WorldWideScience

Sample records for nm diameter gold

  1. Diameter dependent failure current density of gold nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karim, S; Maaz, K; Ali, G; Ensinger, W

    2009-01-01

    Failure current density of single gold nanowires is investigated in this paper. Single wires with diameters ranging from 80 to 720 nm and length 30 μm were electrochemically deposited in ion track-etched single-pore polycarbonate membranes. The maximum current density was investigated while keeping the wires embedded in the polymer matrix and ramping up the current until failure occurred. The current density is found to increase with diminishing diameter and the wires with a diameter of 80 nm withstand 1.2 x 10 12 A m -2 before undergoing failure. Possible reasons for these results are discussed in this paper.

  2. Gold Nanohole Array with Sub-1 nm Roughness by Annealing for Sensitivity Enhancement of Extraordinary Optical Transmission Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Irannejad, Mehrdad; Yavuz, Mustafa; Cui, Bo

    2015-05-01

    Nanofabrication technology plays an important role in the performance of surface plasmonic devices such as extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) sensor. In this work, a double liftoff process was developed to fabricate a series of nanohole arrays of a hole diameter between 150 and 235 nm and a period of 500 nm in a 100-nm-thick gold film on a silica substrate. To improve the surface quality of the gold film, thermal annealing was conducted, by which an ultra-smooth gold film with root-mean-square (RMS) roughness of sub-1 nm was achieved, accompanied with a hole diameter shrinkage. The surface sensitivity of the nanohole arrays was measured using a monolayer of 16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid (16-MHA) molecule, and the surface sensitivity was increased by 2.5 to 3 times upon annealing the extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) sensor.

  3. Sub-10 ohm resistance gold films prepared by removal of ligands from thiol-stabilized 6 nm gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugden, Mark W; Richardson, Tim H; Leggett, Graham

    2010-03-16

    The optical and electrical properties of dodecanethiol-stabilized nanoparticles (6 nm diameter gold core) have been investigated over a range of film thicknesses and temperatures. The surface plasmon resonance absorbance is found to be dependent on temperature. Heating of the nanoparticle film causes desorption of the thiol from the surface of the gold nanoparticle, resulting in irreversible changes to the absorption spectra of the nanoparticle film. Atomic force microscopy images of the samples before and after heating for different film thicknesses reveal structural changes and increased domain connectivity for thicker films leading to sub-10 ohm resistances measured for the 15-layer film.

  4. Optoacoustic response of gold nanorods in soft phantoms using high-power diode laser assemblies at 870 and 905 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggio, L; Gawali, S; Gallego, D; Rodríguez, S; Sánchez, M; Carpintero, G; Lamela, H

    2017-03-01

    In the present paper we show the optoacoustic (OA) response of two solutions of gold nanorods dispersed in distilled water (0.8 mg/ml) and hosted in tissue-like phantoms by using small arrays of HPDLs at 870 and 905 nm as excitation sources. The HPDLs are coupled to a 7-to-1 optical fiber bundle with output diameter of 675 μm. Each solution of gold nanorods exhibits an absorption peak close to the operating wavelength, i.e. ~860 nm and ~900 nm, respectively, to optimize the generation of OA signals. The phantoms are made of agar, intralipid and hemoglobin to simulate a soft biological tissue with reduced properties of scattering. Three 3-mm diameter tubes done in the phantoms at different depths (0.9 cm, 1.8 cm, and 2.7 cm) have been filled with gold nanorods. In this way, OA signals with appreciable SNR are generated at different depths in the phantoms. The high OA response exhibited by gold nanorods suggests their application in OA spectroscopy as exogenous contrast agents to detect and monitor emerging diseases like metastasis and arteriosclerotic plaques.

  5. On-chip measurements of Brownian relaxation of magnetic beads with diameters from 10 nm to 250 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Rizzi, Giovanni; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of planar Hall effect magnetoresistive sensors for AC susceptibility measurements of magnetic beads with frequencies ranging from DC to 1 MHz. This wide frequency range allows for measuring Brownian relaxation of magnetic beads with diameters ranging from 10 nm to 250 nm....... Brownian relaxation is measured for six different magnetic bead types and their hydrodynamic diameters are determined. The hydrodynamic diameters are found to be within 40% of the nominal bead diameters. We discuss the applicability of the different bead types for volume-based biosensing with respect...... to sedimentation, magnetic trapping, and signal per bead. Among the investigated beads, we conclude that the beads with a nominal diameter of 80 nm are best suited for future on-chip volume-based biosensing experiments using planar Hall effect sensors....

  6. Size control in the synthesis of 1-6 nm gold nanoparticles via solvent-controlled nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jieun; Kim, Dukhan; Lee, Dongil

    2011-11-15

    We report a facile synthetic route for size-controlled preparation of gold nanoparticles. Nearly monodisperse gold nanoparticles with core diameters of 1-6 nm were obtained by reducing AuP(Phenyl)(3)Cl with tert-butylamine borane in the presence of dodecanethiol in the solvent mixture of benzene and CHCl(3). Mechanism studies have shown that the size control is achieved by the solvent-controlled nucleation in which the nuclei concentration increases with increasing the fraction of CHCl(3), leading to smaller particles. It was also found that, following the solvent-controlled nucleation, particle growth occurs via ligand replacement of PPh(3) on the nuclei by Au(I)thiolate generated by the digestive etching of small particles. This synthetic strategy was successfully demonstrated with other alkanethiols of different chain length with which size-controlled, monodisperse gold nanoparticles were prepared in remarkable yield without requiring any postsynthesis treatments.

  7. Moessbauerspectroscopy on Gold Ruby Glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haslbeck, S.

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, the chemical states of gold and the physical mechanisms of the growing process of the particles under the influence of additional ingredients like tin, lead, antimony and selenium before, during and after the colouring process are investigated by using the Moessbauer spectroscopy on 197 Au, 119 Sn and 121 Sb, optical spectroscopy and X-ray-diffraction. Gold in an unnealed, colourless state of the glasses consists of monovalent forming linear bonds to two neighbouring oxygen atoms. The Lamb-Moessbauer factor of these gold oxide bondings is observed as 0.095 at 4.2 K. The gold in it's oxide state transforms to gold particles with a diameter of 3 nm to 60 nm. The size of the gold particles is quite definable within the optical spectra and certain sizes are also discernable within the Moessbauer spectra. One component of the Moessbauer spectra is assigned to the surface layer of the gold particles. By comparing this surface component with the amount of the bulk metallic core, one can calculate the size of the gold particles. In the Moessbauer spectra of the colourless glass one also can find parts of bulk metallic gold. Investigations with X-ray diffraction show that these are gold particles with a diameter of 100 nm to 300 nm and therefore have no additional colouring effect within the visible spectrum. The Moessbauer spectra on gold of the remelt glasses are similar to those which have been measured on the initial colourless glasses

  8. Organosilane oxidation by water catalysed by large gold nanoparticles in a membrane reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gitis, V.; Beerthuis, R.; Shiju, N.R.; Rothenberg, G.

    2014-01-01

    We show that gold nanoparticles catalyse the oxidation of organosilanes using water as oxidant at ambient conditions. Remarkably, monodispersions of small gold particles (3.5 nm diameter) and large ones (6-18 nm diameter) give equally good conversion rates. This is important because separating large

  9. Acute toxicity and pharmacokinetics of 13 nm-sized PEG-coated gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Wan-Seob; Cho, Minjung; Jeong, Jinyoung; Choi, Mina; Cho, Hea-Young; Han, Beom Seok; Kim, Sheen Hee; Kim, Hyoung Ook; Lim, Yong Taik; Chung, Bong Hyun; Jeong, Jayoung

    2009-01-01

    In general, gold nanoparticles are recognized as being as nontoxic. Still, there have been some reports on their toxicity, which has been shown to depend on the physical dimension, surface chemistry, and shape of the nanoparticles. In this study, we carry out an in vivo toxicity study using 13 nm-sized gold nanoparticles coated with PEG (MW 5000). In our findings the 13 nm sized PEG-coated gold nanoparticles were seen to induce acute inflammation and apoptosis in the liver. These nanoparticles were found to accumulate in the liver and spleen for up to 7 days after injection and to have long blood circulation times. In addition, transmission electron microscopy showed that numerous cytoplasmic vesicles and lysosomes of liver Kupffer cells and spleen macrophages contained the PEG-coated gold nanoparticles. These findings of toxicity and kinetics of PEG-coated gold nanoparticles may have important clinical implications regarding the safety issue as PEG-coated gold nanoparticles are widely used in biomedical applications

  10. Room temperature synthesis and optical properties of small diameter (5 nm) ZnO nanorod arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seungho; Jang, Ji-Wook; Lee, Jae Sung; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2010-10-01

    We report a simple wet-chemical synthesis of ∼5 nm diameter ZnO nanorod arrays at room temperature (20 °C) and normal atmospheric pressure (1 atm) and their optical properties. They were single crystalline in nature, and grew in the [001] direction. These small diameter ZnO nanorod arrays can also be synthesized at 0 °C. Control experiments were also conducted. On the basis of the results, we propose a mechanism for the spontaneous growth of the small diameter ZnO structures. The optical properties of the 5 nm diameter ZnO nanorod arrays synthesized using this method were probed by UV-Visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. A clear blue-shift, relative to the absorption band from 50 nm diameter ZnO nanorod arrays, was attributed to the quantum confinement effects caused by the small nanocrystal size in the 5 nm diameter ZnO nanorods.

  11. Spherical aggregates composed of gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C-C; Kuo, P-L; Cheng, Y-C

    2009-01-01

    Alkylated triethylenetetramine (C12E3) was synthesized and used as both a reductant in the preparation of gold nanoparticles by the reduction of HAuCl 4 and a stabilizer in the subsequent self-assembly of the gold nanoparticles. In acidic aqueous solution, spherical aggregates (with a diameter of about 202 ± 22 nm) of gold nanoparticles (with the mean diameter of ∼18.7 nm) were formed. The anion-induced ammonium adsorption of the alkylated amines on the gold nanoparticles was considered to provide the electrostatic repulsion and steric hindrance between the gold nanoparticles, which constituted the barrier that prevented the individual particles from coagulating. However, as the amino groups became deprotonated with increasing pH, the ammonium adsorption was weakened, and the amino groups were desorbed from the gold surface, resulting in discrete gold particles. The results indicate that the morphology of the reduced gold nanoparticles is controllable through pH-'tunable' aggregation under the mediation of the amino groups of alkylated amine to create spherical microstructures.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of pHLIP® coated gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Jennifer L; Crawford, Troy M; Andreev, Oleg A; Reshetnyak, Yana K

    2017-07-01

    Novel approaches in synthesis of spherical and multispiked gold nanoparticles coated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and pH Low Insertion Peptide (pHLIP ® ) were introduced. The presence of a tumor-targeting pHLIP ® peptide in the nanoparticle coating enhances the stability of particles in solution and promotes a pH-dependent cellular uptake. The spherical particles were prepared with sodium citrate as a gold reducing agent to form particles of 7.0±2.5 nm in mean metallic core diameter and ∼43 nm in mean hydrodynamic diameter. The particles that were injected into tumors in mice (21 µg of gold) were homogeneously distributed within a tumor mass with no staining of the muscle tissue adjacent to the tumor. Up to 30% of the injected gold dose remained within the tumor one hour post-injection. The multispiked gold nanoparticles with a mean metallic core diameter of 146.0±50.4 nm and a mean hydrodynamic size of ~161 nm were prepared using ascorbic acid as a reducing agent and disk-like bicelles as a template. Only the presence of a soft template, like bicelles, ensured the appearance of spiked nanoparticles with resonance in the near infrared region. The irradiation of spiked gold nanoparticles by an 805 nm laser led to the time- and concentration-dependent increase of temperature. Both pHLIP ® and PEG coated gold spherical and multispiked nanoparticles might find application in radiation and thermal therapies of tumors.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of pHLIP® coated gold nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Daniels

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Novel approaches in synthesis of spherical and multispiked gold nanoparticles coated with polyethylene glycol (PEG and pH Low Insertion Peptide (pHLIP® were introduced. The presence of a tumor-targeting pHLIP® peptide in the nanoparticle coating enhances the stability of particles in solution and promotes a pH-dependent cellular uptake. The spherical particles were prepared with sodium citrate as a gold reducing agent to form particles of 7.0±2.5 nm in mean metallic core diameter and ∼43 nm in mean hydrodynamic diameter. The particles that were injected into tumors in mice (21 µg of gold were homogeneously distributed within a tumor mass with no staining of the muscle tissue adjacent to the tumor. Up to 30% of the injected gold dose remained within the tumor one hour post-injection. The multispiked gold nanoparticles with a mean metallic core diameter of 146.0±50.4 nm and a mean hydrodynamic size of ~161 nm were prepared using ascorbic acid as a reducing agent and disk-like bicelles as a template. Only the presence of a soft template, like bicelles, ensured the appearance of spiked nanoparticles with resonance in the near infrared region. The irradiation of spiked gold nanoparticles by an 805 nm laser led to the time- and concentration-dependent increase of temperature. Both pHLIP® and PEG coated gold spherical and multispiked nanoparticles might find application in radiation and thermal therapies of tumors.

  14. Generation of polypeptide-templated gold nanoparticles using ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Candace Rae; Pushpavanam, Karthik; Nair, Divya Geetha; Potta, Thrimoorthy; Sutiyoso, Caesario; Kodibagkar, Vikram D; Sapareto, Stephen; Chang, John; Rege, Kaushal

    2013-08-13

    Ionizing radiation, including γ rays and X-rays, are high-energy electromagnetic radiation with diverse applications in nuclear energy, astrophysics, and medicine. In this work, we describe the use of ionizing radiation and cysteine-containing elastin-like polypeptides (C(n)ELPs, where n = 2 or 12 cysteines in the polypeptide sequence) for the generation of gold nanoparticles. In the presence of C(n)ELPs, ionizing radiation doses higher than 175 Gy resulted in the formation of maroon-colored gold nanoparticle dispersions, with maximal absorbance at 520 nm, from colorless metal salts. Visible color changes were not observed in any of the control systems, indicating that ionizing radiation, gold salt solution, and C(n)ELPs were all required for nanoparticle formation. The hydrodynamic diameters of nanoparticles, determined using dynamic light scattering, were in the range of 80-150 nm, while TEM imaging indicated the formation of gold cores 10-20 nm in diameter. Interestingly, C2ELPs formed 1-2 nm diameter gold nanoparticles in the absence of radiation. Our results describe a facile method of nanoparticle formation in which nanoparticle size can be tailored based on radiation dose and C(n)ELP type. Further improvements in these polypeptide-based systems can lead to colorimetric detection of ionizing radiation in a variety of applications.

  15. Reduction of single-walled carbon nanotube diameter to sub-nm via feedstock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurakitseree, T.; Zhao, Pei; Chiashi, Shohei; Maruyama, Shigeo [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tokyo (Japan); Kramberger, Christian [Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna (Austria); Einarsson, Erik [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tokyo (Japan); Global Center of Excellence for Mechanical Systems Innovation, University of Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    Vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotube arrays were synthesized from dip-coated binary Co/Mo catalyst by no-flow chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from either pure ethanol or acetonitrile as carbon feedstock. By changing to acetonitrile the mean diameter was reduced from 2.1 nm to less than 1.0 nm despite using identically prepared catalyst. The demonstrated diameter control on flat substrates is a versatile approach towards the direct synthesis of tailored single-walled carbon nanotubes. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Ultralow-Power Electronic Trapping of Nanoparticles with Sub-10 nm Gold Nanogap Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Avijit; Chen, Xiaoshu; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2016-10-12

    We demonstrate nanogap electrodes for rapid, parallel, and ultralow-power trapping of nanoparticles. Our device pushes the limit of dielectrophoresis by shrinking the separation between gold electrodes to sub-10 nm, thereby creating strong trapping forces at biases as low as the 100 mV ranges. Using high-throughput atomic layer lithography, we manufacture sub-10 nm gaps between 0.8 mm long gold electrodes and pattern them into individually addressable parallel electronic traps. Unlike pointlike junctions made by electron-beam lithography or larger micron-gap electrodes that are used for conventional dielectrophoresis, our sub-10 nm gold nanogap electrodes provide strong trapping forces over a mm-scale trapping zone. Importantly, our technology solves the key challenges associated with traditional dielectrophoresis experiments, such as high voltages that cause heat generation, bubble formation, and unwanted electrochemical reactions. The strongly enhanced fields around the nanogap induce particle-transport speed exceeding 10 μm/s and enable the trapping of 30 nm polystyrene nanoparticles using an ultralow bias of 200 mV. We also demonstrate rapid electronic trapping of quantum dots and nanodiamond particles on arrays of parallel traps. Our sub-10 nm gold nanogap electrodes can be combined with plasmonic sensors or nanophotonic circuitry, and their low-power electronic operation can potentially enable high-density integration on a chip as well as portable biosensing.

  17. The action of NIR (808nm) laser radiation and gold nanorods labeled with IgA and IgG human antibodies on methicillin-resistant and methicillin sensitive strains of Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuchina, Elena S.; Petrov, Pavel O.; Ratto, Fulvio; Centi, Sonia; Pini, Roberto; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2015-03-01

    The effect of NIR laser radiation (808 nm) on methicillin-sensitive and methicillin resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus incubated with gold nanorods is studied. Nanorods having length of 44 (± 4) nm and diameter of 10 (± 3) nm with the absorption maximum in the NIR (800 nm), functionalized with human immunoglobulins IgA and IgG, were synthesized and used in the studies. The killing ability up to 97% of the microorganism populations by using this nanotechnology was shown.

  18. Optical trapping of gold aerosols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitt, Regina K.; Pedersen, Liselotte Jauffred; Taheri, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Aerosol trapping has proven challenging and was only recently demonstrated.1 This was accomplished by utilizing an air chamber designed to have a minimum of turbulence and a laser beam with a minimum of aberration. Individual gold nano-particles with diameters between 80 nm and 200 nm were trapped...... in air using a 1064 nm laser. The positions visited by the trapped gold nano-particle were quantified using a quadrant photo diode placed in the back focal plane. The time traces were analyzed and the trapping stiffness characterizing gold aerosol trapping determined and compared to aerosol trapping...... of nanometer sized silica and polystyrene particles. Based on our analysis, we concluded that gold nano-particles trap more strongly in air than similarly sized polystyrene and silica particles. We found that, in a certain power range, the trapping strength of polystyrene particles is linearly decreasing...

  19. Silver, gold, and alloyed silver-gold nanoparticles: characterization and comparative cell-biologic action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahl, Dirk; Diendorf, Jörg; Ristig, Simon; Greulich, Christina; Li, Zi-An; Farle, Michael; Köller, Manfred; Epple, Matthias

    2012-10-01

    Silver, gold, and silver-gold-alloy nanoparticles were prepared by citrate reduction modified by the addition of tannin during the synthesis, leading to a reduction in particle size by a factor of three. Nanoparticles can be prepared by this easy water-based synthesis and subsequently functionalized by the addition of either tris(3-sulfonatophenyl)phosphine or poly( N-vinylpyrrolidone). The resulting nanoparticles of silver (diameter 15-25 nm), gold (5-6 nm), and silver-gold (50:50; 10-12 nm) were easily dispersable in water and also in cell culture media (RPMI + 10 % fetal calf serum), as shown by nanoparticle tracking analysis and differential centrifugal sedimentation. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy showed a polycrystalline nature of all nanoparticles. EDX on single silver-gold nanoparticles indicated that the concentration of gold is higher inside a nanoparticle. The biologic action of the nanoparticles toward human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) was different: Silver nanoparticles showed a significant concentration-dependent influence on the viability of hMSC. Gold nanoparticles showed only a small effect on the viability of hMSC after 7 days. Surprisingly, silver-gold nanoparticles had no significant influence on the viability of hMSC despite the silver content. Silver nanoparticles and silver-gold nanoparticles in the concentration range of 5-20 μg mL-1 induced the activation of hMSC as indicated by the release of IL-8. In contrast, gold nanoparticles led to a reduction of the release of IL-6 and IL-8.

  20. Modified gold electrodes based on thiocytosine/guanine-gold nanoparticles for uric and ascorbic acid determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vulcu, Adriana; Grosan, Camelia; Muresan, Liana Maria; Pruneanu, Stela; Olenic, Liliana

    2013-01-01

    The present paper describes the preparation of new modified surfaces for electrodes based on guanine/thiocytosine and gold nanoparticles. The gold nanoparticles were analyzed by UV–vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and it was found that they have diameters between 30 and 40 nm. The layers were characterized by specular reflectance infrared spectroscopy (FTIR-RAS) and by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The thickness of layers was found to be approximately 30 nm for TC layers and 300 nm for GU layers. Every layer was characterized as electrochemical sensor (by cyclic voltammetry) both for uric acid and ascorbic acid determinations, separately and in their mixture. The modified sensors have good calibration functions with good sensitivity (between 1.145 and 1.406 mA cm −2 /decade), reproducibility ( t hiocytosine (Au T C) and gold g uanine (Au G U) layers

  1. Synthesis of gold nanoclusters: a fluorescent marker for water-soluble TiO2 nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratanatawanate, Chalita; Yu Jing; Zhou Chen; Zheng Jie; Balkus, Kenneth J Jr

    2011-01-01

    The first example of a water-soluble wrapped titania nanotube (TNT) decorated with fluorescent gold nanoparticles has been prepared. Gold nanoparticles ∼ 1.6 nm in diameter were grown on the TiO 2 nanotubes using a thiolactic acid linker to control the size. The gold clusters emit at 660 nm in water and were imaged using confocal microscopy. The gold decorated TNTs were suspended in water by wrapping the nanotubes with poly-L-arginine.

  2. Gradual growth of gold nanoseeds on silica for SiO2-gold homogeneous nano core/shell applications by the chemical reduction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezvani Nikabadi, H; Shahtahmasebi, N; Rezaee Rokn-Abadi, M; Bagheri Mohagheghi, M M; Goharshadi, E K

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a facile method for the synthesis of gold nanoseeds on the functionalized surface of silica nanoparticles has been investigated. Mono-dispersed silica particles and gold nanoparticles were prepared by the chemical reduction method. The thickness of the Au shell was well controlled by repeating the reduction time of HAuCl 4 on silica/3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES)/initial gold nanoparticles. The prepared SiO 2 -gold core/shell nanoparticles were studied using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and ultraviolet visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy. The TEM images indicated that the silica nanoparticles were spherical in shape with 100 nm diameters and functionalizing silica nanoparticles with a layer of bi-functional APTES molecules and tetrakis hydroxy methyl phosphonium chloride. The gold nanoparticles show a narrow size of up to 5 nm and by growing gold nanoseeds over the silica cores a red shift in the maximum absorbance of UV-Vis spectroscopy from 524 to 637 nm was observed.

  3. Silver, gold, and alloyed silver-gold nanoparticles: characterization and comparative cell-biologic action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahl, Dirk; Diendorf, Joerg; Ristig, Simon [University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CeNIDE) (Germany); Greulich, Christina [Ruhr-University of Bochum, Bergmannsheil University Hospital/Surgical Research (Germany); Li Zian; Farle, Michael [University of Duisburg-Essen, Faculty of Physics, Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CeNIDE) (Germany); Koeller, Manfred [Ruhr-University of Bochum, Bergmannsheil University Hospital/Surgical Research (Germany); Epple, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.epple@uni-due.de [University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CeNIDE) (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    Silver, gold, and silver-gold-alloy nanoparticles were prepared by citrate reduction modified by the addition of tannin during the synthesis, leading to a reduction in particle size by a factor of three. Nanoparticles can be prepared by this easy water-based synthesis and subsequently functionalized by the addition of either tris(3-sulfonatophenyl)phosphine or poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone). The resulting nanoparticles of silver (diameter 15-25 nm), gold (5-6 nm), and silver-gold (50:50; 10-12 nm) were easily dispersable in water and also in cell culture media (RPMI + 10 % fetal calf serum), as shown by nanoparticle tracking analysis and differential centrifugal sedimentation. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy showed a polycrystalline nature of all nanoparticles. EDX on single silver-gold nanoparticles indicated that the concentration of gold is higher inside a nanoparticle. The biologic action of the nanoparticles toward human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) was different: Silver nanoparticles showed a significant concentration-dependent influence on the viability of hMSC. Gold nanoparticles showed only a small effect on the viability of hMSC after 7 days. Surprisingly, silver-gold nanoparticles had no significant influence on the viability of hMSC despite the silver content. Silver nanoparticles and silver-gold nanoparticles in the concentration range of 5-20 {mu}g mL{sup -1} induced the activation of hMSC as indicated by the release of IL-8. In contrast, gold nanoparticles led to a reduction of the release of IL-6 and IL-8.

  4. Silver, gold, and alloyed silver–gold nanoparticles: characterization and comparative cell-biologic action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahl, Dirk; Diendorf, Jörg; Ristig, Simon; Greulich, Christina; Li Zian; Farle, Michael; Köller, Manfred; Epple, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Silver, gold, and silver–gold-alloy nanoparticles were prepared by citrate reduction modified by the addition of tannin during the synthesis, leading to a reduction in particle size by a factor of three. Nanoparticles can be prepared by this easy water-based synthesis and subsequently functionalized by the addition of either tris(3-sulfonatophenyl)phosphine or poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone). The resulting nanoparticles of silver (diameter 15–25 nm), gold (5–6 nm), and silver–gold (50:50; 10–12 nm) were easily dispersable in water and also in cell culture media (RPMI + 10 % fetal calf serum), as shown by nanoparticle tracking analysis and differential centrifugal sedimentation. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy showed a polycrystalline nature of all nanoparticles. EDX on single silver–gold nanoparticles indicated that the concentration of gold is higher inside a nanoparticle. The biologic action of the nanoparticles toward human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) was different: Silver nanoparticles showed a significant concentration-dependent influence on the viability of hMSC. Gold nanoparticles showed only a small effect on the viability of hMSC after 7 days. Surprisingly, silver–gold nanoparticles had no significant influence on the viability of hMSC despite the silver content. Silver nanoparticles and silver–gold nanoparticles in the concentration range of 5–20 μg mL −1 induced the activation of hMSC as indicated by the release of IL-8. In contrast, gold nanoparticles led to a reduction of the release of IL-6 and IL-8.

  5. Linear Optical Properties of Gold Colloid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingmin XIA

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Gold colloid was prepared by reducing HAuCl4·4H2O with Na3C6H5O7·2H2O. The morphology, size of gold nanoparticles and the optical property of colloid were characterized by transmission electron microscope and UV-Vis spectrophotometer, respectively. It shows that the gold nanoparticles are in the shape of spheres with diameters less than 8 nm, and the surface plasmon resonance absorption peak is located at about 438 nm. As the volume fraction of gold particles increases, the intensity of absorption peak strengthens. The optical property of gold colloid was analyzed by Maxwell-Garnett (MG effective medium theory in the company of Drude dispersion model. The results show that the matrix dielectric constant is a main factor, which influences the optical property of gold colloid.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.4.9558

  6. Optical properties of spherical gold mesoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evlyukhin, A. B.; Kuznetsov, A. I.; Novikov, S. M.

    2012-01-01

    Optical properties of spherical gold particles with diameters of 150-650 nm (mesoparticles) are studied by reflectance spectroscopy. Particles are fabricated by laser-induced transfer of metallic droplets onto metal and dielectric substrates. Contributions of higher multipoles (beyond...

  7. Effect of surface roughness on substrate-tuned gold nanoparticle gap plasmon resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumdee, Chatdanai; Yun, Binfeng; Kik, Pieter G

    2015-03-07

    The effect of nanoscale surface roughness on the gap plasmon resonance of gold nanoparticles on thermally evaporated gold films is investigated experimentally and numerically. Single-particle scattering spectra obtained from 80 nm diameter gold particles on a gold film show significant particle-to-particle variation of the peak scattering wavelength of ±28 nm. The experimental results are compared with numerical simulations of gold nanoparticles positioned on representative rough gold surfaces, modeled based on atomic force microscopy measurements. The predicted spectral variation and average resonance wavelength show good agreement with the measured data. The study shows that nanometer scale surface roughness can significantly affect the performance of gap plasmon-based devices.

  8. The electrical double layer on gold probed by electrokinetic and surface force measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giesbers, M.; Kleijn, J.M.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    Gold surfaces, obtained by vacuum deposition of 15-nm gold films on glass and silica wafers, were studied in aqueous solutions by streaming potential measurements and colloidal-probe AFM force measurements. In the force measurements both a bare and a gold-coated silica particle (6 m in diameter)

  9. Ultra-high sensitive substrates for surface enhanced Raman scattering, made of 3 nm gold nanoparticles embedded on SiO2 nanospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phatangare, A. B.; Dhole, S. D.; Dahiwale, S. S.; Bhoraskar, V. N.

    2018-05-01

    The surface properties of substrates made of 3 nm gold nanoparticles embedded on SiO2 nanospheres enabled fingerprint detection of thiabendazole (TBZ), crystal violet (CV) and 4-Aminothiophenol (4-ATP) at an ultralow concentration of ∼10-18 M by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Gold nanoparticles of an average size of ∼3 nm were synthesized and simultaneously embedded on SiO2 nanospheres by the electron irradiation method. The substrates made from the 3 nm gold nanoparticles embedded on SiO2 nanospheres were successfully used for recording fingerprint SERS spectra of TBZ, CV and 4-ATP over a wide range of concentrations from 10-6 M to 10-18 M using 785 nm laser. The unique features of these substrates are roughness near the surface due to the inherent structural defects of 3 nm gold nanoparticles, nanogaps of ≤ 1 nm between the embedded nanoparticles and their high number. These produced an abundance of nanocavities which act as active centers of hot-spots and provided a high electric field at the reporter molecules and thus an enhancement factor required to record the SERS spectra at ultra low concentration of 10-18 M. The SERS spectra recorded by the substrates of 4 nm and 6 nm gold nanoparticles are discussed.

  10. Fabrication of gold-nanoparticle arrays using photolithography and thermal dewetting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vreede, Lennart; Göeken, Kristian; Göeken, Kristian; Gill, Ron; Gill, Ron; van den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C.T.; Zengerle, R.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a new manufacturing method using only basic cleanroom techniques to produce an array of 106 100 nm diameter gold-nanoparticles (GNPs) of equal shape and 5 μm spacing on a fused silica surface. Photolithography and sputtering are used to produce gold islets, followed by a simple

  11. Rapid extra-/intracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles by the fungus Penicillium sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Liangwei; Xian, Liang; Feng, Jia-Xun

    2011-03-01

    In this work, the fungus Penicillium was used for rapid extra-/intracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles. AuCl4 - ions reacted with the cell filtrate of Penicillium sp. resulting in extracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles within 1 min. Intracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles was obtained by incubating AuCl4 - solution with fungal biomass for 8 h. The gold nanoparticles were characterized by means of visual observation, UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The extracellular nanoparticles exhibited maximum absorbance at 545 nm in UV-Vis spectroscopy. The XRD spectrum showed Bragg reflections corresponding to the gold nanocrystals. TEM exhibited the formed spherical gold nanoparticles in the size range from 30 to 50 nm with an average size of 45 nm. SEM and TEM revealed that the intracellular gold nanoparticles were well dispersed on the cell wall and within the cell, and they are mostly spherical in shape with an average diameter of 50 nm. The presence of gold was confirmed by EDX analysis.

  12. Morphological and electrical study of gold ultrathin films on mica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahamondes, S.; Donoso, S. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Av. Blanco Encalada 2008, Santiago (Chile); Henríquez, R. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Av. España 1680, Valparaíso (Chile); Flores, M., E-mail: mflorescarra@ing.uchile.cl [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Av. Blanco Encalada 2008, Santiago (Chile)

    2013-12-02

    We present a topographical study of the formation of thin films of gold on muscovite mica. The characterization of the samples was done with scanning tunneling microscopy, atomic force microscopy as well as electric measurements. We performed our study on two groups of samples: first group of samples, evaporated at room temperature for thickness ranging from 1.5 up to 97 nm; second group of samples, for two different thicknesses of 3 nm and 50 nm evaporated at different substrate temperatures, between 110 and 530 K. The gold films show a Volmer–Weber growth. The complete films are obtained from samples with a nominal thickness of 8 nm deposited. The average grain diameter is constant, with nominal thicknesses of 18.5 nm, up to 8 nm and increases with the thickness for higher deposition. The average grain diameter is similar regardless of the temperature of the substrate for samples of 3 nm thickness, but changes for samples of 50 nm thickness. The resistivity is inversely dependent on nominal thickness and the mean free path is lineally dependent on nominal thickness. - Highlights: • We have grown thin gold films onto mica at different substrate temperatures. • We identified a continuous film at nominal thickness of 8 nm. • The grain size shows a direct dependence on the nominal film thickness. • The electron mean free path, at 4 K, is linearly dependent on nominal thickness.

  13. Spontaneous formation of gold nanostructures in aqueous microdroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Kyoo; Samanta, Devleena; Nam, Hong Gil; Zare, Richard N

    2018-04-19

    The synthesis of gold nanostructures has received widespread attention owing to many important applications. We report the accelerated synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), as well as the reducing-agent-free and template-free synthesis of gold nanoparticles and nanowires in aerosol microdroplets. At first, the AuNP synthesis are carried out by fusing two aqueous microdroplet streams containing chloroauric acid and sodium borohydride. The AuNPs (~7 nm in diameter) are produced within 60 µs at the rate of 0.24 nm µs -1 . Compared to bulk solution, microdroplets enhance the size and the growth rate of AuNPs by factors of about 2.1 and 1.2 × 10 5 , respectively. Later, we find that gold nanoparticles and nanowires (~7 nm wide and >2000 nm long) are also formed in microdroplets in the absence of any added reducing agent, template, or externally applied charge. Thus, water microdroplets not only accelerate the synthesis of AuNPs by orders of magnitude, but they also cause spontaneous formation of gold nanostructures.

  14. A nanoporous gold membrane for sensing applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swe Zin Oo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Design and fabrication of three-dimensionally structured, gold membranes containing hexagonally close-packed microcavities with nanopores in the base, are described. Our aim is to create a nanoporous structure with localized enhancement of the fluorescence or Raman scattering at, and in the nanopore when excited with light of approximately 600 nm, with a view to provide sensitive detection of biomolecules. A range of geometries of the nanopore integrated into hexagonally close-packed assemblies of gold micro-cavities was first evaluated theoretically. The optimal size and shape of the nanopore in a single microcavity were then considered to provide the highest localized plasmon enhancement (of fluorescence or Raman scattering at the very center of the nanopore for a bioanalyte traversing through. The optimized design was established to be a 1200 nm diameter cavity of 600 nm depth with a 50 nm square nanopore with rounded corners in the base. A gold 3D-structured membrane containing these sized microcavities with the integrated nanopore was successfully fabricated and ‘proof of concept’ Raman scattering experiments are described. Keywords: Nanopore, Polymer sphere, Gold membrane, Plasmons, Sensing, SERS

  15. PVA stabilized gold nanoparticles by use of unexplored albeit conventional reducing agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khanna, P K [Nanomaterials Laboratory, Centre for Materials for Electronics Technology (C-MET), Panchwati, Off Pashan Road, Pune 411008 (India); Gokhale, R [Nanomaterials Laboratory, Centre for Materials for Electronics Technology (C-MET), Panchwati, Off Pashan Road, Pune 411008 (India); Subbarao, V V.V.S. [Nanomaterials Laboratory, Centre for Materials for Electronics Technology (C-MET), Panchwati, Off Pashan Road, Pune 411008 (India); Vishwanath, A Kasi [Nanomaterials Laboratory, Centre for Materials for Electronics Technology (C-MET), Panchwati, Off Pashan Road, Pune 411008 (India); Das, B K [Nanomaterials Laboratory, Centre for Materials for Electronics Technology (C-MET), Panchwati, Off Pashan Road, Pune 411008 (India); Satyanarayana, C V.V. [National Chemical Laboratory, Pashan Road, Pune 41108 (India)

    2005-07-15

    Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) stabilized gold nanoparticles have been prepared in aqueous medium using two different reducing viz.; hydrazine hydrate, a stronger reducing agent and sodium formaldehydesulfoxylate (SFS), a slightly weaker reducing agent. SFS is used for first ever time for reduction of gold metal salt. The PVA stabilized gold nanoparticles solutions are wine red to blood red coloured and are stable over a long period of time with no indication of aggregation. The solution shows strong visible light absorptions in the range of 520-540 nm, characteristics of gold nanoparticles. Powder X-ray diffraction patterns of freshly prepared films containing gold nanoparticles indicated particles size to be about 15 nm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of a more than two-week-old sample revealed well-defined non-agglomerated spherical particles of about 50 nm diameter in solutions.

  16. PVA stabilized gold nanoparticles by use of unexplored albeit conventional reducing agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna, P.K.; Gokhale, R.; Subbarao, V.V.V.S.; Vishwanath, A. Kasi; Das, B.K.; Satyanarayana, C.V.V.

    2005-01-01

    Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) stabilized gold nanoparticles have been prepared in aqueous medium using two different reducing viz.; hydrazine hydrate, a stronger reducing agent and sodium formaldehydesulfoxylate (SFS), a slightly weaker reducing agent. SFS is used for first ever time for reduction of gold metal salt. The PVA stabilized gold nanoparticles solutions are wine red to blood red coloured and are stable over a long period of time with no indication of aggregation. The solution shows strong visible light absorptions in the range of 520-540 nm, characteristics of gold nanoparticles. Powder X-ray diffraction patterns of freshly prepared films containing gold nanoparticles indicated particles size to be about 15 nm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of a more than two-week-old sample revealed well-defined non-agglomerated spherical particles of about 50 nm diameter in solutions

  17. Investigation of ball bond integrity for 0.8 mil (20 microns) diameter gold bonding wire on low k die in wire bonding technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudtarkar, Santosh Anil

    Microelectronics technology has been undergoing continuous scaling to accommodate customer driven demand for smaller, faster and cheaper products. This demand has been satisfied by using novel materials, design techniques and processes. This results in challenges for the chip connection technology and also the package technology. The focus of this research endeavor was restricted to wire bond interconnect technology using gold bonding wires. Wire bond technology is often regarded as a simple first level interconnection technique. In reality, however, this is a complex process that requires a thorough understanding of the interactions between the design, material and process variables, and their impact on the reliability of the bond formed during this process. This research endeavor primarily focused on low diameter, 0.8 mil thick (20 mum) diameter gold bonding wire. Within the scope of this research, the integrity of the ball bond formed by 1.0 mil (25 mum) and 0.8 mil (20 mum) diameter wires was compared. This was followed by the evaluation of bonds formed on bond pads having doped SiO2 (low k) as underlying structures. In addition, the effect of varying the percentage of the wire dopant, palladium and bonding process parameters (bonding force, bond time, ultrasonic energy) for 0.8 mil (20 mum) bonding wire was also evaluated. Finally, a degradation empirical model was developed to understand the decrease in the wire strength. This research effort helped to develop a fundamental understanding of the various factors affecting the reliability of a ball bond from a design (low diameter bonding wire), material (low k and bonding wire dopants), and process (wire bonding process parameters) perspective for a first level interconnection technique, namely wire bonding. The significance of this research endeavor was the systematic investigation of the ball bonds formed using 0.8 mil (20 microm) gold bonding wire within the wire bonding arena. This research addressed low k

  18. Functionalization of lamellar molybdenum disulphide nanocomposite with gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavayen, V.; O'Dwyer, C.; Ana, M.A. Santa; Mirabal, N.; Benavente, E.; Cardenas, G.; Gonzalez, G.; Torres, C.M. Sotomayor

    2007-01-01

    This work explores the functionalization of an organic-inorganic MoS 2 lamellar compound, prepared by a chemical liquid deposition method (CLD), that has an interlamellar distance of ∼5.2 nm, using clusters of gold nanoparticles. The gold nanoparticles have a mean diameter of 1.2 nm, a stability of ∼85 days, and a zeta potential measured to be ζ -6.8 mV (solid). The nanoparticles are localized in the hydrophilic zones, defined by the presence of amine groups of the surfactant between the lamella of MoS 2 . SEM, TEM, EDAX and electron diffraction provide conclusive evidence of the interlamellar insertion of the gold nanoparticles in the MoS 2

  19. Functionalization of lamellar molybdenum disulphide nanocomposite with gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavayen, V. [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Lee Maltings, Prospect Row, Cork (Ireland) and Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Universidad de Chile, P.O. Box 653, Santiago (Chile)]. E-mail: vlavayen@tyndall.ie; O' Dwyer, C. [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Lee Maltings, Prospect Row, Cork (Ireland); Ana, M.A. Santa [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Universidad de Chile, P.O. Box 653, Santiago (Chile); Mirabal, N. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Universidad de Chile, P.O. Box 653, Santiago (Chile); Benavente, E. [Department of Chemistry, Universidad Tecnologica Metropolitana, P.O. Box 9845, Santiago (Chile); Cardenas, G. [Department of Polymers, Faculty of Chemistry Science, Universidad de Concepcion, P.O. Box 160-C, Concepcion (Chile); Gonzalez, G. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Universidad de Chile, P.O. Box 653, Santiago (Chile); Torres, C.M. Sotomayor [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Lee Maltings, Prospect Row, Cork (Ireland)

    2007-01-30

    This work explores the functionalization of an organic-inorganic MoS{sub 2} lamellar compound, prepared by a chemical liquid deposition method (CLD), that has an interlamellar distance of {approx}5.2 nm, using clusters of gold nanoparticles. The gold nanoparticles have a mean diameter of 1.2 nm, a stability of {approx}85 days, and a zeta potential measured to be {zeta} -6.8 mV (solid). The nanoparticles are localized in the hydrophilic zones, defined by the presence of amine groups of the surfactant between the lamella of MoS{sub 2}. SEM, TEM, EDAX and electron diffraction provide conclusive evidence of the interlamellar insertion of the gold nanoparticles in the MoS{sub 2}.

  20. Gold Nanostructures for Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy, Prepared by Electrodeposition in Porous Silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukio H. Ogata

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Electrodeposition of gold into porous silicon was investigated. In the present study, porous silicon with ~100 nm in pore diameter, so-called medium-sized pores, was used as template electrode for gold electrodeposition. The growth behavior of gold deposits was studied by scanning electron microscope observation of the gold deposited porous silicon. Gold nanorod arrays with different rod lengths were prepared, and their surface-enhanced Raman scattering properties were investigated. We found that the absorption peak due to the surface plasmon resonance can be tuned by changing the length of the nanorods. The optimum length of the gold nanorods was ~600 nm for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy using a He-Ne laser. The reason why the optimum length of the gold nanorods was 600 nm was discussed by considering the relationship between the absorption peak of surface plasmon resonance and the wavelength of the incident laser for Raman scattering.

  1. Synthesis of gold nanorods with a longitudinal surface plasmon resonance peak of around 1250 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thi Nhat Hang; Le Trinh Nguyen, Thi; Thanh Tuyen Luong, Thi; Thang Nguyen, Canh Minh; Nguyen, Thi Phuong Phong

    2016-03-01

    We prepared gold nanorods and joined them to chemicals such as tetrachloauric (III) acid trihydrate, silver nitrate, hydroquinone, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide, sodium hydroxide and sodium borohydride using the seed-mediated method. The combination of hydroquinone, with or without salicylic acid, influences the size of the gold nanorods, and this is demonstrated by the results of TEM images, UV-vis spectra and the value of the longitudinal surface plasmon resonance peak with respect to the UV-vis spectra. By changing the Ag+ ion and hydroquinone concentration and the combination of hydroquinone and salicylic acid, the size of the gold nanorods can be controlled and this is manifested by longitudinal surface plasmon resonance peaks forming between 875 and 1278 nm. In particular, sample E2 achieved a longitudinal surface plasmon peak at 1273 nm and an aspect ratio of more than 10 by modifying the hydroquinone to 2.5 mM and salicylic acid to 0.5 mM concentration in the growth solution.

  2. Localized surface plasmon resonance enhanced organic solar cell with gold nanospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, Linfang; Wang, Dan; Ye, Yuqian; Qian, Jun; He, Sailing [Centre for Optical and Electromagnetic Research, State Key Laboratory of Modern Optical Instrumentation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Zuo, Lijian; Chen, Hongzheng [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, State Key Lab of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2011-03-15

    We use gold nanospheres (Au NSs) to improve the performance of polymer organic solar cells. Au NSs with a diameter of about 5 nm or 15 nm were doped into the buffer layer of organic solar cells. We attribute the efficiency improvement to the size-dependent localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) effect of Au NSs, which can enhance the light harvest ability of active layer around the Au NSs, and increase the probability of the exciton generation and dissociation. Our results show that solar cells doped with 15 nm-diameter Au NSs exhibit significant improvement of the efficiency (from 1.99% to 2.36%), while solar cells doped with only 5 nm-diameter Au NSs did not give obvious improvement of the performance. (author)

  3. Optical Epitaxial Growth of Gold Nanoparticle Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ningfeng; Martínez, Luis Javier; Jaquay, Eric; Nakano, Aiichiro; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2015-09-09

    We use an optical analogue of epitaxial growth to assemble gold nanoparticles into 2D arrays. Particles are attracted to a growth template via optical forces and interact through optical binding. Competition between effects determines the final particle arrangements. We use a Monte Carlo model to design a template that favors growth of hexagonal particle arrays. We experimentally demonstrate growth of a highly stable array of 50 gold particles with 200 nm diameter, spaced by 1.1 μm.

  4. Interaction of gold nanoparticles with nanosecond laser pulses: Nanoparticle heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedyalkov, N.N.; Imamova, S.E.; Atanasov, P.A.; Toshkova, R.A.; Gardeva, E.G.; Yossifova, L.S.; Alexandrov, M.T.; Obara, M.

    2011-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental results on the heating process of gold nanoparticles irradiated by nanosecond laser pulses are presented. The efficiency of particle heating is demonstrated by in-vitro photothermal therapy of human tumor cells. Gold nanoparticles with diameters of 40 and 100 nm are added as colloid in the cell culture and the samples are irradiated by nanosecond pulses at wavelength of 532 nm delivered by Nd:YAG laser system. The results indicate clear cytotoxic effect of application of nanoparticle as more efficient is the case of using particles with diameter of 100 nm. The theoretical analysis of the heating process of nanoparticle interacting with laser radiation is based on the Mie scattering theory, which is used for calculation of the particle absorption coefficient, and two-dimensional heat diffusion model, which describes the particle and the surrounding medium temperature evolution. Using this model the dependence of the achieved maximal temperature in the particles on the applied laser fluence and time evolution of the particle temperature is obtained.

  5. Interaction of gold nanoparticles with nanosecond laser pulses: Nanoparticle heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedyalkov, N. N.; Imamova, S. E.; Atanasov, P. A.; Toshkova, R. A.; Gardeva, E. G.; Yossifova, L. S.; Alexandrov, M. T.; Obara, M.

    2011-04-01

    Theoretical and experimental results on the heating process of gold nanoparticles irradiated by nanosecond laser pulses are presented. The efficiency of particle heating is demonstrated by in-vitro photothermal therapy of human tumor cells. Gold nanoparticles with diameters of 40 and 100 nm are added as colloid in the cell culture and the samples are irradiated by nanosecond pulses at wavelength of 532 nm delivered by Nd:YAG laser system. The results indicate clear cytotoxic effect of application of nanoparticle as more efficient is the case of using particles with diameter of 100 nm. The theoretical analysis of the heating process of nanoparticle interacting with laser radiation is based on the Mie scattering theory, which is used for calculation of the particle absorption coefficient, and two-dimensional heat diffusion model, which describes the particle and the surrounding medium temperature evolution. Using this model the dependence of the achieved maximal temperature in the particles on the applied laser fluence and time evolution of the particle temperature is obtained.

  6. Bringing Catalysis with Gold Nanoparticles in Green Solvents to Graduate Level Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghuwanshi, Vikram Singh; Wendt, Robert; O'Neill, Maeve; Ochmann, Miguel; Som, Tirtha; Fenger, Robert; Mohrmann, Marie; Hoell, Armin; Rademann, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate here a novel laboratory experiment for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) by using a low energy gold-sputtering method together with a modern, green, and biofriendly deep eutectic solvent (DES). The strategy is straightforward, economical, ecofriendly, rapid, and clean. It yields uniform AuNPs of 5 nm in diameter with high…

  7. Quantitative Characterization of Gold Nanoparticles by Field-Flow Fractionation Coupled Online with Light Scattering Detection and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Bjørn; Löschner, Katrin; Hadrup, Niels

    2011-01-01

    concentration of nanoparticles (NPs) in aqueous suspension. Mixtures of three polystyrene (PS) NPs between 20 and 100 nm in diameter and mixtures of three gold (Au) NPs between 10 and 60 nm in diameter were separated by AF4. The geometric diameters of the separated PS NPs and the hydrodynamic diameters...... nm, or a mixture of 10 and 60 nm nanoparticles by intravenous injection. The homogenized livers were solubilized in tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH), and the recovery of Au NPs from the livers amounted to 86−123% of their total Au content. In spite of successful stabilization with bovine serum...

  8. Synthesis and characterization of core-shell Fe3O4-gold-chitosan nanostructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salehizadeh Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fe3O4-gold-chitosan core-shell nanostructure can be used in biotechnological and biomedical applications such as magnetic bioseparation, water and wastewater treatment, biodetection and bioimaging, drug delivery, and cancer treatment. Results Magnetite nanoparticles with an average size of 9.8 nm in diameter were synthesized using the chemical co-precipitation method. A gold-coated Fe3O4 monotonous core-shell nanostructure was produced with an average size of 15 nm in diameter by glucose reduction of Au3+ which is then stabilized with a chitosan cross linked by formaldehyde. The results of analyses with X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM indicated that the nanoparticles were regularly shaped, and agglomerate-free, with a narrow size distribution. Conclusions A rapid, mild method for synthesizing Fe3O4-gold nanoparticles using chitosan was investigated. A magnetic core-shell-chitosan nanocomposite, including both the supermagnetic properties of iron oxide and the optical characteristics of colloidal gold nanoparticles, was synthesized.

  9. Gold-Pluronic core-shell nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization and biological evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Timea; Boca, Sanda [Babes-Bolyai University, Nanobiophotonics and Laser Microspectroscopy Center, Interdisciplinary Research Institute on Bio-Nano-Sciences and Faculty of Physics (Romania); Biro, Dominic [Sapientia University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Technical and Human Sciences (Romania); Baldeck, Patrice [Universite Joseph Fourier and CNRS, Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire de Physique, UMR 5588, CNRS (France); Astilean, Simion, E-mail: simion.astilean@phys.ubbcluj.ro [Babes-Bolyai University, Nanobiophotonics and Laser Microspectroscopy Center, Interdisciplinary Research Institute on Bio-Nano-Sciences and Faculty of Physics (Romania)

    2013-04-15

    This study presents the synthesis of gold-Pluronic core-shell nanoparticles by a two-step method and investigates their biological impact on cancer cells, specifically nanoparticle internalization and cytotoxicity. Uniform, 9-10-nm-sized, hydrophobic gold nanoparticles were synthesized in organic phase by reducing gold salt with oleylamine, after which oleylamine-protected gold nanoparticles were phase-transferred into aqueous medium using Pluronic F127 block copolymer, resulting in gold-Pluronic core-shell nanoparticles with a mean hydrodynamic diameter of {approx}35 nm. The formation and phase-transfer of gold nanoparticles were analyzed by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering. The obtained gold-Pluronic core-shell nanoparticles proved to be highly stable in salted solution. Cytotoxicity tests showed no modification of cellular viability in the presence of properly purified particles. Furthermore, dark-field cellular imaging demonstrated that gold-Pluronic nanoparticles were able to be efficiently uptaken by cells, being internalized through nonspecific endocytosis. The high stability, proven biocompatibility, and imaging properties of gold-Pluronic core-shell nanoparticles hold promise for relevant intracellular applications, with such a design providing the feasibility to combine all multiple functionalities in one nanoparticle for simultaneous detection and imaging.

  10. Preparation of gold nanoparticles by γ-ray irradiation method using polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) as stabilizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Tan Man; Le Hai; Le Huu Tu; Tran Thu Hong; Tran Thi Tam; Pham Thi Le Ha; Pham Thi Sam

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles were prepared from (Au 3+ ) aqueous solution by the method of γ-ray irradiation using polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as stabilizer. The saturated conversion dose (Au 3+ --> Au o ) determined by UV-Vis spectroscopy was found to be about 5 kGy. The UV-Vis spectrum showed that an absorption peak at λ max =524 nm due to surface plasmon resonance. The image of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that the gold nanoparticles are mostly spherical in shape and have an average diameter of ≅20 nm. The prepared colloidal gold nanoparticles solution is good stability for 6 months of storage. (author)

  11. Plasmonic effects of gold colloids on the fluorescence behavior of dye-doped SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarpani, Luigi, E-mail: luigi.tarpani@unipg.it; Latterini, Loredana

    2017-05-15

    The interactions of dye molecules with gold nanoparticles are of great interest owing to the potential applications in the areas of bioimaging, sensing and photodynamic therapy applications. In many cases the distances between fluorophores and the metal particles can change during the experiment and the spectral features of the units are not taken into account. In this work, the fluorescence behaviour of two dyes with different spectral properties (Rhodamine B and 9-aminoacridine) are investigated in the presence of gold nanoparticles having diameters of 2 or 26 nm and hence different plasmonic properties. In order to fix the distance between the dye and the gold nanoparticles, the dyes are entrapped in 20 nm silica nanoparticles, and the metal colloids are adsorbed on the silica surface. The distance between the fluorescent units and the metal particles is tuned by growing additional silica layers on the pristine nanoparticles. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence measurements show that in the presence of gold nanoparticles, having 2 nm diameter, a drastic quenching of the dye emission is observed, for all the prepared samples, despite the average dye-metal distances. When gold nanoparticles with 26 nm diameters are used, their interactions with the dyes are strongly dependent on the averaged distances between the metal colloids and the dyes and on the overlap of their spectral properties. Indeed, an enhanced emission is observed for 9-aminoacridine while the fluorescence of longer wavelength emitting Rhodamine B is quenched. The steady state and time-resolved data are analysed to evaluate the plasmonic impact of the radiative and non-radiative rate constants of the dyes.

  12. Towards thiol functionalization of vanadium pentoxide nanotubes using gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavayen, V.; O'Dwyer, C.; Cardenas, G.; Gonzalez, G.; Sotomayor Torres, C.M.

    2007-01-01

    Template-directed synthesis is a promising route to realize vanadate-based 1-D nanostructures, an example of which is the formation of vanadium pentoxide nanotubes and associated nanostructures. In this work, we report the interchange of long-chained alkyl amines with alkyl thiols. This reaction was followed using gold nanoparticles prepared by the Chemical Liquid Deposition (CLD) method with an average diameter of ∼0.9nm and a stability of ∼85 days. V 2 O 5 nanotubes (VOx-NTs) with lengths of ∼2μm and internal hollow diameters of 20-100nm were synthesized and functionalized in a Au-acetone colloid with a nominal concentration of ∼4x10 -3 mol dm -3 . The interchange reaction with dodecylamine is found only to occur in polar solvents and incorporation of the gold nanoparticles is not observed in the presence of n-decane

  13. Core-size regulated aggregation/disaggregation of citrate-coated gold nanoparticles (5-50 nm) and dissolved organic matter: Extinction, emission, and scattering evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfahani, Milad Rabbani; Pallem, Vasanta L.; Stretz, Holly A.; Wells, Martha J. M.

    2018-01-01

    Knowledge of the interactions between gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and dissolved organic matter (DOM) is significant in the development of detection devices for environmental sensing, studies of environmental fate and transport, and advances in antifouling water treatment membranes. The specific objective of this research was to spectroscopically investigate the fundamental interactions between citrate-stabilized gold nanoparticles (CT-GNPs) and DOM. Studies indicated that 30 and 50 nm diameter GNPs promoted disaggregation of the DOM. This result-disaggregation of an environmentally important polyelectrolyte-will be quite useful regarding antifouling properties in water treatment and water-based sensing applications. Furthermore, resonance Rayleigh scattering results showed significant enhancement in the UV range which can be useful to characterize DOM and can be exploited as an analytical tool to better sense and improve our comprehension of nanomaterial interactions with environmental systems. CT-GNPs having core size diameters of 5, 10, 30, and 50 nm were studied in the absence and presence of added DOM at 2 and 8 ppm at low ionic strength and near neutral pH (6.0-6.5) approximating surface water conditions. Interactions were monitored by cross-interpretation among ultraviolet (UV)-visible extinction spectroscopy, excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy (emission and Rayleigh scattering), and dynamic light scattering (DLS). This comprehensive combination of spectroscopic analyses lends new insights into the antifouling behavior of GNPs. The CT-GNP-5 and -10 controls emitted light and aggregated. In contrast, the CT-GNP-30 and CT-GNP-50 controls scattered light intensely, but did not aggregate and did not emit light. The presence of any CT-GNP did not affect the extinction spectra of DOM, and the presence of DOM did not affect the extinction spectra of the CT-GNPs. The emission spectra (visible range) differed only slightly between calculated and actual

  14. Using silicon-coated gold nanoparticles to enhance the fluorescence of CdTe quantum dot and improve the sensing ability of mercury (II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jian; Chang, Hui; Li, Jian-Jun; Li, Xin; Zhao, Jun-Wu

    2018-01-01

    The effect of silicon-coated gold nanoparticles with different gold core diameter and silica shell thickness on the fluorescence emission of CdTe quantum dots (QDs) was investigated. For gold nanoparticles with a diameter of 15 nm, silica coating can only results in fluorescence recover of the bare gold nanoparticle-induced quenching of QDs. However, when the size of gold nanoparticle is increased to 60 nm, fluorescence enhancement of the QDs could be obtained by silica coating. Because of the isolation of the silica shell-reduced quenching effect and local electric field effect, the fluorescence of QDs gets intense firstly and then decreases. The maximum fluorescence enhancement takes place as the silica shell has a thickness of 30 nm. This enhanced fluorescence from silicon-coated gold nanoparticles is demonstrated for sensing of Hg2 +. Under optimal conditions, the enhanced fluorescence intensity decreases linearly with the concentration of Hg2 + ranging from 0 to 200 ng/mL. The limit of detection for Hg2 + is 1.25 ng/mL. Interference test and real samples detection indicate that the influence from other metal ions could be neglected, and the Hg2 + could be specifically detected.

  15. Nanostructured gold microelectrodes for extracellular recording from electrogenic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüggemann, D; Wolfrum, B; Maybeck, V; Mourzina, Y; Jansen, M; Offenhäusser, A

    2011-07-01

    We present a new biocompatible nanostructured microelectrode array for extracellular signal recording from electrogenic cells. Microfabrication techniques were combined with a template-assisted approach using nanoporous aluminum oxide to develop gold nanopillar electrodes. The nanopillars were approximately 300-400 nm high and had a diameter of 60 nm. Thus, they yielded a higher surface area of the electrodes resulting in a decreased impedance compared to planar electrodes. The interaction between the large-scale gold nanopillar arrays and cardiac muscle cells (HL-1) was investigated via focused ion beam milling. In the resulting cross-sections we observed a tight coupling between the HL-1 cells and the gold nanostructures. However, the cell membranes did not bend into the cleft between adjacent nanopillars due to the high pillar density. We performed extracellular potential recordings from HL-1 cells with the nanostructured microelectrode arrays. The maximal amplitudes recorded with the nanopillar electrodes were up to 100% higher than those recorded with planar gold electrodes. Increasing the aspect ratio of the gold nanopillars and changing the geometrical layout can further enhance the signal quality in the future.

  16. Nanostructured gold microelectrodes for extracellular recording from electrogenic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueggemann, D; Wolfrum, B; Maybeck, V; Mourzina, Y; Jansen, M; Offenhaeusser, A, E-mail: a.offenhaeusser@fz-juelich.de [Institute of Complex Systems and Peter Gruenberg Institute: Bioelectronics (ICS8/PGI8), Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Leo-Brandt-Strasse, 52428 Juelich (Germany); Juelich-Aachen Research Alliance-Fundamental of Future Information Technology (JARA-FIT) (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    We present a new biocompatible nanostructured microelectrode array for extracellular signal recording from electrogenic cells. Microfabrication techniques were combined with a template-assisted approach using nanoporous aluminum oxide to develop gold nanopillar electrodes. The nanopillars were approximately 300-400 nm high and had a diameter of 60 nm. Thus, they yielded a higher surface area of the electrodes resulting in a decreased impedance compared to planar electrodes. The interaction between the large-scale gold nanopillar arrays and cardiac muscle cells (HL-1) was investigated via focused ion beam milling. In the resulting cross-sections we observed a tight coupling between the HL-1 cells and the gold nanostructures. However, the cell membranes did not bend into the cleft between adjacent nanopillars due to the high pillar density. We performed extracellular potential recordings from HL-1 cells with the nanostructured microelectrode arrays. The maximal amplitudes recorded with the nanopillar electrodes were up to 100% higher than those recorded with planar gold electrodes. Increasing the aspect ratio of the gold nanopillars and changing the geometrical layout can further enhance the signal quality in the future.

  17. Emission dynamics of hybrid plasmonic gold/organic GaN nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, F.; Schmitzer, H.; Kunert, G.; Hommel, D.; Ge, J.; Duscher, G.; Langbein, W.; Wagner, H. P.

    2017-12-01

    We studied the emission of bare and aluminum quinoline (Alq3)/gold coated wurtzite GaN nanorods by temperature- and intensity-dependent time-integrated and time-resolved photoluminescence (PL). The GaN nanorods of ˜1.5 μm length and ˜250 nm diameter were grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Gold/Alq3 coated GaN nanorods were synthesized by organic molecular beam deposition. The near band-edge and donor-acceptor pair luminescence was investigated in bare GaN nanorods and compared with multilevel model calculations providing the dynamical parameters for electron-hole pairs, excitons, impurity bound excitons, donors and acceptors. Subsequently, the influence of a 10 nm gold coating without and with an Alq3 spacer layer was studied and the experimental results were analyzed with the multilevel model. Without a spacer layer, a significant PL quenching and lifetime reduction of the near band-edge emission is found. The behavior is attributed to surface band-bending and Förster energy transfer from excitons to surface plasmons in the gold layer. Inserting a 5 nm Alq3 spacer layer reduces the PL quenching and lifetime reduction which is consistent with a reduced band-bending and Förster energy transfer. Increasing the spacer layer to 30 nm results in lifetimes which are similar to uncoated structures, showing a significantly decreased influence of the gold coating on the excitonic dynamics.

  18. Wide-Field Imaging of Single-Nanoparticle Extinction with Sub-nm2 Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Lukas M.; Langbein, Wolfgang; Borri, Paola

    2018-03-01

    We report on a highly sensitive wide-field imaging technique for quantitative measurement of the optical extinction cross section σext of single nanoparticles. The technique is simple and high speed, and it enables the simultaneous acquisition of hundreds of nanoparticles for statistical analysis. Using rapid referencing, fast acquisition, and a deconvolution analysis, a shot-noise-limited sensitivity down to 0.4 nm2 is achieved. Measurements on a set of individual gold nanoparticles of 5 nm diameter using this method yield σext=(10.0 ±3.1 ) nm2, which is consistent with theoretical expectations and well above the background fluctuations of 0.9 nm2 .

  19. The use of gold nanoparticles to enhance radiotherapy in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hainfeld, James F; Slatkin, Daniel N; Smilowitz, Henry M

    2004-01-01

    Mice bearing subcutaneous EMT-6 mammary carcinomas received a single intravenous injection of 1.9 nm diameter gold particles (up to 2.7 g Au/kg body weight), which elevated concentrations of gold to 7 mg Au/g in tumours. Tumour-to-normal-tissue gold concentration ratios remained ∼8:1 during several minutes of 250 kVp x-ray therapy. One-year survival was 86% versus 20% with x-rays alone and 0% with gold alone. The increase in tumours safely ablated was dependent on the amount of gold injected. The gold nanoparticles were apparently non-toxic to mice and were largely cleared from the body through the kidneys. This novel use of small gold nanoparticles permitted achievement of the high metal content in tumours necessary for significant high-Z radioenhancement. (note)

  20. Supercapacitive transport of pharmacologic agents using nanoporous gold electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gittard, Shaun D; Pierson, Bonnie E; Ha, Cindy M; Wu, Chung-An Max; Narayan, Roger J; Robinson, David B

    2010-02-01

    In this study, nanoporous gold supercapacitors were produced by electrochemical dealloying of gold-silver alloy. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy confirmed completion of the dealloying process and generation of a porous gold material with approximately 10 nm diameter pores. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry of the nanoporous gold electrodes indicated that these materials exhibited supercapacitor behavior. The storage capacity of the electrodes measured by chronoamperometry was approximately 3 mC at 200 mV. Electrochemical storage and voltage-controlled delivery of two model pharmacologic agents, benzylammonium and salicylic acid, was demonstrated. These results suggest that capacitance-based storage and delivery of pharmacologic agents may serve as an alternative to conventional drug delivery methods.

  1. Plasma-activated core-shell gold nanoparticle films with enhanced catalytic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llorca, Jordi, E-mail: jordi.llorca@upc.edu; Casanovas, Albert; Dominguez, Montserrat; Casanova, Ignasi [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Institut de Tecniques Energetiques (Spain); Angurell, Inmaculada; Seco, Miquel; Rossell, Oriol [Universitat de Barcelona, Departament de Quimica Inorganica (Spain)

    2008-03-15

    Catalytically active gold nanoparticle films have been prepared from core-shell nanoparticles by plasma-activation and characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Methane can be selectively oxidized into formic acid with an O{sub 2}-H{sub 2} mixture in a catalytic wall reactor functionalized with plasma-activated gold nanoparticle films containing well-defined Au particles of about 3.5 nm in diameter. No catalytic activity was recorded over gold nanoparticle films prepared by thermal decomposition of core-shell nanoparticles due to particle agglomeration.

  2. Plasma-activated core-shell gold nanoparticle films with enhanced catalytic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llorca, Jordi; Casanovas, Albert; Dominguez, Montserrat; Casanova, Ignasi; Angurell, Inmaculada; Seco, Miquel; Rossell, Oriol

    2008-01-01

    Catalytically active gold nanoparticle films have been prepared from core-shell nanoparticles by plasma-activation and characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Methane can be selectively oxidized into formic acid with an O 2 -H 2 mixture in a catalytic wall reactor functionalized with plasma-activated gold nanoparticle films containing well-defined Au particles of about 3.5 nm in diameter. No catalytic activity was recorded over gold nanoparticle films prepared by thermal decomposition of core-shell nanoparticles due to particle agglomeration

  3. Tuning of colossal dielectric constant in gold-polypyrrole composite nanotubes using in-situ x-ray diffraction techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarma, Abhisakh; Sanyal, Milan K., E-mail: milank.sanyal@saha.ac.in [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)

    2014-09-15

    In-situ x-ray diffraction technique has been used to study the growth process of gold incorporated polypyrrole nanotubes that exhibit colossal dielectric constant due to existence of quasi-one-dimensional charge density wave state. These composite nanotubes were formed within nanopores of a polycarbonate membrane by flowing pyrrole monomer from one side and mixture of ferric chloride and chloroauric acid from other side in a sample cell that allows collection of x-ray data during the reaction. The size of the gold nanoparticle embedded in the walls of the nanotubes was found to be dependent on chloroauric acid concentration for nanowires having diameter more than 100 nm. For lower diameter nanotubes the nanoparticle size become independent of chloroauric acid concentration and depends on the diameter of nanotubes only. The result of this study also shows that for 50 nm gold-polypyrrole composite nanotubes obtained with 5.3 mM chloroauric acid gives colossal dielectric constant of about 10{sup 7}. This value remain almost constant over a frequency range from 1Hz to 10{sup 6} Hz even at 80 K temperature.

  4. Tuning of colossal dielectric constant in gold-polypyrrole composite nanotubes using in-situ x-ray diffraction techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhisakh Sarma

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In-situ x-ray diffraction technique has been used to study the growth process of gold incorporated polypyrrole nanotubes that exhibit colossal dielectric constant due to existence of quasi-one-dimensional charge density wave state. These composite nanotubes were formed within nanopores of a polycarbonate membrane by flowing pyrrole monomer from one side and mixture of ferric chloride and chloroauric acid from other side in a sample cell that allows collection of x-ray data during the reaction. The size of the gold nanoparticle embedded in the walls of the nanotubes was found to be dependent on chloroauric acid concentration for nanowires having diameter more than 100 nm. For lower diameter nanotubes the nanoparticle size become independent of chloroauric acid concentration and depends on the diameter of nanotubes only. The result of this study also shows that for 50 nm gold-polypyrrole composite nanotubes obtained with 5.3 mM chloroauric acid gives colossal dielectric constant of about 107. This value remain almost constant over a frequency range from 1Hz to 106 Hz even at 80 K temperature.

  5. Effect of the physical properties of activated carbon in the gold adsorption from cyanide media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro, P.; Vargas, C.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of the physical properties of an activated carbon such as pore size distribution, specific surface, pore average diameter, in the gold adsorption from cyanide solution with the gold to the Au (CN) - 2 form, was studied. To meet the proposed objectives two carbons were studied: carbon A with specific surface of 985 m 2 / g, 57 % of micropores and 1.85 nm as average diameter of pores and carbon B with specific surface of 786 m 2 / g, 27 % and pores of 2.35 nm as average diameter of pores; both granular carbons made from coconut shell. Batch adsorption tests were performed in a reactor of 500 ml of capacity with mechanical stirring at constant temperature. The effect of cations present in the aqueous solutions such as Ca 2 +, Na+, K+ and Li+, the effect of pore size distribution, the effect of average pore diameter and surface area were evaluated in function of the rate and amount of gold adsorbed on the activated carbons denominated as A and B. The results to indicate that the physical properties of an activated carbon are an important factor in the gold adsorption process in terms of rate and amount of adsorbed gold. The carbon B with 786 m 2 / g of specific surface area reached a higher load per unit area (0.02 mg Au/m 2 ) in relation to the carbon B of 985 m 2 / g which had a load of 0.01 mg Au / m 2 , after 6 h of contact carbon-solution. The rate adsorption of gold in both carbons is controlled by mass transfer in the liquid film surrounding the carbon particles to short times or small loads of gold in the particles, far from equilibrium. Applying a first order kinetic model, it was obtained that the ratio of the kinetic constants for carbons A and B, ie (kB / kA), fluctuates in a value of 3 for the different cations in study. In general it is possible to say that the rate adsorption and the amount of adsorbed gold increased with the increase in macropores and with the increasing pore average diameter. The presence of cations favors the gold

  6. Inverse gold photonic crystals and conjugated polymer coated opals for functional materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landon, P.B.; Gutierrez, Jose; Ferraris, John P.; Martinez, I.L.; Giridharagopal, Rajiv; Wu, Y.-C.; Lee, Sergey; Parikh, Kunjal; Gillespie, Jessica; Ussery, Geoffrey; Karimi, Behzad; Baughman, Ray; Zakhidov, Anvar; Glosser, R

    2003-10-01

    Inverse gold photonic crystals templated from synthetic opals with a face centered cubic (FCC) crystal lattice were constructed by heat converting gold chloride to metallic gold. Tetrahedral formations constructed of alternating large and small octahedrons oriented in the zinc sulfide structure were created by controlling the infiltration of gold chloride. Silica spheres were coated with polyanilinesulfonic acid, polypyrrole, poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV) and 5 nm colloidal gold. Ordinary yeast cells were coated with polyanilinesulfonic acid, polypyrrole and 5 nm colloidal gold. Spheres coated with MEH-PPV were dispersed in H{sub 2}O and coated with polyelectrolytes which recharged and sterically stabilized the colloidal surfaces. The recharged spheres self-assembled by sedimentation with a FCC crystalline lattice possessing 500 {mu}m wide and 1 mm long crystallites. Silica spheres with diameters as large as 1500 {mu}m were self-assembled along the [1 0 0] direction of the FCC crystal lattice. Opals infiltrated with gold and opals constructed from polymer coated spheres were co-infiltrated with polypropylene yielding inverse polypropylene composite photonic crystals.

  7. Size and Concentration Analysis of Gold Nanoparticles With Ultraviolet-Visible Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanim Rahman

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Spherical gold nanoparticles (GNPs are synthesized by Turkevich Method and PEL 35 UV-VIS spectrophotometer recorded the wavelength and absorption of the Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR peak. The diameter and concentration of solute GNPs are calculated. The concentration of GNPs is done with Beer’s law. The average diameter of GNPs is done via the ratio of SPR peak to the absorbance at 450 nm. The diameters are compared to SEM scan of synthesized GNPs and Sigma-Aldrich values.

  8. Synthesis of gold nano-catalysts supported on carbon nanotubes by using electroless plating technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Xicheng; Li Xia; Lun Ning; Wen Shulin

    2006-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes were prepared by using electroless plating technique. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) has shown that spherical gold nanoparticles were homogeneously dispersed on the surfaces of the carbon nanotubes with a distribution of particle sizes sharply at around 3-4 nm in diameter. The results presented in this work will probably provide new catalysts with better performances

  9. Oxidation of Bioethanol using Zeolite-Encapsulated Gold Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mielby, Jerrik Jørgen; Abildstrøm, Jacob Oskar; Wang, Feng

    2014-01-01

    With the ongoing developments in biomass conversion, the oxidation of bioethanol to acetaldehyde may become a favorable and green alternative to the preparation from ethylene. Here, a simple and effective method to encapsulate gold nanoparticles in zeolite silicalite-1 is reported and their high...... zeolite crystals comprise a broad range of mesopores and contain up to several hundred gold nanoparticles with a diameter of 2-3nm that are distributed inside the zeolites rather than on the outer surface. The encapsulated nanoparticles have good stability and result in 50% conversion of ethanol with 98...

  10. Oxidation of Bioethanol using Zeolite-Encapsulated Gold Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mielby, Jerrik Jørgen; Abildstrøm, Jacob Oskar; Wang, Feng

    2014-01-01

    With the ongoing developments in biomass conversion, the oxidation of bioethanol to acetaldehyde may become a favorable and green alternative to the preparation from ethylene. Here, a simple and effective method to encapsulate gold nanoparticles in zeolite silicalite‐1 is reported and their high...... zeolite crystals comprise a broad range of mesopores and contain up to several hundred gold nanoparticles with a diameter of 2–3 nm that are distributed inside the zeolites rather than on the outer surface. The encapsulated nanoparticles have good stability and result in 50 % conversion of ethanol with 98...

  11. Preparation of gold nanoparticles by microwave heating and application of spectroscopy to study conjugate of gold nanoparticles with antibody E. coli O157:H7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngo, Vo Ke Thanh; Nguyen, Hoang Phuong Uyen; Huynh, Trong Phat; Tran, Nguyen Nguyen Pham; Lam, Quang Vinh; Huynh, Thanh Dat

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) of 15–20 nm size range have attracted attention for producing smart sensing devices as diagnostic tools in biomedical sciences. Citrate capped AuNPs are negatively charged, which can be exploited for electrostatic interactions with some positively charged biomolecules like antibodies. In this paper we describe a method for the low cost synthesis of gold nanoparticles using sodium citrate (Na_3Ct) reduction in chloroauric acid (HAuCl_4.3H_2O) by microwave heating (diameter about 13–15 nm). Gold nanoparticles were functionalized with surface activation by 3-mercaptopropionic acid for attaching antibody. These nanoparticles were then reacted with anti-E. coli O157:H7, using N-hydroxy succinimide (NHS) and carbondimide hydrochloride (EDC) coupling chemistry. The product was characterized with UV-visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and zeta potential. In addition, the binding of antibody-gold nanoparticles conjugates to E. coli O157:H7 was demonstrated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). (paper)

  12. Variable temperature investigation of the atomic structure of gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, N P; Kirkland, A I; Huis, M A van; Zandbergen, H W; Xu, H

    2010-01-01

    The characterisation of nanoparticle structures is the first step towards understanding and optimising their utility in important technological applications such as catalysis. Using newly developed in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) specimen holders, the temperature dependent atomic structure of gold nanoparticles in the size range 5-12 nm has been investigated. In this size interval, the decahedral morphology has been identified as the most favourable structure at or above room temperature, while particle surface roughening becomes evident above 600 0 C. An icosahedral transition has also been identified at low temperature in particles under 9 nm in diameter. These experimental results are consistent with recently published temperature dependent equilibrium phase maps for gold nanoparticles.

  13. Chiral supramolecular gold-cysteine nanoparticles: Chiroptical and nonlinear optical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Russier-Antoine

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cysteine is a sulfur-containing amino acid that easily coordinates to soft metal ions and grafts to noble metal surfaces. We report a simple synthetic approach for the production of chiral gold-cysteine polymeric nanoparticles soluble in water. Conjugation of cysteine with gold in a polymeric way, leading to ~50 nm diameter nanoparticles, resulted in the generation of new characteristic circular dichroism (CD signals in the region of 250–400 nm, whereas no CD signal changes were found with cysteine alone. We also investigate their nonlinear optical properties after two-photon absorption. Two-photon emission spectra and first hyper-polarizabilities, as obtained by the hyper-Rayleigh scattering technique, of these particles are presented.

  14. Variable temperature investigation of the atomic structure of gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, N P; Kirkland, A I [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Huis, M A van; Zandbergen, H W [Kavli Insitute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technolgy, Lorentzweg 1, NL-2628CJ, Delft (Netherlands); Xu, H, E-mail: neil.young@materials.ox.ac.u [Department of Geology and Geophysics, and Materials Science Program, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)

    2010-07-01

    The characterisation of nanoparticle structures is the first step towards understanding and optimising their utility in important technological applications such as catalysis. Using newly developed in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) specimen holders, the temperature dependent atomic structure of gold nanoparticles in the size range 5-12 nm has been investigated. In this size interval, the decahedral morphology has been identified as the most favourable structure at or above room temperature, while particle surface roughening becomes evident above 600{sup 0}C. An icosahedral transition has also been identified at low temperature in particles under 9 nm in diameter. These experimental results are consistent with recently published temperature dependent equilibrium phase maps for gold nanoparticles.

  15. Broadband Spectroscopy of Nanoporous-Gold Promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Nakatani

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of UV photocatalysis on TiO2 particles was increased by mixing TiO2 particles with nanoporous gold (NPG with pore diameters of 10–40 nm. This means that NPG acts as a promoter in the photocatalytic reaction of TiO2. Broadband spectroscopic results from millimeter wave to ultra violet of NPG membrane are discussed to estimate plasmonic effect on the catalysis.

  16. Achieving sub-50 nm controlled diameter of aperiodic Si nanowire arrays by ultrasonic catalyst removal for photonic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaliyawala, Harsh A.; Purohit, Zeel; Khanna, Sakshum; Ray, Abhijit; Pati, Ranjan K.; Mukhopadhyay, Indrajit

    2018-05-01

    We report an alternative approach to fabricate the vertically aligned aperiodic Si nanowire arrays by controlling the diameter of the Ag nanoparticles and tuneable ultrasonic removal. The process begins by sputtering the Ag thin film (t=5 nm) on the Si/SiO2 substrates. Followed by Ag thin film, annealed for various temperature (T=300°C, 400°C, 500°C and 600°C) to selectively achieve a high density, well-spaced and diameter controlled Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) on the Si/SiO2 substrates. The sacrificial layer of AgNPs size indicates the controlled diameter of the Si nanowire arrays. Image J analysis for various annealed samples gives an indication of the high density, uniformity and equal distribution of closely packed AgNPs. Furthermore, the AgNPs covered with Au/Pd mesh (5 nm) as a template, was removed by ultrasonication in the etchant solution for several times in different intervals of preparation. The conventional and facile metal assisted electroless etching approach was finally employed to fabricate the vertically aperiodic sub-50 nm SiNWAs, can be applicable to various nanoscale opto-electronic applications.

  17. A new green chemistry method based on plant extracts to synthesize gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes Castillo, Milka Odemariz

    Extraordinary chemical and physical properties exhibited by nanomaterials, as compared to their bulk counterparts, have made the area of nanotechnology a growing realm in the past three decades. It is the nanoscale size (from 1 to 100 nm) and the morphologies of nanomaterials that provide several properties and applications not possible for the same material in the bulk. Magnetic and optical properties, as well as surface reactivity are highly dependent on the size and morphology of the nanomaterial. Diverse nanomaterials are being widely used in molecular diagnostics as well as in medicine, electronic and optical devices. Among the most studied nanomaterials, gold nanoparticles are of special interest due to their multifunctional capabilities. For instance, spherical gold nanoparticles measuring 15-20 nm in diameter have been studied due to their insulin binding properties. Also, thiol functionalized gold nanoparticles between 5 and 30 nm are used in the detection of DNA. Thus, harnessing the shape and size of gold nanoparticles plays an important role in science and technology. The synthesis of gold nanoparticles via the reduction of gold salts, using citrate or other reducing agents, has been widely studied. In recent years, algae, fungi, bacteria, and living plants have been used to reduce trivalent gold (Au3+) to its zero oxidation state (Au 0) forming gold nanoparticles of different sizes and shapes. In addition, plant biomasses have also been studied for their gold-reducing power and nanoparticle formation. Although there is information about the synthesis of the gold nanoparticles by biologically based materials; to our knowledge, the study of the use of alfalfa extracts has not been reported. This innovation represents a significant improvement; that is an environmentally friendly method that does not use toxic chemicals. Also, the problem of extracting the formed gold nanoparticles from biomaterials is addressed in this research but still remains to be

  18. Polyaniline nanowires-gold nanoparticles hybrid network based chemiresistive hydrogen sulfide sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirsat, Mahendra D.; Bangar, Mangesh A.; Deshusses, Marc A.; Myung, Nosang V.; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2009-02-01

    We report a sensitive, selective, and fast responding room temperature chemiresistive sensor for hydrogen sulfide detection and quantification using polyaniline nanowires-gold nanoparticles hybrid network. The sensor was fabricated by facile electrochemical technique. Initially, polyaniline nanowires with a diameter of 250-320 nm bridging the gap between a pair of microfabricated gold electrodes were synthesized using templateless electrochemical polymerization using a two step galvanostatic technique. Polyaniline nanowires were then electrochemically functionalized with gold nanoparticles using cyclic voltammetry technique. These chemiresistive sensors show an excellent limit of detection (0.1 ppb), wide dynamic range (0.1-100 ppb), and very good selectivity and reproducibility.

  19. Quantum and dielectric confinements of sub-10 nm gold in dichroic phosphate glass nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Shiv Prakash; Nath, Mithun; Karmakar, Basudeb

    2014-01-01

    Blue shifts of the surface plasmon resonance band of sub-10 nm gold in dichroic phosphate glass nanocomposites are observed with increase in both size of gold nanoparticles and refractive index of the medium, which are contrary to the common trends. These phenomena have been enlightened with the electrodynamics theories (Mie and Drude models) and happened due to quantum and dielectric confinements. Nanocomposites have been synthesized by in-situ thermochemical reduction technique in reducing phosphate glass matrices. The plasmon bands are characterized by the UV–vis spectrophotometer, and shape and size of the nanogold by the transmission electron microscopy. All the nanocomposites are dichroic in nature. - Highlights: • We fabricated Au 0 embedded nanocomposites in P 2 O 5 –SnO–ZnO glass matrix. • Au 0 synthesized by a single step in-situ thermochemical reduction technique. • We have reported the blue shifts of the SPR band of sub-10 nm Au 0 NPs. • The optical property has been explained on the basis of electrodynamics theories

  20. Gold nanoparticles produced in a microalga

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luangpipat, Tiyaporn; Beattie, Isabel R.; Chisti, Yusuf; Haverkamp, Richard G.

    2011-01-01

    An efficient biological route to production of gold nanoparticles which allows the nanoparticles to be easily recovered remains elusive. Live cells of the green microalga Chlorella vulgaris were incubated with a solution of gold chloride and harvested by centrifugation. Nanoparticles inside intact cells were identified by transmission electron microscopy and confirmed to be metallic gold by synchrotron based X-ray powder diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. These intracellular gold nanoparticles were 40–60 nm in diameter. At a concentration of 1.4% Au in the alga, a better than 97% recovery of the gold from solution was achieved. A maximum of 4.2% Au in the alga was obtained. Exposure of C. vulgaris to solutions containing dissolved salts of palladium, ruthenium, and rhodium also resulted in the production of the corresponding nanoparticles within the cells. These were surmised to be also metallic, but were produced at a much lower intracellular concentration than achieved with gold. Iridium was apparently toxic to the alga. No nanoparticles were observed using platinum solutions. C. vulgaris provides a possible route to large scale production of gold nanoparticles.

  1. Multiple double cross-section transmission electron microscope sample preparation of specific sub-10 nm diameter Si nanowire devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gignac, Lynne M; Mittal, Surbhi; Bangsaruntip, Sarunya; Cohen, Guy M; Sleight, Jeffrey W

    2011-12-01

    The ability to prepare multiple cross-section transmission electron microscope (XTEM) samples from one XTEM sample of specific sub-10 nm features was demonstrated. Sub-10 nm diameter Si nanowire (NW) devices were initially cross-sectioned using a dual-beam focused ion beam system in a direction running parallel to the device channel. From this XTEM sample, both low- and high-resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM) images were obtained from six separate, specific site Si NW devices. The XTEM sample was then re-sectioned in four separate locations in a direction perpendicular to the device channel: 90° from the original XTEM sample direction. Three of the four XTEM samples were successfully sectioned in the gate region of the device. From these three samples, low- and high-resolution TEM images of the Si NW were taken and measurements of the NW diameters were obtained. This technique demonstrated the ability to obtain high-resolution TEM images in directions 90° from one another of multiple, specific sub-10 nm features that were spaced 1.1 μm apart.

  2. Specific Internalisation of Gold Nanoparticles into Engineered Porous Protein Cages via Affinity Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramelle, David; Peng, Tao; Free, Paul; Fernig, David G; Lim, Sierin; Tomczak, Nikodem

    2016-01-01

    Porous protein cages are supramolecular protein self-assemblies presenting pores that allow the access of surrounding molecules and ions into their core in order to store and transport them in biological environments. Protein cages' pores are attractive channels for the internalisation of inorganic nanoparticles and an alternative for the preparation of hybrid bioinspired nanoparticles. However, strategies based on nanoparticle transport through the pores are largely unexplored, due to the difficulty of tailoring nanoparticles that have diameters commensurate with the pores size and simultaneously displaying specific affinity to the cages' core and low non-specific binding to the cages' outer surface. We evaluated the specific internalisation of single small gold nanoparticles, 3.9 nm in diameter, into porous protein cages via affinity binding. The E2 protein cage derived from the Geobacillus stearothermophilus presents 12 pores, 6 nm in diameter, and an empty core of 13 nm in diameter. We engineered the E2 protein by site-directed mutagenesis with oligohistidine sequences exposing them into the cage's core. Dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy analysis show that the structures of E2 protein cages mutated with bis- or penta-histidine sequences are well conserved. The surface of the gold nanoparticles was passivated with a self-assembled monolayer made of a mixture of short peptidols and thiolated alkane ethylene glycol ligands. Such monolayers are found to provide thin coatings preventing non-specific binding to proteins. Further functionalisation of the peptide coated gold nanoparticles with Ni2+ nitrilotriacetic moieties enabled the specific binding to oligohistidine tagged cages. The internalisation via affinity binding was evaluated by electron microscopy analysis. From the various mutations tested, only the penta-histidine mutated E2 protein cage showed repeatable and stable internalisation. The present work overcomes the limitations of currently

  3. Optical properties of self assembled oriented island evolution of ultra-thin gold layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worsch, Christian; Kracker, Michael; Wisniewski, Wolfgang; Rüssel, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Gold layers with a thickness of only 8 to 21 nm were sputtered on soda–lime–silica glasses. Subsequent annealing at 300 and 400 °C for 1 and 24 h resulted in the formation of separated round gold particles with diameters from 8 to 200 nm. Crystal orientations were described using X-ray diffraction and electron backscatter diffraction. The gold particles are oriented with their (111) planes perpendicular to the surface. Most gold nano particles are single crystalline, some particles are twinned. Thermal annealing of sputtered gold layers resulted in purple samples with a coloration comparable to that of gold ruby glasses. The color can be controlled by the thickness of the sputtered gold layer and the annealing conditions. The simple method of gold film preparation and the annealing temperature dependent properties of the layers make them appropriate for practical applications. - Highlights: ► We produce gold nano particle layers on amorphous substrates. ► Thin sputtered gold layers were annealed at low temperatures. ► Various colors can be achieved reproducibly and UV–vis-NIR spectra are reported. ► A 111-texture of the particles is described as well as twinning. ► The process is suitable for mass production.

  4. Nano-porous anodic aluminium oxide membranes with 6-19 nm pore diameters formed by a low-potential anodizing process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Fan; Liu Xiaohua; Pan Caofeng; Zhu Jing [Beijing National Center for Electron Microscopy, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2007-08-29

    Self-organized nano-porous anodic aluminium oxide (AAO) membranes with small pore diameters were obtained by applying a low anodizing potential in sulfuric acid solutions. The pore diameters of the as-prepared AAO membranes were in the range of about 6-19 nm and the interpore distances were about 20-58 nm. Low potentials (6-18 V) were applied in anodizing processes to make such small pores. A linear relationship between the anodizing potential (U{sub a}) and the interpore distance (D{sub int}) was also revealed. By carefully monitoring the current density's evolution as a function of time with different U{sub a} (2-18 V) during the anodizing processes, a new formula is proposed to simulate the self-ordering anodizing process.

  5. Measurement of discrete energy-level spectra in individual chemically synthesized gold nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Bolotin, Kirill I; Shi, Su-Fei

    2008-01-01

    We form single-electron transistors from individual chemically synthesized gold nanoparticles, 5-15 nm in diameter, with monolayers of organic molecules serving as tunnel barriers. These devices allow us to measure the discrete electronic energy levels of individual gold nanoparticles that are......, by virtue of chemical synthesis, well-defined in their composition, size and shape. We show that the nanoparticles are nonmagnetic and have spectra in good accord with random-matrix-theory predictions taking into account strong spin-orbit coupling....

  6. Using nanosphere lithography for fabrication of a multilayered system of ordered gold nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.I. Styopkin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available New modification of nanosphere lithography has been realized to obtain multilayered systems of ordered gold nanopartciles (NP. NP have been formed using vacuum deposition of 5…60-nm layer of gold on ionic etched multilayered regular coating consisted of several layers of 200-nm polystyrene spheres. Optical study shows that spectra of NP depend on their thickness and may be changed by heat treatment. Increasing the NP thickness within the 5…20-nm range leads to a shortwave displacement of the plasmon resonance peak position, while the longwave shift is observed in 20…60-nm range. Heat treatment of NP brings narrowing and displacement of spectral bands, rising the extinction. It has been supposed that variation of the NP shape is the most substantial factor for changes of optical properties in the 5…20 nm thickness region, while electromagnetic coupling between NP in different layers becomes more important for thicknesses larger than 40 nm. Optical properties inherent to the obtained system of NP can be tuned by changing the polystyrene spheres diameter, extent of etching, thickness of gold layer and with the heat treatment. It may be used in design of nanophotonic devices.

  7. On the formation of protected gold nanoparticles from AuCl4- by the reduction using aromatic amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramaniam, Chandramouli; Tom, Renjis T.; Pradeep, T.

    2005-01-01

    Amines are used extensively as reductants and subsequent capping agents in the synthesis of metal nanoparticles, especially gold, due to its affinity to nitrogen. Taking 2-methyl aniline as an example, we show that metal reduction is followed by polymerization of the amine, while part of it covers the nanoparticle surface another fraction deposits in the solution. It is found that the oxidative polymerization of the amine goes in step with the formation of gold nanoparticles. The gold nanoparticles thus formed have a mean diameter of 20 nm. The polymerized amine encapsulates the gold nanoparticle forming a robust shell of about 5 nm thickness, making the gold core inert towards mineralizing agents such as chloroform, bromoform, sodium cyanide, benzylchloride, etc. which react with the naked gold nanoparticles. The deposited polymer is largely protonated, taking up protons from the medium during its formation. Similar results have been observed in the case of aniline also. The materials have been fully characterized by spectroscopy and microscopy

  8. A simple approach for immobilization of gold nanoparticles on graphene oxide sheets by covalent bonding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pham, Tuan Anh; Choi, Byung Choon; Lim, Kwon Taek; Jeong, Yeon Tae

    2011-01-01

    Amino - functionalized gold nanoparticles with a diameter of around 5 nm were immobilized onto the surface of graphene oxide sheets (GOS) by covalent bonding through a simple amidation reaction. Pristine graphite was firstly oxidized and exfoliated to obtain GOS, which further were acylated with

  9. Nanosecond-pulsed Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm with a gold nanotriangle saturable absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaohan; Li, Ping; Dun, Yangyang; Song, Teng; Ma, Baomin

    2018-06-01

    Gold nanotriangles (GNTs) were successfully employed as a saturable absorber (SA) to achieve passively Q-switched lasers for the first time. The performance of the Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm has been systematically investigated. The corresponding shortest pulsewidth, the threshold pump power and the maximum Q-switched average output power were 275.5 ns, 1.37 W, and 171 mW, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the shortest pulsewidth and the lowest threshold in a passively Q-switched laser at approximately 1.1 µm based on a gold nanoparticle SA (GNPs-SA). Our experimental results proved that the GNTs-SA can be used as a promising saturable absorber for nanosecond-pulsed lasers.

  10. Insitu synthesis of self-assembled gold nanoparticles on glass or silicon substrates through reactive inkjet printing

    KAUST Repository

    Abulikemu, Mutalifu; Da'As, Eman Husni; Haverinen, Hanna M.; Cha, Dong Kyu; Malik, Mohammad A.; Jabbour, Ghassan Elie

    2013-01-01

    A facile and low cost method for the synthesis of self-assembled nanoparticles (NPs) with minimal size variation and chemical waste by using reactive inkjet printing was developed. Gold NPs with diameters as small as (8±2)nm can be made at low

  11. A simple gold-coated microstructure fiber polarization filter in two communication windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xinxing; Li, Shuguang; Du, Huijing; Zhang, Yinan; Liu, Qiang

    2018-03-01

    A polarization filter is designed at two communication windows of 1310 and 1550 nm based on microstructured optical fiber. The model has four large diameter air holes and two gold-coated air holes. The influence of the geometrical parameters of the photonic crystal fiber on the performance of the polarization filter is analyzed by the finite element method. The numerical simulation shows that when the fiber length is 300 μm, the corresponding extinction ratio is 209.7 dB and 179.8 dB, the bandwidth of extinction ratio (ER) better than 20 dB is 150 nm and 350 nm at the communication wavelength of 1310 nm and 1550 nm.

  12. GOLD's coating and testing facilities for ISSIS-WSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larruquert, Juan I.; Méndez, José Antonio; Aznárez, José Antonio; Vidal-Dasilva, Manuela; García-Cortés, Sergio; Rodríguez-de Marcos, Luis; Fernández-Perea, Mónica

    2011-09-01

    ISSIS imager has been thought as an open purpose instrument within the World Space Observatory (WSO) international space mission. The highest priorities of ISSIS, an instrument to be developed by Spain, are to guarantee high spatial resolution and high sensitivity down to the far ultraviolet (FUV). The paper displays the capacities of GOLD for multilayer deposition and FUV reflectometry, among other metrologies, for ISSIS optical elements. Deposition of coatings for ISSIS-WSO will be carried out in a new UHV system with a 75-cm diameter deposition chamber. The purpose of the new laboratory is the deposition of coatings satisfying the constraints for FUV space optics. The first target coating to be developed in this new laboratory is Al protected with MgF2, with optimum reflectance down to ˜120 nm. GOLD's existing reflectometer is able to characterize flat pieces both by transmittance and reflectance, and the latter from near-normal to grazing incidence, in the range from 12 to 200 nm. Other metrologies that will be available at GOLD for ISSIS's coatings and filters include optical thickness of filters to assure parfocality, filter wedge, and coating and filter scattering.

  13. Apertureless SNOM study on gold nanoparticles: Experiments and simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Weizhe; Kimel, Alexey; Kirilyuk, Andrei; Rasing, Theo [Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2010-08-15

    Gold nanoparticles (about 10 nm in diameter) are investigated by an apertureless (or scattering-type) scanning near-field optical microscope (aSNOM) at 633 nm and a negative optical amplitude signal contrast is observed. To understand the size effect and the interactions between light, tip, and sample, an analytical solution is obtained by adopting a model considering the tip as a point dipole. This model successfully shows the contrast reversal measured in experiments. Some important aspects, however, are neglected by the quasistatic dipole model. Thus, three-dimensional (3D) numerical calculations by a finite integration technique are applied to study the interactions between tip apex, gold nanoparticle, and the substrate surface. The simulated near-field and far-field results help us not only to understand the experimentally acquired aSNOM images but also to investigate the complicated tip-particle-surface interactions. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  14. Metal-organic framework templated electrodeposition of functional gold nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worrall, Stephen D.; Bissett, Mark A.; Hill, Patrick I.; Rooney, Aidan P.; Haigh, Sarah J.; Attfield, Martin P.; Dryfe, Robert A.W.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Electrodeposition of anisotropic Au nanostructures templated by HKUST-1. • Au nanostructures replicate ∼1.4 nm pore spaces of HKUST-1. • Encapsulated Au nanostructures active as SERS substrate for 4-fluorothiophenol. - Abstract: Utilizing a pair of quick, scalable electrochemical processes, the permanently porous MOF HKUST-1 was electrochemically grown on a copper electrode and this HKUST-1-coated electrode was used to template electrodeposition of a gold nanostructure within the pore network of the MOF. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrates that a proportion of the gold nanostructures exhibit structural features replicating the pore space of this ∼1.4 nm maximum pore diameter MOF, as well as regions that are larger in size. Scanning electron microscopy shows that the electrodeposited gold nanostructure, produced under certain conditions of synthesis and template removal, is sufficiently inter-grown and mechanically robust to retain the octahedral morphology of the HKUST-1 template crystals. The functionality of the gold nanostructure within the crystalline HKUST-1 was demonstrated through the surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic (SERS) detection of 4-fluorothiophenol at concentrations as low as 1 μM. The reported process is confirmed as a viable electrodeposition method for obtaining functional, accessible metal nanostructures encapsulated within MOF crystals.

  15. Dendritic functionalization of monolayer-protected gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutler, Erin C.; Lundin, Erik; Garabato, B. Davis; Choi, Daeock; Shon, Young-Seok

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the facile synthesis of nanoparticle-cored dendrimers (NCDs) and nanoparticle megamers from monolayer-protected gold clusters using either single or multi-step reactions. First, 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid/hexanethiolate-protected gold clusters were synthesized using the Schiffrin reaction followed by the ligand place-exchange reaction. A convergent approach for the synthesis of nanoparticle-cored dendrimers uses a single step reaction that is an ester coupling reaction of hydroxy-functionalized dendrons with carboxylic acid-functionalized gold clusters. A divergent approach, which is based on multi-step reactions, employs the repetition of an amide coupling reaction and a Michael addition reaction to build polyamidoamine dendritic architectures around a nanoparticle core. Nanoparticle megamers, which are large dendrimer-induced nanoparticle aggregates with an average diameter of more than 300 nm, were prepared by the amide coupling reaction between polyamiodoamine [G-2] dendrimers and carboxylic acid-functionalized gold clusters. 1 H NMR spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used for the characterization of these hybrid nanoparticles

  16. Hydrothermal synthesis of histidine-functionalized single-crystalline gold nanoparticles and their pH-dependent UV absorption characteristic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiguo; Zu, Yuangang; Fu, Yujie; Meng, Ronghua; Guo, Songling; Xing, Zhimin; Tan, Shengnan

    2010-03-01

    L-Histidine capped single-crystalline gold nanoparticles have been synthesized by a hydrothermal process under a basic condition at temperature between 65 and 150 degrees C. The produced gold nanoparticles were spherical with average diameter of 11.5+/-2.9nm. The synthesized gold colloidal solution was very stable and can be stored at room temperature for more than 6 months. The color of the colloidal solution can change from wine red to mauve, purple and blue during the acidifying process. This color changing phenomenon is attributed to the aggregation of gold nanoparticles resulted from hydrogen bond formation between the histidines adsorbed on the gold nanoparticles surfaces. This hydrothermal synthetic method is expected to be used for synthesizing some other amino acid functionalized gold nanomaterials.

  17. PEGylation on mixed monolayer gold nanoparticles: Effect of grafting density, chain length, and surface curvature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiaqi; Zhang, Heng; Morovati, Vahid; Dargazany, Roozbeh

    2017-10-15

    PEGylation on nanoparticles (NPs) is widely used to prevent aggregation and to mask NPs from the fast clearance system in the body. Understanding the molecular details of the PEG layer could facilitate rational design of PEGylated NPs that maximize their solubility and stealth ability without significantly compromising the targeting efficiency and cellular uptake. Here, we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to understand the structural and dynamic the PEG coating of mixed monolayer gold NPs. Specifically, we modeled gold NPs with PEG grafting densities ranging from 0-2.76chain/nm 2 , chain length with 0-10 PEG monomers, NP core diameter from 5nm to 500nm. It is found that the area accessed by individual PEG chains gradually transits from a "mushroom" to a "brush" conformation as NP surface curvature become flatter, whereas such a transition is not evident on small NPs when grafting density increases. It is shown that moderate grafting density (∼1.0chain/nm 2 ) and short chain length are sufficient enough to prevent NPs from aggregating in an aqueous medium. The effect of grafting density on solubility is also validated by dynamic light scattering measurements of PEGylated 5nm gold NPs. With respect to the shielding ability, simulations predict that increase either grafting density, chain length, or NP diameter will reduce the accessibility of the protected content to a certain size molecule. Interestingly, reducing NP surface curvature is estimated to be most effective in promoting shielding ability. For shielding against small molecules, increasing PEG grafting density is more effective than increasing chain length. A simple model that includes these three investigated parameters is developed based on the simulations to roughly estimate the shielding ability of the PEG layer with respect to molecules of different sizes. The findings can help expand our current understanding of the PEG layer and guide rational design of PEGylated gold NPs for a particular

  18. Insitu synthesis of self-assembled gold nanoparticles on glass or silicon substrates through reactive inkjet printing

    KAUST Repository

    Abulikemu, Mutalifu

    2013-12-18

    A facile and low cost method for the synthesis of self-assembled nanoparticles (NPs) with minimal size variation and chemical waste by using reactive inkjet printing was developed. Gold NPs with diameters as small as (8±2)nm can be made at low temperature (120 °C). The size of the resulting NPs can be readily controlled through the concentration of the gold precursor and oleylamine ink. The pure gold composition of the synthesized NPs was confirmed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) analysis. High-resolution SEM (HRSEM) and TEM (HRTEM), and X-ray diffraction revealed their size and face-centered cubic (fcc) crystal structure, respectively. Owing to the high density of the NP film, UV/Vis spectroscopy showed a red shift in the intrinsic plasmonic resonance peak. We envision the extension of this approach to the synthesis of other nanomaterials and the production of tailored functional nanomaterials and devices. Midas touch: The use of low-cost manufacturing approaches in the synthesis of nanoparticles is critical for many applications. Reactive inkjet printing, along with a judicious choice of precursor/solvent system, was used to synthesize a relatively uniform assembly of crystalline gold nanoparticles, with diameters as small as (8±2)nm, over a given substrate surface. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH.

  19. In situ gold nanoparticles formation: contrast agent for dental optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braz, Ana K. S.; Araujo, Renato E. de; Ohulchanskyy, Tymish Y.; Shukla, Shoba; Bergey, Earl J.; Gomes, Anderson S. L.; Prasad, Paras N.

    2012-06-01

    In this work we demonstrate the potential use of gold nanoparticles as contrast agents for the optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging technique in dentistry. Here, a new in situ photothermal reduction procedure was developed, producing spherical gold nanoparticles inside dentinal layers and tubules. Gold ions were dispersed in the primer of commercially available dental bonding systems. After the application and permeation in dentin by the modified adhesive systems, the dental bonding materials were photopolymerized concurrently with the formation of gold nanoparticles. The gold nanoparticles were visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The SEM images show the presence of gold nanospheres in the hybrid layer and dentinal tubules. The diameter of the gold nanoparticles was determined to be in the range of 40 to 120 nm. Optical coherence tomography images were obtained in two- and three-dimensions. The distribution of nanoparticles was analyzed and the extended depth of nanosphere production was determined. The results show that the OCT technique, using in situ formed gold nanoparticles as contrast enhancers, can be used to visualize dentin structures in a non-invasive and non-destructive way.

  20. Gold nanoparticle formation in diamond-like carbon using two different methods: Gold ion implantation and co-deposition of gold and carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvadori, M. C.; Teixeira, F. S.; Araújo, W. W. R.; Sgubin, L. G.; Cattani, M.; Spirin, R. E.; Brown, I. G.

    2012-01-01

    We describe work in which gold nanoparticles were formed in diamond-like carbon (DLC), thereby generating a Au-DLC nanocomposite. A high-quality, hydrogen-free DLC thin film was formed by filtered vacuum arc plasma deposition, into which gold nanoparticles were introduced using two different methods. The first method was gold ion implantation into the DLC film at a number of decreasing ion energies, distributing the gold over a controllable depth range within the DLC. The second method was co-deposition of gold and carbon, using two separate vacuum arc plasma guns with suitably interleaved repetitive pulsing. Transmission electron microscope images show that the size of the gold nanoparticles obtained by ion implantation is 3-5 nm. For the Au-DLC composite obtained by co-deposition, there were two different nanoparticle sizes, most about 2 nm with some 6-7 nm. Raman spectroscopy indicates that the implanted sample contains a smaller fraction of sp 3 bonding for the DLC, demonstrating that some sp 3 bonds are destroyed by the gold implantation.

  1. Preparation of gold nanoparticles for plasmonic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benkovicova, Monika, E-mail: monika.benkovicova@savba.sk [Institute of Physics SAS, Dubravska cesta 9, 845 11 Bratislava (Slovakia); Polymer Institute SAS, Dubravska cesta 9, 845 41 Bratislava (Slovakia); Vegso, Karol; Siffalovic, Peter; Jergel, Matej; Luby, Stefan; Majkova, Eva [Institute of Physics SAS, Dubravska cesta 9, 845 11 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2013-09-30

    We present a simple hot injection method for the preparation of colloidal solutions of hydrophobic spherical gold nanoparticles with the diameter around 20 nm and size dispersion below 20%. Various surfactants with different lengths of hydrocarbon chains, such as oleylamine, 1-octadecanethiol, poly (N-vinylpyrrolidone), and AgNO{sub 3} in 1,5-pentanediol, were used for sterical stabilization in the colloidal solution. The hydrodynamic nanoparticle size and size dispersion were determined by the dynamic light scattering (DLS) while the small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) from the colloidal solution provided information on the size of the metallic nanoparticle core (without surfactant). Plasmon enhanced resonant absorption peaks between 500 nm and 600 nm were detected by the UV–VIS spectrophotometry. The nanoparticle arrays on silicon prepared by solvent evaporation or Langmuir-Schaefer method were inspected by high-resolution scanning electron microscopy and grazing-incidence SAXS (GISAXS). The presence of side maxima in the GISAXS pattern gives evidence of the nanoparticle ordering by self-assembly while very close values of the interparticle distance derived from GISAXS and the nanoparticle size derived from DLS indicate a close-packed order. - Highlights: ► Preparation of gold nanoparticles by use a various of surfactants ► Preparation of monodisperse nanoparticles ► Characterization of nanoparticles on a solid substrate.

  2. Size-dependent multispectral photoacoustic response of solid and hollow gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutrath, Benjamin S; Buchkremer, Anne; Timper, Jan; Leifert, Annika; Simon, Ulrich; Beckmann, Martin F; Schmitz, Georg; Eckert, Thomas; Richtering, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging attracts a great deal of attention as an innovative modality for longitudinal, non-invasive, functional and molecular imaging in oncology. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are identified as superior, NIR-absorbing PA contrast agents for biomedical applications. Until now, no systematic comparison of the optical extinction and PA efficiency of water-soluble AuNPs of various geometries and small sizes has been performed. Here spherical AuNPs with core diameters of 1.0, 1.4 and 11.2 nm, nanorods with longitudinal/transversal elongation of 38/9 and 44/12 nm and hollow nanospheres with outer/inner diameters of 33/19, 57/30, 68/45 and 85/56 nm were synthesized. The diode laser set-up with excitations at 650, 808, 850 and 905 nm allowed us to correlate the molar PA signal intensity with the molar extinction of the respective AuNPs. Deviations were explained by differences in heat transfer from the particle to the medium and, for larger particles, by the scattering of light. The molar PA intensity of 1.0 nm AuNPs was comparable to the commonly used organic dye methylene blue, and rapidly increased with the lateral size of AuNPs. (paper)

  3. Adaptive chemistry of bifunctional gold nanoparticles at the air/water interface. A synchrotron X-ray study of giant amphiphiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, K.; Weygand, M.J.; Kjær, K.

    2004-01-01

    A series of ligand stabilized gold nanoparticles with diameters close to 3 nm were studied as Langmuir monolayers at the air/water interface by synchrotron X-ray diffraction and reflectivity. Alkylthiols with different length and/or terminal functional group (hydrophilic or hydrophobic) were intr...

  4. Gold and gold-copper nanoparticles in 2-propanol: A radiation chemical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, G.R.

    2011-01-01

    The studies on the reduction of Au 3+ to gold nanoparticles in presence and absence of Cu 2+ under deoxygenated conditions in 2-propanol by radiolytic method have been carried out. On γ-radiolysis, preliminary yellow colored solution of Au 3+ changed to purple color owing to gold nanoparticles formation, which exhibits an absorption peak at around 540 nm. In the presence of Cu 2+ , absorption of gold-copper nanoparticles, which was also produced during γ-radiolysis, was red shifted in contrast to the system containing no Cu 2+ . Under DLS studies the sizes of gold nanoparticles in the absence and the presence of Cu 2+ were found to be larger (>400 nm). However, in presence of polyethylene glycol, a stabilizer the nanoparticle sizes became smaller, sizes measured for gold and gold-copper nanoparticles are 40 and 140 nm, respectively. Moreover, the change in UV-vis spectra in the Cu 2+ and Au 3+ mixed system highlights the formation of gold-copper nanoparticles in core-shell type arrangement. - Highlights: → Present radiation chemical study highlights high reactivity of Au ·2+ with Cu 2+ . → Absorption of gold-copper nanoparticles is blue shifted as compared to copper nanoparticles. → Change in UV-vis spectra with dose emphasizes core-shell type arrangement of Au-Cu nanoparticles.

  5. Enhancing DNA binding rate using optical trapping of high-density gold nanodisks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, En-Hung; Pan, Ming-Yang; Lee, Ming-Chang; Wei, Pei-Kuen

    2014-01-01

    We present the dynamic study of optical trapping of fluorescent molecules using high-density gold nanodisk arrays. The gold nanodisks were fabricated by electron beam lithography with a diameter of 500 nm and a period of 1 μm. Dark-field illumination showed ∼15 times enhancement of fluorescence near edges of nanodisks. Such enhanced near-field generated an optical trapping force of ∼10 fN under 3.58 × 10 3 W/m 2 illumination intensity as calculated from the Brownian motions of 590 nm polystyrene beads. Kinetic observation of thiolated DNA modified with Cy5 dye showed different binding rates of DNA under different illumination intensity. The binding rate increased from 2.14 × 10 3 s −1 (I = 0.7 × 10 3 W/m 2 ) to 1.15 × 10 5 s −1 (I = 3.58 × 10 3 W/m 2 ). Both enhanced fluorescence and binding rate indicate that gold nanodisks efficiently improve both detection limit and interaction time for microarrays

  6. Antifungal activity of gold nanoparticles prepared by solvothermal method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Tokeer, E-mail: tahmad3@jmi.ac.in [Nanochemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi 110025 (India); Wani, Irshad A.; Lone, Irfan H.; Ganguly, Aparna [Nanochemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi 110025 (India); Manzoor, Nikhat; Ahmad, Aijaz [Department of Biosciences, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi 110025 (India); Ahmed, Jahangeer [Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Al-Shihri, Ayed S. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, King Khalid University, Abha 61413, P.O. Box 9004 (Saudi Arabia)

    2013-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Gold nanoparticles (7 and 15 nm) of very high surface area (329 and 269 m{sup 2}/g) have been successfully synthesized through solvothermal method by using tin chloride and sodium borohydride as reducing agents. As-prepared gold nanoparticles shows very excellent antifungal activity against Candida isolates and activity increases with decrease in the particle size. Display Omitted Highlights: ► Effect of reducing agents on the morphology of gold nanoparticles. ► Highly uniform and monodisperse gold nanoparticles (7 nm). ► Highest surface area of gold nanoparticles (329 m{sup 2/}g). ► Excellent antifungal activity of gold nanoparticles against Candida strains. -- Abstract: Gold nanoparticles have been successfully synthesized by solvothermal method using SnCl{sub 2} and NaBH{sub 4} as reducing agents. X-ray diffraction studies show highly crystalline and monophasic nature of the gold nanoparticles with face centred cubic structure. The transmission electron microscopic studies show the formation of nearly spherical gold nanoparticles of average size of 15 nm using SnCl{sub 2}, however, NaBH{sub 4} produced highly uniform, monodispersed and spherical gold nanoparticles of average grain size of 7 nm. A high surface area of 329 m{sup 2}/g for 7 nm and 269 m{sup 2}/g for 15 nm gold nanoparticles was observed. UV–vis studies assert the excitations over the visible region due to transverse and longitudinal surface plasmon modes. The gold nanoparticles exhibit excellent size dependant antifungal activity and greater biocidal action against Candida isolates for 7 nm sized gold nanoparticles restricting the transmembrane H{sup +} efflux of the Candida species than 15 nm sized gold nanoparticles.

  7. Antifungal activity of gold nanoparticles prepared by solvothermal method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Tokeer; Wani, Irshad A.; Lone, Irfan H.; Ganguly, Aparna; Manzoor, Nikhat; Ahmad, Aijaz; Ahmed, Jahangeer; Al-Shihri, Ayed S.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Gold nanoparticles (7 and 15 nm) of very high surface area (329 and 269 m 2 /g) have been successfully synthesized through solvothermal method by using tin chloride and sodium borohydride as reducing agents. As-prepared gold nanoparticles shows very excellent antifungal activity against Candida isolates and activity increases with decrease in the particle size. Display Omitted Highlights: ► Effect of reducing agents on the morphology of gold nanoparticles. ► Highly uniform and monodisperse gold nanoparticles (7 nm). ► Highest surface area of gold nanoparticles (329 m 2/ g). ► Excellent antifungal activity of gold nanoparticles against Candida strains. -- Abstract: Gold nanoparticles have been successfully synthesized by solvothermal method using SnCl 2 and NaBH 4 as reducing agents. X-ray diffraction studies show highly crystalline and monophasic nature of the gold nanoparticles with face centred cubic structure. The transmission electron microscopic studies show the formation of nearly spherical gold nanoparticles of average size of 15 nm using SnCl 2 , however, NaBH 4 produced highly uniform, monodispersed and spherical gold nanoparticles of average grain size of 7 nm. A high surface area of 329 m 2 /g for 7 nm and 269 m 2 /g for 15 nm gold nanoparticles was observed. UV–vis studies assert the excitations over the visible region due to transverse and longitudinal surface plasmon modes. The gold nanoparticles exhibit excellent size dependant antifungal activity and greater biocidal action against Candida isolates for 7 nm sized gold nanoparticles restricting the transmembrane H + efflux of the Candida species than 15 nm sized gold nanoparticles.

  8. Macrocluster desorption effect caused by single MCI: charges of gold clusters (2-20 nm) desorbed due to electronic processes induced by fission fragment bombardment in nanodispersed gold targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranov, I.; Jarmiychuk, S.; Kirillov, S.; Novikov, A.; Obnorskii, V.; Pchelintsev, A.; Wien, K.; Reimann, C.

    1999-01-01

    In this work the charge state of the negatively charged gold nanocluster ions (2-20 nm) that were desorbed from nanodispersed gold islet targets by 252 Cf fission fragments via electronic processes is studied. Mean cluster charge was calculated as a ratio of mean cluster mass to mean mass-to-charge ratio . Cluster masses were measured by means of a collector technique employing transmission electron microscopy and scanning force microscopy, while m/q was measured by means of a tandem TOF-spectrometer. It is shown that the nanocluster ions are mostly multiply charged (2-16e) and the charge increases non-linearly with the cluster size. The results are discussed

  9. Passively Q-switched of EDFL employing multi-walled carbon nanotubes with diameter less than 8 nm as saturable absorber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuikafly Siti Nur Fatin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper demonstrates passively Q-switched erbium-doped fiber laser implementing multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs based saturable absorber. The paper is the first to report the use of the MWCNTs with diameter less than 8 nm as typically, the diameter used is 10 to 20 nm. The MWCNTs is incorporated with water soluble host polymer, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA to produce a MWCNTs polymer composite thin film which is then sandwiched between two fiber connectors. The fabricated SA is employed in the laser experimental setup in ring cavity. The Q-switching regime started at threshold pump power of 103 mW and increasable to 215 mW. The stable pulse train from 41.6 kHz to 76.92 kHz with maximum average output power and pulse energy of 0.17 mW and 3.39 nJ are produced. The shortest pulse width of 1.9 μs is obtained in the proposed experimental work, making it the lowest pulse width ever reported using MWCNTs-based saturable absorber.

  10. Synthesis of hexagonal ultrathin tungsten oxide nanowires with diameters below 5 nm for enhanced photocatalytic performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Huidan; Zhu, Qin; Zhang, Mengying; Yan, Yi; Liu, Yongping; Li, Ming; Yang, Zhishu; Geng, Peng

    2018-04-01

    Semiconductor with one dimension (1D) ultrathin nanostructure has been proved to be a promising nanomaterial in photocatalytic field. Great efforts were made on preparation of monoclinic ultrathin tungsten oxide nanowires. However, non-monoclinic phase tungsten oxides with 1D ultrathin structure, especially less than 5 nm width, have not been reported. Herein, we report the synthesis of hexagonal ultrathin tungsten oxide nanowires (U-WOx NW) by modified hydrothermal method. Microstructure characterization showed that U-WOx NW have the diameters of 1-3 nm below 5 nm and are hexagonal phase sub-stoichiometric WOx. U-WOx NW show absorption tail in the visible and near infrared region due to oxygen vacancies. For improving further photocatalytic performance, Ag co-catalyst was grown directly onto U-WOx NW surface by in situ redox reaction. Photocatalytic measurements revealed hexagonal U-WOx NW have better photodegradation activity, compared with commercial WO3(C-WO3) and oxidized U-WOx NW, ascribe to larger surface area, short diffusion length of photo-generated charge carriers and visible absorption of oxygen-vacancy-rich hexagonal ultrathin nanostructures. Moreover, the photocatalytic activity and stability of U-WOx NW using Ag co-catalyst were further improved.

  11. Extinction, emission, and scattering spectroscopy of 5-50 nm citrate-coated gold nanoparticles: An argument for curvature effects on aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfahani, Milad Rabbani; Pallem, Vasanta L.; Stretz, Holly A.; Wells, Martha J. M.

    2017-03-01

    The interaction of macromolecules with gold nanoparticles (GNPs) is of interest in the emerging field of biomedical and environmental detection devices. However, the physicochemical properties, including spectra, of GNPs in aqueous solution in the absence of metal-macromolecular interactions must first be considered before their activity in biological and environmental systems can be understood. The specific objective of this research was to experimentally illuminate the role of nanoparticle core size on the spectral (simultaneous consideration of extinction, emission, and scattering) versus aggregation behaviors of citrate-coated GNPs (CT-GNPs). It is difficult to find in the literature systematic simultaneous presentation of scattering, emission, and extinction spectra, including the UV range, and thus the present work will aid those who would use such particles for spectroscopic related separations or sensors. The spectroscopic behavior of CT-GNPs with different core sizes (5, 10, 30, and 50 nm) was studied in ultra-pure water at pH 6.0-6.5 employing UV-visible extinction, excitation-emission matrix (EEM), resonance Rayleigh scattering, and dynamic light scattering (DLS) spectroscopies. The CT-GNP-5 and CT-GNP-10 samples aggregated, absorbed light, and emitted light. In contrast, the CT-GNP-30 and CT-GNP-50 samples did not aggregate and did not emit light, but scattered light intensely. Multimodal peaks were observed in the intensity-based DLS spectra of CT-GNP-5 and CT-GNP-10 samples. Monomodal peaks in the volume-based DLS spectra overestimated particle diameters by 60% and 30% for the CT-GNP-5 and CT-GNP-10 samples, respectively, but underestimated diameters by 10% and 4% for the CT-GNP-30 and CT-GNP-50 samples. The volume-based DLS spectra indicated that dimer and trimer aggregates contributed most to the overall volume of particles in the 5- and 10-nm CT-GNPs, whereas the CT-GNP-30 and CT-GNP-50 samples did not aggregate. Here, we discuss the potential

  12. One-Step Synthesis of PEGylated Gold Nanoparticles with Tunable Surface Charge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rares Stiufiuc

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work reports a rapid, simple and efficient one-step synthesis and detailed characterisation of stable aqueous colloids of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs coated with unmodified poly(ethyleneglycol (PEG molecules of different molecular weights and surface charges. By mixing and heating aqueous solutions of PEG with variable molecular chain and gold(III chloride hydrate (HAuCl4 in the presence of NaOH, we have successfully produced uniform colloidal 5 nm PEG coated AuNPs of spherical shape with tunable surface charge and an average diameter of 30 nm within a few minutes. It has been found out that PEGylated AuNPs provide optical enhancement of the characteristic vibrational bands of PEG molecules attached to the gold surface when they are excited with both visible (532 nm and NIR (785 nm laser lines. The surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS signal does not depend on the length of the PEG molecular chain enveloping the AuNPs, and the stability of the colloid is not affected by the addition of concentrated salt solution (0.1 M NaCl, thus suggesting their potential use for in vitro and in vivo applications. Moreover, by gradually changing the chain length of the biopolymer, we were able to control nanoparticles’ surface charge from −28 to −2 mV, without any modification of the Raman enhancement properties and of the colloidal stability.

  13. Electrochemical and morphological characterization of gold nanoparticles deposited on boron-doped diamond electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limat, Meriadec; El Roustom, Bahaa [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Institute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Jotterand, Henri [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Institute of Physics of the Complex Matter, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Foti, Gyoergy [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Institute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)], E-mail: gyorgy.foti@epfl.ch; Comninellis, Christos [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Institute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2009-03-30

    A novel two-step method was employed to synthesize gold nanoparticles dispersed on boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrode. It consisted of sputter deposition at ambient temperature of maximum 15 equivalent monolayers of gold, followed by a heat treatment in air at 600 deg. C. Gold nanoparticles with an average diameter between 7 and 30 nm could be prepared by this method on polycrystalline BDD film electrode. The obtained Au/BDD composite electrode appeared stable under conditions of electrochemical characterization performed using ferri-/ferrocyanide and benzoquinone/hydroquinone redox couples in acidic medium. The electrochemical behavior of Au/BDD was compared to that of bulk Au and BDD electrodes. Finally, the Au/BDD composite electrode was regarded as an array of Au microelectrodes dispersed on BDD substrate.

  14. Electrochemical and morphological characterization of gold nanoparticles deposited on boron-doped diamond electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limat, Meriadec; El Roustom, Bahaa; Jotterand, Henri; Foti, Gyoergy; Comninellis, Christos

    2009-01-01

    A novel two-step method was employed to synthesize gold nanoparticles dispersed on boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrode. It consisted of sputter deposition at ambient temperature of maximum 15 equivalent monolayers of gold, followed by a heat treatment in air at 600 deg. C. Gold nanoparticles with an average diameter between 7 and 30 nm could be prepared by this method on polycrystalline BDD film electrode. The obtained Au/BDD composite electrode appeared stable under conditions of electrochemical characterization performed using ferri-/ferrocyanide and benzoquinone/hydroquinone redox couples in acidic medium. The electrochemical behavior of Au/BDD was compared to that of bulk Au and BDD electrodes. Finally, the Au/BDD composite electrode was regarded as an array of Au microelectrodes dispersed on BDD substrate

  15. Gas sensing with gold-decorated vertically aligned carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudimela, Prasantha R; Scardamaglia, Mattia; González-León, Oriol; Reckinger, Nicolas; Snyders, Rony; Llobet, Eduard; Bittencourt, Carla; Colomer, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes of different lengths (150, 300, 500 µm) synthesized by thermal chemical vapor deposition and decorated with gold nanoparticles were investigated as gas sensitive materials for detecting nitrogen dioxide (NO2) at room temperature. Gold nanoparticles of about 6 nm in diameter were sputtered on the top surface of the carbon nanotube forests to enhance the sensitivity to the pollutant gas. We showed that the sensing response to nitrogen dioxide depends on the nanotube length. The optimum was found to be 300 µm for getting the higher response. When the background humidity level was changed from dry to 50% relative humidity, an increase in the response to NO2 was observed for all the sensors, regardless of the nanotube length.

  16. Gas sensing with gold-decorated vertically aligned carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasantha R. Mudimela

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes of different lengths (150, 300, 500 µm synthesized by thermal chemical vapor deposition and decorated with gold nanoparticles were investigated as gas sensitive materials for detecting nitrogen dioxide (NO2 at room temperature. Gold nanoparticles of about 6 nm in diameter were sputtered on the top surface of the carbon nanotube forests to enhance the sensitivity to the pollutant gas. We showed that the sensing response to nitrogen dioxide depends on the nanotube length. The optimum was found to be 300 µm for getting the higher response. When the background humidity level was changed from dry to 50% relative humidity, an increase in the response to NO2 was observed for all the sensors, regardless of the nanotube length.

  17. Fabrication of black-gold coatings by glancing angle deposition with sputtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Vitrey

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication of black-gold coatings using sputtering is reported here. Glancing angle deposition with a rotating substrate is needed to obtain vertical nanostructures. Enhanced light absorption is obtained in the samples prepared in the ballistic regime with high tilt angles. Under these conditions the diameter distribution of the nanostructures is centered at about 60 nm and the standard deviation is large enough to obtain black-metal behavior in the visible range.

  18. Hyperthermia effects in the presence of gold nanoparticles together with chemotherapy on Saos-2 cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sazgarnia, A.; Bahreyni Toosi, M. H.; Haji Ghahremani, F.; Rajabi, O.; Aledavood, A.; Esmaily, H.

    2011-01-01

    Hyperthermia created by microwave, infrared, ultrasound and other methods, is often utilized as an adjuvant to sensitize cancer cells to the effects of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. We investigated the efficacy of hyperthermia using microwave in synergy with chemotherapy in the presence and absence and gold nanoparticles. Material and Methods: After culturing and proliferation of the Saos-2 cell line derived from human osteogenic sarcoma, the cells were incubated at two concentrations of gold nanoparticles in two diameters of 20 and 40 nm and in the absence and presence of doxorubicin in different groups. Forty eight hours after irradiating the cells with microwave up to a temperature of 42 d egree C , cell survival rate was determined using the MTT method, in order to study the effectiveness of the therapeutic parameters. Results: Cell survival in the presence of gold nanoparticles was greater than 95%. After chemotherapy by doxorubicin with and without 40 nm gold nanoparticles, cell survival rates were determined as 62.8% and 37.1 %, declining down to 17% and 4.1% respectively following the combined treatment with microwave and chemotherapy in the presence of 20 and 40 nm gold nanoparticles. Discussion and Conclusions: Gold nanoparticles did not induce any cytotoxicity by themselves; their presence along with microwave provided a reduction in survival rate that was comparable in severity with the lethal effects of doxorubicin. microwave hyperthermia with gold nanoparticles produced a higher treatment efficiency in comparison to similar groups in which gold nanoparticles were absent. The synergism observed between hyperthermia and chemotherapy was dependent in gold nanoparticles' size and concentration. This finding could be caused by increased uptake of doxorubicin by the cells in the presence of gold nanoparticles.

  19. Anthelmintic efficacy of gold nanoparticles derived from a phytopathogenic fungus, Nigrospora oryzae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradip Kumar Kar

    Full Text Available Exploring a green chemistry approach, this study brings to the fore, the anthelmintic efficacy of gold nanoparticles, highlighting the plausible usage of myconanotechnology. Gold nanoparticles of ∼6 to ∼18 nm diameter were synthesized by treating the mycelia-free culture filtrate of the phytopathogenic fungus with gold chloride. Their size and morphology were confirmed by UV-Vis spectroscopy, DLS data, AFM and TEM images. The XRD studies reveal a crystalline nature of the nanoparticles, which are in cubic phase. The FTIR spectroscopic studies before and after the formation of nanoparticles show the presence of possible functional groups responsible for the bio-reduction and capping of the synthesized gold nanoparticles. The latter were tested as vermifugal agents against a model cestode Raillietina sp., an intestinal parasite of domestic fowl. Further, ultrastructural and biochemical parameters were used to corroborate the efficacy study.

  20. Dewetting dynamics of a gold film on graphene: implications for nanoparticle formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namsani, Sadanandam; Singh, Jayant K

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of dewetting of gold films on graphene surfaces is investigated using molecular dynamics simulation. The effect of temperature (973-1533 K), film diameter (30-40 nm) and film thickness (0.5-3 nm) on the dewetting mechanism, leading to the formation of nanoparticles, is reported. The dewetting behavior for films ≤5 Å is in contrast to the behavior seen for thicker films. The retraction velocity, in the order of ∼300 m s(-1) for a 1 nm film, decreases with an increase in film thickness, whereas it increases with temperature. However at no point do nanoparticles detach from the surface within the temperature range considered in this work. We further investigated the self-assembly behavior of nanoparticles on graphene at different temperatures (673-1073 K). The process of self-assembly of gold nanoparticles is favorable at lower temperatures than at higher temperatures, based on the free-energy landscape analysis. Furthermore, the shape of an assembled structure is found to change from spherical to hexagonal, with a marked propensity towards an icosahedral structure based on the bond-orientational order parameters.

  1. Influence of gold nanoparticles on the 805 nm gain in Tm3+/Yb3+ codoped PbO-GeO2 pedestal waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Assumpção, T. A. A.; Camilo, M. E.; Alayo, M. I.; da Silva, D. M.; Kassab, L. R. P.

    2017-10-01

    The production and characterization of pedestal waveguides based on PbO-GeO2 amorphous thin films codoped with Tm3+/Yb3+, with and without gold nanoparticles (NPs), are reported. Pedestal structure was obtained by conventional photolithography and plasma etching. Tm3+/Yb3+ codoped PGO amorphous thin film was obtained by RF Magnetron Sputtering deposition and used as core layer in the pedestal optical waveguide. The minimum propagation losses in the waveguide were 3.6 dB/cm at 1068 nm. The internal gain at 805 nm was enhanced and increased to 8.67 dB due to the presence of gold NPs. These results demonstrate for the first time that Tm3+/Yb3+ codoped PbO-GeO2 waveguides are promising for first telecom window and integrated photonics, especially for applications on fiber network at short distances.

  2. Method development for speciation analysis of nanoparticle and ionic forms of gold in biological samples by high performance liquid chromatography hyphenated to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malejko, Julita; Świerżewska, Natalia; Bajguz, Andrzej; Godlewska-Żyłkiewicz, Beata

    2018-04-01

    A new method based on coupling high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP MS) has been developed for the speciation analysis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and dissolved gold species (Au(III)) in biological samples. The column type, the composition and the flow rate of the mobile phase were carefully investigated in order to optimize the separation conditions. The usefulness of two polymeric reversed phase columns (PLRP-S with 100 nm and 400 nm pore size) to separate gold species were investigated for the first time. Under the optimal conditions (PLRP-S400 column, 10 mmol L-1 SDS and 5% methanol as the mobile phase, 0.5 mL min-1 flow rate), detection limits of 2.2 ng L-1 for Au(III), 2.8 ng L-1 for 10 nm AuNPs and 3.7 ng L-1 for 40 nm AuNPs were achieved. The accuracy of the method was proved by analysis of reference material RM 8011 (NIST) of gold nanoparticles of nominal diameter of 10 nm. The HPLC-ICP MS method has been successfully applied to the detection and size characterization of gold species in lysates of green algae Acutodesmus obliquus, typical representative of phytoplankton flora, incubated with 10 nm AuNPs or Au(III).

  3. Study on gamma radiation-induced synthesis of gold nanoparticles stabilized by hyaluronan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang Van Phu; Bui Duy Du

    2013-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with diameter from 4 to 10 nm were synthesized by γ-irradiation in hyaluronan (HA) solution without usage of any OH radical scavenger. The size distribution of AuNPs were determined by TEM images. The λ max (517-525 nm) of colloidal AuNPs solutions as prepared was measured by UV-Vis spectroscopy. The influence factor on the size of AuNPs particularly the concentration of Au 3+ , HA and dose rate were investigated. The colloidal solution of AuNPs/HA as synthesized was stable more than 6 months stored under ambient condition. AuNPs with the size less than 10 nm narrow size distribution stabilized by HA which is biocompatible polysaccharide can potentially be applied in biomedicine and cosmetic. (author)

  4. Preparation, characterization, and nonlinear optical properties of hybridized graphene @ gold nanorods nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jia; Ning, Tingyin; Han, Yanshun; Sheng, Yingqiang; Li, Chonghui; Zhao, Xiaofei; Lu, Zhengyi; Man, Baoyuan; Jiao, Yang; Jiang, Shouzhen

    2018-03-01

    The methods of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and seed-mediated growth were used to obtain graphene and gold nanorods (GNRs), respectively. We fabricate graphene @ gold nanorods (G@GNRs) nanocomposites by successively using dropping and transferring methods Through SEM, Raman spectra and TEM analysis, the number of graphene layers is 6-7. The diameter of gold nanorods (GNRs) is about 10 nm and the average aspect ratio is 6.5. In addition, we systematically investigate their nonlinear optical responses by using open-aperture Z-scan technique. In contrast with graphene and GNRs, the G@GNRs nanocomposites exhibit excellent nonlinear optical response with a modulation depth of about 51% and a saturable intensity of about 6.23 GW/cm2. The results suggest that the G@GNRs nanocomposites could potentially be used as an optical modulator in pulsed laser generation.

  5. Ultrafast, 2 min synthesis of monolayer-protected gold nanoclusters (d < 2 nm)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Matthew N.; Li, Dawei; Dass, Amala; Eah, Sang-Kee

    2012-06-01

    An ultrafast synthesis method is presented for hexanethiolate-coated gold nanoclusters (d gold nanoclusters are separated from the reaction byproducts fast and easily without any need for post-synthesis cleaning.An ultrafast synthesis method is presented for hexanethiolate-coated gold nanoclusters (d gold nanoclusters are separated from the reaction byproducts fast and easily without any need for post-synthesis cleaning. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details of gold nanocluster synthesis and mass-spectrometry. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30890h

  6. GOLD CLUSTER LABELS AND RELATED TECHNOLOGIES IN MOLECULAR MORPHOLOGY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HAINFELD,J.F.; POWELL,R.D.

    2004-02-04

    Although intensely colored, even the largest colloidal gold particles are not, on their own, sufficiently colored for routine use as a light microscopy stain: only with very abundant antigens or with specialized illumination methods can bound gold be seen. Colloidal gold probes were developed primarily as markers for electron microscopy, for which their very high electron density and selectivity for narrow size distributions when prepared in different ways rendered them highly suited. The widespread use of gold labeling for light microscopy was made possible by the introduction of autometallographic enhancement methods. In these processes, the bound gold particles are exposed to a solution containing metal ions and a reducing agent; they catalyze the reduction of the ions, resulting in the deposition of additional metal selectively onto the particles. On the molecular level, the gold particles are enlarged up to 30-100 nm in diameter; on the macroscale level, this results in the formation of a dark stain in regions containing bound gold particles, greatly increasing visibility and contrast. The applications of colloidal gold have been described elsewhere in this chapter, we will focus on the use of covalently linked cluster complexes of gold and other metals. A gold cluster complex is a discrete molecular coordination compound comprising a central core, or ''cluster'' of electron-dense metal atoms, ligated by a shell of small organic molecules (ligands), which are linked to the metal atoms on the surface of the core. This structure gives clusters several important advantages as labels. The capping of the metal surface by ligands prevents non-specific binding to cell and tissue components, which can occur with colloidal gold. Cluster compounds are more stable and may be used under a wider range of conditions. Unlike colloidal gold, clusters do not require additional macromolecules such as bovine serum albumin or polyethylene glycol for

  7. Gold/silver core-shell 20 nm nanoparticles extracted from citrate solution examined by XPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelhard, Mark H.; Smith, Jordan N.; Baer, Donald R.

    2016-06-01

    Silver nanoparticles of many types are widely used in consumer and medical products. The surface chemistry of particles and the coatings that form during synthesis or use in many types of media can significantly impact the behaviors of particles including dissolution, transformation and biological or environmental impact. Consequently it is useful to be able to extract information about the thickness of surface coatings and other attributes of nanoparticles produced in a variety of ways. It has been demonstrated that X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) can be reliably used to determine the thickness of organic and other nanoparticles coatings and shells. However, care is required to produce reliable and consistent information. Here we report the XPS spectra from gold/silver core-shell nanoparticles of nominal size 20 nm removed from a citrate saturated solution after one and two washing cycles. The Simulation of Electron Spectra for Surface Analysis (SESSA) program had been used to model peak amplitudes to obtain information on citrate coatings that remain after washing and demonstrate the presence of the gold core. This data is provided so that others can compare use of SESSA or other modeling approaches to quantify the nature of coatings to those already published and to explore the impacts particle non-uniformities on XPS signals from core-shell nanoparticles.

  8. Thickness effect of ultra-thin Ta2O5 resistance switching layer in 28 nm-diameter memory cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Tae Hyung; Song, Seul Ji; Kim, Hae Jin; Kim, Soo Gil; Chung, Suock; Kim, Beom Yong; Lee, Kee Jeung; Kim, Kyung Min; Choi, Byung Joon; Hwang, Cheol Seong

    2015-11-01

    Resistance switching (RS) devices with ultra-thin Ta2O5 switching layer (0.5-2.0 nm) with a cell diameter of 28 nm were fabricated. The performance of the devices was tested by voltage-driven current—voltage (I-V) sweep and closed-loop pulse switching (CLPS) tests. A Ta layer was placed beneath the Ta2O5 switching layer to act as an oxygen vacancy reservoir. The device with the smallest Ta2O5 thickness (0.5 nm) showed normal switching properties with gradual change in resistance in I-V sweep or CLPS and high reliability. By contrast, other devices with higher Ta2O5 thickness (1.0-2.0 nm) showed abrupt switching with several abnormal behaviours, degraded resistance distribution, especially in high resistance state, and much lower reliability performance. A single conical or hour-glass shaped double conical conducting filament shape was conceived to explain these behavioural differences that depended on the Ta2O5 switching layer thickness. Loss of oxygen via lateral diffusion to the encapsulating Si3N4/SiO2 layer was suggested as the main degradation mechanism for reliability, and a method to improve reliability was also proposed.

  9. Seeds mediated synthesis of giant gold particles on the glass surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasko, A. A.; Borodinova, T. I.; Marchenko, O. A.; Snegir, S. V.

    2018-03-01

    Herein, we present the protocols of synthesis of two types of gold particles which are in the great interest for the purpose of molecular electronics. The first type is the flat prisms with a triangular/hexagonal shape and a lateral size up to 80 µm. They were synthesized directly on a glass surface pretreated with (3-aminopropyl)-triethoxysilane molecules. The second type of particles was synthesized with using gold seeds with diameter of 18 nm. These seeds were deposited on a glass surface coated with APTES. The resulted three-dimensional structures with a form close to spherical increase in size up to 0.5-0.08 µm. Moreover, these particles grew up separately and did not merge during 48 h of synthesis.

  10. Microwave-induced synthesis of highly dispersed gold nanoparticles within the pore channels of mesoporous silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Jinlou; Fan Wei; Shimojima, Atsushi; Okubo, Tatsuya

    2008-01-01

    Highly dispersed gold nanoparticles have been incorporated into the pore channels of SBA-15 mesoporous silica through a newly developed strategy assisted by microwave radiation (MR). The sizes of gold are effectively controlled attributed to the rapid and homogeneous nucleation, simultaneous propagation and termination of gold precursor by MR. Diol moieties with high dielectric and dielectric loss constants, and hence a high microwave activation, were firstly introduced to the pore channels of SBA-15 by a simple addition reaction between amino group and glycidiol and subsequently served as the reduction centers for gold nanoparticles. Extraction of the entrapped gold from the nanocomposite resulted in milligram quantities of gold nanoparticles with low dispersity. The successful assembly process of diol groups and formation of gold nanoparticles were monitored and tracked by solid-state NMR and UV-vis measurements. Characterization by small angle X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicated that the incorporation of gold nanoparticles would not breakup the structural integrity and long-range periodicity of SBA-15. The gold nanoparticles had a narrow size distribution with diameters in the size range of 5-10 nm through TEM observation. The average particles size is 7.9 nm via calculation by the Scherrer formula and TEM measurements. Nitrogen adsorption and desorption isotherms gave further evidence that the employed method was efficient and gold nanoparticles were successfully incorporated into the pore channels of SBA-15. - Graphical abstract: A facile and novel strategy has been developed to incorporate gold nanoparticles into the pore channels of mesoporous SBA-15 assisted by microwave radiation (MR) with mild reaction condition and rapid reaction speed. Due to the rapid and homogeneous nucleation, simultaneous propagation and termination by MR, the size of gold nanoparticles are effectively controlled

  11. Size-dependent tuning of horseradish peroxidase bioreactivity by gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haohao; Liu, Yi; Li, Meng; Chong, Yu; Zeng, Mingyong; Lo, Y. Martin; Yin, Jun-Jie

    2015-02-01

    Molecules with diverse biological functions, such as heme peroxidases, can be useful tools for identifying potential biological effects of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) at the molecular level. Here, using UV-Vis, circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering, and electron spin resonance spectroscopy, we report tuning of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) bioactivity by reactant-free AuNPs with diameters of 5, 10, 15, 30 and 60 nm (Au-5 nm, Au-10 nm, Au-15 nm, Au-30 nm and Au-60 nm). HRP conjugation to AuNPs was observed with only Au-5 nm and Au-10 nm prominently increasing the α-helicity of the enzyme to extents inversely related to their size. Au-5 nm inhibited both HRP peroxidase activity toward 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine and HRP compound I/II reactivity toward 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide. Au-5 nm enhanced the HRP peroxidase activity toward ascorbic acid and the HRP compound I/II reactivity toward redox-active residues in the HRP protein moiety. Further, Au-5 nm also decreased the catalase- and oxidase-like activities of HRP. Au-10 nm showed similar, but weaker effects, while Au-15 nm, Au-30 nm and Au-60 nm had no effect. Results suggest that AuNPs can size-dependently enhance or inhibit HRP bioreactivity toward substrates with different redox potentials via a mechanism involving extension of the HRP substrate access channel and decline in the redox potentials of HRP catalytic intermediates.Molecules with diverse biological functions, such as heme peroxidases, can be useful tools for identifying potential biological effects of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) at the molecular level. Here, using UV-Vis, circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering, and electron spin resonance spectroscopy, we report tuning of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) bioactivity by reactant-free AuNPs with diameters of 5, 10, 15, 30 and 60 nm (Au-5 nm, Au-10 nm, Au-15 nm, Au-30 nm and Au-60 nm). HRP conjugation to AuNPs was observed with only Au-5 nm and Au-10 nm prominently increasing the

  12. SERS-barcoded colloidal gold NP assemblies as imaging agents for use in biodiagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Priyanka; Olds, William; Blakey, Idriss; Thurecht, Kristofer J.; Izake, Emad L.; Fredericks, Peter M.

    2014-03-01

    There is a growing need for new biodiagnostics that combine high throughput with enhanced spatial resolution and sensitivity. Gold nanoparticle (NP) assemblies with sub-10 nm particle spacing have the benefits of improving detection sensitivity via Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and being of potential use in biomedicine due to their colloidal stability. A promising and versatile approach to form solution-stable NP assemblies involves the use of multi-branched molecular linkers which allows tailoring of the assembly size, hot-spot density and interparticle distance. We have shown that linkers with multiple anchoring end-groups can be successfully employed as a linker to assemble gold NPs into dimers, linear NP chains and clustered NP assemblies. These NP assemblies with diameters of 30-120 nm are stable in solution and perform better as SERS substrates compared with single gold NPs, due to an increased hot-spot density. Thus, tailored gold NP assemblies are potential candidates for use as biomedical imaging agents. We observed that the hot-spot density and in-turn the SERS enhancement is a function of the linker polymer concentration and polymer architecture. New deep Raman techniques like Spatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy (SORS) have emerged that allow detection from beneath diffusely scattering opaque materials, including biological media such as animal tissue. We have been able to demonstrate that the gold NP assemblies could be detected from within both proteinaceous and high lipid containing animal tissue by employing a SORS technique with a backscattered geometry.

  13. Diameter Effect of Silver Nanorod Arrays to Surface-enhanced Raman Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Geun Hoi; Kim, Min Young; Yoon, Hyeok Jin; Suh, Jung Sang

    2014-01-01

    The effect the diameter of silver nanorod arrays whose distance between the nanorods was uniform at 65 nm have on Surface-enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) has been studied by varying the diameter from 28 to 51 nm. Nanorod length was fixed at approximately 62 nm, which is the optimum length for SERS by excitation with a 632.8 nm laser line. The transverse and longitudinal modes of the surface plasmon of these silver nanorods were near 400 and 630 nm, respectively. The extinction of the longitudinal mode increased with increasing nanorod diameter, while the transverse mode did not change significantly. High-quality SERS spectra of p-aminothiophenol and benzenethiol adsorbed on the tips of the silver nanorods were observed by excitation with a 632.8 nm laser line. The SERS enhancement increased with increasing nanorod diameter. We concluded that the SERS enhancement increases when the diameter of silver nanorods is increased mainly by increasing the excitation efficiency of the longitudinal mode. The enhancement factor for the silver nanorods with a 51 nm diameter was approximately 2 Χ 10 7

  14. Effect of the physical properties of activated carbon in the gold adsorption from cyanide media; Efecto de las propiedades fisicas del carbon activado en la adsorcion de oro desde medio cianuro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, P.; Vargas, C.

    2010-07-01

    The effect of the physical properties of an activated carbon such as pore size distribution, specific surface, pore average diameter, in the gold adsorption from cyanide solution with the gold to the Au (CN){sup -}{sub 2} form, was studied. To meet the proposed objectives two carbons were studied: carbon A with specific surface of 985 m{sup 2} / g, 57 % of micropores and 1.85 nm as average diameter of pores and carbon B with specific surface of 786 m{sup 2} / g, 27 % and pores of 2.35 nm as average diameter of pores; both granular carbons made from coconut shell. Batch adsorption tests were performed in a reactor of 500 ml of capacity with mechanical stirring at constant temperature. The effect of cations present in the aqueous solutions such as Ca{sup 2}+, Na+, K+ and Li+, the effect of pore size distribution, the effect of average pore diameter and surface area were evaluated in function of the rate and amount of gold adsorbed on the activated carbons denominated as A and B. The results to indicate that the physical properties of an activated carbon are an important factor in the gold adsorption process in terms of rate and amount of adsorbed gold. The carbon B with 786 m{sup 2} / g of specific surface area reached a higher load per unit area (0.02 mg Au/m{sup 2}) in relation to the carbon B of 985 m{sup 2} / g which had a load of 0.01 mg Au / m{sup 2}, after 6 h of contact carbon-solution. The rate adsorption of gold in both carbons is controlled by mass transfer in the liquid film surrounding the carbon particles to short times or small loads of gold in the particles, far from equilibrium. Applying a first order kinetic model, it was obtained that the ratio of the kinetic constants for carbons A and B, ie (kB / kA), fluctuates in a value of 3 for the different cations in study. In general it is possible to say that the rate adsorption and the amount of adsorbed gold increased with the increase in macropores and with the increasing pore average diameter. The

  15. Investigating the toxicity, uptake, nanoparticle formation and genetic response of plants to gold.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew F Taylor

    Full Text Available We have studied the physiological and genetic responses of Arabidopsis thaliana L. (Arabidopsis to gold. The root lengths of Arabidopsis seedlings grown on nutrient agar plates containing 100 mg/L gold were reduced by 75%. Oxidized gold was subsequently found in roots and shoots of these plants, but gold nanoparticles (reduced gold were only observed in the root tissues. We used a microarray-based study to monitor the expression of candidate genes involved in metal uptake and transport in Arabidopsis upon gold exposure. There was up-regulation of genes involved in plant stress response such as glutathione transferases, cytochromes P450, glucosyl transferases and peroxidases. In parallel, our data show the significant down-regulation of a discreet number of genes encoding proteins involved in the transport of copper, cadmium, iron and nickel ions, along with aquaporins, which bind to gold. We used Medicago sativa L. (alfalfa to study nanoparticle uptake from hydroponic culture using ionic gold as a non-nanoparticle control and concluded that nanoparticles between 5 and 100 nm in diameter are not directly accumulated by plants. Gold nanoparticles were only observed in plants exposed to ionic gold in solution. Together, we believe our results imply that gold is taken up by the plant predominantly as an ionic form, and that plants respond to gold exposure by up-regulating genes for plant stress and down-regulating specific metal transporters to reduce gold uptake.

  16. Investigating the Toxicity, Uptake, Nanoparticle Formation and Genetic Response of Plants to Gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Andrew F.; Rylott, Elizabeth L.; Anderson, Christopher W. N.; Bruce, Neil C.

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the physiological and genetic responses of Arabidopsis thaliana L. (Arabidopsis) to gold. The root lengths of Arabidopsis seedlings grown on nutrient agar plates containing 100 mg/L gold were reduced by 75%. Oxidized gold was subsequently found in roots and shoots of these plants, but gold nanoparticles (reduced gold) were only observed in the root tissues. We used a microarray-based study to monitor the expression of candidate genes involved in metal uptake and transport in Arabidopsis upon gold exposure. There was up-regulation of genes involved in plant stress response such as glutathione transferases, cytochromes P450, glucosyl transferases and peroxidases. In parallel, our data show the significant down-regulation of a discreet number of genes encoding proteins involved in the transport of copper, cadmium, iron and nickel ions, along with aquaporins, which bind to gold. We used Medicago sativa L. (alfalfa) to study nanoparticle uptake from hydroponic culture using ionic gold as a non-nanoparticle control and concluded that nanoparticles between 5 and 100 nm in diameter are not directly accumulated by plants. Gold nanoparticles were only observed in plants exposed to ionic gold in solution. Together, we believe our results imply that gold is taken up by the plant predominantly as an ionic form, and that plants respond to gold exposure by up-regulating genes for plant stress and down-regulating specific metal transporters to reduce gold uptake. PMID:24736522

  17. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering active gold nanoparticle/nanohole arrays fabricated through electron beam lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tsunghsueh; Lin, Yang-Wei

    2018-03-01

    Effective surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-active substrates from gold nanoparticle and gold nanohole arrays were successfully fabricated through electron beam lithography with precise computer-aided control of the unit size and intergap distance. Their SERS performance was evaluated using 4-mercaptobenzoic acid (4-MBA). These gold arrays yielded strong SERS signals under 785 nm laser excitation. The enhancement factors for 4-MBA molecules on the prepared gold nanoparticle and nanohole arrays maxed at 1.08 × 107 and 8.61 × 106, respectively. The observed increase in SERS enhancement was attributed to the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) wavelength shifting toward the near-infrared regime when the gold nanohole diameter increased, in agreement with the theoretical prediction in this study. The contribution of LSPR to the Raman enhancement from nanohole arrays deposited on fluorine-doped tin oxide glass was elucidated by comparing SERS and transmission spectra. This simple fabrication procedure, which entails employing electron beam lithography and the controllability of the intergap distance, suggests highly promising uses of nanohole arrays as functional components in sensing and photonic devices.

  18. Manipulation of extinction spectra of P3HT/PMMA medium arrays on silicon substrate containing self-assembled gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Ming-Chung; Chen, Shih-Wen; Li, Jia-Han; Chou, Yi; Lin, Jhih-Fong; Chen, Yang-Fang; Su, Wei-Fang

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we report a simple novel approach to modulate the extinction spectra of P3HT/PMMA by manipulating the medium arrays on a substrate that is coated with self-assembled gold nanoparticles. The 20 nm gold nanoparticles were synthesized and then self-assembled on the APTMS/silicon substrate surface by immersing the substrate into the gold colloid suspension. A high-resolution P3HT/PMMA photoluminescent electron beam resist was used to fabricate various square hole arrays on the substrate containing gold nanoparticles. The P3HT/PMMA medium composition causes the blue shifts in the extinction peaks of up to 40.6 nm by decreasing the period from 500 nm to 200 nm for P3HT/PMMA square hole arrays with a diameter of 100 nm. The magnitude of blue shift is directly proportional to the product of the changes of medium refractive index and the array structure factor. These peak shifts and intensity of extinction spectra for various P3HT/PMMA medium arrays are well described by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation results. Since this simple cost-effective technique can tune the extinction spectrum of medium and adding the gold nanoparticles can give more functionalities for sensing applications, such as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), that provides good opportunities for the design and fabrication of new optoelectronic devices and sensors. Highlights: ► We can tune the extinction spectra of P3HT/PMMA by manipulating the medium arrays. ► These optical behaviors of P3HT/PMMA medium arrays are well described by FDTD simulation results. ► Adding the Au nanoparticles can give more functionalities for sensing applications.

  19. Manipulation of extinction spectra of P3HT/PMMA medium arrays on silicon substrate containing self-assembled gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Ming-Chung [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333-02, Taiwan (China); Chen, Shih-Wen; Li, Jia-Han [Department of Engineering Science and Ocean Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106-17, Taiwan (China); Chou, Yi; Lin, Jhih-Fong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106-17, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yang-Fang [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106-17, Taiwan (China); Su, Wei-Fang, E-mail: suwf@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106-17, Taiwan (China)

    2012-11-15

    In this study, we report a simple novel approach to modulate the extinction spectra of P3HT/PMMA by manipulating the medium arrays on a substrate that is coated with self-assembled gold nanoparticles. The 20 nm gold nanoparticles were synthesized and then self-assembled on the APTMS/silicon substrate surface by immersing the substrate into the gold colloid suspension. A high-resolution P3HT/PMMA photoluminescent electron beam resist was used to fabricate various square hole arrays on the substrate containing gold nanoparticles. The P3HT/PMMA medium composition causes the blue shifts in the extinction peaks of up to 40.6 nm by decreasing the period from 500 nm to 200 nm for P3HT/PMMA square hole arrays with a diameter of 100 nm. The magnitude of blue shift is directly proportional to the product of the changes of medium refractive index and the array structure factor. These peak shifts and intensity of extinction spectra for various P3HT/PMMA medium arrays are well described by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation results. Since this simple cost-effective technique can tune the extinction spectrum of medium and adding the gold nanoparticles can give more functionalities for sensing applications, such as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), that provides good opportunities for the design and fabrication of new optoelectronic devices and sensors. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We can tune the extinction spectra of P3HT/PMMA by manipulating the medium arrays. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These optical behaviors of P3HT/PMMA medium arrays are well described by FDTD simulation results. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adding the Au nanoparticles can give more functionalities for sensing applications.

  20. Microwave assisted facile green synthesis of silver and gold nanocatalysts using the leaf extract of Aerva lanata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Siby; Mathew, Beena

    2015-02-01

    Herein, we report a simple microwave assisted method for the green synthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles by the reduction of aqueous metal salt solutions using leaf extract of the medicinal plant Aerva lanata. UV-vis., FTIR, XRD, and HR-TEM studies were conducted to assure the formation of nanoparticles. XRD studies clearly confirmed the crystalline nature of the synthesized nanoparticles. From the HR-TEM images, the silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were found to be more or less spherical and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were observed to be of different morphology with an average diameter of 18.62 nm for silver and 17.97 nm for gold nanoparticles. In order to evaluate the effect of microwave heating upon rate of formation, the synthesis was also conducted under ambient condition without the assistance of microwave radiation and the former method was found to be much faster than the later. The synthesized nanoparticles were used as nanocatalysts in the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol by NaBH4.

  1. Controlled UV-C light-induced fusion of thiol-passivated gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocoví-Martínez, Salvador; Parreño-Romero, Miriam; Agouram, Said; Pérez-Prieto, Julia

    2011-05-03

    Thiol-passivated gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) of a relatively small size, either decorated with chromophoric groups, such as a phthalimide (Au@PH) and benzophenone (Au@BP), or capped with octadecanethiol (Au@ODCN) have been synthesized and characterized by NMR and UV-vis spectroscopy as well as transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These NPs were irradiated in chloroform at different UV-wavelengths using either a nanosecond laser (266 and 355 nm, ca. 12 mJ/pulse, 10 ns pulse) or conventional lamps (300 nm UV-vis spectroscopy, as well as by TEM. Laser irradiation at 355 nm led to NP aggregation and precipitation, while the NPs were photostable under UV-A lamp illumination. Remarkably, laser excitation at 266 nm induced a fast (minutes time-scale) increase in the size of the NPs, producing huge spherical nanocrystals, while lamp-irradiation at UV-C wavelengths brought about nanonetworks of partially fused NPs with a larger diameter than the native NPs.

  2. Synthesis of reduced-size gold nanostars and internalization in SH-SY5Y cells

    KAUST Repository

    Dacarro, Giacomo

    2017-07-01

    The synthesis of large pentatwinned five-branched gold nanostars (GNS) has been modified so to obtain overall dimensions shrunk to 60% and a lower branches aspect ratio, leading to a dramatic blue shift of their two near-infrared (NIR) localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPR) absorptions but still maintaining one LSPR in the biotransparent NIR range. The interactions of polyethylene glycol (PEG) coated large and shrunk GNS with SH-SY5Y cells revealed that the large ones (DCI - diameter of the circumference in which GNS can be inscribed = 76 nm) are internalized more efficiently than the shrunk ones (DCI = 46 nm), correlating with a decreased cells surving fraction.

  3. Synthesis of reduced-size gold nanostars and internalization in SH-SY5Y cells

    KAUST Repository

    Dacarro, Giacomo; Pallavicini, Piersandro; Bertani, Serena Maria; Chirico, Giuseppe; D'Alfonso, Laura; Falqui, Andrea; Marchesi, Nicoletta; Pascale, Alessia; Sironi, Laura; Taglietti, Angelo; Zuddas, Efisio

    2017-01-01

    The synthesis of large pentatwinned five-branched gold nanostars (GNS) has been modified so to obtain overall dimensions shrunk to 60% and a lower branches aspect ratio, leading to a dramatic blue shift of their two near-infrared (NIR) localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPR) absorptions but still maintaining one LSPR in the biotransparent NIR range. The interactions of polyethylene glycol (PEG) coated large and shrunk GNS with SH-SY5Y cells revealed that the large ones (DCI - diameter of the circumference in which GNS can be inscribed = 76 nm) are internalized more efficiently than the shrunk ones (DCI = 46 nm), correlating with a decreased cells surving fraction.

  4. On the anomalies in gold nanoparticles prepared by micelle nanolithography and their impact on one-dimensional material synthesis. Role of substrate, size effects and impurity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mbenkum, B.N.

    2007-07-23

    The synthesis of one-dimensional (1-D) inorganic semiconductor materials such as nanotubes and silicon (Si) nanowires is usually achieved by catalyst nanoparticlemediated synthetic routes. Despite the well-established nature of this technique, problems such as low temperature synthesis and adequate control of catalyst nanoparticle diameter in order to control 1-D material diameter still prevail. Additionally, the expansion of this technology from crystalline to cheaper substrates such as glass remains demanding. This work employs a previously established selfassembly route to produce controlled spatial distribution of substrate anchored small diameter gold nanoparticles with controlled size. This enabled successful synthesis of Si 1-D structures with controlled diameters less than 20 nm. Low temperature synthesis due to enhanced catalytic activity was achieved via introduction of impurity by treatment of gold nanoparticles in different plasma environments. This enabled Si 1-D structure growth on Si, SiO{sub x}/Si and borosilicate glass substrates at 320 C. Substrate-induced stress affected Si diffusion at the gold nanoparticle determining whether Si nanowires or nanotubes were grown. These results are of technological relevance because low temperature synthesis provides an economical approach and controlled diameter enhances material functionality. Additionally, exploiting substrate-induced stress to influence Si diffusion in nanoparticles provides an alternate route to tuning Si 1-D structure. (orig.)

  5. Water-Soluble N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Protected Gold Nanoparticles: Size-Controlled Synthesis, Stability, and Optical Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Salorinne, Kirsi; Man, Renee W.Y.; Li, Chien-Hung; Taki, Masayasu; Nambo, Masakazu; Crudden, Cathleen M.

    2017-01-01

    NHC-Au(I) complexes were used to prepare stable, water-soluble, NHC-protected gold nanoparticles. The water-soluble, charged nature of the nanoparticles permitted analysis by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), which showed that the nanoparticles were highly monodisperse, with tunable core diameters between 2.0 and 3.3 nm depending on the synthesis conditions. Temporal, thermal, and chemical stability of the nanoparticles were determined to be high. Treatment with thiols caused etching...

  6. Colloidal gold-labeled insulin complex. Characterization and binding to adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, U M; Thun, C; Pfeiffer, E F

    1986-01-01

    Biologically active insulin gold complex was used as an ultrastructural marker to study insulin binding sites, uptake, and internalization in isolated rat adipocytes. The preparation conditions for monodispersed particles, ca. 16 nm in diameter and loaded with approximately 100 insulin molecules, are reported. The complex is stable for at least six weeks. Single particles or small clusters were scattered across the cell membrane. The distribution of unbound receptors seemed to be independent of the extensive system of pre-existing surface connected vesicles in adipocytes. The uptake of particles took place predominantly via non-coated pinocytotic invaginations; clathrin-coated pits did not seem to be important for this process. Lysosome-like structures contained aggregates of 10-15 particles. These data suggest that insulin gold complex is a useful marker for the specific labeling of insulin binding sites.

  7. Phage based green chemistry for gold ion reduction and gold retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyawati, Magdiel I; Xie, Jianping; Leong, David T

    2014-01-22

    The gold mining industry has taken its toll on the environment, triggering the development of more environmentally benign processes to alleviate the waste load release. Here, we demonstrate the use of bacteriophages (phages) for biosorption and bioreduction of gold ions from aqueous solution, which potentially can be applied to remediate gold ions from gold mining waste effluent. Phage has shown a remarkably efficient sorption of gold ions with a maximum gold adsorption capacity of 571 mg gold/g dry weight phage. The product of this phage mediated process is gold nanocrystals with the size of 30-630 nm. Biosorption and bioreduction processes are mediated by the ionic and covalent interaction between gold ions and the reducing groups on the phage protein coat. The strategy offers a simple, ecofriendly and feasible option to recover of gold ions to form readily recoverable products of gold nanoparticles within 24 h.

  8. [Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles by Azospirillum brasilense].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupriashina, M A; Vetchinkina, E P; Burov, A M; Ponomareva, E G; Nikitina, V E

    2014-01-01

    Plant-associated nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria Azospirillum brasilense were shown to reduce the gold of chloroauric acid to elemental gold, resulting in formation of gold nanoparicles. Extracellular phenoloxidizing enzymes (laccases and Mn peroxidases) were shown to participate in reduction of Au+3 (HAuCl4) to Au(0). Transmission electron microscopy revealed accumulation of colloidal gold nanoparticles of diverse shape in the culture liquid of A. brasilense strains Sp245 and Sp7. The size of the electron-dense nanospheres was 5 to 50 nm, and the size of nanoprisms varied from 5 to 300 nm. The tentative mechanism responsible for formation of gold nanoparticles is discussed.

  9. Langmuir-Blodgett films of alkane chalcogenice (S, Se, Te) stabilized gold nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brust, M.; Stuhr-Hansen, N.; Norgaard, K.

    2001-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles stabilized by alkanethiolates, alkaneselenides, and alkanetellurides have been prepared by analogous methods. Chloroform solutions of thiolate and selenide stabilized particles were spread and evaporated on the water/air interface where the particles formed well-defined Langmuir...... films. The films were transferred to solid supports of freshly cleaved mica and were studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The particles were found to have an average core diameter of 2 nm. The stability of the particles under ambient conditions increased in the order Te

  10. Long-term stability of surfactant-free gold nanostars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Marienette Morales; Bonifacio, Alois; Lughi, Vanni; Marsi, Stefano; Carrato, Sergio; Sergo, Valter

    2014-11-01

    This work investigates the long-term stability of suspensions of surfactant-free gold nanostars with mean diameter of 78 ± 13 nm (measured from tip to tip across the nanostar).We monitored the optical and morphological properties of the nanostars over the course of several days after synthesis by observing the changes in the UV-visible absorption spectra and mean radius of curvature of the nanostar tips. An aging process can be observed, evident in the blunting of the nanostar tips, leading to a blue shift in the absorption maximum. Stability is greatly improved by depositing on the nanostars a monolayer of mercaptopropionic acid (MPA), possibly because of the formation of the gold-sulfur (Au-S) bond that limits the mobility of the Au atoms. Capping the nanostars with MPA is an easy additional step for extending the stability of the nanostars in suspension without significantly affecting the original plasmonic resonance band.

  11. Light-activated microbubbles around gold nanorods for photoacoustic microsurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavigli, Lucia; Centi, Sonia; Lai, Sarah; Borri, Claudia; Micheletti, Filippo; Tortoli, Paolo; Panettieri, Ilaria; Streit, Ingolf; Rossi, Francesca; Ratto, Fulvio; Pini, Roberto

    2018-02-01

    The increasing interest around imaging and microsurgery techniques based on the photoacoustic effect has boosted active research into the development of exogenous contrast agents that may enhance the potential of this innovative approach. In this context, plasmonic particles as gold nanorods are achieving resounding interest, owing to their efficiency of photothermal conversion, intense optical absorbance in the near infrared region, inertness in the body and convenience for conjugation with ligands of molecular targets. On the other hand, the photoinstability of plasmonic particles remains a remarkable obstacle. In particular, gold nanorods easily reshape into nanospheres and so lose their optical absorbance in the near infrared region, under exposure to few-ns-long laser pulses. This issue is attracting much attention and stimulating ad-hoc solutions, such as the addition of rigid shells and the optimization of multiple parameters. In this contribution, we focus on the influence of the shape of gold nanorods on their photothermal behavior and photostability. We describe the photothermal process in the gold nanorods by modeling their optical absorption and consequent temperature dynamics as a function of their aspect ratio (length / diameter). Our results suggest that increasing the aspect ratio does probably not limit the photostability of gold nanorods, while shifting the plasmonic peak towards wavelengths around 1100 nm, which hold more technological interest.

  12. Diameter measurements of polystyrene particles with atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnaes, J

    2011-01-01

    The size of (nano) particles is a key parameter used in controlling their function. The particle size is also important in order to understand their physical and chemical properties and regulate their number in health and safety issues. In this work, the geometric diameters of polystyrene spheres of nominal diameter 100 nm are measured using atomic force microscopy. The measurements are based on the apex height and on the average distance between neighbouring spheres when they form a close-packed monolayer on a flat mica substrate. The most important influence parameters for the determination of the geometric diameter are the lateral air gaps and deformation of the spheres. The lateral air gaps are caused by significant size variations of the individual spheres, and a correction is calculated based on the simulation of packing of spheres. The deformation of the spheres is caused mainly by capillary forces acting when they are in contact with each other or with the mica substrate. Based on calculated capillary forces and the literature values of the elastic properties of the polystyrene and mica, the deformation is estimated to be 2 nm with a standard uncertainty of 2 nm. The geometric diameter of the polystyrene spheres was measured with a combined standard uncertainty of ≈3 nm. The measured vertical diameter of 92.3 nm and the certified mobility equivalent diameter measured by differential mobility analysis (DMA) are marginally consistent at a confidence level of 95%. However, the measured lateral geometric diameter was 98.9 nm and is in good agreement with DMA

  13. Study on gamma radiation-induced synthesis of gold nanoparticles stabilized by hyaluronan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang Van Phu; Nguyen Ngoc Duy; Nguyen Tue Anh; Nguyen Quoc Hien

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with diameter from 4 to 10 nm were synthesized in hyaluronan (HA) solution without usage of any reductant and *OH radical scavenger by gamma irradiation reduction. The size and size distribution of AuNPs were determined by TEM images. The λ max (517 - 525 nm) of colloidal AuNPs solutions as prepared were measured by UV-Vis spectroscopy. The influence factors on the size of AuNPs particularly the concentration of Au 3+ , HA and dose rate were investigated. The stability of AuNPs/HA as synthesized was more than 6 months in storage under atmospheric condition. AuNPs with the size less than 10 nm and narrow size distribution stabilized by HA which is biocompatible natural polysaccharide so that AuNPs/HA can potentially be applied in biomedicine and cosmetic. (author)

  14. Synthesis and stabilization of gold nanoparticles for biotechnological and cosmetics uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Andressa Alves da

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on the synthesis and characterization of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with reducing agents and stabilizing sodium citrate and gum arabic. The synthesis was carried out by heating and use of gamma radiation source 60 Co in doses 1, 7.5 and 15 kGy. In this context, we studied the properties and stability of AuNPs formed through characterization techniques such as UV- Vis absorption, checking the characteristics of AuNPs bands as well as the physical stability thereof. The samples synthesized with sodium citrate (AuCit) showed wavelengths ranging from 520 to 525 nm and the samples synthesized with gum arabic (AuGA) showed wavelengths between 530 and 540 nm. The dynamic light scattering analysis (DLS) was used to determine the hydrodynamic diameter of nanoparticles formed during a period of three months, demonstrating that AuCit samples showed mean hydrodynamic sizes ranging from 20 to 50 nm while AuGA samples synthesized by heating and the use of gamma radiation had mean hydrodynamic sizes ranging 50 - 115 nm. Analysis of scanning electron microscope with field emission (SEM - FEG) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to determine the actual size distribution of nanoparticles and their geometric shape. The characterization of the AuGA showed smaller diameters in comparison to the one resulted from the DLS analysis, thus suggesting possible encapsulation of AuNPs. (author)

  15. Gold-Decorated Supraspheres of Block Copolymer Micelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M. P.; Kang, D. J.; Kannon, A. G.; Jung, D.-W.; Yi, G. R.; Kim, B. J.

    2012-02-01

    Gold-decorated supraspheres displaying various surface morphologies were prepared by infiltration of gold precursor into polystyrene-b-poly(2-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P2VP) supraspheres under acidic condition. The supraspheres were fabricated by emulsifying PS-b-P2VP polymer solution into surfactant solution. Selective swelling of P2VP in the suprasphere by gold precursor under acidic condition resulted in the formation of gold-decorated supraspheres with various surface structures. As evidenced by TEM and SEM images, dot pattern was formed in the case of smaller supraspheres than 800 nm; whereas fingerprint-like pattern was observed in larger supraspheres than 800 nm. Gold nanoparticles were located inside P2VP domains near the surface of prepared supraspheres as confirmed by TEM. The optical property of the supraspheres was characterized using UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and the maximum absorption peak at around 580 nm was observed, which means that gold nanoparticles densely packed into P2VP domain on the suprasphere. Our approach to prepare gold-decorated supraspheres can be extended to other metallic particles such as iron oxide or platinum nanoparticles, and those precursors can be also selectively incorporated into the P2VP domain.

  16. Microbial deposition of gold nanoparticles by the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Y.; Tsukiyama, T.; Tachimi, T.; Saitoh, N.; Nomura, T.; Nagamine, S.

    2007-01-01

    Microbial reduction and deposition of gold nanoparticles was achieved at 25 deg. C over the pH range 2.0-7.0 using the mesophilic bacterium Shewanella algae in the presence of H 2 as the electron donor. The reductive deposition of gold by the resting cells of S. algae was a fast process: 1 mM AuCl 4 - ions were completely reduced to elemental gold within 30 min. At a solution pH of 7, gold nanoparticles 10-20 nm in size were deposited in the periplasmic space of S. algae cells. At pH 2.8, gold nanoparticles 15-200 nm in size were deposited on the bacterial cells, and the biogenic nanoparticles exhibited a variety of shapes that included nanotriangles: in particular, single crystalline gold nanotriangles 100-200 nm in size were microbially deposited. At a solution pH of 2.0, gold nanoparticles about 20 nm in size were deposited intracellularly, and larger gold particles approximately 350 nm in size were deposited extracellularly. The solution pH was an important factor in controlling the morphology of the biogenic gold particles and the location of gold deposition. Microbial deposition of gold nanoparticles is potentially attractive as an environmentally friendly alternative to conventional methods

  17. Effect of Gold Dispersion on the Photocatalytic Activity of Mesoporous Titania for the Vapor-Phase Oxidation of Acetone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Awate

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesostructured titanium dioxide photocatalyst, having uniform crystallite size (6–12 nm and average pore diameter of ∼4.2 nm, was synthesized by using a low-temperature nonsurfactant hydrothermal route, employing tartaric acid as a templating agent. Gold additions from 0.5 to 2 wt% were incorporated, either during the hydrothermal process or by postsynthesis wet impregnation. Compared to the impregnation-prepared samples, the samples synthesized hydrothermally contained smaller-size (≤1 nm gold clusters occluded in the pores of the host matrix. Whereas CO2 and H2O were the main reaction products in UV-assisted vapor-phase oxidation of acetone using these catalysts, C2H6 and HCO2CH3 were also produced for higher acetone concentrations in air. The conversion of acetone was found to increase with decrease in the size of both TiO2 and gold particles. In situ IR spectroscopy revealed that titania and gold particles serve as independent adsorption and reaction sites for acetone and oxygen molecules. Acetone molecules adsorb exclusively at TiO2 surface, giving rise to a strongly adsorbed (condensed state as well as to the formation of formate- and methyl formate-type surface species. Hydroxyl groups at titania surface participate directly in these adsorption steps. Nanosize gold particles, on the other hand, were primarily responsible for the adsorption and activation of oxygen molecules. Mechanistic aspects of the photochemical processes are discussed on the basis of these observations.

  18. Morphology dependent electrical transport behavior in gold nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkhatib, A.; Souier, T.; Chiesa, M.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of electron transport in ultra-thin gold films is investigated and its dependence on the gold islands size is reported. For gold films of thickness below 38 nm, the electrical transport occurs by tunneling within electrically discontinuous islands of gold. Simmons model for metal-insulator-metal junction describes the non-ohmic experimental current-voltage curves obtained by means of conductive atomic force microscopy. Field emission is the predominant transport for thicknesses below 23 nm while direct tunneling occurs in thicker films. The transition between the two regimes is controlled by the gold islands size and their inter-distance.

  19. Immobilization of olfactory receptors onto gold electrodes for electrical biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casuso, Ignacio [Departament d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, Laboratori de Nanobioenginyeria-IBEC, Parc Cientific de Barcelona, C/Josep Samitier 1-5, Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: icasuso@pcb.ub.es; Pla-Roca, Mateu [Departament d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, Laboratori de Nanobioenginyeria-IBEC, Parc Cientific de Barcelona, C/Josep Samitier 1-5, Barcelona (Spain); Gomila, Gabriel [Departament d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, Laboratori de Nanobioenginyeria-IBEC, Parc Cientific de Barcelona, C/Josep Samitier 1-5, Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: ggomila@pcb.ub.es; Samitier, Josep [Departament d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, Laboratori de Nanobioenginyeria-IBEC, Parc Cientific de Barcelona, C/Josep Samitier 1-5, Barcelona (Spain); Minic, Jasmina; Persuy, Marie A.; Salesse, Roland; Pajot-Augy, Edith [INRA, Neurobiologie de l' Olfaction et de la Prise Alimentaire, Equipe Recepteurs et Communication Chimique, Domaine de Vilvert, Jouy en Josas Cedex (France)

    2008-07-01

    We investigate the immobilization of native nanovesicles containing functional olfactory receptors onto gold electrodes by means of atomic force microscopy in liquid. We show that nanovesicles can be adsorbed without disrupting them presenting sizes once immobilized ranging from 50 nm to 200 nm in diameter. The size of the nanovesicles shows no dependence on the electrode hydrophobicity being constant in a height/width ratio close to 1:3. Nevertheless, electrode hydrophobicity does affect the surface coverage, the surface coverage is five times higher in hydrophilic electrodes than on hydrophobic ones. Surface coverage is also affected by nanovesicles dimensions in suspension, the size homogenization to around 50 nm yields a further five fold increment in surface coverage achieving a coverage of about 50% close to the hard spheres jamming limit (54.7%). A single layer of nanovesicles is always formed with no particle overlap. Present results provide insights into the immobilization on electrodes of olfactory receptors for further olfactory electrical biosensor development.

  20. Mercury adsorption to gold nanoparticle and thin film surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Todd Ashley

    Mercury adsorption to gold nanoparticle and thin film surfaces was monitored by spectroscopic techniques. Adsorption of elemental mercury to colloidal gold nanoparticles causes a color change from wine-red to orange that was quantified by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. The wavelength of the surface plasmon mode of 5, 12, and 31 nm gold particles blue-shifts 17, 14, and 7.5 nm, respectively, after a saturation exposure of mercury vapor. Colorimetric detection of inorganic mercury was demonstrated by employing 2.5 nm gold nanoparticles. The addition of low microgram quantities of Hg 2+ to these nanoparticles induces a color change from yellow to peach or blue. It is postulated that Hg2+ is reduced to elemental mercury by SCN- before and/or during adsorption to the nanoparticle surface. It has been demonstrated that surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPRS) is sensitive to mercury adsorption to gold and silver surfaces. By monitoring the maximum change in reflectivity as a function of amount of mercury adsorbed to the surface, 50 nm Ag films were shown to be 2--3 times more sensitive than 50 nm Au films and bimetallic 15 nm Au/35 nm Ag films. In addition, a surface coverage of ˜40 ng Hg/cm2 on the gold surface results in a 0.03° decrease in the SPR angle of minimum reflectivity. SPRS was employed to follow Hg exposure to self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on Au. The data indicate that the hydrophilic or hydrophobic character of the SAM has a significant effect on the efficiency of Hg penetration. Water adsorbed to carboxylic acid end group of the hydrophilic SAMs is believed to slow the penetration of Hg compared to methyl terminated SAMs. Finally, two protocols were followed to remove mercury from gold films: immersion in concentrated nitric acid and thermal annealing up to 200°C. The latter protocol is preferred because it removes all of the adsorbed mercury from the gold surface and does not affect the morphology of the gold surface.

  1. Controlled growth of well-aligned carbon nanotubes with large diameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianbao; Liu, Yunqi; Zhu, Daoben

    2001-06-01

    Well-aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with large diameters (25-200 nm) were synthesized by pyrolysis of iron(II) phthalocyanine. The outer diameter up to 218.5 nm and the length of the well-aligned CNTs can be systematically controlled by varying the growth time. A tube-in-tube nano-structure with large and small diameters of 176 and 16.7 nm, respectively, was found. The grain sizes of the iron catalyst play an important role in controlling the CNT diameters. These results are of great importance to design new aligned CNT-based electron field emitters in the potential application of panel displays.

  2. Optical Properties of Linoleic Acid Protected Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratan Das

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Linoleic acid-protected gold nanoparticles have been synthesized through the chemical reduction of tetrachloroaurate ions by ethanol in presence of sodium linoleate. The structure of these nanoparticles is investigated using transmission electron microscopy, which shows that the Au nanoparticles are spherical in shape with a narrow size distribution which ranges from 8 to 15 nm. Colloidal dispersion of gold nanoparticles in cyclohexane exhibits absorption bands in the ultraviolet-visible range due to surface plasmon resonance, with absorption maximum at 530 nm. Fluorescence spectra of gold nanoparticles also show an emission peak at 610 nm when illuminated at 450 nm. UV-Vis spectroscopy reveals that these nanoparticles remain stable for 10 days.

  3. Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles Stabilized in Dextran Solution by Gamma Co-60 Ray Irradiation and Preparation of Gold Nanoparticles/Dextran Powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phan Ha Nu Diem

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs in spherical shape with diameter of 6–35 nm stabilized by dextran were synthesized by γ-irradiation method. The AuNPs were characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The influence of pH, Au3+ concentration, and dextran concentration on the size of AuNPs was investigated. Results indicated that the smallest AuNPs size (6 nm and the largest AuNPs size (35 nm were obtained for pH of 1 mM Au3+/1% dextran solution of 5.5 and 7.5, respectively. The smaller Au3+ concentration favored smaller size and conversely the smaller dextran concentration favored bigger size of AuNPs. AuNPs powders were prepared by spay drying, coagulation, and centrifugation and their sizes were also evaluated. The purity of prepared AuNPs powders was also examined by energy dispersive X-ray (EDX analysis. Thus, the as-prepared AuNPs stabilized by biocompatible dextran in solution and/or in powder form can be potentially applied in biomedicine and pharmaceutics.

  4. Platycodon saponins from Platycodi Radix ( Platycodon grandiflorum) for the Green Synthesis of Gold and Silver Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoonho; Kang, Sehyeon; Cha, Song-Hyun; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Song, Kwangho; Lee, You Jeong; Kim, Kyeongsoon; Kim, Yeong Shik; Cho, Seonho; Park, Youmie

    2018-01-01

    A green synthesis of gold and silver nanoparticles is described in the present report using platycodon saponins from Platycodi Radix ( Platycodon grandiflorum) as reducing agents. Platycodin D (PD), a major triterpenoidal platycodon saponin, was enriched by an enzymatic transformation of an aqueous extract of Platycodi Radix. This PD-enriched fraction was utilized for processing reduction reactions of gold and silver salts to synthesize gold nanoparticles (PD-AuNPs) and silver nanoparticles (PD-AgNPs), respectively. No other chemicals were introduced during the reduction reactions, providing an entirely green, eco-friendly, and sustainable method. UV-visible spectra showed the surface plasmon resonance bands of PD-AuNPs at 536 nm and PD-AgNPs at 427 nm. Spherically shaped nanoparticles were observed from high-resolution transmission electron microscopy with average diameters of 14.94 ± 2.14 nm for PD-AuNPs and 18.40 ± 3.20 nm for PD-AgNPs. Minor triangular and other polygonal shapes were also observed for PD-AuNPs along with spherical ones. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images also demonstrated that both nanoparticles were mostly spherical in shape. Curvature-dependent evolution was employed to enhance the AFM images and precisely measure the sizes of the nanoparticles. The sizes were measured as 19.14 nm for PD-AuNPs and 29.93 nm for PD-AgNPs from the enhanced AFM images. Face-centered cubic structures for both nanoparticles were confirmed by strong diffraction patterns from high-resolution X-ray diffraction analyses. Fourier transform infrared spectra revealed the contribution of -OH, aromatic C=C, C-O, and C-H functional groups to the synthesis. Furthermore, the catalytic activity of PD-AuNPs was assessed with a reduction reaction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol in the presence of sodium borohydride. The catalytic activity results suggest the potential application of these gold nanoparticles as catalysts in the future. The green strategy reported in this

  5. Empirical Relationships Between Optical Properties and Equivalent Diameters of Fractal Soot Aggregates at 550 Nm Wavelength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Apoorva; Chakrabarty, Rajan K.; Liu, Li; Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2015-01-01

    Soot aggregates (SAs)-fractal clusters of small, spherical carbonaceous monomers-modulate the incoming visible solar radiation and contribute significantly to climate forcing. Experimentalists and climate modelers typically assume a spherical morphology for SAs when computing their optical properties, causing significant errors. Here, we calculate the optical properties of freshly-generated (fractal dimension Df = 1.8) and aged (Df = 2.6) SAs at 550 nm wavelength using the numericallyexact superposition T-Matrix method. These properties were expressed as functions of equivalent aerosol diameters as measured by contemporary aerosol instruments. This work improves upon previous efforts wherein SA optical properties were computed as a function of monomer number, rendering them unusable in practical applications. Future research will address the sensitivity of variation in refractive index, fractal prefactor, and monomer overlap of SAs on the reported empirical relationships.

  6. Surface modification of silica particles with gold nanoparticles as an augmentation of gold nanoparticle mediated laser perforation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalies, Stefan; Gentemann, Lara; Schomaker, Markus; Heinemann, Dag; Ripken, Tammo; Meyer, Heiko

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticle mediated (GNOME) laser transfection/perforation fulfills the demands of a reliable transfection technique. It provides efficient delivery and has a negligible impact on cell viability. Furthermore, it reaches high-throughput applicability. However, currently only large gold particles (> 80 nm) allow successful GNOME laser perforation, probably due to insufficient sedimentation of smaller gold nanoparticles. The objective of this study is to determine whether this aspect can be addressed by a modification of silica particles with gold nanoparticles. Throughout the analysis, we show that after the attachment of gold nanoparticles to silica particles, comparable or better efficiencies to GNOME laser perforation are reached. In combination with 1 µm silica particles, we report laser perforation with gold nanoparticles with sizes down to 4 nm. Therefore, our investigations have great importance for the future research in and the fields of laser transfection combined with plasmonics. PMID:25136494

  7. Study of Colloidal Gold Synthesis Using Turkevich Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohiman, Asep; Anshori, Isa; Surawijaya, Akhmadi; Idris, Irman

    2011-12-01

    The synthesis of colloidal gold or Au-nanoparticles (Au-NPs) by reduction of chloroauric acid (HAuCl4) with sodium citrate was done using Turkevich method. We prepare HAuCl4 solution by dissolving gold wires (99.99%) into aqua regia solution. To initiate the Au-NPs synthesis 0.17 ml of 1 % chloroauric acid solution was heated to the boiling point and then 10 ml of 1 % sodium citrate was added to the boiling solution with a constant stirring in order to maintain a homogenous solution. A color of faint gray was observed in the solution approximately one minute and in a period of 2-3 minutes later, it further darkened to deep wine and red color. It showed that the gold solution has reduced to Au-NPs. The effect of process temperature on the size of Au-NPs prepared by sodium citrate reduction has also been investigated. With increasing temperature of Au-NPs synthesis, smaller-size Au-NPs were obtained. The higher temperatures shorten the time needed to achieve activation energy for reduction process. The resulting Au-NPs has been characterized by scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), showing the size of Au-NPs average diameter is ˜20-27 nm. The resulting colloidal gold will be used as catalyst for Si nanowires growth using VLS method.

  8. The study of indicators of bone marrow and peripheral blood of rats with diabetes and transplanted liver tumor after intravenous injection of gold nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikht, Nataliya I.; Bucharskaya, Alla B.; Maslyakova, Galina N.; Terentyuk, Georgy S.; Matveeva, Olga V.; Navolokin, Nikita A.; Khlebtsov, Boris N.; Khlebtsov, Nikolai G.

    2015-03-01

    In study the evaluation of the influence of gold nanorods on morphological indicators of red bone marrow and peripheral blood of rats with diabetes and transplanted liver tumor after intravenous administration of gold nanorods was conducted. We used gold nanorods with length 41 ± 8 nm and diameter of 10.2±2 nm, synthesized in the laboratory of nanobiotechnology IBPPM RAS (Saratov). After intravenous administration of gold nanorods the decrease of leukocytes, platelets and lymphocytes was observed in animals of control group in blood. It was marked the decrease of the number of mature cellular elements of the leukocyte germ in bone marrow - stab neutrophils and segmented leukocytes, and the increase of immature elements- metamyelocytes, indicating the activation of leukocyte germ after nanoparticle administration. The decrease of leukocyte amount was noted in blood and the increase of cellular elements of the leukocyte germ was revealed in bone marrow, indicating the activation of leukocyte germ in rats with alloxan diabetes and transplanted tumors. The changes of morphological indicators of blood and bone marrow testify about stimulation of myelocytic sprouts of hemopoiesis in bone marrow as a result of reduction of mature cells in peripheral blood after gold nanoparticle administration.

  9. Controlling the reproducibility of Coulomb blockade phenomena for gold nanoparticles on an organic monolayer/silicon system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillard, L; Sattayaporn, S; Lamic-Humblot, A-F; Casale, S; Campbell, P; Chabal, Y J; Pluchery, O

    2015-02-13

    Two types of highly ordered organic layers were prepared on silicon modified with an amine termination for binding gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). These two grafted organic monolayers (GOMs), consisting of alkyl chains with seven or 11 carbon atoms, were grafted on oxide-free Si(111) surfaces as tunnel barriers between the silicon electrode and the AuNPs. Three kinds of colloidal AuNPs were prepared by reducing HAuCl4 with three different reactants: citrate (Turkevich synthesis, diameter ∼16 nm), ascorbic acid (diameter ∼9 nm), or NaBH4 (Natan synthesis, diameter ∼7 nm). Scanning tunnel spectroscopy (STS) was performed in a UHV STM at 40 K, and Coulomb blockade behaviour was observed. The reproducibility of the Coulomb behavior was analysed as a function of several chemical and physical parameters: size, crystallinity of the AuNPs, influence of surrounding surfactant molecules, and quality of the GOM/Si interface (degree of oxidation after the full processing). Samples were characterized with scanning tunneling microscope, STS, atomic force microscope, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and high resolution transmission electronic microscope. We show that the reproducibility in observing Coulomb behavior can be as high as ∼80% with the Natan synthesis of AuNPs and GOMs with short alkyl chains.

  10. Aligned gold nanoneedle arrays for surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yong; Huang Zhengren; Jiang Dongliang; Tanemura, Masaki; Yamaguchi, Kohei; Li Zhiyuan; Huang Yingping; Kawamura, Go; Nogami, Masayuki

    2010-01-01

    A simple Ar + -ion irradiation route has been developed to prepare gold nanoneedle arrays on glass substrates for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-active substrates. The nanoneedles exhibited very sharp tips with an apex diameter of 20 nm. These arrays were evaluated as potential SERS substrates using malachite green molecules and exhibited a SERS enhancement factor of greater than 10 8 , which is attributed to the localized electron field enhancement around the apex of the needle and the surface plasmon coupling originating from the periodic structure. This work demonstrates a new technique for producing controllable and reproducible SERS substrates potentially applicable for chemical and biological assays.

  11. Design and synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles with gold shells for single particle optical tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jitkang

    The design, synthesis, and characterization of iron oxide core, gold shell nanoparticles are studied in this thesis. Firstly, nanoparticles with 18 +/- 1.7 nm diameter iron oxide cores with ˜5 nm thick gold shells were synthesized via a new seed-mediated electroless deposition method. The nanoparticles were superparamagnetic at room temperature and could be reversibly collected by a permanent magnet. These nanoparticles displayed a sharp localized surface plasmon resonance peak at 605 nm, as predicted by scattering theory, and their large scattering cross-section allowed them to be individually resolved in darkfield optical microscopy while undergoing Brownian motion in aqueous suspension. Later, commercially available 38 +/- 3.8 nm diameter spherical iron oxide nanoparticles (from Ocean Nanotech, Inc) were employed to make core-shell particles. These particles were decorated with cationic poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) which further promotes the attachment of small gold clusters. After gold seeding, the average hydrodynamic diameter of the core-shell particles is 172 +/- 65.9 nm. The magnetophoretic motion of these particles was guided by a piece of magnetized mu-metal. Individual particle trajectories were observed by darkfield optical microscopy. The typical magnetophoretic velocity achieved was within the range of 1--10 mum/sec. Random walk analysis performed on these particles while undergoing Brownian motion confirmed that individual particles were indeed being imaged. The particle size variation within the observed sample obtained through random walk analysis was within the size distribution obtained by dynamic light scattering. When the current to the solenoid used to magnetize the mu-metal was turned off, all the collected core-shell particles were readily redispersed by diffusion back into the surrounding environment. A Peclet number analysis was performed to probe the convective motion of nanospheres and nanorods under the influence of

  12. Effects of gold nanoparticles on the photophysical and photosynthetic parameters of leaves and chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Rocio; Diz, Virginia E; Lagorio, M Gabriela

    2018-04-18

    Effects of gold nanoparticles (average diameter: 10-14 nm) on leaves and chloroplasts have been studied. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) quenched significantly chlorophyll fluorescence when introduced both in intact leaves and isolated chloroplasts. Additionally, the fluorescence spectra corrected for light re-absorption processes showed a net decrease in the fluorescence ratio calculated as the quotient between the maximum fluorescence at 680 and 735 nm. This fact gave evidence for a reduction in the fluorescence emission of the PSII relative to that of the PSI. Strikingly, the photosynthetic parameters derived from the analysis of the slow phase of Kautsky's kinetics, the rate of oxygen evolution and the rate of photo-reduction of 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol were increased in the presence of AuNPs indicating an apparent greater photosynthetic capacity. The observed results were consistent with an electron transfer process from the excited PSII, which was thermodynamically possible, and which competed with both the electron transport process that initiated photosynthesis and the deactivation of the excited PSII by fluorescence emission. Additionally, it is here explained, in terms of a completely rational kinetic scheme and their corresponding algebraic expressions, why the photosynthetic parameters and the variable and non-variable fluorescence of chlorophyll are modified in a photosynthetic tissue containing gold nanoparticles.

  13. Structural characterization and plasmonic properties of two-dimensional arrays of hydrophobic large gold nanoparticles fabricated by Langmuir-Blodgett technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, Takuya; Tachikiri, Yuki; Sako, Takayuki [Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Moto-oka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Takahashi, Yukina, E-mail: yukina@mail.cstm.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Moto-oka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Yamada, Sunao, E-mail: yamada@mail.cstm.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Moto-oka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Center for Future Chemistry, Kyushu University, 744 Moto-oka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Hydrophobic gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) by our method were large and stable enough. • Two-dimensional (2D) arrays of the AuNPs were obtained by Langmuir-Blodgett method with polyethylene glycol. • The plasmon resonant wavelength of the 2D arrays can be controlled by the diameter. - Abstract: We have succeeded in fabricating two-dimensional (2D) arrays of larger gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) (diameters 17, 28, and 48 nm) by Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) method. Although the particle size of AuNPs is one of the most important factors in order to control the optical properties of 2D arrays, there have been reported only the size of less than ∼20 nm. This is a first report on the bottom-up fabrication of 2D arrays consisting of hydrophobic AuNP with the diameter of ∼50 nm, of which the size is expected to obtain maximum near-field effects. Octadecylthiolate-capped AuNPs (ODT-AuNPs) which were prepared by our method could be re-dispersed in chloroform even after drying completely, realizing the spreading of the colloidal chloroform solution onto the water surface. Accordingly, densely-packed 2D LB films of ODT-AuNPs could be fabricated on an indium-tin-oxide substrate, when water as the subphase and polyethylene glycol (PEG) as an amphiphilic agent were used. PEG played an important role to form densely-packed film uniformly due to increasing affinity between hydrophobic AuNP and water. Absorption spectra of the films revealed that the resonance wavelengths of plasmon oscillation through interparticle plasmon coupling were clearly correlated with the particle sizes rather than deposition densities.

  14. Laser direct writing using submicron-diameter fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Feng; Yang, Guoguang; Bai, Jian; Xu, Jianfeng; Hou, Changlun; Liang, Yiyong; Wang, Kaiwei

    2009-10-26

    In this paper, a novel direct writing technique using submicron-diameter fibers is presented. The submicron-diameter fiber probe serves as a tightly confined point source and it adopts micro touch mode in the process of writing. The energy distribution of direct writing model is analyzed by Three-Dimension Finite-Difference Time-Domain method. Experiments demonstrate that submicron-diameter fiber direct writing has some advantages: simple process, 350-nm-resolution (lower than 442-nm-wavelength), large writing area, and controllable width of lines. In addition, by altering writing direction of lines, complex submicron patterns can be fabricated.

  15. Nature vs. nurture: gold perpetuates "stemness".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Willi; Sharma, Chandra P; Deb, Kaushik Dilip

    2011-01-01

    Adult tissues contain quiescent reservoirs of multipotent somatic stem cells and pluripotent embryonic-like stem cells (ELSCs). Credited with regenerative properties gold is used across both -contemporary and -ancient medicines. Here, we show that gold exerted these effects by enhancing the pool of pluripotent ELSC while improving their stemness. We used hESCs as an in-vitro model to understand if gold could enhance self-renewal and pluripotency. Swarna-bhasma (SB), an ancient Indian gold microparticulate (41.1 nm), preparation, reduced spontaneous-differentiation, improved self-renewal, pluripotency and proliferation of hESCs. Colloidal gold-nanoparticles (GNP) (15.59 nm) were tested to confirm that the observations were attributable to nanoparticulate-gold. SB and GNP exposure: maintained -stemness, -karyotypic stability, enhanced pluripotency till day-12, increased average colony-sizes, and reduced the number of autonomously-derived differentiated FGFR1 positive fibroblast-niche-cells/colony. Particulate-gold induced upregulation of FGFR1 and IGF2 expression, and decrease in IGF1 secretion indicates IGF1/2 mediated support for enhanced pluripotency and self-renewal in hESCs.

  16. Gold-coated copper cone detector as a new standard detector for F2 laser radiation at 157 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kueck, Stefan; Brandt, Friedhelm; Taddeo, Mario

    2005-01-01

    A new standard detector for high-accuracy measurements of F2 laser radiation at 157 nm is presented. This gold-coated copper cone detector permits the measurement of average powers up to 2 W with an uncertainty of ∼1%. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first highly accurate standard detector for F2 laser radiation for this power level. It is fully characterized according to Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement of the International Organization for Standardization and is connected to the calibration chain for laser radiation established by the German National Metrology Institute

  17. Ferritin as a photocatalyst and scaffold for gold nanoparticle synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyes, Jeremiah D.; Hilton, Robert J. [Brigham Young University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Farrer, Jeffrey [Brigham Young University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (United States); Watt, Richard K., E-mail: rwatt@chem.byu.edu [Brigham Young University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States)

    2011-06-15

    The ferrihydrite mineral core of ferritin is a semi-conductor capable of catalyzing oxidation/reduction reactions. This report shows that ferritin can photoreduce AuCl{sub 4}{sup -} to form gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). An important goal was to identify innocent reaction conditions that prevented formation of AuNPs unless the sample was illuminated in the presence of ferritin. TRIS buffer satisfied this requirement and produced AuNPs with spherical morphology with diameters of 5.7 {+-} 1.6 nm and a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peak at 530 nm. Size-exclusion chromatography of the AuNP-ferritin reaction mixture produced two fractions containing both ferritin and AuNPs. TEM analysis of the fraction close to where native ferritin normally elutes showed that AuNPs form inside ferritin. The other peak eluted at a volume indicating a particle size much larger than ferritin. TEM analysis revealed AuNPs adjacent to ferritin molecules suggesting that a dimeric ferritin-AuNP species forms. We propose that the ferritin protein shell acts as a nucleation site for AuNP formation leading to the AuNP-ferritin dimeric species. Ferrihydrite nanoparticles ({approx}10 nm diameter) were unable to produce soluble AuNPs under identical conditions unless apo ferritin was present indicating that the ferritin protein shell was essential for stabilizing AuNPs in aqueous solution.

  18. Preparation of 2 nm gold nanoparticles for in vitro and in vivo applications

    OpenAIRE

    Moyano, Daniel F.; Duncan, Bradley; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2013-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been a versatile tool in recent years for the exploration of biological systems. However, challenges with purification and adequate surface coverage limit the biocompatibility of gold nanoparticles. Here, we describe a detailed procedure for the synthesis, purification, and functionalization of biologically compatible gold nanoparticles for in vitro and in vivo studies.

  19. Surface-stabilized gold nanocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Sheng [Knoxville, TN; Yan, Wenfu [Oak Ridge, TN

    2009-12-08

    A surface-stabilized gold nanocatalyst includes a solid support having stabilizing surfaces for supporting gold nanoparticles, and a plurality of gold nanoparticles having an average particle size of less than 8 nm disposed on the stabilizing surfaces. The surface-stabilized gold nanocatalyst provides enhanced stability, such as at high temperature under oxygen containing environments. In one embodiment, the solid support is a multi-layer support comprising at least a first layer having a second layer providing the stabilizing surfaces disposed thereon, the first and second layer being chemically distinct.

  20. Phospholipid-assisted synthesis of size-controlled gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Peng; Zhu Xinyuan

    2007-01-01

    Morphology and size control of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) by phospholipids (PLs) has been reported. It was found that gold entities could form nanostructures with different sizes controlled by PLs in an aqueous solution. During the preparation of 1.5 nm gold seeds, AuNPs were obtained from the reduction of gold complex by sodium borohydride and capped by citrate for stabilization. With the different ratios between seed solution and growth solution, which was composed by gold complex and PLs, gold seeds grew into larger nanoparticles step by step until enough large size up to 30 nm. The main discovery of this work is that common biomolecules, such as PLs can be used to control nanoparticle size. This conclusion has been confirmed by transmission electron micrographs, particle size analysis, and UV-vis spectra

  1. Inverse opal photonic crystals with photonic band gaps in the visible and near-infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Brandon C.; Gilleland, Cody L.; Renfro, Tim; Gutierrez, Jose; Parikh, Kunjal; Glosser, R.; Landon, Preston B.

    2005-08-01

    Colloidal silica spheres with 200nm, 250nm, and 290nm diameters were self-assembled with single crystal crystallites 4-5mm wide and 10-15mm long. Larger spheres with diameters between 1000-2300nm were self-assembled with single crystal crystallites up to 1.5mm wide and 2mm long. The silica opals self-assembled vertically along the [100] direction of the face centered cubic lattice resulting in self-templated opals. Inverse opal photonic crystals with a partial band gap possessing a maximum in the near infrared at 3.8μm were constructed from opal templates composed of 2300nm diameter spheres with chalcogenide Ge33As12Se55 (AMTIR-1), a transparent glass in the near infrared with high refractive index. Inverse gold and gold/ polypropylene composite photonic crystals were fabricated from synthetic opal templates composed of 200-290nm silica spheres. The reflectance spectra and electrical conductance of the resulting structures is presented. Gold was infiltrated into opal templates as gold chloride and heat converted to metallic gold. Opals partially infiltrated with gold were co-infiltrated with polypropylene plastic for mechanical support prior to removal of the silica template with hydrofluoric acid.

  2. Diameter Control and Photoluminescence of ZnO Nanorods from Trialkylamines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Andelman

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel solution method to control the diameter of ZnO nanorods is reported. Small diameter (2-3 nm nanorods were synthesized from trihexylamine, and large diameter (50–80 nm nanorods were synthesized by increasing the alkyl chain length to tridodecylamine. The defect (green emission of the photoluminescence (PL spectra of the nanorods varies with diameter, and can thus be controlled by the diameter control. The small ZnO nanorods have strong green emission, while the large diameter nanorods exhibit a remarkably suppressed green band. We show that this observation supports surface oxygen vacancies as the defect that gives rise to the green emission.

  3. Size-selective separation of polydisperse gold nanoparticles in supercritical ethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Dylan P; Satherley, John

    2009-04-09

    The aim of this study was to use supercritical ethane to selectively disperse alkanethiol-stabilized gold nanoparticles of one size from a polydisperse sample in order to recover a monodisperse fraction of the nanoparticles. A disperse sample of metal nanoparticles with diameters in the range of 1-5 nm was prepared using established techniques then further purified by Soxhlet extraction. The purified sample was subjected to supercritical ethane at a temperature of 318 K in the pressure range 50-276 bar. Particles were characterized by UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, TEM, and MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopy. The results show that with increasing pressure the dispersibility of the nanoparticles increases, this effect is most pronounced for smaller nanoparticles. At the highest pressure investigated a sample of the particles was effectively stripped of all the smaller particles leaving a monodisperse sample. The relationship between dispersibility and supercritical fluid density for two different size samples of alkanethiol-stabilized gold nanoparticles was considered using the Chrastil chemical equilibrium model.

  4. Extracellular mycosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using Fusarium solani

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, K.; Arumugam, A.

    2014-08-01

    The development of eco-friendly methods for the synthesis of nanomaterial shape and size is an important area of research in the field of nanotechnology. The present investigation deals with the extracellular rapid biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using Fusarium solani culture filtrate. The UV-vis spectra of the fungal culture filtrate medium containing gold ion showed peak at 527 nm corresponding to the plasmon absorbance of gold nanoparticles. FTIR spectra provide an evidence for the presence of heterocyclic compound in the culture filtrate, which increases the stability of the synthesized gold nanoparticles. The X-ray analysis respects the Bragg's law and confirmed the crystalline nature of the gold nanoparticles. AFM analysis showed the results of particle sizes (41 nm). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that the gold nanoparticles are spherical in shape with the size range from 20 to 50 nm. The use of F. solani will offer several advantages since it is considered as a non-human pathogenic organism. The fungus F. solani has a fast growth rate, rapid capacity of metallic ions reduction, NPs stabilization and facile and economical biomass handling. Extracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles could be highly advantageous from the point of view of synthesis in large quantities, time consumption, eco-friendly, non-toxic and easy downstream processing.

  5. Effects of Gold Nanoparticles on the Response of Phenol Biosensor Containing Photocurable Membrane with Tyrosinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Musa

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The role of incorporation of gold nanoparticles (50-130 nm in diameter into a series of photocurable methacrylic-acrylic based biosensor membranes containing tyrosinase on the response for phenol detection was investigated. Membranes with different hydrophilicities were prepared from 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and n-butyl acrylate via direct photocuring. A range of gold nanoparticles concentrations from 0.01 to 0.5 % (w/w was incorporated into these membranes during the photocuring process. The addition of gold nanoparticles to the biosensor membrane led to improvement in the response time by a reduction of approximately 5 folds to give response times of 5-10 s. The linear response range of the phenol biosensor was also extended from 24 to 90 mM of phenol. The hydrophilicities of the membrane matrices demonstrated strong influence on the biosensor response and appeared to control the effect of the gold nanoparticles. For less hydrophilic methacrylic-acrylic membranes, the addition of gold nanoparticles led to a poorer sensitivity and detection limit of the biosensor towards phenol. Therefore, for the application of gold nanoparticles in the enhancement of a phenol biosensor response, the nanoparticles should be immobilized in a hydrophilic matrix rather than a hydrophobic material.

  6. One-pot synthesis of gold nanoparticles using tetradentate porphyrins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canitez, Fatma K.; Yavuz, Mustafa S.; Ozturk, Ramazan

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the meso-tetra (p-hydroxyphenyl) porphyrin and meso-tetra (m-hydroxyphenyl) porphyrin were coated on to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) via thioacetate anchors which easily dissociate to form S–Au bonds. 4-tert-butyl phenyl thioacetate-AuNPs were prepared and used as a monodentate passivant to control the size of the tetradentate porphyrin-AuNPs. The porphyrin-coated AuNPs were characterized by UV–Vis, TEM, XRD, and XPS analyses. The tetradentate porphyrin-AuNPs size is within a range of 5–15 nm in diameter with exotic shapes. The plausible network formation for AuNP-p-TPP-SAc and the capping structure of the AuNP-m-TPP-SAc have been suggested.

  7. Self-assembly of bacitracin-gold nanoparticles and their toxicity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoling; Wang, Zi; Li, Yanji; Bian, Kexin; Yin, Tian; Gao, Dawei

    2018-01-01

    As the widely use of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in drug delivery, the precise control on the size and morphology of the AuNPs is urgently required. In this scenario, traditional synthesis methods cannot meet current requirement because of their inherent defects. We have depicted here a novel method for fabricating monodispersed large size gold nanoparticles, based on the self-assembly of bacitracin. The AuNPs could be facilely, low-cost, and green synthesized with repeatability and controllability in this method. The Bac gold nanoparticles (Bac-AuNPs), composed by bacitracin core and gold shell, exhibited a spherical morphology in TEM and a face-centered cubic crystal structure in X-Ray diffraction and selected area electron diffraction. The mean diameter of the Bac-AuNPs was 89nm. The nanoparticles were mono-dispersed and the zeta potential of the nanoparticles was 4.1±0.64mV. Notably, in cell viability assay, the Bac-AuNPs showed less toxicity to HepG2 cells and HEK293 cells compared to small size AuNPs. Collectively, the size, rheological characteristic and the biocompatibility supported the use of the gold nanoparticles as intracellular delivery vehicles for drug delivery, especially for tumor therapy. And this study could provide a maneuverable, controllable and green strategy for the synthesis of AuNPs, which would be applied in disease diagnosis and therapy with biosafety. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Angular reflectance of suspended gold, aluminum and silver nanospheres on a gold film: Effects of concentration and size distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslan, Mustafa M.; Wriedt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we describe a parametric study of the effects of the size distribution (SD) and the concentration of nanospheres in ethanol on the angular reflectance. Calculations are based on an effective medium approach in which the effective dielectric constant of the mixture is obtained using the Maxwell-Garnett formula. The detectable size limits of gold, aluminum, and silver nanospheres on a 50-nm-thick gold film are calculated to investigate the sensitivity of the reflectance to the SD and the concentration of the nanospheres. The following assumptions are made: (1) the total number of particles in the unit volume of suspension is constant, (2) the nanospheres in the suspension on a gold film have a SD with three different concentrations, and (3) there is no agglomeration and the particles have a log-normal SD, where the effective diameter, d eff and the effective variance, ν eff are given. The dependence of the reflectance on the d eff , ν eff , and the width of the SD are also investigated numerically. The angular variation of the reflectance as a function of the incident angle shows a strong dependence on the effective size of the metallic nanospheres. The results confirm that the size of the nanospheres (d eff o and 75 o for a given concentration with a particular SD.

  9. 2, 4, 6-Trithiol-1, 3, 5-Triazine-Modified Gold Nanoparticles and Its Potential as Formalin Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulizar, Y.; Ariyanta, H. A.; Rakhmania, L.; Hafizah, M. A. E.

    2018-04-01

    Stabilized gold nanoparticles (AuNP) have been successfully prepared by a modification of ligand 2, 4, 6-trithiol-1, 3, 5-triazine (TT). TT has three thiol groups and nitrogen atoms on the aromatic ring that can interact and stabilize AuNP. TT modified AuNP (AuNP/TT) was characterized using UV-Vis spectrophotometer, particle size analyzer (PSA) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The characterization showed that AuNP/TT stable at a maximum wavelength (λmaks) of 537 nm with the particle diameter of 9.41 nm. The increased acidity (pH) causes the protonated thiol groups of TT marked with a visual change of colloidal AuNP/TT from purple to blue, causing AuNP and TT bonds weakened. In this study, the AuNP/TT was reacted with formalin. This interaction shows that AuNP/TT has a potential as an efficient detector of formalin, marked by changes in the diameter of the particle, colloidal color, and maximum wavelength shift.

  10. Cytotoxicity evaluation of gold nanoparticles on microalga Dunaliella salina in microplate test system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumakov, Daniil; Prilepskii, Artur; Dykman, Lev; Khlebtsov, Boris; Khlebtsov, Nikolai; Bogatyrev, Vladimir

    2018-04-01

    Gold nanoparticles are intensively studied in biomedicine. Assessment of their biocompatibility is highly important. Currently there is lack of evidence, concerning nanotoxicity of ultrasmall gold nanoparticles < 5 nm. Existing data are rather contradictory. The aim of that study was to evaluate the toxicity of 2 nm colloidal gold, using microalga Dunaliella salina. Cellular barriers of that microalga are very similar to animal cells so it might be considered as a valuable model for nanotoxicity testing. Chlorophyll content as a test-function was used. Spectrophotometric method for chlorophyll determination in vivo in suspensions of D.salina cultures was applied. Calculated EC50 48h value of ionic gold was 25.8 +/- 0.3 mg Au/L. EC50 value of phosphine-stabilized gold nanoclusters was 32.2 +/-1.1 mg Au/L. It was not possible to calculate EC50 for 15 nm citrate gold nanoparticles, as they were non-toxic at all concentrations tested. These results are confirmed by fluorescent -microscopic monitoring of the same probes. It was shown that 10-fold growth of phosphine-stabilized gold nanoparticles (from 2.3 +/- 0.9 nm to 21.1 +/- 7.5 nm) led to 7-fold decrease of their toxicity.

  11. Preparation, Physicochemical Characterization and Performance Evaluation of Gold Nanoparticles in Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Kamiar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of the present study was preparation, physicochemical characterization and performance evaluation of gold nanoparticles (GNPs in radiotherapy. Another objective was the investigation of anti-bacterial efficacy of gold nanoparticle against E. coli clinical strains. Methods: Gold nanoparticles prepared by controlled reduction of an aqueous HAuCl4 solution using Tri sodium citrate. Particle size analysis and Transmission electron microscopy were used for physicochemical characterization. Polymer gel dosimetry was used for evaluation of the enhancement of absorbed dose. Diffusion method in agar media was used for investigation of anti-bacterial effect. Results: Gold nanoparticles synthesized in size range from 57 nm to 346 nm by planning different formulation. Gold nanoparticle in 57 nm size increased radiation dose effectiveness with the magnitude of about 21 %. At the concentration of 400 ppm, Nano gold exhibited significant anti-bacterial effect against E. coli clinical strains. Conclusion: It is concluded that gold nanoparticles can be applied as dose enhancer in radiotherapy. The Investigation of anti-bacterial efficacy showed that gold nanoparticle had significant effect against E. coli clinical strains.

  12. Subchronic inhalation toxicity of gold nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung Yong

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gold nanoparticles are widely used in consumer products, including cosmetics, food packaging, beverages, toothpaste, automobiles, and lubricants. With this increase in consumer products containing gold nanoparticles, the potential for worker exposure to gold nanoparticles will also increase. Only a few studies have produced data on the in vivo toxicology of gold nanoparticles, meaning that the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME of gold nanoparticles remain unclear. Results The toxicity of gold nanoparticles was studied in Sprague Dawley rats by inhalation. Seven-week-old rats, weighing approximately 200 g (males and 145 g (females, were divided into 4 groups (10 rats in each group: fresh-air control, low-dose (2.36 × 104 particle/cm3, 0.04 μg/m3, middle-dose (2.36 × 105 particle/cm3, 0.38 μg/m3, and high-dose (1.85 × 106 particle/cm3, 20.02 μg/m3. The animals were exposed to gold nanoparticles (average diameter 4-5 nm for 6 hours/day, 5 days/week, for 90-days in a whole-body inhalation chamber. In addition to mortality and clinical observations, body weight, food consumption, and lung function were recorded weekly. At the end of the study, the rats were subjected to a full necropsy, blood samples were collected for hematology and clinical chemistry tests, and organ weights were measured. Cellular differential counts and cytotoxicity measurements, such as albumin, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, and total protein were also monitored in a cellular bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid. Among lung function test measurements, tidal volume and minute volume showed a tendency to decrease comparing control and dose groups during the 90-days of exposure. Although no statistically significant differences were found in cellular differential counts, histopathologic examination showed minimal alveoli, an inflammatory infiltrate with a mixed cell type, and increased macrophages in the high-dose rats. Tissue

  13. Platycodon saponins from Platycodi Radix (Platycodon grandiflorum) for the Green Synthesis of Gold and Silver Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoonho; Kang, Sehyeon; Cha, Song-Hyun; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Song, Kwangho; Lee, You Jeong; Kim, Kyeongsoon; Kim, Yeong Shik; Cho, Seonho; Park, Youmie

    2018-01-17

    A green synthesis of gold and silver nanoparticles is described in the present report using platycodon saponins from Platycodi Radix (Platycodon grandiflorum) as reducing agents. Platycodin D (PD), a major triterpenoidal platycodon saponin, was enriched by an enzymatic transformation of an aqueous extract of Platycodi Radix. This PD-enriched fraction was utilized for processing reduction reactions of gold and silver salts to synthesize gold nanoparticles (PD-AuNPs) and silver nanoparticles (PD-AgNPs), respectively. No other chemicals were introduced during the reduction reactions, providing an entirely green, eco-friendly, and sustainable method. UV-visible spectra showed the surface plasmon resonance bands of PD-AuNPs at 536 nm and PD-AgNPs at 427 nm. Spherically shaped nanoparticles were observed from high-resolution transmission electron microscopy with average diameters of 14.94 ± 2.14 nm for PD-AuNPs and 18.40 ± 3.20 nm for PD-AgNPs. Minor triangular and other polygonal shapes were also observed for PD-AuNPs along with spherical ones. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images also demonstrated that both nanoparticles were mostly spherical in shape. Curvature-dependent evolution was employed to enhance the AFM images and precisely measure the sizes of the nanoparticles. The sizes were measured as 19.14 nm for PD-AuNPs and 29.93 nm for PD-AgNPs from the enhanced AFM images. Face-centered cubic structures for both nanoparticles were confirmed by strong diffraction patterns from high-resolution X-ray diffraction analyses. Fourier transform infrared spectra revealed the contribution of -OH, aromatic C=C, C-O, and C-H functional groups to the synthesis. Furthermore, the catalytic activity of PD-AuNPs was assessed with a reduction reaction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol in the presence of sodium borohydride. The catalytic activity results suggest the potential application of these gold nanoparticles as catalysts in the future. The green strategy

  14. Niobium oxide nanocolumns formed via anodic alumina with modulated pore diameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pligovka, A.; Zakhlebayeva, A.; Lazavenka, A.

    2018-03-01

    Niobium oxide nanocolumns with modulated diameters were formed for the first time. An Al/Nb bilayer specimen was prepared by successive sputter-deposition of 300 nm niobium layer and 1200 nm aluminum layer onto silicon wafer. Regular anodic alumina matrix with modulated pore diameters was formed by sequential anodization of initial specimen in tartaric acid at 180 V, and in oxalic acid at 37 V. Further potentiodynamic reanodization of the specimen up to 400 V causes the simultaneous growth of 440 nm continuous niobium oxide layer beneath the alumina film and two types of an array of oxide nanocolumns (thick – with 100 nm width and 630 nm high and thin – with 25 nm width and 170 nm high), which are the filling of the alumina pores. The morphology of the formed anodic niobium oxide nanocolumns with modulated diameters was determined by field emission scanning electron microscopy. The formed nanostructures can be used for perspective devices of nano- and optoelectronics such as photonic crystals.

  15. Improved Dielectric Properties of Polyvinylidene Fluoride Nanocomposite Embedded with Poly(vinylpyrrolidone)-Coated Gold Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Toor, Anju

    2017-01-25

    A novel nanocomposite dielectric was developed by embedding polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-encapsulated gold (Au) nanoparticles in the polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) polymer matrix. The surface functionalization of Au nanoparticles with PVP facilitates favorable interaction between the particle and polymer phase, enhancing nanoparticle dispersion. To study the effect of entropic interactions on particle dispersion, nanocomposites with two different particle sizes (5 and 20 nm in diameter) were synthesized and characterized. A uniform particle distribution was observed for nanocomposite films consisting of 5 nm Au particles, in contrast to the film with 20 nm particles. The frequency-dependent dielectric permittivity and the loss tangent were studied for the nanocomposite films. These results showed the effectiveness of PVP ligand in controlling the agglomeration of Au particles in the PVDF matrix. Moreover, the study showed the effect of particle concentration on their spatial distribution in the polymer matrix and the dielectric properties of nanocomposite films.

  16. Improved Dielectric Properties of Polyvinylidene Fluoride Nanocomposite Embedded with Poly(vinylpyrrolidone)-Coated Gold Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Toor, Anju; So, Hongyun; Pisano, Albert P.

    2017-01-01

    A novel nanocomposite dielectric was developed by embedding polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-encapsulated gold (Au) nanoparticles in the polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) polymer matrix. The surface functionalization of Au nanoparticles with PVP facilitates favorable interaction between the particle and polymer phase, enhancing nanoparticle dispersion. To study the effect of entropic interactions on particle dispersion, nanocomposites with two different particle sizes (5 and 20 nm in diameter) were synthesized and characterized. A uniform particle distribution was observed for nanocomposite films consisting of 5 nm Au particles, in contrast to the film with 20 nm particles. The frequency-dependent dielectric permittivity and the loss tangent were studied for the nanocomposite films. These results showed the effectiveness of PVP ligand in controlling the agglomeration of Au particles in the PVDF matrix. Moreover, the study showed the effect of particle concentration on their spatial distribution in the polymer matrix and the dielectric properties of nanocomposite films.

  17. Secondary Emission From Synthetic Opal Infiltrated by Colloidal Gold and Glycine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dovbeshko, G.I.; Fesenko, O.M.; Boyko, V.V.; Romanyuk, V.R.; Gorelik, V.S.; Moiseyenko, V.N.; Sobolev, V.B.; Shvalagin, V.V.

    2012-01-01

    A comparison of the secondary emission (photoluminescence) and Bragg reflection spectra of photonic crystals (PC), namely, synthetic opals, opals infiltrated by colloidal gold, glycine, and a complex of colloidal gold with glycine is performed. The infiltration of colloidal gold and a complex of colloidal gold with glycine into the pores of PC causes a short-wavelength shift (about 5-15 nm) of the Bragg reflection and increases the intensity of this band by 1.5-3 times. In photoluminescence, the infiltration of PC by colloidal gold and colloidal gold with glycine suppresses the PC emission band near 375-450 nm and enhances the shoulder of the stop-zone band of PC in the region of 470-510 nm. The shape of the observed PC emission band connected with defects in synthetic opal is determined by the type of infiltrates and the excitation wavelength. Possible mechanisms of the effects are discussed.

  18. Low-cost mercury (II) ion sensor by biosynthesized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Jet G.; Candano, Gabrielle Jackie; Mendoza, Aileen Nicole; Paderanga, Marciella; Cardino, Krenz John; Locsin, Alessandro; Bibon, Cherilou

    2017-11-01

    Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles has attracted the curiosity of scientists over the past few decades. Nanoparticles have been proven to exhibit enhanced properties and offer a variety of applications in different fields of study. Utilizing nanoparticles instead of bulky equipment and noxious chemicals has become more convenient; reagents needed for synthesis have been proven to be benign (mostly aqueous solutions) and are cost-effective. In this study, gold nanoparticles were biosynthesized using guyabano (Annonamuricata) peel samples as the source of reducing agents. The optimum concentration ratio of gold chloride to guyabano extract was determined to be 1:7. Characterization studies were accomplished using UV Vis Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Electron Microscopy (FTIR) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Spectroscopic maximum absorbance was found to be at 532 nm thereby confirming the presence of gold nanoparticles. Hydroxyl (O-H stretching), carbonyl (C=O stretching), and amide (N-H stretching) functional groups shown in the FTIR spectra are present on possible reducing agents such as phenols, alkaloids, and saponins found in the plant extract. SEM images revealed spherical shaped nanoparticles with mean diameter of 23.18 nm. It was observed that the bio-synthesized AuNPs were selective to mercury ions through uniform color change from wine red to yellow. A novel smartphone-based mercury (II) ions assay was developed using the gold nanoparticles. A calibration curve correlated the analytical response (Red intensity) to the concentrations of Hg 2+ ions. Around 94% of the variations in the intensity is accounted for by the variations in the concentration of mercury (II) ions suggesting a good linear relationship between the two variables. A relative standard deviation (RSD) of less than 1% was achieved at all individual points. The metal sensor displayed a sensitivity of 0.039 R.I./ppm with an LOD of 93.79 ppm. Thus, the bio-fabricated gold nanoparticles

  19. Protracted elimination of gold nanoparticles from mouse liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadauskas, Evaldas; Wallin, Håkan; Stoltenberg, Meredin

    2009-01-01

    The present study aims at revealing the fate of 40-nm gold nanoparticles after intravenous injections. The gold nanoparticles were traced histochemically with light and transmission electron microscopy using autometallographic (AMG) staining, and the gold content in the liver was determined with ...

  20. Effect of gold nanoparticle on stability of the DNA molecule: A study of molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izanloo, Cobra

    2017-09-02

    An understanding of the mechanism of DNA interactions with gold nanoparticles is useful in today medicine applications. We have performed a molecular dynamics simulation on a B-DNA duplex (CCTCAGGCCTCC) in the vicinity of a gold nanoparticle with a truncated octahedron structure composed of 201 gold atoms (diameter ∼1.8 nm) to investigate gold nanoparticle (GNP) effects on the stability of DNA. During simulation, the nanoparticle is closed to DNA and phosphate groups direct the particles into the major grooves of the DNA molecule. Because of peeling and untwisting states that are occur at end of DNA, the nucleotide base lies flat on the surface of GNP. The configuration entropy is estimated using the covariance matrix of atom-positional fluctuations for different bases. The results show that when a gold nanoparticle has interaction with DNA, entropy increases. The results of conformational energy and the hydrogen bond numbers for DNA indicated that DNA becomes unstable in the vicinity of a gold nanoparticle. The radial distribution function was calculated for water hydrogen-phosphate oxygen pairs. Almost for all nucleotide, the presence of a nanoparticle around DNA caused water molecules to be released from the DNA duplex and cations were close to the DNA.

  1. Synthesis of radioactive gold nanoparticle in surfactant medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swadesh Mandal

    2014-01-01

    The present study describes the synthesis of radioactive gold nanoparticle in surfactant medium. Proton irradiated stable 197 Au and radioactive 198 Au were simultaneously used for production of radioactive gold nanoparticle. Face centered cubic gold nanoparticles with size of 4-50 nm were found in proton irradiated gold foil. However, the size of nanoparticle varies with pH using both stable and radioactive gold. (author)

  2. Probing individual redox PEGylated gold nanoparticles by electrochemical--atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kai; Anne, Agnès; Bahri, Mohamed Ali; Demaille, Christophe

    2013-05-28

    Electrochemical-atomic force microscopy (AFM-SECM) was used to simultaneously probe the physical and electrochemical properties of individual ~20 nm sized gold nanoparticles functionalized by redox-labeled PEG chains. The redox PEGylated nanoparticles were assembled onto a gold electrode surface, forming a random nanoarray, and interrogated in situ by a combined AFM-SECM nanoelectrode probe. We show that, in this so-called mediator-tethered (Mt) mode, AFM-SECM affords the nanometer resolution required for resolving the position of individual nanoparticles and measuring their size, while simultaneously electrochemically directly contacting the redox-PEG chains they bear. The dual measurement of the size and current response of single nanoparticles uniquely allows the statistical distribution in grafting density of PEG on the nanoparticles to be determined and correlated to the nanoparticle diameter. Moreover, because of its high spatial resolution, Mt/AFM-SECM allows "visualizing" simultaneously but independently the PEG corona and the gold core of individual nanoparticles. Beyond demonstrating the achievement of single-nanoparticle resolution using an electrochemical microscopy technique, the results reported here also pave the way toward using Mt/AFM-SECM for imaging nano-objects bearing any kind of suitably redox-labeled (bio)macromolecules.

  3. Biodistribution of gold nanoparticles following intratracheal instillation in mouse lung

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadauskas, Evaldas; Jacobsen, Nicklas R.; Danscher, Gorm

    2009-01-01

    plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and neutron activation analysis (NAA). The liver is the major site of deposition of circulating gold nanoparticles. Therefore the degree of translocation was determined by the hepatic deposition of gold. Mice were instilled with 5 intratracheal doses of gold...... repeatedly during 3 weeks, the load was substantial. Ultrastructurally, AMG silver enhanced gold nanoparticles were found in lysosome-/endosome-like organelles of the macrophages and analysis with AMG, ICP-MS and NAA of the liver revealed an almost total lack of translocation of nanoparticles. In mice given...... repeated instillations of 2 nm gold nanoparticles, 1.4‰ (by ICP-MS) to 1.9‰ (by NAA) of the instilled gold was detected in the liver. With the 40 nm gold, no gold was detected in the liver (detection level 2 ng, 0.1‰) except for one mouse in which 3‰ of the instilled gold was found in the liver. No gold...

  4. Quantitative characterization of gold nanoparticles by field-flow fractionation coupled online with light scattering detection and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Bjørn; Loeschner, Katrin; Hadrup, Niels; Mortensen, Alicja; Sloth, Jens J; Koch, Christian Bender; Larsen, Erik H

    2011-04-01

    An analytical platform coupling asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF(4)) with multiangle light scattering (MALS), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) was established and used for separation and quantitative determination of size and mass concentration of nanoparticles (NPs) in aqueous suspension. Mixtures of three polystyrene (PS) NPs between 20 and 100 nm in diameter and mixtures of three gold (Au) NPs between 10 and 60 nm in diameter were separated by AF(4). The geometric diameters of the separated PS NPs and the hydrodynamic diameters of the Au and PS NPs were determined online by MALS and DLS, respectively. The three separated Au NPs were quantified by ICPMS and recovered at 50-95% of the injected masses, which ranged between approximately 8-80 ng of each nanoparticle size. Au NPs adhering to the membrane in the separation channel was found to be a major cause for incomplete recoveries. The lower limit of detection (LOD) ranged between 0.02 ng Au and 0.4 ng Au, with increasing LOD by increasing nanoparticle diameter. The analytical platform was applied to characterization of Au NPs in livers of rats, which were dosed with 10 nm, 60 nm, or a mixture of 10 and 60 nm nanoparticles by intravenous injection. The homogenized livers were solubilized in tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH), and the recovery of Au NPs from the livers amounted to 86-123% of their total Au content. In spite of successful stabilization with bovine serum albumin even in alkaline medium, separation of the Au NPs by AF(4) was not possible due to association with undissolved remains of the alkali-treated liver tissues as demonstrated by electron microscopy images.

  5. Guided proliferation and bone-forming functionality on highly ordered large diameter TiO2 nanotube arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Ruopeng; Wu, Hongliu; Ni, Jiahua; Zhao, Changli; Chen, Yifan; Zheng, Chengjunyi; Zhang, Xiaonong

    2015-01-01

    The significantly enhanced osteoblast adhesion, proliferation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity were observed on TiO 2 nanotube surface in recent studies in which the scale of nanotube diameter was restricted under 100 nm. In this paper, a series of highly ordered TiO 2 nanotube arrays with larger diameters ranging from 150 nm to 470 nm were fabricated via high voltage anodization. The behaviors of MC3T3-E1 cells in response to the diameter-controlled TiO 2 nanotubes were investigated. A contrast between the trend of proliferation and the trend of cell elongation was observed. The highest cell elongation (nearly 10:1) and the lowest cell number were observed on the TiO 2 nanotube arrays with 150 nm diameter. While, the lowest cell elongation and highest cell number were achieved on the TiO 2 nanotube arrays with 470 nm diameter. Furthermore, the ALP activity peaked on the 150 nm diameter TiO 2 nanotube arrays and decreased dramatically with the increase of nanotube diameter. Thus a narrow range of diameter (100–200 nm) that could induce the greatest bone-forming activity is determined. It is expected that more delicate design of orthopedic implant with regional abduction of cell proliferation or bone forming could be achieved by controlling the diameter of TiO 2 nanotubes. - Highlights: • Improved anodization methods leading to more ordered large diameter TiO 2 nanotubes • Significantly enhanced ALP activity was observed on 150 nm diameter TiO 2 nanotubes. • The highest cell density was observed on 470 nm diameter TiO 2 nanotube arrays. • Similar cell response was observed on the amorphous and anatase phased nanotube surface

  6. Biosynthesis, structural characterization and antimicrobial activity of gold and silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Tokeer; Wani, Irshad A; Manzoor, Nikhat; Ahmed, Jahangeer; Asiri, Abdullah M

    2013-07-01

    An eco friendly simple biosynthetic route was used for the preparation of monodisperse and highly crystalline gold and silver nanoparticles using cell free extract of fungus, Candida albicans. Transmission electron microscopic studies show the formation of gold and silver nanocrystals of average size of 5 nm and 30 nm with the specific surface areas of 18.9 m(2)/g and 184.4 m(2)/g respectively. The interaction of gold and silver nanoparticles with proteins has been formulated by FT-IR spectroscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis. The formation of gold and silver nanoparticles was also confirmed by the appearance of a surface plasmon band at 540 nm and 450 nm respectively. The antimicrobial activity of the synthesized gold and silver nanoparticles was investigated against both Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. The results suggest that these nanoparticles can be used as effective growth inhibitors against the test microorganisms. Greater bactericidal activity was observed for silver nanoparticles. The E. coli, a gram negative bacterium was found to be more susceptible to gold and silver nanoparticles than the S. aureus, a gram positive bacterium. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Porous Gold Films Fabricated by Wet-Chemistry Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aymeric Pastre

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Porous gold films presented in this paper are formed by combining gold electroless deposition and polystyrene beads templating methods. This original approach allows the formation of conductive films (2 × 106 (Ω·cm−1 with tailored and interconnected porosity. The porous gold film was deposited up to 1.2 μm on the silicon substrate without delamination. An original zirconia gel matrix containing gold nanoparticles deposited on the substrate acts both as an adhesion layer through the creation of covalent bonds and as a seed layer for the metallic gold film growth. Dip-coating parameters and gold electroless deposition kinetics have been optimized in order to create a three-dimensional network of 20 nm wide pores separated by 20 nm thick continuous gold layers. The resulting porous gold films were characterized by GIXRD, SEM, krypton adsorption-desorption, and 4-point probes method. The process is adaptable to different pore sizes and based on wet-chemistry. Consequently, the porous gold films presented in this paper can be used in a wide range of applications such as sensing, catalysis, optics, or electronics.

  8. New application of two Antarctic macroalgae Palmaria decipiens and Desmarestia menziesii in the synthesis of gold and silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Ballesteros, N.; González-Rodríguez, J. B.; Rodríguez-Argüelles, M. C.; Lastra, M.

    2018-03-01

    In this study, two Antarctic macroalgae (Rhodophyta Palmaria decipiens and Phaeophyta Desmarestia menziessi) were selected in order to report their use for the biosynthesis of nanomaterials. Two aqueous extracts of the macroalgae were prepared and their reducing activity, total phenolic content and DPPH scavenging activity were determined, showing that brown seaweed has higher antioxidant activity than red seaweed. Aqueous extracts were used as an eco-friendly, one-pot synthetic route to obtain gold and silver nanoparticles acting both as reducing and stabilizing agents. The nanoparticles obtained were characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), demonstrating the formation of gold and silver nanoparticles with mean diameters of 36.8 ± 5.3 and 11.5 ± 3.3 nm for Au@PD and Au@DM and 7.0 ± 1.2 nm and 17.8 ± 2.6 nm in the case of Ag@PD and Ag@DM. Lastly, functional groups of the biomolecules present in the extracts were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR) prior to, and after, the synthesis of the nanoparticles, in order to obtain information about the biomolecules involved in the reducing and stabilization process.

  9. Gold nanoparticle assisted assembly of a heme protein for enhancement of long-range interfacial electron transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Palle Skovhus; Chi, Qijin; Grumsen, Flemming Bjerg

    2007-01-01

    and characterization of water-soluble gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with core diameter 3-4 nm and their application for the enhancement of long-range interfacial ET of a heme protein. Gold nanoparticles were electrostatically conjugated with cyt c to form nanoparticle-protein hybrid ET systems with well...... and the protein molecule. When the nanoparticle-protein conjugates are assembled on Au(111) surfaces, long-range interfacial ET across a physical distance of over 50 A via the nanoparticle becomes feasible. Moreover, significant enhancement of the interfacial ET rate by more than an order of magnitude compared...... with that of cyt c in the absence of AuNPs is observed. AuNPs appear to serve as excellent ET relays, most likely by facilitating the electronic coupling between the protein redox center and the electrode surface....

  10. Ultrathin free-standing close-packed gold nanoparticle films: Conductivity and Raman scattering enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qing; Huang, Hongwen; Peng, Xinsheng; Ye, Zhizhen

    2011-09-01

    A simple filtration technique was developed to prepare large scale free-standing close-packed gold nanoparticle ultrathin films using metal hydroxide nanostrands as both barrier layer and sacrificial layer. As thin as 70 nm, centimeter scale robust free-standing gold nanoparticle thin film was obtained. The thickness of the films could be easily tuned by the filtration volumes. The electronic conductivities of these films varied with the size of the gold nanoparticles, post-treatment temperature, and thickness, respectively. The conductivity of the film prepared from 20 nm gold nanoparticles is higher than that of the film prepared from 40 nm gold nanoparticle by filtering the same filtration volume of their solution, respectively. Their conductivities are comparable to that of the 220 nm thick ITO film. Furthermore, these films demonstrated an average surface Raman scattering enhancement up to 6.59 × 105 for Rhodamine 6 G molecules on the film prepared from 40 nm gold nanoparticles. Due to a lot of nano interspaces generated from the close-packed structures, two abnormal enhancements and relative stronger intensities of the asymmetrical vibrations at 1534 and 1594 cm-1 of R6G were observed, respectively. These robust free-standing gold nanoparticle films could be easily transferred onto various solid substrates and hold the potential application for electrodes and surface enhanced Raman detectors. This method is applicable for preparation of other nanoparticle free-standing thin films.A simple filtration technique was developed to prepare large scale free-standing close-packed gold nanoparticle ultrathin films using metal hydroxide nanostrands as both barrier layer and sacrificial layer. As thin as 70 nm, centimeter scale robust free-standing gold nanoparticle thin film was obtained. The thickness of the films could be easily tuned by the filtration volumes. The electronic conductivities of these films varied with the size of the gold nanoparticles, post

  11. Gold nanoflowers with mesoporous silica as "nanocarriers" for drug release and photothermal therapy in the treatment of oral cancer using near-infrared (NIR) laser light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenzhi; Gong, Junxia; Wang, Yuqian; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Hongmei; Zhang, Weihang; Zhang, Hu; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Tianfu; Yin, Wanzhong; Yang, Wensheng

    2016-04-01

    In this experiment, we successfully developed nanocarriers in the form of gold nanoflowers coated with two layers of silica for the purposes of drug loading and NIR (near-infrared) photothermal therapy for the treatment of oral cancer. The gold nanoflowers converted NIR laser energy into heat energy. The cores were coated with a thin silica layer (AuNFs@SiO2) to protect the gold nanoflowers from intraparticle ripening. The second layer was mesoporous silica (AuNFs@SiO2@mSiO2), which acted as a nanocarrier for anticancer drug (DOX) loads. The mean effective diameter of the nanoparticles was approximately 150-200 nm, whereas the peak absorption of the AuNFs was 684 nm. After the AuNFs were encapsulated by the silica shells, the plasmonic absorption peak of AuNFs@SiO2 and AuNFs@SiO2@mSiO2 exhibited a red shift to 718 nm. When exposed to an 808 nm NIR laser, these crystals showed an obvious photothermal conversion in the NIR region and a highly efficient release of DOX. Biocompatibility was assessed in vitro using Cell Counting Kit-8 assays, and the results showed that the nanocarriers induced no obvious cytotoxicity. This nanomaterial could be considered a new type of material that shows promising potential for photothermal-chemotherapy against malignant tumours, including those of oral cancers.

  12. The Stability of Supported Gold Catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masoud, Nazila

    2018-01-01

    Gold has supreme cultural and financial value and, in form of nanoparticles smaller than 10 nm, is a unique catalyst for different industrially relevant reactions. Intriguing properties of the gold catalysts have spurred demand in the chemical industry for Au catalysts, the application of which

  13. Self-Assembly on Gold and Graphene for Molecular Electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reeler, Nini Elisabeth Abildgaard

    In this work, different bottom-up approaches were pursued to develop a method to mass produce dimers of gold nanorods (AuNRs) or large gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) bridged by a conducting molecule for later use in a device. Two types of AuNPs with a size of 3-5 nm and 50-75 nm respectively were syn...

  14. Nonlinear optical studies of single gold nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Meindert Alexander van

    2007-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are spherical clusters of gold atoms, with diameters typically between 1 and 100 nanometers. The applications of these particles are rather diverse, from optical labels for biological experiments to data carrier for optical data storage. The goal of my project was to develop new

  15. Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation of absorbed dose and radiolysis yields enhancement from a gold nanoparticle under MeV proton irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, H.N., E-mail: tranngochoang@tdt.edu.vn [Division of Nuclear Physics, Ton Duc Thang University, Tan Phong Ward, District 7, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Faculty of Applied Sciences, Ton Duc Thang University, Tan Phong Ward, District 7, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Karamitros, M. [Notre Dame Radiation Laboratory, University of Notre-Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Ivanchenko, V.N. [Geant4 Associates International Ltd, Hebden Bridge (United Kingdom); Guatelli, S.; McKinnon, S. [Centre For Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong (Australia); Illawarra Health and Medical Research, University of Wollongong, NSW (Australia); Murakami, K.; Sasaki, T.; Okada, S. [Computing Research Center, High Energy Accelerator Organization, KEK, Tsukuba City (Japan); Bordage, M.C. [INSERM, UMR 1037, CRCT, F-31000 Toulouse (France); Univ. Toulouse III-Paul Sabatier, UMR 1037, CRCT, F-31000 Toulouse (France); Francis, Z. [Saint Joseph University, Faculty of Sciences, Department of Physics, Beirut (Lebanon); El Bitar, Z. [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien/IN2P3/CNRS, Strasbourg (France); Bernal, M.A. [Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil); Shin, J.I. [Division of Heavy Ion Clinical Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, 75, Nowon-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, S.B. [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, 323, Ilsan-ro, Ilsandong-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Barberet, Ph. [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Tran, T.T. [VNUHCM-University of Science (Viet Nam); Brown, J.M.C. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); and others

    2016-04-15

    Gold nanoparticles have been reported as a possible radio-sensitizer agent in radiation therapy due to their ability to increase energy deposition and subsequent direct damage to cells and DNA within their local vicinity. Moreover, this increase in energy deposition also results in an increase of the radiochemical yields. In this work we present, for the first time, an in silico investigation, based on the general purpose Monte Carlo simulation toolkit Geant4, into energy deposition and radical species production around a spherical gold nanoparticle 50 nm in diameter via proton irradiation. Simulations were preformed for incident proton energies ranging from 2 to 170 MeV, which are of interest for clinical proton therapy.

  16. Decomposition of formic acid over silica encapsulated and amine functionalised gold nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mielby, Jerrik Jørgen; Kunov-Kruse, Andreas Jonas; Kegnæs, Søren

    2017-01-01

    Formic acid has recently attracted considerable attention as a safe and convenient source of hydrogen for sustainable chemical synthesis and renewable energy storage. Here, we show that silica encapsulated and amine functionalised gold nanoparticles are highly active catalysts for the production...... of hydrogen by vapour phase decomposition of formic acid. The core-shell catalysts are prepared in a reverse micelle system that makes it possible to control the size of the Au nanoparticles and the thickness of the SiO2 shells, which has a large impact on the catalytic activity. The smallest gold...... nanoparticles are 2.2 ± 0.3 nm in diameter and have a turnover frequency (TOF) of up to 958 h−1 at a temperature of 130 °C. Based on detailed in situ ATR-FTIR studies and results from kinetic isotope labelling experiments we propose that the active site is a low-coordinated and amine functionalised Au atom...

  17. Scalable creation of gold nanostructures on high performance engineering polymeric substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Kun; Wang, Pan; Wei, Shiliang; Huang, Yumin; Liu, Xiaobo

    2017-12-01

    The article reveals a facile protocol for scalable production of gold nanostructures on a high performance engineering thermoplastic substrate made of polyarylene ether nitrile (PEN) for the first time. Firstly, gold thin films with different thicknesses of 2 nm, 4 nm and 6 nm were evaporated on a spin-coated PEN substrate on glass slide in vacuum. Next, the as-evaporated samples were thermally annealed around the glass transition temperature of the PEN substrate, on which gold nanostructures with island-like morphology were created. Moreover, it was found that the initial gold evaporation thickness and annealing atmosphere played an important role in determining the morphology and plasmonic properties of the formulated Au NPs. Interestingly, we discovered that isotropic Au NPs can be easily fabricated on the freestanding PEN substrate, which was fabricated by a cost-effective polymer solution casting method. More specifically, monodispersed Au nanospheres with an average size of ∼60 nm were obtained after annealing a 4 nm gold film covered PEN casting substrate at 220 °C for 2 h in oxygen. Therefore, the scalable production of Au NPs with controlled morphology on PEN substrate would open the way for development of robust flexible nanosensors and optical devices using high performance engineering polyarylene ethers.

  18. Serum protein identification and quantification of the corona of 5, 15 and 80 nm gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schäffler, Martin; Semmler-Behnke, Manuela; Takenaka, Shinji; Wenk, Alexander; Schleh, Carsten; Johnston, Blair D; Kreyling, Wolfgang G; Sarioglu, Hakan; Hauck, Stefanie M

    2013-01-01

    When nanoparticles (NP) enter the body they come into contact with body fluids containing proteins which can adsorb to their surface. These proteins may influence the NP interactions with the biological vicinity, eventually determining their biological fate inside the body. Adsorption of the most abundantly binding proteins was studied after an in vitro 24 hr incubation of monodisperse, negatively charged 5, 15 and 80 nm gold spheres (AuNP) in mouse serum by a two-step analysis: proteomic protein identification and quantitative protein biochemistry. The adsorbed proteins were separated from non-adsorbed proteins by centrifugation and gel electrophoresis and identified using a MALDI-TOF-MS-Proteomics-Analyzer. Quantitative analysis of proteins in gel bands by protein densitometry, required the focus on predominantly binding serum proteins. Numerous proteins adsorbed to the AuNP depending on their size, e.g. apolipoproteins or complement C3. The qualitative and quantitative amount of adsorbed proteins differed between 5, 15 and 80 nm AuNP. Band intensities of adsorbed proteins decreased with increasing AuNP sizes based not only on their mass but also on their surface area. Summarizing, the AuNP surface is covered with serum proteins containing transport and immune related proteins among others. Hence, protein binding depends on the size, surface area and curvature of the AuNP. (paper)

  19. Observation of enhanced infrared absorption in silicon supersaturated with gold by pulsed laser melting of nanometer-thick gold films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Philippe K.; Yang, Wenjie; Hudspeth, Quentin; Lim, Shao Qi; Williams, Jim S.; Warrender, Jeffrey M.

    2018-04-01

    We demonstrate that pulsed laser melting (PLM) of thin 1, 5, and 10 nm-thick vapor-deposited gold layers on silicon enhances its room-temperature sub-band gap infrared absorption, as in the case of ion-implanted and PLM-treated silicon. The former approach offers reduced fabrication complexity and avoids implantation-induced lattice damage compared to ion implantation and pulsed laser melting, while exhibiting comparable optical absorptance. We additionally observed strong broadband absorptance enhancement in PLM samples made using 5- and 10-nm-thick gold layers. Raman spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering analysis indicate that such an enhancement could be explained by absorption by a metastable, disordered and gold-rich surface layer. The sheet resistance and the diode electrical characteristics further elucidate the role of gold-supersaturation in silicon, revealing the promise for future silicon-based infrared device applications.

  20. Laser ablation of nanoscale particles with 193 nm light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, J H; Lucas, D; Koshland, C P

    2007-01-01

    Laser interaction with nanoscale particles is distinct and different from laser-bulk material interaction, where a hot plasma is normally created. Here, we review our studies on 193 nm laser ablation of various nanoscale particles including NaCl, soot, polystyrene, and gold. The 20 ns laser beam with fluences up to 0.3 J/cm 2 irradiates nanoparticles in a gas stream at laser repetition rates from 10 to 100 Hz. The particle size distributions before and after irradiation are measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), and particle morphology is examined with electron microscopy. All the nanomaterials studied exhibit a similar disintegration pattern and similar particle formation characteristics. No broadband emission associated with particle heating or optical breakdown is observed. The nanoparticles formed after irradiation have a smaller mean diameter and an order of magnitude higher number concentration with a more spherical shape compared to the original particles. We use the photon-atom ratio (PAR) to interpret the laser-particle interaction energetics

  1. Antibacterial gold nanoparticles-biomass assisted synthesis and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badwaik, Vivek D; Willis, Chad B; Pender, Dillon S; Paripelly, Rammohan; Shah, Monic; Kherde, Yogesh A; Vangala, Lakshmisri M; Gonzalez, Matthew S; Dakshinamurthy, Rajalingam

    2013-10-01

    Xylose is a natural monosaccharide found in biomass such as straw, pecan shells, cottonseed hulls, and corncobs. Using this monosaccharide, we report the facile, green synthesis and characterization of stable xylose encapsulated gold nanoparticles (Xyl-GNPs) with potent antibacterial activity. Xyl-GNPs were synthesized using the reduction property of xylose in an aqueous solution containing choloraurate anions carried out at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. These nanoparticles were stable and near spherical in shape with an average diameter of 15 +/- 5 nm. Microbiological assay results showed the concentration dependent antibacterial activity of these particles against both Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) and Gram-positive (Staphylococcus epidermidis) bacteria. Thus the facile, environmentally friendly Xyl-GNPs have many potential applications in chemical and biomedical industries, particularly in the development of antibacterial agents in the field of biomedicine.

  2. New synthesis of gold nanocorals using a diazonium compound, and their application to an electrochemiluminescent assay of hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Min; Qi, Wenjing; Zhang, Ling; Lai, Jianping; Aziz-ur-Rehman; Majeed, Saadat; Xu, Guobao

    2014-01-01

    The reaction of hydrogen tetracholoroaurate, sodium borohydride and the diazonium compound prepared from 4-aminobenzoic acid results in the formation of gold nanocorals (Au-NCs) for the first time. Scanning electron microscopy images and transmission electron microscopy images show that the Au-NCs are composed of nanowires with a diameter of 5.3 nm. A glassy carbon electrode modified with Au-NCs is found to trigger intense electrochemiluminescence of the luminol/H 2 O 2 system at a potential of −0.13 V. The effect was exploited to determine H 2 O 2 in the 0.1 to 100 μM concentration range with a 30 nM detection limit. (author)

  3. Large area nano-patterning /writing on gold substrate using dip - pen nanolithography (DPN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Sudhir Kumar; Vishwakarma, Amit; Agarwal, Pankaj B.; Pesala, Bala; Agarwal, Ajay

    2014-10-01

    Dip Pen Nanolithography (DPN) is utilized to pattern large area (50μmX50μm) gold substrate for application in fabricating Nano-gratings. For Nano-writing 16-MHA ink coated AFM tip was prepared using double dipping procedure. Gold substrate is fabricated on thermally grown SiO2 substrate by depositing ˜5 nm titanium layer followed by ˜30nm gold using DC pulse sputtering. The gratings were designed using period of 800nm and 25% duty cycle. Acquired AFM images indicate that as the AFM tip proceeds for nano-writing, line width decreases from 190nm to 100nm. This occurs probably due to depreciation of 16-MHA molecules in AFM tip as writing proceeds.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of gold nanoparticles as diagnostic and therapeutic tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Pryscila Rodrigues da

    2012-01-01

    Nanomedicine covers the use of nanoparticles to the targeted site of action as platforms for building imaging and therapeutic agents against cancer and other human diseases. In particular, gold nanoparticles (AuNp's) have proven to be efficient for the diagnosis and therapy. Interest in the development of AuNp's is due to their extraordinary physical and chemical properties resulting from the effect of its size in the nanoscale, to have an area of easy modification and the radioactive γ and β emitter ( 198 Au; Eγ = 0,411 MeV, β max = 0,96 MeV; T 1/2 = 2,69 days), having the advantage of being able to be applied as a diagnostic tool for molecular photon emission tomography (SPECT) using only a small amount of radioactive gold . In this study were synthesized AuNp's, whose surface is functionalized with a biocompatible polymer (modified polyethylene glycol) and folic acid in order to render them stealth and specific tumors that over express the folate receptors. The techniques of Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), zeta potential (ζ), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV-Visible absorption spectroscopy were employed to characterization of the size and geometry of the nanoparticles, in addition to confirming its binding to thiol -PEG and PEG-thiol Folate. The results of UV-Visible and TEM showed the formation of dispersed AuNp's ranging in size from 8-12 nm with a strong absorption around 520 nm, relating to a maximum of surface plasmon resonance. DLS results showed a hydrodynamic diameter of 10 and 14 nm. The (pH ∼ 5.0 to 6.0) ranged ζ potential values of the dispersions prepared between -16.2 and -42.1 mV, indicating stable colloidal suspensions. To determine the real concentration of gold in the samples, it was used neutron activation in the nuclear reactor TRIGA MARK I IPR-R1 CDTN / CNEN of Belo Horizonte. Biocompatibility studies in vitro and in vivo of the samples were carried out showing that they have low toxicity in the models used. We evaluated

  5. Combination of Q-switched and quasi long-pulsed 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser, non-ablative 1450-nm diode laser, and ablative 10 600-nm carbon dioxide fractional laser for enlarged pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung Bin; Noh, Seongmin; Lee, Sang Ju; Kang, Jin Moon; Kim, Young Koo; Lee, Ju Hee

    2010-07-01

    Currently, there is no gold standard for the treatment of enlarged facial pores. In this report, we describe a patient with enlarged nasal pores which were treated with a combination of a non-ablative 1450-nm diode laser, a Q-switched and quasi long-pulsed 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser, and an ablative 10 600-nm carbon dioxide fractional laser system. Four months after the final treatment, the condition of the patient's pores had markedly improved, and the patient was satisfied with the results.

  6. A low cost microwave synthesis method for preparation of gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngo Vo Ke Thanh; Lam Quang Vinh; Nguyen Dang Giang; Huynh Thanh Dat

    2014-01-01

    The gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in 15-20 nm size range have attention for fabrication of smart sensing devices in biomedical sciences as diagnostic tools. Citrate capped GNPs are negatively charged, which can be exploited for electrostatic interactions with some positively charged biomolecules like antibody. In this study, we are developing a low-cost technique by using a common microwave system with medium power for synthesizing gold nanoparticles with using sodium citrate (Na 3 Ct) reduction in chloroauric acid (HAuCl 4 .3H 2 O). It was found that the comparing with normal thermal method, the reaction by the microwave irradiation was much faster. Besides, the effects the sodium citrate concentration and optical properties of gold nanoparticles were studied. The optical properties of gold nanoparticles suspension were characterized by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy (UV-Vis). Maximum absorbance wavelengths (λ max ) for gold nanoparticles are ∼ 518-524 nm with the size of 12-25 nm. The size of gold nanoparticles decreases with increasing concentration of sodium citrate. Besides, the morphology of gold nanoparticles have a spherical shape with face-centered-cubic (fcc) crystalline structure. (author)

  7. Bio-synthesis of gold nanoparticles by human epithelial cells, in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larios-Rodriguez, E; Rangel-Ayon, C; Herrera-Urbina, R; Castillo, S J; Zavala, G

    2011-01-01

    Healthy epithelial cells, in vivo, have the ability to synthesize gold nanoparticles when aqueous tetrachloroauric acid is made to react with human skin. Neither a reducing agent nor a protecting chemical is needed for this bio-synthesis method. The first indication of gold nanoparticle formation is the staining of the skin, which turns deep purple. Stereoscopic optical micrographs of human skin tissue in contact with aqueous tetrachloroauric acid clearly show the staining of the epithelial cells. The UV-Vis spectrum of these epithelial cells shows an absorption band with a maximum at 553 nm. This absorption peak is within the wavelength region where the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band of aqueous colloidal gold exhibits a maximum. Transmission electron micrographs show that gold nanoparticles synthesized by epithelial cells have sizes between 1 and 100 nm. The electron diffraction pattern of these nanoparticles reveals a crystalline structure whose interplanar distances correspond to fcc metallic gold. Transmission electron micrographs of ultra-thin (70 nm thick) slices of epithelial cells clearly and undoubtedly demonstrate that gold nanoparticles are inside the cell. According to high resolution transmission electron micrographs of intracellular single gold nanoparticles, they have the shape of a polyhedron.

  8. Bio-synthesis of gold nanoparticles by human epithelial cells, in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larios-Rodriguez, E; Rangel-Ayon, C; Herrera-Urbina, R [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Metalurgia, Universidad de Sonora, Rosales y Luis Encinas S/N, Hermosillo, Sonora, C.P. 83000 (Mexico); Castillo, S J [Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora, Rosales y Luis Encinas S/N, Hermosillo, Sonora, C.P. 83000 (Mexico); Zavala, G, E-mail: elarios@polimeros.uson.mx [Instituto de Biotecnologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2011-09-02

    Healthy epithelial cells, in vivo, have the ability to synthesize gold nanoparticles when aqueous tetrachloroauric acid is made to react with human skin. Neither a reducing agent nor a protecting chemical is needed for this bio-synthesis method. The first indication of gold nanoparticle formation is the staining of the skin, which turns deep purple. Stereoscopic optical micrographs of human skin tissue in contact with aqueous tetrachloroauric acid clearly show the staining of the epithelial cells. The UV-Vis spectrum of these epithelial cells shows an absorption band with a maximum at 553 nm. This absorption peak is within the wavelength region where the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band of aqueous colloidal gold exhibits a maximum. Transmission electron micrographs show that gold nanoparticles synthesized by epithelial cells have sizes between 1 and 100 nm. The electron diffraction pattern of these nanoparticles reveals a crystalline structure whose interplanar distances correspond to fcc metallic gold. Transmission electron micrographs of ultra-thin (70 nm thick) slices of epithelial cells clearly and undoubtedly demonstrate that gold nanoparticles are inside the cell. According to high resolution transmission electron micrographs of intracellular single gold nanoparticles, they have the shape of a polyhedron.

  9. Hardness and Elastic Modulus on Six-Fold Symmetry Gold Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Manuel; Ortiz-Jordan, Luis; Hurtado-Macias, Abel; Flores, Sergio; Elizalde-Galindo, José T.; Rocha, Carmen; Torres, Brenda; Zarei-Chaleshtori, Maryam; Chianelli, Russell R.

    2013-01-01

    The chemical synthesis of gold nanoparticles (NP) by using gold (III) chloride trihydrate (HAuCl∙3H2O) and sodium citrate as a reducing agent in aqueous conditions at 100 °C is presented here. Gold nanoparticles areformed by a galvanic replacement mechanism as described by Lee and Messiel. Morphology of gold-NP was analyzed by way of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy; results indicate a six-fold icosahedral symmetry with an average size distribution of 22 nm. In order to understand the mechanical behaviors, like hardness and elastic moduli, gold-NP were subjected to nanoindentation measurements—obtaining a hardness value of 1.72 GPa and elastic modulus of 100 GPa in a 3–5 nm of displacement at the nanoparticle’s surface. PMID:28809302

  10. Effect of gold nano-particles on switch-on voltage and relaxation frequency of nematic liquid crystal cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Inam

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the observation of large changes in the electro-optical properties of nematic liquid crystal (NLC due to inclusion of small concentration of 10 nm diameter gold nanoparticles (GNPs. It is observed that GNPs lower switch-on voltage and also lower the relaxation frequency with applied voltage (AC field to NLC cell. These studies of GNP doped NLC cell have been done using optical interferometry and capacity measurement by impedance analyzer. The change in threshold voltage and relaxation frequency by doping GNPs in NLC is explained theoretically.

  11. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy on laser-engineered ruthenium dye-functionalized nanoporous gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schade, Lina; Franzka, Steffen; Biener, Monika; Biener, Jürgen; Hartmann, Nils

    2016-06-01

    Photothermal processing of nanoporous gold with a microfocused continuous-wave laser at λ = 532 nm provides a facile means in order engineer the pore and ligament size of nanoporous gold. In this report we take advantage of this approach in order to investigate the size-dependence of enhancement effects in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Surface structures with laterally varying pore sizes from 25 nm to ≥200 nm are characterized using scanning electron microscopy and then functionalized with N719, a commercial ruthenium complex, which is widely used in dye-sensitized solar cells. Raman spectroscopy reveals the characteristic spectral features of N719. Peak intensities strongly depend on the pore size. Highest intensities are observed on the native support, i.e. on nanoporous gold with pore sizes around 25 nm. These results demonstrate the particular perspectives of laser-fabricated nanoporous gold structures in fundamental SERS studies. In particular, it is emphasized that laser-engineered porous gold substrates represent a very well defined platform in order to study size-dependent effects with high reproducibility and precision and resolve conflicting results in previous studies.

  12. Diameter control and emission properties of carbon nanotubes grown using chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaatz, F.H.; Siegal, M.P.; Overmyer, D.L.; Provencio, P.P.; Jackson, J.L

    2003-01-15

    We grow multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) via thermal chemical vapor deposition from a sputtered 4-nm-thick nickel catalyst film on a tungsten-coated silicon substrate. CNTs grow from a mixture of nitrogen and acetylene gases at temperatures ranging from 630 to 790 deg. C, resulting in CNT outer diameters of 5-350 nm. CNT diameters increase exponentially with temperature. These results define regimes for template growth fabricated in catalytically active anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) with controlled pinhole sizes ranging from 10 to 50 nm. We measure a threshold electron emission field of 3 V/{mu}m and a field enhancement factor {beta}=5230 on randomly oriented 10-nm diameter CNTs.

  13. Diameter control and emission properties of carbon nanotubes grown using chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaatz, F.H.; Siegal, M.P.; Overmyer, D.L.; Provencio, P.P.; Jackson, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    We grow multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) via thermal chemical vapor deposition from a sputtered 4-nm-thick nickel catalyst film on a tungsten-coated silicon substrate. CNTs grow from a mixture of nitrogen and acetylene gases at temperatures ranging from 630 to 790 deg. C, resulting in CNT outer diameters of 5-350 nm. CNT diameters increase exponentially with temperature. These results define regimes for template growth fabricated in catalytically active anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) with controlled pinhole sizes ranging from 10 to 50 nm. We measure a threshold electron emission field of 3 V/μm and a field enhancement factor β=5230 on randomly oriented 10-nm diameter CNTs

  14. Fenugreek hydrogel–agarose composite entrapped gold nanoparticles for acetylcholinesterase based biosensor for carbamates detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kestwal, Rakesh Mohan; Bagal-Kestwal, Dipali; Chiang, Been-Huang, E-mail: bhchiang@ntu.edu.tw

    2015-07-30

    A biosensor was fabricated to detect pesticides in food samples. Acetylcholinesterase was immobilized in a novel fenugreek hydrogel–agarose matrix with gold nanoparticles. Transparent thin films with superior mechanical strength and stability were obtained with 2% fenugreek hydrogel and 2% agarose. Immobilization of acetylcholinesterase on the membrane resulted in high enzyme retention efficiency (92%) and a significantly prolonged shelf life of the enzyme (half-life, 55 days). Transmission electron microscopy revealed that, gold nanoparticles (10–20 nm in diameter) were uniformly dispersed in the fenugreek hydrogel–agarose–acetylcholinesterase membrane. This immobilized enzyme-gold nanoparticle dip-strip system detected various carbamates, including carbofuran, oxamyl, methomyl, and carbaryl, with limits of detection of 2, 21, 113, and 236 nM (S/N = 3), respectively. Furthermore, the fabricated biosensor exhibited good testing capabilities when used to detect carbamates added to various fruit and vegetable samples. - Highlights: • Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) dip-strip biosensor fabricated to detect carbamates. • AChE entrapped in fenugreek hydrogel–agarose matrix with gold nanoparticles (GNPs). • High enzyme retention efficiency (92%) and shelf life (half-life, 55 days). • Detection limits of carbofuran, oxamyl and methomyl: 2, 21 and 113 nM. • The biosensor had good testing capabilities to detect carbamates in food samples.

  15. Theoretical analysis of gold nano-strip gap plasmon resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soendergaard, T; Jung, J; Bozhevolnyi, S I; Della Valle, G [Department of Physics and Nanotechnology, Aalborg University, Skjernvej 4A, DK-9220 Aalborg Oest (Denmark)], E-mail: ts@nano.aau.dk

    2008-10-15

    Gold gap plasmon resonators consisting of two nm-thin and sub-micron-wide gold strips separated by a nm-thin air or quartz gap are considered. Scattering resonances and resonant fields are related to a model of resonances being due to counter-propagating gap plasmon polaritons forming standing waves. A small gap ({approx}10 nm) is found to result in small resonance peaks in scattering spectra but large electric field magnitude enhancement ({approx}20), whereas a large gap ({approx}100 nm) is found to result in more pronounced scattering peaks but smaller field enhancement. Design curves are presented that allow construction of gap plasmon resonators with any desired resonance wavelength in the range from the visible to the infrared, including telecom wavelengths. The relation between resonance wavelength and resonator width is close to being linear. The field magnitude enhancement mid between the gold strips is systematically investigated versus gap size and wavelength.

  16. Implantation and growth of dendritic gold nanostructures on graphene derivatives: electrical property tailoring and Raman enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasuja, Kabeer; Berry, Vikas

    2009-08-25

    Interfacing electron-rich metal nanoparticles with graphene derivatives can sensitively regulate the properties of the resultant hybrid with potential applications in metal-doped graphene field-effect transistors (FETs), surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, and catalysis. Here, we show that by controlling the rate of diffusion and catalytic reduction of gold ions on graphene oxide (GO), dendritic "snowflake-shaped" gold nanostructures (SFGNs) can be templated on graphene. The structural features of the SFGNs and their interfacing mechanism with GO were characterized by microscopic analysis and Raman-scattering. We demonstrate that (a) SFGNs grow on GO-surface via diffusion limited aggregation; (b) SFGN's morphology (dendritic to globular), size (diameter of 150-500 nm and a height of 45-55 nm), coverage density, and dispersion stability can be controlled by regulating the chemiophysical forces; (c) SFGNs enhance the Raman signal by 2.5 folds; and (d) SFGNs act as antireduction resist during GO-SFGN's chemical reduction. Further, the SFGNs interfacing with graphene reduces the apparent band gap (from 320 to 173 meV) and the Schottky barrier height (from 126 to 56 meV) of the corresponding FET.

  17. Preparation and characterization of flower-like gold nanomaterials and iron oxide/gold composite nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zusing; Lin, Z H; Tang, C-Y; Chang, H-T

    2007-01-01

    We have successfully synthesized flower-like gold nanomaterials and Fe 3 O 4 /Au composite nanomaterials through the use of wet chemical methods in aqueous solution. In the presence of 0.5 mM citrate, 0.313 mM poly(ethylene glycol), and 109.72 mM sodium acetate (NaOAc), we prepared Au nanoflowers (NFs) having diameters ranging from 300 to 400 nm in aqueous solution after the reduction of Au ions at room temperature for 10 min. In the presence of spherical Fe 3 O 4 nanomaterials, we applied a similar synthetic method to prepare Fe 3 O 4 /Au composite nanomaterials, including nanowires (NWs) that have a length of 1.58 μm and a width of 28.3 nm. We conducted energy-dispersive x-ray analysis, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption, and x-ray powder diffraction measurements to characterize the as-prepared flower-like Au nanomaterials and Fe 3 O 4 /Au composite nanomaterials. From time-evolution TEM measurements, we suggested that Au atoms that were bound to the Fe 3 O 4 nanomaterials grew to form Fe 3 O 4 /Au composite nanomaterials. The as-prepared Au NFs absorbed light strongly in the visible-near-infrared (Vis-NIR) region (500-1200 nm). The Fe 3 O 4 /Au composite nanomaterials had electronic conductivities greater than 100 nA at an applied voltage of 20 mV, which induced a temperature increase of 20.5 ± 0.5 deg. C under an alternating magnetic field (62 μT)

  18. Direct electrodeposition of highly ordered gold nanotube arrays for use in non-enzymatic amperometric sensing of glucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Taolei; Dong, Junping; Xu, Jiaqiang

    2016-01-01

    The authors describe vertically aligned gold nanotube arrays (Au-NTAs) and gold nanowire arrays (Au-NWAs) that were directly grown in alumina oxide templates by galvanostatic deposition. The morphology of the gold arrays can be controlled by adjusting the pH value of the plating bath. Scanning electron microscopy shows the nanoarrays to be highly ordered (with an average length of around 2 μm), and the opening width of the gold nanotube arrays to be uniform (with diameters of around 50 nm). The electrocatalytic activities of the Au-NTAs and Au-NWAs deposited on a glassy carbon electrode toward glucose oxidation were compared by cyclic voltammetry and amperometry at pH 7.2. The Au-NTAs yield higher amperometric currents. The respective glucose sensor, when operated at a working potential of 0.25 V (vs. SCE), exhibits a linear range that extends from 5 μM to 16.4 mM concentrations of glucose, a sensitivity of 44.2 μA mM"−"1 cm"−"2, and a detection limit of 2.1 μM (at an S/N ratio of 3). The excellent sensing performance is attributed to the large surface area and the fast electron transfer rate for the one-dimensional gold nanoarrays (author)

  19. Catalytic growth of carbon nanotubes with large inner diameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WEI REN ZHONG

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (2.4 g/g catalyst, with large inner diameters were successfully synthesized through pyrolysis of methane on a Ni–Cu–Al catalyst by adding sodium carbonate into the carbon nanotubes growth system. The inner diameter of the carbon nanotubes prepared by this method is about 20–60 nm, while their outer diameter is about 40–80 nm. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were employed to investigate the morphology and microstructures of the carbon nanotubes. The analyses showed that these carbon nanotubes have large inner diameters and good graphitization. The addition of sodium carbonate into the reaction system brings about a slight decrease in the methane conversion and the yield of carbon. The experimental results showed that sodium carbonate is a mildly toxic material which influenced the catalytic activity of the Ni–Cu–Al catalyst and resulted in the formation of carbon nanotubes with large inner diameters. The growth mechanism of the carbon nanotubes with large inner diameters is discussed in this paper.

  20. Direct formation of gold nanorods on surfaces using polymer-immobilised gold seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid K. Abyaneh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we present the formation of gold nanorods (GNRs on novel gold–poly(methyl methacrylate (Au–PMMA nanocomposite substrates with unprecedented growth control through the polymer molecular weight (Mw and gold-salt-to-polymer weight ratio. For the first time, GNRs have been produced by seed-mediated direct growth on surfaces that were pre-coated with polymer-immobilised gold seeds. A Au–PMMA nanocomposite formed by UV photoreduction has been used as the gold seed. The influence of polymer Mw and gold concentration on the formation of GNRs has been investigated and discussed. The polymer nanocomposite formed with a lower Mw PMMA and 20 wt % gold salt provides a suitable medium for growing well-dispersed GNRs. In this sample, the average dimension of produced GNRs is 200 nm in length with aspect ratios up to 10 and a distribution of GNRs to nanoparticles of nearly 22%. Suitable characterization techniques such as AFM and SEM have been used to support concept of the proposed growth method.

  1. Light-assisted, templated self-assembly of gold nanoparticle chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaquay, Eric; Martínez, Luis Javier; Huang, Ningfeng; Mejia, Camilo A; Sarkar, Debarghya; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2014-09-10

    We experimentally demonstrate the technique of light-assisted, templated self-assembly (LATS) to trap and assemble 200 nm diameter gold nanoparticles. We excite a guided-resonance mode of a photonic-crystal slab with 1.55 μm laser light to create an array of optical traps. Unlike our previous demonstration of LATS with polystyrene particles, we find that the interparticle interactions play a significant role in the resulting particle patterns. Despite a two-dimensionally periodic intensity profile in the slab, the particles form one-dimensional chains whose orientations can be controlled by the incident polarization of the light. The formation of chains can be understood in terms of a competition between the gradient force due to the excitation of the mode in the slab and optical binding between particles.

  2. Hydrophobically modified chitosan/gold nanoparticles for DNA delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattarai, Shanta Raj; Remant Bahadur, K.C.; Aryal, Santosh; Bhattarai, Narayan; Kim, Sun Young; Yi, Ho Keun; Hwang, Pyoung Han; Kim, Hak Yong

    2008-01-01

    Present study dealt an application of modified chitosan gold nanoparticles (Nac-6-Au) for the immobilization of necked plasmid DNA. Gold nanoparticles stabilized with N-acylated chitosan were prepared by graft-onto approach. The stabilized gold nanoparticles were characterized by different physico-chemical techniques such as UV-vis, TEM, ELS and DLS. MTT assay was used for in vitro cytotoxicity of the nanoparticles into three different cell lines (NIH 3T3, CT-26 and MCF-7). The formulation of plasmid DNA with the nanoparticles corresponds to the complex forming capacity and in-vitro/in-vivo transfection efficiency was studied via gel electrophoresis and transfection methods, respectively. Results showed the modified chitosan gold nanoparticles were well-dispersed and spherical in shape with average size around 10∼12 nm in triple distilled water at pH 7.4, and showed relatively no cytotoxicity at low concentration. Addition of plasmid DNA on the aqueous solution of the nanoparticles markedly reduced surface potential (50.0∼66.6%) as well as resulted in a 13.33% increase in hydrodynamic diameters of the formulated nanoparticles. Transfection efficiency of Nac-6-Au/DNA was dependent on cell type, and higher β-galactosidase activity was observed on MCF-7 breast cancer cell. Typically, this activity was 5 times higher in 4.5 mg/ml nanoparticles concentration than that achieved by the nanoparticles of other concentrations (and/or control). However, this activity was lower in in-vitro and dramatically higher in in-vivo than that of commercially available transfection kit (Lipofectin (registered) ) and DNA. From these results, it can be expected to develop alternative new vectors for gene delivery

  3. The effect of electron-surface scattering and thiol adsorption on the electrical resistivity of gold ultrathin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriquez, Ricardo; Del Campo, Valeria; Gonzalez-Fuentes, Claudio; Correa-Puerta, Jonathan; Moraga, Luis; Flores, Marcos; Segura, Rodrigo; Donoso, Sebastián; Marín, Francisca; Bravo, Sergio; Häberle, Patricio

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • We prepared ultra thin films (10 nm) on mica on top of a chromium seedlayer (<1 nm). • We prepared samples with different topographies controlling the substrate temperature. • We studied the contribution of the different scattering mechanims on the resistivity. • We developed a discernment method based on thiol adsorption. - Abstract: In order to study the effect of electron-surface scattering in gold ultrathin films (∼10 nm), we have prepared a set of Au samples on mica on top of a chromium seedlayer (<1 nm). Chromium is added as a metallic surfactant which enables surpassing the electric percolation threshold for substrate temperatures above room temperature. We prepared samples with the same thickness but different topographies setting different substrate temperatures. These modifications modulate the contributions of the different electronic scattering mechanisms to the film resistivity. A second set of gold thin films deposited on mica at room temperature, with different thicknesses between 8 and 100 nm, was also prepared to compare the resisitivities of both sets through Mayadas and Shatzkes theory. We found that in samples with thicknesses below 15 nm, the electron-surface scattering is indeed the dominant mechanism influencing the film resistivity. To obtain further evidence of this prevalence, we developed a discrimination method based on thiol adsorption. The film with the highest resistivity increase is the sample in which electron-surface scattering is dominant. With this method, we observed that a large enhancement of the electron-surface scattering not only occurs in samples with large diameters grains, but also if the film has a reduced surface roughness.​

  4. The effect of electron-surface scattering and thiol adsorption on the electrical resistivity of gold ultrathin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriquez, Ricardo, E-mail: ricardo.henriquez@usm.cl [Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Av. España 1680, Valparaiso 2390123 (Chile); Del Campo, Valeria; Gonzalez-Fuentes, Claudio [Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Av. España 1680, Valparaiso 2390123 (Chile); Correa-Puerta, Jonathan [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Av. Universidad 330, Curauma, Valparaíso (Chile); Moraga, Luis [Universidad Central de Chile, Toesca 1783, Santiago 8370178 (Chile); Flores, Marcos [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Av. Blanco Encalada 2008, Santiago (Chile); Segura, Rodrigo [Instituto de Química y Bioquímica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valparaíso, Av. Gran Bretaña 1111, Valparaíso (Chile); Donoso, Sebastián; Marín, Francisca; Bravo, Sergio; Häberle, Patricio [Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Av. España 1680, Valparaiso 2390123 (Chile)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • We prepared ultra thin films (10 nm) on mica on top of a chromium seedlayer (<1 nm). • We prepared samples with different topographies controlling the substrate temperature. • We studied the contribution of the different scattering mechanims on the resistivity. • We developed a discernment method based on thiol adsorption. - Abstract: In order to study the effect of electron-surface scattering in gold ultrathin films (∼10 nm), we have prepared a set of Au samples on mica on top of a chromium seedlayer (<1 nm). Chromium is added as a metallic surfactant which enables surpassing the electric percolation threshold for substrate temperatures above room temperature. We prepared samples with the same thickness but different topographies setting different substrate temperatures. These modifications modulate the contributions of the different electronic scattering mechanisms to the film resistivity. A second set of gold thin films deposited on mica at room temperature, with different thicknesses between 8 and 100 nm, was also prepared to compare the resisitivities of both sets through Mayadas and Shatzkes theory. We found that in samples with thicknesses below 15 nm, the electron-surface scattering is indeed the dominant mechanism influencing the film resistivity. To obtain further evidence of this prevalence, we developed a discrimination method based on thiol adsorption. The film with the highest resistivity increase is the sample in which electron-surface scattering is dominant. With this method, we observed that a large enhancement of the electron-surface scattering not only occurs in samples with large diameters grains, but also if the film has a reduced surface roughness.​.

  5. Diameter modulation of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Rong; Einarsson, Erik; Murakami, Yoichi; Shiomi, Junichiro; Chiashi, Shohei; Tang, Zikang; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2012-08-28

    We demonstrate wide-range diameter modulation of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) using a wet chemistry prepared catalyst. In order to ensure compatibility to electronic applications, the current minimum mean diameter of 2 nm for vertically aligned SWNTs is challenged. The mean diameter is decreased to about 1.4 nm by reducing Co catalyst concentrations to 1/100 or by increasing Mo catalyst concentrations by five times. We also propose a novel spectral analysis method that allows one to distinguish absorbance contributions from the upper, middle, and lower parts of a nanotube array. We use this method to quantitatively characterize the slight diameter change observed along the array height. On the basis of further investigation of the array and catalyst particles, we conclude that catalyst aggregation-rather than Ostwald ripening-dominates the growth of metal particles.

  6. Estimating the concentration of gold nanoparticles incorporated on natural rubber membranes using multi-level starlet optimal segmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siqueira, A. F. de, E-mail: siqueiraaf@gmail.com; Cabrera, F. C., E-mail: flavioccabrera@yahoo.com.br [UNESP – Univ Estadual Paulista, Dep de Física, Química e Biologia (Brazil); Pagamisse, A., E-mail: aylton@fct.unesp.br [UNESP – Univ Estadual Paulista, Dep de Matemática e Computação (Brazil); Job, A. E., E-mail: job@fct.unesp.br [UNESP – Univ Estadual Paulista, Dep de Física, Química e Biologia (Brazil)

    2014-12-15

    This study consolidates multi-level starlet segmentation (MLSS) and multi-level starlet optimal segmentation (MLSOS) techniques for photomicrograph segmentation, based on starlet wavelet detail levels to separate areas of interest in an input image. Several segmentation levels can be obtained using MLSS; after that, Matthews correlation coefficient is used to choose an optimal segmentation level, giving rise to MLSOS. In this paper, MLSOS is employed to estimate the concentration of gold nanoparticles with diameter around 47  nm, reduced on natural rubber membranes. These samples were used for the construction of SERS/SERRS substrates and in the study of the influence of natural rubber membranes with incorporated gold nanoparticles on the physiology of Leishmania braziliensis. Precision, recall, and accuracy are used to evaluate the segmentation performance, and MLSOS presents an accuracy greater than 88 % for this application.

  7. Gold nanoparticles supported on magnesium oxide for CO oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabineiro, Sónia Ac; Bogdanchikova, Nina; Pestryakov, Alexey; Tavares, Pedro B.; Fernandes, Lisete Sg; Figueiredo, José L.

    2011-06-01

    Au was loaded (1 wt%) on a commercial MgO support by three different methods: double impregnation, liquid-phase reductive deposition and ultrasonication. Samples were characterised by adsorption of N2 at -96°C, temperature-programmed reduction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Upon loading with Au, MgO changed into Mg(OH)2 (the hydroxide was most likely formed by reaction with water, in which the gold precursor was dissolved). The size range for gold nanoparticles was 2-12 nm for the DIM method and 3-15 nm for LPRD and US. The average size of gold particles was 5.4 nm for DIM and larger than 6.5 for the other methods. CO oxidation was used as a test reaction to compare the catalytic activity. The best results were obtained with the DIM method, followed by LPRD and US. This can be explained in terms of the nanoparticle size, well known to determine the catalytic activity of gold catalysts.

  8. Gold nanoparticles supported on magnesium oxide for CO oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdanchikova Nina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Au was loaded (1 wt% on a commercial MgO support by three different methods: double impregnation, liquid-phase reductive deposition and ultrasonication. Samples were characterised by adsorption of N2 at -96°C, temperature-programmed reduction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Upon loading with Au, MgO changed into Mg(OH2 (the hydroxide was most likely formed by reaction with water, in which the gold precursor was dissolved. The size range for gold nanoparticles was 2-12 nm for the DIM method and 3-15 nm for LPRD and US. The average size of gold particles was 5.4 nm for DIM and larger than 6.5 for the other methods. CO oxidation was used as a test reaction to compare the catalytic activity. The best results were obtained with the DIM method, followed by LPRD and US. This can be explained in terms of the nanoparticle size, well known to determine the catalytic activity of gold catalysts.

  9. Development of colloidal gold immunochromatographic strips for detection of Riemerella anatipestifer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanwan Hou

    Full Text Available Riemerella anatipestifer is one of the most important bacterial pathogen of ducks and causes a contagious septicemia. R. anatipestifer infection causes serositis syndromes similar to other bacterial infections in ducks, including infection by Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica and Pasteurella multocida. Clinically differentiating R. anatipestifer infections from other bacterial pathogen infections is usually difficult. In this study, MAb 1G2F10, a monoclonal antibody against R. anatipestifer GroEL, was used to develop a colloidal gold immunochromatographic strip. Colloidal gold particles were prepared by chemical synthesis to an average diameter of 20 ± 5.26 nm by transmission electron microscope imaging. MAb 1G2F10 was conjugated to colloidal gold particles and the formation of antibody-colloidal gold conjugates was monitored by UV/Vis spectroscopy. Immunochromatographic strips were assembled in regular sequence through different accessories sticked on PVC plate. Strips specifically detected R. anatipestifer within 10 min, but did not detect E. coli, S. enterica and P. multocida. The detection limit for R. anatipestifer was 1 × 10(6 colony forming units, which was 500 times higher than a conventional agglutination test. Accuracy was 100% match to multiplex PCR. Assay stability and reproducibility were excellent after storage at 4°C for 6 months. The immunochromatographic strips prepared in this study offer a specific, sensitive, and rapid detection method for R. anatipestifer, which is of great importance for the prevention and control of R. anatipestifer infections.

  10. Gold nanoflowers with mesoporous silica as “nanocarriers” for drug release and photothermal therapy in the treatment of oral cancer using near-infrared (NIR) laser light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Wenzhi; Gong, Junxia; Wang, Yuqian; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Hongmei; Zhang, Weihang; Zhang, Hu; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Tianfu; Yin, Wanzhong; Yang, Wensheng

    2016-01-01

    In this experiment, we successfully developed nanocarriers in the form of gold nanoflowers coated with two layers of silica for the purposes of drug loading and NIR (near-infrared) photothermal therapy for the treatment of oral cancer. The gold nanoflowers converted NIR laser energy into heat energy. The cores were coated with a thin silica layer (AuNFs@SiO_2) to protect the gold nanoflowers from intraparticle ripening. The second layer was mesoporous silica (AuNFs@SiO_2@mSiO_2), which acted as a nanocarrier for anticancer drug (DOX) loads. The mean effective diameter of the nanoparticles was approximately 150–200 nm, whereas the peak absorption of the AuNFs was 684 nm. After the AuNFs were encapsulated by the silica shells, the plasmonic absorption peak of AuNFs@SiO_2 and AuNFs@SiO_2@mSiO_2 exhibited a red shift to 718 nm. When exposed to an 808 nm NIR laser, these crystals showed an obvious photothermal conversion in the NIR region and a highly efficient release of DOX. Biocompatibility was assessed in vitro using Cell Counting Kit-8 assays, and the results showed that the nanocarriers induced no obvious cytotoxicity. This nanomaterial could be considered a new type of material that shows promising potential for photothermal-chemotherapy against malignant tumours, including those of oral cancers.

  11. Gold nanoflowers with mesoporous silica as “nanocarriers” for drug release and photothermal therapy in the treatment of oral cancer using near-infrared (NIR) laser light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Wenzhi; Gong, Junxia [Jilin University, Department of Stomatology, China-Japan Union Hospital (China); Wang, Yuqian [Jilin University, China-Japan Union Hospital, Scientific Research Center (China); Zhang, Yan [Jilin University, Department of Stomatology, China-Japan Union Hospital (China); Zhang, Hongmei [Jilin University, China-Japan Union Hospital, Scientific Research Center (China); Zhang, Weihang; Zhang, Hu; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Tianfu [Jilin University, Department of Stomatology, China-Japan Union Hospital (China); Yin, Wanzhong, E-mail: yinwanzhong88@hotmail.com [First Clinical Hospital of Jilin University, Department of Otorhinolaryngology (China); Yang, Wensheng, E-mail: wsyang@mail.jlu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, The Key Laboratory of Surface and Interface Chemistry of Jilin Province (China)

    2016-04-15

    In this experiment, we successfully developed nanocarriers in the form of gold nanoflowers coated with two layers of silica for the purposes of drug loading and NIR (near-infrared) photothermal therapy for the treatment of oral cancer. The gold nanoflowers converted NIR laser energy into heat energy. The cores were coated with a thin silica layer (AuNFs@SiO{sub 2}) to protect the gold nanoflowers from intraparticle ripening. The second layer was mesoporous silica (AuNFs@SiO{sub 2}@mSiO{sub 2}), which acted as a nanocarrier for anticancer drug (DOX) loads. The mean effective diameter of the nanoparticles was approximately 150–200 nm, whereas the peak absorption of the AuNFs was 684 nm. After the AuNFs were encapsulated by the silica shells, the plasmonic absorption peak of AuNFs@SiO{sub 2} and AuNFs@SiO{sub 2}@mSiO{sub 2} exhibited a red shift to 718 nm. When exposed to an 808 nm NIR laser, these crystals showed an obvious photothermal conversion in the NIR region and a highly efficient release of DOX. Biocompatibility was assessed in vitro using Cell Counting Kit-8 assays, and the results showed that the nanocarriers induced no obvious cytotoxicity. This nanomaterial could be considered a new type of material that shows promising potential for photothermal-chemotherapy against malignant tumours, including those of oral cancers.

  12. Gallotannin-Capped Gold Nanoparticles: Green Synthesis and Enhanced Morphology of AFM Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaehyung; Yhim, Won Been; Park, Jong-Won; Lee, Sang-Hyeon; Kim, Tae Yoon; Cha, Song-Hyun; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Jang, Hong-Lae; Cho, Miyeon; Park, Youmie; Cho, Seonho

    2016-06-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were synthesized by a green method using a plant secondary metabolite, gallotannin. Gallotannin was used as a reducing and capping agent to convert gold ions into AuNPs for the generation of gallotannin-capped AuNPs (GT-AuNPs). This synthetic route is ecofriendly and eliminates the use of toxic chemical reducing agents. The characteristic surface plasmon resonance of the GT-AuNPs was observed at 536 nm in the UV-visible spectra. The face-centered cubic structure of GT-AuNPs was verified by X-ray diffraction analysis. The majority of the GT-AuNPs had a spherical shape with an average diameter of 15.93 ± 8.60 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectra suggested that the hydroxyl functional groups of gallotannin were involved in the synthesis of GT-AuNPs. The size and shape of nanoparticles can have a crucial impact on their biological, mechanical, and structural properties. Herein, we developed a modified anisotropic diffusion equation to selectively remove nanoscale experimental noise while preserving nanoscale intrinsic geometry information. To demonstrate the performance of the developed method, the ridge and valley lines were plotted by utilizing the principle curvatures. Compared to the original anisotropic diffusion and raw atomic force microscopy (AFM) experimental data, the developed modified anisotropic diffusion shows excellent performance in nanoscale noise removal while preserving the intrinsic aeometry of the nanoparticles.

  13. Microbial biosynthesis of nontoxic gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Swarup; Das, Tapan Kumar; Maiti, Guru Prasad; Basu, Utpal

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The manuscript deals with the fungus mediated optimized biologically synthesized GNPs using Aspergillus foetidus and characterization of biosynthesized GNPs using various physico-chemical methods. The fairly stable synthesized nanoparticles have size in the range of 10–40 nm. Cytotoxicity study of biosynthesized GNPs on Human lung cancer cell line A549 showed no significant toxicity of GNPs. - Highlights: • A novel biosynthesis process of GNPs using Aspergillus foetidus. • Biosynthesized GNPs are in the range of 10–40 nm as observed from TEM. • This process of synthesis is an optimized biosynthesis process of GNPs. • Biosynthesized GNPs are noncytotoxic against A549 cell line. - Abstract: We study the extracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) using the fungal species Aspergillus foetidus. The formation of GNPs were initially monitored by visual observation and then characterized with the help of various characterization techniques. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results revealed distinctive formation of face centered cubic crystalline GNPs. From field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) the morphology of the nanoparticles were found to be roughly spherical and within the size range of 30–50 nm. The spherical and polydispersed GNPs in the range of 10–40 nm were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. It was established that alkaline pH, 1 mM gold salt concentration and 75 °C temperature were the respective optimum parameter for biosynthesis of GNPs. Cell cytotoxicity of GNP was compared with that of normal gold salt solution on A549 cell. The A549 cell growth in presence of GNPs was found to be comparatively less toxic than the gold ion.

  14. Microbial biosynthesis of nontoxic gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Swarup, E-mail: swaruproy@klyuniv.ac.in [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Kalyani, Kalyani 741235, West Bengal (India); Das, Tapan Kumar [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Kalyani, Kalyani 741235, West Bengal (India); Maiti, Guru Prasad [Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Kalyani, Kalyani 741235, West Bengal (India); Department of Anesthesiology, Texas Tech University Health science Center, 3601 4th Street, Lubbock, TX 79430 (United States); Basu, Utpal [Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Kalyani, Kalyani 741235, West Bengal (India)

    2016-01-15

    Graphical abstract: The manuscript deals with the fungus mediated optimized biologically synthesized GNPs using Aspergillus foetidus and characterization of biosynthesized GNPs using various physico-chemical methods. The fairly stable synthesized nanoparticles have size in the range of 10–40 nm. Cytotoxicity study of biosynthesized GNPs on Human lung cancer cell line A549 showed no significant toxicity of GNPs. - Highlights: • A novel biosynthesis process of GNPs using Aspergillus foetidus. • Biosynthesized GNPs are in the range of 10–40 nm as observed from TEM. • This process of synthesis is an optimized biosynthesis process of GNPs. • Biosynthesized GNPs are noncytotoxic against A549 cell line. - Abstract: We study the extracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) using the fungal species Aspergillus foetidus. The formation of GNPs were initially monitored by visual observation and then characterized with the help of various characterization techniques. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results revealed distinctive formation of face centered cubic crystalline GNPs. From field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) the morphology of the nanoparticles were found to be roughly spherical and within the size range of 30–50 nm. The spherical and polydispersed GNPs in the range of 10–40 nm were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. It was established that alkaline pH, 1 mM gold salt concentration and 75 °C temperature were the respective optimum parameter for biosynthesis of GNPs. Cell cytotoxicity of GNP was compared with that of normal gold salt solution on A549 cell. The A549 cell growth in presence of GNPs was found to be comparatively less toxic than the gold ion.

  15. Electronic transport behavior of diameter-graded Ag nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xuewei; Yuan Zhihao

    2010-01-01

    Ag nanowires with a graded diameter in anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes were fabricated by the direct-current electrodeposition. The Ag nanowires have a graded-change in diameter from 8 to 32 nm, which is matched with the graded-change of the AAO pore diameter. Electronic transport measurements show that there is a transport behavior similar to that of a metal-semiconductor junction along the axial direction in the diameter-graded Ag nanowires. Such a novel homogeneous nanojunction will be of great fundamental and practical significance.

  16. Electronic transport behavior of diameter-graded Ag nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue Wei; Yuan, Zhi Hao

    2010-05-01

    Ag nanowires with a graded diameter in anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes were fabricated by the direct-current electrodeposition. The Ag nanowires have a graded-change in diameter from 8 to 32 nm, which is matched with the graded-change of the AAO pore diameter. Electronic transport measurements show that there is a transport behavior similar to that of a metal-semiconductor junction along the axial direction in the diameter-graded Ag nanowires. Such a novel homogeneous nanojunction will be of great fundamental and practical significance.

  17. A halogen-free synthesis of gold nanoparticles using gold(III) oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sashuk, Volodymyr; Rogaczewski, Konrad

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are one of the most used nanomaterials. They are usually synthesized by the reduction of gold(III) chloride. However, the presence of halide ions in the reaction mixture is not always welcome. In some cases, these ions have detrimental influence on the morphology and structure of resulting nanoparticles. Here, we present a simple and halogen-free procedure to prepare gold nanoparticles by reduction of gold(III) oxide in neat oleylamine. The method provides the particles with an average size below 10 nm and dispersity of tens of percent. The process of nanoparticle formation was monitored using UV–Vis spectroscopy. The structure and chemical composition of the nanoparticles was determined by SEM, XPS and EDX. We also proposed the mechanism of reduction of gold(III) oxide based on MS, IR and NMR data. Importantly, the synthetic protocol is general and applicable for the preparation of other coinage metal nanoparticles from the corresponding metal oxides. For instance, we demonstrated that the absence of halogen enables efficient alloying of metals when preparing gold–silver bimetallic nanoparticles.

  18. Enhancement of light absorption by blood to Nd:YAG laser using PEG-modified gold nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Linzhuang; Li, Dong; Chen, Bin; Dai, Yuze; Wu, Wenjuan; Wang, Guoxiang

    2016-10-01

    On the basis of the principle of selective photothermolysis, laser therapy has been the most effective treatment strategy for Port-wine stains (PWSs) caused by the expansion of dermal capillaries. Neodymium:Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser at 1064 nm wavelength has great potential for deeply buried PWS, although its application is limited because of its weak absorption by blood. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of PEG-modified gold nanorods (NRs) on the blood absorption enhancement for Nd:YAG laser. PEG-modified gold nanorods (NRs) were synthesized via the seeded growth method. Then, the effect of PEG-modified gold NRs on blood light absorbance was investigated through adding different concentration of PEG-modified gold NRs to 1 ml of blood at room temperature. Finally, the optical properties of whole mice blood with or without PEG-modified gold NRs under slow heating were investigated. The average length and width of PEG-modified gold NRs are 79.5 ± 10.5 and 13.5 ± 0.9 nm, respectively, with the aspect ratio of 5.89, and a strong absorption peak exists at ∼1050 nm in the near-infrared range. A linear correlation between the blood absorbance at 1064 nm and the amount of PEG-modified gold NRs was obtained. The absorbance at 1064 nm increased 17.6, 33.0, 48.3, and 65.4 times when 0.4, 0.8, 1.2, and 1.6 mg of PEG-modified gold NRs was added to 1 ml of blood at room temperature, respectively. After adding 0.8 mg of PEG-modified gold NRs to 1 ml of blood, blood absorbance at 1064 nm at different temperatures increased by an average of 24.0 times. After intravenously injecting PEG-modified gold NRs (0.87 mg/ml) into Sprague-Dawley mice, the blood absorbance at 1064 nm increased from 0.014 to 0.5. Our findings suggest that PEG-modified gold NRs injection is an efficient way to enhance light absorption by blood to Nd:YAG laser. Lasers Surg. Med. 48:790-803, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley

  19. Room-temperature synthesis of gold nanoparticles and nanoplates using Shewanella algae cell extract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogi, Takashi; Saitoh, Norizoh; Nomura, Toshiyuki; Konishi, Yasuhiro

    2010-01-01

    Biosynthesis of spherical gold nanoparticles and gold nanoplates was achieved at room temperature and pH 2.8 when cell extract from the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella algae was used as both a reducing and shape-controlling agent. Cell extract, prepared by sonicating a suspension of S. algae cells, was capable of reducing 1 mol/m 3 aqueous AuCl 4 - ions into elemental gold within 10 min when H 2 gas was provided as an electron donor. The time interval lapsed since the beginning of the bioreductive reaction was found to be an important factor in controlling the morphology of biogenic gold nanoparticles. After 1 h, there was a large population of well-dispersed, spherical gold nanoparticles with a mean size of 9.6 nm. Gold nanoplates with an edge length of 100 nm appeared after 6 h, and 60% of the total nanoparticle population was due to gold nanoplates with an edge length of 100-200 nm after 24 h. The yield of gold nanoplates prepared with S. algae extract was four times higher than that prepared with resting cells of S. algae. The resulting biogenic gold nanoparticle suspensions showed a large variation in color, ranging from pale pink to purple due to changes in nanoparticle morphology.

  20. Room-temperature synthesis of gold nanoparticles and nanoplates using Shewanella algae cell extract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogi, Takashi; Saitoh, Norizoh; Nomura, Toshiyuki; Konishi, Yasuhiro, E-mail: yasuhiro@chemeng.osakafu-u.ac.j [Osaka Prefecture University, Department of Chemical Engineering (Japan)

    2010-09-15

    Biosynthesis of spherical gold nanoparticles and gold nanoplates was achieved at room temperature and pH 2.8 when cell extract from the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella algae was used as both a reducing and shape-controlling agent. Cell extract, prepared by sonicating a suspension of S. algae cells, was capable of reducing 1 mol/m{sup 3} aqueous AuCl{sub 4}{sup -} ions into elemental gold within 10 min when H{sub 2} gas was provided as an electron donor. The time interval lapsed since the beginning of the bioreductive reaction was found to be an important factor in controlling the morphology of biogenic gold nanoparticles. After 1 h, there was a large population of well-dispersed, spherical gold nanoparticles with a mean size of 9.6 nm. Gold nanoplates with an edge length of 100 nm appeared after 6 h, and 60% of the total nanoparticle population was due to gold nanoplates with an edge length of 100-200 nm after 24 h. The yield of gold nanoplates prepared with S. algae extract was four times higher than that prepared with resting cells of S. algae. The resulting biogenic gold nanoparticle suspensions showed a large variation in color, ranging from pale pink to purple due to changes in nanoparticle morphology.

  1. Far- and near-field optical properties of gold nanoparticle ensembles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedyalkov, N N; Dikovska, A O; Dimitrov, I; Nikov, Ru; Atanasov, P A; Toshkova, R A; Gardeva, E G; Yossifova, L S; Alexandrov, M T

    2012-01-01

    The optical properties of gold nanoparticle clusters are presented from the point of view of their applications in biophotonics, where the absorption and scattering spectra are crucial. Generalised multiparticle Mie theory and finite difference time domain (FDTD) technique are used for theoretical description of the far- and nearfield optical properties of two dimensional nanoparticle ensembles. The system under consideration consists of spherical gold nanoparticles from 20 to 200 nm in diameter, forming 2D clusters in water. The properties of the far-field absorption and scattering spectra as a function of the cluster size, particle dimensions, and interparticle distance are investigated for ordered hexagonal structure of the particle arrays. It is found that the absorption efficiency can be shifted to the IR spectral range by increasing array size and decreasing interparticle distance. The increase in the array size also results in enhancement of the scattering efficiency while the absorption is reduced. The near-field intensity distribution is inhomogeneous over the array, as formation of zones with intensity enhancement of about two orders of magnitude is observed in specific areas. The optical properties of an ensemble whose configuration is reproduced from real experiments of gold nanoparticle deposition onto cancer cells are also presented. The results obtained can be used in designing of nanoparticle arrays with applications in biophotonics, bioimaging and photothermal therapy. (nanosystems)

  2. Far- and near-field optical properties of gold nanoparticle ensembles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nedyalkov, N N; Dikovska, A O; Dimitrov, I; Nikov, Ru; Atanasov, P A; Toshkova, R A; Gardeva, E G; Yossifova, L S; Alexandrov, M T

    2012-12-31

    The optical properties of gold nanoparticle clusters are presented from the point of view of their applications in biophotonics, where the absorption and scattering spectra are crucial. Generalised multiparticle Mie theory and finite difference time domain (FDTD) technique are used for theoretical description of the far- and nearfield optical properties of two dimensional nanoparticle ensembles. The system under consideration consists of spherical gold nanoparticles from 20 to 200 nm in diameter, forming 2D clusters in water. The properties of the far-field absorption and scattering spectra as a function of the cluster size, particle dimensions, and interparticle distance are investigated for ordered hexagonal structure of the particle arrays. It is found that the absorption efficiency can be shifted to the IR spectral range by increasing array size and decreasing interparticle distance. The increase in the array size also results in enhancement of the scattering efficiency while the absorption is reduced. The near-field intensity distribution is inhomogeneous over the array, as formation of zones with intensity enhancement of about two orders of magnitude is observed in specific areas. The optical properties of an ensemble whose configuration is reproduced from real experiments of gold nanoparticle deposition onto cancer cells are also presented. The results obtained can be used in designing of nanoparticle arrays with applications in biophotonics, bioimaging and photothermal therapy. (nanosystems)

  3. Terminalia chebula mediated green and rapid synthesis of gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan Kumar, Kesarla; Mandal, Badal Kumar; Sinha, Madhulika; Krishnakumar, Varadhan

    2012-02-01

    Biologically inspired experimental process in synthesising nanoparticles is of great interest in present scenario. Biosynthesis of nanoparticles is considered to be one of the best green techniques in synthesising metal nanoparticles. Here, an in situ green biogenic synthesis of gold nanoparticles using aqueous extracts of Terminalia chebula as reducing and stabilizing agent is reported. Gold nanoparticles were confirmed by surface plasmon resonance in the range of 535 nm using UV-visible spectrometry. TEM analysis revealed that the morphology of the particles thus formed contains anisotropic gold nanoparticles with size ranging from 6 to 60 nm. Hydrolysable tannins present in the extract of T. chebula are responsible for reductions and stabilization of gold nanoparticles. Antimicrobial activity of gold nanoparticles showed better activity towards gram positive S. aureus compared to gram negative E. coli using standard well diffusion method.

  4. Establishment of gold-quartz standard GQS-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, Hugh T.; Marinenko, John; McLane, John E.

    1969-01-01

    A homogeneous gold-quartz standard, GQS-1, was prepared from a heterogeneous gold-bearing quartz by chemical treatment. The concentration of gold in GQS-1 was determined by both instrumental neutron activation analysis and radioisotope dilution analysis to be 2.61?0.10 parts per million. Analysis of 10 samples of the standard by both instrumental neutron activation analysis and radioisotope dilution analysis failed to reveal heterogeneity within the standard. The precision of the analytical methods, expressed as standard error, was approximately 0.1 part per million. The analytical data were also used to estimate the average size of gold particles. The chemical treatment apparently reduced the average diameter of the gold particles by at least an order of magnitude and increased the concentration of gold grains by a factor of at least 4,000.

  5. Multifunctional material based on ionic transition metal complexes and gold-silica nanoparticles: synthesis and photophysical characterization for application in imaging and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardi, Loredana; Martini, Matteo; Tillement, Olivier; Sancey, Lucie; Perriat, Pascal; Ghedini, Mauro; Szerb, Elisabeta I; Yadav, Yogesh J; La Deda, Massimo

    2014-11-01

    A new combination of luminescent ionic transition-metal complexes (M = Ru(II) or Ir(III)) with gold silica-based nanoparticles (GSNPs) gives a promising nanomaterial for application in biomedical fields. Herein we report the synthesis and the photophysical properties of Ru(II) and Ir(III) complexes doped gold core-polysiloxane shell particles prepared by microemulsion method and characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy, Dynamic Light Scattering and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The cytotoxicity and photodynamic activity of the obtained 50 nm-diameter nanoparticles were evaluated in vitro, providing noteworthy results. Furthermore, their intrinsic phosphorescence allows the localization of the photosensitizing nanoparticles into the cytosol of tumor cells by fluorescence confocal microscope. These valuable features designate them as multifunctional nanoplatforms for theranostic purposes.

  6. Quantum Electrostatic Model for Optical Properties of Nanoscale Gold Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Haoliang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The optical properties of thin gold films with thickness varying from 2.5 nm to 30 nm are investigated. Due to the quantum size effect, the optical constants of the thin gold film deviate from the Drude model for bulk material as film thickness decreases, especially around 2.5 nm, where the electron energy level becomes discrete. A theory based on the self-consistent solution of the Schrödinger equation and the Poisson equation is proposed and its predictions agree well with experimental results.

  7. Photoluminescence enhancement of dye-doped nanoparticles by surface plasmon resonance effects of gold colloidal nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Viet Ha; Nghiem, Thi Ha Lien; Tran, Hong Nhung; Fort, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    Due to the energy transfer from surface plasmons, the fluorescence of fluorophores near metallic nanostructures can be enhanced. This effect has been intensively studied recently for biosensor applications. This work reports on the luminescence enhancement of 100 nm Cy3 dye-doped polystyrene nanoparticles by energy transfer from surface plasmons of gold colloidal nanoparticles with sizes of 20 and 100 nm. Optimal luminescence enhancement of the fluorophores has been observed in the mixture with 20 nm gold nanoparticles. This can be attributed to the resonance energy transfer from gold nanoparticles to the fluorophore beads. The interaction between the fluorophores and gold particles is attributed to far-field interaction

  8. Kinetic Assembly of Near-IR Active Gold Nanoclusters using Weakly Adsorbing Polymers to Control Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Jasmine M.; Murthy, Avinash K.; Ingram, Davis R.; Nguyen, Robin; Sokolov, Konstantin V.; Johnston, Keith P.

    2013-01-01

    Clusters of metal nanoparticles with an overall size less than 100 nm and high metal loadings for strong optical functionality, are of interest in various fields including microelectronics, sensors, optoelectronics and biomedical imaging and therapeutics. Herein we assemble ~5 nm gold particles into clusters with controlled size, as small as 30 nm and up to 100 nm, which contain only small amounts of polymeric stabilizers. The assembly is kinetically controlled with weakly adsorbing polymers, PLA(2K)-b-PEG(10K)-b-PLA(2K) or PEG (MW = 3350), by manipulating electrostatic, van der Waals (VDW), steric, and depletion forces. The cluster size and optical properties are tuned as a function of particle volume fractions and polymer/gold ratios to modulate the interparticle interactions. The close spacing between the constituent gold nanoparticles and high gold loadings (80–85% w/w gold) produce a strong absorbance cross section of ~9×10−15 m2 in the NIR at 700 nm. This morphology results from VDW and depletion attractive interactions that exclude the weakly adsorbed polymeric stabilizer from the cluster interior. The generality of this kinetic assembly platform is demonstrated for gold nanoparticles with a range of surface charges from highly negative to neutral, with the two different polymers. PMID:20361735

  9. The green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using the ethanol extract pf black tea and its tannin free fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banoee, M.; Mokhtari, N.; Akhavan Sepahi, A.; Jafari Fesharaki, P.; Monsef-Esfahani, H. R.; Ehsanfar, Z.; Khoshayand, M. R.; Shahverdi, A. R.

    2010-01-01

    In this research the ethanol extract of black tea and its tannin free fraction used for green synthesis of gold nanoparticles. All the extracts were used separately for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles through the reduction of aqueous AuCl 4 - . Transmission electron microscopy and visible absorption spectroscopy confirmed the reduction of gold ions to gold nanoparticles. The ethanol extract of black tea and its tannin free ethanol extract produced gold nanoparticles in the size ranges of 2.5-27.5 nm and 1.25-17.5 nm with an average size of 10 nm and 3 nm, respectively. The prepared colloid gold nanoparticles, using the ethanol extract of black tea, did not show the appropriate stability during storage time (24 hours) at 4 d eg C . In contrast, gold colloids, which were synthesized by a tannin free fraction showed no particle aggregation during short and long storage times at the same conditions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the rapid synthesis of gold nanoparticles using ethanol extract of black tea and its tannin free fraction.

  10. Optical properties of gold nanoparticle embedded Er{sup 3+} doped lead–tellurite glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sazali, E.S.; Sahar, M.R., E-mail: mrahim057@gmail.com; Ghoshal, S.K.; Arifin, R.; Rohani, M.S.; Awang, A.

    2014-09-01

    Highlights: • Er{sup 3+} doped lead–tellurite glass with and without GNPs has been synthesized. • The existence of Au NPs with average diameter of 6.09 nm dispersed in glass matrix. • Plasmonic effect from Au NPs exert prominent enhancement in UC. - Abstract: Enhanced optical properties of rare earth doped glasses for sundry applications are current challenges in materials science and technology. Series of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) embedded Er{sup 3+} doped TeO{sub 2}–PbO–PbO{sub 2} glasses are synthesized and the influences of GNPs on the optical behaviors are examined. XRD spectra confirm the amorphous nature of all the glass samples. TEM images display the existence of a broad distribution of spherical crystalline GNPs with average diameter ∼6.09 nm. UV–Vis–NIR spectra reveal seven absorption bands centered at 490, 526, 551, 652, 800, 982 and 1520 nm due to the absorptions from the ground state to different excited states. Two surface plasmon resonance bands of gold (Au{sup 0}) are evidenced at 556 and 585 nm. The sizable decrease in the optical band gap (2.82–1.09 eV) with the increase of GNPs concentration from 0.025 to 0.1 mol% is attributed to the generation of higher NPs nucleation sites. The intensity parameters related to the radiative transitions within 4f{sup n} configuration of Er{sup 3+} ion are determined and analyzed using Judd–Ofelt (J–O) theory. The room temperature up-conversion emission spectra under 779 nm excitations shows three peaks centered at 520, 550 and 660 nm corresponding to the transitions from {sup 2}H{sub 11/2}, {sup 4}S{sub 3/2} and {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} excited states to {sup 4}I{sub 15/2} ground state. Significant enhancement in the luminescence intensity is primarily ascribed to surface plasmon resonance mediated strong local field effect of GNPs in the proximity Er{sup 3+} ion and radiative energy transfer. The maximum enhancement are evident for green and red bands at 0.05 mol% of Au. The stimulated

  11. Electrosynthesis and characterization of gold nanoparticles for electronic capacitance sensing of pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cioffi, Nicola; Colaianni, Lorenzo; Ieva, Eliana; Pilolli, Rosa; Ditaranto, Nicoletta; Angione, Maria Daniela; Cotrone, Serafina; Buchholt, Kristina; Spetz, Anita Lloyd; Sabbatini, Luigia; Torsi, Luisa

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, gold/surfactant core/shell colloidal nanoparticles with a controlled morphology and chemical composition have been obtained via the so-called sacrificial anode technique, carried out in galvanostatic mode. As synthesized Au-NPs had an average core diameter comprised between 4 and 8 nm, as a function of the electrochemical process experimental conditions. The UV-Vis characterization of gold nanocolloids showed clear spectroscopic size effects, affecting both the position and width of the nanoparticle surface plasmon resonance peak. The nanomaterial surface spectroscopic characterization showed the presence of two chemical states, namely nanostructured Au(0) (its abundance being higher than 90%) and Au(I). Au-NPs were then deposited on the top of a capacitive field effect sensor and subjected to a mild thermal annealing aiming at removing the excess of stabilizing surfactant molecules. Au-NP sensors were tested towards some gases found in automotive gas exhausts. The sensing device showed the largest response towards NO x , and much smaller - if any - responses towards interferent species such as NH 3 , H 2 , CO, and hydrocarbons.

  12. Third-order nonlinear optical response of colloidal gold nanoparticles prepared by sputtering deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Hemerson P. S.; Alencar, Márcio A. R. C.; Hickmann, Jandir M. [Optics and Materials Group–OPTMA, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, CAIXA POSTAL 2051, 57061-970 Maceió (Brazil); Wender, Heberton [Brazilian Synchrotron National Laboratory (LNLS), CNPEM, Rua Giuseppe Máximo Scolfaro 10.000, 13083-970 Campinas (Brazil); Department of Physics, Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso do Sul, 79070-900, Campo Grande (Brazil); Teixeira, Sergio R. [Institute of Physics, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, 91501-970, Porto Alegre (Brazil); Dupont, Jairton [Laboratory of Molecular Catalysis, Institute of Chemistry, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, 91501-970, Porto Alegre (Brazil)

    2013-11-14

    The nonlinear optical responses of gold nanoparticles dispersed in castor oil produced by sputtering deposition were investigated, using the thermally managed Z-scan technique. Particles with spherical shape and 2.6 nm of average diameter were obtained and characterized by transmission electron microscopy and small angle X-ray scattering. This colloid was highly stable, without the presence of chemical impurities, neither stabilizers. It was observed that this system presents a large refractive third-order nonlinear response and a negligible nonlinear absorption. Moreover, the evaluation of the all-optical switching figures of merit demonstrated that the colloidal nanoparticles prepared by sputtering deposition have a good potential for the development of ultrafast photonic devices.

  13. Application of titanium oxide nanotube films containing gold nanoparticles for the electroanalytical determination of ascorbic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseini, Mir Ghasem, E-mail: mg-hosseini@tabrizu.ac.ir; Faraji, Masoud; Momeni, Mohamad Mohsen

    2011-03-31

    Au/TiO{sub 2}/Ti electrodes have been prepared by galvanic deposition of gold particles on TiO{sub 2} nanotube substrates. Titanium oxide nanotubes are fabricated by anodizing titanium foil in a Dimethyl Sulfoxide electrolyte containing fluoride. The scanning electron microscopy results indicated that gold particles are homogeneously deposited on the surface of TiO{sub 2} nanotubes. The TiO{sub 2} layers consist of individual tubes of about 40-80 nm diameters. The electro-catalytic behavior of Au/TiO{sub 2}/Ti and flat gold electrodes for the ascorbic acid electro-oxidation was studied by cyclic voltammetry. The results showed that the flat gold electrode is not suitable for the oxidation of ascorbic acid. However, the Au/TiO{sub 2}/Ti electrodes are shown to possess catalytic activity toward the oxidation reaction. Catalytic oxidation peak current showed a linear dependence on the ascorbic acid concentration and a linear calibration curve is obtained in the concentration range of 1-5 mM of ascorbic acid. Also, determination of ascorbic acid in real samples was evaluated. The obtained results were found to be satisfactory. Finally the effects of interference on the detection of ascorbic acid were investigated.

  14. Optical spectroscopy of iodine-doped single-wall carbon nanotubes of different diameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonkikh, Alexander A.; Obraztsova, Elena D.; Pozharov, Anatolii S.; Obraztsova, Ekaterina A.; Belkin, Alexey V.

    2012-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes with polyiodide chains inside are interesting from two points of view. According to predictions, first, the iodine structure type inside the nanotube is determined by the nanotube geometry. Second, after iodination all nanotubes become metallic. In this work, we made an attempt to check both predictions. To study the diameter-dependent properties we have taken for a gas-phase iodination the pristine single-wall carbon nanotubes grown by three different techniques providing a different average diameter: a chemical vapor deposition with a Co/Mo catalyst (CoMoCat) with a diameter range (0.6-1.3) nm, a high-pressure CO decomposition (HiPCO) - a diameter range (0.8-1.5) nm, and an aerosol technique with Fe catalyst - a diameter range (1.3-2.0) nm. The Raman spectra have shown a complication of the polyiodide chain structure while the nanotube diameter increased. The optical spectroscopy data (a suppression of E 11 band in the UV-Vis-NIR absorption spectrum) have confirmed the theoretical prediction about transformation of all nanotubes into metallic phase after doping. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Controlled self-decoration of Mo6SyIz (8.2 ≤ y + z ≤ 10) nanowires and their transformation to MoS2 nanotubes with gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovič, Andrej; Vengust, Damjan; Vilfan, Mojca; Mrzel, Aleš

    2013-01-01

    Nanowires and nanotubes decorated with gold nanoparticles are known for their excellent sensing and catalytic properties. However, the decoration of transition–metal dichalcogenide nanotubes can be very complex. Here we report on a simple procedure that enables efficient production and purification of thin bundles of Mo 6 S y I z (8.2 ≤ y + z ≤ 10) nanowires decorated with gold nanoparticles and their transformation to gold-decorated MoS 2 nanotubes. We isolated several hundred milligrams of nanowire bundles that were several microns long with average diameters of around 40 nm, and formed a stable dispersion in water without added surfactants. Gold nanoparticles were directly deposited on the nanowire bundles either in a solution or on a substrate at room temperature in a single-step reaction without any additional reducing reagents. The number of gold nanoparticles on a nanowire bundle is controlled by changing the concentration of chloroauric acid HAuCl 4 ·3H 2 O in the solution. Since the nanowires can serve as precursor crystals for fabrication of nanotubes, we were able to transform gold-decorated nanowires and produce gold-decorated MoS 2 nanotubes

  16. A thin gold coated hydrogen heat pipe -cryogenic target for external experiments at cosy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Bary, M.; Abdel-Samad, S.; Elawadi, G.A.; Kilian, K.; Ritman, J.

    2008-01-01

    A gravity assisted Gold Coated Heat Pipe (GCHP) with 5-mm diameter has been developed and tested to cool a liquid hydrogen target for external beam experiments at COSY. The need for a narrow target diameter leads us to study the effect of reducing the heat pipe diameter to 5 mm instead of 7 mm, to study the effect of coating the external surface of the heat pipe by a polished gold layer (to decrease the radiation heat load), and to study the effect of using the heat pipe without using 20 layers super isolation around it (aluminized Mylar foil) to keep the target diameter as small as possible. The developed gold coated heat pipe was tested with 20 layers of super isolation and without. The operating characteristics for both conditions were compared to show the advantages and disadvantages

  17. Template assisted synthesis and optical properties of gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fodor, Petru; Lasalvia, Vincenzo

    2009-03-01

    A hybrid nanofabrication method (interference lithography + self assembly) was explored for the fabrication of arrays of gold nanoparticles. To ensure the uniformity of the nanoparticles, a template assisted synthesis was used in which the gold is electrodeposited in the pores of anodized aluminum membranes. The spacing between the pores and their ordering is controlled in the first fabrication step of the template in which laser lithography and metal deposition are used to produce aluminum films with controlled strain profiles. The diameter of the pores produced after anodizing the aluminum film in acidic solution determines the diameter of the gold particles, while their aspect ratio is controlled through the deposition time. Optical absorbance spectroscopy is used to evaluate the ability to tune the nanoparticles plasmon resonance spectra through control over their size and aspect ratio.

  18. Sensitive flotation-spectrophotometric determination of gold, based on the gold(I)-iodide-methylene blue system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marczenko, Z; Jankowski, K

    1985-04-01

    The gold(I)-iodide-Methylene Blue (MB) system is suitable for flotation separation and spectrophotometric determination of gold. Under the optimum conditions [(MB(+))(AuI(2)(-))].3[(MB(+))(I(3)(-))] is formed, and floated with cyclohexane. The product is dissolved in methanol and its absorbance measured. The molar absorptivity is 3.4 x 10(5)1.mole(-1).cm(-1) at 655 nm. The proposed method is more than three times as sensitive as the Rhodamine B method. Pt, Pd, Ag and Hg interfere seriously, and Ir, Rh, Bi and Cd to a smaller extent. Preliminary separation of gold by precipitation with tellurium as a collector is recommended. The method has been applied to determination of gold traces (about 1 x 10(-4)%) in a copper sample.

  19. Gold island films on indium tin oxide for localized surface plasmon sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szunerits, Sabine; Praig, Vera G; Manesse, Mael; Boukherroub, Rabah

    2008-01-01

    Mechanically, chemically and optically stable gold island films were prepared on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates by direct thermal evaporation of thin gold films (2-6 nm) without the need for pre- or post-coating. The effect of mild thermal annealing (150 deg. C, 12 h) or short high temperature annealing (500 deg. C, 1 min) on the morphology of the gold nanostructures was investigated. ITO covered with 2 nm gold nanoislands and annealed at 500 deg. C for 1 min was investigated for its ability to detect the adsorption of biotinylated bovine serum albumin using local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), and its subsequent molecular recognition of avidin

  20. Towards the use of protein A-tagged gold nanoparticles for signal amplification of electrochemical immunosensors in virus detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huy Tran, Quang; Thuy Nguyen, Thanh; Chung Pham, Van; Hong Hanh Nguyen, Thi; Tuan Mai, Anh

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we represent a study on the potential use of protein A-tagged gold nanoparticles applied for signal amplification of electrochemical immunosensors. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were synthesized by the chemical reduction of tetrachloroauric (III) acid trihydrate using sodium ascorbate, and then tagged with protein A (PrA) via ultracentrifugation. UV-Vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used to verify the characteristics of formed GNPs/PrA complex. The analyzed results indicate that GNPs were found spherically, homogeneously, and with an average diameter of about 10 nm. Immunoelectron microscopy was then used to investigate the bioactivity of the GNPs/PrA complex in solution by the effective binding of GNPs to viral particles. Scanning electron and fluorescence microscopies were also used to investigate the distribution and the bioactivity of the GNPs/PrA complex on the surface of the interdigitated sensor. Consequently, this study provided some assumptions of the potential application of protein A-tagged gold nanoparticles for signal amplification of electrochemical immunosensors in virus detection from clinical samples

  1. Organization of Gold Nanorods in Cylinder-Forming Block Copolymer Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Guoquian; Riggleman, Robert; Composto, Russell

    2012-02-01

    The addition of gold nanorods (AuNRs) to copolymer films can impart unique optical and electrical properties. To take full advantage of this system, the AuNRs must be dispersed in a self-organizing copolymer that directs the orientation of the anisotropic particle. In the present work, AuNRs with aspect ratio 3.6 (8 nm x 29 nm) are grafted with poly(2-vinyl pyridine) (P2VP) brushes and dispersed in a cylindrical forming diblock copolymer of polystyrene-b-P2VP (180K-b-77K, 29.6 wt% P2VP). Films are spun cast and solvent annealed in chloroform to produce a perpendicular cylindrical morphology at the surface. Using TEM and UV-ozone etching combined with AFM, the AuNRs are well dispersed and co-locate (top down view) with the P2VP cylinders, ˜50nm diameter. However, the AuNRs mainly lie parallel to the surface indicating that they likely locate at the junction created at the intersection between P2VP cylinders and P2VP brush layer adjacent to the silicon oxide surface. Self-consistent field calculations of the Au:PS-b-P2VP morphology as well as the effect of adding P2VP homopolymer to the nanocomposite will be discussed.

  2. Thermionic field emission in gold nitride Schottky nanodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyropoulos-Antonakakis, N.; Sarantopoulou, E.; Kollia, Z.; Samardžija, Z.; Kobe, S.; Cefalas, A. C.

    2012-11-01

    We report on the thermionic field emission and charge transport properties of gold nitride nanodomains grown by pulsed laser deposition with a molecular fluorine laser at 157 nm. The nanodomains are sandwiched between the metallic tip of a conductive atomic force microscope and a thin gold layer forming thus a metal-semiconductor-metal junction. Although the limited existing data in the literature indicate that gold nitride was synthesized previously with low efficiency, poor stability, and metallic character; in this work, it is shown that gold nitride nanodomains exhibit semiconducting behavior and the metal-semiconductor-metal contact can be modeled with the back-to-back Schottky barrier model. From the experimental I-V curves, the main charge carrier transport process is found to be thermionic field emission via electron tunneling. The rectifying, near symmetric and asymmetric current response of nanocontacts is related to the effective contact area of the gold nitride nanodomains with the metals. A lower limit for the majority charge carriers concentration at the boundaries of nanodomains is also established using the full depletion approximation, as nanodomains with thickness as low as 6 nm were found to be conductive. Current rectification and charge memory effects are also observed in "quite small" conductive nanodomains (6-10 nm) due to stored charges. Indeed, charges near the surface are identified as inversion domains in the phase shift mapping performed with electrostatic force microscopy and are attributed to charge trapping at the boundaries of the nanodomains.

  3. Biosynthesis of Silver and Gold Crystals Using Grapefruit Extract

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Long; Wang Jianli; Wang Hongfeng; Qi Zhaopeng; Zheng Yuchuan; Wang Junbo; Pan Le; Chang Guanru; Yang Yongmei

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, biological synthesis of silver and gold crystals using grapefruit extract is reported. On treatment of aqueous solutions of silver nitrate and chloroauric acid with grapefruit extract, the formation of stable silver and gold particles at high concentrations is observed to occur. The silver particles formed are quasi-spherical or irregular with sizes ranging from several hundred nanometers to several microns. The gold quasi-spheres with holes on surfaces and with diameters rangi...

  4. Effect of concentration of imperata cylindrica L leaf extraction synthesis process of gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwan Syahjoko Saputra; Yoki Yulizar; Sudirman

    2018-01-01

    Gold Nanoparticles (Gold NPs) successful was performed using HAuCl 4 precursor as Au 3+ ion source with 7 x 10 -4 M concentration. There search aims to knows effect of concentration variation of Imperata cylindrica L leaf extract on synthesis process of gold nanoparticles. There search used of green synthesis method. Colloid of nanoparticles which is formed in analyzed using UV - Vis Spectrophotometer, FT-IR Spectroscopy, PSA, PZC, XRD and TEM. The results of synthesis showed the best concentration of Imperata cilyndrica L leaf extract at 3.46 %, happen a shift of wave length at UV-Vis from 216 nm to 530 nm with 1.779 absorbance value. The PSA analysis showed a particle size of 51.87 nm and a PZC value of -19.2 mV. The result of FT - IR indicated a shift of wave number in the hydroxyl group from 3354 cm -1 to 3390 cm -1 and showed a interaction of hydroxyl group at imperata cylindrica L leaf extract with Au 3+ ion. TEM analysis shows the morphology of Gold NPs that spherical shape with a particle size of 20 nm. XRD calculation results show crystallite size of gold nano particles is 15.47 nm. (author)

  5. Size and shape-dependent cytotoxicity profile of gold nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woźniak, Anna; Malankowska, Anna; Nowaczyk, Grzegorz; Grześkowiak, Bartosz F; Tuśnio, Karol; Słomski, Ryszard; Zaleska-Medynska, Adriana; Jurga, Stefan

    2017-06-01

    Metallic nanoparticles, in particular gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), offer a wide spectrum of applications in biomedicine. A crucial issue is their cytotoxicity, which depends greatly on various factors, including morphology of nanoparticles. Because metallic nanoparticles have an effect on cell membrane integrity, their shape and size may affect the viability of cells, due to their different geometries as well as physical and chemical interactions with cell membranes. Variations in the size and shape of gold nanoparticles may indicate particular nanoparticle morphologies that provide strong cytotoxicity effects. Synthesis of different sized and shaped bare AuNPs was performed with spherical (~ 10 nm), nanoflowers (~ 370 nm), nanorods (~ 41 nm), nanoprisms (~ 160 nm) and nanostars (~ 240 nm) morphologies. These nanostructures were characterized and interacting with cancer (HeLa) and normal (HEK293T) cell lines and cell viability tests were performed by WST-1 tests and fluorescent live/dead cell imaging experiments. It was shown that various shapes and sizes of gold nanostructures may affect the viability of the cells. Gold nanospheres and nanorods proved to be more toxic than star, flower and prism gold nanostructures. This may be attributed to their small size and aggregation process. This is the first report concerning a comparison of cytotoxic profile in vitro with a wide spectrum of bare AuNPs morphology. The findings show their possible use in biomedical applications.

  6. Extracellular biosynthesis of monodispersed gold nanoparticles by a SAM capping route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Li; Lin Zhonghua; Gu Pingying; Zhou Jianzhang; Yao Bingxing; Chen Guoliang; Fu Jinkun

    2009-01-01

    Monodispersed gold nanoparticles capped with a self-assembled monolayer of dodecanethiol were biosynthesized extracellularly by an efficient, simple, and environmental friendly procedure, which involved the use of Bacillus megatherium D01 as the reducing agent and the use of dodecanethiol as the capping ligand at 26 o C. The kinetics of gold nanoparticle formation was followed by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and UV-vis spectroscopy. It was shown that reaction time was an important parameter in controlling the morphology of gold nanoparticles. The effect of thiol on the shape, size, and dispersity of gold nanoparticles was also studied. The results showed that the presence of thiol during the biosynthesis could induce the formation of small size gold nanoparticles (<2.5 nm), hold the shape of spherical nanoparticles, and promote the monodispersity of nanoparticles. Through the modulation of reaction time and the use of thiol, monodispersed spherical gold nanoparticles capped with thiol of 1.9 ± 0.8 nm size were formed by using Bacillus megatherium D01.

  7. Extracellular biosynthesis of monodispersed gold nanoparticles by a SAM capping route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen Li [Xiamen University, Department of Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China); Lin Zhonghua [Xiamen University, State Key Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces (China); Gu Pingying [Xiamen University, Department of Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China); Zhou Jianzhang [Xiamen University, State Key Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces (China); Yao Bingxing [Xiamen University, School of Life Sciences (China); Chen Guoliang; Fu Jinkun, E-mail: wenli_1976@163.co [Xiamen University, Department of Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China)

    2009-02-15

    Monodispersed gold nanoparticles capped with a self-assembled monolayer of dodecanethiol were biosynthesized extracellularly by an efficient, simple, and environmental friendly procedure, which involved the use of Bacillus megatherium D01 as the reducing agent and the use of dodecanethiol as the capping ligand at 26 {sup o}C. The kinetics of gold nanoparticle formation was followed by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and UV-vis spectroscopy. It was shown that reaction time was an important parameter in controlling the morphology of gold nanoparticles. The effect of thiol on the shape, size, and dispersity of gold nanoparticles was also studied. The results showed that the presence of thiol during the biosynthesis could induce the formation of small size gold nanoparticles (<2.5 nm), hold the shape of spherical nanoparticles, and promote the monodispersity of nanoparticles. Through the modulation of reaction time and the use of thiol, monodispersed spherical gold nanoparticles capped with thiol of 1.9 {+-} 0.8 nm size were formed by using Bacillus megatherium D01.

  8. Spontaneous and controlled-diameter synthesis of single-walled and few-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Shuhei; Lojindarat, Supanat; Kawamoto, Takahiro; Matsumura, Yukihiko; Charinpanitkul, Tawatchai

    2018-05-01

    In this study, we explored the spontaneous and controlled-diameter growth of carbon nanotubes. We evaluated the effects of catalyst density, reduction time, and a number of catalyst coating on the substrate (for multi-walled carbon nanotubes) on the diameter of single-walled carbon nanotubes and the number of layers in few-walled carbon nanotubes. Increasing the catalyst density and reduction time increased the diameters of the carbon nanotubes, with the average diameter increasing from 1.05 nm to 1.86 nm for single-walled carbon nanotubes. Finally, we succeeded in synthesizing a significant double-walled carbon nanotube population of 24%.

  9. Effect of pH on ionic liquid mediated synthesis of gold nanoparticle using elaiseguineensis (palm oil) kernel extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irfan, Muhammad; Ahmad, Tausif; Moniruzzaman, Muhammad; Abdullah, Bawadi

    2017-05-01

    This study was conducted for microwave assisted synthesis of stable gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) by reduction of chloroauric acid with Elaeis Guineensis (palm oil) kernel (POK) extract which was prepared in aqueous solution of ionic liquid, [EMIM][OAc], 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate. Effect of initial pH of reaction mixture (3.5 - 8.5) was observed on SPR absorbance, maximum wavelength (λmax ) and size distribution of AuNPs. Change of pH of reaction mixture from acidic to basic region resulted in appearance of strong SPR absorption peaks and blue shifting of λmax from 533 nm to 522 nm. TEM analysis revealed the formation of predominantly spherical AuNPs with mean diameter of 8.51 nm. Presence of reducing moieties such as flavonoids, phenolic and carboxylic groups in POK extract was confirmed by FTIR analysis. Colloidal solution of AuNPs was remained stable at room temperature and insignificant difference in zeta value was recorded within experimental tenure of 4 months.

  10. In situ growth of hollow gold-silver nanoshells within porous silica offers tunable plasmonic extinctions and enhanced colloidal stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chien-Hung; Jamison, Andrew C; Rittikulsittichai, Supparesk; Lee, Tai-Chou; Lee, T Randall

    2014-11-26

    Porous silica-coated hollow gold-silver nanoshells were successfully synthesized utilizing a procedure where the porous silica shell was produced prior to the transformation of the metallic core, providing enhanced control over the structure/composition of the bimetallic hollow core. By varying the reaction time and the precise amount of gold salt solution added to a porous silica-coated silver-core template solution, composite nanoparticles were tailored to reveal a readily tunable surface plasmon resonance that could be centered across the visible and near-IR spectral regions (∼445-800 nm). Characterization by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy revealed that the synthetic methodology afforded particles having uniform composition, size, and shape. The optical properties were evaluated by absorption/extinction spectroscopy. The stability of colloidal solutions of our composite nanoparticles as a function of pH was also investigated, revealing that the nanoshells remain intact over a wide range of conditions (i.e., pH 2-10). The facile tunability, enhanced stability, and relatively small diameter of these composite particles (∼110 nm) makes them promising candidates for use in tumor ablation or as photothermal drug-delivery agents.

  11. UV luminescence of dendrimer-encapsulated gold nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Hyeong Seop; Kim, Jun Myung; Sohn, So Hyeong; Han, Noh Soo; Park, Seung Min [Dept. of Chemistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Size-dependent luminescence color is one of the interesting properties of metal nanocrystals, whose sizes are in the dimension of the Fermi wavelength of an electron. Despite the short Fermi wavelength of electrons in gold (-0.7 nm), luminescence of gold nanoclusters has been reported to range from the near-infrared to near-ultraviolet, depending on the number of atoms in the nanoclusters. The photoluminescence of G4-OH (Au) obtained by the excitation of 266 nm showed UV emission in addition to the well-known blue emission. The higher intensity and red-shifted emission of the gold nanoclusters was distinguished from the emission of dendrimers. The UV emission at 352 nm matched the emission energy of Au{sub 4} in the spherical jellium model, rather than the planar Au{sub 8}, which supported the emission of Au{sub 4} formed in G4-OH. Despite the change of [HAuCl{sub 4} ]/[G4-OH], the relative population between Au{sub 4} and Au{sub 8} was similar in G4-OH(Au), which indicated that the closed electronic and geometric structures stabilized the magic number of Au{sub 4}.

  12. A thin gold coated hydrogen heat pipe-cryogenic target for external experiments at COSY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Bary, M.; Abdel-Samad, S.; Elawadi, G. A.; Kilian, K.; Ritman, J.

    2009-05-01

    A gravity assisted Gold coated heat pipe (GCHP) with 5-mm diameter has been developed and tested to cool a liquid hydrogen target for external beam experiments at COSY. The need for a narrow target diameter leads us to study the effect of reducing the heat pipe diameter to 5 mm instead of 7 mm, to study the effect of coating the external surface of the heat pipe by a shiny gold layer (to decrease the radiation heat load), and to study the effect of using the heat pipe without using 20 layers of' super-insulation around it (aluminized Mylar foil) to keep the target diameter as small as possible. The developed gold coated heat pipe was tested with 20 layers of super-insulation (WI) and without super-insulation (WOI). The operating characteristics for both conditions were compared to show the advantages and disadvantages.

  13. Ionic liquid functionalized synthesis of gold nanoparticles in response to Elaise Guineensis (oil palm) leaves amount

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irfan, Muhammad; Ahmad, Tausif; Moniruzzaman, Muhammad; Abdullah, Bawadi

    2018-05-01

    A modified bio-synthesis method was developed to synthesize gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using Elaeis Guineensis (oil palm) leaves (OPL) extract prepared in aqueous solution of IL, [EMIM][OAc]. The strong interaction and capping ability of IL at surface of AuNPs was examined through XPS analysis. The effect of OPL powder to liquid (P/L) ratio on absorbance, maximum wavelength (λmax) and size variation of AuNPs was observed through UV-vis. TEM analysis indicated predominantly spherical shape AuNPs with mean diameter of 15.76 nm. This study exhibits a rapid, cheap and efficient method to achieve stable AuNPs using bio-waste material.

  14. Light-induced switching of 1,3-diazabicyclo-[3.1.0]hex-3-enes on gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodi, Nosrat O.; Ahmadi, Narges Khatoon; Ghavidast, Atefeh

    2018-05-01

    The fabrication of hybrid nanoassemblies involving sulfure-modified photochromic derivatives (SMPDs) on the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) was carried out to investigate the influence of AuNPs surface plasmons on the SMPDs photoisomerization. The size of the AuNPs obtained was <30 nm in average diameter. Upon irradiation by alternating UV and Vis light, a reversible photochemical isomerization along with bathochromic shift in the absorption band takes place on the surface of the AuNPs in analogy with free SMPDs in solutions. Furthermore, in some cases a significant quenching of photochromic reactivity was observed due to the excited energy transfer from the photochromic molecules to the AuNPs core.

  15. Controlled Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles Using Aspergillus terreus IF0 and Its Antibacterial Potential against Gram Negative Pathogenic Bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priyadarshini, E.; Pradhan, N.; Sukla, L.B.; Panda, P.K.; Pradhan, N.

    2014-01-01

    Biosynthesis of monodispersed nanoparticles, along with determination of potential responsible biomolecules, is the major bottleneck in the area of bio nano technology research. The present study focuses on an eco friendly, ambient temperature protocol for size controlled synthesis of gold nanoparticles, using the fungus Aspergillus terreus IF0. Gold nanoparticles were formed immediately, with the addition of chloroauric acid to the aqueous fungal extract. Synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, TEM-EDX, and XRD analysis. Particle diameter and dispersity of nanoparticles were controlled by varying the ph of the fungal extract. At ph 10, the average size of the synthesized particles was in the range of 10–19 nm. Dialysis to obtain high and low molecular weight fraction followed by FTIR analysis revealed that biomolecules larger than 12 kDa and having –CH, –NH, and –SH functional groups were responsible for bioreduction and stabilization. In addition, the synthesized gold nanoparticles were found to be selectively bactericidal against the pathogenic gram negative bacteria, Escherichia coli.

  16. Fabrication of aerogel capsule, bromine-doped capsule, and modified gold cone in modified target for the Fast Ignition Realization Experiment (FIREX) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Keiji; Yang, H.; Norimatsu, T.; Azechi, H.; Belkada, F.; Fujimoto, Y.; Fujimura, T.; Fujioka, K.; Fujioka, S.; Homma, H.; Ito, F.; Iwamoto, A.; Jitsuno, T.; Kaneyasu, Y.; Nakai, M.; Nemoto, N.; Saika, H.; Shimoyama, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Yamanaka, K.; Mima, K.

    2009-09-01

    The development of target fabrication for the Fast Ignition Realization EXperiment (FIREX) Project is described in this paper. For the first stage of the FIREX Project (FIREX-I), the previously designed target has been modified by using a bromine-doped ablator and coating the inner gold cone with a low-density material. A high-quality bromine-doped capsule without vacuoles was fabricated from bromine-doped deuterated polystyrene. The gold surface was coated with a low-density material by electrochemical plating. For the cryogenic fuel target, a brand new type of aerogel material, phloroglucinol/formaldehyde (PF), was investigated and encapsulated to meet the specifications of 500 µm diameter and 20 µm thickness, with 30 nm nanopores. Polystyrene-based low-density materials were investigated and the relationship between the crosslinker content and the nanopore structure was observed.

  17. Gold Nanoparticle Conjugation Enhances the Antiacanthamoebic Effects of Chlorhexidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqeel, Yousuf; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Anwar, Ayaz; Shah, Muhammad Raza

    2015-01-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis is a serious infection with blinding consequences and often associated with contact lens wear. Early diagnosis, followed by aggressive topical application of drugs, is a prerequisite in successful treatment, but even then prognosis remains poor. Several drugs have shown promise, including chlorhexidine gluconate; however, host cell toxicity at physiologically relevant concentrations remains a challenge. Nanoparticles, subcolloidal structures ranging in size from 10 to 100 nm, are effective drug carriers for enhancing drug potency. The overall aim of the present study was to determine whether conjugation with gold nanoparticles enhances the antiacanthamoebic potential of chlorhexidine. Gold-conjugated chlorhexidine nanoparticles were synthesized. Briefly, gold solution was mixed with chlorhexidine and reduced by adding sodium borohydride, resulting in an intense deep red color, indicative of colloidal gold-conjugated chlorhexidine nanoparticles. The synthesis was confirmed using UV-visible spectrophotometry that shows a plasmon resonance peak of 500 to 550 nm, indicative of gold nanoparticles. Further characterization using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry showed a gold-conjugated chlorhexidine complex at m/z 699 ranging in size from 20 to 100 nm, as determined using atomic force microscopy. To determine the amoebicidal and amoebistatic effects, amoebae were incubated with gold-conjugated chlorhexidine nanoparticles. For controls, amoebae also were incubated with gold and silver nanoparticles alone, chlorhexidine alone, neomycin-conjugated nanoparticles, and neomycin alone. The findings showed that gold-conjugated chlorhexidine nanoparticles exhibited significant amoebicidal and amoebistatic effects at 5 μM. Amoebicidal effects were observed by parasite viability testing using a Trypan blue exclusion assay and flow-cytometric analysis using propidium iodide, while amoebistatic effects were observed using growth

  18. Discrepancy between different estimates of the hydrodynamic diameter of polymer-coated iron oxide nanoparticles in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regmi, R.; Gumber, V.; Subba Rao, V.; Kohli, I.; Black, C.; Sudakar, C.; Vaishnava, P.; Naik, V.; Naik, R.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Lawes, G.

    2011-01-01

    We have synthesized iron oxide nanoparticles coated with a monolayer of dextran, with molecular weights of the polymer between 5 and 670 kDa. Transmission electron microscopy images confirm that the hard core has a crystalline diameter of approximately 12 nm. The hydrodynamic diameters of these coated nanoparticles in solution measured using dynamical light scattering and estimated from magnetic susceptibility studies vary from near 90 nm for the lightest polymer to 140 nm for the heaviest polymer. Conversely, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy measurements yield a diameter of approximately 55 nm for the 15–20 kDa dextran coated nanoparticles, which is consistent with the expected value estimated from the sum of the hard-core diameter and monolayer dextran coating. We discuss the implications of this discrepancy for applications involving polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles.

  19. Diameter dependence of emission power in MgO-based nano-pillar spin-torque oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Bochong; Kubota, Hitoshi, E-mail: hit-kubota@aist.go.jp; Yakushiji, Kay; Tamaru, Shingo; Arai, Hiroko; Imamura, Hiroshi; Fukushima, Akio; Yuasa, Shinji [Spintronics Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2016-06-20

    The dependence on diameter of the emission power in MgO-based nano-pillar spin torque oscillators (STOs) was systematically investigated. A maximum emission power of over 2.5 μW was obtained around 300 nm in diameter, which is the largest reported to date among the out-of-plane precession STOs. By analyzing physical quantities, precession cone angle of the free-layer magnetization was evaluated. In the diameter range below 300 nm, the increase in power was mainly due to the increase of the injected current. The power decrease above 300 nm is possibly attributed to the decrease in the averaged precession cone angle, suggesting spatial phase difference of magnetization precession. This study provides the method for estimating the optimum STO diameter, which is of great importance in practical use.

  20. Optical haze of randomly arranged silver nanowire transparent conductive films with wide range of nanowire diameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Marus

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the diameter of randomly arranged silver nanowires on the optical haze of silver nanowire transparent conductive films was studied. Proposed simulation model behaved similarly with the experimental results, and was used to theoretically study the optical haze of silver nanowires with diameters in the broad range from 30 nm and above. Our results show that a thickening of silver nanowires from 30 to 100 nm results in the increase of the optical haze up to 8 times, while from 100 to 500 nm the optical haze increases only up to 1.38. Moreover, silver nanowires with diameter of 500 nm possess up to 5% lower optical haze and 5% higher transmittance than 100 nm thick silver nanowires for the same 10-100 Ohm/sq sheet resistance range. Further thickening of AgNWs can match the low haze of 30 nm thick AgNWs, but at higher transmittance. The results obtained from this work allow deeper analysis of the silver nanowire transparent conductive films from the perspective of the diameter of nanowires for various optoelectronic devices.

  1. Analytical determination of the reducing and stabilization agents present in different Zostera noltii extracts used for the biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarzuela, Rafael; Luna, Manuel Jesús; Gil, María Luisa Almoraima; Ortega, María Jesús; Palacios-Santander, José María; Naranjo-Rodríguez, Ignacio; Delgado, Juan José; Cubillana-Aguilera, Laura María

    2018-02-01

    The objective of this work was to ascertain the nature of the components responsible for the reducing and stabilizing properties of Zostera noltii extracts that lead to gold nanoparticle formation using chemical techniques of analysis. In order to achieve this aim, we try the synthesis of AuNPs with three different extracts from plants collected in the Bay of Cádiz (Spain). The n-butanol extract produced the best results. Taking this into account, four fractions were isolated by Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography from this extract and we studied their activity. The chemical study of these fractions led to the isolation of several flavone sulfates and these were identified as the species' responsible for the formation and stabilization of the AuNPs. Flavone sulfates were purified by high performance liquid chromatography and the structures were established by means of spectroscopic methods nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectroscopy. AuNPs have an average lifetime of about 16weeks. Additionally, the morphology and crystalline phase of the gold nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy. The composition of the nanoparticles was evaluated by electron diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. An 88% of the gold nanoparticles has a diameter in the range 20-35nm, with an average size of 26±2nm. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Straightforward and robust synthesis of monodisperse surface-functionalized gold nanoclusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Varela-Aramburu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoclusters are small (1–3 nm nanoparticles with a high surface area that are useful for biomedical studies and drug delivery. The synthesis of small, surface-functionalized gold nanoclusters is greatly dependent on the reaction conditions. Here, we describe a straightforward, efficient and robust room temperature one-pot synthesis of 2 nm gold nanoclusters using thioglucose as a reducing and stabilizing agent, which was discovered by serendipity. The resultant monodisperse gold nanoclusters are more stable than those generated using some other common methods. The carboxylic acid contained in the stabilizing agent on the cluster surface serves as anchor for nanocluster functionalization. Alternatively, the addition of thiols serves to functionalize the nanoclusters. The resulting non-cytotoxic nanoclusters are taken up by cells and constitute a tuneable platform for biomedical applications including drug delivery.

  3. Tailoring surface plasmon resonance and dipole cavity plasmon modes of scattering cross section spectra on the single solid-gold/gold-shell nanorod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou Chau, Yuan-Fong; Lim, Chee Ming; Kumara, N. T. R. N.; Yoong, Voo Nyuk; Lee, Chuanyo; Huang, Hung Ji; Lin, Chun-Ting; Chiang, Hai-Pang

    2016-01-01

    Tunable surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and dipole cavity plasmon modes of the scattering cross section (SCS) spectra on the single solid-gold/gold-shell nanorod have been numerically investigated by using the finite element method. Various effects, such as the influence of SCS spectra under x- and y-polarizations on the surface of the single solid-gold/gold-shell nanorod, are discussed in detail. With the single gold-shell nanorod, one can independently tune the relative SCS spectrum width by controlling the rod length and rod diameter, and the surface scattering by varying the shell thickness and polarization direction, as well as the dipole peak energy. These behaviors are consistent with the properties of localized SPRs and offer a way to optically control and produce selected emission wavelengths from the single solid-gold/gold-shell nanorod. The electric field and magnetic distributions provide us a qualitative idea of the geometrical properties of the single solid-gold/gold-shell nanorod on plasmon resonance.

  4. Plasmonic Horizon in Gold Nanosponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Cynthia; Sivun, Dmitry; Ziegler, Johannes; Wang, Dong; Schaaf, Peter; Hrelescu, Calin; Klar, Thomas A

    2018-02-14

    An electromagnetic wave impinging on a gold nanosponge coherently excites many electromagnetic hot-spots inside the nanosponge, yielding a polarization-dependent scattering spectrum. In contrast, a hole, recombining with an electron, can locally excite plasmonic hot-spots only within a horizon given by the lifetime of localized plasmons and the speed carrying the information that a plasmon has been created. This horizon is about 57 nm, decreasing with increasing size of the nanosponge. Consequently, photoluminescence from large gold nanosponges appears unpolarized.

  5. Fabrication of Gold Nanodot Array for the Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Min Bae

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR is a promising method for detecting antigen-antibody binding in label-free biosensors. In this study, the fabrication of a LSPR substrate with a gold nanodot array through the lift-off process of an alumina mask is reported. The substrate showed an extinction peak in its extinction spectrum, and the peak position was dependent on the height of the gold nanodot array, and the change of extinction peak with the height could be predicted by the numerical simulation. In addition, the peak position was observed to be red-shifted with the increasing RIU value of the medium surrounding the gold nanodot array. In particular, the peak position in the 10 nm thick gold nanodot array was approximately 710 nm in air, and the sensitivity, defined as the ratio of the shift of peak position to the RIU of the medium, was 323.6 nm/RIU. The fabrication procedure could be applied to fabricate the LSPR substrates with a large area.

  6. Analysis of fine structure of X-ray spectra from laser-irradiated gold dot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Guohong; Zhang Jiyan; Zhang Baohan; Zhou Yuqing; Li Jun

    2000-01-01

    The X-ray emission spectra from highly stripped plasma of gold has been observed by focusing a Nd-glass frequency tripled laser beam onto the surface of the gold dot at the XINGGUANG II laser facilities. The spectra of gold ions in the range of 0.0003 nm-0.0004 nm was recorded using the plate PET (2d = 0.8742 nm) crystal spectrometer. The code of average energy of relativistic sub-arrays was built on the basis of the code MCDF (Multi-Configuration-Dirac-Fock). Using the spin-orbit-split-arrays (SOSA) formalism, mean wavelengths and full widths at half height of isolated peaks of sub-arrays of lower charged gold ions, isoelectronic with Cu, Zn, Ga and Ge, was calculated. Twenty-six lines are interpreted, they pertain mainly to transitions of 3d-nf (n = 5,6,7) of gold ions from Ni-like to As-like. These results of experiment and calculation have important application in plasma diagnostics and examination of high Z elemental atomic structure calculation

  7. Extracellular biosynthesis of gold and silver nanoparticles using Krishna tulsi ( Ocimum sanctum) leaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Daizy; Unni, C.

    2011-05-01

    Aqueous extract of Ocimum sanctum leaf is used as reducing agent for the environmentally friendly synthesis of gold and silver nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were characterized using UV-vis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FTIR analysis. These methods allow the synthesis of hexagonal gold nanoparticles having size ∼30 nm showing two surface plasmon resonance (SPR) bands by changing the relative concentration of HAuCl 4 and the extract. Broadening of SPR is observed at larger quantities of the extract possibly due to biosorption of gold ions. Silver nanoparticles with size in the range 10-20 nm having symmetric SPR band centered around 409 nm are obtained for the colloid synthesized at room temperature at a pH of 8. Crystallinity of the nanoparticles is confirmed from the XRD pattern. Biomolecules responsible for capping are different in gold and silver nanoparticles as evidenced by the FTIR spectra.

  8. Synthesis of hydrophobic gold nanoclusters: growth mechanism study, luminescence property and catalytic application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvam, Tamil Selvi; Chi, Kai-Ming

    2011-01-01

    One-pot synthesis of well dispersed, size-controlled gold nanoparticles with the average size of 10–15 nm and luminescent gold nanoclusters with average size of 1.7–2.0 nm were successfully achieved by thermal decomposition of gold organometallic precursor CH 3 AuPPh 3 in the presence of thiol surfactants in o-xylene. Only difference between the preparations of two types of Au nanoparticles is the amount of thiol surfactant employed. The mechanistic study of formation of gold nanoparticles was carried out by analyzing the samples at different reaction time intervals and revealed that two-staged growth process was involved. The nanoclusters showed strong red emission with the maximum intensity at about 600 nm. The maximum room temperature photoluminescence quantum yield was measured as 1.2%. The catalytic ability of the Au nanoclusters to promote Suzuki–Miyaura coupling involving the C–C bond formation was also investigated.

  9. Absorption Spectra of Gold Nanoparticle Suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anan'eva, M. V.; Nurmukhametov, D. R.; Zverev, A. S.; Nelyubina, N. V.; Zvekov, A. A.; Russakov, D. M.; Kalenskii, A. V.; Eremenko, A. N.

    2018-02-01

    Three gold nanoparticle suspensions are obtained, and mean radii in distributions - (6.1 ± 0.2), (11.9 ± 0.3), and (17.3 ± 0.7) nm - are determined by the transmission electron microscopy method. The optical absorption spectra of suspensions are obtained and studied. Calculation of spectral dependences of the absorption index of suspensions at values of the gold complex refractive index taken from the literature showed a significant deviation of experimental and calculated data in the region of 450-800 nm. Spectral dependences of the absorption of suspensions are simulated within the framework of the Mie-Drude theory taking into account the interband absorption in the form of an additional term in the imaginary part of the dielectric permittivity of the Gaussian type. It is shown that to quantify the spectral dependences in the region of the plasmon absorption band of nanoparticles, correction of the parameters of the interband absorption is necessary in addition to the increase of the relaxation parameter of the Drude theory. Spectral dependences of the dielectric permittivity of gold in nanodimensional state are refined from the solution of the inverse problem. The results of the present work are important for predicting the special features of operation of photonic devices and optical detonators based on gold nanoparticles.

  10. A Facile Strategy to Prepare Dendrimer-stabilized Gold Nanorods with Sub-10-nm Size for Efficient Photothermal Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinyu; Wang, Hanling; Wang, Yitong; Yu, Xiangtong; Zhang, Sanjun; Zhang, Qiang; Cheng, Yiyun

    2016-03-01

    Gold (Au) nanoparticles are promising photothermal agents with the potential of clinical translation. However, the safety concerns of Au photothermal agents including the potential toxic compositions such as silver and copper elements in their structures and the relative large size-caused retention and accumulation in the body post-treatment are still questionable. In this article, we successfully synthesized dendrimer-stabilized Au nanorods (DSAuNRs) with pure Au composition and a sub-10-nm size in length, which represented much higher photothermal effect compared with dendrimer-encapsulated Au nanoparticles due to their significantly enhanced absorption in the near-infrared region. Furthermore, glycidol-modified DSAuNRs exhibited the excellent biocompatibility and further showed the high photothermal efficiency of killing cancer cells in vitro and retarding tumor growth in vivo. The investigation depicted an optimal photothermal agent with the desirable size and safe composition.

  11. Optical Nonlinear Refractive Index of Laser-Ablated Gold Nanoparticles Graphene Oxide Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Reza Sadrolhosseini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles were prepared in graphene oxide using laser ablation technique. The ablation times were varied from 10 to 40 minutes, and the particle size was decreased from 16.55 nm to 5.18 nm in spherical shape. The nanoparticles were capped with carboxyl and the hydroxyl groups were obtained from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Furthermore, the UV-visible peak shifted with decreasing of nanoparticles size, appearing from 528 nm to 510 nm. The Z-scan technique was used to measure the nonlinear refractive indices of graphene oxide with different concentrations and a gold nanoparticle graphene oxide nanocomposite. Consequently, the optical nonlinear refractive indices of graphene oxide and gold nanoparticle graphene oxide nanocomposite were shifted from 1.63×10-9 cm2/W to 4.1×10-9 cm2/W and from 1.85×10-9 cm2/W to 5.8×10-9 cm2/W, respectively.

  12. Global-scale Observations of the Limb and Disk (GOLD): Science Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, S. C.; McClintock, W. E.; Eastes, R.; Anderson, D. N.; Andersson, L.; Burns, A. G.; Codrescu, M.; Daniell, R. E.; England, S.; Eparvier, F. G.; Evans, J. S.; Krywonos, A.; Lumpe, J. D.; Richmond, A. D.; Rusch, D. W.; Siegmund, O.; Woods, T. N.

    2017-12-01

    The Global-scale Observations of the Limb and Disk (GOLD) is a NASA mission of opportunity that will image the Earth's thermosphere and ionosphere from geostationary orbit. GOLD will investigate how the thermosphere-ionosphere (T-I) system responds to geomagnetic storms, solar radiation, and upward propagating tides and how the structure of the equatorial ionosphere influences the formation and evolution of equatorial plasma density irregularities. GOLD consists of a pair of identical imaging spectrographs that will measure airglow emissions at far-ultraviolet wavelengths from 132 to 162 nm. On the disk, temperature and composition will be determined during the day using emissions from molecular nitrogen Lyman-Birge-Hopfield (LBH) band and atomic oxygen 135.6 nm, and electron density will be derived at night from 135.6 nm emission. On the limb, exospheric temperature will be derived from LBH emission profiles, and molecular oxygen density will be measured using stellar occultations. This presentation describes the GOLD mission science implementation including the as-built instrument performance and the planned observing scenario. It also describes the results of simulations performed by the GOLD team to validate that the measured instrument performance and observing plan will return adequate data to address the science objectives of the mission.

  13. Nanostructured gold microelectrodes for extracellular recording

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueggemann, Dorothea; Wolfrum, Bernhard; Maybeck, Vanessa; Offenhaeusser, Andreas [CNI Center of Nanoelectronic Systems for Information Technology and Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems 2, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Electrophysiological activity of electrogenic cells is currently recorded with planar bioelectronic interfaces such as microelectrode arrays (MEAs). In this work, a novel concept of biocompatible nanostructured gold MEAs for extracellular signal recording is presented. MEAs were fabricated using clean room technologies, e.g. photolithography and metallization. Subsequently, they were modified with gold nanopillars of approximately 300 to 400 nm in height and 60 nm width. The nanostructuring process was carried out with a template-assisted approach using nanoporous aluminium oxide. Impedance spectroscopy of the resulting nanostructures showed higher capacitances compared to planar gold. This confirmed the expected increase of the surface area via nanostructuring. We used the nanostructured microelectrodes to record extracellular potentials from heart muscle cells (HL1), which were plated onto the chips. Good coupling between the HL1 cells and the nanostructured electrodes was observed. The resulting signal-to-noise ratio of nanopillar-MEAs was increased by a factor of 2 compared to planar MEAs. In future applications this nanopillar concept can be adopted for distinct interface materials and coupling to cellular and molecular sensing components.

  14. Gold particle formation via photoenhanced deposition on lithium niobate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaniewski, A.M., E-mail: azaniews@asu.edu; Meeks, V.; Nemanich, R.J.

    2017-05-31

    Highlights: • Gold chloride is reduced into solid gold nanoparticles at the surface of a polarized semiconductor. • Reduction processes are driven by ultraviolet light. • Gold nanoparticle and silver nanoparticle deposition patterns are compared. - Abstract: In this work, we report on a technique to reduce gold chloride into sub-micron particles and nanoparticles. We use photoelectron transfer from periodically polarized lithium niobate (PPLN) illuminated with above band gap light to drive the surface reactions required for the reduction and particle formation. The particle sizes and distributions on the PPLN surface are sensitive to the solution concentration, with inhibited nucleation and large particles (>150 nm) for both low (2E−8M to 9E−7M) and high (1E−5M to 1E−3M) concentrations of gold chloride. At midrange values of the concentration, nucleation is more frequent, resulting in smaller sized particles (<150 nm). We compare the deposition process to that for silver, which has been previously studied. We find that the reduction of gold chloride into nanoparticles is inhibited compared to silver ion reduction, due to the multi-step reaction required for gold particle formation. This also has consequences for the resulting deposition patterns: while silver deposits into nanowires along boundaries between areas with opposite signed polarizations, such patterning of the deposition is not observed for gold, for a wide range of concentrations studied (2E−8 to 1E−3M).

  15. Gold leaf counter electrodes for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Kazuhiro; Toyoda, Takeshi

    2018-03-01

    In this study, a gold leaf 100 nm thin film is used as the counter electrode in dye-sensitized solar cells. The traditional method of hammering gold foil to obtain a thin gold leaf, which requires only small amounts of gold, was employed. The gold leaf was then attached to the substrate using an adhesive to produce the gold electrode. The proposed approach for fabricating counter electrodes is demonstrated to be facile and cost-effective, as opposed to existing techniques. Compared with electrodes prepared with gold foil and sputtered gold, the gold leaf counter electrode demonstrates higher catalytic activity with a cobalt-complex electrolyte and higher cell efficiency. The origin of the improved performance was investigated by surface morphology examination (scanning electron microscopy), various electrochemical analyses (cyclic voltammetry, linear sweep voltammetry, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy), and crystalline analysis (X-ray diffractometry).

  16. Preparation and bactericide activity of gallic acid stabilized gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno-Alvarez, S. A.; Martinez-Castanon, G. A.; Nino-Martinez, N.; Reyes-Macias, J. F.; Patino-Marin, N.; Loyola-Rodriguez, J. P.; Ruiz, Facundo

    2010-01-01

    In this work, gold nanoparticles with three different sizes (13.7, 39.4, and 76.7 nm) were prepared using a simple aqueous method with gallic acid as the reducing and stabilizing agent, the different sizes were obtained varying some experimental parameters as the pH of the reaction and the amount of the gallic acid. The prepared nanoparticles were characterized using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Samples were identified as elemental gold and present spherical morphology, a narrow size distribution and good stabilization according to TEM and DLS results. The antibacterial activity of this gallic acid stabilized gold nanoparticles against S. mutans (the etiologic agent of dental caries) was assessed using a microdilution method obtaining a minimum inhibitory concentration of 12.31, 12.31, and 49.25 μg/mL for 13.7, 39.4, and 76.7 nm gold nanoparticles, respectively. The antibacterial assay showed that gold nanoparticles prepared in this work present a bactericide activity by a synergistic action with gallic acid. The MIC found for this nanoparticles are much lower than those reported for mixtures of gold nanoparticles and antibiotics.

  17. Preparation and bactericide activity of gallic acid stabilized gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno-Alvarez, S. A. [UASLP, Doctorado Institucional en Ingenieria y Ciencia de Materiales (Mexico); Martinez-Castanon, G. A., E-mail: mtzcastanon@fciencias.uaslp.m [UASLP, Maestria en Ciencias Odontologicas, Facultad de Estomatologia (Mexico); Nino-Martinez, N. [UASLP, Facultad de Ciencias (Mexico); Reyes-Macias, J. F.; Patino-Marin, N.; Loyola-Rodriguez, J. P. [UASLP, Maestria en Ciencias Odontologicas, Facultad de Estomatologia (Mexico); Ruiz, Facundo [UASLP, Facultad de Ciencias (Mexico)

    2010-10-15

    In this work, gold nanoparticles with three different sizes (13.7, 39.4, and 76.7 nm) were prepared using a simple aqueous method with gallic acid as the reducing and stabilizing agent, the different sizes were obtained varying some experimental parameters as the pH of the reaction and the amount of the gallic acid. The prepared nanoparticles were characterized using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Samples were identified as elemental gold and present spherical morphology, a narrow size distribution and good stabilization according to TEM and DLS results. The antibacterial activity of this gallic acid stabilized gold nanoparticles against S. mutans (the etiologic agent of dental caries) was assessed using a microdilution method obtaining a minimum inhibitory concentration of 12.31, 12.31, and 49.25 {mu}g/mL for 13.7, 39.4, and 76.7 nm gold nanoparticles, respectively. The antibacterial assay showed that gold nanoparticles prepared in this work present a bactericide activity by a synergistic action with gallic acid. The MIC found for this nanoparticles are much lower than those reported for mixtures of gold nanoparticles and antibiotics.

  18. Gold nanoshell photomodification under a single-nanosecond laser pulse accompanied by color-shifting and bubble formation phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akchurin, Garif; Khlebtsov, Boris; Akchurin, Georgy; Tuchin, Valery; Zharov, Vladimir; Khlebtsov, Nikolai

    2008-01-01

    Laser-nanoparticle interaction is crucial for biomedical applications of lasers and nanotechnology to the treatment of cancer or pathogenic microorganisms. We report on the first observation of laser-induced coloring of gold nanoshell solution after a one nanosecond pulse and an unprecedentedly low bubble formation (as the main mechanism of cancer cell killing) threshold at a laser fluence of about 4 mJ cm -2 , which is safe for normal tissue. Specifically, silica/gold nanoshell (140/15 nm) suspensions were irradiated with a single 4 ns (1064 nm) or 8 ns (900 nm) laser pulse at fluences ranging from 0.1 mJ cm -2 to 50 J cm -2 . Solution red coloring was observed by the naked eye confirmed by blue-shifting of the absorption spectrum maximum from the initial 900 nm for nanoshells to 530 nm for conventional colloidal gold nanospheres. TEM images revealed significant photomodification of nanoparticles including complete fragmentation of gold shells, changes in silica core structure, formation of small 20-30 nm isolated spherical gold nanoparticles, gold nanoshells with central holes, and large and small spherical gold particles attached to a silica core. The time-resolved monitoring of bubble formation phenomena with the photothermal (PT) thermolens technique demonstrated that after application of a single 8 ns pulse at fluences 5-10 mJ cm -2 and higher the next pulse did not produce any PT response, indicating a dramatic decrease in absorption because of gold shell modification. We also observed a dependence of the bubble expansion time on the laser energy with unusually very fast PT signal rising (∼3.5 ns scale at 0.2 J cm -2 ). Application of the observed phenomena to medical applications is discussed, including a simple visual color test for laser-nanoparticle interaction

  19. Measurements of the diameter of the supernova SN 1987A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karovska, M.; Nisenson, P.; Standley, C.; Heathcote, S.R.

    1991-01-01

    Speckle interferometric measurements of the angular diameter of SN 1987A in the Large Magellanic Cloud, obtained at 664 days after the outburst are presented. Diameters were estimated with milliarcsec precision at 657 nm and 550 nm by fitting model visibility functions to the data corresponding to different intensity distributions for the supernova disk. Measurements made assuming a uniform intensity distribution were compared to the uniform disk measurements obtained from 30 days after the explosion. Diameter measurements obtained near the center of the H-alpha line are consistent with homologous expansion of the supernova shell with a mean velocity of 2850 km/s. The linear least-squares fit to the measurements obtained at other wavelengths from 260 days after the explosion yielded a somewhat lower mean expansion velocity. 8 refs

  20. Osseointegration of Implants Surface-Treated with Various Diameters of TiO2 Nanotubes in Rabbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheul-Goo Kang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the osseointegration of implants which were surface-treated with various diameters of TiO2 nanotubes (30 nm, 70 nm, and 100 nm in rabbit. Resorbable blast media (RBM surfaced implants (Osstem, Busan, Korea 3.5 mm in diameter and 8.5 mm in length were designated as the control group and the implants surface-treated with various diameters of nanotubes (30 nm, 70 nm, and 100 nm with the same shapes were designated as the experimental groups. The implants were maintained unloaded for 4 and 12 weeks. After this period, the animals were sacrificed and micro-CT analysis, histomorphometric analysis (bone to implant contact (BIC, bone volume (BV, and removal torque test were performed. Micro-CT analysis, histomorphometric analysis, and removal torque test results all showed the similar pattern, showing that 70 nm experimental group had the highest value at 4 weeks while 30 nm experimental group had the highest value at 12 weeks. Therefore, on the basis of the results above, it can be concluded that 30 nm and 70 nm TiO2 nanotubes may have positive effects on osteogenesis and osseointegration depending on the healing time.

  1. The effects of prolonged oral administration of gold nanoparticles on the morphology of hematopoietic and lymphoid organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucharskaya, Alla B.; Pakhomy, Svetlana S.; Zlobina, Olga V.; Maslyakova, Galina N.; Navolokin, Nikita A.; Matveeva, Olga V.; Khlebtsov, Boris N.; Bogatyrev, Vladimir A.; Khlebtsov, Nikolai G.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2017-02-01

    Currently, the usage of gold nanoparticles as photosensitizers and immunomodulators for plasmonic photothermal therapy has attracted a great attention of researches and end-users. In our work, the influence of prolonged peroral administration of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) with different sizes on the morphological changes of hematopoietic and lymphoid organs was investigated. The 24 white outbred male rats weighing 180-220 g were randomly divided into groups and administered orally for 30 days the suspension of gold nanospheres with diameters of 2, 15 and 50 nm at a dosage of 190 μg/kg of animal body weight. To prevent GNPs aggregation in a tissue and enhance biocompatibility, they were functionalized with thiolated polyethylene glycol. The withdrawal of the animals from the experiment and sampling of spleen, lymph nodes and bone marrow tissues for morphological study were performed a day after the last administration. In the spleen the boundary between the red and white pulp was not clearly differ in all experimental groups, lymphoid follicles were significantly increased in size, containing bright germinative centers represented by large blast cells. The stimulation of lymphocyte and myelocytic series of hematopoiesis was recorded at morphological study of the bone marrow. The number of immunoblasts and large lymphocytes was increased in all structural zones of lymph nodes. The more pronounced changes were found in the group with administration of 15 nm nanoparticles. Thus, the morphological changes of cellular components of hematopoietic organs have size-dependent character and indicate the activation of the migration, proliferation and differentiation of immune cells after prolonged oral administration of GNPs.

  2. Synthesis of gold nanoparticles with graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenshuo; He, Dawei; Zhang, Xiqing; Duan, Jiahua; Wu, Hongpeng; Xu, Haiteng; Wang, Yongsheng

    2014-05-01

    Single sheets of functionalized graphene oxide are derived through chemical exfoliation of natural flake graphite. We present an effective synthetic method of graphene-gold nanoparticles hybrid nanocomposites. AFM (Atomic Force Microscope) was used to measure the thickness of the individual GO nanosheet. FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) spectroscopy was used to verify the attachment of oxygen functionalities on the surface of graphene oxide. TEM (Transmission Electron Microscope) data revealed the average diameters of the gold colloids and characterized the composite particles situation. Absorption spectroscopy showed that before and after synthesis the gold particle size did not change. Our studies indicate that the hybrid is potential substrates for catalysts and biosensors.

  3. Biofabrication of gold and silver nanoparticles for pharmaceutical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Barabadi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Biofabrication by using fungi is an exciting recent interest to develop an eco-friendly production of metallic nanoparticles (NPs for pharmaceutical applications. This study aimed to synthesize and characterize gold (Au and silver (Ag NPs by using Penicillium simplisimum. The fungus was grown in fluid czapek dox broth on shaker at 28 ºC and 200 rpm for ten days. Then the supernatant was separated from the mycelia to convert HAuCl4 and AgNO3 solution into Au and Ag NPs separately. After 24 hours, synthesized Au and Ag NPs were characterized by using UV-Visible Spectroscopy as well as Photon Correlation spectroscopy (PCS involves Polydispersity Index (PDI and zeta potential. The UV-Visible Spectroscopy analysis revealed a plasmon bond peak around 533 nm and 400 nm suggesting formation of Au and Ag NPs, respectively. Furthermore, the PCS analysis showed an average diameter of 68 nm and 76 nm with PDI value of 0.2 and 0.23 for Au and Ag NPs, successively, which demonstrated that the nanoparticles formed with fairly well-defined dimensions and good monodispersity. Besides, a negative zeta potential were found for nanoparticles indicating their stability in the solution. The current approach suggests that the rapid synthesis of nanoparticles would be suitable for developing a green process for mass scale production. Besides, we believe that development of eco-friendly process for the formulation of metallic NPs is an important step in the field of application of nanotechnology and its optimization may make it a potential procedure for industrial production of NPs.

  4. A Comparative XAFS Study of Gold-thiolate Nanoparticles and Nanoclusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevrier, D M; Chatt, A; Zhang, P; Sham, T K

    2013-01-01

    Tiopronin-capped gold nanoparticles and gold nanoclusters of sizes 3.0 and 1.5 nm, respectively, were investigated with XAFS at the gold L 3 -edge. The specific EXAFS fitting procedure is discussed for obtaining reliable fit parameters for each system. The difficulties and challenges faced when analysing EXAFS data for gold nanoparticles and nanoclusters are also mentioned. Fitting results for gold nanoparticles reveal a small amount of surface Au-thiolate interactions with a large Au-Au metal core. For gold nanoclusters, only a one-shell fit was obtainable. Instead of Au-Au metal core, long-range interactions are expected for gold nanoclusters. Tiopronin-capped gold nanoclusters are proposed to be polymeric in nature, which helps explain the observed red luminescence.

  5. Encapsulation of gold nanoparticles into self-assembling protein nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yongkun

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gold nanoparticles are useful tools for biological applications due to their attractive physical and chemical properties. Their applications can be further expanded when they are functionalized with biological molecules. The biological molecules not only provide the interfaces for interactions between nanoparticles and biological environment, but also contribute their biological functions to the nanoparticles. Therefore, we used self-assembling protein nanoparticles (SAPNs to encapsulate gold nanoparticles. The protein nanoparticles are formed upon self-assembly of a protein chain that is composed of a pentameric coiled-coil domain at the N-terminus and trimeric coiled-coil domain at the C-terminus. The self-assembling protein nanoparticles form a central cavity of about 10 nm in size, which is ideal for the encapsulation of gold nanoparticles with similar sizes. Results We have used SAPNs to encapsulate several commercially available gold nanoparticles. The hydrodynamic size and the surface coating of gold nanoparticles are two important factors influencing successful encapsulation by the SAPNs. Gold nanoparticles with a hydrodynamic size of less than 15 nm can successfully be encapsulated. Gold nanoparticles with citrate coating appear to have stronger interactions with the proteins, which can interfere with the formation of regular protein nanoparticles. Upon encapsulation gold nanoparticles with polymer coating interfere less strongly with the ability of the SAPNs to assemble into nanoparticles. Although the central cavity of the SAPNs carries an overall charge, the electrostatic interaction appears to be less critical for the efficient encapsulation of gold nanoparticles into the protein nanoparticles. Conclusions The SAPNs can be used to encapsulate gold nanoparticles. The SAPNs can be further functionalized by engineering functional peptides or proteins to either their N- or C-termini. Therefore encapsulation of gold

  6. Diameter optimization of VLS-synthesized ZnO nanowires, using statistical design of experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafiei, Sepideh; Nourbakhsh, Amirhasan; Ganjipour, Bahram; Zahedifar, Mostafa; Vakili-Nezhaad, Gholamreza

    2007-01-01

    The possibility of diameter optimization of ZnO nanowires by using statistical design of experiment (DoE) is investigated. In this study, nanowires were synthesized using a vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth method in a horizontal reactor. The effects of six synthesis parameters (synthesis time, synthesis temperature, thickness of gold layer, distance between ZnO holder and substrate, mass of ZnO and Ar flow rate) on the average diameter of a ZnO nanowire were examined using the fractional factorial design (FFD) coupled with response surface methodology (RSM). Using a 2 III 6-3 FFD, the main effects of the thickness of the gold layer, synthesis temperature and synthesis time were concluded to be the key factors influencing the diameter. Then Box-Behnken design (BBD) was exploited to create a response surface from the main factors. The total number of required runs for the DoE process is 25, 8 runs for FFD parameter screening and 17 runs for the response surface obtained by BBD. Three extra runs are done to confirm the predicted results

  7. Size and shape control in the overgrowth of gold nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratto, Fulvio; Matteini, Paolo; Rossi, Francesca; Pini, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    We report on a new sustainable approach to manipulate the optical behaviour and geometrical properties of gold nanorods in aqueous solutions by fine control of their overgrowth. In our approach, the overgrowth is realized by modulation of the reduction of the gold ions which are left as Au 1+ after the primary step of the synthesis (typically as much as ∼80% of the gold ions available in the growth solution). The progress of the reduction requires the gradual addition of ascorbic acid, which transforms the Au 1+ into Au 0 and may be performed in the original growth solution with no need for any further manipulation. By control of the total amount and rate of administration of the ascorbic acid, we prove the possibility to realize a systematic modulation of the average lengths, diameters, shapes (rod or dog-bone like), and light extinction of the nanoparticles. A slow overgrowth leads to a gradual enlargement of the lengths and diameters at almost constant shape. In contrast, a faster overgrowth results into a more complex modification of the overall shape of the gold nanorods.

  8. Diameter dependence of the thermal conductivity of InAs nanowires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinkels, M.Y.; van Delft, M.R.; Oliveira, D.S.; Cavalli, A.; Zardo, I.; van der Heijden, R.W.; Bakkers, E.P.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    The diameter dependence of the thermal conductivity of InAs nanowires in the range of 40–1500 nm has been measured. We demonstrate a reduction in thermal conductivity of 80% for 40 nm nanowires, opening the way for further design strategies for nanoscaled thermoelectric materials. Furthermore, we

  9. The in vitro formation of placer gold by bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southam, Gordon; Beveridge, Terrance J.

    1994-10-01

    A laboratory simulation was developed to provide mechanistic information about placer (nugget) gold development in the natural environment. To initiate the simulation, ionic gold was immobilized to a high capacity by Bacillus subtilis 168 (116.2 μg/mg dry weight bacteria) as fine-grained intracellular colloids (5-50 nm). During the low-temperature diagenesis experiment (60°C), the release of organics due to bacterial autolysis coincided with the in vitro formation of hexagonal-octahedral gold crystals (20 μm). This octahedral gold was observed to aggregate, forming fine-grained placer gold (50 μm). In addition to achieving a fundamental understanding into secondary gold deposition, a significant economic benefit could be realized by employing this environmentally safe procedure to concentrate widely dispersed gold in placer deposits to facilitate mining by conventional methodologies.

  10. Not all that glitters is gold - Electron microscopy study on uptake of gold nanoparticles in Daphnia magna and related artefacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Louise Helene Søgaard; Skjolding, Lars Michael; Thit, Amalie

    2017-01-01

    techniques are used to investigate internalization of 10 nm gold nanoparticles in Daphnia magna gut lumen and gut epithelial cells upon 24h exposure and outline potential artefacts, i.e. high contract precipitates from sample preparation related to these techniques. Light sheet microscopy confirmed...... accumulation of gold nanoparticles in the gut lumen. Scanning transmission electron microscopy and elemental analysis revealed gold nanoparticles attached to the microvilli of gut cells. Interestingly, the peritrophic membrane appeared to act as a semipermeable barrier between the lumen and the gut epithelium...

  11. Shape dependent resonance light scattering properties of gold nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Jian; Huang Liqing; Zhao Junwu; Wang Yongchang; Zhao Yanrui; Hao Limei; Lu Yimin

    2005-01-01

    Suspended gold nanorods with mean aspect ratio 2.5 have been synthesized via electrochemical method. Resonance scattering properties have been studied. Two scattering peaks fixed at 400 and 640 nm are due to the scattering of the gold nanorods via coupling to the transverse and longitudinal surface plasmon resonance. The quasi-static calculation results indicate that with the increasing aspect ratio of the nanorods, the longer wavelength scattering peak red shifts linearly and the shorter wavelength peak blue shifts non-linearly. When aspect ratio a/b = 1.0, ellipse degenerate to sphere and the two peaks unite into one peak at 450 nm

  12. Less is More: A Comparison of Antibody-Gold Nanoparticle Conjugates of Different Ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byzova, Nadezhda A; Safenkova, Irina V; Slutskaya, Elvira S; Zherdev, Anatoly V; Dzantiev, Boris B

    2017-11-15

    This comprehensive study is related to gold nanoparticles (GNPs) conjugated with antibodies. The goal of the study is to determine the minimal concentration of antibodies for conjugate synthesis when the conjugates have high antigen-capturing activity. Two systems were studied: gold nanoparticles conjugated with monoclonal antibodies (mAb-GNP) specific to Helicobacter pylori and gold nanoparticles conjugated with polyclonal antibodies (pAb-GNP) specific to mouse immunoglobulins. Several conjugates were synthesized with different GNP-to-antibody molar ratios (from 1:1 to 1:245) through nondirectional and noncovalent immobilization on a surface of GNPs with a diameter of 25.3 ± 4.6 nm. The maximal antigen-capturing activities and equilibrium constants of the conjugates correlate with the formation of a constant hydrodynamic radius of the conjugates for mAb-GNP (GNP to antibody molar ratio 1:58) and with the stabilizing concentration by flocculation curves for pAb-GNP (GNP to antibody molar ratio 1:116). The application of the conjugates to the lateral flow immunoassay shows that the antibody concentrations used for the conjugation can be reduced (below the stabilizing concentration) without losing activity for the mAb-GNP conjugates. The findings highlight that the optimal concentration of antibodies immobilized on the surface of GNPs is not always equal to the stabilizing concentration determined by the flocculation curve.

  13. Biosynthesis and characterization of gold nanoparticles using extracts of tamarindus indica L leaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, S N; Naranjo, A M; Herrera, A P

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using an extract of Tamarindus indica L. leaves. Phenols, ketones and carboxyls were present in the leaves of T. indica. These organic compounds that allowed the synthesis of nanoparticles were identified by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and High Pressure Liquid Chromatographic (HPLC). Synthesis of gold nanoparticles was performed with the extract of T. indica leaves and an Au +3 aqueous solutions (HAuCl 4 ) at room temperature with one hour of reaction time. Characterization of gold nanoparticles was performed by UV visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and EDX. The results indicated the formation of gold nanoparticles with a wavelength of 576nm and an average size of 52±5nm. The EDX technique confirmed the presence of gold nanoparticles with 12.88% in solution. (paper)

  14. Biosynthesis and characterization of gold nanoparticles using extracts of tamarindus indica L leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, S. N.; Naranjo, A. M.; Herrera, A. P.

    2016-02-01

    This study reports the biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using an extract of Tamarindus indica L. leaves. Phenols, ketones and carboxyls were present in the leaves of T. indica. These organic compounds that allowed the synthesis of nanoparticles were identified by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and High Pressure Liquid Chromatographic (HPLC). Synthesis of gold nanoparticles was performed with the extract of T. indica leaves and an Au+3 aqueous solutions (HAuCl4) at room temperature with one hour of reaction time. Characterization of gold nanoparticles was performed by UV visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and EDX. The results indicated the formation of gold nanoparticles with a wavelength of 576nm and an average size of 52±5nm. The EDX technique confirmed the presence of gold nanoparticles with 12.88% in solution.

  15. Biosynthesis of Gold Nanoparticles Using Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd El-Aziz, M.; Badr, Y.; Mahmoud, M. A.

    2007-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa were used for extracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). Consequently, Au NPs were formed due to reduction of gold ion by bacterial cell supernatant of P. aeruginos ATCC 90271, P. aeruginos (2) and P. aeruginos (1). The UV-Vis. and fluorescence spectra of the bacterial as well as chemical prepared Au NPs were recorded. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) micrograph showed the formation of well-dispersed gold nanoparticles in the range of 15-30 nm. The process of reduction being extracellular and may lead to the development of an easy bioprocess for synthesis of Au NPs

  16. Green synthesis of gold nanoparticles by Allium sativum extract and their assessment as SERS substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coman, Cristina; Leopold, Loredana Florina; Rugină, Olivia Dumitriţa; Barbu-Tudoran, Lucian; Leopold, Nicolae; Tofană, Maria; Socaciu, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    A green synthesis was used for preparing stable colloidal gold nanoparticles by using Allium sativum aqueous extract both as reducing and capping agent. The obtained nanoparticles were characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and transmission electron microscopy. Moreover, their potential to be used as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate was investigated. The obtained gold nanoparticles have spherical shape with mean diameters of 9-15 nm (depending on the amount of reducing agent used under boiling conditions) and are stable up to several months. FTIR spectroscopy shows that the nanoparticles are capped by protein molecules from the extract. The protein shell offers a protective coating, relatively impervious to external molecules, thus, rendering the nanoparticles stable and quite inert. These nanoparticles have the potential to be used as SERS substrates, both in solution and inside human fetal lung fibroblast HFL-1 living cells. We were able to demonstrate both the internalization of the nanoparticles inside HFL-1 cells and their ability to preserve the SERS signal after cellular internalization.

  17. Electrochemical synthesis of gold nanorods in track-etched polycarbonate membrane using removable mercury cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Manoj K.; Ambolikar, Arvind S.; Aggarwal, Suresh K.

    2012-01-01

    The electrochemical template synthesis of gold nanorods within the cylindrical pores of track-etched polycarbonate (PC) membrane using a removable mercury cathode is reported. The novelty of this new approach is that it eliminates the requirement of coating an approximately 500 nm–1 μm-thick metallic layer, as conducting substrate, onto one surface of the insulating template membrane by the sputter deposition technique. A two-compartment electrochemical cell was designed and used for this work. The PC membrane was placed between the two compartments separating the aqueous solution of HAuCl 4 from mercury. Mercury, filled in one of the compartments, is in contact with one surface of the membrane (similar to sputter-deposited metallic layer) and serves as the conducting substrate/cathode for the electrochemical deposition of gold in the nanopores of track-etched PC membrane. Once the electrodeposition is completed, the mercury and the HAuCl 4 solution are removed from the compartments, and a malleable track-etched PC membrane embedded with free-standing gold nanorods is obtained. The ensemble of the metal nanorods grown in the template membrane is not attached to any conducting substrate, and gold nanorods can be freed from the template membrane after the dissolution. The Au-deposited PC membrane and free-standing Au nanorods were characterized by EDXRF, XRD, UV–Visible spectroscopy, AFM, and FEG-TEM. The EDXRF and XRD studies confirmed the deposition of the face-centered cubic phase of Au in the pores of the PC membrane. The TEM studies showed the formation of a cigar-shaped gold nanorod in the cylindrical pores of the PC membrane. The diameter of gold nanorods ranges from 100 to 200 nm. The new approach is simple, cost-effective, and saves time.

  18. Preparation of porous polymer monoliths featuring enhanced surface coverage with gold nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Lv, Yongqin

    2012-10-01

    A new approach to the preparation of porous polymer monoliths with enhanced coverage of pore surface with gold nanoparticles has been developed. First, a generic poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolith was reacted with cystamine followed by the cleavage of its disulfide bonds with tris(2-carboxylethyl)phosphine, which liberated the desired thiol groups. Dispersions of gold nanoparticles with sizes varying from 5 to 40. nm were then pumped through the functionalized monoliths. The materials were then analyzed using both energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. We found that the quantity of attached gold was dependent on the size of nanoparticles, with the maximum attachment of more than 60. wt% being achieved with 40. nm nanoparticles. Scanning electron micrographs of the cross sections of all the monoliths revealed the formation of a non-aggregated, homogenous monolayer of nanoparticles. The surface of the bound gold was functionalized with 1-octanethiol and 1-octadecanethiol, and these monolithic columns were used successfully for the separations of proteins in reversed phase mode. The best separations were obtained using monoliths modified with 15, 20, and 30. nm nanoparticles since these sizes produced the most dense coverage of pore surface with gold. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  19. Harnessing the wine dregs: An approach towards a more sustainable synthesis of gold and silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Ballesteros, N; Rodríguez-González, J B; Rodríguez-Argüelles, M C

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, the management of food waste processing has emerged as a major concern. One such type of food waste, grape pomace, has been shown to be a great source of bioactive compounds which might be used for more environmentally - friendly processes for the synthesis of nanomaterials. In this study, grape pomace of Vitis vinifera has been used for the obtainment of an aqueous extract. Firstly, the reducing activity, total phenolic content and DPPH scavenging activity of the aqueous extract were determined. Then, the aqueous extract was used for the synthesis of gold and silver nanoparticles. The formation of spherical and stable nanoparticles with mean diameters of 35.3±5.2nm for Au@GP and 42.9±6.4nm for Ag@GP was confirmed by UV-vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, the functional group of biomolecules present in grape pomace extract, Au@GP and Ag@GP, were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy prior to and after the synthesis, in order to obtain information about the biomolecules involved in the reducing and stabilization process. This study is the first to deal with the use of Vitis vinifera grape pomace in obtaining gold and silver nanoparticles through an eco-friendly, quick, one-pot synthetic route. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Dielectrophoretic trapping of DNA-coated gold nanoparticles on silicon based vertical nanogap devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, Sebastian; Sperling, Ralph A; Fenk, Bernhard; Parak, Wolfgang J; Tornow, Marc

    2011-06-07

    We report on the successful dielectrophoretic trapping and electrical characterization of DNA-coated gold nanoparticles on vertical nanogap devices (VNDs). The nanogap devices with an electrode distance of 13 nm were fabricated from Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) material using a combination of anisotropic reactive ion etching (RIE), selective wet chemical etching and metal thin-film deposition. Au nanoparticles (diameter 40 nm) coated with a monolayer of dithiolated 8 base pairs double stranded DNA were dielectrophoretically trapped into the nanogap from electrolyte buffer solution at MHz frequencies as verified by scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM/TEM) analysis. First electrical transport measurements through the formed DNA-Au-DNA junctions partially revealed an approximately linear current-voltage characteristic with resistance in the range of 2-4 GΩ when measured in solution. Our findings point to the importance of strong covalent bonding to the electrodes in order to observe DNA conductance, both in solution and in the dry state. We propose our setup for novel applications in biosensing, addressing the direct interaction of biomolecular species with DNA in aqueous electrolyte media.

  1. Synthesis of gold nanostructures with optical properties within the near-infrared window for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Soto, Mariano de Jesus

    The work reported in this dissertation describes the design and synthesis of different gold nanoshells with strong absorption coefficients at the near-infrared region (NIR) of the spectrum, and includes preliminary studies of their use for the photo-induced heating of pancreatic cancer cells and ex vivo tissues. As the emphasis was on gold nanoshells with maximum extinctions located at 800 nm, the methods explored for their synthesis led us to the preparation of silica-core and hollow gold nanoshells of improved stability, with maximum extinctions at or beyond the targeted within the near-infrared window. The synthesis of silica-core gold nanoshells was investigated first given its relevance as one of the pioneering methods to produce gold nanostructures with strong absorption and scattering coefficients in the visible and the near-infrared regions of the spectrum. By using a classical method of synthesis, we explored the aging of the precursor materials and the effect of using higher concentrations than the customary for the reduction of gold during the shell growth. We found that the aging for one week of the as-prepared or purified precursors, namely, the gold cluster suspensions, and the seeded silica particles, along with higher concentrations of gold in the plating solution, produced fully coated nanoshells of 120 nm in size with smooth surfaces and maximum extinctions around 800 nm. Additional work carried out to reduce the time and steps in the synthesis of silica-core gold nanoshells, led us to improve the seeding step by increasing the ionic strength of the cluster suspension, and also to explore the growth of gold on tin-seeded silica nanoparticles. The synthesis of hollow gold nanoshells (HGS) of with maximum extinctions at the NIR via the galvanic replacement of silver nanoparticles for gold in solution was explored next. A first method explored led us to obtain HGS with maximum extinctions between 650 and 800 nm and sizes between 30 and 80 nm from

  2. Improvement of optical damage in specialty fiber at 266 nm wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobisch, T.; Ohlmeyer, H.; Zimmermann, H.; Prein, S.; Kirchhof, J.; Unger, S.; Belz, M.; Klein, K.-F.

    2014-02-01

    Improved multimode UV-fibers with core diameters ranging from 70 to 600 μm diameter have been manufactured based on novel preform modifications and fiber processing techniques. Only E'-centers at 214 nm and NBOHC at 260 nm are generated in these fibers. A new generation of inexpensive laser-systems have entered the market and generated a multitude of new and attractive applications in the bio-life science, chemical and material processing field. However, for example pulsed 355 nm Nd:YAG lasers generate significant UV-damages in commercially available fibers. For lower wavelengths, no results on suitable multi-mode or low-mode fibers with high UV resistance at 266 nm wavelength (pulsed 4th harmonic Nd:YAG laser) have been published. In this report, double-clad fibers with 70 μm or 100 μm core diameter and a large claddingto- core ratio will be recommended. Laser-induced UV-damages will be compared between these new fiber type and traditional UV fibers with similar core sizes. Finally, experimental results will be cross compared against broadband cw deuterium lamp damage standards.

  3. Osseointegration of Implants Surface-Treated with Various Diameters of TiO2 Nano tubes in Rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Ch.G.; Park, Y.B.; Choi, H.; Lee, K.W.; Shim, J.S.; Oh, S.; Choi, S.H.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the osseointegration of implants which were surface-treated with various diameters of TiO 2 nano tubes (30 nm, 70 nm, and 100 nm) in rabbit. Resorbable blast media (RBM) surfaced implants (Osstem, Busan, Korea) 3.5 mm in diameter and 8.5 mm in length were designated as the control group and the implants surface-treated with various diameters of nano tubes (30 nm, 70 nm, and 100 nm) with the same shapes were designated as the experimental groups. The implants were maintained unloaded for 4 and 12 weeks. After this period, the animals were sacrificed and micro-CT analysis, histomorphometric analysis (bone to implant contact (BIC), bone volume (BV)), and removal torque test were performed. Micro-CT analysis, histomorphometric analysis, and removal torque test results all showed the similar pattern, showing that 70 nm experimental group had the highest value at 4 weeks while 30 nm experimental group had the highest value at 12 weeks. Therefore, on the basis of the results above, it can be concluded that 30 nm and 70 nm TiO 2 nano tubes may have positive effects on osteogenesis and osseointegration depending on the healing time

  4. Insights on proximity effect and multiphoton induced luminescence from gold nanospheres in far field optical microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borglin, Johan [Biomedical Photonics Group, Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg, Kemivägen 10, 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg, Kemivägen 10, 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Guldbrand, Stina [Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg, Kemivägen 10, 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Evenbratt, Hanne [Pharmaceutical Technology, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Kemigården 4, 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Kirejev, Vladimir; Ericson, Marica B., E-mail: marica.ericson@chem.gu.se [Biomedical Photonics Group, Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg, Kemivägen 10, 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Grönbeck, Henrik [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Kemivägen 9, 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2015-12-07

    Gold nanoparticles can be visualized in far-field multiphoton laser-scanning microscopy (MPM) based on the phenomena of multiphoton induced luminescence (MIL). This is of interest for biomedical applications, e.g., for cancer diagnostics, as MPM allows for working in the near-infrared (NIR) optical window of tissue. It is well known that the aggregation of particles causes a redshift of the plasmon resonance, but its implications for MIL applying far-field MPM should be further exploited. Here, we explore MIL from 10 nm gold nanospheres that are chemically deposited on glass substrates in controlled coverage gradients using MPM operating in NIR range. The substrates enable studies of MIL as a function of inter-particle distance and clustering. It was shown that MIL was only detected from areas on the substrates where the particle spacing was less than one particle diameter, or where the particles have aggregated. The results are interpreted in the context that the underlying physical phenomenon of MIL is a sequential two-photon absorption process, where the first event is driven by the plasmon resonance. It is evident that gold nanospheres in this size range have to be closely spaced or clustered to exhibit detectable MIL using far-field MPM operating in the NIR region.

  5. Insights on proximity effect and multiphoton induced luminescence from gold nanospheres in far field optical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borglin, Johan; Guldbrand, Stina; Evenbratt, Hanne; Kirejev, Vladimir; Ericson, Marica B.; Grönbeck, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles can be visualized in far-field multiphoton laser-scanning microscopy (MPM) based on the phenomena of multiphoton induced luminescence (MIL). This is of interest for biomedical applications, e.g., for cancer diagnostics, as MPM allows for working in the near-infrared (NIR) optical window of tissue. It is well known that the aggregation of particles causes a redshift of the plasmon resonance, but its implications for MIL applying far-field MPM should be further exploited. Here, we explore MIL from 10 nm gold nanospheres that are chemically deposited on glass substrates in controlled coverage gradients using MPM operating in NIR range. The substrates enable studies of MIL as a function of inter-particle distance and clustering. It was shown that MIL was only detected from areas on the substrates where the particle spacing was less than one particle diameter, or where the particles have aggregated. The results are interpreted in the context that the underlying physical phenomenon of MIL is a sequential two-photon absorption process, where the first event is driven by the plasmon resonance. It is evident that gold nanospheres in this size range have to be closely spaced or clustered to exhibit detectable MIL using far-field MPM operating in the NIR region

  6. Size-dependent impairment of cognition in mice caused by the injection of gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yu-Shiun; Hong, Meng-Yeng; Huang, G Steve; Hung, Yao-Ching; Lin, Li-Wei; Liau, Ian

    2010-01-01

    We explored the size-dependent impairment of cognition in mice caused by the injection of gold nanoparticles (GNPs). GNPs of 17 and 37 nm in diameter were injected intraperitoneally into BALB/c mice at doses ranging from 0.5 to 14.6 mg kg -1 . ICP-MS was performed on brain tissue collected 1, 14 and 21 days after the injection. A passive-avoidance test was performed on day 21. Monoamine levels were determined on day 21. The microscopic distribution of GNPs in the hippocampus was examined using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results indicated that 17 nm GNPs passed through the blood-brain barrier more rapidly than 37 nm GNPs. Treatment with 17 nm GNPs decreased the latency time, which was comparable to the effect of scopolamine treatment, while 37 nm GNPs showed no significant effect. Dopamine levels and serotonin levels in the brain were significantly altered by the injection of 17 and 37 nm GNPs. GNPs affected dopaminergic and serotonergic neurons. CARS microscopy indicated that 17 nm GNPs entered the Cornu Ammonis (CA) region of the hippocampus, while 37 nm GNPs were excluded from the CA region. TEM verified the presence of 17 nm GNPs in the cytoplasm of pyramidal cells. In this study, we showed that the ability of GNPs to damage cognition in mice was size-dependent and associated with the ability of the particles to invade the hippocampus. The dosage and duration of the treatment should be taken into account if GNPs are used in the future as vehicles to carry therapeutic agents into the brain.

  7. Size-dependent impairment of cognition in mice caused by the injection of gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu-Shiun; Hong, Meng-Yeng; Huang, G Steve [Institute of Nanotechnology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Hung, Yao-Ching [Section of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, China Medical University and Hospital, 91 Hsueh Shih Road, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Lin, Li-Wei [School of Chinese Medicine for Post-Baccalaureate, I-Shou University, 8 Yida Road, Yanchao Township, Kaohsiung Country 82445, Taiwan (China); Liau, Ian, E-mail: gstevehuang@mail.nctu.edu.tw [Department of Applied Chemistry, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2010-12-03

    We explored the size-dependent impairment of cognition in mice caused by the injection of gold nanoparticles (GNPs). GNPs of 17 and 37 nm in diameter were injected intraperitoneally into BALB/c mice at doses ranging from 0.5 to 14.6 mg kg{sup -1}. ICP-MS was performed on brain tissue collected 1, 14 and 21 days after the injection. A passive-avoidance test was performed on day 21. Monoamine levels were determined on day 21. The microscopic distribution of GNPs in the hippocampus was examined using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results indicated that 17 nm GNPs passed through the blood-brain barrier more rapidly than 37 nm GNPs. Treatment with 17 nm GNPs decreased the latency time, which was comparable to the effect of scopolamine treatment, while 37 nm GNPs showed no significant effect. Dopamine levels and serotonin levels in the brain were significantly altered by the injection of 17 and 37 nm GNPs. GNPs affected dopaminergic and serotonergic neurons. CARS microscopy indicated that 17 nm GNPs entered the Cornu Ammonis (CA) region of the hippocampus, while 37 nm GNPs were excluded from the CA region. TEM verified the presence of 17 nm GNPs in the cytoplasm of pyramidal cells. In this study, we showed that the ability of GNPs to damage cognition in mice was size-dependent and associated with the ability of the particles to invade the hippocampus. The dosage and duration of the treatment should be taken into account if GNPs are used in the future as vehicles to carry therapeutic agents into the brain.

  8. Proteinticle/gold core/shell nanoparticles for targeted cancer therapy without nanotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Koo Chul; Ryu, Ju Hee; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Lee, Eun Jung; Kwon, Ick Chan; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Lee, Jeewon

    2014-10-08

    PGCS-NPs (40 nm) with excellent photo-thermal activity are developed, on the surface of which affibody peptides with specific affinity for EGFR and many small gold dots (1-3 nm) are densely presented. The IV-injected PGCS-NPs into EGFR-expressing tumor-bearing mice successfully perform targeted and photothermal therapy of cancer. It seems that the small gold dots released from disassembled PGCS-NPs are easily removed and never cause in vivo toxicity problems. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Pseudo-template synthesis of gold nanoparticles based on polyhydrosilanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sacarescu, Liviu; Simionescu, Mihaela; Sacarescu, Gabriela

    2011-01-01

    Highly stable colloidal gold nanoparticles are obtained in a pseudo-template system using a specific polyhydrosilane copolymeric structure. This process takes place in situ by microwaves activation of the polymer solution in a non-polar solvent followed by stirring with solid HAuCl 4 in natural light. The experimental procedure is very simple and the resulted colloidal gold solution is indefinitely stable. The specific surface plasmon resonance absorption band of the gold nanoparticles is strongly red shifted and is strictly related to their size. AFM correlated with DLS analysis showed flattened round shaped colloidal polymer-gold nanoparticles with large diameters. SEM-EDX combined analysis reveals that the polysilane-gold nanoparticles show a natural tendency to auto-assemble in close packed structures which form large areas over the polymer film surface.

  10. Biofilm formation on a TiO2 nanotube with controlled pore diameter and surface wettability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anitha, V C; Narayan Banerjee, Arghya; Woo Joo, Sang; Lee, Jin-Hyung; Lee, Jintae; Ki Min, Bong

    2015-01-01

    Titania (TiO 2 ) nanotube arrays (TNAs) with different pore diameters (140 − 20 nm) are fabricated via anodization using hydrofluoric acid (HF) containing ethylene glycol (EG) by changing the HF-to-EG volume ratio and the anodization voltage. To evaluate the effects of different pore diameters of TiO 2 nanotubes on bacterial biofilm formation, Shewanella oneidensis (S. oneidensis) MR-1 cells and a crystal-violet biofilm assay are used. The surface roughness and wettability of the TNA surfaces as a function of pore diameter, measured via the contact angle and AFM techniques, are correlated with the controlled biofilm formation. Biofilm formation increases with the decreasing nanotube pore diameter, and a 20 nm TiO 2 nanotube shows the maximum biofilm formation. The measurements revealed that 20 nm surfaces have the least hydrophilicity with the highest surface roughness of ∼17 nm and that they show almost a 90% increase in the effective surface area relative to the 140 nm TNAs, which stimulate the cells more effectively to produce the pili to attach to the surface for more biofilm formation. The results demonstrate that bacterial cell adhesion (and hence, biofilm formation) can effectively be controlled by tuning the roughness and wettability of TNAs via controlling the pore diameters of TNA surfaces. This biofilm formation as a function of the surface properties of TNAs can be a potential candidate for both medical applications and as electrodes in microbial fuel cells. (paper)

  11. Fungus-mediated synthesis of gold nanoparticles and standardization of parameters for its biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidke, Pritish R; Gupta, Indarchand; Gade, Aniket K; Rai, Mahendra

    2014-12-01

    We report the extracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using a fungus Fusarium acuminatum. Mycosynthesis of Au-NPs was carried out by challenging the fungal cells filtrate with HAuCl 4 solution (1 mM), as nanoparticles synthesizing enzyme secrete extracellularly by the fungi. The AuNPs were characterized with the help of UV-Visible spectrophotometer, Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, Zeta Potential, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We observed absorbance peak in between 520 nm-550 nm corresponding to the surface plasmon absorbance of the gold nanoparticles. The nanoparticles synthesized in the present investigation were found to be capped by proteins. XRD results showed that the distinctive formation of crystalline gold nanoparticles in the solution. The spherical and polydispersed AuNPs in the range 8 to 28 nm with average size of 17 nm were observed by TEM analysis. We also standardized the parameters like the effect of pH, temperature and salt concentration on the biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles. It was found that acidic pH, 1 mM salt concentration and 37 (°)C temperature were found to be optimum for the synthesis of Au-NPs. Therefore, the present study introduces the easy, better and cheaper method for biosynthesis of AuNPs.

  12. Cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of different sized gold nanoparticles in ovarian cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dhiraj; Mutreja, Isha; Chitcholtan, Kenny; Sykes, Peter

    2017-11-01

    Nanomedicine has advanced the biomedical field with the availability of multifunctional nanoparticles (NPs) systems that can target a disease site enabling drug delivery and helping to monitor the disease. In this paper, we synthesised the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with an average size 18, 40, 60 and 80 nm, and studied the effect of nanoparticles size, concentration and incubation time on ovarian cancer cells namely, OVCAR5, OVCAR8, and SKOV3. The size measured by transmission electron microscopy images was slightly smaller than the hydrodynamic diameter; measured size by ImageJ as 14.55, 38.13, 56.88 and 78.56 nm. The cellular uptake was significantly controlled by the AuNPs size, concentration, and the cell type. The nanoparticles uptake increased with increasing concentration, and 18 and 80 nm AuNPs showed higher uptake ranging from 1.3 to 5.4 μg depending upon the concentration and cell type. The AuNPs were associated with a temporary reduction in metabolic activity, but metabolic activity remained more than 60% for all sample types; NPs significantly affected the cell proliferation activity in first 12 h. The increase in nanoparticle size and concentration induced the production of reactive oxygen species in 24 h.

  13. Gold nanoparticles: role of size and surface chemistry on blood protein adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benetti, F., E-mail: filippo.benetti@unitn.it; Fedel, M. [BIOtech Research Centre (Italy); Minati, L.; Speranza, G. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler (Italy); Migliaresi, C. [BIOtech Research Centre (Italy)

    2013-06-15

    Material interaction with blood proteins is a critical issue, since it could influence the biological processes taking place in the body following implantation/injection. This is particularly important in the case of nanoparticles, where innovative properties, such as size and high surface to volume ratio can lead to a behavioral change with respect to bulk macroscopic materials and could be responsible for a potential risk for human health. The aim of this work was to compare gold nanoparticles (AuNP) and planar surfaces to study the role of surface curvature moving from the macro- to the nano-size in the process of blood protein adsorption. In the course of the study, different protocols were tested to optimize the analysis of protein adsorption on gold nanoparticles. AuNP with different size (10, 60 and 200 nm diameter) and surface coatings (citrate and polyethylene glycol) were carefully characterized. The stabilizing action of blood proteins adsorbed on AuNP was studied measuring the variation of size and solubility of the nanoparticles following incubation with single protein solutions (human serum albumin and fibrinogen) and whole blood plasma. In addition, we developed a method to elute proteins from AuNP to study the propensity of gold materials to adsorb plasma proteins in function of dimensional characteristics and surface chemistry. We showed a different efficacy of the various eluting media tested, proving that even the most aggressive agent cannot provide a complete detachment of the protein corona. Enhanced protein adsorption was evidenced on AuNP if compared to gold laminae (bare and PEGylated) used as macroscopic control, probably due to the superior AuNP surface reactivity.

  14. Development of a gold-nanostructured surface for amperometric genosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanardi, Chiara, E-mail: chiara.zanardi@unimore.it [Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Dipartimento di Chimica (Italy); Baldoli, Clara, E-mail: clara.baldoli@istm.cnr.it [Istituto di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari del CNR (Italy); Licandro, Emanuela [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Chimica Organica ed Industriale (Italy); Terzi, Fabio; Seeber, Renato [Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Dipartimento di Chimica (Italy)

    2012-10-15

    A gold-nanostructured surface has been obtained by stable deposition of chemically synthesized gold nanoparticles (2.1-5.5 nm size range) on a gold substrate through a dithiol linker. The method proposed for the obtainment of the nanostructure is suitable for the further stable anchoring of a peptide nucleic acid oligomer through four amine groups of lysine terminal residues, leading to fairly reproducible systems. The geometric area of the nanostructured surface is compared with those of a smooth and of an electrochemically generated nanostructured surface by depositing a probe bearing an electrochemically active ferrocene residue. Despite the area of the two nanostructures being quite similar, the response toward a 2 nM target oligonucleotide sequence is particularly high when using the surface built up by nanoparticle deposition. This aspect indicates that morphologic details of the nanostructure play a key role in conditioning the performances of the genosensors.

  15. Development of a gold-nanostructured surface for amperometric genosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanardi, Chiara; Baldoli, Clara; Licandro, Emanuela; Terzi, Fabio; Seeber, Renato

    2012-01-01

    A gold-nanostructured surface has been obtained by stable deposition of chemically synthesized gold nanoparticles (2.1–5.5 nm size range) on a gold substrate through a dithiol linker. The method proposed for the obtainment of the nanostructure is suitable for the further stable anchoring of a peptide nucleic acid oligomer through four amine groups of lysine terminal residues, leading to fairly reproducible systems. The geometric area of the nanostructured surface is compared with those of a smooth and of an electrochemically generated nanostructured surface by depositing a probe bearing an electrochemically active ferrocene residue. Despite the area of the two nanostructures being quite similar, the response toward a 2 nM target oligonucleotide sequence is particularly high when using the surface built up by nanoparticle deposition. This aspect indicates that morphologic details of the nanostructure play a key role in conditioning the performances of the genosensors.

  16. Gold/silver/gold trilayer films on nanostructured polycarbonate substrates for direct and label-free nanoplasmonic biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Muñoz, Gerardo A; Estévez, M-Carmen; Vázquez-García, Marc; Berenguel-Alonso, Miguel; Alonso-Chamarro, Julián; Homs-Corbera, Antoni; Lechuga, Laura M

    2018-05-01

    Ultrasmooth gold/silver/gold trilayer nanostructured plasmonic sensors were obtained using commercial Blu-ray optical discs as nanoslits-based flexible polymer substrates. A thin gold film was used as an adhesion and nucleation layer to improve the chemical stability and reduce the surface roughness of the overlying silver film, without increasing ohmic plasmon losses. The structures were physically and optically characterized and compared with nanostructures of single gold layer. Ultrasmooth and chemically stable trilayer nanostructures with a surface roughness <0.5 nm were obtained following a simple and reproducible fabrication process. They showed a figure of merit (FOM) value up to 69.2 RIU -1 which is significantly higher (more than 95%) than the gold monolayer counterpart. Their potential for biosensing was demonstrated by employing the trilayer sensor for the direct and refractometric (label-free) detection of C-reactive protein (CRP) biomarker in undiluted urine achieving a Limit of Detection (LOD) in the pM order. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Illumination wavelength and time dependent nano gold photo-deposition and CO oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siewhui Chong

    Full Text Available In this study, nano gold (Au was deposited on titanium dioxide (TiO2 of different morphologies and crystallinities by photo-deposition method under LED irradiation with various wavelengths and irradiation times. The reactivity of carbon monoxide (CO oxidation of the as-prepared catalysts was examined and correlated with the characteristics of TiO2 support and gold particles. Characterization and activity tests showed that the effective illumination wavelength of photo-deposition is strongly determined by the band-gap of TiO2. Au/Cubic-TiO2 (450 nm, 5 min yielded comparatively highest CO conversion of 71%, followed by Au/P25 (375 nm, 1 min and Au/ST21 (340 nm, 1 min. When the photon energy of the LED is lower than the band-gap of TiO2, CO conversion rate increases with the irradiation time due to the decrease in gold particle size which could possibly due to the lower speed of photo-deposition compared to that of concentration diffusion. Keywords: Gold, Catalyst, TiO2, Photodeposition, Carbon monoxide, Oxidation

  18. 8 nm nanodiamonds as markers for 2 photon excited luminescent microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharin, A; Rogov, A; Bonacina, L; Geloen, A; Lysenko, V

    2016-01-01

    Structural and luminescent properties of stable suspensions of fluorescent nanodiamonds were investigated. Measurement of the effective hydrodynamic radius yields particles less than 30 nm diameter, while the TEM measurements made on the same particles shows average diameter about 8 nm. It was found that NDs have relatively low toxicity. Upon incubation, 3T3-L1 cells spontaneously take up nanodiamonds that uniformly distribute in cells cytoplasm. The possibility of fluorescent imaging using both single ore two-photon excitation was shown. (paper)

  19. An in-vitro studies on green synthesis of gold nanoparticles against pathogens and cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Ramesh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology is a most promising field for generating new applications in medicine. It is imperative to integrate nanoscience and medicine. The present investigation is highly warranted to through more light upon the gold nanoparticles reduced from gold salt through the active principle of medicinal plant. The special emphasis of investigation is the active principle along with gold nanoparticles against for cancer cells. The 70 - 90 nm sized particles were synthesized by using Diospyros ferrea and this confirmed by SEM. These gold nanoparticles showed a characteristic absorption peak at 540 nm in UV spectra. The possibility of protein as a stabilizing material in gold nanoparticles is revealed by FTIR analysis. Remarkably, as a result of wide screening on the application of newly synthesized gold nanoparticles their anticancer potential has been discovered using MTT assay. The antimicrobial activity of AuNPs showed effective against bacteria than the fungal strains.

  20. Static and ultrafast optical properties of nanolayered composites. Gold nanoparticles embedded in polyelectrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiel, Mareike

    2012-08-16

    In the course of this thesis gold nanoparticle/polyelectrolyte multilayer structures were prepared, characterized, and investigated according to their static and ultrafast optical properties. Using the dip-coating or spin-coating layer-by-layer deposition method, gold-nanoparticle layers were embedded in a polyelectrolyte environment with high structural perfection. Typical structures exhibit four repetition units, each consisting of one gold-particle layer and ten double layers of polyelectrolyte (cationic+anionic polyelectrolyte). The structures were characterized by X-ray reflectivity measurements, which reveal Bragg peaks up to the seventh order, evidencing the high stratification of the particle layers. In the same measurements pronounced Kiessig fringes were observed, which indicate a low global roughness of the samples. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images verified this low roughness, which results from the high smoothing capabilities of polyelectrolyte layers. This smoothing effect facilitates the fabrication of stratified nanoparticle/polyelectrolyte multilayer structures, which were nicely illustrated in a transmission electron microscopy image. The samples' optical properties were investigated by static spectroscopic measurements in the visible and UV range. The measurements revealed a frequency shift of the reflectance and of the plasmon absorption band, depending on the thickness of the polyelectrolyte layers that cover a nanoparticle layer. When the covering layer becomes thicker than the particle interaction range, the absorption spectrum becomes independent of the polymer thickness. However, the reflectance spectrum continues shifting to lower frequencies (even for large thicknesses). The range of plasmon interaction was determined to be in the order of the particle diameter for 10 nm, 20 nm, and 150 nm particles. The transient broadband complex dielectric function of a multilayer structure was determined experimentally by ultrafast pump

  1. Surface potential on gold nanodisc arrays fabricated on silicon under light irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezaki, Tomotarou; Matsutani, Akihiro; Nishioka, Kunio; Shoji, Dai; Sato, Mina; Okamoto, Takayuki; Isobe, Toshihiro; Nakajima, Akira; Matsushita, Sachiko

    2018-06-01

    This paper proposes Kelvin probe force microscopy (KFM) as a new measurement method of plasmon phenomenon. The surface potential of two arrays, namely, a monomeric array and a tetrameric array, of gold nanodiscs (600 nm diameter) on a silicon substrate fabricated by electron beam lithography was investigated by KFM with the view point of irradiation light wavelength change. In terms of the value of the surface potential, contrasting behaviour, a negative shift in the monomeric disc array and a positive shift in the tetrameric disc array, was observed by light irradiation. This interesting behaviour is thought to be related to a difference in localised plasmons caused by the disc arrangement and was investigated from various viewpoints, including Rayleigh anomalies. Finally, this paper reveals that KFM is powerful not only to investigate the plasmonic behaviour but also to predict the electron transportation.

  2. Precise control of multiwall carbon nanotube diameters using thermal chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, M. P.; Overmyer, D. L.; Provencio, P. P.

    2002-03-01

    We grow multiwall carbon nanotube (CNT) films using thermal chemical vapor deposition at atmospheric pressure using a mixture of acetylene and nitrogen from a 4-nm-thick Ni film catalyst. CNTs are characterized using electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. CNTs grown with this method are extremely uniform in diameter, both throughout the sample and within the lengths of individual tubes. Nanotube outer diameters, ranging from 5-350 nm, and the total deposition of carbon material, increase exponentially with growth temperature from 630 °C-790 °C.

  3. Optoacoustic response from graphene-based solutions embedded in optical phantoms by using 905-nm high-power diode-laser assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggio, Luca; Gallego, Daniel C.; Gawali, Sandeep Babu; Dadrasnia, Ehsan; Sánchez, Miguel; Rodríguez, Sergio; González, Marta; Carpintero, Guillermo; Osiński, Marek; Lamela, Horacio

    2016-03-01

    During the last two decades, optoacoustic imaging has been developed as a novel biomedical imaging technique based on the generation of ultrasound waves by means of laser light. In this work, we investigate the optoacoustic response from graphene-based solutions by using a compact and cost-effective system based on an assembly of several 905-nm pulsed high-power diode lasers coupled to a bundle of 200-μm diameter- core optical fibers. The coupled light is conveyed into a lens system and focused on an absorber consisting of graphene-based nanomaterials (graphene oxide, reduced graphene oxide, and reduced graphene-oxide/gold-nanoparticle hybrid, respectively) diluted in ethanol and hosted in slightly scattering optical phantoms. The high absorption of these graphene-based solutions suggests their potential future use in optoacoustic applications as contrast agents.

  4. Wavelength-dependent Faraday–Tyndall effect on laser-induced microbubble in gold colloid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liaw, Jiunn-Woei; Tsai, Shiao-Wen; Lin, Hung-Hsun; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Chen, Bae-Renn

    2012-01-01

    The cavitation microbubbles in dilute gold colloids of different concentrations (2–10 ppm) induced by a focused nanosecond-pulsed laser beam were measured and characterized at different wavelengths by using the passive and active ultrasound measurements. Three colloids with gold nanoparticles (GNPs) of different sizes (10, 45, and 75 nm) were used for experiment. The results show that the lifespan of the microbubble is reduced as the concentration of GNP increases, particularly at the wavelength of 532 nm, the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of GNP. In contrast, at the off-resonant wavelength (e.g. 700 nm), the lifespan reduction is relatively small. This wavelength-dependent cavitation is attributed to the Faraday–Tyndall effect, a strong light scattering by GNPs. A slight defocusing of the Gaussian beam in gold colloid was proposed. Hence, the waist of the focused beam increases to reduce the optical breakdown in gold colloid. For simplicity, a linear relation between the incremental waist radius of Gaussian beam and the concentration of GNP was assumed. According to this formulation, the theoretical results are consistent with the experimental ones. In addition, the dynamics of the microbubble in gold colloid measured by the active ultrasound method agree with the Rayleigh–Plesset model. -- Highlights: ► The Faraday–Tyndall effect of gold colloid on laser induced microbubble is studied. ► Faraday–Tyndall effect of gold colloid causes the defocusing of laser beam. ► Lifespan of the microbubble is reduced as the concentration of GNP increases. ► Light scattering of laser beam at the surface plasmon resonance of GNP is the maximum.

  5. Recovery of gold as a type of porous fiber by using biosorption followed by incineration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seong-In; Kwak, In Seob; Bae, Min A; Mao, Juan; Won, Sung Wook; Han, Do Hyeong; Chung, Yong Sik; Yun, Yeoung-Sang

    2012-01-01

    This study introduces a new process for the recovery of gold in porous fiber form by the incineration of Au-loaded biosorbent fiber from gold-cyanide solutions. For the recovery of gold from such aqueous solutions, polyethylenimine (PEI)-modified bacterial biosorbent fiber (PBBF) and PEI-modified chitosan fiber (PCSF) were developed and used. The maximum uptakes of Au(I) ions were estimated as 421.1 and 251.7 mg/g at pH 5.5 for PBBF and PCSF, respectively. Au-loaded biosorbents were freeze-dried and then incinerated to oxidize their organic constituents while simultaneously obtaining reduced gold. As a result, porous metallic gold fibers were obtained with 60 μm of diameter. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis and mercury porosimetry revealed the fibers to have 60 μm of diameter and to be highly porous and hollow. The proposed process therefore offers the potential for the efficient recovery of metallic porous gold fibers using combined biosorption and incineration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Surface plasmon enhancement in gold nanoparticles in the presence of an optical gain medium: an analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathiyamoorthy, K; Sreekanth, K V; Sidharthan, R; Murukeshan, V M [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Xing Bengang, E-mail: mmurukeshan@ntu.edu.sg [Division of Chemistry and Biological Chemistry, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 21 Nanyang Link, Singapore 637371 (Singapore)

    2011-10-26

    The localized surface plasmon (LSP) enhancement in a gold nanoparticle is demonstrated in this paper. The enhancement of LSP is influenced by both size and the dielectric gain medium surrounding the nanoparticles. The nanoparticle is found to induce plasmonic enhancement of varying degrees depending on its size, and it is inferred that a gold nanoparticle of size 60 nm exhibits the maximum LSP for 532 nm excitation. Singularity due to cancellation of SP loss by an infinite gain medium and LSP enhancement are studied using a pump-probe Rayleigh scattering experiment. Gold nanoparticles of average size 60 nm exhibit the lowest threshold power to observe Rayleigh scattering. Furthermore, compared with the bare nanoparticles, a 12.5 fold enhancement of LSP is observed when the nanoparticle of average size 60 nm is kept in the gain medium.

  7. Photopyroelectric Techniques for thermo-optical characterization of gold nano-particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chávez-Sandoval, B E; Balderas-López, J A; Padilla-Bernal, G; Moreno-Rivera, M A; Franco-Hernández, M O; Martínez-Jiménez, A; García-Franco, F

    2015-01-01

    Since the first methodology, proposed by Turkevich, to produce gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), improvements have been made as to allow better controllability in their size and shape. These two parameters play important role for application of gold nanoparticles since they determine their optical and thermal properties. Two photopyroelectric techniques for the measurement of the thermal diffusivity and the optical absorption coefficient for nano-particles are introduced. These thermo-physical properties were measured for the colloidal systems at different nano-particle's sizes and, for optical properties, at three different wavelengths (405 nm, 488 nm and 532 nm). No significant difference, on thermal properties, was found in the range of nano-particles' sizes studied in this work; in opposition optical properties shown more sensitive to this parameter

  8. A novel method for the synthesis of monodisperse gold-coated silica nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    English, Michael D.; Waclawik, Eric R.

    2012-01-01

    Monodisperse silica nanoparticles were synthesised by the well-known Stober protocol, then dispersed in acetonitrile (ACN) and subsequently added to a bisacetonitrile gold(I) coordination complex ([Au(MeCN) 2 ] + ) in ACN. The silica hydroxyl groups were deprotonated in the presence of ACN, generating a formal negative charge on the siloxy groups. This allowed the [Au(MeCN) 2 ] + complex to undergo ligand exchange with the silica nanoparticles and form a surface coordination complex with reduction to metallic gold (Au 0 ) proceeding by an inner sphere mechanism. The residual [Au(MeCN) 2 ] + complex was allowed to react with water, disproportionating into Au 0 and Au(III), respectively, with the Au 0 adding to the reduced gold already bound on the silica surface. The so-formed metallic gold seed surface was found to be suitable for the conventional reduction of Au(III) to Au 0 by ascorbic acid (ASC). This process generated a thin and uniform gold coating on the silica nanoparticles. The silica NPs batches synthesised were in a size range from 45 to 460 nm. Of these silica NP batches, the size range from 400 to 480 nm were used for the gold-coating experiments.

  9. Superparamagnetic core/shell GoldMag nanoparticles: size-, concentration- and time-dependent cellular nanotoxicity on human umbilical vein endothelial cells and the suitable conditions for magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Mingfu; Yang, Hua; Zhang, Song; Yang, Yan; Zhang, Dong; Qi, Yueyong; Zou, Liguang

    2015-03-25

    GoldMag nanoparticles (GMNPs) possess the properties of colloid gold and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, which make them useful for delivery, separation and molecular imaging. However, because of the nanometer effect, GMNPs are highly toxic. Thus, the biosafety of GMNPs should be fully studied prior to their use in biomedicine. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the nanotoxicity of GMNPs on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and determine a suitable size, concentration and time for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Transmission electron microscopy showed that GMNPs had a typical shell/core structure, and the shell was confirmed to be gold using energy dispersive spectrometer analysis. The average sizes of the 30 and 50 nm GMNPs were 30.65 ± 3.15 and 49.23 ± 5.01 nm, respectively, and the shell thickness were 6.8 ± 0.65 and 8.5 ± 1.36 nm, respectively. Dynamic light scattering showed that the hydrodynamic diameter of the 30 and 50 nm GMNPs were 33.2 ± 2.68 and 53.12 ± 4.56 nm, respectively. The r 2 relaxivity of the 50 nm GMNPs was 98.65 mM(-1) s(-1), whereas it was 80.18 mM(-1) s(-1) for the 30 nm GMNPs. The proliferation, cytoskeleton, migration, tube formation, apoptosis and ROS generation of labeled HUVECs depended on the size and concentration of GMNPs and the time of exposure. Because of the higher labeling rate, the 50 nm GMNPs exhibited a significant increase in nanotoxicity compared with the 30 nm GMNPs at the same concentration and time. At no more than 25 μg/mL and 12 hours, the 50 nm GMNPs exhibited no significant nanotoxicity in HUVECs, whereas no toxicity was observed at 50 μg/mL and 24 hours for the 30 nm GMNPs. These results demonstrated that the nanotoxicity of GMNPs in HUVECs depended on size, concentration and time. Exposure to larger GMNPs with a higher concentration for a longer period of time resulted in a higher labeling rate and ROS level for HUVECs. Coupled with r 2 relaxivity, it was suggested

  10. Two-photon imaging of field enhancement by groups of gold nanostrip antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novikov, Sergey M.; Beermann, Jonas; Sondergaard, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Resonant field enhancement by groups of 16 nm thin gold nanostrip antennas consisting of four strips (widths of 70, 100, and 130 nm) and fixed gap (50, 100, 150, or 200 nm) between them and positioned on a quartz substrate is investigated by reflection spectroscopy and two-photon photoluminescenc...

  11. Contribution to the study of defect quenching in gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillairet, J.; Delaplace, J.; Mairy, C.; Adda, Y.

    1964-01-01

    We have studied by resistivity measurements at low temperatures the influence of quenching conditions on the behaviour of defects in gold. We have quenched from a high temperature and in various liquids gold wires of 0.3 and 0.5 mm diameter having a purity of 99.999 per cent. For cooling rates of 25,000 deg C/second and above all the defects in equilibrium at high temperature are retained by quenching. The annealing of the defects thus obtained occurs in two stages, the first below 150 deg C and the second between 450 and 650 deg C. The mobility energy of the defects which are annealed during the first stage is 0.70 ± 0.06 eV, The annealing kinetics depend on the initial concentration of the defects and of the diameter of the sample. The second stage corresponds to disappearance of the stacking fault tetrahedra which are formed from defect packets during annealing. The formation energy of the defects measured on the 0. 5 mm samples is 0.94 eV. The values obtained with 0,3 mm diameter samples, much lower than 0.94 eV, can be explained by assuming that packets of defects occur at the end of the annealing of the samples. Electron microscope observations have been carried out on strips of annealed gold. (authors) [fr

  12. Schiff Base Ligand Coated Gold Nanoparticles for the Chemical Sensing of Fe(III Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abiola Azeez Jimoh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available New Schiff base-coated gold nanoparticles (AuNPs of type AuNP@L (where L: thiolated Schiff base ligand have been synthesized and characterized using various spectroscopic techniques. The AuNPs and AuNP@L were imaged by transmission electron microscopy (TEM and were confirmed to be well-dispersed, uniformly distributed, spherical nanoparticles with an average diameter of 8–10 nm. Their potential applications for chemosensing were investigated in UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopic studies. The AuNP@L exhibited selectivity for Fe3+ in an ethanol/water mixture (ratio 9 : 1 v/v. The absorption and emission spectral studies revealed a 1 : 1 binding mode for Fe3+, with binding constants of 8.5×105 and 2.9×105 M−1, respectively.

  13. Photochemical Synthesis of the Bioconjugate Folic Acid-Gold Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    León, John Jairo Castillo; Bertel, Linda; Páez-Mozo, Edgar

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a rapid and simple onepot method to obtain gold nanoparticles functionalized with folic acid using a photochemistry method. The bioconjugate folic acid-gold nanoparticle was generated in one step using a photo-reduction method, mixing hydrogen tetrachloroaurate with folic...... at 4°C prolongs the stability of folic acid-gold nanoparticle suspensions to up to 26 days. Ultraviolet visible and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed a surface plasmon band of around 534nm and fluorescence spectroscopy exhibited a quenching effect on gold nanoparticles in the fluorescence...... emission of folic acid and thus confirmed the conjugation of folic acid to the surface of gold nanoparticles. In this study we demonstrate the use of a photochemistry method to obtain folic acid-gold nanoparticles in a simple and rapid way without the use of surfactants and long reaction times...

  14. Electroless reductions on carbon nanotubes: How critical is the diameter of a nanotube

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Detailed experimental and theoretical studies have been performed to investigate the influence of the diameter of multi-walled carboxy-functionalized carbon nanotubes (CFCNTs) on their ability to reduce PdCl4 2- salt to Pd nanoparticles on their surface at room temperature. The obtained results (inductively-coupled plasmaspectrometry and cyclic voltammetry) show that the reduction ability of CFCNTs with 5 nm diameter (CFCNT5) is stronger than that of CFCNTs with 15 nm diameter (CFCNT15). Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations suggest that a more negative charge distribution exists on CFCNT5, which makes it a better electron donor to PdCl42-. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  15. Polyethyleneglycol diacrylate hydrogels with plasmonic gold nanospheres incorporated via functional group optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnuvelu, Dinesh Veeran; Kim, Seokbeom; Lee, Jungchul

    2017-12-01

    We present a facile method for the preparation of polyethyleneglycol diacrylate (PEG-DA) hydrogels with plasmonic gold (Au) nanospheres incorporated for various biological and chemical sensing applications. Plasmonic Au nanospheres were prepared ex situ using the standard citrate reduction method with an average diameter of 3.5 nm and a standard deviation of 0.5 nm, and evaluated for their surface functionalization process intended for uniform dispersion in polymer matrices. UV-Visible spectroscopy reveals the existence of plasmonic properties for pristine Au nanospheres, functionalized Au nanospheres, and PEG-DA with uniformly dispersed functionalized Au nanospheres (hybrid Au/PEG-DA hydrogels). Hybrid Au/PEG-DA hydrogels examined by using Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FT-IR) exhibit the characteristic bands at 1635, 1732 and 2882 cm-1 corresponding to reaction products of OH- originating from oxidized product of citrate, -C=O stretching from ester bond, and C-H stretching of PEG-DA, respectively. Thermal studies of hybrid Au/PEG-DA hydrogels show three-stage decomposition with their stabilities up to 500 °C. Optical properties and thermal stabilities associated with the uniform dispersion of Au nanospheres within hydrogels reported herein will facilitate various biological and chemical sensing applications.

  16. Conjugated 12 nm long oligomers as molecular wires in nanoelectronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Roar; Strobel, Sebastian; Bundgaard, Eva

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate a generic synthetic approach to oligophenylenevinylene (OPV) derivative molecules with a molecular length of up to 12 nm and a relatively free choice of end group that can attach to different electrodes such as metallic gold or potentially transition metal oxide semiconductors. OPV...

  17. Simple fabrication of gold nanobelts and patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renyun Zhang

    Full Text Available Gold nanobelts are of interest in several areas; however, there are only few methods available to produce these belts. We report here on a simple evaporation induced self-assembly (EISA method to produce porous gold nanobelts with dimensions that scale across nanometer (thickness ∼80 nm and micrometer (width ∼20 µm, to decimeter (length ∼0.15 m. The gold nanobelts are well packed on the beaker wall and can be easily made to float on the surface of the solution for depositing onto other substrates. Microscopy showed that gold nanobelts had a different structure on the two sides of the belt; the density of gold nanowires on one side was greater than on the other side. Electrical measurements showed that these nanobelts were sensitive to compressive or tensile forces, indicating a potential use as a strain sensor. The patterned nanobelts were further used as a template to grow ZnO nanowires for potential use in applications such as piezo-electronics.

  18. Intracellular surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) with thermally stable gold nanoflowers grown from Pt and Pd seeds

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Hyon Min

    2013-01-01

    SERS provides great sensitivity at low concentrations of analytes. SERS combined with near infrared (NIR)-resonant gold nanomaterials are important candidates for theranostic agents due to their combined extinction properties and sensing abilities stemming from the deep penetration of laser light in the NIR region. Here, highly branched gold nanoflowers (GNFs) grown from Pd and Pt seeds are prepared and their SERS properties are studied. The growth was performed at 80°C without stirring, and this high temperature growth method is assumed to provide great shape stability of sharp tips in GNFs. We found that seed size must be large enough (>30 nm in diameter) to induce the growth of those SERS-active and thermally stable GNFs. We also found that the addition of silver nitrate (AgNO3) is important to induce sharp tip growth and shape stability. Incubation with Hela cells indicates that GNFs are taken up and reside in the cytoplasm. SERS was observed in those cells incubated with 1,10-phenanthroline (Phen)-loaded GNFs. This journal is © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  19. Intracellular surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) with thermally stable gold nanoflowers grown from Pt and Pd seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyon Min; Deng, Lin; Khashab, Niveen M

    2013-05-21

    SERS provides great sensitivity at low concentrations of analytes. SERS combined with near infrared (NIR)-resonant gold nanomaterials are important candidates for theranostic agents due to their combined extinction properties and sensing abilities stemming from the deep penetration of laser light in the NIR region. Here, highly branched gold nanoflowers (GNFs) grown from Pd and Pt seeds are prepared and their SERS properties are studied. The growth was performed at 80 °C without stirring, and this high temperature growth method is assumed to provide great shape stability of sharp tips in GNFs. We found that seed size must be large enough (>30 nm in diameter) to induce the growth of those SERS-active and thermally stable GNFs. We also found that the addition of silver nitrate (AgNO3) is important to induce sharp tip growth and shape stability. Incubation with Hela cells indicates that GNFs are taken up and reside in the cytoplasm. SERS was observed in those cells incubated with 1,10-phenanthroline (Phen)-loaded GNFs.

  20. Cellulase assisted synthesis of nano-silver and gold: Application as immobilization matrix for biocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Abhijeet; Sardar, Meryam

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we report in vitro synthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles (NPs) using cellulase enzyme in a single step reaction. Synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by UV-VIS spectroscopy, Dynamic Light Spectroscopy (DLS), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Energy-dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Circular Dichroism (CD) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). UV-visible studies shows absorption band at 415nm and 520nm for silver and gold NPs respectively due to surface plasmon resonance. Sizes of NPs as shown by TEM are 5-25nm for silver and 5-20nm for gold. XRD peaks confirmed about phase purity and crystallinity of silver and gold NPs. FTIR data shows presence of amide I peak on both the NPs. The cellulase assisted synthesized NPs were further exploited as immobilization matrix for cellulase enzyme. Thermal stability analysis reveals that the immobilized cellulase on synthesized NPs retained 77-80% activity as compared to free enzyme. While reusability data suggests immobilized cellulase can be efficiently used up to sixth cycles with minimum loss of enzyme activity. The secondary structural analysis of cellulase enzyme during the synthesis of NPs and also after immobilization of cellulase on these NPs was carried out by CD spectroscopy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Gold nano-particles fixed on glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worsch, Christian; Wisniewski, Wolfgang; Kracker, Michael; Rüssel, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We produced wear resistant gold–ruby coatings on amorphous substrates. ► Thin sputtered gold layers were covered by or embedded in silica coatings. ► Annealing above T g of the substrate glass led to the formation of gold nano particles. ► A 1 1 1-texture of the gold particles is observed via XRD and EBSD. ► EBSD-patterns can be acquired from crystals covered by a thin layer of glass. - Abstract: A simple process for producing wear resistant gold nano-particle coatings on transparent substrates is proposed. Soda-lime-silica glasses were sputtered with gold and subsequently coated with SiO 2 using a combustion chemical vapor deposition technique. Some samples were first coated with silica, sputtered with gold and then coated with a second layer of silica. The samples were annealed for 20 min at either 550 or 600 °C. This resulted in the formation of round, well separated gold nano-particles with sizes from 15 to 200 nm. The color of the coated glass was equivalent to that of gold–ruby glasses. Silica/gold/silica coatings annealed at 600 °C for 20 min were strongly adherent and scratch resistant. X-ray diffraction and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) were used to describe the crystal orientations of the embedded particles. The gold particles are preferably oriented with their (1 1 1) planes perpendicular to the surface.

  2. Stabilization of sputtered gold and silver nanoparticles in PEG colloid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slepička, P.; Elashnikov, R.; Ulbrich, P.; Staszek, M.; Kolská, Z.; Švorčík, V.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a simple technique for preparation of colloid solution of metal nanoparticles in polyethylene glycol (PEG)/H 2 O is described. By this technique, stable colloidal metal solutions can be prepared ready for use without application of chemical reactions, stabilizers, or reducing agents. The nanoparticles are created by direct sputtering of metal into PEG. The influence of sputter conditions and the concentration of PEG/H 2 O on the properties of nanoparticles was studied. The nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, atomic absorption spectrometry, dynamic light scattering, and UV–Vis spectroscopy. UV–Vis spectra of gold nanoparticle solution exhibit localized surface plasmon resonance characteristic peaks located in the region 513–560 nm (PEG/H 2 O—1/1), 509–535 nm (PEG/H 2 O—1/9), and for silver nanoparticles in the region from 401 to 421 nm. Silver nanoparticles have a broader size distribution compared with gold ones. An appropriate choice of concentration, mixing, and deposition conditions allows preparing the stable solution of gold or silver nanoparticles

  3. Stabilization of sputtered gold and silver nanoparticles in PEG colloid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slepička, P., E-mail: petr.slepicka@vscht.cz; Elashnikov, R. [University of Chemistry and Technology Prague, Department of Solid State Engineering (Czech Republic); Ulbrich, P. [University of Chemistry and Technology Prague, Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology (Czech Republic); Staszek, M. [University of Chemistry and Technology Prague, Department of Solid State Engineering (Czech Republic); Kolská, Z. [University of J. E. Purkyně, Faculty of Science (Czech Republic); Švorčík, V. [University of Chemistry and Technology Prague, Department of Solid State Engineering (Czech Republic)

    2015-01-15

    In this study, a simple technique for preparation of colloid solution of metal nanoparticles in polyethylene glycol (PEG)/H{sub 2}O is described. By this technique, stable colloidal metal solutions can be prepared ready for use without application of chemical reactions, stabilizers, or reducing agents. The nanoparticles are created by direct sputtering of metal into PEG. The influence of sputter conditions and the concentration of PEG/H{sub 2}O on the properties of nanoparticles was studied. The nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, atomic absorption spectrometry, dynamic light scattering, and UV–Vis spectroscopy. UV–Vis spectra of gold nanoparticle solution exhibit localized surface plasmon resonance characteristic peaks located in the region 513–560 nm (PEG/H{sub 2}O—1/1), 509–535 nm (PEG/H{sub 2}O—1/9), and for silver nanoparticles in the region from 401 to 421 nm. Silver nanoparticles have a broader size distribution compared with gold ones. An appropriate choice of concentration, mixing, and deposition conditions allows preparing the stable solution of gold or silver nanoparticles.

  4. One-step synthesis of zero-dimensional hollow nanoporous gold nanoparticles with enhanced methanol electrooxidation performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedireddy, Srikanth; Lee, Hiang Kwee; Tjiu, Weng Weei; Phang, In Yee; Tan, Hui Ru; Chua, Shu Quan; Troadec, Cedric; Ling, Xing Yi

    2014-09-17

    Nanoporous gold with networks of interconnected ligaments and highly porous structure holds stimulating technological implications in fuel cell catalysis. Current syntheses of nanoporous gold mainly revolve around de-alloying approaches that are generally limited by stringent and harsh multistep protocols. Here we develop a one-step solution phase synthesis of zero-dimensional hollow nanoporous gold nanoparticles with tunable particle size (150-1,000 nm) and ligament thickness (21-54 nm). With faster mass diffusivity, excellent specific electroactive surface area and large density of highly active surface sites, our zero-dimensional nanoporous gold nanoparticles exhibit ~1.4 times enhanced catalytic activity and improved tolerance towards carbonaceous species, demonstrating their superiority over conventional nanoporous gold sheets. Detailed mechanistic study also reveals the crucial heteroepitaxial growth of gold on the surface of silver chloride templates, implying that our synthetic protocol is generic and may be extended to the synthesis of other nanoporous metals via different templates.

  5. Morphological control of seedlessly-synthesized gold nanorods using binary surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Lucien; Ye, Sunjie; Moorcroft, Samuel C. T.; Critchley, Kevin; Coletta, P. Louise; Evans, Stephen D.

    2018-04-01

    High purity gold nanorods (AuNRs) with tunable morphology have been synthesized through a binary-surfactant seedless method, which enables the formation of monocrystalline AuNRs with diameters between 7 and 35 nm. The protocol has high shape yield and monodispersity, demonstrating good reproducibility and scalability allowing synthesis of batches 0.5 l in volume. Morphological control has been achieved through the adjustment of the molar concentrations of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and sodium oleate in the growth solution, providing fine tuning of the optical scattering and absorbance properties of the AuNRs across the visible and NIR spectrum. Sodium oleate was found to provide greatest control over the aspect ratio (and hence optical properties) with concentration changes between 10 and 23 mM leading to variation in the aspect ratio between 2.8 and 4.8. Changes in the geometry of the end-caps were also observed as a result of manipulating the two surfactant concentrations.

  6. Bubble template synthesis of hollow gold nanoparticles and their applications as theranostic agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chienwen

    Hollow gold nanoparticle with a sub-30nm polycrystalline shell and a 50 nm hollow core has been successfully synthesized through the reduction of sodium gold sulfite by electrochemically evolved hydrogen. Such hollow gold nanoparticles exhibit unique plasmonic properties. They strongly scatter and absorb near infrared light. In this thesis we seek to understand the formation mechanism of hollow gold nanoparticles in this new synthesis process and their plasmonic properties. Also, we explore their biomedical applications as theranostic agents (therapeutic and diagnostic imaging). A lithographically patterned electrode consisting of Ag stripes on a glass substrate was used to investigate the formation process of hollow gold nanoparticles. Ag stripes served as working electrode for electrochemically evolution of hydrogen, and adjacent glass areas provided supporting surface for hydrogen nanobubbles nucleation and growth. Hydrogen nanobubbles served as both templates and reducing agents to trigger the autocatalytic disproportionation reaction of sodium gold sulfite. The effects of applied potential and the additives in the electrolyte have been studied. It has been found that the size and size distribution of hollow gold nanoparticle are directly relative to the applied potential, i.e. the hydrogen evolution rate. It has also been found the addition of Ni2+ ions can greatly improve the size distribution of hollow gold nanoparticles that can be contributed to that the newly electrodeposited nickel metal can enhance the hydrogen evolution efficiency. Another additive, ethylenediamine (EDA) can suppress the autocatalytic reaction of gold sulfite to increase the stability of sodium gold sulfite electrolyte. To capture such electrochemically evolved hydrogen nanobubbles, and subsequently to generate hollow gold nanoparticles in large numbers, alumina membranes were placed on the top of the working electrode. Anodic alumina membrane consists of ~200 nm pores, which provides

  7. Coumarin-gold nanoparticle bioconjugates: preparation, antioxidant, and cytotoxic effects against MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahendran, Gokila; Ponnuchamy, Kumar

    2018-05-01

    In recent, the conjugation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with biomolecules has shown great potential especially in disease diagnostics and treatment. Taking this in account, we report the methodology involved in the conjugation of coumarin onto the surface of citrate-capped AuNPs by a simple in situ method. Herein, we systematically performed UV-Vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and zeta potential measurements to characterize citrate-capped AuNPs and bioconjugates. Our results demonstrate in-depth surface chemistry of bioconjugates with improved surface plasmon resonance (529 nm), morphology (near spherical shape), hydrodynamic diameter (25.3 nm) as well as surface charge (- 35 mV). Furthermore, the bioconjugates displayed dose-dependent response in scavenging free radicals and exhibited cytotoxicity against MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines. In addition, phase-contrast microscopic analysis revealed that bioconjugates promote apoptosis in cancer cells in a time-dependent manner. Overall, we ascertain the fact that this kind of bioconjugation of AuNPs with coumarin further enhances the efficacy of inorganic nanomaterials and thus make them a better bio-therapeutic candidate.

  8. Superfluid density and heat capacity measurements of 4He in porous gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, J.; Chan, M.

    1995-01-01

    Superfluid density of full pore 4 He as well as thin film 4 He confined in porous gold were measured as a function of temperature. The superfluid transition temperature of full pore was found to be 2.156 K. In both cases power law dependence on reduced temperature was found and the exponent was found to be the same as that of bulk 4 He. Porous gold is made by electrochemically leaching out silver from silver-gold alloy. The porous gold sample the authors fabricated has porosity of 55 with a diameter of 250 angstrom. Electron microscope picture shows that the structure of porous gold is exceedingly similar to that of Vycor. Heat capacity measurement of full pore 4 He in porous gold is in progress

  9. Microbially Induced Precipitation of Gold(0) Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Yu; Kang, Serku; Park, Bitna; Kim, Yumi

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to synthesize gold nanoparticles by biomineralization using metal-reducing bacteria and to characterize their mineralogical properties. The metal-reducing bacteria were able to reduce Au(III) to Au(0) with organic fatty acids as electron donors, as indicated by the color change of the culture solution from colorless gold ions to black precipitates at 25 degrees C. XRD, SEM- and TEM-EDS analyses of the precipitates showed that Au(0) was precipitated and formed at either the cell membrane or extracellularly. The Au(0) nanoparticles were about 200 nm in size and ball-shaped. Biomineralization for elemental Au(0) nanoparticle synthesis may be useful for the recovery of natural gold in natural environments.

  10. Diameter-Sensitive Breakdown of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes upon KOH Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jianglin; Wu, Shuilin; Ni, Kun; Tan, Ziqi; Xu, Jin; Tao, Zhuchen; Zhu, Yanwu

    2017-07-19

    While potassium hydroxide (KOH) activation has been used to create pores in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for improved energy-storage performance, the KOH activation mechanism of CNTs has been rarely investigated. In this work, the reaction between single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) and KOH is studied in situ by thermogravimetric analysis coupled to infrared (IR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (MS). The IR and MS results clearly demonstrate the sequential evolution of CO, hydrocarbons, CO 2 , and H 2 O in the activation process. By using the radial breathing mode of Raman spectroscopy, a diameter-sensitive selectivity is observed in the reaction between SWCNTs and KOH, leading to a preferential distribution of SWCNTs with diameters larger than 1 nm after activation at 900 °C and a preferential removal of SWCNTs with diameters below 1 nm upon activation. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. The use of fibrous ion exchangers in gold hydrometallurgy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautzmann, R. M.; Sampaio, C. H.; Cortina, J. L.; Soldatov, V.; Shunkevich, A.

    2002-10-01

    This article examines a family of ion-exchange fibers, FIBAN, containing primary and secondary amine groups. These ion exchangers have a fiber diameter of 20 40 Μm, high osmotic and mechanic stability, a high rate of adsorption and regeneration, and excellent dynamic characteristics as filtering media. Inparticular, this article discusses the use of FIBAN fibrous ion exchangers in the recovery of gold cyanide andbase-metal cyanides (copper and mercury) from mineral-leaching solutions. The influence of polymer structure and water content on their extraction ability is described, along with key parameters of gold hydrometallurgy such as extraction efficiency, selectivity, pH dependence, gold cyanide loading, kinetics, and stripping.

  12. Effect of diameter of metal nanowires on pool boiling heat transfer with FC-72

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar G., Udaya; S., Suresh; M. R., Thansekhar; Babu P., Dinesh

    2017-11-01

    Effect of varying diameter of metal nanowires on pool boiling heat transfer performance is presented in this study. Copper nanowires (CuNWs) of four different diameters (∼35 nm, ∼70 nm, ∼130 nm and ∼200 nm) were grown directly on copper specimen using template-based electrodeposition technique. Both critical heat flux (CHF) and boiling heat transfer coefficient (h) were found to be improved in surfaces with nanowires as compared to the bare copper surface. Moreover, both the parameters were found to increase with increasing diameter of the nanowires. The percentage increases observed in CHF for the samples with nanowires were 38.37%, 40.16%, 48.48% and 45.57% whereas the percentage increase in the heat transfer coefficient were 86.36%, 95.45%, 184.1% and 131.82% respectively as compared to the bare copper surface. Important reasons believed for this enhancement were improvement in micron scale cavity density and cavity size which arises as a result of the coagulation and grouping of nanowires during the drying process. In addition to this, superhydrophilic nature, capillary effect, and enhanced bubble dynamics parameters (bubble frequency, bubble departure diameter, and nucleation site density) were found to be the concurring mechanisms responsible for this enhancement in heat transfer performance. Qualitative bubble dynamics analysis was done for the surfaces involved and the visual observations are provided to support the results presented and discussed.

  13. In-vitro Anticancer and Antioxidant Activity of Gold Nanoparticles Conjugate with Tabernaemontana divaricata flower SMs Against MCF -7 Breast Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preetam, Raj J. P.; Purushothaman, M; Khusro, Ameer; Panicker, Shirly George

    2016-01-01

    Biologically stabilized gold nanoparticles were synthesized from the flower aqueous extract of T. divaricata. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by UV-Vis spectrophotometer, Zeta sizer, FTIR and TEM analysis. T. divaricata reduced gold nanoparticles having particle size and potential of 106.532 nm and -10.2 mV, respectively, with a characteristic peak of 550 nm in UV-visible spectrophotometer. FTIR graph after comparison between the crude flower extract and gold nanoparticles showed three major shifts in the functional groups. The morphology and size of the gold nanoparticles were examined by HRTEM analysis, which showed that most of the nanoparticles were nearly spherical with size of 100 nm. The gold nanoparticles synthesized demonstrated potent anticancer activity against MCF-7 cell line. The findings conclude that the antioxidant molecule present in T. divaricata may be responsible for both reduction and capping of gold nanoparticles which possess potential applications in medicine and pharmaceutical fields

  14. In-vitro Anticancer and Antioxidant Activity of Gold Nanoparticles Conjugate with Tabernaemontana divaricata flower SMs Against MCF -7 Breast Cancer Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preetam, Raj J. P.; Purushothaman, M; Khusro, Ameer; Panicker, Shirly George [PG Biotechnology, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2016-02-15

    Biologically stabilized gold nanoparticles were synthesized from the flower aqueous extract of T. divaricata. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by UV-Vis spectrophotometer, Zeta sizer, FTIR and TEM analysis. T. divaricata reduced gold nanoparticles having particle size and potential of 106.532 nm and -10.2 mV, respectively, with a characteristic peak of 550 nm in UV-visible spectrophotometer. FTIR graph after comparison between the crude flower extract and gold nanoparticles showed three major shifts in the functional groups. The morphology and size of the gold nanoparticles were examined by HRTEM analysis, which showed that most of the nanoparticles were nearly spherical with size of 100 nm. The gold nanoparticles synthesized demonstrated potent anticancer activity against MCF-7 cell line. The findings conclude that the antioxidant molecule present in T. divaricata may be responsible for both reduction and capping of gold nanoparticles which possess potential applications in medicine and pharmaceutical fields.

  15. Rapid synthesis of gold and silver nanoparticles using tryptone as a reducing and capping agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Sourabh M.; Sequeira, Marilyn P.; Muthurajana, Harries; D'Souza, Jacinta S.

    2018-02-01

    Due to its eco-friendliness, recent times have seen an immense interest in the green synthesis of metallic nanoparticles. We present here, a protocol for the rapid and cheap synthesis of Au and Ag nanoparticles (NPs) using 1 mg/ml tryptone (trypsinized casein) as a reducing and capping agent. These nanoparticles are spherical, 10 nm in diameter and relatively monodispersed. The atoms of these NPs are arranged in face-centered cubic fashion. Further, when tested for their cytotoxic property against HeLa and VERO cell lines, gold nanoparticles were more lethal than silver nanoparticles, with a more or less similar trend observed against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. On the other hand, the NPs were least cytotoxic against a unicellular alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii implying their eco-friendly property.

  16. Curcumin coated gold nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, cytotoxicity, antioxidant activity and its comparison with citrate coated gold nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elnaz Shaabani

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Biological applications of gold nanoparticles have limitations because of the toxic chemicals used in their synthesis. Curcumin can be used as reducing as well as capping agent in synthesis of GNPs to eliminate the cytotoxicity. Conjugation of curcumin to gold also helps in increasing its solubility and bioavailability. Materials and Methods: Here we report synthesis of gold nanoparticles coated with citrate and curcumin and of two different sizes via chemical routes. UV-Vis absorbance spectroscopy, Dynamic Light Scattering and Transmission Electron Microscopy were applied to study the average particle size, size stability of the samples and zeta potential. Fourier transform infrared, Raman Spectroscopy and Fluorescence Spectroscopy were applied for detection of curcumin on the surface of GNPs. The antioxidant activity was evaluated using DPPH assay and Cytotoxicity was evaluated by MTT assay.Results: Particles were synthesized of 6 and 16 nm size. The average particle size was found to be 21.7 ± 5.7 by TEM. The zeta potential on the surface of Cur-GNPs was negative and larger than 25 mV which is a sign of their high stability. The stability of these particles (with different coatings but with similar sizes at different time intervals (up to 3 months and also in different media like cell culture medium, different buffers, glucose and at different pH conditions have been investigated thoroughly. Appearance of functional groups assigned to curcumin in FTIR and SERS spectra are sign of presence of curcumin in the sample. The quenching of the fluorescence in the presence of GNPs reveals the clear indication of the capping and binding of curcumin with GNPs. Cur-GNP1 (16 nm were found to exhibit highest antioxidant activity than other gold nanoparticles. Cytotoxicity evaluation using MTT assay on L929 cell line proved curcumin coated gold nanoparticles were non-toxic up to 40 ppm.Conclusion: The results revealed that larger curcumin

  17. Comparison of amino acids interaction with gold nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezani, Fatemeh; Amanlou, Massoud; Rafii-Tabar, Hashem

    2014-04-01

    The study of nanomaterial/biomolecule interface is an important emerging field in bionanoscience, and additionally in many biological processes such as hard-tissue growth and cell-surface adhesion. To have a deeper understanding of the amino acids/gold nanoparticle assemblies, the adsorption of these amino acids on the gold nanoparticles (GNPs) has been investigated via molecular dynamics simulation. In these simulations, all the constituent atoms of the nanoparticles were considered to be dynamic. The geometries of amino acids, when adsorbed on the nanoparticle, were studied and their flexibilities were compared with one another. The interaction of each of 20 amino acids was considered with 3 and 8 nm gold GNPs.

  18. Reverse pattern duplication utilizing a two-step metal lift-off process via nanoimprint lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Sun-Sik; Kim, Eun-Uk; Jung, Hee-Soo; Kim, Ki-Seok; Jung, Gun-Young

    2009-01-01

    A two-step metal lift-off process using a selective etching recipe was demonstrated as a new technique for the reverse pattern fabrication of the features of a master stamp via a UV-based nanoimprint lithography technique. A transparent master stamp with repeated pillars (150 nm diameter at 300 nm pitch) was fabricated by using laser interference lithography and the subsequent dry-etching process. After nanoimprint lithography and the following gold (Au) lift-off process, the corresponding gold dots (20 nm height) were generated. A thin chromium layer (Cr, 5 nm) was then deposited and subjected to the aqua regia solution, which dissolved only Au dots. By using a selective wet etching recipe between gold (Au) and chromium (Cr) materials, a Cr layer with holes was reliably generated, which was used as an etching mask to transfer holes into the silicon substrate in the subsequent dry-etching process. Hole patterns with a diameter of 146 nm were inversely replicated faithfully from the master stamp with the corresponding pillars without a notable feature size distortion

  19. Stability and dewetting kinetics of thin gold films on Ti, TiOx and ZnO adhesion layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, Brian T.; Cheung, Jeffrey; Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Jones, Jacob L.; Nagarajan, Valanoor

    2013-01-01

    We present an in situ high-temperature confocal laser microscopy study on the thermal stability of 40 nm thick gold thin films grown on 40 nm Ti, TiO x and ZnO adhesion layers on (0 0 1) Si. In situ observation of the dewetting process was performed over a wide range of set temperatures (400–800 °C) and ramp rates (10–50 °C min −1 ) for each gold/adhesion layer combination. We found that significant dewetting and subsequent formation of gold islands occurs only at and above 700 °C for all adhesion layers. The dewetting is driven to equilibrium for gold/ZnO compared to gold/Ti and gold/TiO x as confirmed by ex situ X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy characterization. Quantification of the in situ data through stretched exponential kinetic models reveals an underlying apparent activation energy of the dewetting process. This energy barrier for dewetting is higher for gold/Ti and gold/TiO x compared to gold/ZnO, thus confirming the ex situ observations. We rationalize that these apparent activation energies correspond to the underlying thermal stability of each gold/adhesion layer system

  20. Gold nanoparticles stabilized by chitosan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraldes, Adriana N.; Oliveira, Maria Jose A.; Silva, Andressa A. da; Leal, Jessica; Batista, Jorge G.S.; Lugao, Ademar B.

    2015-01-01

    In our laboratory has been growing the interest in studying gold nanoparticles and for this reason, the aim of this work is report the first results of the effect of chitosan as stabilizer in gold nanoparticle formulation. AuNPs were synthesized by reducing hydrogen tetrachloroaurate (HAuCl 4 ) using NaBH 4 or gamma irradiation (25kGy) as reduction agent. The chitosan (3 mol L -1 ) was added at 0.5; 1.0 and 1.5 mL. The gold nanoparticles were characterized by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Their physical stability was determined using a UV-Vis spectrophotometer over one week during storage at room temperature. Absorption measurements indicated that the plasmon resonance wavelength appears at a wavelength around 530 nm. Has been observed that Chitosan in such quantities were not effective in stabilizing the AuNPs. (author)

  1. SU-G-TeP3-13: The Role of Nanoscale Energy Deposition in the Development of Gold Nanoparticle-Enhanced Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkby, C; Koger, B; Suchowerska, N; McKenzie, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) can enhance radiotherapy effects. The high photoelectric cross section of gold relative to tissue, particularly at lower energies, leads to localized dose enhancement. However in a clinical context, photon energies must also be sufficient to reach a target volume at a given depth. These properties must be balanced to optimize such a therapy. Given that nanoscale energy deposition patterns around GNPs play a role in determining biological outcomes, in this work we seek to establish their role in this optimization process. Methods: The PENELOPE Monte Carlo code was used to generate spherical dose deposition kernels in 1000 nm diameter spheres around 50 nm diameter GNPs in response to monoenergetic photons incident on the GNP. Induced “lesions” were estimated by either a local effect model (LEM) or a mean dose model (MDM). The ratio of these estimates was examined for a range of photon energies (10 keV to 2 MeV), for three sets of linear-quadratic parameters. Results: The models produce distinct differences in expected lesion values, the lower the alpha-beta ratio, the greater the difference. The ratio of expected lesion values remained constant within 5% for energies of 40 keV and above across all parameter sets and rose to a difference of 35% for lower energies only for the lowest alpha-beta ratio. Conclusion: Consistent with other work, these calculations suggest nanoscale energy deposition patterns matter in predicting biological response to GNP-enhanced radiotherapy. However the ratio of expected lesions between the different models is largely independent of energy, indicating that GNP-enhanced radiotherapy scenarios can be optimized in photon energy without consideration of the nanoscale patterns. Special attention may be warranted for energies of 20 keV or below and low alpha-beta ratios.

  2. SU-G-TeP3-13: The Role of Nanoscale Energy Deposition in the Development of Gold Nanoparticle-Enhanced Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkby, C [Jack Ady Cancer Centre, Lethbridge, AB (Canada); The University of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada); Koger, B [The University of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada); Suchowerska, N [Chris O’Brien Lifehouse Camperdown, NSW (Australia); McKenzie, D [University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) can enhance radiotherapy effects. The high photoelectric cross section of gold relative to tissue, particularly at lower energies, leads to localized dose enhancement. However in a clinical context, photon energies must also be sufficient to reach a target volume at a given depth. These properties must be balanced to optimize such a therapy. Given that nanoscale energy deposition patterns around GNPs play a role in determining biological outcomes, in this work we seek to establish their role in this optimization process. Methods: The PENELOPE Monte Carlo code was used to generate spherical dose deposition kernels in 1000 nm diameter spheres around 50 nm diameter GNPs in response to monoenergetic photons incident on the GNP. Induced “lesions” were estimated by either a local effect model (LEM) or a mean dose model (MDM). The ratio of these estimates was examined for a range of photon energies (10 keV to 2 MeV), for three sets of linear-quadratic parameters. Results: The models produce distinct differences in expected lesion values, the lower the alpha-beta ratio, the greater the difference. The ratio of expected lesion values remained constant within 5% for energies of 40 keV and above across all parameter sets and rose to a difference of 35% for lower energies only for the lowest alpha-beta ratio. Conclusion: Consistent with other work, these calculations suggest nanoscale energy deposition patterns matter in predicting biological response to GNP-enhanced radiotherapy. However the ratio of expected lesions between the different models is largely independent of energy, indicating that GNP-enhanced radiotherapy scenarios can be optimized in photon energy without consideration of the nanoscale patterns. Special attention may be warranted for energies of 20 keV or below and low alpha-beta ratios.

  3. The comparative effect of wrapping solid gold nanoparticles and hollow gold nanoparticles with doxorubicin-loaded thermosensitive liposomes for cancer thermo-chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanan; He, Dongsheng; Tu, Jiasheng; Wang, Ru; Zu, Chang; Chen, You; Yang, Wenqian; Shi, Di; Webster, Thomas J; Shen, Yan

    2018-04-26

    Since conventional chemotherapy is a systemic treatment that affects the body globally and will not concentrate inside the tumor, it causes adverse side effects to patients. In this study, doxorubicin (DOX) together with solid gold nanoparticles (GNPs) or hollow gold nanoparticles (HGNPs), respectively, is loaded inside thermosensitive liposomes (GNPs&DOX-TLs and HGNPs&DOX-TLs), where the GNPs and HGNPs act as a "nanoswitch" for killing tumor cells directly by hyperthermia and triggering DOX release from TLs in the tumor quickly by near infrared laser (NIR) illumination. In addition, this study investigated the photothermal transformation ability, NIR triggered drug release behavior, and the intracellular uptake and cytotoxicity of breast tumor cells and the thermo-chemotherapy mediated by the co-delivery of GNPs&DOX-TLs and HGNPs&DOX-TLs. GNPs and HGNPs had very different light-to-heat transduction efficiencies, while the hollow HGNPs had the advantage of NIR surface plasmon tunability, resulting in the photothermal ablation of tumors with 800 nm light penetration in tissue. The prepared HGNPs&DOX-TLs exhibited a spherical shape with a diameter of 190 nm and a ξ potential of -29 mV, which were steadily dispersed for at least one month. The co-encapsulated DOX was released under hyperthermia caused by NIR-responsive HGNPs and the local drug concentration increased along with the disintegration of the liposomal membrane. This co-delivery of HGNPs&DOX-TLs produced a synergistic cytotoxicity response, thereby enhancing anticancer efficacy 8-fold and increasing the survival time compared to GNPs&DOX-TLs. This work suggested that the co-delivery of HGNPs&DOX-TLs followed by burst-release of DOX using NIR-responsive HGNPs sensitized cancer cells to the chemotherapeutic compound, which provided a novel concept for the combination strategy of chemotherapy and photothermal therapy. These results suggest that the markedly improved therapeutic efficacy and decreased systemic

  4. Influence of fluorescence of Eu(dbm)3phen doped films by gold nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Qingru; Shi, Qiang; Li, Shuhong; Zhang, Dong; Wang, Wenjun

    2016-01-01

    The gold nanorods (AuNRs) were precipitated on Eu(dbm) 3 phen doped films by different spin rates. The plasmonic enhancement and quenching effects of gold nanorods on the fluorescence of Eu(dbm) 3 phen were both demonstrated. The enhancement on the fluorescence is sensitive to the distribution of the AuNRs. Both fluorescence enhancement mechanisms, i.e. increase of the intense absorption of ligands and increase of quantum efficiency, promote the 20 fold enhancement, at which the excitation wavelength red-shifts from 362 nm to 372 nm. Higher absorption of ligands in the complex due to the AuNRs caused the bathochromic shift of excitation peak. The quenching factor at 612 nm reached to 0.47.

  5. Ultra-small platinum and gold nanoparticles by arc plasma deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Hoon; Jeong, Young Eun; Ha, Heonphil; Byun, Ji Young; Kim, Young Dok

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Ultra-small (<2 nm) and bigger platinum and gold nanoparticles were produced by arc plasma deposition (APD). • Size and coverage of deposited nanoparticles were easily controlled with APD parameters. • Crystalline structures of deposited nanoparticles emerged only when the particle size was bigger than ∼2 nm. - Abstract: Ultra-small (<2 nm) nanoparticles of platinum and gold were produced by arc plasma deposition (APD) in a systematic way and the deposition behavior was studied. Nanoparticles were deposited on two dimensional amorphous carbon and amorphous titania thin films and characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Deposition behavior of nanoparticles by APD was studied with discharge voltage (V), discharge condenser capacitance (C), and the number of plasma pulse shots (n) as controllable parameters. The average size of intrinsic nanoparticles generated by APD process was as small as 0.9 nm and deposited nanoparticles began to have crystal structures from the particle size of about 2 nm. V was the most sensitive parameter to control the size and coverage of generated nanoparticles compared to C and n. Size of APD deposited nanoparticles was also influenced by the nature of evaporating materials and substrates

  6. Facile synthesis of gold nanomaterials with unusual crystal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhanxi; Huang, Xiao; Chen, Ye; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Hua

    2017-11-01

    Gold (Au) nanomaterials have attracted wide research attention, owing to their high chemical stability, promising catalytic properties, excellent biocompatibility, unique electronic structure and outstanding localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) absorption properties; all of which are closely related to their size and shape. Recently, crystal-phase-controlled synthesis of noble metal nanomaterials has emerged as a promising strategy to tune their physicochemical properties. This protocol describes the detailed experimental procedures for the crystal-phase-controlled syntheses of Au nanomaterials with unusual crystal structures under mild conditions. Briefly, pure hexagonal close-packed (hcp) Au square sheets (AuSSs) with a thickness of ∼2.4 nm are synthesized using a graphene-oxide-assisted method in which HAuCl 4 is reduced by oleylamine in a mixture of hexane and ethanol. By using pure hexane as the solvent, well-dispersed ultrathin hcp/face-centered cubic (fcc) Au nanowires with a diameter of ∼1.6 nm on graphene oxide can be obtained. Meanwhile, hcp/fcc Au square-like plates with a side length of 200-400 nm are prepared via the secondary growth of Au on the hcp AuSSs. Remarkably, hexagonal (4H) Au nanoribbons with a thickness of 2.0-6.0 nm can be synthesized with a one-pot colloidal method in which HAuCl 4 is reduced by oleylamine in a mixed solvent of hexane and 1,2-dichloropropane. It takes 17-37 h for the synthesis of these Au nanomaterials with unusual crystal structures. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) are used to characterize the resultant Au nanomaterials, which could have many promising applications, such as biosensing, near-IR photothermal therapy, catalysis and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS).

  7. Scanning tunneling microscopy studies of glucose oxidase on gold surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Losic, D.; Shapter, J.G.; Gooding, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Three immobilization methods have been used for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) studies of glucose oxidase (GOD) on gold. They are based on a) physical adsorption from solution, b) microcontact printing and c) covalent bonding onto self-assembled monolayers (SAM) of 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA). The STM images are used to provide information about the organization of individual GOD molecules and more densely packed monolayers of GOD on electrode surfaces, thus providing information of the role of interfacial structure on biosensor performance. The use of atomically flat gold substrates enables easy distinction of deposited enzyme features from the flat gold substrate. Microcontact printing is found to be a more reliable method than adsorption from solution for preparing individual GOD molecules on the gold surface STM images of printed samples reveal two different shapes of native GOD molecules. One is a butterfly shape with dimensions of 10 ± 1 nm x 6 ± 1 nm, assigned to the lying position of molecule while the second is an approximately spherical shape with dimensions of 6.5 ± 1 nm x 5 ± 1nm assigned to a standing position. Isolated clusters of 5 to 6 GOD molecules are also observed. With monolayer coverage, GOD molecules exhibit a tendency to organize themselves into a two dimensional array with adequate sample stability to obtain high-resolution STM images. Within these two-dimensional arrays are clearly seen repeating clusters of five to six enzyme molecules in a unit STM imaging of GOD monolayers covalently immobilized onto SAM (MPA) are considerably more difficult than when the enzyme is adsorbed directly onto the metal. Cluster structures are observed both high and low coverage despite the fact that native GOD is a negatively charged molecule. Copyright (2002) Australian Society for Electron Microscopy Inc

  8. Nanotoxicity of gold and gold-cobalt nanoalloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girgis, E; Khalil, W K B; Emam, A N; Mohamed, M B; Rao, K V

    2012-05-21

    Nanotoxicology test of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) and gold-cobalt (Au-Co) nanoalloy is an important step in their safety evaluation for biomedical applications. The Au and Au-Co NPs were prepared by reducing the metal ions using sodium borohydride (NaBH(4)) in the presence of polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) as a capping material. The average size and shape of the nanoparticles (NPs) were characterized using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Cobalt presence in the nanoalloy was confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis, and the magnetic properties of these particles were determined using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The Gold and gold-cobalt NPs of average size 15 ± 1.5 nm were administered orally to mice with a dose of 80, 160, and 320 mg/kg per body weight (bw) using gavages. Samples were collected after 7 and 14 days of the treatment. The results indicated that the Au-Co NPs were able to induce significant alteration in the tumor-initiating genes associated with an increase of micronuclei (MNs) formation and generation of DNA adduct (8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine, 8-OHdG) as well as a reduction in the glutathione peroxidase activity. This action of Au-Co NPs was observed using 160 and 320 mg/kg bw at both time intervals. However, Au NPs had much lower effects than Au-Co NPs on alteration in the tumor-initiating genes, frequency of MNs, and generation of 8-OHdG as well as glutathione peroxidase activity except with the highest dose of Au NPs. This study suggests that the potential to cause in vivo genetic and antioxidant enzyme alterations due to the treatment by Au-Co nanoalloy may be attributed to the increase in oxidative stress in mice.

  9. Radiofrequency Heating Pathways for Gold Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, C. B.; McCoy, R. S.; Ackerson, B. J.; Collins, G. J.

    2015-01-01

    This feature article reviews the thermal dissipation of nanoscopic gold under radiofrequency (RF) irradiation. It also presents previously unpublished data addressing obscure aspects of this phenomenon. While applications in biology motivated initial investigation of RF heating of gold nanoparticles, recent controversy concerning whether thermal effects can be attributed to nanoscopic gold highlight the need to understand the involved mechanism or mechanisms of heating. Both the nature of the particle and the nature of the RF field influence heating. Aspects of nanoparticle chemistry and physics, including the hydrodynamic diameter of the particle, the oxidation state and related magnetism of the core, and the chemical nature of the ligand shell may all strongly influence to what extent a nanoparticle heats in an RF field. Aspects of RF include: power, frequency and antenna designs that emphasize relative strength of magnetic or electric fields, and also influence the extent to which a gold nanoparticle heats in RF. These nanoparticle and RF properties are analysed in the context of three heating mechanisms proposed to explain gold nanoparticle heating in an RF field. This article also makes a critical analysis of the existing literature in the context of the nanoparticle preparations, RF structure, and suggested mechanisms in previously reported experiments. PMID:24962620

  10. Alveolar macrophage accumulation rates, for 28 nm and 250 nm PSL, are mediated by separate mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, O R; Wong, V A, E-mail: moss@thehamner.or [Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27509-2137 (United States)

    2009-02-01

    When macrophages accumulate 28 nm and 250 nm diameter polystyrene latex (PSL) beads, the accumulation rates should reflect differences in molecular and cellular function. We used a confocal microscope to measure the accumulation rates of nanoparticles by F344-rat-alveolar macrophages (approx25,000 cells adhered to a 0.7 cm{sup 2} surface). Over the cells were layered 0.1 ml of media, and 0.1 ml of media-with-beads. Fresh cells were introduced for each exposure scenario. The maximum possible individual macrophage exposures were as follows: 8x10{sup 6}, 8x10{sup 5}, and 8x10{sup 4} 28 nm beads per macrophage; and 8x10{sup 4} and 1.12x10{sup 4} 250 nm beads per macrophage. Accumulation rates were estimated over 23 minutes. The increase in bead accumulation-rate matched changes in bead-availability: 7x increase for 250 nm beads; 100x increase for 28 nm beads; and 700x increase for all bead availabilities. The maximum sustained 28 nm bead accumulation rate was > 30,000 /min (for 5 min). Increases in bead accumulation could be explained by two mechanisms: bead-diffusion; and, for the macrophage, macropinocytosis. Also for the highest concentrations of 28 nm beads, we saw a colligative threshold - possibly due to beads masking the cell surface or obstructing cellular mechanisms.

  11. Gold recovery from printed wiring board using bioleaching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kita, Y. [Faculty of Engineering, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Nishikawa, H. [Center for Advanced Science and Innovation, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Takemoto, T. [Joining and Welding Research Inst., Osaka Univ. (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    In the electronic assembly, gold is frequently used as surface plating and a bonding wire. To recover gold from waste electronics, the dissolution process using cyan is a popular method, however, the solution is highly toxic. Accordingly, the environmentally conscious substitute process is preferable. In this study the possibility of Au dissolution from printed wiring boards using bioleaching has been investigated. Chromobacterium violaceum having ability of cyanide formation was used to dissolve Au. The printed wiring boards with gold plating of 0.07nm in thickness were immersed in synthetic medium with C. violaceum. After immersion test for 480h, the gold plating was completely dissolved. The increase in cyanide concentration gave little effect on the enhancement of dissolution of gold, however, the dissolution rate of Au was increased with increasing of dissolved oxygen in the medium. Chromobacterium violaceum produced 0.8mmol/l cyanide but it also decomposed about 60% of cyanide generated, therefore, this dissolution process could be used as an environmentally conscious method. (orig.)

  12. Assessment of gold nanoparticles as a size-dependent vaccine carrier for enhancing the antibody response against synthetic foot-and-mouth disease virus peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu-Shiun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, EE137, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Hung, Yao-Ching [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, China Medical University and Hospital, 91 Hsueh-Shih Road, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Lin, Wei-Hsu [Institute of Nanotechnology, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Huang, Guewha Steven, E-mail: gstevehuang@mail.nctu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Nanotechnology, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan, Republic of China (China)

    2010-05-14

    To assess the ability of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) to act as a size-dependent carrier, a synthetic peptide resembling foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) protein was conjugated to GNPs ranging from 2 to 50 nm in diameter (2, 5, 8, 12, 17, 37, and 50 nm). An extra cysteine was added to the C-terminus of the FMDV peptide (pFMDV) to ensure maximal conjugation to the GNPs, which have a high affinity for sulfhydryl groups. The resultant pFMDV-GNP conjugates were then injected into BALB/c mice. Immunization with pFMDV-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (pFMDV-KLH) conjugate was also performed as a control. Blood was obtained from the mice after 4, 6, 8, and 10 weeks and antibody titers against both pFMDV and the carriers were measured. For the pFMDV-GNP immunization, specific antibodies against the synthetic peptide were detected in the sera of mice injected with 2, 5, 8, 12, and 17 nm pFMDV-GNP conjugates. Maximal antibody binding was noted for GNPs of diameter 8-17 nm. The pFMDV-GNPs induced a three-fold increase in the antibody response compared to the response to pFMDV-KLH. However, sera from either immunized mouse group did not exhibit an antibody response to GNPs, while the sera from pFMDV-KLH-immunized mice presented high levels of binding activity against KLH. Additionally, the uptake of pFMDV-GNP in the spleen was examined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The quantity of GNPs that accumulated in the spleen correlated to the magnitude of the immune response induced by pFMDV-GNP. In conclusion, we demonstrated the size-dependent immunogenic properties of pFMDV-GNP conjugates. Furthermore, we established that GNPs ranging from 8 to 17 nm in diameter may be ideal for eliciting a focused antibody response against a synthetic pFMDV peptide.

  13. Assessment of gold nanoparticles as a size-dependent vaccine carrier for enhancing the antibody response against synthetic foot-and-mouth disease virus peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Shiun; Hung, Yao-Ching; Lin, Wei-Hsu; Huang, Guewha Steven

    2010-05-01

    To assess the ability of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) to act as a size-dependent carrier, a synthetic peptide resembling foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) protein was conjugated to GNPs ranging from 2 to 50 nm in diameter (2, 5, 8, 12, 17, 37, and 50 nm). An extra cysteine was added to the C-terminus of the FMDV peptide (pFMDV) to ensure maximal conjugation to the GNPs, which have a high affinity for sulfhydryl groups. The resultant pFMDV-GNP conjugates were then injected into BALB/c mice. Immunization with pFMDV-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (pFMDV-KLH) conjugate was also performed as a control. Blood was obtained from the mice after 4, 6, 8, and 10 weeks and antibody titers against both pFMDV and the carriers were measured. For the pFMDV-GNP immunization, specific antibodies against the synthetic peptide were detected in the sera of mice injected with 2, 5, 8, 12, and 17 nm pFMDV-GNP conjugates. Maximal antibody binding was noted for GNPs of diameter 8-17 nm. The pFMDV-GNPs induced a three-fold increase in the antibody response compared to the response to pFMDV-KLH. However, sera from either immunized mouse group did not exhibit an antibody response to GNPs, while the sera from pFMDV-KLH-immunized mice presented high levels of binding activity against KLH. Additionally, the uptake of pFMDV-GNP in the spleen was examined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The quantity of GNPs that accumulated in the spleen correlated to the magnitude of the immune response induced by pFMDV-GNP. In conclusion, we demonstrated the size-dependent immunogenic properties of pFMDV-GNP conjugates. Furthermore, we established that GNPs ranging from 8 to 17 nm in diameter may be ideal for eliciting a focused antibody response against a synthetic pFMDV peptide.

  14. Assessment of gold nanoparticles as a size-dependent vaccine carrier for enhancing the antibody response against synthetic foot-and-mouth disease virus peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yu-Shiun; Hung, Yao-Ching; Lin, Wei-Hsu; Huang, Guewha Steven

    2010-01-01

    To assess the ability of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) to act as a size-dependent carrier, a synthetic peptide resembling foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) protein was conjugated to GNPs ranging from 2 to 50 nm in diameter (2, 5, 8, 12, 17, 37, and 50 nm). An extra cysteine was added to the C-terminus of the FMDV peptide (pFMDV) to ensure maximal conjugation to the GNPs, which have a high affinity for sulfhydryl groups. The resultant pFMDV-GNP conjugates were then injected into BALB/c mice. Immunization with pFMDV-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (pFMDV-KLH) conjugate was also performed as a control. Blood was obtained from the mice after 4, 6, 8, and 10 weeks and antibody titers against both pFMDV and the carriers were measured. For the pFMDV-GNP immunization, specific antibodies against the synthetic peptide were detected in the sera of mice injected with 2, 5, 8, 12, and 17 nm pFMDV-GNP conjugates. Maximal antibody binding was noted for GNPs of diameter 8-17 nm. The pFMDV-GNPs induced a three-fold increase in the antibody response compared to the response to pFMDV-KLH. However, sera from either immunized mouse group did not exhibit an antibody response to GNPs, while the sera from pFMDV-KLH-immunized mice presented high levels of binding activity against KLH. Additionally, the uptake of pFMDV-GNP in the spleen was examined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The quantity of GNPs that accumulated in the spleen correlated to the magnitude of the immune response induced by pFMDV-GNP. In conclusion, we demonstrated the size-dependent immunogenic properties of pFMDV-GNP conjugates. Furthermore, we established that GNPs ranging from 8 to 17 nm in diameter may be ideal for eliciting a focused antibody response against a synthetic pFMDV peptide.

  15. Fabrication of conducting polymer-gold nanoparticles film on electrodes using monolayer protected gold nanoparticles and its electrocatalytic application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kannan, Palanisamy [Department of Chemistry, Gandhigram Rural University, Gandhigram 624 302, Dindigul (India); School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, N1.3, B4-01, 70 Nanyang Drive, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637457 (Singapore); John, S. Abraham, E-mail: abrajohn@yahoo.co.in [Department of Chemistry, Gandhigram Rural University, Gandhigram 624 302, Dindigul (India)

    2011-08-01

    We wish to report a simple and new strategy for the fabrication of gold nanoparticles-conducting polymer film on glassy carbon (GC) and indium tin oxide (ITO) surfaces using 5-amino-2-mercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole capped gold nanoparticles (AMT-AuNPs) in 0.01 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} by electropolymerization. The presence of amine groups on the surface of the AuNPs was responsible for the deposition of the AMT-AuNPs film on the electrode surface. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies reveal that the fabricated p-AMT-AuNPs film showed homogeneously distributed AuNPs with a spherical shape of {approx}8 nm diameter. The XPS spectrum shows the binding energies at 83.8 and 87.5 eV in the Au 4f region corresponding to 4f{sub 7/2} and 4f{sub 5/2}, respectively. The position and difference between these two peaks (3.7 eV) exactly match the value reported for Au{sup 0}. The N1s XPS showed three binding energies at 396.7, 399.6 and 403.3 eV, corresponding to the =NH, -NH- and -N{sup +}H-, respectively, confirming that the electropolymerization proceeded through the oxidation of -NH{sub 2} groups present on the periphery of the AMT-AuNPs. The application of the present p-AMT-AuNPs modified electrode was demonstrated by studying the electro reduction of oxygen at pH 7.2. The p-AMT-AuNPs film enhanced the oxygen reduction current more than three times than that of p-AMT film prepared under identical conditions.

  16. Colorimetric As (V) detection based on S-layer functionalized gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Mathias; Matys, Sabine; Raff, Johannes; Pompe, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    Herein, we present simple and rapid colorimetric and UV/VIS spectroscopic methods for detecting anionic arsenic (V) complexes in aqueous media. The methods exploit the aggregation of S-layer-functionalized spherical gold nanoparticles of sizes between 20 and 50 nm in the presence of arsenic species. The gold nanoparticles were functionalized with oligomers of the S-layer protein of Lysinibacillus sphaericus JG-A12. The aggregation of the nanoparticles results in a color change from burgundy-red for widely dispersed nanoparticles to blue for aggregated nanoparticles. A detailed signal analysis was achieved by measuring the shift of the particle plasmon resonance signal with UV/VIS spectroscopy. To further improve signal sensitivity, the influence of larger nanoparticles was tested. In the case of 50 nm gold nanoparticles, a concentration of the anionic arsenic (V) complex lower than 24 ppb was detectable. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Optical constant of thin gold films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yakubovsky, D. I.; Fedyanin, D. Yu; Arsenin, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    The performance of metal-based devices is limited by ohmic losses in the metal, which are determined by electron scattering. The structural properties of gold thin films also play an important role in the film quality, which may affect its' optical properties and the overall capability...... and spectroscopic ellipsometry, the structural morphology and optical properties of polycrystalline gold thin films (fabricated by e-beam deposition at a low sputtering rate smooth gold) in the thickness range of 20 - 200 nm. By extracting the real and imaginary dielectric function and the Drude parameter...... of the device. At the same time, metal films of different thicknesses are needed for different applications and, since these films are polycrystalline, their internal properties and surface roughness can greatly vary from one thickness to another. In this work, we study, using atomic force microscopy...

  18. Optical absorption of carbon-gold core-shell nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaolong; Quan, Xiaojun; Zhang, Zhuomin; Cheng, Ping

    2018-01-01

    In order to enhance the solar thermal energy conversion efficiency, we propose to use carbon-gold core-shell nanoparticles dispersed in liquid water. This work demonstrates theoretically that an absorbing carbon (C) core enclosed in a plasmonic gold (Au) nanoshell can enhance the absorption peak while broadening the absorption band; giving rise to a much higher solar absorption than most previously studied core-shell combinations. The exact Mie solution is used to evaluate the absorption efficiency factor of spherical nanoparticles in the wavelength region from 300 nm to 1100 nm as well as the electric field and power dissipation profiles inside the nanoparticles at specified wavelengths (mostly at the localized surface plasmon resonance wavelength). The field enhancement by the localized plasmons at the gold surfaces boosts the absorption of the carbon particle, resulting in a redshift of the absorption peak with increased peak height and bandwidth. In addition to spherical nanoparticles, we use the finite-difference time-domain method to calculate the absorption of cubic core-shell nanoparticles. Even stronger enhancement can be achieved with cubic C-Au core-shell structures due to the localized plasmonic resonances at the sharp edges of the Au shell. The solar absorption efficiency factor can exceed 1.5 in the spherical case and reach 2.3 in the cubic case with a shell thickness of 10 nm. Such broadband absorption enhancement is in great demand for solar thermal applications including steam generation.

  19. In-situ realtime monitoring of nanoscale gold electroplating using micro-electro-mechanical systems liquid cell operating in transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egawa, Minoru; Fujita, Hiroyuki [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Ishida, Tadashi, E-mail: ishida.t.ai@m.titech.ac.jp [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Graduate School of Science and Technology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa 225-8503 (Japan); Jalabert, Laurent [LIMMS/CNRS-IIS (UMI 2820), Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); CNRS, LAAS, 7 Avenue du Colonel Roche, F-31400 Toulouse, France and University of Toulouse, LAAS, F-31400 Toulouse (France)

    2016-01-11

    The dynamics of nanoscale electroplating between gold electrodes was investigated using a microfabricated liquid cell mounted on a scanning transmission electron microscope. The electroplating was recorded in-situ for 10 min with a spatial resolution higher than 6 nm. At the beginning of the electroplating, gold spike-like structures of about 50 nm in size grew from an electrode, connected gold nanoclusters around them, and form three dimensional nanoscale structures. We visualized the elementary process of the gold electroplating, and believe that the results lead to the deeper understanding of electroplating at the nanoscale.

  20. In-situ realtime monitoring of nanoscale gold electroplating using micro-electro-mechanical systems liquid cell operating in transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egawa, Minoru; Fujita, Hiroyuki; Ishida, Tadashi; Jalabert, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of nanoscale electroplating between gold electrodes was investigated using a microfabricated liquid cell mounted on a scanning transmission electron microscope. The electroplating was recorded in-situ for 10 min with a spatial resolution higher than 6 nm. At the beginning of the electroplating, gold spike-like structures of about 50 nm in size grew from an electrode, connected gold nanoclusters around them, and form three dimensional nanoscale structures. We visualized the elementary process of the gold electroplating, and believe that the results lead to the deeper understanding of electroplating at the nanoscale

  1. Antibacterial nanocarriers of resveratrol with gold and silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sohyun [College of Pharmacy, Inje University, 197 Inje-ro Gimhae, Gyeongnam 621-749 (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Song-Hyun [National Creative Research Initiatives (NCRI) Center for Isogeometric Optimal Design, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Inyoung [School of Civil, Environmental and Architecture Engineering, Korea University, 145 Anam-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Soomin [National Creative Research Initiatives (NCRI) Center for Isogeometric Optimal Design, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yohan [College of Pharmacy, Inje University, 197 Inje-ro Gimhae, Gyeongnam 621-749 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seonho [National Creative Research Initiatives (NCRI) Center for Isogeometric Optimal Design, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Youmie, E-mail: youmiep@inje.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Inje University, 197 Inje-ro Gimhae, Gyeongnam 621-749 (Korea, Republic of); National Creative Research Initiatives (NCRI) Center for Isogeometric Optimal Design, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-01

    This study focused on the preparation of resveratrol nanocarrier systems and the evaluation of their in vitro antibacterial activities. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) for resveratrol nanocarrier systems were synthesized using green synthetic routes. During the synthesis steps, resveratrol was utilized as a reducing agent to chemically reduce gold and silver ions to AuNPs and AgNPs. This system provides green and eco-friendly synthesis routes that do not involve additional chemical reducing agents. Resveratrol nanocarriers with AuNPs (Res-AuNPs) and AgNPs (Res-AgNPs) were observed to be spherical and to exhibit characteristic surface plasmon resonance at 547 nm and at 412–417 nm, respectively. The mean size of the nanoparticles ranged from 8.32 to 21.84 nm, as determined by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The face-centered cubic structure of the Res-AuNPs was confirmed by high-resolution X-ray diffraction. Fourier-transform infrared spectra indicated that the hydroxyl groups and C=C in the aromatic ring of resveratrol were involved in the reduction reaction. Res-AuNPs retained excellent colloidal stability during ultracentrifugation and re-dispersion, suggesting that resveratrol also played a role as a capping agent. Zeta potentials of Res-AuNPs and Res-AgNPs were in the range of − 20.58 to − 48.54 mV. Generally, against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, the Res-AuNPs and Res-AgNPs exhibited greater antibacterial activity compared to that of resveratrol alone. Among the tested strains, the highest antibacterial activity of the Res-AuNPs was observed against Streptococcus pneumoniae. The addition of sodium dodecyl sulfate during the synthesis of Res-AgNPs slightly increased their antibacterial activity. These results suggest that the newly developed resveratrol nanocarrier systems with metallic nanoparticles show potential for application as nano-antibacterial agents with enhanced activities. - Highlights

  2. Green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using Stevia rebaudiana leaf extracts: Characterization and their stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Babak; Mohammadzadeh, M; Babakhani, B

    2015-07-01

    Various methods invented and developed for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles that increases daily consumed. According to this method, including potential environmental pollution problems and the complexity of the synthesis, in this study, the feasibility of using the leaves extract of Stevia rebaudiana (SR) for the reduction of gold ions to nanoparticles form have been studied. Stevia leaves were used to prepare the aqueous extract for this study. Gold nanoparticles were characterized with different techniques such as UV-vis spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Transmission electron microscopy experiments showed that these nanoparticles are spherical and uniformly distributed and its size is from 5 to 20 nm. FT-IR spectroscopy revealed that gold nanoparticles were functionalized with biomolecules that have primary amine group (NH2), carbonyl group, OH groups and other stabilizing functional groups. X-ray diffraction pattern showed high purity and face centered cubic structure of gold nanoparticles with size of 17 nm. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) implies the right of forming gold nanoparticles. The results, confirm that gold nanoparticles have synthesized by the leaves extract of S. rebaudiana (SR). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Oxidative stress and toxicity of gold nanoparticles in Mytilus edulis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tedesco, Sara; Doyle, Hugh; Blasco, Julian; Redmond, Gareth; Sheehan, David

    2010-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNP) have potential applications in drug delivery, cancer diagnosis and therapy, food industry and environment remediation. However, little is known about their potential toxicity or fate in the environment. Mytilus edulis was exposed in tanks to750 ppb AuNP (average diameter 5.3 ± 1 nm) for 24 h to study in vivo biological effects of nanoparticles. Traditional biomarkers and an affinity procedure selective for thiol-containing proteins followed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) separations were used to study toxicity and oxidative stress responses. Results were compared to those obtained for treatment with cadmium chloride, a well known pro-oxidant. M. edulis mainly accumulated AuNP in digestive gland which also showed higher lipid peroxidation. One-dimensional SDS/PAGE (1DE) and 2DE analysis of digestive gland samples revealed decreased thiol-containing proteins for AuNP. Lysosomal membrane stability measured in haemolymph gave lower values for neutral red retention time (NRRT) in both treatments but was greater in AuNP. Oxidative stress occurred within 24 h of AuNP exposure in M. edulis. Previously we showed that larger diameter AuNP caused modest effects, indicating that nanoparticle size is a key factor in biological responses to nanoparticles. This study suggests that M. edulis is a suitable model animal for environmental toxicology studies of nanoparticles.

  4. Electro-catalytic properties of graphene composites containing gold or silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruneanu, Stela; Pogacean, Florina; Biris, Alexandru R.; Coros, Maria; Watanabe, Fumiya; Dervishi, Enkeleda; Biris, Alexandru S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Graphene sheets with embedded gold or silver nanoparticles were prepared by RF-cCVD method. ► The crystallinity of the composite samples is less influenced by the type of metallic nanoparticles (silver or gold). ► The composite nanostructures exhibit excellent electro-catalytic properties toward carbamazepine oxidation. -- Abstract: Composite nanostructures based on few-layers graphene with encased gold or silver nanoparticles (denoted as Gr-Au and Gr-Ag, respectively) were separately prepared in a single-step synthesis by radio frequency catalytic chemical vapor deposition (RF-cCVD) over Au x /MgO and Ag x /MgO catalytic system (where x = 3 wt.%), respectively. Their morphological properties were investigated by electron microscopy techniques (TEM/HRTEM), which demonstrated that the number of graphitic layers within the sheet varied between 2 and 7. Thorough TEM analysis also indicated that gold nanoparticles had a mean size of 22 nm, while silver nanoparticles were found to be larger with a mean size of 35 nm. X-ray powder diffraction proved that the crystallinity of the Gr-Au or Gr-Ag samples is less influenced by the type of metallic nanoparticles (silver or gold) encased between the graphitic layers. The mean value of the crystalline domain perpendicular to graphene (0 0 2) crystallographic plane was determined to be approximately 2.25 nm (for Gr-Au sample) and 2.14 nm (for Gr-Ag sample), both corresponding to 6 graphitic layers. Gr-Ag and Gr-Au nanostructures were used to modify platinum substrates and subsequently employed for the electrochemical analysis of carbamazepine. A significant decrease in the electrochemical oxidation potential of carbamazepine (150 mV) was obtained with both modified electrodes. The detection limit (DL) was found to be 2.75 × 10 −5 M and 2.92 × 10 −5 M for the Pt/Gr-Ag and Pt/Gr-Au electrode, respectively

  5. Green synthesis of anisotropic gold nanoparticles for photothermal therapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazal, Sajid; Jayasree, Aswathy; Sasidharan, Sisini; Koyakutty, Manzoor; Nair, Shantikumar V; Menon, Deepthy

    2014-06-11

    Nanoparticles of varying composition, size, shape, and architecture have been explored for use as photothermal agents in the field of cancer nanomedicine. Among them, gold nanoparticles provide a simple platform for thermal ablation owing to its biocompatibility in vivo. However, the synthesis of such gold nanoparticles exhibiting suitable properties for photothermal activity involves cumbersome routes using toxic chemicals as capping agents, which can cause concerns in vivo. Herein, gold nanoparticles, synthesized using green chemistry routes possessing near-infrared (NIR) absorbance facilitating photothermal therapy, would be a viable alternative. In this study, anisotropic gold nanoparticles were synthesized using an aqueous route with cocoa extract which served both as a reducing and stabilizing agent. The as-prepared gold nanoparticles were subjected to density gradient centrifugation to maximize its NIR absorption in the wavelength range of 800-1000 nm. The particles also showed good biocompatibility when tested in vitro using A431, MDA-MB231, L929, and NIH-3T3 cell lines up to concentrations of 200 μg/mL. Cell death induced in epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells upon irradiation with a femtosecond laser at 800 nm at a low power density of 6 W/cm(2) proved the suitability of green synthesized NIR absorbing anisotropic gold nanoparticles for photothermal ablation of cancer cells. These gold nanoparticles also showed good X-ray contrast when tested using computed tomography (CT), proving their feasibility for use as a contrast agent as well. This is the first report on green synthesized anisotropic and cytocompatible gold nanoparticles without any capping agents and their suitability for photothermal therapy.

  6. Gold nanoparticles assisted surface enhanced Raman scattering and luminescence of Er{sup 3+} doped zinc–sodium tellurite glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghoshal, S.K.; Awang, Asmahani, E-mail: asmahani_awang@yahoo.com; Sahar, M.R.; Arifin, R.

    2015-03-15

    Significant enhancements in Er{sup 3+} luminescence and Raman intensity mediated via surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of gold (Au) nanoparticles (NPs) embedded zinc–sodium tellurite glass are reported. The observed modifications in the physical and spectroscopic properties are ascribed to the alterations in the glass network. XRD pattern confirms the amorphous nature of prepared glass sample. UV–vis-NIR spectra reveal seven absorption bands. Surface plasmon band is evidenced around 626–630 nm. TEM images manifest the growth of non-spherical Au NPs with average diameter between ∼7.2 nm and 8.6 nm. The visible up-conversion (UC) emission for all samples under 779 nm excitation exhibits three bands centered at 503 nm (green), 546 (green) and 637 nm (red) ascribed to {sup 2}H{sub 11/2}→{sup 4}I{sub 15/2}, {sup 4}S{sub 3/2}→{sup 4}I{sub 15/2} and {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}→{sup 4}I{sub 15/2} transitions. Glass sample with 0.4 mol% Au displaying the highest luminescence intensity with enhancement factor of 3.85 and 3.56 for green bands, and 7.61 for the red band is ascribed to the NPs local field enhancement and energy transfer between rare earth (RE) ions and NPs. FTIR spectra show the vibration of ZnO{sub 4} bonds, Te-O bond in TeO{sub 3} (tp) and TeO{sub 4} (tbp) units and the hydroxyl groups. Raman spectra demonstrate the presence of Er-O and Zn-O bond, anti-symmetric vibrations of Te-O-Te bonds and stretching modes of non-bonded oxygen exists in TeO{sub 3} and TeO{sub 3+1} unit. The amplifications in Raman signals by a factor of 1.62, 1.58, 1.64, 1.68 and 1.69 corresponding to the peak centered at 262 cm{sup −1}, 382 cm{sup −1}, 521 cm{sup −1}, 670 cm{sup −1} and 725 cm{sup −1} are attributed to the contribution of a surface plasmon generating a strong, localized and secondary field. We assert that our glass compositions offer favorable potential to develop solid state lasers and other versatile nanophotonic devices. - Highlights: • Gold

  7. Ion induced segregation in gold nanostructured thin films on silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghatak, J.; Satyam, P.V.

    2008-01-01

    We report a direct observation of segregation of gold atoms to the near surface regime due to 1.5 MeV Au 2+ ion impact on isolated gold nanostructures deposited on silicon. Irradiation at fluences of 6 x 10 13 , 1 x 10 14 and 5 x 10 14 ions cm -2 at a high beam flux of 6.3 x 10 12 ions cm -2 s -1 show a maximum transported distance of gold atoms into the silicon substrate to be 60, 45 and 23 nm, respectively. At a lower fluence (6 x 10 13 ions cm -2 ) transport has been found to be associated with the formation of gold silicide (Au 5 Si 2 ). At a high fluence value of 5 x 10 14 ions cm -2 , disassociation of gold silicide and out-diffusion lead to the segregation of gold to defect - rich surface and interface regions.

  8. Single layer porous gold films grown at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Renyun; Hummelgard, Magnus; Olin, Hakan

    2010-01-01

    Large area porous gold films can be used in several areas including electrochemical electrodes, as an essential component in sensors, or as a conducting material in electronics. Here, we report on evaporation induced crystal growth of large area porous gold films at 20, 40 and 60 deg. C. The gold films were grown on liquid surface at 20 deg. C, while the films were grown on the wall of beakers when temperature increased to 40 and 60 deg. C. The porous gold films consisted of a dense network of gold nanowires as characterized by TEM and SEM. TEM diffraction results indicated that higher temperature formed larger crystallites of gold wires. An in situ TEM imaging of the coalescence of gold nanoparticles mimicked the process of the growth of these porous films, and a plotting of the coalescence time and the neck radius showed a diffusion process. The densities of these gold films were also characterized by transmittance, and the results showed film grown at 20 deg. C had the highest density, while the film grown at 60 deg. C had the lowest consistent with SEM and TEM characterization. Electrical measurements of these gold films showed that the most conductive films were the ones grown at 40 deg. C. The conductivities of the gold films were related to the amount of contamination, density and the diameter of the gold nanowires in the films. In addition, a gold film/gold nanoparticle hybrid was made, which showed a 10% decrease in transmittance during hybridization, pointing to applications as chemical and biological sensors.

  9. Rapid colorimetric sensing of tetracycline antibiotics with in situ growth of gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Li; Chen, Jing; Li, Na; He, Pingli; Li, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Tetracyclines directly reduce aurate into gold nanoparticles. • Gold nanoparticles showed characteristic plamson absorbance at 526 nm. • Quantitative detection of tetracyclines with the colorimetric assay. • Tetracyclines spiked urine samples can be detected with the assay. - Abstract: A colorimetric assay utilizing the formation of gold nanoparticles was developed to detect tetracycline antibiotics in fluidic samples. Tetracycline antibiotics showed the capability of directly reducing aurate salts into atomic gold which form gold nanoparticles spontaneously under proper conditions. The resulted gold nanoparticles showed characteristic plasmon absorbance at 526 nm, which can be visualized by naked eyes or with a spectrophotometer. UV–vis absorbance of the resulted gold nanoparticles is correlated directly with the concentrations of tetracycline antibiotics in the solution, allowing for quantitative colorimetric detection of tetracycline antibiotics. Reaction conditions, such as pH, temperature, reaction time, and ionic strength were optimized. Sensitivity of the colorimetric assay can be enhanced by the addition of gold nanoparticle seeds, a LOD as low as 20 ng mL −1 can be achieved with the help of seed particles. The colorimetric assay showed minimum interference from ethanol, methanol, urea, glucose, and other antibiotics such as sulfonamides, amino glycosides etc. Validity of the method was also evaluated on urine samples spiked with tetracycline antibiotics. The method provides a broad spectrum detection method for rapid and sensitive detection of reductive substances such as tetracycline antibiotics in liquid and biological samples

  10. Rapid colorimetric sensing of tetracycline antibiotics with in situ growth of gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Li [Logistics School, Beijing Wuzi University, Beijing 101149 (China); Chen, Jing; Li, Na [Logistics School, Beijing Wuzi University, Beijing 101149 (China); He, Pingli [State Key Laboratory of Animal Nutrition, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China); Li, Zhen [State Key Laboratory of Plant Physiology and Biochemistry, College of Biological Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China)

    2014-08-11

    Highlights: • Tetracyclines directly reduce aurate into gold nanoparticles. • Gold nanoparticles showed characteristic plamson absorbance at 526 nm. • Quantitative detection of tetracyclines with the colorimetric assay. • Tetracyclines spiked urine samples can be detected with the assay. - Abstract: A colorimetric assay utilizing the formation of gold nanoparticles was developed to detect tetracycline antibiotics in fluidic samples. Tetracycline antibiotics showed the capability of directly reducing aurate salts into atomic gold which form gold nanoparticles spontaneously under proper conditions. The resulted gold nanoparticles showed characteristic plasmon absorbance at 526 nm, which can be visualized by naked eyes or with a spectrophotometer. UV–vis absorbance of the resulted gold nanoparticles is correlated directly with the concentrations of tetracycline antibiotics in the solution, allowing for quantitative colorimetric detection of tetracycline antibiotics. Reaction conditions, such as pH, temperature, reaction time, and ionic strength were optimized. Sensitivity of the colorimetric assay can be enhanced by the addition of gold nanoparticle seeds, a LOD as low as 20 ng mL{sup −1} can be achieved with the help of seed particles. The colorimetric assay showed minimum interference from ethanol, methanol, urea, glucose, and other antibiotics such as sulfonamides, amino glycosides etc. Validity of the method was also evaluated on urine samples spiked with tetracycline antibiotics. The method provides a broad spectrum detection method for rapid and sensitive detection of reductive substances such as tetracycline antibiotics in liquid and biological samples.

  11. Efficient surface enhanced Raman scattering on confeito-like gold nanoparticle-adsorbed self-assembled monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Chi; Imae, Toyoko; Chen, Liang-Yih; Ujihara, Masaki

    2015-12-28

    Confeito-like gold nanoparticles (AuNPs; average diameter = 80 nm) exhibiting a plasmon absorption band at 590 nm were adsorbed through immersion-adsorption on two self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES-SAM) and polystyrene spheres coated with amine-terminated poly(amido amine) dendrimers (DEN/PS-SAM). The surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect on the SAM substrates was examined using the molecules of a probe dye, rhodamine 6G (R6G). The Raman scattering was strongly intensified on both substrates, but the enhancement factor (>10,000) of the AuNP/DEN/PS-SAM hierarchy substrate was 5-10 times higher than that of the AuNP/APTES-SAM substrate. This strong enhancement is attributed to the large surface area of the substrate and the presence of hot spots. Furthermore, analyzing the R6G concentration dependence of SERS suggested that the enhancement mechanism effectively excited the R6G molecules in the first layer on the hot spots and invoked the strong SERS effect. These results indicate that the SERS activity of confeito-like AuNPs on SAM substrates has high potential in molecular electronic devices and ultrasensitive analyses.

  12. Preparation of gold ethanol colloid by the arc discharge method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tseng, K.-H.; Huang, J.-C.; Liao, C.-Y.; Tien, D.-C.; Tsung, T.-T.

    2009-01-01

    A new method using the arc discharge method (ADM) to synthesize gold nanoparticles in an anhydrous ethanol was studied. Fabricated gold nanoparticles were characterized by different techniques. Unlike conventional methods for metal nanoparticles synthesis, the ADM method does not require application of chemical surfactants and stabilizers. The microstructure of ADM-produced gold nanoparticles was examined by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The particle size was found in the range of 2-40 nm. The chemical composition of gold nanoparticles has been confirmed by the energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The crystal structure of the nanoscale gold particles was studied using the X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. Images of the gold nanoparticles, Zeta potential, size distribution, and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorbance were investigated. This innovative approach for gold nanoparticles preparation has been successfully established. The experimental results showed that the ADM technique is easy, cheap and clean method which can be used to manufacture gold nanoparticles suspended in ethanol solution without any surfactant

  13. Synthesis of subnanometer-diameter vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes with copper-anchored cobalt catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Kehang; Kumamoto, Akihito; Xiang, Rong; An, Hua; Wang, Benjamin; Inoue, Taiki; Chiashi, Shohei; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    We synthesize vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (VA-SWNTs) with subnanometer diameters on quartz (and SiO2/Si) substrates by alcohol CVD using Cu-anchored Co catalysts. The uniform VA-SWNTs with a nanotube diameter of 1 nm are synthesized at a CVD temperature of 800 °C and have a thickness of several tens of μm. The diameter of SWNTs was reduced to 0.75 nm at 650 °C with the G/D ratio maintained above 24. Scanning transmission electron microscopy energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS-STEM) and high angle annular dark field (HAADF-STEM) imaging of the Co/Cu bimetallic catalyst system showed that Co catalysts were captured and anchored by adjacent Cu nanoparticles, and thus were prevented from coalescing into a larger size, which contributed to the small diameter of SWNTs. The correlation between the catalyst size and the SWNT diameter was experimentally clarified. The subnanometer-diameter and high-quality SWNTs are expected to pave the way to replace silicon for next-generation optoelectronic and photovoltaic devices.We synthesize vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (VA-SWNTs) with subnanometer diameters on quartz (and SiO2/Si) substrates by alcohol CVD using Cu-anchored Co catalysts. The uniform VA-SWNTs with a nanotube diameter of 1 nm are synthesized at a CVD temperature of 800 °C and have a thickness of several tens of μm. The diameter of SWNTs was reduced to 0.75 nm at 650 °C with the G/D ratio maintained above 24. Scanning transmission electron microscopy energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS-STEM) and high angle annular dark field (HAADF-STEM) imaging of the Co/Cu bimetallic catalyst system showed that Co catalysts were captured and anchored by adjacent Cu nanoparticles, and thus were prevented from coalescing into a larger size, which contributed to the small diameter of SWNTs. The correlation between the catalyst size and the SWNT diameter was experimentally clarified. The subnanometer-diameter and high

  14. Directed deposition of silicon nanowires using neopentasilane as precursor and gold as catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britta Kämpken

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work the applicability of neopentasilane (Si(SiH34 as a precursor for the formation of silicon nanowires by using gold nanoparticles as a catalyst has been explored. The growth proceeds via the formation of liquid gold/silicon alloy droplets, which excrete the silicon nanowires upon continued decomposition of the precursor. This mechanism determines the diameter of the Si nanowires. Different sources for the gold nanoparticles have been tested: the spontaneous dewetting of gold films, thermally annealed gold films, deposition of preformed gold nanoparticles, and the use of “liquid bright gold”, a material historically used for the gilding of porcelain and glass. The latter does not only form gold nanoparticles when deposited as a thin film and thermally annealed, but can also be patterned by using UV irradiation, providing access to laterally structured layers of silicon nanowires.

  15. Plasmonic Switches and Sensors Based on PANI-Coated Gold Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nina

    Gold nanostructures have been received intense and growing attention due to their unique properties associated with localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). The frequency and strength of the LSPR are highly dependent on the dielectric properties of the surrounding environment around gold nanostructures. Such dependence offers the essential basis for the achievement of plasmonic switching and sensing. While the plasmonic response of gold nanostructures is tuned by changing their dielectric environment, the external stimuli inducing the changes in the dielectric environment will be read out through the plasmonic response of gold nanostructures. As a consequence, plasmonic sensors and switches can be engineered by integrating active media that can respond to external stimuli with gold nanostructures. In this thesis research, I have achieved the coating of polyaniline (PANI) ' a conductive polymer, on gold nanostructures, and exploited the application of the core/shell nanostructures in plasmonic switching and sensing. Large modulation of the longitudinal plasmon resonance of single gold nanorods is achieved by coating PANI shell onto gold nanorods to produce colloidal plasmonic switches. The dielectric properties of PANI shell can be tuned by changing the proton-doping levels, which allows for the modulation of the plasmonic response of gold nanorods. The coated nanorods are sparsely housed in a simple microfluidic chamber. HCl and NaOH solutions are alternately pumped through the chamber for the realization of proton doping and dedoping. The plasmonic switching behavior is examined by monitoring the single-particle scattering spectra under the proton-doped and dedoped state of PANI. The coated nanorods exhibit a remarkable switching performance, with the modulation depth and scattering peak shift reaching 10 dB and 100 nm, respectively. Electrodynamic simulations are employed to confirm the plasmon switching behavior. I have further investigated the modulation of

  16. A gold electrode modified with silver oxide nanoparticle decorated carbon nanotubes for electrochemical sensing of dissolved ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, Mohammed M.; Asiri, Abdullah M.; Balkhoyor, Hasan B.; Marwani, Hadi M.

    2016-01-01

    We have prepared silver oxide nanoparticles with a diameter of ∼ 15 nm and decorated with carbon nanotube nanocomposites (Ag_2O/CNT NCs) by a facile wet chemical method using reducing agents in alkaline medium. These NCs were characterized by UV/vis, FTIR and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, by X-ray powder diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy. The NCs were then deposited on a flat gold electrode with the help of a conducting binder to result in an electrochemical sensor for aqueous ammonia using the I-V technique. Response is based on surface oxidation of ammonium hydroxide with electrode-adsorbed oxygen to form nitrogen oxide, these simultaneously liberating free electrons in the conduction band. Sensor features include a sensitivity of 32.856 μA.μM"-"1.cm"-"2, a low detection limit (1.3 pM at a signal to noise ratio of 3), reliability, reproducibility, ease of integration, and long term stability. The response to dissolved ammonia is linear (r"2: 0.9778) over the 0.01 nM to 0.1 mM concentration range. (author)

  17. Bioselective synthesis of gold nanoparticles from diluted mixed Au, Ir, and Rh ion solution by Anabaena cylindrica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochert, Anna S.; Rösken, Liz M.; Fischer, Christian B.; Schönleber, Andreas; Ecker, Dennis; van Smaalen, Sander; Geimer, Stefan; Wehner, Stefan

    2017-11-01

    Over the last years, an environmentally friendly and economically efficient way of nanoparticle production has been found in the biosynthesis of metal nanoparticles by bacteria and cyanobacteria. In this study, Anabaena cylindrica, a non-toxic cyanobacterium, is deployed in a diluted ionic aqueous mixture of equal concentrations of gold, iridium, and rhodium, of 0.1 mM each, for the selective biosynthesis of metal nanoparticles (NPs). To analyze the cyanobacterial metal uptake, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were applied. Only gold can be found in crystalline and nanoparticle form inside the cells of A. cylindrica, and it is the only metal for which ICP-MS analyses show a rapid decrease of the concentration in the culture medium. A slight decrease of rhodium and none of iridium was observed in the evaluated timeline of 51 h. The average diameter size of the emerging gold nanoparticles increased over the first few days, but is found to be below 10 nm even after more than 2 days. A new evaluation method was used to determine the spatially resolved distribution of the nanoparticles inside the cyanobacterial cells. This new method was also used to analyze TEM images from earlier studies of A. cylindrica and Anabaena sp., both incubated with an overall concentration of 0.8 mM Au3+ to compare the metal uptake. A. cylindrica was found to be highly selective towards the formation of gold nanoparticles in the presence of rhodium and iridium.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of thiolated pectin stabilized gold coated magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arora, Varun, E-mail: varun.arora3986@gmail.com [University School of Basic and Applied Sciences, Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Sector 16-C, Dwarka, New Delhi 110078 (India); Sood, Ankur, E-mail: ankursood02@gmail.com [University School of Basic and Applied Sciences, Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Sector 16-C, Dwarka, New Delhi 110078 (India); Shah, Jyoti, E-mail: shah.jyoti1@gmail.com [National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Kotnala, R.K., E-mail: rkkotnala@nplindia.org [National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Jain, Tapan K., E-mail: tapankjain@gmail.com [University School of Basic and Applied Sciences, Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Sector 16-C, Dwarka, New Delhi 110078 (India)

    2016-04-15

    Core–shell nanoparticles, magnetic core and gold shell, were synthesized by reduction of gold chloride on the surface of magnetic nanoparticles; using tyrosine as a reducing agent. The formation of gold shell on magnetic nanoparticles was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and UV-Visible spectroscopy. The core–shell nanoparticles (CSn) were conjugated with thiolated pectin to form a stable aqueous dispersion. The hydrodynamic size of thiolated pectin stabilized core–shell nanoparticles (TP-CSn) measured by Dynamic light scattering (DLS) was 160.5 nm with a poly dispersity index (PDI) of 0.302, whereas the mean particle size of TP-CSn calculated by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) was 10.8 ± 2.7 nm. The value of zeta potential for TP-CSn was −13.6 mV. There was a decrease in the value of saturation magnetization upon formation of the gold shell on magnetic nanoparticles. The amount of thiolated pectin bound to the surface of core–shell nanoparticles, calculated using Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), was 6% of sample weight. - Highlights: • Use of side group of tyrosine (phenol) as a pH dependent reducing agent to synthesize gold coated magnetic nanoparticles. • Successful coating of gold shell on magnetic nanoparticles core. • Synthesis of thiolated pectin and stabilization of aqueous dispersion of core–shell nanoparticles with thiolated pectin. • The superparamagnetic behaviour of magnetic nanoparticles is retained after shell formation.

  19. "light-on" sensing of antioxidants using gold nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Lianzhe; Deng, Lin; Alsaiari, Shahad K.; Zhang, Dingyuan; Khashab, Niveen M.

    2014-01-01

    preservatives, and cosmetics has proved to be very vital. Gold nanoclusters (Au-NCs) have a core size below 2 nm and contain several metal atoms. They have interesting photophysical properties, are readily functionalized, and are safe to use in various

  20. Reversible peptide oligomerization over nanoscale gold surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazushige Yokoyama

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A selective oligomeric formation of amyloid beta 1-40 (Ab1-40 monomers over a nanogold colloidal surface was investigated. An unfolded Ab1-40 monomer is considered to construct a dimer or trimer based oligomeric form with its hydrophobic segment placing outward under an acidic condition. Under a basic condition, a conformation of Ab is expected to take a folded monomeric form with its hydrophilic segment folded inward, avoiding the networking with residual colloidal particles. The most probable oligomeric form constructed over a 20 nm gold colloidal surface within a 25 ℃ to 65 ℃ temperature range is a dimer based unit and that over 30 or 40 nm gold colloidal surface below 15 ℃ is concluded to be a trimer based unit. However, selective oligomerization was not successfully reproduced under the rest of the conditions. A dipole-induced dipole interaction must cause a flexible structural change between folded and unfolded forms.

  1. Continuous Flow Controlled Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles Using Pulsed Mixing Microfluidic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guojun Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To prepare the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs with uniform sizes, fine morphology, and good monodispersity, a pulsed mixing microfluidic system based on PZT actuation was presented. The system includes PZT micropump and Y type micromixer. By adjusting voltage (entrance flow rate, pulsed frequency, phase, and other parameters, a variety of mixing modes can be achieved, so as to realize the controllable synthesis of nanoparticles in a certain range. By numerical simulation and analysis, the channel section size, entrance angle, and pulse frequency were optimized. Based on the optimized structure and working parameters, the test prototype has been manufactured in lab, and the related synthesis tests of AuNPs were carried out. The test results indicate that AuNPs with uniform morphology and good monodispersity can be synthesized using the system with the section size (0.4 mm × 0.4 mm, the entrance channel angle (60° under condition of the pulsed frequency (300 Hz, and the entrance flow rate (4 mL/min. The average diameter and its standard deviation of AuNPs synthesized were 21.6 nm, 4.83 nm, respectively. The research work above can be applied to the fields such as the controlled synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles, biomedicine, and microchemical system.

  2. Extracellular biosynthesis of monodispersed gold nanoparticles by a SAM capping route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Li; Lin, Zhonghua; Gu, Pingying; Zhou, Jianzhang; Yao, Bingxing; Chen, Guoliang; Fu, Jinkun

    2009-02-01

    Monodispersed gold nanoparticles capped with a self-assembled monolayer of dodecanethiol were biosynthesized extracellularly by an efficient, simple, and environmental friendly procedure, which involved the use of Bacillus megatherium D01 as the reducing agent and the use of dodecanethiol as the capping ligand at 26 °C. The kinetics of gold nanoparticle formation was followed by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and UV-vis spectroscopy. It was shown that reaction time was an important parameter in controlling the morphology of gold nanoparticles. The effect of thiol on the shape, size, and dispersity of gold nanoparticles was also studied. The results showed that the presence of thiol during the biosynthesis could induce the formation of small size gold nanoparticles (gold nanoparticles capped with thiol of 1.9 ± 0.8 nm size were formed by using Bacillus megatherium D01.

  3. Subwavelength Gold Grating as Polarizers Integrated with InP-Based InGaAs Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Li, Tao; Shao, Xiumei; Li, Xue; Huang, Xiaqi; Shao, Jinhai; Chen, Yifang; Gong, Haimei

    2015-07-08

    There are currently growing needs for polarimetric imaging in infrared wavelengths for broad applications in bioscience, communications and agriculture, etc. Subwavelength metallic gratings are capable of separating transverse magnetic (TM) mode from transverse electric (TE) mode to form polarized light, offering a reliable approach for the detection in polarization way. This work aims to design and fabricate subwavelength gold gratings as polarizers for InP-based InGaAs sensors in 1.0-1.6 μm. The polarization capability of gold gratings on InP substrate with pitches in the range of 200-1200 nm (fixed duty cycle of 0.5) has been systematically studied by both theoretical modeling with a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulator and spectral measurements. Gratings with 200 nm lines/space in 100-nm-thick gold have been fabricated by electron beam lithography (EBL). It was found that subwavelength gold gratings directly integrated on InP cannot be applied as good polarizers, because of the existence of SPP modes in the detection wavelengths. An effective solution has been found by sandwiching the Au/InP bilayer using a 200 nm SiO2 layer, leading to significant improvement in both TM transmission and extinction ratio. At 1.35 μm, the improvement factors are 8 and 10, respectively. Therefore, it is concluded that the Au/SiO2/InP trilayer should be a promising candidate of near-infrared polarizers for the InP-based InGaAs sensors.

  4. Porous silicon photoluminescence modification by colloidal gold nanoparticles: Plasmonic, surface and porosity roles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mora, M.B. de la; Bornacelli, J.; Nava, R.; Zanella, R.; Reyes-Esqueda, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Metal nanoparticles on semiconductors are of interest because of the tunable effect of the surface plasmon resonance on the physical properties of the semiconductor. In this work, colloidal gold nanoparticles obtained by two different methods, with an average size of 6.1±2.0 nm and 5.0±2.0 nm, were added to luminescent porous silicon by drop casting. The gold nanoparticles interact with porous silicon by modifying its optical properties such as photoluminescence. That being said, plasmon effects are not the only to be taken into account; as shown in this work, surface chemical modification and porosity also play a key role in the final performance of photoluminescence of a porous silicon–gold nanoparticle hybrid system. -- Highlights: • A hybrid material consisting of porous silicon and gold nanoparticles was fabricated. • Porous silicon/gold nanoparticle hybrid material was made by drop casting. • Influence of plasmonics, surface chemical modification and porosity on the optical behavior of our material was analyzed. • Porosity is proposed as a parameter control to obtain the best effects on luminescence of the hybrid plasmonic material

  5. Porous silicon photoluminescence modification by colloidal gold nanoparticles: Plasmonic, surface and porosity roles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mora, M.B. de la; Bornacelli, J. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Nava, R. [Centro de Investigación en Energía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Temixco, Morelos 62580 (Mexico); Zanella, R. [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Reyes-Esqueda, J.A., E-mail: betarina@gmail.com [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México D.F. 04510 (Mexico)

    2014-02-15

    Metal nanoparticles on semiconductors are of interest because of the tunable effect of the surface plasmon resonance on the physical properties of the semiconductor. In this work, colloidal gold nanoparticles obtained by two different methods, with an average size of 6.1±2.0 nm and 5.0±2.0 nm, were added to luminescent porous silicon by drop casting. The gold nanoparticles interact with porous silicon by modifying its optical properties such as photoluminescence. That being said, plasmon effects are not the only to be taken into account; as shown in this work, surface chemical modification and porosity also play a key role in the final performance of photoluminescence of a porous silicon–gold nanoparticle hybrid system. -- Highlights: • A hybrid material consisting of porous silicon and gold nanoparticles was fabricated. • Porous silicon/gold nanoparticle hybrid material was made by drop casting. • Influence of plasmonics, surface chemical modification and porosity on the optical behavior of our material was analyzed. • Porosity is proposed as a parameter control to obtain the best effects on luminescence of the hybrid plasmonic material.

  6. Adsorption effectiveness of β-lactoglobulin onto gold surface determined by quartz crystal microbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jachimska, B; Świątek, S; Loch, J I; Lewiński, K; Luxbacher, T

    2018-06-01

    Bovine β-lactoglobulin (LGB) is a transport protein that can bind to its structure hydrophobic bioactive molecules. Due to the lack of toxicity, high stability and pH-dependent molecular binding mechanism, lactoglobulin can be used as a carrier of sparingly soluble drugs. Dynamic light scattering has confirmed LGB's tendency to create oligomeric forms. The hydrodynamic diameter of LGB molecules varies from 4 nm to 6 nm in the pH range of 2-10 and ionic strength I = 0.001-0.15 M, which corresponds to the presence of mono or dimeric LGB forms. The LGB zeta potential varies from 26.5 mV to -33.3 mV for I = 0.01 M and from 13.3 mV to -16 mV for I = 0.15 M in the pH range of 2-10. The isoelectric point is at pH 4.8. As a result of strong surface charge compensation, the maximum effective ionization degree of the LGB molecule is 35% for ionic strength I = 0.01 M and 22% for I = 0.15 M. The effectiveness of adsorption is linked with the properties of the protein, as well as those of the adsorption surface. The functionalization of gold surfaces with β-lactoglobulin (LGB) was studied using a quartz crystal microbalance with energy dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). The effectiveness of LGB adsorption correlates strongly with a charge of gold surface and the zeta potential of the molecule. The greatest value of the adsorbed mass was observed in the pH range in which LGB has a positive zeta potential values, below pH 4.8. This observation shows that electrostatic interactions play a dominant role in LGB adsorption on gold surfaces. Based on the adsorbed mass, protein orientation on gold surfaces was determined. The preferential side-on orientation of LGB molecules observed in the adsorption layer is consistent with the direction of the molecule dipole momentum determined by molecular dynamics simulations of the protein (MD). The use of the QCM-D method also allowed us to determine the effectiveness of adsorption of LGB on gold

  7. Detection of Carbendazim Residues with a Colorimetric Sensor Based on Gold Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Y.; Jiang, H.; Shen, C.; Hou, Ch.; Huo, D.; Wu, H.; Yang, M.

    2017-07-01

    Carbendazim is among the most popular benzimidazole bactericides that are widely used to boost food production, and its residue poses a great threat to human health and the environment. In this paper, we presented a colorimetric sensor based on gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) for the detection of carbendazim residues. The Au-NPs were stabilized by citric acid synthesized by chloroauric acid and sodium citrate with a diameter of about 13 nm. Upon reaction with carbendazim, the sensor gave a clear color change that could be distinguished with the naked eye. Thus we elaborated a new method for rapid determination of this benzimidazole bactericide. After optimization of the detection conditions, the sensor showed a very good linear relationship with the carbendazim concentrations varying from 10 to 600 ppb with a detection limit down to 3.4 ppb (S/N = 3). These preliminary results demonstrate that the presented sensor is promising for fast carbendazim analysis.

  8. Synergistic Use of Gold Nanoparticles (AuNPs) and “Capillary Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA)” for High Sensitivity and Fast Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wan-Joong; Cho, Hyo Young; Jeong, Bongjin; Byun, Sangwon; Huh, JaeDoo; Kim, Young Jun

    2017-01-01

    Using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on “capillary enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)”, we produced highly sensitive and rapid assays, which are the major attributes for point-of-care applications. First, in order to understand the size effect of AuNPs, AuNPs of varying diameters (5 nm, 10 nm, 15 nm, 20 nm, 30 nm, and 50 nm) conjugated with Horseradish Peroxidase (HRP)-labeled anti-C reactive protein (antiCRP) (AuNP•antiCRP-HRP) were used for well-plate ELISA. AuNP of 10 nm produced the largest optical density, enabling detection of 0.1 ng/mL of CRP with only 30 s of incubation, in contrast to 10 ng/mL for the ELISA run in the absence of AuNP. Then, AuNP of 10 nm conjugated with antiCRP-HRP (AuNP•antiCRP-HRP) was used for “capillary ELISA” to detect as low as 0.1 ng/mL of CRP. Also, kinetic study on both 96-well plates and in a capillary tube using antiCRP-HRP or AuNP•antiCRP-HRP showed a synergistic effect between AuNP and the capillary system, in which the fastest assay was observed from the “AuNP capillary ELISA”, with its maximum absorbance reaching 2.5 min, while the slowest was the typical well-plate ELISA with its maximum absorbance reaching in 13.5 min. PMID:29278402

  9. Enhancement of radiation effect on cancer cells by gold-pHLIP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antosh, Michael P.; Wijesinghe, Dayanjali D.; Shrestha, Samana; Lanou, Robert; Huang, Yun Hu; Hasselbacher, Thomas; Fox, David; Neretti, Nicola; Sun, Shouheng; Katenka, Natallia; Cooper, Leon N; Andreev, Oleg A.; Reshetnyak, Yana K.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown that gold nanoparticles can increase the effectiveness of radiation on cancer cells. Improved radiation effectiveness would allow lower radiation doses given to patients, reducing adverse effects; alternatively, it would provide more cancer killing at current radiation doses. Damage from radiation and gold nanoparticles depends in part on the Auger effect, which is very localized; thus, it is important to place the gold nanoparticles on or in the cancer cells. In this work, we use the pH-sensitive, tumor-targeting agent, pH Low-Insertion Peptide (pHLIP), to tether 1.4-nm gold nanoparticles to cancer cells. We find that the conjugation of pHLIP to gold nanoparticles increases gold uptake in cells compared with gold nanoparticles without pHLIP, with the nanoparticles distributed mostly on the cellular membranes. We further find that gold nanoparticles conjugated to pHLIP produce a statistically significant decrease in cell survival with radiation compared with cells without gold nanoparticles and cells with gold alone. In the context of our previous findings demonstrating efficient pHLIP-mediated delivery of gold nanoparticles to tumors, the obtained results serve as a foundation for further preclinical evaluation of dose enhancement. PMID:25870296

  10. Growth of hydroxyapatite on physiologically clotted fibrin capped gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sastry, T P; Sundaraseelan, J; Swarnalatha, K; Sobhana, S S Liji; Makheswari, M Uma; Sekar, S; Mandal, A B

    2008-01-01

    The growth of hydroxyapatite (HAp) on physiologically clotted fibrin (PCF)-gold nanoparticles is presented for the first time by employing a wet precipitation method. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy confirmed the characteristic functionalities of PCF and HAp in the PCF-Au-HAp nanocomposite. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images have shown cuboidal nanostructures having a size in the range of 70-300 nm of HAp, whereas 2-50 nm sized particles were visualized in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) studies have confirmed the presence of HAp. These results show that gold nanoparticles with PCF acted as a matrix for the growth of HAp, and that PCF-Au-HAp nanocomposite is expected to have better osteoinductive properties

  11. Orange pectin mediated growth and stability of aqueous gold and silver nanocolloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigoghossian, Karina; dos Santos, Molíria V.; Barud, Hernane S.; da Silva, Robson R.; Rocha, Lucas A.; Caiut, José M. A.; de Assunção, Rosana M. N.; Spanhel, Lubomir; Poulain, Marcel; Messaddeq, Younes; Ribeiro, Sidney J. L.

    2015-06-01

    The role of orange based pectin in the nucleation and growth of silver and gold nanoparticles is addressed. Pectin is a complex polysaccharide found in fruits such as oranges, lemons, passion fruits or apples. It displays smooth and hairy chain regions containing hydroxyl-, ester-, carboxylate- and eventually amine groups that can act as surface ligands interacting under various pH conditions more or less efficiently with growing nanometals. Here, a high methoxy pectin (>50% esterified) was used as a stabilizer/reducing agent in the preparation of gold, silver and silver-gold nanoparticles. Commercial pectin (CP) and pectin extracted from orange bagasse (OP) were used. Optionally, trisodium citrate or oxalic acid we used to reduce AgNO3 and HAuCl4 in aqueous environment. Characterization methods included UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results show that under different pH conditions, pectin and reducing agents allow producing various nanostructures shapes (triangles, spheres, rods, octahedrons and decahedrons) often with high polydispersity and sizes ranging between 5 nm and 30 nm. In addition, depending on Ag/Au-ratio and pH, the surface plasmon bands can be continuously shifted between 410 nm and 600 nm. Finally, pectin seems to be a highly efficient stabilizer of the colloidal systems that show a remarkable stability and unchanged optical spectral response even after five years.

  12. Inhibitory effect of gold nanoparticles on the D-ribose glycation of bovine serum albumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu W

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Weixi Liu,1 Menashi A Cohenford,1–3 Leslie Frost,3 Champika Seneviratne,4 Joel A Dain1 1Department of Chemistry, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI, USA; 2Department of Integrated Science and Technology, 3Department of Chemistry, Marshall University, Huntington, WV, USA; 4Department of Chemistry, College of the North Atlantic, Labrador, NL, Canada Abstract: Formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs by nonenzymatic glycation of proteins is a major contributory factor to the pathophysiology of diabetic conditions including senile dementia and atherosclerosis. This study describes the inhibitory effect of gold nanoparticles (GNPs on the D-ribose glycation of bovine serum albumin (BSA. A combination of analytical methods including ultraviolet–visible spectrometry, high performance liquid chromatography, circular dichroism, and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry were used to determine the extent of BSA glycation in the presence of citrate reduced spherical GNPs of various sizes and concentrations. GNPs of particle diameters ranging from 2 nm to 20 nm inhibited BSA’s AGE formation. The extent of inhibition correlated with the total surface area of the nanoparticles. GNPs of highest total surface area yielded the most inhibition whereas those with the lowest total surface area inhibited the formation of AGEs the least. Additionally, when GNPs’ total surface areas were set the same, their antiglycation activities were similar. This inhibitory effect of GNPs on BSA’s glycation by D-ribose suggests that colloidal particles may have a therapeutic application for the treatment of diabetes and conditions that promote hyperglycemia. Keywords: gold nanoparticles, glycation, AGEs, GNPs, BSA

  13. Size control synthesis of starch capped-gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajammul Hussain, S.; Iqbal, M.; Mazhar, M.

    2009-01-01

    Metallic gold nanoparticles have been synthesized by the reduction of chloroaurate anions [AuCl 4 ] - solution with hydrazine in the aqueous starch and ethylene glycol solution at room temperature and at atmospheric pressure. The characterization of synthesized gold nanoparticles by UV-vis spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), electron diffraction analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-rays photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicate that average size of pure gold nanoparticles is 3.5 nm, they are spherical in shape and are pure metallic gold. The concentration effects of [AuCl 4 ] - anions, starch, ethylene glycol, and hydrazine, on particle size, were investigated, and the stabilization mechanism of Au nanoparticles by starch polymer molecules was also studied by FT-IR and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). FT-IR and TGA analysis shows that hydroxyl groups of starch are responsible of capping and stabilizing gold nanoparticles. The UV-vis spectrum of these samples shows that there is blue shift in surface plasmon resonance peak with decrease in particle size due to the quantum confinement effect, a supporting evidence of formation of gold nanoparticles and this shift remains stable even after 3 months.

  14. Nano Indentation Inspection of the Mechanical Properties of Gold Nitride Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armen Verdyan

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The morphology and the local mechanical properties of gold nitride thin films were studied by atomic force microscope (AFM. Gold nitride films were deposited for the first time on silicon substrate without any buffer layer at room temperature by reactive pulsed laser ablation deposition (RPLD. The films were fabricated on (100 Si wafers by RPLD technique in which KrF excimer laser was used to ablate a gold target in N2 atmosphere (0.1 GPa-100 Pa and ambient temperature. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and atomic force microscopy inspections showed that the films were flat plane with rms roughness in the range of 35.1 nm-3.6 nm, depending on the deposition pressure. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS and energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS used to detect the nitrogen concentration in the films, have revealed a composition close to Au3N. The film

  15. Glucose oxidase-functionalized fluorescent gold nanoclusters as probes for glucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Xiaodong; Long, Yunfei; Wang, Jianxiu

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A glucose oxidase/gold nanocluster conjugates formed by etching chemistry. ► Integration of the bioactivities and fluorescence properties within a single unit. ► These conjugates serve as novel fluorescent probe for glucose. -- Abstract: Creation and application of noble metal nanoclusters have received continuous attention. By integrating enzyme activity and fluorescence for potential applications, enzyme-capped metal clusters are more desirable. This work demonstrated a glucose oxidase (an enzyme for glucose)-functionalized gold cluster as probe for glucose. Under physiological conditions, such bioconjugate was successfully prepared by an etching reaction, where tetrakis (hydroxylmethyl) phosphonium-protected gold nanoparticle and thioctic acid-modified glucose oxidase were used as precursor and etchant, respectively. These bioconjugates showed unique fluorescence spectra (λ em max = 650 nm, λ ex max = 507 nm) with an acceptable quantum yield (ca. 7%). Moreover, the conjugated glucose oxidase remained active and catalyzed reaction of glucose and dissolved O 2 to produce H 2 O 2 , which quenched quantitatively the fluorescence of gold clusters and laid a foundation of glucose detection. A linear range of 2.0 × 10 −6 –140 × 10 −6 M and a detection limit of 0.7 × 10 −6 M (S/N = 3) were obtained. Also, another horseradish peroxidase/gold cluster bioconjugate was produced by such general synthesis method. Such enzyme/metal cluster bioconjugates represented a promising class of biosensors for biologically important targets in organelles or cells

  16. Synthesis and stabilization of gold nanoparticles for biotechnological and cosmetics uses; Síntese e estabilização de nanopartículas de ouro para fins biotecnológicos e cosméticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Andressa Alves da

    2016-07-01

    This study focuses on the synthesis and characterization of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with reducing agents and stabilizing sodium citrate and gum arabic. The synthesis was carried out by heating and use of gamma radiation source {sup 60}Co in doses 1, 7.5 and 15 kGy. In this context, we studied the properties and stability of AuNPs formed through characterization techniques such as UV- Vis absorption, checking the characteristics of AuNPs bands as well as the physical stability thereof. The samples synthesized with sodium citrate (AuCit) showed wavelengths ranging from 520 to 525 nm and the samples synthesized with gum arabic (AuGA) showed wavelengths between 530 and 540 nm. The dynamic light scattering analysis (DLS) was used to determine the hydrodynamic diameter of nanoparticles formed during a period of three months, demonstrating that AuCit samples showed mean hydrodynamic sizes ranging from 20 to 50 nm while AuGA samples synthesized by heating and the use of gamma radiation had mean hydrodynamic sizes ranging 50 - 115 nm. Analysis of scanning electron microscope with field emission (SEM - FEG) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to determine the actual size distribution of nanoparticles and their geometric shape. The characterization of the AuGA showed smaller diameters in comparison to the one resulted from the DLS analysis, thus suggesting possible encapsulation of AuNPs. (author)

  17. Poly-thiosemicarbazide Membrane for Gold Adsorption and In-situ Growth of Gold Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Parra, Luis F.

    2012-12-01

    In this work the synergy between a polymer containing chelate sites and gold ions was explored by the fabrication of a polymeric membrane with embedded gold nanoparticles inside its matrix and by developing a process to recover gold from acidic solutions. After realizing that the thiosemicarbazide groups present in the monomeric unit of poly-thiosemicarbazide (PTSC) formed strong complexes with Au ions, membrane technology was used to exploit this property to its maximum. The incorporation of metal nanoparticles into polymeric matrices with current technologies involves either expensive and complicated procedures or leads to poor results in terms of agglomeration, loading, dispersion, stability or efficient use of raw materials. The fabrication procedure described in this thesis solves these problems by fabricating a PTSC membrane containing 33.5 wt% in the form of 2.9 nm gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) by a three step simple and scalable procedure. It showed outstanding results in all of the areas mentioned above and demonstrated catalytic activity for the reduction of 4-Nitrophenol (4−NP) to 4-Aminophenol (4−AP). The current exponential demand of gold for electronics has encouraged the development of efficient processes to recycle it. Several adsorbents used to recover gold from acidic solutions can be found in the literature with outstanding maximum uptakes,yet, poor kinetics leading to an overall inefficient process. The method developed in this dissertation consisted in permeating the gold-containing solution through a PTSC membrane that will capture all the Au ions by forming a metal complex with them. Forcing the ions through the pores of the membrane eliminates the diffusion limitations and the adsorption will only depended on the fast complexation kinetics, resulting in a very efficient process. A flux as high as 1868 L/h m2 was enough to capture >90% of the precious metal present in a solution of 100 ppm Au. The maximum uptake achieved without sacrificing

  18. Ethylene Gas Sensing Properties of Tin Oxide Nanowires Synthesized via CVD Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhir, Maisara A. M.; Mohamed, Khairudin; Rezan, Sheikh A.; Arafat, M. M.; Haseeb, A. S. M. A.; Uda, M. N. A.; Nuradibah, M. A.

    2018-03-01

    This paper studies ethylene gas sensing performance of tin oxide (SnO2) nanowires (NWs) as sensing material synthesized using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique. The effect of NWs diameter on ethylene gas sensing characteristics were investigated. SnO2 NWs with diameter of ∼40 and ∼240 nm were deposited onto the alumina substrate with printed gold electrodes and tested for sensing characteristic toward ethylene gas. From the finding, the smallest diameter of NWs (42 nm) exhibit fast response and recovery time and higher sensitivity compared to largest diameter of NWs (∼240 nm). Both sensor show good reversibility features for ethylene gas sensor.

  19. Basic electrochemical properties of sputtered gold film electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libansky, Milan; Zima, Jiri; Barek, Jiri; Reznickova, Alena; Svorcik, Vaclav; Dejmkova, Hana

    2017-01-01

    Gold nanolayers made by sputtering of pure gold (physical vapour deposition) are commonly used for many biophysical and material applications. However, the use of sputtering method for fabrication of working electrodes for electroanalytical purposes is less common. This paper focuses on the testing and characterization of sputtered working roughened gold nanostructured film electrodes, which fall into category of upcoming desirable new generation of nanostructured gold working electrodes. Gold nanostructured films (80 nm thin) were sputtered onto 50 μm thin PTFE substrates with three different types of treatment: pristine, plasma treated, and plasma treated and subsequently spontaneously grafted with biphenyl-4,4′-dithiol. The characterization of gold nanostructured film electrodes was carried out by examination of the electrode reaction of standard redox probes (ferrocyanide/ferricyanide, hydroquinone/benzoquinone) in different types of supporting electrolytes (BR buffers of various pH, KCl, KNO 3 , H 2 SO 4 ), by exploration of the electrode surface by scanning electron microscopy, by atomic force microscopy accompanied by elementary analysis and contact angle measurements. The testing of electrodes was complemented by an attempt to calculate their real surface areas from Randles-Sevcik equation. All results were compared to conventional bulk gold electrode. The practical applicability of the nanostructured gold electrodes as sensors for the determination of environmental pollutants was verified by voltammetric determination of hydroquinone as a model electrochemically oxidisable organic environmental pollutant.

  20. Directing self-assembly of gold nanoparticles in diblock copolymer scaffold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qifang; He, Jinbo; Glogowski, Elizabeth; Emrick, Todd; Russell, Thomas

    2007-03-01

    A versatile hierarchical approach for directing self -assembly of gold nanostructures with size 2-3nm in diblock copolymer scaffolds is found. Diblock copolymer polystyrene-b-poly(2-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P2VP) is used to form a regular scaffold of highly anisotropic, stripe-like domains, and controlled differential wetting by dichloromethane and thermal annealing guides gold nanoparticles with half hydrophilic ligand to aggregate selectively along the scaffold, producing highly organized metal nanostructures. In as-cast block-copolymer and gold nanoparticles thin films, micelle structure and gold nanoparticles random distribution on scaffold are typically observed. However, samples annealed in dichloromethane exhibit well-defined short-range ordered nanostructure with gold nanoparticles located at the interface of PS and P2VP nanoscale domain. After annealing at 170 C, the gold nanoparticles at interface migrated into the middle of P2VP phase and exhibited long-range ordered hierarchical structures. Synergistic interactions between the gold nanoparticles and the PS-b-P2VP caused an orientation of the microdomains normal to the film surface.

  1. TEMPO functionalized C60 fullerene deposited on gold surface for catalytic oxidation of selected alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piotrowski, Piotr; Pawłowska, Joanna; Sadło, Jarosław Grzegorz; Bilewicz, Renata; Kaim, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    C 60 TEMPO 10 catalytic system linked to a microspherical gold support through a covalent S-Au bond was developed. The C 60 TEMPO 10 @Au composite catalyst had a particle size of 0.5–0.8 μm and was covered with the fullerenes derivative of 2.3 nm diameter bearing ten nitroxyl groups; the organic film showed up to 50 nm thickness. The catalytic composite allowed for the oxidation under mild conditions of various primary and secondary alcohols to the corresponding aldehyde and ketone analogues with efficiencies as high as 79–98%, thus giving values typical for homogeneous catalysis, while retaining at the same time all the advantages of heterogeneous catalysis, e.g., easy separation by filtration from the reaction mixture. The catalytic activity of the resulting system was studied by means of high pressure liquid chromatography. A redox mechanism was proposed for the process. In the catalytic cycle of the oxidation process, the TEMPO moiety was continuously regenerated in situ with an applied primary oxidant, for example, O 2 /Fe 3+ system. The new intermediate composite components and the final catalyst were characterized by various spectroscopic methods and thermogravimetry.

  2. Flower-shaped gold nanoparticles: Preparation, characterization, and electro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam M. Al-Akraa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The modification of a glassy carbon electrode with gold nanoparticles was pursued, characterized, and examined for electrocatalytic applications. The fabrication process of this electrode involved assembling the gold nanoparticles atop of amino group grafted glassy carbon electrode. The scanning electron microscopy indicated the deposition of gold nanoparticles in flower-shaped nanostructures with an average particle size of ca. 150 nm. Interestingly, the electrode exhibited outstanding enhancement in the electrocatalytic activity toward the oxygen evolution reaction, which reflected from the large negative shift (ca. 0.8 V in its onset potential, in comparison with that observed at the bulk unmodified glassy carbon and gold electrodes. Alternatively, the Tafel plot of the modified electrode revealed a significant increase (∼one order of magnitude in the apparent exchange current density of the oxygen evolution reaction upon the modification, which infers a faster charge transfer. Kinetically, gold nanoparticles are believed to facilitate a favorable adsorption of OH− (fundamental step in oxygen evolution reaction, which allows the charge transfer at reasonably lower anodic polarizations.

  3. Near IR Scanning Angle Total Internal Reflection Raman Spectroscopy at Smooth Gold Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKee, Kristopher; Meyer, Matthew; Smith, Emily

    2012-04-13

    Total internal reflection (TIR) Raman and reflectivity spectra were collected for nonresonant analytes as a function of incident angle at sapphire or sapphire/smooth 50 nm gold interfaces using 785 nm excitation. For both interfaces, the Raman signal as a function of incident angle is well-modeled by the calculated interfacial mean square electric field (MSEF) relative to the incident field times the thickness of the layer being probed in the Raman measurement (D{sub RS}). The Raman scatter was reproducibly enhanced at the interface containing a gold film relative to the sapphire interface by a factor of 4.3–4.6 for aqueous pyridine or 2.2–3.7 for neat nitrobenzene, depending on the analyzed vibrational mode. The mechanism for the increased Raman signal is the enhanced MSEF at incident angles where propagating surface plasmons are excited in the metal film. The background from the TIR prism was reduced by 89–95% with the addition of the gold film, and the percent relative uncertainty in peak area was reduced from 15 to 1.7% for the 1347 cm–1 mode of nitrobenzene. Single monolayers of benzenethiol (S/N = 6.8) and 4-mercaptopyridine (S/N = 16.5) on gold films were measured by TIR Raman spectroscopy with 785 nm excitation (210 mW) without resonant enhancement in 1 min.

  4. Synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of gold nanobipyramids prepared by a chemical reduction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngo, Vo Ke Thanh; Huynh, Trong Phat; Nguyen, Dang Giang; Nguyen, Hoang Phuong Uyen; Lam, Quang Vinh; Huynh, Thanh Dat

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanobipyramids (NBPs) have attracted much attention because they have potential for applications in smart sensing devices, such as medical diagnostic equippments. This is due to the fact that they show more advantageous plasmonic properties than other gold nanostructures. We describe a chemical reduction method for synthesizing NBPs using conventional heating with ascorbic acid reduction and cetyltrimethylamonium bromide (CTAB) + AgNO_3 as capping agents. The product was characterized by ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy (UV–vis), Fourier transmission infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The results showed that gold nanoparticles were formed with bipyramid shape (tip-to-tip distance of 88.4 ± 9.4 nm and base length of 29.9 ± 3.2 nm) and face-centered-cubic crystalline structure. Optimum parameters for preparation of NBPs are also found. (paper)

  5. Synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of gold nanobipyramids prepared by a chemical reduction method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanh Ngo, Vo Ke; Phat Huynh, Trong; Giang Nguyen, Dang; Phuong Uyen Nguyen, Hoang; Lam, Quang Vinh; Dat Huynh, Thanh

    2015-12-01

    Gold nanobipyramids (NBPs) have attracted much attention because they have potential for applications in smart sensing devices, such as medical diagnostic equippments. This is due to the fact that they show more advantageous plasmonic properties than other gold nanostructures. We describe a chemical reduction method for synthesizing NBPs using conventional heating with ascorbic acid reduction and cetyltrimethylamonium bromide (CTAB) + AgNO3 as capping agents. The product was characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), Fourier transmission infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The results showed that gold nanoparticles were formed with bipyramid shape (tip-to-tip distance of 88.4 ± 9.4 nm and base length of 29.9 ± 3.2 nm) and face-centered-cubic crystalline structure. Optimum parameters for preparation of NBPs are also found.

  6. Attenuated effects of chitosan-capped gold nanoparticles on LPS-induced toxicity in laboratory rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefan, Marius; Melnig, Viorel; Pricop, Daniela; Neagu, Anca; Mihasan, Marius; Tartau, Liliana; Hritcu, Lucian

    2013-01-01

    The impact of nanoparticles in medicine and biology has increased rapidly in recent years. Gold nanoparticles (AuNP) have advantageous properties such as chemical stability, high electron density and affinity to biomolecules. However, the effects of AuNP on human body after repeated administration are still unclear. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of gold-11.68 nm (AuNP1, 9.8 μg) and gold-22.22 nm (AuNP2, 19.7 μg) nanoparticles capped with chitosan on brain and liver tissue reactivity in male Wistar rats exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS from Escherichia coli serotype 0111:B4, 250 μg) upon 8 daily sessions of intraperitoneal administration. Our results suggest that the smaller size of chitosan-capped AuNP shows the protective effects against LPS-induced toxicity, suggesting a very high potential for biomedical applications. - Highlights: ► Smaller size of chitosan-capped gold nanoparticles acts against LPS-induced toxicity. ► Larger size of chitosan-capped gold nanoparticles agglomerated inside neurons and induced toxicity in combination with LPS. ► Chitosan has excellent biocompatible proprieties. ► Smaller size of chitosan-capped gold nanoparticles demonstrates great potential in biomedical applications.

  7. Label-free detection of glycoproteins by the lectin biosensor down to attomolar level using gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertok, Tomas; Sediva, Alena; Katrlik, Jaroslav; Gemeiner, Pavol; Mikula, Milan; Nosko, Martin; Tkac, Jan

    2016-01-01

    We present here an ultrasensitive electrochemical biosensor based on a lectin biorecognition capable to detect concentrations of glycoproteins down to attomolar (aM) level by investigation of changes in the charge transfer resistance (Rct) using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). On polycrystalline gold modified by an aminoalkanethiol linker layer, gold nanoparticles were attached. A Sambucus nigra agglutinin was covalently immobilised on a mixed self-assembled monolayer formed on gold nanoparticles and finally, the biosensor surface was blocked by poly(vinylalcohol). The lectin biosensor was applied for detection of sialic acid containing glycoproteins fetuin and asialofetuin. Building of a biosensing interface was carefully characterised by a broad range of techniques such as electrochemistry, EIS, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and surface plasmon resonance with the best performance of the biosensor achieved by application of HS-(CH2)11-NH2 linker and gold nanoparticles with a diameter of 20 nm. The lectin biosensor responded to an addition of fetuin (8.7% of sialic acid) with sensitivity of (338 ± 11) Ω decade-1 and to asialofetuin (≤ 0.5% of sialic acid) with sensitivity of (109 ± 10) Ω decade-1 with a blank experiment with oxidised asialofetuin (without recognisable sialic acid) revealing sensitivity of detection of (79 ± 13) Ω decade-1. These results suggest the lectin biosensor responded to changes in the glycan amount in a quantitative way with a successful validation by a lectin microarray. Such a biosensor device has a great potential to be employed in early biomedical diagnostics of diseases such as arthritis or cancer, which are connected to aberrant glycosylation of protein biomarkers in biological fluids. PMID:23601864

  8. Anisotropic effective permittivity of an ultrathin gold coating on optical fiber in air, water and saline solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenjun; Mandia, David J; Barry, Seán T; Albert, Jacques

    2014-12-29

    The optical properties of an ultrathin discontinuous gold film in different dielectric surroundings are investigated experimentally by measuring the polarization-dependent wavelength shifts and amplitudes of the cladding mode resonances of a tilted fiber Bragg grating. The gold film was prepared by electron-beam evaporation and had an average thickness of 5.5 nm ( ± 1 nm). Scanning electron imaging was used to determine that the film is actually formed of individual particles with average lateral dimensions of 28 nm ( ± 8 nm). The complex refractive indices of the equivalent uniform film in air at a wavelength of 1570 nm were calculated from the measurements to be 4.84-i0.74 and 3.97-i0.85 for TM and TE polarizations respectively (compared to the value for bulk gold: 0.54-i10.9). Additionally, changes in the birefringence and dichroism of the films were measured as a function of the surrounding medium, in air, water and a saturated NaCl (salt) solution. These results show that the film has stronger dielectric behavior for TM light than for TE, a trend that increases with increasing surrounding index. Finally, the experimental results are compared to predictions from two widely used effective medium approximations, the generalized Maxwell-Garnett and Bruggeman theories for gold particles in a surrounding matrix. It is found that both of these methods fail to predict the observed behavior for the film considered.

  9. Uniformly sized gold nanoparticles derived from PS-b-P2VP block copolymer templates for the controllable synthesis of Si nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jennifer Q; Yi, Sung Soo

    2006-04-25

    A monolayer of gold-containing surface micelles has been produced by spin-coating solution micelles formed by the self-assembly of the gold-modified polystyrene-b-poly(2-vinylpyridine) block copolymer in toluene. After oxygen plasma removed the block copolymer template, highly ordered and uniformly sized nanoparticles have been generated. Unlike other published methods that require reduction treatments to form gold nanoparticles in the zero-valent state, these as-synthesized nanoparticles are in form of metallic gold. These gold nanoparticles have been demonstrated to be an excellent catalyst system for growing small-diameter silicon nanowires. The uniformly sized gold nanoparticles have promoted the controllable synthesis of silicon nanowires with a narrow diameter distribution. Because of the ability to form a monolayer of surface micelles with a high degree of order, evenly distributed gold nanoparticles have been produced on a surface. As a result, uniformly distributed, high-density silicon nanowires have been generated. The process described herein is fully compatible with existing semiconductor processing techniques and can be readily integrated into device fabrication.

  10. Gold nanoparticles on MoS2 layered crystal flakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Wei; Pankratov, Vladimir; Huttula, Marko; Shi, Xinying; Saukko, Sami; Huang, Zhongjia; Zhang, Meng

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic layered crystal MoS 2 is considered as one of the most promising and efficient semiconductor materials for future transistors, photoelectronics, and electrocatalysis. To boost MoS 2 -based material applications, one direction is to grow physically and chemically reactive nanoparticles onto MoS 2 . Here we report on a simple route to synthesis crystalized MoS 2 –Au complexes. The gold nanoparticles were grown on MoS 2 flakes through a wet method in the oxygen free environment at room temperature. Nanoparticles with diameters varying from 9 nm to 429 nm were controlled by the molar ratios of MoS 2 and HAuCl 4 precursors. MoS 2 host flakes keep intrinsic honeycomb layered structures and the Au nanoparticles cubic-center crystal microstructures. From product chemical states analysis, the synthesis was found driven by redox reactions between the sulphide and the chloroauric acid. Photoluminescence measurement showed that introducing Au nanoparticles onto MoS 2 stacks substantially prompted excitonic transitions of stacks, as an analogy for doping Si wafers with dopants. Such composites may have potential applications in wide ranges similar as the doped Si. - Highlights: • The Au nanoparticles were decorated on MoS 2 in oxygen free ambiences via a wet method. • The Au nanoparticles are size-controllable and crystalized. • Chemical reaction scheme was clarified. • The MoS 2 –Au complexes have strong photoluminescent properties

  11. Characteristics of Charging and Collection of 10-nm-Class Ultrafine Nanoparticles in an Electrostatic Precipitator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Bang Woo; Kim, Hak Joon; Kim, Yong Jin; Song, Dong Keun; Hong, Won Seok; Shin, Wan Ho

    2011-01-01

    The charging of 10-nm-class nanoparticles in an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) according to particle charging ratio has been investigated and compared to the diffusion effect of the nanoparticles. The competition between the charging probability and the diffusion loss effect determines the collection efficiency of nanoparticles in the ESP. The collection efficiency of nanoparticles decreased continuously with decreasing particle diameter. This indicates that the partial charging effect of 10-nm-class nanoparticles is more dominant than their diffusion loss effect in the ESP for nanoparticles in the particle size range of less than 10 nm. The charging ratios based on unipolar diffusion charging calculations were in good agreement with the experimental collection efficiencies for nanoparticles less than 10 nm in diameter

  12. Effect of gold nanoparticle as a novel nanocatalyst on luminol-hydrazine chemiluminescence system and its analytical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safavi, A.; Absalan, G.; Bamdad, F.

    2008-01-01

    In this work the catalytic role of unsupported gold nanoparticles on the luminol-hydrazine reaction is investigated. Gold nanoparticles catalyze the reaction of hydrazine and dissolved oxygen to generate hydrogen peroxide and also catalyze the oxidation of luminol by the produced hydrogen peroxide. The result is an intense chemiluminescence (CL) due to the excited 3-aminophthalate anion. In the absence of gold nanoparticles no detectable CL was observed by the reaction of luminol and hydrazine unless an external oxidant is present in the system. The size effect of gold nanoparticles on the CL intensity was investigated. The most intensive CL signals were obtained with 15-nm gold nanoparticles. UV-vis spectra and transmission electron microscopy studies were used to investigate the CL mechanism. The luminol and hydroxide ion concentration, gold nanoparticles size and flow rate were optimized. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of hydrazine in boiler feed water samples. Between 0.1 and 30 μM of hydrazine could be determined with a detection limit of 30 nM

  13. Femtosecond laser generated gold nanoparticles and their plasmonic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Rupali; Navas, M. P.; Soni, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    The pulsed laser ablation in liquid medium is now commonly used to generate stable colloidal nanoparticles (NPs) in absence of any chemical additives or stabilizer with diverse applications. In this paper, we report generation of gold NPs (Au NPs) by ultra-short laser pulses. Femtosecond (fs) laser radiation (λ = 800 nm) has been used to ablate a gold target in pure de-ionized water to produce gold colloids with smallsize distribution. The average size of the particles can be further controlled by subjecting to laser-induced post-irradiation providing a versatile physical method of size-selected gold nanoparticles. The optical extinction and morphological dimensions were investigated with UV-Vis spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy measurements, respectively. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is employed to calculate localized surface plasmon (LSPR) wavelength and the near-field generated by Au NPs and their hybrids.

  14. Plasmonic properties of gold nanoparticles on silicon substrates: Understanding Fano-like spectra observed in reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossard-Giannesini, Léo; Cruguel, Hervé; Lacaze, Emmanuelle; Pluchery, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are known for their localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) that can be measured with UV-visible spectroscopy. AuNPs are often deposited on silicon substrates for various applications, and the LSPR is measured in reflection. In this case, optical spectra are measured by surface differential reflectance spectroscopy (SDRS) and the absorbance exhibits a negative peak. This article studies both experimentally and theoretically on the single layers of 16 nm diameter spherical gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) grafted on silicon. The morphology and surface density of AuNPs were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The plasmon response in transmission on the glass substrate and in reflection on the silicon substrate is described by an analytical model based on the Fresnel equations and the Maxwell-Garnett effective medium theory (FMG). The FMG model shows a strong dependence to the incidence angle of the light. At low incident angles, the peak appears negatively with a shallow intensity, and at angles above 30°, the usual positive shape of the plasmon is retrieved. The relevance of the FMG model is compared to the Mie theory within the dipolar approximation. We conclude that no Fano effect is responsible for this derivative shape. An easy-to-use formula is derived that agrees with our experimental data.

  15. SERS Raman Sensor Based on Diameter-Modulated Sapphire Fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimoji, Yutaka

    2010-08-09

    Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has been observed using a sapphire fiber coated with gold nano-islands for the first time. The effect was found to be much weaker than what was observed with a similar fiber coated with silver nanoparticles. Diameter-modulated sapphire fibers have been successfully fabricated on a laser heated pedestal growth system. Such fibers have been found to give a modest increase in the collection efficiency of induced emission. However, the slow response of the SERS effect makes it unsuitable for process control applications.

  16. Eco-friendly microwave-assisted green and rapid synthesis of well-stabilized gold and core-shell silver-gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Naggar, Mehrez E; Shaheen, Tharwat I; Fouda, Moustafa M G; Hebeish, Ali A

    2016-01-20

    Herein, we present a new approach for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) individually and as bimetallic core-shell nanoparticles (AgNPs-AuNPs). The novelty of the approach is further maximized by using curdlan (CRD) biopolymer to perform the dual role of reducing and capping agents and microwave-aided technology for affecting the said nanoparticles with varying concentrations in addition to those affected by precursor concentrations. Thus, for preparation of AuNPs, curdlan was solubilized in alkali solution followed by an addition of tetrachloroauric acid (HAuCl4). The curdlan solution containing HAuCl4 was then subjected to microwave radiation for up to 10 min. The optimum conditions obtained with the synthesis of AuNPs were employed for preparation of core-shell silver-gold nanoparticles by replacing definite portion of HAuCl4 with an equivalent portion of silver nitrate (AgNO3). The portion of AgNO3 was added initially and allowed to be reduced by virtue of the dual role of curdlan under microwave radiation. The corresponding portion of HAuCl4 was then added and allowed to complete the reaction. Characterization of AuNPs and AgNPs-AuNPs core-shell were made using UV-vis spectra, TEM, FTIR, XRD, zeta potential, and AFM analysis. Accordingly, strong peaks of the colloidal particles show surface plasmon resonance (SPR) at maximum wavelength of 540 nm, proving the formation of well-stabilized gold nanoparticles. TEM investigations reveal that the major size of AuNPs formed at different Au(+3)concentration lie below 20 nm with narrow size distribution. Whilst, the SPR bands of AgNPs-AuNPs core-shell differ than those obtained from original AgNPs (420 nm) and AuNPs (540 nm). Such shifting due to SPR of Au nanoshell deposited onto AgNPs core was significantly affected by the variation of bimetallic ratios applied. TEM micrographs show variation in contrast between dark silver core and the lighter gold shell. Increasing the ratio of silver ions leads to

  17. Low-noise low-jitter 32-pixels CMOS single-photon avalanche diodes array for single-photon counting from 300 nm to 900 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarcella, Carmelo; Tosi, Alberto, E-mail: alberto.tosi@polimi.it; Villa, Federica; Tisa, Simone; Zappa, Franco [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy)

    2013-12-15

    We developed a single-photon counting multichannel detection system, based on a monolithic linear array of 32 CMOS SPADs (Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Single-Photon Avalanche Diodes). All channels achieve a timing resolution of 100 ps (full-width at half maximum) and a photon detection efficiency of 50% at 400 nm. Dark count rate is very low even at room temperature, being about 125 counts/s for 50 μm active area diameter SPADs. Detection performance and microelectronic compactness of this CMOS SPAD array make it the best candidate for ultra-compact time-resolved spectrometers with single-photon sensitivity from 300 nm to 900 nm.

  18. Gold nanocatalyst-based immunosensing strategy accompanying catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol for sensitive monitoring of chloramphenicol residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Que, Xiaohua; Tang, Dianyong; Xia, Biyun; Lu, Minghua; Tang, Dianping

    2014-06-09

    A new competitive-type immunosensing system based on gold nanoparticles toward catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) was developed for sensitive monitoring of antibiotic residue (chloramphenicol, CAP, used in this case) by using ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrometry. Gold nanoparticle (AuNP) with 16 nm in diameter was initially synthesized and functionalized with CAP-bovine serum albumin (CAP-BSA) conjugate, which were used as the competitor on monoclonal anti-CAP antibody-coated polystyrene microtiter plate (MTP). In the presence of target CAP, the labeled CAP-BSA on the AuNP competed with target CAP for the immobilized antibody on the MTP. The conjugated amount of CAP-BSA-AuNP on the MTP decreased with the increase of target CAP in the sample. Upon addition of 4-NP and NaBH4 into the MTP, the carried AuNP could catalytically reduce 4-NP to 4-aminophenol (4-AP), and the as-produced 4-AP could be monitored by using UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. Experimental results indicated that the absorbance at 403 nm increased with the increment of target CAP concentration in the sample, and exhibited a dynamic range from 0.1 to 100 ng mL(-1) with a detection limit (LOD) of 0.03 ng mL(-1) at the 3s(blank) level. Intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation were lower than 5.5% and 8.0%, respectively. In addition, the methodology was evaluated for CAP spiked honey and milk samples, respectively. The recovery was 92-112%. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Fabrication, Characterization and Cytotoxicity of Spherical-Shaped Conjugated Gold-Cockle Shell Derived Calcium Carbonate Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiranda, Hanan Karimah; Mahmud, Rozi; Abubakar, Danmaigoro; Zakaria, Zuki Abubakar

    2018-01-01

    The evolution of nanomaterial in science has brought about a growing increase in nanotechnology, biomedicine, and engineering fields. This study was aimed at fabrication and characterization of conjugated gold-cockle shell-derived calcium carbonate nanoparticles (Au-CSCaCO3NPs) for biomedical application. The synthetic technique employed used gold nanoparticle citrate reduction method and a simple precipitation method coupled with mechanical use of a Programmable roller-ball mill. The synthesized conjugated nanomaterial was characterized for its physicochemical properties using transmission electron microscope (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). However, the intricacy of cellular mechanisms can prove challenging for nanomaterial like Au-CSCaCO3NPs and thus, the need for cytotoxicity assessment. The obtained spherical-shaped nanoparticles (light-green purplish) have an average diameter size of 35 ± 16 nm, high carbon and oxygen composition. The conjugated nanomaterial, also possesses a unique spectra for aragonite polymorph and carboxylic bond significantly supporting interactions between conjugated nanoparticles. The negative surface charge and spectra absorbance highlighted their stability. The resultant spherical shaped conjugated Au-CSCaCO3NPs could be a great nanomaterial for biomedical applications.

  20. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering active gold nanostructure fabricated by photochemical reaction of synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Akinobu, E-mail: yamaguti@lasti.u-hyogo.ac.jp [Laboratory of Advance Science and Technology for Industry, University of Hyogo, 3-1-2 Koto, Kamigori, Ako, Hyogo 678-1205 (Japan); Matsumoto, Takeshi [Laboratory of Advance Science and Technology for Industry, University of Hyogo, 3-1-2 Koto, Kamigori, Ako, Hyogo 678-1205 (Japan); Okada, Ikuo; Sakurai, Ikuya [Synchrotoron Radiation Research Center, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Utsumi, Yuichi [Laboratory of Advance Science and Technology for Industry, University of Hyogo, 3-1-2 Koto, Kamigori, Ako, Hyogo 678-1205 (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    The deposition of gold nanoparticles in an electroplating solution containing gold (I) trisodium disulphite under synchrotron X-ray radiation was investigated. The nanoparticles grew and aggregated into clusters with increasing radiation time. This behavior is explained by evaluating the effect of Derjaguin-Landau-Verweyand-Overbeek (DLVO) interactions combining repulsive electrostatic and attractive van der Waals forces on the particle deposition process. The surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of 4,4′ -bipyridine (4bpy) in aqueous solution was measured using gold nanoparticles immobilized on silicon substrates under systematically-varied X-ray exposure. The substrates provided an in situ SERS spectrum for 1 nM 4bpy. This demonstration creates new opportunities for chemical and environmental analyses through simple SERS measurements. - Highlights: • Gold nanoparticles were produced by photochemical reaction of synchrotron radiation. • The gold nanoparticles grew and aggregated into the higher-order nanostructure. • The behavior is qualitatively explained by analytical estimation. • The surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of 4,4′-bipyridine (4bpy) was demonstrated. • The substrate fabricated in a suitable condition provides in situ SERS for 1 nM 4bpy.

  1. Effect of Catalytic Layer Thickness on Diameter of Vertically Aligned Individual Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Kyung Jung

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of catalytic thin film thickness on the diameter control of individual carbon nanotubes grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition was investigated. Individual carbon nanotubes were grown on catalytic nanodot arrays, which were fabricated by e-beam lithography and e-beam evaporation. During e-beam evaporation of the nanodot pattern, more catalytic metal was deposited at the edge of the nanodots than the desired catalyst thickness. Because of this phenomenon, carbon atoms diffused faster near the center of the dots than at the edge of the dots. The carbon atoms, which were gathered at the interface between the catalytic nanodot and the diffusion barrier, accumulated near the center of the dot and lifted the catalyst off. From the experiments, an individual carbon nanotube with the sam