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Sample records for nitrous vapors experimental

  1. Optimization of the nitrous vapors experimental conditions production by nitric acid electrochemical reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaire, M.

    1996-01-01

    Gaseous nitrogen oxides (NO and NO 2 ) involved as oxidizing agents in nuclear fuel reprocessing can be produced by electrochemical reduction of nitric acid. This is an interesting alternative to the existing process because no wastes are generated. voltammetric studies on a platinum electrode show that two reduction potential regions are observed in concentrated nitric acid solutions, between 0,05 V SHE and between 0,5 V SHE and 1 V SHE . The highest potential region reduction mechanism was studied by: classical micro-electrolysis methods, macro-electrolysis methods, infrared spectroscopy coupled to electrochemistry. It was determined that the origin of nitric acid reduction is the electrochemical reduction of nitrous acid in nitric oxide which chemically reduces nitric acid. This reaction produces nitrous acid back which indicate an auto-catalytic behaviour of nitric acid reduction mechanism. Nitrogen dioxide evolution during nitric reduction can also explained by an other chemical reaction. If the potential value of platinum electrode is above 0,8 V SHE , products of the indirect nitric acid reduction are nitrous acid, nitrogen oxide and nitrogen dioxide. Below this value nitric oxide can be reduced in nitrous oxide. Thus the potential value is the most important parameter for the nitrogen oxides production selectivity. However, owing to the auto-catalytic character of the reduction mechanism, potential value can be controlled during intentiostatic industrial electrolysis. (author)

  2. The influence of water vapor and sulfur dioxide on the catalytic decomposition of nitrous oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yalamas, C.; Heinisch, R.; Barz, M. [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Energietechnik; Cournil, M. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines, 42 - Saint-Etienne (France)

    2001-03-01

    For the nitrous oxide decomposition three groups of catalysts such as metals on support, hydrotalcites, and perovskites were studied relating to their activity in the presence of vapor or sulfur dioxide, in the temperature range from 200 to 500 C. It was found that the water vapor strongly inhibates the nitrous oxide decomposition at T=200-400 C. The sulfur dioxide poisons the catalysts, in particular the perovskites. (orig.)

  3. Nitrous oxide as an opioid agonist: some experimental and clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillman, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    The interactions of nitrous oxide at analgesic concentrations with the endogenous opioid system is investigated, both in vitro and in vivo, with particular emphasis on the possibility that nitrous oxide is a possible tool both experimentally, diagnostically and therapeutically. In vitro findings show that nitrous oxide displaces ( 3 H) - naloxone from its binding sites in a definite and measurable manner, indicating a direct action of nitrous oxide at opioid receptors, in this case the mu site. An additional finding is that nitrous oxide unmasks a heretofore undiscovered super high affinity sites which may be an opioid auto-receptor. Naloxone was demonstrated to reverse acute alcoholic intoxication in some cases. The investigative as well as therapeutic role of nitrous oxide was investigated. It is concluded that nitrous oxide at analgesic concentrations (ie. low concentrations of nitrous oxide diluted with high concentrations of oxygen) is a safe and effective therapeutic agent

  4. Optimization of the nitrous vapors experimental conditions production by nitric acid electrochemical reduction; Optimisation des conditions operatoires de production de vapeurs nitreuses par reduction electrochimique d`acide nitrique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemaire, M.

    1996-11-22

    Gaseous nitrogen oxides (NO and NO{sub 2}) involved as oxidizing agents in nuclear fuel reprocessing can be produced by electrochemical reduction of nitric acid. This is an interesting alternative to the existing process because no wastes are generated. voltammetric studies on a platinum electrode show that two reduction potential regions are observed in concentrated nitric acid solutions, between 0,05 V{sub SHE} and between 0,5 V{sub SHE} and 1 V{sub SHE}. The highest potential region reduction mechanism was studied by: classical micro-electrolysis methods, macro-electrolysis methods, infrared spectroscopy coupled to electrochemistry. It was determined that the origin of nitric acid reduction is the electrochemical reduction of nitrous acid in nitric oxide which chemically reduces nitric acid. This reaction produces nitrous acid back which indicate an auto-catalytic behaviour of nitric acid reduction mechanism. Nitrogen dioxide evolution during nitric reduction can also explained by an other chemical reaction. If the potential value of platinum electrode is above 0,8 V{sub SHE}, products of the indirect nitric acid reduction are nitrous acid, nitrogen oxide and nitrogen dioxide. Below this value nitric oxide can be reduced in nitrous oxide. Thus the potential value is the most important parameter for the nitrogen oxides production selectivity. However, owing to the auto-catalytic character of the reduction mechanism, potential value can be controlled during intentiostatic industrial electrolysis. (author). 91 refs.

  5. Experimental evidence of nitrous acid formation in the electron beam treatment of flue gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maetzing, H.; Namba, H.; Tokunaga, O.

    1994-01-01

    In the Electron Beam Dry Scrubbing (EBDS) process, flue gas from fossil fuel burning power plants is irradiated with accelerated (300-800 keV) electrons. Thereby, nitrogen oxide (NO x ) and sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) traces are transformed into nitric and sulfuric acids, respectively, which are converted into particulate ammonium nitrate and sulfate upon the addition of ammonia. The powdery product can be filtered from the main gas stream and can be sold as agricultural fertilizer. A lot of experimental investigations have been performed on the EBDS process and computer models have been developed to interpret the experimental results and to predict economic improvements. According to the model calculations, substantial amounts of intermediate nitrous acid (HNO 2 ) are formed in the electron beam treatment of flue gas. The first experimental investigation about the formation of nitrous acid in an irradiated mixture of NO in synthetic air has been undertaken. Under these conditions, aerosol formation is avoided. UV spectra of the irradiated gas were recorded in the wavelength range λ = 345-375 nm. Both NO 2 and HNO 2 have characteristic absorption bands in this wavelength range. Calibration spectra of NO 2 were subtracted from the sample spectra. The remaining absorption bands can clearly be assigned to nitrous acid. The concentration of nitrous acid was determined by differential optical absorption. It was found lower than the model prediction. The importance of nitrous acid formation in the EBDS process needs to be clarified. (author)

  6. Experimental study of vapor bubble dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasquini, Maria-Elena

    2015-01-01

    The object of this thesis is an experimental study of vapor bubble dynamics in sub-cooled nucleate boiling. The test section is locally heated by focusing a laser beam: heat fluxes from 1 e4 to 1.5 e6 W/m 2 and water temperature between 100 and 88 C have been considered. Three boiling regimes have been observed. Under saturated conditions and with low heat fluxes a developed nucleate boiling regime has been observed. Under higher sub-cooling and still with low heat fluxes an equilibrium regime has been observed in which the liquid flowrate evaporating at the bubble base is compensated by the vapor condensing flowrate at bubble top. A third regime have been observed at high heat fluxes for all water conditions: it is characterized by the formation of a large dry spot on the heated surface that keeps the nucleation site dry after bubble detachment. The condensation phase starts after bubble detachment. Bubble equivalent radius at detachment varies between 1 and 2.5 mm. Bubble properties have been measured and non-dimensional groups have been used to characterize bubble dynamics. Capillary waves have been observed on the bubble surface thanks to high-speed images acquisition. Two main phenomena have been proposed to explain capillary waves effects on bubble condensation: increasing of the phases interface area and decreasing of vapor bubble translation velocity, because of the increased drag force on the deformed bubble. (author) [fr

  7. Nitrous oxide emissions from a peatbog after 13 years of experimental nitrogen deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Leeson

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen deposition was experimentally increased on a Scottish peatbog over a period of 13 years (2002–2015. Nitrogen was applied in three forms, NH3 gas, NH4Cl solution, and NaNO3 solution, at rates ranging from 8 (ambient to 64 kg N ha−1 yr−1, and higher near the NH3 fumigation source. An automated system was used to apply the nitrogen, such that the deposition was realistic in terms of rates and high frequency of deposition events. We measured the response of nitrous oxide (N2O flux to the increased nitrogen input. Prior expectations, based on the IPCC default emission factor, were that 1 % of the added nitrogen would be emitted as N2O. In the plots treated with NH4+ and NO3− solution, no response was seen, and there was a tendency for N2O fluxes to be reduced by additional nitrogen, though this was not significant. Areas subjected to high NH3 emitted more N2O than expected, up to 8.5 % of the added nitrogen. Differences in the response are related to the impact of the nitrogen treatments on the vegetation. In the NH4+ and NO3− treatments, all the additional nitrogen is effectively immobilised in the vegetation and top 10 cm of peat. In the NH3 treatment, much of the vegetation was killed off by high doses of NH3, and the nitrogen was presumably more available to denitrifying bacteria. The design of the wet and dry experimental treatments meant that they differed in statistical power, and we are less likely to detect an effect of the NH4+ and NO3− treatments, though they avoid issues of pseudo-replication.

  8. Experimental and theoretical studies of metal vapor atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitfield, S.B.; Wehlitz, Ralf; Martins, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Employing electron spectrometry in conjunction with tuneable synchrotron radiation, we will present a detailed examination of the photoionization dynamics of selected metal vapor atoms. In particular, this paper will focus on the relative partial cross sections of the atomic Li K-shell main and satellite (ionization with excitation) photoelectron lines in the region of the strong 1snln'l' autoionizing transitions, the atomic Sc 3d, 4s main and satellite photoelectron lines in the region of the 3p→3d giant resonance, and also the atomic Fe 3d, 4s main and satellite photoelectron lines in the same resonance region. Our experimental data for Sc and Fe will be compared to our state-of-the-art calculations based on the superposition of configuration method developed by Cowan (The Theory of Atomic Structure and Spectra. University of California Berkeley Press, Berkeley and Los Angeles, 1981). Our partial cross section measurements for Li and Sc will be complemented with measurements of the angular distribution parameter, β. In addition, our Li data will also be compared with recent R-matrix calculations (Phys. Rev. 57 (1998) 1045). In the case of Fe, we will also address the term dependent behavior of the partial cross sections on resonance. These results will highlight what can be achieved with today's technology and point the way towards future endeavors in the study of the photoionization dynamics of open-shell metal vapor atoms

  9. 41 CFR 50-204.69 - Nitrous oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Nitrous oxide. 50-204.69..., Vapors, Fumes, Dusts, and Mists § 50-204.69 Nitrous oxide. The piped systems for the in-plant transfer and distribution of nitrous oxide shall be designed, installed, maintained, and operated in accordance...

  10. Vaporization inside a mini microfin tube: experimental results and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diani, A.; Rossetto, L.

    2015-11-01

    This paper proposes a comparison among the common R134a and the extremely low GWP refrigerant R1234yf during vaporization inside a mini microfin tube. This microfin tube has an internal diameter of 2.4 mm, it has 40 fins, with a fin height of 0.12 mm. Due to the high heat transfer coefficients shown by this tube, this technology can lead to a refrigerant charge reduction. Tests were run in the Heat Transfer in Micro Geometries Lab of the Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale of the Università di Padova. Mass velocities range between 375 and 940 kg m-2 s-1, heat fluxes from 10 to 50 kW m-2, vapour qualities from 0.10 to 0.99, at a saturation temperature of 30°C. The comparison among the two fluids is proposed at the same operating conditions, in order to highlight the heat transfer and pressure drop differences among the two refrigerants. In addition, two correlations are proposed to estimate the heat transfer coefficient and frictional pressure drop during refrigerant flow boiling inside mini microfin tubes. These correlations well predict the experimental values, and thus they can be used as a useful tool to design evaporators based on these mini microfin tubes.

  11. Effects of nitrous fumes upon the lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhar, F; Raber, A

    1974-01-01

    After a thorough discussion of the accidental poisoning of 34 workers by large amounts of nitrous fumes in an Austrian chemical plant producing artificial fertilizer and its effects on the lung along with therapeutical measures taken, the chronic effects of long-term exposure to nitrous gases are reviewed. Nitrous gases are a mixture of various oxidation states of nitrogen such as nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, N/sub 2/O/sub 4/, and nitric anhydride plus vapors of nitrous and nitric acid. The individual components of the gas mixture change in dependence on the ambient temperature and the humidity. A different mixture of nitrous gases develops, therefore, at welding operations, blasts, in the chemical industry, in the glass industry, at the production of fertilizer, in the exhausts of combustion engines, and in smoking of cigarettes. The irritations caused by nitrous gases on mucous tissue increase with rising relative humidity. The presence of NO ameliorates the toxic effect of NO/sub 2/. Oil mists protect against the effects of nitrous gases. The addition of sulfur dioxide is supposed to reduce the toxicity of nitrous gases, provided the SO/sub 2/ concentration is considerably higher than the concentration of nitrous gases. Exposure of rats and mice to concentrations of less than 1 ppm nitrous gases caused structural changes in the lung similar to pulmonary edema in humans.

  12. Experimental Results For Hydrocarbon Refrigerant Vaporization In Brazed Plate Heat Exchangers at High Pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Desideri, Adriano; Schmidt Ommen, Torben; Wronski, Jorrit; Quoilin, Sylvain; Lemort, Vincent; Haglind, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    In this contribution, the experimental heat transfer coefficient  and the pressure drop measured during HFC refrigerants vaporization inside small brazed plate heat exchanger (PHE) at typical evaporation temperature for organic Rankine cycle systems for low thermal energy quality applications are presented. Scientific work focusing on the heat transfer in PHEs has been carried out since the late 19th century. More recent publications have been focusing on vaporization and condensation of ref...

  13. Microbial drivers of spatial heterogeneity of nitrous oxide pulse dynamics following drought in an experimental tropical rainforest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, J. C.; Sengupta, A.; U'Ren, J.; Van Haren, J. L. M.; Meredith, L. K.

    2017-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a long-lived, potent greenhouse gas with increasing atmospheric concentrations. Soil microbes in agricultural and natural ecosystems are the dominant source of N2O, which involves complex interactions between N-cycling microbes, metabolisms, soil properties, and plants. Tropical rainforests are the largest natural source of N2O, however the microbial and environmental drivers are poorly understood as few studies have been performed in these environments. Thus, there is an urgent need for further research to fill in knowledge gaps regarding tropical N-cycling, and the response of soil microbial communities to changes in precipitation patterns, temperature, nitrogen deposition, and land use. To address this data gap, we performed a whole-forest drought in the tropical rainforest biome in Biosphere 2 (B2) and analyzed connections between soil microbes, forest heterogeneity, and N2O emissions. The B2 rainforest is the hottest tropical rainforest on Earth, and is an important model system for studying the response of tropical forests to warming with controlled experimentation. In this study, we measured microbial community abundance and diversity profiles (16S rRNA and ITS2 amplicon sequencing) along with their association with soil properties (e.g. pH, C, N) during the drought and rewetting at five locations (3 depths), including regions that have been previously characterized with high and low N2O drought pulse dynamics (van Haren et al., 2005). In this study, we present the spatial distribution of soil microbial communities within the rainforest at Biosphere 2 and their correlations with edaphic factors. In particular, we focus on microbial, soil, and plant factors that drive high and low N2O pulse zones. As in the past, we found that N2O emissions were highest in response to rewetting in a zone hypothesized to be rich in nutrients from a nearby sugar palm. We will characterize microbial indicator species and nitrogen cycling genes to better

  14. Experimental study of the spill and vaporization of a volatile liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohl, Douglas; Jackson, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    Pool and vapor cloud characteristics of an acetone spill issuing from the downstream wall of a flow obstruction oriented perpendicular to a uniform flow were investigated experimentally. Data indicate that the spill event was largely governed by the temperature of the surface in relation to the boiling point of the spilled liquid. The free stream velocity (ranging from 0.75 to 3.0 m/s) also impacted the spreading of the spill. Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) was used to measure acetone vapor concentrations during the transient pool spreading and vaporization in a window 60 cm long by 50 cm high and located downstream of the 16 cm high obstruction. The recirculation region induced by the flow obstruction caused upstream transport of the acetone vapor along the spill surface, after which it was convected vertically along the obstruction wall before being entrained into the flow and convected downstream. The recirculating flow caused regions of vapor within the flammability limits to be localized near the flow obstruction. These regions moved into and out of the measurement plane by large three-dimensional flow structures. The flammable region of the evolved vapor cloud was observed to grow well past the downstream edge of the measurement domain. With decreasing wind speeds, both the mass of acetone vapor within the flammability limits and the total spill event time increased significantly. The data presented herein provides a basis for validating future spill models of hazardous chemical releases, where complex turbulent flow modeling must be coupled with spill spreading and vaporization dynamics

  15. Methodology for the experimental research of vapor explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmitriy I Borisenko; Yanhua Yang

    2005-01-01

    The method for experimental definition of influence of speed of fuel's surface increase at FCI is proposed. by modeling a fuel fragmentation for a case of falling of fuel compact weight on a coolant free surface with the help of the dumped heated up capsule opening under a level of a coolant free surface. Basic scheme of capsule is submitted in figure (the scheme of Dumped Opening Capsule (DOC)). Before beginning experiment through apertures in a covering 3 and a body of a case 4 in a hollow, limited to a case and the cylinder 6, spheres of small diameter have been incorporated. The total area of a surface of spheres is much more than area of external superficial of capsule. DOC is heated up to necessary temperature and it is fallen down in cooling a liquid. The principle work of DOC consists in the following. The plate 8, amazing about a free surface of a coolant, presses a pusher of 11 internal DOC. A pusher moving - relative DOC on axes of symmetry a teeth of compression of 'dog' 14. Being narrowed, teeth 'dogs' stop to hold a glass 7 installations bottom part of a case 5. At action of spring 13 parts of a case 4 and 5 moved separately on an axis of symmetry DOC and are enclosed in spheres adjoin to a coolant. (authors)

  16. Overview: Homogeneous nucleation from the vapor phase-The experimental science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyslouzil, Barbara E; Wölk, Judith

    2016-12-07

    Homogeneous nucleation from the vapor phase has been a well-defined area of research for ∼120 yr. In this paper, we present an overview of the key experimental and theoretical developments that have made it possible to address some of the fundamental questions first delineated and investigated in C. T. R. Wilson's pioneering paper of 1897 [C. T. R. Wilson, Philos. Trans. R. Soc., A 189, 265-307 (1897)]. We review the principles behind the standard experimental techniques currently used to measure isothermal nucleation rates, and discuss the molecular level information that can be extracted from these measurements. We then highlight recent approaches that interrogate the vapor and intermediate clusters leading to particle formation, more directly.

  17. Experimental investigation on fluid flow and heat transfer characteristics of a submerged combustion vaporizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Chang-Liang; Ren, Jing-Jie; Wang, Yan-Qing; Dong, Wen-Ping; Bi, Ming-Shu

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal performance analysis of submerged combustion vaporizer (SCV) was performed experimentally. • Visualization study of shell-side flow field for SCV was carried out. • The effects of various operational parameters on the overall system performance were discussed. • Two new non-dimensional Nusselt correlations were proposed to predict the heat transfer performance of SCV. - Abstract: Submerged combustion vaporizer (SCV) occupies a decisive position in liquefied natural gas (LNG) industrial chain. In this paper, a visual experimental apparatus was established to have a comprehensive knowledge about fluid flow and heat transfer performance of SCV. Trans-critical liquid nitrogen (LN_2) was selected as alternative fluid to substitute LNG because of safety reason. Some unique experimental phenomena inside the SCV (local water bath freezes on the external surface of tube bundle) were revealed. Meanwhile the influences of static water height, superficial flue gas velocity, heat load, tube-side inlet pressure and tube-side mass flux on the system performance were systematically discussed. Finally, based on the obtained experimental results, two new empirical Nusselt number correlations were regressed to predict the shell-side and tube-side heat transfer characteristics of SCV. The maximum errors between predicted results and experimental data were respectively ±25% and ±20%. The outcomes of this paper were critical to the optimum design and economical operation of SCV.

  18. Small-scale experimental study of vaporization flux of liquid nitrogen released on water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalaswami, Nirupama; Olewski, Tomasz; Véchot, Luc N; Mannan, M Sam

    2015-10-30

    A small-scale experimental study was conducted using liquid nitrogen to investigate the convective heat transfer behavior of cryogenic liquids released on water. The experiment was performed by spilling five different amounts of liquid nitrogen at different release rates and initial water temperatures. The vaporization mass fluxes of liquid nitrogen were determined directly from the mass loss measured during the experiment. A variation of initial vaporization fluxes and a subsequent shift in heat transfer mechanism were observed with changes in initial water temperature. The initial vaporization fluxes were directly dependent on the liquid nitrogen spill rate. The heat flux from water to liquid nitrogen determined from experimental data was validated with two theoretical correlations for convective boiling. It was also observed from validation with correlations that liquid nitrogen was found to be predominantly in the film boiling regime. The substantial results provide a suitable procedure for predicting the heat flux from water to cryogenic liquids that is required for source term modeling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Experimental vapor-liquid equilibria data for binary mixtures of xylene isomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.L. Rodrigues

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Separation of aromatic C8 compounds by distillation is a difficult task due to the low relative volatilities of the compounds and to the high degree of purity required of the final commercial products. For rigorous simulation and optimization of this separation, the use of a model capable of describing vapor-liquid equilibria accurately is necessary. Nevertheless, experimental data are not available for all binaries at atmospheric pressure. Vapor-liquid equilibria data for binary mixtures were isobarically obtained with a modified Fischer cell at 100.65 kPa. The vapor and liquid phase compositions were analyzed with a gas chromatograph. The methodology was initially tested for cyclo-hexane+n-heptane data; results obtained are similar to other data in the literature. Data for xylene binary mixtures were then obtained, and after testing, were considered to be thermodynamically consistent. Experimental data were regressed with Aspen Plus® 10.1 and binary interaction parameters were reported for the most frequently used activity coefficient models and for the classic mixing rules of two cubic equations of state.

  20. Effect of high-temperature treatment on Fe/ZSM-5 prepared by chemical vapor deposition of FeCl3. II. Nitrous oxide decomposition, selective oxidation of benzene to phenol, and selective reduction of nitric oxide by isobutane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Q.; Teeffelen, van R.M.; Santen, van R.A.; Hensen, E.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    The catalytic performance (nitrous oxide decomposition, hydroxylation of benzene to phenol with nitrous oxide, and selective reduction of nitric oxide by i-butane) was evaluated for a set of HZSM-5 and sublimed Fe/ZSM-5 catalysts, which have been extensively characterized in an earlier contribution

  1. Experimental Validation of Hybrid Distillation-Vapor Permeation Process for Energy Efficient Ethanol-Water Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The energy demand of distillation-based systems for ethanol recovery and dehydration can be significant, particularly for dilute solutions. An alternative separation process integrating vapor stripping with a vapor compression step and a vapor permeation membrane separation step,...

  2. Emission of nitrous oxide during combustion of organic fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotler, V.R.; Gol' dberg, A.S.

    1990-11-01

    Analyzes formation of nitrogen oxides during combustion of coal, natural gas and mazout: chemical reactions that lead to formation of nitrous oxide during coal combustion, reaction kinetics and reaction yields, factors that influence emission of nitrogen oxides from a furnace, factors that influence formation of nitrous oxide (temperature effects, air excess ratio, coal burnout degree, etc.), effects of fuel type and its chemical composition, effects of flue gas desulfurization and denitrification methods on nitrous oxide yield. Analyses show that yield of nitrous oxide is low and does not exceed 5 cm{sup 3}/m{sup 3} flue gas (0.0005%). However chemical reactions of nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide and water vapor in the atmosphere are said to form additional quantities of nitrous oxide which negatively influence the ozone layer. 4 refs.

  3. Experimental investigation and exergy analysis of a triple fluid vapor absorption refrigerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jemaa, Radhouane Ben; Mansouri, Rami; Boukholda, Ismail; Bellagi, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Experimental study on a commercial triple fluid vapor absorption refrigerator performed. • An Aspen-hysys model developed and validated with experimental measurements. • Exergy analysis of the unit performed and discussed. • Absorber identified as largest source of irreversibility, followed by solution heat exchanger. - Abstract: This paper presents an energy and exergy analyses of a triple fluid vapor absorption refrigerator working with ammonia as refrigerant, water as absorbent and hydrogen as auxiliary gas. The experimental setup is constituted of a commercial unit equipped with the appropriate metrology. The temperature at the inlet and outlet of every component of the machine, as well as the cabinet and ambient temperature are continuously measured and monitored. A simulation model of the machine is developed using the process simulator Aspen-Hysys. The thermodynamic analysis includes energy and exergy efficiency calculations, destroyed exergy evaluation and degradation of the coefficient of performance (COP) in each component of the refrigerator. The results indicate that the absorber exhibits the largest source of irreversibility followed by the solution heat exchanger. These two components alone are at the origin of 63% of the total degradation of COP.

  4. Experimental simulation and numerical modeling of vapor shield formation and divertor material erosion for ITER typical plasma disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuerz, H.; Arkhipov, N.I.; Bakhtin, V.P.; Konkashbaev, I.; Landman, I.; Safronov, V.M.; Toporkov, D.A.; Zhitlukhin, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    The high divertor heat load during a tokamak plasma disruption results in sudden evaporation of a thin layer of divertor plate material, which acts as vapor shield and protects the target from further excessive evaporation. Formation and effectiveness of the vapor shield are theoretically modeled and are experimentally analyzed at the 2MK-200 facility under conditions simulating the thermal quench phase of ITER tokamak plasma disruptions. ((orig.))

  5. Segregating gas from melt: an experimental study of the Ostwald ripening of vapor bubbles in magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautze, Nicole C.; Sisson, Thomas W.; Mangan, Margaret T.; Grove, Timothy L.

    2011-01-01

    Diffusive coarsening (Ostwald ripening) of H2O and H2O-CO2 bubbles in rhyolite and basaltic andesite melts was studied with elevated temperature–pressure experiments to investigate the rates and time spans over which vapor bubbles may enlarge and attain sufficient buoyancy to segregate in magmatic systems. Bubble growth and segregation are also considered in terms of classical steady-state and transient (non-steady-state) ripening theory. Experimental results are consistent with diffusive coarsening as the dominant mechanism of bubble growth. Ripening is faster in experiments saturated with pure H2O than in those with a CO2-rich mixed vapor probably due to faster diffusion of H2O than CO2 through the melt. None of the experimental series followed the time1/3 increase in mean bubble radius and time-1 decrease in bubble number density predicted by classical steady-state ripening theory. Instead, products are interpreted as resulting from transient regime ripening. Application of transient regime theory suggests that bubbly magmas may require from days to 100 years to reach steady-state ripening conditions. Experimental results, as well as theory for steady-state ripening of bubbles that are immobile or undergoing buoyant ascent, indicate that diffusive coarsening efficiently eliminates micron-sized bubbles and would produce mm-sized bubbles in 102–104 years in crustal magma bodies. Once bubbles attain mm-sizes, their calculated ascent rates are sufficient that they could transit multiple kilometers over hundreds to thousands of years through mafic and silicic melt, respectively. These results show that diffusive coarsening can facilitate transfer of volatiles through, and from, magmatic systems by creating bubbles sufficiently large for rapid ascent.

  6. Death from Nitrous Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäckström, Björn; Johansson, Bengt; Eriksson, Anders

    2015-11-01

    Nitrous oxide is an inflammable gas that gives no smell or taste. It has a history of abuse as long as its clinical use, and deaths, although rare, have been reported. We describe two cases of accidental deaths related to voluntary inhalation of nitrous oxide, both found dead with a gas mask covering the face. In an attempt to find an explanation to why the victims did not react properly to oncoming hypoxia, we performed experiments where a test person was allowed to breath in a closed system, with or without nitrous oxide added. Vital signs and gas concentrations as well as subjective symptoms were recorded. The experiments indicated that the explanation to the fact that neither of the descendents had reacted to oncoming hypoxia and hypercapnia was due to the inhalation of nitrous oxide. This study raises the question whether nitrous oxide really should be easily, commercially available. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  7. Numerical and Experimental Study of an Ambient Air Vaporizer Coupled with a Compact Heat Exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Randon

    The University of Washington was tasked with designing a "21st century engine" that will make use of the thermal energy available in cryogenic gasses due to their coldness. There are currently large quantities of cryogenic gases stored throughout the U.S. at industrial facilities whereupon the regasification process, the potential for the fluid to do work is wasted. The engine proposed by the University of Washington will try to capture some of that wasted energy. One technical challenge that must be overcome during the regasification process is providing frost free operation. This thesis presents the numerical analysis and experimental testing of a passive heat exchange system that uses ambient vaporizers coupled with compact heat exchangers to provide frost free operation while minimizing pressure drop.

  8. Experimental study of vapor explosion of molten salt and low boiling point liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Yoshihiro; Takashima, Takeo

    1987-01-01

    Fundamental study of vapor explosion using small drops of high temperature liquid and low boiling point liquid and a series of small-scale vapor explosion tests are carried out. A single or plural drops of molten LiNO 3 are dropped into ethyl alcohol and the temperature range of two liquids wherein the fragmentation occurs is examined. The propagation phenomenon of vapor explosion between two drops is photographed and the pressure trace is proved to be well consistent with the behavior of the vapor bubble regions. A small amount of molten Flinak and tin which are enclosed in a test tube is dropped into tapped water. The temperature effect of two liquids onto the occurrence of vapor explosion is investigated. Some considerations are made with respect to the upper and lower temperature limits of vapor explosion to occur. A qualitative modeling of vapor explosion mechanism is proposed and discussed. (author)

  9. AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON A VAPOR COMPRESSION REFRIGERATION CYCLE BY ADDING INTERNAL HEAT EXCHANGER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Asmail Eleiwi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Thispaper presents practical study to improve the indication COP of a vaporcompression refrigeration cycle in instrumented automobile air conditioner bydesigning internal heat exchanger and installing it in the vapor compressionrefrigeration cycle.  Two cases of  vapor compression refrigeration cycle were takenin this paper:  the first case is thatthe vapor compression refrigeration cycle without internal heat exchanger andin  the second case the vapor compressionrefrigeration cycle with heat exchanger ; in these two cases, the temperatureat each point of  a vapor compressionrefrigeration cycle, the low and the high pressure ,the indoor temperature andthe outdoor temperature were measured at each time at compressor speed 1450 rpmand 2900 rpm for each blower speed 1, blower speed 2 and blower speed 3.Therefrigerant fluid was used in the vapor compression refrigeration cycle withoutIHE and with IHE is R134a..

  10. Experimental investigations on performance of liquid desiccant-vapor compression hybrid air conditioner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, B. Shaji; Tiwari, Shaligram; Maiya, M.P.

    2015-01-01

    A coupled desiccant column is integrated with a conventional room air conditioner (AC) to enhance dehumidification of the room air. One desiccant column (absorber) is placed after the evaporator the other (regenerator) after the condenser of the AC unit. Such a novel liquid desiccant vapour compression hybrid air conditioning system has been fabricated and tested in a balanced ambient room type calorimeter for very low flow rates of liquid desiccant (lithium bromide solution). The moisture from the cold supply air is transferred to the hot condenser air by the desiccant flowing in the loop, thereby complimenting the dehumidification of the room air at the evaporator. The supply air is also sensibly heated during the dehumidification process by liquid desiccant in the absorber, which together enables the hybrid system to maintain low humidity in the room. Whereas the liquid desiccant is regenerated by the condenser waste heat, the entire cooling is derived only by the AC unit. The experimental results show that an increase of room temperature reduces both dehumidification of process air and regeneration of liquid desiccant, whereas an increase of room specific humidity enhances both these for the flow rate of the liquid desiccant in the range of 0.2–1.6% of the air flow rate through the absorber. - Highlights: • A liquid desiccant vapor compression hybrid system is fabricated and tested. • The liquid desiccant reduces latent load but equally increases sensible load. • Hybrid system performance is studied for varying room temperature and humidity. • Higher room temperature lowers air dehumidification and desiccant regeneration. • Increase of room specific humidity enhances dehumidification and also regeneration

  11. Numerical modeling and experimental simulation of vapor shield formation and divertor material erosion for ITER typical plasma disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuerz, H.; Arkhipov, N.I.; Bakhin, V.P.; Goel, B.; Hoebel, W.; Konkashbaev, I.; Landman, I.; Piazza, G.; Safronov, V.M.; Sherbakov, A.R.; Toporkov, D.A.; Zhitlukhin, A.M.

    1994-01-01

    The high divertor heat load during a tokamak plasma disruption results in sudden evaporation of a thin layer of divertor plate material, which acts as vapor shield and protects the target from further excessive evaporation. Formation and effectiveness of the vapor shield are theoretically modeled and experimentally investigated at the 2MK-200 facility under conditions simulating the thermal quench phase of ITER tokamak plasma disruptions. In the optical wavelength range C II, C III, C IV emission lines for graphite, Cu I, Cu II lines for copper and continuum radiation for tungsten samples are observed in the target plasma. The plasma expands along the magnetic field lines with velocities of (4±1)x10 6 cm/s for graphite and 10 5 cm/s for copper. Modeling was done with a radiation hydrodynamics code in one-dimensional planar geometry. The multifrequency radiation transport is treated in flux limited diffusion and in forward reverse transport approximation. In these first modeling studies the overall shielding efficiency for carbon and tungsten defined as ratio of the incident energy and the vaporization energy for power densities of 10 MW/cm 2 exceeds a factor of 30. The vapor shield is established within 2 μs, the power fraction to the target after 10 μs is below 3% and reaches in the stationary state after about 20 μs a value of around 1.5%. ((orig.))

  12. The depletion of aqueous nitrous acid in packed towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Counce, R.M.; Crawford, D.B.

    1987-01-01

    The depletion of aqueous nitrous acid was studied at 298 0 K and at slightly greater than atmospheric pressure. Solutions containing nitrous and nitric acids were contacted with nitrogen in towers packed with 6- and 13-mm Intalox saddles. The results indicate the existence of two depletion mechanisms for the conditions studied - liquid-phase decomposition and direct desorption of nitrous acid. Models based on mass-transfer and chemical-kinetic information are presented to explain the experimental results. 24 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Adverse Cardiovascular Effects of Nitrous Oxide: It is not all about Hyperhomocysteinaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ata Mahmoodpoor

    2015-04-01

    due the dilution effect. This would alter the total and instantaneous nitrous oxide and volatile anesthetic delivery to the patients affecting the results of the study. In the meantime, another confounding factor is the “Carrier Gas Composition”. Vaporizer output is influenced by the composition of the carrier gas, i.e. oxygen, nitrous oxide or air, which flows through the vaporizer (5. Nitrous oxide is more soluble than oxygen in the halogenated liquid within the vaporizer sump, changing the composition of carrier gas would be associated with different steady-state values altering the amount of the delivered volatile anesthetic (6. Increased or decreased amounts of the delivered volatile agents play a major role in the hemodynamic and cardiovascular events both intra- and post-operatively. Factors that contribute to the characteristic steady-state response resulting when various carrier gases are used include the viscosity and density of the carrier gas, the relative solubility of the carrier gas in the anesthetic liquid, the flow-splitting characteristics of the specific vaporizer, and the concentration control dial setting (6.

  14. Experimental investigation of vapor shielding effects induced by ELM-like pulsed plasma loads using the double plasma gun device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, I.; Kikuchi, Y.; Kitagawa, Y.; Asai, Y.; Onishi, K.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2015-08-01

    We have developed a unique experimental device of so-called double plasma gun, which consists of two magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) devices, in order to clarify effects of vapor shielding on material erosion due to transient events in magnetically confined fusion devices. Two ELM-like pulsed plasmas produced by the two MCPG devices were injected into a target chamber with a variable time difference. For generating ablated plasmas in front of a target material, an aluminum foil sample in the target chamber was exposed to a pulsed plasma produced by the 1st MCPG device. The 2nd pulsed plasma was produced with a time delay of 70 μs. It was found that a surface absorbed energy measured by a calorimeter was reduced to ∼66% of that without the Al foil sample. Thus, the reduction of the incoming plasma energy by the vapor shielding effect was successfully demonstrated in the present experiment.

  15. Experimental investigation of vapor shielding effects induced by ELM-like pulsed plasma loads using the double plasma gun device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakuma, I., E-mail: eu13z002@steng.u-hyogo.ac.jp; Kikuchi, Y.; Kitagawa, Y.; Asai, Y.; Onishi, K.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2015-08-15

    We have developed a unique experimental device of so-called double plasma gun, which consists of two magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) devices, in order to clarify effects of vapor shielding on material erosion due to transient events in magnetically confined fusion devices. Two ELM-like pulsed plasmas produced by the two MCPG devices were injected into a target chamber with a variable time difference. For generating ablated plasmas in front of a target material, an aluminum foil sample in the target chamber was exposed to a pulsed plasma produced by the 1st MCPG device. The 2nd pulsed plasma was produced with a time delay of 70 μs. It was found that a surface absorbed energy measured by a calorimeter was reduced to ∼66% of that without the Al foil sample. Thus, the reduction of the incoming plasma energy by the vapor shielding effect was successfully demonstrated in the present experiment.

  16. Experimental investigation and modeling of adsorption of water and ethanol on cornmeal in an ethanol-water binary vapor system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, H.; Yuan, X.G.; Tian, H.; Zeng, A.W. [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2006-04-15

    The adsorption capacity of water and ethanol on cornmeal in an ethanol-water binary vapor system was investigated in a fixed-bed apparatus for ethanol dehydration. Experiments were performed at temperatures of 82-100 C for different relative humidities of ethanol-water vapor. Adsorption equilibrium models, including those based on the adsorption potential theory of Polanyi and Sircar's model, have been used to fit the experimental data for water adsorption on cornmeal, and all gave good fits. For ethanol adsorption, pseudo-equilibrium was defined as the mass adsorbed on the cornmeal within the time needed for the equilibrium for water on the same adsorbent. Based on this limiting condition, adsorption behaviors and mechanisms were analyzed. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  17. Dissolution kinetics of volatile organic compound vapors in water : An integrated experimental and computational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Mahmoodlu, Mojtaba; Pontedeiro, Elizabeth M.; Pérez Guerrero, Jesús S.; Raoof, Amir; Hassanizadeh, S. Majid; van Genuchten, Martinus Th

    In this study we performed batch experiments to investigate the dissolution kinetics of trichloroethylene (TCE) and toluene vapors in water at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The batch systems consisted of a water reservoir and a connected headspace, the latter containing a small glass

  18. Experimental Evaluation of Hybrid Distillation-Vapor Permeation Process for Efficient Ethanol Recovery from Ethanol-Water Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    The energy demand of distillation-based systems for ethanol recovery and dehydration can be significant, particularly for dilute solutions [1]. An alternative separation process integrating vapor stripping with a vapor compression step and a vapor permeation membrane separation ...

  19. Theoretical approaches and experimental evidence for liquid-vapor phase transitions in nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moretto, L.G.; Elliott, J.B.; Phair, L.; Wozniak, G.J.; Mader, C.M.; Chappars, A.

    2001-01-01

    The leptodermous approximation is applied to nuclear systems for T > 0. The introduction of surface corrections leads to anomalous caloric curves and to negative heat capacities in the liquid-gas coexistence region. Clusterization in the vapor is described by associating surface energy to clusters according to Fisher's formula. The three-dimensional Ising model, a leptodermous system par excellence, does obey rigorously Fisher's scaling up to the critical point. Multifragmentation data from several experiments including the ISiS and EOS Collaborations, as well as compound nucleus fragment emission at much lower energy follow the same scaling, thus providing the strongest evidence yet of liquid-vapor coexistence.

  20. Ultrastructural changes in the liver following chronic experimental intoxication with benzine and ethyline vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonek, J.; Przybylowski, J.; Gryzbek, H.; Podolecki, A.; Pacholek, A.

    1978-01-01

    The livers of two groups of rabbits exposed to longer lasting intoxidation, one with benzine vapors and the other one with ethyline vapors, were subjected to examination in an electron microscope twice; immediately after the completion of intoxication and then 3 months later. In both groups there were found: dilatation of the perinuclear spaces, a symptom of nucleolus segregation, dilation of the ergastoplasm, features of cristolysis of mitochondria and the absence of glycogen. These changes were more intensive in the animals intoxicated with ethyline. 3 months after the completion of the process of petrol intoxication the following was observed: persistence of the majority of the changes as well as accumulation of glycogen and hypertrophy of the smooth endoplasmatic reticulum. These changes were more intensified in animals intoxicated with ethyline.

  1. Experimental verification of a condenser with liquid–vapor separation in an air conditioning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xueqing; Chen, Ying; Deng, Lisheng; Mo, Songping; Zhang, Haiyan

    2013-01-01

    Three liquid–vapor separation condensers (LSC) were tested to evaluate their ability to automatically separate the liquid and vapor during condensation. Each was used in a split-type air conditioner to investigate the performance. The performance of the LSC system having the greatest cooling capacity and energy efficiency ratio (EER) was then compared with that of the system having a baseline fin-and-tube condenser for various ambient temperatures from 29 °C to 43 °C. The results showed that both the cooling capacity and EER of the two systems were almost the same at the three standard conditions in the Chinese standard GB/T 7725-2004, with the LSC having just 67% of the heat transfer area of the baseline condenser. In addition, the LSC system was charged with only 80% of the refrigerant in the baseline system. -- Highlights: ► We tested three liquid–vapor separation condensers in an air conditioning system. ► The best system had the most uniform wall temperature and the smallest pressure drop. ► The LSC system performance with only 67% condenser area was as good as the baseline system. ► LSC system operations are compared for various outdoor temperatures

  2. Experimental measurements of vapor-liquid equilibria of the H2O + CO2 + CH4 ternary system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, J.; Rosenbauer, R.J.; Duan, Zhenhao

    2008-01-01

    Reported are the experimental measurements on vapor-liquid equilibria in the H2O + CO2 + CH4 ternary system at temperatures from (324 to 375) K and pressures from (10 to 50) MPa. The results indicate that the CH4 solubility in the ternary mixture is about 10 % to 40 % more than that calculated by interpolation from the Henry's law constants of the binary system, H2O + CH4, and the solubility of CO2 is 6 % to 20 % more than what is calculated by the interpolation from the Henry's law constants of the binary mixture, H 2O + CO2. ?? 2008 American Chemical Society.

  3. Isobaric (vapor + liquid) equilibria of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethylsulfate plus (propionaldehyde or valeraldehyde): Experimental data and prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, Victor H.; Mattedi, Silvana; Aznar, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → We report density, refraction index, and VLE for (propionaldehyde or valeraldehyde) + [emim][EtSO 4 ]. → The Peng -Robinson + Wong -Sandler + COSMO-SAC model was used to predict density and VLE. → The densities were predicted with deviations below than 2.3%. → The experimental VLE was predicted with deviations below than 1.6%. - Abstract: This paper reports the density, refraction index, and (vapor + liquid) equilibria (VLE) for binary systems {aldehyde + 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethylsulfate ([emim][EtSO 4 ])}: {propionaldehyde + [emim][EtSO 4 ]} and {valeraldehyde + [emim][EtSO 4 ]}. The uncertainties for the temperature, pressure, and compositions measurements for the phase equilibria are ±0.1 K, ±0.01 kPa and ±0.0004, respectively. A qualitative analysis of the variation of the properties with changes in solvent and temperature was performed. The Peng-Robinson equation of state (PR EoS), coupled with the Wong-Sandler mixing rule (WS), is used to describe the experimental data. To calculate activity coefficients we used three different models: NRTL, UNIQUAC, and COSMO-SAC. Since the predictive liquid activity coefficient model COSMO-SAC is used in the Wong-Sandler mixing rule, the resulting thermodynamic model is a completely predictive one. The prediction results for the density and for the (vapor + liquid) equilibria have a deviation lower than 2.3% and 1.6%, respectively. The (vapor + liquid) equilibria predictions show a good description for the propionaldehyde system and only a qualitative description for the valeraldehyde system.

  4. An Experimental Study on the Dynamics of a Single Droplet Vapor Explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concilio Hansson, Roberta

    2010-01-01

    The present study aims to develop a mechanistic understanding of the thermal-hydraulic processes in a vapor explosion, which may occur in nuclear power plants during a hypothetical severe accident involving interactions of high-temperature corium melt and volatile coolant. Over the past several decades, a large body of literature has been accumulated on vapor explosion phenomenology and methods for assessment of the related risk. Vapor explosion is driven by a rapid fragmentation of high temperature melt droplets, leading to a substantial increase of heat transfer areas and subsequent explosive evaporation of the volatile coolant. Constrained by the liquid-phase coolant, the rapid vapor production in the interaction zone causes pressurization and dynamic loading on surrounding structures. While such a general understanding has been established, the triggering mechanism and subsequent dynamic fine fragmentation have yet not been clearly understood. A few mechanistic fragmentation models have been proposed, however, computational efforts to simulate the phenomena generated a large scatter of results. Dynamics of the hot liquid (melt) droplet and the volatile liquid (coolant) are investigated in the MISTEE (Micro-Interactions in Steam Explosion Experiments) facility by performing well-controlled, externally triggered, single-droplet experiments, using a high-speed visualization system with synchronized digital cinematography and continuous X-ray radiography, called SHARP (Simultaneous High-speed Acquisition of X-ray Radiography and Photography). After an elaborate image processing, the SHARP images depict the evolution of both melt material (dispersal) and coolant (bubble dynamics), and their microscale interactions, i.e. the triggering phenomenology. The images point to coolant entrainment into the droplet surface as the mechanism for direct contact/mixing ultimately responsible for energetic interactions. Most importantly, the MISTEE data reveals an inverse

  5. An Experimental Study on the Dynamics of a Single Droplet Vapor Explosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Concilio Hansson, Roberta

    2010-07-01

    The present study aims to develop a mechanistic understanding of the thermal-hydraulic processes in a vapor explosion, which may occur in nuclear power plants during a hypothetical severe accident involving interactions of high-temperature corium melt and volatile coolant. Over the past several decades, a large body of literature has been accumulated on vapor explosion phenomenology and methods for assessment of the related risk. Vapor explosion is driven by a rapid fragmentation of high temperature melt droplets, leading to a substantial increase of heat transfer areas and subsequent explosive evaporation of the volatile coolant. Constrained by the liquid-phase coolant, the rapid vapor production in the interaction zone causes pressurization and dynamic loading on surrounding structures. While such a general understanding has been established, the triggering mechanism and subsequent dynamic fine fragmentation have yet not been clearly understood. A few mechanistic fragmentation models have been proposed, however, computational efforts to simulate the phenomena generated a large scatter of results. Dynamics of the hot liquid (melt) droplet and the volatile liquid (coolant) are investigated in the MISTEE (Micro-Interactions in Steam Explosion Experiments) facility by performing well-controlled, externally triggered, single-droplet experiments, using a high-speed visualization system with synchronized digital cinematography and continuous X-ray radiography, called SHARP (Simultaneous High-speed Acquisition of X-ray Radiography and Photography). After an elaborate image processing, the SHARP images depict the evolution of both melt material (dispersal) and coolant (bubble dynamics), and their microscale interactions, i.e. the triggering phenomenology. The images point to coolant entrainment into the droplet surface as the mechanism for direct contact/mixing ultimately responsible for energetic interactions. Most importantly, the MISTEE data reveals an inverse

  6. Arsenic removal by solar-driven membrane distillation: modeling and experimental investigation with a new flash vaporization module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pa, Parimal; Manna, Ajay Kumar; Linnanen, Lassi

    2013-01-01

    A modeling and simulation study was carried out on a new flux-enhancing and solar-driven membrane distillation module for removal of arsenic from contaminated groundwater. The developed new model was validated with rigorous experimental investigations using arsenic-contaminated groundwater. By incorporating flash vaporization dynamics, the model turned out to be substantially different from the existing direct contact membrane distillation models and could successfully predict (with relative error of only 0.042 and a Willmott d-index of 0.997) the performance of such an arsenic removal unit where the existing models exhibited wide variation with experimental findings in the new design. The module with greater than 99% arsenic removal efficiency and greater than 50 L/m2 x h flux could be implemented in arsenic-affected villages in Southeast Asian countries with abundant solar energy, and thus could give relief to millions of affected people. These encouraging results will raise scale-up confidence.

  7. Nitrous oxide and perioperative outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Hanjo; Kaye, Alan David; Urman, Richard D

    2014-06-01

    There is emerging evidence related to the effects of nitrous oxide on important perioperative patient outcomes. Proposed mechanisms include metabolic effects linked to elevated homocysteine levels and endothelial dysfunction, inhibition of deoxyribonucleic acid and protein formation, and depression of chemotactic migration by monocytes. Newer large studies point to possible risks associated with the use of nitrous oxide, although data are often equivocal and inconclusive. Cardiovascular outcomes such as stroke or myocardial infarction were shown to be unchanged in previous studies, but the more recent Evaluation of Nitrous Oxide in the Gas Mixture for Anesthesia I trial shows possible associations between nitrous oxide and increased cardiovascular and pulmonary complications. There are also possible effects on postoperative wound infections and neuropsychological function, although the multifactorial nature of these complications should be considered. Teratogenicity linked to nitrous oxide use has not been firmly established. The use of nitrous oxide for routine anesthetic care may be associated with significant costs if complications such as nausea, vomiting, and wound infections are taken into consideration. Overall, definitive data regarding the effect of nitrous oxide on major perioperative outcomes are lacking. There are ongoing prospective studies that may further elucidate its role. The use of nitrous oxide in daily practice should be individualized to each patient's medical conditions and risk factors.

  8. Modern chemistry of nitrous oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leont'ev, Aleksandr V; Fomicheva, Ol'ga A; Proskurnina, Marina V; Zefirov, Nikolai S

    2001-01-01

    Modern trends of the chemistry of nitrous oxide are discussed. Data on its structure, physical properties and reactivity are generalised. The effect of N 2 O on the environment and the possibility of its utilisation are considered. Attention is focused on the processes in which the oxidising potential of nitrous oxide can be employed. The bibliography includes 329 references.

  9. An experimental study on critical flow rates in a water-vapor mixture, with low quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seynhaeve, J.-M.

    1976-01-01

    The numerous existing studies about critical two-phase flows have shown the difficulty of getting a precise value of the critical flow rate, especially for low qualities. The comparison of results obtained on two different tests sections emphasizes the influence on the critical flow rate of such factors as geometry, channel types and laws governing the phenomena associated with vaporization. One suggests to evaluate the outlet conditions of the test channel from the inlet conditions. The first step is related to the single phase flow up to the section where the water is saturated. The second part takes the boiling delay into account; it is a function of the expansion's velocity. Finally, the last step leads to the determination of the outlet quality from the measured pressure losses [fr

  10. Bronchiolitis from nitrous fumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darke, C S; Warrack, A J.N.

    1958-01-01

    Gases of low solubility (e.g., NO/sub 2/) may not irritate upper respiratory tract but may act insidiously on lower tract producing edema and bronchiolitis. Cases of bronchiolitis (1 resulting in death) from exposure to brown nitrous fumes are reported. There were no or slight symptoms at first but severe ones after about 1 wk. Pathology appears as acute pulmonary edema with damage and desquamation of alveolar epithelium particularly and that of respiratory bronchioles somewhat. Patchy atelectasis, bronchopneumonia and disruption of fibers in cell walls may also occur. Severe cases have obliteration of lumen (bronchiolitis obliterans) with extreme distress and death.

  11. 21 CFR 184.1545 - Nitrous oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Nitrous oxide. 184.1545 Section 184.1545 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1545 Nitrous oxide. (a) Nitrous oxide (empirical formula N2O, CAS Reg. No.... Nitrous oxide is manufactured by the thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate. Higher oxides of nitrogen...

  12. Experimental investigation on a diode-pumped cesium-vapor laser stably operated at continuous-wave and pulse regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fei; Xu, Dongdong; Gao, Fei; Zheng, Changbin; Zhang, Kuo; He, Yang; Wang, Chunrui; Guo, Jin

    2015-05-04

    Employing a fiber-coupled diode-laser with a center wavelength of 852.25 nm and a line width of 0.17 nm, experimental investigation on diode-end-pumped cesium (Cs) vapor laser stably operated at continuous-wave (CW) and pulse regime is carried out. A 5 mm long cesium vapor cell filled with 60 kPa helium and 20 kPa ethane is used as laser medium. Using an output coupler with reflectivity of 48.79%, 1.26 W 894.57 nm CW laser is obtained at an incident pump power of 4.76 W, corresponding an optical-optical efficiency of 26.8% and a slope-efficiency of 28.8%, respectively. The threshold temperature is 67.5 °C. Stable pulsed cesium laser with a maximum average output power of 2.6 W is obtained at a repetition rate of 76 Hz, and the pulse repetition rate can be extend to 1 kHz with a pulse width of 18 μs.

  13. Experimental study on vapor explosion induced by pressure pulse in coarse mixing of hot molten metal and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, A.; Tobita, Y.; Aritomi, M.; Takahashi, M.; Matsuzaki, M.

    2004-01-01

    An experimental study was done to investigate characteristics of metal-water interaction, when a mount of hot liquid metal is injected into the water. The test section is a vertical shock tube of 60mm in inner diameter and 1200mm in length. A special injector which is designed to inject hot metal of controlled volume and flow rate is attached at the top of the tube. When the hot metal is injected in the water and comes down at a position of the test vessel, a trigger pressure pulse is generated at the bottom of the test tube. Local transient pressures along the tube are measured by piezo pressure transducers. The following items were investigated in the experiment; 1) The criteria to cause a vapor explosion, 2) Transient behaviors and propagation characteristics of pressure wave in the mixing region. 3) Effects of triggering pulse, injection temperature and mass of hot molten metal on the peak pressure. The probability of the vapor explosion jumped when the interface temperature at the molten metal-water direct contact is higher than the homogeneous nucleation temperature of water and the triggering pulse becomes larger than 0.9MPa. Two types of the pressure propagation modes are observed, one is the detonative mode with a sharp rise and other is usual pressure mode with a mild rise. (author)

  14. Experimental study of detonation of large-scale powder-droplet-vapor mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, C.-H.; Wang, Y.; Xue, K.; Wang, L.-F.

    2018-05-01

    Large-scale experiments were carried out to investigate the detonation performance of a 1600-m3 ternary cloud consisting of aluminum powder, fuel droplets, and vapor, which were dispersed by a central explosive in a cylindrically stratified configuration. High-frame-rate video cameras and pressure gauges were used to analyze the large-scale explosive dispersal of the mixture and the ensuing blast wave generated by the detonation of the cloud. Special attention was focused on the effect of the descending motion of the charge on the detonation performance of the dispersed ternary cloud. The charge was parachuted by an ensemble of apparatus from the designated height in order to achieve the required terminal velocity when the central explosive was detonated. A descending charge with a terminal velocity of 32 m/s produced a cloud with discernably increased concentration compared with that dispersed from a stationary charge, the detonation of which hence generates a significantly enhanced blast wave beyond the scaled distance of 6 m/kg^{1/3}. The results also show the influence of the descending motion of the charge on the jetting phenomenon and the distorted shock front.

  15. Instantaneous global nitrous oxide photochemical rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, H.S.; Serang, O.; Podolske, J.

    1979-01-01

    In recent years, vertical profiles of nitrous oxide have been measured by balloon up to midstratosphere at several latitudes between 63 0 N and 73 0 S, including one profile in the tropical zone at 9 0 N. Two rocket flights measured nitrous oxide mixing ratios at 44 and 49 km. From these experimental data plus a large amount of interpolation and extrapolation, we have estimated a global distribution of nitrous oxide up to the altitude of 50 km. With standard global distributions of oxygen and ozone we carried out instantaneous, three-dimensional, global photochemical calculations, using recently measured temperature-dependent cross sections for nitrous oxide. The altitude of maximum photolysis rate of N 2 O is about 30 km at all latitudes, and the rate of photolysis is a maximum in tropical latitudes. The altitude of maximum rate of formation of nitric oxide is latitude dependent, about 26 km at the equator, about 23 km over temperate zones, and 20 km at the summer pole. The global rate of N 2 O destruction is 6.2 x 10 27 molecules s -1 , and the global rate of formation of NO from N 2 O is 1.4 x 10 27 molecules s -1 . The global N 2 O inventory divided by the stratospheric loss rate gives a residence time of about 175 years with respect to this loss process. From the global average N 2 O profile a vertical eddy diffusion profile was derived, and this profile agrees very closely with that of Stewart and Hoffert

  16. Experimental study on methanol recovery through flashing vaporation in continuous production of biodiesel via supercritical methanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Cunwen; Chen Wen; Wang Weiguo; Wu Yuanxin; Chi Ruan; Tang Zhengjiao

    2011-01-01

    To improve the oil conversion, high methanol/oil molar ratio is required in the continuous production of biodiesel via supercritical methanol transesterification in tubular reactor. And thus the subsequent excess methanol recovery needs high energy consumption. Based on the feature of high temperature and high pressure in supercritical methanol transesterification, excess methanol recovery in reaction system by flashing vaporation is conducted and the effect of reaction temperature, reaction pressure and flashing pressure on methanol recovery and methanol concentration in gas phase is discussed in detail in this article. Results show that at the reaction pressure of 9-15 MPa and the reaction temperature of 240-300 o C, flashing pressure has significant influence on methanol recovery and methanol content in gas phase, which can be effectively improved by reducing flashing pressure. At the same time, reaction temperature and reaction pressure also have an important effect on methanol recovery and methanol content in gas phase. At volume flow of biodiesel and methanol 1:2, tubular reactor pressure 15 MPa, tubular reactor temperature 300 o C and the flashing pressure 0.4 MPa, methanol recovery is more than 85% and methanol concentration of gas phase (mass fraction) is close to 99% after adiabatic braising; therefore, the condensate liquid of gas phase can be injected directly into methanol feedstock tank to be recycled. Research abstracts: Biodiesel is an important alternative energy, and supercritical methanol transesterification is a new and green technology to prepare biodiesel with some obvious advantages. But it also exists some problems: high reaction temperature, high reaction pressure and large molar ratio of methanol/oil will cause large energy consumption which restricts supercritical methanol for the industrial application of biodiesel. So a set of tubular reactor-coupled flashing apparatus is established for continuous preparing biodiesel in supercritical

  17. Experimental results for hydrocarbon refrigerant vaporization inside brazed plate heat exchangers at high pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Desideri, Adriano; Ommen, Torben Schmidt; Wronski, Jorrit

    2016-01-01

    fluids at typical working conditions of ORC systems for low temperature waste heat recovery (WHR) applications. Based on these premises, a novel testrig has been recently designed and built at the Technical University of Denmark to simulate the evaporating condition occurring in a small capacity ORC...... power unit. In this contribution the preliminary experimental results obtained from the first experimental campaign carried out on the rig are reported. HFC-134a was selected as working fluid. The experiments were carried out at saturation temperature of 60, 70 and 80 °C and inlet and outlet qualities...

  18. Hybrid Vapor Stripping-Vapor Permeation Process for Recovery and Dehydration of 1-Butanol and Acetone/Butanol/Ethanol from Dilute Aqueous Solutions. Part 2. Experimental Validation with Simple Mixtures and Actual Fermentation Broth

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: In Part1 of this work, a process integrating vapor stripping, vapor compression, and a vapor permeation membrane separation step, Membrane Assisted Vapor Stripping (MAVS), was predicted to produce energy savings compared to traditional distillation systems for separat...

  19. Nitrous Paraffin Hybrid, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Nitrous Oxide Paraffin Hybrid engine (N2OP) is a proposed technology designed to provide small launch vehicles with high specific impulse, indefinitely storable...

  20. Experimental observations of the microlayer in vapor bubble growth on a heated solid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koffman, L.D.; Plesset, M.S.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental measurements of microlayer formation and of the time history of microlayer thickness change have been obtained for nucleate boiling of water and ethanol. These detailed measurements were obtained using laser interometry combined with high-speed cinematography. The measurement technique is discussed in detail with emphasis on the difficulties encountered in interpretation of the fringe patterns. The measurements for water can be reasonably applied to the data of Gunther and Kreith, in which case it is concluded that microlayer evaporate alone cannot account for the increased heat transfer rates observed in highly subcooled nucleate boiling. It appears that microconvection must play at least an equal role

  1. Experimental determination of cesium saturated vapor pressure in the 483/642 deg K temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gushchin, G I; Subbotin, V A; Khachaturov, Eh Kh [Gosudarstvennyj Komitet po Ispol' zovaniyu Atomnoj Ehnergii SSSR, Obninsk. Fiziko-Ehnergeticheskij Inst.

    1975-07-01

    Test results of saturated cesium vapour pressure in the temperature range of 483.13-642 deg K and pressure range of 15.77-1.389 N/m/sup 2/ by direct static method are presented. The testing system comprises a differential bellows-type pressure sensor, a thermostatic unit and a gas system with V-shaped oil manometer used for argon-assisted sensor calibration. The static sensor characteristic approaches linearity in the pressure range of 10-600 N/m/sup 2/. The greatest non-linearity is observed at low pressures (10-40 N/m/sup 2/) and does not exceed 3-4%. Sensor sensitivity is 0.39 mV/N/m/sup 2/ in this pressure range. The characteristic hysteresis is 0.5% and below. With pressures greater than 600 N/m/sup 2/, the sensor sensitivity gradually decreases by 12% while the characteristic hysteresis increases to 2-3%. A brief description of the experimental procedure is offered. The present results are compared with other authors' data.

  2. Experimental Validation of the Simulation Model of a DOAS Equipped with a Desiccant Wheel and a Vapor Compression Refrigeration System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro J. Martínez

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A dedicated outdoor air system (DOAS can be designed to supply 100% of the outside air and meet the latent load of the room with dry air. The objectives of this study were to develop a model of a DOAS equipped with a desiccant wheel and a vapor-compression refrigeration system, build a prototype, validate the model with experimental data, and gain knowledge about the system operation. The test facility was designed with the desiccant wheel downstream of the cooling coil to take advantage of the operating principles of cooling coils and desiccants. A model of the DOAS was developed in the TRNSYS environment. The root mean standard error (RMSE was used for model validation by comparing the measured air and refrigerant properties with the corresponding calculated values. The results obtained with the developed model showed that the DOAS was able to maintain an indoor humidity ratio depending on outdoor conditions. Laboratory tests were also used to investigate the effect of changes in the regeneration air temperature and the process airflow rate on the process air humidity ratio at the outlet of the wheel. The results are consistent with the technical literature.

  3. Making sense of enthalpy of vaporization trends for ionic liquids: new experimental and simulation data show a simple linear relationship and help reconcile previous data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verevkin, Sergey P; Zaitsau, Dzmitry H; Emel'yanenko, Vladimir N; Yermalayeu, Andrei V; Schick, Christoph; Liu, Hongjun; Maginn, Edward J; Bulut, Safak; Krossing, Ingo; Kalb, Roland

    2013-05-30

    Vaporization enthalpy of an ionic liquid (IL) is a key physical property for applications of ILs as thermofluids and also is useful in developing liquid state theories and validating intermolecular potential functions used in molecular modeling of these liquids. Compilation of the data for a homologous series of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethane-sulfonyl)imide ([C(n)mim][NTf2]) ILs has revealed an embarrassing disarray of literature results. New experimental data, based on the concurring results from quartz crystal microbalance, thermogravimetric analyses, and molecular dynamics simulation have revealed a clear linear dependence of IL vaporization enthalpies on the chain length of the alkyl group on the cation. Ambiguity of the procedure for extrapolation of vaporization enthalpies to the reference temperature 298 K was found to be a major source of the discrepancies among previous data sets. Two simple methods for temperature adjustment of vaporization enthalpies have been suggested. Resulting vaporization enthalpies obey group additivity, although the values of the additivity parameters for ILs are different from those for molecular compounds.

  4. Nitrous oxide availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, M J; Murray, W J

    1980-04-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is marketed as an inhalation anesthetic and as a food ingredient (e.g., whipping cream propellant). In the human, inhalation has been associated with "highs," peripheral nerve damage, mitotic poisoning of bone marrow, psychosis, and mental impairment. Exposure to hypoxemic mixtures has resulted in death. The commercial N2O sources specifically studied were aerosol whipping cream containers (three brands) and 6.5-cm cylinders, or chargers (two brands). The gas content and N2O concentrations of these devices were measured. The aerosol cans, when not shaken, will dispense at least 3 liters of 87 to 90% N2O. Charger misuse may occur when they are substituted for identically designed carbon dioxide (CO2) chargers of a seltzer bottle; 4.3 to 5.0 liters of 93 to 98% N2O is expelled at a controllable rate. The toxicity of these inexpensive N2O products, their high potential for misuse, and the absence of labeling (chargers) argue that their distribution be discontinued.

  5. 29 CFR 1910.105 - Nitrous oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nitrous oxide. 1910.105 Section 1910.105 Labor Regulations... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Hazardous Materials § 1910.105 Nitrous oxide. The piped systems for the in-plant transfer and distribution of nitrous oxide shall be designed, installed, maintained, and...

  6. Nitrous oxide emissions from estuarine intertidal sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelburg, J.J.; Klaver, G.; Nieuwenhuize, J.; Markusse, R.M.; Vlug, T.; Nat, F.J.W.A. van der

    1995-01-01

    From September 1990 through December 1991 nitrous oxide flux measurements were made at 9 intertidal mud flat sites in the Scheldt Estuary. Nitrous oxide release rates were highly variable both between sites and over time at any one site. Annual nitrous oxide fluxes vary from about 10 mmol N m-2 at

  7. Nitrous Oxide Production by Abundant Benthic Macrofauna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stief, Peter; Schramm, Andreas

    of the short-term metabolic induction of gut denitrification is the preferential production of nitrous oxide rather than dinitrogen. On a large scale, gut denitrification in, for instance, Chironomus plumosus larvae can increase the overall nitrous oxide emission of lake sediment by a factor of eight. We...... screened more than 20 macrofauna species for nitrous oxide production and identified filter-feeders and deposit-feeders that occur ubiquitously and at high abundance (e.g., chironomids, ephemeropterans, snails, and mussels) as the most important emitters of nitrous oxide. In contrast, predatory species...... that do not ingest large quantities of microorganisms produced insignificant amounts of nitrous oxide. Ephemera danica, a very abundant mayfly larva, was monitored monthly in a nitrate-polluted stream. Nitrous oxide production by this filter-feeder was highly dependent on nitrate availability...

  8. Catalytic oxidation using nitrous oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Beltran-Prieto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrous oxide is a very inert gas used generally as oxidant as it offers some advantage compared with other oxidants such as O2 but a considerably higher temperature (> 526 °C is often required. For particular cases such as the oxidation of sugar alcohols, especially for the oxidation of primary alcohols to aldehydes, N2O has the advantage over O2 of a higher reaction selectivity. In the present paper we present the modelling of oxidation reaction of sugar alcohols using an oxidizing agent in low concentrations, which is important to suppress subsequent oxidation reactions due to the very low residual concentrations of the oxidizing agent. For orientation experiments we chose nitrous oxide generated by thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate. Kinetic modeling of the reaction was performed after determination of the differential equations that describe the system under study.

  9. Experimental study on the performance of the vapor injection refrigeration system with an economizer for intermediate pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Chang-Uk; Choi, Kwang-Hwan; Yoon, Jung-In; Kim, Young-Bok; Son, Chang-Hyo; Ha, Soo-Jung; Jeon, Min-Ju; An, Sang-Young; Lee, Joon-Hyuk

    2018-04-01

    In this study, to investigate the performance characteristics of vapor injection refrigeration system with an economizer at an intermediate pressure, the vapor injection refrigeration system was analyzed under various experiment conditions. As a result, the optimum design data of the vapor injection refrigeration system with an economizer were obtained. The findings from this study can be summarized as follows. The mass flow rate through the compressor increases with intermediate pressure. The compression power input showed an increasing trend under all the test conditions. The evaporation capacity increased and then decreased at the intermediate pressure, and as such, it became maximum at the given intermediate pressure. The increased mass flow rate of the by-passed refrigerant enhanced the evaporation capacity at the low medium pressure range, but the increased saturation temperature limited the subcooling degree of the liquid refrigerant after the application of the economizer when the intermediate pressure kept rising, and degenerated the evaporation capacity. The coefficient of performance (COP) increased and then decreased with respect to the intermediate pressures under all the experiment conditions. Nevertheless, there was an optimum intermediate pressure for the maximum COP under each experiment condition. Therefore, the optimum intermediate pressure in this study was found at -99.08 kPa, which is the theoretical standard medium pressure under all the test conditions.

  10. Transformation features in solid nitrous oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drobyshev, A.; Aldiyarov, A.; Korshikov, E.; Sokolov, D.; Kurnosov, V.

    2012-01-01

    The transformation features in cryocondensates of nitrous oxide were studied in the process of thermal cycling in the vicinity of the temperature T = 40 K. The research was aimed at figuring out the response of deformation and translational vibrational subsystems of the condensed nitrous oxide to these transformations. The temperature and the nature of thermally stimulated reactions in the films of nitrous oxide cryocondensates were determined. By measuring the vibrational spectra of the samples and by recording the changes in amplitude and position of the absorption bands characteristic of vibrations. Analysis of the IR spectra suggests that the transition from the amorphous state of nitrous oxide to the crystalline one is carried out in several stages, which account for the implementation of relaxation processes related to a particular type of vibrations of a nitrous oxide molecule. The difference in the temperatures of the transitions is determined by activation energies that are typical of this type of oscillation.

  11. Vacuum evaporation of KCl-NaCl salts. Part 2: Vaporization-rate model and experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.L.; Wallace, T.C. Sr.; Hampel, F.G.; Steele, J.H.

    1996-01-01

    Separation of chloride salts from the actinide residue by vacuum evaporation is a promising method of treating wastes from the pyrochemical plutonium processes. A model based on the Hertz-Langmuir relation is used to describe how evaporation rates of the binary KCl-NaCl system change with time. The effective evaporation coefficient (α), which is a ratio of the actual evaporation rate to the theoretical maximum, was obtained for the KCl-NaCl system using this model. In the temperature range of 640 C to 760 C, the effective evaporation coefficient ranges from ∼0.4 to 0.1 for evaporation experiments conducted at 0.13 Pa. At temperatures below the melting point, the lower evaporation coefficients are suggested to result from the more complex path that a molecule needs to follow before escaping to the gas phase. At the higher liquid temperatures, the decreasing evaporation coefficients result from a combination of the increasing vapor-flow resistances and the heat-transfer effects at the evaporation surface and the condensate layer. The microanalysis of the condensate verified that composition of the condensate changes with time, consistent with the model calculation. The microstructural examination revealed that the vaporate may have condensed as a single solution phase, which upon cooling forms fine lamellar structures of the equilibrium KCl and NaCl phases. In conclusion, the optimum design of the evaporation process and equipment must take the mass and heat transfer factors and equipment materials issues into consideration

  12. Experimental vapor pressures (from 1 Pa to 100 kPa) of six saturated Fatty Acid Methyl Esters (FAMEs): Methyl hexanoate, methyl octanoate, methyl decanoate, methyl dodecanoate, methyl tetradecanoate and methyl hexadecanoate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahraoui, Lakhdar; Khimeche, Kamel; Dahmani, Abdallah; Mokbel, Ilham; Jose, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Highlight: • Vapor-liquid equilibria, Enthalpy of Vaporization, saturated Fatty Acid Methyl Ester. - Abstract: Vapor pressures of six saturated Fatty Acid Methyl Esters (FAMEs), methyl hexanoate (or methyl caproate), methyl octanoate (or methyl caprylate), Methyl decanoate (or methyl caprate), methyl dodecanoate (or methyl laurate), methyl tetradecanoate (or methyl myristate), and methyl hexadecanoate (or methyl palmitate) were measured from 1 Pa to 100 kPa and at temperature range between 262 and 453 K using a static apparatus. The experimental data (P-T) were compared with the available literature data.

  13. 21 CFR 868.1700 - Nitrous oxide gas analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nitrous oxide gas analyzer. 868.1700 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1700 Nitrous oxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A nitrous oxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of nitrous oxide...

  14. Experimental determination of the (vapor + liquid) equilibrium data of binary mixtures of fatty acids by differential scanning calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matricarde Falleiro, Rafael M.; Meirelles, Antonio J.A.; Kraehenbuehl, Maria A.

    2010-01-01

    (Vapor + liquid) equilibrium (VLE) data for three binary mixtures of saturated fatty acids were obtained by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). However, changes in the calorimeter pressure cell and the use of hermetic pans with holes (φ = 250 mm) in the lids were necessary to make it possible to apply this analytical technique, obtaining accurate results with smaller samples and shorter operational times. The systems evaluated in this study were: myristic acid (C 14:0 ) + palmitic acid (C 16:0 ), myristic acid (C 14:0 ) + stearic acid (C 18:0 ), and palmitic acid (C 16:0 ) + stearic acid (C 18:0 ), all measured at 50 mm Hg and with mole fractions between 0.0 and 1.0 in relation to the most volatile component of each diagram. The fugacity coefficients for the components in the vapor phase were calculated using the Hayden and O'Connell method [J.G. Hayden, J.P. O'Connell, Ind. Eng. Chem. Process Design Develop. 14 (3) (1975) 209-216] and the activity coefficients for the liquid phase were correlated with the traditional g E models (NRTL [H. Renon, J.M. Prausnitz, Aiche J. 14 (1968) 135-144], UNIQUAC [D.S. Abrams, J.M. Prausnitz, Aiche J. 21 (1975) 116-128], and Wilson [J.M. Prausnitz, N.L. Linchtenthaler, E.G. Azevedo, Molecular Thermodynamics of Fluid-phase Equilibria, River-Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle, 1999]). The sets of parameters were then compared in order to determine which adjustments best represented the VLE.

  15. Nitrous oxide: Saturation properties and the phase diagram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, A.G.M.; Lobo, L.Q.

    2009-01-01

    The experimental values of the coordinates of the triple point and of the critical point of nitrous oxide registered in the literature were assessed and those judged as most reliable have been selected. Empirical equations have been found for the vapour pressure, sublimation and fusion curves. The virial coefficients and saturation properties as functions of temperature along the equilibrium curves are described by reduced equations. They were used in arriving at the molar enthalpies at the triple point and the normal boiling temperature. Equations for the sublimation and fusion curves resulting from the exactly integrated Clapeyron equation compare favourably with the results from the empirical treatment and the experimental data.

  16. New alternatives for laser vaporization of the prostate: experimental evaluation of a 980-, 1,318- and 1,470-nm diode laser device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wezel, Felix; Wendt-Nordahl, Gunnar; Huck, Nina; Bach, Thorsten; Weiss, Christel; Michel, Maurice Stephan; Häcker, Axel

    2010-04-01

    Several diode laser systems were introduced in recent years for the minimal-invasive surgical therapy of benign prostate enlargement. We investigated the ablation capacities, hemostatic properties and extend of tissue necrosis of different diode lasers at wavelengths of 980, 1,318 and 1,470 nm and compared the results to the 120 W GreenLight HPS laser. The laser devices were evaluated in an ex vivo model using isolated porcine kidneys. The weight difference of the porcine kidneys after 10 min of laser vaporization defined the amount of ablated tissue. Blood loss was measured in blood-perfused kidneys following laser vaporization. Histological examination was performed to assess the tissue effects. The side-firing 980 and 1,470 nm diode lasers displayed similar ablative capacities compared to the GreenLight HPS laser (n.s.). The 1,318-nm laser, equipped with a bare-ended fiber, reached a higher ablation rate compared to the other laser devices (each P laser with a bare-ended fiber reached the highest rate compared to the side-firing devices (each P diode lasers showed superior hemostatic properties compared to the GreenLight HPS laser (each P laser), respectively. The diode lasers offered similar ablative capacities and improved hemostatic properties compared to the 120 W GreenLight HPS laser in this experimental ex vivo setting. The higher tissue penetration of the diode lasers compared to the GreenLight HPS laser may explain improved hemostasis.

  17. Evaluation of surface tension and Tolman length as a function of droplet radius from experimental nucleation rate and supersaturation ratio: metal vapor homogeneous nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onischuk, A A; Purtov, P A; Baklanov, A M; Karasev, V V; Vosel, S V

    2006-01-07

    Zinc and silver vapor homogeneous nucleations are studied experimentally at the temperature from 600 to 725 and 870 K, respectively, in a laminar flow diffusion chamber with Ar as a carrier gas at atmospheric pressure. The size, shape, and concentration of aerosol particles outcoming the diffusion chamber are analyzed by a transmission electron microscope and an automatic diffusion battery. The wall deposit is studied by a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Using SEM data the nucleation rate for both Zn and Ag is estimated as 10(10) cm(-3) s(-1). The dependence of critical supersaturation on temperature for Zn and Ag measured in this paper as well as Li, Na, Cs, Ag, Mg, and Hg measured elsewhere is analyzed. To this aim the classical nucleation theory is extended by the dependence of surface tension on the nucleus radius. The preexponent in the formula for the vapor nucleation rate is derived using the formula for the work of formation of noncritical embryo [obtained by Nishioka and Kusaka [J. Chem. Phys. 96, 5370 (1992)] and later by Debenedetti and Reiss [J. Chem. Phys. 108, 5498 (1998)

  18. R-22 vapor explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.P.; Armstrong, D.R.

    1977-01-01

    Previous experimental and theoretical studies of R-22 vapor explosions are reviewed. Results from two experimental investigations of vapor explosions in a medium scale R-22/water system are reported. Measurements following the drop of an unrestrained mass of R-22 into a water tank demonstrated the existence of two types of interaction behavior. Release of a constrained mass of R-22 beneath the surface of a water tank improved the visual resolution of the system thus allowing identification of two interaction mechansims: at low water temperatures, R-22/water contact would produce immediate violent boiling; at high water temperatures a vapor film formed around its R-22 as it was released, explosions were generated by a surface wave which initiated at a single location and propagated along the vapor film as a shock wave. A new vapor explosion model is proposed, it suggests explosions are the result of a sequence of three independent steps: an initial mixing phase, a trigger and growth phase, and a mature phase where a propagating shock wave accelerates the two liquids into a collapsing vapor layer causing a high velocity impact which finely fragments and intermixes the two liquids

  19. VAPOR PRESSURES AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY COAL TARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric M. Suuberg; Vahur Oja

    1997-07-01

    This project had as its main focus the determination of vapor pressures of coal pyrolysis tars. It involved performing measurements of these vapor pressures and from them, developing vapor pressure correlations suitable for use in advanced pyrolysis models (those models which explicitly account for mass transport limitations). This report is divided into five main chapters. Each chapter is a relatively stand-alone section. Chapter A reviews the general nature of coal tars and gives a summary of existing vapor pressure correlations for coal tars and model compounds. Chapter B summarizes the main experimental approaches for coal tar preparation and characterization which have been used throughout the project. Chapter C is concerned with the selection of the model compounds for coal pyrolysis tars and reviews the data available to us on the vapor pressures of high boiling point aromatic compounds. This chapter also deals with the question of identifying factors that govern the vapor pressures of coal tar model materials and their mixtures. Chapter D covers the vapor pressures and heats of vaporization of primary cellulose tars. Chapter E discusses the results of the main focus of this study. In summary, this work provides improved understanding of the volatility of coal and cellulose pyrolysis tars. It has resulted in new experimentally verified vapor pressure correlations for use in pyrolysis models. Further research on this topic should aim at developing general vapor pressure correlations for all coal tars, based on their molecular weight together with certain specific chemical characteristics i.e. hydroxyl group content.

  20. Experimental study of cluster formation in binary mixture of H2O and H2SO4 vapors in the presence of an ionizing radiation source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, J. J.; Smith, A. C.; Yue, G. K.

    1980-01-01

    Molecular clusters formed in pure nitrogen containing H2O and H2SO4 vapors and exposed to a 3 mCi Ni63 beta source were studied in the mass range 50 to 780 amu using a quadrupole mass spectrometer. Measurements were made under several combinations of relative humidity and relative acidity ranging from 0.7 to 7.5 percent and 0.00047 to 0.06333 percent, respectively. The number of H2SO4 molecules in the clusters observed ranged from 1 to 7 whereas the number of H2O molecules ranged from 1 to 16. The experimental cluster spectra differ considerably from those calculated using the classical nucleation theory. First order calculations using modified surface tension values and including the effects of multipole moments of the nucleating molecules indicate that these effects may be enough to explain the difference between the measured and the calculated spectra.

  1. Experimental study of the vaporization of a droplets injection in a fluidized gas-solid media; Etude experimentale de la vaporisation d'un jet de goutelettes au contact d'un milieu gaz-solide fluidise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leclere, K.

    2002-09-01

    The quality of feedstock injection in the Fluid Catalytic Process (FCC) is essential to ensure a good vaporization. The vaporization should be fast so that the cracking reaction in the gaseous phase can happen within the short residence time in the riser (a few seconds). Vaporization is helped by a uniform injection of droplets as small as possible as well as a good mixing with the catalyst particles that represent the main heat source. Several models were developed to predict the droplet vaporization in a gas-solid media. However, no experimental validation exists for these models, whose predictions vary (from 1 to several hundreds of milliseconds). The objective of this study was to get a better understanding of the physical phenomena taking place during droplet vaporization. This was done in two steps. First, operating limits had to be defined to ensure an optimal vaporization and to avoid local saturation and agglomerate formation. These limits were precisely determined under laboratory conditions to validate a model that showed that agglomeration does not occur under industrial conditions. Then, a kinematic study of vaporization under operating conditions without agglomerate formation was performed. An original measurement technique was developed to get samples at very short times (tens of milliseconds). Experiments showed that heat transfer was not limiting and that mass transfer was the limiting process during vaporization. The developed model was thus based on mass transfer through a boundary layer. The validation of this model in a dense fluidized bed justified its application to operating conditions were the bed voidance is higher. A detailed study of operating parameters will help determine how to improve vaporization. (author)

  2. A study on vapor explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, N.; Shoji, M.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out for vapor explosions of molten tin falling in water. For various initial metal temperatures and subcooling of water, transient pressure of the explosions, relative frequency of the explosions and the position where the explosions occur were measured in detail. The influence of ambient pressure was also investigated. From the results, it was concluded that the vapor explosion is closely related to the collapse of a vapor film around the molten metal. (author)

  3. Nitrous Oxide Emission by Aquatic Macrofauna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stief, Peter; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Schramm, Andreas

    -term metabolic induction of gut denitrification is the preferential production of nitrous oxide rather than dinitrogen. These observations were made in detailed studies on the larvae of the freshwater insects Chironomus plumosus and Ephemera danica which both can be very abundant in lake and stream sediments......, respectively. Aside from these case studies, we screened more than 20 macrofauna species in various aquatic habitats for nitrous oxide production. Filter- and deposit-feeders that ingest large quantities of microorganisms were the most important emitters of nitrous oxide. In contrast, predatory species that do...... not ingest large quantities of microorganisms produced insignificant amounts of nitrous oxide. With increasing eutrophication, filter- and deposit-feeders often become the dominant feeding guilds of benthic communities. Thus, with increasing nitrate pollution, aquatic macrofauna has the potential to further...

  4. Nitrous oxide emission by aquatic macrofauna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stief, Peter; Poulsen, Morten; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Brix, Hans; Schramm, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    A large variety of aquatic animals was found to emit the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide when nitrate was present in the environment. The emission was ascribed to denitrification by ingested bacteria in the anoxic animal gut, and the exceptionally high N2O-to-N2 production ratio suggested delayed induction of the last step of denitrification. Filter- and deposit-feeding animal species showed the highest rates of nitrous oxide emission and predators the lowest, probably reflecting the different amounts of denitrifying bacteria in the diet. We estimate that nitrous oxide emission by aquatic animals is quantitatively important in nitrate-rich aquatic environments like freshwater, coastal marine, and deep-sea ecosystems. The contribution of this source to overall nitrous oxide emission from aquatic environments might further increase because of the projected increase of nitrate availability in tropical regions and the numeric dominance of filter- and deposit-feeders in eutrophic ecosystems. PMID:19255427

  5. Nitrous Oxide flux measurements under various amendments

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The dataset consists of measurements of soil nitrous oxide emissions from soils under three different amendments: glucose, cellulose, and manure. Data includes the...

  6. Resonating Nitrous Oxide Thruster, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — AeroAstro proposes decomposing nitrous oxide (N2O) as an alternative propellant to existing spacecraft propellants. Decomposing N2O can be used as either a high Isp,...

  7. Nitrous oxide emission by aquatic macrofauna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stief, Peter; Poulsen, Morten; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2009-01-01

      A large variety of aquatic animals was found to emit the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide when nitrate was present in the environment. The emission was ascribed to denitrification by ingested bacteria in the anoxic animal gut, and the exceptionally high N2O-to-N2 production ratio suggested...... delayed induction of the last step of denitrification. Filter- and deposit-feeding animal species showed the highest rates of nitrous oxide emission and predators the lowest, probably reflecting the different amounts of denitrifying bacteria in the diet. We estimate that nitrous oxide emission by aquatic...... animals is quantitatively important in nitraterich aquatic environments like freshwater, coastal marine, and deep-sea ecosystems. The contribution of this source to overall nitrous oxide emission from aquatic environments might further increase because of the projected increase of nitrate availability...

  8. Numerical and experimental investigation of DNAPL removal mechanisms in a layered porous medium by means of soil vapor extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hongkyu; Oostrom, Mart; Wietsma, Thomas W; Werth, Charles J; Valocchi, Albert J

    2009-10-13

    The purpose of this work is to identify the mechanisms that govern the removal of carbon tetrachloride (CT) during soil vapor extraction (SVE) by comparing numerical and analytical model simulations with a detailed data set from a well-defined intermediate-scale flow cell experiment. The flow cell was packed with a fine-grained sand layer embedded in a coarse-grained sand matrix. A total of 499 mL CT was injected at the top of the flow cell and allowed to redistribute in the variably saturated system. A dual-energy gamma radiation system was used to determine the initial NAPL saturation profile in the fine-grained sand layer. Gas concentrations at the outlet of the flow cell and 15 sampling ports inside the flow cell were measured during subsequent CT removal using SVE. Results show that CT mass was removed quickly in coarse-grained sand, followed by a slow removal from the fine-grained sand layer. Consequently, effluent gas concentrations decreased quickly at first, and then started to decrease gradually, resulting in long-term tailing. The long-term tailing was mainly due to diffusion from the fine-grained sand layer to the coarse-grained sand zone. An analytical solution for a one-dimensional advection and a first-order mass transfer model matched the tailing well with two fitting parameters. Given detailed knowledge of the permeability field and initial CT distribution, we were also able to predict the effluent concentration tailing and gas concentration profiles at sampling ports using a numerical simulator assuming equilibrium CT evaporation. The numerical model predictions were accurate within the uncertainty of independently measured or literature derived parameters. This study demonstrates that proper numerical modeling of CT removal through SVE can be achieved using equilibrium evaporation of NAPL if detailed fine-scale knowledge of the CT distribution and physical heterogeneity is incorporated into the model. However, CT removal could also be fit by a

  9. Experimental setup for producing tungsten coated graphite tiles using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique for fusion plasma applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauhan, Sachin Singh; Sharma, Uttam; Choudhary, K.K.; Sanyasi, A.K.; Ghosh, J.; Sharma, Jayshree

    2013-01-01

    Plasma wall interaction (PWI) in fusion grade machines puts stringent demands on the choice of materials in terms of high heat load handling capabilities and low sputtering yields. Choice of suitable material still remains a challenge and open topic of research for the PWI community. Carbon fibre composites (CFC), Beryllium (Be), and Tungsten (W) are now being considered as first runners for the first wall components of future fusion machines. Tungsten is considered to be one of the suitable materials for the job because of its superior properties than carbon like low physical sputtering yield and high sputter energy threshold, high melting point, fairly high re-crystallization temperature, low fuel retention capabilities, low chemical sputtering with hydrogen and its isotopes and most importantly the reparability with various plasma techniques both ex-situ and in-situ. Plasma assisted chemical vapour deposition is considered among various techniques as the most preferable technique for fabricating tungsten coated graphite tiles to be used as tokamak first wall and target components. These coated tiles are more favourable compared to pure tungsten due to their light weight and easier machining. A system has been designed, fabricated and installed at SVITS, Indore for producing tungsten coated graphite tiles using Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PE-CVD) technique for Fusion plasma applications. The system contains a vacuum chamber, a turbo-molecular pump, two electrodes, vacuum gauges, mass analyzer, mass flow controllers and a RF power supply for producing the plasma using hydrogen gas. The graphite tiles will be put on one of the electrodes and WF6 gas will be inserted in a controlled manner in the hydrogen plasma to achieve the tungsten-coating with WF6 dissociation. The system is integrated at SVITS, Indore and a vacuum of the order of 3*10 -6 is achieved and glow discharge plasma has been created to test all the sub-systems. The system design with

  10. Increased norepinephrine release from dog pulmonary artery caused by nitrous oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rorie, D.K.; Tyce, G.M.; Sill, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of nitrous oxide on the release and metabolism of norepinephrine (NE) at neuroeffector junctions in dog pulmonary artery were examined. Helical strips of artery were incubated in Krebs-Ringer solution containing L-( 3 H)NE and mounted for superfusion. The arterial strips were studied in the presence of 95% oxygen-5% carbon dioxide, 70% nitrogen-30% oxygen, or 70% nitrous oxide-30% oxygen. During the 60 min of each experiment, five samples of superfusion fluid were collected for analysis and the effluxes of ( 3 H)NE and its radiolabeled metabolites were measured before and during electrical stimulation and during recovery from stimulation. ( 3 H)Norepinephrine was separated from its metabolites in the superfusate and in extracts of artery by column chromatography and quantitated by liquid scintillation spectrometry. Nitrous oxide significantly increased the fractional loss of total radioactivity and the amount of NE in the superfusate both during resting conditions and during stimulation. Nitrous oxide had no effect on the proportions of radioactivity among metabolites of NE in the superfusate or on the profile of NE metabolites remaining in the tissue after experimentation. These findings are consistent with increased NE release as a direct effect of nitrous oxide on nerve endings

  11. Simulation and experimental study of solar-absorption heat transformer integrating with two-stage high temperature vapor compression heat pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nattaporn Chaiyat

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, simulation and experiment studies of a 10 kW solar H2O–LiBr absorption heat transformer (AHT integrating with a two-stage vapor compression heat pump (VCHP were carried out. The whole system was named as compression/absorption heat transformer (CAHT. The VCHP was used to recover rejected heat at the AHT condenser which was transferred back to the AHT evaporator at a higher temperature. The AHT unit took solar heat from a set of flat-plate solar collectors in parallel connection. R-134a and R-123 were refrigerants in the VCHP cycle. From the simulation, the total cycle coefficient (COP of the solar-CAHT was 0.71 compared with 0.49 of the normal solar-AHT. From the experiment, the total cycle COPs of the solar-CAHT and the solar-AHT were 0.62 and 0.39, respectively. The experimental results were lower than those of the simulated models due to the oversize of the experimental compressor. The annual expense of the solar-CAHT was found to be 5113 USD which was lower than 5418 USD of the solar-AHT. So it could be concluded that the modified unit was beneficial than the normal unit in terms of energy efficiency and economic expense.

  12. High-pressure vapor-liquid equilibria of systems containing ethylene glycol, water and methane - Experimental measurements and modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folas, Georgios; Berg, Ole J.; Solbraa, Even

    2007-01-01

    This work presents new experimental phase equilibrium measurements of the binary MEG-methane and the ternary MEG-water-methane system at low temperatures and high pressures which are of interest to applications related to natural gas processing. Emphasis is given to MEG and water solubility...... measurements in the gas phase. The CPA and SRK EoS, the latter using either conventional or EoS/G(E) mixing rules are used to predict the solubility of the heavy components in the gas phase. It is concluded that CPA and SRK using the Huron-Vidal mixing rule perform equally satisfactory, while CPA requires...

  13. Experimental and theoretical investigations of Cs-Ba vapor tacitron inverter for power conditioning in space power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Genk, M.; Murray, C.; Wernsman, B.

    1993-01-01

    The operation characteristics of the Cs-Ba tacitron as a switch are investigated experimentally in three modes: (a) breakdown mode, (b) I-V mode, and (c) current modulation mode. The switching frequency, grid potentials for ignition and extinguishing of discharge, and the Cs pressure and emission conditions (Ba pressure and emitter temperature) for stable current modulation are determined. The experimental data is also used to determine the off-time required for successful ignition, and the effects of the aforementioned operation parameters on the ignition duty cycle threshold for stable modulation. Operation parameters measured include switching frequency up to 20 kHz, hold-off voltage up to 180 V, current densities in excess of 15 A/cm 2 , switch power density of 1 kW/cm 2 . and a switching efficiency in excess of 90% at collector C: realer than 30 V. The voltage drop strongly depends on the Cs pressure and to a lesser extent on the emission conditions. Increasing the Cs pressure and/or the emission current lowers the voltage drop, however, for the same initial Cs pressure and emission conditions, the voltage drop in the I-V mode is usually lower than that during current modulation. As long as the discharge current is kept lower that the.emission current, the voltage drop during stable current modulation could be as low as 3 V

  14. Constrained Vapor Bubble Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokhale, Shripad; Plawsky, Joel; Wayner, Peter C., Jr.; Zheng, Ling; Wang, Ying-Xi

    2002-11-01

    Microgravity experiments on the Constrained Vapor Bubble Heat Exchanger, CVB, are being developed for the International Space Station. In particular, we present results of a precursory experimental and theoretical study of the vertical Constrained Vapor Bubble in the Earth's environment. A novel non-isothermal experimental setup was designed and built to study the transport processes in an ethanol/quartz vertical CVB system. Temperature profiles were measured using an in situ PC (personal computer)-based LabView data acquisition system via thermocouples. Film thickness profiles were measured using interferometry. A theoretical model was developed to predict the curvature profile of the stable film in the evaporator. The concept of the total amount of evaporation, which can be obtained directly by integrating the experimental temperature profile, was introduced. Experimentally measured curvature profiles are in good agreement with modeling results. For microgravity conditions, an analytical expression, which reveals an inherent relation between temperature and curvature profiles, was derived.

  15. Experimental study of arsenic speciation in vapor phase to 500°C: Implications for As transport and fractionation in low-density crustal fluids and volcanic gases.

    OpenAIRE

    Pokrovski , Gleb S.; Zakirov , Ildar V.; Roux , Jacques; Testemale , Denis; Hazemann , Jean-Louis; Y. U. Bychkov , Andrew; V. Golikova , Galina

    2002-01-01

    The stoichiometry and stability of arsenic gaseous complexes were determined in the system As-H2O ± NaCl ± HCl ± H2S at temperatures up to 500°C and pressures up to 600 bar, from both measurements of As(III) and As(V) vapor-liquid and vapor-solid partitioning, and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopic study of As(III)-bearing aqueous fluids. Vapor-aqueous solution partitioning for As(III) was measured from 250 to 450°C at the saturated vapor pressure of the system (Psat) with a...

  16. High Performance Nitrous Oxide Analyzer for Atmospheric Research, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project targets the development of a highly sensitive gas sensor to monitor atmospheric nitrous oxide. Nitrous oxide is an important species in Earth science...

  17. Vapor Pressure Data Analysis and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    near 8, 2000, and 200, respectively. The A (or a) value is directly related to vapor pressure and will be greater for high vapor pressure materials...1, (10) where n is the number of data points, Yi is the natural logarithm of the i th experimental vapor pressure value, and Xi is the...VAPOR PRESSURE DATA ANALYSIS AND STATISTICS ECBC-TR-1422 Ann Brozena RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY DIRECTORATE

  18. Nitrous oxide emissions and denitrification rates: A blueprint for smart management and remediation of agricultural landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasek, A.; Hondzo, M.; Kozarek, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Anthropogenic activities have greatly altered the global nitrogen cycle, especially in the agriculturally dominated Midwest, with severe consequences on human and aquatic health. Complete microbial denitrification can be viewed as a nitrogen sink, converting soluble nitrate into inert nitrogen gas. This research aims to quantify and correlate the driving parameters in microbial denitrification and explore the relationship to the abundance of denitrifying genes and the microbial communities at these sites. Denitrifying genes for each step in the denitrification process have been quantified. Data from a field site in Southern Minnesota has been collected throughout the season for two years enabling investigation into the temporal variability of denitrification. Data was collected at two cross-sections across the channel to determine the effect of bank location and moisture content on denitrification. Data were collected in an experimental basin in the summer of 2015 to determine the effect of flooding and benthic organic matter content and quality on microbial denitrification and nitrous oxide production. Four sediment types were investigated in three different flood regimes. After each raising or lowering of the water level, soil cores were taken to determine soil characteristics, the potential denitrification using the denitrification enzyme activity method, nitrous oxide production using a static core method, and the denitrifying gene abundance. Chambers were also deployed over each soil amendment in each flood regime to determine the nitrous oxide production over time. Results from these studies will convey a more complete explanation of denitrification and nitrous oxide production under varying environmental conditions. By determining the driving parameters for microbial denitrification, denitrification hot spots and hot moments can be created and enhanced. One potential consequence of increased denitrification is the possibility of incomplete denitrification

  19. Experimental measurement of vapor pressures and (vapor + liquid) equilibrium for {1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (R134a) + propane (R290)} by a recirculation apparatus with view windows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Xueqiang; Gong Maoqiong; Liu Junsheng; Wu Jianfeng

    2011-01-01

    The saturated vapor pressures of 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (R134a) and propane (R290), and the (vapor + liquid) equilibrium (VLE) data at (255.000, 265.000, 275.000, and 285.000) K for the (R134a + R290) system were measured by a recirculation apparatus with view windows. The uncertainty of the temperatures, pressures, and compositions are less than ±5 mK, ±0.0005 MPa, and ±0.005, respectively. The saturated vapor pressures data were correlated by a Wagner type equation and compared with the reference data. The binary VLE data were correlated with the Peng-Robinson equation of state (PR EoS) incorporating the Huron-Vidal (HV) mixing rule utilizing the nonrandom two-liquid (NRTL) activity coefficient model. For mixtures, the maximum average absolute relative deviation of pressure is 0.15%, while the maximum average absolute deviation of vapor phase mole fraction is 0.0045. Azeotropic behavior can be found for the (R134a + R290) system at measured temperatures.

  20. Experimental measurement of vapor pressures and (vapor + liquid) equilibrium for {l_brace}1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (R134a) + propane (R290){r_brace} by a recirculation apparatus with view windows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong Xueqiang [Key Laboratory of Cryogenics, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2711, Beijing 100190 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Gong Maoqiong, E-mail: gongmq@mail.ipc.ac.c [Key Laboratory of Cryogenics, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2711, Beijing 100190 (China); Liu Junsheng [Key Laboratory of Cryogenics, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2711, Beijing 100190 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Wu Jianfeng, E-mail: jfwu@mail.ipc.ac.c [Key Laboratory of Cryogenics, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2711, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2011-03-15

    The saturated vapor pressures of 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (R134a) and propane (R290), and the (vapor + liquid) equilibrium (VLE) data at (255.000, 265.000, 275.000, and 285.000) K for the (R134a + R290) system were measured by a recirculation apparatus with view windows. The uncertainty of the temperatures, pressures, and compositions are less than {+-}5 mK, {+-}0.0005 MPa, and {+-}0.005, respectively. The saturated vapor pressures data were correlated by a Wagner type equation and compared with the reference data. The binary VLE data were correlated with the Peng-Robinson equation of state (PR EoS) incorporating the Huron-Vidal (HV) mixing rule utilizing the nonrandom two-liquid (NRTL) activity coefficient model. For mixtures, the maximum average absolute relative deviation of pressure is 0.15%, while the maximum average absolute deviation of vapor phase mole fraction is 0.0045. Azeotropic behavior can be found for the (R134a + R290) system at measured temperatures.

  1. Nitrous oxide and global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroeze, C.

    1994-01-01

    The climatic impact of nitrous oxide (N 2 O) emissions is calculated annually for the period 1900-2100, using a globally averaged computer model. Emissions of N 2 O have been increasing up top an estimated 12.7 Tg N/year in 1990 by human activities and global warming. If the current trends continue, emissions are estimated to be 25.7 Tg N/year by 2100, with fossil-fuel use and human food production as major contributors. The resulting equilibrium temperature increase (0.37 degree C) exceeds the forcing derived from climate goals that may be considered environmentally desirable. Limiting equilibrium warming to 0.1 degree C per decade would require anthropogenic-induced and warming-induced N 2 O emissions to be reduced by 80% relative to current trends and to be stabilized from 2050, so that 10.7 Tg N/year is emitted by 2100. To stabilize the current concentration or climate forcing of N 2 , substantially larger cuts are needed. However, even in an optimistic scenario, emissions keep increasing up to 14.4. Tg N/year by 2100. A major reason is the close connection between N 2 O emissions and human food production. Synthetic fertilizer use, land-use change, and production of manure increase almost inevitably as the human population grows. Thus if global warming is to be limited to 0.1 degree C per decade it may be necessary to set emission reductions for other greenhouse gases relatively high to compensate for growth in climatic forcing by N 2 O

  2. DFT and AIM study of the protonation of nitrous acid and the pKa of nitrous acidium ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crugeiras, Juan; Ríos, Ana; Maskill, Howard

    2011-11-10

    The gas phase and aqueous thermochemistry, NMR chemical shifts, and the topology of chemical bonding of nitrous acid (HONO) and nitrous acidium ion (H(2)ONO(+)) have been investigated by ab initio methods using density functional theory. By the same methods, the dissociation of H(2)ONO(+) to give the nitrosonium ion (NO(+)) and water has also been investigated. We have used Becke's hybrid functional (B3LYP), and geometry optimizations were performed with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. In addition, highly accurate ab initio composite methods (G3 and CBS-Q) were used. Solvation energies were calculated using the conductor-like polarizable continuum model, CPCM, at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory, with the UAKS cavity model. The pK(a) value of H(2)ONO(+) was calculated using two different schemes: the direct method and the proton exchange method. The calculated pK(a) values at different levels of theory range from -9.4 to -15.6, showing that H(2)ONO(+) is a strong acid (i.e., HONO is only a weak base). The equilibrium constant, K(R), for protonation of nitrous acid followed by dissociation to give NO(+) and H(2)O has also been calculated using the same methodologies. The pK(R) value calculated by the G3 and CBS-QB3 methods is in best (and satisfactory) agreement with experimental results, which allows us to narrow down the likely value of the pK(a) of H(2)ONO(+) to about -10, a value appreciably more acidic than literature values.

  3. Nitrous oxide emissions from European agriculture - an analysis of variability and drivers of emissions from field experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rees, R M; Agustin, J; Alberti, G

    2013-01-01

    Nitrous oxide emissions from a network of agricultural experiments in Europe were used to explore the relative importance of site and management controls of emissions. At each site, a selection of management interventions were compared within replicated experimental designs in plot-based experime......Nitrous oxide emissions from a network of agricultural experiments in Europe were used to explore the relative importance of site and management controls of emissions. At each site, a selection of management interventions were compared within replicated experimental designs in plot...

  4. Chemical dosimetry of linac electron pulse with nitrous oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanba, Hideki; Shinsaka, Kyoji; Hatano, Yoshihiko; Yagi, Masuo; Shiokawa, Takanobu.

    1975-01-01

    Absorption dose, dose rate and the reproducibility of intensity in each pulse of the electron beam pulses from a Linac (42 MeV, 3μsec) have been determined by applying nitrous oxide chemical dosimetry, in order to obtain the fundamental data required for radiation chemistry researches with the Linac. Nitrous oxide is used as a chemical dosimeter because it is known that it decomposed through radiation ensures easy detection and the determination of quantity of the decomposed product, nitrogen, which is stable, and presents linear relationship between absorption dose and produced quantity over the wide dose-rate range. Irradiation cells used for the experiment were cylindrical ones made of hard molybdenum glass. Irradiated samples were fractionated with liquid nitrogen, and separated and determined with a gas chromatograph. Details on the experimental results and their examination are described at the end. They include absorption dose of 1x10 16 eV/g per pulse, dose rate of 3x10 21 eV/g, sec and intensity reproducibility of +- 20%. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  5. CHARACTERIZATION OF NITROUS OXIDE EMISSION SOURCES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report presents a global inventory of nitrous oxide (N2O) based on reevaluation of previous estimates and additions of previously uninventoried source categories. (NOTE: N2O is both a greenhouse gas and a precursor of nitric oxide (NO) which destroys stratospheric ozone.) The...

  6. NITROUS OXIDE EMISSIONS FROM FOSSIL FUEL COMBUSTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The role of coal combustion as a significant global source of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions was reexamined through on-line emission measurements from six pulverized-coal-fired utility boilers and from laboratory and pilot-scale combustors. The full-scale utility boilers yielded d...

  7. Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Waste Incineration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svoboda, Karel; Baxter, D.; Martinec, J.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 1 (2006), s. 78-90 ISSN 0366-6352 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4072201 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : nitrous oxide * waste * incineration Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 0.360, year: 2006

  8. Recreational nitrous oxide use: Prevalence and risks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Amsterdam, Jan; Nabben, Ton; van den Brink, Wim

    2015-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O; laughing gas) is clinically used as a safe anesthetic (dentistry, ambulance, childbirth) and appreciated for its anti-anxiety effect. Since five years, recreational use of N2O is rapidly increasing especially in the dance and festival scene. In the UK, N2O is the second most

  9. Nitrous oxide emissions of energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinnunen, L.

    1998-01-01

    The share of energy production of the world-wide total N 2 O emissions is about 10 %. In 1991 the N 2 O emissions estimated to be up to 30 %. The previous estimates based on incorrect measurements. The measurement methods have been improved during the past few years. The present measurements have shown that the share of the combustion of fossil fuels is about 2.0 % and the share biomass combustion about 5.0 % of the total. The uncertainty of the values can be few percentage units. According to the present measurements the share of natural emissions and the fertilizers of the total N 2 O emissions is up to 60 %. The formation of nitrous oxide has been studied widely in various countries in the world. In Finland nitrous oxide has been studied in the national LIEKKI research programme. As a result of the research carried out in the programme it has been possible to reduce the formation of N 2 O by using appropriate catalysts and combustion technologies. Nitrous oxide is formed e.g. in fluidized-bed combustion of nitrogen containing fuels. The combustion temperature of other combustion methods is so high that the gas disintegrates in the furnace. By the new methods the nitrous oxide emissions of the fluidized-bed combustion has been possible to reduce from 100-200 ppm to the level less than 50 ppm of the flue gas volume. The Japanese research has shown that the nitrous oxide emissions of bubbling beds vary in between 58 - 103 ppm, but when combusting paper the emissions are 6 - 29 ppm. The corresponding value of circulating fluidized beds is 40 - 153 ppm

  10. Experimental Line List of Water Vapor Absorption Lines in the Spectral Ranges 1850 - 2280 CM-1 and 2390-4000 CM-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loos, Joep; Birk, Manfred; Wagner, Georg

    2017-06-01

    A new experimental line parameter list of water vapor absorption lines in the spectral ranges 1850 - 2280 cm-1 and 2390 - 4000 cm-1 is presented. The line list is based on the analysis of several transmittance spectra measured using a Bruker IFS 125 HR high resolution Fourier transform spectrometer. A total of 54 measurements of pure water and water/air-mixtures at 296 K as well as water/air-mixtures at high and low temperatures were performed. A multispectrum fitting approach was used applying a quadratic speed-dependent hard collision line shape model in the Hartmann-Tran implementation extended to account for line mixing in the Rosenkranz approximation in order to retrieve line positions, intensities, self- and air-broadening parameters, their speed-dependence, self- and air-shifts as well as line mixing and in some cases collisional narrowing parameters. Additionally, temperature dependence parameters for widths, shifts and in a few cases line mixing were retrieved. For every parameter an extensive error estimation calculation was performed identifying and specifying systematic error sources. The resulting parameters are compared to the databases HITRAN12 as well as experimental values. For intensities, a detailed comparison to results of recent ab initio calculations performed at University College London was done showing an agreement within 2 % for a majority of the data. However, for some bands there are systematic deviations attributed to ab initio calculation errors. .H. Ngo et al. JQSRT 129, 89-100 (2013) doi:10.1016/j.jqsrt.2013.05.034; JQSRT 134, 105 (2014) doi:10.1016/j.jqsrt.2013.10.016. H. Tran et al. JQSRT 129, 199-203 (2013) doi:10.1016/j.jqsrt.2013.06.015; JQSRT 134, 104 (2014) doi:10.1016/j.jqsrt.2013.10.015. L.S. Rothman et al. JQSRT 130, 4-50 (2013) doi:10.1016/j.jqsrt.2013.07.002. N. Jacquinet-Husson et al. JMS 112, 2395-2445 (2016) doi:10.1016/j.jms.2016.06.007.

  11. Nitrous oxide and nitrate concentration in under-drainage from arable fields subject to diffuse pollution mitigation measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hama-Aziz, Zanist; Hiscock, Kevin; Adams, Christopher; Reid, Brian

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric nitrous oxide concentrations are increasing by 0.3% annually and a major source of this greenhouse gas is agriculture. Indirect emissions of nitrous oxide (e.g. from groundwater and surface water) account for about quarter of total nitrous oxide emissions. However, these indirect emissions are subject to uncertainty, mainly due to the range in reported emission factors. It's hypothesised in this study that cover cropping and implementing reduced (direct drill) cultivation in intensive arable systems will reduce dissolved nitrate concentration and subsequently indirect nitrous oxide emissions. To test the hypothesis, seven fields with a total area of 102 ha in the Wensum catchment in eastern England have been chosen for experimentation together with two fields (41 ha) under conventional cultivation (deep inversion ploughing) for comparison. Water samples from field under-drainage have been collected for nitrate and nitrous oxide measurement on a weekly basis from April 2013 for two years from both cultivation areas. A purge and trap preparation line connected to a Shimadzu GC-8A gas chromatograph fitted with an electron capture detector was used for dissolved nitrous oxide analysis. Results revealed that with an oilseed radish cover crop present, the mean concentration of nitrate, which is the predominant form of N, was significantly depleted from 13.9 mg N L-1 to 2.5 mg N L-1. However, slightly higher mean nitrous oxide concentrations under the cover crop of 2.61 μg N L-1 compared to bare fields of 2.23 μg N L-1 were observed. Different inversion intensity of soil tended to have no effect on nitrous oxide and nitrate concentrations. The predominant production mechanism for nitrous oxide was nitrification process and the significant reduction of nitrate was due to plant uptake rather than denitrification. It is concluded that although cover cropping might cause a slight increase of indirect nitrous oxide emission, it can be a highly effective

  12. Amorphous and crystalline aerosol particles interacting with water vapor: conceptual framework and experimental evidence for restructuring, phase transitions and kinetic limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Koop

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Interactions with water are crucial for the properties, transformation and climate effects of atmospheric aerosols. Here we present a conceptual framework for the interaction of amorphous aerosol particles with water vapor, outlining characteristic features and differences in comparison to crystalline particles. We used a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (H-TDMA to characterize the hydration and dehydration of crystalline ammonium sulfate, amorphous oxalic acid and amorphous levoglucosan particles (diameter ~100 nm, relative humidity 5–95% at 298 K. The experimental data and accompanying Köhler model calculations provide new insights into particle microstructure, surface adsorption, bulk absorption, phase transitions and hygroscopic growth. The results of these and related investigations lead to the following conclusions:

    (1 Many organic substances, including carboxylic acids, carbohydrates and proteins, tend to form amorphous rather than crystalline phases upon drying of aqueous solution droplets. Depending on viscosity and microstructure, the amorphous phases can be classified as glasses, rubbers, gels or viscous liquids.

    (2 Amorphous organic substances tend to absorb water vapor and undergo gradual deliquescence and hygroscopic growth at lower relative humidity than their crystalline counterparts.

    (3 In the course of hydration and dehydration, certain organic substances can form rubber- or gel-like structures (supramolecular networks and undergo transitions between swollen and collapsed network structures.

    (4 Organic gels or (semi-solid amorphous shells (glassy, rubbery, ultra-viscous with low molecular diffusivity can kinetically limit the uptake and release of water and may influence the hygroscopic growth and activation of aerosol particles as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN and ice nuclei (IN. Moreover, (semi-solid amorphous phases may influence the uptake of gaseous photo

  13. Mobile vapor recovery and vapor scavenging unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stokes, C.A.; Steppe, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a mobile anti- pollution apparatus, for the recovery of hydrocarbon emissions. It comprises a mobile platform upon which is mounted a vapor recovery unit for recovering vapors including light hydrocarbons, the vapor recovery unit having an inlet and an outlet end, the inlet end adapted for coupling to an external source of hydrocarbon vapor emissions to recover a portion of the vapors including light hydrocarbons emitted therefrom, and the outlet end adapted for connection to a means for conveying unrecovered vapors to a vapor scavenging unit, the vapor scavenging unit comprising an internal combustion engine adapted for utilizing light hydrocarbon in the unrecovered vapors exiting from the vapor recovery unit as supplemental fuel

  14. Nitrous oxide-based techniques versus nitrous oxide-free techniques for general anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rao; Jia, Wen Qin; Zhang, Peng; Yang, KeHu; Tian, Jin Hui; Ma, Bin; Liu, Yali; Jia, Run H; Luo, Xiao F; Kuriyama, Akira

    2015-11-06

    Nitrous oxide has been used for over 160 years for the induction and maintenance of general anaesthesia. It has been used as a sole agent but is most often employed as part of a technique using other anaesthetic gases, intravenous agents, or both. Its low tissue solubility (and therefore rapid kinetics), low cost, and low rate of cardiorespiratory complications have made nitrous oxide by far the most commonly used general anaesthetic. The accumulating evidence regarding adverse effects of nitrous oxide administration has led many anaesthetists to question its continued routine use in a variety of operating room settings. Adverse events may result from both the biological actions of nitrous oxide and the fact that to deliver an effective dose, nitrous oxide, which is a relatively weak anaesthetic agent, needs to be given in high concentrations that restrict oxygen delivery (for example, a common mixture is 30% oxygen with 70% nitrous oxide). As well as the risk of low blood oxygen levels, concerns have also been raised regarding the risk of compromising the immune system, impaired cognition, postoperative cardiovascular complications, bowel obstruction from distention, and possible respiratory compromise. To determine if nitrous oxide-based anaesthesia results in similar outcomes to nitrous oxide-free anaesthesia in adults undergoing surgery. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014 Issue 10); MEDLINE (1966 to 17 October 2014); EMBASE (1974 to 17 October 2014); and ISI Web of Science (1974 to 17 October 2014). We also searched the reference lists of relevant articles, conference proceedings, and ongoing trials up to 17 October 2014 on specific websites (http://clinicaltrials.gov/, http://controlled-trials.com/, and http://www.centerwatch.com). We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing general anaesthesia where nitrous oxide was part of the anaesthetic technique used for the induction or maintenance of general

  15. 78 FR 6400 - Results of FAA Nitrous Oxide BLEVE Characterization Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Results of FAA Nitrous Oxide BLEVE Characterization Testing AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of public... FAA sponsored testing of nitrous oxide (N 2 O) characteristics. Nitrous oxide is an important oxidizer...

  16. Protonated Nitrous Oxide, NNOH(+): Fundamental Vibrational Frequencies and Spectroscopic Constants from Quartic Force Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xinchuan; Fortenberry, Ryan C.; Lee, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    The interstellar presence of protonated nitrous oxide has been suspected for some time. Using established high-accuracy quantum chemical techniques, spectroscopic constants and fundamental vibrational frequencies are provided for the lower energy O-protonated isomer of this cation and its deuterated isotopologue. The vibrationally-averaged B0 and C0 rotational constants are within 6 MHz of their experimental values and the D(subJ) quartic distortion constants agree with experiment to within 3%. The known gas phase O-H stretch of NNOH(+) is 3330.91 cm(exp-1), and the vibrational configuration interaction computed result is 3330.9 cm(exp-1). Other spectroscopic constants are also provided, as are the rest of the fundamental vibrational frequencies for NNOH(+) and its deuterated isotopologue. This high-accuracy data should serve to better inform future observational or experimental studies of the rovibrational bands of protonated nitrous oxide in the ISM and the laboratory.

  17. Greenhouse effect due to atmospheric nitrous oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Y. L.; Wang, W. C.; Lacis, A. A.

    1976-01-01

    The greenhouse effect due to nitrous oxide in the present atmosphere is about 0.8 K. Increase in atmospheric N2O due to perturbation of the nitrogen cycle by man may lead to an increase in surface temperature as large as 0.5 K by 2025, or 1.0 K by 2100. Other climatic effects of N2O are briefly discussed.

  18. 饱和蒸汽压式波纹管疏水阀热动元件实验研究%Experimental study on the saturated vapor pressure type thermostatic bellows for steam traps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李树勋; 徐登伟; 把桥环

    2011-01-01

    针对液体膨胀式波纹管蒸汽疏水阀排量不稳定、漏汽率高等问题,分析波纹管热动元件的热工特性.基于Riedel蒸汽压方程和气液平衡方程,建立饱和蒸汽压式波纹管热动元件的热力学模型,设计相应实验系统,进行不同参数下的实验研究.结果表明,饱和蒸汽压式波纹管热动元件伸长量是相变温度的单值函数,近似呈指数关系;采用不同混合比、刚度及填充方式,可调节疏水阀的排水过冷度.%In view of the instabilities of displacement and high steam leakage rate for the liquid-expansion type ther-mostatic bellows steam traps, thermodynamic characteristical of thermostatic bellows was analyzed. Based on the Riedel equation and the vapor-liquid equilibrium equation, thermodynamic model of the saturated vapor pressure type thermostatic bellows was set up, corresponding experimental system was designed, and experimental studies with different parameters was carried out. The experimental results agree well with the theoretical analysis. The results show that the elongation A/I of the saturated vapor pressure type thermostatic bellows is monodrome function of phase transition temperature T, and relationship between the elongation A/I and the phase change temperature t is an exponential function. The subcooled temperature of steam trap can be adjusted by using different mixture ratio, different bellows' stiffness and different sufficient attire method. This paper establishes theoretical and experimental foundation for improving the performance of thermostatic bellows steam traps.

  19. Successful use of nitrous oxide during lumbar punctures: A call for nitrous oxide in pediatric oncology clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, Mylynda; Lawell, Miranda; McAllister, Nancy

    2017-11-01

    Numerous reports describe the successful use of nitrous oxide for analgesia in children undergoing painful procedures. Although shown to be safe, effective, and economical, nitrous oxide use is not yet common in pediatric oncology clinics and few reports detail its effectiveness for children undergoing repeated lumbar punctures. We developed a nitrous oxide clinic, and undertook a review of pediatric oncology lumbar puncture records for those patients receiving nitrous oxide in 2011. No major complications were noted. Minor complications were noted in 2% of the procedures. We offer guidelines for establishing such a clinic. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Petroleum Vapor Intrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    One type of vapor intrusion is PVI, in which vapors from petroleum hydrocarbons such as gasoline, diesel, or jet fuel enter a building. Intrusion of contaminant vapors into indoor spaces is of concern.

  1. Nitrous oxide emissions from fertilized soil: Can we manage it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cropped fields in the upper Midwest have the potential to emit nitrous oxide (N2O) and nitric oxide (NO) gases resulting from soil transformation of nitrogen (N) fertilizers applied to crops such as corn and potatoes. Nitrous oxide is a potent greenhouse and also an important in ozone depleting che...

  2. Nitrous oxide emission from soils amended with crop residues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velthof, G.L.; Kuikman, P.J.; Oenema, O.

    2002-01-01

    Crop residues incorporated in soil are a potentially important source of nitrous oxide (N2O), though poorly quantified. Here, we report on the N2O emission from 10 crop residues added to a sandy and a clay soil, both with and without additional nitrate (NO3-). In the sandy soil, total nitrous oxide

  3. NITROUS OXIDE CONCENTRATIONS IN SMALL STREAMS OF THE GEORGIA PIEDMONT

    Science.gov (United States)

    We are measuring the dissolved nitrous oxide concentration in 17 headwater streams in the South Fork Broad River, Georgia watershed on a monthly basis. The selected small streams drain watersheds dominated by forest, pasture, developed, or mixed land uses. Nitrous oxide concentr...

  4. Catalytic abatement of nitrous oxide from nitric and production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oonk, J.

    1998-01-01

    Nitric acid production is identified as a main source of nitrous oxide. Options for emission reduction however are not available. TNO and Hydro Agri studied the technological and economic feasibility of catalytic decomposition of nitrous oxide in nitric acid tail-gases. Although in literature

  5. Determination of emissions of methane and nitrous oxide in rice plantations in Guanacaste, Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Herrera

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Methane and nitrous oxide emissions fluxes were measured in 10 rice plantations located in Liberia, Guanacaste, working at least with 04 varieties of rice and two types of soil in the period August 2012 - April 2013. For the determination of flows static camera technique were used taking four air gas samples located in the headspace of the chamber using a plastic syringe of 12 ml at 0, 10, 20 and 30 min after camera location. The gas samples were analyzed with a gas chromatograph, equipped with FID and ECD. Averages of flow methane and nitrous oxide were recorded between 0,12 to 1,9 kg ha-1d-1 and 0,11 - 1,1 mg ha-1d-1, respectively, and no significant difference was found (p < 0,05 in the values between different rice varieties and soil types subject experimental design.

  6. Laryngospasm With Apparent Aspiration During Sedation With Nitrous Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babl, Franz E; Grindlay, Joanne; Barrett, Michael Joseph

    2015-11-01

    Nitrous oxide and oxygen mixture has become increasingly popular for the procedural sedation and analgesia of children in the emergency department. In general, nitrous oxide is regarded as a very safe agent according to large case series. We report a case of single-agent nitrous oxide sedation of a child, complicated by laryngospasm and radiographically confirmed bilateral upper lobe pulmonary opacities. Although rarely reported with parenteral sedative agents, laryngospasm and apparent aspiration has not been previously reported in isolated nitrous oxide sedation. This case highlights that, similar to other sedative agents, nitrous oxide administration also needs to be conducted by staff and in settings in which airway emergencies can be appropriately managed. Copyright © 2015 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Dose-response and concentration-response relation of rocuronium infusion during propofol nitrous oxide and isoflurane nitrous oxide anaesthesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kansanaho, M; Olkkola, KT; Wierda, JMKH

    The dose-response and concentration-response relation of rocuronium infusion was studied in 20 adult surgical patients during proporfol-nitrous oxide and isoflurane (1 MAC) -nitrous oxide anaesthesia. Neuromuscular block was kept constant, initially at 90% and then at 50% with a closed-loop feedback

  8. Active sites in Fe/ZSM-5 for nitrous oxide decomposition and benzene hydroxylation with nitrous oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, K.; Xia, H.; Feng, Z.; Santen, van R.A.; Hensen, E.J.M.; Li, Can

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the iron content and the pretreatment conditions of Fe/ZSM-5 catalysts on the Fe speciation and the catalytic activities in nitrous oxide decomposition and benzene hydroxylation with nitrous oxide has been investigated. Iron-containing ZSM-5 zeolites with varying iron content (Fe/Al =

  9. Biochar and soil nitrous oxide emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Francisco Brazão Vieira Alho

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of biochar application on soil nitrous oxide emissions. The experiment was carried out in pots under greenhouse conditions. Four levels of ground commercial charcoal of 2 mm (biochar were evaluated in a sandy Albaqualf (90% of sand: 0, 3, 6, and 9 Mg ha-1. All treatments received 100 kg ha-1 of N as urea. A cubic effect of biochar levels was observed on the N2O emissions. Biochar doses above 5 Mg ha-1 started to mitigate the emissions in the evaluated soil. However, lower doses promote the emissions.

  10. Management matters: Testing a mitigation strategy of nitrous oxide emissions on managed grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Kathrin; Hörtnagl, Lukas; Eugster, Werner; Koller, Patrick; Käslin, Florian; Merbold, Lutz

    2017-04-01

    The magnitude of greenhouse gas (GHG) exchange between managed grasslands and the atmosphere depends besides climate predominantly on management practices. While natural or extensively managed grasslands are known to function as GHG sinks, intensively managed grasslands are characterized by substantial nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions diminishing their sink function. One potential N2O mitigation strategy is to reduce the required amount of nitrogen (N) fertilizer input by using biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) via legumes. However, the effect of legumes on nitrous oxide emissions is still not fully understood. In this study we quantify net GHG fluxes from two differently managed grassland parcels (mitigation, control) and relate our results to productivity (yields). In addition, we aim at revealing the influence of various driver variables on N2O exchange. Our experimental setup consisted of an eddy covariance tower that measured the net exchange of the three major anthropogenic GHGs, nitrous oxide (N2O), methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2). Both grassland parcels can be covered with this tower due to two prevailing wind directions. GHG flux measurements were accompanied by measurements of commonly known driver variables such as water filled pore space, soil temperature, soil oxygen concentrations and mineral N to disentangle the soil meteorological influence of N2O fluxes from human drivers. Following organic fertilizer application, we measured elevated N2O emissions (>1 nmol m-2 s-1) at the control parcel and unchanged N2O emissions at the treatment parcel. Net annual fluxes were 54% and 50% lower at the experimental parcel in 2015 and 2016, respectively. Annual yields did not significantly differ between parcels, but were slightly lower at the experimental parcel compared to the control parcel. Significantly lower nitrous oxide fluxes under experimental management indicate that nitrous oxide emissions can be effectively reduced at very low costs with a clover

  11. Simulation of nitrous oxide effluxes, crop yields and soil physical properties using the LandscapeDNDC model in managed ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyckowiak, Jedrzej; Lesny, Jacek; Haas, Edwin; Juszczak, Radoslaw; Kiese, Ralf; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Olejnik, Janusz

    2014-05-01

    Modeling of nitrous oxide emissions from soil is very complex. Many different biological and chemical processes take place in soils which determine the amount of emitted nitrous oxide. Additionaly, biogeochemical models contain many detailed factors which may determine fluxes and other simulated variables. We used the LandscapeDNDC model in order to simulate N2O emissions, crop yields and soil physical properties from mineral cultivated soils in Poland. Nitrous oxide emissions from soils were modeled for fields with winter wheat, winter rye, spring barley, triticale, potatoes and alfalfa crops. Simulations were carried out for the plots of the Brody arable experimental station of Poznan University of Life Science in western Poland and covered the period 2003 - 2012. The model accuracy and its efficiency was determined by comparing simulations result with measurements of nitrous oxide emissions (measured with static chambers) from about 40 field campaigns. N2O emissions are strongly dependent on temperature and soil water content, hence we compared also simulated soil temperature at 10cm depth and soil water content at the same depth with the daily measured values of these driving variables. We compared also simulated yield quantities for each individual experimental plots with yield quantities which were measured in the period 2003-2012. We conclude that the LandscapeDNDC model is capable to simulate soil N2O emissions, crop yields and physical properties of soil with satisfactorily good accuracy and efficiency.

  12. Photo release of nitrous oxide from the hyponitrite ion studied by infrared spectroscopy. Evidence for the generation of a cobalt-N2O complex. Experimental and DFT calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacón Villalba, M Elizabeth; Franca, Carlos A; Güida, Jorge A

    2017-04-05

    The solid state photolysis of sodium, silver and thallium hyponitrite (M 2 N 2 O 2 , M=Na, Ag, Tl) salts and a binuclear complex of cobalt bridged by hyponitrite ([Co(NH 3 ) 5 -N(O)-NO-Co(NH 3 ) 5 ] 4+ ) were studied by irradiation with visible and UV light in the electronic absorption region. The UV-visible spectra for free hyponitrite ion and binuclear complex of cobalt were interpreted in terms of Density Functional Theory calculations in order to explain photolysis behavior. The photolysis of each compound depends selectively on the irradiation wavelength. Irradiation with 340-460nm light and with the 488nm laser line generates photolysis only in silver and thallium hyponitrite salts, while 253.7nm light photolyzed all the studied compounds. Infrared spectroscopy was used to follow the photolysis process and to identify the generated products. Remarkably, gaseous N 2 O was detected after photolysis in the infrared spectra of sodium, silver, and thallium hyponitrite KBr pellets. The spectra for [Co(NH 3 ) 5 -N(O)-NO-Co(NH 3 ) 5 ] 4+ suggest that one cobalt ion remains bonded to N 2 O from which the generation of a [(NH 3 ) 5 CoNNO] +3 complex is inferred. Density Functional Theory (DFT) based calculations confirm the stability of this last complex and provide the theoretical data which are used in the interpretation of the electronic spectra of the hyponitrite ion and the cobalt binuclear complex and thus in the elucidation of their photolysis behavior. Carbonate ion is also detected after photolysis in all studied compounds, presumably due to the reaction of atmospheric CO 2 with the microcrystal surface reaction products. Kinetic measurements for the photolysis of the binuclear complex suggest a first order law for the intensity decay of the hyponitrite IR bands and for the intensity increase in the N 2 O generation. Predicted and experimental data are in very good agreement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. (abstract) Experimental and Modeling Studies of the Exchange Current at the Alkali Beta'-Alumina/Porous Electrode/Alkali Metal Vapor Three Phase Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M. A.; Underwood, M. L.; O'Connor, D.; Kikkert, S.

    1993-01-01

    The microscopic mechanism of the alkali ion-electron recombination reaction at the three phase boundary zone formed by a porous metal electrode in the alkali vapor on the surface of an alkali beta'-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) ceramic has been studied by comparison of the expected rates for the three simplest reaction mechanisms with known temperature dependent rate data; and the physical parameters of typical porous metal electrode/BASE/alkali metal vapor reaction zones. The three simplest reactions are tunneling of electrons from the alkali coated electrode to a surface bound alkali metal ion; emission of an electron from the electrode with subsequent capture by a surface bound alkali metal ion; and thermal emission of an alkali cation from the BASE and its capture on the porous metal electrode surface where it may recombine with an electron. Only the first reaction adequately accounts for both the high observed rate and its temperature dependence. New results include crude modeling of simple, one step, three phase, solid/solid/gas electrochemical reaction.

  14. Nitrous oxide emissions at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martikainen, P.J.

    2002-01-01

    Microbial processes in soil are generally stimulated by temperature, but at low temperatures there are anomalies in the response of microbial activities. Soil physical-chemical characteristics allow existence of unfrozen water in soil also at temperatures below zero. Therefore, some microbial activities, including those responsible for nitrous oxide (N 2 0) production, can take place even in 'frozen' soil. Nitrous oxide emissions during winter are important even in boreal regions where they can account for more than 50% of the annual emissions. Snow pack therefore has great importance for N 2 0 emissions, as it insulates soil from the air allowing higher temperatures in soil than in air, and possible changes in snoav cover as a result of global warming would thus affect the N 2 0 emission from northern soils. Freezing-thawing cycles highly enhance N 2 0 emissions from soil, probably because microbial nutrients, released from disturbed soil aggregates and lysed microbial cells, support microbial N 2 0 production. However, the overall interactions between soil physics, chemistry, microbiology and N 2 0 production at low temperatures, including effects of freezing-thawing cycles, are still poorly known. (au)

  15. Nitrous Oxide/Paraffin Hybrid Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrin, Robert; Snyder, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Nitrous oxide/paraffin (N2OP) hybrid rocket engines have been invented as alternatives to other rocket engines especially those that burn granular, rubbery solid fuels consisting largely of hydroxyl- terminated polybutadiene (HTPB). Originally intended for use in launching spacecraft, these engines would also be suitable for terrestrial use in rocket-assisted takeoff of small airplanes. The main novel features of these engines are (1) the use of reinforced paraffin as the fuel and (2) the use of nitrous oxide as the oxidizer. Hybrid (solid-fuel/fluid-oxidizer) rocket engines offer advantages of safety and simplicity over fluid-bipropellant (fluid-fuel/fluid-oxidizer) rocket en - gines, but the thrusts of HTPB-based hybrid rocket engines are limited by the low regression rates of the fuel grains. Paraffin used as a solid fuel has a regression rate about 4 times that of HTPB, but pure paraffin fuel grains soften when heated; hence, paraffin fuel grains can, potentially, slump during firing. In a hybrid engine of the present type, the paraffin is molded into a 3-volume-percent graphite sponge or similar carbon matrix, which supports the paraffin against slumping during firing. In addition, because the carbon matrix material burns along with the paraffin, engine performance is not appreciably degraded by use of the matrix.

  16. Use of Nitrous Oxide in Dermatology: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotzman, Erica A; Sandoval, Laura F; Crane, Jonathan

    2018-05-01

    Many dermatologic procedures are painful and can be distressing to patients. To determine whether nitrous oxide has been used in dermatology and whether literature supports its use in terms of providing analgesia and anxiety associated with dermatologic procedures. A search of PubMed and Cochrane databases was conducted through July 15, 2016, to identify studies involving nitrous oxide use in dermatology. Eight studies were identified and reviewed. The use of nitrous oxide/oxygen mixture resulted in a significant reduction in pain when used for photodynamic therapy, botulinum toxin therapy for hyperhidrosis of both the palms and axilla, aesthetic procedures involving various laser procedures, and in the treatment of bed sores and leg ulcers. However, pain scores were higher when nitrous oxide/oxygen was used in the debridement of chronic ulcers when compared with the use of topical anesthesia. In addition, nitrous oxide has been reported effective at reducing pain in hair transplants, dermabrasion, excision and repairs, and pediatric procedures. Current literature provides some evidence that nitrous oxide, used alone or as adjunct anesthesia, is effective at providing analgesia for many dermatologic procedures. Nitrous oxide has many potential applications in dermatology; however, further evidence from randomized controlled trials is needed.

  17. Exposure of nitrous oxide to X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagida, H.

    1980-01-01

    A study was performed to determine how much NO and NO 2 is produced when nitrous oxide is exposed to X-radiation. Polyethylene bottles filled with either nitrous oxide alone or with nitrous oxide and 30% oxygen were placed 30 cm from the X-ray tube at a standard X-ray beam setting for chest fluoroscopy for 0 to 5 minutes. In the bottles filled with nitrous oxide alone, the production of NO was not affected by the duration of X-ray exposure, but the longer duration of X-ray exposure produced a larger amount of NO 2 . In the bottles filled with nitrous oxide and 30% oxygen, the longer duration of X-ray exposure produced larger amounts of both NO and NO 2 . These findings confirmed a previous investigation in which nitrous oxide was not inert under X-ray exposure. As the presence of oxygen plays an important role in the oxidation of nitrous oxide under X-ray exposure, this study suggests another potentially hazardous interaction that may occur secondary to the administration of an anaesthetic in the presence of X-irradiation as in pulmonary angiography, cardiac catheterisation, and fluoroscopic bronchoscopy or biopsy. (author)

  18. Nitrous oxide-induced slow and delta oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavone, Kara J; Akeju, Oluwaseun; Sampson, Aaron L; Ling, Kelly; Purdon, Patrick L; Brown, Emery N

    2016-01-01

    Switching from maintenance of general anesthesia with an ether anesthetic to maintenance with high-dose (concentration >50% and total gas flow rate >4 liters per minute) nitrous oxide is a common practice used to facilitate emergence from general anesthesia. The transition from the ether anesthetic to nitrous oxide is associated with a switch in the putative mechanisms and sites of anesthetic action. We investigated whether there is an electroencephalogram (EEG) marker of this transition. We retrospectively studied the ether anesthetic to nitrous oxide transition in 19 patients with EEG monitoring receiving general anesthesia using the ether anesthetic sevoflurane combined with oxygen and air. Following the transition to nitrous oxide, the alpha (8-12 Hz) oscillations associated with sevoflurane dissipated within 3-12 min (median 6 min) and were replaced by highly coherent large-amplitude slow-delta (0.1-4 Hz) oscillations that persisted for 2-12 min (median 3 min). Administration of high-dose nitrous oxide is associated with transient, large amplitude slow-delta oscillations. We postulate that these slow-delta oscillations may result from nitrous oxide-induced blockade of major excitatory inputs (NMDA glutamate projections) from the brainstem (parabrachial nucleus and medial pontine reticular formation) to the thalamus and cortex. This EEG signature of high-dose nitrous oxide may offer new insights into brain states during general anesthesia. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Dentists' and Parents' Attitude Toward Nitrous Oxide Use in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkandari, Sarah A; Almousa, Fatemah; Abdulwahab, Mohammad; Boynes, Sean G

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the attitude of dentists in Kuwait toward the use of nitrous oxide sedation as a behavior management technique (BMT) for pediatric patients and assess their training in nitrous oxide sedation. In addition, we assessed parents' knowledge of and attitude toward the use of nitrous oxide as a BMT for their children. The objective was to determine if nitrous oxide sedation is being provided and utilized as a means to enhance dental care for pediatric patients. A cross-sectional survey was randomly distributed to both groups of interest: parents accompanying their children to the dentist and licensed dentists in Kuwait. Participants had to meet certain inclusion criteria to be included in the survey and had to complete the entire questionnaire to be part of the analysis. A total of 381 parents completed the questionnaires. The majority of parents responded that they were unaware of nitrous oxide sedation and were not aware of it as a BMT (79%). Two thirds of the parent would accept nitrous oxide sedation if recommended by a dentist treating their children. Two hundred and one dentists completed the survey and met the inclusion criteria. The majority (74.5%) of dentists were willing to use nitrous oxide as a BMT. However, only 6% were utilizing nitrous oxide sedation and providing it to their child patient if indicated. The main reasons for this huge gap are lack of facilities/equipment and lack of training as indicated by the dentists. This study showed that parents are accepting nitrous oxide sedation as a BMT for their children. It also showed the willingness of the dentists to provide such BMT to their patients. The lack of training and lack of equipment are the main barriers to providing such service to the patients. More training courses and more facilities should be provided to eliminate such barriers.

  20. Review of literature on the asymmetric collapse of vapor bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fremd, R.; Froehlich, G.

    1977-06-01

    This report contains a review of literature on the asymmetric collape of vapor bubbles by cavitation with special consideration to vapor explosions. Two numerical models, which describe the collapse of cavities in the neighbourhood of a solid surface, are presented. Moreover experimental results for this case are provided. Propositions to apply the numerical models to vapor explosions are made. (orig.) [de

  1. Experimental evidence supporting the insensitivity of cloud droplet formation to the mass accommodation coefficient for condensation of water vapor to liquid water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langridge, Justin M.; Richardson, Mathews S.; Lack, Daniel A.; Murphy, Daniel M.

    2016-06-01

    The mass accommodation coefficient for uptake of water vapor to liquid water, αM, has been constrained using photoacoustic measurements of aqueous absorbing aerosol. Measurements performed over a range of relative humidities and pressures were compared to detailed model calculations treating coupled heat and mass transfer occurring during photoacoustic laser heating cycles. The strengths and weaknesses of this technique are very different to those for droplet growth/evaporation experiments that have typically been applied to these measurements, making this a useful complement to existing studies. Our measurements provide robust evidence that αM is greater than 0.1 for all humidities tested and greater than 0.3 for data obtained at relative humidities greater than 88% where the aerosol surface was most like pure water. These values of αM are above the threshold at which kinetic limitations are expected to impact the activation and growth of aerosol particles in warm cloud formation.

  2. Quantification of Nitrous Oxide from Fugitive Emissions by Tracer Dilution Method using a Mobile Real-time Nitrous Oxide Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mønster, J.; Rella, C.; Jacobson, G. A.; He, Y.; Hoffnagle, J.; Scheutz, C.

    2012-12-01

    Nitrous oxide is a powerful greenhouse gas considered 298 times stronger than carbon dioxide on a hundred years term (Solomon et al. 2007). The increasing global concentration is of great concern and is receiving increasing attention in various scientific and industrial fields. Nitrous oxide is emitted from both natural and anthropogenic sources. Inventories of source specific fugitive nitrous oxide emissions are often estimated on the basis of modeling and mass balance. While these methods are well-developed, actual measurements for quantification of the emissions can be a useful tool for verifying the existing estimation methods as well as providing validation for initiatives targeted at lowering unwanted nitrous oxide emissions. One approach to performing such measurements is the tracer dilution method (Galle et al. 2001), in which a tracer gas is released at the source location at a known flow. The ratio of downwind concentrations of both the tracer gas and nitrous oxide gives the ratios of the emissions rates. This tracer dilution method can be done with both stationary and mobile measurements; in either case, real-time measurements of both tracer and analyte gas is required, which places high demands on the analytical detection method. To perform the nitrous oxide measurements, a novel, robust instrument capable of real-time nitrous oxide measurements has been developed, based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy and operating in the near-infrared spectral region. We present the results of the laboratory and field tests of this instrument in both California and Denmark. Furthermore, results are presented from measurements using the mobile plume method with a tracer gas (acetylene) to quantify the nitrous oxide and methane emissions from known sources such as waste water treatment plants and composting facilities. Nitrous oxide (blue) and methane (yellow) plumes downwind from a waste water treatment facility.

  3. Mass spectrometric study of Nd2S3 vaporization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenochka, B.V.

    1987-01-01

    The authors conduct a mass-spectrometric study of neodymium(III) sulfide vaporization. The chemical composition of the samples was stoichiometric and the samples were vaporized from tantalum effusion cells. When the vapor over Nd 2 S 3 is ionized by electrons the mass spectra shows monovalent cations of Nd, S, NdS, and NdO. The enthalpy of vaporization if Nd atoms from Nd 2 S 3 at average experimental temperatures and the standard enthalpy of reaction is shown. Also presented is the enthalpy of vaporization of NdS molecules from Nd 2 S 3 at average experimental temperatures and the standard enthalpy of reaction

  4. Experiences of marijuana-vaporizer users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malouff, John M; Rooke, Sally E; Copeland, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Using a marijuana vaporizer may have potential harm-reduction advantages on smoking marijuana, in that the user does not inhale smoke. Little research has been published on use of vaporizers. In the first study of individuals using a vaporizer on their own initiative, 96 adults anonymously answered questions about their experiences with a vaporizer and their use of marijuana with tobacco. Users identified 4 advantages to using a vaporizer over smoking marijuana: perceived health benefits, better taste, no smoke smell, and more effect from the same amount of marijuana. Users identified 2 disadvantages: inconvenience of setup and cleaning and the time it takes to get the device operating for each use. Only 2 individuals combined tobacco in the vaporizer mix, whereas 15 combined tobacco with marijuana when they smoked marijuana. Almost all participants intended to continue using a vaporizer. Vaporizers seem to have appeal to marijuana users, who perceive them as having harm-reduction and other benefits. Vaporizers are worthy of experimental research evaluating health-related effects of using them.

  5. Tank 241-C-111 headspace gas and vapor sample results - August 1993 samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Tank 241-C-111 is on the ferrocyanide Watch List. Gas and vapor samples were collected to assure safe conditions before planned intrusive work was performed. Sample analyses showed that hydrogen is about ten times higher in the tank headspace than in ambient air. Nitrous oxide is about sixty times higher than ambient levels. The hydrogen cyanide concentration was below 0.04 ppbv, and the average NO x concentration was 8.6 ppmv

  6. [Sedation with nitrous oxide in daily practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Luc C; Marks, Luc A

    2003-01-01

    Conscious sedation is recommended, together with behaviour management techniques, to facilitate treatment of dental fear or dental phobia patients. In this article the authors focus on inhalation sedation by means of nitrous oxide. The procedures and indications are explained and illustrated with clinical cases. On the strength of the literature and their own experience the authors reach the conclusion that Inhalation sedation is a kind of pharmacological behaviour management and an important additional tool to increase patient cooperation. Inhalation sedation can only be performed by trained practitioners under internationally accepted safety conditions. Inhalation sedation has a future in Belgium providing the appropriate law is adapted. This technique deserves a place in the dental curriculum.

  7. Retention of nitrous gases in scrubber columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazone, A.K.; Costa, R.C.; Lobao, A.S.T.; Matsuda, H.T.; Araujo, B.F. de

    1988-01-01

    During the UO 2 dissolution in nitric acid, some different species of NO (sub)x are released. The off gas can either be refluxed to the dissolver or be released and retained on special colums. The final composition of the solution is the main parameter to take in account. A process for nitrous gases retention using scrubber colums containing H 2 O or diluted HNO 3 is presented. Chemiluminescence measurement was employed to NO x evaluation before and after scrubing. Gas flow, temperature, residence time are the main parameters considered in this paper. For the dissolution of 100g UO 2 in 8M nitric acid, a 6NL/h O 2 flow was the best condition for the NO/NO 2 oxidation with maximum absorption in the scrubber columns. (author) [pt

  8. Complexation of Nitrous Oxide by Frustrated Lewis Pairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otten, Edwin; Neu, Rebecca C.; Stephan, Douglas W.

    2009-01-01

    Frustrated Lewis pairs comprised of a basic yet sterically encumbered phosphine with boron Lewis acids bind nitrous oxide to give intact PNNOB linkages. The synthesis, structure, and bonding of these species are described.

  9. Carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide in the North Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DileepKumar, M.; Naqvi, S.W.A; Jayakumar, D.A; George, M.D.; Narvekar, P.V.; DeSousa, S

    The understanding of biogeochemical cycling of carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide in the oceans is essential for predicting the fate of anthropogenically emitted components. The North Indian Ocean, with its diverse regimes, provides us with a natural...

  10. Recreational nitrous oxide use: Prevalence and risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Amsterdam, Jan; Nabben, Ton; van den Brink, Wim

    2015-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O; laughing gas) is clinically used as a safe anesthetic (dentistry, ambulance, childbirth) and appreciated for its anti-anxiety effect. Since five years, recreational use of N2O is rapidly increasing especially in the dance and festival scene. In the UK, N2O is the second most popular recreational drug after cannabis. In most countries, nitrous oxide is a legal drug that is widely available and cheap. Last month prevalence of use among clubbers and ravers ranges between 40 and almost 80 percent. Following one inhalation, mostly from a balloon, a euphoric, pleasant, joyful, empathogenic and sometimes hallucinogenic effect is rapidly induced (within 10 s) and disappears within some minutes. Recreational N2O use is generally moderate with most users taking less than 10 balloons of N2O per episode and about 80% of the users having less than 10 episodes per year. Side effects of N2O include transient dizziness, dissociation, disorientation, loss of balance, impaired memory and cognition, and weakness in the legs. When intoxicated accidents like tripping and falling may occur. Some fatal accidents have been reported due to due to asphyxia (hypoxia). Heavy or sustained use of N2O inactivates vitamin B12, resulting in a functional vitamin B12 deficiency and initially causing numbness in fingers, which may further progress to peripheral neuropathy and megaloblastic anemia. N2O use does not seem to result in dependence. Considering the generally modest use of N2O and its relative safety, it is not necessary to take legal measures. However, (potential) users should be informed about the risk of vitamin B12-deficiency related neurological and hematological effects associated with heavy use. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Nitrous oxide induced myeloneuropathy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheinboldt, Matt; Harper, Derrick; Parrish, David; Francis, Kirenza; Blase, John

    2014-02-01

    We report the case of a 35-year-old male with a history of chronic, escalating nitrous oxide abuse who presented to the ER with a history of recent onset generalized weakness, altered sensorium, abnormal posturing of the hands, urinary complaints, and decreased balance. Physical examination was notable for pathologically brisk reflexes in all extremities, generalized flexion contracture of the fingers, decreased sensation in a stocking and glove distribution, and a weakly positive Babinski sign. The patient was noted to be a poor historian with decreased attention and concentration though otherwise generally alert and oriented. No discrete sensory level in the chest or trunk was detected, and the overall clinical appearance was felt to be most compatible with a mixed myeloneuropathic pattern of central and peripheral involvement. Laboratory findings were normal and noncontributory. Cervical spine MRI subsequently performed to rule out cord compression, intrinsic spinal cord mass, or demyelinating disease was notable for a long segment of increased T2 signal extending from C2-C3 to C6-C7 localizing to the dorsal columns of the cord in a typical "inverted V" fashion. No associated cord expansion was seen nor was there evidence of extrinsic compression; faint associated contrast enhancement was observed on post-gadolinium images. Further evaluation with nerve conduction velocity and electromyographic testing was deferred. Based on the exam findings, clinical history, and presentation, a diagnosis of nitrous oxide-related myeloneuropathy was made, and treatment with high-dose vitamin B12 supplementation was instituted. Recovery has been slow to date.

  12. Nitrous oxide pollution during x-ray exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagida, Hisashi; Nakajima, Michiaki.

    1980-01-01

    X-radiation has been shown to produce NO and NO 2 in the presence of nitrous oxide. The purpose of the present study was to confirm how much NO and NO 2 was produced when constant amount of nitrous oxide was exposed by constant X-radiation. Twenty polyethylene bottles (capacity 10 litres) were filled with nitrous oxide alone. Another 20 bottles were filled with nitrous oxide and 30% oxygen. Each bottle was placed at a distance of 30 cm from X-ray tube and they were directly in the line of the X-ray beam at a setting of 90 KV at 0.5 mA, a standard setting for chest fluoroscopy. The range of duration of X-ray exposure was from 0 (control), to 2, 3, and 5 minutes in 5 bottles each, respectively. A colorimetric recording method (Saltzman) and a chemiluminescent monitor were used for measurement of NO and NO 2 . In the bottles filled with nitrous oxide alone, the production of NO was not affected by the duration of X-ray exposure, but the longer duration of X-ray exposure produced a larger amount of NO 2 . In the bottles filled with nitrous oxide and 30% oxygen, the longer duration of X-ray exposure produced larger amounts of both NO and NO 2 . These findings confirmed a previous investigation in which nitrous oxide was not inert under X-ray exposure. As the presence of oxygen plays an important role in the oxidation of nitrous oxide under X-ray, this study suggests another potentially hazardous interaction that may occur secondary to the administration of anesthetic in the presence of X-irradiation such as pulmonary angiography, cardiac catheterization, and fluoroscopic bronchoscopy or biopsy under general anesthesia. (author)

  13. Alterations in plants through action of nitrous gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristiani, H

    1927-01-01

    Leaves of plants were exposed to atmospheres containing nitrous gases typical of industrial pollution for periods ranging from 15 minutes to 18 hours. The leaves were washed after drying and concentrations of nitrates and nitrites in the leachate/wash water were determined. Accumulation of nitrites seems to be minor, but the nitrate concentration in the leaves was high, even though the leaves were exposed to an atmosphere poor in nitrous gas for periods of 9-18 hours.

  14. A heated vapor cell unit for dichroic atomic vapor laser lock in atomic rubidium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarron, Daniel J; Hughes, Ifan G; Tierney, Patrick; Cornish, Simon L

    2007-09-01

    The design and performance of a compact heated vapor cell unit for realizing a dichroic atomic vapor laser lock (DAVLL) for the D(2) transitions in atomic rubidium is described. A 5 cm long vapor cell is placed in a double-solenoid arrangement to produce the required magnetic field; the heat from the solenoid is used to increase the vapor pressure and correspondingly the DAVLL signal. We have characterized experimentally the dependence of important features of the DAVLL signal on magnetic field and cell temperature. For the weaker transitions both the amplitude and gradient of the signal are increased by an order of magnitude.

  15. A heated vapor cell unit for dichroic atomic vapor laser lock in atomic rubidium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarron, Daniel J.; Hughes, Ifan G.; Tierney, Patrick; Cornish, Simon L.

    2007-01-01

    The design and performance of a compact heated vapor cell unit for realizing a dichroic atomic vapor laser lock (DAVLL) for the D 2 transitions in atomic rubidium is described. A 5 cm long vapor cell is placed in a double-solenoid arrangement to produce the required magnetic field; the heat from the solenoid is used to increase the vapor pressure and correspondingly the DAVLL signal. We have characterized experimentally the dependence of important features of the DAVLL signal on magnetic field and cell temperature. For the weaker transitions both the amplitude and gradient of the signal are increased by an order of magnitude

  16. Enhancement of suggestibility and imaginative ability with nitrous oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalley, M G; Brooks, G B

    2009-05-01

    Imaginative suggestibility, a trait closely related to hypnotic suggestibility, is modifiable under some circumstances. Nitrous oxide (laughing gas) is commonly used for sedation in dentistry and is reported to be more effective when combined with appropriate suggestions. The aim of this study was to determine whether nitrous oxide inhalation alters imaginative suggestibility and imagery vividness. Thirty participants were tested twice in a within-subjects design, once during inhalation of 25% nitrous oxide and once during inhalation of air plus oxygen. Before the study, participants' expectancies regarding the effects of nitrous oxide were assessed. Participants were blinded to drug administration. During each session, participants were verbally administered detailed measures of imagination and suggestibility: the Sheehan-Betts Quality of Mental Imagery scale and the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale Form C, minus the hypnotic induction. Imaginative suggestibility and imaginative ability (imagery vividness) were both elevated in the nitrous oxide condition. This effect was unrelated to participants' expectations regarding the effects of the drug. Nitrous oxide increased imaginative suggestibility and imaginative ability. Possible explanations of these findings are discussed with respect to the effects of N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonists and to other pharmacological effects upon suggestibility and imagination.

  17. Nitrous oxide production associated with coastal marine invertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heisterkamp, Ines Maria; Schramm, Andreas; de Beer, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    Several freshwater and terrestrial invertebrate species emit the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O). The N2O production associated with these animals was ascribed to incomplete denitrification by ingested sediment or soil bacteria. The present study shows that many marine invertebrates also emit N2......O at substantial rates. A total of 19 invertebrate species collected in the German Wadden Sea and in Aarhus Bay, Denmark, and 1 aquacultured shrimp species were tested for N2O emission. Potential N2O emission rates ranged from 0 to 1.354 nmol ind.–1 h–1, with an average rate of 0.320 nmol ind.–1 h–1...... with an experimentally cleaned shell. Thus, the N2O production associated with marine invertebrates is apparently not due to gut denitrification in every species, but may also result from microbial activity on the external surfaces of animals. The high abundance and potential N2O emission rates of many marine...

  18. Point of net vapor generation and vapor void fraction in subcooled boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, P.; Zuber, N.

    1974-01-01

    An analysis is presented directed at predicting the point of net vapor generation and vapor void fraction in subcooled boiling. It is shown that the point of net vapor generation depends upon local conditions--thermal and fluid dynamic. Thus, at low mass flow rates the net vapor generation is determined by thermal conditions, whereas at high mass flow rates the phenomenon is hydrodynamically controlled. Simple criteria are derived which can be used to predict these local conditions for net vapor generation. These criteria are used to determine the vapor void fraction is subcooled boiling. Comparison between the results predicted by this analysis and experimental data presently available shows good agreement for wide range of operating conditions, fluids and geometries. (U.S.)

  19. Expansion of the acceptance program: nitrous oxide scavenging equipment and nitrous oxide trace gas monitoring equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-10-01

    The Acceptance Program for dental materials and devices and the general guidelines for submission of products have been reported in the Journal (88:615 March 1974). At its April 1977 meeting, the Council included equipment for scavenging and monitoring trace nitrous oxide gas in its Acceptance Program. The Council has established the effective date for classification of products under these two sets of guidelines as one year from the date of publication of this announcement. After that date, classification of a product will be required before promotion or exhibition in Association media.

  20. Nitrous Oxide Anesthesia and Plasma Homocysteine in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagele, Peter; Tallchief, Danielle; Blood, Jane; Sharma, Anshuman; Kharasch, Evan D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Nitrous oxide inactivates vitamin B12, inhibits methionine synthase and consequently increases plasma total homocysteine (tHcy). Prolonged exposure to nitrous oxide can lead to neuropathy, spinal cord degeneration and even death in children. We tested the hypothesis that nitrous oxide anesthesia causes a significant increase in plasma tHcy in children. Methods Twenty-seven children (age 10-18 years) undergoing elective major spine surgery were enrolled and serial plasma samples from 0 – 96 hours after induction were obtained. The anesthetic regimen, including the use of nitrous oxide, was at the discretion of the anesthesiologist. Plasma tHcy was measured using standard enzymatic assays. Results The median baseline plasma tHcy concentration was 5.1 μmol/L (3.9 – 8.0 μmol/L, interquartile range) and increased in all patients exposed to nitrous oxide (n=26) by an average of +9.4 μmol/L (geometric mean; 95% CI 7.1 – 12.5 μmol/L) or +228% (mean; 95% CI 178% - 279%). Plasma tHcy peaked between 6-8 hours after induction of anesthesia. One patient who did not receive nitrous oxide had no increase in plasma tHcy. Several patients experienced a several-fold increase in plasma tHcy (max. +567%). The increase in plasma tHcy was strongly correlated with the duration and average concentration of nitrous oxide anesthesia (r= 0.80; pnitrous oxide anesthesia develop significantly increased plasma tHcy concentrations. The magnitude of this effect appears to be greater compared to adults; however, the clinical relevance is unknown. PMID:21680854

  1. Nitrous oxide emissions from open-lot cattle feedyards: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrous oxide volatilization from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFO), including cattle feedyards, has become an important research topic. However, there are limitations to current measurement techniques, uncertainty in the magnitude of feedyard nitrous oxide fluxes and a lack of effective...

  2. Relationship between nitrogen cycling and nitrous oxide emission in grass-clover pasture

    OpenAIRE

    Ambus, P.

    2005-01-01

    The paper reports on a work assessing the relationship between gross N transformations in grass-clover soils and emissions of nitrous oxide. By this manner, the source strength of the biogenic processes responsible for nitrous oxide production is evaluated.

  3. Global oceanic production of nitrous oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freing, Alina; Wallace, Douglas W. R.; Bange, Hermann W.

    2012-01-01

    We use transient time distributions calculated from tracer data together with in situ measurements of nitrous oxide (N2O) to estimate the concentration of biologically produced N2O and N2O production rates in the ocean on a global scale. Our approach to estimate the N2O production rates integrates the effects of potentially varying production and decomposition mechanisms along the transport path of a water mass. We estimate that the oceanic N2O production is dominated by nitrification with a contribution of only approximately 7 per cent by denitrification. This indicates that previously used approaches have overestimated the contribution by denitrification. Shelf areas may account for only a negligible fraction of the global production; however, estuarine sources and coastal upwelling of N2O are not taken into account in our study. The largest amount of subsurface N2O is produced in the upper 500 m of the water column. The estimated global annual subsurface N2O production ranges from 3.1 ± 0.9 to 3.4 ± 0.9 Tg N yr−1. This is in agreement with estimates of the global N2O emissions to the atmosphere and indicates that a N2O source in the mixed layer is unlikely. The potential future development of the oceanic N2O source in view of the ongoing changes of the ocean environment (deoxygenation, warming, eutrophication and acidification) is discussed. PMID:22451110

  4. Nitrous oxide emissions from wastewater treatment processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Yingyu; Ye, Liu; Pan, Yuting; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2012-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from wastewater treatment plants vary substantially between plants, ranging from negligible to substantial (a few per cent of the total nitrogen load), probably because of different designs and operational conditions. In general, plants that achieve high levels of nitrogen removal emit less N2O, indicating that no compromise is required between high water quality and lower N2O emissions. N2O emissions primarily occur in aerated zones/compartments/periods owing to active stripping, and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, rather than heterotrophic denitrifiers, are the main contributors. However, the detailed mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated, despite strong evidence suggesting that both nitrifier denitrification and the chemical breakdown of intermediates of hydroxylamine oxidation are probably involved. With increased understanding of the fundamental reactions responsible for N2O production in wastewater treatment systems and the conditions that stimulate their occurrence, reduction of N2O emissions from wastewater treatment systems through improved plant design and operation will be achieved in the near future. PMID:22451112

  5. Global oceanic production of nitrous oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freing, Alina; Wallace, Douglas W R; Bange, Hermann W

    2012-05-05

    We use transient time distributions calculated from tracer data together with in situ measurements of nitrous oxide (N(2)O) to estimate the concentration of biologically produced N(2)O and N(2)O production rates in the ocean on a global scale. Our approach to estimate the N(2)O production rates integrates the effects of potentially varying production and decomposition mechanisms along the transport path of a water mass. We estimate that the oceanic N(2)O production is dominated by nitrification with a contribution of only approximately 7 per cent by denitrification. This indicates that previously used approaches have overestimated the contribution by denitrification. Shelf areas may account for only a negligible fraction of the global production; however, estuarine sources and coastal upwelling of N(2)O are not taken into account in our study. The largest amount of subsurface N(2)O is produced in the upper 500 m of the water column. The estimated global annual subsurface N(2)O production ranges from 3.1 ± 0.9 to 3.4 ± 0.9 Tg N yr(-1). This is in agreement with estimates of the global N(2)O emissions to the atmosphere and indicates that a N(2)O source in the mixed layer is unlikely. The potential future development of the oceanic N(2)O source in view of the ongoing changes of the ocean environment (deoxygenation, warming, eutrophication and acidification) is discussed.

  6. Formation of methane and nitrous oxide in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keppler, Frank; Lenhart, Katharina

    2017-04-01

    Methane, the second important anthropogenic greenhouse gas after carbon dioxide, is the most abundant reduced organic compound in the atmosphere and plays a central role in atmospheric chemistry. The global atmospheric methane budget is determined by many natural and anthropogenic terrestrial and aquatic surface sources, balanced primarily by one major sink (hydroxyl radicals) in the atmosphere. Natural sources of atmospheric methane in the biosphere have until recently been attributed to originate solely from strictly anaerobic microbial processes in wetland soils and rice paddies, the intestines of termites and ruminants, human and agricultural waste, and from biomass burning, fossil fuel mining and geological sources including mud volcanoes and seeps. However, recent studies suggested that terrestrial vegetation, fungi and mammals may also produce methane without the help of methanogens and under aerobic conditions (e.g. Keppler et al. 2009, Wang et al. 2013). These novel sources have been termed "aerobic methane production" to distinguish them from the well-known anaerobic methane production pathway. Nitrous oxide is another important greenhouse gas and major source of ozone-depleting nitric oxide. About two thirds of nitrous oxide emissions are considered to originate from anthropogenic and natural terrestrial sources, and are almost exclusively related to microbial processes in soils and sediments. However, the global nitrous oxide budget still has major uncertainties since it is unclear if all major sources have been identified but also the emission estimates of the know sources and stratospheric sink are afflicted with high uncertainties. Plants contribute, although not yet quantified, to nitrous oxide emissions either indirectly as conduits of soil derived nitrous oxide (Pihlatie et al. 2005), or directly via generation of nitrous oxide in leaves (Dean & Harper 1986) or on the leaf surface induced by UV irradiation (Bruhn et al. 2014). Moreover, lichens

  7. Simulation and Experimental Study of Photogeneration and Recombination in Amorphous-Like Silicon Thin Films Deposited by 27.12 MHz Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hsun Hsu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Amorphous-like silicon (a-Si:H-like thin films are prepared by 27.12 MHz plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique. The films are applied to p-i-n single junction thin film solar cells with varying i-layer thickness to observe the effects on the short-circuit current density, as well as the open-circuit voltage, fill factor, and conversion efficiency. The most significant experimental result is that Jsc has two different behaviors with increasing the i-layer thickness, which can be related to carrier collection efficiency in the long wavelength region. Furthermore, technology computer-aided design simulation software is used to gain better insight into carrier generation and recombination of the solar cells, showing that for the i-layer thickness of 200 to 300 nm the generation dominates the carrier density and thus Jsc, whereas for the i-layer thickness of 300 to 400 nm the recombination becomes the leading factor. The simulation results of cell performances are in good agreement with experimental data, indicating that our simulation has great reliability. In addition, the a-Si:H-like solar cells have low light-induced degradation, which in turn can have a great potential to be used for stable and high-efficiency solar cells.

  8. Sensitization of in vitro mammalian cells by nitrous oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewing, D.

    1984-01-01

    Powers and his colleagues showed almost ten years ago that sensitization by nitrous oxide required two radiolytic products: OH radicals and hydrogen peroxide. That observation with bacterial spores has been confirmed and extended with spores and several strains of bacteria. OH must be present to form hydrogen peroxide, but, in addition, OH must also be present with the hydrogen peroxide for damage to occur. (Reagent hydrogen peroxide, except at very high concentrations, will not sensitize unless OH radicals are present.) The authors have now tested nitrous oxide with two Chinese hamster cell lines, V79 and CHO. The responses in nitrogen and nitrous oxide are the same for each. The authors have tentatively concluded that insufficient hydrogen peroxide is formed in the cells' suspending fluid for damage from nitrous oxide to occur. Several results support this conclusion: reagent hydrogen peroxide is a potent sensitizer of either cell line tested in nitrogen or nitrous oxide and an assay for radiolytic hydrogen peroxide confirms that only minimal levels are formed at the doses used in these survival curves. The authors also present results of other tests to further complement work with procaryotic cells

  9. Whippits, nitrous oxide and the dangers of legal highs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Alexander G; Leite, M Isabel; Lunn, Michael P; Bennett, David L H

    2015-06-01

    Nitrous oxide is increasingly being used as a recreational drug. Prolonged use of nitrous oxide can have disabling neurological sequelae due to functional inactivation of vitamin B₁₂. We present three cases illustrating the neurological complications of using nitrous oxide. Two of these patients received nitrous oxide as a consequence of repeated hospital attendance and the third via 'Whippit' canisters used in cream dispensers, which are now widely available. Two patients developed sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy with demyelinating features with no clinical or imaging evidence of myelopathy, emphasising that not all patients develop subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord (the typical presentation of functional vitamin B12 deficiency). The diagnosis was based upon the history of nitrous oxide use and raised levels of homocysteine and/or methylmalonic acid. All patients were treated with parenteral vitamin B12 with partial recovery, though two were left significantly disabled. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. Radiolysis of dodecane--tributylphosphate and nitrous oxide solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razvi, J.

    1978-01-01

    The chemical effects of 60 Co gamma irradiation on the nuclear fuel reprocessing solvents tributylphosphate (TBP) and dodecane were studied. Nitrous oxide, with concentrations in the range 20 mM to 140 mM, was used as the standard for competition kinetics. Solutions of TBP (with electron fractions of 0.025, 0.05, 0.1 and 0.3) in dodecane were irradiated. Primary gaseous products (non-condensible at 77K) in the radiolysis were nitrogen and hydrogen. Liquid products observed were the dimer, dodecanone, dodecanol, and fragmentation products C 5 -C 11 and C 17 -C 20 . Acid products from TBP were dibutylphosphate (DBP) and monobutylphosphate (MBP). All yields were determined both as a function of TBP and nitrous oxide concentrations. Kinetic analysis of nitrogen yields from dodecane--N 2 O radiolysis gave, G(total scavengable primary species) = 6.7 molecules/100 eV. Yields of dodecane liquid products could not be analyzed quantitatively due to the complex spectrum of products. In dodecane--N 2 O solutions, the dimer showed insignificant changes in yields and product distributions, indicating formation of additional dodecyl radicals in the presence of nitrous oxide. In dodecane--TBP mixtures, dimer yields reduced significantly as did the products from carbon--carbon bond cleavage. The addition of nitrous oxide to the binary mixture caused the dimer yield to increase, confirming formation of C 12 H 25 radicals by nitrous oxide reactions

  11. Fuel vapor pressure (FVAPRS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, R.E.

    1979-04-01

    A subcode (FVAPRS) is described which calculates fuel vapor pressure. This subcode was developed as part of the fuel rod behavior modeling task performed at EG and G Idaho, Inc. The fuel vapor pressure subcode (FVAPRS), is presented and a discussion of literature data, steady state and transient fuel vapor pressure equations and estimates of the standard error of estimate to be expected with the FVAPRS subcode are included

  12. Globally important nitrous oxide emissions from croplands induced by freeze-thaw cycles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner-Riddle, Claudia; Congreves, Katelyn A.; Abalos Rodriguez, Diego; Berg, Aaron A.; Brown, Shannon E.; Ambadan, Jaison Thomas; Gao, Xiaopeng; Tenuta, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Seasonal freezing induces large thaw emissions of nitrous oxide, a trace gas that contributes to stratospheric ozone destruction and atmospheric warming. Cropland soils are by far the largest anthropogenic source of nitrous oxide. However, the global contribution of seasonal freezing to nitrous

  13. Experimental study on heat transfer with condensation of vapors of pure nitrogen tetroxide with nitrogen oxide additions on a bundle of horizontal tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batishcheva, T.M.; Derov, B.T.; Kolykhan, L.I.; Pulyaev, V.F.

    1977-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation of heat transfer during condensation of pure N 2 O 4 vapours and with NO admixtures on the outside surface of a bundle of horizontal tubes are considered. The tests with pure N 2 O 4 have been performed at pressures between 0.3-1.0 MPa in the range of thermal loads 22-121 kW/m 2 , temperature heads of 5-33 grades with complete condensation and evaporation. The content of admixtures boiling at high temperatures do not exceed 0.8%. A concentration of noncondensing nitrogen oxide in a gas phase have changed in the range of 3-27%. It is shown, that a concentration of noncondensible NO doesn't result in a considerable decrease of the heat transfer intensity as well as in the case of condensation of vapour-liquid mixtures. The generalized criterion relations are presented

  14. Mitigation of hydrogen by oxidation using nitrous oxide and noble metal catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britton, M.D.

    1995-01-01

    This test studied the ability of a blend of nuclear-grade, noble-metal catalysts to catalyze a hydrogen/nitrous oxide reaction in an effort to mitigate a potential hydrogen (H 2 ) gas buildup in the Hanford Site Grout Disposal Facility. For gases having H 2 and a stoichiometric excess of either nitrous oxide or oxygen, the catalyst blend can effectively catalyze the H 2 oxidation reaction at a rate exceeding 380 μmoles of H 2 per hour per gram of catalyst (μmol/h/g) and leave the gas with less than a 0.15 residual H 2 Concentration. This holds true in gases with up to 2.25% water vapor and 0.1% methane. This should also hold true for gases with up to 0.1% carbon monoxide (CO) but only until the catalyst is exposed to enough CO to block the catalytic sites and stop the reaction. Gases with ammonia up to 1% may be slightly inhibited but can have reaction rates greater than 250 μmol/h/g with less than a 0.20% residual H 2 concentration. The mechanism for CO poisoning of the catalyst is the chemisorption of CO to the active catalyst sites. The CO sorption capacity (SC) of the catalyst is the total amount of CO that the catalyst will chemisorb. The average SC for virgin catalyst was determined to be 19.3 ± 2.0 μmoles of CO chemisorbed to each gram of catalyst (μmol/g). The average SC for catalyst regenerated with air was 17.3 ± 1.9 μmol/g

  15. Nitrous oxide reduction in nodules: denitrification or N2 fixation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coyne, M.S.; Focht, D.D.

    1987-01-01

    Detached cowpea nodules that contained a nitrous oxide reductase-positive (Nor + ) rhizobium strain (8A55) and a nitrous oxide reductase-negative (Nor - ) rhizobium strain (32H1) were incubated with 1% 15 N 2 O (95 atom% 15 N) in the following three atmospheres: aerobic with C 2 H 2 (10%), aerobic without C 2 H 2 , and anaerobic (argon atmosphere) without C 2 H 2 . The greatest production of 15 N 2 occurred anaerobically with 8A55, yet very little was formed with 32H1. Although acetylene reduction activity was slightly higher with 32H1, about 10 times more 15 N 2 was produced aerobically by 8A55 than by 32H1 in the absence of acetylene. The major reductive pathway of N 2 O reduction by denitrifying rhizobium strain 8A55 is by nitrous oxide reductase rather than nitrogenase

  16. Crystallization of purple nitrous oxide reductase from Pseudomonas stutzeri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomowski, Anja; Zumft, Walter G.; Kroneck, Peter M. H.; Einsle, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    The physiologically active form of nitrous oxide reductase was isolated and crystallized under strict exclusion of dioxygen and diffraction data were collected from crystals belonging to two different space groups. Nitrous oxide reductase (N 2 OR) from Pseudomonas stutzeri catalyzes the final step in denitrification: the two-electron reduction of nitrous oxide to molecular dinitrogen. Crystals of the enzyme were grown under strict exclusion of dioxygen by sitting-drop vapour diffusion using 2R,3R-butanediol as a cryoprotectant. N 2 OR crystallized in either space group P1 or P6 5 . Interestingly, the key determinant for the resulting space group was the crystallization temperature. Crystals belonging to space group P1 contained four 130 kDa dimers in the asymmetric unit, while crystals belonging to space group P6 5 contained a single dimer in the asymmetric unit. Diffraction data were collected to resolutions better than 2 Å

  17. A simple air sampling technique for monitoring nitrous oxide pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austin, J C; Shaw, R; Moyes, D; Cleaton-Jones, P E

    1981-01-01

    A simple, inexpensive device for the continuous low-flow sampling of air was devised to permit monitoring of pollution by gaseous anaesthetics. The device consisted of a water-filled Perspex cylinder in which a double-walled flexible-film gas sample collection bag was suspended. Air samples could be aspirated into the collection bag at flow rates of as low as 1 ml min-1 by allowing the water to drain from the cylinder at a controlled rate. The maintenance of sample integrity with aspiration and storage of samples of nitrous oxide in air at concentrations of 1000, 100 and 30 p.p.m. v/v was examined using gas chromatography. The sample bags retained a mean 94% of the nitrous oxide in air samples containing nitrous oxide 25 p.p.m. over a 72-h storage period.

  18. The Dynamics of Nitrous Oxide Emission from the Use of Mineral Fertilizers in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A AA. Romanovskaya

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The intensity of nitrous oxide (N2O emission was considered based on literature data on the single input of mineral N (nitrogen fertilizers into different agricultural soil types in Russia. Ambient environmental factors exert a combined effect on the process of gaseous nitrogen formation from fertilizers applied. To reduce the uncertainty of estimates as much as possible, only experimental results obtained under conditions similar to natural were selected for the assessments. Mineral nitric fertilizers were applied to soil at a rate of 40 to 75 kg/ha and the N2O emissions were measured for approximately 140 days. Daily average emission values varied from 0.08 to 0.45% of fertilizer nitrogen. Correspondingly, 1.26 and 2.38% of fertilizer nitrogen were emitted as N2O from chernozems and soddy podzols. In 1990, the use of fertilizers in Russian agricultural practices for 53 Gg N2O-N, which equates to approximately 6.1% of global nitrous oxide emissions from nitric fertilizers. Later, the emission dropped because of a decrease in the input of nitric fertilizers to agricultural crops, and in 1998, it constituted just 20.5% of the 1990 level. In the period from 2008 to 2012, the nitrous oxide emission is expected to vary from 0.5 to 65.0 Gg N2O-N due to possible changes in national agricultural development. In the most likely scenario, the use of mineral fertilizers in Russia will account for approximately 34 to 40 Gg N2O-N emissions annually from 2008�2012.

  19. Experimental study of the structure of vapor phase during boiling of R134a on heat exchange surfaces of heat pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustinov, D. A.; Sukhikh, A. A.; Sidenkov, D. V.; Ustinov, V. A.

    2017-10-01

    The heat supply by means of heat pumps is considered now as a rational method of local heating which can lead to economy of primary fuel. At use of low-potential heat, for example, the heat of a ground (5 … 18 °C) or ground waters (8 … 10°C) only small depressing of temperature of these sources (on 3 … 5°C) is possible that demands application of heat exchangers with intensified heatmass transfer surfaces. In thermal laboratory of TOT department the 200 W experimental installation has been developed for research of process of boiling of freon R134a. The principle of action of the installation consists in realisation of reverse thermodynamic cycle and consecutive natural measurement of characteristics of elements of surfaces of heat exchangers of real installations at boiling points of freon from-10°C to +10°C and condensing temperatures from 15°C to 50 °C. The evaporator casing has optical windows for control of process of boiling of freon on ribbed on technology of distorting cut tubes. Temperature measurement in characteristic points of a cycle is provided by copper-constantan thermocouples which by means of ADT are connected to the computer that allows treat results of measurements in a real time mode. The structure of a two-phase flow investigated by means of the optical procedure based on laser technique.

  20. Gradient Measurements of Nitrous Acid (hono)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleffmann, J.; Kurtenbach, R.; Lörzer, J.; Wiesen, P.; Kalthoff, N.; Vogel, B.; Vogel, H.

    Nitrous acid (HONO) plays an important role in photochemical air pollution due to its photodissociation by solar UV radiation into hydroxyl radicals and thus significantly enhances photooxidation processes. Furthermore, HONO is an important indoor pol- lutant, which can react with amines leading to nitrosamines, which are known to be carcinogenic. Despite its importance in atmospheric chemistry the mechanisms lead- ing to HONO formation are still not completely understood at present. Although it is commonly proposed that HONO is formed by heterogeneous processes, i.e. by the conversion of NO2 on wet surfaces, it is still under discussion whether HONO produc- tion is dominated by the surface of particles or by the ground surface. Simultaneous vertical profile measurements of HONO, the precursor NO2 and the aerosol surface area, which could answer this question are not available at present. Accordingly, in the present study night-time HONO, NO2 and particle surface area gradients in the altitude range 10-190 m were measured on the meteorological tower at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe/Germany using a new, very sensitive HONO in- strument (LOPAP), a commercial NOx monitor and a SMPS system. For all gradient measurements during the campaign it was observed that the [HONO]/[NO2] ratio decreased with increasing altitude. In contrast, the particle sur- face area was found to be more or less constant. Accordingly, no correlation between the [HONO]/[NO2] ratio and the particle surface area was observed showing that HONO formation was dominated by processes on ground surfaces and that signifi- cant HONO formation on particle surfaces could be excluded for the measurement site.

  1. Calculating the enthalpy of vaporization for ionic liquid clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelkar, Manish S; Maginn, Edward J

    2007-08-16

    Classical atomistic simulations are used to compute the enthalpy of vaporization of a series of ionic liquids composed of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cations paired with the bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide anion. The calculations show that the enthalpy of vaporization is lowest for neutral ion pairs. The enthalpy of vaporization increases by about 40 kJ/mol with the addition of each ion pair to the vaporizing cluster. Non-neutral clusters have much higher vaporization enthalpies than their neutral counterparts and thus are not expected to make up a significant fraction of volatile species. The enthalpy of vaporization increases slightly as the cation alkyl chain length increases and as temperature decreases. The calculated vaporization enthalpies are consistent with two sets of recent experimental measurements as well as with previous atomistic simulations.

  2. Physical model for vaporization

    OpenAIRE

    Garai, Jozsef

    2006-01-01

    Based on two assumptions, the surface layer is flexible, and the internal energy of the latent heat of vaporization is completely utilized by the atoms for overcoming on the surface resistance of the liquid, the enthalpy of vaporization was calculated for 45 elements. The theoretical values were tested against experiments with positive result.

  3. Petroleum Vapor - Field Technical

    Science.gov (United States)

    The screening approach being developed by EPA OUST to evaluate petroleum vapor intrusion (PVI) requires information that has not be routinely collected in the past at vapor intrusion sites. What is the best way to collect this data? What are the relevant data quality issues and ...

  4. Study on emission characteristics and reduction strategy of nitrous oxide during wastewater treatment by different processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shichang; Bao, Zhiyuan; Sun, Dezhi

    2015-03-01

    Given the inexorable increase in global wastewater treatment, increasing amounts of nitrous oxide are expected to be emitted from wastewater treatment plants and released to the atmosphere. It has become imperative to study the emission and control of nitrous oxide in the various wastewater treatment processes currently in use. In the present investigation, the emission characteristics and the factors affecting the release of nitrous oxide were studied via full- and pilot-scale experiments in anoxic-oxic, sequencing batch reactor and oxidation ditch processes. We propose an optimal treatment process and relative strategy for nitrous oxide reduction. Our results show that both the bio-nitrifying and bio-denitrifying treatment units in wastewater treatment plants are the predominant sites for nitrous oxide production in each process, while the aerated treatment units are the critical sources for nitrous oxide emission. Compared with the emission of nitrous oxide from the anoxic-oxic (1.37% of N-influent) and sequencing batch reactor (2.69% of N-influent) processes, much less nitrous oxide (0.25% of N-influent) is emitted from the oxidation ditch process, which we determined as the optimal wastewater treatment process for nitrous oxide reduction, given the current technologies. Nitrous oxide emissions differed with various operating parameters. Controlling the dissolved oxygen concentration at a proper level during nitrification and denitrification and enhancing the utilization rate of organic carbon in the influent for denitrification are the two critical methods for nitrous oxide reduction in the various processes considered.

  5. Nitrate denitrification with nitrite or nitrous oxide as intermediate products: Stoichiometry, kinetics and dynamics of stable isotope signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavilin, V A; Rytov, S V

    2015-09-01

    A kinetic analysis of nitrate denitrification by a single or two species of denitrifying bacteria with glucose or ethanol as a carbon source and nitrite or nitrous oxide as intermediate products was performed using experimental data published earlier (Menyailo and Hungate, 2006; Vidal-Gavilan et al., 2013). Modified Monod kinetics was used in the dynamic biological model. The special equations were added to the common dynamic biological model to describe how isotopic fractionation between N species changes. In contrast to the generally assumed first-order kinetics, in this paper, the traditional Rayleigh equation describing stable nitrogen and oxygen isotope fractionation in nitrate was derived from the dynamic isotopic equations for any type of kinetics. In accordance with the model, in Vidal-Gavilan's experiments, the maximum specific rate of nitrate reduction was proved to be less for ethanol compared to glucose. Conversely, the maximum specific rate of nitrite reduction was proved to be much less for glucose compared to ethanol. Thus, the intermediate nitrite concentration was negligible for the ethanol experiment, while it was significant for the glucose experiment. In Menyailo's and Hungate's experiments, the low value of maximum specific rate of nitrous oxide reduction gives high intermediate value of nitrous oxide concentration. The model showed that the dynamics of nitrogen and oxygen isotope signatures are responding to the biological dynamics. Two microbial species instead of single denitrifying bacteria are proved to be more adequate to describe the total process of nitrate denitrification to dinitrogen. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Piezoelectric trace vapor calibrator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verkouteren, R. Michael; Gillen, Greg; Taylor, David W.

    2006-01-01

    The design and performance of a vapor generator for calibration and testing of trace chemical sensors are described. The device utilizes piezoelectric ink-jet nozzles to dispense and vaporize precisely known amounts of analyte solutions as monodisperse droplets onto a hot ceramic surface, where the generated vapors are mixed with air before exiting the device. Injected droplets are monitored by microscope with strobed illumination, and the reproducibility of droplet volumes is optimized by adjustment of piezoelectric wave form parameters. Complete vaporization of the droplets occurs only across a 10 deg. C window within the transition boiling regime of the solvent, and the minimum and maximum rates of trace analyte that may be injected and evaporated are determined by thermodynamic principles and empirical observations of droplet formation and stability. By varying solution concentrations, droplet injection rates, air flow, and the number of active nozzles, the system is designed to deliver--on demand--continuous vapor concentrations across more than six orders of magnitude (nominally 290 fg/l to 1.05 μg/l). Vapor pulses containing femtogram to microgram quantities of analyte may also be generated. Calibrated ranges of three explosive vapors at ng/l levels were generated by the device and directly measured by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). These data demonstrate expected linear trends within the limited working range of the IMS detector and also exhibit subtle nonlinear behavior from the IMS measurement process

  7. Do lagoons near concentrated animal feeding operations promote nitrous oxide supersaturation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makris, Konstantinos C.; Sarkar, Dibyendu; Andra, Syam S.; Bach, Stephan B.H.; Datta, Rupali

    2009-01-01

    Animal wastewater lagoons nearby concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) represent the latest tendency in global animal farming, severely impacting the magnitude of greenhouse gas emissions, including nitrous oxide (N 2 O). We hypothesized that lagoon wastewater could be supersaturated with N 2 O as part of incomplete microbial nitrification/denitrification processes, thereby regulating the N 2 O partitioning in the gaseous phase. The objectives of this study were: (i) to investigate the magnitude of dissolved N 2 O concentrations in the lagoon; and (ii) to determine the extent to which supersaturation of N 2 O occurs in wastewater lagoons. Dissolved N 2 O concentrations in the wastewater samples were high, ranging from 0.4 to 40.5 μg N 2 O mL -1 . Calculated dissolved N 2 O concentrations from the experimentally measured partition coefficients were much greater than those typically expected in aquatic systems ( 2 O mL -1 ). Knowledge of the factors controlling the magnitude of N 2 O supersaturation could potentially bridge mass balance differences between in situ measurements and global N 2 O models. - Supersaturation of nitrous oxide may occur in lagoons near concentrated animal feeding operations.

  8. Biological groundwater denitrification systems: Lab-scale trials aimed at nitrous oxide production and emission assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capodici, Marco; Avona, Alessia; Laudicina, Vito Armando; Viviani, Gaspare

    2018-07-15

    Bio-trenches are a sustainable option for treating nitrate contamination in groundwater. However, a possible side effect of this technology is the production of nitrous oxide, a greenhouse gas that can be found both dissolved in the liquid effluent as well as emitted as off gas. The aim of this study was to analyze NO 3 - removal and N 2 O production in lab-scale column trials. The column contained olive nut as organic carbon media. The experimental study was divided into three phases (I, II and III) each characterized by different inlet NO 3 - concentrations (30, 50, 75mgNO 3 -NL -1 respectively). Sampling ports deployed along the length of the column allowed to observe the denitrification process as well as the formation and consumption of intermediate products, such as nitrite (NO 2 - ) and nitrous oxide (N 2 O). In particular, it was observed that N 2 O production represent only a small fraction of removed NO 3 - during Phase I and II, both for dissolved (0.007%) and emitted (0.003%) phase, and it was recorded a high denitrification efficiency, over 99%. Nevertheless, significantly higher values were recorded for Phase 3 concerning emitted phase (0.018%). This fact is due to increased inlet concentration which resulted in a carbon limitation and in a consequent decrease in denitrification efficiency (76%). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Emissions of ammonia, nitrous oxide and methane during composting of organic household waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunnarsdotter Beck-Friis, Barbro

    2001-01-01

    In Sweden, composting of source-separated organic household waste is increasing, both domestically at the small-scale, and in larger municipal plants. Composting means a microbial decomposition of organic material, which results in the production of environmentally undesirable gases, such as ammonia (NH 3 ), nitrous oxide (N 2 O) and methane (CH 4 ). The aim of this thesis was to study the emissions of NH 3 , N 2 O and CH 4 to the atmosphere during composting of source-separated organic household waste. The studies were conducted in an experimental reactor under constant and controlled conditions and in municipal compost heaps. Emissions of NH 3 , N 2 O and CH 4 occurred at different phases during composting. Ammonia started to volatilise during the shift from mesophilic to thermophilic conditions when short-chained fatty acids were decomposed. Nitrous oxide was only emitted during the first days of composting and later during the cooling phase when nitrate was formed. Methane was only produced during the thermophilic phase. Large municipal compost heaps are a significant source for the production and emission of the greenhouse gases N 2 O and CH 4 . To avoid unwanted gaseous emissions to the atmosphere during composting, gaseous exchange with the atmosphere should be controlled in future composting plants

  10. Regional nitrous oxide flux in Amazon basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felippe, Monica Tais Siqueira D'Amelio

    2010-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N 2 O) is the third most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas. Globally, the main sources of N 2 O are nitrification and denitrification in soils. About two thirds of the soil emissions occur in the tropics and approximately 20% originate in wet rain forest ecosystems, like the Amazon forest. The work presented here involves aircraft vertical profiles of N 2 O from the surface to 4 km over two sites in the Eastern and Central Amazon: Tapajos National Forest (2000-2009) and Cuieiras Biologic Reserve (2004-2007), and the estimation of N 2 O fluxes for regions upwind of these sites using two methods: Column Integration Technique and Inversion Model - FLEXPART. To our knowledge, these regional scale N 2 O measurements in Amazonia are unique and represent a new approach to looking regional scale emissions. For the both methods, the fluxes upwind of Cuieiras Biologic Reserve exhibited little seasonality, and the annual mean was 1.9 ±1.6 mgN 2 Om -2 day -1 for the Column Integration Technique and 2.3±0.9 mgN 2 Om -2 day -1 for Inversion Model - FLEXPART. For fluxes upwind of Tapajos Nacional Forest, the Inversion Model - FLEXPART presented about half (0.9±1.7 mgN 2 Om -2 day -1 ) of the Column Integration Technique (2.0±1.1 mgN 2 Om -2 day -1 ) for the same period (2004-2008). One reason could be because the inversion model does not consider anthropic activities, once it had a good representation for less impacted area. Both regions presented similar emission during wet season. By Column Integration Technique, fluxes upwind Tapajos Nacional Forest were similar for dry and wet seasons. The dry season N 2 O fluxes exhibit significant correlations with CO fluxes, indicating a larger than expected source of N 2 O from biomass burning. The average CO:N 2 O ratio for all 38 profiles sampled during the dry season was 82±69 mol CO:molN 2 O and suggests a larger biomass burning contribution to the global N 2 O budget than previously reported. (author)

  11. Direct methane and nitrous oxide emissions of monogastric livestock ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) methodology adapted to tropical production systems was used to calculate methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. The non-ruminant sector is a minor GHG contributor compared with ruminant CH4 and N2O emissions. The pig industry and ostrich ...

  12. Municipal gravity sewers: an unrecognised source of nitrous oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a primary ozone-depleting substance and powerful greenhouse gas. N2O emissions from secondary-level wastewater treatment processes are relatively well understood as a result of intensive international research effort in recent times, yet little information...

  13. Nitrous oxide emissions affected by biochar and nitrogen stabilizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Both biochar and N fertilizer stabilizers (N transformation inhibitors) are potential strategies to reduce nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from fertilization, but the mechanisms and/or N transformation processes affecting the N dynamics are not fully understood. This research investigated N2O emission...

  14. Controls of nitrous oxide emission after simulated cattle urine deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baral, Khagendra Raj; Thomsen, Anton Gårde; Olesen, Jørgen E

    2014-01-01

    Urine deposited during grazing is a significant source of atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O). The potential for N2O emissions from urine patches is high, and a better understanding of controls is needed. This study investigated soil nitrogen (N) dynamics and N2O emissions from cattle urine...

  15. Nitrous oxide emissions from the Gulf of Mexico Hypoxic Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    The production of nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas, in hypoxic coastal zones remains poorly characterized due to a lack of data, though large nitrogen inputs and deoxygenation typical of these systems create the potential for large N2O emissions. We report the first N...

  16. Nitrous oxide emission from denitrification in stream and river networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change and stratospheric ozone destruction. Anthropogenic nitrogen (N) loading to river networks is a potentially important source of N2O via microbial denitrification which converts N to N2O and dinitrog...

  17. Compilation of a global inventory of emissions of nitrous oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwman, A.F.

    1995-01-01

    A global inventory with 1°x1° resolution was compiled of emissions of nitrous oxide (N 2 O) to the atmosphere, including emissions from soils under natural vegetation, fertilized agricultural land, grasslands and animal excreta, biomass burning, forest clearing,

  18. Pitfalls in measuring nitrous oxide production by nitrifiers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wrage, N.

    2003-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N 2 O) is an important greenhouse gas. At present, it causes 6% of global warming. The atmospheric concentration of N 2 O continues to increase at a rate of 0.8 ppb per year. The main known sink of N 2 O is its destruction in the stratosphere to

  19. Current and future nitrous oxide emissions from African agriculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hickman, J.E.; Havlikova, M.; Kroeze, C.; Palm, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    Most emission estimates of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) from African agriculture at a continental scale are based on emission factors, such as those developed by the IPCC Guidelines. Here we present estimates from Africa from the EDGAR database, which is derived from the IPCC emission

  20. Controlling nitrous oxide emissions from grassland livestock production systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oenema, O.; Gebauer, G.; Rodriguez, M.; Sapek, A.; Jarvis, S.C.; Corré, W.J.; Yamulki, S.

    1998-01-01

    There is growing awareness that grassland livestock production systems are major sources of nitrous oxide (N2O). Controlling these emissions requires a thorough understanding of all sources and controlling factors at the farm level. This paper examines the various controlling factors and proposes

  1. Nitrous oxide in the western Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A.; Jayakumar, D; Nair, M.; DileepKumar, M.; George, M.D

    Extensive observations on nitrous oxide (N@d2@@O) in the atmosphere and waters of the western Bay of Bengal during March-April 1991 yield surface saturations and atmospheric fluxes ranging from 89.3 to 213.9% (mean 125.2%), and from 0.10 to 10...

  2. Measurement and reduction of nitrous oxide in operating rooms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuyt, H. C.; Verberk, M. M.

    1996-01-01

    In a program designed to lower exposure to anesthetic gases, nitrous oxide in the breathing zone of anesthesiologists was continuously monitored by means of a direct reading apparatus and a specially designed collar. Initially, the average concentration during anesthesia in intubated patients,

  3. Nitrous oxide flux under changing temperature and CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    We are investigating nitrous oxide flux seasonal trends and response to temperature and CO2 increases in a boreal peatland. Peatlands located in boreal regions make up a third of global wetland area and are expected to have the highest temperature increases in response to climat...

  4. Improvements to vapor generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, Arthur; Monroe, Neil.

    1976-01-01

    A supporting system is proposed for vapor generators of the 'supported' type. Said supporting system is intended to compensate the disparities of thermal expansion due to the differences in the vertical dimensions of the tubes in the walls of the combustion chamber and their collectors compared to that of the balloon tanks and the connecting tube clusters of vaporization, the first one being longer than the second ones. Said system makes it possible to build said combustion chamber higher than the balloon tanks and the tube clusters of vaporization. The capacity of steam production is thus enhanced [fr

  5. Oxidation of propane with oxygen, nitrous oxide and oxygen/nitrous oxide mixture over Co- and Fe-zeolites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novoveská, K.; Bulánek, R.; Wichterlová, Blanka

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 100, 3-4 (2005), s. 315-319 ISSN 0920-5861 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA104/03/1120 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : propene * propane oxidation * nitrous oxide * Fe-ZSM-5 Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.365, year: 2005

  6. Gasoline Reid Vapor Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA regulates the vapor pressure of gasoline sold at retail stations during the summer ozone season to reduce evaporative emissions from gasoline that contribute to ground-level ozone and diminish the effects of ozone-related health problems.

  7. Optimum design of vaporizer fin with liquefied natural gas by numerical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Hyo Min; Chung, Han Shik; Lee, Sang Chul; Kong, Tae Woo; Yi, Chung Seub

    2006-01-01

    Generally, the temperature drop under 0 .deg. C on vaporizer surface creates frozen dews. This problem seems to increase as the time progress and humidity rises. In addition, the frozen dews create frost deposition. Consequently, heat transfer on vaporizer decreases because frost deposition causes adiabatic condition. Therefore, it is very important to solve this problem. This paper aims to study of the optimum design of used vaporizer at local LNG station. In this paper, experimental results were compared with numerical results. Geometries of numerical and experimental vaporizers were identical. Studied parameters of vaporizer are angle between two fins (Φ) and fin thickness (TH F ). Numerical analysis results were presented through the correlations between the ice layer thickness (TH ICE ) on the vaporizer surface to the temperature distribution of inside vaporizer (T IN ), fin thickness (TH F ), and angle between two fins (Φ). Numerical result shows good agreement with experimental outcome. Finally, the correlations for optimum design of vaporizer are proposed on this paper

  8. A heated vapor cell unit for DAVLL in atomic rubidium

    OpenAIRE

    McCarron, Daniel J.; Hughes, Ifan G.; Tierney, Patrick; Cornish, Simon L.

    2007-01-01

    The design and performance of a compact heated vapor cell unit for realizing a dichroic atomic vapor laser lock (DAVLL) for the D2 transitions in atomic rubidium is described. A 5 cm-long vapor cell is placed in a double-solenoid arrangement to produce the required magnetic field; the heat from the solenoid is used to increase the vapor pressure and correspondingly the DAVLL signal. We have characterized experimentally the dependence of important features of the DAVLL signal on magnetic field...

  9. Water vapor permeabilities through polymers: diffusivities from experiments and simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seethamraju, Sindhu; Ramamurthy, Praveen Chandrashekarapura; Madras, Giridhar

    2014-01-01

    This study experimentally determines water vapor permeabilities, which are subsequently correlated with the diffusivities obtained from simulations. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used for determining the diffusion of water vapor in various polymeric systems such as polyethylene, polypropylene, poly (vinyl alcohol), poly (vinyl acetate), poly (vinyl butyral), poly (vinylidene chloride), poly (vinyl chloride) and poly (methyl methacrylate). Cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) based methodology has been used to determine the water vapor transmission rates. These values were then used to calculate the diffusion coefficients for water vapor through these polymers. A comparative analysis is provided for diffusivities calculated from CRDS and MD based results by correlating the free volumes. (paper)

  10. Molecular dynamics study of the vaporization of an ionic drop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galamba, N

    2010-09-28

    The melting of a microcrystal in vacuum and subsequent vaporization of a drop of NaCl were studied through molecular dynamics simulations with the Born-Mayer-Huggins-Tosi-Fumi rigid-ion effective potential. The vaporization was studied for a single isochor at increasing temperatures until the drop completely vaporized, and gaseous NaCl formed. Examination of the vapor composition shows that the vapor of the ionic drop and gaseous NaCl are composed of neutral species, the most abundant of which, ranging from simple NaCl monomers (ion pairs) to nonlinear polymers, (Na(n)Cl(n))(n=2-4). The enthalpies of sublimation, vaporization, and dissociation of the different vapor species are found to be in reasonable agreement with available experimental data. The decrease of the enthalpy of vaporization of the vapor species, with the radius of the drop decrease, accounts for a larger fraction of trimers and tetramers than that inferred from experiments. Further, the rhombic dimer is significantly more abundant than its linear isomer although the latter increases with the temperature. The present results suggest that both trimers and linear dimers may be important to explain the vapor pressure of molten NaCl at temperatures above 1500 K.

  11. Molecular dynamics study of the vaporization of an ionic drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galamba, N.

    2010-09-01

    The melting of a microcrystal in vacuum and subsequent vaporization of a drop of NaCl were studied through molecular dynamics simulations with the Born-Mayer-Huggins-Tosi-Fumi rigid-ion effective potential. The vaporization was studied for a single isochor at increasing temperatures until the drop completely vaporized, and gaseous NaCl formed. Examination of the vapor composition shows that the vapor of the ionic drop and gaseous NaCl are composed of neutral species, the most abundant of which, ranging from simple NaCl monomers (ion pairs) to nonlinear polymers, (NanCln)n=2-4. The enthalpies of sublimation, vaporization, and dissociation of the different vapor species are found to be in reasonable agreement with available experimental data. The decrease of the enthalpy of vaporization of the vapor species, with the radius of the drop decrease, accounts for a larger fraction of trimers and tetramers than that inferred from experiments. Further, the rhombic dimer is significantly more abundant than its linear isomer although the latter increases with the temperature. The present results suggest that both trimers and linear dimers may be important to explain the vapor pressure of molten NaCl at temperatures above 1500 K.

  12. Analysis of the transient compressible vapor flow in heat pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, J. H.; Faghri, A.; Chang, W. S.

    1989-01-01

    The transient compressible one-dimensional vapor flow dynamics in a heat pipe is modeled. The numerical results are obtained by using the implicit non-iterative Beam-Warming finite difference method. The model is tested for simulated heat pipe vapor flow and actual vapor flow in cylindrical heat pipes. A good comparison of the present transient results for the simulated heat pipe vapor flow with the previous results of a two-dimensional numerical model is achieved and the steady state results are in agreement with the existing experimental data. The transient behavior of the vapor flow under subsonic, sonic, and supersonic speeds and high mass flow rates are successfully predicted. The one-dimensional model also describes the vapor flow dynamics in cylindrical heat pipes at high temperatures.

  13. Analysis of the transient compressible vapor flow in heat pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, J.H.; Faghri, A.; Chang, W.S.

    1989-07-01

    The transient compressible one-dimensional vapor flow dynamics in a heat pipe is modeled. The numerical results are obtained by using the implicit non-iterative Beam-Warming finite difference method. The model is tested for simulated heat pipe vapor flow and actual vapor flow in cylindrical heat pipes. A good comparison of the present transient results for the simulated heat pipe vapor flow with the previous results of a two-dimensional numerical model is achieved and the steady state results are in agreement with the existing experimental data. The transient behavior of the vapor flow under subsonic, sonic, and supersonic speeds and high mass flow rates are successfully predicted. The one-dimensional model also describes the vapor flow dynamics in cylindrical heat pipes at high temperatures

  14. Gross nitrous oxide production drives net nitrous oxide fluxes across a salt marsh landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wendy H; Silver, Whendee L

    2016-06-01

    Sea level rise will change inundation regimes in salt marshes, altering redox dynamics that control nitrification - a potential source of the potent greenhouse gas, nitrous oxide (N2 O) - and denitrification, a major nitrogen (N) loss pathway in coastal ecosystems and both a source and sink of N2 O. Measurements of net N2 O fluxes alone yield little insight into the different effects of redox conditions on N2 O production and consumption. We used in situ measurements of gross N2 O fluxes across a salt marsh elevation gradient to determine how soil N2 O emissions in coastal ecosystems may respond to future sea level rise. Soil redox declined as marsh elevation decreased, with lower soil nitrate and higher ferrous iron in the low marsh compared to the mid and high marshes (P production was highest in the low marsh and lowest in the mid-marsh (P = 0.02), whereas gross N2 O consumption did not differ among marsh zones. Thus, variability in gross N2 O production rates drove the differences in net N2 O flux among marsh zones. Our results suggest that future studies should focus on elucidating controls on the processes producing, rather than consuming, N2 O in salt marshes to improve our predictions of changes in net N2 O fluxes caused by future sea level rise. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. The integrated nitrous oxide and methane grassland project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leffelaar, P.A.; Langeveld, C.A.; Hofman, J.E.; Segers, R.; Van den Pol-van Dasselaar, A.; Goudriaan, J.; Rabbinge, R.; Oenema, O. [Department of Theoretical Production Ecology, Wageningen Agricultural University, Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2000-07-01

    The integrated nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) and methane (CH{sub 4}) grassland project aims to estimate and explain emissions of these greenhouse gases from two ecosystems, namely drained agricultural peat soil under grass at the experimental farm Zegveld and undrained peat in the nature preserve Nieuwkoopse Plassen, both Netherlands. Peat soils were chosen because of their expected considerable contribution to the greenhouse gas budget considering the prevailing wet and partial anaerobic conditions. The emission dynamics of these ecosystems are considered representatives of large peat areas because the underlying processes are rather general and driven by variables like organic matter characteristics, water and nutrient conditions and type of vegetation. The research approach comprises measurements and modelling at different integration levels relating to the microbiology of the production and consumption of N{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4} (laboratory studies), their movement through peat soil (rhizolab and field studies), and the resulting fluxes (field studies). Typical emissions from drained soil were 15-40 kg ha{sup -1} y{sup -1} N{sub 2}O and virtually zero for CH{sub 4}. The undrained soil in the nature preserve emitted 100-280 kg ha{sup -1} y{sup -1} CH{sub 4}, and probably little N{sub 2}O. The process knowledge, collected and partly integrated in the models, helps to explain these data. For example, the low methane emission from drained peat can more coherently be understood and extrapolated because: (1) upper soil layers are aerobic, thus limiting methane production and stimulating methane oxidation, (2) absence of aerenchymatous roots of wetland plants that connect deeper anaerobic soil layers where methane is produced to the atmosphere and supply labile carbon, (3) a low methane production potential in deep layers due to the low decomposability of organic matter, and (4) long anaerobic periods needed in the topsoil to develop a methane production potential. This

  16. Laser vapor phase deposition of semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlov, N.V.; Luk' ianchuk, B.S.; Sisakian, E.V.; Shafeev, G.A.

    1987-06-01

    The pyrolytic effect of IR laser radiation is investigated with reference to the initiation and control of the vapor phase deposition of semiconductor films. By selecting the gas mixture composition and laser emission parameters, it is possible to control the deposition and crystal formation processes on the surface of semiconductors, with the main control action achieved due to the nonadiabatic kinetics of reactions in the gas phase and high temperatures in the laser heating zone. This control mechanism is demonstrated experimentally during the laser vapor deposition of germanium and silicon films from tetrachlorides on single-crystal Si and Ge substrates. 5 references.

  17. Some studies on the reaction between nitrous acid and plutonium(IV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasudeva Rao, P.R.; Bagawde, S.V.; Ramakrishna, V.V.; Patil, S.K.

    1976-01-01

    In the ion exchange and solvent extraction studies nitrous acid is used as an oxidant for Pu(IV) in perchloric acid. Earlier studies had indicated that Pu(IV) forms complex with nitrous acid. The present investigation aimed to study this complex formation by solvent extraction and spectrophotometric methods, revealed that is no significant complex formation between Pu(IV) and nitrous acid. The high apparent equilibrium constant for the complex formation is caused by the partial reduction of Pu(IV) to Pu(III) by nitrous acid. The nitrate complexing is negligible in the case of Th(IV) and Np(IV) as well. Systematic investigation on the redox reactions of plutonium in different oxidation states with nitrous acid is now in progress. The preliminary results obtained indicate that Pu(IV) is reduced to Pu(III) by nitrous acid with a rate that can be conveniently followed spectrophotometrically. (T.I.)

  18. Quantum cascade laser photoacoustic detection of nitrous oxide released from soils for biofuel production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couto, F. M.; Sthel, M. S.; Castro, M. P. P.; da Silva, M. G.; Rocha, M. V.; Tavares, J. R.; Veiga, C. F. M.; Vargas, H.

    2014-12-01

    In order to investigate the generation of greenhouse gases in sugarcane ethanol production chain, a comparative study of N2O emission in artificially fertilized soils and soils free from fertilizers was carried out. Photoacoustic spectroscopy using quantum cascade laser with an emission ranging from 7.71 to 7.88 µm and differential photoacoustic cell were applied to detect nitrous oxide (N2O), an important greenhouse gas emitted from soils cultivated with sugar cane. Owing to calibrate the experimental setup, an initial N2O concentration was diluted with pure nitrogen and detection limit of 50 ppbv was achieved. The proposed methodology was selective and sensitive enough to detect N2O from no fertilized and artificially fertilized soils. The measured N2O concentration ranged from ppmv to ppbv.

  19. On the Pt(+) and Rh(+) Catalytic Activity in the Nitrous Oxide Reduction by Carbon Monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondinelli, F; Russo, N; Toscano, M

    2008-11-11

    Nitrous oxide activation by CO in the presence of platinum and rhodium monocations was elucidated by density functional methods for ground and first excited states. Platinum and rhodium cations fulfill the thermodynamic request for the oxygen-atom transport that allows the catalytic cycle to be completed, but actually, just the first one meaningfully improves the kinetics of the process. For both catalysts, the reaction pathways show the only activation barrier in correspondence of nitrogen release and monoxide cation formation. The kinetic analysis of the potential energy profile, in agreement with ICP/SIFT MS experimental data, indicates that platinum performs more in the reduction, while the whole process is not sufficiently fast in the case of rhodium ionic catalyst.

  20. Establishment and calibration of consensus process model for nitrous oxide dynamics in water quality engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domingo-Felez, Carlos

    that enhance cost and energy efficiency in BNR, while maintaining effluent quali-ty. Now, increasing attention is placed on direct emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O) as by-product of BNR; N2O is a greenhouse gas (GHG) with a high warming potential and also an ozone depleting chemical compound. Several N2O...... process modelling efforts aim to reproduce ex-perimental data with mathematical equations, structuring our understanding of the system. Various mechanistic models with different structures describ-ing N2O production have been proposed, but no consensus exists between researchers. Hence, the existing plant......-wide GHG models still lack a complete biological process model that can be integrated in a methodology that assess-es N2O emissions and their impact on overall plant performance. A mathematical model structure that describes N2O production during biological nitrogen removal is proposed. Two autotrophic...

  1. Ab initio intermolecular potential energy surface and thermophysical properties of nitrous oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crusius, Johann-Philipp; Hellmann, Robert; Hassel, Egon; Bich, Eckard

    2015-06-28

    We present an analytical intermolecular potential energy surface (PES) for two rigid nitrous oxide (N2O) molecules derived from high-level quantum-chemical ab initio calculations. Interaction energies for 2018 N2O-N2O configurations were computed utilizing the counterpoise-corrected supermolecular approach at the CCSD(T) level of theory using basis sets up to aug-cc-pVQZ supplemented with bond functions. A site-site potential function with seven sites per N2O molecule was fitted to the pair interaction energies. We validated our PES by computing the second virial coefficient as well as shear viscosity and thermal conductivity in the dilute-gas limit. The values of these properties are substantiated by the best experimental data.

  2. Urban sources and emissions of nitrous oxide and methane in southern California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend-Small, A.; Pataki, D.; Tyler, S. C.; Czimczik, C. I.; Xu, X.; Christensen, L. E.

    2012-12-01

    Anthropogenic activities have resulted in increasing levels of greenhouse gases, including carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide. While global and regional emissions sources of carbon dioxide are relatively well understood, methane and nitrous oxide are less constrained, particularly at regional scales. Here we present the results of an investigation of sources and emissions of methane and nitrous oxide in Los Angeles, California, USA, one of Earth's largest urban areas. The original goal of the project was to determine whether isotopes are useful tracers of agricultural versus urban nitrous oxide and methane sources. For methane, we found that stable isotopes (carbon-13 and deuterium) and radiocarbon are good tracers of biogenic versus fossil fuel sources. High altitude observations of methane concentration, measured continuously using tunable laser spectroscopy, and isotope ratios, measured on discrete flask samples using mass spectrometry, indicate that the predominant methane source in Los Angeles is from fossil fuels, likely from "fugitive" emissions from geologic formations, natural gas pipelines, oil refining, or power plants. We also measured nitrous oxide emissions and isotope ratios from urban (landscaping and wastewater treatment) and agricultural sources (corn and vegetable fields). There was no difference in nitrous oxide isotope ratios between the different types of sources, although stable isotopes did differ between nitrous oxide produced in oxic and anoxic wastewater treatment tanks. Our nitrous oxide flux data indicate that landscaped turfgrass emits nitrous oxide at rates equivalent to agricultural systems, indicating that ornamental soils should not be disregarded in regional nitrous oxide budgets. However, we also showed that wastewater treatment is a much greater source of nitrous oxide than soils regionally. This work shows that global nitrous oxide and methane budgets are not easily downscaled to regional, urban settings, which has

  3. Vapor pressures and enthalpies of vaporization of azides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verevkin, Sergey P.; Emel'yanenko, Vladimir N.; Algarra, Manuel; Manuel Lopez-Romero, J.; Aguiar, Fabio; Enrique Rodriguez-Borges, J.; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C.G.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We prepared and measured vapor pressures and vaporization enthalpies of 7 azides. → We examined consistency of new and available in the literature data. → Data for geminal azides and azido-alkanes selected for thermochemical calculations. - Abstract: Vapor pressures of some azides have been determined by the transpiration method. The molar enthalpies of vaporization Δ l g H m of these compounds were derived from the temperature dependencies of vapor pressures. The measured data sets were successfully checked for internal consistency by comparison with vaporization enthalpies of similarly structured compounds.

  4. Atmospheric nitrous oxide produced by solar protons and relativistic electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, S.S.; Zipf, E.C.

    1981-01-01

    An alternative means of nitric oxide production in the stratosphere to that of direct formation in the upper atmosphere by solar proton (SP) events and by relativistic electron precipitation (REP) events from the Earth's radiation belt, is described. It is suggested that nitrous oxide is produced in the mesosphere and then migrates downward and is converted in the stratosphere to NO by the reaction N 2 O + O( 1 D) → 2 NO. Such a process could amplify the direct NO production by >10%. Mesospheric nitrous oxide mixing ratios increase to values as high as 6 x 10 -7 due to REP- and SP- related production. Lateral transport will reduce these high values but mesospheric mixing ratios of N 2 O in the high latitudes would approach 10 -7 , considerably greater than those expected on the basis of theories which neglect REP- and SP-related production of this species. (U.K.)

  5. Effects of ionization and nitrous oxide on grated carrot respiration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chervin, C.

    1992-06-01

    Two treatments (nitrous oxide and irradiation) have been applied on grated carrots to reduce the respiratory crisis induced by wounding. Nitrous oxide inhibited cytochrome c oxidase; but, it neither diminished O 2 consumption of the tissues, nor modified atmospheres in a favourable way for conservation of grated carrots, stored in plastic bags (in the conditions chosen for this study). On the contrary, irradiation inhibited simultaneously the respiratory crisis and the ethylene production, both induced by wounding. This behaviour led to a lower consumption of sugars in irradiated tissues and to the generation of atmospheres, which were better adapted to the conservation needs (it was necessary to use plastic film with high permeability). Finally, an applied study demonstrated that irradiation, by permitting a less denaturing preparation than industrial process, allowed the conservation of produces with a better quality (nutritional, sensory and microbiological). Biochemical analyses have been validated by sensory analyses

  6. Measurement system for nitrous oxide based on amperometric gas sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siswoyo, S.; Persaud, K. C.; Phillips, V. R.; Sneath, R.

    2017-03-01

    It has been well known that nitrous oxide is an important greenhouse gas, so monitoring and control of its concentration and emission is very important. In this work a nitrous oxide measurement system has been developed consisting of an amperometric sensor and an appropriate lab-made potentiostat that capable measuring picoampere current ranges. The sensor was constructed using a gold microelectrode as working electrode surrounded by a silver wire as quasi reference electrode, with tetraethyl ammonium perchlorate and dimethylsulphoxide as supporting electrolyte and solvent respectively. The lab-made potentiostat was built incorporating a transimpedance amplifier capable of picoampere measurements. This also incorporated a microcontroller based data acquisition system, controlled by a host personal computer using a dedicated computer program. The system was capable of detecting N2O concentrations down to 0.07 % v/v.

  7. Atmospheric nitrogen deposition influences denitrification and nitrous oxide production in lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrackin, Michelle L; Elser, James J

    2010-02-01

    Microbially mediated denitrification is an important process that may ameliorate the effects of nitrogen (N) loading by permanently removing excess N inputs. In this study, we measured the rate of denitrification and nitrous oxide (N2O) production during denitrification in sediments from 32 Norwegian lakes at the high and low ends of a gradient of atmospheric N deposition. Denitrification and N2O production rates averaged 41.7 and 1.1 micromol N x m(-2) x h(-1), respectively, for high-deposition lakes. There was no detectable denitrification or N2O production in low-deposition lakes. Epilimnetic nitrate concentration was strongly correlated with denitrification rate (r2 = 0.67). We also measured the denitrification rate in response to experimental additions of organic carbon, nitrate, and phosphorus. Experimental nitrate additions stimulated denitrification in sediments of all lakes, regardless of N deposition level. In fact, the rate of denitrification in nitrate-amended treatments was the same magnitude for lakes in both deposition areas. These findings suggest that lake sediments possess considerable capacity to remove nitrate and that this capacity has not been saturated under conditions of chronic N loading. Further, nitrous oxide was nearly 3% of the total gaseous product during denitrification in high-deposition lakes, a fraction that is comparable to polluted marine sediments. Our findings suggest that, while lakes play an important role in N removal in the landscape, they may be a source of N2O emissions, especially in areas subject to elevated N inputs.

  8. Nitrous oxide emissions from manure handling - effects of storage conditions and climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, S.G.; Petersen, S.O.

    2002-01-01

    Stored animal manure and manure applied in the field contributes an estimated 20% to the total anthropogenic emissions of nitrous oxide (N 2 0) in Denmark. Manure composition, handling and climatic conditions may all influence the emission level during storage, but there are relatively few experimental data on emissions of N 2 0 from manure management, including animal houses, slurry stores and manure heaps. Among animal housing systems, very high emission rates have been found with pig deep lifter, and N 2 0 emissions are further stimulated by mechanical mixing. Slurry stores are anaerobic, but a recent study showed that N 2 0 can be produced in porous surface covers such as natural surface crusts, straw or leca pebbles, while no N 2 0 was emitted from uncovered slurry. The emission was significantly related to the water balance, i.e., the difference between evaporation and rain, during dry periods; during wet periods no N 2 0 was emitted. For solid manure, previous studies have typically found that less than 1 % of total N is emitted as N 2 0. Nitrous oxide may be produced throughout the manure heap, provided an environment with both aerobic and anaerobic pockets exists. Profiles from an experimental heap indicated that most of the N 2 0 emitted from solid manure was produced near the surface of the heap. Increasing density appears to stimulate N 2 0 emissions up to a point, where the air exchange is significantly impeded. The IPCC methodology calculates N 2 0 emissions from manure on the basis of total N content (that is, on the basis of volume) and climate region only. Possibly, estimates of N 2 0 emissions from slurry stores could be improved by considering surface area, ammonium content and water balance as input variables. Emissions from solid manure heaps should consider surface area and the potential for composting, as reflected in bulk density and moisture content. (au)

  9. Fungal contribution to nitrous oxide emissions from cattle impacted soils

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirout, Jiří; Šimek, Miloslav; Elhottová, Dana

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 2 (2013), s. 565-572 ISSN 0045-6535 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP504/12/P752; GA MŠk LC06066 Grant - others:GAJU(CZ) 04-142/2010/P Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : nitrous oxide * soil fungi * upland pasture * cattle * outdoor husbandry Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.499, year: 2013

  10. Nitrous oxide emissions from the Arabian Sea: A synthesis

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bange, H.W.; Andreae, M.O.; Lal, S.; Law, C.S.; Naqvi, S.W.A.; Patra, P.K.; Rixen, P.K.; Upstill-Goddard, R.C.

    ) seasonal and annual nitrous oxide (N2O) con- centration fields for the Arabian Sea surface layer using a database containing more than 2400 values measured be- tween December 1977 and July 1997. N2O concentrations are highest during the southwest (SW... is much more tightly constrained than the previous con- sensus derived using averaged in-situ data from a smaller number of studies. However, the tendency to focus on mea- surements in locally restricted features in combination with insufficient seasonal...

  11. Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 84-204-1600, Dental Health Associates, Paoli, Pennsylvania. [Nitrous oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crandall, M.S.

    1985-06-01

    Area air and breathing-zone samples were analyzed for nitrous oxide at Dental Health Associates, Paoli, Pennsylvania on August 2, 1984. The evaluation was requested by a dental assistant because of general concern about the extent of nitrous oxide exposure, especially since the office was not equipped with a waste-anesthetic gas-scavenging system. The author recommends installing a waste anesthetic gas scavenging system with a dedicated exhaust. The nitrous oxide delivery and mixing system should be checked for leaks monthly and work practices for handling nitrous oxide should be improved.

  12. Vapor pressure and thermodynamics of beryllium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinehart, G.H.; Behrens, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    The vapor pressure of beryllium carbide has been measured over the temperature range 1388 to 1763 K using Knudsen-effusion mass spectrometry. Vaporization occurs incongruently according to the reaction Be 2 C(s) = 2Be(g) + C(s). The equilibrium vapor pressure above the mixture of Be 2 C and C over the experimental temperature range is (R/J K -1 mol -1 )ln(p/Pa) = -(3.610 +- 0.009) x 10 5 (K/T) + (221.43 +- 1.06). The third-law enthalpy change for the above reaction obtained from the present vapor pressures is ΔH 0 (298.15 K) = (740.5 +- 0.1) kJ mol -1 . The corresponding second-law result is ΔH 0 (298.15 K) = (732.0 +- 1.8) kJ mol -1 . The enthalpy of formation for Be 2 C(s) calculated from the present third-law vaporization enthalpy and the enthalpy of formation of Be(g) is ΔH 0 sub(f)(298.15 K) = -(92.5 +- 15.7) kJ mol -1 . (author)

  13. Collapsing criteria for vapor film around solid spheres as a fundamental stage leading to vapor explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freud, Roy; Harari, Ronen; Sher, Eran

    2009-01-01

    Following a partial fuel-melting accident, a Fuel-Coolant Interaction (FCI) can result with the fragmentation of the melt into tiny droplets. A vapor film is then formed between the melt fragments and the coolant, while preventing a contact between them. Triggering, propagation and expansion typically follow the premixing stage. In the triggering stage, vapor film collapse around one or several of the fragments occurs. This collapse can be the result of fragments cooling, a sort of mechanical force, or by any other means. When the vapor film collapses and the coolant re-establishes contact with the dry surface of the hot melt, it may lead to a very rapid and rather violent boiling. In the propagation stage the shock wave front leads to stripping of the films surrounding adjacent droplets which enhance the fragmentation and the process escalates. During this process a large quantity of liquid vaporizes and its expansion can result in destructive mechanical damage to the surrounding structures. This multiphase thermal detonation in which high pressure shock wave is formed is regarded as 'vapor explosion'. The film boiling and its possible collapse is a fundamental stage leading to vapor explosion. If the interaction of the melt and the coolant does not result in a film boiling, no explosion occurs. Many studies have been devoted to determine the minimum temperature and heat flux that is required to maintain a film boiling. The present experimental study examines the minimum temperature that is required to maintain a film boiling around metal spheres immersed into a liquid (subcooled distilled water) reservoir. In order to simulate fuel fragments that are small in dimension and has mirror-like surface, small spheres coated with anti-oxidation layer were used. The heat flux from the spheres was calculated from the sphere's temperature profiles and the sphere's properties. The vapor film collapse was associated with a sharp rise of the heat flux during the cooling

  14. Vaporization of irradiated droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, R.L.; O'Rourke, P.J.; Zardecki, A.

    1986-01-01

    The vaporization of a spherically symmetric liquid droplet subject to a high-intensity laser flux is investigated on the basis of a hydrodynamic description of the system composed of the vapor and ambient gas. In the limit of the convective vaporization, the boundary conditions at the fluid--gas interface are formulated by using the notion of a Knudsen layer in which translational equilibrium is established. This leads to approximate jump conditions at the interface. For homogeneous energy deposition, the hydrodynamic equations are solved numerically with the aid of the CON1D computer code (''CON1D: A computer program for calculating spherically symmetric droplet combustion,'' Los Alamos National Laboratory Report No. LA-10269-MS, December, 1984), based on the implict continuous--fluid Eulerian (ICE) [J. Comput. Phys. 8, 197 (1971)] and arbitrary Lagrangian--Eulerian (ALE) [J. Comput. Phys. 14, 1227 (1974)] numerical mehtods. The solutions exhibit the existence of two shock waves propagating in opposite directions with respect to the contact discontinuity surface that separates the ambient gas and vapor

  15. Vapor liquid fraction determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This invention describes a method of measuring liquid and vapor fractions in a non-homogeneous fluid flowing through an elongate conduit, such as may be required with boiling water, non-boiling turbulent flows, fluidized bed experiments, water-gas mixing analysis, and nuclear plant cooling. (UK)

  16. Heat of vaporization spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, D. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Multilayer desorption measurements of various substances adsorbed on a stainless steel substrate are found to exhibit desorption profiles consistent with a zeroth order desorption model. The singleness of the desorption transients together with their narrow peak widths makes the technique ideally suited for a heat of vaporization spectrometer for either substance analysis or identification

  17. Enthalpy of Vaporization and Vapor Pressures: An Inexpensive Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battino, Rubin; Dolson, David A.; Hall, Michael A.; Letcher, Trevor M.

    2007-01-01

    A simple and inexpensive method to determine the enthalpy of vaporization of liquids by measuring vapor pressure as a function of temperature is described. The vapor pressures measured with the stopcock cell were higher than the literature values and those measured with the sidearm rubber septum cell were both higher and lower than literature…

  18. Investigation of odd-order nonlinear susceptibilities in atomic vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Yaqi [Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Information Photonic Technique, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Teaching and Research Section of Maths and Physics, Guangzhou Commanding Academy of Chinese People’s Armed Police Force, Guangzhou, 510440 (China); Wu, Zhenkun; Si, Jinhai; Yan, Lihe; Zhang, Yiqi; Yuan, Chenzhi; Sun, Jia [Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Information Photonic Technique, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Zhang, Yanpeng, E-mail: ypzhang@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Information Photonic Technique, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China)

    2013-06-15

    We theoretically deduce the macroscopic symmetry constraints for arbitrary odd-order nonlinear susceptibilities in homogeneous media including atomic vapors for the first time. After theoretically calculating the expressions using a semiclassical method, we demonstrate that the expressions for third- and fifth-order nonlinear susceptibilities for undressed and dressed four- and six-wave mixing (FWM and SWM) in atomic vapors satisfy the macroscopic symmetry constraints. We experimentally demonstrate consistence between the macroscopic symmetry constraints and the semiclassical expressions for atomic vapors by observing polarization control of FWM and SWM processes. The experimental results are in reasonable agreement with our theoretical calculations. -- Highlights: •The macroscopic symmetry constraints are deduced for homogeneous media including atomic vapors. •We demonstrate that odd-order nonlinear susceptibilities satisfy the constraints. •We experimentally demonstrate the deduction in part.

  19. Exposure control practices for administering nitrous oxide: A survey of dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiano, James M; Steege, Andrea L; Sweeney, Marie H

    2017-06-01

    Engineering, administrative, and work practice controls have been recommended for many years to minimize exposure to nitrous oxide during dental procedures. To better understand the extent to which these exposure controls are used, the NIOSH Health and Safety Practices Survey of Healthcare Workers was conducted among members of professional practice organizations representing dentists, dental hygienists and dental assistants. The anonymous, modular, web-based survey was completed by 284 dental professionals in private practice who administered nitrous oxide to adult and/or pediatric patients in the seven days prior to the survey. Use of primary engineering controls (i.e., nasal scavenging mask and/or local exhaust ventilation (LEV) near the patient's mouth) was nearly universal, reported by 93% and 96% of respondents who administered to adult (A) and pediatric (P) patients, respectively. However, adherence to other recommended precautionary practices were lacking to varying degrees, and were essentially no different among those administering nitrous oxide to adult or pediatric patients. Examples of work practices which increase exposure risk, expressed as percent of respondents, included: not checking nitrous oxide equipment for leaks (41% A; 48% P); starting nitrous oxide gas flow before delivery mask or airway mask was applied to patient (13% A; 12% P); and not turning off nitrous oxide gas flow before turning off oxygen flow to the patient (8% A; 7% P). Absence of standard procedures to minimize worker exposure to nitrous oxide (13% of all respondents) and not being trained on safe handling and administration of nitrous oxide (3%) were examples of breaches of administrative controls which may also increase exposure risk. Successful management of nitrous oxide emissions should include properly fitted nasal scavenging masks, supplemental LEV (when nitrous oxide levels cannot be adequately controlled using nasal masks alone), adequate general ventilation, regular

  20. Observation and particle simulation of vaporized W, Mo, and Be in PISCES-B plasma for vapor-shielding studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ibano

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Interactions of Tungsten (W, Molybdenum (Mo, and Beryllium (Be vapors with a steady-state plasma were studied by the PISCES-B liner plasma experiments as well as Particle-In-Cell (PIC simulations for the understanding of vapor-shielding phenomena. Effective cooling of the plasma by laser-generated Be vapor was observed in PISCES-B. On the other hand, no apparent cooling was observed for W and Mo vapors. The PIC simulation explains these experimental observations of the difference between low-Z and high-Z vapors. Decrease of electron temperature due to the vapor ejection was observed in case of a simulation of the Be vapor. As for the W vapor, it was found that the plasma cooling is localized only near the wall at a higher electron density plasma (∼1019m−3. On the other hand, the appreciable plasma cooling can be observed in a lower density plasma (∼1018m−3 for the W vapor.

  1. Study on the effect of subcooling on vapor film collapse on high temperature particle surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Yutaka; Tochio, Daisuke; Yanagida, Hiroshi

    2000-01-01

    Thermal detonation model is proposed to describe vapor explosion. According to this model, vapor film on pre-mixed high temperature droplet surface is needed to be collapsed for the trigger of the vapor explosion. It is pointed out that the vapor film collapse behavior is significantly affected by the subcooling of low temperature liquid. However, the effect of subcooling on micro-mechanism of vapor film collapse behavior is not experimentally well identified. The objective of the present research is to experimentally investigate the effect of subcooling on micro-mechanism of film boiling collapse behavior. As the results, it is experimentally clarified that the vapor film collapse behavior in low subcooling condition is qualitatively different from the vapor film collapse behavior in high subcooling condition. In case of vapor film collapse by pressure pulse, homogeneous vapor generation occurred all over the surface of steel particle in low subcooling condition. On the other hand, heterogeneous vapor generation was observed for higher subcooling condition. In case of vapor film collapse spontaneously, fluctuation of the gas-liquid interface after quenching propagated from bottom to top of the steel particle heterogeneously in low subcooling condition. On the other hand, simultaneous vapor generation occurred for higher subcooling condition. And the time transient of pressure, particle surface temperature, water temperature and visual information were simultaneously measured in the vapor film collapse experiment by external pressure pulse. Film thickness was estimated by visual data processing technique with the pictures taken by the high-speed video camera. Temperature and heat flux at the vapor-liquid interface were estimated by solving the heat condition equation with the measured pressure, liquid temperature and vapor film thickness as boundary conditions. Movement of the vapor-liquid interface were estimated with the PIV technique with the visual observation

  2. Effects of nitrous oxide on the rat heart in vivo: another inhalational anesthetic that preconditions the heart?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weber, Nina C.; Toma, Octavian; Awan, Saqib; Frässdorf, Jan; Preckel, Benedikt; Schlack, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For nitrous oxide, a preconditioning effect on the heart has yet not been investigated. This is important because nitrous oxide is commonly used in combination with volatile anesthetics, which are known to precondition the heart. The authors aimed to clarify (1) whether nitrous oxide

  3. Reaction of nitrous acid with U(IV) and nitric acid in 30% TBP-kerosene solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xiangrong; Hu Jingxin; Huang Huaian; Qiu Xiaoxi

    1990-01-01

    Reaction of nitrous acid with U(IV) and nitric acid in 30% TBP-kerosene solution is investigated, the rate equations of oxidation of U(IV) by nitrous acid and that of nitrous acid reacting with nitric acid are obtained

  4. Measurement and analysis of transient vaporization in oxide fuel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, D.A.; Bergeron, E.G.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes a series of experiments in which samples are heated to produce high vapor pressure states in times of 10 -6 to 10 -3 seconds. Experimental measurements of vapor pressures over fresh UO 2 from the pulsed electron beam and pulsed reactor heating tests are presented and compared with other high temperature data. The interpretation of the vapor pressure measured in the tests is discussed in detail. Effects of original sample stoichiometry, chemical interactions with the container and non-equilibrium evaporation due to induced temperature gradients are discussed. Special attention is given to dynamic behavior in rapid heating and vaporization of the oxide due to chemical non-equilibrium. Finally, similar projected reactor experiments on irradiated fuel are described and vapor pressure predictions made using available equilibrium models. A discussion of information accessible from such future tests and its importance is presented. (orig.) [de

  5. Measurement and analysis of transient vaporization in oxide fuel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorham-Bergeron, E.; Benson, D.A.

    1978-01-01

    A series of experiments is described in which samples are heated to produce high vapor pressure states in times of 10 -6 to 10 -3 seconds. Experimental measurements of vapor pressures over fresh UO 2 from the pulsed electron beam and pulsed reactor heating tests are presented and compared with other high temperature data. The interpretation of the vapor pressures measured in the tests is discussed in detail. Effects of original sample stoichiometry, chemical interactions with the container and non-equilibrium evaporation due to induced temperature gradients are discussed. Special attention is given to dynamic behavior in rapid heating and vaporization of the oxide due to chemical nonequilibrium. Finally, similar projected reactor experiments on irradiated fuel are described and vapor pressure predictions made using available equilibrium models. A discussion of information accessible from such future tests and its importance is presented

  6. Analysis of the transient compressible vapor flow in heat pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jong Hoon; Faghri, Amir; Chang, Won Soon

    1989-01-01

    The transient compressible one-dimensional vapor flow dynamics in a heat pipe is modeled. The numerical results are obtained by using the implicit non-iterative Beam-Warming finite difference method. The model is tested for simulated heat pipe vapor flow and actual flow in cylindrical heat pipes. A good comparison of the present transient results for the simulated heat pipe vapor flow with the previous results of a two-dimensional numerical model is achieved and the steady state results are in agreement with the existing experimental data. The transient behavior of the vapor flow under subsonic, sonic, and supersonic speeds and high mass flow rates are successfully predicted. The one-dimensional model also describes the vapor flow dynamics in cylindrical heat pipes at high temperatures.

  7. Vapor pressure and enthalpy of vaporization of linear aliphatic alkanediamines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozdeev, Vasiliy A.; Verevkin, Sergey P.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We measured vapor pressure of diamines H 2 N-(CH 2 ) n -NH 2 with n = 3 to 12. → Vaporization enthalpies at 298 K were derived. → We examined consistency of new and available in the literature data. → Enthalpies of vaporization show linear dependence on numbers n. → Enthalpies of vaporization correlate linearly with Kovat's indices. - Abstract: Vapor pressures and the molar enthalpies of vaporization of the linear aliphatic alkanediamines H 2 N-(CH 2 ) n -NH 2 with n = (3 to 12) have been determined using the transpiration method. A linear correlation of enthalpies of vaporization (at T = 298.15 K) of the alkanediamines with the number n and with the Kovat's indices has been found, proving the internal consistency of the measured data.

  8. NITROUS OXIDE EMISSIONS FROM SOUTHERN HIGH PLAINS BEEF CATTLE FEEDYARDS: MEASUREMENT AND MODELING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predictive models for nitrous oxide emission are crucial for assessing the greenhouse gas footprint of beef cattle production. The Texas Panhandle produces approximately 42% of finished beef in the U.S. and cattle production is estimated to contribute 8 Tg carbon dioxide equivalents from nitrous oxi...

  9. Emissions of nitrous oxide and methane from surface and ground waters in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiessl, H.

    1993-01-01

    The paper provides a first estimation of the contribution of inland freshwater systems (surface waters and ground waters) to the emission of the greenhouse gases nitrous oxide and methane in Germany. These amounts are compared to other main sources for the emission of nitrous oxide and methane. (orig.) [de

  10. How well do we understand nitrous oxide emissions from open-lot cattle systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrous oxide is an important greenhouse gas that is produced in manure. Open lot beef cattle feedyards emit nitrous oxide but little information is available about exactly how much is produced. This has become an important research topic because of environmental concerns. Only a few methods are ava...

  11. Nitrogen management impacts nitrous oxide emissions under varying cotton irrigation systems in the American Desert Southwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irrigation of food and fiber crops worldwide continues to increase. Nitrogen (N) from fertilizers is a major source of the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) in irrigated cropping systems. Nitrous oxide emissions data are scarce for crops in the arid Western US. The objective of these studies...

  12. Analysis of microbial populations, denitrification, and nitrous oxide production in riparian buffers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riparian buffers are used extensively to protect water bodies from nonpoint source nitrogen pollution. However there is relatively little information on the impact of these buffers on production of nitrous oxide (N2O). In this study, we assessed nitrous oxide production in riparian buffers of the so...

  13. Nitrous oxide emissions from a coal mine land reclaimed with stabilized manure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mined land restoration using manure-based amendments may create soil conditions suitable for nitrous oxide production and emission. We measured nitrous oxide emissions from mine soil amended with composted poultry manure (Comp) or poultry manure mixed with paper mill sludge (Man+PMS) at C/N ratios o...

  14. Manual on measurement of methane and nitrous oxide emissions from agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    Nitrous oxide and methane are two of the gases primarily responsible for atmospheric warming, or the ''greenhouse effect''. Agricultural activities are an important source of methane and nitrous oxide emissions, but quantitation of these sources is generally lacking. This manual describes techniques to evaluate current emissions from diverse animal and crop production practices and suggests methods for decreasing these emissions. Refs, figs and tabs

  15. Rye cover crop effects on nitrous oxide emissions from a corn-soybean system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agricultural activities are a major source nitrous oxide emitted to the atmosphere. Development of management practices to reduce these emissions is needed. Non-leguminous cover crops are efficient scavengers of residual soil nitrate, but their effects on nitrous oxide emissions have not been well d...

  16. Valuation of the effectiveness of the nitrous oxide administration to the paediatric patient during channelling a peripheral venous

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Margenta Gutiérrez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To valuate if the administration of nitrous oxide (Kalinox® during the technique of channelling a peripheral venous level decreases pain, improves the child´s behavior and facilitates the realization of the technique for the nurse. Experimental, randomized clinical trial. Population: children between 6-12 years old with an indication of peripheral venous channeling and medical approbation for administration of Kalinox to the Pediatric ICU unit of the Hospital in Toledo. Sample: 54 subjects in each group (alpha error of 0.05, with a study power of 90% and expecting a mean effect d/s = 0.5 for reducing pain in the experimental group. Main variables: the administration of nitrous oxide (independent variable and level of pain, motor behavior, degree of difficulty in performing the technique, and complications (dependent variables, besides, sociodemographic and clinical variables will be measured. It was used differents validated scales (Oucher, VAS y Frankl and one performed by us. Data will be analyze by SPSS software programme.

  17. [Clinical trail on the effect of nitrous oxide/oxygen inhalation sedation on the treatment of acute pulpitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin-wen; Wang, Li-xin; Liu, Xi-yun

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of nitrous oxide/oxygen inhalation sedation in the treatment of acute pulpitis. The study population comprised 72 patients of acute pulpitis treated from September 2012 to March 2013. They were randomly divided into 2 groups, which included experimental group (37 cases) and control group (35 cases). Venham clinical anxiety, cooperative behavior level and WHO clinical pain level evaluation were conducted for the patients. Wilcoxon and Chi-square test were used respectively for statistical analysis with SPSS 14.0 software package. In the experimental group, 86.5% cases behaved comfortable, while in the control group the rate was only 42.9%. 94.6% of the patients in the experimental group felt painless after therapy. The proportion of that in the control group was 68.6%. There was significant difference between the 2 groups (Ppulpitis, while the long-term clinical result still needs further investigation.

  18. Acute ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction, a Unique Complication of Recreational Nitrous Oxide Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indraratna, Praveen; Alexopoulos, Chris; Celermajer, David; Alford, Kevin

    2017-08-01

    A 28-year-old male was admitted to hospital with an acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction. This was in the context of recreational abuse of nitrous oxide. The prevalence of nitrous oxide use in Australia has not been formally quantified, however it is the second most commonly used recreational drug in the United Kingdom. Nitrous oxide has previously been shown to increase serum homocysteine levels. This patient was discovered to have an elevated homocysteine level at baseline, which was further increased after nitrous oxide consumption. Homocysteine has been linked to endothelial dysfunction and coronary atherosclerosis and this case report highlights one of the dangers of recreational abuse of nitrous oxide. Copyright © 2017 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The Neurotoxicity of Nitrous Oxide: The Facts and “Putative” Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Sinead; Ma, Daqing

    2014-01-01

    Nitrous oxide is a widely used analgesic agent, used also in combination with anaesthetics during surgery. Recent research has raised concerns about possible neurotoxicity of nitrous oxide, particularly in the developing brain. Nitrous oxide is an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-antagonist drug, similar in nature to ketamine, another anaesthetic agent. It has been linked to post-operative cardiovascular problems in clinical studies. It is also widely known that exposure to nitrous oxide during surgery results in elevated homocysteine levels in many patients, but very little work has investigated the long term effect of these increased homocysteine levels. Now research in rodent models has found that homocysteine can be linked to neuronal death and possibly even cognitive deficits. This review aims to examine the current knowledge of mechanisms of action of nitrous oxide, and to describe some pathways by which it may have neurotoxic effects. PMID:24961701

  20. Gaschromatographic proof of nitrous oxide concentrations in air by means of radiation ionization detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popp, P.; Schoentube, E.; Oppermann, G.

    1985-01-01

    For the analysis of nitrous oxide concentrations at workplaces in operating theatres, gaschromatography is a particularly suitable method if it is possible to measure nitrous oxide concentrations in the ppm to ppb region. For this, most frequently used gaschromatographic detectors (flame ionization detector, thermal conductivity detector) are unsuitable, whereas radiation ionization detectors can be used successfully. The investigations using detectors designed at the Central Institute for Isotopes and Radiation Research of the GDR Academy of Sciences showed that a high-temperature electron-capture detector (ECD), working at a temperatur of 250 0 C, enables the determination of traces of nitrous oxide with a detection limit of about 200 ppb, while the helium detector has a limit of 50 ppb of nitrous oxide in room air. Since the helium detector requires extremely pure carrier gas, the high-temperature ECD appears more suitable for analyzing nitrous oxide. (author)

  1. Microscale interfacial behavior at vapor film collapse on high-temperature particle surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Yutaka; Tochio, Daisuke

    2009-01-01

    It has been pointed out that vapor film on a premixed high-temperature droplet surface should be collapsed to trigger vapor explosion. Thus, it is important to clarify the micromechanism of vapor film collapse behavior for the occurrence of vapor explosion. In the present study, microscale vapor-liquid interface behavior upon vapor film collapse caused by an external pressure pulse is experimentally observed and qualitatively analyzed. In the analytical investigation, interfacial temperature and interface movement were estimated with heat conduction analysis and visual data processing technique. Results show that condensation can possibly occur at the vapor-liquid interface when the pressure pulse arrived. That is, this result indicates that the vapor film collapse behavior is dominated not by fluid motion but by phase change. (author)

  2. Vapor condensation device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Manabu; Hirayama, Fumio; Kurosawa, Setsumi; Yoshikawa, Jun; Hosaka, Seiichi.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention enables to separate and remove 14 C as CO 3 - ions without condensation in a vapor condensation can of a nuclear facility. That is, the vapor condensation device of the nuclear facility comprises (1) a spray pipe for spraying an acidic aqueous solution to the evaporation surface of an evaporation section, (2) a spray pump for sending the acidic aqueous solution to the spray pipe, (3) a tank for storing the acidic aqueous solution, (4) a pH sensor for detecting pH of the evaporation section, (5) a pH control section for controlling the spray pump, depending on the result of the detection of the pH sensor. With such a constitution, the pH of liquid wastes on the vaporization surface is controlled to 7 by spraying an aqueous solution of dilute sulfuric acid to the evaporation surface, thereby enabling to increase the transfer rate of 14 C to condensates to 60 to 70%. If 14 C is separated and removed as a CO 2 gas from the evaporation surface, the pH of the liquid wastes returns to the alkaline range of 9 to 10 and the liquid wastes are returned to a heating section. The amount of spraying the aqueous solution of dilute sulfuric acid can be controlled till the pH is reduced to 5. (I.S.)

  3. Discharge characteristics of copper vapor laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemoto, Koshichi; Fujii, Takashi

    1988-01-01

    This report describes about the copper vapor laser and experimental results of it's discharge characteristics. We measured time varing of plasma regist, and analyzed electron density. (1) The plasma regist is larger than 100Ω at the beginning of discharge, and is rapidly reduced to about 10Ω. (2) The electron density is estimated about 1∼2 x 10 12 /cc at the begining of discharge. (author)

  4. The vapor pressures of explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, Robert G.; Waltman, Melanie J.; Atkinson, David A.; Grate, Jay W.; Hotchkiss, Peter

    2013-01-05

    The vapor pressures of many explosive compounds are extremely low and thus determining accurate values proves difficult. Many researchers, using a variety of methods, have measured and reported the vapor pressures of explosives compounds at single temperatures, or as a function of temperature using vapor pressure equations. There are large variations in reported vapor pressures for many of these compounds, and some errors exist within individual papers. This article provides a review of explosive vapor pressures and describes the methods used to determine them. We have compiled primary vapor pressure relationships traceable to the original citations and include the temperature ranges for which they have been determined. Corrected values are reported as needed and described in the text. In addition, after critically examining the available data, we calculate and tabulate vapor pressures at 25 °C.

  5. Nitrous oxide for labor analgesia: Utilization and predictors of conversion to neuraxial analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Caitlin D; Butwick, Alexander J; Riley, Edward T; Carvalho, Brendan

    2017-08-01

    We examined the characteristics of women who choose nitrous oxide for labor analgesia and identified factors that predict conversion from nitrous oxide to labor neuraxial analgesia. Retrospective descriptive study. Labor and Delivery Ward. 146 pregnant women who used nitrous oxide for analgesia during labor and delivery between September 2014 and September 2015. Chart review only. Demographic, obstetric, and intrapartum characteristics of women using nitrous oxide were examined. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify factors associated with conversion from nitrous oxide to neuraxial analgesia. Data are presented as n (%), median [IQR], adjusted relative risk (aRR), and 95% confidence intervals (CI) as appropriate. During the study period, 146 women used nitrous oxide for labor analgesia (accounting for 3% of the total deliveries). The majority (71.9%) of women who used nitrous oxide were nulliparous, and over half (51.9%) had expressed an initial preference for "nonmedical birth." The conversion rate to neuraxial blockade was 63.2%, compared to a concurrent institutional rate of 85.1% in women who did not use nitrous oxide. Factors associated with conversion from nitrous oxide to neuraxial blockade were labor induction (aRR=2.0, CI 1.2-3.3) and labor augmentation (aRR=1.7, CI 1.0-2.9). Only a small number of women opted to use nitrous oxide during labor, analgesia was minimal, and most converted to neuraxial analgesia. Women with induced and augmented labors should be counseled about the increased likelihood that they will convert to neuraxial analgesia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Nitrous oxide-related postoperative nausea and vomiting depends on duration of exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyton, Philip J; Wu, Christine Yx

    2014-05-01

    Inclusion of nitrous oxide in the gas mixture has been implicated in postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) in numerous studies. However, these studies have not examined whether duration of exposure was a significant covariate. This distinction might affect the future place of nitrous oxide in clinical practice. PubMed listed journals reporting trials in which patients randomized to a nitrous oxide or nitrous oxide-free anesthetic for surgery were included, where the incidence of PONV within the first 24 postoperative hours and mean duration of anesthesia was reported. Meta-regression of the log risk ratio for PONV with nitrous oxide (lnRR PONVN2O) versus duration was performed. Twenty-nine studies in 27 articles met the inclusion criteria, randomizing 10,317 patients. There was a significant relationship between lnRR PONVN2O and duration (r = 0.51, P = 0.002). Risk ratio PONV increased 20% per hour of nitrous oxide after 45 min. The number needed to treat to prevent PONV by avoiding nitrous oxide was 128, 23, and 9 where duration was less than 1, 1 to 2, and over 2 h, respectively. The risk ratio for the overall effect of nitrous oxide on PONV was 1.21 (CIs, 1.04-1.40); P = 0.014. This duration-related effect may be via disturbance of methionine and folate metabolism. No clinically significant effect of nitrous oxide on the risk of PONV exists under an hour of exposure. Nitrous oxide-related PONV should not be seen as an impediment to its use in minor or ambulatory surgery.

  7. Nitrous oxide production kinetics during nitrate reduction in river sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverman, Anniet M; Garnier, Josette A; Mounier, Emmanuelle M; Roose-Amsaleg, Céline L

    2010-03-01

    A significant amount of nitrogen entering river basins is denitrified in riparian zones. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of nitrate and carbon concentrations on the kinetic parameters of nitrate reduction as well as nitrous oxide emissions in river sediments in a tributary of the Marne (the Seine basin, France). In order to determine these rates, we used flow-through reactors (FTRs) and slurry incubations; flow-through reactors allow determination of rates on intact sediment slices under controlled conditions compared to sediment homogenization in the often used slurry technique. Maximum nitrate reduction rates (R(m)) ranged between 3.0 and 7.1microg Ng(-1)h(-1), and affinity constant (K(m)) ranged from 7.4 to 30.7mg N-NO(3)(-)L(-1). These values were higher in slurry incubations with an R(m) of 37.9microg Ng(-1)h(-1) and a K(m) of 104mg N-NO(3)(-)L(-1). Nitrous oxide production rates did not follow Michaelis-Menten kinetics, and we deduced a rate constant with an average of 0.7 and 5.4ng Ng(-1)h(-1) for FTR and slurry experiments respectively. The addition of carbon (as acetate) showed that carbon was not limiting nitrate reduction rates in these sediments. Similar rates were obtained for FTR and slurries with carbon addition, confirming the hypothesis that homogenization increases rates due to release of and increasing access to carbon in slurries. Nitrous oxide production rates in FTR with carbon additions were low and represented less than 0.01% of the nitrate reduction rates and were even negligible in slurries. Maximum nitrate reduction rates revealed seasonality with high potential rates in fall and winter and low rates in late spring and summer. Under optimal conditions (anoxia, non-limiting nitrate and carbon), nitrous oxide emission rates were low, but significant (0.01% of the nitrate reduction rates). Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Nitrous oxide emission from denitrification in stream and river networks

    OpenAIRE

    Beaulieu, Jake J.; Tank, Jennifer L.; Hamilton, Stephen K.; Wollheim, Wilfred M.; Hall, Robert O.; Mulholland, Patrick J.; Peterson, Bruce J.; Ashkenas, Linda R.; Cooper, Lee W.; Dahm, Clifford N.; Dodds, Walter K.; Grimm, Nancy B.; Johnson, Sherri L.; McDowell, William H.; Poole, Geoffrey C.

    2010-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change and stratospheric ozone destruction. Anthropogenic nitrogen (N) loading to river networks is a potentially important source of N2O via microbial denitrification that converts N to N2O and dinitrogen (N2). The fraction of denitrified N that escapes as N2O rather than N2 (i.e., the N2O yield) is an important determinant of how much N2O is produced by river networks, but little is known about the N2O yield in flowi...

  9. Portable nitrous oxide sensor for understanding agricultural and soil emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanton, Alan [Southwest Sciences, Inc., Santa Fe, NM (United States); Zondlo, Mark [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Gomez, Anthony [Southwest Sciences, Inc., Santa Fe, NM (United States); Pan, Da [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2017-02-27

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is the third most important greenhouse gas (GHG,) with an atmospheric lifetime of ~114 years and a global warming impact ~300 times greater than that of carbon dioxide. The main cause of nitrous oxide’s atmospheric increase is anthropogenic emissions, and over 80% of the current global anthropogenic flux is related to agriculture, including associated land-use change. An accurate assessment of N2O emissions from agriculture is vital not only for understanding the global N2O balance and its impact on climate but also for designing crop systems with lower GHG emissions. Such assessments are currently hampered by the lack of instrumentation and methodologies to measure ecosystem-level fluxes at appropriate spatial and temporal scales. Southwest Sciences and Princeton University are developing and testing new open-path eddy covariance instrumentation for continuous and fast (10 Hz) measurement of nitrous oxide emissions. An important advance, now being implemented, is the use of new mid-infrared laser sources that enable the development of exceptionally low power (<10 W) compact instrumentation that can be used even in remote sites lacking in power. The instrumentation will transform the ability to measure and understand ecosystem-level nitrous oxide fluxes. The Phase II results included successful extended field testing of prototype flux instruments, based on quantum cascade lasers, in collaboration with Michigan State University. Results of these tests demonstrated a flux detection limit of 5 µg m-2 s-1 and showed excellent agreement and correlation with measurements using chamber techniques. Initial tests of an instrument using an interband cascade laser (ICL) were performed, verifying that an order of magnitude reduction in instrument power requirements can be realized. These results point toward future improvements and testing leading to introduction of a commercial open path instrument for N2O flux measurements that is truly portable and

  10. A Local Propagation for Vapor Explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochiai, M.; Bankoff, S.G.

    1976-01-01

    Explosive boiling, defined as energy transfer leading to formation of vapor rapidly enough to produce large shock waves, has been widely studied in a number of contexts. Depending upon the nature and temperatures of the liquids and mode of contacting, large-scale mixing and explosive vaporization may occur, or alternatively, only relatively non-energetic, film-type boiling may exist. The key difference is whether a mechanism is operative for increasing the liquid-liquid interfacial area in a time scale consistent with the formation of a detonation wave. Small drops of a cold volatile liquid were dropped onto a free surface of a hot, non-volatile liquid. The critical Weber number for coalescence is obtained from the envelope of the film boiling region. Markedly different behavior for the two hot liquids is observed. A 'splash' theory for local propagation of vapor explosions in spontaneously nucleating liquid-liquid systems is now formulated. After a random contact is made, explosive growth and coalescence of the vapor bubbles occurs as soon as the surrounding pressure is relieved, resulting in a high-pressure vapor layer at the liquid-liquid contact area. This amounts to an impact pressure applied to the free surface, with a resulting velocity distribution obtained from potential flow theory. The peak pressure predictions are. consistent with data for Freon-oil mixing, but further evaluation will await additional experimental data. Nevertheless, the current inference is that a UO 2 -Na vapor explosion in a reactor environment cannot be visualized. In conclusion: The propagation model presented here differs in some details from that of Henry and Fauske, although both are consistent with some peak pressure data obtained by Henry, et al. Clearly, additional experimental information is needed for further evaluation of these theories. Nevertheless, it should be emphasized that even at this time a number of important observations concerning the requirements for a vapor

  11. Water-vapor pressure control in a volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scialdone, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    The variation with time of the partial pressure of water in a volume that has openings to the outside environment and includes vapor sources was evaluated as a function of the purging flow and its vapor content. Experimental tests to estimate the diffusion of ambient humidity through openings and to validate calculated results were included. The purging flows required to produce and maintain a certain humidity in shipping containers, storage rooms, and clean rooms can be estimated with the relationship developed here. These purging flows are necessary to prevent the contamination, degradation, and other effects of water vapor on the systems inside these volumes.

  12. Water vapor absorption in the atmospheric window at 239 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, A.; Godon, M.; Carlier, J.; Ma, Q.

    1995-01-01

    Absolute absorption rates of pure water vapor and mixtures of water vapor and nitrogen have been measured in the atmospheric window at 239 GHz. The dependence on pressure as well as temperature has been obtained. The experimental data are compared with several theoretical or empirical models, and satisfactory agreement is obtained with the models involving a continuum; in the case of pure water vapor, the continuum contribution based upon recent theoretical developments gives good results. The temperature dependence is stronger than that proposed in a commonly used atmospheric transmission model.

  13. External fuel vaporization study, phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szetela, E. J.; Chiappetta, L.

    1981-01-01

    An analytical study was conducted to evaluate the effect of variations in fuel properties on the design of an external fuel vaporizaton system. The fuel properties that were considered included thermal stability, critical temperature, enthalpy a critical conditions, volatility, and viscosity. The design parameters that were evaluated included vaporizer weight and the impact on engine requirement such as maintenance, transient response, performance, and altitude relight. The baseline fuel properties were those of Jet A. The variation in thermal stability was taken as the thermal stability variation for Experimental Referee Broad Specification (ERBS) fuel. The results of the analysis indicate that a change in thermal stability equivalent to that of ERBS would increase the vaporization system weight by 20 percent, decrease oprating time between cleaning by 40 percent and make altitude relight more difficult. An increase in fuel critical temperature of 39 K would require a 40 percent increase in vaporization system weight. The assumed increase in enthalpy and volatility would also increase vaporizer weight by 40 percent and make altitude relight extremely difficult. The variation in fuel viscosity would have a negligible effect on the design parameters.

  14. Similarities and differences in vapor explosion criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronenberg, A.W.

    1978-01-01

    An overview of recent ideas pertaining to vapor explosion criteria indicates that in general sense, a consensus of opinion is emerging on the conditions applicable to explosive vaporization. Experimental and theoretical work has lead a number of investigators to the formulation of such conditions which are quite similar in many respects, although the quantitative details of the model formulation of such conditions are somewhat different. All model concepts are consistent in that an initial period of stable film boiling, separating molten fuel from coolant, is considered necessary (at least for large-scale interactions and efficient intermixing), with subsequent breakdown of film boiling due to pressure and/or thermal effects, followed by intimate fuel-coolant contact and a rapid vaporization process which is sufficient to cause shock pressurization. Although differences arise as to the conditions for and the energetics associated with film boiling destabilization and the mode and energetics of fragmentation and intermixing. However, the principal area of difference seems to be the question of what constitutes the requisite condition(s) for rapid vapor production to cause shock pressurization

  15. [Impact of the decrease of nitrous oxide use on the consumption of halogenated agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverdure, F; Gaudin, A; Bourgain, J-L

    2013-11-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) toxicity and its impact on pollution lead to restrict its use. A decrease of N2O consumption should increase the hypnotic inhaled consumption. This monocentric study estimated consumptions and costs of halogenated agents (HA) and N2O over 5 years when the N2O consumption was reduced. Retrospective from a computerized database. Between 2006 and 2010, 34,097 procedures were studied after two meetings exposing the risks of the N2O. At the end of anesthesia, consumptions of hypnotic agents (millilitres transmitted by the injectors and the blender) were archived in the database. The annual consumption of agents was obtained by adding the individual consumptions, then divided by the annual number of cases. The costs were given by the hospital pharmacy from invoices. N2O consumption per anesthesia constantly decreased during the study, from 75.1L by act to 22.7L. The sum of the annual consumptions of N2O and air did not change suggesting that total fresh gas flow remained stable. Between 2006 and 2010, the sevoflurane consumption by act increased by 25%, from 16.5 to 20.6mL, and desflurane consumption by 37%, from 46.1 to 63.1mL by patient. The costs of the administration of hypnotic agents remained stable. N2O consumption decrease had an impact on the consumption of HA. The cost reduction of the N2O was counterbalanced by the increase of halogenated vapor cost. The profit of the ecological impact of the reduction in N2O use could be quantified. Copyright © 2013 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Determinants of Nitrous Oxide Emission from Agricultural Drainage Waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reay, D. S.; Edwards, A. C.; Smith, K. A.

    2004-01-01

    Emissions of the powerful greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N 2 O) from agricultural drainage waters are poorly quantified and its determinants are not fully understood. Nitrous oxide formation in agricultural soils is known to increase in response to N fertiliser application, but the response of N 2 O in field drainage waters is unknown. This investigation combined an intensive study of the direct flux of N 2 O from the surface of a fertilised barley field with measurement of dissolved N 2 O and nitrate (NO 3 ) concentrations in the same field's drainage waters. Dissolved N 2 O in drainage waters showed a clear response to field N fertilisation, following an identical pattern to direct N 2 O flux from the field surface. The range in N 2 O concentrations between individual field drains sampled on the same day was large, indicating considerable spatial variability exists at the farm scale. A consistent pattern of very rapid outgassing of the dissolved N 2 O in open drainage ditches was accentuated at a weir, where increased turbulence led to a clear drop in dissolved N 2 O concentration. This study underlines the need for carefully planned sampling campaigns wherever whole farm or catchment N 2 O emission budgets are attempted. It adds weight to the argument for the downward revision of the IPCC emission factor (EF 5 -g) for NO 3 in drainage waters

  17. Determinants of nitrous oxide emission from agricultural drainage waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reay, D. S.; Edwards, A. C.; Smith, K. A.

    2005-01-01

    Emissions of the powerful greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N 2 O) from agricultural drainage waters are poorly quantified and its determinants are not fully understood. Nitrous oxide formation in agricultural soils is known to increase in response to N fertiliser application, but the response of N 2 O in field drainage waters is unknown. This investigation combined an intensive study of the direct flux of N 2 O from the surface of a fertilised barley field with measurement of dissolved N 2 O and nitrate (NO 3 ) concentrations in the same field's drainage waters. Dissolved N 2 O in drainage waters showed a clear response to field N fertilisation, following an identical pattern to direct N 2 O flux from the field surface. The range in N 2 O concentrations between individual field drains sampled on the same day was large, indicating considerable spatial variability exists at the farm scale. A consistent pattern of very rapid outgassing of the dissolved N 2 O in open drainage ditches was accentuated at a weir, where increased turbulence led to a clear drop in dissolved N 2 O concentration. This study underlines the need for carefully planned sampling campaigns wherever whole farm or catchment N 2 O emission budgets are attempted. It adds weight to the argument for the downward revision of the IPCC emission factor (EF 5 -g) for NO 3 in drainage waters

  18. Differentiation of nitrous oxide emission factors for agricultural soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesschen, Jan Peter; Velthof, Gerard L.; Vries, Wim de; Kros, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N 2 O) direct soil emissions from agriculture are often estimated using the default IPCC emission factor (EF) of 1%. However, a large variation in EFs exists due to differences in environment, crops and management. We developed an approach to determine N 2 O EFs that depend on N-input sources and environmental factors. The starting point of the method was a monitoring study in which an EF of 1% was found. The conditions of this experiment were set as the reference from which the effects of 16 sources of N input, three soil types, two land-use types and annual precipitation on the N 2 O EF were estimated. The derived EF inference scheme performed on average better than the default IPCC EF. The use of differentiated EFs, including different regional conditions, allows accounting for the effects of more mitigation measures and offers European countries a possibility to use a Tier 2 approach. - Highlights: → We developed an N 2 O emission factor inference scheme for agricultural soils. → This scheme accounts for different N-input sources and environmental conditions. → The derived EF inference scheme performed better than the default IPCC EF. → The use of differentiated EFs allows for better accounting of mitigation measures. - Emission factors for nitrous oxide from agricultural soils are derived as a function of N-input sources and environmental conditions on the basis of empirical information.

  19. Strategies for decreasing nitrous oxide emissions from agricultural sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oenema, O. [AB-DLO, Wageningen (Netherlands)

    1999-08-01

    Following the Kyoto Conference of 1997, declaring the urgency of implementing strategies for decreasing greenhouse gas emissions, there are several valid arguments to examine the opportunities for reducing nitrous oxide emissions from agriculture. This paper provides a review of the state-of-the-art of emission reduction, discusses two strategies for decreasing emissions and identifies various gaps in current knowledge in this field and the need for relevant scientific research. The two strategies discussed are (1) increasing the nitrogen use efficiency toward the goal of lowering total nitrogen input, and (2) decreasing the release of nitrous oxide per unit of nitrogen from the processes of nitrification and denitrification. Increasing nitrogen use efficiency is thought to be the most effective strategy. To that end, the paper discusses several practical actions and measures based on decisions at tactical and operational management levels. Knowledge gaps identified include (1) incomplete understanding of nitrogen cycling in farming systems, (2) incomplete quantitative understanding of emission controlling factors, (3) information gap between science and policy, and (4) information gap between science and practice. Appropriate research needs are suggested for each of these areas. It is suggested that the highest priority should be given to improving the understanding of emission controlling factors in the field and on the farm. 23 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Technical opportunities to reduce global anthropogenic emissions of nitrous oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winiwarter, Wilfried; Höglund-Isaksson, Lena; Klimont, Zbigniew; Schöpp, Wolfgang; Amann, Markus

    2018-01-01

    We describe a consistent framework developed to quantify current and future anthropogenic emissions of nitrous oxide and the available technical abatement options by source sector for 172 regions globally. About 65% of the current emissions derive from agricultural soils, 8% from waste, and 4% from the chemical industry. Low-cost abatement options are available in industry, wastewater, and agriculture, where they are limited to large industrial farms. We estimate that by 2030, emissions can be reduced by about 6% ±2% applying abatement options at a cost lower than 10 €/t CO2-eq. The largest abatement potential at higher marginal costs is available from agricultural soils, employing precision fertilizer application technology as well as chemical treatment of fertilizers to suppress conversion processes in soil (nitrification inhibitors). At marginal costs of up to 100 €/t CO2-eq, about 18% ±6% of baseline emissions can be removed and when considering all available options, the global abatement potential increases to about 26% ±9%. Due to expected future increase in activities driving nitrous oxide emissions, the limited technical abatement potential available means that even at full implementation of reduction measures by 2030, global emissions can be at most stabilized at the pre-2010 level. In order to achieve deeper reductions in emissions, considerable technological development will be required as well as non-technical options like adjusting human diets towards moderate animal protein consumption.

  1. Theorical and experimental study of the induced forces by the mixed, divergent, convergent and straight labyrinth of seal systems on the steam turbines, gas turbines and compressor rotors; Estudio teorico-experimental de las fuerzas inducidas por los sistemas de sellos de laberinto rectos, convergentes, divergentes y mixtos sobre los rotores de turbinas de vapor, turbinas de gas y compresores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar San Andres, Octavio Ramon

    1991-12-31

    A theoretical and experimental research is conducted in order to determine the labyrinth seal forces, as well as the stiffness and damping coefficients for straight, convergent, divergent, and combined shapes on turbine and compressor rotors. The mathematical model is deduced on the basis of the single volume method and its solution is obtained by the perturbation procedure. The validation is achieved with published results. Experimental work carried out on a test bench is described in the text. This involved labyrinth seals with straight, convergent, and divergent profiles, as the published information relating to mixed type is sufficient to perform the evaluation. The conclusions demonstrate that the model is able to predict and determine the performance of labyrinth seals based on forces and rotordynamic coefficients for static and dynamic motions. Finally, tests on real steam turbines of 300 MW are recommended. In this case the high pressures and use of wheels with strips on the periphery and supported by the upper part of blades, increase the susceptibility of self excited subsynchronous vibrations. [Espanol] Se presenta una investigacion teorica-experimental relacionada con la obtencion y validacion de un modelo matematico capaz de predecir las fuerzas y los coeficientes de rigidez y amortiguamiento de los sellos de laberinto de tipo recto, convergente, divergente y mixto que se emplean en turbinas y compresores tanto terrestres como aereos. El modelo matematico propuesto se deduce a partir del metodo de un solo volumen y su solucion se obtiene a traves de metodos perturbatorios. La validacion del mismo se consigue al comparar con resultados experimentales publicados en revistas especializadas y con los datos medidos en un banco de pruebas cuya descripcion se incluye en el trabajo, cualculado para sellos rectos, convergentes y divergentes, ya que la informacion publicada respecto al tipo mixto o combinado es suficiente. Las conclusiones de la investigacion

  2. Prediction of the vapor pressure and vaporization enthalpy of 1-n-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium-bis-(trifluoromethanesulfonyl) amide ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diedenhofen, Michael; Klamt, Andreas; Marsh, Kenneth; Schäfer, Ansgar

    2007-09-07

    The vapor pressures and vaporization enthalpies of a series of 1-n-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium-bis-(trifluoromethanesulfonyl) amide ionic liquids have been predicted with two different approaches using the COSMO-RS method and quantum chemical gas phase calculations. While the calculated enthalpies are in good agreement with the experimental data, COSMO-RS seems to underestimate the vapor pressures by roughly 0.5-4 log units dependent on the IL and approach used.

  3. Nitrous oxide for the management of labor pain: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likis, Frances E; Andrews, Jeffrey C; Collins, Michelle R; Lewis, Rashonda M; Seroogy, Jeffrey J; Starr, Sarah A; Walden, Rachel R; McPheeters, Melissa L

    2014-01-01

    We systematically reviewed evidence addressing the effectiveness of nitrous oxide for the management of labor pain, the influence of nitrous oxide on women's satisfaction with their birth experience and labor pain management, and adverse effects associated with nitrous oxide for labor pain management. We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) databases for articles published in English. The study population included pregnant women in labor intending a vaginal birth, birth attendees or health care providers who may be exposed to nitrous oxide during labor, and the fetus/neonate. We identified a total of 58 publications, representing 59 distinct study populations: 2 studies were of good quality, 11 fair, and 46 poor. Inhalation of nitrous oxide provided less effective pain relief than epidural analgesia, but the quality of studies was predominately poor. The heterogeneous outcomes used to assess women's satisfaction with their birth experience and labor pain management made synthesis of studies difficult. Most maternal adverse effects reported in the literature were unpleasant side effects that affect tolerability, such as nausea, vomiting, dizziness, and drowsiness. Apgar scores in newborns whose mothers used nitrous oxide were not significantly different from those of newborns whose mothers used other labor pain management methods or no analgesia. Evidence about occupational harms and exposure was limited. The literature addressing nitrous oxide for the management of labor pain includes few studies of good or fair quality. Further research is needed across all of the areas examined: effectiveness, satisfaction, and adverse effects.

  4. Nitrous oxide emissions from European agriculture – an analysis of variability and drivers of emissions from field experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Rees

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Nitrous oxide emissions from a network of agricultural experiments in Europe were used to explore the relative importance of site and management controls of emissions. At each site, a selection of management interventions were compared within replicated experimental designs in plot-based experiments. Arable experiments were conducted at Beano in Italy, El Encin in Spain, Foulum in Denmark, Logården in Sweden, Maulde in Belgium, Paulinenaue in Germany, and Tulloch in the UK. Grassland experiments were conducted at Crichton, Nafferton and Peaknaze in the UK, Gödöllö in Hungary, Rzecin in Poland, Zarnekow in Germany and Theix in France. Nitrous oxide emissions were measured at each site over a period of at least two years using static chambers. Emissions varied widely between sites and as a result of manipulation treatments. Average site emissions (throughout the study period varied between 0.04 and 21.21 kg N2O-N ha−1 yr−1, with the largest fluxes and variability associated with the grassland sites. Total nitrogen addition was found to be the single most important determinant of emissions, accounting for 15% of the variance (using linear regression in the data from the arable sites (p 2O emissions within sites that occurred as a result of manipulation treatments was greater than that resulting from site-to-site and year-to-year variation, highlighting the importance of management interventions in contributing to greenhouse gas mitigation.

  5. Current use of nitrous oxide in public hospitals in Scandinavian countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husum, B; Stenqvist, O; Alahuhta, S; Sigurdsson, G H; Dale, O

    2013-10-01

    The use of nitrous oxide in modern anaesthesia has been questioned. We surveyed changes in use of nitrous oxide in Scandinavia and its justifications during the last two decades. All 191 departments of anaesthesia in the Scandinavian countries were requested by email to answer an electronic survey in SurveyMonkey. One hundred and twenty-five (64%) of the departments responded; four were excluded. The 121 departments provided 807.520 general anaesthetics annually. The usage of nitrous oxide was reported in 11.9% of cases, ranging from 0.6% in Denmark to 38.6% in Iceland while volatile anaesthetics were employed in 48.9%, lowest in Denmark (22.6%) and highest in Iceland (91.9%). Nitrous oxide was co-administered with volatile anaesthetics in 21.5% of general anaesthetics [2.4% (Denmark) -34.5% (Iceland)]. Use of nitrous oxide was unchanged in five departments (4%), decreasing in 75 (62%) and stopped in 41 (34%). Reasons for decreasing or stopping use of nitrous oxide were fairly uniform in the five countries, the most important being that other agents were 'better', whereas few put weight on its potential risk for increasing morbidity. Decision to stop using nitrous oxide was made by the departments except in four cases. Of 87 maternity wards, nitrous oxide was used in 72, whereas this was the case in 42 of 111 day-surgery units. The use of nitrous oxide has decreased in the Scandinavian countries, apparently because many now prefer other agents. Difference in practices between the five countries were unexpected and apparently not justified on anticipated evidence only. © 2013 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Liquid-liquid transfer phenomena studies coupled with redox reactions: back-extraction of nitrous acid in the presence of scavengers in aqueous phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K'zerho, R.

    1998-01-01

    This work deals with the investigation of redox reaction contribution to the kinetics of liquid-liquid transfer, in relation with PUREX reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. The chemical system chosen concerns the tripping of nitrous acid from tributylphosphate organic phase into a nitric acid aqueous solution containing an 'anti-nitrous' component, namely hydrazinium nitrate. According to the abundant literature, a major attention is devoted to the very important role of interfacial phenomena on the kinetics of solvent extraction with tributylphosphate. Although, a suitable experimental technique is chosen, using a constant interfacial area cell of the ARMOLLEX-type. Furthermore, the effects of the hydrodynamical and the physico-chemical parameters on the extraction rate led to the identification of the extraction regime nature: diffusional, then chemical limitation. When no 'anti-nitrous' component is used, the diffusional resistance is found to be mainly located in the aqueous diffusion layer. The presence of hydrazinium nitrate into the aqueous solution has an overall accelerating effect on the rate of extraction, related to both a complete suppression of the aqueous diffusional resistance, and a very significant enhancement of the interfacial transfer of the nitrous acid, as a function of hydrazinium concentration. If the first effect could be expected because of the well known fast redox reaction in aqueous phase, the second phenomenon represents a quite original and new result which has never been explored before, to the best of our knowledge. A reaction mechanism is postulated and validated, taking into account the reactive effect of hydrazinium on the interfacial step. In order to support the drawn general patterns, different complementary studies were attempted. When hydroxyl-ammonium nitrate is used, a surprising interfacial transfer blockage is observed, pointing out the extreme performance and specificity of the common hydrazinium component. (author)

  7. Experimental and theoretical investigations about the vaporization of laser-produced aerosols and individual particles inside inductively-coupled plasmas — Implications for the extraction efficiency of ions prior to mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flamigni, Luca; Koch, Joachim; Günther, Detlef

    2012-01-01

    Current quantification capabilities of laser ablation inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) are known to be restricted by elemental fractionation as a result of LA-, transport-, and ICP-induced effects which, particularly, may provoke inaccuracies whenever calibration strategies on the basis of non-matrix matched standard materials are applied. The present study is dealing with the role of ICP in this complex scenario. Therefore, the vaporization process of laser-produced aerosols and subsequent diffusion losses occurring inside ICP sources were investigated using 2-D optical emission spectrometry (OES) and ICP-quadrupole (Q)MS of individual particles. For instance, Na- and Ca-specific OES of aerosols produced by LA of silicate glasses or metals revealed axial shifts in the onset and maximum position of atomic emission which were in the range of a few millimeters. The occurrence of these shifts was found to arise from composition-dependent particle/aerosol penetration depths, i.e. the displacement of axial vaporization starting points controlling the ion extraction efficiency through the ICP-MS vacuum interface due to a delayed, diffusion-driven expansion of oxidic vs. metallic aerosols. Furthermore, ICP-QMS of individual particles resulted in 1/e half-value signal durations of approximately 100 μs, which complies with modeled values if OES maxima are assumed to coincide with positions of instantaneous vaporization and starting points for atomic diffusion. To prove phenomena observed for their consistency, in addition, “ab initio” as well as semi-empirical simulations of particle/aerosol penetration depths followed by diffusion-driven expansion was accomplished indicating differences of up to 15% in the relative ion extraction efficiency depending on whether analytes are supplied as metals or oxides. Implications of these findings on the accuracy achievable by state-of-the-art LA-ICP-MS systems are outlined. - Highlights: ► Specification

  8. Mathematical Modeling of Nitrous Oxide Production during Denitrifying Phosphorus Removal Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiwen; Peng, Lai; Chen, Xueming; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-07-21

    A denitrifying phosphorus removal process undergoes frequent alternating anaerobic/anoxic conditions to achieve phosphate release and uptake, during which microbial internal storage polymers (e.g., Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA)) could be produced and consumed dynamically. The PHA turnovers play important roles in nitrous oxide (N2O) accumulation during the denitrifying phosphorus removal process. In this work, a mathematical model is developed to describe N2O dynamics and the key role of PHA consumption on N2O accumulation during the denitrifying phosphorus removal process for the first time. In this model, the four-step anoxic storage of polyphosphate and four-step anoxic growth on PHA using nitrate, nitrite, nitric oxide (NO), and N2O consecutively by denitrifying polyphosphate accumulating organisms (DPAOs) are taken into account for describing all potential N2O accumulation steps in the denitrifying phosphorus removal process. The developed model is successfully applied to reproduce experimental data on N2O production obtained from four independent denitrifying phosphorus removal study reports with different experimental conditions. The model satisfactorily describes the N2O accumulation, nitrogen reduction, phosphate release and uptake, and PHA dynamics for all systems, suggesting the validity and applicability of the model. The results indicated a substantial role of PHA consumption in N2O accumulation due to the relatively low N2O reduction rate by using PHA during denitrifying phosphorus removal.

  9. Liquid--liquid contact in vapor explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segev, A.

    1978-08-01

    The contact of two liquid materials, one of which is at a temperature substantially above the boiling point of the other, can lead to fast energy conversion and a subsequent shock wave. This well-known phenomenon is called a ''vapor explosion.'' One method of producing intimate, liquid--liquid contact (which is known to be a necessary condition for vapor explosion) is a shock tube configuration. Such experiments in which water was impacted upon molten aluminum showed that very high pressures, even larger than the thermodynamic critical pressure, could occur. The mechanism by which such sharp pressure pulses are generated is not yet clear. In this experiment cold liquids (Freon-11, Freon-22, water, or butanol) were impacted upon various hot materials (mineral oil, silicone oil, water, mercury, molten Wood's metal or molten salt mixture). The main conclusion from the experimental study is that hydrodynamic effects may be very significant in any shock tube analyses, especially when multiple interactions are observed. A theoretical study was performed to check the possibility of vapor film squeezing (between a drop in film boiling and a surface) as a controlling mechanism for making liquid--liquid contact. Using experimental data, the film thickness was calculated and it was found to be too thick for any conceivable film rupture mechanism. It was suggested that the coalescence is a two-stage process, in which the controlling stage depends mainly on temperature and surface properties and can be described as the ability of cold liquid to spread on a hot surface

  10. Nuclear system vaporization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bougault, R.; Brou, R.; Colin, J.; Cussol, D.; Durand, D.; Le Brun, C.; Lecolley, J.F.; Lopez, O.; Louvel, M.; Nakagawa, T.; Peter, J.; Regimbart, R.; Steckmeyer, J.C.; Tamain, B.; Vient, E.; Yuasa-Nakagawa, K.; Wieloch, A.

    1998-01-01

    A particular case of the hot nuclei de-excitation is the total nuclear dislocation into light particles (n, p, d, t, 3 He and α). Such events were first observed at bombarding energies lower than 100 MeV/nucleon due to high detection performances of the INDRA multidetector. The light system Ar + Ni was studied at several bombarding energies ranging from 32 to 95 MeV/nucleon. The events associated to a total vaporization of the system occur above the energy threshold of ∼ 50 MeV/nucleon. A study of the form of these events shows that we have essentially two sources. The excitation energy of these sources may be determined by means of the kinematic properties of their de-excitation products. A preliminary study results in excitation energy values of the order 10 - 14 MeV/nucleon. The theoretical calculation based on a statistical model modified to take into account high excitation energies and excited levels in the lightest nuclei predicts that the vaporization of the two partner nuclei in the Ar + Ni system takes place when the excitation energy exceeds 12 MeV/nucleon what is qualitatively in agreement with the values deduced from calorimetric analysis

  11. The electronic and optical properties of warm dense nitrous oxide using quantum molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yujuan; Wang Cong; Zhang Ping

    2012-01-01

    First-principles molecular-dynamics simulations based on density-functional theory have been used to study the electronic and optical properties of fluid nitrous oxide under extreme conditions. Systematic descriptions of pair-correlation function, atomic structure, and the charge density distribution are used to investigate the dissociation of fluid nitrous oxide. The electrical and optical properties are derived from the Kubo-Greenwood formula. It is found that the nonmetal-metal transition for fluid nitrous oxide can be directly associated to the dissociation and has significant influence on the optical properties of the fluid.

  12. Nitrogen removal and intentional nitrous oxide production from reject water in a coupled nitritation/nitrous denitritation system under real feed-stream conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weißbach, Max; Thiel, Paul; Drewes, Jörg E; Koch, Konrad

    2018-05-01

    A Coupled Aerobic-anoxic Nitrous Decomposition Operation (CANDO) was performed over five months to investigate the performance and dynamics of nitrogen elimination and nitrous oxide production from digester reject water under real feed-stream conditions. A 93% conversion of ammonium to nitrite could be maintained for adapted seed sludge in the first stage (nitritation). The second stage (nitrous denitritation), inoculated with conventional activated sludge, achieved a conversion of 70% of nitrite to nitrous oxide after only 12 cycles of operation. The development of an alternative feeding strategy and the addition of a coagulant (FeCl 3 ) facilitated stable operation and process intensification. Under steady-state conditions, nitrite was reliably eliminated and different nitrous oxide harvesting strategies were assessed. Applying continuous removal increased N 2 O yields by 16% compared to the application of a dedicated stripping phase. These results demonstrate the feasible application of the CANDO process for nitrogen removal and energy recovery from ammonia rich wastewater. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Chemical vapor composites (CVC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reagan, P.

    1993-01-01

    The Chemical Vapor Composite, CVC trademark , process fabricates composite material by simply mixing particles (powders and or fibers) with CVD reactants which are transported and co-deposited on a hot substrate. A key feature of the CVC process is the control provided by varing the density, geometry (aspect ratio) and composition of the entrained particles in the matrix material, during deposition. The process can fabricate composite components to net shape (± 0.013 mm) on a machined substrate in a single step. The microstructure of the deposit is described and several examples of different types of particles in the matrix are illustrated. Mechanical properties of SiC composite material fabricated with SiC powder and fiber will be presented. Several examples of low cost ceramic composite products will be shown. (orig.)

  14. Iron bromide vapor laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhanov, V. B.; Shiyanov, D. V.; Trigub, M. V.; Dimaki, V. A.; Evtushenko, G. S.

    2016-03-01

    We have studied the characteristics of a pulsed gas-discharge laser on iron bromide vapor generating radiation with a wavelength of 452.9 nm at a pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 5-30 kHz. The maximum output power amounted to 10 mW at a PRF within 5-15 kHz for a voltage of 20-25 kV applied to electrodes of the discharge tube. Addition of HBr to the medium produced leveling of the radial profile of emission. Initial weak lasing at a wavelength of 868.9 nm was observed for the first time, which ceased with buildup of the main 452.9-nm line.

  15. The tracking of interfaces in an electron-beam vaporizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westerberg, K.W.; McClelland, M.A.; Finlayson, B.A.

    1993-03-01

    A numerical analysis is made of the material and energy flow in an electron beam vaporizer. In this system the energy from an electron beam heats metal confined in a water-cooled crucible. Metal is vaporized from a liquid pool circulating in a shell of its own solid. A modified Galerkin finite element method is used to calculate the flow and temperature fields along with the interface locations. The mesh is parameterized with spines which stretch and pivot as the phase boundaries move. The discretized equations are arranged in an ''arrow'' matrix and solved using the Newton-Raphson method. Results are given for an experimental aluminum vaporizer. The effects of buoyancy and capillary driven flow are included along with the surface contributions of vapor thrust, latent heat, thermal radiation, and crucible contact resistance

  16. Vapor-droplet flow equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowe, C.T.

    1975-01-01

    General features of a vapor-droplet flow are discussed and the equations expressing the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy for the vapor, liquid, and mixture using the control volume approach are derived. The phenomenological laws describing the exchange of mass, momentum, and energy between phases are also reviewed. The results have application to development of water-dominated geothermal resources

  17. Shell biofilm-associated nitrous oxide production in marine molluscs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heisterkamp, I.M.; Schramm, Andreas; Larsen, Lone Heimann

    2013-01-01

    Emission of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) from freshwater and terrestrial invertebrates has exclusively been ascribed to N2O production by ingested denitrifying bacteria in the anoxic gut of the animals. Our study of marine molluscs now shows that also microbial biofilms on shell surfaces...... are important sites of N2O production. The shell biofilms of Mytilus edulis, Littorina littorea and Hinia reticulata contributed 18-94% to the total animal-associated N2O emission. Nitrification and denitrification were equally important sources of N2O in shell biofilms as revealed by 15N-stable isotope...... mollusc species. Ammonium excretion by the animals was found to be sufficient to sustain N2O production in the shell biofilm. Apparently, the animals provide a nutrient-enriched microenvironment that stimulates growth and N2O production of the shell biofilm. This animal-induced stimulation...

  18. Sources of nitrous oxide emitted from European forest soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambus, P.; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, S.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.

    2006-01-01

    Forest ecosystems may provide strong sources of nitrous oxide (N2O), which is important for atmospheric chemical and radiative properties. Nonetheless, our understanding of controls on forest N2O emissions is insufficient to narrow current flux estimates, which still are associated with great...... uncertainties. In this study, we have investigated the quantitative and qualitative relationships between N-cycling and N2O production in European forests in order to evaluate the importance of nitrification and denitrification for N2O production. Soil samples were collected in 11 different sites characterized...... by variable climatic regimes and forest types. Soil N-cycling and associated production of N2O was assessed following application of 15N-labeled nitrogen. The N2O emission varied significantly among the different forest soils, and was inversely correlated to the soil C: N ratio. The N2O emissions were...

  19. Rapid nitrous oxide cycling in the suboxic ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbin, Andrew R.; Bianchi, Daniele; Jayakumar, Amal; Ward, Bess B.

    2015-06-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a powerful greenhouse gas and a major cause of stratospheric ozone depletion, yet its sources and sinks remain poorly quantified in the oceans. We used isotope tracers to directly measure N2O reduction rates in the eastern tropical North Pacific. Because of incomplete denitrification, N2O cycling rates are an order of magnitude higher than predicted by current models in suboxic regions, and the spatial distribution suggests strong dependence on both organic carbon and dissolved oxygen concentrations. Furthermore, N2O turnover is 20 times higher than the net atmospheric efflux. The rapid rate of this cycling coupled to an expected expansion of suboxic ocean waters implies future increases in N2O emissions.

  20. [Sedation with 50 % nitrous oxide/oxygen in paediatric dentistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atash, R; Vanden Abbeele, A

    2008-09-01

    The management of paediatric dentistry treatment is essentially based on behaviour management but some behaviour troubles or mental retardation may hinder this kind of treatment at the dental office without any premedication. This often leads the dentist to change his treatment planning even if this may compromise the quality of treatment . Conscious sedation techniques enable stress and pain control during the active treatment phase and represent a useful alternative to general anaesthesia which cannot be used on a routine based level. Conscious sedation by the inhalation of nitrous oxide and oxygen (MEOPA) represents a good choice, as well as by its harmlessness as by its fast reversibility. MEOPA is a precious help in our practice, provided that its administration is totally under central and all contra-indication are respected. However sedation by inhalation should in no case be systematized and its goal must remain the progressive rehabilitation of the patient in a circuit of traditional ambulatory care.

  1. Reaction Kinetics of Monomethylhydrazine With Nitrous Acid in Perchloric Acid Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Yan; Wang Hui; Pan Yongjun; Cong Haifeng; Jiao Haiyang; Jia Yongfen; Zheng Weifang

    2009-01-01

    The oxidation of monomethylhydrazine (MMH) by nitrous acid was researched in perchloric acid solution with spectrophotometry. The rate equation has been determined as follows: -dc (HNO 2 ) /dt= kc (H + ) 0.9 c (MMH) 1.1 c (HNO 2 ), k is (46.0 ± 2.7) L 2 / (mol 2 · s) with the initial perchlorate concentration of 0.50 mol/L at the temperature of 4.5 degree C. The corresponding activation energy of the reaction is (42.4 ± 0.1) kJ/mol. The results indicate that oxidation of mono-methylhydrazine (MMH) by nitrous acid is fast. The higher concentration of MMH can accelerate the reduction process of nitrous acid. Higher acidity can also speed up the reduction of nitrous acid. (authors)

  2. Denitrification: An important pathway for nitrous oxide production in tropical mangrove sediments (Goa, India)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, S.O.; LokaBharathi, P.A.; Bonin, P.C.; Michotey, V.D.

    Net nitrous oxide production and denitrification activity were measured in two mangrove ecosystems of Goa, India. The relatively pristine site Tuvem was compared to Divar, which is prone to high nutrient input. Stratified sampling at 2-cm intervals...

  3. effects of nitrous acid on growth and yield of digitaria exilis (haller)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF EKWUEME

    Digitaria exilis seeds have several economic uses with long shelf life and impressive nutritional qualities. The crop is ... This work assessed effect of Nitrous acid on growth and ... of 10 g each were weighed using Mettler balance (Model.

  4. Data for "Controls on nitrous oxide production and consumption in reservoirs of the Ohio River Basin"

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Dissolved oxygen, dissolved nitrous oxide, and water temperature in reservoirs. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Beaulieu , J., C. Nietch ,...

  5. MLS/Aura Level 2 Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Mixing Ratio V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2N2O is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for nitrous oxide derived from radiances measured primarily by the 640 GHz radiometer (Band 12)...

  6. Effectiveness of Nitrous Oxide as a Liquid Injection Thrust Vector Control Fluid, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Nitrous Oxide is proposed as an energetic liquid injection thrust vector control fluid for vehicle attitude control during dynamic vehicle maneuvers. Pulled from the...

  7. Fluxes of methane and nitrous oxide from an Indian mangrove

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krithika, K.; Purvaja, R.; Ramesh, R. [Anna Univ., Chennai (India). Institute for Ocean Management

    2008-01-25

    Methane and nitrous oxide are atmospheric trace gases and contribute about 15 and 6% respectively to the greenhouse effect. Both have a long atmospheric residence time of about 114 and 12 years respectively and since they are key compounds in the chemical reaction cycles of the troposphere and the stratosphere, their potential to directly or indirectly influence global climate is high. Fluxes of greenhouse gases, methane (CH{sub 4}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), were measured from a mangrove ecosystem of the Cauvery delta (Muthupet) in South India. CH{sub 4} emissions were in the range between 18.99 and 37.53 mg/sq. m/d, with an average of 25.21 mg/sq. m/d, whereas N{sub 2}O emission ranged between 0.41 and 0.80 mg/sq. m/d (average of 0.62 mg/sq. m/d). The emission of CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O correlated positively with the number of pneumatophores. In addition to the flux measurements, different parts of the roots of Avicennia marina were quantified for CH{sub 4} concentration. Invariably in all the seasons, measured CH{sub 4} concentrations were high in the cable roots, with gradual decrease through the pneumatophores below water level and the above water level. This clearly indicates the transport of CH{sub 4} through the roots. We were able to establish that CH{sub 4} was released passively through the mangrove pneumatophores and is also a source to the atmosphere. We present some additional information on transport mechanisms of CH{sub 4} through the pneumatophores and bubble release from the mangrove ecosystems.

  8. HONO (nitrous acid) emissions from acidic northern soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maljanen, Marja; Yli-Pirilä, Pasi; Joutsensaari, Jorma; Martikainen, Pertti J.

    2015-04-01

    The photolysis of HONO (nitrous acid) is an important source of OH radical, the key oxidizing agent in the atmosphere, contributing also to removal of atmospheric methane (CH4), the second most important greenhouse gas after carbon dioxide (CO2). The emissions of HONO from soils have been recently reported in few studies. Soil HONO emissions are regarded as missing sources of HONO when considering the chemical reactions in the atmosphere. The soil-derived HONO has been connected to soil nitrite (NO2-) and also directly to the activity of ammonia oxidizing bacteria, which has been studied with one pure culture. Our hypothesis was that boreal acidic soils with high nitrification activity could be also sources of HONO and the emissions of HONO are connected with nitrification. We selected a range of dominant northern acidic soils and showed in microcosm experiments that soils which have the highest nitrous oxide (N2O) and nitric oxide (NO) emissions (drained peatlands) also have the highest HONO production rates. The emissions of HONO are thus linked to nitrogen cycle and also NO and N2O emissions. Natural peatlands and boreal coniferous forests on mineral soils had the lowest HONO emissions. It is known that in natural peatlands with high water table and in boreal coniferous forest soils, low nitrification activity (microbial production of nitrite and nitrate) limits their N2O production. Low availability of nitrite in these soils is the likely reason also for their low HONO production rates. We also studied the origin of HONO in one peat soil with acetylene and other nitrification inhibitors and we found that HONO production is not closely connected to ammonium oxidation (nitrification). Acetylene blocked NO emissions but did not affect HONO or N2O emissions, thus there is another source behind HONO emission from these soils than ammonium oxidation. It is still an open question if this process is microbial or chemical origin.

  9. Uptake of mercury vapor by wheat. An assimilation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Browne, C.L.; Fang, S.C.

    1978-01-01

    Using a whole-plant chamber and 203 Hg-labeled mercury, a quantitative study was made of the effect of environmental parameters on the uptake, by wheat (Triticum aestivum), of metallic mercury vapor, an atmospheric pollutant. Factors were examined in relation to their influence on components of the gas-assimilation model, U(Hg) = (C/sub A' -- C/sub L')/(r/sub L.Hg/ + r/sub M.Hg/) where U(Hg) is the rate of mercury uptake per unit leaf surface, C/sub A'/ is the ambient mercury vapor concentration, C/sub L'/ is the mercury concentration at immobilization sites within the plant (assumed to be zero), r/sub L.Hg/ is the total leaf resistance to mercury vapor exchange, and r/sub M.Hg/ is a residual term to account for unexplained physical and biochemical resistances to mercury vapor uptake. Essentially all mercury vapor uptake was confined to the leaves. r/sub L.Hg/ was particularly influenced by illumination (0 to 12.8 klux), but unaffected by ambient temperature (17 to 33 0 C) and mercury vapor concentration (0 to 40 μg m -3 ). The principal limitation to mercury vapor uptake was r/sub M.Hg/, which was linearly related to leaf temperature, but unaffected by mercury vapor concentration and illumination, except for apparent high values in darkness. Knowing C/sub A'/ and estimating r/sub L.Hg/ and r/sub M.Hg/ from experimental data, mercury vapor uptake by wheat in light was accurately predicted for several durations of exposure using the above model

  10. Vapor compression distiller and membrane technology for water revitalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashida, A.; Mitani, K.; Ebara, K.; Kurokawa, H.; Sawada, I.; Kashiwagi, H.; Tsuji, T.; Hayashi, S.; Otsubo, K.; Nitta, K.

    1987-01-01

    Water revitalization for a space station can consist of membrane filtration processes and a distillation process. Water recycling equipment using membrane filtration processes was manufactured for ground testing. It was assembled using commercially available components. Two systems for the distillation are studied: one is absorption type thermopervaporation cell and the other is a vapor compression distiller. Absorption type thermopervaporation, able to easily produce condensed water under zero gravity, was investigated experimentally and through simulated calculation. The vapor compression distiller was studied experimentally and it offers significant energy savings for evaporation of water.

  11. Nitrous Oxide for Treatment-Resistant Major Depression: A Proof-of-Concept Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagele, Peter; Duma, Andreas; Kopec, Michael; Gebara, Marie Anne; Parsoei, Alireza; Walker, Marie; Janski, Alvin; Panagopoulos, Vassilis N; Cristancho, Pilar; Miller, J Philip; Zorumski, Charles F; Conway, Charles R

    2015-07-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists, such as ketamine, have rapid antidepressant effects in patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD). We hypothesized that nitrous oxide, an inhalational general anesthetic and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, may also be a rapidly acting treatment for TRD. In this blinded, placebo-controlled crossover trial, 20 patients with TRD were randomly assigned to 1-hour inhalation of 50% nitrous oxide/50% oxygen or 50% nitrogen/50% oxygen (placebo control). The primary endpoint was the change on the 21-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-21) 24 hours after treatment. Mean duration of nitrous oxide treatment was 55.6 ± 2.5 (SD) min at a median inspiratory concentration of 44% (interquartile range, 37%-45%). In two patients, nitrous oxide treatment was briefly interrupted, and the treatment was discontinued in three patients. Depressive symptoms improved significantly at 2 hours and 24 hours after receiving nitrous oxide compared with placebo (mean HDRS-21 difference at 2 hours, -4.8 points, 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.8 to -7.8 points, p = .002; at 24 hours, -5.5 points, 95% CI, -2.5 to -8.5 points, p nitrous oxide and placebo, p nitrous oxide compared with one patient (5%) and none after placebo (odds ratio for response, 4.0, 95% CI, .45-35.79; OR for remission, 3.0, 95% CI, .31-28.8). No serious adverse events occurred; all adverse events were brief and of mild to moderate severity. This proof-of-concept trial demonstrated that nitrous oxide has rapid and marked antidepressant effects in patients with TRD. Copyright © 2015 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of nitrous oxide on cisatracurium infusion demands: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Illman Hanna L

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have questioned our previous understanding on the effect of nitrous oxide on muscle relaxants, since nitrous oxide has been shown to potentiate the action of bolus doses of mivacurium, rocuronium and vecuronium. This study was aimed to investigate the possible effect of nitrous oxide on the infusion requirements of cisatracurium. Methods 70 ASA physical status I-III patients aged 18-75 years were enrolled in this randomized trial. The patients were undergoing elective surgery requiring general anesthesia with a duration of at least 90 minutes. Patients were randomized to receive propofol and remifentanil by target controlled infusion in combination with either a mixture of oxygen and nitrous oxide (Nitrous oxide/TIVA group or oxygen in air (Air/TIVA group. A 0.1 mg/kg initial bolus of cisatracurium was administered before tracheal intubation, followed by a closed-loop computer controlled infusion of cisatracurium to produce and maintain a 90% neuromuscular block. Cumulative dose requirements of cisatracurium during the 90-min study period after bolus administration were measured and the asymptotic steady state rate of infusion to produce a constant 90% block was determined by applying nonlinear curve fitting to the data on the cumulative dose requirement during the study period. Results Controller performance, i.e. the ability of the controller to maintain neuromuscular block constant at the setpoint and patient characteristics were similar in both groups. The administration of nitrous oxide did not affect cisatracurium infusion requirements. The mean steady-state rates of infusion were 0.072 +/- 0.018 and 0.066 +/- 0.017 mg * kg-1 * h-1 in Air/TIVA and Nitrous oxide/TIVA groups, respectively. Conclusions Nitrous oxide does not affect the infusion requirements of cisatracurium. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01152905; European Clinical Trials Database at http://eudract.emea.eu.int/2006-006037-41.

  13. Vapor pressure and enthalpy of vaporization of aliphatic propanediamines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verevkin, Sergey P.; Chernyak, Yury

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We measured vapor pressure of four aliphatic 1,3-diamines. ► Vaporization enthalpies at 298 K were derived. ► We examined consistency of new and available data in the literature. ► A group-contribution method for prediction was developed. - Abstract: Vapor pressures of four aliphatic propanediamines including N-methyl-1,3-propanediamine (MPDA), N,N-dimethyl-1,3-propanediamine (DMPDA), N,N-diethyl-1,3-propanediamine (DEPDA) and N,N,N′,N′-tetramethyl-1,3-propanediamine (4MPDA) were measured using the transpiration method. The vapor pressures developed in this work and reported in the literature were used to derive molar enthalpy of vaporization values at the reference temperature 298.15 K. An internal consistency check of the enthalpy of vaporization was performed for the aliphatic propanediamines studied in this work. A group-contribution method was developed for the validation and prediction vaporization enthalpies of amines and diamines.

  14. The vaporization enthalpies and vapor pressures of fatty acid methyl esters C18, C21 to C23, and C25 to C29 by correlation - gas chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chickos, James S.; Zhao Hui; Nichols, Gary

    2004-01-01

    Vapor pressures and vaporization enthalpies for methyl heptadecanoate and methyl heneicosanoate to methyl octacosanoate exclusive of methyl tricosanoate are evaluated as a function of temperature over the temperature range T = 298.15-450 K by correlation gas chromatography. The results are generated by an extrapolative process using literature values for methyl tetradecanoate to methyl eicosanoate as standards. Relationships for calculating vapor pressures of the title compounds from T = 298.15 to 450 K are provided. Experimental fusion enthalpies are also reported for the methyl esters from methyl hexadecanoate to methyl octacosanoate excluding methyl tridecanoate. Vaporization enthalpies and fusion enthalpies adjusted for temperature to T = 298.15 K are combined to provide sublimation enthalpies. The results are compared to available literature values. A rationale for the linear relationship observed between enthalpies of vaporization and enthalpies of transfer from solution to the vapor is also provided

  15. A Citizen's Guide to Vapor Intrusion Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    This guide describes how vapor intrusion is the movement of chemical vapors from contaminated soil and groundwater into nearby buildings.Vapors primarily enter through openings in the building foundation or basement walls.

  16. Vapor pressure measured with inflatable plastic bag

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Deflated plastic bag in a vacuum chamber measures initial low vapor pressures of materials. The bag captures the test sample vapors and visual observation of the vapor-inflated bag under increasing external pressures yields pertinent data.

  17. Role of nitrous acid during the dissolution of UO2 in nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deigan, N.; Pandey, N.K.; Kamachi Mudali, U.; Joshi, J.B.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the dissolution behaviour of sintered UO 2 pellet in nitric acid is very important in designing an industrial scale dissolution system for the plutonium rich fast reactor MOX fuel. In the current article we have established the role of nitrous acid on the dissolution kinetics of UO 2 pellets in nitric acid. Under the chemical conditions that prevail in a typical Purex process, NO and NO 2 gases gets generated in the process streams. These gases produce nitrous acid in nitric acid medium. In addition, during the dissolution of UO 2 in nitric acid medium, nitrous acid is further produced in-situ at the pellet solution interface. As uranium dissolves oxidatively in nitric acid medium wherein it goes from U(IV) in solid to U(VI) in liquid, presence of nitrous acid (a good oxidizing agent) accelerates the reaction rate. Hence for determining the reaction mechanism of UO 2 dissolution in nitric acid medium, knowing the nitrous acid concentration profile during the course of dissolution is important. The current work involves the measurement of nitrous acid concentration during the course of dissolution of sintered UO 2 pellets in 8M starting nitric acid concentration as a function of mixing intensity from unstirred condition to 1500 RPM

  18. Rate for energy transfer from excited cyclohexane to nitrous oxide in the liquid phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, T.; Hatano, Y.

    1975-01-01

    Pure liquid cyclohexane and cyclohexane solutions of nitrous oxide have been photolyzed at 163 nm. The quantum yield of the product hydrogen in the photolysis of pure cyclohexane is found to be 1.0. The addition of nitrous oxide results in the reduction in the yield of hydrogen and in the formation of nitrogen. The decrement of the hydrogen yield is approximately equal to the increment of the nitrogen yield. About 40 percent of the hydrogen yield in pure cyclohexane is found to be produced through a path which is not affected by the addition of nitrous oxide. The effect of the addition of nitrous oxide is attributed to energy transfer from excited cyclohexane to nitrous oxide with the rate constant of k = 1.0 x 10 11 M -1 sec -1 (at 15 0 C). This value is about a factor of 10 larger than that expected as for diffusion-controlled rate. A contribution of the energy transfer process to the formation of nitrogen in the radiolysis of cyclohexane solutions of nitrous oxide has also been discussed. (auth)

  19. Influence of nitrous oxide anesthesia, B-vitamins, and MTHFR gene polymorphisms on perioperative cardiac events: the vitamins in nitrous oxide (VINO) randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagele, Peter; Brown, Frank; Francis, Amber; Scott, Mitchell G; Gage, Brian F; Miller, J Philip

    2013-07-01

    Nitrous oxide causes an acute increase in plasma homocysteine that is more pronounced in patients with the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T or A1298C gene variant. In this randomized controlled trial, the authors sought to determine whether patients carrying the MTHFR C677T or A1298C variant had a higher risk for perioperative cardiac events after nitrous oxide anesthesia and whether this risk could be mitigated by B-vitamins. The authors randomized adult patients with cardiac risk factors undergoing noncardiac surgery, to receive nitrous oxide plus intravenous B-vitamins before and after surgery, or to nitrous oxide and placebo. Serial cardiac biomarkers and 12-lead electrocardiograms were obtained. The primary study endpoint was the incidence of myocardial injury, as defined by cardiac troponin I increase within the first 72 h after surgery. A total of 500 patients completed the trial. Patients who were homozygous for either MTHFR C677T, or A1298C gene variant (n=98; 19.6%) had no increased rate of postoperative cardiac troponin I increase compared with wild-type and heterozygous patients (11.2 vs. 14.0%; relative risk 0.96; 95% CI, 0.85-1.07; P=0.48). B-vitamins blunted the rise in homocysteine, but had no effect on cardiac troponin I increase compared with patients receiving placebo (13.2 vs. 13.6%; relative risk 1.02; 95% CI 0.78 to 1.32; P=0.91). Neither MTHFR C677T and A1298C gene variant, nor acute homocysteine increase are associated with perioperative cardiac troponin increase after nitrous oxide anesthesia. B-vitamins blunt nitrous oxide-induced homocysteine increase but have no effect on cardiac troponin I increase.

  20. Safety limits of half-mask cartridge respirators for organic solvent vapors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    Recent studies of the effective service life (safety limits) for typical half-mask cartridge respirators have shown these devices to be unsuitable for certain organic vapors, e.g., methanol, methylamine, vinyl chloride, and dichloromethane, because the effective service life is too short. For these vapors other forms of protection such as air-supplied respirators are recommended. The experimentally determined service life for many vapors is shorter--sometimes significantly shorter--than predicted by adsorption theory

  1. Collapsing criteria for vapor film around solid spheres as a fundamental stage leading to vapor explosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freud, Roy [Nuclear Research Center - Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel)], E-mail: freud@bgu.ac.il; Harari, Ronen [Nuclear Research Center - Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Sher, Eran [Pearlstone Center for Aeronautical Studies, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva (Israel)

    2009-04-15

    Following a partial fuel-melting accident, a Fuel-Coolant Interaction (FCI) can result with the fragmentation of the melt into tiny droplets. A vapor film is then formed between the melt fragments and the coolant, while preventing a contact between them. Triggering, propagation and expansion typically follow the premixing stage. In the triggering stage, vapor film collapse around one or several of the fragments occurs. This collapse can be the result of fragments cooling, a sort of mechanical force, or by any other means. When the vapor film collapses and the coolant re-establishes contact with the dry surface of the hot melt, it may lead to a very rapid and rather violent boiling. In the propagation stage the shock wave front leads to stripping of the films surrounding adjacent droplets which enhance the fragmentation and the process escalates. During this process a large quantity of liquid vaporizes and its expansion can result in destructive mechanical damage to the surrounding structures. This multiphase thermal detonation in which high pressure shock wave is formed is regarded as 'vapor explosion'. The film boiling and its possible collapse is a fundamental stage leading to vapor explosion. If the interaction of the melt and the coolant does not result in a film boiling, no explosion occurs. Many studies have been devoted to determine the minimum temperature and heat flux that is required to maintain a film boiling. The present experimental study examines the minimum temperature that is required to maintain a film boiling around metal spheres immersed into a liquid (subcooled distilled water) reservoir. In order to simulate fuel fragments that are small in dimension and has mirror-like surface, small spheres coated with anti-oxidation layer were used. The heat flux from the spheres was calculated from the sphere's temperature profiles and the sphere's properties. The vapor film collapse was associated with a sharp rise of the heat flux

  2. Mathematical modeling of nitrous oxide production in an anaerobic/oxic/anoxic process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiaoqian; Zhao, Jianqiang; Hu, Bo; Chen, Ying; Ge, Guanghuan; Li, Xiaoling; Wang, Sha; Gao, Kun; Tian, Xiaolei

    2016-12-01

    This study incorporates three currently known nitrous oxide (N 2 O) production pathways: ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) denitrification, incomplete hydroxylamine (NH 2 OH) oxidation, and heterotrophic denitrification on intracellular polymers, into a mathematical model to describe N 2 O production in an anaerobic/oxic/anoxic (AOA) process for the first time. The developed model was calibrated and validated by four experimental cases, then evaluated by two independent anaerobic/aerobic (AO) studies from literature. The modeling results displayed good agreement with the measured data. N 2 O was primarily generated in the aerobic stage by AOB denitrification (67.84-81.64%) in the AOA system. Smaller amounts of N 2 O were produced via incomplete NH 2 OH oxidation (15.61-32.17%) and heterotrophic denitrification on intracellular polymers (0-12.47%). The high nitrite inhibition on N 2 O reductase led to the increased N 2 O accumulation in heterotrophic denitrification on intracellular polymers. The new model was capable of modeling nitrification-denitrification dynamics and heterotrophic denitrification on intracellular polymers in the AOA system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Released air during vapor and air cavitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jablonská, Jana, E-mail: jana.jablonska@vsb.cz; Kozubková, Milada, E-mail: milada.kozubkova@vsb.cz [VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Department of Hydromechanics and Hydraulic Equipment, 17. listopadu 15, 708 33 Ostrava-Poruba (Czech Republic)

    2016-06-30

    Cavitation today is a very important problem that is solved by means of experimental and mathematical methods. The article deals with the generation of cavitation in convergent divergent nozzle of rectangular cross section. Measurement of pressure, flow rate, temperature, amount of dissolved air in the liquid and visualization of cavitation area using high-speed camera was performed for different flow rates. The measurement results were generalized by dimensionless analysis, which allows easy detection of cavitation in the nozzle. For numerical simulation the multiphase mathematical model of cavitation consisting of water and vapor was created. During verification the disagreement with the measurements for higher flow rates was proved, therefore the model was extended to multiphase mathematical model (water, vapor and air), due to release of dissolved air. For the mathematical modeling the multiphase turbulence RNG k-ε model for low Reynolds number flow with vapor and air cavitation was used. Subsequently the sizes of the cavitation area were verified. In article the inlet pressure and loss coefficient depending on the amount of air added to the mathematical model are evaluated. On the basis of the approach it may be create a methodology to estimate the amount of released air added at the inlet to the modeled area.

  4. Passive vapor extraction feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohay, V.J.

    1994-01-01

    Demonstration of a passive vapor extraction remediation system is planned for sites in the 200 West Area used in the past for the disposal of waste liquids containing carbon tetrachloride. The passive vapor extraction units will consist of a 4-in.-diameter pipe, a check valve, a canister filled with granular activated carbon, and a wind turbine. The check valve will prevent inflow of air that otherwise would dilute the soil gas and make its subsequent extraction less efficient. The granular activated carbon is used to adsorb the carbon tetrachloride from the air. The wind turbine enhances extraction rates on windy days. Passive vapor extraction units will be designed and operated to meet all applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements. Based on a cost analysis, passive vapor extraction was found to be a cost-effective method for remediation of soils containing lower concentrations of volatile contaminants. Passive vapor extraction used on wells that average 10-stdft 3 /min air flow rates was found to be more cost effective than active vapor extraction for concentrations below 500 parts per million by volume (ppm) of carbon tetrachloride. For wells that average 5-stdft 3 /min air flow rates, passive vapor extraction is more cost effective below 100 ppm

  5. The lithium vapor box divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldston, R J; Schwartz, J; Myers, R

    2016-01-01

    It has long been recognized that volumetric dissipation of the plasma heat flux from a fusion power system is preferable to its localized impingement on a material surface. Volumetric dissipation mitigates both the anticipated very high heat flux and intense particle-induced damage due to sputtering. Recent projections to a tokamak demonstration power plant suggest an immense upstream parallel heat flux, of order 20 GW m −2 , implying that fully detached operation may be a requirement for the success of fusion power. Building on pioneering work on the use of lithium by Nagayama et al and by Ono et al as well as earlier work on the gas box divertor by Watkins and Rebut, we present here a concept for a lithium vapor box divertor, in which lithium vapor extracts momentum and energy from a fusion-power-plant divertor plasma, using fully volumetric processes. At the high powers and pressures that are projected this requires a high density of lithium vapor, which must be isolated from the main plasma in order to avoid lithium build-up on the chamber walls or in the plasma. Isolation is achieved through a powerful multi-box differential pumping scheme available only for condensable vapors. The preliminary box-wise calculations are encouraging, but much more work is required to demonstrate the practical viability of this scheme, taking into account at least 2D plasma and vapor flows within and between the vapor boxes and out of the vapor boxes to the main plasma. (paper)

  6. Short exposure to acetylene to distinguish between nitrifier and denitrifier nitrous oxide production in soil and sediment samples

    OpenAIRE

    Kester, R.A.; Boer, W. de; Laanbroek, H.J.

    1996-01-01

    The contribution of nitrifiers and denitrifiers to the nitrous oxide production in slurries of calcareous silt loam and river bank sediment at different oxygen concentrations was determined using acetylene as nitrification inhibitor. The addition of 10 Pa acetylene resulted in inhibition of nitrous oxide production at oxic conditions, but strongly enhanced the nitrous oxide production at oxygen-poor and anoxic conditions. Inhibition of nitrification by short exposure (1 to 24 h) to high conce...

  7. Reactions of atmospheric vapors with lunar soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, E.L. Jr.; Agron, P.A.

    1976-03-01

    Detailed experimental data have been acquired for the hydration of the surfaces of lunar fines. Inert vapor adsorption has been employed to measure the surface properties (surface energy, surface area, porosity, etc.) and changes wrought in the hydration-dehydration processes. Plausible mechanisms have been considered and the predominant process involves hydration of the metamict metallosilicate surfaces to form a hydrated laminar structure akin to terrestrial clays. Additional credence for this interpretation is obtained by comparison to existing geochemical literature concerning terrestrial weathering of primary metallosilicates. The surface properties of the hydrated lunar fines are compared favorably to those of terrestrial clay minerals. In addition, experimental results are given to show that fresh disordered surfaces of volcanic sand react with water vapor in a manner virtually identical to the majority of the lunar fines. The results show that ion track etching and/or grain boundary attack are minor contributions in the weathering of lunar fines in the realm of our microgravimetric experimental conditions. 14 references

  8. Dimers in nucleating vapors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lushnikov, A. A.; Kulmala, M.

    1998-09-01

    The dimer stage of nucleation may affect considerably the rate of the nucleation process at high supersaturation of the nucleating vapor. Assuming that the dimer formation limits the nucleation rate, the kinetics of the particle formation-growth process is studied starting with the definition of dimers as bound states of two associating molecules. The partition function of dimer states is calculated by summing the Boltzmann factor over all classical bound states, and the equilibrium population of dimers is found for two types of intermolecular forces: the Lennard-Jones (LJ) and rectangular well+hard core (RW) potentials. The principle of detailed balance is used for calculating the evaporation rate of dimers. The kinetics of the particle formation-growth process is then investigated under the assumption that the trimers are stable with respect to evaporation and that the condensation rate is a power function of the particle mass. If the power exponent λ=n/(n+1) (n is a non-negative integer), the kinetics of the process is described by a finite set of moments of particle mass distribution. When the characteristic time of the particle formation by nucleation is much shorter than that of the condensational growth, n+2 universal functions of a nondimensional time define the kinetic process. These functions are calculated for λ=2/3 (gas-to-particle conversion in the free molecular regime) and λ=1/2 (formation of islands on surfaces).

  9. Effect of degree of subcooling on vapor explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Zhihong; Yang Yanhua; Li Tianshu

    2010-01-01

    In order to investigate the mechanism of the vapor explosion, an observable experiment equipment for low-temperature molten materials to be dropped into water was designed. In the experiment, molten material jet was injected into water to experimentally obtain the visualized information. This experiment results show that the degree of subcooling restrains the explosion. In order to validate the result by other aspects, the breakup experiment was conducted. Results show that the degree of water subcooling is important to melt breakup. High temperature of water is easy to increase the vapor generation during molten material falling, which decrease the drag and accelerated the molten material falling. At the same time, more vapor appear around the molten metal decrease the heat transfer amount between water and molten materials. The two experimental results coincide. (authors)

  10. Does mercury vapor exposure increase urinary selenium excretion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hongo, T; Suzuki, T; Himeno, S; Watanabe, C; Satoh, H; Shimada, Y

    1985-01-01

    It has been reported that an increase of urinary selenium excretion may occur as a result of mercury vapor exposure. However, experimental data regarding the interaction between mercury vapor and selenium have yielded ambiguous results about the retention and elimination of selenium due to mercury vapor exposure and the decrease of selenium excretion due to mercury in the form of mercuric mercury (Hg/sup 2 +/). In this study, the authors measured urinary mercury and selenium in workers with or without exposure to mercury vapor to determine whether or not urinary selenium excretion was increased as a result of mercury vapor exposure. Urine samples were collected from 141 workers, 71 men and 70 women, whose extent of exposure to mercury vapor varied according to their job sites. Workers were divided into five groups according to their urinary mercury levels. The mercury level in group I was less than 2.8 nmol/mmol creatinine which means that this group was mostly free from mercury exposure. The average age was almost identical among the groups. For both sexes, group V (with the highest urinary mercury level) had the lowest urinary selenium level, but one-way variance analysis (ANOVA) did not reveal any significant variations of urinary selenium with urinary mercury levels; however, a weak but significant negative correlation between mercury and selenium was found in men.

  11. Vapor generation rate model for dispersed drop flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unal, C.; Tuzla, K.; Cokmez-Tuzla, A.F.; Chen, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    A comparison of predictions of existing nonequilibrium post-CHF heat transfer models with the recently obtained rod bundle data has been performed. The models used the experimental conditions and wall temperatures to predict the heat flux and vapor temperatures at the location of interest. No existing model was able to reasonably predict the vapor superheat and the wall heat flux simultaneously. Most of the models, except Chen-Sundaram-Ozkaynak, failed to predict the wall heat flux, while all of the models could not predict the vapor superheat data or trends. A recently developed two-region heat transfer model, the Webb-Chen two-region model, did not give a reasonable prediction of the vapor generation rate in the far field of the CHF point. A new correlation was formulated to predict the vapor generation rate in convective dispersed droplet flow in terms of thermal-hydraulic parameters and thermodynamic properties. A comparison of predictions of the two-region heat transfer model, with the use of a presently developed correlation, with all the existing post-CHF data, including single-tube and rod bundle, showed significant improvements in predicting the vapor superheat and tube wall heat flux trends. (orig.)

  12. Measuring Vapor Pressure with an Isoteniscope: A Hands-on Introduction to Thermodynamic Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenqian; Haslam, Andrew J.; Macey, Andrew; Shah, Umang V.; Brechtelsbauer, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    Characterization of the vapor pressure of a volatile liquid or azeotropic mixture, and its fluid phase diagram, can be achieved with an isoteniscope and an industrial grade digital pressure sensor using the experimental method reported in this study. We describe vapor-pressure measurements of acetone and n-hexane and their azeotrope, and how the…

  13. Acetone vapor sensing using a vertical cavity surface emitting laser diode coated with polystyrene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansbæk, Thor; Nielsen, Claus Højgaard; Larsen, Niels Bent

    2009-01-01

    We report theoretical and experimental on a new vapor sensor, using a single-mode vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) coated with a polymer sensor coating, which can detect acetone vapor at a volume fraction of 2.5%. The sensor provides the advantage of standard packaging, small form...

  14. Tubing For Sampling Hydrazine Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, Josh; Taffe, Patricia S.; Rose-Pehrsson, Susan L.; Wyatt, Jeffrey R.

    1993-01-01

    Report evaluates flexible tubing used for transporting such hypergolic vapors as those of hydrazines for quantitative analysis. Describes experiments in which variety of tubing materials, chosen for their known compatibility with hydrazine, flexibility, and resistance to heat.

  15. Vapor trap for liquid metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, T

    1968-05-22

    In a pipe system which transfers liquid metal, inert gas (cover gas) is packed above the surface of the liquid metal to prevent oxidization of the liquid. If the metal vapor is contained in such cover gas, the circulating system of the cover gas is blocked due to condensation of liquid metal inside the system. The present invention relates to an improvement in vapor trap to remove the metal vapor from the cover gas. The trap consists of a cylindrical outer body, an inlet nozzle which is deeply inserted inside the outer body and has a number of holes to inject the cove gas into the body, metal mesh or steel wool which covers the exterior of the nozzle and on which the condensation of the metal gas takes place, and a heater wire hich is wound around the nozzle to prevent condensation of the metal vapor at the inner peripheral side of the mesh.

  16. Suffocation caused by plastic wrap covering the face combined with nitrous oxide inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leth, Peter Mygind; Astrup, Birgitte Schmidt

    2017-09-01

    Suicide using a combination of a plastic bag over the head and inhalation of a non-irritating gas, such as helium, argon or nitrogen, has been reported in the literature. Here an unusual suicide method in a 17-year old man by suffocation from covering the face with household plastic wrap, combined with nitrous oxide inhalation, is presented. The case was reviewed based on police, autopsy and hospital reports. A PubMed search for scientific literature related to nitrous oxide abuse and suicide by suffocation was performed and our findings discussed in relation to the scientific literature found. The deceased was a 17-year old man who was found with the nose and mouth closed with a piece of kitchen plastic wrap. The plastic wrap had been removed prior to autopsy. Autopsy findings were suggestive of asphyxia, but were otherwise negative. Nitrous oxide was detected in the brain and lung tissue with headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (headspace-GCMS). The cause of death was assumed to be suffocation caused by plastic wrap covering the face, combined with nitrous oxide inhalation. Suicide was suspected because of a history of depression for several months. Nitrous oxide, also known as laughing gas, has a euphoric effect and is used as a recreational inhalant drug that can be purchased legally. Deaths caused by recreational nitrous oxide abuse are rare but may occur if used in combination with a plastic bag over the head. This is the first report of suicide by suffocation by external obstruction combined with nitrous oxide inhalation.

  17. An empirical equation for the enthalpy of vaporization of quantum liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuz, Victor A.; Meyra, Ariel G.; Zarragoicoechea, Guillermo J.

    2004-01-01

    An empirical equation for the enthalpy of vaporization of quantum fluids is presented. Dimensionless analysis is used to define enthalpy of vaporization as a function of temperature with a standard deviation of about 1%. Experimental data represented in these variables show two different behaviours and exhibit different maximum values of the enthalpy of vaporization, one corresponding to fluids with a triple point and the other to fluids having a lambda point. None of the existing empirical equations are able to describe this fact. Also enthalpy of vaporization of helium-3, n-deuterium and n-tritium are estimated

  18. Analyzing microporosity with vapor thermogravimetry and gas pycnometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dral, A. Petra; ten Elshof, Johan E.

    2018-01-01

    The complementary use of thermogravimetry and pycnometry is demonstrated to expand the toolbox for experimental micropore analysis <1 nm. Thermogravimetry is employed to assess the uptake of water, methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol and cyclohexane vapors in microporous structures at room temperature and

  19. Synchrotron X-ray studies of liquid-vapor interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage

    1986-01-01

    The density profile ρ(z) across a liquid-vapor interface may be determined by the reflectivity R(θ) of X-rays at grazing angle incidence θ. The relation between R(θ) and ρ(z) is discussed, and experimental examples illustrating thermal roughness of simple liquids and smectic layering of liquid...

  20. Vapor Explosions with Subcooled Freon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, R.E.; Fauske, Hans K.; McUmber, L.M.

    1976-01-01

    Explosive vapor formation accompanied by destructive shock waves, can be produced when two liquids, at much different temperatures, are brought into intimate contact. A proposed analytical model states that the interface temperature upon contact between the two liquid systems, gust be greater than or equal to the spontaneous nucleation temperature of that liquid-liquid system and that the thermal boundary layer must be sufficiently developed to support a critical size cavity. For time scales greater than 10-12 sec, the interface temperature upon contact of two semi-infinite masses, with constant thermal properties, can be related to the initial liquid temperatures. The spontaneous nucleation behavior at the interface can either be heterogeneous or homogeneous in nature. In either case, the critical size cavities, which initiate the vaporization process, are produced by local density fluctuations within the cold liquid. For homogeneous conditions, the two liquids present a well-wetted system and the vapor embryos are produced entirely within the cold liquid. For heterogeneous conditions, which result from poor, or imperfect wetting, at the liquid-liquid interface, the critical sized cavities are created at the interface at somewhat lower temperatures. A sequence of experiments, using Freon-22 and water, Freon-22 and mineral oil, and Freon-12 and mineral oil have been performed to test this spontaneous nucleation premise. For Freon-22 at its normal boiling point, the interface temperature of the water must be at least 77 deg. C before the interface temperature equals or exceeds the minimum homogeneous nucleation value of 54 deg. C and 84 deg. C before the interface temperature equals 60 deg. C where the homogeneous nucleation rate becomes truly explosive. The Freon-water test demonstrated explosive interactions for water temperatures considerably lower than this value and this was attributed to the heterogeneous nucleation characteristics of that particular system

  1. Heat and mass transfer analysis for paraffin/nitrous oxide burning rate in hybrid propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Basat (Sisi), Shani; Gany, Alon

    2016-03-01

    This research presents a physical-mathematical model for the combustion of liquefying fuels in hybrid combustors, accounting for blowing effect on the heat transfer. A particular attention is given to a paraffin/nitrous oxide hybrid system. The use of a paraffin fuel in hybrid propulsion has been considered because of its much higher regression rate enabling significantly higher thrust compared to that of common polymeric fuels. The model predicts the overall regression rate (melting rate) of the fuel and the different mechanisms involved, including evaporation, entrainment of droplets of molten material, and mass loss due to melt flow on the condensed fuel surface. Prediction of the thickness and velocity of the liquid (melt) layer formed at the surface during combustion was done as well. Applying the model for an oxidizer mass flux of 45 kg/(s m2) as an example representing experimental range, it was found that 21% of the molten liquid undergoes evaporation, 30% enters the gas flow by the entrainment mechanism, and 49% reaches the end of the combustion chamber as a flowing liquid layer. When increasing the oxidizer mass flux in the port, the effect of entrainment increases while that of the flowing liquid layer along the surface shows a relatively lower contribution. Yet, the latter is predicted to have a significant contribution to the overall mass loss. In practical applications it may cause reduced combustion efficiency and should be taken into account in the motor design, e.g., by reinforcing the paraffin fuel with different additives. The model predictions have been compared to experimental results revealing good agreement.

  2. Influence of Nitrous Oxide Anesthesia, B-Vitamins, and MTHFR gene polymorphisms on Perioperative Cardiac Events: The Vitamins in Nitrous Oxide (VINO) Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagele, Peter; Brown, Frank; Francis, Amber; Scott, Mitchell G.; Gage, Brian F.; Miller, J. Philip

    2013-01-01

    Background Nitrous oxide causes an acute increase in plasma homocysteine that is more pronounced in patients with the MTHFR C677T or A1298C gene variant. In this randomized controlled trial we sought to determine if patients carrying the MTHFR C677T or A1298C variant had a higher risk for perioperative cardiac events after nitrous oxide anesthesia and if this risk could be mitigated by B-vitamins. Methods We randomized adult patients with cardiac risk factors undergoing noncardiac surgery to receive nitrous oxide plus intravenous B-vitamins before and after surgery or to nitrous oxide and placebo. Serial cardiac biomarkers and 12-lead electrocardiograms were obtained. The primary study endpoint was the incidence of myocardial injury, as defined by cardiac troponin I elevation within the first 72 hours after surgery. Results A total of 500 patients completed the trial. Patients who were homozygous for either MTHFR C677T or A1298C gene variant (n= 98; 19.6%) had no increased rate of postoperative cardiac troponin I elevation compared to wild-type and heterozygous patients (11.2% vs. 14.0%; relative risk 0.96, 95% CI 0.85 to 1.07, p=0.48). B-vitamins blunted the rise in homocysteine, but had no effect on cardiac troponin I elevation compared to patients receiving placebo (13.2% vs. 13.6%; relative risk 1.02, 95% CI 0.78 to 1.32, p=0.91). Conclusions Neither MTHFR C677T and A1298C gene variant nor acute homocysteine increase are associated with perioperative cardiac troponin elevation after nitrousoxide anesthesia. B-vitamins blunt nitrous oxide-induced homocysteine increase but have no effect on cardiac troponin elevation. PMID:23856660

  3. Effect of vapor plasma on the coupling of laser radiation with aluminum targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shui, V H; Kivel, B; Weyl, G M

    1978-12-01

    The effect of vapor plasma on thermal and impulse coupling of laser radiation with aluminum targets is studied to understand and explain experimental data showing anomalously high coupling to 10.6-micron laser radiation. Heating of vapor by inverse bremsstrahlung absorption of laser radiation, subsequent reradiation in the uv and deep uv by ionized species, and vapor layer growth are modeled. A computer code has been developed to solve the governing equations. Major conclusions include the following: (1) vapor plasma radiative transport can be an important mechanism for laser/target coupling, (2) aluminum vapor (density times thickness) approximately equal to 10 to the 17th power/sq cm (corresponding to about 0.01 micron of target material) can result in thermal coupling coefficients of 20% or more, and (3) too much vapor reduces the net flux at the target.

  4. Nitrous oxide emissions from clover in the Mediterranean environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iride Volpi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introducing nitrogen N2-fixing crops into cereal-based crop rotations reduces N-fertiliser use and may mitigate soil emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O. However, the effect of the cultivation of N2-fixing crops on N2O emissions is still not well understood. N2O from N2-fixing crops can be emitted in two ways: during biological N2 fixation itself and when legume residues are returned to the soil. A field trial was carried out on clover (Trifolium squarrosum Savi to test the role of leguminous crops on N2O emissions in the Mediterranean environment. Monitoring was performed from December 2013 to September 2014. Cumulated N-N2O fluxes were calculated for the growing season (Phase 1 and the post-harvest period (Phase 2 in order to assess the importance of each phase. Our results did not show statistically significant differences between the two phases in term of contribution to the total cumulative N-N2O emissions, in fact Phase 1 and Phase 2 accounted respectively for 43 and 57% of the total.

  5. Nitrous oxide (N2O) emission from aquaculture: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhen; Lee, Jae Woo; Chandran, Kartik; Kim, Sungpyo; Khanal, Samir Kumar

    2012-06-19

    Nitrous oxide (N(2)O) is an important greenhouse gas (GHG) which has a global warming potential 310 times that of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) over a hundred year lifespan. N(2)O is generated during microbial nitrification and denitrification, which are common in aquaculture systems. To date, few studies have been conducted to quantify N(2)O emission from aquaculture. Additionally, very little is known with respect to the microbial pathways through which N(2)O is formed in aquaculture systems. This review suggests that aquaculture can be an important anthropogenic source of N(2)O emission. The global N(2)O-N emission from aquaculture in 2009 is estimated to be 9.30 × 10(10) g, and will increase to 3.83 × 10(11)g which could account for 5.72% of anthropogenic N(2)O-N emission by 2030 if the aquaculture industry continues to increase at the present annual growth rate (about 7.10%). The possible mechanisms and various factors affecting N(2)O production are summarized, and two possible methods to minimize N(2)O emission, namely aquaponic and biofloc technology aquaculture, are also discussed. The paper concludes with future research directions.

  6. Nitrous oxide emission from agricultural lands in Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanovskaya, A.A.; Gytarsky, M.L.; Karaban, R.T.; Nazarov, I.M. [Institute of Global Climate and Ecology, 20B, Glebovskaya Str., Moscow 107258 (Russian Federation); Konushkov, D.E. [Dokuchaev Soil Science Institute, 7, Pyzhevsky per., Moscow 109017 (Russian Federation)

    2002-07-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) atmospheric emission from different agricultural soil types in Russia was evaluated based on published data on single input of nitrogen (N) fertilizers. For most of experiments the rates of fertilization varied from 40 to 75 and from 160 to 264 kg/ha in active matter and they were considered separately. The higher rates of synthetic fertilizers (160 to 264 kg/ha) reduced relative gaseous loss of N as N2O (N2O-N). Evidently, if nitrate (NO3) concentrations were high, the low content of organic carbon (C) and oxygen (O) restricted soil microbiological activity and consequently formation of N2O. The majority of gaseous loss of N2O-N occurred within 140 days after the input of fertilizers. The N2O emission factors derived for chernozem and soddy podzolic soil are 0.0126 and 0.0238 kg N2O-N/kg N respectively. In 1990, the use of N fertilizers in national agriculture caused the release of 53 Gg N2O-N that constituted 6% of global N2O emission. Later on, the emission dropped because of decreased use of N fertilizers, and in 1998 it was almost 21% of the 1990 level.

  7. Nitrous oxide emission from agricultural lands in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanovskaya, A.A.; Gytarsky, M.L.; Karaban, R.T.; Nazarov, I.M.; Konushkov, D.E.

    2002-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) atmospheric emission from different agricultural soil types in Russia was evaluated based on published data on single input of nitrogen (N) fertilizers. For most of experiments the rates of fertilization varied from 40 to 75 and from 160 to 264 kg/ha in active matter and they were considered separately. The higher rates of synthetic fertilizers (160 to 264 kg/ha) reduced relative gaseous loss of N as N2O (N2O-N). Evidently, if nitrate (NO3) concentrations were high, the low content of organic carbon (C) and oxygen (O) restricted soil microbiological activity and consequently formation of N2O. The majority of gaseous loss of N2O-N occurred within 140 days after the input of fertilizers. The N2O emission factors derived for chernozem and soddy podzolic soil are 0.0126 and 0.0238 kg N2O-N/kg N respectively. In 1990, the use of N fertilizers in national agriculture caused the release of 53 Gg N2O-N that constituted 6% of global N2O emission. Later on, the emission dropped because of decreased use of N fertilizers, and in 1998 it was almost 21% of the 1990 level

  8. Representative concentration pathways and mitigation scenarios for nitrous oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, Eric A

    2012-01-01

    The challenges of mitigating nitrous oxide (N 2 O) emissions are substantially different from those for carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and methane (CH 4 ), because nitrogen (N) is essential for food production, and over 80% of anthropogenic N 2 O emissions are from the agricultural sector. Here I use a model of emission factors of N 2 O to demonstrate the magnitude of improvements in agriculture and industrial sectors and changes in dietary habits that would be necessary to match the four representative concentration pathways (RCPs) now being considered in the fifth assessment report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Stabilizing atmospheric N 2 O by 2050, consistent with the most aggressive of the RCP mitigation scenarios, would require about 50% reductions in emission factors in all sectors and about a 50% reduction in mean per capita meat consumption in the developed world. Technologies exist to achieve such improved efficiencies, but overcoming social, economic, and political impediments for their adoption and for changes in dietary habits will present large challenges. (letter)

  9. UK emissions of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiba, U.; Jones, S. K.; Dragosits, U.; Drewer, J.; Fowler, D.; Rees, R. M.; Pappa, V. A.; Cardenas, L.; Chadwick, D.; Yamulki, S.; Manning, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Signatories of the Kyoto Protocol are obliged to submit annual accounts of their anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions, which include nitrous oxide (N2O). Emissions from the sectors industry (3.8 Gg), energy (14.4 Gg), agriculture (86.8 Gg), wastewater (4.4 Gg), land use, land-use change and forestry (2.1 Gg) can be calculated by multiplying activity data (i.e. amount of fertilizer applied, animal numbers) with simple emission factors (Tier 1 approach), which are generally applied across wide geographical regions. The agricultural sector is the largest anthropogenic source of N2O in many countries and responsible for 75 per cent of UK N2O emissions. Microbial N2O production in nitrogen-fertilized soils (27.6 Gg), nitrogen-enriched waters (24.2 Gg) and manure storage systems (6.4 Gg) dominate agricultural emission budgets. For the agricultural sector, the Tier 1 emission factor approach is too simplistic to reflect local variations in climate, ecosystems and management, and is unable to take into account some of the mitigation strategies applied. This paper reviews deviations of observed emissions from those calculated using the simple emission factor approach for all anthropogenic sectors, briefly discusses the need to adopt specific emission factors that reflect regional variability in climate, soil type and management, and explains how bottom-up emission inventories can be verified by top-down modelling. PMID:22451103

  10. A critical analysis of nitrous oxide emissions from animal manure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klemendtsson, Aa.K.; Klemedtsson, L.

    2002-01-01

    Emission of nitrous oxide, N 2 0, alter manure applications to agricultural soil is composed of two components. The first is the immediately increased potential for N 2 0 production due to favourable conditions in the manure-soil environment. More N 2 0 is produced and emitted when the nitrogen content of the manure is high, especially the mineral nitrogen content. The amount of carbon available for microbiological decomposition and water content regulate the oxygen availability, which is important for N 2 0 production in both nitrification and denitrification. The balance between mineralisation of organically bound nitrogen and immobilisation of mineral nitrogen by microorganisms and plants control the availability of N for N 2 0 production. The initial burst of N 2 0 to the atmosphere following manure application may last for two months, while a second component is long term and due to nitrogen in organic matter accumulating in the soil, resulting in a small increase in background emissions over many years due to nitrogen cycling. The IPCC emission factor for N 2 0 emission due to manure addition accounts for the increased emission of N 2 0 during the first year, whereas the long-term emission is not included. (au)

  11. Nitrous oxide emission reduction in temperate biochar-amended soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felber, R.; Hüppi, R.; Leifeld, J.; Neftel, A.

    2012-01-01

    Biochar, a pyrolysis product of organic residues, is an amendment for agricultural soils to improve soil fertility, sequester CO2 and reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In highly weathered tropical soils laboratory incubations of soil-biochar mixtures revealed substantial reductions for nitrous oxide (N2O) and carbon dioxide (CO2). In contrast, evidence is scarce for temperate soils. In a three-factorial laboratory incubation experiment two different temperate agricultural soils were amended with green waste and coffee grounds biochar. N2O and CO2 emissions were measured at the beginning and end of a three month incubation. The experiments were conducted under three different conditions (no additional nutrients, glucose addition, and nitrate and glucose addition) representing different field conditions. We found mean N2O emission reductions of 60 % compared to soils without addition of biochar. The reduction depended on biochar type and soil type as well as on the age of the samples. CO2 emissions were slightly reduced, too. NO3- but not NH4+ concentrations were significantly reduced shortly after biochar incorporation. Despite the highly significant suppression of N2O emissions biochar effects should not be transferred one-to-one to field conditions but need to be tested accordingly.

  12. Strategies for enhanced deammonification performance and reduced nitrous oxide emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leix, Carmen; Drewes, Jörg E; Ye, Liu; Koch, Konrad

    2017-07-01

    Deammonification's performance and associated nitrous oxide emissions (N 2 O) depend on operational conditions. While studies have investigated factors for high performances and low emissions separately, this study investigated optimizing deammonification performance while simultaneously reducing N 2 O emissions. Using a design of experiment (DoE) method, two models were developed for the prediction of the nitrogen removal rate and N 2 O emissions during single-stage deammonification considering three operational factors (i.e., pH value, feeding and aeration strategy). The emission factor varied between 0.7±0.5% and 4.1±1.2% at different DoE-conditions. The nitrogen removal rate was predicted to be maximized at settings of pH 7.46, intermittent feeding and aeration. Conversely, emissions were predicted to be minimized at the design edges at pH 7.80, single feeding, and continuous aeration. Results suggested a weak positive correlation between the nitrogen removal rate and N 2 O emissions, thus, a single optimizing operational set-point for maximized performance and minimized emissions did not exist. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Nitrous oxide flux from landfill leachate-sawdust nitrogenous compost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hui, C.H.; So, M.K.; Lee, C.M.; Chan, G.Y.S.

    2003-01-01

    Composted nitrogenous waste has the potential to produce excessive amounts of nitrous oxide (N 2 O), a potent greenhouse gas that also contributes to stratospheric ozone depletion. In this laboratory study, sawdust was irrigated with varying amounts of landfill leachate with high NH 4 + -N content (3950 mg l -1 ). Physicochemical properties, including the amount of N 2 O produced, were monitored during the composting process over 28 days. A rapid decline in NH 4 + -N in the first 4 days and increasing NO 3 - -N for 11 days was followed by lower but stabilized levels of available-N, even with repeated leachate irrigation. Less than 0.03% of the leachate-applied N was lost as N 2 O. Higher leachate applications as much as tripled N 2 O production, but this represented a lesser proportion overall of the total nitrogen. Addition of glucose to the composting process had no significant effect on N 2 O production. The derived sawdust-leachate compost supported healthy growth of Sesbania rostrata. It is concluded that compost can be produced from sawdust irrigated with landfill leachate without substantial emission of N 2 O, although excessive flux of N 2 O remains about high application rates over longer time periods. (Author)

  14. The ideal oxygen/nitrous oxide fresh gas flow sequence with the Anesthesia Delivery Unit machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickx, Jan F A; Cardinael, Sara; Carette, Rik; Lemmens, Hendrikus J M; De Wolf, Andre M

    2007-06-01

    To determine whether early reduction of oxygen and nitrous oxide fresh gas flow from 6 L/min to 0.7 L/min could be accomplished while maintaining end-expired nitrous oxide concentration > or =50% with an Anesthesia Delivery Unit anesthesia machine. Prospective, randomized clinical study. Large teaching hospital in Belgium. 53 ASA physical status I and II patients requiring general endotracheal anesthesia and controlled mechanical ventilation. Patients were randomly assigned to one of 4 groups depending on the duration of high oxygen/nitrous oxide fresh gas flow (two and 4 L/min, respectively) before lowering total fresh gas flow to 0.7 L/min (0.3 and 0.4 L/min oxygen and nitrous oxide, respectively): one, two, three, or 5 minutes (1-minute group, 2-minute group, 3-minute group, and 5-minute group), with n = 10, 12, 13, and 8, respectively. The course of the end-expired nitrous oxide concentration and bellows volume deficit at end-expiration was compared among the 4 groups during the first 30 minutes. At the end of the high-flow period the end-expired nitrous oxide concentration was 35.6 +/- 6.2%, 48.4 +/- 4.8%, 53.7 +/- 8.7%, and 57.3 +/- 1.6% in the 4 groups, respectively. Thereafter, the end-expired nitrous oxide concentration decreased to a nadir of 36.1 +/- 4.5%, 45.4 +/- 3.8%, 50.9 +/- 6.1%, and 55.4 +/- 2.8% after three, 4, 6, and 8 minutes after flows were lowered in the 1- to 5-minute groups, respectively. A decrease in bellows volume was observed in most patients, but was most pronounced in the 2-minute group. The bellows volume deficit gradually faded within 15 to 20 minutes in all 4 groups. A 3-minute high-flow period (oxygen and nitrous oxide fresh gas flow of 2 and 4 L/min, respectively) suffices to attain and maintain end-expired nitrous oxide concentration > or =50% and ensures an adequate bellows volume during the ensuing low-flow period.

  15. Melting temperature, vapor density, and vapor pressure of molybdenum pentafluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, Jr, R F; Douglas, T B [National Bureau of Standards, Washington, D.C. (USA). Inst. for Materials Research

    1977-12-01

    A sample of MoF/sub 5/ was prepared by reaction of MoF/sub 6/(g) and Mo(c). Melting curves of temperature against time established the melting temperature at zero impurity to be 318.85 K, the enthalpy of fusion to be 6.1 kJ mol/sup -1/ (+ - 5 per cent), and the cryoscopic impurity of the sample to be 0.15 mole per cent. In the presence of MoF/sub 6/(g) which was added to suppress disproportionation, the vapor density of MoF/sub 5/ over the liquid was measured by the transpiration method at 343, 363, and 383 K, the total MoF/sub 5/ that evaporated being determined by permanganate titration. The total vapor pressure of MoF/sub 5/ oligomers over the liquid was measured by a simple static method at 373 and 392 K, while melting temperatures were taken alternately to monitor possible contamination of the sample. Although the vapor pressures were adjusted for disproportionation, solution of MoF/sub 6/ in MoF/sub 5/ (1), and wall adsorption of MoF/sub 6/ their percentage uncertainty is probably several times that of the vapor densities. A combination of the two properties indicates the average extent of association of the saturated vapor to be near 2, which is the value for the dimer species (MoF/sub 5/)/sub 2/.

  16. Changes in heart rate variability during anaesthesia induction using sevoflurane or isoflurane with nitrous oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Tomoki

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic balance using heart rate variability (HRV) during induction of anaesthesia between sevoflurane and isoflurane in combination with nitrous oxide. 40 individuals aged from 30 to 60 years, scheduled for general anaesthesia were equally divided into sevoflurane or isoflurane groups. After 100% oxygen inhalation for a few minutes, anaesthesia was induced with nitrous oxide 3 L min-1, oxygen 3 L min-1 and sevoflurane or isoflurane. Sevoflurane or isoflurane concentration was increased by 0.5% every 2 to 3 breaths until 5% was attained for sevoflurane, or 3% for isoflurane. Vecuronium was administered to facilitate tracheal intubation. After intubation, sevoflurane was set to 2% while isoflurane was set to 1% with nitrous oxide with oxygen (1:1) for 5 min. Both sevoflurane and isoflurane provoked a decrease in blood pressure, total power, the low frequency component (LF), and high frequency component (HF) of HRV. Although the heart rate increased during isoflurane anaesthesia, it decreased under sevoflurane. The power of LF and HF also decreased in both groups. LF was higher in the isoflurane group while HF was higher in the sevoflurane group. The LF/HF ratio increased transiently in the isoflurane group, but decreased in the sevoflurane group. Anaesthesia induction with isoflurane-nitrous oxide transiently increased cardiac sympathetic activity, while sevoflurane-nitrous oxide decreased both cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic activities. The balance of cardiac parasympathetic/sympathetic activity was higher in sevoflurane anaesthesia.

  17. Community Composition of Nitrous Oxide-Related Genes in Salt Marsh Sediments Exposed to Nitrogen Enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angell, John H; Peng, Xuefeng; Ji, Qixing; Craick, Ian; Jayakumar, Amal; Kearns, Patrick J; Ward, Bess B; Bowen, Jennifer L

    2018-01-01

    Salt marshes provide many key ecosystem services that have tremendous ecological and economic value. One critical service is the removal of fixed nitrogen from coastal waters, which limits the negative effects of eutrophication resulting from increased nutrient supply. Nutrient enrichment of salt marsh sediments results in higher rates of nitrogen cycling and, commonly, a concurrent increase in the flux of nitrous oxide, an important greenhouse gas. Little is known, however, regarding controls on the microbial communities that contribute to nitrous oxide fluxes in marsh sediments. To address this disconnect, we generated profiles of microbial communities and communities of micro-organisms containing specific nitrogen cycling genes that encode several enzymes ( amoA, norB, nosZ) related to nitrous oxide flux from salt marsh sediments. We hypothesized that communities of microbes responsible for nitrogen transformations will be structured by nitrogen availability. Taxa that respond positively to high nitrogen inputs may be responsible for the elevated rates of nitrogen cycling processes measured in fertilized sediments. Our data show that, with the exception of ammonia-oxidizing archaea, the community composition of organisms involved in the production and consumption of nitrous oxide was altered under nutrient enrichment. These results suggest that previously measured rates of nitrous oxide production and consumption are likely the result of changes in community structure, not simply changes in microbial activity.

  18. Large-scale Modeling of Nitrous Oxide Production: Issues of Representing Spatial Heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, C. K.; Knighton, J.

    2017-12-01

    Nitrous oxide is produced from the biological processes of nitrification and denitrification in terrestrial environments and contributes to the greenhouse effect that warms Earth's climate. Large scale modeling can be used to determine how global rate of nitrous oxide production and consumption will shift under future climates. However, accurate modeling of nitrification and denitrification is made difficult by highly parameterized, nonlinear equations. Here we show that the representation of spatial heterogeneity in inputs, specifically soil moisture, causes inaccuracies in estimating the average nitrous oxide production in soils. We demonstrate that when soil moisture is averaged from a spatially heterogeneous surface, net nitrous oxide production is under predicted. We apply this general result in a test of a widely-used global land surface model, the Community Land Model v4.5. The challenges presented by nonlinear controls on nitrous oxide are highlighted here to provide a wider context to the problem of extraordinary denitrification losses in CLM. We hope that these findings will inform future researchers on the possibilities for model improvement of the global nitrogen cycle.

  19. Sedation with nitrous oxide compared with no sedation during catheterization for urologic imaging in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zier, Judith L.; Kvam, Kathryn A.; Kurachek, Stephen C.; Finkelstein, Marsha

    2007-01-01

    Various strategies to mitigate children's distress during voiding cystourethrography (VCUG) have been described. Sedation with nitrous oxide is comparable to that with oral midazolam for VCUG, but a side-by-side comparison of nitrous oxide sedation and routine care is lacking. The effects of sedation/analgesia using 70% nitrous oxide and routine care for VCUG and radionuclide cystography (RNC) were compared. A sample of 204 children 4-18 years of age scheduled for VCUG or RNC with sedation or routine care were enrolled in this prospective study. Nitrous oxide/oxygen (70%/30%) was administered during urethral catheterization to children in the sedated group. The outcomes recorded included observed distress using the Brief Behavioral Distress Score, self-reported pain, and time in department. The study included 204 patients (99 nonsedated, 105 sedated) with a median age of 6.3 years (range 4.0-15.2 years). Distress and pain scores were greater in nonsedated than in sedated patients (P < 0.001). Time in department was longer in the sedated group (90 min vs. 30 min); however, time from entry to catheterization in a non-imaging area accounted for most of the difference. There was no difference in radiologic imaging time. Sedation with nitrous oxide is effective in reducing distress and pain during catheterization for VCUG or RNC in children. (orig.)

  20. Understanding the chemical vapor deposition of diamond: recent progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, J E; Mankelevich, Y A; Cheesman, A; Ma, Jie; Ashfold, M N R

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we review and provide an overview to the understanding of the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of diamond materials with a particular focus on the commonly used microwave plasma-activated chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD). The major topics covered are experimental measurements in situ to diamond CVD reactors, and MPCVD in particular, coupled with models of the gas phase chemical and plasma kinetics to provide insight into the distribution of critical chemical species throughout the reactor, followed by a discussion of the surface chemical process involved in diamond growth.

  1. CONDENSATION OF WATER VAPOR IN A VERTICAL TUBE CONDENSER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Havlík

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of heat transfer in the process of condensation of water vapor in a vertical shell-and-tube condenser. We analyze the use of the Nusselt model for calculating the condensation heat transfer coefficient (HTC inside a vertical tube and the Kern, Bell-Delaware and Stream-flow analysis methods for calculating the shell-side HTC from tubes to cooling water. These methods are experimentally verified for a specific condenser of waste process vapor containing air. The operating conditions of the condenser may be different from the assumptions adopted in the basic Nusselt theory. Modifications to the Nusselt condensation model are theoretically analyzed.

  2. Short exposure to acetylene to distinguish between nitrifier and denitrifier nitrous oxide production in soil and sediment samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kester, R.A.; De Boer, W.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    1996-01-01

    The contribution of nitrifiers and denitrifiers to the nitrous oxide production in slurries of calcareous silt loam and river bank sediment at different oxygen concentrations was determined using acetylene as nitrification inhibitor. The addition of 10 Pa acetylene resulted in inhibition of nitrous

  3. Control of occupational exposure to nitrous oxide in the dental operatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitcher, C.E.; Zimmerman, D.C.; Tonn, E.M.; Piziali, R.L.

    1977-10-01

    Methods were developed for controlling the dental team's occupational exposure to nitrous oxide. The most applicable and effective use of these methods included the use of properly maintained gas delivery equipment, a double-walled scavenging nosepiece and vented suction machine, and minimizing speech by the patient. These methods were evaluated by measuring concentrations of nitrous oxide present in the air inspired by dental personnel. Before their use, the dentist inhaled 900 ppM nitrous oxide; their application reduced his inhaled concentration to 31 ppM, representing a 97% reduction. These methods were well accepted during 157 procedures completed by a group of eight dentists engaged in private practice (four general practitioners, two pedodontists, and two oral surgeons).

  4. Electrochemical reduction of nitrous oxide on La1-xSrxFeO3 perovskites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammer Hansen, Kent

    2010-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction of nitrous oxide and oxygen has been studied on cone-shaped electrodes of La1-xSrxFeO3-delta perovskites in an all solid state cell, using cyclic voltammetry. It was shown that the activity of the La1-xSrxFeO3-delta perovskites for the electrochemical reduction...... of nitrous oxide mainly depends on the amount of Fe(III) and oxide ion vacancies. The activity of the La1-xSrxFeO3-delta perovskites towards the electrochemical reduction of nitrous oxide is much lower than the activity of the La1-xSrxFeO3-delta perovskites towards the electrochemical reduction of oxygen...

  5. Suffocation caused by plastic wrap covering the face combined with nitrous oxide inhalation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Peter Mygind; Astrup, Birgitte Schmidt

    2017-01-01

    Suicide using a combination of a plastic bag over the head and inhalation of a non-irritating gas, such as helium, argon or nitrogen, has been reported in the literature. Here an unusual suicide method in a 17-year old man by suffocation from covering the face with household plastic wrap, combined....... The deceased was a 17-year old man who was found with the nose and mouth closed with a piece of kitchen plastic wrap. The plastic wrap had been removed prior to autopsy. Autopsy findings were suggestive of asphyxia, but were otherwise negative. Nitrous oxide was detected in the brain and lung tissue...... with headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (headspace-GCMS). The cause of death was assumed to be suffocation caused by plastic wrap covering the face, combined with nitrous oxide inhalation. Suicide was suspected because of a history of depression for several months. Nitrous oxide, also known...

  6. Efficiencies of laser dyes for atomic vapor laser isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Mitsuo; Oki, Yuji; Uchiumi, Michihiro; Takao, Takayuki; Igarashi, Kaoru; Shimamoto, Kojiro.

    1995-01-01

    Efficiencies of 30 laser dyes for the atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) are experimentally evaluated with a dye laser pumped by a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser. On the other hand, a simulation code is developed to describe the laser action of Rhodamine 6G, and the dependence of the laser efficiency on the pump wavelength is calculated. Following conclusions are obtained by these considerations:space: 1) Pyrromethene 567 showed 16% higher laser efficiency than Rhodamine 6G by 532 nm pumping, and Pyrromethene 556 has an ability to provide better efficiency by green light pumping with a Cu vapor laser; 2) Kiton red 620 and Rhodamine 640, whose efficiencies were almost the same as Rhodamine 6G by 532 nm pumping, will show better efficiencies by two-wavelength pumping with a Cu vapor laser. (author)

  7. On the vapor-liquid equilibrium in hydroprocessing reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.; Munteanu, M.; Farooqi, H. [National Centre for Upgrading Technology, Devon, AB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    When petroleum distillates undergo hydrotreating and hydrocracking, the feedstock and hydrogen pass through trickle-bed catalytic reactors at high temperatures and pressures with large hydrogen flow. As such, the oil is partially vaporized and the hydrogen is partially dissolved in liquid to form a vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) system with both vapor and liquid phases containing oil and hydrogen. This may result in considerable changes in flow rates, physical properties and chemical compositions of both phases. Flow dynamics, mass transfer, heat transfer and reaction kinetics may also be modified. Experimental observations of VLE behaviours in distillates with different feedstocks under a range of operating conditions were presented. In addition, VLE was predicted along with its effects on distillates in pilot and commercial scale plants. tabs., figs.

  8. Inhalation analgesia with nitrous oxide versus other analgesic techniques in hysteroscopic polypectomy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Valle Rubido, Cristina; Solano Calvo, Juan Antonio; Rodríguez Miguel, Antonio; Delgado Espeja, Juan José; González Hinojosa, Jerónimo; Zapico Goñi, Álvaro

    2015-01-01

    To show the decrease in pain and better tolerance to inhalation analgesia with a 50% equimolar mixture of nitrogen protoxide and oxygen in hysteroscopic polypectomy compared with paracervical anesthesia and a control group. One hundred six patients scheduled for office hysteroscopy and polypectomy were divided into the following 3 groups: the control group, the nitrous oxide group, and the paracervical infiltration group. Patients were assigned sequentially (Canadian Task Force classification II-1). The study took place in a hysteroscopy outpatient clinic under the supervision of a gynecologist and 2 nurses trained to cooperate in the trial. One hundred six women from Area III of Madrid Community, Spain, who had been diagnosed with endometrial polyps at a gynecology office and were scheduled for office hysteroscopy and polypectomy agreed to participate in the study. Patients in group 1 (control group) received no treatment. Group 2 received inhaled nitrous oxide and group 3 paracervical infiltration with 1% lidocaine. Pain was assessed using the visual analog scale (0-10). Pain perceived by patients was lower in the nitrous Oxide group (mean: 3.55 ± 0.60, median: 3) versus the control group (mean: 5.49 ± 1.88, median: 6, p nitrous oxide group, and good for the paracervical infiltration group (p nitrous oxide group, whereas in the paracervical infiltration group, there were complications in more than 50% of the patients. No severe complications occurred. Nitrous oxide is a safe and effective analgesic technique for polipectomy office hysteroscopy compared with the paracervical infiltration and control groups. Copyright © 2015 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Investigating the effects of nitrous oxide sedation on frontal-parietal interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Ji-Ho; Kim, Pil-Jong; Kim, Hong-Gee; Koo, Yong-Seo; Shin, Teo Jeon

    2017-06-09

    Although functional connectivity has received considerable attention in the study of consciousness, few studies have investigated functional connectivity limited to the sedated state where consciousness is maintained but impaired. The aim of the present study was to investigate changes in functional connectivity of the parietal-frontal network resulting from nitrous oxide-induced sedation, and to determine the neural correlates of cognitive impairment during consciousness transition states. Electroencephalography was acquired from healthy adult patients who underwent nitrous oxide inhalation to induce cognitive impairment, and was analyzed using Granger causality (GC). Periods of awake, sedation and recovery for GC between frontal and parietal areas in the delta, theta, alpha, beta, gamma and total frequency bands were obtained. The Friedman test with post-hoc analysis was conducted for GC values of each period for comparison. As a sedated state was induced by nitrous oxide inhalation, power in the low frequency band showed increased activity in frontal regions that was reversed with discontinuation of nitrous oxide. Feedback and feedforward connections analyzed in spectral GC were changed differently in accordance with EEG frequency bands in the sedated state by nitrous oxide administration. Calculated spectral GC of the theta, alpha, and beta frequency regions in the parietal-to-frontal direction was significantly decreased in the sedated state while spectral GC in the reverse direction did not show significant change. Frontal-parietal functional connectivity is significantly affected by nitrous oxide inhalation. Significantly decreased parietal-to-frontal interaction may induce a sedated state. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Boundary vapor contentsin an annular channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remizov, O.V.; Shurkin, N.G.; Podgornyj, K.K.; Gal'chenko, Eh.F.; Bukhteev, I.S.

    1978-01-01

    The work is aimed at the experimental investigation of the worsening of the heat transfer in an annular channel. The experiments have been carried out on the annular channel 32x28x3000 mm with the even distribution of the heat flux along the length at pressures of 6.9-19.6 MPa, flow rate of 350-1000 kg/m 2 s, and specific heat fluxes from 0.18 up to 0.6 MW/m 2 . Heating is external, oneside. Water monodistillate of the following composition has been used as a coolant: pH 9; dry residue - 0.8-1.2 mg/kg, oxygen -10-15 mg/kg. It is found out that the change character of the temperature field of the heating surface of the annular channel at the regime with the worsen of heat emission depends on the ratio of regime parameters. At pressures of 6.9-13.7 MPa and flow rate of 350-500 kg/m 2 s the channel wall temperature rises monotoneously, never reaching its maximum. With pressure rise > 13.7 MPa and mass velocity > 500 kg/m 2 s the temperature of the heat emitting surface reaches its maximum, and then slowly falls. At pressures of 6.9-11.8 MPa the boundary vapor content value within the whole range of mass velocities does not depend on the specific heat flux q. At pressures higher than 13.7 MPa and mass velocities of 350-1000 kg/m 2 s the boundary vapor content depends on q. The heating of the external or internal surface of the annular channel affects the value of the boundary vapor content within the whole range of regime parameters' change under investigation

  11. Homocysteine levels after nitrous oxide anesthesia for living-related donor renal transplantation: a randomized, controlled, double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coskunfirat, N; Hadimioglu, N; Ertug, Z; Akbas, H; Davran, F; Ozdemir, B; Aktas Samur, A; Arici, G

    2015-03-01

    Nitrous oxide anesthesia increases postoperative homocysteine concentrations. Renal transplantation candidates present with higher homocysteine levels than patients with no renal disease. We designed this study to investigate if homocysteine levels are higher in subjects receiving nitrous oxide for renal transplantation compared with subjects undergoing nitrous oxide free anesthesia. Data from 59 patients scheduled for living-related donor renal transplantation surgery were analyzed in this randomized, controlled, blinded, parallel-group, longitudinal trial. Patients were assigned to receive general anesthesia with (flowmeter was set at 2 L/min nitrous oxide and 1 L/min oxygen) or without nitrous oxide (2 L/min air and 1 L/min oxygen). We evaluated levels of total homocysteine and known determinants, including creatinine, folate, vitamin B12, albumin, and lipids. We evaluated factor V and von Willebrand factor (vWF) to determine endothelial dysfunction and creatinine kinase myocardial band (CKMB)-mass, troponin T to show myocardial ischemia preoperatively in the holding area (T1), after discontinuation of anesthetic gases (T2), and 24 hours after induction (T3). Compared with baseline, homocysteine concentrations significantly decreased both in the nitrous oxide (22.3 ± 16.3 vs 11.8 ± 9.9; P nitrous oxide-free groups (21.5 ± 15.3 vs 8.0 ± 5.7; P nitrous oxide group had significantly higher mean plasma homocysteine concentrations than the nitrous oxide-free group (P = .021). The actual homocysteine difference between groups was 3.8 μmol/L. This study shows that homocysteine levels markedly decrease within 24 hours after living-related donor kidney transplantation. Patients receiving nitrous oxide have a lesser reduction, but this finding is unlikely to have a clinical relevance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Nitrous Oxides Ozone Destructiveness Under Different Climate Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, David R.; McDermid, Sonali P.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas and ozone depleting substance as well as a key component of the nitrogen cascade. While emissions scenarios indicating the range of N2O's potential future contributions to radiative forcing are widely available, the impact of these emissions scenarios on future stratospheric ozone depletion is less clear. This is because N2O's ozone destructiveness is partially dependent on tropospheric warming, which affects ozone depletion rates in the stratosphere. Consequently, in order to understand the possible range of stratospheric ozone depletion that N2O could cause over the 21st century, it is important to decouple the greenhouse gas emissions scenarios and compare different emissions trajectories for individual substances (e.g. business-as-usual carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions versus low emissions of N2O). This study is the first to follow such an approach, running a series of experiments using the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Sciences ModelE2 atmospheric sub-model. We anticipate our results to show that stratospheric ozone depletion will be highest in a scenario where CO2 emissions reductions are prioritized over N2O reductions, as this would constrain ozone recovery while doing little to limit stratospheric NOx levels (the breakdown product of N2O that destroys stratospheric ozone). This could not only delay the recovery of the stratospheric ozone layer, but might also prevent a return to pre-1980 global average ozone concentrations, a key goal of the international ozone regime. Accordingly, we think this will highlight the importance of reducing emissions of all major greenhouse gas emissions, including N2O, and not just a singular policy focus on CO2.

  13. Strategies to mitigate nitrous oxide emissions from herbivore production systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schils, R L M; Eriksen, J; Ledgard, S F; Vellinga, Th V; Kuikman, P J; Luo, J; Petersen, S O; Velthof, G L

    2013-03-01

    Herbivores are a significant source of nitrous oxide (N(2)O) emissions. They account for a large share of manure-related N(2)O emissions, as well as soil-related N(2)O emissions through the use of grazing land, and land for feed and forage production. It is widely acknowledged that mitigation measures are necessary to avoid an increase in N(2)O emissions while meeting the growing global food demand. The production and emissions of N(2)O are closely linked to the efficiency of nitrogen (N) transfer between the major components of a livestock system, that is, animal, manure, soil and crop. Therefore, mitigation options in this paper have been structured along these N pathways. Mitigation technologies involving diet-based intervention include lowering the CP content or increasing the condensed tannin content of the diet. Animal-related mitigation options also include breeding for improved N conversion and high animal productivity. The main soil-based mitigation measures include efficient use of fertilizer and manure, including the use of nitrification inhibitors. In pasture-based systems with animal housing facilities, reducing grazing time is an effective option to reduce N(2)O losses. Crop-based options comprise breeding efforts for increased N-use efficiency and the use of pastures with N(2)-fixing clover. It is important to recognize that all N(2)O mitigation options affect the N and carbon cycles of livestock systems. Therefore, care should be taken that reductions in N(2)O emissions are not offset by unwanted increases in ammonia, methane or carbon dioxide emissions. Despite the abundant availability of mitigation options, implementation in practice is still lagging. Actual implementation will only follow after increased awareness among farmers and greenhouse gases targeted policies. So far, reductions in N(2)O emissions that have been achieved are mostly a positive side effect of other N-targeted policies.

  14. Modelling nitrous oxide emissions from grazed grassland systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Junye; Cardenas, Laura M.; Misselbrook, Tom H.; Cuttle, Steve; Thorman, Rachel E.; Li Changsheng

    2012-01-01

    Grazed grassland systems are an important component of the global carbon cycle and also influence global climate change through their emissions of nitrous oxide and methane. However, there are huge uncertainties and challenges in the development and parameterisation of process-based models for grazed grassland systems because of the wide diversity of vegetation and impacts of grazing animals. A process-based biogeochemistry model, DeNitrification-DeComposition (DNDC), has been modified to describe N 2 O emissions for the UK from regional conditions. This paper reports a new development of UK-DNDC in which the animal grazing practices were modified to track their contributions to the soil nitrogen (N) biogeochemistry. The new version of UK-DNDC was tested against datasets of N 2 O fluxes measured at three contrasting field sites. The results showed that the responses of the model to changes in grazing parameters were generally in agreement with observations, showing that N 2 O emissions increased as the grazing intensity increased. - Highlights: ► Parameterisation of grazing system using grazing intensity. ► Modification of UK D NDC for the UK soil and weather conditions. ► Validation of the UK D NDC against measured data of N 2 O emissions in three UK sites. ► Estimating influence of animal grazing practises on N 2 O emissions. - Grazing system was parameterised using grazing intensity and UK-DNDC model was modified and validated against measured data of N 2 O emissions in three UK sites.

  15. Modelling nitrous oxide emissions from cropland at the regional scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielle Benoît

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Arable soils are a large source of nitrous oxide (N2O emissions, making up half of the biogenic emissions worldwide. Estimating their source strength requires methods capable of capturing the spatial and temporal variability of N2O emissions, along with the effects of crop management. Here, we applied a process-based model, CERES, with geo-referenced input data on soils, weather, and land use to map N2O emissions from wheat-cropped soils in three agriculturally intensive regions in France. Emissions were mostly controlled by soil type and local climate conditions, and only to a minor extent by the doses of fertilizer nitrogen applied. As a result, the direct emission factors calculated at the regional level were much smaller (ranging from 0.0007 to 0.0033 kg N2O-N kg–1 N than the value of 0.0125 kg N2O-N kg–1 N currently recommended in the IPCC Tier 1 methodology. Regional emissions were far more sensitive to the soil microbiological parameter s governing denitrification and its fraction evolved as N2O, soil bulk density, and soil initial inorganic N content. Mitigation measures should therefore target a reduction in the amount of soil inorganic N upon sowing of winter crops, and a decrease of the soil N2O production potential itself. From a general perspective, taking into account the spatial variability of soils and climate thereby appears necessary to improve the accuracy of national inventories, and to tailor mitigation strategies to regional characteristics. The methodology and results presented here may easily be transferred to winter oilseed rape, whose has growing cycle and fertilser requirements are similar.

  16. Nitrous oxide emission from denitrification in stream and river networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, J.J.; Tank, J.L.; Hamilton, S.K.; Wollheim, W.M.; Hall, R.O.; Mulholland, P.J.; Peterson, B.J.; Ashkenas, L.R.; Cooper, L.W.; Dahm, Clifford N.; Dodds, W.K.; Grimm, N. B.; Johnson, S.L.; McDowell, W.H.; Poole, G.C.; Maurice, Valett H.; Arango, C.P.; Bernot, M.J.; Burgin, A.J.; Crenshaw, C.L.; Helton, A.M.; Johnson, L.T.; O'Brien, J. M.; Potter, J.D.; Sheibley, R.W.; Sobota, D.J.; Thomas, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change and stratospheric ozone destruction. Anthropogenic nitrogen (N) loading to river networks is a potentially important source of N 2O via microbial denitrification that converts N to N2O and dinitrogen (N2). The fraction of denitrified N that escapes as N2O rather than N2 (i.e., the N2O yield) is an important determinant of how much N2O is produced by river networks, but little is known about the N2O yield in flowing waters. Here, we present the results of whole-stream 15N-tracer additions conducted in 72 headwater streams draining multiple land-use types across the United States. We found that stream denitrification produces N2O at rates that increase with stream water nitrate (NO3-) concentrations, but that production, but does not increase the N2O yield. In our study, most streams were sources of N2O to the atmosphere and the highest emission rates were observed in streams draining urban basins. Using a global river network model, we estimate that microbial N transformations (e.g., denitrification and nitrification) convert at least 0.68 Tg??y -1 of anthropogenic N inputs to N2O in river networks, equivalent to 10% of the global anthropogenic N2O emission rate. This estimate of stream and river N2O emissions is three times greater than estimated by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

  17. Measurements of nitrous oxide emissions from vegetable production in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zhengqin; Xie, Yingxin; Xing, Guangxi; Zhu, Zhaoliang; Butenhoff, Chris

    Nitrous oxide (N 2O) emissions resulting from Chinese vegetable production were measured. A site in suburban Nanjing (East coast; Jiangsu Province) was monitored from November 2001 to January 2003, in which five consecutive vegetable crops were sown. The crops consisted of radish, baby bok choy, lettuce, second planting of baby bok choy, and finally celery. Results suggested that N 2O emission events occur in pulses. The average N 2O-N flux for all five crops was 148±9 μg N m -2 h -1 and the average emission rate was 12±0.7 kg N ha -1. The average seasonal emission fluxes ranged from 37 μg N m -2 h -1 in the radish plot to 300 μg N m -2 h -1 in the celery plot. The celery field produced the greatest cumulative emission of 5.8 kg N ha -1 while the baby bok choy field had the lowest rate of 0.96-1.0 kg N ha -1. In total, 0.73% of applied fertilizer N was emitted as N 2O-N as a whole. The lettuce field had the largest emission factor of 2.2%. Results indicate that emissions from vegetable field are a potential source of national N 2O inventory. Temporal variation is much greater than spatial variation and the corresponding CV averaged 115% and 22%, respectively. Under the same total sampling quantity, increasing sampling frequency is more important than increasing spatial replicates.

  18. Nitrous oxide production pathways in a partial nitritation-anammox reactor: Isotopic evidence for nitrous oxide production associated anaerobic ammonium oxidation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderlin, P.; Harris, E. J.; Joss, A.; Emmenegger, L.; Kipf, M.; Mohn, J.; Siegrist, H.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a strong greenhouse gas and a major sink for stratospheric ozone. In biological wastewater treatment N2O can be produced via several pathways. This study investigates the dynamics of N2O emissions from a nitritation-anammox reactor, and links its interpretation to the nitrogen and oxygen isotopic signature of the emitted N2O. A 400-litre single-stage nitritation-anammox reactor was operated and continuously fed with digester liquid. The isotopic composition of N2O emissions was monitored online with quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS; Aerodyne Research, Inc.; Waechter et al., 2008). Dissolved ammonium and nitrate were monitored online (ISEmax, Endress + Hauser), while nitrite was measured with test strips (Nitrite-test 0-24mgN/l, Merck). Table 1. Summary of experiments conducted to understand N2O emissions Experimental conditions O2[mgO2/L] NO2-[mgN/L] NH4+[mgN/L] N2O/NH4+[%] Normal operation production pathway, which is hypothesized to be mediated by anammox activity (Figure 1). A less likely explanation is that the SP of N2O was increased by partial N2O reduction by heterotrophic denitrification. Various experiments were conducted to further investigate N2O formation pathways in the reactor. Our data reveal that N2O emissions increased when reactor operation was not ideal, for example when dissolved oxygen was too high (Table 1). SP measurements confirmed that these N2O peaks were due to enhanced nitrifier denitrification, generally related to nitrite build-up in the reactor (Figure 1; Table 1). Overall, process control via online N2O monitoring was confirmed to be an ideal method to detect imbalances in reactor operation and regulate aeration, to ensure optimal reactor conditions and minimise N2O emissions. ReferencesWaechter H. et al. (2008) Optics Express, 16: 9239-9244. Wunderlin, P et al. (2013) Environmental Science & Technology 47: 1339-1348.

  19. The biosynthesis of nitrous oxide in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plouviez, Maxence; Wheeler, David; Shilton, Andy; Packer, Michael A; McLenachan, Patricia A; Sanz-Luque, Emanuel; Ocaña-Calahorro, Francisco; Fernández, Emilio; Guieysse, Benoit

    2017-07-01

    Over the last decades, several studies have reported emissions of nitrous oxide (N 2 O) from microalgal cultures and aquatic ecosystems characterized by a high level of algal activity (e.g. eutrophic lakes). As N 2 O is a potent greenhouse gas and an ozone-depleting pollutant, these findings suggest that large-scale cultivation of microalgae (and possibly, natural eutrophic ecosystems) could have a significant environmental impact. Using the model unicellular microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, this study was conducted to investigate the molecular basis of microalgal N 2 O synthesis. We report that C. reinhardtii supplied with nitrite (NO 2 - ) under aerobic conditions can reduce NO 2 - into nitric oxide (NO) using either a mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (COX) or a dual enzymatic system of nitrate reductase (NR) and amidoxime-reducing component, and that NO is subsequently reduced into N 2 O by the enzyme NO reductase (NOR). Based on experimental evidence and published literature, we hypothesize that when nitrate (NO 3 - ) is the main Nitrogen source and the intracellular concentration of NO 2 - is low (i.e. under physiological conditions), microalgal N 2 O synthesis involves the reduction of NO 3 - to NO 2 - by NR followed by the reduction of NO 2 - to NO by the dual system involving NR. This microalgal N 2 O pathway has broad implications for environmental science and algal biology because the pathway of NO 3 - assimilation is conserved among microalgae, and because its regulation may involve NO. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Graphitic carbon nitride: Synthesis, characterization and photocatalytic decomposition of nitrous oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Praus, Petr; Svoboda, Ladislav; Ritz, Michal; Troppová, Ivana; Šihor, Marcel; Kočí, Kamila

    2017-01-01

    Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C_3N_4) was synthetized by condensation of melamine at the temperatures of 400–700 °C in air for 2 h and resulting products were characterized and finally tested for the photocatalytic decomposition of nitrous oxide. The characterization methods were elemental analysis, UV–Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), photoluminescence (PL), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy, measurement of specific surface area (SSA), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy. The XRD patterns, FTIR and Raman spectra proved the presence of g-C_3N_4 at above 550 °C but the optimal synthesis temperature of 600–650 °C was found. Under these conditions graphitic carbon nitride of the overall empirical composition of C_6N_9H_2 was formed. At lower temperatures g-C_3N_4 with a higher content of hydrogen was formed but at higher temperatures g-C_3N_4 was decomposed. At the temperatures above 650 °C, its exfoliation was observed. The photocatalytic experiments showed that the activity of all the samples synthetized at 400–700 °C was very similar, that is, within the range of experimental error (5 %). The total conversion of N_2O reached about 43 % after 14 h. - Highlights: • Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C_3N_4) was thermally synthetized from melamine in the range of 400–700 °C. • The optimal temperature was determined at 600–650 °C. • All synthesis products were properly characterized by physico-chemical methods. • Exfoliation of g-C_3N_4 at above 600 °C was observed. • g-C_3N_4 was used for the photocatalytic decomposition of N_2O.

  1. Isotopic evidence for nitrous oxide production pathways in a partial nitritation-anammox reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Eliza; Joss, Adriano; Emmenegger, Lukas; Kipf, Marco; Wolf, Benjamin; Mohn, Joachim; Wunderlin, Pascal

    2015-10-15

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) production pathways in a single stage, continuously fed partial nitritation-anammox reactor were investigated using online isotopic analysis of offgas N2O with quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS). N2O emissions increased when reactor operating conditions were not optimal, for example, high dissolved oxygen concentration. SP measurements indicated that the increase in N2O was due to enhanced nitrifier denitrification, generally related to nitrite build-up in the reactor. The results of this study confirm that process control via online N2O monitoring is an ideal method to detect imbalances in reactor operation and regulate aeration, to ensure optimal reactor conditions and minimise N2O emissions. Under normal operating conditions, the N2O isotopic site preference (SP) was much higher than expected - up to 40‰ - which could not be explained within the current understanding of N2O production pathways. Various targeted experiments were conducted to investigate the characteristics of N2O formation in the reactor. The high SP measurements during both normal operating and experimental conditions could potentially be explained by a number of hypotheses: i) unexpectedly strong heterotrophic N2O reduction, ii) unknown inorganic or anammox-associated N2O production pathway, iii) previous underestimation of SP fractionation during N2O production from NH2OH, or strong variations in SP from this pathway depending on reactor conditions. The second hypothesis - an unknown or incompletely characterised production pathway - was most consistent with results, however the other possibilities cannot be discounted. Further experiments are needed to distinguish between these hypotheses and fully resolve N2O production pathways in PN-anammox systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The influence of solid retention time on IFAS-MBR systems: Assessment of nitrous oxide emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannina, Giorgio; Capodici, Marco; Cosenza, Alida; Laudicina, Vito Armando; Di Trapani, Daniele

    2017-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the nitrous oxide (N 2 O) emissions from a moving bed based Integrated Fixed Film Activated Sludge (IFAS) - membrane bioreactor (MBR) pilot plant, designed according to the University of Cape Town (UCT) layout. The experimental campaign had a duration of 110 days and was characterized by three different sludge retention time (SRT) values (∞, 30 d and 15 d). Results highlighted that N 2 O concentrations decreased when the biofilm concentrations increased within the aerobic reactor. Results have shown an increase of N 2 O with the decrease of SRT. Specifically, an increase of N 2 O-N emission factor occurred with the decrease of the SRT (0.13%, 0.21% and 0.76% of influent nitrogen for SRT = ∞, SRT = 30 d and SRT = 15 d, respectively). Moreover, the MBR tank resulted the key emission source (up to 70% of the total N 2 O emission during SRT = ∞ period) whereas the highest N 2 O production occurred in the anoxic reactor. Moreover, N 2 O concentrations measured in the permeate flow were not negligible, thus highlighting its potential detrimental contribution for the receiving water body. The role of each plant reactor as N 2 O-N producer/consumer varies with the SRT variation, indeed the aerobic reactor was a N 2 O consumer at SRT = ∞ and a producer at SRT = 30 d. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Nitrous oxide production during nitrification from organic solid waste under temperature and oxygen conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Mitali; Shimaoka, Takayuki; Komiya, Teppei

    2016-11-01

    Landfill aeration can accelerate the biological degradation of organic waste and reduce methane production; however, it induces nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas. Nitrification is one of the pathways of N2O generation as a by-product during aerobic condition. This study was initiated to demonstrate the features of N2O production rate from organic solid waste during nitrification under three different temperatures (20°C, 30°C, and 40°C) and three oxygen concentrations (5%, 10%, and 20%) with high moisture content and high substrates' concentration. The experiment was carried out by batch experiment using Erlenmeyer flasks incubated in a shaking water bath for 72 h. A duplicate experiment was carried out in parallel, with addition of 100 Pa of acetylene as a nitrification inhibitor, to investigate nitrifiers' contribution to N2O production. The production rate of N2O ranged between 0.40 × 10(-3) and 1.14 × 10(-3) mg N/g-DM/h under the experimental conditions of this study. The rate of N2O production at 40°C was higher than at 20°C and 30°C. Nitrification was found to be the dominant pathway of N2O production. It was evaluated that optimization of O2 content is one of the crucial parameters in N2O production that may help to minimize greenhouse gas emissions and N turnover during aeration.

  4. Thermal plasma chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heberlein, J.; Pfender, E.

    1993-01-01

    Thermal plasmas, with temperatures up to and even exceeding 10 4 K, are capable of producing high density vapor phase precursors for the deposition of relatively thick films. Although this technology is still in its infancy, it will fill the void between the relatively slow deposition processes such as physical vapor deposition and the high rate thermal spray deposition processes. In this chapter, the present state-of-the-art of this field is reviewed with emphasis on the various types of reactors proposed for this emerging technology. Only applications which attracted particular attention, namely diamond and high T c superconducting film deposition, are discussed in greater detail. (orig.)

  5. Nitrous oxide provides safe and effective analgesia for minor paediatric procedures - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rie S; Bayat, Allan; Steen, Nick Phaff

    2013-01-01

    Pain and distress during minor hospital-related procedures is a familiar problem in many children. Inadequate relief of children's procedural pain and distress not only affects the experience of the children and their parents, but also adversely impacts procedural success. We aimed to review the ...... the safety and efficacy of nitrous oxide during brief, but painful paediatric procedures and to compare nitrous oxide with some of the commonly used pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments for relieving anxiety and mild to moderate pain in Denmark....

  6. Field study of nitrous oxide production with in situ aeration in a closed landfill site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Mitali; Shimaoka, Takayuki; Nakayama, Hirofumi; Komiya, Teppei; Xiaoli, Chai

    2016-03-01

    Nitrous oxide (N(2)O) has gained considerable attention as a contributor to global warming and depilation of stratospheric ozone layer. Landfill is one of the high emitters of greenhouse gas such as methane and N(2)O during the biodegradation of solid waste. Landfill aeration has been attracted increasing attention worldwide for fast, controlled and sustainable conversion of landfills into a biological stabilized condition, however landfill aeration impel N(2)O emission with ammonia removal. N(2)O originates from the biodegradation, or the combustion of nitrogen-containing solid waste during the microbial process of nitrification and denitrification. During these two processes, formation of N(2)O as a by-product from nitrification, or as an intermediate product of denitrification. In this study, air was injected into a closed landfill site and investigated the major N(2)O production factors and correlations established between them. The in-situ aeration experiment was carried out by three sets of gas collection pipes along with temperature probes were installed at three different distances of one, two and three meter away from the aeration point; named points A-C, respectively. Each set of pipes consisted of three different pipes at three different depths of 0.0, 0.75 and 1.5 m from the bottom of the cover soil. Landfill gases composition was monitored weekly and gas samples were collected for analysis of nitrous oxide concentrations. It was evaluated that temperatures within the range of 30-40°C with high oxygen content led to higher generation of nitrous oxide with high aeration rate. Lower O(2) content can infuse N(2)O production during nitrification and high O(2) inhibit denitrification which would affect N(2)O production. The findings provide insights concerning the production potentials of N(2)O in an aerated landfill that may help to minimize with appropriate control of the operational parameters and biological reactions of N turnover. Investigation of

  7. Nitrous oxide production and consumption potential in an agricultural and a forest soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Kewei; Struwe, Sten; Kjøller, Annelise

    2008-01-01

    Both a laboratory incubation experiment using soils from an agricultural field and a forest and field measurements at the same locations were conducted to determine nitrous oxide (N2O) production and consumption (reduction) potentials using the acetylene (C2H2) inhibition technique. Results from...... measurements show that average N2O emission rates were 0.56 and 0.59 kg N ha-1 in the agricultural field and forest, respectively. When C2H2 was provided in the field measurements, N2O emission rates from the agricultural field and forest increased by 38 and 51%, respectively. Nitrous oxide consumption under...

  8. Bending localization of nitrous oxide under anharmonicity and Fermi coupling: the dynamical potential approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chi; Wu Guo-Zhen; Fang Chao

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the vibrational nonlinear dynamics of nitrous oxide with Fermi coupling between the symmetric stretching and bending coordinates by classical dynamical potential approach. This is a global approach in the sense that the overall dynamics is evidenced by the classical nonlinear variables such as the fixed points and the focus are on a set of levels instead of individual ones. The dynamics of nitrous oxide is demonstrated to be not so much dependent on the excitation energy. Moreover, the localized bending mode is shown to be ubiquitous in all the energy range studied

  9. Navier slip model of drag reduction by Leidenfrost vapor layers

    KAUST Repository

    Berry, Joseph D.; Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev; Chan, Derek Y. C.; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2017-01-01

    Recent experiments found that a hot solid sphere that is able to sustain a stable Leidenfrost vapor layer in a liquid exhibits significant drag reduction during free fall. The variation of the drag coefficient with Reynolds number deviates substantially from the characteristic drag crisis behavior at high Reynolds numbers. Measurements based on liquids of different viscosities show that the onset of the drag crisis depends on the viscosity ratio of the vapor to the liquid. Here we attempt to characterize the complexity of the Leidenfrost vapor layer with respect to its variable thickness and possible vapor circulation within, in terms of the Navier slip model that is defined by a slip length. Such a model can facilitate tangential flow and thereby alter the behavior of the boundary layer. Direct numerical and large eddy simulations of flow past a sphere at moderate to high Reynolds numbers (102≤Re≤4×104) are employed to quantify comparisons with experimental results, including the drag coefficient and the form of the downstream wake on the sphere. This provides a simple one parameter characterization of the drag reduction phenomenon due to a stable vapor layer that envelops a solid body.

  10. Navier slip model of drag reduction by Leidenfrost vapor layers

    KAUST Repository

    Berry, Joseph D.

    2017-10-17

    Recent experiments found that a hot solid sphere that is able to sustain a stable Leidenfrost vapor layer in a liquid exhibits significant drag reduction during free fall. The variation of the drag coefficient with Reynolds number deviates substantially from the characteristic drag crisis behavior at high Reynolds numbers. Measurements based on liquids of different viscosities show that the onset of the drag crisis depends on the viscosity ratio of the vapor to the liquid. Here we attempt to characterize the complexity of the Leidenfrost vapor layer with respect to its variable thickness and possible vapor circulation within, in terms of the Navier slip model that is defined by a slip length. Such a model can facilitate tangential flow and thereby alter the behavior of the boundary layer. Direct numerical and large eddy simulations of flow past a sphere at moderate to high Reynolds numbers (102≤Re≤4×104) are employed to quantify comparisons with experimental results, including the drag coefficient and the form of the downstream wake on the sphere. This provides a simple one parameter characterization of the drag reduction phenomenon due to a stable vapor layer that envelops a solid body.

  11. Waste Tank Vapor Project: Tank vapor database development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seesing, P.R.; Birn, M.B.; Manke, K.L.

    1994-09-01

    The objective of the Tank Vapor Database (TVD) Development task in FY 1994 was to create a database to store, retrieve, and analyze data collected from the vapor phase of Hanford waste tanks. The data needed to be accessible over the Hanford Local Area Network to users at both Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The data were restricted to results published in cleared reports from the laboratories analyzing vapor samples. Emphasis was placed on ease of access and flexibility of data formatting and reporting mechanisms. Because of time and budget constraints, a Rapid Application Development strategy was adopted by the database development team. An extensive data modeling exercise was conducted to determine the scope of information contained in the database. a A SUN Sparcstation 1000 was procured as the database file server. A multi-user relational database management system, Sybase reg-sign, was chosen to provide the basic data storage and retrieval capabilities. Two packages were chosen for the user interface to the database: DataPrism reg-sign and Business Objects trademark. A prototype database was constructed to provide the Waste Tank Vapor Project's Toxicology task with summarized and detailed information presented at Vapor Conference 4 by WHC, PNL, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Oregon Graduate Institute. The prototype was used to develop a list of reported compounds, and the range of values for compounds reported by the analytical laboratories using different sample containers and analysis methodologies. The prototype allowed a panel of toxicology experts to identify carcinogens and compounds whose concentrations were within the reach of regulatory limits. The database and user documentation was made available for general access in September 1994

  12. Droplet Vaporization In A Levitating Acoustic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, G. A.; Liu, S.; Ciobanescu, I.

    2003-01-01

    Combustion experiments using arrays of droplets seek to provide a link between single droplet combustion phenomena and the behavior of complex spray combustion systems. Both single droplet and droplet array studies have been conducted in microgravity to better isolate the droplet interaction phenomena and eliminate or reduce the effects of buoyancy-induced convection. In most experiments involving droplet arrays, the droplets are supported on fibers to keep them stationary and close together before the combustion event. The presence of the fiber, however, disturbs the combustion process by introducing a source of heat transfer and asymmetry into the configuration. As the number of drops in a droplet array increases, supporting the drops on fibers becomes less practical because of the cumulative effect of the fibers on the combustion process. To eliminate the effect of the fiber, several researchers have conducted microgravity experiments using unsupported droplets. Jackson and Avedisian investigated single, unsupported drops while Nomura et al. studied droplet clouds formed by a condensation technique. The overall objective of this research is to extend the study of unsupported drops by investigating the combustion of well-characterized drop clusters in a microgravity environment. Direct experimental observations and measurements of the combustion of droplet clusters would provide unique experimental data for the verification and improvement of spray combustion models. In this work, the formation of drop clusters is precisely controlled using an acoustic levitation system so that dilute, as well as dense clusters can be created and stabilized before combustion in microgravity is begun. While the low-gravity test facility is being completed, tests have been conducted in 1-g to characterize the effect of the acoustic field on the vaporization of single and multiple droplets. This is important because in the combustion experiment, the droplets will be formed and

  13. Method of estimating changes in vapor concentrations continuously generated from two-component organic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Hajime; Ishidao, Toru; Ishimatsu, Sumiyo

    2010-12-01

    We measured vapor concentrations continuously evaporated from two-component organic solvents in a reservoir and proposed a method to estimate and predict the evaporation rate or generated vapor concentrations. Two kinds of organic solvents were put into a small reservoir made of glass (3 cm in diameter and 3 cm high) that was installed in a cylindrical glass vessel (10 cm in diameter and 15 cm high). Air was introduced into the glass vessel at a flow rate of 150 ml/min, and the generated vapor concentrations were intermittently monitored for up to 5 hours with a gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization detector. The solvent systems tested in this study were the methanoltoluene system and the ethyl acetate-toluene system. The vapor concentrations of the more volatile component, that is, methanol in the methanol-toluene system and ethyl acetate in the ethyl acetate-toluene system, were high at first, and then decreased with time. On the other hand, the concentrations of the less volatile component were low at first, and then increased with time. A model for estimating multicomponent organic vapor concentrations was developed, based on a theory of vapor-liquid equilibria and a theory of the mass transfer rate, and estimated values were compared with experimental ones. The estimated vapor concentrations were in relatively good agreement with the experimental ones. The results suggest that changes in concentrations of two-component organic vapors continuously evaporating from a liquid reservoir can be estimated by the proposed model.

  14. Estimated vapor pressure for WTP process streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pike, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Poirier, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-01-01

    Design assumptions during the vacuum refill phase of the Pulsed Jet Mixers (PJMs) in the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) equate the vapor pressure of all process streams to that of water when calculating the temperature at which the vacuum refill is reduced or eliminated. WTP design authority asked the authors to assess this assumption by performing calculations on proposed feed slurries to calculate the vapor pressure as a function of temperature. The vapor pressure was estimated for each WTP waste group. The vapor pressure suppression caused by dissolved solids is much greater than the increase caused by organic components such that the vapor pressure for all of the waste group compositions is less than that of pure water. The vapor pressure for each group at 145°F ranges from 81% to 98% of the vapor pressure of water. If desired, the PJM could be operated at higher temperatures for waste groups with high dissolved solids that suppress vapor pressure. The SO4 group with the highest vapor pressure suppression could be operated up to 153°F before reaching the same vapor pressure of water at 145°F. However, most groups would reach equivalent vapor pressure at 147 to 148°F. If any of these waste streams are diluted, the vapor pressure can exceed the vapor pressure of water at mass dilution ratios greater than 10, but the overall effect is less than 0.5%.

  15. Vapor generation methods for explosives detection research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grate, Jay W.; Ewing, Robert G.; Atkinson, David A.

    2012-12-01

    The generation of calibrated vapor samples of explosives compounds remains a challenge due to the low vapor pressures of the explosives, adsorption of explosives on container and tubing walls, and the requirement to manage (typically) multiple temperature zones as the vapor is generated, diluted, and delivered. Methods that have been described to generate vapors can be classified as continuous or pulsed flow vapor generators. Vapor sources for continuous flow generators are typically explosives compounds supported on a solid support, or compounds contained in a permeation or diffusion device. Sources are held at elevated isothermal temperatures. Similar sources can be used for pulsed vapor generators; however, pulsed systems may also use injection of solutions onto heated surfaces with generation of both solvent and explosives vapors, transient peaks from a gas chromatograph, or vapors generated by s programmed thermal desorption. This article reviews vapor generator approaches with emphasis on the method of generating the vapors and on practical aspects of vapor dilution and handling. In addition, a gas chromatographic system with two ovens that is configurable with up to four heating ropes is proposed that could serve as a single integrated platform for explosives vapor generation and device testing. Issues related to standards, calibration, and safety are also discussed.

  16. Final Report for DOE grant no. DE-FG02-04ER63883: Can soil genomics predict the impact of precipitation on nitrous oxide flux from soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egbert Schwartz

    2008-12-15

    Nitrous oxide is a potent greenhouse gas that is released by microorganisms in soil. However, the production of nitrous oxide in soil is highly variable and difficult to predict. Future climate change may have large impacts on nitrous oxide release through alteration of precipitation patterns. We analyzed DNA extracted from soil in order to uncover relationships between microbial processes, abundance of particular DNA sequences and net nitrous oxide fluxes from soil. Denitrification, a microbial process in which nitrate is used as an electron acceptor, correlated with nitrous oxide flux from soil. The abundance of ammonia oxidizing archaea correlated positively, but weakly, with nitrous oxide production in soil. The abundance of bacterial genes in soil was negatively correlated with gross nitrogen mineralization rates and nitrous oxide release from soil. We suggest that the most important control over nitrous oxide production in soil is the growth and death of microorganisms. When organisms are growing nitrogen is incorporated into their biomass and nitrous oxide flux is low. In contrast, when microorganisms die, due to predation or infection by viruses, inorganic nitrogen is released into the soil resulting in nitrous oxide release. Higher rates of precipitation increase access to microorganisms by predators or viruses through filling large soil pores with water and therefore can lead to large releases of nitrous oxide from soil. We developed a new technique, stable isotope probing with 18O-water, to study growth and mortality of microorganisms in soil.

  17. Vapor generating unit blowdown arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, B.N.

    1978-01-01

    A vapor generating unit having a U-shaped tube bundle is provided with an orificed downcomer shroud and a fluid flow distribution plate between the lower hot and cold leg regions to promote fluid entrained sediment deposition in proximity to an apertured blowdown pipe

  18. Nitrous Oxide and Serious Long-term Morbidity and Mortality in the Evaluation of Nitrous Oxide in the Gas Mixture for Anaesthesia (ENIGMA)-II Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Kate; Myles, Paul S; Kasza, Jessica; Forbes, Andrew; Peyton, Philip J; Chan, Matthew T V; Paech, Michael J; Sessler, Daniel I; Beattie, W Scott; Devereaux, P J; Wallace, Sophie

    2015-12-01

    The Evaluation of Nitrous Oxide in the Gas Mixture for Anaesthesia (ENIGMA)-II trial randomly assigned 7,112 noncardiac surgery patients at risk of perioperative cardiovascular events to 70% N2O or 70% N2 groups. The aim of this follow-up study was to determine the effect of nitrous oxide on a composite primary outcome of death and major cardiovascular events at 1 yr after surgery. One-year follow-up was conducted via a medical record review and telephone interview. Disability was defined as a Katz index of independence in activities of daily living score less than 8. Adjusted odds ratios and hazard ratios were calculated as appropriate for primary and secondary outcomes. Among 5,844 patients evaluated at 1 yr, 435 (7.4%) had died, 206 (3.5%) had disability, 514 (8.8%) had a fatal or nonfatal myocardial infarction, and 111 (1.9%) had a fatal or nonfatal stroke during the 1-yr follow-up period. Exposure to nitrous oxide did not increase the risk of the primary outcome (odds ratio, 1.08; 95% CI, 0.94 to 1.25; P = 0.27), disability or death (odds ratio, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.90 to 1.27; P = 0.44), death (hazard ratio, 1.17; 95% CI, 0.97 to 1.43; P = 0.10), myocardial infarction (odds ratio, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.81 to 1.17; P = 0.78), or stroke (odds ratio, 1.08; 95% CI, 0.74 to 1.58; P = 0.70). These results support the long-term safety of nitrous oxide administration in noncardiac surgical patients with known or suspected cardiovascular disease.

  19. Vapor Cartesian diver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebenev, Igor V.; Lebedeva, Olga V.; Polushkina, Svetlana V.

    2018-07-01

    The article proposes a new research object for a general physics course—the vapour Cartesian diver, designed to study the properties of saturated water vapour. Physics education puts great importance on the study of the saturated vapour state, as it is related to many fundamental laws and theories. For example, the temperature dependence of the saturated water vapour pressure allows the teacher to demonstrate the Le Chatelier’s principle: increasing the temperature of a system in a dynamic equilibrium favours the endothermic change. That means that increasing the temperature increases the amount of vapour present, and so increases the saturated vapour pressure. The experimental setup proposed in this paper can be used as an example of an auto-oscillatory system, based on the properties of saturated vapour. The article describes a mathematical model of physical processes that occur in the experiment, and proposes a numerical solution method for the acquired system of equations. It shows that the results of numerical simulation coincide with the self-oscillation parameters from the real experiment. The proposed installation can also be considered as a model of a thermal engine.

  20. Nitrous oxide as an opioid agonist: some experimental and clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillman, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation is primarily to determine whether N 2 O at analgesic concentrations acts vid the opioid system. Interaction at an opioid receptor level will be studied by means of a ligand binding study. An in vitro study is presented in which the effect of 50% N 2 O mixed with 50% O 2 and 100% N 2 O on ( 3 H) naloxone binding is presented. Secondly, possible therapeutic and diagnostic applications of the use of N 2 O in conditions possibly related to abnormalities of the opioid system viz alcoholism, depression, schizophrenia and anxiety will be investigated. Thirdly, possible hematological abnormalities induced by the use of N 2 O will be studied

  1. Crystallographic studies with xenon and nitrous oxide provide evidence for protein-dependent processes in the mechanisms of general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraini, Jacques H; Marassio, Guillaume; David, Helene N; Vallone, Beatrice; Prangé, Thierry; Colloc'h, Nathalie

    2014-11-01

    The mechanisms by which general anesthetics, including xenon and nitrous oxide, act are only beginning to be discovered. However, structural approaches revealed weak but specific protein-gas interactions. To improve knowledge, we performed x-ray crystallography studies under xenon and nitrous oxide pressure in a series of 10 binding sites within four proteins. Whatever the pressure, we show (1) hydrophobicity of the gas binding sites has a screening effect on xenon and nitrous oxide binding, with a threshold value of 83% beyond which and below which xenon and nitrous oxide, respectively, binds to their sites preferentially compared to each other; (2) xenon and nitrous oxide occupancies are significantly correlated respectively to the product and the ratio of hydrophobicity by volume, indicating that hydrophobicity and volume are binding parameters that complement and oppose each other's effects; and (3) the ratio of occupancy of xenon to nitrous oxide is significantly correlated to hydrophobicity of their binding sites. These data demonstrate that xenon and nitrous oxide obey different binding mechanisms, a finding that argues against all unitary hypotheses of narcosis and anesthesia, and indicate that the Meyer-Overton rule of a high correlation between anesthetic potency and solubility in lipids of general anesthetics is often overinterpreted. This study provides evidence that the mechanisms of gas binding to proteins and therefore of general anesthesia should be considered as the result of a fully reversible interaction between a drug ligand and a receptor as this occurs in classical pharmacology.

  2. Gas and vapor bubble growth and collapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnin, J.; Reali, M.; Sardella, L.

    1976-01-01

    The rate of growth or collapse of a spherical bubble of gas or vapor under the effect of a nonequilibrium with the ambient liquid can be expressed in terms of generalized parameters taking into account either mass or heat diffusion. Diffusion equations have been solved either by numerical computation or under the form of a asymptotical solution, for a growing bubble only and with a constant nonequilibrium. Solutions are compared between them and with already published ones. Experimental results obtained match with a unique nonequilibrium parameter, analogous to a Jacob number. Discrepancies with asymptotical solutions can require in some cases complete numerical computation. But taking into account convection due to bubble lift will require a more sophisticated numerical computation [fr

  3. Hanford soil partitioning and vapor extraction study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonge, D.; Hossain, A.; Cameron, R.; Ford, H.; Storey, C.

    1996-07-01

    This report describes the testing and results of laboratory experiments conducted to assist the carbon tetrachloride soil vapor extraction project operating in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. Vapor-phase adsorption and desorption testing was performed using carbon tetrachloride and Hanford Site soils to estimate vapor-soil partitioning and reasonably achievable carbon tetrachloride soil concentrations during active vapor extractions efforts at the 200 West Area. (CCl 4 is used in Pu recovery from aqueous streams.)

  4. Production of oceanic nitrous oxide by ammonia-oxidizing archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Löscher

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The recent finding that microbial ammonia oxidation in the ocean is performed by archaea to a greater extent than by bacteria has drastically changed the view on oceanic nitrification. The numerical dominance of archaeal ammonia-oxidizers (AOA over their bacterial counterparts (AOB in large parts of the ocean leads to the hypothesis that AOA rather than AOB could be the key organisms for the oceanic production of the strong greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O that occurs as a by-product of nitrification. Very recently, enrichment cultures of marine ammonia-oxidizing archaea have been reported to produce N2O.

    Here, we demonstrate that archaeal ammonia monooxygenase genes (amoA were detectable throughout the water column of the eastern tropical North Atlantic (ETNA and eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP Oceans. Particularly in the ETNA, comparable patterns of abundance and expression of archaeal amoA genes and N2O co-occurred in the oxygen minimum, whereas the abundances of bacterial amoA genes were negligible. Moreover, selective inhibition of archaea in seawater incubations from the ETNA decreased the N2O production significantly. In studies with the only cultivated marine archaeal ammonia-oxidizer Nitrosopumilus maritimus SCM1, we provide the first direct evidence for N2O production in a pure culture of AOA, excluding the involvement of other microorganisms as possibly present in enrichments. N. maritimus showed high N2O production rates under low oxygen concentrations comparable to concentrations existing in the oxycline of the ETNA, whereas the N2O production from two AOB cultures was comparably low under similar conditions. Based on our findings, we hypothesize that the production of N2O in tropical ocean areas results mainly from archaeal nitrification and will be affected by the predicted decrease in dissolved

  5. Sources of nitrous oxide emitted from European forest soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ambus

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Forest ecosystems may provide strong sources of nitrous oxide (N2O, which is important for atmospheric chemical and radiative properties. Nonetheless, our understanding of controls on forest N2O emissions is insufficient to narrow current flux estimates, which still are associated with great uncertainties. In this study, we have investigated the quantitative and qualitative relationships between N-cycling and N2O production in European forests in order to evaluate the importance of nitrification and denitrification for N2O production. Soil samples were collected in 11 different sites characterized by variable climatic regimes and forest types. Soil N-cycling and associated production of N2O was assessed following application of 15N-labeled nitrogen. The N2O emission varied significantly among the different forest soils, and was inversely correlated to the soil C:N ratio. The N2O emissions were significantly higher from the deciduous soils (13 ng N2O-N cm-3 d-1 than from the coniferous soils (4 ng N2O-N cm-3 d-1. Nitrate (NO3- was the dominant substrate for N2O with an average contribution of 62% and exceeding 50% at least once for all sites. The average contribution of ammonium (NH4+ to N2O averaged 34%. The N2O emissions were correlated with gross nitrification activities, and as for N2O, gross nitrification was also higher in deciduous soils (3.4 µg N cm-3 d-1 than in coniferous soils (1.1 µg N cm-3 d-1. The ratio between N2O production and gross nitrification averaged 0.67% (deciduous and 0.44% (coniferous. Our study suggests that changes in forest composition in response to land use activities and global change may have implications for regional budgets of greenhouse gases. From the study it also became clear that N2O emissions were driven by the nitrification activity, although the N2O was produced per se mainly from denitrification. Increased nitrification in response to accelerated N inputs predicted for forest ecosystems in Europe may

  6. Permafrost Thaw increases Emissions of Nitrous Oxide from Subarctic Peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, C.; Marushchak, M. E.; Lamprecht, R. E.; Jackowicz-Korczynski, M.; Lindgren, A.; Mastepanov, M.; Christensen, T. R.; Granlund, L.; Tahvanainen, T.; Martikainen, P. J.; Biasi, C.

    2017-12-01

    Permafrost soils in the Arctic are thawing, exposing not only carbon but also large nitrogen stocks. The decomposition of this vast pool of long-term immobile C and N stocks results in the release of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. Among these, carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) are being studied extensively, and gaseous C release from thawing permafrost is known to be substantial. Most recent studies, however, show that Arctic soils may further be a relevant source of the strong greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O). As N2O is almost 300 times more powerful in warming the climate than CO2 based on a 100-yr time horizon, the release of N2O from thawing permafrost could create a significant non-carbon permafrost-climate feedback. To study the effect of permafrost thaw on N2O fluxes, we collected peat mesocosms from a Subarctic permafrost peatland, and subjected these intact soil-plant systems to sequential thawing from the top of the active layer down to the upper permafrost layer. Measurements of N2O fluxes were coupled with detailed soil analyses and process studies. Since N2O fluxes are highly dependent on moisture conditions and vegetation cover, we applied two distinct moisture treatments (dry vs. wet) and simulated permafrost thaw in vegetated as well as in naturally bare mesocosms. Under dry conditions, permafrost thaw clearly increased N2O emissions. We observed the largest post-thaw emissions from bare peat surfaces, a typical landform in subarctic peatlands previously identified as hot spots for Arctic N2O emissions. There, permafrost thaw caused a five-fold increase in emissions (0.56 vs. 2.81 mg N2O m-2 d-1). While water-logged conditions suppressed N2O emissions, the presence of vegetation lowered, but did not prevent post-thaw N2O release. Based on these findings, we show that one fourth of the Arctic land area could be vulnerable for N2O emissions when permafrost thaws. Our results demonstrate that Arctic N2O emissions may be larger than

  7. Fact and Fiction of Nitrous Oxide Production By Nitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, L. Y.; Kozlowski, J.; Stieglmeier, M.; Klotz, M. G.; Schleper, C.

    2014-12-01

    An accepted dogma in nitrification research is that ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) produce a modicum of nitrous oxide (N2O) during nitritation via incomplete oxidation of hydroxylamine, and substantially more at low oxygen concentrations via nitrifier denitrification.The nitrifier denitrification pathway involves the reduction of nitrite to N2O via nitric oxide and was thought to require activities of a copper-containing nitrite reductase (NirK) and nitric oxide reductase (NorB); inventory encoded in most, but not all AOB genome sequences. The discovery of nirK genes in ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota (AOA) resulted in a slew of publications stating that AOA must also perform nitrifier denitrification and, due to their high abundance, must control the majority of nitrification-linked N2O emissions. Prior to a publication by Stieglmeier et al. (2014), which definitively showed a lack of nitrifier denitrification by two axenic AOA cultures, other researchers relied on enrichment cultures, negative data, and heavy inferencing without direct demonstration of either a functional pathway or involvement of specific genes or enzymes. AOA genomes lack recognizable nitric oxide reductases and thermophilic AOA also lack nirK genes. Physiological and microrespirometry experiments with axenic AOB and AOA cultures allowed us to demonstrate that: 1) AOB produce N2O via nitrifier denitrification even though some lack annotated nirK and/or norB genes; 2) nitrifier denitrification by AOB is reliant on nitric oxide but ammonia oxidation is not; 3) ammonia oxidation by AOA is reliant on production of nitric oxide; 4) AOA are incapable of generating N2O via nitrifier denitrification; 5) N2O production by AOA is from chemical interactions between NO and media components, most likely not by enzyme activity. Our results reveal operation of different N oxide transformation pathways in AOB and AOA governed by different environmental controls and involving different mechanisms of N2O

  8. Continuous measurements of nitrous oxide isotopomers during incubation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winther, Malte; Balslev-Harder, David; Christensen, Søren; Priemé, Anders; Elberling, Bo; Crosson, Eric; Blunier, Thomas

    2018-02-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important and strong greenhouse gas in the atmosphere. It is produced by microbes during nitrification and denitrification in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The main sinks for N2O are turnover by denitrification and photolysis and photo-oxidation in the stratosphere. In the linear N = N = O molecule 15N substitution is possible in two distinct positions: central and terminal. The respective molecules, 14N15N16O and 15N14N16O, are called isotopomers. It has been demonstrated that N2O produced by nitrifying or denitrifying microbes exhibits a different relative abundance of the isotopomers. Therefore, measurements of the site preference (difference in the abundance of the two isotopomers) in N2O can be used to determine the source of N2O, i.e., nitrification or denitrification. Recent instrument development allows for continuous position-dependent δ15N measurements at N2O concentrations relevant for studies of atmospheric chemistry. We present results from continuous incubation experiments with denitrifying bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens (producing and reducing N2O) and Pseudomonas chlororaphis (only producing N2O). The continuous measurements of N2O isotopomers reveals the transient isotope exchange among KNO3, N2O, and N2. We find bulk isotopic fractionation of -5.01 ‰ ± 1.20 for P. chlororaphis, in line with previous results for production from denitrification. For P. fluorescens, the bulk isotopic fractionation during production of N2O is -52.21 ‰ ± 9.28 and 8.77 ‰ ± 4.49 during N2O reduction.The site preference (SP) isotopic fractionation for P. chlororaphis is -3.42 ‰ ± 1.69. For P. fluorescens, the calculations result in SP isotopic fractionation values of 5.73 ‰ ± 5.26 during production of N2O and 2.41 ‰ ± 3.04 during reduction of N2O. In summary, we implemented continuous measurements of N2O isotopomers during incubation of denitrifying bacteria and believe that similar experiments will lead to a better

  9. Fluxed of nitrous oxide and methane in a lake border ecosystem in northern Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusch, H.; Rembges, D.; Papke, H.; Rennenberg, H. [Fraunhofer Inst. for Atmospheric Environmental Research, Garmisch-Partenkirchen (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    Methane and nitrous oxide are radiatively active trace gases. This accounts for approximately 20 % of the total anticipated greenhouse effect. The atmospheric mixing ratio of both gases has increased significantly during the last decades at a rate of 0.25 % yr{sup -l} for N{sub 2}O and a rate of 1 % yr{sup -1} for CH{sub 4}. Whether this increase is caused by enhanced biogenic production of both gases or is due to decreased global sinks, has not been definitely elucidated. Soils are an important source of methane and nitrous oxide. Natural wetlands, e.g., have a similar global source strength of methane as rice paddies. On the other hand, well aerated grasslands have been shown to be a sink for atmospheric methane due to methane oxidation. Nitrous oxide is emitted by a wide range of soil types. Its rate of emission is strongly enhanced by nitrogen fertilization. In the present study, fluxes of methane and nitrous oxide were determined in a lake border ecosystem along a toposequence from reed to dry pasture. The aim of this study was to characterize the influence of soil type, land use and season on the flux rates of these greenhouse gases. (author)

  10. Nitrous oxide production by micromycetes isolated from soils under cattle overwintering husbandry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirout, Jiří; Šimek, Miloslav; Elhottová, Dana

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 2 (2013), s. 427 ISSN 2040-4700. [Greenhouse Gases and Animal Agriculture Conference (GGAA 2013) /5./. 23.06.2013-26.06.2013, Dublin] R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP504/12/P752 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : nitrous oxide * micromycetes * soils * cattle overwintering husbandry Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  11. Nitrous oxide productivity of soil fungi along a gradient of cattle impact

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirout, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 17, October (2015), s. 155-163 ISSN 1754-5048 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP504/12/P752 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : soil * fungi * nitrous oxide * selective inhibition * cattle overwintering * oxygen availability Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.631, year: 2015

  12. Nitrous oxide fluxes and nitrogen cycling along a pasturechronosequence in Central Amazonia, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    B. Wick; E. Veldkamp; W. Z. de Mello; M. Keller; P. Crill

    2005-01-01

    We studied nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes and soil nitrogen (N) cycling following forest conversion to pasture in the central Amazon near Santarém, Pará, Brazil. Two undisturbed forest sites and 27 pasture sites of 0.5 to 60 years were sampled once each during wet and dry seasons. In addition to soil-atmosphere fluxes of N...

  13. Testing a Conceptual Model of Soil Emissions of Nitrous and Nitric Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric A. Davidson; Michael Keller; Heather E. Erickson; Verchot NO-VALUE; Edzo Veldkamp

    2000-01-01

    Nitrous and nitric oxides are often studied separately by atmospheric chemists because they play such different roles in the atmosphere. N2O is a stable greenhouse gas in the lower atmosphere (the troposphere; Ramanathan et al. 1985), but it participates in photochemical reactions in the upper atmosphere (the stratosphere) that destroy ozone (Crutzen 1970). In contrast...

  14. The role of nitrifier denitrification in the production of nitrous oxide revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wrage-Mönnig, Nicole; Horn, Marcus A.; Well, Reinhard; Müller, Christoph; Velthof, Gerard; Oenema, Oene

    2018-01-01

    Nitrifier denitrification is the reduction of nitrite (NO2 −) by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. This process may account for up to 100% of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from ammonium (NH4 +) in soils and is more significant than classical denitrification under some conditions. Investigations of

  15. Development and performance test of a continuous source of nitrous acid (HONO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammann, M.; Roessler, E.; Kalberer, M.; Bruetsch, S.; Schwikowski, M.; Baltensperger, U.; Zellweger, C.; Gaeggeler, H.W. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Laboratory investigations involving nitrous acid (HONO) require a stable, continuous source of HONO at ppb levels. A flow type generation system based on the reaction of sodium nitrite with sulfuric acid has been developed. Performance and speciation of gaseous products were tested with denuder and chemiluminescence techniques. (author) 2 figs., 2 refs.

  16. Nitrate leaching and nitrous oxide flux in urban forests and grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter M. Groffman; Candiss O. Williams; Richard V. Pouyat; Lawrence E. Band; Ian D. Yesilonis

    2009-01-01

    Urban landscapes contain a mix of land-use types with different patterns of nitrogen (N) cycling and export. We measured nitrate (NO3-) leaching and soil:atmosphere nitrous oxide (N2O) flux in four urban grassland and eight forested long-term study plots in the Baltimore, Maryland metropolitan area....

  17. Nitrous oxide (laughing gas) inhalation as an alternative to electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Brian

    2010-05-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is used widely in the treatment of psychiatric conditions; however, its use is not without controversy with some recommending a moratorium on its clinical use. Complications and side effects of ECT include memory loss, injury, problems originating from sympathetic stimulation such as arrhythmias and myocardial ischemia and the risk of general anesthesia. Nitrous oxide (laughing gas) could potentially substitute for ECT as it shares some similar effects, has potential beneficial properties for these psychiatric patients and is relatively safe and easy to administer. Nitrous oxide induces laughter which has been described as nature's epileptoid catharsis which one might surmise would be beneficial for depression. It also produces a central sympathetic stimulation similar to ECT and causes release of endogenous opioid peptides, which are potential candidates for the development of antidepressant drugs. Nitrous oxide is also associated with seizure like activity itself. Administration of nitrous oxide as a substitute for ECT is eminently feasible and could be given in a series of treatments similar to ECT therapy.

  18. Effectiveness of nitrous oxide for postpartum perineal repair: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlit, Sebastian; Tuschy, Benjamin; Brade, Joachim; Mayer, Jade; Kehl, Sven; Sütterlin, Marc

    2013-10-01

    To compare the effectiveness of self-administered 50% nitrous oxide and conventional infiltrative anaesthesia with 1% prilocaine hydrochloride in postpartum perineal repair. A total of 100 women were prospectively enrolled and randomised to receive either infiltrative anaesthesia or a self-administered nitrous oxide mixture (Livopan(©)) for pain relief during postpartum perineal suturing. Besides data concerning anaesthesia, characteristics of patients and labour were documented for statistical analysis. Pain experienced during perineal repair was assessed using the short form of the McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ). Forty-eight women received nitrous oxide and 52 underwent perineal suturing after infiltrative anaesthesia. There were no statistically significant differences regarding maternal age, body mass index (BMI), duration of pregnancy and suturing time between the groups. The most frequent birth injury was second-degree perineal laceration in the study group [22/48; 46%] and episiotomy in the control group [18/52; 35%]. Pain experienced during genital tract suturing and patients' satisfaction showed no statistically significant differences between the groups. Thirty-seven women in the study group and 47 in the control group were satisfied with the anaesthesia during perineal repair and would recommend it to other parturients [37/48, 77% vs. 47/52, 90%; p=0.0699). Nitrous oxide self-administration during genital tract suturing after vaginal childbirth is a satisfactory and effective alternative to infiltrative anaesthesia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Nitrous Oxide Emissions from a Large, Impounded River: The Ohio River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Models suggest that microbial activity in streams and rivers is a globally significant source of anthropogenic nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas and the leading cause of stratospheric ozone destruction. However, model estimates of N2O emissions are poorly constrained ...

  20. Dynamic modelling of nitrous oxide emissions from three Swedish sludge liquor treatment systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindblom, E.; Arnell, M.; Flores-Alsina, X.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to model the dynamics and validate the results of nitrous oxide (N2O)emissions from three Swedish nitrifying/denitrifying, nitritation and anammox systems treating real anaerobic digester sludge liquor. The Activated Sludge Model No. 1 is extended to describe N2O...

  1. Catalytic Reduction of Nitrous Oxide with Carbon Monoxide over Calcined Co–Mn–Al Hydrotalcite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pacultová, K.; Obalová, L.; Kovanda, F.; Jirátová, Květa

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 137, 2-4 (2008), s. 358-389 ISSN 0920-5861 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/05/0366 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : nitrous oxide * carbon monoxide * mixed oxide catalysts Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 3.004, year: 2008

  2. SOIL NITROUS OXIDE, NITRIC OXIDE, AND AMMONIA EMISSIONS FROM A RECOVERING RIPARIAN ECOSYSTEM IN SOUTHERN APPALACHIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper presents two years of seasonal nitric oxide, ammonia, and nitrous oxide trace gas fluxes measured in a recovering riparian zone with cattle excluded and in an adjacent riparian zone grazed by cattle. In the recovering riparian zone, average nitric oxide, ammonia, and ni...

  3. Temporal nitrous oxide emissions from beef cattle feedlot manure following a simulated rainfall event

    Science.gov (United States)

    A pilot-scale, recirculating-flow-through, non-steady-state (RFT-NSS) chamber system was designed for quantifying nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from simulated open-lot beef cattle feedlot pens. The system employed five 1 square meter steel pans. A lid was placed systematically on each pan and heads...

  4. Controls on nitrous oxide production and consumption in reservoirs of the Ohio River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquatic ecosystems are a globally significant source of nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas, but estimates are largely based on studies conducted in streams and rivers with relatively less known about N2O dynamics in lakes and reservoirs. Due to long water residence tim...

  5. Predicting nitrous oxide emissions from manure properties and soil moisture: An incubation experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baral, Khagendra Raj; Arthur, Emmanuel; Olesen, Jørgen Eivind

    2016-01-01

    Field-applied manure is a source of essential plant nutrients, but benefits may be partly offset by high rates of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, as modified by manure characteristics and soil properties. In a 28-d incubation experiment we quantified short-term emissions of N2O from a sandy loam...

  6. Can pine trees act as sources for nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4)?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macháčová, Kateřina; Pihlatie, M.; Vanhatalo, A.; Halmeenmäki, E.; Aaltonen, H.; Kolari, P.; Aalto, J.; Pumpanen, J.; Pavelka, Marian; Acosta, Manuel; Urban, Otmar; Bäck, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 142, č. 2013 (2013), s. 362-366. ISBN 952-5027-76-7. ISSN 0784-3496 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : methane * nitrous oxide * scots pine * transport Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  7. Differential effects of nitrous oxide and propofol on myogenic transcranial motor evoked responses during sufentanil anaesthesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ubags, L. H.; Kalkman, C. J.; Been, H. D.; Drummond, J. C.

    1997-01-01

    We have compared the effects of 50% nitrous oxide and propofol, each administered concurrently with sufentanil, on the amplitudes and latencies of the compound muscle action potential (CMAP) response to transcranial electrical stimulation. Using a crossover design, 12 patients undergoing spinal

  8. Comparing Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Three Residential Landscapes under Different Management Schemes Following Natural Rainfall Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cultural lawn management practices that produce aesthetically appealing landscapes may also create environmental conditions that stimulate soil nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of lawn management practices on N2O fluxes from ...

  9. Marine nitrous oxide emissions: An unknown liability for the international water sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reliable estimates of anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are essential for setting effective climate policy at both the sector and national level. Current IPCC Guidelines for calculating nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from sewage management are both highly uncertain and ...

  10. Spatial variability in nitrous oxide and methane emissions from beef cattle feedyard pen surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhouse gas emissions from beef cattle feedlots include enteric carbon dioxide and methane, and manure-derived methane, nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide. Enteric methane comprises the largest portion of the greenhouse gas footprint of beef cattle feedyards. For the manure component, methane is th...

  11. A geostatistical approach to identify and mitigate agricultural nitrous oxide emission hotspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthropogenic emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O), a trace gas with severe environmental costs, are greatest from agricultural soils amended with nitrogen (N) fertilizer. However, accurate N2O emission estimates at fine spatial scales are made difficult by their high variability, which represents a cr...

  12. NITRATE AND NITROUS OXIDE CONCENTRATIONS IN SMALL STREAMS OF THE GEORGIA PIEDMONT

    Science.gov (United States)

    We are measuring dissolved nitrate and nitrous oxide concentrations and related parameters in 17 headwater streams in the South Fork Broad River, Georgia watershed on a monthly basis. The selected small streams drain watersheds dominated by forest, pasture, residential, or mixed...

  13. NITROUS OXIDE BEHAVIOR IN THE ATMOSPHERE, AND IN COMBUSTION AND INDUSTRIAL SYSTEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tropospheric measurements show that nitrous oxide (N2O) concentrations are increasing over time. This demonstrates the existence of one or more significant anthropogenic sources, a fact that has generated considerable research interest over the last several years. The debate has ...

  14. Nitrous oxide production in sputum from cystic fibrosis patients with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolpen, Mette; Kühl, Michael; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    local anoxia by consuming the majority of O2 for production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We hypothesized that P. aeruginosa acquires energy for growth in anaerobic endobronchial mucus by denitrification, which can be demonstrated by production of nitrous oxide (N2O), an intermediate...

  15. Nitrous Oxide Production in an Eastern Corn Belt Soil: Sources and Redox Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) derived from soils is a main contributor to the greenhouse gas effect and a precursor to ozone-depleting substrates; however, the source processes and interacting controls are not well established. This study was conducted to estimate magnitude and source (nitrification vs. denit...

  16. Nitrous oxide production in grassland soils: assessing the contribution of nitrifier denitrification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wrage, N.; Velthof, G.L.; Laanbroek, H.J.; Oenema, O.

    2004-01-01

    Nitrifier denitrification is the reduction of NO2- to N2 by nitrifiers. It leads to the production of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) as an intermediate and possible end product. It is not known how important nitrifier denitrification is for the production of N2O in soils. We explored N2O

  17. Nitrous oxide production, its source and distribution in urine patches on grassland on peat soil.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koops, J.G.; Beusichem, van M.L.; Oenema, O.

    1997-01-01

    Urine patches are considered to be important sites for nitrous oxide (N2O) production through nitrification and denitrification due to their high concentration of nitrogen (N). The aim of the present study was to determine the microbial source and size of production of N2O in different zones of a

  18. AMMONIA REMOVAL AND NITROUS OXIDE PRODUCTION IN GAS-PHASE COMPOST BIOFILTERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biofiltration technology is widely utilized for treating ammonia gas (NH3), with one of its potential detrimental by-products being nitrous oxide (N2O), a greenhouse gas approximately 300 times more reactive to infrared than CO2. The present work intends to provide the relation between NH3 removal d...

  19. Linking organic carbon, water content and nitrous oxide emission in a reclaimed coal mine soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manure-based organic amendments can restore soil quality and allow for intensive sustained biomass production on degraded lands. However the large quantities of nitrogen and organic carbon added with such amendments could create soil conditions favorable for nitrous oxide production and emissions. T...

  20. Nitrous oxide (N2O). Emission inventory and options for control in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroeze C; LAE

    1994-01-01

    This study was initiated to overview current knowledge on nitrous oxide (N2O). The report reviews atmospheric behaviour of N2O, global sources and sinks, Dutch emissions in 1990, options to reduce emissions, and past and future emissions. Despite the uncertainties involved, it is likely that without

  1. The impact of slurry application technique on nitrous oxide emission from agricultural soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velthof, G.L.; Mosquera, J.

    2011-01-01

    Direct nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from fertilized soils are generally estimated using emission factors. However, the emission factors for N2O emission of applied slurry are not well quantified. The effect of slurry application technique on N2O emission was quantified in field experiments in the

  2. Dissimilatory nitrate reduction to nitrate, nitrous oxide, and ammonium by Pseudomonas putrefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsson, M O

    1985-10-01

    The influence of redox potential on dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium was investigated on a marine bacterium, Pseudomonas putrefaciens. Nitrate was consumed (3.1 mmol liter-1), and ammonium was produced in cultures with glucose and without sodium thioglycolate. When sodium thioglycolate was added, nitrate was consumed at a lower rate (1.1 mmol liter-1), and no significant amounts of nitrite or ammonium were produced. No growth was detected in glucose media either with or without sodium thioglycolate. When grown on tryptic soy broth, the production of nitrous oxide paralleled growth. In the same medium, but with sodium thioglycolate, nitrous oxide was first produced during growth and then consumed. Acetylene caused the nitrous oxide to accumulate. These results and the mass balance calculations for different nitrogen components indicate that P. putrefaciens has the capacity to dissimilate nitrate to ammonium as well as to dinitrogen gas and nitrous oxide (denitrification). The dissimilatory pathway to ammonium dominates except when sodium thioglycolate is added to the medium.

  3. Nitrous oxide in the Schelde estuary: production by nitrification and emission to the atmosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Wilde, H.; De Bie, M.J.M.

    2000-01-01

    Concentrations of nitrous oxide (N2O), oxygen, nitrate, and ammonium, as well as nitrification activity were determined along the salinity gradient of the Schelde Estuary, Northwest Europe, in October 1993, March 1994, and July 1996, The entire estuary was always supersaturated with N2O.

  4. The effect of sepsis and short-term exposure to nitrous oxide on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is recognised that prolonged anaesthesia with nitrous oxide (N20) induces megaloblastic anaemia by oxidising vitamin B12 To determine whether sepsis aggravates the effect of H20 on haemopoiesis 5 patients with severe sepsis, who required surgery and were exposed to short-term (45 - 105 minutes) N20 anaesthesia, ...

  5. Simultaneous Measurement of Nitrous Acid,Nitric Acid, and Nitrogen Dioxide by Means \

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vichi, F.; Mašková, Ludmila; Frattoni, M.; Imperiali, A.; Smolík, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 4, FEB 22 (2016), s. 4 ISSN 2050-7445. [International Conference on Indoor Air Quality in Heritage and Historic Environments /11./. Prague, 13.04.2014-16.04.2014] Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : diffusive sampling * nitrous acid * nitric acid Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  6. Biochar type and factors affecting N transformation, ammonia volatilization, and nitrous oxide emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil amendment with biochar has shown the potential to improve nitrogen (N) availability for plant uptake and reduce environmental losses via ammonia (NH3) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. There are still many unknowns on how biochar type and soil conditions affect N dynamics and processes associa...

  7. EPA/IFP EUROPEAN WORKSHOP ON THE EMISSION ON NITROUS OXIDE FROM FOSSIL FUEL COMBUSTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report summarizes the proceedings of an EPA/Institut Francais du Petrole (IFP) cosponsored workshop addressing direct nitrous oxide (N2O) emission from fossil fuel combustion. The third in a series, it was held at the IFP in Rueil-Malmaison, France, on June 1-2, 1988. Increas...

  8. Nitrous Oxide (N2O) emissions from human waste in 1970-2050

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strokal, M.; Kroeze, C.

    2014-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important contributor to climate change. Human waste is an important source of N2O emissions in several world regions, and its share in global emissions may increase in the future. In this paper we, therefore, address N2O emission from human waste: collected (from treatment

  9. Designing efficient nitrous oxide sampling strategies in agroecosystems using simulation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debasish Saha; Armen R. Kemanian; Benjamin M. Rau; Paul R. Adler; Felipe Montes

    2017-01-01

    Annual cumulative soil nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions calculated from discrete chamber-based flux measurements have unknown uncertainty. We used outputs from simulations obtained with an agroecosystem model to design sampling strategies that yield accurate cumulative N2O flux estimates with a known uncertainty level. Daily soil N2O fluxes were simulated for Ames, IA (...

  10. Earthworms can increase nitrous oxide emissions from managed grassland: a field study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubbers, I.M.; López González, E.; Hummelink, E.W.J.; Groenigen, van J.W.

    2013-01-01

    Earthworms are important in determining the greenhouse gas (GHG) balance of soils. In laboratory studies they have been shown to increase emissions of the potent GHG nitrous oxide (N2O). Here we test whether these earthworm-induced N2O emissions also occur in the field. We quantified N2O emissions

  11. Corn nitrogen management influences nitrous oxide emissions in drained and undrained soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tile-drainage and nitrogen (N) fertilization are important for corn (Zea mays L.) production. To date, no studies have evaluated nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions of single vs. split-N fertilizer application under different soil drainage conditions. The objective of this study was to quantify season-lon...

  12. Biochar's role in mitigating soil nitrous oxide emissions: a review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cayuela, M.L.; Zwieten, van L.; Singh, B.P.; Jeffery, S.L.; Roig, A.; Sánchez-Monedero, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    More than two thirds of global nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions originate from soil, mainly associated with the extensive use of nitrogen (N) fertilizers in agriculture. Although the interaction of black carbon with the N cycle has been long recognized, the impact of biochar on N2O emissions has only

  13. Nitrous oxide levels in operating and recovery rooms of Iranian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroufi, Sh Sadigh; Gharavi, Mj; Behnam, M; Samadikuchaksaraei, A

    2011-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N(2)O) is the oldest anesthetic in routine clinical use and its occupational exposure is under regulation by many countries. As studies are lacking to demonstrate the status of nitrous oxide levels in operating and recovery rooms of Iranian hospitals, we aimed to study its level in teaching hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. During a 6-month period, we have measured the shift-long time weighted average concentration of N(2)O in 43 operating and 12 recovery rooms of teaching hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The results show that the level of nitrous oxide in all hospitals is higher than the limits set by different countries and anesthetists are at higher risk of exposure. In addition, it was shown that installation of air ventilation could reduce not only the overall exposure level, but also the level of exposure of anesthetists in comparison with other personnel. The high nitrous oxide level in Iranian hospitals necessitates improvement of waste gas evacuation systems and regular monitoring to bring the concentration of this gas into the safe level.

  14. Nitrous oxide emissions from a golf course fairway and rough following application of different nitrogen fertilizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas that destroys stratospheric ozone. There is limited research of golf course N2O emission and the effects of frequent fertilization and irrigation. Three enhanced efficiency nitrogen fertilizers (EENFs) were applied to a Colorado golf course fairway and ...

  15. Nitrous oxide fluxes from grassland in the Netherlands. 1. Statistical analysis of flux-chamber measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velthof, G.L.; Oenema, O.

    1995-01-01

    Accurate estimates of total nitrous oxide (N2O) losses from grasslands derived from flux-chamber measurements are hampered by the large spatial and temporal variability of N2O fluxes from these sites. In this study, four methods for the calculation o

  16. Fluxed of nitrous oxide and methane in a lake border ecosystem in northern Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusch, H; Rembges, D; Papke, H; Rennenberg, H [Fraunhofer Inst. for Atmospheric Environmental Research, Garmisch-Partenkirchen (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    Methane and nitrous oxide are radiatively active trace gases. This accounts for approximately 20 % of the total anticipated greenhouse effect. The atmospheric mixing ratio of both gases has increased significantly during the last decades at a rate of 0.25 % yr{sup -l} for N{sub 2}O and a rate of 1 % yr{sup -1} for CH{sub 4}. Whether this increase is caused by enhanced biogenic production of both gases or is due to decreased global sinks, has not been definitely elucidated. Soils are an important source of methane and nitrous oxide. Natural wetlands, e.g., have a similar global source strength of methane as rice paddies. On the other hand, well aerated grasslands have been shown to be a sink for atmospheric methane due to methane oxidation. Nitrous oxide is emitted by a wide range of soil types. Its rate of emission is strongly enhanced by nitrogen fertilization. In the present study, fluxes of methane and nitrous oxide were determined in a lake border ecosystem along a toposequence from reed to dry pasture. The aim of this study was to characterize the influence of soil type, land use and season on the flux rates of these greenhouse gases. (author)

  17. Control strategies for nitrous oxide emissions reduction on wastewater treatment plants operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santín, I; Barbu, M; Pedret, C; Vilanova, R

    2017-11-15

    The present paper focused on reducing greenhouse gases emissions in wastewater treatment plants operation by application of suitable control strategies. Specifically, the objective is to reduce nitrous oxide emissions during the nitrification process. Incomplete nitrification in the aerobic tanks can lead to an accumulation of nitrite that triggers the nitrous oxide emissions. In order to avoid the peaks of nitrous oxide emissions, this paper proposes a cascade control configuration by manipulating the dissolved oxygen set-points in the aerobic tanks. This control strategy is combined with ammonia cascade control already applied in the literature. This is performed with the objective to take also into account effluent pollutants and operational costs. In addition, other greenhouse gases emissions sources are also evaluated. Results have been obtained by simulation, using a modified version of Benchmark Simulation Model no. 2, which takes into account greenhouse gases emissions. This is called Benchmark Simulation Model no. 2 Gas. The results show that the proposed control strategies are able to reduce by 29.86% of nitrous oxide emissions compared to the default control strategy, while maintaining a satisfactory trade-off between water quality and costs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Anti-leukemic potential of methyl-cobalamin inactivation by nitrous oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Abels; A.C.M. Kroes (Aloys C.M.); A.A.M. Ermens (Anton); J. van Kapel (Jan); M. Schoester (Martijn); L.J.M. Spijkers (L. J M); J. Lindemans (Jan)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractMyelo‐cytotoxicity of extended nitrous oxide (N2O) inhalation was described almost forty years ago and then incidentally applied already with temporary success for suppressing leukemia. In 1948 the accompanying megaloblastic maturation arrest was explained by inactivation of the

  19. Nitrous oxide does not influence operating conditions or postoperative course in colonic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, B; Jørn Jensen, P; Henneberg, S W

    1994-01-01

    We studied 150 patients undergoing elective colonic surgery; they were allocated randomly to undergo artificial ventilation with either air-oxygen or nitrous oxide-oxygen during surgery. Eleven patients were excluded. Preoperative management, surgery and postoperative analgesia were similar in bo...

  20. Nitrous oxide emission hotspots and acidic soil denitrification in a riparian buffer zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, R.N.

    2010-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a greenhouse gas with a global warming potential of 296 CO2 equivalents and is involved in the depletion of the ozone layer. Through studies on emission sources it was revealed that natural and agricultural soils are important sources of N2O emissions and are responsible for

  1. Nitrogen loss from grassland on peat soils through nitrous oxide production.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koops, J.G.; Beusichem, van M.L.; Oenema, O.

    1997-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) in soils is produced through nitrification and denitrification. The N2O produced is considered as a nitrogen (N) loss because it will most likely escape from the soil to the atmosphere as N2O or N2. Aim of the study was to quantify N2O production in grassland on peat soils in

  2. Optimization of conditions to produce nitrous gases by electrochemical reduction of nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaire, M.; CEA Centre d'Etudes de la Vallee du Rhone, 30 -Marcoule

    1996-01-01

    Gaseous nitrogen oxides (NO and NO 2 ) involved as oxidizing agents in nuclear fuel reprocessing can be an produced by electrochemical reduction of nitric acid. This could be an interesting alternative to the usual process because no wastes are generated. Voltammetric studies on a platinum electrode show that two reduction potential regions are observed in concentrated nitric acid solutions, between 0.05 V S HE and 0.3 V S HE and O.5 V S HE and 1 V S HE. The highest potential region reduction mechanism was studies by: classical micro-electrolysis methods; macro-electrolysis methods; infra-red spectroscopy couplet to electrochemistry. It was determined that the origin of nitric acid reduction is the electrochemical reduction of nitrous acid in nitric oxide which chemically reduces nitric acid. This reaction produces nitrous acid back which indicate an auto-catalytic behaviour of nitric acid reduction mechanism. Nitrogen dioxide evolution during nitric acid reduction can also be explained by an other chemical reaction. In the potential value of platinum electrode is above 0.8 V S HE, products of the indirect nitric acid reduction are nitrous acid, nitrogen oxide and nitrogen dioxide. Below this value nitric oxide can be reduced in nitrous oxide. Thus the potential value is the most important parameter for the nitrogen oxides production selectivity. However, owing to the auto-catalytic character of the reduction mechanism, potential value can be controlled during intentiostatic industrial electrolysis. (author)

  3. 2004 Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Manure Management in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokhele Edmond Moeletsi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Manure management in livestock makes a significant contribution towards greenhouse gas emissions in the Agriculture; Forestry and Other Land Use category in South Africa. Methane and nitrous oxide emissions are prevalent in contrasting manure management systems; promoting anaerobic and aerobic conditions respectively. In this paper; both Tier 1 and modified Tier 2 approaches of the IPCC guidelines are utilized to estimate the emissions from South African livestock manure management. Activity data (animal population, animal weights, manure management systems, etc. were sourced from various resources for estimation of both emissions factors and emissions of methane and nitrous oxide. The results show relatively high methane emissions factors from manure management for mature female dairy cattle (40.98 kg/year/animal, sows (25.23 kg/year/animal and boars (25.23 kg/year/animal. Hence, contributions for pig farming and dairy cattle are the highest at 54.50 Gg and 32.01 Gg respectively, with total emissions of 134.97 Gg (3104 Gg CO2 Equivalent. Total nitrous oxide emissions are estimated at 7.10 Gg (2272 Gg CO2 Equivalent and the three main contributors are commercial beef cattle; poultry and small-scale beef farming at 1.80 Gg; 1.72 Gg and 1.69 Gg respectively. Mitigation options from manure management must be taken with care due to divergent conducive requirements of methane and nitrous oxide emissions requirements.

  4. Nitrous oxide emissions from a beech forest floor measured by eddy covariance and soil enclosure techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihlatie, M.; Rinne, J.; Ambus, P.

    2005-01-01

    Spring time nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from an old beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) forest were measured with eddy covariance (EC) and chamber techniques. The aim was to obtain information on the spatial and temporal variability in N2O emissions and link the emissions to soil environmental parameters...

  5. Estimating enthalpy of vaporization from vapor pressure using Trouton's rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Matthew; Scheringer, Martin; Hungerbühler, Konrad

    2007-04-15

    The enthalpy of vaporization of liquids and subcooled liquids at 298 K (delta H(VAP)) is an important parameter in environmental fate assessments that consider spatial and temporal variability in environmental conditions. It has been shown that delta H(VAP)P for non-hydrogen-bonding substances can be estimated from vapor pressure at 298 K (P(L)) using an empirically derived linear relationship. Here, we demonstrate that the relationship between delta H(VAP)and PL is consistent with Trouton's rule and the ClausiusClapeyron equation under the assumption that delta H(VAP) is linearly dependent on temperature between 298 K and the boiling point temperature. Our interpretation based on Trouton's rule substantiates the empirical relationship between delta H(VAP) degree and P(L) degrees for non-hydrogen-bonding chemicals with subcooled liquid vapor pressures ranging over 15 orders of magnitude. We apply the relationship between delta H(VAP) degrees and P(L) degrees to evaluate data reported in literature reviews for several important classes of semivolatile environmental contaminants, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, chlorobenzenes, polychlorinated biphenyls and polychlorinated dibenzo-dioxins and -furans and illustrate the temperature dependence of results from a multimedia model presented as a partitioning map. The uncertainty associated with estimating delta H(VAP)degrees from P(L) degrees using this relationship is acceptable for most environmental fate modeling of non-hydrogen-bonding semivolatile organic chemicals.

  6. Quantification of methane and nitrous oxide emissions from various waste treatment facilities by tracer dilution method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mønster, Jacob; Rella, Chris; Jacobson, Gloria; Kjeldsen, Peter; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2013-04-01

    Urban activities generate solid and liquid waste, and the handling and aftercare of the waste results in the emission of various compounds into the surrounding environment. Some of these compounds are emitted as gasses into the atmosphere, including methane and nitrous oxide. Methane and nitrous oxide are strong greenhouse gases and are considered to have 25 and 298 times the greenhouse gas potential of carbon dioxide on a hundred years term (Solomon et al. 2007). Global observations of both gasses have shown increasing concentrations that significantly contribute to the greenhouse gas effect. Methane and nitrous oxide are emitted from both natural and anthropogenic sources and inventories of source specific fugitive emissions from the anthropogenic sources of methane and nitrous oxide of are often estimated on the basis of modeling and mass balance. Though these methods are well-developed, actual measurements for quantification of the emissions is a very useful tool for verifying the modeling and mass balance as well as for validation initiatives done for lowering the emissions of methane and nitrous oxide. One approach to performing such measurements is the tracer dilution method (Galle et al. 2001, Scheutz et al. 2011), where the exact location of the source is located and a tracer gas is released at this source location at a known flow. The ratio of downwind concentrations of the tracer gas and the methane and nitrous oxide gives the emissions rates of the greenhouse gases. This tracer dilution method can be performed using both stationary and mobile measurements and in both cases, real-time measurements of both tracer and quantified gas are required, placing high demands on the analytical detection method. To perform the methane and nitrous oxide measurements, two robust instruments capable of real-time measurements were used, based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy and operating in the near-infrared spectral region. One instrument measured the methane and

  7. Measurement of the enthalpies of vaporization and sublimation of solids aromatic hydrocarbons by differential scanning calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas, Aaron; Orozco, Eulogio

    2003-01-01

    An experimental procedure is proposed for direct measurement of the heat involved in the vaporization of a solid organic compound above its normal melting temperature. This technique consists on the fusion of a solid aromatic hydrocarbon, which is then vaporized by a sudden decrease of the pressure. The direct register of heat flow as function of time by differential scanning calorimetry allows the quantifying of the enthalpy of vaporization of compounds such as phenanthrene, β-naphthol, pyrene, and anthracene. Enthalpies of vaporization were measured in an isothermal mode over a range of temperatures from 10 to 20 K above the melting temperatures of each compound, while enthalpies of fusion were determined from separate experiments performed in a scanning mode. Enthalpies of sublimation are computed from results of fusion and vaporization, and then compared with results from the literature, which currently are obtained by calorimetric or indirect techniques

  8. Detailed kinetic and heat transport model for the hydrolysis of lignocellulose by anhydrous hydrogen fluoride vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rorrer, G.L.; Mohring, W.R.; Lamport, D.T.A.; Hawley, M.C.

    1988-01-01

    Anhydrous Hydrogen Fluoride (HF) vapor at ambient conditions efficiently and rapidly hydrolyzed lignocellulose to glucose and lignin. The unsteady-state reaction of HF vapor with a single lignocellulose chip was mathematically modeled under conditions where external and internal mass-transfer resistances were minimized. The model incorporated physical adsorption of HF vapor onto the lignocellulosic matrix and solvolysis of cellulose to glucosyl fluoride by adsorbed HF into the differential material and energy balance expressions. Model predictions for the temperature distribution and global glucose yield in the HF-reacting lignocellulose chip as a function of reaction time and HF vapor stream temperature agreed reasonably with the complimentary experimental data. The model correctly predicted that even when mass-transfer resistances for the reaction of HF vapor with a single lignocellulose chip are minimized, external and internal heat-transfer resistances are still significant.

  9. Analysis of the one-dimensional transient compressible vapor flow in heat pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jong H.; Faghri, Amir; Chang, Won S.

    1991-01-01

    The transient compressible one-dimensional vapor flow dynamics in a heat pipe is modeled. The numerical results are obtained by using the implicit non-iterative Beam-Warming finite difference method. The model is tested for simulated heat pipe vapor flow and actual vapor flow in cylindrical heat pipes. A good comparison of the present transient results for the simulated heat pipe vapor flow with the previous results of a two-dimensional numerical model is achieved and the steady state results are in agreement with the existing experimental data. The transient behavior of the vapor flow under subsonic, sonic, and supersonic speeds as well as high mass flow rates are successfully predicted.

  10. Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 84-412-1612, Drs. Youdelman and Teig, Brentwood, New York. [Nitrous oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crandall, M.S.

    1985-07-01

    Environmental and breathing zone samples were analyzed for nitrous-oxide (10102440) at two oral surgery clinics in Holbrook and Brentwood, New York on July 30 to 31, 1984. The evaluation was requested by the dentists because of general concern regarding the extent of exposure to nitrous oxide. The Brentwood office was equipped with a waste anesthetic gas scavenging system. Recommendations include checking the nitrous-oxide delivery and mixing systems at both clinics, installing a waste anesthetic gas scavenging system with a dedicated exhaust at the Holbrook office, and improving work practices at the Brentwood clinic.

  11. Microstructure of vapor deposited coatings on curved substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, Theron M.; Zhao, Hengbei; Wadley, Haydn N. G., E-mail: haydn@virginia.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Virginia, 395 McCormick Rd., P.O. Box 400745, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Thermal barrier coating systems consisting of a metallic bond coat and ceramic over layer are widely used to extend the life of gas turbine engine components. They are applied using either high-vacuum physical vapor deposition techniques in which vapor atoms rarely experience scattering collisions during propagation to a substrate, or by gas jet assisted (low-vacuum) vapor deposition techniques that utilize scattering from streamlines to enable non-line-of-sight deposition. Both approaches require substrate motion to coat a substrate of complex shape. Here, direct simulation Monte Carlo and kinetic Monte Carlo simulation methods are combined to simulate the deposition of a nickel coating over the concave and convex surfaces of a model airfoil, and the simulation results are compared with those from experimental depositions. The simulation method successfully predicted variations in coating thickness, columnar growth angle, and porosity during both stationary and substrate rotated deposition. It was then used to investigate a wide range of vapor deposition conditions spanning high-vacuum physical vapor deposition to low-vacuum gas jet assisted vapor deposition. The average coating thickness was found to increase initially with gas pressure reaching a maximum at a chamber pressure of 8–10 Pa, but the best coating thickness uniformity was achieved under high vacuum deposition conditions. However, high vacuum conditions increased the variation in the coatings pore volume fraction over the surface of the airfoil. The simulation approach was combined with an optimization algorithm and used to investigate novel deposition concepts to tailor the local coating thickness.

  12. Removal of gasoline vapors from air streams by biofiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, W.A.; Kant, W.D.; Colwell, F.S.; Singleton, B.; Lee, B.D.; Andrews, G.F.; Espinosa, A.M.; Johnson, E.G.

    1993-03-01

    Research was performed to develop a biofilter for the biodegradation of gasoline vapors. The overall goal of this effort was to provide information necessary for the design, construction, and operation of a commercial gasoline vapor biofilter. Experimental results indicated that relatively high amounts of gasoline vapor adsorption occur during initial exposure of the biofilter bed medium to gasoline vapors. Biological removal occurs over a 22 to 40{degrees}C temperature range with removal being completely inhibited at 54{degrees}C. The addition of fertilizer to the relatively fresh bed medium used did not increase the rates of gasoline removal in short term experiments. Microbiological analyses indicated that high levels of gasoline degrading microbes are naturally present in the bed medium and that additional inoculation with hydrocarbon degrading cultures does not appreciably increase gasoline removal rates. At lower gasoline concentrations, the vapor removal rates were considerably lower than those at higher gasoline concentrations. This implies that system designs facilitating gasoline transport to the micro-organisms could substantially increase gasoline removal rates at lower gasoline vapor concentrations. Test results from a field scale prototype biofiltration system showed volumetric productivity (i.e., average rate of gasoline degradation per unit bed volume) values that were consistent with those obtained with laboratory column biofilters at similar inlet gasoline concentrations. In addition, total benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, and xylene (BTEX) removal over the operating conditions employed was 50 to 55%. Removal of benzene was approximately 10 to 15% and removal of the other members of the BTEX group was much higher, typically >80%.

  13. Removal of gasoline vapors from air streams by biofiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, W.A.; Kant, W.D.; Colwell, F.S.; Singleton, B.; Lee, B.D.; Andrews, G.F.; Espinosa, A.M.; Johnson, E.G.

    1993-03-01

    Research was performed to develop a biofilter for the biodegradation of gasoline vapors. The overall goal of this effort was to provide information necessary for the design, construction, and operation of a commercial gasoline vapor biofilter. Experimental results indicated that relatively high amounts of gasoline vapor adsorption occur during initial exposure of the biofilter bed medium to gasoline vapors. Biological removal occurs over a 22 to 40[degrees]C temperature range with removal being completely inhibited at 54[degrees]C. The addition of fertilizer to the relatively fresh bed medium used did not increase the rates of gasoline removal in short term experiments. Microbiological analyses indicated that high levels of gasoline degrading microbes are naturally present in the bed medium and that additional inoculation with hydrocarbon degrading cultures does not appreciably increase gasoline removal rates. At lower gasoline concentrations, the vapor removal rates were considerably lower than those at higher gasoline concentrations. This implies that system designs facilitating gasoline transport to the micro-organisms could substantially increase gasoline removal rates at lower gasoline vapor concentrations. Test results from a field scale prototype biofiltration system showed volumetric productivity (i.e., average rate of gasoline degradation per unit bed volume) values that were consistent with those obtained with laboratory column biofilters at similar inlet gasoline concentrations. In addition, total benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, and xylene (BTEX) removal over the operating conditions employed was 50 to 55%. Removal of benzene was approximately 10 to 15% and removal of the other members of the BTEX group was much higher, typically >80%.

  14. Microstructure of vapor deposited coatings on curved substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgers, Theron M.; Zhao, Hengbei; Wadley, Haydn N. G.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating systems consisting of a metallic bond coat and ceramic over layer are widely used to extend the life of gas turbine engine components. They are applied using either high-vacuum physical vapor deposition techniques in which vapor atoms rarely experience scattering collisions during propagation to a substrate, or by gas jet assisted (low-vacuum) vapor deposition techniques that utilize scattering from streamlines to enable non-line-of-sight deposition. Both approaches require substrate motion to coat a substrate of complex shape. Here, direct simulation Monte Carlo and kinetic Monte Carlo simulation methods are combined to simulate the deposition of a nickel coating over the concave and convex surfaces of a model airfoil, and the simulation results are compared with those from experimental depositions. The simulation method successfully predicted variations in coating thickness, columnar growth angle, and porosity during both stationary and substrate rotated deposition. It was then used to investigate a wide range of vapor deposition conditions spanning high-vacuum physical vapor deposition to low-vacuum gas jet assisted vapor deposition. The average coating thickness was found to increase initially with gas pressure reaching a maximum at a chamber pressure of 8–10 Pa, but the best coating thickness uniformity was achieved under high vacuum deposition conditions. However, high vacuum conditions increased the variation in the coatings pore volume fraction over the surface of the airfoil. The simulation approach was combined with an optimization algorithm and used to investigate novel deposition concepts to tailor the local coating thickness

  15. The catalytic cycle of nitrous oxide reductase - The enzyme that catalyzes the last step of denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreira, Cíntia; Pauleta, Sofia R; Moura, Isabel

    2017-12-01

    The reduction of the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide requires a catalyst to overcome the large activation energy barrier of this reaction. Its biological decomposition to the inert dinitrogen can be accomplished by denitrifiers through nitrous oxide reductase, the enzyme that catalyzes the last step of the denitrification, a pathway of the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle. Nitrous oxide reductase is a multicopper enzyme containing a mixed valence CuA center that can accept electrons from small electron shuttle proteins, triggering electron flow to the catalytic sulfide-bridged tetranuclear copper "CuZ center". This enzyme has been isolated with its catalytic center in two forms, CuZ*(4Cu1S) and CuZ(4Cu2S), proven to be spectroscopic and structurally different. In the last decades, it has been a challenge to characterize the properties of this complex enzyme, due to the different oxidation states observed for each of its centers and the heterogeneity of its preparations. The substrate binding site in those two "CuZ center" forms and which is the active form of the enzyme is still a matter of debate. However, in the last years the application of different spectroscopies, together with theoretical calculations have been useful in answering these questions and in identifying intermediate species of the catalytic cycle. An overview of the spectroscopic, kinetics and structural properties of the two forms of the catalytic "CuZ center" is given here, together with the current knowledge on nitrous oxide reduction mechanism by nitrous oxide reductase and its intermediate species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Nitrous oxide emission by the non-denitrifying, nitrate ammonifier Bacillus licheniformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yihua; De Vos, Paul; Heylen, Kim

    2016-01-19

    Firmicutes have the capacity to remove excess nitrate from the environment via either denitrification, dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium or both. The recent renewed interest in their nitrogen metabolism has revealed many interesting features, the most striking being their wide variety of dissimilatory nitrate reduction pathways. In the present study, nitrous oxide production from Bacillus licheniformis, a ubiquitous Gram-positive, spore-forming species with many industrial applications, is investigated. B. licheniformis has long been considered a denitrifier but physiological experiments on three different strains demonstrated that nitrous oxide is not produced from nitrate in stoichiometric amounts, rather ammonium is the most important end-product, produced during fermentation. Significant strain dependency in end-product ratios, attributed to nitrite and ammonium, and medium dependency in nitrous oxide production were also observed. Genome analyses confirmed the lack of a nitrite reductase to nitric oxide, the key enzyme of denitrification. Based on the gene inventory and building on knowledge from other non-denitrifying nitrous oxide emitters, hypothetical pathways for nitrous oxide production, involving NarG, NirB, qNor and Hmp, are proposed. In addition, all publically available genomes of B. licheniformis demonstrated similar gene inventories, with specific duplications of the nar operon, narK and hmp genes as well as NarG phylogeny supporting the evolutionary separation of previously described distinct BALI1 and BALI2 lineages. Using physiological and genomic data we have demonstrated that the common soil bacterium B. licheniformis does not denitrify but is capable of fermentative dissimilatory nitrate/nitrite reduction to ammonium (DNRA) with concomitant production of N2O. Considering its ubiquitous nature and non-fastidious growth in the lab, B. licheniformis is a suitable candidate for further exploration of the actual mechanism of N2O

  17. Oxygen concentrators performance with nitrous oxide at 50:50 volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Ronaldo Moll

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Few investigations have addressed the safety of oxygen from concentrators for use in anesthesia in association with nitrous oxide. This study evaluated the percent of oxygen from a concentrator in association with nitrous oxide in a semi-closed rebreathing circuit. Methods: Adult patients undergoing low risk surgery were randomly allocated into two groups, receiving a fresh gas flow of oxygen from concentrators (O293 or of oxygen from concentrators and nitrous oxide (O293N2O. The fraction of inspired oxygen and the percentage of oxygen from fresh gas flow were measured every 10 min. The ratio of FiO2/oxygen concentration delivered was compared at various time intervals and between the groups. Results: Thirty patients were studied in each group. There was no difference in oxygen from concentrators over time for both groups, but there was a significant improvement in the FiO2 (p < 0.001 for O293 group while a significant decline (p < 0.001 for O293N2O. The FiO2/oxygen ratio varied in both groups, reaching a plateau in the O293 group. Pulse oximetry did not fall below 98.5% in either group. Conclusion: The FiO2 in the mixture of O293 and nitrous oxide fell during the observation period although oxygen saturation was higher than 98.5% throughout the study. Concentrators can be considered a stable source of oxygen for use during short anesthetic procedures, either pure or in association with nitrous oxide at 50:50 volume.

  18. Experimental and molecular dynamics simulation study of the sublimation and vaporization energetics of iron metalocenes. crystal structures of Fe(eta5-C5H4CH3)2 and Fe[(eta5-(C5H5)(eta5-C5H4CHO)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lousada, Claudio M; Pinto, Susana S; Lopes, José N Canongia; da Piedade, M Fatima Minas; Diogo, Hermínio P; da Piedade, Manuel E Minas

    2008-04-03

    The standard molar enthalpies of sublimation of ferrocene, 1,1'-dimethylferrocene, decamethylferrocene, ferrocenecarboxaldehyde and alpha-methylferrocenemethanol, and the enthalpy of vaporization of N,N-dimethyl(aminomethyl)ferrocene, at 298.15 K, were determined by Calvet-drop microcalorimetry and/or the Knudsen effusion method. The obtained values were used to assess and refine our previously developed force field for metallocenes. The modified force field was able to reproduce the deltasubHdegreesm and deltavapHdegreesm values of the test-set with an accuracy better than 5 kJ.mol-1, except for decamethylferrocene, in which case the deviation between the calculated and experimental deltasubHdegreesm values was 16.1 kJ.mol-1. The origin of the larger error found in the prediction of the sublimation energetics of decamethylferrocene, and which was also observed in the estimation of structural properties (e.g., density and unit cell dimensions), is discussed. Finally, the crystal structures of Fe(eta5-C5H4CH3)2 and Fe[(eta5-(C5H5)(eta5-C5H4CHO)] at 293 and 150 K, respectively, are reported.

  19. Apparatus to measure vapor pressure, differential vapor pressure, liquid molar volume, and compressibility of liquids and solutions to the critical point. Vapor pressures, molar volumes, and compressibilities of protiobenzene and deuteriobenzene at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kooner, Z.S.; Van Hook, W.A.

    1986-01-01

    An apparatus designed to measure vapor pressure differences between two similar liquids, such as isotopic isomers, or between a solution and its reference solvent at temperatures and pressures extending to the critical point is described. Vapor-phase volume is minimized and pressure is transmitted to the transducer through the liquid, thereby avoiding several experimental difficulties. Liquid can be injected into the heated part of the system by volumetrically calibrated screw injectors, thus permitting measurements of liquid molar volume, compressibility, and expansivity. The addition of a high-pressure circulating pump and injection valve allows the apparatus to be employed as a continuous dilution differential vapor pressure apparatus for determining partial molar free energies of solution. In the second part of the paper data on the vapor pressure, molar volume, compressibility, and expansivity and their isotope effects for C 6 H 6 and C 6 D 6 from room temperature to near the critical temperature are reported

  20. Vapor deposition of tantalum and tantalum compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trkula, M.

    1996-01-01

    Tantalum, and many of its compounds, can be deposited as coatings with techniques ranging from pure, thermal chemical vapor deposition to pure physical vapor deposition. This review concentrates on chemical vapor deposition techniques. The paper takes a historical approach. The authors review classical, metal halide-based techniques and current techniques for tantalum chemical vapor deposition. The advantages and limitations of the techniques will be compared. The need for new lower temperature processes and hence new precursor chemicals will be examined and explained. In the last section, they add some speculation as to possible new, low-temperature precursors for tantalum chemical vapor deposition

  1. What Good is Raman Water Vapor Lidar?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, David

    2011-01-01

    Raman lidar has been used to quantify water vapor in the atmosphere for various scientific studies including mesoscale meteorology and satellite validation. Now the international networks of NDACC and GRUAN have interest in using Raman water vapor lidar for detecting trends in atmospheric water vapor concentrations. What are the data needs for addressing these very different measurement challenges. We will review briefly the scientific needs for water vapor accuracy for each of these three applications and attempt to translate that into performance specifications for Raman lidar in an effort to address the question in the title of "What good is Raman water vapor Iidar."

  2. High temperature vapors science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Hastie, John

    2012-01-01

    High Temperature Vapors: Science and Technology focuses on the relationship of the basic science of high-temperature vapors to some areas of discernible practical importance in modern science and technology. The major high-temperature problem areas selected for discussion include chemical vapor transport and deposition; the vapor phase aspects of corrosion, combustion, and energy systems; and extraterrestrial high-temperature species. This book is comprised of seven chapters and begins with an introduction to the nature of the high-temperature vapor state, the scope and literature of high-temp

  3. Importance Profiles for Water Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapes, Brian; Chandra, Arunchandra S.; Kuang, Zhiming; Zuidema, Paquita

    2017-11-01

    Motivated by the scientific desire to align observations with quantities of physical interest, we survey how scalar importance functions depend on vertically resolved water vapor. Definitions of importance begin from familiar examples of water mass I m and TOA clear-sky outgoing longwave flux I OLR, in order to establish notation and illustrate graphically how the sensitivity profile or "kernel" depends on whether specific humidity S, relative humidity R, or ln( R) are used as measures of vapor. Then, new results on the sensitivity of convective activity I con to vapor (with implied knock-on effects such as weather prediction skill) are presented. In radiative-convective equilibrium, organized (line-like) convection is much more sensitive to moisture than scattered isotropic convection, but it exists in a drier mean state. The lesson for natural convection may be that organized convection is less susceptible to dryness and can survive and propagate into regions unfavorable for disorganized convection. This counterintuitive interpretive conclusion, with respect to the narrow numerical result behind it, highlights the importance of clarity about what is held constant at what values in sensitivity or susceptibility kernels. Finally, the sensitivities of observable radiance signals I sig for passive remote sensing are considered. While the accuracy of R in the lower free troposphere is crucial for the physical importance scalars, this layer is unfortunately the most difficult to isolate with passive remote sensing: In high emissivity channels, water vapor signals come from too high in the atmosphere (for satellites) or too low (for surface radiometers), while low emissivity channels have poor altitude discrimination and (in the case of satellites) are contaminated by surface emissions. For these reasons, active ranging (LiDAR) is the preferred observing strategy.

  4. Vapor Pressure of Antimony Triiodide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-07

    unlimited. iii Contents List of Figures iv 1. Introduction 1 2. Vapor Pressure 1 3. Experiment 3 4. Discussion and Measurements 5 5...SbI3 as a function of temperature ......................... 6 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 1 1. Introduction ...single-crystal thin films of n-type (Bi,Sb)2(Te,Se)3 materials presents new doping challenges because it is a nonequilibrium process. (Bi,Sb)2(Te,Se)3

  5. Sodium vapor charge exchange cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiddleston, H.R.; Fasolo, J.A.; Minette, D.C.; Chrien, R.E.; Frederick, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    An operational sequential charge-exchange ion source yielding a 50 MeV H - current of approximately 8 mA is planned for use with the Argonne 500 MeV booster synchrotron. We report on the progress for development of a sodium vapor charge-exchange cell as part of that planned effort. Design, fabrication, and operating results to date are presented and discussed. (author)

  6. The vapor pressure and vaporization enthalpy of R-(+)-menthofuran, a hepatotoxin metabolically derived from the abortifacient terpene, (R)-(+)-pulegone by correlation gas chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gobble, Chase; Chickos, James S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The vaporization enthalpy and vapor pressure of R-(+) menthofuran is evaluated. • The normal boiling temperature is predicted and compared to experimental and predicted values. • A vapor pressure equation as a function of temperature for menthofuran is evaluated. - Abstract: The vapor pressure as a function of temperature and its vaporization enthalpy at T = 298.15 K of R-(+)-menthofuran, a substance metabolically derived from R-(+)-pulegone that is both a flavoring agent at low concentrations and a hepatotoxin at larger ones, is evaluated by correlation-gas chromatography. A vapor pressure p/Pa = (36 ± 12) has been evaluated at T = 298.15 K, and a normal boiling temperature of T_b/K = 482.4 K is predicted. A boiling temperature of T_b/K = 374.3 compares with the literature value of T_b/K = 371.2 at reduced pressure, p/kPa = 2.93. The vaporization enthalpy of (56.5 ± 3.0) kJ·mol"−"1 compares to an estimated value of (57.8 ± 2.9) kJ·mol"−"1.

  7. High Temperature Corrosion of Silicon Carbide and Silicon Nitride in Water Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opila, E. J.; Robinson, Raymond C.; Cuy, Michael D.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) and silicon nitride (Si3N4) are proposed for applications in high temperature combustion environments containing water vapor. Both SiC and Si3N4 react with water vapor to form a silica (SiO2) scale. It is therefore important to understand the durability of SiC, Si3N4 and SiO2 in water vapor. Thermogravimetric analyses, furnace exposures and burner rig results were obtained for these materials in water vapor at temperatures between 1100 and 1450 C and water vapor partial pressures ranging from 0.1 to 3.1 atm. First, the oxidation of SiC and Si3N4 in water vapor is considered. The parabolic kinetic rate law, rate dependence on water vapor partial pressure, and oxidation mechanism are discussed. Second, the volatilization of silica to form Si(OH)4(g) is examined. Mass spectrometric results, the linear kinetic rate law and a volatilization model based on diffusion through a gas boundary layer are discussed. Finally, the combined oxidation and volatilization reactions, which occur when SiC or Si3N4 are exposed in a water vapor-containing environment, are presented. Both experimental evidence and a model for the paralinear kinetic rate law are shown for these simultaneous oxidation and volatilization reactions.

  8. Cooperative effect of radiation and vapor environments on the deterioration of insulator materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusama, Yasuo; Okada, Sohei; Yagi, Toshiaki; Ito, Masayuki; Yoshida, Kenzo; Tamura, Naoyuki

    1985-01-01

    Experimental results and speculations are described on the cooperative effect of radiation and vapor environments for the deterioration of insulator cable cladding materials such as polyethylene chlorosulphonate, ethylene propylene rubber, cross-linked polyethylene, chloroprene and silicone rubber, by the separate, simultaneous or subsequent exposure of the above-mentioned two kinds of exposure factors. These experiment was carried out by considering main environmental factors in the LOCA (loss of coolant accident) conditions. Radiation experiment was made by employing 60 Co source of 9.7 kGy/h at a room-temperature air condition. Vapor environment exposure was conducted by the conditions of 120 to 160 deg C steam-saturated air conditions and others. With the experimental results described on the characteristics of the five kinds of the above-mentioned insulator materials in radiation and saturated vapor conditions, the following conclusions were obtained. Acceleration of deterioration by the cooperative action of radiation and saturated vapor was found for the examined materials except the cross-linked polyethylene. In the subsequent exposure of radiation and saturated vapor, deterioration behavior was dependent on insulator materials and component ratios of the insulator materials. For the cross-linked polyethylene, annealing effect by heat was found, and the effect was less significent in the simultaneous exposure. Restoration phenomenon was found in the cross-linked polyethylene even in the saturated vapor exposure stage of the subsequent exposure conditions of radiation exposure followed by saturated vapor. (Takagi, S.)

  9. Dissimilatory reduction of nitrate and nitrite in the bovine rumen: nitrous oxide production and effect of acetylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspar, H F; Tiedje, J M

    1981-03-01

    15N tracer methods and gas chromatography coupled to an electron capture detector were used to investigate dissimilatory reduction of nitrate and nitrite by the rumen microbiota of a fistulated cow. Ammonium was the only 15N-labeled end product of quantitative significance. Only traces of nitrous oxide were detected as a product of nitrate reduction; but in experiments with nitrite, up to 0.3% of the added nitrogen accumulated as nitrous oxide, but it was not further reduced. Furthermore, when 13NO3- was incubated with rumen microbiota virtually no [13N]N2 was produced. Acetylene partially inhibited the reduction of nitrite to ammonium as well as the formation of nitrous oxide. It is suggested that in the rumen ecosystem nitrous oxide is a byproduct of dissimilatory nitrite reduction to ammonium rather than a product of denitrification and that the latter process is absent from the rumen habitat.

  10. GOZCARDS Source Data for Nitrous Oxide Monthly Zonal Means on a Geodetic Latitude and Pressure Grid V1.01

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GOZCARDS Source Data for Nitrous Oxide Monthly Zonal Averages on a Geodetic Latitude and Pressure Grid product (GozSmlpN2O) contains zonal means and related...

  11. GOZCARDS Merged Data for Nitrous Oxide Monthly Zonal Means on a Geodetic Latitude and Pressure Grid V1.01

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GOZCARDS Merged Data for Nitrous Oxide Monthly Zonal Averages on a Geodetic Latitude and Pressure Grid product (GozMmlpN2O) contains zonal means and related...

  12. Nitrate reductase and nitrous oxide production by Fusarium oxysporum 11dn1 under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurakov, A V; Nosikov, A N; Skrynnikova, E V; L'vov, N P

    2000-08-01

    The fungus Fusarium oxysporum 11dn1 was found to be able to grow and produce nitrous oxide on nitrate-containing medium in anaerobic conditions. The rate of nitrous oxide formation was three to six orders of magnitude lower than the rates of molecular nitrogen production by common denitrifying bacteria. Acetylene and ammonia did not affect the release of nitrous oxide release. It was shown that under anaerobic conditions fast increase of nitrate reductase activity occurred, caused by the synthesis of enzyme de novo and protein dephosphorylation. Reverse transfer of the mycelium to aerobic conditions led to a decline in nitrate reductase activity and stopped nitrous oxide production. The presence of two nitrate reductases was shown, which differed in molecular mass, location, temperature optima, and activity in nitrate- and ammonium-containing media. Two enzymes represent assimilatory and dissimilatory nitrate reductases, which are active in aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively.

  13. Prediction model for initial point of net vapor generation for low-flow boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Qi; Zhao Hua; Yang Ruichang

    2003-01-01

    The prediction of the initial point of net vapor generation is significant for the calculation of phase distribution in sub-cooled boiling. However, most of the investigations were developed in high-flow boiling, and there is no common model that could be successfully applied for the low-flow boiling. A predictive model for the initial point of net vapor generation for low-flow forced convection and natural circulation is established here, by the analysis of evaporation and condensation heat transfer. The comparison between experimental data and calculated results shows that this model can predict the net vapor generation point successfully in low-flow sub-cooled boiling

  14. Thermodynamic comparison of Peltier, Stirling, and vapor compression portable coolers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermes, Christian J.L.; Barbosa, Jader R.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A Peltier, a Stirling, and two vapor compression refrigerators were compared. ► Tests were carried out to obtain key performance parameters of the systems. ► The overall 2nd-law efficiency was splited to take into account the internal and external irreversibilities. ► The Stirling and vapor compression refrigeration systems presented higher efficiencies. ► The thermoelectric device was not at the same efficiency level as the other coolers. -- Abstract: The present study compares the thermodynamic performance of four small-capacity portable coolers that employ different cooling technologies: thermoelectric, Stirling, and vapor compression using two different compressors (reciprocating and linear). The refrigeration systems were experimentally evaluated in a climatized chamber with controlled temperature and humidity. Tests were carried out at two different ambient temperatures (21 and 32 °C) in order to obtain key performance parameters of the systems (e.g., power consumption, cooling capacity, internal air temperature, and the hot end and cold end temperatures). These performance parameters were compared using a thermodynamic approach that splits the overall 2nd law efficiency into two terms, namely, the internal and external efficiencies. In doing so, the internal irreversibilities (e.g., friction in the working fluid in the Stirling and vapor compression machines, Joule heating and heat conduction in the thermoelectric devices of the Peltier cooler) were separated from the heat exchanger losses (external irreversibilities), allowing the comparison between different refrigeration technologies with respect to the same thermodynamic baseline.

  15. Dissimilatory reduction of nitrate and nitrite in the bovine rumen: nitrous oxide production and effect of acetylene.

    OpenAIRE

    Kaspar, H F; Tiedje, J M

    1981-01-01

    15N tracer methods and gas chromatography coupled to an electron capture detector were used to investigate dissimilatory reduction of nitrate and nitrite by the rumen microbiota of a fistulated cow. Ammonium was the only 15N-labeled end product of quantitative significance. Only traces of nitrous oxide were detected as a product of nitrate reduction; but in experiments with nitrite, up to 0.3% of the added nitrogen accumulated as nitrous oxide, but it was not further reduced. Furthermore, whe...

  16. Correlation of vapor - liquid equilibrium data for acetic acid - isopropanol - water - isopropyl acetate mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Mandagarán

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available A correlation procedure for the prediction of vapor - liquid equilibrium of acetic acid - isopropanol - water - isopropyl acetate mixtures has been developed. It is based on the NRTL model for predicting liquid activity coefficients, and on the Hayden-O'Connell second virial coefficients for predicting the vapor phase of systems containing association components. When compared with experimental data the correlation shows a good agreement for binary and ternary data. The correlation also shows good prediction for reactive quaternary data.

  17. The determination of the initial point of net vapor generation in flow subcooled boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Changqi; Sun Zhongning

    2000-01-01

    The experimental results for the initial point of net vapor generation in up-flow subcooled boiling in an internally-heated annulus are given. The characteristics of the initial point of net vapor generation and the problem on gamma ray attenuation measurement are discussed. The comparison between the data and a calculation model is given, it is showed that the data agree well with the model

  18. Graphitic carbon nitride: Synthesis, characterization and photocatalytic decomposition of nitrous oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Praus, Petr, E-mail: petr.praus@vsb.cz [Institute of Environmental Technology, VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava, 17. Listopadu 15/2172, Ostrava 708 33 (Czech Republic); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava, 17. Listopadu 15/2172, Ostrava 708 33 (Czech Republic); Svoboda, Ladislav [Institute of Environmental Technology, VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava, 17. Listopadu 15/2172, Ostrava 708 33 (Czech Republic); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava, 17. Listopadu 15/2172, Ostrava 708 33 (Czech Republic); Ritz, Michal [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava, 17. Listopadu 15/2172, Ostrava 708 33 (Czech Republic); Troppová, Ivana; Šihor, Marcel; Kočí, Kamila [Institute of Environmental Technology, VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava, 17. Listopadu 15/2172, Ostrava 708 33 (Czech Republic)

    2017-06-01

    Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}) was synthetized by condensation of melamine at the temperatures of 400–700 °C in air for 2 h and resulting products were characterized and finally tested for the photocatalytic decomposition of nitrous oxide. The characterization methods were elemental analysis, UV–Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), photoluminescence (PL), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy, measurement of specific surface area (SSA), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy. The XRD patterns, FTIR and Raman spectra proved the presence of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} at above 550 °C but the optimal synthesis temperature of 600–650 °C was found. Under these conditions graphitic carbon nitride of the overall empirical composition of C{sub 6}N{sub 9}H{sub 2} was formed. At lower temperatures g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} with a higher content of hydrogen was formed but at higher temperatures g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} was decomposed. At the temperatures above 650 °C, its exfoliation was observed. The photocatalytic experiments showed that the activity of all the samples synthetized at 400–700 °C was very similar, that is, within the range of experimental error (5 %). The total conversion of N{sub 2}O reached about 43 % after 14 h. - Highlights: • Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}) was thermally synthetized from melamine in the range of 400–700 °C. • The optimal temperature was determined at 600–650 °C. • All synthesis products were properly characterized by physico-chemical methods. • Exfoliation of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} at above 600 °C was observed. • g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} was used for the photocatalytic decomposition of N{sub 2}O.

  19. Sheep Excreta as Source of Nitrous Oxide in Ryegrass Pasture in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michely Tomazi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Livestock urine and dung are important components of the N cycle in pastures, but little information on its effect on soil nitrous oxide (N2O emissions is available. We conducted a short-term (39-day trial to quantify the direct N2O-N emissions from sheep excreta on an experimental area of ryegrass pasture growing on a Typic Paleudult in southern Brazil. Four rates of urine-N (161, 242, 323, and 403 kg ha-1 N and one of dung-N (13 kg ha-1 N were applied, as well as a control plot receiving no excreta. The N2O-N emission factor (EF = % of added N released as N2O-N for urine and dung was calculated, taking into account the N2O fluxes in the field, over a period of 39 days. The EF value of the urine and dung was used to estimate the emissions of N2O-N over a 90-day period of pasture in the winter under two grazing intensities (2.5 or 5.0 times the herbage intake potential of grazing lambs. The soil N2O-N fluxes ranged from 4 to 353 µg m-2h-1. The highest N2O-N fluxes occurred 16 days after application of urine and dung, when the highest soil nitrate content was also recorded and the water-filled pore space exceeded 60 %. The mean EF for urine was 0.25 % of applied N, much higher than that for dung (0.06 %. We found that N2O-N emissions for the 90-day winter pasture period were 0.54 kg ha-1 for low grazing intensity and 0.62 kg ha-1 for moderate grazing intensity. Comparison of the two forms of excreta show that urine was the main contributor to N2O-N emissions (mean of 36 %, whereas dung was responsible for less than 0.1 % of total soil N2O-N emissions.

  20. Modeling nitrous oxide production during biological nitrogen removal via nitrification and denitrification: extensions to the general ASM models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Ruscalleda, Maël; Pellicer-Nàcher, Carles; Smets, Barth F

    2011-09-15

    Nitrous oxide (N(2)O) can be formed during biological nitrogen (N) removal processes. In this work, a mathematical model is developed that describes N(2)O production and consumption during activated sludge nitrification and denitrification. The well-known ASM process models are extended to capture N(2)O dynamics during both nitrification and denitrification in biological N removal. Six additional processes and three additional reactants, all involved in known biochemical reactions, have been added. The validity and applicability of the model is demonstrated by comparing simulations with experimental data on N(2)O production from four different mixed culture nitrification and denitrification reactor study reports. Modeling results confirm that hydroxylamine oxidation by ammonium oxidizers (AOB) occurs 10 times slower when NO(2)(-) participates as final electron acceptor compared to the oxic pathway. Among the four denitrification steps, the last one (N(2)O reduction to N(2)) seems to be inhibited first when O(2) is present. Overall, N(2)O production can account for 0.1-25% of the consumed N in different nitrification and denitrification systems, which can be well simulated by the proposed model. In conclusion, we provide a modeling structure, which adequately captures N(2)O dynamics in autotrophic nitrification and heterotrophic denitrification driven biological N removal processes and which can form the basis for ongoing refinements.