WorldWideScience

Sample records for nitrite oxidizing bacteria

  1. Isolation and Identification of Nitrite- oxidizing Bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yulong; CHEN; Wenyong; TAN; Da; YANG

    2015-01-01

    In order to select the strain that can degrade nitrite,we use the screening plate with nitrite as the sole nitrogen source to select the strain with ability to degrade nitrite,and get a strain with nitrite degrading capacity from the silt of shrimp farming pond in Hepu City,Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region. By identifying the strain from colony morphology,physiological and biochemical characteristics and 16 S r RNA sequence,we finally get a bacteria strain that can degrade nitrite,and this strain can grow well on the culture medium with nitrite concentration of 2 g / L. Based on morphology,nitrogen source requirements and evolutionary tree analysis of the above 16 S r RNA sequence,it is found that this strain belongs to Pannonibacter phragmitetus. According to the screening location,it is named HPPP007 strain.

  2. Immobilization of nitrite oxidizing bacteria using biopolymeric chitosan media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pranee Lertsutthiwong; Duangcheewan Boonpuak; Wiboonluk Pungrasmi; Sorawit Powtongsook

    2013-01-01

    The effects of chitosan characteristics including the degree of deacetylation,molecular weight,particle size,pH pretreatment and immobilization time on the immobilization of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) on biopolymeric chitosan were investigated.Nitrite removal efficiency of immobilized NOB depended on the degree of deacetylation,particle size,pH pretreatment on the surface of chitosan and immobilization time.Scanning electron microscope characterization illustrated that the number of NOB cells attached to the surface of chitosan increased with an increment of immobilization time.The optimal condition for NOB immobilization on chitosan was achieved during a 24-hr immobilization period using chitosan with the degree of deacetylation larger than 80% and various particle size ranges between 1-5 mm at pH 6.5.In general,the NOB immobilized on chitosan flakes has a high potential to remove excess nitrite from wastewater and aquaculture systems.

  3. Expanded metabolic versatility of ubiquitous nitrite-oxidizing bacteria from the genus Nitrospira

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Hanna; Lücker, Sebastian; Albertsen, Mads

    2015-01-01

    Nitrospira are a diverse group of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria and among the environmentally most widespread nitrifiers. However, they remain scarcely studied and mostly uncultured. Based on genomic and experimental data from Nitrospira moscoviensis representing the ubiquitous Nitrospira lineage II...

  4. Expanded metabolic versatility of ubiquitous nitrite-oxidizing bacteria from the genus Nitrospira

    OpenAIRE

    Koch, Hanna; Lücker, Sebastian; Albertsen, Mads; Kitzinger, Katharina; Herbold, Craig; Spieck, Eva; Nielsen, Per Halkjaer; Wagner, Michael; Daims, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Nitrification, the sequential aerobic oxidation of ammonia via nitrite to nitrate, is a key process of the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle and catalyzed by two aerobic microbial guilds (nitrifiers): ammonia oxidizers and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB). NOB are generally considered as metabolically restricted and dependent on ammonia oxidizers. Here, we report that, surprisingly, key NOB of many ecosystems (Nitrospira) convert urea, an important ammonia source in nature, to ammonia and CO2. Th...

  5. Nitrate reduction to nitrite, nitric oxide and ammonia by gut bacteria under physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiso, Mauro; Schechter, Alan N

    2015-01-01

    The biological nitrogen cycle involves step-wise reduction of nitrogen oxides to ammonium salts and oxidation of ammonia back to nitrites and nitrates by plants and bacteria. Neither process has been thought to have relevance to mammalian physiology; however in recent years the salivary bacterial reduction of nitrate to nitrite has been recognized as an important metabolic conversion in humans. Several enteric bacteria have also shown the ability of catalytic reduction of nitrate to ammonia via nitrite during dissimilatory respiration; however, the importance of this pathway in bacterial species colonizing the human intestine has been little studied. We measured nitrite, nitric oxide (NO) and ammonia formation in cultures of Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species grown at different sodium nitrate concentrations and oxygen levels. We found that the presence of 5 mM nitrate provided a growth benefit and induced both nitrite and ammonia generation in E.coli and L.plantarum bacteria grown at oxygen concentrations compatible with the content in the gastrointestinal tract. Nitrite and ammonia accumulated in the growth medium when at least 2.5 mM nitrate was present. Time-course curves suggest that nitrate is first converted to nitrite and subsequently to ammonia. Strains of L.rhamnosus, L.acidophilus and B.longum infantis grown with nitrate produced minor changes in nitrite or ammonia levels in the cultures. However, when supplied with exogenous nitrite, NO gas was readily produced independently of added nitrate. Bacterial production of lactic acid causes medium acidification that in turn generates NO by non-enzymatic nitrite reduction. In contrast, nitrite was converted to NO by E.coli cultures even at neutral pH. We suggest that the bacterial nitrate reduction to ammonia, as well as the related NO formation in the gut, could be an important aspect of the overall mammalian nitrate/nitrite/NO metabolism and is yet another way in which the microbiome

  6. Optimization of fermentation media for nitrite oxidizing bacteria using sequential statistical design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jie; Lin, Wei-Tie; Shen, Yan-Jing; Wang, Ju-Fang; Luo, Xiao-Chun; Xie, Ming-Quan

    2008-11-01

    The sequential statistical experimental design (Plackett-Burman, factorial, response surface and steepest ascent experiment) was applied to optimize the culture medium of nitrite oxidizing bacteria for improving the nitrite oxidizing rate. Estimated optimum medium composition of the nitrite oxidizing rate was as follows: NaHCO3, 1.86gl(-1); NaNO2, 2.04gl(-1); Na2CO3, 0.2gl(-1); NaCl, 0.2gl(-1); KH2PO4, 0.1gl(-1); MgSO4 x7H2O, 0.1gl(-1); and FeSO4 x 7H2O, 0.01gl(-1). The nitrite oxidizing rate was increased by 48.0% and reached a maximum at 859.5+/-8.4mgNO2-N/gMLSS.d as compared to 580.7+/-25.8mgNO2-N/gMLSS x d. In the field trial, 50L of nitrite oxidizing bacteria concentrate (1.99gVSS/L) with 850mgNO2-N/gMLSS x d were added to 0.6ha of the aquaculture water. Nitrite level in all treated ponds remained very low compared to the steady increase observed in all of the control ponds during 7 days.

  7. Nitrite reductase activity of sulphate-reducing bacteria prevents their inhibition by nitrate-reducing, sulphide-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, E A; Hubert, C; Nemati, M; Jenneman, G E; Voordouw, G

    2003-07-01

    Sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) can be inhibited by nitrate-reducing, sulphide-oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB), despite the fact that these two groups are interdependent in many anaerobic environments. Practical applications of this inhibition include the reduction of sulphide concentrations in oil fields by nitrate injection. The NR-SOB Thiomicrospira sp. strain CVO was found to oxidize up to 15 mM sulphide, considerably more than three other NR-SOB strains that were tested. Sulphide oxidation increased the environmental redox potential (Eh) from -400 to +100 mV and gave 0.6 nitrite per nitrate reduced. Within the genus Desulfovibrio, strains Lac3 and Lac6 were inhibited by strain CVO and nitrate for the duration of the experiment, whereas inhibition of strains Lac15 and D. vulgaris Hildenborough was transient. The latter had very high nitrite reductase (Nrf) activity. Southern blotting with D. vulgaris nrf genes as a probe indicated the absence of homologous nrf genes from strains Lac3 and Lac6 and their presence in strain Lac15. With respect to SRB from other genera, inhibition of the known nitrite reducer Desulfobulbus propionicus by strain CVO and nitrate was transient, whereas inhibition of Desulfobacterium autotrophicum and Desulfobacter postgatei was long-lasting. The results indicate that inhibition of SRB by NR-SOB is caused by nitrite production. Nrf-containing SRB can overcome this inhibition by further reducing nitrite to ammonia, preventing a stalling of the favourable metabolic interactions between these two bacterial groups. Nrf, which is widely distributed in SRB, can thus be regarded as a resistance factor that prevents the inhibition of dissimilatory sulphate reduction by nitrite.

  8. Diversity and enrichment of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidizing bacteria from wastewater sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luesken, Francisca A; van Alen, Theo A; van der Biezen, Erwin; Frijters, Carla; Toonen, Ger; Kampman, Christel; Hendrickx, Tim L G; Zeeman, Grietje; Temmink, Hardy; Strous, Marc; Op den Camp, Huub J M; Jetten, Mike S M

    2011-11-01

    Recently discovered microorganisms affiliated to the bacterial phylum NC10, named "Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera", perform nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation. These microorganisms could be important players in a novel way of anaerobic wastewater treatment where ammonium and residual dissolved methane might be removed at the expense of nitrate or nitrite. To find suitable inocula for reactor startup, ten selected wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) located in The Netherlands were screened for the endogenous presence of M. oxyfera using molecular diagnostic methods. We could identify NC10 bacteria with 98% similarity to M. oxyfera in nine out of ten WWTPs tested. Sludge from one selected WWTP was used to start a new enrichment culture of NC10 bacteria. This enrichment was monitored using specific pmoA primers and M. oxyfera cells were visualized with fluorescence oligonucleotide probes. After 112 days, the enrichment consumed up to 0.4 mM NO(2)(-) per day. The results of this study show that appropriate sources of biomass, enrichment strategies, and diagnostic tools existed to start and monitor pilot scale tests for the implementation of nitrite-dependent methane oxidation in wastewater treatment at ambient temperature.

  9. Cultivation of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria: impact of reactor configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Baolan; He, Zhanfei; Geng, Sha; Cai, Chen; Lou, Liping; Zheng, Ping; Xu, Xinhua

    2014-09-01

    Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) is mediated by bacteria that anaerobically oxidize methane coupled with nitrite reduction and is a potential bioprocess for wastewater treatment. In this work, the effect of reactor configuration on n-damo bacterial cultivation was investigated. A magnetically stirred gas lift reactor (MSGLR), a sequencing batch reactor (SBR), and a continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) were selected to cultivate the bacteria. Microbial community was monitored by using quantitative PCR, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, pmoA gene sequencing, and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The effects of substrate inhibition, methane mass transfer, and biomass washout in the three reactors were focused on. The results indicated that the MSGLR had the best performance among the three reactor systems, with the highest total and specific n-damo activities. Its maximum volumetric nitrogen removal rate was up to 76.9 mg N L(-1) day(-1), which was higher than previously reported values (5.1-37.8 mg N L(-1) d(-1)).

  10. The impact of influent total ammonium nitrogen concentration on nitrite-oxidizing bacteria inhibition in moving bed biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouba, Vojtech; Catrysse, Michael; Stryjova, Hana; Jonatova, Ivana; Volcke, Eveline I P; Svehla, Pavel; Bartacek, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The application of nitrification-denitrification over nitrite (nitritation-denitritation) with municipal (i.e. diluted and cold (or low-temperature)) wastewater can substantially improve the energy balance of municipal wastewater treatment plants. For the accumulation of nitrite, it is crucial to inhibit nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) with simultaneous proliferation of ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). The present study describes the effect of the influent total ammonium nitrogen (TAN) concentration on AOB and NOB activity in two moving bed biofilm reactors operated as sequencing batch reactors (SBR) at 15 °C (SBR I) and 21 °C (SBR II). The reactors were fed with diluted reject water containing 600, 300, 150 and 75 mg TAN L(-1). The only factor limiting NOB activity in these reactors was the high concentrations of free ammonia and/or free nitrous acid (FNA) during the SBR cycles. Nitrite accumulation was observed with influents containing 600, 300 and 150 mg TAN L(-1) in SBR I and 600 and 300 in SBR II. Once nitrate production established in the reactors, the increase of influent TAN concentration up to the original 600 mg TAN L(-1) did not limit NOB activity. This was due to the massive development of NOB clusters throughout the biofilm that were able to cope with faster formation of FNA. The results of the fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis preliminarily showed the stratification of bacteria in the biofilm.

  11. Spatial interaction of archaeal ammonia-oxidizers and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria in an unfertilized grassland soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara eStempfhuber

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Interrelated successive transformation steps of nitrification are performed by distinct microbial groups – the ammonia-oxidizers, comprising ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA and bacteria (AOB, and nitrite-oxidizers such as Nitrobacter and Nitrospira, which are the dominant genera in the investigated soils. Hence, not only their presence and activity in the investigated habitat is required for nitrification, but also their temporal and spatial interactions. To demonstrate the interdependence of both groups and to address factors promoting putative niche differentiation within each group, temporal and spatial changes in nitrifying organisms were monitored in an unfertilized grassland site over an entire vegetation period at the plot scale of 10 m². Nitrifying organisms were assessed by measuring the abundance of marker genes (amoA for AOA and AOB, nxrA for Nitrobacter, 16S rRNA gene for Nitrospira selected for the respective sub-processes. A positive correlation between numerically dominant AOA and Nitrospira, and their co-occurrence at the same spatial scale in August and October, suggests that the nitrification process is predominantly performed by these groups and is restricted to a limited timeframe. Amongst nitrite-oxidizers, niche differentiation was evident in observed seasonally varying patterns of co-occurrence and spatial separation. While their distributions were most likely driven by substrate concentrations, oxygen availability may also have played a role under substrate-limited conditions. Phylogenetic analysis revealed temporal shifts in Nitrospira community composition with an increasing relative abundance of OTU03 assigned to sublineage V from August onwards, indicating its important role in nitrite oxidation.

  12. Application of hierarchical oligonucleotide primer extension (HOPE) to assess relative abundances of ammonia- and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria

    KAUST Repository

    Scarascia, Giantommaso

    2017-04-04

    Background: Establishing an optimal proportion of nitrifying microbial populations, including ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB), complete nitrite oxidizers (comammox) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), is important for ensuring the efficiency of nitrification in water treatment systems. Hierarchical oligonucleotide primer extension (HOPE), previously developed to rapidly quantify relative abundances of specific microbial groups of interest, was applied in this study to track the abundances of the important nitrifying bacterial populations. Results: The method was tested against biomass obtained from a laboratory-scale biofilm-based trickling reactor, and the findings were validated against those obtained by 16S rRNA gene-based amplicon sequencing. Our findings indicated a good correlation between the relative abundance of nitrifying bacterial populations obtained using both HOPE and amplicon sequencing. HOPE showed a significant increase in the relative abundance of AOB, specifically Nitrosomonas, with increasing ammonium content and shock loading (p < 0.001). In contrast, Nitrosospira remained stable in its relative abundance against the total community throughout the operational phases. There was a corresponding significant decrease in the relative abundance of NOB, specifically Nitrospira and those affiliated to comammox, during the shock loading. Based on the relative abundance of AOB and NOB (including commamox) obtained from HOPE, it was determined that the optimal ratio of AOB against NOB ranged from 0.2 to 2.5 during stable reactor performance. Conclusions: Overall, the HOPE method was developed and validated against 16S rRNA gene-based amplicon sequencing for the purpose of performing simultaneous monitoring of relative abundance of nitrifying populations. Quantitative measurements of these nitrifying populations obtained via HOPE would be indicative of reactor performance and nitrification functionality.

  13. Dependence of nitrite oxidation on nitrite and oxygen in low-oxygen seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xin; Ji, Qixing; Jayakumar, Amal; Ward, Bess B.

    2017-08-01

    Nitrite oxidation is an essential step in transformations of fixed nitrogen. The physiology of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) implies that the rates of nitrite oxidation should be controlled by concentration of their substrate, nitrite, and the terminal electron acceptor, oxygen. The sensitivities of nitrite oxidation to oxygen and nitrite concentrations were investigated using 15N tracer incubations in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific. Nitrite stimulated nitrite oxidation under low in situ nitrite conditions, following Michaelis-Menten kinetics, indicating that nitrite was the limiting substrate. The nitrite half-saturation constant (Ks = 0.254 ± 0.161 μM) was 1-3 orders of magnitude lower than in cultivated NOB, indicating higher affinity of marine NOB for nitrite. The highest rates of nitrite oxidation were measured in the oxygen depleted zone (ODZ), and were partially inhibited by additions of oxygen. This oxygen sensitivity suggests that ODZ specialist NOB, adapted to low-oxygen conditions, are responsible for apparently anaerobic nitrite oxidation.

  14. A novel control method for nitritation: The domination of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria by high concentrations of inorganic carbon in an airlift-fluidized bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokutomi, Takaaki; Shibayama, Chizu; Soda, Satoshi; Ike, Michihiko

    2010-07-01

    A novel nitritation method based on the addition of inorganic carbon (IC) was verified using an airlift-fluidized bed reactor packed with sponge cubes. A continuous-treatment experiment demonstrated that the type of nitrification-nitrite or nitrate accumulation-could be controlled by the addition of different alkalinity sources (NaHCO(3) or NaOH, respectively). The maximum rate of ammonia oxidation at 30 degrees C was 2.47kg-N/(m(3) d), with nitrate formation of less than 0.5% of the converted ammonia. Nitrite accumulation of over 90% was maintained stably over 250 days at 30 degrees C and was achieved even at 19 degrees C. Qualitative and quantitative shifts of nitrifying bacteria in the biofilm were monitored by real-time PCR and T-RFLP analysis. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) were dominant but nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) were eliminated in the reactor when NaHCO(3) was used as the alkalinity source. From the kinetic data, we inferred that high IC concentrations drive stable nitritation by promoting a higher growth rate for AOB than for NOB.

  15. Anaerobic nitrite-dependent methane-oxidizing bacteria - novel participants in methane cycling of drained peatlands ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchenko, Irina; Sukhacheva, Marina; Menko, Ekaterina; Sirin, Andrey

    2014-05-01

    Northern peatlands are one of the key sources of atmospheric methane. Process-based studies of methane dynamic are based on the hypothesis of the balance between microbial methane production and oxidation, but this doesn't explain all variations in and constraints on peatland CH4 emissions. One of the reasons for this discrepancy could be anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM) - the process which is still poorly studied and remained controversial. Very little is known about AOM in peatlands, where it could work as an important 'internal' sink for CH4. This lack of knowledge primarily originated from researchers who generally consider AOM quantitatively insignificant or even non-existent in northern peatland ecosystems. But not far ago, Smemo and Yavitt (2007) presented evidence for AOM in freshwater peatlands used indirect techniques including isotope dilution assays and selective methanogenic inhibitors. Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation NC10 group bacteria (n-damo) were detected in a minerotrophic peatland in the Netherlands that is infiltrated by nitrate-rich ground water (Zhu et al., 2012). Present study represents the first, to our knowledge, characterization of AOM in human disturbed peatlands, including hydrological elements of artificial drainage network. The experiments were conducted with samples of peat from drained peatlands, as well as of water and bottom sediments of ditches from drained Dubnensky mire massif, Moscow region (Chistotin et al., 2006; Sirin et al., 2012). This is the key testing area of our research group in European part of Russia for the long-term greenhouse gases fluxes measurements supported by testing physicochemical parameters, intensity and genomic diversity of CH4-cycling microbial communities. Only in sediments of drainage ditches the transition anaerobic zone was found, where methane and nitrate occurred, suggested the possible ecological niche for n-damo bacteria. The NC10 group methanotrophs were analyzed by PCR

  16. Nitrite oxidation in the Namibian oxygen minimum zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füssel, Jessika; Lam, Phyllis; Lavik, Gaute; Jensen, Marlene M; Holtappels, Moritz; Günter, Marcel; Kuypers, Marcel M M

    2012-06-01

    Nitrite oxidation is the second step of nitrification. It is the primary source of oceanic nitrate, the predominant form of bioavailable nitrogen in the ocean. Despite its obvious importance, nitrite oxidation has rarely been investigated in marine settings. We determined nitrite oxidation rates directly in (15)N-incubation experiments and compared the rates with those of nitrate reduction to nitrite, ammonia oxidation, anammox, denitrification, as well as dissimilatory nitrate/nitrite reduction to ammonium in the Namibian oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). Nitrite oxidation (≤372 nM NO(2)(-) d(-1)) was detected throughout the OMZ even when in situ oxygen concentrations were low to non-detectable. Nitrite oxidation rates often exceeded ammonia oxidation rates, whereas nitrate reduction served as an alternative and significant source of nitrite. Nitrite oxidation and anammox co-occurred in these oxygen-deficient waters, suggesting that nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) likely compete with anammox bacteria for nitrite when substrate availability became low. Among all of the known NOB genera targeted via catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization, only Nitrospina and Nitrococcus were detectable in the Namibian OMZ samples investigated. These NOB were abundant throughout the OMZ and contributed up to ~9% of total microbial community. Our combined results reveal that a considerable fraction of the recently recycled nitrogen or reduced NO(3)(-) was re-oxidized back to NO(3)(-) via nitrite oxidation, instead of being lost from the system through the anammox or denitrification pathways.

  17. Intermittent Aeration Suppresses Nitrite-Oxidizing Bacteria in Membrane-Aerated Biofilms: A Model-Based Explanation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Yunjie; Domingo Felez, Carlos; Plósz, Benedek G.

    2017-01-01

    Autotrophic ammonium oxidation in membrane-aerated biofilm reactors (MABRs) can make treatment of ammonium-rich wastewaters more energy-efficient, especially within the context of short-cut ammonium removal. The challenge is to exclusively enrich ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). To achieve...

  18. Distribution and characteristic of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation bacteria by comparative analysis of wastewater treatment plants and agriculture fields in northern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Hu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo is a recently discovered biological process which has been arousing global attention because of its potential in minimizing greenhouse gases emissions. In this study, molecular biological techniques and potential n-damo activity batch experiments were conducted to investigate the presence and diversity of M. oxyfera bacteria in paddy field, corn field, and wastewater treatment plant (WWTP sites in northern China, as well as lab-scale n-damo enrichment culture. N-damo enrichment culture showed the highest abundance of M. oxyfera bacteria, and positive correlation was observed between potential n-damo rate and abundance of M. oxyfera bacteria. Both paddy field and corn field sites were believed to be better inoculum than WWTP for the enrichment of M. oxyfera bacteria due to their higher abundance and the diversity of M. oxyfera bacteria. Comparative analysis revealed that long biomass retention time, low NH ${}_{4}^{+}$ 4 + and high NO ${}_{2}^{-}$ 2 − content were suitable for the growth of M. oxyfera bacteria.

  19. Molecular Fingerprint and Dominant Environmental Factors of Nitrite-Dependent Anaerobic Methane-Oxidizing Bacteria in Sediments from the Yellow River Estuary, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Pengze; Li, Mingcong; Wei, Guangshan; Li, Han; Gao, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) is performed by “Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera” (M. oxyfera), which connects the carbon and nitrogen global nutrient cycles. In the present study, M. oxyfera-like bacteria sequences were successfully recovered from Yellow River Estuary sediments using specific primers for 16S rRNA and pmoA genes. A M. oxyfera-like sequences analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene revealed greater diversity compared with the pmoA gene; the 16S rRNA gene sequences retrieved from the Yellow River Estuary sediments belong to groups A as well as B and were mainly found in freshwater habitats. Quantitative PCR showed that 16S rRNA gene abundance varied from 9.28±0.11×103 to 2.10±0.13×105 copies g-1 (dry weight), and the pmoA gene abundance ranged from 8.63±0.50×103 to 1.83±0.18×105 copies g-1 (dry weight). A correlation analysis showed that the total organic carbon (TOC) and ammonium (NH4+) as well as the ratio of total phosphorus to total nitrogen (TP/TN) influenced the M. oxyfera-like bacteria distribution in the Yellow River Estuary sediments. These findings will aid in understanding the n-damo bacterial distribution pattern as well as their correlation with surrounding environmental factors in temperate estuarine ecosystems. PMID:26368535

  20. Hypoxia tolerance, nitric oxide, and nitrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fago, Angela; Jensen, Frank Bo

    2015-01-01

    Among vertebrates able to tolerate periods of oxygen deprivation, the painted and red-eared slider turtles (Chrysemys picta and Trachemys scripta) and the crucian carp (Carassius carassius) are the most extreme and can survive even months of total lack of oxygen during winter. The key to hypoxia ...... of NO and nitrite signaling in the adaptive response to hypoxia in vertebrate animals....... survival resides in concerted physiological responses, including strong metabolic depression, protection against oxidative damage and – in air breathing animals - redistribution of blood flow. Each of these responses is known to be tightly regulated by nitric oxide (NO) and during hypoxia by its metabolite...... nitrite. The aim of this review is to highlight recent work illustrating the widespread roles of NO and nitrite in the tolerance to extreme oxygen deprivation, in particular in the red-eared slider turtle and crucian carp, but also in diving marine mammals. The emerging picture underscores the importance...

  1. Nitrification expanded: discovery, physiology and genomics of a nitrite-oxidizing bacterium from the phylum Chloroflexi

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Lücker, Sebastian; Vejmelkova, Dana; Kostrikina, Nadezhda A; Kleerebezem, Robbert; Rijpstra, W Irene C; Damsté, Jaap S Sinninghe; Le Paslier, Denis; Muyzer, Gerard; Wagner, Michael; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Daims, Holger

    2012-01-01

    Nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) catalyze the second step of nitrification, a major process of the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle, but the recognized diversity of this guild is surprisingly low and only two bacterial phyla contain known NOB...

  2. Hypoxia tolerance, nitric oxide, and nitrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fago, Angela; Jensen, Frank Bo

    2015-01-01

    Among vertebrates able to tolerate periods of oxygen deprivation, the painted and red-eared slider turtles (Chrysemys picta and Trachemys scripta) and the crucian carp (Carassius carassius) are the most extreme and can survive even months of total lack of oxygen during winter. The key to hypoxia...... survival resides in concerted physiological responses, including strong metabolic depression, protection against oxidative damage and – in air breathing animals - redistribution of blood flow. Each of these responses is known to be tightly regulated by nitric oxide (NO) and during hypoxia by its metabolite...... nitrite. The aim of this review is to highlight recent work illustrating the widespread roles of NO and nitrite in the tolerance to extreme oxygen deprivation, in particular in the red-eared slider turtle and crucian carp, but also in diving marine mammals. The emerging picture underscores the importance...

  3. Controls of nitrite oxidation in ammonia-removing biological air filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhler, Susanne; Ottosen, Lars Ditlev Mørck; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2008-01-01

    In biological air filters ammonia is removed due to the action of Ammonia Oxidizing Bacteria (AOB) resulting in nitrite accumulation exceeding 100 mM. Among filters treating exhaust air from pig facilities successful establishment of Nitrite Oxidizing Bacteria (NOB) sometimes occurs, resulting...... in accumulation of nitrate rather than nitrite and a significant decline in pH. As a consequence, ammonia is removed more efficiently, but heterotrophic oxidation of odorous compounds might be inhibited.  To identify the controlling mechanisms of nitrite oxidation, full-scale biological air filters were...... investigated applying a broad in situ approach. Bacterial distribution and chemical gradients were examined at both a macro scale from filter inlet towards outlet and on a micro scale within the intact biofilm, applying Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH), electrochemical microsensors, and chemical...

  4. Generation of nitric oxide from nitrite by carbonic anhydrase:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aamand, Rasmus; Dalsgaard, Thomas; Jensen, Frank Bo;

    2009-01-01

    bicarbonate and nitrite, we hypothesized that CA uses nitrite as a substrate to produce the potent vasodilator nitric oxide (NO) to increase local blood flow to metabolically active tissues. Here we show that CA readily reacts with nitrite to generate NO, particularly at low pH, and that the NO produced...

  5. Microbial competition among anammox bacteria in nitrite-limited bioreactors

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Lei

    2017-08-26

    Phylogenetically diverse anammox bacteria have been detected in most of anoxic natural and engineered ecosystems and thus regarded as key players in the global nitrogen cycle. However, ecological niche differentiation of anammox bacteria remains unresolved despite its ecological and practical importance. In this study, the microbial competitions for a common substrate (nitrite) among three anammox species (i.e. “Candidatus Brocadia sinica”, “Candidatus Jettenia caeni” and “Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis”) were systematically investigated in nitrite-limited gel-immobilized column reactors (GICR) and membrane bioreactors (MBRs) under different nitrogen loading rates (NLRs). 16 S rRNA gene-based population dynamics revealed that “Ca. J. caeni” could proliferate only at low NLRs, whereas “Ca. B. sinica” outcompeted other two species at higher NLRs in both types of reactors. Furthermore, FISH analysis revealed that “Ca. J. caeni” was mainly present as spherical microclusters at the inner part (low NO2− environment), whereas “Ca. B. sinica” was present throughout the gel beads and granules. This spatial distribution supports the outcomes of the competition experiments. However, the successful competition of “Ca. J. caeni” at low NLR could not be explained with the Monod model probably due to inaccuracy of kinetic parameters such as half saturation constant (Ks) for nitrite and a difference in the maintenance rate (m). In addition, the growth of “Ca. K. stuttgartiensis” could not be observed in any experimental conditions, suggesting possible unknown factor(s) is missing. Taken together, NLR was one of factors determining ecological niche differentiation of “Ca. B. sinica” and “Ca. J. caeni”.

  6. Determination of Ammonia Oxidizing Bacteria and Nitrate Oxidizing Bacteria in Wastewater and Bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Somilez Asya

    2014-01-01

    The process of water purification has many different physical, chemical, and biological processes. One part of the biological process is the task of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB). Both play critical roles in the treatment of wastewater by oxidizing toxic compounds. The broad term is nitrification, a naturally occurring process that is carried out by AOB and NOB by using oxidation to convert ammonia to nitrite and nitrite to nitrate. To monitor this biological activity, bacterial staining was performed on wastewater contained in inoculum tanks and biofilm samples from bioreactors. Using microscopy and qPCR, the purpose of this experiment was to determine if the population of AOB and NOB in wastewater and membrane bioreactors changed depending on temperature and hibernation conditions to determine the optimal parameters for AOB/NOB culture to effectively clean wastewater.

  7. Cultivation of a chemoautotroph from the SUP05 clade of marine bacteria that produces nitrite and consumes ammonium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Vega; Chang, Bonnie X; Morris, Robert M

    2017-01-01

    Marine oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) are expanding regions of intense nitrogen cycling. Up to half of the nitrogen available for marine organisms is removed from the ocean in these regions. Metagenomic studies have identified an abundant group of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SUP05) with the genetic potential for nitrogen cycling and loss in OMZs. However, SUP05 have defied cultivation and their physiology remains untested. We cultured, sequenced and tested the physiology of an isolate from the SUP05 clade. We describe a facultatively anaerobic sulfur-oxidizing chemolithoautotroph that produces nitrite and consumes ammonium under anaerobic conditions. Genetic evidence that closely related strains are abundant at nitrite maxima in OMZs suggests that sulfur-oxidizing chemoautotrophs from the SUP05 clade are a potential source of nitrite, fueling competing nitrogen removal processes in the ocean. PMID:27434424

  8. Evaluating operating conditions for outcompeting nitrite oxidizers and maintaining partial nitrification in biofilm systems using biofilm modeling and Monte Carlo filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmann, D; Morgenroth, E

    2010-03-01

    In practice, partial nitrification to nitrite in biofilms has been achieved with a range of different operating conditions, but mechanisms resulting in reliable partial nitrification in biofilms are not well understood. In this study, mathematical biofilm modeling combined with Monte Carlo filtering was used to evaluate operating conditions that (1) lead to outcompetition of nitrite oxidizers from the biofilm, and (2) allow to maintain partial nitrification during long-term operation. Competition for oxygen was found to be the main mechanism for displacing nitrite oxidizers from the biofilm, and preventing re-growth of nitrite oxidizers in the long-term. To maintain partial nitrification in the model, a larger oxygen affinity (i.e., smaller half saturation constant) for ammonium oxidizers compared to nitrite oxidizers was required, while the difference in maximum growth rate was not important for competition under steady state conditions. Thus, mechanisms for washout of nitrite oxidizing bacteria from biofilms are different from suspended cultures where the difference in maximum growth rate is a key mechanism. Inhibition of nitrite oxidizers by free ammonia was not required to outcompete nitrite oxidizers from the biofilm, and to maintain partial nitrification to nitrite. But inhibition by free ammonia resulted in faster washout of nitrite oxidizers.

  9. Nitric oxide formation from nitrite in zebrafish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank Bo

    2007-01-01

    nitrite levels for variable time periods, and changes in blood nitrosylhemoglobin (HbNO), methemoglobin (metHb), oxygenated hemoglobin (oxyHb) and deoxygenated hemoglobin (deoxyHb) were evaluated by spectral deconvolution. Blood HbNO (a biomarker of internal NO production) was low in controls, increased......, and the possibility that excess NO may inhibit mitochondrial respiration, whole animal routine oxygen consumption was not depressed....

  10. Sodium nitrite: the "cure" for nitric oxide insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathy, Deepa K; Bryan, Nathan S

    2012-11-01

    This process of "curing" food is a long practice that dates back thousands of years long before refrigeration or food safety regulations. Today food safety and mass manufacturing are dependent upon safe and effective means to cure and preserve foods including meats. Nitrite remains the most effective curing agent to prevent food spoilage and bacterial contamination. Despite decades of rigorous research on its safety and efficacy as a curing agent, it is still regarded by many as a toxic undesirable food additive. However, research within the biomedical science community has revealed enormous therapeutic benefits of nitrite that is currently being developed as novel therapies for conditions associated with nitric oxide (NO) insufficiency. Much of the same biochemistry that has been understood for decades in the meat industry has been rediscovered in human physiology. This review will highlight the fundamental biochemistry of nitrite in human physiology and highlight the risk benefit evaluation surrounding nitrite in food and meat products. Foods or diets enriched with nitrite can have profound positive health benefits.

  11. Optimization of Fermentation Media for Enhancing Nitrite-oxidizing Activity by Artificial Neural Network Coupling Genetic Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗剑飞; 林炜铁; 蔡小龙; 李敬源

    2012-01-01

    Two artificial intelligence techniques, artificial neural network and genetic algorithm, were applied to optimize the fermentation medium for improving the nitrite oxidization rate of nitrite oxidizing bacteria. Experiments were conducted with the composition of medium components obtained by genetic algorithm, and the experimental data were used to build a BP (back propagation) neural network model. The concentrations of six medium components were used as input vectors, and the nitrite oxidization rate was used as output vector of the model. The BP neural network model was used as the objective function of genetic algorithm to find the optimum medium composition for the maximum nitrite oxidization rate. The maximum nitrite oxidization rate was 0.952 g 2 NO-2-N·(g MLSS)-1·d-1 , obtained at the genetic algorithm optimized concentration of medium components (g·L-1 ): NaCl 0.58, MgSO 4 ·7H 2 O 0.14, FeSO 4 ·7H 2 O 0.141, KH 2 PO 4 0.8485, NaNO 2 2.52, and NaHCO 3 3.613. Validation experiments suggest that the experimental results are consistent with the best result predicted by the model. A scale-up experiment shows that the nitrite degraded completely after 34 h when cultured in the optimum medium, which is 10 h less than that cultured in the initial medium.

  12. Complex community of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation bacteria in coastal sediments of the Mai Po wetland by PCR amplification of both 16S rRNA and pmoA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Zhou, Zhichao; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2015-02-01

    In the present work, both 16S rRNA and pmoA gene-based PCR primers were employed successfully to study the diversity and distribution of n-damo bacteria in the surface and lower layer sediments at the coastal Mai Po wetland. The occurrence of n-damo bacteria in both the surface and subsurface sediments with high diversity was confirmed in this study. Unlike the two other known n-damo communities from coastal areas, the pmoA gene-amplified sequences in the present work clustered not only with some freshwater subclusters but also within three newly erected marine subclusters mostly, indicating the unique niche specificity of n-damo bacteria in this wetland. Results suggested vegetation affected the distribution and community structures of n-damo bacteria in the sediments and n-damo could coexist with sulfate-reducing methanotrophs in the coastal ecosystem. Community structures of the Mai Po n-damo bacteria based on 16S rRNA gene were different from those of either the freshwater or the marine. In contrast, structures of the Mai Po n-damo communities based on pmoA gene grouped with the marine ones and were clearly distinguished from the freshwater ones. The abundance of n-damo bacteria at this wetland was quantified using 16S rRNA gene PCR primers to be 2.65-6.71 × 10(5) copies/g dry sediment. Ammonium and nitrite strongly affected the community structures and distribution of n-damo bacteria in the coastal Mai Po wetland sediments.

  13. A review on regulation methods of nitrite oxidizing bacteria in one-stage anaerobic ammonia oxidation process%一段式厌氧氨氧化工艺亚硝酸盐氧化菌抑制方法研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢丽; 殷紫; 尹志轩; 王悦超; 周琪

    2016-01-01

    近年来,厌氧氨氧化工艺(anaerobic ammonium oxidation, Anammox)作为一种新型的脱氮技术,由于其耗能少、效率高而被应用于高氨氮废水的处理中。然而,实际运行的厌氧氨氧化工程中有时会出现亚硝酸盐氧化菌(nitrite oxidizing bacteria, NOB)大量繁殖的情况,导致硝酸盐积累,脱氮效率下降。在一段式 Anammox 反应器中,通过控制某些影响因素,如调节体系中的溶解氧,控制游离氨和游离亚硝酸的浓度,调控碳源浓度以及外加中间产物(N2H4、NO 和 NH2OH)等方式,能够在维持 Anammox 工艺脱氮效率的同时有效抑制 NOB。除了系统地综述一段式 Anammox 工艺中 NOB 抑制手段以外,将进一步讨论实际 Anammox 工程应用中抑制 NOB 大量繁殖行之有效的手段。%In recent years,anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox), a new technology for nitrogen removal, has been used in the treatment of high-strength ammonia wastewater due to its low energy consumption and high treatment efficiency. Whereas, the accumulation of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) often occurs in full-scale Anammox process, leading to the accumulation of nitrate and deterioration of nitrogen removal effectiveness. In two-stage Anammox processes, NOB accumulation often occurs in partial nitritation stage, the inhibition of which has been discussed in details. While in one-stage Anammox process, NOB accumulation is more common and fatal due to the complexity brought by the coexistence of functional bacteria like ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AOB), NOB, anaerobic ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AnAOB) and denitrifiers. It has been reported that NOB could be effectively suppressed in the one-stage Anammox process by some methods, e.g. regulating dissolved oxygen, altering the free ammonia and free nitrous acid concentration, adjusting carbon source and adding externally intermediate products (N2H4, NO, NH2OH), etc. The regulation methods

  14. Genome sequence of the chemolithoautotrophic nitrite-oxidizing bacterium Nitrobacter winogradskyi Nb-255

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Larimer, Frank W [ORNL; Arp, D J [Oregon State University; Hickey, W J [University of Wisconsin, Madison

    2006-03-01

    The alphaproteobacterium Nitrobacter winogradskyi (ATCC 25391) is a gram-negative facultative chemolithoautotroph capable of extracting energy from the oxidation of nitrite to nitrate. Sequencing and analysis of its genome revealed a single circular chromosome of 3,402,093 bp encoding 3,143 predicted proteins. There were extensive similarities to genes in two alphaproteobacteria, Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA110 (1,300 genes) and Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA009 CG (815 genes). Genes encoding pathways for known modes of chemolithotrophic and chemoorganotrophic growth were identified. Genes encoding multiple enzymes involved in anapleurotic reactions centered on C2 to C4 metabolism, including a glyoxylate bypass, were annotated. The inability of N. winogradskyi to grow on C6 molecules is consistent with the genome sequence, which lacks genes for complete Embden-Meyerhof and Entner-Doudoroff pathways, and active uptake of sugars. Two gene copies of the nitrite oxidoreductase, type I ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, cytochrome c oxidase, and gene homologs encoding an aerobic-type carbon monoxide dehydrogenase were present. Similarity of nitrite oxidoreductases to respiratory nitrate reductases was confirmed. Approximately 10% of the N. winogradskyi genome codes for genes involved in transport and secretion, including the presence of transporters for various organic-nitrogen molecules. The N. winogradskyi genome provides new insight into the phylogenetic identity and physiological capabilities of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. The genome will serve as a model to study the cellular and molecular processes that control nitrite oxidation and its interaction with other nitrogen-cycling processes.

  15. Oxidation of Fe(II)-EDTA by nitrite and by two nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing Acidovorax strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klueglein, N; Picardal, F; Zedda, M; Zwiener, C; Kappler, A

    2015-03-01

    The enzymatic oxidation of Fe(II) by nitrate-reducing bacteria was first suggested about two decades ago. It has since been found that most strains are mixotrophic and need an additional organic co-substrate for complete and prolonged Fe(II) oxidation. Research during the last few years has tried to determine to what extent the observed Fe(II) oxidation is driven enzymatically, or abiotically by nitrite produced during heterotrophic denitrification. A recent study reported that nitrite was not able to oxidize Fe(II)-EDTA abiotically, but the addition of the mixotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizer, Acidovorax sp. strain 2AN, led to Fe(II) oxidation (Chakraborty & Picardal, 2013). This, along with other results of that study, was used to argue that Fe(II) oxidation in strain 2AN was enzymatically catalyzed. However, the absence of abiotic Fe(II)-EDTA oxidation by nitrite reported in that study contrasts with previously published data. We have repeated the abiotic and biotic experiments and observed rapid abiotic oxidation of Fe(II)-EDTA by nitrite, resulting in the formation of Fe(III)-EDTA and the green Fe(II)-EDTA-NO complex. Additionally, we found that cultivating the Acidovorax strains BoFeN1 and 2AN with 10 mM nitrate, 5 mm acetate, and approximately 10 mM Fe(II)-EDTA resulted only in incomplete Fe(II)-EDTA oxidation of 47-71%. Cultures of strain BoFeN1 turned green (due to the presence of Fe(II)-EDTA-NO) and the green color persisted over the course of the experiments, whereas strain 2AN was able to further oxidize the Fe(II)-EDTA-NO complex. Our work shows that the two used Acidovorax strains behave very differently in their ability to deal with toxic effects of Fe-EDTA species and the further reduction of the Fe(II)-EDTA-NO nitrosyl complex. Although the enzymatic oxidation of Fe(II) cannot be ruled out, this study underlines the importance of nitrite in nitrate-reducing Fe(II)- and Fe(II)-EDTA-oxidizing cultures and demonstrates that Fe(II)-EDTA cannot

  16. Community analysis of ammonia oxidizer in the oxygen-limited nitritation stage of OLAND system by DGGE of PCR amplified 16S rDNA Fragments and FISH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Dan; ZHANG De-min; LIU Yao-ping; CAO Wen-wei; CHEN Guan-xiong

    2004-01-01

    OLAND(oxygen limited autotrophic nitrification and denitrification) nitrogen removal system was constructed by coupling with oxygen limited nitritation stage and anaerobic ammonium oxidation stage. Ammonia oxidizer, as a kind of key bacteria in N cycle, plays an important role at the oxygen limited nitritation stage of OLAND nitrogen removal system. In this study, specific amplification of 16S rDNA fragment of ammonia oxidizer by nested PCR, separation of mixed PCR samples by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis(DGGE), and the quantification of ammonia oxidizer by Fluorescence in situ hybridization(FISH) were combined to investigate the shifts of community composition and quantity of ammonia oxidizer of the oxygen limited nitritation stage in OLAND system. It showed that the community composition of ammonia oxidizer changed drastically when dissolved oxygen was decreased gradually, and the dominant ammonia oxidizer of the steady nitrite accumulation stage were completely different from that of the early stage of oxygen limited nitritation identified by DGGE . It was concluded that the Nitrosomonas may be the dominant genus of ammonia oxidizer at the oxygen limited nitritation stage of OLAND system characterized by nested PCR-DGGE and FISH, and the percentage of Nitrosomonas was 72.5% ( 0.8% of ammonia oxidizer at the steady nitrite accumulation stage detected by FISH.

  17. Mechanism of nitrite oxidation by eosinophil peroxidase: implications for oxidant production and nitration by eosinophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dalen, Christine J; Winterbourn, Christine C; Kettle, Anthony J

    2006-03-15

    Eosinophil peroxidase is a haem enzyme of eosinophils that is implicated in oxidative tissue injury in asthma. It uses hydrogen peroxide to oxidize thiocyanate and bromide to their respective hypohalous acids. Nitrite is also a substrate for eosinophil peroxidase. We have investigated the mechanisms by which the enzyme oxidizes nitrite. Nitrite was very effective at inhibiting hypothiocyanous acid ('cyanosulphenic acid') and hypobromous acid production. Spectral studies showed that nitrite reduced the enzyme to its compound II form, which is a redox intermediate containing Fe(IV) in the haem active site. Compound II does not oxidize thiocyanate or bromide. These results demonstrate that nitrite is readily oxidized by compound I, which contains Fe(V) at the active site. However, it reacts more slowly with compound II. The observed rate constant for reduction of compound II by nitrite was determined to be 5.6x10(3) M(-1) x s(-1). Eosinophils were at least 4-fold more effective at promoting nitration of a heptapeptide than neutrophils. This result is explained by our finding that nitrite reacts 10-fold faster with compound II of eosinophil peroxidase than with the analogous redox intermediate of myeloperoxidase. Nitration by eosinophils was increased 3-fold by superoxide dismutase, which indicates that superoxide interferes with nitration. We propose that at sites of eosinophilic inflammation, low concentrations of nitrite will retard oxidant production by eosinophil peroxidase, whereas at higher concentrations nitrogen dioxide will be a major oxidant formed by these cells. The efficiency of protein nitration will be decreased by the diffusion-controlled reaction of superoxide with nitrogen dioxide.

  18. Identification of nitrite-reducing bacteria using sequential mRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization and fluorescence-assisted cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Cesar R; So, Mark Jason; de los Reyes, Francis L

    2012-07-01

    Sequential mRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (mRNA FISH) and fluorescence-assisted cell sorting (SmRFF) was used for the identification of nitrite-reducing bacteria in mixed microbial communities. An oligonucleotide probe labeled with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was used to target mRNA of nirS, the gene that encodes nitrite reductase, the enzyme responsible for the dissimilatory reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide. Clones for nirS expression were constructed and used to provide proof of concept for the SmRFF method. In addition, cells from pure cultures of Pseudomonas stutzeri and denitrifying activated sludge were hybridized with the HRP probe, and tyramide signal amplification was performed, conferring a strongly fluorescent signal to cells containing nirS mRNA. Flow cytometry-assisted cell sorting was used to detect and physically separate two subgroups from a mixed microbial community: non-fluorescent cells and an enrichment of fluorescent, nitrite-reducing cells. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and subsequent sequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes were used to compare the fragments amplified from the two sorted subgroups. Sequences from bands isolated from DGGE profiles suggested that the dominant, active nitrite reducers were closely related to Acidovorax BSB421. Furthermore, following mRNA FISH detection of nitrite-reducing bacteria, 16S rRNA FISH was used to detect ammonia-oxidizing and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria on the same activated sludge sample. We believe that the molecular approach described can be useful as a tool to help address the longstanding challenge of linking function to identity in natural and engineered habitats.

  19. [Protonation of nitrite is an obligatory stage in the generation of nitric oxide from nitrite in biological systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikoian, V D; Kubrina, L N; Khachatrian, G N; Vanin, A F

    2006-01-01

    The yield of nitric oxide from 1 mM sodium nitrite differs 200 times when the process was initiated by 10 mM sodium dithionite in the solution of 5 or 150 mM HEPES-buffer (pH 7.4). Dithionite acted both as a strong reductant and an agent that induced a local acidification of solutions without notable change in pH value. The amount of nitric oxide was estimated by the EPR method by measuring the incorporation of nitric oxide to water-soluble complexes of Fe with N-methyl-D-glucamine dithiocarbamate (MGD), which led to the formation of EPR-detectable mononitrosyl iron complexes with MGD (MNIC-MGD). Ten seconds after dithionite addition, the concentration of MNIC - MGD complexes reached 2 microM in 5 mM HEPES-buffer in contrast to 0.01 microM in 150 mM HEPES-buffer. The difference was suggested to be due to a higher life-time of zones with decreased pH values in a weaker weak buffer solution. The life-time was high enough to ensure the protonation of a part of nitrite. The resulting nitrous acid was decomposed to form nitric oxide. The difference in the formation of nitric oxide from nitrite was also observed in weak and strong buffer solutions in the presence of hemoglobin (0.3 mM) or serum albumin (0.5 mM). However, the ratios of nitric oxide yields in weak and strong buffer did not exceed 3-4 times. The increase in the formation of nitric oxide from nitrite was characteristic for the solutions containing both proteins. Large amounts of nitric oxide formed from nitrite was observed in mouse liver preparation subjected to freezing-thawing procedure followed by incubation in 150 mM HEPES-buffer (pH 7.4) and addition of dithionite. The proposition was made that the presence of zones with low pH value in cells and tissues can ensure the predominant operation of the acid mechanism formation of nitric oxide from nitrite. The contribution of the formation of nitric oxide from nitrite catalyzing with heme-containing proteins nitrite reductases can be minor one under these

  20. Low nitrous oxide production through nitrifier-denitrification in intermittent-feed high-rate nitritation reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, Qingxian; Ma, Chun; Domingo-Felez, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    operated with intermittent feeding and demonstrating long-term and high-rate nitritation. The resulting reactor biomass was highly enriched in ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, and converted ∼93 ± 14% of the oxidized ammonium to nitrite. The low DO set-point combined with intermittent feeding was sufficient...... to maintain high nitritation efficiency and high nitritation rates at 20-26 °C over a period of ∼300 days. Even at the high nitritation efficiencies, net N2O production was low (∼2% of the oxidized ammonium). Net N2O production rates transiently increased with a rise in pH after each feeding, suggesting...... a potential effect of pH on N2O production. In situ application of 15N labeled substrates revealed nitrifier denitrification as the dominant pathway of N2O production. Our study highlights operational conditions that minimize N2O emission from two-stage autotrophic nitrogen removal systems....

  1. Achieving nitrogen removal via nitrite pathway from urban landfill leachate using the synergetic inhibition of free ammonia and free nitrous acid on nitrifying bacteria activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, H W; Bai, Y; Peng, Y Z; Xie, H G; Shi, X N

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a biological system consisting of an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) and anoxic-oxic (A/O) reactor was established for the advanced treatment of high ammonium urban landfill leachate. The inhibitory effect of free ammonia (FA) and free nitrous acid (FNA) on the nitrifying bacterial activity was used to achieve stable nitritation in the A/O reactor. The results demonstrated that the biological system achieved chemical oxygen demand (COD), total nitrogen (TN) and NH(4)(+)-N removal efficiencies of 95.3, 84.6 and 99.2%, respectively at a low carbon-to-nitrogen ratio of 3:1. Simultaneous denitritation and methanogenesis in the UASB could improve the removal of COD and TN. Nitritation with above 90% nitrite accumulation was successfully achieved in the A/O reactor by synergetic inhibition of FA and FNA on the activity of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis showed that ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) was dominant and was considered to be responsible for the satisfactory nitritation performance.

  2. Coupling Between and Among Ammonia Oxidizers and Nitrite Oxidizers in Grassland Mesocosms Submitted to Elevated CO2 and Nitrogen Supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonin, Marie; Le Roux, Xavier; Poly, Franck; Lerondelle, Catherine; Hungate, Bruce A; Nunan, Naoise; Niboyet, Audrey

    2015-10-01

    Many studies have assessed the responses of soil microbial functional groups to increases in atmospheric CO2 or N deposition alone and more rarely in combination. However, the effects of elevated CO2 and N on the (de)coupling between different microbial functional groups (e.g., different groups of nitrifiers) have been barely studied, despite potential consequences for ecosystem functioning. Here, we investigated the short-term combined effects of elevated CO2 and N supply on the abundances of the four main microbial groups involved in soil nitrification: ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (belonging to the genera Nitrobacter and Nitrospira) in grassland mesocosms. AOB and AOA abundances responded differently to the treatments: N addition increased AOB abundance, but did not alter AOA abundance. Nitrobacter and Nitrospira abundances also showed contrasted responses to the treatments: N addition increased Nitrobacter abundance, but decreased Nitrospira abundance. Our results support the idea of a niche differentiation between AOB and AOA, and between Nitrobacter and Nitrospira. AOB and Nitrobacter were both promoted at high N and C conditions (and low soil water content for Nitrobacter), while AOA and Nitrospira were favored at low N and C conditions (and high soil water content for Nitrospira). In addition, Nitrobacter abundance was positively correlated to AOB abundance and Nitrospira abundance to AOA abundance. Our results suggest that the couplings between ammonia and nitrite oxidizers are influenced by soil N availability. Multiple environmental changes may thus elicit rapid and contrasted responses between and among the soil ammonia and nitrite oxidizers due to their different ecological requirements.

  3. Coastal water column ammonium and nitrite oxidation are decoupled in summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Elise M.; Fulweiler, Robinson W.

    2016-09-01

    Water column nitrification is a key process in the nitrogen cycle as it links reduced and oxidized forms of nitrogen and also provides the substrate (nitrate) needed for reactive nitrogen removal by denitrification. We measured potential water column ammonium and nitrite oxidation rates at four sites along an estuary to continental shelf gradient over two summers. In most cases, nitrite oxidation rates outpaced ammonium oxidation rates. Overall, ammonium and nitrite oxidation rates were higher outside of the estuary, and this trend was primarily driven by higher oxidation rates in deeper waters. Additionally, both ammonium and nitrite oxidation rates were impacted by different in situ variables. Ammonium oxidation rates throughout the water column as a whole were most positively correlated to depth and salinity and negatively correlated to dissolved oxygen and light. In contrast, nitrite oxidation rates throughout the water column were negatively correlated with light and pH. Multivariate regression analysis revealed that while both surface (20 m) ammonium oxidation rates were most strongly predicted by depth and light, surface rates were also regulated by salinity and deep rates by temperature. Surface (20 m) nitrite oxidation rates. These results support the growing body of evidence that ammonium oxidation and nitrite oxidation are not always coupled, should be measured separately, and are influenced by different environmental conditions.

  4. Erratum to ;Coastal water column ammonium and nitrite oxidation are decoupled in summer;

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Elise M.; Fulweiler, Robinson W.

    2017-07-01

    Water column nitrification is a key process in the nitrogen cycle as it links reduced and oxidized forms of nitrogen and also provides the substrate (nitrate) needed for reactive nitrogen removal by denitrification. We measured potential water column ammonium and nitrite oxidation rates at four sites along an estuary to continental shelf gradient over two summers. In most cases, nitrite oxidation rates outpaced ammonium oxidation rates. Overall, ammonium and nitrite oxidation rates were higher outside of the estuary, and this trend was primarily driven by higher oxidation rates in deeper waters. Additionally, both ammonium and nitrite oxidation rates were impacted by different in situ variables. Ammonium oxidation rates throughout the water column as a whole were most positively correlated to depth and salinity and negatively correlated to dissolved oxygen, light, and temperature. In contrast, nitrite oxidation rates throughout the water column were negatively correlated with temperature, light and pH. Multivariate regression analysis revealed that surface (20 m) rates were regulated by temperature, light, and [H+] (i.e. pH). In addition, surface (oxygen all played a role in predicting deep (>20 m) nitrite oxidation rates. These results support the growing body of evidence that ammonium oxidation and nitrite oxidation are not always coupled, should be measured separately, and are influenced by different environmental conditions.

  5. Distinctive microbial ecology and biokinetics of autotrophic ammonia and nitrite oxidation in a partial nitrification bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Joon Ho; Yu, Ran; Chandran, Kartik

    2008-08-15

    Biological nitrogen removal (BNR) based on partial nitrification and denitrification via nitrite is a cost-effective alternate to conventional nitrification and denitrification (via nitrate). The goal of this study was to investigate the microbial ecology, biokinetics, and stability of partial nitrification. Stable long-term partial nitrification resulting in 82.1 +/- 17.2% ammonia oxidation, primarily to nitrite (77.3 +/- 19.5% of the ammonia oxidized) was achieved in a lab-scale bioreactor by operation at a pH, dissolved oxygen and solids retention time of 7.5 +/- 0.1, 1.54 +/- 0.87 mg O(2)/L, and 3.0 days, respectively. Bioreactor ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) populations were most closely related to Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter spp., respectively. The AOB population fraction varied in the range 61 +/- 45% and was much higher than the NOB fraction, 0.71 +/- 1.1%. Using direct measures of bacterial concentrations in conjunction with independent activity measures and mass balances, the maximum specific growth rate (micro(max)), specific decay (b) and observed biomass yield coefficients (Y(obs)) for AOB were 1.08 +/- 1.03 day(-1), 0.32 +/- 0.34 day(-1), and 0.15 +/- 0.06 mg biomass COD/mg N oxidized, respectively. Corresponding micro(max), b, and Y(obs) values for NOB were 2.6 +/- 2.05 day(-1), 1.7 +/- 1.9 day(-1), and 0.04 +/- 0.02 mg biomass COD/mg N oxidized, respectively. The results of this study demonstrate that the highly selective partial nitrification operating conditions enriched for a narrow diversity of rapidly growing AOB and NOB populations unlike conventional BNR reactors, which host a broader diversity of nitrifying bacteria. Further, direct measures of microbial abundance enabled not only elucidation of mixed community microbial ecology but also estimation of key engineering parameters describing bioreactor systems supporting these communities. 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Effect of sodium ascorbate and sodium nitrite on protein and lipid oxidation in dry fermented sausages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berardo, A; De Maere, H; Stavropoulou, D A; Rysman, T; Leroy, F; De Smet, S

    2016-11-01

    The effects of sodium nitrite and ascorbate on lipid and protein oxidation were studied during the ripening process of dry fermented sausages. Samples were taken at day 0, 2, 8, 14, 21 and 28 of ripening to assess lipid (malondialdehyde) and protein (carbonyls and sulfhydryl groups) oxidation. Sodium ascorbate and nitrite were separately able to reduce the formation of malondialdehyde. Their combined addition resulted in higher amounts of carbonyl compounds compared to their separate addition or the treatment without any of both compounds. Moreover, sodium nitrite limited the formation of γ-glutamic semialdehyde whereas sodium ascorbate showed a pro-oxidant effect. A loss of thiol groups was observed during ripening, which was not affected by the use of sodium ascorbate nor sodium nitrite. In conclusion, sodium nitrite and ascorbate affected protein and lipid oxidation in different manners. The possible pro-oxidant effect of their combined addition on carbonyl formation might influence the technological and sensory properties of these products.

  7. Shifts between Nitrospira- and Nitrobacter-like nitrite oxidizers underlie the response of soil potential nitrite oxidation to changes in tillage practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attard, E; Poly, F; Commeaux, C; Laurent, F; Terada, A; Smets, B F; Recous, S; Roux, X Le

    2010-02-01

    Despite their role in soil functioning, the ecology of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria, NOB, and their response to disturbances such as those generated by agricultural practices are scarcely known. Over the course of 17 months, we surveyed the potential nitrite oxidation, PNO, the abundance of the Nitrobacter- and Nitrospira-like NOB (by quantitative PCR) and the community structure of the Nitrobacter-like NOB (by PCR-DGGE and cloning-sequencing targeting the nxrA gene) in soils for four treatments: after establishment of tillage on a previously no-tillage system, after cessation of tillage on a previously tillage system, and on control tillage and no-tillage systems. Key soil variables (moisture, organic carbon content and gross mineralization--i.e. ammonification--measured by the 15N dilution technique) were also surveyed. PNO was always higher for the no-tillage than tillage treatments. Establishment of tillage led to a strong and rapid decrease in PNO whereas cessation of tillage did not change PNO even after 17 months. PNO was strongly and positively correlated to the abundance of Nitrobacter-like NOB and was also strongly related to gross mineralization, a proxy of N-availability; in contrast, PNO was weakly and negatively correlated to the abundance of Nitrospira-like NOB. Selection of a dominant population was observed under no-tillage, and PNO was loosely correlated to the community structure of Nitrobacter-like NOB. Our results demonstrate that Nitrobacter-like NOB are the key functional players within the NOB community in soils with high N availability and high activity level, and that changes in PNO are due to shifts between Nitrospira-like and Nitrobacter-like NOB and to a weaker extent by shifts of populations within Nitrobacter-like NOB.

  8. Ammonium and nitrite oxidation at nanomolar oxygen concentrations in oxygen minimum zone waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, Laura A; Dalsgaard, Tage; Tiano, Laura; Mills, Daniel B; Bertagnolli, Anthony D; Wright, Jody J; Hallam, Steven J; Ulloa, Osvaldo; Canfield, Donald E; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Thamdrup, Bo

    2016-09-20

    A major percentage of fixed nitrogen (N) loss in the oceans occurs within nitrite-rich oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) via denitrification and anammox. It remains unclear to what extent ammonium and nitrite oxidation co-occur, either supplying or competing for substrates involved in nitrogen loss in the OMZ core. Assessment of the oxygen (O2) sensitivity of these processes down to the O2 concentrations present in the OMZ core (Michaelis-Menten model, indicating a high-affinity component with a Km of just a few nanomolar. As the communities of ammonium and nitrite oxidizers were similar to other OMZs, these kinetics should apply across OMZ systems. The high O2 affinities imply that ammonium and nitrite oxidation can occur within the OMZ core whenever O2 is supplied, for example, by episodic intrusions. These processes therefore compete with anammox and denitrification for ammonium and nitrite, thereby exerting an important control over nitrogen loss.

  9. Low nitrous oxide production in intermittent-feed high performance nitritating reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, Qingxian; Jensen, Malene M.; Smets, Barth F.

    was converted to nitrite, with the average total net N2O production of 2.1 ± 0.7% of the ammonium oxidized. Operation with intermittent feeding appears an effective optimization approach to mitigate N2O emissions from nitritating systems. Net N2O production rates transiently increased with a rise in pH after...

  10. The role of nitrite in nitric oxide homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank Bo

    2009-01-01

    -tolerant species. Nitrite-induced vasodilation is well documented, and many studies support a role of erythrocyte/hemoglobin-derived NO. Vasodilation can, however, also originate from nitrite reduction within the vessel wall, and at present there is no consensus regarding the relative importance of competing...

  11. Nitrate reduction by organotrophic Anammox bacteria in a nitritation/anammox granular sludge and a moving bed biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Mari K H; Yang, Jingjing; Kleerebezem, Robbert; Plaza, Elzbieta; Trela, Jozef; Hultman, Bengt; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2012-06-01

    The effects of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) on nitrogen removal and microbial community structure in nitritation/anammox process were compared within a granular sludge reactor and a moving bed biofilm reactor. Nitrate productions in both systems were lower by 40-68% in comparison with expected nitrate production. Expected sludge production on VFAs was estimated to be 67-77% higher if heterotrophs were the main acetate degraders suggesting that Anammox bacteria used its organotrophic capability and successfully competed with general heterotrophs for organic carbon, which led to a reduced sludge production. FISH measurements showed a population consisting of mainly Anammox and AOB in both reactors and oxygen uptake rate (OUR) tests also confirmed that flocculent biomass consisted of a minor proportion of heterotrophs with a large proportion of AOBs. The dominant Anammox bacterium was Candidatus "Brocadia fulgida" with a minor fraction of Candidatus "Anammoxoglobus propionicus", both known to be capable of oxidizing VFAs.

  12. The protective potential of Yucca schidigera (Sarsaponin 30) against nitrite-induced oxidative stress in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigerci, I Hakki; Fidan, A Fatih; Konuk, Muhsin; Yuksel, Hayati; Kucukkurt, Ismail; Eryavuz, Abdullah; Sozbilir, Nalan Baysu

    2009-07-01

    The present study was designed to determine the protective effects of Yucca schidigera (Ys) against oxidative damage induced by acute nitrite intoxication as well as the histopathological evaluation of Ys in rats. The rats were divided into three groups each containing 12 rats: control (C); nitrite intoxication (N); Ys + nitrite intoxication (NY). C and N groups were fed standard rat feed (SRF). The NY group was fed SRF + 100 ppm Ys powder for 4 weeks. Acute nitrite intoxication was induced by subcutaneous (s.c.) administration of sodium nitrite (60 mg/kg) 1 day after the feeding period. Fifty minutes after sodium nitrite administration, blood samples and tissues including lung, liver, and kidney were collected for clinical biochemistry and histopathological investigations. Ys treatment was found to decrease methemoglobin, blood and tissue malondialdehyde, and tissue nitric oxide concentrations, and to increase the glutathione in blood and various tissues. However, plasma nitric oxide, total antioxidant activity, beta-carotene, and vitamin A did not differ between N and NY groups. While the N group rats showed distinct pathology in various tissues (compared with controls), the NY group had similar lung and liver pathology to the control. Only moderate or mild hemorrhage and hyperemia were seen in kidneys of NY group rats. Consequently, the natural compounds found in Ys, such as polyphenols, steroidal saponins, and other phytonutrients, could be used to substantially protect the organism from nitrite-induced oxidative damage and its complications.

  13. Conversion of nitrite to nitric oxide at zinc via S-nitrosothiols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Allan Jay P; Abelman, Rebecca; Warren, Timothy H

    2014-01-07

    Nitrite is an important reservoir of nitric oxide activity in the plasma and cells. Using a biomimetic model, we demonstrate the conversion of zinc-bound nitrite in the tris(pyrazolyl)borate complex (iPr2)TpZn(NO2) to the corresponding S-nitrosothiol RSNO and zinc thiolate (iPr2)TpZn-SR via reaction with thiols H-SR. Decomposition of the S-nitrosothiol formed releases nitric oxide gas.

  14. Nitric oxide generation from heme/copper assembly mediated nitrite reductase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hematian, Shabnam; Siegler, Maxime A; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2014-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) as a cellular signaling molecule and vasodilator regulates a range of physiological and pathological processes. Nitrite (NO2 (-)) is recycled in vivo to generate nitric oxide, particularly in physiologic hypoxia and ischemia. The cytochrome c oxidase binuclear heme a 3/CuB active site is one entity known to be responsible for conversion of cellular nitrite to nitric oxide. We recently reported that a partially reduced heme/copper assembly reduces nitrite ion, producing nitric oxide; the heme serves as the reductant and the cupric ion provides a Lewis acid interaction with nitrite, facilitating nitrite (N-O) bond cleavage (Hematian et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 134:18912-18915, 2012). To further investigate this nitrite reductase chemistry, copper(II)-nitrito complexes with tridentate and tetradentate ligands were used in this study, where either O,O'-bidentate or O-unidentate modes of nitrite binding to the cupric center are present. To study the role of the reducing ability of the ferrous heme center, two different tetraarylporphyrinate-iron(II) complexes, one with electron-donating para-methoxy peripheral substituents and the other with electron-withdrawing 2,6-difluorophenyl substituents, were used. The results show that differing modes of nitrite coordination to the copper(II) ion lead to differing kinetic behavior. Here, also, the ferrous heme is in all cases the source of the reducing equivalent required to convert nitrite to nitric oxide, but the reduction ability of the heme center does not play a key role in the observed overall reaction rate. On the basis of our observations, reaction mechanisms are proposed and discussed in terms of heme/copper heterobinuclear structures.

  15. Generation of nitric oxide from nitrite by carbonic anhydrase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aamand, Rasmus; Dalsgaard, Thomas; Jensen, Frank B;

    2009-01-01

    In catalyzing the reversible hydration of CO2 to bicarbonate and protons, the ubiquitous enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA) plays a crucial role in CO2 transport, in acid-base balance, and in linking local acidosis to O2 unloading from hemoglobin. Considering the structural similarity between...... in the reaction induces vasodilation in aortic rings. This reaction occurs under normoxic and hypoxic conditions and in various tissues at physiological levels of CA and nitrite. Furthermore, two specific inhibitors of the CO2 hydration, dorzolamide and acetazolamide, increase the CA-catalyzed production...... of vasoactive NO from nitrite. This enhancing effect may explain the known vasodilating effects of these drugs and indicates that CO2 and nitrite bind differently to the enzyme active site. Kinetic analyses show a higher reaction rate at high pH, suggesting that anionic nitrite participates more effectively...

  16. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea and nitrite-oxidizing nitrospiras in the biofilter of a shrimp recirculating aquaculture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Monisha N; Briones, Aurelio; Diana, James; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2013-01-01

    This study analysed the nitrifier community in the biofilter of a zero discharge, recirculating aquaculture system (RAS) for the production of marine shrimp in a low density (low ammonium production) system. The ammonia-oxidizing populations were examined by targeting 16S rRNA and amoA genes of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA). The nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) were investigated by targeting the 16S rRNA gene. Archaeal amoA genes were more abundant in all compartments of the RAS than bacterial amoA genes. Analysis of bacterial and archaeal amoA gene sequences revealed that most ammonia oxidizers were related to Nitrosomonas marina and Nitrosopumilus maritimus. The NOB detected were related to Nitrospira marina and Nitrospira moscoviensis, and Nitrospira marina-type NOB were more abundant than N. moscoviensis-type NOB. Water quality and biofilm attachment media played a role in the competitiveness of AOA over AOB and Nitrospira marina-over N. moscoviensis-type NOB.

  17. Red wine-dependent reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide in the stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gago, Bruno; Lundberg, Jon O; Barbosa, Rui M; Laranjinha, João

    2007-11-01

    Nitrite may be a source for nitric oxide (*NO), particularly in highly acidic environments, such as the stomach. Diet products contribute also with reductants that dramatically increase the production of *NO from nitrite. Red wine has been attributed health promoting properties largely on basis of the reductive antioxidant properties of its polyphenolic fraction. We show in vitro that wine, wine anthocyanin fraction and wine catechol (caffeic acid) dose- and pH-dependently promote the formation of *NO when mixed with nitrite, as measured electrochemically. The production of *NO promoted by wine from nitrite was substantiated in vivo in healthy volunteers by measuring *NO in the air expelled from the stomach, following consumption of wine, as measured by chemiluminescence. Mechanistically, the reaction involves the univalent reduction of nitrite, as suggested by the formation of *NO and by the appearance of EPR spectra assigned to wine phenolic radicals. Ascorbic and caffeic acids cooperate in the reduction of nitrite to *NO. Moreover, reduction of nitrite is critically dependent on the phenolic structure and nitro-derivatives of phenols are also formed, as suggested by caffeic acid UV spectral modifications. The reduction of nitrite may reveal previously unrecognized physiologic effects of red wine in connection with *NO bioactivity.

  18. Enrichment culture of marine anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Yong-jie

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigates the enrichment of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) bacteria in the marine environment using sediment samples obtained from the East China Sea and discusses the nitrogen removal efficiency of marine anammox bioreactor. Enrichment of anammox bacteria with simultaneous removal of nitrite and ammonium ions was observed in the Anaerobic Sequencing Batch Reactor under a total nitrogen loading rate of 0.37kg-N m-3day-1. In this study, The nitrogen removal efficiency was up to 80% and the molar-reaction ratio of ammonium, nitrite and nitrate was 1.0:1.22:0.22 which was a little different from a previously reported ratio of 1.0:1.32:0.26 in a freshwater system.

  19. Anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to nitrite reduction can be a potential methane sink in coastal environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Li-Dong; Hu, Bao-Lan; Liu, Shuai; Chai, Xiao-Ping; He, Zhan-Fei; Ren, Hong-Xing; Liu, Yan; Geng, Sha; Wang, Wei; Tang, Jing-Liang; Wang, Yi-Ming; Lou, Li-Ping; Xu, Xiang-Yang; Zheng, Ping

    2016-08-01

    In the current study, we investigated nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (N-DAMO) as a potential methane sink in the Hangzhou Bay and the adjacent Zhoushan sea area. The potential activity of the N-DAMO process was primarily observed in Hangzhou Bay by means of (13)C-labeling experiments, whereas very low or no potential N-DAMO activity could be detected in the Zhoushan sea area. The measured potential N-DAMO rates ranged from 0.2 to 1.3 nmol (13)CO2 g(-1) (dry sediment) day(-1), and the N-DAMO potentially contributed 2.0-9.4 % to the total microbial methane oxidation in the examined sediments. This indicated that the N-DAMO process may be an alternative pathway in the coastal methane cycle. Phylogenetic analyses confirmed the presence of Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera-like bacteria in all the examined sediments, while the group A members (the dominant bacteria responsible for N-DAMO) were found mainly in Hangzhou Bay. Quantitative PCR showed that the 16S rRNA gene abundance of Candidatus M. oxyfera-like bacteria varied from 5.4 × 10(6) to 5.0 × 10(7) copies g(-1) (dry sediment), with a higher abundance observed in Hangzhou Bay. In addition, the overlying water NO3 (-) concentration and salinity were identified as the most important factors influencing the abundance and potential activity of Candidatus M. oxyfera-like bacteria in the examined sediments. This study showed the evidence of N-DAMO in coastal environments and indicated the importance of N-DAMO as a potential methane sink in coastal environments.

  20. Detecting oxidized contaminants in water using sulfur-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ginkel, Steven W; Hassan, Sedky H A; Ok, Yong Sik; Yang, Jae E; Kim, Yong-Seong; Oh, Sang-Eun

    2011-04-15

    For the rapid and reliable detection of oxidized contaminants (i.e., nitrite, nitrate, perchlorate, dichromate) in water, a novel toxicity detection methodology based on sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) has been developed. The methodology exploits the ability of SOB to oxidize elemental sulfur to sulfuric acid in the presence of oxygen. The reaction results in an increase in electrical conductivity (EC) and a decrease in pH. When oxidized contaminants were added to the system, the effluent EC decreased and the pH increased due to the inhibition of the SOB. We found that the system can detect these contaminants in the 5-50 ppb range (in the case of NO(3)(-), 10 ppm was detected), which is lower than many whole-cell biosensors to date. At low pH, the oxidized contaminants are mostly in their acid or nonpolar, protonated form which act as uncouplers and make the SOB biosensor more sensitive than other whole-cell biosensors which operate at higher pH values where the contaminants exist as dissociated anions. The SOB biosensor can detect toxicity on the order of minutes to hours which can serve as an early warning so as to not pollute the environment and affect public health.

  1. Long-term straw returning affects Nitrospira-like nitrite oxidizing bacterial community in a rapeseed-rice rotation soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xuesong; Han, Shun; Lai, Songsong; Huang, Qiaoyun; Chen, Wenli

    2016-11-25

    Nitrospira are the most widespread and well known nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) and putatively key nitrite-oxidizers in acidic ecosystems. Nevertheless, their ecology in agriculture soils has not been well studied. To understand the impact of straw incorporation on soil Nitrospira-like bacterial community, a cloned library analysis of the nitrite oxidoreductase gene-nxrB was performed for a long-term rapeseed-rice rotation system. In this study, most members of the Nitrospira-like NOB in the paddy soils from the Wuxue field experiment station were phylogenetically related with Nitrospira lineages II. The Shannon diversity index possessed a decrease trend in the straw applied soils. The relative abundances of 16 OTUs (accounting 72% of the total OTUs, including 11 unique OTUs and 5 shared OTUs) were different between in the straw applied and control soils. These data suggested a selection effect from the long-term straw fertilization. Canonical correspondence analysis data showed that a centralized group of Nitrospira-like NOB OTUs in the community was partly explained by the soil ammonium, nitrate, available phosphorus, and the available potassium. This could suggest that straw fertilization led to the soil Nitrospira-like NOB community shift, which was correlated with the change of available nutrients in the bulk soil.

  2. Investigation of the photocatalytic effect of zinc oxide nanoparticles in the presence of nitrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Min; Abbood, Hayder A. [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430074 (China); Institute of Inorganic Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Hubei key Laboratory of Bioinorganic Chemistry and Medicine, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhu, Zhening [National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, No.11 ZhongGuanCun BeiYiTiao Road, Beijing 100190 (China); Li, Hailing [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430074 (China); Institute of Inorganic Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Hubei key Laboratory of Bioinorganic Chemistry and Medicine, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430074 (China); Gao, Zhonghong, E-mail: zhgao144@mail.hust.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430074 (China); Institute of Inorganic Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Hubei key Laboratory of Bioinorganic Chemistry and Medicine, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: ► Nitrite enhanced the photo-damage by ZnO nanoparticles to BSA and HaCaT cells. ► Protein nitration was induced by nitrite in photo-damaged BSA and HaCaT cells. ► The effects of photo-damage on BSA were affected by various factors. ► 50-nm ZnO induced more apoptosis than 90-nm ZnO in HaCaT cells. -- Abstract: Zinc oxide nanoparticles are widely used in sunscreen products because of their chemical stability and capability of blocking harmful ultraviolet rays. However, zinc oxide nanoparticles can also generate reactive species under ultraviolet irradiation. Because nitrite can form reactive nitrogen species under oxidative stress and because it exists in perspiration and cosmetics, we studied the effects of nitrites on the photocatalytic damage of zinc oxide nanoparticles (50 nm and 90 nm) to bovine serum albumin and human keratinocyte cells under ultraviolet irradiation (365 nm and 254 nm). The results indicate that nitrite plays an enhancing role in photocatalytic damage by breaking amino acid residues and promoting protein oxidation and nitration. The concentrations of zinc oxide and nitrite, the irradiation light and duration, and the pH of the medium are important factors influencing this photocatalytic damage. Size effects of ZnO nanoparticles on bovine serum albumin and keratinocyte cells are different. It is speculated that the extent of photo-damage is partially dependent on the aggregation of zinc oxide. These findings may be valuable for understanding potential risks of applying zinc oxide nanoparticle-containing sunscreens to human skin under sunlight exposure.

  3. Microbial mediated iron redox cycling in Fe (hydr)oxides for nitrite removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yongsheng; Xu, Lu; Shu, Weikang; Zhou, Jizhi; Chen, Xueping; Xu, Yunfeng; Qian, Guangren

    2017-01-01

    Nitrite, at an environmentally relevant concentration, was significantly reduced with iron (hydr)oxides mediated by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. The average nitrite removal rates of 1.28±0.08 and 0.65±0.02(mgL(-1))h(-1) were achieved with ferrihydrite and magnetite, respectively. The results showed that nitrite removal was able to undergo multiple redox cycles with iron (hydr)oxides mediated by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. During the bioreduction of the following cycles, biogenic Fe(II) was subsequently chemically oxidized to Fe(III), which is associated with nitrite reduction. There was 11.18±1.26mgL(-1) of NH4(+)-N generated in the process of redox cycling of ferrihydrite. Additionally, results obtained by using X-ray diffraction showed that ferrihydrite and magnetite remained mainly stable in the system. This study indicated that redox cycling of Fe in iron (hydr)oxides was a potential process associated with NO2(-)-N removal from solution, and reduced most nitrite abiotically to gaseous nitrogen species.

  4. Sensing nitrite through a pseudoazurin-nitrite reductase electron transfer relay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astier, Y; Canters, GW; Davis, JJ; Hill, HAO; Verbeet, MP; Wijma, HJ

    2005-01-01

    Nitrite is converted to nitric oxide by haem or copper-containing enzymes in denitrifying bacteria during the process of denitrification. In designing an efficient biosensor, this enzymic turnover must be quantitatively assessed. The enzyme nitrite reductase from Alcaligenes faecalis contains a redo

  5. Aldehyde-Selective Wacker-Type Oxidation of Unbiased Alkenes Enabled by a Nitrite Co-Catalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Wickens, Zachary K.

    2013-09-13

    Breaking the rules: Reversal of the high Markovnikov selectivity of Wacker-type oxidations was accomplished using a nitrite co-catalyst. Unbiased aliphatic alkenes can be oxidized with high yield and aldehyde selectivity, and several functional groups are tolerated. 18O-labeling experiments indicate that the aldehydic O atom is derived from the nitrite salt.

  6. Niche segregation of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and anammox bacteria in the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pitcher, A.; Villanueva, L.; Hopmans, E.C.; Schouten, S.; Reichart, G.J.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2011-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria have emerged as significant factors in the marine nitrogen cycle and are responsible for the oxidation of ammonium to nitrite and dinitrogen gas, respectively. Potential for an interaction between these groups exists;

  7. Microbiology, ecology, and application of the nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation process

    OpenAIRE

    Li-Dong eShen; Bao-lan eHu

    2012-01-01

    Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo), which couples the anaerobic oxidation of methane to denitrification, is a recently discovered process observed in Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera. M. oxyfera is affiliated with the NC10 phylum, a phylum having no members in pure culture. Based on the isotopic labeling experiments, it is hypothesized that M. oxyfera has an unusual intra-aerobic pathway for the production of oxygen via the dismutation of nitric oxide into dinitrogen ga...

  8. Normoxic cyclic GMP-independent oxidative signaling by nitrite enhances airway epithelial cell proliferation and wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Frizzell, Sheila A; Zhao, Xuejun; Gladwin, Mark T

    2012-05-15

    The airway epithelium provides important barrier and host defense functions. Recent studies reveal that nitrite is an endocrine reservoir of nitric oxide (NO) bioactivity that is converted to NO by enzymatic reductases along the physiological oxygen gradient. Nitrite signaling has been described as NO dependent activation mediated by reactions with deoxygenated redox active hemoproteins, such as hemoglobin, myoglobin, neuroglobin, xanthine oxidoreductase (XO) and NO synthase at low pH and oxygen tension. However, nitrite can also be readily oxidized to nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)·) via heme peroxidase reactions, suggesting the existence of alternative oxidative signaling pathways for nitrite under normoxic conditions. In the present study, we examined normoxic signaling effects of sodium nitrite on airway epithelial cell wound healing. In an in vitro scratch injury model under normoxia, we exposed cultured monolayers of human airway epithelial cells to various concentrations of sodium nitrite and compared responses to NO donor. We found sodium nitrite potently enhanced airway epithelium wound healing at physiological concentrations (from 1 μM). The effect of nitrite was blocked by the NO and NO(2)· scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (c-PTIO). Interestingly, nitrite treatment did not increase cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels under these normoxic conditions, even in the presence of a phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor, suggesting cGMP independent signaling. Consistent with an oxidative signaling pathway requiring hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))/heme-peroxidase/NO(2)· signaling, the effects of nitrite were potentiated by superoxide dismutase (SOD) and low concentration H(2)O(2), whereas inhibited completely by catalase, followed by downstream extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 activation. Our data represent the first description of normoxic nitrite signaling on lung epithelial cell proliferation and wound

  9. Co-occurrence of nitrite-dependent anaerobic ammonium and methane oxidation processes in subtropical acidic forest soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Han; Wang, Yong-Feng; Chan, Ho-Wang; Wu, Ruo-Nan; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2016-09-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) and nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) are two new processes of recent discoveries linking the microbial nitrogen and carbon cycles. In this study, 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene of anammox bacteria and pmoA gene of n-damo bacteria were used to investigate their distribution and diversity in natural acidic and re-vegetated forest soils. The 16S rRNA gene sequences retrieved featured at least three species in two genera known anammox bacteria, namely Candidatus Brocadia anammoxidans, Candidatus Brocadia fulgida, and Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis while the pmoA gene amplified was affiliated with two species of known n-damo bacteria Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera and a newly established Candidatus Methylomirabilis sp. According to the results, the diversity of anammox bacteria in natural forests was lower than in re-vegetated forests, but no significant difference was observed in n-damo community between them. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that both anammox and n-damo bacteria were more abundant in the lower layer (10-20 cm) than the surface layer (0-5 cm). The abundance of anammox bacteria varied from 2.21 × 10(5) to 3.90 × 10(6) gene copies per gram dry soil, and n-damo bacteria quantities were between 1.69 × 10(5) and 5.07 × 10(6) gene copies per gram dry soil in the two different layers. Both anammox and n-damo bacteria are reported for the first time to co-occur in acidic forest soil in this study, providing a more comprehensive information on more defined microbial processes contributing to C and N cycles in the ecosystems.

  10. The capacity of red blood cells to reduce nitrite determines nitric oxide generation under hypoxic conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel H Fens

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is a key regulator of vascular tone. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS is responsible for NO generation under normoxic conditions. Under hypoxia however, eNOS is inactive and red blood cells (RBC provide an alternative NO generation pathway from nitrite to regulate hypoxic vasodilation. While nitrite reductase activity of hemoglobin is well acknowledged, little is known about generation of NO by intact RBC with physiological hemoglobin concentrations. We aimed to develop and apply a new approach to provide insights in the ability of RBC to convert nitrite into NO under hypoxic conditions. We established a novel experimental setup to evaluate nitrite uptake and the release of NO from RBC into the gas-phase under different conditions. NO measurements were similar to well-established clinical measurements of exhaled NO. Nitrite uptake was rapid, and after an initial lag phase NO release from RBC was constant in time under hypoxic conditions. The presence of oxygen greatly reduced NO release, whereas inhibition of eNOS and xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR did not affect NO release. A decreased pH increased NO release under hypoxic conditions. Hypothermia lowered NO release, while hyperthermia increased NO release. Whereas fetal hemoglobin did not alter NO release compared to adult hemoglobin, sickle RBC showed an increased ability to release NO. Under all conditions nitrite uptake by RBC was similar. This study shows that nitrite uptake into RBC is rapid and release of NO into the gas-phase continues for prolonged periods of time under hypoxic conditions. Changes in the RBC environment such as pH, temperature or hemoglobin type, affect NO release.

  11. The capacity of red blood cells to reduce nitrite determines nitric oxide generation under hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fens, Marcel H; Larkin, Sandra K; Oronsky, Bryan; Scicinski, Jan; Morris, Claudia R; Kuypers, Frans A

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a key regulator of vascular tone. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is responsible for NO generation under normoxic conditions. Under hypoxia however, eNOS is inactive and red blood cells (RBC) provide an alternative NO generation pathway from nitrite to regulate hypoxic vasodilation. While nitrite reductase activity of hemoglobin is well acknowledged, little is known about generation of NO by intact RBC with physiological hemoglobin concentrations. We aimed to develop and apply a new approach to provide insights in the ability of RBC to convert nitrite into NO under hypoxic conditions. We established a novel experimental setup to evaluate nitrite uptake and the release of NO from RBC into the gas-phase under different conditions. NO measurements were similar to well-established clinical measurements of exhaled NO. Nitrite uptake was rapid, and after an initial lag phase NO release from RBC was constant in time under hypoxic conditions. The presence of oxygen greatly reduced NO release, whereas inhibition of eNOS and xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) did not affect NO release. A decreased pH increased NO release under hypoxic conditions. Hypothermia lowered NO release, while hyperthermia increased NO release. Whereas fetal hemoglobin did not alter NO release compared to adult hemoglobin, sickle RBC showed an increased ability to release NO. Under all conditions nitrite uptake by RBC was similar. This study shows that nitrite uptake into RBC is rapid and release of NO into the gas-phase continues for prolonged periods of time under hypoxic conditions. Changes in the RBC environment such as pH, temperature or hemoglobin type, affect NO release.

  12. [Research progress on microbial properties of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane-oxidising bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Li-dong

    2015-03-01

    Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (N-DAMO) is a recently discovered process that constitutes a unique association between the two major global elements essential for life, carbon and nitrogen. This process is one of the most important discoveries in the fields of environmental science and microbiology. The discovery of N-DAMO process supplements biogeochemical cycles of carbon and nitrogen in nature, extends microbial diversity and urges development of novel simultaneous carbon and nitrogen removal process. The N-DAMO process is mediated by the bacterium " Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera" (M. oxyfera), which belongs to the candidate phylum NC10. Currently, a series of breakthroughs have been made in the research of M. oxyfera. The properties of M. oxyfera morphology, chemical composition, enrichment culture, physiology and biochemistry, and ecology have been revealed. Most importantly, the special ultrastructure (star-like) of the cell shape and unique chemical composition (10MeC(16,1Δ7)) of M. oxyfera have been revealed. In addition, a new intra-aerobic metabolism (the fourth biological pathway to produce oxygen) was discovered in M. oxyfera. It was observed that M. oxyfera bypassed the denitrification intermediate nitrous oxide by the conversion of two nitric oxide molecules to dinitrogen gas and oxygen, which was then used to oxidise methane. The present review summarises various aspects of microbiological properties of M. oxyfera.

  13. Hybrid Nitrous Oxide Production from a Partial Nitrifying Bioreactor: Hydroxylamine Interactions with Nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Akihiko; Sugawara, Sho; Hojo, Keisuke; Takeuchi, Yuki; Riya, Shohei; Harper, Willie F; Yamamoto, Tomoko; Kuroiwa, Megumi; Isobe, Kazuo; Katsuyama, Chie; Suwa, Yuichi; Koba, Keisuke; Hosomi, Masaaki

    2017-03-07

    The goal of this study was to elucidate the mechanisms of nitrous oxide (N2O) production from a bioreactor for partial nitrification (PN). Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) enriched from a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) were subjected to N2O production pathway tests. The N2O pathway test was initiated by supplying an inorganic medium to ensure an initial NH4(+)-N concentration of 160 mg-N/L, followed by (15)NO2(-) (20 mg-N/L) and dual (15)NH2OH (each 17 mg-N/L) spikings to quantify isotopologs of gaseous N2O ((44)N2O, (45)N2O, and (46)N2O). N2O production was boosted by (15)NH2OH spiking, causing exponential increases in mRNA transcription levels of AOB functional genes encoding hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (haoA), nitrite reductase (nirK), and nitric oxide reductase (norB) genes. Predominant production of (45)N2O among N2O isotopologs (46% of total produced N2O) indicated that coupling of (15)NH2OH with (14)NO2(-) produced N2O via N-nitrosation hybrid reaction as a predominant pathway. Abiotic hybrid N2O production was also observed in the absence of the AOB-enriched biomass, indicating multiple pathways for N2O production in a PN bioreactor. The additional N2O pathway test, where (15)NH4(+) was spiked into 400 mg-N/L of NO2(-) concentration, confirmed that the hybrid N2O production was a dominant pathway, accounting for approximately 51% of the total N2O production.

  14. Stable Copper-Nitrosyl Formation By Nitrite Reductase in Either Oxidation State

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tocheva, E.I.; Rosell, F.I.; Mauk, A.G.; Murphy, M.E.P.

    2009-06-04

    Nitrite reductase (NiR) is an enzyme that uses type 1 and type 2 copper sites to reduce nitrite to nitric oxide during bacterial denitrification. A copper-nitrosyl intermediate is a proposed, yet poorly characterized feature of the NiR catalytic cycle. This intermediate is formally described as Cu(I)-NO{sup +} and is proposed to be formed at the type 2 copper site after nitrite binding and electron transfer from the type 1 copper site. In this study, copper-nitrosyl complexes were formed by prolonged exposure of exogenous NO to crystals of wild-type and two variant forms of NiR from Alcaligenes faecalis (AfNiR), and the structures were determined to 1.8 {angstrom} or better resolution. Exposing oxidized wild-type crystals to NO results in the reverse reaction and formation of nitrite that remains bound at the active site. In a type 1 copper site mutant (H145A) that is incapable of electron transfer to the type 2 site, the reverse reaction is not observed. Instead, in both oxidized and reduced H145A crystals, NO is observed bound in a side-on manner to the type 2 copper. In AfNiR, Asp98 forms hydrogen bonds to both substrate and product bound to the type 2 Cu. In the D98N variant, NO is bound side-on but is more disordered when observed for the wild-type enzyme. The solution EPR spectra of the crystallographically characterized NiR-NO complexes indicate the presence of an oxidized type 2 copper site and thus are interpreted as resulting from stable copper-nitrosyls and formally assigned as Cu(II)-NO{sup -}. A reaction scheme in which a second NO molecule is oxidized to nitrite can account for the formation of a CuD-NO{sup -} species after exposure of the oxidized H145A variant to NO gas.

  15. Iron-Doped Titania Nanoparticles for the Photocatalytic Oxidative Degradation of Nitrite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Iron-doped titania nanoparticles exhibit a higher photocatalytic activity than pure TiO2 for the degradation of nitrite. The optimum Fe-doped content in terms of activity is approximately 0. 5 %. The increase in photoactivity is probably due to the higher adsorption and the inhibition of electron-hole recombination. The photocatalytic oxidation reaction of nitrite over the Fe-doped TiO2 catalyst follows zero-order kinetics, which is different from that over pure TiO2. The reaction rate decreases linearly with the increase of the pH of the solution.

  16. Crystal Structures of the Nitrite and Nitric Oxide Complexes of Horse Heart Myoglobin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copeland,D.; Soares, A.; West, A.; Richter-Addo, G.

    2006-01-01

    Nitrite is an important species in the global nitrogen cycle, and the nitrite reductase enzymes convert nitrite to nitric oxide (NO). Recently, it has been shown that hemoglobin and myoglobin catalyze the reduction of nitrite to NO under hypoxic conditions. We have determined the 1.20 Angstroms resolution crystal structure of the nitrite adduct of ferric horse heart myoglobin (hh Mb). The ligand is bound to iron in the nitrito form, and the complex is formulated as Mb{sup III}(ONO{sup -}). The Fe-ONO bond length is 1.94 Angstroms, and the O-N-O angle is 113 degrees. In addition, the nitrite ligand is stabilized by hydrogen bonding with the distal His64 residue. We have also determined the 1.30 Angstroms resolution crystal structures of hh Mb{sup II}NO. When hh Mb{sup II}NO is prepared from the reaction of metMb{sup III} with nitrite/dithionite, the FeNO angle is 144 degrees with a Fe-NO bond length of 1.87 Angstroms. However, when prepared from the reaction of NO with reduced Mb{sup II}, the FeNO angle is 120 degrees with a Fe-NO bond length of 2.13 Angstroms. This difference in FeNO conformations as a function of preparative method is reproducible, and suggests a role of the distal pocket in hh Mb{sup II}NO in stabilizing local FeNO conformational minima.

  17. The genome of Nitrospina gracilis illuminates the metabolism and evolution of the major marine nitrite oxidizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian eLuecker

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In marine systems, nitrate is the major reservoir of inorganic fixed nitrogen. The only known biological nitrate-forming reaction is nitrite oxidation, but despite its importance, our knowledge of the organisms catalyzing this key process in the marine N-cycle is very limited. The most frequently encountered marine NOB are related to Nitrospina gracilis, an aerobic chemolithoautotrophic bacterium isolated from ocean surface waters. To date, limited physiological and genomic data for this organism were available and its phylogenetic affiliation was uncertain. In this study, the draft genome sequence of Nitrospina gracilis strain 3/211 was obtained. Unexpectedly for an aerobic organism, N. gracilis lacks classical reactive oxygen defense mechanisms and uses the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle for carbon fixation. These features indicate microaerophilic ancestry and are consistent with the presence of Nitrospina in marine oxygen minimum zones. Fixed carbon is stored intracellularly as glycogen, but genes for utilizing external organic carbon sources were not identified. N. gracilis also contains a full gene set for oxidative phosphorylation with oxygen as terminal electron acceptor and for reverse electron transport from nitrite to NADH. A novel variation of complex I may catalyze the required reverse electron flow to low-potential ferredoxin. Interestingly, comparative genomics indicated a strong evolutionary link between Nitrospina, the nitrite-oxidizing genus Nitrospira, and anaerobic ammonium oxidizers, apparently including the horizontal transfer of a periplasmically oriented nitrite oxidoreductase and other key genes for nitrite oxidation at an early evolutionary stage. Further, detailed phylogenetic analyses using concatenated marker genes provided evidence that Nitrospina forms a novel bacterial phylum, for which we propose the name Nitrospinae.

  18. The Genome of Nitrospina gracilis Illuminates the Metabolism and Evolution of the Major Marine Nitrite Oxidizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lücker, Sebastian; Nowka, Boris; Rattei, Thomas; Spieck, Eva; Daims, Holger

    2013-01-01

    In marine systems, nitrate is the major reservoir of inorganic fixed nitrogen. The only known biological nitrate-forming reaction is nitrite oxidation, but despite its importance, our knowledge of the organisms catalyzing this key process in the marine N-cycle is very limited. The most frequently encountered marine NOB are related to Nitrospina gracilis, an aerobic chemolithoautotrophic bacterium isolated from ocean surface waters. To date, limited physiological and genomic data for this organism were available and its phylogenetic affiliation was uncertain. In this study, the draft genome sequence of N. gracilis strain 3/211 was obtained. Unexpectedly for an aerobic organism, N. gracilis lacks classical reactive oxygen defense mechanisms and uses the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle for carbon fixation. These features indicate microaerophilic ancestry and are consistent with the presence of Nitrospina in marine oxygen minimum zones. Fixed carbon is stored intracellularly as glycogen, but genes for utilizing external organic carbon sources were not identified. N. gracilis also contains a full gene set for oxidative phosphorylation with oxygen as terminal electron acceptor and for reverse electron transport from nitrite to NADH. A novel variation of complex I may catalyze the required reverse electron flow to low-potential ferredoxin. Interestingly, comparative genomics indicated a strong evolutionary link between Nitrospina, the nitrite-oxidizing genus Nitrospira, and anaerobic ammonium oxidizers, apparently including the horizontal transfer of a periplasmically oriented nitrite oxidoreductase and other key genes for nitrite oxidation at an early evolutionary stage. Further, detailed phylogenetic analyses using concatenated marker genes provided evidence that Nitrospina forms a novel bacterial phylum, for which we propose the name Nitrospinae.

  19. Kinetic Constants for Biological Ammonium and Nitrite Oxidation Processes Under Sulfide Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejarano-Ortiz, Diego Iván; Huerta-Ochoa, Sergio; Thalasso, Frédéric; Cuervo-López, Flor de María; Texier, Anne-Claire

    2015-12-01

    Inhibition of nitrification by sulfide was assessed using sludge obtained from a steady-state nitrifying reactor. Independent batch activity assays were performed with ammonium and nitrite as substrate, in order to discriminate the effect of sulfide on ammonium and nitrite oxidation. In the absence of sulfide, substrate affinity constants (K S,NH4  = 2.41 ± 0.11 mg N/L; K s, NO2  = 0.74 ± 0.03 mg N/L) and maximum specific rates (q max,NH4  = 0.086 ± 0.008 mg N/mg microbial protein h; q max,NO2  = 0.124 ± 0.001 mg N/mg microbial protein h) were determined. Inhibition of ammonium oxidation was no-competitive (inhibition constant (K i , NH4 ) of 2.54 ± 0.12 mg HS(-)-S/L) while inhibition of nitrite oxidation was mixed (competitive inhibition constant (K' i , NO2 ) of 0.22 ± 0.03 mg HS(-)-S/L and no-competitive inhibition constant (K i , NO2 ) of 1.03 ± 0.06 mg HS(-)-S/L). Sulfide has greater inhibitory effect on nitrite oxidation than ammonium oxidation, and its presence in nitrification systems should be avoided to prevent accumulation of nitrite. By simulating the effect of sulfide addition in a continuous nitrifying reactor under steady-state operation, it was shown that the maximum sulfide concentration that the sludge can tolerate without affecting the ammonium consumption efficiency and nitrate yield is 1 mg HS(-)-S/L.

  20. Effect of wall growth on the kinetic modeling of nitrite oxidation in a CSTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokianakis, Spiros N; Kornaros, Michael; Lyberatos, Gerasimos

    2006-03-05

    A simple kinetic model was developed for describing nitrite oxidation by autotrophic aerobic nitrifiers in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), in which mixed (suspended and attached) growth conditions prevail. The CSTR system was operated under conditions of constant nitrite feed concentration and varying volumetric flow rates. Experimental data from steady-state conditions in the CSTR system and from batch experiments were used for the determination of the model's kinetic parameters. Model predictions were verified against experimental data obtained under transient operating conditions, when volumetric flow rate and nitrite feed concentration disturbances were imposed on the CSTR. The presented kinetic modeling procedure is quite simple and general and therefore can also be applied to other mixed growth biological systems.

  1. Dietary Nitrite: from menace to marvel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan S. Bryan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The health benefits of nitrite are now indisputable when administered in a clinical setting for specific diseases. Currently, most published reports identify the production of nitric oxide (NO as the mechanism of action for nitrite. Basic science, in addition to clinical studies, demonstrate that nitrite and/or nitrate cannot restore NO homeostasis as an endothelium independent source of NO that may be a redundant system for endogenous NO production. Nitrate must first be reduced to nitrite by oral commensal bacteria; nitrite can then be further reduced to NO along the physiological oxygen gradient. But despite decades of rigorous research on sodium nitrate’s safety and efficacy as a curing agent, sodium nitrite is still regarded by many as a toxic undesirable food additive. However, research within the biomedical science community has revealed enormous therapeutic benefits of nitrite which are being developed as novel therapies for conditions associated with nitric oxide insufficiency. Thus, this review will highlight the fundamental biochemistry of nitrite in human physiology and provide evidence that nitrite be considered an essential nutrient. Foods or diets enriched with nitrite can have profound positive health benefits.

  2. A two-component monooxygenase catalyzes both the hydroxylation of p-nitrophenol and the oxidative release of nitrite from 4-nitrocatechol in Bacillus sphaericus JS905.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadiyala, V; Spain, J C

    1998-07-01

    Bacteria that metabolize p-nitrophenol (PNP) oxidize the substrate to 3-ketoadipic acid via either hydroquinone or 1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene (THB); however, initial steps in the pathway for PNP biodegradation via THB are unclear. The product of initial hydroxylation of PNP could be either 4-nitrocatechol or 4-nitroresorcinol. Here we describe the complete pathway for aerobic PNP degradation by Bacillus sphaericus JS905 that was isolated by selective enrichment from an agricultural soil in India. Washed cells of PNP-grown JS905 released nitrite in stoichiometric amounts from PNP and 4-nitrocatechol. Experiments with extracts obtained from PNP-grown cells revealed that the initial reaction is a hydroxylation of PNP to yield 4-nitrocatechol. 4-Nitrocatechol is subsequently oxidized to THB with the concomitant removal of the nitro group as nitrite. The enzyme that catalyzed the two sequential monooxygenations of PNP was partially purified and separated into two components by anion-exchange chromatography and size exclusion chromatography. Both components were required for NADH-dependent oxidative release of nitrite from PNP or 4-nitrocatechol. One of the components was identified as a reductase based on its ability to catalyze the NAD(P)H-dependent reduction of 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol and nitroblue tetrazolium. Nitrite release from either PNP or 4-nitrocatechol was inhibited by the flavoprotein inhibitor methimazole. Our results indicate that the two monooxygenations of PNP to THB are catalyzed by a single two-component enzyme system comprising a flavoprotein reductase and an oxygenase.

  3. A two-component monooxygenase catalyzes both the hydroxylation of p-nirophenol and the oxidative release of nitrite from 4-nitrocatechol in Bacillus sphaericus JS905

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadiyala, V.; Spain, J.C. [Air Force Research Lab., Tyndall AFB, FL (United States)

    1998-07-01

    Bacteria that metabolize p-nitrophenol (PNP) oxidize the substrate to 3-ketoadipic acid via either hydroquinone or 1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene (THB); however, initial steps in the pathway for PNP biodegradation via THB are unclear. The product of initial hydroxylation of PNP could be either 4-nitrocatechol or 4-nitroresorcinol. Here the authors describe the complete pathway for aerobic PNP degradation by Bacillus sphaericus JS905 that was isolated by selective enrichment from an agricultural soil in India. Washed cells of PNP-grown JS905 released nitrite in stoichiometric amounts from PNP and 4-nitrocatechol. Experiments with extracts obtained from PNP-grown cells revealed that the initial reaction is a hydroxylation of PNP to yield 4-nitrocatechol. 4-nitrocatechol is subsequently oxidized to THB with the concomitant removal of the nitro group as nitrite. The enzyme that catalyzed the two sequential monooxygenations of PNP was partially purified and separated into two components by anion-exchange chromatography and size exclusion chromatography. Both components were required for NADH-dependent oxidative release of nitrite from PNP or 4-nitrocatechol. One of the components was identified as a reductase based on its ability to catalyze the NAD(P)H-dependent reduction of 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol and nitroblue tetrazolium. Nitrite release from either PNP or 4-nitrocatechol was inhibited by the flavoprotein inhibitor methimazole. Their results indicate that the two monooxygenations of PNP to THB are catalyzed by a single two-component enzyme system comprising a flavoprotein reductase and an oxygenase.

  4. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation by anammox bacteria in the Black Sea RID B-8834-2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuypers, MMM; Sliekers, AO; Lavik, G.

    2003-01-01

    The availability of fixed inorganic nitrogen (nitrate, nitrite and ammonium) limits primary productivity in many oceanic regions(1). The conversion of nitrate to N(2) by heterotrophic bacteria (denitrification) is believed to be the only important sink for fixed inorganic nitrogen in the ocean(2...... by anammox bacteria below the oxic zone. This is the first time that anammox bacteria have been identified and directly linked to the removal of fixed inorganic nitrogen in the environment. The widespread occurrence of ammonium consumption in suboxic marine settings(5-7) indicates that anammox might......). Here we provide evidence for bacteria that anaerobically oxidize ammonium with nitrite to N(2) in the world's largest anoxic basin, the Black Sea. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences shows that these bacteria are related to members of the order Planctomycetales performing...

  5. A carbon nanotube/polyvanillin composite film as an electrocatalyst for the electrochemical oxidation of nitrite and its application as a nitrite sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng Dongyun [College of Chemistry and Molecular Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Hu Chengguo [College of Chemistry and Molecular Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)], E-mail: cghu@whu.edu.cn; Peng Yanfen [College of Chemistry and Molecular Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Hu Shengshui [College of Chemistry and Molecular Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)], E-mail: sshu@whu.edu.cn

    2009-08-30

    We report a simple method for the stable dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) in water by vanillin and controllable surface addition onto carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFE) via electropolymerization. We have characterized these polyvanillin-carbon nanotube (PVN-MWNT) composite films with techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), infrared spectroscopy (IR) and voltammetry. These investigations showed that the films have a uniform porous nanostructure with a large surface area. This PVN-MWNT composite-modified CFE (PVN-MWNT/CFE) exhibited a sensitive response to the electrochemical oxidation of nitrite. Under optimal working conditions, the oxidation peak current of nitrite linearly increased with its concentration in the range of 0.2 {mu}M-3.1 mM, with the system exhibiting a lower detection limit of 50 nM (S/N = 3). We successfully applied the PVN-MWNT/CFE system to the determination of nitrite from lake water. The efficient recovery of nitrite indicated that this electrode was able to detect nitrite in real samples.

  6. The confounding effect of nitrite on N2O production by an enriched ammonia-oxidizing culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Yingyu; Lant, Paul; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2013-07-02

    The effect of nitrite (NO2(-)) on the nitrous oxide (N2O) production rate of an enriched ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) culture was characterized over a concentration range of 0-1000 mg N/L. The AOB culture was enriched in a nitritation system fed with synthetic anaerobic digester liquor. The N2O production rate was highest at NO2(-) concentrations of less than 50 mg N/L. At dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration of 0.55 mg O2/L, further increases in NO2(-) concentration from 50 to 500 mg N/L resulted in a gradual decrease in N2O production rate, which maintained at its lowest level of 0.20 mg N2O-N/h/g VSS in the NO2(-) concentration range of 500-1000 mg N/L. The observed NO2(-)-induced decrease in N2O production was even more apparent at increased DO concentration. At DO concentrations of 1.30 and 2.30 mg O2/L, the lowest N2O production rate (0.25 mg N2O-N/h/g VSS) was attained at a lower NO2(-) concentration of 200-250 mg N/L. These observations suggest that N2O production by the culture is diminished by both high NO2(-) and high DO concentrations. Collectively, the findings show that exceedingly high NO2(-) concentrations in nitritation systems could lead to decreased N2O production. Further studies are required to determine the extent to which the same response to NO2(-) is observed across different AOB cultures.

  7. Evidence for the cooccurrence of nitrite-dependent anaerobic ammonium and methane oxidation processes in a flooded paddy field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Li-Dong; Liu, Shuai; Huang, Qian; Lian, Xu; He, Zhan-Fei; Geng, Sha; Jin, Ren-Cun; He, Yun-Feng; Lou, Li-Ping; Xu, Xiang-Yang; Zheng, Ping; Hu, Bao-Lan

    2014-12-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) and nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) are two of the most recent discoveries in the microbial nitrogen cycle. In the present study, we provide direct evidence for the cooccurrence of the anammox and n-damo processes in a flooded paddy field in southeastern China. Stable isotope experiments showed that the potential anammox rates ranged from 5.6 to 22.7 nmol N2 g(-1) (dry weight) day(-1) and the potential n-damo rates varied from 0.2 to 2.1 nmol CO2 g(-1) (dry weight) day(-1) in different layers of soil cores. Quantitative PCR showed that the abundance of anammox bacteria ranged from 1.0 × 10(5) to 2.0 × 10(6) copies g(-1) (dry weight) in different layers of soil cores and the abundance of n-damo bacteria varied from 3.8 × 10(5) to 6.1 × 10(6) copies g(-1) (dry weight). Phylogenetic analyses of the recovered 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that anammox bacteria affiliated with "Candidatus Brocadia" and "Candidatus Kuenenia" and n-damo bacteria related to "Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera" were present in the soil cores. It is estimated that a total loss of 50.7 g N m(-2) per year could be linked to the anammox process, which is at intermediate levels for the nitrogen flux ranges of aerobic ammonium oxidation and denitrification reported in wetland soils. In addition, it is estimated that a total of 0.14 g CH4 m(-2) per year could be oxidized via the n-damo process, while this rate is at the lower end of the aerobic methane oxidation rates reported in wetland soils.

  8. Faster autotrophic growth of anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing microorganisms in presence of nitrite, using inocula from Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Sanchez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Título en español: Crecimiento rápido autotrófico de microorganismos anaerobios oxidadores de amonio en presencia de nitrito, usando inóculos de ColombiaShort Title: Growth from Colombian inoculated anammoxSummary: Anammox is a nitrite dependent process, catalyzed by bacteria of the order Brocadiales. Anammox bacteria oxidize ammonia under anoxic conditions, with nitrite as electron acceptor producing dinitrogen gas. Here, we demonstrated the presence of anammox bacteria by enriched them in a SBR reactor, with anaerobic samples taken from de bottom of a pond used in primary wastewater treatment. The enrichment reached nitrogen (N removal rates of nearly 1.92kg N/m3/day. (The stoichiometry of the reaction matched previous anammox studies. The enriched bacterial communities were analyzed by Fluorescence In situ Hybridization (FISH, and showed nearly a 90% of enrichment at the end of the experiment (day 90. As far as we know, this is the first time that the anammox bacteria were enriched using Colombian inocula. The enrichment was achieved in relatively short time with high yields and has an excellent potential for application in wastewater treatment opening the opportunity to treat nitrogen-rich effluents by partial nitritation and anammox, thereby decreasing operational costs with respect to aeration (nitrification and addition of organic electron donor (heterotrophic denitrification. This more sustainable treatment is a good alternative to control nutrient pollution in water bodies in tropical countries.Key words: nitrogen cycle; advanced treatment; anammox;  nitritation; nitratation; denitrification.Resumen: La oxidación anaerobia del amonio (anammox, es un proceso nitrito dependiente, catalizado por bacterias del filo planctomicetes. Estas bacterias oxidan el amonio en ausencia de oxígeno, con nitrito como aceptor de electrones produciendo nitrógeno molecular. En Colombia, demostramos la presencia de estas bacterias mediante el

  9. Biogeography of anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing (anammox bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puntipar eSonthiphand

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing (anammox bacteria are able to oxidize ammonia and reduce nitrite to produce N2 gas. After being discovered in a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP, anammox bacteria were subsequently characterized in natural environments, including marine, estuary, freshwater, and terrestrial habitats. Anammox bacteria play an important role in removing fixed N from both engineered and natural ecosystems, but broad scale anammox bacterial distributions, based on available data, have not yet been summarized. The objectives of this study were to explore global distributions and diversity of anammox bacteria and to identify factors that influence their biogeography. Over 6,000 anammox 16S rRNA gene sequences from the public database were analyzed in this current study. Data ordinations indicated that salinity was an important factor governing anammox bacterial distributions, with distinct populations inhabiting natural and engineered ecosystems. Gene phylogenies and rarefaction analysis demonstrated that freshwater environments and the marine water column harbored the highest and the lowest diversity of anammox bacteria, respectively. A co-occurrence network analysis indicated that Ca. Scalindua strongly correlated with other Ca. Scalindua taxa, whereas Ca. Brocadia co-occurred with taxa from both known and unknown anammox genera. Our survey provides a better understanding of ecological factors affecting anammox bacterial distributions and provides a comprehensive baseline for understanding the relationships among anammox communities in global environments.

  10. The Genome of Nitrospina gracilis Illuminates the Metabolism and Evolution of the Major Marine Nitrite Oxidizer

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    In marine systems, nitrate is the major reservoir of inorganic fixed nitrogen. The only known biological nitrate-forming reaction is nitrite oxidation, but despite its importance, our knowledge of the organisms catalyzing this key process in the marine N-cycle is very limited. The most frequently encountered marine NOB are related to Nitrospina gracilis, an aerobic chemolithoautotrophic bacterium isolated from ocean surface waters. To date, limited physiological and genomic data for this orga...

  11. The genome of Nitrospina gracilis illuminates the metabolism and evolution of the major marine nitrite oxidizer

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    In marine systems, nitrate is the major reservoir of inorganic fixed nitrogen. The only known biological nitrate-forming reaction is nitrite oxidation, but despite its importance, our knowledge of the organisms catalyzing this key process in the marine N-cycle is very limited. The most frequently encountered marine NOB are related to Nitrospina gracilis, an aerobic chemolithoautotrophic bacterium isolated from ocean surface waters. To date, limited physiological and genomic data for this orga...

  12. A bioreactor approach to investigate the linkage between methane oxidation and nitrate/nitrite reduction in the pelagic oxic-anoxic transition zone of the central Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar Jakobs

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Evidence of aerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification has been provided for different freshwater environments, whereas the significance of this process for the marine realm has not been adequately investigated. The goal of this study was to investigate the methane-related reduction of nitrate/nitrite in a marine environment (salinity 8.5. A water sample was collected from the oxic-anoxic transition zone of the Gotland Deep (central Baltic Sea and the microorganisms contained therein were cultivated in a bioreactor under hypoxic conditions (0.5 µM O2. To enrich the microorganisms involved in the coupled process the bioreactor was continuously sparged with methane as the sole energy and carbon source and simultaneously supplied with a nutrient solution rich in nitrate and nitrite. The bioreactor experiment showed a relationship between the turnover of methane and the concomitant concentration decrease of nitrite and nitrate at the early stage of the experiment. This relationship indicates the role of methanotrophs, which may support heterotrophic denitrifiers by the release of organic compounds as an energy source. Besides, a mixture of uncultured microorganisms, aerobic methanotrophic and heterotrophic denitrifying bacteria were identified in the enrichment culture. Microbial incorporation of nitrite and methane was proven on the cellular and gene levels via 15NO2- / 13CH4 incubation experiments and subsequent analyses with nano secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS and stable isotope probing (SIP. The NanoSIMS showed the incorporation of 15N in almost all the bacteria and in 9% of those there was a concomitant enrichment in 13C. The relatively low abundance of methane-consuming bacteria in the bioreactor was further reflected in specific fatty acids indicative for type I methanotrophic bacteria. Based on pmoA gene analyses, this bacterium is different from the one that was identified as the only key player of methane oxidation in

  13. Characterization of a new marine nitrite oxidizing bacterium, Nitrospina watsonii sp. nov., a member of the newly proposed phylum "Nitrospinae".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spieck, Eva; Keuter, Sabine; Wenzel, Thilo; Bock, Eberhard; Ludwig, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    Nitrite oxidizing bacteria are an integral part of the nitrogen cycle in marine waters, but the knowledge about their diversity is limited. Recently, a high abundance of Nitrospina-like 16S rRNA gene sequences has been detected in oceanic habitats with low oxygen content by molecular methods. Here, we describe a new strain of Nitrospina, which was sampled in 100m depth from the Black Sea. It coexisted with a not-yet cultivated chemoorganotrophic gammaproteobacterium and could be purified by classical isolation methods including Percoll density gradient centrifugation. The new Nitrospina-like bacterium grew lithoautotrophically at 28°C in diluted seawater supplemented with inorganic salts and nitrite. Gram-negative rods were characterized morphologically, physiologically and partly biochemically. The 16S rRNA gene of the new strain of Nitrospina is 97.9% similar to the described species N. gracilis and DNA/DNA hybridization experiments revealed a relatedness of 30.0%. The data from both Nitrospina species and environmental clones were used for an extensive 16S rRNA based phylogenetic study applying high quality filtering. Treeing analyses confirm the newly defined phylum status for "Nitrospinae" [18]. The results of phylogenetic and genotypic analyses support the proposal of a novel species Nitrospina watsonii sp. nov. (type strain 347(T), LMG 27401(T), NCIMB 14887(T)).

  14. Ammonia Oxidation and Nitrite Reduction in the Verrucomicrobial Methanotroph Methylacidiphilum fumariolicum SolV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepehr S. Mohammadi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Solfatara volcano near Naples (Italy, the origin of the recently discovered verrucomicrobial methanotroph Methylacidiphilum fumariolicum SolV was shown to contain ammonium (NH4+ at concentrations ranging from 1 to 28 mM. Ammonia (NH3 can be converted to toxic hydroxylamine (NH2OH by the particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO, the first enzyme of the methane (CH4 oxidation pathway. Methanotrophs rapidly detoxify the intermediate NH2OH. Here, we show that strain SolV performs ammonium oxidation to nitrite at a rate of 48.2 nmol NO2-.h−1.mg DW−1 under O2 limitation in a continuous culture grown on hydrogen (H2 as an electron donor. In addition, strain SolV carries out nitrite reduction at a rate of 74.4 nmol NO2-.h−1.mg DW−1 under anoxic condition at pH 5–6. This range of pH was selected to minimize the chemical conversion of nitrite (NO2- potentially occurring at more acidic pH values. Furthermore, at pH 6, we showed that the affinity constants (Ks of the cells for NH3 vary from 5 to 270 μM in the batch incubations with 0.5–8% (v/v CH4, respectively. Detailed kinetic analysis showed competitive substrate inhibition between CH4 and NH3. Using transcriptome analysis, we showed up-regulation of the gene encoding hydroxylamine dehydrogenase (haoA cells grown on H2/NH4+ compared to the cells grown on CH4/NO3- which do not have to cope with reactive N-compounds. The denitrifying genes nirk and norC showed high expression in H2/NH4+ and CH4/NO3- grown cells compared to cells growing at μmax (with no limitation while the norB gene showed downregulation in CH4/NO3- grown cells. These cells showed a strong upregulation of the genes in nitrate/nitrite assimilation. Our results demonstrate that strain SolV can perform ammonium oxidation producing nitrite. At high concentrations of ammonium this may results in toxic effects. However, at low oxygen concentrations strain SolV is able to reduce nitrite to N2O to cope with this toxicity.

  15. Impact of hemoglobin nitrite to nitric oxide reductase on blood transfusion for resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad Brouse

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Transfusion of blood remains the gold standard for fluid resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock. Hemoglobin (Hb within the red blood cell transports oxygen and modulates nitric oxide (NO through NO scavenging and nitrite reductase. Aims: This study was designed to examine the effects of incorporating a novel NO modulator, RRx-001, on systemic and microvascular hemodynamic response after blood transfusion for resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock in a hamster window chamber model. In addition, to RRx-001 the role of low dose of nitrite (1 × 10−9 moles per animal supplementation after resuscitation was studied. Materials and Methods: Severe hemorrhage was induced by arterial controlled bleeding of 50% of the blood volume (BV and the hypovolemic state was maintained for 1 h. The animals received volume resuscitation by an infusion of 25% of BV using fresh blood alone or with added nitrite, or fresh blood treated with RRx-001 (140 mg/kg or RRx-001 (140 mg/kg with added nitrite. Systemic and microvascular hemodynamics were followed at baseline and at different time points during the entire study. Tissue apoptosis and necrosis were measured 8 h after resuscitation to correlate hemodynamic changes with tissue viability. Results: Compared to resuscitation with blood alone, blood treated with RRx-001 decreased vascular resistance, increased blood flow and functional capillary density immediately after resuscitation and preserved tissue viability. Furthermore, in RRx-001 treated animals, both mean arterial pressure (MAP and met Hb were maintained within normal levels after resuscitation (MAP >90 mmHg and metHb <2%. The addition of nitrite to RRx-001 did not significantly improve the effects of RRx-001, as it increased methemoglobinemia and lower MAP. Conclusion: RRx-001 alone enhanced perfusion and reduced tissue damage as compared to blood; it may serve as an adjunct therapy to the current gold standard treatment for resuscitation from

  16. Detection and analysis of two serotypes of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in sewage plants by flow cytometry.

    OpenAIRE

    Völsch, A; Nader, W F; Geiss, H. K.; Nebe, G; Birr, C

    1990-01-01

    Two different serotypes of the genus Nitrosomonas were isolated from samples of the sewage plant Heidelberg. These nitrifiers were enumerated in activated sludge of various other sewage plants after immunofluorescent labeling and staining with propidium iodide by flow cytometry. The concentrations of these serotypes of Nitrosomonas spp. were in the range of 0.1 to 2%. Also, a test for the determination of the activity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria was developed. Nitrite-oxidizing bacteria wer...

  17. Effect of the kinetics of ammonium and nitrite oxidation on nitritation success or failure for different biofilm reactor geometries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lackner, Susanne; Smets, Barth F.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of biokinetics on nitritation was investigated in two biofilm geometries, the Membrane Aerated Biofilm Reactor (MABR) and a conventional biofilm system. A 1D biofilm model was used and evaluated by global sensitivity analysis using the variance based Sobol method. The main focus...... strongly depends on the chosen kinetic parameters of AOB and NOB. The maximum specific growth rates (μmax,AOB and μmax,NOB) had the strongest impact on nitritation efficiency (NE). In comparison, the counter-diffusion geometry yielded more parameter combinations (27.5%) that resulted in high NE than the co...

  18. Metal-mediated Multiporphyrin Arrays at Interfaces:Preparation, Electrochemistry, Catalytic Oxidation of Nitrite and NO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Manganese porphyrins have attracted growing interest because of their unique physical and chemical properties,such as mimicking the role of Mn complex in photosystem Ⅱ and acting as electrocatalysts towards the oxidation of nitric oxide and nitrite.As one of the bottom-up techniques,we are currently investigating the design,preparation and opto-electrochemical properties of metal-mediated multiporphyrin arrays on the solid surfaces.Because the porphyrins are connected by metal ions via coordin...

  19. Predicting the responses of soil nitrite-oxidizers to multi-factorial global change: a trait-based approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier eLE ROUX

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Soil microbial diversity is huge and a few grams of soil contain more bacterial taxa than there are bird species on Earth. This high diversity often makes predicting the responses of soil bacteria to environmental change intractable and restricts our capacity to predict the responses of soil functions to global change. Here, using a long-term field experiment in a California grassland, we studied the main and interactive effects of three global change factors (increased atmospheric CO2 concentration, precipitation and nitrogen addition, and all their factorial combinations, based on global change scenarios for central California on the potential activity, abundance and dominant taxa of soil nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB. Using a trait-based model, we then tested whether categorizing NOB into a few functional groups unified by physiological traits enables understanding and predicting how soil NOB respond to global environmental change. Contrasted responses to global change treatments were observed between three main NOB functional types. In particular, putatively mixotrophic Nitrobacter, rare under most treatments, became dominant under the ‘High CO2+Nitrogen+Precipitation’ treatment. The mechanistic trait-based model, which simulated ecological niches of NOB types consistent with previous ecophysiological reports, helped predicting the observed effects of global change on NOB and elucidating the underlying biotic and abiotic controls. Our results are a starting point for representing the overwhelming diversity of soil bacteria by a few functional types that can be incorporated into models of terrestrial ecosystems and biogeochemical processes.

  20. Relevance of Nitrospira for nitrite oxidation in a marine recirculation aquaculture system and physiological features of a Nitrospira marina-like isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keuter, Sabine; Kruse, Myriam; Lipski, André; Spieck, Eva

    2011-09-01

    In biofilters of recirculation aquaculture systems (RAS), nitrification by lithoautotrophic microorganisms is essential to prevent the cultivated organisms from intoxication with ammonium and nitrite. In moving-bed biofilters nitrifying microorganisms are immobilized together with heterotrophic bacteria in dense biofilms on carrier elements like plastic beads. Analyses of fatty acid profiles of these biofilms from a marine biofilter revealed a high abundance of Nitrospira-related lipid markers (8-12% of total fatty acids). Further results of a labeling experiment with (13) C-bicarbonate in mineral salts medium with 3 mM nitrite confirmed that Nitrospira is the major autotrophic nitrite oxidizer in the biofilter system. According to 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses the nitrite-oxidizing community in the biofilter consisted of at least two different representatives of Nitrospira, one of which could be successfully isolated. The marine isolate 'Ecomares 2.1' belongs to cluster IVa and showed 98.8% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to Nitrospira marina, whereas the enrichment 'M1 marine' is only distantly related (94.0% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to N. marina). In laboratory experiments, the isolate exhibited remarkable tolerances against high substrate and product concentrations (30 mM nitrite and 80 mM nitrate) as well as ammonium (50 mM). During the isolation process a strong tendency of this strain to develop biofilms became apparent. Thus, Ecomares 2.1 seems to be well adapted to the attached lifestyle in biofilters and the nitrogenous load prevailing in the effluent waters of RAS. Both members of Nitrospira could be detected by PCR-based methods in environmental samples of marine and brackish RAS biofilters and are therefore considered to be characteristic for these engineered ecosystems.

  1. Effects of Lactic Acid Bacteria on Residual Nitrite in a Summer Style Sausage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    the American Type Culture Collection Culture ATCC Number Lactobacillus acidophilus 4365 0 Lactobacillus casei E393 Lactobacillus leichmannii 4797...200 400 600 800 1000 200 400 600 800 1000 * Control -h Lactobacillus acidophilus ’a Lactobacillus casela Lactobacillus leichmanniia... Lactobacillus leichmannii, Streptococcus faecalis, and several atypical lactobacilli isolated from fresh beef and mutton reduced 200-1000 ppm nitrite

  2. Nitrosomonas Nm143-like ammonia oxidizers and Nitrospira marina-like nitrite oxidizers dominate the nitrifier community in a marine aquaculture biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foesel, Bärbel U; Gieseke, Armin; Schwermer, Carsten; Stief, Peter; Koch, Liat; Cytryn, Eddie; de la Torré, José R; van Rijn, Jaap; Minz, Dror; Drake, Harold L; Schramm, Andreas

    2008-02-01

    Zero-discharge marine aquaculture systems are an environmentally friendly alternative to conventional aquaculture. In these systems, water is purified and recycled via microbial biofilters. Here, quantitative data on nitrifier community structure of a trickling filter biofilm associated with a recirculating marine aquaculture system are presented. Repeated rounds of the full-cycle rRNA approach were necessary to optimize DNA extraction and the probe set for FISH to obtain a reliable and comprehensive picture of the ammonia-oxidizing community. Analysis of the ammonia monooxygenase gene (amoA) confirmed the results. The most abundant ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) were members of the Nitrosomonas sp. Nm143-lineage (6.7% of the bacterial biovolume), followed by Nitrosomonas marina-like AOB (2.2% of the bacterial biovolume). Both were outnumbered by nitrite-oxidizing bacteria of the Nitrospira marina-lineage (15.7% of the bacterial biovolume). Although more than eight other nitrifying populations were detected, including Crenarchaeota closely related to the ammonia-oxidizer 'Nitrosopumilus maritimus', their collective abundance was below 1% of the total biofilm volume; their contribution to nitrification in the biofilter is therefore likely to be negligible.

  3. Nitrogen source effects on the denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation culture and anaerobic ammonium oxidation bacteria enrichment process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Liang; Ding, Jing; Lu, Yong-Ze; Ding, Zhao-Wei; Zeng, Raymond J

    2017-05-01

    The co-culture system of denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) has a potential application in wastewater treatment plant. This study explored the effects of permutation and combination of nitrate, nitrite, and ammonium on the culture enrichment from freshwater sediments. The co-existence of NO3(-), NO2(-), and NH4(+) shortened the enrichment time from 75 to 30 days and achieved a total nitrogen removal rate of 106.5 mg/L/day on day 132. Even though ammonium addition led to Anammox bacteria increase and a higher nitrogen removal rate, DAMO bacteria still dominated in different reactors with the highest proportion of 64.7% and the maximum abundance was 3.07 ± 0.25 × 10(8) copies/L (increased by five orders of magnitude) in the nitrite reactor. DAMO bacteria showed greater diversity in the nitrate reactor, and one was similar to M. oxyfera; DAMO bacteria in the nitrite reactor were relatively unified and similar to M. sinica. Interestingly, no DAMO archaea were found in the nitrate reactor. This study will improve the understanding of the impact of nitrogen source on DAMO and Anammox co-culture enrichment.

  4. Nitric oxide availability in deeply hypoxic crucian carp: acute and chronic changes and utilization of ambient nitrite reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Marie N; Gerber, Lucie; Jensen, Frank B

    2016-03-15

    Recent research suggest that anoxia-tolerant fish transfer extracellular nitrite into the tissues, where it is used for nitric oxide (NO) generation, iron-nitrosylation, and S-nitrosation of proteins, as part of the cytoprotective response toward prolonged hypoxia and subsequent reoxygenation. We hypothesized that crucian carp take up ambient nitrite and use it as a source of cellular NO availability during hypoxia. Fish were exposed for 1 day to normoxia (Po2 > 140 mmHg) and deep hypoxia (1 nitric oxide synthase-2 gene variant. The data support that ambient nitrite is taken up across the gills to be distributed via the blood to the tissues, particularly the heart, where it assists in cytoprotection and other functions. Cardiac nitrite was not elevated in acutely exposed fish, revealing that the response requires time. NO metabolite levels were higher during acute than chronic exposures, possibly caused by increased swimming activity and stress in acutely exposed fish.

  5. Nitrite Oxidation with Copper-Cobalt Nanoparticles on Carbon Nanotubes Doped Conducting Polymer PEDOT Composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junjie; Xu, Guiyun; Wang, Wei; Xu, Shenghao; Luo, Xiliang

    2015-09-01

    Copper-cobalt bimetal nanoparticles (Cu-Co) have been electrochemically prepared on glassy carbon electrodes (GCEs), which were electrodeposited with conducting polymer nanocomposites of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) doped with carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Owing to their good conductivity, high mechanical strength, and large surface area, the PEDOT/CNTs composites offered excellent substrates for the electrochemical deposition of Cu-Co nanoparticles. As a result of their nanostructure and the synergic effect between Cu and Co, the Cu-Co/PEDOT/CNTs composites exhibited significantly enhanced catalytic activity towards the electrochemical oxidation of nitrite. Under optimized conditions, the nanocomposite-modified electrodes had a fast response time within 2 s and a linear range from 0.5 to 430 μm for the detection of nitrite, with a detection limit of 60 nm. Moreover, the Cu-Co/PEDOT/CNTs composites were highly stable, and the prepared nitrite sensors could retain more than 96 % of their initial response after 30 days.

  6. Physiology of Haloalkaliphilic Sulfur-oxidizing Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banciu, H.L.

    2004-01-01

    The inorganic sulfur oxidation by obligate haloalkaliphilic chemolithoautotrophs was only recently discovered and investigated. These autotrophic sulfur oxidizing bacteria (SOB), capable of oxidation of inorganic sulfur compounds at moderate to high salt concentration and at high pH, can be divided

  7. Physiology of Haloalkaliphilic Sulfur-oxidizing Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banciu, H.L.

    2004-01-01

    The inorganic sulfur oxidation by obligate haloalkaliphilic chemolithoautotrophs was only recently discovered and investigated. These autotrophic sulfur oxidizing bacteria (SOB), capable of oxidation of inorganic sulfur compounds at moderate to high salt concentration and at high pH, can be divided

  8. Nutritional epidemiology in the context of nitric oxide biology: a risk-benefit evaluation for dietary nitrite and nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milkowski, Andrew; Garg, Harsha K; Coughlin, James R; Bryan, Nathan S

    2010-02-15

    The discovery of the nitric oxide (NO) pathway in the 1980s represented a critical advance in understanding cardiovascular disease, and today a number of human diseases are characterized by NO insufficiency. In the interim, recent biomedical research has demonstrated that NO can be modulated by the diet independent of its enzymatic synthesis from l-arginine, e.g., the consumption of nitrite- and nitrate-rich foods such as fruits, leafy vegetables, and cured meats along with antioxidants. Regular intake of nitrate-containing food such as green leafy vegetables may ensure that blood and tissue levels of nitrite and NO pools are maintained at a level sufficient to compensate for any disturbances in endogenous NO synthesis. However, some in the public perceive that dietary sources of nitrite and nitrate are harmful, and some epidemiological studies reveal a weak association between foods that contain nitrite and nitrate, namely cured and processed meats, and cancer. This paradigm needs revisiting in the face of undisputed health benefits of nitrite- and nitrate-enriched diets. This review will address and interpret the epidemiological data and discuss the risk-benefit evaluation of dietary nitrite and nitrate in the context of nitric oxide biology. The weak and inconclusive data on the cancer risk of nitrite, nitrate and processed meats are far outweighed by the health benefits of restoring NO homeostasis via dietary nitrite and nitrate. This risk/benefit balance should be a strong consideration before there are any suggestions for new regulatory or public health guidelines for dietary nitrite and nitrate exposures.

  9. Facile synthesis of flower like copper oxide and their application to hydrogen peroxide and nitrite sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Li

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and nitrite ion (NO2- is of great important in various fields including clinic, food, pharmaceutical and environmental analyses. Compared with many methods that have been developed for the determination of them, the electrochemical detection method has attracted much attention. In recent years, with the development of nanotechnology, many kinds of micro/nano-scale materials have been used in the construction of electrochemical biosensors because of their unique and particular properties. Among these catalysts, copper oxide (CuO, as a well known p-type semiconductor, has gained increasing attention not only for its unique properties but also for its applications in many fields such as gas sensors, photocatalyst and electrochemistry sensors. Continuing our previous investigations on transition-metal oxide including cuprous oxide and α-Fe2O3 modified electrode, in the present paper we examine the electrochemical and electrocatalytical behavior of flower like copper oxide modified glass carbon electrodes (CuO/GCE. Results Flower like copper oxide (CuO composed of many nanoflake was synthesized by a simple hydrothermal reaction and characterized using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD. CuO modified glass carbon electrode (CuO/GCE was fabricated and characterized electrochemically. A highly sensitive method for the rapid amperometric detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and nitrite (NO2- was reported. Conclusions Due to the large specific surface area and inner characteristic of the flower like CuO, the resulting electrode show excellent electrocatalytic reduction for H2O2 and oxidation of NO2-. Its sensitivity, low detection limit, fast response time and simplicity are satisfactory. Furthermore, this synthetic approach can also be applied for the synthesis of other inorganic oxides with improved performances and they can also be extended to

  10. Nitrogen removal and electricity production at a double-chamber microbial fuel cell with cathode nitrite denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yangyang; Zhao, Jianqiang; Wang, Sha; Zhao, Huimin; Ding, Xiaoqian; Gao, Kun

    2017-02-17

    Double-chamber microbial fuel cell was applied to investigate the performance of the electricity production and nitrite denitrification through feeding nitrite into the cathode. Factors influencing denitrification performance and power production, such as external resistance, influent nitrite concentration and Nitrite Oxygen Bacteria inhibitors, were studied. The results show that when the concentration of nitrite nitrogen and external resistance were 100 mg L(-1) and 10 Ω, respectively, the nitrite denitrification reached the best state. The NaN3 can inhibit nitrite oxidation effectively; meanwhile, the nitrite denitrification with N2O as the final products was largely improved. The [Formula: see text] was reduced to [Formula: see text], causing the cathode denitrification coulombic efficiency to exceed 100%. In chemoautotrophic bio-nitrification, microorganisms may utilize H2O to oxidize nitrite under anaerobic conditions. Proteobacteria might play a major role in the process of denitrification in MFC.

  11. Nitric oxide formation from the reaction of nitrite with carp and rabbit hemoglobin at intermediate oxygen saturations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank Bo

    2008-01-01

    The nitrite reductase activity of deoxyhemoglobin has received much recent interest because the nitric oxide produced in this reaction may participate in blood flow regulation during hypoxia. The present study used spectral deconvolution to characterize the reaction of nitrite with carp and rabbit...... hemoglobin at different constant oxygen tensions that generate the full range of physiological relevant oxygen saturations. Carp is a hypoxia-tolerant species with very high hemoglobin oxygen affinity, and the high R-state character and low redox potential of the hemoglobin is hypothesized to promote...... NO generation from nitrite. The reaction of nitrite with deoxyhemoglobin leads to a 1 : 1 formation of nitrosylhemoglobin and methemoglobin in both species. At intermediate oxygen saturations, the reaction with deoxyhemoglobin is clearly favored over that with oxyhemoglobin, and the oxyhemoglobin reaction...

  12. Halophilic and haloalkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorokin, D.Y.; Banciu, H.; Robertson, L.A.; Kuenen, J.G.; Muntyan, M.S.; Muyzer, G.; Rosenberg, E.; DeLong, F.; Delong, E.; Lory, S.; Stackebrandt, E.; Thompson, F.

    2013-01-01

    Chemotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) represent an important functional group of microorganisms responsible for the dark oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds generated by sulfidogens. Until recently, only a single genus of halophilic SOB (Halothiobacillus) has been described, and nothing was

  13. Halophilic and haloalkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorokin, D.Y.; Banciu, H.; Robertson, L.A.; Kuenen, J.G.; Muntyan, M.S.; Muyzer, G.; Rosenberg, E.; DeLong, F.; Delong, E.; Lory, S.; Stackebrandt, E.; Thompson, F.

    2013-01-01

    Chemotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) represent an important functional group of microorganisms responsible for the dark oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds generated by sulfidogens. Until recently, only a single genus of halophilic SOB (Halothiobacillus) has been described, and nothing was

  14. Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in environmental technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorna, Dana; Zabranska, Jana

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is widely known as the most undesirable component of biogas that caused not only serious sensoric and toxic problems, but also corrosion of concrete and steel structures. Many agricultural and industrial waste used in biogas production, may contain a large amount of substances that serve as direct precursors to the formation of sulfide sulfur-sources of hydrogen sulfide in the biogas. Biological desulfurization methods are currently promoted to abiotic methods because they are less expensive and do not produce undesirable materials which must be disposed of. The final products of oxidation of sulfides are no longer hazardous. Biological removal of sulfide from a liquid or gaseous phase is based on the activity of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. They need an oxidizing agent such as an acceptor of electrons released during the oxidation of sulfides-atmospheric oxygen or oxidized forms of nitrogen. Different genera of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and their technological application are discussed.

  15. Ferrous iron oxidation by anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Widdel, Friedrich; Schnell, Sylvia; Heising, Silke; Ehrenreich, Armin; Assmus, Bernhard; Schink, Bernhard

    1993-01-01

    Natural oxidation of ferrous to ferric iron by bacteria such as Thiobacillus ferrooxidans or Gallionella ferruginea 1, or by chemical oxidation2,3 has previously been thought always to involve molecular oxygen as the electron acceptor. Anoxic photochemical reactions4 6 or a photobiological process involving two photosystems7 9 have also been discussed as mechanisms of ferrous iron oxidation. The knowledge of such processes has implications that bear on our understanding of the origin of Preca...

  16. Physiology of Haloalkaliphilic Sulfur-oxidizing Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Banciu, H.L.

    2004-01-01

    The inorganic sulfur oxidation by obligate haloalkaliphilic chemolithoautotrophs was only recently discovered and investigated. These autotrophic sulfur oxidizing bacteria (SOB), capable of oxidation of inorganic sulfur compounds at moderate to high salt concentration and at high pH, can be divided into three genera belonging to the γ subdivision of the Proteobacteria: Thioalkalimicrobium, Thioalkalivibrio and Thioalkalispira. Their taxonomy, metabolic diversity and the potential application...

  17. Insights into the Effect of Nitric Oxide and its Metabolites Nitrite and Nitrate at Inhibiting Neointimal Hyperplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavra, Ashley K.; Havelka, George E.; Martinez, Janet; Lee, Vanessa R.; Fu, Bo; Jiang, Qun; Keefer, Larry K.; Kibbe, Melina R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Periadventitial delivery of the nitric oxide (NO) donor PROLI/NO following arterial injury effectively inhibits neointimal hyperplasia. Given the short half-life of NO release from PROLI/NO, our goal was to determine if inhibition of neointimal hyperplasia by PROLI/NO was due to NO, or its metabolites nitrite and nitrate. Methods and Results In vitro, the NO donor DETA/NO inhibited proliferation of rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (RASMC), but neither nitrite nor nitrate did. In vivo, following rat carotid artery balloon injury or injury plus the molar equivalents of PROLI/NO, nitrite, or nitrate (n=8–11/group), PROLI/NO was found to provide superior inhibition of neointimal hyperplasia (82% inhibition of intimal area, and 44% inhibition of medial area, phyperplasia following arterial injury than nitrite or nitrate. However, modest inhibition of neointimal hyperplasia was observed with nitrite and nitrate, likely secondary to anti-inflammatory actions. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that the efficacy of NO donors is primarily due to NO production and not its metabolites, nitrite and nitrate. PMID:21554972

  18. The redox interplay between nitrite and nitric oxide: From the gut to the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassilda Pereira

    2013-01-01

    We here discuss the implications of the redox conversion of nitrite to ·NO in the gut, how nitrite-derived ·NO may signal from the digestive to the central nervous system, influencing brain function, as well as a putative ascorbate-driven nitrite/NO pathway occurring in the brain.

  19. Enhancement of nitrite on heme-induced oxidative reactions: A potential toxicological implication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Naihao; Chen, Wei; Zhu, Jingjie; Peng, Yi-Yuan

    2012-02-01

    Evidence to support the role of heme as major inducers of oxidative damage is increasingly present. Nitrite (NO(2)(-)) is one of the major end products of NO metabolism. Although the biological significance of heme/NO(2)(-)-mediated protein tyrosine nitration is a subject of great interest, the important roles of NO(2)(-) on heme-dependent redox reaction have been greatly underestimated. In this study, we investigated the influence of NO(2)(-) on heme -dependent oxidative reactions. It was found that NO(2)(-) had the capacity to act as a reducing agent to remove high oxidation states of heme iron. In the reduction of ferryl heme to ferric heme, NO(2)(-) was oxidized to a nitrating agent NO(2), and subsequently, tyrosine residues in bovine serum albumin (BSA) were nitrated. However, the presence of NO(2)(-) surprisingly exerted pro-oxidant effect on heme-H(2)O(2)-induced formation of BSA carbonyls at lower concentrations and enhanced the loss of HepG2 cell viability dose-dependently, which was probably due to the ability of this inorganic compound to efficiently enhance the peroxidase activity and oxidative degradation of heme. These data provide novel evidence that the dietary intake and experimental use of NO(2)(-) in vivo and in vitro would possess the pro-oxidant activity through interfering in heme-dependent oxidative reactions. Besides the classic role in protein tyrosine nitration, the deleterious effects on heme redox reactions may provide new insights into the toxicological implications of NO(2)(-) with cellular heme proteins. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Evidence for nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation as a previously overlooked microbial methane sink in wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bao-lan; Shen, Li-dong; Lian, Xu; Zhu, Qun; Liu, Shuai; Huang, Qian; He, Zhan-fei; Geng, Sha; Cheng, Dong-qing; Lou, Li-ping; Xu, Xiang-yang; Zheng, Ping; He, Yun-feng

    2014-01-01

    The process of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) was recently discovered and shown to be mediated by “Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera” (M. oxyfera). Here, evidence for n-damo in three different freshwater wetlands located in southeastern China was obtained using stable isotope measurements, quantitative PCR assays, and 16S rRNA and particulate methane monooxygenase gene clone library analyses. Stable isotope experiments confirmed the occurrence of n-damo in the examined wetlands, and the potential n-damo rates ranged from 0.31 to 5.43 nmol CO2 per gram of dry soil per day at different depths of soil cores. A combined analysis of 16S rRNA and particulate methane monooxygenase genes demonstrated that M. oxyfera-like bacteria were mainly present in the deep soil with a maximum abundance of 3.2 × 107 gene copies per gram of dry soil. It is estimated that ∼0.51 g of CH4 m−2 per year could be linked to the n-damo process in the examined wetlands based on the measured potential n-damo rates. This study presents previously unidentified confirmation that the n-damo process is a previously overlooked microbial methane sink in wetlands, and n-damo has the potential to be a globally important methane sink due to increasing nitrogen pollution. PMID:24616523

  1. Integrating nitric oxide, nitrite and hydrogen sulfide signaling in the physiological adaptations to hypoxia: A comparative approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fago, Angela; Jensen, Frank Bo; Tota, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), nitric oxide (NO) and nitrite (NO2-) are formed in vivo and are of crucial importance in the tissue response to hypoxia, particularly in the cardiovascular system, where these signaling molecules are involved in a multitude of processes including the regulation of vascular...... of the Society for Experimental Biology in 2011 in Glasgow. It also highlights the need and potential for a comparative approach of study and collaborative effort to identify potential link(s) between the signaling pathways involving NO, nitrite and H2S in the whole-body responses to hypoxia....

  2. Experimental study of nitrite accumulation in predenitrification biological nitrogen removal process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The effect of dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration on nitrite accumulation was investigated in a pilot-scale pre-denitrification process at room temperature for 100 days.In the first 10 days,due to the instability of the system,the DO concentration fluctuated between 1.0 and 2.0 mg/L.In the next 14 days,the DO concentration was kept at 0.5 mg/L and nitrite accumulation occurred,with the average nitrite accumulation rate at 91%.From the 25th day,the DO concentration was increased to 2.0 mg/L to destroy the nitrite accumulation,but nitrite accumulation rate was still as high as 90%.From the 38th day the nitrite accumulation rate decreased to 15%-30% linearly.From the 50th day,DO concentration was decreased to 0.5 mg/L to resume nitrite accumulation.Until the 83rd day the nitrite accumulation rate began to increase to 80%.Dissolved oxygen was the main cause of nitrite accumulation,taking into account other factors such as pH,free ammonia concentration,temperature,and sludge retention time.Because of the different affinity for oxygen between nitrite oxidizing bacteria and ammonia oxidizing bacteria when DO concentration was kept at 0.5 rag/L,nitrite accumulation occurred.

  3. Microbiology, ecology and application of the nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Dong eShen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo, which couples the anaerobic oxidation of methane to denitrification, is a recently discovered process observed in Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera. M. oxyfera is affiliated with the NC10 phylum, a phylum having no members in pure culture. Based on the isotopic labeling experiments, it is hypothesized that M. oxyfera has an unusual intra-aerobic pathway for the production of oxygen via the dismutation of nitric oxide into dinitrogen gas and oxygen. In addition, the bacterial species has a unique ultrastructure that is distinct from that of other previously described bacterial shapes. M. oxyfera-like sequences have been recovered from different natural habitats, suggesting that the n-damo process potentially contributes to global carbon and nitrogen cycles. The n-damo process is an ecological process that can reduce the greenhouse effect, as methane is more effective in heat-trapping than carbon dioxide. The n-damo process, which uses methane instead of organic matter to drive denitrification, is also an economical nitrogen removal process because methane is a relatively inexpensive electron donor. This mini-review summarizes the peculiar microbiology of M. oxyfera and discusses the potential ecological importance and engineering application of the n-damo process.

  4. Microbiology, ecology, and application of the nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Li-Dong; He, Zhan-Fei; Zhu, Qun; Chen, Dong-Qing; Lou, Li-Ping; Xu, Xiang-Yang; Zheng, Ping; Hu, Bao-Lan

    2012-01-01

    Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo), which couples the anaerobic oxidation of methane to denitrification, is a recently discovered process mediated by "Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera." M. oxyfera is affiliated with the "NC10" phylum, a phylum having no members in pure culture. Based on the isotopic labeling experiments, it is hypothesized that M. oxyfera has an unusual intra-aerobic pathway for the production of oxygen via the dismutation of nitric oxide into dinitrogen gas and oxygen. In addition, the bacterial species has a unique ultrastructure that is distinct from that of other previously described microorganisms. M. oxyfera-like sequences have been recovered from different natural habitats, suggesting that the n-damo process potentially contributes to global carbon and nitrogen cycles. The n-damo process is a process that can reduce the greenhouse effect, as methane is more effective in heat-trapping than carbon dioxide. The n-damo process, which uses methane instead of organic matter to drive denitrification, is also an economical nitrogen removal process because methane is a relatively inexpensive electron donor. This mini-review summarizes the peculiar microbiology of M. oxyfera and discusses the potential ecological importance and engineering application of the n-damo process.

  5. Globin X is a six-coordinate globin that reduces nitrite to nitric oxide in fish red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corti, Paola; Xue, Jianmin; Tejero, Jesús; Wajih, Nadeem; Sun, Ming; Stolz, Donna B.; Tsang, Michael; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of novel globins in diverse organisms has stimulated intense interest in their evolved function, beyond oxygen binding. Globin X (GbX) is a protein found in fish, amphibians, and reptiles that diverged from a common ancestor of mammalian hemoglobins and myoglobins. Like mammalian neuroglobin, GbX was first designated as a neuronal globin in fish and exhibits six-coordinate heme geometry, suggesting a role in intracellular electron transfer reactions rather than oxygen binding. Here, we report that GbX to our knowledge is the first six-coordinate globin and the first globin protein apart from hemoglobin, found in vertebrate RBCs. GbX is present in fish erythrocytes and exhibits a nitrite reduction rate up to 200-fold faster than human hemoglobin and up to 50-fold higher than neuroglobin or cytoglobin. Deoxygenated GbX reduces nitrite to form nitric oxide (NO) and potently inhibits platelet activation in vitro, to a greater extent than hemoglobin. Fish RBCs also reduce nitrite to NO and inhibit platelet activation to a greater extent than human RBCs, whereas GbX knockdown inhibits this nitrite-dependent NO signaling. The description of a novel, six-coordinate globin in RBCs with dominant electron transfer and nitrite reduction functionality provides new insights into the evolved signaling properties of ancestral heme-globins. PMID:27407144

  6. Nitric oxide, nitrite, and Fnr regulation of hmp (flavohemoglobin) gene expression in Escherichia coli K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, R K; Anjum, M F; Membrillo-Hernández, J; Kim, S O; Hughes, M N; Stewart, V

    1996-01-01

    Escherichia coli possesses a soluble flavohemoglobin, with an unknown function, encoded by the hmp gene. A monolysogen containing an hmp-lacZ operon fusion was constructed to determine how the hmp promoter is regulated in response to heme ligands (O2, NO) or the presence of anaerobically utilized electron acceptors (nitrate, nitrite). Expression of the phi (hmp-lacZ)1 fusion was similar during aerobic growth in minimal medium containing glucose, glycerol, maltose, or sorbitol as a carbon source. Mutations in cya (encoding adenylate cyclase) or changes in medium pH between 5 and 9 were without effect on aerobic expression. Levels of aerobic and anaerobic expression in glucose-containing minimal media were similar; both were unaffected by an arcA mutation. Anaerobic, but not aerobic, expression of phi (hmp-lacZ)1 was stimulated three- to four-fold by an fnr mutation; an apparent Fnr-binding site is present in the hmp promoter. Iron depletion of rich broth medium by the chelator 2'2'-dipyridyl (0.1 mM) enhanced hmp expression 40-fold under anaerobic conditions, tentatively attributed to effects on Fnr. At a higher chelator concentration (0.4 mM), hmp expression was also stimulated aerobically. Anaerobic expression was stimulated 6-fold by the presence of nitrate and 25-fold by the presence of nitrite. Induction by nitrate or nitrite was unaffected by narL and/or narP mutations, demonstrating regulation of hmp by these ions via mechanisms alternative to those implicated in the regulation of other respiratory genes. Nitric oxide (10 to 20 microM) stimulated aerobic phi (hmp-lacZ)1 activity by up to 19-fold; soxS and soxR mutations only slightly reduced the NO effect. We conclude that hmp expression is negatively regulated by Fnr under anaerobic conditions and that additional regulatory mechanisms are involved in the responses to oxygen, nitrogen compounds, and iron availability. Hmp is implicated in reactions with small nitrogen compounds. PMID:8808940

  7. Hydrogenase activity in Azospirillum brasilense is inhibited by nitrite, nitric oxide, carbon monoxide, and acetylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tibelius, K.H.; Knowles, R.

    1984-10-01

    Nitrite, NO, CO, and C/sub 2/H/sub 2/ inhibited O/sub 2/-dependent H/sub 2/ uptake (H/sup 3/H oxidation) in denitrifying Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 grown anaerobically on N/sub 2/O or NO/sub 3//sup -/. The apparent K/sub i/ values for inhibition of O/sub 2/-dependent H/sub 2/ uptake were 20 ..mu..M for NO/sub 2//sup -/, 0.4 ..mu..M for NO, 28 ..mu..M for CO, and 88 ..mu..M for C/sub 2/H/sub 2/. These inhibitors also affected methylene blue-dependent H/sub 2/ uptake, presumably by acting directly on the hydrogenase. Nitrite and NO inhibited H/sub 2/ uptake irreversibly, whereas inhibition due to CO was easily reversed by repeatedly evacuating and backfilling with N/sub 2/. The C/sub 2/H/sub 2/ inhibition was not readily reversed, partly due to difficulty in removing the last traces of this gas from solution. The NO/sub 2//sup -/ inhibition of malate-dependent respiration was readily reversed by repeatedly washing the cells, in contrast to the effect of NO/sub 2//sup -/ on H/sub 2/-dependent respiration. These results suggest that the low hydrogenase activities observed in NO/sub 3//sup -/-grown cultures of A. brasilense may be due to the irreversible inhibition of hydrogenase by NO/sub 2//sup -/ and NO produced by NO/sub 3//sup -/ reduction.

  8. The effect of G1c6P uptake and its subsequent oxidation within pea root plastids on nitrite reduction and glutamate synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bowsher, Caroline G.; Lacey, Anne E.; Hanke, Guy T.; Clarkson, David T.; Saker, Les R.; Stulen, Ineke; Emes, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    In roots, nitrate assimilation is dependent upon a supply of reductant that is initially generated by oxidative metabolism including the pentose phosphate pathway (OPPP). The uptake of nitrite into the plastids and its subsequent reduction by nitrite reductase (NiR) and glutamate synthase (GOGAT) ar

  9. Nitrolancea hollandica gen. nov., sp. nov., a chemolithoautotrophic nitrite-oxidizing bacterium isolated from a bioreactor belonging to the phylum Chloroflexi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorokin, D.Y.; Vejmelkova, D.; Lücker, S.; Streshinskaya, G.M.; Rijpstra, W.I.C.; Sinninghe Damste, J.S.; Kleerbezem, R.; van Loosdrecht, M.; Muyzer, G.; Daims, H.

    2014-01-01

    A novel nitrite-oxidizing bacterium (NOB), strain LbT, was isolated from a nitrifying bioreactor with a high loading of ammonium bicarbonate in a mineral medium with nitrite as the energy source. The cells were oval (lancet-shaped) rods with pointed edges, non-motile, Gram-positive (by staining and

  10. Simultaneous pentafluorobenzyl derivatization and GC-ECNICI-MS measurement of nitrite and malondialdehyde in human urine : Close positive correlation between these disparate oxidative stress biomarkers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanff, Erik; Eisenga, Michele F.; Beckmann, Bibiana; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Tsikas, Dimitrios

    2017-01-01

    Urinary nitrite and malondialdehyde (MDA) are biomarkers of nitrosative and oxidative stress, respectively. At physiological pH values of urine and plasma, nitrite and MDA exist almost entirely in their dissociated forms, i.e., as ONO- (ONOH, p Kappa a =3.4) and -CH(CHO)(2) (CH2(CHO)(2), p Kappa a =

  11. Investigating Sodium Nitrite Effect on Blood Nitric Oxide and Histopathologic Changes on Pulmonary Artery in Adult Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Joibar

    2013-12-01

    Results: The outcome of nitric oxide plasmatic density measurement showed that nitric oxide level in animal ’s blood in 175 mg/kg/day dose recipient group and 350 mg/kg/day dose recipient group increased significantly compared with the control group at the level of P ≤ 0.05. Also thickness of media layer decreased in maximum dose group (350 mg/kg/day dose compared to the control group. Conclusion: Based on the results of different doses of sodium nitrite, the nitric oxide levels in the blood were increased, and the thickness of middle layer of the lung arteries at dose 350 mg of sodium nitrite was reduced.

  12. Aeration Strategies To Mitigate Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Single-Stage Nitritation/Anammox Reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domingo Felez, Carlos; Mutlu, A. Gizem; Jensen, Marlene Mark;

    2014-01-01

    -stage nitritation/anammox were operated under different aeration strategies, gradually adjusted over six months. At constant but limiting oxygen loading, synthetic reject water was fed (0.75g-N/L.d) and high nitrogen removal efficiencies (83 +/- 5 and 88 +/- 2%) obtained. Dynamics of liquid phase nitrous (N2O......) and nitric oxide (NO) concentrations were monitored and N2O emissions calculated. Significant decreases in N2O emissions were obtained when the frequency of aeration was increased while maintaining a constant air flow rate (from >6 to 1.7% Delta N2O/Delta TN). However, no significant effect on the emissions...... was noted when the duration of aeration was increased while decreasing air flow rate (10.9 +/- 3.2% Delta N2O/Delta TN). The extant ammonium oxidation activity (mgNH(4)(+)-N/gVSS.min) positively correlated with the specific N2O production rate (mgN(2)O-N/gVSS.min) of the systems. Operating under conditions...

  13. THE DECOMPOSITION OF DIETHYL PEROXIDE IN THE PRESENCE OF NITRIC OXIDE AND ETHYL NITRITE

    Science.gov (United States)

    substantial amounts. Studies were made of the reactions of ethoxyl radicals (produced by the decomposition of diethyl peroxide at 181 deg C) with ethyl nitrite...and NO. The reaction rate between the ethoxyl radicals and NO was much greater than that between the radicals the nitrite.

  14. Garlic oil as a modulating agent for oxidative stress and neurotoxicity induced by sodium nitrite in male albino rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Hanaa A; Hafez, Hani S; Zeghebar, Fawzia E

    2010-07-01

    In the present study, we investigated the neurobiochemical alterations and oxidative stress induced by food preservative; sodium nitrite (NaNO2) as well as the role of the garlic oil in amelioration of the neurotoxicity in male albino rats. Serum and brain homogenates of the rats received NaNO2 (80 mg/kg body weight) for 3 months exhibited significant decrease in acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity as well as the levels of phospholipids, total protein and the endogenous antioxidant system (glutathione; GSH and superoxide dismutase; SOD). In contrast, lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, brain thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and nitric oxide (NO) levels were significantly increased. On the other hand, the oral administration of garlic oil (5 ml/kg body weight) daily for 3 months significantly improved the neurobiochemical disorders and inhibited the oxidative stress induced by NaNO2 ingestion. So, this study reveals the neural toxic effects of NaNO2 by exerting oxidative stress and retrograde the endogenous antioxidant system. However, garlic oil has a promising role in attenuating the obtained hazard effects of sodium nitrite by its high antioxidant properties which may eventually be related with the preservation of SOD activity and primary mitochondrial role against nitrite-induced neurotoxicity in rats.

  15. Short-term hypoxic vasodilation in vivo is mediated by bioactive nitric oxide metabolites, rather than free nitric oxide derived from haemoglobin-mediated nitrite reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umbrello, Michele; Dyson, Alex; Pinto, Bernardo Bollen; Fernandez, Bernadette O; Simon, Verena; Feelisch, Martin; Singer, Mervyn

    2014-03-01

    Local increases in blood flow--'hypoxic vasodilation'--confer cellular protection in the face of reduced oxygen delivery. The physiological relevance of this response is well established, yet ongoing controversy surrounds its underlying mechanisms. We sought to confirm that early hypoxic vasodilation is a nitric oxide (NO)-mediated phenomenon and to study putative pathways for increased levels of NO, namely production from NO synthases, intravascular nitrite reduction, release from preformed stores and reduced deactivation by cytochrome c oxidase. Experiments were performed on spontaneously breathing, anaesthetized, male Wistar rats undergoing short-term systemic hypoxaemia, who received pharmacological inhibitors and activators of the various NO pathways. Arterial blood pressure, cardiac output, tissue oxygen tension and the circulating pool of NO metabolites (oxidation, nitrosation and nitrosylation products) were measured in plasma and erythrocytes. Hypoxaemia caused a rapid and sustained vasodilation, which was only partially reversed by non-selective NO synthase inhibition. This was associated with significantly lower plasma nitrite, and marginally elevated nitrate levels, suggestive of nitrite bioinactivation. Administration of sodium nitrite had little effect in normoxia, but produced significant vasodilation and increased nitrosylation during hypoxaemia that could not be reversed by NO scavenging. Methodological issues prevented assessment of the contribution, if any, of reduced deactivation of NO by cytochrome c oxidase. In conclusion, acute hypoxic vasodilation is an adaptive NO-mediated response conferred through bioactive metabolites rather than free NO from haemoglobin-mediated reduction of nitrite.

  16. Association Analysis for Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase Gene Polymorphism with Plasma Nitrite/Nitrate Concentration in Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Vladimir V.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP of many genes, including the gene for neuronal nitric oxide syn-thase (NOS1, were found significantly associated with schizo-phrenia. According to our previously published results of increased plasma nitric oxide concentration in patients with schizophrenia, we hypothesized that the NOS1 gene polymorphism might be a cause of increased nitric oxide production in patients with schizophrenia and tested the interdependence between plasma nitrite/nitrate concentrations and SNP (a CT transition located in exon 29 of the human NOS1 gene.

  17. Characteristic of nitrous oxide production in partial denitrification process with high nitrite accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Rui; Peng, Yongzhen; Cao, Shenbin; Wang, Shuying; Niu, Meng

    2016-03-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) production during the partial denitrification process with nitrate (NO3(-)-N) to nitrite (NO2(-)-N) transformation ratio of 80% was investigated in this study. Results showed that N2O was seldom observed before complete depletion of NO3(-)-N, but it was closely related to the reduction of NO2(-)-N rather than NO3(-)-N. High COD/NO3(-)-N was in favor of N2O production in partial denitrification with high NO2(-)-N accumulation. It was seriously enhanced at constant acidic pH due to the free nitrous acid (FNA) inhibition. However, the N2O production was much lower at initial pH of 5.5 and 6.5 due to the pH increase during denitrification process. Significantly, the pH turning point could be chosen as a controlled parameter to denote the end of NO3(-)-N reduction, which could not only achieve high NO2(-)-N accumulation but also decrease the N2O production significantly for practical application.

  18. Nitrite-Oxidizing Bacterium Nitrobacter winogradskyi Produces N-Acyl-Homoserine Lactone Autoinducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellbye, Brett L; Bottomley, Peter J; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis A

    2015-09-01

    Nitrobacter winogradskyi is a chemolithotrophic bacterium that plays a role in the nitrogen cycle by oxidizing nitrite to nitrate. Here, we demonstrate a functional N-acyl-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL) synthase in this bacterium. The N. winogradskyi genome contains genes encoding a putative acyl-HSL autoinducer synthase (nwi0626, nwiI) and a putative acyl-HSL autoinducer receptor (nwi0627, nwiR) with amino acid sequences 38 to 78% identical to those in Rhodopseudomonas palustris and other Rhizobiales. Expression of nwiI and nwiR correlated with acyl-HSL production during culture. N. winogradskyi produces two distinct acyl-HSLs, N-decanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (C10-HSL) and a monounsaturated acyl-HSL (C10:1-HSL), in a cell-density- and growth phase-dependent manner, during batch and chemostat culture. The acyl-HSLs were detected by bioassay and identified by ultraperformance liquid chromatography with information-dependent acquisition mass spectrometry (UPLC-IDA-MS). The C=C bond in C10:1-HSL was confirmed by conversion into bromohydrin and detection by UPLC-IDA-MS.

  19. Source identification of nitrous oxide emission pathways from a single-stage nitritation-anammox granular reactor

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Muhammad

    2016-06-16

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) production pathway in a signal-stage nitritation-anammox sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was investigated based on a multilateral approach including real-time N2O monitoring, N2O isotopic composition analysis, and in-situ analyses of spatial distribution of N2O production rate and microbial populations in granular biomass. N2O emission rate was high in the initial phase of the operation cycle and gradually decreased with decreasing NH4+ concentration. The average emission of N2O was 0.98 ± 0.42% and 1.35 ± 0.72% of the incoming nitrogen load and removed nitrogen, respectively. The N2O isotopic composition analysis revealed that N2O was produced via NH2OH oxidation and NO2− reduction pathways equally, although there is an unknown influence from N2O reduction and/or anammox N2O production. However, the N2O isotopomer analysis could not discriminate the relative contribution of nitrifier denitrification and heterotrophic denitrification in the NO2− reduction pathway. Various in-situ techniques (e.g. microsensor measurements and FISH (fluorescent in-situ hybridization) analysis) were therefore applied to further identify N2O producers. Microsensor measurements revealed that approximately 70% of N2O was produced in the oxic surface zone, where nitrifiers were predominantly localized. Thus, NH2OH oxidation and NO2 reduction by nitrifiers (nitrifier-denitrification) could be responsible for the N2O production in the oxic zone. The rest of N2O (ca. 30%) was produced in the anammox bacteria-dominated anoxic zone, probably suggesting that NO2− reduction by coexisting putative heterotrophic denitrifiers and some other unknown pathway(s) including the possibility of anammox process account for the anaerobic N2O production. Further study is required to identify the anaerobic N2O production pathways. Our multilateral approach can be useful to quantitatively examine the relative contributions of N2O production pathways. Good understanding of the key N2O

  20. Achieving nitrogen removal via nitrite in a pilot-scale continuous pre-denitrification plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yong; Peng, Yongzhen; Wang, Shuying; Yuan, Zhiguo; Wang, Xiaolian

    2009-02-01

    Nitrogen removal via nitrite (the nitrite pathway) is beneficial for carbon-limited biological wastewater treatment plants. However, partial nitrification to nitrite has proven difficult in continuous processes treating domestic wastewater. The nitrite pathway is achieved in this study in a pilot-scale continuous pre-denitrification plant (V=300 L) treating domestic wastewater by controlling the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration at 0.4-0.7 mg/L. It is demonstrated that the nitrite pathway could be repeatedly and reliably achieved, with over 95% of the oxidized nitrogen compounds at the end of the aerobic zone being nitrite. The nitrite pathway improved the total nitrogen (TN) removal by about 20% in comparison to the nitrate pathway, and also reduced aeration costs by 24%. FISH analysis showed that the nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) population gradually reduced at low DO levels, and reached negligible levels when stable nitrite pathway was established. It is hypothesized that NOB was washed out due to its relatively lower affinity with oxygen. A lag phase was observed in the establishment of the nitrite pathway. Several sludge ages were required for the onset of the nitrite pathway after the application of low DO levels. However, nitrite accumulation increased rapidly after that. A similar lag phase was observed for the upset of the nitrite pathway when a DO concentration of 2-3 mg/L was applied. The nitrite pathway negatively impacted on the sludge settleability. A strong correlation between the sludge volume index and the degree of nitrite accumulation was observed.

  1. Control factors of partial nitritation for landfill leachate treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Zhu; LIU Jun-xin

    2007-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (ANAMMOX) technology has potential technical superiority and economical efficiency for the nitrogen removal from landfill leachate, which contains high-strength ammonium nitrogen (NH4+-N) and refractory organics. To complete the ANAMMOX process, a preceding partial nitritation step to produce the appropriate ratio of nitrite/ammonium is a key stage. The objective of this study was to determine the optimal conditions to acquire constant partial nitritation for landfill leachate treatment, and a bench scale fixed bed bio-film reactor was used in this study to investigate the effects of the running factors on the partial nitritation. The results showed that both the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration and the ammonium volumetric loading rate (Nv) had effects on the partial nitritation. In the controlling conditions with a temperature of 30±1℃, Nv of 0.2-1.0 kg NH4+-N/(m3·d), and DO concentration of 0.8-2.3 mg/L, the steady partial nitritation was achieved as follows: more than 94% partial nitritation efficiency (nitrite as the main product), 60%-74% NH4+-N removal efficiency, and NO2--N/NH4+-N ratio (concentration ratio) of 1.0-1.4 in the effluent.The impact of temperature was related to Nv at certain DO concentration, and the temperature range of 25-30℃ was suitable for treating high strength ammonium leachate. Ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) could be acclimated to higher FA (free ammonium) in the range of 122-224 mg/L. According to the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis result of the bio-film in the reactor, there were 25 kinds of 16S rRNA gene fragments, which indicated that abundant microbial communities existed in the bio-film, although high concentrations of ammonium and FA may inhibit the growth of the nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) and other microorganisms in the reactor.

  2. [Modifying effect of nitrites on pulmonary blastogenesis and viral leukogenesis in mice: role of nitric oxide and dioxide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Il'nitskiĭ, A P; Reutov, V P; Ryzhova, N I; Kolpakova, A S; Deriagina, V P; Nekrasova, E A; Savluchinskaia, L A; Travkin, A G

    2000-01-01

    The long-term effects of sodium nitrite (NaNO2) on carcinogenesis induced by urethane (total dose 1.0 mg/g body weight) in low-grade cancer F1 (C57BLxCBA) and high-grade A/Snell mice and on viral (Rausher leukemia virus) leukomogenesis in Balb/c mice. The murine intake of NaNO2 with water (50 mg/l) causes a statistically significant increase in the number of adenomas in the lung. Examining the mechanism of conversion of NO2- to NO led to the assumption that the free radical compounds NO and NO2 are involved in the potentiating action of NO2 on blastomogenesis. The use of the oxidant emoxypine (3-hydroxypyridine) confirmed the above. The role of NO and NO2 in the intracellular processes under the modifying effects of nitrites and nitrates on blastomogenesis is analyzed.

  3. Ecophysiology of the anammox bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kartal, Mustafa Boran

    2008-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox) bacteria oxidize ammonium to dinitrogen gas with nitrite as the electron acceptor. These bacteria are the key players in the global nitrogen cycle, responsible for the most of nitrogen production in natural ecosystems. The anammox process is also a cost-effecti

  4. Isolated and combined exposure to ammonia and nitrite in giant freshwater pawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii): effects on the oxidative stress, antioxidant enzymatic activities and apoptosis in haemocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yufan; Ye, Chaoxia; Wang, Anli; Zhu, Xuan; Chen, Changhong; Xian, Jianan; Sun, Zhenzhu

    2015-10-01

    The residual contaminators such as ammonia and nitrite are widely considered as relevant sources of aquatic environmental pollutants, posing a great threat to shrimp survival. To study the toxicological effects of ammonia and nitrite exposure on the innate immune response in invertebrates, we investigated the oxidative stress and apoptosis in haemocytes of freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) under isolated and combined exposure to ammonia and nitrite in order to provide useful information about adult prawn immune responses. M. rosenbergii (13.44 ± 2.75 g) were exposed to 0, 5, and 25 mg/L total ammonia-N (TAN) and 0, 5, and 20 mg/L nitrite-N for 24 h. All ammonia concentrations were combined with all nitrite concentrations, making a total of nine treatments studied. Following the exposure treatment, antioxidant enzyme activity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, nitric oxide (NO) generation, and apoptotic cell ratio of haemocytes were measured using flow cytometry. Results indicated that ROS generation was sensitive to the combined effect of ammonia and nitrite, which subsequently affected the Cu-Zn SOD activity. In addition, CAT showed the highest activity at 5 mg/L TAN while GPx decreased at 5 mg/L TAN and returned towards baseline at 25 mg/L. NO generation synchronized with the apoptotic cell ratio in haemocytes, indicating that NO production was closely associated with programmed cell death. Both NO production and apoptotic ratios significantly decreased following 25 mg/L TAN, which may be due to the antagonistic regulation of NO and GPx. We hypothesized that the toxicological effect of nitrite exhibited less change in physiological changes compared to that of ammonia, because of the high tolerance to nitrite exposure in mature M. rosenbergii and/or the competitive effects of chloride ions. Taken together, these results showed that ammonia and nitrite caused a series of combined oxidative stress and apoptosis in M. rosenbergi, but further

  5. Dissimilatory metabolism of nitrogen oxides in bacteria: comparative reconstruction of transcriptional networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial response to nitric oxide (NO is of major importance since NO is an obligatory intermediate of the nitrogen cycle. Transcriptional regulation of the dissimilatory nitric oxides metabolism in bacteria is diverse and involves FNR-like transcription factors HcpR, DNR, and NnrR; two-component systems NarXL and NarQP; NO-responsive activator NorR; and nitrite-sensitive repressor NsrR. Using comparative genomics approaches, we predict DNA-binding motifs for these transcriptional factors and describe corresponding regulons in available bacterial genomes. Within the FNR family of regulators, we observed a correlation of two specificity-determining amino acids and contacting bases in corresponding DNA recognition motif. Highly conserved regulon HcpR for the hybrid cluster protein and some other redox enzymes is present in diverse anaerobic bacteria, including Clostridia, Thermotogales, and delta-proteobacteria. NnrR and DNR control denitrification in alpha- and beta-proteobacteria, respectively. Sigma-54-dependent NorR regulon found in some gamma- and beta-proteobacteria contains various enzymes involved in the NO detoxification. Repressor NsrR, which was previously known to control only nitrite reductase operon in Nitrosomonas spp., appears to be the master regulator of the nitric oxides' metabolism, not only in most gamma- and beta-proteobacteria (including well-studied species such as Escherichia coli, but also in Gram-positive Bacillus and Streptomyces species. Positional analysis and comparison of regulatory regions of NO detoxification genes allows us to propose the candidate NsrR-binding motif. The most conserved member of the predicted NsrR regulon is the NO-detoxifying flavohemoglobin Hmp. In enterobacteria, the regulon also includes two nitrite-responsive loci, nipAB (hcp-hcr and nipC (dnrN, thus confirming the identity of the effector, i.e. nitrite. The proposed NsrR regulons in Neisseria and some other species are extended to include

  6. Dissimilatory metabolism of nitrogen oxides in bacteria: comparative reconstruction of transcriptional networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry A Rodionov

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial response to nitric oxide (NO is of major importance since NO is an obligatory intermediate of the nitrogen cycle. Transcriptional regulation of the dissimilatory nitric oxides metabolism in bacteria is diverse and involves FNR-like transcription factors HcpR, DNR, and NnrR; two-component systems NarXL and NarQP; NO-responsive activator NorR; and nitrite-sensitive repressor NsrR. Using comparative genomics approaches, we predict DNA-binding motifs for these transcriptional factors and describe corresponding regulons in available bacterial genomes. Within the FNR family of regulators, we observed a correlation of two specificity-determining amino acids and contacting bases in corresponding DNA recognition motif. Highly conserved regulon HcpR for the hybrid cluster protein and some other redox enzymes is present in diverse anaerobic bacteria, including Clostridia, Thermotogales, and delta-proteobacteria. NnrR and DNR control denitrification in alpha- and beta-proteobacteria, respectively. Sigma-54-dependent NorR regulon found in some gamma- and beta-proteobacteria contains various enzymes involved in the NO detoxification. Repressor NsrR, which was previously known to control only nitrite reductase operon in Nitrosomonas spp., appears to be the master regulator of the nitric oxides' metabolism, not only in most gamma- and beta-proteobacteria (including well-studied species such as Escherichia coli, but also in gram-positive Bacillus and Streptomyces species. Positional analysis and comparison of regulatory regions of NO detoxification genes allows us to propose the candidate NsrR-binding motif. The most conserved member of the predicted NsrR regulon is the NO-detoxifying flavohemoglobin Hmp. In enterobacteria, the regulon also includes two nitrite-responsive loci, nipAB (hcp-hcr and nipC (dnrN, thus confirming the identity of the effector, i.e. nitrite. The proposed NsrR regulons in Neisseria and some other species are extended to include

  7. Dissimilatory Metabolism of Nitrogen Oxides in Bacteria:Comparative Reconstruction of Transcriptional Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Dubchak, Inna L.; Arkin, Adam P.; Alm, EricJ.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.

    2005-09-01

    Bacterial response to nitric oxide (NO) is of major importance since NO is an obligatory intermediate of the nitrogen cycle. Transcriptional regulation of the dissimilatory nitric oxides metabolism in bacteria is diverse and involves FNR-like transcription factors HcpR, DNR and NnrR, two-component systems NarXL and NarQP, NO-responsive activator NorR, and nitrite sensitive repressor NsrR. Using comparative genomics approaches we predict DNA-binding signals for these transcriptional factors and describe corresponding regulons in available bacterial genomes. Within the FNR family of regulators, we observed a correlation of two specificity-determining amino acids and contacting bases in corresponding DNA signal. Highly conserved regulon HcpR for the hybrid cluster protein and some other redox enzymes is present in diverse anaerobic bacteria including Clostridia, Thermotogales and delta-proteobacteria. NnrR and DNR control denitrification in alpha- and beta-proteobacteria, respectively. Sigma-54-dependent NorR regulon found in some gamma- and beta-proteobacteria contains various enzymes involved in the NO detoxification. Repressor NsrR, which was previously known to control only nitrite reductase operon in Nitrosomonas spp., appears to be the master regulator of the nitric oxides metabolism not only in most gamma- and beta-proteobacteria (including well-studied species like Escherichia coli), but also in Gram-positive Bacillus and Streptomyces species. Positional analysis and comparison of regulatory regions of NO detoxification genes allows us to propose the candidate NsrR-binding signal. The most conserved member of the predicted NsrR regulon is the NO-detoxifying flavohemoglobin Hmp. In enterobacteria, the regulon includes also two nitrite-responsive loci, nipAB (hcp-hcr) and nipC(dnrN), thus confirming the identity of the effector, i.e., nitrite. The proposed NsrR regulons in Neisseria and some other species are extended to include denitrification genes. As the

  8. Development of PCR primer systems for amplification of nitrite reductase genes (nirK and nirS) to detect denitrifying bacteria in environmental samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braker, G.; Witzel, K.P. [Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Limnologie, Ploen (Germany); Fesefeldt, A. [Univ. Kiel (Germany). Inst. fuer Allgemeine Mikrobiologie

    1998-10-01

    A system was developed for the detection of denitrifying bacteria by the application of specific nitrite reductase gene fragments with PCR. Primer sequences were found for the amplification of fragments from both nitrite reductase genes (nirK and nirS) after comparative sequence analysis. Whenever amplification was tried with these primers, the known nir type of denitrifying laboratory cultures could be confirmed. Likewise, the method allowed a determination of the nir type of five laboratory strains. The nirK gene could be amplified from Blastobacter denitrificans, Alcaligenes xylosoxidans, and Alcaligenes sp. (DSM 30128); the nirS gene was amplified from Alcaligenes eutrophus DSM 530 and from the denitrifying isolate IFAM 3698. For each of the two genes, at least one primer combination amplified successfully for all of the test strains. Specific amplification products were not obtained wit h nondenitrifying bacteria or with strains of the other nir type. The specificity of the amplified products was confirmed by subsequent sequencing. These results suggest the suitability of the method for the qualitative detection of denitrifying bacteria in environmental samples. This was shown by applying the generally amplifying primer combination for each nir gene developed in this study to total DNA preparations from aquatic habitats.

  9. Plasma nitrite levels, total antioxidant status, total oxidant status, and oxidative stress index in patients with tension-type headache and fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neyal, Munife; Yimenicioglu, Fatih; Aydeniz, Ali; Taskin, Abdullah; Saglam, Sadullah; Cekmen, Mustafa; Neyal, Abdurrahman; Gursoy, Savas; Erel, Ozcan; Balat, Ayse

    2013-06-01

    Tension-type headache (TTH) and fibromyalgia syndrome (FM) are worldwide seen chronic pain syndromes of unknown etiology. Despite the growing body of data on pathophysiology and generation mechanisms of pain; our knowledge on pain mechanisms in both FM and TTH is yet to be limited. We investigated the plasma nitrite levels, total antioxidant status (TAS), total oxidant status (TOS), and oxidative stress index (OSI) in 35 TTH, 33 FM patients and 31 healthy controls. The mean plasma nitrite levels and TAS levels were significantly low and OSI was found to be significantly high in TTH and FM groups compared to the control group (p=0.001, p=0.001, p=0.001 and p=0.001, respectively). The mean serum TOS levels were also significantly higher in FM group according to the control group (p=0.034), but there was not a significant difference between TTH and control groups (p=0.066). These results indicated that; FM and TTH patients revealed higher oxidative stress index and lower total nitrite levels than healthy controls. We conclude that oxidative stress may have a role in the pathophysiological mechanisms of TTH and FM, although, whether it is the cause or the consequence, is not clear. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Nitrite to nitric oxide interconversion by heme FeII complex assisted by [CuI(tmpa)]+

    KAUST Repository

    Turias, Francesc

    2015-09-09

    The present computational study complements the recent experimental efforts by Karlin and coworkers to describe the interconversion of nitrite to nitric oxide by means of an iron porphyrin complex together with a Cu chemical system, i.e., the iron(II) complex (F8TPP)FeII [F8TPP = tetrakis(2,6-difluorophenyl)porphyrinate(2−)] and a preformed copper(II)–nitrito complex [(tmpa)CuII(NO2)][B(C6F5)4] [tmpa = tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine], being the latter an oxidized species of [(tmpa)CuI(MeCN)]+. By DFT calculations, we unravel how the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide takes place through a μ-oxo heme-FeIII–O–CuII complex, following a mimetic path as in the cytochrome c oxidase. Mayer bond order (MBO) and energy decomposition analyses are used to analyze the bonding strength of such nitro derivatives to either copper or iron. © 2015 Springer Science+Business Media New York

  11. Cultivation of autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing archaea from marine sediments in coculture with sulfur-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byoung-Joon; Park, Soo-Je; Yoon, Dae-No; Schouten, Stefan; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S; Rhee, Sung-Keun

    2010-11-01

    The role of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) in nitrogen cycling in marine sediments remains poorly characterized. In this study, we enriched and characterized AOA from marine sediments. Group I.1a crenarchaea closely related to those identified in marine sediments and "Candidatus Nitrosopumilus maritimus" (99.1 and 94.9% 16S rRNA and amoA gene sequence identities to the latter, respectively) were substantially enriched by coculture with sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB). The selective enrichment of AOA over ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) is likely due to the reduced oxygen levels caused by the rapid initial growth of SOB. After biweekly transfers for ca. 20 months, archaeal cells became the dominant prokaryotes (>80%), based on quantitative PCR and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. The increase of archaeal 16S rRNA gene copy numbers was coincident with the amount of ammonia oxidized, and expression of the archaeal amoA gene was observed during ammonia oxidation. Bacterial amoA genes were not detected in the enrichment culture. The affinities of these AOA to oxygen and ammonia were substantially higher than those of AOB. [(13)C]bicarbonate incorporation and the presence and activation of genes of the 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate cycle indicated autotrophy during ammonia oxidation. In the enrichment culture, ammonium was oxidized to nitrite by the AOA and subsequently to nitrate by Nitrospina-like bacteria. Our experiments suggest that AOA may be important nitrifiers in low-oxygen environments, such as oxygen-minimum zones and marine sediments.

  12. Acute effect of nitric oxide supplement on blood nitrate/nitrite and hemodynamic variables in resistance trained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomer, Richard J; Williams, Sara A; Canale, Robert E; Farney, Tyler M; Kabir, Mohammad M

    2010-10-01

    Nitric oxide dietary supplements are extremely popular within the sport and bodybuilding community. Most products contain l-arginine, for which there is no direct evidence that oral L-arginine increases circulating nitric oxide or blood flow. A new molecule (2-[nitrooxy]thyl 2-amino-3-methylbutanoate) is being marketed as a sport supplement for purposes of delivering "real nitric oxide" to the circulation. In the present study, we measured the acute effects of this supplement on blood nitrate/nitrite and hemodynamic variables. Ten resistance trained men (26 ± 4 years old; 8 ± 6 years of resistance exercise training) reported to the laboratory in random order after a 10-hour overnight fast on 2 occasions separated by 1 week and were provided the supplement (2-[nitrooxy]ethyl 2-amino-3-methylbutanoate) or placebo. Heart rate and blood pressure were recorded, and venous blood samples were collected before and at 5, 15, 30, and 60 minutes after complete breakdown of the supplement (5 minutes post intake) or placebo. Blood samples were assayed for plasma nitrate/nitrite. No interaction (p = 0.99), condition (p = 0.18), or time (p = 0.98) effects were noted for plasma nitrate/nitrite, with values remaining nearly identical across time for placebo (∼27 μmol·L(-1)) and increasing a maximum of ∼6.7% (from 32.9 to 35.1 μmol·L(-1)) at the 15-minute collection period for the supplement. In regards to hemodynamic variables, no interaction, condition, or time effects were noted for heart rate, systolic, or diastolic blood pressure (p > 0.05), with values near identical between conditions and virtually unchanged across time. These findings indicate that 2-(nitrooxy)ethyl 2-amino-3-methylbutanoate has a small effect on increasing circulating nitrate/nitrite and does not cause any change in hemodynamic variables within the 1 hour postingestion period in a sample of resistance trained men.

  13. Nitrite to nitrate molar ratio is inversely proportional to oxidative cell damages and granulocytic apoptosis at the wound site following cutaneous injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunić, Gordana; Colić, Miodrag; Vuceljić, Marina

    2009-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) metabolism in response to the inflammatory cell infiltration and their apoptosis at the wound site, using a model of subcutaneously implanted sponges in Albino Oxford rats, were examined. The injured animals were sacrificed at days 1, 2 and 3 after the injury. Nitrites, nitrates (final products of NO metabolism), malondialdehyde (an indicator of oxidative cell damages), urea (product of arginase activity) and other parameters were measured both in plasma and wound fluid samples. Nitrite to nitrate molar ratio and sum of nitrites and nitrates (NO(x)) were calculated. The total cell numbers were at similar level throughout the examined period, but a gradual decrease of viable granulocytes, mainly due to the increased apoptosis, and the increase of monocyte-macrophage number occurred after the second day. A gradual increase of wound fluid nitrates, NO(x) and malondialdehyde suggested the increases of both NO and free oxygen radicals production. Interestingly, wound fluid nitrites peaked at the first day decreasing to the corresponding plasma levels thereafter. Wound fluid nitrite to nitrate molar ratio gradually decreased and negatively correlated both with the number of apoptotic cells (r= -0.752, poxidative cell damages and cell apoptosis at the wound site early after the cutaneous wound. Moreover, the obtained findings suggest that measurement of both nitrites and nitrates contribute to better insight into overall wound NO metabolism.

  14. Formation of nitric oxide, ethyl nitrite and an oxathiolone derivative of caffeic acid in a mixture of saliva and white wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahama, Umeo; Tanaka, Mariko; Hirota, Sachiko

    2010-03-01

    Reactions of salivary nitrite with components of wine were studied using an acidic mixture of saliva and wine. The formation of nitric oxide (NO) in the stomach after drinking wine was observed. The formation of NO was also observed in the mixture (pH 3.6) of saliva and wine, which was prepared by washing the oral cavity with wine. A part of the NO formation in the stomach and the oral cavity was due to the reduction of salivary nitrite by caffeic and ferulic acids present in wine. Ethyl nitrite produced by the reaction of salivary nitrite and ethyl alcohol in wine also contributed to the formation of NO. In addition to the above reactions, caffeic acid in wine could be transformed to the oxathiolone derivative, which might have pharmacological functions. The results obtained in this study may help in understanding the effects of drinking wine on human health.

  15. Niche differentiation between ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in aquatic environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coci, M.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the studies presented in this thesis was the search for niche differentiation between the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in aquatic environments. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria are chemolitho-autotrophic microorganisms responsible for the first, mostly rate-limiting step of the nitrification

  16. Nitrous oxide production by lithotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and implications for engineered nitrogen-removal systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Kartik; Stein, Lisa Y; Klotz, Martin G; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2011-12-01

    Chemolithoautotrophic AOB (ammonia-oxidizing bacteria) form a crucial component in microbial nitrogen cycling in both natural and engineered systems. Under specific conditions, including transitions from anoxic to oxic conditions and/or excessive ammonia loading, and the presence of high nitrite (NO₂⁻) concentrations, these bacteria are also documented to produce nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N₂O) gases. Essentially, ammonia oxidation in the presence of non-limiting substrate concentrations (ammonia and O₂) is associated with N₂O production. An exceptional scenario that leads to such conditions is the periodical switch between anoxic and oxic conditions, which is rather common in engineered nitrogen-removal systems. In particular, the recovery from, rather than imposition of, anoxic conditions has been demonstrated to result in N₂O production. However, applied engineering perspectives, so far, have largely ignored the contribution of nitrification to N₂O emissions in greenhouse gas inventories from wastewater-treatment plants. Recent field-scale measurements have revealed that nitrification-related N₂O emissions are generally far higher than emissions assigned to heterotrophic denitrification. In the present paper, the metabolic pathways, which could potentially contribute to NO and N₂O production by AOB have been conceptually reconstructed under conditions especially relevant to engineered nitrogen-removal systems. Taken together, the reconstructed pathways, field- and laboratory-scale results suggest that engineering designs that achieve low effluent aqueous nitrogen concentrations also minimize gaseous nitrogen emissions.

  17. Aerobic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria: Environmental selection and diversification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, D.

    1985-01-01

    Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria oxidize reduced inorganic compounds to sulfuric acid. Lithotrophic sulfur oxidizer use the energy obtained from oxidation for microbial growth. Heterotrophic sulfur oxidizers obtain energy from the oxidation of organic compounds. In sulfur-oxidizing mixotrophs energy are derived either from the oxidation of inorganic or organic compounds. Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria are usually located within the sulfide/oxygen interfaces of springs, sediments, soil microenvironments, and the hypolimnion. Colonization of the interface is necessary since sulfide auto-oxidizes and because both oxygen and sulfide are needed for growth. The environmental stresses associated with the colonization of these interfaces resulted in the evolution of morphologically diverse and unique aerobic sulfur oxidizers.

  18. In vivo evidence of hepato- and reno-protective effect of garlic oil against sodium nitrite-induced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Hanaa A; El-Agmy, Sherif M; Gaur, Rajiv L; Fernando, Augusta; Raj, Madhwa Hg; Ouhtit, Allal

    2009-01-01

    Sodium nitrite (NaNO2), a food color fixative and preservative, contributes to carcinogenesis. We investigated the protective role of garlic oil against NaNO2-induced abnormalities in metabolic biochemical parameters and oxidative status in male albino rats. NaNO2 treatment for a period of three months induced a significant increase in serum levels of glucose, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bilirubin, urea and creatinine as well as hepatic AST and ALT. However, significant decrease was recorded in liver ALP activity, glycogen content, and renal urea and creatinine levels. In parallel, a significant increase in lipid peroxidation, and a decrease in glutathione content and catalase activity were observed in the liver and the kidney. However, garlic oil supplementation showed a remarkable amelioration of these abnormalities. Our data indicate that garlic is a phytoantioxidant with powerful chemopreventive properties against chemically-induced oxidative stress.

  19. In vivo evidence of hepato- and reno-protective effect of garlic oil against sodium nitrite-induced oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanaa A Hassan, Sherif M El-Agmy, Rajiv L Gaur, Augusta Fernando, Madhwa HG Raj, Allal Ouhtit

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Sodium nitrite (NaNO2, a food color fixative and preservative, contributes to carcinogenesis. We investigated the protective role of garlic oil against NaNO2-induced abnormalities in metabolic biochemical parameters and oxidative status in male albino rats. NaNO2 treatment for a period of three months induced a significant increase in serum levels of glucose, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, bilirubin, urea and creatinine as well as hepatic AST and ALT. However, significant decrease was recorded in liver ALP activity, glycogen content, and renal urea and creatinine levels. In parallel, a significant increase in lipid peroxidation, and a decrease in glutathione content and catalase activity were observed in the liver and the kidney. However, garlic oil supplementation showed a remarkable amelioration of these abnormalities. Our data indicate that garlic is a phytoantioxidant with powerful chemopreventive properties against chemically-induced oxidative stress.

  20. Manganese Oxidation by Bacteria: Biogeochemical Aspects

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sujith, P.P.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    Manganese is an essential trace metal that is not as readily oxidizable like iron. Several bacterial groups posses the ability to oxidize Mn effectively competing with chemical oxidation. The oxides of Mn are the strongest of the oxidants, next...

  1. Selective isolation of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria from autotrophic nitrifying granules by applying cell-sorting and sub-culturing of microcolonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujitani, Hirotsugu; Kumagai, Asami; Ushiki, Norisuke; Momiuchi, Kengo; Tsuneda, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Nitrification is a key process in the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle and biological wastewater treatment that consists of two stepwise reactions, ammonia oxidation by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) or archaea followed by nitrite oxidation by nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. One of the representatives of the AOB group is Nitrosomonas mobilis species. Although a few pure strains of this species have been isolated so far, approaches to their preservation in pure culture have not been established. Here, we report isolation of novel members of the N. mobilis species from autotrophic nitrifying granules used for ammonia-rich wastewater treatment. We developed an isolation method focusing on microcolonies formation of nitrifying bacteria. Two kinds of distinctive light scattering signatures in a cell-sorting system enabled to separate microcolonies from single cells and heterogeneous aggregates within granule samples. Inoculation of a pure microcolony into 96-well microtiter plates led to successful sub-culturing and increased probability of isolation. Obtained strain Ms1 is cultivated in the liquid culture with relatively high ammonia or nitrite concentration, not extremely slow growing. Considering environmental clones that were closely related to N. mobilis and detected in various environments, the availability of this novel strain would facilitate to reveal this member's ecophysiology in a variety of habitats.

  2. Selective isolation of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria from autotrophic nitrifying granules by applying cell-sorting and sub-culturing of microcolonies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotsugu eFujitani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitrification is a key process in the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle and biological wastewater treatment that consists of two stepwise reactions, ammonia oxidation by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB or archaea followed by nitrite oxidation by nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. One of the representative of the AOB group is Nitrosomonas mobilis species. Although a few pure strains of this species have been isolated so far, approaches to their preservation in pure culture have not been established. Here, we report isolation of novel members of the N. mobilis species from autotrophic nitrifying granules used for ammonia-rich wastewater treatment. We developed an isolation method focusing on microcolonies formation of nitrifying bacteria. Two kinds of distinctive light scattering signatures in a cell-sorting system enabled to separate microcolonies from single cells and heterogeneous aggregates within granule samples. Inoculation of a pure microcolony into 96-well microtiter plates led to successful sub-culturing and increased probability of isolation. Obtained strain Ms1 is cultivated in the liquid culture with relatively high ammonia or nitrite concentration, not extremely slow growing. Considering environmental clones that were closely related to N. mobilis and detected in various environments, the availability of this novel strain would facilitate to reveal this member’s ecophysiology in a variety of habitats.

  3. Abiotic process for Fe(II) oxidation and green rust mineralization driven by a heterotrophic nitrate reducing bacteria (Klebsiella mobilis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etique, Marjorie; Jorand, Frédéric P A; Zegeye, Asfaw; Grégoire, Brian; Despas, Christelle; Ruby, Christian

    2014-04-01

    Green rusts (GRs) are mixed Fe(II)-Fe(III) hydroxides with a high reactivity toward organic and inorganic pollutants. GRs can be produced from ferric reducing or ferrous oxidizing bacterial activities. In this study, we investigated the capability of Klebsiella mobilis to produce iron minerals in the presence of nitrate and ferrous iron. This bacterium is well-known to reduce nitrate using an organic carbon source as electron donor but is unable to enzymatically oxidize Fe(II) species. During incubation, GR formation occurred as a secondary iron mineral precipitating on cell surfaces, resulting from Fe(II) oxidation by nitrite produced via bacterial respiration of nitrate. For the first time, we demonstrate GR formation by indirect microbial oxidation of Fe(II) (i.e., a combination of biotic/abiotic processes). These results therefore suggest that nitrate-reducing bacteria can potentially contribute to the formation of GR in natural environments. In addition, the chemical reduction of nitrite to ammonium by GR is observed, which gradually turns the GR into the end-product goethite. The nitrogen mass-balance clearly demonstrates that the total amount of ammonium produced corresponds to the quantity of bioreduced nitrate. These findings demonstrate how the activity of nitrate-reducing bacteria in ferrous environments may provide a direct link between the biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen and iron.

  4. Anammox bacteria and the anaerobic oxidation of ammonium in the oxygen minimum zone off northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán, Alexander; Molina, Verónica; Thamdrup, Bo; Woebken, Dagmar; Lavik, Gaute; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.; Ulloa, Osvaldo

    2009-07-01

    Anammox is the anaerobic oxidation of ammonium by nitrite or nitrate to yield N 2. This process, along with conventional denitrification, contributes to nitrogen loss in oxygen-deficient systems. Anammox is performed by a special group of bacteria belonging to the Planctomycetes phylum. However, information about the distribution, activity, and controlling factors of these anammox bacteria is still limited. Herein, we examine the phylogenetic diversity, vertical distribution, and activity of anammox bacteria in the coastal upwelling region and oxygen minimum zone off northern Chile. The phylogeny of anammox bacteria was studied using primers designed to specifically target 16S rRNA genes from Planctomycetes in samples taken during a cruise in 2004. Anammox bacteria-like sequences affiliated with Candidatus "Scalindua spp." dominated the 16S rRNA gene clone library. However, 62% of the sequences subgrouped separately within this cluster and together with a single sequence retrieved from the suboxic zone of the freshwater Lake Tanganyika. The vertical distribution and activity of anammox bacteria were explored through CARD-FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization with catalyzed reporter deposition) and 15N labeling incubations, respectively, at two different open-ocean stations during a second cruise in 2005. Anammox bacterial CARD-FISH counts (up to 3000 cells ml -1) and activity (up to 5.75 nmol N 2 L -1 d -1) were only detected at the station subjected directly to the upwelling influence. Anammox cell abundance and activity were highest at 50 m depth, which is the upper part of the OMZ. In this layer, a high abundance of cyanobacteria and a marked nitrogen deficit were also observed. Thus, our results show the presence of a new subcluster within the marine anammox phylogeny and indicate high vertical variability in the abundance and activity of anammox bacteria that could be related to an intensification of carbon and nitrogen cycling in the upper part of the OMZ.

  5. Performance and microbial ecology of a nitritation sequencing batch reactor treating high-strength ammonia wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenjing; Dai, Xiaohu; Cao, Dawen; Wang, Sha; Hu, Xiaona; Liu, Wenru; Yang, Dianhai

    2016-01-01

    The partial nitrification (PN) performance and the microbial community variations were evaluated in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) for 172 days, with the stepwise elevation of ammonium concentration. Free ammonia (FA) and low dissolved oxygen inhibition of nitrite-oxidized bacteria (NOB) were used to achieve nitritation in the SBR. During the 172 days operation, the nitrogen loading rate of the SBR was finally raised to 3.6 kg N/m3/d corresponding the influent ammonium of 1500 mg/L, with the ammonium removal efficiency and nitrite accumulation rate were 94.12% and 83.54%, respectively, indicating that the syntrophic inhibition of FA and low dissolved oxygen contributed substantially to the stable nitrite accumulation. The results of the 16S rRNA high-throughput sequencing revealed that Nitrospira, the only nitrite-oxidizing bacteria in the system, were successively inhibited and eliminated, and the SBR reactor was dominated finally by Nitrosomonas, the ammonium-oxidizing bacteria, which had a relative abundance of 83%, indicating that the Nitrosomonas played the primary roles on the establishment and maintaining of nitritation. Followed by Nitrosomonas, Anaerolineae (7.02%) and Saprospira (1.86%) were the other mainly genera in the biomass. PMID:27762325

  6. The abundance and diversity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in activated sludge under autotrophic domestication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; Ma, Chao; Sun, Shifang; Xie, Hui; Zhang, Wei; Feng, Jun; Song, Cunjiang

    2013-04-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) play a key role in nitrogen-removal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) as they can transform ammonia into nitrite. AOB can be enriched in activated sludge through autotrophic domestication although they are difficult to be isolated. In this study, autotrophic domestication was carried out in a lab-scale sequencing-batch-reactor (SBR) system with two activated sludge samples. The ammonia removal capacity of the sludge samples increased during the domestication, and pH exhibited a negative correlation with the ammonia removal amount, which indicated that it was one important factor of microbial ammonia oxidation. The count of AOB, measured by the most probable number (MPN) method, increased significantly during autotrophic domestication as ammonia oxidation efficiency was enhanced. We investigated the changes in the community structure of AOB before and after domestication by amoA clone library and T-RFLP profile. It showed that AOB had been successfully enriched and the community structure significantly shifted during the domestication. Two groups of AOB were found in sludge samples: Nitrosomonas-like group remained predominant all the time and Nitrosospira-like group changed obviously. Simultaneously, the total heterotrophic bacteria were investigated by MPN and Biolog assay. The metabolic diversity of heterotrophs had changed minutely, although the count of them decreased significantly and lost superiority of microbial communities in the sludge.

  7. Ammonia oxidizing bacteria community dynamics in a pilot-scale wastewater treatment plant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohui Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chemoautotrophic ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB have the metabolic ability to oxidize ammonia to nitrite aerobically. This metabolic feature has been widely used, in combination with denitrification, to remove nitrogen from wastewater in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs. However, the relative influence of specific deterministic environmental factors to AOB community dynamics in WWTP is uncertain. The ecological principles underlying AOB community dynamics and nitrification stability and how they are related are also poorly understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The community dynamics of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB in a pilot-scale WWTP were monitored over a one-year period by Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP. During the study period, the effluent ammonia concentrations were almost below 2 mg/L, except for the first 60 days, indicting stable nitrification. T-RFLP results showed that, during the test period with stable nitrification, the AOB community structures were not stable, and the average change rate (every 15 days of AOB community structures was 10% ± 8%. The correlations between T-RFLP profiles and 10 operational and environmental parameters were tested by Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA and Mantel test. The results indicated that the dynamics of AOB community correlated most strongly with Dissolved Oxygen (DO, effluent ammonia, effluent Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD and temperature. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study suggests that nitrification stability is not necessarily accompanied by a stable AOB community, and provides insight into parameters controlling the AOB community dynamics within bioreactors with stable nitrification.

  8. Nitrite curing of chicken, pork, and beef inhibits oxidation but does not affect N-nitroso compound (NOC)-specific DNA adduct formation during in vitro digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hecke, Thomas; Vanden Bussche, Julie; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Vossen, Els; Van Camp, John; De Smet, Stefaan

    2014-02-26

    Uncured and nitrite-cured chicken, pork, and beef were used as low, medium, and high sources of heme-Fe, respectively, and exposed to an in vitro digestion model simulating the mouth, stomach, duodenum, and colon. With increasing content of iron compounds, up to 25-fold higher concentrations of the toxic lipid oxidation products malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, and other volatile aldehydes were formed during digestion, together with increased protein carbonyl compounds as measurement of protein oxidation. Nitrite curing of all meats lowered lipid and protein oxidation to the level of oxidation in uncured chicken. Strongly depending on the individual fecal inoculum, colonic digestion of beef resulted in significantly higher concentrations of the NOC-specific DNA adduct O(6)-carboxymethyl-guanine compared to chicken and pork, whereas nitrite curing had no significant effect. This study confirms previously reported evidence that heme-Fe is involved in the epidemiological association between red meat consumption and colorectal cancer, but questions the role of nitrite curing in this association.

  9. Inorganic nitrate promotes the browning of white adipose tissue through the nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lee D; Ashmore, Tom; Kotwica, Aleksandra O; Murfitt, Steven A; Fernandez, Bernadette O; Feelisch, Martin; Murray, Andrew J; Griffin, Julian L

    2015-02-01

    Inorganic nitrate was once considered an oxidation end product of nitric oxide metabolism with little biological activity. However, recent studies have demonstrated that dietary nitrate can modulate mitochondrial function in man and is effective in reversing features of the metabolic syndrome in mice. Using a combined histological, metabolomics, and transcriptional and protein analysis approach, we mechanistically defined that nitrate not only increases the expression of thermogenic genes in brown adipose tissue but also induces the expression of brown adipocyte-specific genes and proteins in white adipose tissue, substantially increasing oxygen consumption and fatty acid β-oxidation in adipocytes. Nitrate induces these phenotypic changes through a mechanism distinct from known physiological small molecule activators of browning, the recently identified nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide pathway. The nitrate-induced browning effect was enhanced in hypoxia, a serious comorbidity affecting white adipose tissue in obese individuals, and corrected impaired brown adipocyte-specific gene expression in white adipose tissue in a murine model of obesity. Because resulting beige/brite cells exhibit antiobesity and antidiabetic effects, nitrate may be an effective means of inducing the browning response in adipose tissue to treat the metabolic syndrome.

  10. Ammonia effect on hydrogenotrophic methanogens and syntrophic acetate oxidizing bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Han; Fotidis, Ioannis; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia-rich substrates can cause inhibition on anaerobic digestion process. Syntrophic acetate oxidizing bacteria (SAOB) and hydrogenotrophic methanogens are important for the ammonia inhibitory mechanism on anaerobic digestion. The roles and interactions of SAOB and hydrogenotrophic methanogens...

  11. Nitrogen-removal performance and community structure of nitrifying bacteria under different aeration modes in an oxidation ditch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chang-Zi; Fu, Wei; Chen, Xue-Mei; Peng, Dang-Cong; Jin, Peng-Kang

    2013-07-01

    Oxidation-ditch operation modes were simulated using sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) with alternate stirring and aerating. The nitrogen-removal efficiencies and nitrifying characteristics of two aeration modes, point aeration and step aeration, were investigated. Under the same air-supply capacity, oxygen dissolved more efficiently in the system with point aeration, forming a larger aerobic zone. The nitrifying effects were similar in point aeration and step aeration, where the average removal efficiencies of NH4(+) N were 98% and 96%, respectively. When the proportion of anoxic and oxic zones was 1, the average removal efficiencies of total nitrogen (TN) were 45% and 66% under point aeration and step aeration, respectively. Step aeration was more beneficial to both anoxic denitrification and simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND). The maximum specific ammonia-uptake rates (AUR) of point aeration and step aeration were 4.7 and 4.9 mg NH4(+)/(gMLVSS h), respectively, while the maximum specific nitrite-uptake rates (NUR) of the two systems were 7.4 and 5.3 mg NO2(-)-N/(gMLVSS h), respectively. The proportions of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) to all bacteria were 5.1% under point aeration and 7.0% under step aeration, and the proportions of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) reached 6.5% and 9.0% under point and step aeration, respectively. The dominant genera of AOB and NOB were Nitrosococcus and Nitrospira, which accounted for 90% and 91%, respectively, under point aeration, and the diversity of nitrifying bacteria was lower than under step aeration. Point aeration was selective of nitrifying bacteria. The abundance of NOB was greater than that of AOB in both of the operation modes, and complete transformation of NH4(+) N to NO3(-)-N was observed without NO2(-)-N accumulation.

  12. Nitrite Reduction to Nitrous Oxide and Ammonia by TiO2 Electrons in a Colloid Solution via Consecutive One-Electron Transfer Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Sara; Behar, David; Rajh, Tijana; Rabani, Joseph

    2016-04-21

    The mechanism of nitrite reduction by excess electrons on TiO2 nanoparticles (eTiO2(-)) was studied under anaerobic conditions. TiO2 was loaded with up to 75 electrons per particle, induced by γ-irradiation of acidic TiO2 colloid solutions containing 2-propanol. Time-resolved kinetics and material analysis were performed, mostly at 1.66 g L(-1) TiO2. At relatively low nitrite concentrations (R = [eTiO2(-)]o/[nitrite]o > 1.5), eTiO2(-) decays via two consecutive processes; at higher concentrations, only one decay step is observed. The stoichiometric ratio Δ[eTiO2(-)]/[nitrite]o of the faster process is about 2. This process involves the one-electron reduction of nitrite, forming the nitrite radical (k1 = (2.0 ± 0.2) × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1)), which further reacts with eTiO2(-) (k2) in competition with its dehydration to nitric oxide (NO) (k3). The ratios k2/k3 = (3.0 ± 0.5) × 10(3) M(-1) and k2 > 1 × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1) were derived from kinetic simulations and product analysis. The major product of this process is NO. The slower stage of the kinetics involves the reduction of NO by eTiO2(-), and the detailed mechanism of this process has been discussed in our earlier publication. The results reported in this study suggest that several intermediates, including NO and NH2OH, are adsorbed on the titanium nanoparticles and give rise to inverse dependency of the respective reaction rates on the TiO2 concentration. It is demonstrated that the reduction of nitrite by eTiO2(-) yields mainly N2O and NH3 via consecutive one-electron transfer reactions.

  13. A novel and simple electrochemical sensor for electrocatalytic reduction of nitrite and oxidation of phenylhydrazine based on poly (o-anisidine) film using ionic liquid carbon paste electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojani, Reza, E-mail: fer-o@umz.ac.ir [Electroanalytical Chemistry Research Laboratory, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Mazandaran, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Raoof, Jahan-Bakhsh; Zamani, Saeed [Electroanalytical Chemistry Research Laboratory, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Mazandaran, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    In this study, nitrite electroreduction and phenylhydrazine electrooxidation were investigated on poly(o-anisidine) formed by cyclic voltammetry at the surface of ionic liquid carbon paste electrode. The films were characterized by cyclic voltammetry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and were contrasted with poly(o-anisidine) prepared under identical conditions in the absence of ionic liquid in carbon paste electrode. This carbon paste modified electrode exhibits a good electrocatalytic capability (via an EC’ mechanism) for both electrooxidation and electroreduction of some important molecules. The obtained results showed that the catalytic oxidation peak currents of phenylhydrazine and catalytic reduction peak currents of nitrite at the surface of this simple (unfunctionalized) polymeric electrode were linearly dependent on their concentrations. Electrode was successfully applied for determination of nitrite and phenylhydrazine in real samples.

  14. Novel oxidative coupling reactions of cisapride or metaclopramide with phenoxazines and their applications in the determination of nitrite at trace level in environmental samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL-Okab, Riyad Ahmed; Syed, Akheel Ahmed

    2007-11-01

    Phenoxazine (PNZ), 2-chlorophenoxazine (CPN) and 2-trifluoromethylphenoxazine (TPN) were used as new class of spectrophotometric reagents for the determination of nanoamounts of nitrite in presence of cisapride (CSP) and metaclopramide (MCP) as new electrophilic coupling reagents. The methods were based on the oxidation of CSP or MCP by nitrite in hydrochloric acid medium and coupling with PNZ, CPN or TPN to yield red color derivatives which were stable for about 3 h and having an absorbance maximum in the range 520-530 nm. Beer's law is obeyed for nitrite in the concentration range 0.08-0.80 and 0.13-1.60 μg ml -1 for phenoxazine-cisapride and phenoxazine-metaclopramide, respectively. The optimum reaction conditions and other important analytical parameters were established to enhance the sensitivity of these methods. Interference due to various non-target ions was also investigated. The methods were applied to the analysis of nitrite in environmental samples. The performance of proposed methods were evaluated by Student's t-test and variance ratio F-test indicated the significance of proposed methods over the reference spectrophotometric method (Association of Official Analytical Communities (AOAC) method for the determination of nitrite in water samples).

  15. The effects of endothelial nitric oxide synthase tagSNPs on nitrite levels and risk of hypertension and obesity in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Miranda, J A; Lacchini, R; Belo, V A; Lanna, C M M; Sertorio, J T; Luizon, M R; Tanus-Santos, J E

    2015-02-01

    Obesity and the nitric oxide synthase 3 (NOS3) gene polymorphisms are associated with nitrite levels and hypertension. However, no study has tested the hypothesis that NOS3 tagSNPs rs3918226, rs3918188, rs743506 and rs7830 affect nitrite levels and are associated with hypertension in childhood obesity. We investigated the association of these NOS3 tagSNPs and the haplotypes formed by them with hypertension and with nitrite levels in children and adolescents with obesity and with obesity plus hypertension. We studied 355 subjects: 174 healthy (controls), 109 normotensive obese, and 72 obese children and adolescents with obesity plus hypertension. Genotypes were determined by Taqman allele discrimination assay and real-time PCR. We compared the distribution of NOS3 tagSNP genotypes, alleles and haplotypes in the three groups of subjects. Nitrite levels were determined by ozone-based chemiluminescence. Nitrite levels were affected by the rs3918226 polymorphism (Phypertension in children and adolescents. Our findings show that the NOS3 tagSNP rs3918226 is associated with NO production in children and adolescents, and suggest that this polymorphism may have an impact on cardiovascular health. Further studies are needed to better clarify the effects of this polymorphism on cardiovascular risk.

  16. Achieving the nitrite pathway using FA inhibition and process control in UASB-SBR system removing nitrogen from landfill leachate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    An up-flow sludge blanket(UASB) and sequencing batch reactor(SBR) system was introduced to remove organics and nitrogen from landfill leachate.The synergetic effect of free ammonia(FA) inhibition and process control was used to achieve the nitrite pathway in the SBR.In previous research,inhibition of FA on nitrite oxidizing bacteria(NOB) activity has been revealed and the process control parameters(DO,ORP and pH) exactly indicate the end-point of nitritation.The method was implemented in the SBR achieving stable nitrogen removal via the nitrite pathway from landfill leachate.The degree of nitrite accumulation during the nitritation was monitored along with the simultaneous and advanced removal of organics and nitrogen in the UASB-SBR system.The nitrifying bacteria community was quantitatively analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization(FISH) techniques.Batch tests were carried out to investigate the denitritation kinetics of microbial bacteria in the SBR.Experimental results showed that the nitrite pathway could be repeatedly and reliably achieved by synergetic effect of FA inhibition and process control.FISH analysis showed the dominant nitrifying bacteria were ammonia-oxidizing β-Proteobacteria. Relationship between nitrite concentration and nitrite reduction rate followed the Monod-type equation.The maximum specific nitrite utilization rate(k) and half-velocity constant(Ks) were calculated as 0.44 gN gVSS-1d-1and 15.8 mg L-1,respectively.

  17. Bimodal effect of hydrogen peroxide and oxidative events in nitrite-induced rapid root abscission by the water fern Azolla pinnata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael F Cohen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In the genus Azolla rapid abscission of roots from floating fronds occurs within minutes in response to a variety of stresses, including exposure to nitrite. We found that hydrogen peroxide, though itself not an inducer of root abscission, modulates nitrite-induced root abscission by Azolla pinnata in a dose-dependent manner, with 2 mM H2O2 significantly diminishing the responsiveness to 2 mM NaNO2, and 10 mM H2O2 slightly enhancing it. Hypoxia, which has been found in other plants to result in autogenic production of H2O2, dramatically stimulated root abscission of A. pinnata in response to nitrite, especially for plants previously cultivated in medium containing 5 mM KNO3 compared to plants cultivated under N2-fixing conditions without combined nitrogen. Plants, including Azolla, produce the small signaling molecule nitric oxide (NO from nitrite using nitrate reductase. We found Azolla plants to display dose-dependent root abscission in response to the NO donor spermine NONOate. Treatment of plants with the thiol-modifying agents S-methyl methanethiosulfonate or glutathione inhibited the nitrite-induced root abscission response. Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR spectromicroscopy revealed higher levels of carbonylation in the abscission zone of dropped roots, indicative of reaction products of polysaccharides with potent free radical oxidants. We hypothesize that metabolic products of nitrite and NO react with H2O2 in the apoplast leading to free-radical-mediated cleavage of structural polysaccharides and consequent rapid root abscission.

  18. Bimodal effect of hydrogen peroxide and oxidative events in nitrite-induced rapid root abscission by the water fern Azolla pinnata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Michael F; Gurung, Sushma; Birarda, Giovanni; Holman, Hoi-Ying N; Yamasaki, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    In the genus Azolla rapid abscission of roots from floating fronds occurs within minutes in response to a variety of stresses, including exposure to nitrite. We found that hydrogen peroxide, though itself not an inducer of root abscission, modulates nitrite-induced root abscission by Azolla pinnata in a dose-dependent manner, with 2 mM H2O2 significantly diminishing the responsiveness to 2 mM NaNO2, and 10 mM H2O2 slightly enhancing it. Hypoxia, which has been found in other plants to result in autogenic production of H2O2, dramatically stimulated root abscission of A. pinnata in response to nitrite, especially for plants previously cultivated in medium containing 5 mM KNO3 compared to plants cultivated under N2-fixing conditions without combined nitrogen. Plants, including Azolla, produce the small signaling molecule nitric oxide (NO) from nitrite using nitrate reductase. We found Azolla plants to display dose-dependent root abscission in response to the NO donor spermine NONOate. Treatment of plants with the thiol-modifying agents S-methyl methanethiosulfonate or glutathione inhibited the nitrite-induced root abscission response. Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared spectromicroscopy revealed higher levels of carbonylation in the abscission zone of dropped roots, indicative of reaction products of polysaccharides with potent free radical oxidants. We hypothesize that metabolic products of nitrite and NO react with H2O2 in the apoplast leading to free-radical-mediated cleavage of structural polysaccharides and consequent rapid root abscission.

  19. A dual nitrite isotopic investigation of chemodenitrification by mineral-associated Fe(II) and its production of nitrous oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabb, Kalina C.; Buchwald, Carolyn; Hansel, Colleen M.; Wankel, Scott D.

    2017-01-01

    Under anaerobic conditions, the environmental reduction of nitrate (NO3-) and nitrite (NO2-) to more reduced forms is widely regarded as being microbially catalyzed. However, the chemical reduction of oxidized nitrogen species by reduced iron (Fe(II)), whether mineral-bound or surface-associated, may also occur under environmentally relevant conditions. Here we examine the nitrogen (N) and oxygen (O) stable isotope dynamics of the chemical reduction of NO2- by mineral associated Fe(II) (chemodenitrification) and its production of the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O). By shedding light on factors controlling kinetics of the reaction and its corresponding dual isotopic expression in the reactant NO2- and product N2O, this work contributes to a growing body of work aiming to improve our ability to identify chemodenitrification in the environment. Consistent with previous studies, we find that while homogenous reactions between aqueous NO2- and Fe(II) were kinetically slow, heterogeneous reactions involving Fe(II)-containing minerals often catalyzed considerable nitrite loss. In particular, rapid reduction of NO2- was catalyzed by the Fe-rich smectite clay mineral nontronite as well as the mixed Fe(II)-Fe(III) oxyhydroxide phase green rust. These minerals serve as both a source of reduced iron within the mineral structure as well as a surface for promoting the reactivity of Fe(II). However, even in the presence of aqueous Fe(II), experiments with low-Fe and non-Fe containing minerals showed little to no NO2- loss, perhaps suggesting a more dominant role for structural iron during chemodenitrification. When catalyzed by nontronite and green rust, N and O isotope effects for chemodenitrification (15εcDNF and 18εcDNF) ranged from 2 to 11‰ and 4 to 10‰, respectively, with lower values generally observed at higher reaction rates. Higher reaction rates were also linked to higher molar yields of N2O (up to 31%), highlighting a strong potential for

  20. Isotopologue signatures of nitrous oxide produced by nitrate-ammonifying bacteria isolated from soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, Undine; Well, Reinhard; Giesemann, Anette; Ulrich, Andreas; Augustin, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    Agricultural soils are the largest single source of anthropogenic N2O to the atmosphere, primarily driven by microbiological processes such as denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA). Both processes occur under similar conditions of low oxygen concentration and therefore, source partitioning of emitted N2O is difficult. Understanding what controls the dynamics and reaction equilibrium of denitrification and DNRA is important and may allow the development of more effective mitigation strategies. 15N site preference (SP), i.e. the difference between 15N of the central and peripheral N-position of the asymmetric N2O molecule, differs depending on processes involved in N2O formation. Hence investigation of the isotopomer ratios of formed N2O potentially presents a reliable mean to identify its source. In this study, bacterial isolates obtained from organic soils were screened for their ability to reduce nitrate/nitrite to ammonium and to release N2O to the atmosphere. Taxonomic characterisation of the strains revealed that N2O formation was only detected in ammonifying strains affiliated to several genera of the family Enterobacteriaceae and strains belonging to the genus Bacillus and Paenibacillus. Sampling of N2O was conducted by incubation of strains under oxic and anoxic conditions. Investigation of the 15N site preference showed SP values in the range of 39 to 57 o . Incubation conditions had no influence on the SP. The lowest values were achieved by a strain of the species Escherichia coli which was included in this study as a DNRA reference bacterium harbouring the NrfA gene that is coding the nitrite reductase, associated with respiratory nitrite ammonification. Soil isolates showed SP-values higher than 40 o . Comparison of these results with SP-values of N2O produced by denitrifying bacteria in pure cultures (-5 to 0 o )^[1, 2]revealedsignificantdifferences.Incontrast,N_2OproducedbydenitrifyingfungidisplayedSP - valuesinarangeof

  1. Formation of reactive nitrogen species during peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of nitrite. A potential additional mechanism of nitric oxide-dependent toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Vliet, A; Eiserich, J P; Halliwell, B; Cross, C E

    1997-03-21

    Involvement of peroxynitrite (ONOO-) in inflammatory diseases has been implicated by detection of 3-nitrotyrosine, an allegedly characteristic protein oxidation product, in various inflamed tissues. We show here that nitrite (NO2-), the primary metabolic end product of nitric oxide (NO.), can be oxidized by the heme peroxidases horseradish peroxidase, myeloperoxidase (MPO), and lactoperoxidase (LPO), in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), to most likely form NO.2, which can also contribute to tyrosine nitration during inflammatory processes. Phenolic nitration by MPO-catalyzed NO2- oxidation is only partially inhibited by chloride (Cl-), the presumed major physiological substrate for MPO. In fact, low concentrations of NO2- (2-10 microM) catalyze MPO-mediated oxidation of Cl-, indicated by increased chlorination of monochlorodimedon or 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, most likely via reduction of MPO compound II. Peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of NO2-, as indicated by phenolic nitration, was also observed in the presence of thiocyanate (SCN-), an alternative physiological substrate for mammalian peroxidases. Collectively, our results suggest that NO2-, at physiological or pathological levels, is a substrate for the mammalian peroxidases MPO and lactoperoxidase and that formation of NO2. via peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of NO2- may provide an additional pathway contributing to cytotoxicity or host defense associated with increased NO. production.

  2. Respiratory Ammonification of Nitrate Coupled to Anaerobic Oxidation of Elemental Sulfur in Deep-Sea Autotrophic Thermophilic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slobodkina, Galina B.; Mardanov, Andrey V.; Ravin, Nikolai V.; Frolova, Anastasia A.; Chernyh, Nikolay A.; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A.; Slobodkin, Alexander I.

    2017-01-01

    Respiratory ammonification of nitrate is the microbial process that determines the retention of nitrogen in an ecosystem. To date, sulfur-dependent dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium has been demonstrated only with sulfide as an electron donor. We detected a novel pathway that couples the sulfur and nitrogen cycles. Thermophilic anaerobic bacteria Thermosulfurimonas dismutans and Dissulfuribacter thermophilus, isolated from deep-sea hydrothermal vents, grew autotrophically with elemental sulfur as an electron donor and nitrate as an electron acceptor producing sulfate and ammonium. The genomes of both bacteria contain a gene cluster that encodes a putative nitrate ammonification enzyme system. Nitrate reduction occurs via a Nap-type complex. The reduction of produced nitrite to ammonium does not proceed via the canonical Nrf system because nitrite reductase NrfA is absent in the genomes of both microorganisms. The genome of D. thermophilus encodes a complete sulfate reduction pathway, while the Sox sulfur oxidation system is missing, as shown previously for T. dismutans. Thus, in high-temperature environments, nitrate ammonification with elemental sulfur may represent an unrecognized route of primary biomass production. Moreover, the anaerobic oxidation of sulfur compounds coupled to growth has not previously been demonstrated for the members of Thermodesulfobacteria or Deltaproteobacteria, which were considered exclusively as participants of the reductive branch of the sulfur cycle. PMID:28194142

  3. Preliminary study on nitrite degradation by nirS recombinant genetic engineering bacteria%nirS基因重组工程菌降解亚硝酸盐的初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨兴兴; 陈学萍; 刘冬秀; 沈洁; 陆永生

    2014-01-01

    通过基因工程手段增加厌氧氨氧化菌亚硝酸盐还原酶(nitrite reductase, nirS)的表达量,运用质粒载体pGEM-T克隆nirS基因。琼脂糖凝胶电泳检测显示, nirS基因重组工程菌在440 bp处有明显的目的条带; nirS基因重组工程菌扩大培养7~8h后即达到生长曲线稳定期,引入外加氮源后,菌体生长情况更优。通过不同菌液投加量以及处理不同初始浓度的亚硝酸钠溶液,检测nirS基因重组工程菌的性能。结果表明,当nirS基因重组工程菌投加30 mL(细菌数为2.3×107个∕mL),亚硝酸盐初始质量浓度为40 mg∕L时,亚硝酸盐去除率达到90%以上。nirS基因重组工程菌可适用于亚硝酸盐废水的处理。%In order to improve the expression quantity of nitrite reductase (nirS) in ANAMMOX bacteria through bioengineering means, nirS gene was cloned using the plasmid vector pGEM-T. A target band of 440 bp PCR products from the recombinant genetic engineering bacter was observed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The nirS recombinant genetic engineering bacteria reached stationary phase after 7-8 hours incubation, the addition of nitrogen source was advantageous to the growth of bacteria significantly. The performance of nirS recombinant genetic engineering bacteria was tested by adding different dosages of bacteria and treating sodium nitrite solu‐tion with different initial concentrations. The results showed that, when 30 mL of nirS recombinant genetic engi‐neering bacteria(2.3 × 107 cells/mL) inoculates was added to the solution with 40 mg/L of initial mass concentra‐tion of nitrite, the removal rate of nitrite reached above 90%. It was indicated that nirS recombinant genetic en‐gineering bacteria could be applied for nitrite-containing wastewater treatment in the future.

  4. Origin, causes and effects of increased nitrite concentrations in aquatic environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Philips, S.; Laanbroek, H.J.; Verstraete, W.

    2002-01-01

    Literature frequently mentions increased nitrite concentrations along with its inhibitory effect towards bacteria and aquatic life. Nitrite accumulation has been studied for decades, and although numerous causal factors have already been commented on in literature, the mechanism of nitrite

  5. Oxidation and methylation of dissolved elemental mercury by anaerobic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Haiyan; Lin, Hui; Zheng, Wang; Tomanicek, Stephen J.; Johs, Alexander; Feng, Xinbin; Elias, Dwayne A.; Liang, Liyuan; Gu, Baohua

    2013-09-01

    Methylmercury is a neurotoxin that poses significant health risks to humans. Some anaerobic sulphate- and iron-reducing bacteria can methylate oxidized forms of mercury, generating methylmercury. One strain of sulphate-reducing bacteria (Desulfovibrio desulphuricans ND132) can also methylate elemental mercury. The prevalence of this trait among different bacterial strains and species remains unclear, however. Here, we compare the ability of two strains of the sulphate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio and one strain of the iron-reducing bacterium Geobacter to oxidize and methylate elemental mercury in a series of laboratory incubations. Experiments were carried out under dark, anaerobic conditions, in the presence of environmentally relevant concentrations of elemental mercury. We report differences in the ability of these organisms to oxidize and methylate elemental mercury. In line with recent findings, we show that D.desulphuricans ND132 can both oxidize and methylate elemental mercury. We find that the rate of methylation of elemental mercury is about one-third the rate of methylation of oxidized mercury. We also show that Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 can oxidize, but not methylate, elemental mercury. Geobacter sulphurreducens PCA is able to oxidize and methylate elemental mercury in the presence of cysteine. We suggest that the activity of methylating and non-methylating bacteria may together enhance the formation of methylmercury in anaerobic environments.

  6. Meat processing and colon carcinogenesis: cooked, nitrite-treated, and oxidized high-heme cured meat promotes mucin-depleted foci in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santarelli, Raphaëlle L; Vendeuvre, Jean-Luc; Naud, Nathalie; Taché, Sylviane; Guéraud, Françoise; Viau, Michelle; Genot, Claude; Corpet, Denis E; Pierre, Fabrice H F

    2010-07-01

    Processed meat intake is associated with colorectal cancer risk, but no experimental study supports the epidemiologic evidence. To study the effect of meat processing on carcinogenesis promotion, we first did a 14-day study with 16 models of cured meat. Studied factors, in a 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 design, were muscle color (a proxy for heme level), processing temperature, added nitrite, and packaging. Fischer 344 rats were fed these 16 diets, and we evaluated fecal and urinary fat oxidation and cytotoxicity, three biomarkers of heme-induced carcinogenesis promotion. A principal component analysis allowed for selection of four cured meats for inclusion into a promotion study. These selected diets were given for 100 days to rats pretreated with 1,2-dimethylhydrazine. Colons were scored for preneoplastic lesions: aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and mucin-depleted foci (MDF). Cured meat diets significantly increased the number of ACF/colon compared with a no-meat control diet (P = 0.002). Only the cooked nitrite-treated and oxidized high-heme meat significantly increased the fecal level of apparent total N-nitroso compounds (ATNC) and the number of MDF per colon compared with the no-meat control diet (P < 0.05). This nitrite-treated and oxidized cured meat specifically increased the MDF number compared with similar nonnitrite-treated meat (P = 0.03) and with similar nonoxidized meat (P = 0.004). Thus, a model cured meat, similar to ham stored aerobically, increased the number of preneoplastic lesions, which suggests colon carcinogenesis promotion. Nitrite treatment and oxidation increased this promoting effect, which was linked with increased fecal ATNC level. This study could lead to process modifications to make nonpromoting processed meat. 2010 AACR.

  7. Serum concentrations of nitrite and malondialdehyde as markers of oxidative stress in chronic myeloid leukemia patients treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Juracy Petrola

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic myeloid leukemia is a neoplasm characterized by clonal expansion of hematopoietic progenitor cells resulting from the (9:22(q34,11 translocation. The tyrosine kinase abl fusion protein,the initial leukemogenic event in chronic myeloid leukemia, is constitutively activated thus inducing the production of reactive oxygen species. Of particular relevance is the fact that an increase in reactive oxygen species can facilitate genomic instability and may contribute to disease progression. OBJETIVE: To evaluate oxidative stress by determining the levels of malondialdehyde and nitrite in chronic myeloid leukemia patients under treatment with 1st and 2nd generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors monitored at a referral hospital in Fortaleza, Ceará. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was performed of 64 male and female adults. Patients were stratified according to treatment. The levels of malondialdehyde and nitrite were determined by spectrophotometry. Statistical differences between groups were observed using the Student t-test and Fisher's exact test. The results are expressed as mean ± standard error of mean. The significance level was set for a p-value < 0.05 in all analyses. RESULTS: The results show significantly higher mean concentrations of nitrite and malondialdehyde in chronic myeloid leukemia patients using second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors compared to patients on imatinib. Conclusion: It follows that chronic myeloid leukemia patients present higher oxidative activity and that the increases in oxidative damage markers can indicate resistance to 1st generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

  8. Numerical modeling of nitrogen removal processes in biofilters with simultaneous nitritation and anammox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shun; Tao, Wendong

    2013-01-01

    This study developed a simple numerical model for nitrogen removal in biofilters, which was designed to enhance simultaneous nitritation and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox). It is the first attempt to simulate anammox together with two-step nitrification in natural treatment systems, which may have different kinetic parameters and temperature effects from conventional bioreactors. Prediction accuracy was improved by adjusting kinetic coefficients over the startup period of the biofilters. The maximum rates of nitritation and nitrite oxidation increased linearly over time during the startup period. Simulations confirmed successful enhancement of simultaneous nitritation and anammox (SNA) in the biofilters, with anammox contributing 35% of ammonium removal. Effluent ammonium concentration was affected by influent ammonium concentration and the maximum nitritation rate, and was insensitive to the maximum nitrite oxidation rate and anammox substrate factor. Ammonium removal via SNA was likely limited by biomass of aerobic ammonia oxidizing bacteria in the biofilters. The developed model is a promising tool for studying the dynamics of nitrogen removal processes including SNA in natural treatment systems.

  9. Nitrate reduction, nitrous oxide formation, and anaerobic ammonia oxidation to nitrite in the gut of soil-feeding termites (Cubitermes and Ophiotermes spp.)

    KAUST Repository

    Ngugi, David

    2011-11-28

    Soil-feeding termites play important roles in the dynamics of carbon and nitrogen in tropical soils. Through the mineralization of nitrogenous humus components, their intestinal tracts accumulate enormous amounts of ammonia, and nitrate and nitrite concentrations are several orders of magnitude above those in the ingested soil. Here, we studied the metabolism of nitrate in the different gut compartments of two Cubitermes and one Ophiotermes species using 15N isotope tracer analysis. Living termites emitted N 2 at rates ranging from 3.8 to 6.8nmolh -1 (g fresh wt.) -1. However, in homogenates of individual gut sections, denitrification was restricted to the posterior hindgut, whereas nitrate ammonification occurred in all gut compartments and was the prevailing process in the anterior gut. Potential rates of nitrate ammonification for the entire intestinal tract were tenfold higher than those of denitrification, implying that ammonification is the major sink for ingested nitrate in the intestinal tract of soil-feeding termites. Because nitrate is efficiently reduced already in the anterior gut, reductive processes in the posterior gut compartments must be fuelled by an endogenous source of oxidized nitrogen species. Quite unexpectedly, we observed an anaerobic oxidation of 15N-labelled ammonia to nitrite, especially in the P4 section, which is presumably driven by ferric iron; nitrification and anammox activities were not detected. Two of the termite species also emitted substantial amounts of N 2O, ranging from 0.4 to 3.9nmolh -1 (g fresh wt.) -1, providing direct evidence that soil-feeding termites are a hitherto unrecognized source of this greenhouse gas in tropical soils. © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Acetic Acid bacteria: physiology and carbon sources oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamlouk, Dhouha; Gullo, Maria

    2013-12-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are obligately aerobic bacteria within the family Acetobacteraceae, widespread in sugary, acidic and alcoholic niches. They are known for their ability to partially oxidise a variety of carbohydrates and to release the corresponding metabolites (aldehydes, ketones and organic acids) into the media. Since a long time they are used to perform specific oxidation reactions through processes called "oxidative fermentations", especially in vinegar production. In the last decades physiology of AAB have been widely studied because of their role in food production, where they act as beneficial or spoiling organisms, and in biotechnological industry, where their oxidation machinery is exploited to produce a number of compounds such as l-ascorbic acid, dihydroxyacetone, gluconic acid and cellulose. The present review aims to provide an overview of AAB physiology focusing carbon sources oxidation and main products of their metabolism.

  11. Pyrite oxidation by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savić Dragiša S.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetic model of pyrite particle dissolution by the action of bacteria Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans in a shaken Erlenmeyer flask was presented. The model agreed well with the experimental data for the extracted iron and the number of cells in the liquid phase. The specific growth rate of the adsorbed cells was evaluated (μA = 1,6 d-1 by fitting the experimental data to the model curve. Also, the relevance of the two proposed mechanisms for the bacterial dissolution of sulphide (direct and indirect was discussed, indicating that the indirect one was dominant. The adsorption process of A. ferrooxidans to the pyrite surface was well correlated by a Langmuir type isotherm.

  12. Multiple metabolisms constrain the anaerobic nitrite budget in the Eastern Tropical South Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbin, Andrew R.; Peters, Brian D.; Mordy, Calvin W.; Widner, Brittany; Casciotti, Karen L.; Ward, Bess B.

    2017-02-01

    The Eastern Tropical South Pacific is one of the three major oxygen deficient zones (ODZs) in the global ocean and is responsible for approximately one third of marine water column nitrogen loss. It is the best studied of the ODZs and, like the others, features a broad nitrite maximum across the low oxygen layer. How the microbial processes that produce and consume nitrite in anoxic waters interact to sustain this feature is unknown. Here we used 15N-tracer experiments to disentangle five of the biologically mediated processes that control the nitrite pool, including a high-resolution profile of nitrogen loss rates. Nitrate reduction to nitrite likely depended on organic matter fluxes, but the organic matter did not drive detectable rates of denitrification to N2. However, multiple lines of evidence show that denitrification is important in shaping the biogeochemistry of this ODZ. Significant rates of anaerobic nitrite oxidation at the ODZ boundaries were also measured. Iodate was a potential oxidant that could support part of this nitrite consumption pathway. We additionally observed N2 production from labeled cyanate and postulate that anammox bacteria have the ability to harness cyanate as another form of reduced nitrogen rather than relying solely on ammonification of complex organic matter. The balance of the five anaerobic rates measured—anammox, denitrification, nitrate reduction, nitrite oxidation, and dissimilatory nitrite reduction to ammonium—is sufficient to reproduce broadly the observed nitrite and nitrate profiles in a simple one-dimensional model but requires an additional source of reduced nitrogen to the deeper ODZ to avoid ammonium overconsumption.

  13. Oxidation of gaseous hydrocarbons by alkene-utilizing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginkel, van C.G.

    1987-01-01

    Gaseous alkenes are widespread in the environment due to the emission of these hydrocarbons by industry and due to their production from natural sources as for instance ethene by plants, fungi and bacteria. Micro-organisms have developed the potential to oxidize these hydrocarbons. Alkenes

  14. Oxidation of gaseous hydrocarbons by alkene-utilizing bacteria.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginkel, van C.G.

    1987-01-01

    Gaseous alkenes are widespread in the environment due to the emission of these hydrocarbons by industry and due to their production from natural sources as for instance ethene by plants, fungi and bacteria. Micro-organisms have developed the potential to oxidize these hydrocarbons. Alkenes can eithe

  15. Gibberellic acid nitrite stimulates germination of two species of light-requiring seeds via the nitric oxide pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanović, Vladan; Giba, Zlatko; Djoković, Dejan; Milosavljević, Slobodan; Grubisić, Dragoljub; Konjević, Radomir

    2005-06-01

    We used two species of light-requiring seeds, Paulownia tomentosa, which have absolute light requirement (no germination in darkness), and Stellaria media seeds, which germinate in darkness to a certain extent because of presence of preformed active phytochrome, to obtain results strongly suggesting that gibberellic acid nitrite stimulates seed germination via its capability as a functional NO donor. Exogenous application of gibberellic acid nitrite stimulates gibberellin-insensitive Stellaria media seed germination in darkness as do a wide variety of NO donors. Pure gibberellic acid could replace the light requirement of P. tomentosa seeds, thus enabling them to germinate in darkness. Gibberellic acid nitrite did not have this effect. A stimulative effect from gibberellic acid nitrite could be detected only after exposure of these seeds to short, 10 min, pulse of red light. Taken together, these results suggest that gibberellic activity of gibberellic acid nitrite is lost after nitrosation but, regarding to the presence of -O-NO moiety in the molecule, gibberellic acid nitrite shares stimulative properties in seed germination with other compounds with NO-releasing properties.

  16. Oxidation of thiamine on reaction with nitrogen dioxide generated by ferric myoglobin and hemoglobin in the presence of nitrite and hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepuro, I I; Oparin, A Yu; Stsiapura, V I; Maskevich, S A; Titov, V Yu

    2012-01-01

    It is shown that nitrogen dioxide oxidizes thiamine to thiamine disulfide, thiochrome, and oxodihydrothiochrome (ODTch). The latter is formed during oxidation of thiochrome by nitrogen dioxide. Nitrogen dioxide was produced by incubation of nitrite with horse ferric myoglobin and human hemoglobin in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. After addition of tyrosine or phenol to aqueous solutions containing oxoferryl forms of the hemoproteins, thiamine, and nitrite, the yield of thiochrome greatly increased, whereas the yield of ODTch decreased. In the presence of high concentrations of tyrosine or phenol compounds ODTch was not formed at all. The neutral form of thiamine with the closed thiazole cycle and minor tricyclic form of thiamine do not enter the heme pocket of the protein and do not interact with the oxoferryl heme complex Fe(IV=O) or porphyrin radical. The tricyclic form of thiamine is oxidized to thiochrome by tyrosyl radicals located on the surface of the hemoprotein. The thiol form of thiamine is oxidized to thiamine disulfide by both hemoprotein tyrosyl radicals and oxoferryl heme complexes. Nitrite and also tyrosine, tyramine, and phenol readily penetrate into the heme pocket of the protein and reduce the oxyferryl complex to ferric cation. These reactions yield nitrogen dioxide as well as tyrosyl and phenoxyl radicals of tyrosine molecules and phenol compounds, respectively. Tyrosyl and phenoxyl radicals of low molecular weight compounds oxidize thiamine only to thiochrome and thiamine disulfide. The effect of oxoferryl forms of myoglobin and hemoglobin, nitrogen dioxide, and phenol on thiamine oxidative transformation as well as antioxidant properties of the hydrophobic thiamine metabolites thiochrome and ODTch are discussed.

  17. Kinetics of electro-oxidation of ammonia-N, nitrites and COD from a recirculating aquaculture saline water system using BDD anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, V; Ibáñez, R; Gómez, P; Urtiaga, A M; Ortiz, I

    2011-01-01

    The viability of the electro-oxidation technology provided with boron doped diamond (BDD) electrodes for the treatment and reuse of the seawater used in a Recirculating Aquaculture System (RAS) was evaluated in this work. The influence of the applied current density (5-50 A m(-2)) in the removal of Total Ammonia Nitrogen (TAN), nitrite and chemical oxygen demand (COD) was analyzed observing that complete TAN removal together with important reductions of the other considered contaminants could be achieved, thus meeting the requirements for reuse of seawater in RAS systems. TAN removal, mainly due to an indirect oxidation mechanism was described by a second order kinetics while COD and nitrite removal followed zero-th order kinetics. The values of the kinetic constants for the anodic oxidation of each compound were obtained as a function of the applied current density (k(TAN) = 7.86 × 10(-5) · exp(6.30 × 10(-2) J); kNO2 = 3.43 × 10(-2) J; k(COD) = 1.35 × 10(-2) J). The formation of free chlorine and oxidation by-products, i.e., trihalomethanes (THMs) was followed along the electro-oxidation process. Although a maximum concentration of 1.7 mg l(-1) of total trihalomethanes was detected an integrated process combining electrochemical oxidation in order to eliminate TAN, nitrite and COD and adsorption onto activated carbon to remove the residual chlorine and THMs is proposed, as an efficient alternative to treat and reuse the seawater in fish culture systems. Finally, the energy consumption of the treatment has been evaluated.

  18. Temporal and Spatial Stability of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria in Aquarium Biofilters

    KAUST Repository

    Bagchi, Samik

    2014-12-05

    Nitrifying biofilters are used in aquaria and aquaculture systems to prevent accumulation of ammonia by promoting rapid conversion to nitrate via nitrite. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), as opposed to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), were recently identified as the dominant ammonia oxidizers in most freshwater aquaria. This study investigated biofilms from fixed-bed aquarium biofilters to assess the temporal and spatial dynamics of AOA and AOB abundance and diversity. Over a period of four months, ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms from six freshwater and one marine aquarium were investigated at 4–5 time points. Nitrogen balances for three freshwater aquaria showed that active nitrification by aquarium biofilters accounted for ≥81–86% of total nitrogen conversion in the aquaria. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) for bacterial and thaumarchaeal ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) genes demonstrated that AOA were numerically dominant over AOB in all six freshwater aquaria tested, and contributed all detectable amoA genes in three aquarium biofilters. In the marine aquarium, however, AOB outnumbered AOA by three to five orders of magnitude based on amoA gene abundances. A comparison of AOA abundance in three carrier materials (fine sponge, rough sponge and sintered glass or ceramic rings) of two three-media freshwater biofilters revealed preferential growth of AOA on fine sponge. Denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis (DGGE) of thaumarchaeal 16S rRNA genes indicated that community composition within a given biofilter was stable across media types. In addition, DGGE of all aquarium biofilters revealed low AOA diversity, with few bands, which were stable over time. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprints of thaumarchaeal 16S rRNA genes placed freshwater and marine aquaria communities in separate clusters. These results indicate that AOA are the dominant ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in freshwater aquarium

  19. Temporal and spatial stability of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria in aquarium biofilters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagchi, Samik; Vlaeminck, Siegfried E; Sauder, Laura A; Mosquera, Mariela; Neufeld, Josh D; Boon, Nico

    2014-01-01

    Nitrifying biofilters are used in aquaria and aquaculture systems to prevent accumulation of ammonia by promoting rapid conversion to nitrate via nitrite. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), as opposed to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), were recently identified as the dominant ammonia oxidizers in most freshwater aquaria. This study investigated biofilms from fixed-bed aquarium biofilters to assess the temporal and spatial dynamics of AOA and AOB abundance and diversity. Over a period of four months, ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms from six freshwater and one marine aquarium were investigated at 4-5 time points. Nitrogen balances for three freshwater aquaria showed that active nitrification by aquarium biofilters accounted for ≥ 81-86% of total nitrogen conversion in the aquaria. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) for bacterial and thaumarchaeal ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) genes demonstrated that AOA were numerically dominant over AOB in all six freshwater aquaria tested, and contributed all detectable amoA genes in three aquarium biofilters. In the marine aquarium, however, AOB outnumbered AOA by three to five orders of magnitude based on amoA gene abundances. A comparison of AOA abundance in three carrier materials (fine sponge, rough sponge and sintered glass or ceramic rings) of two three-media freshwater biofilters revealed preferential growth of AOA on fine sponge. Denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis (DGGE) of thaumarchaeal 16S rRNA genes indicated that community composition within a given biofilter was stable across media types. In addition, DGGE of all aquarium biofilters revealed low AOA diversity, with few bands, which were stable over time. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprints of thaumarchaeal 16S rRNA genes placed freshwater and marine aquaria communities in separate clusters. These results indicate that AOA are the dominant ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in freshwater aquarium

  20. Temporal and spatial stability of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria in aquarium biofilters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samik Bagchi

    Full Text Available Nitrifying biofilters are used in aquaria and aquaculture systems to prevent accumulation of ammonia by promoting rapid conversion to nitrate via nitrite. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA, as opposed to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB, were recently identified as the dominant ammonia oxidizers in most freshwater aquaria. This study investigated biofilms from fixed-bed aquarium biofilters to assess the temporal and spatial dynamics of AOA and AOB abundance and diversity. Over a period of four months, ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms from six freshwater and one marine aquarium were investigated at 4-5 time points. Nitrogen balances for three freshwater aquaria showed that active nitrification by aquarium biofilters accounted for ≥ 81-86% of total nitrogen conversion in the aquaria. Quantitative PCR (qPCR for bacterial and thaumarchaeal ammonia monooxygenase (amoA genes demonstrated that AOA were numerically dominant over AOB in all six freshwater aquaria tested, and contributed all detectable amoA genes in three aquarium biofilters. In the marine aquarium, however, AOB outnumbered AOA by three to five orders of magnitude based on amoA gene abundances. A comparison of AOA abundance in three carrier materials (fine sponge, rough sponge and sintered glass or ceramic rings of two three-media freshwater biofilters revealed preferential growth of AOA on fine sponge. Denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis (DGGE of thaumarchaeal 16S rRNA genes indicated that community composition within a given biofilter was stable across media types. In addition, DGGE of all aquarium biofilters revealed low AOA diversity, with few bands, which were stable over time. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE fingerprints of thaumarchaeal 16S rRNA genes placed freshwater and marine aquaria communities in separate clusters. These results indicate that AOA are the dominant ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in freshwater

  1. Temporal and Spatial Stability of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria in Aquarium Biofilters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauder, Laura A.; Mosquera, Mariela; Neufeld, Josh D.; Boon, Nico

    2014-01-01

    Nitrifying biofilters are used in aquaria and aquaculture systems to prevent accumulation of ammonia by promoting rapid conversion to nitrate via nitrite. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), as opposed to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), were recently identified as the dominant ammonia oxidizers in most freshwater aquaria. This study investigated biofilms from fixed-bed aquarium biofilters to assess the temporal and spatial dynamics of AOA and AOB abundance and diversity. Over a period of four months, ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms from six freshwater and one marine aquarium were investigated at 4–5 time points. Nitrogen balances for three freshwater aquaria showed that active nitrification by aquarium biofilters accounted for ≥81–86% of total nitrogen conversion in the aquaria. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) for bacterial and thaumarchaeal ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) genes demonstrated that AOA were numerically dominant over AOB in all six freshwater aquaria tested, and contributed all detectable amoA genes in three aquarium biofilters. In the marine aquarium, however, AOB outnumbered AOA by three to five orders of magnitude based on amoA gene abundances. A comparison of AOA abundance in three carrier materials (fine sponge, rough sponge and sintered glass or ceramic rings) of two three-media freshwater biofilters revealed preferential growth of AOA on fine sponge. Denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis (DGGE) of thaumarchaeal 16S rRNA genes indicated that community composition within a given biofilter was stable across media types. In addition, DGGE of all aquarium biofilters revealed low AOA diversity, with few bands, which were stable over time. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprints of thaumarchaeal 16S rRNA genes placed freshwater and marine aquaria communities in separate clusters. These results indicate that AOA are the dominant ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in freshwater aquarium

  2. Long-term nitritation performance of ammonium-rich landfill leachate☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongwei Sun; Xintao L; Yongzhen Peng; Shuying Wang; Juan Ma

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a biological system combined upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) with sequencing batch reactor (SBR) to treat ammonium-rich landfill leachate. The start-up and operation of the nitritation at low temperatures were investigated. The synergetic interaction of free ammonia (FA) inhibition on nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) and process control was used to achieve nitritation in the SBR. It is demonstrated that nitritation was successful y started up in the SBR at low temperatures (14.0 °C–18.2 °C) by using FA inhibition coupled with process control, and then was maintained for 482 days at normal/low temperature. Although ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and NOB co-existed within bacterial clusters in the SBR sludge, AOB were confirmed to be dominant nitrifying population species by scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observation and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. This confirmation not only emphasized that cultivating the appropriate bacteria is essential for achieving stable nitritation performance, but it also revealed that NOB activity was strongly inhibited by FA rather than being eliminated altogether from the system.

  3. Competitive interactions between methane- and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria modulate carbon and nitrogen cycling in paddy soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y.; Huang, R.; Wang, B. Z.; Bodelier, P. L. E.; Jia, Z. J.

    2014-06-01

    Pure culture studies have demonstrated that methanotrophs and ammonia oxidizers can both carry out the oxidation of methane and ammonia. However, the expected interactions resulting from these similarities are poorly understood, especially in complex, natural environments. Using DNA-based stable isotope probing and pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA and functional genes, we report on biogeochemical and molecular evidence for growth stimulation of methanotrophic communities by ammonium fertilization, and that methane modulates nitrogen cycling by competitive inhibition of nitrifying communities in a rice paddy soil. Pairwise comparison between microcosms amended with CH4, CH4+Urea, and Urea indicated that urea fertilization stimulated methane oxidation activity 6-fold during a 19-day incubation period, while ammonia oxidation activity was significantly suppressed in the presence of CH4. Pyrosequencing of the total 16S rRNA genes revealed that urea amendment resulted in rapid growth of Methylosarcina-like MOB, and nitrifying communities appeared to be partially inhibited by methane. High-throughput sequencing of the 13C-labeled DNA further revealed that methane amendment resulted in clear growth of Methylosarcina-related MOB while methane plus urea led to an equal increase in Methylosarcina and Methylobacter-related type Ia MOB, indicating the differential growth requirements of representatives of these genera. An increase in 13C assimilation by microorganisms related to methanol oxidizers clearly indicated carbon transfer from methane oxidation to other soil microbes, which was enhanced by urea addition. The active growth of type Ia methanotrops was significantly stimulated by urea amendment, and the pronounced growth of methanol-oxidizing bacteria occurred in CH4-treated microcosms only upon urea amendment. Methane addition partially inhibited the growth of Nitrosospira and Nitrosomonas in urea-amended microcosms, as well as growth of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. These

  4. Evidence for the Existence of Autotrophic Nitrate-Reducing Fe(II)-Oxidizing Bacteria in Marine Coastal Sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufer, Katja; Røy, Hans; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Kappler, Andreas

    2016-10-15

    Nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms were described for the first time ca. 20 years ago. Most pure cultures of nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers can oxidize Fe(II) only under mixotrophic conditions, i.e., when an organic cosubstrate is provided. A small number of nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing cultures have been proposed to grow autotrophically, but unambiguous evidence for autotrophy has not always been provided. Thus, it is still unclear whether or to what extent Fe(II) oxidation coupled to nitrate reduction is an enzymatically catalyzed and energy-yielding autotrophic process or whether Fe(II) is abiotically oxidized by nitrite from heterotrophic nitrate reduction. The aim of the present study was to find evidence for the existence of autotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers in coastal marine sediments. Microcosm incubations showed that with increasing incubation times, the stoichiometric ratio of reduced nitrate/oxidized Fe(II) [NO3(-)reduced/Fe(II)oxidized] decreased, indicating a decreasing contribution of heterotrophic denitrification and/or an increasing contribution of autotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidation over time. After incubations of sediment slurries for >10 weeks, nitrate-reducing activity ceased, although nitrate was still present. This suggests that heterotrophic nitrate reduction had ceased due to the depletion of readily available organic carbon. However, after the addition of Fe(II) to these batch incubation mixtures, the nitrate-reducing activity resumed, and Fe(II) was oxidized, indicating the activity of autotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers. The concurrent reduction of (14)C-labeled bicarbonate concentrations unambiguously proved that autotrophic C fixation occurred during Fe(II) oxidation and nitrate reduction. Our results clearly demonstrated that autotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria were present in the investigated coastal marine sediments.

  5. Fat content and nitrite-curing influence the formation of oxidation products and NOC-specific DNA adducts during in vitro digestion of meat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Van Hecke

    Full Text Available The effects of fat content and nitrite-curing of pork were investigated on the formation of cytotoxic and genotoxic lipid oxidation products (malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, volatile simple aldehydes, protein oxidation products (protein carbonyl compounds and NOC-specific DNA adducts (O6-carboxy-methylguanine during in vitro digestion. The formation of these products during digestion is suggested to be responsible for the association between red meat and processed meat consumption and colorectal cancer risk. Digestion of uncured pork to which fat was added (total fat content 5 or 20%, resulted in significantly higher lipid and protein oxidation in the mimicked duodenal and colonic fluids, compared to digestion of pork without added fat (1% fat. A higher fat content also significantly favored the formation of O6-carboxy-methylguanine in the colon. Nitrite-curing of meat resulted in significantly lower lipid and protein oxidation before and after digestion, while an inconsistent effect on the formation of O6-carboxy-methylguanine was observed. The presented results demonstrate that haem-Fe is not solely responsible for oxidation and nitrosation reactions throughout an in vitro digestion approach but its effect is promoted by a higher fat content in meat.

  6. Fat Content and Nitrite-Curing Influence the Formation of Oxidation Products and NOC-Specific DNA Adducts during In Vitro Digestion of Meat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hecke, Thomas; Vossen, Els; Vanden Bussche, Julie; Raes, Katleen; Vanhaecke, Lynn; De Smet, Stefaan

    2014-01-01

    The effects of fat content and nitrite-curing of pork were investigated on the formation of cytotoxic and genotoxic lipid oxidation products (malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, volatile simple aldehydes), protein oxidation products (protein carbonyl compounds) and NOC-specific DNA adducts (O6-carboxy-methylguanine) during in vitro digestion. The formation of these products during digestion is suggested to be responsible for the association between red meat and processed meat consumption and colorectal cancer risk. Digestion of uncured pork to which fat was added (total fat content 5 or 20%), resulted in significantly higher lipid and protein oxidation in the mimicked duodenal and colonic fluids, compared to digestion of pork without added fat (1% fat). A higher fat content also significantly favored the formation of O6-carboxy-methylguanine in the colon. Nitrite-curing of meat resulted in significantly lower lipid and protein oxidation before and after digestion, while an inconsistent effect on the formation of O6-carboxy-methylguanine was observed. The presented results demonstrate that haem-Fe is not solely responsible for oxidation and nitrosation reactions throughout an in vitro digestion approach but its effect is promoted by a higher fat content in meat. PMID:24978825

  7. Fat content and nitrite-curing influence the formation of oxidation products and NOC-specific DNA adducts during in vitro digestion of meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hecke, Thomas; Vossen, Els; Vanden Bussche, Julie; Raes, Katleen; Vanhaecke, Lynn; De Smet, Stefaan

    2014-01-01

    The effects of fat content and nitrite-curing of pork were investigated on the formation of cytotoxic and genotoxic lipid oxidation products (malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, volatile simple aldehydes), protein oxidation products (protein carbonyl compounds) and NOC-specific DNA adducts (O6-carboxy-methylguanine) during in vitro digestion. The formation of these products during digestion is suggested to be responsible for the association between red meat and processed meat consumption and colorectal cancer risk. Digestion of uncured pork to which fat was added (total fat content 5 or 20%), resulted in significantly higher lipid and protein oxidation in the mimicked duodenal and colonic fluids, compared to digestion of pork without added fat (1% fat). A higher fat content also significantly favored the formation of O6-carboxy-methylguanine in the colon. Nitrite-curing of meat resulted in significantly lower lipid and protein oxidation before and after digestion, while an inconsistent effect on the formation of O6-carboxy-methylguanine was observed. The presented results demonstrate that haem-Fe is not solely responsible for oxidation and nitrosation reactions throughout an in vitro digestion approach but its effect is promoted by a higher fat content in meat.

  8. Competitive interactions between methane- and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria modulate carbon and nitrogen cycling in paddy soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zheng

    2014-03-01

    addition of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. These results provide comprehensive insights in the interactions between actively growing methanotrophs and ammonia oxidizers in a complex soil ecosystem.

  9. Diversity of culturable halophilic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in hypersaline habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, Dimitry Yu; Tourova, Tatjana P; Lysenko, Anatoly M; Muyzer, Gerard

    2006-10-01

    Unexpectedly high culturable diversity of moderately and extremely halophilic obligately chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) was discovered in the sediments of various hypersaline habitats, including chloride-sulfate lakes in Mongolia, Russia and Ukraine, a sea saltern in Slovenia and a deep-sea salt brine from the Mediterranean. Six different groups of halophilic SOB, including four new genera, all belonging to the Gammaproteobacteria, were found. Two groups of moderately halophilic strictly aerobic SOB dominated at 2 M NaCl, including representatives of the genus Halothiobacillus (in fully aerobic conditions) and Thiomicrospira (in micro-oxic conditions). Under denitrifying conditions at 2 M NaCl, a group of moderately halophilic and facultatively anaerobic SOB was selected, capable of complete denitrification of nitrate. The group represents a new genus with closest relatives among as yet undescribed marine thiodenitrifying isolates. With thiocyanate as a substrate, an enrichment culture at 2 M NaCl yielded a pure culture of moderately halophilic SOB capable of aerobic growth with thiocyanate and thiosulfate at up to 4 M NaCl. Furthermore, this bacterium also grew anaerobically using nitrite as electron acceptor. It formed a new lineage distantly related to the genus Thiomicrospira. Enrichments at 4 M NaCl resulted in the domination of two different, previously unknown, groups of extremely halophilic SOB. Under oxic conditions, they were represented by strictly aerobic spiral-shaped bacteria, related to the Ectothiorhodospiraceae, while under denitrifying conditions a group of facultatively anaerobic nitrate-reducing bacteria with long rod-shaped cells was selected, distantly related to the genus Acidithiobacillus.

  10. Nitrification and Nitrifying Bacteria in a Coastal Microbial Mat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fan, H.; Bolhuis, H.; Stal, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    The first step of nitrification, the oxidation of ammonia to nitrite, can be performed by ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) or ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). We investigated the presence of these two groups in three structurally different types of coastal microbial mats that develop along the tida

  11. NC10 bacteria in marine oxygen minimum zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Padilla, Cory C; Bristow, Laura A; Sarode, Neha

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria of the NC10 phylum link anaerobic methane oxidation to nitrite denitrification through a unique O2-producing intra-aerobic methanotrophy pathway. A niche for NC10 in the pelagic ocean has not been confirmed. We show that NC10 bacteria are present and transcriptionally active in oceanic....... rRNA and mRNA transcripts assignable to NC10 peaked within the OMZ and included genes of the putative nitrite-dependent intra-aerobic pathway, with high representation of transcripts containing the unique motif structure of the nitric oxide (NO) reductase of NC10 bacteria, hypothesized...

  12. Extreme differences between hemoglobins I and II of the clam Lucina pectinalis in their reactions with nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaventura, Celia; Henkens, Robert; De Jesus-Bonilla, Walleska; Lopez-Garriga, Juan; Jia, Yiping; Alayash, Abdu I; Siburt, Claire J Parker; Crumbliss, Alvin L

    2010-10-01

    The clam Lucina pectinalis supports its symbiotic bacteria by H₂S transport in the open and accessible heme pocket of Lucina Hb I and by O₂ transport in the narrow and crowded heme pocket of Lucina Hb II. Remarkably, air-equilibrated samples of Lucina Hb I were found to be more rapidly oxidized by nitrite than any previously studied Hb, while those of Lucina Hb II showed an unprecedented resistance to oxidation induced by nitrite. Nitrite-induced oxidation of Lucina Hb II was enabled only when O₂ was removed from its active site. Structural analysis revealed that O₂ "clams up" the active site by hydrogen bond formation to B10Tyr and other distal-side residues. Quaternary effects further restrict nitrite entry into the active site and stabilize the hydrogen-bonding network in oxygenated Lucina Hb II dimers. The dramatic differences in nitrite reactivities of the Lucina Hbs are not related to their O₂ affinities or anaerobic redox potentials, which were found to be similar, but are instead a result of differences in accessibility of nitrite to their active sites; i.e. these differences are due to a kinetic rather than thermodynamic effect. Comparative studies revealed heme accessibility to be a factor in human Hb oxidation by nitrite as well, as evidenced by variations of rates of nitrite-induced oxidation that do not correlate with R and T state differences and inhibition of oxidation rate in the presence of O₂. These results provide a dramatic illustration of how evolution of active sites with varied heme accessibility can moderate the rates of inner-sphere oxidative reactions of Hb and other heme proteins. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. T-786c Polymorphism in nitric oxide synthase 3 gene and Nitrit Oxide Level of Diabetic Retinopathy in Javanese Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putri Widelia Welkriana

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available AbstractComplication of retinopathy in type 2 DM is caused of lower level of NO. Nitric oxide level is synthesizedfrom L-arginin in reaction that catalyze Nitric oxide synthase (NOS 3. The T-786C mutation in NOS 3 genedecreases the expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS 3 so decreases NO synthesis. To investigate theassociation between T-786C polymorphism in NOS 3 gene with NO level of diabetic retinopathy patients. Thisstudy was a case control study, consist of 40 patient of type 2 diabetic with DR (case group and 40 patient oftype 2 diabetic without DR (control group of Javanese ethnic. The genotyping of T-786C polymorphism wasperformed by PCR-RLFP. Level of NO was measured by spectrophotometry. Chi square test and odd ratiowere used to analyze the association of the T-786C polymorphism in NOS 3 gene with DR. Differences ofNO level between TT and TC genotypes were analyzed using independent t test. The distribution of T-786Cpolymorphism in NOS 3 gene of DR subjects showed that frequency of TT genotype was 22.5% and TC genotypewas 77.5%. Non DR subjects showed the frequency of TT genotype was 50% and TC genotype was 50%, (p=0.011. Frequency of T allele in DR group was 61.25% and C allele was 38.75%, and frequency of T allele in nonDR group was 75% and C allele was 25%, (p= 0.62. Odd ratio of TC genotype was 3.444(CI; 95% : 0.964-3.735and C allele was 1.898 (CI; 95% : 1.310-9.058. The NO level of TC genotype was 1.43+0.126 and TT genotypewas 11.27+5.87 (p=0.000. Level of NO between RD and non RD showed not different significantly (p=0.160for retinopathy. The T-786C polymorphism of NOS 3 gene is risk factor for retinopathy in type 2 DiabetesMellitus. Individual with TC genotype of NOS 3 gene has lower level of NO than TT genotype.Keywords : Diabetic Retinopathy, Polymorphism, Nitric Oxide, Nitric Oxide Synthase.

  14. Development of an online sulfur-oxidizing bacteria biosensor for the monitoring of water toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, Anup; Kang, Woo-Chang; Shin, Beom-Soo; Cho, Ju Sik; Oh, Sang-Eun

    2014-12-01

    A toxicity monitoring system based on the metabolic properties of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) in continuous and fed-batch modes has been applied for the detection of nitrite (NO2 (-)-N). In this study, the effects of different concentrations of NO2 (-)-N (0.1 to 5 mg/L) on the SOB bioreactors were tested. We found that 5 mg/L NO2 (-)-N was very toxic to the SOB bioreactors in both continuous (R1) and fed-batch (R2) modes, showing complete inhibition of SOB activity within 2 h of operation. R1 and R2 were operated in different ways; however, the EC inhibition and recovery patterns were very similar. The EC rate increased with an increasing NO2 (-)-N concentration in both continuous and fed-batch modes. The addition of 5 mg/L NO2 (-)-N in continuous mode decreased the average EC rate by 14.38 ± 2.1 μS/cm/min; while in fed-batch mode, the EC rate decreased by 23 μS/cm/min. Although the toxicity monitoring system could detect 0.5-5 mg/L NO2 (-)-N, it could not detect 0.1 mg/L NO2 (-)-N in either continuous or fed-batch operation. Thus, the SOB biosensor method presented is useful to detect toxic agents such as NO2 (-)-N within a few minutes or hours.

  15. Impact of nitrite on aerobic phosphorus uptake by poly-phosphate accumulating organisms in enhanced biological phosphorus removal sludges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wei; Li, Boxiao; Yang, Yingying; Wang, Xiangdong; Li, Lei; Peng, Yongzhen

    2014-02-01

    Impact of nitrite on aerobic phosphorus (P) uptake of poly-phosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) in three different enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) systems was investigated, i.e., the enriched PAOs culture fed with synthetic wastewater, the two lab-scale sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) treating domestic wastewater for nutrient removal through nitrite-pathway nitritation and nitrate-pathway nitrification, respectively. Fluorescence in situ hybridization results showed that PAOs in the three sludges accounted for 72, 7.6 and 6.5% of bacteria, respectively. In the enriched PAOs culture, at free nitrous acid (FNA) concentration of 0.47 × 10(-3) mg HNO₂-N/L, aerobic P-uptake and oxidation of intercellular poly-β-hydroxyalkanoates were both inhibited. Denitrifying phosphorus removal under the aerobic conditions was observed, indicating the existence of PAOs using nitrite as electron acceptor in this culture. When the FNA concentration reached 2.25 × 10(-3) mg HNO2-N/L, denitrifying phosphorus removal was also inhibited. And the inhibition ceased once nitrite was exhausted. Corresponding to both SBRs treating domestic wastewater with nitritation and nitrification pathway, nitrite inhibition on aerobic P-uptake by PAOs did not occur even though FNA concentration reached 3 × 10(-3) and 2.13 × 10(-3) mg HNO₂-N/L, respectively. Therefore, PAOs taken from different EBPR activated sludges had different tolerance to nitrite.

  16. Nitrite disrupts multiple physiological functions in aquatic animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank Bo

    2003-01-01

    nitrite-induced vasodilation (possibly via nitric oxide generated from nitrite) that is countered by increased cardiac pumping to re-establish blood pressure. Nitrite can form and/or mimic nitric oxide and thereby interfere with processes regulated by this local hormone. Steroid hormone synthesis may...... species and in some cases also within species. Rainbow trout fall into two groups with regard to susceptibility and physiological response. These two groups are not related to sex but show significant different nitrite uptake rates....

  17. Electrodeposition of Gold on Fluorine-Doped Tin Oxide: Characterization and Application for Catalytic Oxidation of Nitrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahbubur Rahman, Md.; Li, Xiaobo; Lopa, Nasrin Siraj; Lee, Jaejoon [Konkuk Univ., Chungju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-15

    Sub-micrometer size gold particles were electrodeposited on a transparent fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) from acetonitrile solution containing AuCl{sub 4}{sup -} and tetramethylammonium tetraflouroborate (TMATFB) for detecting NO{sub 2}{sup -}. A series of two-electron (2e{sup -}) and one-electron (1e{sup -}) reductions of the AuCl{sub 4}{sup -}-AuCl{sub 2}{sup -}-Au redox systems were observed at FTO and a highly stable and homogeneous distribution of Au on FTO (Au/FTO) was obtained by stepping the potential from 0 to .0.55 V (vs. Ag/Ag{sup +}). The Au/FTO electrode exhibited sufficiently high catalytic activity toward the oxidation of NO{sub 2}{sup -} with a detection limit (S/N = 3) and sensitivity of 2.95 μM and 223.4 μA·cm{sup -2}·mM{sup -1}, respectively, under optimal conditions. It exhibited an interference-free signal for NO{sub 2}{sup -} detection with excellent recoveries from real samples.

  18. Screening and Identification of Nitrite-Degrading Lactic Acid Bacteria%高效降亚硝酸盐乳酸菌的驯化复筛及菌株鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴慧昊; 牛锋; 陈珊珊; 钟琦; 肖俊川

    2016-01-01

    目的:筛选出高效降亚硝酸盐乳酸菌,为今后益生乳酸菌的开发提供一定的理论依据。方法:从地方特有食品及动物肠道中分离纯化出13株乳酸菌,采用盐酸萘乙二胺法对13株乳酸菌的体外降亚硝酸盐能力进行测定,并对降亚硝酸盐效果最强菌株进行驯化培养和抑菌实验,通过生理生化及16S rDNA法对所分离的降亚硝酸盐能力最强菌株进行鉴定。结果:获得1株编号为JS3的乳酸菌,该菌对亚硝酸盐降解率为83.39%,经过驯化复筛及培养条件优化得到:培养基中蛋白胨添加量15 g/L、接菌量5%、培养温度30℃、培养时间48 h,其降解率达到93.47%,同时菌株对金黄色葡萄球菌和枯草芽孢杆菌还具有抑制性能。经鉴定菌株为玉米乳杆菌(Lactobacillus zeae),将其命名为L. zeaeJS3。结论:菌株JS3具有高效降解亚硝酸盐能力,能够成为今后降解亚硝酸盐微生态活性菌的优良菌种。%Objective: To screen nitrite-degrading lactic acid bacteria (LAB), and thus to lay a theoretical foundation for the future development of probiotic lactic acid bacteria. Methods: Totally 13 LAB strains were isolated and purified from unique local foods and animal intestines, and their nitrite-degrading abilities were evaluated by the naphthyl ethylenediamine dihydrochloride spectrophotometric method. Biochemical assays and 16S rDNA sequencing were used to identify the lactic acid bacteria with the highest nitrite-degrading capacity. Results: A nitrite-degrading strain, JS3, was obtained, which was found to be able to degrade 83.39% nitrite. The optimized culture conditions for enhanced nitrite degradation by the selected strain were determined as peptone concentration in medium of 15 g/L, inoculum quantity of 5%, and culture at 30℃ for 48 h, resulting in a degradation rate as high as 93.47%. The strain had obvious antibacterial activity againstStaphylococcus aureus and

  19. Role of copper oxides in contact killing of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans, Michael; Erbe, Andreas; Mathews, Salima; Chen, Ying; Solioz, Marc; Mücklich, Frank

    2013-12-31

    The potential of metallic copper as an intrinsically antibacterial material is gaining increasing attention in the face of growing antibiotics resistance of bacteria. However, the mechanism of the so-called "contact killing" of bacteria by copper surfaces is poorly understood and requires further investigation. In particular, the influences of bacteria-metal interaction, media composition, and copper surface chemistry on contact killing are not fully understood. In this study, copper oxide formation on copper during standard antimicrobial testing was measured in situ by spectroscopic ellipsometry. In parallel, contact killing under these conditions was assessed with bacteria in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) or Tris-Cl. For comparison, defined Cu2O and CuO layers were thermally generated and characterized by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. The antibacterial properties of these copper oxides were tested under the conditions used above. Finally, copper ion release was recorded for both buffer systems by inductively coupled plasma atomic absorption spectroscopy, and exposed copper samples were analyzed for topographical surface alterations. It was found that there was a fairly even growth of CuO under wet plating conditions, reaching 4-10 nm in 300 min, but no measurable Cu2O was formed during this time. CuO was found to significantly inhibit contact killing, compared to pure copper. In contrast, thermally generated Cu2O was essentially as effective in contact killing as pure copper. Copper ion release from the different surfaces roughly correlated with their antibacterial efficacy and was highest for pure copper, followed by Cu2O and CuO. Tris-Cl induced a 10-50-fold faster copper ion release compared to PBS. Since the Cu2O that primarily forms on copper under ambient conditions is as active in contact killing as pure copper, antimicrobial objects will retain their antimicrobial properties even after oxide formation.

  20. Quantification of Nitrosomonas oligotropha-Like Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria and Nitrospira spp. from Full-Scale Wastewater Treatment Plants by Competitive PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionisi, Hebe M.; Layton, Alice C.; Harms, Gerda; Gregory, Igrid R.; Robinson, Kevin G.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2002-01-01

    Utilizing the principle of competitive PCR, we developed two assays to enumerate Nitrosomonas oligotropha-like ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria belonging to the genus Nitrospira. The specificities of two primer sets, which were designed for two target regions, the amoA gene and Nitrospira 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA), were verified by DNA sequencing. Both assays were optimized and applied to full-scale, activated sludge wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) samples. If it was assumed that there was an average of 3.6 copies of 16S rDNA per cell in the total population and two copies of the amoA gene per ammonia-oxidizing bacterial cell, the ammonia oxidizers examined represented 0.0033% ± 0.0022% of the total bacterial population in a municipal WWTP. N. oligotropha-like ammonia-oxidizing bacteria were not detected in an industrial WWTP. If it was assumed that there was one copy of the 16S rDNA gene per nitrite-oxidizing bacterial cell, Nitrospira spp. represented 0.39% ± 0.28% of the biosludge population in the municipal WWTP and 0.37% ± 0.23% of the population in the industrial WWTP. The number of Nitrospira sp. cells in the municipal WWTP was more than 62 times greater than the number of N. oligotropha-like cells, based on a competitive PCR analysis. The results of this study extended our knowledge of the comparative compositions of nitrifying bacterial populations in wastewater treatment systems. Importantly, they also demonstrated that we were able to quantify these populations, which ultimately will be required for accurate prediction of process performance and stability for cost-effective design and operation of WWTPs. PMID:11772633

  1. [Fermentation process during the ensiling of green forage low in nitrate. 2. Fermentation process after supplementation of nitrate, nitrite, lactic acid bacteria and formic acid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, E; Weiss, K

    1997-01-01

    The effect of adding nitrate and nitrite (0.05% and 0.01% N in DM) of two inoculants or formic acid on the ensiling of orchardgrass and a grass-legumes-mixture, both low in nitrate, was proved in two experiments during ensiling starting in an early stage of fermentation silages without additives contained butyric acid, with increasing amounts up to 180 day of storage period. Silages with added nitrate or nitrite (0.1% N in DM) contained no butyric acid despite of a delay in the formation of lactic acid Nitrite was more effective as nitrate (both 0.05% N in DM) to suppress butyric acid fermentation. However, both additives, nitrite and nitrate, increased the lactic acid fermentation. Interpreting this facts it was hypothesized that the clostridia was inhibited by nitrate and nitrite. Addition of inoculants improved the formation of lactic acid, and decreased pH-value in comparison to control silages. The formation of butyric acid was limited, but not suppressed. The effect of inoculants differed in the intensity of fermentation and the formation of by-products of lactic acid fermentation. The effect of formic acid was not sure.

  2. The fate of arsenic adsorbed on iron oxides in the presence of arsenite-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhennan; Yin, Naiyi; Du, Huili; Cai, Xiaolin; Cui, Yanshan

    2016-05-01

    Arsenic (As) is a redox-active metalloid whose toxicity and mobility in soil depend on its oxidation state. Arsenite [As(III)] can be oxidized by microbes and adsorbed by minerals in the soil. However, the combined effects of these abiotic and biotic processes are not well understood. In this study, the fate of arsenic in the presence of an isolated As(III)-oxidizing bacterium (Pseudomonas sp. HN-1, 10(9) colony-forming units (CFUs)·ml(-1)) and three iron oxides (goethite, hematite, and magnetite at 1.6 g L(-1)) was determined using batch experiments. The total As adsorption by iron oxides was lower with bacteria present and was higher with iron oxides alone. The total As adsorption decreased by 78.6%, 36.0% and 79.7% for goethite, hematite and magnetite, respectively, due to the presence of bacteria. As(III) adsorbed on iron oxides could also be oxidized by Pseudomonas sp. HN-1, but the oxidation rate (1.3 μmol h(-1)) was much slower than the rate in the aqueous phase (96.2 μmol h(-1)). Therefore, the results of other studies with minerals only might overestimate the adsorptive capacity of solids in natural systems; the presence of minerals might hinder As(III) oxidation by microbes. Under aerobic conditions, in the presence of iron oxides and As(III)-oxidizing bacteria, arsenic is adsorbed onto iron oxides within the adsorption capacity, and As(V) is the primary form in the solid and aqueous phases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. One-step self-assembled synthesis of CuO with tunable hierarchical structures and their electrocatalytic properties for nitrite oxidation in aqueous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Youcheng; Song, Xinyu; Yin, Zhilei; Song, Qisheng

    2013-04-15

    Controlled synthesis of CuO with various hierarchical structures consisting of self-organized nanoparticles is realized by using n-octylamine (OLA) as a structure inducing agent via a facile hydrothermal synthetic method. The growth and assemblage of CuO can be finely tuned by selecting the preparative parameters. In particular, it is found that the degree of the hierarchical organization can be modulated by simply changing the amount of the n-octylamine and CuO nanoparticles exhibit self-assembled two-dimensional (2D) sheet-like, three-dimensional (3D) disk-like and bowknot-like architectures, respectively. In the present case, OLA serves as a capping surfactant that can modulate growth of CuO nanocrystals via hydrophobic forces between the OLA molecules. CuO nanoparticles can be self-assembled into different complex architectures depending on the strength of hydrophobic forces. Hierarchical sphere-like CuO assembled from nanorods can also be easily fabricated by adjusting the starting NaOH to CuCl2 volume ratio, in which OLA serves not only as the structure-directing agent, but also as a weak base agent to produce hydroxyl anions. The electrochemical performances of the as-synthesized different products for sensing nitrite oxidation are evaluated. The results reveal that the electrocatalytic activity is related to the secondary nanostructures. Compared to the others, the bowknot-shaped and sphere-shaped CuO products exhibit excellent electrocatalytic activity toward nitrite oxidation and fast current response in nitrite sensing because of their peculiar hierarchical structures with high BET surface areas and well-ordered pores.

  4. Mimicking the oxygen minimum zones: stimulating interaction of aerobic archaeal and anaerobic bacterial ammonia oxidizers in a laboratory-scale model system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, J.; Haaijer, S.C.M.; Op den Camp, H.J.M.; van Niftrik, L.; Stahl, D.A.; Könneke, M.; Rush, D.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Hu, Y.Y.; Jetten, M.S.M.

    2012-01-01

    In marine oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) rather than marine ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) may provide nitrite to anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria. Here we demonstrate the cooperation between marine anammox bacteria and nitrifiers in a laboratory-scale

  5. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic investigation of the inhibition of the phosphoroclastic system of Clostridium sporogenes by nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, M J; Woods, L F; Gibbs, P; Cammack, R

    1990-10-01

    The proposal that nitrite exerts its inhibitory effect on anaerobic bacteria by direct interaction with the iron-sulphur proteins of the phosphoroclastic system was investigated. The effects of nitrate, nitrite with or without ascorbate, and nitric oxide on the growth of Clostridium sporogenes in liquid cultures at pH 7.4, on the rates of hydrogen production, and on the activities of the enzymes pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase and hydrogenase, and of ferredoxin were investigated. In agreement with previous studies, nitrate was the least effective inhibitor of cell growth, and nitric oxide the most effective. Nitrite reductase activity was very low in C. sporogenes, indicating that the presence of external reducing agents would be necessary for the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide. Inhibition by nitrite was enhanced by ascorbate; 0.5 mM-nitrite with 10 mM-ascorbate stopped growth completely. In partially-purified preparations 4.1 mM-NaNO2 and equimolar ascorbate caused complete inactivation of hydrogenase activity but only partial (up to 78%) inactivation of pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase. This agreed with the loss of hydrogen production observed with nitrite in vivo. Inhibition occurred within 5 min, and was irreversible in each case. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy showed that paramagnetic [Fe(NO)2(SR)2] species were formed during growth in the presence of nitrite, and were associated with cells. However, the intensity of these EPR signals did not correlate with the inhibition of cell growth. The [4Fe-4S] clusters in ferredoxin were shown by EPR spectroscopy to be resistant to treatment with 3.6 mM-NaNO2 and 3.6 mM-ascorbate. It is concluded that the effects of nitrite on pre-formed iron-sulphur proteins are not convincing as a basis for the lethal effects on bacterial cells.

  6. Achieving complete nitrogen removal by coupling nitritation-anammox and methane-dependent denitrification: A model-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueming; Guo, Jianhua; Xie, Guo-Jun; Yuan, Zhiguo; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2016-05-01

    The discovery of denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) processes enables the complete nitrogen removal from wastewater by utilizing the methane produced on site from anaerobic digesters. This model-based study investigated the mechanisms and operational window for efficient nitrogen removal by coupling nitritation-anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) and methane-dependent denitrification in membrane biofilm reactors (MBfRs). A mathematical model was applied to describe the microbial interactions among Anammox bacteria, DAMO archaea, and DAMO bacteria. The model sufficiently described the batch experimental data from an MBfR containing an Anammox-DAMO biofilm with different feeding nitrogen compositions, which confirmed the validity of the model. The effects of process parameters on the system performance and microbial community structure could therefore be reliably evaluated. The impacts of nitritation produced NO2(-)/NH4(+) ratio, methane supply, biofilm thickness and total nitrogen (TN) surface loading were comprehensively investigated with the model. Results showed that the optimum NO2(-)/NH4(+) ratio produced from nitritation for the Anammox-DAMO biofilm system was around 1.0 in order to achieve the maximum TN removal (over 99.0%), independent on TN surface loading. The corresponding optimal methane supply increased while the associated methane utilization efficiency decreased with the increase of TN surface loading. The cooperation between DAMO organisms and Anammox bacteria played the key role in the TN removal. Based on these results, the proof-of-concept feasibility of a single-stage MBfR coupling nitritation-Anammox-DAMO for complete nitrogen removal was also tested through integrating the model with ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) processes whilst controlling the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in the simulated system. The maximum TN removal was found to be achieved at the bulk DO concentration of

  7. Nitrate decreases xanthine oxidoreductase-mediated nitrite reductase activity and attenuates vascular and blood pressure responses to nitrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célio Damacena-Angelis

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Nitrite and nitrate restore deficient endogenous nitric oxide (NO production as they are converted back to NO, and therefore complement the classic enzymatic NO synthesis. Circulating nitrate and nitrite must cross membrane barriers to produce their effects and increased nitrate concentrations may attenuate the nitrite influx into cells, decreasing NO generation from nitrite. Moreover, xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR mediates NO formation from nitrite and nitrate. However, no study has examined whether nitrate attenuates XOR-mediated NO generation from nitrite. We hypothesized that nitrate attenuates the vascular and blood pressure responses to nitrite either by interfering with nitrite influx into vascular tissue, or by competing with nitrite for XOR, thus inhibiting XOR-mediated NO generation. We used two independent vascular function assays in rats (aortic ring preparations and isolated mesenteric arterial bed perfusion to examine the effects of sodium nitrate on the concentration-dependent responses to sodium nitrite. Both assays showed that nitrate attenuated the vascular responses to nitrite. Conversely, the aortic responses to the NO donor DETANONOate were not affected by sodium nitrate. Further confirming these results, we found that nitrate attenuated the acute blood pressure lowering effects of increasing doses of nitrite infused intravenously in freely moving rats. The possibility that nitrate could compete with nitrite and decrease nitrite influx into cells was tested by measuring the accumulation of nitrogen-15-labeled nitrite (15N-nitrite by aortic rings using ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS. Nitrate exerted no effect on aortic accumulation of 15N-nitrite. Next, we used chemiluminescence-based NO detection to examine whether nitrate attenuates XOR-mediated nitrite reductase activity. Nitrate significantly shifted the Michaelis Menten saturation curve to the right, with a 3-fold increase in

  8. Control of hydrogen sulfide production in oil fields by managing microbial communities through nitrate or nitrite addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, Casey R. J.

    Nitrate or nitrite injection into oil reservoirs during water flooding has the potential to control biological souring, the production of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Souring control is essential because sulfide is toxic, sulfide precipitates can plug reservoir formations, souring lowers crude oil value, and SRB induce corrosion. Nitrate and nitrite can stimulate heterotrophic nitrate- or nitrite-reducing bacteria (hNRB) and nitrate- or nitrite-reducing, sulfide oxidizing bacteria (NRSOB). Nitrite also inhibits SRB activity by blocking the sulfate reduction pathway. Continuous up-flow packed-bed bioreactors were inoculated with produced water from the Coleville oil field to establish sulfide-producing biofilms similar to those found in sour reservoirs. Nitrate or nitrite addition to bioreactors indicated that the dose required for hNRB or NR-SOB to control souring depended on the concentration of oil organics. Either mechanism mediates the net removal of oil organics (lactate) with nitrate or nitrite, with lower doses of nitrate required due to its greater oxidative power. Microbial community analysis by reverse sample genome probing (RSGP) revealed that NR-SOB mediated sulfide removal at low nitrate or nitrite concentrations when lactate was still available to SRB and the redox potential was low. At high nitrate doses hNRB oxidized lactate directly, produced nitrite and maintained a high redox potential, thus excluding SRB activity. Facultatively chemolithotrophic Campylobacter sp. strains were isolated from the bioreactors and incorporated into RSGP analyses, revealing their dominance in both NR-SOB- and hNRB-containing communities. The metabolic flexibility of these strains may confer a competitive advantage over obligate chemolithotrophs like Thiomicrospira sp. strain CVO or hNRB that do not have NR-SOB activity like newly isolated Thauera sp. and Rhodobacter sp. strains. A single high dose of nitrite resulted in immediate

  9. The Impact of Nitrite on Aerobic Growth of Paracoccus denitrificans PD1222

    OpenAIRE

    Hartop, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    The effect of nitrite stress induced in Paracoccus denitrificans PD1222 was examined using additions of sodium nitrite to an aerobic bacterial culture. Nitrite generates a strong stress response in P. denitrificans, causing growth inhibition. This is dependent on both the concentration of nitrite present and the pH. The pH dependent effect of nitrite growth inhibition is likely a result of nitrite and free nitrous acid (FNA; pKa = 3.16) and subsequent reactive nitrogen oxides, ...

  10. Quantification of Aerobic Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria in Soil using Activity-Based Fluorescent Labeling of Ammonia Monooxygenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnan, J.; Bennett, K.; Hyman, M. R.

    2016-12-01

    Nitrification is a key step in the biological nitrogen cycle and has a large effect on the fate of nitrogen species in both wastewater treatment systems and agricultural soils. Aerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) initiate nitrification by converting ammonia (NH3) to nitrite (NO2-) and are therefore pivotal to the process. AOB are ubiquitous in the environment but are difficult to quantify as they grow poorly on solid media. Other quantification methods like iquid most-probable number techniques are slow and error-prone, while modern molecular approaches involving polymerase chain reaction amplification are faster and more accurate but do not differentiate between active and inactive AOB. In this study, we explored using activity-based fluorescent mechanisms for rapidly quantifying metabolically active forms of AOB in soils. Initial experiments using Nitrosomonas europaea aimed to establish a relationship between NH3-dependent nitrite production and bacterial cell numbers. Active AMO was treated cells with 1,7-octadiyne (17OD) to inactivate the enzyme and a subsequent copper-dependent "click" reaction attached a fluor. The labeled protein was quantified by SDS-PAGE and IR scanning. In future experiments, AOB will be stimulated in soil microcosms by adding NH4Cl. AMO will again be inactivated by adding 17OD, and total bacteria will be separated from the soil samples using gradient centrifugation. After "click" conjugation with AlexaFluor 647 azide, the abundance of AMO will be determined with SDS-PAGE and IR analysis while metabolically active AOB will be measured via fluorescence-activating cell sorting.

  11. Growth kinetics of hydrogen sulfide oxidizing bacteria in corroded concrete from sewers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, H.S.; Lens, P.N.L.; Nielsen, J.L.; Bester, K.; Nielsen, A.H.; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Th.; Vollertsen, J.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide oxidation by microbes present on concrete surfaces of sewer pipes is a key process in sewer corrosion. The growth of aerobic sulfur oxidizing bacteria from corroded concrete surfaces was studied in a batch reactor. Samples of corrosion products, containing sulfur oxidizing bacteria,

  12. The effect of plant growth regulators, nitric oxide, nitrate, nitrite and light on the germination of dimorphic seeds of Suaeda salsa under saline conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weiqiang; Liu, Xiaojing; Ajmal Khan, M; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro

    2005-06-01

    Suaeda salsa, a leaf succulent shrub in the family Chenopodiaceae, is one of the most important halophytes in China. Suaeda salsa produces dimorphic seeds (soft brown seeds and hard black seeds). Seeds of S. salsa were collected from the coastal salt flats near Huanghua City, China. Experiments were conducted to determine the salinity-alleviating effect of plant growth regulators, nitric oxide, nitrate, nitrite and light on the germination of dimorphic seeds of S. salsa. Brown seeds had a higher germination rate than black seeds in all experiments. Black seeds were more sensitive to salt in the absence of light in comparison to brown seeds. Brown seeds absorbed water more quickly in comparison to black seeds and were found to be more tolerant of salt stress. Our results showed that 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC, the immediate precursor of ethylene), nitrite, GA(4) and BA improved seed germination in the presence of salt. However, nitrate, GA(1), GA(3) failed to alleviate salt stress. ABA inhibited seed germination and seedling growth. Possible mechanisms involved in the alleviation of salt stress in S. salsa seeds and the ecological adaptation of the seeds to the environment are discussed.

  13. Effect of alkalinity on nitrite accumulation in treatment of coal chemical industry wastewater using moving bed biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Baolin; Han, Hongjun; Jia, Shengyong; Zhuang, Haifeng; Zhao, Qian; Xu, Peng

    2014-05-01

    Nitrogen removal via nitrite (the nitrite pathway) is more suitable for carbon-limited industrial wastewater. Partial nitrification to nitrite is the primary step to achieve nitrogen removal via nitrite. The effect of alkalinity on nitrite accumulation in a continuous process was investigated by progressively increasing the alkalinity dosage ratio (amount of alkalinity to ammonia ratio, mol/mol). There is a close relationship among alkalinity, pH and the state of matter present in aqueous solution. When alkalinity was insufficient (compared to the theoretical alkalinity amount), ammonia removal efficiency increased first and then decreased at each alkalinity dosage ratio, with an abrupt removal efficiency peak. Generally, ammonia removal efficiency rose with increasing alkalinity dosage ratio. Ammonia removal efficiency reached to 88% from 23% when alkalinity addition was sufficient. Nitrite accumulation could be achieved by inhibiting nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) by free ammonia (FA) in the early period and free nitrous acid in the later period of nitrification when alkalinity was not adequate. Only FA worked to inhibit the activity of NOB when alkalinity addition was sufficient.

  14. Effect of acid whey and freeze-dried cranberries on lipid oxidation and fatty acid composition of nitrite-/nitrate-free fermented sausage made from deer meat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karwowska, Małgorzata; Dolatowski, Zbigniew J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated the effect of acid whey and freeze-dried cranberries on the physicochemical characteristics, lipid oxidation and fatty acid composition of nitrite-free fermented sausage made from deer meat and pork fat. Antioxidant interactions between acid whey and cranberry compounds were also explored. Methods Four formulations of fermented venison sausage were prepared: F1 (control), F2 (with 5% liquid acid whey), F3 (with 0.06% of freeze-dried cranberries), and F4 (with 5% liquid acid whey and 0.06% of freeze-dried cranberries). Each sample was analyzed for pH, water activity (aw), heme iron content, 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) value and conjugated dienes at the end of the manufacturing process and at 30 and 90 days of refrigerated storage. Fatty acid composition was measured once at the end of the manufacturing process. Results At the end of ripening, all samples presented statistically different values for a pH range of 4.47 to pH 4.59. The sum of the unsaturated fatty acids was higher, while the conjugated diene and the TBARS values were lower in sausages with freeze-dried cranberries as compared to the control sausage. The highest content of heme iron (21.52 mg/kg) at day 90 was found in the sausage formulation with the addition of freeze-dried cranberries, which suggests that the addition of cranberries stabilized the porphyrin ring of the heme molecule during storage and thereby reduced the release of iron. The use of liquid acid whey in combination with cranberries appears to not be justified in view of the oxidative stability of the obtained products. Conclusion The results suggest that the application of freeze-dried cranberries can lower the intensity of oxidative changes during the storage of nitrite-free fermented sausage made from deer meat. PMID:27165018

  15. Effect of acid whey and freeze-dried cranberries on lipid oxidation and fatty acid composition of nitrite-/nitrate-free fermented sausage made from deer meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Karwowska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study evaluated the effect of acid whey and freeze-dried cranberries on the physicochemical characteristics, lipid oxidation and fatty acid composition of nitrite-free fermented sausage made from deer meat and pork fat. Antioxidant interactions between acid whey and cranberry compounds were also explored. Methods Four formulations of fermented venison sausage were prepared: F1 (control, F2 (with 5% liquid acid whey, F3 (with 0.06% of freeze-dried cranberries, and F4 (with 5% liquid acid whey and 0.06% of freeze-dried cranberries. Each sample was analyzed for pH, water activity (aw, heme iron content, 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS value and conjugated dienes at the end of the manufacturing process and at 30 and 90 days of refrigerated storage. Fatty acid composition was measured once at the end of the manufacturing process. Results At the end of ripening, all samples presented statistically different values for a pH range of 4.47 to pH 4.59. The sum of the unsaturated fatty acids was higher, while the conjugated diene and the TBARS values were lower in sausages with freeze-dried cranberries as compared to the control sausage. The highest content of heme iron (21.52 mg/kg at day 90 was found in the sausage formulation with the addition of freeze-dried cranberries, which suggests that the addition of cranberries stabilized the porphyrin ring of the heme molecule during storage and thereby reduced the release of iron. The use of liquid acid whey in combination with cranberries appears to not be justified in view of the oxidative stability of the obtained products. Conclusion The results suggest that the application of freeze-dried cranberries can lower the intensity of oxidative changes during the storage of nitrite-free fermented sausage made from deer meat.

  16. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in a chloraminated distribution system: seasonal occurrence, distribution and disinfection resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, R L; Lieu, N I; Izaguirre, G; Means, E G

    1990-02-01

    Nitrification in chloraminated drinking water can have a number of adverse effects on water quality, including a loss of total chlorine and ammonia-N and an increase in the concentration of heterotrophic plate count bacteria and nitrite. To understand how nitrification develops, a study was conducted to examine the factors that influence the occurrence of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in a chloraminated distribution system. Samples were collected over an 18-month period from a raw-water source, a conventional treatment plant effluent, and two covered, finished-water reservoirs that previously experienced nitrification episodes. Sediment and biofilm samples were collected from the interior wall surfaces of two finished-water pipelines and one of the covered reservoirs. The AOB were enumerated by a most-probable-number technique, and isolates were isolated and identified. The resistance of naturally occurring AOB to chloramines and free chlorine was also examined. The results of the monitoring program indicated that the levels of AOB, identified as members of the genus Nitrosomonas, were seasonally dependent in both source and finished waters, with the highest levels observed in the warm summer months. The concentrations of AOB in the two reservoirs, both of which have floating covers made of synthetic rubber (Hypalon; E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., Inc., Wilmington, Del.), had most probable numbers that ranged from less than 0.2 to greater than 300/ml and correlated significantly with temperature and levels of heterotrophic plate count bacteria. No AOB were detected in the chloraminated reservoirs when the water temperature was below 16 to 18 degrees C. The study indicated that nitrifiers occur throughout the chloraminated distribution system. Higher concentrations of AOB were found in the reservoir and pipe sediment materials than in the pipe biofilm samples. The AOB were approximately 13 times more resistant to monochloramine than to free chlorine. After 33 min

  17. Partial nitritation of stored source-separated urine by granular activated sludge in a sequencing batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liping; Yang, Xiaoxiao; Tian, Xiujun; Yao, Song; Li, Jiuyi; Wang, Aimin; Yao, Qian; Peng, Dangcong

    2017-12-01

    The combination of partial nitritation (PN) and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) has been proposed as an ideal process for nitrogen removal from source-separated urine, while the high organic matters in urine cause instability of single-stage PN-anammox process. This study aims to remove the organic matters and partially nitrify the nitrogen in urine, producing an ammonium/nitrite solution suitable for anammox. The organic matters in stored urine were used as the electron donors to achieve 40% total nitrogen removal in nitritation-denitrification process in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). Granular aggregates were observed and high mixed liquor suspended solids (9.5 g/L) were maintained in the SBR. Around 70-75% ammonium was oxidized to nitrite under the volumetric loading rates of 3.23 kg chemical oxygen demand (COD)/(m(3) d) and 1.86 kg N/(m(3) d), respectively. The SBR produced an ammonium/nitrite solution free of biodegradable organic matters, with a NO2(-)-N:NH4(+)-N of 1.24 ± 0.13. Fluorescence in situ hybridization images showed that Nitrosomonas-like ammonium-oxidizing bacteria, accounting for 7.2% of total bacteria, located in the outer layer (25 μm), while heterotrophs distributed homogeneously throughout the granular aggregates. High concentrations of free ammonia and nitrous acids in the reactor severely inhibited the growth of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria, resulting in their absence in the granular sludge. The microbial diversity analysis indicated Proteobacteria was the predominant phylum, in which Pseudomonas was the most abundant genus.

  18. Nitrogen polishing in a fully anoxic anammox MBBR treating mainstream nitritation-denitritation effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regmi, Pusker; Holgate, Becky; Miller, Mark W; Park, Hongkeun; Chandran, Kartik; Wett, Bernhard; Murthy, Sudhir; Bott, Charles B

    2016-03-01

    As nitrogen discharge limits are becoming more stringent, short-cut nitrogen systems and tertiary nitrogen polishing steps are gaining popularity. For partial nitritation or nitritation-denitritation systems, anaerobic ammonia oxidation (anammox) polishing may be feasible to remove residual ammonia and nitrite from the effluent. Nitrogen polishing of mainstream nitritation-denitritation system effluent via anammox was studied at 25°C in a fully anoxic moving bed bioreactor (MBBR) (V = 0.45 m(3) ) over 385 days. Unlike other anammox based processes, a very fast startup of anammox MBBR was demonstrated, despite nitrite limited feeding conditions (influent nitrite = 0.7 ± 0.59 mgN/L, ammonia = 6.13 ± 2.86 mgN/L, nitrate = 3.41 ± 1.92 mgN/L). The nitrogen removal performance was very stable within a wide range of nitrogen inputs. Anammox bacteria (AMX) activity up to 1 gN/m(2) /d was observed which is comparable to other biofilm-based systems. It is generally believed that nitrate production limits nitrogen removal through AMX metabolism. However, in this study, anammox MBBR demonstrated ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate removal at limited chemical oxygen demand (COD) availability. AMX and heterotrophs contributed to 0.68 ± 0.17 and 0.32 ± 0.17 of TIN removal, respectively. It was speculated that nitrogen removal might be aided by denitratation which could be due to heterotrophs or the recently discovered ability for AMX to use short-chain fatty acids to reduce nitrate to nitrite. This study demonstrates the feasibility of anammox nitrogen polishing in an MBBR is possible for nitritation-denitration systems.

  19. N2O production by ammonia oxidizing bacteria in an enriched nitrifying sludge linearly depends on inorganic carbon concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lai; Ni, Bing-Jie; Ye, Liu; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-05-01

    The effect of inorganic carbon (IC) on nitrous oxide (N2O) production by ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) was investigated over a concentration range of 0-12 mmol C/L, encompassing typical IC levels in a wastewater treatment reactors. The AOB culture was enriched along with nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) to perform complete nitrification. Batch experiments were conducted with continuous carbon dioxide (CO2) stripping or at controlled IC concentrations. The results revealed a linear relationship between N2O production rate (N2OR) and IC concentration (R(2) = 0.97) within the IC range studied, suggesting a substantial effect of IC on N2O production by AOB. Similar results were also obtained with an AOB culture treating anaerobic sludge digestion liquor. The fundamental mechanism responsible for this dependency is unclear; however, in agreement with previous studies, it was observed that the ammonia oxidation rate (AOR) was also influenced by the IC concentration, which could be well described by the Monod kinetics. These resulted in an exponential relationship between N2OR and AOR, as previously observed in experiments where AOR was altered by varying dissolved oxygen and ammonia concentrations. It is therefore possible that IC indirectly affected N2OR by causing a change in AOR. The observation in this study indicates that alkalinity (mostly contributed by IC) could be a significant factor influencing N2O production and should be taken into consideration in estimating and mitigating N2O emissions in wastewater treatment systems.

  20. How to make a living from anaerobic ammonium oxidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kartal, B.; De Almeida, N.M.; Maalcke, W.J.; Op den Camp, H.J.M.; Jetten, M.S.M.; Keltjens, J.T.

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria primarily grow by the oxidation of ammonium coupled to nitrite reduction, using CO2 as the sole carbon source. Although they were neglected for a long time, anammox bacteria are encountered in an enormous species (micro)diversity in virtually any anoxi

  1. Effects of plant polyphenols and a-tocopherol on lipid oxidation, residual nitrites, biogenic amines, and N-nitrosamines formation during ripening and storage of dry-cured bacon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effects of plant polyphenols (green tea polyphenols (GTP) and grape seed extract (GSE) and a-tocopherol on physicochemical parameters, lipid oxidation, residual nitrite, microbiological counts, biogenic amines, and N-nitrosamines were determined in bacons during dry-curing and storage. Results show ...

  2. A computational model for nitric oxide, nitrite and nitrate biotransport in the microcirculation: effect of reduced nitric oxide consumption by red blood cells and blood velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deonikar, Prabhakar; Kavdia, Mahendra

    2010-12-01

    Bioavailability of vasoactive endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) in vasculature is a critical factor in regulation of many physiological processes. Consumption of NO by RBC plays a crucial role in maintaining NO bioavailability. Recently, Deonikar and Kavdia (2009b) reported an effective NO-RBC reaction rate constant of 0.2×10(5)M(-1)s(-1) that is ~7 times lower than the commonly used NO-RBC reaction rate constant of 1.4×10(5)M(-1)s(-1). To study the effect of lower NO-RBC reaction rate constant and nitrite and nitrate formation (products of NO metabolism in blood), we developed a 2D mathematical model of NO biotransport in 50 and 200μm ID arterioles to calculate NO concentration in radial and axial directions in the vascular lumen and vascular wall of the arterioles. We also simulated the effect of blood velocity on NO distribution in the arterioles to determine whether NO can be transported to downstream locations in the arteriolar lumen. The results indicate that lowering the NO-RBC reaction rate constant increased the NO concentration in the vascular lumen as well as the vascular wall. Increasing the velocity also led to increase in NO concentration. We predict increased NO concentration gradient along the axial direction with an increase in the velocity. The predicted NO concentration was 281-1163nM in the smooth muscle cell layer for 50μm arteriole over the blood velocity range of 0.5-4cms(-1) for k(NO-RBC) of 0.2×10(5)M(-1)s(-1), which is much higher than the reported values from earlier mathematical modeling studies. The NO concentrations are similar to the experimentally measured vascular wall NO concentration range of 300-1000nM in several different vascular beds. The results are significant from the perspective that the downstream transport of NO is possible under the right circumstances.

  3. Haloalkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in soda lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, Dimitry Yu; Kuenen, Johannes Gijs

    2005-09-01

    The existence of chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) capable of growth in an extremely alkaline and saline environment has not been recognized until recently. Extensive studies of saline, alkaline (soda) lakes located in Central Asia, Africa and North America have now revealed the presence, at relatively high numbers, of a new branch of obligately autotrophic SOB in these doubly extreme environments. Overall more than 100 strains were isolated in pure culture. All of them have the potential to grow optimally at around pH 10 in media strongly buffered with sodium carbonate/bicarbonate and cannot grow at pHbacteria, dominating in hyposaline steppe soda lakes of Central Asia. The genus Thioalkalivibrio includes mostly slowly growing species better adapted to life in hypersaline conditions and with a more versatile metabolism. It includes denitrifying, thiocyanate-utilizing and facultatively alkaliphilic species.

  4. An observational prospective study of topical acidified nitrite for killing methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA in contaminated wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferguson Gail P

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endogenous nitric oxide (NO kills bacteria and other organisms as part of the innate immune response. When nitrite is exposed to low pH, NO is generated and has been used as an NO delivery system to treat skin infections. We demonstrated eradication of MRSA carriage from wounds using a topical formulation of citric acid (4.5% and sodium nitrite (3% creams co-applied for 5 days to 15 wounds in an observational prospective pilot study of 8 patients. Findings Following treatment with topical citric acid and sodium nitrite, 9 of 15 wounds (60% and 3 of 8 patients (37% were cleared of infection. MRSA isolates from these patients were all sensitive to acidified nitrite in vitro compared to methicillin-sensitive S. aureus and a reference strain of MRSA. Conclusions Nitric oxide and acidified nitrite offer a novel therapy for control of MRSA in wounds. Wounds that were not cleared of infection may have been re-contaminated or the bioavailability of acidified nitrite impaired by local factors in the tissue.

  5. Short-and long-term effects of ammonia and nitrite on the anammox process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, I.; Campos, J. L.; Mosquera-Corral, A.; Mendez, R.

    2009-07-01

    Auto trophic anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) process is a feasible alternative to treat industrial wastewater with high ammonia concentration but low content of organic matter. In this process ammonium and nitrite are used by Planctomycete-type bacteria under anoxic conditions to generate nitrogen gas. Both substrates can exert inhibitory effects on the process, causing the decrease of the specific activity of the biomass and the loss of the performance and stability of reactors. (Author)

  6. The anammoxosome organelle is crucial for the energy metabolism of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Teeseling, Muriel C F; Neumann, Sarah; van Niftrik, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Anammox bacteria convert ammonium and nitrite to dinitrogen gas under anaerobic conditions to obtain their energy for growth. The anammox reaction was deemed impossible until its discovery in the early 1990s. Now, anammox bacteria are recognized as major players in the global nitrogen cycle and estimated to be responsible for up to 50% of the nitrogen in the air that we breathe. In addition, anammox bacteria are extremely valuable for wastewater treatment where they are applied for the removal of ammonium. Besides their importance in industry and the environment, anammox bacteria defy some basic biological concepts. Whereas most other bacteria have only one cell compartment, the cytoplasm, anammox bacteria have three independent cell compartments bounded by bilayer membranes, from out- to inside; the paryphoplasm, riboplasm and anammoxosome. The anammoxosome is the largest compartment of the anammox cell and is proposed to be dedicated to energy conservation. As such it would be analogous to the mitochondria of eukaryotes. This review will discuss the anammox cell plan in detail, with the main focus on the anammoxosome. The identity of the anammoxosome as a prokaryotic organelle and the importance of this organelle for anammox bacteria are discussed as well as challenges these bacteria face by having three independent cell compartments.

  7. Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria and associated activity in fixed-film biofilters of a marine recirculating aquaculture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal, Yossi; Watts, Joy E M; Schreier, Harold J

    2006-04-01

    Microbial communities in the biological filter and waste sludge compartments of a marine recirculating aquaculture system were examined to determine the presence and activity of anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria. Community DNA was extracted from aerobic and anaerobic fixed-film biofilters and the anaerobic sludge waste collection tank and was analyzed by amplifying 16S rRNA genes by PCR using anammox-selective and universal GC-clamped primers. Separation of amplified PCR products by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequencing of the different phylotypes revealed a diverse biofilter microbial community. While Planctomycetales were found in all three communities, the anaerobic denitrifying biofilters contained one clone that exhibited high levels of sequence similarity to known anammox bacteria. Fluorescence in situ hybridization studies using an anammox-specific probe confirmed the presence of anammox Planctomycetales in the microbial biofilm from the denitrifying biofilters, and anammox activity was observed in these biofilters, as detected by the ability to simultaneously consume ammonia and nitrite. To our knowledge, this is the first identification of anammox-related sequences in a marine recirculating aquaculture filtration system, and our findings provide a foundation for incorporating this important pathway for complete nitrogen removal in such systems.

  8. Platelet inhibition by nitrite is dependent on erythrocytes and deoxygenation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirada Srihirun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nitrite is a nitric oxide (NO metabolite in tissues and blood, which can be converted to NO under hypoxia to facilitate tissue perfusion. Although nitrite is known to cause vasodilation following its reduction to NO, the effect of nitrite on platelet activity remains unclear. In this study, the effect of nitrite and nitrite+erythrocytes, with and without deoxygenation, on platelet activity was investigated. METHODOLOGY/FINDING: Platelet aggregation was studied in platelet-rich plasma (PRP and PRP+erythrocytes by turbidimetric and impedance aggregometry, respectively. In PRP, DEANONOate inhibited platelet aggregation induced by ADP while nitrite had no effect on platelets. In PRP+erythrocytes, the inhibitory effect of DEANONOate on platelets decreased whereas nitrite at physiologic concentration (0.1 µM inhibited platelet aggregation and ATP release. The effect of nitrite+erythrocytes on platelets was abrogated by C-PTIO (a membrane-impermeable NO scavenger, suggesting an NO-mediated action. Furthermore, deoxygenation enhanced the effect of nitrite as observed from a decrease of P-selectin expression and increase of the cGMP levels in platelets. The ADP-induced platelet aggregation in whole blood showed inverse correlations with the nitrite levels in whole blood and erythrocytes. CONCLUSION: Nitrite alone at physiological levels has no effect on platelets in plasma. Nitrite in the presence of erythrocytes inhibits platelets through its reduction to NO, which is promoted by deoxygenation. Nitrite may have role in modulating platelet activity in the circulation, especially during hypoxia.

  9. Nitrate removal by organotrophic anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria with C2/C3 fatty acid in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yuhai; Li, Dong; Zhang, Xiaojing; Zeng, Huiping; Yang, Yin; Zhang, Jie

    2015-10-01

    In anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) process, a harsh ratio of nitrite to ammonia in influent was demanded, and the max nitrogen removal efficiency could only achieve to 89%, both of which limited the development of Anammox. The aim of this work was to study the nitrate removal by organotrophic anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AAOB) with C2/C3 fatty acid in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors. In this study, organotrophic AAOB was successfully enriched by adding acetate and propionate with the total organic carbon to nitrogen (TOC/N) ratio of 0.1. In the condition of low substrate, the TN removal efficiency reached 90%, with the effluent TN of around 11.8 mg L(-1). After the addition of acetate and propionate, the predominant species in Anammox granular sludge transformed to Candidatus Jettenia that belonging to organotrophic AAOB from the Candidatus Kuenenia relating to general AAOB.

  10. Analysis of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria dominating in lab-scale bioreactors with high ammonium bicarbonate loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vejmelkova, D.; Sorokin, D.Y.; Abbas, B.; Kovaleva, O.L.; Kleerebezem, R.; Kampschreur, M.J.; Muyzer, G.; Van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.

    2011-01-01

    The ammonia-oxidizing bacterial community (AOB) was investigated in two types of laboratory-scale bioreactors performing partial oxidation of ammonia to nitrite or nitrate at high (80 mM) to extremely high (428 mM) concentrations of ammonium bicarbonate. At all conditions, the dominant AOB was affil

  11. Analysis of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria dominating in lab-scale bioreactors with high ammonium bicarbonate loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Vejmelkova; D.Y. Sorokin; B. Abbas; O.L. Kovaleva; R. Kleerebezem; M.J. Kampschreur; G. Muyzer; M.C.M. van Loosdrecht

    2012-01-01

    The ammonia-oxidizing bacterial community (AOB) was investigated in two types of laboratory-scale bioreactors performing partial oxidation of ammonia to nitrite or nitrate at high (80 mM) to extremely high (428 mM) concentrations of ammonium bicarbonate. At all conditions, the dominant AOB was affil

  12. Miniaturized metal oxide pH sensors for bacteria detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uria, Naroa; Abramova, Natalia; Bratov, Andrey; Muñoz-Pascual, Francesc-Xavier; Baldrich, Eva

    2016-01-15

    It is well known that the metabolic activity of some microorganisms results in changes of pH of the culture medium, a phenomenon that can be used for detection and quantification of bacteria. However, conventional glass electrodes that are commonly used for pH measurements are bulky, fragile and expensive, which hinders their application in miniaturized systems and encouraged to the search for alternatives. In this work, two types of metal oxide pH sensors have been tested to detect the metabolic activity of the bacterium Escherichia coli (E. coli). These pH sensors were produced on silicon chips with platinum metal contacts, onto which thin layers of IrOx or Ta2O5 were incorporated by two different methods (electrodeposition and e-beam sputtering, respectively). In order to facilitate measurement in small sample volumes, an Ag/AgCl pseudo-reference was also screen-printed in the chip and was assayed in parallel to an external Ag/AgCl reference electrode. As it is shown, the developed sensors generated results indistinguishable from those provided by a conventional glass pH-electrode but could be operated in significantly smaller sample volumes. After optimization of the detection conditions, the metal oxide sensors are successfully applied for detection of increasing concentrations of viable E. coli, with detection of less than 10(3)cfu mL(-1) in undiluted culture medium in just 5h.

  13. L-arginine and L-glutamine as immunonutrients and modulating agents for oxidative stress and toxicity induced by sodium nitrite in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sheikh, Nora M; Khalil, Fatma A

    2011-04-01

    Sodium nitrite (NaNO(2)) is a flavoring, coloring and preservative agent in meat and fish products. The study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of L-arginine and L-glutamine supplementation as a potentially novel and useful strategy for the modulation of oxidative stress and toxicity induced by NaNO(2) in male rats. Rats were divided into six groups each of 10 rats and treated for 6 weeks: group 1 as normal control; group 2 fed standard diet containing 0.2% NaNO(2); group 3 and 4 fed the previous diet supplemented with 1% and 2% arginine, respectively; group 5 and 6 fed NaNO(2) diet supplemented with 1% and 2% glutamine, respectively. NaNO(2) treatment induced a significant increase in serum malondialdehyde, nitric oxide, arginase, glutathione-S-transferase activities, urea and creatinine as well as differential leucocytes%. However, a significant decrease was recorded in reduced glutathione, catalase activity, total protein, albumin and some hematological parameters as well as immunoglobulin G. On the other hand, arginine or glutamine showed a remarkable modulation of these abnormalities as indicated by reduction of malondialdehyde and improvement of the investigated antioxidant and hematological parameters. It can be concluded that arginine or glutamine supplementation may reduce oxidative stress and improve the hazard effects of NaNO(2).

  14. Determination of nitric oxide metabolites, nitrate and nitrite, in Anopheles culicifacies mosquito midgut and haemolymph by anion exchange high-performance liquid chromatography: plausible mechanism of refractoriness

    OpenAIRE

    Adak Tridibesh; Raghavendra Kamaraju; Sharma Arun; Dash Aditya P

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The diverse physiological and pathological role of nitric oxide in innate immune defenses against many intra and extracellular pathogens, have led to the development of various methods for determining nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. NO metabolites, nitrite (NO2-) and nitrate (NO3-) are produced by the action of an inducible Anopheles culicifacies NO synthase (AcNOS) in mosquito mid-guts and may be central to anti-parasitic arsenal of these mosquitoes. Method While exploring a...

  15. Different Abilities of Eight Mixed Cultures of Methane-oxidizing Bacteria to Degrade TCE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, Kim; Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Jensen, Bjørn K.

    1993-01-01

    The ability of eight mixed cultures of methane-oxidizing bacteria to degrade trichloroethylene (TCE) was examined in laboratory batch experiments. This is one of the first reported works studying TCE degradation by mixed cultures of methane-oxidizing bacteria at 10°C, a common temperature for soils...

  16. Composite of Cu metal nanoparticles-multiwall carbon nanotubes-reduced graphene oxide as a novel and high performance platform of the electrochemical sensor for simultaneous determination of nitrite and nitrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagheri, Hasan, E-mail: h.bagheri@bmsu.ac.ir [Chemical Injuries Research Center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hajian, Ali [Laboratory for Sensors, Department of Microsystems Engineering (IMTEK), University of Freiburg, Georges Köhler Allee 103, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Rezaei, Mosayeb; Shirzadmehr, Ali [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Hamedan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Hamedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • An electrochemical sensor based on Cu metal nanoparticles-multiwall carbon nanotubes-reduced graphene oxide modified glassy carbon electrode was developed. • Simultaneous electrochemical determination of nitrate and nitrite by fabricated sensor was performed. • Modification improved the sensitivity and detection limit of the method. • It is a useful method for determining of nitrate and nitrite in various real samples. - Abstract: In the present research, we aimed to fabricate a novel electrochemical sensor based on Cu metal nanoparticles on the multiwall carbon nanotubes-reduced graphene oxide nanosheets (Cu/MWCNT/RGO) for individual and simultaneous determination of nitrite and nitrate ions. The morphology of the prepared nanocomposite on the surface of glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was characterized using various methods including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Under optimal experimental conditions, the modified GCE showed excellent catalytic activity toward the electro-reduction of nitrite and nitrate ions (pH = 3.0) with a significant increase in cathodic peak currents in comparison with the unmodified GCE. By square wave voltammetry (SWV) the fabricated sensor demonstrated wide dynamic concentration ranges from 0.1 to 75 μM with detection limits (3S{sub b}/m) of 30 nM and 20 nM method for nitrite and nitrate ions, respectively. Furthermore, the applicability of the proposed modified electrode was demonstrated by measuring the concentration of nitrite and nitrate ions in the tap and mineral waters, sausages, salami, and cheese samples.

  17. Nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria as microbial oxidants for rapid biological sulfide removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gusseme, Bart; De Schryver, Peter; De Cooman, Michaël; Verbeken, Kim; Boeckx, Pascal; Verstraete, Willy; Boon, Nico

    2009-01-01

    The emission of hydrogen sulfide into the atmosphere of sewer systems induces the biological production of sulfuric acid, causing severe concrete corrosion. As a possible preventive solution, a microbial consortium of nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB) was enriched in a continuously stirred tank reactor in order to develop a biological technique for the removal of dissolved sulfide. The consortium, dominated by Arcobacter sp., was capable of removing 99% of sulfide. Stable isotope fractioning of the sulfide indicated that the oxidation was a biological process. The capacity of the NR-SOB consortium for rapid removal of sulfide was demonstrated by using it as an inoculum in synthetic and real sewage. Removal rates up to 52 mg sulfide-S g VSS(-1) h(-1) were achieved, to our knowledge the highest removal rate reported so far for freshwater species in the absence of molecular oxygen. Further long-term incubation experiments revealed the capacity of the bacteria to oxidize sulfide without the presence of nitrate, suggesting that an oxidized redox reserve is present in the culture.

  18. Graphene oxide sheets involved in vertically aligned zinc oxide nanowires for visible light photoinactivation of bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nourmohammadi, Amin; Rahighi, Reza [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Akhavan, Omid, E-mail: oakhavan@sharif.edu [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 14588-89694, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moshfegh, Alireza [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 14588-89694, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-11-05

    Highlights: • Involvement of GO into the vertically aligned ZnO nanowires using electrophoretic deposition. • UV assisted photocatalytic reduction of the GO sheets involved in the ZnO nanowires. • Visible light photoinactivation of bacteria by the reduced graphene oxide/ZnO nanocomposite. - Abstract: Vertically aligned ZnO nanowires (NWs) hybridized with reduced graphene oxide sheets (rGO) were applied in efficient visible light photoinactivation of bacteria. To incorporate graphene oxide (GO) sheets within the NWs two different methods of drop-casting and electrophoretic deposition (EPD) were utilized. The EPD method yielded effective penetration of the positively charged GO sheets into the NWs to form a spider net-like structure, whereas the drop-casting method resulted in only a surface coverage of the GO sheets on top of the NWs. The electrical connection between the EPD-incorporated sheets and the NWs was checked by monitoring the electron transfer from UV-assisted photoexcited ZnO NWs into the GO sheets, during photocatalytic reduction of the sheets. The obtained rGO/ZnO composites were applied in visible light photoinactivation of Escherichia coli bacteria. The ZnO NWs could inactivate only ∼58% of the bacteria, while both drop-casting and EPD-prepared GO/ZnO composites exhibited strong antibacterial activities (especially the EPD sample with ∼99.5% photoinactivation), under visible light irradiation for 1 h. In fact, the visible light photocatalytic activity of the EPD-prepared GO/ZnO NW composite was found ∼1.9 and 6.2 folds of the activity of the GO/ZnO composite prepared by drop-casting method and the bare ZnO NWs.

  19. CTAB functionalized graphene oxide/multiwalled carbon nanotube composite modified electrode for the simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, dopamine, uric acid and nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu Jun; Li, Weikun

    2014-06-15

    We have developed hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) functionalized graphene oxide (GO)/multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) modified glassy carbon electrode (CTAB-GO/MWNT) as a novel system for the simultaneous determination of dopamine (DA), ascorbic acid (AA), uric acid (UA) and nitrite (NO2(-)). The combination of graphene oxide and MWNTs endow the biosensor with large surface area, good biological compatibility, electricity and stability, high selectivity and sensitivity. In the fourfold co-existence system, the linear calibration plots for AA, DA, UA and NO2(-) were obtained over the range of 5.0-300 μM, 5.0-500 μM, 3.0-60 μM and 5.0-800 μM with detection limits of 1.0 μM, 1.5 μM, 1.0 μM and 1.5 μM, respectively. In addition, the modified biosensor was applied to the determination of AA, DA, UA and NO2(-) in urine samples by using standard adding method with satisfactory results.

  20. Predicting the Responses of Soil Nitrite-Oxidizers to Multi-Factorial Global Change: A Trait-Based Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Roux, Xavier; Bouskill, Nicholas J.; Niboyet, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    Soil microbial diversity is huge and a few grams of soil contain more bacterial taxa than there are bird species on Earth. This high diversity often makes predicting the responses of soil bacteria to environmental change intractable and restricts our capacity to predict the responses of soil func...

  1. 21 CFR 181.34 - Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. 181.34...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.34 Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. Sodium nitrite and potassium... fixatives and preservative agents, with or without sodium or potassium nitrate, in the curing of red...

  2. Diverse manganese(II)-oxidizing bacteria are prevalent in drinking water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Daniel N; Pinto, Ameet; Anantharaman, Karthik; Ruberg, Steven A; Kramer, Eva L; Raskin, Lutgarde; Dick, Gregory J

    2016-12-09

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are highly reactive minerals that influence the speciation, mobility, bioavailability and toxicity of a wide variety of organic and inorganic compounds. Although Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria are known to catalyze the formation of Mn oxides, little is known about the organisms responsible for Mn oxidation in situ, especially in engineered environments. Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria are important in drinking water systems, including in biofiltration and water distribution systems. Here, we used cultivation dependent and independent approaches to investigate Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria in drinking water sources, a treatment plant and associated distribution system. We isolated 29 strains of Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria and found that highly similar 16S rRNA gene sequences were present in all culture-independent datasets and dominant in the studied drinking water treatment plant. These results highlight a potentially important role for Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria in drinking water systems, where biogenic Mn oxides may affect water quality in terms of aesthetic appearance, speciation of metals and oxidation of organic and inorganic compounds. Deciphering the ecology of these organisms and the factors that regulate their Mn(II)-oxidizing activity could yield important insights into how microbial communities influence the quality of drinking water.

  3. Bidirectional catalysis by copper-containing nitrite reductase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijma, HJ; Canters, GW; de Vries, S; Verbeet, MP

    2004-01-01

    The copper-containing nitrite reductase from Alcaligenes faecalis S-6 was found to catalyze the oxidation of nitric oxide to nitrite, the reverse of its physiological reaction. Thermodynamic and kinetic constants with the physiological electron donor pseudoazurin were determined for both directions

  4. Nitrate and nitrite in biology, nutrition and therapeutics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lundberg, J.O.; van Faassen, E.E.H.; Gladwin, M.T.; Ahluwalia, A.; Benjamin, N.

    2009-01-01

    Inorganic nitrate and nitrite from endogenous or dietary sources are metabolized in vivo to nitric oxide (NO) and other bioactive nitrogen oxides. The nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway is emerging as an important mediator of blood flow regulation, cell signaling, energetics and tissue responses to hypoxia.

  5. Substrate and nutrient limitation of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in temperate forest soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.S. Norman; J.E. Barrett

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing microbes control the rate-limiting step of nitrification, a critical ecosystem process, which affects retention and mobility of nitrogen in soil ecosystems. This study investigated substrate (NH4þ) and nutrient (K and P) limitation of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) in temperate forest soils at Coweeta Hydrologic...

  6. A Two-Component Monooxygenase Catalyzes Both the Hydroxylation of p-Nitrophenol and the Oxidative Release of Nitrite from 4-Nitrocatechol in Bacillus sphaericus JS905

    OpenAIRE

    Kadiyala, Venkateswarlu; Spain, Jim C.

    1998-01-01

    Bacteria that metabolize p-nitrophenol (PNP) oxidize the substrate to 3-ketoadipic acid via either hydroquinone or 1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene (THB); however, initial steps in the pathway for PNP biodegradation via THB are unclear. The product of initial hydroxylation of PNP could be either 4-nitrocatechol or 4-nitroresorcinol. Here we describe the complete pathway for aerobic PNP degradation by Bacillus sphaericus JS905 that was isolated by selective enrichment from an agricultural soil in India...

  7. Comparative analysis of nitrite uptake and hemoglobin-nitrite reactions in erythrocytes: sorting out uptake mechanisms and oxygenation dependencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank Bo; Rohde, Sabina

    2010-01-01

    Nitrite uptake into red blood cells (RBCs) precedes its intracellular reactions with hemoglobin (Hb) that forms nitric oxide (NO) during hypoxia. We investigated the uptake of nitrite and its reactions with Hb at different oxygen saturations (So2), using RBCs with (carp and rabbit) and without...... (hagfish and lamprey) anion exchanger-1 (AE1) in the membrane, with the aim to unravel the mechanisms and oxygenation dependencies of nitrite transport. Added nitrite rapidly diffused into the RBCs until equilibrium. The distribution ratio of nitrite across the membrane agreed with that expected from HNO2...... diffusion and AE1-mediated facilitated NO2- diffusion. Participation of HNO2 diffusion was emphasized by rapid transmembrane nitrite equilibration also in the natural AE1 knockouts. Following the equilibration, nitrite was consumed by reacting with Hb, which created a continued inward diffusion controlled...

  8. Nitrification activity and community structure of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria in the bioreactors operated with addition of pharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraigher, Barbara, E-mail: barbara.kraigher@bf.uni-lj.si [University of Ljubljana, Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Food Science and Technology, Chair of Microbiology, Vecna pot 111, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Mandic-Mulec, Ines [University of Ljubljana, Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Food Science and Technology, Chair of Microbiology, Vecna pot 111, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2011-04-15

    Pharmaceuticals represent a group of the new emerging contaminants, which might influence microbial communities in the activated sludge. Nitrification activity and Nitrospira community structure in the small-scale reactors supplied with different concentrations (0, 50, 200, 500 {mu}g L{sup -1}) of the selected pharmaceuticals (ibuprofen, naproxen, ketoprofen, diclofenac and clofibric acid) were evaluated. Ammonia removal was not influenced by selected pharmaceuticals. However, in the two reactors operated with 50 {mu}g L{sup -1} of pharmaceuticals (R50 and R50P), the effluent concentration of N-(NO{sub 2}{sup -} + NO{sub 3}{sup -}) was significantly higher than in the other reactors. Nitrospira community structure was assessed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and by cloning and sequencing of the partial genes for 16S rRNA. Nitrospira spp. were detected in all reactors. The two dominant T-RFs represented the sublineages I and II of the genus Nitrospira. Main shifts were observed in the reactors R50 and R50P, where the T-RF representing sublineage II was much higher as compared to the other reactors. Consistent with this, the Nitrospira sublineage II was detected only in the clone libraries from the reactors R50 and R50P. Our results suggest that the relative abundance of Nitrospira sublineage II could be related to the effluent N-(NO{sub 2}{sup -} + NO{sub 3}{sup -}) concentration.

  9. Granulation of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria for autotrophic denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weiming; Lu, Hui; Khanal, Samir K; Zhao, Qing; Meng, Liao; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2016-11-01

    Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) was successfully employed for effective autotrophic denitrification and sludge minimization in a full-scale application of saline sewage treatment in Hong Kong. In this study, a Granular Sludge Autotrophic Denitrification (GSAD) reactor was continuously operated over 600 days for SOB granulation, and to evaluate the long-term stability of SOB granules, microbial communities and denitrification efficacy. Sludge granulation initiated within the first 40 days of start-up with an average particle size of 186.4 μm and sludge volume index (SVI5) of 40 mL/g in 5 min. The sludge granules continued to grow reaching a nearly uniform size of mean diameter 1380 ± 20 μm with SVI5 of 30 mL/g during 600 days of GSAD reactor operation at hydraulic retention time of 5 h and nitrate loading rate of 0.33 kg-N/m(3)/d. The GSAD reactor with SOB granular sludge achieved 93.7 ± 2.1% nitrogen and complete sulfide removal with low sludge yield of 0.15 g-volatile suspended solids (VSS)/g-N, and much lower nitrous oxide (N2O) emission than the heterotrophic denitrifying process. Microbial community analysis using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique revealed that granules were enriched with SOB contributing to autotrophic denitrification. Furthermore, 16S rRNA analysis showed diverse autotrophic denitrification related genera, namely Thiobacillus (32.6%), Sulfurimonas (31.3%), and Arcobacter (0.01%), accounting for 63.9% of total operational taxonomic units at the generic level. No heterotrophic denitrification related genera were detected. The results from this study could provide useful design and operating conditions with respect to SOB sludge granulation and its subsequent application in a full-scale autotrophic denitrification in the Sulfate reduction-Autotrophic denitrification-Nitrification Integrated (SANI) process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Communities of sediment ammonia-oxidizing bacteria along a coastal pollution gradient in the East China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Manhua; Xiong, Jinbo; Wang, Kai; Ye, Xiansen; Ye, Ran; Wang, Qiong; Hu, Changju; Zhang, Demin

    2014-09-15

    Anthropogenic nitrogen (N) discharges has caused eutrophication in coastal zones. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) convert ammonia to nitrite and play important roles in N transformation. Here, we used pyrosequencing based on the amoA gene to investigate the response of the sediment AOB community to an N pollution gradient in the East China Sea. The results showed that AOB assemblages were primarily affiliated with Nitrosospira-like lineages, and only 0.4% of those belonged to Nitrosomonas-like lineage. The Nitrosospira-like lineage was separated into four clusters that were most similar to the sediment AOB communities detected in adjacent marine regions. Additionally, one clade was out grouped from the AOB lineages, which shared the high similarities with pmoA gene. The AOB community structures substantially changed along the pollution gradient, which were primarily shaped by NH4(+)-N, NO3(-)-N, SO4(2)(-)-S, TP and Eh. These results demonstrated that coastal pollution could dramatically influence AOB communities, which, in turn, may change ecosystem function.

  11. Production and mitigation of N2O in sequentially membrane-aerated redox-stratified nitritation/anammox biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smets, Barth F.; Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles; Thamdrup, Bo;

    Combining partial nitritation with anaerobic ammonium oxidation maybe a cost- and energy-efficient alternative to remove reduced nitrogen from nitrogen rich waste streams. However, increased N2O emissions (upto several % of the incoming N flux) have been observed for reactors performing partial......) conditions. Although anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria are not known to metabolize N2O, we speculate that the existence of oxygen free zone would permit complete expression ofa denitrification pathway by heterotrophic bacteria- and hence remove any N2O which is transiently produced in the inner (aerobic...

  12. Core-shell heterostructured multiwalled carbon nanotubes@reduced graphene oxide nanoribbons/chitosan, a robust nanobiocomposite for enzymatic biosensing of hydrogen peroxide and nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Veerappan; Govindasamy, Mani; Chen, Shen-Ming; Chen, Tse-Wei; Kumar, Annamalai Senthil; Huang, Sheng-Tung

    2017-09-19

    A robust nanobiocomposite based on core-shell heterostructured multiwalled carbon nanotubes@reduced graphene oxide nanoribbons (MWCNTs@rGONRs)/chitosan (CHIT) was described for the fabrication of sensitive, selective, reproducible and durable biosensor for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitrite (NO2(-)). The excellent physicochemical properties of MWCNTs@rGONRs such as, presence of abundant oxygen functionalities, higher area-normalized edge-plane structures and chemically active sites in combination with excellent biocompatibility of CHIT resulting in the versatile immobilization matrix for myoglobin (Mb). The most attractive property of MWCNTs@rGONRs which distinguishes it from other members of graphene family is its rich edge density and edge defects that are highly beneficial for constructing enzymatic biosensors. The direct electron transfer characteristics such as, redox properties, amount of immobilized active Mb, electron transfer efficiency and durability were studied. Being as good immobilization matrix, MWCNTs@rGONRs/CHIT is also an excellent signal amplifier which helped in achieving low detection limits to quantify H2O2 (1 nM) and NO2(-) (10 nM). The practical feasibility of the biosensor was successfully validated in contact lens cleaning solution and meat sample.

  13. Immobilization of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria by polyvinyl alcohol and sodium alginate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yuwei; Zhang, Yanqiu; Tu, Baojun

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria were immobilized by polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and sodium alginate. The immobilization conditions and ammonia oxidation ability of the immobilized bacteria were investigated. The following immobilization conditions were observed to be optimal: PVA, 12%; sodium alginate, 1.1%; calcium chloride, 1.0%; inoculum concentration, 1.3 immobilized balls/mL of immobilized medium; pH, 10; and temperature, 30°C. The immobilized ammonia-oxidizing bacteria exhibited strong ammonia oxidation ability even after being recycled four times. The ammonia nitrogen removal rate of the immobilized ammonia-oxidizing bacteria reached 90.30% under the optimal immobilization conditions. When compared with ammonia-oxidizing bacteria immobilized by sodium alginate alone, the bacteria immobilized by PVA and sodium alginate were superior with respect to pH resistance, the number of reuses, material cost, heat resistance, and ammonia oxidation ability. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria in Biofilters Removing Trihalomethanes Are Related to Nitrosomonas oligotropha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrifying biofilters degrading the four regulated trihalomethanes (THMs) trichloromethane (TCM), bromodichloromethane (BDCM), dibromochloromethane (DBCM), and tribromomethane (TBM) -were analyzed for the presence and activity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). Biofilter perfor...

  15. Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria in Biofilters Removing Trihalomethanes Are Related to Nitrosomonas oligotropha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrifying biofilters degrading the four regulated trihalomethanes (THMs) trichloromethane (TCM), bromodichloromethane (BDCM), dibromochloromethane (DBCM), and tribromomethane (TBM) -were analyzed for the presence and activity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). Biofilter perfor...

  16. Niche partitioning of diverse sulfur-oxidizing bacteria at hydrothermal vents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dimitri V Meier; Petra Pjevac; Wolfgang Bach; Stephane Hourdez; Peter R Girguis; Charles Vidoudez; Rudolf Amann; Anke Meyerdierks

    2017-01-01

    .... Dense and highly diverse assemblies of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) are observed, yet the principles of niche differentiation between the different SOB across geochemical gradients remain poorly understood...

  17. Ammonia-oxidizing Bacteria and Archaea in the Rhizosphere of Freshwater Macrophytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Martina; Schramm, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    AMMONIA-OXIDIZING ARCHAEA AND BACTERIA IN THE RHIZOSPHERE OF FRESHWATER MACROPHYTES Martina Herrmann and Andreas Schramm Department of Biological Sciences, Microbiology, University of Aarhus, Denmark Aquatic macrophytes such as Littorella uniflora and Lobelia dortmanna release oxygen from...... measurements revealed clear differences in ammonia oxidation rates. The diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) was assessed using the ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) gene as functional marker. Both AOA and AOB could be detected in the rhizosphere of all three plant...

  18. Mechanisms and evolution of oxidative sulfur metabolism in green sulfur bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Lea Haarup; Bryant, Donald A.; Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik

    2011-01-01

    Green sulfur bacteria (GSB) constitute a closely related group of photoautotrophic and thiotrophic bacteria with limited phenotypic variation. They typically oxidize sulfide and thiosulfate to sulfate with sulfur globules as an intermediate. Based on genome sequence information from 15 strains......, the distribution and phylogeny of enzymes involved in their oxidative sulfur metabolism was investigated. At least one homolog of sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase (SQR) is present in all strains. In all sulfur-oxidizing GSB strains except the earliest diverging Chloroherpeton thalassium, the sulfide oxidation...... and SOX systems. Finally, based upon structural, biochemical, and phylogenetic analyses, a uniform nomenclature is suggested for sqr genes in prokaryotes....

  19. Detection, phylogeny and population dynamics of syntrophic propionate-oxidizing bacteria in anaerobic granular sludge.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmsen, H.J.M.

    1996-01-01

    The research described this thesis concerns the diversity and phylogeny of syntrophic propionate-oxidizing bacteria and their ecology in granular sludge, from which they were obtained. 16S rRNA was used as a molecular marker to study both the phylogeny and the ecology of these bacteria. Sequence ana

  20. Modelling the growth of methane-oxidizing bacteria in a fixed biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilbo, Carl Morten; Arvin, Erik; Holst, Helle

    1992-01-01

    Methane-oxidizing bacteria were grown in a fixed biofilm reactor in order to study their ability to degrade chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons. Focus is on the growth behaviour of the mixed culture. The growth is described by a model that includes methanotrophic bacteria in the active biomass...

  1. Detection, phylogeny and population dynamics of syntrophic propionate - oxidizing bacteria in anaerobic granular sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmsen, H.J.M.

    1996-01-01


    The research described this thesis concerns the diversity and phylogeny of syntrophic propionate-oxidizing bacteria and their ecology in granular sludge, from which they were obtained. 16S rRNA was used as a molecular marker to study both the phylogeny and the ecology of these bacteria.

  2. Detection, phylogeny and population dynamics of syntrophic propionate - oxidizing bacteria in anaerobic granular sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmsen, H.J.M.

    1996-01-01


    The research described this thesis concerns the diversity and phylogeny of syntrophic propionate-oxidizing bacteria and their ecology in granular sludge, from which they were obtained. 16S rRNA was used as a molecular marker to study both the phylogeny and the ecology of these bacteria. S

  3. A review of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in Chinese soils

    OpenAIRE

    Ji-Zheng eHe; Ju-Pei eShen; Li-Mei eZhang; Hong J eDi

    2012-01-01

    Ammonia (NH3) oxidation, the first and rate-limiting step of nitrification, is a key step in the global Nitrogen (N) cycle. Major advances have been made in recent years in our knowledge and understanding of the microbial communities involved in ammonia oxidation in a wide range of habitats, including Chinese agricultural soils. In this mini-review, we focus our attention on the distribution and community diversity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) in Chi...

  4. Nitrotoga is selected over Nitrospira in newly assembled biofilm communities from a tap water source community at increased nitrite loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinnunen, Marta; Gülay, Arda; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    a source community, present in the tap water, to determine the extent of selection and neutral processes in newly assembled biofilm communities at both the community and the functional guild (of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria, NOB) levels. The community composition of biofilms assembled under low and high...... that can only be interrogated by observing multiple assemblies under controlled conditions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  5. Measurements of nitrite production and nitrite-producing organisms in and around the primary nitrite maximum in the central California Current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Santoro

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Nitrite (NO2– is a substrate for both oxidative and reductive microbial metabolism. NO2– accumulates at the base of the euphotic zone in oxygenated, stratified open ocean water columns, forming a feature known as the primary nitrite maximum (PNM. Potential pathways of NO2– production include the oxidation of ammonia (NH3 by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria or archaea and assimilatory nitrate (NO3– reduction by phytoplankton or heterotrophic bacteria. Measurements of NH3 oxidation and NO3– reduction to NO2– were conducted at two stations in the central California Current in the eastern North Pacific to determine the relative contributions of these processes to NO2– production in the PNM. Sensitive (−1, high-resolution measurements of [NH4+] and [NO2–] indicated a persistent NH4+ maximum overlying the PNM at every station, with concentrations as high as 1.5 μmol L−1. Within and just below the PNM, NH3 oxidation was the dominant NO2– producing process with rates of NH3 oxidation of up to 50 nmol L−1 d−1, coinciding with high abundances of ammonia-oxidizing archaea. Though little NO2– production from NO3– was detected, potentially nitrate-reducing phytoplankton (photosynthetic picoeukaryotes, Synechococcus, and Prochlorococcus were present at the depth of the PNM. Rates of NO2– production from NO3– were highest within the upper mixed layer (4.6 nmol L−1 d−1 but were either below detection limits or 10 times lower than NH3 oxidation rates around the PNM. One-dimensional modeling of water column NO2– profiles supported direct rate measurements of a net biological sink for NO2– just below the PNM. Residence time estimates of NO2– within the PNM were similar at the mesotrophic and oligotrophic stations and ranged from 150–205 d. Our results suggest the PNM is a dynamic, rather than relict, feature with a source term dominated by ammonia oxidation.

  6. Computer-assisted electrochemical fabrication of a highly selective and sensitive amperometric nitrite sensor based on surface decoration of electrochemically reduced graphene oxide nanosheets with CoNi bimetallic alloy nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gholivand, Mohammad-Bagher, E-mail: mbgholivand2013@gmail.com [Faculty of Chemistry, Razi University, Kermanshah 671496734 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jalalvand, Ali R. [Faculty of Chemistry, Razi University, Kermanshah 671496734 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Laboratorio de Desarrollo Analítico y Quimiometría (LADAQ), Cátedra de Química Analítica I, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Ciudad Universitaria, CC 242 (S3000ZAA), Santa Fe (Argentina); Goicoechea, Hector C. [Laboratorio de Desarrollo Analítico y Quimiometría (LADAQ), Cátedra de Química Analítica I, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Ciudad Universitaria, CC 242 (S3000ZAA), Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2014-07-01

    For the first time, a novel, robust and very attractive statistical experimental design (ED) using minimum-run equireplicated resolution IV factorial design (Min-Run Res IV FD) coupled with face centered central composite design (FCCCD) and Derringer's desirability function (DF) was developed to fabricate a highly selective and sensitive amperometric nitrite sensor based on electrodeposition of CoNi bimetallic alloy nanoparticles (NPs) on electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) nanosheets. The modifications were characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopic (EDS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. The CoNi bimetallic alloy NPs were characterized using digital image processing (DIP) for particle counting (density estimation) and average diameter measurement. Under the identified optimal conditions, the novel sensor detects nitrite in concentration ranges of 0.1–30.0 μM and 30.0–330.0 μM with a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.05 μM. This sensor selectively detects nitrite even in the presence of high concentration of common ions and biological interferents therefore, we found that the sensor is highly selective. The sensor also demonstrated an excellent operational stability and good antifouling properties. The proposed sensor was used to the determination of nitrite in several foodstuff and water samples. - Highlights: • Eight variables were screened by Min Run Res IV FD to identify the key variables. • Mathematical models for the two studied responses were developed by FCCCD. • By using DF the responses were optimized simultaneously. • The SEM image of the modified electrode was processed by digital image processing. • The sensor was successfully applied to determination of nitrite in real samples.

  7. Conversion of cropland to forest increases soil CH4 oxidation and abundance of CH4 oxidizing bacteria with stand age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bárcena, Teresa G; D'Imperio, Ludovica; Gundersen, Per

    2014-01-01

    -oxidizing bacteria (MOB) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA) based on quantitative PCR (qPCR) on pmoA and amoA genes. Our study showed that CH4 oxidation rates and the abundance of MOB increased simultaneously with time since afforestation, suggesting that the methanotrophic activity is reflected...... in the abundance of this functional group. The development of forest soils resulted in increased soil organic carbon and reduced bulk density, and these were the two variables that most strongly related to CH4 oxidation rates in the forest soils. For the top mineral soil layer (0–5 cm) CH4 oxidation rates did...... not differ between even aged stands from oak and larch, and were significantly smaller under Norway spruce. Compared to the other tree species Norway spruce caused a decrease in the abundance of MOB over time that could explain the decreased oxidation rates. However, the cause for the lower abundance remains...

  8. Signatures of Conformational Stability and Oxidation Resistance in Proteomes of Pathogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Vidovic

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Protein oxidation is known to compromise vital cellular functions. Therefore, invading pathogenic bacteria must resist damage inflicted by host defenses via reactive oxygen species. Using comparative genomics and experimental approaches, we provide multiple lines of evidence that proteins from pathogenic bacteria have acquired resistance to oxidative stress by an increased conformational stability. Representative pathogens exhibited higher survival upon HSP90 inhibition and a less-oxidation-prone proteome. A proteome signature of the 46 pathogenic bacteria encompasses 14 physicochemical features related to increasing protein conformational stability. By purifying ten representative proteins, we demonstrate in vitro that proteins with a pathogen-like signature are more resistant to oxidative stress as a consequence of their increased conformational stability. A compositional signature of the pathogens’ proteomes allowed the design of protein fragments more resilient to both unfolding and carbonylation, validating the relationship between conformational stability and oxidability with implications for synthetic biology and antimicrobial strategies.

  9. Study on the application of reduced graphene oxide and multiwall carbon nanotubes hybrid materials for simultaneous determination of catechol, hydroquinone, p-cresol and nitrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu Fangxin [Education Ministry Key Laboratory on Luminescence and Real-Time Analysis, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Chen Shihong, E-mail: cshong@swu.edu.cn [Education Ministry Key Laboratory on Luminescence and Real-Time Analysis, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Wang Chengyan [Education Ministry Key Laboratory on Luminescence and Real-Time Analysis, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Yuan Ruo, E-mail: yuanruo@swu.edu.cn [Education Ministry Key Laboratory on Luminescence and Real-Time Analysis, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Yuan Dehua; Wang Cun [Education Ministry Key Laboratory on Luminescence and Real-Time Analysis, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China)

    2012-04-29

    Graphical abstract: In this paper, the reduced graphene oxide and multiwall carbon nanotubes hybrid materials (RGO-MWNTs) were prepared and a novel strategy for the simultaneous determination of multiple environmental contaminations has been proposed on the basis of RGO-MWNTs hybrid materials modified electrode. The hybrid materials were characterized by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and N{sub 2} sorption-desorption isotherms. Due to the excellent catalytic activity, enhanced electrical conductivity, high surface area and porous structure of the RGO-MWNTs, the RGO-MWNTs/GCE achieved the simultaneous measurement of hydroquinone (HQ), catechol (CC), p-cresol (PC) and nitrite (NO{sub 2}{sup -}) with well-separate four peaks. Scheme 1a illuminated the preparation process of the RGO-MWNTs hybrid materials. Scheme 1b explains the electron mediating properties of RGO-MWNTs/GCE towards the oxidation of HQ, CC, PC and NO{sub 2}{sup -}. Scheme 1c presented the SEM image of RGO-MWNTs hybrid materials. Scheme 1d and e showed the 2D and 3D AFM images of RGO-MWNTs films, respectively. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The novel RGO-MWNTs hybrid materials were synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The simultaneous detection of four environmental contaminations was achieved. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SEM, AFM, XPS was employed to characterize the RGO-MWNTs hybrid materials. - Abstract: In this paper, the reduced graphene oxide and multiwall carbon nanotubes hybrid materials (RGO-MWNTs) were prepared and a strategy for detecting environmental contaminations was proposed on the basis of RGO-MWNTs modified electrode. The hybrid materials were characterized by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and N{sub 2} sorption-desorption isotherms. Due to the excellent catalytic activity, enhanced electrical conductivity and high

  10. Chemical behaviors of different arsenic-bearing sulphides bio-oxidated by thermophilic bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Hong-ying; GONG En-pu; YANG Li-li; WANG Da-wen

    2005-01-01

    The study on arsenopyrite and realgar of bacterial oxidation shows that the chemical behaviors of different arsenic-bearing sulphides oxidated by thermophilic bacteria are quite distinct. Arsenopyrite is active and quickly eroded in bacteria-bearing solution. With a high leaching rate over 95%, the arsenopyrite phase cannot be detected by X-ray diffraction(XRD). Arsenopyrite is highly toxic to bacteria that at the initial stage of bio-oxidation, bacterial growth is inhibited and the number of bacterium cell drops from 2.26 × 108/mL to the lowest 2.01 × 105/mL. At the later stages of bio-oxidation, bacteria grow fast and reach 2.23 × 108/mL. Comparably, realgar is inertial and resistive to bacterial corrosion and oxidation. Arsenic in realgar crystal is hard to be leached and the residue is still realgar phase, as indicated by XRD. The cell number of bacteria varies a little, decreasing from 2.26 × 108/mL to 2.01 × 107/mL, during the bacterial oxidation. The results show that the crystal structure and arsenic valency of arsenic-bearing sulphides play a vital role during the leaching process of bacterial oxidation.

  11. [Quantitative and qualitative analysis of total bacteria and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in Buji River in wet season].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hai-mei; Bai, Jiao-jiao; Sun, Wei-ling; Shao, Jun

    2012-08-01

    Microbial community structure and biomass in river water can reflect the situation of water quality in some extent. Nitrogen removal was mainly achieved by the nitrification and denitrification processes, and ammonia oxidation catalyzed by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) is the first and rate-limiting step of nitrification. To explore the AOB community structure and biomass in nitrogen polluted river, water samples were collected from Buji River (Shenzhen) in wet season. Quantification of 16S rRNA copy numbers of total bacteria and AOB were performed by real-time PCR, and the microbial community structures were studied by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The results showed that the number of total bacterial 16S rRNA changed from 4.73 x 10(10) - 3.90 x 10(11) copies x L(-1) in the water samples. The copy numbers of AOB varied from 5.44 x 10(6) - 5.96 x 10(8)copies x L(-1). Redundancy discrimination analysis (RDA) showed that the main factors affecting the structure and the numbers of bacteria were different. For total bacteria, nitrate influenced the biomass significantly (P analysis showed that water pollution in downstream resulted in evident difference in microbial community structure between upstream and downstream water samples.

  12. Isolation and Identification of Lactic Acid Bacteria of Degradation of Nitrite%降解亚硝酸盐乳酸菌的分离与鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩梅; 王衍强; 彭帅; 崔艺久; 王悦

    2011-01-01

    Isolated Lactobacillus from water was used to degrade nitrite. The strains wyq-1, wyq-2 and wyq-3 were identified by the characteristics of morphology, physiology and biochemistrytests and 16S rRNA sequence was analysed by molecular biological method. The degradation nitritea ability was based on GB/T 5009.33-2008. The three strains were identified as Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus plantarum. The degradation nitritea ability was detected in the hemoglobin MRS liquid medium and pork medium, the degradation rate of wyq-3 was 87.0% and 69.4%. Nitritea in meat products can be degradated well by Lactobacillus.%从水体中分离能够降解亚硝酸盐的乳酸菌.参照《伯杰细菌鉴定手册》对分离出的wyq-1、wyq-2和wyq-3株菌进行生理生化特性鉴定,并利用分子生物学方法进行16SrRNA序列分析,参照国家标准方法GB/T 5009.33-2008中的格里斯比色法测定降解亚硝酸盐的能力.结果表明:3株菌均为乳杆菌属( Lactobacillus),wyq-1为发酵乳杆菌(Lactobacillus fermentum)、wyq-2为嗜酸乳杆菌(Lactobacillus acidophilus)、wyq-3为植物乳杆菌(Lactobacillus plantarum).对3株菌在添加血红素的MRS液体培养基中和猪肉培养基中降解亚硝酸盐的能力进行了测试,菌株wyq-3降解能力最好,降解率分别为87.0%和69.4%.研究结果表明用乳酸菌降解肉制品中的亚硝酸盐可以取得较好的效果.

  13. Ageing well: methane oxidation and methane oxidizing bacteria along a chronosequence of 2000 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Adrian; Lüke, Claudia; Cao, Zhihong; Frenzel, Peter

    2011-12-01

    Rice is the staple food for more than half of the world's growing population. While the area planted to wetland rice is expected to increase further, virtually nothing is known about the long-term development of the respective microbial communities, and how these might influence biogeochemistry. Focusing on methane oxidizing bacteria, we studied a chronosequence of paddy fields in China aged 50-2000 years. Potential methanotrophic activity increased substantially with age of soil. Community composition was relatively similar in all fields. However, growth and activity of one particular subgroup of methanotrophs correlated to soil age suggesting an intricate abiotic control on methanotrophs evolving with time. Our results demonstrate that continuous rice agriculture does not only shape the microbial community, but also modifies the micro-environment in a way enabling faster growth and higher activity of selected populations.

  14. Study on Synthesis of 1,2-Cyclohexanedione from Cyclohexanone Oxidized by Isopropyl Nitrite%亚硝酸异戊酯氧化环己酮制1,2-环己二酮的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王维; 李振斌; 顾运江; 刘迎新; 魏作君

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, 1,2-cyclohexanedione was synthesized through oxidization of cyclohexanone by isopropyl nitrite in acidic medium. The effects of the ratio of isopropyl nitrite and cyclohexanone, and the concentration of H2SO4 and cyclohexanone on the reaction were investigated. Under the optimized reaction conditions, the yield of 1,2-cyclohexanedione reached 76%.%研究了酸性环境下亚硝酸异戊酯氧化环己酮合成1,2-环己二酮的反应。通过优化亚硝酸异戊酯与环己酮的比例,硫酸浓度以及原料的浓度等条件,使得1,2-环己二酮的收率达到76%。

  15. Contributions of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria to nitrification in Oregon forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xinda Lu; Peter J. Bottomley; David D. Myrold

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia oxidation, the first step of nitrification, is mediated by both ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB); however, the relative contributions of AOA and AOB to soil nitrification are not well understood. In this study we used 1-octyne to discriminate between AOA-and AOB-supported nitrifi-cation determined both in soil-water slurries and in unsaturated...

  16. Determination of nitric oxide metabolites, nitrate and nitrite, in Anopheles culicifacies mosquito midgut and haemolymph by anion exchange high-performance liquid chromatography: plausible mechanism of refractoriness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adak Tridibesh

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The diverse physiological and pathological role of nitric oxide in innate immune defenses against many intra and extracellular pathogens, have led to the development of various methods for determining nitric oxide (NO synthesis. NO metabolites, nitrite (NO2- and nitrate (NO3- are produced by the action of an inducible Anopheles culicifacies NO synthase (AcNOS in mosquito mid-guts and may be central to anti-parasitic arsenal of these mosquitoes. Method While exploring a plausible mechanism of refractoriness based on nitric oxide synthase physiology among the sibling species of An. culicifacies, a sensitive, specific and cost effective high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC method was developed, which is not influenced by the presence of biogenic amines, for the determination of NO2- and NO3- from mosquito mid-guts and haemolymph. Results This method is based on extraction, efficiency, assay reproducibility and contaminant minimization. It entails de-proteinization by centrifugal ultra filtration through ultracel 3 K filter and analysis by high performance anion exchange liquid chromatography (Sphereclone, 5 μ SAX column with UV detection at 214 nm. The lower detection limit of the assay procedure is 50 pmoles in all midgut and haemolymph samples. Retention times for NO2- and NO3- in standards and in mid-gut samples were 3.42 and 4.53 min. respectively. Assay linearity for standards ranged between 50 nM and 1 mM. Recoveries of NO2- and NO3- from spiked samples (1–100 μM and from the extracted standards (1–100 μM were calculated to be 100%. Intra-assay and inter assay variations and relative standard deviations (RSDs for NO2- and NO3- in spiked and un-spiked midgut samples were 5.7% or less. Increased levels NO2- and NO3- in midguts and haemolymph of An. culicifacies sibling species B in comparison to species A reflect towards a mechanism of refractoriness based on AcNOS physiology. Conclusion HPLC is a sensitive

  17. NEW TRENDS IN AMMONIA NITROGEN REMOVAL FROM WASTEWATER: NITRITATION – ANAMMOX AT LOW TEMPERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Tomaszewski

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Partial nitrification (nitritation – anammox (anaerobic ammonia oxidation process is increasingly used to treat wastewater, characterized by a high nitrogen content and high temperature (25 - 40°C. It is connected with the optimal temperature of anammox bacteria, which is at the range between 30 and 40°C. Mainstream application of anammox for the municipal wastewater, characterized by lower temperature seems to be one of the most challenging, but profitable process. Thenceforth, the research performed in the field of the nitritation – anammox at low temperature (10 - 20°C become more and more intense. Compared with the conventional nitrification – denitrification system, nitritation – anammox reduces oxygen demand, eliminates the need for organic carbon source and produces less excess sludge. As a result, it allows to a significant cost reduction. This paper reviews the most important and recent information in the field of nitritation – anammox process at low temperature. Effective nitrogen removal from the municipal wastewater was demonstrated at 15°C in a pilot scale and at 12°C in a laboratory scale reactor. The best performance is achieved in sequencing batch reactors and moving bed reactors with biofilm or granular biomass, as well as combinations of these technologies. Molecular biology studies shows that anammox bacteria of the genus Candidatus Brocadia may have the biggest predispositions to adapt to low temperature. However, temperature about 10°C, time and method of biomass adaptation are still the main challenges for stable and common nitritation – anammox process.

  18. Ammonia-oxidizing Bacteria and Archaea in the Rhizosphere of Freshwater Macrophytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Martina; Schramm, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    measurements revealed clear differences in ammonia oxidation rates. The diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) was assessed using the ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) gene as functional marker. Both AOA and AOB could be detected in the rhizosphere of all three plant......AMMONIA-OXIDIZING ARCHAEA AND BACTERIA IN THE RHIZOSPHERE OF FRESHWATER MACROPHYTES Martina Herrmann and Andreas Schramm Department of Biological Sciences, Microbiology, University of Aarhus, Denmark Aquatic macrophytes such as Littorella uniflora and Lobelia dortmanna release oxygen from......-specific microbial community distinct from that of unvegetated sediment and (ii) that aquatic macrophytes have an impact on abundance and activity of nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria in freshwater sediment. The goal of this study was to test these hypotheses for the key functional group for coupled nitrification...

  19. Nebulization of the acidified sodium nitrite formulation attenuates acute hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surber Mark W

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Generalized hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV occurring during exposure to hypoxia is a detrimental process resulting in an increase in lung vascular resistance. Nebulization of sodium nitrite has been shown to inhibit HPV. The aim of this project was to investigate and compare the effects of nebulization of nitrite and different formulations of acidified sodium nitrite on acute HPV. Methods Ex vivo isolated rabbit lungs perfused with erythrocytes in Krebs-Henseleit buffer (adjusted to 10% hematocrit and in vivo anesthetized catheterized rabbits were challenged with periods of hypoxic ventilation alternating with periods of normoxic ventilation. After baseline hypoxic challenges, vehicle, sodium nitrite or acidified sodium nitrite was delivered via nebulization. In the ex vivo model, pulmonary arterial pressure and nitric oxide concentrations in exhaled gas were monitored. Nitrite and nitrite/nitrate were measured in samples of perfusion buffer. Pulmonary arterial pressure, systemic arterial pressure, cardiac output and blood gases were monitored in the in vivo model. Results In the ex vivo model, nitrite nebulization attenuated HPV and increased nitric oxide concentrations in exhaled gas and nitrite concentrations in the perfusate. The acidified forms of sodium nitrite induced higher levels of nitric oxide in exhaled gas and had longer vasodilating effects compared to nitrite alone. All nitrite formulations increased concentrations of circulating nitrite to the same degree. In the in vivo model, inhaled nitrite inhibited HPV, while pulmonary arterial pressure, cardiac output and blood gases were not affected. All nitrite formulations had similar potency to inhibit HPV. The tested concentration of appeared tolerable. Conclusion Nitrite alone and in acidified forms effectively and similarly attenuates HPV. However, acidified nitrite formulations induce a more pronounced increase in nitric oxide exhalation.

  20. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea have more important role than ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in ammonia oxidation of strongly acidic soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-Mei; Hu, Hang-Wei; Shen, Ju-Pei; He, Ji-Zheng

    2012-05-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrated the involvement of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) in the global nitrogen cycle, but the relative contributions of AOA and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) to ammonia oxidation are still in debate. Previous studies suggest that AOA would be more adapted to ammonia-limited oligotrophic conditions, which seems to be favored by protonation of ammonia, turning into ammonium in low-pH environments. Here, we investigated the autotrophic nitrification activity of AOA and AOB in five strongly acidic soils (pHnitrification inhibitor dicyandiamide (DCD) completely inhibited the nitrification activity and CO(2) fixation by AOA, accompanied by decreasing thaumarchaeal amoA gene abundance. Bacterial amoA gene abundance decreased in all microcosms irrespective of DCD addition, and mostly showed no correlation with nitrate concentrations. Phylogenetic analysis of thaumarchaeal amoA gene and 16S rRNA gene revealed active (13)CO(2)-labeled AOA belonged to groups 1.1a-associated and 1.1b. Taken together, these results provided strong evidence that AOA have a more important role than AOB in autotrophic ammonia oxidation in strongly acidic soils.

  1. Simultaneous nitritation-denitritation for the treatment of high-strength nitrogen in hypersaline wastewater by aerobic granular sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsino, Santo Fabio; Capodici, Marco; Morici, Claudia; Torregrossa, Michele; Viviani, Gaspare

    2016-01-01

    Fish processing industries produce wastewater containing high amounts of salt, organic matter and nitrogen. Biological treatment of such wastewaters could be problematic due to inhibitory effects exerted by high salinity levels. In detail, high salt concentrations lead to the accumulation of nitrite due to the inhibition of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. The feasibility of performing simultaneous nitritation and denitritation in the treatment of fish canning wastewater by aerobic granular sludge was evaluated, and simultaneous nitritation-denitritation was successfully sustained at salinities up to 50 gNaCl L(-1), with a yield of over 90%. The total nitrogen concentration in the effluent was less than 10 mg L(-1) at salinities up to 50 gNaCl L(-1). Nitritation collapsed above 50 gNaCl L(-1), and then, the only nitrogen removal mechanism was represented by heterotrophic synthesis. In contrast, organic matter removal was not affected by salinity but was instead affected by the organic loading rate (OLR). Both COD and BOD removal efficiencies were over 90%. The COD fractionation analysis indicated that aerobic granules were able to remove more than 95% of the particulate organic matter. Finally, results obtained in this work noted that aerobic granular sludge had an excellent ability to adapt under adverse environmental conditions.

  2. The role of inoculum and reactor configuration for microbial community composition and dynamics in mainstream partial nitritation anammox reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Shelesh; Karst, Søren M; Gilbert, Eva M; Horn, Harald; Nielsen, Per H; Lackner, Susanne

    2017-03-10

    Implementation of partial nitritation anammox (PNA) in the mainstream (municipal wastewater treatment) is still under investigation. Microbial community structure and reactor type can influence the performance of PNA reactor; yet, little is known about the role of the community composition of the inoculum and the reactor configuration under mainstream conditions. Therefore, this study investigated the community structure of inocula of different origin and their consecutive community dynamics in four different lab-scale PNA reactors with 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. These reactors were operated for almost 1 year and subjected to realistic seasonal temperature fluctuations as in moderate climate regions, that is, from 20°C in summer to 10°C in winter. The sequencing analysis revealed that the bacterial community in the reactors comprised: (1) a nitrifying community (consisting of anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AnAOB), ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB)); (2) different heterotrophic denitrifying bacteria and other putative heterotrophic bacteria (HB). The nitrifying community was the same in all four reactors at the genus level, although the biomasses were of different origin. Community dynamics revealed a stable community in the moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBR) in contrast to the sequencing batch reactors (SBR) at the genus level. Moreover, the reactor design seemed to influence the community dynamics, and reactor operation significantly influenced the overall community composition. The MBBR seems to be the reactor type of choice for mainstream wastewater treatment.

  3. Oxidative Stress Parameters in Saliva and Its Association with Periodontal Disease and Types of Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Manuel Almerich-Silla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the association between oxidative stress parameters with periodontal disease, bleeding, and the presence of different periodontal bacteria. Methods. A cross-sectional study in a sample of eighty-six patients, divided into three groups depending on their periodontal status. Thirty-three with chronic periodontitis, sixteen with gingivitis, and thirty-seven with periodontal healthy as control. Oxidative stress biomarkers (8-OHdG and MDA, total antioxidant capacity (TAOC, and the activity of two antioxidant enzymes (GPx and SOD were determined in saliva. Subgingival plaque samples were obtained from the deepest periodontal pocket and PCR was used to determine the presence of the 6 fimA genotypes of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola. Results. Periodontal disease was found to be associated with increased oxidative stress parameter levels. These levels rose according to the number and type of different periodontal bacteria found in the periodontal pockets. The presence of different types of periodontal bacteria is predictive independent variables in linear regresion models of oxidative stress parameters as dependent variable, above all 8-OHdG. Conclusions. Oxidative stress parameter levels are correlated with the presence of different types of bacteria. Determination of these levels and periodontal bacteria could be a potent tool for controlling periodontal disease development.

  4. Conversion of cropland to forest increases soil CH4 oxidation and abundance of CH4 oxidizing bacteria with stand age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bárcena, Teresa G; D'Imperio, Ludovica; Gundersen, Per

    2014-01-01

    -oxidizing bacteria (MOB) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA) based on quantitative PCR (qPCR) on pmoA and amoA genes. Our study showed that CH4 oxidation rates and the abundance of MOB increased simultaneously with time since afforestation, suggesting that the methanotrophic activity is reflected...

  5. Aggregate size and architecture determine biomass activity for one-stage partial nitritation and anammox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlaeminck, S.; Terada, Akihiko; Smets, Barth F.

    2010-01-01

    In partial nitritation/anammox systems, aerobic and anoxic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AerAOB and AnAOB) remove ammonium from wastewater. In this process, large granular microbial aggregates enhance the performance, but little is known about this type of granulation so far. In this study......, aggregates of three reactors (A, B, C) with different inoculation and operation were studied. The test objectives were to quantify the AerAOB and AnAOB abundance and the activity balance for the different aggregate sizes, and to relate aggregate morphology, size distribution, and architecture putatively...... to the inoculation and operation of the reactors. Fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) was applied on aggregate sections to quantify AerAOB and AnAOB, as well as to visualize the aggregate architecture. The activity balance of the aggregates was calculated as the nitrite accumulation rate ratio (NARR), i...

  6. Iron oxide deposits associated with the ectosymbiotic bacteria in the hydrothermal vent shrimp Rimicaris exoculata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Compère

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The Rimicaris exoculata shrimp is considered as a primary consumer that dominates the fauna of most Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR hydrothermal ecosystems. These shrimps harbour in their gill chambers an important ectosymbiotic community of chemoautotrophic bacteria associated with iron oxide deposits. The structure and elemental composition of the mineral concretions associated with these bacteria have been investigated by using LM, ESEM, TEM STEM and EDX microanalyses. The nature of the iron oxides in shrimps obtained from the Rainbow vent field has also been determined by Mössbauer spectroscopy. This multidisciplinary approach has revealed that the three layers of mineral crust in the Rimicaris exoculata shrimps consist of large concretions formed by aggregated nanoparticles of two-line ferrihydrite and include other minor elements as Si, Ca, Mg, S and P, probably present as silicates cations, sulphates or phosphates respectively that may contribute to stabilise the ferrihydrite form of iron oxides. TEM-observations on the bacteria have revealed their close interactions with these minerals. Abiotic and biotic precipitation could occur within the gill chamber of Rimicaris exoculata, suggesting the biologically-mediated formation of the iron oxide deposits. The difference of the bacterial density in the three-mineral crust layers could be correlated to the importance of the iron oxide concretions and suggest that the first mineral particles precipitates on the lower layer which could be considered as the most likely location of iron-oxidizing bacteria.

  7. High abundances of potentially active ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in oligotrophic, high-altitude lakes of the Sierra Nevada, California, USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curtis J Hayden

    Full Text Available Nitrification plays a central role in the nitrogen cycle by determining the oxidation state of nitrogen and its subsequent bioavailability and cycling. However, relatively little is known about the underlying ecology of the microbial communities that carry out nitrification in freshwater ecosystems--and particularly within high-altitude oligotrophic lakes, where nitrogen is frequently a limiting nutrient. We quantified ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA and bacteria (AOB in 9 high-altitude lakes (2289-3160 m in the Sierra Nevada, California, USA, in relation to spatial and biogeochemical data. Based on their ammonia monooxygenase (amoA genes, AOB and AOA were frequently detected. AOB were present in 88% of samples and were more abundant than AOA in all samples. Both groups showed >100 fold variation in abundance between different lakes, and were also variable through time within individual lakes. Nutrient concentrations (ammonium, nitrite, nitrate, and phosphate were generally low but also varied across and within lakes, suggestive of active internal nutrient cycling; AOB abundance was significantly correlated with phosphate (r(2 = 0.32, p<0.1, whereas AOA abundance was inversely correlated with lake elevation (r(2 = 0.43, p<0.05. We also measured low rates of ammonia oxidation--indicating that AOB, AOA, or both, may be biogeochemically active in these oligotrophic ecosystems. Our data indicate that dynamic populations of AOB and AOA are found in oligotrophic, high-altitude, freshwater lakes.

  8. Cultivation-independent detection of autotrophic hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria by DNA stable-isotope probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumphrey, Graham M; Ranchou-Peyruse, Anthony; Spain, Jim C

    2011-07-01

    Knallgas bacteria are a physiologically defined group that is primarily studied using cultivation-dependent techniques. Given that current cultivation techniques fail to grow most bacteria, cultivation-independent techniques that selectively detect and identify knallgas bacteria will improve our ability to study their diversity and distribution. We used stable-isotope probing (SIP) to identify knallgas bacteria in rhizosphere soil of legumes and in a microbial mat from Obsidian Pool in Yellowstone National Park. When samples were incubated in the dark, incorporation of (13)CO(2) was H(2) dependent. SIP enabled the detection of knallgas bacteria that were not detected by cultivation, and the majority of bacteria identified in the rhizosphere soils were betaproteobacteria predominantly related to genera previously known to oxidize hydrogen. Bacteria in soil grew on hydrogen at concentrations as low as 100 ppm. A hydB homolog encoding a putative high-affinity NiFe hydrogenase was amplified from (13)C-labeled DNA from both vetch and clover rhizosphere soil. The results indicate that knallgas bacteria can be detected by SIP and populations that respond to different H(2) concentrations can be distinguished. The methods described here should be applicable to a variety of ecosystems and will enable the discovery of additional knallgas bacteria that are resistant to cultivation.

  9. The role of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria Thiobacillus thiooxidans in pyrite weathering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, K.; Tsunekawa, M.; Ohtsuka, T.; Konno, H. [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan). Graduate School of Engineering

    1998-02-28

    The paper investigates the role of the sulfur-oxidizing bacteria Thiobacillus thiooxidans in pyrite weathering in order to clarify the effects of the bacteria on the dissolution behavior of pyrite and the formation of secondary minerals using Raman spectroscopy and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) in addition to solution analysis. It was found that T. thiooxidans, when present with the iron-oxidizing bacteria Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, enhanced the dissolution of Fe and S species for pyrite, whereas T. thiooxidans alone did not oxidize pyrite. Enhancement of the consumption of elemental sulfur and regeneration of Fe(II) ions were also observed with T. thiooxidans together with T. ferrooxidans, while this did not occur with T. ferrooxidans alone.

  10. Electron uptake by iron-oxidizing phototrophic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bose, A; Gardel, EJ; Vidoudez, C; Parra, EA; Girguis, PR

    2014-02-26

    Oxidation-reduction reactions underlie energy generation in nearly all life forms. Although most organisms use soluble oxidants and reductants, some microbes can access solid-phase materials as electron-acceptors or -donors via extracellular electron transfer. Many studies have focused on the reduction of solid-phase oxidants. Far less is known about electron uptake via microbial extracellular electron transfer, and almost nothing is known about the associated mechanisms. Here we show that the iron-oxidizing photoautotroph Rhodopseudomonas palustris TIE-1 accepts electrons from a poised electrode, with carbon dioxide as the sole carbon source/electron acceptor. Both electron uptake and ruBisCo form I expression are stimulated by light. Electron uptake also occurs in the dark, uncoupled from photosynthesis. Notably, the pioABC operon, which encodes a protein system essential for photoautotrophic growth by ferrous iron oxidation, influences electron uptake. These data reveal a previously unknown metabolic versatility of photoferrotrophs to use extracellular electron transfer for electron uptake.

  11. Molecular diversity of the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria community in disused tin-mining ponds located within Kampar, Perak, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sow, S L S; Khoo, G; Chong, L K; Smith, T J; Harrison, P L; Ong, H K A

    2014-02-01

    Disused tin-mining ponds make up a significant amount of water bodies in Malaysia particularly at the Kinta Valley in the state of Perak where tin-mining activities were the most extensive, and these abundantly available water sources are widely used in the field of aquaculture and agriculture. However, the natural ecology and physicochemical conditions of these ponds, many of which have been altered due to secondary post-mining activities, remains to be explored. As ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) are directly related to the nutrient cycles of aquatic environments and are useful bioindicators of environmental variations, the focus of this study was to identify AOBs associated with disused tin-mining ponds that have a history of different secondary activities in comparison to ponds which were left untouched and remained as part of the landscape. The 16S rDNA gene was used to detect AOBs in the sediment and water sampled from the three types of disused mining ponds, namely ponds without secondary activity, ponds that were used for lotus cultivation and post-aquaculture ponds. When the varying pond types were compared with the sequence and phylogenetic analysis of the AOB clone libraries, both Nitrosomonas and Nitrosospira-like AOB were detected though Nitrosospira spp. was seen to be the most ubiquitous AOB as it was present in all ponds types. However, AOBs were not detected in the sediments of idle ponds. Based on rarefaction analysis and diversity indices, the disused mining pond with lotus culture indicated the highest richness of AOBs. Canonical correspondence analysis indicated that among the physicochemical properties of the pond sites, TAN and nitrite were shown to be the main factors that influenced the community structure of AOBs in these disused tin-mining ponds.

  12. Visible light photoinactivation of bacteria by tungsten oxide nanostructures formed on a tungsten foil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghasempour, Fariba [Plasma Physics Research Centre, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, P.O. Box 147789-3855, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Azimirad, Rouhollah [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amini, Abbas [School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics, University of Western Sydney, Kingswood, NSW 2751 (Australia); Akhavan, Omid, E-mail: oakhavan@sharif.edu [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 14588-89694, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-05-30

    Highlights: • Synthesis of tungsten oxide nano/micro-structures on W foils using KOH as a catalyst. • Strong antibacterial activity of tungsten oxide nanorods under visible light irradiation. • Decrease in photoinactivation of bacteria on tungsten oxide nano/micro-rods doped by potassium. - Abstract: Antibacterial activity of tungsten oxide nanorods/microrods were studied against Escherichia coli bacteria under visible light irradiation and in dark. A two-step annealing process at temperatures up to 390 °C and 400–800 °C was applied to synthesize the tungsten oxide nanorods/microrods on tungsten foils using KOH as a catalyst. Annealing the foils at 400 °C in the presence of catalyst resulted in formation of tungsten oxide nanorods (with diameters of 50–90 nm and crystalline phase of WO{sub 3}) on surface of tungsten foils. By increasing the annealing temperature up to 800 °C, tungsten oxide microrods with K{sub 2}W{sub 6}O{sub 19} crystalline phase were formed on the foils. The WO{sub 3} nanorods showed a strong antibacterial property under visible light irradiation, corresponding to >92% bacterial inactivation within 24 h irradiation at room temperature, while the K{sub 2}W{sub 6}O{sub 19} microrods formed at 800 °C could inactivate only ∼45% of the bacteria at the same conditions.

  13. [Nitrate removal by a strain of nitrate-dependent Fe (II) -oxidizing bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Yu; Yang, Kai; Zhang, Qian; Ji, Bin; Chen, Dan; Sun, Yu-Chong; Tian, Jun

    2014-04-01

    A nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterial strain, named W5, was isolated from the sediment of the East Lake in Wuhan. Strain W5 was studied for its characteristics of denitrification and nitrogen removal. According to its physiological and biochemical characteristics and the analysis of its 16S rRNA gene sequence, strain W5 was identified as Microbacterium sp. The optimal denitrification performance can be obtained under conditions of NO3(-) -N 40 mg x L(-1), Fe2+ 500 mg x L(-1) and pH 6.8-7.0. After one week of cultivation under optimal conditions, nitrate removal percentage reached 87.0%. During the process of the culture, the nitrite nitrogen concentration was no more than 0.31 mg x L(-1) and there was no ammonia nitrogen production. It was indicated that the nitrate was mostly converted into N2. The consumption rate of Fe2+ was 95.2%.

  14. Research Progress on Microbial Properties of Nitrite-Dependent Anaerobic Methane-Oxidising Bacteria%亚硝酸盐型甲烷厌氧氧化微生物特性研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈李东

    2015-01-01

    亚硝酸盐型甲烷厌氧氧化( nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation, N-DAMO)是新近发现的生物反应,是偶联碳氮循环的关键环节,是环境领域和微生物领域的重大发现. N-DAMO的发现对于完善碳氮生物地球化学循环、丰富微生物学内容和研发新型生物脱氮除碳工艺均具有巨大的推动作用.催化N-DAMO反应的微生物为Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera ( M. oxyfera),其隶属于一新发现的细菌门———NC10门.近年来,M. oxyfera的生物学研究取得了许多突破性进展,如初步探明了其个体形态特征、细胞化学组分特征、富集培养特征、生理生化特征及生态学特征,最突出的例子包括发现了M. oxyfera独特的细胞(星状)形态及特殊的脂肪酸(10MeC16:1△7)组分等.最近,N-DAMO的机制研究方面也有了突破性进展:发现了地球上第4种生物产氧途径.目前认为,M. oxyfera具有内产氧功能,其首先将NO2-还原为NO,然后将2分子NO进行歧化反应生成N2和O2,最后利用生成的O2对甲烷进行氧化.本文系统地介绍了M. oxyfera各方面的微生物特性.%Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation ( N-DAMO ) is a recently discovered process that constitutes a unique association between the two major global elements essential for life, carbon and nitrogen. This process is one of the most important discoveries in the fields of environmental science and microbiology. The discovery of N-DAMO process supplements biogeochemical cycles of carbon and nitrogen in nature, extends microbial diversity and urges development of novel simultaneous carbon and nitrogen removal process. The N-DAMO process is mediated by the bacterium “Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera” (M. oxyfera), which belongs to the candidate phylum NC10. Currently, a series of breakthroughs have been made in the research of M. oxyfera. The properties of M. oxyfera morphology, chemical composition, enrichment culture

  15. Combination of upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor and partial nitritation/anammox moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) for municipal wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malovanyy, Andriy; Yang, Jingjing; Trela, Jozef; Plaza, Elzbieta

    2015-03-01

    In this study the combination of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor and a deammonification moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) for mainstream wastewater treatment was tested. The competition between aerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) was studied during a 5months period of transition from reject water to mainstream wastewater followed by a 16months period of mainstream wastewater treatment. The decrease of influent ammonium concentration led to a wash-out of suspended biomass which had a major contribution to nitrite production. Influence of a dissolved oxygen concentration and a transient anoxia mechanism of NOB suppression were studied. It was shown that anoxic phase duration has no effect on NOB metabolism recovery and oxygen diffusion rather than affinities of AOB and NOB to oxygen determine the rate of nitrogen conversion in a biofilm system. Anammox activity remained on the level comparable to reject water treatment systems.

  16. Effects of iron oxidizing bacteria in thiourea leaching of gold ores

    OpenAIRE

    甲斐, 敬美; 山崎, 研市; 高橋, 武重; カイ, タカミ; ヤマサキ, ケンイチ; タカハシ, タケシゲ; KAI, Takami; YAMASAKI, Kenichi; Takahashi, Takeshige

    1991-01-01

    Bacterial leaching was combined with thiourea method for the gold leaching from ores. For gold bearing pyrites, biological pre-oxidation has been generally perfomed. In the present study, we carried out the biological treatment to the high silicate bearing ores by using the iron oxidizing bacteria, Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. The recovery of gold and silver was enhanced by the biological pretreatment, while the effects of the treatment was influenced by the types of gold ores. Since the biolog...

  17. Characterization of sulfur oxidizing bacteria related to biogenic sulfuric acid corrosion in sludge digesters

    OpenAIRE

    Huber, Bettina;Herzog, Bastian;Drewes, Jörg E.;Koch, Konrad;Müller, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    Background Biogenic sulfuric acid (BSA) corrosion damages sewerage and wastewater treatment facilities but is not well investigated in sludge digesters. Sulfur/sulfide oxidizing bacteria (SOB) oxidize sulfur compounds to sulfuric acid, inducing BSA corrosion. To obtain more information on BSA corrosion in sludge digesters, microbial communities from six different, BSA-damaged, digesters were analyzed using culture dependent methods and subsequent polymerase chain reaction denaturing gradient ...

  18. Barite encrustation of benthic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria at a marine cold seep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, E W N; Bailey, J V; Flood, B E; Jones, D S; Gilhooly, W P; Joye, S B; Teske, A; Mason, O U

    2015-11-01

    Crusts and chimneys composed of authigenic barite are found at methane seeps and hydrothermal vents that expel fluids rich in barium. Microbial processes have not previously been associated with barite precipitation in marine cold seep settings. Here, we report on the precipitation of barite on filaments of sulfide-oxidizing bacteria at a brine seep in the Gulf of Mexico. Barite-mineralized bacterial filaments in the interiors of authigenic barite crusts resemble filamentous sulfide-oxidizing bacteria of the genus Beggiatoa. Clone library and iTag amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene show that the barite crusts that host these filaments also preserve DNA of Candidatus Maribeggiatoa, as well as sulfate-reducing bacteria. Isotopic analyses show that the sulfur and oxygen isotope compositions of barite have lower δ(34)S and δ(18)O values than many other marine barite crusts, which is consistent with barite precipitation in an environment in which sulfide oxidation was occurring. Laboratory experiments employing isolates of sulfide-oxidizing bacteria from Gulf of Mexico seep sediments showed that under low sulfate conditions, such as those encountered in brine fluids, sulfate generated by sulfide-oxidizing bacteria fosters rapid barite precipitation localized on cell biomass, leading to the encrustation of bacteria in a manner reminiscent of our observations of barite-mineralized Beggiatoa in the Gulf of Mexico. The precipitation of barite directly on filaments of sulfide-oxidizing bacteria, and not on other benthic substrates, suggests that sulfide oxidation plays a role in barite formation at certain marine brine seeps where sulfide is oxidized to sulfate in contact with barium-rich fluids, either prior to, or during, the mixing of those fluids with sulfate-containing seawater in the vicinity of the sediment/water interface. As with many other geochemical interfaces that foster mineral precipitation, both biological and abiological processes likely contribute

  19. Structure and composition of biofilm communities in a moving bed biofilm reactor for nitritation-anammox at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Frank; Sultana, Razia; Suarez, Marco; Hermansson, Malte; Plaza, Elzbieta; Wilén, Britt-Marie

    2014-02-01

    It is a challenge to apply anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) for nitrogen removal from wastewater at low temperatures. Maintenance of anammox- and aerobic ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and suppression of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) are key issues. In this work, a nitritation-anammox moving bed biofilm pilot reactor was operated at 19-10°C for 300 d. Nitrogen removal was decreasing, but stable, at 19-13°C. At 10°C removal became unstable. Quantitative PCR, fluorescence in situ hybridization and gene sequencing showed that no major microbial community changes were observed with decreased temperature. Anammox bacteria dominated the biofilm (0.9-1.2 × 10(14) 16S rRNA copies m(-2)). Most anammox bacteria were similar to Brocadia sp. 40, but another smaller Brocadia population was present near the biofilm-water interface, where also the AOB community (Nitrosomonas) was concentrated in thin layers (1.8-5.3 × 10(12) amoA copies m(-2)). NOB (Nitrobacter, Nitrospira) were always present at low concentrations (<1.3 × 10(11) 16S rRNA copies m(-2)).

  20. Integrating landfill bioreactors, partial nitritation and anammox process for methane recovery and nitrogen removal from leachate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Faqian; Su, Xiaomei; Kang, Tingting; Wu, Songwei; Yuan, Mengdong; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Xiayun; Xu, Fang; Wu, Weixiang

    2016-06-01

    A new process consisting of a landfill bioreactor, partial-nitritation (PN) and the anammox process has been developed for landfill leachate treatment. In this study, the landfill bioreactor exhibited excellent performance in methane-rich biogas recovery, with a specific biogas yield of 0.47 L gas g-1 COD and methane percentages of 53-76%. PN was achieved in the aerobic reactor by high free ammonia (101 ± 83 mg NH3 L-1) inhibition for nitrite-oxidizing bacteria, and the desired PN effluent composition (effluent nitrite: ammonium ratio of 1.1 ± 0.3) was controlled by adjusting the alkalinity concentration per unit of ammonium oxidized to approximately 14.3 mg CaCO3 mg-1 N in the influent. The startup of anammox process was successfully achieved with a membrane bioreactor in 160 d, and a maximum nitrogen removal rate of 216 mg N L-1 d-1 was attained for real landfill leachate treatment. The quantitative polymerase chain reaction results confirmed that the cell-specific anammox activity was approximately 68-95 fmol N cell-1 d-1, which finally led to the stable operation of the system.

  1. Achieving nitritation and anammox enrichment in a single moving-bed biofilm reactor treating reject water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekker, I; Rikmann, E; Tenno, T; Saluste, A; Tomingas, M; Menert, A; Loorits, L; Lemmiksoo, Vallo; Tenno, T

    2012-01-01

    A biofilm with high nitrifying efficiency was converted into a nitritating and thereafter a nitritating-anammox biofilm in a moving-bed biofilm reactor at 26.5 (+/- 0.5) degrees C by means of a combination of intermittent aeration, low dissolved oxygen concentration, low hydraulic retention time, free ammonia and furthermore, also by elevated HCO3- concentration. Nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) were more effectively suppressed by an enhanced HCO3- concentration range of 1200-2350 mg/L as opposed to free-ammonia-based process control where NOBs recovered from inhibition; the respective total-nitrogen removal rates were 0.3 kg N/(m3 x d) and 0.2 kg N/(m3 x d). The biofilm modification strategies resulted in a shift in bacterial community as the NOB Nitrobacter spp. were replaced with NOB belonging to the genus Nitrospira spp. and were closely related to Candidatus Nitrospira defluvii. A community of anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing microorganisms -uncultured Planctomycetales bacterium clone P4 (closely related to Candidatus Brocadia fulgida)--was developed.

  2. Bacterial community succession during the enrichment of chemolithoautotrophic arsenite oxidizing bacteria at high arsenic concentrations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nguyen Ai Le; Akiko Sato; Daisuke Inoue; Kazunari Sei; Satoshi Soda; Michihiko Ike

    2012-01-01

    To generate cost-effective technologies for the removal of arsenic from water,we developed an enrichment culture of chemolithoautotrophic arsenite oxidizing bacteria (CAOs) that could effectively oxidize widely ranging concentrations of As(Ⅲ) to As(Ⅴ).In addition,we attempted to elucidate the enrichment process and characterize the microbial composition of the enrichment culture.A CAOs enrichment culture capable of stably oxidizing As(Ⅲ) to As(Ⅴ) was successfully constructed through repeated batch cultivation for more than 700 days,during which time the initial As(Ⅲ) concentrations were increased in a stepwise manner from l to 10-12 mmol/L.As(Ⅲ) oxidation activity of the enrichment culture gradually improved,and 10-12 mmol/L As(Ⅲ) was almost completely oxidized within four days.Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis showed that the dominant bacteria in the enrichment culture varied drastically during the enrichment process depending on the As(Ⅲ) concentration.Isolation and characterization of bacteria in the enrichment culture revealed that the presence of multiple CAOs with various As(Ⅲ) oxidation abilities enabled the culture to adapt to a wide range of As(Ⅲ) concentrations.The CAOs enrichment culture constructed here may he useful for pretreatment of water from which arsenic is being removed.

  3. Growth kinetics of hydrogen sulfide oxidizing bacteria in corroded concrete from sewers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Henriette Stokbro; Lens, Piet N L; Nielsen, Jeppe L; Bester, Kai; Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild; Vollertsen, Jes

    2011-05-30

    Hydrogen sulfide oxidation by microbes present on concrete surfaces of sewer pipes is a key process in sewer corrosion. The growth of aerobic sulfur oxidizing bacteria from corroded concrete surfaces was studied in a batch reactor. Samples of corrosion products, containing sulfur oxidizing bacteria, were suspended in aqueous solution at pH similar to that of corroded concrete. Hydrogen sulfide was supplied to the reactor to provide the source of reduced sulfur. The removal of hydrogen sulfide and oxygen was monitored. The utilization rates of both hydrogen sulfide and oxygen suggested exponential bacterial growth with median growth rates of 1.25 d(-1) and 1.33 d(-1) as determined from the utilization rates of hydrogen sulfide and oxygen, respectively. Elemental sulfur was found to be the immediate product of the hydrogen sulfide oxidation. When exponential growth had been achieved, the addition of hydrogen sulfide was terminated leading to elemental sulfur oxidation. The ratio of consumed sulfur to consumed oxygen suggested that sulfuric acid was the ultimate oxidation product. To the knowledge of the authors, this is the first study to determine the growth rate of bacteria involved in concrete corrosion with hydrogen sulfide as source of reduced sulfur.

  4. Growth kinetics of hydrogen sulfide oxidizing bacteria in corroded concrete from sewers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Henriette Stokbro, E-mail: h.s.jensen@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Biotechnology, Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Aalborg University, Sohngaardsholmsvej 57, 9000 Aalborg (Denmark); Lens, Piet N.L. [Sub-department of Environmental Technology, Agricultural University of Wageningen, Bomenweg 2, NL-6700-EV Wageningen (Netherlands); Nielsen, Jeppe L.; Bester, Kai; Nielsen, Asbjorn Haaning; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild; Vollertsen, Jes [Department of Biotechnology, Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Aalborg University, Sohngaardsholmsvej 57, 9000 Aalborg (Denmark)

    2011-05-30

    Hydrogen sulfide oxidation by microbes present on concrete surfaces of sewer pipes is a key process in sewer corrosion. The growth of aerobic sulfur oxidizing bacteria from corroded concrete surfaces was studied in a batch reactor. Samples of corrosion products, containing sulfur oxidizing bacteria, were suspended in aqueous solution at pH similar to that of corroded concrete. Hydrogen sulfide was supplied to the reactor to provide the source of reduced sulfur. The removal of hydrogen sulfide and oxygen was monitored. The utilization rates of both hydrogen sulfide and oxygen suggested exponential bacterial growth with median growth rates of 1.25 d{sup -1} and 1.33 d{sup -1} as determined from the utilization rates of hydrogen sulfide and oxygen, respectively. Elemental sulfur was found to be the immediate product of the hydrogen sulfide oxidation. When exponential growth had been achieved, the addition of hydrogen sulfide was terminated leading to elemental sulfur oxidation. The ratio of consumed sulfur to consumed oxygen suggested that sulfuric acid was the ultimate oxidation product. To the knowledge of the authors, this is the first study to determine the growth rate of bacteria involved in concrete corrosion with hydrogen sulfide as source of reduced sulfur.

  5. Aggregate Size and Architecture Determine Microbial Activity Balance for One-Stage Partial Nitritation and Anammox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlaeminck, S.E.; Terada, Akihiko; Smets, Barth F.

    2010-01-01

    Aerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AerAOB) and anoxic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AnAOB) cooperate in partial nitritation/anammox systems to remove ammonium from wastewater. In this process, large granular microbial aggregates enhance the performance, but little is known about granulation so far....... In this study, three suspended-growth oxygen-limited autotrophic nitrification-denitrification (OLAND) reactors with different inoculation and operation (mixing and aeration) conditions, designated reactors A, B, and C, were used. The test objectives were (i) to quantify the AerAOB and AnAOB abundance......AOB-rich aggregates (reactors B and C). The hypothesized granulation pathways include granule replication by division and budding and are driven by growth and/or decay based on species-specific physiology and by hydrodynamic shear and mixing....

  6. Atmospheric methane removal by methane-oxidizing bacteria immobilized on porous building materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganendra, G; De Muynck, W; Ho, A.; Hoefman, S.; De Vos, P.; Boeckx, P.; Boon, N.

    2014-01-01

    Biological treatment using methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) immobilized on six porous carrier materials have been used to mitigate methane emission. Experiments were performed with different MOB inoculated in building materials at high (similar to 20 % (v/v)) and low (similar to 100 ppmv) methane

  7. Continuous culture enrichments of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria at low ammonium concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bollmann, A.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    2001-01-01

    Until now enrichments of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria from natural ammonium-limited environments have been performed mainly in the presence of much higher ammonia concentrations than those present in the natural environment and many have resulted in the enrichment and isolation of environmentally less

  8. Mechanisms and evolution of oxidative sulfur metabolism in green sulfur bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea Haarup Gregersen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Green sulfur bacteria (GSB constitute a closely related group of photoautotrophic and thiotrophic bacteria with limited phenotypic variation. They typically oxidize sulfide and thiosulfate to sulfate with sulfur globules as an intermediate. Based on genome sequence information from 15 strains, the distribution and phylogeny of enzymes involved in their oxidative sulfur metabolism was investigated. At least one homolog of sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase (SQR is present in all strains. In all sulfur-oxidizing GSB strains except the earliest diverging Chloroherpeton thalassium, the sulfide oxidation product is further oxidized to sulfite by the dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DSR system. This system consists of components horizontally acquired partly from sulfide-oxidizing and partly from sulfate-reducing bacteria. Depending on the strain, the sulfite is probably oxidized to sulfate by one of two different mechanisms that have different evolutionary origins: adenosine-5’-phosphosulfate reductase (APR or polysulfide reductase-like complex 3 (PSRLC3. Thiosulfate utilization by the SOX system in GSB has apparently been acquired horizontally from proteobacteria. SoxCD does not occur in GSB, and its function in sulfate formation in other bacteria has been replaced by the DSR system in GSB. Sequence analyses suggested that the conserved soxJXYZAKBW gene cluster was horizontally acquired by Chlorobium phaeovibrioides DSM 265 from the Chlorobaculum lineage and that this acquisition was mediated by a mobile genetic element. Thus, the last common ancestor of currently known GSB was probably photoautotrophic, hydrogenotrophic, and contained SQR but not DSR or SOX. In addition, the predominance of the Chlorobium-Chlorobaculum-Prosthecochloris lineage among cultured GSB could be due to the horizontally acquired DSR and SOX systems. Finally, based upon structural, biochemical, and phylogenetic analyses, a uniform nomenclature is suggested for sqr genes in

  9. A mixture of nitrite-oxidizing and denitrifying microorganisms affects the δ18O of dissolved nitrate during anaerobic microbial denitrification depending on the δ18O of ambient water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderlich, Anja; Meckenstock, Rainer U.; Einsiedl, Florian

    2013-10-01

    The stable isotopes 15N/14N and 18O/16O of nitrate are frequently used to determine sources of nitrate and to assess denitrification processes in the environment. Nitrate isotope ratios are thought to be conservative unless involved in (bio-) chemical conversion processes. Thus, stable isotopes are considered to be a reliable tool to determine sources of nitrate in aquatic habitats even after transport and dilution has occurred. Denitrification is known to shift both isotope ratios towards higher δ-values. A fixed ratio of 0.5 for Δδ18O/Δδ15N has been proposed and has been widely used to detect denitrification in terrestrial environments, predominantly in aquifers. However, it is observed in environmental and laboratory studies that this ratio actually varies between less than 0.5 and 1 for uncertain reasons with laboratory studies usually describing a ratio close to 1. Here we report results of anoxic incubation experiments with natural populations of nitrate-reducing microorganisms using sediments from three different environments. In our experiments we used water with a δ18O in excess of 500‰ and found a microbially mediated influence of the oxygen isotopic composition of ambient water on the isotopic composition of the residual dissolved nitrate. We found up to 5.7 ± 2.3% of the oxygen-atoms in the residual dissolved nitrate was exchanged by oxygen-atoms from ambient water within the limited timeframe of the experiments. The fastest incorporation of oxygen-atoms from water into dissolved nitrate correlated with the highest intermittent nitrite concentrations observed in our experiments. In a second series of batch experiments we also found that pure cultures of the nitrite-oxidizing bacterium Nitrobacter vulgaris promoted the incorporation of oxygen atoms from ambient water into dissolved nitrate under anoxic conditions. Presumably this happens via a reoxidation of intermediary formed nitrite by the enzyme "nitrite oxidoreductase" (NXR) in concurrence

  10. Physiology and interaction of nitrate and nitrite reduction in Staphylococcus carnosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, H; Götz, F

    1996-04-01

    Staphylococcus carnosus reduces nitrate to ammonia in two steps. (i) Nitrate was taken up and reduced to nitrite, and nitrite was subsequently excreted. (ii) After depletion of nitrate, the accumulated nitrite was imported and reduced to ammonia, which again accumulated in the medium. The localization, energy gain, and induction of the nitrate and nitrite reductases in S. carnosus were characterized. Nitrate reductase seems to be a membrane-bound enzyme involved in respiratory energy conservation, whereas nitrite reductase seems to be a cytosolic enzyme involved in NADH reoxidation. Syntheses of both enzymes are inhibited by oxygen and induced to greater or lesser degrees by nitrate or nitrite, respectively. In whole cells, nitrite reduction is inhibited by nitrate and also by high concentrations of nitrite (> or = 10 mM). Nitrite did not influence nitrate reduction. Two possible mechanisms for the inhibition of nitrite reduction by nitrate that are not mutually exclusive are discussed. (i) Competition for NADH nitrate reductase is expected to oxidize the bulk of the NADH because of its higher specific activity. (ii) The high rate of nitrate reduction could lead to an internal accumulation of nitrite, possibly the result of a less efficient nitrite reduction or export. So far, we have no evidence for the presence of other dissimilatory or assimilatory nitrate or nitrite reductases in S. carnosus.

  11. Sulfur globule oxidation in green sulfur bacteria is dependent on the dissimilatory sulfite reductase system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holkenbrink, Carina; Ocón Barbas, Santiago; Mellerup, Anders;

    2011-01-01

    Green sulfur bacteria oxidize sulfide and thiosulfate to sulfate with extracellular globules of elemental sulfur as intermediate. Here we investigated which genes are involved in the formation and consumption of these sulfur globules in the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum. We show...... that sulfur globule oxidation is strictly dependent on the dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DSR) system. Deletion of dsrM/CT2244 or dsrT/CT2245 or the two dsrCABL clusters (CT0851-CT0854, CT2247-2250) abolished sulfur globule oxidation and prevented formation of sulfate from sulfide, whereas deletion of dsr...

  12. Pathways of sulfide oxidation by haloalkaliphilic bacteria in limited-oxygen gas lift bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klok, Johannes B M; van den Bosch, Pim L F; Buisman, Cees J N; Stams, Alfons J M; Keesman, Karel J; Janssen, Albert J H

    2012-07-17

    Physicochemical processes, such as the Lo-cat and Amine-Claus process, are commonly used to remove hydrogen sulfide from hydrocarbon gas streams such as landfill gas, natural gas, and synthesis gas. Biodesulfurization offers environmental advantages, but still requires optimization and more insight in the reaction pathways and kinetics. We carried out experiments with gas lift bioreactors inoculated with haloalkaliphilic sulfide-oxidizing bacteria. At oxygen-limiting levels, that is, below an O(2)/H(2)S mole ratio of 1, sulfide was oxidized to elemental sulfur and sulfate. We propose that the bacteria reduce NAD(+) without direct transfer of electrons to oxygen and that this is most likely the main route for oxidizing sulfide to elemental sulfur which is subsequently oxidized to sulfate in oxygen-limited bioreactors. We call this pathway the limited oxygen route (LOR). Biomass growth under these conditions is significantly lower than at higher oxygen levels. These findings emphasize the importance of accurate process control. This work also identifies a need for studies exploring similar pathways in other sulfide oxidizers such as Thiobacillus bacteria.

  13. Purification and characterization of assimilatory nitrite reductase from Candida utilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, S; Shaila, M S; Rao, G R

    1996-07-01

    Nitrate assimilation in many plants, algae, yeasts and bacteria is mediated by two enzymes, nitrate reductase (EC 1.6.6.2) and nitrite reductase (EC 1.7.7.1). They catalyse the stepwise reduction of nitrate to nitrite and nitrite to ammonia respectively. The nitrite reductase from an industrially important yeast, Candida utilis, has been purified to homogeneity. Purified nitrite reductase is a heterodimer and the molecular masses of the two subunits are 58 and 66 kDa. The native enzyme exhibits a molecular mass of 126 kDa as analysed by gel filtration. The identify of the two subunits of nitrite reductase was confirmed by immunoblotting using antibody for Cucurbita pepo leaf nitrite reductase. The presence of two different sized transcripts coding for the two subunits was confirmed by (a) in vitro translation of mRNA from nitrate-induced C. utilis followed by immunoprecipitation of the in vitro translated products with heterologous nitrite reductase antibody and (b) Northern-blot analysis. The 66 kDa subunit is acidic in nature which is probably due to its phosphorylated status. The enzyme is stable over a range of temperatures. Both subunits can catalyse nitrite reduction, and the reconstituted enzyme, at a higher protein concentration, shows an activity similar to that of the purified enzyme. Each of these subunits has been shown to contain a few unique peptides in addition to a large number of common peptides. Reduced Methyl Viologen has been found to be as effective an electron donor as NADPH in the catalytic process, a phenomenon not commonly seen for nitrite reductases from other systems.

  14. Biocidal effects of silver and zinc oxide nanoparticles on the bioluminescent bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taran, M. V.; Starodub, N. F.; Katsev, A. M.; Guidotti, M.; Khranovskyy, V. D.; Babanin, A. A.; Melnychuk, M. D.

    2013-11-01

    The effect of silver and zinc oxide nanoparticles in combination with alginate on bioluminescent Photobacterium leiognathi Sh1 bacteria was investigated. Silver nanoparticles were found to be more toxic than zinc oxide nanoparticles on bioluminescent bacteria. The nanoparticles and their ions released results in the same effect, however, it was absent in combination with alginate. The effective inhibiting concentration (EC50) for silver nanoparticles was found about 0.3 - 0.4 μg mL-1, which was up to two times larger then for zinc oxide nanoparticles. The absence of sodium chloride in the tested media prevented the formation of colloidal particles of larger size and the effective inhibition concentrations of metal derivatives were lower than in the presence of sodium chloride.

  15. Enrichment, isolation and identification of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria from sulfide removing bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jianfei; Tian, Guoliang; Lin, Weitie

    2013-07-01

    Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) are the main microorganisms that participate in the natural sulfur cycle. To obtain SOB with high sulfur-oxidizing ability under aerobic or anaerobic conditions, aerobic and anaerobic enrichments were carried out. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles showed that the microbial community changed according to the thiosulfate utilization during enrichments, and Rhodopseudomonas and Halothiobacillus were the predominant bacteria in anaerobic enrichment and aerobic enrichment, respectively, which mainly contributed to the thiosulfate oxidization in the enrichments. Based on the enriched cultures, six isolates were isolated from the aerobic enrichment and four isolates were obtained from the anaerobic enrichment. Phylogenetic analysis suggested the 16S rRNA gene of isolates belonged to the genus Acinetobacter, Rhodopseudomonas, Pseudomonas, Halothiobacillus, Ochrobactrum, Paracoccus, Thiobacillus, and Alcaligenes, respectively. The tests suggested isolates related to Halothiobacillus and Rhodopseudomonas had the highest thiosulfate oxidizing ability under aerobic or anaerobic conditions, respectively; Paracoccus and Alcaligenes could aerobically and anaerobically oxidize thiosulfate. Based on the DGGE and thiosulfate oxidizing ability analysis, Rhodopseudomonas and Halothiobacillus were found to be the main SOB in the sulfide-removing reactor, and were responsible for the sulfur-oxidizing in the treatment system.

  16. Leaching of pyrite by acidophilic heterotrophic iron-oxidizing bacteria in pure and mixed cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacelar-Nicolau, P.; Johnson, D.B. [Univ. of Wales, Bangor (United Kingdom). School of Biological Sciences

    1999-02-01

    Seven strains of heterotrophic iron-oxidizing acidophilic bacteria were examined to determine their abilities to promote oxidative dissolution of pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) when they were grown in pure cultures and in mixed cultures with sulfur-oxidizing Thiobacillus spp. Only one of the isolates (strain T-24) oxidized pyrite when it was grown in pyrite-basal salts medium. However, when pyrite-containing cultures were supplemented with 0.02% (wt/vol) yeast extract, most of the isolates oxidized pyrite, and one (strain T-24) promoted rates of mineral dissolution similar to the rates observed with the iron-oxidizing autotroph Thiobacillus ferroxidans. Pyrite oxidation by another isolate (strain T-21) occurred in cultures containing between 0.005 and 0.05% (wt/vol) yeast extract but was completely inhibited in cultures containing 0.5% yeast extract. Ferrous iron was also needed for mineral dissolution by the iron-oxidizing heterotrophs, indicating that these organisms oxidize pyrite via the indirect mechanism. Mixed cultures of three isolates (strains T-21, T-232, and T-24) and the sulfur-oxidizing autotroph Thiobacillus thiooxidans promoted pyrite dissolution; since neither strains T-21 and T-23 nor T. thiooxidans could oxidize this mineral in yeast extract-free media, this was a novel example of bacterial synergism. Mixed cultures of strains T-21 and T-23 and the sulfur-oxidizing mixotroph Thiobacillus acidophilus also oxidized pyrite but to a lesser extent than did mixed cultures containing T. thiooxidans. Pyrite leaching by strain T -23 grown in an organic compound-rich medium and incubated either shaken or unshaken was also assessed. The potential environmental significance of iron-oxidizing heterotrophs in accelerating pyrite oxidation is discussed.

  17. EFEK POLIMORFISME GENA NITRIT OKSIDA SINTASE3(NOS3 TERHADAP KADAR NITRIT OKSIDA DAN TEKANAN DARAH PADA INDIVIDU TERPAPAR PLUMBUM (The Effect of Polymorphisms Gene Nitric Oxide Synthase3 (NOS3 to Nitric Oxide Level and Blood Pressure on Lead-exposed Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernayanti Hernayanti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengidentifikasi efek polimorfisme gena nitrit oksida sintase3 terhadap kadar nitrit oks ida (NO dan tekanan darah pada individu terpapar Plumbum. Metode penelitian menggunakan metode survai dengan rancangan kasus kontrol. Subjek kasus terdiri dari 30 orang pekerja bengkel mobil dan 30 orang subjek kontrol berasal dari pedesaan yang mewakili area yang tidak terpolusi Pb.Genotip individu ditentukan dengan metode PCR~RFLP. Parameter yang diukur adalah kadar NO, tekanan darah sistolik dan diastolik serta kadar Pb. Data dianalisis menggunakan uji t independent. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa 40% dari subjek kasus, terdeteksi sebagai individu pembawa polimorfisme gena NOS3 dengan genotip GA, sedangkan 60% dari subjek kasus dan subjek kontrol terdeteksi sebagai individu nonpolimorfisme gena NOS3 dengan genotip GG. Hasil uji t menunjukkan untuk parameter NO, tekanan sistolik, diastole serta Pb menunjukkan perbedaan yang sangat nyata an tara individu pembawa polimorfisme gena NOS3 dengan individu nonpolimorfisme. Kadar NO individu pembawa polimorfisme NOS3 lebih rendah dibandingkan individu nonpolimorfism. Sebaliknya kadar Pb, tekanan sistolik dan diastole individu pembawa polimorfisme gena NOS3 lebih tinggi dibandingkan individu nonpolimorfisme. Kesimpulan yang diperoleh adalah adanya polimorfisme gena NOS3 dan paparan Pb menyebabkan ketersediaan NO makin rendah dan meningkatkan kadar Pb, tekanan sistolik dan diastolik. Individu terpapar Pb pembawa polimorfisme gena NOS3 beresiko mengalami penyakit hipertensi yang lebih parah dibandingkan individu nonpolimorfisme terpapar Pb. ABSTRACT The aim of  these research were to identify  the effect of polymorphisms gene NOS3 to nitric oxide level and blood pressure on lead-exposed men. The research used survey method and case control design. These cases of subject were 30 autorepair workers and 30 subject control from village as non polluted area.  The genotype of

  18. Comparison of the Morphology and Deoxyribonucleic Acid Composition of 27 Strains of Nitrifying Bacteria1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Stanley W.; Mandel, Manley

    1971-01-01

    The gross morphology, fine structure, and per cent guanine plus cytosine (GC) composition of deoxyribonucleic acid of 27 strains of nitrifying bacteria were compared. Based on morphological differences, the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria were separated into four genera. Nitrosomonas species and Nitrosocystis species formed one homogenous group, and Nitrosolobus species and Nitrosospira species formed a second homogenous group in respect to their deoxyribonucleic acid GC compositions. Similarly, the nitrite-oxidizing bacteria were separated into three genera based on their morphology. The members of two of these nitrite-oxidizing genera, Nitrobacter and Nitrococcus, had similar GC compositions, but Nitrospina gracilis had a significantly lower GC composition than the members of the other two genera. Images PMID:4939767

  19. Comparison of the morphology and deoxyribonucleic acid composition of 27 strains of nitrifying bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, S W; Mandel, M

    1971-08-01

    The gross morphology, fine structure, and per cent guanine plus cytosine (GC) composition of deoxyribonucleic acid of 27 strains of nitrifying bacteria were compared. Based on morphological differences, the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria were separated into four genera. Nitrosomonas species and Nitrosocystis species formed one homogenous group, and Nitrosolobus species and Nitrosospira species formed a second homogenous group in respect to their deoxyribonucleic acid GC compositions. Similarly, the nitrite-oxidizing bacteria were separated into three genera based on their morphology. The members of two of these nitrite-oxidizing genera, Nitrobacter and Nitrococcus, had similar GC compositions, but Nitrospina gracilis had a significantly lower GC composition than the members of the other two genera.

  20. Synthesis of bacteria promoted reduced graphene oxide-nickel sulfide networks for advanced supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haiming; Yu, Xinzhi; Guo, Di; Qu, Baihua; Zhang, Ming; Li, Qiuhong; Wang, Taihong

    2013-08-14

    Supercapacitors with potential high power are useful and have attracted much attention recently. Graphene-based composites have been demonstrated to be promising electrode materials for supercapacitors with enhanced properties. To improve the performance of graphene-based composites further and realize their synthesis with large scale, we report a green approach to synthesize bacteria-reduced graphene oxide-nickel sulfide (BGNS) networks. By using Bacillus subtilis as spacers, we deposited reduced graphene oxide/Ni3S2 nanoparticle composites with submillimeter pores directly onto substrate by a binder-free electrostatic spray approach to form BGNS networks. Their electrochemical capacitor performance was evaluated. Compared with stacked reduced graphene oxide-nickel sulfide (GNS) prepared without the aid of bacteria, BGNS with unique nm-μm structure exhibited a higher specific capacitance of about 1424 F g(-1) at a current density of 0.75 A g(-1). About 67.5% of the capacitance was retained as the current density increased from 0.75 to 15 A g(-1). At a current density of 75 A g(-1), a specific capacitance of 406 F g(-1) could still remain. The results indicate that the reduced graphene oxide-nickel sulfide network promoted by bacteria is a promising electrode material for supercapacitors.

  1. Fossilization of Iron-Oxidizing Bacteria at Hydrothermal Vents: a Useful Biosignature on Mars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveille, R. J.; Lui, S.

    2009-05-01

    Iron oxidizing bacteria are ubiquitous in marine and terrestrial environments on Earth, where they often display distinctive cell morphologies and are commonly encrusted by minerals, especially bacteriogenic iron oxides and silica. Putative microfossils of iron oxidizing bacteria have been found in jaspers as old as 490Ma and microbial iron oxidation may be an ancient metabolic pathway. In order to investigate the usefulness of mineralized iron oxidizing bacteria as a biosignature, we have examined mineral samples collected from relict hydrothermal systems along Explorer Ridge, NE Pacific Ocean. In addition, microaerophilic, neutrophilic iron oxidizing bacteria, isolated from Pacific hydrothermal vents, were grown in a Fe-enriched seawater medium at constant pH (6.5) and oxygen concentration (5 percent) in a controlled bioreactor system. Both natural samples and experimental products were examined with a combination of variable pressure scanning electron microscopy (SEM), field emission gun SEM, and in some cases by preparing samples with a focused ion beam (FIB) milling system. Natural seafloor samples display abundant filamentous forms often resembling, in both size and shape, the twisted stalks of Gallionella and the elongated filaments of Leptothrix. Generally, these filamentous features are 1-5 microns in diameter and up to several microns in length. Some samples consist entirely of low- density, porous masses of silica encrusted filamentous forms. Presumably, these masses were formed by a rapid precipitation by the influx of silica-rich fluids into a microbial mat dominated by bacteria with filamentous morphologies. The presence of rare, amorphous (unmineralized) filamentous matter rich in C and Fe suggests that these bacteria were iron oxidizers. There is no evidence that sulfur oxidizers were present. Filamentous features sectioned by FIB milling show internal material within semi-hollow tubular-like features. Silica encrustations also show pseudo

  2. Sequential reductive and oxidative conditions used to biodegradation of organochlorine pesticides by native bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopytko, M.; Correa-Torres, S. N.; Plata, A.

    2016-07-01

    Despite restrictions and bans on the use of many organochlorine pesticides in the 1970s and 1980s, they continue to persist in the environment today. This is the case of Agustin Codazzi, Cesar where the organochlorine pesticides were buried without control in the soil in 1999, after being banned their use. Nowadays is necessary to find the best method, which allows remediation of this soils. Reductive dechlorination is the first and limiting step in the metabolism of many organochlorine pesticides by anaerobic bacteria. In this study the reductive conditions were enhanced by addition of biogas as an auxiliary electron donors.The soil sample was taken from the zone at Agustin Codazzi, Cesar, and their characteristics correspond to a loam soil with low nutrient and slight compaction. The experimental tests were performed by varying the exposure time of a reducer to oxidative environment. Reductive conditions were enhanced by methane from biogas and oxidative environment was generated by air blown to stimulate a metabolic process of the soil native bacteria. Removals between 70 and 78.9% of compounds such as 4,4'-DDT, 4, 4'-DDD, 4,4'-DDE, Endrin and Trans- Chlordane, detected by gas chromatography analysis, were achieved under reductive/oxidative conditions during 120 days. Furthermore, bacterial strains capable of degrading organochlorine pesticides were selected from the native bacteria, and identified by the purified and identified based on its morphological characteristics and 16S rDNA sequencing.

  3. Isolation and characterization of facultative mixotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria from constructed wetlands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Soulwène Kouki; Neila Saidi; Fadhel M'hiri; Houda Nasr; Hanène Cherif; Hadda Ouzari; Abdermaceur Hassen

    2011-01-01

    Autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) have been widely studied in constructed wetlands systems,while mixotrophic AOB have been less thoroughly examined.Heterotrophic bacteria were isolated from wastewater and rhizospheres of macrophytes of constructed wetlands,and then cultivated in a mixotrophic medium containing ammonium and acetic acid.A molecular characterization was accomplished using ITS-PCR amplification,and phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences.Results showed the presence of 35 bacteria,among 400 initially heterotrophic isolates,that were able to remove ammonia.These 35 isolates were classified into 10 genetically different groups based on ITS pattern.Then,a collection of 10 isolates were selected because of their relatively high ammonia removal efficiencies (ARE ≥ 80%) and their phylogenetic diversity.In conditions of mixotrophy,these strains were shown to be able to grow (increase of optical density OD660 during incubation with assimilation of nitrogen into cellular biomass) and to oxidize ammonia (important ammonia oxidation efficiencies,AOE between 79% and 87%).Among these facultative mixotrophic AOB,four isolates were genetically related to Firmicutes (Bacillus and Exiguobacterium),three isolates were affiliated to Actinobacteria (Arthrobacter) and three other isolates were associated with Proteobacteria (Pseudomonas,Ochrobactrum and Bordetella).

  4. Gut-Colonizing Bacteria Promote C. elegans Innate Immunity by Producing Nitric Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Xiao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Many commensal bacteria in the gut are beneficial to the host immune system, but the underlying mechanisms are largely unclear. Using culture-independent Illumina MiSeq sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene amplicons, we show that bacterial diversity in the intestine of Caenorhabditis elegans, the free-living nematode, is distinct from that in soil. Of these bacteria, Bacillus subtilis is the most prominent species in the worm gut. We demonstrate that B. subtilis confers worm resistance to infection by pathogenic bacteria, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella enterica, and Enterococcus faecalis, by producing nitric oxide (NO. Deletion of the nos gene, which encodes an NO synthase, reduces the protective effect. NO promotes innate immune responses to P. aeruginosa PA14 by activating a conserved p38 mitogen protein kinase (MAPK in C. elegans. Our work provides an example of antagonism of commensal bacteria against pathogens and illustrates the importance of commensal bacteria in host immunity.

  5. Effect of free ammonium and free nitrous acid on the activity, aggregate morphology and extracellular polymeric substance distribution of ammonium oxidizing bacteria in partial nitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qian; Peng, Dangcong; Wang, Bo; Chen, Yuanyuan; Li, Jiaqi; Zhao, Qiaodi; Wang, Binbin

    2017-09-01

    Successful partial nitrification not only guarantees the inhibition of nitrite oxidation, but also does not excessively retard the ammonia oxidation rate. Therefore, the performance of ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AOB) during partial nitrification is fundamental to this process. In this study, two lab-scale partial nitrification bioreactors containing different inhibition conditions-one with free ammonium (FA) inhibition, the other with free nitrous acid (FNA) inhibition-were used to compare the differences between activity, quantity, aggregation morphology and extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) distribution of AOB. The results showed that although stable, long-term, partial nitrification was achieved in both reactors, there were differences in AOB activity, microbial spatial distribution and EPS characteristic. In the FA bioreactor, FA concentration was conducted at more than 40 mg/L, which had a strong impact on the metabolism of AOB. The activity and quantity decreased by 50%. Higher EPS (42.44 ± 2.31 mg g(-1) mixed liquor volatile suspended solids [MLVSS]) and protein were introduced into the EPS matrix. However, in the FNA bioreactor, the FNA concentration was about 0.23 mg/L. It did not reach a level to affect AOB metabolism. The AOB activity and quantity were maintained at high levels and the total EPS content was 28.29 ± 2.04 mg g(-1) MLVSS. Additionally, the microscopic results showed that in the FA bioreactor, AOB cells aggregated in microcolonies, while they appeared to be self-flocculating with no specific conformation in the other reactor. β-polysaccharides located inside sludge flocs in the FA bioreactor but only accumulated around the outer layer of activated sludge flocs in the FNA condition. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Identification of antimony- and arsenic-oxidizing bacteria associated with antimony mine tailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamura, Natsuko; Fukushima, Koh; Itai, Takaaki

    2013-01-01

    Antimony (Sb) is a naturally occurring toxic element commonly associated with arsenic (As) in the environment and both elements have similar chemistry and toxicity. Increasing numbers of studies have focused on microbial As transformations, while microbial Sb interactions are still not well understood. To gain insight into microbial roles in the geochemical cycling of Sb and As, soils from Sb mine tailing were examined for the presence of Sb- and As-oxidizing bacteria. After aerobic enrichment culturing with As(III) (10 mM) or Sb(III) (100 μM), pure cultures of Pseudomonas- and Stenotrophomonas-related isolates with Sb(III) oxidation activities and a Sinorhizobium-related isolate capable of As(III) oxidation were obtained. The As(III)-oxidizing Sinorhizobium isolate possessed the aerobic arsenite oxidase gene (aioA), the expression of which was induced in the presence of As(III) or Sb(III). However, no Sb(III) oxidation activity was detected from the Sinorhizobium-related isolate, suggesting the involvement of different mechanisms for Sb and As oxidation. These results demonstrate that indigenous microorganisms associated with Sb mine soils are capable of Sb and As oxidation, and potentially contribute to the speciation and mobility of Sb and As in situ.

  7. Identification, characterization and application of sulfide-oxidizing bacteria in oil fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenneman, G.E. [Phillips Petroleum Co., Bartlesville, OK (United States). Research and Development Dept; Gevertz, D. [Agouron Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2000-07-01

    The efforts being made to identify and characterize sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) in oil fields were described. The role of SOB in the cycling of sulfur in shallow oil reservoirs in Western Canada and Western Texas was also explained. Field tests from reservoirs where anaerobic sulfide oxidation can be potentially applied were also included in this presentation. Sulfides are not desirable in oil fields because they are toxic, corrosive and form insoluble metal sulfides. Nitrate has been found to stimulate the activity of indigenous, anaerobic SOB when amended to sulfide-laden sewage sludges and pond sediments. In this study sulfide-laden, produced brine was collected from a field and dispensed into sterile, anaerobic bottles and amended with potassium nitrate and sodium phosphate. Oxidation of the sulfide was monitored using colour as a means by which to detect oxidation. Results showed that sulfide-oxidizing activity in brines from the Coleville field in Western Canada is a result of autotrophic SOB. Sulfide-oxidizing activity in produced brines collected from Western Texas oil fields needed the addition of organic acids and yeast extract, suggesting oxidation by heterotrophic SOB.19 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig.

  8. Mineralized iron oxidizing bacteria from hydrothermal vents: targeting biosignatures on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveille, R. J.

    2010-12-01

    Putative hydrothermal systems have been identified on Mars based on orbital imagery and rover-based analyses. Based on Earth analogs, hydrothermal systems on Mars would be highly attractive for their potential for preserving organic and inorganic biosignatures. For example, iron oxidizing bacteria are ubiquitous in marine and terrestrial hydrothermal systems, where they often display distinctive cell morphologies and are commonly encrusted by minerals, especially bacteriogenic iron oxides and silica. Microfossils of iron oxidizing bacteria have been found in ancient Si-Fe deposits and iron oxidation may be an ancient and widespread metabolic pathway. In order to investigate mineralized iron oxidizing bacteria as a biosignature, we have examined samples collected from extinct hydrothermal vents along Explorer Ridge, NE Pacific Ocean. In addition, microaerophilic iron oxidizing bacteria, isolated from active Pacific hydrothermal vents, were grown in a Fe-enriched seawater medium at constant pH (6.5) and O2 concentration (5%) in a controlled bioreactor system. Samples and experimental products were examined with a combination of variable-pressure and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (SEM), in some cases by preparing samples with a focused ion beam (FIB) milling system. Light-toned seafloor samples display abundant filamentous forms resembling, in both size and shape (1-5 microns in diameter and up to several microns in length), the twisted stalks of Gallionella and the elongated filaments of Leptothrix. Some samples consist entirely of low-density masses of silica (>90% Si) encrusted filamentous forms. The presence of unmineralized filamentous matter rich in C and Fe suggests that these are the remains of iron oxidizing bacteria. Mineralized filaments sectioned by FIB show variable internal material within semi-hollow, tubular-like features. Silica encrustations also show pseudo-concentric growth bands. In the bioreactor runs, abundant microbial growth and

  9. Biogeochemical oxidation of calcium sulfite hemihydrate to gypsum in flue gas desulfurization byproduct using sulfur-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Duane; Smith, Jacques J; Chen, Linxi; Kreinberg, Allison; Wallace, Brianna; White, Robby

    2017-10-01

    Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) is a well-established air treatment technology for coal and oil combustion gases that commonly uses lime or pulverized limestone aqueous slurries to precipitate sulfur dioxide (SO2) as crystalline calcium salts. Under forced oxidation (excess oxygen) conditions, FGD byproduct contains almost entirely (>92%) gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O), a useful and marketable commodity. In contrast, FGD byproduct formed in oxygen deficient oxidation systems contains a high percentage of hannebachite (CaSO3·0.5H2O) to yield a material with no commercial value, poor dewatering characteristics, and that is typically disposed in landfills. Hannebachite in FGD byproduct can be chemically converted to gypsum; however, the conditions that support rapid formation of gypsum require large quantities of acids or oxidizers. This work describes a novel, patent pending application of microbial physiology where a natural consortium of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) was used to convert hannebachite-enriched FGD byproduct into a commercially valuable, gypsum-enriched product (US Patent Assignment 503373611). To optimize the conversion of hannebachite into gypsum, physiological studies on the SOB were performed to define their growth characteristics. The SOB were found to be aerobic, mesophilic, neutrophilic, and dependent on a ready supply of ammonia. They were capable of converting hannebachite to gypsum at a rate of approximately five percent per day when the culture was applied to a 20 percent FGD byproduct slurry and SOB growth medium. 16S rDNA sequencing revealed that the SOB consortium contained a variety of different bacterial genera including both SOB and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Halothiobacillus, Thiovirga and Thiomonas were the dominant sulfur-oxidizing genera. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Visible light photoinactivation of bacteria by tungsten oxide nanostructures formed on a tungsten foil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasempour, Fariba; Azimirad, Rouhollah; Amini, Abbas; Akhavan, Omid

    2015-05-01

    Antibacterial activity of tungsten oxide nanorods/microrods were studied against Escherichia coli bacteria under visible light irradiation and in dark. A two-step annealing process at temperatures up to 390 °C and 400-800 °C was applied to synthesize the tungsten oxide nanorods/microrods on tungsten foils using KOH as a catalyst. Annealing the foils at 400 °C in the presence of catalyst resulted in formation of tungsten oxide nanorods (with diameters of 50-90 nm and crystalline phase of WO3) on surface of tungsten foils. By increasing the annealing temperature up to 800 °C, tungsten oxide microrods with K2W6O19 crystalline phase were formed on the foils. The WO3 nanorods showed a strong antibacterial property under visible light irradiation, corresponding to >92% bacterial inactivation within 24 h irradiation at room temperature, while the K2W6O19 microrods formed at 800 °C could inactivate only ∼45% of the bacteria at the same conditions.

  11. Sulfur-Oxidizing Bacteria Mediate Microbial Community Succession and Element Cycling in Launched Marine Sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihara, Hideyuki; Hori, Tomoyuki; Aoyagi, Tomo; Takasaki, Mitsuru; Katayama, Yoko

    2017-01-01

    A large amount of marine sediment was launched on land by the Great East Japan earthquake. Here, we employed both on-site and laboratory studies on the launched marine sediment to investigate the succession of microbial communities and its effects on geochemical properties of the sediment. Twenty-two-month on-site survey showed that microbial communities at the uppermost layer (0-2 mm depth) of the sediment changed significantly with time, whereas those at the deeper layer (20-40 mm depth) remained nearly unchanged and kept anaerobic microbial communities. Nine months after the incidence, various sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) prevailed in the uppermost layer, in which afterwards diverse chemoorganotrophic bacteria predominated. Geochemical analyses indicated that the concentration of metals other than Fe was lower in the uppermost layer than that in the deeper layer. Laboratory study was carried out by incubating the sediment for 57 days, and clearly indicated the dynamic transition of microbial communities in the uppermost layer exposed to atmosphere. SOB affiliated in the class Epsilonproteobacteria rapidly proliferated and dominated at the uppermost layer during the first 3 days, after that Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria and chemoorganotrophic bacteria were sequentially dominant. Furthermore, the concentration of sulfate ion increased and the pH decreased. Consequently, SOB may have influenced the mobilization of heavy metals in the sediment by metal-bound sulfide oxidation and/or sediment acidification. These results demonstrate that SOB initiated the dynamic shift from the anaerobic to aerobic microbial communities, thereby playing a critical role in element cycling in the marine sediment.

  12. How Is the Oxidative Capacity of the Cloud Aqueous Phase Modified By Bacteria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguillaume, L.; Mouchel-Vallon, C.; Passananti, M.; Wirgot, N.; Joly, M.; Sancelme, M.; Bianco, A.; Cartier, N.; Brigante, M.; Mailhot, G.; Delort, A. M.; Chaumerliac, N. M.

    2014-12-01

    The aqueous phase photochemical reactions of constituents present in atmospheric water like H2O2, NO3-, NO2- and Fe(III) aqua-complexes or organic complexes can form radicals such as the hydroxyl radical HO within the water drop. However, the literature lacks of data precising the rate of HO formation and the relative contribution of the photochemical sources of HO. The production of radicals in cloud aqueous phase drives the oxidative capacity of the cloud medium and the efficiency of organic matter oxidation. The oxidation of organic compounds is suspected to lead to oxygenated species that could contribute to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass (Ervens et al., 2011). In current cloud chemistry models, HO concentrations strongly depend on the organic and iron amount. For high concentrations of organic compounds, this radical is efficiently consumed during the day due to the oxidation process. When iron concentrations are typical from continental cloud, the photolysis of Fe(III) complexes and the Fenton reaction drive the HO concentrations in the cloud models. The concept of biocatalysed reactions contributing to atmospheric chemistry as an alternative route to photochemistry is quite new (Vaïtilingom et al., 2013); it emerged from the recent discovery of metabolically active microorganisms in clouds. Microorganisms are well-known to degrade organic matter but they could also interact with oxidant species such as H2O2 (or their precursors) thanks to their oxidative and nitrosative stress metabolism that will act directly on these species and on their interactions with iron (metalloproteins and siderophores). For the moment, biological impact on radical chemistry within cloud has not been yet considered in cloud chemistry models. Bacterial activity will be introduced as catalysts in a multiphase cloud chemistry model using degradation rates measured in the laboratory. For example, biodegradation rates of the oxidants H2O2 by model bacteria will be tested in the

  13. Nitrogen removal by granular nitritation-anammox in an upflow membrane-aerated biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojin; Sun, Shan; Badgley, Brian D; Sung, Shihwu; Zhang, Husen; He, Zhen

    2016-05-01

    The nitritation-anammox process has been a promising nitrogen removal technology towards sustainable wastewater treatment, but its application in treating domestic wastewater with relatively low ammonium concentrations (mainstream) remains a great challenge. In this study, an innovative lab-scale upflow membrane-aerated biofilm reactor (UMABR) was employed to treat a synthetic wastewater containing 70 mg N L(-1) ammonium. With a DO level at 0.6 ± 0.1 mg O2 L(-1) and HRT of 32 h, the effluent ammonium concentration was 4.8 ± 2.0 mg N L(-1). Increasing the nitrogen loading rate from 52.4 to 104.8 g N m(-3) d(-1) with stepwise decreasing HRT from 32 to 16 h resulted in an average TN removal efficiency of 81% without nitrite accumulation. The average observed NO3(-)-N (residue)/NH4(+)-N (consumed) ratio of 8% was below the "theoretical ratio" of 13% and further reduction of nitrate residue needs to be addressed. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and high-throughput sequencing analyses showed the coexistence of anammox bacteria and ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in both biofilm and granular samples. Anammox bacteria accounted for up to 63.3% of the microbial community of the granules, with Candidatus Jettenia being the distinctly dominant anammox genus. In contrast, the biofilm contained abundant Nitrosomonadaceae (AOB, 33.1%). In addition, the brown-yellow granules exhibited a more balanced community structure with anammox bacteria and AOB accounting for 33.7% and 18.2%, respectively, which may contribute to the long-term operation of single-stage nitritation-anammox process. These results demonstrate that the nitritation-anammox UMABR could potentially be used for nitrogen removal from mainstream in some specific regions with relatively warm temperature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cell surface characteristics enable encrustation-free survival of neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, G.; Chan, C. S.

    2011-12-01

    Microbial growth in mineralizing environments depends on the cells' ability to evade surface precipitation. Cell-mineral interactions may be required for metabolism, but if unmoderated, cells could become encrusted, which would limit diffusion of nutrients and waste across cell walls. A combination of cell surface charge and hydrophobicity could enable the survival of microbes in such environments by inhibiting mineral attachment. To investigate this mechanism, we characterized the surfaces of two neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB): Mariprofundus ferrooxydans, a Zetaproteobacterium from Fe(II)-rich submarine hydrothermal vents and a Betaproteobacterium Gallionellales strain R-1, recently isolated from a ferrous groundwater seep. Both bacteria produce iron oxyhydroxides, yet successfully escape surface encrustation while inhabiting milieu where iron minerals are also produced by abiotic processes. SEM-EDX and TEM-EELS analyses of cultured bacteria revealed no iron on the cell surfaces. Zeta potential measurements showed that these bacteria have very small negative surface charge (0 to -4 mV) over a pH range of 4-9, indicating near-neutrally charged surfaces. Water contact angle measurements and thermodynamic calculations demonstrate that both bacteria and abiotically-formed Fe oxhydroxides are hydrophilic. Extended-DLVO calculations showed that hydrophilic repulsion between cells and minerals dominates over electrostatic and Lifshitz-van der Waals interactions. This leads to overall repulsion between microbes and minerals, thus preventing surface encrustation. Low surface charge and hydrophilicity (determined by microbial adhesion to hydrocarbon assay) were common features for both live and azide-inhibited cells, which shows that surface characteristics do not depend on active metabolism. It is remarkable that these two phylogenetically-distant bacteria from different environments employ similar adaptations to prevent surface mineralization. Our results

  15. Mn-oxidizing Bacteria in Oak Ridge, TN and the Potential for Mercury Remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, K. L.; McNeal, K. S.; Han, F. X.

    2012-12-01

    East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) in Oak Ridge, TN was highly contaminated with elemental mercury in the 1950 and 1960. The area is still experiencing the effects of mercury contamination, and researchers are searching for ways to remediate the EFPC. One possible mechanism for bioremediation is the use of biogenic Mn oxides to remove heavy metals from water systems. Six native Pseudomonas bacteria species were isolated from the EFPC in order to examine biogenic Mn oxides production and bioremediation of Oak Ridge slurries. To investigate the biochemical interactions of Pseudomonas and the native microbial communities with Hg, Mn, Fe, S, six different slurry treatment groups were compared using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS). Oak Ridge slurries were autoclaved to inhibit microbial growth (group 1), autoclaved and amended with HgS (group 2), autoclaved and amended with Pseudomonas isolates and additional HgS (group 3), untreated slurry (group 4), normal slurry amended with HgS (group 5), and normal slurry amended with Pseudomonas isolates and additional HgS (group 6). The comparison of the autoclaved groups with the counterpart untreated and normal Oak Ridge slurries highlighted important microbial interactions. Also, the Pseudomonas isolates were grown separately in a MnSO4 media, and the individual bacteria were monitored for Mn-oxidization using ICP-AES and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In the slurry sediments, the Pseudomonas isolates did produce Mn oxides which bound to mercury, and mercury bound to organic matter significantly decreased. However, after a significant decrease of dissolved mercury in the water, dissolved mercury was cycled back into the water system on day 10 of the study. Additionally, two individual native Oak Ridge Pseudomonas isolates demonstrated Mn-oxidization. Biogenic Mn oxides have the potential to decrease mercury cycling, however there is

  16. Arsenite-oxidizing and arsenate-reducing bacteria associated with arsenic-rich groundwater in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Vivian Hsiu-Chuan; Chu, Yu-Ju; Su, Yu-Chen; Hsiao, Sung-Yun; Wei, Chia-Cheng; Liu, Chen-Wuing; Liao, Chung-Min; Shen, Wei-Chiang; Chang, Fi-John

    2011-04-01

    Drinking highly arsenic-contaminated groundwater is a likely cause of blackfoot disease in Taiwan, but microorganisms that potentially control arsenic mobility in the subsurface remain unstudied. The objective of this study was to investigate the relevant arsenite-oxidizing and arsenate-reducing microbial community that exists in highly arsenic-contaminated groundwater in Taiwan. We cultured and identified arsenic-transforming bacteria, analyzed arsenic resistance and transformation, and determined the presence of genetic markers for arsenic transformation. In total, 11 arsenic-transforming bacterial strains with different colony morphologies and varying arsenic transformation abilities were isolated, including 10 facultative anaerobic arsenate-reducing bacteria and one strictly aerobic arsenite-oxidizing bacterium. All of the isolates exhibited high levels of arsenic resistance with minimum inhibitory concentrations of arsenic ranging from 2 to 200 mM. Strain AR-11 was able to rapidly oxidize arsenite to arsenate at concentrations relevant to environmental groundwater samples without the addition of any electron donors or acceptors. We provide evidence that arsenic-reduction activity may be conferred by the ars operon(s) that were not amplified by the designed primers currently in use. The 16S rRNA sequence analysis grouped the isolates into the following genera: Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Psychrobacter, Vibrio, Citrobacter, Enterobacter, and Bosea. Among these genera, we present the first report of the genus Psychrobacter being involved in arsenic reduction. Our results further support the hypothesis that bacteria capable of either oxidizing arsenite or reducing arsenate coexist and are ubiquitous in arsenic-contaminated groundwater.

  17. Mutagenicity of some alkyl nitrites used as recreational drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunkel, V.C.; Cameron, T.P. (National Institute of Health, Bethesda (USA)); Rogers-Back, A.M.; Lawlor, T.E.; Harbell, J.W. (Microbiological Associates Inc., Rockville, MD (USA))

    1989-01-01

    When the AIDS epidemic was in its earliest stages, and prior to identification of HIV as the etiological factor, the use of volatile nitrites by the male homosexual community to enhance sexual activities appeared to have a significant role in this disease. Preliminary observations indicated that that portion of the male homosexual community which developed Kaposi's sarcoma were also heavy nitrite users. These nitrites had been demonstrated to be mutagenic in bacteria and thus it was postulated that they could be responsible for the appearance of the sarcoma. To evaluate further the genotoxic activity of these chemicals, six nitrites, including those most commonly used by homosexuals for sexual gratification, were selected for testing in the mouse lymphoma TK {plus minus} and Salmonell typhimurium mutagenicity assays. One chemical, n-amyl nitrite, was negative in the mouse lymphoma assay, while the other five chemicals, n-butyl, isobutyl, iso-amyl, sec-butyl, and n-propyl nitrite, were positive. All six compounds were positive in the Salmonella assay. The mutagenic and known toxic effects of these chemicals remain a concern because a large population of teenagers and young adults continue to abuse these substances.

  18. Renal carbonic anhydrases are involved in the reabsorption of endogenous nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chobanyan-Jürgens, Kristine; Schwarz, Alexandra; Böhmer, Anke; Beckmann, Bibiana; Gutzki, Frank-Mathias; Michaelsen, Jan T; Stichtenoth, Dirk O; Tsikas, Dimitrios

    2012-02-15

    Nitrite (ONO(-)) exerts nitric oxide (NO)-related biological actions and its concentration in the circulation may be of particular importance. Nitrite is excreted in the urine. Hence, the kidney may play an important role in nitrite/NO homeostasis in the vasculature. We investigated a possible involvement of renal carbonic anhydrases (CAs) in endogenous nitrite reabsorption in the proximal tubule. The potent CA inhibitor acetazolamide was administered orally to six healthy volunteers (5 mg/kg) and nitrite was measured in spot urine samples before and after administration. Acetazolamide increased abruptly nitrite excretion in the urine, strongly suggesting that renal CAs are involved in nitrite reabsorption in healthy humans. Additional in vitro experiments support our hypothesis that nitrite reacts with CO(2), analogous to the reaction of peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) with CO(2), to form acid-labile nitrito carbonate [ONOC(O)O(-)]. We assume that this reaction is catalyzed by CAs and that nitrito carbonate represents the nitrite form that is actively transported into the kidney. The significance of nitrite reabsorption in the kidney and the underlying mechanisms, notably a direct involvement of CAs in the reaction between nitrite and CO(2), remain to be elucidated.

  19. Coexistence of nitrifying, anammox and denitrifying bacteria in a sequencing batch reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela eLangone

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Elevated nitrogen removal efficiencies from ammonium-rich wastewaters have been demonstrated by several applications, that combine nitritation and anammox processes. Denitrification will occur simultaneously when organic carbon is also present. In this study, the activity of aerobic ammonia oxidizing, anammox and denitrifying bacteria in a full scale Sequencing Batch Reactor, treating digester supernatants, was studied by means of batch-assays. AOB and anammox activities were maximum at pH of 8.0 and 7.8-8.0, rispectively. Short term effect of nitrite on anammox activity was studied, showing nitrite up to 42 mg/L did not result in inhibition. Both denitrification via nitrate and nitrite were measured. To reduce nitrite-oxidizing activity, high of NH3 – N (1.9-10 mg N-NH3/L and low nitrite (3-8 mg TNN/L are required conditions during the whole SBR cycle.Molecular analysis showed the nitritation-anammox sludge harbored a high microbial diversity, where each microorganism has a specific role. Using ammonia monooxygenase α –subunit (amoA gene as a marker, our analyses suggested different macro- and micro-environments in the reactor strongly affect the AOB community, allowing the development of different AOB species, such as N. europaea/eutropha and N. oligotropha groups, which improve the stability of nitritation process. A specific PCR primer set, used to target the 16S rRNA gene of anammox bacteria, confirmed the presence of the Ca. Brocadia fulgida type, able to grow in precence of organic matter and to tolerate high nitrite concentrations. The diversity of denitrifiers was assessed by using dissimilatory nitrite reductase (nirS gene-based analyses, who showed denitifiers were related to different betaproteobacterial genera, such as Thauera, Pseudomonas, Dechloromonas and Aromatoleum, able to assist in forming microbial aggregates. Concerning possible secondary processes, no n-damo bacteria were found while NOB from the genus of Nitrobacter

  20. Performance of denitrifying microbial fuel cell with biocathode over nitrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao eHuimin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Microbial fuel cell (MFC with nitrite as an electron acceptor in cathode provided a new technology for nitrogen removal and electricity production simultaneously. The influences of influent nitrite concentration and external resistance on the performance of denitrifying MFC were investigated. The optimal effectiveness were obtained with the maximum total nitrogen (TN removal rate of 54.80±0.01 g m-3 d-1. It would be rather desirable for the TN removal than electricity generation at lower external resistance. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis suggested that Proteobacteria was the predominant phylum, accounting for 35.72%. Thiobacillus and Afipia might benefit to nitrite removal. The presence of nitrifying Devosia indicated that nitrite was oxidized to nitrate via a biochemical mechanism in the cathode. Ignavibacterium and Anaerolineaceae was found in the cathode as a heterotrophic bacterium with sodium acetate as substrate, which illustrated that sodium acetate in anode was likely permeated through proton exchange membrane to the cathode .

  1. Three-dimensional stratification of bacterial biofilm populations in a moving bed biofilm reactor for nitritation-anammox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almstrand, Robert; Persson, Frank; Daims, Holger; Ekenberg, Maria; Christensson, Magnus; Wilén, Britt-Marie; Sörensson, Fred; Hermansson, Malte

    2014-01-29

    Moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs) are increasingly used for nitrogen removal with nitritation-anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) processes in wastewater treatment. Carriers provide protected surfaces where ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and anammox bacteria form complex biofilms. However, the knowledge about the organization of microbial communities in MBBR biofilms is sparse. We used new cryosectioning and imaging methods for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to study the structure of biofilms retrieved from carriers in a nitritation-anammox MBBR. The dimensions of the carrier compartments and the biofilm cryosections after FISH showed good correlation, indicating little disturbance of biofilm samples by the treatment. FISH showed that Nitrosomonas europaea/eutropha-related cells dominated the AOB and Candidatus Brocadia fulgida-related cells dominated the anammox guild. New carriers were initially colonized by AOB, followed by anammox bacteria proliferating in the deeper biofilm layers, probably in anaerobic microhabitats created by AOB activity. Mature biofilms showed a pronounced three-dimensional stratification where AOB dominated closer to the biofilm-water interface, whereas anammox were dominant deeper into the carrier space and towards the walls. Our results suggest that current mathematical models may be oversimplifying these three-dimensional systems and unless the multidimensionality of these systems is considered, models may result in suboptimal design of MBBR carriers.

  2. Three-Dimensional Stratification of Bacterial Biofilm Populations in a Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor for Nitritation-Anammox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Almstrand

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs are increasingly used for nitrogen removal with nitritation-anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox processes in wastewater treatment. Carriers provide protected surfaces where ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB and anammox bacteria form complex biofilms. However, the knowledge about the organization of microbial communities in MBBR biofilms is sparse. We used new cryosectioning and imaging methods for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH to study the structure of biofilms retrieved from carriers in a nitritation-anammox MBBR. The dimensions of the carrier compartments and the biofilm cryosections after FISH showed good correlation, indicating little disturbance of biofilm samples by the treatment. FISH showed that Nitrosomonas europaea/eutropha-related cells dominated the AOB and Candidatus Brocadia fulgida-related cells dominated the anammox guild. New carriers were initially colonized by AOB, followed by anammox bacteria proliferating in the deeper biofilm layers, probably in anaerobic microhabitats created by AOB activity. Mature biofilms showed a pronounced three-dimensional stratification where AOB dominated closer to the biofilm-water interface, whereas anammox were dominant deeper into the carrier space and towards the walls. Our results suggest that current mathematical models may be oversimplifying these three-dimensional systems and unless the multidimensionality of these systems is considered, models may result in suboptimal design of MBBR carriers.

  3. A review of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in Chinese soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ju-Pei; Zhang, Li-Mei; Di, Hong J; He, Ji-Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Ammonia (NH(3)) oxidation, the first and rate-limiting step of nitrification, is a key step in the global Nitrogen (N) cycle. Major advances have been made in recent years in our knowledge and understanding of the microbial communities involved in ammonia oxidation in a wide range of habitats, including Chinese agricultural soils. In this mini-review, we focus our attention on the distribution and community diversity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) in Chinese soils with variable soil properties and soil management practices. The niche differentiation of AOB and AOA in contrasting soils have been functionally demonstrated using DNA-SIP (stable isotope probing) methods, which have shown that AOA dominate nitrification processes in acidic soils, while AOB dominated in neutral, alkaline and N-rich soils. Finally, we discuss the composition and activity of ammonia oxidizers in paddy soils, as well as the mitigation of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N(2)O) emissions and nitrate leaching via inhibition of nitrification by both AOB and AOA.

  4. A review of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in Chinese soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Zheng eHe

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia (NH3 oxidation, the first and rate-limiting step of nitrification, is a key step in the global Nitrogen (N cycle. Major advances have been made in recent years in our knowledge and understanding of the microbial communities involved ammonia oxidation in a wide range of habitats, including Chinese agricultural soils. In this mini-review, we focus our attention on the distribution and community diversity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB and ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA in Chinese soils with variable soil properties and soil management practices. The niche differentiation of AOB and AOA in contrasting soils have been functionally demonstrated using DNA-SIP (stable isotope probing methods, which have shown that AOA dominate nitrification processes in acidic soils, while AOB dominated in neutral, alkaline and N-rich soils. Finally, we discuss the composition and activity of ammonia oxidizer in paddy soils, as well as the mitigation of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O emissions and nitrate leaching via inhibition of nitrification by both AOB and AOA.

  5. Global prevalence of methane oxidation by symbiotic bacteria in peat-moss ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kip, Nardy; van Winden, Julia F.; Pan, Yao; Bodrossy, Levente; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Smolders, Alfons J. P.; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Damsté, Jaap S. Sinninghe; Op den Camp, Huub J. M.

    2010-09-01

    Peat bogs store up to a third of all terrestrial carbon on Earth, and are one of the largest natural sources of atmospheric methane. Anaerobic degradation of submerged Sphagnum species-mosses that are prevalent in peat bogs across the globe-produces significant quantities of methane in these systems. However, a study on peat mosses in the Netherlands revealed that a large fraction of this methane is consumed by aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria, known as methanotrophs; in return, the methanotrophs provide Sphagnum mosses with carbon. Here, we show that Sphagnum-associated methane oxidation occurs ubiquitously across the globe. We collected Sphagnum mosses from pools, lawns and hummocks in nine Sphagnum-dominated peatlands across the world, and measured their capacity to oxidize methane in a series of laboratory incubations. All mosses were capable of oxidizing methane. The rate of methane oxidation increased with temperature, and was most pronounced in submerged mosses, collected from peatland pools. According to DNA microarray analyses, the methanotrophic community responsible for methane oxidation was highly diverse. 13C labelling revealed that methane-derived carbon was incorporated into plant lipids when mosses were submerged, indicative of a mutually beneficial symbiosis between mosses and methanotrophs. Our findings suggest that the interaction between methanotrophs and Sphagnum mosses may play a role in carbon recycling in waterlogged Sphagnum vegetation, potentially reducing methane emissions.

  6. The production and detoxification of a potent cytotoxin, nitric oxide, by pathogenic enteric bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkenberg, Anke; Runkel, Sebastian; Richardson, David J; Rowley, Gary

    2011-12-01

    The nitrogen cycle is based on several redox reactions that are mainly accomplished by prokaryotic organisms, some archaea and a few eukaryotes, which use these reactions for assimilatory, dissimilatory or respiratory purposes. One group is the Enterobacteriaceae family of Gammaproteobacteria, which have their natural habitats in soil, marine environments or the intestines of humans and other warm-blooded animals. Some of the genera are pathogenic and usually associated with intestinal infections. Our body possesses several physical and chemical defence mechanisms to prevent pathogenic enteric bacteria from invading the gastrointestinal tract. One response of the innate immune system is to activate macrophages, which produce the potent cytotoxin nitric oxide (NO). However, some pathogens have evolved the ability to detoxify NO to less toxic compounds, such as the neuropharmacological agent and greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N₂O), which enables them to overcome the host's attack. The same mechanisms may be used by bacteria producing NO endogenously as a by-product of anaerobic nitrate respiration. In the present review, we provide a brief introduction into the NO detoxification mechanisms of two members of the Enterobacteriaceae family: Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. These are discussed as comparative non-pathogenic and pathogenic model systems in order to investigate the importance of detoxifying NO and producing N₂O for the pathogenicity of enteric bacteria.

  7. Model-based evaluation on the conversion ratio of ammonium to nitrite in a nitritation process for ammonium-rich wastewater treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-ming; YANG Qi; ZENG Guang-ming; A. Cornelius; K. H. Rosenwinkel; S. Kunst; D. Weichgrebe

    2004-01-01

    Modeling for nitritation process was discussed and analyzed quantlitatively for the factors that influence nitrite accumulation. The results indicated that pH, inorganic carbon source and Hydraulic Retention Time(HRT) as well as biomass concentration are the main factors that influenced the conversion ratio of ammonium to nitrite. A constant high pH can lead to a high nitritation rate and results in high conversion ratio on condition that free ammonia inhibition do not happen. In a CSTR system, without pH control, this conversion ratio can be monitored by pH variation in the reactor. The pH goes down far from the inlet level means a strongly nitrite accumulation. High concentration of alkalinity can promoted the conversion ratio by means of accelerating the nitritation rate through providing sufficient inorganic carbon source(carbon dioxide). When inorganic carbon source was depleted, the nitritation process stopped. HRT adjustment could be an efficient way to make the nitritation system run more flexible, which to some extent can meet the requirements of the fluctuant of inlet parameters such as ammonium concentration, pH, and temperature and so on. Biomass concentration is the key point, especially for a CSTR system in steady state, which was normally circumscribed by the characteristics of bacteria and may also affected by aeration mode and can be increased by prolonging the HRT on the condition of no nitrate accumulation when no recirculation available. The higher the biomass concentration is, the better the nitrite accumulation can be obtained.

  8. Quantification of anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria in enrichment cultures by quantitative competitive PCR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Chun; WANG Huan; LIU Qinhua; LI Xudong

    2009-01-01

    The anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (ANAMMOX) bacteria were enriched from a sequencing batch biofilm reactor (SBBR) biofilm.We successfully developed a quantitative competitive polymerase chain reaction (QC-PCR) system to detect and quantify ANAMMOX bacteria in environmental samples.For QC-PCR system,PCR primer sets targeting 16S ribosomal RNA genes of ANAMMOX bacteria were designed and used.The quantification range of this system was 4 orders of magnitude,from 10~3 to 10~6 copies per PCR,corresponding to the detection limit of 300 target copies per mL.A 312-bp internal standard (IS) was constructed,which showed very similar amplification efficiency with the target amxC fragment (349 bp) over 4 orders of magnitude (10~3-10~6).The linear regressions were obtained with a R~2 of 0.9824 for 10~3 copies,R~2 of 0.9882 for 10~4 copies,0.9857 for 10~5 copies and 0.9899 for 10~6 copies.Using this method,we quantified ANAMMOX bacteria in a shortcut nitrification/denitrification-anammox system which is set for piggery wastewater treatment.

  9. The metabolic impact of extracellular nitrite on aerobic metabolism of Paracoccus denitrificans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartop, K R; Sullivan, M J; Giannopoulos, G; Gates, A J; Bond, P L; Yuan, Z; Clarke, T A; Rowley, G; Richardson, D J

    2017-02-07

    Nitrite, in equilibrium with free nitrous acid (FNA), can inhibit both aerobic and anaerobic growth of microbial communities through bactericidal activities that have considerable potential for control of microbial growth in a range of water systems. There has been much focus on the effect of nitrite/FNA on anaerobic metabolism and so, to enhance understanding of the metabolic impact of nitrite/FNA on aerobic metabolism, a study was undertaken with a model denitrifying bacterium Paracoccus denitrificans PD1222. Extracellular nitrite inhibits aerobic growth of P. denitrificans in a pH-dependent manner that is likely to be a result of both nitrite and free nitrous acid (pKa = 3.25) and subsequent reactive nitrogen oxides generated from the intracellular passage of FNA into P. denitrificans. Increased expression of a gene encoding a flavohemoglobin protein (Fhp) (Pden_1689) was observed in response to extracellular nitrite. Construction and analysis of a deletion mutant established Fhp to be involved in endowing nitrite/FNA resistance at high extracellular nitrite concentrations. Global transcriptional analysis confirmed nitrite-dependent expression of fhp and indicated that P. denitrificans expressed a number of stress response systems associated with protein, DNA and lipid repair. It is therefore suggested that nitrite causes a pH-dependent stress response that is due to the production of associated reactive nitrogen species, such as nitric oxide from the internalisation of FNA.

  10. Mobilization of manganese by basalt associated Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria from the Indian Ridge System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujith, P P; Mourya, B S; Krishnamurthi, S; Meena, R M; Loka Bharathi, P A

    2014-01-01

    The Indian Ridge System basalt bearing Mn-oxide coatings had todorokite as the major and birnesite as the minor mineral. We posit that microorganisms associated with these basalts participate in the oxidation of Mn and contribute to mineral deposition. We also hypothesized that, the Mn-oxidizing microbes may respond reversibly to pulses of fresh organic carbon introduced into the water column by mobilizing the Mn in Mn-oxides. To test these two hypotheses, we enumerated the number of Mn-oxidizers and -reducers and carried out studies on the mobilization of Mn by microbial communities associated with basalt. In medium containing 100 μM Mn(2+), 10(3) colony forming units (CFU) were recovered with undetectable number of reducers on Mn-oxide amended medium, suggesting that the community was more oxidative. Experiments were then conducted with basalt fragments at 4±2 °C in the presence 'G(+)' and absence 'G(-)' of glucose (0.1%). Controls included set-ups, some of which were poisoned with 15 mM azide and the others of which were heat-killed. The mobilization of Mn in the presence of glucose was 1.76 μg g(-1) d(-1) and in the absence, it was 0.17 μg g(-1) d(-1) after 150 d. Mn mobilization with and without added glucose was 13 and 4 times greater than the corresponding azide treated controls. However, rates in 'G(+)' were 16 times and 'G(-)' 24 times more than the respective heat killed controls. The corresponding total counts in the presence of added glucose increased from 1.63×10(6) to 6.71×10(7) cells g(-1) and from 1.41×10(7) to 3.52×10(7) cells g(-1) in its absence. Thus, the addition of glucose as a proxy for organic carbon changed the community's response from Mn(II)-oxidizing to Mn(IV)-reducing activity. The results confirm the participation of Mn oxidizing bacteria in the mobilization of Mn. Identification of culturable bacteria by 16S rRNA gene analysis showed taxonomic affiliations to Bacillus, Exiguobacterium, Staphylococcus, Brevibacterium and

  11. Modelling nitrite dynamics and associated feedback processes in the Benguela oxygen minimum zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashifane, T. B.; Vichi, M.; Waldron, H. N.; Machu, E.; Garçonc, V.

    2016-08-01

    Understanding nitrite dynamics in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) is a challenge as it represents an intermediary nitrogen species with a short turnover time. Nitrite is also reduced to nitrogen in OMZs, preventing its accumulation. This creates difficulties in detecting nitrite with colorimetric methods as concentrations may occur below detection limits in some regions. Nitrite concentrations are key to understanding intermediate nitrogen processes and their implication for nitrogen loss in OMZs. A coupled physical-biogeochemical model is applied in the Benguela OMZ to study nitrite dynamics and its associated feedback processes. Simulated results show occurrence of primary and secondary nitrite maxima in the Benguela shelf waters. The primary nitrite maxima in the Benguela are attributed to nitrification and nitrate assimilation as they occur in association with the nitracline. Secondary nitrite maxima accumulate in the Angola-Benguela Front (ABF) OMZ and are attributed to denitrification. The secondary nitrite maxima are consumed by anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) off Walvis Bay. Nitrite maxima are restricted to the shelf off Walvis Bay and advected offshore in the ABF region. Interchanges between the poleward South Atlantic Central Water (SACW) and the equatorward, well-aerated Eastern South Atlantic Central Water (ESACW) drive the seasonality of nitrogen processes in the Benguela. Subsequent nitrite reduction in the Benguela OMZ leads to nitrous oxide production, with high concentrations occurring in the ABF region as a result of nitrification and denitrification. Off Walvis Bay, nitrous oxide production is low since nitrite is consumed by anammox. Nitrous oxide production occurs in thermocline, intermediate and deeper water masses in the ABF region. High N fluxes in the Benguela are attributed to nitrification as compared to anammox and denitrification. Results from this study demonstrate the role of intermediate nitrogen species in nitrogen feedback

  12. Modelling the growth of methane-oxidizing bacteria in a fixed biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilbo, Carl Morten; Arvin, Erik; Holst, Helle

    1992-01-01

    Methane-oxidizing bacteria were grown in a fixed biofilm reactor in order to study their ability to degrade chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons. Focus is on the growth behaviour of the mixed culture. The growth is described by a model that includes methanotrophic bacteria in the active biomass...... fraction. The inactive biomass fraction consists of exocellular polymers and biodegradable and inert particulate biomass. The model describes the oxygen respiration in detail. Yield coefficients, decay constants and hydrolysis constants are estimated based on the oxygen respiration. An analysis...... of the observability of the system reveals that several of the coefficients cannot be determined explicitly due to the complexity of the model and the limited amount of variables measured. Estimation procedures based on least squares methods are employed and parameter estimates and confidence intervals are computed...

  13. Spectrophotometric Determination of Nitrite by Catalytic Oxidation of Methyl Red with Potassium Chlorate%氯酸钾氧化甲基红催化光度法测定痕量亚硝酸根

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李红艳; 李子荣

    2013-01-01

    This paper erects a new method for the storage of nitrite under normal temperature and pressure in brown volumetric flask storage by adding appropriate amount of sodium carbonate solution and sodium hydroxide.A method of measuring nitrite un-der the normal temperature and pressure is established.In the presence of nitrite, methyl red can be oxidized by potassium chlorate in the solution of H3 PO4 .Under the wavelength of maximum absorption 519nm and the conditions of the experiment, linear equa-tions: y =0.1443x +0.011, R =0.9990,linear range: 0.04 ~4.0 μg・ mL -1 , detection limit is 0.01μg・ mL -1 .The method is simple, fast, reproducible, energy saving and environmental protection,The method has been applied to the determination of boiling water, lake water and river water with satisfactory results.%  通过加入适量碳酸钠和氢氧化钠,用棕色容量瓶储藏,获得常温、常压下储存亚硝酸根的新方法。基于磷酸介质中,利用亚硝酸根对氯酸钾氧化甲基红褪色有诱导催化作用,建立了常温、常压下测定痕量亚硝酸根的方法,在最大吸收波长519 nm 及选择的试验条件下,线性方程 y =0.1463x +0.011,R =0.9990,线性范围0.04~4.0μg・ mL -1,检出限为0.01μg・ mL -1,该方法简单、快捷、重现性好,节能环保。

  14. Isolation of iron-oxidizing bacteria from corroded concretes of sewage treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, T; Negishi, A; Komoto, H; Oshima, Y; Kamimura, K; Sugio, T

    1999-01-01

    Thirty-six strains of iron-oxidizing bacteria were isolated from corroded concrete samples obtained at eight sewage treatment plants in Japan. All of the strains isolated grew autotrophically in ferrous sulfate (3.0%), elemental sulfur (1.0%) and FeS (1.0%) media (pH 1.5). Washed intact cells of the 36 isolates had activities to oxidize both ferrous iron and elemental sulfur. Strain SNA-5, a representative of the isolated strains, was a gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium (0.5-0.6x0.9-1.5 microm). The mean G+C content of its DNA was 55.9 mol%. The pH and temperature optima for growth were 1.5 and 30 degrees C, and the bacterium had activity to assimilate 14CO2 into the cells when ferrous iron or elemental sulfur was used as a sole source of energy. These results suggest that SNA-5 is Thiobacillus ferrooxidans strain. The pHs and numbers of iron-oxidizing bacteria in corroded concrete samples obtained by boring to depths of 0-1, 1-3, and 3-5 cm below the concrete surface were respectively 1.4, 1.7, and 2.0, and 1.2 x 10(8), 5 x 10(7), and 5 x 10(6) cells/g concrete. The degree of corrosion in the sample obtained nearest to the surface was more severe than in the deeper samples. The findings indicated that the levels of acidification and corrosion of the concrete structure corresponded with the number of iron-oxidizing bacteria in a concrete sample. Sulfuric acid produced by the chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacterium Thiobacillus thiooxidansis known to induce concrete corrosion. Since not only T. thiooxidans but also T. ferrooxidans can oxidize reduced sulfur compounds and produce sulfuric acid, the results strongly suggest that T. ferrooxidans as well as T. thiooxidans is involved in concrete corrosion.

  15. Quantification of syntrophic fatty acid-beta-oxidizing bacteria in a mesophilic biogas reactor by oligonucleotide probe hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, K.W.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær; Raskin, L.

    1999-01-01

    -beta-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria, were developed and characterized. The probes were designed to be specific at the family, genus, and species levels and were characterized by temperature of-dissociation and specificity studies, To demonstrate the usefulness of the probes for the detection and quantification of saturated......Small-subunit rRNA sequences were obtained for two saturated fatty acid-beta-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria, Syntrophomonas sapovorans and Syntrophomonas wolfei LYE, and sequence analysis confirmed their classification as members of the family Syntrophomonadaceae. S, wolfei LYE was closely related...... fatty acid-beta-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria in methanogenic environments, the microbial community structure of a sample from a full-scale biogas plant was determined. Hybridization results with probes for syntrophic bacteria-and methanogens were compared to specific methanogenic activities...

  16. Nitrogen cycling and community structure of proteobacterial ß-subgroup ammonia-oxidizing bacteria within polluted marine fish farm sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCaig, A.E.; Phillips, C.B.; Stephen, J.R.; Kowalchuk, G.A.; Harvey, S.M.; Herbert, R.A.; Embley, T.M.; Prosser, J.I.

    1999-01-01

    A multidisciplinary approach was used to study the effects of pollution from a marine fish farm on nitrification rates and on the community structure of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in the underlying sediment. Organic content, ammonium concentrations, nitrification rates, and ammonia oxidizer most-pro

  17. Impact of chemical oxidation on indigenous bacteria and mobilization of nutrients and subsequent bioremediation of crude oil-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jinlan; Deng, Xin; Cui, Yiwei; Kong, Fanxing

    2016-12-15

    Fenton pre-oxidation provides nutrients to promote bioremediation. However, the effects of the indigenous bacteria that remain following Fenton oxidation on nutrient mobilization and subsequent bioremediation remain unclear. Experiments were performed with inoculation with native bacteria and foreign bacteria or without inoculation after four regimens of stepwise pre-oxidations. The effects of the indigenous bacteria remaining after stepwise oxidation on nutrient mobilization and subsequent bioremediation over 80 days were investigated. After stepwise Fenton pre-oxidation at a low H2O2 concentration (225×4), the remaining indigenous bacterial populations reached their peak (4.8±0.17×10(6)CFU/g), the nutrients were mobilized rapidly, and the subsequent bioremediation of crude oil was improved (biodegradation efficiency of 35%). However, after stepwise Fenton pre-oxidation at a high H2O2 concentration (450×4), only 3.6±0.16×10(3)CFU/g of indigenous bacteria remained, and the indigenous bacteria that degrade C15-C30 alkanes were inhibited. The nutrient mobilization was then highly limited, and only 19% of total petroleum hydrocarbon was degraded. Furthermore, the recovery period after the low H2O2 concentration stepwise Fenton pre-oxidation (225×4) was less than 20 days, which was 20-30 days shorter than with the other pre-oxidation treatments. Therefore, stepwise Fenton pre-oxidation at a low H2O2 concentration protects indigenous bacterial populations and improves the nutrient mobilization and subsequent bioremediation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. High-rate, high-yield production of methanol by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taher, Edris; Chandran, Kartik

    2013-04-02

    The overall goal of this study was to develop an appropriate biological process for achieving autotrophic conversion of methane (CH(4)) to methanol (CH3OH). In this study, we employed ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) to selectively and partially oxidize CH(4) to CH(3)OH. In fed-batch reactors using mixed nitrifying enrichment cultures from a continuous bioreactor, up to 59.89 ± 1.12 mg COD/L of CH(3)OH was produced within an incubation time of 7 h, which is approximately ten times the yield obtained previously using pure cultures of Nitrosomonas europaea. The maximum specific rate of CH(4) to CH(3)OH conversion obtained during this study was 0.82 mg CH(3)OH COD/mg AOB biomass COD-d, which is 1.5 times the highest value reported with pure cultures. Notwithstanding these positive results, CH(4) oxidation to CH(3)OH by AOB was inhibited by NH(3) (the primary substrate for the oxidative enzyme, ammonia monooxygenase, AMO) as well as the product, CH(3)OH, itself. Further, oxidation of CH(4) to CH(3)OH by AOB was also limited by reducing equivalents supply, which could be overcome by externally supplying hydroxylamine (NH(2)OH) as an electron donor. Therefore, a potential optimum design for promoting CH(4) to CH(3)OH oxidation by AOB could involve supplying NH(3) (needed to maintain AMO activity) uncoupled from the supply of NH(2)OH and CH(4). Partial oxidation of CH(4)-containing gases to CH3OH by AOB represents an attractive platform for the conversion of a gaseous mixture to an aqueous compound, which could be used as a commodity chemical. Alternately, the nitrate and CH(3) OH thus produced could be channeled to a downstream anoxic zone in a biological nitrogen removal process to effect nitrate reduction to N(2), using an internally produced organic electron donor.

  19. Evaluating primers for profiling anaerobic ammonia oxidizing bacteria within freshwater environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puntipar Sonthiphand

    Full Text Available Anaerobic ammonia oxidizing (anammox bacteria play an important role in transforming ammonium to nitrogen gas and contribute to fixed nitrogen losses in freshwater environments. Understanding the diversity and abundance of anammox bacteria requires reliable molecular tools, and these are not yet well established for these important Planctomycetes. To help validate PCR primers for the detection of anammox bacteria within freshwater ecosystems, we analyzed representative positive controls and selected samples from Grand River and groundwater sites, both from Ontario, Canada. The objectives of this study were to identify a suitable anammox denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE fingerprint method by using GC-clamp modifications to existing primers, and to verify the specificity of anammox-specific primers used for DGGE, cloning and qPCR methods. Six primer combinations were tested from four published primer sets (i.e. A438f/A684r, Amx368f/Amx820r, An7f/An1388r, and Pla46/1392r for both direct and nested PCR amplifications. All PCR products were run subsequently on DGGE gels to compare the resulting patterns. Two anammox-specific primer combinations were also used to generate clone libraries and quantify anammox bacterial 16S rRNA genes with qPCR. The primer set A438f/A684r was highly specific to anammox bacteria, provided reliable DGGE fingerprints and generated a high proportion of anammox-related clones. A second primer set (Amx368f/Amx820r was anammox specific, based on clone library analysis, but PCR products from different candidate species of anammox bacteria resolved poorly using DGGE analysis. Both DGGE and cloning results revealed that Ca. Brocadia and an uncharacterized anammox bacterial cluster represented the majority of anammox bacteria found in Grand River sediment and groundwater samples, respectively. Together, our results demonstrate that although Amx368f/Amx820r was useful for anammox-specific qPCR and clone library

  20. Linking Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria to natural attenuation at a former U mining site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akob, D.; Bohu, T.; Beyer, A.; Schäffner, F.; Händel, M.; Johnson, C.; Merten, D.; Büchel, G.; Totsche, K.; Küsel, K.

    2012-04-01

    Uranium mining near Ronneburg, Germany resulted in widespread environmental contamination with acid mine drainage (AMD) and high concentrations of heavy metals and radionuclides. Despite physical remediation of the area, groundwater is still a source of heavy metal contaminants, e.g., Cd, Ni, Co, Cu and Zn, to nearby ecosystems. However, natural attenuation of heavy metals is occurring in Mn oxide rich soils and sediments ranging in pH from 5 to 7. While microorganisms readily oxidize Mn(II) and precipitate Mn oxides at pH ~7 under oxic conditions, few studies describe Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) at pH ~5 and/or in the presence of heavy metals. In this study we (1) isolated MOB from the contaminated Ronneburg area at pH 5.5 and 7 and (2) evaluated the biological formation of Mn oxides. We isolated nine MOB strains at pH 7 (members of the Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes phyla) and a single isolate at pH 5.5 (Oxalobacteraceae isolate AB_14, within the β-Proteobacteria). LA-ICP-MS showed that all isolates accumulated Mn and Fe in their biomass. However, the Oxalobacteraceae isolate AB_14 oxidizes more Mn without additional Fe in the medium. Preliminary FTIR analysis indicated that all isolates formed precipitates, which showed absorption bands that were characteristic for birnessite. High resolution TEM showed variable morphology of precipitates and EDS confirmed the presence of Mn oxides. Isolate AB_14 was not surrounded with precipitates whereas our Actinobacteria isolate AB_18 was encrusted with Mn oxides. Electron diffraction is currently being used to confirm the presence of birnessite and other Mn oxide phases. This, the first known report of any organism capable of Mn oxidation at low pH, demonstrated that MOB can be involved in the natural attenuation of both moderately acidic and neutral pH soils and sediments via the formation of biogenic Mn oxides. Future work will fully evaluate the minerals formed in this process as well

  1. Evidence for hydrogen oxidation and metabolic plasticity in widespread deep-sea sulfur-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantharaman, Karthik; Breier, John A; Sheik, Cody S; Dick, Gregory J

    2013-01-02

    Hydrothermal vents are a well-known source of energy that powers chemosynthesis in the deep sea. Recent work suggests that microbial chemosynthesis is also surprisingly pervasive throughout the dark oceans, serving as a significant CO(2) sink even at sites far removed from vents. Ammonia and sulfur have been identified as potential electron donors for this chemosynthesis, but they do not fully account for measured rates of dark primary production in the pelagic water column. Here we use metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses to show that deep-sea populations of the SUP05 group of uncultured sulfur-oxidizing Gammaproteobacteria, which are abundant in widespread and diverse marine environments, contain and highly express genes encoding group 1 Ni, Fe hydrogenase enzymes for H(2) oxidation. Reconstruction of near-complete genomes of two cooccurring SUP05 populations in hydrothermal plumes and deep waters of the Gulf of California enabled detailed population-specific metatranscriptomic analyses, revealing dynamic patterns of gene content and transcript abundance. SUP05 transcripts for genes involved in H(2) and sulfur oxidation are most abundant in hydrothermal plumes where these electron donors are enriched. In contrast, a second hydrogenase has more abundant transcripts in background deep-sea samples. Coupled with results from a bioenergetic model that suggest that H(2) oxidation can contribute significantly to the SUP05 energy budget, these findings reveal the potential importance of H(2) as a key energy source in the deep ocean. This study also highlights the genomic plasticity of SUP05, which enables this widely distributed group to optimize its energy metabolism (electron donor and acceptor) to local geochemical conditions.

  2. Detecting endocrine disrupting compounds in water using sulfur-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ginkel, Steven W; Hassan, Sedky H A; Oh, Sang-Eun

    2010-09-01

    For the rapid and reliable detection of endocrine disrupting compounds in water, a novel toxicity detection methodology based on sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) has been developed. The methodology exploits the ability of SOB to oxidize elemental sulfur to sulfuric acid in the presence of oxygen. The reaction results in an increase in electrical conductivity (EC) and a decrease in pH. When endocrine disrupting compounds were added to the system, the effluent EC decreased and the pH increased due to the inhibition of the SOB. We found that the system can detect these chemicals in the 50-200 ppb range, which is lower than many whole-cell biosensors to date. The SOB biosensor can detect toxicity on the order of min to h which can serve as an early warning so as to not pollute the environment and affect public health. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The life cycle of iron Fe(III) oxide: impact of fungi and bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneville, Steeve

    2014-05-01

    Iron oxides are ubiquitous reactive constituents of soils, sediments and aquifers. They exhibit vast surface areas which bind a large array of trace metals, nutrients and organic molecules hence controlling their mobility/reactivity in the subsurface. In this context, understanding the "life cycle" of iron oxide in soils is paramount to many biogeochemical processes. Soils environments are notorious for their extreme heterogeneity and variability of chemical, physical conditions and biological agents at play. Here, we present studies investigating the role of two biological agents driving iron oxide dynamics in soils, root-associated fungi (mycorrhiza) and bacteria. Mycorrhiza filaments (hypha) grow preferentially around, and on the surface of nutrient-rich minerals, making mineral-fungi contact zones, hot-spots of chemical alteration in soils. However, because of the microscopic nature of hyphae (only ~ 5 µm wide for up to 1 mm long) and their tendency to strongly adhere to mineral surface, in situ observations of this interfacial micro-environment are scarce. In a microcosm, ectomycorrhiza (Paxillus involutus) was grown symbiotically with a pine tree (Pinus sylvestris) in the presence of freshly-cleaved biotite under humid, yet undersaturated, conditions typical of soils. Using spatially-resolved ion milling technique (FIB), transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopy (TEM/STEM-EDS), synchrotron based X-ray microscopy (STXM), we were able to quantify the speciation of Fe at the biotite-hypha interface. The results shows that substantial oxidation of biotite structural-Fe(II) into Fe(III) subdomains occurs at the contact zone between mycorrhiza and biotite. Once formed, iron(III) oxides can reductively dissolve under suboxic conditions via several abiotic and microbial pathways. In particular, they serve as terminal electron acceptors for the oxidation of organic matter by iron reducing bacteria. We aimed here to understand the role of Fe(III) mineral

  4. Protective effect of immobilized ammonia oxidizers and phenol-degrading bacteria on nitrification in ammonia- and phenol-containing wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, M.; Watanabe, A. [Environmental Science Research Laboratory, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), Chiba (Japan); Kudo, N.; Shinozaki, H. [Materials Science Engineering, Tokyo Denki University, Tokyo (Japan); Uemoto, H.

    2007-12-15

    Phenol present in wastewaters from various industries has an inhibitory effect on nitrification even at low concentrations. Hence, the biological treatment of wastewater containing both phenol and ammonia involves a series of treatment steps. It is difficult to achieve nitrification capability in an activated sludge system that contains phenol at concentrations above the inhibitory level. Batch treatment of wastewater containing various concentrations of phenol showed that the ammonia oxidation capability of suspended Nitrosomonas europaea cells, an ammonia oxidizer, was completely inhibited in the presence of more than 5.0 mg/L phenol. To protect the ammonia oxidizer from the inhibitory effect of phenol and to achieve ammonia oxidation capability in the wastewater containing phenol at concentrations above the inhibitory level, a simple bacterial consortium composed of an ammonia oxidizer (N. europaea) and a phenol-degrading bacterial strain (Acinetobacter sp.) was used. Ammonia oxidation did not occur in the presence of phenol at concentrations above the inhibitory level when suspended or immobilized N. europaea and Acinetobacter sp. cells were used in batch treatment. Following the acclimatization of the immobilized cells, accumulation of nitrite was observed, even when the wastewater contained phenol at concentrations above the inhibitory level. These results showed that immobilization was effective in protecting N. europaea cells from the inhibitory effect of phenol present in the wastewater. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  5. Anaerobic sulfide-oxidation in marine colorless sulfur-oxidizing bacteria

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.; Nair, S.; Chandramohan, D.

    ) as protein by Petersen’s method (1977). Dehydrogenase activity was measured using triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC) (Klapwijk et al. 1974) and measuring OD 520 of the reduced formazan. Nitrate was estimated by the method described by Parsons et al. (1984...) the sulfide concentration was increased to 45 ppm, 29 oxi- dized 19% whereas 82 could oxidize all of it. Strains M6 Pressure is an important parameter that could play a signifi- cant role in the survival and activity of these microbes. Anand 92 did not show...

  6. Interactions of the metal tolerant heterotrophic microorganisms and iron oxidizing autotrophic bacteria from sulphidic mine environment during bioleaching experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremic, Sanja; Beškoski, Vladimir P; Djokic, Lidija; Vasiljevic, Branka; Vrvić, Miroslav M; Avdalović, Jelena; Gojgić Cvijović, Gordana; Beškoski, Latinka Slavković; Nikodinovic-Runic, Jasmina

    2016-05-01

    Iron and sulfur oxidizing chemolithoautotrophic acidophilic bacteria, such as Acidithiobacillus species, hold the dominant role in mine environments characterized by low pH values and high concentrations of reduced sulfur and iron compounds, such as ores, rocks and acid drainage waters from mines. On the other hand, heterotrophic microorganisms, especially their biofilms, from these specific niches are receiving increased attention, but their potential eco-physiological roles have not been fully understood. Biofilms are considered a threat to human health, but biofilms also have beneficial properties as they are deployed in waste recycling and bioremediation systems. We have analyzed interactions of the metal tolerant heterotrophic microorganisms in biofilms with iron oxidizing autotrophic bacteria both from the sulphidic mine environment (copper mine Bor, Serbia). High tolerance to Cu(2+), Cd(2+) and Cr(6+) and the presence of genetic determinants for the respective metal tolerance and biofilm-forming ability was shown for indigenous heterotrophic bacteria that included strains of Staphylococcus and Rhodococcus. Two well characterized bacteria- Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (known biofilm former) and Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 (known metal resistant representative) were also included in the study. The interaction and survivability of autotrophic iron oxidizing Acidithiobacillus bacteria and biofilms of heterotrophic bacteria during co-cultivation was revealed. Finally, the effect of heterotrophic biofilms on bioleaching process with indigenous iron oxidizing Acidithiobacillus species was shown not to be inhibitory under in vitro conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Water dispersal of methanotrophic bacteria maintains functional methane oxidation in Sphagnum mosses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuliina ePutkinen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is known that Sphagnum associated methanotrophy (SAM changes in relation to the peatland water table (WT level. After drought, rising WT is able to reactivate SAM. We aimed to reveal whether this reactivation is due to activation of indigenous methane (CH4 oxidizing bacteria (MOB already present in the mosses or to MOB present in water. This was tested through two approaches: In a transplantation experiment, Sphagna lacking SAM activity were transplanted into flark water next to Sphagna oxidizing CH4. Already after 3 d, most of the transplants showed CH4 oxidation activity. Microarray showed that the MOB community compositions of the transplants and the original active mosses had become more similar within 28 d thus indicating MOB movement through water between mosses. Methylocystis-related type II MOB dominated the community. In a following experiment, SAM inactive mosses were bathed overnight in non-sterile and sterile-filtered SAM active site flark water. Only mosses bathed with non-sterile flark water became SAM active, which was also shown by the pmoA copy number increase of over 60 times. Thus, it was evident that MOB present in the water can colonize Sphagnum mosses. This colonization could act as a resilience mechanism for peatland CH4 dynamics by allowing the re-emergence of CH4 oxidation activity in Sphagnum.

  8. Enrichment and characteristics of mixed methane-oxidizing bacteria from a Chinese coal mine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hao; Duan, Changhong; Luo, Mingfang; Xing, Xin-Hui

    2016-12-01

    In methane-rich environments, methane-oxidizing bacteria usually occur predominantly among consortia including other types of microorganisms. In this study, artificial coal bed gas and methane gas were used to enrich mixed methanotrophic cultures from the soil of a coal mine in China, respectively. The changes in microbial community structure and function during the enrichment were examined. The microbial diversity was reduced as the enrichment proceeded, while the capacity for methane oxidation was significantly enhanced by the increased abundance of methanotrophs. The proportion of type II methanotrophs increased greatly from 7.84 % in the sampled soil to about 50 % in the enrichment cultures, due to the increase of methane concentration. After the microbial community of the cultures got stable, Methylomonas and Methylocystis became the dominant type I and type II methanotrophs, while Methylophilus was the prevailing methylotroph. The sequences affiliated with pigment-producing strains, Methylomonas rubra, Hydrogenophaga sp. AH-24, and Flavobacterium cucumis, could explain the orange appearance of the cultures. Comparing the two cultures, the multi-carbon sources in the artificial coal bed gas caused more variety of non-methanotrophic bacteria, but did not help to maintain the diversity or to increase the quantity and activity of methanotrophs. The results could help to understand the succession and interaction of microbial community in a methane-driven ecosystem.

  9. Nitric oxide synthase-dependent immune response against gram negative bacteria in a crustacean, Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Ramos, Tania; Carpio, Yamila; Bolívar, Jorge; Gómez, Leonardo; Estrada, Mario Pablo; Pendón, Carlos

    2016-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a short-lived radical generated by nitric oxide synthases (NOS). NO is involved in a variety of functions in invertebrates, including host defense. In previous studies, we isolated and sequenced for the first time the NOS gene from hemocytes of Panulirus argus, demonstrating the inducibility of this enzyme by lipopolysaccharide in vitro e in vivo. Hyperimmune serum was obtained from rabbits immunized with a P. argus -NOS fragment of 31 kDa produced in Escherichia coli, which specifically detected the recombinant polypeptide and the endogenous NOS from lobster hemocytes by western blotting and immunofluorescence. In the present work, we demonstrate that the hyperimmune serum obtained against P. argus NOS also recognizes Litopenaeus vannamei NOS in hemocytes by western blotting and immunofluorescence. Our data also show that while the hemolymph of L. vannamei has a strong antibacterial activity against the Gram negative bacteria Aeromonas hydrophila, the administration of the anti NOS serum reduce the natural bacterial clearance. These results strongly suggest that NOS is required for the shrimp immune defense toward Gram negative bacteria. Therefore, the monitoring of induction of NOS could be an important tool for testing immunity in shrimp farming.

  10. Diversity of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in greenwater system of coastal aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnani, Kishore Kumar; Kathiravan, V; Natarajan, M; Kailasam, M; Pillai, S M

    2010-11-01

    Reduced sulfur compounds produced by the metabolism are the one of the major problems in aquaculture. In the present study, herbivorous fishes have been cultured as biomanipulators for secretions of slime, which enhanced the production of greenwater containing beneficial bacteria. The genes encoding soxB which is largely unique to sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) due to its hydrolytic function has been targeted for examining the diversity of SOB in the green water system of coastal aquaculture. Novel sequences obtained based on the sequencing of metagenomic clone libraries for soxB genes revealed the abundance of SOB in green water system. Phylogenetic tree constructed from aligned amino acid sequences demonstrated that different clusters have only 82-93% match with Roseobacter sp., Phaeobacter sp., Roseovarius sp., Sulfitobacter sp., Ruegeria sp., and Oceanibulbus sp. The level of conservation of the soxB amino acid sequences ranged from 42% to 71%. 16S rRNA gene analyses of enrichment culture from green water system revealed the presence of Pseudoxanthomonas sp., which has 97% similarity with nutritionally fastidious Indian strain of Pseudoxanthomonas mexicana-a sulfur chemolithotrophic gamma-proteobacterium. Our results illustrate the relevance of SOB in the functioning of the green water system of coastal shrimp aquaculture for oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds, which in turn maintain the sulfide concentration well within the prescribed safe levels.

  11. Phylogenetic and functional marker genes to study ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms (AOM) in the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junier, Pilar; Molina, Verónica; Dorador, Cristina; Hadas, Ora; Kim, Ok-Sun; Junier, Thomas; Witzel, Jean-Paul; Imhoff, Johannes F

    2010-01-01

    The oxidation of ammonia plays a significant role in the transformation of fixed nitrogen in the global nitrogen cycle. Autotrophic ammonia oxidation is known in three groups of microorganisms. Aerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea convert ammonia into nitrite during nitrification. Anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (anammox) oxidize ammonia using nitrite as electron acceptor and producing atmospheric dinitrogen. The isolation and cultivation of all three groups in the laboratory are quite problematic due to their slow growth rates, poor growth yields, unpredictable lag phases, and sensitivity to certain organic compounds. Culture-independent approaches have contributed importantly to our understanding of the diversity and distribution of these microorganisms in the environment. In this review, we present an overview of approaches that have been used for the molecular study of ammonia oxidizers and discuss their application in different environments.

  12. Allosteric control of internal electron transfer in cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Kroneck, Peter M H; Zumft, Walter G

    2003-01-01

    Cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase is a bifunctional multiheme enzyme catalyzing the one-electron reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide and the four-electron reduction of dioxygen to water. Kinetics and thermodynamics of the internal electron transfer process in the Pseudomonas stutzeri enzyme have...

  13. Antimicrobial Effect of Copper Oxide Nanoparticles on Some Oral Bacteria and Candida Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amiri M

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Acid producing bacteria including Streptococcus mutans and lactobacilli cause tooth demineralization and lead to tooth decay. Also, oral colonization of the species of Candida has been reported in many studies that are resistant to antifungal agents. Objectives: In this study, antibacterial and antifungal effects of nano-CuO were studied against some oral bacteria and yeast fungi. Materials and Methods: The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs for oral bacterial and fungal test strains were determined in 96-well microtiter plate technique. The agar diffusion test (ADT was employed to assess the antifungal properties of nystatin. Results: The MIC50 value of CuO NPs was determined at the range of 1–10 µg/ml for S. mutans, < 1 µg/ml for L. acidophilus, and 10 µg/ml for L. casei. Higher concentrations of CuO NPs (100-1000 µg/ml were effective on the bacterial cell growth, resulting in 100% reduction in the optical density in TSB medium. The cells of Candida albicans, C. krusei and C. glabrata were treated with CuO NPs and the results showed a decrease in fungal growth at a concentration of 1-1000 µg/ml in TSB medium. The MIC50 value of CuO NPs was determined 1000 µg/ml for three species of Candida. The diameter of growth inhibition zones of 1100 µg/ml nystatin was obtained 15-21 mm for clinical isolates of three species of Candida. Conclusions: With respect to the potential bactericidal activity of CuO NPs on various cariogenic bacteria examined in this study, these NPs could be introduce as a candidate control agent for preventing dental caries or dental infections. In our study, on the other hand, Nano copper oxide had a weak effect on the candida species.

  14. Present and past contribution of anaerobic ammonium oxidation to nitrogen cycling as revealed by ladderane lipids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaeschke, A.

    2009-01-01

    Anammox, the anaerobic oxidation of ammonium to dinitrogen gas with nitrite as the electron acceptor, constitutes a novel route to convert biologically available (fixed) nitrogen to gaseous N2. This process is mediated by specific bacteria belonging to the Planctomycetes that were initially discover

  15. Present and past contribution of anaerobic ammonium oxidation to nitrogen cycling as revealed by ladderane lipids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaeschke, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Anammox, the anaerobic oxidation of ammonium to dinitrogen gas with nitrite as the electron acceptor, constitutes a novel route to convert biologically available (fixed) nitrogen to gaseous N2. This process is mediated by specific bacteria belonging to the Planctomycetes that were initially

  16. Practical Use of Nitrite and Basis for Dosage in the Manufacture of Meat Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adler-Nissen, Jens; Ekgreen, Maria Helbo; Risum, Jørgen

    The use of nitrite (NaNO2) in the manufacture of salted (cured) meat products has a long tradition in the industry, dating back to the early twentieth century. Nitrite serves several technological purposes, primarily by the formation of a stable red colour in the meat and the inhibition....... Nitrite also has a desirable anti-oxidant activity and contributes to the formation of pleasant flavours. A systematic literature review on the function and use of nitrite in meat leads to a tentative first conclusion that if the level of nitrite added to meat products is sufficient to protect against...... number of experiments were conducted in Denmark in collaboration with the Danish meat manufacturing industry in 1981-1983. Wiltshire bacon and certain canned products largely for export were not investigated in this study, however. The adverse effects of nitrite can mainly be ascribed to the risk...

  17. Roles of nitric oxide, nitrite and myoglobin on myocardial efficiency in trout (Oncorthynchus mykiss) and goldfish (Carassius auratus): implications for hypoxia tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Claus Lunde; Faggiano, Serena; Helbo, Signe;

    2010-01-01

    and nitrite on the O2 consumption rate and isometric twitch force development in electrically paced ventricular preparations during hypoxia, and measured O2 affinity and nitrite reductase activity of the purified heart Mbs of both species. Upon hypoxia (9% O2), O2 consumption and developed force decreased...

  18. Role of blood and vascular smooth muscle in the vasoactivity of nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Taiming; Schroeder, Hobe J; Barcelo, Lisa; Bragg, Shannon L; Terry, Michael H; Wilson, Sean M; Power, Gordon G; Blood, Arlin B

    2014-10-01

    Recent evidence from humans and rats indicates that nitrite is a vasodilator under hypoxic conditions by reacting with metal-containing proteins to produce nitric oxide (NO). We tested the hypothesis that near-physiological concentrations of nitrite would produce vasodilation in a hypoxia- and concentration-dependent manner in the hind limb of sheep. Anesthetized sheep were instrumented to measure arterial blood pressure and femoral blood flows continuously in both hind limbs. Nitrite was infused into one femoral artery to raise the nitrite concentration in the femoral vein by 10 to 15-fold while the sheep breathed 50%, 14% or 12% oxygen in inspired air. In contrast to reports in humans and rats, the nitrite infusion had no measurable effect on mean femoral blood flows or vascular conductances, regardless of inspired O2 levels. In vitro experiments showed no significant difference in the release of NO from nitrite in sheep and human red blood cells. Further experiments demonstrated nitrite is converted to NO in rat artery homogenates faster than sheep arteries, and that this source of NO production is attenuated in the presence of a heme oxidizer. Finally, western blots indicate that concentrations of the heme-containing protein cytoglobin, but not myoglobin, are markedly lower in sheep arteries compared with rats. Overall, the results demonstrate that nitrite is not a physiological vasodilator in sheep. This is likely due to a lack of conversion of nitrite to NO within the vascular smooth muscle, perhaps due to deficient amounts of the heme-containing protein cytoglobin.

  19. Role of Nitrite in Processed Meat Products and its Degradation during their Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ILIRJANA BOCI

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents the analytical data of nitrite level obtained from the experimental work done on meat processed samples taken from a meat processing plant in Tirana. There has been a long debate and health concern about the nitrite content in meat products. Nitrite is added to e.g. sausages, and hams and other meat products to preserve these products and keep them free from dangerous bacteria. Among the aims are preventing botulism, a dangerous food poison. But also it’s important to use the smallest possible amount of nitrite as a preservative because nitrite in meat can also form nitrosamines, which can damage the health. That’s why the role of nitrite in processed meat and its recommended level conform to new EC Regulations are given in the introduction part of this paper. It is important that the nitrite level be monitored during all the processing steps up to the end consumers. This makes the objective of this paper. It gives the analytical data on nitrite level on meat processed samples taken and tested during their storage and ripening period of time. Different kinds of meat products are taken and tested to evaluate the influence of various parameters (storage time, time until to the end consumers, various kinds of packing in the degradation rate of ingoing nitrite.

  20. Effect of lactic acid bacteria inoculated on sensory quality and nitrite concentration of pickles%人工接种乳酸菌对泡菜感官品质和亚硝酸盐含量的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁亚; 池金颖; 黄丹丹; 赵山山; 张秋香; 陈卫

    2012-01-01

    研究了不同的乳酸菌菌种、添加比例、添加量和加糖量对泡菜pH和亚硝酸盐含量的动态变化。通过单因素研究和优化实验,确定了乳酸菌菌种、添加比例、添加总量和加糖量。结果表明,植物乳杆菌和干酪乳杆菌混合发酵泡菜,添加比例为2∶1时,泡菜的发酵时间明显缩短,泡菜的色、香、味较好,亚硝酸盐含量显著降低。%The study aimed to analyze the change of pH and nitrite concentration during the fermentation of pickles with different strains,proportion and amount of Lactobacillus and different amount of sugar.Through single factor and optimal experiments,type,proportion and amount of strains was determined.The results showed that the proportion of L.plantarum and L.casei was 2∶1,the fermentation cycle of pickles was shortened,pickle had better sensory state,nitrite concentration was obviously degraded.

  1. Metagenomic Evidence for the Presence of Comammox Nitrospira-Like Bacteria in a Drinking Water System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Ameet J; Marcus, Daniel N; Ijaz, Umer Zeeshan; Bautista-de Lose Santos, Quyen Melina; Dick, Gregory J; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2016-01-01

    We report metagenomic evidence for the presence of a Nitrospira-like organism with the metabolic potential to perform the complete oxidation of ammonia to nitrate (i.e., it is a complete ammonia oxidizer [comammox]) in a drinking water system. This metagenome bin was discovered through shotgun DNA sequencing of samples from biologically active filters at the drinking water treatment plant in Ann Arbor, MI. Ribosomal proteins, 16S rRNA, and nxrA gene analyses confirmed that this genome is related to Nitrospira-like nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. The presence of the full suite of ammonia oxidation genes, including ammonia monooxygenase and hydroxylamine dehydrogenase, on a single ungapped scaffold within this metagenome bin suggests the presence of recently discovered comammox potential. Evaluations based on coverage and k-mer frequency distribution, use of two different genome-binning approaches, and nucleic acid and protein similarity analyses support the presence of this scaffold within the Nitrospira metagenome bin. The amoA gene found in this metagenome bin is divergent from those of canonical ammonia and methane oxidizers and clusters closely with the unusual amoA gene of comammox Nitrospira. This finding suggests that previously reported imbalances in abundances of nitrite- and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria/archaea may likely be explained by the capacity of Nitrospira-like organisms to completely oxidize ammonia. This finding might have significant implications for our understanding of microbially mediated nitrogen transformations in engineered and natural systems. IMPORTANCE Nitrification plays an important role in regulating the concentrations of inorganic nitrogen species in a range of environments, from drinking water and wastewater treatment plants to the oceans. Until recently, aerobic nitrification was considered to be a two-step process involving ammonia-oxidizing bacteria or archaea and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. This process requires close cooperation

  2. Adsorption immobilization of sulfide-oxidizing bacteria in the mass of the support medium made of phosphogypsum

    OpenAIRE

    Черныш, Елизавета Юрьевна; Пляцук, Леонид Дмитриевич

    2015-01-01

    The basic patterns and mechanisms of adsorption immobilization of sulfide-oxidizing bacteria in the mass of mineral support medium made of phosphogypsum were determined for gas purification system. The advantage of the adsorption method on the granulated support medium of phosphogypsum is that it allows to bind the bacteria in the granules with the bioactive layer formation. Granules based on phosphogypsum are characterized by permeability to Thiobacillus sp. and contain useful minerals for b...

  3. Cultivation-Independent Detection of Autotrophic Hydrogen-Oxidizing Bacteria by DNA Stable-Isotope Probing ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumphrey, Graham M.; Ranchou-Peyruse, Anthony; Spain, Jim C.

    2011-01-01

    Knallgas bacteria are a physiologically defined group that is primarily studied using cultivation-dependent techniques. Given that current cultivation techniques fail to grow most bacteria, cultivation-independent techniques that selectively detect and identify knallgas bacteria will improve our ability to study their diversity and distribution. We used stable-isotope probing (SIP) to identify knallgas bacteria in rhizosphere soil of legumes and in a microbial mat from Obsidian Pool in Yellowstone National Park. When samples were incubated in the dark, incorporation of 13CO2 was H2 dependent. SIP enabled the detection of knallgas bacteria that were not detected by cultivation, and the majority of bacteria identified in the rhizosphere soils were betaproteobacteria predominantly related to genera previously known to oxidize hydrogen. Bacteria in soil grew on hydrogen at concentrations as low as 100 ppm. A hydB homolog encoding a putative high-affinity NiFe hydrogenase was amplified from 13C-labeled DNA from both vetch and clover rhizosphere soil. The results indicate that knallgas bacteria can be detected by SIP and populations that respond to different H2 concentrations can be distinguished. The methods described here should be applicable to a variety of ecosystems and will enable the discovery of additional knallgas bacteria that are resistant to cultivation. PMID:21622787

  4. Co-existence of Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation Bacteria and Denitrifying Anaerobic Methane Oxidation Bacteria in Sewage Sludge: Community Diversity and Seasonal Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Sai; Lu, Wenjing; Mustafa, Muhammad Farooq

    2017-01-01

    , and an unknown cluster was primarily detected in autumn and winter. Similar patterns of seasonal variation in the community structure of DAMO bacteria were also observed. Group B was the dominant in spring and summer, whereas in autumn and winter, group A and group B presented almost the same proportion...... and their abundance in sewage sludge collected from wastewater treatment plants were analysed. Results indicated that ANAMMOX and DAMO bacteria co-existed in sewage sludge in different seasons and their abundance was positively correlated (P bacteria in autumn and winter...... indicated that these seasons were the preferred time to favour the growth of ANAMMOX and DAMO bacteria. The community structure of ANNAMOX and DAMO bacteria could also shift with seasonal changes. The “Candidatus Brocadia� genus of ANAMMOX bacteria was mainly recovered in spring and summer...

  5. Functional genes based analysis of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria community in sulfide removing bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jian-Fei; Lin, Wei-Tie; Guo, Yong

    2011-04-01

    Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) are the main microorganisms that participate in the bioremediation of sulfide-rich wastewater. To reveal the SOB community structure and determine which members of SOB contribute to the sulfide oxidation in a sulfide-rich cloth printing and dyeing wastewater treatment plant, specific primer pairs dsrA 625F/877R, soxB 704F/1199R, and sqr 473F/982R based on the SOB functional genes encoding dissimilatory sulfite reductase, sulfate thioesterase/thiohydrolase, and sulfide: quinone oxidoreductase were designed. The restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis showed that the diversity indices and the abundance of each OTU have no significant changes after time, which suggested the SOB community in the sulfide removing bioreactor have high steady phylogenetic analysis of functional gene-based clone libraries detected the SOB from Chlorobia, α-proteobacteria, β-proteobacteria, and γ-proteobacteria. The combined clone library showed the presence of dominant members of the SOB species closely related to families Halothiobacillaceae (17%), Hydrogenophilaceae (14%), and Rhodocyclaceae (13%), which may contribute to the sulfide oxidation in wastewater treatment process. This work provides a precise understanding of SOB microbial community within sulfide removing bioreactor, and the result gives assistance for the optimization of the treatment systems for sulfide biological degradation. © Springer-Verlag 2011

  6. Nitrous oxide emission related to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and mitigation options from N fertilization in a tropical soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Johnny R.; Cassman, Noriko A.; Kielak, Anna M.; Pijl, Agata; Carmo, Janaína B.; Lourenço, Kesia S.; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J.; Cantarella, Heitor; Kuramae, Eiko E.

    2016-07-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) from nitrogen fertilizers applied to sugarcane has high environmental impact on ethanol production. This study aimed to determine the main microbial processes responsible for the N2O emissions from soil fertilized with different N sources, to identify options to mitigate N2O emissions, and to determine the impacts of the N sources on the soil microbiome. In a field experiment, nitrogen was applied as calcium nitrate, urea, urea with dicyandiamide or 3,4 dimethylpyrazone phosphate nitrification inhibitors (NIs), and urea coated with polymer and sulfur (PSCU). Urea caused the highest N2O emissions (1.7% of N applied) and PSCU did not reduce cumulative N2O emissions compared to urea. NIs reduced N2O emissions (95%) compared to urea and had emissions comparable to those of the control (no N). Similarly, calcium nitrate resulted in very low N2O emissions. Interestingly, N2O emissions were significantly correlated only with bacterial amoA, but not with denitrification gene (nirK, nirS, nosZ) abundances, suggesting that ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, via the nitrification pathway, were the main contributors to N2O emissions. Moreover, the treatments had little effect on microbial composition or diversity. We suggest nitrate-based fertilizers or the addition of NIs in NH4+-N based fertilizers as viable options for reducing N2O emissions in tropical soils and lessening the environmental impact of biofuel produced from sugarcane.

  7. Community Structure of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea and Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria in Soil Treated with the Insecticide Imidacloprid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Cycoń

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this experiment was to assess the effect of imidacloprid on the community structure of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB in soil using the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE approach. Analysis showed that AOA and AOB community members were affected by the insecticide treatment. However, the calculation of the richness (S and the Shannon-Wiener index (H values for soil treated with the field rate (FR dosage of imidacloprid (1 mg/kg soil showed no changes in measured indices for the AOA and AOB community members. In turn, the 10*FR dosage of insecticide (10 mg/kg soil negatively affected the AOA community, which was confirmed by the decrease of the S and H values in comparison with the values obtained for the control soil. In the case of AOB community, an initial decline followed by the increase of the S and H values was obtained. Imidacloprid decreased the nitrification rate while the ammonification process was stimulated by the addition of imidacloprid. Changes in the community structure of AOA and AOB could be due to an increase in the concentration of N-NH4+, known as the most important factor which determines the contribution of these microorganisms to soil nitrification.

  8. Inhibitory action of two zinc oxide sources on the ex vivo growth of porcine small intestine bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahjen, W; Zentek, J; Durosoy, S

    2012-12-01

    Pharmacological dosage of zinc oxide in piglet weaning diets is a common practice to improve growth performance and gut health. However, high zinc excretion in animal wastes poses environmental challenges. Alternatives to current practice are studied. In this study, the inhibitory action of 2 zinc oxide sources on the ex vivo growth of small intestinal bacteria from weaned piglets was studied. Lag time was higher (P < 0.05) in media supplemented with a new zinc oxide preparation in stomach samples, but not in jejunum samples. Bacterial growth reduction (P < 0.05) was more drastic and more rapid in media supplemented with the new zinc oxide preparation.

  9. Characterization of phosphorus removal bacteria in (AO)2 SBR system by using different electron acceptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Yi-feng; WANG Lin; YU Ying; WANG Bao-zhen; LIU Shuo; SHEN Zheng

    2007-01-01

    Characteristics of phosphorus removal bacteria were investigated by using three different types of electron acceptors, as well as the positive role of nitrite in phosphorus removal process. An (AO)2 SBR (anaerobic-aerobic-anoxic-aerobic sequencing batch reactor) was thereby employed to enrich denitrifying phosphorus removal bacteria for simultaneously removing phosphorus and nitrogen via anoxic phosphorus uptake. Ammonium oxidation was controlled at the first phase of the nitrification process. Nitrite-inhibition batch tests illustrated that nitrite was not an inhibitor to phosphorus uptake process, but served as an alternative electron acceptor to nitrate and oxygen if the concentration was under the inhibition level of 40mg NO2 - N · L- 1. It implied that in addition to the two well-accepted groups of phosphorus removal bacterium ( one can only utilize oxygen as electron acceptor, P1, while the other can use both oxygen and nitrate as electron acceptor, P2 ), a new group of phosphorus removal bacterium P3, which could use oxygen, nitrate and nitrite as electron acceptor to take up phosphorus were identified in the test system. To understand (AO)2 SBR sludge better, the relative population of the different bacteria in this system, plus another A/O SBR sludge (seed sludge) were respectively estimated by the phosphorus uptake batch tests with either oxygen or nitrate or nitrite as electron acceptor. The results demonstrated that phosphorus removal capability of (AO)2 SBR sludge had a little degradation after A/O sludge was cultivated in the (AO)2 mode over a long period of time. However, denitrifying phosphorus removal bacteria ( P2 and P3 ) was significantly enriched showed by the relative population of the three types of bacteria,which implied that energy for aeration and COD consumption could be reduced in theory.

  10. A new method for sustained generation of ultra-pure nitric oxide-containing gas mixtures via controlled UVA-photolysis of nitrite solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opländer, C.; Baschin, M.; van Faassen, E.E.H.; Born, M.; Möller, M.; Pallua, N.; Suschek, C.V.

    2010-01-01

    Exogenous gaseous nitric oxide (gNO) is an FDA approved drug for treatment of a variety of human pathologies like Persistent Pulmonary Hypertension in neonates and premature babies, skin lesions and fungal dermatophyte infections. Substantial disadvantages of current gNO-based therapies are the high

  11. Acetobacterium, a new genus of hydrogen-oxidizing, carbon dioxide-reducing, anaerobic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balch, W.E.; Schoberth, S.; Tanner, R.S.; Wolfe, R.S.

    1977-10-01

    A new genus of fastidiously anaerobic bacteria which produce a homoacetic fermentation is described. Cells are gram-positive, oval-shaped, short rods which are actively motile by means of one or two subterminal flagella. Hydrogen is oxidized, and carbon dioxide is reduced to acetic acid. Organic substrates which are fermented in a mineral medium include frutose, glucose, lactate, glycerate, and formate. Pantothenate is required as a growth factor. The deoxyribonucleic acid base composition of the type species is 39 mol% guanine plus cytosine. The name Acetobacterium is proposed for this new genus, which is tentatively placed in the family Propionibacteriaceae. The type species, Acetobacterium woodii sp. nov., is named in honor of Harland G. Wood. The type strain of A. woodii is WB1 (= ATCC 29683 and DSM 1030).

  12. Use of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria as recognition elements in hydrogen sulfide biosensing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janfada, Behdokht; Yazdian, Fatemeh; Amoabediny, Ghassem; Rahaie, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Four sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (Thiobacillus thioparus, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans PTCC1717, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans PTCC1646, and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans PTCC1647) were used as biorecognition elements in a hydrogen sulfide biosensing system. All the experiments were performed in 0.1 M phosphate buffer solution containing 1-20 ppm H2S with optimum pH and temperature for each species. Although H2 S was applied to the biosensing system, the dissolved O2 content decreased. Dissolved O2 consumed by cells in both free and immobilized forms was measured using a dissolved oxygen sensor. Free bacterial cells exhibit fast response (thiooxidans retained more than 50% of activity after 30 days of immobilization. According to the data, A. thiooxidans and A. ferrooxidans are appropriate species for hydrogen sulfide biosensor.

  13. Temporal and Spatial Dynamics of Sediment Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (Anammox) Bacteria in Freshwater Lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuyin; Dai, Yu; Li, Ningning; Li, Bingxin; Xie, Shuguang; Liu, Yong

    2017-02-01

    Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) process can play an important role in freshwater nitrogen cycle. However, the distribution of anammox bacteria in freshwater lake and the associated environmental factors remain essentially unclear. The present study investigated the temporal and spatial dynamics of sediment anammox bacterial populations in eutrotrophic Dianchi Lake and mesotrophic Erhai Lake on the Yunnan Plateau (southwestern China). The remarkable spatial change of anammox bacterial abundance was found in Dianchi Lake, while the relatively slight spatial shift occurred in Erhai Lake. Dianchi Lake had greater anammox bacterial abundance than Erhai Lake. In both Dianchi Lake and Erhai Lake, anammox bacteria were much more abundant in summer than in spring. Anammox bacterial community richness, diversity, and structure in these two freshwater lakes were subjected to temporal and spatial variations. Sediment anammox bacterial communities in Dianchi Lake and Erhai Lake were dominated by Candidatus Brocadia and a novel phylotype followed by Candidatus Kuenenia; however, these two lakes had distinct anammox bacterial community structure. In addition, trophic status determined sediment anammox bacterial community structure.

  14. Lithotrophic iron-oxidizing bacteria produce organic stalks to control mineral growth: implications for biosignature formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Clara S; Fakra, Sirine C; Emerson, David; Fleming, Emily J; Edwards, Katrina J

    2011-04-01

    Neutrophilic Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) are often identified by their distinctive morphologies, such as the extracellular twisted ribbon-like stalks formed by Gallionella ferruginea or Mariprofundus ferrooxydans. Similar filaments preserved in silica are often identified as FeOB fossils in rocks. Although it is assumed that twisted iron stalks are indicative of FeOB, the stalk's metabolic role has not been established. To this end, we studied the marine FeOB M. ferrooxydans by light, X-ray and electron microscopy. Using time-lapse light microscopy, we observed cells excreting stalks during growth (averaging 2.2  μm  h(-1)). Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy show that stalks are Fe(III)-rich, whereas cells are low in Fe. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that stalks are composed of several fibrils, which contain few-nanometer-sized iron oxyhydroxide crystals. Lepidocrocite crystals that nucleated on the fibril surface are much larger (∼100  nm), suggesting that mineral growth within fibrils is retarded, relative to sites surrounding fibrils. C and N 1s NEXAFS spectroscopy and fluorescence probing show that stalks primarily contain carboxyl-rich polysaccharides. On the basis of these results, we suggest a physiological model for Fe oxidation in which cells excrete oxidized Fe bound to organic polymers. These organic molecules retard mineral growth, preventing cell encrustation. This model describes an essential role for stalk formation in FeOB growth. We suggest that stalk-like morphologies observed in modern and ancient samples may be correlated confidently with the Fe-oxidizing metabolism as a robust biosignature.

  15. Characterization of sulfur oxidizing bacteria related to biogenic sulfuric acid corrosion in sludge digesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Bettina; Herzog, Bastian; Drewes, Jörg E; Koch, Konrad; Müller, Elisabeth

    2016-07-18

    Biogenic sulfuric acid (BSA) corrosion damages sewerage and wastewater treatment facilities but is not well investigated in sludge digesters. Sulfur/sulfide oxidizing bacteria (SOB) oxidize sulfur compounds to sulfuric acid, inducing BSA corrosion. To obtain more information on BSA corrosion in sludge digesters, microbial communities from six different, BSA-damaged, digesters were analyzed using culture dependent methods and subsequent polymerase chain reaction denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). BSA production was determined in laboratory scale systems with mixed and pure cultures, and in-situ with concrete specimens from the digester headspace and sludge zones. The SOB Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, Thiomonas intermedia, and Thiomonas perometabolis were cultivated and compared to PCR-DGGE results, revealing the presence of additional acidophilic and neutrophilic SOB. Sulfate concentrations of 10-87 mmol/L after 6-21 days of incubation (final pH 1.0-2.0) in mixed cultures, and up to 433 mmol/L after 42 days (final pH sulfuric acid production potentials. Additionally, elevated sulfate concentrations in the corroded concrete of the digester headspace in contrast to the concrete of the sludge zone indicated biological sulfur/sulfide oxidation. The presence of SOB and confirmation of their sulfuric acid production under laboratory conditions reveal that these organisms might contribute to BSA corrosion within sludge digesters. Elevated sulfate concentrations on the corroded concrete wall in the digester headspace (compared to the sludge zone) further indicate biological sulfur/sulfide oxidation in-situ. For the first time, SOB presence and activity is directly relatable to BSA corrosion in sludge digesters.

  16. Lithotrophic iron-oxidizing bacteria produce organic stalks to control mineral growth: implications for biosignature formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Clara S; Fakra, Sirine C; Emerson, David; Fleming, Emily J; Edwards, Katrina J

    2011-07-01

    Neutrophilic Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) are often identified by their distinctive morphologies, such as the extracellular twisted ribbon-like stalks formed by Gallionella ferruginea or Mariprofundus ferrooxydans. Similar filaments preserved in silica are often identified as FeOB fossils in rocks. Although it is assumed that twisted iron stalks are indicative of FeOB, the stalk's metabolic role has not been established. To this end, we studied the marine FeOB M. ferrooxydans by light, X-ray and electron microscopy. Using time-lapse light microscopy, we observed cells excreting stalks during growth (averaging 2.2 {micro}m h(-1)). Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy show that stalks are Fe(III)-rich, whereas cells are low in Fe. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that stalks are composed of several fibrils, which contain few-nanometer-sized iron oxyhydroxide crystals. Lepidocrocite crystals that nucleated on the fibril surface are much larger ({approx}100 nm), suggesting that mineral growth within fibrils is retarded, relative to sites surrounding fibrils. C and N 1s NEXAFS spectroscopy and fluorescence probing show that stalks primarily contain carboxyl-rich polysaccharides. On the basis of these results, we suggest a physiological model for Fe oxidation in which cells excrete oxidized Fe bound to organic polymers. These organic molecules retard mineral growth, preventing cell encrustation. This model describes an essential role for stalk formation in FeOB growth. We suggest that stalk-like morphologies observed in modern and ancient samples may be correlated confidently with the Fe-oxidizing metabolism as a robust biosignature.

  17. Identification of Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria from a low-pH contaminated former uranium mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akob, Denise M.; Bohu, Tsing; Beyer, Andrea; Schäffner, Franziska; Händel, Matthias; Johnson, Carol A.; Merten, Dirk; Büchel, Georg; Totsche, Kai Uwe; Küsel, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    Biological Mn oxidation is responsible for producing highly reactive and abundant Mn oxide phases in the environment that can mitigate metal contamination. However, little is known about Mn oxidation in low-pH environments, where metal contamination often is a problem as the result of mining activities. We isolated two Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) at pH 5.5 (Duganella isolate AB_14 and Albidiferax isolate TB-2) and nine strains at pH 7 from a former uranium mining site. Isolate TB-2 may contribute to Mn oxidation in the acidic Mn-rich subsoil, as a closely related clone represented 16% of the total community. All isolates oxidized Mn over a small pH range, and isolates from low-pH samples only oxidized Mn below pH 6. Two strains with different pH optima differed in their Fe requirements for Mn oxidation, suggesting that Mn oxidation by the strain found at neutral pH was linked to Fe oxidation. Isolates tolerated Ni, Cu, and Cd and produced Mn oxides with similarities to todorokite and birnessite, with the latter being present in subsurface layers where metal enrichment was associated with Mn oxides. This demonstrates that MOB can be involved in the formation of biogenic Mn oxides in both moderately acidic and neutral pH environments.

  18. The Effect of Influent Characteristics and Operational Conditions over the Performance and Microbial Community Structure of Partial Nitritation Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Rodriguez-Sanchez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen is a main contaminant of wastewater worldwide. Novel processes for nitrogen removal have been developed over the last several decades. One of these is the partial nitritation process. This process includes the oxidation of ammonium to nitrite without the generation of nitrate. The partial nitritation process has several advantages over traditional nitrification-denitrification processes for nitrogen removal from wastewaters. In addition, partial nitritation is required for anammox elimination of nitrogen from wastewater. Partial nitritation is affected by operational conditions and substances present in the influent, such as quinolone antibiotics. In this review, the impact that several operational conditions, such as temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen concentration, hydraulic retention time and solids retention time, have over the partial nitritation process is covered. The effect of quinolone antibiotics and other emerging contaminants are discussed. Finally, future perspectives for the partial nitritation process are commented upon.

  19. Magnetic resonance study of the transmembrane nitrite diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samouilov, A; Woldman, Ya Yu; Zweier, J L; Khramtsov, V V

    2007-05-01

    Nitrite (NO(2)-), being a product of metabolism of both nitric oxide (NO(*)) and nitrate (NO(3)-), can accumulate in tissues and regenerate NO() by several mechanisms. The effect of NO(2)- on ischemia/reperfusion injury was also reported. Nevertheless, the mechanisms of intracellular NO(2)- accumulation are poorly understood. We suggested significant role of nitrite penetration through biological membranes in the form of undissociated nitrous acid (HNO(2)). This hypothesis has been tested using large unilamellar phosphatidylcholine liposomes and several spectroscopic techniques. HNO(2) transport across the phospholipid bilayer of liposomes facilitates proton transfer resulting in intraliposomal acidification, which was measured using pH-sensitive probes. NO(2)(-)-mediated intraliposomal acidification was confirmed by EPR spectroscopy using membrane-impermeable pH-sensitive nitroxide, AMC (2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-yloxy-2,5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-3-ium-4-yl)-aminomethanesulfonic acid (pK 5.25), and by (31)P NMR spectroscopy using inorganic phosphate (pK 6.9). Nitrite accumulates inside liposomes in concentration exceeding its concentration in the bulk solution, when initial transmembrane pH gradient (alkaline inside) is applied. Intraliposomal accumulation of NO(2)- was observed by direct measurement using chemiluminescence technique. Perfusion of isolated rat hearts with buffer containing 4 microM NO(2)- was performed. The nitrite concentrations in the effluent and in the tissue, measured after 1 min perfusion, were close, supporting fast penetration of the nitrite through the tissue. Measurements of the nitrite/nitrate showed that total concentration of NO(x) in myocardium increased from initial 7.8 to 24.7 microM after nitrite perfusion. Physiological significance of passive transmembrane transport of NO(2)- and its coupling with intraliposomal acidification are discussed.

  20. Increased Salivary Nitrite and Nitrate Excretion in Rats with Cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodi, Somayeh; Rahmatollahi, Mahdieh; Shahsavari, Fatemeh; Shafaroodi, Hamed; Grayesh-Nejad, Siyavash; Dehpour, Ahmad R

    2015-11-01

    Increased nitric oxide (NO) formation is mechanistically linked to pathophysiology of the extrahepatic complications of cirrhosis. NO is formed by either enzymatic or non-enzymatic pathways. Enzymatic production is catalyzed by NO synthase (NOS) while entero-salivary circulation of nitrate and nitrite is linked to non-enzymatic formation of NO under acidic pH in the stomach. There is no data on salivary excretion of nitrate and nitrite in cirrhosis. This study was aimed to investigate salivary levels of nitrate and nitrite in a rat model of biliary cirrhosis. Cirrhosis was induced by bile duct ligation (BDL). Four weeks after the operation, submandibular ducts of anesthetized BDL and control rats were cannulated with polyethylene microtube for saliva collection. Assessment of pH, nitrite and nitrate levels was performed in our research. We also investigated NOS expression by real time RT-PCR to estimate eNOS, nNOS and iNOS mRNA levels in the submandibular glands. Salivary pH was significantly lower in BDL rats in comparison to control animals. We also observed a statistically significant increase in salivary levels of nitrite as well as nitrate in BDL rats while there was no elevation in the mRNA expression of nNOS, eNOS, and iNOS in submandibular glands of cirrhotic groups. This indicates that an increased salivary level of nitrite/nitrate is less likely to be linked to increased enzymatic production of NO in the salivary epithelium. It appears that nitrate/nitrite can be transported from the blood stream by submandibular glands and excreted into saliva as entero-salivary circulation, and this mechanism may have been exaggerated during cirrhosis.

  1. Cerebrospinal fluid nitrite/nitrate levels in neurologic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milstien, S; Sakai, N; Brew, B J; Krieger, C; Vickers, J H; Saito, K; Heyes, M P

    1994-09-01

    Nitric oxide has been proposed to mediate cytotoxic effects in inflammatory diseases. To investigate the possibility that overproduction of nitric oxide might play a role in the neuropathology of inflammatory and noninflammatory neurological diseases, we compared levels of the markers of nitric oxide, nitrite plus nitrate, in the CSF of controls with those in patients with various neurologic diseases, including Huntington's and Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and HIV infection. We found that there were no significant increases in the CSF levels of these nitric oxide metabolites, even in patients infected with HIV or in monkeys infected with poliovirus, both of which have significantly elevated levels of the neurotoxin quinolinic acid and the marker of macrophage activation, neopterin. However, CSF quinolinic acid, neopterin, and nitrite/nitrate levels were significantly increased in a small group of patients with bacterial and viral meningitis.

  2. Molecular analysis of the distribution and phylogeny of the soxB gene among sulfur-oxidizing bacteria - evolution of the Sox sulfur-oxidizing enzyme system

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Birte; Imhoff, Johannes F.; Kuever, Jan

    2007-01-01

    The soxB gene encodes the SoxB component of the periplasmic thiosulfate-oxidizing Sox enzyme complex, which has been proposed to be widespread among the various phylogenetic groups of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) that convert thiosulfate to sulfate with and without the formation of sulfur globules as intermediate. Indeed, the comprehensive genetic and genomic analyses presented in the present study identified the soxB gene in 121 phylogenetically and physiologically divergent SOB, includin...

  3. Measurement of nitrite and nitrate in saliva of children with different caries activity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ghasempour, Maryam; Qujeq, Durdi; Rabiee, Maryam; Hamzeh, Mahtab

    2014-01-01

    .... Nitrate is a natural compound found in fruits and vegetables and when secreted in saliva, is reduced to nitrite through bacterial respiration and subsequently reduced to nitric oxide in acidic condition...

  4. ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY WASTEWATER TREATMENT OF NITRITE IONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.G. Morozov

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The main reason for high concentration of nitrite ions in water is the existence of sources of industrial and agricultural pollution. Contamination of drinking water, juices, wine and other liquids of nitrite ions as a result of improper use of nitrogen fertilizers has an adverse effect on living organism, because under the influence of enzymes nitrite ions in living organisms form high carcinogenic nitrosamines, and the interaction of nitrite ions from blood hemoglobin causes such toxicity that leads to disease cyanosis [1]. Therefore removal of nitrite ions from water has received increased attention. The paper discusses an innovative wastewater treatment technology from the nitrite ion with hypochlorite produced during electrolysis.

  5. Diversity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in relation to soil environment in Ebinur Lake Wetland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenge Hu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia oxidation is the first and rate-limiting step of nitrification and is carried out by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB. Ebinur Lake Wetland, the most representative temperate arid zone wetland ecosystem in China, is the centre of oasis and desertification of the northern slope of Tianshan conjugate. Soil samples were collected from three sites (Tamarix ramosissima, Halocnemum strobilaceum and Phragmites australis and different soil layers (0–5, 5–15, 15–25 and 25–35 cm in this wetland in spring, summer and autumn and were used to characterize the diversity of AOB based on the ammonia monooxygenase (amoA gene. Polymerase chain reaction denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE and bivariate correlation analysis were used to analyse the relationship between the diversity of AOB and soil environment factors. The PCR-DGGE indicated that the diversity of AOB was high in the entire sample and the Shannon diversity index varied from 1.369 to 2.471. The phylogenetic analysis showed that the amoA fragments were grouped into Nitrosospira sp. and Nitrosomonas sp. Most amoA gene sequences fell within the Nitrosospira sp. cluster, and only a few sequences were clustered with Nitrosomonas sp., indicating that Nitrosospira sp. may be more adaptable than Nitrosomonas sp. in this area. Bivariate correlation analysis showed that the diversity of AOB was significantly correlated with soil organic matter, conductivity, total phosphorus and nitrate in the Ebinur Lake Wetland in Xinjiang.

  6. Experimental diagenesis of organo-mineral structures formed by microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Aude; Kappler, Andreas; Schmid, Gregor; Quaroni, Luca; Obst, Martin

    2015-02-18

    Twisted stalks are organo-mineral structures produced by some microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria at O2 concentrations as low as 3 μM. The presence of these structures in rocks having experienced a diagenetic history could indicate microbial Fe(II)-oxidizing activity as well as localized abundance of oxygen at the time of sediment deposition. Here we use spectroscopy and analytical microscopy to evaluate if--and what kind of--transformations occur in twisted stalks through experimental diagenesis. Unique mineral textures appear on stalks as temperature and pressure conditions increase. Haematite and magnetite form from ferrihydrite at 170 °C-120 MPa. Yet the twisted morphology of the stalks, and the organic matrix, mainly composed of long-chain saturated aliphatic compounds, are preserved at 250 °C-140 MPa. Our results suggest that iron minerals might play a role in maintaining the structural and chemical integrity of stalks under diagenetic conditions and provide spectroscopic signatures for the search of ancient life in the rock record.

  7. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in groundwater treatment and drinking water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wielen, Paul W J J; Voost, Stefan; van der Kooij, Dick

    2009-07-01

    The ammonia-oxidizing prokaryote (AOP) community in three groundwater treatment plants and connected distribution systems was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR and sequence analysis targeting the amoA gene of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA). Results demonstrated that AOB and AOA numbers increased during biological filtration of ammonia-rich anoxic groundwater, and AOP were responsible for ammonium removal during treatment. In one of the treatment trains at plant C, ammonia removal correlated significantly with AOA numbers but not with AOB numbers. Thus, AOA were responsible for ammonia removal in water treatment at one of the studied plants. Furthermore, an observed negative correlation between the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration in the water and AOA numbers suggests that high DOC levels might reduce growth of AOA. AOP entered the distribution system in numbers ranging from 1.5 x 10(3) to 6.5 x 10(4) AOPs ml(-1). These numbers did not change during transport in the distribution system despite the absence of a disinfectant residual. Thus, inactive AOP biomass does not seem to be degraded by heterotrophic microorganisms in the distribution system. We conclude from our results that AOA can be commonly present in distribution systems and groundwater treatment, where they can be responsible for the removal of ammonia.

  8. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea grow under contrasting soil nitrogen conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Hong J; Cameron, Keith C; Shen, Ju-Pei; Winefield, Chris S; O'Callaghan, Maureen; Bowatte, Saman; He, Ji-Zheng

    2010-06-01

    Nitrification is a key process of the nitrogen (N) cycle in soil with major environmental implications. The recent discovery of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) questions the traditional assumption of the dominant role of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in nitrification. We investigated AOB and AOA growth and nitrification rate in two different layers of three grassland soils treated with animal urine substrate and a nitrification inhibitor [dicyandiamide (DCD)]. We show that AOB were more abundant in the topsoils than in the subsoils, whereas AOA were more abundant in one of the subsoils. AOB grew substantially when supplied with a high dose of urine substrate, whereas AOA only grew in the Controls without the urine-N substrate. AOB growth and the amoA gene transcription activity were significantly inhibited by DCD. Nitrification rates were much higher in the topsoils than in the subsoils and were significantly related to AOB abundance, but not to AOA abundance. These results suggest that AOB and AOA prefer different soil N conditions to grow: AOB under high ammonia (NH(3)) substrate and AOA under low NH(3) substrate conditions.

  9. Dynamics of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria in contrasted freshwater ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugoni, Mylène; Etien, Sandrine; Bourges, Antoine; Lepère, Cécile; Domaizon, Isabelle; Mallet, Clarisse; Bronner, Gisèle; Debroas, Didier; Mary, Isabelle

    2013-05-01

    Thaumarchaeota have been recognized as the main drivers of aerobic ammonia oxidation in many ecosystems. However, little is known about the role of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) and Bacteria (AOB) in lacustrine ecosystems. In this study, the photic zone of three contrasted freshwater ecosystems located in France was sampled during two periods: winter homothermy (H) and summer thermal stratification (TS), to investigate the distribution of planktonic AOA and AOB. We showed that AOB were predominant in nutrient-rich ecosystems, whereas AOA dominated when ammonia concentrations were the lowest and during winter, which could provide a favorable environment for their growth. Moreover, analyses of archaeal libraries revealed the ubiquity of the thaumarchaeal I.1a clade associated with higher diversity of AOA in the most nutrient-poor lake. More generally, this work assesses the presence of AOA in lakes, but also highlights the existence of clades typically associated with lacustrine and hot spring ecosystems and specific ecological niches occupied by these microorganisms.

  10. Detection of Cr6+ by the sulfur oxidizing bacteria biosensor: effect of different physical factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Sedky H A; Van Ginkel, Steven W; Oh, Sang-Eun

    2012-07-17

    A biosensor based on sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) for detection of toxic chemicals in water was developed. SOB are acidophilic microorganisms that get their energy through the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds in the presence of oxygen to produce sulfuric acid. The reaction results in an increase in electrical conductivity (EC) and a decrease in pH. The bioassay is based on the inhibition of SOB in the presence of toxic chemicals by measuring changes in EC and pH. The effect of different physical factors such as HRT, inorganic sulfur (S°) particle size, and temperature on detection of Cr(6+) was studied. The detection of Cr(6+) (50 ppb) was improved by decreasing the hydraulic retention time (HRT) from 30 to 10 min and increasing S° particle size from 1 to 4.75 mm. Detection time was shorter at 30 °C compared to 45 °C and the SOB were active over a wide range of temperatures with a maximum temperature for growth at 45 °C. This novel biosensor is simple, highly sensitive to low Cr(6+) concentrations (50 ppb), and also minimizes detection time. The present findings can be applied to the proper continuous screening of water ecosystem toxicity.

  11. Semi-continuous detection of toxic hexavalent chromium using a sulfur-oxidizing bacteria biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, Anup; Oh, Sang-Eun; Kim, Ki Duck; Shin, Beom-Soo

    2012-09-15

    Toxicity testing is becoming a useful tool for environmental risk assessment. A biosensor based on the metabolic properties of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) has been applied for the detection of toxic chemicals in water. The methodology exploits the ability of SOB to oxidize elemental sulfur to sulfuric acid under aerobic conditions. The reaction results in an increase in electrical conductivity (EC) and a decrease in pH. Five hours after Cr(6+) was added to the SOB biosensor operated in semi-continuous mode (1 min rapid feeding and 29 min batch reaction), a decrease in effluent EC and an increase in pH (from 2-3 to 6) were detected due to Cr(6+) toxicity to SOB. The SOB biosensor is simple; it can detect toxic levels of Cr(6+) on the order of minutes to hours, a useful time scale for early warning detection systems designed to protect the environment from further degradation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Niche partitioning of diverse sulfur-oxidizing bacteria at hydrothermal vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Dimitri V; Pjevac, Petra; Bach, Wolfgang; Hourdez, Stephane; Girguis, Peter R; Vidoudez, Charles; Amann, Rudolf; Meyerdierks, Anke

    2017-07-01

    At deep-sea hydrothermal vents, primary production is carried out by chemolithoautotrophic microorganisms, with the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds being a major driver for microbial carbon fixation. Dense and highly diverse assemblies of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) are observed, yet the principles of niche differentiation between the different SOB across geochemical gradients remain poorly understood. In this study niche differentiation of the key SOB was addressed by extensive sampling of active sulfidic vents at six different hydrothermal venting sites in the Manus Basin, off Papua New Guinea. We subjected 33 diffuse fluid and water column samples and 23 samples from surfaces of chimneys, rocks and fauna to a combined analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences, metagenomes and real-time in situ measured geochemical parameters. We found Sulfurovum Epsilonproteobacteria mainly attached to surfaces exposed to diffuse venting, while the SUP05-clade dominated the bacterioplankton in highly diluted mixtures of vent fluids and seawater. We propose that the high diversity within Sulfurimonas- and Sulfurovum-related Epsilonproteobacteria observed in this study derives from the high variation of environmental parameters such as oxygen and sulfide concentrations across small spatial and temporal scales.

  13. Nitrosylation of c heme in cd(1)-nitrite reductase is enhanced during catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldo, Serena; Giardina, Giorgio; Cutruzzolà, Francesca

    2014-08-29

    The reduction of nitrite into nitric oxide (NO) in denitrifying bacteria is catalyzed by nitrite reductase. In several species, this enzyme is a heme-containing protein with one c heme and one d1 heme per monomer (cd1NiR), encoded by the nirS gene. For many years, the evidence of a link between NO and this hemeprotein represented a paradox, given that NO was known to tightly bind and, possibly, inhibit hemeproteins, including cd1NiRs. It is now established that, during catalysis, cd1NiRs diverge from "canonical" hemeproteins, since the product NO rapidly dissociates from the ferrous d1 heme, which, in turn, displays a peculiar "low" affinity for NO (KD=0.11 μM at pH 7.0). It has been also previously shown that the c heme reacts with NO at acidic pH but c heme nitrosylation was not extensively investigated, given that in cd1NiR it was considered a side reaction, rather than a genuine process controlling catalysis. The spectroscopic study of the reaction of cd1NiR and its semi-apo derivative (containing the sole c heme) with NO reported here shows that c heme nitrosylation is enhanced during catalysis; this evidence has been discussed in order to assess the potential of c heme nitrosylation as a regulatory process, as observed for cytochrome c nitrosylation in mammalian mitochondria.

  14. Quantification of syntrophic fatty acid-beta-oxidizing bacteria in a mesophilic biogas reactor by oligonucleotide probe hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, K.W.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær; Raskin, L.

    1999-01-01

    Small-subunit rRNA sequences were obtained for two saturated fatty acid-beta-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria, Syntrophomonas sapovorans and Syntrophomonas wolfei LYE, and sequence analysis confirmed their classification as members of the family Syntrophomonadaceae. S, wolfei LYE was closely related...... to S. wolfei subsp. wolfei, but S. sapovorans did not cluster with the other members of the genus Syntrophomonas, Five oligonucleotide probes targeting the small-subunit rRNA of different groups within the family Syntrophomonadaceae, which contains all currently known saturated fatty acid...... fatty acid-beta-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria in methanogenic environments, the microbial community structure of a sample from a full-scale biogas plant was determined. Hybridization results with probes for syntrophic bacteria-and methanogens were compared to specific methanogenic activities...

  15. Candidatus "Scalindua brodaea", spec. nov., Candidatus "Scalindua wagneri", spec. nov., two new species of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Schmid, M.; Walsh, K.; Webb, R.; Rijpstra, W.I.C.; Pas-Schoonen, K. van de; Verbruggen, M.J.; Hill, T.; Moffett, B.; Fuerst, J.; Schouten, S.; Harris, James; Shaw, P.; Jetten, M.S.M.; Strous, M.

    2003-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) is both a promising process in wastewater treatment and a long overlooked microbial physiology that can contribute significantly to biological nitrogen cycling in the world's oceans. Anammox is mediated by a monophyletic group of bacteria that branches deeply i

  16. Candidatus "Scalindua brodaea", spec. nov., Candidatus "Scalindua wagneri", spec. nov., two new species of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Schmid, M.; Walsh, K.; Webb, R.; Rijpstra, W.I.C.; Pas-Schoonen, K. van de; Verbruggen, M.J.; Hill, T.; Moffett, B.; Fuerst, J.; Schouten, S.; Harris, James; Shaw, P.; Jetten, M.S.M.; Strous, M.

    2003-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) is both a promising process in wastewater treatment and a long overlooked microbial physiology that can contribute significantly to biological nitrogen cycling in the world's oceans. Anammox is mediated by a monophyletic group of bacteria that branches deeply

  17. Influence of oxygen partial pressure and salinity on the community composition of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in the Schelde estuary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bollmann, A.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    2002-01-01

    The influence of environmental factors on the community structure of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) was investigated in the Schelde estuary. Simultaneously with the increase of oxygen and salinity, a shift of the dominant AOB was observed. Molecular analysis based on 16S rRNA genes showed that the

  18. Remarkable recovery and colonization behaviour of methane oxidizing bacteria in soil after disturbance is controlled by methane source only

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pan, Y.; Abell, G.C.J.; Bodelier, P.L.E.; Meima-Franke, M.; Sessitsch, A.; Bodrossy, L.

    2014-01-01

    Little is understood about the relationship between microbial assemblage history, the composition and function of specific functional guilds and the ecosystem functions they provide. To learn more about this relationship we used methane oxidizing bacteria (MOB) as model organisms and performed soil

  19. Nitrogen dioxide-dependent oxidation of uric acid in the human oral cavity under acidic conditions: implications for its occurrence in acidic dental plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahama, Umeo; Hirota, Sachiko

    2010-06-21

    The pH in dental plaque falls to below 5 after the ingestion of foods, and it may remain low if acid-tolerant bacteria grow in the plaque. Certain nitrate-reducing bacteria in the oral cavity can proliferate in dental plaque at low pH, and nitrite is detected in such plaque. In acidic dental plaque, NO(2) can be produced by self-decomposition of nitrous acid and also by peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of nitrite, and it may oxidize uric acid, a major antioxidant in the oral cavity. Under experimental conditions that simulate oral cavity, the oxidation of uric acid by nitrite and by nitrite/peroxidase systems was much more rapid at pH 5 than at pH 7, suggesting the more rapid production of NO(2) in dental plaque at lower pH. We propose that if the pH of plaque developed in a dental crevice decreased, NO(2) and other nitrogen oxides produced in the plaque would diffuse into the adjoining gingival tissues. The results of this study seem to contribute to the understanding of the induction of periodontal diseases in the context of nitrite-dependent production of nitrogen oxides in acidic dental plaque.

  20. Model-based evaluation of ferrous iron oxidation by acidophilic bacteria in chemostat and biofilm airlift reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Sirous; Faraghi, Neda; Hosseini, Maryam

    2015-10-01

    This article presents a model-based evaluation of ferrous iron oxidation in chemostat and biofilm airlift reactors inoculated with a mixed culture of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans bacteria. The competition between the two types of bacteria in the chemostat and in the biofilm airlift reactors together with the distribution of both bacteria along the biofilm thickness at different time sections has been studied. The bacterial distribution profiles along the biofilm in the airlift reactor at different time scales show that in the beginning A. ferrooxidans bacteria are dominant, but when the reactor operates for a long time the desirable L. ferrooxidans species outcompete A. ferrooxidans as a result of the low Fe(2+) and high Fe(3+) concentrations. The results obtained from the simulation were compared with the experimental data of continuously operated internal loop airlift biofilm reactor. The model results are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  1. Oxygen and sulfur isotope fractionation during sulfide oxidation by anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabec, Michelle Y.; Lyons, Timothy W.; Mandernack, Kevin W.

    2012-04-01

    Sulfide-mediated anoxygenic photosynthesis (SMAP) carried out by anaerobic phototrophic bacteria may have played an important role in sulfur cycling, formation of sulfate, and, perhaps, primary production in the Earth’s early oceans. Determination of ε34SSO4-Sulfide- and ε18OSO4-H2O values for bacterial sulfide oxidation will permit more refined interpretation of the δ34S and δ18OSO4 values measured in modern anoxic environments, such as meromictic lakes where sulfide commonly extends into the photic zone, and in the ancient rock record, particularly during periods of the Precambrian when anoxic and sulfidic (euxinic) conditions were believed to be more pervasive than today. Laboratory experiments with anaerobic purple and green sulfur phototrophs, Allochromatium vinosum and Chlorobaculum tepidum, respectively, were conducted to determine the sulfur and oxygen isotope fractionation during the oxidation of sulfide to sulfate. Replicate experiments were conducted at 25 °C for A. vinosum and 45 °C for C. tepidum, and in duplicate at three different starting oxygen isotope values for water to determine sulfate-water oxygen isotope fractionations accurately (ε18OSO4-H2O). ε18OSO4-H2O values of 5.6 ± 0.2‰ and 5.4 ± 0.1‰ were obtained for A. vinosum and C. tepidum, respectively. Temperature had no apparent effect on the ε18OSO4-H2O values. By combining all data from both cultures, an average ε18OSO4-H2O value of 5.6 ± 0.3‰ was obtained for SMAP. This value falls between those previously reported for bacterial oxidation of sphalerite and elemental sulfur (7-9‰) and abiotic and biotic oxidation of pyrite and chalcopyrite (2-4‰). Sulfur isotope fractionation between sulfide and sulfate formed by A.vinosum was negligible (0.1 ± 0.2‰) during all experiments. For C. tepidum an apparent fractionation of -2.3 ± 0.5‰ was observed during the earlier stages of oxidation based on bulk δ34S measurements of sulfate and sulfide and became smaller (-0.7

  2. Nitrogen removal performance and loading capacity of a novel single-stage nitritation-anammox system with syntrophic micro-granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaopo; Liu, Yuan; Niu, Qigui; Ji, Jiayuan; Hojo, Toshimasa; Li, Yu-You

    2017-07-01

    The operation performance of a novel micro-granule based syntrophic system of nitritation and anammox was studied by controlling the oxygen concentration and maintaining a constant temperature of 25°C. With the oxygen concentration of around 0.11 (removal of 82%. The microbial community was composed by ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and anammox bacteria forming micro-granules with an average diameter of 0.8mm and good settleability. Results from pyrosequencing analysis revealed that Ca. Kuenenia and Nitrosomonas were selected and enriched in the community over the startup period, and these were identified as the dominant anammox bacteria and AOB species, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Diversification and niche adaptations of Nitrospina-like bacteria in the polyextreme interfaces of Red Sea brines

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) of the genus Nitrospina have exclusively been found in marine environments. In the brine–seawater interface layer of Atlantis II Deep (Red Sea), Nitrospina-like bacteria constitute up to one-third of the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences. This is much higher compared with that reported in other marine habitats (~10% of all bacteria), and was unexpected because no NOB culture has been observed to grow above 4.0% salinity, presumably due to the l...

  4. Distribution and activity of methane-oxidizing bacteria in a polluted, stratified lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, M. C.; Udert, K.; Gschwend, P. M.; Cavanaugh, C. M.

    2006-12-01

    Methanotrophs are of global significance in their role as a major biological sink for methane, a greenhouse gas, and are metabolically active where methane and oxygen co-occur. Lake Mishawum in Woburn, MA, is a shallow, permanently stratified lake with a highly saline, anoxic hypolimnion rich in methane and organic pollutants, an oxic epilimnion and an interface between these layers, the metalimnion. This unique stratification is maintained because the bottom water continually receives inputs of salty, polluted groundwater while the upper layer is fed by rainwater runoff and a fast moving brook. Based upon observed decreases in methane and oxygen in metalimnion waters and geochemical modeling of the lake, methanotrophs were hypothesized to play a significant role in methane oxidation at the oxic-anoxic interface of the metalinion and to be found in greatest number at this junction between methane and oxygen. To test this hypothesis, the abundance of methanotrophs in epilimnion, metalimnion and hypolimnion of Lake Mishawum was investigated. Quantitative PCR (QPCR) studies in which the methanol dehydrogenase gene of either Type I or Type II methanotrophs was amplified showed that their populations were in fact similar in number through out the depth of the water column. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies confirmed the presence of methanotrophs in each layer. However, 16S rRNA hybridization studies showed that methanotrophs in the metalimnion and epilimnion have 2-3X greater rRNA content than those in the hypolimnion. These results suggest that methanotrophs are most active in the oxygenate zones of the lake, particulary in the metalimnion where the presence of methane and oxygen allows them to actively metabolize and proliferate. Furthermore, it suggests that the activity of bacteria and not necessarily the number of these populations is the more important variable in assessing the significance of these bacteria in this ecosystem.

  5. Effects of arbuscular mycorrhizas on ammonia oxidizing bacteria in an organic farm soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavagnaro, T R; Jackson, L E; Scow, K M; Hristova, K R

    2007-11-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are potentially important in nutrient cycling in agricultural soils and particularly in soils managed for organic production; little is known, however, about the interrelationships between AMF and other members of soil microbial communities. Ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) are a trophic group of bacteria having an enormous impact on nitrogen availability in soils and are expected to be influenced by the presence of AMF. In a field study, we utilized a unique genetic system comprised of a mycorrhiza defective tomato mutant (named rmc) and its mycorrhiza wild-type progenitor (named 76RMYC+). We examined the effect of AMF by comparing AOB community composition and populations in soil containing roots of the two tomato genotypes in an organically managed soil. Responses of AOB to soil N and P amendments were also studied in the same experiment. Phylogenetic analysis of cloned AOB sequences, derived from excised denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) bands, revealed that the organic farm soil supported a diverse yet stable AOB community, which was neither influenced by mycorrhizal colonization of roots nor by N and P addition to the soil. Real-time TaqMan polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to quantify AOB population sizes and showed no difference between any of the treatments. An alternative real-time PCR protocol for quantification of AOB utilizing SYBR green yielded similar results as the TaqMan real-time PCR method, although with slightly lower resolution. This alternative method is advantageous in not requiring the detailed background information about AOB community composition required for adaptation of the TaqMan system for a new soil.

  6. Metal mobilization by iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in a multiple extreme mine tailings in the Atacama Desert, Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korehi, H; Blöthe, M; Sitnikova, M A; Dold, B; Schippers, A

    2013-03-05

    The marine shore sulfidic mine tailings dump at the Chañaral Bay in the Atacama Desert, northern Chile, is characterized by extreme acidity, high salinity, and high heavy metals concentrations. Due to pyrite oxidation, metals (especially copper) are mobilized under acidic conditions and transported toward the tailings surface and precipitate as secondary minerals (Dold, Environ. Sci. Technol. 2006, 40, 752-758.). Depth profiles of total cell counts in this almost organic-carbon free multiple extreme environment showed variable numbers with up to 10(8) cells g(-1) dry weight for 50 samples at four sites. Real-time PCR quantification and bacterial 16S rRNA gene diversity analysis via clone libraries revealed a dominance of Bacteria over Archaea and the frequent occurrence of the acidophilic iron(II)- and sulfur-oxidizing and iron(III)-reducing genera Acidithiobacillus, Alicyclobacillus, and Sulfobacillus. Acidophilic chemolithoautotrophic iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria were also frequently found via most-probable-number (MPN) cultivation. Halotolerant iron(II)-oxidizers in enrichment cultures were active at NaCl concentrations up to 1 M. Maximal microcalorimetrically determined pyrite oxidation rates coincided with maxima of the pyrite content, total cell counts, and MPN of iron(II)-oxidizers. These findings indicate that microbial pyrite oxidation and metal mobilization preferentially occur in distinct tailings layers at high salinity. Microorganisms for biomining with seawater salt concentrations obviously exist in nature.

  7. Long-term effects of engineered nanoparticles on enzyme activity and functional bacteria in wastewater treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiong; Huang, Haining; Su, Yinglong; Wei, Yuanyuan; Chen, Yinguang

    2015-01-01

    The pervasive use of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) in a wide range of fields raises concerns about their potential environmental impacts. Previous studies confirmed that some NPs had already entered wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Wastewater nutrient removal depends on the metabolisms of activated sludge bacteria and their related key enzymes. Therefore, this study compared the possible influences of Al2O3, SiO2, TiO2, and ZnO NPs on the key enzymes activities and microbial community structures involved in wastewater treatment facilities. It was found that long-term exposure to these NPs significantly affected the microbial communities and changed the relative abundances of key functional bacteria, such as ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. Also, the gene expressions and catalytic activities of essential enzymes, such as ammonia monooxygenase, nitrite oxidoreductase, nitrate reductase, and nitrite reductase, were decreased, which finally resulted in a lower efficiency of biological nitrogen removal.

  8. ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY WASTEWATER TREATMENT OF NITRITE IONS

    OpenAIRE

    E. G. Morozov; V.M. Nikol`skii; T.V. Saprunova; A.A. Yakovlev

    2012-01-01

    The main reason for high concentration of nitrite ions in water is the existence of sources of industrial and agricultural pollution. Contamination of drinking water, juices, wine and other liquids of nitrite ions as a result of improper use of nitrogen fertilizers has an adverse effect on living organism, because under the influence of enzymes nitrite ions in living organisms form high carcinogenic nitrosamines, and the interaction of nitrite ions from blood hemoglobin causes such toxicity t...

  9. A novel thermophilic methane-oxidizing bacteria from thermal springs of Uzon volcano caldera, Kamchatka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorianchikova, E.; Kizilova, A.; Kravchenko, I.; Galchenko, V.

    2012-04-01

    Methane is a radiatively active trace gas, contributing significantly to the greenhouse effect. It is 26 times more efficient in absorbing and re-emitting infrared radiation than carbon dioxide. Methanotrophs play an essential role in the global carbon cycle by oxidizing 50-75% of the biologically produced methane in situ, before it reaches the atmosphere. Methane-oxidizing bacteria are isolated from the various ecosystems and described at present. Their biology, processes of methane oxidation in fresh-water, marsh, soil and marine habitats are investigated quite well. Processes of methane oxidation in places with extreme physical and chemical conditions (high or low , salinity and temperature values) are studied in much smaller degree. Such ecosystems occupy a considerable part of the Earth's surface. The existence of aerobic methanotrophs inhabiting extreme environments has been verified so far by cultivation experiments and direct detection of methane monooxygenase genes specific to almost all aerobic methanotrophs. Thermophilic and thermotolerant methanotrophs have been isolated from such extreme environments and consist of the gammaproteobacterial (type I) genera Methylothermus, Methylocaldum, Methylococcus and the verrucomicrobial genus Methylacidiphilum. Uzon volcano caldera is a unique area, where volcanic processes still happen today. Hydrothermal springs of the area are extreme ecosystems which microbial communities represent considerable scientific interest of fundamental and applied character. A thermophilic aerobic methane-oxidising bacterium was isolated from a sediment sample from a hot spring (56.1; 5.3) of Uzon caldera. Strain S21 was isolated using mineral low salt medium. The headspace gas was composed of CH4, Ar, CO2, and O2 (40:40:15:5). The temperature of cultivation was 50, pH 5.5. Cells of strain S21 in exponential and early-stationary phase were coccoid bacilli, about 1 μm in diameter, and motile with a single polar flagellum. PCR and

  10. The effect of thiosulfate-oxidizing bacteria on the stability of the gold-thiosulfate complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengke, Maggy F.; Southam, Gordon

    2005-08-01

    An Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans spp., isolated from the Driefontein Consolidated Gold Mine, Witwatersrand Basin, Republic of South Africa was able to precipitate gold from Au(S 2O 3) 23- in the presence of up to 0.26 mM gold. In chemical control experiments and with the presence of dead bacteria, gold was not precipitated under similar experimental conditions and duration. During growth, the pH of the culture medium decreased from pH 5.4 to 1.9, while the Eh increased from 0.3 to between 0.5 to 0.6 V within a period of 75 days. In the active (live) bacterial culture systems, acid production enhanced thiosulfate disproportionation, after which the elemental sulfur and any other intermediate sulfur species were oxidized completely to sulfate. The gold, Au(S 2O 3) 23-, was stable in the bacterial systems until sulfur oxidation was complete; then the bacteria precipitated gold from Au(S 2O 3) 23-. The bacterial systems (0.02-0.26 mM gold) precipitated 87 to 100% of the gold under diurnal light exposure, while only 11 to 69% of the gold was precipitated in the dark. The presence of gold (≥0.08 mM) reduced bacterial growth, disrupted cell division causing cell elongation, and was ultimately toxic to this bacterium, killing the cultures. The gold was precipitated inside the bacterial cells as fine-grained colloids ranging between 5 and 10 nm in diameter and in the bulk fluid phase as crystalline micrometer-scale gold. Observations using transmission electron microscopy revealed that the gold was deposited throughout the cell; however, it was concentrated in the cell envelope, especially along the cytoplasmic membrane, suggesting that gold precipitation was likely enhanced via electron transport processes associated with energy generation. Seven months after population growth had stopped, the gold had formed coiled or wire gold, irregular and rounded structures with an approximate size ranging from 0.5 to 5 μm, and crystalline octahedral gold.

  11. Optimization of oxidative stability, color and sensory properties of uncured (nitrite-free) Asian hot dogs (Jigo) using response surface methodology (RSM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahmouzi, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    This work investigated the effect of natural antioxidants (ascorbic acid (AA), α-tocopherol (TOC) and orange dietary fibre (ODF)) on oxidative stability, color and sensory properties in uncured hot dogs during chilled storage (3 ± 1 °C 4 weeks). A box-behnken design was employed for analysis of the responses (TBARS, peroxide value, pH, colour, taste and aroma) to obtain optimal conditions. Sausages containing TOC (20 mg/kg) and AA (0.1 %) had lower (0.11 mg malonaldehyde (MAD)/kg) TBARS values than those other combinations. This treatment also showed a peroxide value of 1.53 meq/kg when the experiment was finished. Lightness, redness and yellowness values varied among variables. Treatment with AA (0.1 %) resulted in lower lightness, yellowness and pH values than other treatments. Based on analysis, AA (0.1 %), TOC (20 mg/kg) and ODF (5 %), gave the optimum results. Under these conditions, the actual values were in close agreement with the values predicted by the model.

  12. Complete Nitrogen Removal from Synthetic Anaerobic Sludge Digestion Liquor through Integrating Anammox and Denitrifying Anaerobic Methane Oxidation in a Membrane Biofilm Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Guo-Jun; Cai, Chen; Hu, Shihu; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2017-01-17

    Partial nitritation and Anammox processes are increasingly used for nitrogen removal from anaerobic sludge digestion liquor. However, their nitrogen removal efficiency is often limited due to the production of nitrate by the Anammox reaction and the sensitivity to the nitrite to ammonium ratio. This work develops and demonstrates an innovative process that achieves complete nitrogen removal from partially nitrified anaerobic sludge digestion liquor through the use of a membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR), with methane supplied through hollow fiber membranes. When steady state with a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 1 day was reached, the process achieved complete nitrite and ammonium removal at rates of 560 mg N/L/d and 470 mg N/L/d, respectively, without any nitrate accumulation. The process is relatively insensitive to the nitrite to ammonium ratio, achieving complete nitrogen removal when their ratio in influent varied in the range of 1.125-1.32. Pyrosequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis revealed that denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) archaea, Anammox bacteria and DAMO bacteria jointly dominated the microbial community. Mass balance analysis showed that nitrate produced by Anammox (122.2 mg N/L/d) was entirely converted to nitrite by DAMO archaea, while nitrite in the feed and produced by DAMO archaea was jointly removed by Anammox (90%) and DAMO bacteria (10%). The nitrogen removal rate of over 1 kg N/m(3)/d is comparable to the practical rates reported for side-stream nitrogen removal processes.

  13. 21 CFR 172.175 - Sodium nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Preservatives § 172.175 Sodium nitrite. The food additive sodium nitrite may be safely used in or on specified... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrite. 172.175 Section 172.175 Food and... preservative and color fixative, with sodium nitrate, in meat-curing preparations for the home curing of...

  14. Excessive nitrite affects zebrafish valvulogenesis through yielding too much NO signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junbo Li

    Full Text Available Sodium nitrite, a common food additive, exists widely not only in the environment but also in our body. Excessive nitrite causes toxicological effects on human health; however, whether it affects vertebrate heart valve development remains unknown. In vertebrates, developmental defects of cardiac valves usually lead to congenital heart disease. To understand the toxic effects of nitrite on valvulogenesis, we exposed zebrafish embryos with different concentrations of sodium nitrite. Our results showed that sodium nitrite caused developmental defects of zebrafish heart dose dependently. It affected zebrafish heart development starting from 36 hpf (hour post fertilization when heart initiates looping process. Comprehensive analysis on the embryos at 24 hpf and 48 hpf showed that excessive nitrite did not affect blood circulation, vascular network, myocardium and endocardium development. But development of endocardial cells in atrioventricular canal (AVC of the embryos at 48 hpf was disrupted by too much nitrite, leading to defective formation of primitive valve leaflets at 76 hpf. Consistently, excessive nitrite diminished expressions of valve progenitor markers including bmp4, has2, vcana and notch1b at 48 hpf. Furthermore, 3', 5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP, downstream of nitric oxide (NO signaling, was increased its level significantly in the embryos exposed with excessive nitrite and microinjection of soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor ODQ (1H-[1], [2], [4]Oxadiazolo[4,3-a] quinoxalin-1-one, an antagonist of NO signaling, into nitrite-exposed embryos could partly rescue the cardiac valve malformation. Taken together, our results show that excessive nitrite affects early valve leaflet formation by producing too much NO signaling.

  15. Presence, distribution, and diversity of iron-oxidizing bacteria at a landfill leachate-impacted groundwater surface water interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, R.; Gan, P.; Mackay, A.A.;

    2010-01-01

    We examined the presence of iron-oxidizing bacteria (IOB) at a groundwater surface water interface (GSI) impacted by reduced groundwater originating as leachate from an upgradient landfill. IOB enrichments and quantifications were obtained, at high vertical resolution, by an iron/oxygen opposing...... gradient cultivation method. The depth-resolved soil distribution profiles of water content, Fe2+, and total Fe indicated sharp gradients within the top 10 cm sediments of the GSI, where the IOB density was the highest. In addition, the vertical distribution of iron-reducing bacteria at the same sampling...

  16. Advance in Studies of Manganese Oxidizing Bacteria%锰氧化细菌研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    井晓欢; 杨季芳; 陈吉刚

    2015-01-01

    Manganese oxidizing bacteria widely occur in nature, which can oxide Mn2+ ions to high manganese oxide (Mn3+,Mn4+,etc.). Manganese oxidizing bacteria not only involved in the formation of the ocean manganese nodules, which played an important role in the cycle of marine manganese element, but also could oxide free manganese ions, adsorb heavy metal, control their transformation and migration, restore the heavy metal pollution and degrade many organic pollutants by oxidation in the environment. This paper mainly reviewed the advances in the studies on the identification methods , classification, biological function, oxidation mechanism, oxidation inhibitor and related oxidases of manganese oxidizing bacteria at home and abroad. The problems existed in the research of manganese oxidizing bacteria were also put forward. Finally, the future study was prospected in this paper.%能够将离子存在的Mn2+氧化成为可沉淀的高价锰(Mn3+、Mn4+等)的锰氧化细菌广泛存在于大自然中。锰氧化细菌不仅参与海洋锰结核的形成,在海洋锰元素的循环中起着举足轻重的作用,而且能够氧化游离的锰离子,吸附多种重金属,控制其在环境中的转化和迁移,修复环境中重金属的污染和氧化降解多种有机污染物。文章主要就国内外对锰氧化细菌的鉴定方法、分类、生物作用、氧化机制、氧化抑制剂以及相关的氧化酶等的研究进展进行了总结,同时提出了锰氧化细菌研究中存在的问题,并对进一步的研究作了展望。

  17. Impact of TiO₂ and ZnO nanoparticles at predicted environmentally relevant concentrations on ammonia-oxidizing bacteria cultures under ammonia oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhuanxi; Qiu, Zhaozheng; Chen, Zheng; Du Laing, Gijs; Liu, Aifen; Yan, Changzhou

    2015-02-01

    Increased application of titanium dioxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2 and nano-ZnO) raises concerns related to their environmental impacts. The effects that such nanoparticles have on environmental processes and the bacteria that carry them out are largely unknown. In this study, ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) enrichment cultures, grown from surface sediments taken from an estuary wetland in Fujian Province, China, were spiked with nano-TiO2 and nano-ZnO (with an average size of 32 and 43 nm, respectively) at predicted environmentally relevant concentrations (≤2 mg L(-1)) to determine their impacts on ammonia oxidation and the mechanisms involved. Results showed that higher nano-TiO2 concentrations significantly inhibited ammonia oxidation in enrichment cultures. It is noteworthy that the average ammonia oxidation rate was significantly correlated to the Shannon index, the Simpson's index, and AOB abundance. This suggested that ammonia oxidation inhibition primarily resulted from a reduction of AOB biodiversity and abundance. However, AOB biodiversity and abundance as well as the average ammonia oxidation rate were not inhibited by nano-ZnO at predicted environmentally relevant concentrations. Accordingly, an insignificant correlation was established between biodiversity and abundance of the AOB amoA gene and the average ammonia oxidation rate under nano-ZnO treatments. AOB present in samples belonged to the β-Proteobacteria class with an affinity close to Nitrosospira and Nitrosomonas genera. This suggested that identified impacts of nano-TiO2 and nano-ZnO on ammonia oxidation processes can be extrapolated to some extent to natural aquatic environments. Complex impacts on AOB may result from different nanomaterials present in aquatic environments at various ambient conditions. Further investigation on how and to what extent different nanomaterials influence AOB diversity and abundance and their subsequent ammonia oxidation processes is therefore

  18. Antimicrobial effect of acidified nitrate and nitrite on six common oral pathogens in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Deng-sheng; LIU Yin; ZHANG Chun-mei; YANG Sheng-hui; WANG Song-lin

    2006-01-01

    Background Salivary nitrate is positively correlated with plasma nitrate and its level is 9 times the plasma level after nitrate loading. Nitrate in saliva is known to be reduced to nitrite by oral bacteria. Nitrate and nitrite levels in saliva are 3-5 times those in serum in physiological conditions respectively in our previous study. The biological functions of high salivary nitrate and nitrite are still not well understood. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the antimicrobial effects of nitrate and nitrite on main oral pathogens under acidic conditions.Methods Six common oral pathogens including Streptococcus mutans NCTC 10449, Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4646, Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277, Capnocytophaga gingivalis ATCC 33624, Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 10953, and Candida albicans ATCC 10231 were cultured in liquid medium. Sodium nitrate or sodium nitrite was added to the medium to final concentrations of 0, 0.5, 1, 2, and 10 mmol/L. All of the microorganisms were incubated for 24 to 48 hours. The optical densities (OD) of cell suspensions were determined and the cultures were transferred to solid nutrient broth medium to observe the minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal/fungicidal concentration for the six tested pathogens.Results Nitrite at concentrations of 0.5 to 10 mmol/L had an inhibitory effect on all tested organisms at low pH values. The antimicrobial effect of nitrite increased with the acidity of the medium. Streptococcus mutans NCTC 10449 was highly sensitive to nitrite at low pH values. Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4646 and Candida albicans ATCC 10231 were relatively resistant to acidified nitrite. Nitrate at the given concentrations and under acidic conditions had no inhibitory effect on the growth of any of the tested pathogens.Conclusion Nitrite, at a concentration equal to that in human saliva, is both cytocidal and cytostatic to six principal oral pathogens in vitro, whereas nitrate at a similar

  19. Methane-Oxidizing Bacteria Shunt Carbon to Microbial Mats at a Marine Hydrocarbon Seep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Blair G.; Ding, Haibing; Bagby, Sarah C.; Kellermann, Matthias Y.; Redmond, Molly C.; Andersen, Gary L.; Valentine, David L.

    2017-01-01

    The marine subsurface is a reservoir of the greenhouse gas methane. While microorganisms living in water column and seafloor ecosystems are known to be a major sink limiting net methane transport from the marine subsurface to the atmosphere, few studies have assessed the flow of methane-derived carbon through the benthic mat communities that line the seafloor on the continental shelf where methane is emitted. We analyzed the abundance and isotope composition of fatty acids in microbial mats grown in the shallow Coal Oil Point seep field off Santa Barbara, CA, USA, where seep gas is a mixture of methane and CO2. We further used stable isotope probing (SIP) to track methane incorporation into mat biomass. We found evidence that multiple allochthonous substrates supported the rich growth of these mats, with notable contributions from bacterial methanotrophs and sulfur-oxidizers as well as eukaryotic phototrophs. Fatty acids characteristic of methanotrophs were shown to be abundant and 13C-enriched in SIP samples, and DNA-SIP identified members of the methanotrophic family Methylococcaceae as major 13CH4 consumers. Members of Sulfuricurvaceae, Sulfurospirillaceae, and Sulfurovumaceae are implicated in fixation of seep CO2. The mats’ autotrophs support a diverse assemblage of co-occurring bacteria and protozoa, with Methylophaga as key consumers of methane-derived organic matter. This study identifies the taxa contributing to the flow of seep-derived carbon through microbial mat biomass, revealing the bacterial and eukaryotic diversity of these remarkable ecosystems.

  20. Differential response of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria to the wetting of salty arid soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Yonatan; Ronen, Zeev; Nejidat, Ali

    2016-08-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria (AOA, AOB) catalyze the first and rate-limiting step of nitrification. To examine their differential responses to the wetting of dry and salty arid soil, AOA and AOB amoA genes (encoding subunit A of the ammonia monooxygenase) and transcripts were enumerated in dry (summer) and wet (after the first rainfall) soil under the canopy of halophytic shrubs and between the shrubs. AOA and AOB were more abundant under shrub canopies than between shrubs in both the dry and wetted soil. Soil wetting caused a significant decrease in AOB abundance under the canopy and an increase of AOA between the shrubs. The abundance of the archaeal amoA gene transcript was similar for both the wet and dry soil, and the transcript-to-gene ratios were water content. In contrast, the bacterial amoA transcript-to-gene ratios were between 78 and 514. The lowest ratio was in dry soil under the canopy and the highest in the soil between the shrubs. The results suggest that the AOA are more resilient to stress conditions and maintain a basic activity in arid ecosystems, while the AOB are more responsive to changes in the biotic and abiotic conditions.

  1. Sphere of influence of indole acetic acid and nitric oxide in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koul, Vatsala; Adholeya, Alok; Kochar, Mandira

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial biosynthesis of the phytohormone, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is well established and along with the diffusible gaseous molecule, nitric oxide (NO) is known to positively regulate the developmental processes of plant roots. IAA and NO act as signaling molecules in plant-microbe interactions as they modulate the gene expression in both, plants and microorganisms. Although IAA and NO may not be required for essential bacterial physiological processes, numerous studies point towards a crosstalk between IAA and NO in the rhizosphere. In this review, we describe various IAA and NO-responsive or sensing genes/proteins/regulators. There is also growing evidence for the interaction of IAA and NO with other plant growth regulators and the involvement of NO with the quorum sensing system in biofilm formation and virulence. This interactive network can greatly impact the host plant-microbe interactions in the soil. Coupled with this, the specialized σ(54) -dependent transcription observed in some of the IAA and NO-influenced genes can confer inducibility to these traits in bacteria and may allow the expression of IAA and NO-influenced microbial genes in nutrient limiting or changing environmental conditions for the benefit of plants.

  2. Ammonia biofiltration and community analysis of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in biofilters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Yin; Wenfeng, Xu

    2009-09-01

    Biological removal of ammonia was investigated using compost and sludge as packing materials in laboratory-scale biofilters. The aim of this study is to characterize the composition of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in two biofilters designed to remove ammonia. Experimental tests and measurements included analysis of removal efficiency and metabolic products. The inlet concentration of ammonia applied was 20-100 mg m(-3). Removal efficiencies of BFC and BFS were in the range of 97-99% and 95-99%, respectively. Periodic analysis of the biofilter packing materials showed ammonia was removed from air stream by nitrification and by the improved absorption of NH(3) in the resultant acidity. Nitrate was the dominant product of NH(3) transformation. Changes in the composition of AOB were examined by using nested PCR, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and sequencing of DGGE bands. DGGE analysis of biofilter samples revealed that shifts in the community structure of AOB were observed in the experiment; however, the idle phase did not cause the structural shift of AOB. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the population of AOB showed Nitrosospira sp. remains the predominant population in BFC, while Nitrosomonas sp. is the predominant population in BFS.

  3. Community structure of β-Proteobacterial ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in prawn farm sediment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Ma; Lin Wang; Lumin Qian

    2008-01-01

    To examine the community structure of β-Proteobacterial ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in prawn farm sediment, the 16S rRNA gene library was constructed with β-Proteobacterial AOB-specific primers. The library was screened by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and clones with unique RFLP patterns were sequenced. Two groups of β-Proteobacterial AOB, the Nitrosomonas and the Nitrosospira, were detected. The Nitrosomonas occupied an absolute dominant position, accounting for more than 90% of total clones in the clone library, while the Nitrosospira accounting for 5.48%. Nitrosomonas-affiliated clones were grouped into the Nitrosomonas marina and the Nitrosomonas sp. Nm 143 clusters, and Nitrosospira-affiliated clones were grouped into the Nitrosospira cluster 1. No other clusters of β-Proteobacterial AOB were found. The results enriched our knowledge of AOB diversity in the prawn farm sediment and provided important foundational data for further functional studies of these microbes in mariculture environments.

  4. Endosymbiotic sulphate-reducing and sulphide-oxidizing bacteria in an oligochaete worm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubilier, N; Mülders, C; Ferdelman, T; de Beer, D; Pernthaler, A; Klein, M; Wagner, M; Erséus, C; Thiermann, F; Krieger, J; Giere, O; Amann, R

    2001-05-17

    Stable associations of more than one species of symbiont within a single host cell or tissue are assumed to be rare in metazoans because competition for space and resources between symbionts can be detrimental to the host. In animals with multiple endosymbionts, such as mussels from deep-sea hydrothermal vents and reef-building corals, the costs of competition between the symbionts are outweighed by the ecological and physiological flexibility gained by the hosts. A further option for the coexistence of multiple symbionts within a host is if these benefit directly from one another, but such symbioses have not been previously described. Here we show that in the gutless marine oligochaete Olavius algarvensis, endosymbiotic sulphate-reducing bacteria produce sulphide that can serve as an energy source for sulphide-oxidizing symbionts of the host. Thus, these symbionts do not compete for resources but rather share a mutalistic relationship with each other in an endosymbiotic sulphur cycle, in addition to their symbiotic relationship with the oligochaete host.

  5. Influence of soil moisture on linear alkylbenzene sulfonate-induced toxicity in ammonia-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Klaus B; Brandt, Kristian K; Jacobsen, Anne-Marie; Mortensen, Gerda K; Sørensen, Jan

    2004-02-01

    Moisture affects bioavailability and fate of pollutants in soil, but very little is known about moisture-induced effects on pollutant toxicity. We here report on a modifying effect of moisture on degradation of linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LASs) and on their toxicity towards ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in agricultural soil. In soil spiked with two LAS levels (250 or 1,000 mg/kg) and incubated at four different moisture levels (9-100% of water-holding capacity), degradation was strongly affected by both soil moisture and initial LAS concentration, resulting in degradation half-lives ranging from 13 to more than 160 d. Toxicity towards AOB assessed by a novel Nitrosomonas europaea luxAB-reporter assay was correlated to total LAS concentration, indicating that LAS remained bioavailable over time without accumulation of toxic intermediates. Toxicity towards indigenous AOB increased with increasing soil moisture. The results indicate that dry soil conditions inhibit LAS degradation and provide protection against toxicity within the indigenous AOB, thus allowing for a rapid recovery of this population when LAS degradation is resumed and completed after rewetting. We propose that the protection of microbial populations against toxicity in dry soil may be a general phenomenon caused primarily by limited diffusion and thus a low bioavailability of the toxicant.