINDII values to be 0.75 that of NRLMSISE-00 compared with 0.80 for GUVI. Thus the WINDII values agreed with those of GUVI to within 6%, although taken 10 years apart.

  6. Regional-Scale Climate Change: Observations and Model Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, Raymond S; Diaz, Henry F

    2010-12-14

    This collaborative proposal addressed key issues in understanding the Earth's climate system, as highlighted by the U.S. Climate Science Program. The research focused on documenting past climatic changes and on assessing future climatic changes based on suites of global and regional climate models. Geographically, our emphasis was on the mountainous regions of the world, with a particular focus on the Neotropics of Central America and the Hawaiian Islands. Mountain regions are zones where large variations in ecosystems occur due to the strong climate zonation forced by the topography. These areas are particularly susceptible to changes in critical ecological thresholds, and we conducted studies of changes in phonological indicators based on various climatic thresholds.

  7. Experimental and simulated neon spectra in the 10 nm wavelength region from the Tore Supra Tokamak and the reversed field pinch RFX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattioli, M.; DeMichelis, C.; Monier-Garbet, P. [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/Cadarache, Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee (DRFC), 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Fournier, K.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Carraro, L.; Puiatti, M.E.; Sattin, F.; Scarin, P.; Valisa, M. [Conzorzio RFX, Padova (Italy)

    1999-07-01

    Experimental neon spectra (in the 10 nm region), from the tokamak Tore Supra and the reversed field pinch RFX, have been simulated. The spectra include lines from three neon ionization states, Ne{sup 7+}, Ne{sup 6+}, and Ne{sup 5+} ions. Collisional radiative models have been built for these three Ne ions, considering electron collisional excitation and radiative decay as populating processes of the excited states. These models give photon emission coefficients for the emitted lines at electron density and temperature values corresponding to the experimental situations. Impurity modelling is performed using a 1-D impurity transport code, calculating the steady state radial distribution of the Ne ions. The Ne line brightnesses are evaluated in a post-process subroutine and simulated spectra are obtained. The parts of the spectra corresponding to a single ionization state do not depend on the experimental conditions and show good agreement with the simulated single ionization state spectra. On the other hand, the superposition of the three spectra depends on the experimental conditions, as a consequence of the fact that the ion charge distribution depends not only on the radial profiles of the electron density and temperature, but also of the impurity transport coefficients. Simulations of the Ne spectra (including transport) give confidence in the atomic physics calculations; moreover, they allow the determination of the transport coefficients in the plasma region emitting the considered ionization states. (authors)

  8. Aging worlds in contradiction: gerontological observations in the Mediterranean region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Joachim von Kondratowitz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the existing and developing aging regimes in the Northern and Southern rim countries of the whole Mediterranean region which are all undergoing considerable social and political transformation processes. It is argued that several eye-opening theoretical interventions for such a gerontological project may lead to some methodological problems and pitfalls, which have to be dealt with productively. Central collective concepts of such an analysis (as the change-oriented "modernization effects" of societal aging and the continuity-oriented gaze at the "unity of the region" have to be reconsidered and ought to be more differentiated in order to allow smaller social entities (such as kinship and community systems and their connectivity to be central orientations for analyzing poverty and care management in old age in the Mediterranean region. How to reconnect such a rather micro-political agenda with large processes and big structures of aging policies in the region however still remains an open question.

  9. Observations of the cusp region under northward IMF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Pitout

    Full Text Available We present a comparative study of the cusp region using the EISCAT Svalbard Radars (ESR and the Cluster spacecraft. We focus in this paper on 2 February 2001, over the time period from 07:30 UT to 12:00 UT when the oblique ESR antenna pointing northward at a low elevation recorded latitudinal motions of the cusp region in response to the IMF. Meanwhile, the Cluster satellites were flying over the EISCAT Svalbard Radar field-of-view around local magnetic noon. The spacecraft first flew near ESR, northeast of Svalbard and then passed over the field-of-view of the antenna at about 11:30 UT. From 08:00 UT to 09:00 UT, the IMF remains primarily southward yet several variations in the Z-component are seen to move the cusp. Around 09:00 UT, an abrupt northward turning of the IMF moves the cusp region to higher latitudes. As a result, the Cluster satellites ended up in the northernmost boundary of the high-altitude cusp region where the CIS instrument recorded highly structured plasma due to ion injections in the lobe of the magnetosphere. After 09:00 UT, the IMF remains northward for more than two hours. Over this period, the ESR records sunward plasma flow in the cusp region due to lobe reconnection, while Cluster spacecraft remain in the high-altitude cusp.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause, cusp, and boundary layers; plasma convection Ionosphere (polar ionosphere

  10. Deep Sea Coral National Observation Database, Northeast Region

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The national database of deep sea coral observations. Northeast version 1.0. * This database was developed by the NOAA NOS NCCOS CCMA Biogeography office as part of...

  11. Relationship between sensitizer concentration and resist performance of chemically amplified extreme ultraviolet resists in sub-10 nm half-pitch resolution region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozawa, Takahiro; Santillan, Julius Joseph; Itani, Toshiro

    2017-01-01

    The development of lithography processes with sub-10 nm resolution is challenging. Stochastic phenomena such as line width roughness (LWR) are significant problems. In this study, the feasibility of sub-10 nm fabrication using chemically amplified extreme ultraviolet resists with photodecomposable quenchers was investigated from the viewpoint of the suppression of LWR. The relationship between sensitizer concentration (the sum of acid generator and photodecomposable quencher concentrations) and resist performance was clarified, using the simulation based on the sensitization and reaction mechanisms of chemically amplified resists. For the total sensitizer concentration of 0.5 nm-3 and the effective reaction radius for the deprotection of 0.1 nm, the reachable half-pitch while maintaining 10% critical dimension (CD) LWR was 11 nm. The reachable half-pitch was 7 nm for 20% CD LWR. The increase in the effective reaction radius is required to realize the sub-10 nm fabrication with 10% CD LWR.

  12. Global observations of substorm injection region evolution: 27 August 2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Spanswick

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available We present riometer and in situ observations of a substorm electron injection on 27 August 2001. The event is seen at more than 20 separate locations (including ground stations and 6 satellites: Cluster, Polar, Chandra, and 3 Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL spacecraft. The injection is observed to be dispersionless at 12 of these locations. Combining these observations with information from the GOES-8 geosynchronous satellite we argue that the injection initiated near geosynchronous orbit and expanded poleward (tailward and equatorward (earthward afterward. Further, the injection began several minutes after the reconnection identified in the Cluster data, thus providing concrete evidence that, in at least some events, near-Earth reconnection has little if any ionospheric signature.

  13. The black disk to be observed in the Orear region

    CERN Document Server

    Dremin, I M

    2012-01-01

    It is argued that the very first signatures of the approach to the black disk asymptotical limit in hadron collisions may be observed in the differential cross section of elastic scattering. The exponentially decreasing with the angle (or $\\sqrt {|t|}$) regime beyond the diffraction peak will become replaced by an oscillatory behavior. Some estimates of energies where this can happen are presented.

  14. Quantifying solar superactive regions with vector magnetic field observations

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, A Q

    2012-01-01

    The vector magnetic field characteristics of superactive regions (SARs) hold the key for understanding why SARs are extremely active and provide the guidance in space weather prediction. We aim to quantify the characteristics of SARs using the vector magnetograms taken by the Solar Magnetic Field Telescope at Huairou Solar Observatory Station. The vector magnetic field characteristics of 14 SARs in solar cycles 22 and 23 were analyzed using the following four parameters: 1) the magnetic flux imbalance between opposite polarities, 2) the total photospheric free magnetic energy, 3) the length of the magnetic neutral line with its steep horizontal magnetic gradient, and 4) the area with strong magnetic shear. Furthermore, we selected another eight large and inactive active regions (ARs), which are called fallow ARs (FARs), to compare them with the SARs. We found that most of the SARs have a net magnetic flux higher than 7.0\\times10^21 Mx, a total photospheric free magnetic energy higher than 1.0\\times10^24 erg/c...

  15. Nucleotide sequence and molecular genetic analysis of the vaccinia virus HindIII N/M region encoding the genes responsible for resistance to alpha-amanitin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamin, A; Villarreal, E C; Weinrich, S L; Hruby, D E

    1988-07-01

    The genomic location of the gene(s) which provides vaccinia virus (VV) alpha-amanitin-resistant mutants with a drug-resistant phenotype have been mapped to the HindIII N/M region of the genome by the use of marker rescue techniques [E. C. Villarreal and D. E. Hruby (1986) J. Virol. 57, 65-70]. Nucleotide sequencing of a 2356-bp HindIII-Sau3A fragment of the vaccinia virus genome encompassing this region reveals the presence of two complete leftward-reading open reading frames (ORFs, N2 and M1) and two incomplete ORFs (N1 and M2). By computer analysis the N2 and M1 ORFs would be predicted to encode soluble VV polypeptides with molecular weights of approximately 20 and 48 kDa, respectively. The N2 and M1 ORFs have extremely A-T-rich 5'-proximal sequences, consistent with previous data regarding the location and A-T-richness of viral early promoters. Likewise, the consensus signal believed to be involved in terminating VV early gene transcription, TTTTTNT, was evident at the 3'-boundary of both the N2 and M1 ORFs suggesting that these genes may be VV early genes. The in vivo transcriptional activity, orientation, and limits of these putative transcriptional units were investigated by Northern blot, nuclease S1, and primer extension analysis. Both N2- and M1-specific transcripts were detected in the cytoplasm of VV-infected cells, suggesting that these loci are bonafide viral genes. Time-course nuclease S1 experiments revealed that the N2 gene was transcribed exclusively prior to VV DNA replication. In contrast, the M1 gene was transcribed throughout infection, although different start sites were used at early versus late times postinfection. These results are discussed in relation to the drug-resistant phenotype and future experiments to identify the viral gene product responsible.

  16. The black disk to be observed in the Orear region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dremin, I. M.

    2012-08-01

    It is argued that the very first signatures of the approach to the black disk asymptotical limit in hadron collisions may be observed in the differential cross section of elastic scattering. The exponentially decreasing with the angle (or √{|t|} ) regime beyond the diffraction peak will become replaced by an oscillatory behavior or by the power-like falloff. Some estimates of energies where this can happen are presented.

  17. The black disk to be observed in the Orear region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dremin, I.M., E-mail: dremin@td.lpi.ru [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2012-08-15

    It is argued that the very first signatures of the approach to the black disk asymptotical limit in hadron collisions may be observed in the differential cross section of elastic scattering. The exponentially decreasing with the angle (or {radical}(|t|) ) regime beyond the diffraction peak will become replaced by an oscillatory behavior or by the power-like falloff. Some estimates of energies where this can happen are presented.

  18. Statistical region-based active contours with exponential family observations

    CERN Document Server

    Lecellier, François; Fadili, Jalal; Aubert, Gilles; Revenu, Marinette

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on statistical region-based active contour models where image features (e.g. intensity) are random variables whose distribution belongs to some parametric family (e.g. exponential) rather than confining ourselves to the special Gaussian case. Using shape derivation tools, our effort focuses on constructing a general expression for the derivative of the energy (with respect to a domain) and derive the corresponding evolution speed. A general result is stated within the framework of multi-parameter exponential family. More particularly, when using Maximum Likelihood estimators, the evolution speed has a closed-form expression that depends simply on the probability density function, while complicating additive terms appear when using other estimators, e.g. moments method. Experimental results on both synthesized and real images demonstrate the applicability of our approach.

  19. Initial daytime and nighttime SOFDI observations of thermospheric winds from Fabry-Perot Doppler shift measurements of the 630-nm OI line-shape profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Gerrard

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present both night and day thermospheric wind observations made with the Second-generation, Optimized, Fabry-Perot Doppler Imager (SOFDI, a novel triple-etalon Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI designed to make 24-h measurements of thermospheric winds from OI 630-nm emission. These results were obtained from the northeastern United States and from under the magnetic equator at Huancayo, Peru and demonstrate the current instrument capability for measurements of Doppler shifts for either night or day. We found the uncertainties in the measurements agree with expected values based upon forward modeling calculations; nighttime wind components having an uncertainty of ~20-m s−1 at 30-min resolution and daytime wind components having an uncertainty of ~70-m s−1 at 20-min resolution. The nighttime uncertainties are typically larger than those seen with traditional single-etalon FPIs, which occur at the cost of being able to achieve daytime measurements. The thermospheric wind measurements from Huancayo replicate recently reported CHAMP zonal winds and are in disagreement with current empirical wind climatologies. In addition, we discuss the incorporation of how multiple point heads in the SOFDI instrument will allow for unique studies of gravity wave activity in future measurements.

  20. Lroc Observations of Permanently Shadowed Regions: Seeing into the Dark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeber, S. D.; Robinson, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    Permanently shadowed regions (PSRs) near the lunar poles that receive secondary illumination from nearby Sun facing slopes were imaged by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Narrow Angle Cameras (NAC). Typically secondary lighting is optimal in polar areas around respective solstices and when the LRO orbit is nearly coincident with the sub-solar point (low spacecraft beta angles). NAC PSR images provide the means to search for evidence of surface frosts and unusual morphologies from ice rich regolith, and aid in planning potential landing sites for future in-situ exploration. Secondary illumination imaging in PSRs requires NAC integration times typically more than ten times greater than nominal imaging. The increased exposure time results in downtrack smear that decreases the spatial resolution of the NAC PSR images. Most long exposure NAC images of PSRs were acquired with exposure times of 24.2-ms (1-m by 40-m pixels, sampled to 20-m) and 12-ms (1-m by 20-m, sampled to 10-m). The initial campaign to acquire long exposure NAC images of PSRs in the north pole region ran from February 2013 to April 2013. Relative to the south polar region, PSRs near the north pole are generally smaller (D6-km were successfully imaged (ex. Whipple, Hermite A, and Rozhestvenskiy U). The third PSR south polar campaign began in April 2013 and will continue until October 2013. The third campaign will expand previous NAC coverage of PSRs and follow up on discoveries with new images of higher signal to noise ratio (SNR), higher resolution, and varying secondary illumination conditions. Utilizing previous campaign images and Sun's position, an individualized approach for targeting each crater drives this campaign. Secondary lighting within the PSRs, though somewhat diffuse, is at low incidence angles and coupled with nadir NAC imaging results in large phase angles. Such conditions tend to reduce albedo contrasts, complicating identification of patchy frost or ice deposits. Within

  1. Anthropogenic air pollution observed near dust source regions in northwestern China during springtime 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Can; Tsay, Si-Chee; Fu, Joshua S.; Dickerson, Russell R.; Ji, Qiang; Bell, Shaun W.; Gao, Yang; Zhang, Wu; Huang, Jianping; Li, Zhanqing; Chen, Hongbin

    2010-04-01

    Trace gases and aerosols were measured in Zhangye (39.082°N, 100.276°E, 1460 m a.s.l.), a rural site near the Gobi deserts in northwestern China during spring 2008. Primary trace gases (CO: 265 ppb; SO2: 3.4 ppb; NOy*: 4.2 ppb; hereafter results given as means of hourly data) in the area were lower than in eastern China, but still indicative of marked anthropogenic emissions. Sizable aerosol mass concentration (153 μg/m3) and light scattering (159 Mm-1 at 500 nm) were largely attributable to dust emissions, and aerosol light absorption (10.3 Mm-1 at 500 nm) was dominated by anthropogenic pollution. Distinct diurnal variations in meteorology and pollution were induced by the local valley terrain. Strong daytime northwest valley wind cleaned out pollution and was replaced by southeast mountain wind that allowed pollutants to build up overnight. In the afternoon, aerosols had single scattering albedo (SSA, 500 nm) of 0.95 and were mainly of supermicron particles, presumably dust, while at night smaller particles and SSA of 0.89-0.91 were related to pollution. The diverse local emission sources were characterized: the CO/SO2, CO/NOy, NOy/SO2 (by moles), and BC/CO (by mass) ratios for small point sources such as factories were 24.6-54.2, 25.8-35.9, 0.79-1.31, and 4.1-6.1 × 10-3, respectively, compared to the corresponding inventory ratios of 43.7-71.9, 23.7-25.7, 1.84-2.79, and 3.4-4.0 × 10-3 for the industrial sector in the area. The mixing between dust and pollution can be ubiquitous in this region. During a dust storm shown as an example, pollutants were observed to mix with dust, causing discernible changes in both SSA and aerosol size distribution. Further interaction between dust and pollutants during transport may modify the properties of dust particles that are critical for their large-scale impact on radiation, clouds, and global biogeochemical cycles.

  2. Optical polarization observations in the Scorpius region: NGC 6124

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergne, M. Marcela; Feinstein, Carlos; Martínez, Ruben; Orsatti, Ana María; Alvarez, María Paula

    2010-04-01

    We have obtained optical multicolour (UBVRI) linear polarimetric data for 46 of the brightest stars in the area of the open cluster NGC 6124 in order to investigate the properties of the interstellar medium (ISM) that lies along the line of sight towards the cluster. Our data yield a mean polarization efficiency of PV/E(B - V) = 3.1 +/- 0.62, i.e. a value lower than the polarization produced by the ISM with normal efficiency for an average colour excess of E(B - V) = 0.80 as that found for NGC 6124. Besides, the polarization shows an orientation of which is not parallel to the Galactic disc, an effect that we think may be caused by the Lupus cloud. Our analysis also indicates that the observed visual extinction in NGC 6124 is caused by the presence of three different absorption sheets located between the Sun and NGC 6124. The values of the internal dispersion of the polarization (ΔPV ~ 1.3 per cent) and of the colour excess (ΔE(B - V) ~ 0.29 mag) for the members of NGC 6124 seem to be compatible with the presence of an intracluster dust component. Only six stars exhibit some evidence of intrinsic polarization. Our work also shows that polarimetry provides an excellent tool to distinguish between member and non-member stars of a cluster. Based on observations obtained at Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO), operated under agreement between the CONICET and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba, and San Juan, Argentina. E-mail: cfeinstein@fcaglp.unlp.edu.ar (CF)

  3. Observations of day-to-day variability in precursor signatures to equatorial F-region plasma depletions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. R. Fagundes

    Full Text Available In December 1995, a campaign was carried out to study the day-to-day variability in precursor signatures to large-scale ionospheric F-region plasma irregularities, using optical diagnostic techniques, near the magnetic equator in the Brazilian sector. Three instruments were operated simultaneously: (a an all-sky (180° field of view imaging system for observing the OI 630 nm nightglow emission at Alcântara (2.5°S, 44.4°W; (b a digisonde (256-Lowell at São Luis (2.6°S, 44.2°W; and (c a multi-channel tilting filter-type zenith photometer for observing the OI 630 nm and mesospheric nightglow emissions at Fortaleza (3.9°S, 38.4°W. During the period December 14-18, 1995 (summer in the southern hemisphere, a good sequence of the OI 630 nm imaging observations on five consecutive nights were obtained, which are presented and discussed in this study. The observing period was geomagnetically quiet to moderate 
    (Kp = 0+ to 5+; Dst = 18 nT to -37 nT. On four nights, out of the five observation nights, the OI 630 nm imaging pictures showed formations of transequatorial north-south aligned intensity depletions, which are the optical signatures of large-scale ionospheric F-region plasma bubbles. However, considerable day-to-day variability in the onset and development of the plasma depleted bands was observed. On one of the nights it appears that the rapid uplifting of the F-layer in the post-sunset period, in conjunction with gravity wave activity at mesospheric heights, resulted in generation of very strong plasma bubble irregularities. One of the nights showed an unusual formation of north-south depleted band in the western sector of the imaging system field of view, but the structure did not show any eastward movement, which is a normal characteristic of plasma bubbles. This type of irregularity structure, which probably can be observed only by wide-angle imaging system, needs more investigations for a better understanding of

  4. Optical polarization observations in the Scorpius region: NGC 6124

    CERN Document Server

    Vergne, M Marcela; Martinez, Ruben; Orsatti, Ana Maria; Alvarez, Maria Paula

    2010-01-01

    We have obtained optical multicolour (UBVRI) linear polarimetric data for 46 of the brightest stars in the area of the open cluster NGC 6124 in order to investigate the properties of the interstellar medium (ISM) that lies along the line of sight toward the cluster. Our data yield a mean polarization efficiency of $P_V/E_{B-V}=3.1\\pm$0.62, i.e., a value lower than the polarization produced by the ISM with normal efficiency for an average color excess of $E_{B-V}=0.80$ as that found for NGC 6124. Besides, the polarization shows an orientation of $\\theta \\sim 8^\\circ$.1 which is not parallel to the Galactic Disk,an effect that we think may be caused by the Lupus Cloud. Our analysis also indicates that the observed visual extinction in NGC 6124 is caused by the presence of three different absorption sheets located between the Sun and NGC 6124. The values of the internal dispersion of the polarization ($\\Delta P_V\\sim 1.3% $) and of the colour excess ($\\Delta E_{B-V}\\sim 0.29$ mag) for the members of NGC 6124 see...

  5. A Flare Observed in Coronal, Transition Region and Helium I 10830 \\AA\\ Emissions

    CERN Document Server

    Zeng, Zhicheng; Cao, Wenda; Judge, Philip G

    2014-01-01

    On June 17, 2012, we observed the evolution of a C-class flare associated with the eruption of a filament near a large sunspot in the active region NOAA 11504. We obtained high spatial resolution filtergrams using the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope at the Big Bear Solar Observatory in broad-band TiO at 706 nm (bandpass:10 \\AA) and He I 10830 \\AA\\ narrow-band (bandpass: 0.5 \\AA, centered 0.25 \\AA\\ to the blue). We analyze the spatio-temporal behavior of the He I 10830 \\AA\\ data, which were obtained over a 90" X 90" field of view with a cadence of 10 sec. We also analyze simultaneous data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment instruments on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft, and data from Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager and GOES spacecrafts. Non-thermal effects are ignored in this analysis. Several quantitative aspects of the data, as well as models derived using the "0D" Enthalpy-Based Thermal Evolution of Loops model (EBTEL: Klimchuk...

  6. Enhancing carrier injection in the active region of a 280nm emission wavelength LED using graded hole and electron blocking layers

    KAUST Repository

    Janjua, Bilal

    2014-02-27

    A theoretical investigation of AlGaN UV-LED with band engineering of hole and electron blocking layers (HBL and EBL, respectively) was conducted with an aim to improve injection efficiency and reduce efficiency droop in the UV LEDs. The analysis is based on energy band diagrams, carrier distribution and recombination rates (Shockley-Reed-Hall, Auger, and radiative recombination rates) in the quantum well, under equilibrium and forward bias conditions. Electron blocking layer is based on AlaGa1-aN / Al b → cGa1-b → 1-cN / AldGa 1-dN, where a < d < b < c. A graded layer sandwiched between large bandgap AlGaN materials was found to be effective in simultaneously blocking electrons and providing polarization field enhanced carrier injection. The graded interlayer reduces polarization induced band bending and mitigates the related drawback of impediment of holes injection. Similarly on the n-side, the Alx → yGa1-x → 1-yN / AlzGa 1-zN (x < z < y) barrier acts as a hole blocking layer. The reduced carrier leakage and enhanced carrier density in the active region results in significant improvement in radiative recombination rate compared to a structure with the conventional rectangular EBL layers. The improvement in device performance comes from meticulously designing the hole and electron blocking layers to increase carrier injection efficiency. The quantum well based UV-LED was designed to emit at 280nm, which is an effective wavelength for water disinfection application.

  7. Variation of the Meridional Wind at 95 km with Season and Local Solar Time from Observations of the 11.072 GHz Ozone line and 557.7 nm Oxygen line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, O. B.; Rogers, A.; Erickson, P. J.; Goncharenko, L. P.; Noto, J.

    2015-12-01

    Ground-based spectrometers have been deployed to measure the concentration, velocity, and temperature of ozone in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) using low-cost satellite television electronics to observe the 11.072 GHz line of ozone. The ozone line was observed at an altitude near 95 km and latitude of 38 degrees north using three spectrometers located at the MIT Haystack Observatory (Westford, MA), Chelmsford High School (Chelmsford, MA), and Union College (Schenectady, NY) pointed south at 8 degrees. Observations from 2009 through 2014 are used to derive the nightly-averaged seasonal variation in meridional velocity, as well as the seasonally-averaged variation with local solar time. The results indicate a seasonal trend in which the winds at 95 km come from the north at about 10 m/s in the summer of the northern hemisphere, and from the south at about 10 m/s in the winter. Nighttime data from -5 to +5 local solar time show a gradual transition of the meridional wind velocity from about -20 m/s to 20 m/s. These two trends correlate with nighttime wind measurements from the Millstone Hill High-Resolution Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FPI) in Westford, MA. The FPI uses the 557.7 nm green line nightglow from atomic oxygen that occupies the same region of the mesosphere as the ozone centered at 95 km. The results have also been compared with average meridional winds measured with meteor radar.

  8. Photodissociation of gaseous CH{sub 3}COSH at 248 nm by time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy: Observation of three dissociation channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, En-Lan; Tsai, Po-Yu; Fan, He; Lin, King-Chuen [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China) and Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2013-01-07

    Upon one-photon excitation at 248 nm, gaseous CH{sub 3}C(O)SH is dissociated following three pathways with the products of (1) OCS + CH{sub 4}, (2) CH{sub 3}SH + CO, and (3) CH{sub 2}CO + H{sub 2}S that are detected using time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy. The excited state {sup 1}(n{sub O}, {pi}{sup *}{sub CO}) has a radiative lifetime of 249 {+-} 11 ns long enough to allow for Ar collisions that induce internal conversion and enhance the fragment yields. The rate constant of collision-induced internal conversion is estimated to be 1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Among the primary dissociation products, a fraction of the CH{sub 2}CO moiety may undergo further decomposition to CH{sub 2}+ CO, of which CH{sub 2} is confirmed by reaction with O{sub 2} producing CO{sub 2}, CO, OH, and H{sub 2}CO. Such a secondary decomposition was not observed previously in the Ar matrix-isolated experiments. The high-resolution spectra of CO are analyzed to determine the ro-vibrational energy deposition of 8.7 {+-} 0.7 kcal/mol, while the remaining primary products with smaller rotational constants are recognized but cannot be spectrally resolved. The CO fragment detected is mainly ascribed to the primary production. A prior distribution method is applied to predict the vibrational distribution of CO that is consistent with the experimental findings.

  9. Flows in and around active region NOAA12118 observed with the GREGOR solar telescope and SDO/HMI

    CERN Document Server

    Verma, M; Balthasar, H; Kuckein, C; Manrique, S J González; Sobotka, M; González, N Bello; Hoch, S; Diercke, A; Kummerow, P; Berkefeld, T; Collados, M; Feller, A; Hofmann, A; Kneer, F; Lagg, A; Löhner-Böttcher, J; Nicklas, H; Yabar, A Pastor; Schlichenmaier, R; Schmidt, D; Schmidt, W; Schubert, M; Sigwarth, M; Solanki, S K; Soltau, D; Staude, J; Strassmeier, K G; Volkmer, R; von der Lühe, O; Waldmann, T

    2016-01-01

    Accurate measurements of magnetic and velocity fields in and around solar active regions are key to unlocking the mysteries of the formation and the decay of sunspots. High spatial resolution image and spectral sequences with a high cadence obtained with the GREGOR solar telescope give us an opportunity to scrutinize 3-D flow fields with local correlation tracking and imaging spectroscopy. We present GREGOR early science data acquired in 2014 July - August with the GREGOR Fabry-P\\'erot Interferometer and the Blue Imaging Channel. Time-series of blue continuum (? 450.6 nm) images of the small active region NOAA 12118 were restored with the speckle masking technique to derive horizontal proper motions and to track the evolution of morphological changes. In addition, high-resolution observations are discussed in the context of synoptic data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory.

  10. Anthropogenic Air Pollution Observed Near Dust Source Regions in Northwestern China During Springtime 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Can; Tsay, Si-Chee; Fu, Joshua S.; Dickerson, Russell R.; Ji, Qiang; Bell, Shaun W.; Gao, Yang; Zhang, Wu; Huang, Jianping; Li, Zhanqing; Chen, Hongbin

    2010-01-01

    Trace gases and aerosols were measured in Zhangye (39.082degN, 100.276degE, 1460 m a.s. 1.), a rural site near the Gobi deserts in northwestern China during spring 2008. Primary trace gases (CO:265 ppb; SO2:3.4 ppb; NO(*y): 4.2 ppb; hereafter results given as means of hourly data) in the area were lower than in eastern China, but still indicative of marked anthropogenic emissions. Sizable aerosol mass concentration (153 micro-g/cu m) and light scattering (159/Mm at 500 nm) were largely attributable to dust emissions, and aerosol light absorption (10.3/Mm at 500 nm) was dominated by anthropogenic pollution. Distinct diurnal variations in meteorology and pollution were induced by the local valley terrain. Strong daytime northwest valley wind cleaned out pollution and was replaced by southeast mountain wind that allowed pollutants to build up overnight. In the afternoon, aerosols had single scattering albedo (SSA, 500 mn) of 0.95 and were mainly of supermicron particles, presumably dust, while at night smaller particles and SSA of 0.89-0.91 were related to Pollution. The diverse local emission sources were characterized: the CO/SO2, CO/NO(y), NO(y)/SO2 (by moles), and BC/CO (by mass) ratios for small point sources such as factories were 24.6-54.2, 25.8-35.9, 0.79-1.31, and 4.1-6.1 x 10(exp -3), respectively, compared to the corresponding inventory ratios of 43.7-71.9, 23.7-25.7, 1.84-2.79, and 3.4-4.0 x 10(exp -3) for the industrial sector in the area. The mixing between dust and pollution can be ubiquitous in this region. During a dust storm shown as an example, pollutants were observed to mix with dust, causing discernible changes in both SSA and aerosol size distribution. Further interaction between dust and pollutants during transport may modify the properties of dust particles that are critical for their large-scale impact on radiation, clouds, and global biogeochemical cycles.

  11. High-speed, high-resolution Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography system for retinal imaging in the 1060 nm wavelength region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puvanathasan, Prabakar; Forbes, Peter; Ren, Zhao; Malchow, Doug; Boyd, Shelley; Bizheva, Kostadinka

    2008-11-01

    A high-speed (47,000 A-scans/s), ultrahigh axial resolution Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) system for retinal imaging at approximately 1060 nm, based on a 1024 pixel linear array, 47 kHz readout rate InGaAs camera is presented. When interfaced with a custom superluminescent diode (lambda(c) = 1020 nm, Deltalambda = 108 nm, Pout = 9 mW), the system provides 3.3 microm axial OCT resolution at the surface of biological tissue, approximately 4.5 microm in vivo in rat retina, approximately 5.7 microm in vivo in human retina, and 110 dB sensitivity for 870 microW incident power and 21 mus integration time. Retinal tomograms acquired in vivo from a human volunteer and a rat animal model show clear visualization of all intraretinal layer and increased penetration into the choroid.

  12. A Long-Term Decrease of the Mid-Size Segmentation Lengths Observed in the He ii (30.4 nm) Solar EUV Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didkovsky, Leonid; Wieman, Seth; Korogodina, Elena

    2017-02-01

    Power spectra of segmentation-cell length (a dominant length scale of EUV emission in the transition region) from full-disk He ii extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images observed by the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) during periods of quiet-Sun conditions for a time interval from 1996 to 2015 were analyzed. The spatial power as a function of the spatial frequency from about 0.04 to 0.27 (EIT) or up to 0.48 (AIA) Mm-1 depends on the distribution of the observed segmentation-cell dimensions - a structure of the solar EUV network. The temporal variations of the spatial power reported by Didkovsky and Gurman ( Solar Phys. 289, 153, 2014) were suggested as decreases at the mid-spatial frequencies for the compared spectra when the power curves at the highest spatial frequencies of 0.5 pix-1 were adjusted to match each other. This approach has been extended in this work to compare spectral ratios at high spatial frequencies expressed in the solar spatial frequency units of Mm-1. A model of EIT and AIA spatial responses allowed us to directly compare spatial spectral ratios at high spatial frequencies for five years of joint operation of EIT and AIA, from 2010 to 2015. Based on this approach, we represent these ratio changes as a long-term network transformation that may be interpreted as a continuous dissipation of mid-size network structures to the smaller-size structures in the transition region. In contrast to expected cycling of the segmentation-cell dimension structures and associated spatial power in the spectra with the solar cycle, the spectra demonstrate a significant and steady change of the EUV network. The temporal trend across these structural spectra is not critically sensitive to any long-term instrumental changes, e.g. degradation of sensitivity, but to the change of the segmentation-cell dimensions of the EUV

  13. First observation of natural circular dichroism spectra in the extreme ultraviolet region using a polarizing undulator-based optical system and its polarization characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masahito; Yagi-Watanabe, Kazutoshi; Kaneko, Fusae; Nakagawa, Kazumichi

    2009-07-01

    Natural circular dichroism (CD) spectra in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) region down to a wavelength of 80 nm have been observed for the first time, using an alanine thin film deposited on sodium salicylate coated glass as a sample. Calibrated EUV-CD spectra of L-alanine exhibited a large negative peak at around 120 nm and a positive CD signal below 90 nm, which were roughly predicted by theoretical calculations. A CD measurement system with an Onuki-type polarizing undulator was used to obtain the EUV-CD spectra. This CD system, the development of which took five years, can be used to observe even weak natural CD spectra. The polarization characteristics of this system were also evaluated in order to calibrate the recorded CD spectra.

  14. Extreme dust storm over the eastern Mediterranean in September 2015: satellite, lidar, and surface observations in the Cyprus region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamouri, Rodanthi-Elisavet; Ansmann, Albert; Nisantzi, Argyro; Solomos, Stavros; Kallos, George; Hadjimitsis, Diofantos G.

    2016-11-01

    A record-breaking dust storm originating from desert regions in northern Syria and Iraq occurred over the eastern Mediterranean in September 2015. In this contribution of a series of two articles (part 1, observations; part 2, atmospheric modeling), we provide a comprehensive overview of the aerosol conditions during this extreme dust outbreak in the Cyprus region. These observations are based on satellite observations (MODIS, moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer) of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and Ångström exponent, surface particle mass (PM10) concentrations measured at four sites in Cyprus, visibility observations at three airports in southern Cyprus and corresponding conversion products (particle extinction coefficient, dust mass concentrations), EARLINET (European Aerosol Research Lidar Network) lidar observations of dust vertical layering over Limassol, particle optical properties (backscatter, extinction, lidar ratio, linear depolarization ratio), and derived profiles of dust mass concentrations. Maximum 550 nm AOT exceeded values of 5.0, according to MODIS, and the mass loads were correspondingly > 10 g m-2 over Larnaca and Limassol during the passage of an extremely dense dust front on 8 September 2015. Hourly mean PM10 values were close to 8000 µg m-3 and the observed meteorological optical range (visibility) was reduced to 300-750 m at Larnaca and Limassol. The visibility observations suggest peak values of the near-surface total suspended particle (TSP) extinction coefficients of 6000 Mm-1 and thus TSP mass concentrations of 10 000 µg m-3. The Raman polarization lidar observations mainly indicated a double layer structure of the dust plumes (reaching to about 4 km height), pointing to at least two different dust source regions. Dust particle extinction coefficients (532 nm) already exceeded 1000 Mm-1 and the mass concentrations reached 2000 µg m-3 in the elevated dust layers on 7 September, more than 12 h before the peak dust front on

  15. Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy of Hydrogen in the 784-852 NM Region and Corresponding Line Shape Implementation Into HITRAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yan; Wang, Jin; Cheng, Cunfeng; Liu, An-Wen; Hu, Shui-Ming; Wcislo, Piotr; Kochanov, Roman V.; Gordon, Iouli E.; Rothman, Laurence S.

    2016-06-01

    The hydrogen molecule as the most abundant neutral molecule in the universe is an important object of studies in different areas of science, especially astrophysics. The precision spectroscopy of the hydrogen molecule is particularly useful to verify the quantum electrodynamics theory (QED) in a molecular system. The electric quadrupole transitions of the second overtone of H_2 have been recorded with a high precision cavity ring-down spectrometer. A total of eight lines including the extremely weak S3(5) line in the 784-852 nm range have been observed. The line positions have been determined to an accuracy of 3 × 10-4 cm-1 and the line intensities were determined with a relative accuracy of about 1%. The deviations between the experimental and theoretical frequencies are less than 5 × 10-4 cm-1, which is much smaller than the claimed theoretical uncertainty of 0.0025cm-1. The data from this experiment along with other high-quality H_2 spectra have also been analyzed by the Hartmann-Tran profile as a test case for incorporating parametrization of this profile in the HITRAN database. It was incorporated in the new relational structure of the HITRAN database (www.hitran.org) and into the HITRAN Application Programming Interface (HAPI) for the case of H_2 spectra. Tan Y, Wang J, Cheng C-F, Zhao X-Q, Liu A-W, Hu S-M, J Mol Spectrosc 2014;300:60-4; Tran H, Ngo NH, Hartmann J-M, J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transf 2013;129:199-203; Wcislo P, Gordon IE, Tran H, Tan Y, Hu S-M, Campargue A, et al., Accepted J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transf HighRus Special Issue, 2015 Rothman LS, Gordon IE, Babikov Y, Barbe A, Chris Benner D, Bernath PF, et al., J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transf 2013;130:4-50; Kochanov RV, Gordon IE, Rothman LS, Wcislo P, Hill C, Wilzewski JS, Submitted to J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transf HighRus Special Issue, 2015.

  16. A flare observed in coronal, transition region, and helium I 10830 Å emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Zhicheng; Cao, Wenda [Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 323 Martin Luther King Boulevard, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States); Qiu, Jiong [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717-3840 (United States); Judge, Philip G. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    On 2012 June 17, we observed the evolution of a C-class flare associated with the eruption of a filament near a large sunspot in the active region NOAA 11504. We obtained high spatial resolution filtergrams using the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope at the Big Bear Solar Observatory in broadband TiO at 706 nm (bandpass: 10 Å) and He I 10830 Å narrow band (bandpass: 0.5 Å, centered 0.25 Å to the blue). We analyze the spatio-temporal behavior of the He I 10830 Å data, which were obtained over a 90''×90'' field of view with a cadence of 10 s. We also analyze simultaneous data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment instruments on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft, and data from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager and GOES spacecrafts. Non-thermal effects are ignored in this analysis. Several quantitative aspects of the data, as well as models derived using the '0D' enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops model code, indicate that the triplet states of the 10830 Å multiplet are populated by photoionization of chromospheric plasma followed by radiative recombination. Surprisingly, the He II 304 Å line is reasonably well matched by standard emission measure calculations, along with the C IV emission which dominates the Atmosphere Imaging Assembly 1600 Å channel during flares. This work lends support to some of our previous work combining X-ray, EUV, and UV data of flares to build models of energy transport from corona to chromosphere.

  17. Observation of green lasing at 537 nm from Er-ions by coupled photon-atom modes in a random cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Van Hoi; Do, Thuy Chi; Bui, Huy; Nguyen, The Anh; Van Nguyen, Thuy

    2011-03-01

    We present new results of a laser phenomenon that gives rise to a narrow green emission mode in a random photonic-crystal cavity based on an Er-doped glass-air gap-polymer with a 976 nm diode laser pump. Lasing occurs at 537 nm, which does not respond to the resonant radiative transition 2H11/2→4I15/2 4S3/2→4I15/2 in Erbium ions. This effect can be seen as photon-atom coupling in the context of the interaction between a single atom and/or a few atoms and resonant optical media, such as cavities or photonic crystals. Experimental results show that the random lasing mode directly originates from the coupled photon-atom mode inside the random cavity. The measured Q-factor is of 2100-2800 for a random cavity with an air gap of 600-1700 nm between Er-doped glass fiber and a coated polymer layer.

  18. Observation of parametric instabilities in the quarter critical density region driven by the Nike KrF laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, J. L.; Oh, J.; Phillips, L.; Afeyan, B.; Seely, J.; Kehne, D.; Brown, C. M.; Obenschain, S. P.; Serlin, V.; Schmitt, A. J.; Feldman, U.; Lehmberg, R. H.; Mclean, E.; Manka, C.

    2013-02-01

    The krypton-fluoride (KrF) laser is an attractive choice for inertial confinement fusion due to its combination of short wavelength (λ =248 nm), large bandwidth (up to 3 THz), and superior beam smoothing by induced spatial incoherence. These qualities improve the overall hydrodynamics of directly driven pellet implosions and should allow use of increased laser intensity due to higher thresholds for laser plasma instabilities when compared to frequency tripled Nd:glass lasers (λ =351 nm). Here, we report the first observations of the two-plasmon decay instability using a KrF laser. The experiments utilized the Nike laser facility to irradiate solid plastic planar targets over a range of pulse lengths (0.35 ns≤τ≤1.25 ns) and intensities (up to 2×1015 W/cm2). Variation of the laser pulse created different combinations of electron temperature and electron density scale length. The observed onset of instability growth was consistent with the expected scaling that KrF lasers have a higher intensity threshold for instabilities in the quarter critical density region.

  19. Observation of parametric instabilities in the quarter critical density region driven by the Nike KrF laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, J. L.; Kehne, D.; Brown, C. M.; Obenschain, S. P.; Serlin, V.; Schmitt, A. J. [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington DC 20375 (United States); Oh, J.; Lehmberg, R. H.; Mclean, E.; Manka, C. [Research Support Instruments, Lanham, Maryland 20905 (United States); Phillips, L. [Alogus Research Corporation, McLean, Virginia 22101 (United States); Afeyan, B. [Polymath Research, Inc., Pleasanton, California 94566 (United States); Seely, J.; Feldman, U. [Berkeley Research Associates, Inc., Beltsville, Maryland 20705 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    The krypton-fluoride (KrF) laser is an attractive choice for inertial confinement fusion due to its combination of short wavelength ({lambda}=248 nm), large bandwidth (up to 3 THz), and superior beam smoothing by induced spatial incoherence. These qualities improve the overall hydrodynamics of directly driven pellet implosions and should allow use of increased laser intensity due to higher thresholds for laser plasma instabilities when compared to frequency tripled Nd:glass lasers ({lambda}=351 nm). Here, we report the first observations of the two-plasmon decay instability using a KrF laser. The experiments utilized the Nike laser facility to irradiate solid plastic planar targets over a range of pulse lengths (0.35 ns{<=}{tau}{<=}1.25 ns) and intensities (up to 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}). Variation of the laser pulse created different combinations of electron temperature and electron density scale length. The observed onset of instability growth was consistent with the expected scaling that KrF lasers have a higher intensity threshold for instabilities in the quarter critical density region.

  20. Observation of an optical vortex beam from a helical undulator in the XUV region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneyasu, Tatsuo; Hikosaka, Yasumasa; Fujimoto, Masaki; Iwayama, Hiroshi; Hosaka, Masahito; Shigemasa, Eiji; Katoh, Masahiro

    2017-09-01

    The observation of an optical vortex beam at 60 nm wavelength, produced as the second-harmonic radiation from a helical undulator, is reported. The helical wavefront of the optical vortex beam was verified by measuring the interference pattern between the vortex beam from a helical undulator and a normal beam from another undulator. Although the interference patterns were slightly blurred owing to the relatively large electron beam emittance, it was possible to observe the interference features thanks to the helical wavefront of the vortex beam. The experimental results were well reproduced by simulation.

  1. Analysis of visibility simulation of three polar regions from lunar-based earth observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hanlin; Liu, Guang; Ren, Yuanzhen; Guo, Huadong; Ding, Yixing

    2016-07-01

    Global environment change has caught the attention of many scientists around the world. The Arctic, Antarctic and Tibet Plateau are known as the three polar regions. They are the world's largest storage of cold and carbon which are the sensitive regions of global environment change. These three regions have significant impacts on the global environment change. It is extremely obvious that the environment change of these three regions is one of the major factors of global environment change. The special geographical positions of these three regions have great influence on the local climate and ecological environment that caused the climate is very bad and few people can get there, so there is very little observation data exists. In addition, these three regions have large scale and long-term observation characteristics. Since the meaning of remote sensing technology came out, we have developed airborne and space-borne Earth observation system. However, when taking three polar regions for researching, we will have to face the problems of temporal coherence and spatial continuity in the global scale, which challenges the Earth observation on the satellite and airborne platform. Moon is the unique natural satellite of the Earth, which always has one side facing it, with the advantages of large coverage, long-life platform, stable geological structure and multi-spheres three-dimensional detecting, turning out to be the ideal platform for observing three polar regions. At present and in the near future, the study of Earth observation data from a lunar observatory would be difficult to carry out, so a simulation is used in this paper to analyze the visibility of three polar regions. At first, we discuss the motion pattern of the Sun-Earth-Moon system. Then we construct a simulation system with simulated optical sensors setting up at different places on the Moon, finding that sunlight has great influence on optical observation. The visible region of a lunar-based optical

  2. Active region fine structure observed at 0.08 arcsec resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Schlichenmaier, R; Hoch, S; Soltau, D; Berkefeld, T; Schmidt, D; Schmidt, W; Denker, C; Balthasar, H; Hofmann, A; Strassmeier, K G; Staude, J; Feller, A; Lagg, A; Solanki, S K; Collados, M; Sigwarth, M; Volkmer, R; Waldmann, T; Kneer, F; Nicklas, H; Sobotka, M

    2016-01-01

    The various mechanisms of magneto-convective energy transport determines the structure of sunspots and active regions. We characterise the appearance of light bridges and other fine structure details and elaborate on their magneto-convective nature. We present speckle-reconstructed images taken with the broad band imager at the 1.5 m GREGOR telescope in the 486nm and 589nm bands. We estimate the spatial resolution from the noise characteristics of the image bursts and obtain 0.08" at 589nm. We describe structure details in individual best images as well as the temporal evolution of selected features. We find branched dark lanes extending along thin (~1") light bridges in sunspots at various heliocentric angles. In thick (~2") light bridges the branches are disconnected from the central lane and have a `Y' shape with a bright grain toward the umbra. The images reveal that light bridges exist on varying intensity levels and that their small-scale features evolve on time scales of minutes. Faint light bridges sh...

  3. Comparing tide gauge observations to regional patterns of sea-level change (1961–2003)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slangen, A.B.A.; Van de Wal, R.S.W.; Wada, Y.; Vermeersen, L.L.A.

    2014-01-01

    Although the global mean sea-level budget for the 20th century can now be closed, the understanding of sea-level change on a regional scale is still limited. In this study we compare observations from tide gauges to regional patterns from various contributions to sea-level change to see how much of

  4. Comparing tide gauge observations to regional patterns of sea-level change (1961–2003)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slangen, A.B.A.; van de Wal, R.S.W.; Wada, Y.; Vermeersen, L.L.A.

    2014-01-01

    Although the global mean sea-level budget for the20th century can now be closed, the understanding of sealevelchange on a regional scale is still limited. In this studywe compare observations from tide gauges to regional patternsfrom various contributions to sea-level change to seehow much of the re

  5. Comparing tide gauge observations to regional patterns of sea-level change (1961-2003)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slangen, A. B. A.; van de Wal, R. S. W.; Wada, Y.; Vermeersen, L. L. A.

    2014-01-01

    Although the global mean sea-level budget for the 20th century can now be closed, the understanding of sea-level change on a regional scale is still limited. In this study we compare observations from tide gauges to regional patterns from various contributions to sea-level change to see how much of

  6. Dynamics in Restructuring Active Regions Observed During Soho/Yohkoh/Gbo Campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmieder, B.; Deng, Y.; Mandrini, C. H.; Rudawy, P.; Nitta, N.; Mason, H.; Fletcher, L.; Martens, P.; Brynildsen, N.

    JOP17 and JOP 33 are SOHO Joint Observing Programs in collaboration with Yohkoh/SXT and ground based observatories (GBO's), dedicated to observe dynamical events through the atmosphere. During runs of these programs we observed in restructuring active regions (ARs), surges, subflares, bright knots, but not large flares and jets. From these observations we have been able to derive some of the responses of the coronal and chromospheric plasma to the evolution of the photospheric magnetic field. Emerging flux in an AR led to the formation of Arch Filament Systems in the chromosphere, hot loops and knots in the transition region, and X-ray loops. Frequent surges have been observed in relation to parasitic or mixed polarities, but coronal jets have not yet been found. We discuss the possible mechanisms acting during the restructuring of the active regions (reconnection or ``sea-serpent'' geometries)

  7. TIME DEPENDENT NONEQUILIBRIUM IONIZATION OF TRANSITION REGION LINES OBSERVED WITH IRIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-Sykora, Juan; Pontieu, Bart De; Hansteen, Viggo H. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Gudiksen, Boris, E-mail: j.m.sykora@astro.uio.no [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway)

    2016-01-20

    The properties of nonstatistical equilibrium ionization of silicon and oxygen ions are analyzed in this work. We focus on five solar targets (quiet Sun; coronal hole; plage; quiescent active region, AR; and flaring AR) as observed with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). IRIS is best suited for this work owing to the high cadence (up to 0.5 s), high spatial resolution (up to 0.″32), and high signal-to-noise ratios for O iv λ1401 and Si iv λ1402. We find that the observed intensity ratio between lines of three times ionized silicon and oxygen ions depends on their total intensity and that this correlation varies depending on the region observed (quiet Sun, coronal holes, plage, or active regions) and on the specific observational objects present (spicules, dynamic loops, jets, microflares, or umbra). In order to interpret the observations, we compare them with synthetic profiles taken from 2D self-consistent radiative MHD simulations of the solar atmosphere, where the statistical equilibrium or nonequilibrium treatment of silicon and oxygen is applied. These synthetic observations show vaguely similar correlations to those in the observations, i.e., between the intensity ratios and their intensities, but only in the nonequilibrium case do we find that (some of) the observations can be reproduced. We conclude that these lines are formed out of statistical equilibrium. We use our time-dependent nonequilibrium ionization simulations to describe the physical mechanisms behind these observed properties.

  8. Characterization of LANDSAT Panels Using the NIST BRDF Scale from 1100 nm to 2500 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Brian; Tsai, Benjamin K.; Allen, David W.; Cooksey, Catherine; Yoon, Howard; Hanssen, Leonard; Zeng, Jinan; Fulton, Linda; Biggar, Stuart; Markham, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Many earth observing sensors depend on white diffuse reflectance standards to derive scales of radiance traceable to the St Despite the large number of Earth observing sensors that operate in the reflective solar region of the spectrum, there has been no direct method to provide NIST traceable BRDF measurements out to 2500 rim. Recent developments in detector technology have allowed the NIST reflectance measurement facility to expand the operating range to cover the 250 nm to 2500 nm range. The facility has been modified with and additional detector using a cooled extended range indium gallium arsenide (Extended InGaAs) detector. Measurements were made for two PTFE white diffuse reflectance standards over the 1100 nm to 2500 nm region at a 0' incident and 45' observation angle. These two panels will be used to support the OLI calibration activities. An independent means of verification was established using a NIST radiance transfer facility based on spectral irradiance, radiance standards and a diffuse reflectance plaque. An analysis on the results and associated uncertainties will be discussed.

  9. Overlapping $B^{3}_{0u}← X^{1}^{+}_{g}$ and $^{1}_{1u} ← X^{1}^{+}_{g}$ non-radiative characteristic of Br2 vapour in the wavelength region 505–541 nm

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ramesh C Sharma; S N Thakur

    2001-01-01

    The vibronic vapour phase photoacoustic spectrum of Br2 in the wavelength region 505–541 nm (19796–18480 cm-1) has been recorded using microphone as well as pump-probe method. Discrete vibronic bands superimposed on a monotonically increasing continuum background towards the dissociation limit results from the overlapping $B^{3}^{+}_{0u}← X^{1}^{+}_{g}$ and $^{1}_{1u}← X^{1}^{+}_{g}$ electronic transitions. Vibronic bands originating from '' = 0 have been used to estimate the relative rate of non-radiative relaxation as a function of the excited state $^{3}_{0u}$ vibrational quantum number '. A comparison with the optical absorption spectroscopy of Br2 leads to the identification of three broad spectral regions between 505 and 541 nm (19796 and 18480 cm-1) on the basis of different non-radiative relaxation processes.

  10. Daytime zonal drifts in the ionospheric E and 150 km regions estimated using EAR observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddapati, PavanChaitanya; Otsuka, Yuichi; Yamamoto, Mamoru; Yokoyama, Tatsuhiro; Patra, Amit

    2016-07-01

    The Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR), located at Kototabang (0.2o S, 100.32o E, mag. lat. 10.36o S), Indonesia, is capable of detecting both E region and 150 km echoes during daytime. We have conducted multi-beam observations using the EAR during daytime covering all seasons to study seasonal variations of these echoes and their dynamics. Given the facts that drifts at the 150 km region are governed primarily by electric field, drifts at the E region are governed by both electric field and neutral wind, simultaneous observations of drifts in both E and 150 km regions would help understand their variations. In this paper we present local time and seasonal variations of zonal drifts in the E and 150 km regions estimated using multi-beam observations. Zonal drifts (positive eastward) in the E and 150 km regions are found to be in the range of -10 to -60 m/s and -40 to 80 m/s, respectively. In the E region, zonal drifts show height reversal and temporal variations having tidal signature and noticeable seasonal variations. Zonal drifts in the 150 km region also show noticeable height and seasonal variations. These results are compared with model drifts and evaluated in terms of electric field and neutral wind.

  11. A Rapidly Evolving Active Region NOAA 8032 observed on April 15th, 1997

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shibu K. Mathew; Ashok Ambastha

    2000-09-01

    The active region NOAA 8032 of April 15, 1997 was observed to evolve rapidly. The GOES X-ray data showed a number of sub-flares and two C-class flares during the 8-9 hours of its evolution. The magnetic evolution of this region is studied to ascertain its role in flare production. Large changes were observed in magnetic field configuration due to the emergence of new magnetic flux regions (EFR). Most of the new emergence occured very close to the existing magnetic regions, which resulted in strong magnetic field gradients in this region. EFR driven reconnection of the field lines and subsequent flux cancellation might be the reason for the continuous occurrence of sub-flares and other related activities.

  12. Results of seismological observations in the western Kaliningrad region and in the Baltic Sea water area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovachev, S. A.

    2008-09-01

    In 2006 2007, researchers of the IO RAS conducted seismological observations in the Baltic Sea and western Kaliningrad region with the use of ocean-bottom and land-based autonomous seismic stations. According to maps of general seismic zoning of the territory of Russia, the Kaliningrad region is aseismic. However, a series of seismic phenomena with magnitudes of about 5 and sources located near the Bay of Gdansk coast occurred here in September 2004. The total duration of the IO RAS seismological observations in five areas of the region under investigation was more than 200 days. The analysis of seismic records of the IO RAS network located sources of two local weak earthquakes with magnitudes M L = 3.4 3.5, which indicates that the seismic process in the western part of the Kaliningrad region continues and the region is far from being seismically stable.

  13. A classification of spectral populations observed in HF radar backscatter from the E region auroral electrojets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Milan

    Full Text Available Observations of HF radar backscatter from the auroral electrojet E region indicate the presence of five major spectral populations, as opposed to the two predominant spectral populations, types I and II, observed in the VHF regime. The Doppler shift, spectral width, backscatter power, and flow angle dependencies of these five populations are investigated and described. Two of these populations are identified with type I and type II spectral classes, and hence, are thought to be generated by the two-stream and gradient drift instabilities, respectively. The remaining three populations occur over a range of velocities which can greatly exceed the ion acoustic speed, the usual limiting velocity in VHF radar observations of the E region. The generation of these spectral populations is discussed in terms of electron density gradients in the electrojet region and recent non-linear theories of E region irregularity generation.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionospheric irregularities

  14. Testing models of low-excitation photodissociation regions with far-infrared observations of reflection nebulae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Owl, RCY; Meixner, MM; Fong, D; Haas, MR; Rudolph, AL; Tielens, AGGM

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents Kuiper Airborne Observatory observations of the photodissociation regions ( PDRs) in nine reflection nebulae. These observations include the far-infrared atomic fine-structure lines of [O I] 63 and 145 mum, [C II] 158 mum, and [Si II] 35 mum and the adjacent far-infrared continuu

  15. Enhancing carrier injection in the active region of a 280nm emission wavelength LED using graded hole and electron blocking layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjua, Bilal; Ng, Tien K.; Alyamani, Ahmed Y.; El-Desouki, Munir M.; Ooi, Boon S.

    2014-02-01

    A theoretical investigation of AlGaN UV-LED with band engineering of hole and electron blocking layers (HBL and EBL, respectively) was conducted with an aim to improve injection efficiency and reduce efficiency droop in the UV LEDs. The analysis is based on energy band diagrams, carrier distribution and recombination rates (Shockley-Reed-Hall, Auger, and radiative recombination rates) in the quantum well, under equilibrium and forward bias conditions. Electron blocking layer is based on AlaGa1-aN / Alb → cGa1-b → 1-cN / AldGa1-dN, where a UV-LED was designed to emit at 280nm, which is an effective wavelength for water disinfection application.

  16. Clinical Observation on Comprehensive Treatment on Cutaneous Region for Low Back Pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Feng; Liu Shu-tian

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To observe the clinical effects of comprehensive treatmenton cutaneous region for low back pain. Methods: One hundred and twenty outpatients with low back pain who met the diagnostic criteria were randomly divided into a cutaneous region group or a medication group, 60 cases in each group. The cases in the cutaneous region group were treated by Nie-pinching up the skin of the lumbosacral region, cupping and acupuncture. Those in the medication group were treated by oral administration of Celecoxib capsule. The visual analogue scale (VAS) and Oswestry disability index (ODI) were used to assess the therapeutic effects. Results: After treatment, the VAS scores of both groups were different from those before treatment, showing statistical significances (allP Conclusion: Both comprehensive treatment on the cutaneous region and Celecoxib capsule can obviously relieve low back pain. But comprehensive treatment on the cutaneous region is better than Celecoxib capsule in the therapeutic effects.

  17. The Sagittarius B2 star-forming region - Subarcsecond radio spectral line and continuum observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaume, R.A.; Claussen, M.J. (E. O. Hulburt Center for Space Research, Washington, DC (USA))

    1990-03-01

    Results are reported of a subarcsecond spatial resolution RF line and continuum study of the Sgr B2 region, observed at the frequency of the 76-alpha hydrogen recombination line and at the (J,K = 3,2) transition of NH3. Also reported are new observations of the ground-state OH main line masers toward Sgr B2 in both left and right circular polarization. The continuum images showed no less than 19 separate H II regions in the Sgr B2 complex. Ammonia emission was observed in the Sgr B2 K and F regions. The emission toward K was found near the K1, K2, and K3 regions. The NH3 emission and absorption toward the F region, along with the OH maser emission, delineate a rotating disk or torus of molecular material surrounding the Sgr B2 F complex of H II regions. The mass interior to the NH3 and OH emission regions was calculated to be on the order of 1400 solar masses. 38 refs.

  18. Statistical study of network jets observed in the solar transition region: A comparison between coronal holes and quiet sun regions

    CERN Document Server

    Narang, Nancy; Tian, Hui; Banerjee, Dipankar; Cranmer, Steven R; DeLuca, Ed E; McKillop, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Recent IRIS observations have revealed a prevalence of intermittent small-scale jets with apparent speeds of 80 - 250 km s$^{-1}$, emanating from small-scale bright regions inside network boundaries of coronal holes. We find that these network jets appear not only in coronal holes but also in quiet-sun regions. Using IRIS 1330A (C II) slit-jaw images, we extract several parameters of these network jets, e.g. apparent speed, length, lifetime and increase in foot-point brightness. Using several observations, we find that some properties of the jets are very similar but others are obviously different between the quiet sun and coronal holes. For example, our study shows that the coronal-hole jets appear to be faster and longer than those in the quiet sun. This can be directly attributed to a difference in the magnetic configuration of the two regions with open magnetic field lines rooted in coronal holes and magnetic loops often present in quiet sun. We have also detected compact bright loops, likely transition r...

  19. Thermal and albedo mapping of the polar regions of Mars using Viking thermal mapper observations: 2. South polar region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paige, David A.; Keegan, Kenneth D.

    1994-01-01

    We present the first maps of the apparent thermal inertia and albedo of the south polar region of Mars. The observations used to create these maps were acquired by the infrared thermal mapper (IRTM) instruments on the two Viking Orbiters over a 30-day period in 1977 during the Martian late southern summer season. The maps cover the region from 60 deg S to the south pole at a spatial resolution of 1 deg of latitude, thus completing the initial thermal mapping of the entire planet. The analysis and interpretation of these maps is aided by the results of a one-dimensional radiative convective model, which is used to calculate diurnal variations in surface and atmospheric temperatures, and brightness temperatures at the top of the atmosphere for a range of assumptions concerning dust optical properties and dust optical depths. The maps show that apparent thermal inertias of bare ground regions decrease systematically from 60 deg S to the south pole. In unfrosted regions close to the south pole, apparent thermal inertias are among the lowest observed anywhere on the planet. On the south residual cap, apparent thermal inertias are very high due to the presence of CO2 frost. In most other regions of Mars, best fit apparent albedos based on thermal emission measurements are generally in good agreement with actual surface albedos based on broadband solar reflectance measurements. The one-dimensional atmospheric model calculations also predict anomalously cold brightness temperatures close to the pole during late summer, and after considering a number of alternatives, it is concluded that the net surface cooling due to atmospheric dust is the best explanation for this phenomenon. The region of lowest apparent thermal inertia close to the pole, which includes the south polar layered deposits, is interpreted to be mantled by a continuous layer of aeolian material that must be at least a few millimeters thick. The low thermal inertias mapped in the south polar region imply an

  20. Non-LTE Inversion of Spectropolarimetric and Spectroscopic Observations of a Small Active-region Filament Observed at the VTT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, P.; Balthasar, H.; Kuckein, C.; Koza, J.; Gömöry, P.; Rybák, J.; Kučera, A.; Heinzel, P.

    2016-04-01

    An active region mini-filament was observed by VTT simultaneously in the HeI 10 830 Å triplet by the TIP 1 spectropolarimeter, in Hα by the TESOS Fabry-Pérot interferometer, and in Ca II 8542 Å by the VTT spectrograph. The spectropolarimetric data were inverted using the HAZEL code and Hα profiles were modelled solving a NLTE radiative transfer in a simple isobaric and isothermal 2D slab irradiated both from bottom and sides. It was found that the mini-filament is composed of horizontal fluxtubes, along which the cool plasma of T˜10 000 K can flow by very large - even supersonic - velocities.

  1. THEMIS Observations of the Magnetopause Electron Diffusion Region: Large Amplitude Waves and Heated Electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Xiangwei; Dombeck, John; Dai, Lei; Wilson, Lynn B; Breneman, Aaron; Hupach, Adam

    2013-01-01

    We present the first observations of large amplitude waves in a well-defined electron diffusion region at the sub-solar magnetopause using data from one THEMIS satellite. These waves identified as whistler mode waves, electrostatic solitary waves, lower hybrid waves and electrostatic electron cyclotron waves, are observed in the same 12-sec waveform capture and in association with signatures of active magnetic reconnection. The large amplitude waves in the electron diffusion region are coincident with abrupt increases in electron parallel temperature suggesting strong wave heating. The whistler mode waves which are at the electron scale and enable us to probe electron dynamics in the diffusion region were analyzed in detail. The energetic electrons (~30 keV) within the electron diffusion region have anisotropic distributions with T_{e\\perp}/T_{e\\parallel}>1 that may provide the free energy for the whistler mode waves. The energetic anisotropic electrons may be produced during the reconnection process. The whi...

  2. The Unresolved Fine Structure Resolved - IRIS observations of the Solar Transition Region

    CERN Document Server

    Hansteen, V; Carlsson, M; Lemen, J; Title, A; Boerner, P; Hurlburt, N; Tarbell, T D; Wuelser, J P; Pereira, T M D; De Luca, E E; Golub, L; McKillop, S; Reeves, K; Saar, S; Testa, P; Tian, H; Kankelborg, C; Jaeggli, S; Kleint, L; Martinez-Sykora, J

    2014-01-01

    The heating of the outer solar atmospheric layers, i.e., the transition region and corona, to high temperatures is a long standing problem in solar (and stellar) physics. Solutions have been hampered by an incomplete understanding of the magnetically controlled structure of these regions. The high spatial and temporal resolution observations with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) at the solar limb reveal a plethora of short, low lying loops or loop segments at transition-region temperatures that vary rapidly, on the timescales of minutes. We argue that the existence of these loops solves a long standing observational mystery. At the same time, based on comparison with numerical models, this detection sheds light on a critical piece of the coronal heating puzzle.

  3. The unresolved fine structure resolved: IRIS observations of the solar transition region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansteen, V; De Pontieu, B; Carlsson, M; Lemen, J; Title, A; Boerner, P; Hurlburt, N; Tarbell, T D; Wuelser, J P; Pereira, T M D; De Luca, E E; Golub, L; McKillop, S; Reeves, K; Saar, S; Testa, P; Tian, H; Kankelborg, C; Jaeggli, S; Kleint, L; Martínez-Sykora, J

    2014-10-17

    The heating of the outer solar atmospheric layers, i.e., the transition region and corona, to high temperatures is a long-standing problem in solar (and stellar) physics. Solutions have been hampered by an incomplete understanding of the magnetically controlled structure of these regions. The high spatial and temporal resolution observations with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) at the solar limb reveal a plethora of short, low-lying loops or loop segments at transition-region temperatures that vary rapidly, on the time scales of minutes. We argue that the existence of these loops solves a long-standing observational mystery. At the same time, based on comparison with numerical models, this detection sheds light on a critical piece of the coronal heating puzzle.

  4. Evaluation of Observation-Fused Regional Air Quality Model Results for Population Air Pollution Exposure Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Li, Jingyi; Ying, Qi; Sherman, Seth; Perkins, Neil; Rajeshwari, Sundaram; Mendola, Pauline

    2014-01-01

    In this study, Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model was applied to predict ambient gaseous and particulate concentrations during 2001 to 2010 in 15 hospital referral regions (HRRs) using a 36-km horizontal resolution domain. An inverse distance weighting based method was applied to produce exposure estimates based on observation-fused regional pollutant concentration fields using the differences between observations and predictions at grid cells where air quality monitors were located. Although the raw CMAQ model is capable of producing satisfying results for O3 and PM2.5 based on EPA guidelines, using the observation data fusing technique to correct CMAQ predictions leads to significant improvement of model performance for all gaseous and particulate pollutants. Regional average concentrations were calculated using five different methods: 1) inverse distance weighting of observation data alone, 2) raw CMAQ results, 3) observation-fused CMAQ results, 4) population-averaged raw CMAQ results and 5) population-averaged fused CMAQ results. It shows that while O3 (as well as NOx) monitoring networks in the HRR regions are dense enough to provide consistent regional average exposure estimation based on monitoring data alone, PM2.5 observation sites (as well as monitors for CO, SO2, PM10 and PM2.5 components) are usually sparse and the difference between the average concentrations estimated by the inverse distance interpolated observations, raw CMAQ and fused CMAQ results can be significantly different. Population-weighted average should be used to account spatial variation in pollutant concentration and population density. Using raw CMAQ results or observations alone might lead to significant biases in health outcome analyses. PMID:24747248

  5. High-resolution Observations of a Flux Rope with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ting; ZHANG, JUN

    2015-01-01

    We report the observations of a flux rope at transition region temperatures with the \\emph{Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph} (IRIS) on 30 August 2014. Initially, magnetic flux cancellation constantly took place and a filament was activated. Then the bright material from the filament moved southward and tracked out several fine structures. These fine structures were twisted and tangled with each other, and appeared as a small flux rope at 1330 {\\AA}, with a total twist of about 4$\\pi$. Af...

  6. Cluster observations and theoretical identification of broadband waves in the auroral region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Backrud-Ivgren

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Broadband waves are common on auroral field lines. We use two different methods to study the polarization of the waves at 10 to 180 Hz observed by the Cluster spacecraft at altitudes of about 4 Earth radii in the nightside auroral region. Observations of electric and magnetic wave fields, together with electron and ion data, are used as input to the methods. We find that much of the wave emissions are consistent with linear waves in homogeneous plasma. Observed waves with a large electric field perpendicular to the geomagnetic field are more common (electrostatic ion cyclotron waves, while ion acoustic waves with a large parallel electric field appear in smaller regions without suprathermal (tens of eV plasma. The regions void of suprathermal plasma are interpreted as parallel potential drops of a few hundred volts.

  7. The internal solar angular velocity: Theory, observations and relationship to solar magnetic fields; Proceedings of the Eighth Summer Symposium, Sunspot, NM, Aug. 11-14, 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durney, Bernard R.; Sofia, Sabatino

    The conference presents papers on observations of solar p-mode rotational splittings, observations of surface velocity fields, the equatorial rotation rate in the solar convective zone, chromospheric activity in open clusters, and solar rotation variations from sunspot group statistics. Other topics include adiabatic nonradial oscillations of a differentially rotating star, a spherical harmonic decomposition technique for analyzing steady photospheric flows, turbulent transport in the radiative zone of a rotating star, and the generation of magnetic fields in the sun. Consideration is also given to magnetic fields and the rotation of the solar convection zone, the hydrostatic adjustment time of the solar subconvective layer, models for a differentially rotating solar-convection zone, and horizontal Reynolds stress and the radial rotation law of the sun.

  8. Determining the solar wind speed above active regions using remote radio-wave observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougeret, J L; Fainberg, J; Stone, R G

    1983-11-04

    A new technique has made it possible to measure the velocity of portions of the solar wind during its flow outward from the sun. This analysis utilizes spacecraft (ISEE-3) observations of radio emission generated in regions of the solar wind associated with solar active regions. By tracking the source of these radio waves over periods of days, it is possible to measure the motion of the emission regions. Evidence of solar wind acceleration during this outward flow, consistent with theoretical models, has also been obtained.

  9. [Ne II] Observations of Gas Motions in Compact and Ultracompact H II Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Qingfeng; Jaffe, Daniel T; Richter, Matthew J; Greathouse, Thomas K

    2008-01-01

    We present high spatial and spectral resolution observations of sixteen Galactic compact and ultracompact H II regions in the [Ne II] 12.8 microns fine structure line. The small thermal width of the neon line and the high dynamic range of the maps provide an unprecedented view of the kinematics of compact and ultracompact H II regions. These observations solidify an emerging picture of the structure of ultracompact H II regions suggested in our earlier studies of G29.96-0.02 and Mon R2 IRS1; systematic surface flows, rather than turbulence or bulk expansion, dominate the gas motions in the H II regions. The observations show that almost all of the sources have significant (5-20 km/s) velocity gradients and that most of the sources are limb-brightened. In many cases, the velocity pattern implies tangential flow along a dense shell of ionized gas. None of the observed sources clearly fits into the categories of filled expanding spheres, expanding shells, filled blister flows, or cometary H II regions formed by ...

  10. Modelling Carbon Radio Recombination Line observation towards the Ultra-Compact HII region W48A

    CERN Document Server

    Jeyakumar, S

    2013-01-01

    We model Carbon Recombination Line (CRL) emission from the Photo Dissociation Region (PDR) surrounding the Ultra-Compact (UC) HII region W48A. Our modelling shows that the inner regions ($A_V \\sim 1$) of the CII layer in the PDR contribute significantly to the CRL emission. The dependence of line ratios of CRL emission with the density of the PDR and the far ultra-violet (FUV) radiation incident on the region is explored over a large range of these parameters that are typical for the environments of UCHII regions. We find that by observing a suitable set of CRLs it is possible to constrain the density of the PDR. If the neutral density in the PDR is high ($\\gtrsim 10^7$ \\cmthree) CRL emission is bright at high frequencies ($\\gtrsim 20$ GHz), and absorption lines from such regions can be detected at low frequencies ($\\lesssim 10$ GHz). Modelling CRL observations towards W48A shows that the UCHII region is embedded in a molecular cloud of density of about $4 \\times$ 10$^7$ \\cmthree.

  11. Chromospheric Observations of a Kink Wave in an On-disk Active Region Fibril

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietarila, A. M.; Aznar Cuadrado, R.; Hirzberger, J.; Solanki, S.

    2011-12-01

    Most observations of kink and Alfven waves in the chromosphere are made in off-limb spicules. Here we present observations of a kink wave in high spatial and temporal resolution Ca II 8542 data of an active region fibril on the solar disk. The properties of the observed wave are similar to kink waves in spicules. From the inferred wave phase and period we estimate the lower limit for the field strength in the chromospheric fibril to be a few hundred Gauss. The observations indicate that the event may have been triggered by a small-scale reconnection event higher up in the atmosphere.

  12. Optimization of the GOSAT global observation from space with region-by-region target-mode operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    kuze, A.; Suto, H.; Shiomi, K.; Kawakami, S.; Nakajima, M.

    2013-12-01

    observations, by uploading the pointing angles from the ground every day, TANSO-FTS can target a maximum of about 1,000 points per day. Dithering over fractional clouds area and targeting coast and islands avoiding bay and channels can increase yield rate. GOSAT has a UV band (380nm) in TANSO-CAI to observe dark land and FTS-SWIR bands has been acquiring two linear polarizations simultaneously. Multi-angle observations with forward, nadir and backward viewing with two axis pointing mirror will distinguish aerosol scattering from surface reflection and reduce aerosol related errors. The optimized target mode allocation are now considered. We will add the classification information of the target such as validation site, mega cities, volcano in the future Level 1B product to identify high bias possibility in XCO2. In addition, the geo-location information after the best estimate pointing-offset correction will be added. Lastly, after optimizing the observation locations, consistency between different gains, target brightness and aerosol optical thickness has to be confirmed. Validation other than TCCON site is also discussed.

  13. Lubbock Regional Airport, Texas. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-11-12

    FREQUENCY OF WIND DIRECTION AND SPEED (FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) 7 267 LUBOCK REGIONAL ARPT TX 73-81 ALUG ALL WEATHER 1 ]0-ZC02 SPEED MEAN IN’S) 5.- 4.-6 7.10...VISIBILITYA!;- EAITHER SF0VlCF/-AC :-’ LUBOCK ;ZE IONAL Af T T - C PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF OCCURRENCE FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS 672- 6 0. T 6 67 69.1~ 64

  14. Evaluation of observation-fused regional air quality model results for population air pollution exposure estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Li, Jingyi; Ying, Qi; Sherman, Seth; Perkins, Neil; Rajeshwari, Sundaram; Mendola, Pauline

    2014-07-01

    In this study, Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model was applied to predict ambient gaseous and particulate concentrations during 2001 to 2010 in 15 hospital referral regions (HRRs) using a 36-km horizontal resolution domain. An inverse distance weighting based method was applied to produce exposure estimates based on observation-fused regional pollutant concentration fields using the differences between observations and predictions at grid cells where air quality monitors were located. Although the raw CMAQ model is capable of producing satisfying results for O3 and PM2.5 based on EPA guidelines, using the observation data fusing technique to correct CMAQ predictions leads to significant improvement of model performance for all gaseous and particulate pollutants. Regional average concentrations were calculated using five different methods: 1) inverse distance weighting of observation data alone, 2) raw CMAQ results, 3) observation-fused CMAQ results, 4) population-averaged raw CMAQ results and 5) population-averaged fused CMAQ results. It shows that while O3 (as well as NOx) monitoring networks in the HRRs are dense enough to provide consistent regional average exposure estimation based on monitoring data alone, PM2.5 observation sites (as well as monitors for CO, SO2, PM10 and PM2.5 components) are usually sparse and the difference between the average concentrations estimated by the inverse distance interpolated observations, raw CMAQ and fused CMAQ results can be significantly different. Population-weighted average should be used to account for spatial variation in pollutant concentration and population density. Using raw CMAQ results or observations alone might lead to significant biases in health outcome analyses.

  15. Effect of time-varying tropospheric models on near-regional and regional infrasound propagation as constrained by observational data

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Mihan H.; Stump, Brian W.; Hayward, Chris

    2008-06-01

    The Chulwon Seismo-Acoustic Array (CHNAR) is a regional seismo-acoustic array with co-located seismometers and infrasound microphones on the Korean peninsula. Data from forty-two days over the course of a year between October 1999 and August 2000 were analyzed; 2052 infrasound-only arrivals and 23 seismo-acoustic arrivals were observed over the six week study period. A majority of the signals occur during local working hours, hour 0 to hour 9 UT and appear to be the result of cultural activity located within a 250 km radius. Atmospheric modeling is presented for four sample days during the study period, one in each of November, February, April, and August. Local meteorological data sampled at six hour intervals is needed to accurately model the observed arrivals and this data produced highly temporally variable thermal ducts that propagated infrasound signals within 250 km, matching the temporal variation in the observed arrivals. These ducts change dramatically on the order of hours, and meteorological data from the appropriate sampled time frame was necessary to interpret the observed arrivals.

  16. High spatial resolution FeXII observations of solar active region

    CERN Document Server

    Testa, Paola; Hansteen, Viggo

    2016-01-01

    We use UV spectral observations of active regions with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) to investigate the properties of the coronal FeXII 1349.4A emission at unprecedented high spatial resolution (~0.33"). We find that by using appropriate observational strategies (i.e., long exposures, lossless compression), FeXII emission can be studied with IRIS at high spatial and spectral resolution, at least for high density plasma (e.g., post-flare loops, and active region moss). We find that upper transition region (moss) FeXII emission shows very small average Doppler redshifts (v_Dop ~3 km/s), as well as modest non-thermal velocities (with an average ~24 km/s, and the peak of the distribution at ~15 km/s). The observed distribution of Doppler shifts appears to be compatible with advanced 3D radiative MHD simulations in which impulsive heating is concentrated at the transition region footpoints of a hot corona. While the non-thermal broadening of FeXII 1349.4A peaks at similar values as lower resolut...

  17. VHF radar observations of the dip equatorial E-region during sunset in the Brazilian sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Denardini

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Using the RESCO 50 MHz backscatter radar (2.33° S, 44.2° W, DIP: –0.5, at São Luís, Brazil, we obtained Range Time Intensity (RTI maps covering the equatorial electrojet heights during daytime and evening. These maps revealed a scattering region at an altitude of about 108 km during the sunset period. The type of 3-m irregularity region we present here has not been reported before in the literature, to our knowledge. It was mainly observed around the Southern Hemisphere summer-solstice period, under quiet magnetic activity condition. The occurrence of this echo region coincides in local time with the maximum intensity of an evening pre-reversal eastward electric field of the ionospheric F-region. A tentative explanation is proposed here in terms of the theory of the divergence of the equatorial electrojet (EEJ current in the evening ionosphere presented by Haerendel and Eccles (1992, to explain the partial contribution of the divergence to the development of the pre-reversal electric field. The theory predicts an enhanced zonal electric field and hence a vertical electric field below 300 km as a consequence of the EEJ divergence in the evening. The experimental results of the enhanced echoes from the higher heights of the EEJ region seem to provide evidence that the divergence of the EEJ current can indeed be the driver of the observed scattering region.

  18. Two centuries of observed atmospheric variability and change over the North Sea region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stendel, Martin; van den Besselaar, Else; Hannachi, Abdel; Kent, Elizabeth; Lefebvre, Christiana; Rosenhagen, Gudrun; Schenk, Frederik; van der Schrier, Gerard; Woollings, Tim

    2016-04-01

    In the upcoming North Sea Region Climate Change Assessment (NOSCCA), we present a synthesis of current knowledge about past, present and possible future climate change in the North Sea region. A climate change assessment from published scientific work has been conducted as a kind of regional IPCC report, and a book has been produced that will be published by Springer in 2016. In the framework of the NOSCCA project, we examine past and present studies of variability and changes in atmospheric variables within the North Sea region over the instrumental period, roughly the past 200 years, based on observations and reanalyses. The variables addressed in this presentation are large-scale circulation, pressure and wind, surface air temperature, precipitation and radiative properties (clouds, solar radiation, and sunshine duration). While air temperature over land, not unexpectedly, has increased everywhere in the North Sea region, with strongest trends in spring and in the north of the region, a precipitation increase has been observed in the north and a decrease in the south of the region. This pattern goes along with a north-eastward shift of storm tracks and is in agreement with climate model projections under enhanced greenhouse gas concentrations. For other variables, it is not obvious which part of the observed changes may be due to anthropogenic activities and which is internally forced. It remains also unclear to what extent atmospheric circulation over the North Sea region is influenced by distant factors, in particular Arctic sea-ice decline in recent decades. There are indications of an increase in the number of deep cyclones (but not in the total number of cyclones), while storminess since the late 19th century shows no robust trends. The persistence of circulation types appears to have increased over the last century, and consequently, there is an indication for 'more extreme' extreme events. However, changes in extreme weather events are difficult to assess

  19. FLARE FOOTPOINT REGIONS AND A SURGE OBSERVED BY HINODE/EIS, RHESSI, AND SDO/AIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doschek, G. A.; Warren, H. P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Dennis, B. R. [Solar Physics Laboratory, Heliophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Reep, J. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Caspi, A. [Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on the Hinode spacecraft observed flare footpoint regions coincident with a surge for an M3.7 flare observed on 2011 September 25 at N12 E33 in active region 11302. The flare was observed in spectral lines of O vi, Fe x, Fe xii, Fe xiv, Fe xv, Fe xvi, Fe xvii, Fe xxiii, and Fe xxiv. The EIS observations were made coincident with hard X-ray bursts observed by RHESSI. Overlays of the RHESSI images on the EIS raster images at different wavelengths show a spatial coincidence of features in the RHESSI images with the EIS upflow and downflow regions, as well as loop-top or near-loop-top regions. A complex array of phenomena were observed, including multiple evaporation regions and the surge, which was also observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly telescopes. The slit of the EIS spectrometer covered several flare footpoint regions from which evaporative upflows in Fe xxiii and Fe xxiv lines were observed with Doppler speeds greater than 500 km s{sup −1}. For ions such as Fe xv both evaporative outflows (∼200 km s{sup −1}) and downflows (∼30–50 km s{sup −1}) were observed. Nonthermal motions from 120 to 300 km s{sup −1} were measured in flare lines. In the surge, Doppler speeds are found from about 0 to over 250 km s{sup −1} in lines from ions such as Fe xiv. The nonthermal motions could be due to multiple sources slightly Doppler-shifted from each other or turbulence in the evaporating plasma. We estimate the energetics of the hard X-ray burst and obtain a total flare energy in accelerated electrons of ≥7 × 10{sup 28} erg. This is a lower limit because only an upper limit can be determined for the low-energy cutoff to the electron spectrum. We find that detailed modeling of this event would require a multithreaded model owing to its complexity.

  20. Airborne Observations of Regional Variations in Fluorescent Aerosol Across the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perring, A. E.; Schwarz, J. P.; Baumgardner, D.; Hernandez, M.; Spracklen, D. V.; Heald, C. L.; Gao, R. S.; Kok, G. L.; McMeeking, G.; McQuaid, J. B.; Fahey, D. W.

    2014-12-01

    Airborne observations of fluorescent aerosol were made aboard an airship during CloudLab, a series of flights that took place in September and October of 2013 and covered a wide band of longitude across the continental US between Florida and California between 28 and 37N latitude. Sampling occurred from near the surface to 1000 m above the ground. A Wide-band Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor (WIBS-4) measured concentrations of supermicron fluorescent particles with average regional concentrations ranging from 1.4±0.7 to 6.8±1.4 x 104 particles m-3 and representing up to 24% of total supermicron particle number. We observed distinct variations in size distributions and fluorescent characteristics in different regions, and attribute these to geographically diverse bioaerosol populations. Fluorescent aerosol signatures detected in the east is largely consistent with those of mold spores observed in a laboratory setting. A shift to larger sizes associated with different fluorescent patterns is observed in the west. Loadings in the desert west were nearly as high as those near the Gulf of Mexico, indicating that bioaerosol is a substantial component of supermicron aerosol both of these humid and arid environments. The observations are compared to simulated fungal and bacterial loadings. Good agreement in both particle size and concentrations is observed in the east. In the west the model underestimates observed concentrations by a factor of 2 to 3 and the prescribed particle sizes are smaller than the observed bioaerosol.

  1. FLOWS AT THE EDGE OF AN ACTIVE REGION: OBSERVATION AND INTERPRETATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutry, C.; Buchlin, E.; Vial, J.-C. [Universite Paris Sud, Institut d' Astrophysique Spatiale, UMR8617, 91405 Orsay (France); Regnier, S., E-mail: eric.buchlin@ias.u-psud.fr [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, PR1 2HE (United Kingdom)

    2012-06-10

    Upflows observed at the edges of active regions have been proposed as the source of the slow solar wind. In the particular case of Active Region (AR) 10942, where such an upflow has been already observed, we want to evaluate the part of this upflow that actually remains confined in the magnetic loops that connect AR 10942 to AR 10943. Both active regions were visible simultaneously on the solar disk and were observed by STEREO/SECCHI EUVI. Using Hinode/EIS spectra, we determine the Doppler shifts and densities in AR 10943 and AR 10942 in order to evaluate the mass flows. We also perform magnetic field extrapolations to assess the connectivity between AR 10942 and AR 10943. AR 10943 displays a persistent downflow in Fe XII. Magnetic extrapolations including both ARs show that this downflow can be connected to the upflow in AR 10942. We estimate that the mass flow received by AR 10943 areas connected to AR 10942 represents about 18% of the mass flow from AR 10942. We conclude that the upflows observed on the edge of active regions represent either large-scale loops with mass flowing along them (accounting for about one-fifth of the total mass flow in this example) or open magnetic field structures where the slow solar wind originates.

  2. Observations of the frontal region of a buoyant river plume using an autonomous underwater vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogowski, Peter; Terrill, Eric; Chen, Jialin

    2014-11-01

    To characterize the transitional region from the near-field to far-field of a river plume entering coastal waters, we conducted four surveys using an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) to target the outflow of the New River Inlet, North Carolina, during maximum ebb tide. The utilization of a mobile sensor to synoptically observe current velocity data in tandem with natural river plume tracers (e.g., colored dissolved organic matter, salinity) was essential in understanding the mechanisms driving the observed circulation and mixing patterns within these waters. We find that this region is regularly impacted by two primary processes: (1) the interaction of an old dredged channel plume with the main discharge and (2) the recirculation of the discharge plume by an eddy that persistently forms between the old channel and main discharge location. Wind-driven processes in the nearshore can enhance the interaction of these two plumes resulting in unstable regions where mixing of the merged plume with the receiving waters is accelerated. We also conduct comparisons between AUV velocity observations from two surveys and their corresponding velocity outputs from a parallelized quasi-3-D model. We conclude that the ability to observe the estuarine outflow transitional region at near-synoptic temporal scales and resolutions discussed in this paper is key in providing the mechanisms driving local circulation which is essential for proper parameterization of high-resolution numerical coastal models.

  3. 30 MHz radar observations of artificial E region field-aligned plasma irregularities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Hysell

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Artificial E region field aligned irregularities (FAIs have been observed during heating experiments at the HAARP facility using a new 30 MHz coherent scatter radar imager deployed near Homer, Alaska. Irregularities were observed during brief experiments on three quiet days in July and August, 2007, when the daytime E region critical frequency was close to 3 MHz. Irregularities were consistently generated and detected during experiments with O-mode HF pumping on zenith with a 1-min on, 1-min off CW modulation. The scattering cross sections, rise, and fall times of the echoes were observed as well as their spectral properties. Results were found to be mainly in agreement with observations from other mid- and high-latitude sites with some discrepancies. Radar images of the irregularity-filled volume on one case exhibited clear variations in backscatter power and Doppler shift across the volume. The images furthermore show the emergence of a small irregularity-filled region to the south southwest of the main region in the approximate direction of magnetic zenith.

  4. Magnetoseismology of Active Regions using Multi-wavelength Observations from GONG and SDO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Sushanta; Jain, Kiran; Kholikov, Shukur; Hill, Frank; Cally, Paul

    2016-05-01

    The structure and dynamics of active regions beneath the surface show significant uncertainties due to our limited understanding of the wave interaction with magnetic field. Recent numerical simulations further demonstrate that the atmosphere above the photospheric levels also modifies the seismic observables at the surface. Thus the key to improve helioseismic interpretation beneath the active regions requires a synergy between models and helioseismic inferences from observations. In this context, using data from Global Oscillation Network Group and from Helioseismic Magnetic Imager and Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard Solar Dynamics Observatory, we characterize the spatio-temporal power distribution in and around active regions. Specifically, we focus on the power enhancements seen around active regions as a function of wave frequencies, strength, inclination of magnetic field and observation height as well as the relative phases of the observables and their cross-coherence functions. It is expected that these effects will help us to comprehend the interaction of acoustic waves with magnetic field in the solar photosphere.

  5. An Observing System Simulation Experiment for the Western North Pacific Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhei Masuda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effectiveness of concentrated observations for ocean state estimation in a region remote from the observation site. I executed a twin observing system simulation experiment (OSSE for the North Pacific region, using an ocean data synthesis system, to examine how the potential effectiveness is for a well-defined criterion, the representativeness of the subsurface salinity minimum corresponding to North Pacific Intermediate Water (NPIW. The results of the OSSE show that data synthesis confined to the region corresponding to the recent origin of the NPIW (35°N–53°N, 130°E–170°E can affect the modeled extent of the NPIW in the central Pacific at 35°N, 180°. The interannual variability of the NPIW is not well reproduced in terms of the standard deviation value (std, only by the data input in the origin region. The root mean square difference between the “true” and the synthesized field is twice larger than the std although there the representativeness of the scale of salinity minimum is improved by about one-third of the difference between the “true” and “first-guess” fields in a snapshot. These results imply that combinations of concentrated and other in situ observations should be required for the dynamic state estimation of the NPIW.

  6. Long-Wavelength Observations of Jets from Polar Regions of the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, R.

    1999-10-01

    We report radio observations of enhanced emission associated with the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) jets from polar coronal hole regions of the Sun, with the Gauribidanur radioheliograph (GRH). We have estimated the brightness temperature, electron density and mass of the ejected material. These jets were not accompanied by nonthermal radio bursts, particularly Type III events.

  7. The effect of Galactic foreground subtraction on redshifted 21-cm observations of quasar HII regions

    CERN Document Server

    Geil, Paul M; Petrovic, Nada; Oh, Peng

    2008-01-01

    We assess the impact of Galactic synchrotron foreground removal on the observation of high-redshift quasar HII regions in redshifted 21-cm emission. We consider the case where a quasar is observed in an intergalactic medium (IGM) whose ionisation structure evolves slowly relative to the light crossing time of the HII region, as well as the case where the evolution is rapid. The latter case is expected towards the end of the reionisation era where the highest redshift luminous quasars will be observed. In the absence of foregrounds the fraction of neutral hydrogen in the IGM could be measured directly from the contrast between the HII region and surrounding IGM. However, we find that foreground removal lowers the observed contrast between the HII region and the IGM. This indicates that measurement of the neutral fraction would require modelling to correct for this systematic effect. On the other hand, foreground removal does not modify the most prominent features of the 21-cm maps. Using a simple algorithm we ...

  8. Development of Innovative Technology to Provide Low-Cost Surface Atmospheric Observations in Data Sparse Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Paul; Steinson, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Accurate and reliable real-time monitoring and dissemination of observations of surface weather conditions is critical for a variety of societal applications. Applications that provide local and regional information about temperature, precipitation, moisture, and winds, for example, are important for agriculture, water resource monitoring, health, and monitoring of hazard weather conditions. In many regions of the World, surface weather stations are sparsely located and/or of poor quality. Existing stations have often been sited incorrectly, not well-maintained, and have limited communications established at the site for real-time monitoring. The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR)/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), with support from USAID, has started an initiative to develop and deploy low-cost weather instrumentation in sparsely observed regions of the world. The project is focused on improving weather observations for environmental monitoring and early warning alert systems on a regional to global scale. Instrumentation that has been developed use innovative new technologies such as 3D printers, Raspberry Pi computing systems, and wireless communications. The goal of the project is to make the weather station designs, software, and processing tools an open community resource. The weather stations can be built locally by agencies, through educational institutions, and residential communities as a citizen effort to augment existing networks to improve detection of natural hazards for disaster risk reduction. The presentation will provide an overview of the open source weather station technology and evaluation of sensor observations for the initial networks that have been deployed in Africa.

  9. Magnetospheric Multiscale Observations of the Electron Diffusion Region of Large Guide Field Magnetic Reconnection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, S; Wilder, F D; Ergun, R E; Schwartz, S J; Cassak, P A; Burch, J L; Chen, L-J; Torbert, R B; Phan, T D; Lavraud, B; Goodrich, K A; Holmes, J C; Stawarz, J E; Sturner, A P; Malaspina, D M; Usanova, M E; Trattner, K J; Strangeway, R J; Russell, C T; Pollock, C J; Giles, B L; Hesse, M; Lindqvist, P-A; Drake, J F; Shay, M A; Nakamura, R; Marklund, G T

    2016-07-01

    We report observations from the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) satellites of a large guide field magnetic reconnection event. The observations suggest that two of the four MMS spacecraft sampled the electron diffusion region, whereas the other two spacecraft detected the exhaust jet from the event. The guide magnetic field amplitude is approximately 4 times that of the reconnecting field. The event is accompanied by a significant parallel electric field (E_{∥}) that is larger than predicted by simulations. The high-speed (∼300  km/s) crossing of the electron diffusion region limited the data set to one complete electron distribution inside of the electron diffusion region, which shows significant parallel heating. The data suggest that E_{∥} is balanced by a combination of electron inertia and a parallel gradient of the gyrotropic electron pressure.

  10. Magnetic field observations as Voyager 1 entered the heliosheath depletion region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlaga, L F; Ness, N F; Stone, E C

    2013-07-12

    Magnetic fields measured by Voyager 1 (V1) show that the spacecraft crossed the boundary of an unexpected region five times between days 210 and ~238 in 2012. The magnetic field strength B increased across this boundary from ≈0.2 to ≈0.4 nanotesla, and B remained near 0.4 nanotesla until at least day 270, 2012. The strong magnetic fields were associated with unusually low counting rates of >0.5 mega-electron volt per nuclear particle. The direction of B did not change significantly across any of the five boundary crossings; it was very uniform and very close to the spiral magnetic field direction, which was observed throughout the heliosheath. The observations indicate that V1 entered a region of the heliosheath (the heliosheath depletion region), rather than the interstellar medium.

  11. Magnetospheric Multiscale Observations of the Electron Diffusion Region of Large Guide Field Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, S.; Wilder, F. D.; Ergun, R. E.; Schwartz, S. J.; Cassak, P. A.; Burch, J. L.; Chen, Li-Jen; Torbert, R. B.; Phan, T. D.; Lavraud, B.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We report observations from the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) satellites of a large guide field magnetic reconnection event. The observations suggest that two of the four MMS spacecraft sampled the electron diffusion region, whereas the other two spacecraft detected the exhaust jet from the event. The guide magnetic field amplitude is approximately 4 times that of the reconnecting field. The event is accompanied by a significant parallel electric field (E(sub parallel lines) that is larger than predicted by simulations. The high-speed (approximately 300 km/s) crossing of the electron diffusion region limited the data set to one complete electron distribution inside of the electron diffusion region, which shows significant parallel heating. The data suggest that E(sub parallel lines) is balanced by a combination of electron inertia and a parallel gradient of the gyrotropic electron pressure.

  12. Observations of nightside auroral plasma upflows in the F-region and topside ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Foster

    Full Text Available Observations from the special UK EISCAT program UFIS are presented. UFIS is a joint UHF-VHF experiment, designed to make simultaneous measurements of enhanced vertical plasma flows in the F-region and topside ionospheres. Three distinct intervals of upward ion flow were observed. During the first event, upward ion fluxes in excess of 1013 m–2 s–1 were detected, with vertical ion velocities reaching 300 m s–1 at 800 km. The upflow was associated with the passage of an auroral arc through the radar field of view. In the F-region, an enhanced and sheared convection electric field on the leading edge of the arc resulted in heating of the ions, whilst at higher altitudes, above the precipitation region, strongly enhanced electron temperatures were observed; such features are commonly associated with the generation of plasma upflows. These observations demonstrate some of the acceleration mechanisms which can exist within the small-scale structure of an auroral arc. A later upflow event was associated with enhanced electron temperatures and only a moderate convection electric field, with no indication of significantly elevated ion tem- peratures. There was again some evidence of F-region particle precipitation at the time of the upflow, which exhibited vertical ion velocities of similar magnitude to the earlier upflow, suggesting that the behaviour of the electrons might be the dominant factor in this type of event. A third upflow was detected at altitudes above the observing range of the UHF radar, but which was evident in the VHF data from 600 km upwards. Smaller vertical velocities were observed in this event, which was apparently uncorrelated with any features observed at lower altitudes. Limitations imposed by the experimental conditions inhibit the interpretation of this event, although the upflow was again likely related to topside plasma heating.

  13. Regional nitrogen oxides emission trends in East Asia observed from space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Mijling

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to changing economic activity, emissions of air pollutants in East Asia change rapidly in space and time. Monthly emission estimates of nitrogen oxides derived from satellite observations provide valuable insight in the evolution of anthropogenic activity on a regional scale. We present the first results of a new emission estimation algorithm, specifically designed to use daily satellite observations of column concentrations for fast updates of emissions of short-lived atmospheric constituents on a~mesoscopic scale (~ 0.25° × 0.25°. The algorithm is used to construct a monthly NOx emission time series for 2007–2011 from tropospheric NO2 observations of GOME-2 for East Chinese provinces and surrounding countries. The new emission estimates correspond well with the bottom-up inventory of EDGAR v4.2, but are smaller than the inventories of INTEX-B and MEIC. They reveal a strong positive trend during 2007–2011 for almost all Chinese provinces, related to the country's economic development. We find a 41% increment of NOx emissions in East China during this period, which shows the need to update emission inventories in this region on a regular basis. Negative emission trends are found in Japan and South Korea, which can be attributed to a combined effect of local environmental policy and global economic crises. Analysis of seasonal variation distinguishes between regions with dominant anthropogenic or biogenic emissions. For regions with a mixed anthropogenic and biogenic signature, the opposite seasonality can be used for an estimation of the separate emission contributions. Finally, the non-local concentration/emission relationships calculated by the algorithm are used to quantify the direct effect of regional NOx emissions on tropospheric NO2 concentrations outside the region. For regions such as North Korea and Beijing province, a substantial part of the tropospheric NO2 originates from emissions elsewhere.

  14. Regional nitrogen oxides emission trends in East Asia observed from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijling, B.; van der A, R. J.; Zhang, Q.

    2013-12-01

    Due to changing economic activity, emissions of air pollutants in East Asia are changing rapidly in space and time. Monthly emission estimates of nitrogen oxides derived from satellite observations provide valuable insight into the evolution of anthropogenic activity on a regional scale. We present the first results of a new emission estimation algorithm, specifically designed to use daily satellite observations of column concentrations for fast updates of emissions of short-lived atmospheric constituents on a mesoscopic scale (~ 0.25° × 0.25°). The algorithm is used to construct a monthly NOx emission time series for the period 2007-2011 from tropospheric NO2 observations of GOME-2 for East Chinese provinces and surrounding countries. The new emission estimates correspond well with the bottom-up inventory of EDGAR v4.2, but are smaller than the inventories of INTEX-B and MEIC. They reveal a strong positive trend during 2007-2011 for almost all Chinese provinces, related to the country's economic development. We find a 41% increment of NOx emissions in East China during this period, which shows the need to update emission inventories in this region on a regular basis. Negative emission trends are found in Japan and South Korea, which can be attributed to a combined effect of local environmental policy and global economic crises. Analysis of seasonal variation distinguishes between regions with dominant anthropogenic or biogenic emissions. For regions with a mixed anthropogenic and biogenic signature, the opposite seasonality can be used for an estimation of the separate emission contributions. Finally, the non-local concentration/emission relationships calculated by the algorithm are used to quantify the direct effect of regional NOx emissions on tropospheric NO2 concentrations outside the region. For regions such as North Korea and the Beijing municipality, a substantial part of the tropospheric NO2 originates from emissions elsewhere.

  15. Explosive events in active region observed by IRIS and SST/CRISP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Z.; Madjarska, M. S.; Scullion, E. M.; Xia, L.-D.; Doyle, J. G.; Ray, T.

    2017-01-01

    Transition-region explosive events (EEs) are characterized by non-Gaussian line profiles with enhanced wings at Doppler velocities of 50-150 km s-1. They are believed to be the signature of solar phenomena that are one of the main contributors to coronal heating. The aim of this study is to investigate the link of EEs to dynamic phenomena in the transition region and chromosphere in an active region. We analyse observations simultaneously taken by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) in the Si IV 1394 Å line and the slit-jaw (SJ) 1400 Å images, and the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope in the Hα line. In total 24 events were found. They are associated with small-scale loop brightenings in SJ 1400 Å images. Only four events show a counterpart in the Hα-35 km s-1 and Hα+35 km s-1 images. Two of them represent brightenings in the conjunction region of several loops that are also related to a bright region (granular lane) in the Hα-35 km s-1 and Hα+35 km s-1 images. 16 are general loop brightenings that do not show any discernible response in the Hα images. Six EEs appear as propagating loop brightenings, from which two are associated with dark jet-like features clearly seen in the Hα-35 km s-1 images. We found that chromospheric events with jet-like appearance seen in the wings of the Hα line can trigger EEs in the transition region and in this case the IRIS Si IV 1394 Å line profiles are seeded with absorption components resulting from Fe II and Ni II. Our study indicates that EEs occurring in active regions have mostly upper-chromosphere/transition-region origin. We suggest that magnetic reconnection resulting from the braidings of small-scale transition region loops is one of the possible mechanisms of energy release that are responsible for the EEs reported in this paper.

  16. Observations of regional and local variability in the optical properties of maritime clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, A.B. [Univ. of Colorado at Boulder/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States); Fairall, C.W. [Environmental Technology Lab., Boulder, CO (United States)

    1996-04-01

    White and Fairall (1995) calculated the optical properties of the marine boundary layer (MBL) clouds observed during the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) and compared their results with the results obtained by Fairall et al. for the MBL clouds observed during the First International Satellite Climatology Program (ISSCP) Regional Experiment (FIRE). They found a factor of two difference in the optical depth versus liquid water relationship that applies to the clouds observed in each case. In the present study, we present evidence to support this difference. We also investigate the local variability exhibited in the ASTEX optical properties using measurements of the boundary layer aerosol concentration.

  17. VSA Observations of the Anomalous Microwave Emission in the Perseus Region

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    The dust feature G159.6--18.5 in the Perseus region has previously been observed with the COSMOSOMAS experiment \\citep{Watson:05} on angular scales of $\\approx$ 1$^{\\circ}$, and was found to exhibit anomalous microwave emission. We present new observations of this dust feature, performed with the Very Small Array (VSA) at 33 GHz, to help increase the understanding of the nature of this anomalous emission. On the angular scales observed with the VSA ($\\approx$ 10 -- 40$^{\\prime}$), G159.6--18....

  18. Fostering Earth Observation Regional Networks - Integrative and iterative approaches to capacity building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habtezion, S.

    2015-12-01

    Fostering Earth Observation Regional Networks - Integrative and iterative approaches to capacity building Fostering Earth Observation Regional Networks - Integrative and iterative approaches to capacity building Senay Habtezion (shabtezion@start.org) / Hassan Virji (hvirji@start.org)Global Change SySTem for Analysis, Training and Research (START) (www.start.org) 2000 Florida Avenue NW, Suite 200 Washington, DC 20009 USA As part of the Global Observation of Forest and Land Cover Dynamics (GOFC-GOLD) project partnership effort to promote use of earth observations in advancing scientific knowledge, START works to bridge capacity needs related to earth observations (EOs) and their applications in the developing world. GOFC-GOLD regional networks, fostered through the support of regional and thematic workshops, have been successful in (1) enabling participation of scientists for developing countries and from the US to collaborate on key GOFC-GOLD and Land Cover and Land Use Change (LCLUC) issues, including NASA Global Data Set validation and (2) training young developing country scientists to gain key skills in EOs data management and analysis. Members of the regional networks are also engaged and reengaged in other EOs programs (e.g. visiting scientists program; data initiative fellowship programs at the USGS EROS Center and Boston University), which has helped strengthen these networks. The presentation draws from these experiences in advocating for integrative and iterative approaches to capacity building through the lens of the GOFC-GOLD partnership effort. Specifically, this presentation describes the role of the GODC-GOLD partnership in nurturing organic networks of scientists and EOs practitioners in Asia, Africa, Eastern Europe and Latin America.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radio observations of Galactic WISE HII regions (Anderson+, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, L. D.; Armentrout, W. P.; Johnstone, B. M.; Bania, T. M.; Balser, D. S.; Wenger, T. V.; Cunningham, V.

    2016-01-01

    We draw our targets from the MIR objects in the WISE catalog of Anderson+, 2014, J/ApJS/212/1. We also include in our sample Sharpless H II regions (Sharpless 1959, VII/20). See section 2 for further details. Our observations were made with the GBT 100m telescope from 2012 July through 2014 August. There are seven radio recombination lines (RRLs) that can be cleanly observed simultaneously with the GBT in the X-band: H87α to H93α. We average these seven RRLs (each at two orthogonal polarizations) to create a single average RRL spectrum. We followed the same GBT observational procedure as in the original HRDS (Green Bank Telescope H II Region Discovery Survey (GBT HRDS; Bania et al. 2010ApJ...718L.106B). (3 data files).

  20. Observation of a Sharp Negative Dipolarization Front in the Reconnection Outflow Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Meng; HUANG Shi-Yong; DENG Xiao-Hua; PANG Ye

    2011-01-01

    A sharp dipolarization front (DF) has recently been detected in the Earth's magnetotail and is associated with complex kinetic effects. We present one event where a tailward propagating negative DF (with Bz decreasing sharply to negative value) was observed near a reconnection region. The thickness of the negative DF is comparable with the local ion gyro-radius/inertial length. There is a strong field-aligned current at the front. Electromagnetic whistler wave enhancements are observed around the front, associated with counter-streaming electron beams. We further compare the features of the observed negative DF with the recent kinetic simulation results, as well as the Earthward propagating DFs observed by the THEMIS spacecraft.%A sharp dipolarization front (DF) has recently been detected in the Earth's magnetotail and is associated with complex kinetic effects.We present one event where a tailward propagating negative DF (with Bz decreasing sharply to negative value) was observed near a reconnection region.The thickness of the negative DF is comparable with the local ion gyro-radius/inertial length.There is a strong field-aligned current at the front.Electromagnetic whistler wave enhancements are observed around the front,associated with counter-streaming electron beams.We further compare the features of the observed negative DF with the recent kinetic simulation results,as well as the Earthward propagating DFs observed by the THEMIS spacecraft.A substorm is an explosive energy release process that occurs in the magnetosphere of many planets.Magnetic field dipolarization is believed to be an essential ingredient of the substorm process,each of which is generally associated with dipolarization.Traditionally,dipolarization was believed to be associated with a decrease in the cross-tail current in the nearEarth region,which might be caused by cross-tail current instability[1] or the dawnward inertial current due to fast-flow braking.[2

  1. ISO Mid-Infrared Observations of Giant HII Regions in M33

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelton, B. P.; Waller, W. H.; Hodge, P. W.; Boulanger, F.; Cornett, R. H.; Fanelli, M. N.; Lequeux, J.; Stecher, T. P.; Viallefond, F.; Hui, Y.

    1999-01-01

    We present Infrared Space Observatory Camera (ISOCAM) Circular Variable Filter scans of three giant HII regions in M33. IC 133, NGC 595, and CC 93 span a wide range of metallicity, luminosity, nebular excitation, and infrared excess; three other emission regions (CC 43, CC 99, and a region to the northeast of the core of NGC 595) are luminous enough in the mid-infrared to be detected in the observed fields. ISOCAM CVF observations provide spatially resolved observations (5'') of 151 wavelengths between 5.1 and 16.5 microns with a spectral resolution R = 35 to 50. We observe atomic emission lines ([Ne II], [Ne III], and [S IV]), several "unidentified infrared bands" (UIBs; 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, 11.3, 12.0, and 12.7 microns), and in some cases a continuum which rises steeply at longer wavelengths. We conclude that the spectra of these three GHRs are well explained by combinations of ionized gas, PAHs, and very small grains in various proportions and with different spatial distributions. Comparisons between observed ratios of the various UIBs with model ratios indicate that the PAHs in all three of the GHRs are dehydrogenated and that the small PAHs have been destroyed in IC 133 but have survived in NGC 595 and CC 93. The [Ne III]/[Ne II] ratios observed in IC 133 and NGC 595 are consistent with their ages of 5 and 4.5 Myr, respectively; the deduced ionization parameter is higher in IC 133, consistent with its more compact region of emission.

  2. ISO Mid-Infrared Observations of Giant HII Regions in M33

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelton, B. P.; Waller, W. H.; Hodge, P. W.; Boulanger, F.; Cornett, R. H.; Fanelli, M. N.; Lequeux, J.; Stecher, T. P.; Viallefond, F.; Hui, Y.

    1999-01-01

    We present Infrared Space Observatory Camera (ISOCAM) Circular Variable Filter scans of three giant HII regions in M33. IC 133, NGC 595, and CC 93 span a wide range of metallicity, luminosity, nebular excitation, and infrared excess; three other emission regions (CC 43, CC 99, and a region to the northeast of the core of NGC 595) are luminous enough in the mid-infrared to be detected in the observed fields. ISOCAM CVF observations provide spatially resolved observations (5'') of 151 wavelengths between 5.1 and 16.5 microns with a spectral resolution R = 35 to 50. We observe atomic emission lines ([Ne II], [Ne III], and [S IV]), several "unidentified infrared bands" (UIBs; 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, 11.3, 12.0, and 12.7 microns), and in some cases a continuum which rises steeply at longer wavelengths. We conclude that the spectra of these three GHRs are well explained by combinations of ionized gas, PAHs, and very small grains in various proportions and with different spatial distributions. Comparisons between observed ratios of the various UIBs with model ratios indicate that the PAHs in all three of the GHRs are dehydrogenated and that the small PAHs have been destroyed in IC 133 but have survived in NGC 595 and CC 93. The [Ne III]/[Ne II] ratios observed in IC 133 and NGC 595 are consistent with their ages of 5 and 4.5 Myr, respectively; the deduced ionization parameter is higher in IC 133, consistent with its more compact region of emission.

  3. Evidence for Steady Heating: Observations of an Active Region Core with Hinode and TRACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Harry P.; Winebarger, Amy R.; Brooks, David H.

    2010-03-01

    The timescale for energy release is an important parameter for constraining the coronal heating mechanism. Observations of "warm" coronal loops (~1 MK) have indicated that the heating is impulsive and that coronal plasma is far from equilibrium. In contrast, observations at higher temperatures (~3 MK) have generally been consistent with steady heating models. Previous observations, however, have not been able to exclude the possibility that the high temperature loops are actually composed of many small-scale threads that are in various stages of heating and cooling and only appear to be in equilibrium. With new observations from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer and X-ray Telescope (XRT) on Hinode we have the ability to investigate the properties of high temperature coronal plasma in extraordinary detail. We examine the emission in the core of an active region and find three independent lines of evidence for steady heating. We find that the emission observed in XRT is generally steady for hours, with a fluctuation level of approximately 15% in an individual pixel. Short-lived impulsive heating events are observed, but they appear to be unrelated to the steady emission that dominates the active region. Furthermore, we find no evidence for warm emission that is spatially correlated with the hot emission, as would be expected if the high temperature loops are the result of impulsive heating. Finally, we also find that intensities in the "moss," the footpoints of high temperature loops, are consistent with steady heating models provided that we account for the local expansion of the loop from the base of the transition region to the corona. In combination, these results provide strong evidence that the heating in the core of an active region is effectively steady, that is, the time between heating events is short relative to the relevant radiative and conductive cooling times.

  4. Insights from Synthetic Star-forming Regions: I. Reliable Mock Observations from SPH Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Koepferl, Christine M; Dale, James E; Biscani, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Through synthetic observations of a hydrodynamical simulation of an evolving star-forming region, we assess how the choice of observational techniques affects the measurements of properties which trace star formation. Testing and calibrating observational measurements requires synthetic observations which are as realistic as possible. In this part of the paper series (Paper I), we explore different techniques for how to map the distributions of densities and temperatures from the particle-based simulations onto a Voronoi mesh suitable for radiative transfer and consequently explore their accuracy. We further test different ways to set up the radiative transfer in order to produce realistic synthetic observations. We give a detailed description of all methods and ultimately recommend techniques. We have found that the flux around 20 microns is strongly overestimated when blindly coupling the dust radiative transfer temperature with the hydrodynamical gas temperature. We find that when instead assuming a consta...

  5. ICMEs Likely From the Same Active Region Observed by Both Helios 1 and IMP 8

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Dan; WANG Chi

    2007-01-01

    The chance of an Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection (ICME) observed by widely-separated spacecraft is rare. However, such an event provides us a good opportunity to study the propagation and evolution of ICMEs in the heliosphere. On day 72 of 1975, an ICME was observed by Helios 1 at 0.3 AU, while a similar solar wind structure was observed by IMP 8 at Earth on day 70 of 1975. On the basis of comparison of the plasma signatures and the transit time from Helios 1 to IMP 8, we hypothesize the observed ICMEs by both spacecraft are resulted from the same active region on the solar surface. A one-dimensional MHD model was used to track the ICME from Helios 1 (0.3 AU) to Earth. The observed plasma profiles and timing are close to those predicted by our MHD model and thus, give the supports to the model.

  6. Evidence for Steady Heating: Observations of an Active Region Core with Hinode and TRACE

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Harry P; Brooks, David H

    2009-01-01

    The timescale for energy release is an important parameter for constraining the coronal heating mechanism. Observations of "warm" coronal loops (~1 MK) have indicated that the heating is impulsive and that coronal plasma is far from equilibrium. In contrast, observations at higher temperatures (~3 MK) have generally been consistent with steady heating models. Previous observations, however, have not been able to exclude the possibility that the high temperature loops are actually composed of many small scale threads that are in various stages of heating and cooling and only appear to be in equilibrium. With new observations from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and X-ray Telescope (XRT) on Hinode we have the ability to investigate the properties of high temperature coronal plasma in extraordinary detail. We examine the emission in the core of an active region and find three independent lines of evidence for steady heating. We find that the emission observed in XRT is generally steady for hours, with a fluct...

  7. High resolution radio observations of nuclear and circumnuclear regions of luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberdi, A; Perez-Torres, M A [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (IAA, CSIC), PO Box 3004, 18080-Granada (Spain); Colina, L [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia - IEM, CSIC, C, Serrano 115, 28005 Madrid (Spain); Torrelles, J M [Instituto de Ciencias del Espacio (ICE, CSIC) and IEEC, Gran Capita 2-4, 08034 Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: antxon@iaa.es, E-mail: torres@iaa.es, E-mail: colina@damir.iem.csic.es, E-mail: torrelle@ieec.fcr.es

    2008-10-15

    High-resolution radio observations of the nuclear region of Luminous and Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs) have shown that its radio structure consists of a compact high surface-brightness central radio source immersed in a diffuse low brightness circumnuclear halo. While the central component could be associated with an AGN or compact star-forming regions where radio supernovae are exploding, it is well known that the circumnuclear regions host bursts of star-formation. The studies of radio supernovae can provide essential information about stellar evolution and CSM/ISM properties in regions hidden by dust at optical and IR wavelengths. In this contribution, we show results from radio interferometric observations from NGC 7469, IRAS 18293-3413 and IRAS 17138-1017 where three extremely bright radio supernovae have been found. High-resolution radio observations of these and other LIRGs would allow us to determine the core-collapse supernova rate in them as well as their star-formation rate.

  8. Thermal and albedo mapping of the polar regions of Mars using Viking thermal mapper observations: 1. North polar region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paige, David A.; Bachman, Jennifer E.; Keegan, Kenneth D.

    1994-01-01

    We present the first maps of the apparent thermal inertia and albedo of the north polar region of Mars. The observations used to create these maps were acquired by the infrared thermal mapper (IRTM) instruments on the two Viking orbiters over a 50-day period in 1978 during the Martian early northern summer season. The maps cover the region from 60 deg N to the north pole at a spatial resolution of 1/2 deg of latitude. The analysis and interpretation of these maps is aided by the results of a one-dimensional radiative convective model, which is used to calculate diurnal variations in surface and atmospheric temperatures, and brightness temperatures at the top of the atmospphere for a wide range of assumptions concerning aerosol optical properties and aerosol optical depths. The results of these calculations show that the effects of the Martian atmosphere on remote determinations of surface thermal inertia are more significant than have been indicated in previous studies. The maps of apparent thermal inertia and albedo show a great deal of spatial structure that is well correlated with surface features.

  9. OBSERVATIONAL STUDY OF THE CONTINUUM AND WATER MASER EMISSION IN THE IRAS 19217+1651 REGION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Esnard, T.; Trinidad, M. A. [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Guanajuato, Apdo Postal 144, Guanajuato, GTO, Mexico CP 36000 (Mexico); Migenes, V., E-mail: tatiana@iga.cu, E-mail: trinidad@astro.ugto.mx, E-mail: vmigenes@byu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brigham Young University, ESC-N145, Provo, UT 84602 (United States)

    2012-12-20

    We report interferometric observations of the high-mass star-forming region IRAS 19217+1651. We observed the radio continuum (1.3 cm and 3.6 cm) and water maser emission using the Very Large Array (VLA-EVLA) in transition mode (configuration A). Two radio continuum sources were detected at both wavelengths, I19217-A and I19217-B. In addition, 17 maser spots were observed distributed mainly in two groups, M1 and M2, and one isolated maser. This latter could be indicating the relative position of another continuum source which we did not detect. The results indicate that I19217-A appears to be consistent with an ultracompact H II region associated with a zero-age main-sequence B0-type star. Furthermore, the 1.3 cm continuum emission of this source suggests a cometary morphology. In addition, I19217-B appears to be an H II region consisting of at least two stars, which may be contributing to its complex structure. It was also found that the H{sub 2}O masers of the group M1 are apparently associated with the continuum source I19217-A. These are tracing motions which are not gravitationally bound according to their spatial distribution and kinematics. They also seem to be describing outflows in the direction of the elongated cometary region. On the other hand, the second maser group, M2, could be tracing the base of a jet. Finally, infrared data from Spitzer, Midcourse Space Experiment, and IRIS show that IRAS 19217+1651 is embedded inside a large open bubble, like a broken ring, which possibly has affected the morphology of the cometary H II region observed at 1.3 cm.

  10. Observational evidence for new instabilities in the midlatitude E and F region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hysell, David L.; Larsen, Miguel; Sulzer, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Radar observations of the E- and F-region ionosphere from the Arecibo Observatory made during moderately disturbed conditions are presented. The observations indicate the presence of patchy sporadic E (Es) layers, medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs), and depletion plumes associated with spread F conditions. New analysis techniques are applied to the dataset to infer the vector plasma drifts in the F region as well as vector neutral wind and temperature profiles in the E region. Instability mechanisms in both regions are evaluated. The mesosphere-lower-thermosphere (MLT) region is found to meet the conditions for neutral dynamic instability in the vicinity of the patchy Es layers even though the wind shear was relatively modest. An inversion in the MLT temperature profile contributed significantly to instability in the vicinity of one patchy layer. Of particular interest is the evidence for the conditions required for neutral convective instability in the lower-thermosphere region (which is usually associated with highly stable conditions) due to the rapid increase in temperature with altitude. A localized F-region plasma density enhancement associated with a sudden ascent up the magnetic field is shown to create the conditions necessary for convective plasma instability leading to the depletion plume and spread F. The growth time for the instability is short compared to the one described by [Perkins(1973)]. This instability does not offer a simple analytic solution but is clearly present in numerical simulations. The instability mode has not been described previously but appears to be more viable than the various mechanisms that have been suggested previously as an explanation for the occurrence of midlatitude spread F.

  11. Observations about chemical composition of aerosols in the Brazilian Amazon region - Case study: Biomass burning in the subequatorial Amazon region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioda, A.; Monteiro, I. L.; Almeida, A. C.; Hacon, S. S.; Dallacort, R.; Ignotti, E.; Godoy, J. M.; Loureiro, A. L.; Morais, F.; Artaxo, P.

    2012-04-01

    The study was carried out in two cities in the Brazilian Amazon region, Tangará da Serra (14 ° 37'10 "S, 57 ° 29'09" W, 427 m asl), located in a transition area between the Amazon biome and the Cerrado and has the characteristics of urban area in Amazon region; and Alta Floresta (9 ° 52 '32 "S, 56 ° 5' 10" W, 283 m asl) situated in the extreme north of the state of Mato Grosso (MT), both in the subequatorial Amazon region. Tangara da Serra has the largest production of sugar cane in the subequatorial Amazon region. They are located 800 km from each other. These two regions are inserted in a region with typical cycles of drought and rain that alter air pollution levels, and lies in the dispersion path of the pollution plume resulting from burnings in the Brazilian Amazon and pollution emanating from neighboring countries. Both cities have wet tropical climate with two well defined seasons: rainy summer (November to May) and dry winter (June to October). During the dry winter, biomass burnings are frequent in these regions. In 2008, the Department of the Environment has banned fires in the period from July 15 to September 15 throughout the State. In this study chemical characterization was performed for approximately 100 aerosol samples collected in each site during 2008. Fine and coarse aerosol samples collected in SFUs were analyzed by ion chromatography for determination of cations (Na+, K+, NH3+, Ca2+ and Mg2+), anions (SO42-, Cl- and NO3-) and organic acids (acetate and formiate) and also measures of black carbon (BC) (Aethalometer). The results showed that for both sites the average concentrations were quite similar for PM2.5 (16 µg/m3), PM10 (11 and 13 µg/m3) and black carbon (1.4 µg/m3 for PM2.5 and 1.6 µg/m3 for PM10). Sulfate was the predominant species in fine (45%) and coarse (26%) particles in both sites. The sulfate concentrations ranged from 0.01-1.92 µg/m3 in PM2.5 and 0.01-1.66 µg/m3 in PM10 in Tangará da Serra and 0.01-2.93 µg/m3 in PM2

  12. 308 nm准分子光联合他克莫司软膏治疗白癜风临床观察%Cinical observation of the combination therapy of 308 nm excimer laser and tacrolimus on vitiligo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毕晓东

    2013-01-01

    目的 观察308 nm准分子光联合他克莫司治疗白癜风的临床疗效.方法 360例白癜风患者随机分为联合组和308单频光组,两组均采用准分子光系统进行308 nm光疗,联合组同时外用他克莫司软膏.结果 联合组和308单频光组的有效率分别为83.9%和和70.1%,差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05).两组临床有效率最高的部位均为颈部、面部和躯干,最低为手足部;稳定期疗效高于进展期,差异均具有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 308 nm准分子光联合外用他克莫司软膏治疗白癜风临床疗效好.%Objective To observe the clinical effect of the combination therapy of 308nm excimer laser and tacrolimus on vitiligo. Methods Three hundreds and sixty cases with vitiligo were randomly divided into combination therapy group and 308nm excimer laser group. The cases were all treated with 308nm excimer laser, and the combination therapy group was given tacrolimus ointment additionally. Results The total effective rate of combination therapy group was 83.9%, higher than 70.1% of 308nm excimer laser group (P<0.05). In the both groups the positions showed the highes total effective rate were neck, face and trunk, and the lowest were hands and feet. The curative effect in stable stage was better than that in progressive stage (P<0.05). Conclusion The combination trerapy of tacmlimus ointment and the 308nm excimer laser is superior to 308nm excimer laser monotherapy for the treatment of vitiligo.

  13. Impact of urban expansion on meteorological observation data and overestimation to regional air temperature in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO Quanqin; SUN Chaoyang; LIU Jiyuan; HE Jianfeng; KUANG Wenhui; TAO Fulu

    2011-01-01

    Since the implementation of the reform and opening up policy in China in the late 1970s,some meteorological stations 'entered' cities passively due to urban expansion.Changes in the surface and built environment around the stations have influenced observations of air temperature.When the observational data from urban stations are applied in the interpolation of national or regional scale air temperature dataset,they could lead to overestimation of regional air temperature and inaccurate assessment of warming.In this study,the underlying surface surrounding 756 meteorological stations across China was identified based on remote sensing images over a number of time intervals to distinguish the rural stations that 'entered' into cities.Then,after removing the observational data from these stations which have been influenced by urban expansion,a dataset of background air temperatures was generated by interpolating the observational data from the remaining rural stations.The mean urban heat island effect intensity since 1970 was estimated by comparing the original observational records from urban stations with the background air temperature interpolated.The result shows that urban heat island effect does occur due to urban expansion,with a higher intensity in winter than in other seasons.Then the overestimation of regional air temperature is evaluated by comparing the two kinds of grid datasets of air temperature which are respectively interpolated by all stations' and rural stations' observational data.Spatially,the overestimation is relatively higher in eastern China than in the central part of China; however,both areas exhibit a much higher effect than is observed in western China.We concluded that in the last 40 years the mean temperature in China increased by about 1.58℃,of which about 0.01℃ was attributed to urban expansion,with a contribution of up to 0.09℃ in the core areas from the overestimation of air temperature.

  14. Characteristics of Mesospheric Gravity Waves Observed in the Central Region of Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrasse, Cristiano Max; Messias Almeida, Lazaro; Abalde Guede, Jose Ricardo; Valentin Bageston, José; Pillat, Valdir G.; Lima, Washington L. C.

    Gravity waves observations were carried out at Palmas (10.16o S, 48.26o W) Brazil, between September 2007 and December 2008, using an all-sky airglow imager to measure the OH emis-sion. The gravity waves were divided in two groups following they morphology as band and ripples type waves. The main characteristics of the band type waves are: horizontal wavelength between 10-35 km; observed period raging from 5 to 25 minutes; observed phase speed between 5-60 m/s. Preferential propagation directions of the bands are northward and southward, show-ing a clear anisotropy. For the ripples the main wave parameters are: horizontal wavelength ranging between 5 and 15 km; observed period mainly distributed between 5 and 15 minutes and horizontal phase velocity from 5 to 30 m/s. The ripples showed the same anisotropy as in the preferential propagation direction as the band type waves. The gravity wave characteristics observed at Palmas were compared with other observations carried out in Brazil, showing simi-lar features. In order to explain the seasonal variation of the wave propagation direction, maps of Outgoing Longwave Radiation (ORL) were used to locate regions with intense deep con-vection (OLR < 220 W.m-2 ) in the lower atmosphere. During summer and autumn the wave sources regions are well correlated with deep convection areas located at west and northwest of Palmas.

  15. Observations of Galactic star-forming regions with the Cosmic Background Imager at 31 GHz

    CERN Document Server

    Demetroullas, Constantinos; Stamadianos, Dimitrios; Harper, Stuart; Cleary, Kieran; Jones, Mike; Pearson, Tim; Readhead, Anthony; Taylor, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Studies of the diffuse Galactic radio emission are interesting both for better understanding the physical conditions in our Galaxy and for minimising the contamination in cosmological measurements. Motivated by this we present Cosmic Background Imager 31 GHz observations of the Galactic regions NGC 6357, NGC 6334, W51 and W40 at $\\sim$4$'$.5 resolution and conduct an investigation of the spectral emission process in the regions at 4$'$.5 and 1$^{\\circ}$ resolution. We find that most of the emission in the regions is due to optically thin free-free. For 2 sub-regions of NGC 6334 and for a sub-region of W51 though, at 4$'$.5 resolution and at 31 GHz we detect less emission than expected from extrapolation of radio data at lower frequencies assuming a spectral index of $-$0.12 for optically thin free-free emission, at 3.3$\\sigma$, 3.7$\\sigma$ and 6.5$\\sigma$ respectively. We also detect excess emission in a sub-region of NCG 6334 at 6.4$\\sigma$, after ruling out any possible contribution from Ultra Compact HII (...

  16. Explosive events in active region observed by IRIS and SST/CRISP

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Z; Scullion, E M; Xia, L -D; Doyle, J G; Ray, T

    2016-01-01

    Transition-region explosive events (EEs) are characterized by non-Gaussian line profiles with enhanced wings at Doppler velocities of 50-150 km/s. They are believed to be the signature of solar phenomena that are one of the main contributors to coronal heating. The aim of this study is to investigate the link of EEs to dynamic phenomena in the transition region and chromosphere in an active region. We analyze observations simultaneously taken by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) in the Si IV 1394\\AA\\ line and the slit-jaw (SJ) 1400\\AA\\ images, and the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope (SST) in the H$\\alpha$ line. In total 24 events were found. They are associated with small-scale loop brightenings in SJ 1400\\AA\\ images. Only four events show a counterpart in the H$\\alpha$-35 km/s and H$\\alpha$+35 km/s images. Two of them represent brightenings in the conjunction region of several loops that are also related to a bright region (granular lane) in the H$\\alpha$-35km/s and H$\\alpha$+35 km/s images. Sixte...

  17. Ultraviolet observations of the structure and dynamics of an active region at the limb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korendyke, C. M.; Dere, K. P.; Socker, D. G.; Brueckner, G. E.; Schmieder, B.

    1995-04-01

    The structure and dynamics of active region NOAA 7260 at the limb have been studied using ultraviolet spectra and spectroheliograms obtained during the eighth rocket flight of the Naval Research Laboratory's High Resolution Telescope an Spectrograph (HRTS). The instrument configuration included a narrow-bandpass spectroheliograph to observe the Sun in the lines of C IV lambda 550 and a tandem-Wadsworth mount spectrograph to record the profiles of chromospheric transition region and coronal lines in the 1850-2670 A region. The combination of high spatial resolution and high spectral purity C IV slit jaw images with ultraviolet emission-line spectra corresponding allows examination of a variety of active region phenomena. A time series of spectroheliograms shows large-scale loop systems composed of fine-scale threads with some extending up to 100 Mm above the limb. The proper motion of several supersonic features, including a surge were measured. The accelerated plasmas appear in several different geometries and environments. Spectrograph exposures were taken with the slit positioned at a range of altitudes above the limb and provide a direct comparison between coronal, transition region and chromospheric emission line profiles. The spectral profiles of chromospheric and transition region emission lines show line-of-sight velocities up to 70 km/s. These lower temperature, emission-line spectra show small-scale spatial and velocity variations which are correlated with the threadlike structures seen in C IV. Coronal lines of Fe XII show much lower velocities and no fine structure.

  18. First E- and D-region incoherent scatter spectra observed over Jicamarca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Chau

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available We present here the first Jicamarca observations of incoherent scatter radar (ISR spectra detected from E- and D-region altitudes. In the past such observations have not been possible at Jicamarca due a combined effect of strong equatorial electrojet (EEJ clutter and hardware limitations in the receiving system. The observations presented here were made during weak EEJ conditions (i.e., almost zero zonal electric field using an improved digital receiving system with a wide dynamic range and a high data throughput.

    The observed ISR spectra from E- and D-region altitudes are, as expected, narrow and get even narrower with decreasing altitude due to increasing ion-neutral collision frequencies. Therefore, it was possible to obtain accurate spectral measurements using a pulse-to-pulse data analysis. At lower altitudes in the D-region where signal correlation times are relatively long we used coherent integration to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the collected data samples. The spectral estimates were fitted using a standard incoherent scatter (IS spectral model between 87 and 120 km, and a Lorentzian function below 110 km. Our preliminary estimates of temperature and ion-neutral collisions frequencies above 87 km are in good agreement with the MSISE-90 model. Below 87 km, the measured spectral widths are larger than expected, causing an overestimation of the temperatures, most likely due to spectral distortions caused by atmospheric turbulence.

  19. Observationally driven 3D MHD model of the solar corona above an active region

    CERN Document Server

    Bourdin, Ph -A; Peter, H

    2013-01-01

    Aims. The goal is to employ a 3D magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model including spectral synthesis to model the corona in an observed solar active region. This will allow us to judge the merits of the coronal heating mechanism built into the 3D model. Methods. Photospheric observations of the magnetic field and horizontal velocities in an active region are used to drive our coronal simulation from the bottom. The currents induced by this heat the corona through Ohmic dissipation. Heat conduction redistributes the energy that is lost in the end through optically thin radiation. Based on the MHD model, we synthesized profiles of coronal emission lines which can be directly compared to actual coronal observations of the very same active region. Results. In the synthesized model data we find hot coronal loops which host siphon flows or which expand and lose mass through draining. These synthesized loops are at the same location as and show similar dynamics in terms of Doppler shifts to the observed structures. This m...

  20. Multispectral optical observations of ionospheric F-region storm effects at low latitude

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahai, Y.; Bittencourt, J.A.; Takahashi, H.; Teixeira, N.R.; Sobral, J.H.A.; Tinsley, B.A.; Rohrbaugh, R.P.

    1988-04-01

    Simultaneous measurements of specified nightglow emissions have been carried out at Cachoeira Paulista, since 1982, to study the response of the low-latitude ionospheric F-region to magnetic storms. The observations obtained during three magnetic storms in Brazil in 1983 and 1984 are presented and discussed. Emissions excited by energetic particle precipitation were observed during the main phase of strong magnetic storms. In contrast to the observations reported from mid-latitude stations by other investigators, no enhancements in the OI 7774 A emission due to energetic particle precipitation were evident at our latitude. Radiative recombination is suggested as the main excitation mechanism. The OI 6300 A emission, on 7-8 August and 28-29 March, showed periodic intensity variations, which are associated with vertical oscillations of the ionospheric F-region plasma, as shown by the periodic height variations of the F-region seen from the ionograms obtained at the same location. Also, the North-South scanning observation of this wavelength on one occasion showed no meridional and longitudinal phase change, indicating the absence of propagation.

  1. A Transition Region Explosive Event Observed in He II with the MOSES Sounding Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, J. Lewis; Kankelborg, Charles C.; Thomas, Roger J.

    2010-08-01

    Transition region explosive events (EEs) have been observed with slit spectrographs since at least 1975, most commonly in lines of C IV (1548 Å, 1550 Å) and Si IV (1393 Å, 1402 Å). We report what we believe to be the first observation of a transition region EE in He II 304 Å. With the Multi-Order Solar EUV Spectrograph (MOSES) sounding rocket, a novel slitless imaging spectrograph, we are able to see the spatial structure of the event. We observe a bright core expelling two jets that are distinctly non-collinear, in directions that are not anti-parallel. The jets have sky-plane velocities of order 75 km s-1 and line-of-sight velocities of +75 km s-1 (blue) and -30 km s-1 (red). The core is a region of high non-thermal Doppler broadening, characteristic of EEs, with maximal broadening 380 km s-1 FWHM. It is possible to resolve the core broadening into red and blue line-of-sight components of maximum Doppler velocities +160 km s-1 and -220 km s-1. The event lasts more than 150 s. Its properties correspond to the larger, long-lived, and more energetic EEs observed in other wavelengths.

  2. Evaluation of regional climate model simulations versus gridded observed and regional reanalysis products using a combined weighting scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eum, Hyung-Il; Laprise, Rene [University of Quebec at Montreal, ESCER (Etude et Simulation du Climat a l' Echelle Regionale), Montreal, QC (Canada); Gachon, Philippe [University of Quebec at Montreal, ESCER (Etude et Simulation du Climat a l' Echelle Regionale), Montreal, QC (Canada); Environment Canada, Adaptation and Impacts Research Section, Climate Research Division, Montreal, QC (Canada); Ouarda, Taha [University of Quebec, INRS-ETE (Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Centre Eau-Terre-Environnement), Quebec, QC (Canada)

    2012-04-15

    This study presents a combined weighting scheme which contains five attributes that reflect accuracy of climate data, i.e. short-term (daily), mid-term (annual), and long-term (decadal) timescales, as well as spatial pattern, and extreme values, as simulated from Regional Climate Models (RCMs) with respect to observed and regional reanalysis products. Southern areas of Quebec and Ontario provinces in Canada are used for the study area. Three series of simulation from two different versions of the Canadian RCM (CRCM4.1.1, and CRCM4.2.3) are employed over 23 years from 1979 to 2001, driven by both NCEP and ERA40 global reanalysis products. One series of regional reanalysis dataset (i.e. NARR) over North America is also used as reference for comparison and validation purpose, as well as gridded historical observed daily data of precipitation and temperatures, both series have been beforehand interpolated on the CRCM 45-km grid resolution. Monthly weighting factors are calculated and then combined into four seasons to reflect seasonal variability of climate data accuracy. In addition, this study generates weight averaged references (WARs) with different weighting factors and ensemble size as new reference climate data set. The simulation results indicate that the NARR is in general superior to the CRCM simulated precipitation values, but the CRCM4.1.1 provides the highest weighting factors during the winter season. For minimum and maximum temperature, both the CRCM4.1.1 and the NARR products provide the highest weighting factors, respectively. The NARR provides more accurate short- and mid-term climate data, but the two versions of the CRCM provide more precise long-term data, spatial pattern and extreme events. Or study confirms also that the global reanalysis data (i.e. NCEP vs. ERA40) used as boundary conditions in the CRCM runs has non-negligible effects on the accuracy of CRCM simulated precipitation and temperature values. In addition, this study demonstrates

  3. High resolution telescope and spectrograph observations of solar fine structure in the 1600 A region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, J. W.; Brueckner, G. E.; Bartoe, J.-D. F.

    1983-01-01

    High spatial resolution spectroheliograms of the 1600 A region obtained during the HRTS rocket flight of 1978 February 13 are presented. The morphology, fine structure, and temporal behavior of emission bright points (BPs) in active and quiet regions are illustrated. In quiet regions, network elements persist as morphological units, although individual BPs may vary in intensity while usually lasting the flight duration. In cell centers, the BPs are highly variable on a 1 minute time scale. BPs in plages remain more constant in brightness over the observing sequence. BPs cover less than 4 percent of the quiet surface. The lifetime and degree of packing of BPs vary with the local strength of the magnetic field.

  4. Distinct characteristics of asymmetric magnetic reconnections: Observational results from the exhaust region at the dayside magnetopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y. C.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection plays a key role in the conversion of magnetic energy into the thermal and kinetic energy of plasma. On either side of the diffusion region in space plasma, the conditions for the occurrence of reconnections are usually not symmetric. Previous theoretical studies have predicted that reconnections under asymmetric conditions will bear different features compared with those of symmetric reconnections, and numerical simulations have verified these distinct features. However, to date, the features of asymmetric reconnections have not been thoroughly investigated using in situ observations; thus, some results from theoretical studies and simulations have not been tested with observations sufficiently well. Here, spacecraft observations are used in a statistical investigation of asymmetric magnetic reconnection exhaust at the dayside magnetopause. The resulting observational features are consistent with the theoretical predictions. The results presented here advance our understanding of the development of reconnections under asymmetric conditions. PMID:27270685

  5. Solar surface emerging flux regions: a comparative study of radiative MHD modeling and Hinode SOT observations

    CERN Document Server

    Cheung, M C M; Tarbell, T D; Title, A M

    2008-01-01

    We present results from numerical modeling of emerging flux regions on the solar surface. The modeling was carried out by means of 3D radiative MHD simulations of the rise of buoyant magnetic flux tubes through the convection zone and into the photosphere. Due to the strong stratification of the convection zone, the rise results in a lateral expansion of the tube into a magnetic sheet, which acts as a reservoir for small-scale flux emergence events at the scale of granulation. The interaction of the convective downflows and the rising magnetic flux undulates it to form serpentine field lines emerging into the photosphere. Observational characteristics including the pattern of emerging flux regions, the cancellation of surface flux and associated high speed downflows, the convective collapse of photospheric flux tubes, the appearance of anomalous darkenings, the formation of bright points and the possible existence of transient kilogauss horizontal fields are discussed in the context of new observations from t...

  6. High-resolution photoabsorption cross section measurements of sulfur dioxide between 198 nm and 325 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Glenn; Smith, Peter; Blackie, Douglas; Blackwell-Whitehead, Richard; Pickering, Juliet; Rufus, James; Thorne, Anne

    Accurate photoabsorption cross section data at a range of temperatures are required for the incorporation of sulfur dioxide into atmospheric photochemical models. In addition to its role in the terrestrial atmosphere, sulfur dioxide is observed in significant concentrations in the atmospheres of Venus and Io. Our laboratory measurement program focuses on the very congested SO2 spectrum in the ultraviolet. Using the Imperial College UV Fourier transform spectrometer, we have recorded high-resolution (resolving power (λ/∆λ) = 450,000) absorption spectra in the 198 to 325 nm region over a range of temperatures from 160 K to 295 K. This high resolving power allows resolutions approaching those required to fully resolve the Doppler profile of SO2 in the UV. We have reported absolute photoabsorption cross sections at 295 K [Stark et al., JGR Planets 104, 16585 (1999); Rufus et al. JGR Planets 108, doi:10.1029/2002JE001931,(2003)]. Further measurements, at 160 K in the 198 to 200 nm region and at 195 K in the 220 to 325 nm region, have been recorded and analyzed. We present an overview of our new measured cross sections at temperatures and pressures comparable to those found in planetary atmospheres. This work was supported in part by NASA Grant NNG05GA03G, PPARC (UK), and the Leverhulme Trust.

  7. Impact of East Asian summer monsoon circulation on the regional aerosol distribution in observations and models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongli; Xie, Xiaoning; Yan, Libin; Liu, Xiaodong

    2017-06-01

    The East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) can change the spatio-temporal distribution of aerosols by influencing the aerosol horizontal and vertical transports and the wet deposition of aerosols over East Asia. In this paper, we examined the aerosol optical depth (AOD) during summer together with the intensity of the EASM based on moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer products on board the Terra satellite and the modeling results from the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model 5.1 in the mid-latitude monsoonal East Asia (20-45° N, 105-130° E). Our results from both observations and simulations show positive correlations of AOD with the monsoon intensity over the Northeast Asia sub-region (32.5-45° N, 105-130° E), and negative correlations with that over the southeast Asia sub-region (20-32.5° N, 105-130° E). The observed and simulated AODs were much larger over the northern sub-region and much smaller over the southern sub-region in the strongest monsoon years compared with those in the weakest monsoon years. The model results suggest that the mechanism responsible for the north-south difference in the aerosol distribution was mainly caused by lower-tropospheric meridional wind anomalies related to EASM. Compared with the weakest monsoon years, the strongest monsoon years experienced southerly wind anomalies, which enabled more aerosols to be transported northward and resulted in a convergence of aerosols over the northern sub-region. In addition, the wet deposition of aerosols reduced (enhanced) the aerosol concentrations in the northern (southern) sub-region during the strongest monsoon years compared with the weakest monsoon years, which partly offset the impact of the lower southerly winds on the aerosol distribution over East Asia.

  8. CloudSat observations of cloud-type distribution over the Indian summer monsoon region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Subrahmanyam

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The three-dimensional distribution of various cloud types over the Indian summer monsoon (ISM region using five years (2006–2010 of CloudSat observations during June-July-August-September months is discussed for the first time. As the radiative properties, latent heat released and microphysical properties of clouds differ largely depending on the cloud type, it becomes important to know what types of clouds occur over which region. In this regard, the present analysis establishes the three-dimensional distribution of frequency of occurrence of stratus (St, stratocumulus (Sc, nimbostratus (Ns, cumulus (Cu, altocumulus (Ac, altostratus (As, cirrus (Ci and deep convective (DC clouds over the ISM region. The results show that the various cloud types preferentially occur over some regions of the ISM, which are consistent during all the years of observations. It is found that the DC clouds frequently occur over northeast of Bay of Bengal (BoB, Ci clouds over a wide region of south BoB–Indian peninsula–equatorial Indian Ocean, and Sc clouds over the north Arabian Sea. Ac clouds preferentially occur over land, and a large amount of As clouds are found over BoB. The occurrence of both St and Ns clouds over the study region is much lower than all other cloud types.The interannual variability of all these clouds including their vertical distribution is discussed. It is envisaged that the present study opens up possibilities to quantify the feedback of individual cloud type in the maintenance of the ISM through radiative forcing and latent heat release.

  9. Coordinated Observations of X-ray and High-Resolution EUV Active Region Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Sabrina; Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Kobayashi, Ken; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    The recently-launched High-resolution Coronal imager (Hi-C) sounding rocket provided the highest resolution images of coronal loops and other small-scale structures in the 193 Angstrom passband to date. With just 5 minutes of observations, the instrument recorded a variety of dynamic coronal events -- including even a small B-class flare. We will present our results comparing these extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) observations with X-ray imaging from Hinode/XRT as well as EUV AIA data to identify sources of hot plasma rooted in the photosphere and track their affect on the overall topology and dynamics of the active region.

  10. Solar Surface Emerging Flux Regions: A Comparative Study of Radiative MHD Modeling and Hinode SOT Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, M.; Schüssler, M.; Tarbell, T. D.; Title, A. M.

    2009-12-01

    We present results from three-dimensional radiative MHD simulations of the rise of buoyant magnetic flux tubes through the convection zone and into the photosphere. Due to the strong stratification of the convection zone, the rise results in a lateral expansion of the tube into a magnetic sheet, which acts as a reservoir for small-scale flux emergence events at the scale of granulation. The interaction of the convective downflows and the rising magnetic flux tube undulates it to form serpentine field lines that emerge into the photosphere. Observational characteristics of the simulated emerging flux regions are discussed in the context of new observations from Hinode SOT.

  11. Photospheric and Coronal Observations of Abrupt Magnetic Restructuring in Two Flaring Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Gordon

    2016-05-01

    For two major X-class flares observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory Ahead (STEREO-A) spacecraft when they were close to quadrature, we compare major, abrupt changes in the photospheric magnetic vector field to changes in the observed coronal magnetic structure during the two flares. The Lorentz force changes in strong photospheric fields within active regions are estimated from time series of SDO Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) vector magnetograms. These show that the major changes occurred in each case near the main neutral line of the region and in two neighboring twisted opposite-polarity sunspots. In each case the horizontal parallel field strengthened significantly near the neutral line while the azimuthal field in the sunspots decreased, suggesting that a flux rope joining the two sunspots collapsed across the neutral line with reduced magnetic pressure because of a reduced field twist component. At the same time, the coronal extreme ultraviolet (EUV) loop structure was observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard SDO and the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) on STEREO-A to decrease significantly in height during each eruption, discontinuous changes signifying ejection of magnetized plasma, and outward-propagating continuous but abrupt changes consistent with loop contraction. An asymmetry in the observed EUV loop changes during one of the flares matches an asymmetry in the photospheric magnetic changes associated with that flare. The observations are discussed in terms of the well-known tether-cutting and breakout flare initiation models.

  12. Observations of SNR CTA 1 and the Cyg OB1 region with VERITAS

    CERN Document Server

    Aliu, Ester

    2011-01-01

    The Cygnus region is a nearby very active star forming region, containing several OB associations, considered as tracers of young pulsars. Above 12 TeV, the Milagro Collaboration has reported the discovery of a very large source, MGRO J2019+37, lying towards the Cyg OB1 association, at the edge of the Cygnus region. The young and energetic pulsar PSR J2021+3651 has been proposed to power this emission. We present here the result of deep VERITAS observations of this region at energies above 650 GeV. These observations unveil extended and complex TeV emission compatible with MGRO J2019+37, likely made of multiple sources, and a clearly separated point source emission from the direction of CTB 87, a pulsar wind nebula candidate. We will also report on the detection of TeV emission from the young Galactic SNR CTA 1, likely powered by the first pulsar discovered through its gamma-ray radiation.

  13. Optical, radio, and infrared observations of compact H II regions. V. The hourglass in M8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, C.E.; Pipher, J.L.; Helfer, H.L.; Sharpless, S.; Moneti, A.; Kozikowski, D.; Oliveri, M.; Willner, S.P.; Lacasse, M.G.; Herter, T.

    1986-04-01

    Multiwavelength observations of the inner core of the M8 Hourglass region are presented, including VLA interferometric maps, 2--4 ..mu..m and 8--13 ..mu..m spectroscopy, photometric mapping in the K (2.2 ..mu..m) and L (3.45 ..mu..m) bands and in the 3.28 ..mu..m dust-emission feature, optical CCD imaging, and optical and infrared polarimetry. The compact H II region is excited by the O7 V star Herschel 36, and its apparent bipolar structure at optical wavelengths may be due to variable line-of-sight extinction and scattered light. Standard reddening laws are not applicable in the Hourglass region. A power law extinction lambda/sup -0.78/ yields consistent agreement between ultraviolet, optical, and infrared extinction estimates and suggests that one component of the total grain distribution is on the average larger than that found in the interstellar medium. The spatial distribution of the 3.28 ..mu..m dust-emission feature shows that the feature emission is associated with the boundary layer in the H II region/molecular cloud interface. The observations favor models in which feature emission comes from small refractory grains rather than from fluorescence or thermal emission from volatile mantles.

  14. New radio observations of anomalous microwave emission in the HII region RCW175

    CERN Document Server

    Battistelli, E S; Cruciani, A; de Bernardis, P; Genova-Santos, R; Masi, S; Naldi, A; Paladini, R; Piacentini, F; Tibbs, C T; Verstraete, L; Ysard, N

    2015-01-01

    We have observed the HII region RCW175 with the 64m Parkes telescope at 8.4GHz and 13.5GHz in total intensity, and at 21.5GHz in both total intensity and polarization. High angular resolution, high sensitivity, and polarization capability enable us to perform a detailed study of the different constituents of the HII region. For the first time, we resolve three distinct regions at microwave frequencies, two of which are part of the same annular diffuse structure. Our observations enable us to confirm the presence of anomalous microwave emission (AME) from RCW175. Fitting the integrated flux density across the entire region with the currently available spinning dust models, using physically motivated assumptions, indicates the presence of at least two spinning dust components: a warm component with a relatively large hydrogen number density n_H=26.3/cm^3 and a cold component with a hydrogen number density of n_H=150/cm^3. The present study is an example highlighting the potential of using high angular-resolutio...

  15. The impact of new ionizing fluxes on ISO observations of HII regions and starbursts

    CERN Document Server

    Schärer, D; Schaerer, Daniel; Stasinska, Grazyna

    1998-01-01

    Extensive grids of photoionization models have been calculated for single star HII regions and evolving starbursts. We illustrate the predictions for IR fine structure lines which are used to analyse the stellar content, and derive properties such as the age and IMF. The impact of recent ionizing fluxes on the IR lines are shown. First comparisons of our starburst models with IR-diagnostics and the ISO observations of Genzel et al. (1998) are also presented.

  16. Wind observations of low energy particles within a solar wind reconnection region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. E. J. Huttunen

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available We report characteristics of thermal particle observations during the encounter of the Wind satellite with the separatrix and the outflow domains of a reconnection event on 22 July 1999 in the solar wind. During the studied event the electrostatic analyzers on Wind were transmitting three-dimensional electron and proton distributions in a burst mode every 3 s, the spin period of the spacecraft. The event was associated with a magnetic shear angle of 114° and a large guide magnetic field. The observations suggest that Wind crossed the separatrix and outflow regions about a thousand of ion skin depths from the X-line. At the leading separator boundary, a strong proton beam was identified that originated from the direction of the X-line. In the separatrix and the outflow regions, the phase space distributions of thermal electrons displayed field aligned bidirectional anisotropy. During the crossings of the current sheets bounding the outflow region, we identified two adjacent layers in which the dominant thermal electron flows were towards the X-line at the inner edges of the current sheets and away from the X-line at the outer edges. Interestingly, simulation studies and observations in the Earth's magnetosphere have revealed that the electron flows are reversed, consistent with the Hall current system.

  17. How can mountaintop CO2 observations be used to constrain regional carbon fluxes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, John C.; Mallia, Derek V.; Wu, Dien; Stephens, Britton B.

    2017-05-01

    Despite the need for researchers to understand terrestrial biospheric carbon fluxes to account for carbon cycle feedbacks and predict future CO2 concentrations, knowledge of these fluxes at the regional scale remains poor. This is particularly true in mountainous areas, where complex meteorology and lack of observations lead to large uncertainties in carbon fluxes. Yet mountainous regions are often where significant forest cover and biomass are found - i.e., areas that have the potential to serve as carbon sinks. As CO2 observations are carried out in mountainous areas, it is imperative that they are properly interpreted to yield information about carbon fluxes. In this paper, we present CO2 observations at three sites in the mountains of the western US, along with atmospheric simulations that attempt to extract information about biospheric carbon fluxes from the CO2 observations, with emphasis on the observed and simulated diurnal cycles of CO2. We show that atmospheric models can systematically simulate the wrong diurnal cycle and significantly misinterpret the CO2 observations, due to erroneous atmospheric flows as a result of terrain that is misrepresented in the model. This problem depends on the selected vertical level in the model and is exacerbated as the spatial resolution is degraded, and our results indicate that a fine grid spacing of ˜ 4 km or less may be needed to simulate a realistic diurnal cycle of CO2 for sites on top of the steep mountains examined here in the American Rockies. In the absence of higher resolution models, we recommend coarse-scale models to focus on assimilating afternoon CO2 observations on mountaintop sites over the continent to avoid misrepresentations of nocturnal transport and influence.

  18. Impact of various observing systems on weather analysis and forecast over the Indian region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Randhir; Ojha, Satya P.; Kishtawal, C. M.; Pal, P. K.

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the potential impact of various types of data on weather forecast over the Indian region, a set of data-denial experiments spanning the entire month of July 2012 is executed using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and its three-dimensional variational (3DVAR) data assimilation system. The experiments are designed to allow the assessment of mass versus wind observations and terrestrial versus space-based instruments, to evaluate the relative importance of the classes of conventional instrument such as radiosonde, and finally to investigate the role of individual spaceborne instruments. The moist total energy norm is used for validation and forecast skill assessment. The results show that the contribution of wind observations toward error reduction is larger than mass observations in the short range (48 h) forecast. Terrestrial-based observations generally contribute more than space-based observations except for the moisture fields, where the role of the space-based instruments becomes more prevalent. Only about 50% of individual instruments are found to be beneficial in this experiment configuration, with the most important role played by radiosondes. Thereafter, Meteosat Atmospheric Motion Vectors (AMVs) (only for short range forecast) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) are second and third, followed by surface observations, Sounder for Probing Vertical Profiles of Humidity (SAPHIR) radiances and pilot observations. Results of the additional experiments of comparative performance of SSM/I total precipitable water (TPW), Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS), and SAPHIR radiances indicate that SSM/I is the most important instrument followed by SAPHIR and MHS for improving the quality of the forecast over the Indian region. Further, the impact of single SAPHIR instrument (onboard Megha-Tropiques) is significantly larger compared to three MHS instruments (onboard NOAA-18/19 and MetOp-A).

  19. E-region decameter-scale plasma waves observed by the dual TIGER HF radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Carter

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The dual Tasman International Geospace Environment Radar (TIGER HF radars regularly observe E-region echoes at sub-auroral magnetic latitudes 58°–60° S including during geomagnetic storms. We present a statistical analysis of E-region backscatter observed in a period of ~2 years (late 2004–2006 by the TIGER Bruny Island and Unwin HF radars, with particular emphasis on storm-time backscatter. It is found that the HF echoes normally form a 300-km-wide band at ranges 225–540 km. In the evening sector during geomagnetic storms, however, the HF echoes form a curved band joining to the F-region band at ~700 km. The curved band lies close to the locations where the geometric aspect angle is zero, implying little to no refraction during geomagnetic storms, which is an opposite result to what has been reported in the past. The echo occurrence, Doppler velocity, and spectral width of the HF echoes are examined in order to determine whether new HF echo types are observed at sub-auroral latitudes, particularly during geomagnetic storms. The datasets of both TIGER radars are found to be dominated by low-velocity echoes. A separate population of storm-time echoes is also identified within the datasets of both radars with most of these echoes showing similar characteristics to the low-velocity echo population. The storm-time backscatter observed by the Bruny Island radar, on the other hand, includes near-range echoes (r<405 km that exhibit some characteristics of what has been previously termed the High Aspect angle Irregularity Region (HAIR echoes. We show that these echoes appear to be a storm-time phenomenon and further investigate this population by comparing their Doppler velocity with the simultaneously measured F- and E-region irregularity velocities. It is suggested that the HAIR-like echoes are observed only by HF radars with relatively poor geometric aspect angles when electron density is low and when the electric field is particularly

  20. VLA Observations of Solar Decimetric Spike Bursts: Direct Signature of Accelerated Electrons in Reconnection Outflow Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, B.; Bastian, T.; Gary, D. E.

    2014-12-01

    Solar decimetric spike bursts, which appear in a radio dynamic spectrum as a cluster of short-lived and narrowband brightenings, have been suggested as a possible signature of many, "elementary" particle accelerations at or near a magnetic reconnection site. Their dynamic spectral feature can be potentially used to diagnose important parameters of the reconnection site such as plasma density and spatial size of the fragmentation. Yet direct observational evidence supporting this scenario has been elusive mainly due to the lack of imaging observations. The upgraded Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) provides the first opportunity of performing simultaneous radio imaging and dynamic spectroscopy, which allows radio sources to be imaged at every spatio-temporal pixel in the dynamic spectrum. Here we report Jansky VLA observations of decimetric spike bursts recorded during an eruptive solar limb flare. Combined with EUV and X-ray data from SDO and RHESSI, we show that the spike bursts coincide spatially with a loop-top hard X-ray source, which are located in a region where supra-arcade downflows meet the underlying hot, EUV/X-ray loops. We interpret the observed spike bursts as a direct signature of non-thermal electrons accelerated by turbulences and/or shocks in the reconnection outflow region.

  1. Simultaneous Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) and Very Large Array (VLA) observations of solar active regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, Robert F.

    1991-01-01

    Very Large Array observations at 20 cm wavelength can detect the hot coronal plasma previously observed at soft x ray wavelengths. Thermal cyclotron line emission was detected at the apex of coronal loops where the magnetic field strength is relatively constant. Detailed comparison of simultaneous Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) Satellite and VLA data indicate that physical parameters such as electron temperature, electron density, and magnetic field strength can be obtained, but that some coronal loops remain invisible in either spectral domain. The unprecedent spatial resolution of the VLA at 20 cm wavelength showed that the precursor, impulsive, and post-flare components of solar bursts originate in nearby, but separate loops or systems of loops.. In some cases preburst heating and magnetic changes are observed from loops tens of minutes prior to the impulsive phase. Comparisons with soft x ray images and spectra and with hard x ray data specify the magnetic field strength and emission mechanism of flaring coronal loops. At the longer 91 cm wavelength, the VLA detected extensive emission interpreted as a hot 10(exp 5) K interface between cool, dense H alpha filaments and the surrounding hotter, rarefield corona. Observations at 91 cm also provide evidence for time-correlated bursts in active regions on opposite sides of the solar equator; they are attributed to flare triggering by relativistic particles that move along large-scale, otherwise-invisible, magnetic conduits that link active regions in opposite hemispheres of the Sun.

  2. Structure and Dynamics of Cool Flare Loops Observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikuła, K.; Heinzel, P.; Liu, W.; Berlicki, A.

    2017-08-01

    Flare loops were well observed with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) during the gradual phase of two solar flares on 2014 March 29 and 2015 June 22. Cool flare loops are visible in various spectral lines formed at chromospheric and transition-region temperatures and exhibit large downflows which correspond to the standard scenario. The principal aim of this work is to analyze the structure and dynamics of cool flare loops observed in Mg ii lines. Synthetic profiles of the Mg ii h line are computed using the classical cloud model and assuming a uniform background intensity. In this paper, we study novel IRIS NUV observations of such loops in Mg ii h and k lines and also show the behavior of hotter lines detected in the FUV channel. We obtained the spatial evolution of the velocities: near the loop top, the flow velocities are small and they are increasing toward the loop legs. Moreover, from slit-jaw image (SJI) movies, we observe some plasma upflows into the loops, which are also detectable in Mg ii spectra. The brightness of the loops systematically decreases with increasing flow velocity, and we ascribe this to the effect of Doppler dimming, which works for Mg ii lines. Emission profiles of Mg ii were found to be extremely broad, and we explain this through the large unresolved non-thermal motions.

  3. Transition Region Explosive Events in He II 304Å: Observation and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust, Thomas; Kankelborg, Charles C.

    2016-05-01

    We present examples of transition region explosive events observed in the He II 304Å spectral line with the Multi Order Solar EUV Spectrograph (MOSES). With small (thermal (100-150 km/s) velocities these events satisfy the observational signatures of transition region explosive events. Derived line profiles show distinct blue and red velocity components with very little broadening of either component. We observe little to no emission from low velocity plasma, making the plasmoid instability reconnection model unlikely as the plasma acceleration mechanism for these events. Rather, the single speed, bi-directional jet characteristics suggested by these data are consistent with acceleration via Petschek reconnection.Observations were made during the first sounding rocket flight of MOSES in 2006. MOSES forms images in 3 orders of a concave diffraction grating. Multilayer coatings largely restrict the passband to the He II 303.8Å and Si XI 303.3Å spectral lines. The angular field of view is about 8.5'x17', or about 20% of the solar disk. These images constitute projections of the volume I(x,y,λ), the intensity as a function of sky plane position and wavelength. Spectral line profiles are recovered via tomographic inversion of these projections. Inversion is carried out using a multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique.

  4. Satellite observations of seasonal and regional variability of particulate organic carbon concentration in the Barents Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stramska, Malgorzata; Białogrodzka, Jagoda

    2016-04-01

    The Nordic and Barents Seas are of special interest for research on climate change, since they are located on the main pathway of the heat transported from low to high latitudes. Barents Sea is known to be an important area for formation of deep water and significant uptake from the atmosphere and sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). This region is characterized by supreme phytoplankton blooms and large amount of carbon is sequestered here due to biological processes. It is important to monitor the biological variability in this region in order to derive in depth understanding whether the size of carbon reservoirs and fluxes may vary as a result of climate change. In this presentation we analyze the 17 years (1998-2014) of particulate organic carbon (POC) concentration derived from remotely sensed ocean color. POC concentrations in the Barents Sea are among the highest observed in the global ocean with monthly mean concentrations in May exceeding 300 mg m-3. The seasonal amplitude of POC concentration in this region is larger when compared to other regions in the global ocean. Our results indicate that the seasonal increase in POC concentration is observed earlier in the year and higher concentrations are reached in the southeastern part of the Barents Sea in comparison to the southwestern part. Satellite data indicate that POC concentrations in the southern part of the Barents Sea tend to decrease in recent years, but longer time series of data are needed to confirm this observation. This work was funded by the Norway Grants (NCBR contract No. 201985, project NORDFLUX). Partial support for MS comes from the Institute of Oceanology (IO PAN).

  5. High-Frequency Oscillations in a Solar Active Region observed with the Rapid Dual Imager

    CERN Document Server

    Jess, D B; Mathioudakis, M; Bloomfield, D S; Keenan, F P

    2007-01-01

    High-cadence, synchronized, multiwavelength optical observations of a solar active region (NOAA 10794) are presented. The data were obtained with the Dunn Solar Telescope at the National Solar Observatory/Sacramento Peak using a newly developed camera system : the Rapid Dual Imager. Wavelet analysis is undertaken to search for intensity related oscillatory signatures, and periodicities ranging from 20 to 370 s are found with significance levels exceeding 95%. Observations in the H-alpha blue wing show more penumbral oscillatory phenomena when compared to simultaneous G-band observations. The H-alpha oscillations are interpreted as the signatures of plasma motions with a mean velocity of 20 km/s. The strong oscillatory power over H-alpha blue-wing and G-band penumbral bright grains is an indication of the Evershed flow with frequencies higher than previously reported.

  6. Picosecond laser texturization of mc-silicon for photovoltaics: A comparison between 1064 nm, 532 nm and 355 nm radiation wavelengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binetti, Simona [Department of Materials Science and Milano-Bicocca Solar Energy Research Center (MIB-SOLAR), University of Milano-Bicocca, Via Cozzi 55, 20125 Milano (Italy); Le Donne, Alessia, E-mail: alessia.ledonne@mater.unimib.it [Department of Materials Science and Milano-Bicocca Solar Energy Research Center (MIB-SOLAR), University of Milano-Bicocca, Via Cozzi 55, 20125 Milano (Italy); Rolfi, Andrea [Department of Materials Science and Milano-Bicocca Solar Energy Research Center (MIB-SOLAR), University of Milano-Bicocca, Via Cozzi 55, 20125 Milano (Italy); Jäggi, Beat; Neuenschwander, Beat [Bern University of Applied Sciences, Engineering and Information Technology, Institute for Applied Laser, Photonics and Surface Technologies ALPS, Pestalozzistrasse 20, CH-3400 Burgdorf (Switzerland); Busto, Chiara [ENI Spa, Via Giacomo Fauser, 4, 28100 Novara (Italy); Frigeri, Cesare [CNR-IMEM Institute, Parco Area Delle Scienze 37/A, Fontanini, 43010 Parma (Italy); Scorticati, Davide; Longoni, Luca; Pellegrino, Sergio [Laserpoint Srl, Via Della Burrona 51, 20090 Vimodrone, Milano (Italy)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Self-organized surface structures were produced by picosecond laser pulses on mc-Si. • Three laser wavelengths were used which effectively reduce Si reflectivity up to 8%. • The subsurface damage induced by the three lasers was studied in detail. • μ-Raman, PL and TEM proved that UV laser provides the lowest subsurface damage. • UV laser induced damage is located above the depletion region of the p–n junction. - Abstract: Self-organized surface structures were produced by picosecond laser pulses on multi-crystalline silicon for photovoltaic applications. Three different laser wavelengths were employed (i.e. 1064 nm, 532 nm and 355 nm) and the resulting morphologies were observed to effectively reduce the reflectivity of the samples after laser irradiation. Besides, a comparative study of the laser induced subsurface damage generated by the three different wavelengths was performed by confocal micro-Raman, photoluminescence and transmission electron microscopy. The results of both the structural and optical characterization showed that the mc-Si texturing performed with the laser at 355 nm provides surface reflectivity between 11% and 8% over the spectral range from 400 nm to 1 μm, while inducing the lowest subsurface damage, located above the depletion region of the p–n junction.

  7. Comparing regional modeling (CHIMERE) and satellite observations of aerosols (PARASOL): Methodology and case study over Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromatas, Stavros

    2010-05-01

    S. Stromatas (1), S. Turquety (1), H. Chepfer (1), L. Menut (1), B. Bessagnet (2), JC Pere (2), D. Tanré (3) . (1) Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique, CNRS/IPSL, École Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex, France, (2) INERIS, Institut National de l'Environnement Industriel et des Risques, Parc technologique ALATA, 60550 Verneuil en Halatte, FRANCE, (3) Laboratoire d'Optique Atmosphérique/CNRS Univ. des Sciences et Tech. de Lille, 59650 - Villeneuve d'Ascq, France. Atmospheric suspended particles (aerosols) have significant radiative and environmental impacts, affecting human health, visibility and climate. Therefore, they are regulated by air quality standards worldwide, and monitored by regional observation networks. Satellite observations vastly improve the horizontal and temporal coverage, providing daily distributions. Aerosols are currently estimated using aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals, a quantitative measure of the extinction of solar radiation by aerosol scattering and absorption between the point of observation and the top of the atmosphere. Even though remarkable progresses in aerosol modeling by chemistry-transport models (CTM) and measurement experiments have been made in recent years, there is still a significant divergence between the modeled and observed results. However, AOD retrievals from satellites remains a highly challenging task mostly because it depends on a variety of different parameters such as cloud contamination, surface reflectance contributions and a priori assumptions on aerosol types, each one of them incorporating its own difficulties. Therefore, comparisons between CTM and observations are often difficult to interpret. In this presentation, we will discuss comparisons between regional modeling (CHIMERE CTM) over Mexico and satellite observations obtained by the POLDER instrument embarked on PARASOL micro-satellite. After a comparison of the model AOD with the retrieved L2 AOD, we will present an alternative

  8. Regional frequency analysis of observed sub-daily rainfall maxima over eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hemin; Wang, Guojie; Li, Xiucang; Chen, Jing; Su, Buda; Jiang, Tong

    2017-02-01

    Based on hourly rainfall observational data from 442 stations during 1960-2014, a regional frequency analysis of the annual maxima (AM) sub-daily rainfall series (1-, 2-, 3-, 6-, 12-, and 24-h rainfall, using a moving window approach) for eastern China was conducted. Eastern China was divided into 13 homogeneous regions: Northeast (NE1, NE2), Central (C), Central North (CN1, CN2), Central East (CE1, CE2, CE3), Southeast (SE1, SE2, SE3, SE4), and Southwest (SW). The generalized extreme value performed best for the AM series in regions NE, C, CN2, CE1, CE2, SE2, and SW, and the generalized logistic distribution was appropriate in the other regions. Maximum return levels were in the SE4 region, with value ranges of 80-270 mm (1-h to 24-h rainfall) and 108-390 mm (1-h to 24-h rainfall) for 20- and 100 yr, respectively. Minimum return levels were in the CN1 and NE1 regions, with values of 37-104 mm and 53-140 mm for 20 and 100 yr, respectively. Comparing return levels using the optimal and commonly used Pearson-III distribution, the mean return-level differences in eastern China for 1-24-h rainfall varied from -3-4 mm to -23-11 mm (-10%-10%) for 20-yr events, reaching -6-26 mm (-10%-30%) and -10-133 mm (-10%-90%) for 100-yr events. In view of the large differences in estimated return levels, more attention should be given to frequency analysis of sub-daily rainfall over China, for improved water management and disaster reduction.

  9. Characteristics of sub-daily precipitation extremes in observed data and regional climate model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beranová, Romana; Kyselý, Jan; Hanel, Martin

    2017-03-01

    The study compares characteristics of observed sub-daily precipitation extremes in the Czech Republic with those simulated by Hadley Centre Regional Model version 3 (HadRM3) and Rossby Centre Regional Atmospheric Model version 4 (RCA4) regional climate models (RCMs) driven by reanalyses and examines diurnal cycles of hourly precipitation and their dependence on intensity and surface temperature. The observed warm-season (May-September) maxima of short-duration (1, 2 and 3 h) amounts show one diurnal peak in the afternoon, which is simulated reasonably well by RCA4, although the peak occurs too early in the model. HadRM3 provides an unrealistic diurnal cycle with a nighttime peak and an afternoon minimum coinciding with the observed maximum for all three ensemble members, which suggests that convection is not captured realistically. Distorted relationships of the diurnal cycles of hourly precipitation to daily maximum temperature in HadRM3 further evidence that underlying physical mechanisms are misrepresented in this RCM. Goodness-of-fit tests indicate that generalised extreme value distribution is an applicable model for both observed and RCM-simulated precipitation maxima. However, the RCMs are not able to capture the range of the shape parameter estimates of distributions of short-duration precipitation maxima realistically, leading to either too many (nearly all for HadRM3) or too few (RCA4) grid boxes in which the shape parameter corresponds to a heavy tail. This means that the distributions of maxima of sub-daily amounts are distorted in the RCM-simulated data and do not match reality well. Therefore, projected changes of sub-daily precipitation extremes in climate change scenarios based on RCMs not resolving convection need to be interpreted with caution.

  10. Polar-Region Distributions of Poynting Flux: Global Models Compared With Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanson, P. D.; Lotko, W.; Murr, D.; Gagne, J. R.; Wiltberger, M.; Lyon, J. G.

    2007-12-01

    Low-altitude distributions of electric potential, field-aligned current and Poynting flux derived from the Lyon- Fedder-Mobarry global simulation model of the magnetosphere are compared with distributions derived from SuperDARN, the Iridium satellite constellation, and the Weimer 2005 empirical model for a one-hour interval (1400-1500 UT) on 23 November 1999 during which the interplanetary magnetic field was steady and southward. Synthetic measurements along a pseudo-satellite track are also obtained from each distribution and compared with measurements from the DMSP F13 satellite. Previous studies of the event are supplemented here with updated simulation results for the electric potential and field-aligned currents, new simulation diagnostics for the Poynting flux incident on the ionosphere, and comparisons of observational and simulation results with the Weimer empirical model. The location and extent of the simulated Poynting fluxes that occur in the afternoon sector, between the Region-1 and 2 currents, are consistent with the observed and empirically modeled locations, but the magnitudes exhibit significant differences (locally up to ~100% both higher and lower). Elsewhere, the distribution of simulated fluxes more closely resembles the empirically modeled values than the observed ones and in general is greater in magnitude by about 100%. Additionally, the fraction of simulated Poynting flux that flow into the polar cap region (above 75 deg) is about one third of the total flowing into the ionosphere above 60 deg; a similar value is found for both the observed and the empirically modeled fluxes. The effect of including the parallel potential drop in the self-consistent mapping of electric potential between the ionosphere and inner boundary of the simulation domain is also examined. Globally the effect is small (< 5%); however, in regions where the field-aligned potential drop is appreciable, local changes of 100% or more are found in the magnitude of the

  11. A THREE-DIMENSIONAL MODEL OF ACTIVE REGION 7986: COMPARISON OF SIMULATIONS WITH OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mok, Yung [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Mikić, Zoran; Lionello, Roberto; Downs, Cooper; Linker, Jon A., E-mail: ymok@uci.edu [Predictive Science, Inc., San Diego, CA 92121 (United States)

    2016-01-20

    In the present study, we use a forward modeling method to construct a 3D thermal structure encompassing active region 7986 of 1996 August. The extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emissions are then computed and compared with observations. The heating mechanism is inspired by a theory on Alfvén wave turbulence dissipation. The magnetic structure is built from a Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/MDI magnetogram and an estimated torsion parameter deduced from observations. We found that the solution to the equations in some locations is in a thermal nonequilibrium state. The time variation of the density and temperature profiles leads to time dependent emissions, which appear as thin, loop-like structures with uniform cross-section. Their timescale is consistent with the lifetime of observed coronal loops. The dynamic nature of the solution also leads to plasma flows that resemble observed coronal rain. The computed EUV emissions from the coronal part of the fan loops and the high loops compare favorably with SOHO/EIT observations in a quantitative comparison. However, the computed emission from the lower atmosphere is excessive compared to observations, a symptom common to many models. Some factors for this discrepancy are suggested, including the use of coronal abundances to compute the emissions and the neglect of atmospheric opacity effects.

  12. Characteristics of Anthropogenic Sulfate and Carbonaceous Aerosols over East Asia: Regional Modeling and Observation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan HUANG; William L. CHAMEIDES; Qian TAN; Robert E. DICKINSON

    2008-01-01

    The authors present spatial and temporal characteristics of anthropogenic sulfate and carbonaceous aerosols over East Asia using a 3-D coupled regional climate-chemistry-aerosol model, and compare the simulation with the limited aerosol observations over the region. The aerosol module consists of SO2, SO42-, hydrophobic and hydrophilic black carbon (BC) and organic carbon compounds (OC), including emission, advections, dry and wet deposition, and chemical production and conversion. The simulated patterns of SO2 are closely tied to its emission rate, with sharp gradients between the highly polluted regions and more rural areas. Chemical conversion (especially in the aqueous phase) and dry deposition remove 60% and 30% of the total SO2 emission, respectively. The SO42- shows less horizontal gradient and seasonality than SO2, with wet deposition (60%) and export (27%) being two major sinks. Carbonaceous aerosols are spatially smoother than sulfur species. The aging process transforms more than 80% of hydrophobic BC and OC to hydrophilic components, which are removed by wet deposition (60%) and export (30%). The simulated spatial and seasonal SO42-, BC and OC aerosol concentrations and total aerosol optical depth are generally consistent with the observations in rural areas over East Asia, with lower bias in simulated OC aerosols, likely due to the underestimation of anthropogenic OC emissions and missing treatment of secondary organic carbon. The results suggest that our model is a useful tool for characterizing the anthropogenic aerosol cycle and for assessing its potential climatic and environmental effects in future studies.

  13. High-resolution Observation of Moving Magnetic Features in Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qin; Deng, Na; Jing, Ju; Wang, Haimin

    2017-08-01

    Moving magnetic features (MMFs) are small photospheric magnetic elements that emerge and move outward toward the boundary of moat regions mostly during a sunspot decaying phase, in a serpent wave-like magnetic topology. Studies of MMFs and their classification (e.g., unipolar or bipolar types) strongly rely on the high spatiotemporal-resolution observation of photospheric magnetic field. In this work, we present a detailed observation of a sunspot evolution in NOAA active region (AR) 12565, using exceptionally high resolution Halpha images from the 1.6 New Solar telescope (NST) at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) and the UV images from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). The spectropolarimetric measurements of photospheric magnetic field are obtained from the NST Near InfraRed Imaging Spectropolarimeter (NIRIS) at Fe I 1.56 um line. We investigate the horizontal motion of the classified MMFs and discuss the clustering patterns of the geometry and motion of the MMFs. We estimate the rate of flux generation by appearance of MMFs and the role MMFs play in sunspot decaying phase. We also study the interaction between the MMFs and the existing magnetic field features and its response to Ellerman bombs and IRIS bombs respectively at higher layers.

  14. Neutral and Ionized Hydrides in Star-forming Regions -- Observations with Herschel/HIFI

    CERN Document Server

    Benz, Arnold O; van Dishoeck, Ewine F; Staeuber, Pascal; Wampfler, Susanne F

    2013-01-01

    The cosmic abundance of hydrides depends critically on high-energy UV, X-ray, and particle irradiation. Here we study hydrides in star-forming regions where irradiation by the young stellar object can be substantial, and density and temperature can be much enhanced over interstellar values. Lines of OH, CH, NH, SH and their ions OH+, CH+, NH+, SH+, H2O+, and H3O+ were observed in star-forming regions by the HIFI spectrometer onboard the Herschel Space Observatory. Molecular column densities are derived from observed ground-state lines, models, or rotational diagrams. We report here on two prototypical high-mass regions, AFGL 2591 and W3 IRS5, and compare them to chemical calculations making assumptions on the high-energy irradiation. A model assuming no ionizing protostellar emission is compared with (i) a model assuming strong protostellar X-ray emission and (ii) a two-dimensional (2D) model including emission in the far UV (FUV, 6 -- 13.6 eV) irradiating the outflow walls that separate the outflowing gas an...

  15. An observational and numerical study of a flash flood event in Eastern Marmara Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, A.

    2010-09-01

    Warm season cut-off cyclones over North-western Anatolia frequently triggers storms with heavy precipitation over Marmara and Western Black Sea Region. Since the area is highly urbanized with a deficiency in substructure, an important percentage of these storms result in flash floods, producing severe damage and fatalities. A heavy precipitation case from 5th to 9th of June, 2010 is studied. With the large scale circulation of the cut-off low, the storm system over Northern Anatolia moved Black Sea, and after getting richer in moisture, turned back to land over Eastern Marmara Region resulting more than 100 mm of precipitation in 24 hours. A peak of 77 mm in 6 hours is observed at Istanbul Sabiha Gokcen Airport on 7th of June, 2010. Damage in some buildings and one death occured related with the flash flood. In addition to synoptic charts, satellite data, surface and upper air observations, numerical simulation with WRF-ARW is used to make a mesoscale analysis of the meteorological conditions. Heavy rain ingredients such as conditionally unstability, low level jet and high moisture exist over the region according to the model output. Precipitable water and storm relative helicity values are mature and CAPE is moderate.

  16. HERSCHEL FAR-IR OBSERVATIONS OF THE GIANT H II REGION NGC 3603

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecco, Alessandra Di [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Teramo, Via Mentore Maggini snc, I-64100 Teramo (Italy); Faustini, Fabiana; Calzoletti, Luca [ASDC-ASI Science Data Center, Via G. Galilei snc, I-00044 Frascati (RM) (Italy); Paresce, Francesco [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica, Via Piero Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Correnti, Matteo, E-mail: dicecco@oa-teramo.inaf.it [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2015-01-20

    We observed the giant H II region around the NGC 3603 YC with the five broad bands (70, 160, 250, 350, 500 μm) of the SPIRE and PACS instruments, on board the Herschel Space Observatory. Together with what is currently known of the stellar, atomic, molecular, and warm dust components, this additional and crucial information should allow us to better understand the details of the star-formation history in this region. The main objective of the investigation is to study, at high spatial resolution, the distribution and main physical characteristics of the cold dust. By reconstructing the temperature and density maps, we found, respectively, a mean value of 36 K and log{sub 10} N {sub H} = 22.0 ± 0.1 cm{sup –2}. We carried out a photometric analysis detecting 107 point-like sources, mostly confined to the north and south of the cluster. By comparing our data with spectral energy distribution models, we found that 35 sources are well represented by young stellar objects in early evolutionary phases, from Class 0 to Class I. The Herschel detections also provided far-IR counterparts for 4 H{sub 2}O masers and 11 objects previously known from mid-IR observations. The existence of so many embedded sources confirms the hypothesis of intense and ongoing star-formation activity in the region around NGC 3603 YC.

  17. Atmospheric Gravity Waves and Turbulent Processes in the Mesopause Region Based on PMSE MAARSY Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudadze, N.; Chau, J. L.; Stober, G.; Latteck, R.

    2016-12-01

    Mesosphere-lower-thermosphere (MLT) polar dynamics are interesting and important subject for study in atmospheric physic. It is considered that mesopause region is where the main part of the Atmospheric gravity waves breaks and/or dissipates. However this region is difficult to observe. Continuous Observations of the polar summer mesosphere with the Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY) and its predecessor the ALOMAR-Wind-Radar (ALWIN) (before 2010), have been used to investigate dynamical structures of well-known phenomenon - Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE) which is an important tracer in the summer polar mesopause region. Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) and Doppler radial velocity from the PMSE are used to investigate the wave-like motions with periods larger than 5 minutes. Such oscillations are studied in terms of atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs). Processes also connected with AGWs as PMSE layering, are studied in connection with the background conditions of the neutral atmosphere as well. Background winds are obtained from collocated meteor radar (MR). We used local enhancement method for the processing of altitude-time SNR images to detect layers in the PMSEs and characterised them. Our preliminary results indicate that PMSE strength and behaviour is correlated with the meridional wind. Furthermore we found that the spectral width (SW), which is a proxy of turbulence, is most of the time weakly dependent on SNR strength. However, there are some events where SW is highly dependent on SNR intensity indicating that they could be associated to turbulent-dominated events.

  18. Narrow-line-width UV Bursts in the Transition Region above Sunspots Observed by IRIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Zhenyong; Huang, Zhenghua; Xia, Lidong; Li, Bo; Madjarska, Maria S.; Fu, Hui; Mou, Chaozhou; Xie, Haixia

    2016-10-01

    Various small-scale structures abound in the solar atmosphere above active regions, playing an important role in the dynamics and evolution therein. We report on a new class of small-scale transition region structures in active regions, characterized by strong emissions but extremely narrow Si iv line profiles as found in observations taken with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). Tentatively named as narrow-line-width UV bursts (NUBs), these structures are located above sunspots and comprise one or multiple compact bright cores at sub-arcsecond scales. We found six NUBs in two data sets (a raster and a sit-and-stare data set). Among these, four events are short-lived with a duration of ∼10 minutes, while two last for more than 36 minutes. All NUBs have Doppler shifts of 15–18 km s‑1, while the NUB found in sit-and-stare data possesses an additional component at ∼50 km s‑1 found only in the C ii and Mg ii lines. Given that these events are found to play a role in the local dynamics, it is important to further investigate the physical mechanisms that generate these phenomena and their role in the mass transport in sunspots.

  19. Observations of a New Foreshock Region Upstream of a Foreshock Bubble's Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, T. Z.; Hietala, H.; Angelopoulos, V.; Turner, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    Earth's foreshock is a region within the solar wind upstream of Earth's bow shock filled with back-streaming solar wind particles reflected at the shock. Within this region, when the interplanetary field is approximately radial, foreshock bubbles (FBs) can be formed when the back-streaming particles interact with approaching discontinuities embedded in the solar wind. Foreshock bubbles can grow to 5-10 RE in scale, well upstream of the bow shock. Having a high concentration of thermalized upstream ions and slow, or even sunward, speeds within them, these transient phenomena deflect the solar wind by forming a new shock ahead of them. Although FBs eventually succumb to solar wind dynamic pressure and crash onto Earth's bow-shock and magnetopause, they may last long enough to allow solar wind reflection at their own shocks, which forms a new FB foreshock region upstream of them. The FB shock may be of different obliquity than the parent bow-shock providing new and diverse opportunities for particle acceleration. Using a case study from THEMIS, we demonstrate that ions and electrons are reflected at the FB shock, where they acquire energies consistent with shock acceleration theory. These are the first definitive observations of a new ion and electron foreshock region upstream of the FB shock with implications for shock acceleration in general.

  20. Si and Fe depletion in Galactic star-forming regions observed by the Spitzer Space Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Okada, Yoko; Miyata, Takashi; Okamoto, Yoshiko K; Sakon, Itsuki; Shibai, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Hidenori

    2008-01-01

    We report the results of the mid-infrared spectroscopy of 14 Galactic star-forming regions with the high-resolution modules of the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. We detected [SiII] 35um, [FeII] 26um, and [FeIII] 23um as well as [SIII] 33um and H2 S(0) 28um emission lines. Using the intensity of [NII] 122um or 205um and [OI] 146um or 63um reported by previous observations in four regions, we derived the ionic abundance Si+/N+ and Fe+/N+ in the ionized gas and Si+/O0 and Fe+/O0 in the photodissociation gas. For all the targets, we derived the ionic abundance of Si+/S2+ and Fe2+/S2+ for the ionized gas. Based on photodissociation and HII region models the gas-phase Si and Fe abundance are suggested to be 3-100% and <8% of the solar abundance, respectively, for the ionized gas and 16-100% and 2-22% of the solar abundance, respectively, for the photodissociation region gas. Since the [FeII] 26um and [FeIII] 23um emissions are weak, the high sensitivity of the IRS enables to de...

  1. Narrow-line-width UV bursts in the transition region above Sunspots observed by IRIS

    CERN Document Server

    Hou, Zhenyong; Xia, Lidong; Li, Bo; Madjarska, Maria S; Fu, Hui; Mou, Chaozhou; Xie, Haixia

    2016-01-01

    Various small-scale structures abound in the solar atmosphere above active regions, playing an important role in the dynamics and evolution therein. We report on a new class of small-scale transition region structures in active regions, characterized by strong emissions but extremely narrow Si IV line profiles as found in observations taken with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). Tentatively named as Narrow-line-width UV bursts (NUBs), these structures are located above sunspots and comprise of one or multiple compact bright cores at sub-arcsecond scales. We found six NUBs in two datasets (a raster and a sit-and-stare dataset). Among these, four events are short-living with a duration of $\\sim$10 mins while two last for more than 36 mins. All NUBs have Doppler shifts of 15--18 km/s, while the NUB found in sit-and-stare data possesses an additional component at $\\sim$50 km/s found only in the C II and Mg II lines. Given that these events are found to play a role in the local dynamics, it is impo...

  2. Discovering young stars in the Gum 31 region with infrared observations

    CERN Document Server

    Ohlendorf, Henrike; Gaczkowski, Benjamin; Ratzka, Thorsten; Ngoumou, Judith; Roccatagliata, Veronica; Grellmann, Rebekka

    2013-01-01

    Context. The Gum 31 bubble containing the stellar cluster NGC 3324 is a poorly-studied young region close to the Carina Nebula. Aims. We are aiming to characterise the young stellar and protostellar population in and around Gum 31 and to investigate the star-formation process in this region. Methods. We identify candidate young stellar objects from Spitzer, WISE, and Herschel data. Combining these, we analyse the spectral energy distributions of the candidate young stellar objects. With density and temperature maps obtained from Herschel data and comparisons to a 'collect and collapse' scenario for the region we are able to further constrain the characteristics of the region as a whole. Results. 661 candidate young stellar objects are found from WISE data, 91 protostar candidates are detected through Herschel observations in a 1.0 deg x 1.1 deg area. Most of these objects are found in small clusters or are well aligned with the H II bubble. We also identify the sources of Herbig-Haro jets. The infrared morpho...

  3. Undercover EUV Solar Jets Observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, N -H

    2016-01-01

    It is well-known that extreme ultraviolet emission emitted at the solar surface is absorbed by overlying cool plasma. Especially in active regions dark lanes in EUV images suggest that much of the surface activity is obscured. Simultaneous observations from IRIS, consisting of UV spectra and slit-jaw images give vital information with sub-arcsecond spatial resolution on the dynamics of jets not seen in EUV images. We studied a series of small jets from recently formed bipole pairs beside the trailing spot of active region 11991, which occurred on 2014 March 5 from 15:02:21 UT to 17:04:07 UT. There were collimated outflows with bright roots in the SJI 1400 {\\AA} (transition region) and 2796 {\\AA} (upper chromosphere) that were mostly not seen in AIA 304 {\\AA} (transition region) and AIA 171 \\AA\\ (lower corona) images. The Si IV spectra show strong blue-wing but no red-wing enhancements in the line profiles of the ejecta for all recurrent jets indicating outward flows without twists. We see two types of Mg II l...

  4. Cloud-radiation-precipitation associations over the Asian monsoon region: an observational analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiandong; Wang, Wei-Chyung; Dong, Xiquan; Mao, Jiangyu

    2017-01-01

    This study uses 2001-2014 satellite observations and reanalyses to investigate the seasonal characteristics of Cloud Radiative Effects (CREs) and their associations with cloud fraction (CF) and precipitation over the Asian monsoon region (AMR) covering Eastern China (EC) and South Asia (SA). The CREs exhibit strong seasonal variations but show distinctly different relationships with CFs and precipitation over the two regions. For EC, the CREs is dominated by shortwave (SW) cooling, with an annual mean value of - 40 W m- 2 for net CRE, and peak in summer while the presence of extensive and opaque low-level clouds contributes to large Top-Of-Atmosphere (TOA) albedo (>0.5) in winter. For SA, a weak net CRE exists throughout the year due to in-phase compensation of SWCRE by longwave (LW) CRE associated with the frequent occurrence of high clouds. For the entire AMR, SWCRE strongly correlates with the dominant types of CFs, although the cloud vertical structure plays important role particularly in summer. The relationships between CREs and precipitation are stronger in SA than in EC, indicating the dominant effect of monsoon circulation in the former region. SWCRE over EC is only partly related to precipitation and shows distinctive regional variations. Further studies need to pay more attention to vertical distributions of cloud micro- and macro-physical properties, and associated precipitation systems over the AMR.

  5. Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer Observations of the Evolution of Massive Star-Forming Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, X. P.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Benford, D. J.; Rebull, L. M.; Padgett, D. L.; Asslef, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a mid-infrared survey of II outer Galaxy massive star-forming regions and 3 open clusters with data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using a newly developed photometric scheme to identify young stellar objects and exclude extragalactic contamination, we have studied the distribution of young stars within each region. These data tend to support the hypothesis that latter generations may be triggered by the interaction of winds and radiation from the first burst of massive star formation with the molecular cloud material leftover from that earlier generation of stars. We dub this process the "fireworks hypothesis" since star formation by this mechanism would proceed rapidly and resemble a burst of fireworks. We have also analyzed small cutout WISE images of the structures around the edges of these massive star-forming regions. We observe large (1-3 pc size) pillar and trunk-like structures of diffuse emission nebulosity tracing excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and small dust grains at the perimeter of the massive star-forming regions. These structures contain small clusters of emerging Class I and Class II sources, but some are forming only a single to a few new stars.

  6. The Spectrum of Thorium from 250 nm to 5500 nm: Ritz Wavelengths and Optimized Energy Levels

    CERN Document Server

    Redman, Stephen L; Sansonetti, Craig J

    2013-01-01

    We have made precise observations of a thorium-argon hollow cathode lamp emission spectrum in the region between 350 nm and 1175 nm using a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer. Our measurements are combined with results from seven previously published thorium line lists (Giacchetti et al. 1974; Zalubas & Corliss 1974; Zalubas 1976; Palmer & Engleman 1983; Engleman et al. 2003; Lovis & Pepe 2007; Kerber et al. 2008) to re-optimize the energy levels of neutral, singly-, and doubly-ionized thorium (Th I, Th II, and Th III). Using the optimized level values, we calculate accurate Ritz wavelengths for 19679 thorium lines between 250 nm and 5500 nm (40000 1/cm to 1800 1/cm). We have also found 102 new thorium energy levels. A systematic analysis of previous measurements in light of our new results allows us to identify and propose corrections for systematic errors in Palmer & Engleman (1983) and typographical errors and incorrect classifications in Kerber et al. (2008). We also found a la...

  7. Atmospheric observations and emissions estimates of methane and nitrous oxide from regional to global scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kort, Eric Adam

    2011-12-01

    Methane (CH4) and Nitrous Oxide (N2O) are the two most significant anthropogenic, long-lived, non-CO2 greenhouse gases, together perturbing the earth's energy balance by an amount comparable to that of CO2. This dissertation will focus on the use of atmospheric observations to quantify emissions of CH4 and N2O. First top-down emissions constraints on the regional scale, covering large areas of the U.S and southern Canada, are derived from airborne observations made in Spring of 2003. Using a receptor-oriented Lagrangian particle dispersion model provides robust validation of bottom-up emission estimates from EDGAR 32FT2000 and GEIA inventories. It is found that EDGAR CH4 emission rates are slightly low by a factor of 1.08 +/- 0.15 (2 sigma), while both EDGAR and GEIA N2O emissions are significantly too low, by factors of 2.62 +/- 0.50 and 3.05 +/- 0.61 respectively. This analysis is then extended over a full calendar year in 2004 with observations from NOAA's tall tower and aircraft profile network. EDGAR 32FT2000 CH 4 emissions are found to be consistent with observations, though the newer EDGAR v4.0 reduces CH4 emissions by 30%, and this reduction is not consistent with this study. Scaling factors found for N2O in May/June of 2003 (2.62 & 3.05) are found to hold for February-May of 2004, suggesting inventories are significantly too low in primary growing season coincident with significant fertilizer inputs. A new instrument for airborne observation of CO2, CH 4, N2O, and CO is introduced, and its operation and in-field performance are highlighted (demonstrated 1-sec precisions of 20 ppb, 0.5 ppb, 0.09 ppb, and 0.15 ppb respectively). Finally, global N2O observations collected with this sensor on the HIPPO (Hlaper Pole to Pole Observations) campaign are assessed. Comparison with a global model and subsequent inversion indicates strong, episodic inputs of nitrous oxide from tropical regions are necessary to bring observations and model in agreement. Findings

  8. The HI Distribution Observed toward a Halo Region of the Milky Way

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ericson López

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We use observations of the neutral atomic hydrogen (HI 21-cm emission line to study the spatial distribution of the HI gas in a 80° × 90° region of the Galaxy halo. The HI column densities in the range of 3–11 × 10 20 cm − 2 have been estimated for some of the studied regions. In our map—obtained with a spectral sensitivity of ∼2 K—we do not detect any HI 21-cm emission line above 2 σ at Galactic latitudes higher than ∼46°. This report summarizes our contribution presented at the conference on the origin and evolution of barionic Galaxy halos.

  9. Velocity Field Statistics in Star-Forming Regions, 1 Centroid Velocity Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Miesch, M S; Bally, J

    1998-01-01

    The probability density functions (pdfs) of molecular line centroid velocity fluctuations and fluctuation differences at different spatial lags are estimated for several nearby molecular clouds with active internal star formation. The data consist of over 75,000 $^{13}$CO line profiles divided among twelve spatially and/or kinematically distinct regions. Although three regions (all in Mon R2) appear nearly Gaussian, the others show strong evidence for non-Gaussian, often nearly exponential, centroid velocity pdfs, possibly with power law contributions in the far tails. Evidence for nearly exponential centroid pdfs in the neutral HI component of the ISM is also presented, based on older optical and radio observations. These results are in striking contrast to pdfs found in isotropic incompressible turbulence experiments and simulations. Furthermore, no evidence is found for the scaling of difference pdf kurtosis with Reynolds number which is seen in incompressible turbulence, and the spatial distribution of hi...

  10. Deep VLA observations of nearby star forming regions I: Barnard 59 and Lupus 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzib, S. A.; Loinard, L.; Medina, S.-N. X.; Rodríguez, L. F.; Mioduszewski, A. J.; Torres, R. M.

    2016-10-01

    Barnard 59 and Lupus 1 are two nearby star-forming regions visible from the southern hemisphere. In this manuscript, we present deep (σ˜15 μJy) radio observations (ν=6 GHz) of these regions, and report the detection of a total of 114 sources. Thirteen of these sources are associated with known young stellar objects, nine in Barnard 59 and four in Lupus 1. The properties of the radio emission (spectral index and, in some cases, polarization) suggest a thermal origin for most young stellar objects. Only for two sources (Sz 65 and Sz 67) are there indications for a possible non-thermal origin. The remaining radio detections do not have counterparts at other wavelengths, and the number of sources detected per unit solid angle is in agreement with extragalactic number counts, suggesting that they are extragalactic sources.

  11. Spitzer Observations of M83 and the Hot Star, H II Region Connection

    CERN Document Server

    Rubin, R H; Colgan, S W J; Dufour, R J; Ray, K L; Erickson, E F; Haas, M R; Pauldrach, A W A; Citron, R I; Rubin, Robert H.; Simpson, Janet P.; Colgan, Sean W.J.; Dufour, Reginald J.; Ray, Katherine L.; Erickson, Edwin F.; Haas, Michael R.; Pauldrach, Adalbert W.A.; Citron, Robert I.

    2007-01-01

    We have undertaken a program to observe emission lines of SIV 10.5, NeII 12.8, NeIII 15.6, & SIII 18.7 um in a number of extragalactic HII regions with the Spitzer Space Telescope. We report our results for the nearly face-on spiral galaxy M83. The nebulae selected cover a wide range of galactocentric radii (R_G). The observations were made with the Infrared Spectrograph in the short wavelength, high dispersion configuration. The above set of 4 lines is observed cospatially, thus permitting a reliable comparison of the fluxes. From the measured fluxes, we determine the ionic abundance ratios including Ne++/Ne+, S3+/S++, and S++/Ne+ and find that there is a correlation of increasingly higher ionization with larger R_G. By sampling the dominant ionization states of Ne and S for HII regions, Ne/S ~ (Ne+ + Ne++)/(S++ + S3+). Our findings of ratios that exceed the benchmark Orion value are more likely due to other effects than a true gradient in Ne/S. Both Ne and S are primary elements produced in alpha- chain...

  12. Spitzer Observations of M33 and the Hot Star, H II Region Connection

    CERN Document Server

    Rubin, Robert H; Colgan, Sean W J; Dufour, Reginald J; Brunner, Gregory; McNabb, Ian A; Pauldrach, Adalbert W A; Erickson, Edwin F; Haas, Michael R; Citron, Robert I

    2008-01-01

    We have observed emission lines of [S IV] 10.51, H(7-6) 12.37, [Ne II] 12.81, [Ne III] 15.56, and [S III] 18.71 um in a number of extragalactic H II regions with the Spitzer Space Telescope. A previous paper presented our data and analysis for the substantially face-on spiral galaxy M83. Here we report our results for the local group spiral galaxy M33. The nebulae selected cover a wide range of galactocentric radii (R_G). The observations were made with the Infrared Spectrograph with the short wavelength, high resolution module. The above set of five lines is observed cospatially, thus permitting a reliable comparison of the fluxes. From the measured fluxes, we determine the ionic abundance ratios including Ne++/Ne+, S3+/S++, and S++/Ne+ and find that there is a correlation of increasingly higher ionization with larger R_G. By sampling the dominant ionization states of Ne (Ne+, Ne++) and S (S++, S3+) for H II regions, we can estimate the Ne/H, S/H, and Ne/S ratios. We find from linear least-squares fits that ...

  13. NuSTAR's X-ray observations of a microflaring active region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah, Iain; Kleint, Lucia; Krucker, Sam; Wright, Paul James; Glesener, Lindsay; Grefenstette, Brian

    2017-08-01

    We present observations of a weakly microflaring active region observed in X-rays with NuSTAR, UV with IRIS and EUV with SDO/AIA. NuSTAR was pointed at this unnamed active region near the East limb between 23:27UT and 23:37UT 26-July-2016, finding mostly quiescent emission except for a small microflare about 23:35UT. The NuSTAR spectrum for the pre-microflare time (23:27UT to 23:34UT) is well fitted by a single thermal of about 3MK and combined with SDO/AIA we can determine the differential emission measure (DEM), finding it, as expected, drops very sharply to higher temperatures. During the subsequent microflare, the increase in NuSTAR counts matches a little brightening loop observed with IRIS SJI 1400Å and SDO/AIA 94Å/Fe XVIII. Fortuitously the IRIS slit was on this microflaring loop and we find that the IRIS spectrum shows increased emission in Si IV 1394Å, O IV 1402Å and Si IV 1403Å but only average line widths and velocities. The NuSTAR microflare spectrum shows heating to higher temperatures and also allows us to investigate the energetics of this event.

  14. Transition Region and Chromospheric Signatures of Impulsive Heating Events. I. Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Harry P; Crump, Nicholas A; Simoes, Paulo J A

    2016-01-01

    We exploit the high spatial resolution and high cadence of the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) to investigate the response of the transition region and chromosphere to energy deposition during a small flare. Simultaneous observations from RHESSI provide constraints on the energetic electrons precipitating into the flare footpoints while observations of XRT, AIA, and EIS allow us to measure the temperatures and emission measures from the resulting flare loops. We find clear evidence for heating over an extended period on the spatial scale of a single IRIS pixel. During the impulsive phase of this event the intensities in each pixel for the Si IV 1402.770, C II 1334.535, Mg II 2796.354 and O I 1355.598 emission lines are characterized by numerous, small-scale bursts typically lasting 60s or less. Red shifts are observed in Si IV, C II, and Mg II during the impulsive phase. Mg II shows red-shifts during the bursts and stationary emission at other times. The Si IV and C II profiles, in contrast, are ...

  15. Radar observations of artificial E-region field-aligned irregularities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Nossa

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Artificial E region field aligned plasma density irregularities (FAIs were generated using HAARP in four different experimental modes and observed with a coherent scatter radar imager located 450 km to the southwest where it could detect field-aligned backscatter. The experiments were conducted in July of 2008, during the Polar Aeronomy and Radio Science Summer School (PARS, during quiet conditions in the daytime when the E layer was dense and absorption was modest. The echoes observed during zenith and magnetic zenith heating experiments were deflected from their nominally anticipated horizontal positions toward the midpoint position. The occurrence of hysteresis when heating with amplitude modulated pulses implied the development of the resonance instability, although the threshold for the onset of instability appeared to be higher than what has been predicted theoretically. Heating experiments involving pump frequencies slightly above and below the second electron gyroharmonic frequency produced no significant differences in the observed echoes. Finally, heating with a pump frequency slightly above the E region critical frequency appears to have produced FAIs at two distinct altitudes where the upper-hybrid resonance condition could be satisfied.

  16. Deep XMM-Newton Observations of the NW Radio Relic Region of Abell 3667

    CERN Document Server

    Sarazin, Craig L; Wik, Daniel R; Clarke, Tracy E

    2016-01-01

    The results of long XMM-Newton X-ray observations of the NW radio relic of Abell 3667 are presented. A shock is detected at the sharp outer edge of the radio relic, both in the X-ray surface brightness and the temperature profiles. The Mach number is M = 2.54^+0.80_-0.43. The temperature jump at the shock is larger than expected from the density jump, which may indicate that a dynamically important magnetic field aligned primarily parallel to the shock front is present. The gas temperature rises gradually over several arc minutes within the shock region. This could indicate that the shock energy is initially dissipated into some mix of thermal and nonthermal (e.g., turbulence) components, and that the nonthermal energy decays into heat in the post-shock region. The observed radio relic can be powered if ~0.2% of the energy dissipated in the shock goes into the (re)acceleration of relativistic electrons. We show that the observed steepening of the radio spectrum with distance behind the shock is consistent wit...

  17. GRB follow-up observations in the East-Asian region

    CERN Document Server

    Urata, Y; Ip, W H; Qiu, Y; Hu, J Y; Zhou, X; Tamagawa, T; Onda, K; Makishima, K; Zhou, Xn.

    2005-01-01

    In 2004, we established a Japan-Taiwan-China collaboration for GRB study in the East-Asian region. This serves as a valuable addition to the world-wide optical and infrared follow-up network, because the East-Asia region would otherwise be blank. We have been carrying out imaging and spectroscopic follow-up observations at Lulin (Taiwan), Kiso (Japan), WIDGET (Japan) and Xinglong (China). From Xinglong and Kiso, we can locate candidates and obtain early time spectra for afterglows. While WIDGET provides early time observations before the burst, the high-time resolution for multi-band light curves can be obtained at Lulin. With the data from these sites, we can obtain detailed information about the light curve and redshift of GRBs, which are important to understand the mechanism of the afterglows. Up to March 2005, ten follow-up observations have been provided by this East-Asia cooperation. Two optical afterglows were detected, GRB 040924 and GRB 041006. The results of the two detected afterglows are reported ...

  18. Three Dimensional Structure and Time Evolution of a Transition Region Explosive Event Observed in He II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, J. L.; Kankelborg, C. C.; Thomas, R. J.; Longcope, D.

    2007-12-01

    Transition Region Explosive Events (TREEs) have been observed with slit spectrographs since at least 1975, most commonly in lines of C IV (1548A,1550A) and Si IV (1393A, 1402A). We report what we believe to be the first observation of a TREE in He II 304A. With the MOSES sounding rocket, a novel type of imaging spectrograph, we are able to see the spatial and spectral structure of the event. It consists of a bright core expelling two jets, oppositely directed but not collinear, which curve away from the axis of the core. The jets have both line-of-sight and sky-plane motion. The core is a region of high non-thermal doppler broadening, characteristic of TREEs. It is possible to resolve the core broadening into red and blue line-of-sight components. MOSES captured approximately 150 sec of time evolution before the rocket flight ended. We see the beginning (core activation) and middle (jet ejection), but not the end. It is clear from our data-set that TREEs in He II 304A are much less common than observed in other wavelengths.

  19. Airborne observations of regional variation in fluorescent aerosol across the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perring, A. E.; Schwarz, J. P.; Baumgardner, D.; Hernandez, M. T.; Spracklen, D. V.; Heald, C. L.; Gao, R. S.; Kok, G.; McMeeking, G. R.; McQuaid, J. B.; Fahey, D. W.

    2015-02-01

    Airborne observations of fluorescent aerosol were made aboard an airship during CloudLab, a series of flights that took place in September and October of 2013 and covered a wideband of longitude across the continental U.S. between Florida and California and between 28 and 37 N latitudes. Sampling occurred from near the surface to 1000 m above the ground. A Wideband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor (WIBS-4) measured average concentrations of supermicron fluorescent particles aloft (1 µm to 10 µm), revealing number concentrations ranging from 2.1 ± 0.8 to 8.7 ± 2.2 × 104 particles m-3 and representing up to 24% of total supermicron particle number. We observed distinct variations in size distributions and fluorescent characteristics in different regions, and attribute these to geographically diverse bioaerosol. Fluorescent aerosol detected in the east is largely consistent with mold spores observed in a laboratory setting, while a shift to larger sizes associated with different fluorescent patterns is observed in the west. Fluorescent bioaerosol loadings in the desert west were as high as those near the Gulf of Mexico, suggesting that bioaerosol is a substantial component of supermicron aerosol both in humid and arid environments. The observations are compared to model fungal and bacterial loading predictions, and good agreement in both particle size and concentrations is observed in the east. In the west, the model underestimated observed concentrations by a factor between 2 and 4 and the prescribed particle sizes are smaller than the observed fluorescent aerosol. A classification scheme for use with WIBS data is also presented.

  20. Low-frequency magnetic field fluctuations in Venus' solar wind interaction region: Venus Express observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Guicking

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We investigate wave properties of low-frequency magnetic field fluctuations in Venus' solar wind interaction region based on the measurements made on board the Venus Express spacecraft. The orbit geometry is very suitable to investigate the fluctuations in Venus' low-altitude magnetosheath and mid-magnetotail and provides an opportunity for a comparative study of low-frequency waves at Venus and Mars. The spatial distributions of the wave properties, in particular in the dayside and nightside magnetosheath as well as in the tail and mantle region, are similar to observations at Mars. As both planets do not have a global magnetic field, the interaction process of the solar wind with both planets is similar and leads to similar instabilities and wave structures. We focus on the spatial distribution of the wave intensity of the fluctuating magnetic field and detect an enhancement of the intensity in the dayside magnetosheath and a strong decrease towards the terminator. For a detailed investigation of the intensity distribution we adopt an analytical streamline model to describe the plasma flow around Venus. This allows displaying the evolution of the intensity along different streamlines. It is assumed that the waves are generated in the vicinity of the bow shock and are convected downstream with the turbulent magnetosheath flow. However, neither the different Mach numbers upstream and downstream of the bow shock, nor the variation of the cross sectional area and the flow velocity along the streamlines play probably an important role in order to explain the observed concentration of wave intensity in the dayside magnetosheath and the decay towards the nightside magnetosheath. But, the concept of freely evolving or decaying turbulence is in good qualitative agreement with the observations, as we observe a power law decay of the intensity along the streamlines. The observations support the assumption of wave convection through the magnetosheath, but

  1. Application of a Regional Thermohaline Inverse Method to observational reanalyses in an Arctic domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Neill; Wilson, Chris; Zika, Jan

    2017-04-01

    The Overturning in the Subpolar North Atlantic Program (OSNAP) aims to quantify the subpolar AMOC and its variability, including associated fluxes of heat and freshwater, using a combination of observations and models. In contribution OSNAP, we have developed a novel inverse method that diagnoses the interior mixing and advective flux at the boundary of an enclosed volume in the ocean. This Regional Thermohaline Inverse Method (RTHIM) operates in salinity-temperature (S-T) coordinates, a framework which allows us to gain insights into water mass transformation within the control volume and boundary fluxes of heat and freshwater. RTHIM will use multiple long-term observational datasets and reanalyses, including Argo, to provide a set of inverse estimates to be used to understand the sub-annual transport timescales sampled by the OSNAP array. Having validated the method using the NEMO model, we apply RTHIM to an Arctic domain using temperature and salinity and surface flux data from reanalyses. We also use AVISO surface absolute geostrophic velocities which, combined with thermal wind balance, provide an initial estimate for the inflow and outflow through the boundary. We diagnose the interior mixing in S-T coordinates and the boundary flow, calculating the transformation rates of well-known water masses and the individual contributions to these rates from surface flux processes, boundary flow and interior mixing. Outputs from RTHIM are compared with similar metrics from previous literature on the region. The inverse solution reproduces an observed pattern of warm, saline Atlantic waters entering the Arctic volume and cooler, fresher waters leaving. Meanwhile, surface fluxes act to create waters at the extremes of the S-T distribution and interior mixing acts in opposition, creating water masses at intermediate S-T and destroying them at the extremes. RTHIM has the potential to be compared directly with the OSNAP array observations by defining a domain boundary which

  2. 50 MHz continuous wave interferometer observations of the unstable mid-latitude E-region ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Haldoupis

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe the conversion of SESCAT (Sporadic-E SCATter experiment, a bistatic 50 MHz continuous wave (CW Doppler radar located on the island of Crete, Greece, to a single (east-west baseline interferometer. The first results show that SESCAT, which provides high quality Doppler spectra and excellent temporal resolution, has its measurement capabilities enhanced significantly when operated as an interferometer, as it can also study short-term dynamics of localized scattering regions within mid-latitude sporadic E-layers. The interferometric observations reveal that the aspect sensitive area viewed by the radar often contains a few zonally located backscatter regions, presumably blobs or patches of unstable metallic ion plasma, which drift across the radar field-of-view with the neutral wind. On average, these active regions of backscatter have mean zonal scales ranging from a few kilometers to several tens of kilometers and drift with westward speeds from ~ 20 m/s to 100 m/s, and occasionally up to 150 m/s. The cross-spectral analysis shows that mid-latitude type 1 echoes occur much more frequently than has been previously assumed and they originate in single and rather localized areas of elevated electric fields. On the other hand, typical bursts of type 2 echoes are often found to result from two adjacent regions in azimuth undergoing the same bulk motion westwards but producing scatter of opposite Doppler polarity, a fact that contradicts the notion of isotropic turbulence to which type 2 echoes are attributed. Finally, quasi-periodic (QP echoes are observed simply to be due to sequential unstable plasma patches or blobs which traverse across the radar field-of-view, sometimes in a wave-like fashion.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionospheric irregularities; mid-latitude ionosphere; plasma waves and instabilities

  3. Occurrence and location of concentrated load and generator regions observed by Cluster in the plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hamrin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Here, and in a companion paper by Hamrin et al. (2009 [Scale size and life time of energy conversion regions observed by Cluster in the plasma sheet], we investigate localized energy conversion regions (ECRs in the Earth's plasma sheet. In total we have studied 151 ECRs within 660 h of plasma sheet data from the summer and fall of 2001 when Cluster was close to apogee at an altitude of about 15–20 RE. Cluster offers appropriate conditions for the investigation of energy conversion by the evaluation of the power density, E·J, where E is the electric field and J the current density. From the sign of the power density, we have identified more than three times as many Concentrated Load Regions (CLRs as Concentrated Generator Regions (CGRs. We also note that the CLRs appear to be stronger. To our knowledge, these are the first in situ observations confirming the general notion of the plasma sheet, on the average, behaving as a load. At the same time the plasma sheet appears to be highly structured, with energy conversion occurring in both directions between the fields and the particles. From our data we also find that the CLRs appear to be located closer to the neutral sheet, while CGRs prefer locations towards the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL. For both CLRs and CGRs, E and J in the GSM y (cross-tail direction dominate the total power density, even though the z contribution occasionally can be significant. The prevalence of the y-direction seems to be weaker for the CGRs, possibly related to a higher fluctuation level near the PSBL.

  4. Scale size and life time of energy conversion regions observed by Cluster in the plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hamrin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, and in a companion paper by Hamrin et al. (2009 [Occurrence and location of concentrated load and generator regions observed by Cluster in the plasma sheet], we investigate localized energy conversion regions (ECRs in Earth's plasma sheet. From more than 80 Cluster plasma sheet crossings (660 h data at the altitude of about 15–20 RE in the summer and fall of 2001, we have identified 116 Concentrated Load Regions (CLRs and 35 Concentrated Generator Regions (CGRs. By examining variations in the power density, E·J, where E is the electric field and J is the current density obtained by Cluster, we have estimated typical values of the scale size and life time of the CLRs and the CGRs. We find that a majority of the observed ECRs are rather stationary in space, but varying in time. Assuming that the ECRs are cylindrically shaped and equal in size, we conclude that the typical scale size of the ECRs is 2 RE≲ΔSECR≲5 RE. The ECRs hence occupy a significant portion of the mid altitude plasma sheet. Moreover, the CLRs appear to be somewhat larger than the CGRs. The life time of the ECRs are of the order of 1–10 min, consistent with the large scale magnetotail MHD simulations of Birn and Hesse (2005. The life time of the CGRs is somewhat shorter than for the CLRs. On time scales of 1–10 min, we believe that ECRs rise and vanish in significant regions of the plasma sheet, possibly oscillating between load and generator character. It is probable that at least some of the observed ECRs oscillate energy back and forth in the plasma sheet instead of channeling it to the ionosphere.

  5. Observing Observers: Using Video to Prompt and Record Reflections on Teachers' Pedagogies in Four Regions of Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, David A; Simmt, Elaine; Savard, Annie; Suurtamm, Christine; Manuel, Dominic; Lin, Terry Wan Jung; Quigley, Brenna; Knipping, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Regional differences in performance in mathematics across Canada prompted us to conduct a comparative study of middle-school mathematics pedagogy in four regions. We built on the work of Tobin, using a theoretical framework derived from the work of Maturana. In this paper, we describe the use of video as part of the methodology used. We used…

  6. Confidence Region of Least Squares Solution for Single-Arc Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Principe, G.; Armellin, R.; Lewis, H.

    2016-09-01

    The total number of active satellites, rocket bodies, and debris larger than 10 cm is currently about 20,000. Considering all resident space objects larger than 1 cm this rises to an estimated minimum of 500,000 objects. Latest generation sensor networks will be able to detect small-size objects, producing millions of observations per day. Due to observability constraints it is likely that long gaps between observations will occur for small objects. This requires to determine the space object (SO) orbit and to accurately describe the associated uncertainty when observations are acquired on a single arc. The aim of this work is to revisit the classical least squares method taking advantage of the high order Taylor expansions enabled by differential algebra. In particular, the high order expansion of the residuals with respect to the state is used to implement an arbitrary order least squares solver, avoiding the typical approximations of differential correction methods. In addition, the same expansions are used to accurately characterize the confidence region of the solution, going beyond the classical Gaussian distributions. The properties and performances of the proposed method are discussed using optical observations of objects in LEO, HEO, and GEO.

  7. Using observations of slipping velocities to test the hypothesis that reconnection heats the active region corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; Longcope, Dana; Guo, Yang; Ding, Mingde

    2017-08-01

    Numerous proposed coronal heating mechanisms have invoked magnetic reconnection in some role. Testing such a mechanism requires a method of measuring magnetic reconnection coupled with a prediction of the heat delivered by reconnection at the observed rate. In the absence of coronal reconnection, field line footpoints move at the same velocity as the plasma they find themselves in. The rate of coronal reconnection is therefore related to any discrepancy observed between footpoint motion and that of the local plasma — so-called slipping motion. We propose a novel method to measure this velocity discrepancy by combining a sequence of non-linear force-free field extrapolations with maps of photospheric velocity. We obtain both from a sequence of vector magnetograms of an active region (AR). We then propose a method of computing the coronal heating produced under the assumption the observed slipping velocity was due entirely to coronal reconnection. This heating rate is used to predict density and temperature at points along an equilibrium loop. This, in turn, is used to synthesize emission in EUV and SXR bands. We perform this analysis using a sequence of HMI vector magnetograms of a particular AR and compare synthesized images to observations of the same AR made by SDO. We also compare differential emission measure inferred from those observations to that of the modeled corona.

  8. Anti-parallel EUV flows observed along active region filament threads with Hi-C

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, Caroline E; Regnier, Stephane; Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy R; Golub, Leon; Kobayashi, Ken; Platt, Simon; Mitchell, Nick; Korreck, Kelly; DePontieu, Bart; DeForest, Craig; Weber, Mark; Title, Alan; Kuzin, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    Plasma flows within prominences/filaments have been observed for many years and hold valuable clues concerning the mass and energy balance within these structures. Previous observations of these flows primarily come from H-alpha and cool EUV lines (e.g., 304A) where estimates of the size of the prominence threads has been limited by the resolution of the available instrumentation. Evidence of `counter-steaming' flows has previously been inferred from these cool plasma observations but now, for the first time, these flows have been directly imaged along fundamental filament threads within the million degree corona (at 193A). In this work we present observations of an active region filament observed with Hi-C that exhibits anti-parallel flows along adjacent filament threads. Complementary data from SDO/AIA and HMI are presented. The ultra-high spatial and temporal resolution of Hi-C allow the anti-parallel flow velocities to be measured (70-80 km/s) and gives an indication of the resolvable thickness of the ind...

  9. Meteor head echo characteristics observed with MAARSY in the polar region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schult, Carsten; Stober, Gunter; Chau, Jorge L.

    2016-04-01

    The Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY, 53.5 MHz), on the North Norwegian island Andoya (69.30° N, 16.04° E) , is the only high power large aperture (HPLA) radar system with interferometric capabilities providing daily meteor head echo observations since November 2013. Meanwhile, the data set of meteor head echoes contains over one million events with a perfect daily and seasonal coverage of the four northern hemisphere sporadic sources. Although, the North Apex meteor source dominates the observation by far (more than 40%), the statistic is large enough for a comparison of the observational meteor parameters for all sporadic sources. Furthermore, due to the large spread of the antenna gain of the HPLA radar system in combination with the interferometric solutions, the observation area can be divided into high and low sensitive regions with different collecting sizes. This separation is equivalent with a measurement of various radar systems with different beam characteristics, observing at the same time and geographical location. This helps answering question on the impact of the radar specifications on the meteor head echo measurements.

  10. Direct observations of plasma upflows and condensation in a catastrophically cooling solar transition region loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orange, N. B.; Chesny, D. L.; Oluseyi, H. M.; Hesterly, K.; Patel, M.; Champey, P. [Department of Physics and Space Sciences, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Minimal observational evidence exists for fast transition region (TR) upflows in the presence of cool loops. Observations of such occurrences challenge notions of standard solar atmospheric heating models as well as their description of bright TR emission. Using the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode, we observe fast upflows (v {sub λ} ≤ –10 km s{sup –1}) over multiple TR temperatures (5.8 ≤log T ≤ 6.0) at the footpoint sites of a cool loop (log T ≤ 6.0). Prior to cool loop energizing, asymmetric flows of +5 km s{sup –1} and –60 km s{sup –1} are observed at footpoint sites. These flows, speeds, and patterns occur simultaneously with both magnetic flux cancellation (at the site of upflows only) derived from the Solar Dynamics Observatory's Helioseismic Magnetic Imager's line-of-sight magnetogram images, and a 30% mass influx at coronal heights. The incurred non-equilibrium structure of the cool loop leads to a catastrophic cooling event, with subsequent plasma evaporation indicating that the TR is the heating site. From the magnetic flux evolution, we conclude that magnetic reconnection between the footpoint and background field is responsible for the observed fast TR plasma upflows.

  11. Undercover EUV Solar Jets Observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, N.-H.; Innes, D. E.

    2016-12-01

    It is well-known that extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission emitted at the solar surface is absorbed by overlying cool plasma. Especially in active regions, dark lanes in EUV images suggest that much of the surface activity is obscured. Simultaneous observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph, consisting of UV spectra and slit-jaw images (SJI), give vital information with sub-arcsecond spatial resolution on the dynamics of jets not seen in EUV images. We studied a series of small jets from recently formed bipole pairs beside the trailing spot of active region 11991, which occurred on 2014 March 5 from 15:02:21 UT to 17:04:07 UT. Collimated outflows with bright roots were present in SJI 1400 Å (transition region) and 2796 Å (upper chromosphere) that were mostly not seen in Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) 304 Å (transition region) and AIA 171 Å (lower corona) images. The Si iv spectra show a strong blue wing enhancement, but no red wing, in the line profiles of the ejecta for all recurrent jets, indicating outward flows without twists. We see two types of Mg ii line profiles produced by the jets spires: reversed and non-reversed. Mg ii lines remain optically thick, but turn optically thin in the highly Doppler shifted wings. The energy flux contained in each recurrent jet is estimated using a velocity differential emission measure technique that measures the emitting power of the plasma as a function of the line-of-sight velocity. We found that all the recurrent jets release similar energy (108 erg cm-2 s-1) toward the corona and the downward component is less than 3%.

  12. Observations of E region irregularities generated at auroral latitudes by a high-power radio wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djuth, F. T.; Jost, R. J.; Noble, S. T.; Gordon, W. E.; Stubbe, P.

    1985-01-01

    The initial results of a series of observations made with the high-power HF heating facility near Tromso, Norway are reported. During these experiments, attention was focused on the production of artificial geomagnetic field-aligned irregularities (AFAIs) in the auroral E region by HF waves. A mobile 46.9-MHz radar was used to diagnose the formation of AFAIs having spatial scales of 3.2 across geomagnetic field lines. The dynamic characteristics of the AFAIs are discussed within the context of current theoretical work dealing with the natural production of AFAIs in the ionosphere.

  13. Variability of Radiosonde-Observed Precipitable Water in the Baltic Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakobson, Erko; Ohvril, H.; Okulov, O.; Laulainen, Nels S.

    2005-06-01

    The total mass of columnar water vapor (precipitable water, W) is an important parameter of atmospheric thermodynamic and radiative models. In this work radiosonde observations from 17 aerological stations in the Baltic region during 14 years, 1989?2002, were used to examine the variability of precipitable water. A table of monthly and annual means of W for the stations is given. Seasonal and annual means of W are expressed as linear functions of geographical latitude. Linear formulas are also derived for parameterization of precipitable water as function of surface water vapor pressure at each station.

  14. Regional variation of inner core anisotropy from seismic normal mode observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deuss, Arwen; Irving, Jessica C E; Woodhouse, John H

    2010-05-21

    Earth's solid inner core is surrounded by a convecting liquid outer core, creating the geodynamo driving the planet's magnetic field. Seismic studies using compressional body waves suggest hemispherical variation in the anisotropic structure of the inner core, but are poorly constrained because of limited earthquake and receiver distribution. Here, using normal mode splitting function measurements from large earthquakes, based on extended cross-coupling theory, we observe both regional variations and eastern versus western hemispherical anisotropy in the inner core. The similarity of this pattern with Earth's magnetic field suggests freezing-in of crystal alignment during solidification or texturing by Maxwell stress as origins of the anisotropy. These observations limit the amount of inner core super rotation, but would be consistent with oscillation.

  15. First observation of low-energy {\\gamma}-ray enhancement in the rare-earth region

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, A; Larsen, A C; Beausang, C W; Humby, P; Burke, J T; Casperson, R J; Hughes, R O; Ross, T J; Allmond, J M; Chyzh, R; Dag, M; Koglin, J; McCleskey, E; McCleskey, M; Ota, S; Saastamoinen, A

    2016-01-01

    The {\\gamma}-ray strength function and level density in the quasi-continuum of 151,153Sm have been measured using BGO shielded Ge clover detectors of the STARLiTeR system. The Compton shields allow for an extraction of the {\\gamma} strength down to unprecedentedly low {\\gamma} energies of about 500 keV. For the first time an enhanced low- energy {\\gamma}-ray strength has been observed in the rare-earth region. In addition, for the first time both the upbend and the well known scissors resonance have been observed simultaneously for the same nucleus. Hauser-Feshbach calculations show that this strength enhancement at low {\\gamma} energies could have an impact of 2-3 orders of magnitude on the (n,{\\gamma}) reaction rates for the r-process nucleosynthesis.

  16. Determination of magnetic fields in broad line region of active galactic nuclei from polarimetric observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrovich, Mikhail; Silant'ev, Nikolai; Gnedin, Yuri; Natsvlishvili, Tinatin; Buliga, Stanislava

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic fields play an important role in confining gas clouds in the broad line region (BLR) of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and in maintaining the stability of these clouds. Without magnetic fields the clouds would not be stable, and soon after their formation they would expand and disperse. We show that the strength of the magnetic field can be derived from the polarimetric observations. Estimates of magnetic fields for a number of AGNs are based on the observed polarization degrees of broad Hα lines and nearby continuum. The difference between their values allows us to estimate the magnetic field strength in the BLR using the method developed by Silant'ev et al. (2013). Values of magnetic fields in BLR for a number of AGNs have been derived.

  17. Structures of magnetic null points in reconnection diffusion region: Cluster observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU YunHui; R.NAKAMURA; W.BAUMJOHANN; H.R'EME; C.M.CARR; DENG XiaoHua; ZHOU Meng; TANG RongXin; ZHAO Hui; FU Song; SU ZhiWen; WANG JingFang; YUAN ZhiGang

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a very important and fundamental plasma process in transferring energy from magnetic field into plasma. Previous theory, numerical simulations and observations mostly concen-trate on 2-dimensional (2D) model; however, magnetic reconnection is a 3-dimensional (3D) nonlinear process in nature. The properties of reconnection in 3D and its associated singular structure have not been resolved completely. Here we investigate the structures and characteristics of null points inside the reconnection diffusion region by introducing the discretized Poincaré index through Gauss integral and using magnetic field data with high resolution from the four satellites of Cluster mission. We esti-mate the velocity and trajectory of null points by calculating its position in different times, and compare and discuss the observations with different reconnection models with null points based on character-istics of electric current around null points.

  18. Aura OMI observations of regional SO2 and NO2 pollution changes from 2005 to 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Krotkov

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI onboard NASA's Aura satellite has been providing global observations of the ozone layer and key atmospheric pollutant gases, such as nitrogen dioxide (NO2 and sulfur dioxide (SO2, since October 2004. The data products from the same instrument provide consistent spatial and temporal coverage and permit the study of anthropogenic and natural emissions on local-to-global scales. In this paper we examine changes in SO2 and NO2 over some of the world's most polluted industrialized regions during the first decade of OMI observations. In terms of regional pollution changes, we see both upward and downward trends, sometimes in opposite directions for NO2 and SO2, for the different study areas. The trends are, for the most part, associated with economic and/or technological changes in energy use, as well as regional regulatory policies. Over the eastern US, both NO2 and SO2 levels decreased dramatically from 2005 to 2014, by more than 40 and 80 %, respectively, as a result of both technological improvements and stricter regulations of emissions. OMI confirmed large reductions in SO2 over eastern Europe's largest coal power plants after installation of flue gas desulfurization devices. The North China Plain has the world's most severe SO2 pollution, but a decreasing trend has been observed since 2011, with about a 50 % reduction in 2012–2014, due to an economic slowdown and government efforts to restrain emissions from the power and industrial sectors. In contrast, India's SO2 and NO2 levels from coal power plants and smelters are growing at a fast pace, increasing by more than 100 and 50 %, respectively, from 2005 to 2014. Several SO2 hot spots observed over the Persian Gulf are probably related to oil and gas operations and indicate a possible underestimation of emissions from these sources in bottom-up emission inventories. Overall, OMI observations have proved to be very valuable in documenting rapid changes in

  19. Aura OMI observations of regional SO2 and NO2 pollution changes from 2005 to 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krotkov, Nickolay A.; McLinden, Chris A.; Li, Can; Lamsal, Lok N.; Celarier, Edward A.; Marchenko, Sergey V.; Swartz, William H.; Bucsela, Eric J.; Joiner, Joanna; Duncan, Bryan N.; Folkert Boersma, K.; Pepijn Veefkind, J.; Levelt, Pieternel F.; Fioletov, Vitali E.; Dickerson, Russell R.; He, Hao; Lu, Zifeng; Streets, David G.

    2016-04-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) onboard NASA's Aura satellite has been providing global observations of the ozone layer and key atmospheric pollutant gases, such as nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2), since October 2004. The data products from the same instrument provide consistent spatial and temporal coverage and permit the study of anthropogenic and natural emissions on local-to-global scales. In this paper, we examine changes in SO2 and NO2 over some of the world's most polluted industrialized regions during the first decade of OMI observations. In terms of regional pollution changes, we see both upward and downward trends, sometimes in opposite directions for NO2 and SO2, for different study areas. The trends are, for the most part, associated with economic and/or technological changes in energy use, as well as regional regulatory policies. Over the eastern US, both NO2 and SO2 levels decreased dramatically from 2005 to 2015, by more than 40 and 80 %, respectively, as a result of both technological improvements and stricter regulations of emissions. OMI confirmed large reductions in SO2 over eastern Europe's largest coal-fired power plants after installation of flue gas desulfurization devices. The North China Plain has the world's most severe SO2 pollution, but a decreasing trend has been observed since 2011, with about a 50 % reduction in 2012-2015, due to an economic slowdown and government efforts to restrain emissions from the power and industrial sectors. In contrast, India's SO2 and NO2 levels from coal power plants and smelters are growing at a fast pace, increasing by more than 100 and 50 %, respectively, from 2005 to 2015. Several SO2 hot spots observed over the Persian Gulf are probably related to oil and gas operations and indicate a possible underestimation of emissions from these sources in bottom-up emission inventories. Overall, OMI observations have proved valuable in documenting rapid changes in air quality over different

  20. Aura OMI observations of regional SO2 and NO2 pollution changes from 2005 to 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krotkov, Nickolay A.; McLinden, Chris A; Li, Can; Lamsal, Lok N.; Celarier, Edward A.; Marchenko, Sergey V.; Swartz, William H.; Bucsela, Eric J.; Joiner, Joanna; Duncan, Bryan N.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) onboard NASA's Aura satellite has been providing global observations of the ozone layer and key atmospheric pollutant gases, such as nitrogen dioxide (NO2/ and sulfur dioxide (SO2/, since October 2004. The data products from the same instrument provide consistent spatial and temporal coverage and permit the study of anthropogenic and natural emissions on local-to-global scales. In this paper, we examine changes in SO2 and NO2 over some of the world's most polluted industrialized regions during the first decade of OMI observations. In terms of regional pollution changes, we see both upward and downward trends, sometimes in opposite directions for NO2 and SO2, for different study areas. The trends are, for the most part, associated with economic and/or technological changes in energy use, as well as regional regulatory policies. Over the eastern US, both NO2 and SO2 levels decreased dramatically from 2005 to 2015, by more than 40 and 80 %, respectively, as a result of both technological improvements and stricter regulations of emissions. OMI confirmed large reductions in SO2 over eastern Europe's largest coal-fired power plants after installation of flue gas desulfurization devices. The North China Plain has the world's most severe SO2 pollution, but a decreasing trend has been observed since 2011, with about a 50% reduction in 2012- 2015, due to an economic slowdown and government efforts to restrain emissions from the power and industrial sectors. In contrast, India's SO2 and NO2 levels from coal power plants and smelters are growing at a fast pace, increasing by more than 100 and 50 %, respectively, from 2005 to 2015. Several SO2 hot spots observed over the Persian Gulf are probably related to oil and gas operations and indicate a possible underestimation of emissions from these sources in bottom-up emission inventories. Overall, OMI observations have proved valuable in documenting rapid changes in air quality over different

  1. Aura OMI observations of regional SO2 and NO2 pollution changes from 2005 to 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krotkov, Nickolay A.; McLinden, Chris A; Li, Can; Lamsal, Lok N.; Celarier, Edward A.; Marchenko, Sergey V.; Swartz, William H.; Bucsela, Eric J.; Joiner, Joanna; Duncan, Bryan N.; Boersma, K. Folkert; Veefkind, J. Pepijn; Levelt, Pieternel F.; Fioletov, Vitali E.; Dickerson, Russell R.; He, Hao; Lu, Zifeng; Streets, David G.

    2016-01-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) onboard NASA's Aura satellite has been providing global observations of the ozone layer and key atmospheric pollutant gases, such as nitrogen dioxide (NO2/ and sulfur dioxide (SO2/, since October 2004. The data products from the same instrument provide consistent spatial and temporal coverage and permit the study of anthropogenic and natural emissions on local-to-global scales. In this paper, we examine changes in SO2 and NO2 over some of the world's most polluted industrialized regions during the first decade of OMI observations. In terms of regional pollution changes, we see both upward and downward trends, sometimes in opposite directions for NO2 and SO2, for different study areas. The trends are, for the most part, associated with economic and/or technological changes in energy use, as well as regional regulatory policies. Over the eastern US, both NO2 and SO2 levels decreased dramatically from 2005 to 2015, by more than 40 and 80 %, respectively, as a result of both technological improvements and stricter regulations of emissions. OMI confirmed large reductions in SO2 over eastern Europe's largest coal-fired power plants after installation of flue gas desulfurization devices. The North China Plain has the world's most severe SO2 pollution, but a decreasing trend has been observed since 2011, with about a 50% reduction in 2012- 2015, due to an economic slowdown and government efforts to restrain emissions from the power and industrial sectors. In contrast, India's SO2 and NO2 levels from coal power plants and smelters are growing at a fast pace, increasing by more than 100 and 50 %, respectively, from 2005 to 2015. Several SO2 hot spots observed over the Persian Gulf are probably related to oil and gas operations and indicate a possible underestimation of emissions from these sources in bottom-up emission inventories. Overall, OMI observations have proved valuable in documenting rapid changes in air quality over different

  2. Hi-C Observations of an Active Region Corona, and Investigation of the Underlying Magnetic Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, S. K.; Alexander, C. E.; Winebarger, A.; Moore, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    The solar corona is much hotter (>=10(exp 6) K) than its surface (approx 6000 K), puzzling astrophysicists for several decades. Active region (AR) corona is again hotter than the quiet Sun (QS) corona by a factor of 4-10. The most widely accepted mechanism that could heat the active region corona is the energy release by current dissipation via reconnection of braided magnetic field structure, first proposed by E. N. Parker three decades ago. The first observational evidence for this mechanism has only recently been presented by Cirtain et al. by using High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) observations of an AR corona at a spatial resolution of 0.2 arcsec, which is required to resolve the coronal loops, and was not available before the rocket flight of Hi-C in July 2012. The Hi-C project is led by NASA/MSFC. In the case of the QS, work done by convection/granulation on the inter-granular feet of the coronal field lines translates into the heat observed in the corona. In the case of the AR, as here, there could be flux emergence, cancellation/submergence, or shear flows generating large stress and tension in coronal field loops which is released as heat in the corona. We are currently investigating the changes taking place in photospheric feet of the magnetic field involved with brightenings in the Hi-C AR corona. For this purpose, we are also using SDO/AIA data of +/- 2 hours around the 5 minutes Hi-C flight. In the present talk, I will first summarize some of the results of the Hi-C observations and then present some results from our recent analysis on what photospheric processes feed the magnetic energy that dissipates into heat in coronal loops.

  3. Evaluation of regional ionospheric grid model over China from dense GPS observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The current global or regional ionospheric models have been established for monitoring the ionospheric variations. However, the spatial and temporal resolutions are not enough to describe total electron content (TEC variations in small scales for China. In this paper, a regional ionospheric grid model (RIGM with high spatial-temporal resolution (0.5° × 0.5° and 10-min interval in China and surrounding areas is established based on spherical harmonics expansion from dense GPS measurements provided by Crustal Movement Observation Network of China (CMONOC and the International GNSS Service (IGS. The correlation coefficient between the estimated TEC from GPS and the ionosonde measurements is 0.97, and the root mean square (RMS with respect to Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE Global Ionosphere Maps (GIMs is 4.87 TECU. In addition, the impact of different spherical harmonics orders and degrees on TEC estimations are evaluated and the degree/order 6 is better. Moreover, effective ionospheric shell heights from 300 km to 700 km are further assessed and the result indicates that 550 km is the most suitable for regional ionospheric modeling in China at solar maximum.

  4. Incoherent scatter radar observations of D-region charged aerosol species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strelnikova, Irina; Rapp, Markus; Li, Qiang

    There is today substantial interest in aerosols in the mesosphere and their interaction with their neutral and charged environment. These aerosols comprise both ice particles in the polar summer mesopause region and smoke particles of meteoric origin that are expected to occur in the entire middle atmosphere and during all seasons. The presence of ice particles in the mesosphere has been known for many decades and is most prominently revealed in the form of noctilucent clouds, also known as polar mesospheric clouds. Smoke particles, on the other hand, have sizes of few nanometers only such that their detection by remote sensing techniques has long been deemed impossible. In consequence, sporadic rocket borne in-situ measurements have long been the only source of experimental evidence regarding the existence and properties of these particles. However, it has recently been realized that charged mesospheric aerosol particles modify the plasma properties of the D-region and thereby influence the characteristics of radar backscatter from these altitudes (i.e., radar reflectivity and/or spectral properties). Hence, it is possible to infer properties of these charged aerosol particles in the D-Region using radar observations. In this paper we present two independent methods yielding particles properties based on such measurements and give an overview of recent results.

  5. High Resolution HC3N Observations toward the Central Region of Sagittarius B2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hyun Soo; Ohishi, Masatoshi; Morimoto, Masaki

    1994-04-01

    We have observed the emission of HC3N J=4-3, 5-4, 10-9 and 12-11 transitions toward the Sgr B2 central region in an area of 150"*150" with resolution of 16"-48". The intensities and central velocities of line profiles show significant variations with positions. In contrast to the intensities of the low J-level transitions which gradually increase from the central source toward the outside region, the HC3N emission of the high J-level transition become stronger toward the central radio continuum source MD5. Systematic change in the radial velocity of each line profile occurs along north-south direction. There are a few peaks in most line profiles, and these indicate that there are multiple velocity components along the line of sight. Distributions of excitation temperature and column density which were estimated from the excitation calculations show the existence of a small(1*2pc), hot(Tex > 50K) core which contains two temperature peaks at about 15" east and north of MD5. The column density of HC3N is (1-3)*10E14 /cm2. Column density at distant position from MD5 is larger than that in the central region. We have deduced that this 'hot-core' has a mass of 10E5 Mo, which is about an order of magnitude larger than those obtained by previous studies.

  6. Pillars and globules at the edges of H ii regions, Confronting Herschel observations and numerical simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Tremblin, P; Schneider, N; Audit, E; Hill, T; Didelon, P; Peretto, N; Arzoumanian, D; Motte, F; Zavagno, A; Bontemps, S; Anderson, L D; Andre, Ph; Bernard, J P; Csengeri, T; Di Francesco, J; Elia, D; Hennemann, M; Konyves, V; Marston, A P; Luong, Q Nguyen; Rivera-Ingraham, A; Roussel, H; Sousbie, T; Spinoglio, L; White, G J; Williams, J

    2013-01-01

    Pillars and globules are present in many high-mass star-forming regions, such as the Eagle nebula (M16) and the Rosette molecular cloud, and understanding their origin will help characterize triggered star formation. The formation mechanisms of these structures are still being debated. Recent numerical simulations have shown how pillars can arise from the collapse of the shell in on itself and how globules can be formed from the interplay of the turbulent molecular cloud and the ionization from massive stars. The goal here is to test this scenario through recent observations of two massive star-forming regions, M16 and Rosette. The column density structure of the interface between molecular clouds and H ii regions was characterized using column density maps obtained from far-infrared imaging of the Herschel HOBYS key programme. Then, the DisPerSe algorithm was used on these maps to detect the compressed layers around the ionized gas and pillars in different evolutionary states. Finally, their velocity structu...

  7. Type II supernovae as probes of environment metallicity: observations of host HII regions

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, J P; Dessart, L; Hamuy, M; Galbany, L; Morrell, N I; Stritzinger, M D; Phillips, M M; Folatelli, G; Boffin, H M J; de Jaeger, T; Kuncarayakti, H; Prieto, J L

    2016-01-01

    Spectral modelling of SNII atmospheres indicates a clear dependence of metal line strengths on progenitor metallicity. This motivates further work to evaluate the accuracy with which these SNe can be used as metallicity indicators. To assess this accuracy we present a sample of SNII HII-region spectroscopy, from which environment abundances are derived. These environment abundances are compared to the observed strength of metal lines in SN spectra. Combining our sample with measurements from the literature, we present oxygen abundances of 119 host HII regions, by extracting emission line fluxes and using abundance diagnostics. Then, following Dessart et al., these abundances are compared to equivalent widths of Fe 5018 A at various time and colour epochs. Our distribution of inferred SNII host HII-region abundances has a range of ~0.6 dex. We confirm the dearth of SNeII exploding at metallicities lower than those found (on average) in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The equivalent width of Fe 5018 A at 50 days po...

  8. Observations of Multi - Component Ion Beams in the High-Altitude Cusp/Cleft Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koleva, R.; Semkova, J.; Smirnov, V.; Fedorov, A.

    Both Solar wind and the Earth ionosphere serve as sources of magnetospheric plasma. Having entered (SW ions) or being ejected (ionospheric ions) into the magnetosphere, ions are involved in the magnetospheric circulation. The common idea is that ions, convected to the lobe region, due to the ExB drift, enter the region of the plasma sheet and get energized by different processes. Magnetospheric plasma flows have been widely investigated, using mainly energy-per-charge measurements. While this method successfully differentiates ion species, which have near - equal flow speed and low thermal velocities [e.g. Seki et al., J. Geophys. Res., 1998], the ionic composition of hot magnetospheric flows could only be revealed in mass or mass-per-charge measurements. Recent plasma flows studies based on ion composition measurements [Lennartson, J. Geophys. Res., 2001] showed a great deal of similarity between the tailward drifts of the different ions, especially in the transition region between the central plasma sheet and the tail lobes, and evoked the idea of near-Earth mixing of the Solar wind and ionospheric ions. We present some experimental evidence on near-Earth mixing of magnetospheric ions of different origin. Used are data from the Low Energy Plasma Composition Experiment (AMEI-2) onboard the high-apogee INTERBALL-1 satellite. We present and discuss several cases of ion beams with energies above 3 keV, registered in the cusp/cleft region at distances from 5 to 9 Re, in which both He++ and O+ are present. The beams are observed on filed lines connected with different magnetospheric regions: the LLBL, the plasma mantle and the lobe. The energy/pitch angle behaviour of both He++ (Solar wind origin) and O+ (ionospheric origin) reveals great similarity, as if they are from one and the same source. Only the wider distributions of the He++ fluxes and the narrow ones of the O+ ions indicate their different origin. The distributions bare the signatures of various acceleration

  9. Observation of Energetic particles between a pair of Corotating Interaction Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Z; Li, G; Zhao, L L; Ebert, R W; Desai, M I; Mason, G M; Lavraud, B; Zhao, L; Liu, Y C -M; Guo, F; Tang, C L; Landi, E; Sauvaud, J

    2014-01-01

    We report observations of the acceleration and trapping of energetic ions and electrons between a pair of corotating interaction regions (CIRs). The event occurred in Carrington Rotation 2060. Observed at spacecraft STEREO-B, the two CIRs were separated by less than 5 days. In contrast to other CIR events, the fluxes of energetic ions and electrons in this event reached their maxima between the trailing-edge of the first CIR and the leading edge of the second CIR. The radial magnetic field (Br) reversed its sense and the anisotropy of the flux also changed from sunward to anti-sunward between the two CIRs. Furthermore, there was an extended period of counter-streaming suprathermal electrons between the two CIRs. Similar observations for this event were also obtained for ACE and STEREO-A. We conjecture that these observations were due to a "U-shape" large scale magnetic field topology connecting the reverse shock of the first CIR and the forward shock of the second CIR. Such a disconnected U-shaped magnetic fi...

  10. Observations of gravity wave forcing of themesopause region during the January 2013 major Sudden Stratospheric Warming

    CERN Document Server

    deWit, R J; Espy, P J; Orsolini, Y J; Limpasuvan, V; Kinnison, D E

    2016-01-01

    Studies of vertical and interhemispheric coupling during Sudden Stratospheric Warmings (SSWs) suggest that gravity wave (GW) momentum flux divergence plays a key role in forcing the middle atmosphere, although observational validation of GW forcing is limited. We present a whole atmosphere view of zonal winds from the surface to 100 km during the January 2013 major SSW, together with observed GW momentum fluxes in the mesopause region derived from uninterrupted high-resolution meteor radar observations from an All-Sky Interferometric Meteor Radar system located at Trondheim, Norway (63.4 $^{\\circ}$N, 10.5 $^{\\circ}$E). Observations show GW momentum flux divergence 6 days prior to the SSW onset, producing an eastward forcing with peak values of $\\sim$+145 $\\pm$ 60m $s^{-1}$ $d^{-1}$. As the SSW evolves, GW forcing turns westward, reaching a minimum of $\\sim$-240 $\\pm$ 70 m $s^{-1}$ $d^{-1}$ $\\sim$+18 days after the SSW onset. These results are discussed in light of previous studies and simulations using the Wh...

  11. Observations of a 12 H wave in the mesopause region at the South Pole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, R.L.; Senft, D.C.; Gardner, C.S. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana (United States))

    1992-01-03

    In December 1989 a Na lidar was installed at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station and was used to measure aerosol, stratospheric temperature and mesospheric Na profiles through October 1990. The mesospheric Na data are used to characterize the gravity wave field in the mesopause region, These first lidar observations of Na layer dynamics at the South Pole show strong wave activity during the Antarctic winter. Data for 25 June and 19 August 1990 UT are presented here. The total wave induced variances in atmospheric density are respectively 29 and 35(%){sup 2}. The Na layer centroid height is very low during both observation periods. On 25 June a strong 12 h oscillation is observed in the bottomside of the Na layer which extends to altitudes as low as 74 km. The vertical displacement and temperature amplitudes associated with the 12 h oscillation are respectively 1.9 km and 19 K. The characteristics of the 12 h wave are similar to the pseudotide observed at Svalbard by Walterscheid et al.

  12. Observations of energetic particles between a pair of corotating interaction regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Z.; Chen, Y.; Tang, C. L. [Institute of Space Sciences and School of Space Science and Physics, Shandong University at Weihai, Weihai 264209 (China); Li, G.; Zhao, L. L. [Department of Space Science and CSPAR, University of Alabama in Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Ebert, R. W.; Desai, M. I. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 78228 (United States); Mason, G. M. [Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Lavraud, B.; Sauvaud, J. [Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie, Université de Toulouse (UPS) and Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, UMR 5277, Toulouse (France); Zhao, L.; Landi, E. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48105 (United States); Liu, Y. C.-M. [State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, National Space Science Center, CAS. Beijing 100190 (China); Guo, F., E-mail: gang.li@uah.edu [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM 87545 (United States)

    2014-01-20

    We report observations of the acceleration and trapping of energetic ions and electrons between a pair of corotating interaction regions (CIRs). The event occurred in Carrington Rotation 2060. Observed by the STEREO-B spacecraft, the two CIRs were separated by less than 5 days. In contrast to other CIR events, the fluxes of the energetic ions and electrons in this event reached their maxima between the trailing edge of the first CIR and the leading edge of the second CIR. The radial magnetic field (B{sub r} ) reversed its sense and the anisotropy of the flux also changed from Sunward to anti-Sunward between the two CIRs. Furthermore, there was an extended period of counterstreaming suprathermal electrons between the two CIRs. Similar observations for this event were also obtained with the Advanced Composition Explorer and STEREO-A. We conjecture that these observations were due to a U-shaped, large-scale magnetic field topology connecting the reverse shock of the first CIR and the forward shock of the second CIR. Such a disconnected U-shaped magnetic field topology may have formed due to magnetic reconnection in the upper corona.

  13. LABOCA observations of giant molecular clouds in the south west region of the Small Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Bot, Caroline; Boulanger, Francois; Albrecht, Marcus; Leroy, Adam; Bolatto, Alberto D; Bertoldi, Frank; Gordon, Karl; Engelbracht, Chad; Block, Miwa; Misselt, Karl

    2010-01-01

    The amount of molecular gas is a key for understanding the future star formation in a galaxy. Because H2 is difficult to observe directly in dense and cold clouds, tracers like CO are used. However, at low metallicities especially, CO only traces the shielded interiors of the clouds. mm dust emission can be used as a tracer to unveil the total dense gas masses. The comparison of masses deduced from the continuum SIMBA 1.2 mm emission and virial masses in a sample of giant molecular clouds (GMCs), in the SW region of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), showed a discrepancy that is in need of an explanation. This study aims at better assessing possible uncertainties on the dust emission observed in the sample of GMCs from the SMC and focuses on the densest parts of the GMCs where CO is detected. New observations were obtained with the LABOCA camera on the APEX telescope. All GMCs previously observed in CO are detected and their emission at 870microns is compared to ancillary data. The different contributions to t...

  14. Improve earthquake hypocenter using adaptive simulated annealing inversion in regional tectonic, volcano tectonic, and geothermal observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ry, Rexha Verdhora; Nugraha, Andri Dian

    2015-04-01

    Observation of earthquakes is routinely used widely in tectonic activity observation, and also in local scale such as volcano tectonic and geothermal activity observation. It is necessary for determining the location of precise hypocenter which the process involves finding a hypocenter location that has minimum error between the observed and the calculated travel times. When solving this nonlinear inverse problem, simulated annealing inversion method can be applied to such global optimization problems, which the convergence of its solution is independent of the initial model. In this study, we developed own program codeby applying adaptive simulated annealing inversion in Matlab environment. We applied this method to determine earthquake hypocenter using several data cases which are regional tectonic, volcano tectonic, and geothermal field. The travel times were calculated using ray tracing shooting method. We then compared its results with the results using Geiger's method to analyze its reliability. Our results show hypocenter location has smaller RMS error compared to the Geiger's result that can be statistically associated with better solution. The hypocenter of earthquakes also well correlated with geological structure in the study area. Werecommend using adaptive simulated annealing inversion to relocate hypocenter location in purpose to get precise and accurate earthquake location.

  15. Improve earthquake hypocenter using adaptive simulated annealing inversion in regional tectonic, volcano tectonic, and geothermal observation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ry, Rexha Verdhora, E-mail: rexha.vry@gmail.com [Master Program of Geophysical Engineering, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No.10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Nugraha, Andri Dian, E-mail: nugraha@gf.itb.ac.id [Global Geophysical Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No.10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2015-04-24

    Observation of earthquakes is routinely used widely in tectonic activity observation, and also in local scale such as volcano tectonic and geothermal activity observation. It is necessary for determining the location of precise hypocenter which the process involves finding a hypocenter location that has minimum error between the observed and the calculated travel times. When solving this nonlinear inverse problem, simulated annealing inversion method can be applied to such global optimization problems, which the convergence of its solution is independent of the initial model. In this study, we developed own program codeby applying adaptive simulated annealing inversion in Matlab environment. We applied this method to determine earthquake hypocenter using several data cases which are regional tectonic, volcano tectonic, and geothermal field. The travel times were calculated using ray tracing shooting method. We then compared its results with the results using Geiger’s method to analyze its reliability. Our results show hypocenter location has smaller RMS error compared to the Geiger’s result that can be statistically associated with better solution. The hypocenter of earthquakes also well correlated with geological structure in the study area. Werecommend using adaptive simulated annealing inversion to relocate hypocenter location in purpose to get precise and accurate earthquake location.

  16. High-Resolution Observations of a Flux Rope with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Zhang, Jun

    2015-10-01

    We report the observations of a flux rope at transition region temperatures with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) on 30 August 2014. Initially, magnetic flux cancellation continually took place and a filament was activated. Then the bright material from the filament moved southward and tracked out several fine structures. These fine structures were twisted and tangled with each other, and appeared as a small flux rope at 1330 Å, with a total twist of about 4π. Afterwards, the flux rope underwent a counterclockwise (viewed top-down) unwinding motion around its axis. Spectral observations of C ii 1335.71 Å at the southern leg of the flux rope revealed Doppler redshifts of 6 - 24 km s^{-1} at the western side of the axis, which is consistent with the counterclockwise rotation motion. We suggest that the magnetic flux cancellation initiates reconnection and activation of the flux rope. The stored twist and magnetic helicity of the flux rope are transported into the upper atmosphere by the unwinding motion in the late stage. The small-scale flux rope (width of 8.3^'') had a cylindrical shape with helical field lines, similar to the morphology of the large-scale CME core (width of 1.54 {R}_{⊙}) on 2 June 1998. This similarity shows the presence of flux ropes of different scales on the Sun.

  17. High-resolution Observations of a Flux Rope with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Ting

    2015-01-01

    We report the observations of a flux rope at transition region temperatures with the \\emph{Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph} (IRIS) on 30 August 2014. Initially, magnetic flux cancellation constantly took place and a filament was activated. Then the bright material from the filament moved southward and tracked out several fine structures. These fine structures were twisted and tangled with each other, and appeared as a small flux rope at 1330 {\\AA}, with a total twist of about 4$\\pi$. Afterwards, the flux rope underwent a counter-clockwise (viewed top-down) unwinding motion around its axis. Spectral observations of C {\\sc ii} 1335.71 {\\AA} at the southern leg of the flux rope showed that Doppler redshifts of 6$-$24 km s$^{-1}$ appeared at the western side of the axis, which is consistent with the counter-clockwise rotation motion. We suggest that the magnetic flux cancellation initiates reconnection and some activation of the flux rope. The stored twist and magnetic helicity of the flux rope are transpor...

  18. The Climatology of Neutral Winds in the MLT Region as Observed From Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niciejewski, R.; Skinner, W.; Gell, D.; Cooper, M.; Marsh, A.; Killeen, T.; Wu, Q.; Solomon, S.; Ortland, D.; Drob, D.; Emmert, J.

    2005-12-01

    Unique observations of the horizontal neutral winds in the altitude range 70 to 115 km have been performed from satellite platforms by HRDI and WINDII (UARS) and by TIDI (TIMED), the former since September 1991 and the latter since January 2002. All three experiments observed airglow on the terrestrial limb and derived vertical wind profiles of geophysical quantities by inverting altitude scans of Doppler shifted emission spectra. As a result, the global mesosphere / lower thermosphere region has been sampled for 14 years by a common technique resulting in an unparalleled neutral wind database. This database will be one of the key contributions to an improved Horizontal Wind Model (HWM). This paper will describe results from the first long term climatological study of the MLT region based on satellite wind measurements. The basic dynamic structure in the MLT is a tide, which also has long-term variation that has similar periods to the 27-month QBO (quasi-biennial oscillation) and the SAO (semi-annual oscillation). Signatures of ultra-long variability require analysis of the full wind database.

  19. Silicon Monoxide Observations Reveal a Cluster of Hidden Compact Outflows in the OMC1 South Region

    CERN Document Server

    Zapata, L A; Rodríguez, L F; O'Dell, C R; Zhang, Q; Muench, A; Zapata, Luis A.; Ho, Paul T. P.; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Zhang, Qizhou; Muench, August

    2006-01-01

    We present high angular resolution ($2\\rlap.{''}8 \\times 1\\rlap.{''}7$) SiO J=5$\\to$4; $v=0$ line observations of the OMC1S region in the Orion Nebula made using the Submillimeter Array (SMA). We detect for the first time a cluster of four compact bipolar and monopolar outflows that show high, moderate and low velocity gas and appear to be energized by millimeter and infrared sources associated with this region. The SiO molecular outflows are compact ($<$ 3500 AU), and in most of the cases, they are located very close to their exciting sources. We thus propose that the SiO thermal emission is tracing the youngest and most highly excited parts of the outflows which cannot be detected by other molecules. Moreover, since the ambient cloud is weak in the SiO line emission, these observations can reveal flows that in other molecular transitions will be confused with the ambient velocity cloud emission. Analysis of their positional-velocity diagrams show that some components of these outflows may be driven by wi...

  20. Regional estimation of Q from seismic coda observations by the Gauribidanur seismic array (southern India)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Jayant Nath; Ugalde, Arantza

    2004-07-01

    Attenuation properties of the lithosphere in southern India are estimated from 1219 vertical-component, short-period observations of microearthquake codas recorded by the Gauribidanur seismic array. The magnitudes of the earthquakes range from 0.3 to 3.7 and have focal depths less than 10 km. Coda-wave attenuation ( Qc-1) is estimated by means of a single isotropic scattering method and a multiple lapse time window analysis based on the hypothesis of multiple isotropic scattering and uniform distribution of scatterers is used to estimate the contribution of intrinsic absorption ( Qi-1) and scattering ( Qs-1) to total attenuation ( Qt-1). All the attenuation parameters are estimated, as a function of frequency for hypocentral distances up to 255 km. Results show a frequency dependent relation of the Qc-1 values in the range 1-10 Hz that fit the power law Q -1(f)=Q 0-1(f/f 0) ηA Q 0-1 value of 0.014 and a decrease of f-1.2 have been found using data from the whole region. On the other hand, scattering attenuation is found to be greater than intrinsic absorption for all the frequency bands. A high value of the seismic albedo (which ranges from 0.68 to 1) is found which indicates that scattering is the dominant effect in the study region. Nevertheless, the attenuation parameters estimated are much lower than the obtained for other regions in the world. On the other hand, the observed energy at 0-15 s from the S-wave arrival time bends significantly downward with decreasing distance. In order to clarify this phenomenon, there is a need to take into account the vertical varying velocity structure in the theoretical model.

  1. Variability of trace gas concentrations over Asian region: satellite observations vs model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheel, Varun; Richter, Andreas; Srivastava, Shuchita; Lal, Shyam

    2012-07-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO_2) and Carbon Monoxide (CO) play a key role in the chemistry of the tropospheric ozone and are emitted mainly by anthropogenic processes. These emissions have been increasing over Asia over the past few years due to rapid economic growth and yet there are very few systematic ground based observations of these species over this region. We have analysed ten years of data from space borne instruments: Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME), SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) and Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT), which have been measuring the tropospheric abundance of these trace gases. We have examined trends over the period 1996-2008 in NO_2 and CO over a few Indian regions where high economic growth in the present decade is likely to see increased emissions for these species. However, even the highest growth rate of these species seen in the present study, is less when compared with similar polluted regions of China, where a much more rapid increase has been observed. In order to understand the trends and variability in atmospheric trace gas concentrations, one must take into account changes in emissions and transport. Only by assessing the relevance of each of these factors will it be possible to predict future changes with reasonable confidence. To this effect we have used a global chemical transport model, MOZART, to simulate concentrations of NO_2 and CO using the POET (European) and REAS (Asian) emission inventories. These are compared with satellite measurements to study seasonal variations and the discrepancies are discussed. The combined uncertainties of the emission inventory and retrieval of the satellite data could be contributing factors to the discrepancies. It may be thus worthwhile to develop emission inventories for India at a higher resolution to include local level activity data.

  2. Observation of regional air pollutant transport between the megacity Beijing and the North China Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingruo; Ye, Chunxiang; Liu, Jun; Zhu, Yi; Wang, Junxia; Tan, Ziqiang; Lin, Weili; Zeng, Limin; Zhu, Tong

    2016-11-01

    Megacities have strong interactions with the surrounding regions through transport of air pollutants. It has been frequently addressed that the air quality of Beijing is influenced by the influx of air pollutants from the North China Plain (NCP). Estimations of air pollutant cross-boundary transport between Beijing and the NCP are important for air quality management. However, evaluation of cross-boundary transport using long-term observations is very limited. Using the observational results of the gaseous pollutants SO2, NO, NO2, O3, and CO from August 2006 to October 2008 at the Yufa site, a cross-boundary site between the megacity Beijing and the NCP, together with meteorological parameters, we explored a method for evaluating the transport flux intensities at Yufa, as part of the "Campaign of Air Quality Research in Beijing and Surrounding Region 2006-2008" (CAREBeijing 2006-2008). The hourly mean ± SD (median) concentration of SO2, NO, NO2, NOx, O3, Ox, and CO was 15 ± 16 (9) ppb, 12 ± 25 (3) ppb, 24 ± 19 (20) ppb, 36 ± 39 (23) ppb, 28 ± 27 (21) ppb, 52 ± 24 (45) ppb, and 1.6 ± 1.4 (1.2) ppm during the observation period, respectively. The bivariate polar plots showed the dependence of pollutant concentrations on both wind speed and wind direction, and thus inferred their dominant transport directions. Surface flux intensity calculations further demonstrated the regional transport influence of Beijing and the NCP on Yufa. The net surface transport flux intensity (mean ± SD) of SO2, NO, NO2, NOx, O3, Ox, and CO was 6.2 ± 89.5, -4.3 ± 29.5, -0.6 ± 72.3, -4.9 ± 93.0, 14.7 ± 187.8, 14.8 ± 234.9, and 70 ± 2830 µg s-1 m-2 during the observation period, respectively. For SO2, CO, O3, and Ox the surface flux intensities from the NCP to Yufa surpassed those from Beijing to Yufa in all seasons except winter, with the strongest net fluxes largely in summer, which were about 4-8 times those of other seasons. The surface transport flux intensity of NOx

  3. Aerosol variability and atmospheric transport in the Himalayan region from CALIOP 2007-2010 observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucci, S.; Cagnazzo, C.; Cairo, F.; Di Liberto, L.; Fierli, F.

    2013-06-01

    Himalayan Plateau is surrounded by regions with high natural and anthropogenic aerosol emissions that have a strong impact on regional climate. This is particularly critical for the Himalayan glaciers whose equilibrium is also largely influenced by radiative direct and indirect effects induced by aerosol burden. This work focuses on the spatial and vertical distribution of different aerosol types, their seasonal variability and sources. The analysis of the 2007-2010 yr of CALIPSO vertically resolved satellite data allows the identification of spatial patterns of desert dust and carbonaceous particles in different atmospheric layers. Clusters of Lagrangian back-trajectories highlight the transport pathways from source regions during the dusty spring season. The analysis shows a prevalence of dust; at low heights they are distributed mainly north (with a main contribution from the Gobi and Taklamakan deserts) and west of the Tibetan Plateau (originating from the deserts of South-West Asia and advected by the westerlies). Above the Himalayas the dust amount is minor but still not negligible (detectable in around 20% of the measurements), and transport from more distant deserts (Sahara and Arabian Peninsula) is important. Smoke aerosol, produced mainly in North India and East China, is subject to shorter range transport and is indeed observed closer to the sources while there is a limited amount reaching the top of the plateau. Data analysis reveals a clear seasonal variability in the frequencies of occurrence for the main aerosol types; dust is regulated principally by the monsoon dynamics, with maxima of occurrence in spring. The study also highlights relevant interannual differences, showing a larger presence of aerosol in the region during 2007 and 2008 yr.

  4. Millimetre spectral line mapping observations towards four massive star-forming H II regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shanghuo; Wang, Junzhi; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Fang, Min; Li, Juan; Zhang, Jiangshui; Fan, Junhui; Zhu, Qingfeng; Li, Fei

    2017-04-01

    We present spectral line mapping observations towards four massive star-forming regions - Cepheus A, DR21S, S76E and G34.26+0.15 - with the IRAM 30-m telescope at the 2 and 3 mm bands. In total, 396 spectral lines from 51 molecules, one helium recombination line, 10 hydrogen recombination lines and 16 unidentified lines were detected in these four sources. An emission line of nitrosyl cyanide (ONCN, 140, 14-130, 13) was detected in G34.26+0.15, as the first detection in massive star-forming regions. We found that c-C3H2 and NH2D show enhancement in shocked regions, as suggested by the evidence of SiO and/or SO emission. The column density and rotational temperature of CH3CN were estimated with the rotational diagram method for all four sources. Isotope abundance ratios of 12C/13C were derived using HC3N and its 13C isotopologue, which were around 40 in all four massive star-forming regions and slightly lower than the local interstellar value (∼65). The 14N/15N and 16O/18O abundance ratios in these sources were also derived using the double isotopic method, which were slightly lower than in the local interstellar medium. Except for Cep A, the 33S/34S ratios in the other three targets were derived, which were similar to that in the local interstellar medium. The column density ratios of N(DCN)/N(HCN) and N(DCO+)/N(HCO+) in these sources were more than two orders of magnitude higher than the elemental [D]/[H] ratio, which is 1.5 × 10-5. Our results show that the later stage sources, G34.26+0.15 in particular, present more molecular species than earlier stage sources. Evidence of shock activity is seen in all stages studied.

  5. Imperial Industry and Observational Control in the Faynan Region, Southern Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Friedman

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The Faynan district of southern Jordan is an area rich in copper ore, a resource that has made it a focus for human settlement since prehistory. During the Roman and Byzantine periods, the Faynan was the site of a metallum, a State-owned extraction industry. The imperial administration in charge of the Faynan used a variety of methods to regulate and direct the copper industry, ensuring large-scale copper production. This article explores one of the management techniques employed, the use of surveillance as a mechanism to control the local population of workers and slaves. North American historical archaeology has studied control through surveillance in relation to slave populations on plantations. I argue that these theories can be applied to the placement of observational structures and the role of buildings in the Faynan landscape. Roman sources attest to the presence of convict labour at this metallum. As an example, the administration building in the Wadi Ratiye, WF1415, is discussed in detail. This building had towers and I argue that its placement in the landscape in relation to the nearby copper mines was not merely to observe them but to enforce discipline through surveillance. To test this hypothesis the GIS technique viewshed analysis was employed. The main argument of the article hangs on understanding the views and surveillance possibilities, therefore the viewshed produced needed to be very robust with a clear methodology. To accomplish this, the unique environment of the Faynan and limitations of human visual acuity are taken into account to create a regionally and theoretically appropriate model. I posit that the imperial administration displayed a thorough understanding of control through observation and that surveillance of the miners and convicts in the region encouraged their hard work and obedience while discouraging misconduct.

  6. High-resolution regional gravity field recovery from Poisson wavelets using heterogeneous observational techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yihao; Luo, Zhicai; Chen, Wu; Chen, Yongqi

    2017-02-01

    We adopt Poisson wavelets for regional gravity field recovery using data acquired from various observational techniques; the method combines data of different spatial resolutions and coverage, and various spectral contents and noise levels. For managing the ill-conditioned system, the performances of the zero- and first-order Tikhonov regularization approaches are investigated. Moreover, a direct approach is proposed to properly combine Global Positioning System (GPS)/leveling data with the gravimetric quasi-geoid/geoid, where GPS/leveling data are treated as an additional observation group to form a new functional model. In this manner, the quasi-geoid/geoid that fits the local leveling system can be computed in one step, and no post-processing (e.g., corrector surface or least squares collocation) procedures are needed. As a case study, we model a new reference surface over Hong Kong. The results show solutions with first-order regularization are better than those obtained from zero-order regularization, which indicates the former may be more preferable for regional gravity field modeling. The numerical results also demonstrate the gravimetric quasi-geoid/geoid and GPS/leveling data can be combined properly using this direct approach, where no systematic errors exist between these two data sets. A comparison with 61 independent GPS/leveling points shows the accuracy of the new geoid, HKGEOID-2016, is around 1.1 cm. Further evaluation demonstrates the new geoid has improved significantly compared to the original model, HKGEOID-2000, and the standard deviation for the differences between the observed and computed geoidal heights at all GPS/leveling points is reduced from 2.4 to 0.6 cm. Finally, we conclude HKGEOID-2016 can be substituted for HKGEOID-2000 for engineering purposes and geophysical investigations in Hong Kong.

  7. Regional Evaluation of ERA-40 Reanalysis Data with Marine Atmospheric Observations in the North Sea Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils H. Schade

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available An important task of the departmental research programme KLIWAS is the evaluation and assessment of climate model results by means of a comprehensive reference data set. For validation purposes, and to create a North Sea wide maritime atmospheric and oceanographic reference database, in-situ observations of the Centre for Global Marine Meteorological Observations (GZS of the National Meteorological Service DWD have been compared to the ERA-40 reanalysis. ERA-40 is used as forcing for the hindcast runs of the ENSEMBLES regional climate models, which is used within the KLIWAS model chain. The GZS hosts a regularly updated, quality controlled, world-wide data bank of weather observations from the oceans. It includes data from all sorts of observation platforms as Voluntary Observing Ships (VOS, drifting and moored buoys, light vessels, and offshore platforms, either from real-time (RT via the Global Telecommunication System (GTS or from international exchange in delayed-mode (DM. In addition to the automated set of programs applied for high quality control, erroneous data are also manually corrected to a certain extent, if possible. To assure reliable statistics for the evaluation, the corrected observations are gridded to a resolution of 2.25 degree, so each grid box includes four ERA-40 reanalysis grid points. The temporal coverage of the grid boxes depends on shipping routes and the positions of automated systems. Observed air temperatures, covering a period of 40 years (1961?2000, show noticeable differences to the reanalysis data for all land influenced boxes, specifically in the winter months. The same differences can be found if ERA-40 data alone are compared between land- and sea facing boxes. They can not be found in GZS data. It can be assumed that the differences are not resulting from measurement errors or uncertain fraction variabilities, since they are small during the winter months. A comparison of the differences basing on the 1981

  8. Lightning hazard region over the maritime continent observed from satellite and climate change threat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilhamsyah, Y.; Koesmaryono, Y.; Hidayat, R.; Murjaya, J.; Nurjaya, I. W.; Rizwan

    2017-02-01

    Climate change would lead to such hydrometeorological disaster as: flash-flood, landslide, hailstone, lightning, and twister become more likely to happen in the future. In terms of lightning event, one research question arise of where lightning would be mostly to strike over the Maritime Continent (MC)?. The objective of the research is to investigate region with high-density of lightning activity over MC by mapping climatological features of lightning flashes derived from onboard NASA-TRMM Satellite, i.e. Optical Transient Detector/Lightning Imaging Sensor (OTD/LIS). Based on data retrieved since 1995-2013, it is seasonally observed that during transition season March to May, region with high vulnerability of lightning flashes cover the entire Sumatra Island, the Malacca Strait, and Peninsular Malaysia as well as Java Island. High-frequent of lightning activity over the Malacca Strait is unique since it is the only sea-region in the world where lightning flashes are denser. As previously mentioned that strong lightning activity over the strait is driven by mesoscale convective system of Sumatra Squalls due to convergences of land breeze between Sumatra and Peninsular Malaysia. Lightning activity over the strait is continuously observed throughout season despite the intensity reduced. Java Island, most populated island, receive high-density of lightning flashes during rainy season (December to February) but small part in the northwestern of Java Island, e.g., Bogor and surrounding areas, the density of lightning flashes are high throughout season. Northern and southern parts of Kalimantan and Central part of Sulawesi are also prone to lightning activity particularly during transition season March to May and September to November. In the eastern part of MC, Papua receive denser lightning flashes during September to November. It is found that lightning activity are mostly concentrated over land instead of ocean which is in accordance with diurnal convective

  9. Intensification of the regional scale variability of extreme precipitation derived from RCM simulations and observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmann, H.; Schädler, G.; Panitz, H.-J.

    2012-04-01

    Future climate change patterns are usually derived from ensembles of coarse global climate model simulations (GCMs), for instance within the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) or from regional climate projections at resolutions of some tens of km, for instance for Europe from the ENSEMBLES or PRUDENCE projects. For regions with complex topography like Central Europe the horizontal resolution of these climate projections is still too coarse to resolve the typical topographical length scales, and therefore the impact of the large scale changes with the regional geography cannot be captured adequately. For this task high resolution ensemble simulations with regional climate models (RCMs) are needed. The generation of an ensemble of such high resolution simulations requires great computational efforts. With the RCM COSMO-CLM several simulations with resolutions down to 7 km have been performed, using different driving GCMs and GCM realisations. This ensemble approach is needed to estimate the robustness of the change signals and to account for the uncertainties introduced by differences in the large scale forcing due to the variability of the climate change signals caused by the different GCMs or the natural variability. The focus of the study is on the changes of extreme precipitation for the near future until the middle of the 21st century. An increase of the temporal and spatial variability is found for the precipitation extremes, especially for summer. The change patterns seem to be statistically robust. Based on long-term observation climatologies for the second half of the 20th century, similar structures where found with areas of decrease and increase only a few tens of kilometres apart from each other. The combination of the findings from the RCM projections and observations suggests a continuation of the trends from the recent past into the near future. Possible causes for the horizontally heterogeneous change patterns are related to weather pattern

  10. VSA Observations of the Anomalous Microwave Emission in the Perseus Region

    CERN Document Server

    Tibbs, Christopher T; Dickinson, Clive; Davies, Rodney D; Davis, Richard J; del Burgo, Carlos; Franzen, Thomas M O; Génova-Santos, Ricardo; Grainge, Keith; Hobson, Michael P; Padilla-Torres, Carmen P; Rebolo, Rafael; Rubiño-Martín, Jóse Alberto; Saunders, Richard D E; Scaife, Anna M M; Scott, Paul F

    2009-01-01

    The dust feature G159.6--18.5 in the Perseus region has previously been observed with the COSMOSOMAS experiment \\citep{Watson:05} on angular scales of $\\approx$ 1$^{\\circ}$, and was found to exhibit anomalous microwave emission. We present new observations of this dust feature, performed with the Very Small Array (VSA) at 33 GHz, to help increase the understanding of the nature of this anomalous emission. On the angular scales observed with the VSA ($\\approx$ 10 -- 40$^{\\prime}$), G159.6--18.5 consists of five distinct components, each of which have been individually analysed. All five of these components are found to exhibit an excess of emission at 33 GHz, and are found to be highly correlated with far-infrared emission. We provide evidence that each of these compact components have anomalous emission that is consistent with electric dipole emission from very small, rapidly rotating dust grains. These components contribute $\\approx$ 10 % to the flux density of the diffuse extended emission detected by COSMO...

  11. HI deficiency in the galaxy cluster ACO 3627. ATCA observations in the Great Attractor region

    CERN Document Server

    Vollmer, B; Van Driel, W; Henning, P A; Kraan-Korteweg, R C; Balkowski, C; Woudt, P A; Duschl, W J

    2001-01-01

    ATCA 21 cm HI observations of the rich galaxy cluster ACO 3627 in the Great Attractor region are presented. Three fields of 30' diameter located within one Abell radius of ACO 3627 were observed with a resolution of 15'' and an rms noise of \\sim 1 mJy/beam. Only two galaxies were detected in these fields. We compare their HI distribution to new optical R-band images and discuss their velocity fields. The first galaxy is a gas-rich unperturbed spiral whereas the second shows a peculiar HI distribution. The estimated 3-sigma HI mass limit of our observations is \\sim 7 x 10^8 M_{\\odot} for a line width of 150 km s^{-1}. The non-detection of a considerable number of luminous spiral galaxies indicates that the spiral galaxies are HI deficient. The low detection rate is comparable to the HI deficient Coma cluster (Bravo-Alfaro et al. 2000). ACO 3627 is a bright X-ray cluster. We therefore suspect that ram pressure stripping is responsible for the HI deficiency of the bright cluster spirals.

  12. Satellite observations of lightning-induced hard X-ray flux enhancements in the conjugate region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bučík

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Preliminary examination of October-December 2002 SONG (SOlar Neutron and Gamma rays data aboard the Russian CORONAS-F (Complex Orbital Near-Earth Observations of the Activity of the Sun low-altitude satellite has revealed many X-ray enhanced emissions (30–500 keV in the slot region (L ~ 2–3 between the Earth's radiation belts. In one case, CORONAS-F data were analyzed when the intense hard X-ray emissions were seen westward of the South Atlantic Anomaly in a rather wide L shell range from 1.7 to 2.6. Enhanced fluxes observed on day 316 (12 November were most likely associated with a Major Severe Weather Outbreak in Eastern USA, producing extensive lightning flashes, as was documented by simultaneous optical observations from space. We propose that whistler mode signals from these lightning discharges cause precipitation of energetic electrons from terrestrial trapped radiation belts, which, in turn, produce atmospheric X-rays in the Southern Hemisphere.

  13. Far and mid infrared observations of two ultracompact H II regions and one compact CO clump

    CERN Document Server

    Verma, R P; Mookerjea, B; Rengarajan, T N

    2003-01-01

    Two ultracompact H II regions (IRAS 19181+1349 and 20178+4046) and one compact molecular clump (20286+4105) have been observed at far infrared wavelengths using the TIFR 1 m balloon-borne telescope and at mid infrared wavelengths using ISO. Far infrared observations have been made simultaneously in two bands with effective wavelengths of ~ 150 and ~ 210 micron, using liquid 3He cooled bolometer arrays. ISO observations have been made in seven spectral bands using the ISOCAM instrument; four of these bands cover the emission from Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules. In addition, IRAS survey data for these sources in the four IRAS bands have been processed using the HIRES routine. In the high resolution mid infrared maps as well as far infrared maps multiple embedded energy sources have been resolved. There are structural similarities between the images in the mid infrared and the large scale maps in the far infrared bands, despite very different angular resolutions of the two. Dust temperature and ...

  14. CO observations of massive star forming regions at different evolutionary phases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Xi; XU; Ye; SHEN; Zhiqiang; LI; Jingjing

    2006-01-01

    The 12CO (J=1-0), 13CO (J=1-0) and C18O (J=1-0) emissions in 9 massive star forming regions, which are believed to be at different stages of massive star formation,were mapped with the 13.7 m millimeter wave telescope at Qinghai Station of Purple Mountain Observatory. Of the observed 9 sources, 13CO cores were detected in seven of them, and C18O cores in five of them. And only two sources associated with C18O cores and H2O masers showed the extended structures and strong outflows. This is the first detection of outflow associated with IRAS 22566+5828 in the observing field of S152/S153.The physical parameters of cores and outflows for these sources, derived from Local Thermal Equilibrium (LTE) analysis, are presented. These observing results suggest that the C18O cores will only appear when the gas density is high enough and the probability to have an outflow is very high when the clumps show the C18O and H2O maser simultaneously.

  15. A Regional CO2 Observing System Simulation Experiment for the ASCENDS Satellite Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J. S.; Kawa, S. R.; Eluszkiewicz, J.; Baker, D. F.; Mountain, M.; Henderson, J.; Nehrkorn, T.; Zaccheo, T. S.

    2014-01-01

    Top-down estimates of the spatiotemporal variations in emissions and uptake of CO2 will benefit from the increasing measurement density brought by recent and future additions to the suite of in situ and remote CO2 measurement platforms. In particular, the planned NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) satellite mission will provide greater coverage in cloudy regions, at high latitudes, and at night than passive satellite systems, as well as high precision and accuracy. In a novel approach to quantifying the ability of satellite column measurements to constrain CO2 fluxes, we use a portable library of footprints (surface influence functions) generated by the WRF-STILT Lagrangian transport model in a regional Bayesian synthesis inversion. The regional Lagrangian framework is well suited to make use of ASCENDS observations to constrain fluxes at high resolution, in this case at 1 degree latitude x 1 degree longitude and weekly for North America. We consider random measurement errors only, modeled as a function of mission and instrument design specifications along with realistic atmospheric and surface conditions. We find that the ASCENDS observations could potentially reduce flux uncertainties substantially at biome and finer scales. At the 1 degree x 1 degree, weekly scale, the largest uncertainty reductions, on the order of 50 percent, occur where and when there is good coverage by observations with low measurement errors and the a priori uncertainties are large. Uncertainty reductions are smaller for a 1.57 micron candidate wavelength than for a 2.05 micron wavelength, and are smaller for the higher of the two measurement error levels that we consider (1.0 ppm vs. 0.5 ppm clear-sky error at Railroad Valley, Nevada). Uncertainty reductions at the annual, biome scale range from 40 percent to 75 percent across our four instrument design cases, and from 65 percent to 85 percent for the continent as a whole. Our uncertainty

  16. A regional CO2 observing system simulation experiment for the ASCENDS Satellite Mission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Top-down estimates of the spatiotemporal variations in emissions and uptake of CO2 will benefit from the increasing measurement density brought by recent and future additions to the suite of in situ and remote CO2 measurement platforms. In particular, the planned NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS satellite mission will provide greater coverage in cloudy regions, at high latitudes, and at night than passive satellite systems, as well as high precision and accuracy. In a novel approach to quantifying the ability of satellite column measurements to constrain CO2 fluxes, we use a portable library of footprints (surface influence functions generated by the WRF-STILT Lagrangian transport model in a regional Bayesian synthesis inversion. The regional Lagrangian framework is well suited to make use of ASCENDS observations to constrain fluxes at high resolution, in this case at 1° latitude × 1° longitude and weekly for North America. We consider random measurement errors only, modeled as a function of mission and instrument design specifications along with realistic atmospheric and surface conditions. We find that the ASCENDS observations could potentially reduce flux uncertainties substantially at biome and finer scales. At the 1° × 1°, weekly scale, the largest uncertainty reductions, on the order of 50%, occur where and when there is good coverage by observations with low measurement errors and the a priori uncertainties are large. Uncertainty reductions are smaller for a 1.57 μm candidate wavelength than for a 2.05 μm wavelength, and are smaller for the higher of the two measurement error levels that we consider (1.0 ppm vs. 0.5 ppm clear-sky error at Railroad Valley, Nevada. Uncertainty reductions at the annual, biome scale range from ∼40% to ∼75% across our four instrument design cases, and from ∼65% to ∼85% for the continent as a whole. Our uncertainty reductions at various scales are

  17. Albuquerque, NM, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Albuquerque, NM (35.0N, 106.5W) is situated on the edge of the Rio Grande River and flood plain which cuts across the image. The reddish brown surface of the Albuquerque Basin is a fault depression filled with ancient alluvial fan and lake bed sediments. On the slopes of the Manzano Mountains to the east of Albuquerque, juniper and other timber of the Cibola National Forest can be seen as contrasting dark tones of vegetation.

  18. Improving the Gap between Model Predictions and Observations of Formaldehyde over the Remote Marine Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trueblood, J.; Meskhidze, N.

    2013-05-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is a ubiquitous oxidation product that exists in polluted rural and urban areas, as well as remote background sites where it is an important photochemical intermediate. HCHO levels of up to six times above what is typically predicted by photochemical models have been reported over the Marine Boundary Layer (MBL). As proposed mechanisms for HCHO production remain to be insufficient to explain such large discrepancies between model predictions and measured values, the role of marine regions in the creation of HCHO continues to be one of the largest sources of uncertainty in current global chemistry-transport models. Here we examine the viability of a proposed mechanism for the photochemical production of formaldehyde involving aerosols enriched with biologically produced organic matter. In this study, the phytoplankton Emiliania Huxleyi was incubated in autoclaved seawater contained within a 9 liter Pyrex glass bottle. Quantitative analysis of the enrichment of transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) and other biologically produced organic matter (dissolved and particulate) in the surface microlayer was carried out by employing Alldredge's alcian blue staining technique. To produce organic aerosols, enriched seawater was bubbled with hydrocarbon free air using a sintered glass filter placed 5 cm below the surface. Utilizing a mixed flow reaction scheme, produced aerosols were then pushed through stainless steel flow tubes into a separate 9-liter Pyrex glass container acting as a residence chamber. The container was surrounded with six Ushio 9W Midrange UVB lights to allow for the irradiation of aerosols at 306 nm. A flow rate of approximately 0.1 l/min allowed for an average aerosol residence time of 90 minutes inside the residence chamber. All air from the chamber was then passed through a 5" long Pyrex desorber tube packed with 60/80 Tenax that had been soaked in the derivatizing agent pentafluorophenyl hydrazine (PFPH). Subsequent thermal

  19. Observation of associated production of a $Z$ boson with a $D$ meson in the forward region

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Balagura, Vladislav; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Bauer, Thomas; Bay, Aurelio; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; van den Brand, Johannes; Bressieux, Joël; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Busetto, Giovanni; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Callot, Olivier; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carranza-Mejia, Hector; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Ciba, Krzystof; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coca, Cornelia; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bonis, Isabelle; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dorosz, Piotr; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; van Eijk, Daan; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farry, Stephen; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garofoli, Justin; Garosi, Paola; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gordon, Hamish; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Hafkenscheid, Tom; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; Hartmann, Thomas; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hunt, Philip; Huse, Torkjell; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Iakovenko, Viktor; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kaballo, Michael; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Wallaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Klaver, Suzanne; Kochebina, Olga; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kozlinskiy, Alexandr; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanciotti, Elisa; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leo, Sabato; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Guoming; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Ian; Lopes, Jose; Lopez-March, Neus; Lowdon, Peter; Lu, Haiting; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luisier, Johan; Luo, Haofei; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manzali, Matteo; Maratas, Jan; Marconi, Umberto; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martens, Aurelien; Martín Sánchez, Alexandra; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Moran, Dermot; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Mountain, Raymond; Mous, Ivan; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Muresan, Raluca; Muryn, Bogdan; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Oggero, Serena; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pavel-Nicorescu, Carmen; Pazos Alvarez, Antonio; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perez Trigo, Eliseo; Perret, Pascal; Perrin-Terrin, Mathieu; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Pessina, Gianluigi; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Polok, Grzegorz; Poluektov, Anton; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Powell, Andrew; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redford, Sophie; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Alexander; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Roa Romero, Diego; Robbe, Patrick; Roberts, Douglas; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruffini, Fabrizio; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Sabatino, Giovanni; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sapunov, Matvey; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Savrie, Mauro; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Seco, Marcos; Semennikov, Alexander; Senderowska, Katarzyna; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Oksana; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Sparkes, Ailsa; Spradlin, Patrick; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Subbiah, Vijay Kartik; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szilard, Daniela; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teodorescu, Eliza; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; Voss, Helge; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Webber, Adam Dane; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wiechczynski, Jaroslaw; Wiedner, Dirk; Wiggers, Leo; Wilkinson, Guy; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wu, Suzhi; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zvyagin, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    A search for associated production of a $Z$ boson with an open charm meson is presented using a data sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $1.0\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ of proton--proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, collected by the LHCb experiment. Seven candidate events for associated production of a $Z$ boson with a $D^0$ meson and four candidate events for a $Z$ boson with a $D^+$ meson are observed with a combined significance of 5.1 standard deviations. The production cross-sections in the forward region are measured to be $$\\sigma_{Z\\rightarrow\\mu^+\\mu^-\\!,D^0} = 2.50\\pm1.12\\pm0.22pb$$ $$\\sigma_{Z\\rightarrow\\mu^+\\mu^-\\!,D^+} = 0.44\\pm0.23\\pm0.03pb,$$ where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic.

  20. Polar patches observed by ESR and their possible origin in the cusp region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Smith

    Full Text Available Observations by the EISCAT Svalbard radar in summer have revealed electron density enhancements in the magnetic noon sector under conditions of IMF Bz southward. The features were identified as possible candidates for polar-cap patches drifting anti-Sunward with the plasma flow. Supporting measurements by the EISCAT mainland radar, the CUTLASS radar and DMSP satellites, in a multi-instrument study, suggested that the origin of the structures lay upstream at lower latitudes, with the modulation in density being attributed to variability in soft-particle precipitation in the cusp region. It is proposed that the variations in precipitation may be linked to changes in the location of the reconnection site at the magnetopause, which in turn results in changes in the energy distribution of the precipitating particles.

    Key words: Ionosphere (ionosphere-magnetosphere interactions; plasma temperature and density; polar ionosphere

  1. Seasat altimeter observations of dynamic topography in the Gulf Stream region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheney, R. E.; Marsh, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    A straightforward approach to altimeter data analysis in the Gulf Stream system is presented, using a detailed geoid model to remove the gravitational component. The resulting sea surface height profiles compare remarkably well with independent oceanographic observations. Specific features such as cold rings, warm rings, and no anomaly regions are analyzed and it is shown that known positions of cyclonic and anticyclonic rings correspond with depressions and elevations, respectively, with amplitudes as large as 95 cm. The apparent fluctuation of the Gulf Stream is indicated by the results, as in the finding that on time scales of a few days, surface transport indicated by the sea surface height difference across the stream varied by nearly 30%

  2. NLTE modeling of a small active region filament observed with the VTT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, P.; Balthasar, H.; Kuckein, C.; Koza, J.; Gömöry, P.; Rybák, J.; Heinzel, P.; Kučera, A.

    2016-11-01

    An active region mini-discretionary-filament was observed with the Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) in Tenerife simultaneously in the He I infrared triplet using the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter 1 (TIP 1), in Hα with the TESOS Fabry-Pérot interferometer, and in Ca II 8542 Å with the VTT spectrograph. The spectropolarimetric data were inverted using the HAZEL code and Hα profiles were modelled by solving a NLTE radiative transfer in a simple isobaric and isothermal 2D slab irradiated both from its bottom and sides from the solar surface. It was found that the mini-discretionary-filament is composed of horizontal fluxtubes, along which the cool plasma of T˜10 000 K can flow with very large, even supersonic, velocities.

  3. Estimating methane emissions in California's urban and rural regions using multitower observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seongeun; Newman, Sally; Zhang, Jingsong; Andrews, Arlyn E.; Bianco, Laura; Bagley, Justin; Cui, Xinguang; Graven, Heather; Kim, Jooil; Salameh, Peter; LaFranchi, Brian W.; Priest, Chad; Campos-Pineda, Mixtli; Novakovskaia, Elena; Sloop, Christopher D.; Michelsen, Hope A.; Bambha, Ray P.; Weiss, Ray F.; Keeling, Ralph; Fischer, Marc L.

    2016-11-01

    We present an analysis of methane (CH4) emissions using atmospheric observations from 13 sites in California during June 2013 to May 2014. A hierarchical Bayesian inversion method is used to estimate CH4 emissions for spatial regions (0.3° pixels for major regions) by comparing measured CH4 mixing ratios with transport model (Weather Research and Forecasting and Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport) predictions based on seasonally varying California-specific CH4 prior emission models. The transport model is assessed using a combination of meteorological and carbon monoxide (CO) measurements coupled with the gridded California Air Resources Board (CARB) CO emission inventory. The hierarchical Bayesian inversion suggests that state annual anthropogenic CH4 emissions are 2.42 ± 0.49 Tg CH4/yr (at 95% confidence), higher (1.2-1.8 times) than the current CARB inventory (1.64 Tg CH4/yr in 2013). It should be noted that undiagnosed sources of errors or uncaptured errors in the model-measurement mismatch covariance may increase these uncertainty bounds beyond that indicated here. The CH4 emissions from the Central Valley and urban regions (San Francisco Bay and South Coast Air Basins) account for 58% and 26% of the total posterior emissions, respectively. This study suggests that the livestock sector is likely the major contributor to the state total CH4 emissions, in agreement with CARB's inventory. Attribution to source sectors for subregions of California using additional trace gas species would further improve the quantification of California's CH4 emissions and mitigation efforts toward the California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 (Assembly Bill 32).

  4. In-situ Observations of the Ionospheric F2-Region from the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Victoria N.; Wright, Kenneth H.; Minow, Joseph I.; Chandler, Michael O.; Parker, Linda N.

    2008-01-01

    The International Space Station orbit provides an ideal platform for in-situ studies of space weather effects on the mid and low latitude F-2 region ionosphere. The Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU) operating on the ISS since Aug 2006, is a suite of plasma instruments: a Floating Potential Probe (FPP), a Plasma Impedance Probe (PIP), a Wide-sweep Langmuir Probe (WLP), and a Narrow-sweep Langmuir Probe (NLP). This instrument package provides a new opportunity for collaborative multi-instrument studies of the F-region ionosphere during both quiet and disturbed periods. This presentation first describes the operational parameters for each of the FPMU probes and shows examples of an intra-instrument validation. We then show comparisons with the plasma density and temperature measurements derived from the TIMED GUVI ultraviolet imager, the Millstone Hill ground based incoherent scatter radar, and DIAS digisondes, Finally we show one of several observations of night-time equatorial density holes demonstrating the capabilities of the probes for monitoring mid and low latitude plasma processes.

  5. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: First results from SCUBA-2 observations of the Cepheus Flare Region

    CERN Document Server

    Pattle, Kate; Kirk, Jason M; Di Francesco, James; Kirk, Helen; Mottram, Joseph C; Keown, Jared; Buckle, Jane; Beaulieu, Sylvie F; Berry, David S; Broekhoven-Fiene, Hannah; Currie, Malcolm J; Fich, Michel; Hatchell, Jenny; Jenness, Tim; Johnstone, Doug; Nutter, David; Pineda, Jaime E; Quinn, Ciera; Salji, Carl; Tisi, Sam; Walker-Smith, Samantha; Hogerheijde, Michiel R; Bastien, Pierre; Bresnahan, David; Butner, Harold; Chen, Mike; Chrysostomou, Antonio; Coudé, Simon; Davis, Chris J; Drabek-Maunder, Emily; Duarte-Cabral, Ana; Fiege, Jason; Friberg, Per; Friesen, Rachel; Fuller, Gary A; Graves, Sarah; Greaves, Jane; Gregson, Jonathan; Holland, Wayne; Joncas, Gilles; Knee, Lewis B G; Mairs, Steve; Marsh, Ken; Matthews, Brenda C; Moriarty-Schieven, Gerald; Mowat, Chris; Rawlings, Jonathan; Richer, John; Robertson, Damien; Rosolowsky, Erik; Rumble, Damian; Sadavoy, Sarah; Thomas, Holly; Tothill, Nick; Viti, Serena; White, Glenn J; Wouterloot, Jan; Yates, Jeremy; Zhu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    We present observations of the Cepheus Flare obtained as part of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) Gould Belt Legacy Survey (GBLS) with the SCUBA-2 instrument. We produce a catalogue of sources found by SCUBA-2, and separate these into starless cores and protostars. We determine masses and densities for each of our sources, using source temperatures determined by the Herschel Gould Belt Survey. We compare the properties of starless cores in four different molecular clouds: L1147/58, L1172/74, L1251 and L1228. We find that the core mass functions for each region typically show shallower-than-Salpeter behaviour. We find that L1147/58 and L1228 have a high ratio of starless cores to Class II protostars, while L1251 and L1174 have a low ratio, consistent with the latter regions being more active sites of current star formation, while the former are forming stars less actively. We determine that, if modelled as thermally-supported Bonnor-Ebert spheres, most of our cores have stable configurations accessible...

  6. Precipitable Water Vapor Estimates in the Australian Region from Ground-Based GPS Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suelynn Choy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a comparison of atmospheric precipitable water vapor (PWV derived from ground-based global positioning system (GPS receiver with traditional radiosonde measurement and very long baseline interferometry (VLBI technique for a five-year period (2008–2012 using Australian GPS stations. These stations were selectively chosen to provide a representative regional distribution of sites while ensuring conventional meteorological observations were available. Good agreement of PWV estimates was found between GPS and VLBI comparison with a mean difference of less than 1 mm and standard deviation of 3.5 mm and a mean difference and standard deviation of 0.1 mm and 4.0 mm, respectively, between GPS and radiosonde measurements. Systematic errors have also been discovered during the course of this study, which highlights the benefit of using GPS as a supplementary atmospheric PWV sensor and calibration system. The selected eight GPS sites sample different climates across Australia covering an area of approximately 30° NS/EW. It has also shown that the magnitude and variation of PWV estimates depend on the amount of moisture in the atmosphere, which is a function of season, topography, and other regional climate conditions.

  7. Observed temperature and precipitation changes in Hungary with an outlook to the Carpathian region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Tamas; Lakatos, Monika; Bihari, Zita; Szentimrey, Tamas

    2013-04-01

    Climate change challenges natural ecosystems and also human activity, and is expected to result in significant changes in temperature and precipitation in Hungary. The exact knowledge of the observed tendencies are crucial for responsible awareness. Climate indices are used in several projects on climate change as prevailing indicators of changes in extremes. The past tendencies of temperature are presented by examining the changes in the number of summer days, frost days, warm nights and hot days. For describing the precipitation changes the number of wet days, days with heavy rainfall, simple daily intensity (precipitation sum/number of wet days) and maximum number of consecutive days are analyzed in this paper. The changes of such indices for Hungary from the beginning of the 20th century to present are illustrated and analyzed on graphs and trend maps. With an outlook to the Carpathian region the preliminary results of the CARPATCLIM project, hold by JRC and lead by the Hungarian Meteorological Service are introduced in this study. The homogenized and interpolated database is produced in daily temporal resolution for the period 1961-2010 and in 0.1° spatial resolution for the 50°N - 44°N, 17°E - 27°E area for many basic meteorological variables. The harmonized database provides relevant outcomes for climate change studies and other climatological research. Several climate indices are presented in this study for the Carpathian region as preliminary results of the investigations of the dataset.

  8. Patterns of Nanoflare Storm Heating Exhibited by an Active Region Observed with SDO/AIA

    CERN Document Server

    Viall, Nicholeen M

    2011-01-01

    It is largely agreed that many coronal loops---those observed at a temperature of about 1 MK--- are bundles of unresolved strands that are heated by storms of impulsive nanoflares. The nature of coronal heating in hotter loops and in the very important but largely ignored diffuse component of active regions is much less clear. Are these regions also heated impulsively, or is the heating quasi steady? The spectacular new data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) telescopes on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) offer an excellent opportunity to address this question. We analyze the light curves of coronal loops and the diffuse corona in 6 different AIA channels and compare them with the predicted light curves from theoretical models. Light curves in the different AIA channels reach their peak intensities with predictable orderings as a function the nanoflare storm properties. We show that while some sets of light curves exhibit clear evidence of cooling after nanoflare storms, other cases are less stra...

  9. Water in massive star-forming regions: HIFI observations of W3 IRS5

    CERN Document Server

    Chavarria, L; Jacq, T; Braine, J; Bontemps, S; Baudry, A; Marseille, M; van der Tak, F; Pietropaoli, B; Wyrowski, F; Shipman, R; Frieswijk, W; van Dishoeck, E F; Cernicharo, J; Bachiller, R; Benedettini, M; Benz, A O; Bergin, E; Bjerkeli, P; Blake, G A; Bruderer, S; Caselli, P; Codella, C; Daniel, F; di Giorgio, A M; Dominik, C; Doty, S D; Encrenaz, P; Fich, M; Fuente, A; Giannini, T; Goicoechea, J R; de Graauw, Th; Hartogh, P; Helmich, F; Herczeg, G J; Hogerheijde, M R; Johnstone, D; Jørgensen, J K; Kristensen, L E; Larsson, B; Lis, D; Liseau, R; McCoey, C; Melnick, G; Nisini, B; Olberg, M; Parise, B; Pearson, J C; Plume, R; Risacher, C; Santiago-Garcia, J; Saraceno, P; Szczerba, J Stutzki R; Tafalla, M; Tielens, A; van Kempen, T A; Visser, R; Wampfler, S F; Willem, J; Yıldız, U A

    2010-01-01

    We present Herschel observations of the water molecule in the massive star-forming region W3 IRS5. The o-H17O 110-101, p-H18O 111-000, p-H2O 22 202-111, p-H2O 111-000, o-H2O 221-212, and o-H2O 212-101 lines, covering a frequency range from 552 up to 1669 GHz, have been detected at high spectral resolution with HIFI. The water lines in W3 IRS5 show well-defined high-velocity wings that indicate a clear contribution by outflows. Moreover, the systematically blue-shifted absorption in the H2O lines suggests expansion, presumably driven by the outflow. No infall signatures are detected. The p-H2O 111-000 and o-H2O 212-101 lines show absorption from the cold material (T ~ 10 K) in which the high-mass protostellar envelope is embedded. One-dimensional radiative transfer models are used to estimate water abundances and to further study the kinematics of the region. We show that the emission in the rare isotopologues comes directly from the inner parts of the envelope (T > 100 K) where water ices in the dust mantles ...

  10. Investigation of regional geokinematics of central Europe using permanent GPS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogusz, J.; Figurski, M.; Kontny, B.; Jarosinski, M.; Klos, A.; Grzempowski, P.

    2012-12-01

    Since 2009 the Centre of Applied Geomatics of the Military University of Technology acts as one of the 18 Local Analysis Centers within EPN (EUREF Permanent Network). The duty of the LAC is to process a subnetwork of EPN stations and deliver weekly free network solutions to the Combination Centre as well as make research aimed at interpretation of obtained sites' coordinates. We have used satellite data from more than 300 permanent sites located in Europe, incorporated to EPN and supplemented by the sites operated within Polish GBAS (Ground-Based Augmentation System) called ASG-EUPOS for investigation of the regional geokinematic effects. These observations were processed by means of combining the normal equations using BERNESE 5.0 software. The velocities of permanent sites were determined from time series (geocentric coordinates) in two ways: using robust estimation using M-estimators and with CATREF software with no significant differences obtained. The several methods of interpolation of velocities into regular grid were tested. The research on regional kinematics was done by scientific description of continuous velocity model in comparison with different discontinuous models with geological structure taken into consideration. Finally the strain rates of Central Europe were elaborated using GRID_STRAIN software and compared to the previously determined empirical models.

  11. X-ray and Radio Observations of the Massive Star Forming Region IRAS 20126+4104

    CERN Document Server

    Montes, Virginie A; Anderson, Crystal; Rosero, Viviana

    2015-01-01

    We present results of Chandra ACIS-I and Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) 6 cm continuum observations of the IRAS 20126+4104 massive star forming region. We detect 150 X-ray sources within the 17 arcmin x 17 arcmin ACIS-I field, and a total of 13 radio sources within the 9'.2 primary beam at 4.9 GHz. Among these are the first 6 cm detections of the central sources reported by Hofner et al. (2007), namely I20N1, I20S, and I20var. A new variable radio sources is also reported. Searching the 2MASS archive we identified 88 NIR counterparts to the X-ray sources. Only 4 of the X-ray sources had 6 cm counterparts. Based on an NIR color-color analysis, and on the Besancon simulation of Galactic stellar populations (Robin et al. 2003), we estimate that about 90 X-ray sources are associated with this massive star forming region. We detect an increasing surface density of X-ray sources toward the massive protostar and infer the presence of a cluster of at least 46 YSOs within a distance of 1.2 pc from the massive p...

  12. Mesoscale convection system and occurrence of extreme low tropopause temperatures. Observations over Asian summer monsoon region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, A.R.; Mandal, T.K.; Gautam, R. [National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi (India). Radio and Atmospheric Div.; Panwar, V. [National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi (India). Radio and Atmospheric Div.; Delhi Univ. (India). Dept. of Physics and Astrophysics; Rao, V.R. [India Meteorology Dept., New Delhi (India). Satellite Meteorology Div.; Goel, A. [Delhi Univ. (India). Dept. of Physics and Astrophysics; Das, S.S. [Vikram Sarabhai Space Center, Trivandrum (India). Space Physics Lab.; Dhaka, S.K. [Delhi Univ., New Delhi (India). Dept. of Physics and Electronics

    2010-07-01

    The present study examines the process of how tropospheric air enters the stratosphere, particularly in association with tropical mesoscale convective systems (TMCS) which are considered to be one of the causative mechanisms for the observation of extremely low tropopause temperature over the tropics. The association between the phenomena of convection and the observation of extreme low tropopause temperature events is, therefore, examined over the Asian monsoon region using data from multiple platforms. Satellite observations show that the area of low outgoing long wave radiation (OLR), which is a proxy for the enhanced convection, is embedded with high altitude clouds top temperatures ({<=}193 K). A detailed analysis of OLR and 100 hPa temperature shows that both are modulated by westward propagating Rossby waves with a period of {proportional_to}15 days, indicating a close linkage between them. The process by which the tropospheric air enters the stratosphere may, in turn, be determined by how the areas of convection and low tropopause temperature (LTT) i.e. T {<=}191K are spatially located. In this context, the relative spatial distribution of low OLR and LTT areas is examined. Though, the locations of low OLR and LTT are noticed in the same broad area, the two do not always overlap, except for partial overlap in some cases. When there are multiple low OLR areas, the LTT area generally appears in between the low OLR areas. Implications of these observations are also discussed. The present analysis also shows that the horizontal mean winds have a role in the spatial distribution of low OLR and LTT. (orig.)

  13. Acute leukemias in Piauí: comparison with features observed in other regions of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rego M.F.N.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Differences in age and sex distribution as well as FAB (French-American-British classification types have been reported for acute leukemias in several countries. We studied the demographics and response to treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL between 1989 and 2000 in Teresina, Piauí, and compared these results with reports from Brazil and other countries. Complete data concerning 345 patients (230 ALL, 115 AML were reviewed. AML occurred predominantly in adults (77%, with a median age of 34 years, similar to that found in the southeast of Brazil but lower than the median age in the United States and Europe (52 years. FAB distribution was similar in children and adults and FAB-M2 was the most common type, as also found in Japan. The high frequency of FAB-M3 described in most Brazilian studies and for Hispanics in the United States was not observed. Overall survival for adults was 40%, similar to other studies in Brazil. A high mortality rate was observed during induction. No clinical or hematological parameter influenced survival in the Cox model. ALL presented the characteristic peak of incidence between 2-8 years. Most of the cases were CD10+ pre-B ALL. In 25%, abnormal expression of myeloid antigens was observed. Only 10% of the patients were older than 30 years. Overall survival was better for children. Age and leukocyte count were independent prognostic factors. These data demonstrate that, although there are regional peculiarities, the application of standardized treatments and good supportive care make it possible to achieve results observed in other countries for the same chemotherapy protocols.

  14. On the origin of the anisotropy observed beneath the westernmost Mediterranean region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Jordi

    2017-04-01

    The Iberian Peninsula and Northern Morocco region provides an excellent opportunity to investigate the origin of subcrustal anisotropy. Following the TopoIberia-Iberarray experiment, anisotropic properties have been explored in a dense network of 60x60 km spaced broad-band stations, resulting in more than 300 sites investigated over an area extending from the Bay of Biscay to the Sahara platform and covering more than 6000.000 km2. The rather uniform N100°E FPD retrieved beneath the Variscan Central Iberian Massif is consistent with global mantle flow models taking into account contributions of surface plate motion, density variations and net lithosphere rotation. The origin of this anisotropy is hence globally related to the lattice preferred orientation of mantle minerals generated by mantle flow at asthenospheric depths, although significant regional variations are observed. The anisotropic parameters retrieved from single events providing high quality data show significant differences for stations located in the Variscan units of NW Iberia, suggesting that the region includes multiple anisotropic layers or complex anisotropy systems have to be considered there. The rotation of the FDE along the Gibraltar arc following the curvature of the Rif-Betic chain has been interpreted as an evidence of mantle flow deflected around the high velocity slab beneath the Gibraltar Arc. Beneath the SW corner of Iberia and the High Atlas zone, small delay times and inconsistent FPD have been detected, suggesting the presence of vertical mantle flow affecting the anisotropic structure of the asthenosphere. Future developments will include a better integration with the anisotropic estimations provided by Pn tomography and, in particular, with those arising from surface wave tomographic inversions using TopoIberia-Ibearray results. Additionally, the contribution of crustal anisotropy could be estimated from the analysis of receiver functions. The detailed knowledge on the

  15. First Results from High Angular Resolution ALMA Observations Toward the HL Tau Region

    CERN Document Server

    Partnership, ALMA; Perez, L M; Hunter, T R; Dent, W R F; Hales, A S; Hills, R; Corder, S; Fomalont, E B; Vlahakis, C; Asaki, Y; Barkats, D; Hirota, A; Hodge, J A; Impellizzeri, C M V; Kneissl, R; Liuzzo, E; Lucas, R; Marcelino, N; Matsushita, S; Nakanishi, K; Phillips, N; Richards, A M S; Toledo, I; Aladro, R; Broguiere, D; Cortes, J R; Cortes, P C; Dhawan, V; Espada, D; Galarza, F; Garcia-Appadoo, D; Guzman-Ramirez, L; Humphreys, E M; Jung, T; Kameno, S; Laing, R A; Leon, S; Marconi, G; Nikolic, B; Nyman, L -A; Radiszcz, M; Remijan, A; Rodon, J A; Sawada, T; Takahashi, S; Tilanus, R P J; Vilaro, B Vila; Watson, L C; Wiklind, T; Akiyama, E; Chapillon, E; de Gregorio, I; Di Francesco, J; Gueth, F; Kawamura, A; Lee, C -F; Luong, Q Nguyen; Mangum, J; Pietu, V; Sanhueza, P; Saigo, K; Takakuwa, S; Ubach, C; van Kempen, T; Wootten, A; Castro-Carrizo, A; Francke, H; Gallardo, J; Garcia, J; Gonzalez, S; Hill, T; Kaminski, T; Kurono, Y; Liu, H -Y; Lopez, C; Morales, F; Plarre, K; Schieven, G; Testi, L; Videla, L; Villard, E; Andreani, P; Hibbard, J E; Tatematsu, K

    2015-01-01

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations from the 2014 Long Baseline Campaign in dust continuum and spectral line emission from the HL Tau region. The continuum images at wavelengths of 2.9, 1.3, and 0.87 mm have unprecedented angular resolutions of 0.075 arcseconds (10 AU) to 0.025 arcseconds (3.5 AU), revealing an astonishing level of detail in the circumstellar disk surrounding the young solar analogue HL Tau, with a pattern of bright and dark rings observed at all wavelengths. By fitting ellipses to the most distinct rings, we measure precise values for the disk inclination (46.72pm0.05 degrees) and position angle (+138.02pm0.07 degrees). We obtain a high-fidelity image of the 1.0 mm spectral index ($\\alpha$), which ranges from $\\alpha\\sim2.0$ in the optically-thick central peak and two brightest rings, increasing to 2.3-3.0 in the dark rings. The dark rings are not devoid of emission, we estimate a grain emissivity index of 0.8 for the innermost dark ring and lower for ...

  16. Swarm in situ observations of F region polar cap patches created by cusp precipitation

    CERN Document Server

    Goodwin, L V; Miles, D M; Patra, S; van der Meeren, C; Buchert, S C; Burchill, J K; Clausen, L B N; Knudsen, D J; McWilliams, K A; Moen, J

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution in situ measurements from the three Swarm spacecraft, in a string-of-pearls configuration, provide new insights about the combined role of flow channel events and particle impact ionization in creating $\\textit{F}$ region electron density structures in the northern Scandinavian dayside cusp. We present a case of polar cap patch formation where a reconnection-driven low-density relative westward flow channel is eroding the dayside solar-ionized plasma but where particle impact ionization in the cusp dominates the initial plasma structuring. In the cusp, density features are observed which are twice as dense as the solar-ionized background. These features then follow the polar cap convection and become less structured and lower in amplitude. These are the first in situ observations tracking polar cap patch evolution from creation by plasma transport and enhancement by cusp precipitation, through entrainment in the polar cap flow and relaxation into smooth patches as they approach the nightside a...

  17. Very-high energy observations of the galactic center region by VERITAS in 2010-2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archer, A.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Chen, W. [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Barnacka, A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Benbow, W.; Cerruti, M. [Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States); Berger, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and the Bartol Research Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Bird, R. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Biteau, J. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Byrum, K. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Cardenzana, J. V; Dickinson, H. J.; Eisch, J. D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Chen, X. [Institute of Physics and Astronomy, University of Potsdam, D-14476 Potsdam-Golm (Germany); Ciupik, L. [Astronomy Department, Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Connolly, M. P. [School of Physics, National University of Ireland Galway, University Road, Galway (Ireland); Cui, W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Dumm, J., E-mail: beilicke@physics.wustl.edu [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); and others

    2014-08-01

    The Galactic center is an interesting region for high-energy (0.1-100 GeV) and very-high-energy (E > 100 GeV) γ-ray observations. Potential sources of GeV/TeV γ-ray emission have been suggested, e.g., the accretion of matter onto the supermassive black hole, cosmic rays from a nearby supernova remnant (e.g., Sgr A East), particle acceleration in a plerion, or the annihilation of dark matter particles. The Galactic center has been detected by EGRET and by Fermi/LAT in the MeV/GeV energy band. At TeV energies, the Galactic center was detected with moderate significance by the CANGAROO and Whipple 10 m telescopes and with high significance by H.E.S.S., MAGIC, and VERITAS. We present the results from three years of VERITAS observations conducted at large zenith angles resulting in a detection of the Galactic center on the level of 18 standard deviations at energies above ∼2.5 TeV. The energy spectrum is derived and is found to be compatible with hadronic, leptonic, and hybrid emission models discussed in the literature. Future, more detailed measurements of the high-energy cutoff and better constraints on the high-energy flux variability will help to refine and/or disentangle the individual models.

  18. Very-high energy observations of the Galactic center region by VERITAS in 2010-2012

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2014-01-01

    The Galactic center is an interesting region for high-energy (0.1-100 GeV) and very-high-energy (E > 100 GeV) gamma-ray observations. Potential sources of GeV/TeV gamma-ray emission have been suggested, e.g., the accretion of matter onto the supermassive black hole, cosmic rays from a nearby supernova remnant (e.g. SgrA East), particle acceleration in a plerion, or the annihilation of dark matter particles. The Galactic center has been detected by EGRET and by Fermi/LAT in the MeV/GeV energy band. At TeV energies, the Galactic center was detected with moderate significance by the CANGAROO and Whipple 10 m telescopes and with high significance by H.E.S.S., MAGIC, and VERITAS. We present the results from three years of VERITAS observations conducted at large zenith angles resulting in a detection of the Galactic center on the level of 18 standard deviations at energies above ~2.5TeV. The energy spectrum is derived and is found to be compatible with hadronic, leptonic and hybrid emission models discussed in the ...

  19. InGaN light emitting diodes for 415 nm-520 nm spectral range by plasma assisted MBE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szankowska, M.L.; Smalc-Koziorowska, J.; Cywinski, G.; Grzanka, S.; Grzegory, I.; Lucznik, B. [Institute of High Pressure Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 01-142 Warszawa (Poland); Feduniewicz-Zmuda, A. [TopGaN Ltd, ul Sokolowska 29/37, 01-142 Warszawa (Poland); Wasilewski, Z.R. [Institute for Microstructural Sciences, National Research Council, Ottawa (Canada); Porowski, S.; Skierbiszewski, C. [Institute of High Pressure Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 01-142 Warszawa (Poland); TopGaN Ltd, ul Sokolowska 29/37, 01-142 Warszawa (Poland); Siekacz, M

    2009-06-15

    In this work we study the growth of the Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) by Plasma Assisted MBE (PAMBE). The active LEDs region was grown to cover the spectral range spanning from 415 nm to 520 nm. We demonstrate efficient LEDs with the highest optical power output of 1.5 mW and 20 mA for 415 nm. For longer wavelengths we observe a drop of the optical power. The reduction of the quantum efficiency for green emission can be related to the presence of strong built-in piezoelectric fields or increased number of nonradiative recombination centers. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. Observations and modeling of the fine structure of loops in the transition region and corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, David

    2017-08-01

    The physical dimensions of loops hold important clues to the coronal heating process. Theoretical arguments universally indicate that coronal heating should operate on very small spatial scales and loops should be unresolvable by current instrumentation. There are a number of observational results, however, that suggest that coronal loops are organized on spatial scales of several hundred km. For example, recent observations from IRIS have discovered a new class of low-lying dynamic loops structures, and it has been argued that they are the long-postulated unresolved fine structures (UFS) that dominate the emission of the solar transition region. Here we show that the properties of the UFS (intensities, lengths, widths, lifetimes) are consistent with 1-D non-equilibrium ionization simulations of an impulsively heated single strand, suggesting that they are resolved, and that the distribution of UFS widths implies that like coronal loops they are also structured on a spatial scale of a few hundred km. Spatial scales of a few hundred kilometers appear to be typical for a range of chromospheric and coronal structures, but it is unclear whether the true distribution of loop widths is normalized around this scale, or whether it extends to much smaller scales - perhaps by a power-law - below the resolution of current instruments. We have extended our previous modeling of the cross-field intensity profiles of coronal loops observed by EIS and AIA, to investigate what the modeled profiles would look like at Hi-C resolution, what they would look like if loops are composed only of temperatures and densities, and the intensity profiles from the power-law simulations are dominated by emission from the largest strands.

  1. Drought, Fire and Insects in Western US Forests: Observations to Improve Regional Land System Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, B. E.; Yang, Z.; Berner, L. T.; Hicke, J. A.; Buotte, P.; Hudiburg, T. W.

    2015-12-01

    Drought, fire and insects are major disturbances in the western US, and conditions are expected to get warmer and drier in the future. We combine multi-scale observations and modeling with CLM4.5 to examine the effects of these disturbances on forests in the western US. We modified the Community Land Model, CLM4.5, to improve simulated drought-related mortality in forests, and prediction of insect outbreaks under future climate conditions. We examined differences in plant traits that represent species variation in sensitivity to drought, and redefined plant groupings in PFTs. Plant traits, including sapwood area: leaf area ratio and stemwood density were strongly correlated with water availability during the ecohydrologic year. Our database of co-located observations of traits for 30 tree species was used to produce parameterization of the model by species groupings according to similar traits. Burn area predicted by the new fire model in CLM4.5 compares well with recent years of GFED data, but has a positive bias compared with Landsat-based MTBS. Biomass mortality over recent decades increased, and was captured well by the model in general, but missed mortality trends of some species. Comparisons with AmeriFlux data showed that the model with dynamic tree mortality only (no species trait improvements) overestimated GPP in dry years compared with flux data at semi-arid sites, and underestimated GPP at more mesic sites that experience dry summers. Simulations with both dynamic tree mortality and species trait parameters improved estimates of GPP by 17-22%; differences between predicted and observed NEE were larger. Future projections show higher productivity from increased atmospheric CO2 and warming that somewhat offsets drought and fire effects over the next few decades. Challenges include representation of hydraulic failure in models, and availability of species trait and carbon/water process data in disturbance- and drought-impacted regions.

  2. Bias correction methods for regional climate model simulations considering the distributional parametric uncertainty underlying the observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kue Bum; Kwon, Hyun-Han; Han, Dawei

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we present a comparative study of bias correction methods for regional climate model simulations considering the distributional parametric uncertainty underlying the observations/models. In traditional bias correction schemes, the statistics of the simulated model outputs are adjusted to those of the observation data. However, the model output and the observation data are only one case (i.e., realization) out of many possibilities, rather than being sampled from the entire population of a certain distribution due to internal climate variability. This issue has not been considered in the bias correction schemes of the existing climate change studies. Here, three approaches are employed to explore this issue, with the intention of providing a practical tool for bias correction of daily rainfall for use in hydrologic models ((1) conventional method, (2) non-informative Bayesian method, and (3) informative Bayesian method using a Weather Generator (WG) data). The results show some plausible uncertainty ranges of precipitation after correcting for the bias of RCM precipitation. The informative Bayesian approach shows a narrower uncertainty range by approximately 25-45% than the non-informative Bayesian method after bias correction for the baseline period. This indicates that the prior distribution derived from WG may assist in reducing the uncertainty associated with parameters. The implications of our results are of great importance in hydrological impact assessments of climate change because they are related to actions for mitigation and adaptation to climate change. Since this is a proof of concept study that mainly illustrates the logic of the analysis for uncertainty-based bias correction, future research exploring the impacts of uncertainty on climate impact assessments and how to utilize uncertainty while planning mitigation and adaptation strategies is still needed.

  3. NO2分子519~524 nm区的激光诱导荧光激发谱%Laser-induced fluorescence excitation spectrum of NO2 in the region519~524 nm at room temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔执凤; 凤尔银; 陈东; 季学韩; 周士康

    2001-01-01

    实验测定了室温下NO2分子在519~524 nm区域的高分辨激光诱导荧光激发谱,标识了25个振动带,并作了转动分析,确定了这些带的带源、转动常数以及旋-转偶合常数等分子常数,其中有8个振动带是新发现的,对振动带的转动结构分析表明,所有得到转动标识的谱线均属于平行跃迁2B2-AX~U62A1,其中上振动能级具有B2对称类是由于电子激发态AA~U62B2与电子基态的振动能级之间的强烈相互作用所致。%The high-resolution fluorescence excitation spectrum was measured in the region 519~524 nm at room temperature. Though the spectrum is rather congested, we determined the molecular constants such as band origins and rotational and spin-rotation constants for 25 vibronic bands in the this region. Among the vibronic bands assigned there were 8 new bands reported firstly. All rotational structures analyzed are of the parallel type. It was shown from the experiment that the high lying vibration levels of ground state AX~U62A1 heavily perturbed the electronic excited state AA~U62B2.

  4. The influence of regional surface soil moisture anomalies on forest fires in Siberia observed from satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, A.; Balzter, H.; George, C.

    2009-10-01

    Forest fires are frequent in the Siberian taiga and are predicted to increase in frequency as a result of increased fire risk under drought conditions, and prolonged fire seasons caused by climate change. There is, however, some uncertainty as to the extent to which drought influences forest fire frequency at a regional scale. Here, we present an analysis of satellite derived soil moisture anomaly data from ERS-1/2 (ERS: Earth Resources Satellite) scatterometer data and burned area maps from MODIS/AVHRR/ATSR (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer/Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer/Along-Track Scanning Radiometer) over Central Siberia for the years 1992-2000. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship of remotely sensed soil moisture deviations from the long-term mean and fire within the boreal biome on a sub-continental scale. Results show that wet surface soil moisture conditions limit the extent of burned area. They can prevent the outbreak of fires but the magnitude of a negative (dry) deviation does not determine the maximum size of fire affected areas. It is known from the literature, however, that an ignition is more likely to occur under low surface wetness conditions, such as those that we observed during July and August in both permafrost and non-permafrost regions. Although the burned area under drier conditions in July is lowest over non-permafrost, the actual number of fires is as high as over continuous permafrost. Approximately 80% of all events occurred under such conditions during that month. The fire size was below 50 km2 under moist conditions. Larger burned areas have in general not been detected when the surface wetness deviation exceeded +5%.

  5. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: first results from SCUBA-2 observations of the Cepheus Flare region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattle, K.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Kirk, J. M.; Di Francesco, J.; Kirk, H.; Mottram, J. C.; Keown, J.; Buckle, J.; Beaulieu, S. F.; Berry, D. S.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Currie, M. J.; Fich, M.; Hatchell, J.; Jenness, T.; Johnstone, D.; Nutter, D.; Pineda, J. E.; Quinn, C.; Salji, C.; Tisi, S.; Walker-Smith, S.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Bastien, P.; Bresnahan, D.; Butner, H.; Chen, M.; Chrysostomou, A.; Coudé, S.; Davis, C. J.; Drabek-Maunder, E.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Fiege, J.; Friberg, P.; Friesen, R.; Fuller, G. A.; Graves, S.; Greaves, J.; Gregson, J.; Holland, W.; Joncas, G.; Knee, L. B. G.; Mairs, S.; Marsh, K.; Matthews, B. C.; Moriarty-Schieven, G.; Mowat, C.; Rawlings, J.; Richer, J.; Robertson, D.; Rosolowsky, E.; Rumble, D.; Sadavoy, S.; Thomas, H.; Tothill, N.; Viti, S.; White, G. J.; Wouterloot, J.; Yates, J.; Zhu, M.

    2017-02-01

    We present observations of the Cepheus Flare obtained as part of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) Gould Belt Legacy Survey (GBLS) with the SCUBA-2 instrument. We produce a catalogue of sources found by SCUBA-2, and separate these into starless cores and protostars. We determine masses and densities for each of our sources, using source temperatures determined by the Herschel Gould Belt Survey. We compare the properties of starless cores in four different molecular clouds: L1147/58, L1172/74, L1251 and L1228. We find that the core mass functions for each region typically show shallower-than-Salpeter behaviour. We find that L1147/58 and L1228 have a high ratio of starless cores to Class II protostars, while L1251 and L1174 have a low ratio, consistent with the latter regions being more active sites of current star formation, while the former are forming stars less actively. We determine that if modelled as thermally supported Bonnor-Ebert spheres, most of our cores have stable configurations accessible to them. We estimate the external pressures on our cores using archival 13CO velocity dispersion measurements and find that our cores are typically pressure confined, rather than gravitationally bound. We perform a virial analysis on our cores, and find that they typically cannot be supported against collapse by internal thermal energy alone, due primarily to the measured external pressures. This suggests that the dominant mode of internal support in starless cores in the Cepheus Flare is either non-thermal motions or internal magnetic fields.

  6. Tail reconnection region versus auroral activity inferred from conjugate ARTEMIS plasma sheet flow and auroral observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Y.; Lyons, L. R.; Xing, X.; Angelopoulos, V.; Donovan, E. F.; Mende, S. B.; Bonnell, J. W.; Auster, U.

    2013-09-01

    sheet flow bursts have been suggested to correspond to different types of auroral activity, such as poleward boundary intensifications (PBIs), ensuing auroral streamers, and substorms. The flow-aurora association leads to the important question of identifying the magnetotail source region for the flow bursts and how this region depends on magnetic activity. The present study uses the ARTEMIS spacecraft coordinated with conjugate ground-based auroral imager observations to identify flow bursts beyond 45 RE downtail and corresponding auroral forms. We find that quiet-time flows are directed dominantly earthward with a one-to-one correspondence with PBIs. Flow bursts during the substorm recovery phase and during steady magnetospheric convection (SMC) periods are also directed earthward, and these flows are associated with a series of PBIs/streamers lasting for tens of minutes with similar durations to that of the series of earthward flows. Presubstorm onset flows are also earthward and associated with PBIs/streamers. The earthward flows during those magnetic conditions suggest that the flow bursts, which lead to PBIs and streamers, originate from further downtail of ARTEMIS, possibly from the distant-tail neutral line (DNL) or tailward-retreated near-Earth neutral line (NENL) rather than from the nominal NENL location in the midtail. We find that tailward flows are limited primarily to the substorm expansion phase. They continue throughout the period of auroral poleward expansion, indicating that the expansion-phase flows originate from the NENL and that NENL activity is closely related to the auroral expansion of the substorm expansion phase.

  7. NANOOS, the Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observing Systems: a regional Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) for the Pacific Northwest US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, J.; Martin, D.; Kosro, M.

    2012-12-01

    NANOOS is the Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observing Systems, the Pacific Northwest Regional Association of the United States Integrated Ocean Observing System (US IOOS). User driven since its inception in 2003, this regional observing system is responding to a variety of scientific and societal needs across its coastal ocean, estuaries, and shorelines. Regional priorities have been solicited and re-affirmed through active engagement with users and stakeholders. NANOOS membership is composed of an even mix of academic, governmental, industry, and non-profit organizations, who appoint representatives to the NANOOS Governing Council who confirm the priority applications of the observing system. NANOOS regional priorities are: Maritime Operations, Regional Fisheries, Ecosystem Assessment, Coastal Hazards, and Climate. NANOOS' regional coastal ocean observing system is implemented by seven partners (three universities, three state agencies, and one industry). Together, these partners conduct the observations, modeling, data management and communication, analysis products, education and outreach activities of NANOOS. Observations, designed to span coastal ocean, shorelines, and estuaries, include physical, chemical, biological and geological measurements. To date, modeling has been more limited in scope, but has provided the system with increased coverage for some parameters. The data management and communication system for NANOOS, led by the NANOOS Visualization System (NVS) is the cornerstone of the user interaction with NANOOS. NVS gives users access to observational data, both real time and archived, as well as modeling output. Given the diversity of user needs, measurements, and the complexity of the coastal environment, the challenge for the system is large. NANOOS' successes take advantage of technological advances, including real-time data transmission, profiling buoys, gliders, HF radars, and modeling. The most profound challenges NANOOS faces stem

  8. Observational analysis of the atmosphere-land surface interactions over the TERENO pre-alpine region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Mohsen; Mauder, Matthias; Laux, Patrick; Kunstmann, Harald

    2016-04-01

    In order to examine the variability of heat fluxes and energy partitioning over complex terrain in the TERrestrial ENvironmental Observatories (TERENO) pre-alpine region, the turbulent heat fluxes and moisture at the surface layer were calculated using the eddy covariance technique. To better understand the principle characteristics of the land-surface energy balance, monthly and seasonal variations of radiation components, heat fluxes and moisture contents in the region, the measurements obtained from three eddy-covariance towers from January 2013 to December 2014 were analyzed. The diurnal, monthly and seasonal variations observed in all the radiation components as a result of the seasonal variation in the solar radiation. The diurnal variations in shortwave radiation were larger than those of longwave radiations. The highest daily value of incoming shortwave radiation (ISR, 344.2 W/m2), incoming longwave radiation (ILR, 389.3 W/m2) and outgoing longwave radiation (OLR, 439.2 W/m2) were measured in summer, while the highest daily value of outgoing shortwave radiation (OSR, 120.7 W/m2) occurred in winter due to the snow cover in the region. The ISR and OLR had the strongest seasonal and interannual variability, in particular during the summertime. The maximum (extreme) surface albedo value was measured in winter 2013 due to the heavy snowfall event. By contrast, it was lower during the warm seasons because of a darker surface (i.e. high vegetation fraction and wetter soil). The seasonal variation of the sensible heat flux (H) was stronger than that of the latent heat flux (LE) in winter, while LE had a stronger variation in summer and considered as the main consumer of available energy in summer, while the soil heat flux (G) indicated the least variation over the experimental time. In addition, the range of the seasonal diurnal cycle of net radiation (Rn) increased from winter to summer and decreased in-turned position indicating a high variation of Rn in summer

  9. Observation and Model Comparison on Precipitation response to Volcanic Aerosols in the Asian Monsoon Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Z.; Gao, C.

    2014-12-01

    Disagreement between observation and models were shown on the volcanic sulfate aerosols' effect on precipitation in Asia monsoon region. Here, we investigate it by classifying two groups of historical volcanism between AD 1300 and AD 1850 to 2, 1, and 0.5 times Pinatubo sulfate injection into the northern hemisphere (NH) stratosphere based on IVI2 and Crowley2013 volcanic reconstructions, then comparing precipitation response of BCC-CSM1 and CCSM4 model outputs under past1000 scenario to IVI2 volcanic group, and that of MIROC-ESM and MPI-ESM-P to Crowley2013 group with tree-ring reconstruction data MADA. In both groups, Superposed Epoch Analysis (SEA) of MADA and four model outputs show a drying trend over Asia monsoon regions after the NH injections and drier with larger sulfate magnitude, with a 1 or 2 year time lag in MADA comparing to the model outputs, this may result from the biological response of tree ring data that lag behind the meteorological forcing of model outputs. On the other hand, different responses to Southern Hemisphere (SH) only injections were found between the two groups as well as MADA and model outputs. Most of the results were found significant at 90% or even 95% significance level with a 10,000 Monte Carlo resampling procedure. Spatial variation of MADA show a significant drying effect in central Asia in year 1, and then move westward in year 2 and 3 after 2, 1×Pinatubo eruptions of IVI2, while a significant wetting effect in northwest Asia but drying effect in south Asia were shown in Crowley2013 group. However, model outputs did not show spatial variation, with a pattern drier in northwest than in southeast Asia along the years after the eruptions in both volcanic groups. Thus, observation and model outputs are well consistent on precipitation response to NH aerosol injections, but models may need large improvement on the response to SH aerosol injection as well as the spatial variation. Besides, opposite precipitation response to SH

  10. CUTLASS HF radar observations of high-velocity E-region echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Uspensky

    Full Text Available A short event of high-velocity E-region echo observations by the Pykkvibaer HF radar is analysed to study echo parameters and the echo relation to the Farley-Buneman plasma instability. The echoes were detected in several beams aligned closely to the magnetic L-shell direction. Two echo groups were identified: one group corresponded to the classical type 1 echoes with velocities close to the nominal ion-acoustic speed of 400 ms1 , while the other group had significantly larger velocities, of the order of 700 ms1 . The mutual relationship between the echo power, Doppler velocity, spectral width and elevation angles for these two groups was studied. Plotting of echo parameters versus slant range showed that all ~700 ms1 echoes originated from larger heights and distances of 500–700 km, while all ~400 ms1 echoes came from lower heights and from farther distances; 700–1000 km. We argue that both observed groups of echoes occurred due to the Farley-Buneman plasma instability excited by strong ( ~70 mVm1 and uniformly distributed electric fields. We show that the echo velocities for the two groups were different because the echoes were received from different heights. Such a separation of echo heights occurred due to the differing amounts of ionospheric refraction at short and large ranges. Thus, the ionospheric refraction and related altitude modulation of ionospheric parameters are the most important factors to consider, when various characteristics of E-region decametre irregularities are derived from HF radar measurements.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionospheric irregularities; plasma waves and instabilities; polar ionosphere

  11. Flare Footpoint Regions and a Surge Observed by the Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS), RHESSI, and SDO/AIA

    CERN Document Server

    Doschek, George A; Dennis, Brian R; Reep, Jeffrey W; Caspi, Amir

    2015-01-01

    The Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on the Hinode spacecraft observed flare footpoint regions coincident with a surge for a M3.7 flare observed on 25 September 2011 at N12 E33 in active region 11302. The flare was observed in spectral lines of O VI, Fe X, Fe XII, Fe XIV, Fe XV, Fe XVI, Fe XVII, Fe XXIII and Fe XXIV. The EIS observations were made coincident with hard X-ray bursts observed by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). Overlays of the RHESSI images on the EIS raster images at different wavelengths show a spatial coincidence of features in the RHESSI images with the EIS upflow and downflow regions, as well as loop-top or near-loop-top regions. A complex array of phenomena was observed including multiple evaporation regions and the surge, which was also observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) telescopes. The slit of the EIS spectrometer covered several flare footpoint regions from which evaporative upflows in Fe XX...

  12. Beyond Str\\"omgren Spheres and Wind-Blown Bubbles: An Observational Perspective on H II Region Feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Povich, Matthew S

    2012-01-01

    Massive stars produce copious quantities of ultraviolet radiation beyond the Lyman limit, photoionizing the interstellar medium (ISM) and producing H II regions. As strong sources of recombination- and forbidden-line emission, infrared continuum, and thermal (free-free) radio continuum, H II regions serve as readily-observable beacons of massive star formation in the Milky Way and external galaxies. Along with supernovae, H II regions are dominant sources of feedback in star-forming galaxies, injecting radiative and mechanical luminosity into the ISM. H II regions may prove more important than supernovae as triggers of star formation through localized compression of cold cloud cores. In this review, I give a broad overview of the structure and time-evolution of H II regions, emphasizing complications to the theoretical picture revealed by multiwavelength observations. I discuss a recent controversy surrounding the dominant feedback mechanism in 30 Doradus, the most luminous H II region in the Local Group. I s...

  13. Spitzer observations of extragalactic H II regions III: NGC 6822 and the hot star, H II region connection

    CERN Document Server

    Rubin, Robert H; Colgan, Sean W J; Dufour, Reginald J; Kader, Justin; McNabb, Ian A; Pauldrach, Adalbert W A; Weber, Johann A

    2016-01-01

    Using the short-high module of the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope, we have measured the [S IV] 10.51, [Ne II] 12.81, [Ne III] 15.56, and [S III] 18.71-micron emission lines in 9 H II regions in the dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 6822. These lines arise from the dominant ionization states of the elements neon (Ne$^{++}$, Ne$^+$) and sulphur (S$^{3+}$, S$^{++}$), thereby allowing an analysis of the neon to sulphur abundance ratio as well as the ionic abundance ratios Ne$^+$/Ne$^{++}$ and S$^{3+}$/S$^{++}$. By extending our studies of H II regions in M83 and M33 to the lower metallicity NGC 6822, we increase the reliability of the estimated Ne/S ratio. We find that the Ne/S ratio appears to be fairly universal, with not much variation about the ratio found for NGC 6822: the median (average) Ne/S ratio equals 11.6 (12.2$\\pm$0.8). This value is in contrast to Asplund et al.'s currently best estimated value for the Sun: Ne/S = 6.5. In addition, we continue to test the predicted ionizing spectral e...

  14. Communication: Photodissociation of CH{sub 3}CHO at 308 nm: Observation of H-roaming, CH{sub 3}-roaming, and transition state pathways together along the ground state surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hou-Kuan; Tsai, Po-Yu; Hung, Kai-Chan; Kasai, Toshio; Lin, King-Chuen, E-mail: kclin@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan and Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2015-01-28

    Following photodissociation of acetaldehyde (CH{sub 3}CHO) at 308 nm, the CO(v = 1–4) fragment is acquired using time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy. The CO(v = 1) rotational distribution shows a bimodal feature; the low- and high-J components result from H-roaming around CH{sub 3}CO core and CH{sub 3}-roaming around CHO radical, respectively, in consistency with a recent assignment by Kable and co-workers (Lee et al., Chem. Sci. 5, 4633 (2014)). The H-roaming pathway disappears at the CO(v ≥ 2) states, because of insufficient available energy following bond-breaking of H + CH{sub 3}CO. By analyzing the CH{sub 4} emission spectrum, we obtained a bimodal vibrational distribution; the low-energy component is ascribed to the transition state (TS) pathway, consistent with prediction by quasiclassical trajectory calculations, while the high-energy component results from H- and CH{sub 3}-roamings. A branching fraction of H-roaming/CH{sub 3}-roaming/TS contribution is evaluated to be (8% ± 3%)/(68% ± 10%)/(25% ± 5%), in which the TS pathway was observed for the first time. The three pathways proceed concomitantly along the electronic ground state surface.

  15. Optical multicolor polarization observations in the region of the open cluster NGC 5749

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergne, M. M.; Feinstein, C.; Martínez, R.

    2007-02-01

    We present (UBVRI ) multicolor linear polarimetric data for 31 of the brightest stars in the area of the open cluster NGC 5749 considered to study the properties of the interstellar medium (ISM) towards the cluster. Our data yield a mean polarization percentage of PV ˜ 1.7%, close to the polarization value produced by the ISM with normal efficiency (P(%)=3.5 {E(B-V)}0.8) for a mean color excess of EB-V=0.42. The mean angle of polarization vectors, θ=74°, agrees quite well with the expected angle produced by dust particles aligned in the direction of the galactic disk (and the magnetic field) in the region. Our analysis indicates that the visual absorption affecting the stars in NGC 5749 is partially produced by a dust layer located up to 300 pc from the Sun and also by a second layer of dust closer to the cluster (located at least at 700 pc). The observed photometry and our polarization data are consistent with the existence of dust within the cluster. We also show in this work how polarimetry could be an excellent technique for identifying nonmember stars. Based on observations obtained at Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO), operated under agreement between the CONICET and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba, and San Juan, Argentina. Table 1 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/462/621

  16. The Gumbel hypothesis test for left censored observations using regional earthquake records as an example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Thompson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Annual maximum (AM time series are incomplete (i.e., censored when no events are included above the assumed censoring threshold (i.e., magnitude of completeness. We introduce a distrtibutional hypothesis test for left-censored Gumbel observations based on the probability plot correlation coefficient (PPCC. Critical values of the PPCC hypothesis test statistic are computed from Monte-Carlo simulations and are a function of sample size, censoring level, and significance level. When applied to a global catalog of earthquake observations, the left-censored Gumbel PPCC tests are unable to reject the Gumbel hypothesis for 45 of 46 seismic regions. We apply four different field significance tests for combining individual tests into a collective hypothesis test. None of the field significance tests are able to reject the global hypothesis that AM earthquake magnitudes arise from a Gumbel distribution. Because the field significance levels are not conclusive, we also compute the likelihood that these field significance tests are unable to reject the Gumbel model when the samples arise from a more complex distributional alternative. A power study documents that the censored Gumbel PPCC test is unable to reject some important and viable Generalized Extreme Value (GEV alternatives. Thus, we cannot rule out the possibility that the global AM earthquake time series could arise from a GEV distribution with a finite upper bound, also known as a reverse Weibull distribution. Our power study also indicates that the binomial and uniform field significance tests are substantially more powerful than the more commonly used Bonferonni and false discovery rate multiple comparison procedures.

  17. Analysis on observational results of Pi2 geomagnetic pulsation in Henan region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A measurement profile consisted of 5 sites from Xinyang to Tangyin in Henan Province was set up in September of 1996 to carry out simultaneous observation of Pi2 geomagnetic pulsations. Simultaneity of Pi2 geomagnetic pulsation occurrence along the N-S profile was investigated. Results of analysis pointed out that Pi2 geomagnetic pulsations appeared at first at the site of Xinyang at the southern end of the profile, the later the same Pi2 geomagnetic pulsation appeared, the more north the site was at. Apparent propagation speed of Pi2 in N-S direction in the region is about 140 km/s. Because Pi2 geomagnetic pulsation varying with time is of instability, and based on characteristics that basic wavelet can be dilated and localized, we selected proper basic wavelet form and by means of wavelet transform to analyze the changes of periods and amplitudes of main periodic components included in Pi2 pulsations with time. The results show that there existed complex form in periods and amplitudes of wavelet varying with time.

  18. VLA observations of ammonia in high-mass star formation regions

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Xing; Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Wang, Junzhi; Gu, Qiusheng

    2014-01-01

    We report systematic mapping observations of the NH$_{3}$ (1,1) and (2,2) inversion lines towards 62 high-mass star-forming regions using VLA in its D and DnC array configurations. The VLA images cover a spatial dynamic range from 40$"$ to 3$"$, allowing us to trace gas kinematics from $\\sim$1 pc scales to $\\lesssim$0.1 pc scales. Based on the NH$_3$ morphology and the infrared nebulosity on 1\\,pc scales, we categorize three sub-classes in the sample: filaments, hot cores, and NH$_3$ dispersed sources. The ubiquitous gas filaments found on 1 pc scales have a typical width of $\\sim$0.1\\,pc and often contain regularly spaced fragments along the major axis. The spacing of the fragments and the column densities are consistent with the turbulent supported fragmentation of cylinders. Several sources show multiple filaments that converge toward a center, where the velocity field in the filaments is consistent with gas flows. We derive rotational temperature maps for the entire sample. For the three hot core sources,...

  19. The 3D structure of an active region filament as extrapolated from photospheric and chromospheric observations

    CERN Document Server

    Chaouche, L Yelles; Pillet, V Martínez; Moreno-Insertis, F

    2012-01-01

    The 3D structure of an active region (AR) filament is studied using nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolations based on simultaneous observations at a photospheric and a chromospheric height. To that end, we used the Si I 10827 \\AA\\ line and the He I 10830 \\AA\\ triplet obtained with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter (TIP) at the VTT (Tenerife). The two extrapolations have been carried out independently from each other and their respective spatial domains overlap in a considerable height range. This opens up new possibilities for diagnostics in addition to the usual ones obtained through a single extrapolation from, typically, a photospheric layer. Among those possibilities, this method allows the determination of an average formation height of the He I 10830 \\AA\\ signal of \\approx 2 Mm above the surface of the sun. It allows, as well, to cross-check the obtained 3D magnetic structures in view of verifying a possible deviation from the force- free condition especially at the photosphere. The extrapolati...

  20. Observation of associated production of a Z boson with a D meson in the forward region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaij, R. [Nikhef National Institute for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Adeva, B. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Adinolfi, M. [H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Bristol (United Kingdom); Affolder, A. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Collaboration: The LHCb Collaboration; and others

    2014-04-14

    A search for associated production of a Z boson with an open charm meson is presented using a data sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb{sup −1} of proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, collected by the LHCb experiment. Seven candidate events for associated production of a Z boson with a D{sup 0} meson and four candidate events for a Z boson with a D{sup +} meson are observed with a combined significance of 5.1 standard deviations. The production cross-sections in the forward region are measured to be σ{sub Z→μ{sup +}μ{sup −},D{sup 0}} = 2.50±1.12±0.22 pb and σ{sub Z→μ{sup +}μ{sup −},D{sup +}} = 0.44±0.23±0.03 pb, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic.

  1. Observations of the north polar region of Mars from the Mars orbiter laser altimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuber, M. T.; Smith, D. E.; Solomon, S. C.; Abshire, J. B.; Afzal, R. S.; Aharonson, O.; Fishbaugh, K.; Ford, P. G.; Frey, H. V.; Garvin, J. B.; Head, J. W.; Ivanov, A. B.; Johnson, C. L.; Muhleman, D. O.; Neumann, G. A.; Pettengill, G. H.; Phillips, R. J.; Sun, X.; Zwally, H. J.; Banerdt, W. B.; Duxbury, T. C.

    1998-01-01

    Elevations from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) have been used to construct a precise topographic map of the martian north polar region. The northern ice cap has a maximum elevation of 3 kilometers above its surroundings but lies within a 5-kilometer-deep hemispheric depression that is contiguous with the area into which most outflow channels emptied. Polar cap topography displays evidence of modification by ablation, flow, and wind and is consistent with a primarily H2O composition. Correlation of topography with images suggests that the cap was more spatially extensive in the past. The cap volume of 1.2 x 10(6) to 1.7 x 10(6) cubic kilometers is about half that of the Greenland ice cap. Clouds observed over the polar cap are likely composed of CO2 that condensed out of the atmosphere during northern hemisphere winter. Many clouds exhibit dynamical structure likely caused by the interaction of propagating wave fronts with surface topography.

  2. The systematic radial downflow in the transition region of the quiet sun from limb-to-limb observations of the C IV resonance lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottman, Gary J.; Hassler, Donald D.; Jones, Michael D.; Orrall, Frank Q.

    1990-08-01

    This paper presents absolute velocities of C IV 1548, 1550 nm measured as a function of position along the solar equator, which was free of both active regions and coronal holes, and uniformly representative of the quiet sun. These observations were made with moderate spatial resolution (18 arcsec) using an EUV spectrometer dedicated to measuring absolute wavelengths (velocities) by direct comparison with a platinum spectrum generated on board the sounding rocket. On the assumption that systematic horizontal motions cancel statistically so that the line-of-sight velocities approach zero at the limb, a net radial downflow of 7.5 + or - 1.0 km/sec was found. The assumption was tested using the wavelength reference and found to be valid within the absolute accuracy of the rest wavelengths of the C IV lines.

  3. Multi-wavelength, Multi-scale Observations of Outflows in Star-Forming Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plunkett, Adele Laurie Dennis

    During the early stages of star formation, an embedded protostar accretes mass and simultaneously expels mass and angular momentum in the form of a bipolar outflow. In the common case of clustered star formation, outflows likely impact their surrounding environment and influence subsequent star formation. Numerical simulations have shown that outflows can sustain turbulence and maintain a cluster in quasi-equilibrium; alternatively, it was proposed that outflows may trigger rather than regulate or inhibit star formation. Observations of outflows and their impact on clusters are challenging because they must probe spatial scales over several orders of magnitude --- from the size of a core (a few hundred AU, or N ~ 10-3 pc) to a cluster (a few pc) --- and previous works generally focused on one scale or the other. This thesis incorporates high-resolution, high-sensitivity interferometry observations (with millimeter/sub-millimeter wavelengths) complemented by observations obtained using single dish telescopes in order to assess molecular outflow properties and their cumulative impact in two young protostellar clusters: Serpens South and NGC 1333. Based on these case studies, I develop an evolutionary scenario for clustered star formation spanning the ages of the two clusters, about 0.1 - 1 Myr. Within this scenario, outflows in both Serpens South and NGC 1333 provide sufficient energy to sustain turbulence early in the protocluster formation process. In neither cluster do outflows provide enough energy to counter the gravitational potential energy and disrupt the entire cluster. However, most of the mass in outflows in both clusters have velocities greater than the escape velocity, and therefore the relative importance of outflow-driven turbulence compared with gravitational potential likely changes with time as ambient gas escapes. We estimate that enough gas mass will escape via outflows in Serpens South so that it will come to resemble NGC 1333 in terms of its

  4. Rice Crop Monitoring by Earth Observation Data in the Asian Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyoshi, K.; Sobue, S.; Tomiyama, N.; Okumura, T.; Rakwatin, P.

    2012-12-01

    Food security is a critical issue for the international community. In June 2011, the meeting of G20 agriculture ministers was held to discuss global food security and they agreed on an "Action Plan on Food Price Volatility and Agriculture". This plan includes a GEO Global Agricultural Monitoring (GEO-GLAM) initiative which utilizes remote sensing to improve projections of crop production and weather forecasting. Hence, satellite remote sensing is expected to contribute national, regional and global food security through the systematic and efficient collection of food security related information such as agro-meteorological condition, crop growth or yield estimation. Food security related information is utilized to take mitigation strategies or policies to manage food shortages or trading, and ensure food security. Especially in Asia, rice is the most important cereal crop because Asian countries are responsible for approximately 90% of the world rice productions and consumptions. There- fore, Asian countries are expected to contribute GLAM through the construction of rice crop monitoring system. We demonstrated the estimation of rice production, the crop phenology monitoring by Earth Observation (EO) data. The aim of this study is to establish a prototype system designed to provide paddy rice area and yield estimation. Generally, crop yield estimation is consist of two components, cultivated area and yield per area. The cultivated areas of paddy field are detected by the seasonal pattern of SAR data over paddy field. This means paddy field is filled with water just before planting rice, then covered by dense vegetation in growing season. The paddy filed map was derived from the seasonal Advanced Land Observation Satellite (ALOS) Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) data with a simple threshold method. Then, to estimate rice productivity, we applied a simple rice crop model. The input data to the model are physical and chemical properties of

  5. Retrieving Neptune's aerosol properties from Keck OSIRIS observations. I. Dark regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luszcz-Cook, S. H.; de Kleer, K.; de Pater, I.; Adamkovics, M.; Hammel, H. B.

    2016-09-01

    We present and analyze three-dimensional data cubes of Neptune from the OSIRIS integral-field spectrograph on the 10-m W.M. Keck II telescope, from 26 July 2009. These data have a spatial resolution of 0.035/pixel and spectral resolution of R ∼3800 in the H (1.47-1.80 μm) and K (1.97-2.38 μm) broad bands. We focus our analysis on regions of Neptune's atmosphere that are near-infrared dark - that is, free of discrete bright cloud features. We use a forward model coupled to a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm to retrieve properties of Neptune's aerosol structure and methane profile above ∼4 bar in these near-infrared dark regions. We construct a set of high signal-to-noise spectra spanning a range of viewing geometries to constrain the vertical structure of Neptune's aerosols in a cloud-free latitude band from 2-12°N. We find that Neptune's cloud opacity at these wavelengths is dominated by a compact, optically thick cloud layer with a base near 3 bar. Using the pyDISORT algorithm for the radiative transfer and assuming a Henyey-Greenstein phase function, we observe this cloud to be composed of low albedo (single scattering albedo = 0.45-0.01+0.01), forward scattering (asymmetry parameter g = 0.50-0.02+0.02) particles, with an assumed characteristic size of ∼1μm. Above this cloud, we require an aerosol layer of smaller (∼0.1μm) particles forming a vertically extended haze, which reaches from the upper troposphere (0.59-0.03+0.04 bar) into the stratosphere. The particles in this haze are brighter (single scattering albedo = 0.91-0.05+0.06) and more isotropically scattering (asymmetry parameter g = 0.24-0.03+0.02) than those in the deep cloud. When we extend our analysis to 18 cloud-free locations from 20°N to 87°S, we observe that the optical depth in aerosols above 0.5 bar decreases by a factor of 2-3 or more at mid- and high-southern latitudes relative to low latitudes. We also consider Neptune's methane (CH4) profile, and find that our retrievals

  6. Pore-pressure sensitivities to dynamic strains: observations in active tectonic regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbour, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Triggered seismicity arising from dynamic stresses is often explained by the Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion, where elevated pore pressures reduce the effective strength of faults in fluid-saturated rock. The seismic response of a fluid-rock system naturally depends on its hydro-mechanical properties, but accurately assessing how pore-fluid pressure responds to applied stress over large scales in situ remains a challenging task; hence, spatial variations in response are not well understood, especially around active faults. Here I analyze previously unutilized records of dynamic strain and pore-pressure from regional and teleseismic earthquakes at Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) stations from 2006 through 2012 to investigate variations in response along the Pacific/North American tectonic plate boundary. I find robust scaling-response coefficients between excess pore pressure and dynamic strain at each station that are spatially correlated: around the San Andreas and San Jacinto fault systems, the response is lowest in regions of the crust undergoing the highest rates of secular shear strain. PBO stations in the Parkfield instrument cluster are at comparable distances to the San Andreas fault (SAF), and spatial variations there follow patterns in dextral creep rates along the fault, with the highest response in the actively creeping section, which is consistent with a narrowing zone of strain accumulation seen in geodetic velocity profiles. At stations in the San Juan Bautista (SJB) and Anza instrument clusters, the response depends non-linearly on the inverse fault-perpendicular distance, with the response decreasing towards the fault; the SJB cluster is at the northern transition from creeping-to-locked behavior along the SAF, where creep rates are at moderate to low levels, and the Anza cluster is around the San Jacinto fault, where to date there have been no statistically significant creep rates observed at the surface. These results suggest that the strength

  7. VELOCITY MEASUREMENTS FOR A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION FAN LOOP FROM HINODE/EIS OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, P. R. [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); O' Dwyer, B.; Mason, H. E. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-01

    The velocity pattern of a fan loop structure within a solar active region over the temperature range 0.15-1.5 MK is derived using data from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board the Hinode satellite. The loop is aligned toward the observer's line of sight and shows downflows (redshifts) of around 15 km s{sup -1} up to a temperature of 0.8 MK, but for temperatures of 1.0 MK and above the measured velocity shifts are consistent with no net flow. This velocity result applies over a projected spatial distance of 9 Mm and demonstrates that the cooler, redshifted plasma is physically disconnected from the hotter, stationary plasma. A scenario in which the fan loops consist of at least two groups of 'strands'-one cooler and downflowing, the other hotter and stationary-is suggested. The cooler strands may represent a later evolutionary stage of the hotter strands. A density diagnostic of Mg VII was used to show that the electron density at around 0.8 MK falls from 3.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} cm{sup -3} at the loop base, to 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} cm{sup -3} at a projected height of 15 Mm. A filling factor of 0.2 is found at temperatures close to the formation temperature of Mg VII (0.8 MK), confirming that the cooler, downflowing plasma occupies only a fraction of the apparent loop volume. The fan loop is rooted within a so-called outflow region that displays low intensity and blueshifts of up to 25 km s{sup -1} in Fe XII {lambda}195.12 (formed at 1.5 MK), in contrast to the loop's redshifts of 15 km s{sup -1} at 0.8 MK. A new technique for obtaining an absolute wavelength calibration for the EIS instrument is presented and an instrumental effect, possibly related to a distorted point-spread function, that affects velocity measurements is identified.

  8. Observational studies on the near-infrared unidentified emission bands in galactic H II regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Tamami I.; Onaka, Takashi; Sakon, Itsuki; Ohsawa, Ryou; Bell, Aaron C. [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Ishihara, Daisuke [Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Shimonishi, Takashi, E-mail: morii@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada Kobe 657-8501 Japan (Japan)

    2014-03-20

    Using a large collection of near-infrared spectra (2.5-5.4 μm) of Galactic H II regions and H II region-like objects, we perform a systematic investigation of astronomical polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features. Thirty-six objects were observed using the infrared camera on board the AKARI satellite as a part of a director's time program. In addition to the well known 3.3-3.6 μm features, most spectra show a relatively weak emission feature at 5.22 μm with sufficient signal-to-noise ratios, which we identify as the PAH 5.25 μm band (previously reported). By careful analysis, we find good correlations between the 5.25 μm band and both the aromatic hydrocarbon feature at 3.3 μm and the aliphatic hydrocarbon features at around 3.4-3.6 μm. The present results give us convincing evidence that the astronomical 5.25 μm band is associated with C-H vibrations, as suggested by previous studies, and show its potential to probe the PAH size distribution. The analysis also shows that the aliphatic-to-aromatic ratio of I {sub 3.4-3.6} {sub μm}/I {sub 3.3} {sub μm} decreases against the ratio of the 3.7 μm continuum intensity to the 3.3 μm band, I {sub cont,} {sub 3.7} {sub μm}/I {sub 3.3} {sub μm}, which is an indicator of the ionization fraction of PAHs. The midinfrared color of I {sub 9} {sub μm}/I {sub 18} {sub μm} also declines steeply against the ratio of the hydrogen recombination line Brα at 4.05 μm to the 3.3 μm band, I {sub Brα}/I {sub 3.3} {sub μm}. These facts indicate possible dust processing inside or at the boundary of ionized gas.

  9. Tilt Angle and Footpoint Separation of Small and Large Bipolar Sunspot Regions Observed with HMI

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintock, B. H.; Norton, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate bipolar sunspot regions and how tilt angle and footpoint separation vary during emergence and decay. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory collects data at a higher cadence than historical records and allows for a detailed analysis of regions over their lifetimes. We sample the umbral tilt angle, footpoint separation, and umbral area of 235 bipolar sunspot regions in Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager—Debrecen Data with an hourly cadence. We use the time when the umbral area peaks as time zero to distinguish between the emergence and decay periods of each region and we limit our analysis of tilt and separation behavior over time to within ±96 hr of time zero. Tilt angle evolution is distinctly different for regions with small (≈30 MSH), midsize (≈50 MSH), and large (≈110 MSH) maximum umbral areas, with 45 and 90 MSH being useful divisions for separating the groups. At the peak umbral area, we determine median tilt angles for small (7.°6), midsize (5.°9), and large (9.°3) regions. Within ±48 hr of the time of peak umbral area, large regions steadily increase in tilt angle, midsize regions are nearly constant, and small regions show evidence of negative tilt during emergence. A period of growth in footpoint separation occurs over a 72-hr period for all of the regions from roughly 40 to 70 Mm. The smallest bipoles (Jaramillo et al. (2015) results that the sunspots appear to be two distinct populations.

  10. A New Interpretation of the Bipolar HII Region S106 from HCN J = 3 - 2 Mapping Observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng-Li Qin; Jun-Jie Wang; Gang Zhao; Martin Miller

    2005-01-01

    The first mapping observations of the bipolar HII region S106 in HCN J = 3-2 line were made by KOSMA submillimeter telescope in April, 2004. The results show that there is a bipolar cloud core is perpendicular to the IRS4 and that the flat structure of molecular cloud core is perpendicular to the axis of the outflow. This image roughly corresponds to the optical image where a dark lane bisects the bipolar HII region. Together with the optical, infrared and radio data, we conclude that the central UC HII region, and that a neutral disk is responsible for the bipolar HII region and the outflow.

  11. Experiences in Applying Earth Observing Satellite Technology in SERVIR Regions with an Emphasis on Disasters: Successes, Lessons and Paths Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Earth observing satellites offer a unique perspective of our environment from the vantage point of space. Repeated measurements of the Earths subsystems such as the biosphere, atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere, and of humans interactions with their environments, allow for a better understanding of Earth system processes, and they can provide input for decision making in areas of environmental management and disaster risk reduction. SERVIR is a joint initiative of the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the US Agency for International Development (USAID) that began in 2005 and has been active in applying Earth observations for sustainable development in many regions around the world, recently the Lower Mekong and West Africa regions. This talk will highlight some successes achieved and lessons learned through SERVIR in Central America, Eastern Southern Africa, and the Hindu Kush-Himalaya region, focusing on disasters. We will also present opportunities for enhanced decision making with Earth observations and geospatial technologies in the Lower Mekong region.

  12. Annual consultation prevalence of regional musculoskeletal problems in primary care: an observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Regional musculoskeletal pain such as back or shoulder pain are commonly reported symptoms in the community. The extent of consultation to primary care with such problems is unknown as a variety of labels may be used to record such consultations. The objective was to classify musculoskeletal morbidity codes used in routine primary care by body region, and to determine the annual consultation prevalence of regional musculoskeletal problems. Methods Musculoskeletal codes within the Read morbidity Code system were identified and grouped by relevant body region by four GPs. Consultations with these codes were then extracted from the recorded consultations at twelve general practices contributing to a general practice consultation database (CiPCA). Annual consultation prevalence per 10,000 registered persons for the year 2006 was determined, stratified by age and gender, for problems in individual regions and for problems affecting multiple regions. Results 5,908 musculoskeletal codes were grouped into regions. One in seven of all recorded consultations were for a musculoskeletal problem. The back was the most common individual region recorded (591 people consulting per 10,000 registered persons), followed by the knee (324/10,000). In children, the foot was the most common region. Different age and gender trends were apparent across body regions although women generally had higher consultation rates. The annual consultation-based prevalence for problems encompassing more than one region was 556 people consulting per 10,000 registered persons and increased in older people and in females. Conclusions There is an extensive and varied regional musculoskeletal workload in primary care. Musculoskeletal problems are a major constituent of general practice. The output from this study can be used as a resource for planning future studies. PMID:20598124

  13. Observations of trace gases, photolysis rate coefficients and model simulations over semi-arid region, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingaswamy, A. P.; Arafath, S. Md; Balakrishnaiah, G.; Rama Gopal, K.; Siva Kumar Reddy, N.; Raja Obul Reddy, K.; Reddy, R. R.; Chakradhar Rao, T.

    2017-06-01

    Continuous ground-based measurements of CO, SO2 and NO2 were carried out in a semi-arid rural area, Anantapur [14.62 0N, 77.65 0E], Southern India, for the period January 2012-December 2012. The maximum CO concentration was observed in winter (310 ± 17 ppbv) followed by summer (180 ± 21 ppbv) and post monsoon (174 ± 20 ppbv), while the minimum in monsoon (72 ± 9 ppbv). Seasonal mean NO2/NOx ratios for monsoon, post monsoon, winter and summer were about 0.88, 0.91, 0.76 and 0.80 respectively, indicating a higher conversion of NO to NO2 over the measurement site. Monthly mean low SO2 mixing ratio was found (0.46 ± 0.02 ppbv) in monsoon and high (2.42 ± 0.21 ppbv) in winter. Keeping the emissions aside, the levels of CO, SO2 and NO2 were influenced by meteorology, urban effects and trans-boundary transport in the lower troposphere. Atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) had the good correlation coefficient (R = 0.76) with solar radiation during daytime, while it was mainly correlated with wind speed during night time (R = 0.42). Diurnal trend of atmospheric visibility was found to be maximum during noon times at around (14:00-16:00 h) about 76 k.m. and minimum during morning periods (06:00-08:00 h) about 45 k.m. A strong positive correlation was observed between BC and CO (R = 0.71) with an average slope, suggesting common or proximate sources likely to be traffic emissions contribution for the production of BC and CO. The SO2/NOx and CO/NOx study were strongly suggested that mobile sources were larger contributors over the site and the evidence of transport of emissions from other surrounding regions. Tropospheric Ultraviolet Visible (TUV) radiative transfer model was used to calculate the Photolysis rate coefficients (J(O3), J(NO2)). Chemical box model (NCAR-MM) was used to simulate diurnal variation of CO and the results were reported.

  14. Very large array observations of ammonia in high-mass star formation regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xing; Gu, Qiusheng [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210093 (China); Zhang, Qizhou [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Liu, Hauyu Baobab [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Wang, Junzhi [Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200030 (China)

    2014-08-01

    We report systematic mapping observations of the NH{sub 3} (1, 1) and (2, 2) inversion lines toward 62 high-mass star-forming regions using the Very Large Array (VLA) in its D and DnC array configurations. The VLA images cover a spatial dynamic range from 40'' to 3'', allowing us to trace gas kinematics from ∼1 pc scales to ≲0.1 pc scales. Based on the NH{sub 3} morphology and the infrared nebulosity on 1 pc scales, we categorize three subclasses in the sample: filaments, hot cores, and NH{sub 3}-dispersed sources. The ubiquitous gas filaments found on 1 pc scales have a typical width of ∼0.1 pc and often contain regularly spaced fragments along the major axis. The spacing of the fragments and the column densities is consistent with the turbulent supported fragmentation of cylinders. Several sources show multiple filaments that converge toward a center where the velocity field in the filaments is consistent with gas flows. We derive rotational temperature maps for the entire sample. For the three hot core sources, we find a projected radial temperature distribution that is best fit by power-law indices from –0.18 to –0.35. We identify 174 velocity-coherent ∼0.1 pc scale dense cores from the entire sample. The mean physical properties for these cores are 1.1 km s{sup –1} in intrinsic linewidth, 18 K in NH{sub 3} rotational temperature, 2.3 × 10{sup 15} cm{sup –2} in NH{sub 3} gas column density, and 67 M{sub ☉} in molecular mass. The dense cores identified from the filamentary sources are closer to being virialized. Dense cores in the other two categories of sources appear to be dynamically unstable.

  15. Observational study of admission and triage decisions for patients referred to a regional intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, D C

    2011-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to identify factors associated with decisions concerning triage and admission to the intensive care unit and to describe the outcome of patients referred to intensive care unit for admission. The study was a single-centre, prospective, observational study. It was performed in the general intensive care unit of a tertiary regional hospital, over the period of February to June 2009. The patients were non-elective, acute medical in-patients. For 100 patients referred, only 36 were admitted to the intensive care unit. The remaining 64 were declined admission: nine were declined admission because they were assessed as too sick to benefit, 41 were declined admission because they were assessed as too well to benefit and 14 were deemed to potentially benefit from intensive care unit admission but were not admitted ('triage'). Patients most likely to receive triage decisions were medical in-patients who had expressed wishes about end-of-life care, who were functionally limited with co-morbid conditions affecting their performance status. Patients referred by Resident Medical Officers were also more likely to receive a triage decision. Age, gender Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status, diagnostic category and reason for referral did not impact on admission or triage decisions. Bed status in intensive care unit at the time of referral affected neither admission nor triage decisions. Hospital mortality in patients deemed too well to benefit from intensive care unit was 7.3%, suggesting that all patients referred for consideration of admission to intensive care unit should be classified as 'high risk'.

  16. Etiology of Pancytopenia: An observation from a referral medical institution of Eastern Region of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senjuti Dasgupta

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Aplastic anemia was found to be the most common cause of pancytopenia in this study, which is in contrast to studies conducted from other regions of India. Delineation of etiologies of pancytopenia in various regions can help in defining diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, which is expected to contribute toward the better management of such patients.

  17. X-ray observations of the Sagittarius D HII region toward the Galactic center with Suzaku

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sawada, M.; Tsujimoto, M.; Koyama, K.; Law, C.J.; Tsuru, T.G.; Hyodo, Y.

    2009-01-01

    We present a Suzaku X-ray study of the Sagittarius D (Sgr D) HII region in the Galactic center region. Two 18' × 18' images by the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (XIS) encompass the entire Sgr D complex. Thanks to the low background, XIS discovered two diffuse sources with low surface brightness and obt

  18. Polarization switching in vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers observed at constant active region temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Regalado, J.; Chilla, J. L. A.; Rocca, J. J.; Brusenbach, P.

    1997-06-01

    Polarization switching in gain-guided, vertical-cavity, surface-emitting lasers was studied as a function of the active region temperature. We show that polarization switching occurs even when the active region temperature is kept constant during fast pulse low duty cycle operation. This temperature independent polarization switching phenomenon is explained in terms of a recently developed model.

  19. TILT ANGLE AND FOOTPOINT SEPARATION OF SMALL AND LARGE BIPOLAR SUNSPOT REGIONS OBSERVED WITH HMI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClintock, B. H. [University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, 4350 (Australia); Norton, A. A., E-mail: u1049686@umail.usq.edu.au, E-mail: aanorton@stanford.edu [HEPL, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA 94305 (United States)

    2016-02-10

    We investigate bipolar sunspot regions and how tilt angle and footpoint separation vary during emergence and decay. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory collects data at a higher cadence than historical records and allows for a detailed analysis of regions over their lifetimes. We sample the umbral tilt angle, footpoint separation, and umbral area of 235 bipolar sunspot regions in Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager—Debrecen Data with an hourly cadence. We use the time when the umbral area peaks as time zero to distinguish between the emergence and decay periods of each region and we limit our analysis of tilt and separation behavior over time to within ±96 hr of time zero. Tilt angle evolution is distinctly different for regions with small (≈30 MSH), midsize (≈50 MSH), and large (≈110 MSH) maximum umbral areas, with 45 and 90 MSH being useful divisions for separating the groups. At the peak umbral area, we determine median tilt angles for small (7.°6), midsize (5.°9), and large (9.°3) regions. Within ±48 hr of the time of peak umbral area, large regions steadily increase in tilt angle, midsize regions are nearly constant, and small regions show evidence of negative tilt during emergence. A period of growth in footpoint separation occurs over a 72-hr period for all of the regions from roughly 40 to 70 Mm. The smallest bipoles (<9 MSH) are outliers in that they do not obey Joy's law and have a much smaller footpoint separation. We confirm the Muñoz-Jaramillo et al. results that the sunspots appear to be two distinct populations.

  20. Laser induced incandescence determination of the ratio of the soot absorption functions at 532 nm and 1064 nm in the nucleation zone of a low pressure premixed sooting flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cléon, G.; Amodeo, T.; Faccinetto, A.; Desgroux, P.

    2011-08-01

    In this work, the two-excitation wavelength laser induced incandescence (LII) method has been applied in a low-pressure premixed methane/oxygen/nitrogen flame (equivalence ratio 2.32) to determine the variation of the ratio of the soot absorption functions at 532 nm and 1064 nm E( m,532 nm)/ E( m,1064 nm) along the flame. This method relies on the comparison of LII signals measured upon two different excitation wavelengths (here 532 nm and 1064 nm) and with laser fluences selected in such a way that the soot particles are equally laser-heated. The comparison of the laser fluences at 532 nm and 1064 nm leads to an easy determination of E( m,532 nm)/ E( m,1064 nm). The reliability of the method is demonstrated for the first time in a low pressure flame in which the soot nucleation zone can be spatially resolved and which contains soot particles acting differently with the laser fluence according to their residence time in the flame. The method is then applied to determine the profile of E( m,532 nm)/ E( m,1064 nm) along the flame. A very important decrease of this ratio is observed in the region of nascent soot, while the ratio remains constant at high distance above the burner. Implication on temperature determination from spectrally resolved measurement of flame emission is studied.

  1. Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patell, Hilla

    2016-01-01

    In order to achieve the goal of observation, preparation of the adult, the observer, is necessary. This preparation, says Hilla Patell, requires us to "have an appreciation of the significance of the child's spontaneous activities and a more thorough understanding of the child's needs." She discusses the growth of both the desire to…

  2. Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kripalani, Lakshmi A.

    2016-01-01

    The adult who is inexperienced in the art of observation may, even with the best intentions, react to a child's behavior in a way that hinders instead of helping the child's development. Kripalani outlines the need for training and practice in observation in order to "understand the needs of the children and...to understand how to remove…

  3. DIFFRACTION, REFRACTION, AND REFLECTION OF AN EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET WAVE OBSERVED DURING ITS INTERACTIONS WITH REMOTE ACTIVE REGIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen Yuandeng; Liu Yu; Zhao Ruijuan; Tian Zhanjun [Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Su Jiangtao [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Li Hui [Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Shibata, Kazunari, E-mail: ydshen@ynao.ac.cn [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Kyoto 6078471 (Japan)

    2013-08-20

    We present observations of the diffraction, refraction, and reflection of a global extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave propagating in the solar corona. These intriguing phenomena are observed when the wave interacts with two remote active regions, and together they exhibit properties of an EUV wave. When the wave approached AR11465, it became weaker and finally disappeared in the active region, but a few minutes later a new wavefront appeared behind the active region, and it was not concentric with the incoming wave. In addition, a reflected wave was also simultaneously observed on the wave incoming side. When the wave approached AR11459, it transmitted through the active region directly and without reflection. The formation of the new wavefront and the transmission could be explained with diffraction and refraction effects, respectively. We propose that the different behaviors observed during the interactions may be caused by different speed gradients at the boundaries of the two active regions. We find that the EUV wave formed ahead of a group of expanding loops a few minutes after the start of the loops' expansion, which represents the initiation of the associated coronal mass ejection (CME). Based on these results, we conclude that the EUV wave should be a nonlinear magnetosonic wave or shock driven by the associated CME, which propagated faster than the ambient fast mode speed and gradually slowed down to an ordinary linear wave. Our observations support the hybrid model that includes both fast wave and slow non-wave components.

  4. Laser hypersensitisation using 266nm light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Henrik Rokkjær; Canning, J.; Kristensen, Martin

    2005-01-01

    UV hypersensitisation using CW 266 nm light on hydrogenated Ge-doped fibre is reported. The optimum sensitisation fluence is found to be in the range of 5 to 10 kJ/cm2, coinciding with previous results obtained using 355 nm light, indicating the same end-process used in the photochemical reaction....... We also report the observation of type IA behaviour using this wavelength....

  5. Spitzer observations of dust emission from H II regions in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, Ian W. [Now at Institute for Astrophysical Research, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA. (United States); Evans, Jessica Marie; Xue, Rui; Chu, You-Hua; Gruendl, Robert A.; Segura-Cox, Dominique M., E-mail: ianws@bu.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Massive stars can alter physical conditions and properties of their ambient interstellar dust grains via radiative heating and shocks. The H II regions in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) offer ideal sites to study the stellar energy feedback effects on dust because stars can be resolved, and the galaxy's nearly face-on orientation allows us to unambiguously associate H II regions with their ionizing massive stars. The Spitzer Space Telescope survey of the LMC provides multi-wavelength (3.6-160 μm) photometric data of all H II regions. To investigate the evolution of dust properties around massive stars, we have analyzed spatially resolved IR dust emission from two classical H II regions (N63 and N180) and two simple superbubbles (N70 and N144) in the LMC. We produce photometric spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of numerous small subregions for each region based on its stellar distributions and nebular morphologies. We use DustEM dust emission model fits to characterize the dust properties. Color-color diagrams and model fits are compared with the radiation field (estimated from photometric and spectroscopic surveys). Strong radial variations of SEDs can be seen throughout the regions, reflecting the available radiative heating. Emission from very small grains drastically increases at locations where the radiation field is the highest, while polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) appear to be destroyed. PAH emission is the strongest in the presence of molecular clouds, provided that the radiation field is low.

  6. EISCAT Svalbard radar observations of SPEAR-induced E- and F-region spectral enhancements in the polar cap ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Dhillon

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The Space Plasma Exploration by Active Radar (SPEAR facility has successfully operated in the high-power heater and low-power radar modes and has returned its first results. The high-power results include observations of SPEAR-induced ion and plasma line spectral enhancements recorded by the EISCAT Svalbard UHF incoherent scatter radar system (ESR, which is collocated with SPEAR. These SPEAR-enhanced spectra possess features that are consistent with excitation of both the purely growing mode and the parametric decay instability. In this paper, we present observations of upper and lower E-region SPEAR-induced ion and plasma line enhancements, together with F-region spectral enhancements, which indicate excitation of both instabilities and which are consistent with previous theoretical treatments of instability excitation in sporadic E-layers. In agreement with previous observations, spectra from the lower E-region have the single-peaked form characteristic of collisional plasma. Our observations of the SPEAR-enhanced E-region spectra suggest the presence of variable drifting regions of patchy overdense plasma, which is a finding also consistent with previous results.

  7. Large-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances observed using GPS receivers over high-latitude and equatorial regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrus, Intan Izafina; Abdullah, Mardina; Hasbi, Alina Marie; Husin, Asnawi; Yatim, Baharuddin

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents the first results of large-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (LSTIDs) observation during two moderate magnetic storm events on 28 May 2011 (SYM-H∼ -94 nT and Dst∼-80 nT) and 6 August 2011 (SYM-H∼-126 nT and Dst∼-113 nT) over the high-latitude region in Russia, Sweden, Norway, Iceland and Greenland and equatorial region in the Peninsular Malaysia using vertical total electron content (VTEC) from the Global Positioning System (GPS) observations measurement. The propagation of the LSTID signatures in the GPS TEC measurements over Peninsular Malaysia was also investigated using VTEC map. The LSTIDs were found to propagate both equatorward and poleward directions during these two events. The results showed that the LSTIDs propagated faster at high-latitude region with an average phase velocity of 1074.91 m/s than Peninsular Malaysia with an average phase velocity of 604.84 m/s. The LSTIDs at the high-latitude region have average periods of 150 min whereas the ones observed over Peninsular Malaysia have average periods of 115 min. The occurrences of these LSTIDs were also found to be the subsequent effects of substorm activities in the auroral region. To our knowledge, this is the first result of observation of LSTIDs over Peninsular Malaysia during the 24th solar cycle.

  8. Tilt Angle and Footpoint Separation of Small and Large Bipolar Sunspot Regions Observed with HMI

    CERN Document Server

    McClintock, Bruce H

    2016-01-01

    We investigate bipolar sunspot regions and how tilt angle and footpoint separation vary during emergence and decay. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory collects data at a higher cadence than historical records and allows for a detailed analysis of regions over their lifetimes. We sample the umbral tilt angle, footpoint separation, and umbral area of 235 bipolar sunspot regions in Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager - Debrecen Data (HMIDD) with an hourly cadence. We use the time when the umbral area peaks as time zero to distinguish between the emergence and decay periods of each region and we limit our analysis of tilt and separation behavior over time to within +/-96 hours of time zero. Tilt angle evolution is distinctly different for regions with small (~30 MSH), midsize (~50 MSH), and large (~110 MSH) maximum umbral areas, with 45 and 90 MSH being useful divisions in separating the groups. At the peak umbral area, we determine median tilt angles for small (7.6 degrees),...

  9. High time resolution observations of HF cross-modulation within the D region ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langston, J.; Moore, R. C.

    2013-05-01

    High-frequency cross-modulation is employed to probe the D region ionosphere during HF heating experiments at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) observatory. We have adapted Fejer's well-known cross-modulation probing method to determine the extent of ionospheric conductivity modification in the D region ionosphere with high (5 μsec) time resolution. We demonstrate that the method can be used to analyze D region conductivity changes produced by HF heating both during the initial stages of heating and under steady state conditions. The sequence of CW probe pulses used allow the separation of cross-modulation effects that occur as the probe pulse propagates upward and downward through the heated region. We discuss how this probing technique can be applied to benefit ELF/VLF wave generation experiments and ionospheric irregularities experiments at higher altitudes. We demonstrate that large phase changes equivalent to Doppler shift velocities >60 km/s can be imposed on HF waves propagating through the heated D region ionosphere.

  10. ALMA high spatial resolution observations of the dense molecular region of NGC 6302

    CERN Document Server

    Santander-García, M; Alcolea, J; Castro-Carrizo, A; Sánchez-Contreras, C; Quintana-Lacaci, G; Corradi, R L M; Neri, R

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism behind the shaping of bipolar planetary nebulae is still poorly understood. Accurately tracing the molecule-rich equatorial regions of post-AGB stars can give valuable insight into the ejection mechanisms at work. We investigate the physical conditions, structure and velocity field of the dense molecular region of the planetary nebula NGC 6302 by means of ALMA band 7 interferometric maps. The high spatial resolution of the $^{12}$CO and $^{13}$CO J=3-2 ALMA data allows for an analysis of the geometry of the ejecta in unprecedented detail. We built a spatio-kinematical model of the molecular region with the software SHAPE and performed detailed non-LTE calculations of excitation and radiative transfer with the SHAPEMOL plug-in. We find that the molecular region consists of a massive ring out of which a system of fragments of lobe walls emerge and enclose the base of the lobes visible in the optical. The general properties of this region are in agreement with previous works, although the much grea...

  11. Direct Observations of the Dynamics and Variability at High Energy Emission Regions in TeV Blazars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kino, M.; Asada, K.; Hagiwara, Y.; Edwards, P. G.; VSOP-2 Science Working Group

    2009-08-01

    VSOP-2 observations of ``blazars" may be part of the VSOP-2 Key Science Program for Active Galactic Nuclei. We propose VSOP-2 observations of nearby blazars together with a multi-frequency campaign observations. For example, in two nearby TeV blazars Mrk 421 and Mrk 501, the 38 micro-arcsec resolution corresponds to about 0.03 pc in linear scale, which is comparable to the size of the high energy emission region in the standard one-zone model. We show the advantages of VSOP-2 observation of these blazars compared with previous VLBI studies, and discuss some relevant unresolved problems.

  12. Neutron radiography observations of inner wet region in drying of quartz sand cylinder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FijaL-Kirejczyk, I.M. [Institute of Atomic Energy POLATOM, 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Milczarek, J.J., E-mail: jjmilcz@cyf.gov.pl [Institute of Atomic Energy POLATOM, 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); ZoLadek-Nowak, J. [Institute of Atomic Energy POLATOM, 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    2011-09-21

    The drying process of wet quartz sand cylinder was studied with neutron radiography as well as with sample temperature and mass measurements. The constant rate and falling rate periods of the process were clearly identified. During the advanced phase of drying, an inner wet region in the sample center was revealed in the neutron radiographs. The emergence of the inner wet region resulted in marked rise in the standard deviation of the brightness of pixels constituting the sample image. The theoretical analysis of the brightness variations was performed in terms of neutron absorption in dry material matrix and water occupying some of the space between sand grains as well as scattering of neutrons on water. It was found that the inner wet region shrinks in radial direction with time while the apparent water content within it remains constant. The different periods of drying have been attributed to capillary transport at the beginning and vapor flow at advanced stages of the process.

  13. SAS-2 observations of the high energy gamma radiation from the Vela region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. J.; Bignami, G. F.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    Data from a scan of the galactic plane by the SAS-B high energy gamma ray experiment in the region 250 deg smaller than 12 smaller than 290 deg show a statistically significant excess over the general radiation from the galactic plane for gamma radiation of energy larger than 100 MeV. If the enhanced gamma radiation results from interactions of cosmic rays with galactic matter, as the energy spectrum suggests, it seems reasonable to associate the enhancement with large scale galactic features, such as spiral arm segments in that direction, or with the region surrounding the Vela supernova remnant with which PSR 0833-45 is associated. If the excess is attributed to cosmic rays released from the supernova interacting with the interstellar matter in that region, than on the order of 3 x 10 to the 50th power ergs would have been released by that supernova in the form of cosmic rays.

  14. Winds on the West Florida Shelf: Regional comparisons between observations and model estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Dennis A.; Weisberg, Robert H.; Zheng, Lianyuan; Liu, Yonggang

    2017-02-01

    Wind fields on the West Florida Continental Shelf are investigated using observations from five University of South Florida Coastal Ocean Monitoring and Prediction System buoys and seven of NOAA's National Ocean Service and National Weather Service, National Data Buoy Center stations or buoys spanning the 10 year period, 2004-2013. These observations are compared with NOAA's National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) reanalysis wind fields (NCEP winds). The analyses consist of vector correlations in both the time and frequency domains. The primary findings are that winds observed on and near the coastline underestimate those observed offshore and that NCEP winds derived from assimilating mostly land-based observations also underestimate winds observed offshore. With regard to wind stress, and depending upon location, wind stress derived from NCEP winds are 6%-49% lower than what is computed from observations over open water. A corollary is that wind forcing fields that are underestimated may result in coastal ocean model circulation fields that are also underestimated. These analyses stress the importance of having offshore wind observations, and suggest that adding more offshore wind observations will lead to improved coastal ocean wind fields and hence to improved model renditions of coastal ocean model circulation and related water property fields.

  15. ALMA high spatial resolution observations of the dense molecular region of NGC 6302

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santander-García, M.; Bujarrabal, V.; Alcolea, J.; Castro-Carrizo, A.; Sánchez Contreras, C.; Quintana-Lacaci, G.; Corradi, R. L. M.; Neri, R.

    2017-01-01

    Context. The mechanism behind the shaping of bipolar planetary nebulae is still poorly understood. It is becoming increasingly clear that the main agents must operate at their innermost regions, where a significant equatorial density enhancement should be present and related to the collimation of light and jet launching from the central star preferentially towards the polar directions. Most of the material in this equatorial condensation must be lost during the asymptotic giant branch as stellar wind and later released from the surface of dust grains to the gas phase in molecular form. Accurately tracing the molecule-rich regions of these objects can give valuable insight into the ejection mechanisms themselves. Aims: We investigate the physical conditions, structure and velocity field of the dense molecular region of the planetary nebula NGC 6302 by means of ALMA band 7 interferometric maps. Methods: The high spatial resolution of the 12CO and 13CO J = 3-2 ALMA data allows for an analysis of the geometry of the ejecta in unprecedented detail. We built a spatio-kinematical model of the molecular region with the software SHAPE and performed detailed non-LTE calculations of excitation and radiative transfer with the shapemol plug-in. Results: We find that the molecular region consists of a massive ring out of which a system of fragments of lobe walls emerge and enclose the base of the lobes visible in the optical. The general properties of this region are in agreement with previous works, although the much greater spatial resolution of the data allows for a very detailed description. We confirm that the mass of the molecular region is 0.1 M⊙. Additionally, we report a previously undetected component at the nebular equator, an inner, younger ring inclined 60° with respect to the main ring, showing a characteristic radius of 7.5 × 1016 cm, a mass of 2.7 × 10-3M⊙, and a counterpart in optical images of the nebula. This inner ring has the same kinematical age as

  16. AMBER/VLTI high spectral resolution observations of the Br$\\gamma$ emitting region in HD 98922. A compact disc wind launched from the inner disc region

    CERN Document Server

    Garatti, A Caratti o; Lopez, R Garcia; Kraus, S; Schertl, D; Grinin, V P; Weigelt, G; Hofmann, K -H; Massi, F; Lagarde, S; Vannier, M; Malbet, F

    2015-01-01

    We analyse the main physical parameters and the circumstellar environment of the young Herbig Be star HD 98922. We present AMBER/VLTI high spectral resolution (R =12000) interferometric observations across the Br$\\gamma$ line, accompanied by UVES high-resolution spectroscopy and SINFONI-AO assisted near-infrared integral field spectroscopic data. To interpret our observations, we develop a magneto-centrifugally driven disc-wind model. Our analysis of the UVES spectrum shows that HD 98922 is a young (~5x10^5 yr) Herbig Be star (SpT=B9V), located at a distance of 440(+60-50) pc, with a mass accretion rate of ~9+/-3x10^(-7) M_sun yr^(-1). SINFONI K-band AO-assisted imaging shows a spatially resolved circumstellar disc-like region (~140 AU in diameter) with asymmetric brightness distribution. Our AMBER/VLTI UT observations indicate that the Br$\\gamma$ emitting region (radius ~0.31+/-0.04 AU) is smaller than the continuum emitting region (inner dust radius ~0.7+/-0.2 AU), showing significant non-zero V-shaped diff...

  17. Simultaneous SMM flat crystal spectrometer and Very Large Array observations of solar active regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Kenneth R.; Willson, Robert F.; Smith, Kermit L.; Strong, Keith T.

    1987-01-01

    High-resolution images of the quiescent emission from two solar active regions at 20 cm (VLA) and soft X-ray (SMM FCS) wavelengths are compared. There are regions where the X-ray coronal loops have been completely imaged at 20 cm wavelength. In other regions, the X-ray radiation was detected without detectable 20 cm radiation, and vice versa. The X-ray data were used to infer average electron temperatures of about 3-million K and average electron densities of about 2.5 x 10 to the 9th/cu cm for the X-ray emitting plasma in the two active regions. The thermal bremsstrahlung of the X-ray emitting plasma is optically thin at 20 cm wavelength. The 20 cm brightness temperatures were always less than T(e), which is consistent with optically thin bremsstrahlung. The low T(B) can be explained if a higher, cooler plasma covers the hotter X-ray emitting plasma. Thermal gyroresonance radiation must account for the intense 20 cm radiation near and above sunspots where no X-ray radiation is detected.

  18. SAS-2 observations of the galactic gamma radiation from the Vela region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. J.; Bignami, G. F.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    Data from a scan of the galactic plane by the SAS-2 high energy gamma ray experiment in the region 250 deg l2 290 deg show a statistically-significant excess over the general radiation from the galactic plane for gamma radiation of energy 100 MeV in the region 260 deg l2 270 deg and -7.5 deg b2 0 deg. If the enhanced gamma radiation results from interactions of cosmic rays with galactic matter, as the energy spectrum suggests, it seems reasonable to associate the enhancement with large scale galactic features, such as spiral arm segments in that direction, or with the region surrounding the Vela supernova remnant, with which PSR 0833-45 is associated. If the excess is attributed to cosmic rays released from this supernova interacting with the interstellar matter in that region, then on the order of 3.10 to the 50th power ergs would be released by that supernova in the form of cosmic rays.

  19. First simultaneous lidar observations of sodium layers and VHF radar observations of E-region field-aligned irregularities at the low-latitude station Gadanki

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sridharan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous observations of atmospheric sodium (Na made by a resonance lidar and E-region field-aligned-irregularities (FAI made by the Indian MST radar, both located at Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E and horizontal winds acquired by a SKiYMET meteor radar at Trivandrum (8.5° N, 77° E are used to investigate the relationship among sodium layer, FAI and neutral winds in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere region. The altitudes and descent rates of higher altitude (~95 km Na layer and FAI agree quite well. The descending structures of the higher altitude Na layer and FAI are found to be closely related to the diurnal tidal phase structure in zonal winds observed over Trivandrum. At lower altitudes, the descent rate of FAI is larger than that of Na layer and zonal tidal phase. These observations support the hypothesis that the metallic ion layers are formed by the zonal wind shear associated with tidal winds and subsequently get neutralized to manifest in the form of descending Na layers. The descending FAI echoing layers are manifestation of the instabilities setting in on the ionization layer. In the present observations, the altitudes of occurrence of Na layer and FAI echoes being low, we surmise that it is quite possible that the FAI echoes are due to the descent of already formed irregularities at higher altitudes.

  20. VLA and GBT Observations of Orion B (NGC 2024, W12) : Photo-dissociation Region Properties and Magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Roshi, D Anish; Jeyakumar, S

    2014-01-01

    We present images of C110$\\alpha$ and H110$\\alpha$ radio recombination line (RRL) emission at 4.8 GHz and images of H166$\\alpha$, C166$\\alpha$ and X166$\\alpha$ RRL emission at 1.4 GHz, observed toward the starforming region NGC 2024. The 1.4 GHz image with angular resolution $\\sim$ 70\\arcsec\\ is obtained using VLA data. The 4.8 GHz image with angular resolution $\\sim$ 17\\arcsec\\ is obtained by combining VLA and GBT data. The similarity of the LSR velocity (10.3 \\kms\\) of the C110$\\alpha$ line to that of lines observed from molecular material located at the far side of the \\HII\\ region suggests that the photo dissociation region (PDR) responsible for C110$\\alpha$ line emission is at the far side. The LSR velocity of C166$\\alpha$ is 8.8 \\kms. This velocity is comparable with the velocity of molecular absorption lines observed from the foreground gas, suggesting that the PDR is at the near side of the \\HII\\ region. Non-LTE models for carbon line forming regions are presented. Typical properties of the foreground...

  1. Electromagnetic Wave-filled Cavities Observed by the GEODESIC Sounding Rocket: A Direct Encounter with VLF Saucer Source Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabirzadeh, Rasoul

    The GEODESIC sounding rocket encountered hundreds of localized, VLF-wave-filled density depletions in an auroral return current region at altitudes between 900--1000 km. While these are similar to well-studied lower-hybrid "spikelets", which are electrostatic, many of the GEODESIC events exhibited strong VLF magnetic field enhancements as well. In the present study we show that these magnetic field fluctuations can be interpreted as the result of geomagnetic field-aligned electron currents driven by fluctuating electric fields parallel to the geomagnetic field lines. This observation suggests that the electromagnetic wave-filled cavities are signatures of unstable filaments of return current fluctuating at VLF frequencies. We argue that the cavities' spatial dimensions, their location inside the return current region and their total radiated power are consistent with the properties of VLF saucer source regions inferred from earlier satellite observations taken at higher altitudes.

  2. On the importance of observational data properties when assessing regional climate model performance of extreme precipitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sunyer Pinya, Maria Antonia; Sørup, Hjalte Jomo Danielsen; Christensen, Ole Bøssing

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of climate studies addressing changes in extreme precipitation. A common step in these studies involves the assessment of the climate model performance. This is often measured by comparing climate model output with observational data....... In the majority of such studies the characteristics and uncertainties of the observational data are neglected. This study addresses the influence of using different observational datasets to assess the climate model performance. Four different datasets covering Denmark using different gauge systems and comprising...... both networks of point measurements and gridded datasets are considered. Additionally, the influence of using different performance indices and metrics is addressed. A set of indices ranging from mean to extreme precipitation properties is calculated for all the datasets. For each of the observational...

  3. Vic-Maui Race Observed Marine Debris Map Service, Pacific Ocean, 2012, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Location and descriptions of marine debris observed by the Sailing Vessel (S/V) Family Affair yacht during the Victoria, British Columbia to Maui, Hawaii Yacht Race...

  4. Voyager 1 observes low-energy galactic cosmic rays in a region depleted of heliospheric ions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stone, E C; Cummings, A C; McDonald, F B; Heikkila, B C; Lal, N; Webber, W R

    2013-01-01

    On 25 August 2012, Voyager 1 was at 122 astronomical units when the steady intensity of low-energy ions it had observed for the previous 6 years suddenly dropped for a third time and soon completely...

  5. Causes of Observed Long-Periodic Variations of the Polarization at Polar Regions of Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Shalygina, O S; Shalygin, E V; Marchenko, G P; Velikodsky, Y I; Akimov, L A; Starodubtseva, O M; Velikodsky, Yu. I.

    2006-01-01

    Data of 23-years of Jupiter polarimetric observations (1981- 2004) have been reprocessed using new improved technique. The data from other observers have been added to the analysis (1971-74). Anticorrelation between asymmetry of polarization and insolation has been found. The mechanism of influence of seasons changing (through temperature variations) on north-south asymmetry of polarization formation has been proposed. Also a possibility of existence of influence of solar cosmic rays flux on polarization value is noted.

  6. A Tale of Two Emergences: Sunrise II Observations of Emergence Sites in a Solar Active Region

    CERN Document Server

    Centeno, Rebecca; Iniesta, Jose Carlos Del Toro; Solanki, Sami K; Barthol, Peter; Gandorfer, Achim; Gizon, Laurent; Hirzberger, Johann; Riethmuller, Tino L; van Noort, Michiel; Suarez, David Orozco; Schmidt, Wolfgang; Pillet, Valentin Martinez; Knolker, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In June 2013, the two scientific instruments onboard the second Sunrise mission witnessed, in detail, a small-scale magnetic flux emergence event as part of the birth of an active region. The Imaging Magnetograph Experiment (IMaX) recorded two small (~5 arcsec) emerging flux patches in the polarized filtergrams of a photospheric Fe I spectral line. Meanwhile, the Sunrise Filter Imager (SuFI) captured the highly dynamic chromospheric response to the magnetic fields pushing their way through the lower solar atmosphere. The serendipitous capture of this event offers a closer look at the inner workings of active region emergence sites. In particular, it reveals in meticulous detail how the rising magnetic fields interact with the granulation as they push through the Sun's surface, dragging photospheric plasma in their upward travel. The plasma that is burdening the rising field slides along the field lines, creating fast downflowing channels at the footpoints. The weight of this material anchors this field to the...

  7. Long-term active-layer dynamics: results of 22 years of field observations in Northern Hemisphere permafrost regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiklomanov, N. I.; Nelson, F. E.; Streletskiy, D. A.; Klene, A. E.; Biskaborn, B. K.

    2016-12-01

    The uppermost layer of seasonal thawing above permafrost (the active layer) is an important regulator of energy and mass fluxes between the surface and the atmosphere in the polar regions. Active layer monitoring is an important component of efforts to assess the effects of global change in permafrost environments. The Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring (CALM) program, established in the early 1990s, is designed to observe temporal and spatial variability of the active layer and its response to changes and variations in climatic conditions. The CALM network is an integral part of the Global Terrestrial Network for Permafrost (GTN-P), operating under the auspices of the Global Terrestrial Observing System (GTOS) /Global Climate Observing System (GCOS). Standardized thaw depth observations in the Northern Hemisphere are available for more than 200 GTN-P/CALM sites in the Northern Hemisphere. At each of the sites spatially distributed ALT measurements have been conducted annually by mechanical probing. The locations of sites represent generalized surface and subsurface conditions characteristic of broader regions. The data are assimilated and distributed though the CALM (www.gwu.edu/ calm) and GTN-P (gtnpdatabase.org) online databases. In this presentation we use data from approximately 20 years of continuous observations to examine temporal trends in active-layer thickness for several representative Arctic regions. Results indicate substantial interannual fluctuations in active-layer thickness, primarily in response to variations in air temperature. Decadal trends in ALT vary by region. A progressive increase in ALT has been observed in the Nordic countries, the Russian European North, West Siberia, East Siberia, the Russian Far East, and the Interior of Alaska. North American Arctic sites show no apparent thaw depth trend over 22-years of record. However, combined active layer, ground temperature and heave/subsidence observations conducted in northern Alaska

  8. A novel gridding algorithm to create regional trace gas maps from satellite observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kuhlmann

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The recent increase in spatial resolution for satellite instruments has made it feasible to study distributions of trace gas column densities on a regional scale. For this application a new gridding algorithm was developed to map measurements from the instrument's frame of reference (level 2 onto a longitude–latitude grid (level 3. The algorithm is designed for the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI and can easily be employed for similar instruments – for example, the upcoming TROPOspheric Monitoring Instrument (TROPOMI. Trace gas distributions are reconstructed by a continuous parabolic spline surface. The algorithm explicitly considers the spatially varying sensitivity of the sensor resulting from the instrument function. At the swath edge, the inverse problem of computing the spline coefficients is very sensitive to measurement errors and is regularised by a second-order difference matrix. Since this regularisation corresponds to the penalty term for smoothing splines, it similarly attenuates the effect of measurement noise over the entire swath width. Monte Carlo simulations are conducted to study the performance of the algorithm for different distributions of trace gas column densities. The optimal weight of the penalty term is found to be proportional to the measurement uncertainty and the width of the instrument function. A comparison with an established gridding algorithm shows improved performance for small to moderate measurement errors due to better parametrisation of the distribution. The resulting maps are smoother and extreme values are more accurately reconstructed. The performance improvement is further illustrated with high-resolution distributions obtained from a regional chemistry model. The new algorithm is applied to tropospheric NO2 column densities measured by OMI. Examples of regional NO2 maps are shown for densely populated areas in China, Europe and the United States of America. This work demonstrates that the newly

  9. Spitzer IRS observations of the XA region in the cygnus loop supernova remnant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sankrit, Ravi [SOFIA Science Center, NASA Ames Research Center, M/S N211-3, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Raymond, John C.; Gaetz, Terrance J. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, MS 15, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bautista, Manuel [Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo MI 49008-5252 (United States); Williams, Brian J. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Mail Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Blair, William P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Borkowski, Kazimierz J. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27607 (United States); Long, Knox S. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    We report on spectra of two positions in the XA region of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant obtained with the InfraRed Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. The spectra span the 10-35 μm wavelength range, which contains a number of collisionally excited forbidden lines. These data are supplemented by optical spectra obtained at the Whipple Observatory and an archival UV spectrum from the International Ultraviolet Explorer. Coverage from the UV through the IR provides tests of shock wave models and tight constraints on model parameters. Only lines from high ionization species are detected in the spectrum of a filament on the edge of the remnant. The filament traces a 180 km s{sup –1} shock that has just begun to cool, and the oxygen to neon abundance ratio lies in the normal range found for Galactic H II regions. Lines from both high and low ionization species are detected in the spectrum of the cusp of a shock-cloud interaction, which lies within the remnant boundary. The spectrum of the cusp region is matched by a shock of about 150 km s{sup –1} that has cooled and begun to recombine. The post-shock region has a swept-up column density of about 1.3 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup –2}, and the gas has reached a temperature of 7000-8000 K. The spectrum of the Cusp indicates that roughly half of the refractory silicon and iron atoms have been liberated from the grains. Dust emission is not detected at either position.

  10. Recent global CO2 flux inferred from atmospheric CO2 observations and its regional analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Chen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The net surface exchange of CO2 for the years 2002–2007 is inferred from 12 181 atmospheric CO2 concentration data with a time-dependent Bayesian synthesis inversion scheme. Monthly CO2 fluxes are optimized for 30 regions of the North America and 20 regions for the rest of the globe. Although there have been many previous multiyear inversion studies, the reliability of atmospheric inversion techniques has not yet been systematically evaluated for quantifying regional interannual variability in the carbon cycle. In this study, the global interannual variability of the CO2 flux is found to be dominated by terrestrial ecosystems, particularly by tropical land, and the variations of regional terrestrial carbon fluxes are closely related to climate variations. These interannual variations are mostly caused by abnormal meteorological conditions in a few months in the year or part of a growing season and cannot be well represented using annual means, suggesting that we should pay attention to finer temporal climate variations in ecosystem modeling. We find that, excluding fossil fuel and biomass burning emissions, terrestrial ecosystems and oceans absorb an average of 3.63 ± 0.49 and 1.94 ± 0.41 Pg C yr−1, respectively. The terrestrial uptake is mainly in northern land while the tropical and southern lands contribute 0.62 ± 0.47, and 0.67 ± 0.34 Pg C yr−1 to the sink, respectively. In North America, terrestrial ecosystems absorb 0.89 ± 0.18 Pg C yr−1 on average with a strong flux density found in the south-east of the continent.

  11. Recent global CO2 flux inferred from atmospheric CO2 observations and its regional analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Chen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The net surface exchange of CO2 for the years 2002–2007 is inferred from 12 181 atmospheric CO2 concentration data with a time-dependent Bayesian synthesis inversion scheme. Monthly CO2 fluxes are optimized for 30 regions of the North America and 20 regions for the rest of the globe. Although there have been many previous multiyear inversion studies, the reliability of atmospheric inversion techniques is not yet been systematically evaluated for quantifying regional interannual variability in the carbon cycle. In this study, the global interannual variability of the CO2 flux is found to be dominated by terrestrial ecosystems and is mostly caused by tropical land, and the variations of regional terrestrial carbon fluxes are closely related to climate variations. These interannual variations are mostly caused by abnormal meteorological conditions in a few months in the year or part of a growing season and cannot be well represented using annual means, suggesting that we should pay attention to monthly or submonthly climate variations in ecosystem modeling. We find that, excluding fossil fuel and biomass burning emissions, terrestrial ecosystems and oceans absorb an average of 3.63±0.49 and 1.94±0.41 Pg C/yr, respectively. The terrestrial uptake is mainly in northern land while the tropical and southern lands contribute 0.62±0.47, and 0.67±0.34 Pg C/yr to the sink, respectively. In North America, terrestrial ecosystems absorb 0.89±0.18 Pg C/yr on average with a strong flux density found in the south-east of the continent.

  12. A novel gridding algorithm to create regional trace gas maps from satellite observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kuhlmann

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent increase of spatial resolution for satellite instruments has it made feasible to study distributions of trace gas column densities on a regional scale. For this application a new gridding algorithm was developed to map measurements from the instrument's frame of reference (Level 2 onto a longitude-latitude grid (Level 3. The algorithm is designed for the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI and can be employed easily to similar instruments, for example, the upcoming TROPOspheric Monitoring Instrument (TROPOMI. Trace gas distributions are reconstructed by a continuous parabolic spline surface. The algorithm explicitly considers the spatially varying sensitivity of the sensor resulting from the instrument function. At the swath edge, the inverse problem of computing the spline coefficients is very sensitive to measurement errors and is regularised by a second-order difference matrix. Since this regularisation corresponds to the penalty term for smoothing splines, it similarly attenuates the effect of measurement noise over the entire swath width. Monte Carlo simulations are conducted to study the performance of the algorithm for different distributions of trace gas column densities. The optimal weight of the penalty term is found to be proportional to the measurement uncertainty and the width of the instrument function. A comparison with an established gridding algorithm shows improved performance for small to moderate measurement errors due to better parametrization of the distribution. The resulting maps are smoother and extreme values are more accurately reconstructed. The performance improvement is further illustrated with high-resolution distributions obtained from a regional chemistry model. The new algorithm is applied to tropospheric NO2 column densities measured by OMI. Examples of regional NO2 maps are shown for densely populated areas in China, Europe and the United States of America. This work demonstrates that the newly developed

  13. Polarimetric observations of the innermost regions of relativistic jets in X-ray binaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell D.M.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Synchrotron emission from the relativistic jets launched close to black holes and neutron stars can be highly linearly polarized, depending on the configuration of the magnetic field. In X-ray binaries, optically thin synchrotron emission from the compact jets resides at infrared–optical wavelengths. The polarimetric signature of the jets is detected in the infrared and is highly variable in some X-ray binaries. This reveals the magnetic geometry in the compact jet, in a region close enough to the black hole that it is influenced by its strong gravity. In some cases the magnetic field is turbulent and variable near the jet base. In Cyg X–1, the origin of the γ-ray, X-ray and some of the infrared polarization is likely the optically thin synchrotron power law from the inner regions of the jet. In order to reproduce the polarization properties, the magnetic field in this region must be highly ordered, in contrast to other sources.

  14. Spitzer IRS Observations of the XA Region in the Cygnus Loop Supernova Remnant

    CERN Document Server

    Sankrit, R; Bautista, M; Gaetz, T J; Williams, B J; Blair, W P; Borkowski, K J; Long, K S

    2014-01-01

    We report on spectra of two positions in the XA region of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant obtained with the InfraRed Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. The spectra span the 10-35 micron wavelength range, which contains a number of collisionally excited forbidden lines. These data are supplemented by optical spectra obtained at the Whipple Observatory and an archival UV spectrum from the International Ultraviolet Explorer. Coverage from the UV through the IR provides tests of shock wave models and tight constraints on model parameters. Only lines from high ionization species are detected in the spectrum of a filament on the edge of the remnant. The filament traces a 180 km/s shock that has just begun to cool, and the oxygen to neon abundance ratio lies in the normal range found for Galactic H II regions. Lines from both high and low ionization species are detected in the spectrum of the cusp of a shock-cloud interaction, which lies within the remnant boundary. The spectrum of the cusp region is mat...

  15. Regional CO2 flux estimates for 2009–2010 based on GOSAT and ground-based CO2 observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Maksyutov

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the application of a global carbon cycle modeling system to the estimation of monthly regional CO2 fluxes from the column-averaged mole fractions of CO2 (XCO2 retrieved from spectral observations made by the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT. The regional flux estimates are to be publicly disseminated as the GOSAT Level 4 data product. The forward modeling components of the system include an atmospheric tracer transport model, an anthropogenic emissions inventory, a terrestrial biosphere exchange model, and an oceanic flux model. The atmospheric tracer transport was simulated using isentropic coordinates in the stratosphere and was tuned to reproduce the age of air. We used a fossil fuel emission inventory based on large point source data and observations of nighttime lights. The terrestrial biospheric model was optimized by fitting model parameters to observed atmospheric CO2 seasonal cycle, net primary production data, and a biomass distribution map. The oceanic surface pCO2 distribution was estimated with a 4-D variational data assimilation system based on reanalyzed ocean currents. Monthly CO2 fluxes of 64 sub-continental regions, between June 2009 and May 2010, were estimated from GOSAT FTS SWIR Level 2 XCO2 retrievals (ver. 02.00 gridded to 5° × 5° cells and averaged on a monthly basis and monthly-mean GLOBALVIEW-CO2 data. Our result indicated that adding the GOSAT XCO2 retrievals to the GLOBALVIEW data in the flux estimation brings changes to fluxes of tropics and other remote regions where the surface-based data are sparse. The uncertainties of these remote fluxes were reduced by as much as 60% through such addition. Optimized fluxes estimated for many of these regions, were brought closer to the prior fluxes by the addition of the GOSAT retrievals. In most of the regions and seasons considered here, the estimated fluxes fell within the range of natural flux variabilities estimated with the component models.

  16. Comparison of Helioseismic Far-Side Active Region Detections with STEREO Far-Side EUV Observations of Solar Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liewer, P. C.; Qiu, J.; Lindsey, C.

    2017-10-01

    Seismic maps of the Sun's far hemisphere, computed from Doppler data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) are now being used routinely to detect strong magnetic regions on the far side of the Sun (http://jsoc.stanford.edu/data/farside/). To test the reliability of this technique, the helioseismically inferred active region detections are compared with far-side observations of solar activity from the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO), using brightness in extreme-ultraviolet light (EUV) as a proxy for magnetic fields. Two approaches are used to analyze nine months of STEREO and HMI data. In the first approach, we determine whether new large east-limb active regions are detected seismically on the far side before they appear Earth side and study how the detectability of these regions relates to their EUV intensity. We find that while there is a range of EUV intensities for which far-side regions may or may not be detected seismically, there appears to be an intensity level above which they are almost always detected and an intensity level below which they are never detected. In the second approach, we analyze concurrent extreme-ultraviolet and helioseismic far-side observations. We find that 100% (22) of the far-side seismic regions correspond to an extreme-ultraviolet plage; 95% of these either became a NOAA-designated magnetic region when reaching the east limb or were one before crossing to the far side. A low but significant correlation is found between the seismic signature strength and the EUV intensity of a far-side region.

  17. ANTI-PARALLEL EUV FLOWS OBSERVED ALONG ACTIVE REGION FILAMENT THREADS WITH HI-C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, Caroline E.; Walsh, Robert W.; Régnier, Stéphane [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, VP 62, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Weber, Mark [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kobayashi, Ken [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, The University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Platt, Simon; Mitchell, Nick [School of Computing, Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); DePontieu, Bart; Title, Alan [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab, 3251 Hanover Street, Org. ADBS, Bldg. 252, Palo Alto, CA (United States); DeForest, Craig [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Kuzin, Sergey [P.N. Lebedev Physical institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii prospekt, 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-20

    Plasma flows within prominences/filaments have been observed for many years and hold valuable clues concerning the mass and energy balance within these structures. Previous observations of these flows primarily come from Hα and cool extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) lines (e.g., 304 Å) where estimates of the size of the prominence threads has been limited by the resolution of the available instrumentation. Evidence of 'counter-steaming' flows has previously been inferred from these cool plasma observations, but now, for the first time, these flows have been directly imaged along fundamental filament threads within the million degree corona (at 193 Å). In this work, we present observations of an AR filament observed with the High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) that exhibits anti-parallel flows along adjacent filament threads. Complementary data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager are presented. The ultra-high spatial and temporal resolution of Hi-C allow the anti-parallel flow velocities to be measured (70-80 km s{sup –1}) and gives an indication of the resolvable thickness of the individual strands (0.''8 ± 0.''1). The temperature of the plasma flows was estimated to be log T (K) = 5.45 ± 0.10 using Emission Measure loci analysis. We find that SDO/AIA cannot clearly observe these anti-parallel flows or measure their velocity or thread width due to its larger pixel size. We suggest that anti-parallel/counter-streaming flows are likely commonplace within all filaments and are currently not observed in EUV due to current instrument spatial resolution.

  18. Anti-parallel EUV Flows Observed along Active Region Filament Threads with Hi-C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Caroline E.; Walsh, Robert W.; Régnier, Stéphane; Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy R.; Golub, Leon; Kobayashi, Ken; Platt, Simon; Mitchell, Nick; Korreck, Kelly; DePontieu, Bart; DeForest, Craig; Weber, Mark; Title, Alan; Kuzin, Sergey

    2013-09-01

    Plasma flows within prominences/filaments have been observed for many years and hold valuable clues concerning the mass and energy balance within these structures. Previous observations of these flows primarily come from Hα and cool extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) lines (e.g., 304 Å) where estimates of the size of the prominence threads has been limited by the resolution of the available instrumentation. Evidence of "counter-steaming" flows has previously been inferred from these cool plasma observations, but now, for the first time, these flows have been directly imaged along fundamental filament threads within the million degree corona (at 193 Å). In this work, we present observations of an AR filament observed with the High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) that exhibits anti-parallel flows along adjacent filament threads. Complementary data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager are presented. The ultra-high spatial and temporal resolution of Hi-C allow the anti-parallel flow velocities to be measured (70-80 km s-1) and gives an indication of the resolvable thickness of the individual strands (0.''8 ± 0.''1). The temperature of the plasma flows was estimated to be log T (K) = 5.45 ± 0.10 using Emission Measure loci analysis. We find that SDO/AIA cannot clearly observe these anti-parallel flows or measure their velocity or thread width due to its larger pixel size. We suggest that anti-parallel/counter-streaming flows are likely commonplace within all filaments and are currently not observed in EUV due to current instrument spatial resolution.

  19. Three-dimensional model-observation comparison in the Loop Current region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosburg, K. C.; Donohue, K. A.; Chassignet, E. P.

    2016-12-01

    Accurate high-resolution ocean models are required for hurricane and oil spill pathway predictions, and to enhance the dynamical understanding of circulation dynamics. Output from the 1/25° data-assimilating Gulf of Mexico HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM31.0) is compared to daily full water column observations from a moored array, with a focus on Loop Current path variability and upper-deep layer coupling during eddy separation. Array-mean correlation was 0.93 for sea surface height, and 0.93, 0.63, and 0.75 in the thermocline for temperature, zonal, and meridional velocity, respectively. Peaks in modeled eddy kinetic energy were consistent with observations during Loop Current eddy separation, but with modeled deep eddy kinetic energy at half the observed amplitude. Modeled and observed LC meander phase speeds agreed within 8% and 2% of each other within the 100 - 40 and 40 - 20 day bands, respectively. The model reproduced observed patterns indicative of baroclinic instability, that is, a vertical offset with deep stream function leading upper stream function in the along-stream direction. While modeled deep eddies differed slightly spatially and temporally, the joint development of an upper-ocean meander along the eastern side of the LC and the successive propagation of upper-deep cyclone/anticylone pairs that preceded separation were contained within the model solution. Overall, model-observation comparison indicated that HYCOM31.0 could provide insight into processes within the 100 - 20 day band, offering a larger spatial and temporal window than observational arrays.

  20. ALMA OBSERVATIONS OF THE OUTFLOW FROM SOURCE I IN THE ORION-KL REGION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapata, Luis A.; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Loinard, Laurent [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, UNAM, Apdo. Postal 3-72 (Xangari), 58089 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Schmid-Burgk, Johannes; Menten, Karl M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Curiel, Salvador [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ap. 70-264, 04510 DF (Mexico)

    2012-07-20

    In this Letter, we present sensitive millimeter SiO (J = 5-4; {nu} = 0) line observations of the outflow arising from the enigmatic object Orion Source I made with the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA). The observations reveal that at scales of a few thousand AU, the outflow has a marked 'butterfly' morphology along a northeast-southwest axis. However, contrary to what is found in the SiO and H{sub 2}O maser observations at scales of tens of AU, the blueshifted radial velocities of the moving gas are found to the northwest, while the redshifted velocities are in the southeast. The ALMA observations are complemented with SiO (J = 8-7; {nu} = 0) maps (with a similar spatial resolution) obtained with the Submillimeter Array. These observations also show a similar morphology and velocity structure in this outflow. We discuss some possibilities to explain these differences at small and large scales across the flow.

  1. Clasp/SJ Observation of Time Variations of Lyman-Alpha Emissions in a Solar Active Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, S.; Kubo, M.; Katsukawa, Y.; Kano, R.; Narukage, N.; Ishikawa, R.; Bando, T.; Winebarger, A.; Kobayashi, K.; Trujillo Bueno, J.; Auchere, F.

    2016-01-01

    The Chromospheric Lyman-alpha SpectroPolarimeter (CLASP) is a sounding rocket experiment launched on September 3, 2015 to investigate the solar chromosphere, and the slit-jaw (SJ) optical system took Lya images with the high time cadence of 0.6 s. By the CLASP/SJ observation, many time variations in the solar chromosphere with the time scale of time variations and relation to the coronal structure observed by SDO/AIA. We compared the Ly(alpha) time variations at footpoints of coronal magnetic fields observed by AIA 211 Å (approx.2 MK) and AIA 171 Å (0.6 MK), and non-loop regions. As the result, we found the time variations had more in the footpoint regions. On the other hand, the time variations had no dependency on the temperature of the loop.

  2. Climatology of observed rainfall in Southeast France at the Regional Climate Model scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froidurot, Stéphanie; Molinié, Gilles; Diedhiou, Arona

    2016-04-01

    In order to provide convenient data to assess rainfall simulated by Regional Climate Models, a spatial database (hereafter called K-REF) has been designed. This database is used to examine climatological features of rainfall in Southeast France, a study region characterized by two mountain ranges of comparable altitude (the Cévennes and the Alps foothill) on both sides of the Rhône valley. Hourly records from 1993 to 2013 have been interpolated to a 0.1° × 0.1° latitude-longitude regular grid and accumulated over 3-h periods in K-REF. The assessment of K-REF relatively to the SAFRAN daily rainfall reanalysis indicates consistent patterns and magnitudes between the two datasets even though K-REF fields are smoother. A multi-scale analysis of the occurrence and non-zero intensity of rainfall is performed and shows that the maps of the 50th and 95th percentiles of 3- and 24-h rain intensity highlight different patterns. The maxima of the 50th and 95th percentiles are located over plain and mountainous areas respectively. Moreover, the location of these maxima is not the same for the 3- and 24-h intensities. To understand these differences between median and intense rainfall on the one hand and between the 3- and 24-h rainfall on the other hand, we analyze the statistical distributions and the space-time structure of occurrence and intensity of the 3-h rainfall in two classes of days, defined as median and intense. This analysis illustrates the influence of two factors on the triggering and the intensity of rain in the region: the solar cycle and the orography. The orographic forcing appears to be quite different for the two ranges of the domain and is much more pronounced over the Cévennes.

  3. Solar Transition-Region Lines Observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph: Diagnostics for the O IV and Si IV Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Dudík, Jaroslav; Dzifčáková, Elena; Mason, Helen E; Golub, Leon

    2013-01-01

    The formation of the transition-region O IV and Si IV lines observable by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) is investigated for both Maxwellian and non-Maxellian conditions characterized by a kappa-distribution exhibiting a high-energy tail. The \\ion{Si}{4} lines are formed at lower temperatures than the O IV lines for all kappa. In non-Maxwellian situations with lower kappa, the contribution functions are shifted to lower temperatures. Combined with the slope of the differential emission measure, it is possible for the Si IV lines to be formed at very different regions of solar transition region than the O IV lines; possibly close to solar chromosphere. Such situations might be discernible by IRIS. It is found that photoexcitation can be important for the Si IV lines, but is negligible for the O IV lines. The usefulness of the O IV ratios for density diagnostics independently of kappa is investigated and it is found that the O IV 1404.78A /1399.77A ratio provides a good density diagnostics exc...

  4. Observation and Measurements of Flow Structures in the Stagnation Region of a Wing-Body Junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-09-01

    estimates of location from his visualized flow pattern. His results show that the separation region can be characterized by a single similarity...rrouREs 133 ~ tio i 0i 4Pk FICSE 13 -1 cm0 Z7 𔃽) P4) PIGURES 13 0 C.) CL)) EE CO 9 a13 0 A z o o0 -0- CjC a)- E )- E EJ a) ca C .2 E 0 Cl) 0 C/)o o CU...0. (B.4) Since S QTA = QTQR = DR (B.5) the preceding equation may be rewritten as R 1 T(QTb - DRx ) = 0. (B.6) Thus, we arrive at DRx = QTb or Rx

  5. [Gamma]-ray emission form regions of star formation theory and observations with the MAGIC telescope /

    OpenAIRE

    Domingo Santamaría, Eva

    2006-01-01

    Consultable des del TDX Títol obtingut de la portada digitalitzada Es el propósito de esta tesis estudiar la posibilidad de que regiones con importante actividad en formación estelar sean fuentes de rayos gamma para los actuales y futuros detectores, ya sean detectores de rayos gamma con base en satélites como telescopios Cherenkov situados en la superficie terrestre. Tras una evaluación fenomenológica positiva de que la emisión de rayos gamma procedente de galaxias con elevada activida...

  6. (gamma)-ray emission from regions of star formation: Theory and observations with the MAGIC Telescope

    OpenAIRE

    Domingo Santamaría, Eva

    2006-01-01

    Es el propósito de esta tesis estudiar la posibilidad de que regiones con importante actividad en formación estelar sean fuentes de rayos gamma para los actuales y futuros detectores, ya sean detectores de rayos gamma con base en satélites como telescopios Cherenkov situados en la superficie terrestre.Tras una evaluación fenomenológica positiva de que la emisión de rayos gamma procedente de galaxias con elevada actividad en formación estelar (como las llamadas starburst o las galaxias ultra l...

  7. Decline in hepatitis B infection observed after 11 years of regional vaccination among Danish drug users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mössner Klemmensen, Belinda; Skamling, M; Jørgensen, T Riis

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the current prevalence of viral hepatitis and HIV among drug users, and to compare this prevalence with previous findings in the same geographical region. Cross-sectional surveys of drug users attending treatment centers on the island of Funen with approxi...... with approximately 500,000 inhabitants were administered in 1996 and 2007. The 2007 prevalence estimates were: anti-HBc 50.2%, HBsAg 0.9%, anti-HCV 66.8%, HCV-RNA 40%, and anti-HIV 1.1%. The corresponding 1996 prevalence values were: anti-HBc 70% (P ...

  8. Regional-scale surface flux observations across the boreal forest during BOREAS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oncley, S.P.; Lenschow, D.H.; Campos, T.L.

    1997-01-01

    forests to be more photosynthetically active than nearby coniferous forests. Coniferous forest fluxes across the transect from the BOREAS southern to northern study areas show no apparent spatial trend, though smaller-scale variability is large. The fluxes make a smooth transition from the BOREAS northern...... study area to the subarctic tundra. Typical midsummer, midday, large-scale net ecosystem exchanges of carbon dioxide were about -10 mu mol m(-2) s(-1) for primarily deciduous forests, about -6 mu mol m(-2) s(-1) for the primarily coniferous regions between and including the two BOREAS study areas...

  9. SCIAMACHY observed changes in the column mixing ratio of methane over the Indian region and a comparison with global scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavitha, M.; Nair, Prabha R.

    2017-10-01

    The trends in the column averaged mixing ratio of methane (XCH4) over the Indian region during 2003-2009 periods were studied using the SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) observations. Considering the sensor degradation, the trends were analyzed for 2003 to 2005 and 2006 to 2009 separately. Over India, the trend in XCH4 varied from 5.2 to 7.6 ppb per year after 2005, exhibiting a 2-4 fold increase compared to 2003-2005. While the increase over Northern parts of India is attributed to increasing CH4 emissions from rice cultivation and livestock population, those over Southern regions are due to increased oil and gas mining activities. A comparison of these trends with those over most of the hotspot regions over the globe revealed that those regions exhibited higher growth rates of XCH4 compared to Indian regions during 2006-2009. The seasonal patterns of XCH4 and near-surface CH4 at selected global network stations were also examined in detail. This analysis revealed hemispheric difference and varying seasonal patterns suggesting the inhomogeneous vertical distribution of CH4. The observed differences in the seasonal patterns of near-surface CH4 and XCH4 suggest that the surface emissions need not replicate at higher altitudes due to long-range transport, the boundary layer meteorology and lifetime of CH4 in the atmosphere.

  10. Observed and modeled surface Lagrangian transport between coastal regions in the Adriatic Sea with implications for marine protected areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Daniel F.; Griffa, Annalisa; Zambianchi, Enrico; Suaria, Giuseppe; Corgnati, Lorenzo; Magaldi, Marcello G.; Poulain, Pierre-Marie; Russo, Aniello; Bellomo, Lucio; Mantovani, Carlo; Celentano, Paolo; Molcard, Anne; Borghini, Mireno

    2016-04-01

    Surface drifters and virtual particles are used to investigate transport between seven coastal regions in the central and southern Adriatic Sea to estimate the degree to which these regions function as a network. Alongshore coastal currents and cyclonic gyres are the primary circulation features that connected regions in the Adriatic Sea. The historical drifter observations span 25 years and, thus, provide estimates of transport between regions realized by the mean surface circulation. The virtual particle trajectories and a dedicated drifter experiment show that southeasterly Sirocco winds can drive eastward cross-Adriatic transport from the Italian coast near the Gargano Promontory to the Dalmatian Islands in Croatia. Southeasterly winds disrupt alongshore transport on the west coast. Northwesterly Mistral winds enhanced east-to-west transport and resulted in stronger southeastward coastal currents in the western Adriatic current (WAC) and export to the northern Ionian Sea. The central Italian regions showed strong connections from north to south, likely realized by alongshore transport in the WAC. Alongshore, downstream transport was weaker on the east coast, likely due to the more complex topography introduced by the Dalmatian Islands of Croatia. Cross-Adriatic connection percentages were higher for east-to-west transport. Cross-Adriatic transport, in general, occurred via the cyclonic sub-gyres, with westward (eastward) transport observed in the northern (southern) arms of the central and southern gyres.

  11. Aura OMI observations of regional SO2 and NO2 pollution changes from 2005 to 2015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krotkov, Nickolay A.; McLinden, Chris A.; Li, Can; Lamsal, Lok N.; Celarier, Edward A.; Marchenko, Sergey V.; Swartz, William H.; Bucsela, Eric J.; Joiner, Joanna; Duncan, Bryan N.; Boersma, Folkert; Veefkind, J.P.; Levelt, Pieternel F.; Fioletov, Vitali E.; Dickerson, Russell R.; He, Hao; Lu, Zifeng; Streets, David G.

    2016-01-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) onboard NASA's Aura satellite has been providing global observations of the ozone layer and key atmospheric pollutant gases, such as nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2), since October 2004. The data products from the same instrument provide consis

  12. Aura OMI observations of regional SO2 and NO2 pollution changes from 2005 to 2015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krotkov, Nickolay A.; McLinden, Chris A.; Li, Can; Lamsal, Lok N.; Celarier, Edward A.; Marchenko, Sergey V.; Swartz, William H.; Bucsela, Eric J.; Joiner, Joanna; Duncan, Bryan N.; Boersma, Folkert; Veefkind, J.P.; Levelt, Pieternel F.; Fioletov, Vitali E.; Dickerson, Russell R.; He, Hao; Lu, Zifeng; Streets, David G.

    2016-01-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) onboard NASA's Aura satellite has been providing global observations of the ozone layer and key atmospheric pollutant gases, such as nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2), since October 2004. The data products from the same instrument provide

  13. Present Day Regional Mass Loss of Greenland Observed with Satellite Gravimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrama, E.J.O.; Wouters, B.; Vermeersen, L.L.A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes results obtained for Greenland’s mass balance observed with NASA’s GRACE mission. We estimate a Greenland ice sheet mass loss at −201 ± 19 Gt/year including a discernible acceleration of −8 ± 7 Gt/year2 between March 2003 and February 2010. The mass loss of glacier systems on

  14. Present Day Regional Mass Loss of Greenland Observed with Satellite Gravimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrama, E.J.O.; Wouters, B.; Vermeersen, L.L.A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes results obtained for Greenland’s mass balance observed with NASA’s GRACE mission. We estimate a Greenland ice sheet mass loss at −201 ± 19 Gt/year including a discernible acceleration of −8 ± 7 Gt/year2 between March 2003 and February 2010. The mass loss of glacier systems on t

  15. Southern high-latitude Digisonde observations of ionosphere E-region Bragg scatter during intense lacuna conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. P. Monselesan

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available During summer months at solar cycle minimum, F-region lacuna and slant-Es conditions (SEC are common features of daytime ionograms recorded around local magnetic noon at Casey, Antarctica. Digisonde measurements of drift velocity height profiles show that the occurrence of lacuna prevents the determination of F-region drift velocities and also affects E-region drift velocity measurements. Unique E-region spectral features revealed as intervals of Bragg scatter superimposed on typical background E-region reflection were observed in Digisonde Doppler spectra during intense lacuna conditions. Daytime E-region Doppler spectra recorded at carrier frequencies from 1.5 to 2.7MHz, below the E-region critical frequency foE, have two side-peaks corresponding to Bragg scatter at approximately ±1-2Hz symmetrically located on each side of a central-peak corresponding to near-zenith total reflections. Angle-of-arrival information and ray-tracing simulations show that echo returns are coming from oblique directions most likely resulting from direct backscatter from just below the total reflection height for each sounding frequency. The Bragg backscatter events are shown to manifest during polar lacuna conditions, and to affect the determination of E-region background drift velocities, and as such must be considered when using standard Doppler-sorted interferometry (DSI techniques to estimate ionospheric drift velocities. Given the Doppler and spatial separation of the echoes determined from high-resolution Doppler measurements, we are able to estimate the Bragg scatter phase velocity independently from the bulk E-region motion. The phase velocity coincides with the ExB direction derived from in situ fluxgate magnetometer records. When ionospheric refraction is considered, the phase velocity amplitudes deduced from DSI are comparable to the ion-acoustic speed expected in the E-region. We briefly consider the plausibility that these

  16. A new approach for tsunami early warning using tsunami observations in a source region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanioka, Y.

    2015-12-01

    After the 2011 devastating Tohoku tsunami, improvement of tsunami early warning system is one of key issues in Japan. Japanese government was decided to install 125 ocean bottom pressure sensors and seismometers with a cable system along the Japan and Kurile trench. Each sensor is separated by 30km. We should develop a new approach for real-time tsunami forecast using those newly available data combined with GNSS data or seismic data. A well-recognized problem to use tsunami data at pressure sensors on the top of tsunami source area is a fact that a large vertical coseismic deformation due to a large earthquake cannot be observed at those sensors. The sensors observe a tsunami wave when it starts to propagate. Because of that problem, GSNN data or seismic data are typically used to estimate the coseismic deformation for the tsunami numerical simulation. In this paper, we develop a new technique, which solve the problem. Our technique uses the observations at pressure sensors on the tsunami source area as an input to compute the tsunami directly. Actual tsunami heights at the sensors on the source area is unknown because the cosismic vertical deformation is unknown. However, we can observe directly the time derivative of tsunami heights at those sensors. Time derivatives of tsunami heights at each point are used as inputs to compute the tsunami height distribution in the calculated area. Then we can numerically compute a tsunami using a traditional finite difference technique from the tsunami height distribution computed. For numerical test, first, we compute the synthetic tsunamis using the fault model with 1 minute grid system. The computed tsunami waveforms at 15 minutes x 15 minutes grid points are used as the observed data for this new technique. Each observed point is separated by 15 minutes, about 30km. The result show that the accuracy of tsunami computation is good enough for tsunami forecast. Tsunami generation with a long duration, such as tsunami

  17. Long-Term Observation of Small and Medium-Scale Gravity Waves over the Brazilian Equatorial Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essien, Patrick; Buriti, Ricardo; Wrasse, Cristiano M.; Medeiros, Amauri; Paulino, Igo; Takahashi, Hisao; Campos, Jose Andre

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports the long term observations of small and medium-scale gravity waves over Brazilian equatorial region. Coordinated optical and radio measurements were made from OLAP at Sao Joao do Cariri (7.400S, 36.500W) to investigate the occurrences and properties and to characterize the regional mesospheric gravity wave field. All-sky imager measurements were made from the site. for almost 11 consecutive years (September 2000 to November 2010). Most of the waves propagated were characterized as small-scale gravity. The characteristics of the two waves events agreed well with previous gravity wave studies from Brazil and other sites. However, significant differences in the wave propagation headings indicate dissimilar source regions. The observed medium-scale gravity wave events constitute an important new dataset to study their mesospheric properties at equatorial latitudes. These data exhibited similar propagation headings to the short period events, suggesting they originated from the same source regions. It was also observed that some of the medium-scale were capable of propagating into the lower thermosphere where they may have acted directly as seeds for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability development. The wave events were primarily generated by meteorological processes since there was no correlation between the evolution of the wave events and solar cycle F10.7.

  18. Optical effects of space weathering in lunar crustal magnetic anomaly regions based on CE-1 observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; Wang, X.; Cui, J.; Fu, X.; Zhang, G.; Yao, M.; Liu, B.; Liu, J.; Li, C.; Ouyang, Z.

    2013-12-01

    The discovery of mini-magnetospheres above the lunar surface suggests that magnetic shielding could have led to anomalous space weathering (little darkening with limited reddening) in magnetic anomaly regions. Using spectral data from Chang'E 1 Imaging Interferometer (IIM) and data from Lunar Prospector's magnetometer, we instigate the relationship between lunar crustal magnetic anomalies and the optical effects in those areas in association with space weathering. The IIM onboard China's Chang'E 1 (CE-1) spacecraft is a Fourier transform Sagnac imaging spectrometer operating in the visible to near infrared (0.48-0.96 μm) spectral range, with 32 channels at spectral intervals of 325.5 cm-1. We selected four regions with crustal magnetic anomalies to study their albedo properties: three lunar swirls (Gerasimovich, Mare Marginis, and Reiner Gamma) and the area antipodal to Herzsprung. We found that all three of the anomalous albedo areas are associated with magnetic anomalies, however, no anomalous albedo feature is found in the last magnetic anomaly area. In addition, we also studied the correlation between magnetic anomaly strength and albedo anomaly on a global scale. Our initial analysis suggests an overall tread of less darkening with increased magnetic anomaly.

  19. [National socialism he