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Sample records for nitrite sulfite oxalate

  1. Effects of low concentrations of bisulfite-sulfite and nitrite on microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodzinski, R S; Labeda, D P; Alexander, M

    1978-01-01

    A wide range of microorganisms was tested to determine their sensitivity to low concentrations of bisulfite-sulfite and nitrite, solubility products of SO2 and NO2, respectively. Photosynthesis by blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) was more strongly inhibited by 0.1 mM bisulfite-sulfite and 1 mM nitrite at pH 6.0 than photosynthesis by eucaryotic algae and respiration of bacteria, fungi, and protozoa. At pH 7.7, blue-green algae were still more sensitive to bisulfite-sulfite and nitrite than eucaryotic algae, but the toxicity of bisulfite-sulfite and nitrite decreased as the pH increased. Photosynthesis by Anabaena flos-aquae at pH 6.0 was inhibited 25% by a bisulfite-sulfite concentration of 10 micrometer and 15% by a nitrite concentration of 50 micrometer. Photosynthesis by the blue-green alga, Lyngbya sp., was not exceptionally sensitive to chlorate and thiosulfate. Acetylene-reducing activity of Beijerinckia indica was completely inhibited by 0.1 mM bisulfite-sulfite at pH 4.0, the suppression being decreased with increasing pH. PMID:646357

  2. An Evaluation of Alternatives to Nitrites and Sulfites to Inhibit the Growth of Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes in Meat Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Lamas

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the use of nitrites and sulfites as food preservatives has been a cause for concern due to the health problems that these additives can cause in humans. Natural products have been studied as an alternative, but most of them have hardly been applied in the food industry for technological and economic reasons. In this sense, organic salts such as sodium acetate are a good alternative due to their affordability. Thus, this study evaluated the capacity of sodium nitrite, sodium sulfite, a sodium acetate product (TQI C-6000, and chitosan to inhibit two important foodborne pathogens, Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes. The MIC of each chemical was in vitro evaluated and their antibacterial action was subsequently checked in situ using minced meat as a food model. MIC values of sodium nitrite (10,000 mg/L and sodium sulfite (50,000 mg/L for Salmonella enterica were higher than the values allowed by legislation (450 mg/L for sulfites and 150 mg/L for nitrites. Additionally, the sodium acetate product caused the inhibition of Salmonella enterica and Listeria at a relative low quantity. The two foodborne pathogens were inhibited in the food model with 1% of the sodium acetate product. Additionally, there were no significant differences between sodium nitrite, sodium sulfite, and sodium acetate products in the inhibition of Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes in the food model. Thus, products based on sodium acetate can be an alternative to traditional preservatives in food products.

  3. Sulfite reductase protects plants against sulfite toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmolinsky, Dmitry; Brychkova, Galina; Fluhr, Robert; Sagi, Moshe

    2013-02-01

    Plant sulfite reductase (SiR; Enzyme Commission 1.8.7.1) catalyzes the reduction of sulfite to sulfide in the reductive sulfate assimilation pathway. Comparison of SiR expression in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum 'Rheinlands Ruhm') and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants revealed that SiR is expressed in a different tissue-dependent manner that likely reflects dissimilarity in sulfur metabolism between the plant species. Using Arabidopsis and tomato SiR mutants with modified SiR expression, we show here that resistance to ectopically applied sulfur dioxide/sulfite is a function of SiR expression levels and that plants with reduced SiR expression exhibit higher sensitivity than the wild type, as manifested in pronounced leaf necrosis and chlorophyll bleaching. The sulfite-sensitive mutants accumulate applied sulfite and show a decline in glutathione levels. In contrast, mutants that overexpress SiR are more tolerant to sulfite toxicity, exhibiting little or no damage. Resistance to high sulfite application is manifested by fast sulfite disappearance and an increase in glutathione levels. The notion that SiR plays a role in the protection of plants against sulfite is supported by the rapid up-regulation of SiR transcript and activity within 30 min of sulfite injection into Arabidopsis and tomato leaves. Peroxisomal sulfite oxidase transcripts and activity levels are likewise promoted by sulfite application as compared with water injection controls. These results indicate that, in addition to participating in the sulfate assimilation reductive pathway, SiR also plays a role in protecting leaves against the toxicity of sulfite accumulation.

  4. Solubilities of magnesium sulfite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nývlt, Jaroslav

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 2 (2001), s. 509-512 ISSN 1418-2874 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4032918 Keywords : magnesium sulfate * magnesium sulfite * metastable solid Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.545, year: 2001

  5. An essential role for tomato sulfite oxidase and enzymes of the sulfite network in maintaining leaf sulfite homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brychkova, Galina; Grishkevich, Vladislav; Fluhr, Robert; Sagi, Moshe

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the homeostasis of sulfite levels, a cytotoxic by-product of plant sulfur turnover. By employing extended dark to induce catabolic pathways, we followed key elements of the sulfite network enzymes that include adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate reductase and the sulfite scavengers sulfite oxidase (SO), sulfite reductase, UDP-sulfoquinovose synthase, and β-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferases. During extended dark, SO was enhanced in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) wild-type leaves, while the other sulfite network components were down-regulated. SO RNA interference plants lacking SO activity accumulated sulfite, resulting in leaf damage and mortality. Exogenous sulfite application induced up-regulation of the sulfite scavenger activities in dark-stressed or unstressed wild-type plants, while expression of the sulfite producer, adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate reductase, was down-regulated. Unstressed or dark-stressed wild-type plants were resistant to sulfite applications, but SO RNA interference plants showed sensitivity and overaccumulation of sulfite. Hence, under extended dark stress, SO activity is necessary to cope with rising endogenous sulfite levels. However, under nonstressed conditions, the sulfite network can control sulfite levels in the absence of SO activity. The novel evidence provided by the synchronous dark-induced turnover of sulfur-containing compounds, augmented by exogenous sulfite applications, underlines the role of SO and other sulfite network components in maintaining sulfite homeostasis, where sulfite appears to act as an orchestrating signal molecule.

  6. Enrofloxacinium oxalate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thammarse S. Yamuna

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The title salt, 2C19H23FN3O3+·C2O42− {systematic name: bis-[4-(3-carboxy-1-cyclopropyl-6-fluoro-4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinolin-7-yl-1-ethylpiperazin-1-ium] oxalate}, crystallizes with two independent monocations (A and B and an oxalate dianion (C in the asymmetric unit. The piperazinium ring in both the cations adopts a slightly disordered chair conformation. The dihedral angles between the mean planes of the cyclopropyl ring and the 10-membered quinoline ring are 50.6 (5° (A and 62.2 (5° (B. In each of the cations, a single O—H...O intramolecular hydrogen bond is observed. In the crystal, the oxalate anions interact with the cations through N—H...O hydrogen bonds and weak C—H...O interactions, forming R22(8 graph-set ring motifs. Weak C—H...F interactions along with further C—H...O interactions are observed between the cations, forming zigzag chains along [001]. In addition, π–π stacking interactions are observed with centroid–centroid distances of 3.5089 (13, 3.5583 (13, 3.7900 (13 and 3.7991 (13 Å.

  7. Utilisation of sulfites by animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fromageot, P.; Chapeville, F.

    1955-01-01

    It studied the uptake of radioactive sulfates and sulfites in sulfinic cysteine acid, taurine and cystine in animal organism. The experiments are conducted on rabbits. The experimental procedures are described: one experiment is to sterilize intestines of the animal before to inject it radioactive sulfites or sulfates, the rabbit is sacrificed 28 hours after and its organs analysed. The other experiment is to inject radioactive sulfites or sulfates in an eviscerated rabbit and sacrificed it 30 minutes after. Sulfinic cysteine acid is mainly found in liver extracts after 30 minutes and only after injection of radioactive sulfites, whereas cystine is found after 28 hours in a majority of organ extracts. It showed that sulfur used for the synthesis of sulfinic cysteine acid comes from sulfites intake and that sulfinic cysteine acid is a precursor of taurine and cystine. (M.P.)

  8. [Oral testing for sulfite asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, H; Kirsten, D; Jörres, R A; Magnussen, H

    1996-06-01

    Patients with asthma may develop bronchoconstriction after ingestion of sulfites. We studied the sensitivity and specificity of an oral provocation challenge with metabisulfite to detect a sulfite-sensitive asthma. We performed an oral dose-response metabisulfite challenge in 44 patients with a history of sulfite-sensitive asthma, 27 patients with asthma but without a history of sulfite sensitivity, and 8 control subjects without asthma. Metabisulfite was administered in capsules in a single-blind manner. Airway response was assessed by FEV decline, measured 30' after each dose. Thirty-nine percent of patients with a history of sulfite-sensitive asthma demonstrated a significant bronchoconstriction after ingestion of metabisulfite, whereas patients without an appropriate history and control subjects did not respond to the challenge. The oral metabisulfite challenge exhibits a high specificity (100%) but low sensitivity of about 40%. Nonetheless, taking into account the uncertainties in the patients' history of sulfite-sensitive asthma, the oral metabisulfite challenge as performed by us is a useful method for the diagnosis of sulfite sensitive asthma.

  9. Coenzyme F420-Dependent Sulfite Reductase-Enabled Sulfite Detoxification and Use of Sulfite as a Sole Sulfur Source by Methanococcus maripaludis▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Eric F.; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup

    2008-01-01

    Coenzyme F420-dependent sulfite reductase (Fsr) of Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, a sulfite-tolerant methanogen, was expressed with activity in Methanococcus maripaludis, a sulfite-sensitive methanogen. The recombinant organism reduced sulfite to sulfide and grew with sulfite as the sole sulfur source, indicating that Fsr is a sulfite detoxification and assimilation enzyme for methanogens and that M. maripaludis synthesizes siroheme. PMID:18378657

  10. Structural study of the X-ray-induced enzymatic reaction of octahaem cytochrome C nitrite reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimov, A A; Polyakov, K M; Lazarenko, V A; Popov, A N; Tikhonova, T V; Tikhonov, A V; Popov, V O

    2015-05-01

    Octahaem cytochrome c nitrite reductase from the bacterium Thioalkalivibrio nitratireducens catalyzes the reduction of nitrite to ammonium and of sulfite to sulfide. The reducing properties of X-ray radiation and the high quality of the enzyme crystals allow study of the catalytic reaction of cytochrome c nitrite reductase directly in a crystal of the enzyme, with the reaction being induced by X-rays. Series of diffraction data sets with increasing absorbed dose were collected from crystals of the free form of the enzyme and its complexes with nitrite and sulfite. The corresponding structures revealed gradual changes associated with the reduction of the catalytic haems by X-rays. In the case of the nitrite complex the conversion of the nitrite ions bound in the active sites to NO species was observed, which is the beginning of the catalytic reaction. For the free form, an increase in the distance between the oxygen ligand bound to the catalytic haem and the iron ion of the haem took place. In the case of the sulfite complex no enzymatic reaction was detected, but there were changes in the arrangement of the active-site water molecules that were presumably associated with a change in the protonation state of the sulfite ions.

  11. Influence of the enzyme dissimilatory sulfite reductase on stable isotope fractionation during sulfate reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangalo, Muna; Einsiedl, Florian; Meckenstock, Rainer U.; Stichler, Willibald

    2008-03-01

    The stable isotopes of sulfate are often used as a tool to assess bacterial sulfate reduction on the macro scale. However, the mechanisms of stable isotope fractionation of sulfur and oxygen at the enzymatic level are not yet fully understood. In batch experiments with water enriched in 18O we investigated the effect of different nitrite concentrations on sulfur isotope fractionation by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. With increasing nitrite concentrations, we found sulfur isotope enrichment factors ranging from -11.2 ± 1.8‰ to -22.5 ± 3.2‰. Furthermore, the δ18O values in the remaining sulfate increased from approximately 50-120‰ when 18O-enriched water was supplied. Since 18O-exchange with ambient water does not take place in sulfate, but rather in intermediates of the sulfate reduction pathway (e.g. SO32-), we suggest that nitrite affects the steady-state concentration and the extent of reoxidation of the metabolic intermediate sulfite to sulfate during sulfate reduction. Given that nitrite is known to inhibit the production of the enzyme dissimilatory sulfite reductase, our results suggest that the activity of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase regulates the kinetic isotope fractionation of sulfur and oxygen during bacterial sulfate reduction. Our novel results also imply that isotope fractionation during bacterial sulfate reduction strongly depends on the cell internal enzymatic regulation rather than on the physico-chemical features of the individual enzymes.

  12. An Essential Role for Tomato Sulfite Oxidase and Enzymes of the Sulfite Network in Maintaining Leaf Sulfite Homeostasis1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brychkova, Galina; Grishkevich, Vladislav; Fluhr, Robert; Sagi, Moshe

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the homeostasis of sulfite levels, a cytotoxic by-product of plant sulfur turnover. By employing extended dark to induce catabolic pathways, we followed key elements of the sulfite network enzymes that include adenosine-5′-phosphosulfate reductase and the sulfite scavengers sulfite oxidase (SO), sulfite reductase, UDP-sulfoquinovose synthase, and β-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferases. During extended dark, SO was enhanced in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) wild-type leaves, while the other sulfite network components were down-regulated. SO RNA interference plants lacking SO activity accumulated sulfite, resulting in leaf damage and mortality. Exogenous sulfite application induced up-regulation of the sulfite scavenger activities in dark-stressed or unstressed wild-type plants, while expression of the sulfite producer, adenosine-5′-phosphosulfate reductase, was down-regulated. Unstressed or dark-stressed wild-type plants were resistant to sulfite applications, but SO RNA interference plants showed sensitivity and overaccumulation of sulfite. Hence, under extended dark stress, SO activity is necessary to cope with rising endogenous sulfite levels. However, under nonstressed conditions, the sulfite network can control sulfite levels in the absence of SO activity. The novel evidence provided by the synchronous dark-induced turnover of sulfur-containing compounds, augmented by exogenous sulfite applications, underlines the role of SO and other sulfite network components in maintaining sulfite homeostasis, where sulfite appears to act as an orchestrating signal molecule. PMID:23148079

  13. Sulfite Oxidase Activity of Cytochrome c: Role of Hydrogen Peroxide

    OpenAIRE

    Velayutham, Murugesan; Hemann, Craig F.; Cardounel, Arturo J.; Zweier, Jay L.

    2016-01-01

    In humans, sulfite is generated endogenously by the metabolism of sulfur containing amino acids such as methionine and cysteine. Sulfite is also formed from exposure to sulfur dioxide, one of the major environmental pollutants. Sulfite is used as an antioxidant and preservative in dried fruits, vegetables, and beverages such as wine. Sulfite is also used as a stabilizer in many drugs. Sulfite toxicity has been associated with allergic reactions characterized by sulfite sensitivity, asthma, an...

  14. Sulphite metabolism; Metabolisme du sulfite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fromageot, P.; Chapeville, F. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-07-01

    Although the formation of sulphite by micro-organisms was observed as early as 1914 by Neuberg, it was only in 1932 that Nightingale showed it to be present inside cells, in the case of tomato leaf stalks, its formation being due to the reaction: SO{sub 3}H{sup -} + (S{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup --} {yields} S{sub 2}O{sub 3}{sup --} + O{sub 3}S{sub 2}O{sub 3}{sup --}. The presence of the thiosulphate formed was shown by the high refractive index of its barium salt. Today we have a certain amount of data concerning the formation and use of sulphite in the living cell, even through the knowledge is still incomplete. In this article we will describe and discuss the facts which are known, with particular reference to the oxidation of sulphite. (author) [French] Si la formation de sulfite par des micro-organismes a ete observee des 1914 par Neuberg, sa presence a l'interieur des cellules a ete demontree pour la premiere fois par Nightingale en 1932, dans des tiges et des feuilles de tomates, par la reaction: SO{sub 3}H{sup -} + (S{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup --} {yields} S{sub 2}O{sub 3}{sup --} + O{sub 3}S{sub 2}O{sub 3}{sup --}. Le thiosulfate forme etait mis en evidence par l'indice de refraction eleve de son sel de baryum. Aujourd'hui on possede un certain nombre de donnees, cependant encore tres incompletes, sur la formation du sulfite et son utilisation par la cellule vivante. Dans cet expose nous decrirons et discuterons quelques-unes de ces acquisitions, tout particulierement celles relatives a l'oxydation du sulfite. (auteur)

  15. Ion chromatographic determination of sulfites in foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, C; Warner, C R; Daniels, D H; Padgett, K L

    1986-01-01

    Ion chromatography (IC) is shown to be a promising technique for the determination of sulfites (SO2, SO2/3-) in foods. Results of a 10 min flash distillation and 10 min IC determination compare favorably with the results from the conventional Monier-Williams method for total sulfite in a variety of food matrices. The IC technique also provides a wealth of additional information, such as (1) sulfite and sulfate (oxidized sulfite) content of the spiking or treatment solution, (2) residual sulfite applied to the food after oxidation losses in the treatment process, (3) free sulfite in foods, and (4) total sulfite in foods. As a further check on the Monier-Williams method, the sulfate content of the trapping solution can be determined by IC. Because the IC technique traps the liberated SO2 in a non-oxidizing rather than an oxidizing medium, it is considered free from interfering sulfides and organic sulfur-containing groups which can give false positives in the Monier-Williams method. IC thus offers a high speed, more sensitive, and cost-effective alternative to conventional techniques for the determination of sulfite in foods.

  16. Sulfite Reductase Protects Plants against Sulfite Toxicity1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmolinsky, Dmitry; Brychkova, Galina; Fluhr, Robert; Sagi, Moshe

    2013-01-01

    Plant sulfite reductase (SiR; Enzyme Commission 1.8.7.1) catalyzes the reduction of sulfite to sulfide in the reductive sulfate assimilation pathway. Comparison of SiR expression in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum ‘Rheinlands Ruhm’) and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants revealed that SiR is expressed in a different tissue-dependent manner that likely reflects dissimilarity in sulfur metabolism between the plant species. Using Arabidopsis and tomato SiR mutants with modified SiR expression, we show here that resistance to ectopically applied sulfur dioxide/sulfite is a function of SiR expression levels and that plants with reduced SiR expression exhibit higher sensitivity than the wild type, as manifested in pronounced leaf necrosis and chlorophyll bleaching. The sulfite-sensitive mutants accumulate applied sulfite and show a decline in glutathione levels. In contrast, mutants that overexpress SiR are more tolerant to sulfite toxicity, exhibiting little or no damage. Resistance to high sulfite application is manifested by fast sulfite disappearance and an increase in glutathione levels. The notion that SiR plays a role in the protection of plants against sulfite is supported by the rapid up-regulation of SiR transcript and activity within 30 min of sulfite injection into Arabidopsis and tomato leaves. Peroxisomal sulfite oxidase transcripts and activity levels are likewise promoted by sulfite application as compared with water injection controls. These results indicate that, in addition to participating in the sulfate assimilation reductive pathway, SiR also plays a role in protecting leaves against the toxicity of sulfite accumulation. PMID:23221833

  17. Oxalate induces breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellaro, Andrés M; Tonda, Alfredo; Cejas, Hugo H; Ferreyra, Héctor; Caputto, Beatriz L; Pucci, Oscar A; Gil, German A

    2015-10-22

    Microcalcifications can be the early and only presenting sign of breast cancer. One shared characteristic of breast cancer is the appearance of mammographic mammary microcalcifications that can routinely be used to detect breast cancer in its initial stages, which is of key importance due to the possibility that early detection allows the application of more conservative therapies for a better patient outcome. The mechanism by which mammary microcalcifications are formed is still largely unknown but breast cancers presenting microcalcifications are more often associated with a poorer prognosis. We combined Capillary Electrochromatography, histology, and gene expression (qRT-PCR) to analyze patient-matched normal breast tissue vs. breast tumor. Potential carcinogenicity of oxalate was tested by its inoculation into mice. All data were subjected to statistical analysis. To study the biological significance of oxalates within the breast tumor microenvironment, we measured oxalate concentration in both human breast tumor tissues and adjoining non-pathological breast tissues. We found that all tested breast tumor tissues contain a higher concentration of oxalates than their counterpart non-pathological breast tissue. Moreover, it was established that oxalate induces proliferation of breast cells and stimulates the expression of a pro-tumorigenic gene c-fos. Furthermore, oxalate generates highly malignant and undifferentiated tumors when it was injected into the mammary fatpad in female mice, but not when injected into their back, indicating that oxalate does not induce cancer formation in all types of tissues. Moreover, neither human kidney-epithelial cells nor mouse fibroblast cells proliferate when are treated with oxalate. We found that the chronic exposure of breast epithelial cells to oxalate promotes the transformation of breast cells from normal to tumor cells, inducing the expression of a proto-oncogen as c-fos and proliferation in breast cancer cells

  18. Oxalate induces breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellaro, Andrés M.; Tonda, Alfredo; Cejas, Hugo H.; Ferreyra, Héctor; Caputto, Beatriz L.; Pucci, Oscar A.; Gil, German A.

    2015-01-01

    Microcalcifications can be the early and only presenting sign of breast cancer. One shared characteristic of breast cancer is the appearance of mammographic mammary microcalcifications that can routinely be used to detect breast cancer in its initial stages, which is of key importance due to the possibility that early detection allows the application of more conservative therapies for a better patient outcome. The mechanism by which mammary microcalcifications are formed is still largely unknown but breast cancers presenting microcalcifications are more often associated with a poorer prognosis. We combined Capillary Electrochromatography, histology, and gene expression (qRT-PCR) to analyze patient-matched normal breast tissue vs. breast tumor. Potential carcinogenicity of oxalate was tested by its inoculation into mice. All data were subjected to statistical analysis. To study the biological significance of oxalates within the breast tumor microenvironment, we measured oxalate concentration in both human breast tumor tissues and adjoining non-pathological breast tissues. We found that all tested breast tumor tissues contain a higher concentration of oxalates than their counterpart non-pathological breast tissue. Moreover, it was established that oxalate induces proliferation of breast cells and stimulates the expression of a pro-tumorigenic gene c-fos. Furthermore, oxalate generates highly malignant and undifferentiated tumors when it was injected into the mammary fatpad in female mice, but not when injected into their back, indicating that oxalate does not induce cancer formation in all types of tissues. Moreover, neither human kidney-epithelial cells nor mouse fibroblast cells proliferate when are treated with oxalate. We found that the chronic exposure of breast epithelial cells to oxalate promotes the transformation of breast cells from normal to tumor cells, inducing the expression of a proto-oncogen as c-fos and proliferation in breast cancer cells

  19. 21 CFR 181.34 - Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... fixatives and preservative agents, with or without sodium or potassium nitrate, in the curing of red meat... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. 181.34...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.34 Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. Sodium nitrite and potassium...

  20. Utilisation of sulfites by animals; Utilisation des sulfites par l'animal superieur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fromageot, P.; Chapeville, F. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1955-07-01

    It studied the uptake of radioactive sulfates and sulfites in sulfinic cysteine acid, taurine and cystine in animal organism. The experiments are conducted on rabbits. The experimental procedures are described: one experiment is to sterilize intestines of the animal before to inject it radioactive sulfites or sulfates, the rabbit is sacrificed 28 hours after and its organs analysed. The other experiment is to inject radioactive sulfites or sulfates in an eviscerated rabbit and sacrificed it 30 minutes after. Sulfinic cysteine acid is mainly found in liver extracts after 30 minutes and only after injection of radioactive sulfites, whereas cystine is found after 28 hours in a majority of organ extracts. It showed that sulfur used for the synthesis of sulfinic cysteine acid comes from sulfites intake and that sulfinic cysteine acid is a precursor of taurine and cystine. (M.P.)

  1. Thorium oxalate solubility and morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monson, P.R. Jr.; Hall, R.

    1981-10-01

    Thorium was used as a stand-in for studying the solubility and precipitation of neptunium and plutonium oxalates. Thorium oxalate solubility was determined over a range of 0.001 to 10.0 in the concentration parameter [H 2 C 2 O 4 ]/[HNO 3 ] 2 . Morphology of thorium oxide made from the oxalate precipitates was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The different morphologies found for oxalate-lean and oxalate-rich precipitations were in agreement with predictions based on precipitation theory

  2. Localized periorbital edema as a clinical manifestation of sulfite sensitivity.

    OpenAIRE

    Park, H. S.; Nahm, D.

    1996-01-01

    Sulfite is commonly used in pharmaceuticals as a preservative. We report a unique clinical presentation of localized periorbital edema on the left eye after administration of sulfite-containing dexamethasone. The patient's sulfite sensitivity was confirmed by sulfite oral provocation test: periorbital edema on the same site developed after ingestion of 200 mg sodium bisulfite. She was non-atopic and did not complain of any respiratory symptoms. Allergy skin prick test with 100 mg/ml sodium bi...

  3. Sulfite oxidase activity of cytochrome c: Role of hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murugesan Velayutham

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In humans, sulfite is generated endogenously by the metabolism of sulfur containing amino acids such as methionine and cysteine. Sulfite is also formed from exposure to sulfur dioxide, one of the major environmental pollutants. Sulfite is used as an antioxidant and preservative in dried fruits, vegetables, and beverages such as wine. Sulfite is also used as a stabilizer in many drugs. Sulfite toxicity has been associated with allergic reactions characterized by sulfite sensitivity, asthma, and anaphylactic shock. Sulfite is also toxic to neurons and cardiovascular cells. Recent studies suggest that the cytotoxicity of sulfite is mediated by free radicals; however, molecular mechanisms involved in sulfite toxicity are not fully understood. Cytochrome c (cyt c is known to participate in mitochondrial respiration and has antioxidant and peroxidase activities. Studies were performed to understand the related mechanism of oxidation of sulfite and radical generation by ferric cytochrome c (Fe3+cyt c in the absence and presence of H2O2. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spin trapping studies using 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO were performed with sulfite, Fe3+cyt c, and H2O2. An EPR spectrum corresponding to the sulfite radical adducts of DMPO (DMPO-SO3- was obtained. The amount of DMPO-SO3- formed from the oxidation of sulfite by the Fe3+cyt c increased with sulfite concentration. In addition, the amount of DMPO-SO3- formed by the peroxidase activity of Fe3+cyt c also increased with sulfite and H2O2 concentration. From these results, we propose a mechanism in which the Fe3+cyt c and its peroxidase activity oxidizes sulfite to sulfite radical. Our results suggest that Fe3+cyt c could have a novel role in the deleterious effects of sulfite in biological systems due to increased production of sulfite radical. It also shows that the increased production of sulfite radical may be responsible for neurotoxicity and some of the injuries which

  4. Sulfite Oxidase Activity of Cytochrome c: Role of Hydrogen Peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velayutham, Murugesan; Hemann, Craig F; Cardounel, Arturo J; Zweier, Jay L

    2016-03-01

    In humans, sulfite is generated endogenously by the metabolism of sulfur containing amino acids such as methionine and cysteine. Sulfite is also formed from exposure to sulfur dioxide, one of the major environmental pollutants. Sulfite is used as an antioxidant and preservative in dried fruits, vegetables, and beverages such as wine. Sulfite is also used as a stabilizer in many drugs. Sulfite toxicity has been associated with allergic reactions characterized by sulfite sensitivity, asthma, and anaphylactic shock. Sulfite is also toxic to neurons and cardiovascular cells. Recent studies suggest that the cytotoxicity of sulfite is mediated by free radicals; however, molecular mechanisms involved in sulfite toxicity are not fully understood. Cytochrome c (cyt c) is known to participate in mitochondrial respiration and has antioxidant and peroxidase activities. Studies were performed to understand the related mechanism of oxidation of sulfite and radical generation by ferric cytochrome c (Fe 3+ cyt c) in the absence and presence of H 2 O 2 . Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin trapping studies using 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) were performed with sulfite, Fe 3+ cyt c, and H 2 O 2 . An EPR spectrum corresponding to the sulfite radical adducts of DMPO (DMPO-SO 3 - ) was obtained. The amount of DMPO-SO 3 - formed from the oxidation of sulfite by the Fe 3+ cyt c increased with sulfite concentration. In addition, the amount of DMPO-SO 3 - formed by the peroxidase activity of Fe 3+ cyt c also increased with sulfite and H 2 O 2 concentration. From these results, we propose a mechanism in which the Fe 3+ cyt c and its peroxidase activity oxidizes sulfite to sulfite radical. Our results suggest that Fe 3+ cyt c could have a novel role in the deleterious effects of sulfite in biological systems due to increased production of sulfite radical. It also shows that the increased production of sulfite radical may be responsible for neurotoxicity and some of the

  5. Literature review for oxalate oxidation processes and plutonium oxalate solubility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, C. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-01

    A literature review of oxalate oxidation processes finds that manganese(II)-catalyzed nitric acid oxidation of oxalate in precipitate filtrate is a viable and well-documented process. The process has been operated on the large scale at Savannah River in the past, including oxidation of 20 tons of oxalic acid in F-Canyon. Research data under a variety of conditions show the process to be robust. This process is recommended for oxalate destruction in H-Canyon in the upcoming program to produce feed for the MOX facility. Prevention of plutonium oxalate precipitation in filtrate can be achieved by concentrated nitric acid/ferric nitrate sequestration of oxalate. Organic complexants do not appear practical to sequester plutonium. Testing is proposed to confirm the literature and calculation findings of this review at projected operating conditions for the upcoming campaign.

  6. Sulfite-containing Canadian pharmaceutical products available in 1991.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, M; Schuster, B; Schellenberg, R

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compile an inclusive list of Canadian pharmaceutical products available in 1991 that contained sulfites. DATA SOURCES: Written and oral responses from 94 pharmaceutical companies selected from the 1989 Compendium of Pharmaceuticals and Specialties. RESULTS: A list of sulfite-containing pharmaceutical products was compiled from data supplied by the 90 responding companies. Companies whose products contained no sulfites were separately identified. CONCLUSIONS: Sulfites are present in many pharmaceutical products and are one of many excipients and additives that have been reported to cause severe adverse reactions. The provided list should be a useful aid for health care practitioners when prescribing pharmaceutical products for sulfite-sensitive patients. PMID:1483237

  7. 21 CFR 582.3798 - Sodium sulfite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium sulfite. 582.3798 Section 582.3798 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 582.3798...

  8. 21 CFR 182.3798 - Sodium sulfite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium sulfite. 182.3798 Section 182.3798 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 182.3798 Sodium...

  9. Risk analysis of sulfites used as food additives in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian Bo; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Hua Li; Zhang, Ji Yue; Luo, Peng Jie; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Zhu Tian

    2014-02-01

    This study was to analyze the risk of sulfites in food consumed by the Chinese people and assess the health protection capability of maximum-permitted level (MPL) of sulfites in GB 2760-2011. Sulfites as food additives are overused or abused in many food categories. When the MPL in GB 2760-2011 was used as sulfites content in food, the intake of sulfites in most surveyed populations was lower than the acceptable daily intake (ADI). Excess intake of sulfites was found in all the surveyed groups when a high percentile of sulfites in food was in taken. Moreover, children aged 1-6 years are at a high risk to intake excess sulfites. The primary cause for the excess intake of sulfites in Chinese people is the overuse and abuse of sulfites by the food industry. The current MPL of sulfites in GB 2760-2011 protects the health of most populations. Copyright © 2014 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  10. Ability of sat-1 to transport sulfate, bicarbonate, or oxalate under physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krick, Wolfgang; Schnedler, Nina; Burckhardt, Gerhard; Burckhardt, Birgitta C

    2009-07-01

    Tubular reabsorption of sulfate is achieved by the sodium-dependent sulfate transporter, NaSi-1, located at the apical membrane, and the sulfate-anion exchanger, sat-1, located at the basolateral membrane. To delineate the physiological role of rat sat-1, [(35)S]sulfate and [(14)C]oxalate uptake into sat-1-expressing oocytes was determined under various experimental conditions. Influx of [(35)S]sulfate was inhibited by bicarbonate, thiosulfate, sulfite, and oxalate, but not by sulfamate and sulfide, in a competitive manner with K(i) values of 2.7 +/- 1.3 mM, 101.7 +/- 9.7 microM, 53.8 +/- 10.9 microM, and 63.5 +/- 38.7 microM, respectively. Vice versa, [(14)C]oxalate uptake was inhibited by sulfate with a K(i) of 85.9 +/- 9.5 microM. The competitive type of inhibition indicates that these compounds are most likely substrates of sat-1. Physiological plasma bicarbonate concentrations (25 mM) reduced sulfate and oxalate uptake by more than 75%. Simultaneous application of sulfate, bicarbonate, and oxalate abolished sulfate as well as oxalate uptake. These data and electrophysiological studies using a two-electrode voltage-clamp device provide evidence that sat-1 preferentially works as an electroneutral sulfate-bicarbonate or oxalate-bicarbonate exchanger. In kidney proximal tubule cells, sat-1 likely completes sulfate reabsorption from the ultrafiltrate across the basolateral membrane in exchange for bicarbonate. In hepatocytes, oxalate extrusion is most probably mediated either by an exchange for sulfate or bicarbonate.

  11. LITERATURE REVIEW FOR OXALATE OXIDATION PROCESSES AND PLUTONIUM OXALATE SOLUBILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, C.

    2012-02-03

    A literature review of oxalate oxidation processes finds that manganese(II)-catalyzed nitric acid oxidation of oxalate in precipitate filtrate is a viable and well-documented process. The process has been operated on the large scale at Savannah River in the past, including oxidation of 20 tons of oxalic acid in F-Canyon. Research data under a variety of conditions show the process to be robust. This process is recommended for oxalate destruction in H-Canyon in the upcoming program to produce feed for the MOX facility. Prevention of plutonium oxalate precipitation in filtrate can be achieved by concentrated nitric acid/ferric nitrate sequestration of oxalate. Organic complexants do not appear practical to sequester plutonium. Testing is proposed to confirm the literature and calculation findings of this review at projected operating conditions for the upcoming campaign. H Canyon plans to commence conversion of plutonium metal to low-fired plutonium oxide in 2012 for eventual use in the Mixed Oxide Fuel (MOX) Facility. The flowsheet includes sequential operations of metal dissolution, ion exchange, elution, oxalate precipitation, filtration, and calcination. All processes beyond dissolution will occur in HB-Line. The filtration step produces an aqueous filtrate that may have as much as 4 M nitric acid and 0.15 M oxalate. The oxalate needs to be removed from the stream to prevent possible downstream precipitation of residual plutonium when the solution is processed in H Canyon. In addition, sending the oxalate to the waste tank farm is undesirable. This report addresses the processing options for destroying the oxalate in existing H Canyon equipment.

  12. Tetraphenylphosphonium hydrogen oxalate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip A. W. Dean

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C24H20P+·C2HO4−, two symmetry-independent ion pairs are present. The cations aggregate into puckered sheets via zigzag infinite chains of sixfold phenyl embraces and parallel fourfold phenyl embraces, while the anions form hydrogen-bonded chains between the sheets of cations. In the two independent oxalate anions, the angles between the normals to the two least-squares carboxylate COO planes are unusually large, viz. 72.5 (1 and 82.1 (1°.

  13. SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION OF TRACE OXALIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Based on the property that oxalic acid has the effect on the replacement of dibromochloroarsenazo in zirconium(IV)-dibromochloroarsenazo complex to produce hyperchromic effects in 1.26 M hydrochloric acid medium, a novel method for the determination of trace oxalic acid by spectrophotometry was developed.

  14. Highly sensitive and stable electrochemical sulfite biosensor incorporating a bacterial sulfite dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalimuthu, Palraj; Tkac, Jan; Kappler, Ulrike; Davis, Jason J; Bernhardt, Paul V

    2010-09-01

    This paper describes a highly sensitive electrochemical (voltammetric) determination of sulfite using a combination of Starkeya novella sulfite dehydrogenase (SDH), horse heart cytochrome c (cyt c), and a self-assembled monolayer of 11-mercaptoundecanol (MU) cast on a gold electrode. The biosensor was optimized in terms of pH and the ratio of cyt c/SDH. The electrocatalytic oxidation current of sulfite increased linearly from 1 to 6 microM at the enzyme-modified electrode with a correlation coefficient of 0.9995 and an apparent Michaelis constant (K(M,app)) of 43 microM. Using an amperometric method, the low detection limit for sulfite at the enzyme-modified electrode was 44 pM (signal-to-noise ratio = 3). The modified electrode retained a stable response for 3 days while losing only ca. 4% of its initial sensitivity during a 2 week storage period in 50 mM Tris buffer solution at 4 degrees C. The enzyme electrode was successfully used for the determination of sulfite in beer and white wine samples. The results of these electrochemical analyses agreed well with an independent spectrophotometric method using Ellman's reagent, but the detection limit was far superior using the electrochemical method.

  15. Electrocatalytic sulfite biosensor with human sulfite oxidase co-immobilized with cytochrome c in a polyelectrolyte-containing multilayer

    OpenAIRE

    Spricigo, Roberto; Dronov, Roman; Lisdat, Fred; Leimk?hler, Silke; Scheller, Frieder W.; Wollenberger, Ulla

    2008-01-01

    An efficient electrocatalytic biosensor for sulfite detection was developed by co-immobilizing sulfite oxidase and cytochrome c with polyaniline sulfonic acid in a layer-by-layer assembly. QCM, UV?Vis spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry revealed increasing loading of electrochemically active protein with the formation of multilayers. The sensor operates reagentless at low working potential. A catalytic oxidation current was detected in the presence of sulfite at the modified gold electrode, p...

  16. Destruction of oxalate by reaction with hydrogen peroxide. [Hydrazine oxalate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mailen, J.C.; Tallent, O.K.; Arwood, P.C.

    1981-09-01

    The destruction of oxalate by oxidation to carbon dioxide using hydrogen peroxide was studied as an alternative method for the disposal of oxalate in connection with the possible use of an aqueous hydrazine oxalate solution as a scrubbing agent for solvent cleanup in processes for the recovery of uranium, plutonium, and thorium by solvent extraction. The rate of oxidation of oxalate by hydrogen peroxide in acid solution at the reflux temperature was adequate for process application; reaction half-times at 100/sup 0/C were less than one hour when the hydrogen peroxide concentration was greater than 0.5 M. The reaction was first order with respect to both the oxalate and hydrogen peroxide concentrations and had an activation energy of 58.7 kJ/g-mol. The rate increased with the hydrogen ion concentration as (H/sup +/)/sup 0/ /sup 3/ but was not significantly affected by the presence of 100 ppM of uranium or copper in solution. In the near-neutral hydrazine oxalate solutions, the reaction of either component with hydrogen peroxide was too slow for process application.

  17. Hippocampal neuron number loss in rats exposed to ingested sulfite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdogan, Ilgaz; Kocamaz, Erdogan; Kucukatay, Vural; Yonguc, Nilufer Goksin; Ozdemir, Mehmet Bulent; Murk, William

    2011-10-01

    Sulfite, which is continuously formed in the body during metabolism of sulfur-containing amino acids, is commonly used in preservatives. It has been shown that there are toxic effects of sulfite on many cellular components. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible toxic effects of sulfite on pyramidal neurons by counting cell numbers in CA1 and CA2-CA3 subdivisions of the rat hippocampus. For this purpose, male albino rats were divided into a control group and a sulfite group (25 mg/kg). Sulfite was administered to the animals via drinking water for 8 weeks. At the end of the experimental period, brains were removed and neurons were estimated in total and in a known fraction of CA1 and CA2-CA3 subdivisions of the left hippocampus by using the optical fractionator method--a stereological method. Results showed that sulfite treatment caused a significant decrease in the total number of pyramidal neurons in three subdivisions of the hippocampus (CA1 and CA2-CA3) in the sulfite group compared with the control group (p < 0.05, Mann Whitney U test). It was concluded that exogenous administration of sulfite causes loss of pyramidal neurons in CA1 and CA2-CA3 subdivisions of the rat hippocampus.

  18. 21 CFR 130.9 - Sulfites in standardized food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sulfites in standardized food. 130.9 Section 130.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FOOD STANDARDS: GENERAL General Provisions § 130.9 Sulfites in standardized food...

  19. Analytical Study of Oxalates Coprecipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana MARTA

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the establishing of the oxalates coprecipitation conditions in view of the synthesis of superconducting systems. A systematic analytical study of the oxalates precipitation conditions has been performed, for obtaining superconducting materials, in the Bi Sr-Ca-Cu-O system. For this purpose, the formulae of the precipitates solubility as a function of pH and oxalate excess were established. The possible formation of hydroxo-complexes and soluble oxalato-complexes was taken into account. A BASIC program was used for tracing the precipitation curves. The curves of the solubility versus pH for different oxalate excess have plotted for the four oxalates, using a logaritmic scale. The optimal conditions for the quantitative oxalate coprecipitation have been deduced from the diagrams. The theoretical curves were confirmed by experimental results. From the precursors obtained by this method, the BSCCO superconducting phases were obtained by an appropriate thermal treatment. The formation of the superconducting phases was identified by X-ray diffraction analysis.

  20. Localized periorbital edema as a clinical manifestation of sulfite sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H. S.; Nahm, D.

    1996-01-01

    Sulfite is commonly used in pharmaceuticals as a preservative. We report a unique clinical presentation of localized periorbital edema on the left eye after administration of sulfite-containing dexamethasone. The patient's sulfite sensitivity was confirmed by sulfite oral provocation test: periorbital edema on the same site developed after ingestion of 200 mg sodium bisulfite. She was non-atopic and did not complain of any respiratory symptoms. Allergy skin prick test with 100 mg/ml sodium bisulfite showed a negative result. She also has aspirin-sensitive urticaria which was confirmed by oral provocation test. In conclusion, sulfite can induce a localized periorbital edema, an uncommon manifestation in sensitive patients. Further investigations are needed to clarify the pathogenetic mechanisms. PMID:8878807

  1. Effect of Oxalate on the Recycle of Neptunium Filtrate Solution by Anion Exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyser, E

    2004-11-18

    A series of laboratory column runs has been performed that demonstrates the recovery of neptunium (Np) containing up to 0.05 M oxalate. Np losses were generally less than one percent to the raffinate for feed solutions that contained 2 to 10 g Np/L. Up to 16 percent Np losses were observed with lower Np feed concentrations, but those losses were attributed to the shortened residence times rather than the higher oxalate to Np ratios. Losses in the plant are expected to be significantly less due to the lower cross-section flowrate possible with existing plant pumps. Elimination of the permanganate treatment of filtrates appears to be reasonable since the amount of Np in those filtrates does not appear to be practical to recover. Combination of untreated filtrates with other actinide rich solutions is not advisable as precipitation problems are likely. If untreated filtrates are kept segregated from other actinide rich streams, the recovery of the remaining Np is probably still possible, but could be limited due to the excessively high oxalate to Np ratio. The persistence of hydrazine/hydrazoic acid in filtrate solutions dictates that the nitrite treatment be retained to eliminate those species from the filtrates prior to transfer to the canyon. Elimination of the permanganate treatment of precipitator flushes and recovery by anion exchange does not appear to be limited by the oxalate effect on anion exchange. Np from solutions with higher oxalate to Np molar ratios than expected in precipitator flushes was recovered with low to modest losses. Solubility problems appear to be unlikely when the moles of oxalate involved are less than the total number of moles of Np due to complexation effects. The presence of significant concentrations of iron (Fe) in the solutions will further decrease the probability of Np oxalate precipitation due the formation of Fe oxalate complexes. Np oxalate solubility data in 8 M HNO{sub 3} with from one to six times as much oxalate as Np have

  2. Characterization of a heme c nitrite reductase from a non-ammonifying microorganism, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, I A; LeGall, J; Xavier, A V; Teixeira, M

    2000-08-31

    A cytochrome c nitrite reductase (NiR) was purified for the first time from a microorganism not capable of growing on nitrate, the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough. It was isolated from the membranes as a large heterooligomeric complex of 760 kDa, containing two cytochrome c subunits of 56 and 18 kDa. This complex has nitrite and sulfite reductase activities of 685 micromol NH(4)(+)/min/mg and 1.0 micromol H(2)/min/mg. The enzyme was studied by UV-visible and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies. The overall redox behavior was determined through a visible redox titration. The data were analyzed with a set of four redox transitions, with an E(0)' of +160 mV (12% of total absorption), -5 mV (38% of total absorption), -110 mV (38% of total absorption) and -210 mV (12% of total absorption) at pH 7.6. The EPR spectra of oxidized and partially reduced NiR show a complex pattern, indicative of multiple heme-heme magnetic interactions. It was found that D. vulgaris Hildenborough is not capable of using nitrite as a terminal electron acceptor. These results indicate that in this organism the NiR is not involved in the dissimilative reduction of nitrite, as is the case with the other similar enzymes isolated so far. The possible role of this enzyme in the detoxification of nitrite and/or in the reduction of sulfite is discussed.

  3. Sulfite oxidase biosensors based on tetrathiafulvalene modified screen-printed carbon electrodes for sulfite determination in wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinero-Abad, Begoña; Alonso-Lomillo, M Asunción; Domínguez-Renedo, Olga; Arcos-Martínez, M Julia

    2014-02-17

    Screen-printed carbon electrodes have been modified with tetrathiafulvalene and sulfite oxidase enzyme for the sensitive and selective detection of sulfite. Amperometric experimental conditions were optimized taking into account the importance of quantifying sulfite in wine samples and the inherent complexity of these samples, particularly red wine. The biosensor responds to sulfite giving a cathodic current (at +200 mV vs screen-printed Ag/AgCl electrode and pH 6) in a wide concentration range, with a capability of detection of 6 μM (α=β=0.05) at 60°C. The method has been applied to the determination of sulfite in white and red samples, with averages recoveries of 101.5% to 101.8%, respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Macrokinetics of magnesium sulfite oxidation inhibited by ascorbic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidong, Wang; Yongliang, Ma; Wendi, Zhang; Qiangwei, Li; Yi, Zhao; Zhanchao, Zhang

    2013-08-15

    Magnesia flue gas desulfurization is a promising process for small to medium scale industrial coal-fired boilers in order to reduce sulfur dioxide emissions, in which oxidation control of magnesium sulfite is of great importance for the recycling of products. Effects of four inhibitors were compared by kinetic experiments indicating that ascorbic acid is the best additive, which retards the oxidation process of magnesium sulfite in trace presence. The macrokinetics of magnesium sulfite oxidation inhibited by ascorbic acid were studied. Effects of the factors, including ascorbic acid concentration, magnesium sulfite concentration, oxygen partial pressure, pH, and temperature, were investigated in a stirred reactor with bubbling. The results show that the reaction rate is -0.55 order in ascorbic acid, 0.77 in oxygen partial pressure, and zero in magnesium sulfite concentration, respectively. The apparent activation energy is 88.0 kJ mol(-1). Integrated with the kinetic model, it is concluded that the oxidation rate of magnesium sulfite inhibited by ascorbic acid is controlled by the intrinsic chemical reaction. The result provides a useful reference for sulfite recovery in magnesia desulfurization. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Factors supporting cysteine tolerance and sulfite production in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennicke, Florian; Grumbt, Maria; Lermann, Ulrich; Ueberschaar, Nico; Palige, Katja; Böttcher, Bettina; Jacobsen, Ilse D; Staib, Claudia; Morschhäuser, Joachim; Monod, Michel; Hube, Bernhard; Hertweck, Christian; Staib, Peter

    2013-04-01

    The amino acid cysteine has long been known to be toxic at elevated levels for bacteria, fungi, and humans. However, mechanisms of cysteine tolerance in microbes remain largely obscure. Here we show that the human pathogenic yeast Candida albicans excretes sulfite when confronted with increasing cysteine concentrations. Mutant construction and phenotypic analysis revealed that sulfite formation from cysteine in C. albicans relies on cysteine dioxygenase Cdg1, an enzyme with similar functions in humans. Environmental cysteine induced not only the expression of the CDG1 gene in C. albicans, but also the expression of SSU1, encoding a putative sulfite efflux pump. Accordingly, the deletion of SSU1 resulted in enhanced sensitivity of the fungal cells to both cysteine and sulfite. To study the regulation of sulfite/cysteine tolerance in more detail, we screened a C. albicans library of transcription factor mutants in the presence of sulfite. This approach and subsequent independent mutant analysis identified the zinc cluster transcription factor Zcf2 to govern sulfite/cysteine tolerance, as well as cysteine-inducible SSU1 and CDG1 gene expression. cdg1Δ and ssu1Δ mutants displayed reduced hypha formation in the presence of cysteine, indicating a possible role of the newly proposed mechanisms of cysteine tolerance and sulfite secretion in the pathogenicity of C. albicans. Moreover, cdg1Δ mutants induced delayed mortality in a mouse model of disseminated infection. Since sulfite is toxic and a potent reducing agent, its production by C. albicans suggests diverse roles during host adaptation and pathogenicity.

  6. Siroheme- and [Fe4-S4]-dependent NirA from Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a sulfite reductase with a covalent Cys-Tyr bond in the active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Robert; Sandalova, Tatyana; Hellman, Ulf; Lindqvist, Ylva; Schneider, Gunter

    2005-07-22

    The nirA gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is up-regulated in the persistent state of the bacteria, suggesting that it is a potential target for the development of antituberculosis agents particularly active against the pathogen in its dormant phase. This gene encodes a ferredoxin-dependent sulfite reductase, and the structure of the enzyme has been determined using x-ray crystallography. The enzyme is a monomer comprising 555 amino acids and contains a [Fe4-S4] cluster and a siroheme cofactor. The molecule is built up of three domains with an alpha/beta fold. The first domain consists of two ferredoxin-like subdomains, related by a pseudo-2-fold symmetry axis passing through the whole molecule. The other two domains, which provide much of the binding interactions with the cofactors, have a common fold that is unique to the sulfite/nitrite reductase family. The domains form a trilobal structure, with the cofactors and the active site located at the interface of all three domains in the center of the molecule. NirA contains an unusual covalent bond between the side chains of Tyr69 and Cys161 in the active site, in close proximity to the siroheme cofactor. Removal of this covalent bond by site-directed mutagenesis impairs catalytic activity, suggesting that it is important for the enzymatic reaction. These residues are part of a sequence fingerprint, able to distinguish between ferredoxin-dependent sulfite and nitrite reductases. Comparison of NirA with the structure of the truncated NADPH-dependent sulfite reductase from Escherichia coli suggests a binding site for the external electron donor ferredoxin close to the [Fe4-S4] cluster.

  7. Elevated levels of serum sulfite in patients with chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajiyama, H; Nojima, Y; Mitsuhashi, H; Ueki, K; Tamura, S; Sekihara, T; Wakamatsu, R; Yano, S; Naruse, T

    2000-05-01

    Sulfite, a well known air pollutant, is toxic for humans, especially those with sulfite hypersensitivity. Sulfite is also generated endogenously, during normal metabolism of sulfur-containing amino acids. Mammalian tissues contain the enzyme sulfite oxidase, which detoxifies both endogenous and exogenous sulfite by oxidation to sulfate. Deficiency of sulfite oxidase in humans is fatal, demonstrating its physiologic importance. Nevertheless, information about serum and tissue levels of sulfite in normal and pathologic conditions is limited. Using a sensitive HPLC assay, it is shown here that sera from patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) contain significantly higher amounts of sulfite than those from healthy subjects. Mean +/- SD of serum sulfite in healthy subjects (n = 20) was 1.55 +/- 0.54 microM, whereas those in patients under maintenance hemodialysis (HD patients; n = 44) and CRF patients before introducing dialysis therapy (pre-HD patients; n = 33) were 3. 23 +/- 1.02 microM (P sulfite was positively correlated with serum creatinine (r = 0.714, P sulfite and patient age, gender, or leukocyte counts. Multiple regression analysis revealed serum creatinine as the sole independent predictor of serum sulfite levels. Each HD treatment was associated with approximately 27% reduction in serum sulfite levels, suggesting the presence of a dialyzable form in serum. Thus, these results indicate that reduced glomerular filtration is a factor that determines serum sulfite levels. Chronic elevation in serum sulfite levels might contribute to tissue or organ dysfunction in patients with CRF.

  8. Oxalate Concentrations in Human Gastrointestinal Fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Thanmaya G; Knight, John; Holmes, Ross P; Harvey, Lisa M; Mitchem, April L E; Wilcox, Charles M; Monkemuller, Klaus E; Assimos, Dean G

    2016-05-01

    Urinary oxalate excretion is a risk factor for nephrolithiasis and is a result of endogenous metabolism and gastrointestinal processes. Gastrointestinal absorption of oxalate has been well demonstrated but to our knowledge evidence for secretion of oxalate is absent in humans. The objective of this study was to measure the amount and conformation of oxalate in the stomach and small intestine of adult subjects undergoing gastrointestinal endoscopy. Eleven adults participated in this study. Gastrointestinal fluid was collected from the stomach and small intestine during endoscopy. A determination of the soluble and insoluble components of oxalate was made by centrifugation of the sample and subsequent acidification of the resultant pellet and supernatant. Samples were processed and the amount of oxalate was measured by ion chromatography, the limit of which is 1.6 μM. The majority of small intestinal samples contained some degree of oxalate. This is in contrast to the stomach where minimal oxalate was detected. There was a wide range of oxalate concentrations and a greater degree of insoluble oxalate in small intestinal samples. Our results suggest that some degree of oxalate secretion in the small intestine may occur in the fasted state while this is less likely in the stomach. Further studies are warranted to provide definitive evidence of gastrointestinal secretion of oxalate.

  9. Sulfite-induced protein radical formation in LPS aerosol-challenged mice: Implications for sulfite sensitivity in human lung disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Ashutosh; Triquigneaux, Mathilde; Madenspacher, Jennifer; Ranguelova, Kalina; Bang, John J.; Fessler, Michael B.; Mason, Ronald P.

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to (bi)sulfite (HSO3 –) and sulfite (SO3 2–) has been shown to induce a wide range of adverse reactions in sensitive individuals. Studies have shown that peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of (bi)sulfite leads to formation of several reactive free radicals, such as sulfur trioxide anion (.SO3 –), peroxymonosulfate (–O3SOO.), and especially the sulfate (SO4 . –) anion radicals. One such peroxidase in neutrophils is myeloperoxidase (MPO), which has been shown to form protein radicals. Alth...

  10. Sulfite-induced protein radical formation in LPS aerosol-challenged mice: Implications for sulfite sensitivity in human lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashutosh; Triquigneaux, Mathilde; Madenspacher, Jennifer; Ranguelova, Kalina; Bang, John J; Fessler, Michael B; Mason, Ronald P

    2018-05-01

    Exposure to (bi)sulfite (HSO 3 - ) and sulfite (SO 3 2- ) has been shown to induce a wide range of adverse reactions in sensitive individuals. Studies have shown that peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of (bi)sulfite leads to formation of several reactive free radicals, such as sulfur trioxide anion (.SO 3 - ), peroxymonosulfate ( - O 3 SOO.), and especially the sulfate (SO 4 . - ) anion radicals. One such peroxidase in neutrophils is myeloperoxidase (MPO), which has been shown to form protein radicals. Although formation of (bi)sulfite-derived protein radicals is documented in isolated neutrophils, its involvement and role in in vivo inflammatory processes, has not been demonstrated. Therefore, we aimed to investigate (bi)sulfite-derived protein radical formation and its mechanism in LPS aerosol-challenged mice, a model of non-atopic asthma. Using immuno-spin trapping to detect protein radical formation, we show that, in the presence of (bi)sulfite, neutrophils present in bronchoalveolar lavage and in the lung parenchyma exhibit, MPO-catalyzed oxidation of MPO to a protein radical. The absence of radical formation in LPS-challenged MPO- or NADPH oxidase-knockout mice indicates that sulfite-derived radical formation is dependent on both MPO and NADPH oxidase activity. In addition to its oxidation by the MPO-catalyzed pathway, (bi)sulfite is efficiently detoxified to sulfate by the sulfite oxidase (SOX) pathway, which forms sulfate in a two-electron oxidation reaction. Since SOX activity in rodents is much higher than in humans, to better model sulfite toxicity in humans, we induced SOX deficiency in mice by feeding them a low molybdenum diet with tungstate. We found that mice treated with the SOX deficiency diet prior to exposure to (bi)sulfite had much higher protein radical formation than mice with normal SOX activity. Altogether, these results demonstrate the role of MPO and NADPH oxidase in (bi)sulfite-derived protein radical formation and show the involvement of

  11. Factors Supporting Cysteine Tolerance and Sulfite Production in Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Hennicke, Florian; Grumbt, Maria; Lermann, Ulrich; Ueberschaar, Nico; Palige, Katja; Böttcher, Bettina; Jacobsen, Ilse D.; Staib, Claudia; Morschhäuser, Joachim; Monod, Michel; Hube, Bernhard; Hertweck, Christian; Staib, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The amino acid cysteine has long been known to be toxic at elevated levels for bacteria, fungi, and humans. However, mechanisms of cysteine tolerance in microbes remain largely obscure. Here we show that the human pathogenic yeast Candida albicans excretes sulfite when confronted with increasing cysteine concentrations. Mutant construction and phenotypic analysis revealed that sulfite formation from cysteine in C. albicans relies on cysteine dioxygenase Cdg1, an enzyme with similar functions ...

  12. Electrocatalytic sulfite biosensor with human sulfite oxidase co-immobilized with cytochrome c in a polyelectrolyte-containing multilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spricigo, Roberto; Dronov, Roman; Lisdat, Fred; Leimkühler, Silke; Scheller, Frieder W; Wollenberger, Ulla

    2009-01-01

    An efficient electrocatalytic biosensor for sulfite detection was developed by co-immobilizing sulfite oxidase and cytochrome c with polyaniline sulfonic acid in a layer-by-layer assembly. QCM, UV-Vis spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry revealed increasing loading of electrochemically active protein with the formation of multilayers. The sensor operates reagentless at low working potential. A catalytic oxidation current was detected in the presence of sulfite at the modified gold electrode, polarized at +0.1 V (vs. Ag/AgCl 1 M KCl). The stability of the biosensor performance was characterized and optimized. A 17-bilayer electrode has a linear range between 1 and 60 microM sulfite with a sensitivity of 2.19 mA M(-1) sulfite and a response time of 2 min. The electrode retained a stable response for 3 days with a serial reproducibility of 3.8% and lost 20% of sensitivity after 5 days of operation. It is possible to store the sensor in a dry state for more than 2 months. The multilayer electrode was used for determination of sulfite in unspiked and spiked samples of red and white wine. The recovery and the specificity of the signals were evaluated for each sample.

  13. Vanillin: Synthetic Flavoring from Spent Sulfite Liquor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Martin B.

    1997-09-01

    Separation of the lignin component of wood from the cellulose presents an opportunity to access various interesting products from the lignin fragments. The lignin represents availability of a sizable renewable resource. Vanillin, or 3-methoxy-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, is one of a series of related substituted aromatic flavor constituents, and represents one of the potentially profitable possibilities. Vanillin production from the lignin-containing waste liquor obtained from acid sulfite pulping of wood began in North America in the mid 1930's. By 1981 one plant at Thorold, Ontario produced 60% of the contemporary world supply of vanillin. The process also simultaneously decreased the organic loading of the aqueous waste streams of the pulping process. Today, however, whilst vanillin production from lignin is still practiced in Norway and a few other areas, all North American facilities using this process have closed, primarily for environmental reasons. New North American vanillin plants use petrochemical raw materials. An innovation is needed to help overcome the environmental problems of this process before vanillin production from lignin is likely to resume here. Current interest in the promotion of chemicals production from renewable raw materials reinforces the incentive to do this.

  14. A Nitrite Biosensor Based on Co-immobilization of Nitrite Reductase and Viologen-modified Chitosan on a Glassy Carbon Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Quan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available An electrochemical nitrite biosensor based on co-immobilization of copper- containing nitrite reductase (Cu-NiR, from Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides forma sp. denitrificans and viologen-modified chitosan (CHIT-V on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE is presented. Electron transfer (ET between a conventional GCE and immobilized Cu-NiR was mediated by the co-immobilized CHIT-V. Redox-active viologen was covalently linked to a chitosan backbone, and the thus produced CHIT-V was co-immobilized with Cu-NiR on the GCE surface by drop-coating of hydrophilic polyurethane (HPU. The electrode responded to nitrite with a limit of detection (LOD of 40 nM (S/N = 3. The sensitivity, linear response range, and response time (t90% were 14.9 nA/mM, 0.04−11 mM (r2 = 0.999 and 15 s, respectively. The corresponding Lineweaver-Burk plot showed that the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (KMapp was 65 mM. Storage stability of the biosensor (retaining 80% of initial activity was 65 days under ambient air and room temperature storage conditions. Reproducibility of the sensor showed a relative standard deviation (RSD of 2.8% (n = 5 for detection of 1 mM of nitrite. An interference study showed that anions commonlyfound in water samples such as chlorate, chloride, sulfate and sulfite did not interfere with the nitrite detection. However, nitrate interfered with a relative sensitivity of 64% and this interference effect was due to the intrinsic character of the NiR employed in this study.

  15. Sulfite induces release of lipid mediators by alveolar macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck-Speier, I.; Dayal, N.; Maier, L. [GSF - National Research Center for Environment and Health, Neuherberg (Germany). Inst. for Inhalation Biology; Denzlinger, C. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Dept. II, Medical Clinic; Haberl, C. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Dept. III, Medical Clinic

    1998-03-01

    Air pollutants are supposed to modulate physiological responses of alveolar macrophages (AM). This study was addressed to the question whether at neutral pH sulfur(IV) species in comparison to sulfur(VI) species cause AM to release proinflammatory mediators and which pathways are involved in their generation. Supernatants obtained from canine AM treated with sulfite (0.1 mM to 2 mM) enhanced the respiratory burst of canine neutrophils, measured by lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence, whereas supernatants derived from AM treated with sulfate (1 mM) did not. The neutrophil-stimulating activity released by sulfite-treated AM consisted of platelet-activating factor (PAF) and leukotriene B{sub 4} (LTB{sub 4}) as shown by desensitization of the platelet-activating factor (PAF) and leukotriene B{sub 4} (LTB{sub 4}) as shown by desensitization of the corresponding receptors. Inhibitors of phospholipase A{sub 2} substantially suppressed release of neutrophil-stimulating activity by sulfite-treated AM. Inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase in sulfite-treated AM also reduced neutrophil-stimulating activity, while inhibition of cyclooxygenase had no effect. In conclusion, sulfite induces AM to release lipid mediators via phospholipase A{sub 2}- and 5-lipoxygenase-dependent pathways. These mediators activate neutrophils via the receptors for PAF and LTB{sub 4}. (orig.)

  16. Role of sulfite additives in wine induced asthma: single dose and cumulative dose studies

    OpenAIRE

    Vally, H; Thompson, P

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Wine appears to be a significant trigger for asthma. Although sulfite additives have been implicated as a major cause of wine induced asthma, direct evidence is limited. Two studies were undertaken to assess sulfite reactivity in wine sensitive asthmatics. The first study assessed sensitivity to sulfites in wine using a single dose sulfited wine challenge protocol followed by a double blind, placebo controlled challenge. In the second study a cumulative dose su...

  17. 40 CFR 430.40 - Applicability; description of the dissolving sulfite subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applicability; description of the dissolving sulfite subcategory. 430.40 Section 430.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Dissolving Sulfite Subcategory § 430.40 Applicability; description of the dissolving sulfite...

  18. 21 CFR 201.22 - Prescription drugs containing sulfites; required warning statements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... sensitivity in the general population is unknown and probably low. Sulfite sensitivity is seen more frequently... metabisulfite, sodium sulfite, potassium bisulfite, and potassium metabisulfite. Recent studies have... containing a sulfite, except epinephrine for injection when intended for use in allergic or other emergency...

  19. Determination of total sulfite in shrimp: a review of methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Vyncke, W.

    1991-01-01

    Two basic techniques are used to liberate sulfite from the sample matrix. The first is based on distillation of sulfur dioxide from an acidified aqueous suspension of the product in an absorbing solution. The second is based on the extraction of sulfite from the sample with water or alkali.The most commonly used of the distillation techniques is the Monier-Williams method, where the sulfur dioxide evolved by acidification is displaced by a stream of inert gas into hydrogen peroxide to convert...

  20. A novel marine nitrite-oxidizing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haaijer, S.C.M.; Ji, K.; van Niftrik, L.; Hoischen, A.; Speth, D.R.; Jetten, M.S.M.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Op den Camp, H.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Marine microorganisms are important for the global nitrogen cycle, but marine nitrifiers, especially aerobic nitrite oxidizers, remain largely unexplored. To increase the number of cultured representatives of marine nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB), a bioreactor cultivation approach was adopted to

  1. The Reaction of Oxy Hemoglobin with Nitrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hathazi, Denisa; Scurtu, Florina; Bischin, Cristina

    2018-01-01

    -peroxynitrate. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations support this latter assignment. The reaction allows for differentiating between the reactivities of various chemically modified hemoglobins, including candidates for blood substitutes. Polymerization of hemoglobin slows the nitrite-induced oxidation, in sharp...... contrast to oxidative-stress type reactions which are generally accelerated, not inhibited. Sheep hemoglobin is found to be distinctly more resistant to reaction with nitrite compared to bovine Hb, at large nitrite concentrations (stopped-flow experiments directly observing the oxy + nitrite reaction...

  2. 21 CFR 172.175 - Sodium nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Preservatives § 172.175 Sodium nitrite. The food additive sodium nitrite may be safely used in or on specified... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrite. 172.175 Section 172.175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN...

  3. 21 CFR 573.700 - Sodium nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Listing § 573.700 Sodium nitrite. Sodium nitrite may be safely used in canned pet food containing meat and... as a preservative and color fixative in canned pet food containing fish, meat, and fish and meat... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium nitrite. 573.700 Section 573.700 Food and...

  4. Tannin, oxalate, saponin, cyanogenic and cardiac glycosides ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two species of cola, Cola nitida and Cola acuminate, were investigated for their possible relative contents of the secondary plant products:- tannin, oxalate, saponin, cyanogenic and cardiac glycosides. The two cola species gave low levels of tannin and oxalate but very high levels of cyanogenic and cardiac glycosides as ...

  5. Copper(I) in fogwater: Determination and interactions with sulfite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanbin Xue; Reutlinger, M.; Sigg, L.; Stumm, W. (Swiss Federal Inst. of Tech., Duebendorf (Switzerland)); Lurdes S. Goncalves, M. de (Inst. Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal))

    1991-10-01

    The copper(I)/(II) redox system was examined in fogwater with respect to the occurrence of Cu(I), the role of sulfite as a reductant of Cu(II) and as a complexing ligand, and the speciation of Cu(I) and Cu(II). Copper(I) was measured in fogwater by the bathocuproine method, which was evaluated for the conditions typically encountered in atmospheric water droplets. Concentrations of Cu(I) in the range 0.1-1 {mu}M were found, which represented between 4 and > 90% of the total copper in these samples. In experiments using concentration ranges of copper and S(IV) close to that of fogwater, the reduction of copper(II) to copper(I) by sulfite was shown to be pH-dependent and to occur rapidly at pH > 6. Calculations of the equilibrium complexation of Cu(I) and Cu(II) under fogwater conditions show that complexes of Cu(I) with sulfite predominate, while for Cu(II) oxalato complexes are important. Sulfite plays an important role as a ligand for Cu(I) in fogwater; Cu(I) may be produced by various reduction reactions, e.g., by organic compounds, and appears to be oxidized only slowly in the presence of S(IV).

  6. Evaluation of the lactate of sodium as a substitute for conventional nitrites in fish sausages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Pérez-Cantillo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The sodium salt of lactic acid is a natural acid produced by bacteria in the fermented foods which are rich in this component. It is produced by fermentation of sugars from some products such as corn or beets. Both lactic acid and lactates are used as preservatives, mainly against yeasts and fungi. It is also used to increase the stability of antioxidants, and to prevent loss of water from various products. The objective of this research was to determine the effectiveness of sodium lactate on the inhibition of Clostridium sporogenes in fish sausages, extending their life and reducing microbial growth. Two different formulations were made; F(A preserved with nitrites, F(B, preserved with sodium lactate and a control sample without preservative. A positive control SPS agar inoculated with Clostridium sporogenes at different dilutions were also carried out, finally they took incubation in candle jar at 37°C for 48 h. It was found that the use of sodium lactate 2% controlled growth of spores of Clostridium reducing sulfite in 48 hours in the solutions prepared as is the use of nitrites, these being a promising alternative to replace the use of nitrite in products type sausage meat.

  7. Crystal structure of dimethylammonium hydrogen oxalate hemi(oxalic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waly Diallo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Single crystals of the title salt, Me2NH2+·HC2O4−·0.5H2C2O4, were isolated as a side product from the reaction involving Me2NH, H2C2O4 and Sn(n-Bu3Cl in a 1:2 ratio in methanol or by the reaction of the (Me2NH22C2O4 salt and Sn(CH33Cl in a 2:1 ratio in ethanol. The asymmetric unit comprises a dimethylammonium cation (Me2NH2+, an hydrogenoxalate anion (HC2O4−, and half a molecule of oxalic acid (H2C2O4 situated about an inversion center. From a supramolecular point of view, the three components interact together via hydrogen bonding. The Me2NH2+ cations and the HC2O4− anions are in close proximity through bifurcated N—H...(O,O hydrogen bonds, while the HC2O4− anions are organized into infinite chains via O—H...O hydrogen bonds, propagating along the a-axis direction. In addition, the oxalic acid (H2C2O4 molecules play the role of connectors between these chains. Both the carbonyl and hydroxyl groups of each diacid are involved in four intermolecular interactions with two Me2NH2+ and two HC2O4− ions of four distinct polymeric chains, via two N—H...O and two O—H...O hydrogen bonds, respectively. The resulting molecular assembly can be viewed as a two-dimensional bilayer-like arrangement lying parallel to (010, and reinforced by a C—H...O hydrogen bond.

  8. Reaction of Hydrazine Hydrate with Oxalic Acid: Synthesis and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The reaction of oxalic acid with hydrazine hydrate (in appropriate mole ratio) forms the dihydrazinium oxalate under specific experimental condition. The title compound is a molecular salt containing two discrete hydrazinium cations and an oxalate anion. The oxalate anion is perfectly planar and there is a crystallographic ...

  9. Role of sulfite additives in wine induced asthma: single dose and cumulative dose studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vally, H; Thompson, P J

    2001-10-01

    Wine appears to be a significant trigger for asthma. Although sulfite additives have been implicated as a major cause of wine induced asthma, direct evidence is limited. Two studies were undertaken to assess sulfite reactivity in wine sensitive asthmatics. The first study assessed sensitivity to sulfites in wine using a single dose sulfited wine challenge protocol followed by a double blind, placebo controlled challenge. In the second study a cumulative dose sulfited wine challenge protocol was employed to establish if wine sensitive asthmatics as a group have an increased sensitivity to sulfites. In study 1, 24 asthmatic patients with a strong history of wine induced asthma were screened. Subjects showing positive responses to single blind high sulfite (300 ppm) wine challenge were rechallenged on separate days in a double blind, placebo controlled fashion with wines of varying sulfite levels to characterise their responses to these drinks. In study 2, wine sensitive asthmatic patients (n=12) and control asthmatics (n=6) were challenged cumulatively with wine containing increasing concentrations of sulfite in order to characterise further their sensitivity to sulfites in wine. Four of the 24 self-reporting wine sensitive asthmatic patients were found to respond to sulfite additives in wine when challenged in a single dose fashion (study 1). In the double blind dose-response study all four had a significant fall in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1)) (>15% from baseline) following exposure to wine containing 300 ppm sulfite, but did not respond to wines containing 20, 75 or 150 ppm sulfite. Responses were maximal at 5 minutes (mean (SD) maximal decline in FEV(1) 28.7 (13)%) and took 15-60 minutes to return to baseline levels. In the cumulative dose-response study (study 2) no significant difference was observed in any of the lung function parameters measured (FEV(1), peak expiratory flow (PEF), mid phase forced expiratory flow (FEF(25-75))) between wine

  10. Dietary Nitrite: from menace to marvel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan S. Bryan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The health benefits of nitrite are now indisputable when administered in a clinical setting for specific diseases. Currently, most published reports identify the production of nitric oxide (NO as the mechanism of action for nitrite. Basic science, in addition to clinical studies, demonstrate that nitrite and/or nitrate cannot restore NO homeostasis as an endothelium independent source of NO that may be a redundant system for endogenous NO production. Nitrate must first be reduced to nitrite by oral commensal bacteria; nitrite can then be further reduced to NO along the physiological oxygen gradient. But despite decades of rigorous research on sodium nitrate’s safety and efficacy as a curing agent, sodium nitrite is still regarded by many as a toxic undesirable food additive. However, research within the biomedical science community has revealed enormous therapeutic benefits of nitrite which are being developed as novel therapies for conditions associated with nitric oxide insufficiency. Thus, this review will highlight the fundamental biochemistry of nitrite in human physiology and provide evidence that nitrite be considered an essential nutrient. Foods or diets enriched with nitrite can have profound positive health benefits.

  11. Probiotics and Other Key Determinants of Dietary Oxalate Absorption1

    OpenAIRE

    Liebman, Michael; Al-Wahsh, Ismail A.

    2011-01-01

    Oxalate is a common component of many foods of plant origin, including nuts, fruits, vegetables, grains, and legumes, and is typically present as a salt of oxalic acid. Because virtually all absorbed oxalic acid is excreted in the urine and hyperoxaluria is known to be a considerable risk factor for urolithiasis, it is important to understand the factors that have the potential to alter the efficiency of oxalate absorption. Oxalate bioavailability, a term that has been used to refer to that p...

  12. Boletus edulis Nitrite Reductase Reduces Nitrite Content of Pickles and Mitigates Intoxication in Nitrite-intoxicated Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Tian, Guoting; Feng, Shanshan; Wong, Jack Ho; Zhao, Yongchang; Chen, Xiao; Wang, Hexiang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2015-10-08

    Pickles are popular in China and exhibits health-promoting effects. However, nitrite produced during fermentation adversely affects health due to formation of methemoglobin and conversion to carcinogenic nitrosamine. Fruiting bodies of the mushroom Boletus edulis were capable of inhibiting nitrite production during pickle fermentation. A 90-kDa nitrite reductase (NiR), demonstrating peptide sequence homology to fungal nitrite reductase, was isolated from B. edulis fruiting bodies. The optimum temperature and pH of the enzyme was 45 °C and 6.8, respectively. B. edulis NiR was capable of prolonging the lifespan of nitrite-intoxicated mice, indicating that it had the action of an antidote. The enzyme could also eliminate nitrite from blood after intragastric administration of sodium nitrite, and after packaging into capsule, this nitrite-eliminating activity could persist for at least 120 minutes thus avoiding immediate gastric degradation. B. edulis NiR represents the first nitrite reductase purified from mushrooms and may facilitate subsequent applications.

  13. Hydrogen peroxide inhibition of bicupin oxalate oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, John M; Rana, Hassan; Ndungu, Joan; Chakrabarti, Gaurab; Moomaw, Ellen W

    2017-01-01

    Oxalate oxidase is a manganese containing enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of oxalate to carbon dioxide in a reaction that is coupled with the reduction of oxygen to hydrogen peroxide. Oxalate oxidase from Ceriporiopsis subvermispora (CsOxOx) is the first fungal and bicupin enzyme identified that catalyzes this reaction. Potential applications of oxalate oxidase for use in pancreatic cancer treatment, to prevent scaling in paper pulping, and in biofuel cells have highlighted the need to understand the extent of the hydrogen peroxide inhibition of the CsOxOx catalyzed oxidation of oxalate. We apply a membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS) assay to directly measure initial rates of carbon dioxide formation and oxygen consumption in the presence and absence of hydrogen peroxide. This work demonstrates that hydrogen peroxide is both a reversible noncompetitive inhibitor of the CsOxOx catalyzed oxidation of oxalate and an irreversible inactivator. The build-up of the turnover-generated hydrogen peroxide product leads to the inactivation of the enzyme. The introduction of catalase to reaction mixtures protects the enzyme from inactivation allowing reactions to proceed to completion. Circular dichroism spectra indicate that no changes in global protein structure take place in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Additionally, we show that the CsOxOx catalyzed reaction with the three carbon substrate mesoxalate consumes oxygen which is in contrast to previous proposals that it catalyzed a non-oxidative decarboxylation with this substrate.

  14. Modeling the Adsorption of Oxalate onto Montmorillonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, M Elena; Emiroglu, Caglayan; García, David; Sainz-Díaz, C Ignacio; Huertas, F Javier

    2015-11-03

    In this work, a multiscale modeling of the interaction of oxalate with clay mineral surfaces from macroscale thermodynamic equilibria simulations to atomistic calculations is presented. Previous results from macroscopic adsorption data of oxalate on montmorillonite in 0.01 M KNO3 media at 25 °C within the pH range from 2.5 to 9 have been used to develop a surface complexation model. The experimental adsorption edge data were fitted using the triple-layer model (TLM) with the aid of the FITEQL 4.0 computer program. Surface complexation of oxalate is described by two reactions: >AlOH + Ox(2-) + 2H(+) = >AlOxH + H2O (log K = 14.39) and >AlOH + Ox(2-) + H(+) = >AlOx(-) + H2O (log K = 10.39). The monodentate complex >AlOxH dominated adsorption below pH 4, and the bidentate complex >AlOx(-) was predominant at higher pH values. Both of the proposed inner-sphere oxalate species are qualitatively consistent with previously published diffuse reflectance FTIR spectroscopic results for oxalate on montmorillonite edge surface (Chem. Geol. 2014, 363, 283-292). Atomistic computational studies have been performed to understand the interactions at the molecular level between adsorbates and mineral surface, showing the atomic structures and IR frequency shifts of the adsorption complexes of oxalate with the edge surface of a periodic montmorillonite model.

  15. Sulfur and adenine metabolisms are linked, and both modulate sulfite resistance in wine yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda, Agustín; Jiménez-Martí, Elena; Orozco, Helena; Matallana, Emilia; Del Olmo, Marcellí

    2006-08-09

    Sulfite treatment is the most common way to prevent grape must spoilage in winemaking because the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is particularly resistant to this chemical. In this paper we report that sulfite resistance depends on sulfur and adenine metabolism. The amount of adenine and methionine in a chemically defined growth medium modulates sulfite resistance of wine yeasts. Mutations in the adenine biosynthetic pathway or the presence of adenine in a synthetic minimal culture medium increase sulfite resistance. The presence of methionine has the opposite effect, inducing a higher sensitivity to SO(2). The concentration of methionine, adenine, and sulfite in a synthetic grape must influences the progress of fermentation and at the transcriptional level the expression of genes involved in sulfur (MET16), adenine (ADE4), and acetaldehyde (ALD6) metabolism. Sulfite alters the pattern of expression of all these genes. This fact indicates that the response to this stress is complex and involves several metabolic pathways.

  16. A simple levulinate-based ratiometric fluorescent probe for sulfite with a large emission shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Caiyun; Wu, Huifang; Yang, Wen; Zhang, Xiaoling

    2014-01-01

    A simple 4-hydroxynaphthalimide-derived colorimetric and ratiometric fluorescent probe (1) containing a receptor of levulinate moiety was designed and synthesized to monitor sulfite. Probe 1 could quantificationally detect sulfite by a ratiometric fluorescence spectroscopy method with high selectivity and sensitivity. Specially, probe 1 exhibited a 100 nm red-shifted absorption spectrum along with the color changes from colorless to yellow, and 103 nm red-shifted emission spectra upon the addition of sulfite. Thus, 1 can serve as a "naked-eye" probe for sulfite. Further, the recognition mechanism of probe 1 for sulfite was confirmed using nuclear magnetic resonance and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Also, the preliminary practical application demonstrated that our proposed probe provided a promising method for the determination of sulfite.

  17. Different mechanisms of resistance modulate sulfite tolerance in wine yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadai, Chiara; Treu, Laura; Campanaro, Stefano; Giacomini, Alessio; Corich, Viviana

    2016-01-01

    From a technological point of view, yeast resistance to sulfite is of great interest and represents an important technological character for winemaking. Several mechanisms are involved, and strain-dependent strategies to obtain SO2 resistance can deeply influence wine quality, although this choice is less relevant in determining the technological performance of the strain during fermentation. In this study, to better understand the strain-specific mechanisms of resistance, 11 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, whose genomes have been previously sequenced, were selected. Their attitude towards sulfites, in terms of resistance and production, was evaluated, and RNA-sequencing of four selected strains was performed during fermentation process in synthetic grape must in the presence of SO2. Results demonstrated that at molecular level, the physical effect of SO2 triggered multiple stress responses in the cell and high tolerance to general enological stressing condition increased SO2 resistance. Adaptation mechanism due to high basal gene expression level rather than specific gene induction in the presence of sulfite seemed to be responsible in modulating strain resistance. This mechanism involved higher basal gene expression level of specific cell wall proteins, enzymes for lipid biosynthesis, and enzymes directly involved in SO2 assimilation pathway and efflux.

  18. Conformational Control of Electron Tunneling in Redox Proteins: Sulfite Oxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balabin, Ilya; Kawatsu, Tsutomu; Beratan, David

    2004-03-01

    Many redox proteins mediate electron transfer over large (10-25A) distances, with the reaction rate being, in some cases, remarkably sensitive to the protein structure and dynamics (e.g., Science 290, 114-117 (2000)). These properties make redox proteins excellent candidates for molecular electronics applications. Sulfite oxidase (SO) is a molybdenum-containing electron-transfer enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of sulfite to sulfate. The enzyme consists of two domains, one hosting a molybdopterin moiety, which receives an electron from sulfite, and the other hosting a heme, from which electrons travels to cytochrome c. The domains are connected together by a flexible link, which allows for the domains to move relative to each other. This motion is believed to control electron transfer from the molybdopterin to the heme, which is only possible when the enzyme assumes a closed conformation (the two domains are in contact with each other). The only available crystallographic structure of SO (PDB code 1SOX) characterizes an open conformation, when the two domains are separated. Classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the enzyme in solvent, combined with semi-empirical quantum chemistry calculations, were performed to identify possible closed conformations of SO and to investigate the electron transfer rate in these conformations. Steered MD simulations supplemented by analytical modeling were used to characterize kinetics of conformational transitions, particularly opening and closing of the enzyme, which controls the electron tunneling rate.

  19. Further Studies on Oxalic Acid Biosynthesis in Oxalate-accumulating Plants 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuss, Richard F.; Loewus, Frank A.

    1978-01-01

    l-Ascorbic acid functions as a precursor of oxalic acid in several oxalate-accumulating plants. The present study extends this observation to include Rumex crispus L. (curly dock), Amaranthus retroflexus L. (red root pigweed), Chenopodium album L. (lamb's-quarters), Beta vulgaris L. (sugar beet), Halogeton glomeratus M. Bieb. (halogeton), and Rheum rhabarbarum L. (rhubarb). Several species with low oxalate content are also examined. When l-[1-14C]ascorbic acid is supplied to young seedlings of R. crispus or H. glomeratus, a major portion of the 14C is released over a 24-hour period as 14CO2 and only a small portion is recovered as [14C]oxalate, unlike cuttings from 2- or 4-month-old plants which retain a large part of the 14C as [14C]oxalic acid and release very little 14CO2. Support for an intermediate role of oxalate in the release of 14CO2 from l-[1-14C]ascorbic acid is seen in the rapid release of 14CO2 by R. crispus and H. glomeratus seedlings labeled with [14C]oxalic acid. The common origin of oxalic acid carbon in the C1 and C2 fragment from l-ascorbic acid is demonstrated by comparison of 14C content of oxalic acid in several oxalate-accumulators after cuttings or seedlings are supplied equal amounts of l-[1-14C]- or l-[UL-14C]ascorbic acid. Theoretically, l-[1-14C]ascorbic acid will produce labeled oxalic acid containing three times as much 14C as l-[UL-14C]ascorbic acid when equal amounts of label are provided. Experimentally, a ratio of 2.7 ± 0.5 is obtained in duplicate experiments with six different species. PMID:16660342

  20. Further Studies on Oxalic Acid Biosynthesis in Oxalate-accumulating Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuss, R F; Loewus, F A

    1978-04-01

    l-Ascorbic acid functions as a precursor of oxalic acid in several oxalate-accumulating plants. The present study extends this observation to include Rumex crispus L. (curly dock), Amaranthus retroflexus L. (red root pigweed), Chenopodium album L. (lamb's-quarters), Beta vulgaris L. (sugar beet), Halogeton glomeratus M. Bieb. (halogeton), and Rheum rhabarbarum L. (rhubarb). Several species with low oxalate content are also examined.When l-[1-(14)C]ascorbic acid is supplied to young seedlings of R. crispus or H. glomeratus, a major portion of the (14)C is released over a 24-hour period as (14)CO(2) and only a small portion is recovered as [(14)C]oxalate, unlike cuttings from 2- or 4-month-old plants which retain a large part of the (14)C as [(14)C]oxalic acid and release very little (14)CO(2). Support for an intermediate role of oxalate in the release of (14)CO(2) from l-[1-(14)C]ascorbic acid is seen in the rapid release of (14)CO(2) by R. crispus and H. glomeratus seedlings labeled with [(14)C]oxalic acid.The common origin of oxalic acid carbon in the C1 and C2 fragment from l-ascorbic acid is demonstrated by comparison of (14)C content of oxalic acid in several oxalate-accumulators after cuttings or seedlings are supplied equal amounts of l-[1-(14)C]- or l-[UL-(14)C]ascorbic acid. Theoretically, l-[1-(14)C]ascorbic acid will produce labeled oxalic acid containing three times as much (14)C as l-[UL-(14)C]ascorbic acid when equal amounts of label are provided. Experimentally, a ratio of 2.7 +/- 0.5 is obtained in duplicate experiments with six different species.

  1. Sulfites--a food and drug administration review of recalls and reported adverse events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timbo, Babgaleh; Koehler, Kathleen M; Wolyniak, Cecilia; Klontz, Karl C

    2004-08-01

    Sulfite-sensitive individuals can experience adverse reactions after consuming foods containing sulfiting agents (sulfites), and some of these reactions may be severe. In the 1980s and 1990s, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) acted to reduce the likelihood that sulfite-sensitive individuals would unknowingly consume foods containing sulfites. The FDA prohibited the use of sulfites on fruits and vegetables (except potatoes) to be served or presented fresh to the public and required that the presence of detectable levels of sulfites be declared on food labels, even when these sulfites are used as a processing aid or are a component of another ingredient in the food. In the present study, data from FDA recall records and adverse event reports were used to examine the current status of problems of sensitivity to sulfites in foods. From 1996 through 1999, the FDA processed a total of 59 recalls of foods containing undeclared sulfites; these 59 recalls involved 93 different food products. Fifty (55%) of the recalled products were classified as class I, a designation indicating that a consumer reasonably could have ingested > or = 10 mg of undeclared sulfites on a single occasion, a level that could potentially cause a serious adverse reaction in a susceptible person. From 1996 through mid-1999, the FDA received a total of 34 reports of adverse reactions allegedly due to eating foods containing undeclared sulfites. The average of 10 reports per year, although derived from a passive surveillance system, was lower than the average of 111 reports per year that the FDA received from 1980 to 1987, a decrease that may have resulted in part from FDA regulatory action.

  2. Short communication: Urinary oxalate and calcium excretion by dogs and cats diagnosed with calcium oxalate urolithiasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijcker, J.C.; Kummeling, A.; Hagen-Plantinga, E.A.; Hendriks, W.H.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Urine concentrations of oxalate and calcium play an important role in calcium oxalate (CaOx) urolith formation in dogs and cats, with high excretions of both substances increasing the chance of CaOx urolithiasis. In 17 CaOx-forming dogs, urine calcium:creatinine ratio (Ca:Cr) was found

  3. Probiotics and other key determinants of dietary oxalate absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebman, Michael; Al-Wahsh, Ismail A

    2011-05-01

    Oxalate is a common component of many foods of plant origin, including nuts, fruits, vegetables, grains, and legumes, and is typically present as a salt of oxalic acid. Because virtually all absorbed oxalic acid is excreted in the urine and hyperoxaluria is known to be a considerable risk factor for urolithiasis, it is important to understand the factors that have the potential to alter the efficiency of oxalate absorption. Oxalate bioavailability, a term that has been used to refer to that portion of food-derived oxalate that is absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), is estimated to range from 2 to 15% for different foods. Oxalate bioavailability appears to be decreased by concomitant food ingestion due to interactions between oxalate and coingested food components that likely result in less oxalic acid remaining in a soluble form. There is a lack of consensus in the literature as to whether efficiency of oxalate absorption is dependent on the proportion of total dietary oxalate that is in a soluble form. However, studies that directly compared foods of varying soluble oxalate contents have generally supported the proposition that the amount of soluble oxalate in food is an important determinant of oxalate bioavailability. Oxalate degradation by oxalate-degrading bacteria within the GIT is another key factor that could affect oxalate absorption and degree of oxaluria. Studies that have assessed the efficacy of oral ingestion of probiotics that provide bacteria with oxalate-degrading capacity have led to promising but generally mixed results, and this remains a fertile area for future studies.

  4. Probiotics and Other Key Determinants of Dietary Oxalate Absorption1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebman, Michael; Al-Wahsh, Ismail A.

    2011-01-01

    Oxalate is a common component of many foods of plant origin, including nuts, fruits, vegetables, grains, and legumes, and is typically present as a salt of oxalic acid. Because virtually all absorbed oxalic acid is excreted in the urine and hyperoxaluria is known to be a considerable risk factor for urolithiasis, it is important to understand the factors that have the potential to alter the efficiency of oxalate absorption. Oxalate bioavailability, a term that has been used to refer to that portion of food-derived oxalate that is absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), is estimated to range from 2 to 15% for different foods. Oxalate bioavailability appears to be decreased by concomitant food ingestion due to interactions between oxalate and coingested food components that likely result in less oxalic acid remaining in a soluble form. There is a lack of consensus in the literature as to whether efficiency of oxalate absorption is dependent on the proportion of total dietary oxalate that is in a soluble form. However, studies that directly compared foods of varying soluble oxalate contents have generally supported the proposition that the amount of soluble oxalate in food is an important determinant of oxalate bioavailability. Oxalate degradation by oxalate-degrading bacteria within the GIT is another key factor that could affect oxalate absorption and degree of oxaluria. Studies that have assessed the efficacy of oral ingestion of probiotics that provide bacteria with oxalate-degrading capacity have led to promising but generally mixed results, and this remains a fertile area for future studies. PMID:22332057

  5. SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION OF NITRITE BY ITS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    The main sources of nitrite ion in unpolluted surface waters are the processes of organic matter mineralization and nitrification by Nitrosomonas bacteria. The content of nitrite in unpolluted surface and ground water is very low, generally < 0.01–0.02 mg L-1 NO2. - [2]. Similar concentrations are typically found in unpolluted ...

  6. Comparative study of sulfite pretreatments for robust enzymatic saccharification of corn cob residue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bu Lingxi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Corn cob residue (CCR is a kind of waste lignocellulosic material with enormous potential for bioethanol production. The moderated sulphite processes were used to enhance the hydrophily of the material by sulfonation and hydrolysis. The composition, FT-IR spectra, and conductometric titrations of the pretreated materials were measured to characterize variations of the CCR in different sulfite pretreated environments. And the objective of this study is to compare the saccharification rate and yield of the samples caused by these variations. Results It was found that the lignin in the CCR (43.2% had reduced to 37.8%, 38.0%, 35.9%, and 35.5% after the sulfite pretreatment in neutral, acidic, alkaline, and ethanol environments, respectively. The sulfite pretreatments enhanced the glucose yield of the CCR. Moreover, the ethanol sulfite sample had the highest glucose yield (81.2%, based on the cellulose in the treated sample among the saccharification samples, which was over 10% higher than that of the raw material (70.6%. More sulfonic groups and weak acid groups were produced during the sulfite pretreatments. Meanwhile, the ethanol sulfite treated sample had the highest sulfonic group (0.103 mmol/g and weak acid groups (1.85 mmol/g in all sulfite treated samples. In FT-IR spectra, the variation of bands at 1168 and 1190 cm-1 confirmed lignin sulfonation during sulfite pretreatment. The disappearance of the band at 1458 cm-1 implied the methoxyl on lignin had been removed during the sulfite pretreatments. Conclusions It can be concluded that the lignin in the CCR can be degraded and sulfonated during the sulfite pretreatments. The pretreatments improve the hydrophility of the samples because of the increase in sulfonic group and weak acid groups, which enhances the glucose yield of the material. The ethanol sulfite pretreatment is the best method for lignin removal and with the highest glucose yield.

  7. ADVANCED OXIDATION: OXALATE DECOMPOSITION TESTING WITH OZONE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketusky, E.; Subramanian, K.

    2012-02-29

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), oxalic acid is currently considered the preferred agent for chemically cleaning the large underground Liquid Radioactive Waste Tanks. It is applied only in the final stages of emptying a tank when generally less than 5,000 kg of waste solids remain, and slurrying based removal methods are no-longer effective. The use of oxalic acid is preferred because of its combined dissolution and chelating properties, as well as the fact that corrosion to the carbon steel tank walls can be controlled. Although oxalic acid is the preferred agent, there are significant potential downstream impacts. Impacts include: (1) Degraded evaporator operation; (2) Resultant oxalate precipitates taking away critically needed operating volume; and (3) Eventual creation of significant volumes of additional feed to salt processing. As an alternative to dealing with the downstream impacts, oxalate decomposition using variations of ozone based Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) were investigated. In general AOPs use ozone or peroxide and a catalyst to create hydroxyl radicals. Hydroxyl radicals have among the highest oxidation potentials, and are commonly used to decompose organics. Although oxalate is considered among the most difficult organic to decompose, the ability of hydroxyl radicals to decompose oxalate is considered to be well demonstrated. In addition, as AOPs are considered to be 'green' their use enables any net chemical additions to the waste to be minimized. In order to test the ability to decompose the oxalate and determine the decomposition rates, a test rig was designed, where 10 vol% ozone would be educted into a spent oxalic acid decomposition loop, with the loop maintained at 70 C and recirculated at 40L/min. Each of the spent oxalic acid streams would be created from three oxalic acid strikes of an F-area simulant (i.e., Purex = high Fe/Al concentration) and H-area simulant (i.e., H area modified Purex = high Al/Fe concentration

  8. Advanced Oxidation: Oxalate Decomposition Testing With Ozone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketusky, E.; Subramanian, K.

    2012-01-01

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), oxalic acid is currently considered the preferred agent for chemically cleaning the large underground Liquid Radioactive Waste Tanks. It is applied only in the final stages of emptying a tank when generally less than 5,000 kg of waste solids remain, and slurrying based removal methods are no-longer effective. The use of oxalic acid is preferred because of its combined dissolution and chelating properties, as well as the fact that corrosion to the carbon steel tank walls can be controlled. Although oxalic acid is the preferred agent, there are significant potential downstream impacts. Impacts include: (1) Degraded evaporator operation; (2) Resultant oxalate precipitates taking away critically needed operating volume; and (3) Eventual creation of significant volumes of additional feed to salt processing. As an alternative to dealing with the downstream impacts, oxalate decomposition using variations of ozone based Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) were investigated. In general AOPs use ozone or peroxide and a catalyst to create hydroxyl radicals. Hydroxyl radicals have among the highest oxidation potentials, and are commonly used to decompose organics. Although oxalate is considered among the most difficult organic to decompose, the ability of hydroxyl radicals to decompose oxalate is considered to be well demonstrated. In addition, as AOPs are considered to be 'green' their use enables any net chemical additions to the waste to be minimized. In order to test the ability to decompose the oxalate and determine the decomposition rates, a test rig was designed, where 10 vol% ozone would be educted into a spent oxalic acid decomposition loop, with the loop maintained at 70 C and recirculated at 40L/min. Each of the spent oxalic acid streams would be created from three oxalic acid strikes of an F-area simulant (i.e., Purex = high Fe/Al concentration) and H-area simulant (i.e., H area modified Purex = high Al/Fe concentration) after nearing

  9. Generation of PHB from Spent Sulfite Liquor Using Halophilic Microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Weissgram

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Halophilic microorganisms thrive at elevated concentrations of sodium chloride up to saturation and are capable of growing on a wide variety of carbon sources like various organic acids, hexose and also pentose sugars. Hence, the biotechnological application of these microorganisms can cover many aspects, such as the treatment of hypersaline waste streams of different origin. Due to the fact that the high osmotic pressure of hypersaline environments reduces the risk of contamination, the capacity for cost-effective non-sterile cultivation can make extreme halophilic microorganisms potentially valuable organisms for biotechnological applications. In this contribution, the stepwise use of screening approaches, employing design of experiment (DoE on model media and subsequently using industrial waste as substrate have been implemented to investigate the applicability of halophiles to generate PHB from the industrial waste stream spent sulfite liquor (SSL. The production of PHB on model media as well as dilutions of industrial substrate in a complex medium has been screened for by fluorescence microscopy using Nile Blue staining. Screening was used to investigate the ability of halophilic microorganisms to withstand the inhibiting substances of the waste stream without negatively affecting PHB production. It could be shown that neither single inhibiting substances nor a mixture thereof inhibited growth in the investigated range, hence, leaving the question on the inhibiting mechanisms open. However, it could be demonstrated that some haloarchaea and halophilic bacteria are able to produce PHB when cultivated on 3.3% w/w dry matter spent sulfite liquor, whereas H. halophila was even able to thrive on 6.6% w/w dry matter spent sulfite liquor and still produce PHB.

  10. Inhibition of tyrosinase-mediated enzymatic browning by sulfite and natural alternatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, T.F.M.; Vincken, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    Although sulfite is widely used to counteract enzymatic browning, its mechanism has remained largely unknown. We describe a double inhibitory mechanism of sulfite on enzymatic browning, affecting both the enzymatic oxidation of phenols into o‑quinones, as well as the non‑enzymatic reactions of these

  11. Spectrophotometric Determination of Total Sulfite in White Wine Samples Using Crude Extracts from Flowers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flora Barbosa Soares, Márlon Herbert; Ramos, Luiz Antonio; Tadeu Gomes Cavalheiro, Éder

    2002-09-01

    A didactic spectrophotometric method for determining the sulfite content in white wine samples is proposed. It is based upon a discoloring reaction between flower anthocyanins and the sulfite in basic media. Students' results obtained from iodometric data agreed well with results obtained by the proposed procedure. The use of natural dyes attracted students' interest, enhancing the learning process.

  12. Sulfite pretreatment (SPORL) for robust enzymatic saccharification of spruce and red pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.Y. Zhu; X.J. Pan; G.S. Wang; R. Gleisner

    2009-01-01

    This study established a novel process using sulfite pretreatment to overcome recalcitrance of lignocellulose (SPORL) for robust and efficient bioconversion of softwoods. The process consists of sulfite treatment of wood chips under acidic conditions followed by mechanical size reduction using disk refining. The results indicated that after the SPORL pretreatment of...

  13. Case studies on sugar production from underutilized woody biomass using sulfite chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.Y. Zhu; M. Subhosh Chandra; Roland Gleisner; William Gilles; Johnway Gao; Gevan Marrs; Dwight Anderson; John Sessions

    2015-01-01

    We examined two case studies to demonstrate the advantages of sulfite chemistry for pretreating underutilized woody biomass to produce sugars through enzymatic saccharification. In the first case study, we evaluated knot rejects from a magnesium-basedsulfite mill for direct enzymatic sugar production.We found that the sulfite mill rejects are an excellent feedstock for...

  14. Colorimetric and fluorescent determination of sulfide and sulfite with kinetic discrimination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pei, X.; Tian, H.; Zhang, W.; Brouwer, A.M.; Qian, J.

    2014-01-01

    Two fluorescent probes, m-PSP and p-PSP, for sulfite and/or sulfide were constructed by connecting a pyridinium ion to a coumarin fluorophore through an alpha,beta-unsaturated ketone. The presence of the pyridinium salt promoted the nucleophilic addition of sulfite and sulfide to the

  15. Triple oxygen isotope determination of oxygen exchange between sulfite and water preceding the aqueous oxidation of sulfite (pH=1-10)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, I. E.; Bao, H.

    2010-12-01

    The use of sulfate isotope compositions to interpret past surface conditions has highlighted the importance of understanding sulfur redox pathways. Both O2 and H2O are known to contribute oxygen to sulfate produced from the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds. The results from a set of our recent experiments pointed to sulfite as a key intermediate in controlling the δ18OSO4. Sulfite is produced as a sulfoxyanion intermediate during both dissimilatory sulfate reduction (DSR) and sulfide oxidation. The importance of sulfite is directly linked to its ability to readily exchange oxygen with water, resulting in a partial or total resetting of the oxygen isotope ratio in sulfite. We propose that during the production of sulfate via sulfide oxidation under Earth surface conditions, sulfate oxygen isotope composition is determined by rate competition between Fe (III)-shuttling (resulting in H2O oxygen incorporation) and direct O2 oxidation during both sulfide-sulfite and sulfite-sulfate oxidation as well as the rate of sulfite-water exchange. These competing rates are in direct control of: 1) the degree of preservation of the oxygen sources preceding sulfite formation, 2) the final SO42—oxygen source ratio, and 3) the δ18OSO4. In order to construct a unified, quantitative model, many rate efficiencies and isotope fractionation factors have to be determined. In this study, we focus on the competition between the rate of sulfite-water oxygen exchange and the rate of sulfite to sulfate oxidation. We set up a series of 50 ml (short term) and 150 ml (long term) D.D. and Δ17O-labeled, H2O reactors in which we introduced NaHSO3 to a concentration of 0.25 M at variable pH (1-10). Sulfate formed in solution and was collected and precipitated as BaSO4 at time intervals from 10 sec to 24hours (short term) or 1 to 21weeks (long term). The rates of sulfite-water oxygen exchange and sulfite to sulfate oxidation were quantitatively evaluated over the time range 10 sec to 21 weeks

  16. Radiation-induced radical ions in calcium sulfite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogushevich, S. E.

    2006-07-01

    We have used EPR to study the effect of γ radiation on calcium sulfite. We have observed and identified the radiation-induced radical ions SO 2 - (iso) with g = 2.0055 and SO 2 - (orth-1) with g1 = 2.0093, g2 = 2.0051, g3 = 2.0020, identical to the initial and thermally induced SO 2 - respectively, SO 3 - (iso) with g = 2.0031 and SO 3 - (axial) with g⊥ = 2.0040, g∥ = 2.0023, identical to mechanically induced SO 3 - . We have established the participation of radiation-induced radical ions SO 3 - in formation of post-radiation SO 2 - .

  17. The anti-browning agent sulfite inactivates Agaricus bisporus tyrosinase through covalent modification of the copper-B site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, T.F.M.; Gruppen, H.; Sforza, S.; Berkel, van W.J.H.; Vincken, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    Sulfite salts are widely used as antibrowning agents in food processing. Nevertheless, the exact mechanism by which sulfite prevents enzymatic browning has remained unknown. Here, we show that sodium hydrogen sulfite (NaHSO3 ) irreversibly blocks the active site of tyrosinase from the edible

  18. Kinetic study of sulfite ion inhibition during alcoholic fermentation of beet molasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glacet, A.; Letourneau, F.; Leveque, P.; Villa, P. (UER des Sciences Exactes et Naturelles, 80 - Amiens (France))

    Alcoholic fermentation cycle has been studied on beet molasses exempt from sulfite ions, and containing added amounts of these ions from 1000 to 3000 ppm. Experimental results show that fermentation duration increasing sulfite concentration in the medium from 8% to 40% if SO/sub 3//sup - -/ added varies from 1000 to 3000 ppm. A detailed kinetic study reveals that this increase occurs only during latency period. Moreover the biomass and the ethanol generation curves drawn after latency period appear to be quite linear, their slopes being independent of initial sulfite concentration. Sulfite evolution during fermentation cycle of artificial wort, under identical experimental conditions to those of wort molasses, indicates that more than 80% of these ions disappear during latency period. We have proved that this phenomenon is due to yeast action and not to any chemical reactions between sulfites ions and wort components.

  19. Reevaluation of Monier-Williams method for determining sulfite in food

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner, C.R.; Daniels, D.H.; Joe, F.L. Jr.; Fazio, T.

    The Monier-Williams distillation procedure has a long history of successful use for determining sulfite in fruit products and wine; however, a systematic evaluation of its accuracy and precision with other food matrices has not been undertaken. The authors found that Monier-Williams distillation yielded >90% recovery of sulfite added to foods such as table grapes, hominy, dried mangoes, and lemon juice. Less than 85% recovery was obtained with broccoli, soda crackers, cheese-peanut butter crackers, mushrooms, and potato chips. These results may, in fact, accurately reflect the residual levels of sulfite if a portion of the sulfite undergoes irreversible reaction with some food components. Analysis of commercial food products gave sulfite levels as 25 ppm in cream sherry.

  20. A new diketopyrrolopyrrole-based probe for sensitive and selective detection of sulfite in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Cui, Yu; Li, Yexin; Zheng, Luyi; Xie, Lijun; Ning, Rui; Liu, Zheng; Lu, Junling; Zhang, Gege; Liu, Chunxiang; Zhang, Guangyou

    2015-02-01

    A new probe was synthesized by incorporating an α,β -unsaturated ketone to a diketopyrrolopyrrole fluorophore. The probe had exhibited a selective and sensitive response to the sulfite against other thirteen anions and biothiols (Cys, Hcy and GSH), through the nucleophilic addition of sulfite to the alkene of probe with the detection limit of 0.1 μM in HEPES (10 mM, pH 7.4) THF/H2O (1:1, v/v). Meanwhile, it could be easily observed that the probe for sulfite changed from pink to colorless by the naked eye, and from pink to blue under UV lamp after the sulfite was added for 20 min. The NMR and Mass spectral analysis demonstrated the expected addition of sulfite to the Cdbnd C bonds.

  1. Fluorometric determination of nitrite with 4-hydroxycoumarin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohta, T.; Arai, Y.; Takitani, S.

    1986-12-01

    A simple, sensitive, and reproducible fluorometric method for determination of nitrite has been developed. This method is based on the nitrosation of 4-hydroxycoumarin in acidic medium and subsequent reduction to 3-amino-4-hydroxy-coumarin, which is fluorescent in alkaline medium. The fluorescence intensity is proportional to the nitrite concentration in the range of 3 ng/mL to 1 ..mu..g/mL in the sample solution, with a relative standard deviation of 0.5% (50 ng/mL). The method has been applied to the determination of nitrite in saliva.

  2. 2AF sodium nitrite monitor: interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dierks, R.D.; Russell, J.L.

    1970-01-01

    The feasibility of monitoring the sodium nitrite in the 2AF makeup tank in the Purex process by measuring the NO 2 concentration of the gas phase was investigated in simulation studies. It was concluded that the NO 2 concentration is a function of the nitrite concentration but is also dependent on the sample temperature, acid concentration of the sample, and air/liquid ratio maintained in the simulated conditions. However under proper conditions of constant air purging, the NO 2 content can be related to the nitrite concentration. (U.S.)

  3. Physicochemical effects on sulfite transformation in a lipid-rich Chlorella sp. strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Fang; Wen, Xiaobin; Luo, Liming; Geng, Yahong; Li, Yeguang

    2014-11-01

    SO2 is very rapidly hydrated to sulfurous acid in water solution at pH value above 6.0, whereby sulfite is yielded from the disassociation of protons. We aimed to improve the sulfite transformation efficiency and provide a basis for the direct utilization of SO2 from flue gas by a microalgal suspension. Chlorella sp. XQ-20044 was cultured in a medium with 20 mmol/L sodium sulfite under different physicochemical conditions. Under light conditions, sulfite concentration in the algal suspension reduced linearly over time, and was completely converted into sulfate within 8 h. The highest sulfite transformation rate (3.25 mmol/(L·h)) was obtained under the following conditions: 35°C, light intensity of 300 μmol/(m2·s), NaHCO3 concentration of 6 g/L, initial cell density (OD540) of 0.8 and pH of 9-10. There was a positive correlation between sulfite transformation rate and the growth of Chlorella, with the conditions favorable to algal growth giving better sulfite transformation. Although oxygen in the air plays a role in the transformation of SO2- 3 to SO2- 4, the transformation is mainly dependent on the metabolic activity of algal cells. Chlorella sp. XQ-20044 is capable of tolerating high sulfite concentration, and can utilize sulfite as the sole sulfur source for maintaining healthy growth. We found that sulfite ≤20 mmol/L had no obvious effect on the total lipid content and fatty acid profiles of the algae. Thus, the results suggest it is feasible to use flue gas for the mass production of feedstock for biodiesel using Chlorella sp. XQ-20044, without preliminary removal of SO2, assuming there is adequate control of the pH.

  4. Determination of Sulfite in Food by Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry: Collaborative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos, Katherine S; de Jager, Lowri S

    2017-11-01

    Sulfites are added to a wide range of food and beverage products to prevent browning or oxidation. Although most of the population do not experience side effects from consuming sulfites, a small subset has been shown to experience an "allergic-like" response. For this reason, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration requires that sulfites be labeled on all products that contain more than 10 mg/kg (parts per million) sulfur dioxide. The current regulatory method, optimized Monier-Williams (OMW) Official Method 990.28, has been successful in quantifying sulfites in most matrixes, but is time-consuming and has a method detection limit at the regulatory-labeling threshold. Recently, an LC-tandem MS (MS/MS) method was published that was applicable to a wide range of sulfite-containing matrixes. This method converts free and reversibly bound sulfite to the formaldehyde adduct hydroxymethylsulfonate, which could then be separated from matrix constituents using a hydrophilic interaction LC analytical column and subsequently be detected with tandem MS (MS/MS). In this study, multilaboratory validation was conducted with 11 laboratories in the United States and Canada. Four matrixes were spiked at varying concentrations and three additional commercially sulfited matrixes were included. An abbreviated comparison study between the LC-MS/MS and OMW methods was conducted for select samples. Average recoveries for all matrixes ranged from 86 to 114% with RSDr and RSDR values of 4.5-17.5 and 8.6-22.5%, respectively. Further comparisons will be necessary to draw comparisons between the two methods. This method proved to be a faster and more sensitive way to determine sulfites in food and beverages, showing promise for the continuing improvement of enforcement of sulfite labeling requirements to protect individuals who have sulfite sensitivity.

  5. Sulfite-induced protein radical formation in LPS aerosol-challenged mice: Implications for sulfite sensitivity in human lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh Kumar

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to (bisulfite (HSO3– and sulfite (SO32– has been shown to induce a wide range of adverse reactions in sensitive individuals. Studies have shown that peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of (bisulfite leads to formation of several reactive free radicals, such as sulfur trioxide anion (.SO3–, peroxymonosulfate (–O3SOO., and especially the sulfate (SO4. – anion radicals. One such peroxidase in neutrophils is myeloperoxidase (MPO, which has been shown to form protein radicals. Although formation of (bisulfite-derived protein radicals is documented in isolated neutrophils, its involvement and role in in vivo inflammatory processes, has not been demonstrated. Therefore, we aimed to investigate (bisulfite-derived protein radical formation and its mechanism in LPS aerosol-challenged mice, a model of non-atopic asthma. Using immuno-spin trapping to detect protein radical formation, we show that, in the presence of (bisulfite, neutrophils present in bronchoalveolar lavage and in the lung parenchyma exhibit, MPO-catalyzed oxidation of MPO to a protein radical. The absence of radical formation in LPS-challenged MPO- or NADPH oxidase-knockout mice indicates that sulfite-derived radical formation is dependent on both MPO and NADPH oxidase activity. In addition to its oxidation by the MPO-catalyzed pathway, (bisulfite is efficiently detoxified to sulfate by the sulfite oxidase (SOX pathway, which forms sulfate in a two-electron oxidation reaction. Since SOX activity in rodents is much higher than in humans, to better model sulfite toxicity in humans, we induced SOX deficiency in mice by feeding them a low molybdenum diet with tungstate. We found that mice treated with the SOX deficiency diet prior to exposure to (bisulfite had much higher protein radical formation than mice with normal SOX activity. Altogether, these results demonstrate the role of MPO and NADPH oxidase in (bisulfite-derived protein radical formation and show the involvement of

  6. Human sulfite oxidase electrochemistry on gold nanoparticles modified electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasca, Stefano; Rojas, Oscar; Salewski, Johannes; Neumann, Bettina; Stiba, Konstanze; Weidinger, Inez M; Tiersch, Brigitte; Leimkühler, Silke; Koetz, Joachim; Wollenberger, Ulla

    2012-10-01

    The present study reports a facile approach for sulfite biosensing, based on enhanced direct electron transfer of a human sulfite oxidase (hSO) immobilized on a gold nanoparticles modified electrode. The spherical core shell AuNPs were prepared via a new method by reduction of HAuCl(4) with branched poly(ethyleneimine) in an ionic liquids resulting particles with a diameter less than 10nm. These nanoparticles were covalently attached to a mercaptoundecanoic acid modified Au-electrode where then hSO was adsorbed and an enhanced interfacial electron transfer and electrocatalysis was achieved. UV/Vis and resonance Raman spectroscopy, in combination with direct protein voltammetry, are employed for the characterization of the system and reveal no perturbation of the structural integrity of the redox protein. The proposed biosensor exhibited a quick steady-state current response, within 2 s, a linear detection range between 0.5 and 5.4 μM with a high sensitivity (1.85 nA μM(-1)). The investigated system provides remarkable advantages in the possibility to work at low applied potential and at very high ionic strength. Therefore these properties could make the proposed system useful in the development of bioelectronic devices and its application in real samples. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Nutrition and oxalate metabolism in cats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijcker, J.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/315029412

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, a progressive increase in calcium oxalate (CaOx) urolith prevalence is reported in cats and dogs diagnosed with urolithiasis. This increase in prevalence appears to have occurred since dietary modifications were introduced to address magnesium ammonium phosphate urolithiasis.

  8. Effect of Ethylenediaminetetraacetic Acid and Ammonium Oxalate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research was carried out to investigate effect of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and ammonium oxalate on the prevalence of microorganisms and removal of aluminum in soil by bitter leaf plant (Vernonia amygdalina). The test plant was sown in aluminium-polluted soil (conc. = 150mg Al kg-1 soil). One gram of each ...

  9. RISK FACTORS AND MARKERS OF TUBULOINTERSTITIAL NEPHRITIS DEVELOPMENT IN CHILDREN WITH OXALATE-CALCIUM CRYSTALLURIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Popova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Research objective: to study the clinical and biochemical risk factors and markers for the formation of tubulointerstitial nephritis  in children with oxalate-calcium crystalluria. Methods: 30 children with tubulointerstitial nephritis were examined on a background  of oxalate-calcium crystalluria. Special clinical and laboratory methods of research were used: stable metabolites of nitric oxide-nitrites and activity of superoxide dismutase, albumin in urine were determined in erythrocytes and urine. To determine the clinical  features of the course and identify risk factors for the development of tubulointerstitial nephritis, we analyzed: perinatal and genealogical anamnesis, the age of debut of oxalate-calcium crystalluria and tubulointerstitial nephritis, and ultrasound data from the organs  of the urinary system. Results: In children with tubulointerstitial nephritis, in 22% of cases the signs of oxalate-calcium crystal-luria preceded the underlying disease. For tubulointerstitial nephritis, which occurred against the background of metabolic disturbances, whose debut occurred at an early age, a latent course is typical, and minimal tubular kidney dysfunction, formed at the age  of 4–11 years. The following clinical and anamnestic factors had the greatest impact on the formation of tubulointerstitial nephritis  from a single-factor analysis: a family history with family history and the presence of 2 degrees of kinship of urolithiasis, a threat of termination of pregnancy and gestosis of the first half of pregnancy, hyperechoic inclusions in the renal parenchyma by ultrasound examination of child. In parallel with the processes of antioxidant protection against the background of oxidative stress, there is an increase in the level of metabolites of nitric oxide in the urine, and in combination with albuminuria, an increase in endothelial dysfunction. Conclusion: the leading factors in the formation of tubulointerstitial nephritis in

  10. Nitrate decreases xanthine oxidoreductase-mediated nitrite reductase activity and attenuates vascular and blood pressure responses to nitrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célio Damacena-Angelis

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Nitrite and nitrate restore deficient endogenous nitric oxide (NO production as they are converted back to NO, and therefore complement the classic enzymatic NO synthesis. Circulating nitrate and nitrite must cross membrane barriers to produce their effects and increased nitrate concentrations may attenuate the nitrite influx into cells, decreasing NO generation from nitrite. Moreover, xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR mediates NO formation from nitrite and nitrate. However, no study has examined whether nitrate attenuates XOR-mediated NO generation from nitrite. We hypothesized that nitrate attenuates the vascular and blood pressure responses to nitrite either by interfering with nitrite influx into vascular tissue, or by competing with nitrite for XOR, thus inhibiting XOR-mediated NO generation. We used two independent vascular function assays in rats (aortic ring preparations and isolated mesenteric arterial bed perfusion to examine the effects of sodium nitrate on the concentration-dependent responses to sodium nitrite. Both assays showed that nitrate attenuated the vascular responses to nitrite. Conversely, the aortic responses to the NO donor DETANONOate were not affected by sodium nitrate. Further confirming these results, we found that nitrate attenuated the acute blood pressure lowering effects of increasing doses of nitrite infused intravenously in freely moving rats. The possibility that nitrate could compete with nitrite and decrease nitrite influx into cells was tested by measuring the accumulation of nitrogen-15-labeled nitrite (15N-nitrite by aortic rings using ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS. Nitrate exerted no effect on aortic accumulation of 15N-nitrite. Next, we used chemiluminescence-based NO detection to examine whether nitrate attenuates XOR-mediated nitrite reductase activity. Nitrate significantly shifted the Michaelis Menten saturation curve to the right, with a 3-fold increase in

  11. Nitrite and nitrite reductases: from molecular mechanisms to significance in human health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiglione, Nicoletta; Rinaldo, Serena; Giardina, Giorgio; Stelitano, Valentina; Cutruzzolà, Francesca

    2012-08-15

    Nitrite, previously considered physiologically irrelevant and a simple end product of endogenous nitric oxide (NO) metabolism, is now envisaged as a reservoir of NO to be activated in response to oxygen (O(2)) depletion. In the first part of this review, we summarize and compare the mechanisms of nitrite-dependent production of NO in selected bacteria and in eukaryotes. Bacterial nitrite reductases, which are copper or heme-containing enzymes, play an important role in the adaptation of pathogens to O(2) limitation and enable microrganisms to survive in the human body. In mammals, reduction of nitrite to NO under hypoxic conditions is carried out in tissues and blood by an array of metalloproteins, including heme-containing proteins and molybdenum enzymes. In humans, tissues play a more important role in nitrite reduction, not only because most tissues produce more NO than blood, but also because deoxyhemoglobin efficiently scavenges NO in blood. In the second part of the review, we outline the significance of nitrite in human health and disease and describe the recent advances and pitfalls of nitrite-based therapy, with special attention to its application in cardiovascular disorders, inflammation, and anti-bacterial defence. It can be concluded that nitrite (as well as nitrate-rich diet for long-term applications) may hold promise as therapeutic agent in vascular dysfunction and ischemic injury, as well as an effective compound able to promote angiogenesis.

  12. Red facts: Oxalic acid. Fact sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    All pesticides sold or used in the United States must be registered by EPA, based on scientific studies showing that they can be used without posing unreasonable risks to people or the environment. Because of advances in scientific knowledge, the law requires that pesticides which were first registered years ago be reregistered to ensure that they meet today's more stringent standards. Oxalic acid is registered for use as a disinfectant to control bacteria and germs, and as a sanitizer, in toilet bowls, urinals and bathroom premises. Oxalic acid also has many diverse, non-pesticidal, manufacturing and industrial uses including use in fabric printing and dyeing; bleaching straw hats; removing paint, varnish, rust or ink stains; and cleaning wood.

  13. Isomers and energy landscapes of micro-hydrated sulfite and chlorate clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hey, John C.; Doyle, Emily J.; Chen, Yuting; Johnston, Roy L.

    2018-03-01

    We present putative global minima for the micro-hydrated sulfite SO32-(H2O)N and chlorate ClO32(H2O)N systems in the range 3≤N≤15 found using basin-hopping global structure optimization with an empirical potential. We present a structural analysis of the hydration of a large number of minimized structures for hydrated sulfite and chlorate clusters in the range 3≤N≤50. We show that sulfite is a significantly stronger net acceptor of hydrogen bonding within water clusters than chlorate, completely suppressing the appearance of hydroxyl groups pointing out from the cluster surface (dangling OH bonds), in low-energy clusters. We also present a qualitative analysis of a highly explored energy landscape in the region of the global minimum of the eight water hydrated sulfite and chlorate systems. This article is part of the theme issue `Modern theoretical chemistry'.

  14. Isomers and energy landscapes of micro-hydrated sulfite and chlorate clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hey, John C; Doyle, Emily J; Chen, Yuting; Johnston, Roy L

    2018-03-13

    We present putative global minima for the micro-hydrated sulfite SO 3 2- (H 2 O) N and chlorate ClO 3 - (H 2 O) N systems in the range 3≤ N ≤15 found using basin-hopping global structure optimization with an empirical potential. We present a structural analysis of the hydration of a large number of minimized structures for hydrated sulfite and chlorate clusters in the range 3≤ N ≤50. We show that sulfite is a significantly stronger net acceptor of hydrogen bonding within water clusters than chlorate, completely suppressing the appearance of hydroxyl groups pointing out from the cluster surface (dangling OH bonds), in low-energy clusters. We also present a qualitative analysis of a highly explored energy landscape in the region of the global minimum of the eight water hydrated sulfite and chlorate systems.This article is part of the theme issue 'Modern theoretical chemistry'. © 2018 The Authors.

  15. Sulfite pretreatment to overcome recalcitrance of lignocellulose (SPORL) for robust enzymatic saccharification of hardwoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    G. S. Wang; X. J. Pan; Junyong Zhu; Roland Gleisner; D. Rockwood

    2009-01-01

    This study demonstrates sulfite pretreatment to overcome recalcitrance of lignocellulose (SPORL) for robust bioconversion of hardwoods. With only about 4% sodium bisulfite charge on aspen and 30-min pretreatment at temperature 180[...

  16. Colorimetric and fluorescent determination of sulfide and sulfite with kinetic discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Xiaoliang; Tian, Haiyu; Zhang, Weibing; Brouwer, Albert M; Qian, Junhong

    2014-10-21

    Two fluorescent probes, m-PSP and p-PSP , for sulfite and/or sulfide were constructed by connecting a pyridinium ion to a coumarin fluorophore through an α,β-unsaturated ketone. The presence of the pyridinium salt promoted the nucleophilic addition of sulfite and sulfide to the α,β-unsaturated ketone, which could be visualized by dramatic changes in the solution's color and fluorescence intensity. Both probes exhibit good selectivity (the selectivity coefficients toward major interferences are less than 0.07) and high sensitivity for sulfite and sulfide over biothiols and other potential analytes. The detection limits of m-PSP for the analysis of sulfite and sulfide are calculated to 8.5 × 10(-7) M and 2.7 × 10(-7) M, respectively. Living cell imaging results indicate that both probes can be applied in biological systems.

  17. The roles of polycarboxylates in Cr(VI)/sulfite reaction system: Involvement of reactive oxygen species and intramolecular electron transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Bo, E-mail: bjiang86upc@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum, Qingdao 266580, Shandong (China); School of Environmental and Municipal Engineering, Qingdao University of Technology, Qingdao 266033 (China); Wang, Xianli; Liu, Yukun [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum, Qingdao 266580, Shandong (China); Wang, Zhaohui [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Southern Cross GeoScience, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW 2480 (Australia); Zheng, Jingtang, E-mail: jtzheng03@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum, Qingdao 266580, Shandong (China); Wu, Mingbo, E-mail: wumb@upc.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum, Qingdao 266580, Shandong (China)

    2016-03-05

    Highlights: • The formations of SO{sub 4}·{sup −} and OH·, involve in Cr(VI) reduction induced by S(IV). • Affinity of polycarboxylate to Cr(VI) accelerates Cr(VI) reduction rate. • Polycarboxylates can act as electron donors for Cr(VI) reduction retrenching S(IV). • Only oxalate can enhance the formations of SO{sub 4}·{sup −} and OH· in Cr(VI)/S(IV) system. - Abstract: In this study, the effects of polycarboxylates on both Cr(VI) reduction and S(IV) consumption in Cr(VI)/S(IV) system was investigated in acidic solution. Under aerobic condition, the productions of reactive oxygen species (ROS), i.e., SO{sub 4}·{sup −} and OH·, have been confirmed in S(IV) reducing Cr(VI) process by using electron spin resonance and fluorescence spectrum techniques, leading to the excess consumption of S(IV). However, when polycarboxylates (oxalic, citric, malic and tartaric acid) were present in Cr(VI)/S(IV) system, the affinity of polycarboxylates to CrSO{sub 6}{sup 2−} can greatly promote the reduction of Cr(VI) via expanding the coordination of Cr(VI) species from tetrahedron to hexahedron. Besides, as alternatives to S(IV), these polycarboxylates can also act as electron donors for Cr(VI) reduction via intramolecular electron transfer reaction, which is dependent on the energies of the highest occupied molecular orbital of these polycarboxylates. Notably, the variant electron donating capacity of these polycarboxylates resulted in different yield of ROS and therefore the oxidation efficiencies of other pollutants, e.g., rhodamine B and As(III). Generally, this study does not only shed light on the mechanism of S(IV) reducing Cr(VI) process mediated by polycarboxylates, but also provides an escalated, cost-effective and green strategy for the remediation of Cr(VI) using sulfite as a reductant.

  18. Addition of calcium compounds to reduce soluble oxalate in a high oxalate food system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bong, Wen-Chun; Vanhanen, Leo P; Savage, Geoffrey P

    2017-04-15

    Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) is often used as a base vegetable to make green juices that are promoted as healthy dietary alternatives. Spinach is known to contain significant amounts of oxalates, which are toxic and, if consumed regularly, can lead to the development of kidney stones. This research investigates adding 50-500mg increments of calcium carbonate, calcium chloride, calcium citrate and calcium sulphate to 100g of raw homogenates of spinach to determine whether calcium would combine with the soluble oxalate present in the spinach. Calcium chloride was the most effective additive while calcium carbonate was the least effective. The formation of insoluble oxalate after incubation at 25°C for 30min is a simple practical step that can be incorporated into the juicing process. This would make the juice considerably safer to consume on a regular basis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of Sulfites on Antioxidant Activity, Total Polyphenols, and Flavonoid Measurements in White Wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardini, Mirella; Garaguso, Ivana

    2018-03-09

    Polyphenols content and antioxidant activity are directly related to the quality of wine. Wine also contains sulfites, which are added during the winemaking process. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of sulfites on the assays commonly used to measure the antioxidant activity and polyphenols and flavonoids content of white wines. The effects of sulfites were explored both in the standard assays and in white wine. The addition of sulfites (at 1-10 μg) in the standard assays resulted in a significant, positive interference in the Folin-Ciocalteu's assay used for polyphenols measurements and in both the Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power and 2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt radical cation decolorization assays, which were used for antioxidant activity evaluation. A negative interference of sulfites (at 1-20 μg) was observed for the colorimetric aluminium-chloride flavonoids assay. The addition of sulfites to organic white wines (at 25-200 mg/L wine) clearly resulted in a significant overestimation of antioxidant activity and polyphenols content, and in an underestimation of flavonoids concentration. To overcome sulfite interferences, white wines were treated with cross-linked polyvinylpyrrolidone. The total polyphenols content and antioxidant activity measurements obtained after polyvinylpyrrolidone treatment were significantly lower than those obtained in the untreated wines. Flavonoids were expected to be higher after polyvinylpyrrolidone treatment, but were instead found to be lower than for untreated wines, suggesting that in addition to sulfites, other non-phenolic reducing compounds were present in white wine and interfered with the flavonoid assay. In view of our results, we advise that a purification procedure should be applied in order to evaluate the quality of white wine.

  20. Colorimetric and fluorescent determination of sulfide and sulfite with kinetic discrimination

    OpenAIRE

    Pei, X.; Tian, H.; Zhang, W.; Brouwer, A.M.; Qian, J.

    2014-01-01

    Two fluorescent probes, m-PSP and p-PSP, for sulfite and/or sulfide were constructed by connecting a pyridinium ion to a coumarin fluorophore through an alpha,beta-unsaturated ketone. The presence of the pyridinium salt promoted the nucleophilic addition of sulfite and sulfide to the alpha,beta-unsaturated ketone, which could be visualized by dramatic changes in the solution's color and fluorescence intensity. Both probes exhibit good selectivity (the selectivity coefficients toward major int...

  1. A coumarin-quinolinium-based fluorescent probe for ratiometric sensing of sulfite in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Li; Lin, Weiying; Zhu, Sasa; Yuan, Lin; Zheng, Kaibo

    2014-07-14

    Based on a novel coumarin-quinolinium platform, probe 2 was rationally designed and synthesized as a novel ratiometric fluorescent sensor for sulfite anions. The probe exhibited a wide dynamic concentration range for sulfite anions in a PBS buffer (containing 1 mg mL(-1) BSA). More importantly, the probe was suitable for ratiometric fluorescence imaging in living cells with high sensitivity, favorable selectivity, and minimal cytotoxicity.

  2. A sensitive and selective on-line amperometric sulfite biosensor using sulfite oxidase immobilized on a magnetite-gold-folate nanocomposite modified carbon-paste electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroysee, Wongduan; Ponlakhet, Kitayanan; Chairam, Sanoe; Jarujamrus, Purim; Amatatongchai, Maliwan

    2016-08-15

    We describe a novel amperometric sulfite biosensor, comprising a carbon-paste electrode (Fe3O4@Au-Cys-FA/CPE) modified with immobilized sulfite oxidase (SOx) on a gold-coated magnetite nanoparticle core, encased within a conjugated folic acid (FA) cysteine (Cys) shell. The biosensor electrode was fabricated using a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and mineral oil mixture as binder, which also enhances the physical stability and sensitivity of the electrode. The developed biosensor displays good electrocatalytic activity toward oxidation of H2O2, which occurs by an enzymatic reaction between SOx and sulfite. The Fe3O4@Au-Cys-FA electrode exhibits good electrocatalytic activity, and has good retention of chemisorbed SOx on the electrode because of its large surface area. Sulfite was quantified using amperometric measurements from the Fe3O4@Au-Cys-FA/CPE biosensor, and using an in-house assembled flow cell at +0.35V (vs. Ag/AgCl), with a phosphate buffer carrier (0.10M, pH 7.0) at a flow rate of 0.8mLmin(-1). The system detects sulfite over the range 0.1-200mgL(-1) (r(2)=0.998), with a detection limit of 10µgL(-1) (3σ of blank). The system exhibits acceptable precision (%R.S.D.=3.1%), rapid sample throughput (109samplesh(-1)), and good stability (2w). The developed biosensor shows satisfactory tolerance to potential interferences, such as sugars, anions, ascorbic acid, and ethanol. We applied the developed method to the determination of sulfite content in wines and pickled food extracts, and our results are in good agreement with those obtained by the standard iodometric method. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Platelet inhibition by nitrite is dependent on erythrocytes and deoxygenation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirada Srihirun

    Full Text Available Nitrite is a nitric oxide (NO metabolite in tissues and blood, which can be converted to NO under hypoxia to facilitate tissue perfusion. Although nitrite is known to cause vasodilation following its reduction to NO, the effect of nitrite on platelet activity remains unclear. In this study, the effect of nitrite and nitrite+erythrocytes, with and without deoxygenation, on platelet activity was investigated.Platelet aggregation was studied in platelet-rich plasma (PRP and PRP+erythrocytes by turbidimetric and impedance aggregometry, respectively. In PRP, DEANONOate inhibited platelet aggregation induced by ADP while nitrite had no effect on platelets. In PRP+erythrocytes, the inhibitory effect of DEANONOate on platelets decreased whereas nitrite at physiologic concentration (0.1 µM inhibited platelet aggregation and ATP release. The effect of nitrite+erythrocytes on platelets was abrogated by C-PTIO (a membrane-impermeable NO scavenger, suggesting an NO-mediated action. Furthermore, deoxygenation enhanced the effect of nitrite as observed from a decrease of P-selectin expression and increase of the cGMP levels in platelets. The ADP-induced platelet aggregation in whole blood showed inverse correlations with the nitrite levels in whole blood and erythrocytes.Nitrite alone at physiological levels has no effect on platelets in plasma. Nitrite in the presence of erythrocytes inhibits platelets through its reduction to NO, which is promoted by deoxygenation. Nitrite may have role in modulating platelet activity in the circulation, especially during hypoxia.

  4. In vivo role of sulfite in photocontrol of urocanase from Pseudomonas putida

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venema, R.C.; Hunter, J.K.; Hug, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    Urocanase from Pseudomonas putida becomes inactive in growing and resting cells and is activated by UV radiation. Sulfite addition to the bound nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide coenzyme has previously been shown to inactivate the enzyme in vitro. The enzyme released sulfite upon photoactivation. Whether sulfite addition and dissociation is involved in the in vivo photoregulation of urocanase was examined. The dark reversion (inactivation) in cultures was markedly enhanced by growth at 32 0 C rather than at 24 0 C; cells grown at 32 0 C and resting cells were used to obtain in vivo-inactivated urocanase. The in vivo-inactivated enzyme was purified and the amount of sulfite released through photodissociation quantitated. One mole of sulfite was released per mole of urocanase. This is based on a molecular weight of 110 000 confirmed by gel electrophoresis and a protein estimation method. A previous report of sulfide inactivation of urocanase in vitro is now shown to have been mistaken; the inactivation resulted from the oxidation of sulfide to sulfite, which occurred in solution. (author)

  5. Hypoxia tolerance, nitric oxide, and nitrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fago, Angela; Jensen, Frank Bo

    2015-01-01

    survival resides in concerted physiological responses, including strong metabolic depression, protection against oxidative damage and – in air breathing animals - redistribution of blood flow. Each of these responses is known to be tightly regulated by nitric oxide (NO) and during hypoxia by its metabolite...... nitrite. The aim of this review is to highlight recent work illustrating the widespread roles of NO and nitrite in the tolerance to extreme oxygen deprivation, in particular in the red-eared slider turtle and crucian carp, but also in diving marine mammals. The emerging picture underscores the importance...

  6. Oxalate Content of Taro Leaves Grown in Central Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Thanh, Hang; Phan Vu, Hai; Vu Van, Hai; Le Duc, Ngoan; Le Minh, Tuan; Savage, Geoffrey

    2017-01-01

    Leaves were harvested from four different cultivars of Colocasia esculenta and three cultivars of Alocasia odora that were growing on nine different farms in central Vietnam. The total, soluble and insoluble oxalate contents of the leaves were extracted and measured using HPLC chromatography. Total calcium determinations were also carried out on the same samples. The total oxalate content of the leaves ranged from 433.8 to 856.1 mg/100 g wet matter (WM) while the soluble oxalate ranged from 147.8 to 339.7 mg/100 g WM. The proportion of soluble oxalate ranged from 28% to 41% (overall mean 35%) of the total oxalate content of the leaves. The equivalent insoluble oxalate proportion ranged from 59% to 72% of the total (overall mean 65%). There was little difference between the Colocasia esculenta and Alocasia odora taro cultivars, although the total oxalate content was significantly higher in Alocasia odora cultivars. The overall mean total calcium content was 279.5 mg/100 WM and the percentage of insoluble calcium bound as calcium oxalate ranged from 31.7% to 57.3% of the total calcium content (overall mean 47.1%). The oxalate content in taro leaves is a major factor to consider when different cultivars of taro are recommended for human or animal consumption. PMID:28231080

  7. Oxalate Content of Taro Leaves Grown in Central Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang Du Thanh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Leaves were harvested from four different cultivars of Colocasia esculenta and three cultivars of Alocasia odora that were growing on nine different farms in central Vietnam. The total, soluble and insoluble oxalate contents of the leaves were extracted and measured using HPLC chromatography. Total calcium determinations were also carried out on the same samples. The total oxalate content of the leaves ranged from 433.8 to 856.1 mg/100 g wet matter (WM while the soluble oxalate ranged from 147.8 to 339.7 mg/100 g WM. The proportion of soluble oxalate ranged from 28% to 41% (overall mean 35% of the total oxalate content of the leaves. The equivalent insoluble oxalate proportion ranged from 59% to 72% of the total (overall mean 65%. There was little difference between the Colocasia esculenta and Alocasia odora taro cultivars, although the total oxalate content was significantly higher in Alocasia odora cultivars. The overall mean total calcium content was 279.5 mg/100 WM and the percentage of insoluble calcium bound as calcium oxalate ranged from 31.7% to 57.3% of the total calcium content (overall mean 47.1%. The oxalate content in taro leaves is a major factor to consider when different cultivars of taro are recommended for human or animal consumption.

  8. Electrochemical synthesis and characterization of zinc oxalate nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba, E-mail: mshamsipur@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Roushani, Mahmoud [Department of Chemistry, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Ilam University, Ilam (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Pourmortazavi, Seied Mahdi [Faculty of Material and Manufacturing Technologies, Malek Ashtar University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► Synthesis of zinc oxalate nanoparticles via electrolysis of a zinc plate anode in sodium oxalate solutions. ► Design of a Taguchi orthogonal array to identify the optimal experimental conditions. ► Controlling the size and shape of particles via applied voltage and oxalate concentration. ► Characterization of zinc oxalate nanoparticles by SEM, UV–vis, FT-IR and TG–DTA. - Abstract: A rapid, clean and simple electrodeposition method was designed for the synthesis of zinc oxalate nanoparticles. Zinc oxalate nanoparticles in different size and shapes were electrodeposited by electrolysis of a zinc plate anode in sodium oxalate aqueous solutions. It was found that the size and shape of the product could be tuned by electrolysis voltage, oxalate ion concentration, and stirring rate of electrolyte solution. A Taguchi orthogonal array design was designed to identify the optimal experimental conditions. The morphological characterization of the product was carried out by scanning electron microscopy. UV–vis and FT-IR spectroscopies were also used to characterize the electrodeposited nanoparticles. The TG–DTA studies of the nanoparticles indicated that the main thermal degradation occurs in two steps over a temperature range of 350–430 °C. In contrast to the existing methods, the present study describes a process which can be easily scaled up for the production of nano-sized zinc oxalate powder.

  9. Nitrite maxima in the Northern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sankaranarayanan, V.N.; DeSousa, S.N.; Fondekar, S.P.

    There are 2 nitrite maxima in the Northern Arabian Sea, one at the thermocline depth and the other at depths between 300 and 500 m. The 2nd maximum is more prominent in the northeastern part of the Arabian Sea. The 1st maximum is associated...

  10. Neutralization of wastewater from nitrite passivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawlowski, L.; Mientki, B.; Wasag, H.

    1982-01-01

    A method for neutralization of wastewater formed in nitrite passivation has been presented. The method consists of introducing urea into wastewater and acidifying it with sulphuric acid. Wastewater is neutralized with lime. After clarification, wastewater can be drained outside the plant

  11. 9 CFR 319.2 - Products and nitrates and nitrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... and nitrates and nitrites. Any product, such as frankfurters and corned beef, for which there is a... without nitrate or nitrite and labeled with such standard name when immediately preceded with the term... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Products and nitrates and nitrites...

  12. The role of nitrite in nitric oxide homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank Bo

    2009-01-01

    Nitrite is endogenously produced as an oxidative metabolite of nitric oxide, but it also functions as a NO donor that can be activated by a number of cellular proteins under hypoxic conditions. This article discusses the physiological role of nitrite and nitrite-derived NO in blood flow regulatio...

  13. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The category of chemical substances which are nitrites of the alkali metals (Group IA in the...

  14. Influence of nutrition on feline calcium oxalate urolithiasis with emphasis on endogenous oxalate synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijcker, J.C.; Plantinga, E.A.; Baal, van J.; Hendriks, W.H.

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of calcium oxalate (CaOx) uroliths detected in cats with lower urinary tract disease has shown a sharp increase over the last decades with a concomitant reciprocal decrease in the occurrence of struvite (magnesium ammonium phosphate) uroliths. CaOx stone-preventative diets are

  15. Characterization of oxalic acid pretreatment on lignocellulosic biomass using oxalic acid recovered by electrodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hong-Joo; Seo, Young-Jun; Lee, Jae-Won

    2013-04-01

    The properties of pretreated biomass and hydrolysate obtained by oxalic acid pretreatment using oxalic acid recovered through electrodialysis (ED) were investigated. Most of the oxalic acid was recovered and some of the fermentation inhibitors were removed by ED. For the original hydrolysate, the ethanol production was very low and fermentable sugars were not completely consumed by Pichia stipitis during fermentation. Ethanol yield was less than 0.12 g/g in all stage. For the ED-treated hydrolysate, ethanol production was increased by up to two times in all stages compared to the original hydrolysate. The highest ethanol production was 19.38 g/l after 72 h which correspond to the ethanol yield of 0.33 g/g. Enzymatic conversion of the cellulose to glucose for all the pretreated biomass was in the range of 76.03 and 77.63%. The hydrolysis rate on each pretreated biomass was not significantly changed when oxalic acid recovered by ED was used for pretreatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. TEMPOL enhances the antihypertensive effects of sodium nitrite by mechanisms facilitating nitrite-derived gastric nitric oxide formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Jefferson H; Montenegro, Marcelo F; Pinheiro, Lucas C; Ferreira, Graziele C; Barroso, Rafael P; Costa-Filho, Antonio J; Tanus-Santos, Jose E

    2013-12-01

    Orally administered nitrite exerts antihypertensive effects associated with increased gastric nitric oxide (NO) formation. While reducing agents facilitate NO formation from nitrite, no previous study has examined whether antioxidants with reducing properties improve the antihypertensive responses to orally administered nitrite. We hypothesized that TEMPOL (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl) could enhance the hypotensive effects of nitrite in hypertensive rats by exerting antioxidant effects (and enhancing NO bioavailability) and by promoting gastric nitrite-derived NO generation. The hypotensive effects of intravenous and oral sodium nitrite were assessed in unanesthetized freely moving rats with L-NAME (N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester; 100mg/kg; po)-induced hypertension treated with TEMPOL (18mg/kg; po) or vehicle. While TEMPOL exerted antioxidant effects in hypertensive rats, as revealed by lower plasma 8-isoprostane and vascular reactive oxygen species levels, this antioxidant did not affect the hypotensive responses to intravenous nitrite. Conversely, TEMPOL enhanced the dose-dependent hypotensive responses to orally administered nitrite, and this effect was associated with higher increases in plasma nitrite and lower increases in plasma nitrate concentrations. In vitro experiments using electrochemical and chemiluminescence NO detection under variable pH conditions showed that TEMPOL enhanced nitrite-derived NO formation, especially at low pH (2.0 to 4.0). TEMPOL signal evaluated by electron paramagnetic resonance decreased when nitrite was reduced to NO under acidic conditions. Consistent with these findings, increasing gastric pH with omeprazole (30mg/kg; po) attenuated the hypotensive responses to nitrite and blunted the enhancement in plasma nitrite concentrations and hypotensive effects induced by TEMPOL. Nitrite-derived NO formation in vivo was confirmed by using the NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl

  17. Calcium Oxalate: A Surface Treatment for Limestone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tody M. Cezar

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper looks at the artificially induced surface conversion of calcium carbonate to the more durable calcium oxalate. Extensive research is being carried out on wall paintings and marble sculpture at the Opicificio delle Pietre Dure e Laboratori di Restauro in Florence, Encouraged by their work, I have researched the effectiveness of the conversion on English limestones. The treated samples have been compared to untreated samples for appearance, hardness, resistance to acid and alkali, porosity, and durability. The results have been assessed considering ease of use, effectiveness, and the appropriateness of the treatment.

  18. Computational and experimental studies on oxalic acid imprinted ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    template-functional monomer interactions by computa- tional method is a successful approach towards more rational designing of MIP.8–11. In this work, oxalic acid which is widely distributed in various organisms, fungi, plants and animals was selected as template. High levels of oxalic acid remove calcium from blood with ...

  19. Hydrogen bonding in oxalic acid and its complexes: A database ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The basic result of carboxylic group that the oxygen atom of the –OH never seems to be a hydrogen bond acceptor is violated in the cases, namely urea oxalic acid and bis urea oxalic acid complexes, where the hydroxyl oxygen atom is an acceptor of a weak. N–H...O hydrogen bond. The parameters of this ...

  20. Hydrogen bonding in oxalic acid and its complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The basic result of carboxylic group that the oxygen atom of the –OH never seems to be a hydrogen bond acceptor is violated in the cases, namely urea oxalic acid and bis urea oxalic acid complexes, where the hydroxyl oxygen atom is an acceptor of a weak N–H... O hydrogen bond. The parameters of this hydrogen bond, ...

  1. Hydrogen bonding in oxalic acid and its complexes: A database ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The basic result of carboxylic group that the oxygen atom of the –OH never seems to be a hydrogen bond acceptor is violated in the cases, namely urea oxalic acid and bis urea oxalic acid complexes, where the hydroxyl oxygen atom is an acceptor of a weak N–H... O hydrogen bond. The parameters of this hydrogen bond, ...

  2. Synthesis and structural characterization of actinide oxalate compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamain, C.

    2011-01-01

    Oxalic acid is a well-known reagent to recover actinides thanks to the very low solubility of An(IV) and An(III) oxalate compounds in acidic solution. Therefore, considering mixed-oxide fuel or considering minor actinides incorporation in ceramic fuel materials for transmutation, oxalic co-conversion is convenient to synthesize mixed oxalate compounds, precursors of oxide solid solutions. As the existing oxalate single crystal syntheses are not adaptable to the actinide-oxalate chemistry or to their manipulation constrains in gloves box, several original crystal growth methods were developed. They were first validate and optimized on lanthanides and uranium before the application to transuranium elements. The advanced investigations allow to better understand the syntheses and to define optimized chemical conditions to promote crystal growth. These new crystal growth methods were then applied to a large number of mixed An1(IV)-An2(III) or An1(IV)-An2(IV) systems and lead to the formation of the first original mixed An1(IV)-An2(III) and An1(IV)-An2(IV) oxalate single crystals. Finally thanks to the first thorough structural characterizations of these compounds, single crystal X-ray diffraction, EXAFS or micro-RAMAN, the particularly weak oxalate-actinide compounds structural database is enriched, which is essential for future studied nuclear fuel cycles. (author) [fr

  3. Oxalate Synthesis and Pyrolysis: A Colorful Introduction to Stoichiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannatta, Michael W.; Richards-Babb, Michelle; Sweeney, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Metal oxalate synthesis and pyrolysis provides an opportunity for students to (i) learn stoichiometry, (ii) experience the consequences of proper stoichiometric calculations and experimental techniques, and (iii) be introduced to the relevance of chemistry by highlighting oxalates in context, for example, usages and health effects. At our…

  4. Probable functions of calcium oxalate crystals in different tissues of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Representatives of seven major edible aroid accessions were screened for calcium oxalate using standard histochemical methods. All the accessions were noted to contain calcium oxalate in the forms of raphide bundles and intra-amylar crystals. The crystals were widely present in all parts of the plants including spongy ...

  5. Wu-Ling-San formula prophylaxis against recurrent calcium oxalate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wu-Ling-San (WLS) formula has been proved to prevent calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis both in vitro and in vivo. This is the first prospective, randomized and placebo-controlled clinical trial of WLS in calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis prevention. All patients who enrolled were asked to drink enough fluid to urinate at least 2 L ...

  6. Urinary oxalate to creatinine ratios in healthy Turkish schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursun, Ismail; Çelik, İlknur; Poyrazoglu, Hakan M; Köse, Kader; Tanrıkulu, Esen; Sahin, Habibe; Yılmaz, Kenan; Öztürk, Ahmet; Yel, Sibel; Gündüz, Zübeyde; Düşünsel, Ruhan

    2017-11-01

    we aimed to establish reference values for urinary oxalate to creatinine ratios in healthy children aged 6-15 years and to investigate the relationship between their nutritional habits and oxalate excretion. Random urine specimens from 953 healthy children aged 6-15 years were obtained and analyzed for oxalate and creatinine. Additionally, a 24-h dietary recall form was prepared and given to them. The ingredient composition of the diet was calculated. The children were divided into three groups according to age: Group I (69 years, n = 353), Group II (10-12 years, n = 335), and Group III (13-15 years, n = 265). The 95th percentile of the oxalate to creatinine ratio for subjects aged 6-9, 10-12, and 13-15 years were 0.048, 0.042, and 0.042 mg/mg, respectively. The oxalate to creatinine ratio was significantly higher in Group 1 than in Group 2 and Group 3. Urinary oxalate excretion was positively correlated with increased protein intake and negatively correlated with age. A significant positive correlation was determined between urinary oxalate excretion and the proline, serine, protein, and glycine content of diet. Dietary proline intake showed a positive correlation with the urine oxalate to creatinine ratio and was found to be an independent predictor for urinary oxalate. These data lend support to the idea that every country should have its own normal reference values to determine the underlying metabolic risk factor for kidney stone disease since regional variation in the dietary intake of proteins and other nutrients can affect normal urinary excretion of oxalate.

  7. Crystal growth methods dedicated to low solubility actinide oxalates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamain, C., E-mail: christelle.tamain@cea.fr [CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, Marcoule, RadioChemistry & Processes Department, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Arab-Chapelet, B. [CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, Marcoule, RadioChemistry & Processes Department, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Rivenet, M. [University Lille Nord de France, Unité de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide, UCCS UMR CNRS 8181, ENSCL-USTL, B.P. 90108, F-59652 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France); Grandjean, S. [CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, Marcoule, RadioChemistry & Processes Department, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Abraham, F. [University Lille Nord de France, Unité de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide, UCCS UMR CNRS 8181, ENSCL-USTL, B.P. 90108, F-59652 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France)

    2016-04-15

    Two novel crystal growth syntheses dedicated to low solubility actinide-oxalate systems and adapted to glove box handling are described. These methods based on the use of precursors of either actinide metal or oxalic acid have been optimized on lanthanide systems (analogue of actinides(III)) and then assessed on real actinide systems. They allow the synthesis of several actinide oxalate single crystals, Am{sub 2}(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}·xH{sub 2}O, Th(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2}·6H{sub 2}O, M{sub 2+x}[Pu{sup IV}{sub 2−x}Pu{sup III}{sub x}(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 5}]·nH{sub 2}O and M{sub 1−x}[Pu{sup III}{sub 1−x}Pu{sup IV}{sub x}(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2}·H{sub 2}O]·nH{sub 2}O. It is the first time that these well-known compounds are formed by crystal growth methods, thus enabling direct structural studies on transuranic element systems and acquisition of basic data beyond deductions from isomorphic (or not) lanthanide compounds. Characterizations by X-ray diffraction, UV–visible solid spectroscopy, demonstrate the potentialities of these two crystal growth methods to obtain oxalate compounds. - Graphical abstract: Two new single crystal growth methods dedicated to actinide oxalate compounds. - Highlights: • Use of diester as oxalate precursor for crystal growth of actinide oxalates. • Use of actinide oxide as precursor for crystal growth of actinide oxalates. • Crystal growth of Pu(III) and Am(III) oxalates. • Crystal growth of mixed Pu(III)/Pu(IV) oxalates.

  8. Modification of membrane sulfhydryl groups in bacteriostatic action of nitrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchman, G.W. III; Hansen, J.N.

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism by which nitrite inhibits outgrowing spores of bacillus cereus T was examined by using techniques developed earlier for nitrite analogs. The morphological stage of inhibition, cooperativity effects, effect of pH on inhibition, kinetics of protection against tritiated iodoacetate incorporation into membrane sulfhydryl groups, and protection against the bacteriocidal effect of carboxymethylation of iodoacetate indicate that nitrite acts as a membrane-directed sulfhydryl agent. The mechanism by which nitrite modifies the chemical reactivity of the sulfhyrdyl group could be either direct covalent modification or inactivation through communication with another modified membrane component. Profiles of pH effects suggest that the active agent is the protonated form of nitrite. The nitrite concentrations which modify membrane sulfhydryl activity coincide with those which have a bacteriostatic effect. These results are consistent with membrane sulfhydryl modification as a component of the mechanism of nitrite-induced bacteriostasis in this aerobic sporeformer

  9. Mutagenesis breeding research of Lactobacillus brevis of nitrite reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Zeli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The pollution of nitrite in food became one of the focus of food safety issues,the use of biotechnology methods degrading nitrite became hotspot.The primitive strain was Lactobacillus brevis C2,preserved in our laboratory,had the ability to degrade nitrite,through composite mutagenesis of 15 W,254 nm,20 cm ultraviolet mutagenesis (UV for 120 s and 0.8% diethyl sulfate(DES in 37℃ mutation for 40 min,after screening,we successfully obtained high efficient strain of nitrite degradation,named UV6-DS2,relative to the starting strain,under the condition of 400 mg/L nitrite,after 12 h degradation,nitrite degradation rate increased from 92.8% to 97.8%,to explore its application in food was able to effectively reduce concentration of nitrite in food.

  10. Value-Added Products from FGD Sulfite-Rich Scrubber Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vivak Malhotra

    2010-01-31

    According to the American Coal Ash Association, about 29.25 million tons of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts were produced in the USA in 2003. Out of 29.25 million tons, 17.35 million tons were sulfite-rich scrubber materials. At present, unlike its cousin FGD gypsum, the prospect for effective utilization of sulfite-rich scrubber materials is not bright. In fact, almost 16.9 million tons are leftover every year. In our pursuit to mitigate the liability of sulfite-rich FGD scrubber materials' disposal, we are attempting to develop value-added products that can commercially compete. More specifically, for this Innovative Concept Phase I project, we have the following objectives: to characterize the sulfite-rich scrubber material for toxic metals; to optimize the co-blending and processing of scrubber material and natural byproducts; to formulate and develop structural composites from sulfite-rich scrubber material; and to evaluate the composites' mechanical properties and compare them with current products on the market. After successfully demonstrating the viability of our research, a more comprehensive approach will be proposed to take these value-added materials to fruition.

  11. Amperometric Determination of Sulfite by Gas Diffusion- Sequential Injection with Boron-Doped Diamond Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orawon Chailapakul

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A gas diffusion sequential injection system with amperometric detection using aboron-doped diamond electrode was developed for the determination of sulfite. A gasdiffusion unit (GDU was used to prevent interference from sample matrices for theelectrochemical measurement. The sample was mixed with an acid solution to generategaseous sulfur dioxide prior to its passage through the donor channel of the GDU. Thesulfur dioxide diffused through the PTFE hydrophobic membrane into a carrier solution of 0.1 M phosphate buffer (pH 8/0.1% sodium dodecyl sulfate in the acceptor channel of theGDU and turned to sulfite. Then the sulfite was carried to the electrochemical flow cell anddetected directly by amperometry using the boron-doped diamond electrode at 0.95 V(versus Ag/AgCl. Sodium dodecyl sulfate was added to the carrier solution to preventelectrode fouling. This method was applicable in the concentration range of 0.2-20 mgSO32−/L and a detection limit (S/N = 3 of 0.05 mg SO32−/L was achieved. This method wassuccessfully applied to the determination of sulfite in wines and the analytical resultsagreed well with those obtained by iodimetric titration. The relative standard deviations forthe analysis of sulfite in wines were in the range of 1.0-4.1 %. The sampling frequency was65 h−1.

  12. Inhibition kinetics of nitritation and half-nitritation of old landfill leachate in a membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun; Wang, Zhaozhao; Li, Jun; Wei, Jia; Zhang, Yanzhuo; Zhao, Baihang

    2017-04-01

    Nitritation can be used as a pretreatment for anaerobic ammonia oxidation (anammox). Various control strategies for nitritation and half-nitritation of old landfill leachate in a membrane bioreactor were investigated in this study and the inhibition kinetics of substrate, product and old landfill leachate on nitritation were analyzed via batch tests. The results demonstrated that old landfill leachate nitritation in the membrane bioreactor can be achieved by adjusting the influent loading and dissolved oxygen (DO). From days 105-126 of the observation period, the average effluent concentration was 871.3 mg/L and the accumulation rate of [Formula: see text] was 97.2%. Half-nitritation was realized quickly by adjusting hydraulic retention time and DO. A low-DO control strategy appeared to best facilitate long-term and stable operation. Nitritation inhibition kinetic experiments showed that the inhibition of old landfill leachate was stronger than that of the substrate [Formula: see text] or product [Formula: see text] . The ammonia oxidation rate dropped by 22.2% when the concentration of old landfill leachate (calculated in chemical oxygen demand) was 1600.2 mg/L; further, when only free ammonia or free nitrous acid were used as a single inhibition factor, the ammonia oxidation rate dropped by 4.7-6.5% or 14.5-15.9%, respectively. Haldane, Aiba, and a revised inhibition kinetic model were adopted to separately fit the experimental data. The R 2 correlation coefficient values for these three models were 0.982, 0.996, and 0.992, respectively. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Nitric oxide formation from nitrite in zebrafish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank Bo

    2007-01-01

    nitrite levels for variable time periods, and changes in blood nitrosylhemoglobin (HbNO), methemoglobin (metHb), oxygenated hemoglobin (oxyHb) and deoxygenated hemoglobin (deoxyHb) were evaluated by spectral deconvolution. Blood HbNO (a biomarker of internal NO production) was low in controls, increased......, and the possibility that excess NO may inhibit mitochondrial respiration, whole animal routine oxygen consumption was not depressed....

  14. A colorimetric and ratiometric fluorescent probe for sulfite based on an intramolecular cleavage mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Peng; Chen, Song; Voitchovsky, Kislon; Song, Xiangzhi

    2014-11-01

    A colorimetric and ratiometric fluorescent sulfite probe, the levulinate of 4-hydroxynaphthalimide, was successfully synthesized from 4-hydroxy-naphthalimide and levulinic acid. Through sulfite-mediated intramolecular cleavage, the probe was converted into 4-hydroxynaphthalimide, which when excited at 450 nm, displayed a large Stokes shift due to the intramolecular charge transfer process. The probe exhibited high selectivity and sensitivity towards sulfite over other typical anionic species (F(-), Cl(-), Br(-), I(-), HPO(4)(2-), SO(4)(2-), NO(3)(-), AcO(-), ClO(4)(-), HCO(3)(-)) in HEPES-buffered solution (25 mm, pH 7.4, 50% acetonitrile, v/v). Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Nitrite in feed: From Animal health to human health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cockburn, Andrew [Institute for Research on Environment and Sustainability, Devonshire Building, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE17RU (United Kingdom); Brambilla, Gianfranco [Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Toxicological chemistry unit, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Fernández, Maria-Luisa [Departamento de Medio Ambiente, Instituto Nacional de Investigación y Tecnología Agraria y Alimentaria (INIA), Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación, Carretera de la Coruña, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Arcella, Davide [Unit on Data Collection and Exposure, European Food Safety Authority, Largo N. Palli 5/A43100 Parma (Italy); Bordajandi, Luisa R. [Unit on Contaminants in the Food chain, European Food Safety Authority, Largo N. Palli 5/A, 43100 Parma (Italy); Cottrill, Bruce [Policy Delivery Group, Animal Health and Welfare, ADAS, Wolverhampton (United Kingdom); Peteghem, Carlos van [University of Gent, Harelbekestraat 72, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Dorne, Jean-Lou, E-mail: jean-lou.dorne@efsa.europa.eu [Unit on Contaminants in the Food chain, European Food Safety Authority, Largo N. Palli 5/A, 43100 Parma (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    Nitrite is widely consumed from the diet by animals and humans. However the largest contribution to exposure results from the in vivo conversion of exogenously derived nitrate to nitrite. Because of its potential to cause to methaemoglobin (MetHb) formation at excessive levels of intake, nitrite is regulated in feed and water as an undesirable substance. Forages and contaminated water have been shown to contain high levels of nitrate and represent the largest contributor to nitrite exposure for food-producing animals. Interspecies differences in sensitivity to nitrite intoxication principally result from physiological and anatomical differences in nitrite handling. In the case of livestock both pigs and cattle are relatively susceptible. With pigs this is due to a combination of low levels of bacterial nitrite reductase and hence potential to reduce nitrite to ammonia as well as reduced capacity to detoxify MetHb back to haemoglobin (Hb) due to intrinsically low levels of MetHb reductase. In cattle the sensitivity is due to the potential for high dietary intake and high levels of rumen conversion of nitrate to nitrite, and an adaptable gut flora which at normal loadings shunts nitrite to ammonia for biosynthesis. However when this escape mechanism gets overloaded, nitrite builds up and can enter the blood stream resulting in methemoglobinemia. Looking at livestock case histories reported in the literature no-observed-effect levels of 3.3 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) per day for nitrite in pigs and cattle were estimated and related to the total daily nitrite intake that would result from complete feed at the EU maximum permissible level. This resulted in margins of safety of 9-fold and 5-fold for pigs and cattle, respectively. Recognising that the bulkiness of animal feed limits their consumption, these margins in conjunction with good agricultural practise were considered satisfactory for the protection of livestock health. A human health risk assessment was also

  16. Oxalic acid excretion after intravenous ascorbic acid administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robitaille, Line; Mamer, Orval A.; Miller, Wilson H.; Levine, Mark; Assouline, Sarit; Melnychuk, David; Rousseau, Caroline; Hoffer, L. John

    2012-01-01

    Ascorbic acid is frequently administered intravenously by alternative health practitioners and, occasionally, by mainstream physicians. Intravenous administration can greatly increase the amount of ascorbic acid that reaches the circulation, potentially increasing the risk of oxalate crystallization in the urinary space. To investigate this possibility, we developed gas chromatography mass spectrometry methodology and sampling and storage procedures for oxalic acid analysis without interference from ascorbic acid and measured urinary oxalic acid excretion in people administered intravenous ascorbic acid in doses ranging from 0.2 to 1.5 g/kg body weight. In vitro oxidation of ascorbic acid to oxalic acid did not occur when urine samples were brought immediately to pH less than 2 and stored at –30°C within 6 hours. Even very high ascorbic acid concentrations did not interfere with the analysis when oxalic acid extraction was carried out at pH 1. As measured during and over the 6 hours after ascorbic acid infusions, urinary oxalic acid excretion increased with increasing doses, reaching approximately 80 mg at a dose of approximately 100 g. We conclude that, when studied using correct procedures for sample handling, storage, and analysis, less than 0.5% of a very large intravenous dose of ascorbic acid is recovered as urinary oxalic acid in people with normal renal function. PMID:19154961

  17. A new polymorph of magnesium oxalate dihydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-An Chen

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available In the asymmetric unit of the title compound, catena-poly[[diaquamagnesium(II]-μ-oxalato], [Mg(C2O4(H2O2]n, there is one Mg atom in an octahedral coordination with site symmetry 222, a unique C atom of the oxalate anion lying on a twofold axis, an O atom of the anion in a general position and a water O atom at a site with imposed twofold rotation symmetry. The Mg2+ ions are ligated by water molecules and bridged by the anions to form chains that are held together by O—H...O hydrogen bonds. The structure of the title compound has already been reported in a different space group [Lagier, Pezerat & Dubernat (1969. Rev. Chim. Miner. 6, 1081–1093; Levy, Perrotey & Visser (1971. Bull. Soc. Chim. Fr. pp. 757–761].

  18. Determination of sulfite in dried garlic by reversed-phase ion-pairing liquid chromatography with post-column detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfetti, Gracia A; Diachenko, Gregory W

    2003-01-01

    A method is described for determining sulfite in dried garlic. Garlic is extracted with an HCl solution to inhibit the formation of allicin, which interferes with the determination of sulfite. After cleanup of the extract on a C18 solid-phase extraction column, sulfite is converted to hydroxymethylsulfonate (HMS) by adding formaldehyde and heating to 50 degrees C. HMS is determined by reversed-phase ion-pairing liquid chromatography with post-column detection. The post-column reaction system consists of the addition of KOH to convert HMS to sulfite ion, followed by the addition of 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) to produce 5-mercapto-2-nitrobenzoic acid which is detected spectrophotometrically at 450 nm. Background levels in unsulfited dried garlic equivalent to method for determining sulfite in garlic is discussed.

  19. Highly improved electrocatalytic behavior of sulfite at carbon ionic liquid electrode: Application to the analysis of some real samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safavi, Afsaneh; Maleki, Norouz; Momeni, Safieh; Tajabadi, Fariba

    2008-01-01

    The electrocatalytic oxidation of sulfite was investigated at carbon ionic liquid electrode (CILE). This electrode is a very good alternative to previously described electrodes because the electrocatalytic effect is achieved without any electrode modification. Comparative experiments were carried out using carbon paste electrode (CPE) and glassy carbon electrode (GCE). At CILE, highly reproducible and well-defined cyclic voltammograms were obtained for sulfite with a peak potential of 0.55 V vs. Ag/AgCl. Sulfite oxidation at CILE does not result in deactivation of the electrode surface. The kinetic parameters for this irreversible heterogeneous electron transfer process were determined. Under optimal experimental conditions, the peak current response increased linearly with sulfite concentration over the range of 6-1000 μM. The detection limit of the method was 4 μM. The method was applied to the determination of sulfite in mineral water, grape juice and non-alcoholic beer samples

  20. Variation in oxalate and oxalate decarboxylase production by six species of brown and white rot fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hastrup, Anne Christine Steenkjær; Oliver, Jason; Howell, Caitlin

    cell lumen where it quickly dissociates into hydrogen ions and oxalate, resulting in a pH decrease of the environment, and oxalate-cation complexes. Generally, brown rot fungi accumulate larger quantities of oxalic acid in the wood than white rot fungi. The amount of oxalic acid has been shown to vary......  Oxalic acid (C2O4H2), the strongest of the organic acids is produced by both brown and white rot decay fungi and has been connected to various aspects of brown- and white rot decay including the Fenton reaction (Green and Highley, 1997; Munir et al.,2001). Oxalic acid is secreted into the wood...

  1. Viscosities of oxalic acid and its salts in water and binary aqueous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Relative viscosities for the solutions of oxalic acid and its salts, viz. ammonium oxalate, sodium oxalate and potassium oxalate, at different concentrations have been determined in water and in binary aqueous mixtures of tetrahydrofuran (THF) [5, 10, 15 and 20% by weight of THF] at 298⋅15 K, and in water and in ...

  2. Determination of Nitrite in Meat Products using a Metalloporphyrin Based Nitrite-Selective Membrane Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana VLASCICI

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The potentiometric response characteristics of a nitrite-selective electrode based on Co (III tetraphenylporphyrins (TPP in o-nitrophenyloctylether plasticized polyvinyl chloride membranes are compared. To establish the optimum composition of the membrane, different molar percents of cationic derivative (0-100 mol% relative to ionophore were used. The influence of different plasticizers: o-nitrophenyloctylether, dioctylphtalate and tricresilphosphate on potentiometric answer were studied. Electrodes formulated with membranes containing 1 wt% ClCoTPP, 66 wt% o-NPOE, 33 wt% PVC (plasticizer:PVC = 2:1 and the lipophilic cationic derivative (10 mol% are shown to exhibit high selectivity for nitrite over many anions, except the lipophilic anions perchlorate and thiocyanate. The electrodes based on Co (III porphyrins were used for the potentiometric determination of nitrites in meat products. The results were compared with a colorimetric method used as the reference method. There was a good agreement between the potentiometric and colorimetric procedures.

  3. Synthesis of unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine oxalate from rejected liquid rocket propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Xiaogang; Yang, Jingjing; Zhang, Youzhi

    2018-02-01

    The rejected liquid propellant unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) was converted to UDMH oxalate, which has commercial value. The UDMH oxalate structure and stability were investigated by the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometric analysis. The results indicate that UDMH oxalate has good thermal and aqueous solution stability, a melting point of 144 °C, an initial decomposition temperature of 180 °C, and a peak wavelength of UV in aqueous solution at λ = 204 nm. This disposal method of rejected UDMH is highly efficient and environmentally safe.

  4. Influence of additives on the structure and microstructure of lanthanides and actinides oxalates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haidon, Blaise; Vitart, Anne-Lise; Rivenet, Murielle; Arab-Chapelet, Benedicte; Roussel, Pascal; Delahaye, Thibaud; Grandjean, Stephane; Abraham, Francis

    2015-07-01

    Oxalic conversion is a well-known process in the nuclear industry where it is used for precipitating plutonium as an oxalate thereafter calcinated into an oxide. As there is a strong relationship between the morphology of the oxalate precursor and that of the resulting oxide, it is of interest to control the oxalate structure and microstructure during the precipitation step. The influence of additives on the precipitation of neodymium (III) oxalates, non-radioactive analogs of actinides (III) oxalates, was explored. With the use of nitrilotri-methylphosphonic acid (NTMP), the structure and microstructure of the neodymium oxalates are different from that obtained without additive. (authors)

  5. Nitrite-free Asian hot dog sausages reformulated with nitrite replacers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Capillas, C; Tahmouzi, S; Triki, M; Rodríguez-Salas, L; Jiménez-Colmenero, F; Herrero, A M

    2015-07-01

    This research deals with the application of a global strategy designed to produce a nitrite-free Asian hot dog. Different ingredients such as annatto, cochineal, orange dietary fibre, vitamins E and C, lactate and celery were combined in order to study the appearance (colour), lipid oxidation stability and microbial stability of the nitrite-free formulations. The control sample contained much more (P annatto (RA) had the lowest a* values. Lipid oxidation levels were similar irrespective of formulation. The hot dog reformulated with cochineal (RC) scored higher for overall acceptability than RA, mainly due to its colour.

  6. Mixing state of oxalic acid containing particles in the rural area of Pearl River Delta, China: implications for the formation mechanism of oxalic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chunlei; Li, Mei; Chan, Chak K.; Tong, Haijie; Chen, Changhong; Chen, Duohong; Wu, Dui; Li, Lei; Wu, Cheng; Cheng, Peng; Gao, Wei; Huang, Zhengxu; Li, Xue; Zhang, Zhijuan; Fu, Zhong; Bi, Yanru; Zhou, Zhen

    2017-08-01

    The formation of oxalic acid and its mixing state in atmospheric particulate matter (PM) were studied using a single-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) in the summer and winter of 2014 in Heshan, a supersite in the rural area of the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region in China. Oxalic-acid-containing particles accounted for 2.5 and 2.7 % in total detected ambient particles in summer and winter, respectively. Oxalic acid was measured in particles classified as elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), elemental and organic carbon (ECOC), biomass burning (BB), heavy metal (HM), secondary (Sec), sodium-potassium (NaK), and dust. Oxalic acid was found predominantly mixing with sulfate and nitrate during the whole sampling period, likely due to aqueous-phase reactions. In summer, oxalic-acid-containing particle number and ozone concentration followed a very similar trend, which may reflect the significant contribution of photochemical reactions to oxalic acid formation. The HM particles were the most abundant oxalic acid particles in summer and the diurnal variations in peak area of iron and oxalic acid show opposite trends, which suggests a possible loss of oxalic acid through the photolysis of iron oxalato-complexes during the strong photochemical activity period. In wintertime, carbonaceous particles contained a substantial amount of oxalic acid as well as abundant carbon clusters and BB markers. The general existence of nitric acid in oxalic-acid-containing particles indicates an acidic environment during the formation process of oxalic acid. The peak areas of nitrate, sulfate and oxalic had similar temporal change in the carbonaceous type oxalic acid particles, and the organosulfate-containing oxalic acid particles correlated well with total oxalic acid particles during the haze episode, which suggests that the formation of oxalic acid is closely associated with the oxidation of organic precursors in the aqueous phase.

  7. Mixing state of oxalic acid containing particles in the rural area of Pearl River Delta, China: implications for the formation mechanism of oxalic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Cheng

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The formation of oxalic acid and its mixing state in atmospheric particulate matter (PM were studied using a single-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS in the summer and winter of 2014 in Heshan, a supersite in the rural area of the Pearl River Delta (PRD region in China. Oxalic-acid-containing particles accounted for 2.5 and 2.7 % in total detected ambient particles in summer and winter, respectively. Oxalic acid was measured in particles classified as elemental carbon (EC, organic carbon (OC, elemental and organic carbon (ECOC, biomass burning (BB, heavy metal (HM, secondary (Sec, sodium-potassium (NaK, and dust. Oxalic acid was found predominantly mixing with sulfate and nitrate during the whole sampling period, likely due to aqueous-phase reactions. In summer, oxalic-acid-containing particle number and ozone concentration followed a very similar trend, which may reflect the significant contribution of photochemical reactions to oxalic acid formation. The HM particles were the most abundant oxalic acid particles in summer and the diurnal variations in peak area of iron and oxalic acid show opposite trends, which suggests a possible loss of oxalic acid through the photolysis of iron oxalato-complexes during the strong photochemical activity period. In wintertime, carbonaceous particles contained a substantial amount of oxalic acid as well as abundant carbon clusters and BB markers. The general existence of nitric acid in oxalic-acid-containing particles indicates an acidic environment during the formation process of oxalic acid. The peak areas of nitrate, sulfate and oxalic had similar temporal change in the carbonaceous type oxalic acid particles, and the organosulfate-containing oxalic acid particles correlated well with total oxalic acid particles during the haze episode, which suggests that the formation of oxalic acid is closely associated with the oxidation of organic precursors in the aqueous phase.

  8. Oxalate accumulation in forage plants: Some agronomic, climatic and genetic aspects

    OpenAIRE

    M.M.Rahman; Kawamura, O

    2011-01-01

    Oxalic acid is synthesized by a wide range of plants. A few of them are forage plants that can cause oxalate poisoning in ruminants under certain conditions. In this paper, the role of some agronomic, climatic and genetic factors in minimizing oxalate accumulation in forage plants has been discussed. Research indicates that the content of oxalate in forage can be controlled by fertilizer application. For example, nitrate application resulted in higher contents of soluble and insoluble oxalate...

  9. Potentiometric sulfite biosensor based on entrapment of sulfite oxidase in a polypyrrole film on a platinum electrode modified with platinum nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adeloju, Samuel B.; Hussain, Shahid

    2016-01-01

    The surface of a platinum electrode has been modified with platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) and the enzyme sulfite oxidase (SOx), was entrapped on its surface in an ultrathin polypyrrole (PPy) film. The PtNPs, with a diameter of 30-40 nm, were deposited on the Pt electrode by cycling the electrode potential 20 times from -200 to 200 mV at a sweep rate of 50 mV.s -1 . Morphological evidence of the successful incorporation of SOx and the presence of PtNPs were obtained by scanning electron microscopy. Also, the electrochemical behavior of the PtNPs/PPy-SOx film was examined by cyclic voltammetry, chronopotentiometry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiometry. Under optimized conditions, the biosensor achieved a sensitivity of 57.5 mV.decade -1 , a linear response that extends from 0.75 to 65 μM of sulfite, a detection limit of 12.4 nM, and a response time of 3-5 s. The biosensor was successfully applied to the determination of sulfite in wine and beer samples. (author)

  10. Study of oxalic acid effect on equilibrium and kinetics of isotopic exchange between penta- and hexavalent neptunium in nitric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikitenko, S.I.; Ionnikova, N.I.

    1989-01-01

    Spectrophotometry at 25 deg C and ionic force μ=1.0 mol/l (KNO 3 +HNO 3 ) was used to show that at HNO 3 concentration 0.1-1.0 mol/l H 2 C 2 O 4 introduction to nitric acid solutions of Np 5+ in the presence of nitrite-ion resulted in the shift of equilibrium between Np 5+ and Np 6+ to the side of Np 6+ accumulation. The presence of H 2 C 2 O 4 at HNO 3 concentration > 1.0 mol/l doesn't affect the equilibrium position. The values of nominal equilibrium constant at different HNO 3 and H 2 C 2 O 4 concentrations were calculated. It was found that isotope exchange ( 239 Np/ 237 Np) between Np 5+ and Np 6+ in oxalate solutions proceeded more slowly than in oxalate absence. Rate constants of isotope exchange calculated at 9 deg C, μ=1.0 mol/l (KNO 3 ), H 2 C 2 O 4 concentration 0.01 mol/l and pH=2.2 and 3.5 are equal to 0.49x10 3 and 0.67x10 2 l/mol·min respectively. Mechanism of isotope exchange including electron transport between Np 5+ and Np 6+ oxalate complexes is suggested

  11. Computational and experimental studies on oxalic acid imprinted ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    EGDMA) were purchased from Sigma Aldrich. Ace- tonitrile and Oxalic acid were procured from Merck. Azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) was supplied by Across. Organics and re-crystallized from methanol before use. All chemicals were of analytical ...

  12. Dynamic process model of a plutonium oxalate precipitator. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, C.L.; Hammelman, J.E.; Borgonovi, G.M.

    1977-11-01

    In support of LLL material safeguards program, a dynamic process model was developed which simulates the performance of a plutonium (IV) oxalate precipitator. The plutonium oxalate precipitator is a component in the plutonium oxalate process for making plutonium oxide powder from plutonium nitrate. The model is based on state-of-the-art crystallization descriptive equations, the parameters of which are quantified through the use of batch experimental data. The dynamic model predicts performance very similar to general Hanford oxalate process experience. The utilization of such a process model in an actual plant operation could promote both process control and material safeguards control by serving as a baseline predictor which could give early warning of process upsets or material diversion. The model has been incorporated into a FORTRAN computer program and is also compatible with the DYNSYS 2 computer code which is being used at LLL for process modeling efforts.

  13. Dynamic process model of a plutonium oxalate precipitator. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, C.L.; Hammelman, J.E.; Borgonovi, G.M.

    1977-11-01

    In support of LLL material safeguards program, a dynamic process model was developed which simulates the performance of a plutonium (IV) oxalate precipitator. The plutonium oxalate precipitator is a component in the plutonium oxalate process for making plutonium oxide powder from plutonium nitrate. The model is based on state-of-the-art crystallization descriptive equations, the parameters of which are quantified through the use of batch experimental data. The dynamic model predicts performance very similar to general Hanford oxalate process experience. The utilization of such a process model in an actual plant operation could promote both process control and material safeguards control by serving as a baseline predictor which could give early warning of process upsets or material diversion. The model has been incorporated into a FORTRAN computer program and is also compatible with the DYNSYS 2 computer code which is being used at LLL for process modeling efforts

  14. Oxalate quantification in hemodialysate to assess dialysis adequacy for primary hyperoxaluria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaojing; Voskoboev, Nikolay V; Wannarka, Stacie L; Olson, Julie B; Milliner, Dawn S; Lieske, John C

    2014-01-01

    Patients with primary hyperoxaluria (PH) overproduce oxalate which is eliminated via the kidneys. If end-stage kidney disease develops they are at high risk for systemic oxalosis, unless adequate oxalate is removed during hemodialysis (HD) to equal or exceed ongoing oxalate production. The purpose of this study was to validate a method to measure oxalate removal in this unique group of dialysis patients. Fourteen stable patients with a confirmed diagnosis of PH on HD were included in the study. Oxalate was measured serially in hemodialysate and plasma samples in order to calculate rates of oxalate removal. HD regimens were adjusted according to a given patient's historical oxalate production, amount of oxalate removal at dialysis, residual renal clearance of oxalate, and plasma oxalate levels. After a typical session of HD, plasma oxalate was reduced by 78.4 ± 7.7%. Eight patients performed HD 6 times/week, 2 patients 5 times/week, and 3 patients 3 times/week. Combined oxalate removal by HD and the kidneys was sufficient to match or exceed endogenous oxalate production. After a median period of 9 months, pre-dialysis plasma oxalate was significantly lower than initially (75.1 ± 33.4 vs. 54.8 ± 46.6 mmol/l, p = 0.02). This methodology can be used to individualize the dialysis prescription of PH patients to prevent oxalosis during the time they are maintained on HD and to reduce risk of oxalate injury to a transplanted kidney.

  15. Comparative analysis of nitrite uptake and hemoglobin-nitrite reactions in erythrocytes: sorting out uptake mechanisms and oxygenation dependencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank Bo; Rohde, Sabina

    2010-01-01

    (hagfish and lamprey) anion exchanger-1 (AE1) in the membrane, with the aim to unravel the mechanisms and oxygenation dependencies of nitrite transport. Added nitrite rapidly diffused into the RBCs until equilibrium. The distribution ratio of nitrite across the membrane agreed with that expected from HNO2...... diffusion and AE1-mediated facilitated NO2- diffusion. Participation of HNO2 diffusion was emphasized by rapid transmembrane nitrite equilibration also in the natural AE1 knockouts. Following the equilibration, nitrite was consumed by reacting with Hb, which created a continued inward diffusion controlled....... We propose a model for RBC nitrite uptake that involves both HNO2 diffusion and AE1-mediated transport and which explains both the present and previous (sometimes puzzling) results....

  16. Oxalate Encapsulation in Aqueous Medium by Tripodal Urea ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1H-NMR titration studies: All 1H-NMR titration experiments for L1 and L2 were conducted on a Bruker 300 MHz spectrometer at 298 K respectively. Potassium oxalate dihydrate (K2C2O4.2H2O) was used to prepare the stock solution of anion in DMSO-d6:D2O (1:1.1) solvent system. Lower solubility of potassium oxalate in ...

  17. Fluorimetry of nitrite and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Hongjuan; Wu Jizong; Zhang Lihua; Liu Junling

    2007-01-01

    A new fluorimetric method for determination of nitrite was studied, based on the reaction of 5-aminofluorescein in acidic medium to form a new compound which was no fluorescence and reduced to highly fluorescence in alkaline medium. Effects of metal ions impurity were discussed. The acidity and measuring time were given. The precision of this method are 4% and 5% respectively. The recoveries are between 96% and 106% in nuclear fuel reprocessing solution and between 96% and 103% in high-level radioactive liquid waste. The method is applied to the determination of NO 2 - in nuclear fuel reprocessing solution and high- level radioactive liquid waste and nitrocompound in organic liquid waste. (authors)

  18. Methanol as electron donor for thermophilic biological sulfate and sulfite reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijma, J.

    2000-01-01

    Sulfur oxyanions (e.g. sulfate, sulfite) can be removed from aqueous waste- and process streams by biological reduction with a suitable electron donor to sulfide, followed by partial chemical or biological oxidation of sulfide to elemental sulfur. The aim of the research described in this

  19. Reaction-based probe for hydrogen sulfite: dual-channel and good ratiometric response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaohong; He, Ping; Zhong, Zhicheng; Liang, Guijie

    2016-11-01

    We designed and synthesized a new series of intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) molecules (compounds T1, T2 and T3) by attaching various electron-donating thiophene groups to the triphenylamine backbone with aldehyde group as the electron acceptor. Based on the nucleophilic addition reaction between hydrogen sulfite and aldehyde, all compounds could act as ratiometric optical probe for hydrogen sulfite and displayed efficient chromogenic and fluorogenic signaling. Upon the addition of hydrogen sulfite anions, probe T3 displayed apparent fluorescent color changes from yellowish-green to blue, with a large emission wavelength shift (Δλ = 120 nm). T3 responded to hydrogen sulfite with high sensitivity and the detection limit was determined to be as low as 0.9 μM. At the same time, apparent changes in UV-vis spectra could also be observed. By virtue of the special nucleophilic addition reaction with aldehyde, T3 displayed high selectivity over other anions. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Air pollution indications and growth of spruce and pine near a sulfite plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lars Westman

    1976-01-01

    A preliminary study has been made around a sulfite plant in the north of Sweden. The emission of sulfur dioxide increased considerably in 1950 as a consequence of the introduction of lye-burning. Using the pH in pine bark and two common lichen epiphytes as indicators, the resistant Parmelia physodes and the very sensitive Alectoria implexa...

  1. Thermodynamics of hydrothermal systems with oxalate ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodakovsky, I. L.; Devina, O. A.

    2009-04-01

    The geochemical and industrial significance of oxalates have led to great interest in the behavior of oxalate ion in hydrothermal systems. On the basis of a study by G.B. Naumov et al (1971) of gaseous-liquid inclusions it is shown that whewellite (CaC2O4•H2O) which was found in quartz-calcite-fluorite veins in the uranium ore deposit of the Eastern Transbaikal region was formed at temperatures about 150°C and pressure CO2 of 600-860 atm. The isotopic composition of carbon for these hydrothermal whewellite samples was determined by Galimov et al (1975): Delta13C from -1.56 to -2.22%. In a continuation of the study of organic-acid-water-rock interactions the thermodynamics of hydrothermal equilibriums for the systems Ox-H, Ox-H-Ca, Ox-H-Mg (where Ox = C2O42-), are described up to 200°C. The key network reactions and compounds related to the aqueous ion C2O42- are discussed and used to define the key values. The critical evaluation of thermodynamic properties for this ion is a part of the development of the new key values system for the joint thermodynamic database in the Internet. The evaluation involves the analysis of the enthalpy changes, Gibbs energy changes, and the entropy calculations for all key substances in the key network. A consistent set of thermodynamic property values is given for α-H2C2O4(cr), β-H2C2O4(cr), H2C2O4•H2O(cr), CaC2O4(cr), CaC2O4•H2O(cr,whewellite), NaC2O4(cr,natroxalate), MgC2O4•2H2O(cr,glushinskite) and aqueous species C2O42-, HC2O4-, H2C2O4°, CaC2O4°. This study was funded by Russian Foundation for Basic Research (project N 07-05-01108).

  2. Comparison of the ion exclusion chromatographic method with the Monier-Williams method for determination of total sulfite in foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H J

    1989-01-01

    Experimental data comparing the alkali extraction/ion exclusion chromatographic method with the Monier-Williams method for determination of total sulfite are presented in (a) enzymatic and nonenzymatic browning systems, (b) vegetables containing naturally occurring sulfite, and (c) a carbohydrate-type food additive, erythorbic acid. Excellent agreement, with a linear correlation coefficient of 0.99, was observed in fresh potato samples homogenized with sulfite and allowed to react for different time intervals (enzymatic browning system). A good overall correlation was observed in dehydrated, sulfited apple samples heated for different times (nonenzymatic browning system); however, as heating time increased, higher results were obtained by the Monier-Williams method than by the alkali extraction/ion exclusion chromatographic method. The results of determining sulfite in the alkali trapping solution following acid distillation or acid treatment without heat suggested that this deviation was due to a fraction of sulfite bound to the browning reaction products in such a way that it was released by acid distillation but not by alkali extraction or acid treatment without heat. Similar behavior was demonstrated in cabbage with naturally occurring sulfite, which was released by acid distillation but not by alkali extraction or acid treatment without heat. The ion exclusion chromatographic method could overcome interference by the volatile caramelization reaction products in the Monier-Williams determination of erythorbic acid.

  3. A self-assembled fluorescent organic nanoprobe and its application for sulfite detection in food samples and living systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tang; Cao, Xiaozheng; Ge, Peng; Dong, Jie; Yang, Shuqi; Xu, Huan; Wu, Yong; Gao, Feng; Zeng, Wenbin

    2017-05-23

    Sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) is a widely distributed air pollutant, and humans can easily be exposed to sulfite by inhaling SO 2 , thus inducing respiratory responses and diseases. Hence, to develop a rapid, sensitive and selective method for detection of sulfites is of great importance. Herein, we designed and synthesized a novel tetraphenyl imidazole compound TIBM with aggregation-induced emission enhancement (AIEE). TIBM can self-assemble into well-organized nanoparticles and is reported as an excellent probe for detection of sulfite with high selectivity and sensitivity. The nanoprobe performed very well for the detection of sulfite with an ultrafast detection time (15 s) and an ultralow detection limit (7.4 nM), which is superior to most of the reported probes. Moreover, the nanoprobe was successfully used to detect sulfite in food samples with a favorable accuracy. In addition, we developed paper-based devices for point-of-care detection of sulfite with naked eyes. Furthermore, due to its high water solubility, cell membrane permeability and good biocompatibility, the nanoproboe was further applied to detect sulfite in living systems. This study may offer some helpful insights for designing other AIE-based fluorescent nanosensors for various analytes.

  4. Development of a Liquid Chromatography–Tandem Mass Spectrometry Method for the Determination of Sulfite in Food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Katherine S.; Shah, Romina; MacMahon, Shaun; de Jager, Lowri S.

    2018-01-01

    Sulfites are widely used food preservatives that can cause severe reactions in sensitive individuals. As a result, the U.S. FDA requires that sulfites be listed on the label of any food product containing >10 mg/kg (ppm) sulfite (measured as sulfur dioxide). Currently, the optimized Monier–Williams (MW) method (AOAC Official Method 990.28) is the most common approach for determining sulfite concentrations in food samples. However, this method is time-consuming and lacks specificity in certain matrices. An improved rapid, sensitive, and selective method has been developed using electrospray ionization (ESI) high-performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for the determination of sulfite in various food matrices. A total of 12 different types of foods were evaluated. These included dried fruits and vegetables, frozen seafood, sweeteners, and juices. The matrix is extracted with a buffered formaldehyde solution, converting free and reversibly bound sulfite to the stable formaldehyde adduct, hydroxymethylsulfonate (HMS). Extracts are prepared for injection using a C18 SPE cartridge to remove any lipophilic compounds. HMS is then separated from other matrix components using hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) and detected using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). The method was validated at 5 concentrations in 12 food matrices. Accuracy data showed spiked recoveries ranging from 84 to 115% in representative foods. Six commercially available sulfited products were analyzed using the LC-MS/MS method, as well as the MW method, to determine if differences exist. PMID:25695590

  5. Molecular Basis for Enzymatic Sulfite Oxidation -- HOW THREE CONSERVED ACTIVE SITE RESIDUES SHAPE ENZYME ACTIVITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, Susan; Rapson, Trevor; Johnson-Winters, Kayunta; Astashkin, Andrei; Enemark, John; Kappler, Ulrike

    2008-11-10

    Sulfite dehydrogenases (SDHs) catalyze the oxidation and detoxification of sulfite to sulfate, a reaction critical to all forms of life. Sulfite-oxidizing enzymes contain three conserved active site amino acids (Arg-55, His-57, and Tyr-236) that are crucial for catalytic competency. Here we have studied the kinetic and structural effects of two novel and one previously reported substitution (R55M, H57A, Y236F) in these residues on SDH catalysis. Both Arg-55 and His-57 were found to have key roles in substrate binding. An R55M substitution increased Km(sulfite)(app) by 2-3 orders of magnitude, whereas His-57 was required for maintaining a high substrate affinity at low pH when the imidazole ring is fully protonated. This effect may be mediated by interactions of His-57 with Arg-55 that stabilize the position of the Arg-55 side chain or, alternatively, may reflect changes in the protonation state of sulfite. Unlike what is seen for SDHWT and SDHY236F, the catalytic turnover rates of SDHR55M and SDHH57A are relatively insensitive to pH (~;;60 and 200 s-1, respectively). On the structural level, striking kinetic effects appeared to correlate with disorder (in SDHH57A and SDHY236F) or absence of Arg-55 (SDHR55M), suggesting that Arg-55 and the hydrogen bonding interactions it engages in are crucial for substrate binding and catalysis. The structure of SDHR55M has sulfate bound at the active site, a fact that coincides with a significant increase in the inhibitory effect of sulfate in SDHR55M. Thus, Arg-55 also appears to be involved in enabling discrimination between the substrate and product in SDH.

  6. Intramuscular Cobinamide Sulfite in a Rabbit Model of Sub-Lethal Cyanide Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Matthew; Kim, Jae G.; Mahon, Sari B.; Lee, Jangwoen; Kreuter, Kelly A.; Blackledge, William; Mukai, David; Patterson, Steve; Mohammad, Othman; Sharma, Vijay S.; Boss, Gerry R.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine the ability of an intramuscular cobinamide sulfite injection to rapidly reverse the physiologic effects of cyanide toxicity. Background Exposure to cyanide in fires and industrial exposures and intentional cyanide poisoning by terrorists leading to mass casualties is an ongoing threat. Current treatments for cyanide poisoning must be administered intravenously, and no rapid treatment methods are available for mass casualty cyanide exposures. Cobinamide is a cobalamin (vitamin B12) analog with an extraordinarily high affinity for cyanide that is more water-soluble than cobalamin. We investigated the use of intramuscular cobinamide sulfite to reverse cyanide toxicity induced physiologic changes in a sublethal cyanide exposure animal model. Methods New Zealand white rabbits were given 10 mg sodium cyanide intravenously over 60 minutes. Quantitative diffuse optical spectroscopy and continuous wave near infrared spectroscopy monitoring of tissue oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin concentrations were performed concurrently with blood cyanide level measurements and cobinamide levels. Immediately after completion of the cyanide infusion, the rabbits were injected intramuscularly with cobinamide sulfite (n=6) or inactive vehicle (controls, n=5). Results Intramuscular administration led to rapid mobilization of cobinamide and was extremely effective at reversing the physiologic effects of cyanide on oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin extraction. Recovery time to 63% of their baseline values in the central nervous system was in a mean of 1032 minutes in the control group and 9 minutes in the cobinamide group with a difference of 1023 minutes (95% confidence interval [CI] 116, 1874 minutes). In muscle tissue, recovery times were 76 and 24 minutes with a difference of 52 minutes (95% CI 7, 98min). Red blood cell cyanide levels returned towards normal significantly faster in cobinamide sulfite-treated animals than in control animals. Conclusions Intramuscular

  7. Value-Added Products From FGD Sulfite-Rich Scrubber Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vivak M. Malhotra

    2006-09-30

    Massive quantities of sulfite-rich flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber materials are produced every year in the USA. In fact, at present, the production of wet sulfite-rich scrubber cake outstrips the production of wet sulfate-rich scrubber cake by about 6 million tons per year. However, most of the utilization focus has centered on FGD gypsum. Therefore, we have recently initiated research on developing new strategies for the economical, but environmentally-sound, utilization of sulfite-rich scrubber material. In this exploratory project (Phase I), we attempted to ascertain whether it is feasible to develop reconstituted wood replacement products from sulfite-rich scrubber material. In pursuit of this goal, we characterized two different wet sulfite-rich scrubber materials, obtained from two power plants burning Midwestern coal, for their suitability for the development of value-added products. The overall strategy adopted was to fabricate composites where the largest ingredient was scrubber material with additional crop materials as additives. Our results suggested that it may be feasible to develop composites with flexural strength as high as 40 MPa (5800 psi) without the addition of external polymers. We also attempted to develop load-bearing composites from scrubber material, natural fibers, and phenolic polymer. The polymer-to-solid ratio was limited to {le} 0.4. The formulated composites showed flexural strengths as high as 73 MPa (10,585 psi). We plan to harness the research outcomes from Phase I to develop parameters required to upscale our value-added products in Phase II.

  8. In vitro killing of Mycobacterium ulcerans by acidified nitrite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phillips, R.; Kuijper, S.; Benjamin, N.; Wansbrough-Jones, M.; Wilks, M.; Kolk, A. H. J.

    2004-01-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans, which causes Buruli ulcer, was exposed to acidified nitrite or to acid alone for 10 or 20 min. Killing was rapid, and viable counts were reduced below detectable limits within 10 min of exposure to 40 mM acidified nitrite. M. ulcerans is highly susceptible to acidified

  9. determination of nitrite, nitrate and total nitrogen in vegetable samples

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The above colour reaction system has been applied successfully for the determination of nitrite, nitrate and total nitrogen in vegetable samples. Unreduced samples give direct measure for nitrite whilst reduction of samples by copperized-cadmium column gives total nitrogen content and their difference shows nitrate content ...

  10. NITRITE AND NITRATE DETERMINATIONS IN PLASMA - A CRITICAL-EVALUATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MOSHAGE, H; KOK, B; HUIZENGA, [No Value; JANSEN, PLM

    Plasma nitrite and nitrate determinations are increasingly being used in clinical chemistry as markers for the activity of nitric oxide synthase and the production of nitric oxide radicals. However, a systematic evaluation of the determination of nitrite and nitrate in plasma has not been performed.

  11. Occurrence and Toxicological Significance of Nitrate and Nitrite in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To determine and evaluate the levels of nitrate and nitrite in some commercial infant formula in view of the health implications of these factors. Method: Nitrate and nitrite, which may create significant health problems in infants, were determined in four commercial infant formula. The public health and toxicological ...

  12. Nitrite and nitrate determinations in plasma: a critical evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moshage, H.; Kok, B.; Huizenga, J. R.; Jansen, P. L.

    1995-01-01

    Plasma nitrite and nitrate determinations are increasingly being used in clinical chemistry as markers for the activity of nitric oxide synthase and the production of nitric oxide radicals. However, a systematic evaluation of the determination of nitrite and nitrate in plasma has not been performed.

  13. Nitrite as a stimulus for ammonia-starved Nitrosomonas europaea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laanbroek, H.J.; Bär-Gilissen, M.J.; Hoogveld, H.L.

    2002-01-01

    Ammonia-starved cells of Nitrosomonas europaea are able to preserve a high level of ammonia-oxidizing activity in the absence of ammonium. However, when the nitrite-oxidizing cells that form part of the natural nitrifying community do not keep pace with the ammonia-oxidizing cells, nitrite

  14. Nitrite as regulator of hypoxic signaling in mammalian physiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Faassen, E.E.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071100938; Bahrami, S.; Feelisch, M.; Hogg, N.; Kelm, M.

    2009-01-01

    In this review we consider the effects of endogenous and pharmacological levels of nitrite under conditions of hypoxia. In humans, the nitrite anion has long been considered as metastable intermediate in the oxidation of nitric oxide radicals to the stable metabolite nitrate. This oxidation cascade

  15. Inactivation of Yersinia enterocolitica by nitrite and nitrate in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Giusti, M; de Vito, E

    1992-01-01

    The antimicrobial effects of sodium nitrite and sodium and potassium nitrate against Yersinia enterocolitica were investigated in solution and in treated pork meat. Potassium nitrate and sodium nitrate showed only feeble antimicrobial activity in cultures; no antimicrobial activity was detected with sodium nitrite. Conversely, all three salts displayed apparent antimicrobial activity in pork meat, possibly due to selective effects on competitive flora.

  16. Nitrate and nitrite in biology, nutrition and therapeutics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lundberg, J.O.; van Faassen, E.E.H.; Gladwin, M.T.; Ahluwalia, A.; Benjamin, N.

    2009-01-01

    Inorganic nitrate and nitrite from endogenous or dietary sources are metabolized in vivo to nitric oxide (NO) and other bioactive nitrogen oxides. The nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway is emerging as an important mediator of blood flow regulation, cell signaling, energetics and tissue responses to hypoxia.

  17. Electrochemical removal of nitrite in simulated aquaculture wastewater

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Electrochemical removal of nitrite at a concentration of 10 mg l-1 from synthetic aquaculture wastewater was investigated in this study using a batch reactor. The effects of important operating parameters such as electrode material and applied current density were studied. The highest nitrite removal is achieved with nickel ...

  18. Unraveling the origin of the nitrite-mediated hypoxic vasodilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fago, Angela; Dalsgaard, T.; Simonsen, U.

    2007-01-01

    are sufficient to induce NO-mediated vasodilation independently of the nitrite reductase activities here investigated. These results further indicate that the vasoactive effect of nitrite is intrinsic to the vessel and may be due to S-nitrosothiols formed within the arterial smooth muscle....

  19. Cardiac contractility in Antarctic teleost is modulated by nitrite through xanthine oxidase and cytochrome p-450 nitrite reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, Filippo; Amelio, Daniela; Gattuso, Alfonsina; Cerra, Maria Carmela; Pellegrino, Daniela

    2015-09-15

    In mammalian and non-mammalian vertebrates, nitrite anion, the largest pool of intravascular and tissue nitric oxide storage, represents a key player of many biological processes, including cardiac modulation. As shown by our studies on Antarctic teleosts, nitrite-dependent cardiac regulation is of great relevance also in cold-blooded vertebrates. This study analysed the influence elicited by nitrite on the performance of the perfused beating heart of two Antarctic stenotherm teleosts, the haemoglobinless Chionodraco hamatus (icefish) and the red-blooded Trematomus bernacchii. Since haemoglobin is crucial in nitric oxide homeostasis, the icefish, a naturally occurring genetic knockout for this protein, provides exclusive opportunities to investigate nitric oxide/nitrite signaling. In vivo, nitrite conversion to nitric oxide requires the nitrite reductase activity of xanthine oxidase and cytochrome P-450, thus the involvement of these enzymes was also evaluated. We showed that, in C. hamatus and T. bernacchii, nitrite influenced cardiac performance by inducing a concentration-dependent positive inotropic effect which was unaffected by nitric oxide scavenging by PTIO in C. hamatus, while it was abolished in T. bernacchii. Specific inhibition of xanthine oxidase and cytochrome P-450 revealed, in the two teleosts, that the nitrite-dependent inotropism required the nitrite reductase activity of both enzymes. We also found that xanthine oxidase is more expressed in C. hamatus than in T. bernacchii, while the opposite was observed concerning cytochrome P-450. Results suggested that in the heart of C. hamatus and T. bernacchii, nitrite is an integral physiological source of nitric oxide with important signaling properties, which require the nitrite reductase activity of xanthine oxidase and cytochrome P-450. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Nitrite disrupts multiple physiological functions in aquatic animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank Bo

    2003-01-01

    is at the expense of chloride, leading to chloride depletion. Nitrite also activates efflux of potassium from skeletal muscle and erythrocytes, disturbing intracellular and extracellular K+ levels. Nitrite transfer across the erythrocytic membrane leads to oxidation of haemoglobin to methaemoglobin (met......Hb), compromising blood O2 transport. Other haem proteins are also oxidised. Hyperventilation is observed, and eventually tissue O2 shortage becomes reflected in elevated lactate concentrations. Heart rate increases rapidly, before any significant elevations in metHb or extracellular potassium occur. This suggests...... nitrite-induced vasodilation (possibly via nitric oxide generated from nitrite) that is countered by increased cardiac pumping to re-establish blood pressure. Nitrite can form and/or mimic nitric oxide and thereby interfere with processes regulated by this local hormone. Steroid hormone synthesis may...

  1. Rapid flow injection method for the determination of sulfite in wine using the permanganate-luminol luminescence system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrro, Mercedes Villar; Payán, María Ramos; López, Miguel Angel Bello; Fernández-Torres, Rut; Mochón, Manuel Callejón

    2010-10-15

    A simple, rapid and sensitive chemiluminescence method for the determination of sulfite has been developed by combining flow-injection analysis and its sensitizing effect on the known chemiluminescence emission produced by the oxidation of luminol in alkaline medium; in this work permanganate has been proposed as oxidizing reactive. The optimum conditions for the chemiluminescence emission were established. The chemiluminescence was proportional to the sulfite concentration over the range 1.6 × 10(-5) and 4.0 × 10(-4)mol L(-1). The detection limit was 4.7 × 10(-6)mol L(-1) of sulfite. The method has been satisfactorily used for the determination of free and bound sulfite in wines. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparison of bamboo green, timber and yellow in sulfite, sulfuric acid and sodium hydroxide pretreatments for enzymatic saccharification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhiqiang Li; Zehui Jiang; Benhua Fei; Zhiyong Cai; Xuejun Pan

    2014-01-01

    The response and behavior of bamboo green, timber, and yellow of moso bamboo (Phyllostachys heterocycla) to three pretreatments, sulfite (SPORL), dilute acid (DA), and alkali (NaOH), were investigated and compared with varied chemical loadings at 180

  3. Surface analysis of transition metal oxalates: Damage aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chenakin, S.P., E-mail: chenakin@imp.kiev.ua [Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Chimie-Physique des Matériaux, B-1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Institute of Metal Physics, Nat. Acad. Sci. of Ukraine, Akad. Vernadsky Blvd. 36, 03680 Kiev (Ukraine); Szukiewicz, R. [Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Chimie-Physique des Matériaux, B-1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Barbosa, R.; Kruse, N. [Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Chimie-Physique des Matériaux, B-1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Washington State University, 155 Wegner Hall, Pullman, WA 99164-6515 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Gas evolution from the Mn, Co, Ni and Cu oxalate hydrates in vacuum, during exposure to X-rays and after termination of X-ray irradiation is studied. • A comparative study of the damage caused by X-rays in NiC{sub 2}O{sub 4} and CuC{sub 2}O{sub 4} is carried out. • Effect of Ar{sup +} bombardment on the structure and composition of CoC{sub 2}O{sub 4} is studied. - Abstract: The behavior of transition metal oxalates in vacuum, under X-ray irradiation and low-energy Ar{sup +} ion bombardment was studied. A comparative mass-spectrometric analysis was carried out of gas evolution from the surface of Mn, Co, Ni and Cu oxalate hydrates in vacuum, during exposure to X-rays and after termination of X-ray irradiation. The rates of H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} liberation from the oxalates were found to be in an inverse correlation with the temperatures of dehydration and decomposition, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed to study the X-ray induced damage in NiC{sub 2}O{sub 4} and CuC{sub 2}O{sub 4} by measuring the various XP spectral characteristics and surface composition of the oxalates as a function of time of exposure to X-rays. It was shown that Cu oxalate underwent a significantly faster degradation than Ni oxalate and demonstrated a high degree of X-ray induced reduction from the Cu{sup 2+} to the Cu{sup 1+} chemical state. 500 eV Ar{sup +} sputter cleaning of CoC{sub 2}O{sub 4} for 10 min was found to cause a strong transformation of the oxalate structure which manifested itself in an appreciable alteration of the XP core-level and valence band spectra. The analysis of changes in stoichiometry and comparison of XP spectra of bombarded oxalate with respective spectra of a reference carbonate CoCO{sub 3} implied that the bombardment-induced decomposition of CoC{sub 2}O{sub 4} gave rise to the formation of CoO-like and disordered CoCO{sub 3}-like phases.

  4. Precipitation of plutonium (III) oxalate and calcination to plutonium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteban, A.; Orosco, E.H.; Cassaniti, P.; Greco, L.; Adelfang, P.

    1989-01-01

    The plutonium based fuel fabrication requires the conversion of the plutonium nitrate solution from nuclear fuel reprocessing into pure PuO2. The conversion method based on the precipitation of plutonium (III) oxalate and subsequent calcination has been studied in detail. In this procedure, plutonium (III) oxalate is precipitated, at room temperature, by the slow addition of 1M oxalic acid to the feed solution, containing from 5-100 g/l of plutonium in 1M nitric acid. Before precipitation, the plutonium is adjusted to trivalent state by addition of 1M ascorbic acid in the presence of an oxidation inhibitor such as hydrazine. Finally, the precipitate is calcinated at 700 deg C to obtain PuO2. A flowsheet is proposed in this paper including: a) A study about the conditions to adjust the plutonium valence. b) Solubility data of plutonium (III) oxalate and measurements of plutonium losses to the filtrate and wash solution. c) Characterization of the obtained products. Plutonium (III) oxalate has several potential advantages over similar conversion processes. These include: 1) Formation of small particle sizes powder with good pellets fabrication characteristics. 2) The process is rather insensitive to most process variables, except nitric acid concentration. 3) Ambient temperature operations. 4) The losses of plutonium to the filtrate are less than in other conversion processes. (Author) [es

  5. Changes in oxalate and some mineral concentrations of Setaria sphacelata under cutting and uncutting conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M M; Tateyama, M; Niimi, M; Abdullah, R B; Khadijah, W E Wan; Kawamura, O

    2014-04-01

    Oxalate concentration in forage plants is important, because it results mineral deficiency in ruminants. Data on oxalate concentration in forage plants in conjunction with cutting and uncutting conditions throughout the growing period are limited. This study was aimed to investigate the changes in oxalate and some mineral concentrations of setaria (Setaria sphacelata). The plants were harvested at different stages (vegetative, boot, pre-flowering, flowering and seed) of maturity and at about 50 cm in length of regrowth (second to sixth cuttings) for evaluation of soluble oxalate, insoluble oxalate and some mineral concentrations. Soluble oxalate and total oxalate concentrations, as well as mineral concentrations, decreased with advancing maturity. Both oxalate concentrations (soluble or insoluble) were higher in leaf compared to stem. Soluble oxalate and total oxalate concentrations of regrowth were the highest at third cutting and lowest at sixth cutting. Insoluble oxalate concentration of regrowth was almost similar in all cuttings, except for the sixth cutting. The highest concentrations of potassium, sodium and magnesium of regrowth were observed at third cutting, while the highest concentration of calcium was observed at sixth cutting. A relationship between oxalate and mineral concentrations was partially observed. Results suggest that cutting materials of setaria from June to October could achieve oxalate levels that are toxic to ruminants.

  6. Combined effects of sulfites, temperature, and agitation time on production of glycerol in grape juice by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, N; Rodrigue, N; Champagne, C P

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of variance was used to evaluate the simultaneous effects of strain, incubation temperature (15 to 25 degrees C), agitation time (0 to 24 h), and initial sulfite concentration (100 to 300 ppm) on glycerol production in grape juice by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Fourteen strains were studied to determine their growth patterns in the presence of sulfites and ethanol. Baker's yeast strains were more sensitive to sulfite than wine strains, and little growth occurred at initial sulfite levels greater than 150 ppm. Sensitivity to sulfite increased with increasing levels of ethanol. Three strains exhibiting the best growth in the presence of sulfites and ethanol were selected for interaction studies. Fermentations were carried out until the solids content had decreased to less than 6 degrees Brix, which was the point that glycerol content became stable. For the three strains used, the greatest level of glycerol production was observed in the presence of 300 ppm of sulfite for most incubation temperatures and agitation times. There was significant interaction between the strain, incubation temperature, and agitation time parameters for glycerol synthesis, and a response surface method was used to predict the optimal conditions for glycerol production. Under static conditions, the highest level of glycerol production was observed at 20 degrees C, while incubation at 25 degrees C gave the best results when the cultures were agitated for 24 h. Response surface equations were used to predict that the optimum conditions for glycerol production by S. cerevisiae Y11 were a temperature of 22 degrees C, an initial sulfite concentration of 300 ppm, and no agitation, which yielded 0.68 g of glycerol per 100 ml. PMID:8357243

  7. Sulfites inhibit the growth of four species of beneficial gut bacteria at concentrations regarded as safe for food.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally V Irwin

    Full Text Available Sulfites and other preservatives are considered food additives to limit bacterial contamination, and are generally regarded as safe for consumption by governmental regulatory agencies at concentrations up to 5000 parts per million (ppm. Consumption of bactericidal and bacteriostatic drugs have been shown to damage beneficial bacteria in the human gut and this damage has been associated with several diseases. In the present study, bactericidal and bacteriostatic effects of two common food preservatives, sodium bisulfite and sodium sulfite, were tested on four known beneficial bacterial species common as probiotics and members of the human gut microbiota. Lactobacillus species casei, plantarum and rhamnosus, and Streptococcus thermophilus were grown under optimal environmental conditions to achieve early log phase at start of experiments. Bacterial cultures were challenged with sulfite concentrations ranging between 10 and 3780 ppm for six hours. To establish a control, a culture of each species was inoculated into media containing no sulfite preservative. By two hours of exposure, a substantial decrease (or no increase of cell numbers (based on OD600 readings were observed for all bacteria types, in concentrations of sulfites between 250-500 ppm, compared to cells in sulfite free media. Further testing using serial dilution and drop plates identified bactericidal effects in concentrations ranging between 1000-3780 ppm on all the Lactobacillus species by 4 hours of exposure and bactericidal effects on S. thermophilus in 2000ppm NaHSO3 after 6 hours of exposure.

  8. NITRATE AND NITRITE CONCENTRATION IN VEGETABLES GRAWING AROUND ISFAHAN CITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A JAFARI

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The improper and excess use of chemical fertilizers by the farmers special in "urea" form may cause the commulation of nitrates and nitrites in vegetables and fruits. This investigation has been done to determine the concentration of nitrates and nitrites in some vegetables growing around Isfahan. Methods: One hundred and thirteen random samples from 15 different kinds of green lest tuber vegetables were measured by Cadmium Column Procedure for nitrates and nitrites. Results: The mean of the nitrates level in green leaf and tuber-vegetables was 287.9 and 76.3 mg/kg, respectively. These amounts were more higher than standard value (67 mg/kg in the basis of wet material, significantly. The mean of the nitrite level in green leaf and tuber vegetables were 1.7 and 1 mg/kg, repectively, which were more higher than standard value (zero mg/kg in the basis of wet matrial. The most high concentration of nitrites and nitrates was seen in commondill and leek, repectively. Discussion: Amounts of nitrites and nitrates in our analysed samples exceeded the perimissible limits. The comulation of nitrates in some of the vegetables depend on the application of chemical fertilizers, temprature and wether, but the nitrites in vegetables is unusual in normal condition and the unsuitable storage of them causes it"s expansion.

  9. Successful treatment of sodium oxalate induced urolithiasis with Helichrysum flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onaran, Metin; Orhan, Nilüfer; Farahvash, Amirali; Ekin, Hasya Nazlı; Kocabıyık, Murat; Gönül, İpek Işık; Şen, İlker; Aslan, Mustafa

    2016-06-20

    Helichrysum (Asteraceae) flowers, known as "altın otu, yayla çiçeği, kudama çiçeği" , are widely used to remove kidney stones and for their diuretic properties in Turkey. To determine the curative effect of infusions prepared from capitulums of Helichrysum graveolens (M. Bieb.) Sweet (HG) and H. stoechas ssp. barellieri (Ten.) Nyman (HS) on sodium oxalate induced kidney stones. Infusions prepared from the capitulums of HG and HS were tested for their curative effect on calcium oxalate deposition induced by sodium oxalate (70mg/kg i.p.). Following the injection of sodium oxalate for 5 days, plant extracts were administered to rats at two different doses. Potassium citrate was used as positive control. Water intake, urine volume, body, liver and kidney weights were measured; biochemical and hematological analyses were conducted on urine and blood samples. Additionally, histopathological examinations were done on kidney samples. H. stoechas extract showed prominent effect at 156mg/kg dose (stone formation score: 0.33), whereas number of kidney stones was maximum in sodium oxalate group (stone formation score: 2.33). The reduction in the uric acid and oxalate levels of urine samples and the elevation in the urine citrate levels are significant and promising in extract groups. Some hematological, biochemical and enzymatic markers are also ameliorated by the extracts. This is the first report on the curative effect of immortal flowers. Our preliminary study indicated that Helichrysum extracts may be used for treatment of urolithiasis and Helichrysum extracts are an alternative therapy to potassium citrate for patients suffering from kidney stones. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Efficiency of population-dependent sulfite against Brettanomyces bruxellensis in red wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longin, Cédric; Degueurce, Claudine; Julliat, Frédérique; Guilloux-Benatier, Michèle; Rousseaux, Sandrine; Alexandre, Hervé

    2016-11-01

    Brettanomyces bruxellensis is considered as a spoilage yeast encountered mainly in red wine. It is able to reduce vinylphenols from phenolic acids to ethylphenols. These volatiles are responsible for the phenolic "Brett character" described as animal, farm, horse sweat and animal leather odors. Other molecules are responsible for organoleptic deviations described as "mousiness taint". SO 2 is the product most often used by winemakers to prevent B. bruxellensis growth. Usually, the recommended molecular dose of SO 2 (active SO 2 , mSO 2 ) is highly variable, from 0.3 to 0.8mg/L. But these doses do not take into account differences of strain resistance to sulfites or population levels. Moreover, SO 2 is known as a chemical stressor inducing a viable but nonculturable (VBNC) state of B. bruxellensis. These cells, which are non-detectable by plate counting, can lead to new contamination when the amount of sulfite decreases over time. Consequently, we first assessed the effect of SO 2 levels in red wine on two strains with phenotypically different sulfite resistances. Then, we studied the relationship between amounts of SO 2 (0, 0.5, 0.9 and 1.1mg/L active SO 2 ) and population levels (10 3 , 10 4 and 10 5 cells/mL) in red wine. Yeasts were enumerated by both plate counting and flow cytometry over time using viability dye. Our results showed different SO 2 resistances according to the strain used. A relationship between yeast population level and SO 2 resistance was demonstrated: the higher the yeast concentration, the lower the efficiency of SO 2 . Under certain conditions, the VBNC state of B. bruxellensis was highlighted in red wine. Yeasts in this VBNC state did not produce 4-EP. Moreover, cells became culturable again over time. All these results provide new information enabling better management of sulfite addition during wine aging. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Hypoxia tolerance, nitric oxide, and nitrite: Lessons from extreme animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fago, Angela; B. Jensen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    survival resides in concerted physiological responses, including strong metabolic depression, protection against oxidative damage and – in air breathing animals - redistribution of blood flow. Each of these responses is known to be tightly regulated by nitric oxide (NO) and during hypoxia by its metabolite...... nitrite. The aim of this review is to highlight recent work illustrating the widespread roles of NO and nitrite in the tolerance to extreme oxygen deprivation, in particular in the red-eared slider turtle and crucian carp, but also in diving marine mammals. The emerging picture underscores the importance...... of NO and nitrite signaling in the adaptive response to hypoxia in vertebrate animals....

  12. Generation of nitric oxide from nitrite by carbonic anhydrase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aamand, Rasmus; Dalsgaard, Thomas; Jensen, Frank B

    2009-01-01

    In catalyzing the reversible hydration of CO2 to bicarbonate and protons, the ubiquitous enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA) plays a crucial role in CO2 transport, in acid-base balance, and in linking local acidosis to O2 unloading from hemoglobin. Considering the structural similarity between...... bicarbonate and nitrite, we hypothesized that CA uses nitrite as a substrate to produce the potent vasodilator nitric oxide (NO) to increase local blood flow to metabolically active tissues. Here we show that CA readily reacts with nitrite to generate NO, particularly at low pH, and that the NO produced...

  13. Electrochemical oxidation of nitrite on nanodiamond powder electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, L.H.; Zang, J.B.; Wang, Y.H.; Bian, L.Y. [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); College of Materials Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China)

    2008-03-10

    Nanodiamond (ND) powder electrodes were fabricated and the electrochemical properties were investigated in the solution containing nitrite in this article. This electrode exhibits substantial catalytic ability toward the oxidation of nitrite anions. The electrochemical oxidation mechanism of nitrite on the ND powder electrode is discussed. The oxidation of NaNO{sub 2} is a two-electron transfer process. The electrode reaction rate constant k is estimated to be 2.013 x 10{sup -4} cm/s and (1 - {alpha})n{sub {alpha}} is 0.1643. The peak current increases linearly with the rising of the concentration of NaNO{sub 2}. (author)

  14. Internalization of Calcium Oxalate Calculi Developed in Narrow Cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fèlix Grases

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of a patient with calcium oxalate monohydrate and calcium oxalate dihydrate calculi occluded in cavities. All those calculi were located inside narrow cavities covered with a thin epithelium that permits their visualization. Urinary biochemical analysis showed high calciuria, not hypercalciuria, hypocitraturia, and a ratio [calcium]/[citrate] >0.33. The existence of cavities of very low urodynamic efficacy was decisive in the formation of such calculi. It is important to emphasize that we observed a thin epithelium covering such cavities, demonstrating that this epithelium may be formed after the development of the calculi through a re-epithelialization process.

  15. On thorium and plutonium cocrystallization with calcium oxalate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basalaeva, L.N.; Bekyasheva, T.A.; Popov, D.K.

    1987-01-01

    Study of possibility of 239 Pu and 234 Th concentration from bone ashe (calcium phosphate) hydrochloric acid solutions by coprecipitation with nonisotopic medium (CaC 2 O 4 ) for their further radiometry or alpha-spectrometry is carried out. Thorium and plutonium distribution coefficients in calcium oxalate precipitate - solution system, as well as coefficients of Th and Pu cocrystallization with CaC 2 O 4 and cocrystallization type are determined. Possibility of Pu and Th concentration from bone tissue solutions is demonstrated on small oxalate amount containing 25% of Ca total amount in bone tissue

  16. Protection of metal artefacts with the formation of metal-oxalates complexes by Beauveria bassiana.

    OpenAIRE

    Edith eJoseph; Edith eJoseph; Sylvie eCario; Anaële eSimon; Marie eWörle; Rocco eMazzeo; Pilar eJunier; Daniel eJob

    2012-01-01

    Several fungi present high tolerance to toxic metals and some are able to transform metals into metal-oxalate complexes. In this study, the ability of Beauveria bassiana to produce copper oxalates was evaluated in vitro. Growth performance was tested on various copper-containing media. B. bassiana proved highly resistant to copper, tolerating concentrations of up to 20 g.L-1, and precipitating copper oxalates on all media tested. Chromatographic analyses showed that this species produced oxal...

  17. Protection of Metal Artifacts with the Formation of Metal?Oxalates Complexes by Beauveria bassiana

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph, Edith; Cario, Sylvie; Simon, Ana?le; W?rle, Marie; Mazzeo, Rocco; Junier, Pilar; Job, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Several fungi present high tolerance to toxic metals and some are able to transform metals into metal–oxalate complexes. In this study, the ability of Beauveria bassiana to produce copper oxalates was evaluated. Growth performance was tested on various copper-containing media. B. bassiana proved highly resistant to copper, tolerating concentrations of up to 20 g L−1, and precipitating copper oxalates on all media tested. Chromatographic analyses showed that this species produced oxalic acid a...

  18. Screening and partial immunochemical characterization of sulfite oxidase from plant source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Ausaf; Sarfraz, Ahmad

    2010-01-01

    Sulfite oxidase [SO; EC 1.8.3.1] catalyses the physiologically vital oxidation of sulfite to sulfate, the terminal reaction in degradation of sulfur containing amino acids, cysteine and methionine. Sulfite oxidase from vertebrate sources is among the best studied molybdenum enzymes. Existence of SO in plants has been established recently by identification of a cDNA from Arabidopsis thaliana encoding a functional SO. The present study was undertaken to identify herbaceous and woody plants (viz., Azardirachta indica L., Cassia fistula L., Saraca indica L., Spinacea oleracea L., and Syzyzium cumini L.), a relatively less explored source, having significant SO activity and to characterize some of its immuno-biochemical properties. The Syzyzium cumini was chosen to characterize SO as it showed maximum enzyme activity in the crude extract as compared to other plants. Absorption spectra of SO revealed two peaks at 235 and 277 nm, but no distinct peak in the visible region could be observed. Crude extract of all the plants were taken into considerations for immuno-biochemical studies. Despite of significant protein structure-functional similarities between plant and animal SO, no cross-reactivity could be established between the two sources of SO. These data suggested that plants SO, however, differed with regards to their immunobiochemical properties.

  19. QM/MM study of the reaction mechanism of sulfite oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldararu, Octav; Feldt, Milica; Cioloboc, Daniela; van Severen, Marie-Céline; Starke, Kerstin; Mata, Ricardo A; Nordlander, Ebbe; Ryde, Ulf

    2018-03-16

    Sulfite oxidase is a mononuclear molybdenum enzyme that oxidises sulfite to sulfate in many organisms, including man. Three different reaction mechanisms have been suggested, based on experimental and computational studies. Here, we study all three with combined quantum mechanical (QM) and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) methods, including calculations with large basis sets, very large QM regions (803 atoms) and QM/MM free-energy perturbations. Our results show that the enzyme is set up to follow a mechanism in which the sulfur atom of the sulfite substrate reacts directly with the equatorial oxo ligand of the Mo ion, forming a Mo-bound sulfate product, which dissociates in the second step. The first step is rate limiting, with a barrier of 39-49 kJ/mol. The low barrier is obtained by an intricate hydrogen-bond network around the substrate, which is preserved during the reaction. This network favours the deprotonated substrate and disfavours the other two reaction mechanisms. We have studied the reaction with both an oxidised and a reduced form of the molybdopterin ligand and quantum-refinement calculations indicate that it is in the normal reduced tetrahydro form in this protein.

  20. Determination of total sulfite in wine by ion chromatography after in-sample oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Matthias; Köppen, Robert; Siegel, David; Witt, Angelika; Nehls, Irene

    2010-09-08

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) or sulfites are the most common preservatives used in winemaking. The level of total SO2 is subject to regulation. Currently, the regulatory determination of total SO2 (including sulfites) is done by the optimized Monier-Williams (OMW) method, which includes time-consuming distillation and titration steps. This paper describes the development and application of an alternative, rapid, straightforward, and reliable method for the determination of total sulfite in wine. In this method, a simple oxidation step using alkaline hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) solution is followed by ion chromatographic (IC) analysis of sulfate coupled with conductometric detection. Thirteen wines were analyzed in order to compare the in-sample oxidation method with the OMW-procedure. A t-test revealed satisfying compliance regarding sample preparation, i.e., alkaline H2O2 treatment and acidic distillation (OMW method). Comparable results were also obtained between IC analysis and acid/base titration. Our results indicate that the novel method (limit of quantification: 4 mg SO2 L(-1)) is well suited for the cost-efficient monitoring of regulatory limits.

  1. Enzymatic oxalic acid regulation correlated with wood degradation in four brown-rot fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anne Christine Steenkjær Hastrup; Frederick Green III; Patricia K. Lebow; Bo Jensen

    2012-01-01

    Oxalic acid is a key component in the initiation of brown-rot decay and it has been suggested that it plays multiple roles during the degradation process. Oxalic acid is accumulated to varying degrees among brown-rot fungi; however, details on active regulation are scarce. The accumulation of oxalic acid was measured in this study from wood degraded by the four brown-...

  2. Thermal, FT–IR and dielectric studies of gel grown sodium oxalate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    Abstract. Oxalic acid metabolism is important in humans, animals and plants. The effect of oxalic acid sodium salt is widely studied in living body. The growth of sodium oxalate single crystals by gel growth is reported, which can be used to mimic the growth of crystals in vivo. The grown single crystals are colourless, ...

  3. A new method for the analysis of soluble and insoluble oxalate in pulp and paper matrices

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sithole, Bruce

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A novel method has been developed for determining soluble and insoluble forms of oxalate in pulp and paper samples by ion chromatography. Methanesulphonic acid is used to dissolve insoluble oxalate, and total oxalate is then determined by ion...

  4. The abiotic degradation of soil organic matter to oxalic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studenroth, Sabine; Huber, Stefan; Schöler, H. F.

    2010-05-01

    The abiotic degradation of soil organic matter to volatile organic compounds was studied intensely over the last years (Keppler et al., 2000; Huber et al., 2009). It was shown that soil organic matter is oxidised due to the presence of iron (III), hydrogen peroxide and chloride and thereby produces diverse alkyl halides, which are emitted into the atmosphere. The formation of polar halogenated compounds like chlorinated acetic acids which are relevant toxic environmental substances was also found in soils and sediments (Kilian et al., 2002). The investigation of the formation of other polar halogenated and non-halogenated compounds like diverse mono- and dicarboxylic acids is going to attain more and more importance. Due to its high acidity oxalic acid might have impacts on the environment e.g., nutrient leaching, plant diseases and negative influence on microbial growth. In this study, the abiotic formation of oxalic acid in soil is examined. For a better understanding of natural degradation processes mechanistic studies were conducted using the model compound catechol as representative for structural elements of the humic substances and its reaction with iron (III) and hydrogen peroxide. Iron is one of the most abundant elements on earth and hydrogen peroxide is produced by bacteria or through incomplete reduction of oxygen. To find suitable parameters for an optimal reaction and a qualitative and quantitative analysis method the following reaction parameters are varied: concentration of iron (III) and hydrogen peroxide, time dependence, pH-value and influence of chloride. Analysis of oxalic acid was performed employing an ion chromatograph equipped with a conductivity detector. The time dependent reaction shows a relatively fast formation of oxalic acid, the optimum yield is achieved after 60 minutes. Compared to the concentration of catechol an excess of hydrogen peroxide as well as a low concentration of iron (III) are required. In absence of chloride the

  5. Nitrite-dependent vasodilation is facilitated by hypoxia and is independent of known NO-generating nitrite reductase activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Thomas; Simonsen, Ulf; Fago, Angela

    2007-01-01

    The reduction of circulating nitrite to nitric oxide (NO) has emerged as an important physiological reaction aimed to increase vasodilation during tissue hypoxia. Although hemoglobin, xanthine oxidase, endothelial NO synthase, and the bc(1) complex of the mitochondria are known to reduce nitrite...... effect of nitrite during hypoxia was abolished on inhibition of soluble guanylate cyclase and was unaffected by removal of the endothelium or by inhibition of xanthine oxidase and of the mitochondrial bc(1) complex. In the presence of hemoglobin and inositol hexaphosphate (which increases the fraction...

  6. Measuring nitrate and nitrite concentrations in vegetables, fruits in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) and accuracy was measured by a conventional spectrophotometers. SAS and Excel were used to draw diagrams and statistical calculations. Statistical comparisons showed value of nitrate and nitrite in leafy vegetables is more than fruits and ...

  7. Performance of denitrifying microbial fuel cell with biocathode over nitrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao eHuimin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Microbial fuel cell (MFC with nitrite as an electron acceptor in cathode provided a new technology for nitrogen removal and electricity production simultaneously. The influences of influent nitrite concentration and external resistance on the performance of denitrifying MFC were investigated. The optimal effectiveness were obtained with the maximum total nitrogen (TN removal rate of 54.80±0.01 g m-3 d-1. It would be rather desirable for the TN removal than electricity generation at lower external resistance. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis suggested that Proteobacteria was the predominant phylum, accounting for 35.72%. Thiobacillus and Afipia might benefit to nitrite removal. The presence of nitrifying Devosia indicated that nitrite was oxidized to nitrate via a biochemical mechanism in the cathode. Ignavibacterium and Anaerolineaceae was found in the cathode as a heterotrophic bacterium with sodium acetate as substrate, which illustrated that sodium acetate in anode was likely permeated through proton exchange membrane to the cathode .

  8. Intramolecular electron transfer in Pseudomonas aeruginosa cd(1) nitrite reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Brunori, Maurizio; Cutruzzolà, Francesca

    2009-01-01

    The cd(1) nitrite reductases, which catalyze the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide, are homodimers of 60 kDa subunits, each containing one heme-c and one heme-d(1). Heme-c is the electron entry site, whereas heme-d(1) constitutes the catalytic center. The 3D structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa...... nitrite reductase has been determined in both fully oxidized and reduced states. Intramolecular electron transfer (ET), between c and d(1) hemes is an essential step in the catalytic cycle. In earlier studies of the Pseudomonas stutzeri enzyme, we observed that a marked negative cooperativity...... is controlling this internal ET step. In this study we have investigated the internal ET in the wild-type and His369Ala mutant of P. aeruginosa nitrite reductases and have observed similar cooperativity to that of the Pseudomonas stutzeri enzyme. Heme-c was initially reduced, in an essentially diffusion...

  9. Differential uptake and metabolism of nitrite in normoxic and hypoxic goldfish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank Bo; Hansen, Marie N.

    2011-01-01

    extracellular and intracellular compartments, revealing nitrosative stress with extensive nitros(yl)ation of thiols, amines and heme groups. The degree of nitrosative stress correlated with nitrite load. Nitrate levels increased in all compartments, reflecting that a significant fraction of the nitrite taken up...... was converted to non-toxic nitrate. The generation of methemoglobin and nitrosylhemoglobin (assessed by spectral deconvolution) was more pronounced during normoxic nitrite exposure than during hypoxic nitrite exposure, in agreement with the higher nitrite load in normoxic fish. However, at any given nitrite......Nitrite is a physiological important nitric oxide donor at low concentrations but becomes toxic at high concentrations, as develops in freshwater fish exposed to environmental nitrite. We hypothesized that nitrite uptake across the gills differs between normoxic and hypoxic fish and that nitrite...

  10. Urinary nitrite in symptomatic and asymptomatic urinary infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, H R; McCredie, D A; Ritchie, M A

    1987-01-01

    The dipstrip test for urinary nitrite is fairly unreliable in symptomatic urinary infections and only 104 (52%) of 200 symptomatic children with urinary infection attending an emergency department had a positive result. The test yielded positive results, however, in 83 of 100 outpatients with largely asymptomatic urinary infection attending a follow up clinic because of known predisposition to urinary infection. This difference was highly significant. The finding of urinary nitrite is highly ...

  11. Mitochondria recycle nitrite back to the bioregulator nitric monoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nohl, H.; Staniek, K.; Sobhian, B.; Bahrami, S.; Redl, H.; Kozlov, A.V.

    2000-01-01

    Nitric monoxide (NO) exerts a great variety of physiological functions. L-Arginine supplies amino groups which are transformed to NO in various NO-synthase-active isoenzyme complexes. NO-synthesis is stimulated under various conditions increasing the tissue of stable NO-metabolites. The major oxidation product found is nitrite. Elevated nitrite levels were reported to exist in a variety of diseases including HIV, reperfusion injury and hypovolemic shock. Denitrifying bacteria such as Paracoccus denitrificans have a membrane bound set of cytochromes (cyt cd 1 , cyt bc) which were shown to be involved in nitrite reduction activities. Mammalian mitochondria have similar cytochromes which form part of the respiratory chain. Like in bacteria quinols are used as reductants of these types of cytochromes. The observation of one-e - divergence from this redox-couple to external dioxygen made us to study whether this site of the respiratory chain may also recycle nitrite back to its bioactive form NO. Thus, the aim of the present study was therefore to confirm the existence of a reductive pathway which reestablishes the existence of the bioregulator NO from its main metabolite NO 2 - . Our results show that respiring mitochondria readily reduce added nitrite to NO which was made visible by nitrosylation of deoxyhemoglobin. The adduct gives characteristic triplet-ESR-signals. Using inhibitors of the respiratory chain for chemical sequestration of respiratory segments we were able to identify the site where nitrite is reduced. The results confirm the ubiquinone/cyt bc 1 couple as the reductant site where nitrite is recycled. The high affinity of NO to the heme-iron of cytochrome oxidase will result in an impairment of mitochondrial energy-production. ''Nitrite tolerance'' of angina pectoris patients using NO-donors may be explained in that way. (author)

  12. Nitrate, Nitrite and ascorbic acid content of commercial and home ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The contents of nitrate, nitrite and ascorbic acid were determined in four samples of commercial and fifteen samples of home - prepared complementary infant foods common in Nigeria. The nitrate and nitrite values of the commercial food samples ranged from 3.1– 3.9mgNO3- N/100g and 5.0 - 16.0ug N02 - N/100g ...

  13. Modulation of nitrate-nitrite conversion in the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Maanen, J M; van Geel, A A; Kleinjans, J C

    1996-01-01

    The formation of nitrite from ingested nitrate can give rise to the induction of methemoglobinemia and endogenous nitrosation resulting in the formation of carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds. We investigated the possibility of modulation of the conversion of nitrate into nitrite in the oral cavity in order to seek ways of reducing the formation of the deleterious nitrite. We investigated the effectiveness of several mouthwash solutions with antibacterial constituents on the reduction of nitrate into nitrite in the oral cavity. In 15 studied subjects, the mean percentage of salivary nitrate reduced to nitrite after ingestion of 235 mg (3.8 mmol) nitrate was found to be 16.1 +/- 6.2%. The use of an antiseptic mouthwash with active antibacterial constituent chlorhexidine resulted in an almost complete decrease of the mean percentage of reduced nitrate, to 0.9 +/- 0.8%. Mouthwash solutions with antibacterial component triclosan or antimicrobial enzymes amyloglucosidase and glucose oxidase did not affect the reduction of nitrate into nitrite. A toothpaste with active components triclosan and zinc citrate with synergistic antiplaque activity was also without effect. Use of a pH-regulating chewing gum resulted in a rise in the pH in the oral cavity from 6.8 to 7.3. At 30 min after nitrate ingestion, this rise was accompanied by a significant increase in the salivary nitrite concentration, which might be explained by the pH being close to the optimal pH for nitrate reductase of 8. In conclusion, a limited number of possibilities of modulation of the conversion of nitrate into nitrite in the oral cavity are available.

  14. Synthesis, Crystal structure and Characterization of a New Oxalate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    dination modes.4 Moreover, the oxalate bridge can effi- ciently mediate the exchange interactions between para- magnetic metal ions, leading to interesting magnetic ..... step which is consistent with the calculated weight loss of 21.67%. The result is in agreement with the struc- ture which contains five water molecules.

  15. Phase transition in L-alaninium oxalate by photoacoustics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Phase transition in L-alaninium oxalate is studied by using TG, DTA and photoacoustic spectroscopy. A sharp transition at 378 K by photoacoustics is observed whereas at the same temperature the endothermic energy change observed by TG and DTA is not very sharp. This is discussed in detail with reference to the other ...

  16. Charge dynamics in conducting polyaniline–metal oxalate composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Polyaniline (Pani) and its metal oxalate composites (~ 10 wt.%) of trivalent metal ions of Cr, Fe,. Mn, Co and Al were synthesized by chemical oxidative polymerization technique with potassium perdisul- phate oxidant in aqueous sulphuric acid medium. These materials were characterized by UV–VIS and EPR.

  17. Crystal growth and morphology of calcium oxalates and carbonates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijnen, W.M.M.

    1986-01-01

    The main purpose of the research described in this thesis is to establish a relationship between the crystal structure and morphology of calcium oxalate and calcium carbonate crystals grown from aqueous solutions. Starting point is the PBC (Periodic Bond Chain) theory formulated by Hartman and

  18. Metal oxalate complexes as novel inorganic dopants: Studies on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Metal oxalate complexes as novel inorganic dopants: Studies on their effect on conducting polyaniline. R MURUGESAN† and E SUBRAMANIAN*. Department of Chemistry, Manonmaniam Sundaranar University, Abishekapatti, Tirunelveli 627 012, India. †Deputed on F.I.P. from Department of Chemistry, T.D.M.N.S. College ...

  19. Competitive adsorption and photodegradation of salicylate and oxalate on goethite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krýsa, J.; Jirkovský, Jaromír; Bajt, O.; Mailhot, G.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 161, č. 1 (2011), s. 221-227 ISSN 0920-5861 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0577 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : goethite * oxalate * salicylate Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 3.407, year: 2011

  20. peroxo-oxalate preparation of doped barium titanate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Gijp, S.; Winnubst, Aloysius J.A.; Verweij, H.

    1999-01-01

    The peroxo-oxalate complexation method is a method that can be used for the preparation of doped barium titanate. In this paper we focus on BaTi0.91Zr0.09O3, which can be used for discharge capacitors in lamp starters. The preparation method described here is based on the complexation and subsequent

  1. Histochemical localization and probable functions of calcium oxalate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. Julian O. Osuji

    The most remarkable aspect of the histochemistry of this ergastic substance in the edible aroids is the high concentration of the raphide bundles around the root apical meristems. This suggests that the crystals of calcium oxalate serve a protective function in the root of these taxa. Their occurrence in starch granules imply.

  2. Metal oxalate complexes as novel inorganic dopants: Studies on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Doped polyaniline materials with metal oxalate complexes of Cr, Fe, Mn, Co and Al were synthesized by in situ chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline using potassium perdisulphate as oxidant in aqueous sulphuric acid medium. These polymer materials were characterized by chemical analyses, spectral studies ...

  3. Growth of strontium oxalate crystals in agar–agar gel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Crystal growth; strontium oxalate; X-ray spectroscopy; FT–IR. 1. Introduction. The growth of single crystals of various substances has gained considerable attention of several investigators. Sophisticated and strenuous equipments have been devel- oped and employed for growing a wide variety of crystals; either may be due ...

  4. A Review of Nitrate and Nitrite Toxicity in Foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir-Jamal Hosseini

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural advancement and population growth have prompted increases in food supplies, and higher crop yields have been made possible through the application of fertilizers. Large quantities of livestock and poultry on farms, along with the accumulation of biomass and agricultural residues, can cause contamination of ground water resources and other water sanitation concerns in both developing and developed countries. Nitrate is mainly used as a fertilizer in agriculture, and because of its high solubility in water, it can create biological problems in the environment. High usage of nitrite in the food industry as a preservative, flavor enhancer, antioxidant, and color stabilizing agent can cause human exposure to this toxic compound. Nitrite is 10 times as toxic as nitrate in humans. Nitrate is converted to nitrite and nitrosamine compounds in the human stomach, which can lead to bladder cancer. In this review, sources of nitrate and nitrite exposure were investigated. Furthermore, the review evaluates standard levels of nitrate and nitrite in different foods, and acceptable daily doses of these compounds in various countries. Finally, we discuss valid methods of nitrate and nitrite identification and removal in foods.

  5. Mutagenicity of some alkyl nitrites used as recreational drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunkel, V.C.; Cameron, T.P. (National Institute of Health, Bethesda (USA)); Rogers-Back, A.M.; Lawlor, T.E.; Harbell, J.W. (Microbiological Associates Inc., Rockville, MD (USA))

    1989-01-01

    When the AIDS epidemic was in its earliest stages, and prior to identification of HIV as the etiological factor, the use of volatile nitrites by the male homosexual community to enhance sexual activities appeared to have a significant role in this disease. Preliminary observations indicated that that portion of the male homosexual community which developed Kaposi's sarcoma were also heavy nitrite users. These nitrites had been demonstrated to be mutagenic in bacteria and thus it was postulated that they could be responsible for the appearance of the sarcoma. To evaluate further the genotoxic activity of these chemicals, six nitrites, including those most commonly used by homosexuals for sexual gratification, were selected for testing in the mouse lymphoma TK {plus minus} and Salmonell typhimurium mutagenicity assays. One chemical, n-amyl nitrite, was negative in the mouse lymphoma assay, while the other five chemicals, n-butyl, isobutyl, iso-amyl, sec-butyl, and n-propyl nitrite, were positive. All six compounds were positive in the Salmonella assay. The mutagenic and known toxic effects of these chemicals remain a concern because a large population of teenagers and young adults continue to abuse these substances.

  6. Nitrite therapy improves survival postexposure to chlorine gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honavar, Jaideep; Doran, Stephen; Oh, Joo-Yeun; Steele, Chad; Matalon, Sadis; Patel, Rakesh P

    2014-12-01

    Exposure to relatively high levels of chlorine (Cl₂) gas can occur in mass-casualty scenarios associated with accidental or intentional release. Recent studies have shown a significant postexposure injury phase to the airways, pulmonary, and systemic vasculatures mediated in part by oxidative stress, inflammation, and dysfunction in endogenous nitric oxide homeostasis pathways. However, there is a need for therapeutics that are amenable to rapid and easy administration in the field and that display efficacy toward toxicity after chlorine exposure. In this study, we tested whether nitric oxide repletion using nitrite, by intramuscular injection after Cl₂ exposure, could prevent Cl₂ gas toxicity. C57bl/6 male mice were exposed to 600 parts per million Cl₂ gas for 45 min, and 24-h survival was determined with or without postexposure intramuscular nitrite injection. A single injection of nitrite (10 mg/kg) administered either 30 or 60 min postexposure significantly improved 24-h survival (from ∼20% to 50%). Survival was associated with decreased neutrophil accumulation in the airways. Rendering mice neutropenic before Cl₂ exposure improved survival and resulted in loss of nitrite-dependent survival protection. Interestingly, female mice were more sensitive to Cl₂-induced toxicity compared with males and were also less responsive to postexposure nitrite therapy. These data provide evidence for efficacy and define therapeutic parameters for a single intramuscular injection of nitrite as a therapeutic after Cl₂ gas exposure that is amenable to administration in mass-casualty scenarios. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Calcium extraction from brine water and seawater using oxalic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natasha, Nadia Chrisayu; Lalasari, Latifa Hanum

    2017-01-01

    Calcium can be extracted not only from rocks but also from natural liquor such as seawater and brine water. In order to extract the calcium from seawater and brine water, oxalic acid was used in this research. Effect of variations of the volume of the oxalic acid at a constant concentration in seawater and brine water to produce calcium was investigated. The concentration of oxalic acid was 100 g/l and the variations of its volume were 2 ml, 4 ml, 6 ml, 8 ml, 10 ml, 20 ml, 30 ml, 40 ml, and 50 ml. The used seawater and brine water were firstly evaporated from 100 ml into 50 ml and then the oxalic acid was added into them with mixing to produce the calcium precipitates. The precipitates were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the filtrates were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The SEM analysis showed that the precipitates from brine water were consisted of only calcium compound while from seawater sodium one was also found along with calcium compound. The XRD analysis showed that the calcium was present in the form of calcium oxalate for both seawater and brine water. The ICP-OES analysis of the filtrate from seawater precipitation showed that the its calcium content was decreased from 826.20 ppm to 0.04 ppm while from brine water, it decreased from 170.06 ppm to 1.96 ppm. These results showed that both seawater and brine water have the potential to be a raw material for calcium production.

  8. Nitrate and nitrite content of human, formula, bovine, and soy milks: implications for dietary nitrite and nitrate recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hord, Norman G; Ghannam, Janine S; Garg, Harsha K; Berens, Pamela D; Bryan, Nathan S

    2011-12-01

    Estimation of nitrate and nitrite concentrations of milk sources may provide insight into potential health risks and benefits of these food sources for infants, children, and adults. The World Health Organization and American Academy of Pediatrics recommends exclusive consumption of human milk for the first 6 months of life. Human milk is known to confer significant nutritional and immunological benefits for the infant. Consumption of formula, cow's, and soy milk may be used as alternatives to human milk for infants. We sought to estimate potential exposure to nitrate and nitrite in human, formula, bovine, and soy milk to inform total dietary exposure estimates and recommendations. Using sensitive quantitative methodologies, nitrite and nitrate were analyzed in different samples of milk. Human milk concentrations of colostrum (expressed days 1-3 postpartum; n=12), transition milk (expressed days 3-7 postpartum; n=17), and mature milk (expressed >7 days postpartum; n=50) were 0.08 mg/100 mL nitrite and 0.19 mg/100 mL nitrate, 0.001 mg/100 mL nitrite and 0.52 mg/100 mL nitrate, and 0.001 mg/100 mL nitrite and 0.3 mg/100 mL nitrate, respectively, revealing that the absolute amounts of these anions change as the composition of milk changes. When expressed as a percentage of the World Health Organization's Acceptable Daily Intake limits, Silk® Soy Vanilla (WhiteWave Foods, Broomfield, CO) intake could result in high nitrate intakes (104% of this standard), while intake of Bright Beginnings Soy Pediatric® formula (PBM Nutritionals, Georgia, VT) could result in the highest nitrite intakes (383% of this standard). The temporal relationship between the provision of nitrite in human milk and the development of commensal microbiota capable of reducing dietary nitrate to nitrite supports a hypothesis that humans are adapted to provide nitrite to the gastrointestinal tract from birth. These data support the hypothesis that the high concentrations of

  9. Averrhoa carambola: A Renewable Source of Oxalic Acid for the Facile and Green Synthesis of Divalent Metal (Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, and Cu Oxalates and Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguimezong Nguefack Marius Borel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A green, simple, and environmentally benign synthetic approach has been utilised to obtain some bivalent metal oxalates from Averrhoa carambola juice extract, without any purification or special treatment of the juice. The main acid components (oxalic acid and ascorbic acid of the juice were identified by HPLC technique. The effect of temperature on the purity of the product has been investigated. The as-synthesized metal oxalates were thermally decomposed at low temperatures to their respective metal oxide nanoparticles. The metal oxalates and their respective thermal decomposition products were characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, and thermogravimetry.

  10. Intermediates detected by visible spectroscopy during the reaction of nitrite with deoxyhemoglobin: the effect of nitrite concentration and diphosphoglycerate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagababu, Enika; Ramasamy, Somasundaram; Rifkind, Joseph M

    2007-10-16

    The reaction of nitrite with deoxyhemoglobin (deoxyHb) results in the reduction of nitrite to NO, which binds unreacted deoxyHb forming Fe(II)-nitrosylhemoglobin (Hb(II)NO). The tight binding of NO to deoxyHb is, however, inconsistent with reports implicating this reaction with hypoxic vasodilation. This dilemma is resolved by the demonstration that metastable intermediates are formed in the course of the reaction of nitrite with deoxyHb. The level of intermediates is quantitated by the excess deoxyHb consumed over the concentrations of the final products formed. The dominant intermediate has a spectrum that does not correspond to that of Hb(III)NO formed when NO reacts with methemoglobin (MetHb), but is similar to metHb resulting in the spectroscopic determinations of elevated levels of metHb. It is a delocalized species involving the heme iron, the NO, and perhaps the beta-93 thiol. The putative role for red cell reacted nitrite on vasodilation is associated with reactions involving the intermediate. (1) The intermediate is less stable with a 10-fold excess of nitrite and is not detected with a 100-fold excess of nitrite. This observation is attributed to the reaction of nitrite with the intermediate producing N2O3. (2) The release of NO quantitated by the formation of Hb(II)NO is regulated by changes in the distal heme pocket as shown by the 4.5-fold decrease in the rate constant in the presence of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate. The regulated release of NO or N2O3 as well as the formation of the S-nitroso derivative of hemoglobin, which has also been reported to be formed from the intermediates generated during nitrite reduction, should be associated with any hypoxic vasodilation attributed to the RBC.

  11. Oxalate-Degrading Enzyme Recombined Lactic Acid Bacteria Strains Reduce Hyperoxaluria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chenming; Yang, Huan; Zhu, Xiaojing; Li, Yang; Wang, Ning; Han, Shanfu; Xu, Hua; Chen, Zhiqiang; Ye, Zhangqun

    2017-12-02

    To develop recombinant lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains that express oxalate-degrading enzymes through biotechnology-based approach for the treatment of hyperoxaluria by oral administration. The coding gene of oxalate decarboxylase (ODC) and oxalate oxidase (OxO) was transformed into Lactococcus lactis MG1363. The oxalate degradation ability in vitro was evaluated in media with high concentration of oxalate. Hyperoxaluria rat models through high oxalate diet were given recombinant LAB through oral administration. Twenty-four-hour urinary oxalate was measured, and kidney stone formation was investigated. LAB recombined with the coding gene of ODC could effectively decrease the amount of oxalate in the media and in the urine of rats. Moreover, the formation of calcium oxalate crystals in kidneys was also inhibited. The acid-induced promoter p170 significantly enhanced the reduction of hyperoxaluria. However, recombinant LAB expressing heterologous OxO showed less efficiency in oxalate degradation even in the presence of p170. LAB expressing ODC is more efficient in degradation of oxalate in vitro and in vivo than that expressing OxO. This present study provided novel recombinant probiotic strains as a potential treatment tool against oxalosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of Dry Red Grape Pomace as a Nitrite Substitute on the Microbiological and Physicochemical Properties and Residual Nitrite of Dry-cured Sausage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Riazi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite have been traditionally used for inhibition of Clostridium botulinum and also as an agent to stabilize the color of meat products; however, usage of these additives at high levels could lead to toxicity and cancer originating from the formation of nitrosamines. Nowadays, application of natural preservatives in order to reduce the nitrite content in meat products is increasing. Thus, we used dry red grape pomace (DRGP as a natural alternative to sodium nitrite. Materials and Methods: The effect of two levels of DRGP (1 and 2% on the proximate composition, microbial counts, pH values and residual nitrite level of the samples formulated with two levels of sodium nitrite (30 and 60 mg/kg, as well as the comparison of these sausages with the blank (nitrite-free  and control (full nitrite added samples on the 1rst, 10th, 20th and 30th days of storage at 3-5 °C were evaluated. Results: The results showed that all chemical compositions were in the ranges reported by other researchers, and nitrite was very effective in preventing the microbial growth. Also about 50 % of the ingoing nitrite could be analyzed in the samples after processing. Moreover, the residual nitrite level declined both during the storage of sausage and after the addition of DRGP. Conclusions: The use of DRGP in combination with nitrite for sausages was more effective in keeping the quality and safety of the refrigerated consumer products as indicated by the lower nitrite levels, microbial count and similar composition as compared to the samples treated with nitrite and without nitrite. Keywords: Dry red grape pomace (DRGP, Sausage, Nitrite, Microbial count

  13. Exploring surface characterization and electrostatic property of Hybrid Pennisetum during alkaline sulfite pretreatment for enhanced enzymatic hydrolysability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming; Wang, Jingfeng; Hou, Xincun; Wu, Juying; Fan, Xifeng; Jiang, Fan; Tao, Pan; Wang, Fan; Peng, Pai; Yang, Fangxia; Zhang, Junhua

    2017-11-01

    The surface characterization and electrostatic property of Hybrid Pennisetum (HP) after alkaline sulfite pretreatment were explored for enhanced enzymatic hydrolysability. The O/C ratio in HP increased from 0.34 to 0.60, and C1 concentration decreased from 62.5% to 31.6%, indicating that alkaline sulfite pretreatment caused poorer lignin but richer carbohydrate on HP surface. Zeta potential and sulfur element analysis indicated that more enzymes would preferably adsorb on the carbohydrate surface of alkaline sulfite pretreated HP because the lignin was sulfonated, which facilitated the decrease of non-productive adsorption. Glucose yield of alkaline sulfite pretreated HP reached to 100% by synergistic action of cellulase and xylanase in the hydrolysis, which was significantly higher than that of NaOH pretreated, and the concentration of glucose released was 1.52times higher. The results suggested that alkaline sulfite pretreatment had potential for improving the HP hydrolysability, and the surface characterization and electrostatic property facilitated the enzymatic digestibility. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Sulfite inhibits the F1F0-ATP synthase and activates the F1F0-ATPase of Paracoccus denitrificans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco-Moisés, Fermín; Minauro-Sanmiguel, Fernando; Bravo, Concepción; García, José J

    2002-08-01

    The F1F0 complex of Paracoccus denitrificans (PdF1F0) is the fastest ATP synthase but the slowest ATPase. Sulfite exerts maximal activation of the PdF1F0-ATPase (Pacheco-Moisés, F., García, J. J., Rodríguez-Zavala, J. S., and Moreno-Sánchez, R. (2000). Eur J. Biochem. 267, 993-1000) but its effect on the PdF1F0-ATP synthase activity remains unknown. Therefore, we studied the effect of sulfite on ATP synthesis and 32Pi ATP exchange reactions of inside-out membrane vesicles of P. denitrificans. Sulfite inhibited both reactions under conditions of maximal delta pH and normal sensitivity to dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. Sulfite increased by 10- and 5-fold the K0.5 for Mg2+-ADP and Pi during ATP synthesis, respectively, and by 4-fold the IC50 of Mg2+-ADP for inhibition of the PdF1F0-ATPase activity. Thus, sulfite exerts opposite effects on the forward and reverse functioning of the PdF1F0 complex. These effects are not due to membrane or PdF1F0 uncoupling. Kinetic and structural modifications that could account for these results are discussed.

  15. Calcium oxalate contribution to calcium cycling in forests of contrasting nutrient status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauer, Jenny M.; Perakis, Steven S.

    2014-01-01

    Calcium oxalate (Ca oxalate) is an insoluble biomineral that forms in plants and fungi, and occurs in soils across many types of ecosystems. Assessing how Ca oxalate may shape ecosystem Ca cycling requires information on the distribution of Ca oxalate among plant biomass, detritus, and mineral soil, and how it varies with ecosystem Ca status. We compared two Douglas-fir forests of contrasting ecosystem Ca availability, and found that Ca oxalate was partitioned similarly among plant biomass, detritus and mineral soil major ecosystem compartments at both sites, and total pools of Ca oxalate were greater in the high-Ca forest. However, the proportional importance of Ca oxalate was greater in the low-Ca than high-Ca forest (18% versus 4% of actively cycling ecosystem Ca, respectively). And calcium oxalate in mineral soil, which is of particular interest as a potential long-term Ca reservoir, was a larger portion of total available Ca (exchangeable Ca plus Ca oxalate Ca) in the low-Ca site than the high-Ca site (9% versus 1% of available soil Ca, respectively). Calcium oxalate was the dominant form of Ca returned from plants to soil as leaf litterfall at the high-Ca site, yet calcium oxalate disappeared rapidly from decomposing litter (0.28 yr−1 or faster) at both sites. We conclude that accumulation of Ca oxalate in forest ecosystems appears most closely related to overall Ca supply for live biomass pools, and that the accumulation of Ca oxalate in forest floor and mineral soil is limited by rapid microbial degradation of putatively unavailable Ca oxalate.

  16. Novel Inorganic Coordination Polymers Based on Cadmium Oxalates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, P. A.; Neeraj, S.; Vaidhyanathan, R.; Natarajan, Srinivasan

    2002-06-01

    Three new cadmium oxalate coordination polymers, I-III, with extended layered structures have been synthesized in the presence of imidazole. While I was prepared by the reaction between imidazolium oxalate and Cd, II and III were synthesized from their constituents using hydrothermal methods. [Cd(C2O4)(C3N2H4)]∞ (I): monoclinic, space group P21/c (no. 14), a=8.7093(1) Å, b=9.9477(3) Å, c=8.4352 Å, β=93.796(1)°, Z=4; [Cd(C2O4)2(C3N2H4)3(H2O)]∞ (II): monoclinic, space group P21/c (no. 14), a=7.8614(2) Å, b=14.9332(3) Å, c=15.9153(4) Å β=94.587(1)°, Z=4; [Cd(C2O4)2(C3N2H4)3(H2O)]∞ (III): monoclinic, space group P21/c (no. 14), a=11.844(2) Å, b=9.066(1) Å, c=18.583(2) Å, β=103.84(2)°, Z=4. While the structure of I is made from CdO5N distorted octahedra linked with oxalate, II and III are built-up from CdO6N, CdO5N2 distorted pentagonal bi-pyramids connected to oxalate units. The framework formulas of II and III are identical and their structures closely related. In all the cases, the networking between the Cd-O/N polyhedra and oxalates give rise to layered architectures with the amine molecules pointing in a direction perpendicular to the layers (in the inter-lamellar region). The difference in the linkages between the oxalates and the Cd atoms in I-III, produces unusual Cd-O-Cd one-dimensional chains, which have been observed for the first time.

  17. Using sulfite chemistry for robust bioconversion of Douglas-fir forest residue to bioethanol at high titer and lignosulfonate: A pilot-scale evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.Y. Zhu; M. Subhosh Chandra; Feng Gu; Roland Gleisner; J.Y. Zhu; John Sessions; Gevan Marrs; Johnway Gao; Dwight Anderson

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrated at the pilot-scale (50 kg) use of Douglas-fir forest harvest residue, an underutilized forest biomass, for the production of high titer and high yield bioethanol using sulfite chemistry without solid–liquor separation and detoxification. Sulfite Pretreatment to Overcome the Recalcitrance of Lignocelluloses (SPORL) was directly applied to the...

  18. Nitrogen cycling in the secondary nitrite maximum of the eastern tropical North Pacific off Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwald, Carolyn; Santoro, Alyson E.; Stanley, Rachel H. R.; Casciotti, Karen L.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrite is a central intermediate in the marine nitrogen cycle and represents a critical juncture where nitrogen can be reduced to the less bioavailable N2 gas or oxidized to nitrate and retained in a more bioavailable form. We present an analysis of rates of microbial nitrogen transformations in the oxygen deficient zone (ODZ) within the eastern tropical North Pacific Ocean (ETNP). We determined rates using a novel one-dimensional model using the distribution of nitrite and nitrate concentrations, along with their natural abundance nitrogen (N) and oxygen (O) isotope profiles. We predict rate profiles for nitrate reduction, nitrite reduction, and nitrite oxidation throughout the ODZ, as well as the contributions of anammox to nitrite reduction and nitrite oxidation. Nitrate reduction occurs at a maximum rate of 25 nM d-1 at the top of the ODZ, at the same depth as the maximum rate of nitrite reduction, 15 nM d-1. Nitrite oxidation occurs at maximum rates of 10 nM d-1 above the secondary nitrite maximum, but also in the secondary nitrite maximum, within the ODZ. Anammox contributes to nitrite oxidation within the ODZ but cannot account for all of it. Nitrite oxidation within the ODZ that is not through anammox is also supported by microbial gene abundance profiles. Our results suggest the presence of nitrite oxidation within the ETNP ODZ, with implications for the distribution and physiology of marine nitrite-oxidizing bacteria, and for total nitrogen loss in the largest marine ODZ.

  19. Sulfur globule oxidation in green sulfur bacteria is dependent on the dissimilatory sulfite reductase system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holkenbrink, Carina; Ocón Barbas, Santiago; Mellerup, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Green sulfur bacteria oxidize sulfide and thiosulfate to sulfate with extracellular globules of elemental sulfur as intermediate. Here we investigated which genes are involved in the formation and consumption of these sulfur globules in the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum. We show...... that sulfur globule oxidation is strictly dependent on the dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DSR) system. Deletion of dsrM/CT2244 or dsrT/CT2245 or the two dsrCABL clusters (CT0851-CT0854, CT2247-2250) abolished sulfur globule oxidation and prevented formation of sulfate from sulfide, whereas deletion of dsr...

  20. Nitrite as regulator of hypoxic signaling in mammalian physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Faassen, Ernst E.; Bahrami, Soheyl; Feelisch, Martin; Hogg, Neil; Kelm, Malte; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.; Kozlov, Andrey V.; Li, Haitao; Lundberg, Jon O.; Mason, Ron; Nohl, Hans; Rassaf, Tienush; Samouilov, Alexandre; Slama-Schwok, Anny; Shiva, Sruti; Vanin, Anatoly F.; Weitzberg, Eddie; Zweier, Jay; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2009-01-01

    In this review we consider the physiological effects of endogenous and pharmacological levels of nitrite under conditions of hypoxia. In humans, the nitrite anion has long been considered as metastable intermediate in the oxidation of nitric oxide radicals to the stable metabolite nitrate. This oxidation cascade was thought to be irreversible under physiological conditions. However, a growing body of experimental observations attests that the presence of endogenous nitrite regulates a number of signaling events along the physiological and pathophysiological oxygen gradient. Hypoxic signaling events include vasodilation, modulation of mitochondrial respiration, and cytoprotection following ischemic insult. These phenomena are attributed to the reduction of nitrite anions to nitric oxide if local oxygen levels in tissues decrease. Recent research identified a growing list of enzymatic and non-enzymatic pathways for this endogenous reduction of nitrite. Additional direct signaling events not involving free nitric oxide are proposed. We here discuss the mechanisms and properties of these various pathways and the role played by the local concentration of free oxygen in the affected tissue. PMID:19219851

  1. Nitrite therapy prevents chlorine gas toxicity in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honavar, Jaideep; Doran, Stephen; Ricart, Karina; Matalon, Sadis; Patel, Rakesh P

    2017-04-05

    Chlorine (Cl 2 ) gas exposure and toxicity remains a concern in military and industrial sectors. While post-Cl 2 exposure damage to the lungs and other tissues has been documented and major underlying mechanisms elucidated, no targeted therapeutics that are effective when administered post-exposure, and which are amenable to mass-casualty scenarios have been developed. Our recent studies show nitrite administered by intramuscular (IM) injection post-Cl 2 exposure is effective in preventing acute lung injury and improving survival in rodent models. Our goal in this study was to develop a rabbit model of Cl 2 toxicity and test whether nitrite affords protection in a non-rodent model. Exposure of New Zealand White rabbits to Cl 2 gas (600ppm, 45min) caused significant increases in protein and neutrophil accumulation in the airways and ∼35% mortality over 18h. Nitrite administered 30min post Cl 2 exposure by a single IM injection, at 1mg/kg or 10mg/kg, prevented indices of acute lung injury at 6h by up to 50%. Moreover, all rabbits that received nitrite survived over the study period. These data provide further rationale for developing nitrite as post-exposure therapeutic to mitigate against Cl 2 gas exposure injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Relation between nitrate and nitrite food habits with lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimzadeh, Laleh; Koohdani, Fariba; Siassi, Fereydoon; Mahmoudi, Mahmoud; Moslemi, Daryoush; Safari, Farid

    2012-01-01

    Nitrites, a probable human carcinogen, generate reactive nitrogen species that may cause damage to the lung. We evaluated the association between nutritional habits related to nitrite and nitrate intake and risk of lung cancer in Mazandaran, Northern Province of Iran. In this case-control study the two groups were matched for gender and age (+/- 5 years). A semi -quantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) was used to collect dietary data about nutritional habits related to nitrate, nitrite, vitamins E and C intake, from 40 lung cancer cases and 40 control subjects admitted at Mazanaran hospitals. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the risk of lung cancer using logistic regression. Mean score of nutritional habits in case group was significantly lower than that in control group (P less than or equal 0.001). We observed a positive association between animal sources of nitrate and nitrite intake (OR = 2.7, 95% CI: 0.13-0.96) and risk of lung cancer. Decreased risk of lung cancer was also observed with fruit intake (OR = 0.26, 95% CI: 1.3-11). Our results indicate a probable association between nutritional habits related to animal sources of nitrate and nitrite intake and the risk of lung cancer that requires to be confirmed by other studies.

  3. An electrochemical approach: Switching Structures of rare earth metal Praseodymium hexacyanoferrate and its application to sulfite sensor in Red Wine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devadas, Balamurugan; Sivakumar, Mani; Chen, Shen Ming; Cheemalapati, Srikanth

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Nucleation and growth of PrHCF and its application to sulfite oxidation in wine samples. - Highlights: • Electrochemical synthesis of PrHCF. • Switching structures of PrHCF. • Sulfite electrochemical sensor. • Wide linear range and low limit of detection. • Real sample application. - Abstract: Herein, we report a shape-controlled preparation of Praseodymium hexacyanoferrate (PrHCF) using a simple electrochemical technique. The electrochemically fabricated PrHCF modified glassy carbon electrodes (GCE) shows an excellent electrocatalytic activity towards sulfite oxidation. The morphology of PrHCF particles were controlled by carefully changing various synthesis conditions including electrochemical technique (cyclic voltammetry, amperometry and chemical), cations in the supporting electrolyte (K + , Na + , Li + and H + ), deposition cycles, molar ratio of precursors, and applied potential (-.2,0 and 0.2 V). The morphologies of the PrHCF was elucidated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The as-synthesized PrHCF was characterized using X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD), Infra-red (IR) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The electrochemical oxidation of sulfite on PrHCF modified GCE was investigated using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and linear sweep voltammetry (LSV). The sensitivity of the as-developed sulfite sensor was determined to be 0.036 μA μM −1 cm −2 . The low limit of detection was determined to be 2.15 μM. The real time application of PrHCF modified GCE was confirmed through the determination of sulfite from red wine and tap water samples

  4. The metabolic and ecological interactions of oxalate-degrading bacteria in the Mammalian gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Aaron W; Dearing, Denise

    2013-12-06

    Oxalate-degrading bacteria comprise a functional group of microorganisms, commonly found in the gastrointestinal tract of mammals. Oxalate is a plant secondary compound (PSC) widely produced by all major taxa of plants and as a terminal metabolite by the mammalian liver. As a toxin, oxalate can have a significant impact on the health of mammals, including humans. Mammals do not have the enzymes required to metabolize oxalate and rely on their gut microbiota for this function. Thus, significant metabolic interactions between the mammalian host and a complex gut microbiota maintain the balance of oxalate in the body. Over a dozen species of gut bacteria are now known to degrade oxalate. This review focuses on the host-microbe and microbe-microbe interactions that regulate the degradation of oxalate by the gut microbiota. We discuss the pathways of oxalate throughout the body and the mammalian gut as a series of differentiated ecosystems that facilitate oxalate degradation. We also explore the mechanisms and functions of microbial oxalate degradation along with the implications for the ecological and evolutionary interactions within the microbiota and for mammalian hosts. Throughout, we consider questions that remain, as well as recent technological advances that can be employed to answer them.

  5. Oxalate-Degrading Capacities of Gastrointestinal Lactic Acid Bacteria and Urinary Tract Stone Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Kargar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Calcium oxalate is one the most significant causes of human kidney stones. Increasing oxalate uptake results in increased urinary oxalate. Elevated urinary oxalate is one the most important causes of kidney stone formation. This study aims to evaluate oxalate-degrading capacity of lactic acid bacteria and its impact on incidence of kidney stone.Materials and Methods: This case-control study was conducted on serum, urinary, and fecal samples. The research population included a total of 200 subjects divided in two equal groups. They were selected from the patients with urinary tract stones, visiting urologist, and also normal people. The level of calcium, oxalate, and citrate in the urinary samples, parathyroid and calcium in the serum samples, and degrading activity of fecal lactobacillus strains of all the subjects were evaluated. Then, data analysis was carried out using SPSS-11.5, χ2 test, Fisher’s exact test, and analysis of variance. Results: The results revealed that the patients had higher urinary level of oxalate and calcium, as well as higher serum level of parathyroid hormone than normal people. In contrast, urinary level of citrate was higher in normal people. In addition, there was a significant difference between the oxalate-degrading capacities of lactobacillus isolated from the patients and their normal peers.Conclusion: Reduction of digestive lactobacillus-related oxalate-degrading capacity and increased serum level of parathyroid hormone can cause elevated urinary level of oxalate and calcium in people with kidney stone.

  6. Assessment of in vitro oxalate degradation by Lactobacillus species cultured from veterinary probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jenny G; Gebhart, Connie J; Furrow, Eva; Lulich, Jody P

    2015-09-01

    To culture Lactobacillus spp from veterinary probiotics and measure their in vitro oxalate-degrading capacity. 2 commercial veterinary probiotics containing Lactobacillus spp. Lactobacillus spp were cultured anaerobically on selective deMan, Rogosa, Sharpe agar medium and subcultured for speciation by 16S rDNA gene sequencing. Isolates were inoculated into broth containing sodium oxalate (5 mg/L) and incubated anaerobically for 72 hours. An oxalate-degrading isolate of Lactobacillus acidophilus (American Type Culture Collection [ATCC] 53544) was the positive control sample; sterile broth containing a known quantity of sodium oxalate was the negative control sample. Oxalate concentrations were detected with ion chromatography. Oxalate degradation was assessed with Dunnett tests to detect differences in mean oxalate concentration for each isolate, compared with results for the negative control. Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus plantarum, and Lactobacillus casei or Lactobacillus zeae (too closely related to differentiate) were isolated from probiotic 1, and L plantarum was isolated from probiotic 2. Sequencing of the 16S rDNA gene confirmed 100% homology to type species. Lactobacillus acidophilus (ATCC 53544) and L acidophilus from probiotic 1 significantly decreased oxalate concentrations by 85.3 and 161.9 mg/L, respectively. Lactobacillus plantarum from probiotics 1 and 2 significantly increased oxalate concentrations by 56.1 and 36.1 mg/L, respectively. Lactobacillus casei did not alter oxalate concentrations. Lactobacillus acidophilus isolates significantly reduced oxalate concentrations. In vivo studies are needed to determine whether probiotics containing L acidophilus decrease urine oxalate concentrations and reduce risk of urolith recurrence in dogs with a history of calcium oxalate urolithiasis.

  7. The crystal structure of urea oxalic acid (2:1)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harkema, Sybolt; Bats, J.W.; Weyenberg, A.M.; Feil, D.

    1972-01-01

    The crystal structure of urea oxalic acid, 2[CO(NH2)2].(COOH)2 has been determined using three-dimensional X-ray data, collected on an automatic diffractometer. The space group is P21/c. The lattice constants are: a = 5.058 (3), b = 12.400 (3), c = 6.964 (2) A, fl= 98"13 (7) °. The number of

  8. Radiochemical separation of rare earths by retention on lanthanum oxalate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csajka, M.

    1975-01-01

    Investigations have been made on the applicability of lanthanum oxalate for the practically total retention of rare earth activities using radiochemical group separation. The variation of the retention was studied by increasing the concentration of the investigated rare earth ions in the solution. The effect of the presence of another than the retained rare earth activity in the solution was determined. Finally, the retention of scandium under the same conditions as those used for the rare earths was investigated. (T.G.)

  9. Hafnium(IV) complexation with oxalate at variable temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friend, Mitchell T.; Wall, Nathalie A. [Washington State Univ., Pullmanm, WA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2017-08-01

    Appropriate management of fission products in the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is crucial in developing advanced reprocessing schemes. The addition of aqueous phase complexing agents can prevent the co-extraction of these fission products. A solvent extraction technique was used to study the complexation of Hf(IV) - an analog to fission product Zr(IV) - with oxalate at 15, 25, and 35 C in 1 M HClO{sub 4} utilizing a {sup 175+181}Hf radiotracer. The mechanism of the solvent extraction system of 10{sup -5} M Hf(IV) in 1 M HClO{sub 4} to thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) in toluene demonstrated a 4{sup th}-power dependence in both TTA and H{sup +}, with Hf(TTA){sub 4} the only extractable species. The equilibrium constant for the extraction of Hf(TTA){sub 4} was determined to be log K{sub ex}=7.67±0.07 (25±1 C, 1 M HClO{sub 4}). The addition of oxalate to the aqueous phase decreased the distribution ratio, indicating aqueous Hf(IV)-oxalate complex formation. Polynomial fits to the distribution data identified the formation of Hf(ox){sup 2+} and Hf(ox){sub 2(aq)} and their stability constants were measured at 15, 25, and 35 C in 1 M HClO{sub 4}. van't Hoff analysis was used to calculate Δ{sub r}G, Δ{sub r}H, and Δ{sub r}S for these species. Stability constants were observed to increase at higher temperature, an indication that Hf(IV)-oxalate complexation is endothermic and driven by entropy.

  10. Binding abilities of copper to phospholipids and transport of oxalate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jaklová Dytrtová, Jana; Jakl, M.; Nováková, Kateřina; Navrátil, Tomáš; Šádek, Vojtěch

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 146, č. 5 (2015), s. 831-837 ISSN 0026-9247 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP13-21409P; GA ČR(CZ) GAP208/12/1645 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : copper cations * dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (lecithin) * ESI-MS * impedance spectroscopy * oxalic acid * voltammetry * membrane Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.131, year: 2015

  11. Equilibrium studies of oxalate and aluminum containing solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hay, M. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); King, W. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Peters, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jones, D. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-11-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked to develop data on the solubility and conditions leading to precipitation of sodium oxalate, sodium nitrate, Bayerite (a polymorph of gibbsite, Al(OH)3), and sodium aluminosilicate solids recently found in the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). The data generated will be used to improve the OLI Systems thermodynamic database for these compounds allowing better prediction of solids formation by the modeling software in the future.

  12. Impact of Clean-Label Antimicrobials and Nitrite Derived from Natural Sources on the Outgrowth of Clostridium perfringens during Cooling of Deli-Style Turkey Breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Amanda M; Glass, Kathleen A; Milkowski, Andrew L; Sindelar, Jeffrey J

    2015-05-01

    Organic acids and sodium nitrite have long been shown to provide antimicrobial activity during chilling of cured meat products. However, neither purified organic acids nor NaNO2 is permitted in products labeled natural and both are generally avoided in clean-label formulations; efficacy of their replacement is not well understood. Natural and clean-label antimicrobial alternatives were evaluated in both uncured and in alternative cured (a process that uses natural sources of nitrite) deli-style turkey breast to determine inhibition of Clostridium perfringens outgrowth during 15 h of chilling. Ten treatments of ground turkey breast (76% moisture, 1.2% salt) included a control and four antimicrobials: 1.0% tropical fruit extract, 0.7% dried vinegar, 1.0% cultured sugar-vinegar blend, and 2.0% lemon-vinegar blend. Each treatment was formulated without (uncured) and with nitrite (PCN; 50 ppm of NaNO2 from cultured celery juice powder). Treatments were inoculated with C. perfringens spores (three-strain mixture) to yield 2.5 log CFU/g. Individual 50-g portions were vacuum packaged, cooked to 71.1°C, and chilled from 54.4 to 26.7°C in 5 h and from 26.7 to 7.2°C in an additional 10 h. Triplicate samples were assayed for growth of C. perfringens at predetermined intervals by plating on tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine agar. Uncured control and PCN-only treatments allowed for 4.6- and 4.2-log increases at 15 h, respectively, and although all antimicrobial treatments allowed less outgrowth than uncured and PCN, the degree of inhibition varied. The 1.0% fruit extract and 1.0% cultured sugar-vinegar blend were effective at controlling populations at or below initial levels, whether or not PCN was included. Without PCN, 0.7% dried vinegar and 2.0% lemon-vinegar blend allowed for 2.0- and 2.5-log increases, respectively, and ∼1.5-log increases with PCN. Results suggest using clean-label antimicrobials can provide for safe cooling following the study parameters, and greater

  13. Liquid waste processing from plutonium (III) oxalate precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteban, A.; Cassaniti, P.; Orosco, E.H.

    1990-01-01

    Plutonium (III) oxalate filtrates contain about 0.2M oxalic acid, 0.09M ascorbic acid, 0.05M hydrazine, 1M nitric acid and 20-100 mg/l of plutonium. The developed treatment of liquid wastes consist in two main steps: a) Distillation to reduce up to 10% of the initial volume and refluxing to destroy organic material. Then, the treated solution is suitable to adjust the plutonium at the tetravalent state by addition of hydrogen peroxide and the nitric molarity up to 8.6M. b) Recovery and purification of plutonium by anion exchange using two columns in series containing Dowex 1-X4 resin. With the proposed process, it is possible to transform 38 litres of filtrates with 40mg/l of Pu into 0.1 l of purified solution with 15-20g/l of Pu. This solution is suitable to be recycled in the Pu (III) oxalate precipitation process. This process has several potential advantages over similar liquid waste treatments. These include: 1) It does not increase the liquid volume. 2) It consumes only few reagents. 3) The operations involved are simple, requiring limited handling and they are feasible to automatization. 4) The Pu recovery factor is about 99%. (Author) [es

  14. Diversity in protein profiles of individual calcium oxalate kidney stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Nobuaki; Tsujihata, Masao; Momohara, Chikahiro; Yoshioka, Iwao; Suto, Kouzou; Nonomura, Norio; Okuyama, Akihiko; Takao, Toshifumi

    2013-01-01

    Calcium oxalate kidney stones contain low amounts of proteins, some of which have been implicated in progression or prevention of kidney stone formation. To gain insights into the pathophysiology of urolithiasis, we have characterized protein components of calcium oxalate kidney stones by proteomic approaches. Proteins extracted from kidney stones showed highly heterogeneous migration patterns in gel electrophoresis as reported. This was likely to be mainly due to proteolytic degradation and protein-protein crosslinking of Tamm-Horsfall protein and prothrombin. Protein profiles of calcium oxalate kidney stones were obtained by in-solution protease digestion followed by nanoLC-MALDI-tandem mass spectrometry, which resulted in identification of a total of 92 proteins in stones from 9 urolithiasis patients. Further analysis showed that protein species and their relative amounts were highly variable among individual stones. Although proteins such as prothrombin, osteopontin, calgranulin A and calgranulin B were found in most stones tested, some samples had high contents of prothrombin and osteopontin, while others had high contents of calgranulins. In addition, calgranulin-rich stones had various neutrophil-enriched proteins such as myeloperoxidase and lactotransferrin. These proteomic profiles of individual kidney stones suggest that multiple systems composed of different groups of proteins including leucocyte-derived ones are differently involved in pathogenesis of individual kidney stones depending on situations.

  15. Adsorption characteristics of amino acids on to calcium oxalate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Junbin; Lin, Rihui; Long, Han; Liang, Yuwei; Chen, Yangyang

    2015-09-15

    Adsorption of amino acids on to calcium oxalate found in urinary calculus has been studied and the adsorption characteristics were analyzed. Pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion models were used to fit the kinetics data. The pseudo-second-order model best described the dynamic behavior of the adsorption process. The uptake of glutamic acid and aspartic acid were found to decrease as solution pH increasing from 4 to 8. The experimental data obtained at different pH conditions were analyzed and fitted by Langmuir, Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson, Temkin and Sips isotherm models using linear and nonlinear regression analysis. Error analysis (correlation coefficient, residual root mean square error and chi-square test) showed that the Langmuir I isotherm model and the non-linear form of Sips isotherm model should be primarily adopted for fitting the equilibrium data. The maximum adsorption capacity of glutamic acid and aspartic acid onto calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals are 0.059 and 0.066μmol/g at pH 4, respectively. These studies have the vital significance for research aimed at exploring the role of urinary amino acids effect the formation process of calcium oxalate crystals found in urinary calculus and for potential application in the design of synthetic peptides used for urinary calculi therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Primary Nonfunction of Renal Allograft Secondary to Acute Oxalate Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Parasuraman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary nonfunction (PNF accounts for 0.6 to 8% of renal allograft failure, and the focus on causes of PNF has changed from rejection to other causes. Calcium oxalate (CaOx deposition is common in early allograft biopsies, and it contributes in moderate intensity to higher incidence of acute tubular necrosis and poor graft survival. A-49-year old male with ESRD secondary to polycystic kidney disease underwent extended criteria donor kidney transplantation. Posttransplant, patient developed delayed graft function (DGF, and the biopsy showed moderately intense CaOx deposition that persisted on subsequent biopsies for 16 weeks, eventually resulting in PNF. The serum oxalate level was 3 times more than normal at 85 μmol/L (normal <27 μmol/L. Allograft nephrectomy showed massive aggregates of CaOx crystal deposition in renal collecting system. In conclusion, acute oxalate nephropathy should be considered in the differential diagnosis of DGF since optimal management could change the outcome of the allograft.

  17. Recent structural insights into the function of copper nitrite reductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horrell, Sam; Kekilli, Demet; Strange, Richard W; Hough, Michael A

    2017-11-15

    Copper nitrite reductases (CuNiR) carry out the first committed step of the denitrification pathway of the global nitrogen cycle, the reduction of nitrite (NO 2 - ) to nitric oxide (NO). As such, they are of major agronomic and environmental importance. CuNiRs occur primarily in denitrifying soil bacteria which carry out the overall reduction of nitrate to dinitrogen. In this article, we review the insights gained into copper nitrite reductase (CuNiR) function from three dimensional structures. We particularly focus on developments over the last decade, including insights from serial femtosecond crystallography using X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) and from the recently discovered 3-domain CuNiRs.

  18. Comparison of the relative propensities of isoamyl nitrite and sodium nitrite to ameliorate acute cyanide poisoning in mice and a novel antidotal effect arising from anesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambal, Leah K; Weitz, Andrew C; Li, Hui-Hua; Zhang, Yang; Zheng, Xi; Pearce, Linda L; Peterson, Jim

    2013-05-20

    Isoamyl nitrite has previously been considered acceptable as an inhaled cyanide antidote; therefore, the antidotal utility of this organic nitrite compared with sodium nitrite was investigated. To facilitate a quantitative comparison, doses of both sodium nitrite and isoamyl nitrite were given intraperitoneally in equimolar amounts to sublethally cyanide-challenged mice. Righting recovery from the knockdown state was clearly compromised in the isoamyl nitrite-treated animals, the effect being attributable to the toxicity of the isoamyl alchol produced during hydrolysis of the isoamyl nitrite to release nitrite anion. Subsequently, inhaled aqueous sodium nitrite aerosol was demonstrated to ameliorate sublethal cyanide toxicity, when provided to mice after the toxic dose, by the more rapid recovery of righting ability compared to that of the control animals given only the toxicant. Aerosolized sodium nitrite has thus been shown by these experiments to have promise as a better alternative to organic nitrites for development as an inhaled cyanide antidote. The inhaled sodium nitrite led to the production of NO in the bloodstream as determined by the appearance of EPR signals attributable to nitrosylhemoglobin and methemoglobin. The aerosol delivery was performed in an unmetered inhalation chamber, and in this study, no attempt was made to optimize the procedure. It is argued that administration of an effective inhaled aqueous sodium nitrite dose in humans is possible, though just beyond the capability of current individual metered-dose inhaler designs, such as those used for asthma. Finally, working at slightly greater than LD50 NaCN doses, it was fortuitously discovered that (i) anesthesia leads to significantly prolonged survival compared to that of unanesthetized animals and that (ii) the antidotal activity of nitrite anion was completely abolished under anesthesia. Plausible explanations for these effects in mice and their practical consequences in relation to

  19. Investigating the potential of thermophilic species for ethanol production from industrial spent sulfite liquor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Weissgram

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Thermophilic microorganisms hold a great potential for bioethanol production on waste biomass, due to their ability to utilize pentoses and hexoses alike. However, to date hardly any data on thermophiles growing directly on industrial substrates like spent sulfite liquor (SSL are available. This contribution investigates the ability of Thermoanaerobacter species to utilize the main sugars in the used SSL (mannose, glucose and xylose and the effect of process parameters (pH, temperature and sugar concentration on their growth. Based on these results the strain T. mathranii was chosen for further studies. The ability of T. mathranii to grow directly on SSL was investigated and the effect of several inhibiting substances on growth was elucidated. Furthermore it was tested whether pretreatment with activated charcoal can increase the fermentability of SSL. The fermentations were evaluated based on yields and specific rates. It could be shown that T. mathranii was able to ferment all sugars in the investigated softwood SSL and fermented diluted, untreated SSL (up to 2.7% (w/w dry matter. Pretreatment with activated charcoal could slightly reduce the amount of phenols in the substrate and thus facilitate growth and ethanol production on higher SSL concentrations (up to 4.7% (w/v dry matter. Ethanol yields of 0.29-0.44 Cmmol of ethanol per Cmmol sugar were obtained on untreated and pretreated spent sulfite liquor, respectively. These results on an industrial substrate strengthen the claim that thermophilic microorganisms might be the optimal candidates for forest biorefinery.

  20. Redox states of Desulfovibrio vulgaris DsrC, a key protein in dissimilatory sulfite reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venceslau, Sofia S. [Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica António Xavier, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras (Portugal); Cort, John R.; Baker, Erin S. [Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Chu, Rosalie K.; Robinson, Errol W. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Dahl, Christiane [Institut für Mikrobiologie and Biotechnologie, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn, Meckenheimer Allee 168, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Saraiva, Lígia M. [Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica António Xavier, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras (Portugal); Pereira, Inês A.C., E-mail: ipereira@itqb.unl.pt [Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica António Xavier, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras (Portugal)

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •DsrC is known to interact with the dissimilatory sulfite reductase enzyme (DsrAB). •We show that, however, most cellular DsrC is not associated with DsrAB. •A gel-shift assay was developed that allows monitoring of the DsrC redox state. •The DsrC intramolecularly oxidized state could only be produced by arginine treatment. -- Abstract: Dissimilatory reduction of sulfite is carried out by the siroheme enzyme DsrAB, with the involvement of the protein DsrC, which has two conserved redox-active cysteines. DsrC was initially believed to be a third subunit of DsrAB. Here, we report a study of the distribution of DsrC in cell extracts to show that, in the model sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio vulgaris, the majority of DsrC is not associated with DsrAB and is thus free to interact with other proteins. In addition, we developed a cysteine-labelling gel-shift assay to monitor the DsrC redox state and behaviour, and procedures to produce the different redox forms. The oxidized state of DsrC with an intramolecular disulfide bond, which is proposed to be a key metabolic intermediate, could be successfully produced for the first time by treatment with arginine.

  1. Nebulization of the acidified sodium nitrite formulation attenuates acute hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surber Mark W

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Generalized hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV occurring during exposure to hypoxia is a detrimental process resulting in an increase in lung vascular resistance. Nebulization of sodium nitrite has been shown to inhibit HPV. The aim of this project was to investigate and compare the effects of nebulization of nitrite and different formulations of acidified sodium nitrite on acute HPV. Methods Ex vivo isolated rabbit lungs perfused with erythrocytes in Krebs-Henseleit buffer (adjusted to 10% hematocrit and in vivo anesthetized catheterized rabbits were challenged with periods of hypoxic ventilation alternating with periods of normoxic ventilation. After baseline hypoxic challenges, vehicle, sodium nitrite or acidified sodium nitrite was delivered via nebulization. In the ex vivo model, pulmonary arterial pressure and nitric oxide concentrations in exhaled gas were monitored. Nitrite and nitrite/nitrate were measured in samples of perfusion buffer. Pulmonary arterial pressure, systemic arterial pressure, cardiac output and blood gases were monitored in the in vivo model. Results In the ex vivo model, nitrite nebulization attenuated HPV and increased nitric oxide concentrations in exhaled gas and nitrite concentrations in the perfusate. The acidified forms of sodium nitrite induced higher levels of nitric oxide in exhaled gas and had longer vasodilating effects compared to nitrite alone. All nitrite formulations increased concentrations of circulating nitrite to the same degree. In the in vivo model, inhaled nitrite inhibited HPV, while pulmonary arterial pressure, cardiac output and blood gases were not affected. All nitrite formulations had similar potency to inhibit HPV. The tested concentration of appeared tolerable. Conclusion Nitrite alone and in acidified forms effectively and similarly attenuates HPV. However, acidified nitrite formulations induce a more pronounced increase in nitric oxide exhalation.

  2. Nitrite Contents in Fresh Vegetables of Different Families and Genus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yuqian; Li, Xiao; Xu, Lingyi; Pang, Meixia; Qi, Jinghua; Wang, Fang

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study is firstly aimed at investigating the contents of nitrite in common consumed vegetables according to families and genus classification. The vegetables were randomly collected and analyzed in quartile sampling according to GB5009.30-2016. The vegetables were analyzed by the software of Spss20.0 and statistically significant Duncan multiple comparisons. The data indicates that the nitrite contents in different families and different genus vegetables in same family were significant (Pcorn kernels (0.7119mg/kg dry weight), Lotus root (0.592mg/kg dry weight).

  3. Acute oxalate poisoning attributable to ingestion of curly dock (Rumex crispus) in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panciera, R J; Martin, T; Burrows, G E; Taylor, D S; Rice, L E

    1990-06-15

    Ten of 100 mature ewes were afflicted with acute oxalate toxicosis within 40 hours after being temporarily penned in a lot that contained considerable growing Rumex crispus (curly dock). Clinical signs of toxicosis included excess salivation, tremors, ataxia, and recumbency. Affected ewes were markedly hypocalcemic and azotemic. Oxalate crystals were not observed in urine. Gross postmortem lesions were minimal and nondiagnostic in 2 ewes that died peracutely, but perirenal edema and renal tubular degeneration were clearly observable in ewes euthanatized on the third day of toxicosis. Diagnosis of oxalate toxicosis was confirmed by histopathologic findings. Samples of Rumex spp contained 6.6 to 11.1% oxalic acid on a dry-weight basis, a concentration comparable with that in other oxalate-containing plants that have caused acute oxalate toxicosis.

  4. Evidence for a cytoplasmic pathway of oxalate biosynthesis in Aspergillus niger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubicek, C.P.; Schreferl-Kunar, G.; Woehrer, W.; Roehr, M.

    1988-03-01

    Oxalate accumulation of up to 8 g/liter was induced in Aspergillus niger by shifting the pH from 6 to 8. This required the presence of P/sub i/ and a nitrogen source and was inhibited by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. Exogenously added /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ was not incorporated into oxalate, but was incorporated into acetate and malate, thus indicating the biosynthesis of oxalate by hydrolytic cleavage of oxaloacetate. Inhibition of mitochondrial citrate metabolism by fluorocitrate did not significantly decrease the oxalate yield. The putative enzyme that was responsible for this oxaloacetate hydrolase (EC 3.7.1.1), which was induced de novo during the pH shift. Subcellular fractionation of oxalic acid-forming mycelia of A. niger showed that this enzyme is located in the cytoplasm of A. niger. The results are consistent with a cytoplasmic pathway of oxalate formation which does not involve the tricarboxylic acid cycle.

  5. A Novel Method for Fabricating Double Layers Porous Anodic Alumina in Phosphoric/Oxalic Acid Solution and Oxalic Acid Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanfang Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel method for fabricating ordered double layers porous anodic alumina (DL-PAA with controllable nanopore size was presented. Highly ordered large pore layer with interpore distance of 480 nm was fabricated in phosphoric acid solution with oxalic acid addition at the potential of 195 V and the small pore layer was fabricated in oxalic acid solution at the potential from 60 to 100 V. Experimental results show that the thickness of large pore layer is linearly correlative with anodizing time, and pore diameter is linearly correlative with pore widening time. When the anodizing potential in oxalic acid solution was adjusted from 60 to 100 V, the small pore layers with continuously tunable interpore distance from 142 to 241 nm and pore density from 1.94×109 to 4.89×109 cm−2 were obtained. And the interpore distance and the pore density of small pore layers are closely correlative with the anodizing potential. The fabricated DL-PAA templates can be widely utilized for fabrication of ordered nanomaterials, such as superhydrophobic or gecko-inspired adhesive materials and metal or semiconductor nanowires.

  6. Availability of calcium from chemically pure potassium oxalate to the buffalo (Bubalus bubalis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Sudarshan; Sareen, V.K.; Marwah, S.R.; Sharma, K.C.; Bhatia, I.S.

    1978-01-01

    Three experiments were conducted to determine the true dige'stibility of calcium in the buffalo calves fed chemically pure potassium oxalate. In each experiments 6 calves were divided into two groups, viz. control and oxalate-fed. The control group was given basal ration consisting of wheat straw, mustard-cake and maize grains. The oxalate-fed group was fed the basal ration supplemented with 60, 100 and 140 g potassium oxalate per day in experiments 1,2, and 3 respectively. The percent true digestibility of calcium was 51.7 and 52.5 in experiment 1, 60.5 and 44.1 in experiment 2, and 59.3 and 44.1 in experiment 3 in the control and oxalate-fed groups respectively. In all the experiments the oxalate was completely broken down in the rumen. The volume of water intake and urine excretion was more in the oxalate-fed groups. The daily alkali output in the urine in terms of N-acid was 0.7 and 1.3 in experiment 1, 1.5 and 2.5 in experiment 2, and 2.1 and 3.8 in experiment 3 in control and oxalate-fed groups respectively. The daily bicarbonate concentration in the urine (in g) was 26.5 and 53.4 in experiment 1, 83.2 and 146.2 in experiment 2, and 132.6 and 222.8 in experiment 3 in control and oxalate-fed groups respectively. Likewise the excretion of oxalate in the urine was more in oxalate-fed groups. On the basis of the results obtained, the reason for the somewhat low true digestibility of calcium in the calves consuming more than 60 g of potassium oxalate/day are discussed. Isotope-dilution technique using 45 CaCl 2 was employed in the study. (auth.)

  7. PENGARUH PENAMBAHAN UREA TERHADAP PENINGKATAN PENCEMARAN NITRIT DAN NITRAT DALAM TANAH (Influence of Addition of Urea to Increased Pollution of Nitrite and Nitrate in The Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida Mawaddah

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK Nitrat dan nitrit merupakan sumber nitrogen bagi tanaman. Nitrogen sangat diperlukan tanaman untuk pertumbuhan dan perkembangan. Bentuk-bentuk nitrogen di lingkungan mengalami transformasi sebagai bagian dari siklus nitrogen seperti nitrifikasi dan denitrifikasi. Apabila kadar nitrogen dalam tanah rendah, maka urea digunakan sebagai sumber nitrogen. Perubahan urea menjadi nitrit atau nitrat pada beberapa sampel tanah perlu diketahui. Kadar nitrit dan nitrat yang tinggi dapat meningkatkan pencemaran di dalam tanah. Sampel tanah yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini adalah tanah pasir, tanah sawah, tanah pupuk kompos dan tanah pupuk kandang. Analisis nitrit dan nitrat dilakukan dengan menggunakan pereaksi asam p-amino benzoat (PABA yang dikopling dengan N-naftiletilendiamin (NEDA dan reduktor spongy cadmium. Sebelum digunakan untuk analisis nitrit dan nitrat, metode divalidasi terlebih dahulu. Hasil validasi metode analisis nitrit dan nitrat dengan pereaksi PABA/NEDA menunjukkan persentase perolehan kembali masing-masing antara 87,15–100,8% untuk nitrit dan 88,16–105,7% untuk nitrat. Setelah ditambah urea sebesar 0,66 g.kg-1 ke dalam tanah, konsentrasi nitrit dan nitrat pada semua sampel tanah mengalami peningkatan. Dari penelitian ini diketahui bahwa peningkatan kadar nitrit dan nitrat setelah ditambahkan urea sangat dipengaruhi oleh kondisi tanah.   ABSTRACT Nitrate and nitrite were sources of nitrogen for plants. Nitrogen is indispensable for the growth and development of plants. The forms of nitrogen in the environment undergoes a transformation as part of the nitrogen cycle like nitrification and denitrification. If nitrogen level in the soil is low, urea is used as a source of nitrogen. Changes of urea into nitrite or nitrate in some of soil samples need to be known. The levels of nitrite and nitrate are high can increase pollution in the soil. Some of soil samples which is used in this research were sandy soil, paddy soil

  8. Effect of the kinetics of ammonium and nitrite oxidation on nitritation success or failure for different biofilm reactor geometries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lackner, Susanne; Smets, Barth F.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of biokinetics on nitritation was investigated in two biofilm geometries, the Membrane Aerated Biofilm Reactor (MABR) and a conventional biofilm system. A 1D biofilm model was used and evaluated by global sensitivity analysis using the variance based Sobol method. The main focus...... strongly depends on the chosen kinetic parameters of AOB and NOB. The maximum specific growth rates (μmax,AOB and μmax,NOB) had the strongest impact on nitritation efficiency (NE). In comparison, the counter-diffusion geometry yielded more parameter combinations (27.5%) that resulted in high NE than the co...

  9. Efficacy of Mixtures of Magnesium, Citrate and Phytate as Calcium Oxalate Crystallization Inhibitors in Urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grases, Felix; Rodriguez, Adrian; Costa-Bauza, Antonia

    2015-09-01

    The main aim of the current study was to evaluate the effectiveness of mixtures of magnesium, citrate and phytate as calcium oxalate crystallization inhibitors. A turbidimetric assay in synthetic urine was performed to obtain induction times for calcium oxalate crystallization in the absence and presence of different mixtures of inhibitors. The morphology of calcium oxalate crystals in the absence or presence of inhibitors and mixtures of the inhibitors was evaluated in 2 crystallization experiments at low and high calcium oxalate supersaturation. The crystals formed were examined using scanning electron microscopy. Examination of crystallization induction times revealed clear inhibitory effects of magnesium, citrate and phytate on calcium oxalate crystallization, supporting usefulness in the treatment and prevention of calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis. Significant synergistic effects between magnesium and phytate were observed. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed that phytate is a powerful crystal growth inhibitor of calcium oxalate, totally preventing the formation of trihydrate and monohydrate. In addition to crystallization inhibition capacity, citrate and magnesium avoided calcium oxalate crystallization by decreasing its supersaturation. The synergistic effect between magnesium and phytate on calcium oxalate crystallization suggests that a combination of these 2 compounds may be highly useful as antilithiasis therapy. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Arthritis associated with calcium oxalate crystals in an anephric patient treated with peritoneal dialysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, A.; Ryan, L.M.; McCarty, D.J.

    1988-09-02

    The authors report a case of calcium oxalate arthropathy in a woman undergoing intermittent peritoneal dialysis who was not receiving pharmacologic doses of ascorbic acid. She developed acute arthritis, with calcium oxalate crystals in Heberden's and Bouchard's nodes, a phenomenon previously described in gout. Intermittent peritoneal dialysis may be less efficient than hemodialysis in clearing oxalate, and physicians should now consider calcium oxalate-associated arthritis in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis who are not receiving large doses of ascorbic acid.

  11. Isolation of thermophilic Desulfotomaculum strains with methanol and sulfite from solfataric mud pools, and characterization of Desulfotomaculum solfataficum sp nov

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goorissen, H.P.; Boschker, H.T.S.; Stams, A.J.M.; Hansen, T.A.

    2003-01-01

    Four strains of thermophilic, endospore-forming, sulfate-reducing bacteria were enriched and isolated from hot solfataric fields in the Krafla area of north-east Iceland, using methanol and sulfite as substrates. Morphologically, these strains resembled thermophilic Desulfotomaculum species. The

  12. Isolation of thermophilic Desulfotomaculum strains with methanol and sulfite from solfataric mud pools, and characterization of Desulfotomaculum solfataficum sp nov

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goorissen, HP; Boschker, HTS; Stams, AJM; Hansen, TA

    Four strains of thermophilic, endospore-forming, sulfate-reducing bacteria were enriched and isolated from hot solfataric fields in the Krafla area of north-east Iceland, using methanol and sulfite as substrates. Morphologically, these strains resembled thermophilic Desulfotomaculum species. The

  13. Thiosulfate and Sulfite Distributions in Porewater of Marine-Sediments Related to Manganese, Iron, and Sulfur Geochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thamdrup, B; Finster, Kai; Fossing, Henrik

    1994-01-01

    Depth distributions of thiosulfate (S2O32-) and sulfite (SO32-) were measured in the porewaters of a Danish salt marsh and subtidal marine sediments by HPLC analysis after derivatization with DTNP [2,2'-dithiobis(5-nitropyridine)]. The distributions were compared to the redox zonation as indicate...

  14. Evaluation of mountain beetle-infested lodgepole pine for cellulosic ethanol production by sulfite pretreatment to overcome recalcitrance of lignocellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    X. Luo; R. Gleisner; S. Tian; J. Negron; W. Zhu; E. Horn; X. J. Pan; J. Y. Zhu

    2010-01-01

    The potentials of deteriorated mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae)-killed lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) trees for cellulosic ethanol production were evaluated using the sulfite pretreatment to overcome recalcitrance of lignocellulose (SPORL) process. The trees were harvested from two sites in the United States Arapaho-Roosevelt National Forest, Colorado....

  15. Using a combined hydrolysis factor to optimize high titer ethanol production from sulfite-pretreated poplar without detoxification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jingzhi Zhang; Feng Gu; J.Y. Zhu; Ronald S. Zalesny Jr.

    2015-01-01

    Sulfite pretreatment to overcome the recalcitrance of lignocelluloses (SPORL) was applied to poplar NE222 chips in a range of chemical loadings, temperatures, and times. The combined hydrolysis factor (CHF) as a pretreatment severity accurately predicted xylan dissolution by SPORL. Good correlations between CHF and pretreated...

  16. Ethanol production from non-detoxified whole slurry of sulfite-pretreated empty fruit bunches at a low cellulase loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinlan Cheng; Shao-Yuan Leu; J.Y. Zhu; Thomas W. Jeffries

    2014-01-01

    Sulfite pretreatment to overcome the recalcitrance of lignocelluloses (SPORL) was applied to an empty fruit bunches (EFB) for ethanol production. SPORL facilitated delignification through lignin sulfonation and dissolution of xylan to result in a highly digestible substrate. The pretreated whole slurry was enzymatically saccharified at a solids loading of 18% using a...

  17. Fermentation kinetics for xylitol production by a Pichia stipitis D-xylulokinase mutant previously grown in spent sulfite liquor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rita C.L.B. Rodrigues; Chenfeng Lu; Bernice Liu; Thomas W. Jeffries

    2008-01-01

    Spent sulfite pulping liquor (SSL) contains lignin, which is present as lignosulfonate, and hemicelluloses that are present as hydrolyzed carbohydrates. To reduce the biological oxygen demand of SSL associated with dissolved sugars, we studied the capacity of Pichia stipitis FPL-YS30 (xyl3[delta]) to convert these sugars into useful products. FPL-YS30 produces a...

  18. Genotypic variation in sulfur assimilation and metabolism of onion (Allium cepa L.) III. Characterization of sulfite reductase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genomic and cDNA sequences corresponding to a ferredoxin-sulfite reductase (SiR) have been cloned from bulb onion (Allium cepa L.) and the expression of the gene and activity of the enzyme characterised with respect to sulfur (S) supply. Cloning, mapping and expression studies revealed that onion ha...

  19. Removal of nitrite from aqueous solution by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens biofilm adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Cai; Guo, Xiaoxiao; Sun, Pengfei; Khan, Rashid Azim; Zhang, Qichun; Liang, Yongchao; Zhao, Yu-Hua

    2018-01-01

    A newly verified adsorbent biofilm produced by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens DT was investigated for nitrite removal from aqueous solutions. The biofilm's characteristics and adsorption mechanism were determined, with results indicating that nitrite ions were adsorbed onto the protonated amine sites of biofilm under acidic conditions. Analysis of various factors showed that higher nitrite adsorption capacities occurred at pH amyloliquefaciens biofilm can be considered as a promising adsorbent for nitrite removal from wastewater. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Simple flow injection for determination of sulfite by amperometric detection using glassy carbon electrode modified with carbon nanotubes-PDDA-gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amatatongchai, Maliwan; Sroysee, Wongduan; Chairam, Sanoe; Nacapricha, Duangjai

    2015-02-01

    A new approach is presented for sensitive and selective measurement of sulfite (SO3(2-)) in beverages based on a simple flow injection system with amperometric detection. In this work, the sulfite sensor was a glassy carbon electrode modified with multiwall carbon nanotubes-poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride)-gold nanoparticles composites (CNTs-PDDA-AuNPs/GC). Electrochemical oxidation of sulfite with this electrode was first studied in 0.1M phosphate buffer (pH 7.0) using cyclic voltammetry. The results indicated that the CNTs-PDDA-AuNPs/GC electrode possesses electrocatalytic activity for the oxidation of sulfite with high sensitivity and selectivity. Sulfite was quantified using amperometric measurement with the new sensor at +0.4V vs Ag/AgCl in conjunction with flow injection. The linear working range for the quantitation of sulfite was 2-200 mg L(-1) (r(2)=0.998) with a detection limit of 0.03 mg L(-1) (3σ of blank) and an estimated precision of 1.5%.The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of sulfite in fruit juices and wines with a sample throughput of 23 samples per hour. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Fed-batch cultivation of the marine bacterium Sulfitobacter pontiacus using immobilized substrate and purification of sulfite oxidase by application of membrane adsorber technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muffler, Kai; Ulber, Roland

    2008-03-01

    Sulfitobacter pontiacus, a gram-negative heterotrophic bacterium isolated from the Black Sea is well known to produce a soluble AMP-independent sulfite oxidase (sulfite: acceptor oxidoreductase) of high activity. Such an enzyme can be of great help in establishing biosensor systems for detection of sulfite in food and beverages considering the high sensitivity of biosensors and the increasing demand for such biosensor devices. For obtaining efficient amounts of the enzyme, an induction of its biosynthesis by supplementing sufficient concentrations of sodium sulfite to the fermentation broth is required. Owing to the fact that a high initial concentration of sodium sulfite decreases dramatically the enzyme expression, different fed-batch strategies can be applied to circumvent such inhibition or repression of the enzyme respectively. By the use of sulfite species immobilized in polyvinyl alcohol gels, an approach to the controlled and continuous feeding of sulfite to the cultivation media could be established to diminish inhibitory concentrations. Furthermore, the purification of the enzyme is described by using membrane adsorber technology. Copyright 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The effects of nitrogen and phosphorus deficiencies and nitrite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of 50% N, 100% N, 50% N plus 50% P and 50% P deficiencies and nitrite addition were treated on Chlorella vulgaris (Chlorophyceae) was studied in laboratory conditions with the aim to determine the effects of the deficient nutrient and different nitrogen sources on lipid and protein contents. Protein and lipid ...

  3. Electrochemical removal of nitrite in simulated aquaculture wastewater

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-11-21

    Nov 21, 2011 ... which may cause cancer in several animal species (Liao and Mayo, 1974). Nitrite also can result in the emission of nitrous oxide (N2O) to the atmosphere, ..... Biofouling Management in the Cooling Circuit of a. Power Industry Using Electrochemical Process. J. Chem. Soc. Pak. 33 (3): 295-304. Sun CC ...

  4. Presence of nitrites, nitrates, nitrosamines in the eggs of Intensively ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the presence and concentrations of nitrosamines and their precursors (nitrates and nitrites) in raw table eggs obtained from four layer-farms in Abeokuta, were analysed. Nitrosamines are highly toxic and carcinogenic group of chemicals that have the potential to be formed in the body through a process called ...

  5. Cyanide, Nitrates and Nitrite Contents of Livestock Feeds in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The cyanide nitrate and nitrite contents in pig feeds from six different farms in Umuahia, Nigeria were assayed using spectrophotometric and enzymatic methods. Enzymatic analysis of the feed samples indicated mean total cyanide level of 59.30 ± 3.72 – 361.90 ± 11.2mg-1 DM. The mean cyanide content of cyanogenic ...

  6. Seasonal Distribution of Nitrate and Nitrite Levels in Eleme Abattoir ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study deals with the seasonal distribution of nitrate (NO3) and nitrite (NO2) levels in Eleme Abattoir environment. Samples of soil, surface water and groundwater were collected from areas unaffected and those affected by abattoir activities. For the soils from the affected area and control points respectively, nitrate levels ...

  7. Nitrite and nitroso compounds can serve as specific catalase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, Vladimir Yu; Osipov, Anatoly N

    2017-03-01

    We present evidence that nitrite and nitrosothiols, nitrosoamines and non-heme dinitrosyl iron complexes can reversibly inhibit catalase with equal effectiveness. Catalase activity was evaluated by the permanganatometric and calorimetric assays. This inhibition is not the result of chemical transformations of these compounds to a single inhibitor, as well as it is not the result of NO release from these substances (as NO traps have no effect on the extent of inhibition). It was found that chloride and bromide in concentration above 80 mM and thiocyanate in concentration above 20 μM enhance catalase inhibition by nitrite and the nitroso compounds more than 100 times. The inhibition degree in this case is comparable with that induced by azide. We propose that the direct catalase inhibitor is a positively charged NO-group. This group acquires a positive charge in the active center of enzyme by interaction of nitrite or nitroso compounds with some enzyme groups. Halides and thiocyanate protect the NO + group from hydration and thus increase its inhibition effect. It is probable that a comparatively low chloride concentration in many cells is the main factor to protect catalase from inhibition by nitrite and nitroso compounds.

  8. Hydrogen ion (Ph), ammonia, dissolved oxygen and nitrite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hydrogen ion (pH), dissolved oxygen, ammonia and nitrite concentrations were studied monthly in two systems (re-circulatory and semi-intensive of 3 m2 sizes) each for six months. The systems were each stocked with 200 g of Clarias gariepinus fingerlings. Results showed that all parameters were within acceptable limits ...

  9. Nitrate, Nitrite, and Ammonium Variability in Drinking Water Distribution Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schullehner, Jörg; Stayner, Leslie; Hansen, Birgitte

    2017-03-09

    Accurate assessments of exposure to nitrate in drinking water is a crucial part of epidemiological studies investigating long-term adverse human health effects. However, since drinking water nitrate measurements are usually collected for regulatory purposes, assumptions on (1) the intra-distribution system variability and (2) short-term (seasonal) concentration variability have to be made. We assess concentration variability in the distribution system of nitrate, nitrite, and ammonium, and seasonal variability in all Danish public waterworks from 2007 to 2016. Nitrate concentrations at the exit of the waterworks are highly correlated with nitrate concentrations within the distribution net or at the consumers' taps, while nitrite and ammonium concentrations are generally lower within the net compared with the exit of the waterworks due to nitrification. However, nitrification of nitrite and ammonium in the distribution systems only results in a relatively small increase in nitrate concentrations. No seasonal variation for nitrate, nitrite, or ammonium was observed. We conclude that nitrate measurements taken at the exit of the waterworks are suitable to calculate exposures for all consumers connected to that waterworks and that sampling frequencies in the national monitoring programme are sufficient to describe temporal variations in longitudinal studies.

  10. Spectrophotometric determination of nitrite by its catalytic effect on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A novel simple, sensitive and rapid kinetic-spectrophotometric method for the determination of trace amounts of nitrite is proposed. The method is based on its catalytic effect on the oxidation of congo red (CR) by potassium bromate in acidic solution. The oxidation reaction is monitored spectrophotometrically by measuring ...

  11. The intramolecular electron transfer between copper sites of nitrite reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Eady, R R; Abraham, Z H

    1998-01-01

    The intramolecular electron transfer (ET) between the type 1 Cu(I) and the type 2 Cu(II) sites of Alcaligenes xylosoxidans dissimilatory nitrite reductase (AxNiR) has been studied in order to compare it with the analogous process taking place in ascorbate oxidase (AO). This internal process is in...

  12. Neurotoxicity induced by alkyl nitrites: Impairment in learning/memory and motor coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Hye Jin; Kim, Yun Ji; Jeon, Seo Young; Kim, Young-Hoon; Shin, Jisoon; Yun, Jaesuk; Han, Kyoungmoon; Park, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Hyung Soo

    2016-04-21

    Although alkyl nitrites are used as recreational drugs, there is only little research data regarding their effects on the central nervous system including their neurotoxicity. This study investigated the neurotoxicity of three representative alkyl nitrites (isobutyl nitrite, isoamyl nitrite, and butyl nitrite), and whether it affected learning/memory function and motor coordination in rodents. Morris water maze test was performed in mice after administrating the mice with varying doses of the substances in two different injection schedules of memory acquisition and memory retention. A rota-rod test was then performed in rats. All tested alkyl nitrites lowered the rodents' capacity for learning and memory, as assessed by both the acquisition and retention tests. The results of the rota-rod test showed that isobutyl nitrite in particular impaired motor coordination in chronically treated rats. The mice chronically injected with isoamyl nitrite also showed impaired function, while butyl nitrite had no significant effect. The results of the water maze test suggest that alkyl nitrites may impair learning and memory. Additionally, isoamyl nitrite affected the rodents' motor coordination ability. Collectively, our findings suggest that alkyl nitrites may induce neurotoxicity, especially on the aspect of learning and memory function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Intramolecular electron transfer in cytochrome cd(1) nitrite reductase from Pseudomonas stutzeri; kinetics and thermodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Kroneck, Peter M H; Zumft, Walter G

    2002-01-01

    Cytochrome cd(1) nitrite reductase from Pseudomonas stutzeri catalyzes the one electron reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide. It is a homodimer, each monomer containing one heme-c and one heme-d(1), the former being the electron uptake site while the latter is the nitrite reduction site. Hence, i...

  14. Protection of Metal Artifacts with the Formation of Metal-Oxalates Complexes by Beauveria bassiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Edith; Cario, Sylvie; Simon, Anaële; Wörle, Marie; Mazzeo, Rocco; Junier, Pilar; Job, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Several fungi present high tolerance to toxic metals and some are able to transform metals into metal-oxalate complexes. In this study, the ability of Beauveria bassiana to produce copper oxalates was evaluated. Growth performance was tested on various copper-containing media. B. bassiana proved highly resistant to copper, tolerating concentrations of up to 20 g L(-1), and precipitating copper oxalates on all media tested. Chromatographic analyses showed that this species produced oxalic acid as sole metal chelator. The production of metal-oxalates can be used in the restoration and conservation of archeological and modern metal artifacts. The production of copper oxalates was confirmed directly using metallic pieces (both archeological and modern). The conversion of corrosion products into copper oxalates was demonstrated as well. In order to assess whether the capability of B. bassiana to produce metal-oxalates could be applied to other metals, iron and silver were tested as well. Iron appears to be directly sequestered in the wall of the fungal hyphae forming oxalates. However, the formation of a homogeneous layer on the object is not yet optimal. On silver, a co-precipitation of copper and silver oxalates occurred. As this greenish patina would not be acceptable on silver objects, silver reduction was explored as a tarnishing remediation. First experiments showed the transformation of silver nitrate into nanoparticles of elemental silver by an unknown extracellular mechanism. The production of copper oxalates is immediately applicable for the conservation of copper-based artifacts. For iron and silver this is not yet the case. However, the vast ability of B. bassiana to transform toxic metals using different immobilization mechanisms seems to offer considerable possibilities for industrial applications, such as the bioremediation of contaminated soils or the green synthesis of chemicals.

  15. Preventive treatment of calcium oxalate crystal deposition with immortal flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orhan, Nilüfer; Onaran, Metin; Şen, İlker; Işık Gönül, İpek; Aslan, Mustafa

    2015-04-02

    A number of medicinal plants are used for their diuretic, urolithiatic and anti-inflammatory effects on urinary system problems in Turkey and the most common traditional remedy for kidney stones is the tea of immortal flowers. The aim of this study is to evaluate the preventive effect of infusions prepared from capitulums of Helichrysum graveolens (M.Bieb.) Sweet (HG) and Helichrysum stoechas ssp. barellieri (Ten.) Nyman (HS) on formation of kidney stones. Sodium oxalate (Ox-70mg/kg intraperitoneally) was used to induce kidney stones on Wistar albino rats. At the same time, two different doses of the plant extracts (HG: 62.5 and 125mg/kg; HS: 78 and 156mg/kg) were dissolved in the drinking water and administered to animals for 5 days. Potassium citrate was used as positive control in the experiments. During the experiment, water intake, urine volume and body weights of the animals were recorded. At the end of the experiments, liver, kidney and body weights of the animals were determined; biochemical analysis were conducted on urine, blood and plasma samples. Histopathological changes in kidney tissues were examined and statistical analysis were evaluated. HS extract showed the highest preventive effect at 156mg/kg dose (stone formation score: 1.16), whereas a number of kidney stones were maximum in sodium oxalate group (stone formation score: 2.66). Helichrysum extracts decreased urine oxalate and uric acid levels and increased citrate levels significantly. In addition, Helichrysum extracts regulated the negative changes in biochemical and hematological parameters occurred after Ox injection. We conclude that Helichrysum extracts could reduce the formation and growth of kidney stones in Ox-induced urolithiasis and can be beneficial for patients with recurrent stones. In addition, this is the first study on the preventive effect of immortal flowers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Ultrasound-assisted anodization of aluminum in oxalic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Rong; Jiang Kaiming [Department of Physics, Shanghai Maritime University, 1550 Pudong Avenue, Shanghai 200135 (China); Zhu Yun [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Qi Haiyang [Department of Physics, Shanghai Maritime University, 1550 Pudong Avenue, Shanghai 200135 (China); Ding Guqiao, E-mail: gqding@mail.sim.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2011-10-15

    Porous anodic alumina is an important nanoscale template for fabrication of various nanostructures. We report a new ultrasound-assisted anodization process in oxalic acid. Under the continuous irradiation of ultrasound, the one-step-anodized sample has a smooth and clean surface, and two-step-anodization brings ordered porous anodic alumina with higher growth rate of 52 {mu}m/h. The ultrasound applied during the anodization can clean the surface and enhance the nanopore growth since it can accelerate the oxide dissolving on the electrolyte/oxide interface. The ultrasound-assisted anodization may be utilized for other anodizations.

  17. Electrochemical oxidation of sulfites by DWCNTs, MWCNTs, higher fullerenes and manganese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzun, Dzhamal; Pchelarov, George; Dimitrov, Ognian; Vassilev, Sasho; Obretenov, Willi; Petrov, Konstantin

    2018-03-01

    Different electrocatalysts were tested for oxidation of sulfites to sulfates, namely, manganese thin films deposited on fullerenes and carbon nanotubes. The results presented clearly show that electrodes containing HFs (higher fullerenes), DWCNTs (double-wall carbon nanotubes) and manganese acetate are effective catalysts in S/O2 fuel cells. HFs and DWCNTs have high catalytic activity and can be employed as standalone catalysts. Manganese was deposited on DWCNTs, HFs and fullerenes C60/C70 by a thermal process. The electrocatalysts were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The electrochemical testing was carried out by plotting the E/V polarization curve. The polarization curves of the electrodes composed of pristine DWCNTs showed the lowest overpotentials.

  18. Effect of sulfites on the in vitro antioxidant activity of wines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.D. Di Mattia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the contribution of SO2 to the overall antioxidant activity of wines. In this study, white, red, and model wines, with increasing sulfite content, were used.The radical scavenging activity of the wines was evaluated by ABTS and DPPH assays, while the reducing capacity of the wines was assessed by the FRAP assay. SO2 positively affected the antioxidant properties of the wines and, in some cases, its contribution to the overall antioxidant activity of wines was higher than that of naturally occurring antioxidants. Depending on the assay, SO2 showed both synergistic and antagonistic effects with the antioxidants naturally present in wines.

  19. An oxalyl-CoA synthetase is important for oxalate metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although oxalic acid is common in nature, our understanding of the mechanism(s) regulating its turnover remains incomplete. In this study we identify Saccharomyces cerevisiae acyl-activating enzyme 3 (ScAAE3) as an enzyme capable of catalyzing the conversion of oxalate to oxalyl-CoA. Based on our fi...

  20. Electrochemical Oxidation and Determination of Oxalic Acid at an Exfoliated Graphite-Polystyrene Composite Electrode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonman, J.; Manea, F.; Radovan, C.; Corb, I.; Pop, A.; Burtica, G.; Malchev, P.G.; Picken, S.J.

    2007-01-01

    An exfoliated graphite-polystyrene composite electrode was evaluated as analternative electrode in the oxidation and the determination of oxalic acid in 0.1 M Na2SO4supporting electrolyte. Using CV, LSV, CA procedures, linear dependences I vs. C wereobtained in the concentrations range of oxalic

  1. an oxalate-peroxide complex used in the preparation of doped barium titanate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Gijp, S.; Winnubst, Aloysius J.A.; Verweij, H.

    1998-01-01

    A method is described for the preparation of homogeneously doped barium titanate, which can be applied in non-linear dielectric elements. Ba and Ti salts are dissolved, mixed with hydrogen peroxide and added to a solution of ammonium oxalate, resulting in the formation of an insoluble peroxo-oxalate

  2. The effects of copper proximity on oxalate production in Fibroporia radiculosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katie M. Jenkins; Carol A. Clausen; Frederick Green III

    2014-01-01

    Copper remains a key component used in wood preservatives available today. However, the observed tolerance of several critical wood rotting organisms continues to be problematic. Tolerance to copper has been linked to the production and accumulation of oxalate, which precipitates copper into insoluble copper-oxalate crystals, thus inactivating copper ions. The purpose...

  3. Retention and leaching of nitrite by municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash under the landfill circumstance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jun; Kong, Qingna; Zhu, Huayue; Long, Yuyang; Shen, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    The retention and leaching of nitrite by municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) bottom ash could affect its migration in the landfill. In this study, the effect of the dosage of MSWI bottom ash as well as the variation of the landfill environmental parameters including pH, anions and organic matter on the nitrite retention and leaching behavior was investigated by batch experiments. The highest removal percentage (73.0%) of nitrite was observed when the dosage of MSWI bottom ash was 10 g L(-1) in 2 mg L(-1) nitrite solution. Further increase of the dosage would retard the retention, as the nitrite leaching from MSWI bottom ash was enhanced. The optimum retention of nitrite was observed when the pH was 5.0, while the leaching of nitrite showed a consistent reduction with the increase of pH. Besides, the presence of Cl(-), SO4(2)(-) and acetic acid could enhance the leaching of nitrite and mitigate the retention process. However, the retention of nitrite was enhanced by PO4(3)(-), which was probably due to the formation of the apatite, an active material for the adsorption of the nitrite. These results suggested that MSWI bottom ash could affect the migration of nitrite in the landfill, which was related to the variation of the landfill circumstance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Practical Use of Nitrite and Basis for Dosage in the Manufacture of Meat Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adler-Nissen, Jens; Ekgreen, Maria Helbo; Risum, Jørgen

    . Nitrite also has a desirable anti-oxidant activity and contributes to the formation of pleasant flavours. A systematic literature review on the function and use of nitrite in meat leads to a tentative first conclusion that if the level of nitrite added to meat products is sufficient to protect against......The use of nitrite (NaNO2) in the manufacture of salted (cured) meat products has a long tradition in the industry, dating back to the early twentieth century. Nitrite serves several technological purposes, primarily by the formation of a stable red colour in the meat and the inhibition...... of the growth of Clostridium botulinum. According to an assessment report by the European Food Safety Authority (The EFSA Journal, 14, p. 1-134, 2003) all evidence points to that it is the added amount of nitrite rather than the residual amount of nitrite in the product which exerts the antimicrobial effect...

  5. Protection of metal artifacts with the formation of metal–oxalates complexes by Beauveria bassiana

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph, Edith; Cario, Sylvie; Simon, Anaële; Wörle, Marie; Mazzeo, Rocco; Junier, Pilar; Job, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Several fungi present high tolerance to toxic metals and some are able to transform metals into metal-oxalate complexes. In this study, the ability of Beauveria bassiana to produce copper oxalates was evaluated. Growth performance was tested on various copper-containing media. B. bassiana proved highly resistant to copper, tolerating concentrations of up to 20 g L-1, and precipitating copper oxalates on all media tested. Chromatographic analyses showed that this species produced oxalic acid a...

  6. The initial and subsequent inflammatory events during calcium oxalate lithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, John W M; Gohel, Mayur-Danny I; Poon, Ngork-Wah; Shum, Daisy K Y; Tam, Po-Chor; Au, Doris W T

    2010-08-05

    Crystallization is believed to be the initiation step of urolithiasis, even though it is unknown where inside the nephron the first crystal nucleation occurs. Direct nucleation of calcium oxalate and subsequent events including crystal retention, cellular damage, endocytosis, and hyaluronan (HA) expression, were tested in a two-compartment culture system with intact human proximal tubular HK-2 cell monolayer. Calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) was nucleated and bound onto the apical surface of the HK-2 cells under hypercalciuric and hyperoxaluric conditions. These cells displayed mild cellular damage and internalized some of the adhered crystals within 18h post-COD-exposure, as revealed by electron microscopy. Prolonged incubation in complete medium caused significant damage to disrupt the monolayer integrity. Furthermore, hyaluronan disaccharides were detected in the harvested media, and were associated with HAS-3 mRNA expression. Human proximal cells were able to internalize COD crystals which nucleated directly onto the apical surface, subsequently triggering cellular damage and HAS-3 specific hyaluronan synthesis as an inflammatory response. The proximal tubule cells here demonstrate that it plays an important role in facilitating urolithiasis via endocytosis and creating an inflammatory environment whereby free hyaluronan in tubular fluid can act as crystal-binding molecule at the later segments of distal and collecting tubules. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of oxalic acid on the optical, thermal, dielectric and mechanical behaviour of ADP crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajesh, P.; Ramasamy, P.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of the addition, over a concentration range from 1 to 5 mol%, of oxalic acid on the growth rate, optical transparency, hardness, dielectric behaviour, and SHG efficiency of ammonium dihydrogen phosphate single crystals grown by slow evaporation method has been investigated. UV-Vis studies show that the transparency of the oxalic acid added crystals decreased gradually. Thermal studies indicate that the decomposition temperatures of the crystal are decreased in oxalic acid added ADP crystals. It is observed from the dielectric measurements that the dielectric constant and dielectric loss increase with increase in temperature for all the crystals. Vicker's microhardness study reveals that the addition of higher concentration of oxalic acid decreases the hardness of the crystal. SHG efficiency of 1 mol% of oxalic acid is higher than the pure ADP.

  8. Facile fabrication of cobalt oxalate nanostructures with superior specific capacitance and super-long cycling stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Guanhua; Si, Conghui; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Ying; Yang, Wanfeng; Dong, Chaoqun; Zhang, Zhonghua

    2016-04-01

    Transition metal oxalate materials have shown huge competitive advantages for applications in supercapacitors. Herein, nanostructured cobalt oxalate supported on cobalt foils has been facilely fabricated by anodization, and could directly serve as additive/binder-free electrodes for supercapacitors. The as-prepared cobalt oxalate electrodes present superior specific capacitance of 1269 F g-1 at the current density of 6 A g-1 in the galvanostatic charge/discharge test. Moreover, the retained capacitance is as high as 87.2% as the current density increases from 6 A g-1 to 30 A g-1. More importantly, the specific capacitance of cobalt oxalate retains 91.9% even after super-long cycling of 100,000 cycles. In addition, an asymmetric supercapacitor assembled with cobalt oxalate (positive electrode) and activated carbon (negative electrode) demonstrates excellent capacitive performance with high energy density and power density.

  9. Enzymatic mechanism of oxalate production in the TCA and glyoxylate pathways using various isolates of Antrodia radiculosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    K.M. Jenkins; S.V. Diehl; C.A. Clausen; F. Green

    2011-01-01

    Brown-rot fungi produce oxalate in large amounts; however, levels of accumulation and function vary by species. Copper-tolerant fungi, like Antrodia radiculosa, produce and accumulate high levels of oxalate in response to copper. Oxalate biosynthesis in copper-tolerant fungi has been linked to the glyoxylate and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycles. Within these two cycles...

  10. Improving the two-step remediation process for CCA-treated wood. Part I, Evaluating oxalic acid extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carol Clausen

    2004-01-01

    In this study, three possible improvements to a remediation process for chromated-copper-arsenate (CCA) treated wood were evaluated. The process involves two steps: oxalic acid extraction of wood fiber followed by bacterial culture with Bacillus licheniformis CC01. The three potential improvements to the oxalic acid extraction step were (1) reusing oxalic acid for...

  11. An antagonist treatment in combination with tracer experiments revealed isocitrate pathway dominant to oxalate biosynthesis in Rumex obtusifolius L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxalate accumulates in leaves of certain plants such as Rumex species (Polygonaceae). Oxalate plays important roles in defense to predator, detoxification of metallic ions, and in hydroxyl peroxide formation upon wounding/senescence. However, biosynthetic pathways of soluble oxalate are largely unkn...

  12. Protection of metal artefacts with the formation of metal-oxalates complexes by Beauveria bassiana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith eJoseph

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Several fungi present high tolerance to toxic metals and some are able to transform metals into metal-oxalate complexes. In this study, the ability of Beauveria bassiana to produce copper oxalates was evaluated in vitro. Growth performance was tested on various copper-containing media. B. bassiana proved highly resistant to copper, tolerating concentrations of up to 20 g.L-1, and precipitating copper oxalates on all media tested. Chromatographic analyses showed that this species produced oxalic acid as sole metal chelator. The production of metal-oxalates can be used in the restoration and conservation of archaeological and modern metal artefacts. The production of copper-oxalates was confirmed directly using metallic pieces (both archaeological and modern. The conversion of corrosion products into copper oxalates was demonstrated as well. In order to assess whether the capability of B. bassiana to produce metal-oxalates could be applied to other metals, iron and silver were tested as well. Iron appears to be directly sequestered in the wall of the fungal hyphae forming oxalates and probably goethite. However, the formation of a homogeneous layer on the object is not yet optimal. Silver nitrate was extracellularly reduced into nanoparticles of elemental silver by an unknown mechanism. The production of copper oxalates is immediately applicable for the conservation of copper-based artefacts. For iron and silver this is not yet the case. However, the vast ability of B. bassiana to transform toxic metals using different immobilization mechanisms seems to offer considerable possibilities for industrial applications, such as the bioremediation of contaminated soils or the green synthesis of chemicals.

  13. Sinorhizobium meliloti sigma factors RpoE1 and RpoE4 are activated in stationary phase in response to sulfite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bénédicte Bastiat

    Full Text Available Rhizobia are soil bacteria able to establish a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with legume plants. Both in soil and in planta, rhizobia spend non-growing periods resembling the stationary phase of in vitro-cultured bacteria. The primary objective of this work was to better characterize gene regulation in this biologically relevant growth stage in Sinorhizobium meliloti. By a tap-tag/mass spectrometry approach, we identified five sigma factors co-purifying with the RNA polymerase in stationary phase: the general stress response regulator RpoE2, the heat shock sigma factor RpoH2, and three extra-cytoplasmic function sigma factors (RpoE1, RpoE3 and RpoE4 belonging to the poorly characterized ECF26 subgroup. We then showed that RpoE1 and RpoE4 i are activated upon metabolism of sulfite-generating compounds (thiosulfate and taurine, ii display overlapping regulatory activities, iii govern a dedicated sulfite response by controlling expression of the sulfite dehydrogenase SorT, iv are activated in stationary phase, likely as a result of endogenous sulfite generation during bacterial growth. We showed that SorT is required for optimal growth of S. meliloti in the presence of sulfite, suggesting that the response governed by RpoE1 and RpoE4 may be advantageous for bacteria in stationary phase either by providing a sulfite detoxification function or by contributing to energy production through sulfite respiration. This paper therefore reports the first characterization of ECF26 sigma factors, the first description of sigma factors involved in control of sulphur metabolism, and the first indication that endogenous sulfite may act as a signal for regulation of gene expression upon entry of bacteria in stationary phase.

  14. Two cases of methemoglobinaemia caused by suspected sodium nitrite poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo Matteucci

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Among the causes of acute methemo-globinaemia are the ingestion and inhalation of over 40 oxidising substances, including nitrite, nitrate, carbon monoxide, some medicines, chlorine. The authors describe a case of acute methemoglobinaemia in two people that most probably suffered from food poisoning resulting from the consumption of a preparation of a dish called turkey alla canzanese that contained significant amounts of sodium nitrite. Both subjects who were treated promptly with methylene blue and hyperbaric oxygen therapy room recovered fully. Epidemiological investigations performed to clarify the dynamics of the episode suggested that among the causes of contamination were the swapping of products at the time of sale and the non-compliance to rules for the preparation of foods for human consumption.

  15. Nitrates and nitrites content of water boreholes and packaged water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nitrate and nitrite levels were determined in forty-three water samples obtained from different locations in Calabar using colorimetric methods. Twenty-three of these samples were packaged water while twenty were borehole water. Nitrate levels were found to be 24.28 ± 9.30μg/ml and 34.57 ± 14.56µ/ml for packaged water ...

  16. Determination of nitrate and nitrite content of Turkish cheeses ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The levels of nitrate and nitrite were determined in 185 samples of Turkish cheese having high consumption rate. All cheese samples contained nitrate and its level in Turkish white cheese produced from cow's and sheep's milk were found between 0.92 - 22.40 (mean 8.96±4.93) mg/kg and 0.47 - 23.68 (mean 12.35±6.28) ...

  17. Nitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: a hidden source of nitrite?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balk, Melike; Laverman, Anniet M; Keuskamp, Joost A; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate reduction is considered to be a minor microbial pathway in the oxidation of mangrove-derived organic matter due to a limited supply of nitrate in mangrove soils. At a limited availability of this electron acceptor compared to the supply of degradable carbon, nitrate ammonification is thought to be the preferential pathway of nitrate reduction. Mangrove forest mutually differ in their productivity, which may lead to different available carbon to nitrate ratios in their soil. Hence, nitrate ammonification is expected to be of more importance in high- compared to low-productive forests. The hypothesis was tested in flow-through reactors that contain undisturbed mangrove soils from high-productive Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle forests in Florida and low-productive Avicennia marina forests in Saudi Arabia. Nitrate was undetectable in the soils from both regions. It was assumed that a legacy of nitrate ammonification would be reflected by a higher ammonium production from these soils upon the addition of nitrate. Unexpectedly, the soils from the low-productive forests in Saudi Arabia produced considerably more ammonium than the soils from the high-productive forests in Florida. Hence, other environmental factors than productivity must govern the selection of nitrate ammonification or denitrification. A rather intriguing observation was the 1:1 production of nitrite and ammonium during the consumption of nitrate, more or less independent from sampling region, location, sampling depth, mangrove species and from the absence or presence of additional degradable carbon. This 1:1 ratio points to a coupled production of ammonium and nitrite by one group of nitrate-reducing microorganisms. Such a production of nitrite will be hidden by the presence of active nitrite-reducing microorganisms under the nitrate-limited conditions of most mangrove forest soils.

  18. The negative phonon confinement effect in nanoscopic sodium nitrite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koroleva, E.Yu.; Nuzhnyy, Dmitry; Pokorný, Jan; Kamba, Stanislav; Kumzerov, Y. A.; Vakhrushev, S. B.; Petzelt, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 39 (2009), 395706/1-395706/7 ISSN 0957-4484 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB100100704; GA ČR(CZ) GA202/09/0682 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : nanocomposite * sodium nitrite * infrared * THz * Raman * phonon * effective medium approach Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.137, year: 2009

  19. Cloning and characterization of a nitrite reductase gene related to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-03-01

    Mar 1, 2010 ... BL21 (DE3) strain with the recombinant expression vector pET-28A-GhNiR. NiR activity assay showed that the crude GhNiR protein had obvious activity to NaNO2 substrate. Key words: Cotton, nitrite reductase, prokaryotic expression, semi-quantitative RT-PCR, GenBank Accession. No: GQ389691.

  20. Nitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: a hidden source of nitrite?

    KAUST Repository

    Balk, Melike

    2015-03-02

    Nitrate reduction is considered to be a minor microbial pathway in the oxidation of mangrove-derived organic matter due to a limited supply of nitrate in mangrove soils. At a limited availability of this electron acceptor compared to the supply of degradable carbon, nitrate ammonification is thought to be the preferential pathway of nitrate reduction. Mangrove forest mutually differ in their productivity, which may lead to different available carbon to nitrate ratios in their soil. Hence, nitrate ammonification is expected to be of more importance in high- compared to low-productive forests. The hypothesis was tested in flow-through reactors that contain undisturbed mangrove soils from high-productive Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle forests in Florida and low-productive Avicennia marina forests in Saudi Arabia. Nitrate was undetectable in the soils from both regions. It was assumed that a legacy of nitrate ammonification would be reflected by a higher ammonium production from these soils upon the addition of nitrate. Unexpectedly, the soils from the low-productive forests in Saudi Arabia produced considerably more ammonium than the soils from the high-productive forests in Florida. Hence, other environmental factors than productivity must govern the selection of nitrate ammonification or denitrification. A rather intriguing observation was the 1:1 production of nitrite and ammonium during the consumption of nitrate, more or less independent from sampling region, location, sampling depth, mangrove species and from the absence or presence of additional degradable carbon. This 1:1 ratio points to a coupled production of ammonium and nitrite by one group of nitrate-reducing microorganisms. Such a production of nitrite will be hidden by the presence of active nitrite-reducing microorganisms under the nitrate-limited conditions of most mangrove forest soils.

  1. Determination of nitrate, nitrite, N- nitrosamines, cyanide and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The nitrate, nitrite, N- nitrosamines and ascorbic acid content as well as the levels of cyanide in eight brands of fruit juices and twelve brands of sachet water commonly marketed and consumed in Nigeria were estimated. The mean values of nitrate ranged from 2.29±0.05 to 16.50±1.21 mg/L for the juices and 0.64±0.21 to ...

  2. Regioselective synthesis of nitrosoimidazoheterocycles using tert-butyl nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monir, Kamarul; Ghosh, Monoranjan; Jana, Sourav; Mondal, Pallab; Majee, Adinath; Hajra, Alakananda

    2015-08-28

    A simple and practical method has been developed for the regioselective nitrosylation of imidazopyridines via C(sp(2))-H bond functionalization using tert-butyl nitrite under mild reaction conditions in a short time. A library of 3-nitrosoimidazopyridines with broad functionalities was synthesized in near quantitative yields. The present protocol is also applicable to imidazo[2,1-b]thiazole and benzo[d]imidazo[2,1-b]thiazole.

  3. Physical simulation of precipitation of radioactive element oxalates by using the harmless neodymium oxalate for studying the agglomeration phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalleman, Sophie; Bertrand, Murielle; Plasari, Edouard

    2012-01-01

    Oxalic precipitation is usually applied in nuclear industry to process radioactive wastes or to recover actinides from a multicomponent solution.This paper deals with the development of methods adapted to a nuclear environment in order to study the agglomeration phenomena during actinide oxalic precipitation.These methods are previously set up with harmless elements that simulate the actinide behaviour: the lanthanides. A parametric study is carried out to quantify the influence of operating parameters on the agglomeration kernel and to determine a kinetic law for this mechanism. The experimental study is performed in a continuous-MSMPR precipitator at steady-state. The method is based on the resolution of two population balances using the moment approach, one for elementary crystals and the other for agglomerates. Provided that the kinetic rates of nucleation and growth are known, the agglomeration kernel can be obtained from a mathematical treatment of the experimental particle size distributions. Results point out that experimental crystal sizes are consistent with an independent kernel. It appears that the agglomeration kernel is directly proportional to supersaturation, increases with temperature but is limited by ionic strength and shear rate. (authors)

  4. Hypoxia tolerance, nitric oxide, and nitrite: lessons from extreme animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fago, Angela; Jensen, Frank B

    2015-03-01

    Among vertebrates able to tolerate periods of oxygen deprivation, the painted and red-eared slider turtles (Chrysemys picta and Trachemys scripta) and the crucian carp (Carassius carassius) are the most extreme and can survive even months of total lack of oxygen during winter. The key to hypoxia survival resides in concerted physiological responses, including strong metabolic depression, protection against oxidative damage and-in air-breathing animals-redistribution of blood flow. Each of these responses is known to be tightly regulated by nitric oxide (NO) and during hypoxia by its metabolite nitrite. The aim of this review is to highlight recent work illustrating the widespread roles of NO and nitrite in the tolerance to extreme oxygen deprivation, in particular in the red-eared slider turtle and crucian carp, but also in diving marine mammals. The emerging picture underscores the importance of NO and nitrite signaling in the adaptive response to hypoxia in vertebrate animals. ©2015 Int. Union Physiol. Sci./Am. Physiol. Soc.

  5. Simple methods to decrease sodium and nitrite contents in hams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talia Franco-Avila

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ham is a product highly consumed by society; however it contains some elements that make it a non-recommended food. Thus, it has been attempted to eliminate or reduce those components.Material and Methods: Content of sodium, nitrites, peroxides and total coliforms were compared after processes of Washing (W and Simple Cooking (SC in turkey and pork ham in a cross-sectional analytical experimental study. Furthermore, sensory acceptance of thesamples through an acceptance test of five points was evaluated. One-way ANOVA with post hoc Bonferroni were used to assess the mean difference between groups. The value of p≤0.05 was considered statistically significant.Results: Both processes reduced the amount of sodium in both types of ham in statistically significant way (p≤0.001. The major percentage of reduction was presented with SC: 73.4% for turkey ham and 63.5% for pork ham. Likewise, the higher percentage of nitrite reduction was 50.6% in pork ham with SC technique (p≤0.05. Peroxide index decreased with both techniques in both hams without statistical significance. Total coliforms count was kept constant in all samples. Higher sensory acceptance of W concerning SC in all sensory characteristics was observed.Conclusions: W and SC techniques reduce sodium, nitrite and peroxide index without affecting the sanitation of hams. Furthermore, W is accepted in all sensory categories. We recommend using W technique before consumption of the product.

  6. Turning sunlight into stone: the oxalate-carbonate pathway in a tropical tree ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Cailleau

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available An African oxalogenic tree, the iroko tree (Milicia excelsa, has the property to enhance carbonate precipitation in tropical oxisols, where such accumulations are not expected due to the acidic conditions in these types of soils. This uncommon process is linked to the oxalate-carbonate pathway, which increases soil pH through oxalate oxidation. In order to investigate the oxalate-carbonate pathway in the iroko system, fluxes of matter have been identified, described, and evaluated from field to microscopic scales. In the first centimeters of the soil profile, decaying of the organic matter allows the release of whewellite crystals, mainly due to the action of termites and saprophytic fungi. In addition, a concomitant flux of carbonate formed in wood tissues contributes to the carbonate flux and is identified as a direct consequence of wood feeding by termites. Nevertheless, calcite biomineralization of the tree is not a consequence of in situ oxalate consumption, but rather related to the oxalate oxidation inside the upper part of the soil. The consequence of this oxidation is the presence of carbonate ions in the soil solution pumped through the roots, leading to preferential mineralization of the roots and the trunk base. An ideal scenario for the iroko biomineralization and soil carbonate accumulation starts with oxalatization: as the iroko tree grows, the organic matter flux to the soil constitutes the litter, and an oxalate pool is formed on the forest ground. Then, wood rotting agents (mainly termites, saprophytic fungi, and bacteria release significant amounts of oxalate crystals from decaying plant tissues. In addition, some of these agents are themselves producers of oxalate (e.g. fungi. Both processes contribute to a soil pool of "available" oxalate crystals. Oxalate consumption by oxalotrophic bacteria can then start. Carbonate and calcium ions present in the soil solution represent the end products of the oxalate

  7. Effect of trace metals and sulfite oxidation of adipic acid degradation in FGD systems. Final report Dec 81-May 82

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvis, J.B.; Terry, J.C.; Schubert, S.A.; Utley, B.L.

    1982-12-01

    The report gives results of the measurement of the adipic acid degradation rate in a bench-scale flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system, designed to simulate many of the important aspects of full-scale FGD systems. Results show that the adipic acid degradation rate depends on the sulfite oxidation rate, the adipic acid concentration, the presence of manganese in solution, and temperature. The degradation rate is also affected by pH, but only when manganese is present. Adipic acid degradation products identified in the liquid phase include valeric, butyric, propionic, succinic, and glutaric acids. When manganese was present, the predominant degradation products were succinic and glutaric acids. Analysis of solids from the bench scale tests shows large concentrations of coprecipitated adipic acid in low oxidation sulfite solids. By contrast, low quantities of coprecipitated adipic acid were found in high oxidation gypsum solids.

  8. Antioxidative Mechanisms of Sulfite and Protein-Derived Thiols during Early Stages of Metal Induced Oxidative Reactions in Beer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Marianne N; Krämer, Anna C; Andersen, Mogens L

    2015-09-23

    The radical-mediated reactions occurring during the early stages of beer storage were studied by following the rate of oxygen consumption, radical formation as detected by electron spin resonance spectroscopy, and concentrations of the antioxidant compounds sulfite and thiols. Addition of either Fe(III) or Fe(II) had similar effects, indicating that a fast redox equilibrium is obtained between the two species in beer. Addition of iron in combination with hydrogen peroxide gave the most pronounced levels of oxidation due to a direct initiation of ethanol oxidation through generation of hydroxyl radicals by the Fenton reaction. The concentration of sulfite decreased more than the thiol concentration, suggesting that thiols play a secondary role as antioxidants by mainly quenching 1-hydroxyethyl radicals that are intermediates in the oxidation of ethanol. Increasing the temperature had a minor effect on the rate of oxygen consumption.

  9. The proton spin-flip lines of Mo(V) EPR signals from sulfite oxidase and xanthine oxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Graham Neil

    The proton spin-flip transitions in Mo(V) EPR spectra of the different reduced forms of the enzymes xanthine oxidase and sulfite oxidase have been examined. The proton spin-flip transitions of xanthine oxidase originate from weakly coupled nonexchangeable nuclei, probably carbon-bound protons of amino acid ligands or of the molybdenum cofactor. The sulfite oxidase high-pH signal, on the other hand, in addition to proton spin-flip transitions similar to those of xanthine oxidase, shows transitions from an exchangeable, relatively strongly coupled proton. The hyperfine coupling of this proton is not resolved in the powder lineshape because of noncolinearity of A( 1H) and g, and because of the largely anisotropic nature of its coupling. The possible significance in relation to the catalytic mechanism of this latter finding is discussed.

  10. Stable-isotope dilution GC-MS approach for nitrite quantification in human whole blood, erythrocytes, and plasma using pentafluorobenzyl bromide derivatization: nitrite distribution in human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Alexandra; Modun, Darko; Heusser, Karsten; Tank, Jens; Gutzki, Frank-Mathias; Mitschke, Anja; Jordan, Jens; Tsikas, Dimitrios

    2011-05-15

    Previously, we reported on the usefulness of pentafluorobenzyl bromide (PFB-Br) for the simultaneous derivatization and quantitative determination of nitrite and nitrate in various biological fluids by GC-MS using their (15)N-labelled analogues as internal standards. As nitrite may be distributed unevenly in plasma and blood cells, its quantification in whole blood rather than in plasma or serum may be the most appropriate approach to determine nitrite concentration in the circulation. So far, GC-MS methods based on PFB-Br derivatization failed to measure nitrite in whole blood and erythrocytes because of rapid nitrite loss by oxidation and other unknown reactions during derivatization. The present article reports optimized and validated procedures for sample preparation and nitrite derivatization which allow for reliable quantification of nitrite in human whole blood and erythrocytes. Essential measures for stabilizing nitrite in these samples include sample cooling (0-4°C), hemoglobin (Hb) removal by precipitation with acetone and short derivatization of the Hb-free supernatant (5 min, 50°C). Potassium ferricyanide (K(3)Fe(CN)(6)) is useful in preventing Hb-caused nitrite loss, however, this chemical is not absolutely required in the present method. Our results show that accurate GC-MS quantification of nitrite as PFB derivative is feasible virtually in every biological matrix with similar accuracy and precision. In EDTA-anticoagulated venous blood of 10 healthy young volunteers, endogenous nitrite concentration was measured to be 486±280 nM in whole blood, 672±496 nM in plasma (C(P)), and 620±350 nM in erythrocytes (C(E)). The C(E)-to-C(P) ratio was 0.993±0.188 indicating almost even distribution of endogenous nitrite between plasma and erythrocytes. By contrast, the major fraction of nitrite added to whole blood remained in plasma. The present GC-MS method is useful to investigate distribution and metabolism of endogenous and exogenous nitrite in blood

  11. Nitrite reductase activity and inhibition of H₂S biogenesis by human cystathionine ß-synthase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Gherasim

    Full Text Available Nitrite was recognized as a potent vasodilator >130 years and has more recently emerged as an endogenous signaling molecule and modulator of gene expression. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate nitrite metabolism is essential for its use as a potential diagnostic marker as well as therapeutic agent for cardiovascular diseases. In this study, we have identified human cystathionine ß-synthase (CBS as a new player in nitrite reduction with implications for the nitrite-dependent control of H₂S production. This novel activity of CBS exploits the catalytic property of its unusual heme cofactor to reduce nitrite and generate NO. Evidence for the possible physiological relevance of this reaction is provided by the formation of ferrous-nitrosyl (Fe(II-NO CBS in the presence of NADPH, the human diflavin methionine synthase reductase (MSR and nitrite. Formation of Fe(II-NO CBS via its nitrite reductase activity inhibits CBS, providing an avenue for regulating biogenesis of H₂S and cysteine, the limiting reagent for synthesis of glutathione, a major antioxidant. Our results also suggest a possible role for CBS in intracellular NO biogenesis particularly under hypoxic conditions. The participation of a regulatory heme cofactor in CBS in nitrite reduction is unexpected and expands the repertoire of proteins that can liberate NO from the intracellular nitrite pool. Our results reveal a potential molecular mechanism for cross-talk between nitrite, NO and H₂S biology.

  12. Implications of Limited Thermophilicity of Nitrite Reduction for Control of Sulfide Production in Oil Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fida, Tekle Tafese; Chen, Chuan; Okpala, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nitrate reduction to nitrite in oil fields appears to be more thermophilic than the subsequent reduction of nitrite. Concentrated microbial consortia from oil fields reduced both nitrate and nitrite at 40 and 45°C but only nitrate at and above 50°C. The abundance of the nirS gene correlated with mesophilic nitrite reduction activity. Thauera and Pseudomonas were the dominant mesophilic nitrate-reducing bacteria (mNRB), whereas Petrobacter and Geobacillus were the dominant thermophilic NRB (tNRB) in these consortia. The mNRB Thauera sp. strain TK001, isolated in this study, reduced nitrate and nitrite at 40 and 45°C but not at 50°C, whereas the tNRB Petrobacter sp. strain TK002 and Geobacillus sp. strain TK003 reduced nitrate to nitrite but did not reduce nitrite further from 50 to 70°C. Testing of 12 deposited pure cultures of tNRB with 4 electron donors indicated reduction of nitrate in 40 of 48 and reduction of nitrite in only 9 of 48 incubations. Nitrate is injected into high-temperature oil fields to prevent sulfide formation (souring) by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), which are strongly inhibited by nitrite. Injection of cold seawater to produce oil creates mesothermic zones. Our results suggest that preventing the temperature of these zones from dropping below 50°C will limit the reduction of nitrite, allowing more effective souring control. IMPORTANCE Nitrite can accumulate at temperatures of 50 to 70°C, because nitrate reduction extends to higher temperatures than the subsequent reduction of nitrite. This is important for understanding the fundamentals of thermophilicity and for the control of souring in oil fields catalyzed by SRB, which are strongly inhibited by nitrite. PMID:27208132

  13. Concentrated urine and diluted urine: the effects of citrate and magnesium on the crystallization of calcium oxalate induced in vitro by an oxalate load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Angela; Meschi, Tiziana; Allegri, Franca; Prati, Beatrice; Nouvenne, Antonio; Fiaccadori, Enrico; Borghi, Loris

    2006-12-01

    Supplementation of certain calcium crystallization inhibitors, such as citrate and magnesium, and the dilution of urine with water are now considered consolidated practice for the prevention of calcium kidney stones. The aim of this study is to verify, using tried and true in vitro methods, whether the effect of these inhibitors can manifest itself in different ways depending on whether the urine is concentrated or diluted. Calcium oxalate crystallization was studied on 4-h urine of 20 male idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers, first under low hydration conditions (non-diluted urine) and then under high hydration conditions (diluted urine). Both the diluted and the non-diluted urine samples were subjected to three types of load: (a) an oxalate concentration increment of 1.3 mmol/l only; (b) an oxalate concentration increment of 1.3 mmol/l with a citrate concentration increment of 1.56 mmol/l; (c) an oxalate concentration increment of 1.3 mmol/l with a magnesium concentration increment of 2.08 mmol/l. In non-diluted urine, the addition of the citrate and magnesium did not modify the crystallization parameters under study. In contrast, in the diluted urine the addition of the citrate and magnesium led to a reduction in the total quantity of crystals (equivalent to 35-45%) and their aggregates (equivalent to 30-40%); at the same time, there was an increase in the diameter of the monohydrate calcium oxalate crystals, which also underwent a morphological change. In conclusion, the inhibitory effects of citrate and magnesium on the crystallization of calcium oxalate do not manifest themselves in highly concentrated urine.

  14. Oxalate mediated nephronal impairment and its inhibition by c-phycocyanin: a study on urolithic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Shukkur Muhammed; Ebrahim, Abdul Shukkur; Subramhanya, Karthik Harve; Sakthivel, Ramasamy; Rajesh, Nachiappa Ganesh; Varalakshmi, Palaninathan

    2006-03-01

    The assumption of oxidative stress as a mechanism in oxalate induced renal damage suggests that antioxidants might play a beneficial role against oxalate toxicity. An in vivo model was used to investigate the effect of C-phycocyanin (from aquatic micro algae; Spirulina spp.), a known antioxidant, against calcium oxalate urolithiasis. Hyperoxaluria was induced in two of the 4 groups of Wistar albino rats (n = 6 in each) by intraperitoneally injecting sodium oxalate (70 mg/kg body weight). A pretreatment of phycocyanin (100 mg/kg body weight) as a single oral dosage was given, one hour prior to oxalate challenge. An untreated control and drug control (phycocyanin alone) were employed. Phycocyanin administration resulted in a significant improvement (p calcium oxalate crystal retention in renal tissue using polarization microscopy and renal ultrastructure by electron microscopy reveals normal features in phycocyanin-- pretreated groups. Thus the study presents positive pharmacological implications of phycocyanin against oxalate mediated nephronal impairment and warrants further work to tap this potential aquatic resource for its medicinal application.

  15. Tol1, a Fission Yeast Phosphomonoesterase, Is an In Vivo Target of Lithium, and Its Deletion Leads to Sulfite Auxotrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Rumi; Sugiura, Reiko; Kamitani, Shinya; Yada, Tomoko; Lu, Yabin; Sio, Susie O.; Asakura, Masahiro; Matsuhisa, Akio; Shuntoh, Hisato; Kuno, Takayoshi

    2000-01-01

    Lithium is the drug of choice for the treatment of bipolar affective disorder. The identification of an in vivo target of lithium in fission yeast as a model organism may help in the understanding of lithium therapy. For this purpose, we have isolated genes whose overexpression improved cell growth under high LiCl concentrations. Overexpression of tol1+, one of the isolated genes, increased the tolerance of wild-type yeast cells for LiCl but not for NaCl. tol1+ encodes a member of the lithium-sensitive phosphomonoesterase protein family, and it exerts dual enzymatic activities, 3′(2′),5′-bisphosphate nucleotidase and inositol polyphosphate 1-phosphatase. tol1+ gene-disrupted cells required high concentrations of sulfite in the medium for growth. Consistently, sulfite repressed the sulfate assimilation pathway in fission yeast. However, tol1+ gene-disrupted cells could not fully recover from their growth defect and abnormal morphology even when the medium was supplemented with sulfite, suggesting the possible implication of inositol polyphosphate 1-phosphatase activity for cell growth and morphology. Given the remarkable functional conservation of the lithium-sensitive dual-specificity phosphomonoesterase between fission yeast and higher-eukaryotic cells during evolution, it may represent a likely in vivo target of lithium action across many species. PMID:10850973

  16. Optimization of air-sparged plutonium oxalate/hydroxide precipitators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanderHeyden, W.B.; Yarbro, S.L.; Fife, K.W.

    1997-04-01

    The high cost of waste management and experimental work makes numerical modeling an inexpensive and attractive tool for optimizing and understanding complex chemical processes. Multiphase open-quotes bubbleclose quotes columns are used extensively at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility for a variety of different applications. No moving parts and efficient mixing characteristics allow them to be used in glovebox operations. Initially, a bubble column for oxalate precipitations is being modeled to identify the effect of various design parameters such as, draft tube location, air sparge rate and vessel geometry. Two-dimensional planar and axisymmetric models have been completed and successfully compared to literature data. Also, a preliminary three-dimensional model has been completed. These results are discussed in this report along with future work

  17. Decontamination effectiveness of mixtures of citric acid, oxalic acid and EDTA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speranzini, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental study of the decontamination effectiveness of citric acid, oxalic acid and EDTA mixtures was conducted to assess whether oxalic acid could be removed from decontamination solutions to minimize corrosion. In loop experiments, radioactive specimens from two boiling water reactors and one pressurized water reactor were suspended in solutions of single acids or in mixtures of reagents at total reagent concentrations of less than 0.1 wt% under conditions similar to those used to decontaminate reactor systems. Rate constants for dissolution of oxides and decontamination factors were measured. Based on the results, it was concluded that under certain conditions, oxalic acid was the most effective reagent for the dissolution of oxides. It was also found, however, that conditions under which effective dissolution occurred in solutions of oxalic acid and/or citric acid were difficult to define and control. EDTA was found to be an effective reagent for dissolution of oxides such that rates of dissolution in EDTA containing solutions at 117 degrees Celsius were comparable to rates in oxalic acid containing solutions. At 90 degrees Celsius, EDTA acted synergistically with oxalic acid such that the rate of dissolution of oxides in citric-acid/oxalic-acid/EDTA solutions was higher than in citric-acid/EDTA solutions. The rates of dissolution of oxides were significantly reduced when 60 mg/kg of ferric ion was added to the citric-acid/oxalic-acid, citric-acid/EDTA and citric-acid/oxalic-acid/EDTA solutions. It was concluded that effective decontaminations of BWR and PWR systems could be achieved with mixtures of citric acid and EDTA

  18. Enhanced nitrogen availability in karst ecosystems by oxalic acid release in the rhizosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujing ePan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In karst ecosystems, a high level of CaCO3 enhances the stabilization of soil organic matter (SOM and causes nitrogen (N and/or phosphorus (P limitation in plants. Oxalic acid has been suggested to be involved in the nutrient-acquisition strategy of plants because its addition can temporarily relieve nutrient limitation. Therefore, understanding how oxalic acid drives N availability may help support successful vegetation restoration in the karst ecosystems of southwest China. We tested a model suggested by Clarholm et al. (2015 where oxalate reacts with Ca bridges in SOM, thus exposing previously protected areas to enzymatic attacks in a way that releases N for local uptake. We studied the effects of oxalic acid, microbial biomass C (MBC, and β-1,4-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAG on potential N mineralization rates in rhizosphere soils of four plant species (two shrubs and two trees in karst areas. The results showed that rhizosphere soils of shrubs grown on formerly deforested land had significantly lower oxalic acid concentrations and NAG activity than that of trees in a 200-year-old forest. The levels of MBC in rhizosphere soils of shrubs were significantly lower than those of trees in the growing season, but the measure of shrubs and trees were similar in the non-growing season; the potential N mineralization rates showed a reverse pattern. Positive relationships were found among oxalic acid, MBC, NAG activity, and potential N mineralization rates for both shrubs and trees. This indicated that oxalic acid, microbes, and NAG may enhance N availability for acquisition by plants. Path analysis showed that oxalic acid enhanced potential N mineralization rates indirectly through inducing microbes and NAG activities. We found that the exudation of oxalic acid clearly provides an important mechanism that allows plants to enhance nutrient acquisition in karst ecosystems.

  19. EFFECTIVENESS OF USING DILUTE OXALIC ACID TO DISSOLVE HIGH LEVEL WASTE IRON BASED SLUDGE SIMULANT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketusky, E

    2008-01-01

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken South Carolina, there is a crucial need to remove residual quantities of highly radioactive iron-based sludge from large select underground storage tanks (e.g., 19,000 liters of sludge per tank), in order to support tank closure. The use of oxalic acid is planned to dissolve the residual sludge, hence, helping in the removal. Based on rigorous testing, primarily using 4 and 8 wt% oxalic acid solutions, it was concluded that the more concentrated the acid, the greater the amount of residual sludge that would be dissolved; hence, a baseline technology on using 8 wt% oxalic acid was developed. In stark contrast to the baseline technology, reports from other industries suggest that the dissolution will most effectively occur at 1 wt% oxalic acid (i.e., maintaining the pH near 2). The driver for using less oxalic acid is that less (i.e., moles) would decrease the severity of the downstream impacts (i.e., required oxalate solids removal efforts). To determine the initial feasibility of using 1 wt% acid to dissolve > 90% of the sludge solids, about 19,000 liters of representative sludge was modeled using about 530,000 liters of 0 to 8 wt% oxalic acid solutions. With the chemical thermodynamic equilibrium based software results showing that 1 wt% oxalic acid could theoretically work, simulant dissolution testing was initiated. For the dissolution testing, existing simulant was obtained, and an approximate 20 liter test rig was built. Multiple batch dissolutions of both wet and air-dried simulant were performed. Overall, the testing showed that dilute oxalic acid dissolved a greater fraction of the stimulant and resulted in a significantly larger acid effectiveness (i.e., grams of sludge dissolved/mole of acid) than the baseline technology. With the potential effectiveness confirmed via simulant testing, additional testing, including radioactive sludge testing, is planned

  20. Complexation of Am(III) by oxalate in NaClO4 media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choppin, G.R.; Chen, J.F.

    1995-01-01

    The complexation of Am(III) by oxalate has been investigated in solutions of NaClO 4 up to 9.0 M ionic strength at 25 degrees C. The dissociation constants of oxalic acid were determined by potentiometric titration, while the stability constants of the Am(III)-oxalate complexation were measured by the solvent extraction technique. A thermodynamic model was constructed to predict the apparent equilibrium constants at different ionic strengths by applying the Pitzer equation using parameters for the Na + -HOx - , Na + -Ox - , AmOx + -ClO 4 - , and Na + -Am(Ox) 2 - interactions obtained by fitting the data

  1. [Oxalate nephropathy: a new entity of acute kidney injury in diabetic patients?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muji, A; Moll, S; Saudan, P

    2015-02-25

    Acute oxalate nephropathy is a severe cause of acute kidney injury characterized by tubule-interstitial oxalate deposits with an inflammatory infiltrate. Three cases of AKI occuring in diabetic patients, and whose renal biopsy gave a diagnosis of acute oxalate nephropathy are reported. This cristal deposit AKI is due to either primary hyperoxaluria or secondary to enteric hyperabsorption. Its prognosis is dismal and rapid recognition by renal biopsy and determination of the cause of hyperoxaluria is mandatory in order to avoid end-stage kidney disease. This diagnosis should be suspected in cases of non resolving AKI, especially in diabetic patients who may have undetected pancreatic exocrine insufficiency.

  2. Blue luminescence in porous anodic alumina films: the role of the oxalic impurities

    CERN Document Server

    Gao Tao; Zhang Li

    2003-01-01

    Porous anodic alumina (PAA) films with ordered nanopore arrays have been prepared by electrochemically anodizing aluminium in oxalic acid solutions, and the role of the oxalic impurities in the optical properties of PAA films has been discussed. Photoluminescence (PL) measurements show that the PAA films obtained have a blue PL band with a peak position at around 470 nm; the oxalic impurities, incorporated in the PAA films during the anodization processes and already existing in them, could be being transformed into PL centres and hence responsible for this PL emission.

  3. Insight into the in-cloud formation of oxalate based on in situ measurement by single particle mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guohua; Lin, Qinhao; Peng, Long; Yang, Yuxiang; Fu, Yuzhen; Bi, Xinhui; Li, Mei; Chen, Duohong; Chen, Jianxin; Cai, Zhang; Wang, Xinming; Peng, Ping'an; Sheng, Guoying; Zhou, Zhen

    2017-11-01

    While ground-based works suggest the significance of in-cloud production (or aqueous formation) to oxalate, direct evidence is rare. With the in situ measurements performed at a remote mountain site (1690 m above sea level) in southern China, we first reported the size-resolved mixing state of oxalate in the cloud droplet residual (cloud RES), the cloud interstitial (cloud INT), and ambient (cloud-free) particles by single particle mass spectrometry. The results support the growing evidence that in-cloud aqueous reactions promote the formation of oxalate, with ˜ 15 % of the cloud RES and cloud INT particles containing oxalate in contrast to only ˜ 5 % of the cloud-free particles. Furthermore, individual particle analysis provides unique insight into the formation of oxalate during in-cloud processing. Oxalate was predominantly (> 70 % in number) internally mixed with the aged biomass-burning particles, highlighting the impact of biomass burning on the formation of oxalate. In contrast, oxalate was underrepresented in aged elemental carbon particles, although they represented the largest fraction of the detected particles. It can be interpreted by the individual particle mixing state that the aged biomass-burning particles contained an abundance of organic components serving as precursors for oxalate. Through the analysis of the relationship between oxalate and organic acids (-45[HCO2]-, -59[CH3CO2]-, -71[C2H3CO2]-, -73[C2HO3]-), the results show that in-cloud aqueous reactions dramatically improved the conversion of organic acids to oxalate. The abundance of glyoxylate associated with the aged biomass-burning particles is a controlling factor for the in-cloud production of oxalate. Since only limited information on oxalate is available in the free troposphere, the results also provide an important reference for future understanding of the abundance, evolution, and climate impacts of oxalate.

  4. Role of blood and vascular smooth muscle in the vasoactivity of nitrite

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Taiming; Schroeder, Hobe J.; Barcelo, Lisa; Bragg, Shannon L.; Terry, Michael H.; Wilson, Sean M.; Power, Gordon G.; Blood, Arlin B.

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence from humans and rats indicates that nitrite is a vasodilator under hypoxic conditions by reacting with metal-containing proteins to produce nitric oxide (NO). We tested the hypothesis that near-physiological concentrations of nitrite would produce vasodilation in a hypoxia- and concentration-dependent manner in the hind limb of sheep. Anesthetized sheep were instrumented to measure arterial blood pressure and femoral blood flows continuously in both hind limbs. Nitrite was inf...

  5. Nitrate reduction to nitrite, nitric oxide and ammonia by gut bacteria under physiological conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Tiso

    Full Text Available The biological nitrogen cycle involves step-wise reduction of nitrogen oxides to ammonium salts and oxidation of ammonia back to nitrites and nitrates by plants and bacteria. Neither process has been thought to have relevance to mammalian physiology; however in recent years the salivary bacterial reduction of nitrate to nitrite has been recognized as an important metabolic conversion in humans. Several enteric bacteria have also shown the ability of catalytic reduction of nitrate to ammonia via nitrite during dissimilatory respiration; however, the importance of this pathway in bacterial species colonizing the human intestine has been little studied. We measured nitrite, nitric oxide (NO and ammonia formation in cultures of Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species grown at different sodium nitrate concentrations and oxygen levels. We found that the presence of 5 mM nitrate provided a growth benefit and induced both nitrite and ammonia generation in E.coli and L.plantarum bacteria grown at oxygen concentrations compatible with the content in the gastrointestinal tract. Nitrite and ammonia accumulated in the growth medium when at least 2.5 mM nitrate was present. Time-course curves suggest that nitrate is first converted to nitrite and subsequently to ammonia. Strains of L.rhamnosus, L.acidophilus and B.longum infantis grown with nitrate produced minor changes in nitrite or ammonia levels in the cultures. However, when supplied with exogenous nitrite, NO gas was readily produced independently of added nitrate. Bacterial production of lactic acid causes medium acidification that in turn generates NO by non-enzymatic nitrite reduction. In contrast, nitrite was converted to NO by E.coli cultures even at neutral pH. We suggest that the bacterial nitrate reduction to ammonia, as well as the related NO formation in the gut, could be an important aspect of the overall mammalian nitrate/nitrite/NO metabolism and is yet another way in

  6. Presence of Nitrate and Nitrite in Well Water in Mureș County

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fogarasi Erzsébet

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: One of the most important sources of nitrite and nitrate anions, besides vegetables and meat products, is the drinking water. Presence of nitrite and nitrate in the water in higher concentrations than those set by EFSA (0.5 mg/l nitrite, 50 mg/l nitrate, may have toxicological significance. A quantitative determination of these ions in samples collected from several pleases from Mureș County was made.

  7. [Quantitative analysis and stability ofp-hydroxybenzyl hydrogen sulfite in sulfur-fumigated Gastrodiae Rhizoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Chuan-Zhi; Jiang, Jing-Yi; Yang, Wan-Zhen; Zhou, Li; Lv, Chao-Geng; Li, Jia-Xing; Wang, Sheng; Zhou, Tao; Yang, Ye; Huang, Lu-Qi; Guo, Lan-Ping

    2018-01-01

    Studies on the characteristic chemical markers of sulfur fumigation have become an effective auxiliary way for quality control of traditional Chinese medicine. This study established a quantitative analysis method for the determination of p -hydroxybenzyl hydrogen sulfite ( p -HS) in Gastrodiae Rhizoma (GR) based on UPLC-MS/MS. Then, 37 batches of GR were screened, and the results showed that 27 batches of them were sulfur-fumigated. Especially, the GR samples in Yunnan producing areas were sulfur-fumigated more seriously. Based on the stability of p -HS after different storage time and heat treatment methods, it was found that the content of p -HS was stable and reliable in the storage period of 8 months and under normal heat treatment (50, 60, 70, 80 °C) conditions. In conclusion, this study shows a high sensitivity, good selectivity and good stability of p -HS, which can provide reference for the quality control and sulfur fumigation screening of GR. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  8. Reaction of hydrogen sulfide with oxygen in the presence of sulfite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weres, O.; Tsao, L.

    1983-01-14

    Commonly, abatement of hydrogen sulfide emission from a geothermal powerplant requires that hydrogen sulfide dissolved in the cooling water be eliminated by chemical reaction. Oxidation by atmospheric oxygen is the preferred reaction, but requires a suitable catalyst. Nickel is the most potent and thereby cheapest catalyst for this purpose. One mg/L nickel in the cooling water would allow 99% removal of hydrogen sulfide to be attained. A major drawback of catalytic air oxidation is that colloidal sulfur is a major reaction product; this causes rapid sludge accumulation and deposition of sulfur scale. We studied the kinetics and product distribution of the reaction of hydrogen sulfide with oxygen, catalyzed by nickel. Adding sodium sulfite to the solution completely suppresses formation of colloidal sulfur by converting it to thiosulfate. The oxidation reaction is an autocatalytic, free radical chain reaction. A rate expression for this reaction and a detailed reaction mechanism were developed. Nickel catalyzes the chain initiation step, and polysulfidoradical ions propagate the chains. Several complexes of iron and cobalt were also studied. Iron citrate and iron N-hydroxyEDTA are the most effective iron based catalysts. Uncomplexed cobalt is as effective as nickel, but forms a precipitate of cobalt oxysulfide and is too expensive for practical use. 33 figures, 9 tables.

  9. Reaction of Hydrogen Sulfide with Oxygen in the Presence ofSulfite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weres, Oleh; Tsao, Leon

    1983-01-01

    Commonly, abatement of hydrogen sulfide emissions from a geothermal powerplant requires that hydrogen sulfide dissolved in the cooling water be eliminated by chemical reaction. Oxidation by atmospheric oxygen is the preferred reaction, but requires a suitable catalyst. Nickel is the most potent and thereby cheapest catalyst for this purpose. One Mg/L nickel in the cooling water would allow 99% removal of hydrogen sulfide to be attained. A major drawback of catalytic air oxidation is that colloidal sulfur is a major reaction product; this causes rapid sludge accumulation and deposition of sulfur scale. The authors studied the kinetics and product distribution of the reaction of hydrogen sulfide with oxygen, catalyzed by nickel. Adding sodium sulfite to the solution completely suppresses formation of colloidal sulfur by converting it to thiosulfate. The oxidation reaction is an autocatalytic, free radical chain reaction. A rate expression for this reaction and a detailed reaction mechanism were developed. Nickel catalyzes the chain initiation step, and polysulfidoradical ions propagate the chains. Several complexes of iron and cobalt were also studied. Iron citrate and iron N-hydroxyEDT are the most effective iron based catalysts. Uncomplexed cobalt is as effective as nickel, but forms a precipitate of cobalt oxysulfide and is too expensive for practical use.

  10. Nitrogen removal and electricity production at a double-chamber microbial fuel cell with cathode nitrite denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yangyang; Zhao, Jianqiang; Wang, Sha; Zhao, Huimin; Ding, Xiaoqian; Gao, Kun

    2017-12-01

    Double-chamber microbial fuel cell was applied to investigate the performance of the electricity production and nitrite denitrification through feeding nitrite into the cathode. Factors influencing denitrification performance and power production, such as external resistance, influent nitrite concentration and Nitrite Oxygen Bacteria inhibitors, were studied. The results show that when the concentration of nitrite nitrogen and external resistance were 100 mg L -1 and 10 Ω, respectively, the nitrite denitrification reached the best state. The NaN 3 can inhibit nitrite oxidation effectively; meanwhile, the nitrite denitrification with N 2 O as the final products was largely improved. The [Formula: see text] was reduced to [Formula: see text], causing the cathode denitrification coulombic efficiency to exceed 100%. In chemoautotrophic bio-nitrification, microorganisms may utilize H 2 O to oxidize nitrite under anaerobic conditions. Proteobacteria might play a major role in the process of denitrification in MFC.

  11. Sulfite-stress induced functional and structural changes in the complexes of photosystems I and II in a cyanobacterium, Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Satomi; Tsuzuki, Mikio; Sato, Norihiro

    2015-08-01

    Excess sulfite is well known to have toxic effects on photosynthetic activities and growth in plants, however, so far, the behavior of the photosynthetic apparatus during sulfite-stress has not been characterized as to the responsible proteins or genes. Here, the effects of sulfite on photosystem complexes were investigated in a cyanobacterium, Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, a possible model organism of chloroplasts. Culturing of the cells for 24 h in the presence of 10 mM sulfite retarded cell growth of the wild type, concomitantly with synthesis of Chl and phycobilisome repressed. The excess sulfite simultaneously repressed photosynthesis by more than 90%, owing largely to structural destabilization and resultant inactivation of the PSII complex, which seemed to consequently retard the cell growth. Notably, the PsbO protein, one of the subunits that construct the water-splitting system of PSII, was retained at a considerable level, and disruption of the psbO gene led to higher sensitivity of photosynthesis and growth to sulfite. Meanwhile, the PSI complex showed monomerization of its trimeric configuration with little effect on the activity. The structural alterations of these PS complexes depended on light. Our data provide evidence for quantitative decreases in the photosystem complex(es) including their antenna(e), structural alterations of the PSI and PSII complexes that would modulate their functions, and a crucial role of psbO in PSII protection, in Synechococcus cells during sulfite-stress. We suggest that the reconstruction of the photosystem complexes is beneficial to cell survival. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Effect of Nitrite Inhibitor on the Macrocell Corrosion Behavior of Reinforcing Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonglu Cao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of nitrite ions on the macrocell corrosion behavior of reinforcing steel embedded in cement mortar was investigated by comparing and analyzing the macrocell corrosion current, macrocell polarization ratios, and slopes of anodic and cathodic steels. Based on the experimental results, the relationship between macrocell potential difference and macrocell current density was analyzed, and the mechanism of macrocell corrosion affected by nitrite ions was proposed. The results indicated that nitrite ions had significant impact on the macrocell polarization ratios of cathode and anode. The presence of nitrite could reduce the macrocell current by decreasing the macrocell potential difference and increasing the macrocell polarization resistance of the anode.

  13. Exposure to inhaled isobutyl nitrite reduces T cell-dependent responsiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soderberg, L.S.F.; Barnett, J.B. (Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock (United States))

    1991-03-11

    Isobutyl nitrite is a drug of abuse popular among male homosexuals and among adolescents. In order to approximate the nitrite exposures of inhalant abusers, mice were treated with 900 ppm isobutyl nitrite in an inhalation chamber for 45 min per day for 14 days. At 72 hr after the last exposure, mice were assayed for immune competence. Under these conditions, mice gained only half the weight of mice exposed to air. The spleens of nitrite exposed mice weighed 15% less and had 24% fewer cells per spleen than controls. Adjusted for equal cell numbers, T cell mitogenic and allogeneic proliferative responses were significantly reduce by 33% and 47%, respectively. Unstimulated spleen cells had elevated levels of IL-2 transcription following exposure to isobutyl nitrite suggesting that nitrite inhalation caused a nonspecific induction of T cells. In contrast, B cell proliferative responses to LPS were unaltered. Exposure to the nitrite reduced the frequency of T-dependent antibody plaque-forming cells (PFC) by 63% and the total number of reduced by 60% after as few as five daily exposures to isobutyl nitrite. Therefore, the data suggest that habitual inhalation of isobutyl nitrite impairs immune competence and that toxicity appears to be directed toward T cell functions.

  14. Radiation preservation with reduced nitrites of bacon and other cured meats - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, H.

    1987-01-01

    The main problem caused by nitrite as a preservative is the formation of carcinogenic nitrosamines in bacon and other cured meats. This has led to a search for alternatives to the use of nitrite. Irradiation with reduced level of nitrite is a promising alternative to the use of current levels of nitrite. Radurization (radiation pasteurization) of bacon containing 20 to to 40 mg/kg of nitrite in evacuated packages, irradiated and stored at 4 degrees C, gives a product with good organoleptic qualities and extended shelf life of > 80 days vs. < days 30 days for the conventionally treated bacon. Radappertization (radiation sterilization) of bacon containing 20 mg/kg of nitrite at a dose of about 30 kGy, irradiated at -20 degrees or lower in evacuated packages, results in a product that is shelf stable for months to years at room temperature (∼ 25 degrees C). It has organoleptic properties comparable to commercial bacon in terms of color, flavor, odor and texture. Irradiation also reduces the nitrite and preformed nitrosamines present in bacon. Lower levels of nitrosamines are formed on cooking irradiated bacon containing presently used commercial levels of nitrite (120-150 mg/kg) and the levels of nitrosamines become negligible with 20 mg/kg of nitrite. Various aspects of preservation of bacon and other cured meats are reviewed in this report with emphasis on radiation processing. 357 refs

  15. METHOD FOR NITRATE DETERMINATION IN WATER IN THE PRESENCE OF NITRITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sandu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study relates to determination of nitrate in presence of nitrite in water and can be used in the quality monitoring of natural water (surface and groundwater, drinking water, water from fish farms and public aquaria where autonomous filters is used. The nature and quantity of reagents used have insignificant impact on natural waters and sewages. According to the investigation, the method includes the removal of nitrite from the solution/water with sulfaminic acid, the nitrate ion reduction to nitrite using a reducing mixture that contains Na2SO4 and zinc dust in ratio of 100:5 and determining the nitrite with the Griess reagent.

  16. Implications of Limited Thermophilicity of Nitrite Reduction for Control of Sulfide Production in Oil Reservoirs

    OpenAIRE

    Fida, Tekle Tafese; Chen, Chuan; Okpala, Gloria; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate reduction to nitrite in oil fields appears to be more thermophilic than the subsequent reduction of nitrite. Concentrated microbial consortia from oil fields reduced both nitrate and nitrite at 40 and 45°C but only nitrate at and above 50°C. The abundance of the nirS gene correlated with mesophilic nitrite reduction activity. Thauera and Pseudomonas were the dominant mesophilic nitrate-reducing bacteria (mNRB), whereas Petrobacter and Geobacillus were the dominant thermophilic NRB (tN...

  17. Nitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: A hidden source of nitrite?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melike eBalk

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate reduction is considered to be a minor microbial pathway in the oxidation of mangrove-derived organic matter due to a limited supply of nitrate in mangrove soils. At a limited availability of this electron acceptor compared to the supply of degradable carbon, nitrate ammonification is thought to be the preferential pathway of nitrate reduction. Mangrove forest mutually differ in their productivity, which may lead to different available carbon to nitrate ratios in their soil. Hence, nitrate ammonification is expected to be of more importance in high- compared to low-productive forests.The hypothesis was tested in flow-through reactors that contain undisturbed mangrove soils from high-productive Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle forests in Florida and low-productive Avicennia marina forests in Saudi Arabia. Nitrate was undetectable in the soils from both regions. It was assumed that a legacy of nitrate ammonification would be reflected by a higher ammonium production from these soils upon the addition of nitrate. Unexpectedly, the soils from the low-productive forests in Saudi Arabia produced considerably more ammonium than the soils from the high-productive forests in Florida. Hence, other environmental factors than productivity must govern the selection of nitrate ammonification or denitrification. A rather intriguing observation was the 1:1 production of nitrite and ammonium during the consumption of nitrate, more or less independent from sampling region, location, sampling depth, mangrove species and from the absence or presence of additional degradable carbon. This 1:1 ratio points to a coupled production of ammonium and nitrite by one group of nitrate-reducing microorganisms. Such a production of nitrite will be hidden under the nitrate-limited conditions of most mangrove forest soils.

  18. Optimization of nitrogen removal from piggery waste by nitrite nitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eum, Y; Choi, E

    2002-01-01

    The piggery waste characteristics greatly vary with types of manure collections and the amount of water used. If solids are separated well, the waste strength will be greatly reduced resulting in lower TCOD/TKN ratio of 4 (average). If solids are separated by a mechanical scraper, some solids will remain and the waste strength will be increased with a TCOD/TKN ratio of 7. This study was conducted to find an optimum operating condition for nitrogen removal with these two ratios. Nitrite nitrification was targeted because it could be a short cut process for savings in oxygen for nitrification and carbon requirements for denitrification. The study results indicated that nitrogen loading rate and pH were the most important factors to be considered for stable nitrite nitrification. The applicable nitrogen loads were estimated to be 0.3 to 2.0 kgTKN/oxic m3/d for high TCOD/TKN ratio without pH control. With higher pH > 8, NO2N/NOxN ratios in oxic stages even with lower nitrogen loads were increased. The SBR with low TCOD/TKN ratio less than 4 required additional alkalinity. For a complete denitrification, the influent TCOD/TKN ratio must exceed 6 with oxic/total reactor volume ratio of 0.5. Nitrite nitrification and denitrification could save about 35% in tank volume and 50% in carbon requirement, respectively. However, 9.5% oxygen saving could be expected during the operation with low TCOD/TKN ratio. The elevated temperature due to the heat released from COD removal also enhanced microbial activities for nitrification and denitrification as well as ammonia stripping. However, careful attention must be provided for the reactor temperature not to inhibit the nitrification process.

  19. Microbial competition among anammox bacteria in nitrite-limited bioreactors

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Lei

    2017-08-26

    Phylogenetically diverse anammox bacteria have been detected in most of anoxic natural and engineered ecosystems and thus regarded as key players in the global nitrogen cycle. However, ecological niche differentiation of anammox bacteria remains unresolved despite its ecological and practical importance. In this study, the microbial competitions for a common substrate (nitrite) among three anammox species (i.e. “Candidatus Brocadia sinica”, “Candidatus Jettenia caeni” and “Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis”) were systematically investigated in nitrite-limited gel-immobilized column reactors (GICR) and membrane bioreactors (MBRs) under different nitrogen loading rates (NLRs). 16 S rRNA gene-based population dynamics revealed that “Ca. J. caeni” could proliferate only at low NLRs, whereas “Ca. B. sinica” outcompeted other two species at higher NLRs in both types of reactors. Furthermore, FISH analysis revealed that “Ca. J. caeni” was mainly present as spherical microclusters at the inner part (low NO2− environment), whereas “Ca. B. sinica” was present throughout the gel beads and granules. This spatial distribution supports the outcomes of the competition experiments. However, the successful competition of “Ca. J. caeni” at low NLR could not be explained with the Monod model probably due to inaccuracy of kinetic parameters such as half saturation constant (Ks) for nitrite and a difference in the maintenance rate (m). In addition, the growth of “Ca. K. stuttgartiensis” could not be observed in any experimental conditions, suggesting possible unknown factor(s) is missing. Taken together, NLR was one of factors determining ecological niche differentiation of “Ca. B. sinica” and “Ca. J. caeni”.

  20. Cultivation, growth physiology, and chemotaxonomy of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spieck, Eva; Lipski, André

    2011-01-01

    Lithoautotrophic nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) are known as fastidious microorganisms, which are hard to maintain and not many groups are trained to keep them in culture. They convert nitrite stoichiometrically to nitrate and growth is slow due to the poor energy balance. NOB are comprised of five genera, which are scattered among the phylogenetic tree. Because NOB proliferate in a broad range of environmental conditions (terrestrial, marine, acidic) and have diverse lifestyles (lithoautotrophic, mixotrophic, and heterotrophic), variation in media composition is necessary to match their individual growth requirements in the laboratory. From Nitrobacter and Nitrococcus relatively high cell amounts can be achieved by consumption of high nitrite concentrations, whereas accumulation of cells belonging to Nitrospira, Nitrospina, or the new candidate genus Nitrotoga needs prolonged feeding procedures. Isolation is possible for planktonic cells by dilution series or plating techniques, but gets complicated for strains with a tendency to develop microcolonies like Nitrospira. Physiological experiments including determination of the temperature or pH-optimum can be conducted with active laboratory cultures of NOB, but the attainment of reference values like cell protein content or cell numbers might be hard to realize due to the formation of flocs and the low cell density. Monitoring of laboratory enrichments is necessary especially if several species or genera coexist within the same culture and due to population shifts over time. Chemotaxonomy is a valuable method to identify and quantify NOB in biofilms and pure cultures alike, since fatty acid profiles reflect their phylogenetic heterogeneity. This chapter focusses on methods to enrich, isolate, and characterize NOB by various cultivation-based techniques. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. ADSORPTION OF NITRITE FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTION USING SAWDUST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiz Nuran ACAR

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of nitrites ions onto sawdust materials have been studied using a batch system. In this study, using adsorbents are beech, pine, poplar and walnut sawdust materials. The maximum adsorption percentage was occured by beech sawdust. In the studies, the effects of adsorbents and the solution of initial pH for beech sawdust were analysed using the first order reversible reaction kinetic model. For the different experimental conditions, the reaction rate constants and equilibrium constant have been determined with this kinetic model.

  2. Structure and dynamics of solvated hydrogenoxalate and oxalate anions: theoretical study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kroutil, O.; Minofar, Babak; Kabeláč, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 9 (2016), s. 210 ISSN 1610-2940 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Ab initio molecular dynamics * oxalic acid anions * Potential energy surface Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.425, year: 2016

  3. Circular patterns of calcium oxalate monohydrate induced by defective Langmuir-Blodgett film on quartz substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He Jieyu [Institute of Biomineralization and Lithiasis Research, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Institute of Biomineralization and Lithiasis Research, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Ouyang Jianming [Institute of Biomineralization and Lithiasis Research, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Institute of Biomineralization and Lithiasis Research, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China)], E-mail: toyjm@jnu.edu.cn

    2009-01-01

    The defective Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) film of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) on quartz injured by potassium oxalate (K{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}) was used as a model system to induce growth of calcium oxalate crystals. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) indicated that circular defective domains with a diameter of 1-200 {mu}m existed in the LB film. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed circular patterns of aggregated calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystallites were induced by these defective domains. It was ascribed to that the interaction between the negatively-charged oxalate ions and the phosphatidyl groups in DPPC headgroups makes the phospholipid molecules rearranged and exist in an out-of-order state in the LB film, especially at the boundaries of liquid-condensed (LC)/liquid-expanded (LE) phases, which provide much more nucleating sites for COM crystals.

  4. MRP-1 and BCRP Promote the Externalization of Phosphatidylserine in Oxalate-treated Renal Epithelial Cells: Implications for Calcium Oxalate Urolithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, YiFu; Yu, ShiLiang; Gan, XiuGuo; Zhang, Ze; Wang, Yan; Wang, YingWei; An, RuiHua

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the possible involvement of multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP-1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) in the oxalate-induced redistribution of phosphatidylserine (PS) in renal epithelial cell membranes. A western blot analysis was used to examine the MRP-1 and BCRP expression levels. Surface-expressed PS was detected by the annexin V-binding assay. The cell-permeable fluorogenic probe 2,7-dichlorofluorescein diacetate was used to measure the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level. A rat model of hyperoxaluria was obtained using 0.5% ethylene glycol and 1.0% ammonium chloride. In addition, certain animals received verapamil (50 mg/kg body weight), which is a common inhibitor of MRP-1 and BCRP. The degree of nephrolithiasis was assessed histomorphometrically using sections stained by Pizzolato method and by measuring the calcium oxalate crystal content in the renal tissue. Oxalate produced a concentration-dependent increase in the synthesis of MRP-1 and BCRP. Treatment with MK571 and Ko143 (MRP-1- and BCRP-specific inhibitors, respectively) significantly attenuated the oxalate-induced PS externalization. Adding the antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine significantly reduced MRP-1 and BCRP expression. In vivo, markedly decreased nephrocalcinosis was observed compared with that in the rat model of hyperoxaluria without verapamil treatment. Oxalate induces the upregulation of MRP-1 and BCRP, which act as phospholipid floppases causing PS externalization in the renal epithelial cell membrane. The process is mediated by intracellular ROS production. The ROS-mediated increase in the synthesis of MRP-1 and BCRP can play an important role in hyperoxaluria-promoted calcium oxalate urolithiasis by facilitating phosphatidylserine redistribution in renal epithelial cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of Kimchi Fermentation on Oxalate Levels in Silver Beet (Beta vulgaris var. cicla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukiko Wadamori

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Total, soluble and insoluble oxalates were extracted and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC following the preparation of kimchi using silver beet (Beta vulgaris var. cicla stems and leaves. As silver beet contains high oxalate concentrations and consumption of high levels can cause the development of kidney stones in some people, the reduction of oxalate during preparation and fermentation of kimchi was investigated. The silver beet stems and leaves were soaked in a 10% brine solution for 11 h and then washed in cold tap water. The total, soluble and insoluble oxalate contents of the silver beet leaves were reduced by soaking in brine, from 4275.81 ± 165.48 mg/100 g to 3709.49 ± 216.51 mg/100 g fresh weight (FW. Fermenting the kimchi for 5 days at 19.3 ± 0.8 °C in 5 L ceramic jars with a water airtight seal resulted in a mean 38.50% reduction in total oxalate content and a mean 22.86% reduction in soluble oxalates. The total calcium content was essentially the same before and after the fermentation of the kimchi (mean 296.1 mg/100 g FW. The study showed that fermentation of kimchi significantly (p < 0.05 reduced the total oxalate concentration in the initial mix from 609.32 ± 15.69 to 374.71 ± 7.94 mg/100 g FW in the final mix which led to a 72.3% reduction in the amount of calcium bound to insoluble oxalate.

  6. Effect of Kimchi Fermentation on Oxalate Levels in Silver Beet (Beta vulgarisvar. cicla).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadamori, Yukiko; Vanhanen, Leo; Savage, Geoffrey P

    2014-04-23

    Total, soluble and insoluble oxalates were extracted and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) following the preparation of kimchi using silver beet ( Beta vulgaris var. cicla) stems and leaves. As silver beet contains high oxalate concentrations and consumption of high levels can cause the development of kidney stones in some people, the reduction of oxalate during preparation and fermentation of kimchi was investigated. The silver beet stems and leaves were soaked in a 10% brine solution for 11 h and then washed in cold tap water. The total, soluble and insoluble oxalate contents of the silver beet leaves were reduced by soaking in brine, from 4275.81 ± 165.48 mg/100 g to 3709.49 ± 216.51 mg/100 g fresh weight (FW). Fermenting the kimchi for 5 days at 19.3 ± 0.8 °C in 5 L ceramic jars with a water airtight seal resulted in a mean 38.50% reduction in total oxalate content and a mean 22.86% reduction in soluble oxalates. The total calcium content was essentially the same before and after the fermentation of the kimchi (mean 296.1 mg/100 g FW). The study showed that fermentation of kimchi significantly ( p < 0.05) reduced the total oxalate concentration in the initial mix from 609.32 ± 15.69 to 374.71 ± 7.94 mg/100 g FW in the final mix which led to a 72.3% reduction in the amount of calcium bound to insoluble oxalate.

  7. Substituting milk for apple juice does not increase kidney stone risk in most normocalciuric adults who form calcium oxalate stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, L K; Kynast-Gales, S A

    1998-03-01

    Increasing intake of dietary calcium from less than 400 mg to 800 mg daily may decrease the absorption of dietary oxalate, which in turn would decrease urinary oxalate excretion. The effect of substituting milk for apple juice on urine composition and risk of calcium oxalate precipitability was studied. Twenty-one normocalciuric adults with a history of at least 1 calcium oxalate stone and urinary oxalate excretion exceeding 275 micromol/day on their self-selected diet. Randomized crossover trial. Each participant consumed two moderate-oxalate (2,011 micromol/day) study diets, which were identical except that one contained 360 mL milk and the other contained 540 mL apple juice as the beverage with meals. Four days free-living then 2 days in the metabolic unit of a university nutrition department. Tiselius risk index for calcium oxalate precipitability calculated from urine composition. Paired t tests. Twenty-four hour urinary oxalate excretion was 18% lower (Papple juice with meals in a diet containing moderate amounts of dietary oxalate from whole grains, legumes, fruits, and vegetables does not increase the risk index of calcium oxalate precipitability in most normocalciuric adults who form stones.

  8. Oxalate synthesis in leaves is associated with root uptake of nitrate and its assimilation in spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao Xia; Zhou, Kai; Hu, Yan; Jin, Rong; Lu, Ling Li; Jin, Chong Wei; Lin, Xian Yong

    2015-08-15

    Excessive accumulation of oxalate in numerous vegetables adversely affects their quality as food. While it is known that nitrate could effectively stimulate oxalate accumulation in many vegetables, little information is available about the mechanism of nitrate-induced oxalate accumulation. In this study, we examined the association of oxalate synthesis with nitrate uptake and assimilation in two genotypes of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.), Heizhenzhu and Weilv. Increasing nitrate levels resulted in enhanced synthesis of oxalate, as well as increased root uptake of nitrate and leaf activities of nitrate reductase (NR) and glutamine synthetase (GS) for both genotypes. Correlation analysis revealed that oxalate accumulation in spinach leaves was positively related with rate of nitrate uptake by roots, as well as leaf activities of NR and GS. Addition of plasmalemma H(+)-ATPase inhibitor sodium vanadate (Na3VO4) significantly decreased leaf oxalate accumulation in both genotypes. Presence of NR or GS inhibitors led to reduction of leaf oxalate contents, GS/NR activities and decreased nitrate uptake rate. Significantly higher levels of nitrate root uptake, leaf NR and GS activities were observed in the high-oxalate genotype Heizhenzhu than in Weilv. Oxalate synthesis in leaves of spinach is not only positively associated with root uptake of nitrate, but also with its assimilation within the plants. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Determination of sulfite by pervaporation-flow injection with amperometric detection using copper hexacyanoferrate-carbon nanotube modified carbon paste electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamo, Lori Shayne T; Tangkuaram, Tanin; Satienperakul, Sakchai

    2010-06-15

    A pervaporation-flow injection (PFI) method was developed for the determination of sulfite in selected food samples using a copper hexacyanoferrate-carbon nanotube (CuHCF-CNT)-modified carbon paste electrode. The electrochemical behavior of the modified electrode was observed using cyclic voltammetry in comparison to a CuHCF-modified carbon paste electrode and a bare carbon paste electrode at a scan rate of 100mVs(-1) in 0.10M KNO(3). The bare carbon paste electrode gave the lowest response to sulfite, while the presence of CuHCF made the detection of sulfite possible through electrocatalytic oxidation by the hexacyanoferrate in the modified electrodes. The presence of CNT in the CuHCF-CNT-modified sensor gave the most remarkable current for the detection of sulfite and was then used as a working electrode in the amperometric flow-through cell in the pervaporation flow injection system. The PFI method involves the injection of a standard or sample sulfite solution into a sulfuric acid donor stream to generate sulfur dioxide gas and evaporate into the headspace of the pervaporation unit. The sulfur dioxide diffuses through the PTFE hydrophobic membrane into a potassium nitrate acceptor stream and reverts to the sulfite form, which, subsequently, is transported to the electrochemical flow cell where it is analyzed amperometrically at a CuHCF-CNT-modified electrode at +0.55V (vs. Ag/AgCl). The detection was determined to be applicable in the sulfite concentration range of 0.5-50mgL(-1). The sensitivity, detection limit, and sample throughput were determined to be 2.105nALmg(-1), 0.40mgL(-1) and 11h(-1), respectively. The developed PFI method, coupled with the CuHCF-CNT-modified carbon paste electrode, was applied in the determination of sulfite content in sulfite-containing food products. The results agreed well with those obtained through the officially recommended differential pulse polarographic method.

  10. Urinary metals in a spontaneous canine model of calcium oxalate urolithiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Furrow

    Full Text Available Calcium oxalate urolithiasis is a common and painful condition in people. The pathogenesis of this disease is complex and poorly understood. Laboratory animal and in vitro studies have demonstrated an effect of multiple trace metals in the crystallization process, and studies in humans have reported relationships between urinary metal concentrations and stone risk. Dogs are a spontaneous model of calcium oxalate urolithiasis, and the metal content of canine calcium oxalate stones mirrors that of human stones. The aim of this study was to test for a relationship between urinary metals and calcium oxalate urolithiasis in dogs. We hypothesized that urinary metals would differ between dogs with and without calcium oxalate urolithiasis. Urine from 122 dogs (71 cases and 51 stone-free controls was analyzed for calcium and 12 other metals. The cases had higher urinary calcium, copper, iron, and vanadium and lower urinary cobalt. Higher urinary vanadium in the cases was associated with being fed a therapeutic stone-prevention diet. Urinary calcium had a strong positive correlation with strontium and moderate positive correlations with chromium, nickel, and zinc. The results of this study complement the findings of similar human studies and suggest a potential role of trace metals in calcium oxalate urolithiasis. Further investigation into how trace metals may affect stone formation is warranted.

  11. Inhibition of crystallization of calcium oxalate by the extraction of Tamarix gallica L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensatal, Ahmed; Ouahrani, M R

    2008-12-01

    The main objective is to study the inhibitor effect of acid fraction of the extract of Tamarix gallica L on the crystallization of calcium oxalate. The extract of Tamarix gallica L is very rich by acid compounds that are used as an inhibitor of nephrolithiasis (calcium oxalate). Our study of the calcium oxalate crystallization is based on the model of turbidimetry by means of a spectrophotometer. The calcium oxalate formation is induced by the addition of oxalate solutions of sodium and of calcium chloride. The addition of inhibitor with various concentrations enabled us to give information on the percentage of inhibition. The comparison between the turbidimetric slopes with and without inhibitor gives the effectiveness of inhibitor for the acid fraction. By comparing the photographs of with and without inhibitor, we concluded that the extract of Tamarix gallica L acts at the stage of growth. The acid fraction of the extract of Tamarix gallica L gives an activity remarkable in the formation of urinary lithiasis (calcium oxalate); this effectiveness is due to the presence of functions of acid.

  12. Competitive and Cooperative Effects during Nickel Adsorption to Iron Oxides in the Presence of Oxalate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, Elaine D. [Department of Earth and Planetary; Catalano, Jeffrey G. [Department of Earth and Planetary

    2017-08-09

    Iron oxides are ubiquitous in soils and sediments and play a critical role in the geochemical distribution of trace elements and heavy metals via adsorption and coprecipitation. The presence of organic acids may potentially alter how metals associate with iron oxide minerals through a series of cooperative or competitive processes: solution complexation, ternary surface complexation, and surface site competition. The macroscopic and molecular-scale effects of these processes were investigated for Ni adsorption to hematite and goethite at pH 7 in the presence of oxalate. The addition of this organic acid suppresses Ni uptake on both minerals. Aqueous speciation suggests that this is dominantly the result of oxalate complexing and solubilizing Ni. Comparison of the Ni surface coverage to the concentration of free (uncomplexed) Ni2+ in solution suggests that the oxalate also alters Ni adsorption affinity. EXAFS and ATR-FTIR spectroscopies indicate that these changes in binding affinity are due to the formation of Ni–oxalate ternary surface complexes. These observations demonstrate that competition between dissolved oxalate and the mineral surface for Ni overwhelms the enhancement in adsorption associated with ternary complexation. Oxalate thus largely enhances Ni mobility, thereby increasing micronutrient bioavailability and inhibiting contaminant sequestration.

  13. Putative Aspergillus niger-induced oxalate nephrosis in sheep : clinical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.J. Botha

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available A sheep farmer provided a maize-based brewer's grain (mieliemaroek and bales of Eragrostis curvula hay to ewes and their lambs, kept on zero-grazing in pens. The 'mieliemaroek' was visibly mouldy. After 14 days in the feedlot, clinical signs, including generalised weakness, ataxia of the hind limbs, tremors and recumbency, were noticed. Six ewes died within a period of 7 days. A post mortem examination was performed on 1 ewe. The carcass appeared to be cachectic with mild effusions into the body cavities; mild lung congestion and pallor of the kidneys were observed. Microscopical evaluation revealed nephrosis and birefringent oxalate crystals in the renal tubules when viewed under polarised light. A provisional diagnosis of oxalate nephrosis with subsequent kidney failure was made. Amongst other fungi, Aspergillus niger was isolated from 'mieliemaroek' samples submitted for fungal culture and identification. As A. niger is known to synthesise oxalates, a qualitative screen to detect oxalic acid in the mieliemaroek and purified A. niger isolates was performed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Oxalic acid was detected, which supported a diagnosis of soluble oxalate-induced nephropathy.

  14. Excessive nitrite affects zebrafish valvulogenesis through yielding too much NO signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junbo Li

    Full Text Available Sodium nitrite, a common food additive, exists widely not only in the environment but also in our body. Excessive nitrite causes toxicological effects on human health; however, whether it affects vertebrate heart valve development remains unknown. In vertebrates, developmental defects of cardiac valves usually lead to congenital heart disease. To understand the toxic effects of nitrite on valvulogenesis, we exposed zebrafish embryos with different concentrations of sodium nitrite. Our results showed that sodium nitrite caused developmental defects of zebrafish heart dose dependently. It affected zebrafish heart development starting from 36 hpf (hour post fertilization when heart initiates looping process. Comprehensive analysis on the embryos at 24 hpf and 48 hpf showed that excessive nitrite did not affect blood circulation, vascular network, myocardium and endocardium development. But development of endocardial cells in atrioventricular canal (AVC of the embryos at 48 hpf was disrupted by too much nitrite, leading to defective formation of primitive valve leaflets at 76 hpf. Consistently, excessive nitrite diminished expressions of valve progenitor markers including bmp4, has2, vcana and notch1b at 48 hpf. Furthermore, 3', 5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP, downstream of nitric oxide (NO signaling, was increased its level significantly in the embryos exposed with excessive nitrite and microinjection of soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor ODQ (1H-[1], [2], [4]Oxadiazolo[4,3-a] quinoxalin-1-one, an antagonist of NO signaling, into nitrite-exposed embryos could partly rescue the cardiac valve malformation. Taken together, our results show that excessive nitrite affects early valve leaflet formation by producing too much NO signaling.

  15. Toluene nitration in irradiated nitric acid and nitrite solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, Gracy, E-mail: gracy.elias@inl.go [Idaho National Laboratory, Chemical and Radiation Measurement Department, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2213 (United States); Mincher, Bruce J. [Idaho National Laboratory, Aqueous Separations and Radiochemistry Department, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6180 (United States); Mezyk, Stephen P. [California State University-Long Beach, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 1250 Bellflower Boulevard, Long Beach, CA 90840-3903 (United States); Muller, Jim [University of Utah, Department of Chemistry, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0850 (United States); Martin, Leigh R. [Idaho National Laboratory, Aqueous Separations and Radiochemistry Department, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6180 (United States)

    2011-04-15

    The kinetics, mechanisms, and stable products produced for the nitration of aryl alkyl mild ortho-para director toluene in irradiated nitric acid and neutral nitrite solutions were investigated using {gamma} and pulse radiolysis. Electron pulse radiolysis was used to determine the bimolecular rate constants for the reaction of toluene with different transient species produced by irradiation. HPLC with UV detection, GC-MS and LC-MS, were used to assess the stable reaction products. Free-radical based nitration reaction products were found in irradiated acidic and neutral media. In 6.0 M HNO{sub 3}, ring substitution, side chain substitution, and oxidation, produced different nitrated toluene products. For ring substitution, nitrogen oxide radicals were added mainly to cyclohexadienyl radicals, whereas for side chain substitution, these radicals were added to the carbon-centered benzyl radical produced by H-atom abstraction. In neutral nitrite solutions, radiolytically-induced ring nitration products approached a statistically random distribution, suggesting a direct free-radical reaction involving addition of the {sup {center_dot}N}O{sub 2} radical.

  16. Toluene nitration in irradiated nitric acid and nitrite solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Gracy; Mincher, Bruce J.; Mezyk, Stephen P.; Muller, Jim; Martin, Leigh R.

    2011-04-01

    The kinetics, mechanisms, and stable products produced for the nitration of aryl alkyl mild ortho-para director toluene in irradiated nitric acid and neutral nitrite solutions were investigated using γ and pulse radiolysis. Electron pulse radiolysis was used to determine the bimolecular rate constants for the reaction of toluene with different transient species produced by irradiation. HPLC with UV detection, GC-MS and LC-MS, were used to assess the stable reaction products. Free-radical based nitration reaction products were found in irradiated acidic and neutral media. In 6.0 M HNO3, ring substitution, side chain substitution, and oxidation, produced different nitrated toluene products. For ring substitution, nitrogen oxide radicals were added mainly to cyclohexadienyl radicals, whereas for side chain substitution, these radicals were added to the carbon-centered benzyl radical produced by H-atom abstraction. In neutral nitrite solutions, radiolytically-induced ring nitration products approached a statistically random distribution, suggesting a direct free-radical reaction involving addition of the rad NO2 radical.

  17. Toluene nitration in irradiated nitric acid and nitrite solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gracy Elias; Bruce J. Mincher; Stephen P. Mezyk; Jim Muller; Leigh R. Martin

    2011-04-01

    The kinetics, mechanisms, and stable products produced for the aryl alkyl mild ortho-para director - toluene, in irradiated nitric acid and neutral nitrite solutions were investigated using ?, and pulse radiolysis. Electron pulse radiolysis was used to determine the bimolecular rate constants for the reaction of toluene with different transient species produced by irradiation. HPLC with UV detection was primarily used to assess the stable reaction products. GC-MS and LC-MS were used to confirm the results from HPLC. Free-radical nitration reaction products were found in irradiated acidic and neutral media. In acidic medium, the ring substitution and side chain substitution and oxidation produced different nitro products. In ring substitution, nitrogen oxide radicals were added mainly to hydroxyl radical-produced cyclohexadienyl radical, and in side chain substitution they were added to the carbon-centered benzyl radical produced by H-atom abstraction. In neutral nitrite toluene solution, radiolytic ring nitration products approached a statistically random distribution, suggesting a free-radical reaction involving addition of the •NO2 radical.

  18. Toluene nitration in irradiated nitric acid and nitrite solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, Gracy; Mincher, Bruce J.; Mezyk, Stephen P.; Muller, Jim; Martin, Leigh R.

    2011-01-01

    The kinetics, mechanisms, and stable products produced for the nitration of aryl alkyl mild ortho-para director toluene in irradiated nitric acid and neutral nitrite solutions were investigated using γ and pulse radiolysis. Electron pulse radiolysis was used to determine the bimolecular rate constants for the reaction of toluene with different transient species produced by irradiation. HPLC with UV detection, GC-MS and LC-MS, were used to assess the stable reaction products. Free-radical based nitration reaction products were found in irradiated acidic and neutral media. In 6.0 M HNO 3 , ring substitution, side chain substitution, and oxidation, produced different nitrated toluene products. For ring substitution, nitrogen oxide radicals were added mainly to cyclohexadienyl radicals, whereas for side chain substitution, these radicals were added to the carbon-centered benzyl radical produced by H-atom abstraction. In neutral nitrite solutions, radiolytically-induced ring nitration products approached a statistically random distribution, suggesting a direct free-radical reaction involving addition of the · NO 2 radical.

  19. Spectrofluorometric and Molecular Modeling Studies on Binding of Nitrite Ion with Bovine Hemoglobin: Effect of Nitrite Ion on Amino Acid Residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrakian, T.; Bagheri, H.; Afkhami, A.

    2015-05-01

    The interaction between nitrite ion and bovine hemoglobin was investigated by a spectrofluorometric technique. The experimental results indicated that the interaction causes a static quenching of the fluorescence of bovine hemoglobin, that the binding reaction is spontaneous, and that H-bonding interactions play a major role in binding of this ion to bovine hemoglobin. The formation constant for this interaction was calculated. Based on Förster's theory of nonradiative energy transfer, the binding distance between this ion and bovine hemoglobin was determined. Furthermore, the interaction of nitrite ion with tyrosine and tryptophan was investigated with synchronous fluorescence. There was no significant shift of the maximum emission wavelength with interactions of the mentioned ion with bovine hemoglobin, which implies that interaction of nitrite ion with bovine hemoglobin does not affect the microenvironment around the tryptophan and tyrosine residues. Furthermore, the effect of nitrite ion on amino acid residues of bovine hemoglobin was studied by a molecular docking technique.

  20. Metabolic fates and effects of nitrite in brown trout under normoxic and hypoxic conditions: blood and tissue nitrite metabolism and interactions with branchial NOS, Na+/K+-ATPase and hsp70 expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank Bo; Gerber, Lucie; Hansen, Marie Niemann

    2015-01-01

    Nitrite secures essential nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability in hypoxia at low endogenous concentrations, whereas it becomes toxic at high concentrations. We exposed brown trout to normoxic and hypoxic water in the absence and presence of added ambient nitrite to decipher the cellular metabolism...... and effects of nitrite at basal and elevated concentrations under different oxygen regimes. We also tested hypotheses concerning the influence of nitrite on branchial nitric oxide synthase (NOS), Na+/K+-ATPase (nka) and heat shock protein (hsp70) mRNA expression. Basal plasma and erythrocyte nitrite levels...... were higher in hypoxia than normoxia, suggesting increased NOS activity. Nitrite exposure strongly elevated nitrite concentrations in plasma, erythrocytes, heart tissue and white muscle, which was associated with an extensive metabolism of nitrite to nitrate and to iron-nitrosylated and S...

  1. Hydrothermal Conversion of Neutral Sulfite Semi-Chemical Red Liquor into Hydrochar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramy Gamgoum

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrochar was produced from neutral sulfite semi-chemical (NSSC red liquor as a possible bio-based solid fuel for use in power generation facilities. Hydrothermal conversion (HTC experiments were conducted using a fixed liquor-to-water volume ratio of 1:8 and reaction time of 3 h. Solutions were processed using different chemical additives, pH and temperature conditions to determine the optimum conditions required for producing a high energy content solid fuel. The hydrochar samples produced were analyzed by ultimate, thermogravimetric (TGA and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR analyses to determine physicochemical properties that are important for utilization as a fuel. The residual process liquids were also analyzed to better understand the effect of HTC process conditions on their properties. It was determined that the optimum conditions for producing a solid fuel was at a reaction temperature of 250 °C, in the presence of acetic acid at pH 3. The maximum energy content (HHV of the hydrochar produced from red liquor at this condition was 29.87 MJ/kg, and its ash content was 1.12 wt.%. This result reflects the effect of increasing reaction temperature on the physicochemical characteristics of the hydrochar. The increase of HTC temperature significantly reduces the ash content of the hydrochar, leads to a significant increase in the carbon content of the hydrochar, and a reduction in both the oxygen and hydrogen content. These effects suggests an increase in the degree of condensation of the hydrochar products, and consequently the formation of a high energy content material. Based on TGA and FTIR analyses, hydrochars prepared at high HTC temperature showed lower adsorbed moisture, hemicellulose and cellulose contents, with enrichment in content of higher temperature volatiles, such as lignin.

  2. Monitoring heavy metals, residual agricultural chemicals and sulfites in traditional herbal decoctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, In-Sil; Lee, Jeong-Sook; Kim, Sung-Dan; Kim, Yun-Hee; Park, Hae-Won; Ryu, Hoe-Jin; Lee, Jib-Ho; Lee, Jeong-Mi; Jung, Kweon; Na, Cheol; Joung, Jin-Yong; Son, Chang-Gue

    2017-03-14

    Asian traditional herbal preparations are frequently considered for the contamination with undeclared toxic or hazardous substances. The aim of this study was to determine the toxic heavy metals, pesticides and sulfur dioxide in decoctions that is a common form of final utilization in Korea. A total of 155 decoctions composed of multi-ingredient traditional herbs were randomly sampled from Seoul in Korea between 2013 and 2014. For each decoction, the concentrations of four heavy metals (arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury), 33 pesticides and sulfur dioxide were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), mercury analyzer, gas chromatography/nitrogen phosphorous detector (GC/NPD), gas chromatography/micro electron capture detector (GC/μECD), and Monier-Williams method respectively. One hundred fifty-two of One hundred fifty-five decoctions (98.1%) contained one of three heavy metals (96.1% for As, 97.4% for Cd, and 90.3% for Pb, 0.0% for Hg). Their average concentrations (77.0 ± 79.7 ug/kg for As, 20.4 ± 23.7 ug/kg for Cd, and 68.8 ± 76.5 ug/kg for Pb) were approximately 20% of the maximum allowable limits of vegetable or ginseng beverage described in the Korean Food Standard Codex while their 95th percentile concentrations were below than the guideline for them. None of 33 pesticides was detected in 155 decoction samples, and only one sample showed over limit of detection for residual sulfites. This study support that the contained status of toxic heavy metals, pesticides and sulfur dioxide in herbal decoctions are currently within safe level in Korea, and provide a reference data for the further studies focused on the safety herbal preparations.

  3. Effect of Electrolytes on the Adsorption of Nitrite and Nitrate from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nitrite and nitrate levels were quantitatively adsorbed to wood-derived activated carbon in aqueous system and the effects of electrolytes investigated in this study using batch sorption process. The data showed that nitrate adsorbed nearly 1.5 times higher than that of nitrite. The adsorption is adequately explained by ...

  4. Haematological and ion regulatory effects of nitrite in the air-breathing snakehead fish Channa striata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefevre, Sjannie; Jensen, Frank Bo; Huong, Do T.T.

    2012-01-01

    The tolerance and effects of nitrite on ion balance and haematology were investigated in the striped snakehead, Channa striata Bloch 1793, which is an air-breathing fish with reduced gills of importance for aquaculture in South East Asia. C. striata was nitrite tolerant with a 96 h LC50 of 4.7 m...

  5. The effect of environmental hypercapnia and size on nitrite toxicity in the striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Malthe; Damsgaard, Christian; Gam, Le Thi Hong

    2016-01-01

    Striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) are farmed intensively at high stocking densities in Vietnam where they are likely to encounter environmental hypercapnia as well as occasional high levels of aquatic nitrite. Nitrite competes with Cl- for uptake at the branchial HCO3-/Cl- exchanger, ...... the ambient concentration, while small fish did not. Small P. hypophthalmus instead had significantly higher plasma [nitrate], and haemoglobin concentrations, revealing greater capacity for detoxifying nitrite by oxidising it to nitrate.......Striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) are farmed intensively at high stocking densities in Vietnam where they are likely to encounter environmental hypercapnia as well as occasional high levels of aquatic nitrite. Nitrite competes with Cl- for uptake at the branchial HCO3-/Cl- exchanger...... to a reduced nitrite uptake. To assess the effect of hypercapnia on nitrite uptake, fish were cannulated in the dorsal aorta, allowing repeated blood sampling for measurements of haemoglobin derivatives, plasma ions and acid-base status during exposure to 0.9 mM nitrite alone and in combination with acute...

  6. 21 CFR 172.177 - Sodium nitrite used in processing smoked chub.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Food Preservatives § 172.177 Sodium nitrite used in processing smoked chub. The food additive sodium nitrite may be safely used in combination with salt (NaCl) to aid in...

  7. Dietary nitrite attenuates oxidative stress and activates antioxidant genes in rat heart during hypobaric hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manjulata; Arya, Aditya; Kumar, Rajesh; Bhargava, Kalpana; Sethy, Niroj Kumar

    2012-01-01

    The nitrite anion represents the circulatory and tissue storage form of nitric oxide (NO) and a signaling molecule, capable of conferring cardioprotection and many other health benefits. However, molecular mechanisms for observed cardioprotective properties of nitrite remain largely unknown. We have evaluated the NO-like bioactivity and cardioprotective efficacies of sodium nitrite supplemented in drinking water in rats exposed to short-term chronic hypobaric hypoxia. We observed that, nitrite significantly attenuates hypoxia-induced oxidative stress, modulates HIF-1α stability and promotes NO-cGMP signaling in hypoxic heart. To elucidate potential downstream targets of nitrite during hypoxia, we performed a microarray analysis of nitrite supplemented hypoxic hearts and compared with both hypoxic and nitrite supplemented normoxic hearts respectively. The analysis revealed a significant increase in the expression of many antioxidant genes, transcription factors and cardioprotective signaling pathways which was subsequently confirmed by qRT-PCR and Western blotting. Conversely, hypoxia exposure increased oxidative stress, activated inflammatory cytokines, downregulated ion channels and altered expression of both pro- and anti-oxidant genes. Our results illustrate the physiological function of nitrite as an eNOS-independent source of NO in heart profoundly modulating the oxidative status and cardiac transcriptome during hypoxia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Electrochemical detection of nitrite based on the polythionine/carbon nanotube modified electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Chunyan; Chen, Jinzhuo; Nie, Zhou; Yang, Minghui; Si, Shihui

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, thionine was electro-polymerized onto the surface of carbon nanotube (CNT)-modified glassy carbon (GC) to fabricate the polythionine (PTH)/CNT/GC electrode. It was found that the electro-reduction current of nitrite was enhanced greatly at the PTH/CNT/GC electrode. It may be demonstrated that PTH was used as a mediator for electrocatalytic reduction of nitrite, and CNTs as an excellent nanomaterial can improve the electron transfer between the electrode and nitrite. Therefore, based on the synergic effect of PTH and CNTs, the PTH/CNT/GC electrode was employed to detect nitrite, and the high sensitivity of 5.81 μA mM −1 , and the detection limit of 1.4 × 10 −6 M were obtained. Besides, the modified electrode showed an inherent stability, fast response time, and good anti-interference ability. These suggested that the PTH/CNT/GC electrode was favorable and reliable for the detection of nitrite. - Highlights: ► Polythionine (PTH) was used as a mediator for electrocatalytic reduction of nitrite. ► Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) improve electron transfer between the electrode and nitrite. ► The PTH/CNT/glassy carbon electrode showed excellent nitrite detection performance.

  9. Bioavailability of sodium nitrite from an aqueous solution in healthy adults.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunault, C.C.; van Velzen, A.G.; Sips, A.J.; Schothorst, R.C.; Meulenbelt, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/079479227

    2009-01-01

    Nitrate intake in humans is high through intake of vegetables such as beets, lettuce, and spinach. Nitrate itself is a compound of low toxicity but its metabolite, nitrite, formed by bacteria in the oral cavity and gastrointestinal tract, has been suspected of potential carcinogenic effects. Nitrite

  10. 77 FR 71006 - Sodium Nitrite Injection and Sodium Thiosulfate Injection Drug Products Labeled for the Treatment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-28

    ... Sodium Nitrite Injection and Sodium Thiosulfate Injection Drug Products Labeled for the Treatment of... against unapproved injectable drug products containing sodium nitrite labeled for the treatment of cyanide poisoning and unapproved injectable drug products containing sodium thiosulfate labeled for the treatment of...

  11. Influence of turkey meat on residual nitrite in cured meat products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, B; Cassens, R G; Borchert, L L

    2001-02-01

    A response surface experimental design was employed to estimate residual nitrite level at various initial nitrite concentrations, percent turkey meat in the formula, and heat quantity (F) values using a typical wiener as the test system. Pork and mechanically separated turkey were used as the meat ingredients. Residual nitrite and pH were measured at day 1, 7 days, 14 days, and 49 days after processing. Protein, fat, salt, moisture, and CIE (L*a*b*) color values were also determined. Results showed that the effect of turkey meat on residual nitrite level was significant (P meat in the formula resulted in lower residual nitrite levels at a fixed pH. The residual nitrite level was initially proportional to initial nitrite concentration, but it became a nonsignificant factor during longer storage time. Differences in heat quantity had a significant effect (P meat products at a fixed pH. However, this effect became nonsignificant during longer storage. Reduction of residual nitrite in wieners because of turkey meat addition at a fixed pH was due to characteristics of the turkey tissue, but the mechanism of action remains unknown. It was also established that commercial wieners had a higher pH if poultry meat was included in the formulation.

  12. Low nitrous oxide production in intermittent-feed high performance nitritating reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, Qingxian; Jensen, Malene M.; Smets, Barth F.

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) production from autotrophic nitrogen removal processes, especially nitritating systems, is of growing concern. N2O dynamics were characterized and N2O production factors were quantified in two lab-scale intermittent-feed nitritating SBRs. 93 ± 14% of the oxidized ammonium...

  13. Catalyst free, base free microwave irradiated synthesis of aryl nitrites from potassium aryltrifluoroborates and bismuth nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Masum, Mohammad; Welch, Rebecca L.

    2014-01-01

    A mixture of bismuth nitrate pentahydrate and potassium aryltrifluoroborate in toluene under microwave heating at 120 °C for 20 min provides an interesting and mild reaction protocol for the synthesis of aryl nitrite. The conversion to aryl nitrites from aryltrifluoroborates without transition metal catalyst and base in high yields is remarkable. PMID:25242828

  14. Nanoscale observations of the effect of citrate on calcium oxalate precipitation on calcite surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos-Cara, Alejandro; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion; Putnis, Christine V.

    2016-04-01

    Calcium oxalate (CaC2O4ṡxH2O) minerals are naturally occurring minerals found in fossils, plants, kidney stones and is a by-product in some processes such as paper, food and beverage production [1,2]. In particular, calcium oxalate monohydrate phase (COM) also known as whewellite (CaC2O4ṡH2O), is the most frequently reported mineral phase found in urinary and kidney stones together with phosphates. Organic additives are well known to play a key role in the formation of minerals in both biotic and abiotic systems, either facilitating their precipitation or hindering it. In this regard, recent studies have provided direct evidence demonstrating that citrate species could enhance dissolution of COM and inhibit their precipitation. [3,4] The present work aims at evauate the influence of pH, citrate and oxalic acid concentrations in calcium oxalate precipitation on calcite surfaces (Island Spar, Chihuahua, Mexico) through in-situ nanoscale observation using in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM, Multimode, Bruker) in flow-through experiments. Changes in calcium oxalate morphologies and precipitated phases were observed, as well as the inhibitory effect of citrate on calcium oxalate precipitation, which also lead to stabilization an the amorphous calcium oxalate phase. [1] K.D. Demadis, M. Öner, Inhibitory effects of "green"additives on the crystal growth of sparingly soluble salts, in: J.T. Pearlman (Ed.), Green Chemistry Research Trends, Nova Science Publishers Inc., New York, 2009, pp. 265-287. [2] M. Masár, M. Zuborová, D. Kaniansky, B. Stanislawski, Determination of oxalate in beer by zone electrophoresis on a chip with conductivity detection, J. Sep. Sci. 26 (2003) 647-652. [3] Chutipongtanate S, Chaiyarit S, Thongboonkerd V. Citrate, not phosphate, can dissolve calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals and detach these crystals from renal tubular cells. Eur J Pharmacol 2012;689:219-25. [4] Weaver ML, Qiu SR, Hoyer JR, Casey WH, Nancollas GH, De Yoreo JJ

  15. Controls of nitrite oxidation in ammonia-removing biological air filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhler, Susanne; Ottosen, Lars Ditlev Mørck; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2008-01-01

    in accumulation of nitrate rather than nitrite and a significant decline in pH. As a consequence, ammonia is removed more efficiently, but heterotrophic oxidation of odorous compounds might be inhibited.  To identify the controlling mechanisms of nitrite oxidation, full-scale biological air filters were...... activity resulting in a lowered pH and thus a decreased FA concentration, promoting further growth of NOB. Yet, in some cases a situation with a nitrate-to-nitrite ratio of 1 and moderate pH remained stable even under varying air load and water supply, suggesting that additional mechanisms were involved......In biological air filters ammonia is removed due to the action of Ammonia Oxidizing Bacteria (AOB) resulting in nitrite accumulation exceeding 100 mM. Among filters treating exhaust air from pig facilities successful establishment of Nitrite Oxidizing Bacteria (NOB) sometimes occurs, resulting...

  16. Aggregate Size and Architecture Determine Microbial Activity Balance for One-Stage Partial Nitritation and Anammox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlaeminck, S.E.; Terada, Akihiko; Smets, Barth F.

    2010-01-01

    and the activity balance for the different aggregate sizes and (ii) to relate aggregate morphology, size distribution, and architecture putatively to the inoculation and operation of the three reactors. A nitrite accumulation rate ratio (NARR) was defined as the net aerobic nitrite production rate divided...... by the anoxic nitrite consumption rate. The smallest reactor A, B, and C aggregates were nitrite sources (NARR, > 1.7). Large reactor A and C aggregates were granules capable of autonomous nitrogen removal (NARR, 0.6 to 1.1) with internal AnAOB zones surrounded by an AerAOB rim. Around 50% of the autotrophic...... space in these granules consisted of AerAOB- and AnAOB-specific extracellular polymeric substances. Large reactor B aggregates were thin film-like nitrite sinks (NARR,

  17. Electrochemical Single‐Molecule AFM of the Redox Metalloenzyme Copper Nitrite Reductase in Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hao, Xian; Zhang, Jingdong; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager

    2012-01-01

    We studied the electrochemical behavior of the redox metalloenzyme copper nitrite reductase (CNiR, Achromobacter xylosoxidans) immobilized on a Au(111)‐electrode surface modified by a self‐assembled cysteamine molecular monolayer (SAM) using a combination of cyclic voltammetry and electrochemically......‐controlled atomic force microscopy (in situ AFM). The enzyme showed no voltammetric signals in the absence of nitrite substrate, whereas a strong reductive electrocatalytic signal appeared in the presence of nitrite. Such a pattern is common in protein film and monolayer voltammetry and points to conformational...... in the presence of nitrite. No change in size was observed in the absence of nitrite over the same potential range. The enzyme size variation is suggested to offer clues to the broadly observed substrate triggering in metalloenzyme monolayer voltammetry....

  18. Diversity and composition of sulfate- and sulfite-reducing prokaryotes as affected by marine-freshwater gradient and sulfate availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Lan-Feng; Tang, Sen-Lin; Chen, Chang-Po; Hsieh, Hwey-Lian

    2012-01-01

    Sulfate- and sulfite-reducing prokaryotes (SSRP) communities play a key role in both sulfur and carbon cycles. In estuarine ecosystems, sulfate concentrations change with tides and could be limited in tidal freshwater reach or deep sediments. In a subtropical estuary of northern Taiwan in December 2007, we examined the compositional changes of SSRP communities. We examined three sites: from the lower estuarine brackish-water reach (site GR and mangrove vegetation site, GM) to the upper estuarine tidal freshwater reach (site HR), as well as from surface to a 50-cm depth. The partial sequence of sulfite reductase (dsrB) genes was used as a molecular marker of SSRP, linked to polymerase chain reaction and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) techniques. SSRP communities of the DGGE profiles varied with sites according to one-way analyses of similarities (Global R = 0.69, P = 0.001). Using cluster analysis, the DGGE profile was found to show site-specific clusters and a distinct depth zonation (five, six, and two SSRP communities at the GM, GR, and HR sites, respectively). SSRP composition was highly correlated to the combination of salinity, reduced sulfur, and total organic carbon contents (BIO-ENV analysis, r ( s ) = 0.56). After analyzing a total of 35 dsrB sequences in the DGGE gel, six groups with 15 phylotypes were found, which were closely related to marine-freshwater gradient. Moreover, sequences neighboring sulfite-reducing prokaryotes were observed, in addition to those affiliated to sulfate-reducing prokaryotes. Four phylotypes harvested in HR resembled the genus Desulfitobacterium, a sulfite-reducing prokaryote, which failed to use sulfate as an electron acceptor and were active in freshwater and sulfate-limited habitat. The other five phylotypes in the HR reach belonged to the sulfate-reducing prokaryotes of the genera Desulfatiferula, Desulfosarcina, Desulfovibrio, and Desulfotomaculum, which appeared to tolerate low salinity and

  19. On the mechanism of sulfite activation of chloroplast thylakoid ATPase and the relation of ADP tightly bound at a catalytic site to the binding change mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Z.; Boyer, P.D.

    1990-01-01

    Washed chloroplast thylakoid membranes upon exposure to [ 3 H]ADP retain in tightly bound [ 3 H]ADP on a catalytic site of the ATP synthase. The presence of sufficient endogenous or added Mg 2+ results in an enzyme with essentially no ATPase activity. Sulfite activates the ATPase, and many molecules of ATP per synthase can be hydrolyzed before most of the bound [ 3 H]ADP is released, a result interpreted as indicating that the ADP is not bound at a site participating in catalysis by the sulfite-activated enzyme. The authors present evidence that this is not the case. The Mg 2+ - and ADP-inhibited enzyme when exposed to MgATP and 20-100 mM sulfite shows a lag of about 1 min at 22 degree C and of about 15 s at 37 degree C before reaching the same steady-state rate as attained with light-activated ATPase that has not been inhibited by Mg 2+ and ADP. The lag is not eliminated if the enzyme is exposed to sulfite prior to MgATP addition, indicating that ATPase turnover is necessary for the activation. The release of most of the bound [ 3 H]ADP parallels the onset of ATPase activity, although some [ 3 H]ADP is not released even with prolonged catalytic turnover and may be on poorly active or inactive enzyme or at noncatalytic sites. The results are consistent with most of the tightly bound [ 3 H]ADP being at a catalytic site and being replaced as this Mg 2+ - and ADP-inhibited site regains equivalent participation with other catalytic sites on the activated enzyme. The sulfite activation can be explained by sulfite combination at a P i binding site of the enzyme-ADP-Mg 2+ complex to give a form more readily activated by ATP binding at an alternative site

  20. Food sources of nitrates and nitrites: the physiologic context for potential health benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hord, Norman G; Tang, Yaoping; Bryan, Nathan S

    2009-07-01

    The presence of nitrates and nitrites in food is associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal cancer and, in infants, methemoglobinemia. Despite the physiologic roles for nitrate and nitrite in vascular and immune function, consideration of food sources of nitrates and nitrites as healthful dietary components has received little attention. Approximately 80% of dietary nitrates are derived from vegetable consumption; sources of nitrites include vegetables, fruit, and processed meats. Nitrites are produced endogenously through the oxidation of nitric oxide and through a reduction of nitrate by commensal bacteria in the mouth and gastrointestinal tract. As such, the dietary provision of nitrates and nitrites from vegetables and fruit may contribute to the blood pressure-lowering effects of the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet. We quantified nitrate and nitrite concentrations by HPLC in a convenience sample of foods. Incorporating these values into 2 hypothetical dietary patterns that emphasize high-nitrate or low-nitrate vegetable and fruit choices based on the DASH diet, we found that nitrate concentrations in these 2 patterns vary from 174 to 1222 mg. The hypothetical high-nitrate DASH diet pattern exceeds the World Health Organization's Acceptable Daily Intake for nitrate by 550% for a 60-kg adult. These data call into question the rationale for recommendations to limit nitrate and nitrite consumption from plant foods; a comprehensive reevaluation of the health effects of food sources of nitrates and nitrites is appropriate. The strength of the evidence linking the consumption of nitrate- and nitrite-containing plant foods to beneficial health effects supports the consideration of these compounds as nutrients.

  1. Characterization of nitrite degradation by Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus LCR 6013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-mei Liu

    Full Text Available Nitrites are potential carcinogens. Therefore, limiting nitrites in food is critically important for food safety. The nitrite degradation capacity of Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus LCR 6013 was investigated in pickle fermentation. After LCR 6013 fermentation for 120 h at 37°C, the nitrite concentration in the fermentation system was significantly lower than that in the control sample without the LCR 6013 strain. The effects of NaCl and Vc on nitrite degradation by LCR 6013 in the De Man, Rogosa and Sharpe (MRS medium were also investigated. The highest nitrite degradations, 9.29 mg/L and 9.89 mg/L, were observed when NaCl and Vc concentrations were 0.75% and 0.02%, respectively in the MRS medium, which was significantly higher than the control group (p ≤ 0.01. Electron capture/gas chromatography and indophenol blue staining were used to study the nitrite degradation pathway of LCR 6013. The nitrite degradation products contained N2O, but no NH4(+. The LCR 6013 strain completely degraded all NaNO2 (50.00 mg/L after 16 h of fermentation. The enzyme activity of NiR in the periplasmic space was 2.5 times of that in the cytoplasm. Our results demonstrated that L. casei subsp. rhamnosus LCR 6013 can effectively degrade nitrites in both the pickle fermentation system and in MRS medium by NiR. Nitrites are degraded by the LCR 6013 strain, likely via the nitrate respiration pathway (NO2(->NO->N2O->N2, rather than the aammonium formation pathway (dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium, DNRA, because the degradation products contain N2O, but not NH4(+.

  2. Crosstalk between nitrite, myoglobin and reactive oxygen species to regulate vasodilation under hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Totzeck

    Full Text Available The systemic response to decreasing oxygen levels is hypoxic vasodilation. While this mechanism has been known for more than a century, the underlying cellular events have remained incompletely understood. Nitrite signaling is critically involved in vessel relaxation under hypoxia. This can be attributed to the presence of myoglobin in the vessel wall together with other potential nitrite reductases, which generate nitric oxide, one of the most potent vasodilatory signaling molecules. Questions remain relating to the precise concentration of nitrite and the exact dose-response relations between nitrite and myoglobin under hypoxia. It is furthermore unclear whether regulatory mechanisms exist which balance this interaction. Nitrite tissue levels were similar across all species investigated. We then investigated the exact fractional myoglobin desaturation in an ex vivo approach when gassing with 1% oxygen. Within a short time frame myoglobin desaturated to 58±12%. Given that myoglobin significantly contributes to nitrite reduction under hypoxia, dose-response experiments using physiological to pharmacological nitrite concentrations were conducted. Along all concentrations, abrogation of myoglobin in mice impaired vasodilation. As reactive oxygen species may counteract the vasodilatory response, we used superoxide dismutase and its mimic tempol as well as catalase and ebselen to reduce the levels of reactive oxygen species during hypoxic vasodilation. Incubation of tempol in conjunction with catalase alone and catalase/ebselen increased the vasodilatory response to nitrite. Our study shows that modest hypoxia leads to a significant nitrite-dependent vessel relaxation. This requires the presence of vascular myoglobin for both physiological and pharmacological nitrite levels. Reactive oxygen species, in turn, modulate this vasodilation response.

  3. Biological Control of Meloidogyne incognita by Aspergillus niger F22 Producing Oxalic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Ja Yeong; Choi, Yong Ho; Shin, Teak Soo; Kim, Tae Hoon; Shin, Kee-Sun; Park, Hae Woong; Kim, Young Ho; Kim, Hun; Choi, Gyung Ja; Jang, Kyoung Soo; Cha, Byeongjin; Kim, In Seon; Myung, Eul Jae; Kim, Jin-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Restricted usage of chemical nematicides has led to development of environmentally safe alternatives. A culture filtrate of Aspergillus niger F22 was highly active against Meloidogyne incognita with marked mortality of second-stage juveniles (J2s) and inhibition of egg hatching. The nematicidal component was identified as oxalic acid by organic acid analysis and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). Exposure to 2 mmol/L oxalic acid resulted in 100% juvenile mortality at 1 day after treatment and suppressed egg hatching by 95.6% at 7 days after treatment. Oxalic acid showed similar nematicidal activity against M. hapla, but was not highly toxic to Bursaphelenchus xylophilus. The fungus was incubated on solid medium and dried culture was used for preparation of a wettable powder-type (WP) formulation as an active ingredient. Two WP formulations, F22-WP10 (ai 10%) and oxalic acid-WP8 (ai 8%), were prepared using F22 solid culture and oxalic acid. In a field naturally infested with M. incognita, application of a mixture of F22-WP10 + oxalic acid-WP8 at 1,000- and 500-fold dilutions significantly reduced gall formation on the roots of watermelon plants by 58.8 and 70.7%, respectively, compared to the non-treated control. The disease control efficacy of the mixture of F22-WP10 + oxalic acid-WP8 was significantly higher than that of a chemical nematicide, Sunchungtan (ai 30% fosthiazate). These results suggest that A. niger F22 can be used as a microbial nematicide for the control of root-knot nematode disease.

  4. Biological Control of Meloidogyne incognita by Aspergillus niger F22 Producing Oxalic Acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ja Yeong Jang

    Full Text Available Restricted usage of chemical nematicides has led to development of environmentally safe alternatives. A culture filtrate of Aspergillus niger F22 was highly active against Meloidogyne incognita with marked mortality of second-stage juveniles (J2s and inhibition of egg hatching. The nematicidal component was identified as oxalic acid by organic acid analysis and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS. Exposure to 2 mmol/L oxalic acid resulted in 100% juvenile mortality at 1 day after treatment and suppressed egg hatching by 95.6% at 7 days after treatment. Oxalic acid showed similar nematicidal activity against M. hapla, but was not highly toxic to Bursaphelenchus xylophilus. The fungus was incubated on solid medium and dried culture was used for preparation of a wettable powder-type (WP formulation as an active ingredient. Two WP formulations, F22-WP10 (ai 10% and oxalic acid-WP8 (ai 8%, were prepared using F22 solid culture and oxalic acid. In a field naturally infested with M. incognita, application of a mixture of F22-WP10 + oxalic acid-WP8 at 1,000- and 500-fold dilutions significantly reduced gall formation on the roots of watermelon plants by 58.8 and 70.7%, respectively, compared to the non-treated control. The disease control efficacy of the mixture of F22-WP10 + oxalic acid-WP8 was significantly higher than that of a chemical nematicide, Sunchungtan (ai 30% fosthiazate. These results suggest that A. niger F22 can be used as a microbial nematicide for the control of root-knot nematode disease.

  5. Prophylactic role of phycocyanin: a study of oxalate mediated renal cell injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Shukkur Muhammed; Asokan, Devarajan; Kalaiselvi, Periandavan; Sakthivel, Ramasamy; Varalakshmi, Palaninathan

    2004-08-10

    Oxalate induced renal calculi formation and the associated renal injury is thought to be caused by free radical mediated mechanisms. An in vivo model was used to investigate the effect of phycocyanin (from Spirulina platensis), a known antioxidant, against calcium oxalate urolithiasis. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups. Hyperoxaluria was induced in two of these groups by intraperitoneal infusion of sodium oxalate (70 mg/kg) and a pretreatment of phycocyanin (100 mg/kg) as a single oral dosage was given, 1h prior to sodium oxalate infusion. An untreated control and drug control (phycocyanin alone) were also included in the study. We observed that phycocyanin significantly controlled the early biochemical changes in calcium oxalate stone formation. The antiurolithic nature of the drug was evaluated by the assessment of urinary risk factors and light microscopic observation of urinary crystals. Renal tubular damage as divulged by urinary marker enzymes (alkaline phosphatase, acid phosphatase and gamma-glutamyl transferase) and histopathological observations such as decreased tubulointerstitial, tubular dilatation and mononuclear inflammatory cells, indicated that renal damage was minimised in drug-pretreated group. Oxalate levels (P < 0.001) and lipid peroxidation (P < 0.001) in kidney tissue were significantly controlled by drug pretreatment, suggesting the ability of phycocyanin to quench the free radicals, thereby preventing the lipid peroxidation mediated tissue damage and oxalate entry. This accounts for the prevention of CaOx stones. Thus, the present analysis revealed the antioxidant and antiurolithic potential of phycocyanin thereby projecting it as a promising therapeutic agent against renal cell injury associated kidney stone formation.

  6. 14C-oxalic acid resorption in patients with small bowel resection, jejunoileal bypass, Crohn's disease, and chronic pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, T.; Mueller, G.; Schuette, W.; Rogos, R.; Schneider, W.

    1987-01-01

    The enteric absorption of oxalic acid was determined with 14 C-oxalic acid in patients with small bowel resection, jejunoileal bypass, Crohn's disease and chronic pancreatitis in comparison to the control group. Extreme hyperoxaluria was found in small bowel resections above 100 cm, after bypass operations and in ileocolitis Crohn with signs of clinical activity. Small bowel resections and relapses of Crohn's disease increase the absorption of oxalic acid. The significance of 14 C-oxalic acid absorption test is the recognition of enteric hyperoxaluria. (author)

  7. SSU1 encodes a plasma membrane protein with a central role in a network of proteins conferring sulfite tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avram, D; Bakalinsky, A T

    1997-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae SSU1 gene was isolated based on its ability to complement a mutation causing sensitivity to sulfite, a methionine intermediate. SSU1 encodes a deduced protein of 458 amino acids containing 9 or 10 membrane-spanning domains but has no significant similarity to other proteins in public databases. An Ssu1p-GEP fusion protein was localized to the plasma membrane. Multicopy suppression analysis, undertaken to explore relationships among genes previously implicated in sulfite metabolism, suggests a regulatory pathway in which SSU1 acts downstream of FZF1 and SSU3, which in turn act downstream of GRR1. PMID:9294463

  8. Intake assessment of the food additives nitrite (E 249 and E 250) and nitrate (E 251 and E 252)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprong RC; Niekerk EM; Beukers MH; VVH; V&Z

    2017-01-01

    Nitrate and nitrite are authorised as preservatives in certain food products, such as salami, ham (nitrite) and cheese (nitrate). They prevent food spoilage and protect the consumer against food-borne pathogens. Next to that, nitrate and nitrite play a role in food colour retention and contribute to

  9. Diversity of nitrite reductase genes (nirS) in the denitrifying water column of the coastal Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jayakumar, D.A.; Francis, C.A.; Naqvi, S.W.A.; Ward, B.B.

    are investigated. Nitrite reduction to nitric oxide is the key step in the denitrification pathway, and is catalyzed by the enzyme nitrite reductase, which is encoded by the genes nirS and nirK. The diversity and distribution of nirS genes in relation to nitrite...

  10. Addition of nitrite enhances the electrochemical defluorination of 2-fluoroaniline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Huajun [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Zhejiang Gongshang University, Hangzhou 310012 (China); Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Solid Waste Treatment and Recycling, Hangzhou 310012 (China); Laboratory of Microbial Ecology and Technology, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Liang, Yuxiang [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Zhejiang Gongshang University, Hangzhou 310012 (China); Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Solid Waste Treatment and Recycling, Hangzhou 310012 (China); Guo, Kun [Laboratory of Microbial Ecology and Technology, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Long, Yuyang [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Zhejiang Gongshang University, Hangzhou 310012 (China); Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Solid Waste Treatment and Recycling, Hangzhou 310012 (China); Cong, Yanqing, E-mail: yqcong@hotmail.com [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Zhejiang Gongshang University, Hangzhou 310012 (China); Shen, Dongsheng [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Zhejiang Gongshang University, Hangzhou 310012 (China); Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Solid Waste Treatment and Recycling, Hangzhou 310012 (China)

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • A method for improving defluorination performance by in situ self-assembly of pollutants was developed. • The mechanisms of 2-FA modification and defluorination are discussed. • Positively-charged diazonium salt is used to weaken the C–F bond. - Abstract: This study introduces a novel approach that uses the interaction of pollutants with added nitrite to produce diazonium salts, which cause in situ self-assembly of the pollutants on carbon electrodes, to improve their 2-fluoroaniline (2-FA) defluorination and removal performance. The 2-FA degradation performance, electrode properties, electrochemical properties and degradation pathway were investigated. The reactor containing NO{sub 2}{sup −} achieved a 2-FA removal efficiency of 90.1% and a defluorination efficiency of 38% within 48 h, 1.4 and 2.3 times higher than the corresponding results achieved without NO{sub 2}{sup −}, respectively. The residual NO{sub 2}{sup −} was less than 0.5 mg/L in the reactor containing added NO{sub 2}{sup −}, which would not cause serious secondary pollution. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results proved that the carbon anode surface was successfully modified with benzene polymer, and electrochemical tests confirmed that the electrochemical activity of the modified anode was enhanced significantly. The C–F bond was weakened by the effect of the positive charge of the benzenediazonium groups, and the high electrochemical activity of the carbon anode enhanced the electrochemical performance of the system to accelerate defluorination. Thus, the present electrical method involving nitrite nitrogen is very promising for the treatment of wastewater containing fluoroaniline compounds.

  11. Tempol improves xanthine oxidoreductase-mediated vascular responses to nitrite in experimental renovascular hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo H. Oliveira-Paula

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Upregulation of xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR increases vascular reactive oxygen species (ROS levels and contributes to nitroso-redox imbalance. However, XOR can generate nitric oxide (NO from nitrite, and increased superoxide could inactivate NO formed from nitrite. This study tested the hypothesis that XOR contributes to the cardiovascular effects of nitrite in renovascular hypertension, and that treatment with the antioxidant tempol (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl improves XOR-mediated effects of nitrite. Blood pressure was assessed weekly in two-kidney one-clip (2K1C and control rats. After six weeks of hypertension, the relaxing responses to nitrite were assessed in aortic rings in the presence of the XOR inhibitor oxypurinol (or vehicle, either in the absence or in the presence of tempol. Moreover, in vivo hypotensive responses to nitrite were also examined in the presence of oxypurinol (or vehicle and tempol (or vehicle. Aortic XOR activity and expression were evaluated by fluorescence and Western blot, respectively. Vascular ROS production was assessed by the dihydroethidium assay. 2K1C hypertensive rats showed increased aortic XOR activity and vascular ROS production compared with control rats. Oxypurinol shifted the nitrite concentration–response curve to the right in aortic rings from 2K1C rats (but not in controls. Oxypurinol also attenuated the hypotensive responses to nitrite in 2K1C rats (but not in controls. These functional findings agree with increased aortic and plasma XOR activity found in 2K1C rats. Tempol treatment enhanced oxypurinol-induced shift of the nitrite concentration–response curve to the right. However, antioxidant treatment did not affect XOR-mediated hypotensive effects of nitrite. Our results show that XOR is important to the cardiovascular responses to nitrite in 2K1C hypertension, and XOR inhibitors commonly used by patients may cancel this effect. This finding suggests that nitrite

  12. Tempol improves xanthine oxidoreductase-mediated vascular responses to nitrite in experimental renovascular hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Paula, Gustavo H; Pinheiro, Lucas C; Guimaraes, Danielle A; Tella, Sandra O Conde; Blanco, Ana L Furlan; Angelis, Celio D; Schechter, Alan N; Tanus-Santos, Jose E

    2016-08-01

    Upregulation of xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) increases vascular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and contributes to nitroso-redox imbalance. However, XOR can generate nitric oxide (NO) from nitrite, and increased superoxide could inactivate NO formed from nitrite. This study tested the hypothesis that XOR contributes to the cardiovascular effects of nitrite in renovascular hypertension, and that treatment with the antioxidant tempol (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl) improves XOR-mediated effects of nitrite. Blood pressure was assessed weekly in two-kidney one-clip (2K1C) and control rats. After six weeks of hypertension, the relaxing responses to nitrite were assessed in aortic rings in the presence of the XOR inhibitor oxypurinol (or vehicle), either in the absence or in the presence of tempol. Moreover, in vivo hypotensive responses to nitrite were also examined in the presence of oxypurinol (or vehicle) and tempol (or vehicle). Aortic XOR activity and expression were evaluated by fluorescence and Western blot, respectively. Vascular ROS production was assessed by the dihydroethidium assay. 2K1C hypertensive rats showed increased aortic XOR activity and vascular ROS production compared with control rats. Oxypurinol shifted the nitrite concentration-response curve to the right in aortic rings from 2K1C rats (but not in controls). Oxypurinol also attenuated the hypotensive responses to nitrite in 2K1C rats (but not in controls). These functional findings agree with increased aortic and plasma XOR activity found in 2K1C rats. Tempol treatment enhanced oxypurinol-induced shift of the nitrite concentration-response curve to the right. However, antioxidant treatment did not affect XOR-mediated hypotensive effects of nitrite. Our results show that XOR is important to the cardiovascular responses to nitrite in 2K1C hypertension, and XOR inhibitors commonly used by patients may cancel this effect. This finding suggests that nitrite treatment may not be

  13. QTL dissection of Lag phase in wine fermentation reveals a new translocation responsible for Saccharomyces cerevisiae adaptation to sulfite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien Zimmer

    Full Text Available Quantitative genetics and QTL mapping are efficient strategies for deciphering the genetic polymorphisms that explain the phenotypic differences of individuals within the same species. Since a decade, this approach has been applied to eukaryotic microbes such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae in order to find natural genetic variations conferring adaptation of individuals to their environment. In this work, a QTL responsible for lag phase duration in the alcoholic fermentation of grape juice was dissected by reciprocal hemizygosity analysis. After invalidating the effect of some candidate genes, a chromosomal translocation affecting the lag phase was brought to light using de novo assembly of parental genomes. This newly described translocation (XV-t-XVI involves the promoter region of ADH1 and the gene SSU1 and confers an increased expression of the sulfite pump during the first hours of alcoholic fermentation. This translocation constitutes another adaptation route of wine yeast to sulfites in addition to the translocation VIII-t-XVI previously described. A population survey of both translocation forms in a panel of domesticated yeast strains suggests that the translocation XV-t-XVI has been empirically selected by human activity.

  14. QTL dissection of Lag phase in wine fermentation reveals a new translocation responsible for Saccharomyces cerevisiae adaptation to sulfite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Adrien; Durand, Cécile; Loira, Nicolás; Durrens, Pascal; Sherman, David James; Marullo, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative genetics and QTL mapping are efficient strategies for deciphering the genetic polymorphisms that explain the phenotypic differences of individuals within the same species. Since a decade, this approach has been applied to eukaryotic microbes such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae in order to find natural genetic variations conferring adaptation of individuals to their environment. In this work, a QTL responsible for lag phase duration in the alcoholic fermentation of grape juice was dissected by reciprocal hemizygosity analysis. After invalidating the effect of some candidate genes, a chromosomal translocation affecting the lag phase was brought to light using de novo assembly of parental genomes. This newly described translocation (XV-t-XVI) involves the promoter region of ADH1 and the gene SSU1 and confers an increased expression of the sulfite pump during the first hours of alcoholic fermentation. This translocation constitutes another adaptation route of wine yeast to sulfites in addition to the translocation VIII-t-XVI previously described. A population survey of both translocation forms in a panel of domesticated yeast strains suggests that the translocation XV-t-XVI has been empirically selected by human activity.

  15. Temperature Oscillations, Complex Oscillations, and Elimination of Extraordinary Temperature Sensitivity in the Iodate-Sulfite-Thiosulfate Flow System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haimiao; Xie, Jingxuan; Yuan, Ling; Gao, Qingyu

    2009-09-01

    Temperature oscillations and complex pH oscillations in the IO3--SO32--S2O32- system were observed in a continuously flow stirred tank reactor. During one period of oscillation, the temperature increases rapidly while the pH shows an extremely sharp change. High-amplitude pH oscillations undergo 11 complex oscillations (LS, oscillations with L large peaks and S small peaks per period) to another kind of higher-amplitude regular oscillations upon increasing the concentration of sulfite step by step. Importantly, the longstanding experimental phenomena, the extraordinary temperature sensitivity of oscillatory behavior reported 20 years ago by Rábai and Beck, can be eliminated by premixing of sulfite and sulfuric acid before entering into the reactor, avoiding local acidification, which brings out fluctuation and temperature sensitivity. The temperature oscillations can be understood by taking into account the interaction between thermal effect of various reactions and heat transfer. Experimental observations, both temperature oscillations and 11-type pH oscillations, are reproduced with a four-step Horváth model by addition of an energy-balance equation. This new detailed dynamical behavior would have potential applications in designing complex chemical waves and pH responsive gels with rhythmical motion.

  16. Smad signaling pathway in pathogenesis of kidney injury induced by calcium oxalate stone in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the involvement of Smad signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of kidney injury induced by calcium oxalate stone in rats to provide a reference for clinical treatment. Methods: Clean SD rats were randomly divided into 3 group, namely the control group, model group and pirfenidone group. Ethylene glycol + αhydroxy vitamin D3 was used as a stone-inducing agent to replicate the renal calcium oxalate stone model. Rats in the pirfenidone group were treated with pirfenidone intragastric administration. The serum Cr, BUN and 24-hour oxalate and calcium in renal tissues were assayed. The expressions of Bax/ Bcl2 protein, Caspase3 protein, TGFβ, Smad1, Smad2 and Smad3 proteins were detected by the fluorescent quantitation PCR method. Results: Compared with the rats of the control group, the results showed that the levels of serum BUN, Cr and 24-hour oxalate in rats of the model group were increased greatly, Bax and Caspase3 mRNA also increased while the level of Bcl2 decreased significantly, and the expressions of TGFβ, Smad1, Smad2 and Smad3 proteins increased distinctly as well (P<0.01. These abnormal parameters could be normalized effectively by pirfenidone. Conclusions: Activated TGFβ/Smad signaling pathway is involved in the pathogenesis of kidney injury induced by calcium oxalate stone in rats.

  17. Growth and characterization of Sm3+ doped cerium oxalate single crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minu Mary C

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Single crystals of Sm3+ doped cerium oxalate decahydrate were synthesized using single diffusion gel technique and the conditions influencing the size, morphology, nucleation density and quality of the crystals were optimized. Highly transparent single crystals of average size 3 mm × 2 mm × 1 mm with well-defined hexagonal morphology were grown during a time period of two weeks. X-ray powder diffraction analysis revealed that the grown crystals crystallize in the monoclinic system with space group P21/c as identical with the pure cerium oxalate. The various functional groups of the oxalate ligand and the water of crystallization were identified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The photoluminescence spectrum of the Sm3+ doped cerium oxalate indicated that the Sm3+ ions are optically active in the cerium oxalate matrix. The crystal has a strong and efficient orange red emission with a wavelength peak at 595 nm and hence can be effectively used for optical amplification. Microhardness measurements of the crystal revealed that they belong to the soft material category.

  18. [Effect of phosphorus supply and signal inhibitors on oxalate efflux in ectomycorrhizal fungi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongjun; Li, Yong; Huang, Jianguo

    2015-06-04

    Phosphorous (P) is one of the essential elements for tree growth in forests. It is beneficial to characterize oxalate secretion by ectomycorrhizal fungi in response to P supply for understanding the mechanism of P mobilization in soils. In the present experiment, the influence of P supplies and inhibitors of Ca2+ signal/anion channel on oxalate efflux in ectomycorrhizal fungi was studied in the pure liquid culture with various P concentrations. Ectomycorrhizal fungi released a large amount of H+ and organic acids such as oxalate, acetate, malate, citrate and succinate, which are important for mobilization of insoluble P in the soils. Oxalate accounted for 15. 14% to 36. 01% of the total organic acids released by the fungi and was accelerated in culture solution under the condition of low P supply, but inhibited under normal and high P. Ectomycorrhizal fungi released a large amount of H+ and organic acids, particularly oxalate, which might be beneficial to inorganic P mobilization in the soils and improvement of P nutrition for their host plants.

  19. Effect of Blumea balsamifera extract on the phase and morphology of calcium oxalate crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montealegre, Charlimagne M; De Leon, Rizalinda L

    2017-10-01

    Calcium oxalate crystals are found in majority of kidney stones with calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) as one of the primary types of kidney stones. Various methods of treatment exist, including herbal treatment in the Philippines that uses the medicinal herb Blumea balsamifera ( B. balsamifera ). The effect of B. balsamifera extract on the morphology of calcium oxalate crystals was studied by light microscopy, image analysis, powder X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The extract decreased the crystal size by 5.22%-82.62% depending on the degree of supersaturation. Through analysis of the projected area of the crystals, the extract was found to shift the phase of the crystals from COM to calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD). This shift in phase is significant with a COM to COD shift of 88.26% at 0.5 mg/mL of extract and 91.53% at 1.0 mg/mL of extract. Scanning election microscopic (SEM) images revealed aggregation of crystals at 0 mg/mL of extract. At 1.0 mg/mL of extract, the scanning electron micrographs showed discernible crystal unit boundaries. B. balsamifera extract was observed to have decreased crystal size, shifted crystal phase from COM to COD and prevented the aggregation of calcium oxalate crystals.

  20. Nitrite reduction and methanogenesis in a single-stage UASB reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, L I; López-Vazquez, C M; García, H; van Lier, J B

    2015-01-01

    In this study, nitrite reduction and methanogenesis in a single-stage upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor was investigated, using high-strength synthetic domestic wastewater as substrate. To assess long-term effects and evaluate the mechanisms that allow successful nitrite reduction and methanogenesis in a single-stage UASB, sludge was exposed to relatively high nitrite loading rates (315 ± 13 mgNO(2)(-)-N/(l.d)), using a chemical oxygen demand (COD) to nitrogen ratio of 18 gCOD/gNO(2)(-)-N, and an organic loading rate of 5.4 ± 0.2 gCOD/(l.d). In parallel, the effects of sludge morphology on methanogenesis inhibition were studied by performing short-term batch activity tests at different COD/NO(2)(-)-N ratios with anaerobic sludge samples. In long-term tests, denitrification was practically complete and COD removal efficiency did not change significantly after nitrite addition. Furthermore, methane production only decreased by 13%, agreeing with the reducing equivalents requirement for complete NO(2)(-) reduction to N₂. Apparently, the spatial separation of denitrification and methanogenesis zones inside the UASB reactor allowed nitrite reduction and methanogenesis to occur at the same moment. Batch tests showed that granules seem to protect methanogens from nitrite inhibition, probably due to transport limitations. Combined COD and N removal via nitrite in a single-stage UASB reactor could be a feasible technology to treat high-strength domestic wastewater.

  1. The protective potential of Yucca schidigera (Sarsaponin 30) against nitrite-induced oxidative stress in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigerci, I Hakki; Fidan, A Fatih; Konuk, Muhsin; Yuksel, Hayati; Kucukkurt, Ismail; Eryavuz, Abdullah; Sozbilir, Nalan Baysu

    2009-07-01

    The present study was designed to determine the protective effects of Yucca schidigera (Ys) against oxidative damage induced by acute nitrite intoxication as well as the histopathological evaluation of Ys in rats. The rats were divided into three groups each containing 12 rats: control (C); nitrite intoxication (N); Ys + nitrite intoxication (NY). C and N groups were fed standard rat feed (SRF). The NY group was fed SRF + 100 ppm Ys powder for 4 weeks. Acute nitrite intoxication was induced by subcutaneous (s.c.) administration of sodium nitrite (60 mg/kg) 1 day after the feeding period. Fifty minutes after sodium nitrite administration, blood samples and tissues including lung, liver, and kidney were collected for clinical biochemistry and histopathological investigations. Ys treatment was found to decrease methemoglobin, blood and tissue malondialdehyde, and tissue nitric oxide concentrations, and to increase the glutathione in blood and various tissues. However, plasma nitric oxide, total antioxidant activity, beta-carotene, and vitamin A did not differ between N and NY groups. While the N group rats showed distinct pathology in various tissues (compared with controls), the NY group had similar lung and liver pathology to the control. Only moderate or mild hemorrhage and hyperemia were seen in kidneys of NY group rats. Consequently, the natural compounds found in Ys, such as polyphenols, steroidal saponins, and other phytonutrients, could be used to substantially protect the organism from nitrite-induced oxidative damage and its complications.

  2. Nitrite-induced enhancement of toxicity of phenanthrene in fish and its implications for coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shailaja, M. S.; Rodrigues, A.

    2003-04-01

    Coastal areas are prone to varying degrees of anthropogenic chemical contamination. In many coastal environments experiencing reducing conditions in the water column, nitrite is produced as a result of denitrification. With a view to determining the effect of a natural stress such as the presence of nitrite in water on the xenobiotic metabolism in fish, the euryhaline cichlid Oreochromis mossambicus was exposed for up to 9 days to environmentally relevant concentrations of water-borne nitrite and phenanthrene, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon. Analyses of different biomarkers in the treated fish indicated significant increase in the metabolism of phenanthrene as a result of exposure to nitrite. For example, the activity of the biotransformation enzyme measured as 7-ethoxyresorufin- O-deethylase activity was, in the presence of 1 μM nitrite, nearly twice that produced by phenanthrene alone. Similarly, biliary fixed fluorescence values reflecting phenanthrene and its metabolites were rendered 1.7 times higher when exposed simultaneously to nitrite. Contact with nitrite and phenanthrene together also led to severe hepatic damage with possible cell death as inferred from the large enhancement in sorbitol dehydrogenase activity in the serum and reduced liver somatic index.

  3. Erratum to ;Coastal water column ammonium and nitrite oxidation are decoupled in summer;

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Elise M.; Fulweiler, Robinson W.

    2017-07-01

    Water column nitrification is a key process in the nitrogen cycle as it links reduced and oxidized forms of nitrogen and also provides the substrate (nitrate) needed for reactive nitrogen removal by denitrification. We measured potential water column ammonium and nitrite oxidation rates at four sites along an estuary to continental shelf gradient over two summers. In most cases, nitrite oxidation rates outpaced ammonium oxidation rates. Overall, ammonium and nitrite oxidation rates were higher outside of the estuary, and this trend was primarily driven by higher oxidation rates in deeper waters. Additionally, both ammonium and nitrite oxidation rates were impacted by different in situ variables. Ammonium oxidation rates throughout the water column as a whole were most positively correlated to depth and salinity and negatively correlated to dissolved oxygen, light, and temperature. In contrast, nitrite oxidation rates throughout the water column were negatively correlated with temperature, light and pH. Multivariate regression analysis revealed that surface (20 m) rates were regulated by temperature, light, and [H+] (i.e. pH). In addition, surface (20 m) nitrite oxidation rates. These results support the growing body of evidence that ammonium oxidation and nitrite oxidation are not always coupled, should be measured separately, and are influenced by different environmental conditions.

  4. Effect of Ethanolamines on Corrosion Inhibition of Ductile Cast Iron in Nitrite Containing Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K. T.; Kim, Y. S.; Chang, H. Y.; Lim, B. T.; Park, H. B.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, synergistic corrosion inhibition effect of nitrite and 3 kinds of ethanolamines on ductile cast iron using chemical and electrochemical methods was evaluated. This work attempts to clarify the synergistic effect of nitrite and ethanolamines. The effects of single addition of TEA, DEA, and MEA, and mixed addition of nitrite plus TEA, DEA or MEA on the corrosion inhibition of ductile cast iron in a tap water were evaluated. A huge amount of single addition of ethanolamine was needed. However, the synergistic effect by mixed addition was observed regardless of the combination of nitrite and triethanolamines, but their effects increased in a series of MEA + nitrite > DEA + nitrite > TEA + nitrite. This tendency of synergistic effect was attributed to the film properties and polar effect; TEA addition couldn't form the film showing high film resistance and semiconductive properties, but DEA or MEA could build the film having relatively high film resistance and n-type semiconductive properties. Moreover, it can be explained that this behaviour was closely related to electron attractive group within the ethanolamines, and thus corrosion inhibition power depends upon the number of the electron attractive group of MEA, DEA, and TEA.

  5. Effect of Ethanolamines on Corrosion Inhibition of Ductile Cast Iron in Nitrite Containing Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K. T.; Kim, Y. S. [Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of); Chang, H. Y.; Lim, B. T.; Park, H. B. [KEPCO Engineering and Construction Company, Gimcheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    In this work, synergistic corrosion inhibition effect of nitrite and 3 kinds of ethanolamines on ductile cast iron using chemical and electrochemical methods was evaluated. This work attempts to clarify the synergistic effect of nitrite and ethanolamines. The effects of single addition of TEA, DEA, and MEA, and mixed addition of nitrite plus TEA, DEA or MEA on the corrosion inhibition of ductile cast iron in a tap water were evaluated. A huge amount of single addition of ethanolamine was needed. However, the synergistic effect by mixed addition was observed regardless of the combination of nitrite and triethanolamines, but their effects increased in a series of MEA + nitrite > DEA + nitrite > TEA + nitrite. This tendency of synergistic effect was attributed to the film properties and polar effect; TEA addition couldn't form the film showing high film resistance and semiconductive properties, but DEA or MEA could build the film having relatively high film resistance and n-type semiconductive properties. Moreover, it can be explained that this behaviour was closely related to electron attractive group within the ethanolamines, and thus corrosion inhibition power depends upon the number of the electron attractive group of MEA, DEA, and TEA.

  6. Preliminary nitrite, nitrate and colour analysis of Malaysian edible bird’s nest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meei Chien Quek

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The high nitrite content in edible bird’s nests is a major concern to the local swiftlet industry. It lowers the price of the edible bird’s nests and it brings severe health hazards to consumers and farmers. This research investigated the nitrite and nitrate contents of eight types of local edible bird’s nests by using ion chromatography system and evaluating its colour using the CIE system in L∗a∗b∗ parameters. The nitrite content obtained ranged from 5.7 μg/g for the house nests to 843.8 μg/g for the cave nests. The nitrate content for the house and cave nests was 98.2 μg/g and 36,999.4 μg/g, respectively. The cave nests with darker and redder colour had higher nitrite and nitrate contents than the brighter and more yellow house nests. This likely suggests that the nitrite and nitrate contents have correlations with edible bird’s nests colour. Correlations studies suggested that the nitrite content had high correlations with colour parameters, L∗a∗b∗ of edible bird’s nests at significant level of P < 0.10. These findings suggest that edible bird’s nests’ colour may be a useful indicator for measuring nitrite and nitrate contaminations.

  7. Effect of luminal or circulating nitrite on colonic ion movement in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radcliffe, B.C.; Nance, S.H.; Deakin, E.J.; Roediger, W.E.W.

    1987-01-01

    The disposition of intravenously or luminally administered nitrite across the colonic mucosa and its effect on ion movement into or from the colon was assessed in anesthetized Porton rats using the isolated colon instilled either with sodium chloride or sodium chloride with sodium butyrate. Ionic changes in the colon after intravenous injection of 10 μmol NaNO 2 were compared with those occurring after injection of 10 μmol NaCl. After intravenous administration of nitrite, both nitrite and nitrate appeared in the colonic instillate in a ratio of 1:1. Nitrite increased chloride absorption (110%) and bicarbonate production (20%) when 40 mM butyrate was included in the instillate. Net sodium absorption, measured in the whole colon, was unchanged. Intravenous nitrite had no effect on ionic movement in the absence of butyrate. When NaNO 2 was included luminally with the sodium chloride-butyrate instillate, bicarbonate production rate increased, but sodium and chloride absorption were unaffected. Nitrite concentration in the instillate decreased during the 40-min experimental period at a rate of 0.275 nmol·min -1 ·cm -2 and nitrate appeared at a rate of 0.037 nmol·min -1 ·cm -2 . The authors conclude that nitrite stimulates bicarbonate production in the colon, probably by stimulating the oxidation by butyrate, the main source of CO 2 generation by the colonic mucosa

  8. Role of nitrite in the photochemical formation of radicals in the snow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobi, Hans-Werner; Kleffmann, Jörg; Villena, Guillermo; Wiesen, Peter; King, Martin; France, James; Anastasio, Cort; Staebler, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Photochemical reactions in snow can have an important impact on the composition of the atmosphere over snow-covered areas as well as on the composition of the snow itself. One of the major photochemical processes is the photolysis of nitrate leading to the formation of volatile nitrogen compounds. We report nitrite concentrations determined together with nitrate and hydrogen peroxide in surface snow collected at the coastal site of Barrow, Alaska. The results demonstrate that nitrite likely plays a significant role as a precursor for reactive hydroxyl radicals as well as volatile nitrogen oxides in the snow. Pollution events leading to high concentrations of nitrous acid in the atmosphere contributed to an observed increase in nitrite in the surface snow layer during nighttime. Observed daytime nitrite concentrations are much higher than values predicted from steady-state concentrations based on photolysis of nitrate and nitrite indicating that we do not fully understand the production of nitrite and nitrous acid in snow. The discrepancy between observed and expected nitrite concentrations is probably due to a combination of factors, including an incomplete understanding of the reactive environment and chemical processes in snow, and a lack of consideration of the vertical structure of snow.

  9. Photoreduction of mercury metal (Hg) using catalyst of oxalic acid from cellulose of rice husks (Oryza sativa L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumiardi, Ade, E-mail: zulfasalmasaodah@gmail.com [Departement of Biology, Faculty of Sciences and Pharmacy, Math’laul Anwar University, Banten (Indonesia); Novi, Cory; Sukaesih, Esih [Departement of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences and Pharmacy, Math’laul Anwar University, Banten (Indonesia); Humaedi, Aji [Departement of Pharmacy, Faculty of Sciences and Pharmacy, Math’laul Anwar University, Banten (Indonesia)

    2016-04-19

    Photoreduction of mercury metal using catalyst of oxalic acid from cellulose of rice husks (Oryza sativa L.) is one of methods to reduce toxicity properties of the mercury metal in the society. The purpose of this research is to enhance photoreduction of mercury metal using catalyst of oxalic acid from cellulose of rice husks (Oryza sativa L.) at various concentrations. Photoreduction process is carried out in a closed reactor equipped with UV light and magnetic stirrer. Analysis of the influence of oxalic acid is determined by adding 25 mL of Hg (II) 5 ppm without oxalic acid, 25 mL of Hg (II) 5 ppm + 25 mL of oxalic acid 3 ppm, 25 mL of Hg (II) 5 ppm + 25 mL of oxalic acid 6 ppm, 25 mL of Hg (II) 5 ppm + 25 mL of oxalic acid 9 ppm, 25 mL of Hg (II) 5 ppm + 25 mL of oxalic acid 12 ppm and 25 mL of Hg (II) 5 ppm + 25 mL of oxalic acid 15 ppm. All treatments are followed by centrifugation for 15 minutes, then the concentration of Hg residual in the solution is measured by mercury analyzer. The research results showed that addition of oxalic acid concentration from the cellulose of rice husks (Oryza sativa L.) can enhance photoreduction of mercury metal. Optimum concentration reduction of mercury metal with addition of oxalic acid is obtained as many as 9-12 ppm. It can reduce the concentration of mercury metal (II) by 68.8% to 88.6%.

  10. Role of blood and vascular smooth muscle in the vasoactivity of nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Taiming; Schroeder, Hobe J; Barcelo, Lisa; Bragg, Shannon L; Terry, Michael H; Wilson, Sean M; Power, Gordon G; Blood, Arlin B

    2014-10-01

    Recent evidence from humans and rats indicates that nitrite is a vasodilator under hypoxic conditions by reacting with metal-containing proteins to produce nitric oxide (NO). We tested the hypothesis that near-physiological concentrations of nitrite would produce vasodilation in a hypoxia- and concentration-dependent manner in the hind limb of sheep. Anesthetized sheep were instrumented to measure arterial blood pressure and femoral blood flows continuously in both hind limbs. Nitrite was infused into one femoral artery to raise the nitrite concentration in the femoral vein by 10 to 15-fold while the sheep breathed 50%, 14% or 12% oxygen in inspired air. In contrast to reports in humans and rats, the nitrite infusion had no measurable effect on mean femoral blood flows or vascular conductances, regardless of inspired O2 levels. In vitro experiments showed no significant difference in the release of NO from nitrite in sheep and human red blood cells. Further experiments demonstrated nitrite is converted to NO in rat artery homogenates faster than sheep arteries, and that this source of NO production is attenuated in the presence of a heme oxidizer. Finally, western blots indicate that concentrations of the heme-containing protein cytoglobin, but not myoglobin, are markedly lower in sheep arteries compared with rats. Overall, the results demonstrate that nitrite is not a physiological vasodilator in sheep. This is likely due to a lack of conversion of nitrite to NO within the vascular smooth muscle, perhaps due to deficient amounts of the heme-containing protein cytoglobin. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Randomised phase 2 trial of intra-coronary nitrite during acute myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Daniel A; Pellaton, Cyril; Velmurugan, Shanti; Rathod, Krishnaraj Sinha; Andiapen, Mervyn; Antoniou, Sotiris; van Eijl, Sven; Webb, Andrew J; Westwood, Mark A; Parmar, Mahesh K; Mathur, Anthony; Ahluwalia, Amrita

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Pre-clinical evidence demonstrates that inorganic nitrite, following its in situ conversion to nitric oxide, attenuates consequent myocardial reperfusion injury. Objective We investigated whether intra-coronary injection of nitrite during primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) might improve infarct size in ST-elevated myocardial infarction (STEMI). Methods and Results Patients undergoing primary PCI (n=80) were randomised to receive intracoronary (10mL) sodium nitrite (1.8μmol) or NaCl (placebo) before balloon inflation. The primary endpoint was infarct size assessed by measuring creatine kinase (CK) release. Secondary outcomes included infarct size assessed by troponin T release and by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) on day 2. Baseline characteristics were similar between the groups. No evidence of differences in CK release (p=0.92), troponin T (p=0.85) or CMR-assessed infarct size (p=0.254) were evident. In contrast there was an improvement in myocardial salvage index (p=0.05) and reduction in MACE at 1 year (2.6% vs 15.8%, p=0.04) in the nitrite group. In a 66-patient sub-group with TIMI≤1 flow there was reduced serum CK (p=0.030) and a 19% reduction in CMR-determined infarct size (p=0.034) with nitrite. No adverse effects of nitrite were detected. Conclusions In this phase II study intra-coronary nitrite infusion did not alter infarct size although a trend to improved myocardial salvage index and a significant reduction in MACE was evident. In a sub-group of patients with TIMI flow≤1 nitrite reduced infarct size and MACE and improved myocardial salvage index indicating that a phase III clinical trial assessing intra-coronary nitrite administration as an adjunct to PCI in STEMI patients is warranted. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://clinicaltrials.gov NCT01584453. PMID:25512434

  12. Role of blood and vascular smooth muscle in the vasoactivity of nitrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Taiming; Schroeder, Hobe J.; Barcelo, Lisa; Bragg, Shannon L.; Terry, Michael H.; Wilson, Sean M.; Power, Gordon G.

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence from humans and rats indicates that nitrite is a vasodilator under hypoxic conditions by reacting with metal-containing proteins to produce nitric oxide (NO). We tested the hypothesis that near-physiological concentrations of nitrite would produce vasodilation in a hypoxia- and concentration-dependent manner in the hind limb of sheep. Anesthetized sheep were instrumented to measure arterial blood pressure and femoral blood flows continuously in both hind limbs. Nitrite was infused into one femoral artery to raise the nitrite concentration in the femoral vein by 10 to 15-fold while the sheep breathed 50%, 14% or 12% oxygen in inspired air. In contrast to reports in humans and rats, the nitrite infusion had no measurable effect on mean femoral blood flows or vascular conductances, regardless of inspired O2 levels. In vitro experiments showed no significant difference in the release of NO from nitrite in sheep and human red blood cells. Further experiments demonstrated nitrite is converted to NO in rat artery homogenates faster than sheep arteries, and that this source of NO production is attenuated in the presence of a heme oxidizer. Finally, western blots indicate that concentrations of the heme-containing protein cytoglobin, but not myoglobin, are markedly lower in sheep arteries compared with rats. Overall, the results demonstrate that nitrite is not a physiological vasodilator in sheep. This is likely due to a lack of conversion of nitrite to NO within the vascular smooth muscle, perhaps due to deficient amounts of the heme-containing protein cytoglobin. PMID:25108012

  13. Antiurolithiatic Potential of Neeri against Calcium-Oxalate Stones by Crystallization Inhibition, Free Radicals Scavenging, and NRK-52E Cell Protection from Oxalate Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Parveen Kumar; Verma, Santosh Kumar; Sharma, Anil Kumar

    2017-10-01

    Neeri is a well-established polyherbal formulation prescribed for renal stones by the physicians but has not been experimentally evaluated for its antiurolithiatic potential using cell-lines. This study is aimed to scientifically substantiate the antiurolithiatic effect of Neeri extract (NRE) through calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystallization inhibition, scavenging of free radicals, and protection of renal tubular epithelial NRK-52E cells from oxalate-induced injury. The crystallization inhibition was studied by turbidimetric assay while the free radical scavenging potential was determined for superoxide and nitric oxide (NO) radicals. The cytoprotective effect against oxalate-induced injury was assessed by estimating lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage and determining cell viability using 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. NRE significantly inhibited the CaOx crystallization in a concentration-dependent manner and also scavenged superoxide (IC 50 302.88 μg/ml) and NO (IC 50 300.45 μg/ml) free radicals. It did not show any significant cytotoxicity for NRK-52E cells till the highest dose (500 μg/ml) and found to be safe. When NRK-52E cells, injured by exposing to oxalate crystals for 24 h, were treated with NRE, it appreciably prevented the cell injury in a dose-dependent manner. It significantly decreased the elevated LDH leakage toward normal range and improved renal cell viability (82.37% ± 0.87%), hence, prevented growth and retention of crystals. The experimental findings concluded that Neeri is a potent antiurolithiatic formulation that inhibited CaOx crystallization and prevented tubular retention of crystals by protecting the renal cells against oxalate-induced injury as well as reducing the oxidative stress by scavenging free radicals. Neeri extract significantly ( P free radicalsIt significantly ( P < 0.001) improved the cell viability by inhibiting the leakage of lactate dehydrogenase in a dose-dependent manner

  14. Stress Corrosion Cracking of an Austenitic Stainless Steel in Nitrite-Containing Chloride Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Singh Raman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the susceptibility of 316L stainless steel to stress corrosion cracking (SCC in a nitrite-containing chloride solution. Slow strain rate testing (SSRT in 30 wt. % MgCl2 solution established SCC susceptibility, as evidenced by post-SSRT fractography. Addition of nitrite to the chloride solution, which is reported to have inhibitive influence on corrosion of stainless steels, was found to increase SCC susceptibility. The susceptibility was also found to increase with nitrite concentration. This behaviour is explained on the basis of the passivation and pitting characteristics of 316L steel in chloride solution.

  15. Solubilities of sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, and sodium aluminate in simulated nuclear waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, D.A.; Herting, D.L.

    1984-09-01

    Solubilities were determined for sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, and sodium aluminate in synthetic nuclear waste liquor. Solubilities were determined as a function of temperature and solution composition (concentrations of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, and sodium aluminate). Temperature had the greatest effect on the solubilities of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite and a somewhat lesser effect on sodium aluminate solubility. Hydroxide had a great effect on the solubilities of all three salts. Other solution components had minor effects. 2 references, 8 figures, 11 tables.

  16. Color and oxidative stability of nitrite-free cured meat after gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahidi, F.; Pegg, R.B.; Shamsuzzaman, K.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of 5 and 10 kGy irradiation on the color and oxidative stability of meats treated with nitrite or a nitrite-free curing system were investigated. The nitrite-free curing system consisted of the preformed cooked cured-meat pigment, sodium ascorbate and sodium tripolyphosphate with or without sodium acid pyrophosphate. Irradiation had no detrimental effects on the color or flavor of either cured samples. Polyphosphates had a beneficial effect on oxidative stability but had a slight detrimental effect on color stability of irradiated samples

  17. Post Chlorine gas exposure administration of nitrite prevents lung injury: effect of administration modality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samal, Andrey A.; Honavar, Jaideep; Brandon, Angela; Bradley, Kelley M.; Doran, Stephen; Liu, Yanping; Dunaway, Chad; Steele, Chad; Postlethwait, Edward M.; Squadrito, Giuseppe L.; Fanucchi, Michelle V.; Matalon, Sadis; Patel, Rakesh P.

    2012-01-01

    Cl2 gas toxicity is complex and occurs during, and post exposure leading to acute lung injury (ALI) and reactive airway syndrome (RAS). Moreover, Cl2 exposure can occur in diverse situations encompassing mass casualty scenarios underscoring the need for post-exposure therapies that are efficacious and amenable to rapid and easy administration. In this study, we compared the efficacy of a single dose, post (30min) Cl2 exposure administration of nitrite (1mg/kg) via intraperitoneal (IP) or intramuscular (IM) injection in rats, to decrease ALI. Exposure of rats to Cl2 gas (400ppm, 30min) significantly increased ALI and caused RAS 6–24h post exposure as indexed by BAL sampling of lung surface protein, PMN and increased airway resistance and elastance prior to and post methacholine challenge. IP nitrite decreased Cl2 - dependent increases in BAL protein but not PMN. In contrast IM nitrite decreased BAL PMN levels without decreasing BAL protein in a xanthine oxidoreductase independent manner. Histological evaluation of airways 6h post exposure showed significant bronchial epithelium exfoliation and inflammatory injury in Cl2 exposed rats. Both IP and IM nitrite improved airway histology compared to Cl2 gas alone, but more coverage of the airway by cuboidal or columnar epithelium was observed with IM compared to IP nitrite. Airways were rendered more sensitive to methacholine induced resistance and elastance after Cl2 gas exposure. Interestingly, IM nitrite, but not IP nitrite, significantly decreased airway sensitivity to methacholine challenge. Further evaluation and comparison of IM and IP therapy showed a two-fold increase in circulating nitrite levels with the former, which was associated with reversal of post-Cl2 exposure dependent increases in circulating leukocytes. Halving the IM nitrite dose resulted in no effect in PMN accumulation but significant reduction of of BAL protein levels indicating distinct nitrite dose dependence for inhibition of Cl2 dependent

  18. Administration of nitrite after chlorine gas exposure prevents lung injury: effect of administration modality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samal, Andrey A; Honavar, Jaideep; Brandon, Angela; Bradley, Kelley M; Doran, Stephen; Liu, Yanping; Dunaway, Chad; Steele, Chad; Postlethwait, Edward M; Squadrito, Giuseppe L; Fanucchi, Michelle V; Matalon, Sadis; Patel, Rakesh P

    2012-10-01

    Cl(2) gas toxicity is complex and occurs during and after exposure, leading to acute lung injury (ALI) and reactive airway syndrome (RAS). Moreover, Cl(2) exposure can occur in diverse situations encompassing mass casualty scenarios, highlighting the need for postexposure therapies that are efficacious and amenable to rapid and easy administration. In this study, we assessed the efficacy of a single dose of nitrite (1 mg/kg) to decrease ALI when administered to rats via intraperitoneal (ip) or intramuscular (im) injection 30 min after Cl(2) exposure. Exposure of rats to Cl(2) gas (400 ppm, 30 min) significantly increased ALI and caused RAS 6-24h postexposure as indexed by BAL sampling of lung surface protein and polymorphonucleocytes (PMNs) and increased airway resistance and elastance before and after methacholine challenge. Intraperitoneal nitrite decreased Cl(2)-dependent increases in BAL protein but not PMNs. In contrast im nitrite decreased BAL PMN levels without decreasing BAL protein in a xanthine oxidoreductase-dependent manner. Histological evaluation of airways 6h postexposure showed significant bronchial epithelium exfoliation and inflammatory injury in Cl(2)-exposed rats. Both ip and im nitrite improved airway histology compared to Cl(2) gas alone, but more coverage of the airway by cuboidal or columnar epithelium was observed with im compared to ip nitrite. Airways were rendered more sensitive to methacholine-induced resistance and elastance after Cl(2) gas exposure. Interestingly, im nitrite, but not ip nitrite, significantly decreased airway sensitivity to methacholine challenge. Further evaluation and comparison of im and ip therapy showed a twofold increase in circulating nitrite levels with the former, which was associated with reversal of post-Cl(2) exposure-dependent increases in circulating leukocytes. Halving the im nitrite dose resulted in no effect in PMN accumulation but significant reduction of BAL protein levels, indicating a distinct

  19. Stress Corrosion Cracking of an Austenitic Stainless Steel in Nitrite-Containing Chloride Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, R K Singh; Siew, Wai Hoong

    2014-12-05

    This article describes the susceptibility of 316L stainless steel to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in a nitrite-containing chloride solution. Slow strain rate testing (SSRT) in 30 wt. % MgCl₂ solution established SCC susceptibility, as evidenced by post-SSRT fractography. Addition of nitrite to the chloride solution, which is reported to have inhibitive influence on corrosion of stainless steels, was found to increase SCC susceptibility. The susceptibility was also found to increase with nitrite concentration. This behaviour is explained on the basis of the passivation and pitting characteristics of 316L steel in chloride solution.

  20. Effect of Surface Precipitate on the Crevice Corrosion in HYBRID and Oxalic Acid Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S. Y.; Jung, J. Y.; Won, H. J.; Kim, S. B.; Choi, W. K.; Moon, J. K.; Park, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the characteristics of the crevice corrosion for Inconel-600 and 304SS in OA solution according to the change in pH. The evaluation of the crevice corrosion with the chemical thermodynamic analysis identified the effect of the residual chemicals such as iron-oxalate and nickeloxalate to the crevice corrosion behavior. Test results were compared with those of HYBRID (HYdrizine Base Reductive metal Ion Decontamination). The crevice corrosion properties of 304 SS and Inconel-600 in HYBRID and oxalic acid solution were evaluated. In case of oxalic acid solution, the corrosion rate on 304SS was rapidly increased with a pH decrease of around 2, but there was no increase in the corrosion rate on Inconel-600

  1. Hydrothermal decomposition of actinide(IV oxalates: a new aqueous route towards reactive actinide oxide nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The hydrothermal decomposition of actinide(IV oxalates (An= Th, U, Pu at temperatures between 95 and 250 °C is shown to lead to the production of highly crystalline, reactive actinide oxide nanocrystals (NCs. This aqueous process proved to be quantitative, reproducible and fast (depending on temperature. The NCs obtained were characterised by X-ray diffraction and TEM showing their size to be smaller than 15 nm. Attempts to extend this general approach towards transition metal or lanthanide oxalates failed in the 95–250 °C temperature range. The hydrothermal decomposition of actinide oxalates is therefore a clean, flexible and powerful approach towards NCs of AnO2 with possible scale-up potential.

  2. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TANK CLEANING: CORROSION RATE FOR ONE VERSUS EIGHT PERCENT OXALIC ACID SOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketusky, E.; Subramanian, K.

    2011-01-20

    Until recently, the use of oxalic acid for chemically cleaning the Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive waste tanks focused on using concentrated 4 and 8-wt% solutions. Recent testing and research on applicable dissolution mechanisms have concluded that under appropriate conditions, dilute solutions of oxalic acid (i.e., 1-wt%) may be more effective. Based on the need to maximize cleaning effectiveness, coupled with the need to minimize downstream impacts, SRS is now developing plans for using a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution. A technology gap associated with using a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution was a dearth of suitable corrosion data. Assuming oxalic acid's passivation of carbon steel was proportional to the free oxalate concentration, the general corrosion rate (CR) from a 1-wt% solution may not be bound by those from 8-wt%. Therefore, after developing the test strategy and plan, the corrosion testing was performed. Starting with the envisioned process specific baseline solvent, a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution, with sludge (limited to Purex type sludge-simulant for this initial effort) at 75 C and agitated, the corrosion rate (CR) was determined from the measured weight loss of the exposed coupon. Environmental variations tested were: (a) Inclusion of sludge in the test vessel or assuming a pure oxalic acid solution; (b) acid solution temperature maintained at 75 or 45 C; and (c) agitation of the acid solution or stagnant. Application of select electrochemical testing (EC) explored the impact of each variation on the passivation mechanisms and confirmed the CR. The 1-wt% results were then compared to those from the 8-wt%. The immersion coupons showed that the maximum time averaged CR for a 1-wt% solution with sludge was less than 25-mils/yr for all conditions. For an agitated 8-wt% solution with sludge, the maximum time averaged CR was about 30-mils/yr at 50 C, and 86-mils/yr at 75 C. Both the 1-wt% and the 8-wt% testing demonstrated that if the sludge was removed

  3. Oxalic acid as a heterogeneous ice nucleus in the upper troposphere and its indirect aerosol effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Zobrist

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous ice freezing points of aqueous solutions containing various immersed solid dicarboxylic acids (oxalic, adipic, succinic, phthalic and fumaric have been measured with a differential scanning calorimeter. The results show that only the dihydrate of oxalic acid (OAD acts as a heterogeneous ice nucleus, with an increase in freezing temperature between 2 and 5 K depending on solution composition. In several field campaigns, oxalic acid enriched particles have been detected in the upper troposphere with single particle aerosol mass spectrometry. Simulations with a microphysical box model indicate that the presence of OAD may reduce the ice particle number density in cirrus clouds by up to ~50% when compared to exclusively homogeneous cirrus formation without OAD. Using the ECHAM4 climate model we estimate the global net radiative effect caused by this heterogeneous freezing to result in a cooling as high as −0.3 Wm−2.

  4. Synthesis, thermal and nonlinear optical characterization of L-arginine semi-oxalate single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, P.; Gokulraj, S.; Sankar, S.

    2012-06-01

    Optically good quality L-arginine semi-oxalate, an organic nonlinear optical crystal, has been synthesized from aqueous solution by slow evaporation method. Single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis reveals that the synthesized L-arginine semi-oxalate crystal possesses triclinic structure with unit cell dimensions as a=5.05Å, b=9.73Å, c=13.12Å, α=111.030, β=92.790 and γ=91.910. The Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy was analyzed and the presence of functional groups of L-arginine semi-oxalate was confirmed. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) studies show that the material is thermally stable up to 1460C and the melting point is 1500C. Kurtz and Perry powder technique confirms that the second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency is 0.32 times that of standard organic materials urea and KDP.

  5. A carbon nanotube/polyvanillin composite film as an electrocatalyst for the electrochemical oxidation of nitrite and its application as a nitrite sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng Dongyun [College of Chemistry and Molecular Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Hu Chengguo [College of Chemistry and Molecular Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)], E-mail: cghu@whu.edu.cn; Peng Yanfen [College of Chemistry and Molecular Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Hu Shengshui [College of Chemistry and Molecular Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)], E-mail: sshu@whu.edu.cn

    2009-08-30

    We report a simple method for the stable dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) in water by vanillin and controllable surface addition onto carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFE) via electropolymerization. We have characterized these polyvanillin-carbon nanotube (PVN-MWNT) composite films with techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), infrared spectroscopy (IR) and voltammetry. These investigations showed that the films have a uniform porous nanostructure with a large surface area. This PVN-MWNT composite-modified CFE (PVN-MWNT/CFE) exhibited a sensitive response to the electrochemical oxidation of nitrite. Under optimal working conditions, the oxidation peak current of nitrite linearly increased with its concentration in the range of 0.2 {mu}M-3.1 mM, with the system exhibiting a lower detection limit of 50 nM (S/N = 3). We successfully applied the PVN-MWNT/CFE system to the determination of nitrite from lake water. The efficient recovery of nitrite indicated that this electrode was able to detect nitrite in real samples.

  6. Acute, Sub-lethal Cyanide Poisoning in Mice is Ameliorated by Nitrite Alone: Complications Arising from Concomitant Administration of Nitrite and Thiosulfate as an Antidotal Combination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambal, Leah K.; Swanson, Megan R.; Yuan, Quan; Weitz, Andrew C.; Li, Hui-Hua; Pitt, Bruce R.; Pearce, Linda L.; Peterson, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Sodium nitrite alone is shown to ameliorate sub-lethal cyanide toxicity in mice when given from ~1 hour before until 20 minutes after the toxic dose as demonstrated by the recovery of righting ability. An optimum dose (12 mg/kg) was determined to significantly relieve cyanide toxicity (5.0 mg/kg) when administered to mice intraperitoneally. Nitrite so administered was shown to rapidly produce NO in the bloodsteam as judged by the dose dependent appearance of EPR signals attributable to nitrosylhemoglobin and methemoglobin. It is argued that antagonism of cyanide inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase by NO is the crucial antidotal activity rather than the methemoglobin-forming action of nitrite. Concomitant addition of sodium thiosulfate to nitrite-treated blood resulted in the detection of sulfidomethemoblobin by EPR spectroscopy. Sulfide is a product of thiosulfate hydrolysis and, like cyanide, is known to be a potent inhibitor of cytochrome c oxidase; the effects of the two inhibitors being essentially additive under standard assay conditions, rather than dominated by either one. The findings afford a plausible explanation for an observed detrimental effect in mice associated with the use of the standard nitrite-thiosulfate combination therapy at sub-lethal levels of cyanide intoxication. PMID:21534623

  7. Acute, sublethal cyanide poisoning in mice is ameliorated by nitrite alone: complications arising from concomitant administration of nitrite and thiosulfate as an antidotal combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambal, Leah K; Swanson, Megan R; Yuan, Quan; Weitz, Andrew C; Li, Hui-Hua; Pitt, Bruce R; Pearce, Linda L; Peterson, Jim

    2011-07-18

    Sodium nitrite alone is shown to ameliorate sublethal cyanide toxicity in mice when given from ∼1 h before until 20 min after the toxic dose as demonstrated by the recovery of righting ability. An optimum dose (12 mg/kg) was determined to significantly relieve cyanide toxicity (5.0 mg/kg) when administered to mice intraperitoneally. Nitrite so administered was shown to rapidly produce NO in the bloodsteam as judged by the dose-dependent appearance of EPR signals attributable to nitrosylhemoglobin and methemoglobin. It is argued that antagonism of cyanide inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase by NO is the crucial antidotal activity rather than the methemoglobin-forming action of nitrite. Concomitant addition of sodium thiosulfate to nitrite-treated blood resulted in the detection of sulfidomethemoblobin by EPR spectroscopy. Sulfide is a product of thiosulfate hydrolysis and, like cyanide, is known to be a potent inhibitor of cytochrome c oxidase, the effects of the two inhibitors being essentially additive under standard assay conditions rather than dominated by either one. The findings afford a plausible explanation for an observed detrimental effect in mice associated with the use of the standard nitrite-thiosulfate combination therapy at sublethal levels of cyanide intoxication. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  8. The Effect of Influent Characteristics and Operational Conditions over the Performance and Microbial Community Structure of Partial Nitritation Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Rodriguez-Sanchez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen is a main contaminant of wastewater worldwide. Novel processes for nitrogen removal have been developed over the last several decades. One of these is the partial nitritation process. This process includes the oxidation of ammonium to nitrite without the generation of nitrate. The partial nitritation process has several advantages over traditional nitrification-denitrification processes for nitrogen removal from wastewaters. In addition, partial nitritation is required for anammox elimination of nitrogen from wastewater. Partial nitritation is affected by operational conditions and substances present in the influent, such as quinolone antibiotics. In this review, the impact that several operational conditions, such as temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen concentration, hydraulic retention time and solids retention time, have over the partial nitritation process is covered. The effect of quinolone antibiotics and other emerging contaminants are discussed. Finally, future perspectives for the partial nitritation process are commented upon.

  9. Effect of Initial nitrite concentration on growth of spirulina platensis; Supirurina no zoshoku ni oyobosu ashosan ion shonodo no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohira, Y.; Obata, E.; Kuga, Y.; Ando, K. [Muroran Inst. of Tech., Hokkaido (Japan). Dept. of Applied Chemistry; Yamada, S.

    2000-09-10

    The effect of the initial nitrite concentration on the growth of S. platensis was experimentally investigated using the medium added to the sodium nitrite of 0.0-1.6 kg{center_dot}m{sup -3}. When the initial nitrite concentration is smaller than 0.8 kg{center_dot}m{sup -3}, the growth rate is greater than that without nitrite. The specific growth rate had the maximum value and is approximately 1.3 times that of a standard medium when the range of the initial nitrite concentration is 0.3-0.4 kg{center_dot}m{sup -3}. When the initial nitrite concentration is greater than 0.8 kg{center_dot}m{sup -3}, the growth rate was smaller than that of a standard medium due to nitrite inhibition. (author)

  10. ANALYSIS OF MACRONUTRIENCONTENT, GLYCEMIC INDEX AND CALCIUM OXALATE ELIMINATION IN Amorphophallus campanulatus (Roxb.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endang Lukitaningsih

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the research to find alternative sources of carbohydrates as a replacement for rice has been developed. Walur is one of the carbohydrate sources that can be explored because it can be grown in any area with out special treatment. However, walur has limitation for direct consumption, because it contains calcium oxalate. The purposes of this study were to determine the chemical character (macronutrient content, calculate glycemic index and get the proper washing techniques to elimin ate calcium oxalate of walur. Macro nutrients content studied in this research include carbohydrates, fats, protein, star chand crude fiber. Analysis of macronutrients has been chemically done, while the glycemic index was measured by in vivo using glucose as a standard. Elimination of calcium oxalate was conducted by washing the fresh walur tubers using a solution of0.01NHCl-NaOH, 5% NaCl, and solution of lemon-lime. The content of oxalate before and after washing was analyzed by permanganometry method. The results showed that walur containing 4.34 ±0.07% of reducingsugar,3.24 ± 0.06 % of not-reducing sugar, 11.27±0.40 % of crude fiber,0.03±1.05 % of starchand0.57±0.01 % of protein. Qualitative analysis of fatty acids showed that hexade canoicacid, octade cadienoicacid, and the acide icosatetranoic were detected in high concentrations. The glycemic index valueof walur was relative lylow, about of 16.9. In addition, washing technique using a solution of lemon-lime was the most excellent technique and can reduce the oxalate content up to61.82%.Fromthis research, it can be concluded that walur can be used as food substitute esrice after washing treatment using lemon-lime solution to remove the calcium oxalate content.

  11. Stability-indicating RP-HPLC method for the simultaneous determination of escitalopram oxalate and clonazepam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakde, Rajendra B; Satone, Dinesh D; Gadapayale, Kamalesh K; Kakde, Megha G

    2013-07-01

    The objective of the current study was to develop a validated, specific stability-indicating reversed-phase liquid chromatographic (LC) method for the quantitative determination of escitalopram oxalate and clonazepam and their related substances in bulk drugs and pharmaceutical dosage forms in the presence of degradation products. Forced degradation studies were performed on the pure drugs of escitalopram oxalate and clonazepam, as per the stress conditions prescribed by the International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) using acid, base, oxidation, thermal stress and photolytic degradation to show the stability-indicating power of the method. Significant degradation was observed during acid and alkaline hydrolysis and no degradation was observed in other stress conditions. The chromatographic method was optimized using the samples generated from forced degradation studies. Good resolution between the peaks corresponded to the active pharmaceutical ingredients, escitalopram oxalate and clonazepam, and degradation products from the analyte were achieved on an ODS Hypersil C18 column (250 × 4.6 mm) using a mobile phase consisting of a mixture of acetonitrile-50 mM phosphate buffer + 10 mM triethylamine (70:30, v/v). The detection was conducted at 268 nm. The limit of detection and the limit of quantitation for escitalopram oxalate and clonazepam were established. The stress test solutions were assayed against the qualified working standards of escitalopram oxalate and clonazepam, which indicated that the developed LC method was stability-indicating. Validation of the developed LC method was conducted as per ICH requirements. The developed LC method was found to be suitable to check the quality of bulk samples of escitalopram oxalate and clonazepam.

  12. SAFETY EVALUATION OF OXALIC ACID WASTE RETRIEVAL IN SINGLE SHELL TANK (SST) 241-C-106

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SHULTZ, M.V.

    2003-01-01

    This report documents the safety evaluation of the process of retrieving sludge waste from single-shell tank 241-C-106 using oxalic acid. The results of the HAZOP, safety evaluation, and control allocation/decision are part of the report. This safety evaluation considers the use of oxalic acid to recover residual waste in single-shell tank (SST) 241-C-106. This is an activity not addressed in the current tank farm safety basis. This evaluation has five specific purposes: (1) Identifying the key configuration and operating assumptions needed to evaluate oxalic acid dissolution in SST 241-C-106. (2) Documenting the hazardous conditions identified during the oxalic acid dissolution hazard and operability study (HAZOP). (3) Documenting the comparison of the HAZOP results to the hazardous conditions and associated analyzed accident currently included in the safety basis, as documented in HNF-SD-WM-TI-764, Hazard Analysis Database Report. (4) Documenting the evaluation of the oxalic acid dissolution activity with respect to: (A) Accident analyses described in HNF-SD-WM-SAR-067, Tank Farms Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR), and (B) Controls specified in HNF-SD-WM-TSR-006, Tank Farms Technical Safety Requirements (TSR). (5) Documenting the process and results of control decisions as well as the applicability of preventive and/or mitigative controls to each oxalic acid addition hazardous condition. This safety evaluation is not intended to be a request to authorize the activity. Authorization issues are addressed by the unreviewed safety question (USQ) evaluation process. This report constitutes an accident analysis

  13. Spectroscopic study of the inhibition of calcium oxalate calculi by Larrea tridentata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinales, Luis Alonso

    The causes of urolithiasis include such influences as diet, metabolic disorders, and genetic factors which have been documented as sources that aggravate urinary calculi depositions and aggregations, and, implicitly, as causes of urolithiasis. This study endeavors to detail the scientific mechanisms involved in calcium oxalate calculi formation, and, more importantly, their inhibition under growth conditions imposed by the traditional medicinal approach using the herbal extract, Larrea tridentata. The calculi were synthesized without and with Larrea tridentata infusion by employing the single diffusion gel technique. A visible decrease in calcium oxalate crystal growth with increasing amounts of Larrea tridentata herbal infusion was observed in photomicrographs, as well as a color change from white-transparent for pure crystals to light orange-brown for crystals with inhibitor. Analysis of the samples, which includes Raman, infrared absorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) techniques, demonstrate an overall transition in morphology of the crystals from monohydrate without herbal extract to dihydrate with inhibitor. Furthermore, the resulting data from Raman and infrared absorption support the possibilities of the influences, in this complex process, of NDGA and its derivative compounds from Larrea tridentata, and of the bonding of the magnesium of the inhibitor with the oxalate ion on the surface of the calculi crystals. This assumption corroborates well with the micrographs obtained under higher magnification, which show that the separated small crystallites consist of darker brownish cores, which we attribute to the dominance of growth inhibition by NDGA, surrounded by light transparent thin shells, which possibly correspond to passivation of the crystals by magnesium oxalate. The SEM results reveal the transformation from the dominant monoclinic structure of the calcium oxalate crystals grown alone to the tetragonal

  14. Photodegradation of orange I in the heterogeneous iron oxide-oxalate complex system under UVA irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei, Jing; Liu Chengshuai; Li Fangbai; Li Xiaomin; Zhou Shungui; Liu Tongxu; Gu Minghua; Wu Qitang

    2006-01-01

    To understand the photodegradation of azo dyes in natural aquatic environment, a novel photo-Fenton-like system, the heterogeneous iron oxide-oxalate complex system was set up with the existence of iron oxides and oxalate. Five iron oxides, including γ-FeOOH, IO-250, IO-320, IO-420 and IO-520, were prepared and their adsorption capacity was investigated in the dark. The results showed that the saturated adsorption amount (Γ max ) was ranked the order of IO-250>IO-320>γ-FeOOH>IO-420>IO-520 and the adsorption equilibrium constant (K a ) followed the order of IO-250>IO-520>γ-FeOOH>IO-420>IO-320. The effect of initial pH value, the initial concentrations of oxalate and orange I on the photodegradation of orange I were also investigated in different iron oxide-oxalate systems. The results showed that the photodegradation of orange I under UVA irradiation could be enhanced greatly in the presence of oxalate. And the optimal oxalate concentrations (C ox 0 ) for γ-FeOOH, IO-250, IO-320, IO-420 and IO-520 were 1.8, 1.6, 3.5, 3.0 and 0.8mM, respectively. The photodegradation of orange I in the presence of optimal C ox 0 was ranked as the order of γ-FeOOH>IO-250>IO-320>IO-420>IO-520. The optimal range of initial pH was at about 3-4. The first-order kinetic constant for the degradation of orange I decreased with the increase in the initial concentration of orange I. Furthermore, the variation of pH, the concentrations of Fe 3+ and Fe 2+ during the photoreaction were also strongly dependent on the C ox 0 and iron oxides

  15. Bioconversion of woody biomass to biofuel and lignin co-product using sulfite pretreatment to overcome the recalcitrance of lignocelluloses (SPORL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junyong Zhu; Chao Zhang; Roland Gleisner; Carl Houtman; Xuejun Pan

    2016-01-01

    Sulfite pretreatment to overcome the recalcitrance of lignocelluloses (SPORL) promises to provide efficient bioconversion of woody biomass into bioethanol and lignin co-products. Results from several laboratory and pilot-scale studies are presented to demonstrate SPORL performance, with comparisons to competing technologies. Excellent ethanol yields of up to...

  16. Effects of pH on the formation of 4(5)-Methylimidazole in glucose/ammonium sulfate and glucose/ammonium sulfite caramel model reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xinlan; Kong, Fansheng; Huang, Minghui; Yu, Shujuan

    2015-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to detail the change of 4(5)-Methylimidazole (4-MI) in sulfite and sulfate reactions with different initial pH values. Glucose/ammonium sulfate and glucose/ammonium sulfite reaction systems with initial pH conditions 4.9, 5.9, 6.9, 8.0 and 8.6, were heated at 100°C for 2h, respectively. Higher concentration of methylglyoxal (MGO) and 4-MI was detected in thermal treated glucose/ammonium sulfite reaction system than that in sulfate system. The SO 3 2- reacting with MGO and other precursors of 4-MI at higher pH conditions prevented 4-MI formation. However, no inhibition of 4-MI was found at lower pH conditions due to higher reactivity of the nucleophilic NH 4 + than SO 3 2- . The browning intensity of the sulfite system changed scarcely at higher pH values, which was possibly caused by the polyreaction between SO 3 2- and carbonyl, instead of the intermolecular polymerisation of carbonyl in the advanced stage of the Maillard reaction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. 21 CFR Appendix A to Part 101 - Monier-Williams Procedure (With Modifications) for Sulfites in Food, Center for Food Safety and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Monier-Williams Procedure (With Modifications) for...-Williams Procedure (With Modifications) for Sulfites in Food, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition...-Williams apparatus. Component identification is given in text. ER01JA93.363 Figure 2. Diagram of bubbler (F...

  18. Flow injection analysis-flame atomic absorption spectrometry system for indirect determination of sulfite after on-line reduction of solid-phase manganese (IV) dioxide reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare-Dorabei, Rouholah; Boroun, Shokoufeh; Noroozifar, Meissam

    2018-02-01

    A new and simple flow injection method followed by atomic absorption spectrometry was developed for indirect determination of sulfite. The proposed method is based on the oxidation of sulfite to sulphate ion using solid-phase manganese dioxide (30% W/W suspended on silica gel beads) reactor. MnO 2 will be reduced to Mn(II) by sample injection in to the column under acidic carrier stream of HNO 3 (pH 2) with flow rate of 3.5mLmin -1 at room temperature. Absorption measurement of Mn(II) which is proportional to the concentration of sulfite in the sample was carried out by atomic absorption spectrometry. The calibration curve was linear up to 25mgL -1 with a detection limit (DL) of 0.08mgL -1 for 400µL injection sample volume. The presented method is efficient toward sulfite determination in sugar and water samples with a relative standard deviation (RSD) less than 1.2% and a sampling rate of about 60h -1 . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Novel use of tryptose sulfite cycloserine egg yolk agar for isolation of Clostridium perfringens during an outbreak of necrotizing enterocolitis in a neonatal unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsanas, Despina; Carson, Jolene A; Awad, Milena M; Lyras, Dena; Rood, Julian I; Jenkin, Grant A; Stuart, Rhonda L; Korman, Tony M

    2010-11-01

    Clostridium perfringens has been associated with necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), which is a serious disease of neonates. Our study describes the novel use of selective tryptose sulfite cycloserine with egg yolk agar (TSC-EYA) during a nursery outbreak. This medium provides a rapid, sensitive, and accurate presumptive identification of C. perfringens.

  20. The roles of xylan and lignin in oxalic acid pretreated corncob during separate enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jae-Won Lee; Rita C.L.B. Rodrigues; Hyun Joo Kim; In-Gyu Choi; Thomas W. Jeffries

    2010-01-01

    High yields of hemicellulosic and cellulosic sugars are critical in obtaining economical conversion of agricultural residues to ethanol. To optimize pretreatment conditions, we evaluated oxalic acid loading rates, treatment temperatures and times in a 23 full factorial design. Response-surface analysis revealed an optimal oxalic acid pretreatment...

  1. Kinetic and Mechanism of Oxidation of Oxalic Acid by Cerium (IV)

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Ammar J. Mohammed

    2005-01-01

    Kinetic and mechanism studies of the oxidation of oxalic acid by Cerium sulphate have been carried out in acid medium sulphuric acid. The uv- vis. Spectrophotometric technique was used to follow up the reaction and the selected wavelength to be followed was 320 nm. The kinetic study showed that the order of reaction is first order in Ce(IV) and fractional in oxalic acid. The effect of using different concentration of sulphuric acid on the rate of the reaction has been studied a and it was fou...

  2. Electrochemical oxidation of oxalic acid and hydrazinium nitrate on platinum in nitric acid media

    OpenAIRE

    Rockombeny, L.C.; Féraud, Jean-Pierre; Queffelec, Benoit; Ode, Denis; Tzedakis, Théodore

    2012-01-01

    Several studies in the literature have investigated the electrochemical effects of oxalic acid and hydrazine on various materials in neutral (pH buffered to 7), basic or weakly acidic media (pH 6). The present work proposes electrochemical techniques that allow for the study of the electrochemical behavior, on a Pt electrode, of oxalic acid and hydrazinium nitrate to better understand their oxidation mechanisms in a nitric acid medium at a pH below 1; in addition, some experiments were carrie...

  3. A kinetic and ESR investigation of iron(II) oxalate oxidation by hydrogen peroxide and dioxygen as a source of hydroxyl radicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, J S; Wood, P M; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    1997-01-01

    The reaction of Fe(II) oxalate with hydrogen peroxide and dioxygen was studied for oxalate concentrations up to 20 mM and pH 2-5, under which conditions mono- and bis-oxalate complexes (Fe[II](ox) and Fe[II](ox)2[2-]) and uncomplexed Fe2+ must be considered. The reaction of Fe(II) oxalate...

  4. Insight into the in-cloud formation of oxalate based on in situ measurement by single particle mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available While ground-based works suggest the significance of in-cloud production (or aqueous formation to oxalate, direct evidence is rare. With the in situ measurements performed at a remote mountain site (1690 m above sea level in southern China, we first reported the size-resolved mixing state of oxalate in the cloud droplet residual (cloud RES, the cloud interstitial (cloud INT, and ambient (cloud-free particles by single particle mass spectrometry. The results support the growing evidence that in-cloud aqueous reactions promote the formation of oxalate, with  ∼  15 % of the cloud RES and cloud INT particles containing oxalate in contrast to only  ∼  5 % of the cloud-free particles. Furthermore, individual particle analysis provides unique insight into the formation of oxalate during in-cloud processing. Oxalate was predominantly (> 70 % in number internally mixed with the aged biomass-burning particles, highlighting the impact of biomass burning on the formation of oxalate. In contrast, oxalate was underrepresented in aged elemental carbon particles, although they represented the largest fraction of the detected particles. It can be interpreted by the individual particle mixing state that the aged biomass-burning particles contained an abundance of organic components serving as precursors for oxalate. Through the analysis of the relationship between oxalate and organic acids (−45[HCO2]−, −59[CH3CO2]−, −71[C2H3CO2]−, −73[C2HO3]−, the results show that in-cloud aqueous reactions dramatically improved the conversion of organic acids to oxalate. The abundance of glyoxylate associated with the aged biomass-burning particles is a controlling factor for the in-cloud production of oxalate. Since only limited information on oxalate is available in the free troposphere, the results also provide an important reference for future understanding of the abundance, evolution, and climate impacts of oxalate.

  5. Protective performances of two anti-graffiti treatments towards sulfite and sulfate formation in SO 2 polluted model environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Quiroga, Paula María; Panas, Itai; Svensson, Jan-Erik; Johansson, Lars-Gunnar; Blanco-Varela, María Teresa; Martínez-Ramírez, Sagrario

    2010-11-01

    Specific strategies for protection are being developed to counter both the staining and corrosive effects of polluted air in cities, as well as to allow for efficient removal of unwanted graffiti paintings. These protection strategies employ molecules with tailored functionalities, e.g. being hydrophobic, while maintaining porosity for molecular water vapour permeation. The present study employs SO 2 and water to probe the behaviors of two anti-graffiti treatments, a water-base fluoroalkylsiloxane ("Protectosil Antigraffiti" marketed by Degussa) and an organically modified silicate (Ormosil) synthesized from a polymer chain (polydimethyl siloxane, PDMS) and two network forming alkoxides (Zr propoxide and methyl triethoxy silane, MTES) dissolved in n-propanol, on five building materials, comprising limestone, aged lime mortar, hydrated cement mortar, granite, and brick material. The materials were exposed to a synthetic atmosphere for 20 h in a climate chamber, 0.78 ± 0.03 ppm of SO 2 and 95% RH. Diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared (DR-FTIR) spectra were registered before and after exposure in the climate chamber in the cases of both treated and untreated samples. DR-FTIR, scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analyses, suggest the anti-graffiti Ormosil to suppress formation of calcium sulfite hemihydrate (the primary initial product of the reaction of calcium compounds with SO 2 and water) on carbonate materials (limestone and lime mortar). In case of the granite, brick and cement mortar, Ormosil has a negligible influence on the SO 2 capture. While no sulfite formation was detected by DR-FTIR, gypsum is inferred to form due to metal oxides and minority compounds catalysed oxidation of sulfite to sulfate. In case of brick, this understanding finds support from SEM images as well as EDX. A priori presence of gypsum in hydrated cement mortars prevents positive identification by SEM. However, support for sulfur

  6. Selection and validation of reference genes for quantitative real-time PCR studies during Saccharomyces cerevisiae alcoholic fermentation in the presence of sulfite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadai, Chiara; Campanaro, Stefano; Giacomini, Alessio; Corich, Viviana

    2015-12-23

    Sulfur dioxide is extensively used during industrial fermentations and contributes to determine the harsh conditions of winemaking together with low pH, high sugar content and increasing ethanol concentration. Therefore the presence of sulfite has to be considered in yeast gene expression studies to properly understand yeast behavior in technological environments such as winemaking. A reliable expression pattern can be obtained only using an appropriate reference gene set that is constitutively expressed regardless of perturbations linked to the experimental conditions. In this work we tested 15 candidate reference genes suitable for analysis of gene expression during must fermentation in the presence of sulfite. New reference genes were selected from a genome-wide expression experiment, obtained by RNA sequencing of four Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains grown in enological conditions. Their performance was compared to that of the most common genes used in previous studies. The most popular software based on different statistical approaches (geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper) were chosen to evaluate expression stability of the candidate reference genes. Validation was obtained using other wine strains by comparing normalized gene expression data with transcriptome quantification both in the presence and absence of sulfite. Among 15 reference genes tested ALG9, FBA1, UBC6 and PFK1 appeared to be the most reliable while ENO1, PMA1, DED1 and FAS2 were the worst. The most popular reference gene ACT1, widely used for S. cerevisiae gene expression studies, showed a stability level markedly lower than those of our selected reference genes. Finally, as the expression of the new reference gene set remained constant over the entire fermentation process, irrespective of the perturbation due to sulfite addition, our results can be considered also when no sulfite is added to the must. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Major role of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria in dark ocean carbon fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachiadaki, Maria G; Sintes, Eva; Bergauer, Kristin; Brown, Julia M; Record, Nicholas R; Swan, Brandon K; Mathyer, Mary Elizabeth; Hallam, Steven J; Lopez-Garcia, Purificacion; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Nunoura, Takuro; Woyke, Tanja; Herndl, Gerhard J; Stepanauskas, Ramunas

    2017-11-24

    Carbon fixation by chemoautotrophic microorganisms in the dark ocean has a major impact on global carbon cycling and ecological relationships in the ocean's interior, but the relevant taxa and energy sources remain enigmatic. We show evidence that nitrite-oxidizing bacteria affiliated with the Nitrospinae phylum are important in dark ocean chemoautotrophy. Single-cell genomics and community metagenomics revealed that Nitrospinae are the most abundant and globally distributed nitrite-oxidizing bacteria in the ocean. Metaproteomics and metatranscriptomics analyses suggest that nitrite oxidation is the main pathway of energy production in Nitrospinae. Microautoradiography, linked with catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization, indicated that Nitrospinae fix 15 to 45% of inorganic carbon in the mesopelagic western North Atlantic. Nitrite oxidation may have a greater impact on the carbon cycle than previously assumed. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  8. Statistics analysis regarding nitrate and nitrite content in lettuce from the west side of Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersilia ALEXA

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we studied the statistics interpretation of nitrate and nitrite content in lettuce.During three years, between 2005 - 2007 have been made determinations regarding nitrate and nitrite content in garden lettuce. Samples have been taken from agro-food markets in Timisoara, proceed from a few places in Timis County, in the west part of Romania.Nitrate and nitrite content determination have been realized colorimetrically in the Laboratory for the Measurement of Residues of the Department of Agro-techniques of the U.S.A-V.M.B in Timisoara. The analysis were done with the help of rapid tests AQUA MERCK, with the Spectrophotometer SQ 118 at a wavelength of 515 and 525 nm for nitrate, nitrites.The statistics interpretation of the results was done by using the analysis of some statistics parameters like: mean, range, kurtosis, skewness.

  9. Rapid and simple preparation of rhodamine 6G loaded HY zeolite for highly selective nitrite detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viboonratanasri, Duangkamon; Pabchanda, Suwat; Prompinit, Panida

    2018-05-01

    In this study, a simple, rapid and relatively less toxic method for rhodamine 6G dye adsorption on hydrogen-form Y-type zeolite for highly selective nitrite detection was demonstrated. The adsorption behavior was described by Langmuir isotherm and the adsorption process reached the equilibrium promptly within a minute. The developed test papers characterized by fluorescence technique display high sensing performance with wide working range (0.04-20.0 mg L-1) and high selectivity. The test papers show good reproducibility with relative standard deviation (RSD) of 7% for five replicated determinations of 3 mg L-1 of nitrite. The nitrite concentration determined by using the test paper was in the same range as using ion chromatography within a 95% confidence level. The test papers offer advantages in terms of low cost and practical usage enabling them to be a promising candidate for nitrite sensor in environmental samples, food, and fertilizers.

  10. Dramatic loss of comammox Nitrospira associated with long-term nitrite feeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinnunen, Marta; Palomo, Alejandro; Dechesne, Arnaud

    Until recently, nitrification was thought to be a strict two-step process where ammonia was first oxidized to nitrite by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and/or archaea, and subsequently to nitrate by nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB). Recent studies in NOB metabolism, however, have revealed that certain......, with nitrite as the main energy source. Community assembly was monitored on well-established biofilms formed on the grains of rapid sand filter (RSF) for drinking water production. RSF sand was placed in laboratory scale column bioreactors and subjected to continuous feeding of tap water spiked with NO2- (1 mg...... sequences (100% similarity to uncultured Nitrospira sp. clone KC836101 (Pester et al., 2014)). These observations indicate different behavior of Nitrospira in the absence of ammonia and point to a possible competitive advantage of canonical Nitrospira in environments where nitrite is the sole nitrogen...

  11. Evaluation of the Intake of Nitrate, Nitrite, Nitrosodiethylamine and Nitrosodimethylamine by Food Consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Avasilcai

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was the evaluation of nitrate, nitrite, nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA and nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA intake by food consumption. We determined concentrations of nitrates, nitrites in 102 food samples (40 meat products, 15 fermented cheese, 25 vegetables, 22 fruits and the concentration NDEA, NDMA in 40 meat products. Nitrates and nitrites were determined using Peter-Griess method; nitrosamines were quantified by HPLC with UV detection.  We designed vegetalian, vegetarian and conventional diets of about 2500 kcal/day.  Based of the values found, we calculated the intake of nitrates, nitrites and nitrosamines. The obtained values fits to WHO’s recommendations, except for vegetalian and conventional diet, in which the nitrate content was 3,46 respectively 1,64 times higher than the acceptable daily intake (157 mg NO3-/day.

  12. Peroxynitrite formation from the simultaneous reduction of nitrite and oxygen by xanthine oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, Timothy M

    2004-03-26

    One electron reductions of oxygen and nitrite by xanthine oxidase form peroxynitrite. The nitrite and oxygen reducing activities of xanthine oxidase are regulated by oxygen with K(oxygen) 26 and 100 microM and K(nitrite) 1.0 and 1.1 mM with xanthine and NADH as donor substrates. Optimal peroxynitrite formation occurs at 70 microM oxygen with purine substrates. Kinetic parameters: V(max) approximately 50 nmol/min/mg and K(m) of 22, 36 and 70 microM for hypoxanthine, pterin and nitrite respectively. Peroxynitrite generation is inhibited by allopurinol, superoxide dismutase and diphenylene iodonium. A role for this enzyme activity can be found in the antibacterial activity of milk and circulating xanthine oxidase activity.

  13. Aggregate size and architecture determine biomass activity for one-stage partial nitritation and anammox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlaeminck, S.; Terada, Akihiko; Smets, Barth F.

    2010-01-01

    to the inoculation and operation of the reactors. Fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) was applied on aggregate sections to quantify AerAOB and AnAOB, as well as to visualize the aggregate architecture. The activity balance of the aggregates was calculated as the nitrite accumulation rate ratio (NARR), i.......e. the net aerobic nitrite production rate divided by the anoxic nitrite consumption rate, with all rates determined in aerobic and anoxic batch tests. The space occupied by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) was calculated from transmission electron micrographs. All smallest aggregates were flocs...... and nitrite sources (NARR, > 1.7). Large A and C aggregates were granules capable of autonomous nitrogen removal (NARR, 0.6 to 1.1) with internal AnAOB zones surrounded by an AerAOB rim. Around 50% of the autotrophic space in these granules consisted of AerAOB- and AnAOB-specific EPS. Large B aggregates were...

  14. Determination of nitrite ion at schiff's base derivative of chitosan modified glassy carbon electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Zhongliang; Zhang Jianmei; Liu Shujuan; Peng Daofeng

    2007-01-01

    Chitosan react with salicyclaldehyde by schiff's base reaction in water, a polymer product S-CTS can be prepared. Glassy carbon electrode was modified with S-CTS by drop-coating method. Then, its electrocatalysis effect on the reduction of nitrite by the films of S-CTS was investigated. Experimental results showed that S-CTS modified electrode could reduce the oxidation overpotential of nitrite in pH4.5 B-R buffer solution, the peak current of reduction was proportional to the concentration of nitrite and a good linear relation from 0.20 to 81 mg/kg (r=0.9899) with a detection limit of 2.8 x 10 -7 mol/L was obtained. The methods have been applied to determining nitrite in some samples, satisfactory results were obtained. (authors)

  15. Changes of sodium nitrate, nitrite, and N-nitrosodiethylamine during in vitro human digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeong Sang; Hur, Sun Jin

    2017-06-15

    This study aimed to determine the changes in sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, and N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) during in vitro human digestion, and the effect of enterobacteria on the changes in these compounds. The concentrations of nitrate, nitrite, and NDEA were significantly reduced from 150, 150, and 1ppm to 42.8, 63.2, and 0.85ppm, respectively, during in vitro human digestion (pdigestion. This study is the first to report that E. coli can dramatically reduce the amount of nitrite during in vitro human digestion and this may be due to the effect of nitrite reductase present in E. coli. We therefore conclude that the amounts of potentially harmful substances and their toxicity can be decreased during human digestion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. EVALUASI PENCEMARAN NITRAT-NITRIT PADA AIR MINUM PDAM DI DKI JAKARTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukar Sukar

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A survey on drinking water quality was conducted in 1990/1991 to evaluate the impact of organic matters particularly of nitrate-nitrite contamination in raw water. Water samples were taken from Water Supply Enterprices (WSE in Jakarta, i.e Pejompongan WSE and Pulogadung WSE. The results showed that the treatment efficiency of Pejompongan WSE to reduce nitrate and nitrite concentration was 5% and 82.1% respectively, and that of Pulogadung WSE were 50.0% and 63.2%. The concentration of nitrate in water the supply from Pejompongan WSE and Pulogadung WSE in general is in accordance with the water quality standard. The nitrite level in the water supply from Pejompongan also met the standard, while from Pulogadung did not. It has been observed that the nitrite concentration in water from Pejompongan distribution pipe is increasing with the distance from water treatment installation.

  17. Nitrite Biosensing via Selective Enzymes—A Long but Promising Route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gabriela Almeida

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The last decades have witnessed a steady increase of the social and political awareness for the need of monitoring and controlling environmental and industrial processes. In the case of nitrite ion, due to its potential toxicity for human health, the European Union has recently implemented a number of rules to restrict its level in drinking waters and food products. Although several analytical protocols have been proposed for nitrite quantification, none of them enable a reliable and quick analysis of complex samples. An alternative approach relies on the construction of biosensing devices using stable enzymes, with both high activity and specificity for nitrite. In this paper we review the current state-of-the-art in the field of electrochemical and optical biosensors using nitrite reducing enzymes as biorecognition elements and discuss the opportunities and challenges in this emerging market.

  18. Evaluation of soluble oxalates content in infusions of different kinds of tea and coffee available on the Polish market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusinek, Elzbieta

    2012-01-01

    Tea and coffee are the potentially rich source of oxalic acid, which can act as a antinutrient. The aim of this study was to determine and evaluate the content of soluble oxalates in teas and coffees available on the Polish market. The green, red and black teas, and black natural ground and instant coffees were used for preparing the infusions. The manganometric method was used for the determination of the oxalates in the infusions. The mean oxalates content in the infusions from 3 g of black teas was 115.68 mg/100 cm3 and was higher as compared to red teas (101.91 mg/100 cm3) and green teas (87.64 mg/100 cm3). Disregarding the variety of analyzed teas, the largest oxalates content was in infusions of pure one-component tea--"Sir Roger" (164.82-174.22 mg/100 cm3), while the lowest oxalates content was noted in the tea containing the components from other plants ("Bio-Active" with grapefruit juice--reaching as low level as 39.00 mg/100 cm3). Instant coffees contained larger amount of oxalates than natural ground coffees. Irrespective of the kind of the tested coffees, the lowest oxalates content was found in the infusions from the following coffees: Tchibo Exclusive--19.62 mg/100 cm3, Gala ulubiona--37.32 mg/100 cm3, and Maxwell House--38.40 mg/100 cm3, while the highest oxalates content in instant coffee--Nescafe Espiro 51.80 mg/100 cm3. The results revealed a significant relation between phytochemical composition of analyzed teas and coffees and the level of soluble oxalates in infusions prepared from the tested products.

  19. Diminution of oxalate induced renal tubular epithelial cell injury and inhibition of calcium oxalate crystallization in vitro by aqueous extract of Tribulus terrestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, A; Tandon, S; Singla, S K; Tandon, C

    2010-01-01

    Recurrence and persistent side effects of present day treatment for urolithiasis restrict their use, so an alternate solution, using phytotherapy is being sought. The present study attempted to evaluate the antilithiatic properties of Tribulus terrestris commonly called as "gokhru" which is often used in ayurveda to treat various urinary diseases including urolithiasis. The activity of Tribulus terrestris was investigated on nucleation and the growth of the calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals as well as on oxalate induced cell injury of NRK 52E renal epithelial cells. Tribulus terrestris extract exhibited a concentration dependent inhibition of nucleation and the growth of CaOx crystals. When NRK-52E cells were injured by exposure to oxalate for 72 h, Tribulus terrestris extract prevented the injury in a dose-dependent manner. On treatment with the different concentrations of the plant, the cell viability increased and lactate dehydrogenase release decreased in a concentration dependent manner. The current data suggests that Tribulus terrestris extract not only has a potential to inhibit nucleation and the growth of the CaOx crystals but also has a cytoprotective role. Our results indicate that it could be a potential candidate for phytotherapy against urolithiasis.

  20. Diminution of oxalate induced renal tubular epithelial cell injury and inhibition of calcium oxalate crystallization in vitro by aqueous extract of Tribulus terrestris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Aggarwal

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Recurrence and persistent side effects of present day treatment for urolithiasis restrict their use, so an alternate solution, using phytotherapy is being sought. The present study attempted to evaluate the antilithiatic properties of Tribulus terrestris commonly called as “gokhru” which is often used in ayurveda to treat various urinary diseases including urolithiasis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The activity of Tribulus terrestris was investigated on nucleation and the growth of the calcium oxalate (CaOx crystals as well as on oxalate induced cell injury of NRK 52E renal epithelial cells. RESULTS: Tribulus terrestris extract exhibited a concentration dependent inhibition of nucleation and the growth of CaOx crystals. When NRK-52E cells were injured by exposure to oxalate for 72 h, Tribulus terrestris extract prevented the injury in a dose-dependent manner. On treatment with the different concentrations of the plant, the cell viability increased and lactate dehydrogenase release decreased in a concentration dependent manner. CONCLUSION: The current data suggests that Tribulus terrestris extract not only has a potential to inhibit nucleation and the growth of the CaOx crystals but also has a cytoprotective role. Our results indicate that it could be a potential candidate for phytotherapy against urolithiasis.