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Sample records for nitrogen fluorescence emissions

  1. Spectral resolved Measurement of the Nitrogen Fluorescence Emissions in Air induced by Electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Waldenmaier, Tilo; Klages, Hans

    2007-01-01

    For the calorimetric determination of the primary energy of extensive air showers, measured by fluorescence telescopes, a precise knowledge of the conversion factor (fluorescence yield) between the deposited energy in the atmosphere and the number of emitted fluorescence photons is essential. The fluorescence yield depends on the pressure and the temperature of the air as well as on the water vapor concentration. Within the scope of this work the fluorescence yield for the eight strongest nitrogen emission bands between 300 nm and 400 nm has been measured using electrons from a Sr-90 source with energies between 250 keV and 2000 keV. Measurements have been performed in dry air, pure nitrogen, and a nitrogen-oxygen mixture at pressures ranging from 2 hPa to 990 hPa. Furthermore the influence of water vapor has been studied. A new approach for the parametrization of the fluorescence yield was used to analyze the data, leading to a consistent description of the fluorescence yield with a minimal set of parameters...

  2. Effect of carbon and nitrogen assimilation on chlorophyll fluorescence emission by the cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, J.M.; Lara, C. (Instituto de Bioquimica Vegetal y Fotosintesis, Univ. de Sevilla y CSIC, Sevilla (ES)); Sivak, M.N. (Dept. of Biochemistry, Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (US))

    1992-01-01

    O{sub 2} evolution and chlorophyll A fluorescence emission have been monitored in intact cells of the cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans 1402-1 to study the influence of carbon and nitrogen assimilation on the operation of the photosynthetic apparatus. The pattern of fluorescence induction in dark-adapted cyanobacterial cells was different from that of higher plants. Cyanobacteria undergo large, rapid state transitions upon illumination, which lead to marked changes in the fluorescence yield, complicating the estimation of quenching coefficients. The Kautsky effect was not evident, although it could be masked by a state II-state I transition, upon illumination with actinic light. The use of inhibitors of carbon assimilation such as D,L-glyceraldehyde or iodoacetamide allowed us to relate changes in variable fluorescence to active CO{sub 2} fixation. Ammonium, but not nitrate, induced non-photochemical fluorescence quenching, in agreement with a previous report on green algae, indicative of an ammonium-induced state i transition. (au).

  3. Nitrogen fluorescence in air for observing extensive air showers

    CERN Document Server

    Keilhauer, B; Fraga, M; Matthews, J; Sakaki, N; Tameda, Y; Tsunesada, Y; Ulrich, A

    2012-01-01

    Extensive air showers initiate the fluorescence emissions from nitrogen molecules in air. The UV-light is emitted isotropically and can be used for observing the longitudinal development of extensive air showers in the atmosphere over tenth of kilometers. This measurement technique is well-established since it is exploited for many decades by several cosmic ray experiments. However, a fundamental aspect of the air shower analyses is the description of the fluorescence emission in dependence on varying atmospheric conditions. Different fluorescence yields affect directly the energy scaling of air shower reconstruction. In order to explore the various details of the nitrogen fluorescence emission in air, a few experimental groups have been performing dedicated measurements over the last decade. Most of the measurements are now finished. These experimental groups have been discussing their techniques and results in a series of \\emph{Air Fluorescence Workshops} commenced in 2002. At the 8$^{\\rm{th}}$ Air Fluoresc...

  4. Prediction of BOD, COD, and Total Nitrogen Concentrations in a Typical Urban River Using a Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Matrix with PARAFAC and UV Absorption Indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Hur

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of a real-time monitoring tool for the estimation of water quality is essential for efficient management of river pollution in urban areas. The Gap River in Korea is a typical urban river, which is affected by the effluent of a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP and various anthropogenic activities. In this study, fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (EEM with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC and UV absorption values at 220 nm and 254 nm were applied to evaluate the estimation capabilities for biochemical oxygen demand (BOD, chemical oxygen demand (COD, and total nitrogen (TN concentrations of the river samples. Three components were successfully identified by the PARAFAC modeling from the fluorescence EEM data, in which each fluorophore group represents microbial humic-like (C1, terrestrial humic-like organic substances (C2, and protein-like organic substances (C3, and UV absorption indices (UV220 and UV254, and the score values of the three PARAFAC components were selected as the estimation parameters for the nitrogen and the organic pollution of the river samples. Among the selected indices, UV220, C3 and C1 exhibited the highest correlation coefficients with BOD, COD, and TN concentrations, respectively. Multiple regression analysis using UV220 and C3 demonstrated the enhancement of the prediction capability for TN.

  5. Prediction of BOD, COD, and total nitrogen concentrations in a typical urban river using a fluorescence excitation-emission matrix with PARAFAC and UV absorption indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Jin; Cho, Jinwoo

    2012-01-01

    The development of a real-time monitoring tool for the estimation of water quality is essential for efficient management of river pollution in urban areas. The Gap River in Korea is a typical urban river, which is affected by the effluent of a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) and various anthropogenic activities. In this study, fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (EEM) with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) and UV absorption values at 220 nm and 254 nm were applied to evaluate the estimation capabilities for biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), and total nitrogen (TN) concentrations of the river samples. Three components were successfully identified by the PARAFAC modeling from the fluorescence EEM data, in which each fluorophore group represents microbial humic-like (C1), terrestrial humic-like organic substances (C2), and protein-like organic substances (C3), and UV absorption indices (UV(220) and UV(254)), and the score values of the three PARAFAC components were selected as the estimation parameters for the nitrogen and the organic pollution of the river samples. Among the selected indices, UV(220), C3 and C1 exhibited the highest correlation coefficients with BOD, COD, and TN concentrations, respectively. Multiple regression analysis using UV(220) and C3 demonstrated the enhancement of the prediction capability for TN.

  6. Nitrogen fluorescence in air for observing extensive air showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keilhauer, B.; Bohacova, M.; Fraga, M.; Matthews, J.; Sakaki, N.; Tameda, Y.; Tsunesada, Y.; Ulrich, A.

    2013-06-01

    Extensive air showers initiate the fluorescence emissions from nitrogen molecules in air. The UV-light is emitted isotropically and can be used for observing the longitudinal development of extensive air showers in the atmosphere over tenth of kilometers. This measurement technique is well-established since it is exploited for many decades by several cosmic ray experiments. However, a fundamental aspect of the air shower analyses is the description of the fluorescence emission in dependence on varying atmospheric conditions. Different fluorescence yields affect directly the energy scaling of air shower reconstruction. In order to explore the various details of the nitrogen fluorescence emission in air, a few experimental groups have been performing dedicated measurements over the last decade. Most of the measurements are now finished. These experimental groups have been discussing their techniques and results in a series of Air Fluorescence Workshops commenced in 2002. At the 8th Air Fluorescence Workshop 2011, it was suggested to develop a common way of describing the nitrogen fluorescence for application to air shower observations. Here, first analyses for a common treatment of the major dependences of the emission procedure are presented. Aspects like the contributions at different wavelengths, the dependence on pressure as it is decreasing with increasing altitude in the atmosphere, the temperature dependence, in particular that of the collisional cross sections between molecules involved, and the collisional de-excitation by water vapor are discussed.

  7. Nitrogen fluorescence in air for observing extensive air showers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsunesada Y.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Extensive air showers initiate the fluorescence emissions from nitrogen molecules in air. The UV-light is emitted isotropically and can be used for observing the longitudinal development of extensive air showers in the atmosphere over tenth of kilometers. This measurement technique is well-established since it is exploited for many decades by several cosmic ray experiments. However, a fundamental aspect of the air shower analyses is the description of the fluorescence emission in dependence on varying atmospheric conditions. Different fluorescence yields affect directly the energy scaling of air shower reconstruction. In order to explore the various details of the nitrogen fluorescence emission in air, a few experimental groups have been performing dedicated measurements over the last decade. Most of the measurements are now finished. These experimental groups have been discussing their techniques and results in a series of Air Fluorescence Workshops commenced in 2002. At the 8th Air Fluorescence Workshop 2011, it was suggested to develop a common way of describing the nitrogen fluorescence for application to air shower observations. Here, first analyses for a common treatment of the major dependences of the emission procedure are presented. Aspects like the contributions at different wavelengths, the dependence on pressure as it is decreasing with increasing altitude in the atmosphere, the temperature dependence, in particular that of the collisional cross sections between molecules involved, and the collisional de-excitation by water vapor are discussed.

  8. Marine Engines and Nitrogen Oxides Emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corneliu Moroianu

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Current international policy initiatives by the International Maritime Organization (IMO to reduce emissions from ship propulsion systems (NOx and SOx, primarily mark the first efforts to define a framework to address this issue. Oxides of nitrogen (NOx emissions from ship engines are significant on a global level. NOx emissions participate in the formation of photochemical smog and acid rain. Marine sourced emissions have significant impact on air quality on land. The challenge is to control NOx emissions without increasing fuel consumption and smoke. Most engine manufacturers can meet the current IMO limits by engine tuning measures

  9. Nitrogen Emission and Deposition: The European Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Willem Erisman

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Europe has been successful in reducing the emissions of several nitrogenous pollutants over recent decades. This is reflected in concentrations and deposition rates that have decreased for several components. Emissions of nitrogen containing gases are estimated to have decreased in Europe by 10%, 21%, and 14% for NO, NOx, and NH3, respectively, between 1990 and 1998. The main reductions are the result of a decrease in industrial and agricultural activities in the east of Europe as a result of the economic situation, measures in the transport sector, industry and agricultural sector, with only a small part of the reduction due to specific measures designed to reduce emissions. The reduction is significant, but far from the end goal for large areas in Europe in relation to different environmental problems. The Gothenburg Protocol will lead to reductions of 50 and 12% in 2010 relative to 1990 for NOx and NH3, respectively. The N2O emissions are expected to grow between 1998 and 2010 by 9%. Further reductions are necessary to reach critical limits for ecosystem protection, air quality standards and climate change. Emissions of nitrogen compounds result from an overload of reactive nitrogen, which is produced by combustion processes, by synthesis of ammonia or by import from other areas as concentrated animal feeds. Although some improvements can be made by improving the efficiency of combustion processes and agricultural systems, measures to reduce emissions substantially need to be focused on decreasing the production or import of reactive N. Reactive N ceilings for regions based on critical limits for all N-related effects can help to focus such measures. An integrated approach might have advantages over the pollutant specific approach to combat nitrogen pollution. This could provide the future direction for European policy to reduce the impacts of excess nitrogen.

  10. Fluorescence emission of pyrene in surfactant solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñeiro, Lucas; Novo, Mercedes; Al-Soufi, Wajih

    2015-01-01

    The systematic description of the complex photophysical behaviour of pyrene in surfactant solutions in combination with a quantitative model for the surfactant concentrations reproduces with high accuracy the steady-state and the time resolved fluorescence intensity of pyrene in surfactant solutions near the cmc, both in the monomer and in the excimer emission bands. We present concise model equations that can be used for the analysis of the pyrene fluorescence intensity in order to estimate fundamental parameters of the pyrene-surfactant system, such as the binding equilibrium constant K of pyrene to a given surfactant micelle, the rate constant of excimer formation in micelles, and the equilibrium constant of pyrene-surfactant quenching. The values of the binding equilibrium constant K(TX100)=3300·10³ M⁻¹ and K(SDS)=190·10³ M⁻¹ for Triton X-100 (TX100) and SDS micelles, respectively, show that the partition of pyrene between bulk water and micelles cannot be ignored, even at relatively high surfactant concentrations above the cmc. We apply the model to the determination of the cmc from the pyrene fluorescence intensity, especially from the intensity ratio at two vibronic bands in the monomer emission or from the ratio of excimer to monomer emission intensity. We relate the finite width of the transition region below and above the cmc with the observed changes in the pyrene fluorescence in this region.

  11. Optimal Fluorescence Waveband Determination for Detecting Defective Cherry Tomatoes Using a Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Suck Baek

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A multi-spectral fluorescence imaging technique was used to detect defective cherry tomatoes. The fluorescence excitation and emission matrix was used to measure for defects, sound surface and stem areas to determine the optimal fluorescence excitation and emission wavelengths for discrimination. Two-way ANOVA revealed the optimal excitation wavelength for detecting defect areas was 410 nm. Principal component analysis (PCA was applied to the fluorescence emission spectra of all regions at 410 nm excitation to determine the emission wavelengths for defect detection. The major emission wavelengths were 688 nm and 506 nm for the detection. Fluorescence images combined with the determined emission wavebands demonstrated the feasibility of detecting defective cherry tomatoes with >98% accuracy. Multi-spectral fluorescence imaging has potential utility in non-destructive quality sorting of cherry tomatoes.

  12. Multiple stimulated emission fluorescence photoacoustic sensing and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Gaoming [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Key Laboratory of OptoElectronic Science and Technology for Medicine, Ministry of Education, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007 (China); Gao, Fei; Feng, Xiaohua; Zheng, Yuanjin, E-mail: yjzheng@ntu.edu.sg [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Qiu, Yishen [Key Laboratory of OptoElectronic Science and Technology for Medicine, Ministry of Education, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007 (China)

    2016-07-04

    Multiple stimulated emission fluorescence photoacoustic (MSEF-PA) phenomenon is demonstrated in this letter. Under simultaneous illumination of pumping light and stimulated emission light, the fluorescence emission process is speeded up by the stimulated emission effect. This leads to nonlinear enhancement of photoacoustic signal while the quantity of absorbed photons is more than that of fluorescent molecules illuminated by pumping light. The electronic states' specificity of fluorescent molecular can also be labelled by the MSEF-PA signals, which can potentially be used to obtain fluorescence excitation spectrum in deep scattering tissue with nonlinearly enhanced photoacoustic detection. In this preliminary study, the fluorescence excitation spectrum is reconstructed by MSEF-PA signals through sweeping the wavelength of exciting light, which confirms the theoretical derivation well.

  13. Foliar Reflectance and Fluorescence Responses for Plants Under Nitrogen Stress Determined with Active and Passive Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, E. M.; McMurtrey, J. E.; Campbell, P. K. Entcheva; Corp, L. A.; Butcher, L. M.; Chappelle, E. W.

    2003-01-01

    Vegetation productivity is driven by nitrogen (N) availability in soils. Both excessive and low soil N induce physiological changes in plant foliage. In 2001, we examined the use of spectral fluorescence and reflectance measurements to discriminate among plants provided different N fertilizer application rates: 20%, 50%, 100% and 150% of optimal N levels. A suite of optical, fluorescence, and biophysical measurements were collected on leaves from field grown corn (Zea mays L.) and soybean plants (Glycine max L.) grown in pots (greenhouse + ambient sunlight daily). Three types of steady state laser-induced fluorescence measurements were made on adaxial and abaxial surfaces: 1) fluorescence images in four 10 nm bands (blue, green, red, far-red) resulting from broad irradiance excitation; 2) emission spectra (5 nm resolution) produced by excitation at single wavelengths (280,380 or 360, and 532 nm); and 3) excitation spectra (2 nm resolution), with emission wavelengths fixed at wavelengths centered on selected solar Fraunhofer lines (532,607,677 and 745 nm). Two complementary sets of high resolution (less than 2 nm) optical spectra were acquired for both adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces: 1) optical properties (350-2500 nm) for reflectance, transmittance, and absorptance; and 2) reflectance spectra (500-1000 nm) acquired with and without a short pass filter at 665 nm to determine the fluorescence contribution to apparent reflectance in the 650-750 spectrum, especially at the 685 and 740 nm chlorophyll fluorescence (ChIF) peaks. The strongest relationships between foliar chemistry and optical properties were demonstrated for C/N content and two optical parameters associated with the red edge inflection point. Select optical properties and ChIF parameters were highly correlated for both species. A significant contribution of ChIF to apparent reflectance was observed, averaging 10-25% at 685 nm and 2 - 6% at 740 nm over all N treatments. Discrimination of N treatment

  14. Photoacoustic emission from fluorescent nanodiamonds enhanced with gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bailin; Fang, Chia-Yi; Chang, Cheng-Chun; Peterson, Ralph; Maswadi, Saher; Glickman, Randolph D; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Ye, Jing Yong

    2012-07-01

    Fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) have drawn much attention in recent years for biomedical imaging applications due to their desired physical properties including excellent photostability, high biocompatibility, extended far-red fluorescence emission, and ease of surface functionalization. Here we explore a new feature of FNDs, i.e. their photoacoustic emission capability, which may lead to potential applications of using FNDs as a dual imaging contrast agent for combined fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging modalities. We observed significant enhancement of photoacoustic emission from FNDs when they were conjugated with gold nanoparticles (GNPs).

  15. A Proposed Method for Measurement of Absolute Air Fluorescence Yield based on High Resolution Optical Emission Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Gika, V; Maltezos, S

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present a method for absolute measurement of air fluorescence yield based on high resolution optical emission spectroscopy. The absolute measurement of the air fluorescence yield is feasible using the Cherenkov light, emitted by an electron beam simultaneously with the fluorescence light, as a "standard candle". The separation of these two radiations can be accomplished exploiting the "dark" spectral regions of the emission band systems of the molecular spectrum of nitrogen. In these "dark" regions the net Cherenkov light can be recorded experimentally and be compared with the calculated one. The instrumentation for obtaining the nitrogen molecular spectra in high resolution and the noninvasive method for monitoring the rotational temperature of the emission process are also described. For the experimental evaluation of the molecular spectra analysis we used DC normal glow discharges in air performed in an appropriate spectral lamp considered as an air-fluorescence light emulator. The propose...

  16. Volatile organic compounds and oxides of nitrogen. Further emission reductions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froste, H. [comp.

    1996-12-31

    This report presents the current status in relation to achievement of the Swedish Environmental target set by Parliament to reduce emission of volatile organic compounds by 50 per cent between 1988 and 2000. It also instructed the Agency to formulate proposed measures to achieve a 50 per cent reduction of emission of nitrogen oxides between 1985 and 2005. The report presents an overall account of emission trends for volatile organic compounds (from all sectors) and nitrogen oxides (from the industry sector) and steps proposed to achieve further emission reductions. 43 refs

  17. Fluorescence Emission Centres and the Corresponding Infrared Fluorescence Saturation in a Bismuth-Doped Silica Fibre

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Yan-Qing; SHEN Yong-Hang

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the fluorescence characteristics of bismuth doped silica fibres with and without Al co-dopant which are fabricated by means of modified chemical vapour deposition (MCVD) technique, and find that the fluorescences in the red region (centred around 750nm) and in the infrared region (centred around 1100nm) may originate from different emission sites in the fibre. Strong upconversion phenomena are observed in both Al-codoped and non Al codoped bismuth fibres when the fibres are excited by an acoustic-optic Q-switched Nd: YVO4 laser. Both the aspects indicate that the upper energy level absorption reported in the work of the bismuth doped silica fibre lasers may result from the fluorescence emission sites that are not responsible for the infrared emission. It is thus expected that optimizing the compositions and the fabrication conditions of the fibre and then transferring more fluorescence emission centres are helpful for the infrared emission.

  18. Characterization of donor–acceptor-pair emission in fluorescent 6H-SiC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Yiyu; Jokubavicius, Valdas; Linnarsson, Margareta

    2012-01-01

    We investigated donor–acceptor-pair emission in N–B-doped 6H-SiC samples by using photoluminescence (PL) and angle-resolved PL. It is shown that n-type doping with concentrations larger than 1018 cm−3 is favorable for observing luminescence, and increasing nitrogen results in stronger luminescenc...... indicate that N–B-doped fluorescent SiC is a good wavelength converter in white LED applications....

  19. Crystalline amino acids and nitrogen emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstegen, M.W.A.; Jongbloed, A.W.

    2003-01-01

    Reductions in dietary protein level and supplementation with certain crystalline amino acids is a well-established method of formulating diets to achieve a more ideal amino acid pattern and to reduce nitrogen excretion. Up to 35% reduction in nitrogen excretion may be achieved by supplementing pig

  20. Crystalline amino acids and nitrogen emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstegen, M.W.A.; Jongbloed, A.W.

    2003-01-01

    Reductions in dietary protein level and supplementation with certain crystalline amino acids is a well-established method of formulating diets to achieve a more ideal amino acid pattern and to reduce nitrogen excretion. Up to 35% reduction in nitrogen excretion may be achieved by supplementing pig d

  1. Synchronous fluorescence and excitation emission characteristics of transformer oil ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepa, Subbiah; Sarathi, R; Mishra, Ashok K

    2006-11-15

    This paper describes the evaluation of synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) and excitation emission matrix fluorescence (EEMF) spectroscopy as means of monitoring transformer oil degradation. When accelerated thermal ageing method is used, the onset of degradation of transformer oil on 17th day and transformer oil with polypropylene and cellulosic paper on 23rd and 27th days is sensitively reflected in the SFS and EEMF fluorescence spectral characteristics.

  2. Emissions of gaseous nitrogen species from manure management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dämmgen, Ulrich; Hutchings, Nick

    2008-01-01

    A procedure for the assessment of emissions of nitrogen (N) species (ammonia, nitrous oxide, nitric oxide, di-nitrogen) from the manure management system is developed, which treats N pools and flows including emissions strictly according to conservation of mass criteria. As all relevant flows...... in the husbandry of mammals are depicted, the methodology is considered a Tier 3 approach in IPCC terminology or a detailed methodology in UN ECE terminology. The importance of accounting for all N species is illustrated by comparing emission estimates obtained using this approach with those obtained from...

  3. Nitrogen emissions, deposition, and monitoring in the western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark E. Fenn; Richard Haeuber; Gail S. Tonnesen; Jill S. Baron; Susanne Grossman-Clarke; Diane Hope; Daniel A. Jaffe; Scott Copeland; Linda Geiser; Heather M. Rueth; James O. Sickman

    2003-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) deposition in the western United States ranges from 1 to 4 kilograms (kg) per hectare (ha) per year over much of the region to as high as 30 to 90 kg per ha per year downwind of major urban and agricultural areas. Primary N emissions sources are transportation, agriculture, and industry. Emissions of N as ammonia are about 50% as great as emissions of N as...

  4. Background suppression in fluorescence nanoscopy with stimulated emission double depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peng; Prunsche, Benedikt; Zhou, Lu; Nienhaus, Karin; Nienhaus, G. Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Stimulated emission depletion (STED) fluorescence nanoscopy is a powerful super-resolution imaging technique based on the confinement of fluorescence emission to the central subregion of an observation volume through de-excitation of fluorophores in the periphery via stimulated emission. Here, we introduce stimulated emission double depletion (STEDD) as a method to selectively remove artificial background intensity. In this approach, a first, conventional STED pulse is followed by a second, delayed Gaussian STED pulse that specifically depletes the central region, thus leaving only background. Thanks to time-resolved detection we can remove this background intensity voxel by voxel by taking the weighted difference of photons collected before and after the second STED pulse. STEDD thus yields background-suppressed super-resolved images as well as STED-based fluorescence correlation spectroscopy data. Furthermore, the proposed method is also beneficial when considering lower-power, less redshifted depletion pulses.

  5. Optical Reflectance and Fluorescence for Detecting Nitrogen Needs in Zea mays L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurtrey, J. E.; Middleton, E. M.; Corp. L. A.; Campbell, P. K. Entcheva; Butcher, L. M.; Daughtry, C. S. T.

    2003-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) status in field grown corn (Zea mays L.) was assessed using spectral techniques. Passive reflectance remote sensing and, both passive and active fluorescence sensing methods were investigated. Reflectance and fluorescence methods are reported to detect changes in the primary plant pigments (chlorophylls a and b; carotenoids) in higher plant species. As a general rule, foliar chlorophyll a (Chl a) and chlorophyll b (Chl b) usually exist in approx.3:l ratio. In plants under stress, Chl b content is affected before Chl a reductions occur. For reflectance, a version of the chlorophyll absorption in reflectance index (CARI) method was tested with narrow bands from the Airborne Imaging Spectroradiometer for Applications (ASIA). CARI minimizes the effects of soil background on the signal from green canopies. A modified CARI (MCARI) was used to track total Chl a levels in the red dip of the spectrum from the corn canopy. A second MCARI was used to track the auxiliary plant pigments (Chl b and the carotenoids) in the yellow/orange/red edge part of the reflectance spectrum. The difference between these two MCARI indices detected variations in N levels across the field plot canopies using ASIA data. At the leaf level, ratios of fluorescence emissions in the blue, green, red and far-red wavelengths sensed responses that were associated with the plant pigments, and were indicative of energy transfer in the photosynthetic process. N stressed corn stands could be distinguish from those with optimally applied N with fluorescence emission spectra obtained from individual corn leaves. Both reflectance and fluorescence methods are sensitive in detecting corn N needs and may be especially powerful in monitoring crop conditions if both types of information can be combined.

  6. Fluorescent sensor for Cu2+ with a tunable emission wavelength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhir, Andriy; Kiel, Alexander; Herten, Dirk-Peter; Kraemer, Roland

    2005-08-08

    A concept of fluorescent metal ion sensing with an easily tunable emission wavelength is presented and its principle demonstrated by detection of Cu(2+). A fluorescein dye was chemically modified with a metal chelating group and then attached to the terminus of ss-DNA. This was combined with a complementary ss-DNA modified with another fluorescent dye (ATTO 590), emitting at a longer wavelength. In the assembled duplex, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the fluorescein donor (excited at 470 nm) and the ATTO 590 acceptor (emitting at 624 nm) is observed. Proper positioning within the rigid DNA double helix prevents intramolecular contact quenching of the two dyes. Coordination of paramagnetic Cu(2+) ions by the chelating unit of the sensor results in direct fluorescence quenching of the fluorescein dye and indirect (by loss of FRET) quenching of the ATTO 590 emission at 624 nm. As a result, emission of the acceptor dye can be used for monitoring of the concentration of Cu(2+), with a 20 nM detection limit. The emission wavelength is readily tuned by replacement of ATTO-DNA by other commercially available DNA-acceptor dye conjugates. Fluorescent metal ion sensors emitting at >600 nm are very rare. The possibility of tuning the emission wavelength is important with respect to the optimization of this sensor type for application to biological samples, which usually show broad autofluorescence at <550 nm.

  7. Foliar Reflectance and Fluorescence Responses for Corn and Soybean Plants Under Nitrogen Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, E. M.; Campbell, P. K. Entcheva; Corp, L. A.; Butcher, L. M.; McMurtrey, J. E.

    2003-01-01

    We are investigating the use of spectral indices derived from actively induced fluorescence spectra and passive optical spectra. We examined the influence of photosynthetic pigment, carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) content on the spectral fluorescence and passive optical property characteristics of mature, upper leaves from plants provided different N fertilizer application rates: 20%, 50%, 100% and 150% of recommended N levels. A suite of optical, fluorescence, and biophysical measurements were collected on leaves from field grown corn (Zea mays L.) and soybean plants (Glycine max L.) grown in pots (greenhouse + ambient sunlight. Steady state laser-induced fluorescence emission spectra (5 nm resolution) were obtained from adaxial and abaxial surfaces resulting from excitation at single wavelengths (280, 380 or 360, and 532 nm). For emission spectra produced by each of these excitation wavelengths, ratios of emission peaks were calculated, including the red far-red chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) ratio (F685/F740) and the far-red/green (F740/F525) ratio. High resolution (< 3 nm) optical spectra (350-2500 nm) of reflectance, transmittance, and absorptance were also acquired for both adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces. Species differences were demonstrated for several optical parameters. A 'red edge' derivative ratio determined from transmittance spectra [as the maximum first deivative, between 650-750 nm, normalized to the value at 744 nm, or Dmax/D744], was strongly associated with the C/N ratio (r(exp 2) = 0.90, P +/- 0.001). This ratio, calculated from reflectance spectra, was inversely related to chlorophyll b content (r(exp 2) = 0.91, P +/- 0.001) as was the ChlF (F685/F740) ratio obtained with 532 nm excitation (r(exp 2) = 0.76, P +/- 0.01). Discrimination of N treatment groups was possible with specific fluorescence band ratios (e.g., F740/F525 obtained with 380 nm excitation). Higher ChlF and blue-green emissions were measured from the abaxial leaf surfaces

  8. Correlated spontaneous emission of fluorescent emitters mediated by single plasmons

    CERN Document Server

    Bouchet, Dorian; Ithurria, Sandrine; Gulinatti, Angelo; Rech, Ivan; Carminati, Rémi; De Wilde, Yannick; Krachmalnicoff, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Manipulating the spontaneous emission of a fluorescent emitter can be achieved by placing the emitter in a nanostructured environment. A privileged spot is occupied by plasmonic structures that provide a strong confinement of the electromagnetic field, which results in an enhancement of the emitter-environment interaction. While plasmonic nanostructures have been widely exploited to control the emission properties of single photon emitters, performing the coupling between quantum emitters with plasmons poses a huge challenge. In this Letter we report on a first crucial step towards this goal by the observation of correlated emission between a single CdSe/CdS/ZnS quantum dot exhibiting single photon statistics and a fluorescent nanobead located micrometers apart. This is accomplished by coupling both emitters to a silver nanowire. Single-plasmons are created on the latter from the quantum dot, and transfer energy to excite in turn the fluorescent nanobead.

  9. Light emission from compound eye with conformal fluorescent coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Palma, Raúl J.; Miller, Amy E.; Pulsifer, Drew P.; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2015-03-01

    Compound eyes of insects are attractive biological systems for engineered biomimicry as artificial sources of light, given their characteristic wide angular field of view. A blowfly eye was coated with a thin conformal fluorescent film, with the aim of achieving wide field-of-view emission. Experimental results showed that the coated eye emitted visible light and that the intensity showed a weaker angular dependence than a fluorescent thin film deposited on a flat surface.

  10. Soil biochemical properties of grassland ecosystems under anthropogenic emission of nitrogen compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudrevatykh, Irina; Ivashchenko, Kristina; Ananyeva, Nadezhda

    2016-04-01

    Inflow of pollutants in terrestrial ecosystems nowadays increases dramatically, that might be led to disturbance of natural biogeochemical cycles and landscapes structure. Production of nitrogen fertilizers is one of the air pollution sources, namely by nitrogen compounds (NH4+, NO3-, NO2-). Air pollution by nitrogen compounds of terrestrial ecosystems might be affected on soil biochemical properties, which results increasing mineral nitrogen content in soil, changing soil P/N and Al/Ca ratios, and, finally, the deterioration of soil microbial community functioning. The research is focused on the assessment of anthropogenic emission of nitrogen compounds on soil properties of grassland ecosystems in European Russia. Soil samples (Voronic Chernozem Pachic, upper 10 cm mineral layer, totally 10) were taken from grassland ecosystem: near (5-10 m) nitrogen fertilizer factory (NFF), and far from it (20-30 km, served as a control) in Tula region. In soil samples the NH4+ and NO3- (Kudeyarov's photocolorimetric method), P, Ca, Al (X-ray fluorescence method) contents were measured. Soil microbial biomass carbon (Cmic) was analyzed by substrate-induced respiration method. Soil microbial respiration (MR) was assessed by CO2 rate production. Soil microbial metabolic quotient (qCO2) was calculated as MR/Cmic ratio. Near NFF the soil ammonium and nitrate nitrogen contents were a strongly varied, variation coefficient (CV) was 42 and 86This study was supported by Russian Foundation of Basic Research Grant No. 14-04-00098, 15-44-03220, 15-04-00915.

  11. Measurement of the pressure dependence of air fluorescence emission induced by electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Ave, M; Buonomo, B; Busca, N; Cazon, L; Chemerisov, S D; Conde, M E; Crowell, R A; Di Carlo, P; Di Giulio, C; Doubrava, M; Esposito, A; Facal, P; Franchini, F J; Horandel, J; Hrabovsky, M; Iarlori, M; Kasprzyk, T E; Keilhauer, B; Klages, H; Kleifges, M; Kuhlmann, S; Mazzitelli, G; Nozka, L; Obermeier, A; Palatka, M; Petrera, S; Privitera, P; Rídky, J; Rizi, V; Rodríguez, G; Salamida, F; Schovanek, P; Spinka, H; Strazzeri, E; Ulrich, A; Yusof, Z M; Vacek, V; Valente, P; Verzi, V; Waldenmaier, T

    2007-01-01

    The fluorescence detection of ultra high energy (> 10^18 eV) cosmic rays requires a detailed knowledge of the fluorescence light emission from nitrogen molecules, which are excited by the cosmic ray shower particles along their path in the atmosphere. We have made a precise measurement of the fluorescence light spectrum excited by MeV electrons in dry air. We measured the relative intensities of 34 fluorescence bands in the wavelength range from 284 to 429 nm with a high resolution spectrograph. The pressure dependence of the fluorescence spectrum was also measured from a few hPa up to atmospheric pressure. Relative intensities and collisional quenching reference pressures for bands due to transitions from a common upper level were found in agreement with theoretical expectations. The presence of argon in air was found to have a negligible effect on the fluorescence yield. We estimated that the systematic uncertainty on the cosmic ray shower energy due to the pressure dependence of the fluorescence spectrum i...

  12. [Interactions of straw, nitrogen fertilizer and bacterivorous nematodes on soil labile carbon and nitrogen and greenhouse gas emissions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Teng-Hao; Wang, Nan; Liu, Man-Qiang; Li, Fang-Hui; Zhu, Kang-Li; Li, Hui-Xin; Hu, Feng

    2014-11-01

    A 3 x 2 factorial design of microcosm experiment was conducted to investigate the interactive effects of straw, nitrogen fertilizer and bacterivorous nematodes on soil microbial biomass carbon (C(mic)) and nitrogen (N(mic)), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (DON), mineral nitrogen (NH(4+)-N and NO(3-)-N), and greenhouse gas (CO2, N2O and CH4) emissions. Results showed that straw amendment remarkably increased the numbers of bacterivorous nematodes and the contents of Cmic and Nmic, but Cmic and Nmic decreased with the increasing dose of nitrogen fertilization. The effects of bacterivorous nematodes strongly depended on either straw or nitrogen fertilization. The interactions of straw, nitrogen fertilization and bacterivorous nematodes on soil DOC, DON and mineral nitrogen were strong. Straw and nitrogen fertilization increased DOC and mineral nitrogen contents, but their influences on DON depended on the bacterivorous nematodes. The DOC and mineral nitrogen were negatively and positively influenced by the bacterivorous nematodes, re- spectively. Straw significantly promoted CO2 and N2O emissions but inhibited CH4 emission, while interactions between nematodes and nitrogen fertilization on emissions of greenhouse gases were obvious. In the presence of straw, nematodes increased cumulative CO2 emissions with low nitrogen fertilization, but decreased CO2 and N2O emissions with high nitrogen fertilization on the 56th day after incubation. In summary, mechanical understanding the soil ecological process would inevitably needs to consider the roles of soil microfauna.

  13. Practical use of corrected fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of fluorescent proteins in Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hink, M.A.; Visser, N.V.; Borst, J.W.; Hoek, van A.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2003-01-01

    Corrected fluorescence excitation and emission spectra have been obtained from several enhanced variants of the green fluorescent protein (EGFP) isolated from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria, blue fluorescence protein (EBFP), cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP), EGFP and yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP

  14. Practical use of corrected fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of fluorescent proteins in Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hink, M.A.; Visser, N.V.; Borst, J.W.; Hoek, van A.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2003-01-01

    Corrected fluorescence excitation and emission spectra have been obtained from several enhanced variants of the green fluorescent protein (EGFP) isolated from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria, blue fluorescence protein (EBFP), cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP), EGFP and yellow fluorescent protein

  15. Emissions of nitrogen oxides and particulates of diesel vehicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kadijk, G.; Ligterink, N.E.; Mensch, P. van; Spreen, J.S.; Vermeulen, R.J.; Vonk, W.A.

    2015-01-01

    In real-world conditions, modern Euro VI heavy-duty vehicles produce an average of ten times less nitrogen oxide (NOx)emissions than previous generations of Euro IV and Euro V heavy-duty vehicles. However, Euro 6 passenger cars and light commercial vehicles present an entirely different picture sinc

  16. Saturated virtual fluorescence emission difference microscopy based on detector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shaocong; Sun, Shiyi; Kuang, Cuifang; Ge, Baoliang; Wang, Wensheng; Liu, Xu

    2017-07-01

    Virtual fluorescence emission difference microscopy (vFED) has been proposed recently to enhance the lateral resolution of confocal microscopy with a detector array, implemented by scanning a doughnut-shaped pattern. Theoretically, the resolution can be enhanced by around 1.3-fold compared with that in confocal microscopy. For further improvement of the resolving ability of vFED, a novel method is presented utilizing fluorescence saturation for super-resolution imaging, which we called saturated virtual fluorescence emission difference microscopy (svFED). With a point detector array, matched solid and hollow point spread functions (PSF) can be obtained by photon reassignment, and the difference results between them can be used to boost the transverse resolution. Results show that the diffraction barrier can be surpassed by at least 34% compared with that in vFED and the resolution is around 2-fold higher than that in confocal microscopy.

  17. Atmospheric emission of reactive nitrogen during biofuel ethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Cristine M D; Cardoso, Arnaldo A; Allen, Andrew G

    2008-01-15

    This paper evaluates emissions to the atmosphere of biologically available nitrogen compounds in a region characterized by intensive sugar cane biofuel ethanol production. Large emissions of NH3 and NOx, as well as particulate nitrate and ammonium, occur at the harvest when the crop is burned, with the amount of nitrogen released equivalent to approximately 35% of annual fertilizer-N application. Nitrogen oxides concentrations show a positive association with fire frequency, indicating that biomass burning is a major emission source, with mean concentrations of NOx doubling in the dry season relative to the wetseason. During the dry season biomass burning is a source of NH3, with other sources (wastes, soil, biogenic) predominant during the wet season. Estimated NO2-N, NH3-N, NO3- -N and NH4+ -N emission fluxes from sugar cane burning in a planted area of ca. 2.2 x 10(6) ha are 11.0, 1.1, 0.2, and 1.2 Gg N yr(-1), respectively.

  18. Fluorescence action spectra of algae and bean leaves at room and at liquid nitrogen temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedheer, J.C.

    1965-01-01

    Fluorescence action spectra were determined, both at room temperature and at liquid nitrogen temperature, with various blue-green, red and green algae, and greening bean leaves. The action spectra of algae were established with samples of low light absorption as well as dense samples. Fluorescence

  19. Nitrogen oxides emission from two beech forests subjected to different nitrogen loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Kitzler

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We analysed nitrogen oxides (N2O, NO and carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions from two beech forest soils close to Vienna, Austria, which were exposed to different nitrogen input from the atmosphere. The site Schottenwald (SW received 20.2 kg N ha−1 y−1 and Klausenleopoldsdorf (KL 12.6 kg N ha−1 y−1 through wet deposition. Nitric oxide emissions from soil were measured hourly with an automatic dynamic chamber system. Daily N2O measurements were carried out by an automatic gas sampling system. Measurements of nitrous oxide (N2O and CO2 emissions were conducted over larger areas on a biweekly (SW or monthly (KL basis by manually operated chambers. We used an autoregression procedure (time-series analysis for establishing time-lagged relationships between N-oxides emissions and different climate, soil chemistry and N-deposition data. It was found that changes in soil moisture and soil temperature significantly effected CO2 and N-oxides emissions with a time lag of up to two weeks and could explain up to 95% of the temporal variations of gas emissions. Event emissions after rain or during freezing and thawing cycles contributed significantly (for NO 50% to overall N-oxides emissions. In the two-year period of analysis the annual gaseous N2O emissions at SW ranged from 0.64 to 0.79 kg N ha−1 y−1 and NO emissions were 0.24 to 0.49 kg N ha−1 per vegetation period. In KL significantly lower annual N2O emissions (0.52 to 0.65 kg N2O-N kg ha−1 y−1 as well as considerably lower NO-emissions were observed. During a three-month measurement campaign NO emissions at KL were 0.02 kg N ha−1, whereas in the same time period significantly more NO was emitted in SW (0.32 kg NO-N ha−1. Higher N-oxides emissions, especially NO emissions from the high N-input site (SW may indicate that atmospheric deposition has an impact on emissions of gaseous N from our forest soils. At KL there was a strong correlation between N-deposition and N-emission over time

  20. Treatment of digested substrates for nitrogen removal and emission decrease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauermeister, U.; Spindler, H.; Wild, A. [GNS - Gesellschaft fuer Nachhaltige Stoffnutzung mbH, Halle/Saale (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    The production and application of biogas is well tried. Originally, the main goal of the biogas technology was the hygienization of the strong smelling manure from live stock. With change of priorities to an energetic application of the produced biogas, an enormous increase of the digested substrates was reached, which could lead to additional emission problems by using it as fertilizer. An important aim of the agricultural policy is to reduce emissions of ammonia and other compounds of nitrogen caused by agriculture into the air and the ground water. Therefore, it is necessary to know more about technical possibilities, reduction rates and the economy of reduction technologies. In combination with the fermentation process there are new opportunities of manure treatment to reduce emissions and to avoid over-fertilization. This presentation will give an introduction to the topic and to a new technology for separation of digested substrates into low emission fertilizers, called ANAStrip {sup registered} -process. (orig.)

  1. Nitrogen- Doped Graphene Quantum Dots: "Turn-off" Fluorescent Probe for Detection of Ag(+) Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabaraki, Reza; Nateghi, Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    Highly luminescent nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots (N-GQDs) were prepared from glucose and ammonia as carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively. The N-GQDs showed a strong emission at 458 nm with excitation at 360 nm. The N-GQDs exhibited analytical potential as sensing probes for silver ions determination. Factors affecting the fluorescence sensing of Ag(+) ions such as pH, N-GQDs concentration and incubation time were studied using Box-Behnken experimental design. The optimum conditions were determined as pH 7, N-GQDs concentration 1 mg/mL and time 60 min. It suggested that N-GQDs exhibited high sensitivity and selectivity toward Ag(+). The linear range of N-GQDs and the limit of detection (LOD) were 0.2-40 μM and 168 nM, respectively. The N-GQDs-based Ag(+) ions sensor was successfully applied to the determination of Ag(+) in tap water and real river water samples.

  2. Background information on a multimedia nitrogen emission reduction strategy; Hintergrundpapier zu einer multimedialen Stickstoffemissionsminderungsstrategie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geupel; Jering; Frey (and others)

    2009-04-15

    The background information report on a multimedia nitrogen reduction strategy covers the following chapters: 1. Introduction: the nitrogen cascade and the anthropogenic influence, environmental impact of increased nitrogen emissions and effects on human health. 2. Sources and balancing of anthropogenic nitrogen emissions in Germany. 3. Environmental quality targets, activity goals of environmental measures and instruments of an integrated nitrogen reduction strategy. 4. Conclusions and perspectives. The attachments include emission sources, nitrogen release and nitrogen transport in Germany; catalogue of measures and instruments according the criteria efficiency and cost-efficacy.

  3. Measuring reactive oxygen and nitrogen species with fluorescent probes: challenges and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Davies, Kelvin J.A.; Dennery, Phyllis A.; Forman, Henry Jay; Grisham, Matthew B.; Mann, Giovanni E.; Moore, Kevin; Roberts, L. Jackson; Ischiropoulos, Harry

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this position paper is to present a critical analysis of the challenges and limitations of the most widely used fluorescent probes for detecting and measuring reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Where feasible, we have made recommendations for the use of alternate probes and appropriate analytical techniques that measure the specific products formed from the reactions between fluorescent probes and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. We have proposed guidelines that will help present and future researchers with regard to the optimal use of selected fluorescent probes and interpretation of results. PMID:22027063

  4. Fluorescently tuned nitrogen-doped carbon dots from carbon source with different content of carboxyl groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Wang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (NCDs were tuned via varying the sources with different number of carboxyl groups. Owing to the interaction between amino and carboxyl, more amino groups conjugate the surface of the NCDs by the source with more carboxyl groups. Fluorescent NCDs were tuned via varying the sources with different content of carboxyl groups. Correspondingly, the nitrogen content, fluorescence quantum yields and lifetime of NCDs increases with the content of carboxyl groups from the source. Furthermore, cytotoxicity assay and cell imaging test indicate that the resultant NCDs possess low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility.

  5. Fluorescently tuned nitrogen-doped carbon dots from carbon source with different content of carboxyl groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Yun; Dai, Xiao; Zou, Guifu, E-mail: kqzhang@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: zouguifu@suda.edu.cn [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Gao, Peng; Zhang, Ke-Qin, E-mail: kqzhang@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: zouguifu@suda.edu.cn; Du, Dezhuang [National Engineering Laboratory for Modern Silk, College of Textile and Clothing Engineering, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Guo, Jun [Testing and Analysis Center, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2015-08-01

    In this study, fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (NCDs) were tuned via varying the sources with different number of carboxyl groups. Owing to the interaction between amino and carboxyl, more amino groups conjugate the surface of the NCDs by the source with more carboxyl groups. Fluorescent NCDs were tuned via varying the sources with different content of carboxyl groups. Correspondingly, the nitrogen content, fluorescence quantum yields and lifetime of NCDs increases with the content of carboxyl groups from the source. Furthermore, cytotoxicity assay and cell imaging test indicate that the resultant NCDs possess low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility.

  6. Revealing the underlying absorption and emission mechanism of nitrogen doped graphene quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xianghong; Li, Yunhai; Shu, Huabing; Wang, Jinlan

    2016-11-24

    Nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots (N-GQDs) hold promising application in electronics and optoelectronics because of their excellent photo-stability, tunable photoluminescence and high quantum yield. However, the absorption and emission mechanisms have been debated for years. Here, by employing time-dependent density functional theory, we demonstrate that the different N-doping types and positions give rise to different absorption and emission behaviors, which successfully addresses the inconsistency observed in different experiments. Specifically, center doping creates mid-states, rendering non-fluorescence, while edge N-doping modulates the energy levels of excited states and increases the radiation transition probability, thus enhancing fluorescence strength. More importantly, the even hybridization of frontier orbitals between edge N atoms and GQDs leads to a blue-shift of both absorption and emission spectra, while the uneven hybridization of frontier orbitals induces a red-shift. Solvent effects on N-GQDs are further explored by the conductor-like screening model and it is found that strong polarity of the solvent can cause a red-shift and enhance the intensity of both absorption and emission spectra.

  7. Evaluation of Nitrogen Oxides Emissions over California in Spring 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, M.; Bowman, K. W.; Carmichael, G. R.; Chai, T.; Pierce, R.; Pollack, I. B.; Ryerson, T. B.

    2013-12-01

    Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2) belongs to the regulated 'six common air pollutants' by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), due to its adverse impacts on the human respiratory system. It is also often used as the indicator for the highly reactive group of gases nitrogen oxides (NOx), the important ozone precursors. We model California air quality during the NOAA CalNex field campaign period in May 2010 using the STEM chemical transport model on a 12 km horizontal resolution grid. Three different anthropogenic emission inventories were used in the simulations: 1) 2005 National Emission Inventory (NEI 2005); 2) daily-varying emissions recently developed by California Air Resources Board (CARB); and 3) NEI 2008. The model-simulated NO2 were compared with the measurements by aircraft and the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on board of the Aura satellite. We further conduct NO2 emission inversion using the four-dimensional variational approach [Chai et al., 2009] and the OMI NO2 column data. The inversion generated grid-based emission scaling factors on the NEI 2005, and the resulting NOx fields were 'cross-validated' by comparing with aircraft NO2 measurements. The adjustment on original emissions was then compared with 1) the CARB-documented NOx emission trends, 2) other 'top-down' estimates of California NOx emissions using aircraft measurements [Brioude et al., 2013], and 3) the space-observed NO2 column trends [Russell et al., 2012]. References Chai, T., Carmichael, G., Tang, Y., and Sandu, A., Regional NO2 emission inversion through four-dimensional variational approach using Sciamachy tropospheric column observations, Atmos. Environ., 43, 5046-5055, 2009. Brioude, J., Angevine, W. M., Ahmadov, R., Kim, S.-W., Evan, S., McKeen, S. A., Hsie, E.-Y., Frost, G. J., Neuman, J. A., Pollack, I. B., Peischl, J., Ryerson, T. B., Holloway, J., Brown, S. S., Nowak, J. B., Roberts, J. M., Wofsy, S. C., Santoni, G. W., Oda, T., and Trainer, M.: Top-down estimate of surface

  8. Reactive nitrogen in atmospheric emission inventories – a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Reis

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Excess reactive Nitrogen (Nr has become one of the most pressing environmental problems leading to air pollution, acidification and eutrophication of ecosystems, biodiversity impacts, leaching of nitrates into groundwater and global warming. This paper investigates how current inventories cover emissions of Nr to the atmosphere in Europe, the United States of America, and The People's Republic of China. The focus is on anthropogenic sources, assessing the state-of-the-art of quantifying emissions of Ammonia (NH3, Nitrogen Oxides (NOx and Nitrous Oxide (N2O, the different purposes for which inventories are compiled, and to which extent current inventories meet the needs of atmospheric dispersion modelling. The paper concludes with a discussion of uncertainties involved and a brief outlook on emerging trends in the three regions investigated is conducted.

    Key issues are substantial differences in the overall magnitude, but as well in the relative sectoral contribution of emissions in the inventories that have been assessed. While these can be explained by the use of different methodologies and underlying data (e.g. emission factors or activity rates, they may lead to quite different results when using the emission datasets to model ambient air quality or the deposition with atmospheric dispersion models. Hence, differences and uncertainties in emission inventories are not merely of academic interest, but can have direct policy implications when the development of policy actions is based on these model results.

    The robustness of emission estimates varies greatly between substances, regions and emission source sectors. This has implications for the direction of future research needs and indicates how existing gaps between modelled and measured concentration or deposition rates could be most efficiently addressed.

    The observed current trends in emissions display decreasing NO

  9. Electron beam dispersion measurements in nitrogen using two-dimensional imaging of N2(+) fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, L. H.; Twiss, R. G.; Cattolica, R. J.

    Experimental results are presented related to the radial spread of fluorescence excited by 10 and 20 KeV electron beams passing through nonflowing rarefied nitrogen at 293 K. An imaging technique for obtaining species distributions from measured beam-excited fluorescence is described, based on a signal inversion scheme mathematically equivalent to the inversion of the Abel integral equation. From fluorescence image data, measurements of beam radius, integrated signal intensity, and spatially resolved distributions of N2(+) first-negative-band fluorescence-emitting species have been made. Data are compared with earlier measurements and with an heuristic beam spread model.

  10. Effect of reaction temperature on structure and fluorescence properties of nitrogen-doped carbon dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Wang, Yaling; Feng, Xiaoting; Zhang, Feng; Yang, Yongzhen; Liu, Xuguang

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the effect of reaction temperature and nitrogen doping on the structure and fluorescence properties of carbon dots (CDs), six kinds of nitrogen-doped CDs (NCDs) were synthesized at reaction temperatures of 120, 140, 160, 180, 200 and 220 °C, separately, by using citric acid as carbon source and ammonia solution as nitrogen source. Nitrogen-free CDs (N-free CDs-180) was also prepared at 180 °C by using citric acid as the only carbon source for comparison. Results show that reaction temperature has obvious effect on carbonization degree, quantum yield (QY), ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectra but less effect on functional groups, nitrogen doping degree and fluorescence lifetime of NCDs. Compared with N-free CDs-180, NCDs-180 possesses enchanced QY and longer fluorescence lifetime. Doping nitrogen has obvious effect on UV-vis absorption and PL spectra but less effect on particles sizes and carbonization degree. The formation mechanism of NCDs is explored: QY of NCDs depends largely on the number of fluorescent polymer chains (FPC), the competition between FPC formation on the surface of NCDs and carbon core growth leads to the change in number of FPC, and consequently to the NCDs with highest QY at appropriate hydrothermal temperature.

  11. Effect of reaction temperature on structure and fluorescence properties of nitrogen-doped carbon dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yi [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials (Taiyuan University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Lyuliang University, Lyuliang 033001 (China); Research Center on Advanced Materials Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Wang, Yaling [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials (Taiyuan University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Research Center on Advanced Materials Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Feng, Xiaoting [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials (Taiyuan University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Zhang, Feng [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials (Taiyuan University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Research Center on Advanced Materials Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Yang, Yongzhen, E-mail: yyztyut@126.com [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials (Taiyuan University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Research Center on Advanced Materials Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Liu, Xuguang, E-mail: liuxuguang@tyut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials (Taiyuan University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Nitrogen-doped carbon dots (NCDs) from ammonia solution and citric acid were synthesized at different temperatures. • Quantum yield (QY) of NCDs depends largely on the amount of fluorescent polymer chains (FPC), more FPC gives higher QY. • The law of QY of NCDs first increase and then decrease with the reaction temperature increased is found and explained. • Nitrogen doping plays significant role in getting increased UV–vis absorption and QY. - Abstract: To investigate the effect of reaction temperature and nitrogen doping on the structure and fluorescence properties of carbon dots (CDs), six kinds of nitrogen-doped CDs (NCDs) were synthesized at reaction temperatures of 120, 140, 160, 180, 200 and 220 °C, separately, by using citric acid as carbon source and ammonia solution as nitrogen source. Nitrogen-free CDs (N-free CDs-180) was also prepared at 180 °C by using citric acid as the only carbon source for comparison. Results show that reaction temperature has obvious effect on carbonization degree, quantum yield (QY), ultraviolet-visible (UV–vis) absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectra but less effect on functional groups, nitrogen doping degree and fluorescence lifetime of NCDs. Compared with N-free CDs-180, NCDs-180 possesses enchanced QY and longer fluorescence lifetime. Doping nitrogen has obvious effect on UV–vis absorption and PL spectra but less effect on particles sizes and carbonization degree. The formation mechanism of NCDs is explored: QY of NCDs depends largely on the number of fluorescent polymer chains (FPC), the competition between FPC formation on the surface of NCDs and carbon core growth leads to the change in number of FPC, and consequently to the NCDs with highest QY at appropriate hydrothermal temperature.

  12. Lyman-alpha Emission From Cosmic Structure I: Fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    Kollmeier, Juna A; Davé, Romeel; Gould, Andrew; Katz, Neal; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Weinberg, David H

    2009-01-01

    We present predictions for the fluorescent Lyman-alpha emission signature arising from photoionized, optically thick structures in Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic (SPH) cosmological simulations of a Lambda-CDM universe using a Monte Carlo Lyman-alpha radiative transfer code. We calculate the expected Lyman-alpha image and 2-dimensional spectra for gas exposed to a uniform ultraviolet ionizing background as well as gas exposed additionally to the photoionizing radiation from a local quasar, after correcting for the self-shielding of hydrogen. As a test of our numerical methods and for application to current observations, we examine simplified analytic structures that are uniformly or anisotropically illuminated. We compare these results with recent observations. We discuss future observing campaigns on large telescopes and realistic strategies for detecting fluorescence owing to the ambient metagalactic ionization and in regions close to bright quasars. While it will take hundreds of hours on the current genera...

  13. Mitigation of Nitrogen Emissions from Animal Agriculture in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oenema, O.

    2011-12-01

    More than 70% of the utilized agricultural area (187 Mha) in the 27 Member States of the European Union (EU-27) is used for animal production. In addition, a considerable amount of animal feed is imported. Dairy and beef cattle, pigs, and poultry are the dominant animal species. Total livestock density is highest in the Netherlands, Belgium, Ireland, Denmark and some regions in France, Germany and Italy. The mean nitrogen (N) retention in animal products in EU-27 in 2005 was 20% for milk, 8% for beef, 25% for pork, 38% for poultry and 28% for egg production. This indicates that dairy cows excreted on average 80% of the N intake, beef cattle 92%, pigs 75%, poultry 62% and layers 72%. There was a large variation in N retention between countries. Animal manures and nitrogen (N) fertilizers are main sources of N emissions. In 2005, mean N excretion by animals ranged from less than 25 kg per ha per year in Bulgaria to nearly 250 kg per ha in The Netherlands. On average 25% of the total amount of N excreted was lost as ammonia (NH3) to the atmosphere, though with a considerable variation between countries. About 10% was lost as NH3-N from housing systems, 9% from manure application to land, 4% from manure storage and treatment facilities, and 3% from grazing. Nitrogen leaching was in the same order of magnitude. Animal production also had a considerable share in the total emissions of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere (range 5-25%). Especially dairy cattle and beef cattle contribute to the emissions of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) to the atmosphere. Considerable efforts are being made to decrease N emissions from agriculture in EU-27. Good agricultural practices and mandatory emission mitigation measures are enforced through EU environmental policies, including Nitrates Directive, National Emissions Ceiling Directive, and Water Framework Directive. Some countries have succeeded to decrease the NH3 emissions to air and N leaching losses to groundwater and

  14. Plasmon-enhanced emission from single fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donehue, Jessica E.; Haas, Beth L.; Wertz, Esther; Talicska, Courtney N.; Biteen, Julie S.

    2013-02-01

    In this work, we use evaporated gold nanoparticle films (GNPFs) as substrates for plasmon-enhanced imaging of two fluorescent proteins (FPs): mCherry and YFP. Through single-molecule epifluorescence microscopy, we show enhancement of single FP emission in the presence of GNPFs. The gold-coupled FPs demonstrate emission up to four times brighter and seven times longer lived, yielding order-of-magnitude enhancements in total photons detected. Ultimately, this results in increased localization accuracies for single-molecule imaging. Furthermore, we introduce preliminary results for enhancement of mCherry-labeled TcpP membrane proteins inside live Vibrio cholerae cells coupled to GNPFs. Our work indicates that plasmonic substrates are uniquely advantageous for super-resolution imaging and that plasmon-enhanced imaging is a promising technique for improving live cell single-molecule microscopy.

  15. Ultrahigh magnetically responsive microplatelets with tunable fluorescence emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libanori, Rafael; Reusch, Frieder B; Erb, Randall M; Studart, André R

    2013-11-26

    Tuning the optical properties of suspensions by controlling the orientation and spatial distribution of suspended particles with magnetic fields is an interesting approach to creating magnetically controlled displays, microrheology sensors, and materials with tunable light emission. However, the relatively high concentration of magnetic material required to manipulate these particles very often reduces the optical transmittance of the system. In this study, we describe a simple method of generating particles with magnetically tunable optical properties via sol-gel deposition and functionalization of a continuous layer of silica on ultrahigh magnetically responsive (UHMR) alumina microplatelets. UHMR microplatelets with tunable magnetic response in the range of 15-36 G are obtained by the electrostatic adsorption of 2 to 13% of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) on the alumina surface. The magnetized platelets are coated with a 20-50 nm layer of SiO2 through the controlled hydrolysis and condensation reactions of tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) in an NH3/ethanol mixture. Finally, the silica surface is covalently modified with an organic fluorescent dye by conventional silane chemistry. Because of the anisotropic shape of the particles, control of their orientation and distribution using magnetic fields and field gradients enables easy tuning of the optical properties of the suspension. This strategy allows us to gain both spatial and temporal control over the fluorescence emission from the particle surface, making the multifunctional platelets interesting building blocks for the manipulation of light in colloid-based smart optical devices and sensors.

  16. Nitrogen oxides emission from two beech forests subjected to different nitrogen loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Kitzler

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available We analysed nitrogen oxides (N2O, NO and NO2 and carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions from two beech forest soils close to Vienna, Austria, which were exposed to different nitrogen input from the atmosphere. The site Schottenwald (SW received 22.6 kg N y-1 and Klausenleopoldsdorf (KL 13.5 kg N y-1 through wet and dry deposition. Nitrogen oxide emissions from soil were measured hourly with an automatic dynamic chamber system. Daily N2O measurements were carried out by an automatic gas sampling system. Measurements of nitrous oxide (N2O and CO2 emissions were conducted over larger areas on a biweekly (SW or monthly (KL basis by manually operated chambers. We used an autoregression procedure (time-series analysis for establishing time-lagged relationships between N-oxide emissions and different climate, soil chemistry and N-deposition data. It was found that changes in soil moisture and soil temperature significantly effected CO2 and N-oxide emissions with a time lag of up to two weeks and could explain up to 95% of the temporal variations of gas emissions. Event emissions after rain or during freezing and thawing cycles contributed significantly (for NO 50% to overall N-oxides emissions. In the two-year period of analysis the annual gaseous N2O losses at SW ranged from 0.65 to 0.77 kg N ha-1 y-1 and NO losses were 0.18 to 0.67 kg N ha-1 per vegetation period. In KL significantly lower annual N2O emissions (0.52 kg N2O-N kg ha-1 y-1 as well as considerably lower NO-losses were observed. During a three-month measurement campaign NO losses at KL were 0.02 kg, whereas in the same time period significantly more NO was emitted in SW (0.32 kg NO-N ha-1. Higher N-oxide emissions, especially NO emissions from the high N-input site (SW indicate that atmospheric

  17. Absolute measurement of the nitrogen fluorescence yield in air between 300 and 430 nm

    CERN Document Server

    Lefeuvre, G; Gorodetzky, P; Patzak, T; Salin, P

    2007-01-01

    The nitrogen fluorescence induced in air is used to detect ultra-high energy cosmic rays and to measure their energy. The precise knowledge of the absolute fluorescence yield is the key quantity to improve the accuracy on the cosmic ray energy. The total yield has been measured in dry air using a 90Sr source and a [300-430 nm] filter. The fluorescence yield in air is 4.23 $\\pm$ 0.20 photons per meter when normalized to 760 mmHg, 15 degrees C and with an electron energy of 0.85 MeV. This result is consistent with previous experiments made at various energies, but with an accuracy improved by a factor of about 3. For the first time, the absolute continuous spectrum of nitrogen excited by 90Sr electrons has also been measured with a spectrometer. Details of this experiment are given in one of the author's PhD thesis [32].

  18. Efficient signal processing for time-resolved fluorescence detection of nitrogen-vacancy spins in diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, A.; Hacquebard, L.; Childress, L.

    2016-03-01

    Room-temperature fluorescence detection of the nitrogen-vacancy center electronic spin typically has low signal to noise, requiring long experiments to reveal an averaged signal. Here, we present a simple approach to analysis of time-resolved fluorescence data that permits an improvement in measurement precision through signal processing alone. Applying our technique to experimental data reveals an improvement in signal to noise equivalent to a 14% increase in photon collection efficiency. We further explore the dependence of the signal to noise ratio on excitation power, and analyze our results using a rate equation model. Our results provide a rubric for optimizing fluorescence spin detection, which has direct implications for improving precision of nitrogen-vacancy-based sensors.

  19. Nitrogen biogeochemistry in tropical peatlands: nitrogen gas emissions and metagenomic insights into related microbial groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasak, Kuno; Espenberg, Mikk; Oopkaup, Kristjan; Ligi, Teele; Truu, Marika; Truu, Jaak; Maddison, Martin; Järveoja, Järvi; Teemusk, Alar; Mander, Ülo

    2017-04-01

    Tropical peatlands constitute considerable amount of global peatland areas and are one of the most important and vulnerable terrestrial ecosystems in terms of impact on the atmospheric greenhouse gas composition. Anthropogenic actions, especially drainage and agriculture, are transforming biochemical cycles in tropical peatlands substantially. It is well known that drainage of tropical peatlands will result in huge amount of carbon loss, however a comprehensive study of the nitrogen cycling genetic potential in tropical areas is still less known. In the current study, nitrogen gas (N2, N2O) emissions from tropical peatlands (French Guiana, South America) were measured and their relationships with the soil chemical parameters, water regime, and abundances and diversity of genes in nitrogen cycle was assessed. The measurements and soil sampling were carried out in October 2013 in two sites (undisturbed and drainage influenced) of the northern part of French Guiana. At both sampling sites, N2O emissions were measured in six sessions during three days using static closed chambers. N2 and N2O emission from the top soil samples were measured in the laboratory applying He-O (N2) method. Soil pHKCl, NO3-N, NH4-N, soluble P, K, Ca and Mg, totN and soil organic matter content were determined from the collected samples. The bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes and functional genes involved in nitrogen cycle (nirS, nirK, nosZI, nosZII, bacterial and archaeal amoA, nifH, nrfA, ANAMMOX bacteria specific 16S rRNA genes) in soil were quantified by using quantitative PCR method. DNA extracted from soil samples was sequenced on Illumina NextSeq system. Metagenomes were used for microbial profiling, identifying functional genes and relating them to biogeochemical cycles and biological processes. N2O emissions were significantly lower and N2 emissions higher (p<0.05 in both cases) in natural site (mean values -0.3 and 9.9 μg m-2 h-1 for N2O, and 1477.3 and 637.2 μg m-2 h-1 for N2

  20. Fluorescence-excitation and Emission Spectroscopy on Single FMO Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhner, Alexander; Ashraf, Khuram; Cogdell, Richard J; Köhler, Jürgen

    2016-08-22

    In green-sulfur bacteria sunlight is absorbed by antenna structures termed chlorosomes, and transferred to the RC via the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex. FMO consists of three monomers arranged in C3 symmetry where each monomer accommodates eight Bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) molecules. It was the first pigment-protein complex for which the structure has been determined with high resolution and since then this complex has been the subject of numerous studies both experimentally and theoretically. Here we report about fluorescence-excitation spectroscopy as well as emission spectroscopy from individual FMO complexes at low temperatures. The individual FMO complexes are subjected to very fast spectral fluctuations smearing out any possible different information from the ensemble data that were recorded under the same experimental conditions. In other words, on the time scales that are experimentally accessible by single-molecule techniques, the FMO complex exhibits ergodic behaviour.

  1. Measurement of undisturbed di-nitrogen emissions from aquatic ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Shuping, Clough, Timothy, Lou, Jiafa; Hu, Chunsheng; Oenema, Oene; Wrage-Mönnig, Nicole; Zhang, Yuming

    2016-04-01

    Increased production of reactive nitrogen (Nr) from atmospheric di-nitrogen (N2) during the last century has greatly contributed to increased food production1-4. However, enriching the biosphere with Nr through N fertilizer production, combustion, and biological N2 fixation has also caused a series of negative effects on global ecosystems 5,6, especially aquatic ecosystems7. The main pathway converting Nr back into the atmospheric N2 pool is the last step of the denitrification process, i.e., the reduction of nitrous oxide (N2O) into N2 by micro-organisms7,8. Despite several attempts9,10, there is not yet an accurate, fast and direct method for measuring undisturbed N2 fluxes from denitrification in aquatic sediments at the field scale11-14. Such a method is essential to study the feedback of aquatic ecosystems to Nr inputs1,2,7. Here we show that the measurement of both N2O emission and its isotope signature can be used to infer the undisturbed N2 fluxes from aquatic ecosystems. The microbial reduction of N2O increases the natural abundance of 15N-N2O relative to 14N-N2O (δ15N-N2O). We observed linear relationships between δ15N-N2O and the logarithmic transformed N2O/(N2+N2O) emission ratios. Through independent measurements, we verified that the undisturbed N2 flux from aquatic ecosystems can be inferred from measurements of N2O emissions and the δ15N-N2O signature. Our method allows the determination of field-scale N2 fluxes from undisturbed aquatic ecosystems, and thereby allows model predictions of denitrification rates to be tested. The undisturbed N2 fluxes observed are almost one order of magnitude higher than those estimated by the traditional method, where perturbation of the system occurs, indicating that the ability of aquatic ecosystems to remove Nr may have been severely underestimated.

  2. Analyzing the performance of fluorescence parameters in the monitoring of leaf nitrogen content of paddy rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian; Gong, Wei; Shi, Shuo; Du, Lin; Sun, Jia; Song, Shalei; Chen, Biwu; Zhang, Zhenbing

    2016-06-01

    Leaf nitrogen content (LNC) is a significant factor which can be utilized to monitor the status of paddy rice and it requires a reliable approach for fast and precise quantification. This investigation aims to quantitatively analyze the correlation between fluorescence parameters and LNC based on laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technology. The fluorescence parameters exhibited a consistent positive linear correlation with LNC in different growing years (2014 and 2015) and different rice cultivars. The R2 of the models varied from 0.6978 to 0.9045. Support vector machine (SVM) was then utilized to verify the feasibility of the fluorescence parameters for monitoring LNC. Comparison of the fluorescence parameters indicated that F740 is the most sensitive (the R2 of linear regression analysis of the between predicted and measured values changed from 0.8475 to 0.9226, and REs ranged from 3.52% to 4.83%) to the changes in LNC among all fluorescence parameters. Experimental results demonstrated that fluorescence parameters based on LIF technology combined with SVM is a potential method for realizing real-time, non-destructive monitoring of paddy rice LNC, which can provide guidance for the decision-making of farmers in their N fertilization strategies.

  3. Purcell-Enhanced Single-Photon Emission from Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers Coupled to a Tunable Microcavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaupp, Hanno; Hümmer, Thomas; Mader, Matthias; Schlederer, Benedikt; Benedikter, Julia; Haeusser, Philip; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Fedder, Helmut; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Hunger, David

    2016-11-01

    Optical microcavities are a powerful tool for enhancing the fluorescence of individual quantum emitters. However, the broad emission spectra encountered in the solid state at room temperature limit the influence of a cavity, calling for an ultrasmall mode volume. We demonstrate Purcell-enhanced single-photon emission from nitrogen-vacancy centers in nanodiamonds coupled to a tunable fiber-based microcavity with a mode volume down to 1.0 λ3. We record cavity-enhanced fluorescence images and study several single emitters with one cavity. The Purcell effect is evidenced by enhanced fluorescence collection and tunable lifetime modification, and we infer an effective Purcell factor of up to 2. Furthermore, we show an alternative regime for light confinement, where a Fabry-Perot mode is combined with additional mode confinement by the nanocrystal itself. Simulations predict effective Purcell factors of up to 11 for nitrogen-vacancy centers and 63 for silicon-vacancy centers, holding promise for bright single-photon sources and efficient spin readout under ambient conditions.

  4. The effect of nitrogen fertilization on the COS and CS2 emissions from temperature forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melillo, Jerry M.; Steudler, Paul A.

    1989-11-01

    The net fluxes of carbonyl sulfide (COS) and CS2 to the atmosphere from nitrogen amended and unamended deciduous and coniferous forest soils were measured during the spring of 1986. It was found that emissions of these gases from acidic forest soils were substantially increased after nitrogen fertilization. The total (COS + CS2) emissions were increased by nearly a factor of three in the hardwood stand and were more than doubled in the pine stand. Furthermore, vegetation type appeared to have an influence on which was the dominant sulfur gas released from the forest soils. The added nitrogen caused a dramatic increase in COS emissions from the hardwood stand (a factor of 3 increase), while CS2 emissions from this site were not affected. The opposite response was observed in the pine stand; that is, the nitrogen fertilization had no effect on COS emissions, but did stimulate CS2 emissions (a factor of more than 9 increase).

  5. Determination of the Residual Anthracene Concentration in Cultures of Haloalkalitolerant Actinomycetes by Excitation Fluorescence, Emission Fluorescence, and Synchronous Fluorescence: Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyna del Carmen Lara-Severino

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are compounds that can be quantified by fluorescence due to their high quantum yield. Haloalkalitolerant bacteria tolerate wide concentration ranges of NaCl and pH. They are potentially useful in the PAHs bioremediation of saline environments. However, it is known that salinity of the sample affects fluorescence signal regardless of the method. The objective of this work was to carry out a comparative study based on the sensitivity, linearity, and detection limits of the excitation, emission, and synchronous fluorescence methods, during the quantification of the residual anthracene concentration from the following haloalkalitolerant actinomycetes cultures Kocuria rosea, Kocuria palustris, Microbacterium testaceum, and 4 strains of Nocardia farcinica, in order to establish the proper fluorescence method to study the PAHs biodegrading capacity of haloalkalitolerant actinobacteria. The study demonstrated statistical differences among the strains and among the fluorescence methods regarding the anthracene residual concentration. The results showed that excitation and emission fluorescence methods performed very similarly but sensitivity in excitation fluorescence is slightly higher. Synchronous fluorescence using Δλ=150 nm is not the most convenient method. Therefore we propose the excitation fluorescence as the fluorescence method to be used in the study of the PAHs biodegrading capacity of haloalkalitolerant actinomycetes.

  6. Biomolecule-to-fluorescent-color encoder: modulation of fluorescence emission via DNA structural changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Takahiro; Ogura, Yusuke; Yamada, Kenji; Ohno, Yuko; Tanida, Jun

    2014-07-01

    A biomolecule-to-fluorescent-color (B/F) encoder for optical readout of biomolecular information is proposed. In the B/F encoder, a set of fluorescence wavelengths and their intensity levels are used for coding of a biomolecular signal. A hybridization chain reaction of hairpin DNAs labeled with fluorescent reporters was performed to generate the fluorescence color codes. The fluorescence is modulated via fluorescence resonance energy transfer, which is controlled by DNA structural changes. The results demonstrate that fluorescent color codes can be configured based on two wavelengths and five intensities using the B/F encoder, and the assigned codes can be retrieved via fluorescence measurements.

  7. Fluorescence spectral studies of Gum Arabic: Multi-emission of Gum Arabic in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhenadhayalan, Namasivayam, E-mail: ndhena@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Mythily, Rajan, E-mail: rajanmythily@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Dwaraka Doss Goverdhan Doss Vaishnav College (Autonomous), 833, Gokul Bagh, E.V.R. Periyar Road, Arumbakkam, Chennai 600 106 (India); Kumaran, Rajendran, E-mail: kumaranwau@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Dwaraka Doss Goverdhan Doss Vaishnav College (Autonomous), 833, Gokul Bagh, E.V.R. Periyar Road, Arumbakkam, Chennai 600 106 (India)

    2014-11-15

    Gum Arabic (GA), a food hydrocolloid is a natural composite obtained from the stems and branches of Acacia Senegal and Acacia Seyal trees. GA structure is made up of highly branched arabinogalactan polysaccharides. Steady-state absorption, fluorescence, and time-resolved fluorescence spectral studies of acid hydrolyzed GA solutions were carried out at various pH conditions. The fluorescence in GA is predominantly attributed to the presence of tyrosine and phenylalanine amino acids. The presence of multi-emissive peaks at different pH condition is attributed to the exposure of the fluorescing amino acids to the aqueous phase, which contains several sugar units, hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties. Time-resolved fluorescence studies of GA exhibits a multi-exponential decay with different fluorescence lifetime of varying amplitude which confirms that tyrosine is confined to a heterogeneous microenvironment. The existence of multi-emissive peaks with large variation in the fluorescence intensities were established by 3D emission contour spectral studies. The probable location of the fluorophore in a heterogeneous environment was further ascertained by constructing a time-resolved emission spectrum (TRES) and time-resolved area normalized emission spectrum (TRANES) plots. Fluorescence spectral technique is used as an analytical tool in understanding the photophysical properties of a water soluble complex food hydrocolloid containing an intrinsic fluorophore located in a multiple environment is illustrated. - Highlights: • The Manuscript deals with the steady state absorption, emission, fluorescence lifetime and time-resolved emission spectrum studies of Gum Arabic in aqueous medium at various pH conditions. • The fluorescence emanates from the tyrosine amino acid present in GA. • Change in pH results in marked variation in the fluorescence spectral properties of tyrosine. • Fluorescence spectral techniques are employed as a tool in establishing the

  8. The influence of emission changes on ozone concentrations and nitrogen deposition into the southern North Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke M.I. Meyer

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The impact of changes in amount of emission for NOx (Nitrogen monoxide NO + Nitrogen dioxide NO2 and NMVOC (Non Methane Volatile Organic Compounds on concentrations of ozone (O3, NOx, nitric acid (HNO3 and on nitrogen deposition in the area of the southern North Sea are investigated. One reference case for the period 16 June till 20 June, 1998 and six emission scenarios are calculated. Spatial and temporal emission patterns are kept and overall emission factors are used that correspond to years 1998 (reference, 1970 and 2010. Some more artificial emission scenarios are constructed to investigate the effect of a changed ratio of NOx to NMVOC emissions. The meteorology is unchanged for all scenarios. The studies are performed with the meteorology/chemistry model M-SYS (METRAS/MECTM including a simple aerosol chemistry and using a horizontal resolution of 8 km. Changes in emissions of NMVOC and NOx cause nonlinear changes in O3, NOx and HNO3 concentrations. The concentration changes depend on emission changes and on changes in the ratio of NMVOC to NOx emissions. The whole area, over land and water, turns out to be in the NMVOC limited regime. Ozone scenario concentrations linearly depend on the ratio of NMVOC to NOx emissions. NOx concentrations linearly depend on changes in the total emissions of NOx and NMVOC. They are inversely related to changes in the ratio of NMVOC to NOx emissions. HNO3 concentrations mainly depend on the total emission changes with NOx emission changes being of doubled relevance compared to NMVOC emission changes. The same relation is found for nitrogen deposition. Compared to mean ozone concentrations from the reference case, higher (lower NOx emissions reduce (increase ozone concentrations, while HNO3 concentrations are increased (reduced. In contrast, reduced (increased NMVOC emissions reduce (increase both, ozone and HNO3 concentrations and, in addition, the nitrogen deposition.

  9. Optical absorption and emission of nitrogen-doped silicon nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Xiaodong; Chen, Xiaobo; Ma, Yeshi; Yang, Deren

    2011-11-01

    Silicon nanocrystals (Si NCs) may be both unintentionally and intentionally doped with nitrogen (N) during their synthesis and processing. Since the importance of Si NCs largely originates from their remarkable optical properties, it is critical to understand the effect of N doping on the optical behavior of Si NCs. On the basis of theoretical calculations, we show that the doping of Si NCs with N most likely leads to the formation of paired interstitial N at the NC surface, which causes both the optical absorption and emission of Si NCs to redshift. But these redshifts are smaller than those induced by doubly bonded O at the NC surface. It is found that high radiative recombination rates can be reliably obtained for Si NCs with paired interstitial N at the NC surface. The current results not only help to understand the optical behavior of Si NCs synthesized and processed in N-containing environments, but also inspire intentional N doping as an additional means to control the optical properties of Si NCs.

  10. Nitrogen emission balance for Niedersachsen; Bilanzierung der Stickstoffemissionen in Niedersachsen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krieg, V.

    2000-07-01

    This report provides a comprehensive emission balance for the German state of Niedersachsen, which will provide a basis for deciding on actions to reduce nitrogen levels. [German] In einem natuerlichen Oekosystem erfolgt der Grossteil des Stickstoffumsatzes als Kreisprozess, aus dem nur verhaeltnismaessig geringe Mengen in das System importiert bzw. aus dem System exportiert werden. Durch menschliche Nutzungsaktivitaeten wie insbesondere im landwirtschaftlichen Bereich sowie durch atmosphaerische Eintraege wird dieser natuerliche Kreislauf stark beeintraechtigt. In der Regel kann in den dicht besiedelten industriell gepraegten und landwirtschaftlich intensiv genutzten Regionen Europas von einem deutlichen Stickstoffueberschuss ausgegangen werden mit den negativen Folgen von Boden- und Gewaesserbelastung und den Eutrophierungserscheinungen bei aquatischen und terrestrischen Oekosystemen. Der dringende Handlungsbedarf zur Senkung der menschlich verursachten Stickstoffueberschuesse ist offensichtlich und in einem Bericht der Arbeitsgruppe aus Vertretern der Umwelt- und Agrarministerkonferenz (STICKSTOFFMINDERUNGSPROGRAMM, 1997) dokumentiert. Grundlage fuer entsprechende Massnahmen muss der Nachweis der entsprechenden Emissionsquellen unter Beruecksichtigung von wechselseitigen Beeinflussungen sein. Der vorliegende Bericht liefert fuer das Bundesland Niedersachsen eine vollstaendige Bilanzierung und damit eine fundierte Basis fuer entsprechende Handlungsempfehlungen zur Reduzierung des Stickstoffniveaus. (orig.)

  11. Fluorescence Emission from Small Molecules Containing Amino Group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    After the treatment of oxygen gas, the small molecules containing amine group could emit fluorescence. Oxidation was believed to play an important role in the formation of fluorescence centers. Compared to previous results, both small molecules and macromolecules might have the same fluorescence centers.

  12. 40 CFR 77.6 - Penalties for excess emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... excess emissions, a demand notice for the payment. (d)(1) Except for wire transfers made in accordance... penalties of $25,000 or more may be made by wire transfer to the U.S. Treasury at the Federal Reserve Bank... contemporaneous emission limitations or annual heat input limits, then excess emissions of nitrogen oxides...

  13. Influence of nitrogen loading and plant nitrogen assimilation on nitrogen leaching and N₂O emission in forage rice paddy fields fertilized with liquid cattle waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riya, Shohei; Zhou, Sheng; Kobara, Yuso; Sagehashi, Masaki; Terada, Akihiko; Hosomi, Masaaki

    2015-04-01

    Livestock wastewater disposal onto rice paddy fields is a cost- and labor-effective way to treat wastewater and cultivate rice crops. We evaluated the influence of nitrogen loading rates on nitrogen assimilation by rice plants and on nitrogen losses (leaching and N2O emission) in forage rice fields receiving liquid cattle waste (LCW). Four forage rice fields were subjected to nitrogen loads of 107, 258, 522, and 786 kg N ha(-1) (N100, N250, N500, and N750, respectively) using basal fertilizer (chemical fertilizer) (50 kg N ha(-1)) and three LCW topdressings (each 57-284 kg N ha(-1)). Nitrogen assimilated by rice plants increased over time. However, after the third topdressing, the nitrogen content of the biomass did not increase in any treatment. Harvested aboveground biomass contained 93, 60, 33, and 31 % of applied nitrogen in N100, N250, N500, and N750, respectively. The NH4 (+) concentration in the pore water at a depth of 20 cm was less than 1 mg N L(-1) in N100, N250, and N500 throughout the cultivation period, while the NH4 (+) concentration in N750 increased to 3 mg N L(-1) after the third topdressing. Cumulative N2O emissions ranged from -0.042 to 2.39 kg N ha(-1); the highest value was observed in N750, followed by N500. In N750, N2O emitted during the final drainage accounted for 80 % of cumulative N2O emissions. This study suggested that 100-258 kg N ha(-1) is a recommended nitrogen loading rate for nitrogen recovery by rice plants without negative environmental impacts such as groundwater pollution and N2O emission.

  14. Purcell-enhanced single-photon emission from nitrogen-vacancy centers coupled to a tunable microcavity

    CERN Document Server

    Kaupp, Hanno; Mader, Matthias; Schlederer, Benedikt; Benedikter, Julia; Haeusser, Philip; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Fedder, Helmut; Hänsch, Theodor W; Hunger, David

    2016-01-01

    Optical microcavities are a powerful tool to enhance spontaneous emission of individual quantum emitters. However, the broad emission spectra encountered in the solid state at room temperature limit the influence of a cavity, and call for ultra-small mode volume. We demonstrate Purcell-enhanced single photon emission from nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in nanodiamonds coupled to a tunable fiber-based microcavity with a mode volume down to $1.0\\,\\lambda^{3}$. We record cavity-enhanced fluorescence images and study several single emitters with one cavity. The Purcell effect is evidenced by enhanced fluorescence collection, as well as tunable fluorescence lifetime modification, and we infer an effective Purcell factor of up to 2.0. With numerical simulations, we furthermore show that a novel regime for light confinement can be achieved, where a Fabry-Perot mode is combined with additional mode confinement by the nanocrystal itself. In this regime, effective Purcell factors of up to 11 for NV centers and 63 for si...

  15. Improved speciation of dissolved organic nitrogen in natural waters: amide hydrolysis with fluorescence derivatization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ryan L.Firnmen; Tamara D.Trouts; Daniel D.Richter Jr.; Dharni Vasudevan

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to improve primary-amine nitrogen (1°-N) quantification in dissolved organic matter (DOM)originating from natural waters where inorganic forms of N, which may cause analytical interference, are commonly encountered.Efforts were targeted at elucidating organic-N structural criteria influencing the response of organic amines to known colorimetric andfluorescent reagents and exploring the use of divalent metal-assisted amide hydrolysis in combination with fluorescence analyses.We found that reaction of o-phthaldialdehyde (OPA) with primary amines is significantly influenced by steric factors, whereasfluorescamine (FLU) lacks sensitivity to steric factors and allows for the detection of a larger suite of organic amines, includingdi- and tri-peptides and sterically hindered 1°-N. Due to the near quantitative recovery of dissolved peptides with the FLU reagent andlack of analytical response to inorganic nitrogen, we proposed that FLU be utilized for the quantification of primary amine nitrogen.In exploring the application of divalent metal promoted peptide hydrolysis to the analysis of organic forms of nitrogen in DOM, wefound that Zn(Ⅱ) reaction increased the total fraction of organic-N detectable by both OPA and FLU reagents. Zn-hydrolysis improvedrecovery of organic-N in natural waters from<5% to 35%. The above method, coupled with standard inorganic-N analyses, allows forenhanced resolution of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) speciation in natural waters.

  16. Influence of carbohydrate addition on nitrogen transformations and greenhouse gas emissions of intensive aquaculture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhen; Lee, Jae Woo; Chandran, Kartik; Kim, Sungpyo; Sharma, Keshab; Khanal, Samir Kumar

    2014-02-01

    Aquaculture is one of the fastest-growing segments of the food economy in modern times. It is also being considered as an important source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. To date, limited studies have been conducted on GHG emissions from aquaculture system. In this study, daily addition of fish feed and soluble starch at a carbon-to-nitrogen (C/N) ratio of 16:1 (w/w) was used to examine the effects of carbohydrate addition on nitrogen transformations and GHG emissions in a zero-water exchange intensive aquaculture system. The addition of soluble starch stimulated heterotrophic bacterial growth and denitrification, which led to lower total ammonia nitrogen, nitrite and nitrate concentrations in aqueous phase. About 76.2% of the nitrogen output was emitted in the form of gaseous nitrogen (i.e., N2 and N2O) in the treatment tank (i.e., aquaculture tank with soluble starch addition), while gaseous nitrogen accounted for 33.3% of the nitrogen output in the control tank (i.e., aquaculture tank without soluble starch addition). Although soluble starch addition reduced daily N2O emissions by 83.4%, it resulted in an increase of daily carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by 91.1%. Overall, starch addition did not contribute to controlling the GHG emissions from the aquaculture system.

  17. Fluxes of oxidised and reduced nitrogen above a mixed coniferous forest exposed to various nitrogen emission sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neirynck, J. [Research Institute for Nature and Forest, Gaverstraat 4, B-9500 Geraardsbergen (Belgium)]. E-mail: johan.neirynck@inbo.be; Kowalski, A.S. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicida, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Granada, Calle Fuentenueva, SP-18071 Granada (Spain); Carrara, A. [Fundacion CEAM, Parque Technologico, Calle Charles H. Darwin 14, SP-46980 Paterna (Valencia) (Spain); Genouw, G. [Research Institute for Nature and Forest, Gaverstraat 4, B-9500 Geraardsbergen (Belgium); Berghmans, P. [Flemish Institute for Technological Research, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Ceulemans, R. [Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk (Antwerp) (Belgium)

    2007-09-15

    Concentrations of nitrogen gases (NH{sub 3}, NO{sub 2}, NO, HONO and HNO{sub 3}) and particles (pNH{sub 4} and pNO{sub 3}) were measured over a mixed coniferous forest impacted by high nitrogen loads. Nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) represented the main nitrogen form, followed by nitric oxide (NO) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}). A combination of gradient method (NH{sub 3} and NO {sub x} ) and resistance modelling techniques (HNO{sub 3}, HONO, pNH{sub 4} and pNO{sub 3}) was used to calculate dry deposition of nitrogen compounds. Net flux of NH{sub 3} amounted to -64 ng N m{sup -2} s{sup -1} over the measuring period. Net fluxes of NO {sub x} were upward (8.5 ng N m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) with highest emission in the morning. Fluxes of other gases or aerosols substantially contributed to dry deposition. Total nitrogen deposition was estimated at -48 kg N ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1} and consisted for almost 80% of NH {sub x} . Comparison of throughfall nitrogen with total deposition suggested substantial uptake of reduced N ({+-}15 kg N ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}) within the canopy. - Reduced nitrogen was found to be the main contributor to total deposition which was predominantly governed by dry deposition.

  18. Assessing topographic cutaneous autofluorescence variation using fluorescence UV and visible excitation emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianhua; Zandi, Soodabeh; Feng, Florina; Zeng, Haishan; McLean, David I.; Lui, Harvey

    2011-03-01

    Cutaneous autofluorescence properties were systematically studied using fluorescence excitation emission matrix spectroscopy. Twenty-six healthy subjects with a mean age of 34 (range 21-74) participated in this study. The fluorescence of major skin fluorophores such as tryptophan, collagen, elastin and NADH could be readily identified. On average, facial skin shows strong tryptophan and measurable porphyrin fluorescence; the palm and nail show strong tryptophan and keratin fluorescence. These results demonstrate that regional topographic variations exist not only in the amount of fluorescence but also in the relative distribution of fluorophores in normal skin. Moreover this provides a basis for future interpretation of autofluorescence in diseased skin.

  19. Fluorescent carbon nanowires made by pyrolysis of DNA nanofibers and plasmon-assisted emission enhancement of their fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Hidenobu; Tokonami, Shiho; Yamamoto, Yojiro; Shiigi, Hiroshi; Takeda, Yoshihiko

    2014-10-14

    We report on a facile method for preparing fluorescent carbon nanowires (CNWs) with pyrolysis of highly aligned DNA nanofibers as carbon sources. Silver nanoparticle (AgNP)-doped CNWs were also produced using pyrolysis of DNA nanofibers with well-attached AgNPs, indicating emission enhancement assisted by localized plasmon resonances.

  20. Future trends in worldwide river nitrogen transport and related nitrous oxide emissions : a scenario analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroeze, C.; Seitzinger, S.P.; Domingues, R.

    2001-01-01

    We analyze possible future trends in dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) export by world rivers and associated emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O). Our scenarios either assume that current trends continue or that nitrogen (N) inputs to aquatic systems are reduced as a result of changes in agriculture pr

  1. Effects of nitrogen loading on greenhouse gas emissions in salt marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, J.; Moseman-Valtierra, S.; Kroeger, K. D.; Morkeski, K.; Mora, J.; Chen, X.; Carey, J.

    2014-12-01

    Salt marshes play an important role in global and regional carbon and nitrogen cycling. We tested the hypothesis that anthropogenic nitrogen loading alters greenhouse gas (GHG, including CO2, CH4, and N2O) emissions and carbon sequestration in salt marshes. We measured GHG emissions biweekly for two growing seasons across a nitrogen-loading gradient of four Spartina salt marshes in Waquoit Bay, Massachusetts. In addition, we conducted nitrogen addition experiments in a pristine marsh by adding low and high nitrate to triplicate plots bi-weekly during the summer. The GHG flux measurements were made in situ with a state-of-the-art mobile gas measurement system using the cavity ring down technology that consists of a CO2/CH4 analyzer (Picarro) and an N2O/CO analyzer (Los Gatos). We observed strong seasonal variations in greenhouse gas emissions. The differences in gas emissions across the nitrogen gradient were not significant, but strong pulse emissions of N2O were observed after nitrogen was artificially added to the marsh. Our results will facilitate model development to simulate GHG emissions in coastal wetlands and support methodology development to assess carbon credits in preserving and restoring coastal wetlands.

  2. Energy transfer in Anabaena variabilis filaments adapted to nitrogen-depleted and nitrogen-enriched conditions studied by time-resolved fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Aya; Aikawa, Shimpei; Kondo, Akihiko; Akimoto, Seiji

    2017-02-16

    Nitrogen is among the most important nutritious elements for photosynthetic organisms such as plants, algae, and cyanobacteria. Therefore, nitrogen depletion severely compromises the growth, development, and photosynthesis of these organisms. To preserve their integrity under nitrogen-depleted conditions, filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria reduce atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia, and self-adapt by regulating their light-harvesting and excitation energy-transfer processes. To investigate the changes in the primary processes of photosynthesis, we measured the steady-state absorption and fluorescence spectra and time-resolved fluorescence spectra (TRFS) of whole filaments of the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis at 77 K. The filaments were grown in standard and nitrogen-free media for 6 months. The TRFS were measured with a picosecond time-correlated single photon counting system. Despite the phycobilisome degradation, the energy-transfer paths within phycobilisome and from phycobilisome to both photosystems were maintained. However, the energy transfer from photosystem II to photosystem I was suppressed and a specific red chlorophyll band appeared under the nitrogen-depleted condition.

  3. Excitation emission and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of selected varnishes used in historical musical instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin, Austin; Echard, Jean-Philippe; Thoury, Mathieu; Comelli, Daniela; Valentini, Gianluca; Cubeddu, Rinaldo

    2009-11-15

    The analysis of various varnishes from different origins, which are commonly found on historical musical instruments was carried out for the first time with both fluorescence excitation emission spectroscopy and laser-induced time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Samples studied include varnishes prepared using shellac, and selected diterpenoid and triterpenoid resins from plants, and mixtures of these materials. Fluorescence excitation emission spectra have been collected from films of naturally aged varnishes. In parallel, time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of varnishes provides means for discriminating between short- (less than 2.0 ns) and long-lived (greater than 7.5 ns) fluorescence emissions in each of these complex materials. Results suggest that complementary use of the two non destructive techniques allows a better understanding of the main fluorophores responsible for the emission in shellac, and further provides means for distinguishing the main classes of other varnishes based on differences in fluorescence lifetime behaviour. Spectrofluorimetric data and time resolved spectra presented here may form the basis for the interpretation of results from future in situ fluorescence examination and time resolved fluorescence imaging of varnished musical instruments.

  4. Determination of optimal excitation and emission wavebands for detection of defect cherry tomato by using fluorescence emission and excitation matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, In-Suck; Cho, Byoung-Kwan; Kim, Moon S.; Kim, Young-Sik

    2013-05-01

    Fluorescence imaging technique has been widely used for quality and safety measurements of agro-food materials. Fluorescence emission intensities of target materials are influenced by wavelengths of excitation sources. Hence, selection of a proper excitation wavelength is an important factor in differentiating target materials effectively. In this study, optimal fluorescence excitation wavelength was determined on the basis of fluorescence emission intensity of defect and sound areas of cherry tomatoes. The result showed that fluorescence responses of defect and sound surfaces of cherry tomatoes were most significantly separated with the excitation light wavelength range between 400 and 410 nm. Fluorescence images of defect cherry tomatoes were acquired with the LEDs with the central wavelength of 410 nm as the excitation source to verify the detection efficiency of cherry tomato defects. The resultant fluorescence images showed that the defects were discriminated from sound areas on cherry tomatoes with above 98% accuracy. This study shows that high power LEDs as the excitation source for fluorescence imaging are suitable for defect detection of cherry tomatoes.

  5. Optical and fluorescence properties of corn leaves from different nitrogen regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Elizabeth M.; McMurtrey, James E., III; Entcheva Campbell, Petya K.; Corp, Lawrence A.; Butcher, L. M.; Chappelle, Emmett W.

    2003-03-01

    The important role of nitrogen (N) in limiting or enhancing vegetation productivity is relatively well understood, although the interaction of N with other environmental variables in natural and agricultural ecosystems needs more study. In 2001, a suite of optical, fluorescence, and biophysical measurements were collected on leaves of corn (Zea Mays L.) from field plots provided four N fertilizer application rates: 20%, 50%, 100% and 150% of optimal N levels. Two complementary sets of high-resolution (foliar chemistry were obtained for a "red-edge" optical parameter versus C/N and chlorophyll b. Select optical indices and ChlF parameters were correlated. A significant contribution of steady-state ChlF to apparent reflectance was observed, averaging 10-25% at 685 nm and 2-6% at 740 nm over the range of N treatments. From all measurements assessing fluorescence, higher ChlF was measured from the abaxial leaf surfaces.

  6. Measurement of air and nitrogen fluorescence light yields induced by electron beam for UHECR experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Colin, P; Grebenyuk, V; Naumov, D; Nédélec, P; Nefedov, Y; Onofre, A; Porokhovoi, S; Sabirov, B; Tkatchev, L G

    2006-01-01

    Most of the Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray (UHECR) experiments and projects (HiRes, AUGER, TA, EUSO, TUS,...) use air fluorescence to detect and measure extensive air showers (EAS). The precise knowledge of the Fluorescence Light Yield (FLY) is of paramount importance for the reconstruction of UHECR. The MACFLY - Measurement of Air Cherenkov and Fluorescence Light Yield - experiment has been designed to perform such FLY measurements. In this paper we will present the results of FLY in the 290-440 nm wavelength range for dry air and pure nitrogen, both excited by electrons with energy of 1.5 MeV, 20 GeV and 50 GeV. The experiment uses a 90Sr radioactive source for low energy measurement and a CERN SPS electron beam for high energy. We find that the FLY is proportional to the deposited energy (E_d) in the gas and we show that the air fluorescence properties remain constant independently of the electron energy. At the reference point: atmospheric dry air at 1013 hPa and 23C, the ratio FLY/E_d=17.6 photon/MeV with ...

  7. Chlorophyll Fluorescence Emissions of Vegetation Canopies From High Resolution Field Reflectance Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, E. M.; Corp, L. A.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Campbell, P. K. Entcheva

    2006-01-01

    A two-year experiment was performed on corn (Zea mays L.) crops under nitrogen (N) fertilization regimes to examine the use of hyperspectral canopy reflectance information for estimating chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) and vegetation production. Fluorescence of foliage in the laboratory has proven more rigorous than reflectance for correlation to plant physiology. Especially useful are emissions produced from two stable red and far-red chlorophyll ChlF peaks centered at 685V10 nm and 735V5 nm. Methods have been developed elsewhere to extract steady state solar induced fluorescence (SF) from apparent reflectance of vegetation canopies/landscapes using the Fraunhofer Line Depth (FLD) principal. Our study utilized these methods in conjunction with field-acquired high spectral resolution canopy reflectance spectra obtained in 2004 and 2005 over corn crops, as part of an ongoing multi-year experiment at the USDA/Agriculture Research Service in Beltsville, MD. A spectroradiometer (ASD-FR Fieldspec Pro, Analytical Spectral Devices, Inc., Boulder, CO) was used to measure canopy radiances 1 m above plant canopies with a 22deg field of view and a 0deg nadir view zenith angle. Canopy and plant measurements were made at the R3 grain fill reproductive stage on 3-4 replicate N application plots provided seasonal inputs of 280, 140, 70, and 28 kg N/ha. Leaf level measurements were also made which included ChlF, photosynthesis, and leaf constituents (photosynthetic pigment, carbon (C), and N contents). Crop yields were determined at harvest. SIF intensities for ChlF were derived directly from canopy reflectance spectra in specific narrowband regions associated with atmospheric oxygen absorption features centered at 688 and 760 nm. The red/far-red S F ratio derived from these field reflectance spectra successfully discriminated foliar pigment levels (e.g., total chlorophyll, Chl) associated with N application rates in both corn crops. This canopy-level spectral ratio was also

  8. Effects of nitrogen application rate, nitrogen synergist and biochar on nitrous oxide emissions from vegetable field in south China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mu; Pang, Yuwan; Huang, Xu; Huang, Qiaoyi

    2017-01-01

    Globally, vegetable fields are the primary source of greenhouse gas emissions. A closed-chamber method together with gas chromatography was used to measure the fluxes of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions in typical vegetable fields planted with four vegetables sequentially over time in the same field: endive, lettuce, cabbage and sweet corn. Results showed that N2O fluxes occurred in pulses with the N2O emission peak varying greatly among the crops. In addition, N2O emissions were linearly associated with the nitrogen (N) application rate (r = 0.8878, n = 16). Excessive fertilizer N application resulted in N loss through nitrous oxide gas emitted from the vegetable fields. Compared with a conventional fertilization (N2) treatment, the cumulative N2O emissions decreased significantly in the growing seasons of four plant species from an nitrogen synergist (a nitrification inhibitor, dicyandiamide and biochar treatments by 34.6% and 40.8%, respectively. However, the effects of biochar on reducing N2O emissions became more obvious than that of dicyandiamide over time. The yield-scaled N2O emissions in consecutive growing seasons for four species increased with an increase in the N fertilizer application rate, and with continuous application of N fertilizer. This was especially true for the high N fertilizer treatment that resulted in a risk of yield-scaled N2O emissions. Generally, the additions of dicyandiamide and biochar significantly decreased yield-scaled N2O-N emissions by an average of 45.9% and 45.7%, respectively, compared with N2 treatment from the consecutive four vegetable seasons. The results demonstrated that the addition of dicyandiamide or biochar in combination with application of a rational amount of N could provide the best strategy for the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions in vegetable field in south China. PMID:28419127

  9. EFFECTS OF WATER TABLE AND NITROGEN ADDITION ON CO2 EMISSION FROM WETLAND SOIL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ji-song; LIU Jing-shuang; YU Jun-bao; WANG Jin-da; QIN Sheng-jin; LI Xin-hua

    2005-01-01

    Soil respiration is a main dynamic process of carbon cycle in wetland. It is important to contribute to global climate changes. Water table and nutritious availability are significant impact factors to influence responses of CO2 emission from wetland soil to climate changes. Twenty-four wetland soil monoliths at 4 water-table positions and in 3 nitrogen status have been incubated to measure rates of CO2 emission from wetland soils in this study.Three static water-table controls and a fluctuant water-table control, with 3 nitrogen additions in every water-table control,were carried out. In no nitrogen addition treatment, high CO2 emissions were found at a static low water table ( Ⅰ )and a fluctuant water table (Ⅳ),averaging 306.7mg/(m2·h) and 307.89mg/(m2·h), respectively, which were 51%-57% higher than that at static high water table ( Ⅱ and Ⅲ). After nitrogen addition, however, highest CO2 emission was found at Ⅱ and lowest emission at Ⅲ. The results suggested that nutritious availability of wetland soil might be important to influence the effect of water table on the CO2 emission from the wetland soil. Nitrogen addition led to enhancing CO2 emissions from wetland soil, while the highest emission was found in 1N treatments other than in 2N treatments. In 3 nutritious treatments,low CO2 emissions at high water tables and high CO2 emissions at low water tables were also observed when water table fluctuated. Our results suggested that both water table changes and nutritious imports would effect the CO2 emission from wetland.

  10. Dynamics of Nitric Oxide and Nitrous Oxide Emission during Nitrogen Conversion Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampschreur, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions can be a serious threat to the environment. Rising levels of N2O in the atmosphere contribute to global warming and destruction of the ozone layer. This thesis describes an investigation on the emission of NO and N2O during nitrogen conversion proc

  11. Stimulated emission depletion microscopy resolves individual nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo-Camejo, Silvia; Adam, Marie-Pierre; Besbes, Mondher; Hugonin, Jean-Paul; Jacques, Vincent; Greffet, Jean-Jacques; Roch, Jean-François; Hell, Stefan W; Treussart, François

    2013-12-23

    Nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers in nanodiamonds are highly promising for bioimaging and sensing. However, resolving individual NV centers within nanodiamond particles and the controlled addressing and readout of their spin state has remained a major challenge. Spatially stochastic super-resolution techniques cannot provide this capability in principle, whereas coordinate-controlled super-resolution imaging methods, like stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy, have been predicted to fail in nanodiamonds. Here we show that, contrary to these predictions, STED can resolve single NV centers in 40-250 nm sized nanodiamonds with a resolution of ≈10 nm. Even multiple adjacent NVs located in single nanodiamonds can be imaged individually down to relative distances of ≈15 nm. Far-field optical super-resolution of NVs inside nanodiamonds is highly relevant for bioimaging applications of these fluorescent nanolabels. The targeted addressing and readout of individual NV(-) spins inside nanodiamonds by STED should also be of high significance for quantum sensing and information applications.

  12. Synthesis and fluorescence studies of nine 1,5-benzodiazepine-2,4-dione derivatives: Dual emission and excimer fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qomi, Hamid Reza; Habibi, Azizollah; Shahcheragh, Seyyed Mohammad

    2017-03-01

    The photophysical properties of nine 1,5-benzodiazepine-2,4-dione (BZD) derivatives were investigated using absorption and fluorescence spectral techniques in dimethyl sulfoxide. The trend of red shifts caused by the substitutions had full compliance with the trend of decreasing the calculated band gap (ΔELUMO-HOMO) by semi-empirical AM1 and DFT/B3LYP/6-311 + G* computational methods. The positive solvatochromism of BZD a demonstrated the π-π* nature of the singlet excited state. Dual fluorescence was observed in the emission spectra of BZD f and g, while their spectrum in different concentration showed only one peak short wavelength (SW) in dilute solutions. The main peak in SW around 370 nm was attributed to the monomer of BZD (f* or g*) and the broader emission shifted to the visible region around 400 nm in middle wavelength (MW) to the intermolecular excimer emission of BZD ([f/f]*or [g/g]*). The observed phenomena, such as solvatochromism, dual fluorescence, some red shifts caused by substitution, and larger Stokes shift indicated the existence of intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) in the BZDs series. The phosphorescence emission of the BZDs demonstrated their intersystem crossing (ISC) process.

  13. Emission dynamics in QD systems: from single QD resonance fluorescence to many-emitter laser switching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorke, Michael; Lund, Anders Mølbjerg; Nielsen, Per Kær

    2012-01-01

    and photonic confinement. This combination opens the possibility to exploit the Purcell effect to enhance and direct the photon emission. In this contribution, we investigate multiple facets of the emission dynamics in semiconductor QDs, ranging from the resonance fluorescence of QDs under pulsed excitation...

  14. Reduction in nitrogen oxides emission on TGME-464 boiler of IRU power plant (Estonia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roslyakov, P. V.; Ionkin, I. L.

    2015-01-01

    The possibility for realization of measures on a reduction in nitrogen oxides emission on a TGME-464 (plant no. 2) boiler of the IRU power plant (Tallinn, Estonia) is investigated. Low-cost techno-logical measures, namely, nonstoichiometric burning and burning with the moderate controlled chemical underburning, are proposed and experimentally tested. Recommendations on the implementation of low-emission modes of burning natural gas into mode diagrams of the boiler are given. Nitrogen oxides emissions are reduced to the required level as a result of the implementation of the proposed measures.

  15. Modulation of nitrogen vacancy charge state and fluorescence in nanodiamonds using electrochemical potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaveli, Sinan; Gaathon, Ophir; Wolcott, Abraham; Sakakibara, Reyu; Shemesh, Or A.; Peterka, Darcy S.; Boyden, Edward S.; Owen, Jonathan S.; Yuste, Rafael; Englund, Dirk

    2016-04-01

    The negatively charged nitrogen vacancy (NV-) center in diamond has attracted strong interest for a wide range of sensing and quantum information processing applications. To this end, recent work has focused on controlling the NV charge state, whose stability strongly depends on its electrostatic environment. Here, we demonstrate that the charge state and fluorescence dynamics of single NV centers in nanodiamonds with different surface terminations can be controlled by an externally applied potential difference in an electrochemical cell. The voltage dependence of the NV charge state can be used to stabilize the NV- state for spin-based sensing protocols and provides a method of charge state-dependent fluorescence sensing of electrochemical potentials. We detect clear NV fluorescence modulation for voltage changes down to 100 mV, with a single NV and down to 20 mV with multiple NV centers in a wide-field imaging mode. These results suggest that NV centers in nanodiamonds could enable parallel optical detection of biologically relevant electrochemical potentials.

  16. Modulation of nitrogen vacancy charge state and fluorescence in nanodiamonds using electrochemical potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaveli, Sinan; Gaathon, Ophir; Wolcott, Abraham; Sakakibara, Reyu; Shemesh, Or A; Peterka, Darcy S; Boyden, Edward S; Owen, Jonathan S; Yuste, Rafael; Englund, Dirk

    2016-04-12

    The negatively charged nitrogen vacancy (NV(-)) center in diamond has attracted strong interest for a wide range of sensing and quantum information processing applications. To this end, recent work has focused on controlling the NV charge state, whose stability strongly depends on its electrostatic environment. Here, we demonstrate that the charge state and fluorescence dynamics of single NV centers in nanodiamonds with different surface terminations can be controlled by an externally applied potential difference in an electrochemical cell. The voltage dependence of the NV charge state can be used to stabilize the NV(-) state for spin-based sensing protocols and provides a method of charge state-dependent fluorescence sensing of electrochemical potentials. We detect clear NV fluorescence modulation for voltage changes down to 100 mV, with a single NV and down to 20 mV with multiple NV centers in a wide-field imaging mode. These results suggest that NV centers in nanodiamonds could enable parallel optical detection of biologically relevant electrochemical potentials.

  17. Excitation-emission matrices and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy for the diagnosis of gastrointestinal cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genova, Ts; Borisova, E.; Penkov, N.; Vladimirov, B.; Zhelyazkova, A.; Avramov, L.

    2016-06-01

    We report the development of an improved fluorescence technique for cancer diagnostics in the gastrointestinal tract. We investigate the fluorescence of ex vivo colorectal (cancerous and healthy) tissue samples using excitation-emission matrix (EEM) and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) steady-state approaches. The obtained results are processed for revealing characteristic fluorescence spectral features with a valuable diagnostic meaning. The main tissue fluorophores, contributing to the observed fluorescence, are tyrosine, tryptophan, NADH, FAD, collagen and elastin. Based on the results of the Mann-Whitney test as useful parameters for differentiation of gastrointestinal cancer from normal mucosa, we suggest using excitation wavelengths in the range 300 - 360 nm for fluorescence spectroscopy and wavelengths intervals of 60 nm and 90 nm for SFS.

  18. One-pot synthesis of highly greenish-yellow fluorescent nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots for pyrophosphate sensing via competitive coordination with Eu(3+) ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Liping; Song, Xinhong; Chen, Yiying; Rong, Mingcong; Zhao, Tingting; Jiang, Yaqi; Wang, Yiru; Chen, Xi

    2015-10-01

    Highly fluorescent nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots (N-GQDs) with greenish-yellow emission and quantum yield of 13.2% have been synthesized via a one-pot hydrothermal method. The obtained N-GQDs displayed excellent optical properties, high photostability and resistance to strong ion strength. Based on the higher affinity of pyrophosphate (PPi) than carboxyl and amido groups on the surface of the N-GQDs to Eu(3+), a Eu(3+)-modulated N-GQD off-on fluorescent probe for PPi detection was constructed with a detection limit of 0.074 μM. The detection process was simple in design, easy to operate, and showed a highly selective response to PPi in the presence of co-existing anions. This work widens the applications of N-GQDs with versatile functionality and reactivity in clinical diagnostics and as biosensors.

  19. Pathological changes in Alzheimer"s brain evaluated with fluorescence emission analysis (FEA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christov, Alexander; Ottman, Todd; Grammas, Paula

    2004-07-01

    Development of AD is associated with cerebrovascular deposition of amyloid beta (Aβ) as well as a progressive increase in vasular collagen content. Both AΒ and collagen are naturally fluorescent compounds when exposed to UV light. We analyzed autofluorescence emitted from brain tissue samples and isolated brain resistance vessels harvested postmortem from patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and age-matched controls. Fluorescence emission, excited at 355 nm with an Nd:YAG laser, was measured using a fiber-optic based fluorescence spectroscopic system for tissue analysis. Significantly higher values of fluorescence emission intensity (Pcollagen, and reduced levels of type IV collagen in resistance vessels from AD patients, compared to control samples. In addition, using direct scanning of the cortical suface for fluoresxcence emission by the laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy system we detected a significantly (P<0.05) higher level of apoptosis in AD brain tissue compared to age-matched controls. Fluorescence emission analysis (FEA) appears to be a sensitive technique for detecting structural changes in AD brain tissue.

  20. Lanthanide based dual-emission fluorescent probe for detection of mercury (II) in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hongliang; Li, Qian; Ma, Chanjiao; Song, Yonghai; Xu, Fugang; Chen, Shouhui; Wang, Li

    2015-01-15

    It is highly desirable to develop a simple and sensitive method for Hg(2+) detection because of the dangerous nature of Hg(2+). In this work, we prepared a dual-emission fluorescent probe for Hg(2+) detection by combining two lanthanide chelates with different emission wavelengths. Green-emitting terbium (Tb(3+)) chelates as reference signals were embedded into SiO2 nanoparticles and red-emitting europium (Eu(3+)) chelates as response units were covalently linked to the surface of silica shell. Upon the addition of Hg(2+), the fluorescence of Eu(3+) chelates can be selectively quenched, while the fluorescence of Tb(3+) chelates remained unchanged. As a kind of Hg(2+) nanosensor, the dual-emission fluorescent probe exhibited excellent selectivity to Hg(2+) and high sensitivity up to 7.07 nM detection limit. The Hg(2+) levels in drinking water and milk samples were determined by using the dual-emission fluorescent probe with satisfied recovery. Additionally, our probe has a long enough fluorescence lifetime, which can avoid the interference from autofluorescence of the biological samples. We envision that the proposed probe could find great potential applications for ultrasensitive time-resolved fluorometric assays and biomedical imaging in the future.

  1. Potential mercury emissions from fluorescent lamps production and obsolescence in mainland China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Quanyin; Li, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    The use of fluorescent lamps has expanded rapidly all over the world in recent years, because of their energy-saving capability. Consequently, however, mercury emissions from production, breakage, and discard of the lamps are drawing increasing concern from the public. This article focuses on evaluating the amount of mercury used for fluorescent lamp production, as well as the potential mercury emissions during production and breakage, in mainland China. It is expected to provide a comprehensive understanding about the risks present in the mercury from fluorescent lamps, and to know about the impacts of the policies on fluorescent lamps after their implementation. It is estimated that, in 2020, mercury consumption will be about 11.30-15.69 tonnes, a significant reduction of 34.9%-37.4% from that used in 2013, owing to improvement in mercury dosing dosage technology and tighter limitations on mercury content in fluorescent lamps. With these improvements, the amount of mercury remaining in fluorescent lamps and released during production is estimated to be 10.71-14.86 and 0.59-0.83 tonnes, respectively; the mercury released from waste fluorescent lamps is estimated to be about 5.37-7.59 tonnes. Also, a significant reduction to the mercury emission can be expected when a collection and treatment system is well established and conducted in the future.

  2. Unusually high soil nitrogen oxide emissions influence air quality in a high-temperature agricultural region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikawa, P Y; Ge, C; Wang, J; Eberwein, J R; Liang, L L; Allsman, L A; Grantz, D A; Jenerette, G D

    2015-11-10

    Fertilized soils have large potential for production of soil nitrogen oxide (NOx=NO+NO2), however these emissions are difficult to predict in high-temperature environments. Understanding these emissions may improve air quality modelling as NOx contributes to formation of tropospheric ozone (O3), a powerful air pollutant. Here we identify the environmental and management factors that regulate soil NOx emissions in a high-temperature agricultural region of California. We also investigate whether soil NOx emissions are capable of influencing regional air quality. We report some of the highest soil NOx emissions ever observed. Emissions vary nonlinearly with fertilization, temperature and soil moisture. We find that a regional air chemistry model often underestimates soil NOx emissions and NOx at the surface and in the troposphere. Adjusting the model to match NOx observations leads to elevated tropospheric O3. Our results suggest management can greatly reduce soil NOx emissions, thereby improving air quality.

  3. Nickel(II) dithiocarbamate complexes containing sulforhodamine B as fluorescent probes for selective detection of nitrogen dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yan; Krishnakumar, Saarangan; Yu, Huan; Ramishetti, Srinivas; Deng, Lih-Wen; Wang, Suhua; Huang, Leaf; Huang, Dejian

    2013-04-10

    We synthesized complexes of Ni(II) with dithiocarbamate ligands derived from the ortho and para isomers of sulforhodamine B fluorophores and demonstrated they are highly selective in reactions with nitrogen dioxide (NO2). Compared with the para isomer, the ortho isomer showed a much greater fluorescence increase upon reaction with NO2, which led to oxidation and decomplexation of the dithiocarbamate ligand from Ni(II). We applied this probe for visual detection of 1 ppm NO2 in the gas phase and fluorescence imaging of NO2 in macrophage cells treated with a nitrogen dioxide donor.

  4. Nitrogen transformations in intensive aquaculture system and its implication to climate change through nitrous oxide emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhen; Lee, Jae Woo; Chandran, Kartik; Kim, Sungpyo; Sharma, Keshab; Brotto, Ariane Coelho; Khanal, Samir Kumar

    2013-02-01

    The rapid development of aquaculture could result in significant environmental concerns such as eutrophication and climate change. However, to date, very few studies have been conducted to investigate nitrogen transformations in aquaculture systems; and specifically the emission of nitrous oxide (N(2)O), which is an important greenhouse gas and ozone-depleting substance. In this study, nitrogen transformations in intensive laboratory-scale Chinese catfish (Clarias fuscus) aquaculture systems were investigated by identifying and quantifying N(2)O emissions. Results indicated that about 1.3% of the nitrogen input was emitted as N(2)O gas. Dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations and feeding rates had significant effects on N(2)O emissions. Higher N(2)O emissions were obtained in aquaculture systems with lower DO concentrations and higher feeding rates. Both nitrification and denitrification appeared to be responsible for the emissions of N(2)O. Key factors which correlated with the N(2)O emission rate in aquaculture systems were NO(2)(-), DO and total ammonia nitrogen concentrations.

  5. Combined effect of nitrogen doping and nanosteps on microcrystalline diamond films for improvement of field emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mengui, U.A., E-mail: ursulamengui@gmail.com [INPE – Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais Laboratório Associado de Sensores e Materiais – LAS, Av. dos Astronautas 1758, CP 515, CEP 12.245-970, São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Campos, R.A.; Alves, K.A.; Antunes, E.F. [INPE – Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais Laboratório Associado de Sensores e Materiais – LAS, Av. dos Astronautas 1758, CP 515, CEP 12.245-970, São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Hamanaka, M.H.M.O. [Centro de Tecnologia da Informação Renato Archer, Divisão de Superfícies de Interação e Displays, Rodovia D. Pedro I (SP 65) km 143.6, CP 6162, CEP 13089-500, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Corat, E.J.; Baldan, M.R. [INPE – Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais Laboratório Associado de Sensores e Materiais – LAS, Av. dos Astronautas 1758, CP 515, CEP 12.245-970, São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Hot filament chemical vapor deposition using methane, hydrogen and a solution of urea in methanol produced nitrogen-doped diamond films. • Diamonds had the grain morphology changed for long growth time (28 h), and the nitrogen doping were evaluated by Raman spectroscopy. • Field emission characterization shows a decrease up to 70% in threshold field, related to reference diamond layer. - Abstract: Nitrogen-doped microcrystalline diamond (N-MCD) films were grown on Si substrates using a hot filament reactor with methanol solution of urea as N source. Electrostatic self-assembly seeding of nanocrystalline diamond were used to obtain continuous and uniform films. Simultaneous changes in grains morphology and work function of diamond by nitrogen doping decreased the threshold field and the angular coefficient of Fowler–Nordhein plots. The field emission properties of our N-MCD films are comparable to carbon nanotube films.

  6. Advances in Nitrogen Denitrification and N2O Emission in Agro-ecosystem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yu-shu; DING Hong; QIN Sheng-jin

    2011-01-01

    Nitrification and denitrification are two key links of nitrogen flow cycle in soil. N2O and N2, generated from biochemical process of nitrogen, can cause not only the nitrogen losses and reduction of nitrogen use efficiency, but also the boosted concentration of greenhouse gases,severely endangering the environment. Accordingly, nitrification-denitrification has been more and more concerned from whether an agricultural view, or an environmental one. Referring to the related literatures published at home and abroad in recent years, we overviewed the denitrification-caused N loss and N2O emission in various agro-ecosystems, and based on which we put forward countermeasures to reduce the denitrification-caused N loss and N2O emission and its research prospects in the future.

  7. Nitrogen fertiliser formulation: The impact on N2O emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harty, Mary; Krol, Dominika; Carolan, Rachael; McNeill, Gavin; McGeough, Karen; Laughlin, Ronnie; Watson, Catherine; Richards, Karl; Lanigan, Gary; Forrestal, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    Agriculture was responsible for 31% of Ireland's Agricultural Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions in 2012, with 39% of these emissions arising from chemical/organic fertilizers in the form of nitrous oxide (N2O). Switching from calcium ammonium nitrate (CAN) to a urea based fertiliser limits the soil residence period of nitrate, the major substrate for denitrification loss in the N2O form. However, urea is susceptible to ammonia (NH3) volatilisation but this risk can be managed using urease inhibitors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of switching from CAN to urea, urea with the urease inhibitor N- (n-butyl) thiophosphoric triamide (trade name Agrotain®) and/or the nitrification inhibitor dicyandiamide (DCD on direct and indirect N2O emissions. The experiment is a two year study (commenced March 2013) at six permanent pasture sites located on the island of Ireland, at Johnstown Castle Co. Wexford, Moorepark Co. Cork and Hillsborough Co. Down, covering a range of soil textures and drainage characteristics. The experiment simulated a grazing environment; annual fertiliser N was applied at different rates (0, 100, 200, 300, 400 or 500 kg N ha-1) in five equal splits, with grass harvested prior to fertilizer application. Direct N2O emissions were quantified regularly using static chambers over 1 year and indirect N2O from ammonia volatilisation was measured using wind tunnels and annual emission factors calculated. Switching from CAN to urea dramatically reduced direct N2O emissions, but had little effect on dry-matter yield. However, there was evidence of pollution swapping of direct for indirect N2O from NH3. In the first year, two urea based formulations successfully reduced both direct and indirect N2O emissions at all sites. Fertiliser formulation strategy has the potential to be a solution for reduction of direct and indirect N2O emissions.

  8. Solid-immersion fluorescence microscopy with increased emission and super resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liau, Z. L.; Porter, J. M. [Lincoln Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Lexington, Massachusetts 02420 (United States); Liau, A. A.; Chen, J. J. [Institute for Medical Engineering and Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Salmon, W. C. [Whitehead Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Sheu, S. S. [Department of Medicine, Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107 (United States)

    2015-01-07

    We investigate solid-immersion fluorescence microscopy suitable for super-resolution nanotechnology and biological imaging, and have observed limit of resolution as small as 15 nm with microspheres, mitochondria, and chromatin fibers. We have further observed that fluorescence efficiency increases with excitation power density, implicating appreciable stimulated emission and increased resolution. We discuss potential advantages of the solid-immersion microscopy, including combined use with previously established super-resolution techniques for reaching deeper beyond the conventional diffraction limit.

  9. Factors controlling regional differences in forest soil emission of nitrogen oxides (NO and N2O)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, K.; Skiba, U.; Ambus, P.;

    2006-01-01

    Soil emissions of NO and N2O were measured continuously at high frequency for more than one year at 15 European forest sites as part of the EU-funded project NOFRETETE. The locations represent different forest types (coniferous/deciduous) and different nitrogen loads. Geoaphically they range from...... to a compact and moist litter layer lead to N2O production and NO consumption in the soil. The two factors soil moisture and soil temperature are often explaining most of the temporal variation within a site. When comparing annual emissions on a regional scale, however, factors such as nitrogen deposition...

  10. Dynamic reallocation of marketable nitrogen emission permits in Danish freshwater aquaculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus; Andersen, Jesper Levring; Bogetoft, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The potential gains from a regulatory change allowing for reallocation of marketable nitrogen emission permits under a cap and trade system are analyzed in a dynamic context using Data Envelopment Analysis to formulate linear programming models. In these models new, more environmental friendly...... farms are gradually introduced to the industry over 10 years. The new industry structure, production, and profitability gains are investigated, and the effect of changing the overall level of nitrogen emission is analyzed. Our results show that there is scope for a more efficient allocation of resources...

  11. Dynamic Reallocation of Marketable Nitrogen Emission Permits in Danish Freshwater Aquaculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus; Levring Andersen, Jesper; Bogetoft, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The potential gains from a regulatory change allowing for reallocation of marketable nitrogen emission permits under a cap and trade system are analyzed in a dynamic context using Data Envelopment Analysis to formulate linear programming models. In these models new, more environmental friendly...... farms are gradually introduced to the industry over 10 years. The new industry structure, production, and profitability gains are investigated, and the effect of changing the overall level of nitrogen emission is analyzed. Our results show that there is scope for a more efficient allocation of resources...

  12. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy of vitiligo skin in vivo (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianhua; Richer, Vincent; Al Jasser, Mohammed; Zandi, Soodabeh; Kollias, Nikiforos; Kalia, Sunil; Zeng, Haishan; Lui, Harvey

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescence signals depend on the intensity of the exciting light, the absorption properties of the constituent molecules, and the efficiency with which the absorbed photons are converted to fluorescence emission. The optical features and appearance of vitiligo have been explained primarily on the basis of reduced epidermal pigmentation, which results in abnormal white patches on the skin. The objective of this study is to explore the fluorescence properties of vitiligo and its adjacent normal skin using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy. Thirty five (35) volunteers with vitiligo were acquired using a double-grating spectrofluorometer with excitation and emission wavelengths of 260-450 nm and 300-700 nm respectively. As expected, the most pronounced difference between the spectra obtained from vitiligo lesions compared to normally pigmented skin was that the overall fluorescence was much higher in vitiligo; these differences increased at shorter wavelengths, thus matching the characteristic spectral absorption of epidermal melanin. When comparing the fluorescence spectra from vitiligo to normal skin we detected three distinct spectral bands centered at 280nm, 310nm, and 335nm. The 280nm band may possibly be related to inflammation, whereas the 335 nm band may arise from collagen or keratin cross links. The source of the 310 nm band is uncertain; it is interesting to note its proximity to the 311 nm UV lamps used for vitiligo phototherapy. These differences are accounted for not only by changes in epidermal pigment content, but also by other optically active cutaneous biomolecules.

  13. New insights in the interpretation of tryptophan fluorescence : origin of the fluorescence lifetime and characterization of a new fluorescence parameter in proteins: the emission to excitation ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albani, J R

    2007-07-01

    Origin of tryptophan fluorescence is still up to these days a quiz which is not completely solved. Fluorescence emission properties of tryptophan within proteins are in general considered as the result of fluorophore interaction within its environment. For example, a low fluorescence quantum yield is supposed to be the consequence of an important fluorophore-environment interaction. However, are we sure that the fluorophore has been excited upon light absorption? What if fluorophore excitation did not occur as the result of internal conformation specific to the fluorophore environment? Are we sure that all absorbed energy is used for the excitation process? Fluorescence lifetimes of Trp residues are considered to originate from rotamers or conformers resulting from the rotation of the indole ring within the peptide bonds. However, how can we explain the fact that in most of the proteins, the two lifetimes 0.5 and 3 ns, attributed to the conformers, are also observed for free tryptophan in solution? The present work, performed on free tryptophan and tyrosine in solution and on different proteins, shows that absorption and excitation spectra overlap but their intensities at the different excitation wavelengths are not necessarily equal. Also, we found that fluorescence emission intensities recorded at different excitation wavelengths depend on the intensities at these excitation wavelengths and not on the optical densities. Thus, excitation is not equal to absorption. In our interpretation of the data, we consider that absorbed photons are not necessary used only for the excitation, part of them are used to reorganize fluorophore molecules in a new state (excited structure) and another part is used for the excitation process. A new parameter that characterizes the ratio of the number of emitted photons over the real number of photons used to excite the fluorophore can be defined. We call this parameter, the emission to excitation ratio. Since our results were

  14. Chamber bioaerosol study: human emissions of size-resolved fluorescent biological aerosol particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhangar, S; Adams, R I; Pasut, W; Huffman, J A; Arens, E A; Taylor, J W; Bruns, T D; Nazaroff, W W

    2016-04-01

    Humans are a prominent source of airborne biological particles in occupied indoor spaces, but few studies have quantified human bioaerosol emissions. The chamber investigation reported here employs a fluorescence-based technique to evaluate bioaerosols with high temporal and particle size resolution. In a 75-m(3) chamber, occupant emission rates of coarse (2.5-10 μm) fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAPs) under seated, simulated office-work conditions averaged 0.9 ± 0.3 million particles per person-h. Walking was associated with a 5-6× increase in the emission rate. During both walking and sitting, 60-70% or more of emissions originated from the floor. The increase in emissions during walking (vs. while sitting) was mainly attributable to release of particles from the floor; the associated increased vigor of upper body movements also contributed. Clothing, or its frictional interaction with human skin, was demonstrated to be a source of coarse particles, and especially of the highly fluorescent fraction. Emission rates of FBAPs previously reported for lecture classes were well bounded by the experimental results obtained in this chamber study. In both settings, the size distribution of occupant FBAP emissions had a dominant mode in the 3-5 μm diameter range.

  15. Donor-acceptor-pair emission characterization in N-B doped fluorescent SiC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Yiyu; Jokubavicius, Valdas; Kamiyama, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    In the present work, we investigated donor-acceptor-pair emission in N-B doped fluorescent 6H-SiC, by means of photoluminescence, Raman spectroscopy, and angle-resolved photoluminescence. The photoluminescence results were interpreted by using a band diagram with Fermi-Dirac statistics. It is shown...... intensity in a large emission angle range was achieved from angle-resolved photoluminescence. The results indicate N-B doped fluorescent SiC as a good wavelength converter in white LEDs applications....

  16. Milk urea nitrogen (MUN) tool reduces nitrogen emissions from dairy farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    The milk urea nitrogen (MUN) tool was developed to monitor dietary crude protein (CP) use and feed costs. MUN within the range of 12 to 10 mg/100 ml milk usually indicates the recommended dietary CP level of 16.5%. MUN levels greater than 12 mg/100 ml indicate dietary CP is being wasted and excreted...

  17. Experimental investigation of nitrogen based emissions from an ammonia fueled SI-engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westlye, Fredrik Ree; Ivarsson, Anders; Schramm, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    This study concerns nitrogen based emissions from a hydrogen enriched ammonia fueled SI engine. These emissions deserve special attention as their formation may differ from conventional HC combustion due to the nitrogen content in the fuel. A range of experiments are conducted with a single...... with gasoline, but has a relatively low share of the total NOx emissions (3-4%). Nitrous oxide is a product of NH2 reacting with NO 2 and NH reacting with NO. The magnitude is largely affected by ignition timing due to the temperature development during expansion and the amount of excess air, as increased...... oxygen availability stimulates the formation of the NH2 radical and the levels of NO2 are higher. Under ideal operating conditions (MBT ignition timing) N2O levels are very low. The dominating contributors to unburned ammonia are chamber crevices as the magnitude of these emissions is greatly affected...

  18. Solid-phase synthesis of highly fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots for sensitive and selective probing ferric ions in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haijuan; Chen, Yonglei; Liang, Meijuan; Xu, Laifang; Qi, Shengda; Chen, Hongli; Chen, Xingguo

    2014-10-07

    Carbon quantum dots (C-Dots) have drawn extensive attention in recent years due to their stable physicochemical and photochemical properties. However, the development of nitrogen-doped carbon quantum dots (N-doped C-Dots) is still on its early stage. In this paper, a facile and high-output solid-phase synthesis approach was proposed for the fabrication of N-doped, highly fluorescent carbon quantum dots. The obtained N-doped C-Dots exhibited a strong blue emission with an absolute quantum yield (QY) of up to 31%, owing to fluorescence enhancement effect of introduced N atoms into carbon dots. The strong coordination of oxygen-rich groups on N-doped C-Dots to Fe(3+) caused fluorescence quenching via nonradiative electron-transfer, leading to the quantitative detection of Fe(3+). The probe exhibited a wide linear response concentration range (0.01-500 μM) to Fe(3+) with a detection limit of 2.5 nM. Significantly, the N-doped C-Dots possess negligible cytotoxicity, excellent biocompatibility, and high photostability. All these features are favorable for label-free monitoring of Fe(3+) in complex biological samples. It was then successfully applied for the fluorescence imaging of intracellular Fe(3+). As an efficient chemosensor, the N-doped C-Dots hold great promise to broaden applications in biological systems.

  19. Comparison of Measurements and FluorMOD Simulations for Solar Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence and Reflectance of a Corn Crop under Nitrogen Treatments [SIF and Reflectance for Corn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Elizabeth M.; Corp, Lawrence A.; Campbell, Petya K. E.

    2007-01-01

    The FLuorescence Explorer (FLEX) satellite concept is one of six semifinalist mission proposals selected in 2006 for pre-Phase studies by the European Space Agency (ESA). The FLEX concept proposes to measure passive solar induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) of terrestrial ecosystems. A new spectral vegetation Fluorescence Model (FluorMOD) was developed to include the effects of steady state SIF on canopy reflectance. We used our laboratory and field measurements previously acquired from foliage and canopies of corn (Zea mays L.) under controlled nitrogen (N) fertilization to parameterize and evaluate FluorMOD. Our data included biophysical properties, fluorescence (F) and reflectance spectra for leaves; reflectance spectra of canopies and soil; solar irradiance; plot-level leaf area index; and canopy SIF emissions determined using the Fraunhofer Line Depth principal for the atmospheric telluric oxygen absorption features at 688 nm (O2-beta) and 760 nm (O2-alpha). FluorMOD simulations implemented in the default "look-up-table" mode did not reproduce the observed magnitudes of leaf F, canopy SIF, or canopy reflectance. However, simulations for all of these parameters agreed with observations when the default FluorMOD information was replaced with measurements, although N treatment responses were underestimated. Recommendations were provided to enhance FluorMOD's potential utility in support of SIF field experiments and studies of agriculture and ecosystems.

  20. Emission of Nitrous Oxide in Temperate Forests with Different Stages of Nitrogen Saturation in Central Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaoyan, F.

    2015-12-01

    Long-term nitrogen deposition has caused a problem called nitrogen saturation in forest ecosystems globally. Aber et al. (1989) suggested that nitrogen saturation activate soil nitrification in forest systems, which is the main process of N2O production in aerobic condition. Thus, nitrogen saturation may affect significantly the N2O emission from forests, while the impact on flux has not been quantitatively evaluated yet. In the present study, 3-year monitoring of N2O emission was performed in an N-saturated forests (Tama Hill, Tokyo): the emission rate of N2O was measured monthly by a closed chamber method at 12 plots along a slope, and the net nitrification rate of surface soil (0-10 cm) was measured 4 times in situ. In addition, a comparative research was conducted in summer in eight temperate forests with different stages of nitrogen saturation in central Japan; the N2O flux, soil moisture, nitrogen availability and stream water NO3- concentration were measured at each site. In an N-saturated forests, the annual N2O emission was estimated to be 0.88 kg N ha-1year-1 , showing a typical seasonal variation . The seasonal patterns of N2O emission were significantly related to soil moisture and ambient temperature. We also found high spatial variation of N2O flux among 12 plots along the slope, which was generally higher at the bottom. Moreover, a positive correlation was found between the rate of N2O emission and the net nitrification rate with WFPS60% , probably due to the effect of denitrification. In comparison sites, the N2O emission rate ranged nearly 16-fold from 0.13-2.11 g N ha-1day-1 was linearly related to the stream water NO3- concentration ranged 10-fold from 0.14 to 1.4 mg N/L. Our results revealed N enrichment in forest obviously stimulate soil N2O emission. Keywords: Nitrous oxide, nitrogen saturation, nitrification, temperate forest

  1. DNA abasic site-selective enhancement of sanguinarine fluorescence with a large emission shift.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Wu

    Full Text Available Small molecules that can specifically bind to a DNA abasic site (AP site have received much attention due to their importance in DNA lesion identification, drug discovery, and sensor design. Herein, the AP site binding behavior of sanguinarine (SG, a natural alkaloid, was investigated. In aqueous solution, SG has a short-wavelength alkanolamine emission band and a long-wavelength iminium emission band. At pH 8.3, SG experiences a fluorescence quenching for both bands upon binding to fully matched DNAs without the AP site, while the presence of the AP site induces a strong SG binding and the observed fluorescence enhancement for the iminium band are highly dependent on the nucleobases flanking the AP site, while the alkanolamine band is always quenched. The bases opposite the AP site also exert some modifications on the SG's emission behavior. It was found that the observed quenching for DNAs with Gs and Cs flanking the AP site is most likely caused by electron transfer between the AP site-bound excited-state SG and the nearby Gs. However, the flanking As and Ts that are not easily oxidized favor the enhanced emission. This AP site-selective enhancement of SG fluorescence accompanies a band conversion in the dominate emission from the alkanolamine to iminium band thus with a large emission shift of about 170 nm. Absorption spectra, steady-state and transient-state fluorescence, DNA melting, and electrolyte experiments confirm that the AP site binding of SG occurs and the stacking interaction with the nearby base pairs is likely to prevent the converted SG iminium form from contacting with water that is thus emissive when the AP site neighbors are bases other than guanines. We expect that this fluorophore would be developed as a promising AP site binder having a large emission shift.

  2. Differentiation of ocular fundus fluorophores by fluorescence lifetime imaging using multiple excitation and emission wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, M.; Schweitzer, D.; Schenke, S.; Becker, W.; Bergmann, A.

    2006-10-01

    Ocular fundus autofluorescence imaging has been introduced into clinical diagnostics recently. It is in use for the observation of the age pigment lipofuscin, a precursor of age - related macular degeneration (AMD). But other fluorophores may be of interest too: The redox pair FAD - FADH II provides information on the retinal energy metabolism, advanced glycation end products (AGE) indicate protein glycation associated with pathologic processes in diabetes as well as AMD, and alterations in the fluorescence of collagen and elastin in connective tissue give us the opportunity to observe fibrosis by fluorescence imaging. This, however, needs techniques able to differentiate particular fluorophores despite limited permissible ocular exposure as well as excitation wavelength (limited by the transmission of the human ocular lens to >400 nm). We present an ophthalmic laser scanning system (SLO), equipped with picosecond laser diodes (FWHM 100 ps, 446 nm or 468 nm respectively) and time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) in two emission bands (500 - 560 nm and 560 - 700 nm). The decays were fitted by a bi-exponential model. Fluorescence spectra were measured by a fluorescence spectrometer fluorolog. Upon excitation at 446 nm, the fluorescence of AGE, FAD, and lipofuscin were found to peak at 503 nm, 525 nm, and 600 nm respectively. Accordingly, the statistical distribution of the fluorescence decay times was found to depend on the different excitation wavelengths and emission bands used. The use of multiple excitation and emission wavelengths in conjunction with fluorescence lifetime imaging allows us to discriminate between intrinsic fluorophores of the ocular fundus. Taken together with our knowledge on the anatomical structure of the fundus, these findings suggest an association of the short, middle and long fluorescence decay time to the retinal pigment epithelium, the retina, and connective tissue respectively.

  3. Simulating the global transport of nitrogen oxides emissions from aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sausen, R.; Köhler, I.

    1994-05-01

    With the atmosphere general circulation model ECHAM the passive transport of NOx emitted from global subsonic air traffic and the NOx concentration change due to these emissions are investigated. The source of NOx is prescribed according to an aircraft emission data base. The sink of NOx is parameterized as an exponential decay process with globally constant lifetime. Simulations in perpetual January and July modes are performed. Both the resulting mean and the standard deviation of the NOx mass mixing ratio are analysed. In January horizontal dispersion is more pronounced and vertical mixing is smaller than in July. In both cases the resulting quasi-stationary fields of the mass mixing ratio display a pronounced zonal asymmetry. The variability accounts up to 30% of the mean field.

  4. Nitrogen excretion and ammonia emissions from pigs fed modified diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panetta, D M; Powers, W J; Xin, H; Kerr, B J; Stalder, K J

    2006-01-01

    Two swine feeding trials were conducted (initial body weight = 47 +/- 2 and 41 +/- 3 kg for Trials 1 and 2, respectively) to evaluate reduced crude protein (CP) and yucca (Yucca schidigera Roezl ex Ortgies) extract-supplemented diets on NH3 emissions. In Trial 1, nine pigs were offered a corn-soybean meal diet (C, 174 g kg(-1) CP), a Lys-supplemented diet (L, 170 g kg(-1) CP), or a 145 g kg(-1) CP diet supplemented with Lys, Met, Thr, and Trp (LMTT). In Trial 2, nine pigs were fed diet L supplemented with 0, 62.5, or 125 mg of yucca extract per kg diet. Each feeding period consisted of a 4-d dietary adjustment followed by 72 h of continuous NH3 measurement. Urine and fecal samples were collected each period. Feeding the LMTT diet reduced (P Yucca had no effect on feed intake, ADG, or G:F. Ammonium and N concentrations of manure and NH3 emission rates did not differ with yucca content. Caution must be executed to maintain animal performance when strategies are implemented to reduce NH3 emissions.

  5. The Origins of Fluorescent H2 Emission From T Tauri~Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Herczeg, G J; Johns-Krull, C M; Linsky, J L; Walter, F M; Gahm, Gosta F.; Herczeg, Gregory J.; Johns-Krull, Christopher M.; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Walter, Frederick M.

    2006-01-01

    We survey fluorescent H2 emission in HST/STIS spectra of the classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs) TW Hya, DF Tau, RU Lupi, T Tau, and DG Tau, and the weak-lined T Tauri star (WTTS) V836 Tau. From each of those sources we detect between 41-209 narrow H2 emission lines, most of which are pumped by strong Ly-alpha emission. H2 emission is not detected from the WTTS V410 Tau. The fluorescent H2 emission appears to be common to circumstellar environments around all CTTSs, but high spectral and spatial resolution STIS observations reveal diverse phenomenon. Blueshifted H2 emission detected from RU Lupi, T Tau, and DG Tau is consistent with an origin in an outflow. The H2 emission from TW Hya, DF Tau, and V836 Tau is centered at the radial velocity of the star and is consistent with an origin in a warm disk surface. The H2 lines from RU Lupi, DF Tau, and T Tau also have excess blueshifted H2 emission that extends to as much as -100 km/s. The strength of this blueshifted component from DF Tau and T Tau depends on the uppe...

  6. Modeling of carbon and nitrogen gaseous emissions from cattle manure compost windrows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windrow composting of cattle manure is a significant source of gaseous emissions, which include ammonia (NH3) and the greenhouse gases (GHGs) of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O). A manure compost model was developed to simulate carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) processes includ...

  7. Effects of nitrogen application and maize growth on N2O emission from soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Lanfang; CAI Zucong

    2007-01-01

    Using the pot experiment and closed static chamber-gas chromatography(GC)technique,this paper studied the effects of nitrogen application(150 and 300 mg/kg soil)and maize growth on N2O emission from soil.In maizeplanted soil,the N2O emission rate increased with increasing N application rate,its peak appeared at the seedling stage,and there was no significant correlation between N20 emission rate and air temperature.Contrarily,in exposed soil,the peak of N20 emission rate occurred at the later stages of the experiment,and there was a significant exponential correlation between soil N2O emission rate and air temperature,in which Q10(the value of soil N2O emission rate responding to temperature)was 4.4 and 3.2 in high and low N applications.The total amount of N2O emission increased remarkably with increased N application rate in both planted and un-planted soils.N2O emission inventory from exposed and maizeplanted soils in high N application was 2.5 and 1.6 times as high as that in low N application,respectively.In the same N application rate,N2O emission inventory in high and low N application from exposed soil was 12 and 7.5 times as high as that from maize-planted soil,respectively.As compared with exposed soil,maize growth reduced N2O emission by 92% and 87%,respectively,at high and low N application rates.In summary,maize growth and nitrogen application not only affected the seasonal variation and magnitude of N2O emission from soil,but also altered the relationship between air temperature and soil N2O emission.

  8. Rainfall reduction amplifies the stimulatory effect of nitrogen addition on N2O emissions from a temperate forest soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Shicong; Chen, Zhijie; Han, Shijie; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Junhui

    2017-01-01

    Soil is a significant source of atmospheric N2O, and soil N2O emissions at a global scale are greatly affected by environment changes that include continuous deposition of atmospheric nitrogen and changing precipitation distribution. However, to date, field simulations of multiple factors that control the interaction between nitrogen deposition and precipitation on forest soil N2O emissions are scarce. In this study, we conducted a 2-year continuous assessment of N2O emissions from November 2012 to October 2014 at a nitrogen addition and rainfall reduction manipulation platform in an old broad-leaved Korean pine mixed forest at Changbai Mountain in northeastern China. We found that N2O emissions from control plots were 1.25 ± 0.22 kg N2O-N ha−1 a−1. Nitrogen addition significantly increased N2O emissions, with the emission factor of 1.59%. A 30% reduction in rainfall decreased N2O emissions by 17–45%. However, in combination, nitrogen addition and rainfall reduction increased N2O emissions by 58–140%, with the emission factor of 3.19%, and had a larger promotional effect than the addition of nitrogen alone. Our results indicated that drought slightly decreases forest soil N2O emission; however, with increasing deposition of atmospheric N in temperate forest soils, the effect of drought might become altered to increase N2O emission. PMID:28233839

  9. Amino Nitrogen Quantum Dots-Based Nanoprobe for Fluorescence Detection and Imaging of Cysteine in Biological Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhijiao; Lin, Zhenhua; Li, Gongke; Hu, Yuling

    2017-03-20

    Fluorescent amino nitrogen quantum dots (aN-dots) were synthesized by microwave-assisted method using 2-azidoimidazole and aqueous ammonia. The aN-dots have a nitrogen component up to 40%, which exhibit high fluorescence quantum yield, good photostability, and excellent biocompatibility. We further explored the use of the aN-dots combined with AuNPs as a nanoprobe for detecting fluorescently and imaging of cysteine (Cys) in complex biological samples. In this sensing system, the fluorescence of aN-dots was quenched significantly by gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), while the addition of Cys can lead to the fluorescence signal recovery. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that this strategy can offer a rapid and selective detection of Cys with a good linear relationship in the range of 0.3-3.0 μmol/L. As expected, this assay was successfully applied to the detection of Cys in human serum and plasma samples with recoveries ranging from 90.0% to 106.7%. Especially, the nanoprobe exhibits good cell membrane permeability and excellent biocompatibility by CCK-8 assay, which is favorable for bioimaging applications. Therefore, this fluorescent probe ensemble was further used for imaging of Cys in living cells, which suggests our proposed method has strong potential for clinical diagnosis. As a novel member of the quantum-dot family, the aN-dots hold great promise to broaden applications in biological systems.

  10. Violet and blue light-induced green fluorescence emissions from dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakibaie, F; Walsh, L J

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this laboratory study was to compare violet and visible blue LED light-elicited green fluorescence emissions from enamel and dentine in healthy or carious states. Microscopic digital photography was undertaken using violet and blue LED illumination (405 nm and 455 nm wavelengths) of tooth surfaces, which were photographed through a custom-made stack of green compensating filters which removed the excitation light and allowed green fluorescence emissions to pass. Green channel pixel data were analysed. Dry sound enamel and sound root surfaces showed strong green fluorescence when excited by violet or blue lights. Regions of cavitated dental caries gave lower green fluorescence, and this was similar whether the dentine in the lesions was the same colour as normal dentine or was darkly coloured. The presence of saliva on the surface did not significantly change the green fluorescence, while the presence of blood diluted in saliva depressed green fluorescence. Using violet or blue illumination in combination with green compensating filters could potentially aid in the assessment of areas of mineral loss. © 2016 Australian Dental Association.

  11. Optical investigation of gold shell enhanced 25 nm diameter upconverted fluorescence emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Kory; Wirth, Janina; Lim, Shuang Fang

    2016-04-01

    We enhance the efficiency of upconverting nanoparticles by investigating the plasmonic coupling of 25 nm diameter NaYF4:Yb, Er nanoparticles with a gold-shell coating, and study the physical mechanism of enhancement by single-particle, time-resolved spectroscopy. A three-fold overall increase in emission intensity, and five-fold increase of green emission for these plasmonically enhanced particles have been achieved. Using a combination of structural and fluorescent imaging, we demonstrate that fluorescence enhancement is based on the photonic properties of single, isolated particles. Time-resolved spectroscopy shows that the increase in fluorescence is coincident with decreased rise time, which we attribute to an enhanced absorption of infrared light and energy transfer from Yb3+ to Er3+ atoms. Time-resolved spectroscopy also shows that fluorescence life-times are decreased to different extents for red and green emission. This indicates that the rate of photon emission is not suppressed, as would be expected for a metallic cavity, but rather enhanced because the metal shell acts as an optical antenna, with differing efficiency at different wavelengths.

  12. Excitation-emission fluorescence spectroscopy and time-gated Raman microscopy analysis of dental tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhin, M.; Sen, S.; Kouklin, Nikolai A.; Skliarov, A.; Dhuru, D. B.; Iacopino, A. M.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2007-02-01

    We applied two new spectroscopic techniques (time-gated Raman microscopy and excitation-emission fluorescence microspectroscopy) to characterize healthy and carious dental tissues. These methods were used together with visual inspection, DIAGNOdent, optical polarization microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and chemical microanalysis to get a more detailed picture of chemical and structural transformations in dental tissues as a result of caries development.

  13. Influence of moisturizer and relative humidity on human emissions of fluorescent biological aerosol particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, J; Fang, W; Cao, Q; Yang, L; Chang, V W-C; Nazaroff, W W

    2017-05-01

    Utilizing the ultraviolet light-induced fluorescence (UV-LIF) measurement technique as embodied in the Waveband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor (WIBS-4A), we evaluated the fluorescent particle emissions associated with human shedding while walking in a chamber. The mean emission rates of supermicron (1-10 μm) fluorescent particles were in the range 6.8-7.5 million particles per person-h (~0.3 mg per person-h) across three participants, for conditions when the relative humidity was 60%-70% and no moisturizer was applied after showering. The fluorescent particles displayed a lognormal distribution with the geometric mean diameter in the range 2.5-4 μm and exhibited asymmetry factors that increased with particle size. Use of moisturizer was associated with changes in number and mass emission rates, size distribution, and particle shape. Emission rates were lower when the relative humidity was reduced, but these differences were not statistically significant. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Anthropogenic emissions of oxidized sulfur and nitrogen into the atmosphere of the former Soviet Union in 1985 and 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryaboshapko, A.G.; Brukhanov, P.A.; Gromov, S.A.; Proshina, Yu.V; Afinogenova, O.G. [Institute of Global Climate and Ecology, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-09-01

    Anthropogenic emissions of oxidized sulfur and nitrogen over the former Soviet Union for 1985 and 1990 were calculated on the basis of a combination of `bottom-up` and `top-down` approaches. Sulfur dioxide emissions from combustion of hard coal, brown coal, oil products, natural gas, shale oil, peat, wood as well as from metallurgy, sulfuric acid production, and cement production were estimated. Nitrogen oxides emissions were considered separately for large power plants, small power plants, industrial boilers, residential combustion units, and for transport. The sulfur and nitrogen emissions were spatially distributed over the former Soviet Union with 1 x 1 degree resolution. Data on 721 point sources of sulfur dioxide emissions and on the 242 largest power stations as nitrogen oxides sources were used. The area sources of both sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides were distributed according to the population density separately for about 150 administrative units of the former Soviet Union. 63 refs., 19 tabs.

  15. Functional imaging in bulk tissue specimens using optical emission tomography: fluorescence preservation during optical clearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhalkar, H. S.; Dewhirst, M.; Oliver, T.; Cao, Y.; Oldham, M.

    2007-04-01

    Optical emission computed tomography (optical-ECT) is a technique for imaging the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of fluorescent probes in biological tissue specimens with high contrast and spatial resolution. In optical-ECT, functional information can be imaged by (i) systemic application of functional labels (e.g. fluorophore labelled proteins) and/or (ii) endogenous expression of fluorescent reporter proteins (e.g. red fluorescent protein (RFP), green fluorescent protein (GFP)) in vivo. An essential prerequisite for optical-ECT is optical clearing, a procedure where tissue specimens are made transparent to light by sequential perfusion with fixing, dehydrating and clearing agents. In this study, we investigate clearing protocols involving a selection of common fixing (4% buffered paraformaldehyde (PFA), methanol and ethanol), dehydrating (methanol and ethanol) and clearing agents (methyl salicylate and benzyl-alcohol-benzyl-benzoate (BABB)) in order to determine a 'fluorescence friendly' clearing procedure. Cell culture experiments were employed to optimize the sequence of chemical treatments that best preserve fluorescence. Texas red (TxRed), fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), RFP and GFP were tested as fluorophores and fluorescent reporter proteins of interest. Fluorescent and control cells were imaged on a microscope using a DSred2 and FITC filter set. The most promising clearing protocols of cell culture experiments were applied to whole xenograft tumour specimens, to test their effectiveness in large unsectioned samples. Fluorescence of TxRed/FITC fluorophores was not found to be significantly affected by any of the test clearing protocols. RFP and GFP fluorescence, however, was found to be significantly greater when cell fixation was in ethanol. Fixation in either PFA or methanol resulted in diminished fluorescence. After ethanol fixation, the RFP and GFP fluorescence proved remarkably robust to subsequent exposure to either methyl salicylate or BABB

  16. Magnetic nanocomposites of Fe3O4/SiO2-FITC with pH-dependent fluorescence emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Zhang; Shang Wen Yan Gong; Lu Jin; Shuang Man Li; Zhong Ping Chen; Ming Ma; Ning Gu

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the formation of magnetic and fluorescent nanocomposite particles which consist of superparamagnetic Fe3O4 core, SiO2 shell and organic dye (FITC) coating layer on their surface. The obtained nanocomposites possess typical superparamagnetism and exhibit clear green fluorescence image. And their fluorescence emission is pH-dependent, which would be applied to pH sensing.

  17. Monitoring organic loading to swimming pools by fluorescence excitation–emission matrix with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seredynska-Sobecka, Bozena; Stedmon, Colin; Boe-Hansen, Rasmus

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence Excitation–Emission Matrix spectroscopy combined with parallel factor analysis was employed to monitor water quality and organic contamination in swimming pools. The fluorescence signal of the swimming pool organic matter was low but increased slightly through the day. The analysis...... loading in swimming pool water. The fluorescence at 420nm gradually increased during opening hours and represented material accumulating through the day....

  18. Effect of fluorescence characteristics and different algorithms on the estimation of leaf nitrogen content based on laser-induced fluorescence lidar in paddy rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian; Sun, Jia; Du, Lin; Chen, Biwu; Zhang, Zhenbing; Shi, Shuo; Gong, Wei

    2017-02-20

    Paddy rice is one of the most significant food sources and an important part of the ecosystem. Thus, accurate monitoring of paddy rice growth is highly necessary. Leaf nitrogen content (LNC) serves as a crucial indicator of growth status of paddy rice and determines the dose of nitrogen (N) fertilizer to be used. This study aims to compare the predictive ability of the fluorescence spectra excited by different excitation wavelengths (EWs) combined with traditional multivariate analysis algorithms, such as principal component analysis (PCA), back-propagation neural network (BPNN), and support vector machine (SVM), for estimating paddy rice LNC from the leaf level with three different fluorescence characteristics as input variables. Then, six estimation models were proposed. Compared with the five other models, PCA-BPNN was the most suitable model for the estimation of LNC by improving R2 and reducing RMSE and RE. For 355, 460 and 556 nm EWs, R2 was 0.89, 0.80 and 0.88, respectively. Experimental results demonstrated that the fluorescence spectra excited by 355 and 556 nm EWs were superior to those excited by 460 nm for the estimation of LNC with different models. BPNN algorithm combined with PCA may provide a helpful exploratory and predictive tool for fluorescence spectra excited by appropriate EW based on practical application requirements for monitoring the N status of crops.

  19. Nitrogen fluorescence induced by the femtosecond intense laser pulses in air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Li; Suyu Li; Shuchang Li; Dunli Liu; Dan Tian; Anmin Chen; Ying Wang; Xiaowei Wang; Yunfeng Zhang; Mingxing Jin

    2016-01-01

    Our experiments show that external focusing and initial laser energy strongly influences filament generated by the femtosecond Ti–sapphire laser in air. The experimental measurements show the filament length can be extended both by increasing the laser energy and focal length of focusing lens. On the other hand, the plasma fluorescence emission can be enhanced by increasing the laser energy with fixed focal length or decreasing the focal length. In addition, the collapse distance measured experimentally are larger than the calculated ones owing to the group-velocity-dispersion effect. In addition, we find that the line widths of the spectral lines from N2 is independent of filament positions, laser energies and external focusing.

  20. Chemical Modification of Graphene Oxide by Nitrogenation: An X-ray Absorption and Emission Spectroscopy Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Cheng-Hao; Ray, Sekhar C.; Mazumder, Debarati; Sharma, Surbhi; Ganguly, Abhijit; Papakonstantinou, Pagona; Chiou, Jau-Wern; Tsai, Huang-Ming; Shiu, Hung-Wei; Chen, Chia-Hao; Lin, Hong-Ji; Guo, Jinghua; Pong, Way-Faung

    2017-02-01

    Nitrogen-doped graphene oxides (GO:Nx) were synthesized by a partial reduction of graphene oxide (GO) using urea [CO(NH2)2]. Their electronic/bonding structures were investigated using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), valence-band photoemission spectroscopy (VB-PES), X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS). During GO:Nx synthesis, different nitrogen-bonding species, such as pyrrolic/graphitic-nitrogen, were formed by replacing of oxygen-containing functional groups. At lower N-content (2.7 at%), pyrrolic-N, owing to surface and subsurface diffusion of C, N and NH is deduced from various X-ray spectroscopies. In contrast, at higher N-content (5.0 at%) graphitic nitrogen was formed in which each N-atom trigonally bonds to three distinct sp2-hybridized carbons with substitution of the N-atoms for C atoms in the graphite layer. Upon nitrogen substitution, the total density of state close to Fermi level is increased to raise the valence-band maximum, as revealed by VB-PES spectra, indicating an electron donation from nitrogen, molecular bonding C/N/O coordination or/and lattice structure reorganization in GO:Nx. The well-ordered chemical environments induced by nitrogen dopant are revealed by XANES and RIXS measurements.

  1. Chemical Modification of Graphene Oxide by Nitrogenation: An X-ray Absorption and Emission Spectroscopy Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Cheng-Hao; Ray, Sekhar C.; Mazumder, Debarati; Sharma, Surbhi; Ganguly, Abhijit; Papakonstantinou, Pagona; Chiou, Jau-Wern; Tsai, Huang-Ming; Shiu, Hung-Wei; Chen, Chia-Hao; Lin, Hong-Ji; Guo, Jinghua; Pong, Way-Faung

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped graphene oxides (GO:Nx) were synthesized by a partial reduction of graphene oxide (GO) using urea [CO(NH2)2]. Their electronic/bonding structures were investigated using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), valence-band photoemission spectroscopy (VB-PES), X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS). During GO:Nx synthesis, different nitrogen-bonding species, such as pyrrolic/graphitic-nitrogen, were formed by replacing of oxygen-containing functional groups. At lower N-content (2.7 at%), pyrrolic-N, owing to surface and subsurface diffusion of C, N and NH is deduced from various X-ray spectroscopies. In contrast, at higher N-content (5.0 at%) graphitic nitrogen was formed in which each N-atom trigonally bonds to three distinct sp2-hybridized carbons with substitution of the N-atoms for C atoms in the graphite layer. Upon nitrogen substitution, the total density of state close to Fermi level is increased to raise the valence-band maximum, as revealed by VB-PES spectra, indicating an electron donation from nitrogen, molecular bonding C/N/O coordination or/and lattice structure reorganization in GO:Nx. The well-ordered chemical environments induced by nitrogen dopant are revealed by XANES and RIXS measurements. PMID:28186190

  2. Emissions of gaseous nitrogen species from manure management: A new approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daemmgen, Ulrich [Federal Agricultural Research Centre, Institute of Agroecology, Bundesallee 50, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany)], E-mail: ulrich.daemmgen@fal.de; Hutchings, Nicholas J. [Danish Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Agroecology, Tjele (Denmark)], E-mail: nick.hutchings@agrsci.dk

    2008-08-15

    A procedure for the assessment of emissions of nitrogen (N) species (ammonia, nitrous oxide, nitric oxide, di-nitrogen) from the manure management system is developed, which treats N pools and flows including emissions strictly according to conservation of mass criteria. As all relevant flows in the husbandry of mammals are depicted, the methodology is considered a Tier 3 approach in IPCC terminology or a detailed methodology in UN ECE terminology. The importance of accounting for all N species is illustrated by comparing emission estimates obtained using this approach with those obtained from the application the present detailed/Tier 2 methodology. - A cow is a cow. There is no distinction between an IPCC and a UN ECE cow{exclamation_point}.

  3. Observation of Fluorescence Emissions from Single-Bubble Sonoluminescence in Water doped with Quinine

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, J Q; Lin, F K; Liu, Y H

    2005-01-01

    Sonoluminescence is a phenomenon involving the transduction of sound into light. The detailed mechanism as well as the energy-focusing potentials are not yet fully explored and understood. So far only optical photons are observed, while emissions in the ultra-violet range are only inferred. By doping the fluorescent dye quinine into water with dilute sulphuric acid, the high energy photons can be converted into the optical photons with slower decay constants. These sonoluminescence and fluorescent emissions were observed in coincidence, and the emitted energy of the two modes can be differentiated by their respective timing profiles. Plans for using this technique as a diagnostic tool to quantitatively study ultra-violet and other high energy emissions in sonoluminescence are discussed.

  4. Efficient synthesis of highly fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots for cell imaging using unripe fruit extract of Prunus mume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchudan, Raji; Edison, Thomas Nesakumar Jebakumar Immanuel; Sethuraman, Mathur Gopalakrishnan; Lee, Yong Rok

    2016-10-01

    Highly fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (N-CDs) were synthesized using the extract of unripe Prunus mume (P. mume) fruit by a simple one step hydrothermal-carbonization method. The N-CDs were synthesized at different pH ranges, 2.3, 5, 7, and 9. The pH of the P. mume extract was adjusted using an aqueous ammonia solution (25%). The optical properties of N-CDs were examined by UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The N-CDs synthesized at pH 9 emitted high fluorescence intensity compared to other obtained N-CDs. The N-CDs synthesized at pH 9 was further characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Fourier transform-infra red (FT-IR) spectroscopy. HR-TEM showed that the average size of the synthesized N-CDs was approximately 9 nm and the interlayer distance was 0.21 nm, which was validated by XRD. The graphitic nature of the synthesized N-CDs were confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. XPS and FT-IR spectroscopy confirmed the doping of the nitrogen moiety over the synthesized CDs. The synthesized nitrogen doped CDs (N-CDs) were low toxicity and were used as a staining probe for fluorescence cell imaging.

  5. Evaluation of potential emission spectra for the reliable classification of fluorescently coded materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Siegfried; Kargel, Christian

    2011-06-01

    The conservation and efficient use of natural and especially strategic resources like oil and water have become global issues, which increasingly initiate environmental and political activities for comprehensive recycling programs. To effectively reutilize oil-based materials necessary in many industrial fields (e.g. chemical and pharmaceutical industry, automotive, packaging), appropriate methods for a fast and highly reliable automated material identification are required. One non-contacting, color- and shape-independent new technique that eliminates the shortcomings of existing methods is to label materials like plastics with certain combinations of fluorescent markers ("optical codes", "optical fingerprints") incorporated during manufacture. Since time-resolved measurements are complex (and expensive), fluorescent markers must be designed that possess unique spectral signatures. The number of identifiable materials increases with the number of fluorescent markers that can be reliably distinguished within the limited wavelength band available. In this article we shall investigate the reliable detection and classification of fluorescent markers with specific fluorescence emission spectra. These simulated spectra are modeled based on realistic fluorescence spectra acquired from material samples using a modern VNIR spectral imaging system. In order to maximize the number of materials that can be reliably identified, we evaluate the performance of 8 classification algorithms based on different spectral similarity measures. The results help guide the design of appropriate fluorescent markers, optical sensors and the overall measurement system.

  6. Structure control for fine tuning fluorescence emission from side-chain azobenzene polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smitha, P; Asha, S K

    2007-06-14

    New fluorescent azobenzene dyes and side-chain polymers have been synthesized and characterized and their photophysical properties studied. A series of azobenzene dyes having different fluorophores such as phenol (S1), phenylphenol (S2) and naphthol (S3) incorporated in them were synthesized. S2 had unusually high fluorescence with a quantum yield of phi f = 0.2 recorded in dichloromethane (DCM), whereas S1 and S3 were found to be weakly fluorescent. The azobenzene dyes were converted into methacrylate monomers having short ethyleneoxy spacers and then free radically polymerized. Phenylphenol-based azobenzene polymer (P2) continued to show fluorescence, whereas fluorescence was completely quenched in the case of phenol (P1)- and naphthol (P3)-based polymers. Phenylphenol, though twisted in the ground state is known to have a more planar geometry in the excited state--a factor that enables it to retain its fluorescence behavior even when it is incorporated as part of an azobenzene unit. In contrast, naphthol, which is a better fluorophore compared to phenylphenol, loses much of its emissive behavior upon coupling to the azobenzene unit. The extent of trans to cis photoisomerization in solution was very low (approximately 17%) for P2 after 30 min of continuous irradiation using 365 nm light, in contrast to approximately 40% for P1 under identical conditions. This is attributed to the steric repulsion brought about by the bulky phenylphenol units that restrict rotation. A 2-fold enhancement in fluorescence emission was observed for P2 upon irradiation by UV light at 360 nm, which relaxed to the original intensity in about 7 day's time. The higher emission of the cis azobenzenes is generally attributed to an inhibition of photoinduced electron transfer (PET) mechanism. The emission of P2 showed a concentration dependence which increased initially and then decreased in intensity with the formation of a new red-shifted peak at higher concentration due to aggregation

  7. Technologies for the Reduction of Nitrogen Oxides Emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulica Arsenie

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available When it comes to gas turbines, their main problem concerning pollutant emissions is represented by nitric oxides. Among other emissions, sulphur oxides being much reduced due to the use of liquid distilled and gas fuels with a low content of sulphur. Using water or steam injection became the favourite method during the '80s and especially the '90s since "dry" methods and catalytic reduction were both at the beginning of the development phase. Catalytic convertors have been used since the '80s and they are still used although the costs of renewing the catalyst are very high. In the last twenty years a gradual decrease has been registered on the limits of nitric oxides from 75 ppm to 25 ppm, and now the target is oriented towards the 9 ppm level. The evolution of burning technologies of combustion makes it possible to control the level of production of nitric oxides even from the source without being necessary to use "humid" methods. This, of course, opened the market for gas turbines because they can function even in areas with limited quality water reserves, such as maritime platforms and in the desert. In this paper, we are going to show that, although water injection is still used, "dry" control technologies of burning became favourite methods for the majority of users on the industrial power generators market. The great dependency between the creation of nitric oxides and the temperature reveals the effect of direct water or steam injection on reducing nitric oxides. Recent research showed that a reduction up to 85% of nitric oxides may be obtained by using the water or steam injection all together with the improvement of aerodynamic character of the burning room.

  8. Regional nitrogen oxides emission trends in East Asia observed from space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Mijling

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to changing economic activity, emissions of air pollutants in East Asia change rapidly in space and time. Monthly emission estimates of nitrogen oxides derived from satellite observations provide valuable insight in the evolution of anthropogenic activity on a regional scale. We present the first results of a new emission estimation algorithm, specifically designed to use daily satellite observations of column concentrations for fast updates of emissions of short-lived atmospheric constituents on a~mesoscopic scale (~ 0.25° × 0.25°. The algorithm is used to construct a monthly NOx emission time series for 2007–2011 from tropospheric NO2 observations of GOME-2 for East Chinese provinces and surrounding countries. The new emission estimates correspond well with the bottom-up inventory of EDGAR v4.2, but are smaller than the inventories of INTEX-B and MEIC. They reveal a strong positive trend during 2007–2011 for almost all Chinese provinces, related to the country's economic development. We find a 41% increment of NOx emissions in East China during this period, which shows the need to update emission inventories in this region on a regular basis. Negative emission trends are found in Japan and South Korea, which can be attributed to a combined effect of local environmental policy and global economic crises. Analysis of seasonal variation distinguishes between regions with dominant anthropogenic or biogenic emissions. For regions with a mixed anthropogenic and biogenic signature, the opposite seasonality can be used for an estimation of the separate emission contributions. Finally, the non-local concentration/emission relationships calculated by the algorithm are used to quantify the direct effect of regional NOx emissions on tropospheric NO2 concentrations outside the region. For regions such as North Korea and Beijing province, a substantial part of the tropospheric NO2 originates from emissions elsewhere.

  9. Regional nitrogen oxides emission trends in East Asia observed from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijling, B.; van der A, R. J.; Zhang, Q.

    2013-12-01

    Due to changing economic activity, emissions of air pollutants in East Asia are changing rapidly in space and time. Monthly emission estimates of nitrogen oxides derived from satellite observations provide valuable insight into the evolution of anthropogenic activity on a regional scale. We present the first results of a new emission estimation algorithm, specifically designed to use daily satellite observations of column concentrations for fast updates of emissions of short-lived atmospheric constituents on a mesoscopic scale (~ 0.25° × 0.25°). The algorithm is used to construct a monthly NOx emission time series for the period 2007-2011 from tropospheric NO2 observations of GOME-2 for East Chinese provinces and surrounding countries. The new emission estimates correspond well with the bottom-up inventory of EDGAR v4.2, but are smaller than the inventories of INTEX-B and MEIC. They reveal a strong positive trend during 2007-2011 for almost all Chinese provinces, related to the country's economic development. We find a 41% increment of NOx emissions in East China during this period, which shows the need to update emission inventories in this region on a regular basis. Negative emission trends are found in Japan and South Korea, which can be attributed to a combined effect of local environmental policy and global economic crises. Analysis of seasonal variation distinguishes between regions with dominant anthropogenic or biogenic emissions. For regions with a mixed anthropogenic and biogenic signature, the opposite seasonality can be used for an estimation of the separate emission contributions. Finally, the non-local concentration/emission relationships calculated by the algorithm are used to quantify the direct effect of regional NOx emissions on tropospheric NO2 concentrations outside the region. For regions such as North Korea and the Beijing municipality, a substantial part of the tropospheric NO2 originates from emissions elsewhere.

  10. Responses of chlorophyll fluorescence and nitrogen level of Leymus chinensis Seedling to changes of soil moisture and temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Zhen-zhu; ZHOU Guang-sheng; LI Hui

    2004-01-01

    Controlled experiment of Leymus chinensis seedlings grown in the environmental growth chambers at 3 soilmoisture levels and 3 temperature levels was conducted in order to improve the understanding how leafphotosynthetic parameters will respond to climatic change. The results indicated that soil drought and hightemperature decreased the photochemical efficiency of photosystem (Fv/Fm ), the overall photochemical quantumyield of PSIl(yield), the coefficient of photochemical fluorescence quenching(qp), but increased the coefficient ofnon-photochemical fluorescence quenching(qN). Severe soil drought would decrease Fv/Fm and yield by 3.12% and 37.04% under 26℃ condition, respectively, and 6.60% and 73.33% under 32℃ condition, respectively, suggesting that higher temperature may enhance the negative effects of soil drought. All the soil drought treatments resulted in the decline in leaf nitrogen content. There was no significant effect of temperature on leaf nitrogen level, but higher temperature significantly reduced the root nitrogen content and the ratio of root nitrogen to leaf nitrogen, indicating the different strategies of adaptation to soil drought and temperature. It was also implied that higher temperature would enhance the effect of soil drought on leaf photosynthetic capacity, decrease the adaptability of Leymus chinensis to drought.

  11. High-Crystallinity Covalent Organic Framework with Dual Fluorescence Emissions and Its Ratiometric Sensing Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Hai-Long; Dai, Cong; Yang, Cheng-Xiong; Yan, Xiu-Ping

    2017-07-26

    High crystallinity of covalent organic frameworks (COFs) with dual fluorescence emissions has not been reported so far. Here, we show the rational design and preparation of high-crystallinity COF TzDa via the synergetic interaction of docking sites and hydrogen bonds: 4,4',4″-(1,3,5-Triazine-2,4,6-triyl)trianiline (Tz) with the docking site and 2,5-dihydroxyterephthalaldehyde (Da) with the OH group are employed to synthesize the imine-linked two-dimensional high-crystallinity layered structure TzDa. The prepared mesoporous TzDa (ca. 36 Å) exhibits high thermal and chemical stability. The intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) and excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) effects bring TzDa two main fluorescence emissions around 500 and 590 nm. Water molecules can interfere with the ICT and ESIPT effects, allowing the development of a ratiometric fluorescent sensor for water in organic solvents. The proposed sensor shows high sensitivity to trace water in conventional organic solvents. The high stability of TzDa allows its recyclable uses for trace water detection. This work not only offers a platform for the construction of high-crystallinity COFs, but also provides a rational design of COFs with dual fluorescence emissions for ratiometric sensing applications.

  12. Synthesis of highly fluorescent nitrogen and phosphorus doped carbon dots for the detection of Fe(3+) ions in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Soumen; Laha, Dipranjan; Pramanik, Arindam; Ray Chowdhuri, Angshuman; Karmakar, Parimal; Sahu, Sumanta Kumar

    2016-02-01

    Highly fluorescent nitrogen and phosphorus-doped carbon dots with a quantum yield 59% have been successfully synthesized from citric acid and di-ammonium hydrogen phosphate by single step hydrothermal method. The synthesized carbon dots have high solubility as well as stability in aqueous medium. The as-obtained carbon dots are well monodispersed with particle sizes 1.5-4 nm. Owing to a good tunable fluorescence property and biocompatibility, the carbon dots were applied for intercellular sensing of Fe(3+) ions as well as cancer cell imaging.

  13. Methane emissions from a freshwater marsh in response to experimentally simulated global warming and nitrogen enrichment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flury, Sabine; McGinnis, Daniel Frank; Gessner, Mark O.

    2010-01-01

    We determined methane (CH4) emissions in a field enclosure experiment in a littoral freshwater marsh under the influence of experimentally simulated warming and enhanced nitrogen deposition. Methane emissions by ebullition from the marsh composed of Phragmites australis were measured with funnel ...... to the atmosphere, even when they occupy only relatively small littoral areas. More detailed investigations are clearly needed to assess whether global warming and nitrogen deposition can have climate feedbacks by altering methane fluxes from these wetlands.  ......We determined methane (CH4) emissions in a field enclosure experiment in a littoral freshwater marsh under the influence of experimentally simulated warming and enhanced nitrogen deposition. Methane emissions by ebullition from the marsh composed of Phragmites australis were measured with funnel...... traps deployed in a series of enclosures for two 3 week periods. Diffusive fluxes were estimated on the basis of measured CH4 concentrations and application of Fick's law. Neither diffusive nor ebullitive fluxes of methane were significantly affected by warming or nitrate enrichment, possibly because...

  14. Methane emissions from a freshwater marsh in response to experimentally simulated global warming and nitrogen enrichment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flury, Sabine; McGinnis, Daniel Frank; Gessner, Mark O.

    2010-01-01

    We determined methane (CH4) emissions in a field enclosure experiment in a littoral freshwater marsh under the influence of experimentally simulated warming and enhanced nitrogen deposition. Methane emissions by ebullition from the marsh composed of Phragmites australis were measured with funnel ...... to the atmosphere, even when they occupy only relatively small littoral areas. More detailed investigations are clearly needed to assess whether global warming and nitrogen deposition can have climate feedbacks by altering methane fluxes from these wetlands.  ......We determined methane (CH4) emissions in a field enclosure experiment in a littoral freshwater marsh under the influence of experimentally simulated warming and enhanced nitrogen deposition. Methane emissions by ebullition from the marsh composed of Phragmites australis were measured with funnel...... traps deployed in a series of enclosures for two 3 week periods. Diffusive fluxes were estimated on the basis of measured CH4 concentrations and application of Fick's law. Neither diffusive nor ebullitive fluxes of methane were significantly affected by warming or nitrate enrichment, possibly because...

  15. Suppression of Kasha's rule as a mechanism for fluorescent molecular rotors and aggregation-induced emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Hai; Cousins, Morgan E.; Horak, Erik H.; Wakefield, Audrey; Liptak, Matthew D.; Aprahamian, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Although there are some proposed explanations for aggregation-induced emission, a phenomenon with applications that range from biosensors to organic light-emitting diodes, current understanding of the quantum-mechanical origin of this photophysical behaviour is limited. To address this issue, we assessed the emission properties of a series of BF2-hydrazone-based dyes as a function of solvent viscosity. These molecules turned out to be highly efficient fluorescent molecular rotors. This property, in addition to them being aggregation-induced emission luminogens, enabled us to probe deeper into their emission mechanism. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations and experimental results showed that the emission is not from the S1 state, as predicted from Kasha's rule, but from a higher energy (>S1) state. Furthermore, we found that suppression of internal conversion to the dark S1 state by restricting the rotor rotation enhances fluorescence, which leads to the proposal that suppression of Kasha's rule is the photophysical mechanism responsible for emission in both viscous solution and the solid state.

  16. Achieving lower nitrogen balance and higher nitrogen recovery efficiency reduces nitrous oxide emissions in North America’s maize cropping systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Few studies have assessed the common, yet unproven, hypothesis that an increase of plant nitrogen (N) uptake and/or recovery efficiency (NRE) will reduce nitrous oxide (N2O) emission during crop production. Understanding the relationships between N2O emissions and crop N uptake and use efficiency p...

  17. Polarized fluorescent emission in uniaxial liquid crystals. The effect of intramolecular energy transfer and rotational Brownian motion on measurements of the orientational distribution function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chapoy, Larry Lawrence; DuPré, Donald B.

    1978-01-01

    An expression is derived for the anisotropic fluorescent emission in uniaxial liquid crystals where fluorescent sites governed by an initial nonrandom distribution of orientations are subject to rotational Brownian motion. The possibility of nonparallelism of absorption and emission oscillators...

  18. Spatial assessment of net mercury emissions from the use of fluorescent bulbs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthew J. Eckelman; Paul T. Anastas; Julie B. Zimmerman [Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering

    2008-11-15

    While fluorescent lighting is an important technology for reducing electrical energy demand, mercury used in the bulbs is an ongoing concern. Using state and country level data, net emissions of mercury from the marginal use of fluorescent lightbulbs are examined for a base year of 2004 for each of the 50 United States and 130 countries. Combustion of coal for electric power generation is generally the largest source of atmospheric mercury pollution; reduction in electricity demand from the substitution of incandescent bulbs with fluorescents leads to reduced mercury emissions during the use of the bulb. This analysis considers the local mix of power sources, coal quality, thermal conversion efficiencies, distribution losses, and any mercury control technologies that might be in place. Emissions of mercury from production and end-of-life treatment of the bulbs are also considered, providing a life-cycle perspective. Net reductions in mercury over the entire life cycle range from -1.2 to 97 mg per bulb depending on the country. The consequences for atmospheric mercury emissions of several policy scenarios are also discussed. 46 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Spatial assessment of net mercury emissions from the use of fluorescent bulbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckelman, Matthew J; Anastas, Paul T; Zimmerman, Julie B

    2008-11-15

    While fluorescent lighting is an important technology for reducing electrical energy demand, mercury used in the bulbs is an ongoing concern. Using state and country level data, net emissions of mercury from the marginal use of fluorescent lightbulbs are examined for a base year of 2004 for each of the 50 United States and 130 countries. Combustion of coal for electric power generation is generally the largest source of atmospheric mercury pollution; reduction in electricity demand from the substitution of incandescent bulbs with fluorescents leads to reduced mercury emissions during the use of the bulb. This analysis considers the local mix of power sources, coal quality, thermal conversion efficiencies, distribution losses, and any mercury control technologies that might be in place. Emissions of mercury from production and end-of-life treatment of the bulbs are also considered, providing a life-cycle perspective. Net reductions in mercury over the entire life cycle range from -1.2 to 97 mg per bulb depending on the country. The consequences for atmospheric mercury emissions of several policy scenarios are also discussed.

  20. Effect of Biochar on Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Nitrogen Cycling in Laboratory and Field Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemann, Nikolas; Harter, Johannes; Kaldamukova, Radina; Ruser, Reiner; Graeff-Hönninger, Simone; Kappler, Andreas; Behrens, Sebastian

    2014-05-01

    The extensive use of nitrogen (N) fertilizers in agriculture is a major source of anthropogenic N2O emissions contributing 8% to global greenhouse gas emissions. Soil biochar amendment has been suggested as a means to reduce both CO2 and non-CO2 greenhouse gas emissions. The reduction of N2O emissions by biochar has been demonstrated repeatedly in field and laboratory experiments. However, the mechanisms of the reduction remain unclear. Further it is not known how biochar field-weathering affects GHG emissions and how agro-chemicals, such as the nitrification inhibitor 3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP), that is often simultaneously applied together with commercial N-fertilizers, impact nitrogen transformation and N2O emissions from biochar amended soils. In order investigate the duration of the biochar effect on soil N2O emissions and its susceptibility to DMPP application we performed a microcosm and field study with a high-temperature (400 ° C) beech wood derived biochar (60 t ha-1 and 5 % (w/w) biochar in the field and microcosms, respectively). While the field site contained the biochar already for three years, soil and biochar were freshly mixed for the laboratory microcosm experiments. In both studies we quantified GHG emissions and soil nitrogen speciation (nitrate, nitrite, ammonium). While the field study was carried out over the whole vegetation period of the sunflower Helianthus annuus L., soil microcosm experiments were performed for up to 9 days at 28° C. In both experiments a N-fertilizer containing DMPP was applied either before planting of the sunflowers or at the beginning of soil microcosms incubation. Laboratory microcosm experiments were performed at 60% water filled pore space reflecting average field conditions. Our results show that biochar effectively reduced soil N2O emissions by up to 60 % in the field and in the soil microcosm experiments. No significant differences in N2O emission mitigation potential between field-aged and fresh

  1. Nitrogen enriched combustion of a natural gas internal combustion engine to reduce NO.sub.x emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biruduganti, Munidhar S.; Gupta, Sreenath Borra; Sekar, R. Raj; McConnell, Steven S.

    2008-11-25

    A method and system for reducing nitrous oxide emissions from an internal combustion engine. An input gas stream of natural gas includes a nitrogen gas enrichment which reduces nitrous oxide emissions. In addition ignition timing for gas combustion is advanced to improve FCE while maintaining lower nitrous oxide emissions.

  2. Estimation of indocyanine green concentration in blood from fluorescence emission: application to hemodynamic assessment during hemodialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maarek, Jean-Michel I.; Holschneider, Daniel P.

    2009-09-01

    There is considerable interest in assessing cardiovascular function noninvasively in patients receiving hemodialysis. A possible approach is to measure the blood concentration of bolus-injected indocyanine green dye and to apply the dye-dilution method for estimating cardiac output and blood volume. Blood ICG concentration can be derived from a measurement of the ICG fluorescence through the dialysis tubing if a simple and unique calibration relationship can be established between transmural fluorescence intensity and blood ICG concentration. We investigated this relationship using Monte Carlo simulations of light transport in blood with varying hematocrit and ICG concentrations and performed empiric measurements of optical absorption and ICG fluorescence emission to confirm our findings. The ICG fluorescence intensity measured at the blood surface, as well as the light intensity remitted by the blood, varied as hematocrit changes modified the absorption and scattering characteristics of the blood. Calibration relationships were developed between fluorescence intensity and ICG concentration that accounted for hematocrit changes. Combining the backreflected fluorescence and the reflected light measured near the point of illumination provided optimal signal intensity, linearity, and robustness to hematocrit changes. These results provide a basis for developing a noninvasive approach to derive optically circulating blood ICG concentration in hemodialysis circuits.

  3. Estimating nitrogen oxides emissions at city scale in China with a nightlight remote sensing model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jianhui; Zhang, Jianying; Zhang, Yangwei; Zhang, Chunlong; Tian, Guangming

    2016-02-15

    Increasing nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions over the fast developing regions have been of great concern due to their critical associations with the aggravated haze and climate change. However, little geographically specific data exists for estimating spatio-temporal trends of NOx emissions. In order to quantify the spatial and temporal variations of NOx emissions, a spatially explicit approach based on the continuous satellite observations of artificial nighttime stable lights (NSLs) from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program/Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS) was developed to estimate NOx emissions from the largest emission source of fossil fuel combustion. The NSL based model was established with three types of data including satellite data of nighttime stable lights, geographical data of administrative boundaries, and provincial energy consumptions in China, where a significant growth of NOx emission has experienced during three policy stages corresponding to the 9th-11th)Five-Year Plan (FYP, 1995-2010). The estimated national NOx emissions increased by 8.2% per year during the study period, and the total annual NOx emissions in China estimated by the NSL-based model were approximately 4.1%-13.8% higher than the previous estimates. The spatio-temporal variations of NOx emissions at city scale were then evaluated by the Moran's I indices. The global Moran's I indices for measuring spatial agglomerations of China's NOx emission increased by 50.7% during 1995-2010. Although the inland cities have shown larger contribution to the emission growth than the more developed coastal cities since 2005, the High-High clusters of NOx emission located in Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei regions, the Yangtze River Delta, and the Pearl River Delta should still be the major focus of NOx mitigation. Our results indicate that the readily available DMSP/OLS nighttime stable lights based model could be an easily accessible and effective tool for achieving strategic decision making

  4. Nitrogen oxide emissions from a banana plantation in the humid tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldkamp, Edzo; Keller, Michael

    1997-07-01

    Use of nitrogen fertilizer is thought to contribute significantly to the increase of atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) and nitric oxide (NO). While the current increase of fertilizer use is concentrated in tropical areas, nearly all studies of nitrogen oxide emissions have been conducted in agricultural systems in temperate areas. We measured N2O and NO fluxes from a fertilized banana plantation in the humid tropics of Costa Rica, where 360 kg N ha-1 yr-1 is applied. Using chamber techniques, we sampled an Andisol and an Inceptisol on a monthly basis. Twice on each soil type, we sampled intensively in time following fertilizer applications. There is a strong spatial and temporal dependence of nitrogen oxide emissions on place and time of fertilizer application. We find greater mean N2O and NO emissions from the Andisol (31.4 ng N2O-N cm-2 h-1 and 55.6 ng NO-N cm-2 h-1) than from the Inceptisol (9.3 ng N2O-N cm-2 h-1 and 41.1 ng NO-N cm-2 h-1) under the plants where fertilizer is typically applied. The percentages of applied fertilizer-N that are converted into nitrogen oxide ("yield") are between 1.26 and 2.91% for N2O and between 5.09 and 5.66% for NO depending on soil type. We consistently calculate higher nitrogen oxide yields based on intensive sampling versus monthly sampling. Temporal variation in nitrogen oxide emissions probably causes monthly sampling to underestimate mean annual fluxes. Our results suggest that in some tropical systems a higher percentage of applied nitrogen may be lost in gaseous form than in temperate agriculture. Current global estimates of N2O and NO sources from tropical agriculture are based on information from temperate areas and may cause an underestimate of the contribution of tropical agriculture to the budgets of these trace gases.

  5. Effect of Nitrogen Fertilization on Leaf Chlorophyll Fluorescence in Field-Grown Winter Wheat Under Rainfed Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHANGGUAN Zhou-ping; ZHENG Shu-xia; ZHANG Lei-ming; XUE Qing-wu

    2005-01-01

    The effect of nitrogen fertilization on leaf chlorophyll fluorescence was studied in field-grown winter wheat during grain filling under rainfed conditions in Loess Plateau. Results showed that the actual photochemical efficiency of PS Ⅱ reaction center (Ф PS Ⅱ) decreased significantly as leaf water stress progressed, however, the Ф PS was increased by nitrogen fertilization. The Ф PS Ⅱ of 0, 90 and 180 kg ha-1 nitrogen treatments at noon were 0.197, 0.279 and 0.283, respectively, which decreased by 57.7, 56.4 and 40.2% as compared was even higher than that in the moming. Application of nitrogen fertilizer significantly increased maximum photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm), photochemical quenching coefficient (qP) and non-photochemical quenching coefficient (qNP). These results indicated that application of nitrogen fertilizer could increase the light energy conversion efficiency, the potential activity of photosynthetic reaction center, and the non-photochemical dissipation of excess light energy, which can prevent leaf photosynthetic apparatus from damage of treatments, indicating that the excess nitrogen was unfavorable to photosynthesis.

  6. Spatial Variability Analysis of Within-Field Winter Wheat Nitrogen and Grain Quality Using Canopy Fluorescence Sensor Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyu Song

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Wheat grain protein content (GPC is a key component when evaluating wheat nutrition. It is also important to determine wheat GPC before harvest for agricultural and food process enterprises in order to optimize the wheat grading process. Wheat GPC across a field is spatially variable due to the inherent variability of soil properties and position in the landscape. The objectives of this field study were: (i to assess the spatial and temporal variability of wheat nitrogen (N attributes related to the grain quality of winter wheat production through canopy fluorescence sensor measurements; and (ii to examine the influence of spatial variability of soil N and moisture across different growth stages on the wheat grain quality. A geostatistical approach was used to analyze data collected from 110 georeferenced locations. In particular, Ordinary Kriging Analysis (OKA was used to produce maps of wheat GPC, GPC yield, and wheat canopy fluorescence parameters, including simple florescence ratio and Nitrogen Balance Indices (NBI. Soil Nitrate-Nitrogen (NO3-N content and soil Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR value in the study field were also interpolated through the OKA method. The fluorescence parameter maps, soil NO3-N and soil TDR maps obtained from the OKA output were compared with the wheat GPC and GPC yield maps in order to assess their relationships. The results of this study indicate that the NBI spatial variability map in the late stage of wheat growth can be used to distinguish areas that produce higher GPC.

  7. The importance of climate change and nitrogen use efficiency for future nitrous oxide emissions from agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, David R.; Zhang, Xin; Mauzerall, Denise L.; Malyshev, Sergey; Shevliakova, Elena

    2016-09-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas and ozone depleting substance. Previous projections of agricultural N2O (the dominant anthropogenic source) show emissions changing in tandem, or at a faster rate than changes in nitrogen (N) consumption. However, recent studies suggest that the carbon dioxide (CO2) fertilization effect may increase plant N uptake, which could decrease soil N losses and dampen increases in N2O. To evaluate this hypothesis at a global scale, we use a process-based land model with a coupled carbon-nitrogen cycle to examine how changes in climatic factors, land-use, and N application rates could affect agricultural N2O emissions by 2050. Assuming little improvement in N use efficiency (NUE), the model projects a 24%-31% increase in global agricultural N2O emissions by 2040-2050 depending on the climate scenario—a relatively moderate increase compared to the projected increases in N inputs (42%-44%) and previously published emissions projections (38%-75%). This occurs largely because the CO2 fertilization effect enhances plant N uptake in several regions, which subsequently dampens N2O emissions. And yet, improvements in NUE could still deliver important environmental benefits by 2050: equivalent to 10 Pg CO2 equivalent and 0.6 Tg ozone depletion potential.

  8. Practical aspects of PARAFAC modeling of fluorescence excitation-emission data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Charlotte Møller; Bro, R.

    2003-01-01

    . These steps include choosing the right number of components, handling problems with missing values and scatter, detecting variables influenced by noise and identifying outliers. Various validation methods are applied in order to ensure that the optimal model has been found and several common data......This paper presents a dedicated investigation and practical description of how to apply PARAFAC modeling to complicated fluorescence excitation-emission measurements. The steps involved in finding the optimal PARAFAC model are described in detail based on the characteristics of fluorescence data......-specific problems and their solutions are explained. Finally, interpretations of the specific models are given. The paper can be used as a tutorial for investigating fluorescence landscapes with multi-way analysis. Copyright (C) 2003 John Wiley Sons, Ltd....

  9. Stimulated emission depletion microscopy resolves individual nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond nanocrystals.

    OpenAIRE

    Arroyo Camejo, S.; Adam, M; Besbes, M.; Hugonin, J.; Jaques, V.; Greffet, J.; Roch, J.; Hell, S.; Treussart, F.

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers in nanodiamonds are highly promising for bioimaging and sensing. However, resolving individual NV centers within nanodiamond particles and the controlled addressing and readout of their spin state has remained a major challenge. Spatially stochastic super-resolution techniques cannot provide this capability in principle, whereas coordinate-controlled super-resolution imaging methods, like stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy, have been predicted ...

  10. Moisture effects on carbon and nitrogen emission from burning of wildland biomass

    OpenAIRE

    L.-W. A. Chen; Verburg, P.; A. Shackelford; Zhu, D.; R. Susfalk; Chow, J. C.; J. G. Watson

    2010-01-01

    Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) released from biomass burning have multiple effects on the Earth's biogeochemical cycle, climate change, and ecosystem. These effects depend on the relative abundances of C and N species emitted, which vary with fuel type and combustion conditions. This study systematically investigates the emission characteristics of biomass burning under different fuel moisture contents, through controlled burning experiments with biomass and soil samples collected from a typical...

  11. Three-dimensional super-resolution imaging for fluorescence emission difference microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shangting You

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We propose a method theoretically to break the diffraction limit and to improve the resolution in all three dimensions for fluorescence emission difference microscopy. We produce two kinds of hollow focal spot by phase modulation. By incoherent superposition, these two kinds of focal spot yield a 3D hollow focal spot. The optimal proportion of these two kinds of spot is given in the paper. By employing 3D hollow focal spot, super-resolution image can be yielded by means of fluorescence emission difference microscopy, with resolution enhanced both laterally and axially. According to computation result, size of point spread function of three-dimensional super-resolution imaging is reduced by about 40% in all three spatial directions with respect to confocal imaging.

  12. Resolving the influence of nitrogen abundances on sediment organic matter in macrophyte-dominated lakes, using fluorescence spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Yao; Shengrui Wang; Lixin Jiao; Caihong Yan; Xiangcan Jin

    2015-01-01

    A controlled experiment was designed to resolve the influence of nitrogen abundance on sediment organic matters in macrophyte-dominated lakes using fluorescence analysis.Macrophyte biomass showed coincident growth trends with time,but different variation rates with nitrogen treatment.All plant growth indexes with nitrogen addition (N,NH4Cl 100,200,400 mg/kg,respectively) were lower than those of the control group.Four humiclike components,two autochthonous tryptophan-like components,and one autochthonous tyrosine-like component were identified using the parallel factor analysis model.The results suggested that the relative component changes of fluorescence in the colonized sediments were in direct relation to the change of root biomass with time.In the experiment,the root formation parameters of the plants studied were significantly affected by adding N in sediments,which may be related to the reason that the root growth was affected by N addition.Adding a low concentration of N to sediments can play a part in supplying nutrients to the plants.However,the intensive uptake of NH~ may result in an increase in the intracellular concentration of ammonia,which is highly toxic to the plant cells.Hence,our experiment results manifested that organic matter cycling in the macrophyte-dominated sediment was influenced by nitrogen enrichment through influencing vegetation and relevant microbial activity.

  13. Effects of Nitrogen Fertilizer Level on Chlorophyll Fluorescence Characteristics in Flag Leaf of Super Hybrid Rice at Late Growth Stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG Ji-rui; MA Guo-hui; WAN Yi-zheng; SONG Chun-fang; SUN Jian; QIN Rui-jun

    2013-01-01

    To compare the effects of slow-release nitrogen fertilizer at six different levels on the flag leaf chlorophyll fluorescence characteristics of super hybrid rice,a field fertilization experiment was conducted with super hybrid rice Y Liangyou 1 as a test material.The photosynthetic electron transport rate (ETR),effective quantum yield (EQY),photochemical quenching coefficient (qp),and non-photochemical quenching coefficient (NPQ) of flag leaves were measured at the initial heading,full heading,10 d after full heading and 20 d after full heading stages.Results showed that the values of ETR,EQY and qp increased with rice development from initial heading to 20 d after full heading,whereas the NPQ decreased.During the measured stages,ETR,EQY and qp increased initially and then decreased as nitrogen application amount increased,but they peaked at different nitrogen fertilizer levels.The maximum ETR and EQY values appeared at the treatment of 135 kg/hm2 N.In conclusion,the optimum nitrogen amount for chlorophyll fluorescence characteristics of super hybrid rice was 135-180 kg/hm2.

  14. Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Matrix Regional Integration to Quantify Spectra for Dissolved Organic Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W.; Westerhoff, P.; Leenheer, J.A.; Booksh, K.

    2003-01-01

    Excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy has been widely used to characterize dissolved organic matter (DOM) in water and soil. However, interpreting the >10,000 wavelength-dependent fluorescence intensity data points represented in EEMs has posed a significant challenge. Fluorescence regional integration, a quantitative technique that integrates the volume beneath an EEM, was developed to analyze EEMs. EEMs were delineated into five excitation-emission regions based on fluorescence of model compounds, DOM fractions, and marine waters or freshwaters. Volumetric integration under the EEM within each region, normalized to the projected excitation-emission area within that region and dissolved organic carbon concentration, resulted in a normalized region-specific EEM volume (??i,n). Solid-state carbon nuclear magnetic resonance (13C NMR), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis, ultraviolet-visible absorption spectra, and EEMs were obtained for standard Suwannee River fulvic acid and 15 hydrophobic or hydrophilic acid, neutral, and base DOM fractions plus nonfractionated DOM from wastewater effluents and rivers in the southwestern United States. DOM fractions fluoresced in one or more EEM regions. The highest cumulative EEM volume (??T,n = ????i,n) was observed for hydrophobic neutral DOM fractions, followed by lower ??T,n values for hydrophobic acid, base, and hydrophilic acid DOM fractions, respectively. An extracted wastewater biomass DOM sample contained aromatic protein- and humic-like material and was characteristic of bacterial-soluble microbial products. Aromatic carbon and the presence of specific aromatic compounds (as indicated by solid-state 13C NMR and FTIR data) resulted in EEMs that aided in differentiating wastewater effluent DOM from drinking water DOM.

  15. Greenhouse gas emissions and reactive nitrogen releases from rice production with simultaneous incorporation of wheat straw and nitrogen fertilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Longlong; Xia, Yongqiu; Ma, Shutan; Wang, Jinyang; Wang, Shuwei; Zhou, Wei; Yan, Xiaoyuan

    2016-08-01

    Impacts of simultaneous inputs of crop straw and nitrogen (N) fertilizer on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and N losses from rice production are not well understood. A 2-year field experiment was established in a rice-wheat cropping system in the Taihu Lake region (TLR) of China to evaluate the GHG intensity (GHGI) as well as reactive N intensity (NrI) of rice production with inputs of wheat straw and N fertilizer. The field experiment included five treatments of different N fertilization rates for rice production: 0 (RN0), 120 (RN120), 180 (RN180), 240 (RN240), and 300 kg N ha-1 (RN300, traditional N application rate in the TLR). Wheat straws were fully incorporated into soil before rice transplantation. The meta-analytic technique was employed to evaluate various Nr losses. Results showed that the response of rice yield to N rate successfully fitted a quadratic model, while N fertilization promoted Nr discharges exponentially (nitrous oxide emission, N leaching, and runoff) or linearly (ammonia volatilization). The GHGI of rice production ranged from 1.20 (RN240) to 1.61 kg CO2 equivalent (CO2 eq) kg-1 (RN0), while NrI varied from 2.14 (RN0) to 10.92 g N kg-1 (RN300). Methane (CH4) emission dominated the GHGI with a proportion of 70.2-88.6 % due to direct straw incorporation, while ammonia (NH3) volatilization dominated the NrI with proportion of 53.5-57.4 %. Damage costs to environment incurred by GHG and Nr releases from current rice production (RN300) accounted for 8.8 and 4.9 % of farmers' incomes, respectively. Cutting N application rate from 300 (traditional N rate) to 240 kg N ha-1 could improve rice yield and nitrogen use efficiency by 2.14 and 10.30 %, respectively, while simultaneously reducing GHGI by 13 %, NrI by 23 %, and total environmental costs by 16 %. Moreover, the reduction of 60 kg N ha-1 improved farmers' income by CNY 639 ha-1, which would provide them with an incentive to change the current N application rate. Our study suggests that GHG

  16. Phosphorus, and nitrogen co-doped carbon dots as a fluorescent probe for real-time measurement of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species inside macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yunqian; Yu, Bin; Yang, Wen; Zhang, Xiaoling

    2016-05-15

    Phosphorus and nitrogen doped carbon dots (PN-CDs) were conveniently prepared by carbonization of adenosine-5'-triphosphate using a hydrothermal treatment. The PN-CDs with P/C atomic ratio of ca. 9.2/100 emit blue luminescence with high quantum yields of up to 23.5%. The PN-CDs were used as a novel sensing platform for live cell imaging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), including ClO(-), ONOO(-), and NO in macrophages. The nanosensor design is based on our new finding that the strong fluorescence of the PN-CDs can be sensitively and selectively quenched by ROS and RNS both in vitro and in vivo. These results reveal that the PN-CDs can serve as a sensitive sensor for rapid imaging of ROS and RNS signaling with high selectivity and contrast.

  17. Efficient synthesis of highly fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots for cell imaging using unripe fruit extract of Prunus mume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atchudan, Raji; Edison, Thomas Nesakumar Jebakumar Immanuel [School of Chemical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 38541 (Korea, Republic of); Sethuraman, Mathur Gopalakrishnan, E-mail: mgsethu@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Gandhigram Rural Institute-Deemed University, Gandhigram 624 302, Tamilnadu (India); Lee, Yong Rok, E-mail: yrlee@yu.ac.kr [School of Chemical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 38541 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-30

    Graphical abstract: The green synthesis of highly fluorescent N-CDs was achieved using the extract of unripe P. mume fruit as a carbon precursor by a one-pot simple hydrothermal-carbonization method. The resulting N-CDs were used as a staining agent for the fluorescence imaging of MDA-MB-231 cells. Display Omitted - Highlights: • The green synthesis of highly fluorescent N-CDs using the extract of unripe P. mume. • The N-CDs were synthesized by one-pot hydrothermal-carbonization method. • This method of synthesis is a simple, cost effective and eco-friendly route. • N-CDs will be a good alternative for fluorescent dyes and SQDs for bio-applications. - Abstract: Highly fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (N-CDs) were synthesized using the extract of unripe Prunus mume (P. mume) fruit by a simple one step hydrothermal-carbonization method. The N-CDs were synthesized at different pH ranges, 2.3, 5, 7, and 9. The pH of the P. mume extract was adjusted using an aqueous ammonia solution (25%). The optical properties of N-CDs were examined by UV–vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The N-CDs synthesized at pH 9 emitted high fluorescence intensity compared to other obtained N-CDs. The N-CDs synthesized at pH 9 was further characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Fourier transform-infra red (FT-IR) spectroscopy. HR-TEM showed that the average size of the synthesized N-CDs was approximately 9 nm and the interlayer distance was 0.21 nm, which was validated by XRD. The graphitic nature of the synthesized N-CDs were confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. XPS and FT-IR spectroscopy confirmed the doping of the nitrogen moiety over the synthesized CDs. The synthesized nitrogen doped CDs (N-CDs) were low toxicity and were used as a staining probe for fluorescence cell imaging.

  18. Emissions credits: opportunity to promote integrated nitrogen management in the wastewater sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, James S; Hamburg, Steven P; Pryor, Donald E; Chandran, Kartik; Daigger, Glen T

    2011-08-01

    Relatively little attention has been paid to integrating gaseous N(2)O generated by wastewater treatment into overall reactive nitrogen (Nr) pollution reduction. We propose that there is potential for substantial reductions in N(2)O emissions through the addition of denitrification processes to existing nitrifying wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), which are designed to lower ammonia levels but currently do not reduce overall Nr. In addition to providing the benefit of reducing total nitrogen concentrations in the effluent, this kind of WWTP upgrade has been demonstrated to reduce energy consumption and fossil CO(2) emissions. We show that the creation of a greenhouse gas (GHG) crediting system for the wastewater sector could provide a potentially sizable economic incentive on the order of $10 million to $600 million per year in the U.S. for upgrading of nitrifying WWTPs that results in N(2)O reductions, with an ancillary benefit of another $30-100 million per year from electricity savings. Even if biological nitrogen removal (BNR) treatment were mandated by existing and future water quality regulations, a GHG crediting system could still be created to promote BNR design and operation that drive N(2)O emissions below a baseline to even lower levels. In this case GHG credits could offset around 0.5-70% of the operating and maintenance cost for the BNR.

  19. Emission shaping in fluorescent proteins: role of electrostatics and π-stacking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae Woo; Rhee, Young Min

    2016-02-07

    For many decades, simulating the excited state properties of complex systems has been an intriguing but daunting task due to its high computational cost. Here, we apply molecular dynamics based techniques with interpolated potential energy surfaces toward calculating fluorescence spectra of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and its variants in a statistically meaningful manner. With the GFP, we show that the diverse electrostatic tuning can shape the emission features in many different ways. By computationally modulating the electrostatic interactions between the chromophore phenoxy oxygen and its nearby residues, we demonstrate that we indeed can shift the emission to the blue or to the red side in a predictable manner. We rationalize the shifting effects of individual residues in the GFP based on the responses of both the adiabatic and the diabatic electronic states of the chromophore. We next exhibit that the yellow emitting variant, the Thr203Tyr mutant, generates changes in the electrostatic interactions and an additional π-stacking interaction. These combined effects indeed induce a red shift to emit the fluorescence into the yellow region. With the series of demonstrations, we suggest that our approach can provide sound rationales and useful insights in understanding different responses of various fluorescent complexes, which may be helpful in designing new light emitting proteins and other related systems in future studies.

  20. Estimating fluorescence emission of city trees in Valencia: from leaf to canopy level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wittenberghe, S.; Alonso, L.; Verrelst, J.; Veroustraete, F.; Valcke, R.; Moreno, J.; Samson, R.

    2012-04-01

    Air pollutant concentrations in cities can be very high due to the heavy traffic load. Also, these concentrations vary on a small scale due to differences in traffic density, street layout and the surrounding land uses, leading to local hot-spots for air pollution. These different growing environments can result in a different stress outcome for city trees, which can be measured at different scales. Leaf radiative transfer characteristics such as spectral reflectance and sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (F) give information about the physiological status of the leaf and can be measured both at the leaf and canopy scales. The goal of the BIOHYPE project is to develop a passive biomonitoring methodology from leaf to canopy scale based on fluorescence and reflectance parameters as indicators for leaf physiological stress. Field and flight campaigns were set in Valencia during the summer of 2011. Four tree species with different leaf characteristics were selected at 10 locations in the city with different traffic densities. Fluorescence emission was measured with an ASD FieldSpec spectroradiometer in combination with the Fluowat leafclip, a portable device to measure leaf reflectance, transmittance and fluorescence emission under natural conditions. Airborne images were acquired using a CASI-1500 VNIR hyperspectral imager in tandem with an AHS system for SWIR-TIR. Besides fluorescence, the following parameters have been measured and analyzed at leaf level: optical properties, chlorophyll content (Chl), water content and magnetic properties of deposited pollution dust. In this work, relationships of fluorescence with location (i.e. traffic density), pollution and chlorophyll content have been explored. At leaf level, first results suggest that the up- and down-ward total F yields are related to location for two of the four species, while the fluorescence peaks and their ratios showed a larger influence of location. The ratio F687/F741 for both down- and upward

  1. Donor-acceptor substituted phenylethynyltriphenylenes – excited state intramolecular charge transfer, solvatochromic absorption and fluorescence emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritesh Nandy

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Several 2-(phenylethynyltriphenylene derivatives bearing electron donor and acceptor substituents on the phenyl rings have been synthesized. The absorption and fluorescence emission properties of these molecules have been studied in solvents of different polarity. For a given derivative, solvent polarity had minimal effect on the absorption maxima. However, for a given solvent the absorption maxima red shifted with increasing conjugation of the substituent. The fluorescence emission of these derivatives was very sensitive to solvent polarity. In the presence of strongly electron withdrawing (–CN and strongly electron donating (–NMe2 substituents large Stokes shifts (up to 130 nm, 7828 cm−1 were observed in DMSO. In the presence of carbonyl substituents (–COMe and –COPh, the largest Stokes shift (140 nm, 8163 cm−1 was observed in ethanol. Linear correlation was observed for the Stokes shifts in a Lippert–Mataga plot. Linear correlation of Stokes shift was also observed with ET(30 scale for protic and aprotic solvents but with different slopes. These results indicate that the fluorescence emission arises from excited state intramolecular charge transfer in these molecules where the triphenylene chromophore acts either as a donor or as an acceptor depending upon the nature of the substituent on the phenyl ring. HOMO–LUMO energy gaps have been estimated from the electrochemical and spectral data for these derivatives. The HOMO and LUMO surfaces were obtained from DFT calculations.

  2. Ag-Pb Interaction and Enhanced Fluorescence Emission of Pb^2+ in Lead Borate Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallur, Saisudha; Giri, Prakash; Dc, Mahendra; Babu, P. K.

    2012-06-01

    We carried out Pb^2+ fluorescence measurements in lead borate glasses and studied the effect of adding Ag into the base glass. Lead borate glasses containing Ag (0 and 3 mol%) were prepared by the usual melt quench method. The prepared glasses were then annealed near the glass transition temperature (400 ^oC) at 5, 10, 20 and 30h. Fluorescence spectra of all these samples were obtained using different excitation wavelengths. In general, Pb^2+ monomers are expected to have emission at wavelength less than 400nm. However, no emission in this region was observed due to the base glass absorption. The emission observed at 450nm is attributed to ^3P1->^1S0 transition of Pb^2+ ions in dimer centers. Addition of Ag enhances the Pb^2+ luminescence intensity at 450 nm which also shows an increase with the annealing time. The possible mechanisms for the fluorescence enhancement in the present glass could be the energy transfer from isolated Ag particles and local field effects due to the difference between the dielectric functions of the glass matrix and the silver particles.

  3. Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apodaca, Lori E.

    2013-01-01

    The article presents an overview of the nitrogen chemical market as of July 2013, including the production of ammonia compounds. Industrial uses for ammonia include fertilizers, explosives, and plastics. Other topics include industrial capacity of U.S. ammonia producers CF Industries Holdings Inc., Koch Nitrogen Co., PCS Nitrogen, Inc., and Agrium Inc., the impact of natural gas prices on the nitrogen industry, and demand for corn crops for ethanol production.

  4. The effects of nitrogen fertilization on N2O emissions from a rubber plantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wen-Jun; Ji, Hong-Li; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Yi-Ping; Sha, Li-Qing; Liu, Yun-Tong; Zhang, Xiang; Zhao, Wei; Dong, Yu-Xin; Bai, Xiao-Long; Lin, You-Xin; Zhang, Jun-Hui; Zheng, Xun-Hua

    2016-06-01

    To gain the effects of N fertilizer applications on N2O emissions and local climate change in fertilized rubber (Hevea brasiliensis) plantations in the tropics, we measured N2O fluxes from fertilized (75 kg N ha-1 yr-1) and unfertilized rubber plantations at Xishuangbanna in southwest China over a 2-year period. The N2O emissions from the fertilized and unfertilized plots were 4.0 and 2.5 kg N ha-1 yr-1, respectively, and the N2O emission factor was 1.96%. Soil moisture, soil temperature, and the area weighted mean ammoniacal nitrogen (NH4+-N) content controlled the variations in N2O flux from the fertilized and unfertilized rubber plantations. NH4+-N did not influence temporal changes in N2O emissions from the trench, slope, or terrace plots, but controlled spatial variations in N2O emissions among the treatments. On a unit area basis, the 100-year carbon dioxide equivalence of the fertilized rubber plantation N2O offsets 5.8% and 31.5% of carbon sink of the rubber plantation and local tropical rainforest, respectively. When entire land area in Xishuangbanna is considered, N2O emissions from fertilized rubber plantations offset 17.1% of the tropical rainforest’s carbon sink. The results show that if tropical rainforests are converted to fertilized rubber plantations, regional N2O emissions may enhance local climate warming.

  5. BVOCs emission in a semi-arid grassland under climate warming and nitrogen deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs profoundly affect atmospheric chemistry and ecosystem functioning. BVOCs emission and their responses to global change are still unclear in grasslands, which cover one quarter of the Earth's land surface and are currently undergoing the largest changes. Over two growing seasons, we conducted a field experiment in a semi-arid grassland (Inner Mongolia, China to examine the emission and the responses of BVOCs emissions to warming and nitrogen deposition. The natural emission rate (NER of monoterpene (dominant BVOCs here is 107 ± 16 μg m−2 h−1 in drought 2007, and 266 ± 53 μg m−2 h−1 in wet 2008, respectively. Warming decreased the standard emission factor (SEF by 24% in 2007, while increased it by 43% in 2008. The exacerbated soil moisture loss caused by warming in dry season might be responsible for the decrease of SEF in 2007. A possible threshold of soil moisture (8.2% (v/v, which controls the direction of warming effects on monoterpene emission, existed in the semiarid grassland. Nitrogen deposition decreased the coverage of Artemisia frigida and hence reduced the NER by 24% across the two growing seasons. These results suggest that the grasslands dominated by the extended Artemisia frigida are an important source for BVOCs, while the responses of their emissions to global changes are more uncertain since they depend on multifactorial/in-situ/conditions.

  6. BVOCs emission in a semi-arid grassland under climate warming and nitrogen deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Wang

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs profoundly affect atmospheric chemistry and ecosystem functioning. BVOCs emission and their responses to global change are still unclear in grasslands, which cover one quarter of the Earth's land surface and are currently undergoing the largest changes. Over two growing seasons, we conducted a field experiment in a semi-arid grassland (Inner Mongolia, China to examine the emission and the responses of BVOCs emissions to warming and nitrogen deposition. The natural emission rate (NER of monoterpene (dominant BVOCs here is 107 ± 16 μg m−2 h−1 in drought 2007, and 266 ± 53 μg m−2 h−1 in wet 2008, respectively. Warming decreased the standard emission factor (SEF by 24% in 2007, while it increased by 43% in 2008. The exacerbated soil moisture loss caused by warming in dry season might be responsible for the decrease of SEF in 2007. A possible threshold of soil moisture (8.2% (v/v, which controls the direction of warming effects on monoterpene emission, existed in the semiarid grassland. Nitrogen deposition decreased the coverage of Artemisia frigida and hence reduced the NER by 24% across the two growing seasons. These results suggest that the grasslands dominated by the extended Artemisia frigida are an important source for BVOCs, while the responses of their emissions to global changes are more uncertain since they depend on multifactorial in-situ conditions.

  7. A green fluorescent protein with photoswitchable emission from the deep sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Vogt

    Full Text Available A colorful variety of fluorescent proteins (FPs from marine invertebrates are utilized as genetically encoded markers for live cell imaging. The increased demand for advanced imaging techniques drives a continuous search for FPs with new and improved properties. Many useful FPs have been isolated from species adapted to sun-flooded habitats such as tropical coral reefs. It has yet remained unknown if species expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP-like proteins also exist in the darkness of the deep sea. Using a submarine-based and -operated fluorescence detection system in the Gulf of Mexico, we discovered ceriantharians emitting bright green fluorescence in depths between 500 and 600 m and identified a GFP, named cerFP505, with bright fluorescence emission peaking at 505 nm. Spectroscopic studies showed that approximately 15% of the protein bulk feature reversible ON/OFF photoswitching that can be induced by alternating irradiation with blue und near-UV light. Despite being derived from an animal adapted to essentially complete darkness and low temperatures, cerFP505 maturation in living mammalian cells at 37 degrees C, its brightness and photostability are comparable to those of EGFP and cmFP512 from shallow water species. Therefore, our findings disclose the deep sea as a potential source of GFP-like molecular marker proteins.

  8. Emission wavelength tuning of fluorescence by fine structural control of optical metamaterials with Fano resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritake, Y.; Kanamori, Y.; Hane, K.

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrated fine emission wavelength tuning of quantum dot (QD) fluorescence by fine structural control of optical metamaterials with Fano resonance. An asymmetric-double-bar (ADB), which was composed of only two bars with slightly different bar lengths, was used to obtain Fano resonance in the optical region. By changing the short bar length of ADB structures with high dimensional accuracy in the order of 10 nm, resonant wavelengths of Fano resonance were controlled from 1296 to 1416 nm. Fluorescence of QDs embedded in a polymer layer on ADB metamaterials were modified due to coupling to Fano resonance and fine tuning from 1350 to 1376 nm was observed. Wavelength tuning of modified fluorescence was reproduced by analysis using absorption peaks of Fano resonance. Tuning range of modified fluorescence became narrow, which was interpreted by a simple Gaussian model and resulted from comparable FWHM in QD fluorescence and Fano resonant peaks. The results will help the design and fabrication of metamaterial devices with fluorophores such as light sources and biomarkers.

  9. Emission wavelength tuning of fluorescence by fine structural control of optical metamaterials with Fano resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritake, Y; Kanamori, Y; Hane, K

    2016-09-13

    We demonstrated fine emission wavelength tuning of quantum dot (QD) fluorescence by fine structural control of optical metamaterials with Fano resonance. An asymmetric-double-bar (ADB), which was composed of only two bars with slightly different bar lengths, was used to obtain Fano resonance in the optical region. By changing the short bar length of ADB structures with high dimensional accuracy in the order of 10 nm, resonant wavelengths of Fano resonance were controlled from 1296 to 1416 nm. Fluorescence of QDs embedded in a polymer layer on ADB metamaterials were modified due to coupling to Fano resonance and fine tuning from 1350 to 1376 nm was observed. Wavelength tuning of modified fluorescence was reproduced by analysis using absorption peaks of Fano resonance. Tuning range of modified fluorescence became narrow, which was interpreted by a simple Gaussian model and resulted from comparable FWHM in QD fluorescence and Fano resonant peaks. The results will help the design and fabrication of metamaterial devices with fluorophores such as light sources and biomarkers.

  10. Effects of nitrogen and phosphorus additions on nitrous oxide emission in a nitrogen-rich and two nitrogen-limited tropical forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Mianhai; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Lei; Zhu, Weixing; Zhang, Wei; Mo, Jiangming

    2016-06-01

    Nitrogen (N) deposition is generally considered to increase soil nitrous oxide (N2O) emission in N-rich forests. In many tropical forests, however, elevated N deposition has caused soil N enrichment and further phosphorus (P) deficiency, and the interaction of N and P to control soil N2O emission remains poorly understood, particularly in forests with different soil N status. In this study, we examined the effects of N and P additions on soil N2O emission in an N-rich old-growth forest and two N-limited younger forests (a mixed and a pine forest) in southern China to test the following hypotheses: (1) soil N2O emission is the highest in old-growth forest due to the N-rich soil; (2) N addition increases N2O emission more in the old-growth forest than in the two younger forests; (3) P addition decreases N2O emission more in the old-growth forest than in the two younger forests; and (4) P addition alleviates the stimulation of N2O emission by N addition. The following four treatments were established in each forest: Control, N addition (150 kg N ha-1 yr-1), P addition (150 kg P ha-1 yr-1), and NP addition (150 kg N ha-1 yr-1 plus 150 kg P ha-1 yr-1). From February 2007 to October 2009, monthly quantification of soil N2O emission was performed using static chamber and gas chromatography techniques. Mean N2O emission was shown to be significantly higher in the old-growth forest (13.9 ± 0.7 µg N2O-N m-2 h-1) than in the mixed (9.9 ± 0.4 µg N2O-N m-2 h-1) or pine (10.8 ± 0.5 µg N2O-N m-2 h-1) forests, with no significant difference between the latter two. N addition significantly increased N2O emission in the old-growth forest but not in the two younger forests. However, both P and NP addition had no significant effect on N2O emission in all three forests, suggesting that P addition alleviated the stimulation of N2O emission by N addition in the old-growth forest. Although P fertilization may alleviate the stimulated effects of atmospheric N deposition on N2O

  11. Surface nitrogen functionality for the enhanced field emission of free-standing few-layer graphene nanowalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, C.X. [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Display Material and Technology, and School of Electronics and Information Technology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Guangzhou Key Laboratory of Vacuum Coating Technologies and New Energy Materials, Department of Physics, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Zhang, Yu; Deng, S.Z.; Xu, N.S. [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Display Material and Technology, and School of Electronics and Information Technology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Chen, Jun, E-mail: stscjun@mail.sysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Display Material and Technology, and School of Electronics and Information Technology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2016-07-05

    The effects of nitrogen functionalization on the field emission properties of vertically aligned few-layer graphene (FLG) nanowall thin films are investigated. Lowered work function and enhanced electron emission property are observed after ammonia plasma treatment. The turn-on field (defined at 10 μAcm{sup −2}) is found to be decreased from 6.5 to 4.6 Vμm{sup −1}. Additionally, more stable emission with fluctuation less than 5% is obtained after surface N-functionalization. The electron configuration of nitrogen in FLG edge is proposed to be amine (C–NH{sub 2}) terminal configuration. Nitrogen doping could significantly increases the π density states near the Fermi level. The maximum upward shift of E{sub F} is determined to be ∼0.23 eV by low-energy XPS measurements, which mainly accounts for the lower turn-on electric field. Meanwhile, nitrogen functionalization would minimize surface desorption and accounts for more uniform work function distribution. Finally, the nonlinear characteristics of Fowler–Nordheim plots could be understood by thermionic-field emission process. - Highlights: • Enhanced field emission was found in nitrogen functionalization of FLG nanowalls. • Work function shows remarkable reduce of 0.23 eV after nitrogen functionalization. • Nitrogen in FLG edge is proposed to be amine terminal configuration. • The underlying mechanism about the nonlinear F–N plots was proposed.

  12. Temperature Dependence of the Fluorescence Emission Intensity of Eu/TiO2 Nanocrystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Qing-Guang; DING Ze-Jun; JU Xin; WANG Yi; SHENG Ye-Qing

    2007-01-01

    The samples of europium ions doped titanium dioxide (Eu3+/TiO2) nanocrystals are synthesized by a modified sol-gel method with hydrothermal treatment. The x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy are used to characterize the sample. The temperature-dependent fluorescence emission effect of Eu3+ -doped samples is investigated. It is found that under the excitation of 514.5 nm light, the emission intensity of Eu3+ reaches a maximum value at 450K among various Eu3+ dopant concentrations in Eu3+/TiO2 nanocrystals. The variation of the emission intensity may be attributed to the photon-assist absorption and the temperature-quenching effect.

  13. White organic light emitting devices with hybrid emissive layers combining phosphorescence and fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei Gangtie; Chen Xiaolan; Wang Lei; Zhu Meixiang; Zhu Weiguo [Key Lab of Environmental-friendly Chemistry and Application of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan 411105 (China); Wang Liduo; Qiu Yong [Key Lab of Organic-Optoelectronics and Molecular Sciences of Ministry of Education, Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)], E-mail: lgt@xtu.edu.cn

    2008-05-21

    We fabricated a white organic light-emitting diode (WOLED) by hybrid emissive layers which combined phosphorescence with fluorescence. In this device, the thin layer of 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-(t-butyl)-6-(1, 1, 7, 7-tetramethyljulolidyl-9-enyl)-4H-pyran played the role of undoped red emissive layer which was inserted between two blue phosphorescence emissive layers. The blue phosphorescent dye was bis[(4, 6-difluorophenyl)-pyridinato-N, C{sup 2}] (picolinato) Ir(III), which was doped in the host material, N, N'-dicarbazolyl-1, 4-dimethene-benzene. The WOLED showed stable Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage coordinates and a high efficency of 9.6 cd A{sup -1} when the current density was 1.8 A m{sup -2}. The maximum luminance of the device achieved was 17 400 cd m{sup -2} when the current density was 3000 A m{sup -2}.

  14. Effects of Different Concentrations of Ammonia Nitrogen on N2O Emission in the Process of Partial Nitrification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN; Lin; KONG; Qiang; ZHANG; Jian; MIAO; Ming-sheng

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] The study aimed to discuss the effects of different concentrations of ammonia nitrogen on N2O emission in the process of partial nitrification. [Method] By using a sequencing batch biofilm reactor (SBBR) under intermittent aeration, the influences of various concentrations of influent ammonia nitrogen on nitrous oxide (N2O) emission from partial nitrification were analyzed. [Result] When the concentration of influent ammonia nitrogen varied from 200 to 400 mg/L, the changing trends of DO and ORP value were consistent during the process of partial nitrification, and the concentration ratio of NO-2-N to NH+4-N in effluent water reached 1∶1, with lower NO-3-N level. In addition, ammonia nitrogen concentration in the influent had significant effects on N2O emission in the process of partial nitrification, that is, the higher the ammonia nitrogen concentration, the more the N2O emission. When ammonia nitrogen concentration was 400 mg/L, N2O emission was up to about 37 mg. [Conclusion] N2O emission in the process of partial nitrification might be related to the concentrations of NH+4 and NO-2.

  15. Effects of Different Concentrations of Ammonia Nitrogen on N_2O Emission in the Process of Partial Nitrification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN; Lin; KONG; Qiang; ZHANG; Jian; MIAO; Ming-sheng

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] The study aimed to discuss the effects of different concentrations of ammonia nitrogen on N2O emission in the process of partial nitrification. [Method] By using a sequencing batch biofilm reactor (SBBR) under intermittent aeration, the influences of various concentrations of influent ammonia nitrogen on nitrous oxide (N2O) emission from partial nitrification were analyzed. [Result] When the concentration of influent ammonia nitrogen varied from 200 to 400 mg/L, the changing trends of DO and ORP value were consistent during the process of partial nitrification, and the concentration ratio of NO-2-N to NH+4-N in effluent water reached 1∶1, with lower NO-3-N level. In addition, ammonia nitrogen concentration in the influent had significant effects on N2O emission in the process of partial nitrification, that is, the higher the ammonia nitrogen concentration, the more the N2O emission. When ammonia nitrogen concentration was 400 mg/L, N2O emission was up to about 37 mg. [Conclusion] N2O emission in the process of partial nitrification might be related to the concentrations of NH+4 and NO-2.

  16. Atmospheric Ammonia Emissions and a Nitrogen Mass Balance for a Dairy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumburg, B. P.; Mount, G. H.; Filipy, J. M.; Lamb, B.; Yonge, D.; Wetherelt, S.

    2003-12-01

    Atmospheric ammonia (NH3) emissions have many impacts on the environment and human health. Environmental NH3 impacts include terrestrial and aquatic eutrophication, soil acidification, and aerosol formation. Aerosols affect global radiative transfer and have been linked to human health effects. The global emissions of NH3 are estimated to be 45 Tg N yr-1 (Dentener and Crutzen, 1994) with most of the emissions coming from domestic animals. The largest per animal emission come from dairy cows at 33 kg N animal{-1} year{-1} versus 10 kg N animal{-1} {-1} for cattle. On a global scale the emissions uncertainty is about 25%, but local emissions are highly uncertain (Bouwman et al., 1997). Local emissions determination is required for proper treatment in air pollution models. The main sources of emission from dairies are the cow stalls where urea and manure react to form NH3, the storage lagoons where NH3 is the end product of microbial degradation and the disposal of the waste. There have been numerous studies of NH3 emissions in Europe but farming practices are quite different in Europe than in the U.S.. The impact of these differences on emissions is unknown. We have been studying the NH3 emissions from the Washington State University dairy for three years to develop a detailed emission model for use in a regional air pollution model. NH3 is measured using a short-path spectroscopic absorption near 200 nm with a sensitivity of a few ppbv and a time resolution of a few seconds. The open air short-path method is advantageous because it is self calibrating and avoids inlet wall adherence which is a major problem for most NH3 measurement techniques. A SF6 tracer technique has been used to measure fluxes from the three main emission sources: the cow stalls, anaerobic lagoon and the waste application to grass fields using a sprinkler system. Estimated yearly emissions from each source will be compared to a nitrogen mass balance model for the dairy.

  17. [Effect of Aeration Strategies on Emissions of Nitrogenous Gases and Methane During Sludge Bio-Drying].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Lu; Wei, Yuan-song; Zhang, Jun-ya; Zhao, Chen-yang; Cai, Xing; Zhang, Yuan-li; Shao, Chun-yan; Li, Hong-mei

    2016-01-15

    The data on nitrogen gas (NH3, N2O, NO) emissions during sludge bio-drying process in China is scarce, especially NO due to its unstable chemical property. In this study, effect of two aeration modes on emissions of methane and nitrogenous gas was compared during the continuous aerated turning pile sludge bio-drying process at full scale. In these two aeration strategies, the one currently used in the plant was set as the control, and the other was set as the test in which the aeration was used for oxygen supply, pile temperature control, and moisture removal in the start-up, middle and final stages, respectively. The results showed that the aeration strategy used in the test could not only obviously accelerate the rate of sludge drying (the moisture contents of the test and the control were 36.6% and 42% on day 11) , but also had a better drying performance (the final moisture contents of the test and the control were 33.6% and 37.6%, respectively) and decreased the ammonia cumulative emission by 5%, (ammonia cumulative emission of the test and the control were 208 mg x m(-3) and 219.8 mg x m(-3), respectively). Though a lower accumulated emission (eCO2) of greenhouse gas in the test at 3.61 kg x t(-1) was observed than that of the control (3.73 kg x t(-1) dry weight) , the cumulative emission of NO in the test at 1.9 g x m(-2) was 15. 9% higher than that of the control (1.6 g x m(-2)).

  18. Measurement and mitigation of nitrous oxide emissions from a high nitrogen input vegetable system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Shu Kee; Suter, Helen; Davies, Rohan; Bai, Mei; Sun, Jianlei; Chen, Deli

    2015-02-01

    The emission and mitigation of nitrous oxide (N2O) from high nitrogen (N) vegetable systems is not well understood. Nitrification inhibitors are widely used to decrease N2O emissions in many cropping systems. However, most N2O flux measurements and inhibitor impacts have been made with small chambers and have not been investigated at a paddock-scale using micrometeorological techniques. We quantified N2O fluxes over a four ha celery paddock using open-path Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy in conjunction with a backward Lagrangian stochastic model, in addition to using a closed chamber technique. The celery crop was grown on a sandy soil in southern Victoria, Australia. The emission of N2O was measured following the application of chicken manure and N fertilizer with and without the application of a nitrification inhibitor 3, 4-dimethyl pyrazole phosphate (DMPP). The two techniques consistently demonstrated that DMPP application reduced N2O emission by 37-44%, even though the N2O fluxes measured by a micrometeorological technique were more than 10 times higher than the small chamber measurements. The results suggest that nitrification inhibitors have the potential to mitigate N2O emission from intensive vegetable production systems, and that the national soil N2O emission inventory assessments and modelling predictions may vary with gas measurement techniques.

  19. PARAFAC modeling of fluorescence excitation - Emission spectra of fish bile for rapid en route screening of PAC exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jan H.; Tomasi, Giorgio; Strand, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) and may constitute an alternative to fixed wavelength fluorescence and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (M). PARAFAC was applied to excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) of bile samples of shorthorn sculpins and European eels collected in Greenland and Denmark...

  20. Low Light CMOS Contact Imager with an Integrated Poly-Acrylic Emission Filter for Fluorescence Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonathan Dattner

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the fabrication of a low cost poly-acrylic acid (PAA based emission filter integrated with a low light CMOS contact imager for fluorescence detection. The process involves the use of PAA as an adhesive for the emission filter. The poly-acrylic solution was chosen due its optical transparent properties, adhesive properties, miscibility with polar protic solvents and most importantly its bio-compatibility with a biological environment. The emission filter, also known as an absorption filter, involves dissolving an absorbing specimen in a polar protic solvent and mixing it with the PAA to uniformly bond the absorbing specimen and harden the filter. The PAA is optically transparent in solid form and therefore does not contribute to the absorbance of light in the visible spectrum. Many combinations of absorbing specimen and polar protic solvents can be derived, yielding different filter characteristics in different parts of the spectrum. We report a specific combination as a first example of implementation of our technology. The filter reported has excitation in the green spectrum and emission in the red spectrum, utilizing the increased quantum efficiency of the photo sensitive sensor array. The thickness of the filter (20 μm was chosen by calculating the desired SNR using Beer-Lambert’s law for liquids, Quantum Yield of the fluorophore and the Quantum Efficiency of the sensor array. The filters promising characteristics make it suitable for low light fluorescence detection. The filter was integrated with a fully functional low noise, low light CMOS contact imager and experimental results using fluorescence polystyrene micro-spheres are presented.

  1. Nitrogen-doped carbon nanoparticle modulated turn-on fluorescent probes for histidine detection and its imaging in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaohua; Zhao, Tingbi; Nie, Zhou; Miao, Zhuang; Liu, Yang; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2016-01-01

    In this work, nitrogen-doped carbon nanoparticle (N-CNP) modulated turn-on fluorescent probes were developed for rapid and selective detection of histidine. The as synthesized N-CNPs exhibited high fluorescence quantum yield and excellent biocompatibility. The fluorescence of N-CNPs can be quenched selectively by Cu(ii) ions with high efficiency, and restored by the addition of histidine owing to the competitive binding of Cu(ii) ions and histidine that removes Cu(ii) ions from the surface of the N-CNPs. Under the optimal conditions, a linear relationship between the increased fluorescence intensity of N-CNP/Cu(ii) ion conjugates and the concentration of histidine was established in the range from 0.5 to 60 μM. The detection limit was as low as 150 nM (signal-to-noise ratio of 3). In addition, the as-prepared N-CNP/Cu(ii) ion nanoprobes showed excellent biocompatibility and were applied for a histidine imaging assay in living cells, which presented great potential in the bio-labeling assay and clinical diagnostic applications.In this work, nitrogen-doped carbon nanoparticle (N-CNP) modulated turn-on fluorescent probes were developed for rapid and selective detection of histidine. The as synthesized N-CNPs exhibited high fluorescence quantum yield and excellent biocompatibility. The fluorescence of N-CNPs can be quenched selectively by Cu(ii) ions with high efficiency, and restored by the addition of histidine owing to the competitive binding of Cu(ii) ions and histidine that removes Cu(ii) ions from the surface of the N-CNPs. Under the optimal conditions, a linear relationship between the increased fluorescence intensity of N-CNP/Cu(ii) ion conjugates and the concentration of histidine was established in the range from 0.5 to 60 μM. The detection limit was as low as 150 nM (signal-to-noise ratio of 3). In addition, the as-prepared N-CNP/Cu(ii) ion nanoprobes showed excellent biocompatibility and were applied for a histidine imaging assay in living cells, which

  2. Effects of high pressure on the Raman and fluorescence emission spectra of two novel 1,3,4-oxadiazole derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Ji-Feng; Tang Ben-Chen; Gao Chun-Xiao; Li Min; Han Yong-Hao; Zou Guang-Tian

    2005-01-01

    The effects of pressure on the fluorescence emission and Raman spectra of 1,4-bis[(4-methyloxyphenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazolyl]- 2,5-bisheptyloxyphenylene (OXD-2) and on the fluorescence emission spectra of 1,4-bis[(4-methylphenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazolyl]phenylene (OXD-1) are investigated using a diamond anvil cell. With the increase of pressure, the intensity of the fluorescence emission increases and reaches maxima at 13GPa for OXD-1 and at 9.6GPa for OXD-2.The effect of pressure on the peak position of the emission shows a similar trend, red shift with the increase of pressure.But at higher pressures, the intensity of emission drops down dramatically. The Raman spectra of OXD-2 indicate that there appears a structural change at ca 3GPa.

  3. New technologies reduce greenhouse gas emissions from nitrogenous fertilizer in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei-Feng; Dou, Zheng-Xia; He, Pan; Ju, Xiao-Tang; Powlson, David; Chadwick, Dave; Norse, David; Lu, Yue-Lai; Zhang, Ying; Wu, Liang; Chen, Xin-Ping; Cassman, Kenneth G; Zhang, Fu-Suo

    2013-05-21

    Synthetic nitrogen (N) fertilizer has played a key role in enhancing food production and keeping half of the world's population adequately fed. However, decades of N fertilizer overuse in many parts of the world have contributed to soil, water, and air pollution; reducing excessive N losses and emissions is a central environmental challenge in the 21st century. China's participation is essential to global efforts in reducing N-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions because China is the largest producer and consumer of fertilizer N. To evaluate the impact of China's use of N fertilizer, we quantify the carbon footprint of China's N fertilizer production and consumption chain using life cycle analysis. For every ton of N fertilizer manufactured and used, 13.5 tons of CO2-equivalent (eq) (t CO2-eq) is emitted, compared with 9.7 t CO2-eq in Europe. Emissions in China tripled from 1980 [131 terrogram (Tg) of CO2-eq (Tg CO2-eq)] to 2010 (452 Tg CO2-eq). N fertilizer-related emissions constitute about 7% of GHG emissions from the entire Chinese economy and exceed soil carbon gain resulting from N fertilizer use by several-fold. We identified potential emission reductions by comparing prevailing technologies and management practices in China with more advanced options worldwide. Mitigation opportunities include improving methane recovery during coal mining, enhancing energy efficiency in fertilizer manufacture, and minimizing N overuse in field-level crop production. We find that use of advanced technologies could cut N fertilizer-related emissions by 20-63%, amounting to 102-357 Tg CO2-eq annually. Such reduction would decrease China's total GHG emissions by 2-6%, which is significant on a global scale.

  4. Moisture effects on carbon and nitrogen emission from burning of wildland biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.-W. A. Chen

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon (C and nitrogen (N released from biomass burning have multiple effects on the Earth's biogeochemical cycle, climate change, and ecosystem. These effects depend on the relative abundances of C and N species emitted, which vary with fuel type and combustion conditions. This study systematically investigates the emission characteristics of biomass burning under different fuel moisture contents, through controlled burning experiments with biomass and soil samples collected from a typical alpine forest in North America. Fuel moisture in general lowers combustion efficiency, shortens flaming phase, and introduces prolonged smoldering before ignition. It increases emission factors of incompletely oxidized C and N species, such as carbon monoxide (CO and ammonia (NH3. Substantial particulate carbon and nitrogen (up to 4 times C in CO and 75% of N in NH3 were also generated from high-moisture fuels, maily associated with the pre-flame smoldering. This smoldering process emits particles that are larger and contain lower elemental carbon fractions than soot agglomerates commonly observed in flaming smoke. Hydrogen (H/C ratio and optical properties of particulate matter from the high-moisture fuels show their resemblance to plant cellulous and brown carbon, respectively. These findings have implications for modeling biomass burning emissions and impacts.

  5. The Reduction of Thermal Nitrogen Oxides(NOx) Emission Using Staged Combustion in Furnace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.K.Ma; D.M.Hsieh

    1993-01-01

    The experimental study described in this paper is to investigated the control of thermal nitrogen oxides emissions from a 2.28 MW gas-fired test furnace.Tests,including changing axial or radial air flow rate.adding cooling water,and adding staged air,were performed to characterize and opimize the fuel-rich burning zone and the fuel-lean burnout zone independently.Detailed measurements of O2,CO2,CO,NOand NOx were made at the fuel-rich burning zone and furnace exit.The influence of forming CO,NO and NOx was examined.Results indicated that adding staged air in the fuel-rich burning zone(75cm from burner)will reduce the maximum NO and NOx emissions.Adding cooling water in a right position may further lower the NO and NOx emissions.In addition,the least formation of thermal nitrogen oxides in the first stage fuel-rich burning zone will occur at the stoichiometric ratio's inverse value ,(φ1)-1,0.65 to 0.7.

  6. A Far-ultraviolet Fluorescent Molecular Hydrogen Emission Map of the Milky Way Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Young-Soo; Seon, Kwang-Il; Min, Kyoung-Wook; Edelstein, Jerry; Han, Wonyong

    2017-08-01

    We present the far-ultraviolet (FUV) fluorescent molecular hydrogen (H2) emission map of the Milky Way Galaxy obtained with FIMS/SPEAR covering ˜76% of the sky. The extinction-corrected intensity of the fluorescent H2 emission has a strong linear correlation with the well-known tracers of the cold interstellar medium (ISM), including color excess E(B-V), neutral hydrogen column density N(H i), and Hα emission. The all-sky H2 column density map was also obtained using a simple photodissociation region model and interstellar radiation fields derived from UV star catalogs. We estimated the fraction of H2 (f H2) and the gas-to-dust ratio (GDR) of the diffuse ISM. The f H2 gradually increases from <1% at optically thin regions where E(B-V) < 0.1 to ˜50% for E(B-V) = 3. The estimated GDR is ˜5.1 × 1021 atoms cm-2 mag-1, in agreement with the standard value of 5.8 × 1021 atoms cm-2 mag-1.

  7. Vehicle Real Driving Emissions of Nitrogen Oxides in an Urban Area from a large Vehicle Fleet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pöhler, Denis; Horbanski, Martin; Oesterle, Tobias; Adler, Tim; Reh, Miriam; Tirpitz, Lukas; Kanatschnig, Florian; Lampel, Joahnnes; Platt, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    Nitrogen Oxide (NOx=NO +NO2) emissions by road vehicles are the major contributor for poor air quality in urban areas. High NOx concentrations, and especially NO2, are typically the most problematic pollution in cities. However, emissions vary significantly depending on the type of vehicle, its engine, the age, condition of the vehicle, driving properties, modifications and many more. Even if official NOx emission data of the manufacturer exist, they are only valid for new vehicles and the current vehicle emission scandal shows clearly that these data are often wrong. Thus, real driving emissions (RDE) of the current vehicle fleet is required. With such data the contribution of individual vehicles to the NO2 and NOx levels in urban areas can be estimated. Significant reduction of NOx concentrations can be achieved by identifying the strong emitting vehicles and excluding, replace or modify them. We developed a precise and fast ICAD (Iterative CAvity DOAS) NO2 instrument which can measure the concentration within the emission plume of vehicles under real driving conditions. The sampling was performed with an inlet at the front of a car which was following the investigated vehicles. The instrument measure NO2 and additionally CO2 with a time resolution of 2 seconds. With the observed NO2 values already strong emitters can easily be identified. With the use of known CO2 emissions, more reliable emissions for NO2 can be calculated for each vehicle. Currently the system is expanded with a NOx channel to derive the total nitrogen oxide emissions. The system was successfully applied in several studies over the last two years to investigate NO2 RDE. More than thousand vehicles were investigated. We observed that several vehicles from various brands show much higher emissions than allowed (more than a factor of 5). Highest emissions correlate for trucks and busses typically to older vehicles, what is not the case for cars. A large variability between different cars was

  8. Nitrogen emissions during pyrolysis and combustion; Einfluesse auf die Stickstofffreisetzung bei der Pyrolyse und Verbrennung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koepsel, R.F.; Friebel, J.; Halang, S. [Technische Univ. Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Inst. IEC

    1998-09-01

    Reduction of nitric oxide emissions during brown coal combustion is an important contribution to clean utilisation of this very important domestic primary energy source. In modern processes, the nitrogen contained in the fuels is the main source of oxides. The distribution of this nitrogen in the products can be influenced by modifying the degassing parameters especially in the first phase of combustion, i.e. pyrolysis. The heat-up rate, pressure, as well as the genesis and mineral content of the coal were found to be the main influencing paramters. Depending on the fuel characteristics (degree of coalification, concentration of volatile matter, ash composition), the nitrogen released during pyrolysis and the nitrogen retained in the solid residue contribute to the total emissions of nitric oxides in different degrees. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Verminderung der Stickoxidemission bei der Verbrennung von Braunkohle stellt einen wichtigen Beitrag zur sauberen Verwertung dieses bedeutendsten einheimischen Primaerenergietraegers dar. In modernen Prozessen bildet dabei der im Brennstoff gebundene Stickstoff die Hauptquelle der Oxide. Insbesondere durch Einflussnahme auf die Entgasungsbedingungen waehrend der ersten Phase der Verbrennung - der Pyrolyse - kann die Verteilung dieses Stickstoffes auf die Produkte beeinflusst werden. Als wesentliche Einflussgroessen auf die Einbindung in den verbleibenden Koks und die Freisetzung fluechtiger N-haltiger Gase (HCN, NH{sub 3}) wurden die Aufheizgeschwindigkeit, der Druck und die Mineralsubstanz der Kohle gefunden. Eine wesentliche Einflussgroesse stellt daneben auch die Herkunft der Kohlen dar. In Abhaengigkeit von den Brennstoffeigenschaften (Inkohlungsgrad, Gehalt an fluechtigen Bestandteilen, Aschezusammensetzung) tragen der waehrend der Pyrolyse freigesetzte und der im festen Rueckstand verbleibende Stickstoff in unterschiedlichem Masse zur Gesamtemission an Stickoxiden bei. (orig.)

  9. Global projections for anthropogenic reactive nitrogen emissions to the atmosphere: An assessment of scenarios in the scientific literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vuuren, D.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/11522016X; Bouwman, L.F.; Smith, S.J.; Dentener, F.

    2011-01-01

    Most long-term scenarios of global reactive nitrogen (Nr) emissions to the atmosphere are produced by Integrated Assessment Models in the context of climate change assessments. These scenarios indicate that these global Nr emissions are likely to increase in the next decades, followed by a

  10. Nitrogen source effects on nitrous oxide emissions from irrigated cropping systems in Colorado. American Chemical Society Symposium Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrogen (N) fertilization is essential in most irrigated cropping systems to optimize crop yields and economic returns. Application of inorganic N fertilizers to these cropping systems generally results in increased nitrous oxide (N2O-N) emissions. Nitrous oxide emissions resulting from the appli...

  11. Nitrogen-Use Efficiency, Nitrous Oxide Emissions, and Cereal Production in Brazil: Current Trends and Forecasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Viana Pires

    Full Text Available The agriculture sector has historically been a major source of greenhouse gas (GHG emissions into the atmosphere. Although the use of synthetic fertilizers is one of the most common widespread agricultural practices, over-fertilization can lead to negative economic and environmental consequences, such as high production costs, depletion of energy resources, and increased GHG emissions. Here, we provide an analysis to understand the evolution of cereal production and consumption of nitrogen (N fertilizers in Brazil and to correlate N use efficiency (NUE with economic and environmental losses as N2O emissions. Our results show that the increased consumption of N fertilizers is associated with a large decrease in NUE in recent years. The CO2 eq. of N2O emissions originating from N fertilization for cereal production were approximately 12 times higher in 2011 than in 1970, indicating that the inefficient use of N fertilizers is directly related to environmental losses. The projected N fertilizer forecasts are 2.09 and 2.37 million ton for 2015 and 2023, respectively. An increase of 0.02% per year in the projected NUE was predicted for the same time period. However, decreases in the projected CO2 eq. emissions for future years were not predicted. In a hypothetical scenario, a 2.39% increase in cereal NUE would lead to $ 21 million savings in N fertilizer costs. Thus, increases in NUE rates would lead not only to agronomic and environmental benefits but also to economic improvement.

  12. Nitrogen-Use Efficiency, Nitrous Oxide Emissions, and Cereal Production in Brazil: Current Trends and Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Marcel Viana; da Cunha, Dênis Antônio; de Matos Carlos, Sabrina; Costa, Marcos Heil

    2015-01-01

    The agriculture sector has historically been a major source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions into the atmosphere. Although the use of synthetic fertilizers is one of the most common widespread agricultural practices, over-fertilization can lead to negative economic and environmental consequences, such as high production costs, depletion of energy resources, and increased GHG emissions. Here, we provide an analysis to understand the evolution of cereal production and consumption of nitrogen (N) fertilizers in Brazil and to correlate N use efficiency (NUE) with economic and environmental losses as N2O emissions. Our results show that the increased consumption of N fertilizers is associated with a large decrease in NUE in recent years. The CO2 eq. of N2O emissions originating from N fertilization for cereal production were approximately 12 times higher in 2011 than in 1970, indicating that the inefficient use of N fertilizers is directly related to environmental losses. The projected N fertilizer forecasts are 2.09 and 2.37 million ton for 2015 and 2023, respectively. An increase of 0.02% per year in the projected NUE was predicted for the same time period. However, decreases in the projected CO2 eq. emissions for future years were not predicted. In a hypothetical scenario, a 2.39% increase in cereal NUE would lead to $ 21 million savings in N fertilizer costs. Thus, increases in NUE rates would lead not only to agronomic and environmental benefits but also to economic improvement. PMID:26252377

  13. Nitrogen deposition effects on carbon dioxide and methane emissions from temperate peatland soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aerts, Rien; Caluwe, Hannie de [Utrecht Univ., Dept. of Plant Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Utrecht (Norway)

    1999-04-01

    Northern peatlands are important sources of carbon dioxide and methane emissions to the atmosphere. Increased atmospheric N deposition may have a significant impact on the emission of these greenhouse gases. We studied CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} emissions from untreated peat soils from a eutrophic and a mesotrophic fen in a high N deposition area (the Netherlands) and from a mesotrophic fen in a low N deposition area (north-east Poland). In addition, we investigated the effects of N, P and glucose amendments on the emissions of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} from these soils. Nitrogen availability (extractable NH{sub 4}) in untreated peat from the high N area was 2.5-7.5 times higher than in the low N area, whereas the pH was 0.9-1.7 units lower. Using 6-week laboratory incubations of peat columns, we found that mean dayly CO{sub 2} emission from untreated peat soils from the high N area was lower than that from the low N area. Both linear and multiple regression analysis showed that CO{sub 2} emission was positively related to soil pH (r{sup 2}=0.64). Additional N supply led to pH reduction and to lower CO{sub 2} emission, especially in the low N peat soils. Thus, increased atmospheric N deposition leads, probably as a result of soil acidification, to lower CO{sub 2} emission. Although glucose amendments resulted in increase CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} emission, we did not find evidence that this was caused by increase mineralization of native peat. Mean daily CH{sub 4}-C emission was about 1-2 orders of magnitude lower than mean daily CO{sub 2}-C emission. In the untreated peat soils from the high N eutrophic site, methane emission was higher than in the high N mesotrophic site and in the low N mesotrophic site. Linear regression analysis showed a positive relation between methane emission and soil fertility variables (r{sup 2}=0.42-0.55), whereas a multiple regression model revealed that methane emission was determined by N-related soil chemistry variable (r{sup 2

  14. Abiotic nitrate loss and nitrogenous trace gas emission from Chinese acidic forest soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yajing; Cao, Wenchao; Zhang, Xinmu; Guo, Jingheng

    2017-08-16

    There are an increasing number of studies, which have shown the potential importance of abiotic denitrification in nitrogen biogeochemistry through pure chemical coupling between nitrate/nitrite reduction and Fe(II) oxidation. However, there is little direct evidence showing the environmental significance of abiotic nitrate (NO3(-)) reduction in acidic soils. We assessed the magnitude and gaseous product stoichiometry of abiotic nitrate reduction in acidic forest soils based on sterilized anoxic soil incubations at different soil pHs and nitrate loadings. The results showed that 24.9, 53.4, and 88.7% of added nitrate (70 mg N kg(-1)) were lost during 15 days incubation at pHs 3.9, 4.8, and 5.6, respectively. Nitrous oxide (N2O) was found as the dominant gaseous product of abiotic nitrate reduction, accounting for 5.0, 28.9, and 47.9% of nitrate losses at three pH levels, respectively. Minor but clear NO accumulations were observed for all nitrate-amended treatments, with the maxima at intermediate pH 4.8. The percentage of NO increased significantly with soil pH decline, leading to a negative correlation between NO/N2O ratio and soil pH. Though saturations were found under excessive nitrogen loading (i.e., 140 mg N kg(-1)), we still pose that abiotic nitrate reduction may represent a potentially important pathway for nitrate loss from acidic forest soils receiving nitrogen deposition. Our results here highlight the importance of abiotic nitrate reduction in the soil nitrogen cycle, with special relevance to nitrate removal and nitrogenous trace gas (NO and N2O) emissions from acidic soils.

  15. Theoretical characterization of X-ray absorption, emission, and photoelectron spectra of nitrogen doped along graphene edges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianlong; Hou, Zhufeng; Ikeda, Takashi; Oshima, Masaharu; Kakimoto, Masa-aki; Terakura, Kiyoyuki

    2013-01-24

    K-edge X-ray absorption (XAS), emission (XES), and photoelectron (XPS) spectra of nitrogen doped along graphene edges are systematically investigated by using first-principles methods. In this study we considered pyridinium-like, pyridine-like, cyanide-like, and amine-like nitrogens at armchair and zigzag edges and pyrrole-like nitrogen at armchair edge as well as graphite-like nitrogen at graphene interior site. Our results indicate that nitrogen configuration and its location (armchair or zigzag edge) in nitrogen-doped graphene can be identified via the spectral analysis. Furthermore, some controversial spectral features observed in experiment for N-doped graphene-like materials are unambiguously assigned. The present analysis gives an explanation to the reason why the peak assignment is usually made differently between XPS and XAS.

  16. Nitrification and denitrification as sources of gaseous nitrogen emission from different forest soils in Changbai Mountain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The contributions of nitrification and denitrification to N2O and N2 emissions from four forest soils on northern slop of Changbai Mountain were measured with acetylene inhibition methods. In incubation experiments, 0.06% and 3% C2H2 were used to inhibit nitrification and denitrification in these soils, respectively. Both nitrification and denitification existed in these soils except tundra soil, where only denitrification was found. The annually averaged rates of nitrification and denitrification in mountain dark brown forest soil were much higher than that in other three soils. In mountain brown coniferous soil, contributions of different processes to gaseous nitrogen emissions were Denitrification N2O > Nitrification N2O > Denitrification N2. The same sequence exists in mountain soddy soil as that in the mountain brown coniferous soil. The sequence in mountain tundra soil was Denitrification N2O > Denitrification N2.

  17. Increased influence of nitrogen limitation on CO2 emissions from future land use and land use change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiyappan, Prasanth; Jain, Atul K.; House, Joanna I.

    2015-09-01

    In the latest projections of future greenhouse gas emissions for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), few Earth System Models included the effect of nitrogen limitation, a key process limiting forest regrowth. Few included forest management (wood harvest). We estimate the impacts of nitrogen limitation on the CO2 emissions from land use and land use change (LULUC), including wood harvest, for the period 1900-2100. We use a land surface model that includes a fully coupled carbon and nitrogen cycle and accounts for forest regrowth processes following agricultural abandonment and wood harvest. Future projections are based on the four Representation Concentration Pathways used in the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report, and we account for uncertainty in future climate for each scenario based on ensembles of climate model outputs. Results show that excluding nitrogen limitation will underestimate global LULUC emissions by 34-52 PgC (20-30%) during the 20th century (range across three different historical LULUC reconstructions) and by 128-187 PgC (90-150%) during the 21st century (range across the four IPCC scenarios). The full range for estimated LULUC emissions during the 21st century including climate model uncertainty is 91 to 227 PgC (with nitrogen limitation included). The underestimation increases with time because (1) projected annual wood harvest rates from forests summed over the 21st century are 380-1080% higher compared to those of the 20th century, resulting in more regrowing secondary forests; (2) nitrogen limitation reduces the CO2 fertilization effect on net primary production of regrowing secondary forests following wood harvest and agricultural abandonment; and (3) nitrogen limitation effect is aggravated by the gradual loss of soil nitrogen from LULUC disturbance. Our study implies that (1) nitrogen limitation of CO2 uptake is substantial and sensitive to nitrogen inputs; (2) if LULUC emissions are larger than previously estimated in studies

  18. Spatial variations of nitrogen trace gas emissions from tropical mountain forests in Nyungwe, Rwanda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Gharahi Ghehi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Globally, tropical forest soils represent the second largest source of N2O and NO. However, there is still considerable uncertainty on the spatial variability and soil properties controlling N trace gas emission. To investigate how soil properties affect N2O and NO emission, we carried out an incubation experiment with soils from 31 locations in the Nyungwe tropical mountain forest in southwestern Rwanda. All soils were incubated at three different moisture levels (50, 70 and 90% water filled pore space (WFPS at 17 °C. Nitrous oxide emission varied between 4.5 and 400 μg N m−2 h−1, while NO emission varied from 6.6 to 265 μg N m−2 h−1. Mean N2O emission at different moisture levels was 46.5 ± 11.1 (50% WFPS, 71.7 ± 11.5 (70% WFPS and 98.8 ± 16.4 (90% WFPS μg N m−2 h−1, while mean NO emission was 69.3 ± 9.3 (50% WFPS, 47.1 ± 5.8 (70% WFPS and 36.1 ± 4.2 (90% WFPS μg N m−2 h−1. The latter suggests that climate (i.e. dry vs. wet season controls N2O and NO emissions. Positive correlations with soil carbon and nitrogen indicate a biological control over N2O and NO production. But interestingly N2O and NO emissions also showed a negative correlation (only N2O with soil pH and a positive correlation with free iron. The latter suggest that chemo-denitrification might, at least for N2O, be an important production pathway. In conclusion improved understanding and process based modeling of N trace gas emission from tropical forests will not only benefit from better spatial explicit trace gas emission and basic soil property monitoring, but also by differentiating between biological and chemical pathways for N trace gas formation.

  19. Nitrogen oxides emissions from the MILD combustion with the conditions of recirculation gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Min; Shim, Sung Hoon; Jeong, Sang Hyun; Oh, Kwang-Joong; Lee, Sang-Sup

    2017-04-01

    The nitrogen oxides (NOx) reduction technology by combustion modification which has economic benefits as a method of controlling NOx emitted in the combustion process, has recently been receiving a lot of attention. Especially, the moderate or intense low oxygen dilution (MILD) combustion which applied high temperature flue gas recirculation has been confirmed for its effectiveness with regard to solid fuel as well. MILD combustion is affected by the flue gas recirculation ratio and the composition of recirculation gas, so its NOx reduction efficiency is determined by them. In order to investigate the influence of factors which determine the reduction efficiency of NOx in MILD coal combustion, this study changed the flow rate and concentration of nitrogen (N2), carbon dioxide (CO2) and steam (H2O) which simulate the recirculation gas during the MILD coal combustion using our lab-scale drop tube furnace and performed the combustion experiment. As a result, its influence by the composition of recirculation gas was insignificant and it was shown that flue gas recirculation ratio influences the change of NOx concentration greatly. We investigated the influence of factors determining the nitrogen oxides (NOx) reduction efficiency in MILD coal combustion, which applied high-temperature flue gas recirculation. Using a lab-scale drop tube furnace and simulated recirculation gas, we conducted combustion testing changing the recirculation gas conditions. We found that the flue gas recirculation ratio influences the reduction of NOx emissions the most.

  20. Incineration of kitchen waste with high nitrogen in vortexing fluidized-bed incinerator and its NO emission characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Feng; Chyang, Chiensong; Wen, Jiaruei; Tso, Jim

    2013-09-01

    Some municipal solid waste (MSW) can be used as the fuel. Combustion of MSW with high nitrogen content is successfully conducted in a lab-scale vortexing fluidized-bed incinerator (VFBI). Pigskin with 16.5 wt.% nitrogen content was used to simulate the high nitrogen content kitchen waste, and silica sand was used as the bed material. The effects of operating conditions, such as the bed temperature, freeboard temperature, excess oxygen ratio, and static bed height on the CO and NO concentrations at the exit of combustor and cyclone were investigated. The experimental results show that the freeboard temperature is the most important factor for CO emission. The order of operating conditions impact on the NO emission is: (1) excess oxygen ratio; (2) bed temperature; (3) freeboard temperature; and (4) static bed height. Utilizing cyclone can significantly reduce the CO emission concentration when the CO concentration released from the freeboard is higher than 50 ppm. On the other hand, the cyclone has no significant effect on the NO emission. Despite having high nitrogen content, a low conversion from fuel-N to NO was attained. Compared with other types of combustors, VFBI reduces the CO and NO emission concentrations much better when burning MSW with high nitrogen content.

  1. Incineration of kitchen waste with high nitrogen in vortexing fluidized-bed incinerator and its NO emission characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Duan; Chiensong Chyang; Jiaruei Wen; Jim Tso

    2013-01-01

    Some municipal solid waste (MSW) can be used as the fuel.Combustion of MSW with high nitrogen content is successfully conducted in a lab-scale vortexing fluidized-bed incinerator (VFBI).Pigskin with 16.5 wt.% nitrogen content was used to simulate the high nitrogen content kitchen waste,and silica sand was used as the bed material.The effects of operating conditions,such as the bed temperature,freeboard temperature,excess oxygen ratio,and static bed height on the CO and NO concentrations at the exit of combustor and cyclone were investigated.The experimental results show that the freeboard temperature is the most important factor for CO emission.The order of operating conditions impact on the NO emission is:(1) excess oxygen ratio; (2) bed temperature; (3)freeboard temperature; and (4) static bed height.Utilizing cyclone can significantly reduce the CO emission concentration when the CO concentration released from the freeboard is higher than 50 ppm.On the other hand,the cyclone has no significant effect on the NO emission.Despite having high nitrogen content,a low conversion from fuel-N to NO was attained.Compared with other types of combustors,VFBI reduces the CO and NO emission concentrations much better when burning MSW with high nitrogen content.

  2. Effect of nitrogen fertilization and residue management practices on ammonia emissions from subtropical sugarcane production

    Science.gov (United States)

    mudi, Sanku Datta; Wang, Jim J.; Dodla, Syam Kumar; Arceneaux, Allen; Viator, H. P.

    2016-08-01

    Ammonia (NH3) emission from soil is a loss of nitrogen (N) nutrient for plant production as well as an issue of air quality, due to the fact that it is an active precursor of airborne particulate matters. Ammonia also acts as a secondary source of nitrous oxide (N2O) emission when present in the soil. In this study, the impacts of different sources of N fertilizers and harvest residue management schemes on NH3 emissions from sugarcane production were evaluated based on an active chamber method. The field experiment plots consisting of two sources of N fertilizer (urea and urea ammonium nitrate (UAN)) and two common residue management practices, namely residue retained (RR) and residue burned (RB), were established on a Commerce silt loam. The NH3 volatilized following N fertilizer application was collected in an impinger containing diluted citric acid and was subsequently analyzed using ion chromatography. The NH3 loss was primarily found within 3-4 weeks after N application. Average seasonal soil NH3 flux was significantly greater in urea plots with NH3-N emission factor (EF) twice or more than in UAN plots (2.4-5.6% vs. 1.2-1.7%). The RR residue management scheme had much higher NH3 volatilization than the RB treatment regardless of N fertilizer sources, corresponding to generally higher soil moisture levels in the former. Ammonia-N emissions in N fertilizer-treated sugarcane fields increased with increasing soil water-filled pore space (WFPS) up to 45-55% observed in the field. Both N fertilizer sources and residue management approaches significantly affected NH3 emissions.

  3. The effect of emission from coal combustion in nonindustrial sources on deposition of sulfur and oxidized nitrogen in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryza, Maciej; Werner, Małgorzata; Błaś, Marek; Dore, Anthony J; Sobik, Mieczysław

    2010-07-01

    Poland has one of the largest sulfur and nitrogen emissions in Europe. This is mainly because coal is a main fuel in industrial and nonindustrial combustion. The aim of this paper is to assess the amount of sulfur and nitrogen deposited from SNAP sector 02 (nonindustrial sources) coal combustion. To assess this issue, the Fine Resolution Atmospheric Multipollutant Exchange (FRAME) model was used. The results suggest that industrial combustion has the largest impact on deposition of oxidized sulfur, whereas the oxidized nitrogen national deposition budget is dominated by transboundary transport. The total mass of pollutants deposited in Poland, originating from nonindustrial coal combustion, is 45 Gg of sulfur and 2.5 Gg of nitrogen, which is over 18% of oxidized sulfur and nearly 2% of oxidized nitrogen deposited. SNAP 02 is responsible for up to 80% of dry-deposited sulfur and 11% of nitrogen. The contribution to wet deposition is largest in central Poland in the case of sulfur and in some areas can exceed 11%. For oxidized nitrogen, nonindustrial emissions contribute less than 1% over the whole area of Poland. The switch from coal to gas fuel in this sector will result in benefits in sulfur and nitrogen deposition reduction.

  4. Engineering of fluorescent emission of silk fibroin composite materials by material assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Naibo; Meng, Zhaohui; Toh, Guoyang William; Zhen, Yang; Diao, Yingying; Xu, Hongyao; Liu, Xiang Yang

    2015-03-01

    This novel materials assembly technology endows the designated materials with additional/enhanced performance by fixing "functional components" into the materials. Such functional components are molecularly recognized and accommodated by the designated materials. In this regard, two-photon fluorescence (TPF) organic molecules and CdTe quantum dots (QDs) are adopted as functional components to functionalize silk fibers and films. TPF organic molecules, such as, 2,7-bis[2-(4-nitrophenyl) ethenyl]-9,9-dibutylfluorene (NM), exhibit TPF emission quenching because of the molecular stacking that leads to aggregation in the solid form. The specific recognition between -NO2 in the annealed fluorescent molecules and the -NH groups in the silk fibroin molecules decouples the aggregated molecules. This gives rise to a significant increase in the TPF quantum yields of the silk fibers. Similarly, as another type of functional components, CdTe quantum dots (QDs) with different sizes were also adopted in the silk functionalization method. Compared to QDs in solution the fluorescence properties of functionalized silk materials display a long stability at room temperature. As the functional materials are well dispersed at high quantum yields in the biocompatible silk a TPF microscope can be used to pursue 3D high-resolution imaging in real time of the TPF-silk scaffold. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Laboratory Setup for Scanning-Free Grazing Emission X-ray Fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, J; Herzog, C; Spanier, M; Grötzsch, D; Lühl, L; Witte, K; Jonas, A; Günther, S; Förste, F; Hartmann, R; Huth, M; Kalok, D; Steigenhöfer, D; Krämer, M; Holz, T; Dietsch, R; Strüder, L; Kanngießer, B; Mantouvalou, I

    2017-02-07

    Grazing incidence and grazing emission X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (GI/GE-XRF) are techniques that enable nondestructive, quantitative analysis of elemental depth profiles with a resolution in the nanometer regime. A laboratory setup for soft X-ray GEXRF measurements is presented. Reasonable measurement times could be achieved by combining a highly brilliant laser produced plasma (LPP) source with a scanning-free GEXRF setup, providing a large solid angle of detection. The detector, a pnCCD, was operated in a single photon counting mode in order to utilize its energy dispersive properties. GEXRF profiles of the Ni-Lα,β line of a nickel-carbon multilayer sample, which displays a lateral (bi)layer thickness gradient, were recorded at several positions. Simulations of theoretical profiles predicted a prominent intensity minimum at grazing emission angles between 5° and 12°, depending strongly on the bilayer thickness of the sample. This information was used to retrieve the bilayer thickness gradient. The results are in good agreement with values obtained by X-ray reflectometry, conventional X-ray fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy measurements and serve as proof-of-principle for the realized GEXRF setup. The presented work demonstrates the potential of nanometer resolved elemental depth profiling in the soft X-ray range with a laboratory source, opening, for example, the possibility of in-line or even in situ process control in semiconductor industry.

  6. Reduced Fluorescent Protein Switching Fatigue by Binding-Induced Emissive State Stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thijs Roebroek

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Reversibly switchable fluorescent proteins (RSFPs enable advanced fluorescence imaging, though the performance of this imaging crucially depends on the properties of the labels. We report on the use of an existing small binding peptide, named Enhancer, to modulate the spectroscopic properties of the recently developed rsGreen series of RSFPs. Fusion constructs of Enhancer with rsGreen1 and rsGreenF revealed an increased molecular brightness and pH stability, although expression in living E. coli or HeLa cells resulted in a decrease of the overall emission. Surprisingly, Enhancer binding also increased off-switching speed and resistance to switching fatigue. Further investigation suggested that the RSFPs can interconvert between fast- and slow-switching emissive states, with the overall protein population gradually converting to the slow-switching state through irradiation. The Enhancer modulates the spectroscopic properties of both states, but also preferentially stabilizes the fast-switching state, supporting the increased fatigue resistance. This work demonstrates how the photo-physical properties of RSFPs can be influenced by their binding to other small proteins, which opens up new horizons for applications that may require such modulation. Furthermore, we provide new insights into the photoswitching kinetics that should be of general consideration when developing new RSFPs with improved or different photochromic properties.

  7. Effect of Host Medium on the Fluorescence Emission Intensity of Rhodamine B in Liquid and Solid Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fikry, M.; Omar, M. M.; Ismail, Lotfi Z.

    2011-06-01

    In this work, we study the effect of concentration, host medium, PH, ions complex and phase states on the fluorescence emission from the laser dye, Rhodamine B, pumping by UV laser as exited source. The polymethylmethacrylate PMMA used as host medium in case of solid phase samples while, ethanol and Tetrahydrofuran (THF) are used in case of liquid one. The Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) technique was used to study the fluorescence properties of the both cases liquid and thin film solid-state samples. In addition, the Dual Thermal Lens (DTL) technique was used to study the quantum yield of these samples. The maximum fluorescence emission observed at concentration of Rhodamine B C=3×10-4M. At this concentration of Rhodamine B, the type of solvent and polarity of the medium affect on the fluorescence emission intensity of Rhodamine B with. The measurements revile that, the behavior of both phases state was analogous and Rhodamine B/PMMA thin film sample by ratio of 4:1 and thickness 0.12 mm is the best photostability sample and its quantum yield about ≈ 0.82. Also, the fluorescence emission intensity of Rhodamine B was quenched by complex formation of Co, Al, Cu and iodide ions with Rhodamine B due to the increase of the charge density of the ions.

  8. Increased influence of nitrogen limitation on CO2 emissions from future land use and land-use change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, A. K.; Meiyappan, P.; House, J.

    2015-12-01

    In the latest projections of future greenhouse gas emissions for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), few Earth System Models included the effect of nitrogen limitation, a key process limiting forest regrowth. We estimate the impacts of nitrogen limitation on the CO2 emissions from land use and land-use change (LULUC), including wood harvest, for the period 1900-2100. We use a land-surface model that includes a fully coupled carbon and nitrogen cycle, and accounts for forest regrowth processes following agricultural abandonment and wood harvest. Future projections are based on the four Representation Concentration Pathways used in the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report, and we account for uncertainty in future climate for each scenario based on ensembles of climate model outputs. Results show that excluding nitrogen limitation will underestimate global LULUC emissions by 34-52 PgC (20-30%) during the 20th century (range across three different historical LULUC reconstructions) and by 128-187 PgC (90-150%) during the 21st century (range across the four IPCC scenarios). The full range for estimated LULUC emissions during the 21st century including climate model uncertainty is 91 to 227 PgC (with nitrogen limitation included). The underestimation increases with time because: (1) Projected annual wood harvest rates from forests summed over the 21st century are 380-1080% higher compared to those of the 20th century, resulting in more regrowing secondary forests, (2) Nitrogen limitation reduces the CO2 fertilization effect on net primary production of regrowing secondary forests following wood harvest and agricultural abandonment, and (3) Nitrogen limitation effect is aggravated by the gradual loss of soil nitrogen from LULUC disturbance. Our study implies that: (1) Nitrogen limitation of CO2 uptake is substantial and sensitive to nitrogen inputs, (2) If LULUC emissions are larger than previously estimated in studies without nitrogen limitation, then meeting

  9. Electron ionization of metastable nitrogen and oxygen atoms in relation to the auroral emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Siddharth; Joshipura, K. N.

    Atomic and molecular excited metastable states (EMS) are exotic systems due to their special properties like long radiative life-time, large size (average radius) and large polarizability along with relatively smaller first ionization energy compared to their respective ground states (GS). The present work includes our theoretical calculations on electron impact ionization of metastable atomic states N( (2) P), N( (2) D) of nitrogen and O( (1) S), O( (1) D) of oxygen. The targets of our present interest, are found to be present in our Earth's ionosphere and they play an important role in auroral emissions observed in Earth’s auroral regions [1] as also in the emissions observed from cometary coma [2, 3] and airglow emissions. In particular, atomic oxygen in EMS can radiate, the visible O( (1) D -> (3) P) doublet 6300 - 6364 Å red doublet, the O( (1) S -> (1) D) 5577 Å green line, and the ultraviolet O( (1) S -> (3) P) 2972 Å line. For metastable atomic nitrogen one observes the similar emissions, in different wavelengths, from (2) D and (2) P states. At the Earth's auroral altitudes, from where these emissions take place in the ionosphere, energetic electrons are also present. In particular, if the metastable N as well as O atoms are ionized by the impact of electrons then these species are no longer available for emissions. This is a possible loss mechanism, and hence it is necessary to analyze the importance of electron ionization of the EMS of atomic O and N, by calculating the relevant cross sections. In the present paper we investigate electron ionization of the said metastable species by calculating relevant total cross sections. Our quantum mechanical calculations are based on projected approximate ionization contribution in the total inelastic cross sections [4]. Detailed results and discussion along with the significance of these calculations will be presented during the COSPAR-2014. References [1] A.Bhardwaj, and G. R. Gladstone, Rev. Geophys., 38

  10. Spatial variations of nitrogen trace gas emissions from tropical mountain forests in Nyungwe, Rwanda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Gharahi Ghehi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Globally, tropical forest soils represent the second largest source of N2O and NO. However, there is still considerable uncertainty on the spatial variability and soil properties controlling N trace gas emission. Therefore, we carried out an incubation experiment with soils from 31 locations in the Nyungwe tropical mountain forest in southwestern Rwanda. All soils were incubated at three different moisture levels (50, 70 and 90 % water filled pore space (WFPS at 17 °C. Nitrous oxide emission varied between 4.5 and 400 μg N m−2 h−1, while NO emission varied from 6.6 to 265 μg N m−2 h−1. Mean N2O emission at different moisture levels was 46.5 ± 11.1 (50 %WFPS, 71.7 ± 11.5 (70 %WFPS and 98.8 ± 16.4 (90 %WFPS μg N m−2 h−1, while mean NO emission was 69.3 ± 9.3 (50 %WFPS, 47.1 ± 5.8 (70 %WFPS and 36.1 ± 4.2 (90 %WFPS μg N m−2 h−1. The latter suggests that climate (i.e. dry vs. wet season controls N2O and NO emissions. Positive correlations with soil carbon and nitrogen indicate a biological control over N2O and NO production. But interestingly N2O and NO emissions also showed a positive correlation with free iron and a negative correlation with soil pH (only N2O. The latter suggest that chemo-denitrification might, at least for N2O, be an important production pathway. In conclusion improved understanding and process based modeling of N trace gas emission from tropical forests will benefit from spatially explicit trace gas emission estimates linked to basic soil property data and differentiating between biological and chemical pathways for N trace gas formation.

  11. Two years of gaseous emissions from contrasting soils amended with organic and synthetic nitrogen fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelster, D. E.; Chantigny, M. H.; Rochette, P.; Angers, D. A.; Rieux, C.; Vanasse, A.

    2012-04-01

    Animal manures are often used as a source of nitrogen (N) for agriculture; however impacts of amendment type on N2O production may vary. In this study, N2O emissions from two soil types with contrasting texture and carbon (C) content (a silty clay mixed frigid dystric eutrudept and a sandy loam mixed frigid typic dystrudept) were measured for two years under a cool, humid climate. Treatments consisted of a no N control (CTL), calcium ammonium nitrate (CAN), poultry manure (PM), liquid cattle manure (LCM), or liquid swine manure (LSM). The N sources were surface applied and immediately incorporated at 90 kg N ha-1 before seeding of spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Leaching losses of N were also measured using zero-tension lysimeters located at approximately 0.35 m depth. Cumulative growing season N2O-N emissions from the silty clay ranged from 2.2 to 8.3 kg ha-1 yr-1 and were slightly lower in CTL plots than in the fertilized plots (P = 0.067). The mean N2O emission factors ranged from 2.0 to 4.4% of added N with no difference among treatments. Emissions of N2O from the sandy loam soil ranged from 0.3 to 2.2 kg N2O-N ha-1 yr-1, with greatest emissions following PM application (P < 0.001). The N2O emission factor from sandy loam plots amended with PM was 1.7%, more than double that of the other treatments (0.3 to 0.9%), likely because of the high C content of the PM. On the silty clay the yield-based N2O emissions (g N2O-N kg-1 grain yield N) were similar between treatments; while on the sandy loam, they were greatest when amended with PM. Annual N leaching losses averaged 28.7 kg ha-1 for the silty clay and 19.6 kg ha-1 for the sandy loam and were similar for all amendment types suggesting that off-site N2O emissions will also be similar amongst treatments. Preliminary data indicate that overwinter N2O emissions from sandy loam plots were consistently greater when amended with pig slurry compared with unamended soils, and that these overwinter losses may exceed

  12. Dual-emission fluorescent silica nanoparticle-based probe for ultrasensitive detection of Cu2+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Chenghua; Ai, Kelong; Zhang, Guo; Li, Hongwei; Lu, Lehui

    2011-04-15

    An effective dual-emission fluorescent silica nanoparticle-based probe has been constructed for rapid and ultrasensitive detection of Cu(2+). In this nanoprobe, a dye-doped silica core served as a reference signal, thus providing a built-in correction for environmental effects. A response dye was covalently grafted on the surface of the silica nanoparticles through a chelating reagent for Cu(2+). The fluorescence of the response dye could be selectively quenched in the presence of Cu(2+), accompanied by a visual orange-to-green color switch of the nanoprobe. The nanoprobe provided an effective platform for reliable detection of Cu(2+) with a detection limit as low as 10 nM, which is nearly 2 × 10(3) times lower than the maximum level (∼20 μM) of Cu(2+) in drinking water permitted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The high sensitivity was attributed to the strong chelation of Cu(2+) with polyethyleneimine (PEI) and a signal amplification effect. The nanoprobe constructed by this method was very stable, enabling the rapid detection of Cu(2+) in real water samples. Good linear correlations were obtained over the concentration range from 1 × 10(-7) to 8 × 10(-7) (R(2) = 0.99) with recoveries of 103.8-99.14% and 95.5-95.14% for industrial wastewater and lake water, respectively. Additionally, the long-wavelength emission of the response dye can avoid the interference of the autofluorescence of the biosystems, which facilitated their applications in monitoring Cu(2+) in cells. Furthermore, the nanoprobe showed a good reversibility; the fluorescence can be switched "off" and "on" by an addition of Cu(2+) and EDTA, respectively. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  13. Engineered drought tolerance in tomato plants is reflected in chlorophyll fluorescence emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Kumud Bandhu; Iannacone, Rina; Petrozza, Angelo; Mishra, Anamika; Armentano, Nadia; La Vecchia, Giovanna; Trtílek, Martin; Cellini, Francesco; Nedbal, Ladislav

    2012-01-01

    Drought stress is one of the most important factors that limit crop productivity worldwide. In order to obtain tomato plants with enhanced drought tolerance, we inserted the transcription factor gene ATHB-7 into the tomato genome. This gene was demonstrated earlier to be up-regulated during drought stress in Arabidopsis thaliana thus acting as a negative regulator of growth. We compared the performance of wild type and transgenic tomato line DTL-20, carrying ATHB-7 gene, under well-irrigated and water limited conditions. We found that transgenic plants had reduced stomatal density and stomatal pore size and exhibited an enhanced resistance to soil water deficit. We used the transgenic plants to investigate the potential of chlorophyll fluorescence to report drought tolerance in a simulated high-throughput screening procedure. Wild type and transgenic tomato plants were exposed to drought stress lasting 18 days. The stress was then terminated by rehydration after which recovery was studied for another 2 days. Plant growth, leaf water potential, and chlorophyll fluorescence were measured during the entire experimental period. We found that water potential in wild type and drought tolerant transgenic plants diverged around day 11 of induced drought stress. The chlorophyll fluorescence parameters: the non-photochemical quenching, effective quantum efficiency of PSII, and the maximum quantum yield of PSII photochemistry yielded a good contrast between wild type and transgenic plants from day 7, day 12, and day 14 of induced stress, respectively. We propose that chlorophyll fluorescence emission reports well on the level of water stress and, thus, can be used to identify elevated drought tolerance in high-throughput screens for selection of resistant genotypes.

  14. Biochar reduces yield-scaled emissions of reactive nitrogen gases from vegetable soils across China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Changhua; Chen, Hao; Li, Bo; Xiong, Zhengqin

    2017-06-01

    Biochar amendment to soil has been proposed as a strategy for sequestering carbon, mitigating climate change and enhancing crop productivity. However, few studies have compared the general effect of different feedstock-derived biochars on the various gaseous reactive nitrogen emissions (GNrEs) of N2O, NO and NH3 simultaneously across the typical vegetable soils in China. A greenhouse pot experiment with five consecutive vegetable crops was conducted to investigate the effects of two contrasting biochars, namely wheat straw biochar (Bw) and swine manure biochar (Bm) on GNrEs, vegetable yield and gaseous reactive nitrogen intensity (GNrI) in four typical soils which are representative of the intensive vegetable cropping systems across mainland China: an Acrisol from Hunan Province, an Anthrosol from Shanxi Province, a Cambisol from Shandong Province and a Phaeozem from Heilongjiang Province. Results showed that remarkable GNrE mitigation induced by biochar occurred in Anthrosol and Phaeozem, whereas enhancement of yield occurred in Cambisol and Phaeozem. Additionally, both biochars decreased GNrI through reducing N2O and NO emissions by 36.4-59.1 and 37.0-49.5 % for Bw (except for Cambisol), respectively, and by improving yield by 13.5-30.5 % for Bm (except for Acrisol and Anthrosol). Biochar amendments generally stimulated the NH3 emissions with greater enhancement from Bm than Bw. We can infer that the biochar's effects on the GNrEs and vegetable yield strongly depend on the attributes of the soil and biochar. Therefore, in order to achieve the maximum benefits under intensive greenhouse vegetable agriculture, both soil type and biochar characteristics should be seriously considered before conducting large-scale biochar applications.

  15. Aptamer induced assembly of fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots on gold nanoparticles for sensitive detection of AFB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Chen, Yanfen; Wu, Yuanya; Weng, Bo; Liu, Yingshuai; Lu, Zhisong; Li, Chang Ming; Yu, Cong

    2016-04-15

    Novel fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (N,C-dots) were synthesized and assembled on aptamer modified gold nanoparticles (Aptamer/AuNPs) for the super sensitive detection of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1). Positively charged N,C-dots were synthesized by the hydrothermal treatment of pancreatin. The prepared N,C-dots were assembled on aptamer/AuNPs by electrostatic interactions. The fluorescence of the N,C-dots was efficiently quenched. When AFB1 was added to the assay solution, specific interactions between AFB1 and the aptamer caused release of the N,C-dots. The fluorescence of the N,C-dots recovered and the intensity increase could be used to calculate the amount of AFB1 added. The assay exhibits super-high sensitivity with a detection limit of 5 pg/mL (16 pM) and a wide range of linear response of 5 pg/mL to 2.00 ng/mL. A novel aptasensor is thus successfully constructed, it provides an efficient way for sensitive AFB1 sensing as well as a new technique for aptamer based novel sensor construction.

  16. Effects of Corn Straw Returning and Nitrogen Fertilizer Application Methods on N2O Emission from Wheat Growing Season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XU Yu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on a wheat field experiment, the effect of four treatments such as no-straw returning (SN, straw returning (SR, control release fertilizer application(SRC and nitrogen drilling(SRR on N2O emission was studied using the static chamber method and the gas chromatographic technique. The results indicated that the wheat field was the sources of N2O emission. The N2O emission peaks followed each time of fertilizer application and irrigation, and usually continued for 1~2 weeks. N2O emissions accounted for more than 40% of total emissions during the N2O emission peak. The amount of N2O emission during three growing stage of wheat from high to low was arranged in turn pre-wintering period, post-wintering period and wintering period. N2O emission could be increased by straw returning. Compared with SN, N2O emission could be enhanced by 48.6% under SR. Both SRC and SRR could decrease the N2O emission, increase wheat yield and economic benefit, especially the latter. Nitrogen drilling is a good method for yield increment and N2O abatement.

  17. Diamond Radio Receiver: Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers as Fluorescent Transducers of Microwave Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Linbo; Zhang, Mian; Markham, Matthew; Edmonds, Andrew M.; Lončar, Marko

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate a robust frequency-modulated radio receiver using electron-spin-dependent photoluminescence of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond. The carrier frequency of the frequency-modulated signal is in the 2.8-GHz range, determined by the zero-field splitting in the nitrogen-vacancy electronic ground state. The radio can be tuned over 300 MHz by applying an external dc magnetic field. We show the transmission of high-fidelity audio signals over a bandwidth of 91 kHz using the diamond radio. We demonstrate operating temperature of the radio as high as 350 ° C .

  18. Exploring a suitable nitrogen fertilizer rate to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and ensure rice yields in paddy fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Yiming; Wang, Xiaopeng; Yang, Jingping, E-mail: jpyang@zju.edu.cn; Zhao, Xing; Ye, Xinyi

    2016-09-15

    The application rate of nitrogen fertilizer was believed to dramatically influence greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from paddy fields. Thus, providing a suitable nitrogen fertilization rate to ensure rice yields, reducing GHG emissions and exploring emission behavior are important issues for field management. In this paper, a two year experiment with six rates (0, 75, 150, 225, 300, 375 kg N/ha) of nitrogen fertilizer application was designed to examine GHG emissions by measuring carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane (CH{sub 4}), nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) flux and their cumulative global warming potential (GWP) from paddy fields in Hangzhou, Zhejiang in 2013 and 2014. The results indicated that the GWP and rice yields increased with an increasing application rate of nitrogen fertilizer. Emission peaks of CH{sub 4} mainly appeared at the vegetative phase, and emission peaks of CO{sub 2}, and N{sub 2}O mainly appeared at reproductive phase of rice growth. The CO{sub 2} flux was significantly correlated with soil temperature, while the CH{sub 4} flux was influenced by logging water remaining period and N{sub 2}O flux was significantly associated with nitrogen application rates. This study showed that 225 kg N/ha was a suitable nitrogen fertilizer rate to minimize GHG emissions with low yield-scaled emissions of 3.69 (in 2013) and 2.23 (in 2014) kg CO{sub 2}-eq/kg rice yield as well as to ensure rice yields remained at a relatively high level of 8.89 t/ha in paddy fields. - Highlights: • Exploiting co-benefits of rice yield and reduction of greenhouse gas emission. • Global warming potential and rice yield increased with nitrogen fertilizer rate up. • Emission peaks of CH{sub 4,} CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O appeared at vegetative and reproductive phase. • 225 kg N/ha rate benefits both rice yields and GWP reduction.

  19. Influence of straw types and nitrogen sources on mushroom composting emissions and compost productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, R; Hobbs, P J; Mead, A; Dobrovin-Pennington, A

    2002-09-01

    The effects of different straw types and organic and inorganic nitrogen (N) sources on the chemical composition and odor concentration (OC) of mushroom composting emissions, compost parameters, and mushroom yield were examined using bench-scale and large-scale (windrows and aerated tunnels) composting systems. There were close correlations between the butanol or combined H(2)S+dimethyl sulfide (DMS) concentration and OC of air samples taken from different composting ingredients (r=0.83 and 0.76-0.87, Pcocoa shells, ammonium sulfate) produced lower mushroom yields than materials in which the N was more readily available (poultry manure, urea, brewers' grains, hop and molasses wastes, cocoa meal). Replacement of poultry manure with the other N sources at 50-100% or wheat straw with rape, bean, or linseed straw in aerated tunnel or windrow composts reduced the OC and emissions of odorous sulfur-containing compounds, but also reduced yield. Urea and cocoa meal may be suitable for "low odor" prewetting of straw, with addition of poultry manure immediately before aerated tunnel composting. Rape straw in compost reduces the formation of anaerobic zones and resulting odorous emissions, since it maintains its structure and porosity better than wheat straw.

  20. Comparative Analysis of Lighting Characteristics and Ultraviolet Emissions from Commercial Compact Fluorescent and Incandescent Lamps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Mahtab; Golmohammadi, Rostam; Aliabadi, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Some characteristics of lighting sources such as color properties and ultraviolet emissions have important roles on visual and non-visual health effects of lighting. This study aimed to investigate the light emissions of some compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) and incandescent lamps commercially available to the Iranian consumers. Sixty lamps included 48 single envelope CFLs, and 12 incandescent lamps available in the electrical devices markets (in the west of Iran) were randomly selected from famous manufacturers between 2014 and 2015. Lighting characteristics and ultraviolet (UV) emissions were measured using spectroradiometer and calibrated radiometer, respectively. Data analysis was performed using SPSS16 software. Color-rendering indexes of the studied lamps were above 80, which showed good color properties. The daylight CFLs had more desirable and natural color temperature (near to 5000 0k) compared with the other types of the studied lamps. Occupational exposures for periods up 8 h to UVB from the studied lamps at distances up to 0.25 m were more than the recommended limits. Moreover, public exposures for periods up 16 h to UVB from the studied lamps at any distances up to 2 m were more than the recommended limits. Warm white lamps are suitable for homes usage, while daylight lamps can be used for offices rooms. Occupational exposure to single envelope CFLs near the body at distances of less than 25 cm can result in overexposure to actinic UV. Moreover, CFLs must be used at distances greater than 200 cm for public exposure.

  1. Color optimization of single emissive white OLEDs via energy transfer between RGB fluorescent dopants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Nam Ho; Kim, You-Hyun; Yoon, Ju-An; Lee, Sang Youn [Department of Green Energy and Semiconductor Engineering, Hoseo University, Asan (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Dae Hyun [Department of Information Technology, Hansei University, Gunpo (Korea, Republic of); Wood, Richard [Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8S 4L7 (Canada); Moon, C.-B. [Department of Green Energy and Semiconductor Engineering, Hoseo University, Asan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo Young, E-mail: wykim@hoseo.edu [Department of Green Energy and Semiconductor Engineering, Hoseo University, Asan (Korea, Republic of); Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8S 4L7 (Canada)

    2013-11-15

    The electroluminescent characteristics of white organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) were investigated including single emitting layer (SEL) with an ADN host and dopants; BCzVBi, C545T, and DCJTB for blue, green and red emission, respectively. The structure of the high efficiency WOLED device was; ITO/NPB(700 Å)/ADN: BCzVBi-7%:C545T-0.05%:DCJTB-0.1%(300 Å)/Bphen(300 Å)/Liq(20 Å)/Al(1200 Å) for mixing three primary colors. Luminous efficiency was 9.08 cd/A at 3.5 V and Commission Intenationale de L’eclairage (CIE{sub x,y}) coordinates of white emission was measured as (0.320, 0.338) at 8 V while simulated CIE{sub x,y} coordinates were (0.336, 0.324) via estimation from each dopant's PL spectrum. -- Highlights: • This paper observes single-emissive-layered white OLED using fluorescent dopants. • Electrical and optical properties are analyzed. • Color stability of white OLED is confirmed for new planar light source.

  2. Application of the Kubelka-Munk correction for self-absorption of fluorescence emission in carmine lake paint layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementi, Catia; Miliani, Costanza; Verri, Giovanni; Sotiropoulou, Sophia; Romani, Aldo; Brunetti, Brunetto G; Sgamellotti, A

    2009-12-01

    The variations of the fluorescence emission of carmine lake travelling through an absorbing and scattering medium, such as a paint layer, were investigated by ultraviolet (UV)-visible absorption, fluorescence spectroscopy, and imaging techniques. Samples of the lake were studied in dilute and saturated solutions, on a reference test panel and a real case study. Relevant spectral modifications have been observed as a function of the lake concentration mainly consisting of a fluorescence quenching, red shift of emission maxima, and deformation of emission band. The application of a correction factor based on the Kubelka-Munk model allowed fluorescence spectra obtained in solution and on painted samples of known composition to be compared and correlated, highlighting that the fluorescence of the lake within paint layers is affected by both self-absorption and aggregation phenomena. This approach has been successfully applied on a painting by G. Vasari for the noninvasive identification of carmine lake. The results reported here emphasize the necessity of taking physical phenomena into account in the interpretation of the fluorescence spectra for a proper and reliable characterization and identification of painting materials in works of art.

  3. TRANES analysis of the fluorescence of nile red in organized molecular assemblies confirms emission from two species

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A S R Koti; N Periasamy

    2001-04-01

    Time-resolved area normalized emission spectroscopy (TRANES) is a new method for the analysis of fluorescence of dyes in complex chemical and biological systems (A S R Koti, M M G Krishna and N Periasamy, 2001, J. Phys. Chem. 105, 1767). The model-free method extends the power of time-resolved emission spectroscopy (TRES) analysis and removes the ambiguity in the interpretation when the emission spectrum is time-dependent. Observation of an isoemissive point in TRANES analysis of fluorescence is an unambiguous indication for the presence of two emissive species in the sample. The isoemissive point occurs at a wavelength where the ratio of the radiative rates of the two species is equal to the ratio of their total radiative rates. The polarity-sensitive nile red dye shows timedependent emission spectra in the organized bilayer assemblies of TX micelle and bilayer egg-phosphotidylcholine (egg-PC) membrane. Time-dependent spectra in complex systems support many important models (solvation model and heterogeneity in the ground and/or excited state). TRANES analysis shows that the fluorescence emission of nile red in TX micelle and egg-PC membrane is due to two emissive species solubilized in different sites.

  4. Resolution of heterogeneous fluorescence emission signals and decay lifetime measurement on fluorochrome-labeled cells by phase-sensitive FCM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinkamp, J.A.; Crissman, H.A.

    1993-02-01

    A phase-sensitive flow cytometer has been developed to resolve signals from heterogeneous fluorescence emission spectra and quantify fluorescence decay times on cells labeled with fluorescent dyes. This instrument combines flow cytometry (FCM) and fluorescence spectroscopy measurement principles to provide unique capabilities for making phase-resolved measurements on single cells in flow, while preserving conventional FCM measurement capabilities. Stained cells are analyzed as they pass through an intensity-modulated (sinusoid) laser excitation beam. Fluorescence is measured orthogonally using a s barrier filter to block scattered laser excitation light, and a photomultiplier tube detector output signals, which are shifted in phase from a reference signal and amplitude demodulated, are processed by phase-sensitive detection electronics to resolve signals from heterogeneous emissions and quantify decay lifetimes directly. The output signals are displayed as frequency distribution histograms and bivariate diagrams using a computer-based data acquisition system. Results have demonstrated signal phase shift, amplitude demodulation, and average measurement of fluorescence lifetimes on stained cells; a detection limit threshold of 300 to 500 fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC); fluorescence measurement precision of 1.3% on alignment fluorospheres and 3.4% on propidium iodide (PI)-stained cells; the resolution of PI and FITC signals from cells stainedin combination with PI and FITC, based on differences in their decay lifetimes; and the ability to measure single decay nines by the two-phase, phase comparator, method.

  5. Resolution of heterogeneous fluorescence emission signals and decay lifetime measurement on fluorochrome-labeled cells by phase-sensitive FCM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinkamp, J.A.; Crissman, H.A.

    1993-01-01

    A phase-sensitive flow cytometer has been developed to resolve signals from heterogeneous fluorescence emission spectra and quantify fluorescence decay times on cells labeled with fluorescent dyes. This instrument combines flow cytometry (FCM) and fluorescence spectroscopy measurement principles to provide unique capabilities for making phase-resolved measurements on single cells in flow, while preserving conventional FCM measurement capabilities. Stained cells are analyzed as they pass through an intensity-modulated (sinusoid) laser excitation beam. Fluorescence is measured orthogonally using a s barrier filter to block scattered laser excitation light, and a photomultiplier tube detector output signals, which are shifted in phase from a reference signal and amplitude demodulated, are processed by phase-sensitive detection electronics to resolve signals from heterogeneous emissions and quantify decay lifetimes directly. The output signals are displayed as frequency distribution histograms and bivariate diagrams using a computer-based data acquisition system. Results have demonstrated signal phase shift, amplitude demodulation, and average measurement of fluorescence lifetimes on stained cells; a detection limit threshold of 300 to 500 fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC); fluorescence measurement precision of 1.3% on alignment fluorospheres and 3.4% on propidium iodide (PI)-stained cells; the resolution of PI and FITC signals from cells stainedin combination with PI and FITC, based on differences in their decay lifetimes; and the ability to measure single decay nines by the two-phase, phase comparator, method.

  6. Fertilization practices and soil variations control nitrogen oxide emissions from tropical sugar cane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, P. A.; Billow, C.; Hall, S.; Zachariassen, J.

    1996-08-01

    Nitrogen (N) fertilization of agricultural systems is thought to be a major source of the increase in atmospheric N2O; NO emissions from soils have also been shown to increase due to N fertilization. While N fertilizer use is increasing rapidly in the developing world and in the tropics, nearly all of our information on gas emissions is derived from studies of temperate zone agriculture. Using chambers, we measured fluxes of N2O and NO following urea fertilization in tropical sugar cane systems growing on several soil types in the Hawaiian Islands, United States. On the island of Maui, where urea is applied in irrigation lines and soils are mollisols and inceptisols, N2O fluxes were elevated for a week or less after fertilization; maximum average fluxes were typically less than 30 ng cm-2 h-1. NO fluxes were often an order of magnitude less than N2O. Together, N2O and NO represented from 0.03 to 0.5% of the applied N. In fields on the island of Hawaii, where urea is broadcast on the surface and soils are andisols, N2O fluxes were similar in magnitude to Maui but remained elevated for much longer periods after fertilization. NO emissions were 2-5 times higher than N2O through most of the sampling periods. Together the gas losses represented approximately 1.1-2.5% of the applied N. Laboratory studies indicate that denitrification is a critical source of N2O in Maui, but that nitrification is more important in Hawaii. Experimental studies suggest that differences in the pattern of N2O/NO and the processes producing them are a result of both carbon availability and placement of fertilizer and that the more information-intensive fertilizer management practice results in lower emissions.

  7. Fluorescence Efficiency and Visible Re-emission Spectrum of Tetraphenyl Butadiene Films at Extreme Ultraviolet Wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Gehman, V M; Rielage, K; Hime, A; Sun, Y; Mei, D -M; Maassen, J; Moore, D

    2011-01-01

    A large number of current and future experiments in neutrino and dark matter detection use the scintillation light from noble elements as a mechanism for measuring energy deposition. The scintillation light from these elements is produced in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) range, from 60 - 200 nm. Currently, the most practical technique for observing light at these wavelengths is to surround the scintillation volume with a thin film of Tetraphenyl Butadiene (TPB) to act as a fluor. The TPB film absorbs EUV photons and reemits visible photons, detectable with a variety of commercial photosensors. Here we present a measurement of the re-emission spectrum of TPB films when illuminated with 128, 160, 175, and 250 nm light. We also measure the fluorescence efficiency as a function of incident wavelength from 120 to 250 nm.

  8. Super-resolution microscopy based on fluorescence emission difference of cylindrical vector beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Zihao; Kuang, Cuifang; Fang, Yue; Zhao, Guangyuan; Xu, Yingke; Liu, Xu

    2015-11-01

    We propose a novel fluorescence emission difference microscopy (FED) system based on focusing cylindrical vector beams. In conventional FED, a Gaussian beam and a 0-2π vortex phase plate are used to generate solid and hollow spots. We focus radially polarized and azimuthally polarized cylindrical vector beams to obtain an expanded solid spot and a shrunken hollow spot, taking advantage of the optical properties of cylindrical vector beams to improve the conventional FED performance. Our novel method enhances FED performance because the hollow spot size determines the FED resolution and an expanded solid spot effectively reduces negative side-lobe emergence during image processing. We demonstrate improved performance theoretically and experimentally using an in-house built FED. Our FED achieved resolution of less than λ/4 in test images of 100 nm nanoparticles, better than the confocal image resolution by a factor of approximately 1/3. We also discuss detailed simulation analyses and FED imaging of biological cells.

  9. Plasma Wind Tunnel Investigation of European Ablators in Nitrogen/Methane Using Emission Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricarda Wernitz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For atmospheric reentries at high enthalpies ablative heat shield materials are used, such as those for probes entering the atmosphere of Saturn’s moon Titan, such as Cassini-Huygens in December, 2004. The characterization of such materials in a nitrogen/methane atmosphere is of interest. A European ablative material, AQ60, has been investigated in plasma wind tunnel tests at the IRS plasma wind tunnel PWK1 using the magnetoplasma dynamic generator RD5 as plasma source in a nitrogen/methane atmosphere. The dimensions of the samples are 45 mm in length with a diameter of 39 mm. The actual ablator has a thickness of 40 mm. The ablator is mounted on an aluminium substructure. The experiments were conducted at two different heat flux regimes, 1.4 MW/m2 and 0.3 MW/m2. In this paper, results of emission spectroscopy at these plasma conditions in terms of plasma species’ temperatures will be presented, including the investigation of the free-stream species, N2 and N2+, and the major erosion product C2, at a wavelength range around 500 nm–600 nm.

  10. Determination of ammonium and organic bound nitrogen by inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaber, A M Y; Mehanna, N A; Sultan, S M

    2009-06-15

    The continuous flow sample introduction technique with a hydride generator system in conjunction with an inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometer (ICP-AES-HG), is used in this study for quantitative determination of ammonium and organic bound nitrogen in aqueous and solid samples. Ammonia vapor released from ammonium salt after treatment with concentrated NaOH is transferred by argon to plasma for detection at 174.273 nm using axial argon plasma mode. The calibration curves were linear within a range of 25-1000 mg L(-1)N as ammonium molybdate with correlation coefficients of better than 0.99 and limits of detection of about 10-25mg L(-1)N. The percent recovery of N (25-500 mg L(-1)N) in soft (distilled) water and high salt content (1.7 mol L(-1) NaCl) matrices was found to be in the range of about 97-102% with %RSD in the range of 4.6-0.62. The sensitivity, limit of detection, and blank contribution from the atmospheric nitrogen, were tremendously improved in this method compared with the available ICP-AES spray chamber counterpart. Furthermore, the ICP-AES-HG method gave results for real samples (soil, fertilizer, waste water) containing about 50-1800 mg L(-1)N in good agreement with those obtained by the standard Kjeldahl method. No statistical differences at the 95% confidence level on applying the t-test were observed between the values obtained by the two methods. Thus, the ICP-AES-HG method is reliable and faster than the conventional tedious Kjeldahl method, superior to the ICP-AES spray chamber method, and almost free from matrix interference which is usually a critical factor in atomic emission spectroscopic techniques.

  11. Sensitivity of modeled atmospheric nitrogen species and nitrogen deposition to variations in sea salt emissions in the North Sea and Baltic Sea regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Daniel; Matthias, Volker; Bieser, Johannes; Aulinger, Armin; Quante, Markus

    2016-03-01

    Coarse sea salt particles are emitted ubiquitously from the ocean surface by wave-breaking and bubble-bursting processes. These particles impact the atmospheric chemistry by affecting the condensation of gas-phase species and, thus, indirectly the nucleation of new fine particles, particularly in regions with significant air pollution. In this study, atmospheric particle concentrations are modeled for the North Sea and Baltic Sea regions in northwestern Europe using the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system and are compared to European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) measurement data. The sea salt emission module is extended by a salinity-dependent scaling of the sea salt emissions because the salinity in large parts of the Baltic Sea is very low, which leads to considerably lower sea salt mass emissions compared to other oceanic regions. The resulting improvement in predicted sea salt concentrations is assessed. The contribution of surf zone emissions is considered separately. Additionally, the impacts of sea salt particles on atmospheric nitrate and ammonium concentrations and on nitrogen deposition are evaluated. The comparisons with observational data show that sea salt concentrations are commonly overestimated at coastal stations and partly underestimated farther inland. The introduced salinity scaling improves the predicted Baltic Sea sea salt concentrations considerably. The dates of measured peak concentrations are appropriately reproduced by the model. The impact of surf zone emissions is negligible in both seas. Nevertheless, they might be relevant because surf zone emissions were cut at an upper threshold in this study. Deactivating sea salt leads to minor increases in NH3 + NH4+ and HNO3 + NO3- and a decrease in NO3- concentrations. However, the overall effect on NH3 + NH4+ and HNO3 + NO3- concentrations is smaller than the deviation from the measurements. Nitrogen wet deposition is underestimated by the model at most

  12. A system for endoscopic mechanically scanned localized proton MR and light-induced fluorescence emission spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonmez, Ahmet E.; Webb, Andrew G.; Spees, William M.; Ozcan, Alpay; Tsekos, Nikolaos V.

    2012-09-01

    Molecular and near-cellular modalities offer new opportunities in assessing living tissue in situ, and multimodality approaches, which offer complementary information, may lead to improved characterization of tissue pathophysiology benefiting diagnosis and focal therapy. However, many such modalities are limited by their low penetration through tissue, which has led to minimally invasive trans-cannula approaches to place the corresponding sensors locally at the area of interest. This work presents a system for performing localized fluorescence emission and proton magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopies via endoscopic access. The in-house developed side-firing 1.9-mm wide dual-sensor integrates a three-fiber optical sensor for fluorescence emission optical spectroscopy and a 1-mm circular radiofrequency (RF) coil for localized MR proton spectroscopy. An MR-compatible manipulator was developed for carrying and mechanically translating the dual-sensor along a linear access channel. The hardware and software control of the system allows reconfigurable synchronization of the manipulator-assisted translation of the sensor, and MR and optical data collection. The manipulator serves as the mechanical link for the three modalities and MR images, MR spectra and optical spectra are inherently co-registered to the MR scanner coordinate system. These spectra were then used to generate spatio-spectral maps of the fluorophores and proton MR-signal sources in three-compartment phantoms with optically- and MR-visible, and distinguishable, materials. These data demonstrate a good spatial match between MR images, MR spectra and optical spectra along the scanned path. In addition to basic research, such a system may have clinical applications for assessing and characterizing cancer in situ, as well as guiding focal therapies.

  13. Dielectric barrier discharges with steep voltage rise: mapping of atomic nitrogen in single filaments measured by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukas, C.; Spaan, M.; Schulz-von der Gathen, V.; Thomson, M.; Wegst, R.; Döbele, H. F.; Neiger, M.

    2001-08-01

    Space and time resolved relative atomic density distributions of nitrogen have been measured for the first time at a single filament within a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor with submillimetre radial dimensions. Two-photon-Absorption Laser-Induced Fluorescence (TALIF) spectroscopy of atomic nitrogen using radiation at λ = 206.7 nm is applied to a DBD with fast rising voltage amplitudes. The decay time of the atomic nitrogen density depends strongly on the position within the discharge and the distance from the dielectric where the lifetime is maximum. Admixed oxygen leads to an increase of the N density decay by an order of magnitude even at small fractions.

  14. Near-infrared fluorescence amplified organic nanoparticles with aggregation-induced emission characteristics for in vivo imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Junlong; Zhu, Zhenshu; Qin, Wei; Ma, Lin; Hu, Yong; Gurzadyan, Gagik G.; Tang, Ben Zhong; Liu, Bin

    2013-12-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence signals are highly desirable to achieve high resolution in biological imaging. To obtain NIR emission with high brightness, fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) are synthesized by co-encapsulation of 2,3-bis(4-(phenyl(4-(1,2,2-triphenylvinyl)phenylamino)phenyl)fumaronitrile (TPETPAFN), a luminogen with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) characteristics, and a NIR fluorogen of silicon 2,3-naphthalocyanine bis(trihexylsilyloxide) (NIR775) using 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy(polyethylene glycol)-2000] as the encapsulation matrix. The good spectral overlap between the emission of TPETPAFN and the absorption of NIR775 leads to efficient energy transfer, resulting in a 47-fold enhancement of the NIR775 emission intensity upon excitation of TPETPAFN at 510 nm as compared to that upon direct excitation of NIR775 at 760 nm. The obtained fluorescent NPs show sharp NIR emission with a band width of 20 nm, a large Stokes shift of 275 nm, good photostability and low cytotoxicity. In vivo imaging study reveals that the synthesized NPs are able to provide high fluorescence contrast in live animals. The Förster resonance energy transfer strategy overcomes the intrinsic limitation of broad emission spectra for AIE NPs, which opens new opportunities to synthesize organic NPs with high brightness and narrow emission for potential applications in multiplex sensing and imaging.Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence signals are highly desirable to achieve high resolution in biological imaging. To obtain NIR emission with high brightness, fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) are synthesized by co-encapsulation of 2,3-bis(4-(phenyl(4-(1,2,2-triphenylvinyl)phenylamino)phenyl)fumaronitrile (TPETPAFN), a luminogen with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) characteristics, and a NIR fluorogen of silicon 2,3-naphthalocyanine bis(trihexylsilyloxide) (NIR775) using 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy(polyethylene glycol)-2000

  15. Production mechanism of atomic nitrogen in atmospheric pressure pulsed corona discharge measured using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teramoto, Yoshiyuki; Ono, Ryo [Department of Advanced Energy, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 227-8568 (Japan); Oda, Tetsuji [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2012-06-01

    To study the production mechanism of atomic nitrogen, the temporal profile and spatial distribution of atomic nitrogen are measured in atmospheric pressure pulsed positive corona discharge using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence. The absolute atomic nitrogen density in the streamer filaments is estimated from decay rate of atomic nitrogen in N{sub 2} discharge. The results indicate that the absolute atomic nitrogen density is approximately constant against discharge energy. When the discharge voltage is 21.5 kV, production yield of atomic nitrogen produced by an N{sub 2} discharge pulse is estimated to be 2.9 - 9.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} atoms and the energy efficiency of atomic nitrogen production is estimated to be about 1.8 - 6.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} atoms/J. The energy efficiency of atomic nitrogen production in N{sub 2} discharge is constant against the discharge energy, while that in N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} discharge increases with discharge energy. In the N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} discharge, two-step process of N{sub 2} dissociation plays significant role for atomic nitrogen production.

  16. Role of photoexcited nitrogen dioxide chemistry on ozone formation and emission control strategy over the Pearl River Delta, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new hydroxyl radical formation pathway via photo-excited nitrogen dioxide chemistry is incorporated into a chemistry-only box model as well as a 3D air quality model to examine its potential role on ozone formation and emission control strategy over the Pearl River Delta region...

  17. Effects of nitrogen fertilisation rate and maturity of grass silage on methane emission by lactating dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warner, D.; Hatew, B.; Podesta, S.C.; Klop, G.; Gastelen, van S.; Laar, van H.; Dijkstra, J.; Bannink, A.

    2016-01-01

    Grass silage is typically fed to dairy cows in temperate regions. However, in vivo information on methane (CH4) emission from grass silage of varying quality is limited. We evaluated the effect of two rates of nitrogen (N) fertilisation of grassland (low fertilisation (LF), 65 kg of N/ha; and high f

  18. Vermicomposting as a technology for reducing nitrogen losses and greenhouse gas emissions from small-scale composting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nigussie, Abebe; Kuijper, Thomas; Bruun, Sander; Neergaard, de Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Thermophilic composting produces a significant amount of greenhouse gases. The objectives of this study were (i) to evaluate the effectiveness of vermicomposting to reduce nitrogen losses and greenhouse gases emissions compared to thermophilic composting, and (ii) to determine the effect of

  19. Electromechanical control of nitrogen-vacancy defect emission using graphene NEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reserbat-Plantey, Antoine; Schädler, Kevin G.; Gaudreau, Louis; Navickaite, Gabriele; Güttinger, Johannes; Chang, Darrick; Toninelli, Costanza; Bachtold, Adrian; Koppens, Frank H. L.

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent progress in nano-optomechanics, active control of optical fields at the nanoscale has not been achieved with an on-chip nano-electromechanical system (NEMS) thus far. Here we present a new type of hybrid system, consisting of an on-chip graphene NEMS suspended a few tens of nanometres above nitrogen-vacancy centres (NVCs), which are stable single-photon emitters embedded in nanodiamonds. Electromechanical control of the photons emitted by the NVC is provided by electrostatic tuning of the graphene NEMS position, which is transduced to a modulation of NVC emission intensity. The optomechanical coupling between the graphene displacement and the NVC emission is based on near-field dipole-dipole interaction. This class of optomechanical coupling increases strongly for smaller distances, making it suitable for nanoscale devices. These achievements hold promise for selective control of emitter arrays on-chip, optical spectroscopy of individual nano-objects, integrated optomechanical information processing and open new avenues towards quantum optomechanics.

  20. Fluorescent H_2 Emission Lines from the Reflection Nebula NGC 7023 Observed with IGRINS

    CERN Document Server

    Le, Huynh Anh N; Kaplan, Kyle F; Mace, Gregory N; Lee, Sungho; Pavel, Michael D; Jeong, Ueejeong; Oh, Heeyoung; Lee, Hye-In; Chun, Moo-Young; Yuk, In-Soo; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Hwang, Narae; Kim, Kang-Min; Park, Chan; Oh, Jae Sok; Yu, Young S; Park, Byeong-Gon; Minh, Young Chol; Jaffe, Daniel T

    2016-01-01

    We have analyzed the temperature, velocity and density of H_2 gas in NGC 7023 with a high-resolution near-infrared spectrum of the northwestern filament of the reflection nebula. By observing NGC 7023 in the H and K bands at R ~ 45,000 with the Immersion GRating INfrared Spectrograph (IGRINS), we detected 70 H_2 emission lines within the 1" x 15" slit. The diagnostic ratios of 2-1 S(1)/1-0 S(1) are 0.39-0.54. In addition, the estimated ortho-to-para ratios (OPR) are 1.57-1.62, indicating that the H_2 transitions in the observed regions are mostly from UV fluorescence. Gradients in the temperature, velocity, and OPR of the observed areas imply motion of the photodissociation region (PDR) relative to the molecular cloud. In addition, we derive the column density of H_2 from the observed emission lines and compare these results with PDR models in the literature covering a range of densities and incident UV field intensities. The notable difference between PDR model predictions and the observed data, in high rota...

  1. Directional fluorescence emission by individual V-antennas explained by mode expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercruysse, Dries; Zheng, Xuezhi; Sonnefraud, Yannick; Verellen, Niels; Di Martino, Giuliana; Lagae, Liesbet; Vandenbosch, Guy A E; Moshchalkov, Victor V; Maier, Stefan A; Van Dorpe, Pol

    2014-08-26

    Specially designed plasmonic antennas can, by far-field interference of different antenna elements or a combination of multipolar antenna modes, scatter light unidirectionally, allowing for directional light control at the nanoscale. One of the most basic and compact geometries for such antennas is a nanorod with broken rotational symmetry, in the shape of the letter V. In this article, we show that these V-antennas unidirectionally scatter the emission of a local dipole source in a direction opposite the undirectional side scattering of a plane wave. Moreover, we observe high directivity, up to 6 dB, only for certain well-defined positions of the emitter relative to the antenna. By employing a rigorous eigenmode expansion analysis of the V-antenna, we fully elucidate the fundamental origin of its directional behavior. All findings are experimentally verified by measuring the radiation patterns of a scattered plane wave and the emission pattern of fluorescently doped PMMA positioned in different regions around the antenna. The fundamental interference effects revealed in the eigenmode expansion can serve as guidelines in the understanding and further development of nanoscale directional scatterers.

  2. Effects of nitrogen form on growth, CO₂ assimilation, chlorophyll fluorescence, and photosynthetic electron allocation in cucumber and rice plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan-hong; Zhang, Yi-li; Wang, Xue-min; Cui, Jin-xia; Xia, Xiao-jian; Shi, Kai; Yu, Jing-quan

    2011-02-01

    Cucumber and rice plants with varying ammonium (NH(4)(+)) sensitivities were used to examine the effects of different nitrogen (N) sources on gas exchange, chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence quenching, and photosynthetic electron allocation. Compared to nitrate (NO(3)(-))-grown plants, cucumber plants grown under NH(4)(+)-nutrition showed decreased plant growth, net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance, intercellular carbon dioxide (CO(2)) level, transpiration rate, maximum photochemical efficiency of photosystem II, and O(2)-independent alternative electron flux, and increased O(2)-dependent alternative electron flux. However, the N source had little effect on gas exchange, Chl a fluorescence parameters, and photosynthetic electron allocation in rice plants, except that NH(4)(+)-grown plants had a higher O(2)-independent alternative electron flux than NO(3)(-)-grown plants. NO(3)(-) reduction activity was rarely detected in leaves of NH(4)(+)-grown cucumber plants, but was high in NH(4)(+)-grown rice plants. These results demonstrate that significant amounts of photosynthetic electron transport were coupled to NO(3)(-) assimilation, an effect more significant in NO(3)(-)-grown plants than in NH(4)(+)-grown plants. Meanwhile, NH(4)(+)-tolerant plants exhibited a higher demand for the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) for NO(3)(-) reduction, regardless of the N form supplied, while NH(4)(+)-sensitive plants had a high water-water cycle activity when NH(4)(+) was supplied as the sole N source.

  3. Multimodality Imaging Probe for Positron Emission Tomography and Fluorescence Imaging Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh K. Pandey

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Our goal is to develop multimodality imaging agents for use in cell tracking studies by positron emission tomography (PET and optical imaging (OI. For this purpose, bovine serum albumin (BSA was complexed with biotin (histologic studies, 5(6- carboxyfluorescein, succinimidyl ester (FAM SE (OI studies, and diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA for chelating gallium 68 (PET studies. For synthesis of BSA-biotin-FAM-DTPA, BSA was coupled to (+-biotin N-hydroxysuccinimide ester (biotin-NHSI. BSA- biotin was treated with DTPA-anhydride and biotin-BSA-DTPA was reacted with FAM. The biotin-BSA-DTPA-FAM was reacted with gallium chloride 3 to 5 mCi eluted from the generator using 0.1 N HCl and was passed through basic resin (AG 11 A8 and 150 mCi (100 μL, pH 7–8 was incubated with 0.1 mg of FAM conjugate (100 μL at room temperature for 15 minutes to give 66Ga-BSA-biotin-DTPA-FAM. A shaved C57 black mouse was injected with FAM conjugate (50 μL at one flank and FAM-68Ga (50 μL, 30 mCi at the other. Immediately after injection, the mouse was placed in a fluorescence imaging system (Kodak In-Vivo F, Bruker Biospin Co., Woodbridge, CT and imaged (Λex: 465 nm, Λem: 535 nm, time: 8 seconds, Xenon Light Source, Kodak. The same mouse was then placed under an Inveon microPET scanner (Siemens Medical Solutions, Knoxville, TN injected (intravenously with 25 μCi of 18F and after a half-hour (to allow sufficient bone uptake was imaged for 30 minutes. Molecular weight determined using matrix-associated laser desorption ionization (MALDI for the BSA sample was 66,485 Da and for biotin-BSA was 67,116 Da, indicating two biotin moieties per BSA molecule; for biotin-BSA-DTPA was 81,584 Da, indicating an average of 30 DTPA moieties per BSA molecule; and for FAM conjugate was 82,383 Da, indicating an average of 1.7 fluorescent moieties per BSA molecule. Fluorescence imaging clearly showed localization of FAM conjugate and FAM-68Ga at respective flanks of the mouse

  4. Mutations in Transhydrogenase Change the Fluorescence Emission State of TRP72 from 1La to 1Lb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tveen Jensen, Karina; Strambini, Giovanni; Gonnelli, Margherita; Broos, Jaap; Jackson, J. Baz

    2008-01-01

    The dI component of Rhodospirillum rubrum transhydrogenase has a single Trp residue (Trp72), which has distinctive optical properties, including short-wavelength fluorescence emission with clear vibrational fine structure, and long-lived, well-resolved phosphorescence emission. We have made a set of mutant dI proteins in which residues contacting Trp72 are conservatively substituted. The room-temperature fluorescence-emission spectra of our three Met97 mutants are blue shifted by ∼4 nm, giving them a shorter-wavelength emission than any other protein described in the literature, including azurin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Fluorescence spectra in low-temperature glasses show equivalent well-resolved vibrational bands in wild-type and the mutant dI proteins, and in azurin. Substitution of Met97 in dI changes the relative intensities of some of these vibrational bands. The analysis supports the view that fluorescence from the Met97 mutants arises predominantly from the 1Lb excited singlet state of Trp72, whereas 1La is the predominant emitting state in wild-type dI. It is suggested that the sulfur atom of Met97 promotes greater stabilization of 1La than either 1Lb or the ground state. The phosphorescence spectra of Met97 mutants are also blue-shifted, indicating that the sulfur atom decreases the transition energy between the 3La state of the Trp and the ground state. PMID:18599622

  5. Fluorescence Aggregation-Caused Quenching versus Aggregation-Induced Emission: A Visual Teaching Technology for Undergraduate Chemistry Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaofeng; Sun, Rui; Cheng, Jinghui; Liu, Jiaoyan; Gou, Fei; Xiang, Haifeng; Zhou, Xiangge

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory experiment visually exploring two opposite basic principles of fluorescence of aggregation-caused quenching (ACQ) and aggregation-induced emission (AIE) is demonstrated. The students would prepared two salicylaldehyde-based Schiff bases through a simple one-pot condensation reaction of one equiv of 1,2-diamine with 2 equiv of…

  6. Fluorescent probes for "off-on" highly sensitive detection of Hg²⁺ and L-cysteine based on nitrogen-doped carbon dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Cui, Peipei; Zhang, Feng; Feng, Xiaoting; Wang, Yaling; Yang, Yongzhen; Liu, Xuguang

    2016-05-15

    Fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (NCDs) were synthesized by a facile, and low-cost one-step hydrothermal strategy using citric acid as carbon source and ammonia solution as nitrogen source for the first time. The obtained NCDs show stable blue fluorescence with a high quantum yield of 35.4%, along with the fluorescence lifetime of ca. 6.75 ns. Most importantly, Hg(2+) can completely quench the fluorescence of NCDs as a result of the formation of a non-fluorescent stable NCDs-Hg(2+) complex. Static fluorescence quenching towards Hg(2+) is proved by the Stern-Volmer equation, ultraviolet-visible absorption spectra, temperature dependent quenching and fluorescence lifetime measurements. Subsequently, the fluorescence of the NCDs-Hg(2+) system is completely recovered with the addition L-cysteine (L-Cys) owing to the dissociation of NCDs-Hg(2+) complex to form a more stable Hg(2+)-L-Cys complex by Hg(2+)-S bonding. Therefore, such NCDs can be used as an effective fluorescent "turn-off" probe for rapid, rather highly selective and sensitive detection of Hg(2+), with a limit of detection (LOD) as low as 1.48 nM and a linear detection range of 0-10 μM. Interestingly, NCDs-Hg(2+) system can be conveniently employed as a fluorescent "turn-on" sensor for highly selective and sensitive detection of L-Cys with a low LOD of 0.79 nM and a wide linear detection range of 0-50 μM. Further, the sensitivity of NCDs to Hg(2+) is preserved in tap water with a LOD of 1.65 nM and a linear detection range of 0-10 μM.

  7. Effects of Bleaching by Nitrogen Deficiency on the Quantum Yield of Photosystem II in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 Revealed by Chl Fluorescence Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Takako; Sonoike, Kintake

    2016-03-01

    Estimation of photosynthesis by Chl fluorescence measurement of cyanobacteria is always problematic due to the interference from respiratory electron transfer and from phycocyanin fluorescence. The interference from respiratory electron transfer could be avoided by the use of DCMU or background illumination by blue light, which oxidizes the plastoquinone pool that tends to be reduced by respiration. On the other hand, the precise estimation of photosynthesis in cells with a different phycobilisome content by Chl fluorescence measurement is difficult. By subtracting the basal fluorescence due to the phycobilisome and PSI, it becomes possible to estimate the precise maximum quantum yield of PSII in cyanobacteria. Estimated basal fluorescence accounted for 60% of the minimum fluorescence, resulting in a large difference between the 'apparent' yield and 'true' yield under high phycocyanin conditions. The calculated value of the 'true' maximum quantum yield of PSII was around 0.8, which was similar to the value observed in land plants. The results suggest that the cause of the apparent low yield reported in cyanobacteria is mainly ascribed to the interference from phycocyanin fluorescence. We also found that the 'true' maximum quantum yield of PSII decreased under nitrogen-deficient conditions, suggesting the impairment of the PSII reaction center, while the 'apparent' maximum quantum yield showed a marginal change under the same conditions. Due to the high contribution of phycocyanin fluorescence in cyanobacteria, it is essential to eliminate the influence of the change in phycocyanin content on Chl fluorescence measurement and to evaluate the 'true' photosynthetic condition.

  8. Emission Ratios of the Tropospheric Ozone Precursors Nitrogen Dioxide and Formaldehyde from Australia’s Black Saturday Fires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Paton-Walsh

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The ‘Black Saturday’ fires were a series of devastating forest fires that burned across Victoria, Australia, during February and March of 2009. In this study we have used satellite data made publically available by NASA from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI and the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS to track the smoke plume from the Black Saturday firestorm and explore the chemical aging of the smoke plume in the first days after emission. We also determined emission ratios for formaldehyde and nitrogen dioxide within smoke from fires actively burning across Victoria between 7 and 17 February 2009. The mean emission ratios with respect to carbon monoxide derived for these two tropospheric ozone precursors are (0.016 ± 0.004 mol.mol−1 for formaldehyde and (0.005 ± 0.002 mol.mol−1 for nitrogen dioxide. The mean emission ratio for formaldehyde with respect to CO is in broad agreement with values previously quoted in the literature for temperate forest fires. However, to our knowledge there are no previous measurements of emission ratios for nitrogen dioxide from Australian temperate forest fires.

  9. An optical fiber taper fluorescent probe for detection of nitro-explosives based on tetraphenylethylene with aggregation-induced emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fukun; Cui, Minxin; Ma, Jiajun; Zou, Gang; Zhang, Qijin

    2017-07-01

    In this work, we report a novel optical fiber taper fluorescent probe for detection of nitro-explosives. The probe was fabricated by an in-situ photo-plating through evanescent wave and transmitted light initiated thiol-ene ;click; reaction, from which a cross-linked fluorescence porous polymer film was covalently bonded on the surface of the fiber taper. The film exhibits well-organized porous structure due to the presence of polyhedral oligomeric vinylsilsesquioxane moieties, and simultaneously displays strong fluorescence from tetraphenylethylene with aggregation-induced emission property. These two characters make the probe show a remarkable sensitivity, anti-photo-bleaching and a repeatability in detection of TNT and DNT vapors by fluorescence quenching. In addition, the detection is not interfered in the presence of other volatile organic gases.

  10. Analysis of waveguide-coupled directional emission for efficient collection of Fluorescence/Raman light from surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen; Lu, Dan-Feng; Gao, Ran; Qi, Zhi-Mei

    2016-05-01

    A theoretical method based on the optical reciprocity theorem combined with the Fresnel theory has been developed for the analysis of waveguide-coupled directional emission technique, which is useful for the surface Fluorescence/Raman spectroscopy. The Kretschmann-type waveguide with a molecular dipole located above or inside the core layer serves as the simulation model. The two-dimensional (2D) pattern of power density for the waveguide-coupled emission from the molecular dipole was calculated using the theoretical method. According to the results, with a given waveguide the 2D pattern of power density is highly dependent on both the orientation and position of the dipole. The maximum fraction of power occupied by the waveguide-coupled emission is 87% with the plasmon waveguide and 95% with the resonant mirror. Compared with the dipole emission in free space, the waveguide-coupled directional emission possesses easy collection, which is benefit for the detection of weak Fluorescence and Raman signals. From this point, the theoretical method used here is helpful for design and optimization of Kretschmann-type waveguide structures for high-sensitivity surface monitoring by Fluorescence/Raman spectroscopy.

  11. Sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides emissions from U.S. pulp and paper mills, 1980-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkerton, John E

    2007-08-01

    Comprehensive surveys conducted at 5-yr intervals were used to estimate sulfur dioxide (SO,) and nitrogen oxides (NO.) emissions from U.S. pulp and paper mills for 1980, 1985, 1990, 1995, 2000, and 2005. Over the 25-yr period, paper production increased by 50%, whereas total SO, emissions declined by 60% to 340,000 short tons (t) and total NO, emissions decreased approximately 15% to 230,000 t. The downward emission trends resulted from a combination of factors, including reductions in oil and coal use, steadily declining fuel sulfur content, lower pulp and paper production in recent years, increased use of flue gas desulfurization systems on boilers, growing use of combustion modifications and add-on control systems to reduce boiler and gas turbine NO, emissions, and improvements in kraft recovery furnace operations.

  12. Factors controlling regional differences in forest soil emission of nitrogen oxides (NO and N2O)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, K.; Skiba, U.; Ambus, P.

    2006-01-01

    Soil emissions of NO and N2O were measured continuously at high frequency for more than one year at 15 European forest sites as part of the EU-funded project NOFRETETE. The locations represent different forest types (coniferous/deciduous) and different nitrogen loads. Geoaphically they range from...... Finland in the north to Italy in the south and from Hungary in the east to Scotland in the west. The highest NO emissions were observed from coniferous forests, whereas the lowest NO emissions were observed from deciduous forests. The NO emissions from coniferous forests were highly correlated with N...... with the C/N ratio. The difference in N-oxide emissions from soils of coniferous and deciduous forests may partly be explained by differences in N-deposition rates and partly by differences in characteristics of the litter layer and soil. NO was mainly derived from nitrification whereas N2O was mainly...

  13. Downsizing of Georgia Tech's Airborne Fluorescence Spectrometer (AFS) for the Measurement of Nitrogen Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandholm, Scott

    1998-01-01

    This report addresses the Tropospheric Trace Gas and Airborne Measurements (TTGAMG) endeavors to further downsize and stabilize the Georgia Institute of Technology's Airborne Laser Induced Fluorescence Experiment (GITALIFE). It will mainly address the TTGAMG successes and failures as participants in the summer 1998 Wallops Island test flights on board the P3-B. Due to the restructuring and reorganization of the TTGAMG since the original funding of this grant, some of the objectives and time lines of the deliverables have been changed. Most of these changes have been covered in the preceding annual report. We are anticipating getting back on track with the original proposal's downsizing effort this summer, culminating in the GITALIFE no longer occupying a high bay rack and the loss of several hundred pounds.

  14. Determination of the Residual Anthracene Concentration in Cultures of Haloalkalitolerant Actinomycetes by Excitation Fluorescence, Emission Fluorescence, and Synchronous Fluorescence: Comparative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Reyna del Carmen Lara-Severino; Miguel Ángel Camacho-López; Jessica Marlene García-Macedo; Gómez-Oliván, Leobardo M.; Ángel H. Sandoval-Trujillo; Keila Isaac-Olive; Ninfa Ramírez-Durán

    2016-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are compounds that can be quantified by fluorescence due to their high quantum yield. Haloalkalitolerant bacteria tolerate wide concentration ranges of NaCl and pH. They are potentially useful in the PAHs bioremediation of saline environments. However, it is known that salinity of the sample affects fluorescence signal regardless of the method. The objective of this work was to carry out a comparative study based on the sensitivity, linearity, and detec...

  15. Structural and emission properties of Tb3+-doped nitrogen-rich silicon oxynitride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbé, C.; An, Y.-T.; Zatryb, G.; Portier, X.; Podhorodecki, A.; Marie, P.; Frilay, C.; Cardin, J.; Gourbilleau, F.

    2017-03-01

    Terbium doped silicon oxynitride host matrix is suitable for various applications such as light emitters compatible with CMOS technology or frequency converter systems for photovoltaic cells. In this study, amorphous Tb3+ ion doped nitrogen-rich silicon oxynitride (NRSON) thin films were fabricated using a reactive magnetron co-sputtering method, with various N2 flows and annealing conditions, in order to study their structural and emission properties. Rutherford backscattering (RBS) measurements and refractive index values confirmed the silicon oxynitride nature of the films. An electron microscopy analysis conducted for different annealing temperatures (T A) was also performed up to 1200 °C. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images revealed two different sublayers. The top layer showed porosities coming from a degassing of oxygen during deposition and annealing, while in the region close to the substrate, a multilayer-like structure of SiO2 and Si3N4 phases appeared, involving a spinodal decomposition. Upon a 1200 °C annealing treatment, a significant density of Tb clusters was detected, indicating a higher thermal threshold of rare earth (RE) clusterization in comparison to the silicon oxide matrix. With an opposite variation of the N2 flow during the deposition, the nitrogen excess parameter (Nex) estimated by RBS measurements was introduced to investigate the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum behavior and emission properties. Different vibration modes of the Si-N and Si-O bonds have been carefully identified from the FTIR spectra characterizing such host matrices, especially the ‘out-of-phase’ stretching vibration mode of the Si-O bond. The highest Tb3+ photoluminescence (PL) intensity was obtained by optimizing the N incorporation and the annealing conditions. In addition, according to these conditions, the integrated PL intensity variation confirmed that the silicon nitride-based host matrix had a higher thermal threshold of rare earth

  16. Fluorescence emission and polarization analyses for evaluating binding of ruthenium metalloglycocluster to lectin and tetanus toxin c-fragment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Tomoko; Minoura, Norihiko

    2010-02-01

    We have developed a fluorescent ruthenium metalloglycocluster as a powerful molecular probe for evaluating a binding event between carbohydrates and lectins by fluorescence emission (FE) and fluorescence polarization (FP) analysis. The fluorescent ruthenium metalloglycoclusters, [Ru(bpy-2Gal)3] and [Ru(bpy-2Glc)3], possess clustered galactose and glucose surrounding the ruthenium center. Changes in FE and FP of these metalloglycoclusters were measured by adding each lectin (Peanut agglutinin (PNA), Ricinus communis agglutinin 120 (RCA), Concanavalin A (ConA), or Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)) or tetanus toxin c-fragment (TCF). Following the addition of PNA, the FE spectrum of [Ru(bpy- 2Gal)3] showed new emission peak and the FP value of [Ru(bpy-2Gal)3] increased. Similarly, the FE spectrum of [Ru(bpy-2Glc)3] showed new emission peak and the FP value increased following the addition of ConA. Since other combinations of the metalloglycoclusters and lectin caused little change, specific bindings of galactose to PNA and glucose to ConA were proved by the FE and FP measurement. From nonlinear least-squares fitting, dissociation constants (Kd) of [Ru(bpy-2Gal)3] to PNA was 6.1 μM, while the Kd values of [Ru(bpy)2(bpy-2Gal)] to PNA was ca. 10-4 M. Therefore, the clustered carbohydrates were proved to increase affinity to lectins. Furthermore, the FP measurements proved specific binding of [Ru(bpy-2Gal)3] to TCF.

  17. Continuous field investigation assessing nitrogen and phosphorus emission from irrigated paddy field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogure, Kanami; Aichi, Masaatsu; Zessner, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    In order to maintain good river environment, it is very important to understand and to control nutrient behavior such as Nitrogen and Phosphorus. Other than urban and industrial waste water, nutrient emission from agricultural activity is dominant pollution source into the river system. Rice is one of the staple products of Asia and paddy field occupies large areas in Asian countries. Rice is also widely cultivated in Japan. Paddy field occupies large areas in Japanese river basin areas. While paddy field can deteriorate river water quality by discharging fertilizer, it is also suggested that paddy field has water purification function. Regarding to nutrient emission from paddy field, existing monitored data are insufficient so as to discuss quantitatively seasonal change of material behavior including flooding season and dry season and to evaluate year round comprehensive impact from paddy field to the river system. These are not sufficient data for discussion of material flow and emission impact quantitatively as well as qualitatively. We have carried out field investigation in paddy fields in middle reach of the Tone River Basin. The aim of the survey is understanding of water and nutrient balance in paddy field. In order to understand emission impact from paddy field to river system, all input and output flow are measured to calculate nutrient balance in paddy field. Therefore we observed quantity of water flow into/from paddy field, water quality change of inflow and outflow during flooding season. We set focus on a monitoring paddy field IM, and monitored continuously water and nutrient behavior. By measuring water quality and flow rate of inflow, outflow, infiltrating water, ground water and depth of flooding water, we tried to quantitatively understand N and P cycle around paddy field including seasonal tendency, change accompanying with rainy events and occurred according to agricultural events like fertilization. At the beginning of flooding season, we

  18. Ag@Aggregation-induced emission dye core/shell nanostructures with enhanced one- and two-photon fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng; Li, Yang; Xu, Qiujin; Luo, Liang

    2017-10-01

    Combining plasmonic nanostructures with two-photon fluorescence materials is a promising way to significantly enhance two-photon fluorescence. Ag@1,4-bis(2-cyano-2-phenylethenyl) benzene (BCPEB) core/shell nanostructures were fabricated by simply incubating the isolated Ag nanoparticles with BCPEB microrods in ethanol. BCPEB was chosen as the fluorescent organic molecule owing to the aggregation-induced-emission (AIE) nature which would reduce the emission loss as being practically applied in solid phase. By utilizing the match of the extinction spectrum of Ag nanoparticles and BCPEB's absorption band, the target Ag@BCPEB core/shell nanostructures showed an enhanced one-photon (12×) fluorescence, integrating with SERS signal as well. Moreover, the resultant second harmonic generation of Ag nanoparticles under two-photon excitation also well matched with the absorption band of BCPEB, and significant enhanced two-photon (17×) fluorescence was obtained. The confocal images of NIH-3T3 cells with these nanostructures under one- and two-photon excitation showed good contrast and brightness for bio-imaging.

  19. Assessment of the environmental impacts and health benefits of a nitrogen emission control area in the North Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammingh, P.; Geilenkirchen, G. [Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency PBL, Bilthoven (Netherlands); Maas, R. [National Institute of Public Health and Environmental Protection RIVM, Bilthoven (Netherlands); Holland, M.R. [Ecometrics Research and Consulting EMRC, Reading (United Kingdom); Jonson, J.E. [The Meteorological Synthesizing Centre - West MSC-W, Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Oslo (Norway)

    2012-06-15

    In the last five to ten years, concerns about the health and ecosystem effects of air polluting emissions from ships have grown in international policy debate regarding further air pollutant emissions control. As an outcome of the debate, the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) adopted more stringent emission standards in 2008 to further control air pollution from sea shipping. For example, their most stringent nitrogen oxide emission standards are about 75 per cent lower than the standards for current ships. However, these most stringent standards are only mandatory in specific emission control areas designated by the IMO. Such specific areas aim to protect densely populated areas and sensitive ecosystems from air pollution from nearby international shipping. Prior to a possible application for designation of a nitrogen oxide emission control area, the eight North Sea countries commissioned an assessment of the environmental impacts and health benefits (this report) and the economic impacts and costs (Danish EPA, 2012). The main conclusions of this assessment are presented and concisely explained below. A detailed elaboration of the work carried out, the results and the uncertainties can be found in 'Full results'.

  20. Nitrogen and phosphorus addition impact soil N₂O emission in a secondary tropical forest of South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Faming; Li, Jian; Wang, Xiaoli; Zhang, Wei; Zou, Bi; Neher, Deborah A; Li, Zhian

    2014-07-08

    Nutrient availability greatly regulates ecosystem processes and functions of tropical forests. However, few studies have explored impacts of N addition (aN), P addition (aP) and N × P interaction on tropical forests N₂O fluxes. We established an N and P addition experiment in a tropical forest to test whether: (1) N addition would increase N₂O emission and nitrification, and (2) P addition would increase N₂O emission and N transformations. Nitrogen and P addition had no effect on N mineralization and nitrification. Soil microbial biomass was increased following P addition in wet seasons. aN increased 39% N₂O emission as compared to control (43.3 μgN₂O-N m(-2)h(-1)). aP did not increase N₂O emission. Overall, N₂O emission was 60% greater for aNP relative to the control, but significant difference was observed only in wet seasons, when N₂O emission was 78% greater for aNP relative to the control. Our results suggested that increasing N deposition will enhance soil N₂O emission, and there would be N × P interaction on N₂O emission in wet seasons. Given elevated N deposition in future, P addition in this tropical soil will stimulate soil microbial activities in wet seasons, which will further enhance soil N₂O emission.

  1. Nitrogen emissions along the Colorado Front Range: Response to population growth, land and water use change, and agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, J. S.; Del Grosso, S.; Ojima, D. S.; Theobald, D. M.; Parton, W. J.

    While N emissions are not commonly linked to land use change, the production of fixed nitrogen is strongly related to activities associated with urbanization, such as construction, production of energy, and development and use of transportation corridors. Agricultural intensification, brought about by application of synthetic N fertilizers and industrial-scale animal feeding operations, is another land use change that increases N emissions. The Colorado Front Range region experienced rapid population growth from 1980 (1.9 million) to 2000 (2.9 million). Emissions from point (power plants and industry) and mobile (highway and off road vehicles) sources were responsible for most of the increase in emissions since 1980. Agriculture (cropped and grazed land and livestock) was the other important source of N emissions. Soil emissions from cropped and grazed lands remained stable while livestock emissions increased slightly due to more cattle and hogs in feedlots. Although cause and effect relationships between increased N emissions and eutrophication of particular ecosystems are difficult to establish, higher N deposition has been observed at alpine sites near the headwaters of the South Platte River commensurate with the rise in emissions. The ecosystem responses of alpine systems to N deposition are likely to be the result, albeit an indirect one, of land use change.

  2. Carbon and nitrogen dynamics and greenhouse gases emissions in constructed wetlands: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangir, M. M. R.; Fenton, O.; Gill, L.; Müller, C.; Johnston, P.; Richards, K. G.

    2014-07-01

    The nitrogen (N) removal efficiency of constructed wetlands (CWs) is very inconsistent and does not alone explain if the removed species are reduced by physical attenuation or if they are transformed to other reactive forms (pollution swapping). There are many pathways for the removed N to remain in the system: accumulation in the sediments, leaching to groundwater (nitrate-NO3- and ammonium-NH4+), emission to atmosphere via nitrous oxide- N2O and ammonia and/or conversion to N2 gas and adsorption to sediments. The kinetics of these pathways/processes varies with CWs management and therefore needs to be studied quantitatively for the sustainable use of CWs. For example, the quality of groundwater underlying CWs with regards to the reactive N (Nr) species is largely unknown. Equally, there is a dearth of information on the extent of Nr accumulation in soils and discharge to surface waters and air. Moreover, CWs are rich in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and produce substantial amounts of CO2 and CH4. These dissolved carbon (C) species drain out to ground and surface waters and emit to the atmosphere. The dynamics of dissolved N2O, CO2 and CH4 in CWs is a key "missing piece" in our understanding of global greenhouse gas budgets. In this review we provide an overview of the current knowledge and discussion about the dynamics of C and N in CWs and their likely impacts on aquatic and atmospheric environments. We suggest that the fate of various N species in CWs and their surface emissions and subsurface drainage fluxes need to be evaluated in a holistic way to better understand their potential for pollution swapping. Research on the process based N removal and balancing the end products into reactive and benign forms are critical to assess environmental impacts of CWs. Thus we strongly suggest that in situ N transformation and fate of the transformation products with regards to pollution swapping requires further detailed examination.

  3. Reduction of greenhouse gas emissions in the rape cultivation with special consideration of nitrogen fertilization; Minderung von Treibhausgasemissionen im Rapsanbau unter besonderer Beruecksichtigung der Stickstoffduengung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heilmann, Hubert [Landesforschungsanstalt fuer Landwirtschaft und Fischerei Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Guelzow-Pruezen (Germany). Inst. fuer Pflanzenproduktion und Betriebswirtschaft; Riemer, Doerte

    2017-08-01

    Involved into the research project ''Mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions in oilseed rape cropping with special consideration of nitrogen fertilizing'' regional specific GHG cropping emissions according to benchmark and regional experts are calculated by using a calculation method developed in cooperation with IFEU and according to IPCC (2006). The following results are achieved for 35 German NUTS2-regions: - nitrogen fertilization is the main influence for GHG emission reduction; - the use of low-emission nitrogen fertilizers is worth for GHG emission reduction; - without increasing the nutrient efficiency of organic fertilizers, GHG emission reductions are difficult to achieve in many regions; - GHG emission reduction/climate protection and realization of the WRRL or N-Saldo reduction come up to the same aim; - economic consequences of restrictive carbon mitigation can be compensated by slight price surcharges for certified raw material.

  4. Effects of coherence and vector properties of the light on the resolution limit in stimulated emission depletion fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wanrong

    2008-06-01

    Stimulated emission depletion (STED) fluorescence microscopy is a diffraction-unlimited microscopy. We report a method of analyzing the intensity distribution in the focal region. The method takes both the coherence and the vector properties of the light into account. By using the Gaussian Schell model to describe the cross-spectral density function of the incident beam, we show that the coherence that exists between the electric field at any two points is one of the factors that limit further increase of the spatial resolution in STED fluorescence microscopy.

  5. Alignment-dependent fluorescence emission induced by tunnel ionization of carbon dioxide from lower-lying orbitals

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Jinping; Jia, Xinyan; Hao, Xiaolei; Zeng, Bin; Jing, Chenrui; Chu, Wei; Ni, Jielei; Zhang, Haisu; Xie, Hongqiang; Zhang, Chaojin; Zhao, Zengxiu; Chen, Jing; Liu, Xiaojun; Cheng, Ya; Xu, Zhizhan

    2013-01-01

    We show that fluorescence emission induced by strong field tunnel ionization of carbon dioxide from its lower-lying orbitals exhibits a peculiar molecular alignment dependence. The experimentally measured alignment-dependence of the fluorescence agrees with the alignment-dependence of the ionization probability calculated in the framework of the strong field approximation. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of an all-optical approach for shedding more light on the ionization mechanisms of molecules from their lower-lying orbitals in tunnel ionization regime.

  6. Biogenic NO emissions from savanna soils as a function of fire regime, soil type, soil nitrogen, and water status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Dirk A. B.; Scholes, Mary C.; Scholes, Robert J.; Levine, Joel S.

    1996-10-01

    A study of NOx emissions from soils representative of nutrient-poor and nutrient-rich savannas and their response to burning and soil water content was carried out in the southern Kruger National Park, South Africa. The study spanned the end of the dry season and the beginning of the wet season (September-December 1992). Nitrogen mineralization rates were measured using an in situ technique simultaneously with measurements of NOx emissions. NOx emissions were almost entirely as NO. The relationship between NO emission rate and soil moisture was parabolic regardless of soil type and management practice, with the lowest NO emission rates being measured at low (0.542) water-filled pore space values. The initial increase in NO emission rates with increasing soil moisture are paralleled by increases in the nitrate concentration in the soil. The highest NO emission rates (20 ng N-NO m-2 s-1—excluding the brief initial peak) were measured on plots from which fire had been excluded for 35 years. The next highest rates (8 ng N-NO m-2 s-1) were measured on the more fertile soils. Infertile soils, burned every second year, had rates of 3.5 ng N-NO m-2 s-1. The NO emission rates show a positive correlation with soil total N content and N nitrification rate. The effect of excluding fire from a savanna is to increase the soil nitrogen content through increased litter inputs, which in turn increases nitrification rates and soil NO emissions.

  7. Carbon and nitrogen emissions from stored manure and cropped fields in irrigated mountain oases of Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Gebauer

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about gaseous carbon (C and nitrogen (N emissions from traditional terrace agriculture in irrigated high mountain agroecosystems of the subtropics. In an effort towards filling this knowledge gap measurements of carbon dioxide (CO_2, methane (CH_4, ammonia (NH_3 and dinitrous oxide (N_2O were taken with a mobile photoacoustic infrared multi-gas monitor on manure-filled PE-fibre storage bags and on flood-irrigated untilled and tilled fields in three mountain oases of the northen Omani Al Jabal al Akhdar mountains. During typical 9-11 day irrigation cycles of March, August and September 2006 soil volumetric moisture contents of fields dominated by fodder wheat, barley, oats and pomegranate ranged from 46-23%. While manure incorporation after application effectively reduced gaseous N losses, prolonged storage of manure in heaps or in PE-fibre bags caused large losses of C and N. Given the large irrigation-related turnover of organic C, sustainable agricultural productivity of oasis agriculture in Oman seems to require the integration of livestock which allows for several applications of manure per year at individual rates of 20 t dry matter ha^−1.

  8. Biochar lowers ammonia emission and improves nitrogen retention in poultry litter composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agyarko-Mintah, Eunice; Cowie, Annette; Van Zwieten, Lukas; Singh, Bhupinder Pal; Smillie, Robert; Harden, Steven; Fornasier, Flavio

    2017-03-01

    The poultry industry produces abundant quantities of nutrient-rich litter, much of which is composted before use as a soil amendment. However, a large proportion of nitrogen (N) in poultry litter is lost via volatilisation during composting, with negative environmental and economic consequences. This study examined the effect of incorporating biochar during composting of poultry litter on ammonia (NH3) volatilisation and N retention. Biochars produced at 550°C from greenwaste (GWB) and poultry litter (PLB) feedstocks were co-composted with a mixture of raw poultry litter and sugarcane straw [carbon (C):N ratio 10:1] in compost bins. Ammonia emissions accounted for 17% of the total N (TN) lost from the control and 12-14% from the biochar-amended compost. The TN emitted as NH3, as a percentage of initial TN, was significantly lower (Plitter: decrease of NH3 volatilisation, decrease in NH3 toxicity towards microorganisms, and improved N retention, thus enhancing the fertiliser value of the composted litter. It is suggested that the latter benefit is linked to a beneficial modification of the microbial environment.

  9. Modeling of aircraft exhaust emissions and infrared spectra for remote measurement of nitrogen oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Beier

    Full Text Available Infrared (IR molecular spectroscopy is proposed to perform remote measurements of NOx concentrations in the exhaust plume and wake of aircraft. The computer model NIRATAM is applied to simulate the physical and chemical properties of the exhaust plume and to generate low resolution IR spectra and synthetical thermal images of the aircraft in its natural surroundings. High-resolution IR spectra of the plume, including atmospheric absorption and emission, are simulated using the molecular line-by-line radiation model FASCODE2. Simulated IR spectra of a Boeing 747-400 at cruising altitude for different axial and radial positions in the jet region of the exhaust plume are presented. A number of spectral lines of NO can be identified that can be discriminated from lines of other exhaust gases and the natural atmospheric background in the region around 5.2 µm. These lines can be used to determine NO concentration profiles in the plume. The possibility of measuring nitrogen dioxide NO2 is also discussed briefly, although measurements turn out to be substantially less likely than those of NO. This feasibility study compiles fundamental data for the optical and radiometric design of an airborne Fourier transform spectrometer and the preparation of in-flight measurements for monitoring of aircraft pollutants.

  10. X-ray Emission from Nitrogen-Type Wolf-Rayet Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Skinner, S L; Guedel, M; Schmutz, W; Sokal, K R

    2009-01-01

    We summarize new X-ray detections of four nitrogen-type Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars obtained in a limited survey aimed at establishing the X-ray properties of WN stars across their full range of spectral subtypes. None of the detected stars is so far known to be a close binary. We report Chandra detections of WR 2 (WN2), WR 18 (WN4), and WR 134 (WN6), and an XMM-Newton detection of WR79a (WN9ha). These observations clearly demonstrate that both WNE and WNL stars are X-ray sources. We also discuss Chandra archive detections of the WN6h stars WR 20b, WR 24, and WR 136 and ROSAT non-detections of WR 16 (WN8h) and WR 78 (WN7h). The X-ray spectra of all WN detections show prominent emission lines and an admixture of cool (kT 2 keV) plasma. The hotter plasma is not predicted by radiative wind shock models and other as yet unidentified mechanisms are at work. Most stars show X-ray absorption in excess of that expected from visual extinction (Av), likely due to their strong winds or cold circumstellar gas. Existing data s...

  11. N2O emissions from the global agricultural nitrogen cycle – current state and future scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Lotze-Campen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Reactive nitrogen (Nr is not only an important nutrient for plant growth, thereby safeguarding human alimentation, but it also heavily disturbs natural systems. To mitigate air, land, aquatic, and atmospheric pollution caused by the excessive availability of Nr, it is crucial to understand the long-term development of the global agricultural Nr cycle. For our analysis, we combine a material flow model with a land-use optimization model. In a first step we estimate the state of the Nr cycle in 1995. In a second step we create four scenarios for the 21st century in line with the SRES storylines. Our results indicate that in 1995 only half of the Nr applied to croplands was incorporated into plant biomass. Moreover, less than 10 per cent of all Nr in cropland plant biomass and grazed pasture was consumed by humans. In our scenarios a strong surge of the Nr cycle occurs in the first half of the 21st century, even in the environmentally oriented scenarios. Nitrous oxide (N2O emissions rise from 3 Tg N2O-N in 1995 to 7–9 in 2045 and 5–12 Tg in 2095. Reinforced Nr pollution mitigation efforts are therefore required.

  12. Mapping the Circumstellar Environment of T Tauri with Fluorescent H_2 Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Walter, F M; Brown, A; Ardila, D R; Gahm, G F; Johns-Krull, C M; Lissauer, J J; Simon, M; Valenti, J A; Walter, Frederick M.; Herczeg, Gregory; Brown, Alexander; Ardila, David R.; Gahm, Goesta F.; Johns-Krull, Christopher M.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Simon, Michal; Valenti, Jeff A.

    2003-01-01

    We have obtained three long-slit, far UV spectra of the pre-main sequence system T Tauri. These HST/STIS spectra show a strong and variable on-source spectrum composed of both fluoresced H_2 and stellar chromospheric lines. Extended H_2 emission is seen up to 10" from the T Tau system. The on-source and extended H_2 are both pumped by H I Lyman alpha. The on-source H_2 is pumped by the red wing of a broad, self-absorbed Ly-alpha line, while the progressions seen in the extended gas are pumped from near line center. This suggests that the extended H_2 is pumped locally, and not by the stellar Ly-alpha line. The H_2 to the north and west coincides with the evacuated cavity bounded by the optical reflection nebulosity; to the south the extended H_2 coincides with the HH 255 outflow from the embedded infrared companion T Tau S. The spatial profile of the extended gas shows a prominent dip coincident with the position of T Tau S. This may be absorption by a disk associated with T Tau S. There is no evidence for ab...

  13. Ultraviolet Radiation Emissions and Illuminance in Different Brands of Compact Fluorescent Lamps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahram Safari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Replacing incandescent lamps with compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs, which are three to six times more efficient, is one of the easiest methods to achieve energy efficiency. The present study aimed to evaluate relationships between UV emissions radiated and illuminance CFLs. Material and Methods. This pilot study was conducted on 16 single envelope CFLs. The illuminance and UV irradiance of various types of CFLs are measured on a three-meter long optical bench, using a calibrated lux meter and UV meter, and measurement was done in 10, 25, 50, 100, 150, and 200 cm, in three angles, including 0°, 45°, and 90°, at the ages of 0, 100, and 2000 hours. Result. UVC irradiance was not observed at the distance of 10 cm in all of lamps. The lowest value of UVB irradiance was recorded in Pars Khazar lamp, while the highest value was recorded in Etehad lamps. UVR values measured at different times showed negligible differences; the highest asset value was detected in zero times. One way ANOVA indicated that relationships between UVA irradiance and illuminance were significant (P<0.05. Conclusion. UVB irradiance in most of the lamp in 10 and 25 cm was more than occupational exposure and UVA except for the fact that Pars Khazar 60 watts and Nama Noor 60 watts were less than occupational exposure.

  14. Aggregation-induced emissive nanoparticles for fluorescence signaling in a low cost paper-based immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, Jan F; Roose, Jesse; Zhai, Demi Shuang; Yip, Ka Man; Lee, Mei Suet; Tang, Ben Zhong; Renneberg, Reinhard

    2016-07-01

    Low cost paper based immunoassays are receiving interest due to their fast performance and small amounts of biomolecules needed for developing an immunoassay complex. In this work aggregation-induced emissive (AIE) nanoparticles, obtained from a diastereoisomeric mixture of 1,2-di-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-1,2-diphenylethene (TPEDH) in a one-step top-down method, are characterized through Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Zeta potential. By measuring the Zeta potential before and after labeling the nanoparticles with antibodies we demonstrate that the colloidal system is stable in a wide pH-range. The AIE-active nanoparticles are deposited on chitosan and glutaraldehyde modified paper pads overcoming the common aggregation-caused quenching (ACQ) effect. Analyte concentrations from 1000ng and below are applied in a model immunocomplex using Goat anti-Rabbit IgG and Rabbit IgG. In the range of 7.81ng-250ng, linear trends with a high R(2) are observed, which leads to a strong increase of the blue fluorescence from the TPEDH nanoparticles.

  15. Correlating structure with fluorescence emission in phase-separated conjugated-polymer blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, John; Lidzey, David G; Jukes, Paul C; Higgins, Anthony M; Thompson, Richard L; O'Connor, Stephen; Grizzi, Ilaria; Fletcher, Robert; O'Brien, Jim; Geoghegan, Mark; Jones, Richard A L

    2003-09-01

    Blends of conjugated polymers are frequently used as the active semiconducting layer in light-emitting diodes and photovoltaic devices. Here we report the use of scanning near-field optical microscopy, scanning force microscopy and nuclear-reaction analysis to study the structure of a thin film of a phase-separated blend of two conjugated polymers prepared by spin-casting. We show that in addition to the well-known micrometre-scale phase-separated morphology of the blend, one of the polymers preferentially wets the surface and forms a 10-nm-thick, partially crystallized wetting layer. Using near-field microscopy we identify unexpected changes in the fluorescence emission from the blend that occurs in a 300-nm-wide band located at the interface between the different phase-separated domains. Our measurements provide an insight into the complex structure of phase-separated conjugated-polymer thin films. Characterizing and controlling the properties of the interfaces in such films will be critical in the further development of efficient optoelectronic devices.

  16. Model uncertainties affecting satellite-based inverse modeling of nitrogen oxides emissions and implications for surface ozone simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-T. Lin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Errors in chemical transport models (CTMs interpreting the relation between space-retrieved tropospheric column densities of nitrogen dioxide (NO2 and emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx have important consequences on the inverse modeling. They are however difficult to quantify due to lack of adequate in situ measurements, particularly over China and other developing countries. This study proposes an alternate approach for model evaluation over East China, by analyzing the sensitivity of modeled NO2 columns to errors in meteorological and chemical parameters/processes important to the nitrogen abundance. As a demonstration, it evaluates the nested version of GEOS-Chem driven by the GEOS-5 meteorology and the INTEX-B anthropogenic emissions and used with retrievals from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI to constrain emissions of NOx. The CTM has been used extensively for such applications. Errors are examined for a comprehensive set of meteorological and chemical parameters using measurements and/or uncertainty analysis based on current knowledge. Results are exploited then for sensitivity simulations perturbing the respective parameters, as the basis of the following post-model linearized and localized first-order modification. It is found that the model meteorology likely contains errors of various magnitudes in cloud optical depth, air temperature, water vapor, boundary layer height and many other parameters. Model errors also exist in gaseous and heterogeneous reactions, aerosol optical properties and emissions of non-nitrogen species affecting the nitrogen chemistry. Modifications accounting for quantified errors in 10 selected parameters increase the NO2 columns in most areas with an average positive impact of 22% in July and 10% in January. This suggests a possible systematic model bias such that the top-down emissions will be overestimated by the same magnitudes if the model is used

  17. Nitrogen transformations and greenhouse gas emissions from a riparian wetland soil: An undisturbed soil column study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz-Leoz, Borja [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of the Basque Country, UPV/EHU, E-48013 Bilbao (Spain); Antigueedad, Inaki [Department of Geodynamic, University of the Basque Country, UPV/EHU, E-48940 Leioa (Spain); Garbisu, Carlos [Department of Ecosystems, NEIKER-Tecnalia, E-48160 Derio (Spain); Ruiz-Romera, Estilita, E-mail: estilita.ruiz@ehu.es [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of the Basque Country, UPV/EHU, E-48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2011-01-15

    Riparian wetlands bordering intensively managed agricultural fields can act as biological filters that retain and transform agrochemicals such as nitrate and pesticides. Nitrate removal in wetlands has usually been attributed to denitrification processes which in turn imply the production of greenhouse gases (CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O). Denitrification processes were studied in the Salburua wetland (northern Spain) by using undisturbed soil columns which were subsequently divided into three sections corresponding to A-, Bg- and B2g-soil horizons. Soil horizons were subjected to leaching with a 200 mg NO{sub 3}{sup -} L{sup -1} solution (rate: 90 mL day{sup -1}) for 125 days at two different temperatures (10 and 20 {sup o}C), using a new experimental design for leaching assays which enabled not only to evaluate leachate composition but also to measure gas emissions during the leaching process. Column leachate samples were analyzed for NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration, NH{sub 4}{sup +} concentration, and dissolved organic carbon. Emissions of greenhouse gases (CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O) were determined in the undisturbed soil columns. The A horizon at 20 {sup o}C showed the highest rates of NO{sub 3}{sup -} removal (1.56 mg N-NO{sub 3}{sup -} kg{sup -1} DW soil day{sup -1}) and CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O production (5.89 mg CO{sub 2} kg{sup -1} DW soil day{sup -1} and 55.71 {mu}g N-N{sub 2}O kg{sup -1} DW soil day{sup -1}). For the Salburua wetland riparian soil, we estimated a potential nitrate removal capacity of 1012 kg N-NO{sub 3}{sup -} ha{sup -1} year{sup -1}, and potential greenhouse gas emissions of 5620 kg CO{sub 2} ha{sup -1} year{sup -1} and 240 kg N-N{sub 2}O ha{sup -1} year{sup -1}. - Research Highlights: {yields}A new experimental design is proposed for leaching assays to simulate nitrogen transformations in riparian wetland soil. {yields}Denitrification is the main process responsible for nitrate removal in the riparian zone of Salburua wetland. {yields

  18. Atmospheric Nitrogen Trifluoride: Optimized emission estimates using 2-D and 3-D Chemical Transport Models from 1973-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivy, D. J.; Rigby, M. L.; Prinn, R. G.; Muhle, J.; Weiss, R. F.

    2009-12-01

    We present optimized annual global emissions from 1973-2008 of nitrogen trifluoride (NF3), a powerful greenhouse gas which is not currently regulated by the Kyoto Protocol. In the past few decades, NF3 production has dramatically increased due to its usage in the semiconductor industry. Emissions were estimated through the 'pulse-method' discrete Kalman filter using both a simple, flexible 2-D 12-box model used in the Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE) network and the Model for Ozone and Related Tracers (MOZART v4.5), a full 3-D atmospheric chemistry model. No official audited reports of industrial NF3 emissions are available, and with limited information on production, a priori emissions were estimated using both a bottom-up and top-down approach with two different spatial patterns based on semiconductor perfluorocarbon (PFC) emissions from the Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR v3.2) and Semiconductor Industry Association sales information. Both spatial patterns used in the models gave consistent results, showing the robustness of the estimated global emissions. Differences between estimates using the 2-D and 3-D models can be attributed to transport rates and resolution differences. Additionally, new NF3 industry production and market information is presented. Emission estimates from both the 2-D and 3-D models suggest that either the assumed industry release rate of NF3 or industry production information is still underestimated.

  19. Soil carbon dioxide emission from intensively cultivated black soil in Northeast China. Nitrogen fertilization effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, Kang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing (China). State Key Lab. of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture; Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Ding, Weixin; Cai, Zucong [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing (China). State Key Lab. of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture; Wang, Yufeng; Zhang, Xilin; Zhou, Baoku [Heilongjiang Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Harbin (China). Inst. of Soil and Fertilizer

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to understand the effect of nitrogen fertilization on soil respiration and native soil organic carbon (SOC) decomposition and to identify the key factor affecting soil respiration in a cultivated black soil. Materials and methods: A field experiment was conducted at the Harbin State Key Agroecological Experimental Station, China. The study consisted of four treatments: unplanted and N-unfertilized soil (U0), unplanted soil treated with 225 kg N ha{sup -1} (UN), maize planted and N-unfertilized soil (P0), and planted soil fertilized with 225 kg N ha{sup -1} (PN). Soil CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O fluxes were measured using the static closed chamber method. Results and discussion: Cumulative CO{sub 2} emissions during the maize growing season with the U0, UN, P0, and PN treatments were 1.29, 1.04, 2.30 and 2.27 Mg C ha{sup -1}, respectively, indicating that N fertilization significantly reduced the decomposition of native SOC. However, no marked effect on soil respiration in planted soil was observed because the increase of rhizosphere respiration caused by N addition was counteracted by the reduction of native SOC decomposition. Soil CO{sub 2} fluxes were significantly affected by soil temperature but not by soil moisture. The temperature sensitivity (Q{sub 10}) of soil respiration was 2.16-2.47 for unplanted soil but increased to 3.16-3.44 in planted soil. N addition reduced the Q{sub 10} of native SOC decomposition possibly due to low labile organic C but increased the Q{sub 10} of soil respiration due to the stimulation of maize growth. The estimated annual CO{sub 2} emission in N-fertilized soil was 1.28 Mg C ha{sup -1} and was replenished by the residual stubble, roots, and exudates. In contrast, the lost C (1.53 Mg C ha{sup -1}) in N-unfertilized soil was not completely supplemented by maize residues, resulting in a reduction of SOC. Although N fertilization significantly increased N{sub 2}O emissions, the global warming potential

  20. Nitrogen gas emissions and their genetic potential in tropical peatlands of French Guiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasak, Kuno; Oopkaup, Kristjan; Järveoja, Järvi; Maddison, Martin; Ligi, Teele; Truu, Marika; Truu, Jaak; Mander, Ülo

    2016-04-01

    In the current study, nitrogen gas (N2, N2O) emissions from tropical peatlands (French Guiana) were measured and their relationships with the soil chemical parameters, water regime, and abundances of genes encoding denitrification associated nitrite and nitrous oxide reductases were analysed. The measurements and soil sampling (from 0-10 cm layer) were carried out in October 2013 in two sites (undisturbed and drainage influenced) of the northern part of French Guiana. In both study sites, three transects along the groundwater depth gradient with three sampling points in each transect were established. At each sampling point, N2O emissions were measured in six sessions during three days using static closed chambers. N2 emission from the top-soil samples were measured in the laboratory applying He-O (N2) method. Soil pHKCl, NO3-N, NH4-N, soluble P, K, Ca and Mg, totN and soil organic matter content were determined from the collected samples. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene, (and marker genes for measuring denitrification potential) nirS, nirK, nosZ clade I and clade II copies were quantified in the soils using qPCR method. Whole genome shotgun sequencing of DNA extracted from soil samples was performed on Illumina NextSeq system. Metagenomes were used for microbial profiling, identifying functional genes and relating them to biogeochemical cycles and biological processes. N2O emissions were significantly lower and N2 emissions higher (p<0.05 in both cases) in natural sites (mean values -0.3 and 10 μg m-2 h-1 for N2O, and 1477 and 637 μg m-2 h-1 for N2 in natural and drained sites, respectively). Results from molecular analyses show that the bacterial community was significantly more abundant (p<0.001) in the natural site while the N2O production potential (by the abundance of nir genes) was not different between the two sites. N2O reduction potential (by the abundance of nosZ genes) was higher (p<0.01) in the natural area where also the lower mineral N content and high

  1. Interactions of Climate Change and Nitrogen Management for Optimizing Crop Productivity and Food Security while Minimizing Nitrogen Pollution and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, E. A.; Suddick, E. C.

    2012-12-01

    Producing food, transportation, and energy for seven billion people has led to huge increases in use of synthetic nitrogen (N) fertilizers and fossil fuels, resulting in large releases of N as air and water pollution. In its numerous chemical forms, N plays a critical role in all aspects of climate change, including mitigation, adaptation, and impacts. Here we report on a multi-authored, interdisciplinary technical report on climate-nitrogen interactions submitted to the US National Climate Assessment as part of a Research Coordination Network activity. Management of the N cycle not only affects emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O) and nitrogen oxides (NOX), but also impacts carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4), through effects on carbon cycling processes in forests and soils and the effects on atmospheric reactions of ozone (O3) and CH4. While some of these direct and indirect N effects have a short-term cooling effect, the warming effects of N2O dominate at long time scales. The challenges of mitigating N2O emissions are substantially different from those for CO2 and CH4, because N is essential for food production, and over 80% of anthropogenic N2O emissions are from the agricultural sector. On one hand, improved agricultural nutrient management can confer some adaptive capacity of crops to climatic variability, but, on the other hand, increased climatic variability will render the task more difficult to manage nutrients for the optimization of crop productivity while minimizing N losses to the environment. Higher air temperatures will result in a "climate penalty" for air quality mitigation efforts, because larger NOX emissions reductions will be needed to achieve the same reductions of O3 pollution under higher temperatures, thus imposing further challenges to avoid harmful impacts on human health and crop productivity. Changes in river discharge, due to summer drought and to extreme precipitation events, will affect the transport of N from agricultural fields to

  2. Single-Photon Emission at Liquid Nitrogen Temperature from a Single InAs/GaAs Quantum Dot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DOU Xiu-Ming; SUN Bao-Quan; CHANG Xiu-Ying; XIONG Yong-Hua; HUANG She-Song; NI Hai-Qiao; NIU Zhi-Chuan

    2008-01-01

    We report on the single photon emission from single InAs/GaAs self-assembled Stranski-Krastanow quantum dots up to 80 K under pulsed and continuous wave excitations. At temperature 80 K, the second-order correlation function at zero time delay, g(2)(0), is measured to be 0.422 for pulsed excitation. At the same temperature under continuous wave excitation, the photon antibunching effect is observed. Thus, our experimental results demonstrate a promising potential application of self-assembled InAs/GaAs quantum dots in single photon emission at liquid nitrogen temperature.

  3. Current emission trends for nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and volatile organic compounds by month and state: Methodology and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohout, E.J.; Miller, D.J.; Nieves, L.A.; Rothman, D.S.; Saricks, C.L.; Stodolsky, F.; Hanson, D.A.

    1990-08-01

    This report presents estimates of monthly sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and nonmethane voltatile organic compound (VOC) emissions by sector, region, and state in the contiguous United States for the years 1975 through 1988. This work has been funded as part of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program`s Emissions and Controls Task Group by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE). The DOE project officer is Edward C. Trexler, DOE/FE Office of Planning and Environment.

  4. Current emission trends for nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and volatile organic compounds by month and state: Methodology and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohout, E.J.; Miller, D.J.; Nieves, L.A.; Rothman, D.S.; Saricks, C.L.; Stodolsky, F.; Hanson, D.A.

    1990-08-01

    This report presents estimates of monthly sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and nonmethane voltatile organic compound (VOC) emissions by sector, region, and state in the contiguous United States for the years 1975 through 1988. This work has been funded as part of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program's Emissions and Controls Task Group by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE). The DOE project officer is Edward C. Trexler, DOE/FE Office of Planning and Environment.

  5. Impact of Urban, Agricultural and Industrial Emissions on the Atmospheric Reactive Nitrogen in the Columbia River Gorge Scenic Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainord, J.; George, L. A.; Orlando, P.

    2015-12-01

    Secondary inorganic aerosol (SIA) formation is not fully characterized due to inadequate knowledge of pre-cursor emissions (ammonia, NH3, and nitrogen oxides, NOx) and from incomplete understanding of reactions in model predictions involving the precursors and the chemical products such as nitric acid (HNO3). The Columbia River Gorge (CRG), located between Oregon and Washington states, has unique sources of reactive nitrogen located at both ends and experiences bimodal winds: winter easterlies and summer westerlies. Because of the unique winds, this project will utilize the CRG as an environmental flow tube as we monitor for atmospheric reactive nitrogen species at two locations within the CRG: one located on the western side and one on the east. Measurements will include total oxidized nitrogen, NOx, NH3 and HNO3 using annular denuders, and a novel method using ion exchange resins for particulate ammonium, nitrate, and sulfates. In addition, an ozone gas analyzer and meteorological conditions of temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction will be measured. Our December 2012- June 2014 NOx measurements located near the eastern end of the CRG show significantly different (pwind conditions. This suggests an eastern NOx source - potentially the 550 megawatt Boardman Coal Power Plant 100 km to the east. These measurements in the near-source environment will provide insight into uncertainties in HNO3 formation, regional ammonia levels, and the best strategy for managers to reduce NOx or NH3 emissions to minimize SIA formation.

  6. Preparation of polymer-rare earth complex using salicylic acid-containing polystyrene and its fluorescence emission property

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao Baojiao, E-mail: gaobaojiao@126.com [Department of Chemical Engineering, North University of China, Taiyuan 030051 (China); Zhang Wei; Zhang Zhengguo; Lei Qingjuan [Department of Chemical Engineering, North University of China, Taiyuan 030051 (China)

    2012-08-15

    Salicylic acid (SA) was first bonded onto the side chains of polystyrene (PS), obtaining functional macromolecule SAPS. Using the salicylic acid-containing polystyrene as a macromolecular ligand, a polymer-rare earth complex, SAPS-Eu(III), was prepared. The structure of SAPS-Eu(III) was characterized, and the fluorescence properties of SAPS-Eu(III) were mainly investigated. The experimental results show that the complex SAPS-Eu(III) has fine chemical stability because of the bidentate chelating effect of salicylic acid ligand. More important, the ligand SA on the side chains of PS can strongly sensitize the fluorescence emission of the center ion, Eu{sup 3+} ion, and it enables the complex SAPS-Eu(III) to produce the apparent 'Antenna Effect'. In the diluted solution of the functional macromolecule SAPS, the formed complex SAPS-Eu(III) belongs to an intramolecular complex, or an intrachain complex. For the binary intramolecular complex SAPS-Eu(III), the apparent saturated coordination number of SA of SAPS towards Eu{sup 3+} ion is equal to 10, and here the binary intrachain complex SAPS-Eu(III) has the strongest fluorescence emission. On this basis, small-molecule 1,10-phenanthroline (Phen) acting as a co-ligand is added and the ternary complex SAPS-Eu(III)-Phen will be formed. As long as a small amount of Phen is added (in the molar ratio 1:1 (n(Phen):n(Eu))), the coordination of the two kinds of ligands, SA of SAPS and Phen, to Eu{sup 3+} ion will reach complete saturation, and here the fluorescence emission of the ternary complex will be further enhanced via the complementary coordination effect in comparison with that of the binary complex SAPS-Eu(III). - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We prepared the functional polystyrene, SAPS, on whose side chain salicylic acid ligand was bonded. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The polymer-rare earth complex, SAPS-Eu(III), was prepared and a stronger 'antenna effect' was produced. Black

  7. Effect of feeding garlic leaves on rumen fermentation, methane emission, plasma glucose kinetics, and nitrogen utilization in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panthee, Arvinda; Matsuno, Ayana; Al-Mamun, Mohammad; Sano, Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    Garlic and its constituents are reported to have been effective in reducing methane emission and also influence glucose metabolism in body; however, studies in ruminants using garlic leaves are scarce. Garlic leaves contain similar compounds as garlic bulbs, but are discarded in field after garlic bulb harvest. We speculate that feeding garlic leaves might show similar effect as garlic constituents in sheep and could be potential animal feed supplement. Thus, we examined the effect of freeze dried garlic leaves (FDGL) on rumen fermentation, methane emission, plasma glucose kinetics and nitrogen utilization in sheep. Six sheep were fed Control diet (mixed hay and concentrate (60:40)) or FDGL diet (Control diet supplemented with FDGL at 2.5 g/kg BW(0.75) of sheep) using a crossover design. Methane gas emission was measured using open-circuit respiratory chamber. Plasma glucose turnover rate was measured using isotope dilution technique of [U-(13)C]glucose. Rumen fluid, feces and urine were collected to measure rumen fermentation characteristics and nitrogen utilization. No significant difference in rumen fermentation parameters was noticed except for rumen ammonia tended to be higher (0.05 glucose concentration was similar between diets and plasma glucose turnover rate tended to be higher in FDGL diet (0.05 glucose turnover rate and microbial nitrogen supply, further studies at higher dose would be necessary to conclude the merit of FDGL as supplement in ruminant feedstuff.

  8. Rumen fermentation and nitrogen balance of lambs fed diets containing plant extracts rich in tannins and saponins, and associated emissions of nitrogen and methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwiński, B J; Kreuzer, M; Wettstein, H R; Machmüller, Andrea

    2002-12-01

    Tannins were added to experimental diets at levels of 1 and 2 g/kg DM (hydrolysable tannins; Castanea sativa wood extract) and saponins at 2 and 30 mg/kg DM (sarsaponin; Yucca schidigera extract). These levels were far below thresholds expected to be adverse in ruminants. Effects were measured in lambs by comparison with unsupplemented control diets calculated to be either deficient (10%) or adequate in protein. The diets consisted of hay, concentrate (1:1) and extra wheat starch with increasing body weight. Ruminal pH, VFA concentration, protozoa count and apparent digestibilities of organic matter and fibre did not differ among treatments. The low tannin dose significantly decreased bacteria count compared to the high saponin dose. Saponin supplementation and the high tannin dose showed some potential to reduce ruminal ammonia concentration. This was associated with weak trends towards lower urine N excretion (only tannins) and ammonia emission from manure. Methane release was increased by the low tannin dose compared to the unsupplemented control. Diet effects on heat production were not systematic. In conclusion, the extracts rich in tannins or saponins gave only slight indications for either increased body nitrogen retention or reduced nitrogen emission. However, effects might have been larger with more pronounced dietary protein deficit.

  9. Fluorescence emission and polarization analyses for evaluating binding of ruthenium metalloglycoclusters to lectins and tetanus toxin C-fragment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Tomoko; Minoura, Norihiko

    2011-03-01

    We develop a fluorescent ruthenium metalloglycocluster for use as a powerful molecular probe in evaluating the binding between carbohydrates and lectins by fluorescence emission (FE) and fluorescence polarization (FP) analyses. Changes in the FE and FP of these metalloglycoclusters are measured following the addition of lectin [peanut agglutinin (PNA), Ricinus communis agglutinin 120, Concanavalin A (ConA), or wheat germ agglutinin] or tetanus toxin c-fragment (TCF). After the addition of PNA, the FE spectrum of [Ru(bpy-2Gal)3] shows a new emission peak and the FP value of [Ru(bpy-2Gal)3] increases. Similarly, the FE spectrum of [Ru(bpy-2Glc)3] shows a new emission peak and the FP value increases on addition of ConA. Because other combinations of metalloglycoclusters and lectins show little change, specific binding of galactose to PNA and that of glucose to ConA are confirmed by the FE and FP measurements. Resulting dissociation constants (Kd) prove that the metalloglycoclusters with highly clustered carbohydrates show higher affinity for the respective lectins than those with less clustered carbohydrates. Furthermore, specific binding of [Ru(bpy-2Gal)3] to TCF was confirmed by the FP measurement.

  10. Can Crops with Greater Rooting Systems Improve Nitrogen Retention and Mitigate Emissions of Nitrous Oxide?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decock, Charlotte; Lee, Juhwan; Barthel, Matti; Mikita, Chris; Wilde, Benjamin; Verhoeven, Elizabeth; Hund, Andreas; Abiven, Samuel; Friedli, Cordula; Conen, Franz; Mohn, Joachim; Wolf, Benjamin; Six, Johan

    2016-04-01

    It has been suggested that crops with deeper root systems could improve agricultural sustainability, because scavenging of nitrogen (N) in the subsoil would increase overall N retention and use efficiency in the system. However, the effect of plant root depth and root architecture on N-leaching and emissions of the potent greenhouse N2O remains largely unknown. We aimed to assess the effect of plant rooting depth on N-cycling and N2O production and reduction within the plant-soil system and throughout the soil profile. We hypothesized that greater root depth and root biomass will (1) increase N use efficiency and decrease N losses in the form of N leaching and N2O emissions; (2) increase N retention by shifting the fate of NH4+ from more nitrification toward more plant uptake and microbial immobilization; and (3) increase the depth of maximum N2O production and decrease the ratio of N2O:(N2O+N2) in denitrification end-products. To test these hypotheses, 4 winter wheat cultivars were grown in lysimeters (1.5 m tall, 0.5 m diameter, 3 replications per cultivar) under greenhouse conditions. Each lysimeter was equipped with an automated flux chamber for the determination of N2O surface fluxes. At 7.5, 30, 60, 90 and 120 cm depth, sampling ports were installed for the determination of soil moisture contents, as well as the collection of soil pore air and soil pore water samples. We selected two older and two newer varieties from the Swiss winter wheat breeding program, spanning a 100-year breeding history. The selection was based on previous experiments indicating that the older varieties have deeper rooting systems than the newer varieties under well watered conditions. N2O fluxes were determined twice per day on a quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometer interfaced with the automated flux chambers. Once per week, we determined concentrations of mineral N in pore water and of CO2 and N2O in the pore air. For mineral N and N2O, also natural abundance isotope deltas

  11. Carbon and nitrogen dynamics and greenhouse gases emissions in constructed wetlands: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. R. Jahangir

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The nitrogen (N removal efficiency of constructed wetlands (CWs is very inconsistent and does not alone explain if the removed species are reduced by physical attenuation or if they are transformed to other reactive forms (pollution swapping. There are many pathways for the removed N to remain in the system: accumulation in the sediments, leaching to groundwater (nitrate-NO3- and ammonium-NH4+, emission to atmosphere via nitrous oxide- N2O and ammonia and/or conversion to N2 gas and adsorption to sediments. The kinetics of these pathways/processes varies with CWs management and therefore needs to be studied quantitatively for the sustainable use of CWs. For example, the quality of groundwater underlying CWs with regards to the reactive N (Nr species is largely unknown. Equally, there is a dearth of information on the extent of Nr accumulation in soils and discharge to surface waters and air. Moreover, CWs are rich in dissolved organic carbon (DOC and produce substantial amounts of CO2 and CH4. These dissolved carbon (C species drain out to ground and surface waters and emit to the atmosphere. The dynamics of dissolved N2O, CO2 and CH4 in CWs is a key "missing piece" in our understanding of global greenhouse gas budgets. In this review we provide an overview of the current knowledge and discussion about the dynamics of C and N in CWs and their likely impacts on aquatic and atmospheric environments. We suggest that the fate of various N species in CWs and their surface emissions and subsurface drainage fluxes need to be evaluated in a holistic way to better understand their potential for pollution swapping. Research on the process based N removal and balancing the end products into reactive and benign forms are critical to assess environmental impacts of CWs. Thus we strongly suggest that in situ N transformation and fate of the transformation products with regards to pollution swapping requires further detailed examination.

  12. Dynamics of bolaamphiphilic fluorescent polyenes in lipid bilayers from polarization emission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña, A Ulises; Amat-Guerri, Francisco; Quesada, Ernesto; Vélez, Marisela

    2006-06-20

    The rotational motions of the biamphiphilic polyenes (bolapolyenes) dimethyl all-(E)-octacosa-10,12,14,16,18-pentaenedioate (DE28:5) and dimethyl all-(E)-tetratriaconta-13,15,17,19,21-pentaenedioate (DE34:5), with head-to-head distances of 34 and 42A, respectively, have been examined by fluorescence anisotropy methods. The membrane-spanning bolapolyenes, which contain a central emitting pentaene group tethered to two methoxycarbonyl opposite polar heads by symmetric C(8) (DE28:5) and C(11) (DE34:5) polymethylene chains, were dispersed in lipid bilayers of DPPC or DMPC, and the stationary and picosecond-resolved emission was recorded as a function of temperature. In fluid-phase DMPC bilayers, three relaxation times could be determined, assigned to fast (0.2 and 2ns) single-bond isomerization processes localized on the alkyl chains, and to whole-molecule oscillations ( approximately 11ns), respectively. The anisotropy decay parameters were further analyzed in terms of a diffusive model for wobbling in a Gaussian ordering potential, to assess the anchoring effect of the symmetric polar heads. In this way, the average rotational diffusion constant of the bolapolyenes, D( perpendicular), could be estimated as 0.022-0.026rad(2) ns(-1) (DMPC bilayers, 35 degrees Celsius), a value that is only 1/3 of that corresponding to the related pentaene fatty acid spanning a single membrane monolayer. In contrast, the amplitude of the equilibrium orientational distribution (theta(half-cone) approximately 50 degrees ) is very similar for both the transmembrane and the single-headed polyenes. The reorientational oscillations of the central emitting group in the bolapolyenes necessarily would produce large-amplitude (2-5A) and very fast (ns) translational motions of the polar heads.

  13. Excited-state structural dynamics of a dual-emission calmodulin-green fluorescent protein sensor for calcium ion imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oscar, Breland G.; Liu, Weimin; Zhao, Yongxin; Tang, Longteng; Wang, Yanli; Campbell, Robert E.; Fang, Chong

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) have played a pivotal role in bioimaging and advancing biomedicine. The versatile fluorescence from engineered, genetically encodable FP variants greatly enhances cellular imaging capabilities, which are dictated by excited-state structural dynamics of the embedded chromophore inside the protein pocket. Visualization of the molecular choreography of the photoexcited chromophore requires a spectroscopic technique capable of resolving atomic motions on the intrinsic timescale of femtosecond to picosecond. We use femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy to study the excited-state conformational dynamics of a recently developed FP-calmodulin biosensor, GEM-GECO1, for calcium ion (Ca2+) sensing. This study reveals that, in the absence of Ca2+, the dominant skeletal motion is a ∼170 cm−1 phenol-ring in-plane rocking that facilitates excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) with a time constant of ∼30 ps (6 times slower than wild-type GFP) to reach the green fluorescent state. The functional relevance of the motion is corroborated by molecular dynamics simulations. Upon Ca2+ binding, this in-plane rocking motion diminishes, and blue emission from a trapped photoexcited neutral chromophore dominates because ESPT is inhibited. Fluorescence properties of site-specific protein mutants lend further support to functional roles of key residues including proline 377 in modulating the H-bonding network and fluorescence outcome. These crucial structural dynamics insights will aid rational design in bioengineering to generate versatile, robust, and more sensitive optical sensors to detect Ca2+ in physiologically relevant environments. PMID:24987121

  14. Enhancement of 2.0 μm fluorescence emission in new Ho3+/Tm3+/Yb3+ tri-doped tellurite glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Pan; Yang, Feng-jing; Zhou, Zi-zhong; Huang, Bo; Wu, Li-bo; Zhou, Ya-xun

    2016-09-01

    For enhancing the 2.0 μm band fluorescence of Ho3+, a certain amount of WO3 oxide was introduced into Ho3+/Tm3+/Yb3+ tri-doped tellurite glass prepared using melt-quenching technique. The prepared tri-doped tellurite glass was characterized by the absorption spectra, fluorescence emission and Raman scattering spectra, together with the stimulated absorption, emission cross-sections and gain coefficient. The research results show that the introduction of WO3 oxide can further improve the 2.0 μm band fluorescence emission through the enhanced phonon-assisted energy transfers between Ho3+/Tm3+/Yb3+ ions under the excitation of 980 nm laser diode (LD). Meanwhile, the maximum gain coefficient of Ho3+ at 2.0 μm band reaches about 2.36 cm-1. An intense 2.0 μm fluorescence emission can be realized.

  15. Plasmon assisted fluorescence emission: far-field observables and their fluctuations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langguth, L.A.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence describes the property of matter to absorb light and shortly after emit light of another color. Fluorescent materials are found in nature, e.g. in the jelly-fish Aequorea victoria, in some plants and mushrooms, and in minerals such as Fluorite in which this property was first

  16. Plasmon assisted fluorescence emission: far-field observables and their fluctuations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.A. Langguth

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence describes the property of matter to absorb light and shortly after emit light of another color. Fluorescent materials are found in nature, e.g. in the jelly-fish Aequorea victoria, in some plants and mushrooms, and in minerals such as Fluorite in which this property was first scientific

  17. NITROUS OXIDE EMISSION AND NITROGEN UPTAKE AFFECTED BY SOIL AMENDMENT AND NEMATICIDE IN RAINFED RICE SOILS AT CENTRAL JAVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wihardjaka

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Rice cultivation is one of the antropogenic sources of nitrous oxide (N2O emission that is produced by microbiological nitrification-denitrification processes. Incorporating soil amendment in rainfed rice soil attempted to increase soil productivity, while nematicide application aimed to maintain root growth system. Incorporating soil amendment and nematicide application are predicted to suppress N2O production in lowland rice. The objective of this research was to study the interaction of soil organic amendment and nematicide on N2O emission and nitrogen uptake from rainfed lowland rice soils. A field experiment was conducted in rainfed lowland rice soils during 2010/2011 wet season (direct seeded rice and 2011 dry season (transplanted rice. The 3 x 3 factorial trial was arranged in a randomized completely block design with three replications. The first factor was soil amendment consisted of without rice straw, fresh rice straw and composted rice straw. The second factor was nematicide application consisted of without nematicide, neemcake and carbofuran. Variables measured were N2O flux, rice grain yield and nitrogen uptake. Incorporation of fresh and composted rice straws reduced N2O flux about 49.2% and 59.9% in transplanted rice, and 32.9% and 28.2% in direct seeded rice, respectively. The neemcake application reduced N2O emission about 44-50%, while carbofuran application decreased N2O emission by 23-35%. Neemcake has a good potential as nitrification inhibitor of N2O emission, so the neem trees have a prospect to be cultivated intensively. The reduction of N2O emission was effective in direct seeded rice system with the application of neemcake and fresh rice straw, however, in transplanted rice system it was effective with neemcake and composted rice straw applications.

  18. Emissions of nitrogen oxides from road traffic - regulations, emissions and effects; Vagtrafikens utslaepp av kvaeveoxider - reglering, utslaepp och effekter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjoedin, Aake; Pihl-Karlsson, Gunilla; Johansson, Manne [Swedish Environmental Research Inst., Goeteborg (Sweden); Forsberg, Bertil [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Public Health and Clinical Medicine; Ahlvik, Peter [Ecotraffic ERD3 AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Erlandsson, Lennart [AVL MTC AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2004-10-01

    The report is a review that aims to improve the basis for additional measures against the road traffic emissions of, in particular, NO{sub x}. An important question in the context is whether health effects of NO{sub 2} should serve as a norm for the actions for emission reductions of NO{sub x}, or if the environmental effects of NO{sub x}-emissions in the form of acidification, eutrophication and ozone should play this role. WHO notes, in its latest review of health effect research, that one cannot demonstrate that NO{sub 2} alone has any direct effects in concentrations at the current whole-year mean norm (40 {mu}g/m{sup 3}). Such health effects that has been demonstrated in epidemiologic studies at these concentrations are caused by other traffic related emissions (e. g. particles) for which NO{sub 2} constitutes a good indicator. WHO indicates the need for additional sharpening of the norms for ozone and particles. In this context, it is important to note that emissions of NO{sub x} on a regional scale contributes to formation of ozone as well as particles. Therefore there exist reasons to decrease the emissions of NO{sub x} in order to reach future recommended values for ozone and particles emissions. In the evaluations that will be done during 2004-2005 of the so called Goeteborg protocol, the EU's Ceiling Directives and the CAFE-programme, it is expected that new emissions objective for NO{sub x} will be suggested for 2015-2020, to cope with health and environment objectives in Europe. The report shows that that development that currently happens within the vehicle industry, for engines and exhaust emission control system are pursued to meet future exhaust requirement in the USA gives good conditions for the road traffic sector to contribute to that these objectives will reached.

  19. Fluorescence resonance-energy-transfer in systems of Rhodamine 6G with ionic liquid showing emissions by excitation at wide wavelength areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izawa, Hironori; Wakizono, Satoshi; Kadokawa, Jun-ichi

    2010-09-14

    Fluorescence resonance-energy-transfer occurred in a solution of Rhodamine 6G in an ionic liquid by excitation at wide wavelength areas owing to specific fluorescent behavior of the ionic liquid to show emissions at each excitation wavelength, which was also observed in the guar gum/ionic liquid gel material containing Rhodamine 6G.

  20. [Effect of Ferric Iron on Nitrogen Immigration and Transformation and Nitrous Oxide Emission During Simultaneous Nitrification Denitrification Process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Yan, Yu-jie; Xie, Hui-jun; Jia, Wen-lin; Hu, Zhen; Zhang, Jian

    2015-04-01

    Effect of Fe(III) concentration on nitrogen immigration and transformation and nitrous oxide emission during the simultaneous nitrification denitrification (SND) process was investigated. Higher nitrogen removal efficiency was obtained when the Fe(III) concentration was 20 mg x L(-1), while lower nitrogen removal efficiency was observed when the Fe (III) concentration turned to 60 mg x L(-1). In addition, higher Fe(III) concentration significantly enhanced the N2O emission, as well as the N2O conversion ratio. This was mainly attributed to (1) the high concentration of nitrite accumulation during the oxic stage, which was caused by lower dehydrogenase activity at high Fe(III) concentration; (2) less PHB production during the anoxic stage, which would led to shortage of carbon source for denitrification in the following oxic stage. The results also showed that Fe(III) addition could improve the TP removal efficiency. TP removal efficiency increased with increasing Fe(III) concentration, mainly because of extra chemical reaction.

  1. Effects of nitrification inhibitors (DCD and DMPP) on nitrous oxide emission, crop yield and nitrogen uptake in a wheat-maize cropping system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C.; Wang, K.; Zheng, X.

    2013-04-01

    The application of nitrification inhibitors together with ammonium-based fertilizers is proposed as a potent method to decrease nitrous oxide (N2O) emission while promoting crop yield and nitrogen use efficiency in fertilized agricultural fields. To evaluate the effects of nitrification inhibitors, we conducted year-round measurements of N2O fluxes, yield, aboveground biomass, plant carbon and nitrogen contents, soil inorganic nitrogen and dissolved organic carbon contents and the main environmental factors for urea (U), urea + dicyandiamide (DCD) and urea + 3,4-dimethylpyrazol phosphate (DMPP) treatments in a wheat-maize rotation field. The cumulative N2O emissions were calculated to be 4.49 ± 0.21, 2.93 ± 0.06 and 2.78 ± 0.16 kg N ha-1 yr-1 for the U, DCD and DMPP treatments, respectively. Therefore, the DCD and DMPP treatments significantly decreased the annual emissions by 35% and 38%, respectively (p < 0.01). The variations of soil temperature, moisture and inorganic nitrogen content regulated the seasonal fluctuation of N2O emissions. When the emissions presented clearly temporal variations, high-frequency measurements or optimized sampling schedule for intermittent measurements would likely provide more accurate estimations of annual cumulative emission and treatment effect. The application of nitrification inhibitors significantly increased the soil inorganic nitrogen content (p < 0.01); shifted the main soil inorganic nitrogen form from nitrate to ammonium; and tended to increase the dissolved organic carbon content, crop yield, aboveground biomass and nitrogen uptake by aboveground plant. The results demonstrate the roles the nitrification inhibitors play in enhancing yield and nitrogen use efficiency and reducing N2O emission from the wheat-maize cropping system.

  2. Further evidence for charge transfer complexes in brown carbon aerosols from excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Sabrina M; Smith, Geoffrey D

    2015-05-14

    The light-absorbing fraction of organic molecules in ambient aerosols, known as "brown carbon," is an important yet poorly characterized component. Despite the fact that brown carbon could alter the radiative forcing of aerosols significantly, identification of specific chromophores has remained challenging. We recently demonstrated that charge transfer (CT) complexes formed in organic molecules could be responsible for a large fraction of absorption observed in water-extracted ambient particulate matter.1 In the present study, we use excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy to further corroborate the importance of CT complexes in defining aerosol optical properties. Monotonically increasing and decreasing quantum yields, decreasing Stokes shifts, and red-shifting emission maxima are observed from ambient particulate matter collected in Athens, Georgia, strongly suggesting that a superposition of independent chromophores is not sufficient to explain brown carbon absorption and fluorescence. Instead, we show that a model in which such chromophores are energetically coupled to a dense manifold of CT complexes is consistent with all of the observations. Further, we suggest that a significant fraction of the observed fluorescence originates from CT complexes and that their contribution to brown carbon absorption is likely greater than we reported previously.

  3. Discrimination of marine algal taxonomic groups based on fluorescence excitation emission matrix, parallel factor analysis and CHEMTAX

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiaona; SURongguo; BAIYing; SHI Xiaoyong; YANG Rujun

    2014-01-01

    An in vivo three-dimensional fluorescence method for the determination of algae community structure was developed by parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) and CHEMTAX. The PARAFAC model was applied to fluo-rescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) of 60 algae species belonging to five divisions and 11 fluorescent components were identified according to the residual sum of squares and specificity of the composition profiles of fluorescent. By the 11 fluorescent components, the algae species at different growth stages were classified correctly at the division level using Bayesian discriminant analysis (BDA). Then the reference fluo-rescent component ratio matrix was constructed for CHEMTAX, and the EEM–PARAFAC–CHEMTAX method was developed to differentiate algae taxonomic groups. The correct discrimination ratios (CDRs) when the fluorometric method was used for single-species samples were 100% at the division level, except for Bacil-lariophyta with a CDR of 95.6%. The CDRs for the mixtures were above 94.0% for the dominant algae species and above 87.0% for the subdominant algae species. However, the CDRs of the subdominant algae species were too low to be unreliable when the relative abundance estimated was less than 15.0%. The fluorometric method was tested using the samples from the Jiaozhou Bay and the mesocosm experiments in the Xiaomai Island Bay in August 2007. The discrimination results of the dominant algae groups agreed with microscopy cell counts, as well as the subdominant algae groups of which the estimated relative abundance was above 15.0%. This technique would be of great aid when low-cost and rapid analysis is needed for samples in a large batch. The fluorometric technique has the ability to correctly identify dominant species with proper abundance both in vivo and in situ.

  4. Detecting pad-wafer contact in CMP using dual emission laser induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Caprice

    Chemical Mechanical Polishing (CMP) is a technique used for planarizing a wide range of surfaces, including metal and dielectric materials, during the manufacturing of integrated circuits (ICs). Material removal in CMP occurs with the combind chemical and mechanical action of the slurry and polishing pad. For inter-layer dielectric (ILD) polishing, particle-wafer contact is believed responsible for planarization. The particles sit atop the polishing pad asperities, meaning removal rate should correlate with pad-wafer contact area. In this thesis, we presents in-situ measurements of slurry layer thickness and pad-wafer contact using Dual Emission Laser Induced Fluorescence (DELIF). The DELIF technique for measuring the thickness of thin fluid films has been adapted to make instantaneous measurements of slurry thickness in CMP at high spatial resolution (2.9 mum per pixel). Modeling and calibration experiments confirm that there is a linear relationship between CMP DELIF image intensity and fluid layer thickness over a range of 0 to 133 mum. The slurry thickness in the contacting portions of a Cabot Microelectronics D100 polishing pad is 0-60 mum for polishing speeds ≤ 0.62 m/s and applied wafer load ≤ 1.7 psi. As the polishing pad becomes fully conditioned, the slurry layer thickness approaches a saturation point. The time to saturation is approximately 1 hour. DELIF images of the slurry thickness can be analyzed for contact by plotting the image intensity histogram. This histogram is representative of the pad asperity height distribution. When the pad is in contact with the wafer, the asperity peaks flatten and give rise to a secondary peak in the low intensity extreme of the distribution representative of contact. Data simulations show that the secondary peak is sharp at low noise:signal ratio (<10% noise), and is gradually smoothed as more noise is added increasing measurement errors. Even though DELIF is a high noise measurement technique (≥ 15

  5. Short term responses of nitrogen trace gas emissions to nitrogen fertilization in tropical sugar cane: Variations due to soils and management practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, P. A.; Billow, C.; Hall, S.; Zachariassen, J.

    1994-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) fertilization of agricultural systems is thought to be a major source of the increase in atmospheric N2O; NO emissions from soils have also been shown to increase due to N fertilization. While N fertilizer use is increasing rapidly in the developing world and in the tropics, nearly all of our information on gas emissions is derived from studies of temperate zone agriculture. Using chambers, we measured fluxes of N2O and NO following urea fertilization in tropical sugar cane systems growing on a variety of soil types in the Hawaiian Islands, USA. On the island of Maui, where urea is applied in irrigation lines and soils are mollisols and inceptisols, N2O fluxes were elevated for a week or less following fertilization; maximum average fluxes were typically less than 30 ng cm(exp -2)/ h. NO fluxes were often an order of magnitude less than N2O. Together, N2O and NO represented from 0.01 - 0.5% of the applied N. In fields on the island of Hawaii, where urea is broadcast on the surface and soils are andisols, N2O fluxes were similar in magnitude to Maui but remained elevated for much longer periods after fertilization. NO emissions were 2-5 times higher than N2O through most of the sampling periods. Together the gases loss represented approximately 1. 1 - 3% of the applied N. Laboratory studies indicate that denitrification is a critical source of N2O in Maui, but that nitrification is more important in Hawaii. Experimental studies suggest that differences in the pattern of N2O/NO and the processes producing them are a result of both carbon availability and placement of fertilizer, and that the more information-intensive fertilizer management practice results in lower emissions.

  6. Warmer and drier conditions and nitrogen fertilizer application altered methanotroph abundance and methane emissions in a vegetable soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Yu; Xie, Jianli; Xu, Xiaoya; Li, Yong; Liu, Yapeng; Zhang, Qichun; Li, Zheng; Xu, Jianming; Di, Hongjie

    2016-11-12

    Methane (CH4) is a potent greenhouse gas, and soil can both be a source and sink for atmospheric CH4. It is not clear how future climate change may affect soil CH4 emissions and related microbial communities. The aim of this study was to determine the interactive effects of a simulated warmer and drier climate scenarios and the application of different nitrogen (N) sources (urea and manure) on CH4 emissions and related microbial community abundance in a vegetable soil. Greenhouses were used to control simulated climate conditions which gave 2.99 °C warmer and 6.2% lower water content conditions. The field experiment was divided into two phases. At the beginning of phase II, half of the greenhouses were removed to study possible legacy effects of the simulated warmer and drier conditions. The responses in methanogen and methanotroph abundance to a simulated climate change scenario were determined using real-time PCR. The results showed that the simulated warmer and drier conditions in the greenhouses significantly decreased CH4 emissions largely due to the lower soil moisture content. For the same reason, CH4 emissions of treatments in phase I were much lower than the same treatments in phase II. The abundance of methanotrophs showed a more significant response than methanogens to the simulated climate change scenario, increasing under simulated drier conditions. Methanogenic community abundance remained low, except where manure was applied which provided a source of organic C that stimulated methanogen growth. Soil moisture content was a major driver for methanotroph abundance and strongly affected CH4 emissions. The application of N source decreased CH4 emissions probably because of increased methanotrophic activity. CH4 emissions were positively correlated to methanogenic abundance and negatively correlated to methanotrophic abundance. These results demonstrate that projected future climate change conditions can have a feedback impact on CH4 emissions from the

  7. In vitro cytotoxicity of fluorescent silica nanoparticles hybridized with aggregation-induced emission luminogens for living cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yun; Li, Min; Peng, Tao; Zhang, Weijie; Xiong, Jun; Hu, Qinggang; Song, Zifang; Zheng, Qichang

    2013-01-07

    Fluorescent silica nanoparticles (FSNPs) can provide high-intensity and photostable fluorescent signals as a probe for biomedical analysis. In this study, FSNPs hybridized with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) luminogens (namely FSNP-SD) were successfully fabricated by a surfactant-free sol-gel method. The FSNP-SD were spherical, monodisperse and uniform in size, with an average diameter of approximately 100 nm, and emitted strong fluorescence at the peak of 490 nm. The FSNP-SD selectively stained the cytoplasmic regions and were distributed in the cytoplasm. Moreover, they can stay inside cells, enabling the tacking of cells over a long period of time. The intracellular vesicles and multinucleated cells were increase gradually with the rise of FSNP-SD concentration. Both cell viability and survival only lost less than 20% when the cells were exposed to the high concentration of 100 μg/mL FSNP-SD. Additionally, the cell apoptosis and intracellular ROS assay indicated that FSNP-SD had no significant toxic effects at the maximum working concentration of 80 μg/mL. This study demonstrated that the FSNP-SD are promising biocompatible fluorescent probes for living cell imaging.

  8. In Vitro Cytotoxicity of Fluorescent Silica Nanoparticles Hybridized with Aggregation-Induced Emission Luminogens for Living Cell Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Xia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent silica nanoparticles (FSNPs can provide high-intensity and photostable fluorescent signals as a probe for biomedical analysis. In this study, FSNPs hybridized with aggregation-induced emission (AIE luminogens (namely FSNP-SD were successfully fabricated by a surfactant-free sol-gel method. The FSNP-SD were spherical, monodisperse and uniform in size, with an average diameter of approximately 100 nm, and emitted strong fluorescence at the peak of 490 nm. The FSNP-SD selectively stained the cytoplasmic regions and were distributed in the cytoplasm. Moreover, they can stay inside cells, enabling the tacking of cells over a long period of time. The intracellular vesicles and multinucleated cells were increase gradually with the rise of FSNP-SD concentration. Both cell viability and survival only lost less than 20% when the cells were exposed to the high concentration of 100 μg/mL FSNP-SD. Additionally, the cell apoptosis and intracellular ROS assay indicated that FSNP-SD had no significant toxic effects at the maximum working concentration of 80 μg/mL. This study demonstrated that the FSNP-SD are promising biocompatible fluorescent probes for living cell imaging.

  9. Using violet laser-induced chlorophyll fluorescence emission spectra for crop yield assessment of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L) Walp) varieties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Benjamin; Buah-Bassuah, Paul K.; Tetteh, Jonathan P.

    2004-07-01

    The use of violet laser-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (LICF) emission spectra to monitor the growth of five varieties of cowpea in the University of Cape Coast Botanical Garden is presented. Radiation from a continuous-wave violet laser diode emitting at 396 nm through a fibre is closely incident on in vivo leaves of cowpea to excite chlorophyll fluorescence, which is detected by an integrated spectrometer with CCD readout. The chlorophyll fluorescence spectra with peaks at 683 and 731 nm were used for growth monitoring of the cowpea plants over three weeks and analysed using Gaussian spectral functions with curve fitted parameters to determine the peak positions, area under the spectral curve and the intensity ratio F683/F731. The variation in the intensity ratio of the chlorophyll bands showed sensitive changes indicating the photosynthetic activity of the cowpea varieties. A discussion of the fluorescence result as compared to conventional assessment is presented with regard to discrimination between the cowpea varieties in terms of crop yield performance.

  10. Ag-protein plasmonic architectures for surface plasmon-coupled emission enhancements and Fabry-Perot mode-coupled directional fluorescence emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badiya, Pradeep Kumar; Patnaik, Sai Gourang; Srinivasan, Venkatesh; Reddy, Narendra; Manohar, Chelli Sai; Vedarajan, Raman; Mastumi, Noriyoshi; Belliraj, Siva Kumar; Ramamurthy, Sai Sathish

    2017-10-01

    We report the use of silver decorated plant proteins as spacer material for augmented surface plasmon-coupled emission (120-fold enhancement) and plasmon-enhanced Raman scattering. We extracted several proteins from different plant sources [Triticum aestivum (TA), Aegle marmelos (AM), Ricinus communis (RC), Jatropha curcas (JC) and Simarouba glauca (SG)] followed by evaluation of their optical properties and simulations to rationalize observed surface plasmon resonance. Since the properties exhibited by protein thin films is currently gaining research interest, we have also carried out simulation studies with Ag-protein biocomposites as spacer materials in metal-dielectric-metal planar microcavity architecture for guided emission of Fabry-Perot mode-coupled fluorescence.

  11. The combustion of biomass - the impact of its types and combustion technologies on the emission of nitrogen oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladenović Milica R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Harmonization of environmental protection and the growing energy needs of modern society promote the biomass application as a replacement for fossil fuels and a viable option to mitigate the green house gas emissions. For domestic conditions this is particularly important as more than 60% of renewables belongs to biomass. Beside numerous benefits of using biomass for energy purposes, there are certain drawbacks, one of which is a possible high emission of NOx during the combustion of these fuels. The paper presents the results of the experiments with multiple biomass types (soybean straw, cornstalk, grain biomass, sunflower oil, glycerin and paper sludge, using different combustion technologies (fluidized bed and cigarette combustion, with emphasis on the emission of NOx in the exhaust gas. A presentation of the experimental installations is given, as well as an evaluation of the effects of the fuel composition, combustion regimes and technology on the NOx emissions. As the biomass combustion took place at temperatures low enough that thermal and prompt NOx can be neglected, the conclusion is the emissions of nitrogen oxides primarily depend on the biomass composition- it is increasing with the increase of the nitrogen content, and decreases with the increase of the char content which provides catalytic surface for NOx reduction by CO. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR33042: Improvement of the industrial fluidized bed facility, in scope of technology for energy efficient and environmentally feasible combustion of various waste materials in fluidized bed i br. III42011: Development and improvement of technologies for efficient use of energy of several forms of agricultural and forest biomass in an environmentally friendly manner, with the possibility of cogeneration

  12. Effect of nitrogen on deposition and field emission properties of boron-doped micro-and nano-crystalline diamond films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L.A. Li; S.H. Cheng; H.D. Li; Q. Yu; J.W. Liu; X.Y. Lv

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we report the effect of nitrogen on the deposition and properties of boron doped diamond films synthesized by hot filament chemical vapor deposition. The diamond films consisting of micro-grains (nano-grains) were realized with low (high) boron source flow rate during the growth processes. The transition of micro-grains to nano-grains is speculated to be strongly (weekly) related with the boron (nitrogen) flow rate. The grain size and Raman spectral feature vary insignificantly as a function of the nitrogen introduction at a certain boron flow rate. The variation of electron field emission characteristics dependent on nitrogen is different between microcrystalline and nanocrystalline boron doped diamond samples, which are related to the combined phase composition, boron doping level and texture structure. There is an optimum nitrogen proportion to improve the field emission properties of the boron-doped films.

  13. The influence of microbial-based inoculants on N2O emissions from soil planted to corn under greenhouse conditions with different nitrogen fertilizer regimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions are increasing at an unprecedented rate due to increased nitrogen (N) fertilizers use. Thus, new innovative management tools are needed to reduce emissions. One potential approach is the use of microbial inoculants in agricultural production. In a previous incubation st...

  14. Sensitive determination of specific radioactivity of positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals by radio high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakao, Ryuji [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)], E-mail: nakaor@nirs.go.jp; Furutsuka, Kenji [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Sumitomo Accelerator Service, Tokyo 141-8686 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Masatoshi [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka 814-0180 (Japan); Suzuki, Kazutoshi [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2008-10-15

    A sensitive quality control method is often required in positron emission tomography (PET) radiopharmaceutical analysis due to the high specific radioactivity of synthetic products. The applicability of a radio high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method with fluorescence detection was evaluated for a wide variety of PET radiopharmaceuticals. In 29 different radiopharmaceuticals studied, 20 compounds exhibited native fluorescence. These properties enabled sensitive determination of their chemical masses by direct fluorimetric detection after separation by HPLC. For some substances, detection limits were below nanograms per milliliter level, at least 40 times better than current UV absorbance detection. Sufficient reproducibility and linearity were obtained for the analysis of pharmaceutical fluid. Post-column fluorimetric derivatization was also established for the quantitative determination of FDG and ClDG in [{sup 18}F]FDG samples. These methods could be applied successfully to the analysis of PET radiopharmaceuticals with ultra-high specific radioactivity.

  15. New dual emission fluorescent sensor for pH and Pb(II) based on bis(napfthalimide) derivative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pina-Luis, Georgina, E-mail: gpinaluis@yahoo.com [Centro de Graduados e Investigacion en Quimica, Instituto Tecnologico de Tijuana, AP 1166, Tijuana 22500, BC (Mexico); Martinez-Quiroz, Marisela; Ochoa-Teran, Adrian [Centro de Graduados e Investigacion en Quimica, Instituto Tecnologico de Tijuana, AP 1166, Tijuana 22500, BC (Mexico); Santacruz-Ortega, Hisila [Departamento de investigacion en Polimeros y Materiales, Universidad de Sonora, Hermosillo, Sonora 83000 (Mexico); Mendez-Valenzuela, Eduardo [Centro de Graduados e Investigacion en Quimica, Instituto Tecnologico de Tijuana, AP 1166, Tijuana 22500, BC (Mexico)

    2013-02-15

    This paper describes a novel dual emission bis-1,8-naphthalimide sensor for selective determination of pH and Pb{sup 2+} ions. The influence of the variability in the backbone that links the two fluorophores (naphthalimides) as a function of pH and metal ions was studied by UV-visible and fluorescence spectroscopy. Compounds 1(a-d) with different length alkyl linkers (CH{sub 2}){sub n} (n=1, 2, 4 and 6) showed no excimer formation in aqueous solution. Fluorescence emission of these derivatives varied in a narrow range of pH (5-8) and was only slightly influenced by the addition of metal ions in CH{sub 3}CN solutions. However, derivative 1e with amino-containing spacer (CH{sub 2}-NH-CH{sub 2}) showed excimer emission in aqueous solution, a wide response to pH (2.5-9.5) and fluorescence enhancement with selective behavior towards metal ions. The pH sensor based in derivative 1e has a sufficient selectivity for practical pH monitoring in the presence of Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Cs{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, Ba{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+} and Cd{sup 2+}. The coordination chemistry of these complexes was studied by UV-Vis, fluorescence and {sup 1}H NMR. This chemosensor displayed high selectivity fluorescence enhancement toward Pb{sup 2+} ions in the presence of the metals ions mentioned in CH{sub 3}CN solutions. Competitive assays show that a 1-fold of metal cations in each case, compared with Pb{sup 2+} ions, results in less than {+-}5% fluorescence intensity changes. Linear calibration up to 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} M for Pb(II) ions (R=0.9968) was obtained and detection limit resulted of 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} M. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel dual emission bis-1,8-naphthalimide sensor for pH and Pb{sup 2+} ions is synthetized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The excimer formation depends on the spacer that links the two naphthalimide groups. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bis

  16. Enhanced fluorescence emission using a photonic crystal coupled to an optical cavity

    OpenAIRE

    Pokhriyal, Anusha; Lu, Meng; Chaudhery, Vikram; George, Sherine; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2013-01-01

    All fluorescent assays would benefit from greater signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), which enable detection of disease biomarkers at lower concentrations for earlier disease diagnosis and detection of genes that are expressed at the lowest levels. Here, we report an approach to enhance fluorescence in which surface adsorbed fluorophore-tagged biomolecules are excited on a photonic crystal surface that is coupled to an underlying Fabry-Perot type cavity through a gold mirror reflector beneath the ...

  17. Measuring reactive nitrogen emissions from point sources using visible spectroscopy from aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melamed, M L; Solomon, S; Daniel, J S; Langford, A O; Portmann, R W; Ryerson, T B; Nicks, D K; McKeen, S A

    2003-02-01

    Accurate measurements of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), a key trace gas in the formation and destruction of tropospheric ozone, are important in studies of urban pollution. Nitrogen dioxide column abundances were measured during the Texas Air Quality Study 2000 using visible absorption spectroscopy from an aircraft. The method allows for quantification of the integrated total number of nitrogen dioxide molecules in the polluted atmosphere and is hence a useful tool for measuring plumes of this key trace gas. Further, we show how such remote-sensing observations can be used to obtain information on the fluxes of nitrogen dioxide into the atmosphere with unique flexibility in terms of aircraft altitude, and the height and extent of mixing of the boundary layer. Observations of nitrogen dioxide plumes downwind of power plants were used to estimate the flux of nitrogen oxide emitted from several power plants in the Houston and Dallas metropolitan areas and in North Carolina. Measurements taken over the city of Houston were also employed to infer the total flux from the city as a whole.

  18. Establishing a regional nitrogen management approach to mitigate greenhouse gas emission intensity from intensive smallholder maize production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Liang; Chen, Xinping; Cui, Zhenling; Zhang, Weifeng; Zhang, Fusuo

    2014-01-01

    The overuse of Nitrogen (N) fertilizers on smallholder farms in rapidly developing countries has increased greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and accelerated global N consumption over the past 20 years. In this study, a regional N management approach was developed based on the cost of the agricultural response to N application rates from 1,726 on-farm experiments to optimize N management across 12 agroecological subregions in the intensive Chinese smallholder maize belt. The grain yield and GHG emission intensity of this regional N management approach was investigated and compared to field-specific N management and farmers' practices. The regional N rate ranged from 150 to 219 kg N ha(-1) for the 12 agroecological subregions. Grain yields and GHG emission intensities were consistent with this regional N management approach compared to field-specific N management, which indicated that this regional N rate was close to the economically optimal N application. This regional N management approach, if widely adopted in China, could reduce N fertilizer use by more than 1.4 MT per year, increase maize production by 31.9 MT annually, and reduce annual GHG emissions by 18.6 MT. This regional N management approach can minimize net N losses and reduce GHG emission intensity from over- and underapplications, and therefore can also be used as a reference point for regional agricultural extension employees where soil and/or plant N monitoring is lacking.

  19. Photosensized Controlling Benzyl Methacrylate-Based Matrix Enhanced Eu3+ Narrow-Band Emission for Fluorescence Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Hsiang Lin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study synthesized a europium (Eu3+ complex Eu(DBM3Cl-MIP (DBM = dibenzoyl methane; Cl-MIP = 2-(2-chlorophenyl-1-methyl-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline dispersed in a benzyl methacrylate (BMA monomer and treated with ultraviolet (UV light for polymerization. Spectral results showed that the europium complex containing an antenna, Cl-MIP, which had higher triplet energy into the Eu3+ energy level, was an energetically enhanced europium emission. Typical stacking behaviors of π–π interactions between the ligands and the Eu3+-ion were analyzed using single crystal X-ray diffraction. Regarding the luminescence performance of this europium composite, the ligand/defect emission was suppressed by dispersion in a poly-BMA (PBMA matrix. The underlying mechanism of the effective enhancement of the pure Eu3+ emission was attributed to the combined effects of structural modifications, defect emissions, and carrier charge transfer. Fluorescence spectra were compared to the composite of optimized Eu3+ emission where they were subsequently chelated to four metal ions via carboxylate groups on the BMA unit. The optical enhanced europium composite clearly demonstrated highly efficient optical responses and is, therefore a promising application as an optical detection material.

  20. An expression for the atomic fluorescence and thermal-emission intensity under conditions of near saturation and arbitrary self-absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Omenetto, N.; Winefordner, J.D.; Alkemade, C.T.J.

    1975-01-01

    An expression for the effect of self-absorption on the fluorescence and thermal emission intensities is derived by taking into account stimulated emission. A simple, idealized case is considered, consisting of a two level atomic system, in a flame, homogeneous with respect to temperature and composi

  1. The influence of visible light and inorganic pigments on fluorescence excitation emission spectra of egg-, casein- and collagen-based painting media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin, A.; Anglos, D.; Cather, S.; Burnstock, A.

    2008-07-01

    Spectrofluorimetric analysis of proteinaceous binding media is particularly promising because proteins employed in paintings are often fluorescent and media from different sources have significantly different fluorescence spectral profiles. Protein-based binding media derived from eggs, milk and animal tissue have been used for painting and for conservation, but their analysis using non-destructive techniques is complicated by interferences with pigments, their degradation and their low concentration. Changes in the fluorescence excitation emission spectra of films of binding media following artificial ageing to an equivalent of 50 and 100 years of museum lighting include the reduction of bands ascribed to tyrosine, tryptophan and Maillard reaction products and an increase in fluorescent photodegradation. Fluorescence of naturally aged paint is dependent on the nature of the pigment present and, with egg-based media, in comparison with un-pigmented films, emissions ascribed to amino acids are more pronounced.

  2. Highly linearly polarized white light emission from InGaN light-emitting diode with nanograting-integrated fluorescent ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Linghua; Wang, Miao; Cao, Bing; Zhou, Shengming; Lin, Yu; Hu, Jingpei; Wang, Chinhua; Wang, Jianfeng; Sun, Qian; Xu, Ke

    2017-01-01

    We proposed and demonstrated a linearly polarized white light emission from an InGaN light-emitting diode with nanograting-integrated fluorescent ceramics. By incorporating a dielectric layer with low refractive index between multilayer nanogratings and a fluorescent ceramic, both high TM transmission (TMT) and high extinction ratio (ER) were effectively achieved across the entire range of white light. An ER higher than 20 dB and a TMT of 60% were obtained experimentally for a GaN/fluorescent-ceramic-integrated white LED with a multilayer grating of 150 nm period. The fluorescent-ceramic-integrated structure showed possibilities of implementing a polarized white LED with high performance.

  3. Nitrogen fertilizer increases nitrous oxide, but not dinitrogen, emissions from moist tropical forest soils in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaraz, M.; Porder, S.; Groffman, P. M.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) deposition in tropical forests may increase substantially in coming decades, stimulating a concomitant increase of soil N gas emissions (dinitrogen (N2), nitrous (N2O) and nitric oxides). How N deposition might alter the relative emissions of these gases is unclear, and has ramifications for the global climate since N2O is a potent greenhouse gas. We used a small-scale fertilization study in the Luquillo Experimental Forest (LEF) of Puerto Rico to simulate the effects of N deposition on N gas emissions. Fertilizer was applied by placing mesh bags filled with ammonium saturated weak cation exchange resin directly on the mineral soil for two months. At that time, intact soil cores (0-10cm) were taken from below the bags. The cores were shipped to the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, where they were incubated in a helium headspace with either 0 or 20% oxygen (O2), and analyzed for N2 and N2O emissions. N fertilization increased N2O emissions fourfold (p=0.03). N2O production was positively correlated with field soil moisture (r=0.45, p=0.002), and was higher under 20% than 0% atmospheric O2 (p=0.003). With the exception of a handful of samples, we detected no measureable N2 production from these soils, and fertilization did not influence N2 production. This may have been because our experiment occurred during a drought that reduced soil moisture in the field by ˜20%. We have found that N2 emissions correlate with soil moisture elsewhere in the LEF. While we conclude that N deposition may not influence the N2O:N2 of soil emissions under such conditions, it is still unclear whether this result would hold under higher rainfall.

  4. Detection from space of a reduction in anthropogenic emissions of nitrogen oxides during the Chinese economic downturn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-T. Lin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid economic and industrial development in China and relatively weak emission controls have resulted in significant increases in emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx in recent years, with the exception of late 2008 to mid 2009 when the economic downturn led to emission reductions detectable from space. Here vertical column densities (VCDs of tropospheric NO2 retrieved from satellite observations by SCIAMACHY, GOME-2 and OMI (both by KNMI and by NASA are used to evaluate changes in emissions of NOx from October 2004 to February 2010 identifying impacts of the economic downturn. Data over polluted regions of Northern East China suggest an increase of 27–33% in annual mean VCD of NO2 prior to the downturn, consistent with an increase of 49% in thermal power generation (TPG reflecting the economic growth. More detailed analysis is used to quantify changes in emissions of NOx in January over the period 2005–2010 when the effect of the downturn was most evident. The GEOS-Chem model is employed to evaluate the effect of changes in chemistry and meteorology on VCD of NO2. This analysis indicates that emissions decreased by 20% from January 2008 to January 2009, close to the reduction of 18% in TPG that occurred over the same interval. A combination of three relatively independent approaches indicates that the economic downturn was responsible for a~reduction in emissions by 9–11% in January 2009 with an additional decrease of 10% attributed to the slow-down in industrial activity associated with the coincident celebration of the Chinese New Year.

  5. The effect of long-term exposure to elevated CO2 on nitrogen gas emissions from Mojave Desert soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCalley, Carmody K.; Strahm, Brian D.; Sparks, Kimberlee L.; Eller, Allyson S. D.; Sparks, Jed P.

    2011-09-01

    In arid regions, emissions of nitrogen (N) gases are important to long-term soil fertility and regional atmospheric chemistry, making alterations in N gas emissions an important aspect of ecosystem response to climate change. Studies at the Nevada Desert FACE Facility suggest that rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations impact ecosystems N dynamics in the Mojave Desert; our objective was to identify whether those responses translate into changes in trace N gas emissions. We measured soil fluxes of reactive N gases (NO, NOy, NH3) and N2O in plots receiving long-term fumigation with ambient and elevated (550 ppm) CO2. Reactive N gas emissions were significantly lower under elevated CO2 during high soil moisture conditions in the spring and fall. The strongest responses occurred in the islands of fertility created by the dominant shrub Larrea tridentata, where fluxes were 3-5 ng N m-2 s-1 lower in elevated CO2 plots. Changes in total N gas emissions were driven by reduced NO and NH3 emissions, with smaller changes in NOy efflux and little to no production of N2O. Lower N gas emissions under elevated CO2 reflect changes in plant and microbial demand for N, suggesting increased uptake or immobilization coupled with decreased rates of N mineralization and nitrification. This response of N gas efflux to elevated CO2 in the growing season suggests that in deserts, elevated CO2 promotes ecosystem retention of N during periods of peak biological demand. Concomitantly, exposure to elevated CO2 alters inputs of new reactive gases into the atmosphere, potentially impacting local atmospheric processes.

  6. Room-temperature single-photon emission from zinc oxide nanoparticle defects and their in vitro photostable intrinsic fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung Kelvin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Zinc oxide (ZnO is a promising semiconductor that is suitable for bioimaging applications due to its intrinsic defect fluorescence. However, ZnO generally suffers from poor photostability. We report room-temperature single-photon emission from optical defects found in ZnO nanoparticles (NPs formed by ion implantation followed by thermal oxidation in a silica substrate. We conduct a thorough investigation into the photophysics of a particularly bright defect and identify other single emitters within the NPs. Photostability was observed when the NPs were removed from the growth substrate and taken up by skin cells for in vitro imaging.

  7. Room-temperature single-photon emission from zinc oxide nanoparticle defects and their in vitro photostable intrinsic fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kelvin; Karle, Timothy J.; Khalid, Asma; Abraham, Amanda N.; Shukla, Ravi; Gibson, Brant C.; Simpson, David A.; Djurišic, Aleksandra B.; Amekura, Hiroshi; Tomljenovic-Hanic, Snjezana

    2017-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a promising semiconductor that is suitable for bioimaging applications due to its intrinsic defect fluorescence. However, ZnO generally suffers from poor photostability. We report room-temperature single-photon emission from optical defects found in ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) formed by ion implantation followed by thermal oxidation in a silica substrate. We conduct a thorough investigation into the photophysics of a particularly bright defect and identify other single emitters within the NPs. Photostability was observed when the NPs were removed from the growth substrate and taken up by skin cells for in vitro imaging.

  8. Nitrogen Oxide biogenic emissions from soils: impact on NOx and ozone formation in West Africa during AMMA (African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis)

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Nitrogen Oxide biogenic emissions from soils are driven by soil and environmental parameters. The relationship between these parameters and NO fluxes is highly non linear. A new algorithm, based on a neural network calculation, is used to reproduce the NO biogenic emissions in West Africa during the AMMA campaign, in August 2006. It has been coupled in the surface scheme of a coupled chemistry dynamics model to estimate the impact of the NO emissions on NOx and O3 form...

  9. Decreased rates of terpene emissions in Ornithopus compressus L. and Trifolium striatum L. by ozone exposure and nitrogen fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llusia, Joan; Bermejo-Bermejo, Victoria; Calvete-Sogo, Héctor; Peñuelas, Josep

    2014-11-01

    Increasing tropospheric ozone (O3) and nitrogen soil availability (N) are two of the main drivers of global change. They both may affect gas exchange, including plant emission of volatiles such as terpenes. We conducted an experiment using open-top chambers to analyze these possible effects on two leguminous species of Mediterranean pastures that are known to have different O3 sensitivity, Ornithopus compressus and Trifolium striatum. O3 exposure and N fertilization did not affect the photosynthetic rates of O. compressus and T. striatum, although O3 tended to induce an increase in the stomatal conductance of both species, especially T. striatum, the most sensitive species. O3 and N soil availability reduced the emission of terpenes in O. compressus and T. striatum. If these responses are confirmed as a general pattern, O3 could affect the competitiveness of these species.

  10. Effects on carbon and nitrogen emissions due to swine manure removal for biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Kim H; Harper, Lowry A; Brown, Sarah M

    2012-01-01

    Methane (CH) and ammonia (NH) are emitted from swine-manure processing lagoons, contributing to global climate change and reducing air quality. Manure diverted to biofuel production is proposed as a means to reduce CH emissions. At a swine confined animal feeding operation in the U.S. Central Great Basin, animal manure was diverted from 12 farms to a biofuel facility and converted to methanol. Ammonia emissions were determined using the De Visscher Model from measured data of dissolved lagoon ammoniacal N concentrations, pH, temperature, and wind speed at the lagoon sites. Other lagoon gas emissions were measured with subsurface gas collection devices and gas chromatography analysis. During 2 yr of study, CO and CH emissions from the primary lagoons decreased 11 and 12%, respectfully, as a result of the biofuel process, compared with concurrently measured control lagoon emissions. Ammonia emissions increased 47% compared with control lagoons. The reduction of CH and increase in NH emissions agrees with a short-term study measured at this location by Lagrangian inverse dispersion analysis. The increase in NH emissions was primarily due to an increase in lagoon solution pH attributable to decreased methanogenesis. Also observed due to biofuel production was a 20% decrease in conversion of total ammoniacal N to N, a secondary process for the removal of N in anaerobic waste lagoons. The increase in NH emissions can be partially attributed to the decrease in N production by a proposed NH conversion to N mechanism. This mechanism predicts that a decrease in NH conversion to N increases ammoniacal N pH. Both effects increase NH emissions. It is unknown whether the decrease in NH conversion to N is a direct or physical result of the decrease in methanogenesis. Procedures and practices intended to reduce emissions of one pollutant can have an unintended consequence on the emissions of another pollutant.

  11. On Tuning the Fluorescence Emission of Porphyrin Free Bases Bonded to the Pore Walls of Organo-Modified Silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa I. Y. Quiroz-Segoviano

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A sol-gel methodology has been duly developed in order to perform a controlled covalent coupling of tetrapyrrole macrocycles (e.g., porphyrins, phthalocyanines, naphthalocyanines, chlorophyll, etc. to the pores of metal oxide networks. The resulting absorption and emission spectra intensities in the UV-VIS-NIR range have been found to depend on the polarity existing inside the pores of the network; in turn, this polarization can be tuned through the attachment of organic substituents to the tetrapyrrrole macrocycles before bonding them to the pore network. The paper shows clear evidence of the real possibility of maximizing fluorescence emissions from metal-free bases of substituted tetraphenylporphyrins, especially when these molecules are bonded to the walls of functionalized silica surfaces via the attachment of alkyl or aryl groups arising from the addition of organo-modified alkoxides.

  12. Color-Tunable Solid-State Fluorescence Emission from Carbazole-Based BODIPYs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Chihiro; Todaka, Takumi; Ueda, Tomomi; Ema, Tadashi

    2016-05-23

    Several carbazole-based boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) dyes were synthesized by organometallic approaches. Thiazole, benzothiazole, imidazole, benzimidazole, triazole, and indolone substituents were introduced at the 1-position of the carbazole moiety, and boron complexation of each dipyrrin generated the corresponding compounds 1, 2 a, and 3-6. The properties of these products were investigated by UV/Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, X-ray crystallography, and DFT calculations. These compounds exhibited large Stokes shifts, and compounds 1, 2 a, and 3-5 fluoresced both in solution and in the solid state. Complex 2 a showed the highest fluorescence quantum yield (ΦF ) in the solid state, therefore boron complexes of the carbazole-benzothiazole hybrids 2 b-f, which had several different substituents, were prepared and the effects of the substituents on the photophysical properties of the compounds were examined. The fluorescence properties showed good correlation with the results of crystal-packing analyses, and the dyes exhibited color-tunable solid-state fluorescence.

  13. Comparison of greenhouse gas emissions from rice paddy fields under different nitrogen fertilization loads in Chongming Island, Eastern China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xianxian [School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Rd. 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Research Centre for Low Carbon Agriculture, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Rd. 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Key Laboratory for Urban Agriculture (South), Ministry of Agriculture, PR China, Dongchuan Rd. 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Yin, Shan, E-mail: yinshan@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Rd. 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Research Centre for Low Carbon Agriculture, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Rd. 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Key Laboratory for Urban Agriculture (South), Ministry of Agriculture, PR China, Dongchuan Rd. 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Li, Yinsheng [School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Rd. 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Research Centre for Low Carbon Agriculture, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Rd. 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zhuang, Honglei [School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Rd. 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Research Centre for Low Carbon Agriculture, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Rd. 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Key Laboratory for Urban Agriculture (South), Ministry of Agriculture, PR China, Dongchuan Rd. 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Li, Changsheng [School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Rd. 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Research Centre for Low Carbon Agriculture, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Rd. 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space, University of New Hampshire, Morse Hall, College Road, NH 03824-3525 (United States); and others

    2014-02-01

    Rice is one of the major crops of southern China and Southeast Asia. Rice paddies are one of the largest agricultural greenhouse gas (GHG) sources in this region because of the application of large quantities of nitrogen (N) fertilizers to the plants. In particular, the production of methane (CH{sub 4}) is a concern. Investigating a reasonable amount of fertilizers to apply to plants is essential to maintaining high yields while reducing GHG emissions. In this study, three levels of fertilizer application [high (300 kg N/ha), moderate (210 kg N/ha), and low (150 kg N/ha)] were designed to examine the effects of variation in N fertilizer application rate on carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane (CH{sub 4}), and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) emissions from the paddy fields in Chongming Island, Shanghai, China. The high level (300 kg N/ha) represented the typical practice adopted by the local farmers in the area. Maximum amounts of CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O fluxes were observed upon high-level fertilizer application in the plots. Cumulative N{sub 2}O emissions of 23.09, 40.10, and 71.08 mg N{sub 2}O/m{sup 2} were observed over the growing season in 2011 under the low-, moderate-, and high-level applications plots, respectively. The field data also indicated that soil temperatures at 5 and 10 cm soil depths significantly affected soil respiration; the relationship between Rs and soil temperature in this study could be described by an exponential model. Our study showed that reducing the high rate of fertilizer application is a feasible way of attenuating the global-warming potential while maintaining the optimum yield for the studied paddy fields. - Highlights: • In Chongming Island, Shanghai, GHG emissions were measured under different nitrogen fertilizer rates from the paddy. • Low nitrogen fertilizer application reduced CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O emissions. • The study showed that 210 kg N/ha was the suitable fertilizer application rate.

  14. Exploratory analysis of excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectra with self-organizing maps as a basis for determination of organic matter removal efficiency at water treatment works

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieroza, Magdalena; Baker, Andy; Bridgeman, John

    2009-12-01

    In the paper, the self-organizing map (SOM) was employed for the exploratory analysis of fluorescence excitation-emission data characterizing organic matter removal efficiency at 16 water treatment works in the UK. Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to assess organic matter removal efficiency between raw and partially treated (clarified) water to provide an indication of the potential for disinfection by-products formation. Fluorescence spectroscopy was utilized to evaluate quantitative and qualitative properties of organic matter removal. However, the substantial amount of fluorescence data generated impeded the interpretation process. Therefore a robust SOM technique was used to examine the fluorescence data and to reveal patterns in data distribution and correlations between organic matter properties and fluorescence variables. It was found that the SOM provided a good discrimination between water treatment sites on the base of spectral properties of organic matter. The distances between the units of the SOM map were indicative of the similarity of the fluorescence samples and thus demonstrated the relative changes in organic matter content between raw and clarified water. The higher efficiency of organic matter removal was demonstrated for the larger distances between raw and clarified samples on the map. It was also shown that organic matter removal was highly dependent on the raw water fluorescence properties, with higher efficiencies for higher emission wavelengths in visible and UV humic-like fluorescence centers.

  15. Effects of nitrification inhibitors (DCD and DMPP on nitrous oxide emission, crop yield and nitrogen uptake in a wheat–maize cropping system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Liu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The application of nitrification inhibitors together with ammonium-based fertilizers is proposed as a potent method to decrease nitrous oxide (N2O emission while promoting crop yield and nitrogen use efficiency in fertilized agricultural fields. To evaluate the effects of nitrification inhibitors, we conducted year-round measurements of N2O fluxes, yield, aboveground biomass, plant carbon and nitrogen contents, soil inorganic nitrogen and dissolved organic carbon contents and the main environmental factors for urea (U, urea + dicyandiamide (DCD and urea + 3,4-dimethylpyrazol phosphate (DMPP treatments in a wheat–maize rotation field. The cumulative N2O emissions were calculated to be 4.49 ± 0.21, 2.93 ± 0.06 and 2.78 ± 0.16 kg N ha−1 yr−1 for the U, DCD and DMPP treatments, respectively. Therefore, the DCD and DMPP treatments significantly decreased the annual emissions by 35% and 38%, respectively (p 2O emissions. When the emissions presented clearly temporal variations, high-frequency measurements or optimized sampling schedule for intermittent measurements would likely provide more accurate estimations of annual cumulative emission and treatment effect. The application of nitrification inhibitors significantly increased the soil inorganic nitrogen content (p 2O emission from the wheat–maize cropping system.

  16. A regional mass balance model based on total ammoniacal nitrogen for estimating ammonia emissions from beef cattle in Alberta Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Lilong; Kröbel, Roland; Janzen, H. Henry; Beauchemin, Karen A.; McGinn, Sean M.; Bittman, Shabtai; Atia, Atta; Edeogu, Ike; MacDonald, Douglas; Dong, Ruilan

    2014-08-01

    Animal feeding operations are primary contributors of anthropogenic ammonia (NH3) emissions in North America and Europe. Mathematical modeling of NH3 volatilization from each stage of livestock manure management allows comprehensive quantitative estimates of emission sources and nutrient losses. A regionally-specific mass balance model based on total ammoniacal nitrogen (TAN) content in animal manure was developed for estimating NH3 emissions from beef farming operations in western Canada. Total N excretion in urine and feces was estimated from animal diet composition, feed dry matter intake and N utilization for beef cattle categories and production stages. Mineralization of organic N, immobilization of TAN, nitrification, and denitrification of N compounds in manure, were incorporated into the model to account for quantities of TAN at each stage of manure handling. Ammonia emission factors were specified for different animal housing (feedlots, barns), grazing, manure storage (including composting and stockpiling) and land spreading (tilled and untilled land), and were modified for temperature. The model computed NH3 emissions from all beef cattle sub-classes including cows, calves, breeding bulls, steers for slaughter, and heifers for slaughter and replacement. Estimated NH3 emissions were about 1.11 × 105 Mg NH3 in Alberta in 2006, with a mean of 18.5 kg animal-1 yr-1 (15.2 kg NH3-N animal-1 yr-1) which is 23.5% of the annual N intake of beef cattle (64.7 kg animal-1 yr-1). The percentage of N intake volatilized as NH3-N was 50% for steers and heifers for slaughter, and between 11 and 14% for all other categories. Steers and heifers for slaughter were the two largest contributors (3.5 × 104 and 3.9 × 104 Mg, respectively) at 31.5 and 32.7% of total NH3 emissions because most growing animals were finished in feedlots. Animal housing and grazing contributed roughly 63% of the total NH3 emissions (feedlots, barns and pastures contributed 54.4, 0.2 and 8.1% of

  17. Nitrosation Reaction Without Nitrogen Oxide Waste Gas Emission and Its Engineering Practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chunguang; FENG Yaqing; NIU Weiwei; CHEN Xuexi

    2013-01-01

    The gas-liquid phase equilibrium is used in controlling the nitrosation reaction process.Decomposition of nitrous acid and oxidation side reaction are suppressed in a closed reaction system.The system pressure is used as the criterion of the end of reaction,avoiding excessive feeding and reducing the decomposition of nitrous acid.The head space of the reactor is used as the gas buffer,stabilizing the feeding fluctuations and inhibiting the side reaction,decomposition of nitrous acid.Nitrogen oxide concentration is controlled at the minimum level.Thus the zero release of nitrogen oxide waste gas can be achieved without using any absorption process.

  18. Vitapan 3D-master shade guide showed no fluorescence emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Keun Lee

    2012-01-01

    Results and Conclusion: ΔE FNx01ab-FL values were in the range of 0.2 to 2.7 (mean: 1.2±0.6 for the original and 0.5 to 1.6 (mean: 0.9±0.1 for the ground-to-flat tabs, which was significantly different based on paired t-test (p<0.05; however, fluorescence peak was not detected in all the shade tabs. Therefore, fluorescence property of Vitapan 3D-Master shade guide should be modified to have similarfluorescence property of natural teeth and corresponding restorative materials.

  19. Plant species diversity reduces N2O but not CH4 emissions from constructed wetlands under high nitrogen levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wenjuan; Shi, Mengmeng; Chang, Jie; Ren, Yuan; Xu, Ronghua; Zhang, Chongbang; Ge, Ying

    2017-02-01

    Constructed wetlands (CWs) have been widely used for treating wastewater. CWs also are the sources of greenhouse gas (GHG) due to high pollutant load. It has been reported that plant species diversity can enhance nitrogen (N) removal efficiency in CWs for treating wastewater. However, the influence of plant species diversity on GHG emissions from CWs in habitats with high N levels still lack research. This study established four species richness levels (1, 2, 3, 4) and 15 species compositions by using 75 simulated vertical flow CWs microcosms to investigate the effects of plant species diversity on the GHG emissions and N removal efficiency of CWs with a high N level. Results showed plant species richness reduced nitrous oxide (N2O) emission and N (NO3(-)-N, NH4(+)-N, and TIN) concentrations in wastewater, but had no effect on methane (CH4) emission. Especially, among the 15 compositions of plant species, the four-species mixture emitted the lowest N2O and had under-depletion of N (DminTIN CWs for treating wastewater with a high N level.

  20. The efficiency of biological aerobic treatment of piggery wastewater to control nitrogen, phosphorus, pathogen and gas emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béline, F; Daumer, M L; Loyon, L; Pourcher, A M; Dabert, P; Guiziou, F; Peu, P

    2008-01-01

    Due to the water pollution and in order to reduce the nitrogen load applied on soils, biological nitrogen removal treatment of piggery wastewaters was developed in Brittany (France), with 250-300 units running. Four types of treatment processes were built including a biological reactor allowing to remove about 60-70% of the nitrogen content as gas by nitrification/denitrification. The addition of different mechanical separators (screw-press, centrifuge decanter ...) led to concentration of phosphorus in an exportable solid phase, allowing a reduction up to 80% of the phosphorus applied locally on soils. Moreover, a reduction of the gaseous emissions was observed using this management process as compared to conventional management (storage + land spreading) including ammonia (up to 68%) and greenhouse gases (55%). Finally, the level of enteric and pathogenic bacteria was also decreased with the treatment process as compared to conventional management systems. However, in spite of these results, the significant cost of the treatment must be underlined and alternative systems including anaerobic digestion will have to be studied.

  1. A Sample of Quasars with Strong Nitrogen Emission Lines from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Linhua; Fan, Xiaohui; Vestergaard, Marianne

    2008-01-01

    We report on 293 quasars with strong NIV] lambda 1486 or NIII] lambda 1750 emission lines (rest-frame equivalent width > 3 \\AA) at 1.7......We report on 293 quasars with strong NIV] lambda 1486 or NIII] lambda 1750 emission lines (rest-frame equivalent width > 3 \\AA) at 1.7...

  2. 800 year ice-core record of nitrogen deposition in Svalbard linked to ocean productivity and biogenic emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Wendl

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the records of the two nitrogen species nitrate (NO3− and ammonium (NH4+ analysed in a new ice core from Lomonosovfonna, Svalbard, in the Eurasian Arctic covering the period 1222–2009. We investigate the emission sources and the influence of melt on the records. During the 20th century both records are influenced by anthropogenic pollution from Eurasia. In pre-industrial times NO3− is highly correlated with methane-sulfonate (MSA on decadal time-scales, which we explain by a fertilising effect. Enhanced atmospheric NO3− concentrations and the corresponding nitrogen input to the ocean trigger the growth of dimethyl-sulfide-(DMS-producing phytoplankton. Increased DMS production results in elevated fluxes to the atmosphere where it is oxidised to MSA. Eurasia was presumably the main source area also for pre-industrial NO3−, but a more exact source apportionment could not be performed based on our data. This is different for NH4+, where biogenic ammonia (NH3 emissions from Siberian boreal forests were identified as the dominant source of pre-industrial NH4+. Changes in melt at the Lomonosovfonna glacier are excluded as major driving force for the decadal variations of the investigated compounds.

  3. Modernizing the boiler installation for unit no. 3 at the Kashirskaya GRES to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.A. Smyshlyaev; S.A. Evdokimov; L.G. Dubovitskaya; I.A. Kochetkov; E. K. Verbovetskii [JSC ' Inzhiniringovaya Kompaniya ZIOMAR' , Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2008-03-15

    The purpose of modernizing the Pp-1050-25-545 KGZh (P-50R) boiler is to reduce the emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) to levels consistent with modern requirements. The following engineering steps were taken, with liquid slag removal from the boiler, to attain NOx levels of 700-750 mg/m{sup 3} for operation with coal and 125 mg/m{sup 3} for operation with natural gas - three-stage combustion with natural gas as the reducing fuel (about 15% thermal) burning in the recirculating gases; and - use of low-emission coal-dust burners with dust feed at high concentrations, overflow burners, and tertiary draft nozzles to lower the amount of excess air in the active combustion zone. The NOx level was further reduced to 570 g/m{sup 3} (just for operation with coal) by using a selective noncatalytic nitrogen oxide reduction system with injection of ammonia (NH{sub 3}) vapor into the boiler in a zone with temperatures of 950{sup o}C.

  4. Impacts of European livestock production: nitrogen, sulphur, phosphorus and greenhouse gas emissions, land-use, water eutrophication and biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leip, Adrian; Billen, Gilles; Garnier, Josette; Grizzetti, Bruna; Lassaletta, Luis; Reis, Stefan; Simpson, David; Sutton, Mark A.; de Vries, Wim; Weiss, Franz; Westhoek, Henk

    2015-11-01

    Livestock production systems currently occupy around 28% of the land surface of the European Union (equivalent to 65% of the agricultural land). In conjunction with other human activities, livestock production systems affect water, air and soil quality, global climate and biodiversity, altering the biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen, phosphorus and carbon. Here, we quantify the contribution of European livestock production to these major impacts. For each environmental effect, the contribution of livestock is expressed as shares of the emitted compounds and land used, as compared to the whole agricultural sector. The results show that the livestock sector contributes significantly to agricultural environmental impacts. This contribution is 78% for terrestrial biodiversity loss, 80% for soil acidification and air pollution (ammonia and nitrogen oxides emissions), 81% for global warming, and 73% for water pollution (both N and P). The agriculture sector itself is one of the major contributors to these environmental impacts, ranging between 12% for global warming and 59% for N water quality impact. Significant progress in mitigating these environmental impacts in Europe will only be possible through a combination of technological measures reducing livestock emissions, improved food choices and reduced food waste of European citizens.

  5. Management of irrigation frequency and nitrogen fertilization to mitigate GHG and NO emissions from drip-fertigated crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abalos, Diego; Sanchez-Martin, Laura; Garcia-Torres, Lourdes; van Groenigen, Jan Willem; Vallejo, Antonio

    2014-08-15

    Drip irrigation combined with split application of fertilizer nitrogen (N) dissolved in the irrigation water (i.e. drip fertigation) is commonly considered best management practice for water and nutrient efficiency. As a consequence, its use is becoming widespread. Some of the main factors (water-filled pore space, NH4(+) and NO3(-)) regulating the emissions of greenhouse gases (i.e. N2O, CO2 and CH4) and NO from agroecosystems can easily be manipulated by drip fertigation without yield penalties. In this study, we tested management options to reduce these emissions in a field experiment with a melon (Cucumis melo L.) crop. Treatments included drip irrigation frequency (weekly/daily) and type of N fertilizer (urea/calcium nitrate) applied by fertigation. Crop yield, environmental parameters, soil mineral N concentrations and fluxes of N2O, NO, CH4 and CO2 were measured during 85 days. Fertigation with urea instead of calcium nitrate increased N2O and NO emissions by a factor of 2.4 and 2.9, respectively (Pirrigation reduced NO emissions by 42% (Pirrigation. We found no relation between irrigation frequency and N2O emissions. Based on yield-scaled Global Warming Potential as well as NO cumulative emissions, we conclude that weekly fertigation with a NO3(-)-based fertilizer is the best option to combine agronomic productivity with environmental sustainability. Our study shows that adequate management of drip fertigation, while contributing to the attainment of water and food security, may provide an opportunity for climate change mitigation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Global metaanalysis of the nonlinear response of soil nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions to fertilizer nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbak, Iurii; Millar, Neville; Robertson, G Philip

    2014-06-24

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas (GHG) that also depletes stratospheric ozone. Nitrogen (N) fertilizer rate is the best single predictor of N2O emissions from agricultural soils, which are responsible for ∼ 50% of the total global anthropogenic flux, but it is a relatively imprecise estimator. Accumulating evidence suggests that the emission response to increasing N input is exponential rather than linear, as assumed by Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change methodologies. We performed a metaanalysis to test the generalizability of this pattern. From 78 published studies (233 site-years) with at least three N-input levels, we calculated N2O emission factors (EFs) for each nonzero input level as a percentage of N input converted to N2O emissions. We found that the N2O response to N inputs grew significantly faster than linear for synthetic fertilizers and for most crop types. N-fixing crops had a higher rate of change in EF (ΔEF) than others. A higher ΔEF was also evident in soils with carbon >1.5% and soils with pH GHG inventories should improve assessments of fertilizer-derived N2O emissions, help address disparities in the global N2O budget, and refine the accuracy of N2O mitigation protocols. In low-input systems typical of sub-Saharan Africa, for example, modest N additions will have little impact on estimated N2O emissions, whereas equivalent additions (or reductions) in excessively fertilized systems will have a disproportionately major impact.

  7. Greenhouse gas emissions from a wheat-maize double cropping system with different nitrogen fertilization regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao-Kang; Su, Fang; Ju, Xiao-Tang; Gao, Bing; Oenema, Oene; Christie, Peter; Huang, Bin-Xiang; Jiang, Rong-Feng; Zhang, Fu-Suo

    2013-05-01

    Here, we report on a two-years field experiment aimed at the quantification of the emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) from the dominant wheat-maize double cropping system in North China Plain. The experiment had 6 different fertilization strategies, including a control treatment, recommended fertilization, with and without straw and manure applications, and nitrification inhibitor and slow release urea. Application of N fertilizer slightly decreased CH4 uptake by soil. Direct N2O emissions derived from recommended urea application was 0.39% of the annual urea-N input. Both straw and manure had relatively low N2O emissions factors. Slow release urea had a relatively high emission factor. Addition of nitrification inhibitor reduced N2O emission by 55%. We conclude that use of nitrification inhibitors is a promising strategy for N2O mitigation for the intensive wheat-maize double cropping systems.

  8. Nitrous Oxide and Methane Emissions as Affected by Water, Soil and Nitrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG Zheng-Qin; XING Guang-Xi; ZHU Zhao-Liang

    2007-01-01

    Specific management of water regimes,soil and N in China might play an important role in regulating N2O and CH4 emissions in rice fields.Nitrous oxide and methane emissions from alternate non-flooded/flooded paddies were monitored simultaneously during a 516-day incubation with lysimeter experiments.Two N sources (15N-(NH4)2SO4 and 15N-labeled milk vetch)were applied to two contrasting paddies:one derived from Xiashu loess(Loess)and one from Quaternary red clay(Clay).Both N2O and CH4 emissions were significantly higher in soil Clay than in soil Loess during the flooded period.For both soil,N2O emissions peaked at the transition periods shortly after the beginning of the flooded and non-flooded seasons.Soil type affected N2O emission patterns.In soil Clay,the emission peak during the transition period from non-flooded to flooded conditions was much higher than the peak during the transition period from flooded to non-flooded conditions.In soil Loess,the emission peak during the transition period from flooded to non-flooded conditions was obviously higher than the peak during the transition period from non-flooded to flooded conditions except for milk vetch treatment.Soil type also had a significant effect on CH4 emissions during the flooded season,over which the weighted average flux was 111 mg C m-2 h-1 and 2.2 mg C m-2 h-1 from Clay and Loess,respectively.Results indicated that it was the transition in the water regime that dominated N2O emissions while it was the soil type that dominated CH4 emissions during the flooded season.Anaerobic oxidation of methane possibly existed in soil Loess during the flooded season.

  9. Dye analysis of Shosoin textiles using excitation-emission matrix fluorescence and ultraviolet-visible reflectance spectroscopic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Rikiya; Tanaka, Yoko; Ogata, Atsuhiko; Naruse, Masakazu

    2009-07-15

    The dyes of 8th century textiles, treasured for more than 1250 years in the Shosoin treasure repository in Japan, were analyzed by nondestructive methods, i.e., excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) reflectance spectrometry, in combination with natural dye references extracted from plants, which have been widely used from ancient times. In this analysis, five dyes were found in the following objects: embroidered shoes dedicated to Great Buddha of the Todaiji temple by the empress of that time, the cloth lining for a case holding a mirror belonging to the emperor of that time, two rolls of yellow and light green plain-weave silks, and a sleeveless coat used for a musical in a Buddhist ceremony in 752 A.D. EEM fluorescence spectrometry distinguished kihada yellow (Amur cork tree), kariyasu yellow (eulalia), and akane red (Japanese madder). UV-vis spectrometry also distinguished kariyasu yellow, ai blue (knotweed), akane red, and shikon purple (murasaki); the characteristic peaks of these dyes were detected by a second derivatization. The results show that although the dyes used easily degrade with age, EEM fluorescence and UV-vis reflectance spectrometry are useful for distinguishing dyes used in the Shosoin textiles, which had been stored for more than 1250 years.

  10. DMPP-added nitrogen fertilizer affects soil N2O emission and microbial activity in Southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Luca; De Marco, Anna; Maglione, Giuseppe; Polimeno, Franca; Di Tommasi, Paul; Magliulo, Vincenzo

    2014-05-01

    Arable sites contributes to global N2O emission due to massive utilization of nitrogen fertilizers. N2O derives from the biological processes such as nitrification and denitrification influenced by soil nitrogen availability. The use of nitrogen fertilizers added with nitrification inhibitors represents one among the proposed strategy to reduce soil N2O emission form arable sites. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of 3,4-dimethylphyrazole phosphate (DMPP), a nitrification inhibitor, on N2O emission and microbial activity of a soil cropped to potato in Southern Italy. The experiment was a randomized block design with two treatments applied and three replicates: control (C) and DMPP (Entec®, K+S Nitrogen) plots, both supplied with the same amount of ammonium nitrate. The nitrogen fertilizer was supplied in three events: at 0 Day After Sowing (DAS; 100 kg N ha-1), at 57 DAS (30 kg N ha-1), and at 71 DAS (30 kg N ha-1). Soil N2O emission was monitored by both dynamic and static chambers. Static chambers were located both on hills and furrows whereas dynamic chambers were located on furrows. Air samples were collected from chambers at different times and analysed by a gas chromatograph (SRI 8610C, Gas Chromatograph). Fluxes were estimated as a linear interpolation of N2O changes over a 30 min time. Microbial biomass and basal respiration were determined as CO2 evolution, analysed by means of an IRGA (Li6200, Licor), on 2 g of fresh soil over a 4h incubation time. Microbial biomass was determined by Substrate Induced Respiration method. Data show no statistical differences in N2O fluxes measured with either dynamic chambers between C and DMPP plots in studied period. However, after the first fertilization event, when the fertilizer was applied as 100 kg N ha-1, the average N2O fluxes measured with static chambers were higher in DMPP plots compared to C plots. In the same period, the microbial biomass significantly decreased in DMPP plots as compared to C

  11. Management of irrigation frequency and nitrogen fertilization to mitigate GHG and NO emissions from drip-fertigated crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abalos, Diego, E-mail: diego.abalos@upm.es [ETSI Agronomos, Technical University of Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Sanchez-Martin, Laura; Garcia-Torres, Lourdes [ETSI Agronomos, Technical University of Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Groenigen, Jan Willem van [Department of Soil Quality, Wageningen University, PO Box 47, 6700 AA Wageningen (Netherlands); Vallejo, Antonio [ETSI Agronomos, Technical University of Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-08-15

    Drip irrigation combined with split application of fertilizer nitrogen (N) dissolved in the irrigation water (i.e. drip fertigation) is commonly considered best management practice for water and nutrient efficiency. As a consequence, its use is becoming widespread. Some of the main factors (water-filled pore space, NH{sub 4}{sup +} and NO{sub 3}{sup −}) regulating the emissions of greenhouse gases (i.e. N{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}) and NO from agroecosystems can easily be manipulated by drip fertigation without yield penalties. In this study, we tested management options to reduce these emissions in a field experiment with a melon (Cucumis melo L.) crop. Treatments included drip irrigation frequency (weekly/daily) and type of N fertilizer (urea/calcium nitrate) applied by fertigation. Crop yield, environmental parameters, soil mineral N concentrations and fluxes of N{sub 2}O, NO, CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2} were measured during 85 days. Fertigation with urea instead of calcium nitrate increased N{sub 2}O and NO emissions by a factor of 2.4 and 2.9, respectively (P < 0.005). Daily irrigation reduced NO emissions by 42% (P < 0.005) but increased CO{sub 2} emissions by 21% (P < 0.05) compared with weekly irrigation. We found no relation between irrigation frequency and N{sub 2}O emissions. Based on yield-scaled Global Warming Potential as well as NO cumulative emissions, we conclude that weekly fertigation with a NO{sub 3}{sup −}-based fertilizer is the best option to combine agronomic productivity with environmental sustainability. Our study shows that adequate management of drip fertigation, while contributing to the attainment of water and food security, may provide an opportunity for climate change mitigation. - Highlights: • The effect of fertigation management techniques on GHG and NO emissions was studied. • Fertigation with urea instead of calcium nitrate increased N{sub 2}O by a factor of 2.4. • Daily irrigation reduced NO (42%) but increased CO

  12. Reduction of the Livestock Ammonia Emission under the Changing Temperature during the Initial Manure Nitrogen Biomineralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolandas Bleizgys

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental data were applied for the modelling optimal cowshed temperature environment in laboratory test bench by a mass-flow method. The principal factor affecting exponent growth of ammonia emission was increasing air and manure surface temperature. With the manure temperature increasing from 4°C to 30°C, growth in the ammonia emission grew fourfold, that is, from 102 to 430 mg m−2h−1. Especial risk emerges when temperature exceeds 20°C: an increase in temperature of 1°C contributes to the intensity of ammonia emission by 17 mg m−2h−1. The temperatures of air and manure surface as well as those of its layers are important when analysing emission processes from manure. Indeed, it affects the processes occurring on the manure surface, namely, dehydration and crust formation. To reduce ammonia emission from cowshed, it is important to optimize the inner temperature control and to manage air circulation, especially at higher temperatures, preventing the warm ambient air from blowing direct to manure. Decrease in mean annual temperature of 1°C would reduce the annual ammonia emission by some 5.0%. The air temperature range varied between −15°C and 30°C in barns. The highest mean annual temperature (14.6°C and ammonia emission (218 mg m−2h−1 were observed in the semideep cowshed.

  13. Effects of benzoic acid on nitrogen, phosphorus and energy balance and on ammonia emission from slurries in the heavy pig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Matteo Crovetto

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects of two dietary levels of benzoic acid on nitrogen, phosphorus and energy balance were evaluated in the typical Italian heavy pig during the last phase of growth. Six Landrace x Large White barrows of 125 kg body weight (BW on average were used in a repeated 3x3 Latin Square design and housed in metabolic cages to collect faeces and urine separately, in 3 collection periods of 7 days, after 14 days of adaptation. The animals were individually housed in open circuit respiration chambers to determine the energy metabolism. The dietary treatments were as follows [% on dry matter (DM]: i diet C (control: 14.2 crude protein (CP, 3.7 EE, 13.8 NDF; ii diet B05: diet C plus 0.5% benzoic acid; iii diet B10: diet C plus 1.0% benzoic acid. DM fed was fixed at 6.8% BW0.75. Apparent digestibility was similar among treatments for all the parameters studied. Nitrogen (N retention was 35.8, 37.4, 41.6% of intake N for C, B05 and B10, respectively, with no significant difference. Energy and phosphorus balances were not influenced by dietary treatments. Ammonia nitrogen emission from the slurry, expressed as a proportion of the initial slurry nitrogen, was decreased (P=0.049 by the inclusion of benzoic acid in the diet: 35.2, 28.1, 26.2% for C, B05, B10, respectively. The addition of benzoic acid to the diet determined a numerically decrease of the urinary pH. In conclusion, the inclusion of benzoic acid in the diet of the heavy pig is beneficial to the environment without effects on N, phosphorus (P and energy balances.

  14. White light emission from fluorescent SiC with porous surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Weifang; Ou, Yiyu; Fiordaliso, Elisabetta Maria

    2017-01-01

    , the photoluminescence intensity from the porous layer was signifcant enhanced by a factor of more than 12. Using a porous layer of moderate thickness (~10µm), high-quality white light emission was realized by combining the independent emissions of blue-green emission from the porous layer and yellow emission from......We report for the frst time a NUV light to white light conversion in a N-B co-doped 6H-SiC (fuorescent SiC) layer containing a hybrid structure. The surface of fuorescent SiC sample contains porous structures fabricated by anodic oxidation method. After passivation by 20nm thick Al2O3...... for the development of high performance and rare-earth element free white light emitting materials....

  15. On-road Emissions of Reactive Nitrogen through In-situ, Mobile Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, K.; Tao, L.; Pan, D.; Golston, L.; Miller, D. J.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Ammonia (NH3) is a key precursor to atmospheric fine particulate matter (PM2.5), with strong implications for regional air quality and global climate change. Existing atmospheric measurements suggest that urban traffic may provide significant amount of NH3. NH3 emissions in urban areas may cause greater impact on air quality and human health, because other aerosol tracers, like NO and NO2, are emitted by similar on-road sources. However, the on-road NH3 emission inventories are subject to significant uncertainties. A mobile platform is developed by mounting multiple portable (total power ~ 100 W, weight ~ 25 kg), high-resolution (10 Hz), open-path sensors on top of a passenger car. On-road NH3 emissions are quantified in the real-world driving conditions by synchronized NH3, CO, and CO2 measurements. The mobile platform has covered over 16,000 km in the US and China since 2013. The total on-road sampling time is over 300 hours. Major US metropolitan areas that have been sampled include LA, SF, Houston, Philadelphia, and Denver. Three Chinese megacities (Beijing, Baoding, and Shijiazhuang) were sampled in both 2013 and 2014. The average emission factors (grams of NH3 emitted per kilogram of fuel) range from 0.3 to 0.5 g/kg. Different methodologies were compared, including on-road emission ratios, tunnel measurements, and city-scale gradient measurements. These methodologies yielded the same emission factor for Houston (0.4±0.05 g/kg) within the sampling uncertainties and showed that multiple approaches are consistent with one another. The observed NH3 emission ratios indicate that National Emisison Inventory (NEI) underestimates on-road NH3 emissions by up to 50% in some major urban areas. On-road NH3 emission factors show higher values in both stop-and-go driving conditions and freeway speeds with a minimum near 70 km/h. This is consistent with another observation that the emission factors in urban traffic are generally larger than suburban traffic. Road gradient

  16. Greenhouse gas emissions from rice, peanut and millet farms in peninsular India: Effects of water and nitrogen management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritee, K.; Tiwari, R.; Nair, D.; Loecke, T. D.; Adhya, T. K.; Rudek, J.; Ahuja, R.; Hamburg, S.

    2013-12-01

    small but significant amount. It is crucial to customize fertilizer and water management to each agro-ecological zone such that net GHG emission reduction is maximized. Further comprehensive measurements over next 2-3 growing seasons will make Indian GHG emissions calculations from peninsular region more accurate. Even more importantly, these measurements will enable the region to more effectively reduce emissions from rice cultivation. Our preliminary assessments also show that LCF practices also have the potential to decrease water use by 10-30%, reduce total nitrogen loading in local water bodies by 20-40%, and improve long term soil health by optimizing organic matter and increasing water-holding capacity. Thus, we demonstrate immediate benefits of LCF practices in reducing input costs as well as lay the path for methodology development for better quantification of GHG emission reductions. Monetization of these reductions can provide an additional income stream to small scale farms, thereby helping incentivize adoption of LCF practices. The central payoff is a 'triple win' for society: increased long-term food security (including through enhanced yields), rural economic development (through improved farm profitability and adaptation to climate change), and lower environmental impacts (including lower GHG emissions).

  17. Reduction of harmful nitrogen oxide emission from low heat rejection diesel engine using carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thulasi Gopinathan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, lanthanum aluminate is used as thermal barrier coating material for the first time in the internal combustion engine to convert the standard engine into low heat rejection engine. Initially, the biodiesel is prepared from sunflower oil by using trans-esterification process. The piton crown, cylinder head and valves of the engine is coated with lanthanum aluminate for a thickness of around 200 microns. However, the analysis of performance and emission characteristics of a standard diesel is carried out with diesel/biodiesel to compare with the low heat rejection engine. The lanthanum aluminate coated engine fueled with sunflower methyl ester shows better performance and emission. But the emission of NOx founds to be higher in the coated engine. Further, a small quantity of carbon nanotubes is added onto the biodiesel to carry out the experiments. Based on the results, the carbon nanotubes are added with the biodiesel to reduce the emission of NOx.

  18. Novel lanthanide pH fluorescent probes based on multiple emissions and its visible-light-sensitized feature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jintai [School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Zheng, Yuhui, E-mail: yhzheng78@scnu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Wang, Qianming, E-mail: qmwang@scnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry of Environment, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Guangzhou Key Laboratory of Materials for Energy Conversion and Storage, Guangzhou 510006 (China); State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Zeng, Zhi [School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Zhang, Cheng Cheng [Departments of Physiology and Developmental Biology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas (United States)

    2014-08-11

    Graphical abstract: A new type of Eu(III) ofloxacin complex as the fluorescent pH indicator has been reported. Compared to pure ligand, the complex offers more distinguished color changes (green–red–blue) derived from both lanthanide line emissions and the secondary ionization steps of ofloxacin. - Highlights: • The pH probe offers a very wide working range in water (pH 1–14). • The emission changes have multiple colors. • Long-lived excited state lifetimes of Eu(III) has been used. • Two types of pH sensitive hydrogels were fabricated. - Abstract: A new type of Eu(III) ofloxacin complex as the fluorescent pH indicator has been presented. Compared to pure ligand, the complex offers more distinguished color changes (green–red–blue) derived from both lanthanide line emissions and the secondary ionization steps of ofloxacin. During the concentration dependence experiments, the photoluminescence studies on the complex showed that the excitation of this pH probe can occur at a very long wavelength which extends to visible range (Ex = 427 nm). Furthermore, the functional complex was successfully incorporated into soft networks and two novel luminescent hydrogels (rod and film) were fabricated. The soft materials also exhibited specific responses towards the pH variation. Finally, the onion cell-stain experiments were carried out to further confirm the validity of pH dependence and the results support the idea that the material will be suitable for monitoring biological samples in the future.

  19. Carbonyl and nitrogen dioxide emissions from gasoline- and diesel-powered motor vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban-Weiss, George A; McLaughlin, John P; Harley, Robert A; Kean, Andrew J; Grosjean, Eric; Grosjean, Daniel

    2008-06-01

    Carbonyls can be toxic and highly reactive in the atmosphere. To quantify trends in carbonyl emissions from light-duty (LD) vehicles, measurements were made in a San Francisco Bay area highwaytunnel bore containing essentially all LD vehicles during the summers of 1999, 2001, and 2006. The LD vehicle emission factor for formaldehyde, the most abundant carbonyl, did not change between 1999 and 2001, then decreased by 61 +/- 7% between 2001 and 2006. This reduction was due to fleet turnover and the removal of MTBE from gasoline. Acetaldehyde emissions decreased by 19 +/- 2% between 1999 and 2001 and by the same amount between 2001 and 2006. Absent the increased use of ethanol in gasoline after 2003, acetaldehyde emissions would have further decreased by 2006. Carbonyl emission factors for medium- (MD) and heavy-duty (HD) diesel trucks were measured in 2006 in a separate mixed-traffic bore of the tunnel. Emission factors for diesel trucks were higher than those for LD vehicles for all reported carbonyls. Diesel engine exhaust dominates over gasoline engines as a direct source of carbonyl emissions in California. Carbonyl concentrations were also measured in liquid-gasoline samples and were found to be low (gasoline brands that contained ethanol showed higher concentrations of acetaldehyde in unburned fuel versus gasoline that was formulated without ethanol. Measurements of NO2 showed a yearly rate of decrease for LD vehicle emissions similar to that of total NOx in this study. The observed NO2/NOx ratio was 1.2 +/- 0.3% and 3.7 +/- 0.3% for LD vehicles and diesel trucks, respectively.

  20. Does nitrogen fertilizer application rate to corn affect nitrous oxide emissions from the rotated soybean crop?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Javed; Mitchell, David C; Barker, Daniel W; Miguez, Fernando; Sawyer, John E; Pantoja, Jose; Castellano, Michael J

    2015-05-01

    Little information exists on the potential for N fertilizer application to corn ( L.) to affect NO emissions during subsequent unfertilized crops in a rotation. To determine if N fertilizer application to corn affects NO emissions during subsequent crops in rotation, we measured NO emissions for 3 yr (2011-2013) in an Iowa, corn-soybean [ (L.) Merr.] rotation with three N fertilizer rates applied to corn (0 kg N ha, the recommended rate of 135 kg N ha, and a high rate of 225 kg N ha); soybean received no N fertilizer. We further investigated the potential for a winter cereal rye ( L.) cover crop to interact with N fertilizer rate to affect NO emissions from both crops. The cover crop did not consistently affect NO emissions. Across all years and irrespective of cover crop, N fertilizer application above the recommended rate resulted in a 16% increase in mean NO flux rate during the corn phase of the rotation. In 2 of the 3 yr, N fertilizer application to corn (0-225 kg N ha) did not affect mean NO flux rates from the subsequent unfertilized soybean crop. However, in 1 yr after a drought, mean NO flux rates from the soybean crops that received 135 and 225 kg N ha N application in the corn year were 35 and 70% higher than those from the soybean crop that received no N application in the corn year. Our results are consistent with previous studies demonstrating that cover crop effects on NO emissions are not easily generalizable. When N fertilizer affects NO emissions during a subsequent unfertilized crop, it will be important to determine if total fertilizer-induced NO emissions are altered or only spread across a greater period of time.

  1. Effects of a combined Diesel particle filter-DeNOx system (DPN) on reactive nitrogen compounds emissions: a parameter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeb, Norbert V; Haag, Regula; Seiler, Cornelia; Schmid, Peter; Zennegg, Markus; Wichser, Adrian; Ulrich, Andrea; Honegger, Peter; Zeyer, Kerstin; Emmenegger, Lukas; Zimmerli, Yan; Czerwinski, Jan; Kasper, Markus; Mayer, Andreas

    2012-12-18

    The impact of a combined diesel particle filter-deNO(x) system (DPN) on emissions of reactive nitrogen compounds (RNCs) was studied varying the urea feed factor (α), temperature, and residence time, which are key parameters of the deNO(x) process. The DPN consisted of a platinum-coated cordierite filter and a vanadia-based deNO(x) catalyst supporting selective catalytic reduction (SCR) chemistry. Ammonia (NH₃) is produced in situ from thermolysis of urea and hydrolysis of isocyanic acid (HNCO). HNCO and NH₃ are both toxic and highly reactive intermediates. The deNO(x) system was only part-time active in the ISO8178/4 C1cycle. Urea injection was stopped and restarted twice. Mean NO and NO₂ conversion efficiencies were 80%, 95%, 97% and 43%, 87%, 99%, respectively, for α = 0.8, 1.0, and 1.2. HNCO emissions increased from 0.028 g/h engine-out to 0.18, 0.25, and 0.26 g/h at α = 0.8, 1.0, and 1.2, whereas NH₃ emissions increased from <0.045 to 0.12, 1.82, and 12.8 g/h with maxima at highest temperatures and shortest residence times. Most HNCO is released at intermediate residence times (0.2-0.3 s) and temperatures (300-400 °C). Total RNC efficiencies are highest at α = 1.0, when comparable amounts of reduced and oxidized compounds are released. The DPN represents the most advanced system studied so far under the VERT protocol achieving high conversion efficiencies for particles, NO, NO₂, CO, and hydrocarbons. However, we observed a trade-off between deNO(x) efficiency and secondary emissions. Therefore, it is important to adopt such DPN technology to specific application conditions to take advantage of reduced NO(x) and particle emissions while avoiding NH₃ and HNCO slip.

  2. Attempts to minimize nitrogen oxide emission from diesel engine by using antioxidant-treated diesel-biodiesel blend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashedul, Hasan Khondakar; Kalam, Md Abdul; Masjuki, Haji Hassan; Teoh, Yew Heng; How, Heoy Geok; Monirul, Islam Mohammad; Imdadul, Hassan Kazi

    2017-02-23

    The study represents a comprehensive analysis of engine exhaust emission variation from a compression ignition (CI) diesel engine fueled with diesel-biodiesel blends. Biodiesel used in this investigation was produced through transesterification procedure from Moringa oleifera oil. A single cylinder, four-stroke, water-cooled, naturally aspirated diesel engine was used for this purpose. The pollutants from the exhaust of the engine that are monitored in this study are nitrogen oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbon (HC), and smoke opacity. Engine combustion and performance parameters are also measured together with exhaust emission data. Some researchers have reported that the reason for higher NO emission of biodiesel is higher prompt NO formation. The use of antioxidant-treated biodiesel in a diesel engine is a promising approach because antioxidants reduce the formation of free radicals, which are responsible for the formation of prompt NO during combustion. Two different antioxidant additives namely 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol (BHT) and 2,2'-methylenebis(4-methyl-6-tert-butylphenol) (MBEBP) were individually dissolved at a concentration of 1% by volume in MB30 (30% moringa biodiesel with 70% diesel) fuel blend to investigate and compare NO as well as other emissions. The result shows that both antioxidants reduced NO emission significantly; however, HC, CO, and smoke were found slightly higher compared to pure biodiesel blends, but not more than the baseline fuel diesel. The result also shows that both antioxidants were quite effective in reducing peak heat release rate (HRR) and brake-specific fuel consumption (BSFC) as well as improving brake thermal efficiency (BTE) and oxidation stability. Based on this study, antioxidant-treated M. oleifera biodiesel blend (MB30) can be used as a very promising alternative source of fuel in diesel engine without any modifications.

  3. Sources of nitrogen and phosphorus emissions to Irish rivers: estimates from the Source Load Apportionment Model (SLAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mockler, Eva; Deakin, Jenny; Archbold, Marie; Daly, Donal; Bruen, Michael

    2017-04-01

    More than half of the river and lake water bodies in Europe are at less than good ecological status or potential, and diffuse pollution from agriculture remains a major, but not the only, cause of this poor performance. In Ireland, it is evident that agri-environmental policy and land management practices have, in many areas, reduced nutrient emissions to water, mitigating the potential impact on water quality. However, additional measures may be required in order to further decouple the relationship between agricultural productivity and emissions to water, which is of vital importance given the on-going agricultural intensification in Ireland. Catchment management can be greatly supported by modelling, which can reduce the resources required to analyse large amounts of information and can enable investigations and measures to be targeted. The Source Load Apportionment Model (SLAM) framework was developed to support catchment management in Ireland by characterising the contributions from various sources of phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) emissions to water. The SLAM integrates multiple national spatial datasets relating to nutrient emissions to surface water, including land use and physical characteristics of the sub-catchments to predict emissions from point (wastewater, industry discharges and septic tank systems) and diffuse sources (agriculture, forestry, peatlands, etc.). The annual nutrient emissions predicted by the SLAM were assessed against nutrient monitoring data for 16 major river catchments covering 50% of the area of Ireland. At national scale, results indicate that the total average annual emissions to surface water in Ireland are over 2,700 t yr-1 of P and 80,000 t yr-1 of N. The SLAM results include the proportional contributions from individual sources at a range of scales from sub-catchment to national, and show that the main sources of P are from wastewater and agriculture, with wide variations across the country related to local anthropogenic

  4. Measurement of Three-Dimensional Dipole Orientation of a Single Fluorescent Nanoemitter by Emission Polarization Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Lethiec, Clotilde; Laverdant, Julien; Vallon, Henri; Javaux, Clémentine; Dubertret, Benoît; Frigerio, Jean-Marc; Schwob, Catherine; Coolen, Laurent; Maître, Agnès

    2014-01-01

    International audience; We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the three-dimensional orientation of a single fluorescent nanoemitter can be determined by polarization analysis of the emitted light (while excitation polarization analysis provides only the in-plane orientation). The determination of the emitter orientation by polarimetry requires a theoretical description, including the objective numerical aperture, the 1D or 2D nature of the emitting dipole, and the environment c...

  5. Effects of nitrogen application rate and a nitrification inhibitor dicyandiamide on ammonia oxidizers and N2O emissions in a grazed pasture soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yu; Di, Hong J; Cameron, Keith C; He, Ji-Zheng

    2013-11-01

    Ammonia oxidizers, including ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) are important drivers of a key step of the nitrogen cycle - nitrification, which affects the production of the potent greenhouse gas, nitrous oxide (N2O). A field experiment was conducted to determine the effect of nitrogen application rates and the nitrification inhibitor dicyandiamide (DCD) on the abundance of AOB and AOA and on N2O emissions in a grazed pasture soil. Nitrogen (N) was applied at four different rates, with urea applied at 50 and 100 kg N ha(-1) and animal urine at 300 and 600 kg N ha(-1). DCD was applied to some of the N treatments at 10 kg ha(-1). The results showed that the AOB amoA gene copy numbers were greater than those of AOA. The highest ratio of the AOB to AOA amoA gene copy numbers was 106.6 which occurred in the urine-N 600 treatment. The AOB amoA gene copy numbers increased with increasing nitrogen application rates. DCD had a significant impact in reducing the AOB amoA gene copy numbers especially in the high nitrogen application rates. N2O emissions increased with the N application rates. DCD had the most significant effect in reducing the daily and total N2O emissions in the highest nitrogen application rate. The greatest reduction of total N2O emissions by DCD was 69% in the urine-N 600 treatment. The reduction in the N2O emission factor by DCD ranged from 58% to 83%. The N2O flux and NO3(-)-N concentrations were significantly correlated to the growth of AOB, rather than AOA. This study confirms the importance of AOB in nitrification and the effect of DCD in inhibiting AOB growth and in decreasing N2O emissions in grazed pasture soils under field conditions.

  6. Reduction of Nitrogen Oxides Emissions from a Coal-Fired Boiler Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuikov Andrey V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During combustion of fossil fuels a large amount of harmful substances are discharged into the atmospheres of cities by industrial heating boiler houses. The most harmful substances among them are nitrogen oxides. The paper presents one of the most effective technological solutions for suppressing nitrogen oxides; it is arrangement of circulation process with additional mounting of the nozzle directed into the bottom of the ash hopper. When brown high-moisture coals are burnt in the medium power boilers, generally fuel nitrogen oxides are produced. It is possible to reduce their production by two ways: lowering the temperature in the core of the torch or decreasing the excess-air factor in the boiler furnace. Proposed solution includes the arrangement of burning process with additional nozzle installed in the lower part of the ash hopper. Air supply from these nozzles creates vortex involving large unburned fuel particles in multiple circulations. Thereby time of their staying in the combustion zone is prolonging. The findings describe the results of the proposed solution; and recommendations for the use of this technological method are given for other boilers.

  7. Bio-inspired approach of the fluorescence emission properties in the scarabaeid beetle Hoplia coerulea (Coleoptera): Modeling by transfer-matrix optical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hooijdonk, Eloise; Berthier, Serge; Vigneron, Jean-Pol

    2012-12-01

    Scales of the scarabaeid beetle Hoplia coerulea (Coleoptera) contain fluorescent molecules embedded in a multilayer structure. The consequence of this source confinement is a modification of the fluorescence properties, i.e., an enhancement or inhibition of the emission of certain wavelengths. In this work, we propose a bio-inspired approach to this problem. In other words, we use numerical simulations based on the one-dimensional transfer-matrix formalism to investigate the influence of a Hoplia-like system on emission characteristics and, from the results, we deduce potential technical applications. We reveal that depending on the choice of some parameters (layer thickness, dielectric constant, and position of the emitting source in the structure), it is possible to enhance or inhibit the fluorescence emission for certain wavelengths. This observation could be of great interest to design new optical devices in the field of optoelectronic, solar cells, biosensors, etc.

  8. Effects of flooding cycles in the Pantanal on the turnover of soil nitrogen pools and emission of N2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liengaard, L.; Nielsen, L. P.; Revsbech, N. P.; Elberling, B.; Priemé, A.; Prast, A. E.; Kühl, M.

    2011-06-01

    The global nitrous oxide (N2O) budget remains unbalanced. Currently, ~25 % of the global N2O emission is ascribed to uncultivated tropical soils, but the exact locations and controlling mechanisms are not clear. In this study, we present the first detailed study of the dynamics of soil nitrogen pools and flux of N2O from the world's largest wetland Pantanal, South America. At three long-term measurement sites we measured porewater pH, NO3-, NH4+ , N2O and O2 as well as N2O dynamics in soil slurry, and in situ fluxes of N2O and CO2. The pool of inorganic nitrogen changed (7.1-92 μg NH4+-N g dw-1, and 0.1-201 μg NO3--N g dw-1) with the seasonal flooding and drying cycles, indicating dynamic shifts between ammonification, nitrification and denitrification. In the field, O2 penetrated to a depth of 60 cm in dry soil, but O2 was rapidly depleted in response to precipitation. Soil pH fluctuated from pH 7-7.5 in flooded soil to pH 3.5-4.5 in the same drained soil. Microsensor measurements showed rapid N2O accumulation reaching >500-1000 Pa in soil slurries due to incomplete denitrification. In situ fluxes of N2O were comparable to heavily fertilized forest or agricultural soils. The dominating parameter affecting N2O emission rate was precipitation inducing peak emissions of >3 mmol N2O m-2 d-1, while the mean daily flux was 0.43 mmol N2O m-2 d-1. Single measurement based screening of in situ activity at 10 Pantanal sites during dry conditions averaged 0.39 mmol N2O m-2 d-1. The in situ N2O fluxes were only weakly correlated (r2 = 0.177) with NO3- and pH value, showing a tendency (p = 0.063) for NO3- concentration to be positively correlated with the in situ N2O flux and a weaker tendency (p = 0.138) for the pH value to be negatively correlated with the in situ N2O flux. Over 170 days of the drained period we estimated non-wetted drained soil to contribute 70.0 mmol N2O m-2, while rain induced peak events contributed 9.2 mmol N2O m-2, resulting in a total N2O emission

  9. Fluorescence Emission Study of Cdse/ZnS Quantum Dot and Au Nanoparticles Composite for Application in Quantum Dot Solar Concentrators

    OpenAIRE

    Chandra, Subhash; Doran, John; Kennedy, Manus; McCormack, S.; Chatten, A

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence of core shell (CdSe/ZnS) quantum dots (QDs) and Au nanoparticles (NPs) composite has been studied for application in quantum dot solar concentrators (QDSC). We conclude two points from the particular QD/Au NP composite studied. One; for the particular Au NPs concentration, the relative fluorescence emission enhancement increases with decreasing QD concentration. Second; the enhancement is more pronounced for the Au nanoparticles whose surface plasmon resonance wavelength overlaps...

  10. A multifunctional probe with aggregation-induced emission characteristics for selective fluorescence imaging and photodynamic killing of bacteria over mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Meng; Hu, Qinglian; Feng, Guangxue; Tomczak, Nikodem; Liu, Rongrong; Xing, Bengang; Tang, Ben Zhong; Liu, Bin

    2015-04-02

    A multifunctional probe aggregation-induced emission-Zinc(II)-dipicolylamine (AIE-ZnDPA) is developed for selective targeting, fluorescence imaging, and photodynamic killing of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria over mammalian cells. The probe has significant advantages in simple probe design, enhanced fluorescence upon bacteria binding, excellent photostability, and broad-spectrum antibacterial activity with almost no harm to mammalian cells.

  11. Quenching of coumarin emission by CdSe and CdSe/ZnS quantum dots: Implications for fluorescence reporting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baride, Aravind [Department of Chemistry, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD 57069 (United States); Engebretson, Daniel [Biomedical Engineering, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD 57069 (United States); Berry, Mary T. [Department of Chemistry, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD 57069 (United States); Stanley May, P., E-mail: smay@usd.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD 57069 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    The photoinduced release of highly fluorescent 7-diethylamino coumarin (7DEAC) from CdSe quantum dots (QD) modified with a thiocinnamate ligand (11-mercapto undecyl-E-3-(4-(N,N-diethylamino)-2-hydroxy phenyl) propenoate, [4DEATC]) has been previously described. Coumarin fluorescence was used to ‘report’ the photochemical reaction. The current study quantifies the quenching effect of the QDs on the coumarin emission in this system. A systematic study is presented on the quenching of 7DEAC by CdSe and CdSe/ZnS quantum dots capped with 2-[2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethoxy] ethanethiol (PEG-thiol). A new method for the functionalization of CdSe and CdSe/ZnS QDs with PEG-thiol was developed, which does not require isolation of the as-synthesized QDs. Stern–Volmer analysis was applied to quantify the effect of the PEG-CdSe and PEG-CdSe/ZnS on 7DEAC emission. The Stern–Volmer constant, K{sub SV}, was shown to be inversely proportional to temperature for quenching by PEG-CdSe, and the fluorescence lifetime of 7DEAC was shown to be independent of PEG-CdSe concentration. Room-temperature K{sub SV} values were similar for the PEG-CdSe and PEG-CdSe/ZnS quenchers. The large magnitude of K{sub SV}, the temperature dependence of K{sub SV}, the lifetime data, and the similarity of K{sub SV} values for the core and core–shell QD quenchers are all consistent with a static quenching mechanism. Assuming a static quenching mechanism, the temperature dependence of the coumarin-QD binding constant, K{sub b}, was used to estimate the ΔH and ΔS for the binding process. -- Highlights: • Quenching of a coumarin derivative by CdSe and CdSe/ZnS quantum dots is demonstrated • Stern–Volmer analysis is performed as a function of temperature • Fluorescence lifetime analysis was used to support Stern–Volmer analysis • Data overwhelmingly support quenching via a Static Mechanism • Quenching of coumarin by quantum dots is significant and must be considered in any release and report

  12. Temperature evaluation by simultaneous emission and saturated fluorescence measurements: A critical theoretical and experimental appraisal of the approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelby, Daniel E., E-mail: Shelby@dow.com [Department of Chemistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Merk, Sven [BAM, Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Berlin (Germany); Smith, Benjamin W. [Department of Chemistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Gornushkin, Igor B. [BAM, Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Berlin (Germany); Panne, Ulrich [BAM, Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Berlin (Germany); Department of Chemistry, Humboldt Universität, Berlin (Germany); Omenetto, Nicoló [Department of Chemistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Temperature is one of the most important physical parameters of plasmas induced by a focused laser beam on solid targets, and its experimental evaluation has received considerable attention. An intriguing approach, first proposed by Kunze (H.-J. Kunze, Experimental check of local thermodynamic equilibrium in discharges, Appl. Opt., 25 (1986) 13–13.) as a check of the existence of local thermodynamic equilibrium, is based upon the simultaneous measurement of the thermal emission and the optically saturated fluorescence of the same selected atomic transition. The approach, whose appealing feature is that neither the calibration of the set-up nor the spontaneous radiative probability of the transitions is needed, has not yet been applied, to our knowledge, to analytical flames and plasmas. A critical discussion of the basic requirements for the application of the method, its advantages, and its experimental limitations, is therefore presented here. For our study, Ba{sup +} transitions in a plasma formed by focusing a pulsed Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) on a glass sample containing BaO are selected. At various delay times from the plasma initiation, a pulsed, excimer-pumped dye laser tuned at the center of two Ba transitions (6s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2} → 6p {sup 2}P°{sub 3/2}; 455.403 nm and 6p {sup 2}P°{sub 1/2} → 6d {sup 2}S{sub 1/2}; 452.493 nm) is used to enhance the populations of the excited levels (6p {sup 2}P°{sub 3/2} and 6d {sup 2}S{sub 1/2}) above their thermal values. The measured ratio of the emission and direct line fluorescence signals observed at 614.171 nm (6p {sup 2}P°{sub 3/2} → 5d {sup 2}D{sub 5/2}) and 489.997 nm (6d {sup 2}S{sub 1/2} → 6p {sup 2}P°{sub 3/2}) is then related to the excitation temperature of the plasma. Our conclusion is that the approach, despite being indeed attractive and clever, does not seem to be easily applicable to flames and plasmas, in particular to transient and inhomogeneous plasmas such as those induced by lasers on

  13. Nitrogen, tillage, and crop rotation effects on nitrous oxide emissions from irrigated cropping systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorson, Ardell D; Del Grosso, Stephen J; Reule, Curtis A

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of irrigated crop management practices on nitrous oxide (N(2)O) emissions from soil. Emissions were monitored from several irrigated cropping systems receiving N fertilizer rates ranging from 0 to 246 kg N ha(-1) during the 2005 and 2006 growing seasons. Cropping systems included conventional-till (CT) continuous corn (Zea mays L.), no-till (NT) continuous corn, NT corn-dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) (NT-CDb), and NT corn-barley (Hordeum distichon L.) (NT-CB). In 2005, half the N was subsurface band applied as urea-ammonium nitrate (UAN) at planting to all corn plots, with the rest of the N applied surface broadcast as a polymer-coated urea (PCU) in mid-June. The entire N rate was applied as UAN at barley and dry bean planting in the NT-CB and NT-CDb plots in 2005. All plots were in corn in 2006, with PCU being applied at half the N rate at corn emergence and a second N application as dry urea in mid-June followed by irrigation, both banded on the soil surface in the corn row. Nitrous oxide fluxes were measured during the growing season using static, vented chambers (1-3 times wk(-1)) and a gas chromatograph analyzer. Linear increases in N(2)O emissions were observed with increasing N-fertilizer rate, but emission amounts varied with growing season. Growing season N(2)O emissions were greater from the NT-CDb system during the corn phase of the rotation than from the other cropping systems. Crop rotation and N rate had more effect than tillage system on N(2)O emissions. Nitrous oxide emissions from N application ranged from 0.30 to 0.75% of N applied. Spikes in N(2)O emissions after N fertilizer application were greater with UAN and urea than with PCU fertilizer. The PCU showed potential for reducing N(2)O emissions from irrigated cropping systems.

  14. Evidence for Fluorescent Fe II Emission from Extended Low Ionization Outflows in Obscured Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tinggui; Ferland, Gary J.; Yang, Chenwei; Wang, Huiyuan; Zhang, Shaohua

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that outflows in at least some broad absorption line (BAL) quasars are extended well beyond the putative dusty torus. Such outflows should be detectable in obscured quasars. We present four WISE selected infrared red quasars with very strong and peculiar ultraviolet Fe ii emission lines: strong UV Fe ii UV arising from transitions to ground/low excitation levels, and very weak Fe ii at wavelengths longer than 2800 Å. The spectra of these quasars display strong resonant emission lines, such as C iv, Al iii and Mg ii but sometimes, a lack of non-resonant lines such as C iii], S iii and He ii. We interpret the Fe ii lines as resonantly scattered light from the extended outflows that are viewed nearly edge-on, so that the accretion disk and broad line region are obscured by the dusty torus, while the extended outflows are not. We show that dust free gas exposed to strong radiation longward of 912 Å produces Fe ii emission very similar to that observed. The gas is too cool to collisionally excite Fe ii lines, accounting for the lack of optical emission. The spectral energy distribution from the UV to the mid-infrared can be modeled as emission from a clumpy dusty torus, with UV emission being reflected/scattered light either by the dusty torus or the outflow. Within this scenario, we estimate a minimum covering factor of the outflows from a few to 20% for the Fe ii scattering region, suggesting that Fe ii BAL quasars are at a special stage of quasar evolution.

  15. Application of excitation-emission fluorescence matrices and UV/Vis absorption to monitoring the photocatalytic degradation of commercial humic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valencia, Sergio, E-mail: hvalens@gmail.com [Procesos Fisicoquimicos Aplicados, Universidad de Antioquia, Carrera 53 61-30, Medellin (Colombia); Marin, Juan M.; Restrepo, Gloria [Procesos Fisicoquimicos Aplicados, Universidad de Antioquia, Carrera 53 61-30, Medellin (Colombia); Frimmel, Fritz H., E-mail: fritz.frimmel@kit.edu [BereichWasserchemie, Engler-Bunte-Institut, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technology (KIT), 7631, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2013-01-01

    This study reports the use of excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence and UV/Vis spectroscopy to monitor the changes in the composition and reactivity of Aldrich humic acids (Aldrich HA) as a model compound for natural organic matter (NOM) during photocatalytic degradation. Degussa P-25 titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) and a solar UV-light simulator (a batch reactor) were used. The photocatalysis shifted the fluorescence maxima of EEMs of Aldrich HA toward shorter wavelengths, which implied that the photocatalytic degradation of commercial Aldrich HA caused the breakdown of high molecular weight components and the formation of lower molecular weight fractions. In addition, the fluorescence intensity of fulvic- and humic-like Aldrich HA presented a strong correlation with dissolved organic carbon (DOC), specific UV absorbance (SUVA) parameters, trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP), and organically bound halogens absorbable on activated carbon formation potential (AOXFP). Fluorescence spectroscopy was shown to be a powerful tool for monitoring of the photocatalytic degradation of HA. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There is a strong correlation between the fluorescence intensity of humic acids and DOC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HA-like and FA-like fluorescence intensity and SUVA show strong linear correlation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Humic acids with high fluorescence intensity imply high formation of DBPs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Humic acid photocatalysis lead to a decrease in the fluorescence intensity of EEMs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful tool to monitor HA photocatalytic removal.

  16. Flexible field emission of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes/reduced graphene hybrid films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Duck Hyun; Lee, Jin Ah; Lee, Won Jong; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2011-01-03

    The outstanding flexible field emission properties of carbon hybrid films made of vertically aligned N-doped carbon nanotubes grown on mechanically compliant reduced graphene films are demonstrated. The bottom-reduced graphene film substrate enables the conformal coating of the hybrid film on flexible device geometry and ensures robust mechanical and electrical contact even in a highly deformed state. The field emission properties are precisely examined in terms of the control of the bending radius, the N-doping level, and the length or wall-number of the carbon nanotubes and analyzed with electric field simulations. This high-performance flexible carbon field emitter is potentially useful for diverse, flexible field emission devices.

  17. Leaf Gas Exchange and Fluorescence of Two Winter Wheat Varieties in Response to Drought Stress and Nitrogen Supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiubo; Wang, Lifang; Shangguan, Zhouping

    2016-01-01

    Water and nitrogen supply are the two primary factors limiting productivity of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). In our study, two winter wheat varieties, Xinong 979 and large-spike wheat, were evaluated for their physiological responses to different levels of nitrogen and water status during their seedling stage grown in a phytotron. Our results indicated that drought stress greatly reduced the net photosynthetic rate (Pn), transpiration rate (E), and stomatal conductance (Gs), but with a greater increase in instantaneous water use efficiency (WUE). At the meantime, the nitrogen (N) supply improved photosynthetic efficiency under water deficit. Parameters inferred from chlorophyll a measurements, i.e., photochemical quenching coefficient (qP), the maximum photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm), the quantum yield of photosystemII(ΦPSII), and the apparent photosynthetic electron transport rate (ETR) decreased under water stress at all nitrogen levels and declined in N-deficient plants. The root–shoot ratio (R/S) increased slightly with water stress at a low N level; the smallest root–shoot ratio was found at a high N level and moderate drought stress treatment. These results suggest that an appropriate nitrogen supply may be necessary to enhance drought resistance in wheat by improving photosynthetic efficiency and relieving photoinhibition under drought stress. However, an excessive N supply had no effect on drought resistance, which even showed an adverse effect on plant growth. Comparing the two cultivars, Xinong 979 has a stronger drought resistance compared with large-spike wheat under N deficiency. PMID:27802318

  18. Reducing Soil CO2 Emission and Improving Upland Rice Yield with no-Tillage, Straw Mulch and Nitrogen Fertilization in Northern Benin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossou-Yovo, E.; Brueggemann, N.; Naab, J.; Huat, J.; Ampofo, E.; Ago, E.; Agbossou, E.

    2015-12-01

    To explore effective ways to decrease soil CO2 emission and increase grain yield, field experiments were conducted on two upland rice soils (Lixisols and Gleyic Luvisols) in northern Benin in West Africa. The treatments were two tillage systems (no-tillage, and manual tillage), two rice straw managements (no rice straw, and rice straw mulch at 3 Mg ha-1) and three nitrogen fertilizers levels (no nitrogen, recommended level of nitrogen: 60 kg ha-1, and high level of nitrogen: 120 kg ha-1). Potassium and phosphorus fertilizers were applied to be non-limiting at 40 kg K2O ha-1 and 40 kg P2O5 ha-1. Four replications of the twelve treatment combinations were arranged in a randomized complete block design. Soil CO2 emission, soil moisture and soil temperature were measured at 5 cm depth in 6 to 10 days intervals during the rainy season and every two weeks during the dry season. Soil moisture was the main factor explaining the seasonal variability of soil CO2 emission. Much larger soil CO2 emissions were found in rainy than dry season. No-tillage planting significantly reduced soil CO2 emissions compared with manual tillage. Higher soil CO2 emissions were recorded in the mulched treatments. Soil CO2 emissions were higher in fertilized treatments compared with non fertilized treatments. Rice biomass and yield were not significantly different as a function of tillage systems. On the contrary, rice biomass and yield significantly increased with application of rice straw mulch and nitrogen fertilizer. The highest response of rice yield to nitrogen fertilizer addition was obtained for 60 kg N ha-1 in combination with 3 Mg ha-1 of rice straw for the two tillage systems. Soil CO2 emission per unit grain yield was lower under no-tillage, rice straw mulch and nitrogen fertilizer treatments. No-tillage combined with rice straw mulch and 60 kg N ha-1 could be used by smallholder farmers to achieve higher grain yield and lower soil CO2 emission in upland rice fields in northern Benin.

  19. Denitrification Losses and N2O Emissions from Nitrogen Fertilizer Applied to a Vegetable Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Bing; He Fa-Yun; Xu Qiu-Ming; Yin Bin; CAI Gui-Xin

    2006-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted on Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris L. ssp. pekinensis (Lour.) Olsson) in a Nanjing suburb in 2003. The experiment included 4 treatments in a randomized complete block design with 3 replicates: zero chemical fertilizer N (CK); urea at rates of 300 kg N ha-1 (U300) and 600 kg N ha-1 (U600), both as basal and two topdressings; and polymer-coated urea at a rate of 180 kg N ha-1 (PCU180) as a basal application. The acetylene inhibition technique was used to measure denitrification (N2 + N2O) from intact soil cores and N2O emissions in the absence of acetylene. Results showed that compared to CK total denitrification losses were significantly greater (P ≤ 0.05) in the PCU180, U300, and U600 treatments, while N2O emissions in the U300 and U600 treatments were significantly higher (P ≤ 0.05) than CK. In the U300 and U600 treatments peaks of denitrification and N2O emission were usually observed after N application. In the polymer-coated urea treatment (PCU180) during the period 20 to 40 days after transplanting, higher denitrification rates and N2O fluxes occurred. Compared with urea, polymer-coated urea did not show any effect on reducing denitrification losses and N2O emissions in terms of percentage of applied N. As temperature gradually decreased from transplanting to harvest, denitrification rates and N2O emissions tended to decrease. A significant (P ≤ 0.01) positive correlation occurred between denitrification (r = 0.872) or N2O emission (r = 0.781) flux densities and soil temperature in the CK treatment with a stable nitrate content during the whole growing season.

  20. N2O and N2 emissions from contrasting soil environments - interactive effects of soil nitrogen, hydrology and microbial communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Jesper; Elberling, Bo; Ribbons, Relena; Hedo, Javier; José Fernández Alonso, Maria; Krych, Lukasz; Sandris Nielsen, Dennis; Kitzler, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Reactive nitrogen (N) in the environment has doubled relative to the natural global N cycle with consequences for biogeochemical cycling of soil N. Also, climate change is expected to alter precipitation patterns and increase soil temperatures which in Arctic environments may accelerate permafrost thawing. The combination of changes in the soil N cycle and hydrological regimes may alter microbial transformations of soil N with unknown impacts on N2O and N2 emissions from temperate and Arctic soils. We present the first results of soil N2O and N2 emissions, chemistry and microbial communities over soil hydrological gradients (upslope, intermediate and wet) across a global N deposition gradient. The global gradient covered an N-limited high Arctic tundra (Zackenberg-ZA), a pacific temperate rain forest (Vancouver Island-VI) and an N saturated forest in Austria (Klausenleopoldsdorf-KL). The N2O and N2 emissions were measured from intact cores at field moisture in a He-atmosphere system. Extractable NH4+ and NO3-, organic and microbial C and N and potential enzyme-activities were determined on soil samples. Soil genomic DNA was subjected to MiSeq-based tag-encoded 16S rRNA and ITS gene amplicon sequencing for the bacterial and fungal community structure. Similar soil moisture levels were observed for the upslope, intermediate and wet locations at ZA, VI and KL, respectively. Extractable NO3- was highest at the N rich KL and lowest at ZA and showed no trend with soil moisture similar to NH4+. At ZA and VI soil NH4+ was higher than NO3- indicating a tighter N cycling. N2O emissions increased with soil moisture at all sites. The N2O emissions for the wet locations ranked similarly to NO3- with the largest response to soil moisture at KL. N2 emissions were remarkably similar across the sites and increased with soil wetness. Microbial C and N also increased with soil moisture and were overall lowest at the N rich KL site. The potential activity of protease enzyme was site

  1. Effects of nitrogen fertilizer sources and tillage practices on greenhouse gas emissions in paddy fields of central China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z. S.; Chen, J.; Liu, T. Q.; Cao, C. G.; Li, C. F.

    2016-11-01

    The effects of nitrogen (N) fertilizer sources and tillage practices on greenhouse gas (GHG) emission have been well elucidated separately. However, it is still remained unclear regarding the combined effects of N fertilization and tillage practices on the global warming potential (GWP) and net ecosystem economic budget (NEEB) in paddy fields. In this paper, a 2-year field experiment was performed to investigate the effects of N fertilizer sources (N0, no N; IF, 100% N from chemical fertilizer; SRIF, 50% N from slow-release fertilizer and 50% N from chemical fertilizer; OF, 100% N from organic fertilizer; OFIF, 50% N from organic fertilizer and 50% N from chemical fertilizer) and tillage practices (CT, conventional intensive tillage; NT, no-tillage) on the emissions of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O), GWP, greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI), and NEEB in paddy fields of central China. Compared with N0 treatment, IF, SRIF, OF and OFIF treatments greatly enhanced the cumulative seasonal CH4 emissions (by 54.7%, 41.7%, 51.1% and 66.0%, respectively) and N2O emissions (by 164.5%, 93.4%, 130.2% and 251.3%, respectively). NT treatment significantly decreased the GWP and GHGI compared with CT treatment. On the other hand, NT treatment significantly decreased CH4 emissions by 8.5-13.7%, but did not affect N2O emissions relative to CT treatment. Application of N fertilizers significantly increased GWP and GHGI. It was worth noting that the combined treatment of OFIF and NT resulted in the second-highest GWP and GHGI and the largest NEEB among all treatments. Therefore, our results suggest that OFIF combined with NT is an eco-friendly strategy to optimize the economic and environmental benefits of paddy fields in central China. Although the treatment of SRIF plus NT showed the lowest GWP and GHGI and the highest grain yield among all treatments, it led to the lowest NEEB due to its highest fertilizer cost. These results indicate that the government should provide

  2. Using water Raman intensities to determine the effective excitation and emission path lengths of fluorophotometers for correcting fluorescence inner filter effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, Charles B; Hu, Juan; Zhang, Dongmao

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence and Raman inner filter effects (IFE) cause spectral distortion and nonlinearity between spectral signal intensity with increasing analyte concentration. Convenient and effective correction of fluorescence IFE has been an active research goal for decades. Presented herein is the finding that fluorescence and Raman IFE can be reliably corrected using the equation I(corr)/I(obsd) = 10(dxAx + dmAm) when the effective excitation and emission path lengths, dx and dm, of a fluorophotometer are determined by simple linear curve-fitting of Raman intensities of a series of water Raman reference samples that have known degrees of Raman IFEs. The path lengths derived with one set of Raman measurements at one specific excitation wavelength are effective for correcting fluorescence and Raman IFEs induced by any chromophore or fluorophore, regardless of the excitation and emission wavelengths. The IFE-corrected fluorescence intensities are linearly correlated to fluorophore concentration over 5 orders of magnitude (from 5.9 nM to 0.59 mM) for 2-aminopurine in a 1 cm × 0.17 cm fluorescence cuvette. This water Raman-based method is easy to implement. It does not involve complicated instrument geometry determination or difficult data manipulation. This work should be of broad significance to physical and biological sciences given the popularity of fluorescence techniques in analytical applications.

  3. Nitrogen soil emissions and belowground plant processes in Mediterranean annual pastures are altered by ozone exposure and N-inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Martín, L.; Bermejo-Bermejo, V.; García-Torres, L.; Alonso, R.; de la Cruz, A.; Calvete-Sogo, H.; Vallejo, A.

    2017-09-01

    Increasing tropospheric ozone (O3) and atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition alter the structure and composition of pastures. These changes could affect N and C compounds in the soil that in turn can influence soil microbial activity and processes involved in the emission of N oxides, methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2), but these effects have been scarcely studied. Through an open top chamber (OTC) field experiment, the combined effects of both pollutants on soil gas emissions from an annual experimental Mediterranean community were assessed. Four O3 treatments and three different N input levels were considered. Fluxes of nitric (NO) and nitrous (N2O) oxide, CH4 and CO2 were analysed as well as soil mineral N and dissolved organic carbon. Belowground plant parameters like root biomass and root C and N content were also sampled. Ozone strongly increased soil N2O emissions, doubling the cumulative emission through the growing cycle in the highest O3 treatment, while N-inputs enhanced more slightly NO; CH4 and CO2 where not affected. Both N-gases had a clear seasonality, peaking at the start and at the end of the season when pasture physiological activity is minimal; thus, higher microorganism activity occurred when pasture had a low nutrient demand. The O3-induced peak of N2O under low N availability at the end of the growing season was counterbalanced by the high N inputs. These effects were related to the O3 x N significant interaction found for the root-N content in the grass and the enhanced senescence of the community. Results indicate the importance of the belowground processes, where competition between plants and microorganisms for the available soil N is a key factor, for understanding the ecosystem responses to O3 and N.

  4. Impact of emissions and +2 °C climate change upon future ozone and nitrogen dioxide over Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Laura; Lacressonnière, Gwendoline; Gauss, Michael; Engardt, Magnuz; Andersson, Camilla; Josse, Béatrice; Marécal, Virginie; Nyiri, Agnes; Sobolowski, Stefan; Siour, Guillaume; Szopa, Sophie; Vautard, Robert

    2016-10-01

    The evolution of ozone and nitrogen dioxide over Europe between the present day and a future period with a +2 °C global warming relative to the pre-industrial climate was studied using four offline chemistry transport models, each driven by a different climate model. Given the recent outcome of the COP21 negotiations, understanding the implications of climate change around the +2 °C threshold has never been more pressing or relevant. One of the objectives of this study was to show how changes in anthropogenic emissions and +2 °C climate change are expected to affect future air quality, which may have important implications upon human health. It was found that a +2 °C climate change alone was responsible for a modest, and not statistically significant, increase in surface O3 concentrations (of between -0.1-0.8 ppb in the summer averaged over the European domain) compared to the present climate. Two different emission scenarios were used for the future time period in order to provide an estimate of the extent of air pollution reductions that could occur if (a) all currently planned air quality legislation is implemented and (b) all maximum technologically feasible emission reductions are implemented. The results showed that summer O3 could be reduced by between 4 and 5 ppb under a current legislation scenario, with at least 3 ppb of further reductions under the maximum mitigated scenario. Calculations of summer ozone enhancement were used as a metric to analyse the results after having removed background ozone level changes. In conclusion it was found that future air quality on a regional scale will depend upon the implementation of effective emission reduction policy; the positive effects of which should not be hindered by a +2 °C global warming.

  5. Estimation of the maintenance energy requirements, methane emissions and nitrogen utilization efficiency of two suckler cow genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, C X; Lively, F O; Wylie, A R G; Yan, T

    2016-04-01

    Seventeen non-lactating dairy-bred suckler cows (LF; Limousin×Holstein-Friesian) and 17 non-lactating beef composite breed suckler cows (ST; Stabiliser) were used to study enteric methane emissions and energy and nitrogen (N) utilization from grass silage diets. Cows were housed in cubicle accommodation for 17 days, and then moved to individual tie-stalls for an 8-day digestibility balance including a 2-day adaption followed by immediate transfer to an indirect, open-circuit, respiration calorimeters for 3 days with gaseous exchange recorded over the last two of these days. Grass silage was offered ad libitum once daily at 0900 h throughout the study. There were no significant differences (P>0.05) between the genotypes for energy intakes, energy outputs or energy use efficiency, or for methane emission rates (methane emissions per unit of dry matter intake or energy intake), or for N metabolism characteristics (N intake or N output in faeces or urine). Accordingly, the data for both cow genotypes were pooled and used to develop relationships between inputs and outputs. Regression of energy retention against ME intake (r 2=0.52; Penergy requirements for maintenance of 0.386, 0.392 and 0.375 MJ/kg0.75 for LF+ST, LF and ST respectively. Methane energy output was 0.066 of gross energy intake when the intercept was omitted from the linear equation (r 2=0.59; Penergy requirement, methane emission and manure N output for suckler cows and further information is required to evaluate their application in a wide range of suckler production systems.

  6. Nitrogen plasma formation through terahertz-induced ultrafast electron field emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Zalkovskij, Maksim; Strikwerda, Andrew;

    2015-01-01

    Electron microscopy and electron diffraction techniques rely on electron sources. Those sources require strong electric fields to extract electrons from metals, either by the photoelectric effect, driven by multiphoton absorption of strong laser fields, or in the static field emission regime...

  7. Enhanced-efficiency nitrogen fertilizers: potential role in nitrous oxide emission mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enhanced-efficiency N fertilizers (EENF) have potential for mitigating N2O emissions from N fertilized cropping systems. A synopsis of EENF characteristics is presented. Stabilized EENFs contain nitrification and/or urease inhibitors. Slow-release EENFs contain N components that are slowly releas...

  8. Greenhouse gas emissions from a wheat-maize double cropping system with different nitrogen fertilization regimes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, X.K.; Su, F.; Ju, X.T.; Gao, B.; Oenema, O.; Christie, P.; Huang, B.X.; Jiang, R.F.; Zhang, F.S.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we report on a two-years field experiment aimed at the quantification of the emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) from the dominant wheat maize double cropping system in North China Plain. The experiment had 6 different fertilization strategies, including a control treatment, rec

  9. Nitrogen plasma formation through terahertz-induced ultrafast electron field emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Zalkovskij, Maksim; Strikwerda, Andrew;

    2015-01-01

    Electron microscopy and electron diffraction techniques rely on electron sources. Those sources require strong electric fields to extract electrons from metals, either by the photoelectric effect, driven by multiphoton absorption of strong laser fields, or in the static field emission regime. Ter...

  10. Greenhouse gas emissions from a wheat-maize double cropping system with different nitrogen fertilization regimes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, X.K.; Su, F.; Ju, X.T.; Gao, B.; Oenema, O.; Christie, P.; Huang, B.X.; Jiang, R.F.; Zhang, F.S.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we report on a two-years field experiment aimed at the quantification of the emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) from the dominant wheat maize double cropping system in North China Plain. The experiment had 6 different fertilization strategies, including a control treatment,

  11. Effects of nitrification inhibitors (DCD and DMPP on nitrous oxide emission, crop yield and nitrogen uptake in a wheat-maize cropping system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of nitrification inhibitors together with ammonium-based fertilizers is proposed as a potent method to decrease nitrous oxide (N2O emission while promoting yield and nitrogen use efficiency in fertilized agricultural fields. To evaluate the effects of nitrification inhibitors, we conducted year-round measurements of N2O fluxes, yield, aboveground biomass, plant carbon and nitrogen contents, soil inorganic nitrogen and dissolved organic carbon contents and the main environmental factors for urea (U, urea + dicyandiamide (DCD and urea + 3,4-dimethylpyrazol-phosphate (DMPP treatments in a wheat-maize rotation field. The cumulative N2O emissions were calculated to be 4.49 ± 0.21, 2.93 ± 0.06 and 2.78 ± 0.16 kg N ha−1 yr−1 for the U, DCD and DMPP treatments, respectively. Therefore, the DCD and DMPP treatments decreased the annual emissions by 35% and 38%, respectively. The variations of soil temperature, moisture and inorganic nitrogen content regulated the seasonal fluctuation of N2O emissions. When the emissions presented clearly temporal variations, year-round and high-frequency measurements should be adopted to estimate annual cumulative emissions and treatment effects. The application of nitrification inhibitors increased the soil inorganic nitrogen and dissolved organic carbon availability and shifted the main soil inorganic nitrogen form from nitrate to ammonium. The annual yield, aboveground biomass and nitrogen uptake by aboveground plants increased by 8.5–9.1%, 8.6–9.7% and 10.9–13.2%, respectively, for the DCD and DMPP treatments compared with the U treatment. The results demonstrate the roles the nitrification inhibitors play in enhancing yield and nitrogen use efficiency and reducing N2O emission from the wheat-maize cropping system.

  12. Key chemical NOx sink uncertainties and how they influence top-down emissions of nitrogen oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Stavrakou

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Triggered by recent developments from laboratory and field studies regarding major NOx sink pathways in the troposphere, this study evaluates the influence of chemical uncertainties in NOx sinks for global NOx distributions calculated by the IMAGESv2 chemistry-transport model, and quantifies their significance for top-down NOx emission estimates. Our study focuses on four key chemical parameters believed to be of primary importance, more specifically, the rate of the reaction of NO2 with OH radicals, the newly-identified HNO3-forming channel in the reaction of NO with HO2, the reactive uptake of N2O5 on aerosols, and the regeneration of OH in the oxidation of isoprene. Sensitivity simulations are performed to estimate the impact of each source of uncertainty. The model calculations show that, although the NO2 + OH reaction is the largest NOx sink globally accounting for 50–70% of the total sink, the reaction contributing the most to the overall uncertainty is the formation of HNO3 in NO + HO2, leading to NOx column changes reaching a~factor of two over tropical regions, and to a 35% decrease in the global tropospheric NOx lifetime. Emission inversion experiments are carried out using model settings which either miminize (MINLOSS or maximize (MAXLOSS the total NOx sink, both constrained by one year of OMI NO2 column data from the DOMINO v2 KNMI algorithm. The choice of the model setup is found to have a major impact on the top-down flux estimates, with 50% higher emissions for MAXLOSS compared to the MINLOSS inversion globally. Even larger departures are found for soil NO (factor of 2 and lightning (70%, whereas the global anthropogenic source is comparatively better constrained, especially in China. Evaluation of the emission optimization is performed against independent satellite observations from the SCIAMACHY sensor, airborne NO2 measurements, observed NOx lifetimes at megacities, as well as with two new bottom-up inventories of

  13. Fabrication of aggregation-induced emission based fluorescent nanoparticles and their biological imaging application: recent progress and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Yang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aggregation-induced emission (AIE dyes have received wide-spread concern since their inception. Several types of AIE-based fluorescent nanoparticle (FNP have been developed, and the potential applications of these FNPs have also been explored. Recent studies of AIE-based FNPs in biological areas have suggested that they show promise as bio-materials for cell imaging and other biomedical applications. This article reviews recent progress in the synthesis of AIE-based FNPs via non-covalent, covalent and novel one-pot strategies, and the subsequent cell-imaging of those AIE-based FNPs. Many successes have been achieved, and there is still plenty of space for the development of AIE-based FNPs as new bio-materials.

  14. Perturbation-free measurement of in situ di-nitrogen emissions from denitrification in nitrate-rich aquatic ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Shuping; Clough, Timothy; Luo, Jiafa; Wrage-Mönnig, Nicole; Oenema, Oene; Zhang, Yuming; Hu, Chunsheng

    2017-02-01

    Increased production of reactive nitrogen (Nr) from atmospheric di-nitrogen (N2) has greatly contributed to increased food production. However, enriching the biosphere with Nr has also caused a series of negative effects on global ecosystems, especially aquatic ecosystems. The main pathway converting Nr back into the atmospheric N2 pool is the last step in the denitrification process. Despite several attempts, there is still a need for perturbation-free methods for measuring in situ N2 fluxes from denitrification in aquatic ecosystems at the field scale. Such a method is needed to comprehensively quantify the N2 fluxes from aquatic ecosystems. Here we observed linear relationships between the δ(15)N-N2O signatures and the logarithmically transformed N2O/(N2+N2O) emission ratios. Through independent measurements, we verified that the perturbation-free N2 flux from denitrification in nitrate-rich aquatic ecosystems can be inferred from these linear relationships. Our method allowed the determination of field-scale in situ N2 fluxes from nitrate-rich aquatic ecosystems both with and without overlaying water. The perturbation-free in situ N2 fluxes observed by the new method were almost one order of magnitude higher than those by the sediment core method. The ability of aquatic ecosystems to remove Nr may previously have been severely underestimated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Atmospheric emissions of nitrous oxide, methane, and carbon dioxide from different nitrogen fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sistani, K R; Jn-Baptiste, M; Lovanh, N; Cook, K L

    2011-01-01

    Alternative N fertilizers that produce low greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from soil are needed to reduce the impacts of agricultural practices on global warming potential (GWP). We quantified and compared growing season fluxes of NO, CH, and CO resulting from applications of different N fertilizer sources, urea (U), urea-ammonium nitrate (UAN), ammonium nitrate (NHNO), poultry litter, and commercially available, enhanced-efficiency N fertilizers as follows: polymer-coated urea (ESN), SuperU, UAN + AgrotainPlus, and poultry litter + AgrotainPlus in a no-till corn ( L.) production system. Greenhouse gas fluxes were measured during two growing seasons using static, vented chambers. The ESN delayed the NO flux peak by 3 to 4 wk compared with other N sources. No significant differences were observed in NO emissions among the enhanced-efficiency and traditional inorganic N sources, except for ESN in 2009. Cumulative growing season NO emission from poultry litter was significantly greater than from inorganic N sources. The NO loss (2-yr average) as a percentage of N applied ranged from 0.69% for SuperU to 4.5% for poultry litter. The CH-C and CO-C emissions were impacted by environmental factors, such as temperature and moisture, more than the N source. There was no significant difference in corn yield among all N sources in both years. Site specifics and climate conditions may be responsible for the differences among the results of this study and some of the previously published studies. Our results demonstrate that N fertilizer source and climate conditions need consideration when selecting N sources to reduce GHG emissions.

  16. Soil greenhouse gas emissions affected by irrigation, tillage, crop rotation, and nitrogen fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainju, Upendra M; Stevens, William B; Caesar-Tonthat, Thecan; Liebig, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    Management practices, such as irrigation, tillage, cropping system, and N fertilization, may influence soil greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. We quantified the effects of irrigation, tillage, crop rotation, and N fertilization on soil CO, NO, and CH emissions from March to November, 2008 to 2011 in a Lihen sandy loam in western North Dakota. Treatments were two irrigation practices (irrigated and nonirrigated) and five cropping systems (conventional-tilled malt barley [ L.] with N fertilizer [CT-N], conventional-tilled malt barley with no N fertilizer [CT-C], no-tilled malt barley-pea [ L.] with N fertilizer [NT-PN], no-tilled malt barley with N fertilizer [NT-N], and no-tilled malt barley with no N fertilizer [NT-C]). The GHG fluxes varied with date of sampling and peaked immediately after precipitation, irrigation, and/or N fertilization events during increased soil temperature. Both CO and NO fluxes were greater in CT-N under the irrigated condition, but CH uptake was greater in NT-PN under the nonirrigated condition than in other treatments. Although tillage and N fertilization increased CO and NO fluxes by 8 to 30%, N fertilization and monocropping reduced CH uptake by 39 to 40%. The NT-PN, regardless of irrigation, might mitigate GHG emissions by reducing CO and NO emissions and increasing CH uptake relative to other treatments. To account for global warming potential for such a practice, information on productions associated with CO emissions along with NO and CH fluxes is needed.

  17. Satellite constraint for emissions of nitrogen oxides from anthropogenic, lightning and soil sources over East China on a high-resolution grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-T. Lin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Vertical column densities (VCDs of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2 retrieved from space provide valuable information to estimate emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx inversely. Accurate emission attribution to individual sources, important both for understanding the global biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen and for emission control, remains difficult. This study presents a regression-based multi-step inversion approach to estimate emissions of NOx from anthropogenic, lightning and soil sources individually for 2006 over East China on a 0.25° long × 0.25° lat grid, employing the DOMINO product version 2 retrieved from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument. The inversion is done gridbox by gridbox to derive the respective emissions, taking advantage of differences in seasonality between anthropogenic and natural sources. Lightning and soil emissions are combined together for any given gridbox due to their similar seasonality; and their different spatial distributions are used implicitly for source separation to some extent. The nested GEOS-Chem model for East Asia is used to simulate the seasonal variations of different emission sources and impacts on VCDs of NO2 for the inversion purpose. Sensitivity tests are conducted to evaluate key assumptions embedded in the inversion process. The inverse estimate suggests annual budgets of about 7.1 TgN (±39%, 0.21 TgN (±61%, and 0.38 TgN (±65% for the a posteriori anthropogenic, lightning and soil emissions, respectively, about 18–23% higher than the respective a priori values. The enhancements in anthropogenic emissions are largest in cities and areas with extensive use of coal, particularly in the north in winter, as evident on the high-resolution grid. Derived soil emissions are consistent with recent bottom-up estimates. They are less than 6% of anthropogenic emissions annually, increasing to about 13% for July. Derived lightning emissions are about 3% of

  18. Raman scattering or fluorescence emission? Raman spectroscopy study on lime-based building and conservation materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaszowska, Zofia; Malek, Kamilla; Staniszewska-Slezak, Emilia; Niedzielska, Karina

    2016-12-05

    This work presents an in-depth study on Raman spectra excited with 1064 and 532nm lasers of lime binders employed in the past as building materials and revealed today as valuable conservation materials. We focus our interest on the bands of strong intensity, which are present in the spectra of all binders acquired with laser excitation at 1064nm, but absent in the corresponding spectra acquired with laser excitation at 532nm. We suggest, that the first group of spectra represents fluorescence phenomena of unknown origin and the second true Raman scattering. In our studies, we also include two other phases of lime cycle, i.e. calcium carbonate (a few samples of calcite of various origins) and calcium oxide (quicklime) to assess how structural and chemical transformations of lime phases affect the NIR-Raman spectral profile. Furthermore, we analyse a set of carbonated limewashes and lime binders derived from old plasters to give an insight into their spectral characteristics after excitation with the 1064nm laser line. NIR-Raman micro-mapping results are also presented to reveal the spatial distribution of building materials and fluorescent species in the cross-section of plaster samples taken from a 15th century chapel. Our study shows that the Raman analysis can help identify lime-based building and conservation materials, however, a caution is advised in the interpretation of the spectra acquired using 1064nm excitation.

  19. Reduction of nitrogen excretion and emission in poultry: A review for organic poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalova, Vesela I; Kim, Jihyuk; Patterson, Paul H; Ricke, Steven C; Kim, Woo K

    2016-01-01

    Organic poultry is an alternative to conventional poultry which is rapidly developing as a response to customers' demand for better food and a cleaner environment. Although organic poultry manure can partially be utilized by organic horticultural producers, litter accumulation as well as excessive nitrogen still remains a challenge to maintain environment pureness, animal, and human health. Compared to conventional poultry, diet formulation without nitrogen overloading in organic poultry is even more complicated due to specific standards and regulations which limit the application of some supplements and imposes specific criteria to the ingredients in use. This is especially valid for methionine provision which supplementation as a crystalline form is only temporarily allowed. This review is focused on the utilization of various protein sources in the preparation of a diet composed of 100% organic ingredients which meet the avian physiology need for methionine, while avoiding protein overload. The potential to use unconventional protein sources such as invertebrates and microbial proteins to achieve optimal amino acid provision is also discussed.

  20. Determination of sulpiride in human urine using excitation-emission matrix fluorescence coupled with second-order calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Jin-Fang; Wu, Hai-Long; Xia, A-Lin; Zhu, Shao-Hua; Bian, Ying-Chao; Li, Shu-Fang; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2007-12-01

    This paper proposes a new and effective approach for the quantitative analysis of sulpiride, a significant antipsychotic drug, in human urine samples by the incorporation of excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence and second-order calibration methodologies based on the alternating fitting residue (AFR) and self-weighted alternating trilinear decomposition (SWATLD) algorithms. With the application of a second-order advantage, the proposed strategy could be utilized for a direct concentration determination of sulpiride with a simple pretreatment step, even in the presence of serious natural fluorescent interferences. The average recoveries of sulpiride in complex urine samples by using AFR and SWATLD with an estimated component number of three were 101.2 +/- 2.1 and 94.4 +/- 0.7%, respectively. Moreover, the accuracy of the two algorithms was also evaluated through elliptical joint confidence region (EJCR) tests as well as the figures of merit, such as sensitivity (SEN), selectivity (SEL) and limit of detection (LOD). The experimental results demonstrated that both algorithms, as promising quantitative alternatives, have been satisfactorily applied to the determination of sulpiride in human urine, but the performance of AFR was slightly better than that of SWATLD.

  1. Characterizing fluorescent dissolved organic matter in a membrane bioreactor via excitation-emission matrix combined with parallel factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Tahir; Quang, Viet Ly; Cho, Jinwoo; Hur, Jin

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we successfully tracked the dynamic changes in different constitutes of bound extracellular polymeric substances (bEPS), soluble microbial products (SMP), and permeate during the operation of bench scale membrane bioreactors (MBRs) via fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) combined with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). Three fluorescent groups were identified, including two protein-like (tryptophan-like C1 and tyrosine-like C2) and one microbial humic-like components (C3). In bEPS, protein-like components were consistently more dominant than C3 during the MBR operation, while their relative abundance in SMP depended on aeration intensities. C1 of bEPS exhibited a linear correlation (R(2)=0.738; pbEPS amounts in sludge, and C2 was closely related to the stability of sludge. The protein-like components were more greatly responsible for membrane fouling. Our study suggests that EEM-PARAFAC can be a promising monitoring tool to provide further insight into process evaluation and membrane fouling during MBR operation.

  2. Fluorescence of Bacteria, Pollens, and Naturally Occurring Airborne Particles: Excitation/Emission Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    have important effects on climate, through scattering and absorbing light, and acting as cloud condensation nuclei (17–19). Improved real-time...from polymerization and other reactions of volatile terpenes released by plants are not considered biological by at least some researchers. Humic...has a higher energy per photon absorbed , and this energy is higher than that of the photons emitted from NADH or riboflavin, but the emission is

  3. Molecular mechanisms of water table lowering and nitrogen deposition in affecting greenhouse gas emissions from a Tibetan alpine wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Yu, Lingfei; Zhang, Zhenhua; Liu, Wei; Chen, Litong; Cao, Guangmin; Yue, Haowei; Zhou, Jizhong; Yang, Yunfeng; Tang, Yanhong; He, Jin-Sheng

    2017-02-01

    Rapid climate change and intensified human activities have resulted in water table lowering (WTL) and enhanced nitrogen (N) deposition in Tibetan alpine wetlands. These changes may alter the magnitude and direction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, affecting the climate impact of these fragile ecosystems. We conducted a mesocosm experiment combined with a metagenomics approach (GeoChip 5.0) to elucidate the effects of WTL (-20 cm relative to control) and N deposition (30 kg N ha(-1)  yr(-1) ) on carbon dioxide (CO2 ), methane (CH4 ) and nitrous oxide (N2 O) fluxes as well as the underlying mechanisms. Our results showed that WTL reduced CH4 emissions by 57.4% averaged over three growing seasons compared with no-WTL plots, but had no significant effect on net CO2 uptake or N2 O flux. N deposition increased net CO2 uptake by 25.2% in comparison with no-N deposition plots and turned the mesocosms from N2 O sinks to N2 O sources, but had little influence on CH4 emissions. The interactions between WTL and N deposition were not detected in all GHG emissions. As a result, WTL and N deposition both reduced the global warming potential (GWP) of growing season GHG budgets on a 100-year time horizon, but via different mechanisms. WTL reduced GWP from 337.3 to -480.1 g CO2 -eq m(-2) mostly because of decreased CH4 emissions, while N deposition reduced GWP from 21.0 to -163.8 g CO2 -eq m(-2) , mainly owing to increased net CO2 uptake. GeoChip analysis revealed that decreased CH4 production potential, rather than increased CH4 oxidation potential, may lead to the reduction in net CH4 emissions, and decreased nitrification potential and increased denitrification potential affected N2 O fluxes under WTL conditions. Our study highlights the importance of microbial mechanisms in regulating ecosystem-scale GHG responses to environmental changes.

  4. Projecting Future Nitrous Oxide Emissions From Agriculture: Importance of Ecological Feedbacks and the Environmental Benefits of Improved Nitrogen Use Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, D.; Zhang, X.; Shevliakova, E.; Malyshev, S.; Mauzerall, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) presents a triple threat to the global environment: it is the third most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas, the largest remaining anthropogenic contributor to stratospheric ozone depletion, and an important component of the nitrogen (N) cascade - where one atom of N can interconvert between a number of forms, each with a unique set of environmental impacts. Here we use a dynamic vegetation model (Princeton-Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Lab (GFDL) LM3 - the interactive land component of the GFDL Earth System Model) to assess how changes in future climate, land-use, and global fertilizer and manure application are projected to affect global N2O emissions from agriculture by 2050. Agricultural land is defined in this study as the sum of cropland and pasture. In a baseline scenario assuming little improvement in global N use efficiency (NUE) by 2050, the model projects a 24-31% increase in global agricultural N2O emissions (with the uncertainty range stemming from differences in climate forcing, land-use and fertilizer and manure consumption between RCP2.6 and RCP8.5, the two climate scenarios used in this study) - rising from 2.9 Tg N2O-N yr-1 in 1990-2000 to 3.6-3.8 Tg N2O-N yr-1 in 2040-2050. This emission increase is considerably less than the projected increases in global fertilizer and manure consumption (42-44%) and previously published projections of global agricultural N2O emission increases (38-75% - again, the uncertainty range reflecting the differences between the climate scenarios used). This disparity appears to be a result of ecological feedbacks captured by the model, where a considerable portion of the increase in fertilizer and manure use is absorbed by agricultural plant biomass rather than lost to the environment. In addition to this dynamic, the model projects that improvements in global NUE of 20-50% could reduce global N2O emissions significantly, delivering important climate and stratospheric ozone benefits over the period

  5. Enteric methane emission, diet digestibility, and nitrogen excretion from beef heifers fed sainfoin or alfalfa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Y-H; Mc Geough, E J; Acharya, S; McAllister, T A; McGinn, S M; Harstad, O M; Beauchemin, K A

    2013-10-01

    Effects of plant-bound condensed tannin (CT)-containing sainfoin vs. CT-free alfalfa (or low-CT alfalfa-sainfoin mixture), plant stage of maturity, and their interaction on enteric methane (CH4) emissions, diet digestibility, and N excretion were studied, using 8 ruminally cannulated beef heifers in 2 sequential short-term experiments (Exp. 1 and 2). In Exp. 1, first growth legumes were harvested daily and offered fresh to heifers. Heifers were assigned to 100% sainfoin or 80% alfalfa:20% sainfoin (as-fed basis). Responses were measured at early (late vegetative to early bud; stage 2 to 3) and late (early flower; stage 5) stage of maturity. In Exp. 2, the same legumes were harvested from second growth (late bud; stage 4) and offered to heifers as hay; 100% sainfoin or 100% alfalfa. In both experiments, heifers were fed once daily at 1× maintenance. When fed as fresh forage (Exp. 1), sainfoin, compared with the alfalfa-sainfoin blend, had greater digestibility of OM (74.7 vs. 70.9%; P = 0.02), yet tended to have lower CP digestibility (73.2 vs. 77.1%; P = 0.059). There was no difference between fresh legumes for CH4 emissions [25.9 g/kg DMI ± 4.02 SE; 8.5% of gross energy intake (GEI) ± 1.26 SE; or 36.8 g/kg digested OM ± 1.75 SE]. The fresh legumes were more digestible at early, rather than at late, maturity and, consequently, enteric CH4 (27.4 vs. 24.4 g/kg DMI; P emissions (22.4 g/kg DMI ± 1.29 SD and 7.1% GEI ± 0.40 SD). However, on the basis of OM digested, CH4 emissions were lower for sainfoin than alfalfa hay (44.3 vs. 59.0 g/kg; P = 0.008). Percentage of total N excretion in urine was less for sainfoin compared with alfalfa, both for fresh legumes in Exp. 1 (74 vs. 78%; P = 0.017) or hay in Exp. 2 (64 vs. 72%; P emissions from beef cattle fed at maintenance as compared with feeding either 80% alfalfa:20% sainfoin (fresh forages) or 100% alfalfa (hay). Feeding fresh legumes harvested between the late vegetative to early bud stage, compared with

  6. Evidence for Fluorescent Fe II Emission from Extended Low Ionization Outflows in Obscured Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Tinggui; Yang, Chenwei; Wang, Huiyuan; Zhang, Shaohua

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that outflows in at least some broad absorption line (BAL) quasars are extended well beyond the putative dusty torus. Such outflows should be detectable in obscured quasars. We present four WISE selected infrared red quasars with very strong and peculiar ultraviolet Fe ii emission lines: strong UV Fe II UV arising from transitions to ground/low excitation levels, and very weak Fe II at wavelengths longer than 2800 {\\AA}. The spectra of these quasars display strong resonant emission lines, such as C IV, Al III and Mg II but sometimes, a lack of non-resonant lines such as C III], S III and He II. We interpret the Fe II lines as resonantly scattered light from the extended outflows that are viewed nearly edge-on, so that the accretion disk and broad line region are obscured by the dusty torus, while the extended outflows are not. We show that dust free gas exposed to strong radiation longward of 912 {\\AA} produces Fe II emission very similar to that observed. The gas is too cool to coll...

  7. Key chemical NOx sink uncertainties and how they influence top-down emissions of nitrogen oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Stavrakou

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Triggered by recent developments from laboratory and field studies regarding major NOx sink pathways in the troposphere, this study evaluates the influence of chemical uncertainties in NOx sinks for global NOx distributions calculated by the IMAGESv2 chemistry-transport model, and quantifies their significance for top-down NOx emission estimates. Our study focuses on five key chemical parameters believed to be of primary importance, more specifically, the rate of the reaction of NO2 with OH radicals, the newly identified HNO3-forming channel in the reaction of NO with HO2, the reactive uptake of N2O5 and HO2 by aerosols, and the regeneration of OH in the oxidation of isoprene. Sensitivity simulations are performed to estimate the impact of each source of uncertainty. The model calculations show that, although the NO2+OH reaction is the largest NOx sink globally accounting for ca. 60% of the total sink, the reactions contributing the most to the overall uncertainty are the formation of HNO3 in NO+HO2, leading to NOx column changes exceeding a factor of two over tropical regions, and the uptake of HO2 by aqueous aerosols, in particular over East and South Asia. Emission inversion experiments are carried out using model settings which either minimise (MINLOSS or maximise (MAXLOSS the total NOx sink, both constrained by one year of OMI NO2 column data from the DOMINO v2 KNMI algorithm. The choice of the model setup is found to have a major impact on the top-down flux estimates, with 75% higher emissions for MAXLOSS compared to the MINLOSS inversion globally. Even larger departures are found for soil NO (factor of 2 and lightning (1.8. The global anthropogenic source is better constrained (factor of 1.57 than the natural sources, except over South Asia where the combined uncertainty primarily associated to the NO+HO2 reaction in summer and HO2 uptake by aerosol in winter lead to top-down emission differences exceeding a factor of 2. Evaluation of the

  8. Effect of Biodiesel on Diesel Engine Nitrogen Oxide and Other Regulated Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    process of base - catalyzed transesterification at low temperature (150°F), low pressure (20 pounds per sq in [psi]) and with a high conversion...4 LIST OF TABLES Page Table 1. Emission impacts of B20 for Soybean- Based Biodiesel Added to an Average Base ...Camp Pendleton Marine Corps Base for making the arrangements to supply most of the diesel engines tested in this project. Camp Pendleton was able

  9. [Genetic polymorphism for GOT and GDH loci of Scotch pine seed embryos in the area of nitrogen emissions from the chemical enterprise].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korshikov, I I; Demkovich, A E

    2011-01-01

    Variability for the loci GOT and GDH of seed embryos of three subpopulations of Pinus sylvestris L. exposed to the emissions from the chemical enterprise manufacturing nitrogen fertilizers was studied during four years. The trend to heterozygosity reduction and increased occurrence of the cases of significant deviation of the distribution of genotypes from the theoretically expected one was shown.

  10. Effect of increased fuel temperature on emissions of oxides of nitrogen from a gas turbine combustor burning ASTM jet-A fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchionna, N. R.

    1974-01-01

    An annular gas turbine combustor was tested with heated ASTM Jet-A fuel to determine the effect of increased fuel temperature on the formation of oxides of nitrogen. Fuel temperature ranged from ambient to 700 K. The NOx emission index increased at a rate of 6 percent per 100 K increase in fuel temperature.

  11. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Jjj of... - Class I Nitrogen Oxides Emission Limits for Existing Small Municipal Waste Combustion Unitsa,b,c

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... for Existing Small Municipal Waste Combustion Unitsa,b,c 3 Table 3 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62... Municipal Waste Combustion Units Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Pt. 62, Subpt. JJJ, Table 3 Table 3 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62—Class I Nitrogen Oxides Emission Limits for Existing Small Municipal...

  12. Quantifying the effect of interactions between disease control, nitrogen supply and land use change on the greenhouse gas emissions associated with wheat production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berry, P M; Kindred, D R; Olesen, Jørgen E

    2010-01-01

    A method for calculating the effect of disease control on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with wheat production, reported previously, was developed further to account for effects of disease control on the amount of fertilizer nitrogen (N) which should be applied and on changes in land use...

  13. Increasing thermal drying temperature of biosolids reduced nitrogen mineralisation and soil N2O emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Case, Sean; Gomez Muñoz, Beatriz; Magid, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies found that thermally dried biosolids contained more mineralisable organic nitrogen (N) than the raw or anaerobically digested (AD) biosolids they were derived from. However, the effect of thermal drying temperature on biosolid N availability is not well understood....... This will be of importance for the value of the biosolids when used to fertilise crops. We sourced AD biosolids from a Danish waste water treatment plant (WWTP) and dried it in the laboratory at 70, 130, 190 or 250 °C to >95 % dry matter content. Also, we sourced biosolids from the WWTP dried using its in-house thermal...... drying process (input temperature 95 °C, thermal fluid circuit temperature 200 °C, 95 % dry matter content). The drying process reduced the ammonium content of the biosolids and reduced it further at higher drying temperatures. These findings were attributed to ammonia volatilisation. The percentage...

  14. Compression between ion and hard x-ray emissions from nitrogen and argon in Mather type plasma focus device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Paghe

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, some characteristics of a Mather type Plasma Focus (PF device such as a discharge current, pinch time, ion flux and hard x-ray intensity has been investigated simultaneously in argon and nitrogen gases separately for various operating gas pressures and charging voltages of capacitor bank. It was observed that pinch phenomena was energy and pressure dependent in current sheath as well as ion and hard x-ray emission intensity. Optimum pressure with maximum ion flux and the most intense hard x-ray showed a nearly linear dependence on the charging voltage of the device. Maximum ion flux was estimated in the order of 1018 ions per steradian in both gases. Hard x-ray emission was registered a little after discharge current and Faraday cup (FC signals. Also, optimum pressure for maximum ion flux was not the same as the pressure for intense hard x-rays. Hard x-ray intensity reached its peak at higher pressures

  15. [Effects of dicyandiamide combined with nitrogen fertilizer on N2O emission and economic benefit in winter wheat and summer maize rotation system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-qun; Li, Ying-chun; Peng, Zheng-ping; Wang, Chao-dong; Liu, Ya-nan

    2015-07-01

    Aiming at the problems of excessive and unreasonable fertilizer application, lower nitrogen use efficiency, increasing N2O emission from soil and fertilizer in current intensified agricultural productions, a field experiment was conducted to study the effects of dicyandiamide (DCD) combined with nitrogen fertilizer application at different levels, i.e., 150, 225, 300 kg . hm-2, on N20 emission and relevant economic benefit in a typical winter wheat-summer maize rotation system in North China Plain. The results showed that DCD application decreased N2O emission fluxes and cumulative emissions by 25.6%-32.1% and 23.1%-31.1% in the year-round. There was a significant positive exponential correlation between N2O flux and soil surface temperature or soil moisture content. The effect of soil moisture on N2O emission was stronger in wheat season than in maize season, while the effect of temperature on N2O emission was on the contrary. The yields of winter wheat and summer maize with DCD addition were increased by 16.7%-24.6% and 29.8%-34.5%, respectively, and the average economic income of two seasons was increased by 7973.2 yuan . hm-2. Therefore, appropriate rate of N fertilizer combined with DCD could not only increase crop yield and economic income, but also reduce N2O emission. Considering environmental and economic benefit under this experimental condition, DCD combined with nitrogen of moderate level (total N amount 225 kg . hm-2) was a good nitrogen management mode in North China.

  16. Tunable fluorescence emission of ternary nonstoichiometric Ag-In-S alloyed nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng Jian, E-mail: dhjfeng@ciac.jl.cn; Yang Xiurong, E-mail: xryang@ciac.jl.cn [Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry (China)

    2012-08-15

    Low toxic, nonstoichiometric colloidal Ag-In-S ternary quantum dots with different Ag content were synthesized by a one-pot hot-injection method based on the reaction of metal acetylacetonates with sulfur dissolved in octadecene. X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) were used to characterize the size, structure, and morphology of these samples. ICP-MS was employed to analyze the compositions of Ag-In-S nanocrystals. The optical properties were characterized by UV-Vis absorption, photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, and time-resolved photoluminescence. Varying the fraction of cationic and capping agents, the compositions of Ag-In-S nanocrystals were precisely controlled. XRD and HRTEM results indicate the compositional homogeneity of Ag-In-S. The emission spectra across the different compositions exhibiting a single bandgap feature further confirm the formation of Ag-In-S alloy NCs, rather than phase separated Ag{sub 2}S and In{sub 2}S{sub 3}. Composition-dependent tunable PL emissions have been observed. The relative PL quantum yield is up to 16 %, which exhibited substantially enhanced comparing with the stoichiometric AgInS{sub 2} semiconductor core QDs reported in previous literature. The PL decay curve of Ag-In-S has a biexponential characteristic, which indicates that the recombination of an electron and a hole is dominated by the surface defect and the recombination process associated with internal traps is reduced significantly. The large Stokes shift between the absorption peaks and their emissions should inhibit the reabsorption and Foerster energy transfer between Ag-In-S nanocrystals, which provides the alternative in the further applications where high-concentrations of nanocrystals are needed.

  17. Stable and Size-Tunable Aggregation-Induced Emission Nanoparticles Encapsulated with Nanographene Oxide and Applications in Three-Photon Fluorescence Bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhenfeng; Qian, Jun; Zhao, Xinyuan; Qin, Wei; Hu, Rongrong; Zhang, Hequn; Li, Dongyu; Xu, Zhengping; Tang, Ben Zhong; He, Sailing

    2016-01-26

    Organic fluorescent dyes with high quantum yield are widely applied in bioimaging and biosensing. However, most of them suffer from a severe effect called aggregation-caused quenching (ACQ), which means that their fluorescence is quenched at high molecular concentrations or in the aggregation state. Aggregation-induced emission (AIE) is a diametrically opposite phenomenon to ACQ, and luminogens with this feature can effectively solve this problem. Graphene oxide has been utilized as a quencher for many fluorescent dyes, based on which biosensing can be achieved. However, using graphene oxide as a surface modification agent of fluorescent nanoparticles is seldom reported. In this article, we used nanographene oxide (NGO) to encapsulate fluorescent nanoparticles, which consisted of a type of AIE dye named TPE-TPA-FN (TTF). NGO significantly improved the stability of nanoparticles in aqueous dispersion. In addition, this method could control the size of nanoparticles' flexibly as well as increase their emission efficiency. We then used the NGO-modified TTF nanoparticles to achieve three-photon fluorescence bioimaging. The architecture of ear blood vessels in mice and the distribution of nanoparticles in zebrafish could be observed clearly. Furthermore, we extended this method to other AIE luminogens and showed it was widely feasible.

  18. Comparison of greenhouse gas emissions from rice paddy fields under different nitrogen fertilization loads in Chongming Island, Eastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianxian; Yin, Shan; Li, Yinsheng; Zhuang, Honglei; Li, Changsheng; Liu, Chunjiang

    2014-02-15

    Rice is one of the major crops of southern China and Southeast Asia. Rice paddies are one of the largest agricultural greenhouse gas (GHG) sources in this region because of the application of large quantities of nitrogen (N) fertilizers to the plants. In particular, the production of methane (CH4) is a concern. Investigating a reasonable amount of fertilizers to apply to plants is essential to maintaining high yields while reducing GHG emissions. In this study, three levels of fertilizer application [high (300 kg N/ha), moderate (210 kg N/ha), and low (150 kg N/ha)] were designed to examine the effects of variation in N fertilizer application rate on carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from the paddy fields in Chongming Island, Shanghai, China. The high level (300 kg N/ha) represented the typical practice adopted by the local farmers in the area. Maximum amounts of CH4 and N2O fluxes were observed upon high-level fertilizer application in the plots. Cumulative N2O emissions of 23.09, 40.10, and 71.08 mg N2O/m(2) were observed over the growing season in 2011 under the low-, moderate-, and high-level applications plots, respectively. The field data also indicated that soil temperatures at 5 and 10 cm soil depths significantly affected soil respiration; the relationship between Rs and soil temperature in this study could be described by an exponential model. Our study showed that reducing the high rate of fertilizer application is a feasible way of attenuating the global-warming potential while maintaining the optimum yield for the studied paddy fields.

  19. Growth and slaughter performance, nitrogen balance and ammonia emission from slurry in pigs fed high fibre diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Matteo Crovetto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was to determine digestibility, nitrogen balance and ammonia emission from excreta, in the typical Italian heavy pig during the last phase of growth, when fed diets with a high fibre content. In comparison with a traditional control diet (C, two diets with 12 and 24% wheat bran (WB12 and WB24 and two other diets with 12 and 24% dried beet pulp (BP12 and BP24 were tested. Totally 76 Landrace x Large White fattening barrows, from 45 to 170 kg live weight distributed in 16 pens, were utilized in the trial. Thirty pigs were allocated to 6 metabolic cages in 5 consecutive periods in order to have 6 observations per treatment. For diets C, WB12 and WB24 daily weight gain (DWG, feed conversion ratio (FCR and slaughtering performances were also registered, on 20 pigs per dietary treatment. Growing and slaughter performances were similar for pigs fed C and WB12 diets, whilst diet WB24 determined a significant (P<0.05 decrease in performances (growth and feed conversion in the first period of fattening and a lower dressing percentage at slaughter (85.5, 84.4 and 82.5% for C, WB12 and WB24, respectively. Comparing the diets with the same level of inclusion of the fibrous feeds, WB diets had a lower OM and energy digestibility, while BP diets registered a lower protein but a higher fibre digestibility. Consistently with other experiments, BP diets determined an increase of faecal and a reduction of urinary N, as a percentage of the intake N, as well as a decrease of ammonia emission from the slurries (- 16.6 and -25.3% for BP12 and BP24, in comparison with C diet. For the WB diets the reduction of urinary N and the increase in faecal N were less marked and a reduction of ammonia emissions was not registered.

  20. Nitrogen removal and greenhouse gas emissions from constructed wetlands receiving tile drainage water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groh, Tyler A; Gentry, Lowell E; David, Mark B

    2015-05-01

    Loss of nitrate from agricultural lands to surface waters is an important issue, especially in areas that are extensively tile drained. To reduce these losses, a wide range of in-field and edge-of-field practices have been proposed, including constructed wetlands. We re-evaluated constructed wetlands established in 1994 that were previously studied for their effectiveness in removing nitrate from tile drainage water. Along with this re-evaluation, we measured the production and flux of greenhouse gases (GHGs) (CO, NO, and CH). The tile inlets and outlets of two wetlands were monitored for flow and N during the 2012 and 2013 water years. In addition, seepage rates of water and nitrate under the berm and through the riparian buffer strip were measured. Greenhouse gas emissions from the wetlands were measured using floating chambers (inundated fluxes) or static chambers (terrestrial fluxes). During this 2-yr study, the wetlands removed 56% of the total inlet nitrate load, likely through denitrification in the wetland. Some additional removal of nitrate occurred in seepage water by the riparian buffer strip along each berm (6.1% of the total inlet load, for a total nitrate removal of 62%). The dominant GHG emitted from the wetlands was CO, which represented 75 and 96% of the total GHG emissions during the two water years. The flux of NO contributed between 3.7 and 13% of the total cumulative GHG flux. Emissions of NO were 3.2 and 1.3% of the total nitrate removed from wetlands A and B, respectively. These wetlands continue to remove nitrate at rates similar to those measured after construction, with relatively little GHG gas loss. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  1. Determination of the Dipole Geometry of Fluorescent Nanoparticles Using Polarized Excitation and Emission Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianan; Kwok, Ka-Cheung; Cheung, Nai-Ho

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate that the geometries of the absorption dipole μab and emission dipole μem of nano-emitters such as quantum dots can be determined simultaneously by far-field polarimetry. The method involves plotting the emission polarization ratio against the absorption polarization ratio of single nano-emitters. Using Monte Carlo simulation, we show that these plots depend sensitively on the aspect ratio of the dipole shape. For example, the so-called 3D-2D dipole combination, that is, μab of radius ratio 1:1:1 and μem of ratio 1:1:0, would give rise to a vertical line plot. Polarization ratios of commercial cadmium selenide/zinc sulfide (CdSe/ZnS) quantum dots are measured and plotted. The empirical data points are best-fitted to yield μab of radius ratio 1:1:0.28 and μem of ratio 1:1:0.

  2. Carbon radioactivity of {sup 223}Ac and a search for nitrogen emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guglielmetti, A; Faccio, D; Bonetti, R [Istituto di Fisica Generale Applicata and INFN, Milano (Italy); Shishkin, S V; Tretyakova, S P [JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation); Dmitriev, S V; Ogloblin, A A; Pik-Pichak, G A [Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Meulen, N P van der; Steyn, G F; Walt, T N van der; Vermeulen, C; McGee, D [iThemba LABS, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa)], E-mail: Alessandra.Guglielmetti@mi.infn.it

    2008-05-15

    A very intense {sup 227}Pa source was produced in order to study the possible {sup 14}C and {sup 15}N spontaneous emission from {sup 223}Ac. After the irradiation of a hemispherical, highly efficient array of nuclear track detectors, about 350 Carbon events were found leading to a branching ratio with respect to alpha decay B = 3.2 10{sup -11}. Comparison with other {sup 14}C emitters allows the study of the influence of even-odd effects on cluster radioactivity.

  3. Spatial Variability Analysis of Within-Field Winter Wheat Nitrogen and Grain Quality Using Canopy Fluorescence Sensor Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaoyu Song; Guijun Yang; Chenghai Yang; Jihua Wang; Bei Cui

    2017-01-01

    Wheat grain protein content (GPC) is a key component when evaluating wheat nutrition. It is also important to determine wheat GPC before harvest for agricultural and food process enterprises in order to optimize the wheat grading process. Wheat GPC across a field is spatially variable due to the inherent variability of soil properties and position in the landscape. The objectives of this field study were: (i) to assess the spatial and temporal variability of wheat nitrogen (N) attributes rela...

  4. Analysis of green fluorescent protein bioluminescence in vivo and in vitro using a glow discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, L.; Mandujano, L. A.; Cuevas, J.; Reyes, P. G.; Osorio-González, D.

    2015-03-01

    The discovery of fluorescent proteins has been a revolution in cell biology and related sciences because of their many applications, mainly emphasizing their use as cellular markers. The green fluorescent protein (GFP) is one of the most used as it requires no cofactors to generate fluorescence and retains this property into any organism when it is expressed by recombinant DNA techniques, which is a great advantage. In this work, we analyze the emission spectra of recombinant green fluorescent protein in vivo and in vitro exposed to a glow discharge plasma of nitrogen in order to relate electron temperature to fluorescence intensity.

  5. Combining organic and inorganic nitrogen fertilisation reduces N2O emissions from cereal crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyamadzawo, George; Shi, Yeufeng; Chirinda, Ngonidzashe

    2017-01-01

    maize (Zea mays L.) and winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) fields amended with inorganic, organic N and a combination of both sources (integrated management), in tropical (Zimbabwe) and temperate (China) climatic conditions. In Zimbabwe N2O emissions were measured from maize plots, while in China...... emissions were measured from maize and winter wheat plots. In Zimbabwe the treatments were; (i) Control, (ii) 60 kg N ha−1 ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3), (iii) 120 kg N ha−1 NH4NO3, (iv) 60 kg ha−1 cattle (Bos primigenius) manure-N, plus 60 kg N ha−1 NH4NO3, (v) 60 kg N ha−1 cattle manure-N, and (vi) 120 kg N...... ha−1 cattle manure-N. In China, treatments were; (i) Control, (ii) 300 kg N ha−1 Urea, (iii) 92 kg N ha−1 Urea plus 65 kg ha−1 chicken (Gallus domesticus) manure-N, (iv) 100 kg N ha−1 Urea and (v) 100 kg N ha−1 control release Urea. Our results showed that under both temperate and tropical conditions...

  6. White organic light-emitting device with both phosphorescent and fluorescent emissive layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Li-Juan; Hun Yu-Lin; Wu Xiao-Ming; Wang Yu; Yin Shou-Geng

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports the fabrication of novel white organic light-emitting device(WOLED) by using a high efficiency blue fluorescent dye N-(4-((E)-2-(6-((E)-4-(diphenylamino)styryl)naphthalen-2-yl)vinyl)phenyl)-N-phenylbenzenamine (N-BDAVBi) and a red phosphoresecent dye bis (1-(phenyl) isoquinoline) iridium (Ⅲ) acety-lanetonate (Ir(piq)2(acac)). The configuration of the device was ITO/PVK:TPD/CBP: N-BDAVBi /CBP/ BALq:Ir(piq)2(acac)/BCP/Alq3/LiF:AL. By adjusting the proportion of the dopants (N-BDAVBi, Ir(piq)2(acac)) in the light-emitting layer, white light with Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of (0.35, 0.35) and a maximum luminance of 25350cd/m2 were obtained at an applied voltage of 22V. The WOLED exhibits maximum external quantum and current efficiency of 6.78% and 12ed/A respectively. By placing an undoped spacer CBP layer between the two light-emitting layers and using BCP as hole blocking layer, the colour stabilization slightly changed when the driving voltage increased from 6 to 22 V.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of small size fluorescent LEEH caped blue emission ZnTe quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patnaik Sumanta Kumar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We report here for the first time the synthesis of LEEH caped very small size (2 nm ZnTe quantum dots at low temperature (less than 100 °C using a simple chemical route. The effects of aging and stirring time on the absorption spectra of the quantum dots were investigated. The synthesized nanocrystal (NC was characterized by PL, TEM, XRD and the formation of very small size quantum dots having FCC structure was confirmed. Further, blue emission from the prepared sample was observed during exposure to monochromatic UV radiation. ZnTe NCs obtained in this study were found to be more stable compared to those presented in literature reports. ZnTe NCs may be considered as a new material in place of CdTe for optoelectronics devices.

  8. Coupled effects of straw and nitrogen management on N2O and CH4 emissions of rainfed agriculture in Northwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Htun, Yin Min; Tong, Yanan; Gao, Pengcheng; Xiaotang, Ju

    2017-05-01

    Straw incorporation is a common agricultural practice, but the additional carbon source may increase greenhouse gas emissions by stimulating microbial activity in soil, particularly when straw is applied at the same time as nitrogen (N) fertilizer. We investigated the coupled effects of straw and N fertilizer on greenhouse gas emissions in a rainfed winter wheat-summer fallow system in Northwest China. Simultaneous applications of straw and N fertilizer increased N2O emissions by up to 88%, net greenhouse gas (NGHG) emission and net greenhouse gas intensity (NGHGI) by over 90%, and the N2O emission factor by over 2-fold. When straw was applied before N fertilizer, the emission factor (0.22%) decreased by approximately one-half compared with that for simultaneous applications (0.45%). In addition, early straw incorporation decreased N2O emissions, NGHG, and NGHGI by 35% (0.62 kg N2O-N ha-1 yr-1), 40% (242 kg CO2-eq ha-1 yr-1), and 38% (42 kg CO2-eq t-1 grain), respectively. We identified the period 30-35 days after N fertilization as a crucial period for evaluating the effectiveness of management practices on N2O emissions. The time between straw and fertilizer applications was negatively related to N2O emission (R2 = 0.8031; p early straw incorporation can effectively mitigate greenhouse gas emissions by reducing N2O flux and increasing soil CH4 uptake without significantly decreasing grain yield.

  9. A chemical reactor network for oxides of nitrogen emission prediction in gas turbine combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Nguyen Thanh

    2014-06-01

    This study presents the use of a new chemical reactor network (CRN) model and non-uniform injectors to predict the NOx emission pollutant in gas turbine combustor. The CRN uses information from Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) combustion analysis with two injectors of CH4-air mixture. The injectors of CH4-air mixture have different lean equivalence ratio, and they control fuel flow to stabilize combustion and adjust combustor's equivalence ratio. Non-uniform injector is applied to improve the burning process of the turbine combustor. The results of the new CRN for NOx prediction in the gas turbine combustor show very good agreement with the experimental data from Korea Electric Power Research Institute.

  10. Evaluation of natural organic matter changes from Lake Hohloh by three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy during TiO(2)/UV process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Sergio; Marín, Juan M; Restrepo, Gloria; Frimmel, Fritz H

    2014-03-15

    This study shows the changes of natural organic matter (NOM) from Lake Hohloh, (Black Forest, Germany) during heterogeneous photocatalysis with TiO2 (TiO2/UV). The effect of pH on the adsorption of NOM onto TiO2 in the dark and TiO2/UV degradation of NOM was followed using three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence. At pH values between 4 and 9, the NOM was adsorbed onto TiO2 in the dark with a greater decrease in the fluorescence intensity and in the spectral shapes, especially under acidic pH conditions. However, at pH = 10 there was not adsorption on NOM which led to a negligible changes the fluorescence intensity. A significant high linear correlation was observed between the DOC adsorption onto TiO2 and the maximum fluorescence intensity. Additionally, the NOM adsorption onto TiO2 and its TiO2/UV degradation shifted the fluorescence maxima toward shorter wavelengths in the EEM contour plots, with a decrease in aromaticity. These changes were accompanied by a substantial decrease in the organically bound halogens adsorbable on activated carbon (AOXFP) and the trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP). Thus, the decrease in maximum fluorescence intensity can be used as an indicator of AOXFP and TTHMFP removal efficiency. Therefore, fluorescence spectroscopy is a robust analytical technique for evaluate TiO2/UV removal of NOM.

  11. Nitrogen oxides emission of mobile equipment in the port of Rotterdam. Consequences for nitrogen dioxide concentration, nitrogen deposition and a deduction of emission factors for container and bulk businesses; Stikstofoxidenemissies van mobiele werktuigen in de Rotterdamse haven. Gevolgen voor stikstofdioxide concentratie, stikstofdepositie, en een afleiding van emissiefactoren voor container- en droge bulk bedrijven

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okkerse, W.J.H.; De Gier, C.W.

    2011-08-15

    In container terminals, dry bulk businesses and construction sites in the port of Rotterdam, the Netherlands, large masses of goods are transported by means of diesel-fuelled equipment every year. The combustion of diesel in this equipment results in emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter. This study has calculated the amounts of NOx emissions of the involved businesses based on detailed data on the composition of the equipment fleet of six representative storage and transshipment businesses. The resulting contribution to nitrogen oxide concentration at ground level and the nitrogen deposition have been calculated with the OPS model (Operational Priority Substances) [Dutch] Bij containerterminals, droge bulk bedrijven en bouwplaatsen in de Rotterdamse haven wordt jaarlijks een grote massa aan goederen getransporteerd met behulp van dieselaangedreven apparatuur. De verbranding van diesel in deze apparatuur zorgt voor de emissie van stikstofoxiden (NOx) en stof. In dit onderzoek zijn de NOx emissies van de betrokken bedrijven berekend op basis van gedetailleerde gegevens over de samenstelling van het werktuigenpark van zes representatieve op- en overslagbedrijven. De resulterende bijdrage aan de stikstofdioxide (NO2) concentratie op leefniveau en de stikstofdepositie is berekend met het OPS-model (Operationele Prioritaire Stoffen)

  12. Emission control system for nitrogen oxides using enhanced oxidation, scrubbing, and biofiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, A.; Cabezas, J. [Texas A& amp; M University Kingsville, Kingsville, TX (United States). Dept. of Environmental Engineering

    2009-05-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) constitutes about 90% of the nitrogen oxide (NOx) species in the flue gases emitted from combustion processes, but NO is difficult to remove in existing scrubbers due to its low solubility. NO may be oxidized with hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) into soluble species that can be partially removed in wet scrubbers simultaneously with sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and biofilters located downstream of the scrubber can increase the removal efficiency. This article presents the results of a bench-scale evaluation of such an integrated system combining enhanced oxidation, scrubbing, and biofiltration. Main components of the bench-scale system consisted of a quartz tube in a furnace to simulate the NO oxidation stage and two vertical packed bed cylinders constituting the scrubber and the biofilter. Inlet synthetic gas had a concentration of 50 mu L/L of NO. Overall removal efficiency by the integrated system was in the range of 53% to 93% with an average of 79%, absorption accounted for 43% and biofiltration for 36% of the total removal. Key parameters in the operation of the system are the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}:NO mole ratio, the reaction temperature, the liquid to gas flow ratio, and the biofilter residence time. Experimental results suggest a path for optimization of the technology focusing simultaneously in minimizing H{sub 2}O{sub 2} use in the enhanced oxidation stage, reducing water consumption in the scrubber stage and balancing the residence times in the three stages of the integrated system.

  13. Atomic Emission, Absorption and Fluorescence in the Laser-induced Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winefordner, J. D.

    2009-01-22

    The main result of our efforts is the development and successful application of the theoretical model of laser induced plasma (LIP) that allows a back-calculation of the composition of the plasma (and the condensed phase) based on the observable plasma spectrum. The model has an immediate experimental input in the form of LIP spectra and a few other experimentally determined parameters. The model is also sufficiently simple and, therefore, practical. It is conveniently interfaced in a graphical user-friendly form for using by students and any laboratory personnel with only minimal training. In our view, the model opens up the possibility for absolute analysis, i.e. the analysis which requires no standards and tedious calibration. The other parts of this proposal (including plasma diagnostics) were somewhat subordinate to this main goal. Plasma diagnostics provided the model with the necessary experimental input and led to better understanding of plasma processes. Another fruitful direction we pursued was the use of the correlation analysis for material identification and plasma diagnostics. Through a number of computer simulations we achieved a clear understanding of how, where and why this approach works being applied to emission spectra from a laser plasma. This understanding will certainly improve the quality of forensic and industrial analyses where fast and reliable material identification and sorting are required.

  14. Exploring 1,4-dihydroxyanthraquinone as long-range emissive ratiometric fluorescent probe for signaling Zn(2+)/PO4(3-): Ensemble utilization for live cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Sougata; Gaur, Pankaj; Mukherjee, Trinetra; Mukhopadhyay, Subhrakanti; Ghosh, Subrata

    2015-07-01

    Fluorescent 1,4-dihydroxyanthraquinone 1 was found to demonstrate its ratiometric signaling property upon interaction with divalent zinc (Zn(2+)). While the probe itself exhibited fluorescence emission in the yellow region (λem=544 nm and 567 nm), binding with Zn(2+) induced strong emission in the orange region (λem=600 nm) which was mainly due to a combination of CHEF and ICT mechanism. The probe was found to be highly sensitive toward the detection of zinc and the limit of detection (LOD) was calculated to be 9×10(-7) M. The possibility of using this probe for real-time analysis was strongly supported by the striking stability of fluorescence signal for more than five days with similar fluorescence intensity as observed during instant signaling. The present probe works within physiological pH range and is devoid of any interference caused by the same group elements such as Cd(2+)/Hg(2+). The probe possesses excellent excitation/emission wavelength profile and can penetrate cell membrane to image low concentration of zing inside living system. The in situ formed zinc-probe ensemble was further explored as ratiometric sensing platform for detecting another bio-relevant analyte phosphate anion through a zinc-displacement approach.

  15. Adaptive nitrogen and integrated weed management in conservation agriculture: impacts on agronomic productivity, greenhouse gas emissions, and herbicide residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyeogbe, Anthony Imoudu; Das, T K; Bhatia, Arti; Singh, Shashi Bala

    2017-04-01

    Increasing nitrogen (N) immobilization and weed interference in the early phase of implementation of conservation agriculture (CA) affects crop yields. Yet, higher fertilizer and herbicide use to improve productivity influences greenhouse gase emissions and herbicide residues. These tradeoffs precipitated a need for adaptive N and integrated weed management in CA-based maize (Zea mays L.)-wheat [Triticum aestivum (L.) emend Fiori & Paol] cropping system in the Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP) to optimize N availability and reduce weed proliferation. Adaptive N fertilization was based on soil test value and normalized difference vegetation index measurement (NDVM) by GreenSeeker™ technology, while integrated weed management included brown manuring (Sesbania aculeata L. co-culture, killed at 25 days after sowing), herbicide mixture, and weedy check (control, i.e., without weed management). Results indicated that the 'best-adaptive N rate' (i.e., 50% basal + 25% broadcast at 25 days after sowing + supplementary N guided by NDVM) increased maize and wheat grain yields by 20 and 14% (averaged for 2 years), respectively, compared with whole recommended N applied at sowing. Weed management by brown manuring (during maize) and herbicide mixture (during wheat) resulted in 10 and 21% higher grain yields (averaged for 2 years), respectively, over the weedy check. The NDVM in-season N fertilization and brown manuring affected N2O and CO2 emissions, but resulted in improved carbon storage efficiency, while herbicide residuals in soil were significantly lower in the maize season than in wheat cropping. This study concludes that adaptive N and integrated weed management enhance synergy between agronomic productivity, fertilizer and herbicide efficiency, and greenhouse gas mitigation.

  16. Emission-wavelength tuning of InAs quantum dots grown on nitrogen-δ-doped GaAs(001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaizu, Toshiyuki, E-mail: kaizu@crystal.kobe-u.ac.jp [Center for Supports to Research and Education Activities, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Taguchi, Kohei; Kita, Takashi [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2016-05-21

    We studied the structural and photoluminescence (PL) characteristics of InAs quantum dots (QDs) grown on nitrogen (N) δ-doped GaAs(001). The emission wavelength for low-density N-δ doping exhibited a blueshift with respect to that for undoped GaAs and was redshifted with increasing N-sheet density. This behavior corresponded to the variation in the In composition of the QDs. N-δ doping has two opposite and competing effects on the incorporation of Ga atoms from the underlying layer into the QDs during the QD growth. One is the enhancement of Ga incorporation induced by the lattice strain, which is due to the smaller radius of N atoms. The other is an effect blocking for Ga incorporation, which is due to the large bonding energy of Ga-N or In-N. At a low N-sheet density, the lattice-strain effect was dominant, while the blocking effect became larger with increasing N-sheet density. Therefore, the incorporation of Ga from the underlying layer depended on the N-sheet density. Since the In-Ga intermixing between the QDs and the GaAs cap layer during capping also depended on the size of the as-grown QDs, which was affected by the N-sheet density, the superposition of these three factors determined the composition of the QDs. In addition, the piezoelectric effect, which was induced with increased accumulation of lattice strain and the associated high In composition, also affected the PL properties of the QDs. As a result, tuning of the emission wavelength from 1.12 to 1.26 μm was achieved at room temperature.

  17. FLUORESCENCE EMISSION SPECTRA OF MARINE AND BRACKISH-WATER ECOTYPES OF FUCUS VESICULOSUS AND FUCUS RADICANS (PHAEOPHYCEAE) REVEAL DIFFERENCES IN LIGHT-HARVESTING APPARATUS(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria Gylle, Anna; Rantamäki, Susanne; Ekelund, Nils G A; Tyystjärvi, Esa

    2011-02-01

    The Bothnian Sea in the northerly part of the Baltic Sea is a geologically recent brackish-water environment, and rapid speciation is occurring in the algal community of the Bothnian Sea. We measured low-temperature fluorescence emission spectra from the Bothnian Sea and the Norwegian Sea ecotypes of Fucus vesiculosus L., a marine macroalga widespread in the Bothnian Sea. Powdered, frozen thallus was used to obtain undistorted emission spectra. The spectra were compared with spectra measured from the newly identified species Fucus radicans Bergström et L. Kautsky, which is a close relative of F. vesiculosus and endemic to the Bothnian Sea. The spectrum of variable fluorescence was used to identify fluorescence peaks originating in PSI and PSII in this chl c-containing alga. The spectra revealed much higher PSII emission, compared to PSI emission, in the Bothnian Sea ecotype of F. vesiculosus than in F. radicans or in the Norwegian Sea ecotype of F. vesiculosus. The results suggest that more light-harvesting chl a/c proteins serve PSII in the Bothnian Sea ecotype of F. vesiculosus than in the two other algal strains. Treatment of the Bothnian Sea ecotype of F. vesiculosus in high salinity (10, 20, and 35 practical salinity units) for 1 week did not lead to spectral changes, indicating that the measured features of the Bothnian Sea F. vesiculosus are stable and not simply a direct result of exposure to low salinity.

  18. Measurements of hydrocarbons, oxygenated hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen oxides in an urban basin in Colorado: Implications for Emission Inventories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldan, P. D.; Trainer, M.; Kuster, W. C.; Parrish, D. D.; Carpenter, J.; Roberts, J. M.; Yee, J. E.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.

    1995-11-01

    Concentrations of a wide variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the C3 to C10 range, CO, NOy (total reactive oxidized nitrogen), SO2, and meteorological parameters were measured concurrently at a site on the western perimeter of Boulder, Colorado, during February 1991. The measurement site, located some 150 m above the Boulder urban basin, receives air masses typifying averaged local sources. The highest hydrocarbon concentrations observed showed little effects of photochemical loss processes and reflect the pattern of the local emission sources. The observed ratios of CO and the VOCs to NOy are compared to those predicted by the 1985 National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) inventory.These comparisons indicate (1) good agreement for CO/NOY, (2) significant overpredictions by the NAPAP inventory for many of the hydrocarbon to NOY ratios, (3) much more benzene from mobile sources (and less from area sources) than predicted by the NAPAP inventory, and (4) large underpredictions of the light alcohols and carbonyls by the NAPAP inventory. These first two results are in marked contrast to the conclusions of the recent tunnel study reported by Ingalls in 1989. Source profile reconciliation implies substantial input from both a local propane source and gasoline headspace venting.

  19. Quantifying nitrogen and carbon emissions from large-scale cattle feeding operations through the use of a mobile measurement platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floerchinger, C. R.; Fortner, E.; Brooks, B.; Wormhoult, J.; Massoli, P.; Nowak, J. B.; Roscioli, J. R.; Agnese, M.; Ham, J. M.; Knighton, W. B.; Bon, D.; Herndon, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    Concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFO's) are believed to contribute a significant fraction of reactive nitrogen to the ecosystem in Rocky Mountain National Park through regional transport and deposition of biogenic ammonia and associated particle nitrate, at the same time acting as large contributors to the regional methane budget. These operations were characterized by the Aerodyne Mobile Laboratory as a part of the FRAPPE field study 2014 with the focus of understanding the emission, transmission, and subsequent evolution of the CAFO biogenic airmass. Using Quantum Cascade Laser - Tunable Infrared Laser Differential Absorption Spectrometers (QCL-TILDAS) we measured ammonia, a hydrolysis product of NH4+ found in urine and feces, and methane, a product of both enteric fermentation occurring in the rumen and methanogenic bacterial colonies found in feces. Using a High Resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-TOF-AMS) we also quantified inorganic nitrate aerosol, a secondary aerosol product generated through the reaction of primary ammonia with nitric acid. The results are presented and compared to other methods.

  20. Application of Space Borne CO2 and Fluorescence Measurements to Detect Urban CO2 Emissions and Anthropogenic Influence on Vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paetzold, Johannes C.; Chen, Jia; Ruisinger, Veronika

    2017-04-01

    The Orbiting Carbon Observatory 2 (OCO-2) is a NASA satellite mission dedicated to make global, space-based observations of atmospheric, column-averaged carbon dioxide (XCO2). In addition, the OCO-2 also measures Solar Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence (SIF). In our research we have studied the combination of OCO-2's XCO2 and SIF measurements for numerous urban areas on the different continents. Applying GIS and KML visualization techniques as well as statistical approaches we are able to reliably detect anthropogenic CO2 emissions in CO2 column concentration enhancements over urban areas. Moreover, we detect SIF decreases over urban areas compared to their rural vicinities. We are able to obtain those findings for urban areas on different continents, of diverse sizes, dissimilar topographies and urban constructions. Our statistical analysis finds robust XCO2 enhancements of up to 3 ppm for urban areas in Europe, Asia and North America. Furthermore, the analysis of SIF indicates that urban construction, population density and seasonality influence urban vegetation, which can be observed from space. Additionally, we find that OCO-2's SIF measurements have the potential to identify and approximate green areas within cities. For Berlin's Grunewald Forest as well as Mumbai's Sanjay Gandhi and Tungareshwar National Parks we observe enhancements in SIF measurements at sub-city scales.

  1. Soil organic carbon and nitrogen pools drive soil C-CO2 emissions from selected soils in Maritime Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, C V; Schaefer, C E R G; Hashigushi, A K; Thomazini, A; Filho, E I F; Mendonça, E S

    2017-10-15

    The ongoing trend of increasing air temperatures will potentially affect soil organic matter (SOM) turnover and soil C-CO2 emissions in terrestrial ecosystems of Maritime Antarctica. The effects of SOM quality on this process remain little explored. We evaluated (i) the quantity and quality of soil organic matter and (ii) the potential of C release through CO2 emissions in lab conditions in different soil types from Maritime Antarctica. Soil samples (0-10 and 10-20cm) were collected in Keller Peninsula and the vicinity of Arctowski station, to determine the quantity and quality of organic matter and the potential to emit CO2 under different temperature scenarios (2, 5, 8 and 11°C) in lab. Soil organic matter mineralization is low, especially in soils with low organic C and N contents. Recalcitrant C form is predominant, especially in the passive pool, which is correlated with humic substances. Ornithogenic soils had greater C and N contents (reaching to 43.15gkg(-1) and 5.22gkg(-1) for total organic carbon and nitrogen, respectively). C and N were more present in the humic acid fraction. Lowest C mineralization was recorded from shallow soils on basaltic/andesites. C mineralization rates at 2°C were significant lower than at higher temperatures. Ornithogenic soils presented the lowest values of C-CO2 mineralized by g of C. On the other hand, shallow soils on basaltic/andesites were the most sensitive sites to emit C-CO2 by g of C. With permafrost degradation, soils on basaltic/andesites and sulfates are expected to release more C-CO2 than ornithogenic soils. With greater clay contents, more protection was afforded to soil organic matter, with lower microbial activity and mineralization. The trend of soil temperature increases will favor C-CO2 emissions, especially in the reduced pool of C stored and protected on permafrost, or in occasional Histosols. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The contribution to nitrogen deposition and ozone formation in South Norway from atmospheric emissions related to the petroleum activity in the North Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solberg, S.; Walker, S.-E.; Knudsen, S.; Lazaridis, M.; Beine, H.J.; Semb, A

    1999-03-01

    A photochemical plume model has been developed and refined. The model is designed to simulate the advection and photochemi