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Sample records for nitrogen-containing stainless alloys

  1. A review on nickel-free nitrogen containing austenitic stainless steels for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talha, Mohd; Behera, C K; Sinha, O P

    2013-10-01

    The field of biomaterials has become a vital area, as these materials can enhance the quality and longevity of human life. Metallic materials are often used as biomaterials to replace structural components of the human body. Stainless steels, cobalt-chromium alloys, commercially pure titanium and its alloys are typical metallic biomaterials that are being used for implant devices. Stainless steels have been widely used as biomaterials because of their very low cost as compared to other metallic materials, good mechanical and corrosion resistant properties and adequate biocompatibility. However, the adverse effects of nickel ions being released into the human body have promoted the development of "nickel-free nitrogen containing austenitic stainless steels" for medical applications. Nitrogen not only replaces nickel for austenitic structure stability but also much improves steel properties. Here we review the harmful effects associated with nickel and emphatically the advantages of nitrogen in stainless steel, as well as the development of nickel-free nitrogen containing stainless steels for medical applications. By combining the benefits of stable austenitic structure, high strength, better corrosion and wear resistance and superior biocompatibility in comparison to the currently used austenitic stainless steel (e.g. 316L), the newly developed nickel-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel is a reliable substitute for the conventionally used medical stainless steels. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Plating on stainless steel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dini, J.W.; Johnson, H.R.

    1981-01-01

    Quantitative adhesion data are presented for a variety of electroplated stainless steel type alloys. Results show that excellent adhesion can be obtained by using a Wood's nickel strike or a sulfamate nickel strike prior to final plating. Specimens plated after Wood's nickel striking failed in the deposit rather than at the interface between the substrate and the coating. Flyer plate quantitative tests showed that use of anodic treatment in sulfuric acid prior to Wood's nickel striking even further improved adhesion. In contrast activation of stainless steels by immersion or cathodic treatment in hydrochloric acid resulted in very reduced bond strengths with failure always occurring at the interface between the coating and substrate

  3. Nickel alloys and high-alloyed special stainless steels. Properties, manufacturing, applications. 4. compl. rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heubner, Ulrich; Kloewer, Jutta; Alves, Helena; Behrens, Rainer; Schindler, Claudius; Wahl, Volker; Wolf, Martin

    2012-01-01

    This book contains the following eight topics: 1. Nickel alloys and high-alloy special stainless steels - Material overview and metallurgical principles (U. Heubner); 2. Corrosion resistance of nickel alloys and high-alloy special stainless steels (U. Heubner); 3. Welding of nickel alloys and high-alloy special stainless steels (T. Hoffmann, M. Wolf); 4. High-temperature materials for industrial plant construction (J. Kloewer); 5. Nickel alloys and high-alloy special stainless steels as hot roll clad composites-a cost-effective alternative (C. Schindler); 6. Selected examples of the use of nickel alloys and high-alloy special stainless steels in chemical plants (H. Alves); 7. The use of nickel alloys and stainless steels in environmental engineering (V. Wahl); 8: Nickel alloys and high-alloy special stainless steels for the oil and gas industry (R. Behrens).

  4. Nitrogen-containing steels and thermomechanical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaputkina, L.; Prokoshkina, V.G.; Svyazhin, G.

    2004-01-01

    The strengthening of nitrogen-containing corrosion-resistant steels resulting from alloying and thermomechanical treatment have been investigated using X-ray diffraction analysis, light microscopy, hardness measurements and tensile testing. Combined data have been obtained for nitrogen interaction with alloying elements , peculiarities of deformed structure and short-range of nitrogen-containing steels of various structural classes. The higher nitrogen and total alloying element contents, the higher deformation strengthening. Prospects of use the steels with not high nitrogen content and methods of their thermomechanical strengthening are shown. High temperature thermomechanical treatment (HTMT) is very effective for obtaining high and thermally stable constructional strength of nitrogen-containing steels of all classes. The HTMT is most effective if used in a combination with dispersion hardening for aging steels or in the case of mechanically unstable austenitic steels. (author)

  5. Applications of nitrogen-alloyed stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundvall, J.; Olsson, J. [Avesta Sheffield AB (Sweden); Holmberg, B. [Avesta Welding AB (Sweden)

    1999-07-01

    A selected number of applications for different types of nitrogen-alloyed stainless steels are described. The applications and grades are based on how nitrogen improves different properties. Conventional austenitic grades of type 304 and 316 can be alloyed with nitrogen to increase the strength and to maintain the austenite stability after cold deformation when exposed to cryogenic temperatures. Such examples are presented. The addition of nitrogen to duplex grades of stainless steel such as 2205 improves the pitting resistance, among other things, and also enables faster reformation of the austenite in the heat affected zone. This means that heavy plate can be welded without pre-heating or post-weld heating. Such applications are covered. Modern highly alloyed austenitic stainless steels almost always contain nitrogen and all reasons for this are covered, i.e. to stabilise the austenite, to increase the strength, and to improve the pitting resistance. The increased strength is the characteristic exemplified the least, since the higher strength of duplex grades is well known, but examples on austenite stability and improved pitting resistance are presented. (orig.)

  6. Stainless steel-zirconium alloy waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDeavitt, S.M.; Abraham, D.P.; Keiser, D.D. Jr.; Park, J.Y.

    1996-01-01

    An electrometallurgical treatment process has been developed by Argonne National Laboratory to convert various types of spent nuclear fuels into stable storage forms and waste forms for repository disposal. The first application of this process will be to treat spent fuel alloys from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II. Three distinct product streams emanate from the electrorefining process: (1) refined uranium; (2) fission products and actinides extracted from the electrolyte salt that are processed into a mineral waste form; and (3) metallic wastes left behind at the completion of the electrorefining step. The third product stream (i.e., the metal waste stream) is the subject of this paper. The metal waste stream contains components of the chopped spent fuel that are unaffected by the electrorefining process because of their electrochemically ''noble'' nature; this includes the cladding hulls, noble metal fission products (NMFP), and, in specific cases, zirconium from metal fuel alloys. The selected method for the consolidation and stabilization of the metal waste stream is melting and casting into a uniform, corrosion-resistant alloy. The waste form casting process will be carried out in a controlled-atmosphere furnace at high temperatures with a molten salt flux. Spent fuels with both stainless steel and Zircaloy cladding are being evaluated for treatment; thus, stainless steel-rich and Zircaloy-rich waste forms are being developed. Although the primary disposition option for the actinides is the mineral waste form, the concept of incorporating the TRU-bearing product into the metal waste form has enough potential to warrant investigation

  7. Analysis of Intergranular Precipitation in Isothermally Aged Nitrogen-Containing Austenitic Stainless Steels by an Electrochemical Method and Its Relation to Cryogenic Toughness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maribel L. Saucedo-Muñoz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The precipitation process in two N-containing austenitic stainless steels, aged at temperatures between 873 and 1173 K for times from 10 to 1000 min, was analyzed by an electrochemical method based on the anodic polarization test with an electrolyte of 1 N KOH solution. The anodic polarization curves showed the following intergranular precipitation sequence: austenite → austenite + Cr23C6→ austenite + Cr23C6 + Cr2N. Besides, the fastest precipitation kinetics was detected in the aged steel with the highest content of nitrogen and carbon due to its higher driving force for precipitation. The higher the aging temperature, the higher volume fraction of precipitates. The precipitation fraction can be associated with the current density of the dissolution peaks of each phase. The Charpy-V-Notch impact energy of the aged specimens decreased with the increase in the volume fraction of precipitates.

  8. Fracture toughness of irradiated stainless steel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    The postirradiation fracture toughness responses of Types 316 and 304 stainless steel (SS) wrought products, cast CF8 SS and Type 308 SS weld deposit were characterized at 427 0 C using J/sub R/-curve techniques. Fast-neutron irradiation of these alloys caused an order of magnitude reduction in J/sub c/ and two orders of magnitude reduction in tearing modulus at neutron exposures above 10 dpa, where radiation-induced losses in toughness appeared to saturate. Saturation J/sub c/ values for the wrought materials ranged from 28 to 31 kJ/m 2 ; the weld exhibited a saturation level of 11 kJ/m 2 . Maximum allowable flaw sizes for highly irradiated stainless steel components stressed to 90% of the unirradiated yield strength are on the order of 3 cm for the wrought material and 1 cm for the weld. Electron fractographic examination revealed that irradiation displacement damage brought about a transition from ductile microvoid coalescence to channel fracture, associated with local separation along planar deformation bands. The lower saturation toughness value for the weld relative to that for the wrought products was attributed to local failure of ferrite particles ahead of the advancing crack which prematurely initiated channel fracture

  9. Milling and Drilling Evaluation of Stainless Steel Powder Metallurgy Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazarus, L.J.

    2001-12-10

    Near-net-shape components can be made with powder metallurgy (PM) processes. Only secondary operations such as milling and drilling are required to complete these components. In the past and currently production components are made from powder metallurgy (PM) stainless steel alloys. process engineers are unfamiliar with the difference in machining properties of wrought versus PM alloys and have had to make parts to develop the machining parameters. Design engineers are not generally aware that some PM alloy variations can be furnished with machining additives that greatly increase tool life. Specimens from a MANTEC PM alloy property study were made available. This study was undertaken to determine the machining properties of a number of stainless steel wrought and PM alloys under the same conditions so that comparisons of their machining properties could be made and relative tool life determined.

  10. Laves intermetallics in stainless steel-zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham, D.P.; McDeavitt, S.M.; Richardson, J.W. Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Laves intermetallics have a significant effect on properties of metal waste forms being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. These waste forms are stainless steel-zirconium alloys that will contain radioactive metal isotopes isolated from spent nuclear fuel by electrometallurgical treatment. The baseline waste form composition for stainless steel-clad fuels is stainless steel-15 wt.% zirconium (SS-15Zr). This article presents results of neutron diffraction measurements, heat-treatment studies and mechanical testing on SS-15Zr alloys. The Laves intermetallics in these alloys, labeled Zr(Fe,Cr,Ni) 2+x , have both C36 and C15 crystal structures. A fraction of these intermetallics transform into (Fe,Cr,Ni) 23 Zr 6 during high-temperature annealing; the authors have proposed a mechanism for this transformation. The SS-15Zr alloys show virtually no elongation in uniaxial tension, but exhibit good strength and ductility in compression tests. This article also presents neutron diffraction and microstructural data for a stainless steel-42 wt.% zirconium (SS-42Zr) alloy

  11. CASTI handbook of stainless steels and nickel alloys. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamb, S.

    2002-01-01

    This is the only up-to-date (2002) reference book that covers both stainless steels and nickel alloys. Written by 30 authors and peer reviewers with over 700 years of combined industrial experience, this CASTI handbook provides the latest stainless steels and nickel alloys information in a practical and comprehensive manner. For the project engineer, maintenance engineer or inspector, this book provides solutions to many of the corrosion problems encountered in aggressive environmental conditions. Some of the corrosive conditions covered are: stress corrosion cracking, reducing environments, halogenation, highly oxidizing environments, and high temperatures. Hundreds of different material applications and selections, throughout many industries, are referenced. It is an ideal reference source to assist in preventing or minimizing corrosion related problems, including those encountered during welding fabrication. This practical handbook also contains a handy 'Alloy Index' which lists each alloy by its ASTM Specification, UNS Number, common name, trade name and page number references. The second edition includes additional coverage of corrosion resistant alloys for downhole production tubing. The new material covers corrosion processes, corrosion rates, hydrogen sulfide environments, corrosion inhibitors, corrosion resistant alloys, the application of stainless steel in production conditions, and more

  12. New Stainless Steel Alloys for Low Temperature Surface Hardening?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Dahl, Kristian Vinter; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    The present contribution showcases the possibility for developing new surface hardenable stainless steels containing strong nitride/carbide forming elements (SNCFE). Nitriding of the commercial alloys, austenitic A286, and ferritic AISI 409 illustrates the beneficial effect of having SNCFE presen...

  13. Resistance Element Welding of Magnesium Alloy/austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manladan, S. M.; Yusof, F.; Ramesh, S.; Zhang, Y.; Luo, Z.; Ling, Z.

    2017-09-01

    Multi-material design is increasingly applied in the automotive and aerospace industries to reduce weight, improve crash-worthiness, and reduce environmental pollution. In the present study, a novel variant of resistance spot welding technique, known as resistance element welding was used to join AZ31 Mg alloy to 316 L austenitic stainless steel. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the joints were evaluated. It was found that the nugget consisted of two zones, including a peripheral fusion zone on the stainless steel side and the main fusion zone. The tensile shear properties of the joints are superior to those obtained by traditional resistance spot welding.

  14. Liquid Phase Sintering of Highly Alloyed Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Troels

    1996-01-01

    Liquid phase sintering of stainless steel is usually applied to improve corrosion resistance by obtaining a material without an open pore system. The dense structure normally also give a higher strength when compared to conventional sintered steel. Liquid phase sintrering based on addition...... of boride to AISI 316L type steels have previously been studied, but were found to be sensitive to intergranular corrosion due to formation of intermetallic phases rich in chromium and molybdenum. In order to improve this system further, new investigations have focused on the use of higher alloyed stainless...... steel as base material. The stainless base powders were added different amounts and types of boride and sintered in hydrogen at different temperatures and times in a laboratory furnace. During sintering the outlet gas was analyzed and subsequently related to the obtained microstructure. Thermodynamic...

  15. An accelerated electrochemical MIC test for stainless alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gendron, T.S.; Cleland, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    Previous work in our laboratory and elsewhere has suggested that MIC of stainless steels and nickel-base alloys occurs in locally anaerobic regions that support the growth of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). The cathodic reaction is provided by oxygen reduction at remote sites. Such a coupling between anode and cathode is difficult to reproduce in the laboratory, but can be simulated indirectly using a double electrochemical cell, as in previous work. A more realistic simulation using a single aerated electrochemical cell has now been developed, in which a second organism (P. aeruginosa) is used to provide an anoxic habitat for SRB growth and possibly a source of organic carbon, within a layer of silt. A bare alloy electrode is used as the oxygen cathode. Tests of this kind using rigorous microbiological procedures have generated pitting corrosion of several alloys in low chloride media simulating freshwater heat exchanger conditions. Similar test procedures are applicable to other environments of interest to this symposium

  16. Thermal creep properties of alloy D9 stainless steel and 316 stainless steel fuel clad tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latha, S.; Mathew, M.D.; Parameswaran, P.; Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.; Mannan, S.L.

    2008-01-01

    Uniaxial thermal creep rupture properties of 20% cold worked alloy D9 stainless steel (alloy D9 SS) fuel clad tubes for fast breeder reactors have been evaluated at 973 K in the stress range 125-250 MPa. The rupture lives were in the range 90-8100 h. The results are compared with the properties of 20% cold worked type 316 stainless steel (316 SS) clad tubes. Alloy D9 SS were found to have higher creep rupture strengths, lower creep rates and lower rupture ductility than 316 SS. The deformation and damage processes were related through Monkman Grant relationship and modified Monkman Grant relationship. The creep damage tolerance parameter indicates that creep fracture takes place by intergranular cavitation. Precipitation of titanium carbides in the matrix and chromium carbides on the grain boundaries, dislocation substructure and twins were observed in transmission electron microscopic investigations of alloy D9 SS. The improvement in strength is attributed to the precipitation of fine titanium carbides in the matrix which prevents the recovery and recrystallisation of the cold worked microstructure

  17. Thermal Plasma Spheroidization of High-Nitrogen Stainless Steel Powder Alloys Synthesized by Mechanical Alloying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razumov, Nikolay G.; Popovich, Anatoly A.; Wang, QingSheng

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents the results of experimental studies on the treatment of Fe-23Cr-11Mn-1N high-nitrogen stainless steel powder alloys, synthesized by the mechanical alloying (MA) of elemental powders in the flow of a thermal plasma. Fe-23Cr-11Mn-1N high-nitrogen stainless steel powder alloys were prepared by MA in the attritor under an argon atmosphere. For spheroidization of Fe-23Cr-11Mn-1N high-nitrogen stainless steel powder alloys, the TekSphero 15 plant manufactured by Tekna Plasma Systems Inc was used. The studies have shown the possibility of obtaining Fe-23Cr-11Mn-1N high-nitrogen spherical powders steel alloys from the powder obtained by MA. According to the results of a series of experiments, it was found that the results of plasma spheroidization of powders essentially depend on the size of the fraction due to some difference in the particle shape and flowability, and on the gas regime of the plasma torch. It is established that during the plasma spheroidization process, some of the nitrogen leaves the alloy. The loss rate of nitrogen depends on the size of the initial particles.

  18. Localized corrosion of high alloyed austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morach, R.; Schmuki, P.; Boehni, H.

    1992-01-01

    The susceptibility of several high alloyed stainless steels against localized corrosion was investigated by traditional potentiostatic and -kinetic methods and the current transient technique. Different test cells, proposed in literature, were evaluated for use in testing of plate materials. The AVESTA-cell showed to be not useful for potentiokinetic current density potential curves, but useable for pitting experiments. After pickling and prepassivation epoxy embedded materials proved to be resistant to crevice corrosion at the metal-resin interface. The electrode in form of a wire was the most reliable crevice free cell design. The grinding of the samples in the pretreatment procedure was found to have a large effect on the pitting corrosion behaviour. Using different paper types with varying grit, a drop in pitting potential for rougher surfaces and an increase in metastable pitting activity was found. Increasing surface roughness led also to changes in the electronic structure of the passive film reflected by a lower bandgap energy. High alloyed stainless steels showed no breakdown potential within the examined potential range. Compared to 18/8 type stainless steels significantly less transients were found. The number of transients decreases with increasing molybdenum and chromium content

  19. Alternative to Nitric Acid for Passivation of Stainless Steel Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Pattie L.; Kolody, Mark; Curran, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Corrosion is an extensive problem that affects the Department of Defense (DoD) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The deleterious effects of corrosion result in steep costs, asset downtime affecting mission readiness, and safety risks to personnel. Consequently, it is vital to reduce corrosion costs and risks in a sustainable manner. The DoD and NASA have numerous structures and equipment that are fabricated from stainless steel. The standard practice for protection of stainless steel is a process called passivation. Typical passivation procedures call for the use of nitric acid; however, there are a number of environmental, worker safety, and operational issues associated with its use. Citric acid offers a variety of benefits including increased safety for personnel, reduced environmental impact, and reduced operational cost. DoD and NASA agreed to collaborate to validate citric acid as an acceptable passivating agent for stainless steel. This paper details our investigation of prior work developing the citric acid passivation process, development of the test plan, optimization of the process for specific stainless steel alloys, ongoing and planned testing to elucidate the process' resistance to corrosion in comparison to nitric acid, and preliminary results.

  20. An accelerated electrochemical MIC test for stainless alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gendron, T.S.; Cleland, R.D.

    1994-11-01

    Previous work in our laboratory and elsewhere has suggested that microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) of stainless steels and nickel-base alloys occurs in locally anaerobic regions that support the growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The cathodic reaction is provided by oxygen reduction at remote sites. Such a coupling between anode and cathode is difficult to reproduce in the laboratory, but can be simulated indirectly using a double electrochemical cell, as in previous work. A more realistic simulation using a single aerated electrochemical cell has now been developed, in which a second organism (P. aeruginosa) is used to provide an anoxic habitat for SRB growth and possible a source of organic carbon, within a layer of silt. A bare alloy electrode is used as the oxygen cathode. Tests of this kind using rigorous microbiological procedures have generated pitting corrosion of several alloys in low chloride media simulating freshwater heat exchanger conditions. This report discusses the adaption of these procedures to study corrosion of nuclear waste containers. (author). 20 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs

  1. Alloying effect on martensite transformation in stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulyaev, A.P.; Shlyamnev, A.P.; Sorokina, N.A.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of cobalt, nickel, molybdenum on the martensite transformation kinetics in stainless steels containing 9 to 13% Cr has been studied. Cobalt in Fe-Cr base alloys decreases the temperature of the Msub(in) and Msub(fin) points without a considerable decrease of the martensite phase amount after the transformation. Nickel reduces the martensite transformation temperature range, the nickel effect being enhanced in the presence of cobalt, which is characterized by a change of the linear dependence Msub(in)=f(%Ni) for a quadratic one. Molybdenum decreases the temperature of the Msub(in) and Msub(fin) points intensively, thus, substantially increasing the residual austenite amount. In the steels investigated Ni and Co decrease, whereas Mo increases, to some extent, the temperature of the reverse a-γ-transformation. The reduction of chromium content from 13 to 9% stimulates the martensite transformation initiation, that is why, in alloys containing 9% Cr, the increase in the contents of Ni, Co., Mo with the martensite structure maintained is possible. A further alloying of steel containing 13% Cr with these elements is rather limited due to the inhibition of the martensite transformation

  2. Stress transmission through Ti-Ni alloy, titanium and stainless steel in impact compression test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneyama, T; Doi, H; Kobayashi, E; Hamanaka, H; Tanabe, Y; Bonfield, W

    2000-06-01

    Impact stress transmission of Ti-Ni alloy was evaluated for biomedical stress shielding. Transformation temperatures of the alloy were investigated by means of DSC. An impact compression test was carried out with use of split-Hopkinson pressure-bar technique with cylindrical specimens of Ti-Ni alloy, titanium and stainless steel. As a result, the transmitted pulse through Ti-Ni alloy was considerably depressed as compared with those through titanium and stainless steel. The initial stress reduction was large through Ti-Ni alloy and titanium, but the stress reduction through Ti-Ni alloy was more continuous than titanium. The maximum value in the stress difference between incident and transmitted pulses through Ti-Ni alloy or titanium was higher than that through stainless steel, while the stress reduction in the maximum stress through Ti-Ni alloy was statistically larger than that through titanium or stainless steel. Ti-Ni alloy transmitted less impact stress than titanium or stainless steel, which suggested that the loading stress to adjacent tissues could be decreased with use of Ti-Ni alloy as a component material in an implant system. Copyright 2000 Kluwer Academic Publishers

  3. Fabrication of spherical high-nitrogen stainless steel powder alloys by mechanical alloying and thermal plasma spheroidization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razumov, Nikolay G.; Wang, Qing Sheng; Popovich, Anatoly A.; Shamshurin, Aleksey I.

    2018-04-01

    This paper describes the results of experimental studies on the treatment of Fe-23Cr-11Mn-1N high-nitrogen stainless steel powder alloys, synthesized by the mechanical alloying (MA) of elemental powders in the flow of a radio frequency thermal plasma. The as-milled powder with irregular particles were successfully converted into spherical high-nitrogen stainless steel powder alloy. Measurement of the residual nitrogen content in the obtained powder, shown that during the plasma spheroidization process, part of the nitrogen escapes from the alloy.

  4. Threshold SRB populations for MIC of stainless alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angell, P.; Urbanic, K.; Gendron, T.S.

    1997-12-01

    The three CANDU reactor sites on the Great Lakes exhibit differences in susceptibility to microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) of heat exchanger tubes, despite similar colonization of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Therefore, it was suspected that bacterial activity, rather than numbers, is responsible for pit initiation. Accelerated corrosion tests are being used to examine the relationship between SRB colonization and pitting activity on stainless alloy heat exchanger tubes. Experimental conditions model those of the natural systems. At present, there appears to be little correlation between bacterial numbers and pit initiation. However, there does appear to be a correlation between bacterial activity (causing a decrease in corrosion potential, as a function of sulfide production), and pit initiation. Data are being collected to develop a model to predict MIC for the CHECWORKS service water module. (author)

  5. Galvanic corrosion study of aluminium alloy plates mounted to stainless and mild steel bolts by accelerated exposure test

    OpenAIRE

    MREMA, Emmanuel; ITOH, Yoshito; KANEKO, Akira; HIROHATA, Mikihito

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that aluminium alloy members have a proven durability over stainless steel members, their joint fasteners like bolts, nuts and washers are drawn from steel material due to aluminium alloy inferior mechanical properties. Bare contact between aluminium alloy members and stainless steel fasteners results to galvanic corrosion of aluminium alloy members. A corrosion behaviour study was carried out on different aluminium alloy types with different surface treatments mounted to sta...

  6. Deformation Induced Martensitic Transformation and Its Initial Microstructure Dependence in a High Alloyed Duplex Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xie, Lin; Huang, Tian Lin; Wang, Yu Hui

    2017-01-01

    Deformation induced martensitic transformation (DIMT) usually occurs in metastable austenitic stainless steels. Recent studies have shown that DIMT may occur in the austenite phase of low alloyed duplex stainless steels. The present study demonstrates that DIMT can also take place in a high alloyed...... Fe–23Cr–8.5Ni duplex stainless steel, which exhibits an unexpectedly rapid transformation from γ-austenite into α′-martensite. However, an inhibited martensitic transformation has been observed by varying the initial microstructure from a coarse alternating austenite and ferrite band structure...

  7. Prevention of Crevice Corrosion of STS 304 Stainless Steel by a Mg-alloy Galvanic Anode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, U. J.; Yun, B. D.; Kim, J. J.

    2006-01-01

    Prevention of crevice corrosion was studied for STS 304 stainless steel using a Mg-alloy galvanic anode in solutions with various specific resistivity. The crevice corrosion and corrosion protection characteristics of the steel was investigated by the electrochemical polarization and galvanic corrosion tests. Experimental results show that the crevice corrosion of STS 304 stainless steel does not occur in solutions of high specific resistivity, but it occurs in solutions of low specific resistivity like in solutions with resistivities of 30, 60 and 115 Ω · m. With decreasing specific resistivity of the solution, the electrode potential of STS 304 stainless steel in the crevice is lowered. The potential of STS 304 stainless steel in the crevice after coupling is cathodically polarized more by decreasing specific resistivity indicating that the crevice corrosion of STS 304 stainless steel is prevented by the Mg-alloy galvanic anode

  8. Evaluation of non-conformities of hip prostheses made of titanium alloys and stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezerra, Ewerton de Oliveira Teotonio; Nascimento, Jose Jeferson da Silva; Luna, Carlos Bruno Barreto; Morais, Crislene Rodrigues da Silva; Campos, Karla Valeria Miranda de

    2017-01-01

    A large number of metallic alloys has satisfactory behavior when used to manufacture implants for hip prostheses. However, they must be in conformity with standards, to ensure their quality for long periods without losing its functionality. Therefore, this paper aims to study the non-conformities in two hip prostheses, one of titanium and other stainless steel according to standards. The implants studied passed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence, tensile test and optical microscopy (OM). Specimens for the tensile test were made according to ASTM E 8M, as well, MO samples passed by metallographic procedure. The results evidenced that some chemical compositions showed in relation to the standards. The XRD analysis showed peaks of austenite and absence of ferrite for the stainless steel, while the titanium alloy presents an alpha phase (HCP) more significant than the beta phase (BCC). The stainless steel alloys and titanium have yield strength and tensile strength that meet the standards. On the other hand, the elastic modulus of the titanium alloy and stainless steel, comes to be ten times greater than the human bone. Therefore, the high modulus of elasticity of the alloys, favors bone resorption problems. The stainless steel microstructure is typical of an austenitic matrix, while the titanium alloy presents α + β microstructure. (author)

  9. Production of nitrogen containing chemicals from cyanophycin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Könst, P.M.

    2011-01-01


    Currently nitrogen containing bulk chemicals are produced from naphtha. However, as explained in Chapter 1 it would be more energy efficient, less capital intensive and eventually more economical to start from functionalized compounds that already have nitrogen incorporated, such as amino

  10. Development of thermophysical calculator for stainless steel casting alloys by using CALPHAD approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Sung Cho

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The calculation of thermophysical properties of stainless steel castings and its application to casting simulation is discussed. It is considered that accurate thermophysical properties of the casting alloys are necessary for the valid simulation of the casting processes. Although previous thermophysical calculation software requires a specific knowledge of thermodynamics, the calculation method proposed in the present study does not require any special knowledge of thermodynamics, but only the information of compositions of the alloy. The proposed calculator is based on the CALPHAD approach for modeling of multi-component alloys, especially in stainless steels. The calculator proposed in the present study can calculate thermophysical properties of eight-component systems on an iron base alloy (Fe-C-Si-Cr-Mn-Ni-Cu-Mo, and several Korean standard stainless steel alloys were calculated and discussed. The calculator can evaluate the thermophysical properties of the alloys such as density, heat capacity, enthalpy, latent heat, etc, based on full Gibbs energy for each phase. It is expected the proposed method can help casting experts to devise the casting design and its process easily in the field of not only stainless steels but also other alloy systems such as aluminum, copper, zinc, etc.

  11. Kinetics of chloride ion adsorption on stainless alloys by in situ contact electric resistance technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marichev, V.A.

    2008-01-01

    As the primary reason for pitting of stainless alloys, chloride adsorption is not adequately studied, e.g. kinetic investigations of chloride adsorption are actually absent. We discuss and partly reconsider some well-known facts (e.g. halides order: Cl - > Br - > I - ), disputed points (chloride penetration in passive film), and still unknown aspects of chloride adsorption. For the first time, we report kinetic studies of chloride adsorption on stainless alloys by in situ contact electric resistance technique. The peak-like character of kinetic curves has been found for all studied stainless alloys, but not for pure iron and nickel. This has been considered as a sequence of the substantial charge transfer during chloride adsorption. Opposite to typical d metals, stainless materials are alloys of early and late transition metals having unfilled d-bands with increased number of d-electron vacancies. Such electronic structure is favorable for adsorption of electron donating adsorbates like halide ions. Experimental data of this work are more compatible with possibility of chloride penetration into the passive films on stainless alloys that also might involve a transformation of primary oxy-hydroxide films into oxy-chloride films

  12. M551 metals melting experiment. [space manufacturing of aluminum alloys, tantalum alloys, stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C. H.; Busch, G.; Creter, C.

    1976-01-01

    The Metals Melting Skylab Experiment consisted of selectively melting, in sequence, three rotating discs made of aluminum alloy, stainless steel, and tantalum alloy. For comparison, three other discs of the same three materials were similarly melted or welded on the ground. The power source of the melting was an electron beam unit. Results are presented which support the concept that the major difference between ground base and Skylab samples (i.e., large elongated grains in ground base samples versus nearly equiaxed and equal sized grains in Skylab samples) can be explained on the basis of constitutional supercooling, and not on the basis of surface phenomena. Microstructural observations on the weld samples and present explanations for some of these observations are examined. In particular, ripples and their implications to weld solidification were studied. Evidence of pronounced copper segregation in the Skylab A1 weld samples, and the tantalum samples studied, indicates a weld microhardness (and hence strength) that is uniformly higher than the ground base results, which is in agreement with previous predictions. Photographs are shown of the microstructure of the various alloys.

  13. Corrosion resistance of stainless steels and high Ni-Cr alloys to acid fluoride wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.D.; Mackey, D.B.; Pool, K.H.; Schwenk, E.B.

    1992-04-01

    TRUEX processing of Hanford Site waste will utilize potentially corrosive acid fluoride processing solutions. Appropriate construction materials for such a processing facility need to be identified. Toward this objective, candidate stainless steels and high Ni-Cr alloys have been corrosion tested in simulated acid fluoride process solutions at 333K. The high Ni-Cr alloys exhibited corrosion rates as low as 0.14 mm/y in a solution with an HF activity of about 1.2 M, much lower than the 19 to 94 mm/y observed for austenitic stainless steels. At a lower HF activity (about 0.008 M), stainless steels display delayed passivation while high Ni-Cr alloys display essentially no reaction

  14. Comparison of stainless steel and titanium alloy orthodontic miniscrew implants: a mechanical and histologic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ryan N; Sexton, Brent E; Gabriel Chu, Tien-Min; Katona, Thomas R; Stewart, Kelton T; Kyung, Hee-Moon; Liu, Sean Shih-Yao

    2014-04-01

    The detailed mechanical and histologic properties of stainless steel miniscrew implants used for temporary orthodontic anchorage have not been assessed. Thus, the purpose of this study was to compare them with identically sized titanium alloy miniscrew implants. Forty-eight stainless steel and 48 titanium alloy miniscrew implants were inserted into the tibias of 12 rabbits. Insertion torque and primary stability were recorded. One hundred grams of tensile force was applied between half of the implants in each group, resulting in 4 subgroups of 24 specimens each. Fluorochrome labeling was administered at weeks 4 and 5. When the rabbits were euthanized at 6 weeks, stability and removal torque were measured in half (ie, 12 specimens) of each of the 4 subgroups. Microdamage burden and bone-to-implant contact ratio were quantified in the other 12 specimens in each subgroup. Mixed model analysis of variance was used for statistical analysis. All implants were stable at insertion and after 6 weeks. The only significant difference was the higher (9%) insertion torque for stainless steel. No significant differences were found between stainless steel and titanium alloy miniscrew implants in microdamage burden and bone-to-implant contact regardless of loading status. Stainless steel and titanium alloy miniscrew implants provide the same mechanical stability and similar histologic responses, suggesting that both are suitable for immediate orthodontic clinical loads. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Development of niobium alloy/stainless steel joint by friction welding, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Taiji; Kawamura, Hiroshi.

    1988-08-01

    The niobium alloy and stainless steel have been jointed by the nicrobrazing method generally. However the strength of the jointed part is weaker than that of the mother material. Therefore we developed the niobium alloy(Nb-1 % Zr)/stainless steel(SUS 304) transition joint by the friction welding method. As the tests for the development. We conducted the mechanical tests (tensile test at room temperature, 300 deg C, 500 deg C and 700 deg C, torsion fatigue test and burst test), metallographical observation and electron prove X-ray microanalysis observation. Those tests proved jointed part by the friction welding had enough properties for general uses. (author)

  16. Austenitic stainless steel alloys with high nickel contents in high temperature liquid metal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konvicka, H.R.; Schwarz, N.F.

    1981-01-01

    Fe-Cr-Ni base alloys (nickel content: from 15 to 70 wt%, Chromium content: 15 wt%, iron: balance) together with stainless steel (W.Nr. 1.4981) have been exposed to flowing liquid sodium at 730 0 C in four intervals up to a cumulative exposure time of 1500 hours. Weight change data and the results of post-exposition microcharacterization of specimens are reported. The corrosion rates increase with increasing nickel content and tend to become constant after longer exposure times for each alloy. The corrosion rate of stainless steel is considerably reduced due to the presence of the base alloys. Different kinetics of nickel poor (up to 35% nickel) and nickel rich (> 50% nickel) alloys and nickel transport from nickel rich to nickel poor material is observed. (orig.)

  17. Electrochemical assessment of some titanium and stainless steel impact dental alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echavarria, A.; Arroyave, C.

    2003-01-01

    Commercially pure titanium alloy, Ti-6Al-4V alloy and stainless steel screw implants were evaluated in both Ringer and synthetic saliva physiological solutions at body temperature by EIS (Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy) with immersion times of 30 d. Results were simulated as a sandwich system composed by four capacitors-resistances connected in series with the solution resistance. A model explaining the results in terms of the porosity and thickness of four different layers, was proposed. (Author) 22 refs

  18. Improved hardness of laser alloyed X12CrNiMo martensitic stainless steel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Adebiyi, DI

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The improvement in hardness of X12CrNiMo martensitic stainless steel laser alloyed with 99.9% pure titanium carbide, stellite 6 and two cases of premixed ratio of titanium carbide and stellite 6 [TiC (30 wt.%)- stellite 6 (70 wt.%) and TiC (70 wt...

  19. The Effects of Alloy Chemistry on Localized Corrosion of Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapiro, David O.

    This study investigated localized corrosion behavior of austenitic stainless steels under stressed and unstressed conditions, as well as corrosion of metallic thin films. While austenitic stainless steels are widely used in corrosive environments, they are vulnerable to pitting and stress corrosion cracking (SCC), particularly in chloride-containing environments. The corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steels is closely tied to the alloying elements chromium, nickel, and molybdenum. Polarization curves were measured for five commercially available austenitic stainless steels of varying chromium, nickel, and molybdenum content in 3.5 wt.% and 25 wt.% NaCl solutions. The alloys were also tested in tension at slow strain rates in air and in a chloride environment under different polarization conditions to explore the relationship between the extent of pitting corrosion and SCC over a range of alloy content and environment. The influence of alloy composition on corrosion resistance was found to be consistent with the pitting resistance equivalent number (PREN) under some conditions, but there were also conditions under which the model did not hold for certain commercial alloy compositions. Monotonic loading was used to generate SCC in in 300 series stainless steels, and it was possible to control the failure mode through adjusting environmental and polarization conditions. Metallic thin film systems of thickness 10-200 nm are being investigated for use as corrosion sensors and protective coatings, however the corrosion properties of ferrous thin films have not been widely studied. The effects of film thickness and substrate conductivity were examined using potentiodynamic polarization and scanning vibrating electrode technique (SVET) on iron thin films. Thicker films undergo more corrosion than thinner films in the same environment, though the corrosion mechanism is the same. Conductive substrates encourage general corrosion, similar to that of bulk iron

  20. Irradiation enhanced diffusion and irradiation creep tests in stainless steel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loelgen, R.H.; Cundy, M.R.; Schuele, W.

    1977-01-01

    A review is given of investigations on the rate of phase changes during neutron and electron irradiation in many different fcc alloys showing either precipitation or ordering. The diffusion rate was determined as a function of the irradiation flux, the irradiation temperature and the irradiation dose. It was found that the radiation enhanced diffusion in all the investigated alloys is nearly temperature independent and linearly dependent on the flux. From these results conclusions were drawn concerning the properties of point defects and diffusion mechanisms rate determining during irradiation, which appears to be of a common nature for fcc alloys having a similar structure to those investigated. It has been recognized that the same dependencies which are found for the diffusion rate were also observed for the irradiation creep rate in stainless steels, as reported in literature. On the basis of this obervation a combination of measurements is suggested, of radiation enhanced diffusion and radiation enhanced creep in stainless steel alloys. Measurements of radiation enhanced diffusion are less time consuming and expensive than irradiation creep tests and information on this property can be obtained rather quickly, prior to the selection of stainless steel alloys for creep tests. In order to investigate irradiation creep on many samples at a time two special rigs were developed which are distinguished only by the mode of stress applied to the steel specimens. Finally, a few uniaxial tensile creep tests will be performed in fully instrumented rigs. (Auth.)

  1. Perspective on present and future alloy development efforts on austenitic stainless steels for fusion application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to address important questions concerning how to effect further alloy development of austenitic stainless steels for resistance, and to what extent the behavior of other properties under irradiation, such as strength/embrittlement, fatigue/irradiation creep, corrosion (under irradiation), and radiation-induced activation must be influenced. To summarize current understanding, helium has been found to have major effects on swelling and embrittlement, but several metallurgical avenues are available for significant improvement relative to type 316 stainless steel. Studies on fatigue and irradiation creep, particularly including helium effects, are preliminary but have yet to reveal engineering problems requiring additional alloy development remedies. The effects of irradiation on corrosion behavior are unknown, but higher alloy nickel contents make thermal corrosion in lithium worse. 67 refs

  2. Influence of alloying elements on the corrosion properties of shape memory stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Della Rovere, C.A.; Alano, J.H.; Silva, R.; Nascente, P.A.P.; Otubo, J.; Kuri, S.E.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The corrosion properties of three Fe–Mn–Si–Cr–Ni–(Co) shape-memory stainless steels (SMSSs) were compared with those of a type 304 (SS 304) austenitic stainless steel. ► A considerably high Si content (about 40 at%) is present in the anodic passive films formed on SMSSs in 0.5 M H 2 SO 4 solution. ► The high protectiveness of the anodic passive film formed on SMSSs in 0.5 M H 2 SO 4 solution results from a protective film consisting of a (Fe, Cr)–mixed silicate. ► The SMSSs exhibited higher corrosion resistance than SS 304 in highly oxidizing environments. ► The SMSSs showed poor corrosion resistance in 3.5% NaCl solution compared to that of SS 304. - Abstract: The corrosion properties of three Fe–Mn–Si–Cr–Ni–(Co) shape memory stainless steels were studied based on X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses, immersion and polarization tests. The test results were compared with those of a type 304 austenitic stainless steel. The XPS analyses indicated substantial Si content in the anodic passive films formed on shape memory stainless steels in sulfuric acid solution and that the high protectiveness of these films results from a protective film consisting of a (iron, chromium)–mixed silicate. The corrosion rate of the shape memory stainless steels in boiling nitric acid solution was lower than that of austenitic stainless steel. The high silicon content was found to play an important role in the corrosion behavior of these shape memory alloys in highly oxidizing environments. Due to their high manganese content, the shape memory stainless steels showed poor corrosion behavior in 3.5% sodium chloride solution when compared with austenitic stainless steel.

  3. Nickel-based materials and high-alloy, special stainless steels. 2. new rev. and enl. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heubner, U.; Brill, U.; Hoffmann, T.; Jasner, M.; Kirchheiner, R.; Koecher, R.; Richter, H.; Rockel, M.; White, F.

    1993-01-01

    The book is intended as a source of information on nickel-based materials and special stainless steels and apart from the up-to-date materials data presents information on recent developments and knowledge gained, so that it may be a valuable aid to materials engineers looking for cost-effective resolutions of their materials problems in the chemical process industry, power plant operation, and high-temperature applications. The book presents eight individual contributions entitled as follows: (1) Nickel-base alloys and high-alloy, special stainless steels. - Materials survey and data sheets (Ulrich Heubner). (2) Corrosion of nickel-base alloys and special stainless steels (Manfred Rockel). (3) Welding of nickel-base alloys and high-alloy, special stainless steels (Theo Hoffmann). (4) High-temperature resistant materials (Ulrich Brill). (5) Application and processing of nickel-base materials in the chemical process industry and in pollution abatement equipment (Reiner Koecher). (6) Selected examples of applications of nickel-base materials in chemical plant (Manfred Jasner, Frederick White). (7) Applications of nickel-base alloys and special stainless steels in power plant. (8) The use of nickel-base alloys and stainless steels in pollution abatement processes (R. Kirchheiner). (orig./MM). 151 figs., 226 refs [de

  4. EVALUATION OF METHODS FOR ESTIMATING FATIGUE PROPERTIES APPLIED TO STAINLESS STEELS AND ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Mac Intyer Fonseca Junior

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This work evaluate seven estimation methods of fatigue properties applied to stainless steels and aluminum alloys. Experimental strain-life curves are compared to the estimations obtained by each method. After applying seven different estimation methods at 14 material conditions, it was found that fatigue life can be estimated with good accuracy only by the Bäumel-Seeger method for the martensitic stainless steel tempered between 300°C and 500°C. The differences between mechanical behavior during monotonic and cyclic loading are probably the reason for the absence of a reliable method for estimation of fatigue behavior from monotonic properties for a group of materials.

  5. Austenitic stainless steels and high strength copper alloys for fusion components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowcliffe, A.F.; Zinkle, S.J.; Alexander, D.J.; Stubbins, J.F.

    1998-01-01

    An austenitic stainless steel (316LN), an oxide-dispersion-strengthened copper alloy (GlidCop A125), and a precipitation-hardened copper alloy (Cu-Cr-Zr) are the primary structural materials for the ITER first wall/blanket and divertor systems. While there is a long experience of operating 316LN stainless steel in nuclear environments, there is no prior experience with the copper alloys in neutron environments. The ITER first wall (FW) consists of a stainless steel shield with a copper alloy heat sink bonded by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). The introduction of bi-layer structural material represents a new materials engineering challenge; the behavior of the bi-layer is determined by the properties of the individual components and by the nature of the bond interface. The development of the radiation damage microstructure in both classes of materials is summarized and the effects of radiation on deformation and fracture behavior are considered. The initial data on the mechanical testing of bi-layers indicate that the effectiveness of GlidCop A125 as a FW heat sink material is compromised by its strongly anisotropic fracture toughness and poor resistance to crack growth in a direction parallel to the bi-layer interface. (orig.)

  6. Nitride alloy layer formation of duplex stainless steel using nitriding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleque, M. A.; Lailatul, P. H.; Fathaen, A. A.; Norinsan, K.; Haider, J.

    2018-01-01

    Duplex stainless steel (DSS) shows a good corrosion resistance as well as the mechanical properties. However, DSS performance decrease as it works under aggressive environment and at high temperature. At the mentioned environment, the DSS become susceptible to wear failure. Surface modification is the favourable technique to widen the application of duplex stainless steel and improve the wear resistance and its hardness properties. Therefore, the main aim of this work is to nitride alloy layer on the surface of duplex stainless steel by the nitriding process temperature of 400°C and 450°C at different time and ammonia composition using a horizontal tube furnace. The scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction analyzer are used to analyse the morphology, composition and the nitrided alloy layer for treated DSS. The micro hardnesss Vickers tester was used to measure hardness on cross-sectional area of nitrided DSS. After nitriding, it was observed that the hardness performance increased until 1100 Hv0.5kgf compared to substrate material of 250 Hv0.5kgf. The thickness layer of nitride alloy also increased from 5μm until 100μm due to diffusion of nitrogen on the surface of DSS. The x-ray diffraction results showed that the nitride layer consists of iron nitride, expanded austenite and chromium nitride. It can be concluded that nitride alloy layer can be produced via nitriding process using tube furnace with significant improvement of microstructural and hardness properties.

  7. Boronization and Carburization of Superplastic Stainless Steel and Titanium-Based Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masafumi Matsushita

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Bronization and carburization of fine-grain superplastic stainless steel is reviewed, and new experimental results for fine grain Ti88.5Al4.5V3Fe2Mo2 are reported. In superplastic duplex stainless steel, the diffusion of carbon and boron is faster than in non-superplastic duplex stainless steel. Further, diffusion is activated by uniaxial compressive stress. Moreover, non-superplastic duplex stainless steel shows typical grain boundary diffusion; however, inner grain diffusion is confirmed in superplastic stainless steel. The presence of Fe and Cr carbides or borides is confirmed by X-ray diffraction, which indicates that the diffused carbon and boron react with the Fe and Cr in superplastic stainless steel. The Vickers hardness of the carburized and boronized layers is similar to that achieved with other surface treatments such as electro-deposition. Diffusion of boron into the superplastic Ti88.5Al4.5V3Fe2Mo2 alloy was investigated. The hardness of the surface exposed to boron powder can be increased by annealing above the superplastic temperature. However, the Vickers hardness is lower than that of Ti boride.

  8. Effect of nitrogen alloying on the microstructure and abrasive wear of stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawk, J.A.; Simmons, J.W.; Rawers, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    Alloying stainless steels with nitrogen has distinct advantages. Nitrogen is a strong austenite stabilizer and a potent solid-solution strengthener, and nitrogen has greater solubility than carbon iron. This study investigates the relationship among nitrogen concentration, precipitate microstructure, and abrasive wear using two high-nitrogen stainless steel alloys: Fe-19Cr-5Mn-5Ni-3Mo (SS1) and Fe-16Cr-7Mn-5Ni(SS2). Alloy SS1 contained 0.7 wt% N and was solution annealed at 1,150 C, thereby dissolving the nitrogen interstitially in the austenite. Subsequent aging, or cold work and aging, at 900 C led to the grain-boundary, cellular, and transgranular precipitation of Cr 2 N. Alloy SS2 was remelted in a high-pressure (200 MPa) N 2 atmosphere, leading to a spatial gradient of nitrogen in the alloy in the form of interstitial nitrogen and Cr 2 N and CrN precipitates. Nitrogen contents varied from a low of approximately 0.7 wt% at the bottom of the billet to a high of 3.6 wt% at the top. Nitrogen in excess of approximately 0.7 wt% formed increasingly coarser and more numerous Cr 2 N and CrN precipitates. The precipitate morphology created in alloy SS1 due to aging, or cold work and aging, had little effect on the abrasive wear of the alloy. However, a decrease in the abrasive wear rate in alloy SS2 was observed to correspond to the increase in number and size of the Cr 2 N and CrN precipitates

  9. Surface Nb-ALLOYING on 0.4C-13Cr Stainless Steel: Microstructure and Tribological Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shengwang; You, Kai; Liu, Xiaozhen; Zhang, Yihui; Wang, Zhenxia; Liu, Xiaoping

    2016-02-01

    0.4C-13Cr stainless steel was alloyed with niobium using double glow plasma surface alloying and tribological properties of Nb-alloyed steel such as hardness, friction and wear were measured. Effects of the alloying temperature on microstructure and the tribological behavior of the alloyed steel were investigated compared with untreated steel. Formation mechanisms of Nb-alloyed layers and increased wear resistance were also studied. The result shows that after surface Nb-alloying treatment, the 0.4C-13Cr steel exhibits a diffusion adhesion at the alloyed layer/substrate interface and improved tribological property. The friction coefficient of Nb-alloyed steel is decreased by about 0.3-0.45 and the wear rate after Nb-alloying is only 2-5% of untreated steel.

  10. Is galvanic corrosion between titanium alloy and stainless steel spinal implants a clinical concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serhan, Hassan; Slivka, Michael; Albert, Todd; Kwak, S Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Surgeons are hesitant to mix components made of differing metal classes for fear of galvanic corrosion complications. However, in vitro studies have failed to show a significant potential for galvanic corrosion between titanium and stainless steel, the two primary metallic alloys used for spinal implants. Galvanic corrosion resulting from metal mixing has not been described in the literature for spinal implant systems. To determine whether galvanic potential significantly affects in vitro corrosion of titanium and stainless steel spinal implant components during cyclical compression bending. Bilateral spinal implant constructs consisting of pedicle screws, slotted connectors, 6.35-mm diameter rods and a transverse rod connector assembled in polyethylene test blocks were tested in vitro. Two constructs had stainless steel rods with mixed stainless steel (SS-SS) and titanium (SS-Ti) components, and two constructs had titanium rods with mixed stainless steel (Ti-SS) and titanium (Ti-Ti) components. Each construct was immersed in phosphate-buffered saline (pH 7.4) at 37 C and tested in cyclic compression bending using a sinusoidal load-controlling function with a peak load of 300 N and a frequency of 5 Hz until a level of 5 million cycles was reached. The samples were then removed and analyzed visually for evidence of corrosion. In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) were used to evaluate the extent of corrosion at the interconnections. None of the constructs failed during testing. Gross observation of the implant components after disassembly revealed that no corrosion had occurred on the surface of the implants that had not been in contact with another component. The Ti-Ti interfaces showed some minor signs of corrosion only detectable using SEM and EDS. The greatest amount of corrosion occurred at the SS-SS interfaces and was qualitatively less at the SS-Ti and Ti-SS interfaces. The results from this study indicate

  11. Features of argon-arc welding of aluminium alloy AD1 to stainless steel 12Kh18N10T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadov, I.I.

    1982-01-01

    Welding of pipes made of the 12Kh18N10T stainless steel and the AD1 aluminium alloy is proposed to perform using one-sided aluminizing. It is recommended to use shields in order to protect internal and external surfaces of pipes, aluminizing of which is impossible. It is shown that developed technological process for welded joints made of aluminium and stainless steel for cryogenic apparatus permits to create light-duty cryostat assembly using aluminium alloys instead of copper alloys, to increase reliability of apparatus (usage of welded joints instead of soldered ones), and to improve labour conditions

  12. Microstructural development of diffusion-brazed austenitic stainless steel to magnesium alloy using a nickel interlayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elthalabawy, Waled M.; Khan, Tahir I.

    2010-01-01

    The differences in physical and metallurgical properties of stainless steels and magnesium alloys make them difficult to join using conventional fusion welding processes. Therefore, the diffusion brazing of 316L steel to magnesium alloy (AZ31) was performed using a double stage bonding process. To join these dissimilar alloys, the solid-state diffusion bonding of 316L steel to a Ni interlayer was carried out at 900 deg. C followed by diffusion brazing to AZ31 at 510 deg. C. Metallographic and compositional analyses show that a metallurgical bond was achieved with a shear strength of 54 MPa. However, during the diffusion brazing stage B 2 intermetallic compounds form within the joint and these intermetallics are pushed ahead of the solid/liquid interface during isothermal solidification of the joint. These intermetallics had a detrimental effect on joint strengths when the joint was held at the diffusion brazing temperature for longer than 20 min.

  13. Effect of Mn Content and Solution Annealing Temperature on the Corrosion Resistance of Stainless Steel Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihsan-ul-Haq Toor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behavior of two specially designed austenitic stainless steels (SSs having different Nickel (Ni and Manganese (Mn contents was investigated. Prior to electrochemical tests, SS alloys were solution-annealed at two different temperatures, that is, at 1030°C for 2 h and 1050°C for 0.5 h. Potentiodynamic polarization (PD tests were carried out in chloride and acidic chloride, whereas linear polarization resistance (LPR and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS was performed in 0.5 M NaCl solution at room temperature. SEM/EDS investigations were carried out to study the microstructure and types of inclusions present in these alloys. Experimental results suggested that the alloy with highest Ni content and annealed at 1050°C/0.5 hr has the highest corrosion resistance.

  14. Neutron irradiation test of copper alloy/stainless steel joint materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Hirokazu; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    As a study about the joint technology of copper alloy and stainless steel for utilization as cooling piping in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), Al 2 O 3 -dispersed strengthened copper or CuCrZr was jointed to stainless steel by three kinds of joint methods (casting joint, brazing joint and friction welding method) for the evaluation of the neutron irradiation effect on joints. A neutron irradiation test was performed to three types of joints and each copper alloy. The average value of fast neutron fluence in this irradiation test was about 2 x 10 24 n/m 2 (E>1 MeV), and the irradiation temperature was about 130degC. As post-irradiation examinations, tensile tests, hardness tests and observation of fracture surface after the tensile tests were performed. All type joints changed to be brittle by the neutron irradiation effect like each copper alloy material, and no particular neutron irradiation effect due to the effect of joint process was observed. On the casting and friction welding, hardness of copper alloy near the joint boundary changed to be lower than that of each copper alloy by the effect of joint procedure. However, tensile strength of joints was almost the same as that of each copper alloy before/after neutron irradiation. On the other hand, tensile strength of joints by brazing changed to be much lower than CuAl-25 base material by the effect of joint process before/after neutron irradiation. Results in this study showed that the friction welding method and the casting would be able to apply to the joint method of piping in ITER. This report is based on the final report of the ITER Engineering Design Activities (EDA). (author)

  15. Microstructural features of dissimilar welds between 316LN austenitic stainless steel and alloy 800

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sireesha, M.; Sundaresan, S.

    2000-01-01

    For joining type 316LN austenitic stainless steel to modified 9Cr-1Mo steel for power plant application, a trimetallic configuration using an insert piece (such as alloy 800) of intermediate thermal coefficient of expansion (CTE) has been sometimes suggested for bridging the wide gap in CTE between the two steels. Two joints are thus involved and this paper is concerned with the weld between 316LN and alloy 800. These welds were produced using three types of filler materials: austenitic stainless steels corresponding to 316,16Cr-8Ni-2Mo, and the nickel-base Inconel 182 1 . The weld fusion zones and the interfaces with the base materials were characterised in detail using light and transmission electron microscopy. The 316 and Inconel 182 weld metals solidified dendritically, while the 16-8-2(16%Cr-8%Ni-2%Mo) weld metal showed a predominantly cellular substructure. The Inconel weld metal contained a large number of inclusions when deposited from flux-coated electrodes, but was relatively inclusion-free under inert gas-shielded welding. Long-term elevated-temperature aging of the weld metals resulted in embrittling sigma phase precipitation in the austenitic stainless steel weld metals, but the nickel-base welds showed no visible precipitation, demonstrating their superior metallurgical stability for high-temperature service. (orig.)

  16. Study of electroless Ni-W-P alloy coating on martensitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikitasari, Arini, E-mail: arini-nikitasari@yahoo.com; Mabruri, Efendi, E-mail: efendi-lipi@yahoo.com [Research Center for Metallurgy and Materials, Indonesian Institute of Sciences (470 Building, Puspiptek, Serpong, Indonesia 15313) (Indonesia)

    2016-04-19

    Electroless nickel phospor (Ni-P) is widely used in many industries due to their corrosion and wear resistance, coating uniformity, and ability to coat non-conductive surfaces. The unique properties of tungsten such as high hardness, higher melting point, lower coefficient of linear thermal expansion, and high tensile strength have created a lot of interest in developing ternary Ni-W-P alloys. This article presents the study of electroless Ni-W-P alloys coating using acid or alkaline bath on martensitic stainless steel. Nickel sulfate and sodium tungstate were used as nickel and tungsten sources, respectively, and sodium hypophosphite was used as a reducing agent. Acid or alkaline bath refer to bath pH condition was adjusted by adding sulfuric acid. Martensitic stainless steel was immersed in Ni-W-P bath for 15, 30, and 60 minutes. The substrate of martensitic stainless steel was subjected to pre-treatment (polishing and cleaning) and activation prior to electroless plating. The plating characteristics were investigated for concentration ratio of nickel and hypophosphite (1:3), sodium tungstate concentration 0,1 M, immersion time (15 min, 30 min, 60 min), and bath condition (acid, alkaline). The electroless Ni-W-P plating was heat treated at 400°C for 1 hour. Deposits were characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and corrosion measurement system (CMS).

  17. Strain hardening of cold-rolled lean-alloyed metastable ferritic-austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papula, Suvi [Aalto University School of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, P.O. Box 14200, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Anttila, Severi [Centre for Advanced Steels Research, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 4200, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Talonen, Juho [Outokumpu Oyj, P.O. Box 245, FI-00181 Helsinki (Finland); Sarikka, Teemu; Virkkunen, Iikka; Hänninen, Hannu [Aalto University School of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, P.O. Box 14200, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland)

    2016-11-20

    Mechanical properties and strain hardening of two pilot-scale lean-alloyed ferritic-austenitic stainless steels having metastable austenite phase, present at 0.50 and 0.30 volume fractions, have been studied by means of tensile testing and nanoindentation. These ferritic-austenitic stainless steels have high strain-hardening capacity, due to the metastable austenite phase, which leads to an improved uniform elongation and higher tensile strength in comparison with most commercial lean duplex stainless steels. According to the results, even as low as 0.30 volume fraction of austenite seems efficient for achieving nearly 40% elongation. The austenite phase is initially the harder phase, and exhibits more strain hardening than the ferrite phase. The rate of strain hardening and the evolution of the martensite phase were found to depend on the loading direction: both are higher when strained in the rolling direction as compared to the transverse direction. Based on the mechanical testing, characterization of the microstructure by optical/electron microscopy, magnetic balance measurements and EBSD texture analysis, this anisotropy in mechanical properties of the cold-rolled metastable ferritic-austenitic stainless steels can be explained by the elongated dual-phase microstructure, fiber reinforcement effect of the harder austenite phase and the presence and interplay of rolling textures in the two phases.

  18. Dynamic strain ageing of deformed nitrogen-alloyed AISI 316 stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrnsten, U.; Toivonen, A.; Ivanchenko, M.; Nevdacha, V.; Yagozinskyy, Y.; Haenninen, H.

    2004-01-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking has occurred in BWR environment in non-sensitized, deformed austenitic stainless steel materials. The affecting parameters are so far not fully known, but deformation mechanisms may be decisive. The effect of deformation and nitrogen content on the behaviour of austenitic stainless steels was investigated. The materials were austenitic stainless steels of AISI 316L type with different amounts of nitrogen (0.03 - 0.18%) and they were mechanically deformed 0, 5 and 20%. The investigations are focused on the dynamic strain ageing (DSA) behaviour. A few crack growth rate measurements are performed on nuclear grade AISI 316NG material with different degrees of deformation (0, 5 and 20%). The effects of DSA on mechanical properties of these materials are evaluated based on peaks in ultimate tensile strength and strain hardening coefficient and minimum in ductility in the DSA temperature range. Additionally, internal friction measurements have been performed in the temperature range of -100 to 600 deg. C for determining nitrogen interactions with other alloying elements and dislocations (cold-worked samples). The results show an effect of nitrogen on the stainless steel behaviour, e.g. clear indications of dynamic strain ageing and changes in the internal friction peaks as a function of nitrogen content and amount of deformation. (authors)

  19. Semiconducting properties of oxide and passive films formed on AISI 304 stainless steel and Alloy 600

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira M. G. S.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The semiconducting properties of passive films formed on AISI 304 stainless steel and Alloy 600 in borate buffer solution were studied by capacitance (Mott-Schottky approach and photocurrent measurements. Oxide films formed on 304 stainless steel in air at 350 ºC have also been studied. The results obtained show that, in all cases the electronic structure of the films is comparable to that of a p-n heterojunction in which the space charges developed at the metal-film and film-electrolyte interfaces have also to be considered. This is in accordance with analytical results showing that the oxide films are in all cases composed of an inner region rich in chromium oxide and an outer region rich in iron oxide.

  20. Compatibility of 316L stainless steel with the liquid alloy Pb17Li

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broc, M.; Fauvet, P.; Flament, T.; Terlain, A.; Sannier, J.

    1988-01-01

    The behavior of 316L austenitic stainless steel in liquid eutectic lead alloy is investigated. The 316L is a possible structural material for fusion reactors. The obtained results are summarized and compared with other experimental data. The mechanisms which control the corrosion process are discussed. The investigation shows that whatever, the hydraulic flow, the corrosion of 316L stainless steel exposed to Pb17Li is characterized by the formation of a porous ferritic layer. The corrosion kinetics is mainly dependent on temperature, hydraulic flow and metallurgical state of the steel. At 400 0 C in turbulent flow, the corrosion rate at steady state of 316L solution annealed is estimated to 27 microns/year to which a depth of 25 microns has to be added to take into account the initial transient period. From overall available results, dissolution and solid state transformation in case of turbulent flow and diffusion in liquid phase for laminar flow, may be suggested

  1. Characterization of the dissimilar welding - austenitic stainless steel with filler metal of the nickel alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Bruno Amorim; Schvartzman, Monica Maria de Abreu Mendonca; Campos, Wagner Reis da Costa

    2007-01-01

    In elevated temperature environments, austenitic stainless steel and nickel alloy has a superior corrosion resistance due to its high Cr content. Consequently, this alloys is widely used in nuclear reactors components and others plants of energy generation that burn fossil fuel or gas, chemical and petrochemical industries. The object of the present work was to research the welding of AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel using the nickel alloy filler metals, Inconel 625. Gas tungsten arc welding, mechanical and metallographic tests, and compositional analysis of the joint were used. A fundamental investigation was undertaken to characterize fusion boundary microstructure and to better understand the nature and character of boundaries that are associated with cracking in dissimilar welds. The results indicate that the microstructure of the fusion zone has a dendritic structure, inclusions, and precipitated phases containing Ti and Nb are present in the inter-dendritic region. In some parts near to the fusion line it can be seen a band in the weld, probably a eutectic phase with lower melting point than the AISI 304, were the cracking may be beginning by stress corrosion. (author)

  2. Oxidation of 316 stainless steel and other alloys in prototypic GCFR environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acharya, R.T.

    1980-05-01

    The oxidation behavior of type 316 stainless steel and candidate advanced alloys for the gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) is being investigated at General Atomic Company. The test program consists of oxidation tests in prototypic GCFR environments. Two tests have been completed to date and a third test is under way. The first test was performed in an environment containing a hydrogen/water ratio of 10. The oxidation behavior of all the alloys was good to excellent in this environment. Preferential oxidation of chromium was responsible for this behavior. The second test was performed in an environment containing a hydrogen/water ratio of 0.25, where both chromium and iron oxides are thermodynamically stable. Some of the alloys and some of the ribbed type 316 stainless steel test specimens showed unacceptable oxidation resistance in this environment. In the third test, presently under way, two different pretreatment procedures are being used to control the poor oxidation behavior observed in the second test. Early results show some degree of success

  3. Applications of electricity and corrosion. Precautions for use of metals and stainless and refractory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gras, J.M.

    1993-09-01

    The development of applications of electricity poses highly diversified problems with materials where the resistance to corrosion prevails. Corrosion occurs under various conditions, which sometimes look harmless, and it covers diverse phenomenons linked to the nature of materials and to the physical and chemical context. However, in spite of the diversity of the processes used (electrical boilers, mechanical steam compression, heat pumps, Joule effect,) the knowledge required to approach the corrosion problems corresponds to a limited number of generic situations with regard not only to the phenomenons proper (general corrosion of copper, pitting and stress corrosion cracking of stainless steels, refractory alloys oxidation,) but also to chemical conditions which favour the corrosion (natural waters, acidic condensates, hot gases). This report is a short guide to anti-corrosion. With the aid of questions asked during the past few years, it aims to provide engineers in charge of the development of applications of electricity with a few recommendations upon the precautions for use of metallic materials. We analyze in turn the problems met with wet air and drying mists, chloride-containing neutral waters, alkaline waters and caustic media, acidic waters and concentrated acids, and, last, hot gases. We lay stress upon the behaviour of materials deemed to withstand corrosion under aqueous conditions (stainless steels and alloys, copper,titanium) and corrosion at high temperatures (refractory alloys). (author). 11 figs., 43 refs., 11 tabs

  4. Mechanical properties and microstructure of copper alloys and copper alloy-stainless steel laminates for fusion reactor high heat flux applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leedy, Kevin Daniel

    A select group of copper alloys and bonded copper alloy-stainless steel panels are under consideration for heat sink applications in first wall and divertor structures of a planned thermonuclear fusion reactor. Because these materials must retain high strengths and withstand high heat fluxes, their material properties and microstructures must be well understood. Candidate copper alloys include precipitate strengthened CuNiBe and CuCrZr and dispersion strengthened Cu-Alsb2Osb3 (CuAl25). In this study, uniaxial mechanical fatigue tests were conducted on bulk copper alloy materials at temperatures up to 500sp°C in air and vacuum environments. Based on standardized mechanical properties measurement techniques, a series of tests were also implemented to characterize copper alloy-316L stainless steel joints produced by hot isostatic pressing or by explosive bonding. The correlation between mechanical properties and the microstructure of fatigued copper alloys and the interface of copper alloy-stainless steel laminates was examined. Commercial grades of these alloys were used to maintain a degree of standardization in the materials testing. The commercial alloys used were OMG Americas Glidcop CuAl25 and CuAl15; Brush Wellman Hycon 3HP and Trefimetaux CuNiBe; and Kabelmetal Elbrodur and Trefimetaux CuCrZr. CuAl25 and CuNiBe alloys possessed the best combination of fatigue resistance and microstructural stability. The CuAl25 alloy showed only minimal microstructural changes following fatigue while the CuNiBe alloy consistently exhibited the highest fatigue strength. Transmission electron microscopy observations revealed that small matrix grain sizes and high densities of submicron strengthening phases promoted homogeneous slip deformation in the copper alloys. Thus, highly organized fatigue dislocation structure formation, as commonly found in oxygen-free high conductivity Cu, was inhibited. A solid plate of CuAl25 alloy hot isostatically pressed to a 316L stainless steel

  5. Brazing open cell reticulated copper foam to stainless steel tubing with vacuum furnace brazed gold/indium alloy plating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Stanley R [Windsor, SC; Korinko, Paul S [Aiken, SC

    2008-05-27

    A method of fabricating a heat exchanger includes brush electroplating plated layers for a brazing alloy onto a stainless steel tube in thin layers, over a nickel strike having a 1.3 .mu.m thickness. The resultant Au-18 In composition may be applied as a first layer of indium, 1.47 .mu.m thick, and a second layer of gold, 2.54 .mu.m thick. The order of plating helps control brazing erosion. Excessive amounts of brazing material are avoided by controlling the electroplating process. The reticulated copper foam rings are interference fit to the stainless steel tube, and in contact with the plated layers. The copper foam rings, the plated layers for brazing alloy, and the stainless steel tube are heated and cooled in a vacuum furnace at controlled rates, forming a bond of the copper foam rings to the stainless steel tube that improves heat transfer between the tube and the copper foam.

  6. The effect of σ-phase precipitation at 800°C on the corrosion resistance in sea-water of a high alloyed duplex stainless steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilms, M.E.; Gadgil, V.J.; Krougman, J.M.; Ijsseling, F.P.

    1994-01-01

    Super-duplex stainless steels are recently developed high alloyed stainless steels that combine good mechanical properties with excellent corrosion resistance. Because of a high content of chromium and molybdenum, these alloys are susceptible to σ-phase precipitation during short exposure to

  7. Application of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy to monitor seawater fouling on stainless steels and copper alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feron, D.

    1991-01-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy may be applied to detect and to follow seawater fouling. Experiments have been conducted with natural seawater flowing inside tube-electrodes at temperatures between 30 deg C and 85 deg C. With stainless steel tubes, mineral and organic foulings have been followed; a linear relationship between the dry weight of the organic fouling and its electrical resistance, has been observed. On copper alloy tubes, only mineral deposits have occurred and so have been detected by impedance spectroscopy. (Author). 5 refs., 6 figs

  8. Interim fatigue design curves for carbon, low-alloy, and austenitic stainless steels in LWR environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, S.; Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1993-01-01

    Both temperature and oxygen affect fatigue life; at the very low dissolved-oxygen levels in PWRs and BWRs with hydrogen water chemistry, environmental effects on fatigue life are modest at all temperatures (T) and strain rates. Between 0.1 and 0.2 ppM, the effect of dissolved-oxygen increases rapidly. In oxygenated environments, fatigue life depends strongly on strain rate and T. A fracture mechanics model is developed for predicting fatigue lives, and interim environmentally assisted cracking (EAC)-adjusted fatigue curves are proposed for carbon steels, low-alloy steels, and austenitic stainless steels

  9. Inertia and friction welding of aluminum alloy 1100 to type 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, M.A.

    1979-01-01

    The inertia and friction-welding processes were evaluated for joining aluminum alloy 1100-H14 and Type 316 vacuum-induction melted, vacuum-arc remelted (VIM VAR) stainless steel. While both processes consistently produced joints in which the strength exceeded the strength of the aluminum base metal, 100 percent bonding was not reliably achieved with inertia welding. The deficiency points out the need for development of nondestructive testing techniques for this type of joint. Additionally, solid-state volume diffusion did not appear to be a satisfactory explanation for the inertia and friction-welding bonding mechanism

  10. Study of corrosion-erosion behaviour of stainless alloys in industrial phosphoric acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenbour, Abdellah; Hajji, Mohamed-Adil; Jallouli, El Miloudi; Bachir, Ali Ben

    2006-01-01

    The corrosion and corrosion-abrasion resistance of some stainless steels in industrial phosphoric acid 30% P 2 O 5 has been studied using electrochemical techniques. The corrosion rate of materials increases with the increase of temperature. Alloys which contain chromium, molybdenum and nitrogen in sufficient quantities present the best behaviour. In the abrasion-corrosion conditions, the experimental device set up allowed to follow continually samples electrochemical behaviour. Under dynamic conditions and without solid particles, the increase of acid projection speed has no effect on the alloys corrosion behaviour. The adding of abrasive leads to a general increase of corrosion rate and to a decrease of material resistance. Under these conditions, materials attack is controlled by synergistic effect between the abrasion and the impurities. The cast 30% Cr shows good resistance according to his high chromium content

  11. Investigation of attenuation coefficients of some stainless steel and aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caner, Zafer; Tufan, Mustafa ćaǧatay

    2018-02-01

    In this study, attenuation coefficients of two different stainless steel alloys (AISI 304 and AISI 310), which have a wide range of applications from home appliances to the automotive sector, and two different aluminum alloys (6013 and 5083), which have a high mechanical strength and a light weight structure and are used in many fields from aviation to military vehicles, has been determined. For this purpose, we used gamma spectrometer system with NaI(Tl) detector. In our measurements, we used Eu-152, Ra-226 and Co-60 as gamma ray sources. To narrow the beam of gamma rays, we designed the new steel based collimator. We also investigated the effect of using collimator. Obtained results were compared with the NIST XCOM values.

  12. Corrosion life-time assessment of carbon steel and stainless alloys for geological disposal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosaki, Akio; Komada, Hiroya

    1993-01-01

    The disposal facility for radioactive wastes requires long-term integrity. Metal is being considered for use as the engineered barrier which constructs the outer walls in such a facility, in order to prevent groundwater percolation. Thus, the most important problem for the integrity of the engineered barrier is corrosion by groundwater. There are two ways for using metal as an engineered barrier; one is as a structural material; and the other is as the inner-lining material of a concrete wall. This report discusses the corrosion lifetime assessment of carbon steel used as a structural and lining material, and stainless alloys, Type 304 steel and Titanium alloys used as lining materials. Corrosion potential and crevice corrosion are measured in the environment of neutral and alkalized water

  13. Study of corrosion-erosion behaviour of stainless alloys in industrial phosphoric acid medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenbour, Abdellah [Laboratory of Electrochemistry-Corrosion, Av. Ibn Batouta, BP1014-Faculty of Science, Rabat (Morocco)]. E-mail: guenbour@fsr.ac.ma; Hajji, Mohamed-Adil [Group Corrosion and Protection of Materials, ENIM, Rabat (Morocco); Jallouli, El Miloudi [Group Corrosion and Protection of Materials, ENIM, Rabat (Morocco); Bachir, Ali Ben [Laboratory of Electrochemistry-Corrosion, Av. Ibn Batouta, BP1014-Faculty of Science, Rabat (Morocco)

    2006-12-30

    The corrosion and corrosion-abrasion resistance of some stainless steels in industrial phosphoric acid 30% P{sub 2}O{sub 5} has been studied using electrochemical techniques. The corrosion rate of materials increases with the increase of temperature. Alloys which contain chromium, molybdenum and nitrogen in sufficient quantities present the best behaviour. In the abrasion-corrosion conditions, the experimental device set up allowed to follow continually samples electrochemical behaviour. Under dynamic conditions and without solid particles, the increase of acid projection speed has no effect on the alloys corrosion behaviour. The adding of abrasive leads to a general increase of corrosion rate and to a decrease of material resistance. Under these conditions, materials attack is controlled by synergistic effect between the abrasion and the impurities. The cast 30% Cr shows good resistance according to his high chromium content.

  14. Irradiation enhanced diffusion and irradiation creep tests in stainless steel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loelgen, R.H.; Cundy, M.R.; Schuele, W.

    1977-01-01

    A review is given of investigations on the rate of phase changes during neutron and electron irradiation in many different fcc alloys showing either precipitation or ordering. The diffusion rate was determined as a function of the irradiation flux, the irradiation temperature and the irradiation dose. It was found that the radiation enhanced diffusion in all the investigated alloys is nearly temperature independent and linearly dependent on the flux. From these results conclusions were drawn concerning the properties of point defects and diffusion mechanisms rate determining during irradiation, which appears to be of a common nature for fcc alloys having a similar structure to those investigated. It has been recognized that the same dependencies which are found for the diffusion rate were also observed for the irradiation creep rate in stainless steels, as reported in literature. On the basis of this observation a combination of measurements is suggested, of radiation enhanced diffusion and radiation enhanced creep in stainless steel alloys. The diffusion tests will be performed at the Euratom Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy, and the irradiation creep tests will be carried out in the High Flux Reactor /9/ of the Euratom Joint Research Centre in Petten, The Netherlands. In order to investigate irradiation creep on many samples at a time two special rigs were developed which are distinguished only by the mode of stress applied to the steel specimens. In the first type of rig about 50 samples can be tested uniaxially under tension with various combinations of irradiation temperature and stress. The second type of rig holds up to 70 samples which are tested in bending, again with various combinations of irradiation temperature and stress

  15. Zr/ZrC modified layer formed on AISI 440B stainless steel by plasma Zr-alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, H.H.; Liu, L.; Liu, X.Z.; Guo, Q.; Meng, T.X.; Wang, Z.X.; Yang, H.J.; Liu, X.P., E-mail: liuxiaoping@tyut.edu.cn

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • A Zr/ZrC modified layer was formed on AISI 440B stainless steel using plasma surface Zr-alloying. • The thickness of the modified layer increases with alloying temperature and time. • Formation mechanism of the modified layer is dependent on the mutual diffusion of Zr and substrate elements. • The modified surface shows an improved wear resistance. - Abstract: The surface Zr/ZrC gradient alloying layer was prepared by double glow plasma surface alloying technique to increase the surface hardness and wear resistance of AISI 440B stainless steel. The microstructure of the Zr/ZrC alloying layer formed at different alloying temperatures and times as well as its formation mechanism were discussed by using scanning electron microscopy, glow discharge optical emission spectrum, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The adhesive strength, hardness and tribological property of the Zr/ZrC alloying layer were also evaluated in the paper. The alloying surface consists of the Zr-top layer and ZrC-subsurface layer which adheres strongly to the AISI 440B steel substrate. The thickness of the Zr/ZrC alloying layer increases gradually from 16 μm to 23 μm with alloying temperature elevated from 900 °C to 1000 °C. With alloying time from 0.5 h to 4 h, the alloyed depth increases from 3 μm to 30 μm, and the ZrC-rich alloyed thickness vs time is basically parabola at temperature of 1000 °C. Both the hardness and wear resistance of the Zr/ZrC alloying layer obviously increase compared with untreated AISI 440B steel.

  16. Weldability of neutron-irradiated stainless steel and nickel-base alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyabu, Ken; Asano, Kyoichi; Takahashi, Hidenori; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Kawano, Shohei; Nakamura, Tomomi; Hashimoto, Tsuneyuki; Koshiishi, Masato; Kato, Takahiko; Katsura, Ryoei; Nishimura, Seiji

    2000-01-01

    Degradation of of weldability caused by helium, which is generated by nuclear transmutation irradiated material, is an important issue to be addressed in planning of proactive maintenance of light water reactor core internal components. In this work, the weldability of neutron.irradiated stainless steel and nickel-base alloy, which are major constituting materials for components, was practically evaluated. The weldability was first examined by TIG welding in relation to the weld heat input and helium content using various specimens (made of SUS304 and SUS316L) sampled from reactor internal components. The specimens were neutron irradiated in a boiling water reactor to fluences from 4 x 10 24 to 1.4 x 10 26 n/ m 2 (E> l MeV ), and resulting helium generation ranged from 0.1 to 103 appm. The weld defects were characterized by dye penetrant test and cross-sectional metallography. The weldability of neutron-irradiated stainless steel was shown to be better at lower weld heat input and lower helium content. To evaluate mechanical properties of welded joints, thick plates (20 mm) specimens of SUS304 and Alloy 600 were prepared and irradiated in Japan Material Test Reactor (JMTR). The helium content of the specimens was controlled to range from 0.11 to 1.34 appm selected to determine threshold helium content to weld successfully. The welded joints had multiple passes by TIG welding process at 10 and 20 kJ/cm heat input. The welded joints of thick plate were characterized by dye penetrant test, cross-sectional metallography, tensile test, side bend test and root bend test. It was shown that irradiated stainless steel containing below 0.14 appm of helium could be welded with conventional TIG welding process (heat input below 20 kJ/cm). Nickel-base alloy, which contained as much helium as stainless steel could be welded successfully, could also be welded with conventional TIG welding process, These results served as basis to evaluate the applicability of repair welding to

  17. Effect of solute concentration on grain boundary migration with segregation in stainless steel and model alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, H.; Hashimoto, N.; Takahashi, H.

    The phenomenon of grain boundary migration due to boundary diffusion via vacancies is a well-known process for recrystallization and grain growth during annealing. This phenomenon is known as diffusion-induced grain boundary migration (DIGM) and has been recognized in various binary systems. On the other hand, grain boundary migration often occurs under irradiation. Furthermore, such radiation-induced grain boundary migration (RIGM) gives rise to solute segregation. In order to investigate the RIGM mechanism and the interaction between solutes and point defects during the migration, stainless steel and Ni-Si model alloys were electron-irradiated using a HVEM. RIGM was often observed in stainless steels during irradiation. The migration rate of boundary varied, and three stages of the migration were recognized. At lower temperatures, incubation periods up to the occurrence of the boundary migration were observed prior to first stage. These behaviors were recognized particularly for lower solute containing alloys. From the relation between the migration rates at stage I and inverse temperatures, activation energies for the boundary migration were estimated. In comparison to the activation energy without irradiation, these values were very low. This suggests that the RIGM is caused by the flow of mixed-dumbbells toward the grain boundary. The interaction between solute and point defects and the effective defect concentration generating segregation will be discussed.

  18. Deformation and fracture of Cu alloy-stainless steel layered structures under dynamic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCoy, J.H.; Kumar, A.S.

    1998-01-01

    Fracture resistance of the current ITER first wall configuration, a copper alloy-stainless steel layered structure, is a major design issue. The question of dynamic crack propagation into and through the first wall structure is examined using dynamic finite element modeling (FEM). Several layered configurations that incorporate both strain and frictional energy dissipation during the fracture process are considered. With fixed overall specimen geometry, the energy required to extend a precrack is examined as a function of material properties, and the layer structure. It is found that the crack extension energies vary dramatically with the fracture strain of materials, and to a much lesser extent with the number of layers. In addition, it is found that crack propagation through the lower ductility copper alloy layer may be deflected at the stainless steel-copper interface and not result in total fracture of the structure. Although the total energy required is affected only to a small degree by the interface properties, the time to extend the precrack is strongly affected. By making proper selections of the interface and the layered material, crack propagation rates and the possibility of full fracture can be substantially reduced. (orig.)

  19. Zr/ZrC modified layer formed on AISI 440B stainless steel by plasma Zr-alloying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, H. H.; Liu, L.; Liu, X. Z.; Guo, Q.; Meng, T. X.; Wang, Z. X.; Yang, H. J.; Liu, X. P.

    2016-12-01

    The surface Zr/ZrC gradient alloying layer was prepared by double glow plasma surface alloying technique to increase the surface hardness and wear resistance of AISI 440B stainless steel. The microstructure of the Zr/ZrC alloying layer formed at different alloying temperatures and times as well as its formation mechanism were discussed by using scanning electron microscopy, glow discharge optical emission spectrum, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The adhesive strength, hardness and tribological property of the Zr/ZrC alloying layer were also evaluated in the paper. The alloying surface consists of the Zr-top layer and ZrC-subsurface layer which adheres strongly to the AISI 440B steel substrate. The thickness of the Zr/ZrC alloying layer increases gradually from 16 μm to 23 μm with alloying temperature elevated from 900 °C to 1000 °C. With alloying time from 0.5 h to 4 h, the alloyed depth increases from 3 μm to 30 μm, and the ZrC-rich alloyed thickness vs time is basically parabola at temperature of 1000 °C. Both the hardness and wear resistance of the Zr/ZrC alloying layer obviously increase compared with untreated AISI 440B steel.

  20. Development of Semi-Stochastic Algorithm for Optimizing Alloy Composition of High-Temperature Austenitic Stainless Steels (H-Series) for Desired Mechanical and Corrosion Properties.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dulikravich, George S.; Sikka, Vinod K.; Muralidharan, G.

    2006-06-01

    The goal of this project was to adapt and use an advanced semi-stochastic algorithm for constrained multiobjective optimization and combine it with experimental testing and verification to determine optimum concentrations of alloying elements in heat-resistant and corrosion-resistant H-series stainless steel alloys that will simultaneously maximize a number of alloy's mechanical and corrosion properties.

  1. Electrochemical and passive behaviour of tin alloyed ferritic stainless steel in concrete environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hong; Su, Huaizhi; Li, Baosong; Ying, Guobing

    2018-05-01

    In the present work, the electrochemical behavior and semiconducting properties of a tin alloyed ferritic stainless steel in simulated concrete solution in presence of NaCl were estimated by conventional electrochemical methods such as potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and capacitance measurement (Mott-Schottky approach). The surface passive film was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results revealed a good agreement between pitting corrosion, electrochemical behaviour, and electronic properties. The p and n-type bilayer structure passive film were observed. The increase of Sn4+ oxide species in the passive film shows no beneficial effects on the pitting corrosion. In addition, the dehydration of the passive film was further discussed.

  2. Comparison of Solid and Hollow Torque Transducer Shaft Response in a High Alloy Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milby, Christopher L.; Hecox, Bryan G.; Wiewel, Joseph L.; Boley, Mark S.

    2007-03-01

    Recent investigations of the torque transducer response function (ambient field signal versus applied torque or shear stress) have been conducted in a 13% chromium and 8% nickel stainless steel alloy in both the hollow shaft and solid shaft configuration. An understanding of both is needed for applications with differing yield strength and hardness requirements. Axial hysteresis measurements conducted before and after heat treatment exhibited little difference in coercivity and retentivity between the two sample types. However, the field mapping and transducer sensitivity studies showed the hollow shaft configuration to have a far superior degree of polarization in the sensory region and to exhibit an enhanced sensitivity, especially after heat treatment. This is most likely due to its more efficient provision of closed circumferential geometry for the field lines and improved grain alignment during heat treatment.

  3. Analysis of copper alloy to stainless steel bonded panels for ITER first wall applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stubbins, J.F.; Kurath, P.; Drockelman, D.; Li, G.; Thomas, B.G.; Morgan, G.D.; McAfee, J.

    1995-01-01

    The mechanical performance of bi-layer copper alloy (Gildcop CuA115) to 316L stainless steel panels was examined. This work was to analyze potential bonding methodologies for the fabrication of ITER first wall structures, to verify the bond integrity of the fabricated panels, and to establish some mechanical performance parameters for panel structural performance. Two bonding routes were examined: explosively bonding and hot isostatically pressed (HIP) bonding. Following fabrication, the panels were mechanically loaded in tensile and fatigue tests. The mechanical performance test verified that the bond integrity was excellent, and that the primary mode of failure of the bonded panels was related to failure in the base materials rather than lack of adequate bond strength

  4. Relationship between thermomechanical treatment, microstructure and α' martensite in stainless Fe-based shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otubo, J.; Mei, P.R.; Shinohara, A.H.; Suzuki, C.K.

    1999-01-01

    This work presents some preliminary results relating training treatment, training temperature and the formation of α' martensite to the shape recovery effect of stainless shape memory alloys. For the composition tested, the sample shows some mechanical memory (constant tensile stress at 4% strain and constant yield stress throughout the training cycles) with a very good shape recovery (95% after 4% tensile strain) at a training temperature of 873 K. Its residual strain is related to the generation of perfect dislocations only. For the sample trained at 723 K, the residual strain could be attributed to incomplete reversion of stress-induced ε martensite, in part due to the blocking effect of α' martensite and also to the generation of perfect dislocations. The influence of α' martensite on shape recovery is relative and is dependent on training temperature, and the preferential growth of α' martensite is shown to occur for large grain size. (orig.)

  5. Effects of alloying elements on sticking occurring during hot rolling of ferritic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Dae Jin; Kim, Yong Jin; Lee, Yong Deuk; Lee, Sung Hak; Lee, Jong Seog

    2008-01-01

    In this study, effects of alloying elements on the sticking occurring during hot rolling of five kinds of ferritic STS430J1L stainless steels were investigated by analyzing high-temperature hardness and oxidation behavior of the rolled steels. Hot-rolling simulation tests were conducted by a high-temperature wear tester which could simulate actual hot rolling. The simulation test results revealed that the sticking process proceeded with three stages, i.e., nucleation, growth, and saturation. Since the hardness continuously decreased as the test temperature increased, whereas the formation of Fe-Cr oxides in the rolled steel surface region increased, the sticking of five stainless steels was evaluated by considering both the high-temperature hardness and oxidation effects. The addition of Zr, Cu, or Si had a beneficial effect on the sticking resistance, while the Ni addition did not show any difference in the sticking. Particularly in the case of the Si addition, Si oxides formed first in the initial stage of high-temperature oxidation, worked as initiation sites for Fe-Cr oxides, accelerated the formation of Fe-Cr oxides, and thus raised the sticking resistance by about 10 times in comparison with the steel without Si content

  6. Plastic deformation and fracture behaviors of nitrogen-alloyed austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Songtao; Yang Ke; Shan Yiyin; Li Laifeng

    2008-01-01

    The plastic deformation and fracture behaviors of two nitrogen-alloyed austenitic stainless steels, 316LN and a high nitrogen steel (Fe-Cr-Mn-0.66% N), were investigated by tensile test and Charpy impact test in a temperature range from 77 to 293 K. The Fe-Cr-Mn-N steel showed ductile-to-brittle transition (DBT) behavior, but not for the 316LN steel. X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed that the strain-induced martensite occurred in the 316LN steel, but no such transformation in the Fe-Cr-Mn-N steel. Tensile tests showed that the temperature dependences of the yield strength for the two steels were almost the same. The ultimate tensile strength of the Fe-Cr-Mn-N steel displayed less significant temperature dependence than that of the 316LN steel. The strain-hardening exponent increased for the 316LN steel, but decreased for the Fe-Cr-Mn-N steel, with decreasing temperature. Based on the experimental results and the analyses, a modified scheme was proposed to explain the fracture behaviors of austenitic stainless steels

  7. Brazing technology of Ti alloy/stainless steel dissimilar metal joint at system integrated modular advanced reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Sang Chul; Kim, Sung Ho; Kim, Yong Wan; Kim, Jong In

    2001-02-01

    For the technoldogy development of brazing Ti alloy to stainless steel joints used at SMART, the status of brazing technology development, brazing processes, and the brazing technology of Ti alloy and stainless steel are reviewed. Because fusion welding process cannot be applied due to the formation of intermetallic compounds in the weld metal, brazing joint was selected at the design. The joint part is assembled with a thread composed with male part of Ti alloy tube and female part of stainless tube. The gap in the thread will be filled with brazing filler metal. However, brittle Ti-Fe intermetallic compounds are formed at the surface of stainless steel through the diffusion of Ti at the melt. Brazing conditions should be set-up to reduce the formation of intermetallic compounds. For that, 3 kinds of Ag filler metals were selected as the candidates and heating will be done with induction and electric furnaces. Through measuring of joint strength according to the control of pre- and post-braze treatment, heating rate and heating time, optimal brazing method will be fixed. To qualify the brazing procedure and performance and to check defects in final product, the inspection plan will be established according to the req2wuirements of AWS and ASME.

  8. Brazing technology of Ti alloy/stainless steel dissimilar metal joint at system integrated modular advanced reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Sang Chul; Kim, Sung Ho; Kim, Yong Wan; Kim, Jong In

    2001-02-01

    For the technoldogy development of brazing Ti alloy to stainless steel joints used at SMART, the status of brazing technology development, brazing processes, and the brazing technology of Ti alloy and stainless steel are reviewed. Because fusion welding process cannot be applied due to the formation of intermetallic compounds in the weld metal, brazing joint was selected at the design. The joint part is assembled with a thread composed with male part of Ti alloy tube and female part of stainless tube. The gap in the thread will be filled with brazing filler metal. However, brittle Ti-Fe intermetallic compounds are formed at the surface of stainless steel through the diffusion of Ti at the melt. Brazing conditions should be set-up to reduce the formation of intermetallic compounds. For that, 3 kinds of Ag filler metals were selected as the candidates and heating will be done with induction and electric furnaces. Through measuring of joint strength according to the control of pre- and post-braze treatment, heating rate and heating time, optimal brazing method will be fixed. To qualify the brazing procedure and performance and to check defects in final product, the inspection plan will be established according to the req2wuirements of AWS and ASME

  9. Transformation of saturated nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds by microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parshikov, Igor A; Silva, Eliane O; Furtado, Niege A J C

    2014-02-01

    The saturated nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds include many drugs and compounds that may be used as synthons for the synthesis of other pharmacologically active substances. The need for new derivatives of saturated nitrogen-containing heterocycles for organic synthesis, biotechnology and the pharmaceutical industry, including optically active derivatives, has increased interest in microbial synthesis. This review provides an overview of microbial technologies that can be valuable to produce new derivatives of saturated nitrogen-containing heterocycles, including hydroxylated derivatives. The chemo-, regio- and enantioselectivity of microbial processes can be indispensable for the synthesis of new compounds. Microbial processes carried out with fungi, including Beauveria bassiana, Cunninghamella verticillata, Penicillium simplicissimum, Aspergillus niger and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and bacteria, including Pseudomonas sp., Sphingomonas sp. and Rhodococcus erythropolis, biotransform many substrates efficiently. Among the biological activities of saturated nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds are antimicrobial, antitumor, antihypertensive and anti-HIV activities; some derivatives are effective for the treatment and prevention of malaria and trypanosomiasis, and others are potent glycosidase inhibitors.

  10. Alkoxy(alkyl)silylalkyl derivatives of nitrogen-containing heterocycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trofimova, Ol'ga M; Voronkov, Mikhail G; Chernov, Nikolai F

    1999-01-01

    The published data on the synthesis, properties and transformations of alkoxy(alkyl)silylalkyl derivatives of nitrogen-containing heterocycles of the general formula Het(CH 2 ) n SiX 3 are surveyed and systematised. Data on the biological activities and applications of these compounds are presented. The bibliography includes 255 references.

  11. A preliminary investigation of the initiation of pitting corrosion in austenitic stainless steels and nickel-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higginson, A.

    1984-01-01

    Pitting corrosion in a number of austenitic stainless steels and nickel-based alloys that differ widely in their resistance to corrosion was studed by electrochemical and electron-optical techniques. The effect of contamination of the sulphuric acid electrolyte by chloride ions was also investigated. Preliminary results for the surface analysis of samples of 316 stainless steel by Auger electron spectroscopy are presented, and suggestions are included for further application of this technique to the examination of pitting corrosion. A comprehensive review of the literature concerning the initiation of pitting corrosion is included

  12. Characterization of Friction Welded Titanium Alloy and Stainless Steel with a Novel Interlayer Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, R.; Balasubramanian, M.

    The main purpose of the current research work is to identify and investigate a novel method of holding an intermediate metal and to evaluate its metallurgical and mechanical properties. Copper was used as an interlayer material for the welding of this dissimilar Ti-6Al-4V (Ti alloy) and 304L stainless steel (SS). The study shows that the input parameters and surface geometry played a very significant role in producing a good quality joints with minimum heat affected zone and metal loss. A sound weld was achieved between Ti-6Al-4V and SS304L, on the basis of the earlier experiments conducted by the authors in their laboratory, by using copper rod as intermediate metal. Box-Behnken method was used for performing a minimum number of experiments for the study. In the present study, Ti-6Al-4V alloy and SS304L were joined by a novel method of holding the interlayer and new surface geometry for the interlayer. Initially, the drop test was used for determining the quality of the fabricated joint and, subsequently, non-destructive techniques like radiography and C-scan were used. Further optical micrograph, SEM-EDS, hardness and tensile test were done for understanding the performance of the joint.

  13. Characterization of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans biofilm on high-alloyed stainless steel: XPS and electrochemical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dec, Weronika [Institute of Industrial Organic Chemistry, Branch Pszczyna, Doświadczalna Street 27, 43-200 Pszczyna (Poland); Mosiałek, Michał; Socha, Robert P. [Jerzy Haber Institute of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry PAS, Niezapominajek Street 8, 30-239 Kraków (Poland); Jaworska-Kik, Marzena [Department of Biopharmacy, Medical University of Silesia, Jedności Street 8, 41-200 Sosnowiec (Poland); Simka, Wojciech [Faculty of Chemistry, Silesian University of Technology, B. Krzywoustego 6 Street, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Michalska, Joanna, E-mail: joanna.k.michalska@polsl.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, Silesian University of Technology, B. Krzywoustego 6 Street, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland)

    2017-07-01

    Results on D. desulfuricans biofilm formation on austenitic-ferritic duplex (2205 DSS) and superaustenitic (904L) stainless steels are presented. Surface characterization including the structure, configuration and chemical composition of biofilms were carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements were used to monitor the attachment activity of bacteria on the steels' surface and to determine the effect of bacteria on passivity. It was proved that investigated steels are rapidly colonized by bacteria. The presence of biofilm caused significant ennoblement of 904L steel surface, while retarded the attainment of high passive state of 2205 DSS. XPS analysis revealed significant sulphidation of the biofilm and its layered structure. Accumulation of sulphides and hydroxides was proved in the outermost layer, while the increasing contents of disulphides, organometallic and C-N bonds were detected in the internal part of the biofilm. Irreversible bondings between steel matrix and biofilm had also been observed. - Highlights: • High-alloyed steels are rapidly colonized by sulphate-reducing bacteria. • Higher Ni content stimulates more intensive biofilm growth. • Extracellular polymeric substances indelibly bind to the high-alloyed steels. • Sulphate-reducing bacteria caused irreversible sulphidation of passive films.

  14. Effect of composition on corrosion resistance of high-alloy austenitic stainless steel weld metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, P.I.; Gooch, T.G.

    1993-01-01

    The corrosion resistance of stainless steel weld metal in the ranges of 17 to 28% chromium (Cr), 6 to 60% nickel (Ni), 0 to 9% molybdenum (Mo), and 0.0 to 0.37% nitrogen (N) was examined. Critical pitting temperatures were determined in ferric chloride (FeCl 3 ). Passive film breakdown potentials were assessed from potentiodynamic scans in 3% sodium chloride (NaCl) at 50 C. Potentiodynamic and potentiostatic tests were carried out in 30% sulfuric acid (H 2 SO 4 ) ar 25 C, which was representative of chloride-free acid media of low redox potential. Metallographic examination and microanalysis were conducted on the test welds. Because of segregation of alloying elements, weld metal pitting resistance always was lower than that of matching composition base steel. The difference increased with higher Cr, Mo, and N contents. Segregation also reduced resistance to general corrosion in H 2 SO 4 , but the effect relative to the base steel was less marked than with chloride pitting. Segregation of Cr, Mo, and N in fully austenitic deposits decreased as the Ni' eq- Cr' eq ratio increased. Over the compositional range studied, weld metal pitting resistance was dependent mainly on Mo content and segregation. N had less effect than in wrought alloys. Both Mo and N enhanced weld metal corrosion resistance in H 2 SO 4

  15. Plastic strain characterization in austenitic stainless steels and nickel alloys by electron backscatter diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saez-Maderuelo, A., E-mail: alberto.saez@ciemat.es [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense, 22-28040 Madrid (Spain); Castro, L.; Diego, G. de [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense, 22-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-09-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is enhanced by cold work and causes many problems in components of the nuclear power plants. Besides, during manufacturing, installation, welding and service of the material, residual strains can be produced increasing the susceptibility to SCC. For this reason, it is important to characterize the degree of plastic strain due to dislocation accumulation in each crystal. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), in conjunction with scanning electron microscope (SEM), has been a great advance in this field because it enables to estimate the plastic strain in a quick and easy way. Nevertheless, over the last few years, a lot of different mathematical expressions to estimate the plastic strain have appeared in the literature. This situation hinders the election of one of them by a novel scientist in this field. Therefore, in this paper some of the more common expressions used in the calculation of the angular misorientation have been presented and discussed in order to clarify their more important aspects. Then, using one of these expressions (average local misorientation), curves relating misorientation density with known levels of strain will be obtained for an austenitic stainless steel 304L and nickel base alloy 690, which have shown a linear behaviour that is in good agreement with results found in the literature. Finally, using curves obtained in previous steps, levels of plastic strain in a plate of nickel base alloy 600 welded with weld metal 182 were estimated between 8 and 10% for a high temperature mill annealing sample.

  16. Plastic strain characterization in austenitic stainless steels and nickel alloys by electron backscatter diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saez-Maderuelo, A.; Castro, L.; Diego, G. de

    2011-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is enhanced by cold work and causes many problems in components of the nuclear power plants. Besides, during manufacturing, installation, welding and service of the material, residual strains can be produced increasing the susceptibility to SCC. For this reason, it is important to characterize the degree of plastic strain due to dislocation accumulation in each crystal. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), in conjunction with scanning electron microscope (SEM), has been a great advance in this field because it enables to estimate the plastic strain in a quick and easy way. Nevertheless, over the last few years, a lot of different mathematical expressions to estimate the plastic strain have appeared in the literature. This situation hinders the election of one of them by a novel scientist in this field. Therefore, in this paper some of the more common expressions used in the calculation of the angular misorientation have been presented and discussed in order to clarify their more important aspects. Then, using one of these expressions (average local misorientation), curves relating misorientation density with known levels of strain will be obtained for an austenitic stainless steel 304L and nickel base alloy 690, which have shown a linear behaviour that is in good agreement with results found in the literature. Finally, using curves obtained in previous steps, levels of plastic strain in a plate of nickel base alloy 600 welded with weld metal 182 were estimated between 8 and 10% for a high temperature mill annealing sample.

  17. Electrochemical assessment of some titanium and stainless steel implant dental alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Echevarría, A.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Commercially pure titanium alloy, Ti-6Al-4V alloy and stainless steel screw implants were evaluated in both Ringer and synthetic saliva physiological solutions at body temperature by EIS (Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy with immersion times of 30 d. Results were simulated as a "sandwich system" composed by four capacitors-resistances connected in series with the solution resistance. A model explaining the results in terms of the porosity and thickness of four different layers, was proposed.

    Se utilizó la técnica de la Espectroscopia de Impedancia Electroquímica para evaluar en soluciones fisiológicas artificiales (Ringer y saliva sintética muestras extraídas de tornillos de implantes dentales certificados de titanio comercialmente puro, aleación Ti-6Al-W y acero inoxidable a temperatura corporal, con tiempos de inmersión hasta de 30 d. Los resultados se simularon mediante un modelo del tipo sandwich de cuatro elementos RC, conectados en serie con una resistencia de la solución. A partir de de esta simulación, se propone un modelo que explica los resultados obtenidos en términos de la evolución de la porosidad y el espesor de cuatro diferentes capas que se desarrollan en la superficie de los materiales evaluados.

  18. Characterization of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans biofilm on high-alloyed stainless steel: XPS and electrochemical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dec, Weronika; Mosiałek, Michał; Socha, Robert P.; Jaworska-Kik, Marzena; Simka, Wojciech; Michalska, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    Results on D. desulfuricans biofilm formation on austenitic-ferritic duplex (2205 DSS) and superaustenitic (904L) stainless steels are presented. Surface characterization including the structure, configuration and chemical composition of biofilms were carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements were used to monitor the attachment activity of bacteria on the steels' surface and to determine the effect of bacteria on passivity. It was proved that investigated steels are rapidly colonized by bacteria. The presence of biofilm caused significant ennoblement of 904L steel surface, while retarded the attainment of high passive state of 2205 DSS. XPS analysis revealed significant sulphidation of the biofilm and its layered structure. Accumulation of sulphides and hydroxides was proved in the outermost layer, while the increasing contents of disulphides, organometallic and C-N bonds were detected in the internal part of the biofilm. Irreversible bondings between steel matrix and biofilm had also been observed. - Highlights: • High-alloyed steels are rapidly colonized by sulphate-reducing bacteria. • Higher Ni content stimulates more intensive biofilm growth. • Extracellular polymeric substances indelibly bind to the high-alloyed steels. • Sulphate-reducing bacteria caused irreversible sulphidation of passive films.

  19. Production and characterization of stainless steel based Fe-Cr-Ni-Mn-Si(-Co) shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otubo, J.

    1995-01-01

    It is well known that the Fe based alloys can exhibit shape memory effect due to the γ to ε martensitic transformation. The effect may not be as striking as observed in the NiTi alloy but it might become attractive from the practical point of view. In this work, two compositions of Fe-Cr-Ni-Mn-Si(-Co) stainless steel based shape memory alloy, prepared by the VIM technique, will be presented. The results are good with shape recovery of 95% for a pre-strain of 4% after some training cycles. In terms of workability the alloys produced are worse than the usual AISI304. However, adjusting the thermo-mechanical processing, it is perfectly possible to produce wire as thin as 1,20mm in dia. or down. (orig.)

  20. Corrosion of high Ni-Cr alloys and Type 304L stainless steel in HNO3-HF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ondrejcin, R.S.; McLaughlin, B.D.

    1980-04-01

    Nineteen alloys were evaluated as possible materials of construction for steam heating coils, the dissolver vessel, and the off-gas system of proposed facilities to process thorium and uranium fuels. Commercially available alloys were found that are satisfactory for all applications. With thorium fuel, which requires HNO 3 -HF for dissolution, the best alloy for service at 130 0 C when complexing agents for fluoride are used is Inconel 690; with no complexing agents at 130 0 C, Inconel 671 is best. At 95 0 C, six other alloys tested would be adequate: Haynes 25, Ferralium, Inconel 625, Type 304L stainless steel, Incoloy 825, and Haynes 20 (in order of decreasing preference); based on composition, six untested alloys would also be adequate. The ions most effective in reducing fluoride corrosion were the complexing agents Zr 4+ and Th 4+ ; Al 3+ was less effective. With uranium fuel, modestly priced Type 304L stainless steel is adequate. Corrosion will be most severe in HNO 3 -HF used occasionally for flushing and in solutions of HNO 3 and corrosion products (ferric and dichromate ions). HF corrosion can be minimized by complexing the fluoride ion and by passivation of the steel with strong nitric acid. Corrosion caused by corrosion products can be minimized by operating at lower temperatures

  1. Laser cladding of stainless steel with a copper-silver alloy to generate surfaces of high antimicrobial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans, Michael; Támara, Juan Carlos; Mathews, Salima; Bax, Benjamin; Hegetschweiler, Andreas; Kautenburger, Ralf; Solioz, Marc; Mücklich, Frank

    2014-11-01

    Copper and silver are used as antimicrobial agents in the healthcare sector in an effort to curb infections caused by bacteria resistant to multiple antibiotics. While the bactericidal potential of copper and silver alone are well documented, not much is known about the antimicrobial properties of copper-silver alloys. This study focuses on the antibacterial activity and material aspects of a copper-silver model alloy with 10 wt% Ag. The alloy was generated as a coating with controlled intermixing of copper and silver on stainless steel by a laser cladding process. The microstructure of the clad was found to be two-phased and in thermal equilibrium with minor Cu2O inclusions. Ion release and killing of Escherichia coli under wet conditions were assessed with the alloy, pure silver, pure copper and stainless steel. It was found that the copper-silver alloy, compared to the pure elements, exhibited enhanced killing of E. coli, which correlated with an up to 28-fold increased release of copper ions. The results show that laser cladding with copper and silver allows the generation of surfaces with enhanced antimicrobial properties. The process is particularly attractive since it can be applied to existing surfaces.

  2. Joining of pressureless-sintered SiC to stainless steel using Ag-Cu alloy and insert-metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Toyohiko; Takada, Naohiro; Iseki, Takayoshi

    1987-01-01

    Brazing of pressureless-sintered SiC to stainless steel using Ag-28 wt% Cu alloy was studied. In SiC plate joined to stainless steel rod (6 mm in diameter) using an Ag-Cu alloy powder containing 1.5 wt% Ti, the bond strength increased with decreasing brazing temperature and holding time. When the increased size of stainless steel plate (10 x 10 x 4 mm), joining was unsuccessful by the method mentioned above and even with Ti insert-metal. However, simultaneous use of Ti and Mo as insert-metal gave a good bonding in the order SiC/Ti/Mo/stainless steel, because of relaxation of residual stress due to thermal expansion mismatch. The shear strength was 30 - 50 MPa. A thin layer, probably Ti 3 SiC 2 , was observed at the interface between SiC and brazing filler immediately after melting. But with increasing both temperature and time, Ti 5 Si 3 (C) and TiC x were formed if Ti was continuously provided from the brazing filler. Since the interface of Ti 3 SiC 2 and either Ti 5 Si 3 (C) or TiC x seemed to be brittle, the formation of Ti 5 Si 3 (C) and TiC x decreased the bond strength. At lower temperature and short time, a high bond strength is expected when Ti was inserted in contact with SiC. (author)

  3. Comparison on mechanical anisotropies of selective laser melted Ti-6Al-4V alloy and 304 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Hanchen; Yang, Jingjing; Yin, Jie; Wang, Zemin, E-mail: zmwang@hust.edu.cn; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2017-05-17

    Near-fully dense Ti-6Al-4V and 304 stainless steel samples have been produced applying selective laser melting (SLM) in the present work. The microstructures, textures and microhardnesses on horizontal and vertical cross sections, as well as the tensile properties of horizontally and vertically SLMed samples are investigated. It is found that the microstructures of the two SLMed alloys are mainly composed of hexagonal close-packed (HCP) martensitic phase or face-centered cubic (FCC) austenitic phase within columnar structures in Ti-6Al-4V alloy and 304 stainless steel, respectively. For both SLMed alloys, the tensile properties and microhardnesses show anisotropic though the textures are weak. Especially, the Ti-6Al-4V samples show even stronger anisotropic mechanical properties compared with 304 stainless steel. The higher length-width ratios of the columnar structures, rather than the weaker textures or the less symmetry of HCP crystal structure in SLMed Ti-6Al-4V are believed to be responsible for the stronger mechanical anisotropies. As expected, heat treatment is an effective method to eliminate columnar structures and leads to nearly isotropic mechanical properties.

  4. Corrosion behaviour of austenitic stainless steel, nickel-base alloy and its weldments in aqueous LiBr solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasco-Tamarit, E.; Igual-Munoz, A.; Garcia Anton, J.; Garcia-Garcia, D. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear. E.T.S.I.Industriales, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, P.O. Box 22012 E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    With the advances in materials production new alloys have been developed, such as High- Alloy Austenitic Stainless Steels and Nickel-base alloys, with high corrosion resistance. These new alloys are finding applications in Lithium Bromide absorption refrigeration systems, because LiBr is a corrosive medium which can cause serious corrosion problems, in spite of its favourable properties as absorbent. The objective of the present work was to study the corrosion resistance of a highly alloyed austenitic stainless steel (UNS N08031) used as base metal, a Nickel-base alloy (UNS N06059) used as its corresponding filler metal, and the weld metal obtained by the Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) procedure. The materials have been tested in different LiBr solutions (400 g/l, 700 g/l, 850 g/l and a commercial 850 g/l LiBr heavy brine containing Lithium Chromate as corrosion inhibitor), at 25 deg. C. Open Circuit Potential tests and potentiodynamic anodic polarization curves have been carried out to obtain information about the general electrochemical behaviour of the materials. The polarization curves of all the alloys tested were typical of passivable materials. Pitting corrosion susceptibility has been evaluated by means of cyclic potentiodynamic curves, which provide parameters to analyse re-passivation properties. The galvanic corrosion generated by the electrical contact between the welded and the base material has been estimated from the polarization diagrams according to the Mixed Potential Method. Samples have been etched to study the microstructure by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The results demonstrate that the pitting resistance of all these materials increases as the LiBr concentration decreases. In general, the presence of chromate tended to shift the pitting potential to more positive values than those obtained in the 850 g/l LiBr solution. (authors)

  5. Low Cycle Fatigue behavior of SMAW welded Alloy28 superaustenitic stainless steel at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kchaou, Y., E-mail: yacinekchaou@yahoo.fr [Institut Pprime, Département Physique et Mécanique des Matériaux, UPR 3346 CNRS ISAE-ENSMA Université de Poitiers, Téléport 2, 1, avenue Clément Ader, BP 40109, F – 86961 Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cedex (France); Laboratoire de Génie des Matériaux et Environnement (LGME), ENIS, BPW 1173, Sfax (Tunisia); Pelosin, V.; Hénaff, G. [Institut Pprime, Département Physique et Mécanique des Matériaux, UPR 3346 CNRS ISAE-ENSMA Université de Poitiers, Téléport 2, 1, avenue Clément Ader, BP 40109, F – 86961 Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cedex (France); Haddar, N.; Elleuch, K. [Laboratoire de Génie des Matériaux et Environnement (LGME), ENIS, BPW 1173, Sfax (Tunisia)

    2016-01-10

    This paper focused on the study of Low Cycle Fatigue of welded joints of superaustenitic (Alloy28) stainless steels. Chemical composition and microstructure investigation of Base Metal (BM) and Weld Metal (WM) were identified. The results showed that both of composition is fully austenitic with a dendritic microstructure in the WM. Low cycle fatigue tests at different strain levels were performed on Base Metal (BM) and Welded Joint (WJ) specimens with a strain ratio R{sub ε}=−1. The results indicated that the fatigue life of welded joints is lower than the base metal. This is mainly due to the low ductility of the Welded Metal (WM) and the presence of welding defects. Simultaneously, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) observations of fractured specimens show that WJ have brittle behavior compared to BM with the presence of several welding defects especially in the crack initiation site. An estimation of the crack growth rate during LCF tests of BM and WJ was performed using distance between striations. The results showed that the crack initiation stage is shorter in the case of WJ compared to BM because of the presence of welding defects in WJ specimens.

  6. Effect of Hot Rolling on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Nitrogen Alloyed Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenna Krishna, S.; Karthick, N. K.; Jha, Abhay K.; Pant, Bhanu; Cherian, Roy M.

    2018-05-01

    In the present investigation, the effect of multi-pass hot rolling in the temperature range of 700-1000 °C on the microstructure and mechanical properties of nitrogen alloyed austenitic stainless steel was studied with the aid of optical microscopy, tensile testing and x-ray diffraction measurements. The microstructural changes that occurred in the hot rolled specimens were elongation of grains in rolling direction, nucleation of new grains at the grain boundaries of elongated grains and growth of nucleated grains to form fully recrystallized grains. Elongated grains formed at lower rolling temperature (700-800 °C) due to inadequate strain/temperature for the initiation of dynamic recrystallization. At higher rolling temperature (900-1000 °C), fine grains formed due to dynamic recrystallization. Tensile properties showed strong dependency on the rolling temperature. Tensile strength increased with the decrease in the rolling temperature at the cost of ductility. Maximum strength was observed in samples hot rolled at 700 °C with yield strength of 917 MPa and ductility of 25%. This variation in the tensile properties with the rolling temperature is attributed to changes in the dislocation density and grain structure. The estimated yield strength from the dislocation density, solid solution and grain boundary strengthening closely matched with experimentally determined yield strength confirming the role of dislocation density and grain size in the strengthening.

  7. Laser-Arc Hybrid Welding of Dissimilar Titanium Alloy and Stainless Steel Using Copper Wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ming; Chen, Cong; Wang, Lei; Wang, Zemin; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2015-05-01

    Laser-arc hybrid welding with Cu3Si filler wire was employed to join dissimilar Ti6Al4V titanium alloy and AISI316 stainless steel (316SS). The effects of welding parameters on bead shape, microstructure, mechanical properties, and fracture behavior were investigated in detail. The results show that cross-weld tensile strength of the joints is up to 212 MPa. In the joint, obvious nonuniformity of the microstructure is found in the fusion zone (FZ) and at the interfaces from the top to the bottom, which could be improved by increasing heat input. For the homogeneous joint, the FZ is characterized by Fe67- x Si x Ti33 dendrites spreading on α-Cu matrix, and the two interfaces of 316SS/FZ and FZ/Ti6Al4V are characterized by a bamboo-like 316SS layer and a CuTi2 layer, respectively. All the tensile samples fractured in the hardest CuTi2 layer at Ti6Al4V side of the joints. The fracture surface is characterized by river pattern revealing brittle cleavage fracture. The bead formation mechanisms were discussed according to the melt flow and the thermodynamic calculation.

  8. Stablization of Nanotwinned Microstructures in Stainless Steels Through Alloying and Microstructural Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-23

    Effects of carbon content, deformation, and interfacial energetics on carbide precipitation and corrosion sensitization in 304 stainless steel , Acta...Alumina- Forming Austenitic Stainless Steels Strengthened by LAves Phase and MC Carbide Precipitates , Metallurgical and Materials Transactions A...nano- precipitate engineering---of nanotwinned stainless steels . This preliminary work has provided valuable insight into the mechanisms responsible

  9. Tool degradation during sheet metal forming of three stainless steel alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadman, Boel; Nielsen, Peter Søe; Wiklund, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate if changes in tool design and tool surface preparation are needed when low-Ni stainless steels are used instead of austenitic stainless steels, the effect on tool degradation in the form of galling was investigated with three different types of stainless steel. The resistance to tool ...

  10. Study of cast and thermo-mechanically strengthened chromium-nickel nitrogen-containing steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokoshkina, V.G.; Kaputkina, L.M.; Svyazhin, A.G.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of nitrogen on the structure and strength of corrosion-resistant chromium-nickel steels after thermal and thermomechanical treatment is studied. The 06Kh15N7AD and 07Kh15N7DAMB steels alloying by nitrogen was accomplished through the basic composition steels remelting in the molecular nitrogen atmosphere under the pressure of 0.1-2.5 MPa. The 02Kh15N5DAF and 05Kh15N5DAM steels ingots were obtained through melting in a plasma furnace under the nitrogen pressure of 0.4MPA. The high-temperature thermomechanical treatment (HTMT) was performed by rolling with preliminary blanks heating up to 1050 deg C and the rolling end temperature not below 950 deg C. It is shown, that the HTMT of the nitrogen-containing steels makes it possible to obtain strength characteristics by 1.5 times exceeding the properties of traditionally applicable corrosion-resistant steels, whereby sufficiently high plasticity of the nitrogen-containing steel is retained [ru

  11. Immunological parameters of dental alloy corrosion; A study of gingival inflammation after placement of stainless steel crown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna Indriyanti

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The dental alloy is widely used in many fields of dentistry as a restoration material, orthodontic, prosthodontic, oral surgery and endodontic treatments. Naturally, most of the metallic materials without exception to stainless steel alloy will experience a process of corrosion in a form of electrochemical reaction to achieve thermodynamic equilibrium. The corrosion process in the oral cavity is due to the reaction of metal with saliva as an oral cavity electrolyte fluid. SSC has preformed restoration material conform with dental anatomy, manufactured from stainless steel alloy which is formable and adaptable to the teeth. Stainless Steel Crown generally made of austenitic stainless steel 18/8 of AISI 304 group contain chrome 18% and Nickel 8%, can be used as a restoration for teeth with excessive caries, crown fracture, email hypoplasia, or restoration after endodontic treatment. The toxic effect of Ni+2 released due to corrosion process may cause an inflammation of the gingiva and periodontal tissue. Laboratorically this condition indicated by the expression of pro-inflammation cytokines as immunological parameters such as IL-6, IL-8, TNF and IL-1β whose main role is to initiate and enhance any inflammation responses. The presence of pro-inflammation cytokines can be detected as soon as 1 hour after placement of SSC by examination of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF by ELISA technique. The magnitude of the toxic effect depends on corrosion rate and ions release which is influenced by metal chemical composition, environment temperature and pH, metal wear due to abrasion and friction, soldering if any, and elongation of the metal. Conclusion: The release of Ni+2 during corrosion process after placement of SSC cause gingival inflammation which is indicated by the change of the immunological parameters.

  12. Comparative study of two materials for dynamic hip screw during fall and gait loading: titanium alloy and stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, Nooshin S; Blicblau, Aaron S; Singh, Manmohan

    2011-11-01

    Internal fixation with dynamic hip screw is a choice of treatment for hip fractures to stabilize a femoral fracture. Choosing the proper implant and its material has a great effect on the healing process and failure prevention. The purpose of this analysis was to assess biomechanical behavior of dynamic hip screw with two different materials implanted in the femur during fall and gait. A 3D finite element model of an intact femur and a 3D implant within the same femur were developed. A finite element analysis was carried out to establish the effect of load conditions and implant material properties on biomechanical behavior of the dynamic hip screw after internal fixation. Two load configurations are chosen: one simulating the stance phase of the normal gait cycle, and the other replicating a low-energy fall. The implanted femur was investigated with two different materials for the dynamic hip screw: stainless steel and titanium alloy. During stance, more stress is placed on the implanted femur compared with the intact femur. During a fall, the implanted femur is in a greater state of stress, which mostly occurs inside the dynamic hip screw. Titanium alloy decreases stress levels by an average of 40% compared with stainless steel. However, deformation is slightly reduced with a stainless steel dynamic hip screw during both load cases. After internal fixation, dynamic hip screw generates greater stresses within the implanted femur compared with the intact femur under the same loading conditions. A titanium alloy implant appears to undergo less stress from a low-energy fall compared with stainless steel and can be considered the preferred implant material. The critical parts of the dynamic hip screw are the forth distal screw and the plate.

  13. Improving the corrosion wear resistance of AISI 316L stainless steel by particulate reinforced Ni matrix composite alloying layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiang; Zhuo, Chengzhi; Tao, Jie; Jiang, Shuyun; Liu, Linlin

    2009-01-01

    In order to overcome the problem of corrosion wear of AISI 316L stainless steel (SS), two kinds of composite alloying layers were prepared by a duplex treatment, consisting of Ni/nano-SiC and Ni/nano-SiO2 predeposited by brush plating, respectively, and subsequent surface alloying with Ni-Cr-Mo-Cu by a double glow process. The microstructure of the two kinds of nanoparticle reinforced Ni-based composite alloying layers was investigated by means of SEM and TEM. The electrochemical corrosion behaviour of composite alloying layers compared with the Ni-based alloying layer and 316L SS under different conditions was characterized by potentiodynamic polarization test and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Results showed that under alloying temperature (1000 °C) conditions, amorphous nano-SiO2 particles still retained the amorphous structure, whereas nano-SiC particles were decomposed and Ni, Cr reacted with SiC to form Cr6.5Ni2.5Si and Cr23C6. In static acidic solution, the corrosion resistance of the composite alloying layer with the brush plating Ni/nano-SiO2 particles interlayer is lower than that of the Ni-based alloying layer. However, the corrosion resistance of the composite alloying layer with the brush plating Ni/nano-SiO2 particles interlayer is prominently superior to that of the Ni-based alloying layer under acidic flow medium condition and acidic slurry flow condition. The corrosion resistance of the composite alloying layer with the brush plating Ni/nano-SiC particles interlayer is evidently lower than that of the Ni-based alloying layer, but higher than that of 316L SS under all test conditions. The results show that the highly dispersive nano-SiO2 particles are helpful in improving the corrosion wear resistance of the Ni-based alloying layer, whereas carbides and silicide phase are deleterious to that of the Ni-based alloying layer due to the fact that the preferential removal of the matrix around the precipitated phase takes place by the chemical

  14. Study of magnetism in Ni-Cr hardface alloy deposit on 316LN stainless steel using magnetic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, G. V. K.; Kumar, Anish; Chakraborty, Gopa; Albert, S. K.; Rao, B. Purna Chandra; Bhaduri, A. K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2015-07-01

    Nickel base Ni-Cr alloy variants are extensively used for hardfacing of austenitic stainless steel components in sodium cooled fast reactors (SFRs) to avoid self-welding and galling. Considerable difference in the compositions and melting points of the substrate and the Ni-Cr alloy results in significant dilution of the hardface deposit from the substrate. Even though, both the deposit and the substrate are non-magnetic, the diluted region exhibits ferromagnetic behavior. The present paper reports a systematic study carried out on the variations in microstructures and magnetic behavior of American Welding Society (AWS) Ni Cr-C deposited layers on 316 LN austenitic stainless steels, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and magnetic force microscopy (MFM). The phase variations of the oscillations of a Co-Cr alloy coated magnetic field sensitive cantilever is used to quantitatively study the magnetic strength of the evolved microstructure in the diluted region as a function of the distance from the deposit/substrate interface, with the spatial resolution of about 100 nm. The acquired AFM/MFM images and the magnetic property profiles have been correlated with the variations in the chemical compositions in the diluted layers obtained by the energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The study indicates that both the volume fraction of the ferromagnetic phase and its ferromagnetic strength decrease with increasing distance from the deposit/substrate interface. A distinct difference is observed in the ferromagnetic strength in the first few layers and the ferromagnetism is observed only near to the precipitates in the fifth layer. The study provides a better insight of the evolution of ferromagnetism in the diluted layers of Ni-Cr alloy deposits on stainless steel.

  15. Gas atomized precursor alloy powder for oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieken, Joel [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2011-12-13

    Gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) was employed as a simplified method for producing precursor powders for oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic stainless steels (e.g., Fe-Cr-Y-(Ti,Hf)-O), departing from the conventional mechanical alloying (MA) process. During GARS processing a reactive atomization gas (i.e., Ar-O2) was used to oxidize the powder surfaces during primary break-up and rapid solidification of the molten alloy. This resulted in envelopment of the powders by an ultra-thin (t < 150 nm) metastable Cr-enriched oxide layer that was used as a vehicle for solid-state transport of O into the consolidated microstructure. In an attempt to better understand the kinetics of this GARS reaction, theoretical cooling curves for the atomized droplets were calculated and used to establish an oxidation model for this process. Subsequent elevated temperature heat treatments, which were derived from Rhines pack measurements using an internal oxidation model, were used to promote thermodynamically driven O exchange reactions between trapped films of the initial Cr-enriched surface oxide and internal Y-enriched intermetallic precipitates. This novel microstructural evolution process resulted in the successful formation of nano-metric Y-enriched dispersoids, as confirmed using high energy X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), equivalent to conventional ODS alloys from MA powders. The thermal stability of these Y-enriched dispersoids was evaluated using high temperature (1200°C) annealing treatments ranging from 2.5 to 1,000 hrs of exposure. In a further departure from current ODS practice, replacing Ti with additions of Hf appeared to improve the Y-enriched dispersoid thermal stability by means of crystal structure modification. Additionally, the spatial distribution of the dispersoids was found to depend strongly on the original rapidly solidified microstructure. To exploit this, ODS microstructures were engineered from

  16. Dissimilar Joining of Stainless Steel and 5083 Aluminum Alloy Sheets by Gas Tungsten Arc Welding-Brazing Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheepu, Muralimohan; Srinivas, B.; Abhishek, Nalluri; Ramachandraiah, T.; Karna, Sivaji; Venkateswarlu, D.; Alapati, Suresh; Che, Woo Seong

    2018-03-01

    The dissimilar joining using gas tungsten arc welding - brazing of 304 stainless steel to 5083 Al alloy had been conducted with the addition of Al-Cu eutectic filler metal. The interface microstructure formation between filler metal and substrates, and spreading of the filler metal were studied. The interface microstructure between filler metal and aluminum alloy characterized that the formation of pores and elongated grains with the initiation of micro cracks. The spreading of the liquid braze filler on stainless steel side packed the edges and appeared as convex shape, whereas a concave shape has been formed on aluminum side. The major compounds formed at the fusion zone interface were determined by using X-ray diffraction techniques and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis. The micro hardness at the weld interfaces found to be higher than the substrates owing to the presence of Fe2Al5 and CuAl2 intermetallic compounds. The maximum tensile strength of the weld joints was about 95 MPa, and the tensile fracture occurred at heat affected zone on weak material of the aluminum side and/or at stainless steel/weld seam interface along intermetallic layer. The interface formation and its effect on mechanical properties of the welds during gas tungsten arc welding-brazing has been discussed.

  17. Fatigue crack growth characteristics of nitrogen-alloyed type 347 stainless under operating conditions of a pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Ki Deuk; Hong, Seok Min; Kim, Dae Whan; Lee, Bong Sang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Nuclear Materials Safety Research Division, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seon Jin [Hanyang University, Division of materials science and engineering, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The fatigue crack growth behavior of Type 347 (S347) and Type 347N (S347N) stainless steel was evaluated under the operating conditions of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). These two materials showed different fatigue crack growth rates (FCGRs) according to the changes in dissolved oxygen content and frequency. Under the simulated PWR conditions for normal operation, the FCGR of S347N was lower than that of S347 and insensitive to the changes in PWR water conditions. The higher yield strength and better corrosion resistance of the nitrogen-alloyed Type 347 stainless steel might be a main cause of slower FCGR and more stable properties against changes in environmental conditions.

  18. Stress corrosion cracking and oxidation of austenitic stainless steel 316 L and model alloy in supercritical water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saez-Maderuelo, A.; Gomez-Briceno, D.; Diego, G.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, an austenitic stainless steel type 316 L was tested in deaerated supercritical water at 400 deg. C and 500 deg. C and 25 MPa to determine how variations in water conditions influence its stress corrosion cracking behaviour and to make progress in the understanding of mechanisms involved in SCC processes in this environment. Moreover, the influence of plastic deformation in the resistance of the material to SCC was also studied at both temperatures. In addition to this, previous oxidation experiments at 400 deg. C and 500 deg. C and at 25 MPa were taken into account to gain some insight in this kind of processes. Furthermore, a cold worked model alloy based on the stainless steel 316 L with some variations in the chemical composition in order to simulate the composition of the grain boundary after irradiation was tested at 400 deg. C and 25 MPa in deaerated supercritical water. (authors)

  19. Titanium alloy vs. stainless steel miniscrews: an in vivo split-mouth study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollero, P; Di Fazio, V; Pavoni, C; Cordaro, M; Cozza, P; Lione, R

    2018-04-01

    To compare in vivo Titanium Alloy (TiA) with Stainless Steel (SS) miniscrews Temporary Anchorage Devices (TADs) using removal torque and Scanning Electron Microscopic (SEM) analysis. 15 subjects (6 males and 9 females) who required maximum anchorage were recruited. For each patient, a TiA TAD and a SS TAD with same length and width were implanted following a randomized split-mouth study design. Retraction was carried out with nickel-titanium spring ligated directly from the anterior hooks of the archwire to the TADs to produce 90 to 100 g of force. When no further anchorage supplementation was needed, the TADs were removed. The removal torque values were registered with a digital screwdriver. After removal, the TADs were collected in a fixed solution and examined using SEM and X-ray microanalysis. All TADs remained intact, with a 100% success rate. There was no difference in removal torque between TiA and SS miniscrews (4.4 ± 1.3 N-cm and 5.1 ± 0.7 N-cm, respectively). All specimens' loss of gloss with signs of biological contaminations resulted in a dull implant surface. SEM photomicrographs of TiA miniscrews showed predominantly blood cells while SS miniscrews showed the precipitation of an amorphous layer with low cellular component. There was no difference in spectroscopic analysis between TiA and SS miniscrews. TiA and SS miniscrews had comparable removal torque values. SEM photomicrographs showed no evidence of osseointegration with both TADs having similar biological responses.

  20. Electrochemical and corrosion behavior of a 304 stainless-steel-based metal alloy wasteform in dilute aqueous environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Jian; Asmussen, R. Matthew; Zagidulin, Dmitrij; Noël, James J.; Shoesmith, David W.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We investigated the corrosion behavior of a metal alloy in six reference solutions. ► Majority of rhenium used as a technetium surrogate contained within a Fe 2 Mo phase. ► This prototype alloy exhibited generally passive behavior in all environments. ► Passivity breakdown events can occur and lead to localized corrosion. - Abstract: The electrochemical and corrosion behavior of a stainless-steel-based alloy made as a prototype metallic nuclear wasteform to immobilize 99 Tc, has been studied in a number of reference solutions ranging in pH from 4 to 10. The results showed the 47SS(304)-9Zr–23Mo prototype alloy contained at least five distinct phases with the majority of the Re, used as a Tc surrogate, contained within a Fe 2 Mo intermetallic phase. Polarization studies showed this alloy exhibited generally passive behavior in a range of dilute aqueous environments. Impedance measurements indicated passivity breakdown events can occur and lead to localized corrosion, especially in slightly alkaline conditions.

  1. Comparison of Corrosion Behavior of Low-Alloy Steel Containing Copper and Antimony with 409L Stainless Steel for a Flue Gas Desulfurization System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sun-Ah; Shin, Su-Bin; Kim, Jung-Gu [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    The corrosion behavior of low alloy steel containing Cu, Sb and 409L stainless steel was investigated for application in the low-temperature section of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. The electrochemical properties were evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization testing and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in 16.9 vol% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 0.35 vol% HCl at 60 ℃. The inclusions in these steels ere identified by electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA). The corrosion products of the steels were analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The corrosion rate of the low alloy steel containing Cu, Sb was about 100 times lower than that of 409L stainless steel. For stainless steel without passivation, active corrosion behavior was shown. In contrast, in the low alloy steel, the Cu, Sb compounds accumulated on the surface improved the corrosion resistance by suppressing the anodic dissolution reaction.

  2. Effects of alloys elements, impurities and microstructural factors in austenitic stainless steel to utilize in fuel rod of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimoto, A.

    1988-08-01

    Austenitic Stainless Steel is used as cladding material of pressurized water reactor fuel rods because of its good performance. The addition of alloy elements and the control of impurities make this to happen. Fission products do not contribute to corrosion. Dimensional changes are not critical up to 1,0 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E>0,1 MeV) of neutronic doses. The hydrogen does not cause embrittlement in the reactor operation temperatures, and helium contributes to embrittlement if the material is warmed upon 650 0 C. (author) [pt

  3. Microstructure and corrosion behavior of shielded metal arc-welded dissimilar joints comprising duplex stainless steel and low alloy steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, P. Bala; Muthupandi, V.; Sivan, V.; Srinivasan, P. Bala; Dietzel, W.

    2006-12-01

    This work describes the results of an investigation on a dissimilar weld joint comprising a boiler-grade low alloy steel and duplex stainless steel (DSS). Welds produced by shielded metal arc-welding with two different electrodes (an austenitic and a duplex grade) were examined for their microstructural features and properties. The welds were found to have overmatching mechanical properties. Although the general corrosion resistance of the weld metals was good, their pitting resistance was found to be inferior when compared with the DSS base material.

  4. Microstructure characterization in the weld joint of a high nickel austenitic alloy and Cr18-Ni8 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Na; Li, Yajiang; Wang, Juan [Shandong Univ., Jinan (CN). Key Lab. for Liquid - Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education)

    2012-06-15

    High nickel austenitic alloy, 6 mm thick, and Cr18-Ni8 stainless steel with a thickness of 0.6 mm were joined by pulsed current tungsten inert gas arc welding without filler metal in this work. Metallographic examination, microhardness measurement and electron microprobe analysis were used to reveal microstructural characteristics in the joint. The results indicated that the weld metal consisted of {gamma}-austenite, {delta}-ferrite and carbides without the appearance of martensite. There were dendrite crystals at the edge of the weld metal near the high nickel austenitic alloy and isometric crystals in the center of the weld metal. The microhardness of the weld metal was the highest due to the existence of carbides and its finer structure. Graphite flakes were still embedded in the austenite matrix of the heat-affected zone without the formation of martensite. (orig.)

  5. Assessment of The Cracking Properties of Stainless Steel Alloys and their Usability for Laser Welding in Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther

    2001-01-01

    Methods to assess stainless steel alloys’ cracking properties and usability for laser welding has been studied. Also tests to assess alloys’ susceptibility to hot cracking has been conducted. Among these is the so-called Weeter test which assesses the alloy by executing a number of spot welds...... to provoke cracking in the alloy. In this work the Weeter test has been modified and changed in order to develop a faster and easier test also applicable to small specimens. The new test, called a Groove test differs from the Weeter test by its procedure in which linear seam welds are conducted instead...... of spot welds. The Groove test has the advantage of an easier microscopy and analysis in the welds. Results from crack tests was partly confirmed by predictions made on the basis of the alloy’s constituents and solidification growth rate....

  6. Study of austenitic stainless steel welded with low alloy steel filler metal. [tensile and impact strength tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, F. A.; Dyke, R. A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The tensile and impact strength properties of 316L stainless steel plate welded with low alloy steel filler metal were determined. Tests were conducted at room temperature and -100 F on standard test specimens machined from as-welded panels of various chemical compositions. No significant differences were found as the result of variations in percentage chemical composition on the impact and tensile test results. The weldments containing lower chromium and nickel as the result of dilution of parent metal from the use of the low alloy steel filler metal corroded more severely in a marine environment. The use of a protective finish, i.e., a nitrile-based paint containing aluminum powder, prevented the corrosive attack.

  7. Standard test methods for pitting and crevice corrosion resistance of stainless steels and related alloys by use of ferric Chloride solution

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the determination of the resistance of stainless steels and related alloys to pitting and crevice corrosion (see Terminology G 15) when exposed to oxidizing chloride environments. Six procedures are described and identified as Methods A, B, C, D, E, and F. 1.1.1 Method A—Ferric chloride pitting test. 1.1.2 Method B—Ferric chloride crevice test. 1.1.3 Method C—Critical pitting temperature test for nickel-base and chromium-bearing alloys. 1.1.4 Method D—Critical crevice temperature test for nickel-base and chromium-bearing alloys. 1.1.5 Method E—Critical pitting temperature test for stainless steels. 1.1.6 Method F—Critical crevice temperature test for stainless steels. 1.2 Method A is designed to determine the relative pitting resistance of stainless steels and nickel-base, chromium-bearing alloys, whereas Method B can be used for determining both the pitting and crevice corrosion resistance of these alloys. Methods C, D, E and F allow for a rankin...

  8. Corrosion of stainless steels and nickel-base alloys in solutions of nitric acid and hydrofluoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, E.M.; Renner, M.

    1992-01-01

    Reactions involving nitric acid may always result in the contamination of this acid with fluorides. In highly concentrted nitric acid, the presence of small amounts of HF will substantially reduce the corrosion of metallic materials. Mixtures consisting of hydrofluoric acid and hypo-azeotropic nitric acid on the other hand will strongly attack: the metal loss will markedly increase with increasing HNO 3 and HF concentrations as well as with rising temperatures. The investigation covered 12 stainless steel grades and nickel-base alloys. With constant HNO 3 content, corrosion rates will rise linearly when increasing the HF concentration. With constant HF concentration (0,25 M), corrosion rates will increase rapidly with increasing nitric acid concentration (from 0.3 M to 14.8 M). This can best be described by superimposing a linear function and a hyperbolic function that is reflecting the change in the HNO 3 content. Alloys containing as much chromium as possible (up to 46 wt.%) will exhibit the best corrosion resistance. Alloy NiCr30FeMo (Hastelloy alloy G-30) proved to be well suitable in this investigation. (orig.) [de

  9. Hardness survey of cold-worked and heat-treated JBK-75 stainless steel alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, R.J.; Lucas, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    The alloy JBK-75, an age-hardenable austenitic stainless steel, is similar to commercial A-286, but has certain chemistry modifications to improve weldability and hydrogen compatibility. The principal changes are an increase in nickel and a decrease in manganese with lower limits on carbon, phosphorus, sulfur, silicon, and boron. In this study, the effects of solutionizing time and temperature, quench rate, cold working, and the effects of cold working on precipitation kinetics were examined. Findings show that the solutionizing temperature has a moderate effect on the as-quenched hardness, while times greater than that required for solutionizing do not significantly affect hardness. Quench rate was found to have a small effect on as-quenched hardness, however, hardness gradients did not develop in small bars. It was found that JBK-75 can be significantly strengthened by cold working. Cold working alone produced hardness increases from Rockwell-A 49 to R/sub A/ 68. A recovery-related hardness change was noted on heat treating at 300 and 400 0 C for both as-quenched and as-worked JBK-75. Significant age-hardening was observed at temperatures as low as 500 0 C for as-worked metal. Aging at 600 0 C resulted in maximum hardness in the 75 percent worked sample at about 6 hours (R/sub A/ 73.5) while the 50 percent worked sample was near maximum hardness (R/sub A 72.5) after seven days. THE 25 and 0 percent worked samples were considerably underaged after seven days. Similar type kinetic data were obtained for worked and nonworked metal at 650, 700, 800, 850, 900, 1000, and 1100 0 C for times from 10 minutes to 10,000 minutes (6.7 days). The overall purpose of the hardness survey was to better define the effects of cold work on the stress-relieving range, coherent precipitation range, incoherent precipitation range, recrystallization range, solutionizing range, and grain-growth range

  10. The effect of molten salt on high temperature behavior of stainless steel and titanium alloy with the presence of water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharum, Azila; Othman, Norinsan Kamil; Salleh, Emee Marina

    2018-04-01

    The high temperature oxidation experiment was conducted to study the behavior of titanium alloy Ti6A14V and stainless steel 316 in Na2SO4-50%NaCl + Ar-20%O2 (molten salt) and Na2SO4-50%NaCl + Ar-20%O2 + 12% H2O (molten salt + water vapor) environment at 900°C for 30 hours using horizontal tube furnace. The sample then was investigated using weight change measurement analysis and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis to study the weight gained and the phase oxidation that occurred. The weight gained of the titanium alloy was higher in molten salt environment compared to stainless steel due to the rapid growth in the oxide scale but showed almost no change of weight gained upon addition of water vapor. This is due to the alloy was fully oxidized. Stainless steel showed more protection and better effect in molten salt environment compared to mixed environment showed by slower weight gain and lower oxidation rate. Meanwhile, the phase oxidation test of the samples showed that the titanium alloy consist of multi oxide layer of rutile (TiO2) and Al2O3 on the surface of the exposed sample. While stainless steel show the formation of both protective Cr-rich oxide and non-protective Fe-rich oxide layer. This can be concluded that stainless steel is better compared to Ti alloy due to slow growing of chromia oxide. Therefore it is proven that stainless steel has better self-protection upon high temperature exposure.

  11. Cracking behavior and microstructure of austenitic stainless steels and alloy 690 irradiated in BOR-60 reactor, phase I.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y.; Chopra, O. K.; Soppet, W. K.; Shack, W. J.; Yang, Y.; Allen, T. R.; Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison

    2010-02-16

    Cracking behavior of stainless steels specimens irradiated in the BOR-60 at about 320 C is studied. The primary objective of this research is to improve the mechanistic understanding of irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of core internal components under conditions relevant to pressurized water reactors. The current report covers several baseline tests in air, a comparison study in high-dissolved-oxygen environment, and TEM characterization of irradiation defect structure. Slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) tests were conducted in air and in high-dissolved-oxygen (DO) water with selected 5- and 10-dpa specimens. The results in high-DO water were compared with those from earlier tests with identical materials irradiated in the Halden reactor to a similar dose. The SSRT tests produced similar results among different materials irradiated in the Halden and BOR-60 reactors. However, the post-irradiation strength for the BOR-60 specimens was consistently lower than that of the corresponding Halden specimens. The elongation of the BOR-60 specimens was also greater than that of their Halden specimens. Intergranular cracking in high-DO water was consistent for most of the tested materials in the Halden and BOR-60 irradiations. Nonetheless, the BOR-60 irradiation was somewhat less effective in stimulating IG fracture among the tested materials. Microstructural characterization was also carried out using transmission electron microscopy on selected BOR-60 specimens irradiated to {approx}25 dpa. No voids were observed in irradiated austenitic stainless steels and cast stainless steels, while a few voids were found in base and grain-boundary-engineered Alloy 690. All the irradiated microstructures were dominated by a high density of Frank loops, which varied in mean size and density for different alloys.

  12. Study of magnetism in Ni–Cr hardface alloy deposit on 316LN stainless steel using magnetic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishore, G.V.K.; Kumar, Anish, E-mail: anish@igcar.gov.in; Chakraborty, Gopa; Albert, S.K; Rao, B. Purna Chandra; Bhaduri, A.K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2015-07-01

    Nickel base Ni–Cr alloy variants are extensively used for hardfacing of austenitic stainless steel components in sodium cooled fast reactors (SFRs) to avoid self-welding and galling. Considerable difference in the compositions and melting points of the substrate and the Ni–Cr alloy results in significant dilution of the hardface deposit from the substrate. Even though, both the deposit and the substrate are non-magnetic, the diluted region exhibits ferromagnetic behavior. The present paper reports a systematic study carried out on the variations in microstructures and magnetic behavior of American Welding Society (AWS) Ni Cr–C deposited layers on 316 LN austenitic stainless steels, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and magnetic force microscopy (MFM). The phase variations of the oscillations of a Co–Cr alloy coated magnetic field sensitive cantilever is used to quantitatively study the magnetic strength of the evolved microstructure in the diluted region as a function of the distance from the deposit/substrate interface, with the spatial resolution of about 100 nm. The acquired AFM/MFM images and the magnetic property profiles have been correlated with the variations in the chemical compositions in the diluted layers obtained by the energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The study indicates that both the volume fraction of the ferromagnetic phase and its ferromagnetic strength decrease with increasing distance from the deposit/substrate interface. A distinct difference is observed in the ferromagnetic strength in the first few layers and the ferromagnetism is observed only near to the precipitates in the fifth layer. The study provides a better insight of the evolution of ferromagnetism in the diluted layers of Ni–Cr alloy deposits on stainless steel. - Highlights: • Study of evolution of ferromagnetism in Comonoy-6 deposit on austenitic steel. • Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) exhibited ferromagnetic matrix in first two layers. • The maximum MFM

  13. Characterization of the corrosion behavior of different stainless steel alloys exposed to flowing fresh seawater, using E.I.S technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Muhanna, K. [Petroleum Research and Studies Center, Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, KISR, P.O.Box 24885, Safat 13109 Kuwait (Kuwait)

    2004-07-01

    E.I.S technique was used to characterize the corrosion behavior of UNS NO. S 31600 stainless steel, UNS NO. S 30400 stainless steel and UNS NO. S 62800 sanicro 28 exposed to continuous fresh Seawater. The total exposure time of the test was about 180 days. Two types of additives (4 ppm of Cl{sub 2} and 5 ppm of NH{sub 3}) were also added to the seawater to investigate their effect on the surfaces of these alloys. During the tests, no marine - macro fouling was observed on the surfaces of the tested alloys, as the seawater was filtrated at the Doha Desalination Research Center, where the study was carried out, but only a slimy layer spread on the whole surface of the alloys. The corrosion behavior of each alloy was monitored by the open circuit potential measurement, and the E.I.S technique using the EG and G 352 software and hardware instrument, where the resistance of the solution (R{sub sol}), the resistance of the surface of the tested alloy (R{sub p}), and the double layer capacitance (Cdl) was calculated. Under this study's experimental conditions, results indicated that the stainless steel alloys were highly resistant to marine fouling and corrosion in seawater, and were not affected by the aggressive additives, such as NH{sub 3}, and Cl{sub 2} in the seawater. (author)

  14. Photo-Electrochemical Effect of Zinc Addition on the Electrochemical Corrosion Potentials of Stainless Steels and Nickel Alloys in High Temperature Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yi-Ching; Fong, Clinton; Fang-Chu, Charles; Chang, Ching

    2012-09-01

    Hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) is one of the main mitigating methods for stress corrosion cracking problem of reactor core stainless steel and nickel based alloy components. Zinc is added to minimize the radiation increase associated with HWC. However, the subsequently formed zinc-containing surface oxides may exhibit p-type semiconducting characteristics. Upon the irradiation of Cherenkov and Gamma ray in the reactor core, the ECP of stainless steels and nickel based alloys may shift in the anodic direction, possibly offsetting the beneficial effect of HWC. This study will evaluate the photo-electrochemical effect of Zinc Water Chemistry on SS304 stainless steel and Alloy 182 nickel based weld metal under simulated irradiated BWR water environments with UV illumination. The experimental results reveal that Alloy 182 nickel-based alloy generally possesses n-type semiconductor characteristics in both oxidizing NWC and reducing HWC conditions with zinc addition. Upon UV irradiation, the ECP of Alloy 182 will shift in the cathodic direction. In most conditions, SS304 will also exhibit n-type semiconducting properties. Only under hydrogen water chemistry, a weak p-type property may emerge. Only a slight upward shift in the anodic direction is detected when SS304 is illuminated with UV light. The potential influence of p-type semiconductor of zinc containing surface oxides is weak and the mitigation effect of HWC on the stress corrosion cracking is not adversely affected. (authors)

  15. Burning velocity measurements of nitrogen-containing compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizawa, Kenji; Takahashi, Akifumi; Tokuhashi, Kazuaki; Kondo, Shigeo; Sekiya, Akira

    2008-06-30

    Burning velocity measurements of nitrogen-containing compounds, i.e., ammonia (NH3), methylamine (CH3NH2), ethylamine (C2H5NH2), and propylamine (C3H7NH2), were carried out to assess the flammability of potential natural refrigerants. The spherical-vessel (SV) method was used to measure the burning velocity over a wide range of sample and air concentrations. In addition, flame propagation was directly observed by the schlieren photography method, which showed that the spherical flame model was applicable to flames with a burning velocity higher than approximately 5 cm s(-1). For CH3NH2, the nozzle burner method was also used to confirm the validity of the results obtained by closed vessel methods. We obtained maximum burning velocities (Su0,max) of 7.2, 24.7, 26.9, and 28.3 cm s(-1) for NH3, CH3NH2, C2H5NH2, and C3H7NH2, respectively. It was noted that the burning velocities of NH3 and CH3NH2 were as high as those of the typical hydrofluorocarbon refrigerants difluoromethane (HFC-32, Su0,max=6.7 cm s(-1)) and 1,1-difluoroethane (HFC-152a, Su0,max=23.6 cm s(-1)), respectively. The burning velocities were compared with those of the parent alkanes, and it was found that introducing an NH2 group into hydrocarbon molecules decreases their burning velocity.

  16. Development of bonding techniques for cryogenic components (2). HIP bonding between Cu Alloys and Ti, cryogenic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Shigeru; Ouchi, Nobuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Fukaya, Kiyoshi [Nihon Advanced Technology Ltd., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Ishiyama, Shintaro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Tsuchiya, Yoshinori; Nakajima, Hideo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    Several joints between dissimilar materials are required in the superconducting (SC) magnet system of SC linear accelerator or fusion reactor, Pure titanium (Ti) is one of candidate materials for a jacket of SC coil of fusion reactor because Ti is non-magnetic material and has a feature that its thermal expansion is similar to SC material in addition to good corrosion resistance and workability. Also, Ti does not require strict control of environment during reaction heat treatment of SC material. Copper (Cu) or Cu-alloy is used in electrical joints and cryogenic stainless steel (SS) is used in cryogenic pipes. Therefore, it is necessary to develop new bonding techniques for joints between Ti, Cu, and SS because jacket, electrical joint and cryogenic pipe have to be bonded each other to cool SC coils. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has started to develop dissimilar material joints bonded by hot isostatic pressing (HIP), which can bring a high strength joint with good tolerance and can applied to a large or complex geometry device. HIP conditions for Cu-Ti, Cu alloy-Ti, Cu alloy-SS were investigated in this study and most stable HIP condition were evaluated by microscopic observation, tensile and bending tests at room temperature. (author)

  17. Heterogeneities in local plastic flow behavior in a dissimilar weld between low-alloy steel and stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mas, Fanny [Université Grenoble Alpes, SIMAP, 38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, SIMAP, 38000 Grenoble (France); Martin, Guilhem, E-mail: guilhem.martin@simap.grenoble-inp.fr [Université Grenoble Alpes, SIMAP, 38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, SIMAP, 38000 Grenoble (France); Lhuissier, Pierre; Bréchet, Yves; Tassin, Catherine [Université Grenoble Alpes, SIMAP, 38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, SIMAP, 38000 Grenoble (France); Roch, François [Areva NP, Tour Areva, 92084 Paris La Défense (France); Todeschini, Patrick [EDF R& D, Avenue des Renardières, 77250 Moret-sur-Loing (France); Simar, Aude [Institute of Mechanics, Materials and Civil Engineering (iMMC), Université catholique de Louvain, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2016-06-14

    In dissimilar welds between low-alloy steel and stainless steel, the post-weld heat-treatment results in a high variety of microstructures coexisting around the fusion line, due to carbon diffusion and carbides dissolution/precipitation. The local constitutive laws in the vicinity of the fusion zone were identified by micro tensile specimens for the sub-millimeter sized zones, equivalent bulk materials representing the decarburized layer using both wet H{sub 2} atmosphere and diffusion couple, and nano-indentation for the carburized regions (i.e. the martensitic band and the austenitic region). The decarburized zone presents only 50% of the yield strength of the low-alloy steel heat affected zone and a ductility doubled. The carburized zones have a yield strength 3–5 times higher than that of the low-alloy steel heat affected zone and have almost no strain hardening capacity. These properties result in heterogeneous plastic deformation happening over only millimeters when the weld is loaded perpendicularly to the weld line, affecting its overall behavior. The constitutive laws experimentally identified were introduced as inputs into a finite elements model of the transverse tensile test performed on the whole dissimilar weld. A good agreement between experiments and simulations was achieved on the global stress-strain curve. The model also well predicts the local strain field measured by microscale DIC. A large out-of-plane deformation due to the hard carburized regions has also been identified.

  18. Alloying effect on hardening of martensite stainless steels of the Fe-Cr-Ni and Fe-Cr-Co systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fel'dgandler, Eh.G.; Savkina, L.Ya.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of alloying elements is considered on the γ → a-transformation and hardening of certain compositions of the ternary Fe-Cr-Ni- and Fe-Cr-Co alloy systems with the martensite structure. In martensite Fe-(10 to 14)% Cr base steels the elements Co, Cu, W, Ni, Mo, Si, Cr decrease, Mn, Si, Mo, Cu increase, and Cr, Ni, Co decrease the temperature of α → γ-transition. The tempering of martensite steels of the Fe-Cr-Ni- and Fe-Cr-Co-systems containing 10 to 14% Cr, 4 to 9% Ni, and 7 to 12% Co does not lead to hardening. Alloyage of the martensite Fe-Cr-Ni-, Fe-Cr-Co- and Fe-Cr-Ni-Co base separately with Mo, W, Si or Cu leads to a hardening during tempering, the hardening being the higher, the higher is the content of Ni and, especially, of Co. The increase in the content of Mo or Si produces the same effect as the increase in the Co content. In on Fe-Cr-Co or Fe-Cr-Ni-Co based steels alloyed with Mo or Si, two temperature ranges of ageing have been revealed which, evidently, have different hardening natures. The compositions studied could serve as the base material for producing maraging stainless steels having a complex variety of properties

  19. Preliminary stress corrosion cracking modeling study of a dissimilar material weld of alloy (INCONEL) 182 with Stainless Steel 316

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aly, Omar F.; Mattar Neto, Miguel, E-mail: ofaly@ipen.br, E-mail: mmattar@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Schvartzman, Monica M.A.M., E-mail: monicas@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Dissimilar welds (DW) are normally used in many components junctions in structural project of PWR (Pressurized Water Reactors) in Nuclear Plants. One had been departed of a DW of a nozzle located at a Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) of a PWR reactor, that joins the structural vessel material with an A316 stainless steel safe end. This weld is basically done with Alloy 182 with a weld buttering of Alloy 82. It had been prepared some axial cylindrical specimens retired from the Alloy 182/A316 weld end to be tested in the slow strain rate test machine located at CDTN laboratory. Based in these stress corrosion susceptibility results, it was done a preliminary semi-empirical modeling application to study the failure initiation time evolution of these specimens. The used model is composed by a deterministic part, and a probabilistic part according to the Weibull distribution. It had been constructed a specific Microsoft Excel worksheet to do the model application of input data. The obtained results had been discussed according with literature and also the model application limits. (author)

  20. The Study on Environmental Fatigue Behavior of Low Alloy Steel and Stainless Steel Pipes Using the Simplified Plant Transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, One; Song, M. S.; Kim, I. Y.; Park, S. H.; Lee, B. S.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear components categorized as ASME Code Class 1 shall be evaluated for the fatigue and satisfy the fatigue acceptance criteria, CUF(cumulative usage factor) < 1 in accordance with ASME Code. However, recent studies have shown the fatigue evaluation procedure may not give conservative results when the components operate in the water environment. NRC issued Regulatory Guide 1.207 which enforces the new fatigue evaluation method or Fen(environmental fatigue correction factor) method to nuclear plants to be newly constructed. This paper describes the characteristics of the behavior of low alloy and austenitic stainless steel straight pipe related to environmental fatigue, which are obtained by using the method suggested by Regulatory Guide 1.207 and simplified plant transients

  1. The role of nitrogen in improving pitting corrosion resistance of high-alloy austenitic and duplex stainless steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilpas, M.; Haenninen, H.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of nitrogen alloyed shielding gas on weld nitrogen content and pitting corrosion resistance of super austenitic (6%Mo) and super duplex stainless steels have been studied with special emphasis on microsegregation behaviour of Cr, Mo and N. The measurements performed with the 6%Mo steel indicate that all these elements segregate interdendritically in the fully austenitic weld metal. With nitrogen addition to the shielding gas the enrichment of nitrogen to the interdendritic regions is more pronounced than to the dendrite cores due to which the pitting corrosion resistance of the dendrite cores increases only marginally. In the super duplex steel welds nitrogen enriches in austenite increasing its pitting corrosion resistance more effectively. In these welds the pitting corrosion resistance of the ferrite phase remains lower. (orig.)

  2. Review of corrosion phenomena on zirconium alloys, niobium, titanium, inconel, stainless steel, and nickel plate under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The role of nuclear fluxes in corrosion processes was investigated in ATR, ETR, PRTR, and in Hanford production reactors. Major effort was directed to zirconium alloy corrosion parameter studies. Corrosion and hydriding results are reported as a function of oxygen concentration in the coolant, flux level, alloy composition, surface pretreatment, and metallurgical condition. Localized corrosion and hydriding at sites of bonding to dissimilar metals are described. Corrosion behavior on specimens transferred from oxygenated to low-oxygen coolants in ETR and ATR experiments is compared. Mechanism studies suggest that a depression in the corrosion of the Zr--2.5Nb alloy under irradiation is due to radiation-induced aging. The radiation-induced onset of transition on several alloys is in general a gradual process which nucleates locally, causing areas of oxide prosity which eventually encompass the surface. Examination of Zry-2 process tubes reveals that accelerated corrosion has occurred in low-oxygen coolants. Hydrogen contents are relatively low, but show some localized profiles. Gross hydriding has occurred on process tubes containing aluminum spacers, apparently by a galvanic charging mechanism. Titanium paralleled Zry-2 in corrosion behavior under irradiation. Niobium corrosion was variable, but did not appear to be strongly influenced by radiation. Corrosion rates on Inconel and stainless steel were only slightly higher in-flux than out-of-reactor. Corrosion rates on nickel-plated aluminum appeared to vary substantially with preexposure treatments, but the rates generally were accelerated compared to rates on unirradiated coupons. (59 references, 11 tables, 12 figs.)

  3. The use of stainless steel and nickel alloys as low-cost cathodes in microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Selembo, Priscilla A.; Merrill, Mathew D.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2009-01-01

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) are used to produce hydrogen gas from the current generated by bacteria, but low-cost alternatives are needed to typical cathode materials (carbon cloth, platinum and Nafion™). Stainless steel A286 was superior to platinum sheet metal in terms of cathodic hydrogen recovery (61% vs. 47%), overall energy recovery (46% vs. 35%), and maximum volumetric hydrogen production rate (1.5 m3 m-3 day-1 vs. 0.68 m3 m-3 day-1) at an applied voltage of 0.9 V. Nickel 625 was better than other nickel alloys, but it did not perform as well as SS A625. The relative ranking of these materials in MEC tests was in agreement with cyclic voltammetry studies. Performance of the stainless steel and nickel cathodes was further increased, even at a lower applied voltage (0.6 V), by electrodepositing a nickel oxide layer onto the sheet metal (cathodic hydrogen recovery, 52%, overall energy recovery, 48%; maximum volumetric hydrogen production rate, 0.76 m3 m-3 day-1). However, performance of the nickel oxide cathodes decreased over time due to a reduction in mechanical stability of the oxides (based on SEM-EDS analysis). These results demonstrate that non-precious metal cathodes can be used in MECs to achieve hydrogen gas production rates better than those obtained with platinum. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The use of stainless steel and nickel alloys as low-cost cathodes in microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Selembo, Priscilla A.

    2009-05-01

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) are used to produce hydrogen gas from the current generated by bacteria, but low-cost alternatives are needed to typical cathode materials (carbon cloth, platinum and Nafion™). Stainless steel A286 was superior to platinum sheet metal in terms of cathodic hydrogen recovery (61% vs. 47%), overall energy recovery (46% vs. 35%), and maximum volumetric hydrogen production rate (1.5 m3 m-3 day-1 vs. 0.68 m3 m-3 day-1) at an applied voltage of 0.9 V. Nickel 625 was better than other nickel alloys, but it did not perform as well as SS A625. The relative ranking of these materials in MEC tests was in agreement with cyclic voltammetry studies. Performance of the stainless steel and nickel cathodes was further increased, even at a lower applied voltage (0.6 V), by electrodepositing a nickel oxide layer onto the sheet metal (cathodic hydrogen recovery, 52%, overall energy recovery, 48%; maximum volumetric hydrogen production rate, 0.76 m3 m-3 day-1). However, performance of the nickel oxide cathodes decreased over time due to a reduction in mechanical stability of the oxides (based on SEM-EDS analysis). These results demonstrate that non-precious metal cathodes can be used in MECs to achieve hydrogen gas production rates better than those obtained with platinum. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of water purity on intergranular stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel and nickel alloys in BWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, B. [Structural Integrity Associates (United States); Garcia, S. [Electric Power Research Institute (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Boiling water reactors (BWRs) operate with very high purity water. While even the utilization of a very low conductivity water (e.g., 0.06 {mu}S/cm) coolant cannot prevent intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of sensitized stainless steel and nickel alloys under oxygenated conditions, the presence of certain impurities in the coolant can dramatically increase the probability of this most insidious form of corrosion. The goal of this paper is to present the effect of effect of only a few ionic impurities plus zinc on the IGSCC propensities of BWR stainless steel piping and reactor internals under both oxygenated, i.e., normal water chemistry (NWC) and deoxygenated, i.e., hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) conditions. More specifically, of the numerous impurities identified in the BWR coolant (e.g., lithium, sodium, potassium, silica, borate, chromate, phosphate, sulphate, chloride, nitrate, cuprous, cupric, ferrous, etc.) only strong acid anions sulfate and chloride that are stable in the highly reducing crack tip environment rather than the bulk water conductivity will be discussed in detail. Nitrate will be briefly discussed as representing a species that is not thermodynamically stable in the crack while the effects of zinc is discussed as a deliberate additive to the BWR environment. (authors)

  6. Hydrogen-Induced Delayed Cracking in TRIP-Aided Lean-Alloyed Ferritic-Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvi Papula

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Susceptibility of three lean-alloyed ferritic-austenitic stainless steels to hydrogen-induced delayed cracking was examined, concentrating on internal hydrogen contained in the materials after production operations. The aim was to study the role of strain-induced austenite to martensite transformation in the delayed cracking susceptibility. According to the conducted deep drawing tests and constant load tensile testing, the studied materials seem not to be particularly susceptible to delayed cracking. Delayed cracks were only occasionally initiated in two of the materials at high local stress levels. However, if a delayed crack initiated in a highly stressed location, strain-induced martensite transformation decreased the crack arrest tendency of the austenite phase in a duplex microstructure. According to electron microscopy examination and electron backscattering diffraction analysis, the fracture mode was predominantly cleavage, and cracks propagated along the body-centered cubic (BCC phases ferrite and α’-martensite. The BCC crystal structure enables fast diffusion of hydrogen to the crack tip area. No delayed cracking was observed in the stainless steel that had high austenite stability. Thus, it can be concluded that the presence of α’-martensite increases the hydrogen-induced cracking susceptibility.

  7. Laser Welding Characterization of Kovar and Stainless Steel Alloys as Suitable Materials for Components of Photonic Devices Packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadhali, M. M. A.; Zainal, Saktioto J.; Munajat, Y.; Jalil, A.; Rahman, R.

    2010-01-01

    The weldability of Kovar and stainless steel alloys by Nd:YAG laser beam is studied through changing of some laser beam parameters. It has been found that there is a suitable interaction of the pulsed laser beam of low power laser pulse with both the two alloys. The change of thermophysical properties with absorbed energy from the laser pulse is discussed in this paper which reports the suitability of both Kovar and stainless steel 304 as the base materials for photonic devices packaging. We used laser weld system (LW4000S from Newport) which employs Nd:YAG laser system with two simultaneous beams output for packaging 980 nm high power laser module. Results of changing both laser spot weld width and penetration depth with changing both the pulse peak power density, pulse energy and pulse duration show that there are good linear relationships between laser pulse energy or peak power density and pulse duration with laser spot weld dimensions( both laser spot weld width and penetration depth). Therefore we concluded that there should be an optimization for both the pulse peak power and pulse duration to give a suitable aspect ratio (laser spot width to penetration depth) for achieving the desired welds with suitable penetration depth and small spot width. This is to reduce the heat affected zone (HAZ) which affects the sensitive optical components. An optimum value of the power density in the order of 10 5 w/cm 2 found to be suitable to induce melting in the welded joints without vaporization. The desired ratio can also be optimized by changing the focus position on the target material as illustrated from our measurements. A theoretical model is developed to simulate the temperature distribution during the laser pulse heating and predict the penetration depth inside the material. Samples have been investigated using SEM with EDS. The metallographic measurements on the weld spot show a suitable weld yield with reasonable weld width to depth ratio.

  8. Study and development of solid fluxes for gas tungsten arc welding applied to titanium and its alloys and stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, N.

    2000-06-01

    Gas Tungsten Arc Welding uses an electric arc between the refractory tungsten electrode and the plates to be welded under an argon shielding gas. As a result, the joint quality is excellent, no pollution nor defects are to be feared, consequently this process is used in nuclear, aeronautic, chemical and food industries. Despite of this good qualities, GTAW is limited because of, on the one side, a poor penetrating weld pool and, on the other side, a week productivity rate. Indeed, up to 3 mm thick plates, machining and filler metal is needed. Multiple runs increase the defect's risks, the manufactory time and increase the deformations and the heat affected zone. The goal of this study is to break through this limits without any device investment. Active GTA welding (or ATIG) is a new technique with GTA device and an activating flux to be spread on the upper plate before welding. The arc, by plasma electrochemical equilibrium modifications, and the pool with the inner connective flows inversion, allow 7 mm thick joints in one run without edges machining or filler metal for both stainless steel and titanium alloys. This manuscript describes the development of these fluxes, highlights the several phenomena and presents the possibilities of this new process. This work, in collaboration with B.S.L. industries, leads to two flux formulations (stainless steel and titanium alloys) now in a commercial phase with CASTOLIN S.A. Moreover, B.S.L.industries produces a pressure device (nitrate column) with the ATIG process using more than 2800 ATIG welds. (author)

  9. Structure and microstructure evolution of a ternary Fe–Cr–Ni alloy akin to super martensitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravi Kumar, B.; Sharma, Sailaja; Munda, Parikshit; Minz, R.K.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Reaustenisation by recrystallisation rather by a diffusion controlled process. • Ultrafine grained austenite formation in martensite matrix by recrystallisation. • In situ high temperature austenite transformation studies by X-ray diffraction. • Microstructure tailoring to achieve tensile strength (∼1 GPa) with good ductility. - Abstract: A ternary Fe–Cr–Ni alloy, akin to super martensitic stainless steels was prepared in vacuum induction furnace. The as cast ingot was solution treated at 1200 °C for 25 h and then hot forged and rolled to reduce into plate form. The hot rolled plate of martensitic microstructure was then cold rolled to 80% of thickness reduction. The phase transformation studies by X-ray diffraction analysis of hot and cold rolled specimens showed presence of retained austenite in air cooled as well as in water quenched state after annealing/austenising temperature of 1060 °C. The reaustenisation behaviour of the cold rolled alloy in water quenched state was studied by high temperature X-ray diffraction analysis. It showed very stable martensitic phase and the completion of reaustenisation process were observed to occur at about 950 °C. The recrystallisation behaviour of cold rolled material under isothermal and repeated annealing treatment was studied in detail by electron microscope. The tensile properties of the material were evaluated after various annealing treatments. The study revealed that by a suitable sequence of repetitive annealing process microstructure could be tailored to achieve tensile strength above 1 GPa with good ductility in a super martensitic stainless steel

  10. An electroplated copper–silver alloy as antibacterial coating on stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciacotich, Nicole; Din, Rameez Ud; Sloth, Jens Jørgen

    2018-01-01

    Transfer and growth of pathogenic microorganisms must be prevented in many areas such as the clinical sector. One element of transfer is the adhesion of pathogens to different surfaces and the purpose of the present study was to develop and investigate the antibacterial efficacy of stainless stee...

  11. Austenitic stainless steel alloys having improved resistance to fast neutron-induced swelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    A specification is provided for an austenitic stainless steel consisting of Fe, Cr and Ni, with small amounts of Mo, Mn, Si and Ti. The specification includes a fuel element and a method for cladding a reactor fuel. (U.K.)

  12. Austenitic stainless steel alloys having improved resistance to fast neutron-induced swelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, E.E.; Stiegler, J.O.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Leitnaker, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    The present invention is based on the discovery that radiation-induced voids which occur during fast neutron irradiation can be controlled by small but effective additions of titanium and silicon. The void-suppressing effect of these metals in combination is demonstrated and particularly apparent in austenitic stainless steels. 3 figures, 3 tables

  13. Austenitic stainless steel alloys having improved resistance to fast neutron-induced swelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, E.E.; Stiegler, J.O.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Leitnaker, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    The present invention is based on the discovery that radiation-induced voids which occur during fast neutron irradiation can be controlled by small but effective additions of titanium and silicon. The void-suppressing effect of these metals in combination is demonstrated and particularly apparent in austenitic stainless steels

  14. Microstructural-Scale Model for Surfaces Spreading of Intergranular Corrosion in Sensitized Stainless Steels and Aluminum-Magnesium (AA5XXX) Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Swati

    Components from AA5XXX (Al-Mg alloys with more than 3 wt% Mg) alloys are X attractive due to availability of low cost, high strength to weight ratio and good weldability. Therefore, these alloys have potential applications in Naval ships. However, these alloys become susceptible to IGC (intergranular corrosion) due to beta-phase precipitation due to improper heat treatment or inadvertent thermal exposure. Stainless steels may also become susceptible due to carbide precipitation and chromium depletion on grain boundaries. IGC susceptibility depends on the interplay between the metallurgical conditions, electrochemical conditions, and chemical conditions. Specific combinations cause IGC while others do not. The objective of this study is to investigate the conditions which bring about surface spreading of IGC in these alloy classes. To accomplish this goal, a microstructure scale model was developed with experimental inputs to understand the 2-D IGC spreading in stainless steels and AA5XXX alloys. The conditions strongly affecting IGC spreading were elucidated. Upon natural and artificial aging, the stainless steels become susceptible to intergranular corrosion because of chromium depletion in the grain boundaries. After aging Al-Mg (AA5XXX) alloys show susceptibility due to the precipitation of the beta-phase (Al3Mg7) in the grain boundaries. Chromium depleted grain boundaries in stainless steels are anodically more active as compared to the interior of the grains. (3-phase rich grain boundaries have lower OCP (open circuit potential) and pitting potentials as compared to the Al-Mg solid solutions. A new approach to modeling the IGC surface spreading in polycrystalline materials that is presented. This model is the first to couple several factors into one granular scale model that illustrates the way in which they interact and IGC occurs. It sheds new information on conditions which cause IGC spreading in two alloy classes and describes a new theory for the critical

  15. Characterization of oxide scales grown on alloy 310S stainless steel after long term exposure to supercritical water at 500 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behnamian, Yashar, E-mail: behnamia@ualberta.ca [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1H9 (Canada); Mostafaei, Amir [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Kohandehghan, Alireza [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1H9 (Canada); Amirkhiz, Babak Shalchi [Canmet MATERIALS, Natural Resources Canada, Hamilton, Ontario L8P 0A5 (Canada); Serate, Daniel [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1H9 (Canada); Zheng, Wenyue [Canmet MATERIALS, Natural Resources Canada, Hamilton, Ontario L8P 0A5 (Canada); Guzonas, David [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario K0J 1J0 (Canada); Chmielus, Markus [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Chen, Weixing, E-mail: Weixing@ualberta.ca [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1H9 (Canada); Luo, Jing Li, E-mail: Jingli.luo@ualberta.ca [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1H9 (Canada)

    2016-10-15

    The oxide scale grown of static capsules made of alloy 310S stainless steel was investigated by exposure to the supercritical water at 500 °C 25 MPa for various exposure times up to 20,000 h. Characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction, scanning/transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and fast Fourier transformation were employed on the oxide scales. The elemental and phase analyses indicated that long term exposure to the SCW resulted in the formation of scales identified as Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (outer layer), Fe-Cr spinel (inner layer), Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} (transition layer) on the substrate, and Ni-enrichment (chrome depleted region) in the alloy 310S. It was found that the layer thickness and weight gain vs. exposure time followed parabolic law. The oxidation mechanism and scales grown on the alloy 310S stainless steel exposed to SCW are discussed. - Highlights: •Oxidation of alloy 310S stainless steel exposed to SCW (500 °C/25 MPa) •The layer thickness and weight gain vs. exposure time followed parabolic law. •Oxide layers including Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (outer), Fe-Cr spinel (inner) and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} (transition) •Ni element is segregated by the selective oxidation of Cr.

  16. Laser surface alloying of 316L stainless steel with Ru and Ni mixtures

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lekala, MB

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available an economically sound approach of modifying corrosion properties of alloys. Furthermore, since corrosion is a surface phenomenon, an equally cost-effective approach is to add these only on the surface, where protection is most required. Laser surface... powders were preplaced on the steel surface using a chemical binder. The thickness of the preplaced powder coatings could be controlled to approxi- mately 1mm. The laser surface alloying was performed with a Rofin Sinar DY044 continuous wave Nd : YAG...

  17. Influence of pH on the chemical and structural properties of the oxide films formed on 316L stainless steel, alloy 600 and alloy 690 in high temperature aqueous environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupin, M.; Gosser, P.; Walls, M.G.; Rondot, B.; Pastol, J.L.

    2002-01-01

    The oxide films formed on 316L stainless steel, alloy 600 and alloy 690 at 320 deg C in high temperature aqueous environments of different pH have been examined by glow discharge optical spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and capacitance measurements. The analytical study reveals that the films formed at pH 5 are mainly composed of chromium oxides. When the pH increases the chromium concentration decreases and those of the other two elements (Ni and Fe) tend to increase. The films formed at pH 5 on 316L stainless steel and alloy 600 are thick and powder-like. The film formed at the same pH on alloy 690 is thin and is composed of a compact protective inner layer and a less-compact outer layer formed by crystals of mixed iron-nickel-chromium oxides. The morphological appearance of the thick films and that of the thin films is very different. However, equivalent morphologies can be observed for the relatively thin duplex films formed at pH 8 and pH 9.5 on the 316L stainless steel and nickel-base alloys. The evolution of the chemical composition of the films is accompanied by important changes from the point of view of their semi-conductivity. (authors)

  18. NASA and ESA Collaboration on Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation: Parameter Optimization of Citric Acid Passivation for Stainless Steel Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2016-01-01

    reduced operational cost. The primary objective of this effort is to qualify citric acid as an environmentally-preferable alternative to nitric acid for the passivation of stainless steel alloys. While citric acid use has become more prominent in industry, there is little evidence that citric acid is a technically sound passivation agent, especially for the unique and critical applications encountered by NASA and ESA.

  19. The effect of alloyed nitrogen or dissolved nitrate ions on the anodic behaviour of austenitic stainless steel in hydrochloric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahrabi, T.

    2004-01-01

    The anodic behaviour of high purity stainless steels, based on a 316L composition, has been studied at room temperature in HCl solutions from 1 to 6 M. For all acid concentrations, the presence of 0.22% nitrogen has little or no effect on the active dissolution kinetics at low over-potentials. The effect on the critical current density for passivation is also small for low HCl concentrations ( 4.5 M), no passivation occurs and again nitrogen has little effect. However, for HCl concentrations around 4 M nitrogen reversibly impedes active dissolution at a few hundred mA cm -2 . The effect does not appear to be an oxide passivation, but is more likely to be due to surface enrichment of nitrogen atoms. Implications for localized corrosion are discussed. An effect similar to that of nitrogen alloying is reproduced on a nitrogen free alloy by adding 2 M NaNO 3 to a 4M HCl solution. This effect is distinct from the passivation of salt-covered surfaces and may be preferable to the latter as an explanation of the increase in pitting potential by nitrate additions to NaCl solutions. Passivation under a salt film is retained to explain the passivation of growing pits above the inhibition potential. (authors)

  20. Microstructure and Interfacial Reactions During Vacuum Brazing of Stainless Steel to Titanium Using Ag-28 pct Cu Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laik, A.; Shirzadi, A. A.; Sharma, G.; Tewari, R.; Jayakumar, T.; Dey, G. K.

    2015-02-01

    Microstructural evolution and interfacial reactions during vacuum brazing of grade-2 Ti and 304L-type stainless steel (SS) using eutectic alloy Ag-28 wt pct Cu were investigated. A thin Ni-depleted zone of -Fe(Cr, Ni) solid solution formed on the SS-side of the braze zone (BZ). Cu from the braze alloy, in combination with the dissolved Fe and Ti from the base materials, formed a layer of ternary compound , adjacent to Ti in the BZ. In addition, four binary intermetallic compounds, CuTi, CuTi, CuTi and CuTi formed as parallel contiguous layers in the BZ. The unreacted Ag solidified as islands within the layers of CuTi and CuTi. Formation of an amorphous phase at certain locations in the BZ could be revealed. The -Ti(Cu) layer, formed due to diffusion of Cu into Ti-based material, transformed to an -Ti + CuTi eutectoid with lamellar morphology. Tensile test showed that the brazed joints had strength of 112 MPa and failed at the BZ. The possible sequence of events that led to the final microstructure and the mode of failure of these joints were delineated.

  1. Constant Load SCC Initiation Response of Alloy 22 (UNS N06022), Titanium Grade 7 and Stainless Steels at 1050C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, L.M.; Catlin, G.M.; Andresen, P.L.; Gordon, G.M.

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides an update on research addressing the effects of material condition and applied stress on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in waste package and drip shield materials for the Yucca Mountain Project. Time-to-failure experiments are being performed on smooth bar tensile specimens in a hot, concentrated, mixed-salt solution chosen to simulate concentrated Yucca Mountain water. The effects of applied stress, welding, surface finish, shot peening, cold work, crevicing, and aging treatment are being investigated for Alloy 22 (UNS N06022). Aging treatments were designed to produce topologically close-packed phases (TCP) and long-range ordering (LRO) and are under investigation as worse-case scenarios for possible microstructures in Alloy 22 (UNS N06022). Titanium Grade 7 and 3 16NG stainless steel are included in the matrix, as they are identified for drip shield and waste package components, respectively. Sensitized 304SS specimens are included in the test matrix to provide benchmark data. This research complements high-resolution crack-growth-rate experiments currently being performed in a parallel research project

  2. Microstructures and mechanical properties of magnesium alloy and stainless steel weld-joint made by friction stir lap welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Yanni; Li, Jinglong; Xiong, Jiangtao; Huang, Fu; Zhang, Fusheng

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → Friction stir lap welding technology with cutting pin was successfully employed to form lap joint of magnesium and steel. → The cutting pin made the lower steel participate in deformation and the interface was no longer flat. → A saw-toothed structure formed due to a mechanical mixing of the magnesium and steel was found at the interface. → A high-strength joint was produced which fractured in the magnesium side. -- Abstract: Friction stir lap welding was conducted on soft/hard metals. A welding tool was designed with a cutting pin of rotary burr made of tungsten carbide, which makes the stirring pin possible to penetrate and cut the surface layer of the hard metal. Magnesium alloy AZ31 and stainless steel SUS302 were chosen as soft/hard base metals. The structures of the joining interface were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The joining strength was evaluated by tensile shear test. The results showed that flower-like interfacial morphologies were presented with steel flashes and scraps, which formed bonding mechanisms of nail effect by long steel flashes, zipper effect by saw-tooth structure and metallurgical bonding. The shear strength of the lap joint falls around the shear strength of butt joint of friction stir welded magnesium alloy.

  3. Physical properties and microstructure study of stainless steel 316L alloy fabricated by selective laser melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Nurul Kamariah Md Saiful; Harun, Wan Sharuzi Wan; Ghani, Saiful Anwar Che; Omar, Mohd Asnawi; Ramli, Mohd Hazlen; Ismail, Muhammad Hussain

    2017-12-01

    Selective Laser Melting (SLM) demonstrates the 21st century's manufacturing infrastructure in which powdered raw material is melted by a high energy focused laser, and built up layer-by-layer until it forms three-dimensional metal parts. SLM process involves a variation of process parameters which affects the final material properties. 316L stainless steel compacts through the manipulation of building orientation and powder layer thickness parameters were manufactured by SLM. The effect of the manipulated parameters on the relative density and dimensional accuracy of the 316L stainless steel compacts, which were in the as-build condition, were experimented and analysed. The relationship between the microstructures and the physical properties of fabricated 316L stainless steel compacts was investigated in this study. The results revealed that 90° building orientation has higher relative density and dimensional accuracy than 0° building orientation. Building orientation was found to give more significant effect in terms of dimensional accuracy, and relative density of SLM compacts compare to build layer thickness. Nevertheless, the existence of large number and sizes of pores greatly influences the low performances of the density.

  4. On the corrosion testing of weldments of high alloyed CrNiMo-stainless steels and NiCrMo-alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedel, G.; Voigt, C.; Werner, H.

    1997-01-01

    Weldments of high-alloyed CrNiMo stainless steels and NiCrMo alloys can be more susceptible to localized corrosion than the solution annealed basic material owing to segregations and precipitations in the heat affected zone, the high temperature zone and/or in the weld. To investigate these differences the FeCl 3 -test (10% FeCl 3 . 6aq), the test ''green death'' (11.5% H 2 SO 4 , 1.2% HCl, 1% CuCl 2 , 1% FeCl 3 ) as well as chronopotentiostatic tests in artificial sea water or in 3% NaCl-solution are used. In particular for testing the highest alloyed materials a CaCl 2 -test was developed (4.5 M CaCl 2 , chronopotentiostatic test in duration of 8 to 10 hours at + 200 mV (SCE)), which can be carried out to a temperature of 115 C at atmospheric pressure. The aggressivity increases in the range FeCl 3 -test, ''green death''-test, CaCl 2 -test. Matching and graduated over-alloyed weldments (TIG, heat input of 7 and 15.5 kJ/cm) of materials 1.4529, 1.4562, 2.4856, 2.4819 (german materials No.) are comparingly examined in various tests, of materials 1.4406, 1.4539, 1.4439 and 1.4563 (german materials No.) only matching weldments in the FeCl 3 -test. In strongly oxidizing media only a highly over-alloyed performed weldment (filler material 2.4607, german material No.) produces the best corrosion behaviour, measured as the critical temperatures of localized corrosion. Measurements of critical current densities of passivation can be used for investigations of corrosion behaviour of weldments, too. Critical current densities of passivation are showing a tendency to inverse proportion to the critical temperatures of localized corrosion. Suitable electrolytes are among others 0.2 M H 2 SO 4 + 1 M NaCl + 10 -3 % KSCN, N 2 -bubbled, 25 to 60 C and xM H 2 SO 4 + 4 M NaCl + 10 -3 % KSCN (x = 0.05 to 1), 25 C, in contact with air. An influence of heat input at the welding is indicated in the test of localized corrosion, but it is only small. It is sometimes more clearly shown at

  5. Effects of minor alloying additions on the strength and swelling behavior of an austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gessel, G.R.

    1978-06-01

    A set of 32 alloys consisting of various additions of the elements Mo, W, Al, Ti, Nb, C and Si to an Fe-7.5 Cr-20 Ni alloy were made in order to investigate the effects of these solute additions on alloy swelling and strength. Both single and multiple additions were examined. The influence of various solute elements on the swelling behavior in the range 500 to 730 0 C was investigated using 4 MeV Ni ion bombardment to a dose 170 dpa. It was found that on an atomic percent basis, the elements may be arranged in order of decreasing effectiveness in reducing peak temperature swelling as follows: Ti, C, Nb, Si, and Mo. Small amounts of aluminum enhance swelling. Additions of Si, Ti, or Nb truncate the high temperature swelling regime of the ternary alloy. Mo, W, and C do not have a strong effect on the temperature dependence of swelling. The results may be interpreted in terms of the effect of point defect trapping on void growth rates, and it is suggested that the changes in peak temperature are the result of small changes in the free vacancy formation energy. A method for treating certain multiple additions is proposed. The effect of these alloying additions on short time high temperature strength properties was estimated using hot hardness measurements over the temperature range 22 to 850 0 C. On an atom percent basis Nb and Ti were most effective in conferring solid solution strengthening and Si the least effective. In the regime 22 to approximately 650 0 C, the hardness data was found to fit an equation of the form: H = H 0 + b/T; where H is the hardness, T is the temperature, and H 0 and b are constants for a given alloy. An empirical method was devised to estimate the hot hardness of alloys containing more than one solute addition

  6. Formation of nitrogen-containing compounds during microwave pyrolysis of microalgae: Product distribution and reaction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Feng; Tahmasebi, Arash; Maliutina, Kristina; Yu, Jianglong

    2017-12-01

    The formation of nitrogen-containing compounds in bio-oil during microwave pyrolysis of Chlorella and Spirulina microalgae has been investigated in this study. Activated carbon (AC) and magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) were used as microwave receptors during microwave pyrolysis experiments. It has been found that the use of Fe 3 O 4 increased the total yield of bio-oil. The use of different microwave receptors did not seem to have affected the total yield of nitrogen-containing compounds in the bio-oil. However, Fe 3 O 4 promoted the formation of nitrogen-containing aliphatics, thereby reducing the formation of nitrogen-containing aromatics. The use of AC promoted the dehydration reactions during amino acid decomposition, thereby enhancing the formation of nitrogen-containing aromatics during pyrolysis. From the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis results, the major high-value nitrogen-containing compounds in the pyrolysis bio-oil of Chlorella and Spirulina were identified as indole and dodecamide. The formation mechanisms of nitrogen-containing compounds were proposed and discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Hot Ductility Behaviors in the Weld Heat-Affected Zone of Nitrogen-Alloyed Fe-18Cr-10Mn Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Joonoh; Lee, Tae-Ho; Hong, Hyun-Uk

    2015-04-01

    Hot ductility behaviors in the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) of nitrogen-alloyed Fe-18Cr-10Mn austenitic stainless steels with different nitrogen contents were evaluated through hot tension tests using Gleeble simulator. The results of Gleeble simulations indicated that hot ductility in the HAZs deteriorated due to the formation of δ-ferrite and intergranular Cr2N particles. In addition, the amount of hot ductility degradation was strongly affected by the fraction of δ-ferrite.

  8. Standard practice for evaluation of disbonding of bimetallic stainless alloy/steel plate for use in high-pressure, high-temperature refinery hydrogen service

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2001-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers a procedure for the evaluation of disbonding of bimetallic stainless alloy/steel plate for use in refinery high-pressure/high-temperature (HP/HT) gaseous hydrogen service. It includes procedures to (1) produce suitable laboratory test specimens, (2) obtain hydrogen charging conditions in the laboratory that are similar to those found in refinery HP/HT hydrogen gas service for evaluation of bimetallic specimens exposed to these environments, and (3) perform analysis of the test data. The purpose of this practice is to allow for comparison of data among test laboratories on the resistance of bimetallic stainless alloy/steels to hydrogen-induced disbonding (HID). 1.2 This practice applies primarily to bimetallic products fabricated by weld overlay of stainless alloy onto a steel substrate. Most of the information developed using this practice has been obtained for such materials. The procedures described herein, may also be appropriate for evaluation of hot roll bonded, explosive bonded...

  9. Recovery in cold-worked alloy under pressure: example of AISI 316 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousuf, M; Sahu, P C; Raghunathan, V S; Govinda Rajan, K

    1986-06-01

    In this paper we report the behaviour of defects under high pressure in severely cold-deformed 316 stainless steel. In situ electrical resistivity measurements indicate a minimum in the reduced resistivity ratio at 2 GPa associated with a characteristic relaxation time of 500 + - 5 sec. Microhardness data on pressure-treated and recovered samples are consistent with the electrical resistivity behaviour. X-ray powder diffraction rings indicate sharpening beyond 2 GPa. The decrease in the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the strongest ring is about 2% at pressures beyond 2 GPa. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that samples pressure treated beyond 2 GPa have a polygonized dislocation structure. This is in sharp contrast to the tangled dislocation structure observed in the cold-worked samples. The experimental results suggest a recovery stage in cold-worked stainless steel at 2 GPa. We propose that the recovery process is activated through an enhanced vacancy concentration caused by deformation, a pressure-induced vacancy-dislocation interaction and consequently a pressure-assisted dislocation mobility leading to polygonization.

  10. Influence of alloy elements on physical and mechanical properties of single crystalline austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Kazutaka; Kaneda, Junya; Yoshinari, Akira; Aono, Yasuhisa

    2000-01-01

    The single crystalline austenitic stainless steels based on 316 L were developed to improve their resistance to intergranular corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. However the mechanical properties of the single crystals were lower than those of polycrystalline. The precipitation hardening methods were applied to the single crystal for the increase of their mechanical strength by addition of niobium and heat treatments. In this paper, the influences of niobium concentration on the several physical and mechanical properties of these single crystalline austenitic stainless steels were studied. The thermal conductivity, coefficients of thermal expansion and elastic constants of the single crystals were almost the same as those of polycrystalline independently of the niobium concentration. The mechanical properties of the single crystals strongly depended on the niobium concentration and the orientation. In the specimen which contains 1.0 mass% niobium, 0.2% proof stress were remarkably improved; 370 MPa, 337 MPa and 403 MPa were obtained in , and orientations at the room temperature. The creep rupture strength and the high cycle fatigue strength were also improved by addition of niobium. In the -orientated specimen which contains 1.0 mass% niobium, the creep rupture strength at 873 K for 103 hours, 245 MPa and the high cycle fatigue strength at 773 K for 107 cycles, 220 MPa were obtained. Furthermore, the single crystalline pipe, bolts and nuts were successfully manufactured for the application of these single crystals. (author)

  11. Phosphorylated Derivatives of Alkaloids and Nitrogen-containing Heterocycles — Cholinesterase Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadykov, Abid S.; Dalimov, D. N.; Godovikov, Nikolai N.

    1983-10-01

    The review deals with the synthesis and anticholinesterase activities of phosphorylated derivatives of certain alkaloids and nitrogen-containing heterocycles. It is shown that the conformational properties of the alkaloid and nitrogen-containing heterocycle residues in the composition of the organophosphorus inhibitor (OPI) molecule play an important role in the inhibition of the catalytic activity of cholinesterases. The type of inhibition of cholinesterases also varies as a function of chemical structure. The bibliography includes 45 references.

  12. The electroplated Pd–Co alloy film on 316 L stainless steel and the corrosion resistance in boiling acetic acid and formic acid mixture with stirring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Sirui; Zuo, Yu, E-mail: zuoy@mail.buct.edu.cn; Tang, Yuming; Zhao, Xuhui

    2014-12-01

    Highlights: • Pd–Co alloy films were deposited on 316 L stainless steel by electroplating. • The Pd–Co films show fine grain size, low porosity and obviously high hardness. • In strong acids with Br{sup −} and stirring, Pd–Co films show good corrosion resistance. • The high hardness of Pd–Co film retards the development of micro-pores in the film. - Abstract: Pd–Co alloy films were deposited on 316 L stainless steel by electroplating. Scanning electronic microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, weight loss test and polarization test were used to determine the properties of the Pd–Co alloy films. The Pd–Co films show fine grain size, low porosity and obviously high micro-hardness. The Co content in the film can be controlled in a large range from 21.9 at.% to 57.42 at.%. Pd is rich on the Pd–Co film surface, which is benefit to increase the corrosion resistance. In boiling 90% acetic acid plus 10% formic acid mixture with 0.005 M Br{sup −} under stirring, the Pd–Co plated stainless steel samples exhibit evidently better corrosion resistance in contrast to Pd plated samples. The good corrosion resistance of the Pd–Co alloy film is explained by the better compactness, the lower porosity, and the obviously higher micro-hardness of the alloy films, which increases the resistance to erosion and retards the development of micro-pores in the film.

  13. Dresden 1 Radiation Level Reduction Program. Intergranular corrosion tests of sensitized Type-304 stainless steel in Dow NS-1, and stress corrosion cracking tests of Type-304 stainless steel and carbon and low alloy steels in Dow copper rinse solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, W.L.

    1978-09-01

    Corrosion tests were performed to evaluate the extent of intergranular attack on sensitized Type-304 stainless steel by a proprietary Dow Chemical solvent, NS-1, which is to be used in the chemical cleaning of the Dresden 1 primary system. In addition, tests were performed to evaluate stress corrosion cracking of sensitized Type-304 stainless steel and post-weld heat-treated ASTM A336-F1, A302-B, and A106-B carbon and low alloy steels in a solution to be used to remove residual metallic copper from the Dresden 1 primary system surfaces following the chemical cleaning. No evidence of deleterious corrosion was observed in either set of tests

  14. Cavitation Erosion of Electro Spark Deposited Nitinol vs. Stellite Alloy on Stainless Steel Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-15

    lower proportion of carbon. The lower carbon content of SS-316L allows lower carbide precipitation for welding . Online Metals SS-2205 Duplex ...erosion, per ASTM G32. As a comparison, a known erosion-resistant, weld -friendly alloy called Stellite 6® was ESD’d and its cavitation erosion resistance...Microscopy was conducted to examine the metallurgical bond established by the ESD process. As a comparison, a known erosion resistant, weld

  15. The influence of cooling rate on the microstructure of stainless steel alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmer, J.W.

    1988-09-01

    The emergence of high energy density welding, laser surface modification and rapid solidification as commonly used metallurgical processing techniques has greatly increased the range of cooling rates that can be accessed during the solidification of metals and alloys. The microstructures which develop during these rapid cooling conditions may be significantly different from those which develop during low cooling rate conditions as the result of access to new metastable phases with the additional kinetic limitations that accompany rapid solidification. This investigation explores the influence of cooling rate on a series of seven ternary alloys which span the line of two-fold saturation in the Fe-Ni-Cr system. High speed electron beam surface melting was used to resolidify these alloys at scan speeds up to 5 m/s. The resulting cooling rates were estimated from dendrite arm spacing measurements and were confirmed by heat flow modeling to vary from 7 /times/ 10/sup 0/ /degree/C/s to 8 /times/ 10/sup 6/ /degree/C/s. The microstructures that developed from each solidification condition were examined using optical metallography, electron microprobe analysis, scanning electron microscopy and a vibrating sample magnetometer. These results were used to create diagrams to predict the primary mode of solidification, the ferrite content and the complex microstructural morphologies which develop as a function of interface velocity and composition. 158 refs., 90 figs., 45 tabs.

  16. Solid state alloying by plasma nitriding and diffusion annealing treatment for austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinedo, C.E.; Vatavuk, J.; Oliveira, S.D. de; Tschiptschin, A.P.

    1999-01-01

    Nitrogen has been added to stainless steels to improve mechanical strength and corrosion resistance. High nitrogen steel production is limited by high gas pressure requirements and low nitrogen solubility in the melt. One way to overcome this limitation is the addition of nitrogen in solid state because of its higher solubility in austenite. However, gas and salt bath nitriding have been done at temperatures around 550 C, where nitrogen solubility in the steel is still very low. High temperature nitriding has been, thus proposed to increase nitrogen contents in the steel but the presence of oxide layers on top of the steel is a barrier to nitrogen intake. In this paper a modified plasma nitriding process is proposed. The first step of this process is a hydrogen plasma sputtering for oxide removal, exposing active steel surface improving nitrogen pickup. This is followed by a nitriding step where high nitrogen contents are introduced in the outermost layer of the steel. Diffusion annealing is then performed in order to allow nitrogen diffusion into the core. AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel was plasma nitrided and diffusion annealed at 1423K, for 6 hours, with 0.2 MPa nitrogen pressure. The nitrided steel presented ∝60 μm outermost compact layer of (Fe,Cr) 3 N and (Fe,Cr) 4 N with 11 wt.% N measured by surface depth profiling chemical analysis - GDS system. During the annealing treatment the nitride layer was dissolved and nitrogen diffused to the core of the sample leaving more even nitrogen distribution into the steel. Using this technique one-millimetre thick sample were obtained having high nitrogen content and uniform distribution through the thickness. (orig.)

  17. Weldability of Stainless Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saida, Kazuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    It gives an outline of metallographic properties of welding zone of stainless steels, generation and mechanisms of welding crack and decreasing of corrosion resistance of welding zone. It consists of seven chapters such as introduction, some kinds of stainless steels and properties, metallographic properties of welding zone, weld crack, toughness of welding zone, corrosion resistance and summary. The solidification modes of stainless steels, each solidification mode on the cross section of Fe-Cr-Ni alloy phase diagram, each solidification mode of weld stainless steels metal by electron beam welding, segregation state of alloy elements at each solidification mode, Schaeffler diagram, Delong diagram, effects of (P + S) mass content in % and Cr/Ni equivalent on solidification cracking of weld stainless steels metal, solidification crack susceptibility of weld high purity stainless steels metal, effects of trace impurity elements on solidification crack susceptibility of weld high purity stainless steels metal, ductile fracture susceptibility of weld austenitic stainless steels metal, effects of H2 and ferrite content on generation of crack of weld 25Cr-5N duplex stainless steels, effects of O and N content on toughness of weld SUS 447J1 metals, effect of ferrite content on aging toughness of weld austenitic stainless steel metal, corrosion morphology of welding zone of stainless steels, generation mechanism of knife line attack phenomenon, and corrosion potential of some kinds of metals in seawater at room temperature are illustrated. (S.Y.)

  18. Evaluation of non-conformities of hip prostheses made of titanium alloys and stainless steel; Avaliacao de nao conformidades de proteses de quadril fabricadas com ligas de titanio e aco inox

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezerra, Ewerton de Oliveira Teotonio; Nascimento, Jose Jeferson da Silva; Luna, Carlos Bruno Barreto; Morais, Crislene Rodrigues da Silva; Campos, Karla Valeria Miranda de, E-mail: ewerton.teotonio@hotmail.com, E-mail: brunobarretodemaufcg@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UAEMa/CCT/UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academinca de Engenharia de Materiais

    2017-01-15

    A large number of metallic alloys has satisfactory behavior when used to manufacture implants for hip prostheses. However, they must be in conformity with standards, to ensure their quality for long periods without losing its functionality. Therefore, this paper aims to study the non-conformities in two hip prostheses, one of titanium and other stainless steel according to standards. The implants studied passed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence, tensile test and optical microscopy (OM). Specimens for the tensile test were made according to ASTM E 8M, as well, MO samples passed by metallographic procedure. The results evidenced that some chemical compositions showed in relation to the standards. The XRD analysis showed peaks of austenite and absence of ferrite for the stainless steel, while the titanium alloy presents an alpha phase (HCP) more significant than the beta phase (BCC). The stainless steel alloys and titanium have yield strength and tensile strength that meet the standards. On the other hand, the elastic modulus of the titanium alloy and stainless steel, comes to be ten times greater than the human bone. Therefore, the high modulus of elasticity of the alloys, favors bone resorption problems. The stainless steel microstructure is typical of an austenitic matrix, while the titanium alloy presents α + β microstructure. (author)

  19. Behavior of the elements in the mechanically alloyed and cast ferritic steels and a type 316 stainless steel in a flowing sodium environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, T.; Mutoh, I.

    1988-01-01

    Sodium corrosion behavior of a mechanically alloyed ferritic steel, dispersion-strengthened with addition of Y 2 0 3 and Ti, two kinds of melted/cast ferritic steels and a Type 316 stainless steel was examined by using a non-isothermal sodium loop system, constructed of another Type 316 stainless steel, with a direct resistance electrical heater. The sodium conditions were 675 0 C, 4.0 m/s in velocity and 1-2 ppm oxygen concentration and a cumulative exposure time of the specimens was about 3000 h. The absorption of Ni and selective dissolution of Cr played an important role in the corrosion of the mechanically alloyed ferritic steel as in the case of the cast ferritic steels. However, the region of Ni absorption and Cr diminution was deeper than that of the cast ferritic steels. Peculiar finding for the mechanically alloyed ferritic steel was the corroded surface with irregularly shaped protuberance, that might be related with formation of sodium titanate, and the absorption of carbon and nitrogen to form carbide and nitride of titanium. It seems that these facts resulted in the irregular weight loss of the specimens, which depended on the downstream position and the cumulative exposure time. However, the tensile properties of the mechanically alloyed ferritic steel did not noticeably change by the sodium exposure

  20. Effect of welding process on the microstructure and properties of dissimilar weld joints between low alloy steel and duplex stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Lu, Min-xu; Zhang, Lei; Chang, Wei; Xu, Li-ning; Hu, Li-hua

    2012-06-01

    To obtain high-quality dissimilar weld joints, the processes of metal inert gas (MIG) welding and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding for duplex stainless steel (DSS) and low alloy steel were compared in this paper. The microstructure and corrosion morphology of dissimilar weld joints were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM); the chemical compositions in different zones were detected by energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS); the mechanical properties were measured by microhardness test, tensile test, and impact test; the corrosion behavior was evaluated by polarization curves. Obvious concentration gradients of Ni and Cr exist between the fusion boundary and the type II boundary, where the hardness is much higher. The impact toughness of weld metal by MIG welding is higher than that by TIG welding. The corrosion current density of TIG weld metal is higher than that of MIG weld metal in a 3.5wt% NaCl solution. Galvanic corrosion happens between low alloy steel and weld metal, revealing the weakness of low alloy steel in industrial service. The quality of joints produced by MIG welding is better than that by TIG welding in mechanical performance and corrosion resistance. MIG welding with the filler metal ER2009 is the suitable welding process for dissimilar metals jointing between UNS S31803 duplex stainless steel and low alloy steel in practical application.

  1. Influence of heat input on weld bead geometry using duplex stainless steel wire electrode on low alloy steel specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajit Mondal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Gas metal arc welding cladding becomes a popular surfacing technique in many modern industries as it enhances effectively corrosion resistance property and wear resistance property of structural members. Quality of weld cladding may be enhanced by controlling process parameters. If bead formation is found acceptable, cladding is also expected to be good. Weld bead characteristics are often assessed by bead geometry, and it is mainly influenced by heat input. In this paper, duplex stainless steel E2209 T01 is deposited on E250 low alloy steel specimens with 100% CO2 gas as shielding medium with different heats. Weld bead width, height of reinforcement and depth of penetration are measured. Regression analysis is done on the basis of experimental data. Results reveal that within the range of bead-on-plate welding experiments done, parameters of welding geometry are on the whole linearly related with heat input. A condition corresponding to 0.744 kJ/mm heat input is recommended to be used for weld cladding in practice.

  2. Alloying element effect on the mechanical properties of high-strength stainless steels and welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pustovit, A.I.; Yushchenko, K.A.; Fortunatova, N.N.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental steels containing 11-17% Cr, 3-13% Ni, 0-2% Mo, 0-1% Ti, 1-2% Cu, 0-4% Co, 0-1% He, < 0.03% C and their welded joints have been studied. The ''MRA-1'' program was used to obtain mathematical description (in the form of regression equations) of the effect of alloying elements on strength and plasticity of the steels and the welded joints at 20...-196 deg C. The dependences obtained make it possible to predict the properties of the steels and the joints in a satisfactory agreement with their actual behaviour at 20...-196 deg C

  3. Pyrolysis of superfine pulverized coal. Part 3. Mechanisms of nitrogen-containing species formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jiaxun; Jiang, Xiumin; Shen, Jun; Zhang, Hai

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • NH 3 and NO formation mechanisms during superfine pulverized coal pyrolysis are investigated. • Influences of temperature, heating rate, particle size, atmosphere, and acid wash on the NH 3 and NO formation are analyzed. • Transformations of nitrogen-containing structures in coal/char during pyrolysis are recognized through XPS observation. • Relationships among nitrogen-containing gaseous species during pyrolysis are discussed. - Abstract: With more stringent regulations being implemented, elucidating the formation mechanisms of nitrogen-containing species during the initial pyrolysis step becomes important for developing new NO x control strategies. However, there is a lack of agreement on the origins of NO x precursors during coal pyrolysis, in spite of extensive investigations. Hence, it is important to achieve a more precise knowledge of the formation mechanisms of nitrogen-contain species during coal pyrolysis. In this paper, pyrolysis experiments of superfine pulverized coal were performed in a fixed bed at low heating rates. The influences of temperature, coal type, particle size and atmosphere on the NH 3 and NO evolution were discussed. There is a central theme to develop knowledge of the relationship between particle sizes and evolving behaviors of nitrogen-containing species. Furthermore, the catalytic role of inherent minerals in coal was proved to be effective on the partitioning of nitrogen during coal pyrolysis. In addition, the conversion pathways of heteroaromatic nitrogen structures in coal/char during pyrolysis were recognized through the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. Large quantities of pyridinic and quanternary nitrogen functionalities were formed during the thermal degradation. Finally, the relationships among the nitrogen-containing gaseous species during coal pyrolysis were discussed. In brief, a comprehensive picture of the volatile-nitrogen partitioning during coal pyrolysis is obtained in this

  4. Corrosion of austenitic and martensitic stainless steels in flowing 17Li83Pb alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broc, M.; Flament, T.; Fauvet, P.; Sannier, J.

    1988-07-01

    With regard to the behaviour of 316 L stainless steel at 400°C in flowing anisothermal 17Li83Pb the mass transfer suffered by this steel appears to be quite important without noticeable influence of constant or cyclic stress. Evaluation made from solution-annealed specimens leads to a corrosion rate of approximately 30 μm yr -1 at steady state to which a depth of 25 μm has to be added to take into account the initial period phenomena. On the other hand, with semi-stagnant 17Li83Pb at 400° C, the mass transfer of 316 L steel appears to be lower and more acceptable after a 3000-h exposure; but long-time kinetics data have to be achieved in order to see if that better behaviour is persistent and does not correspond to a longer incubation period. As for the martensitic steels their corrosion rate at 450°C in the thermal convection loop TULIP is constant up to 3000 h and five times lower than that observed for 316 L steel in the same conditions.

  5. Corrosion of austenitic and martensitic stainless steels in flowing 17Li-83Pb alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broc, M.; Flament, T.; Fauvet, P.; Sannier, J.

    1988-01-01

    With regard to the behaviour of 316 L stainless steel at 400 0 C in flowing anisothermal 17Li-83Pb the mass transfer suffered by this steel appears to be quite important without noticeable influence of constant or cyclic stress. Evaluation made from solution-annealed specimens leads to a corrosion rate of approximately 30 μm yr -1 at steady state to which a depth of 25 μm has to be added to take into account the initial period phenomena. On the other hand, with semi-stagnant 17Li-83Pb at 400 0 C, the mass transfer of 316 L steel appears to be lower and more acceptable after a 3000-h exposure; but long-time kinetics data have to be achieved in order to see if that better behaviour is persistent and does not correspond to a longer incubation period. As for the martensitic steels their corrosion rate at 450 0 C in the thermal convection loop TULIP is constant up to 3000 h and five times lower than that observed for 316 L steel in the same conditions. (orig.)

  6. Effect of Sintering Atmosphere and Solution Treatment on Density, Microstructure and Tensile Properties of Duplex Stainless Steels Developed from Pre-alloyed Powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali, Arun Prasad; Mahendran, Sudhahar; Ramajayam, Mariappan; Ganesan, Dharmalingam; Chinnaraj, Raj Kumar

    2017-10-01

    In this research, Powder Metallurgy (P/M) of Duplex Stainless Steels (DSS) of different compositions were prepared through pre-alloyed powders and elemental powders with and without addition of copper. The powder mix was developed by pot mill for 12 h to obtain the homogeneous mixture of pre-alloyed powder with elemental compositions. Cylindrical green compacts with the dimensions of 30 mm diameter and 12 mm height were compacted through universal testing machine at a pressure level of 560 ± 10 MPa. These green compacts were sintered at 1350 °C for 2 h in hydrogen and argon atmospheres. Some of the sintered stainless steel preforms were solution treated at 1050 °C followed by water quenching. The sintered as well as solution treated samples were analysed by metallography examination, Scanning Electron Microscopy and evaluation of mechanical properties. Ferrite content of sintered and solution treated DSS were measured by Fischer Ferritoscope. It is inferred that the hydrogen sintered DSS depicted better density (94% theoretical density) and tensile strength (695 MPa) than the argon sintered steels. Similarly the microstructure of solution treated DSS revealed existence of more volume of ferrite grains than its sintered condition. Solution treated hydrogen sintered DSS A (50 wt% 316L + 50 wt% 430L) exhibited higher tensile strength of 716 MPa and elongation of 17%, which are 10-13% increment than the sintered stainless steels.

  7. Microstructure Evolution During Stainless Steel-Copper Vacuum Brazing with a Ag/Cu/Pd Filler Alloy: Effect of Nickel Plating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, R. K.; Laik, A.; Mishra, P.

    2017-03-01

    Vacuum brazing of stainless steel and copper plates was done using a silver-based filler alloy. In one set of experiments, around 30-µm-thick nickel coatings were electrochemically applied on stainless steel plates before carrying out the brazing runs and its effect in making changes in the braze-zone microstructure was studied. For brazing temperature of 830 °C, scanning electron microscopy examination of the braze-zone revealed that relatively sound joints were obtained when brazing was done with nickel-coated stainless steel than with uncoated one. However, when brazing of nickel-coated stainless steel and copper plates was done at 860 °C, a wide crack appeared in the braze-zone adjacent to copper side. Energy-dispersive x-ray analysis and electron microprobe analysis confirmed that at higher temperature, the diffusion of Cu atoms from copper plate towards the braze-zone was faster than that of Ni atoms from nickel coating. Helium leak rate of the order 10-11 Pa m3/s was obtained for the crack-free joint, whereas this value was higher than 10-4 Pa m3/s for the joint having crack. The shear strength of the joint was found to decrease considerably due to the presence of crack.

  8. Standard test method for evaluating stress-corrosion cracking of stainless alloys with different nickel content in boiling acidified sodium chloride solution

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes a procedure for conducting stress-corrosion cracking tests in an acidified boiling sodium chloride solution. This test method is performed in 25% (by mass ) sodium chloride acidified to pH 1.5 with phosphoric acid. This test method is concerned primarily with the test solution and glassware, although a specific style of U-bend test specimen is suggested. 1.2 This test method is designed to provide better correlation with chemical process industry experience for stainless steels than the more severe boiling magnesium chloride test of Practice G36. Some stainless steels which have provided satisfactory service in many environments readily crack in Practice G36, but have not cracked during interlaboratory testing using this sodium chloride test method. 1.3 This boiling sodium chloride test method was used in an interlaboratory test program to evaluate wrought stainless steels, including duplex (ferrite-austenite) stainless and an alloy with up to about 33% nickel. It may also b...

  9. The effect of mucin, fibrinogen and IgG on the corrosion behaviour of Ni-Ti alloy and stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Zhang; Yaomu, Xiao; Chufeng, Liu; Conghua, Liu

    2017-06-01

    In this study, Ni-Ti alloy and stainless steal were exposed to artificial saliva containing fibrinogen, IgG or mucin, and the resultant corrosion behavior was studied. The purpose was to determine the mechanisms by which different types of protein contribute to corrosion. The effect of different proteins on the electrochemical resistance of Ni-Ti and SS was tested by potentiodynamic polarization, and the repair capacity of passivation film was tested by cyclic polarization measurements. The dissolved corrosion products were determined by ICP-OES, and the surface was analyzed by SEM and AFM. The results showed fibrinogen, IgG or mucin could have different influences on the susceptibility to corrosion of the same alloy. Adding protein lead to the decrease of corrosion resistance of SS, whereas protein could slow down the corrosion process of Ni-Ti. For Ni-Ti, adding mucin could enhance the corrosion stability and repair capacity of passivation film. The susceptibility to pitting corrosion of Ni-Ti and stainless steal in fibrinogen AS is not as high as mucin and IgG AS. There are different patterns of deposition formation on the metal surface by different types of protein, which is associated with their effects on the corrosion process of the alloys.

  10. Gas tungsten arc welding assisted hybrid friction stir welding of dissimilar materials Al6061-T6 aluminum alloy and STS304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, HanSur; Bang, HeeSeon; Jeon, GeunHong; Oh, IkHyun; Ro, ChanSeung

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► GTAW assisted hybrid friction stir welding (HFSW) has been carried out for dissimilar butt joint. ► Mechanical strength of dissimilar butt joint by HFSW and FSW has been investigated and compared. ► Microstructure of dissimilar butt joint by HFSW and FSW has been investigated and compared. -- Abstract: The aim of this research is to evaluate the potential for using the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) assisted hybrid friction stir welding (HFSW) process to join a stainless steel alloy (STS304) to an aluminum alloy (Al6061) in order to improve the weld strength. The difference in mechanical and microstructural characteristics of dissimilar joint by friction stir welding (FSW) and HFSW has been investigated and compared. Transverse tensile strength of approximately 93% of the aluminum alloy (Al6061) base metal tensile strength is obtained with HFSW, which is higher than the tensile strength of FSW welds. This may be due to the enhanced material plastic flow and partial annealing effect in dissimilar materials due to preheating of stainless steel surface by GTAW, resulting in significantly increased elongation of welds. The results indicate that HFSW that integrates GTAW preheating to FSW is advantageous in joining dissimilar combinations compared to conventional FSW.

  11. Trace element assessment of low-alloy and stainless steels with reference to gamma activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goddard, A.J.H.; Macmahon, T.D.; Gamberini, D.; Taylor, J.M.; Duggan, F.

    1984-01-01

    In order to predict the long-lived gamma activities leading to radiation exposure during dismantling operations it is necessary to know the likely trace element content of the reactor vessel and internals. This work has been concerned with measuring the elements Ni, Nb, Mo, Co, Ag, Eu, Sm and Ho in steels, with particular reference to light-water reactors. Various steel samples have been provided by organizations in Europe. Analyses have been carried out principally by neutron activation analysis, but also by atomic absorption (AA), inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and secondary ion microprobe spectrometry (SIMS). Analyses for Ni, Mo and Co were straightforward and results agreed with analyses carried out elsewhere. A variety of techniques were employed for Nb; ICP was the most successful and results were confirmed using SIMS. In the case of Ag only flameless AA yielded results for all samples. The low concentration of rare earth elements required the development of a preliminary ion exchange technique. Low-alloy steels examined had Nb concentrations less than 10 ppm. Ag levels in the vicinity of 1 ppm were found in all steel samples, indicating that Ag may be the most significant element at long cooling times. Rare earth concentrations from this and other work indicate that these elements are unlikely to give gamma activities exceeding those of 60 Co, 59 Ni, sup(108m)Ag and 94 Nb activities. Illustrative gamma activity decay calculations using the Origen code are presented

  12. The Use of Austenitic Stainless Steel versus Monel (Ni-Cu) Alloy in Pressurized Gaseous Oxygen (GOX) Life Support Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    Carbon Steel AISI 1025 2. AISI 4140 3. Ductile Iron 4. 304 Stainless Steel 5. 17-4 PH Stainless Steel 6. 410 Stainless Steel 7. Lead Babbit 8. Tin Babbit...9. Inconel 718 i0. Aluminum 1100 30 6- AISI 4140 steel, all the results were negative (no ignitions). The single exception was with a sample of 4140 ...rates for austenitic stainless steel ( AISI 316), Monel (63% Ni - 34% Cu) and carbon steel (AMS 5050) tubing in this environment. 12 - 14-660 A 7

  13. Probing the coordination environment of Ti(3+) ions coordinated to nitrogen-containing Lewis bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morra, E; Maurelli, S; Chiesa, M; Van Doorslaer, S

    2015-08-28

    Multi-frequency continuous-wave and pulsed EPR techniques are employed to investigate the coordination of nitrogen-containing ligands to Ti(3+)-chloro complexes. Frozen solutions of TiCl3 and TiCl3(Py)3 dissolved in nitrogen-containing solvents have been investigated together with the TiCl3(Py)3 solid-state complex. For these different systems, the hyperfine and nuclear quadrupole data of Ti(3+)-bound (14)N nuclei are reported and discussed in the light of DFT computations, allowing for a detailed description of the microscopic structure of these systems.

  14. Comparison between 4.0-mm stainless steel and 4.75-mm titanium alloy single-rod spinal instrumentation for anterior thoracoscopic scoliosis surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seung Hwan; Ugrinow, Valerie L; Upasani, Vidyadhar V; Pawelek, Jeff B; Newton, Peter O

    2008-09-15

    Retrospective review of a consecutive, single surgeon case series. To compare minimum 2-year postoperative outcomes between 4.0-mm stainless steel and 4.75-mm titanium alloy single-rod anterior thoracoscopic instrumentation for the treatment of thoracic idiopathic scoliosis. Advances in anterior thoracoscopic spinal instrumentation for scoliosis have attempted to mitigate the postoperative complications of rod failure, pseudarthrosis, and deformity progression. Biomechanical data suggest that the 4.75-mm titanium construct has a lower risk of fatigue failure compared to the 4.0-mm stainless steel construct. Sixty-four consecutive anterior thoracoscopic spinal instrumentation cases in patients with thoracic scoliosis performed by a single surgeon and with minimum 2-year follow-up were retrospectively reviewed. The first 34 cases used a 4.0-mm stainless steel (SS) construct, whereas the subsequent 30 cases used a 4.75-mm titanium (Ti) alloy instrumentation system. The first 10 SS cases and the first 5 Ti cases were excluded from the statistical comparison to account for a potential learning curve effect. A multivariate analysis of variance (P 0.13). The average follow-up in the SS group was, however, significantly longer than in the Ti group (4.0 +/- 1.4 years vs. 2.3 +/- 1.0 years; P = 0.001). Preop main thoracic Cobb angles were similar between the 2 groups (P = 0.62); however, the 2-year main thoracic Cobb was significantly smaller (P = 0.03) and the 2-year percent correction was significantly greater in the Ti group (P = 0.03). Five patients (21%) in the SS group had a pseudarthrosis, 3 (13%) experienced rod failure, and 2 (8%) required a revision posterior spinal fusion. In the Ti group, 2 patients (8%) had a pseudarthrosis, and no patient experienced rod failure or required a revision procedure. Although the average follow-up in the Ti group was significantly shorter than in the SS group, the 4.75-mm titanium alloy construct resulted in improved maintenance of

  15. Improvement effect on corrosion under heat flux in nitric acid solutions of anti-IGC stainless steel and high Cr-W-Si Ni base RW alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Masamitsu; Kiuchi, Kiyoshi; Yano, Masaya; Sekiyama, Yoshio

    2001-03-01

    In the advanced purex reprocessing equipment, the higher corrosion resistance is required for materials because of the high corrosive environment caused from the thermodynamic decomposition of boiling nitric acid. The authors group has been developed the two types of new corrosion resistant materials for application to the reprocessing equipment. One is the type 304ULC stainless steel with controlled microstructure and decreased minor elements (EB-SAR). The other is the nickel base alloy with the ability of forming stable oxide film by addition of Cr, W and Si (RW alloy). In this study, the heat transfer tubes applied in diminished pressure was postulated. In addition to the dominant factors of heat conducting corrosion by the nitric acid solution, the effect of the heat flux and the concentration of the corrosive vanadium ions were investigated. (author)

  16. Compatibility of graphite with a martensitic-ferritic steel, an austenitic stainless steel and a Ni-base alloy up to 1250 C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, P.

    1994-08-01

    To study the chemical interactions between graphite and a martensitic-ferritic steel (1.4914), an austenitic stainless steel (1.4919; AISI 316), and a Ni-base alloy (Hastelloy X) isothermal reaction experiments were performed in the temperature range between 900 and 1250 C. At higher temperatures a rapid and complete liquefaction of the components occurred as a result of eutectic interactions. The chemical interactions are diffusion-controlled processes and can be described by parabolic rate laws. The reaction behavior of the two steels is very similar. The chemical interactions of the steels with graphite are much faster above 1100 C than those for the Ni-base alloy. Below 1000 C the effect is opposite. (orig.) [de

  17. Kinetic release studies of nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate fromgum acacia crosslinked hydrogels

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Aderibigbe, BA

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available on the release mechanism of nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate (BP) wasstudied at pH 1.2 and 7.4. The hydrogels exhibited high swelling ratios at pH 7.4 and low swelling ratiosat pH 1.2. The release study was performed using UV–Visible spectroscopy via complex...

  18. Phosphorus and nitrogen-containing carbons obtained by the carbonization of conducting polyaniline complex with phosphites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bober, Patrycja; Trchová, Miroslava; Morávková, Zuzana; Kovářová, Jana; Vulić, I.; Gavrilov, N.; Pašti, I. A.; Stejskal, Jaroslav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 246, 20 August (2017), s. 443-450 ISSN 0013-4686 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-02787S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : carbonization * conducting polymer * nitrogen-containing carbon Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry OBOR OECD: Polymer science Impact factor: 4.798, year: 2016

  19. A comparison of torque expression between stainless steel, titanium molybdenum alloy, and copper nickel titanium wires in metallic self-ligating brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archambault, Amy; Major, Thomas W; Carey, Jason P; Heo, Giseon; Badawi, Hisham; Major, Paul W

    2010-09-01

    The force moment providing rotation of the tooth around the x-axis (buccal-lingual) is referred to as torque expression in orthodontic literature. Many factors affect torque expression, including the wire material characteristics. This investigation aims to provide an experimental study into and comparison of the torque expression between wire types. With a worm-gear-driven torquing apparatus, wire was torqued while a bracket mounted on a six-axis load cell was engaged. Three 0.019 x 0.0195 inch wire (stainless steel, titanium molybdenum alloy [TMA], copper nickel titanium [CuNiTi]), and three 0.022 inch slot bracket combinations (Damon 3MX, In-Ovation-R, SPEED) were compared. At low twist angles (wires were not statistically significant. At twist angles over 24 degrees, stainless steel wire yielded 1.5 to 2 times the torque expression of TMA and 2.5 to 3 times that of nickel titanium (NiTi). At high angles of torsion (over 40 degrees) with a stiff wire material, loss of linear torque expression sometimes occurred. Stainless steel has the largest torque expression, followed by TMA and then NiTi.

  20. Standard practice for determining the susceptibility of stainless steels and related Nickel-Chromium-Iron Alloys to stress-corrosion cracking in polythionic acids

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for preparing and conducting the polythionic acid test at room temperature, 22 to 25°C (72 to 77°F), to determine the relative susceptibility of stainless steels or other related materials (nickel-chromiumiron alloys) to intergranular stress corrosion cracking. 1.2 This practice can be used to evaluate stainless steels or other materials in the “as received” condition or after being subjected to high-temperature service, 482 to 815°C (900 to 1500°F), for prolonged periods of time. 1.3 This practice can be applied to wrought products, castings, and weld metal of stainless steels or other related materials to be used in environments containing sulfur or sulfides. Other materials capable of being sensitized can also be tested in accordance with this test. 1.4 This practice may be used with a variety of stress corrosion test specimens, surface finishes, and methods of applying stress. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, ...

  1. The Interfacial Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Diffusion-Bonded Joints of 316L Stainless Steel and the 4J29 Kovar Alloy Using Nickel as an Interlayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingfeng Song

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available 316L stainless steel (Fe–18Cr–11Ni and a Kovar (Fe–29Ni–17Co or 4J29 alloy were diffusion-bonded via vacuum hot-pressing in a temperature range of 850–950 °C with an interval of 50 °C for 120 min and at 900 °C for 180 and 240 min, under a pressure of 34.66 MPa. Interfacial microstructures of diffusion-bonded joints were characterized by optical microscopy (OM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS. The inter-diffusion of the elements across the diffusion interface was revealed via electron probe microanalysis (EPMA. The mechanical properties of the joints were investigated via micro Vickers hardness and tensile strength. The results show that an Ni interlayer can serve as an effective diffusion barrier for the bonding of 316L stainless steel and the 4J29 Kovar alloy. The composition of the joints was 316L/Ni s.s (Fe–Cr–Ni/remnant Ni/Ni s.s (Fe–Co–Ni/4J29. The highest tensile strength of 504.91 MPa with an elongation of 38.75% was obtained at 900 °C for 240 min. After the width of nickel solid solution (Fe–Co–Ni sufficiently increased, failure located at the 4J29 side and the fracture surface indicated a ductile nature.

  2. HIGH TEMPERATURE BRAZING ALLOY FOR JOINT Fe-Cr-Al MATERIALS AND AUSTENITIC AND FERRITIC STAINLESS STEELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cost, R.C.

    1958-07-15

    A new high temperature brazing alloy is described that is particularly suitable for brazing iron-chromiumaluminum alloys. It consists of approximately 20% Cr, 6% Al, 10% Si, and from 1.5 to 5% phosphorus, the balance being iron.

  3. Alloy by design : A materials genome approach to advanced high strength stainless steels for low and high temperature applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, Q.; Xu, W.; Van der Zwaag, S.

    2016-01-01

    We report a computational 'alloy by design' approach which can significantly accelerate the design process and substantially reduce the development costs. This approach allows simultaneously optimization of alloy composition and heat treatment parameters based on the integration of thermodynamic,

  4. Effects of alloying elements on defect structures in the incubation period for void swelling in austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiki, M.; Yoshiie, T.; Huang, S.S.; Sato, K.; Cao, X.Z.; Xu, Q.; Troev, T.D.

    2013-01-01

    Positron lifetime measurements were used to study the effects of alloying elements on the defect structure during the incubation period for void swelling in several fcc model alloys. Pure Ni, four model alloys (Fe–Cr–Ni, Fe–Cr–Ni–Mo–Mn, Fe–Cr–Ni–Mo–Mn–Si and Fe–Cr–Ni–Mo–Mn–Si–Ti), and four commercial alloys (SUS316LSS, SUS316SS, SUS304SS and Ti added modified SUS316SS) were irradiated with electrons and neutrons. Even at 363 and 573 K to a dose of 0.2 dpa, an effect of alloying elements was observed. At 363 K irradiation, voids were formed only in Ni and Fe–Cr–Ni. At 573 K irradiation, voids were formed in Ni and all model alloys, though the concentration depended on the alloying elements. In commercial alloys, precipitates were formed instead of vacancy clusters, which prevented void growth

  5. Radiation damage of austenitic stainless steels and zirconium alloys; Pregled radijacionog ostecenja austenitnih nerdjajucih celika i legura cirkonijuma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanovic, V [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1965-11-15

    This review contains analyses of available data concerning texture deformations and radiation damage of zirconium and zircaloy-2; radiation damage, influence of neutron radiation on the mechanical properties of austenitic, ferritic and other types of stainless steels.

  6. Application of Box–Behnken design for fabrication of titanium alloy and 304 stainless steel joints with silver interlayer by diffusion bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasubramanian, M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Diffusion bonding of Ti–6Al–4V to SS304 with silver interlayer was successful. • Hardness and shear strength increased with the increase in the bonding temperature. • Shear strength of 149 MPa and 18% strain to failure were achieved. • Joint efficiency of 80% was obtained for the Ti–6Al–4V and SS304L joints. - Abstract: Direct bonding between titanium (Ti)/titanium alloy(Ti alloy) and stainless steel (SS) promotes the formation of various Fe–Ti and Fe–Cr–Ti intermetallics in the diffusion zone, because the solid solubility of Fe, Cr, Ni and Ti in each other is limited and these intermetallics weaken the mechanical properties of the joint. The present study focuses on the titanium alloy Ti–6Al–4V diffusion bonded to AISI 304 stainless steel with silver foil as an interlayer. The process parameters were chosen appropriately and hence, the bonding is achieved without any defect. Box–Behnken design is used to decide the optimum number of experiments required to do the investigation. Microhardness measurements and the lap shear test were carried out to determine the hardness and strength of the joints respectively. The results show that atomic diffusion and migration between Ti and Fe or C are effectively prevented by adding pure Ag as the interlayer metal. The results from mechanical testing showed that shear strength values have a direct relationship with bonding time. The maximum lap shear strength of 149 MPa and 18% strain to failure was observed for joints obtained with bonding time of 60 min. However, effective bonding was not possible at 850 °C due to incomplete coalescence of mating surfaces

  7. Reaction of vanadocene and its monochloride with salts of nitrogen-containing heterocycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordetsov, A.S.; Pereshein, V.V.; Lyatyaeva, V.N.; Mar'in, V.P.; Rukevich, OS.; Zakharova, E.S.

    1985-01-01

    The reaction of bis(eta 5 -cyclopentadienyl) vanadium (Cp 2 V) and its monochloride with diallyl isocyanurates of Ag and alkali metals and with Ag salt of succinimide is used for preparing almost inaccessible Cp 2 V-substituted nitrogen-containing heterocycles. The reactions have been performed in toluene in an evacuated ampoule at room temperature and at 120-130 deg C in case of diallyl isocyanurates of alkali metals. Reaction yields element analysis data, DTA, IR spectra and ESR spectra. Cp 2 V easily reduces Ag from its salts with nitrogen-containing heterocycles oxidizing with production of V(3) sandwich derivatives In exchange reactions of Cp 2 VCl with diallyl isocyanurate salts of alkali metals and silver Cp 2 V-diallyl isocyanurate with an oxo-structure is prosduced as well. The produced AgCl subsequently oxidizers Cp 2 VCl up to Cp 2 VCl 2

  8. Formation of nitrogen-containing oligomers by methylglyoxal and amines in simulated evaporating cloud droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Haan, David O; Hawkins, Lelia N; Kononenko, Julia A; Turley, Jacob J; Corrigan, Ashley L; Tolbert, Margaret A; Jimenez, Jose L

    2011-02-01

    Reactions of methylglyoxal with amino acids, methylamine, and ammonium sulfate can take place in aqueous aerosol and evaporating cloud droplets. These processes are simulated by drying droplets and bulk solutions of these compounds (at low millimolar and 1 M concentrations, respectively) and analyzing the residuals by scanning mobility particle sizing, nuclear magnetic resonance, aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS), and electrospray ionization MS. The results are consistent with imine (but not diimine) formation on a time scale of seconds, followed by the formation of nitrogen-containing oligomers, methylimidazole, and dimethylimidazole products on a time scale of minutes to hours. Measured elemental ratios are consistent with imidazoles and oligomers being major reaction products, while effective aerosol densities suggest extensive reactions take place within minutes. These reactions may be a source of the light-absorbing, nitrogen-containing oligomers observed in urban and biomass-burning aerosol particles.

  9. Evaluation of systemic metal diffusion after spinal pedicular fixation with titanium alloy and stainless steel system: a 36-month experimental study in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brayda-Bruno, M; Fini, M; Pierini, G; Giavaresi, G; Rocca, M; Giardino, R

    2001-01-01

    It is known that titanium alloys cause more extensive local metallosis due to fretting corrosion than stainless steel implants. The aim of the present study was to investigate possible systemic metal releases (Ti, Al, V, Cr, Ni) in sheep where L4-L5 were implanted with titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V, ASTM F 136) and stainless steel (AISI 316 L). 16 sheep were used: 8 were implanted with Ti6Al4V and 8 with stainless steel. At 6, 12, 24 and 36 months, the following examinations were performed: histology, atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), on liver, lung, kidney, brain, spleen and lumbo-aortic lymph nodes. Hair, urine and arteria blood samples were also analysed by AAS before implantation and at sacrifices. A histologic and ultrastructural study was performed on peri-implant tissues, too. Particular attention was paid to avoid contamination from dissection instruments or use of containers. In basal and in samples at 6 and 12 months, no metals were found in blood, urine, hair or other target tissues of the animals implanted with either Ti6Al4V or stainless steel. Regarding Al, V, Co and Ni, negative results in all tissues and body fluids were obtained also at 24 and 36 months. On the contrary, Ti traces were found in lumbo-aortic lymph nodes and lungs of one sheep only (10 and 30 ng/g, respectively) at 24 months. At 36 months, a systemic diffusion of Ti was observed in all tissues of both sheep instrumented with Ti6Al4V (2-16.5 ng/g), except for body fluids and hair. Metal research in target tissues by light and SEM micro-probe analysis provided negative results. Current data suggest that the amount of Ti found in organs after stable pedicular fixation is extremely low and not biologically available. This observation would lead us to exclude the hypothesis of any toxic reaction and such a release seems to be due to the passive diffusion through lymphatic fluids. Additional studies are needed to confirm if this long-term release

  10. Alloying effects on dissolution rate of crevice corrosion for austenitic stainless steels in 3% NaCl solution at 80 C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, P.; Shinohara, Tadashi; Tsujikawa, Shigeo

    1996-01-01

    Chloride stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has been a problem for austenitic stainless steel in aqueous environments containing chlorides. Studies have found that SCC initiates only from a dissolving surface and under the condition that the crack growth rate is higher than the dissolution rate of the dissolving surface. Research conducted to improve the resistance to SCC for Type 304 steels (UNS S30400) have revealed that while molybdenum and phosphorus are unfavored, the combined alloying of 3% aluminum with 2% copper can almost nullify their detrimental effect. Based on the mentioned criteria, this study was dedicated to clarify the mechanism behind these alloying effects by examining the relationship between the measured enhancements on SCC resistance and the dissolution rate observed via the moire technique. It was found that the addition of both molybdenum and phosphorus reduces the dissolution rate and therefore impaired SCC resistance; the addition of copper increases the dissolution rate of steady growth stage where crevice corrosion proceeds at a constant rate. Moreover this dissolution rate could further be increased when combined with the alloying of aluminum. These observed results correspond well to that of the measured behavior of the SCC critical temperature, T c , suggesting that the SCC susceptibility is influenced by anodic dissolution

  11. Influence of Solution Treatment Temperature on Microstructural Properties of an Industrially Forged UNS S32750/1.4410/F53 Super Duplex Stainless Steel (SDSS Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile Dănuț Cojocaru

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this present study, the influence of solution annealing temperature on microstructural properties of a forged Super Duplex Stainless Steel (SDSS was investigated by SEM-BSE (Scanning Electron Microscopy-Backscattered Electrons and SEM-EBSD (Scanning Electron Microscopy-Electron Backscatter Diffraction techniques. A brief solution treatment was applied to the forged super duplex alloy, at different temperatures between 800 °C and 1100 °C, with a constant holding time of 0.6 ks (10 min. Microstructural characteristics such as nature, weight fraction, distribution and morphology of constituent phases, average grain-size and grain misorientation were analysed in relation to the solution annealing temperature. Experimental results have shown that the constituent phases in the SDSS alloy are δ-Fe, γ-Fe and σ (Cr-Fe and that their properties are influenced by the solution treatment temperature. SEM examinations revealed microstructural modifications induced by the Cr rich precipitates along the δ/γ and δ/δ grain boundaries, which may significantly affect the toughness and the corrosion resistance of the alloy. Solution annealing at 1100 °C led to complete dissolution of σ (Cr-Fe phase, the microstructure being formed of primary δ-Fe and γ-Fe. The orientation relationship between δ/δ, γ/γ and δ/γ grains was determined by electron back scattering diffraction (EBSD. Both primary constituent phase’s microhardness and global microhardness were determined.

  12. Microstructure and mechanical properties of 2024-T3 and 7075-T6 aluminum alloys and austenitic stainless steel 304 after being exposed to hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofyan, Nofrijon Bin Imam

    The effect of hydrogen peroxide used as a decontaminant agent on selected aircraft metallic materials has been investigated. The work is divided into three sections; bacterial attachment behavior onto an austenitic stainless steel 304 surface; effect of decontamination process on the microstructure and mechanical properties of aircraft metallic structural materials of two aluminum alloys, i.e. 2024-T3 and 7075-T6, and an austenitic stainless steel 304 as used in galley and lavatory surfaces; and copper dissolution rate into hydrogen peroxide. With respect to bacterial attachment, the results show that surface roughness plays a role in the attachment of bacteria onto metallic surfaces at certain extent. However, when the contact angle of the liquid on a surface increased to a certain degree, detachment of bacteria on that surface became more difficult. In its relation to the decontamination process, the results show that a corrosion site, especially on the austenitic stainless steel 304 weld and its surrounding HAZ area, needs more attention because it could become a source or a harborage of bio-contaminant agent after either incidental or intentional bio-contaminant delivery. On the effect of the decontamination process on the microstructure and mechanical properties of aircraft metallic structural materials, the results show that microstructural effects are both relatively small in magnitude and confined to a region immediately adjacent to the exposed surface. No systematic effect is found on the tensile properties of the three alloys under the conditions examined. The results of this investigation are promising with respect to the application of vapor phase hydrogen peroxide as a decontaminant agent to civilian aircraft, in that even under the most severe circumstances that could occur; only very limited damage was observed. The results from the dissolution of copper by concentrated liquid hydrogen peroxide showed that the rate of copper dissolution increased for

  13. Thermally activated formation of martensite in Fe-C alloys and Fe-17%Cr-C stainless steels during heating from boiling nitrogen temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2016-01-01

    The thermally activated austenite-to-martensite transformation was investigated by magnetometry in three Fe-C alloys and in two 17%Cr stainless steels. After quenching to room temperature, samples were immersed in boiling nitrogen and martensite formation was followed during subsequent (re......)heating to room temperature. Different tests were performed applying heating rates from 0.5 K/min to 10 K/min. An additional test consisted in fast (re)heating the samples by immersion in water. Thermally activated martensite formation was demonstrated for all investigated materials by a heating rate......-dependent transformation curve. Moreover, magnetometry showed that the heating rate had an influence on the fraction of martensite formed during sub-zero Celsius treatment. The activation energy for thermally activated martensite formation was quantified in the range 11‒21 kJ/mol by a Kissinger-like method....

  14. Optimization of HIP bonding conditions for ITER shielding blanket/first wall made from austenitic stainless steel and dispersion strengthened copper alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, S.; Hatano, T.; Kuroda, T.; Furuya, K.; Hara, S.; Enoeda, M.; Takatsu, H.

    1998-01-01

    Optimum bonding conditions were studied on the hot isostatic pressing (HIP) bonded joints of type 316L austenitic stainless steel and dispersion strengthened copper alloy (DSCu) for application to the ITER shielding blanket / first wall. HIP bonded joints were fabricated at temperatures in a 980-1050 C range, and a series of mechanical tests and metallurgical observations were conducted on the joints. Also, bondability of two grades of DSCu (Glidcop Al-25 trademark and Al-15 trademark ) with SS316L was examined in terms of mechanical properties of the HIP bonded joints. From those studies it was concluded that the HIP temperature of 1050 C was an optimal condition for obtaining higher ductility, impact values and fatigue strength. Also, SS316L/Al-15 joints showed better results in terms of ductility and impact values compared with SS316L/Al-25 joints. (orig.)

  15. An Investigation into Stress Corrosion Cracking of Dissimilar Metal Welds with 304L Stainless Steel and Alloy 82 in High Temperature Pure Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Tsung-Kuang; Huang, Guan-Ru; Tsai, Chuen-Horng; Wang, Mei-Ya

    For a better understanding toward stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in dissimilar metal welds with 304L stainless steel and Alloy 82, the SCC growth behavior in the transition regions of weld joints was investigated via slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) tests in 280 oC pure water with a dissolve oxygen level of 300 ppb. Prior to the SSRT tests, samples with dissimilar metal welds were prepared and underwent various pretreatments, including post-weld heat treatment (PWHT), shot peening, solution annealing, and mechanical grinding. In addition to the SSRT tests, measurements of degree of sensitization and micro-hardness on the transition regions of the metal welds were also conducted. According to the test results, the samples having undergone PWHTs exhibited relatively high degrees of sensitization. Distinct decreases in hardness were observed in the heat-affected zones of the base metals in all samples. Furthermore, the fracture planes of all samples after the SSRT tests were located at the stainless steel sides and were in parallel with the fusion lines. Among the treating conditions investigated in this study, a PWHT would pose a detrimental effect on the samples in the aspects of mechanical property and degree of SCC. Solution annealing would lead to the greatest improvement in ductility and SCC retardation, and shot peening would provide the treated samples with a positive improvement in ductility and corrosion retardation, but not to a great extent.

  16. Influence of sulphate ions on the composition and structure of the oxide films on stainless steel and nickel alloys in simulated BWR crack conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojinov, M.; Kinnunen, P.; Laitinen, E.; Maekelae, K.; Saario, T.; Sirkiae, P.; Toivonen, A.; Campbell, J.M.; Johansson, L.S.; Helin, M.; Muttilainen, E.; Reinvall, A.; Ollonqvist, T.; Vaeyrynen, J.

    2002-01-01

    The goal of the present work has been to clarify the influence of sulphate ions on the oxide films formed on stainless steel and Ni-based alloys in simulated crack chemistry conditions using different ex situ analytical techniques. The main observations of this work can be summarised as follows: The thickness of the films formed in simulated oxygen-free crack chemistry conditions during an exposure of circa 4 days varies roughly in the range 200..500 nm, which corresponds to observations reported in the literature [2]. The presence of 10000 ppb sulphate ions in simulated crack tip conditions seems to lead to a considerably lower thickness of the oxide films when compared to sulphate-free conditions. The presence of 10000 ppb sulphate ions leads also to considerable changes in the morphology of the oxide crystals on the material samples. In the absence of sulphate the outer oxide layer contains elongated round-edged crystals, while in the presence of sulphate ions the crystals are longish and needle-like. No visible difference can be observed in the outlook of the crystals formed on stainless steel and Inconel alloy surfaces. A small amount of sulphur in the form of sulphate can be found on the oxide surface on all the studied materials after exposure to the 10000 ppb solution. Sulphur seems to become incorporated inside the oxide film on AISI 316 L(NG). It is not clear at this stage, whether the observed influence of the sulphate ions can be ascribed to the lower pH, to a possible effect on solubility or to a direct influence of the anionic species. (authors)

  17. Laser welding of NiTi shape memory alloy: Comparison of the similar and dissimilar joints to AISI 304 stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirshekari, G. R.; Saatchi, A.; Kermanpur, A.; Sadrnezhaad, S. K.

    2013-12-01

    The unique properties of NiTi alloy, such as its shape memory effect, super-elasticity and biocompatibility, make it ideal material for various applications such as aerospace, micro-electronics and medical device. In order to meet the requirement of increasing applications, great attention has been given to joining of this material to itself and to other materials during past few years. Laser welding has been known as a suitable joining technique for NiTi shape memory alloy. Hence, in this work, a comparative study on laser welding of NiTi wire to itself and to AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel wire has been made. Microstructures, mechanical properties and fracture morphologies of the laser joints were investigated using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), Vickers microhardness (HV0.2) and tensile testing techniques. The results showed that the NiTi-NiTi laser joint reached about 63% of the ultimate tensile strength of the as-received NiTi wire (i.e. 835 MPa) with rupture strain of about 16%. This joint also enabled the possibility to benefit from the pseudo-elastic properties of the NiTi component. However, tensile strength and ductility decreased significantly after dissimilar laser welding of NiTi to stainless steel due to the formation of brittle intermetallic compounds in the weld zone during laser welding. Therefore, a suitable modification process is required for improvement of the joint properties of the dissimilar welded wires.

  18. Boundary lubrication of stainless steel and CoCrMo alloy materials based on three ester-based additives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, J.; Zeng, Xiangqiong; Ren, T.; van der Heide, Emile

    2014-01-01

    Material selection and lubricant additive development are two important aspects for engineering applications. This work explores the possibilities of three different ester-based additives (DBOP, ODOC and DOB) to generate boundary films on two corrosion and wear resistant materials, stainless steel

  19. Ketenimines Generated from Ynamides: Versatile Building Blocks for Nitrogen-Containing Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Robert H; Cariou, Kevin

    2018-02-16

    Using ynamides as readily available starting materials, a single step can generate highly reactive ketenimines, which can then undergo a variety of transformations. The choice of the method for generating the ketenimine dictates the outcome of the reaction that can, moreover, be precisely steered through minor variations of the starting material. This Concept gives an overview of the different existing methodologies for this objective, showcasing the diverse nitrogen-containing frameworks that can be obtained by this highly versatile strategy. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Highly selective deuteration of pharmaceutically relevant nitrogen-containing heterocycles: a flow chemistry approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ötvös, Sándor B; Mándity, István M; Fülöp, Ferenc

    2011-08-01

    A simple and efficient flow-based technique is reported for the catalytic deuteration of several model nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds which are important building blocks of pharmacologically active materials. A continuous flow reactor was used in combination with on-demand pressure-controlled electrolytic D(2) production. The D(2) source was D(2)O, the consumption of which was very low. The experimental set-up allows the fine-tuning of pressure, temperature, and flow rate so as to determine the optimal conditions for the deuteration reactions. The described procedure lacks most of the drawbacks of the conventional batch deuteration techniques, and additionally is highly selective and reproducible.

  1. Experimentation of netlike hydro gel nitrogen containing polymer sorbents for biological liquids purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karieva, Z.M.; Karimova, N. Kh.

    2003-01-01

    The high efficiency of hydrogels synthesized earlier in comparison with Pharmacopoeia sorbents are interesting to study comprehensively for the number of the toxins of biological liquids. Taking into considerations the high electoral sorption ability of ethynilpiperidol polymers to the hydro phobic interaction it may be suggested that they have a high detoxication ability. The detoxication characteristics of studied polymers have advantages over the known sorbents. Experiences with animals showed that in identical conditions of experiment in application of netlike polymers the survival grew 90%. Synthesis and investigations of netlike hydrogels polymer materials on nitrogen containing monomers of ethynil piperidol were given in the work. (author)

  2. Sorption of europium (3) by polymer sorbents with grafted heterocyclic nitrogen-containing groupings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bel'tyukova, S.V.; Kravchenko, T.B.; Balamtsarashvili, G.M.; Roska, A.S.

    1990-01-01

    On polymer sorbents (copolymer of styrene-divinylbenzene) with grafted heterocyclic nitrogen-containing functional groupings of tetrazole, triazole and imidazole (sorbents 1,2,3, respectively). It is stated that europium sorption takes place from neutral solutions in presence of organic solvents. Luminescent properties of europium on sorbent are used to develope methods of its determination in high purity lanthanide and yttrium oxides. Europium determination limits consist 7.5·10 -5 μg/ml on 1 and 3 sorbents and 1.5·10 -4 μg/ml on sorbent 2, S p value is 0.089 and 0.075, respectivaly

  3. Synthesis and Thermal Properties of a Novel Nitrogen-containing Epoxy Resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing Hong ZHANG; Hong Mei WAN; Yu Qin MIN; Zuo FANG; Guo Rong QI

    2005-01-01

    A new nitrogen-containing epoxy resin (XT resin) was synthesized from chain extension of xylenephenolformaldehyde resin (XPF) and triglycidyl isocyanurate (TGIC) in the presence of base catalyst. FT-IR and 1H-NMR analysis confirmed the chemical structure of XT resin. It was cured with dicyandiamide (DICY) and diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS). Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) results showed that the introduction of triazine ring provides epoxy polymer with good thermal stability. Furthermore, high char yields at 800℃ in thermogravimetric (TGA)analysis indicated that XT resin had potential flame retardance.

  4. Microstructural evolution at the overlap zones of 12Cr martensitic stainless steel laser alloyed with TiC

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Adebiyi, DI

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Multiple track laser alloying is characterised by additional heat treatment and differences in the amount of powder deposited at the overlap regions. These result in different microstructural and phase evolution at these regions, which...

  5. Investigation of corrosion and analysis of passive films concerning some nickel alloys and stainless steels in reconstructed geological environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jallerat, Nelly

    1984-01-01

    This research thesis addresses the corrosion behaviour of materials which might be used for the fabrication of radioactive waste containers. After a bibliographical study on films formed on Fe-Cr-Ni alloys, this research concentrates on passivation and de-passivation phenomena of three nickel-base alloys among the most resistant to corrosion and which also meet processing and economic criteria: Hastelloy C4, Inconel 625 and ZICNDU 25-20. Titanium and Ti-Pd alloy are also studied. Parameters governing pitting corrosion are notably studied. After a recall of knowledge on passive films formed on Fe-Cr-Ni alloys, and a presentation of experimental and technical conditions, the author reports and discussed the results obtained by electrochemical studies, reports the determination of factors governing alloy passivation in geological waters. The influence of some soluble impurities is notably studied. The author reports the analysis by glow discharge optical emission spectrometry to determine the composition of passive films with respect to geological water nature, the immersion duration and the electrode potential. Additional surface analyses are performed by X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS or ESCA) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Finally, the author uses a dosing method by neutron radio-activation of alloy elements to determine dissolution mechanisms [fr

  6. Development of Cast Alumina-forming Austenitic Stainless Steel Alloys for use in High Temperature Process Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan [ORNL; Yamamoto, Yukinori [ORNL; Brady, Michael P [ORNL; Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Pankiw, Roman [Duraloy Technologies Inc; Voke, Don [Duraloy Technologies Inc

    2015-01-01

    There is significant interest in the development of alumina-forming, creep resistant alloys for use in various industrial process environments. It is expected that these alloys can be fabricated into components for use in these environments through centrifugal casting and welding. Based on the successful earlier studies on the development of wrought versions of Alumina-Forming Austenitic (AFA) alloys, new alloy compositions have been developed for cast products. These alloys achieve good high-temperature oxidation resistance due to the formation of protective Al2O3 scales while multiple second-phase precipitation strengthening contributes to excellent creep resistance. This work will summarize the results on the development and properties of a centrifugally cast AFA alloy. This paper highlights the strength, oxidation resistance in air and water vapor containing environments, and creep properties in the as-cast condition over the temperature range of 750°C to 900°C in a centrifugally cast heat. Preliminary results for a laboratory cast AFA composition with good oxidation resistance at 1100°C are also presented.

  7. Determination of vanadium in stainless steel and Ni-base alloys by NBPHA spectrophotometric method combined with chloroform extraction separation in media of sulfuric-hydrofluoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Fumiaki; Ohuchi, Yoshifusa; Ochiai, Kenichi; Motoyama, Sigeji; Tsutsumi, Ken-ichi

    1975-01-01

    A new method of rapid vanadium analysis was proposed. In this method, vanadium is directly extracted and determined from sample solutions in sulfuric-hydrofluoric acid. The interference of the coexisting elements can be ignored in this method. Take one gram of sample into a 200 ml beaker, and add 30 ml of aqua regia. Then heat and dissolve it, and add 14 ml of sulfuric acid (1+1) and 5 ml of phosphoric acid. After cooling, dissolve the salts with a small amount of water. Thereafter, transfer it with use of water into a polyethylene separatory funnel, add 10 ml of 46% hydrofluoric acid, and dilute to 50 ml. Then, add 4 ml iron (II) ammonium sulfate solution (10%) and mix it thoroughly. Allow to stand for two or three minutes, add 10 ml of 45% ammonium persulfate solution and mix it thoroughly again. Allow to stand for about five minutes. Then, add exactly 20 ml of BPHA-chloroform solution (0.1%) and shake and mix it vigorously for two minutes. After a while, transfer the chloroform complex into a 10 mm cell through a piece of absorbent cotton. Then, determine vanadium by measuring the absorbance at the wave length of 530 nm against a chloroform reference. This method can be applicable to the analysis of vanadium in other metals and alloys than stainless steel and Ni-base alloys. (Iwakiri, K.)

  8. Kinetic study of hydrogen-material interactions in nickel base alloy 600 and stainless steel 316L through coupled experimental and numerical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurley, Caitlin-Mae

    2015-01-01

    In France all of the nuclear power plant facilities in service today are pressurized water reactors (PWR). Some parts of the PWR in contact with the primary circuit medium, such as the steam generator tubes (fabricated in nickel base alloy A600) and some reactor core internal components (fabricated in stainless steel 316L), can fall victim to environmental degradation phenomena such as stress corrosion cracking (SCC). In the late 1950's, H. Coriou observed experimentally and predicted this type of cracking in alloys traditionally renowned for their SCC resistance (A600). Just some 20 to 30 years later his predictions became a reality. Since then, numerous studies have focused on the description and comprehension of the SCC phenomenon in primary water under reactor operating conditions. In view of reactor lifetime extension, it has become both critical and strategic to be capable of simulating SCC phenomenon in order to optimize construction materials, operating conditions, etc. and to understand the critical parameters in order to limit the damage done by SCC. This study focuses on the role hydrogen plays in SCC phenomenon and in particular H-material interactions. Hydrogen, from primary medium in the form of dissolved H gas or H from the water, can be absorbed by the alloy during the oxidation process taking place under reactor operating conditions. Once absorbed, hydrogen may be transported across the material, diffusing in the interstitial sites of the crystallographic structure and interacting with local defects, such as dislocations, precipitates, vacancies, etc. The presence of these [local defect] sites can slow the hydrogen transport and may provoke local H accumulation in the alloy. This accumulation could modify the local mechanical properties of the material and favor premature rupture. It is therefore essential to identify the nature of these H-material interactions, specifically the rate of H diffusion and hydrogen trapping kinetics at these

  9. High nitrogen-containing cotton derived 3D porous carbon frameworks for high-performance supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Li-Zhen; Chen, Tian-Tian; Song, Wei-Li; Li, Xiaogang; Zhang, Shichao

    2015-10-01

    Supercapacitors fabricated by 3D porous carbon frameworks, such as graphene- and carbon nanotube (CNT)-based aerogels, have been highly attractive due to their various advantages. However, their high cost along with insufficient yield has inhibited their large-scale applications. Here we have demonstrated a facile and easily scalable approach for large-scale preparing novel 3D nitrogen-containing porous carbon frameworks using ultralow-cost commercial cotton. Electrochemical performance suggests that the optimal nitrogen-containing cotton-derived carbon frameworks with a high nitrogen content (12.1 mol%) along with low surface area 285 m2 g-1 present high specific capacities of the 308 and 200 F g-1 in KOH electrolyte at current densities of 0.1 and 10 A g-1, respectively, with very limited capacitance loss upon 10,000 cycles in both aqueous and gel electrolytes. Moreover, the electrode exhibits the highest capacitance up to 220 F g-1 at 0.1 A g-1 and excellent flexibility (with negligible capacitance loss under different bending angles) in the polyvinyl alcohol/KOH gel electrolyte. The observed excellent performance competes well with that found in the electrodes of similar 3D frameworks formed by graphene or CNTs. Therefore, the ultralow-cost and simply strategy here demonstrates great potential for scalable producing high-performance carbon-based supercapacitors in the industry.

  10. High nitrogen-containing cotton derived 3D porous carbon frameworks for high-performance supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Li-Zhen; Chen, Tian-Tian; Song, Wei-Li; Li, Xiaogang; Zhang, Shichao

    2015-01-01

    Supercapacitors fabricated by 3D porous carbon frameworks, such as graphene- and carbon nanotube (CNT)-based aerogels, have been highly attractive due to their various advantages. However, their high cost along with insufficient yield has inhibited their large-scale applications. Here we have demonstrated a facile and easily scalable approach for large-scale preparing novel 3D nitrogen-containing porous carbon frameworks using ultralow-cost commercial cotton. Electrochemical performance suggests that the optimal nitrogen-containing cotton-derived carbon frameworks with a high nitrogen content (12.1 mol%) along with low surface area 285 m2 g−1 present high specific capacities of the 308 and 200 F g−1 in KOH electrolyte at current densities of 0.1 and 10 A g−1, respectively, with very limited capacitance loss upon 10,000 cycles in both aqueous and gel electrolytes. Moreover, the electrode exhibits the highest capacitance up to 220 F g−1 at 0.1 A g−1 and excellent flexibility (with negligible capacitance loss under different bending angles) in the polyvinyl alcohol/KOH gel electrolyte. The observed excellent performance competes well with that found in the electrodes of similar 3D frameworks formed by graphene or CNTs. Therefore, the ultralow-cost and simply strategy here demonstrates great potential for scalable producing high-performance carbon-based supercapacitors in the industry. PMID:26472144

  11. Determination of the penetration hardness and analysis of stainless steel alloys by means of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mohamad Vahid Dastjerdi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A significant feature of alloys is the surfaces hardness that is always accompanied by challenges when it’s measured by common mechanical techniques. In this investigation, we used Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS as a replacement method for common mechanical techniques to measure the surfaces hardness of different alloys. After recording the spectrum of alloy samples in order to identify the surface hardness of analyzed sample, K-Nearest Neighbors method (KNN was used and obtained results showed that the LIBS-KNN method can separate and identify the surfaces hardness of samples with precision of 93.3%. In addition, in order to identify the percentage of constituent elements of alloys and their hardness, calibration approach was investigated that showed there is an appropriate linear relation between recorded emission lines from the LIB spectra of sample alloys and the percentage of their constituent elements and also their Vickers hardness numbers. Therefore, According to exclusive advantages of LIBS technique i.e. high speed analysis, non-destructive analysis and being portable, some of available difficulties in conventional mechanical techniques can be removed.

  12. Microstructure of the Transitional Area of the Connection of a High-temperature Ni-based Brazing Alloy and Stainless Steel AISI 321 (X6CrNiTi 18–10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Augustin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a detailed examination of the structure of the transitional area between a brazing alloy and the parent material, the dimensions of the diffusion zones that are created, and the influence on them of a change in the brazing parameters. Connections between Ni-based brazing alloys (NI 102 with a small content of B and AISI 321 stainless steel (X6CrNiTi 18–10 were created in a vacuum (10−2 Pa at various brazing temperatures and for various holding times at the brazing temperature. Various specimens were tested. First, the brazing alloys were wetted and the dependence of the wetting on the brazing parameters was assessed. Then a chemical microanalysis was made of the interface between the brazing alloy and the parent material. The individual diffusion zones were identified on pictures from a light microscope and REM, and their dimensions, together with their dependence on the brazing parameters, were determined.

  13. Microstructure Characterization and Hardness Evaluation of Alloy 52 Welded Stainless Steel 316 Subjected to Ultrasonic Nanocyrtal Surface Modification Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H. D.; Amanov, A.; Pyun, Y. S. [Sun Moon Univ., Asan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y. S.; Choi, Y. S. [Andong National Univ., Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this study, an ultrasonic nanocrystal surface modification (UNSM) technique was applied to dissimilar weld point between STS316L and Alloy 52. This UNSM technique is a patented technology, which can be described as a type of ultrasonic cold-forging technology. It has been demonstrated that the UNSM technique is a simple method to produce a nanocrystalline surface layer at the top surface of metallic materials. Microstructure and hardness of STS316L and Alloy 52 are investigated before and after UNSM treatment. It is expected according to the previous study that the UNSM technique is able to release the residual stress which delays PWSCC. In this study, microstructural characterization and hardness evaluation of STS316L and welded Alloy 52 subjected to UNSM technique were investigated.

  14. Influence of temperature, cold deformation and a constant mechanical load on the microstructural stability of a nitrogen alloyed duplex stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisbrodt-Reisch, A.; Brummer, M.; Hadler, B.; Wolbank, B.; Werner, E.A.

    2006-01-01

    The influence of temperature, cold deformation and constant mechanical load on the microstructural stability and the kinetics of phase decomposition of a nitrogen-alloyed duplex stainless steel (0.34 wt.% N) was investigated. Calculation of the phase equilibria was done with THERMOCALC using the steel database TCFE3 in order to predict the stability of the phases and to estimate the influence of temperature on the fraction and chemical composition of the phases. Various ageing treatments between 800 deg. C and 1300 deg. C were performed for different time intervals with controlled heating and cooling rates. In order to determine the influence of deformation, annealing at 800 deg. C after cold deformation as well as dilatometry experiments were performed under a constant mechanical compressive load at 800 deg. C and 900 deg. C. Microstructural characterization was carried out by means of light microscopy, electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry. It was found that the microstructural evolution under a thermal load alone in the temperature range above 950 deg. C concerns mainly the transformation of austenite to ferrite, while below 950 deg. C ferrite decomposition and precipitation of nitrides occur. Since duplex stainless steels possess a microstructure consisting of paramagnetic austenite and ferromagnetic ferrite, the kinetics of ferrite decomposition can be determined easily by magnetic inductive measurements. The results of the microstructural investigations and the measurements of the saturation magnetization show that there is a satisfactory agreement with the theoretical predictions based on THERMOCALC. Ferrite decomposition is significantly accelerated by strain introduced during cold deformation. Furthermore, even under a small mechanical load the kinetics of phase decomposition behaviour at 900 deg. C is drastically changed. Whereas during short annealing times the microstructure remains nearly stable the same annealing conditions under a constant

  15. Microstructural evolution at the overlap zones of 12Cr martensitic stainless steel laser alloyed with TiC

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Adebiyi, DI

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available are not obtainable in the single tracks. X12CrNiMo steel has been laser alloyed with TiC using a 4.4 kW continuous wave (CW) Nd:YAG laser. The process parameters were first optimised after which they were kept constant for overlap ratios of 50% and 75%. The depths...

  16. On the corrosion behaviour of stainless steel, nickel-chromium and zirconium-alloys in pore water of Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heitz, E.; Graefen, H.

    1991-12-01

    On the basis of an extensive review of literature and available experience, an evaluation was made of the corrosion of a metallic matrix for radioactive nuclides embedded in porous, water containing Portland cement. As a metallic matrix, austenitic high-alloy steel, nickel-base alloys and zirconium alloys are discussed. Pore waters in Portland cement have low aggressivity. However, through contact with formation water, chloride and sulphate enrichment can occur. Although corrosion is principally possible on the basis of purely thermodynamic considerations, it can be assumed that local corrosion (pitting, stress corrosion cracking, intergranular corrosion) is highly improbable under the given boundary conditions. This is valid for all three groups of alloys and means that only low release rates of corrosion products are to be expected. As a result of the discussion on radiolysis-induced corrosion, additional corrosion activity can be excluded. Final conclusions concerning the stimulation of corrosion processes by microbial action cannot be drawn and, therefore, additional experiments are proposed. The release rates of radioactive products are controlled by a very low dissolution rate of the materials in the passive state. All three groups of alloys show this type of general dissolution. From a survey of literature data it can be concluded that release rates greater than 250 mg/m 2 per day are not exceeded. Since these data were mainly obtained by electrochemical methods, it is proposed that quantitative analytical investigations of the corrosion products in pore water be made. On the whole the release rates determined are far below corrosion rates which are generally technically relevant. (author) 13 figs., 9 tabs., 61 refs

  17. Nitrogen-containing polymers as a platform for CO2 electroreduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnurangam, Sathish; Chernyshova, Irina V; Somasundaran, Ponisseril

    2017-06-01

    Heterogeneous electroreduction of CO 2 has received considerable attention in the past decade. However, none of the earlier reviews has been dedicated to nitrogen-containing polymers (N-polymers) as an emerging platform for conversion of CO 2 to industrially useful chemicals. The term 'platform' is used here to underscore that the role of N-polymers is not only to serve as direct catalysts (through loaded metals) but also as co-catalysts/promoters and stabilizing agents. This review covers the current state, advantages, challenges, and prospects of the application of N-polymer-metal composites, also referred as polymer functionalized, coated, or modified electrodes, as well as functional hybrid materials, for the electrocatalytic conversion of CO 2 . It briefly surveys the efficiencies of the N-polymer-metal electrodes already used for this application, methods of their fabrication, and proposed mechanisms of their catalytic activities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Titanocene-Mediated Dinitrile Coupling: A Divergent Route to Nitrogen-Containing Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiel, Gavin R; Samkian, Adrian E; Nicolay, Amélie; Witzke, Ryan J; Tilley, T Don

    2018-02-21

    A general synthetic strategy for the construction of large, nitrogen-containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is reported. The strategy involves two key steps: (1) a titanocene-mediated reductive cyclization of an oligo(dinitrile) precursor to form a PAH appended with di(aza)titanacyclopentadiene functionality; (2) a divergent titanocene transfer reaction, which allows final-step installation of one or more o-quinone, diazole, or pyrazine units into the PAH framework. The new methodology enables rational, late-stage control of HOMO and LUMO energy levels and thus photophysical and electrochemical properties, as revealed by UV/vis and fluorescence spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and DFT calculations. More generally, this contribution presents the first productive use of di(aza)metallacyclopentadiene intermediates in organic synthesis, including the first formal [2 + 2 + 2] reaction to form a pyrazine ring.

  19. Amination of activated carbon for enhancing phenol adsorption: Effect of nitrogen-containing functional groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Guo; Chen, Honglin; Qin, Hangdao; Feng, Yujun

    2014-01-01

    To study the contribution of different nitrogen-containing functional groups to enhancement of phenol adsorption, the aminated activated carbons (AC) were characterized by N2 adsorption/desorption, XPS, Boehm titration, and pH drift method and tested for adsorption behaviors of phenol. Adsorption isotherm fitting revealed that the Langmuir model was preferred for the aminated ACs. The adsorption capacity per unit surface area (q m /SSA BET ) was linearly correlated with the amount of pyridinic and pyrrolic N, which suggested that these two functional groups played a critical role in phenol adsorption. The enhancement of adsorption capacity was attributed to the strengthened π–π dispersion between phenol and basal plane of AC by pyridinic, pyrrolic N. The adsorption kinetics was found to follow the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, and intraparticle diffusion was one of the rate-controlling steps in the adsorption process.

  20. 76 FR 34964 - Stainless Steel Bar From India: Partial Rescission of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [A-533-810] Stainless Steel Bar From... the antidumping duty order on stainless steel bar from India for the period of review February 1, 2010....; Outokumpu Stainless Bar, Inc.; Universal Stainless & Alloy Products, Inc.; and Valbruna Slater Stainless...

  1. Forming Limit Diagram of Titanium and Stainless Steel Alloys to Study the Formability of Hydro-Mechanical Deep Drawing Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirizly, A.

    2005-08-01

    The increase demand for stronger, lighter and economic sheet metal products, make the Hydromecanical deep drawing process lately more and more popular. The Hydromecanical process is used in almost all types of sheet metal parts from home appliances and kitchenware to automotive and aviation industries. Therefore, many common materials were tested and characterized by their ability to sustain large strains via the well known Forming Limit Diagram (FLD). The aim of this work is to examine the forming capability if the Hydromecanical process in production of hemisphere parts made of materials commonly used in the aviation and aerospace industries. Experimental procedures were carried out to assess their ductility through FLD and the Forming Limit Carve (FLC).Two type of material sheets were tested herewith for demonstrating the procedure: commercial pure titanium and stainless steel 316L. A numerical simulation of the Hydromecanical process was examined and compared to self made Hydromecanical deep drawing of hemispherical parts.

  2. Forming Limit Diagram of Titanium and Stainless Steel Alloys to Study the Formability of Hydro-Mechanical Deep Drawing Parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirizly, A.

    2005-01-01

    The increase demand for stronger, lighter and economic sheet metal products, make the Hydromecanical deep drawing process lately more and more popular. The Hydromecanical process is used in almost all types of sheet metal parts from home appliances and kitchenware to automotive and aviation industries. Therefore, many common materials were tested and characterized by their ability to sustain large strains via the well known Forming Limit Diagram (FLD).The aim of this work is to examine the forming capability if the Hydromecanical process in production of hemisphere parts made of materials commonly used in the aviation and aerospace industries. Experimental procedures were carried out to assess their ductility through FLD and the Forming Limit Carve (FLC).Two type of material sheets were tested herewith for demonstrating the procedure: commercial pure titanium and stainless steel 316L. A numerical simulation of the Hydromecanical process was examined and compared to self made Hydromecanical deep drawing of hemispherical parts

  3. Hydrogen Sulphide Corrosion of Carbon and Stainless Steel Alloys Immersed in Mixtures of Renewable Fuel Sources and Tested Under Co-processing Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gergely András

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In accordance with modern regulations and directives, the use of renewable biomass materials as precursors for the production of fuels for transportation purposes is to be strictly followed. Even though, there are problems related to processing, storage and handling in wide range of subsequent uses, since there must be a limit to the ratio of biofuels mixed with mineral raw materials. As a key factor with regards to these biomass sources pose a great risk of causing multiple forms of corrosion both to metallic and non-metallic structural materials. To assess the degree of corrosion risk to a variety of engineering alloys like low-carbon and stainless steels widely used as structural metals, this work is dedicated to investigating corrosion rates of economically reasonable engineering steel alloys in mixtures of raw gas oil and renewable biomass fuel sources under typical co-processing conditions. To model a desulphurising refining process, corrosion tests were carried out with raw mineral gasoline and its mixture with used cooking oil and animal waste lard in relative quantities of 10% (g/g. Co-processing was simulated by batch-reactor laboratory experiments. Experiments were performed at temperatures between 200 and 300ºC and a pressure in the gas phase of 90 bar containing 2% (m3/m3 hydrogen sulphide. The time span of individual tests were varied between 1 and 21 days so that we can conclude about changes in the reaction rates against time exposure of and extrapolate for longer periods of exposure. Initial and integral corrosion rates were defined by a weight loss method on standard size of coupons of all sorts of steel alloys. Corrosion rates of carbon steels indicated a linear increase with temperature and little variation with composition of the biomass fuel sources. Apparent activation energies over the first 24-hour period remained moderate, varying between 35.5 and 50.3 kJ mol−1. Scales developed on carbon steels at higher

  4. Interfacial characterization of SLM parts in multi-material processing: Metallurgical diffusion between 316L stainless steel and C18400 copper alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Z.H., E-mail: AZHLIU@ntu.edu.sg; Zhang, D.Q., E-mail: ZHANGDQ@ntu.edu.sg; Sing, S.L., E-mail: SING0011@e.ntu.edu.sg; Chua, C.K., E-mail: MCKCHUA@ntu.edu.sg; Loh, L.E., E-mail: LELOH1@e.ntu.edu.sg

    2014-08-15

    Multi-material processing in selective laser melting using a novel approach, by the separation of two different materials within a single dispensing coating system was investigated. 316L stainless steel and UNS C18400 Cu alloy multi-material samples were produced using selective laser melting and their interfacial characteristics were analyzed using focused ion beam, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and electron back scattered diffraction techniques. A substantial amount of Fe and Cu element diffusion was observed at the bond interface suggesting good metallurgical bonding. Quantitative evidence of good bonding at the interface was also obtained from the tensile tests where the fracture was initiated at the copper region. Nevertheless, the tensile strength of steel/Cu SLM parts was evaluated to be 310 ± 18 MPa and the variation in microhardness values was found to be gradual along the bonding interface from the steel region (256 ± 7 HV{sub 0.1}) to the copper region (72 ± 3 HV{sub 0.1}). - Highlights: • Multi-material processing was successfully implemented and demonstrated in SLM. • Bi-metallic laminates of steel/Cu were successfully produced with the SLM process. • A substantial amount of Fe and Cu diffusion was observed at the bond interface. • Good metallurgical bonding was obtained at the interface of the steel/Cu laminates. • Highly refined microstructure was obtained due to rapid solidification in SLM.

  5. Feasibility study for an engineering concept of a stainless steel/copper divertor plate protected by W-5 Re alloy or graphite armor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renda, V.; Federici, G.; Papa, L.

    1988-01-01

    The latest Joint Research Centre (JRC)-Ispra proposal is presented to support the design of a divertor concept that has long been considered the most crucial component of the plasma impurity control system for the Next Europen Torus (NET) tokamak fusion reactor. Because of the harsh tokamak environment, the divertor panel is the plasma facing component that suffers the most severe loading conditions, such as high thermal stresses, thermal fatigue, severe erosion rates and neutron damage. An analysis of a new divertor panel concept has evolved from the previous studies carried out at JRC-Ispra. The materials considered in this study are AISI 316 stainless steel for the cooling tubes, pure copper for the heat sink, and W-5 Re alloy or graphite for the protective armor. The panel is cooled by pressurized water circulation in U-tubes. A preliminary thermo-hydraulic analysis has been carried out to evaluate a set of reference parameters, such as optimum coolant velocity, maximum outlet water temperature, convective heat exchange coefficient, and the expected pressure drops in the channels. Thermal and mechanical calculations, performed by using the finite element technique, showed encouraging results about the engineering feasibility of the pressure boundary of the divertor for loading conditions similar to those of NET double null, assumed as the reference mainframe

  6. Investigation on AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel to AISI 4140 low alloy steel dissimilar joints by gas tungsten arc, electron beam and friction welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arivazhagan, N.; Singh, Surendra; Prakash, Satya; Reddy, G.M.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Beneficial effects of FRW, GTAW and EBW joints of dissimilar AISI 304 and AISI 4140 materials. → Comparative study of FRW, GTAW and EBW joints on mechanical properties. → SEM/EDAX, XRD analysis on dissimilar AISI 304 and AISI 4140 materials. -- Abstract: This paper presents the investigations carried out to study the microstructure and mechanical properties of AISI 304 stainless steel and AISI 4140 low alloy steel joints by Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW), Electron Beam Welding (EBW) and Friction Welding (FRW). For each of the weldments, detailed analysis was conducted on the phase composition, microstructure characteristics and mechanical properties. The results of the analysis shows that the joint made by EBW has the highest tensile strength (681 MPa) than the joint made by GTAW (635 Mpa) and FRW (494 Mpa). From the fractographs, it could be observed that the ductility of the EBW and GTA weldment were higher with an elongation of 32% and 25% respectively when compared with friction weldment (19%). Moreover, the impact strength of weldment made by GTAW is higher compared to EBW and FRW.

  7. Effect of heat input on microstructure and mechanical properties of dissimilar joints between super duplex stainless steel and high strength low alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadeghian, M.; Shamanian, M.; Shafyei, A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The microstructure of weld metal consists of austenite and ferrite. • The HAZ of the API X-65 shows different transformation. • Impact strength of sample with low heat input was lower than base metals. • The heat input at 0.506 kJ/mm is not the suitable for dissimilar joining between UNS S32750/API X-65. - Abstract: In the present study, microstructure and mechanical properties of UNS S32750 super duplex stainless steel (SDSS)/API X-65 high strength low alloy steel (HSLA) dissimilar joint were investigated. For this purpose, gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) was used in two different heat inputs: 0.506 and 0.86 kJ/mm. The microstructures investigation with optical microscope, scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction showed that an increase in heat input led to a decrease in ferrite percentage, and that detrimental phases were not present. It also indicated that in heat affected zone of HSLA base metal in low heat input, bainite and ferrite phases were created; but in high heat input, perlite and ferrite phases were created. The results of impact tests revealed that the specimen with low heat input exhibited brittle fracture and that with high heat input had a higher strength than the base metals

  8. Influence of Solution Treatment Duration on Microstructural Features of an Industrial Forged UNS S32750/1.4410/F53 Super Duplex Stainless Steel (SDSS) Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cojocaru, Vasile Dănuţ; Răducanu, Doina; Angelescu, Mariana Lucia; Vintilă, Adrian Nicolae; Şerban, Nicolae; Dan, Ioan; Cojocaru, Elisabeta Mirela; Cinca, Ion

    2017-08-01

    The microstructural changes induced by solution treatment of an industrial forged F53 Super Duplex Stainless Steel alloy were studied, in order to emphasize how component phases are influenced by heat treatment temperature and duration. The solution treatment was done at a temperature of 1100°C, with variable holding times: 0.6 ks (10 min), 3.6 ks (60 min) and 10.8 ks (180 min). Scanning electron microscopy-electron backscattered diffraction was used as main characterization technique, to obtain and analyse data referring to microstructural features, such as: nature and morphology of constituent phases, average grain-size and grain misorientation. It was shown that in all studied cases the microstructure consisted of a mixture of about 45% δ-Fe (ferrite) and 55% γ-Fe (austenite). Besides δ-Fe and γ-Fe phases, other phases were also identified, such as τ-phase (chromium-iron carbide), σ-phase (chromium-iron) and δ-(Cr-Fe) (ferrite).

  9. An electrochemical procedure coupled with a Schiff base method; application to electroorganic synthesis of new nitrogen-containing heterocycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowlati, Bahram; Othman, Mohamed Rozali

    2013-01-01

    The synthesis of Nitrogen-containing heterocycles has been achieved using chemical and electrochemical methods, respectively. The direct chemical synthesis of nucleophiles proceeds through the Schiff base chemical reaction. This procedure offers an alternate reaction between dicarbonyl compounds and diamines leads to the formation of products. The results indicate that the Schiff base chemical method for synthesis of the product has successfully performed in excellent overall yield. In the electrochemical step, a series of Nitrogen-containing compounds were electrosynthesized. Various parameters such as the applied potential, pH of the electrolytic solution, cell configuration and also purification techniques, were carried out to optimize the yields of corresponding products. New Nitrogen-containing heterocycle derivatives were synthesized using an electrochemical procedure coupled with a Schiff base as a facile, efficient and practical method. The products have been characterized after purification by IR, 1 H NMR, 13 C NMR and ESI-MS 2

  10. Special stainless steels for sea water service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomaselli, A.C.

    1983-01-01

    Very exacting demands are made on the corrosion resistance and mechanical properties of materials which in their service come into contact with seawater, and in many cases simultaneously with corrosive process solutions. The demand for higher alloy stainless steels for seawater application is rising in pace with the increasing requirements for safety and operation economy. The corrosion conditions in seawater and the resistance of stainless steels in this medium will be dealt with in the following. Sanicro 28 will then be compared with stainless steels, types AISI 304, 316 and 317, as well as with Alloy 20, Alloy 825 and SANDVIK 2RK65. (Author) [pt

  11. Solid-phase synthesis of compounds of europium and terbium with nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds under mechanical activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinovskaya, I.V.; Karasev, V.E.

    2000-01-01

    Effect of solvents and parameters of mechanical treatment on basic regularities of synthesis of rare earth compounds with nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds is studied. It is shown that interaction on europium (3) and terbium (3) nitrates with nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds leads to formation of compounds of Ln(NO 3 )·2D composition, where Ln=Eu, Tb; D=2,2-dipyridyl, 1,10-phenanthroline, diphenylguanidine. Effect of conditions of mechanical treatment and different additions on process and yield of products is studied. Compounds prepared are characterized by the methods of chemical element analysis, IR spectroscopy and luminescent spectroscopy [ru

  12. Experimental investigation of Ti–6Al–4V titanium alloy and 304L stainless steel friction welded with copper interlayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Kumar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The basic principle of friction welding is intermetallic bonding at the stage of super plasticity attained with self-generating heat due to friction and finishing at upset pressure. Now the dissimilar metal joints are especially popular in defense, aerospace, automobile, bio-medical, refinery and nuclear engineerings. In friction welding, some special alloys with dual phase are not joined successfully due to poor bonding strength. The alloy surfaces after bonding also have metallurgical changes in the line of interfacing. The reported research work in this area is scanty. Although the sound weld zone of direct bonding between Ti–6Al–4V and SS304L was obtained though many trials, the joint was not successful. In this paper, the friction welding characteristics between Ti–6Al–4V and SS304L into which pure oxygen free copper (OFC was introduced as interlayer were investigated. Box–Behnken design was used to minimize the number of experiments to be performed. The weld joint was analyzed for its mechanical strength. The highest tensile strength between Ti–6Al–4V and SS304L between which pure copper was used as insert metal was acquired. Micro-structural analysis and elemental analysis were carried out by EDS, and the formation of intermetallic compound at the interface was identified by XRD analysis.

  13. Intergranular corrosion in unserviced austenitic stainless steel pipes made of alloy 904L; Kornzerfall in nicht betriebsbeanspruchten rostfreien austenitischen Rohren aus Alloy 904L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neidel, Andreas; Cagliyan, Erhan; Fischer, Boromir; Giller, Madeleine; Riesenbeck, Susanne [Siemens AG, Energy Sector, Berlin (Germany). Gasturbinenwerk Berlin

    2017-09-01

    Seamless tubes of the highly corrosion resistant austenitic steel 1.4539, X1NiCrMoCu25-20-5 (Alloy 904L) were observed to exhibit signs of inter-crystalline damage to a depth of several layers of grains and in particular on their internal surface. The material had been stored and had not been put into service. A number of hypotheses had been discussed to explain the predominant cause of the damage. Using optical light and scanning electron microscopy investigation techniques, clear evidence was obtained indicating it to be inter-crystalline corrosion due to the sensitisation of the grain boundaries. The most probable cause of this was determined to be the presence of residual deposits from the rolling process, which due to poor cleaning, had not been completely removed prior to the final solution annealing treatment. This explaining why predominantly the internal surface of the tubes was affected.

  14. Advances in stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldev Raj; Jayakumar, T.; Saibaba, Saroja; Sivaprasad, P.V.; Shankar, P.

    2010-01-01

    This book covers a broad spectrum of topics spanning the entire life cycle of stainless steel-from alloy design and characterization to engineering design, fabrication, mechanical properties, corrosion, quality assurance of components, in-service performance assessment, life prediction and finally failure analysis of materials and components. The contents provide useful feedback for further developments aimed at effective utilization of this class of materials. The book comprises articles that bring out contemporary developments in stainless steels and is thematically classified into the following sections. 1. Component design, modelling and structural integrity, 2. Manufacturing technology, 3. Property evaluation, 4. Alloy development and applications, 5. NDE methods, 6. Corrosion and surface modification. The book commences with articles on component design and structural integrity, thus opening up the areas of challenge for researchers and academia. The articles in the book relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  15. Direct synthesis of nitrogen-containing carbon nanotubes on carbon paper for fuel cell electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wong Wai; Daud, Wan Ramli Wan; Mohamad, Abu Bakar; Kadhum, Abdul Amir Hassan; Majlan, Edy Herianto; Shyuan, Loh Kee

    2012-06-01

    Organic catalyst has recently been identified as the potential substitution for expensive platinum electrocatalyst for fuel cell application. Numerous studies have shown that the nitrogen-containing carbon nanotubes (N-CNT) can be synthesized through spray pyrolysis or floating chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique using various type of organometallic as precursors. This paper presents the method of synthesis and the initial findings of the growth of N-CNT directly on carbon paper using a modified CVD technique. In this research, nickel (II) phthalocyanines (Ni-Pc) as precursor was dissolved in ethanol solvent, stirred and sonicated to become homogenized. The solution was poured into a bubbler and heated up to allow the mixture to vaporize. Subsequently, the solution vapor was flowed into the tubical reactor maintained at 900°C. Carbon paper sputtered with nickel nanoparticles was used as the substrate. The synthesized sample was examined through Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR). Long, entangled and compartmentalized nanotubes with tube diameter ranging 23-27 nm were found covered the carbon paper surface with approximate of 5.5-6.0 μm in thickness. EDX analysis has successfully showed the presence of nitrogen in the carbon nanotube. FTIR analysis showed the presence of the C-N bond on CNT.

  16. Selective fluorescence quenching of nitrogen-containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by aliphatic amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaoping; McGuffin, Victoria L.

    2004-01-01

    In this investigation, primary, secondary, and tertiary amines are evaluated for their efficiency and selectivity as fluorescence quenchers for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and nitrogen-containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (N-PAHs). In general, the quenching efficiency tends to increase from primary to tertiary amine due to a greater number of alkyl groups that increase the electron-donating ability. However, the selectivity decreases from primary to tertiary amine. The effect of low concentrations of water is also examined. Because water can form hydrogen bonds with amines, the nonbonding electron pair is not available for interaction with the fluorophore, thus the quenching constant is decreased. These aliphatic amines are then applied to PAHs and N-PAHs and some interesting trends are observed. Whereas amino-PAHs remain virtually unquenched by different amines, aza-PAHs are all quenched well. The selectivity between aza-PAHs and amino-PAHs is as high as several hundred. This trend provides an easy and effective method to discriminate between these classes of N-PAHs. Moreover, the alternant aza-PAHs are quenched more than their corresponding alternant PAHs

  17. Nitrogen oxides from combustion of nitrogen-containing polymers in waste-derived fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zevenhoven, R.; Kilpinen, P.; Hupa, M.; Elomaa, M.

    2000-01-01

    Usually, waste-derived fuels present nitrogen-containing fractions, which produce nitrogen oxides (NO) during combustion. This study was mainly concerned with poly amides (PA) (nylon), poly urethanes (PU), urea formaldehyde (UF) glue, sewage sludge and refuse-derived fuels (RDF). For control purposes, the authors chose a Polish sub-bituminous coal and a Finnish pine wood sample. An almost inverse trend between fuel nitrogen content and NO emissions was revealed through analysis of NO emissions at 850 Celsius, 1 bar, 7 per cent O 2 in N 2 . It was not possible to derive a clear correlation to the amount of ash generated by the samples. PU foam decomposed through a two-step process, as suggested by thermochromatography, and PA6-containing samples yielded epsilon-caprolactam as a major decomposition product. Important decomposition products from PU, PA6, PA6/PE, sewage sludge and UF glue samples were greenhouse gases as demonstrated by pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy. The work was carried out at Abo Akademi University and University of Helsinki, Finland. 5 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs

  18. Novel styrene polymers functionalized with phosphorus-nitrogen containing molecules: Synthesis and properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tai Qilong [State Key Laboratory of Fire Science, University of Science and Technology of China and USTC-CityU Joint Advanced Research Centre, Suzhou (China); Department of Building and Construction, City University of Hong Kong and USTC-CityU Joint Advanced Research Centre, Suzhou (China); Suzhou Key Laboratory of Urban Public Safety, Suzhou Institute of University of Science and Technology of China, Suzhou (China); Song Lei [State Key Laboratory of Fire Science, University of Science and Technology of China and USTC-CityU Joint Advanced Research Centre, Suzhou (China); Hu Yuan, E-mail: yuanhu@ustc.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Fire Science, University of Science and Technology of China and USTC-CityU Joint Advanced Research Centre, Suzhou (China); Suzhou Key Laboratory of Urban Public Safety, Suzhou Institute of University of Science and Technology of China, Suzhou (China); Yuen, Richard K.K., E-mail: Richard.Yuen@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Building and Construction, City University of Hong Kong and USTC-CityU Joint Advanced Research Centre, Suzhou (China); Feng Hao; Tao Youji [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Adaptability for Industrial Products, China National Electric Apparatus Research Institute, Guangzhou 510300 (China)

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Novel styrene copolymers were successfully synthesized and well characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The copolymers have good optical transparency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The copolymers exhibited much lower flammability. - Abstract: A phosphorus and nitrogen-containing compound with high phosphorus content, AC{sub 2}NP{sub 2}, was firstly synthesized by the Kabachnik-Fields reaction and followed by esterification with acryloyl chloride. The synthesized comonomer was then incorporated into different amounts of polystyrene via radical solution polymerization. The copolymers were well characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), UV/vis spectrophotometer, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), gel permeation chromatography (GPC), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), microscale combustion calorimeter (MCC) and LOI. The results showed that the AC{sub 2}NP{sub 2} was easily incorporated into the backbone of polystyrene, and the copolymers prepared have high transparency. The glass transition temperature (T{sub g}) of the copolymers was decreased with increasing the AC{sub 2}NP{sub 2} content, due to the introduction of much more flexible molecular chain. The TGA results revealed that the introduction of AC{sub 2}NP{sub 2} units slightly decreased the initial decomposition temperatures, but significantly improved the thermal stability of copolymers at high temperature regions under both nitrogen and air atmosphere. Furthermore, all the copolymers exhibited much lower flammability as compared with virgin polystyrene.

  19. Stress-Corrosion Cracking in Martensitic PH Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T.; Nelson, E.

    1984-01-01

    Precipitation-hardening alloys evaluated in marine environment tests. Report describes marine-environment stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) tests of three martensitic precipitation hardening (PH) stainless-steel alloys.

  20. Stress corrosion cracking of stainless steels under deaerated high-temperature water. Influence of grain boundary carbide precipitation, and effect of Mo and Cr in alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Takuyo; Terachi, Takumi; Miyamoto, Tomoki; Arioka, Koji

    2007-01-01

    In order to evaluate the influence of grain boundary carbide on IGSCC susceptibility of stainless steel, crack growth rate tests were performed under deaerated or 0.3 ppm hydrogenated pure water environments at 320degC using half-inch compact tension (CT) specimens. In our previous report, CT testing showed that the susceptibility of CW316 to IGSCC was inhibited by the precipitation of grain boundary carbide under these environments. The result suggested quite different behavior from that in an oxygenated high-temperature water environment. In this study, the influence of (1) Mo and (2) Cr content in alloys, and (3) Cr depletion at the grain boundary on the IGSCC growth behavior in stainless steel was studied at 320degC under a 0.3-ppm hydrogenated pure-water environment. As a result, (1) IGSCC growth was observed on non-sensitized CW20%316, CW20%304, CW20%20Cr316, and CW20%20Cr304 under a 0.3-ppm hydrogenated pure-water environment at 320degC. (2) IGSCC growth was not observed for sensitized CW20%316 and CW20%304 (at 650degC x 48 or 24 h) and healing heat-treated CW20%316 (at 650degC x 48 h + 900degC x 0.5 h) under the same water environment. (3) The susceptibility of high Cr content materials (CW20%20Cr316 and CW20% 20Cr304) to IGSCC resistance was improved that of conventional CW316 and CW304 under the same water environment. The higher Cr content is effective in inhibiting susceptibility to IGSCC, but the inhibiting effect of Cr content is smaller than the effect of the grain boundary carbide. (4) These differences in IGSCC suggest that grain boundary carbide has a beneficial effect in improving IGSCC resistance, at least in a 0.3-ppm hydrogenated pure-water environment, despite the Mo content and Cr depletion at grain boundary. (author)

  1. Kohonen mapping of the crack growth under fatigue loading conditions of stainless steels in BWR environments and of nickel alloys in PWR environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urquidi-Macdonald, Mirna

    2008-01-01

    In this study, crack growth rate data under fatigue loading conditions generated by Argonne National Laboratories and published in 2006 were analyzed [O.K. Chopra, B. Alexandreanu, E.E. Gruber, R.S. Daum, W.J. Shack, Argonne National Laboratory, NUREG CR 6891-series ANL 04/20, Crack Growth Rates of Austenitic Stainless Steel Weld Heat Affected Zone in BWR Environments, January, 2006; B. Alexandreanu, O.K. Chopra, H.M. Chung, E.E. Gruber, W.K. Soppet, R.W. Strain, W.J. Shack, Environmentally Assisted Cracking in Light Water Reactors, vol. 34 in the NUREG/CR-4667 series annual report of Argonne National Laboratory program studies for Calendar (Annual Report 2003). Manuscript Completed: May 2005, Date Published: May 2006], and reported by DoE [B. Alexandreanu, O.K. Chopra, W.J. Shack, S. Crane, H.J. Gonzalez, NRC, Crack Growth Rates and Metallographic Examinations of Alloy 600 and Alloy 82/182 from Field Components and Laboratory Materials Tested in PWR Environments, NUREG/CR-6964, May 2008]. The data collected were measured on austenitic stainless steels in BWR (boiling water reactor) environments and on nickel alloys in PWR (pressurized water reactor) environments. The data collected contained information on material composition, temperature, conductivity of the environment, oxygen concentration, irradiated sample information, weld information, electrochemical potential, load ratio, rise time, hydrogen concentration, hold time, down time, maximum stress intensity factor (K max ), stress intensity range (ΔK max ), crack length, and crack growth rates (CGR). Each position on that Kohonen map is called a cell. A Kohonen map clusters vectors of information by 'similarities.' Vectors of information were formed using the metal composition, followed by the environmental conditions used in each experiments, and finally followed by the crack growth rate (CGR) measured when a sample of pre-cracked metal is set in an environment and the sample is cyclically loaded

  2. Gold Nanoparticle-Catalyzed Formation of Nitrogen-containing Compounds-From Mechanistic Understanding to Synthetic Exploitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mielby, Jerrik; Kegnaes, Soren; Fristrup, Peter

    2012-01-01

    During the last decade, heterogeneous catalysis using gold nanoparticles has gained importance as an efficient method for the oxidation of alcohols and aldehydes. The scope of these reactions has recently been extended to nitrogen-containing compounds, which is a particularly promising substrate...

  3. Effects of filler wire on residual stress in electron beam welded QCr0.8 copper alloy to 304 stainless steel joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Bing-Gang; Zhao, Jian; Li, Xiao-Peng; Chen, Guo-Qing

    2015-01-01

    The electron beam welding (EBW) of 304 stainless steel to QCr0.8 copper alloy with or without copper filler wire was studied in detail. The temperature fields and magnitude and distribution of stress fields in the joints during the welding process were numerically simulated using finite element method. The temperature cycles and residual stresses were also experimentally measured by thermometric and hole-drilling methods, respectively. The accuracy of the modeling procedure was verified by the good agreement between the calculated results and experimental data. The temperature distribution in the joint was found to be asymmetric along the center of weld. In particular, the temperature in the copper alloy plate is much higher than that in the 304 SS plate owing to the great difference in thermal conductivity between the two materials. The peak three-dimensional residual stresses all appeared at the interface between the copper and steel in the two different joints. Furthermore, the weld was subjected to tensile stress. The longitudinal residual stress, generally the most harmful to the integrity of the structure among the stress components in EBW with filler wire (EBFW), was 53 MPa lower than that of autogenous EBW (AEBW), and the through-thickness residual stress was 12 MPa lower. The transverse residual stress of EBFW was 44 MPa higher than that of AEBW. However, analysis of the von Mises stress showed that the EBFW process effectively reduced the extent of the high residual stress region in the weld location and the magnitude of the residual stresses in the copper side compared with those of the AEBW joint. - Highlights: • Copper and steel was welded by electron beam welding with copper filler wire. • The copper wire fed into gap can reduce the peak value of residual stress. • The peak value of longitudinal stress can be reduced 53 MPa by the filler wire. • The range of nov Mises stress in the weld could be reduced by the wire

  4. Boundary lubrication of stainless steel and CoCrMo alloy based on phosphorous and boron compounds in oil-in-water emulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Jincan; Zeng, Xiangqiong; Ren, Tianhui; Heide, Emile van der

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The boundary lubrication behaviour of three O/W emulsions was investigated. • The interactions between O/W emulsions and CoCrMo surfaces were studied. • Three different additives containing P and B were added in the emulsions. • The tribologcial performance of oil lubricant and emulsion was compared. • The friction profile of emulsion shows three stages due to spreading and plate-out. - Abstract: Emulsion lubrication is widely used in metal forming operations and has potential applications in the biomedical field, yet the emulsion lubrication mechanism is not well understood. This work explores the possibilities of three different oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions containing dibutyl octadecylphosphoramidate (DBOP), 6-octadecyl-1,3,6,2-dioxazaborocan-2-ol calcium salt (ODOC) and 2-(4-dodecylphenoxy)-6-octadecyl-1,3,6,2-dioxazaborocane (DOB) to generate boundary films on stainless steel AISI 316 and CoCrMo alloy surfaces. Experimental results show lower friction values for the emulsions in combination with CoCrMo compared to AISI 316. The different performance of the additives is related to the composition of the adsorption and reaction film on the interacting surfaces, which was shown to be dependent on the active elements and molecular structure of the additives. The friction profile of the emulsions indicates that the emulsion appears to be broken during the rubbing process, then the additives adsorb onto the metal surface to form protecting boundary layers. The XPS analysis shows that for boundary lubrication conditions, the additive molecules in the emulsion first adsorb on the metal surface after the droplet is broken, and then decompose and react with the metal surface during the rubbing process to form stable lubricating films on the rubbed surfaces

  5. Boundary lubrication of stainless steel and CoCrMo alloy based on phosphorous and boron compounds in oil-in-water emulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Jincan [Laboratory for Surface Technology and Tribology, University of Twente (Netherlands); School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Key Laboratory for Thin Film and Microfabrication, Shanghai Jiao Tong University (China); Zeng, Xiangqiong, E-mail: X.Zeng@utwente.nl [Laboratory for Surface Technology and Tribology, University of Twente (Netherlands); School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Key Laboratory for Thin Film and Microfabrication, Shanghai Jiao Tong University (China); Ren, Tianhui [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Key Laboratory for Thin Film and Microfabrication, Shanghai Jiao Tong University (China); Heide, Emile van der [Laboratory for Surface Technology and Tribology, University of Twente (Netherlands); TNO (Netherlands)

    2014-10-01

    Highlights: • The boundary lubrication behaviour of three O/W emulsions was investigated. • The interactions between O/W emulsions and CoCrMo surfaces were studied. • Three different additives containing P and B were added in the emulsions. • The tribologcial performance of oil lubricant and emulsion was compared. • The friction profile of emulsion shows three stages due to spreading and plate-out. - Abstract: Emulsion lubrication is widely used in metal forming operations and has potential applications in the biomedical field, yet the emulsion lubrication mechanism is not well understood. This work explores the possibilities of three different oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions containing dibutyl octadecylphosphoramidate (DBOP), 6-octadecyl-1,3,6,2-dioxazaborocan-2-ol calcium salt (ODOC) and 2-(4-dodecylphenoxy)-6-octadecyl-1,3,6,2-dioxazaborocane (DOB) to generate boundary films on stainless steel AISI 316 and CoCrMo alloy surfaces. Experimental results show lower friction values for the emulsions in combination with CoCrMo compared to AISI 316. The different performance of the additives is related to the composition of the adsorption and reaction film on the interacting surfaces, which was shown to be dependent on the active elements and molecular structure of the additives. The friction profile of the emulsions indicates that the emulsion appears to be broken during the rubbing process, then the additives adsorb onto the metal surface to form protecting boundary layers. The XPS analysis shows that for boundary lubrication conditions, the additive molecules in the emulsion first adsorb on the metal surface after the droplet is broken, and then decompose and react with the metal surface during the rubbing process to form stable lubricating films on the rubbed surfaces.

  6. Dissimilar laser welding of AISI 316L stainless steel to Ti6–Al4–6V alloy via pure vanadium interlayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomashchuk, I., E-mail: iryna.tomashchuk@u-bourgogne.fr; Grevey, D.; Sallamand, P.

    2015-01-12

    Successful continuous laser joining of AISI 316L stainless steel with Ti6Al4V titanium alloy through pure vanadium interlayer has been performed. Three welding configurations were tested: one-pass welding involving all three materials and two pass and double spot welding involving creation of two melted zones separated by remaining solid vanadium. For the most relevant welds, the investigation of microstructure, phase content and mechanical properties has been carried out. In case of formation of a single melted zone, the insertion of steel elements into V-based solid solution embrittles the weld. In case of creation of two separated melted zones, the mechanical resistance of the junction is determined by annealing of remaining vanadium interlayer, which can be witnessed by observing the increase of grain size and decrease of UTS. The two pass configuration allows attain highest mechanical resistance: 367 MPa or 92% of UTS of annealed vanadium. Double spot configuration produces excessive heat supply to vanadium interlayer, which results in important decrease of tensile strength down to 72% of UTS of annealed vanadium. It was found that undesirable σ phase which forms between Fe and V is not created during the laser welding process because of high cooling rates. However, the zones whose composition corresponds to σ homogeneity range are crack-susceptible, so the best choice is to reduce the V content in steel/vanadium melted zone below σ phase formation limit. In the same time, the proportion between V and Ti in Ti6Al4V/vanadium melted zones does not influence mechanical properties as these elements form ideal solid solution.

  7. High temperature corrosion studies on friction welded low alloy steel and stainless steel in air and molten salt environment at 650 oC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arivazhagan, N.; Narayanan, S.; Singh, Surendra; Prakash, Satya; Reddy, G.M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → Thermogravimetric analysis on friction welded AISI 304 with AISI 4140 exposed in air and molten salt environment. → Comparative study on friction welded AISI 4140 with AISI 304 exposed in air, Na 2 SO 4 -60%V 2 O 5 and NaCl-50%Na 2 SO 4 at 650 o C. → SEM/EDAX, XRD analysis on corroded dissimilar AISI 304 and AISI 4140 materials. -- Abstract: The investigation on high-temperature corrosion resistance of the weldments is necessary for prolonged service lifetime of the components used in corrosive environments. This paper reports on the performance of friction welded low alloy steel AISI 4140 and stainless steel AISI 304 in air as well as molten salt environment of Na 2 SO 4 -60%V 2 O 5 and NaCl-50%Na 2 SO 4 at 650 o C. This paper reports several studies carried out for characterizing the weldments corrosion behavior. Initially thermogravimetric technique was used to establish the kinetics of corrosion. For analyzing the corrosion products, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive analysis and electron probe micro analysis techniques were used. From the results of the experiments, it is observed that the weldments suffered accelerated corrosion in NaCl-Na 2 SO 4 environment and showed spalling/sputtering of the oxide scale. Furthermore, corrosion resistance of weld interface was found to be lower than that of parent metals in molten salt environment. Weight gain kinetics in air oxidation studies reveals a steady-state parabolic rate law while the kinetics with salt deposits displays multi-stage growth rates. Moreover NaCl is the main corrosive species in high temperature corrosion, involving mixtures of NaCl and Na 2 SO 4 which is responsible for formation of internal attack.

  8. Corrosion behaviour of laser clad stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damborenea, J.J. de; Weerasinghe, V.M.; West, D.R.F.

    1993-01-01

    The present paper is focussed in the study of the properties of a clad layer of stainless steel on a mild steel. By blowing powder of the alloy into a melt pool generated by a laser of 2 KW, an homogeneous layer of 316 stainless steel can be obtained. Structure, composition and corrosion behaviour are similar to those of a stainless steel in as-received condition. (Author)

  9. FIREX (Fire Influence on Regional and Global Environments Experiment): Measurements of Nitrogen Containing Volatile Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warneke, C.; Schwarz, J. P.; Yokelson, R. J.; Roberts, J. M.; Koss, A.; Coggon, M.; Yuan, B.; Sekimoto, K.

    2017-12-01

    A combination of a warmer, drier climate with fire-control practices over the last century have produced a situation in which we can expect more frequent fires and fires of larger magnitude in the Western U.S. and Canada. There are urgent needs to better understand the impacts of wildfire and biomass burning (BB) on the atmosphere and climate system, and for policy-relevant science to aid in the process of managing fires. The FIREX (Fire Influence on Regional and Global Environment Experiment) research effort is a multi-year, multi-agency measurement campaign focused on the impact of BB on climate and air quality from western North American wild fires, where research takes place on scales ranging from the flame-front to the global atmosphere. FIREX includes methods development and small- and large-scale laboratory and field experiments. FIREX will include: emission factor measurements from typical North American fuels in the fire science laboratory in Missoula, Montana; mobile laboratory deployments; ground site measurements at sites influenced by BB from several western states. The main FIREX effort will be a large field study with multiple aircraft and mobile labs in the fire season of 2019. One of the main advances of FIREX is the availability of various new measurement techniques that allows for smoke evaluation in unprecedented detail. The first major effort of FIREX was the fire science laboratory measurements in October 2016, where a large number of previously understudied Nitrogen containing volatile organic compounds (NVOCs) were measured using H3O+CIMS and I-CIMS instruments. The contribution of NVOCs to the total reactive Nitrogen budget and the relationship to the Nitrogen content of the fuel are investigated.

  10. Tribological properties of nitrogen-containing amorphous carbon film produced by dc plasma chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wei; Wazumi, Koichiro; Tanaka, Akihiro; Koga, Yoshinori

    2003-01-01

    The nitrogen-contained amorphous carbon (a-C:N) films were deposited in a dc plasma chemical vapor deposition system with different substrate bias voltages. The structural, mechanical, and tribological properties of the a-C:N films were investigated. The influence of the bias voltage on the tribological behaviors of the a-C:N films was evaluated under various environments (dry air, O 2 , N 2 , and vacuum) using a ball-on-disk friction tester. It showed that the sp 3 C and hydrogen concentration of the a-C:N films decreases with increasing the bias voltage. However, the nitrogen concentration increases with increasing the bias voltage. As a result, the hardness and internal stress decrease and the critical load for fracturing increases as the substrate bias increases. For the tribological properties of the a-C:N films, the friction coefficient of the films slightly decreases in the environments of N 2 , O 2 , or dry air, but increases slightly in the vacuum environment by increasing the bias voltage. It indicates that the incorporated nitrogen in the a-C:N films would decrease the friction coefficient of the films in N 2 or O 2 environments, but slightly increases the friction coefficient of the films in a vacuum. The excellent wear resistance of the a-C:N films, in the level of 10 -9 -10 -8 mm 3 /Nm, can be observed in N 2 , vacuum, and dry air environments. In addition, the effect of the bias voltage on the wear rate of the a-C:N films becomes less obvious by nitrogen incorporation. So, we suggest the incorporated nitrogen, which bonded to carbon and restrained the increase of the fraction of sp 2 C-C, would restrain the wear of the a-C:N films in different environments, especially in dry air

  11. PDS 1-5. Divertor heat sink materials pre- and post-neutron irradiation. Tensile and fatigue tests of brazed joints of molybdenum alloys and 316L stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lind, Anders.

    1994-01-01

    Tensile specimens from brazed joints of molybdenum alloys (TZM or Mo-5%Re) and Type 316L austenitic stainless steel tubes have been tested at ambient temperature and 127 degrees C before and after neutron irradiation at about 40 degrees C to approximately 0.2 dpa. The unirradiated specimens showed generally ductile behaviour, but the irradiated specimens were notch sensitive and failed in a brittle manner with zero elongation; in all cases the fracture occurred in the molybdenum alloy. The brittle behaviour is consistent with previously published data and results from the increase in strength (radiation hardening) and the associated increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (radiation embrittlement) induced in the body-centered-cubic (BCC) molybdenum alloys by irradiation to relatively low displacement doses. The same type of irradiated specimens were also used in fatigue tests. However, the results from the fatigue tests are too limited and complementary studies are needed. During exposure to water locally up to 25% of the wall thickness of the Mo-alloys has corroded away. These observations cast serious doubts on the viability of the molybdenum alloys for divertor applications in fusion systems. 8 refs, 29 figs

  12. Solving process industry problems with specialty stainlesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montrone, E.D.

    1977-01-01

    Substantial steel industry efforts have been devoted to improving the properties of stainless steels by changing the level of alloying elements. Rapid progress has produced materials to meet many of the diversified service conditions existing in process plants. The performance characteristics of seven stainless steels are compared. The emphasis is on steels which avoid the effects of corrosion. 4 figures, 3 tables

  13. Chromium-Makes stainless steel stainless

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropschot, S.J.; Doebrich, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Chromium, a steely-gray, lustrous, hard metal that takes a high polish and has a high melting point, is a silvery white, hard, and bright metal plating on steel and other material. Commonly known as chrome, it is one of the most important and indispensable industrial metals because of its hardness and resistance to corrosion. But it is used for more than the production of stainless steel and nonferrous alloys; it is also used to create pigments and chemicals used to process leather.

  14. Stainless-Steel-Gadolinium Alloys; Alliages Acier Inoxydable-Gadolinium; Splavy iz nerzhaveyushchej stali i gadoliniya; Aleaciones de Acero Inoxidable-Gadolinio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copeland, M.; Kato, H. [Albany Metallurgy Research Center, Bureau Of Mines, United States Department of the Interior, Albany, OR (United States)

    1964-06-15

    Because of the excellent corrosion resistance of stainless steels and the interest in gadolinium as a poison material, alloys of the two compounds were studied.Gadolinium was alloyed with AISE 304-type and chromium-type stainless steels; and then phase relationships, fabricability and properties were studied. The melting points of minor phases in alloys containing low percentages of gadolinium were noted to have a large effect on the structures resulting from equilibrating treatments and fabricability of the steels. When gadolinium was alloyed with the chromium-nickel-type steel, two minor phases, Fe{sub 9}Gd and Ni{sub 7}Gd, were observed to melt at 1080 Degree-Sign C, which limited the heat treatment and fabrication temperatures. Alloys with up to 5 wt.% gadolinium were successfully fabricated, and mechanical and corrosion properties were determined. No changes in the mechanical properties or resistance to hot-water corrosion of the steel were observed on alloying with up to about 3 wt.% gadolinium. Because of fabrication temperature limitations placed on chromium-nickel steels by the melting point of the minor phases, the effects of gadolinium on chromium steels were studied. Only one minor phase that melted at 1320 Degree-Sign C was noted on investigation of the 10 wt. % gadolinium isopleth in the chromium-iron-gadolinium alloy system. This property would enable one to equilibrate and fabricate these gadolinium steels at normally used temperatures. (author) [French] Les auteurs ont etudie des alliages d'acier inoxydable et de gadolinium en raison de l'excellente resistance a la corrosion des aciers inoxydables et de l 'interet que presente le gadolinium comme poison. Ils ont allie du gadolinium a des aciers inoxydables AISI de nuance 304 et des aciers au chrome et ils ont etudie le diagramme des phases, les possibilites de transformation et les proprietes de ces alliages. Dans les alliages d'une faible teneur en gadolinium, les points de fusion des phases

  15. The Corrosion Resistance of Composite Arch Wire Laser-Welded By NiTi Shape Memory Alloy and Stainless Steel Wires with Cu Interlayer in Artificial Saliva with Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Sun, Xinhua; Hou, Xu; Li, Hongmei; Sun, Daqian

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the corrosion resistance of laser-welded composite arch wire (CoAW) with Cu interlayer between NiTi shape memory alloy and stainless steel wire in artificial saliva with different concentrations of protein was studied. It was found that protein addition had a significant influence on the corrosion behavior of CoAW. Low concentration of protein caused the corrosion resistance of CoAW decrease in electrochemical corrosion and immersion corrosion tests. High concentration of protein could reduce this effect. PMID:23801895

  16. Effect of silicon ion implantation upon the structure and corrosion resistance of the surface layer of stainless steel 316L, Vitalium and titanium alloy Ti6Al14V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baszkiewicz, J.; Kaminski, M.; Krupa, D.; Kozubowski, J.; Barcz, A.; Gawlik, A.; Jagielski, J.

    1995-01-01

    Samples of 316L stainless steel, Vitalium and Ti6A14V titanium alloy have been implanted with doses of 1.5, 3, and 4.5 x 10 17 Si + /cm 2 . Transmission electron microscopy shows that during ion implantation amorphous layers are formed. When samples of titanium alloy were implanted with a dose of 0.5 x 10 17 Si + /cm 2 , the implanted layer consisted of a dispersion of fine silicide crystallites instead of being amorphous. The corrosion resistance was analyzed by electrochemical techniques in 0.9% NaCl at the temperature of 37 C. The increase of corrosion resistance has been observed as a result of structural modifications of the surface layer. (author). 7 refs, 4 tabs

  17. Nickel: makes stainless steel strong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Maeve A.

    2012-01-01

    Nickel is a silvery-white metal that is used mainly to make stainless steel and other alloys stronger and better able to withstand extreme temperatures and corrosive environments. Nickel was first identified as a unique element in 1751 by Baron Axel Fredrik Cronstedt, a Swedish mineralogist and chemist. He originally called the element kupfernickel because it was found in rock that looked like copper (kupfer) ore and because miners thought that "bad spirits" (nickel) in the rock were making it difficult for them to extract copper from it. Approximately 80 percent of the primary (not recycled) nickel consumed in the United States in 2011 was used in alloys, such as stainless steel and superalloys. Because nickel increases an alloy's resistance to corrosion and its ability to withstand extreme temperatures, equipment and parts made of nickel-bearing alloys are often used in harsh environments, such as those in chemical plants, petroleum refineries, jet engines, power generation facilities, and offshore installations. Medical equipment, cookware, and cutlery are often made of stainless steel because it is easy to clean and sterilize. All U.S. circulating coins except the penny are made of alloys that contain nickel. Nickel alloys are increasingly being used in making rechargeable batteries for portable computers, power tools, and hybrid and electric vehicles. Nickel is also plated onto such items as bathroom fixtures to reduce corrosion and provide an attractive finish.

  18. EFFECTIVENESS OF NITROGEN-CONTAINING BISPHOSPHONATES IN THE REGULATION OF MINERAL METABOLISM DISTURBANCES ASSOCIATED WITH ALIMENTARY OSTEOPOROSIS IN RATS

    OpenAIRE

    Komisarenko S. V.; Volochnyuk D. M.; Shymanskyy I. O.; Ivonin S. P.; Veliky M. M.1

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effectiveness of nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates synthesized as promising substances for correction of mineral metabolism in osteoporosis. The study was carried out on a model of alimentary osteoporosis that was characterized by hypocalcaemia, hypophosphatemia, decreased 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3 content in blood serum and severe bone tissue demineralization (reduced ash content and mineral components). It was found that synthesized novel nitrogen bi...

  19. Corrosion resistance of stainless steel, nickel-titanium, titanium molybdenum alloy, and ion-implanted titanium molybdenum alloy archwires in acidic fluoride-containing artificial saliva: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venith Jojee Pulikkottil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: (1 To evaluate the corrosion resistance of four different orthodontic archwires and to determine the effect of 0.5% NaF (simulating high fluoride-containing toothpaste of about 2250 ppm on corrosion resistance of these archwires. (2 To assess whether surface roughness (Ra is the primary factor influencing the corrosion resistance of these archwires. Materials and Methods: Four different archwires (stainless steel [SS], nickel-titanium [NiTi], titanium molybdenum alloy [TMA], and ion-implanted TMA were considered for this study. Surface characteristics were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Linear polarization test, a fast electrochemical technique, was used to evaluate the corrosion resistance, in terms of polarization resistance of four different archwires in artificial saliva with NaF concentrations of 0% and 0.5%. Statistical analysis was performed by one-way analysis of variance. Results: The potentiostatic study reveals that the corrosion resistance of low-friction TMA (L-TMA > TMA > NiTi > SS. AFM analysis showed the surface Ra of TMA > NiTi > L-TMA > SS. This indicates that the chemical composition of the wire is the primary influential factor to have high corrosion resistance and surface Ra is only secondary. The corrosion resistance of all wires had reduced significantly in 0.5% acidic fluoride-containing artificial saliva due to formation of fluoride complex compound. Conclusion: The presence of 0.5% NaF in artificial saliva was detrimental to the corrosion resistance of the orthodontic archwires. Therefore, complete removal of residual high-fluorinated toothpastes from the crevice between archwire and bracket during tooth brushing is mandatory.

  20. Joining method for pressure tube and martensitic stainless steel tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimoto, Hiroshi; Koike, Hiromitsu.

    1993-01-01

    In a joining portion of zirconium alloy and a stainless steel, the surface of martensitic stainless steel being in contact with Zr and Zr alloy is applied with a laser quenching solidification treatment before expanding joining of them to improve the surface. This can provide the surface with refined coagulated cell tissues and make deposits and impurities homogeneous and solubilized. As a result, the surface of the martensitic stainless steel has highly corrosion resistance, to suppress contact corrosion with Zr and Zr alloy. Accordingly, even if it is exposed to high temperature water of 200 to 350degC, failures of Zr and Zr alloy can be suppressed. (T.M.)

  1. Corrosion behavior of 2205 duplex stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, J A; Guzman, A; Zuccari, A; Thornburg, D W; Rhodes, B F; Oshida, Y; Moore, B K

    1997-07-01

    The corrosion of 2205 duplex stainless steel was compared with that of AISI type 316L stainless steel. The 2205 stainless steel is a potential orthodontic bracket material with low nickel content (4 to 6 wt%), whereas the 316L stainless steel (nickel content: 10 to 14 wt%) is a currently used bracket material. Both stainless steels were subjected to electrochemical and immersion (crevice) corrosion tests in 37 degrees C, 0.9 wt% sodium chloride solution. Electrochemical testing indicates that 2205 has a longer passivation range than 316L. The corrosion rate of 2205 was 0.416 MPY (milli-inch per year), whereas 316L exhibited 0.647 MPY. When 2205 was coupled to 316L with equal surface area ratio, the corrosion rate of 2205 reduced to 0.260 MPY, indicating that 316L stainless steel behaved like a sacrificial anode. When 316L is coupled with NiTi, TMA, or stainless steel arch wire and was subjected to the immersion corrosion test, it was found that 316L suffered from crevice corrosion. On the other hand, 2205 stainless steel did not show any localized crevice corrosion, although the surface of 2205 was covered with corrosion products, formed when coupled to NiTi and stainless steel wires. This study indicates that considering corrosion resistance, 2205 duplex stainless steel is an improved alternative to 316L for orthodontic bracket fabrication when used in conjunction with titanium, its alloys, or stainless steel arch wires.

  2. Evaluation of nitrogen containing reducing agents for the corrosion control of materials relevant to nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Padma S. [Water and Steam Chemistry Division, BARC Facilities, Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu (India); Mohan, D. [Department of Chemistry, Anna University, Chennai, Tamilnadu (India); Chandran, Sinu; Rajesh, Puspalata; Rangarajan, S. [Water and Steam Chemistry Division, BARC Facilities, Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu (India); Velmurugan, S., E-mail: svelu@igcar.gov.in [Water and Steam Chemistry Division, BARC Facilities, Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu (India)

    2017-02-01

    Materials undergo enhanced corrosion in the presence of oxidants in aqueous media. Usually, hydrogen gas or water soluble reducing agents are used for inhibiting corrosion. In the present study, the feasibility of using alternate reducing agents such as hydrazine, aqueous ammonia, and hydroxylamine that can stay in the liquid phase was investigated. A comparative study of corrosion behavior of the structural materials of the nuclear reactor viz. carbon steel (CS), stainless steel (SS-304 LN), monel-400 and incoloy-800 in the oxidizing and reducing conditions was also made. In nuclear industry, the presence of radiation field adds to the corrosion problems. The radiolysis products of water such as oxygen and hydrogen peroxide create an oxidizing environment that enhances the corrosion. Electrochemical studies at 90 °C showed that the reducing agents investigated were efficient in controlling corrosion processes in the presence of oxygen and hydrogen peroxide. Evaluation of thermal stability of hydrazine and its effect on corrosion potential of SS-304 LN were also investigated in the temperature range of 200–280 °C. The results showed that the thermal decomposition of hydrazine followed a first order kinetics. Besides, a change in electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) was observed from −0.4 V (Vs SHE) to −0.67 V (Vs SHE) on addition of 5 ppm of hydrazine at 240 °C. Investigations were also made to understand the distribution behavior of hydrogen peroxide and hydrazine in water-steam phases and it was found that both the phases showed identical behavior. - Highlights: • Hydrazine was found to be a promising reducing agent for oxidant control. • In presence of hydrazine corrosion potential of SS304 LN was well below −230 mV. • SS304LN could be protected from IGSCC by hydrazine addition. • Thermal and radiation stability of hydrazine at 285 °C was found satisfactory.

  3. Evaluation of mechanical properties in stainless alloy ferritic with 5 % molybdenum; Avaliacao das propriedades mecanicas em ligas inoxidaveis ferriticas com 5% de molibdenio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima Filho, V.X.; Gomes, F.H.F.; Guimaraes, R.F.; Saboia, F.H.C.; Abreu, H.F.G. de [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia do Ceara (IFCE). Campus Maracanau, CE (Brazil)], e-mail: venceslau@ifce.edu.br

    2010-07-01

    The deterioration of equipment in the oil industry is caused by high aggressiveness in processing the same. One solution to this problem would increase the content of molybdenum (Mo) alloys, since this improves the corrosion resistance. As the increase of Mo content causes changes in mechanical properties, we sought to evaluate the mechanical properties of alloys with 5% Mo and different levels of chromium (Cr). Were performed metallography and hardness measurement of the alloys in the annealed condition. Subsequent tests were performed tensile and Charpy-V, both at room temperature. The results showed that 2% difference in the content of Cr did not significantly alter the mechanical properties of alloys. The alloys studied had higher values in measured properties when compared to commercial ferritic alloys with similar percentages of Cr. The high content of Mo resulted in a brittle at room temperature but ductile at temperatures above 70 degree C. (author)

  4. Nitrogen-containing superlow-carbon austenitic steel 02Kh25N22AM2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fe'ldgandler, É. G.; Svistunova, T. V.; Savkina, L. Ya.; Lapshina, O. B.

    1996-02-01

    At present the equipment for manufacturing carbamide mineral fertilizers is produced from domestic steel 03Kh17N14M3 having "carbamide quality." Imported equipment also used in the industry is produced from steel of the 25-22-2 (Cr -Ni-Mo) type shipped by various firms, namely, 2RE69 (Sandvik, Sweden), 254SFER (Avesta, Sweden), 2522LCN (VDM, Germany), DM 1.4466 (Germany), and X2CrNiMo 25-22-2 (Dalmine, Italy). The imported steels are used because in some units steel 03Khl7Nl4M3 does not provide the requisite corrosion resistance in an intensified process of carbamide manufacturing. We currently possess domestic high-alloyed steel for producing new and repairing imported equipment operating under the severe conditions of carbamide synthesis. The present paper concerns the structure, mechanical properties, and corrosion resistance of industrially produced steel 02Kh25N22AM2 (ChS-108) and the recommended range of its application.

  5. Mass flows of nitrogen-containing pollutants between atmosphere and forest ecosystem. Massenfluesse stickstoffhaltiger Schadstoffe zwischen Atmosphere und Waldoekosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeschke, W.; Grieser, J.; Herrmann, U.; Kessel, M.; Kosiol, W.; Nietzsche, I.; Sattler, T. (Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Zentrum fuer Umweltforschung)

    1992-01-01

    In the discussion about the possible causes of novel forest decline, nitrogen-containing components in the atmosphere have received increased interest in recent years. At the Centre for Environmental Research of the University of Frankfurt, a new approach to this problem was tried within the framework of the coordinated research project Frankfurter Stadtwald. A whole number of concentrations and flows of different pollutants were used to make up a balance for the area of investigation. Where possible, all relevant concentrations and flows were to be measured or at least realistically estimated. Therefore several measuring set-ups were realized. From the compiled data, a budget of nitrogen-containing components for the area of investigation was made up. This novel approach gives an idea of the concentrations and flows of a multitude of nitrogen compounds in an ecosystem like the Frankfurter Stadtwald. These constitute a necessary basis for impact investigations by botanists to explain novel forest decline. (orig./KW) With 90 figs., 23 tabs.

  6. Tensile and fracture toughness properties of copper alloys and their HIP joints with austenitic stainless steel in unirradiated and neutron irradiated condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taehtinen, S.; Pyykkoenen, M.; Singh, B.N.; Toft, P.

    1998-03-01

    The tensile strength and ductility of unirradiated CuAl25 IG0 and CuCrZr alloys decreased continuously with increasing temperature up to 350 deg C. Fracture toughness of unirradiated CuAl25 IG0 alloy decreased continuously with increasing temperature from 20 deg C to 350 deg C whereas the fracture toughness of unirradiated CuCrZr alloy remained almost constant at temperatures up to 100 deg C, was decreased significantly at 200 deg C and slightly increased at 350 deg C. Fracture toughness of HIP joints were lower than that of corresponding copper alloy and fracture path in HIP joint specimen was always within copper alloy side of the joint. Neutron irradiation to a dose level of 0.3 dpa resulted in hardening and reduction in uniform elongation to about 2-4% at 200 deg C in both copper alloys. At higher temperatures softening was observed and uniform elongation increased to about 5% and 16% for CuAl25 IG0 and CuCrZr alloys, respectively. Fracture toughness of CuAl25 IG0 alloy reduced markedly due to neutron irradiation in the temperature range from 20 deg C to 350 deg C. The fracture toughness of the irradiated CuCrZr alloy also decreased in the range from 20 deg C to 350 deg C, although it remained almost unaffected at temperatures below 200 deg C and decreased significantly at 350 deg C when compared with that of unirradiated CuCrZr alloy. (orig.)

  7. Evaluation of austenitic stainless steels for transpassive corrosion by metal purification technology. Synergistic effect of Si and P on intergranular corrosion of Fe-18Cr-14Ni alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayuzumi, Masami; Ohta, Joji; Kako, Kenji; Kawakami, Eishi

    2001-01-01

    The synergistic effect of Si, Mn, C, P, and S on the transpassive corrosion of HP18Cr-14Ni alloys was studied in 13N nitric acid. The specimens were fabricated using a cold crucible method in a high-vacuum chamber to reduce contamination. The additions of Si<1% and Mn<2% had no effect on the corrosion behavior of HP18Cr-14Ni alloys, and the addition of Si<1% also had no effect on the corrosion behavior of HP18Cr-14Ni-1Mn alloys, although 1% Si induced intergranular corrosion in both the alloys. Thus, HP18Cr-14Ni-1Mn-0.5Si alloys were selected to evaluate the effects of C, P and S (100 ppm each). The addition of P, and the co-addition of C, P, and S to HP18Cr-14Ni-1Mn-0.5Si induced intergranular corrosion of the same degree in the solution annealed condition. This result suggests the synergistic effect of Si and P to induce intergranular corrosion, since the single addition of Si or P to this level did not lead to intergranular corrosion of HP18Cr-14Ni alloys. HP18Cr-14Ni-1Mn-0.5Si alloys containing C, P, and S at the 100 ppm level each showed superior corrosion resistance compared to a commercial Type 304L in 13N nitric acid. (author)

  8. Effects of Alloyed Carbon on the General Corrosion and the Pitting Corrosion Behavior of FeCrMnN Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Heon-Young; Lee, Tae-Ho; Kim, Sung-Joon [Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    The effects of alloyed carbon on the pitting corrosion, the general corrosion, and the passivity behavior of Fe{sub 1}8Cr{sub 1}0Mn{sub 0}.4Nx{sub C} (x=0 ⁓ 0.38 wt%) alloys were investigated by various electrochemical methods and XPS analysis. The alloyed carbon increased the general corrosion resistance of the FeCrMnN matrix. Carbon enhanced the corrosion potential, reduced the metal dissolution rate, and accelerated the hydrogen evolution reaction rate in various acidic solutions. In addition, carbon promoted the pitting corrosion resistance of the matrix in a chloride solution. The alloyed carbon in the matrix increased the chromium content in the passive film, and thus the passive film became more protective.

  9. System approach for evaluation of soil contamination by nitrogen containing pollutants in the 30-km zone power nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shevtsova, O.V.; Zhigunova, L.N.; Makovskaya, N.A.; Pavlovich, E.L.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the results of studies of the nitrogen-containing chemical pollutants of the soil 30 km zone nuclear power plant in order to evaluate the chemical carcinogenic risk to public health. As a result of this work the least amount of NDMA fixed at 0,83 × 10 -4 mg/kg, the highest - 128,29 × 10 -4 mg/kg, which is 0,83 and 128,3 %, respectively, of Madman established in the Russian Federation and Republic of Kazakhstan, the content of NDMA precursors - nitrite ions varies from 0,07 to 4,43 mg/kg. Found that most of the compounds reported in agricultural land. Calculate the total carcinogenic risk for the population living in the region - the set value corresponds to the maximum risk tolerance, i. e. the upper limit of acceptable risk. These levels are subject to continuous monitoring. (authors)

  10. Synthesis and study on biological activity of nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds – regulators of enzymes of nucleic acid biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexeeva I. V.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Results of investigations on the development of new regulators of functional activity of nucleic acid biosynthesis enzymes based on polycyclic nitrogen-containing heterosystems are summarized. Computer design and molecular docking in the catalytic site of target enzyme (T7pol allowed to perform the directed optimization of basic structures. Several series of compounds were obtained and efficient inhibitors of herpes family (simple herpes virus type 2, Epstein-Barr virus, influenza A and hepatitis C viruses were identified, as well as compounds with potent antitumor, antibacterial and antifungal activity. It was established that the use of model test systems based on enzymes participating in nucleic acids synthesis is a promising approach to the primary screening of potential inhibitors in vitro.

  11. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) study and design strategies of nitrogen-containing heterocyclic moieties for their anticancer activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Jawaid; Khan, Ahsan Ahmed; Ali, Zulphikar; Haider, Rafi; Shahar Yar, M

    2017-01-05

    The present review article offers a detailed account of the design strategies employed for the synthesis of nitrogen-containing anticancer agents. The results of different studies describe the N-heterocyclic ring system is a core structure in many synthetic compounds exhibiting a broad range of biological activities. Benzimidazole, benzothiazole, indole, acridine, oxadiazole, imidazole, isoxazole, pyrazole, triazoles, quinolines and quinazolines including others drugs containing pyridazine, pyridine and pyrimidines are covered. The following studies of these compounds suggested that these compounds showed their antitumor activities through multiple mechanisms including inhibiting protein kinase (CDK, MK-2, PLK1, kinesin-like protein Eg5 and IKK), topoisomerase I and II, microtubule inhibition, and many others. Our concise representation exploits the design and anticancer potency of these compounds. The direct comparison of anticancer activities with the standard enables a systematic analysis of the structure-activity relationship among the series. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Synergistic effect and mechanism of platinum catalyst and nitrogen-containing silane on the thermal stability of silicone rubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Wanjuan; Zeng, Xingrong; Lai, Xuejun; Li, Hongqiang; Fang, Weizhen; Liu, Tian

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Platinum (Pt) and nitrogen-containing silane (NS) were introduced into silicone rubber. • The thermal stability was improved by Pt/NS both under nitrogen and air atmosphere. • The TG-FTIR of evolved gases during degradation was performed. • The synergistic effect and mechanism of Pt and NS were proposed. - Abstract: Platinum (Pt) catalyst and nitrogen-containing silane (NS) were introduced to improve the thermal stability of silicone rubber. The effects of Pt and NS on thermal stability and degradation mechanism of silicone rubber were investigated by thermogravimetry (TG), thermogravimetry-Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (TG-FTIR), scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDXS) and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR). A significant synergism was found between Pt and NS for improving the thermal stability of silicone rubber. When 6.67 ppm of Pt and 1.4 phr of NS were introduced, the temperature of 10% and 20% weight loss under nitrogen atmosphere were respectively increased by 36 °C and 119 °C. Meanwhile, the residue weight at 900 °C was doubled to 68% in the presence of Pt/NS. The synergistic mechanism might be that the nitrogen atom coordinated with Pt and improved the catalytic efficiency of Pt. Additionally, NS preserved the catalytic activity of Pt under air atmosphere. Hence, Pt/NS efficiently catalyzed thermal crosslinking and suppressed degradation of silicone chains. Moreover, it revealed that the presence of Pt/NS protected silicone chains from oxidation. Thus, the unzipping depolymerization by silanol groups was reduced significantly.

  13. Synergistic effect and mechanism of platinum catalyst and nitrogen-containing silane on the thermal stability of silicone rubber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Wanjuan; Zeng, Xingrong, E-mail: psxrzeng@gmail.com; Lai, Xuejun; Li, Hongqiang; Fang, Weizhen; Liu, Tian

    2016-05-20

    Highlights: • Platinum (Pt) and nitrogen-containing silane (NS) were introduced into silicone rubber. • The thermal stability was improved by Pt/NS both under nitrogen and air atmosphere. • The TG-FTIR of evolved gases during degradation was performed. • The synergistic effect and mechanism of Pt and NS were proposed. - Abstract: Platinum (Pt) catalyst and nitrogen-containing silane (NS) were introduced to improve the thermal stability of silicone rubber. The effects of Pt and NS on thermal stability and degradation mechanism of silicone rubber were investigated by thermogravimetry (TG), thermogravimetry-Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (TG-FTIR), scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDXS) and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR). A significant synergism was found between Pt and NS for improving the thermal stability of silicone rubber. When 6.67 ppm of Pt and 1.4 phr of NS were introduced, the temperature of 10% and 20% weight loss under nitrogen atmosphere were respectively increased by 36 °C and 119 °C. Meanwhile, the residue weight at 900 °C was doubled to 68% in the presence of Pt/NS. The synergistic mechanism might be that the nitrogen atom coordinated with Pt and improved the catalytic efficiency of Pt. Additionally, NS preserved the catalytic activity of Pt under air atmosphere. Hence, Pt/NS efficiently catalyzed thermal crosslinking and suppressed degradation of silicone chains. Moreover, it revealed that the presence of Pt/NS protected silicone chains from oxidation. Thus, the unzipping depolymerization by silanol groups was reduced significantly.

  14. Investigation on localized corrosion of 304 stainless steel joints brazed using Sn-plated Ag alloy filler in NaCl aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingxing; Li, Shuai; Peng, Jin

    2018-03-01

    Novel AgCuZnSn filler metal with high Sn contents was prepared from BAg50CuZn filler metal by a process of electroplating and thermal diffusion, and the prepared filler metal was applied to induction brazing of 304 stainless steel. The corrosion behavior of the brazed joints was evaluated based on localized corrosion analysis, the morphology of the joints were analyzed by SEM after immersion in a 3.5 vol% NaCl aqueous solution. The results indicated that corrosion groove occurred near the interface between the stainless steel base metal and the brazing seam. A wide range of defects such as holes and cracks appeared on the surface of the base metal, while the brazing seam zone almost no corrosion defects occur. With the increase of corrosion time, the corrosion rates of both the brazing seam and the base metal first exhibited an increasing trend, followed by a decreasing trend, and the corrosion rate of the base metal was slightly greater than that of the brazing seam. The corrosion potential of the brazing seam and 304 stainless steel were -0.7758 V and -0.7863 V, respectively.

  15. Fe-15Ni-13Cr austenitic stainless steels for fission and fusion reactor applications. I. Effects of minor alloying elements on precipitate phases in melt products and implication in alloy fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E.H.; Mansur, L.K.

    2000-01-01

    In an effort to develop alloys for fission and fusion reactor applications, 28Fe-15Ni-13Cr base alloys were fabricated by adding various combinations of the minor alloying elements, Mo, Ti, C, Si, P, Nb, and B. The results showed that a significant fraction of undesirable residual oxygen was removed as oxides when Ti, C, and Si were added. Accordingly, the concentrations of the latter three essential alloying elements were reduced also. Among these elements, Ti was the strongest oxide former, but the largest oxygen removal (over 80%) was observed when carbon was added alone without Ti, since gaseous CO boiled off during melting. This paper recommends an alloy melting procedure to mitigate solute losses while reducing the undesirable residual oxygen. In this work, 14 different types of precipitate phases were identified. Compositions of precipitate phases and their crystallographic data are documented. Finally, stability of precipitate phases was examined in view of Gibbs free energy of formation

  16. Low activation ferritic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelles, David S.; Ghoniem, Nasr M.; Powell, Roger W.

    1986-01-01

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  17. Effect of cold working on biocompatibility of Ni-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels using Dalton's Lymphoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talha, Mohd; Kumar, Sanjay; Behera, C.K.; Sinha, O.P.

    2014-01-01

    The aims of the present work are to explore the effect of cold working on in-vitro biocompatibility of indigenized low cost Ni-free nitrogen containing austenitic stainless steels (HNSs) and to compare it with conventionally used biomedical grade, i.e. AISI 316L and 316LVM, using Dalton's Lymphoma (DL) cell line. The MTT assay [3-(4,5-dimethythiazol 2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] was performed on DL cell line for cytotoxicity evaluation and cell adhesion test. As a result, it was observed that the HNS had higher cell proliferation and cell growth and it increases by increasing nitrogen content and degree of cold working. The surface wettability of the alloys was also investigated by water contact angle measurements. The value of contact angles was found to decrease with increase in nitrogen content and degree of cold working. This indicates that the hydrophilic character increases with increasing nitrogen content and degree of cold working which further attributed to enhance the surface free energy (SFE) which would be conducive to cell adhesion which in turn increases the cell proliferation. - Graphical abstract: Effect of cold working on in-vitro biocompatibility of indigenized Ni-free nitrogen bearing austenitic stainless steels was explored using Dalton's Lymphoma cell line. Cell proliferation and cell adhesion increase by increasing the degree of cold working and nitrogen content in steel indicating that indigenized material is more biocompatible and no negative effect of cold working on these steels. - Highlights: • Effect of cold working on biocompatibility of Ni-free austenitic stainless steels • Cell proliferation and adhesion increase with nitrogen and degree of cold working. • Contact angle values decrease with nitrogen and degree of cold working

  18. Caracterização microestrutural de soldas dissimilares dos aços ASTM A-508 e AISI 316L Characterization of dissimilar metal weld between low alloy steel ASTM A-508 and 316L stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Iglésias Lourenço Lima

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available As soldas dissimilares (dissimilar metal welds - DMWs são utilizadas em diversos segmentos da indústria. No caso específico de usinas nucleares, tais soldas são necessárias para conectar tubulações de aço inoxidável com componentes fabricados em aços baixa liga. Os materiais de adição mais utilizados neste tipo de solda são as ligas de níquel 82 e 182. Este trabalho consistiu na soldagem de uma junta dissimilar de aço baixa liga ASTM A-508 G3 e aço inoxidável austenítico AISI 316L utilizando as ligas de níquel 82 e 182 como metais de adição. A soldagem foi realizada manualmente empregando os processos de soldagem ao arco SMAW (Shielded Metal Arc Welding e GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding. Os corpos de prova foram caracterizados microestruturalmente utilizando-se microscópio óptico e microscópio eletrônico de varredura com microanálise por dispersão de energia de raios X (EDS e ensaios de microdureza Vickers. Observou-se uma microestrutura constituída de dendritas de austenita com a presença de precipitados com formas e dimensões definidas pelo aporte térmico e pela direção de soldagem. Não houve variação significativa da dureza ao longo da junta soldada, demonstrando a adequação dos parâmetros de soldagem utilizados.The dissimilar metal welds (DMWs are used in several areas of the industries. In the nuclear power plant, this weld using nickel alloy welding wires is used to connect stainless steel pipes to low alloy steel components on the reactor pressured vessels. The filler materials commonly used in this type of weld are nickel alloys 82 and 182.. In this study, dissimilar metal welds composed of low alloy steel ASTM A-508 G3, nickel alloys 82 e 182 as weld metals, and austenitic stainless steel AISI 316L were prepared by manual shielded metal arc welding (SMAW and gas tungsten arc welding techniques (GTAW. Samples were microstructural characterized by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy

  19. Niobium stainless steel for implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollo, J.M.D.A.

    1983-01-01

    The materials that have often been used, during the last two or three decades, to carry out materials for implants are made according to the specifications: a)A.S.T.M. (F.55-76, F.56-76, F.138-76, F.139-76) stainless steel b)A.S.T.M. (F.75-76), cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloys. c)A.S.T.M. (F.90-76), cobalt-chromium-tungsten-nickel alloys. d)A.S.T.M. (F.67-77), unalloyed titanium. e)A.S.T.M. (F.136-70), titanium alloys. It was the purpose of retaking them, toverify the niobium influence as alloy element in ANSI/ASTM F.55-76 classification stainless steels, usually for these materials elaboration. The problem by substituting molybdenum total or partially for niobium, by comparing the mechanical and corrosion properties, and biocompatibility is presented, by pointing out the variables of these substitutions, when we employ this new material to perform materials for implants. (Author) [pt

  20. Attenuation capability of low activation-modified high manganese austenitic stainless steel for fusion reactor system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eissa, M.M. [Steel Technology Department, Central Metallurgical Research and Development Institute (CMRDI), Helwan (Egypt); El-kameesy, S.U.; El-Fiki, S.A. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); Ghali, S.N. [Steel Technology Department, Central Metallurgical Research and Development Institute (CMRDI), Helwan (Egypt); El Shazly, R.M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Cairo (Egypt); Saeed, Aly, E-mail: aly_8h@yahoo.com [Nuclear Power station Department, Faculty of Engineering, Egyptian-Russian University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Improvement stainless steel alloys to be used in fusion reactors. • Structural, mechanical, attenuation properties of investigated alloys were studied. • Good agreement between experimental and calculated results has been achieved. • The developed alloys could be considered as candidate materials for fusion reactors. - Abstract: Low nickel-high manganese austenitic stainless steel alloys, SSMn9Ni and SSMn10Ni, were developed to use as a shielding material in fusion reactor system. A standard austenitic stainless steel SS316L was prepared and studied as a reference sample. The microstructure properties of the present stainless steel alloys were investigated using Schaeffler diagram, optical microscopy, and X-ray diffraction pattern. Mainly, an austenite phase was observed for the prepared stainless steel alloys. Additionally, a small ferrite phase was observed in SS316L and SSMn10Ni samples. The mechanical properties of the prepared alloys were studied using Vickers hardness and tensile tests at room temperature. The studied manganese stainless steel alloys showed higher hardness, yield strength, and ultimate tensile strength than SS316L. On the other hand, the manganese stainless steel elongation had relatively lower values than the standard SS316L. The removal cross section for both slow and total slow (primary and those slowed down in sample) neutrons were carried out using {sup 241}Am-Be neutron source. Gamma ray attenuation parameters were carried out for different gamma ray energy lines which emitted from {sup 60}Co and {sup 232}Th radioactive sources. The developed manganese stainless steel alloys had a higher total slow removal cross section than SS316L. While the slow neutron and gamma rays were nearly the same for all studied stainless steel alloys. From the obtained results, the developed manganese stainless steel alloys could be considered as candidate materials for fusion reactor system with low activation based on the short life

  1. Development of commercial nitrogen-rich stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liljas, M.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of nitrogen alloyed stainless steels. Nitrogen alloying of austenitic stainless steels started at an early stage and was to a large extent caused by nickel shortage. However, direct technical advantages such as increased strength of the nitrogen alloyed steels made them attractive alternatives to the current steels. It was not until the advent of the AOD (argon oxygen decarburisation) process in the late 1960s that nitrogen alloying could be controlled to such accuracy that it became successful commercially on a broader scale. The paper describes production aspects and how nitrogen addition influences microstructure and the resulting properties of austenitic and duplex stainless steels. For austenitic steels there are several reasons for nitrogen alloying. Apart from increasing strength nitrogen also improves structural stability, work hardening and corrosion resistance. For duplex steels nitrogen also has a decisive effect in controlling the microstructure during thermal cycles such as welding. (orig.)

  2. Hydrogen damage in stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogen damage has been studied in a wide variety of stainless steels. Both internal and external hydrogen damage were evaluated by ductility or J-integral under rising tensile loads and by fractography. Analysis of the data has emphasized the potential effects of strain-induced martensite on hydrogen damage. Strain-induced martensite was neither necessary nor sufficient for hydrogen damage in the alloys studied. Neither ductility loss nor fracture-mode change correlated generally with martensite formation. Alloy composition, particularly nickel and nitrogen contents, was the primary factor in resistance to hydrogen damage. Thermomechanical processing, however, could alter the degree of hydrogen damage in an alloy and was critical for optimizing resistance to hydrogen damage. 10 figures, 10 tables

  3. High methanol oxidation activity of electrocatalysts supported by directly grown nitrogen-containing carbon nanotubes on carbon cloth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.-H.; Shih, H.-C.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Du, H.-Y.; Chen, L.-C.; Chen, K.-H.

    2006-01-01

    The microstructure and electrochemical activity of the Pt-Ru supported by nitrogen-containing carbon nanotubes (CN x NTs) directly grown on the carbon cloth have been investigated. The CN x NTs directly grown on the carbon cloth (CN x NTs-carbon cloth composite electrode) were synthesized using microwave-plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition first and then use as the template to support the Pt-Ru nanoclusters subsequently sputtered on. The ferricyanide/ferrocyanide redox reaction in cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements showed a faster electron transfer on the CN x NTs-carbon cloth composite electrode than the one with carbon cloth alone. Comparing their methanol oxidation abilities, it is found that the Pt-Ru nanoclusters supported by the CN x NTs-carbon cloth composite electrode have considerably higher electrocatalytic activity than the carbon cloth counterpart. This result suggests high performance of the CN x NTs-carbon cloth composite electrode, and demonstrates its suitability for direct methanol fuel cell applications

  4. High methanol oxidation activity of electrocatalysts supported by directly grown nitrogen-containing carbon nanotubes on carbon cloth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, C.-H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Shih, H.-C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Institue of Materials Science and Nano Technology, Chinese Culture University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Y.-T. [Institue of Materials Science and Nano Technology, Chinese Culture University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Du, H.-Y. [Institue of Materials Science and Nano Technology, Chinese Culture University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, L.-C. [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, K.-H. [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China) and Institue of Atomic and Molecular Science, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: chenkh@pub.iams.sinica.edu.tw

    2006-12-01

    The microstructure and electrochemical activity of the Pt-Ru supported by nitrogen-containing carbon nanotubes (CN {sub x} NTs) directly grown on the carbon cloth have been investigated. The CN {sub x} NTs directly grown on the carbon cloth (CN {sub x} NTs-carbon cloth composite electrode) were synthesized using microwave-plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition first and then use as the template to support the Pt-Ru nanoclusters subsequently sputtered on. The ferricyanide/ferrocyanide redox reaction in cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements showed a faster electron transfer on the CN {sub x} NTs-carbon cloth composite electrode than the one with carbon cloth alone. Comparing their methanol oxidation abilities, it is found that the Pt-Ru nanoclusters supported by the CN {sub x} NTs-carbon cloth composite electrode have considerably higher electrocatalytic activity than the carbon cloth counterpart. This result suggests high performance of the CN {sub x} NTs-carbon cloth composite electrode, and demonstrates its suitability for direct methanol fuel cell applications.

  5. Recent Advances in the Synthesis and Anticancer Activity of Some Molecules Other Than Nitrogen Containing Heterocyclic Moeities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Md Jawaid; Yar, M Shahar; Khan, Ahsan Ahmed; Ali, Zulphikar; Haider, Md Rafi

    2017-01-01

    The present review article presented a detailed account of the design strategies and the structure activity relationship of different derivatives apart from the nitrogen containing ring. These scaffolds play an important part in the drug discovery which showed anticancer activity against different human cancer cell lines through apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, inhibiting kinases, angiogenesis, disruption of cell migration, modulation of nuclear receptor responsiveness and others. Naphthalenes amides/amidines, furan, podophyllotoxin, platinum compounds, steroids, and urea, which forms the core part or along with other N-heterocyclic rings are enclosed. Some of these compounds e.g. podophyllotoxin and platinum based drugs displayed anticancer activity at nanomolar range. Various substitutions from the earlier and latest information are prerequisite in the drug synthesis process. The review focused on the recent development of these derivatives, design and anticancer properties, thus providing with the most profound knowledge for the development of targeted based anticancer drugs. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. Mechanism of NH{sub 3} desorption during the reaction of H{sub 2} with nitrogen containing carbonaceous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juan F. Espinal; Thanh N. Truong; Fanor Mondragon [University of Antioquia, Medellin (Colombia). Institute of Chemistry

    2005-07-01

    The continued increase in demand for natural gas has stimulated the interest in coal conversion to methane as synthetic natural gas by hydropyrolysis of coal (pyrolysis in a H{sub 2} atmosphere). Because the produced raw gas contains considerable amounts of gaseous N-containing products that have to be removed before delivering to final users, the information on distribution of coal-N is important for designing purification processes. It has been reported in the literature that NH{sub 3} is the main nitrogen containing gas that is released during the hydropyrolysis process. Other gases such as HCN and N{sub 2} are also released but in a much smaller amount. To the best of our knowledge, the mechanism for NH{sub 3} desorption during hydrogen reaction with carbonaceous materials has not been studied. We carried out a molecular modeling study using Density Functional Theory in order to get an insight of the mechanism and thermodynamics for NH{sub 3} evolution using pyridinic nitrogen as a model of N-containing carbonaceous material. We propose a mechanism that involves consecutive hydrogenation steps that lead to C-N bond breakage and NH{sub 3} desorption to the gas phase. It was found that the first hydrogenation reaction is highly exothermic. However, further hydrogenations are endothermic. Several pathways for NH{sub 3} evolution were proposed and most of them show high exothermicity. 17 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Fabrication of nitrogen-containing diamond-like carbon film by filtered arc deposition as conductive hard-coating film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Yushi; Harigai, Toru; Isono, Ryo; Imai, Takahiro; Suda, Yoshiyuki; Takikawa, Hirofumi; Kamiya, Masao; Taki, Makoto; Hasegawa, Yushi; Tsuji, Nobuhiro; Kaneko, Satoru; Kunitsugu, Shinsuke; Habuchi, Hitoe; Kiyohara, Shuji; Ito, Mikio; Yick, Sam; Bendavid, Avi; Martin, Phil

    2018-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films, which are amorphous carbon films, have been used as hard-coating films for protecting the surface of mechanical parts. Nitrogen-containing DLC (N-DLC) films are expected as conductive hard-coating materials. N-DLC films are expected in applications such as protective films for contact pins, which are used in the electrical check process of integrated circuit chips. In this study, N-DLC films are prepared using the T-shaped filtered arc deposition (T-FAD) method, and film properties are investigated. Film hardness and film density decreased when the N content increased in the films because the number of graphite structures in the DLC film increased as the N content increased. These trends are similar to the results of a previous study. The electrical resistivity of N-DLC films changed from 0.26 to 8.8 Ω cm with a change in the nanoindentation hardness from 17 to 27 GPa. The N-DLC films fabricated by the T-FAD method showed high mechanical hardness and low electrical resistivity.

  8. Towards an interpretation of the mechanism of the actinides(III)/lanthanides(III) separation by synergistic solvent extraction with nitrogen-containing polydendate ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francois, N.

    2000-01-01

    In the field of the separation of long-lived radionuclides from the wastes produced by nuclear fuel reprocessing, aromatic nitrogen-containing polydendate ligands are potential candidates for the selective extraction, alone or in synergistic mixture with acidic extractants, of trivalent actinides from trivalent lanthanides. The first part of this work deals with the complexation of trivalent f cations with various nitrogen-containing ligands (poly-pyridine analogues). Time-resolved laser-induced fluorimetry (TRLIF) and UV-visible spectrophotometry were used to determine the nature and evaluate the stability of each complex. Among the ligands studied, the least basic Me-Btp proved to be highly selective towards americium(III) in acidic solution. In the second part, two synergistic systems (nitrogen-containing polydendate ligand and lipophilic carboxylic acid) are studied and compared in regard to the extraction and separation of lanthanides(III) and actinides(III). TRLIF and gamma spectrometry allowed the nature of the extracted complexes and the optimal conditions of efficiency of both systems to be determined. Comparison between these different studies showed that the selectivity of complexation of trivalent f cations by a given nitrogen-containing polydendate ligand could not always be linked to the Am(III)Eu(III) selectivity reached in synergistic extraction. The latter depends on the 'balance' between the acid-basic properties on the one hand, and on the hard-soft characteristics on the other hand, of both components of synergistic system. (author)

  9. Alloy development for irradiation performance. Quarterly progress report for period ending December 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-04-01

    Progress is reported in eight sections: analysis and evaluation studies, test matrices and test methods development, Path A Alloy Development (austenitic stainless steels), Path C Alloy Development (Ti and V alloys), Path D Alloy Development (Fe alloys), Path E Alloy Development (ferritic steels), irradiation experiments and materials inventory, and materials compatibility and hydrogen permeation studies. (DLC)

  10. Alloy development for irradiation performance. Quarterly progress report for period ending December 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-04-01

    Progress is reported in eight sections: analysis and evaluation studies, test matrices and test methods development, Path A Alloy Development (austenitic stainless steels), Path C Alloy Development (Ti and V alloys), Path D Alloy Development (Fe alloys), Path E Alloy Development (ferritic steels), irradiation experiments and materials inventory, and materials compatibility and hydrogen permeation studies

  11. EFFECTIVENESS OF NITROGEN-CONTAINING BISPHOSPHONATES IN THE REGULATION OF MINERAL METABOLISM DISTURBANCES ASSOCIATED WITH ALIMENTARY OSTEOPOROSIS IN RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komisarenko S. V.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate the effectiveness of nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates synthesized as promising substances for correction of mineral metabolism in osteoporosis. The study was carried out on a model of alimentary osteoporosis that was characterized by hypocalcaemia, hypophosphatemia, decreased 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3 content in blood serum and severe bone tissue demineralization (reduced ash content and mineral components. It was found that synthesized novel nitrogen bisphosphonates (pyrazole-containing analogues, like reference drugs — metylene bisphosphonate (disodium salt of metylene bisphosphonic acid and alendronate (4-amino-1-hidroxybutyliden bisphosphonate, inhibit with the different efficiency demineralization of the bone tissue and increase the mineral metabolism in rats with alimentary (nutritional osteoporosis that was assessed by the marker parameters of bone formation. In particular, drug administration (bisphosphonates І-12, І-40, І-42 resulted in elevation of calcium and phosphate levels and decreased the total activity of alkaline phosphatase and its isoenzymes in blood serum. The ash content and the levels of calcium and phosphorus in the ash of tibia and femur bones were shown to be markedly elevated. Bisphosphonate І-12 has shown more profound antiresorbtive activity and ability to correct mineral metabolism in alimentary osteoporosis, including such of reference drugs. It was found a significant decrease of 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3 content in the serum that is considered as a profound vitamin D3 deficiency associated with nutritional osteoporosis. As it was not compensated by bisphosphonates, we suggest that further investigations should be directed to the combined use of both: bisphosphonates as inhibitors of osteoclast activity that diminish bone resorption and vitamin D3 as a key regulator of bone remodeling process and osteosynthesis activator.

  12. Boron effect on stainless steel plasticity under hot deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulat, S.I.; Kardonov, B.A.; Sorokina, N.A.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of boron on plasticity of stainless steels at temperatures of hot deformation has been studied at three levels of alloying, i.e. 0-0.01% (micro-alloying or modifying), 0.01-0.02% (low alloying) and 0.02-2.0% (high alloying). Introduction of 0.001-0.005% of boron increases hot plasticity of both low and high carbon stainless steels due to decrease in grain size and strengthening of grain boundaries. Microalloying by boron has a positive effect at temperatures below 1200-1220 deg C. At higher temperatures, particularly when its content exceeds 0.008%, boron deteriorates plasticity by increasing the size of grains and weakening their boundaries. 0.1-2% boron strengthen the stainless steel and dectease its plasticity

  13. Multicycle mechanical performance of titanium and stainless steel transpedicular spine implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pienkowski, D; Stephens, G C; Doers, T M; Hamilton, D M

    1998-04-01

    This was a prospective in vitro study comparing titanium alloy and stainless steel alloy in transpedicular spine implants from two different manufactures. To compare the multicycle mechanical performance of these two alloys, used in each of two different implant designs. Transpedicular spine implants primarily have been manufactured from stainless steel, but titanium alloy offers imaging advantages. However, the notch sensitivity of titanium alloy has caused concern regarding how implants made from this material will compare in stiffness and fatigue life with implants made from stainless steel. Twenty-four implants (two alloys, two designs, six implants per group) were mounted in machined polyethylene wafers and repetitively loaded (up to 1 million cycles) from 80 N to 800 N using a 5-Hertz sinusoidal waveform. Load and displacement data were automatically and periodically sampled throughout the entire test. Implant stiffness increased with cycle load number, reached a steady state, then declined just before fatigue failure. Stiffness varied less in titanium transpedicular spine implants than in their stainless counterparts. All stainless steel implant types were stiffer (steady-state value, P titanium alloy counterparts. One titanium implant design failed with fewer (P stainless steel counterpart, whereas a stainless steel implant of another design failed with fewer (P titanium counterpart. Overall, fatigue life, i.e., the total number of load cycles until failure, was related to implant type (P implant material. A transpedicular spine implant's fatigue lifetime depends on both the design and the material and cannot be judged on material alone. Stainless steel implants are stiffer than titanium alloy implants of equal design and size; however, for those designs in which the fatigue life of the titanium alloy version is superior, enlargement of the implant's components can compensate for titanium's lower modulus of elasticity and result in an implant equally stiff

  14. The stress-rupture behavior of tubes made from austenitic stainless steels and Ni-based alloys subjected to internal pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, L.; Kempe, H.

    1983-12-01

    The report outlines the stress-rupture results obtained on tubes tested as possible fuel rod cladding tubes for fast breeder reactors cooled with sodium, steam or gas. For the rupture elongations of some specimens showing a pronounced burst, higher values than in earlier reports are now indicated because of better evaluation techniques. The choice and comparisons of materials are explained, the calculations of stresses and strains are described, and reference is made to the own studies carried out to date of the parameters influencing creep-rupture behaviour. Minor modifications of the composition of an alloy and of the mechanical-thermal treatment of materials, respectively, are seen to produce clearcut changes in the stress-rupture properties. (orig.) [de

  15. Formation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Nitrogen Containing Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds in Titan's Atmosphere, the Interstellar Medium and Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landera, Alexander

    2013-12-01

    Several different mechanisms leading to the formation of (substituted) naphthalene and azanaphthalenes were examined using theoretical quantum chemical calculations. As a result, a series of novel synthetic routes to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) and Nitrogen Containing Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds (N-PACs) have been proposed. On Earth, these aromatic compounds originate from incomplete combustion and are released into our environment, where they are known to be major pollutants, often with carcinogenic properties. In the atmosphere of a Saturn's moon Titan, these PAH and N-PACs are believed to play a critical role in organic haze formation, as well as acting as chemical precursors to biologically relevant molecules. The theoretical calculations were performed by employing the ab initio G3(MP2,CC)/B3LYP/6-311G** method to effectively probe the Potential Energy Surfaces (PES) relevant to the PAH and N-PAC formation. Following the construction of the PES, Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Markus (RRKM) theory was used to evaluate all unimolecular rate constants as a function of collision energy under single-collision conditions. Branching ratios were then evaluated by solving phenomenological rate expressions for the various product concentrations. The most viable pathways to PAH and N-PAC formation were found to be those where the initial attack by the ethynyl (C2H) or cyano (CN) radical toward a unsaturated hydrocarbon molecule led to the formation of an intermediate which could not effectively lose a hydrogen atom. It is not until ring cyclization has occurred, that hydrogen elimination leads to a closed shell product. By quenching the possibility of the initial hydrogen atom elimination, one of the most competitive processes preventing the PAH or N-PAC formation was avoided, and the PAH or N-PAC formation was allowed to proceed. It is concluded that these considerations should be taken into account when attempting to explore any other potential routes towards

  16. The study of electroplating trivalent CrC alloy coatings with different current densities on stainless steel 304 as bipolar plate of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Hsiang-Cheng; Hou, Kung-Hsu; Lu, Chen-En; Ger, Ming-Der

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the trivalent Cr–C coatings were electroplated on stainless steel 304 (SS304) substrates for an application in bipolar plates (BPPs) that was because of coating's excellent electric conductivity and corrosion resistance. The images of scanning electron microscope showed that the thickness of the coatings was between 1.4 and 11.4 μm, which increased with increase of coating current density. The surface morphology of Cr–C plated at coating current density of 10 A/dm 2 was smooth, crack- and pinhole-free, while cracks and pinholes appearing in networks were observed apparently in the deposits plated at a higher coating current density. Additionally, the C content in the coating decreased with increasing the coating current density. Moreover, the polarization curve with different coating current densities (10, 30, 50 A/dm 2 ) exhibited the coating prepared at 10 A/dm 2 and 10 min possessing the best corrosion resistance (I corr = 9.360 × 10 −8 A/cm 2 ). The contact resistance of Cr–C plated at coating current density of 10 A/dm 2 was the lowest (16.54 mΩ cm 2 at 150 N cm −2 ), which showed great potential of application. The single cell test with Cr–C coated SS304 prepared at coating current density of 10 A/dm 2 as BPPs showed the highest current density (about 791.532 mA/cm 2 ) and power density (about 270.150 mW/cm 2 ). - Highlights: • The Cr–C coatings on steel are electroplated for utilization as bipolar plate. • The electrical conductivity and corrosion resistance increase with carbon content. • The power density of Cr–C coated steel is superior to the bare steel

  17. The study of electroplating trivalent CrC alloy coatings with different current densities on stainless steel 304 as bipolar plate of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hsiang-Cheng [Graduate School of Defense Science, Chung Cheng Institute of Technology, National Defense University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Hou, Kung-Hsu, E-mail: khou@ndu.edu.tw [Department of Power Vehicle and Systems Engineering, Chung Cheng Institute of Technology, National Defense University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Lu, Chen-En [Graduate School of Defense Science, Chung Cheng Institute of Technology, National Defense University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Ger, Ming-Der [Department of Applied Chemistry and Materials Engineering, Chung Cheng Institute of Technology, National Defense University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)

    2014-11-03

    In this study, the trivalent Cr–C coatings were electroplated on stainless steel 304 (SS304) substrates for an application in bipolar plates (BPPs) that was because of coating's excellent electric conductivity and corrosion resistance. The images of scanning electron microscope showed that the thickness of the coatings was between 1.4 and 11.4 μm, which increased with increase of coating current density. The surface morphology of Cr–C plated at coating current density of 10 A/dm{sup 2} was smooth, crack- and pinhole-free, while cracks and pinholes appearing in networks were observed apparently in the deposits plated at a higher coating current density. Additionally, the C content in the coating decreased with increasing the coating current density. Moreover, the polarization curve with different coating current densities (10, 30, 50 A/dm{sup 2}) exhibited the coating prepared at 10 A/dm{sup 2} and 10 min possessing the best corrosion resistance (I{sub corr} = 9.360 × 10{sup −8} A/cm{sup 2}). The contact resistance of Cr–C plated at coating current density of 10 A/dm{sup 2} was the lowest (16.54 mΩ cm{sup 2} at 150 N cm{sup −2}), which showed great potential of application. The single cell test with Cr–C coated SS304 prepared at coating current density of 10 A/dm{sup 2} as BPPs showed the highest current density (about 791.532 mA/cm{sup 2}) and power density (about 270.150 mW/cm{sup 2}). - Highlights: • The Cr–C coatings on steel are electroplated for utilization as bipolar plate. • The electrical conductivity and corrosion resistance increase with carbon content. • The power density of Cr–C coated steel is superior to the bare steel.

  18. Measuring secondary phases in duplex stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calliari, I.; Brunelli, K.; Dabalà, M.; Ramous, E.

    2009-01-01

    The use of duplex stainless steels is limited by their susceptibility to the formation of dangerous intermetallic phases resulting in detrimental effects on impact toughness and corrosion resistance. This precipitation and the quantitative determinations of the phases have received considerable attention and different precipitation sequences (σ phase, χ phase, and carbides) have been suggested. This study investigates the phase transformation during continuous cooling and isothermal treatments in commercial duplex stainless steel grades and the effects on alloy properties, and compares the most common techniques of analysis.

  19. Microstructure of laser cladded martensitic stainless steel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Rooyen, C

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available and martensite with 10% ferrite for Material B. Table 7 - Proposed martensitic stainless steel alloys for laser cladding Material C* Cr Ni Mn Si Mo Co Ms (ºC)* Cr eq Ni eq Material A 0.4 13 - 1 0.5 2.5 5.5 120 16.5 12.5 Material B 0.2 15 2 1 0.7 2.5 5.5 117... dilution, low heat input, less distortion, increased mechanical and corrosion properties excellent repeatability and control of process parameters. Solidification of laser cladded martensitic stainless steel is primarily austenitic. Microstructures...

  20. Wear resistance and structural changes in nitrogen-containing high-chromium martensitic steels under conditions of abrasive wear and sliding friction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarov, A.V.; Korshunov, L.G.; Schastlivtsev, V.M.; Chernenko, N.L.

    1998-01-01

    Martensitic nitrogen-containing steels Kh17N2A0.14, Kh13A0.14, Kh14G4A0.22 as well as steel 20Kh13 were studied for their wear resistance under conditions of friction and abrasion. Metallography, X ray diffraction analysis and electron microscopy were used to investigate the structural changes taking place in a thin surface layer on wearing. It is shown that an increase of nitrogen content of 0.14 to 0.22% promotes an enhancement of steel resistance to abrasive and adhesive wear, especially after tempering in the range of 500-550 deg C. Typically, the nitrogen-containing steels exhibit lower resistance to various types of wear in comparison with the steels with high-carbon martensite due to their lower deformability under conditions of friction loading

  1. Stainless steel recycle FY94 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imrich, K.J.

    1994-01-01

    The Materials Technology Section (MTS) of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) was asked to demonstrate the practicality of recycling previously contaminated stainless steel components such as reactor heat exchanger heads, process water piping and slug buckets into 208 liters (55 gallon) drums and 2.8 cubic meter (100 ft 3 ) storage boxes. Radioactively contaminated stainless steel scrap will be sent to several industrial partners where it will be melted, decontaminated/cast into ingots, and rolled into plate and sheet and fabricated into the drums and boxes. As part of this recycle initiative, MTS was requested to demonstrate that radioactively contaminated Type 304L stainless steel could be remelted and cast to meet the applicable ASTM specification for fabrication of drums and boxes. In addition, MTS was requested to develop the technical basis of melt decontamination and establish practicality of using this approach for value added products. The findings presented in this investigation lead to the following conclusions: recycle of 18 wt% Cr-8 wt% Ni alloy can be achieved by melting Type 304 stainless steel in a air vacuum induction furnace; limited melt decontamination of the contaminated stainless steel was achieved, surface contamination was removed by standard decontamination techniques; carbon uptake in the as-cast ingots resulted from the graphite susceptor used in this experiment and is unavoidable with this furnace configuration. A new furnace optimized for melting stainless steel has been installed and is currently being tested for use in this program

  2. Alloy development for cladding and duct applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straalsund, J.L.; Johnson, G.D.

    1981-01-01

    Three general classes of materials under development for cladding and ducts are listed. Solid solution strengthened, or austenitic, alloys are Type 316 stainless steel and D9. Precipitation hardened (also austenitic) alloys consist of D21, D66 and D68. These alloys are similar to such commercial alloys as M-813, Inconel 706, Inconel 718 and Nimonic PE-16. The third general class of alloys is composed of ferritic alloys, with current emphasis being placed on HT-9, a tempered martensitic alloy, and D67, a delta-ferritic steel. The program is comprised of three parallel paths. The current reference, or first generation alloy, is 20% cold worked Type 316 stainless steel. Second generation alloys for near-term applications include D9 and HT-9. Third generation materials consist of the precipitation strengthened steels and ferritic alloys, and are being considered for implementation at a later time than the first and second generation alloys. The development of second and third generation materials was initiated in 1974 with the selection of 35 alloys. This program has proceeded to today where there are six advanced alloys being evaluated. These alloys are the developmental alloys D9, D21, D57, D66 and D68, together with the commerical alloy, HT-9. The status of development of these alloys is summarized

  3. Reducing Stress-Corrosion Cracking in Bearing Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paton, N. E.; Dennies, D. P.; Lumsden, I., J.b.

    1986-01-01

    Resistance to stress-corrosion cracking in some stainless-steel alloys increased by addition of small amounts of noble metals. 0.75 to 1.00 percent by weight of palladium or platinum added to alloy melt sufficient to improve properties of certain stainless steels so they could be used in manufacture of high-speed bearings.

  4. The role of duplex stainless steels for downhole tubulars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, R.

    1993-01-01

    In sour conditions there is an increasing trend to turn to corrosion resistant alloys for downhole tubulars. The most commonly used CRA tubular is 13Cr, and there are thousands of feet in service. However, there are limits to the use of 13Cr, ie., the risk of sulphide stress corrosion cracking at high H 2 S levels, and the possibility of pitting or high corrosion rates in waters with high chloride contents. Where the service conditions are felt to be too severe for 13Cr alloys it has been traditional to switch to nickel base alloys such as alloys 825 and C-276 (UNS N08825 and N10276). The alloys are much more expensive than 13Cr, and in recent years the duplex stainless steels have been selected as alloys with superior corrosion and SSCC resistance compared with 13Cr, and having lower cost than nickel alloys. Originally the 22Cr duplex alloy (UNS 31803) was used, but more recently the 25Cr super duplex alloys (UNS S32760 and S32750) have become more available. The present paper reviews the data available for 13Cr and the limits of applicability. Data is also presented for laboratory tests for both the 22Cr and 25Cr super duplex alloys. There is extensive service experience with both 22Cr and 25Cr super duplex in the North Sea, covering both downhole tubulars, manifold and post wellhead equipment. Data is presented showing some of the sour condition being experienced in the North Sea by super duplex alloys. These results show that there is a substantial gap between the limits of use for 13Cr and the 25Cr super duplex stainless steel alloys. This means that in many sour environments super duplex stainless steel provides a cost effective alternative to nickel-base alloys

  5. Precipitation sequences in austenitic Fe-22Cr-21Ni-6Mo-(N) stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.-J.; Lee, T.-H.

    1999-01-01

    Precipitation sequence of nitrogen containing Fe-22Cr-21Ni-6Mo-N austenitic stainless steel has been investigated after aging at high temperatures, and compared with nitrogen free steel. The σ phases and M 23 C 6 carbides were observed along the grain boundaries as well as in the matrix in both of the solution treated specimens. The M 6 C carbides and chi phase appeared successively in between 3 hours and 24 hours depending on the nitrogen content. Main difference in aging behavior was the precipitation of fine nitrides. Aging for 24 hours and 168 hours of nitrogen containing steel resulted in the formation of fine Cr 2 N and faceted AlN nitrides. The crystallography, structure and morphology were analyzed with analytical electron microscopy. (orig.)

  6. Tooling solutions for sheet metal forming and punching of lean duplex stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadman, Boel; Madsen, Erik; Bay, Niels

    2012-01-01

    .4509 and lean duplex EN1.4162 in a production designed for austenitic stainless steels, such as EN1.4301 and 1.4401. The result is a guideline that summarizes how stainless material properties may affect tool degradation, and suggests tool solutions for reduced production disturbances and tool maintenance cost.......For producers of advanced stainless components the choice of stainless material influences not only the product properties, but also the tooling solution for sheet metal stamping. This work describes how forming and punching tools will be affected when introducing the stainless alloys ferritic EN1...

  7. Austenitic stainless steels with cryogenic resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarata, Daniela Florentina

    1999-01-01

    The most used austenitic stainless steels are alloyed with chromium and nickel and have a reduced carbon content, usually lower than 0.1 % what ensures corresponding properties for processing by plastic deformation at welding, corrosion resistance in aggressive environment and toughness at low temperatures. Steels of this kind alloyed with manganese are also used to reduce the nickel content. By alloying with manganese which is a gammageneous element one ensures the stability of austenites. Being cheaper these steels may be used extensively for components and equipment used in cryogenics field. The best results were obtained with steels of second group, AMnNi, in which the designed chemical composition was achieved, i.e. the partial replacement of nickel by manganese ensured the toughness at cryogenic temperatures. If these steels are supplementary alloyed, their strength properties may increase to the detriment of plasticity and toughness, although the cryogenic character is preserved

  8. Effect of nitrogen in austenitic stainless steel on deformation behavior and stress corrosion cracking susceptibility in BWR simulated environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roychowdhury, S.; Kain, V.; Dey, G.K.

    2012-01-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of austenitic stainless steel (SS) components in boiling water reactor (BWR has been a serious issue and is generic in nature. Initial cracking incidences were attributed to weld induced sensitisation and low temperature sensitisation which was mitigated by the use of low carbon grade of SS and molybdenum and nitrogen containing nuclear grade SS. However, IGSCC has occurred in these SS in the non-sensitised condition which was attributed to residual weld induced strain. Strain hardening in SS has been identified as a major cause for enhanced IGSCC susceptibility in BWR environment. Nitrogen in SS has a significant effect on the strain hardening characteristics and has potential to affect the IGSCC susceptibility in BWR environment. Type 304LN stainless steel is a candidate material for use in future reactors with long design life like the Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR), in which the operating conditions are similar to BWR. This study reports the effect of nitrogen in type 304LN stainless steel on the strain hardening behaviour and deformation characteristics and its effect on the IGSCC susceptibility in BWR/AHWR environment. Two heats of type 304LN stainless steel were used containing different levels of nitrogen, 0.08 and 0.16 wt % (SS alloys A and B, respectively). Both the SS was strain hardened by cross rolling at 200℃ to simulate the strain hardened regions having higher IGSCC susceptibility in BWRs. Tensile testing was done at both room temperature and 288℃(temperature simulating operating BWR conditions) and the effect of nitrogen on the tensile properties were established. Tensile testing was done at strain rates similar to the crack tip strain rates associated with a growing IGSCC in SS. Detailed transmission electron microscopic (TEM) studies were done to establish the effect of nitrogen on the deformation modes. Results indicated twinning was the major mode of deformation during cross rolling while

  9. Phase Transformation in Cast Superaustenitic Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee Phillips, Nathaniel Steven [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Superaustenitic stainless steels constitute a group of Fe-based alloys that are compositionally balanced to have a purely austenitic matrix and exhibit favorable pitting and crevice corrosion resistant properties and mechanical strength. However, intermetallic precipitates such as sigma and Laves can form during casting or exposure to high-temperature processing, which degrade the corrosion and mechanical properties of the material. The goal of this study was to accurately characterize the solid-solid phase transformations seen in cast superaustenitic stainless steels. Heat treatments were performed to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formations in alloys CN3MN and CK3MCuN. Microstructures were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, WDS). The equilibrium microstructures, composed primarily of sigma and Laves within purely austenitic matrices, showed slow transformation kinetics. Factors that determine the extent of transformation, including diffusion, nucleation, and growth, are discussed.

  10. Pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooyen, D.; Bandy, R.

    A pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel comprises 17 to 28 wt. % chromium, 15 to 26 wt. % nickel, 5 to 8 wt. % molybdenum, and 0.3 to 0.5 wt. % nitrogen, the balance being iron, unavoidable impurities, minor additions made in the normal course of melting and casting alloys of this type, and may optionally include up to 10 wt. % of manganese, up to 5 wt. % of silicon, and up to 0.08 wt. % of carbon.

  11. Inhibitory actions by ibandronate sodium, a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate, on calcium-activated potassium channels in Madin–Darby canine kidney cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Nan Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates used for management of the patients with osteoporosis were reported to influence the function of renal tubular cells. However, how nitrogen-containing bisphosphates exert any effects on ion currents remains controversial. The effects of ibandronate (Iban, a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate, on ionic channels, including two types of Ca2+-activated K+ (KCa channels, namely, large-conductance KCa (BKCa and intermediate-conductance KCa (IKCa channels, were investigated in Madin–Darby canine kidney (MDCK cells. In whole-cell current recordings, Iban suppressed the amplitude of voltage-gated K+ current elicited by long ramp pulse. Addition of Iban caused a reduction of BKCa channels accompanied by a right shift in the activation curve of BKCa channels, despite no change in single-channel conductance. Ca2+ sensitivity of these channels was modified in the presence of this compound; however, the magnitude of Iban-mediated decrease in BKCa-channel activity under membrane stretch with different negative pressure remained unchanged. Iban suppressed the probability of BKCa-channel openings linked primarily to a shortening in the slow component of mean open time in these channels. The dissociation constant needed for Iban-mediated suppression of mean open time in MDCK cells was 12.2 μM. Additionally, cell exposure to Iban suppressed the activity of IKCa channels, and DC-EBIO or 9-phenanthrol effectively reversed its suppression. Under current-clamp configuration, Iban depolarized the cells and DC-EBIO or PF573228 reversed its depolarizing effect. Taken together, the inhibitory action of Iban on KCa-channel activity may contribute to the underlying mechanism of pharmacological or toxicological actions of Iban and its structurally similar bisphosphonates on renal tubular cells occurring in vivo.

  12. Mechanical Behavior of Additive Manufactured Layered Materials, Part 2: Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-30

    materials. Elsevier, Oxford; 2007: 416 -420. [19] Deng, D., Chen, R., Sun, Q. and Li, X. Microstructural study of 17-4PH stainless steel after plasma...1 Mechanical Behavior of Additive Manufactured Layered Materials, Part 2: Stainless Steels * Todd M. Mower † and Michael J. Long M.I.T. Lincoln... stainless steel alloys produced with Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) was measured and is compared to that of similar conventional materials

  13. Crevice Corrosion Behavior of 45 Molybdenum-Containing Stainless Steels in Seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-01

    Armco, Avesta Jernverks, Cabot, Carpenter Technology, Crucible, Eastern, Firth-Brown, Huntington, Jessup, Langley Alloys, and Uddeholm. 16...Department of Energy, Report ANL/OTEC-BCM-022. 7. Wallen, B., and M. Liljas, " Avesta 254 SMO - A New, High Molybdenum Stainless Steel," presented at NKM8...1977).; 11. Wallen, B., " Avesta 254 SMO - A Stainless Steel for Seawater Service," presented at the Advanced Stainless Steels for Turbine Condensors

  14. Grindability of dental magnetic alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Eisei; Kikuchi, Masafumi; Okuno, Osamu; Kimura, Kohei

    2005-06-01

    In this study, the grindability of cast magnetic alloys (Fe-Pt-Nb magnetic alloy and magnetic stainless steel) was evaluated and compared with that of conventional dental casting alloys (Ag-Pd-Au alloy, Type 4 gold alloy, and cobalt-chromium alloy). Grindability was evaluated in terms of grinding rate (i.e., volume of metal removed per minute) and grinding ratio (i.e., volume ratio of metal removed compared to wheel material lost). Solution treated Fe-Pt-Nb magnetic alloy had a significantly higher grinding rate than the aged one at a grinding speed of 750-1500 m x min(-1). At 500 m x min(-1), there were no significant differences in grinding rate between solution treated and aged Fe-Pt-Nb magnetic alloys. At a lower speed of 500 m x min(-1) or 750 m x min(-1), it was found that the grinding rates of aged Fe-Pt-Nb magnetic alloy and stainless steel were higher than those of conventional casting alloys.

  15. Effect of silicon on the structure, tribological behaviour, and mechanical properties of nitrogen-containing chromium-manganese austenitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korshunov, L.G.; Chernenko, N.L.; Gojkhenberg, Yu.N.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of silicon in quantity of 3.5-4.5 mass. % on tribological behaviour is studied for nitrogen-bearing (0.20-0.52 mass. % of nitrogen) chromium-manganese austenitic steels (10Kh15G23S4A0.20, 10Kh16G17N3S4A0.30, 10Kh19G20NS4A0.50, 12Kh19G19NS2A0.50, 10Kh18G19A0.50, 08Kh16G8N10S4A0.18). Mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of the steels are determined. Using metallographic, x-ray diffraction and electron microscopical methods a study is made into structural transformations running in the steels considered under friction and static tension. It is shown that additional silicon alloying of nitrogen-bearing chromium-manganese austenitic steels results in an essential increase of adhesion wear resistance of the materials on retention of low friction coefficient (f=0.25-0.33). A strong silicon effect on steel tribological behaviour is related with planar slip activation and with an increase of austenite strength and heat resistance [ru

  16. Sulfur- and nitrogen-containing phenol-formaldehyde co-resites for probing the thermal behaviour of heteroatomic forms in solid fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, K.; Sirkecioglu, O.; Andresen, J.M.; Brown, S.D.; Hall, P.J.; Snape, C.E. [University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom). Dept. of Pure and Applied Chemistry

    1996-09-01

    In order to probe the formation of sulfur- and nitrogen-containing gases during the pyrolysis and combustion of coals and other solid fuels, non-softening model substrates are required. In this respect phenol-formaldehyde (PF) resins are ideal since they readily facilitate the incorporation of individual heteroatomic functions into a highly crosslinked matrix. A series of sulfur- and nitrogen-containing co-resites were prepared using phenol with, as the second component, thiophene, dibenzothiophene, diphenylsulfide, benzyl phenyl sulfide, thioanisole, 8-hydroxyquinoline and 2-hydroxycarbazole. A mole ratio of 3:1 (phenol: heteroatom-containing component) was used. Resoles containing diphenyldisulfide were also prepared but, due to the comparable bond strengths of the S-S and C-O linkages, a curing temperature of only 130{degree}C was used to avoid cleavage of the disulfide bond. The virtually complete elimination of ether and methylol functions from the resoles by curing at 200{degree}C was monitored by solid-state {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The resultant resites were also characterized by sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. Simple air oxidation was found to selectively convert the aliphatic-bound sulfur to a mixture of sulfones and sulfoxides. Applications of the resites in fuel science are described.

  17. Embrittlement and life prediction of aged duplex stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwano, Hisashi

    1996-01-01

    The stainless steel, for which the durability for long term in high temperature corrosive environment is demanded, is a complex plural alloy. Cr heightens the oxidation resistance, Ni improves the ductility and impact characteristics, Si improves the fluidity of the melted alloy and heightens the resistance to stress corrosion cracking, and Mo suppresses the pitting due to chlorine ions. These alloy elements are in the state of nonequilibrium solid solution in Fe base at practical temperature, and cause aging phenomena such as segregation, concentration abnormality and precipitation during the use for long term. The characteristics of stainless steel deteriorate due to this. Two-phase stainless cast steel, the example of the embrittlement of the material for an actual machine, the accelerated test of embrittlement, the activation energy for embrittlement, and as the mechanism of aging embrittlement, the spinodal decomposition of ferrite, the precipitation of G phase and the precipitation of carbides and nitrides are described. Also in the welded parts of austenitic stainless steel, delta-ferrite is formed during cooling, therefore, the condition is nearly same as two-phase stainless steel, and the embrittlement due to long term aging occurs. (K.I.)

  18. Thermal stability of manganese-stabilized stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Kenik, E.A.

    1993-01-01

    Previous work on a series of experimental high-manganese reduced-activation austenitic stainless steels demonstrated that they have improved tensile properties relative to type 316 stainless steel in both the annealed and 20% cold-worked conditions. Steels were tested with an Fe-20Mn-12Cr-0.25C (in weight percent) base composition, to which various combinations of Ti, W, V, P, and B were added. Tensile tests have now been completed on these steels after thermal aging at 600 degrees C. Thermal stability varied with composition, but the alloys were as stable or more stable than type 316 stainless steel. the strength of the annealed steels increased slightly after aging to 5000 h, while a strength decrease occurred for the cold worked steel. In both conditions, a steel containing a combination of all the alloying elements was most stable and had the best strength after thermal aging 5000 h at 600 degrees C. Despite having much higher strength than 316 stainless steel after aging, the ductility of the strongest experimental alloy was still as good as that of 316 stainless steel

  19. Neutron irradiation creep in stainless steel alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuele, Wolfgang (Commission of the European Union, Institute for Advanced Materials, I-21020 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See) (Italy)); Hausen, Hermann (Commission of the European Union, Institute for Advanced Materials, I-21020 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See) (Italy))

    1994-09-01

    Irradiation creep elongations were measured in the HFR at Petten on AMCR steels, on 316 CE-reference steels, and on US-316 and US-PCA steels varying the irradiation temperature between 300 C and 500 C and the stress between 25 and 300 MPa. At the beginning of an irradiation a type of primary'' creep stage is observed for doses up to 3-5 dpa after which dose the secondary'' creep stage begins. The primary'' creep strain decreases in cold-worked steel materials with decreasing stress and decreasing irradiation temperature achieving also negative creep strains depending also on the pre-treatment of the materials. These primary'' creep strains are mainly attributed to volume changes due to the formation of radiation-induced phases, e.g. to the formation of [alpha]-ferrite below about 400 C and of carbides below about 700 C, and not to irradiation creep. The secondary'' creep stage is found for doses larger than 3 to 5 dpa and is attributed mainly to irradiation creep. The irradiation creep rate is almost independent of the irradiation temperature (Q[sub irr]=0.132 eV) and linearly dependent on the stress. The total creep elongations normalized to about 8 dpa are equal for almost every type of steel irradiated in the HFR at Petten or in ORR or in EBR II. The negative creep elongations are more pronounced in PCA- and in AMCR-steels and for this reason the total creep elongation is slightly smaller at 8 dpa for these two steels than for the other steels. ((orig.))

  20. Development of stainless steels for nuclear power plant - Advanced nuclear materials development -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Jun Hwa; Ryu, Woo Seog; Chi, Se Hwan; Lee, Bong Sang; Oh, Yong Jun; Byun, Thak Sang; Oh, Jong Myung

    1994-07-01

    This report reviews the status of R and D and the material specifications of nuclear components in order to develop the stainless steels for nuclear applications, and the technology of computer-assisted alloy design is developed to establish the thermodynamic data of Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo-Si-C-N system which is the basic stainless steel systems. High strength and corrosion resistant stainless steels, 316LN and super clean 347, are developed, and the manufacturing processes and heat treatment conditions are determined. In addition, a martensitic steel is produced as a model alloy for turbine blade, and characterized. The material properties showed a good performance for nuclear applications. (Author)

  1. Electroless nickel plating on stainless steels and aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-01-01

    Procedures for applying an adherent electroless nickel plating on 303 SE, 304, and 17-7 PH stainless steels, and 7075 aluminum alloy was developed. When heat treated, the electroless nickel plating provides a hard surface coating on a high strength, corrosion resistant substrate.

  2. Steel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, E.E.; Stiegler, J.O.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Leitnaker, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    The invention deals with a fuel element for fast breeder reactors. It consits essentially of a uranium oxide, nitride, or carbide or a mixture of these fuels with a plutonium or thorium oxide, nitride, or carbide. The fuel elements are coated with an austenitic stainless steel alloy. Inside the fuel elements, vacancies or small cavities are produced by neutron effects which causes the steel coating to swell. According to the invention, swelling is prevented by a modification of type 304, 316, 321, or 12 K 72HV commercial steels. They consist mainly of Fe, Cr, and Ni in a ratio determined by a temary diagram. They may also contain 1.8 to 2.3% by weight of Mo and a fraction of Si (0.7 to 2% by weight) and Ti(0.10 to 0.5% by weight) to prevent cavity formation. They are structurally modified by cold working. (IHOE) [de

  3. Separation of pharmacologically active nitrogen-containing compounds on silica gels modified with 6,10-ionene, dextran sulfate, and gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioutsi, A. N.; Shapovalova, E. N.; Ioutsi, V. A.; Mazhuga, A. G.; Shpigun, O. A.

    2017-12-01

    New stationary phases for HPLC are obtained via layer-by-layer deposition of polyelectrolytes and studied: (1) silica gel modified layer-by-layer with 6,10-ionene and dextran sulfate (Sorbent 1); (2) silica gel twice subjected to the above modification (Sorbent 2); and (3) silica gel modified with 6,10-ionene, gold nanoparticles, and dextran sulfate (Sorbent 3). The effect the content of the organic solvent in the mobile phase and the concentration and pH of the buffer solution have on the chromatographic behavior of several pharmacologically active nitrogen-containing compounds is studied. The sorbents are stable during the process and allow the effective separation of beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, alpha-agonists, and antihistamines. A mixture of caffeine, nadolol, tetrahydrozoline, pindolol, orphenadrine, doxylamine, carbinoxamine, and chlorphenamine is separated in 6.5 min on the silica gel modified with 6,10-ionene, gold nanoparticles, and dextran sulfate.

  4. Statistical analysis of nitrogen-containing vinyl copolymers: radiation-induced copolymerization of vinyl acetate and N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peppas, N.A.; Gehr, T.W.B.

    1979-01-01

    Radiation-induced copolymerization of vinyl acetate and N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone was carried out at 5 0 C using γ-irradiation of 1450 rads/min. Copolymers prepared at conversions lower than 5% were analyzed by a saponification technique. Various linear and nonlinear statistical analysis techniques were used to determine the reactivity ratios of this system as r 1 = 0.348 and r 2 = 3.108. These data were examined and analyzed in relation to problems of elemental analysis involving nitrogen-containing copolymers and to discrepancies in the reactivity ratios obtained by previous investigators. The presence of oxygen and a higher dose rate did not affect the copolymer composition within statistical error. Hydrolyzed copolymers prepared by this method have potential applications as biocompatible materials

  5. General and Localized corrosion of Austenitic and Borated Stainless Steels in Simulated Concentrated Ground Waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fix, D.; Estill, J.; Wong, L.; Rebak, R.

    2004-01-01

    Boron containing stainless steels are used in the nuclear industry for applications such as spent fuel storage, control rods and shielding. It was of interest to compare the corrosion resistance of three borated stainless steels with standard austenitic alloy materials such as type 304 and 316 stainless steels. Tests were conducted in three simulated concentrated ground waters at 90 C. Results show that the borated stainless were less resistant to corrosion than the witness austenitic materials. An acidic concentrated ground water was more aggressive than an alkaline concentrated ground water

  6. Microstructure and wear resistance of spray-formed supermartensitic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Zepon

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the early 90's the oil industry has been encouraging the development of corrosion and wear resistant alloys for onshore and offshore pipeline applications. In this context supermartensitic stainless steel was introduced to replace the more expensive duplex stainless steel for tubing applications. Despite the outstanding corrosion resistance of stainless steels, their wear resistance is of concern. Some authors reported obtaining material processed by spray forming, such as ferritic stainless steel, superduplex stainless steel modified with boron, and iron-based amorphous alloys, which presented high wear resistance while maintaining the corrosion performance1,2. The addition of boron to iron-based alloys promotes the formation of hard boride particles (M2B type which improve their wear resistances3-9. This work aimed to study the microstructure and wear resistance of supermartensitic stainless steel modified with 0.3 wt. (% and 0.7 wt. (% processed by spray forming (SF-SMSS 0.3%B and SF-SMSS 0.7%B, respectively. These boron contents were selected in order to improve the wear resistance of supermartensitic stainless steel through the formation of uniformly distributed borides maintaining the characteristics of the corrosion resistant matrix. SF-SMSS 0.7%B presents an abrasive wear resistance considerably higher than spray-formed supermartensitic stainless steel without boron addition (SF-SMSS.

  7. Anelastic mechanical loss spectrometry of hydrogen in austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagodzinskyy, Y.; Andronova, E.; Ivanchenko, M.; Haenninen, H.

    2009-01-01

    Atomic distribution of hydrogen, its elemental diffusion jumps and its interaction with dislocations in a number of austenitic stainless steels are studied with anelastic mechanical loss (AML) spectrometry in combination with the hydrogen thermal desorption method. Austenitic stainless steels of different chemical composition, namely, AISI 310, AISI 201, and AISI 301LN, as well as LDX 2101 duplex stainless steel are studied to clarify the role of different alloying elements on the hydrogen behavior. Activation analyses of the hydrogen Snoek-like peaks are performed with their decomposition to sets of Gaussian components. Fine structure of the composite hydrogen peaks is analyzed under the assumption that each component corresponds to diffusion transfer of hydrogen between octahedral positions with certain atomic compositions of the nearest neighbouring lattice sites. An additional component originating from hydrogen-dislocation interaction is considered. Binding energies for hydrogen-dislocation interaction are also estimated for the studied austenitic stainless steels.

  8. Mechanical evaluation of quad-helix appliance made of low-nickel stainless steel wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Rogério Lacerda; Pithon, Matheus Melo

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that there is no difference between stainless steel and low-nickel stainless steel wires as regards mechanical behavior. Force, resilience, and elastic modulus produced by Quad-helix appliances made of 0.032-inch and 0.036-inch wires were evaluated. Sixty Quad-helix appliances were made, thirty for each type of alloy, being fifteen for each wire thickness, 0.032-in and 0.036-in. All the archwires were submitted to mechanical compression test using an EMIC DL-10000 machine simulating activations of 4, 6, 9, and 12 mm. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) with multiple comparisons and Tukey's test were used (p nickel stainless steel alloy had force, resilience, and elastic modulus similar to those made of stainless steel alloy.

  9. Microchemical evolution of neutron-irradiated stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brager, H.R.; Garner, F.A.

    1980-04-01

    The precipitates that develop in AISI 316 stainless steel during irradiation play a dominant role in determining the dimensional and mechanical property changes of this alloy. This role is expressed primarily in a large change in matrix composition that alters the diffusional properties of the alloy matrix and also appears to alter the rate of acceptance of point defects at dislocations and voids. The major elemental participants in the evolution have been identified as nickel, silicon, and carbon. The exceptional sensitivity of this evolution to many variables accounts for much of the variability of response exhibited by this alloy in nominally similar irradiations

  10. Application Feasibility of PRE 50 grade Super Austenitic Stainless Steel as a Steam Generator Tubing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yong Soo [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young sik [Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Taek Jun; Kim, Sun Tae; Park, Hui Sang [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the properties of the super austenitic stainless steel, SR-50A for application as steam generator tubing material. The microstructure, mechanical properties, corrosion properties, were analyzed and the results were compared between super austenitic stainless steel and Alloy 600 and Alloy 690. Super austenitic stainless steel, SR-50A is superior to Alloy 600, Alloy 690 and Alloy 800 in the mechanical properties(tensile strength, yield strength, and elongation). It was investigated that thermal conductivity of SR-50A was higher than Alloy 600. As a result of thermal treatment on super stainless steel, SR-50A, caustic SCC resistance was increased and its resistance was as much as Alloy 600TT and Alloy 690TT. In this study, optimum thermal treatment condition to improve the caustic corrosion properties was considered as 650 deg C or 550 deg C 15 hours. However, it is necessary to verify the corrosion mechanism and to prove the above results in the various corrosive environments. 27 refs., 6 tabs., 59 figs. (author)

  11. Evolution of stainless steels in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavassoli, Farhad

    2010-01-01

    Starting with the stainless steels used in the conventional industry, their adoption and successive evolutions in the nuclear industry, from one generation of nuclear reactors to another, is presented. Specific examples for several steels are given, covering fabrication procedures, qualification methods, property databases and design allowable stresses, to show how the ever-increasing demands for better performance and reliability, in particular under neutron irradiation, have been met. Particular attention is paid to the austenitic stainless steels types 304L, 316L, 316L(N), 316L(N)-IG, titanium stabilized grade 321, precipitation strengthened alloy 800, conventional and low activation ferritic/martensitic steels and their oxygen dispersion strengthening (ODS) derivatives. For each material, the evolution of the associated filler metal and welding techniques are also presented. (author)

  12. A sulfidation-resistant nickel-base alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, G.Y.

    1989-01-01

    For applications in mildly to moderately sulfidizing environments, stainless steels, Fe-Ni-Cr alloys (e.g., alloys 800 and 330), and more recently Fe-Ni-Cr-Co alloys (e.g., alloy 556) are frequently used for construction of process equipment. However, for many highly sulfidizing environments, few existing commercial alloys have adequate performance. Thus, a new nickel-based alloy containing 27 wt.% Co, 28 wt.% Cr, 4 wt.% Fe, 2.75 wt.% Si, 0.5 wt.% Mn and 0.05 wt.% C (Haynes alloy HR-160) was developed

  13. High purity ferritic Cr-Mo stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoth, J.

    1977-01-01

    In five years, E-BRITE 26-1 ferritic stainless steel has won an important place in the spectrum of materials suitable for use in chemical process equipment. It provides, in stainless steel, performance-capability characteristics comparable to more expensive alloys. It has demonstrated cost-effectiveness in equipment used for caustic, nitric-urea, organic chemicals, pulping liquors, refinery streams, and elsewhere. User confidence in the reliability and integrity of Grade XM 27 has increased to the point where large critical systems are now routinely specified in the alloy. The market acceptance of this material has attracted attempts to produce substitute versions of the alloy. Imitation, should be viewed with caution. Stabilized 26-IS must be examined over a lengthy period of time to determine if its own corrosion resistance, ductility, fabricability and reproducibility properties could ever be likened to those of E-BRITE 26-1. (orig.) [de

  14. Study and development of solid fluxes for gas tungsten arc welding applied to titanium and its alloys and stainless steels; Etude et developpement des flux solides en vue d'application en soudage ATIG applique au titane et ses alliages ainsi qu'aux aciers inoxydables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, N

    2000-06-15

    Gas Tungsten Arc Welding uses an electric arc between the refractory tungsten electrode and the plates to be welded under an argon shielding gas. As a result, the joint quality is excellent, no pollution nor defects are to be feared, consequently this process is used in nuclear, aeronautic, chemical and food industries. Despite of this good qualities, GTAW is limited because of, on the one side, a poor penetrating weld pool and, on the other side, a week productivity rate. Indeed, up to 3 mm thick plates, machining and filler metal is needed. Multiple runs increase the defect's risks, the manufactory time and increase the deformations and the heat affected zone. The goal of this study is to break through this limits without any device investment. Active GTA welding (or ATIG) is a new technique with GTA device and an activating flux to be spread on the upper plate before welding. The arc, by plasma electrochemical equilibrium modifications, and the pool with the inner connective flows inversion, allow 7 mm thick joints in one run without edges machining or filler metal for both stainless steel and titanium alloys. This manuscript describes the development of these fluxes, highlights the several phenomena and presents the possibilities of this new process. This work, in collaboration with B.S.L. industries, leads to two flux formulations (stainless steel and titanium alloys) now in a commercial phase with CASTOLIN S.A. Moreover, B.S.L.industries produces a pressure device (nitrate column) with the ATIG process using more than 2800 ATIG welds. (author)

  15. Study and development of solid fluxes for gas tungsten arc welding applied to titanium and its alloys and stainless steels; Etude et developpement des flux solides en vue d'application en soudage ATIG applique au titane et ses alliages ainsi qu'aux aciers inoxydables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, N

    2000-06-15

    Gas Tungsten Arc Welding uses an electric arc between the refractory tungsten electrode and the plates to be welded under an argon shielding gas. As a result, the joint quality is excellent, no pollution nor defects are to be feared, consequently this process is used in nuclear, aeronautic, chemical and food industries. Despite of this good qualities, GTAW is limited because of, on the one side, a poor penetrating weld pool and, on the other side, a week productivity rate. Indeed, up to 3 mm thick plates, machining and filler metal is needed. Multiple runs increase the defect's risks, the manufactory time and increase the deformations and the heat affected zone. The goal of this study is to break through this limits without any device investment. Active GTA welding (or ATIG) is a new technique with GTA device and an activating flux to be spread on the upper plate before welding. The arc, by plasma electrochemical equilibrium modifications, and the pool with the inner connective flows inversion, allow 7 mm thick joints in one run without edges machining or filler metal for both stainless steel and titanium alloys. This manuscript describes the development of these fluxes, highlights the several phenomena and presents the possibilities of this new process. This work, in collaboration with B.S.L. industries, leads to two flux formulations (stainless steel and titanium alloys) now in a commercial phase with CASTOLIN S.A. Moreover, B.S.L.industries produces a pressure device (nitrate column) with the ATIG process using more than 2800 ATIG welds. (author)

  16. Application of a non-dynamometric method to the measurement of the coefficient of static friction in cold and hot water between stainless steel and two alloys of zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Agraives, B.C.; Toornvliet, J.

    1977-01-01

    A method is proposed to perform comparative measurements of the coefficient of friction, either in cold water (25 0 C) or in hot pressurized water (240 0 C). For the purpose, a pin-on-disc tribometer, working with no force transducer, in which the coefficient of friction μ is measured through an angle 0, and given by μ=K sin 0 is used. The method is presently applied to the determination of the incipient friction along a distance of few millimetres. At low speed (1 mm/s) and with light contacts loads (from 50 to 150 g), two different friction mechanisms are observed for the following couples of materials; Zircalloy 2/304L stainless steel, Zirconium Niobium 2.5/304L stainless steel, 304L stainless steel/304L stainless steel. The first mechanism, which is observed essentially in cold conditions, is characterized by a regular sliding since friction starts, whereas the second appears mostly in hot conditions and shows peaks of friction with irregular and scattered values of μ. These two mechanisms seem to be related to intermetallic affinity of the mating materials, and also to the existence of preoxydized surface layers, and, to a large extent, to the change in the water viscosity. In such conditions, it appears that it is not possible to replace friction experiments in hot water by easier experiments in cold water

  17. High nitrogen stainless steels for nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamachi Mudali, U.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen alloying in stainless steels (SS) has myriad beneficial effects, including solid solution strengthening, precipitation effects, phase control and corrosion resistance. Recent years have seen a rapid development of these alloys with improved properties owing to advances in processing technologies. Furthermore, unlimited demands for high-performance advanced steels for special use in advanced applications renewed the interest in high nitrogen steels (HNS). The combination of numbers of attractive properties such as strength, fracture toughness, wear resistance, workability, magnetic properties and corrosion resistance of HNS has given a unique advantage and offers a number of prospective applications in different industries. Based on extensive studies carried out at IGCAR, nitrogen alloyed type 304LN SS and 316LN SS have been chosen as materials of construction for many engineering components of fast breeder reactor (FBR) and associated reprocessing plants. HNS austenitic SS alloys are used as structural/reactor components, i.e., main vessel, inner vessel, control plug, intermediate heat exchanger and main sodium piping for fast breeder reactor. HNS type 304LN SS is a candidate material for continuous dissolver, nuclear waste storage tanks, pipings, etc. for nitric acid service under highly corrosive conditions. Recent developments towards the manufacturing and properties of HNS alloys for application in nuclear industry are highlighted in the presentation. (author)

  18. Studies of Hot Crack Properties of Laser Welded Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther

    During the present work crack testing concerning small and fast solidifying laser welds in austenitic stainless steel has been studied. A set of methods has been applied to investigate alloy properties, including ·Application of known information to predict solidification phases from the alloy...... composition. ·Weld metal solidification rate measurements for prediction of phases. ·Various crack tests to assess the crack susceptibility of alloys. ·A combination of the above for selection of suitable, weldable alloys. The possibility of using such specific methods for alloys and applications has been...... to the crack behaviour, but do not show an expected correlation between the crack resistance and the solidification rate. The employment of pulsed seams is therefore assessed not to be usable in the present selection methods. From evaluation of several crack tests, the Weeter spot weld test has been chosen...

  19. Assessment of Hot Crack Properties of Laser Welded Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    2003-01-01

    Crack testing concerning small and fast solidifying laser welds in austenitic stainless steel has been studied. A set of methods has been applied to investigate alloy properties, including (1) Application of known information to predict solidification phases, (2) Weld metal solidification rate...... crack tests, the Weeter spot weld test has been chosen to form a basis for the development of a practicable method to select specific alloys for welding applications. A new test, the Groove weld test was developed, which has reduced the time consumption and lightened the analysis effort considerably...... measurements for prediction of phases, (3) Various crack tests to assess the crack susceptibility of alloys and (4) A combination of the above for selection of suitable, weldable alloys. The possibility of using such specific methods for alloys and applications has been investigated and recommendations...

  20. STRUCTURAL STRESS RELAXATION IN STAINLESS INSTABILITY STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lyabuk

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The approach to the description of conditions of martensitic transformation in austenitic steel is advanced. Transformation induced hardening is the result of Le Chatelier principle in instability alloys. The phase transformation in austenitic instability stainless steel is the cause of reduction of grain refining and increase of strength. It was experimentally shown that physical-mechanical characteristics of the prepared materials were defined by the structure and inhomogeneous distribution of the hardening phase within a grain. The reasons for high thermal stability of inverse austenitic were established. The factors determining the inverse austenitic relaxation resistibility and resources for its increasing were revealed.

  1. Corrosion evaluation of alloys for nuclear waste processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbett, R.A.; Bickford, D.F.; Morrison, W.S.

    1986-01-01

    Corrosion scouting tests were performed on stainless steel and nickel-based alloys in simulated process solutions to be used in a facility to immobilize high-level radioactive waste by incorporating it into borosilicate glass. Alloys with combined chromium plus molybdenum contents >30% and also >9% molybdenum, were the most resistant to general and local attack. Alloy C-276 was selected as the reference process equipment material, with Alloy 690 and ALLCORR selected for specific applications

  2. Standard test method for electrochemical critical pitting temperature testing of stainless steels

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1999-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a procedure for the evaluation of the resistance of stainless steel and related alloys to pitting corrosion based on the concept of the determination of a potential independent critical pitting temperature (CPT). 1.2 This test methods applies to wrought and cast products including but not restricted to plate, sheet, tubing, bar, forgings, and welds, (see Note 1). Note 1—Examples of CPT measurements on sheet, plate, tubing, and welded specimens for various stainless steels can be found in Ref (1). See the research reports (Section 14). 1.3 The standard parameters recommended in this test method are suitable for characterizing the CPT of austenitic stainless steels and other related alloys with a corrosion resistance ranging from that corresponding to solution annealed UNS S31600 (Type 316 stainless steel) to solution annealed UNS S31254 (6 % Mo stainless steel). 1.4 This test method may be extended to stainless steels and other alloys related to stainless steel that have a CPT...

  3. Underwater laser beam welding of Alloy 690

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, Takehisa; Tamura, Masataka; Kono, Wataru; Kawano, Shohei; Yoda, Masaki

    2009-01-01

    Stress Corrosion Clacking (SCC) has been reported at Alloy 600 welds between nozzles and safe-end in Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) plant. Alloy 690, which has higher chromium content than Alloy 600, has been applied for cladding on Alloy 600 welds for repairing damaged SCC area. Toshiba has developed Underwater Laser Beam Welding technique. This method can be conducted without draining, so that the repairing period and the radiation exposure during the repair can be dramatically decreased. In some old PWRs, high-sulfur stainless steel is used as the materials for this section. It has a high susceptibility of weld cracks. Therefore, the optimum welding condition of Alloy 690 on the high-sulfur stainless steel was investigated with our Underwater Laser Beam Welding unit. Good cladding layer, without any crack, porosity or lack of fusion, could be obtained. (author)

  4. The use of titanium and stainless steel in fracture fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, J S; Richards, R G

    2010-11-01

    The use of metal in fracture fixation has demonstrated unrivalled success for many years owing to its high stiffness, strength, biological toleration and overall reliable function. The most prominent materials used are electropolished stainless steel and commercially pure titanium, along with the more recent emergence of titanium alloys. Despite the many differences between electropolished stainless steel and titanium, both materials provide a relatively predictable clinical outcome, and offer similar success for fulfilling the main biomechanical and biological requirements of fracture fixation despite distinctive differences in implant properties and biological responses. This article explores these differences by highlighting the limitations and advantages of both materials, and addresses how this translates to clinical success.

  5. Corrosion and Nanomechanical Behaviors of 16.3Cr-0.22N-0.43C-1.73Mo Martensitic Stainless Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Rahul; Krishna, S. Chenna; Venugopal, A.; Narayanan, P. Ramesh; Jha, Abhay K.; Ramkumar, P.; Venkitakrishnan, P. V.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of nitrogen on the electrochemical corrosion and nanomechanical behaviors of martensitic stainless steel was examined using potentiodynamic polarization and nanoindentation test methods. The results indicate that partial replacement of carbon with nitrogen effectively improved the passivation and pitting corrosion resistance of conventional high-carbon and high- chromium martensitic steels. Post-test observation of the samples after a potentiodynamic test revealed a severe pitting attacks in conventional martensitic steel compared with nitrogen- containing martensitic stainless steel. This was shown to be due to (i) microstructural refinement results in retaining a high-chromium content in the matrix, and (ii) the presence of reversed austenite formed during the tempering process. Since nitrogen addition also resulted in the formation of a Cr_2N phase as a process of secondary hardening, the hardness of the nitrogen- containing steel is slightly higher than the conventional martensitic stainless steel under tempered conditions, even though the carbon content is lowered. The added nitrogen also improved the wear resistance of the steel as the critical load (Lc2) is less, along with a lower scratch friction coefficient (SFC) when compared to conventional martensitic stainless steel such as AISI 440C.

  6. Corrosion and Nanomechanical Behaviors of 16.3Cr-0.22N-0.43C-1.73Mo Martensitic Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Rahul; Krishna, S. Chenna; Venugopal, A.; Narayanan, P. Ramesh; Jha, Abhay K.; Ramkumar, P.; Venkitakrishnan, P. V. [Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre (ISRO), Kerala (India)

    2016-12-15

    The effect of nitrogen on the electrochemical corrosion and nanomechanical behaviors of martensitic stainless steel was examined using potentiodynamic polarization and nanoindentation test methods. The results indicate that partial replacement of carbon with nitrogen effectively improved the passivation and pitting corrosion resistance of conventional high-carbon and high- chromium martensitic steels. Post-test observation of the samples after a potentiodynamic test revealed a severe pitting attacks in conventional martensitic steel compared with nitrogen- containing martensitic stainless steel. This was shown to be due to (i) microstructural refinement results in retaining a high-chromium content in the matrix, and (ii) the presence of reversed austenite formed during the tempering process. Since nitrogen addition also resulted in the formation of a Cr{sub 2}N phase as a process of secondary hardening, the hardness of the nitrogen- containing steel is slightly higher than the conventional martensitic stainless steel under tempered conditions, even though the carbon content is lowered. The added nitrogen also improved the wear resistance of the steel as the critical load (Lc2) is less, along with a lower scratch friction coefficient (SFC) when compared to conventional martensitic stainless steel such as AISI 440C.

  7. Preparation of multi-layer film consisting of hydrogen-free DLC and nitrogen-containing DLC for conductive hard coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Yushi; Harigai, Toru; Isono, Ryo; Degai, Satoshi; Tanimoto, Tsuyoshi; Suda, Yoshiyuki; Takikawa, Hirofumi; Yasui, Haruyuki; Kaneko, Satoru; Kunitsugu, Shinsuke; Kamiya, Masao; Taki, Makoto

    2018-01-01

    Conductive hard-coating films have potential application as protective films for contact pins used in the electrical inspection process for integrated circuit chips. In this study, multi-layer diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were prepared as conductive hard-coating films. The multi-layer DLC films consisting of DLC and nitrogen-containing DLC (N-DLC) film were prepared using a T-shape filtered arc deposition method. Periodic DLC/N-DLC four-layer and eight-layer films had the same film thickness by changing the thickness of each layer. In the ball-on-disk test, the N-DLC mono-layer film showed the highest wear resistance; however, in the spherical polishing method, the eight-layer film showed the highest polishing resistance. The wear and polishing resistance and the aggressiveness against an opponent material of the multi-layer DLC films improved by reducing the thickness of a layer. In multi-layer films, the soft N-DLC layer between hard DLC layers is believed to function as a cushion. Thus, the tribological properties of the DLC films were improved by a multi-layered structure. The electrical resistivity of multi-layer DLC films was approximately half that of the DLC mono-layer film. Therefore, the periodic DLC/N-DLC eight-layer film is a good conductive hard-coating film.

  8. Effects of organic additives with oxygen- and nitrogen-containing functional groups on the negative electrolyte of vanadium redox flow battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jianlei; Liu, Suqin; He, Zhangxing; Han, Huiguo; Chen, Yong

    2014-01-01

    DL-malic acid and L-aspartic acid are investigated as additives for the negative electrolyte of vanadium redox flow battery (VFRB) to improve its stability and electrochemical performance. The stability experiments indicate that the addition of L-aspartic acid into the 2 M V(III) electrolyte can stabilize the electrolyte by delaying its precipitation. The results of cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy show that the V(III) electrolyte with both additives demonstrates enhanced electrochemical activity and reversibility. The introduction of DL-malic acid and L-aspartic acid can increase the diffusion coefficient of V(III) species and facilitate the charge transfer of V(III)/V(II) redox reaction. Between the two additives, the effect of L-aspartic acid is more remarkable. Moreover, the VFRB cell employing negative electrolyte with L-aspartic acid exhibits excellent cycling stability and achieves higher average energy efficiency (76.4%) compared to the pristine cell (73.8%). The comparison results with the cell employing L-aspartic acid pre-treated electrode confirm that L-aspartic acid in the electrolyte can modify the electrode by constantly providing oxygen- and nitrogen-containing groups, leading to the enhancement of electrochemical performance

  9. Efficient Transdermal Delivery of Alendronate, a Nitrogen-Containing Bisphosphonate, Using Tip-Loaded Self-Dissolving Microneedle Arrays for the Treatment of Osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsumi, Hidemasa; Tanaka, Yutaro; Hitomi, Kaori; Liu, Shu; Quan, Ying-Shu; Kamiyama, Fumio; Sakane, Toshiyasu; Yamamoto, Akira

    2017-08-17

    To improve the transdermal bioavailability and safety of alendronate (ALN), a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate, we developed self-dissolving microneedle arrays (MNs), in which ALN is loaded only at the tip portion of micron-scale needles by a dip-coating method (ALN(TIP)-MN). We observed micron-scale pores in rat skin just after application of ALN(TIP)-MN, indicating that transdermal pathways for ALN were created by MN. ALN was rapidly released from the tip of MNs as observed in an in vitro release study. The tip portions of MNs completely dissolved in the rat skin within 5 min after application in vivo. After application of ALN(TIP)-MN in mice, the plasma concentration of ALN rapidly increased, and the bioavailability of ALN was approximately 96%. In addition, the decrease in growth plate was effectively suppressed by this efficient delivery of ALN in a rat model of osteoporosis. Furthermore, no skin irritation was observed after application of ALN(TIP)-MN and subcutaneous injection of ALN, while mild skin irritation was induced by whole-ALN-loaded MN (ALN-MN)-in which ALN is contained in the whole of the micron-scale needles fabricated from hyaluronic acid-and intradermal injection of ALN. These findings indicate that ALN(TIP)-MN is a promising transdermal formulation for the treatment of osteoporosis without skin irritation.

  10. Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel Made by Additive Manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luecke, William E; Slotwinski, John A

    2014-01-01

    Using uniaxial tensile and hardness testing, we evaluated the variability and anisotropy of the mechanical properties of an austenitic stainless steel, UNS S17400, manufactured by an additive process, selective laser melting. Like wrought materials, the mechanical properties depend on the orientation introduced by the processing. The recommended stress-relief heat treatment increases the tensile strength, reduces the yield strength, and decreases the extent of the discontinuous yielding. The mechanical properties, assessed by hardness, are very uniform across the build plate, but the stress-relief heat treatment introduced a small non-uniformity that had no correlation to position on the build plate. Analysis of the mechanical property behavior resulted in four conclusions. (1) The within-build and build-to-build tensile properties of the UNS S17400 stainless steel are less repeatable than mature engineering structural alloys, but similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (2) The anisotropy of the mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material of this study is larger than that of mature structural alloys, but is similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (3) The tensile mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material fabricated by selective laser melting are very different from those of wrought, heat-treated 17-4PH stainless steel. (4) The large discontinuous yielding strain in all tests resulted from the formation and propagation of Lüders bands.

  11. Development of nuclear grade stainless steels at KCSSL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balachandran, G.; Dhere, M.; Mahadik, A.; Hinge, N.M.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2011-01-01

    Kalyani Carpenter Special Steels Ltd is an alloy steel plant, where a variety of alloy steel grades are produced for automotive, defence, nuclear and aerospace applications. The plant has developed expertise in processing of several alloy steel grades of superior quality that meets stringent specifications. Primary steel is processed through a combination of electric arc furnace, ladle furnace and vacuum degassing where stringent control over dephosphorisation, desulphurization, deoxidation is effected to get a refined high quality steel. The molten steel is cast through continuous casting of slabs or ingot casting. In grades specific to nuclear application, the primary cast products are further subjected to electroslag remelting to achieve further freedom from inclusions and to achieve a favourable solidification grain structure, which ultimately improve the hot workability of the alloy steel. Appropriate choice of slag and operating parameters are needed for realising the required ingot quality. The present study would examine the processing and quality aspects of some important grades of steels used in nuclear industry namely ferritic 9Cr-1Mo steel, martensitic stainless steels 403, 410, precipitation hardenable 17-4 PH stainless steel and austenitic 321, 316LN stainless steel, which were made and supplied for applications to Indian nuclear industry. The expertise developed in processing the steels in terms of melting, heat treatment and their relationship to structural features and mechanical properties would be highlighted. (author)

  12. Hydrogen in titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wille, G.W.; Davis, J.W.

    1981-04-01

    The titanium alloys that offer properties worthy of consideration for fusion reactors are Ti-6Al-4V, Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo-Si (Ti-6242S) and Ti-5Al-6Sn-2Zr-1Mo-Si (Ti-5621S). The Ti-6242S and Ti-5621S are being considered because of their high creep resistance at elevated temperatures of 500 0 C. Also, irradiation tests on these alloys have shown irradiation creep properties comparable to 20% cold worked 316 stainless steel. These alloys would be susceptible to slow strain rate embrittlement if sufficient hydrogen concentrations are obtained. Concentrations greater than 250 to 500 wppm hydrogen and temperatures lower than 100 to 150 0 C are approximate threshold conditions for detrimental effects on tensile properties. Indications are that at the elevated temperature - low hydrogen pressure conditions of the reactors, there would be negligible hydrogen embrittlement

  13. Thermal stability and thermal property characterisation of Fe–14.4Cr–15.4Ni–2.4Mo–2.36Mn–0.25Ti–1.02Si–0.042C–0.04P–0.005B (mass%) austenitic stainless steel (Alloy D9I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathy, Haraprasanna [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Raju, S., E-mail: sraju@igcar.gov.in [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Rai, Arun Kumar [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Panneerselvam, G. [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Jayakumar, T. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► High temperature enthalpy, specific heat, lattice thermal expansion of Alloy D9I determined. ► Melting and solidification studied by thermal analysis. ► Integrated modelling by Debye–Grüneisen quasiharmonic formalism. ► Comprehensive thermal property assessment for austenitic stainless steel. -- Abstract: High temperature measurements of enthalpy increment (ΔH{sub T}°) and lattice parameter have been carried out on Alloy D9I by means of drop calorimetry and high temperature X-ray diffraction techniques, respectively. In addition, the thermal stability during heating and cooling from the melting range has been investigated by differential scanning calorimetry. It is found that under near equilibrium cooling conditions (3 K min{sup −1}), Alloy D9I exhibits L → γ austenite → L + γ + δ ferrite → γ + δ → γ solidification mode. However, the phase fraction of δ ferrite and the temperature region of γ + δ two phase domain are found to be small. The on-cooling liquidus and solidus temperatures are found to be 1684 and 1631 ± 5 K, respectively. The latent heat of solidification is found to be in the range, 190–220 J g{sup −1}. The thermal analysis study has revealed that solution treated Alloy D9I exhibits an endothermic dissolution of Ti(C,N) particles at about 1323 ± 2 K, with an associated heat effect of 16–20 J g{sup −1}. The specific heat C{sub p} and coefficient of linear thermal expansion α{sub l} at 298.15 K are estimated to be 486 J kg{sup −1} K{sup −1} and 1.15 × 10{sup −5} K{sup −1}, respectively. The measured temperature dependencies of C{sub p} and α{sub l} for Alloy D9I are in good agreement with the general trend exhibited by many austenitic steels. Further, an empirical linear correlation has been found between the measured temperature dependent molar volume and molar enthalpy values. The measured thermal property data have been modelled through Debye–Grüneisen formalism to obtain an

  14. Investigation of austenitic alloys for advanced heat recovery and hot-gas cleanup systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swindeman, R.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Materials properties were collected for the design and construction of structural components for use in advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems. Alloys systems included 9Cr-1Mo-V steel, modified 316 stainless steel, modified type 310 stainless steel, modified 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steel, and modified alloy 800. Experimental work was undertaken to expand the databases for potentially useful alloys. Types of testing included creep, stress-rupture, creep-crack growth, fatigue, and post-exposure short-time tensile tests. Because of the interest in relatively inexpensive alloys for service at 700 C and higher, research emphasis was placed on a modified type 310 stainless steel and a modified 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steel. Both steels were found to have useful strength to 925 C with good weldability and ductility.

  15. Relation between the mechanical properties and SCC behavior of the alloys used in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsubota, M.; Katayama, Y.; Kanazawa, Y.

    2007-01-01

    It was shown in the previous reports that carbon and low alloy steels, martensitic stainless steels and cold worked austenitic stainless steels have shown high SCC susceptibility in the highly hardened condition. Those steels had similar critical hardness for SCC (HV300-340), over which the materials showed SCC susceptibility, even though the hardening process was different. Hardening processes applied for the alloys were as follows: (1) Martensitic transformation: Carbon and low alloy steels and martensitic stainless steels. (2) Alpha-prime decomposition (precipitation hardening): martensitic stainless steels. (3) Cold work: austenitic stainless steels. The relationship between the mechanical properties and SCC susceptibility of the alloys is discussed and summarized in the present paper. (author)

  16. Extraction of uranium(6), transuranium elements and europium by bidentate neutral phosphorus- and phosphorus-nitrogen-containing reagents with substituent in methylene bridge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochetkova, N.E.; Kojro, O.Eh.; Nesterova, N.P.; Medved', T.Ya.; Chmutova, M.K.; Myasoedov, B.F.; Kabachnik, M.I.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of substituents in methylene bridge on solubility, extractivity and selectivity of bidentate neutral phosphorus- and phosphorus-nitrogen-containing reagents in the process of U(6), TUE, Eu extraction has been studied. It is ascertained that hydrogen substitution in the bridge of tetraphenylmethylenediphosphine dioxide (1) causes a decrease in the extractivity of reagent as to TPE, uranium (6) and europium. There is no visible regular relation between basicity and extractivity of substituted reagents. Hydrogen substitution in the bridge of diphenyl[diethylcarbamoylmethyl]phosphine oxide (2) causes a decrease in extractivity of the reagent as to TPE, uranium (6) and europium. In contrast to monodentate neutral reagents, when bidentate neutral reagents are used, sometimes no increase in the reagent extractivity with an increase in its basicity is observed. When fragments restricting the conformation mobility of bidentate reagent molecule are introduced in it (here substituents in methylene bridge), it may result in the violation of the regularity, since of all the factors affecting the reagent extractivity the spatial factor may become the prevailing one. On hydrogen substitution in the bridge of 1 separation factors of practically all (with few exceptions) studied pairs of elements increase. Hydrogen substitution in the bridge of 2 causes an increase in separation factor of U (6) /Am pair and it does not affect the separation factor of Am/Eu pair. Hydrogen substitution in the bridge of 1 and 2 does not result in the preparation of more efficient and considerably more selective reagents for extractive isolation and separation of the elements, but some of the substituted reagents (Cl-substituted 1, for instance) may turn out useful for the element separation

  17. Nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate, YM529/ONO-5920 (a novel minodronic acid), inhibits RANKL expression in a cultured bone marrow stromal cell line ST2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, Shozo; Tsubaki, Masanobu; Hoshino, Mayumi; Namimatsu, Ayumi; Uji, Hiromi; Yoshioka, Shohei; Tanimori, Yoshihiro; Yanae, Masashi; Iwaki, Masahiro; Irimajiri, Kiyohiro

    2005-01-01

    Increase in bone resorption by osteoclasts can cause metabolic bone diseases, such as osteoporosis. Recent attention has been paid to the receptor activator of the NF-κB ligand (RANKL), an accelerator of osteoclast differentiation. RANKL is expressed on the bone marrow-derived stromal cell membrane and induces the differentiation of osteoclasts by binding to RANK expressed on the osteoclast precursor cell membrane. Since the inhibition of RANKL expression can lead to the inhibition of osteoclastic bone resorption, the clinical application of RANKL inhibition could be expected to have a major effect on metabolic bone disease therapy. In this study, we investigated whether or not YM529/ONO-5920, a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate (a novel minodronic acid), inhibits RANKL expression in a bone marrow-derived stromal cell line (ST2 cells). Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed that the administration of YM529/ONO-5920 to ST2 cells inhibited RANKL mRNA expression and reduced RANKL proteins as assessed by Western blot analysis. The inhibition of RANKL mRNA expression was reversed when geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP), an intermediate in the mevalonate pathway, was used in combination. Furthermore, YM529/ONO-5920 reduced phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), and similarly, U0126, a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 inhibitor, inhibited RANKL expression. Pretreatment with GGPP reversed the YM529/ONO-5920-induced decrease in phosphorylation of ERK. Furthermore, YM529/ONO-5920 decreased TRAP-positive cells in co-culture of ST2 cells and an osteoclast cell line, C7 cells, and this decrease was inhibited by pretreatment with GGPP. This indicates that YM529/ONO-5920 inhibits GGPP biosynthesis in the mevalonate pathway and then signal transduction in the Ras-mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, thereby inhibiting RANKL expression on ST2 cells. These results suggest a newly elucidated action of bisphosphonates in

  18. Nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate induces a newly discovered hematopoietic structure in the omentum of an anemic mouse model by stimulating G-CSF production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Hirotada; Yagi, Hideki; Endo, Yasuo; Soeta, Satoshi; Nonaka, Naoko; Nakamura, Masanori

    2017-02-01

    We previously reported that the injection of nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate (NBP) induced the site of erythropoiesis to shift from the bone marrow (BM) to the spleen. Our previous study established a severely anemic mouse model that was treated with a combination of NBP with phenylhydrazine (PHZ), which induced newly discovered hematopoietic organs in the omentum. No reports have shown that new hematopoietic organs form under any condition. We characterized the structures and factors related to the formation of these new organs. Splenectomized mice were treated with NBP to inhibit erythropoiesis in the BM and then injected with PHZ to induce hemolytic anemia. The mice showed severe anemia and wine-colored structures appeared in the omentum. Some hematopoietic cells, including megakaryocytes, and well-developed sinuses were observed in these structures. Numerous TER119-positive erythroblasts were located with cells positive for PCNA, a cell proliferation marker. C-kit-positive cells were detected and mRNAs related to hematopoiesis were expressed in these structures. Moreover, TER119-positive erythroblasts emerged and formed clusters and hematopoiesis-related factors were detected in the omentum of mice treated with NBP and PHZ. The levels of G-CSF in the serum and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) in the peripheral blood were increased upon treatment with both NBP and PHZ. These results suggest that the induced hematopoietic structures act as the sites of erythropoiesis and that NBP-induced G-CSF production causes HPC mobilization, homing and colonization in the omentum because they constitutively express some factors, including SDF-1; thus, the newly discovered hematopoietic structure in this study might be formed.

  19. Operational experience of stainless steels in seawater-cooled systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriksson, S.

    1981-06-01

    A study has been made of chiefly Swedish and Finnish operational experience of stainless steel in seawater and brackish water. A report is given on 23 typical cases, behind which in actual fact a considerably larger number of individual practical cases are concealed. The answer to the primary question why a standard steel of type SS 2343 (AISI 316) sometimes, contrary to expectation, remains unattacked by local corrosion is that there is usually spontaneous cathodic protection by other less noble components of carbon steel, cast iron or some copper alloy in direct contact with the stainless steel. The study confirms in other respects the adverse effect of residual oxides after welding and the beneficial of low temperature, high continuous waterflow and periodic cleaning, and of rinsing with fresh water during out-of service periods. It also verifies the additional advantages of the new high-alloy special steels which have begun to be marketed in recent years for seawater applications. (author)

  20. Precipitation reactions in a beryllium-bearing stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, M.J.; Heiple, C.R.

    1980-01-01

    Precipitation reactions in a beryllium-bearing stainless steel alloy have been studied by TEM and electron diffraction for ageing temperatures between 400 0 and 900 0 C. The nominal composition of the alloy was 38% Ni - 21% Cr - 1% Mn - 0.5% Be - Bal Fe. Specimens were solutionized for one hour at 1150 0 C and water quenched. The ageing reaction was studied by hardness measurements for times between 0.5 and 16 hours. The TEM specimens dicussed herein were made from samples aged one hour

  1. The effect of thermoplastic treatment regimes on the microplastic strain of nitrogen-containing steel Kh21G10N7MBF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannykh, O.A.; Blinov, V.M.; Kostina, M.V.; Grachev, S.V.; Mal'tseva, L.A.

    2005-01-01

    A study is made into the influence of a percentage reduction during cold rolling and subsequent holdings at heat on development of microplastic deformation when bending sheet specimens of stainless austenitic high-nitrogen steel Kh21G10N7MBF. It is revealed that a maximum value of apparent limit of elasticity (∼1800 MPa) is attained due to plastic deformation by rolling at 20 Deg C with a total percentage reduction of 60 % and subsequent aging at 500 Deg C for 1-4 h [ru

  2. Effects of solute interstitial elements on swelling of stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiegler, J.O.; Leitnaker, J.M.; Bloom, E.E.

    1975-01-01

    High-purity stainless steel (HPS), equivalent to type 316 stainless steel in major alloy elements but with greatly reduced interstitial elements and manganese contents, was irradiated in the temperature range 725 to 875 K to fluences ranging from 1.0 to 3.5 x 10 26 neutrons/m 2 (>0.1 MeV). The HPS swelled 20 to 50 times more than commercial grade 316 stainless steel (316 SS), and about the same as commercial-purity nickel, which has about the same interstitial content as HPS. A fine-grained 316 SS in which interstitial elements but not manganese were precipitated by thermomechanical treatments also showed exaggerated swelling, approaching that of HPS, which suggests that swelling in commercial stainless steels is retarded by small amounts of interstitial elements normally present in them and not by the major alloying elements. Interstitials tend to precipitate from solution during irradiation, and bulk extractions of precipitate particles were made to evaluate the extent of the precipitation reactions. At both 643 and 853 K precipitation was clearly enhanced by irradiation significantly enough to alter the matrix composition, which suggests that swelling may be increased at high fluences over that predicted by extrapolation of lower fluence data. These observations are discussed in terms of potential behaviour of fuel cladding materials and of the validity and interpretation of accelerated schemes for simulating neutron damage. (author)

  3. Assessment of stainless steel 348 fuel rod performance against literature available data using TRANSURANUS code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovedi Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Early pressurized water reactors were originally designed to operate using stainless steel as cladding material, but during their lifetime this material was replaced by zirconium-based alloys. However, after the Fukushima Daiichi accident, the problems related to the zirconium-based alloys due to the hydrogen production and explosion under severe accident brought the importance to assess different materials. In this sense, initiatives as ATF (Accident Tolerant Fuel program are considering different material as fuel cladding and, one candidate is iron-based alloy. In order to assess the fuel performance of fuel rods manufactured using iron-based alloy as cladding material, it was necessary to select a specific stainless steel (type 348 and modify properly conventional fuel performance codes developed in the last decades. Then, 348 stainless steel mechanical and physics properties were introduced in the TRANSURANUS code. The aim of this paper is to present the obtained results concerning the verification of the modified TRANSURANUS code version against data collected from the open literature, related to reactors which operated using stainless steel as cladding. Considering that some data were not available, some assumptions had to be made. Important differences related to the conventional fuel rods were taken into account. Obtained results regarding the cladding behavior are in agreement with available information. This constitutes an evidence of the modified TRANSURANUS code capabilities to perform fuel rod investigation of fuel rods manufactured using 348 stainless steel as cladding material.

  4. Electrochemical and surface characterization of a nickel-titanium alloy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wever, Dirk; Veldhuizen, AG; de Vries, J; Busscher, HJ; Uges, DRA; van Horn, James

    1998-01-01

    For clinical implantation purposes of shape memory metals the nearly equiatomic nickel-titanium (NiTi) alloy is generally used. In this study, the corrosion properties and surface characteristics of this alloy were investigated and compared with two reference controls, AISI 316 LVM stainless steel

  5. Notch and hydrogen effects on sensitized 21-6-9 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caskey, C.R. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Type 21-6-9 stainless steel alloy is slightly notch sensitive in the solution annealed condition, a behavior that is aggravated by sensitization anneal at 920 0 K. The lower toughness of the sensitized alloy is a measure of microstructural embrittlement associated with carbide precipitation in grain boundaries. The tendency toward grain boundary fracture in the sensitized alloy is accentuated by stress concentration at the notch. Also, there is an increase in notch sensitivity when the alloy is tested in a high pressure (69 MPa) hydrogen environment, due to susceptibility of the grain boundaries to hydrogen embrittlement

  6. Development of super duplex stainless steel for water-supply pipe and valve in nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chan Jin; Kim, Jun Sick; Kwon, Hyuk Sang; Park, Young Hwan; Lee, Zin Hyung

    2000-01-01

    Austenitic-ferritic duplex stainless steels are very attractive as material for water-supply facilities in atomic power plants where both high mechanical strength and excellent resistance to localized and stress corrosion are required. However, these alloys have a problem to get sensitive to embrittlement when exposed to temperatures of 250 ∼ 1050 deg C. So far, there have been large efforts to improve this alloy. In this paper, a new developed alloy designed to improve not resistance to the embrittlement but also mechanical and corrosion properties compared with existing commercial alloys were introduced with some experimental results. (author)

  7. Substitution of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel for austentic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikka, V.K.

    1982-04-01

    This report describes the current program to develop a high-strength ferritic-martensitic steel. The alloy is essentially Fe-9% Cr-1% Mo with small additions of V and Nb and is known as modifed 9 Cr-1 Mo steel. Its elevated-temperature properties and design allowable stresses match those of type 304 stainless steel for temperatures up to 600 0 C and exceed those of other ferritic steels by factors of 2 to 3. The improved strength of this alloy permits its use in place of stainless steels for many applications

  8. Corrosion behaviour of high manganese austenitic stainless steels: positive and negative aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raja, V.S.

    1999-01-01

    Stainless steel 304 has found use as a most versatile engineering material in many industrial applications. Recently, the Indian industries have developed high Mn stainless steels with low C and Ni contents and simultaneously introduced N and Cu in the system. Composition of some of the alloys which are prevalent in the market are given. Individually, the effect of Ni, C, Mn, N and Cu on various forms of corrosion is reasonably understood. However, it will be worthwhile to review the response of these alloys, containing all these elements, towards various forms of corrosion. The objective of this paper is preciously to do this

  9. Diffusion and autoradiographic investigations of the tritium--304 stainless steel system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downs, G.L.; Braun, J.D.; Chaney, K.F.; Powell, G.W.

    1975-01-01

    The diffusion coefficient of tritium in 304-stainless steel at low temperatures (100 to 300 0 C) was determined. Autoradiography was used to establish the concentration as well as the distribution of tritium in the alloy. The autoradiographic study shows that tritium is distributed heterogeneously at room temperature in the cold-worked alloy and also in the fusion zone of weldments. Tritium partitions preferentially to the delta ferrite in weldments and to martensite produced by the cold working of 304-stainless steel. (auth)

  10. Review of lithium iron-base alloy corrosion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVan, J.H.; Selle, J.E.; Morris, A.E.

    1976-01-01

    An extensive literature search was conducted on the compatibility of ferrous alloys with lithium, with the emphasis on austenitic stainless steels. The information is summarized and is divided into two sections. The first section gives a brief summary and the second is an annotated bibliography. Comparisons of results are complicated by differences in lithium purity, alloy composition, alloy treatment, flow rates, and lithium handling procedures. For long-term application, austenitic stainless steels appear to be limited to about 500 0 C. While corrosion can probably not be decreased to zero, a considerable reduction to tolerable and predictable amounts appears possible

  11. Nano-technology based carriers for nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates delivery as sensitisers of γδ T cells for anticancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgins, Naomi O; Wang, Julie Tzu-Wen; Al-Jamal, Khuloud T

    2017-05-15

    Nitrogen containing bisphosphonates (N-BPs) including zoledronate (ZOL) and alendronate (ALD) inhibit farnesyl diphosphate synthase, and have been shown to have a cytotoxic affect against cancer cells as a monotherapy and to also sensitise tumour cells to destruction by γδ T cells. γδ T cells are a subset of human T lymphocytes and have a diverse range of roles in the immune system including the recognition and destruction of cancer cells. This property of γδ T cells can be harnessed for use in cancer immunotherapy through in vivo expansion or the adoptive transfer of ex vivo activated γδ T cells. The use of N-BPs with γδ T cells has been shown to have a synergistic effect in in vitro, animal and clinical studies. N-BPs have limited in vivo activity due to rapid clearance from the circulation. By encapsulating N-BPs in liposomes (L) it is possible to increase the levels of N-BPs at non-osseous tumour sites. L-ZOL and L-ALD have been shown to have different toxicological profiles than free ZOL or ALD. Both L-ALD and L-ZOL led to increased spleen weight, leucocytosis, neutrophilia and lymphocytopenia in mice after intravenous injection. L-ALD was shown to be better tolerated than L-ZOL in murine studies. Biodistribution studies have been performed in order to better understand the interaction of N-BPs and γδ T cells in vivo. Additionally, in vivo therapy studies have shown that mice treated with both L-ALD and γδ T cells had a significant reduction in tumour growth compared to mice treated with L-ALD or γδ T cells alone. The use of ligand-targeted liposomes may further increase the efficacy of this combinatory immunotherapy. Liposomes targeting the αvβ6 integrin receptor using the peptide A20FMDV2 had a greater ability than untargeted liposomes in sensitising cancer cells to destruction by γδ T cells in αvβ6 positive cancer cell lines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of composition on the electrochemical behavior of austenitic stainless steel in Ringer's solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandy, R.; Cahoon, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    Potentiodynamic cyclic polarization tests on Type 316L stainless steel, a common orthopedic implant alloy, in Ringer's solution show considerable hysteresis and a protection potential more active than the open circuit corrosion potential. This implies that chances of repassivation of actively growing pits in this alloy are limited. Tests in Ringer's solution containing hydrochloric acid show that the open circuit potential of Type 316L steel in this solution may exceed in the noble direction the critical pitting potential in the same solution. This signifies that spontaneous breakdown of passivity may occur in a bulk environment which grossly simulates the electrochemical environment within a crevice. Alloying elements such as Mo, Ni, Cr, all improve the corrosion resistance of Type 316L stainless steel in that the critical pitting potential shifts in the noble direction in the alloys having any of the three alloying elements in a higher proportion than in Type 316L steel. Polarization tests in Ringer's solution on a 20% Cr, 25% Ni, 4.5% Mo, 1.5% Cu austenitic stainless steel, having Mo, Cr, and Ni--all in higher proportions than in Type 316L steel, does not show any critical pitting potential or hysteresis at potentials below that for dissociation of water. However, test in 4% NaCl solution at 60 C, a more aggressive chloride environment than Ringer'ssolution, reveals considerable hysteresis and a very active protection potential, indicating that this behavior is a common feature of austenitic stainless steel in sufficiently aggressive, chloride media

  13. Nonmetallic inclusions in JBK-75 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewer, A.W.; Krenzer, R.W.; Doyle, J.H.; Riefenberg, D.H.

    1977-01-01

    Stainless steel alloys that are chemically complex, such as A-286 or JBK-75, are designed to improve such high-temperature properties as strength. This is accomplished by precipitating secondary phases during aging. Such multicomponent systems, however, can also produce undesirable phases that are detrimental to forgeability and final mechanical properties. Cast segregation and numerous nonmetallic inclusions can have a degrading influence on the toughness and ductility of the alloy. Several different heats of A-286 and JBK-75 were studied, and titanium carbide and/or molybdenum carbide [(Ti, Mo)C] plus titanium carbide and/or titanium carbonitride Ti(C,N)-type phases were qualitatively identified as the major nonmetallic constituent in these alloys. The common procedure for rating the microcleanliness of steels does not classify such carbide or carbonitride phases and thus does not provide an appropriate means of controlling in-process inspection. The results of this study are discussed in terms of alternative methods for evaluating the microcleanliness of superalloys

  14. Penentuan konsentrasi stainless steel 316L dan kobalt kromium remanium GM-800 pada uji GPMT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikmal Hafizi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Concentration determination of stainless steel 316L and cobalt chromium remanium GM - 800 on GPMT test. Dentistry had used metals such as cobalt chromium and stainless steel in maxillofacial surgery, cardiovascular, and as a dental material. 316L stainless steel is austenistic stainless steel which has low carbon composition to improve the corrosion resistance as well as the content of molybdenum in the material. Cobalt chromium (CoCr is a cobaltbased alloy with a mixture of chromium. Density of a metal cobalt chromium alloy is about 8-9 g/cm3 that caused metal interference relatively mild. Remanium GM-800 is one type of a cobalt chromium alloy with the advantages of having high resistance to fracture and high modulus of elasticity. This study aims to determine the exact concentration used in 316L stainless steel and cobalt chromium GM-800 as the GPMT test material. Subjects were cobalt chromium Remanium GM-800 and 316L stainless steel concentration of 5%, 10%, 20%, 40% and 80%. Patch containing stainless steel or cobalt chromium paste was af xed for 24 hours each on three experimental animals, then the erythema and edema were observed using the Magnusson and Kligman scale. In the study, concentration of 5% is the concentration recommended for stainless steel 316L and cobalt chromium GM-800 as material in challenge phase GPMT test, while the concentration of 40% is the concentration recommended for stainless steel 316L and cobalt chromium GM-800 in the induction phase. ABSTRAK Dunia kedokteran gigi banyak menggunakan logam pada pembedahan maxillofacial, cardiovascular, dan sebagai material dental. Logam yang banyak digunakan antara lain adalah kobalt kromium dan stainless steel. Stainless steel 316L merupakan austenistic stainless steel yang memiliki komposisi karbon rendah sehingga dapat meningkatkan ketahanan terhadap korosi sama halnya dengan kandungan molybdenum pada material tersebut. Kobalt kromium (CoCr adalah cobalt-based alloy dengan

  15. Hot Corrosion Behavior of Stainless Steel with Al-Si/Al-Si-Cr Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Guangyan; Wu, Yongzhao; Liu, Qun; Li, Rongguang; Su, Yong

    2017-03-01

    The 1Cr18Ni9Ti stainless steel with Al-Si/Al-Si-Cr coatings is prepared by slurry process and vacuum diffusion, and the hot corrosion behavior of the stainless steel with/without the coatings is studied under the condition of Na2SO4 film at 950 °C in air. Results show that the corrosion kinetics of stainless steel, the stainless steel with Al-Si coating and the stainless steel with Al-Si-Cr coating follow parabolic laws in several segments. After 24 h corrosion, the sequence of the mass gain for the three alloys is the stainless steel with Al-Si-Cr coating coating coating. The corrosion products of the three alloys are layered. Thereinto, the corrosion products of stainless steel without coating are divided into two layers, where the outside layer contains a composite of Fe2O3 and FeO, and the inner layer is Cr2O3. The corrosion products of the stainless steel with Al-Si coating are also divided into two layers, of which the outside layer mainly consists of Cr2O3, and the inner layer is mainly SiO2. The corrosion film of the stainless steel with Al-Si-Cr coating is thin and dense, which combines well with substrate. Thereinto, the outside layer is mainly Cr2O3, and the inside layer is Al2O3. In the matrix of all of the three alloys, there exist small amount of sulfides. Continuous and protective films of Cr2O3, SiO2 and Al2O3 form on the surface of the stainless steel with Al-Si and Al-Si-Cr coatings, which prevent further oxidation or sulfide corrosion of matrix metals, and this is the main reason for the much smaller mass gain of the two alloys than that of the stainless steel without any coatings in the 24 h hot corrosion process.

  16. Pitting and stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saithala, Janardhan R.

    An investigation has been performed to determine the pitting resistance of stainless steels and stress corrosion cracking of super duplex stainless steels in water containing chloride ions from 25 - 170°C. The steels studied are 12% Cr, FV520B, FV566, 304L, Uranus65, 2205, Ferallium Alloy 255, and Zeron 100. All these commercial materials used in very significant industrial applications and suffer from pitting and stress corrosion failures. The design of a new experimental setup using an autoclave enabled potentiodynamic polarisation experiments and slow strain rate tests in dilute environments to be conducted at elevated temperatures. The corrosion potentials were controlled using a three electrode cell with computer controlled potentiostat.The experimental programme to determine pitting potentials was designed to simulate the service conditions experienced in most industrial plants and develop mathematical model equations to help a design engineer in material selection decision. Stress corrosion resistance of recently developed Zeron100 was evaluated in dilute environments to propose a mechanism in chloride solutions at high' temperatures useful for the nuclear and power generation industry. Results have shown the significance of the composition of alloying elements across a wide range of stainless steels and its influence on pitting. Nitrogen and molybdenum added to modern duplex stainless steels was found to be unstable at higher temperatures. The fractographic results obtained using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) has given insight in the initiation of pitting in modem duplex and super duplex stainless steels. A mathematical model has been proposed to predict pitting in stainless steels based on the effect of environmental factors (temperature, chloride concentration, and chemical composition). An attempt has been made to identify the mechanism of SCC in Zeron100 super duplex stainless steel.The proposed empirical models have shown good correlation

  17. Crack stability analysis of low alloy steel primary coolant pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, T.; Kameyama, M. [Kansai Electric Power Company, Osaka (Japan); Urabe, Y. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Takasago (Japan)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    At present, cast duplex stainless steel has been used for the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan and joints of dissimilar material have been applied for welding to reactor vessels and steam generators. For the primary coolant piping of the next APWR plants, application of low alloy steel that results in designing main loops with the same material is being studied. It means that there is no need to weld low alloy steel with stainless steel and that makes it possible to reduce the welding length. Attenuation of Ultra Sonic Wave Intensity is lower for low alloy steel than for stainless steel and they have advantageous inspection characteristics. In addition to that, the thermal expansion rate is smaller for low alloy steel than for stainless steel. In consideration of the above features of low alloy steel, the overall reliability of primary coolant piping is expected to be improved. Therefore, for the evaluation of crack stability of low alloy steel piping to be applied for primary loops, elastic-plastic future mechanics analysis was performed by means of a three-dimensioned FEM. The evaluation results for the low alloy steel pipings show that cracks will not grow into unstable fractures under maximum design load conditions, even when such a circumferential crack is assumed to be 6 times the size of the wall thickness.

  18. Relationship between swelling and elastic properties in neutron-irradiated 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.F.

    1976-04-01

    The results encompass elastic property measurements on several alloys, which differ in silicon, molybdenum and phosphorus contents but have a nominal 316 stainless steel composition. It is shown that there is a good correlation between the initial shear modulus of the material and the resultant swelling rate of that material. It is also shown that the bias factor concept does not satisfactorily account for the observed compositional sensitivity of swelling in the alloys investigated. 6 fig

  19. The influence of deformation-induced martensite on the cryogenic behavior of 300-series stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, J.W. Jr.; Chan, J.W.; Mei, Z.

    1992-06-01

    The 300-series stainless steels that are commonly specified for the structures of high field superconducting magnets are metastable austenitic alloys that undergo martensitic transformations when deformed at low temperature. The martensitic tranformation is promoted by plastic deformation and by exposure to high magnetic fields. The transformation significantly influences the mechanical properties of the alloy. The mechanisms of this influence are reviewed, with emphasis on fatigue crack growth effects and magnetomechanical phenomena that have only recently been recognized

  20. Relationship between equivalent chromium content and irradiation-induced swelling in 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.F.; Guthrie, G.L.

    1974-12-01

    A correlation is noted between equivalent chromium content and resistance to irradiation induced swelling in various 316 stainless steel specimens which have slightly different chemical compositions. Several examples are cited where an increased concentration of an α-stabilizing minor constituent results in decreased swelling. It is shown that the relative swelling resistance of alloys having the same carbon and equivalent nickel contents is higher for those alloys with the higher equivalent chromium content

  1. Heat treatment giving a stable high temperature micro-structure in cast austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, Donald L.; Lemkey, Franklin D.

    1988-01-01

    A novel micro-structure developed in a cast austenitic stainless steel alloy and a heat treatment thereof are disclosed. The alloy is based on a multicomponent Fe-Cr-Mn-Mo-Si-Nb-C system consisting of an austenitic iron solid solution (.gamma.) matrix reinforced by finely dispersed carbide phases and a heat treatment to produce the micro-structure. The heat treatment includes a prebraze heat treatment followed by a three stage braze cycle heat treatment.

  2. Compatibility of 316L stainless steel with tritium breeders for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broc, M.; Fauvet, P.; Flament, T.; Sannier, J.

    1986-06-01

    Compatibility problems with structural materials are a concern for the choice of the tritium breeder for fusion reactors. In the frame of the European Programme on Fusion Technology, two types of blankets are considered: liquid (eutectic lithium-lead alloy at 0.68 wt % Li: 17Li83Pb) and solid (lithium aluminate or silicate) breeders. This paper is devoted to compatibility studies of 316L stainless steel with 17Li83Pb alloy and γ-LiA10 2 ceramic

  3. Hydrogen effects in stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of hydrogen on stainless steels have been reviewed and are summarized in this paper. Discussion covers hydrogen solution and transport in stainless steels as well as the effects of hydrogen on deformation and fracture under various loading conditions. Damage is caused also by helium that arises from decay of the hydrogen isotope tritium. Austenitic, ferritic, martensite, and precipitation-hardenable stainless steels are included in the discussion. 200 references

  4. Duplex stainless steel surface bay laser cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amigo, V.; Pineda, Y.; Segovia, F.; Vicente, A.

    2004-01-01

    Laser cladding is one of the most promising techniques to restore damaged surfaces and achieve properties similar to those of the base metal. In this work, duplex stainless steels have been cladded by a nickel alloy under different processing conditions. The influence of the beam speed and defocusing variables ha been evaluated in the microstructure both of the cladding and heat affected zone, HAZ. These results have been correlated to mechanical properties by means of microhardness measurements from cladding area to base metal through the interface. This technique has shown to be very appropriate to obtain controlled mechanical properties as they are determined by the solidification microstructure, originated by the transfer of mass and heat in the system. (Author) 21 refs

  5. Phase Transformations in Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yoon-Jun [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) constitute both ferrite and austenite as a matrix. Such a microstructure confers a high corrosion resistance with favorable mechanical properties. However, intermetallic phases such as σ and χ can also form during casting or high-temperature processing and can degrade the properties of the DSS. This research was initiated to develop time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagrams of two types of cast duplex stainless steels, CD3MN (Fe-22Cr-5Ni-Mo-N) and CD3MWCuN (Fe-25Cr-7Ni-Mo-W-Cu-N), in order to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formation. The alloys were heat treated isothermally or under controlled cooling conditions and then characterized using conventional metallographic methods that included tint etching, and also using electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). The kinetics of intermetallic-phase (σ + χ) formation were analyzed using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (MA) equation in the case of isothermal transformations and a modified form of this equation in the case of continuous cooling transformations. The rate of intermetallic-phase formation was found to be much faster in CD3MWCuN than CD3MN due mainly to differences in the major alloying contents such as Cr, Ni and Mo. To examine in more detail the effects of these elements of the phase stabilities; a series of eight steel castings was designed with the Cr, Ni and Mo contents systematically varied with respect to the nominal composition of CD3MN. The effects of varying the contents of alloying additions on the formation of intermetallic phases were also studied computationally using the commercial thermodynamic software package, Thermo-Calc. In general, σ was stabilized with increasing Cr addition and χ by increasing Mo addition. However, a delicate balance among Ni and other minor elements such as N and Si also exists. Phase equilibria in DSS can be affected by

  6. Degradation of stainless castings. A literature study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norring, K.

    1995-10-01

    Duplex cast stainless steels, containing mainly austenite and some ferrite, is used for different components in light water reactors. These alloys have good mechanical properties, good weldability, and they are resistant to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). Examples of components where cast duplex stainless steel is used are pump housings, valves and pipe elbows. A model for the aging/embrittlement of these materials when used in light water reactors has been developed. The model is based on regression of a large data matrix. It is mainly the impact energy (Charpy V) that has been regarded. The model only requires knowledge of the chemical composition of the material but the prediction can be improved if additional data like initial impact properties and measured ferrite content are available. The model is also capable of predicting fracture toughness. The susceptibility to IGSCC in BWR environment is primarily determined by the amount of ferrite and the carbon content of the material. When the amount of ferrite exceeds 12%, IGSCC has not been observed regardless of the carbon content. At carbon contents lower than 0.035% in weld-sensitized material IGSCC was not observed regardless of the ferrite content. Data for corrosion fatigue in primary PWR and BWR environment are available. Under BWR conditions the crack propagation rate is decreased with decreasing corrosion potential, consequently also with decreasing oxygen content of the water. Some areas have been identified where additional work is needed. In all cases the efforts should focus on characterizing cast duplex stainless steel components removed from Swedish reactors. The characterization should include: Microstructure and chemical analysis, susceptibility to IGSCC, and a comparison with existing models for embrittlement. 24 refs, 12 figs

  7. Single pit propagation on austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heurtault, Stephane

    2016-01-01

    The electrochemical characterization of metastable events such as pitting corrosion of stainless steel in chloride electrolyte remains complex because many individual processes may occur simultaneously on the alloy surface. To overcome these difficulties, an experimental setup, the flow micro-device, has been developed to achieve the initiation of a single pit and to propagate the single pit in three dimensions. In this work, we take advantage of such a device in order to revisit the pitting process on a 316L stainless steel in a chloride - sulphate bulk. In a first step, the time evolution of the pit geometry (depth, radius) and the chemical evolution of the pit solution investigated using in situ Raman spectroscopy have shown that the pit depth propagation depends on the formation of a metal chloride and sulphate gel in the pit solution, and is controlled by the metallic cations diffusion from the pit bottom to the pit mouth. The pit radius growth is defined by the initial surface de-passivation, by the presence of a pit cover and by the gel development in the solution. all of these phenomena are function of applied potential and chemical composition of the solution. In a last step, it was demonstrated that a critical chloride concentration is needed in order to maintain the pit propagation. This critical concentration slightly increases with the pit depth. From statistical analysis performed on identical experiments, a zone diagram showing the pit stability as a function of the chloride concentration and the pit dimensions was built. (author) [fr

  8. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy Of Metal Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdowell, L. G.; Calle, L. M.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes use of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to investigate resistances of 19 alloys to corrosion under conditions similar to those of corrosive, chloride-laden seaside environment of Space Transportation System launch site. Alloys investigated: Hastelloy C-4, C-22, C-276, and B-2; Inconel(R) 600, 625, and 825; Inco(R) G-3; Monel 400; Zirconium 702; Stainless Steel 304L, 304LN, 316L, 317L, and 904L; 20Cb-3; 7Mo+N; ES2205; and Ferralium 255. Results suggest electrochemical impedance spectroscopy used to predict corrosion performances of metal alloys.

  9. Effects of Cr2N Precipitation on the Antibacterial Properties of AISI 430 Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Je-Kang Du

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on their mechanical properties and good corrosion resistance, some commercial Ni-Cr stainless steels have been widely applied as biomaterials, including the austenitic 304 stainless steel, the austenitic 316 stainless steel, the duplex 2205 stainless steel, and the ferritic 430 stainless steel. In order to reduce the occurrence of infections resulting from biomaterial implants, instruments, and medical devices, Cu2+ and Ag2+ ions have been added onto biomaterials for increasing the antibacterial properties, but they are known to damage biofilm. The occurrence of nanoparticles can also improve the antibacterial properties of biomaterials through various methods. In this study, we used Escherichia coli and analyzed the microstructures of American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI 430 stainless steel with a 0.18 mass % N alloy element. During a lower temperature aging, the microstructure of the as-quenched specimen is essentially a ferrite and martensite duplex matrix with some Cr2N precipitates formed. Additionally, the antibacterial properties of the alloy for E. coli ranged from 3% to 60%, consistent with the presence of Cr2N precipitates. When aged at a lower temperature, which resulted in nano-Cr2N precipitation, the specimen possessed the highest antibacterial activity.

  10. Corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking of magnesium alloys in a simulated physiological environment

    OpenAIRE

    Jafari, Sajjad

    2017-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg) alloys have attracted great attention as potential materials for temporary implants in uses such as pins, screws, plates and stents. The usage of Mg alloys is appealing as it avoids the need for a follow-up surgery commonly undertaken when implants are constructed out of traditional materials such as titanium alloys, stainless steels and cobalt-chromium alloys. This reduces health care costs and inconvenience for patients. However, the poor corrosion resistanc...

  11. Oxidization and stress corrosion cracking initiation of austenitic alloys in supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behnamian, Y.; Li, M.; Luo, J.L.; Chen, W.X.; Zheng, W.; Guzonas, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    This study determined the stress corrosion cracking behaviour of austenitic alloys in pure supercritical water. Austenitic stainless steels 310S, 316L, and Inconel 625 were tested as static capsule samples at 500 o C for up to 5000 h. After that period, crack initiations were readily observed in all samples, signifying susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking. The microcracks in 316L stainless steel and Inconel 625 were almost intergranular, whereas transgranular microcrack initiation was observed in 310S stainless steel. (author)

  12. Prevention of microcracking by REM addition to alloy 690 filler metal in laser clad welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okauchi, Hironori; Saida, Kazuyoshi; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi

    2011-01-01

    Effect of REM addition to alloy 690 filler metal on microcracking prevention was verified in laser clad welding. Laser clad welding on alloy 132 weld metal or type 316L stainless steel was conducted using the five different filler metals of alloy 690 varying the La content. Ductility-dip crack occurred in laser clad welding when La-free alloy 690 filler metal was applied. Solidification and liquation cracks occurred contrarily in the laser cladding weld metal when the 0.07mass%La containing filler metal was applied. In case of laser clad welding on alloy 132 weld metal and type 316L stainless steel, the ductility-dip cracking susceptibility decreased, and solidification/liquation cracking susceptibilities increased with increasing the La content in the weld metal. The relation among the microcracking susceptibility, the (P+S) and La contents in every weld pass of the laser clad welding was investigated. Ductility-dip cracks occurred in the compositional range (atomic ratio) of La/(P+S) 0.99(on alloy 132 weld metal), >0.90 (on type 316L stainless steel), while any cracks did not occur at La/(P+S) being between 0.21-0.99 (on alloy 132 weld metal) 0.10-0.90 (on type 316L stainless steel). Laser clad welding test on type 316L stainless steel using alloy 690 filler metal containing the optimum La content verified that any microcracks did not occurred in the laser clad welding metal. (author)

  13. Irradiation of aluminium alloy materials with electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konno, Osamu; Masumoto, Kazuyoshi

    1982-01-01

    It is a theme with a room for discussion to employ the stainless steel composed of longer half-life materials for the vacuum system of accelerators, from the viewpoint of radiation exposure. Therefore, it is desirable to use aluminium of shorter half-life in place of stainless steel. As a result of investigation on the above theme in the 1.2 GeV electron linac project in Tohoku University, it has been concluded that aluminium alloy vacuum chambers can reduce exposure dose by about one or two figures as compared with stainless steel ones. Of course, aluminium alloy contains trace amounts of Mg, Si, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Zn, Cu and others. Therefore, four kinds of aluminium alloy considered to be usable have been examined for induced radioactivity by electron beam irradiation. Stainless steel SUS 304 has been also irradiated for comparison. Radiation energy has been 30 MeV and 200 MeV. When stainless steel and aluminium alloy were compared, aluminium alloy was very effective for reducing surface dose in low energy irradiation. In 200 MeV irradiation, the dose ratio of aluminium alloy to stainless steel became 1/30 to 1/100 after one week, though the dose difference between these two materials became smaller in 100 days or more after irradiation. If practical inspection and repair are implemented during the period from a few days to one week after shutdown, the aluminium alloy is preferable for exposure dose reduction even in high energy irradiation. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  14. Swelling, mechanical properties, and microstructure of Type 316 stainless steel at fusion reactor damage levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horak, J.A.; Bloom, E.E.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Maziasz, P.J.; Stiegler, J.O.; Wiffen, F.W.

    1979-01-01

    Alloys such as AISI 316 stainless steel exhibit more swelling and larger decreases in ductility when irradiated to produce fusion reactor He and dpa levels than at fast reactor He and dpa levels. For T approx. 0 C to ensure adequate ductility for long-term service

  15. Behaviour of steels in natural environments: focus on stainless steels in natural sea water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feron, D.

    2005-01-01

    Corrosion behaviour of steels and alloys in natural environments is not only dependent to material parameters and environmental chemistry, but also to micro-organisms which may be there. The global approach used to investigate the behaviour of alloys in natural environments is illustrated by the work done on stainless steels in seawater. In aerated seawater, studies led to the proposal of an 'enzymatic model' based on the enzymatic catalyze of the cathodic reaction and which allows reproducing the electrochemical behaviour of stainless steels in natural seawater and the crevice corrosion phenomena observed in natural sea waters. Coupling areas under aerobic and anaerobic conditions leads to the worst situation for stainless steel behaviour: the catalysis of the cathodic reaction on aerobic exposed surfaces and the decrease of the corrosion resistance of anaerobic surfaces due to sulphides. These results lead to the concept of electro-active bio-films. (author)

  16. Corrosion studies of austenitic and duplex stainless steels in aqueous lithium bromide solution at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igual Munoz, A.; Garcia Anton, J.; Lopez Nuevalos, S.; Guinon, J.L.; Perez Herranz, V.

    2004-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of three stainless steels EN 14311, EN 14429 (austenitic stainless steels) and EN 14462 (duplex stainless steel) was studied in a commercial LiBr solution (850 g/l LiBr solution containing chromate as inhibitor) at different temperatures (25, 50, 75 and 85 deg C) by electrochemical methods. Open circuit potentials shifted towards more active values as temperature increased, while corrosion potentials presented the opposite tendency. The most resistant alloys to general corrosion were EN 14429 and EN 14462 because they had the lowest corrosion current for all temperatures. In all the cases corrosion current increases with temperature. Pitting corrosion resistance is improved by the EN 14462, which presented the highest pitting potential, and the lowest passivation current for the whole range of temperatures studied. The duplex alloy also presents the worst repassivation behavior (in terms of the narrowest difference between corrosion potential and pitting potential); it does not repassivate from 50 deg C

  17. Investigation of the applicability of some pre expressions for austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfonsson, E.; Qvarfort, R.

    1992-01-01

    The alloying elements known to be most important for the pitting resistance of austenitic stainless steels are chromium, molybdenum and nitrogen. Several authors have tried to quantify the influence of these elements by expressions giving the relative influence of each element. By such an expression a ''pitting resistance equivalent, PRE'', can be calculated for a certain alloy. Recently it has become rather common among both producers and users of stainless steels to discuss pitting resistance in terms of PRE. In the present work, critical pitting temperatures, CPT, was determined in 1 M NaCl for a wide spectrum of austenitic stainless steels. With a newly developed electrochemical cell, the CPT can be determined with high accuracy as crevice corrosion in the specimen mount can be completely eliminated during test. The correlation between the experimental results and some PRE expressions from the literature is discussed

  18. Stainless steels low temperature nitriding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roux, T.; Darbeida, A.; Von Stebut, J.; Michel, H.; Lebrun, J.P.; Hertz, D.

    1995-01-01

    Nitrogen ions implantation of 316L stainless steel leads to monophasic diffusion layers, which are constituted of a solid solution (γ N ) fcc, metastable, nitrogen sur-saturated, and without order. This article shows that for 316L stainless steels,these layers improve the tribological properties without degradation of the corrosion resistance. (A.B.). 13 refs. 6 figs

  19. Alloy materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hans Thieme, Cornelis Leo (Westborough, MA); Thompson, Elliott D. (Coventry, RI); Fritzemeier, Leslie G. (Acton, MA); Cameron, Robert D. (Franklin, MA); Siegal, Edward J. (Malden, MA)

    2002-01-01

    An alloy that contains at least two metals and can be used as a substrate for a superconductor is disclosed. The alloy can contain an oxide former. The alloy can have a biaxial or cube texture. The substrate can be used in a multilayer superconductor, which can further include one or more buffer layers disposed between the substrate and the superconductor material. The alloys can be made a by process that involves first rolling the alloy then annealing the alloy. A relatively large volume percentage of the alloy can be formed of grains having a biaxial or cube texture.

  20. Contribution to surface physicochemical factors to stress corrosion resistance in stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gras, Jean-Marie

    1974-01-01

    The author of this research thesis first presents and discusses the various aspects of stress corrosion cracking of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys of high purity: experimental conditions (alloy elaboration, sample preparation), corrosion results (Schaeffer diagram, crack morphology, intergranular corrosion), influence of addition elements in ferritic alloys. He reports an electrochemical study of stainless steels in magnesium chloride (experimental conditions, influence of metallurgic and environmental parameters on polarization resistance, current-voltage curves), and an analytical study of layers formed in the magnesium chloride

  1. A new ultrahigh-strength stainless steel strengthened by various coexisting nanoprecipitates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, W., E-mail: w.xu@m2i.nl [Materials Innovation Institute M2i, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS, Delft (Netherlands)] [Novel Aerospace Materials (NovAM) Group, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS, Delft (Netherlands); Rivera-Diaz-del-Castillo, P.E.J. [Novel Aerospace Materials (NovAM) Group, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS, Delft (Netherlands); Yan, W.; Yang, K. [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); San Martin, D. [Materalia Group, Department of Physical Metallurgy, Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas (CENIM-CSIC), Av. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Kestens, L.A.I. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ghent University, Technologiepark 903, 9052 Gent (Belgium); Zwaag, S. van der [Novel Aerospace Materials (NovAM) Group, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS, Delft (Netherlands)

    2010-06-15

    A general computational alloy design approach based on thermodynamic and physical metallurgical principles and coupled with a genetic optimization scheme is presented. The model is applied to develop a new ultrahigh-strength maraging stainless steel. The alloy composition and heat treatment parameters are integrally optimized so as to achieve microstructures of fully lath martensite matrix strengthened by multiple precipitates of MC carbides, Cu particles and Ni{sub 3}Ti intermetallics. The combined mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and identification of actual strengthening precipitates in the experimental prototype produced on the basic of the model predictions provide a strong justification for the alloy design approach.

  2. A new ultrahigh-strength stainless steel strengthened by various coexisting nanoprecipitates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, W.; Rivera-Diaz-del-Castillo, P.E.J.; Yan, W.; Yang, K.; San Martin, D.; Kestens, L.A.I.; Zwaag, S. van der

    2010-01-01

    A general computational alloy design approach based on thermodynamic and physical metallurgical principles and coupled with a genetic optimization scheme is presented. The model is applied to develop a new ultrahigh-strength maraging stainless steel. The alloy composition and heat treatment parameters are integrally optimized so as to achieve microstructures of fully lath martensite matrix strengthened by multiple precipitates of MC carbides, Cu particles and Ni 3 Ti intermetallics. The combined mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and identification of actual strengthening precipitates in the experimental prototype produced on the basic of the model predictions provide a strong justification for the alloy design approach.

  3. Microchemical evolution of irradiated stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.

    1980-01-01

    The precipitates that develop during irradiation play the dominant role in the response of 300 series alloys, which alters not only the diffusional properties of point defects but also the rate of acceptance of point defects at dislocations and voids. The major elemental participants are carbon, nickel and silicon. Carbon appears to function as a major governing factor of the route and rate by which the radiation-induced evolution proceeds. It is the sensitivity of carbon's response to a wide range of variables that accounts for much of the variability observed in the swelling of 316 stainless steel. Silicon's role is two-fold: while in solution it depresses void nucleation and determines the duration of the void incubation period, and it also coprecipitates with nickel. The eventual level of nickel in the alloy matrix appears to control the steady-state swelling rate and is determined by the silicon and carbon content. The other participating elements appear to affect primarily the distribution and activity of carbon. Dislocations introduced either by irradiation or cold work likewise appear to influence the role of carbon. Several new physical mechanisms appear to be operating: Inverse Kirkendall effect, interstitial-altered phase stability, solute-interstitial binding, infiltration-exchange process, and creation of radiation-stable precipitates. The sensitivity of the latter phenomenon to temperature and flux has been shown to account for much of the unusual behavior of AISI 316 during irradiation

  4. NEW SERDP Project: Copper- Beryllium Alternatives Alloys Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-10

    Nitronic60, HBN 304 stainless steel , as well as low friction coating\\liner systems on PH stainless steel substrates • Compression strength and...ChemistryRefining Lath Martensite : Ms≥200°C Nickel: Cleavage Resistance Cobalt: SRO Recovery Resistance Chromium: Corrosion Resistance σuts > 280 ksi σys...against representative steels ). o Compression testing from each of the Cu- and Co-based alloys will be performed per ASTM E 9 o Pin-on-Disk test per

  5. Investigation of Laser Peening Effects on Hydrogen Charged Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaleski, Tania M. [San Jose State Univ., CA (United States)

    2008-10-30

    Hydrogen-rich environments such as fuel cell reactors can exhibit damage caused by hydrogen permeation in the form of corrosion cracking by lowering tensile strength and decreasing material ductility. Coatings and liners have been investigated, but there were few shot-peening or laser peening studies referenced in the literature with respect to preventing hydrogen embrittlement. The surface compressive residual stress induced by laser peening had shown success in preventing stress corrosion cracking (SCC) for stainless steels in power plants. The question arose if the residual stresses induced by laser peening could delay the effects of hydrogen in a material. This study investigated the effect of laser peening on hydrogen penetration into metal alloys. Three areas were studied: laser peening, hydrogenation, and hydrogen detection. This study demonstrated that laser peening does not reduce the hydrogen permeation into a stainless steel surface nor does it prevent hydrogen embrittlement. The effect of laser peening to reduce hydrogen-assisted fatigue was unclear.

  6. Inorganic coatings on stainless steel for protection against crevice corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henrikson, Sture

    1989-12-01

    In order to create protection against crevice corrosion stainless steel test specimens of type 316 steel with various inorganic coatings applied on crevice surfaces were tested for 3-50 months at 25 and 30 degree C in natural seawater containing 0.2-1.5 ppm free chlorine. Various metallic coatings, Ni base alloys with Cr and Mo, Ni with W, pure Ag and pure Mo, as well as ceramic coatings - Cr 2 O 3 , TiO 2 and Al 2 O 3 - were studied. All the coatings tested, except pure Molybdenum applied by plasma spraying in a max 0.1 mm thick layer were found to promote crevice corrosion of the stainless steel. A significant reduction of the crevice corrosion susceptibility was obtained with Molybdenum. The result is considered promising enough to justify full scale tests in seawater on flange joints of pipes, valves or pumps. (author)

  7. Nanotribological behavior of deep cryogenically treated martensitic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán Prieto

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cryogenic treatments are increasingly used to improve the wear resistance of various steel alloys by means of transformation of retained austenite, deformation of virgin martensite and carbide refinement. In this work the nanotribological behavior and mechanical properties at the nano-scale of cryogenically and conventionally treated AISI 420 martensitic stainless steel were evaluated. Conventionally treated specimens were subjected to quenching and annealing, while the deep cryogenically treated samples were quenched, soaked in liquid nitrogen for 2 h and annealed. The elastic–plastic parameters of the materials were assessed by nanoindentation tests under displacement control, while the friction behavior and wear rate were evaluated by a nanoscratch testing methodology that it is used for the first time in steels. It was found that cryogenic treatments increased both hardness and elastic limit of a low-carbon martensitic stainless steel, while its tribological performance was enhanced marginally.

  8. Tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mabruri, Efendi, E-mail: effe004@lipi.go.id; Anwar, Moch Syaiful, E-mail: moch.syaiful.anwar@lipi.go.id; Prifiharni, Siska, E-mail: siska.prifiharni@lipi.go.id; Romijarso, Toni B.; Adjiantoro, Bintang [Research Center for Metallurgy and Materials, Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI) Kawasan Puspiptek Gd. 470 Serpong, Tangerang Selatan 15314 (Indonesia)

    2016-04-19

    This paper reports the influence of Mo and Ni on the tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels in tempered condition. Four steels with different content of Mo and Ni were prepared by induction melting followed by hot forging, quenching and tempering. The experimental results showed that the addition of about 1% and 3% Mo has a beneficial effect to increase both the tensile strength and the elongation of the steels. On the contrary, the addition of about 3% Ni into the martensitic stainless steel results in decreasing of both the tensile strength and the elongation. Among the alloys investigated the 13Cr3Mo type steel exhibited largest tensile strength of 1348 MPa and largest elongation of 12%. The observation on the tensile fractured surfaces by using scanning electron microscope supported these findings.

  9. Nanotribological behavior of deep cryogenically treated martensitic stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Germán; Bakoglidis, Konstantinos D; Tuckart, Walter R; Broitman, Esteban

    2017-01-01

    Cryogenic treatments are increasingly used to improve the wear resistance of various steel alloys by means of transformation of retained austenite, deformation of virgin martensite and carbide refinement. In this work the nanotribological behavior and mechanical properties at the nano-scale of cryogenically and conventionally treated AISI 420 martensitic stainless steel were evaluated. Conventionally treated specimens were subjected to quenching and annealing, while the deep cryogenically treated samples were quenched, soaked in liquid nitrogen for 2 h and annealed. The elastic-plastic parameters of the materials were assessed by nanoindentation tests under displacement control, while the friction behavior and wear rate were evaluated by a nanoscratch testing methodology that it is used for the first time in steels. It was found that cryogenic treatments increased both hardness and elastic limit of a low-carbon martensitic stainless steel, while its tribological performance was enhanced marginally.

  10. Tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mabruri, Efendi; Anwar, Moch Syaiful; Prifiharni, Siska; Romijarso, Toni B.; Adjiantoro, Bintang

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the influence of Mo and Ni on the tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels in tempered condition. Four steels with different content of Mo and Ni were prepared by induction melting followed by hot forging, quenching and tempering. The experimental results showed that the addition of about 1% and 3% Mo has a beneficial effect to increase both the tensile strength and the elongation of the steels. On the contrary, the addition of about 3% Ni into the martensitic stainless steel results in decreasing of both the tensile strength and the elongation. Among the alloys investigated the 13Cr3Mo type steel exhibited largest tensile strength of 1348 MPa and largest elongation of 12%. The observation on the tensile fractured surfaces by using scanning electron microscope supported these findings.

  11. New hermetic sealing material for vacuum brazing of stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrandt, S; Wiehl, G; Silze, F

    2016-01-01

    For vacuum brazing applications such as in vacuum interrupter industry Hermetic Sealing Materials (HSM) with low partial pressure are widely used. AgCu28 dominates the hermetic sealing market, as it has a very good wetting behavior on copper and metallized ceramics. Within recent decades wetting on stainless steel has become more and more important. However, today the silver content of HSMs is more in focus than in the past decades, because it has the biggest impact on the material prices. Umicore Technical Materials has developed a new copper based HSM, CuAg40Ga10. The wettability on stainless steel is significantly improved compared to AgCu28 and the total silver content is reduced by almost 44%. In this article the physical properties of the alloy and its brazed joints will be presented compared to AgCu28. (paper)

  12. Characterization and Evaluation of Aged Chromium Nickel Niobium Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewar, Matthew

    20Cr-32Ni-1Nb stainless steel alloys are commonly used in hydrogen reformer manifolds for transporting hot hydrogen by-products at 750-950°C. After long periods of exposure, embrittling secondary carbides and intermetallic phases can precipitate at the grain boundaries which can drastically reduce the ductility, and the repair weldability of the alloy. The intermetallic silicide, G-phase, is commonly observed in 20Cr-32Ni-1Nb stainless steels, and is prone to liquation cracking during welding operations. G-phase is deleterious to the material, where a high degree of G-phase coarsening will render the material unweldable. The present work will investigate various methods in mitigating G-phase precipitation. Variations in casting methods, wall thickness, homogenization treatments, and alloy chemistry will be examined by evaluating their microstructure after periodically aging the samples. Thermodynamic equilibrium modeling using computational thermodynamic tools will be used to optimize the 20Cr-32Ni-1Nb chemistry following ASTM specifications.

  13. Radiation-induced grain boundary segregation in austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruemmer, S.M.; Charlot, L.A.; Vetrano, J.S.; Simonen, E.P.

    1994-11-01

    Radiation-induced segregation (RIS) to grain boundaries in Fe-Ni-Cr-Si stainless alloys has been measured as a function of irradiation temperature and dose. Heavy-ion irradiation was used to produce damage levels from 1 to 20 displacements per atom (dpa) at temperatures from 175 to 550 degrees C. Measured Fe, Ni, and Cr segregation increased sharply with irradiation dose (from G to 5 dpa) and temperature (from 175 to about 350 degrees C). However, grain boundary concentrations did not change significantly as dose or temperatures were further increased. Although interfacial compositions were similar, the width of radiation-induced enrichment or depletion profiles increased consistently with increasing dose or temperature. Impurity segregation (Si and P) was also measured, but only Si enrichment appeared to be radiation-induced. Grain boundary Si peaked at levels approaching 10 at% after irradiation doses to 10 dpa at an intermediate temperature of 325 degrees C. No evidence of grain boundary silicide precipitation was detected after irradiation at any temperature. Equilibrium segregation of P was measured in the high-P alloys, but interfacial concentration did not increase with irradiation exposure. Comparisons to reported RIS in neutron-irradiated stainless steels revealed similar grain boundary compositional changes for both major alloying and impurity elements

  14. Superplastic Forming of Duplex Stainless Steel for Aerospace Part

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ho-Sung; Yoon, Jong-Hoon; Yoo, Joon-Tae; Yi, Young-Moo

    2011-08-01

    In this study, the high temperature forming behavior of duplex stainless steel has been characterized and the outer shell of a combustion chamber was fabricated with pressure difference of hot gas. It consists of two parts which are the outer skin made of stainless steel to sustain the internal pressure and the inner shell made of copper alloy for regenerative cooling channels. Two outer skins partitioned to half with respect to the symmetric axis was prepared by hot gas forming process with a maximum pressure of 7 MPa following to FEM analysis. For inner layer, copper alloy was machined for cooling channels and then placed in the gas pressure welding fixture. It is shown that the optimum condition of gas pressure welding is 7 MPa at 890 °C, for one hour. EDX analysis and scanning electron microscope micrograph confirm the atomic diffusion process is observed at the interface and copper atoms diffuse into steel, while iron and chrome atoms diffuse into copper. The result shows that the manufacturing method with superplastic forming and gas pressure welding of steel and copper alloy has been successful for near net shape manufacturing of scaled combustion chamber of launch vehicle.

  15. Interface characteristic during bonding of Be and HR-1 stainless steel by hot pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hui; Kang Renmu; Zhou Shangqi; Kong Jilan; Zhang Pengcheng

    2010-01-01

    Be and HR-I stainless steel was diffusion bonded by hot pressing. The microstructure,composition and phase distribution and mechanical properties of the joints were analyzed using the optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy(SEM), scanning auger microspectroscopy(SAM) and x-ray diffraction(XRD), and the effect of different interlayer materials Cu and Al and Ag-Cu alloy was also discussed. The results show that it is not easy to joint Be and HR-1 stainless when Al was used as the interlayer material, but good joints can be obtained using Cu and Ag and Cu alloy as the interlayer materials, because the formation of Be-Fe brittle intermetallic compounds was prevented. Ag-Cu alloy is the best interlayer materials among them, as it can reduce the mutual diffusion between Be and Fe. (authors)

  16. Development of ductile long-range ordered alloys for fusion reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.T.

    1979-01-01

    A series of Fe-base ordered alloys with compositions (Fe,Ni,Co) 3 V are developed for fusion reactor applications. The alloys from cubic ordered structure similar to AuCu 3 below their critical ordering temperature. The alloys in the ordered state are ductile with elongation in excess of 35% at room temperture. Tensile tests of the ordered alloys at elevated temperatures indicate an unusually attractive mechanical behavior. Their strength, instead of decreasing as with conventional alloys, increases with temperature because of ordering effects. As a result, the ordered alloys are much stronger than 316 stainless steel, particularly at elevated temperatures

  17. Effect of nitrogen and boron on weldability of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhaduri, A.K.; Albert, S.K.; Srinivasan, G.; Divya, M.; Das, C.R.

    2012-01-01

    Hot cracking is a major problem in the welding of austenitic stainless steels, particularly the fully austenitic grades. A group of alloys of enhanced-nitrogen 316LN austenitic stainless steel is being developed for structural components of the Indian Fast Reactor programme. Studying the hot cracking behaviour of this nitrogen-enhanced austenitic stainless steel is an important consideration during welding, as this material solidifies without any residual delta ferrite in the primary austenitic mode. Nitrogen has potent effects on the solidification microstructure, and hence has a strong influence on the hot cracking behaviour. Different heats of this material were investigated, which included fully austenitic stainless steels containing 0.070.22 wt% nitrogen. Also, borated austenitic stainless steels, such as type 304B4, have been widely used in the nuclear applications primarily due to its higher neutron absorption efficiency. Weldability is a major concern for this alloy due to the formation of low melting eutectic phase that is enriched with iron, chromium, molybdenum and boron. Fully austenitic stainless steels are prone to hot cracking during welding in the absence of a small amount of delta ferrite, especially for compositions rich in elements like boron that increases the tendency to form low melting eutectics. Detailed weldability investigations were carried out on a grade 304B4 stainless steel containing 1.3 wt% boron. Among the many approaches that have been used to determine the hot cracking susceptibility of different alloys, Variable-Restraint (Varestraint) weld test and Hot Ductility (Gleeble) tests are commonly used to evaluate the weldability of austenitic alloys. Hence, investigations on these materials consisted of detailed metallurgical characterization and weldability studies that included studying both the fusion zone and liquation cracking susceptibility, using Varestraint tests at 0.254.0%, strain levels and Gleeble (thermo

  18. Characterization of long term aged martensitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsubota, M.; Hattori, K.; Okada, T.

    1992-01-01

    Types CA6NM (13Cr), 431 and 630 (17Cr) were aged at 400 degrees C and 350 degrees C for up to 10000 hours, and their hardness change and SCC susceptibility in 288 degrees C water were investigated. Hardness of the alloys increased with aging. Hardness of type 431 aged at 400 degrees C for 10000 hours exceeded 340 in Hv, over which tempered martensitic stainless steels had become susceptible to SCC, and showed high SCC susceptibility. Type 630 had high SCC susceptibility in before and after aged condition, and the hardness in both conditions was more than Hv 340. Therefore, hardness was considered to be a parameter which could describe the SCC susceptibility of martensitic stainless steels. Using activation energy for hardness change 105-125kJ/mol and the critical hardness level Hv=340, the marginal life-time for martensitic stainless steels at 288 degrees C was estimated. Predicted life of type 431 and CA6NM were around 10 5 hours and more than 10 6 hours, respectively. Activation energies obtained for toughness change and hardness change were different. Consequently, it was concluded that at least two factors should be taken into consideration for determining the total life-limit for usage of martensitic stainless steels in the light water reactor environment. The meaning of the existence of critical hardness for SCC susceptibility has been also discussed. Higher than 340 in Hv, yield strength and strain for uniform deformation showed a tendency of saturation. Therefore, it was conjectured that some extreme internal strain level, which may change the plastic deformation manner, is the absolute factor for determining the SCC susceptibility of the alloys in high temperature water

  19. Stainless steel decontamination manipulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Three, large-volume coverage manipulator systems were designed and built for the Defense Water Processing Facility at the Savannah River Laboratory. These stainless steel systems will be used for high-pressure spray decontamination of waste containers and large process equipment modules. Each system has a manipulator arm, folding boom, and vertical drive and guide structure. Handling capacity is 45 kg, horizontal reach is 4.6 m with a 180-deg swing motion, and the vertical travel is 6 m. The system is remotely removable and replaceable in modules using an overhead crane and an impact wrench. The manipulator arm has seven motions: Shoulder rotation and pivot, elbow pivot, wrist pivot and rotation, and grip open-close. All motions are variable speed and are slip-clutch protected to prevent overloading from external forces (collisions)

  20. EFFECT OF INTERMETALLIC PHASES ON CORROSION BEHAVIOR AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF DUPLEX STAINLESS STEEL AND SUPER-DUPLEX STAINLESS STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhu Paulraj

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Duplex Stainless Steels (DSS and Super Duplex Stainless Steel (SDSS have excellent integration of mechanical and corrosion properties. However, the formation of intermetallic phases is a major problem in their usage. The mechanical and corrosion properties are deteriorated due to the presence of intermetallic phases. These phases are induced during welding, prolonged exposure to high temperatures, and improper heat treatments. The main emphasis of this review article is on intermetallic phases and their effects on corrosion and mechanical properties. First the effect of various alloying elements on DSS and SDSS has been discussed followed by formation of various intermetallic phases. The intermetallic phases affect impact toughness and corrosion resistance significantly. Their deleterious effect on weldments has also been reviewed.

  1. Effect of microstructure on the localized corrosion of Fe-Cr-Mn-N stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Young; Park, Yong Soo; Kim, Young Sik

    1998-01-01

    This paper dealt with the effect of microstructure on the localized corrosion of Fe-Cr-Mn-N stainless steels. The experimental alloys were made by vacuum induction melting and then hot rolled. The alloys were designed by controlling Cr eq /Ni eq ratio. Two alloys had austenitic phase and one alloy showed (austenite+ferrite) du-plex phase. High nitrogen addition in austenitic alloys stabilized the austenitic structure and then suppressed the formations of ferrite and α martensite, but martensite was formed in the case of large Cr eq /Ni eq ratio and low nitrogen addition. Pitting initiation site was grain boundary in austenitic alloys and was ferrite/austenite phase boundary in duplex alloy in the HCl solution. In sulfuric acids, austenitic alloys showed uniform corrosion, but ferrite phase was preferentially corroded in duplex alloy. The preferential dissolution seems to be related with the distribution of alloying elements between ferrite and austenite. Intergranular corrosion test showed that corrosion rate by immersion Huey test had a linear relation with degree of sensitization by EPR test

  2. The oxidation behaviour of lanthanum implanted stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ager, F.J.; Respaldiza, M.A.; Luna, C.; Botella, J.; Soares, C.G.; da Silva, M.F.

    1997-01-01

    Rare earth oxide deposition onto stainless steel surfaces has been attempted as a way of improving corrosion resistance at elevated temperatures. The improvement in the corrosion behaviour has been related to the modification of the diffusion mechanisms through the chromia protective layer. In a previous work we have postulated the formation of a LaCrO 3 as responsible for such a behaviour. Among the alternatives to deposit reactive elements, ion implantation has been chosen as a way of obtaining surface and/or subsurface alloys with the desired composition. During ion implantation, a modification of the alloy structure may also occur, resulting in a way of testing the influence of the alloy structure on the oxidation behaviour. In the present work we propose two procedures for obtaining the refractory behaviour implantation in the bulk alloy and in controlled preoxidized layers. Ion fluency has been chosen in such a way that final rare earth element concentration falls within the limits experimentally observed as adequate using wet chemistry methods. Excellent parabolic oxidation is observed in every case showing the efficiency of the implantation method both in the implanted bulk alloy as well as in the preoxidized specimens. The differences in the oxidation kinetics are related to the surface composition and to the structure of the implanted materials. (author)

  3. Mechanical properties of martensitic alloy AISI 422

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, F.H.; Hu, W.L.; Hamilton, M.L.

    1992-09-01

    HT9 is a martensitic stainless steel that has been considered for structural applications in liquid metal reactors (LMRs) as well as in fusion reactors. AISI 422 is a commercially available martensitic stainless steel that closely resembles HT9, and was studied briefly under the auspices of the US LMR program. Previously unpublished tensile, fracture toughness and charpy impact data on AISI 422 were reexamined for potential insights into the consequences of the compositional differences between the two alloys, particularly with respect to current questions concerning the origin of the radiation-induced embrittlement observed in HT9. 8 refs, 8 figs

  4. Amorphization of C-implanted Fe(Cr) alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, J.A.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Sorensen, N.R.; Pope, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    The amorphous phase formed by implanting C into Fe alloyed with Cr, which is a prototype for the amorphous phase formed by implanting C into stainless steels, is compared to that formed by implanting C and Ti into Fe and steels. The composition range of the phase has been examined; higher Cr and C concentrations are required than needed with Ti and C. The friction and wear benefits obtained by implanting stainless steels with C only do not persist for the long durations and high wear loads found with Ti and C. However, the amorphous Fe-Cr-C alloys exhibit good aqueous corrosion resistance. (orig.)

  5. Measurement of thermoelectric power of Fe-Cu binary alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joubouji, Katsuo

    2007-01-01

    In INSS, non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of irradiation embrittlement of low alloy steel using thermoelectric power (TEP) measurement has been considered, as well as NDE of thermal aging of cast duplex stainless steel which has been studied in recent years. Material degradation is evaluated based on a relation between progress of the degradation and change in TEP due to change in material structure caused by the degradation event. So it is necessary for NDE of irradiation embrittlement to measure the change in TEP due to precipitation of Cu contained as an impurity, which is known as one of the reasons for the embrittlement. In this study, TEP of Fe-Cu binary alloys with different Cu content was measured for investigation of the relationship between TEP of the alloys and Cu content. In addition, appropriateness of measuring TEP of Fe-Cu binary alloy in the same way to measure TEP of duplex stainless steel was examined. It was found that increment of Cu contained in the alloys changed TEP in a negative direction and the rate was evaluated as -6.6μV/K/wt%Cu. There were the cases that it took 20 minutes for measurement values to become stable in measurement of Fe-Cu binary alloys. It was much longer than the time taken in measurement of duplex stainless steel. So the measurement time per a point was extended to 60 minutes in case of Fe-Cu binary alloys. (author)

  6. Strengthening Hadfield steel welds by nitrogen alloying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efstathiou, C.; Sehitoglu, H.

    2009-01-01

    Strengthening Hadfield steel weld repairs by introducing nitrogen into the weld region was proven to be feasible via two welding techniques. The first technique required a pure Hadfield steel filler material to be diffusion treated in a high pressure nitrogen gas environment, and subsequently used during tungsten inert gas welding with a pure argon shielding gas. The second technique used a Hadfield steel filler material, and a 10% nitrogen containing argon shielding gas during tungsten inert gas welding. Both techniques increased the yield strength, the hardening rate, and the ultimate strength of the weld region. Using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Auger spectroscopy, we determined that the increased strength of the weld region resulted from a combination of nitrogen alloying and microstructural refinement

  7. Elastic interaction between defects during dynamic aging of stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Journaux, J.; Monteiro, S.N.

    1977-01-01

    The study of the mechanical properties through traction tests, at temperatures above room temperature in 316 type stainless steel emphasizes the existence of the dynamic aging phenomenon (Portevin-Lechantelier effect). The present paper explains in a general way the fundamental causes of this effect by examining the elastic interactions that occur between the solute atoms in solid solution and the crystal dislocations. These interactions, which are present only at a certain temperature range, are responsible for the improvement of the mechanical properties always noticed in the alloys showing this phenomenon. (F.R.) [pt

  8. Corrosion Resistance of Some Stainless Steels in Chloride Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasprzyk D.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work compares corrosion behaviour of four types of S30403, S31603, S32615 austenitic and S32404 austenitic-ferritic stainless steels in chloride solutions (1%, 3% NaCl and in Ringer solution, at 37°C temperature. Corrosion resistance was determined by potentiodynamic polarization measurements and a thirty day immersion test conducted in Ringer solution. The immersion test was performed in term of biomedical application. These alloy were spontaneously passivated in all electrolytes, wherein S30403, S31603 and S32404 undergo pitting corrosion. Only S32615 containing 5.5% Si shows resistance to pitting corrosion.

  9. Oxidation resistant high creep strength austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael P.; Pint, Bruce A.; Liu, Chain-Tsuan; Maziasz, Philip J.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Lu, Zhao P.

    2010-06-29

    An austenitic stainless steel displaying high temperature oxidation and creep resistance has a composition that includes in weight percent 15 to 21 Ni, 10 to 15 Cr, 2 to 3.5 Al, 0.1 to 1 Nb, and 0.05 to 0.15 C, and that is free of or has very low levels of N, Ti and V. The alloy forms an external continuous alumina protective scale to provide a high oxidation resistance at temperatures of 700 to 800.degree. C. and forms NbC nanocarbides and a stable essentially single phase fcc austenitic matrix microstructure to give high strength and high creep resistance at these temperatures.

  10. Austenitic stainless steel weld inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mech, S.J.; Emmons, J.S.; Michaels, T.E.

    1978-01-01

    Analytical techniques applied to ultrasonic waveforms obtained from inspection of austenitic stainless steel welds are described. Experimental results obtained from a variety of geometric and defect reflectors are presented. Specifically, frequency analyses parameters, such as simple moments of the power spectrum, cross-correlation techniques, and adaptive learning network analysis, all represent improvements over conventional time domain analysis of ultrasonic waveforms. Results for each of these methods are presented, and the overall inspection difficulties of austenitic stainless steel welds are discussed

  11. Iron-based alloy and nitridation treatment for PEM fuel cell bipolar plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Yang, Bing [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-11-09

    A corrosion resistant electrically conductive component that can be used as a bipolar plate in a PEM fuel cell application is composed of an alloy substrate which has 10-30 wt. % Cr, 0.5 to 7 wt. % V, and base metal being Fe, and a continuous surface layer of chromium nitride and vanadium nitride essentially free of base metal. A oxide layer of chromium vanadium oxide can be disposed between the alloy substrate and the continuous surface nitride layer. A method to prepare the corrosion resistant electrically conductive component involves a two-step nitridization sequence by exposing the alloy to a oxygen containing gas at an elevated temperature, and subsequently exposing the alloy to an oxygen free nitrogen containing gas at an elevated temperature to yield a component where a continuous chromium nitride layer free of iron has formed at the surface.

  12. Impact of a nickel-reduced stainless steel implant on striated muscle microcirculation: a comparative in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, C N; Burian, B; Perlick, L; Wimmer, M A; Wallny, T; Schmitt, O; Diedrich, O

    2001-12-05

    The impairment of skeletal muscle microcirculation by a biomaterial may have profound consequences. With moderately good physical and corrosion characteristics, implant-quality stainless steel is particularly popular in orthopedic surgery. However, due to the presence of a considerable amount of nickel in the alloy, concern has been voiced in respect to local tissue responses. More recently a stainless steel alloy with a significant reduction of nickel has become commercially available. We, therefore, studied in vivo nutritive perfusion and leukocytic response of striated muscle to this nickel-reduced alloy, and compared these results with those of the materials conventional stainless steel and titanium. Using the hamster dorsal skinfold chamber preparation and intravital microscopy, we could demonstrate that reduction of the nickel quantity in a stainless steel implant has a positive effect on local microvascular parameters. Although the implantation of a conventional stainless steel sample led to a distinct and persistent activation of leukocytes combined with disruption of the microvascular endothelial integrity, marked leukocyte extravasation, and considerable venular dilation, animals with a nickel-reduced stainless steel implant showed only a moderate increase of these parameters, with a clear tendency of recuperation. Titanium implants merely caused a transient increase of leukocyte-endothelial cell interaction within the first 120 min, and no significant change in macromolecular leakage, leukocyte extravasation, or venular diameter. Pending biomechanical and corrosion testing, nickel-reduced stainless steel may be a viable alternative to conventional implant-quality stainless steel for biomedical applications. Concerning tolerance by the local vascular system, titanium currently remains unsurpassed. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res 57: 404-412, 2001

  13. Is cell viability always directly related to corrosion resistance of stainless steels?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salahinejad, E.; Ghaffari, M.; Vashaee, D.; Tayebi, L.

    2016-01-01

    It has been frequently reported that cell viability on stainless steels is improved by increasing their corrosion resistance. The question that arises is whether human cell viability is always directly related to corrosion resistance in these biostable alloys. In this work, the microstructure and in vitro corrosion behavior of a new class of medical-grade stainless steels were correlated with adult human mesenchymal stem cell viability. The samples were produced by a powder metallurgy route, consisting of mechanical alloying and liquid-phase sintering with a sintering aid of a eutectic Mn–Si alloy at 1050 °C for 30 and 60 min, leading to nanostructures. In accordance with transmission electron microscopic studies, the additive particles for the sintering time of 30 min were not completely melted. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopic experiments suggested the higher corrosion resistance for the sample sintered for 60 min; however, a better cell viability on the surface of the less corrosion-resistant sample was unexpectedly found. This behavior is explained by considering the higher ion release rate of the Mn–Si additive material, as preferred sites to corrosion attack based on scanning electron microscopic observations, which is advantageous to the cells in vitro. In conclusion, cell viability is not always directly related to corrosion resistance in stainless steels. Typically, the introduction of biodegradable and biocompatible phases to biostable alloys, which are conventionally anticipated to be corrosion-resistant, can be advantageous to human cell responses similar to biodegradable metals. - Highlights: • Cell viability vs. corrosion resistance for medical-grade stainless steels • The stainless steel samples were prepared by powder metallurgy. • Unpenetrated additive played a critical role in the correlation.

  14. Is cell viability always directly related to corrosion resistance of stainless steels?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salahinejad, E., E-mail: salahinejad@kntu.ac.ir [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, K.N. Toosi University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghaffari, M. [Bruker AXS Inc., 5465 East Cheryl Parkway, Madison, WI 53711 (United States); Vashaee, D. [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606 (United States); Tayebi, L. [Department of Developmental Sciences, Marquette University School of Dentistry, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States); Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PJ (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-01

    It has been frequently reported that cell viability on stainless steels is improved by increasing their corrosion resistance. The question that arises is whether human cell viability is always directly related to corrosion resistance in these biostable alloys. In this work, the microstructure and in vitro corrosion behavior of a new class of medical-grade stainless steels were correlated with adult human mesenchymal stem cell viability. The samples were produced by a powder metallurgy route, consisting of mechanical alloying and liquid-phase sintering with a sintering aid of a eutectic Mn–Si alloy at 1050 °C for 30 and 60 min, leading to nanostructures. In accordance with transmission electron microscopic studies, the additive particles for the sintering time of 30 min were not completely melted. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopic experiments suggested the higher corrosion resistance for the sample sintered for 60 min; however, a better cell viability on the surface of the less corrosion-resistant sample was unexpectedly found. This behavior is explained by considering the higher ion release rate of the Mn–Si additive material, as preferred sites to corrosion attack based on scanning electron microscopic observations, which is advantageous to the cells in vitro. In conclusion, cell viability is not always directly related to corrosion resistance in stainless steels. Typically, the introduction of biodegradable and biocompatible phases to biostable alloys, which are conventionally anticipated to be corrosion-resistant, can be advantageous to human cell responses similar to biodegradable metals. - Highlights: • Cell viability vs. corrosion resistance for medical-grade stainless steels • The stainless steel samples were prepared by powder metallurgy. • Unpenetrated additive played a critical role in the correlation.

  15. Analysis of sulphur, phosphorus and silica in metals, alloys, inorganic compounds and solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhya, J.C.; Naik, S.S.; Khedikar, W.K.; Sudersanan, M.; Mathur, P.K

    1999-10-01

    Procedures for the analysis of sulphur, phosphorus and silica in various metals and alloys like mild steel, carbon steel and stainless steel as well as nickel base alloys are described. Procedures were also developed for the analysis of sulphur in thoria pellets and in other materials like crack check fluids, coal etc. Typical results obtained are summarised. (author)

  16. Studies on microstructure, mechanical and pitting corrosion behaviour of similar and dissimilar stainless steel gas tungsten arc welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Dilkush; Srinivasa Rao, K.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2018-03-01

    In the present study, an attempt has been made to weld dissimilar alloys of 5mm thick plates i.e., austenitic stainless steel (316L) and duplex stainless steel (2205) and compared with that of similar welds. Welds are made with conventional gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process with two different filler wires namely i.e., 309L and 2209. Welds were characterized using optical microscopy to observe the microstructural changes and correlate with mechanical properties using hardness, tensile and impact testing. Potentio-dynamic polarization studies were carried out to observe the pitting corrosion behaviour in different regions of the welds. Results of the present study established that change in filler wire composition resulted in microstructural variation in all the welds with different morphology of ferrite and austenite. Welds made with 2209 filler showed plate like widmanstatten austenite (WA) nucleated at grain boundaries. Compared to similar stainless steel welds inferior mechanical properties was observed in dissimilar stainless steel welds. Pitting corrosion resistance is observed to be low for dissimilar stainless steel welds when compared to similar stainless steel welds. Overall study showed that similar duplex stainless steel welds having favorable microstructure and resulted in better mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Relatively dissimilar stainless steel welds made with 309L filler obtained optimum combination of mechanical properties and pitting corrosion resistance when compared to 2209 filler and is recommended for industrial practice.

  17. Nickel and its alloys as perspective materials for intermediate temperature steam electrolysers operating on proton conducting solid acids as electrolyte

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikiforov, Aleksey; Petrushina, Irina; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    2012-01-01

    Several stainless steels, nickel-based alloys, Ta-coated stainless steel, niobium, nickel, platinum and gold were evaluated as possible materials for use in the intermediate temperature water electrolysers. The corrosion resistance was measured in molten KH2PO4 as simulated conditions corresponding...

  18. J-controlled crack growth as an indicator of hydrogen-stainless steel compatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietrich, M.R.; Caskey, G.R. Jr.; Donovan, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    The J-integral was evaluated as a parameter to characterize fracture of stainless steels and as a measure of hydrogen damage. C-shaped specimens of type 304L, 316, and 21-6-9 stainless steels were tested in high pressure helium and hydrogen. The critical force for crack initiation (Jm), and tearing resistance (dJ/da) were decreased by hydrogen in all three alloys. The J-integral appears useful as a measure of hydrogen compatibility because it is sensitive to both test environment and microstructure

  19. Corrosion resistance of high performance stainless steels in cooling water and other refinery environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovach, C.W.; Redmerski, L.S.

    1984-01-01

    The recent successful introduction of high performance stainless steels as tubing for seawater cooled electric utility condensers suggests that these alloys can also provide useful service in refinery heat exchanger applications. Since many of these applications involve higher temperature exposure than steam condensers, a study was conducted to evaluate crevice corrsion resistance over a range of cooling water temperature and chloride concentrations, and also to evaluate general corrosion resistance in some strong chemical and refinery environments. These stainless steels display excellent crevice corrosion resistance as well as good resistance to a variety of chemical environments that may be encountered in refinery, petrochemical and chemical plant service

  20. IMPURITY SEGREGATION OF STAINLESS STEEL STUDIED BY ATOM-PROBE AND AUGER ELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY

    OpenAIRE

    Koguchi , Y.; Takahashi , K.; Ishikawa , Y.

    1987-01-01

    The surface compositions of type 304 stainless steel heated in vacuum at 600-900°C were determined by an atom-probe and Auger electron spectroscopic analysis. In addition to enrichment and depletion of alloying elements in the surface of the stainless steel, segregation of impurity elements such as carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur is known to occur. In this paper the atom-probe was used to measure the impurity segregation in the grains as well as in the grain boundary while the AES was...

  1. Microstructure and mechanical properties of annealed SUS 304H austenitic stainless steel with copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Indrani [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Amankwah, E. [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Department of Materials Science, African University of Science and Technology, Abuja (Nigeria); Kumar, N.S. [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Fleury, E. [Center for High Temperature Energy Materials, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Oh-ishi, K.; Hono, K. [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Ramamurty, U., E-mail: ramu@materials.iisc.ernet.in [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2011-05-25

    Research highlights: {yields} SUS 304H austenitic stainless steel containing 3 wt.% Cu was annealed at 700 deg. C for up to 100 h. {yields} Microstructure and mechanical properties of annealed alloys are examined. {yields} Nano-sized Cu-rich precipitation upon annealing. {yields} Strength of the alloy remains invariant with annealing whereas ductility improves. {yields} Fatigue crack growth threshold of 3 wt.% Cu added alloy increases with annealing. - Abstract: An experimental investigation into the effect of Cu on the mechanical properties of 0 and 3 wt.% Cu added SUS 304H austenitic stainless steel upon annealing at 700 deg. C for up to 100 h was conducted. Optical microscopy reveals grain coarsening in both the alloys upon annealing. Observations by transmission electron microscopy revealed the precipitation of nanometer-sized spherical Cu particles distributed within the austenitic grains and the presence of carbides at the dislocations. Both the yield and ultimate tensile strengths of the alloys were found to remain invariant with annealing. Tensile ductility and the threshold stress intensity factor range for fatigue crack growth for 3 wt.% Cu added alloy increase with annealing. These are attributed to the grain coarsening with annealing. In all, the addition of Cu to SUS 304H does not affect the mechanical performance adversely while improving creep resistance.

  2. Irradiation Stability of Uranium Alloys at High Exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonell, W.R.

    2001-01-01

    Postirradiation examinations were begun of a series of unrestrained dilute uranium alloy specimens irradiated to exposures up to 13,000 MWD/T in NaK-containing stainless steel capsules. This test, part of a program of development of uranium metal fuels for desalination and power reactors sponsored by the Division of Reactor Development and Technology, has the objective of defining the temperature and exposure limits of swelling resistance of the alloyed uranium. This paper discusses those test results

  3. Influences of passivating elements on the corrosion and biocompatibility of super stainless steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Young-Ran; Jang, Soon-Geun; Oh, Keun-Taek; Kim, Jung-Gu; Kim, Young-Sik

    2008-08-01

    Biometals need high corrosion resistance since metallic implants in the body should be biocompatible and metal ion release should be minimized. In this work, we designed three kinds of super stainless steel and adjusted the alloying elements to obtain different microstructures. Super stainless steels contain larger amounts of Cr, Mo, W, and N than commercial alloys. These elements play a very important role in localized corrosion and, thus, their effects can be represented by the "pitting resistance equivalent number (PREN)." This work focused on the behavior which can arise when the bare surface of an implant in the body is exposed during walking, heavy exercise, and so on. Among the experimental alloys examined herein, Alloy Al and 316L stainless steels were mildly cytotoxic, whereas the other super austenitic, duplex, and ferritic stainless steels were noncytotoxic. This behavior is primarily related to the passive current and pitting resistance of the alloys. When the PREN value was increased, the passivation behavior in simulated body solution was totally different from that in acidic chloride solution and, thus, the Cr(2)O(3)/Cr(OH)(3) and [Metal oxide]/[Metal + Metal oxide] ratios of the passive film in the simulated body solution were larger than those in acidic chloride solution. Also, the critical current density in simulated body solution increased and, thus, active dissolution may induce metal ion release into the body when the PREN value and Ni content are increased. This behavior was closely related to the presence of EDTA in the simulated body solution. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Use of stainless stell for cost competitive bipolar plates in the SPFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makkus, R.C.; Janssen, A.H.H.; Bruijn, F.A. de; Mallant, R.K.A.M. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation, Department of Fuels, Conversion and Environment, Petten (Netherlands)

    2000-03-01

    Bipolar plate materials for the Solid Polymer Fuel Cell (SPFC), alternative to the presently used graphite, should fulfil the following requirements in order to be applicable: low-cost, easy to machine or to shape, lightweight and low volume, mechanically and sufficiently chemically stable, and having a low contact resistance. Stainless steel is a low-cost material that is easy to shape, and thin sheets can be used to yield low volume and weight. Several stainless steels have been tested for their applicability (1.4439, 1.4404, 1.4541, 1.4529, 1.3974). The compaction pressure is of large influence on the contact resistance. Also, the pre-treatment of the surface is of influence; this is a permanent effect. Stainless steel constituents slowly dissolve into the Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA). It has been found that the anode side stainless steel flow plate is the main source of contamination. Direct contact between the stainless steel and the membrane greatly enhances the contaminant level. Using an appropriate pre-treatment and a coating or gasket preventing direct contact between stainless steel and the membrane, one alloy was found to satisfy the requirements for use as a low cost material for the flow plate of an SPFC. (orig.)

  5. Irradiation creep of dispersion strengthened copper alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokrovsky, A.S.; Barabash, V.R.; Fabritsiev, S.A.

    1997-01-01

    Dispersion strengthened copper alloys are under consideration as reference materials for the ITER plasma facing components. Irradiation creep is one of the parameters which must be assessed because of its importance for the lifetime prediction of these components. In this study the irradiation creep of a dispersion strengthened copper (DS) alloy has been investigated. The alloy selected for evaluation, MAGT-0.2, which contains 0.2 wt.% Al 2 O 3 , is very similar to the GlidCop trademark alloy referred to as Al20. Irradiation creep was investigated using HE pressurized tubes. The tubes were machined from rod stock, then stainless steel caps were brazed onto the end of each tube. The creep specimens were pressurized by use of ultra-pure He and the stainless steel caps subsequently sealed by laser welding. These specimens were irradiated in reactor water in the core position of the SM-2 reactors to a fluence level of 4.5-7.1 x 10 21 n/cm 2 (E>0.1 MeV), which corresponds to ∼3-5 dpa. The irradiation temperature ranged from 60-90 degrees C, which yielded calculated hoop stresses from 39-117 MPa. A mechanical micrometer system was used to measure the outer diameter of the specimens before and after irradiation, with an accuracy of ±0.001 mm. The irradiation creep was calculated based on the change in the diameter. Comparison of pre- and post-irradiation diameter measurements indicates that irradiation induced creep is indeed observed in this alloy at low temperatures, with a creep rate as high as ∼2 x 10 -9 s -1 . These results are compared with available data for irradiation creep for stainless steels, pure copper, and for thermal creep of copper alloys

  6. Irradiation creep of dispersion strengthened copper alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokrovsky, A.S.; Barabash, V.R.; Fabritsiev, S.A. [and others

    1997-04-01

    Dispersion strengthened copper alloys are under consideration as reference materials for the ITER plasma facing components. Irradiation creep is one of the parameters which must be assessed because of its importance for the lifetime prediction of these components. In this study the irradiation creep of a dispersion strengthened copper (DS) alloy has been investigated. The alloy selected for evaluation, MAGT-0.2, which contains 0.2 wt.% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, is very similar to the GlidCop{trademark} alloy referred to as Al20. Irradiation creep was investigated using HE pressurized tubes. The tubes were machined from rod stock, then stainless steel caps were brazed onto the end of each tube. The creep specimens were pressurized by use of ultra-pure He and the stainless steel caps subsequently sealed by laser welding. These specimens were irradiated in reactor water in the core position of the SM-2 reactors to a fluence level of 4.5-7.1 x 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} (E>0.1 MeV), which corresponds to {approx}3-5 dpa. The irradiation temperature ranged from 60-90{degrees}C, which yielded calculated hoop stresses from 39-117 MPa. A mechanical micrometer system was used to measure the outer diameter of the specimens before and after irradiation, with an accuracy of {+-}0.001 mm. The irradiation creep was calculated based on the change in the diameter. Comparison of pre- and post-irradiation diameter measurements indicates that irradiation induced creep is indeed observed in this alloy at low temperatures, with a creep rate as high as {approx}2 x 10{sup {minus}9}s{sup {minus}1}. These results are compared with available data for irradiation creep for stainless steels, pure copper, and for thermal creep of copper alloys.

  7. Insight of magnesium alloys and composites for orthopedic implant applications – a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Radha

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium (Mg and its alloys have been widely researched for orthopedic applications recently. Mg alloys have stupendous advantages over the commercially available stainless steel, Co-Cr-Ni alloy and titanium implants. Till date, extensive mechanical, in-vitro and in-vivo studies have been done to improve the biomedical performance of Mg alloys through alloying, processing conditions, surface modification etc. This review comprehensively describes the strategies for improving the mechanical and degradation performance of Mg alloys through properly tailoring the composition of alloying elements, reinforcements and processing techniques. It also highlights the status and progress of research in to (i the selection of nutrient elements for alloying, reinforcement and its effects (ii type of Mg alloy system (binary, ternary and quaternary and composites (iii grain refinement for strengthening through severe plastic deformation techniques. Furthermore it also emphasizes on the importance of Mg composites with regard to hard tissue applications.

  8. System approach for evaluation of soil contamination by nitrogen containing pollutants in the 30-km zone power nuclear plant; Sistemnyj podkhod dlya otsenki zagryazneniya okruzhayushchej sredy azotsoderzhashchimi pollyutantami v 30-km zone aehs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shevtsova, O. V.; Zhigunova, L. N.; Makovskaya, N. A.; Pavlovich, E. L. [Ob' ' edinennyj institut ehnergeticheskikh i yadernykh issledovanij – Sosny NAN Belarusi, Minsk(Belarus)

    2013-01-15

    This article presents the results of studies of the nitrogen-containing chemical pollutants of the soil 30 km zone nuclear power plant in order to evaluate the chemical carcinogenic risk to public health. As a result of this work the least amount of NDMA fixed at 0,83 × 10{sup -4} mg/kg, the highest - 128,29 × 10{sup -4} mg/kg, which is 0,83 and 128,3 %, respectively, of Madman established in the Russian Federation and Republic of Kazakhstan, the content of NDMA precursors - nitrite ions varies from 0,07 to 4,43 mg/kg. Found that most of the compounds reported in agricultural land. Calculate the total carcinogenic risk for the population living in the region - the set value corresponds to the maximum risk tolerance, i. e. the upper limit of acceptable risk. These levels are subject to continuous monitoring. (authors)

  9. Genetic design and characterization of novel ultra-high-strength stainless steels strengthened by Ni3Ti intermetallic nanoprecipitates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, W.; Rivera-Diaz-del-Castillo, P.E.J.; Wang, W.; Yang, K.; Bliznuk, V.; Kestens, L.A.I.; Zwaag, S. van der

    2010-01-01

    A general computational alloy design approach based on thermodynamic and physical metallurgical principles, and coupled with a genetic optimization scheme, is presented. The method is applied to the design of new ultra-high-strength maraging stainless steels strengthened by Ni 3 Ti intermetallics. In the first design round, the alloy composition is optimized on the basis of precipitate formation at a fixed ageing temperature without considering other steps in the heat treatment. In the second round, the alloy is redesigned, applying an integrated model which allows for the simultaneous optimization of alloy composition and the ageing temperature as well as the prior austenitization temperature. The experimental characterizations of prototype alloys clearly demonstrate that alloys designed by the proposed approach achieve the desired microstructures.

  10. Stress corrosion cracking evaluation of martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    The resistance of the martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels PH13-8Mo, 15-5PH, and 17-4PH to stress corrosion cracking was investigated. Round tensile and c-ring type specimens taken from several heats of the three alloys were stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths and exposed to alternate immersion in salt water, to salt spray, and to a seacoast environment. The results indicate that 15-5PH is highly resistant to stress corrosion cracking in conditions H1000 and H1050 and is moderately resistant in condition H900. The stress corrosion cracking resistance of PH13-8Mo and 17-4PH stainless steels in conditions H1000 and H1050 was sensitive to mill heats and ranged from low to high among the several heats included in the tests. Based on a comparison with data from seacoast environmental tests, it is apparent that alternate immersion in 3.5 percent salt water is not a suitable medium for accelerated stress corrosion testing of these pH stainless steels.

  11. Laser surface modification of stainless steels for cavitation erosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Chi Tat

    1999-12-01

    Austenitic stainless steel UNS S31603 (Fe -17.6Cr -11.2Ni -2.5Mo -1.4Mn -0.4Si -0.03C) has higher pitting corrosion resistance but lower cavitation erosion resistance than that of UNS S30400. This is because of its lower tendency for strain induced martensitic transformation and higher stacking fault energy as compared with those of UNS S30400. In order to improve its cavitation erosion resistance, surface modification of S31603 was performed by laser surface melting and laser surface alloying using a 2-kW CW Nd-YAG laser and a 3-kW CW CO2 laser. For laser surface melting, austenitic stainless steel UNS S30400, super duplex stainless steel UNS S32760 and martensitic stainless steel UNS S42000 were also investigated for comparison purpose. For laser surface alloying, alloying materials including various elements (Co, Cr, Ni, Mo, Mn, Si & C), alloys (AlSiFe & NiCrSiB), ceramics (Si3N 4, SiC, Cr3C2, TiC, CrB & Cr2O 3) and alloys-ceramics (Co-WC, Ni-WC, Ni-Al2O3, Ni-Cr2C3) were used to modify the surface of S31603. The alloyed surface was achieved first by flame spraying or pre-placing of the alloy powder on the S31603 surface and then followed by laser surface remelting. The cavitation erosion characteristics of laser surface modified specimens in 3.5% NaCl solution at 23°C were studied by means of a 20-kHz ultrasonic vibrator at a peak-to-peak amplitude of 30 mum. In addition, their pitting corrosion behaviour was evaluated by electrochemical techniques. The microstructures, compositions, phase changes and damage mechanisms under cavitation erosion were investigated by optical microscopy, SEM, EDAX and X-ray diffractometry. Mechanical properties such as microhardness profile were also examined. The cavitation erosion resistance Re (reciprocal of the mean depth of penetration rate) of laser surface melted S31603 was found to be improved by 22% and was attributed to the existence of tensile residual stress. Improvement on the Re of S42000 was found to be 8.5 times

  12. Dynamical recrystallization of high purity austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavard, L.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this work is to optimize the performance of structural materials. The elementary mechanisms (strain hardening and dynamical regeneration, germination and growth of new grains) occurring during the hot working of metals and low pile defect energy alloys have been studied for austenitic stainless steels. In particular, the influence of the main experimental parameters (temperature, deformation velocity, initial grain size, impurities amount, deformation way) on the process of discontinuous dynamical recrystallization has been studied. Alloys with composition equal to those of the industrial stainless steel-304L have been fabricated from ultra-pure iron, chromium and nickel. Tests carried out in hot compression and torsion in order to cover a wide range of deformations, deformation velocities and temperatures for two very different deformation ways have allowed to determine the rheological characteristics (sensitivity to the deformation velocity, apparent activation energy) of materials as well as to characterize their microstructural deformations by optical metallography and electron back-scattered diffraction. The influence of the initial grain size and the influence of the purity of the material on the dynamical recrystallization kinetics have been determined. An analytical model for the determination of the apparent mobility of grain boundaries, a semi-analytical model for the dynamical recrystallization and at last an analytical model for the stationary state of dynamical recrystallization are proposed as well as a new criteria for the transition between the refinement state and the state of grain growth. (O.M.)

  13. Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking of austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukada, Takashi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels in oxygenated high temperature water was studied. The IASCC failure has been considered as a degradation phenomenon potential not only in the present light water reactors but rather common in systems where the materials are exposed simultaneously to radiation and water environments. In this study, effects of the material and environmental factors on the IASCC of austenitic stainless steels were investigated in order to understand the underlying mechanism. The following three types of materials were examined: a series of model alloys irradiated at normal water-cooled research reactors (JRR-3M and JMTR), the material irradiated at a spectrally tailored mixed-spectrum research reactor (ORR), and the material sampled from a duct tube of a fuel assembly used in the experimental LMFBR (JOYO). Post-irradiation stress corrosion cracking tests in a high-temperature water, electrochemical corrosion tests, etc., were performed at hot laboratories. Based on the results obtained, analyses were made on the effects of alloying/impurity elements, irradiation/testing temperatures and material processing, (i.e., post-irradiation annealing and cold working) on the cracking behavior. On the basis of the analyses, possible remedies against IASCC in the core internals were discussed from viewpoints of complex combined effects among materials, environment and processing factors. (author). 156 refs.

  14. Electrochemical characterization of AISI 316L stainless steel in contact with simulated body fluid under infection conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Danián Alejandro; Durán, Alicia; Ceré, Silvia Marcela

    2008-05-01

    Titanium and cobalt alloys, as well as some stainless steels, are among the most frequently used materials in orthopaedic surgery. In industrialized countries, stainless steel devices are used only for temporary implants due to their lower corrosion resistance in physiologic media when compared to other alloys. However, due to economical reasons, the use of stainless steel alloys for permanent implants is very common in developing countries. The implantation of foreign bodies is sometimes necessary in the modern medical practice. However, the complex interactions between the host and the can implant weaken the local immune system, increasing the risk of infections. Therefore, it is necessary to further study these materials as well as the characteristics of the superficial film formed in physiologic media in infection conditions in order to control their potential toxicity due to the release of metallic ions in the human body. This work presents a study of the superficial composition and the corrosion resistance of AISI 316L stainless steel and the influence of its main alloying elements when they are exposed to an acidic solution that simulates the change of pH that occurs when an infection develops. Aerated simulated body fluid (SBF) was employed as working solution at 37 degrees C. The pH was adjusted to 7.25 and 4 in order to reproduce normal body and disease state respectively. Corrosion resistance was measured by means of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and anodic polarization curves.

  15. Low-activation Mn-Cr austenitic stainless steel with further reduced content of long-lived radioactive elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onozuka, M.; Saida, T.; Hirai, S. [Mitsubishi Heavy Ind. Ltd., Yokohama (Japan); Kusuhashi, M.; Sato, I.; Hatakeyama, T. [The Japan Steel Works Ltd., Chatsu-machi 4, Muroran 051-8505 (Japan)

    1998-06-01

    Low-activation austenitic stainless steel based on Mn-Cr non-magnetic steels has been developed. The alloying elements of long-life activation, such as Ni, Mo and Co, were eliminated and substituted with Mn along with an addition of N. A Mn-Cr austenitic stainless steel, 24.5Mn-13.5Cr-0.02C-0.2N, has been developed successfully. Examined material properties, including mechanical, thermal and magnetic properties, as well as weldability and characteristics of corrosion resistance, are presented. It was found that the alloy has excellent material properties virtually equivalent to those of 316SS. In this study, the applicability of the Schaeffler, DeLong and Hull constitution diagrams for the stainless steels with low Ni and high Mn contents was also examined. The boundary conditions distinguishing the single austenite phase from the others have been identified for the Mn-Cr steels. (orig.) 22 refs.

  16. Low-activation Mn Cr austenitic stainless steel with further reduced content of long-lived radioactive elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozuka, Masanori; Saida, Tomikane; Hirai, Shouzou; Kusuhashi, Mikio; Sato, Ikuo; Hatakeyama, Tsuyoshi

    1998-06-01

    Low-activation austenitic stainless steel based on Mn-Cr non-magnetic steels has been developed. The alloying elements of long-life activation, such as Ni, Mo and Co, were eliminated and substituted with Mn along with an addition of N. A Mn-Cr austenitic stainless steel, 24.5Mn-13.5Cr-0.02C-0.2N, has been developed successfully. Examined material properties, including mechanical, thermal and magnetic properties, as well as weldability and characteristics of corrosion resistance, are presented. It was found that the alloy has excellent material properties virtually equivalent to those of 316SS. In this study, the applicability of the Schaeffler, DeLong and Hull constitution diagrams for the stainless steels with low Ni and high Mn contents was also examined. The boundary conditions distinguishing the single austenite phase from the others have been identified for the Mn-Cr steels.

  17. Analysis of iron-base alloys by low-wattage glow discharge emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagatsuma, K.; Hirokawa, K.

    1984-01-01

    Several iron-base alloys were investigated by low-wattage glow discharge emission spectrometry. The emission intensity principally depended on the sputtering parameters of constituent elements in the alloy. However, in the case of chromium, stable and firm oxides formed on the surface influencing the yield of ejected atoms. This paper discusses the relation between the sputtering parameters in Fe-Ni, Fe-Cr, and Fe-Co alloys and their relative emission intensities. Additionally, quantitative analysis was performed for some ternary iron-base alloys and commercial stainless steels with the calibration factors of binary alloy systems

  18. Irradiation performance of 9--12 Cr ferritic/martensitic stainless steels and their potential for in-core application in LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1993-08-01

    Ferritic-martensitic stainless steels exhibit radiation stability and stress corrosion resistance that make them attractive replacement materials for austenitic stainless steels for in-core applications. Recent radiation studies have demonstrated that 9% Cr ferritic/martensitic stainless steel had less than a 30C shift in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) following irradiation at 365C to a dose of 14 dpa. These steels also exhibit very low swelling rates, a result of the microstructural stability of these alloys during radiation. The 9 to 12% Cr alloys to also exhibit excellent corrosion and stress corrosion resistance in out-of-core applications. Demonstration of the applicability of ferritic/martensitic stainless steels for in-core LWR application will require verification of the irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking behavior, measurement of DBTT following irradiation at 288C, and corrosion rates measurements for in-core water chemistry

  19. Development and Application of High-Cr Ferritic Stainless Steels as Building Exterior Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeong H.; Lee, Yong H.; Lee, Yong D.

    2008-01-01

    Stainless Steels have been widely used as a building exterior materials in Asian countries for the last decade. It is required for the materials in this field to have an aesthetic appearance,a relatively high strength, and an excellent corrosion resistance. Other metallic materials such as copper, aluminum, and carbon steels have been also used as the exterior materials. Considering the cost of maintenance, stainless steel, having the outstanding corrosion resistance, is replacing other materials in the several parts in the building exteriors. Ferritic stainless steel has been applied as the roofing materials because its thermal expansion is much smaller than that of austenitic stainless steel. Therefore, it is suitable for the large-scale construction such as airport terminal, convention center, and football stadium. To improve the corrosion resistance of the ferritic stainless steels, the modification of alloy composition has been studied to develop new grade materials and the progress in the surface technology has been introduced. Corrosion properties, of these materials were evaluated in the laboratory and in the field for longer than two years. High-Cr ferritic stainless steel showed excellent corrosion resistance to the atmospheric environments. In the region close to the sea, the corrosion resistance of high-Cr ferritic stainless steel was much superior to that of other materials, which may prove this steel to be the appropriate materials for the construction around seashore. In some of the large constructions around seashore in South Korea, high-Cr ferritic stainless steels have been used as the building exterior materials for six years

  20. Development and Application of High-Cr Ferritic Stainless Steels as Building Exterior Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeong H.; Lee, Yong H.; Lee, Yong D. [POSCO Technical Reseaarch Lab., Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Stainless Steels have been widely used as a building exterior materials in Asian countries for the last decade. It is required for the materials in this field to have an aesthetic appearance,a relatively high strength, and an excellent corrosion resistance. Other metallic materials such as copper, aluminum, and carbon steels have been also used as the exterior materials. Considering the cost of maintenance, stainless steel, having the outstanding corrosion resistance, is replacing other materials in the several parts in the building exteriors. Ferritic stainless steel has been applied as the roofing materials because its thermal expansion is much smaller than that of austenitic stainless steel. Therefore, it is suitable for the large-scale construction such as airport terminal, convention center, and football stadium. To improve the corrosion resistance of the ferritic stainless steels, the modification of alloy composition has been studied to develop new grade materials and the progress in the surface technology has been introduced. Corrosion properties, of these materials were evaluated in the laboratory and in the field for longer than two years. High-Cr ferritic stainless steel showed excellent corrosion resistance to the atmospheric environments. In the region close to the sea, the corrosion resistance of high-Cr ferritic stainless steel was much superior to that of other materials, which may prove this steel to be the appropriate materials for the construction around seashore. In some of the large constructions around seashore in South Korea, high-Cr ferritic stainless steels have been used as the building exterior materials for six years.

  1. Chemical decontamination of stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onuma, Tsutomu; Akimoto, Hidetoshi

    1991-01-01

    The present invention concerns a method for chemical decontamination of radioactive metal waste materials contaminated with radioactive materials on the surface, generated in radioactive materials-handling facilities. The invention is comprised of a method of chemical decontamination of stainless steel, characterized by comprising a first process of immersing a stainless steel-based metal waste material contaminated by radioactive materials on the surface in a sulfuric acid solution and second process of immersing in an aqueous solution of sulfuric acid and oxidizing metal salt, in which a portion of the surface of the stainless steel to be decontaminated is polished mechanically to expose a portion of the base material before the above first and second processes. 1 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Fatigue damage assessment of recycled metals and alloys | Ayensu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cyclic fatigue tests were conducted on recycled polycrystalline metals and alloys at room and elevated tempera-ures to determine the fatigue strength, endurance limit and endurance ratio. Annealed and polished stainless steel (Fe-18Cr-8Ni), mild steel (Fe-0.25Cr), aluminium (Al), alpha-brass (Cu-30 % Zn) and copper ...

  3. Martensite transformation in antimony implanted stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.; Littmark, U.; Johansen, A.; Christodoulides, C.

    1981-01-01

    The authors have used Rutherford backscattering analysis (RBS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and diffraction to investigate austenitic stainless steel crystals implanted at room temperature with 80 keV Sb + ions to a fluence of 5 x 10 20 ions/m 2 , thus providing implantation with a heavy group V element. RBS channeling spectra from implanted crystals show a damage peak which approaches the height of the random level and therefore indicates a very high degree of disorder in the implanted layers. The distribution of the disorder extends to a depth 3-5 times the depth of the primary radiation damage. The Sb peaks under channeling as well as random conditions are indistinguishable, confirming that substitutionality during implantation is negligible. To establish the nature of the disorder which cannot be assessed from the RBS analysis alone, and in particular to assess whether an amorphous alloy is formed in the implanted layer as indicated from the RBS spectra, samples implanted under similar conditions were investigated in the TEM. Significant extra spots in the patterns can be ascribed to the presence of a radiation induced b.c.c. phase of martensitic origin. The result that a significant amount of martensite can be induced by antimony implantation seems to indicate that the main driving force for the transition is due to damage induced stress concentrations. (Auth.)

  4. On phase equilibria in duplex stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wessman, S. [Swerea KIMAB AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Pettersson, R. [Outokumpu Stainless AB, Avesta Research Centre, Avesta (Sweden); Hertzman, S. [Outokumpu Stainless Research Foundation, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-05-15

    The equilibrium conditions of four duplex stainless steels; Fe-23Cr-4.5Ni-0.1N, Fe-22Cr-5.5Ni-3Mo-0.17N, Fe-25Cr-7Ni-4Mo-0.27N and Fe-25Cr-7Ni-4Mo-1W-1.5Cu-0.27N were studied in the temperature region from 700 to 1000 C. Phase compositions were determined with SEM EDS and the phase fractions using image analysis on backscattered SEM images. The results showed that below 1000 C the steels develop an inverse duplex structure with austenite and sigma phase, of which the former is the matrix phase. With decreasing temperature, the microstructure will be more and more complex and finely dispersed. The ferrite is, for the higher alloyed steels, only stable above 1000 C and at lower temperatures disappears in favour of intermetallic phases. The major intermetallic phase is sigma phase with small amounts of chi phase, the latter primarily in high Mo and W grades. Nitrides, not a focus in this investigation, were present as rounded particles and acicular precipitates at lower temperatures. The results were compared to theoretical predictions using the TCFE5 and TCFE6 databases. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  5. Pit initiation resistance of ferritic stainless steels in chloride environments from 800 to 2600C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cieslak, W.R.; Duquette, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    The pitting resistance of high-purity ferritic stainless steels has been studied by potentiodynamic anodic polarization, mechanical film-rupture (scratch) testing, and microstructural examination. The purpose has been to determine the ability of the Fe-Cr-Mo alloys to resist pit initiation at temperatures up to 260 0 C in chloride environments. At temperatures exceeding about 200 0 C, Cr is shown to become much more effective than Mo to enhance alloy pitting resistance. In fact, at 260 0 C, 2% Mo does not noticeably affect the pitting resistance of 18% Cr or 28% Cr steels. Also, 5% Mo is more effective for the lower Cr than for the higher Cr alloy, unlike lower temperatures, at which the effect of the two elements is greater than additive. Preferential localized attack at microstructural features, e.g. inclusions, is not observed under any of the experimental conditions, rather the pit-initiation resistance is controlled solely by alloy composition

  6. Microstructural design of PCA austenitic stainless steel for improved resistance to helium embrittlement under HFIR irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.; Braski, D.N.

    1983-01-01

    Several variants of Prime Candidate Alloy (PCA) with different preirradiation thermal-mechanical treatments were irradiated in HFIR and were evaluated for embrittlement resistance via disk-bend tensile testing. Comparison tests were made on two heats of 20%-cold-worked type 316 stainless steel. None of the alloys were brittle after irradiation at 300 to 400 0 C to approx. 44 dpa and helium levels of 3000 to approx.3600 at. ppm. However, all were quite brittle after similar exposure at 600 0 C. Embrittlement varied with alloy and pretreatment for irradiation to 44 dpa at 500 0 C and to 22 dpa at 600 0 C. Better relative embrittlement resistance among PCA variants was found in alloys which contained prior grain boundary MC carbide particles that remained stable under irradiation

  7. Passivation behavior of a ferritic stainless steel in concentrated alkaline solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Fattah-alhosseini

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The passivation behavior of AISI 430 ferritic stainless steel was investigated in concentrated alkaline solutions in relation to several test parameters, using electrochemical techniques. Increasing solution pH (varying from 11.5 to 14.0 leads to an increase in the corrosion rate of the alloy. Mott–Schottky analysis revealed that passive films formed on AISI 430 ferritic stainless steel behave as n-type semiconductor and the donor densities increased with pH. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS results showed that the reciprocal capacitance of the passive film is directly proportional to its thickness, which decreases with pH increase. The results revealed that for this ferritic stainless steel in concentrated alkaline solutions, decreasing the solution pH offers better conditions for forming passive films with higher protection behavior, due to the growth of a much thicker and less defective film.

  8. A Review on the Potential Use of Austenitic Stainless Steels in Nuclear Fusion Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahin, Sümer; Übeyli, Mustafa

    2008-12-01

    Various engineering materials; austenitic stainless steels, ferritic/martensitic steels, vanadium alloys, refractory metals and composites have been suggested as candidate structural materials for nuclear fusion reactors. Among these structural materials, austenitic steels have an advantage of extensive technological database and lower cost compared to other non-ferrous candidates. Furthermore, they have also advantages of very good mechanical properties and fission operation experience. Moreover, modified austenitic stainless (Ni and Mo free) have relatively low residual radioactivity. Nevertheless, they can't withstand high neutron wall load which is required to get high power density in fusion reactors. On the other hand, a protective flowing liquid wall between plasma and solid first wall in these reactors can eliminate this restriction. This study presents an overview of austenitic stainless steels considered to be used in fusion reactors.

  9. Effect of dissolved hydrogen concentration on IASCC initiation susceptibility of type 316 stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Min-Jae; Kim, Sung Woo; Hwang, Seong Sik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The effect of DH concentration on PWSCC of nickel based alloys has been studied, higher dissolved hydrogen strategy is being considered to obtain partial mitigation of PWSCC. In the case of stainless steels, it is necessary to research the effect of DH concentration on irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking(IASCC). In this research, we tried to evaluate the effect of DH concentration on IASCC initiation susceptibility using the proton irradiated type 316 stainless steels under the condition of simulated primary water. The slow strain rate tests were performed using the proton irradiated type 316 stainless steels at the simulated primary water conditions, crack length per unit area for all tested specimens were calculated. IASCC initiation susceptibility was increased by increasing irradiation doses and by increasing DH concentration.

  10. Microstructure and antibacterial properties of microwave plasma nitrided layers on biomedical stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Li-Hsiang; Chen, Shih-Chung; Wu, Ching-Zong; Hung, Jing-Ming; Ou, Keng-Liang

    2011-01-01

    Nitriding of AISI 303 austenitic stainless steel using microwave plasma system at various temperatures was conducted in the present study. The nitrided layers were characterized via scanning electron microscopy, glancing angle X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and Vickers microhardness tester. The antibacterial properties of this nitrided layer were evaluated. During nitriding treatment between 350 deg. C and 550 deg. C, the phase transformation sequence on the nitrided layers of the alloys was found to be γ → (γ + γ N ) → (γ + α + CrN). The analytical results revealed that the surface hardness of AISI 303 stainless steel could be enhanced with the formation of γ N phase in nitriding process. Antibacterial test also demonstrated the nitrided layer processed the excellent antibacterial properties. The enhanced surface hardness and antibacterial properties make the nitrided AISI 303 austenitic stainless steel to be one of the essential materials in the biomedical applications.

  11. Design of aging-resitant martensitic stainless steels for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cozar, R.; Meyzaud, Y.

    1983-06-01

    With the exception of AISI 403 or 410 grades, the use of high strength martensitic stainless steels in PWR is poorly developped because these materials, like ferritic stainless steels, become embrittled by the precitation of a b.c.c. chromium-rich phase during aging at the operating temperature (290 to 350 0 C). The influence of alloying elements and microstructure on the aging behavior of forged low-carbon martensitic stainless steels containing 12 to 16% Cr, 0 to 2% Mo and 0 to 8% Ni was determined during accelerated aging at 450 0 C. Quantitative relationships were derived between the maximum increase in hardness, the maximum shift in CVN transition temperature and the chemical composition (Cr, Mo, C) and microstructure

  12. Microstructure of rapidly solidified Al2O3-dispersion-strengthened Type 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megusar, J.; Arnberg, L.; Vander Sande, J.B.; Grant, N.J.

    1981-01-01

    An aluminum oxide dispersion strengthened 316 stainless steel was developed by surface oxidation. Surface oxidation was chosen as a preferred method in order to minimize formation of less stable chromium oxides. Ultra low C+N 316 stainless steel was alloyed with 1 wt % Al, rapidly solidified to produce fine powders and attrited to approximately 0.5 μm thick flakes to provide for surface oxidation. Oxide particles in the extruded material were identified mostly as Al oxides. In the preirradiated condition, oxide dispersion retarded crystallization and grain growth and had an effect on room temperature tensile properties. These structural modifications are expected to have an effect on the swelling resistance, structure stability and high temperature strength of austenitic stainless steels

  13. A study on corrosion resistance of dissimilar welds between Monel 400 and 316L austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Cherish; Karthikeyan, R.; Vincent, S.

    2018-04-01

    An attempt has been made to study the corrosion resistance of bi-metal weld joints of Monel 400 tube to stainless steel 316 tube by GTAW process. The present research paper contributes to the ongoing research work on the use of Monel400 and 316L austenitic stainless steel in industrial environments. Potentiodynamic method is used to investigate the corrosion behavior of Monel 400 and 316L austenitic stainless steel welded joints. The analysis has been performed on the base metal, heat affected zone and weld zone after post weld heat treatment. Optical microscopy was also performed to correlate the results. The heat affected zone of Monel 400 alloy seems to have the lowest corrosion resistance whereas 316L stainless steel base metal has the highest corrosion resistance.

  14. VANADIUM ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K.F.; Van Thyne, R.J.

    1959-05-12

    This patent deals with vanadium based ternary alloys useful as fuel element jackets. According to the invention the ternary vanadium alloys, prepared in an arc furnace, contain from 2.5 to 15% by weight titanium and from 0.5 to 10% by weight niobium. Characteristics of these alloys are good thermal conductivity, low neutron capture cross section, good corrosion resistance, good welding and fabricating properties, low expansion coefficient, and high strength.

  15. Corrosion resistance of a magnetic stainless steel ion-plated with titanium nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, K; Sawase, T; Matsumura, H; Atsuta, M; Baba, K; Hatada, R

    2000-04-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the corrosion resistance of a titanium nitride (TiN) ion-plated magnetic stainless steel (447J1) for the purpose of applying a magnetic attachment system to implant-supported prostheses made of titanium. The surface hardness of the TiN ion-plated 447J1 alloy with varying TiN thickness was determined prior to the corrosion testing, and 2 micrometers thickness was confirmed to be appropriate. Ions released from the 447J1 alloy, TiN ion-plated 447J1 alloy, and titanium into a 2% lactic acid aqueous solution and 0.1 mol/L phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were determined by means of an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). Long-term corrosion behaviour was evaluated using a multisweep cyclic voltammetry. The ICP-AES results revealed that the 447J1 alloy released ferric ions into both media, and that the amount of released ions increased when the alloy was coupled with titanium. Although both titanium and the TiN-plated 447J1 alloy released titanium ions into lactic acid solution, ferric and chromium ions were not released from the alloy specimen for all conditions. Cyclic voltamograms indicated that the long-term corrosion resistance of the 447J1 alloy was considerably improved by ion-plating with TiN.

  16. Effect of metal surface composition on deposition behavior of stainless steel component dissolved in liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokota, Norikatsu; Shimoyashiki, Shigehiro

    1988-01-01

    Deposition behavior of corrosion products has been investigated to clarify the effect of metal surface composition on the deposition process in liquid sodium. For the study a sodium loop made of Type 304 stainless steel was employed. Deposition test pieces, which were Type 304 stainless steel, iron, nickel or Inconel 718, were immersed in the sodium pool of the test pot. Corrosion test pieces, which were Type 304 stainless steel, 50 at% Fe-50 at%Mn and Inconel 718, were set in a heater pin assembly along the axial direction of the heater pin surface. Sodium temperatures at the outlet and inlet of the heater pin assembly were controlled at 943 and 833 K, respectively. Sodium was purified at a cold trap temperature of 393 K and the deposition test was carried out for 4.3 x 10 2 - 2.9 x 10 4 ks. Several crystallized particles were observed on the surface of the deposition test pieces. The particles had compositions and crystal structures which depended on both the composition of deposition test pieces and the concentration of iron and manganese in sodium. Only iron-rich particles having a polyhedral shape deposited on the iron surface. Two types of particles, iron-rich α-phase and γ-phase with nearly the same composition as stainless steel, were deposited on Type 304 stainless steel. A Ni-Mn alloy was deposited on the nickel surface in the case of a higher concentration of manganese in sodium. On the other hand, for a lower manganese concentration, a Fe-Ni alloy was precipitated on the nickel surface. Particles deposited on nickel had a γ-phase crystal structure similar to the deposition test piece of nickel. Hence, the deposition process can be explained as follows: Corrosion products in liquid sodium were deposited on the metal surface by forming a metal alloy selectively with elements of the metal surface. (author)

  17. Accelerated corrosion of stainless steel in thiocyanate-containing solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pistorius, P Chris; Li, Wen

    2012-09-19

    It is known that reduced sulfur compounds (such as thiocyanate and thiosulfate) can accelerate active corrosion of austenitic stainless steel in acid solutions, but before we started this project the mechanism of acceleration was largely unclear. This work combined electrochemical measurements and analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS), which provided a comprehensive understanding of the catalytic effect of reduced sulfur species on the active corrosion of stainless steel. Both the behavior of the pure elements and the steel were studied and the work focused on the interaction between the pure elements of the steel, which is the least understood area. Upon completion of this work, several aspects are now much clearer. The main results from this work can be summarized as follows: The presence of low concentrations (around 0.1 mM) of thiocyanate or tetrathionate in dilute sulfuric acid greatly accelerates the anodic dissolution of chromium and nickel, but has an even stronger effect on stainless steels (iron-chromium-nickel alloys). Electrochemical measurements and surface analyses are in agreement with the suggestion that accelerated dissolution really results from suppressed passivation. Even well below the passivation potential, the electrochemical signature of passivation is evident in the electrode impedance; the electrode impedance shows clearly that this pre-passivation is suppressed in the presence of thiocyanate. For the stainless steels, remarkable changes in the morphology of the corroded metal surface and in the surface concentration of chromium support the suggestion that pre-passivation of stainless steels is suppressed because dissolution of chromium is accelerated. Surface analysis confirmed that adsorbed sulfur / sulfide forms on the metal surfaces upon exposure to solutions containing thiocyanate or thiosulfate. For pure nickel, and steels containing nickel (and residual copper), bulk sulfide

  18. A review of compatibility of IFR fuel and austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keiser, D.D. Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Interdiffusion experiments have been conducted to investigate the compatibility of various austenitic stainless steels with U-Pu-Zr alloys, which are alloys to be employed as fuel for the Integral Fast Reactor being developed by Argonne National Laboratory. These tests have also studied the compatibility of austenitic stainless steels with fission products, like the minor actinides (Np and Am) and lanthanides (Ce and Nd), that are generated during the fission process in an IFR. This paper compares the results of these investigations in the context of fuel-cladding compatibility in IFR fuel elements, specifically focusing on the relative Interdiffusion behavior of the components and the types of phases that develop based on binary phase diagrams. Results of Interdiffusion tests are assessed in the light of observations derived from post-test examinations of actual irradiated fuel elements

  19. Defining the Post-Machined Sub-surface in Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, N.; Sunil Kumar, B.; Kain, V.; Birbilis, N.; Joshi, S. S.; Sivaprasad, P. V.; Chai, G.; Durgaprasad, A.; Bhattacharya, S.; Samajdar, I.

    2018-06-01

    Austenitic stainless steels grades, with differences in chemistry, stacking fault energy, and thermal conductivity, were subjected to vertical milling. Anodic potentiodynamic polarization was able to differentiate (with machining speed/strain rate) between different post-machined sub-surfaces in SS 316L and Alloy A (a Cu containing austenitic stainless steel: Sanicroe 28™), but not in SS 304L. However, such differences (in the post-machined sub-surfaces) were revealed in surface roughness, sub-surface residual stresses and misorientations, and in the relative presence of sub-surface Cr2O3 films. It was shown, quantitatively, that higher machining speed reduced surface roughness and also reduced the effective depths of the affected sub-surface layers. A qualitative explanation on the sub-surface microstructural developments was provided based on the temperature-dependent thermal conductivity values. The results herein represent a mechanistic understanding to rationalize the corrosion performance of widely adopted engineering alloys.

  20. Study on aging embrittlement of 17-4PH martensite stainless steel at 350 degree C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jun; Shen Baoluo

    2005-01-01

    The transformation of microstructure and hardness with the extension of aging time on the 17-4PH Martensite stainless steel at 350 degree C is studied, and the change of dynamic fracture toughness and fractography of the stainless steel for various holding time at this temperature are also studied by instrumental impact test and scanning electron microscope. The results indicate that the crack initiation energy (E i ), crack propagation energy (E p ), absorbed-in-fracture energy (E t ) and dynamic fracture toughness (K 1d ) of this type of alloy Charpy v-notch sample is decreased with the continuation of time at 350 degree C. It means that the toughness of the alloy is degraded, and the hardness of the steel is ascended when aging time is expanded and reaches the maximum at 9000 h. The fractography of this steel changes from dimple fracture into cleavage fracture and inter-granular rapture. (authors)