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Sample records for nitrite enhances perfusion

  1. Endothelial TLR4 activation impairs intestinal microcirculatory perfusion in necrotizing enterocolitis via eNOS-NO-nitrite signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazji, Ibrahim; Sodhi, Chhinder P; Lee, Elizabeth K; Good, Misty; Egan, Charlotte E; Afrazi, Amin; Neal, Matthew D; Jia, Hongpeng; Lin, Joyce; Ma, Congrong; Branca, Maria F; Prindle, Thomas; Richardson, Ward M; Ozolek, John; Billiar, Timothy R; Binion, David G; Gladwin, Mark T; Hackam, David J

    2013-06-04

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a devastating disease of premature infants characterized by severe intestinal necrosis and for which breast milk represents the most effective protective strategy. Previous studies have revealed a critical role for the lipopolysaccharide receptor toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in NEC development through its induction of mucosal injury, yet the reasons for which intestinal ischemia in NEC occurs in the first place remain unknown. We hypothesize that TLR4 signaling within the endothelium plays an essential role in NEC development by regulating perfusion to the small intestine via the vasodilatory molecule endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Using a unique mouse system in which we selectively deleted TLR4 from the endothelium, we now show that endothelial TLR4 activation is required for NEC development and that endothelial TLR4 activation impairs intestinal perfusion without effects on other organs and reduces eNOS expression via activation of myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88. NEC severity was significantly increased in eNOS(-/-) mice and decreased upon administration of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor sildenafil, which augments eNOS function. Strikingly, compared with formula, human and mouse breast milk were enriched in sodium nitrate--a precursor for enteral generation of nitrite and nitric oxide--and repletion of formula with sodium nitrate/nitrite restored intestinal perfusion, reversed the deleterious effects of endothelial TLR4 signaling, and reduced NEC severity. These data identify that endothelial TLR4 critically regulates intestinal perfusion leading to NEC and reveal that the protective properties of breast milk involve enhanced intestinal microcirculatory integrity via augmentation of nitrate-nitrite-NO signaling.

  2. Endothelial TLR4 activation impairs intestinal microcirculatory perfusion in necrotizing enterocolitis via eNOS–NO–nitrite signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazji, Ibrahim; Sodhi, Chhinder P.; Lee, Elizabeth K.; Good, Misty; Egan, Charlotte E.; Afrazi, Amin; Neal, Matthew D.; Jia, Hongpeng; Lin, Joyce; Branca, Maria F.; Prindle, Thomas; Richardson, Ward M.; Ozolek, John; Billiar, Timothy R.; Binion, David G.; Gladwin, Mark T.; Hackam, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a devastating disease of premature infants characterized by severe intestinal necrosis and for which breast milk represents the most effective protective strategy. Previous studies have revealed a critical role for the lipopolysaccharide receptor toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in NEC development through its induction of mucosal injury, yet the reasons for which intestinal ischemia in NEC occurs in the first place remain unknown. We hypothesize that TLR4 signaling within the endothelium plays an essential role in NEC development by regulating perfusion to the small intestine via the vasodilatory molecule endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Using a unique mouse system in which we selectively deleted TLR4 from the endothelium, we now show that endothelial TLR4 activation is required for NEC development and that endothelial TLR4 activation impairs intestinal perfusion without effects on other organs and reduces eNOS expression via activation of myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88. NEC severity was significantly increased in eNOS−/− mice and decreased upon administration of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor sildenafil, which augments eNOS function. Strikingly, compared with formula, human and mouse breast milk were enriched in sodium nitrate—a precursor for enteral generation of nitrite and nitric oxide—and repletion of formula with sodium nitrate/nitrite restored intestinal perfusion, reversed the deleterious effects of endothelial TLR4 signaling, and reduced NEC severity. These data identify that endothelial TLR4 critically regulates intestinal perfusion leading to NEC and reveal that the protective properties of breast milk involve enhanced intestinal microcirculatory integrity via augmentation of nitrate–nitrite–NO signaling. PMID:23650378

  3. TEMPOL enhances the antihypertensive effects of sodium nitrite by mechanisms facilitating nitrite-derived gastric nitric oxide formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Jefferson H; Montenegro, Marcelo F; Pinheiro, Lucas C; Ferreira, Graziele C; Barroso, Rafael P; Costa-Filho, Antonio J; Tanus-Santos, Jose E

    2013-12-01

    Orally administered nitrite exerts antihypertensive effects associated with increased gastric nitric oxide (NO) formation. While reducing agents facilitate NO formation from nitrite, no previous study has examined whether antioxidants with reducing properties improve the antihypertensive responses to orally administered nitrite. We hypothesized that TEMPOL (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl) could enhance the hypotensive effects of nitrite in hypertensive rats by exerting antioxidant effects (and enhancing NO bioavailability) and by promoting gastric nitrite-derived NO generation. The hypotensive effects of intravenous and oral sodium nitrite were assessed in unanesthetized freely moving rats with L-NAME (N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester; 100mg/kg; po)-induced hypertension treated with TEMPOL (18mg/kg; po) or vehicle. While TEMPOL exerted antioxidant effects in hypertensive rats, as revealed by lower plasma 8-isoprostane and vascular reactive oxygen species levels, this antioxidant did not affect the hypotensive responses to intravenous nitrite. Conversely, TEMPOL enhanced the dose-dependent hypotensive responses to orally administered nitrite, and this effect was associated with higher increases in plasma nitrite and lower increases in plasma nitrate concentrations. In vitro experiments using electrochemical and chemiluminescence NO detection under variable pH conditions showed that TEMPOL enhanced nitrite-derived NO formation, especially at low pH (2.0 to 4.0). TEMPOL signal evaluated by electron paramagnetic resonance decreased when nitrite was reduced to NO under acidic conditions. Consistent with these findings, increasing gastric pH with omeprazole (30mg/kg; po) attenuated the hypotensive responses to nitrite and blunted the enhancement in plasma nitrite concentrations and hypotensive effects induced by TEMPOL. Nitrite-derived NO formation in vivo was confirmed by using the NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl

  4. Addition of nitrite enhances the electrochemical defluorination of 2-fluoroaniline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Huajun [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Zhejiang Gongshang University, Hangzhou 310012 (China); Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Solid Waste Treatment and Recycling, Hangzhou 310012 (China); Laboratory of Microbial Ecology and Technology, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Liang, Yuxiang [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Zhejiang Gongshang University, Hangzhou 310012 (China); Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Solid Waste Treatment and Recycling, Hangzhou 310012 (China); Guo, Kun [Laboratory of Microbial Ecology and Technology, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Long, Yuyang [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Zhejiang Gongshang University, Hangzhou 310012 (China); Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Solid Waste Treatment and Recycling, Hangzhou 310012 (China); Cong, Yanqing, E-mail: yqcong@hotmail.com [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Zhejiang Gongshang University, Hangzhou 310012 (China); Shen, Dongsheng [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Zhejiang Gongshang University, Hangzhou 310012 (China); Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Solid Waste Treatment and Recycling, Hangzhou 310012 (China)

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • A method for improving defluorination performance by in situ self-assembly of pollutants was developed. • The mechanisms of 2-FA modification and defluorination are discussed. • Positively-charged diazonium salt is used to weaken the C–F bond. - Abstract: This study introduces a novel approach that uses the interaction of pollutants with added nitrite to produce diazonium salts, which cause in situ self-assembly of the pollutants on carbon electrodes, to improve their 2-fluoroaniline (2-FA) defluorination and removal performance. The 2-FA degradation performance, electrode properties, electrochemical properties and degradation pathway were investigated. The reactor containing NO{sub 2}{sup −} achieved a 2-FA removal efficiency of 90.1% and a defluorination efficiency of 38% within 48 h, 1.4 and 2.3 times higher than the corresponding results achieved without NO{sub 2}{sup −}, respectively. The residual NO{sub 2}{sup −} was less than 0.5 mg/L in the reactor containing added NO{sub 2}{sup −}, which would not cause serious secondary pollution. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results proved that the carbon anode surface was successfully modified with benzene polymer, and electrochemical tests confirmed that the electrochemical activity of the modified anode was enhanced significantly. The C–F bond was weakened by the effect of the positive charge of the benzenediazonium groups, and the high electrochemical activity of the carbon anode enhanced the electrochemical performance of the system to accelerate defluorination. Thus, the present electrical method involving nitrite nitrogen is very promising for the treatment of wastewater containing fluoroaniline compounds.

  5. Nitrite-induced enhancement of toxicity of phenanthrene in fish and its implications for coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shailaja, M. S.; Rodrigues, A.

    2003-04-01

    Coastal areas are prone to varying degrees of anthropogenic chemical contamination. In many coastal environments experiencing reducing conditions in the water column, nitrite is produced as a result of denitrification. With a view to determining the effect of a natural stress such as the presence of nitrite in water on the xenobiotic metabolism in fish, the euryhaline cichlid Oreochromis mossambicus was exposed for up to 9 days to environmentally relevant concentrations of water-borne nitrite and phenanthrene, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon. Analyses of different biomarkers in the treated fish indicated significant increase in the metabolism of phenanthrene as a result of exposure to nitrite. For example, the activity of the biotransformation enzyme measured as 7-ethoxyresorufin- O-deethylase activity was, in the presence of 1 μM nitrite, nearly twice that produced by phenanthrene alone. Similarly, biliary fixed fluorescence values reflecting phenanthrene and its metabolites were rendered 1.7 times higher when exposed simultaneously to nitrite. Contact with nitrite and phenanthrene together also led to severe hepatic damage with possible cell death as inferred from the large enhancement in sorbitol dehydrogenase activity in the serum and reduced liver somatic index.

  6. Dynamic contrast enhanced MRI for perfusion quantification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Irene Klærke

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging, during bolus passage of a paramagnetic contrast agent, is used world-wide to obtain parameters that reflect the pathological state of tissue. Abnormal perfusion occurs in diseases such as stoke and tumour. Consequently, perfusion quantication could have signi cant...... the contrastagent concentration, [Ca], and the changes in R2 or R 2 has been questioned. In this thesis, an MRI scanner sequence for detection of the longitudinal relaxation rate, R1 during bolus passage was modied for brain perfusion measurements, since the linearity between the changes in R1 and [Ca] is expected...... to be more robust. Successful brain perfusion quantication based on R1 weighted signals has not previously been reported, due to the poor signal to noise ratio of the images. Initial experiments reported in this thesis show that improved sequence may provide more accurate perfusion estimates in the brain...

  7. Platelet inhibition by nitrite is dependent on erythrocytes and deoxygenation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirada Srihirun

    Full Text Available Nitrite is a nitric oxide (NO metabolite in tissues and blood, which can be converted to NO under hypoxia to facilitate tissue perfusion. Although nitrite is known to cause vasodilation following its reduction to NO, the effect of nitrite on platelet activity remains unclear. In this study, the effect of nitrite and nitrite+erythrocytes, with and without deoxygenation, on platelet activity was investigated.Platelet aggregation was studied in platelet-rich plasma (PRP and PRP+erythrocytes by turbidimetric and impedance aggregometry, respectively. In PRP, DEANONOate inhibited platelet aggregation induced by ADP while nitrite had no effect on platelets. In PRP+erythrocytes, the inhibitory effect of DEANONOate on platelets decreased whereas nitrite at physiologic concentration (0.1 µM inhibited platelet aggregation and ATP release. The effect of nitrite+erythrocytes on platelets was abrogated by C-PTIO (a membrane-impermeable NO scavenger, suggesting an NO-mediated action. Furthermore, deoxygenation enhanced the effect of nitrite as observed from a decrease of P-selectin expression and increase of the cGMP levels in platelets. The ADP-induced platelet aggregation in whole blood showed inverse correlations with the nitrite levels in whole blood and erythrocytes.Nitrite alone at physiological levels has no effect on platelets in plasma. Nitrite in the presence of erythrocytes inhibits platelets through its reduction to NO, which is promoted by deoxygenation. Nitrite may have role in modulating platelet activity in the circulation, especially during hypoxia.

  8. Potentially fatal new trend in performance enhancement: a cautionary note on nitrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naughton Declan P

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Considerable interest has been shown by athletes and scientists in the potential for nitric oxide and associated vasodilators to enhance performance. This study aims to explore potential misuse of vasodilators by the athletes, and to highlight the growing concern over these agents. Methods Retrospective analyses of anonymous inquiries recorded in the Drug Information Database™ (DID™ between January 2006 and June 2008 (inclusive. In this 30-month period, the DID™ recorded 198,023 inquiries, of which 118,724 were UK Licensed Pharmaceutical products with a further 79,299 inquiries made for substance not found in the database. Results Phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5 inhibitors, dominated by Viagra®, ranked 16th among the substance groups. The proportion of the inquiries made regarding PDE-5 inhibitors, especially in comparison to antibiotics, painkillers or alcohol, appears to be above the level that would normally be expected from medical need. No significant change in the months leading up to the Beijing Olympics was observed. On the contrary, the Nitric/Nitrate group showed a notable increase between 2006-2007 and 2008, suggesting a potential increase in interest in using nitric oxide among athletes. Conclusions With patents recently filed for the use of agents containing sodium nitrite/nitrate to enhance blood flow for performance enhancement in sport, coupled with anecdotal evidence from internet athlete forums and media, there is a concern that athletes may endanger their health by using vasodilators to enhance athletic performance. PDE-5 inhibitors or chemicals in the nitrate/nitrate group are currently not prohibited or tested for by the doping control agencies but some are highly dangerous to health and can lead to cardiovascular collapse, coma and death. Its promotion among athletes as a performance enhancing supplement is ethically and medically questionable.

  9. Negative pressure ventilation enhances acinar perfusion in isolated rat lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Kal E; Segal, Gilad S; Conhaim, Robert L

    2018-01-01

    We compared acinar perfusion in isolated rat lungs ventilated using positive or negative pressures. The lungs were ventilated with air at transpulmomary pressures of 15/5 cm H 2 O, at 25 breaths/min, and perfused with a hetastarch solution at P pulm art /P LA pressures of 10/0 cm H 2 O. We evaluated overall perfusability from perfusate flows, and from the venous concentrations of 4-µm diameter fluorescent latex particles infused into the pulmonary circulation during perfusion. We measured perfusion distribution from the trapping patterns of those particles within the lung. We infused approximately 9 million red fluorescent particles into each lung, followed 20 min later by an infusion of an equal number of green particles. In positive pressure lungs, 94.7 ± 2.4% of the infused particles remained trapped within the lungs, compared to 86.8 ± 5.6% in negative pressure lungs ( P ≤ 0.05). Perfusate flows averaged 2.5 ± 0.1 mL/min in lungs ventilated with positive pressures, compared to 5.6 ± 01 mL/min in lungs ventilated with negative pressures ( P ≤ 0.05). Particle infusions had little effect on perfusate flows. In confocal images of dried sections of each lung, red and green particles were co-localized in clusters in positive pressure lungs, suggesting that acinar vessels that lacked particles were collapsed by these pressures thereby preventing perfusion through them. Particles were more broadly and uniformly distributed in negative pressure lungs, suggesting that perfusion in these lungs was also more uniformly distributed. Our results suggest that the acinar circulation is organized as a web, and further suggest that portions of this web are collapsed by positive pressure ventilation.

  10. Enhanced Activity and Selectivity of Carbon Nanofiber Supported Pd Catalysts for Nitrite Reduction

    KAUST Repository

    Shuai, Danmeng

    2012-03-06

    Pd-based catalyst treatment represents an emerging technology that shows promise to remove nitrate and nitrite from drinking water. In this work we use vapor-grown carbon nanofiber (CNF) supports in order to explore the effects of Pd nanoparticle size and interior versus exterior loading on nitrite reduction activity and selectivity (i.e., dinitrogen over ammonia production). Results show that nitrite reduction activity increases by 3.1-fold and selectivity decreases by 8.0-fold, with decreasing Pd nanoparticle size from 1.4 to 9.6 nm. Both activity and selectivity are not significantly influenced by Pd interior versus exterior CNF loading. Consequently, turnover frequencies (TOFs) among all CNF catalysts are similar, suggesting nitrite reduction is not sensitive to Pd location on CNFs nor Pd structure. CNF-based catalysts compare favorably to conventional Pd catalysts (i.e., Pd on activated carbon or alumina) with respect to nitrite reduction activity and selectivity, and they maintain activity over multiple reduction cycles. Hence, our results suggest new insights that an optimum Pd nanoparticle size on CNFs balances faster kinetics with lower ammonia production, that catalysts can be tailored at the nanoscale to improve catalytic performance for nitrite, and that CNFs hold promise as highly effective catalyst supports in drinking water treatment. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  11. Pre-concentration of ammonium to enhance treatment of wastewater using the partial nitritation/anammox process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owusu-Agyeman, Isaac; Malovanyy, Andriy; Plaza, Elzbieta

    2015-01-01

    The anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) process is one of the most cost-effective technologies for removing excessive nitrogen compounds from effluents of wastewater treatment plants. The study was conducted to assess the feasibility of using ion exchange (IE) and reverse osmosis (RO) methods to concentrate ammonium to support partial nitritation/anammox process, which so far has been used for treating only wastewater with high concentrations of ammonium. Upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor effluents with 40.40, 37.90 and 21.80 mg NH4─N/L levels were concentrated with IE method to 367.20, 329.50 and 187.50 mg NH4─N/L, respectively, which were about nine times the initial concentrations. RO method was also used to concentrate 41.0 mg NH4─N/L of UASB effluent to 163 mg NH4─N/L at volume reduction factor 5. The rates of nitrogen removal from respective RO pretreated concentrates by partial nitritation/anammox technology were 0.60, 1.10 and 0.50 g N/m2 day. The rates were largely influenced by initial nitrogen concentration. However, rates of RO concentrates were 0.74, 0.92 and 0.81 g N/m2 day even at lower initial NH4─N concentration. It was found out from the study that higher salinity decreased the rate of nitrogen removal when using partial nitritation/anammox process. Dissolved oxygen concentration of ∼1 mg/L was optimal for the operation of the partial nitritation/anammox process when treating IE and RO concentrates. The result shows that IE and RO methods can precede a partial nitritation/anammox process to enhance the treatment of wastewater with low ammonium loads.

  12. Estimating myocardial perfusion from dynamic contrast-enhanced CMR with a model-independent deconvolution method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadrmas Dan J

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Model-independent analysis with B-spline regularization has been used to quantify myocardial blood flow (perfusion in dynamic contrast-enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR studies. However, the model-independent approach has not been extensively evaluated to determine how the contrast-to-noise ratio between blood and tissue enhancement affects estimates of myocardial perfusion and the degree to which the regularization is dependent on the noise in the measured enhancement data. We investigated these questions with a model-independent analysis method that uses iterative minimization and a temporal smoothness regularizer. Perfusion estimates using this method were compared to results from dynamic 13N-ammonia PET. Results An iterative model-independent analysis method was developed and tested to estimate regional and pixelwise myocardial perfusion in five normal subjects imaged with a saturation recovery turboFLASH sequence at 3 T CMR. Estimates of myocardial perfusion using model-independent analysis are dependent on the choice of the regularization weight parameter, which increases nonlinearly to handle large decreases in the contrast-to-noise ratio of the measured tissue enhancement data. Quantitative perfusion estimates in five subjects imaged with 3 T CMR were 1.1 ± 0.8 ml/min/g at rest and 3.1 ± 1.7 ml/min/g at adenosine stress. The perfusion estimates correlated with dynamic 13N-ammonia PET (y = 0.90x + 0.24, r = 0.85 and were similar to results from other validated CMR studies. Conclusion This work shows that a model-independent analysis method that uses iterative minimization and temporal regularization can be used to quantify myocardial perfusion with dynamic contrast-enhanced perfusion CMR. Results from this method are robust to choices in the regularization weight parameter over relatively large ranges in the contrast-to-noise ratio of the tissue enhancement data.

  13. Contrast-enhanced 3D MRI of lung perfusion in children with cystic fibrosis - initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichinger, Monika; Puderbach, Michael; Zuna, Ivan; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Fink, Christian; Gahr, Julie; Mueller, Frank-Michael; Ley, Sebastian; Plathow, Christian; Tuengerthal, Siegfried

    2006-01-01

    This paper is a feasibility study of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of lung perfusion in children with cystic fibrosis (CF) using contrast-enhanced 3D MRI. Correlation assessment of perfusion changes with structural abnormalities. Eleven CF patients (9 f, 2 m; median age 16 years) were examined at 1.5 T. Morphology: HASTE coronal, transversal (TR/TE/α/ST: 600 ms/28 ms/180 /6 mm), breath-hold 18 s. Perfusion: Time-resolved 3D GRE pulse sequence (FLASH, TE/TR/α: 0.8/1.9 ms/40 ), parallel imaging (GRAPPA, PAT 2). Twenty-five data sets were acquired after intravenous injection of 0.1 mmol/kg body weight of gadodiamide, 3-5 ml/s. A total of 198 lung segments were analyzed by two radiologists in consensus and scored for morphological and perfusion changes. Statistical analysis was performed by Mantel-Haenszel chi-square test. Results showed that perfusion defects were observed in all patients and present in 80% of upper, and 39% of lower lobes. Normal lung parenchyma showed homogeneous perfusion (86%, P<0.0001). Severe morphological changes led to perfusion defects (97%, P<0.0001). Segments with moderate morphological changes showed normal (53%) or impaired perfusion (47%). In conclusion, pulmonary perfusion is easy to judge in segments with normal parenchyma or severe changes. In moderately damaged segments, MRI of lung perfusion may help to better assess actual functional impairment. Contrast-enhanced 3D MRI of lung perfusion has the potential for early vascular functional assessment and therapy control in CF patients. (orig.)

  14. Delta-projection imaging on contrast-enhanced ultrasound to quantify tumor microvasculature and perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Chandra M; Cary, Theodore W; Arger, Peter H; Wood, Andrew K W

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the Delta-projection image processing technique for visualizing tumor microvessels and for quantifying the area of tissue perfused by them on contrast-enhanced ultrasound images. The Delta-projection algorithm was implemented to quantify perfusion by tracking the running maximum of the difference (Delta) between the contrast-enhanced ultrasound image sequence and a baseline image. Twenty-five mice with subcutaneous K1735 melanomas were first imaged with contrast-enhanced grayscale and then with minimum-exposure contrast-enhanced power Doppler (minexCPD) ultrasound. Delta-projection images were reconstructed from the grayscale images and then used to evaluate the evolution of tumor vascularity during the course of contrast enhancement. The extent of vascularity (ratio of the perfused area to the tumor area) for each tumor was determined quantitatively from Delta-projection images and compared to the extent of vascularity determined from contrast-enhanced power Doppler images. Delta-projection and minexCPD measurements were compared using linear regression analysis. Delta-projection was successfully performed in all 25 cases. The technique allowed the dynamic visualization of individual blood vessels as they filled in real time. Individual tumor blood vessels were distinctly visible during early image enhancement. Later, as an increasing number of blood vessels were filled with the contrast agent, clusters of vessels appeared as regions of perfusion, and the identification of individual vessels became difficult. Comparisons were made between the perfused area of tumors in Delta-projections and in minexCPD images. The Delta-projection perfusion measurements were correlated linearly with minexCPD. Delta-projection visualized tumor vessels and enabled the quantitative assessment of the tumor area perfused by the contrast agent.

  15. Pomegranate Extract Enhances Endothelium-Dependent Coronary Relaxation in Isolated Perfused Hearts from Spontaneously Hypertensive Ovariectomized Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Nathalie T. B.; Rouver, Wender do N.; Freitas-Lima, Leandro C.; de Paula, Tiago D.-C.; Duarte, Andressa; Silva, Josiane F.; Lemos, Virgínia S.; Santos, Alexandre M. C.; Mauad, Helder; Santos, Roger L.; Moysés, Margareth R.

    2017-01-01

    Decline in estrogen levels promotes endothelial dysfunction and, consequently, the most prevalent cardiovascular diseases in menopausal women. The use of natural therapies such as pomegranate can change these results. Pomegranate [Punica granatum L. (Punicaceae)] is widely used as a phytotherapeutic agent worldwide, including in Brazil. We hypothesized that treatment with pomegranate hydroalcoholic extract (PHE) would improve coronary vascular reactivity and cardiovascular parameters. At the beginning of treatment, spontaneously hypertensive female rats were divided into Sham and ovariectomized (OVX) groups, which received pomegranate extract (PHE) (250 mg/kg) or filtered water (V) for 30 days by gavage. Systolic blood pressure was measured by tail plethysmography. After euthanasia, the heart was removed and coronary vascular reactivity was assessed by Langendorff retrograde perfusion technique. A dose-response curve for bradykinin was performed, followed by L-NAME inhibition. The protein expression of p-eNOS Ser1177, p-eNOS Thr495, total eNOS, p-AKT Ser473, total AKT, SOD-2, and catalase was quantified by Western blotting. The detection of coronary superoxide was performed using the protocol of dihydroethidium (DHE) staining Plasma nitrite measurement was analyzed by Griess method. Systolic blood pressure increased in both Sham-V and OVX-V groups, whereas it was reduced after treatment in Sham-PHE and OVX-PHE groups. The baseline coronary perfusion pressure was reduced in the Sham-PHE group. The relaxation was significantly higher in the treated group, and L-NAME attenuated the relaxation in all groups. The treatment has not changed p-eNOS (Ser1177), total eNOS, p-AKT (Ser473) and total AKT in any groups. However, in Sham and OVX group the treatment reduced the p-eNOS (Thr495) and SOD-2. The ovariectomy promoted an increasing in the superoxide anion levels and the treatment was able to prevent this elevation and reducing oxidative stress. Moreover, the treatment

  16. Hepatic perfusion parameters of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography correlate with the severity of chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Qian, Linxue; Wang, Jinrui; Hu, Xiangdong; Qiu, Lanyan

    2014-11-01

    In the study described here, we introduced a new ratio acquired with contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS): a liver parenchyma blood supply ratio that differentiates arterial and portal phases. Our purpose was to determine whether this ratio and other liver parenchyma perfusion parameters acquired with CEUS can be correlated with the severity of chronic liver disease. Twelve patients with non-cirrhotic chronic liver disease, 35 patients with cirrhosis (child class A: n = 10; child class B: n = 13; child class C: n = 12) and 21 healthy volunteers were examined by CEUS. Time-intensity curves were drawn for regions of interest located in liver parenchyma and right kidney cortex using QLAB quantification software. The arterial and portal phases were differentiated by the time to the maximum enhancement of right kidney and liver parenchyma perfusion data acquired from the time-intensity curves: the intensity of liver parenchyma perfused by hepatic arterial flow (I(ap)), the intensity of total perfusion of liver parenchyma (I(peak)), the intensity of liver parenchyma perfused by portal venous flow (I(pp)) and the ratio of portal perfusion to total perfusion of liver parenchyma expressed by the parameters I(pp)/I(peak), I(peak), I(pp) and I(pp)/I(peak) significantly decreased in patients with cirrhosis and in patients with non-cirrhotic chronic liver disease, whereas Iap increased. The parameters I(pp), I(peak), I(pp)/I(peak) and Iap correlated with the severity of chronic liver disease (r = -0.938, p Liver parenchyma perfusion parameters obtained by CEUS were correlated with the severity of chronic liver disease and have the potential to assess cirrhosis non-invasively. Copyright © 2014 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Bioelectrode-based approach for enhancing nitrate and nitrite removal and electricity generation from eutrophic lakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    Nitrate and nitrite contamination of surface waters (e.g. lakes) has become a severe environmental and health problem, especially in developing countries. The recent demonstration of nitrate reduction at the cathode of microbial fuel cell (MFC) provides an opportunity to develop a new technology ...... saturated at 0.84 mg/g-sediment. This bioelectrode-based in situ approach is attractive not only due to the electricity production, but also due to no need of extra reactor construction, which may broaden the application possibilities of sediment MFC technology....

  18. Bioelectrode-based approach for enhancing nitrate and nitrite removal and electricity generation from eutrophic lakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2012-01-01

    Nitrate and nitrite contamination of surface waters (e.g. lakes) has become a severe environmental and health problem, especially in developing countries. The recent demonstration of nitrate reduction at the cathode of microbial fuel cell (MFC) provides an opportunity to develop a new technology ...... saturated at 0.84 mg/g-sediment. This bioelectrode-based in situ approach is attractive not only due to the electricity production, but also due to no need of extra reactor construction, which may broaden the application possibilities of sediment MFC technology....

  19. Nitrite-induced enhancement of toxicity of phenanthrene in fish and its implications for coastal waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shailaja, M.S.; Rodrigues, A.

    of conjugative metabolism but not Phase I biotransformation in ex- posed fish (Gonzalez, Del Valle, Thohan, & Kane, 2000). It is not known what effect nitrite at low concen- trations has on the metabolism of xenobiotics such as PAHs in fish. In this study...J.Bergmeyer,&M.Graßl(Eds.),3rded.Methods of enzymatic analysis Vol. 3 (pp. 112–117). Florida: Verlag-Chemie. Goering, J. J. (1968). Denitrification in the oxygen minimum layer of the eastern Tropical Pacific Ocean. Deep Sea Research 15, 157–164. Gonzalez, J. F., Del Valle, P...

  20. Enhanced gluconeogenesis from lactate in perfused livers after endurance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumida, K D; Urdiales, J H; Donovan, C M

    1993-02-01

    The effects of endurance training (running 90 min/day at 30 m/min, 10% grade) on hepatic gluconeogenesis were studied in 24-h-fasted rats with use of the isolated liver perfusion technique. After isolation, the liver was perfused (single pass) for 30 min with Krebs-Henseleit bicarbonate buffer and fresh bovine erythrocytes (hematocrit 22-24%) with no added substrate. Subsequent to the "washout" period, the reservoir was elevated with various concentrations of lactate and [U-14C]lactate (10,000 dpm/ml) to assess hepatic glucose production. Relative flow rates were not significantly different between trained (1.94 +/- 0.05 ml/g liver) and control livers (1.91 +/- 0.05 ml/g liver). Furthermore, no significant differences were observed in perfusate pH, hematocrit, bile production, or serum alanine aminotransferase effluxing from trained or control livers. At saturating arterial lactate concentrations (> 2 mM), the maximal rate (Vmax) for hepatic glucose production was significantly higher for trained (0.91 +/- 0.04 mumol.min-1 x g liver-1) than for control livers (0.73 +/- 0.02 mumol.min-1 x g liver-1). That this reflected increased gluconeogenesis is supported by a significant elevation in the Vmax for [14C]glucose production from trained (13,150 +/- 578 dpm.min-1 x g liver-1) compared with control livers (10,712 +/- 505 dpm.min-1 x g liver-1). Significant increases were also observed in the Vmax for lactate uptake (25%), O2 consumption (19%), and 14CO2 production (23%) from endurance-trained livers. The Km for hepatic glucose output, approximately 1.05 mM lactate, was unchanged after endurance training. These findings demonstrate that chronic physical activity results in an elevated capacity for hepatic gluconeogenesis, as assessed in situ at saturating lactate concentrations.

  1. Herpes simplex encephalitis: increased retention of Tc-99m HMPAO on acetazolamide enhanced brain perfusion SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yun Young; Kim, Kwon Hyung; Kim, Seung Hyun; Cho, Suk Shin

    1998-01-01

    We present an interesting case of herpes simplex encephalitis, which showed increased upta unilateral temporal cortex on brain perfusion SPECT using Tc-99m HMPAO, but in bilateral tem cortex after acetazolamide administration. A 42-year-old man was admitted via emergency room, due to rapidly progressing hea disorientation and mental changes. On neurologic examination, neck stiffness and Kernig sign noted. CSF examination showed pleocytosis with lymphcyte predominance. MRI showed swelling bilateral temporal lobe with left predominance, suggestive of herpes simplex encephalitis. Baseline/ Acetazolamide brain perfusion SPECT were acquired consecutively at the same position IV administration of 740MBq and additional 1480 MBq of Tc-99m HMPAO respectively. The temporal and inferior frontal cortex showed markedly increased perfusion on the baseline acetazolamide-enhanced SPECT images. The right temporal cortex showed normal uptake on the b SPECT images, and markedly increased uptake after acetazolamide administration, which seemed to the abundant vascularity at the acute inflammation site without marked brain damage. The fo brain perfusion SPECT after 6 months showed perfusion defect in left temporal cortex but norm perfusion in right temporal cortex. Therefore, we can conclude that baseline SPECT is helpful for the prediction of the prognosis acetazolamide SPECT for the evaluation of the extent of herpes simples encephalitis

  2. Hepatic blood perfusion estimated by dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winterdahl, Michael; Sørensen, Michael; Keiding, Inger Susanne

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) and the slope method can provide absolute measures of hepatic blood perfusion from the hepatic artery (HA) and portal vein (PV) at experimentally varied blood flow rates....

  3. Contrast-enhanced CT- and MRI-based perfusion assessment for pulmonary diseases: basics and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Koyama, Hisanobu; Lee, Ho Yun; Miura, Sachiko; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of regional pulmonary perfusion as well as nodule and tumor perfusions in various pulmonary diseases are currently performed by means of nuclear medicine studies requiring radioactive macroaggregates, dual-energy computed tomography (CT), and dynamic first-pass contrast-enhanced perfusion CT techniques and unenhanced and dynamic first-pass contrast enhanced perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as well as time-resolved three-dimensional or four-dimensional contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Perfusion scintigraphy, single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) and SPECT fused with CT have been established as clinically available scintigraphic methods; however, they are limited by perfusion information with poor spatial resolution and other shortcomings. Although positron emission tomography with 15O water can measure absolute pulmonary perfusion, it requires a cyclotron for generation of a tracer with an extremely short half-life (2 min), and can only be performed for academic purposes. Therefore, clinicians are concentrating their efforts on the application of CT-based and MRI-based quantitative and qualitative perfusion assessment to various pulmonary diseases. This review article covers 1) the basics of dual-energy CT and dynamic first-pass contrast-enhanced perfusion CT techniques, 2) the basics of time-resolved contrast-enhanced MRA and dynamic first-pass contrast-enhanced perfusion MRI, and 3) clinical applications of contrast-enhanced CT- and MRI-based perfusion assessment for patients with pulmonary nodule, lung cancer, and pulmonary vascular diseases. We believe that these new techniques can be useful in routine clinical practice for not only thoracic oncology patients, but also patients with different pulmonary vascular diseases.

  4. Isoattenuating insulinomas at biphasic contrast-enhanced CT: frequency, clinicopathologic features and perfusion characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Liang; Xue, Hua-dan; Sun, Hao; Wang, Xuan; He, Yong-lan; Jin, Zheng-yu [Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Zhao, Yu-pei [Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Department of General Surgery, Beijing (China)

    2016-10-15

    We aimed to determine the frequency of isoattenuating insulinomas, to investigate their clinicopathological features and to assess their regional pancreatic perfusion characteristics. Institutional review board approval was obtained, and patient informed consent was waived. From July 2010 to June 2014, 170 patients (66 male, 104 female) with endogenous hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia underwent biphasic contrast-enhanced CT before surgery, and 129 of those patients also received preoperative whole-pancreas CT perfusion. A total of 181 tumours were proved histopathologically after surgery. Enhancement pattern and regional pancreatic perfusion characteristics were analyzed. Clinical features, tumour size and pathological grading were investigated. The frequency of isoattenuating tumours was 24.9 %. Tumour size and WHO grading was not significantly different between isoattenuating and hyperattenuating tumours. Tumour-free regions had identical blood flow (BF) regardless of their location (p = 0.35). Isoattenuating tumour-harbouring regions had lower BF compared with hyperattenuating tumour-harbouring regions; both showed higher BF compared with tumour-free neighbourhood regions (all p < 0.01). For patients with isoattenuating tumours, the overall hospital stay was longer (p < 0.01). A substantial subset of insulinomas were isoattenuating on biphasic CT. CT perfusion showed higher BF in tumour-harbouring regions compared to tumour-free regions, providing a clue for tumour regionalization. (orig.)

  5. Semi-automatic motion compensation of contrast-enhanced ultrasound images from abdominal organs for perfusion analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schafer, S.; Nylund, K.; Saevik, F.; Engjom, T.; Mézl, M.; Jiřík, Radovan; Dimcevski, G.; Gilja, O.H.; Tönnies, K.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 63, AUG 1 (2015), s. 229-237 ISSN 0010-4825 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP102/12/2380 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : ultrasonography * motion analysis * motion compensation * registration * CEUS * contrast-enhanced ultrasound * perfusion * perfusion modeling Subject RIV: FS - Medical Facilities ; Equipment Impact factor: 1.521, year: 2015

  6. Hypovolemic shock complex: does the pancreatic perfusion increase or decrease at contrast-enhanced dynamic CT?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Hiroki; Tamada, Tsutomu; Kanki, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Akira; Ito, Katsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate contrast enhancement effects of the pancreas at dynamic computed tomography (CT) to clarify whether pancreatic perfusion increases or decreases in severe trauma patients with hypovolemic shock. A total of 90 patients with (n=30) and without (n=60) blunt trauma and hypovolemic shock who underwent dynamic CT for abdomen was included. The measurement of CT attenuation values of the pancreas in the early phase and the late phase was performed to compare the contrast enhancement effects between patients with and without hypovolemic shock. The mean CT attenuation values of the pancreas in the early phase of dynamic CT in patients with hypovolemic shock [95.4±29.1 Hounsfield units (HU)] were significantly lower (P perfusion in patients with hypovolemic shock. The mean CT attenuation values of the pancreas in the late phase of dynamic CT in patients with hypovolemic shock (95.9±17.6 HU) were significantly higher (P perfusion in the early phase and delayed pancreatic enhancement in the late phase of contrast-enhanced dynamic CT was a common finding in patients with hypovolemic shock. © 2014.

  7. Quantitative pulmonary perfusion imaging with 3-dimensional, contrast-enhanced MR: regional difference in the perfusion parameters of healthy volunteers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Song Soo; Seo, Joon Beom; Kim, Nam Kuk; Do, Kyung Hyun; Lee, Young Kyung; Song, Jae Woo; Lee, Jin Seong; Kim, Jin Hwan

    2007-01-01

    We wanted to evaluate the regional differences in such perfusion parameters as pulmonary blood flow (PBF), mean transit time (MTT) and pulmonary blood volume (PBV) in the entire lung of healthy volunteers with using three-dimensional, contrast-enhanced MR imaging (3D CEMRI). Six healthy volunteers underwent dynamic 3D CEMRI (TR/TE 2.7/0.6 msec; flip angle 40 .deg. ; matrix 128 x 96; reconstructed matrix 256 x 192; rectangular field of view 450 x 315 mm; coronal 100-150mm-thick x 10 slabs; temporal resolution 1.0 sec; 35 dynamic phases) For all subjects, 2 mL of Gd-DTPA mixed with 3 ml of physiologic saline was administered as a bolus at a rate of 5 mL/sec, and this was followed by 20 mL of physiologic saline flush. From the signal intensity-time curves, the PBF, MTT and PBV maps were generated using indicator dilution theories and the central volume principle on a pixel-by-pixel basis. A total of 54 round, 1-cm sized ROIs were placed in the lung in each subject (6 ROIs per slab x 9 slices except for the most posterior slab). The regional differences of the measured parameters were statistically evaluated in the gravitational direction and in the upper-mid-lower direction by one-way ANOVA tests. The calculated PBF, MTT and PBV in the entire lung were 141.8 ± 53.4 mL/100 mL/min (mean ± SD), 5.35 ± 1.38 sec, and 13.4 ± 6.48 mL/100mL, respectively. In the gravitational direction, there was a significant increase in the PBF and PBV as it goes to the posterior direction (ρ < 0.05). No statistical difference was found in PBF or PBV between the upper, mid and lower lung zone areas. Regional difference in the various perfusion parameters of the lung in healthy volunteers can be quantitatively assessed with performing 3D CEMRI

  8. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography to assess blood perfusion of skeletal muscles in normal dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    OH, Juyeon; JEON, Sunghoon; CHOI, Jihye

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated perfusion of skeletal muscle using contrast enhanced ultrasonography in humerus, radius, femur and tibia in normal dogs. Contrast enhanced ultrasonography for each region was performed after injecting 0.5 mL and 1 mL of contrast medium (SonoVue) in every dog. Blood perfusion was assessed quantitatively by measuring the peak intensity, time to the peak intensity and area under the curve from the time–intensity curve. Vascularization in skeletal muscle was qualitatively graded with a score of 0–3 according to the number of vascular signals. A parabolic shape of time–intensity curve was observed from muscles in normal dogs, and time to the peak intensity, the peak intensity and area under the curve of each muscle were not significantly different according to the appendicular regions examined and the dosage of contrast agent administered. This study reports that feasibility of contrast enhanced ultrasonography for assessment of the muscular perfusion in canine appendicular regions. PMID:25754794

  9. Nitrate decreases xanthine oxidoreductase-mediated nitrite reductase activity and attenuates vascular and blood pressure responses to nitrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célio Damacena-Angelis

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Nitrite and nitrate restore deficient endogenous nitric oxide (NO production as they are converted back to NO, and therefore complement the classic enzymatic NO synthesis. Circulating nitrate and nitrite must cross membrane barriers to produce their effects and increased nitrate concentrations may attenuate the nitrite influx into cells, decreasing NO generation from nitrite. Moreover, xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR mediates NO formation from nitrite and nitrate. However, no study has examined whether nitrate attenuates XOR-mediated NO generation from nitrite. We hypothesized that nitrate attenuates the vascular and blood pressure responses to nitrite either by interfering with nitrite influx into vascular tissue, or by competing with nitrite for XOR, thus inhibiting XOR-mediated NO generation. We used two independent vascular function assays in rats (aortic ring preparations and isolated mesenteric arterial bed perfusion to examine the effects of sodium nitrate on the concentration-dependent responses to sodium nitrite. Both assays showed that nitrate attenuated the vascular responses to nitrite. Conversely, the aortic responses to the NO donor DETANONOate were not affected by sodium nitrate. Further confirming these results, we found that nitrate attenuated the acute blood pressure lowering effects of increasing doses of nitrite infused intravenously in freely moving rats. The possibility that nitrate could compete with nitrite and decrease nitrite influx into cells was tested by measuring the accumulation of nitrogen-15-labeled nitrite (15N-nitrite by aortic rings using ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS. Nitrate exerted no effect on aortic accumulation of 15N-nitrite. Next, we used chemiluminescence-based NO detection to examine whether nitrate attenuates XOR-mediated nitrite reductase activity. Nitrate significantly shifted the Michaelis Menten saturation curve to the right, with a 3-fold increase in

  10. The investigation of electrochemical properties for Fe3O4@Pt nanocomposites and an enhancement sensing for nitrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yang; Zhou, Jie; Gong, Jin; Wu, Wei-Ping; Bao, Ning; Pan, Zhong-Qin; Gu, Hai-Ying

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Electrochemical characteristics on nanoparticles and nanocomposites were compared. •The reasons for superior electrochemical activity of Fe 3 O 4 @Pt were discussed. •We report an excellent nitrite biosensor based on Fe 3 O 4 @Pt. •Electro-analytical parameters of nitrite at Fe 3 O 4 @Pt were evaluated in detail. -- Abstract: The electrochemical differences (such as charge transfer resistivity, electroactive surface, standard electron transfer rate constant, adsorption amount and analytical performance of nitrite sensor) between Fe 3 O 4 @Pt nanocomposites with two elements and core–shell structure and NPs (Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles and Pt nanoparticles) with single component and simple structure were investigated in detail. Above those investigations, it is believed that for the Fe 3 O 4 @Pt core–shell nanocomposites, Pt shell could provide more electro-catalytic activity while magnetic Fe 3 O 4 core could provide larger surface area and facilitate the purification of nanocomposites. After that, Fe 3 O 4 @Pt nanocomposites modified GCE served as a nitrite sensor. Electrochemical parameters of nitrite at Fe 3 O 4 @Pt nanocomposites such as electron transfer number, electron transfer coefficient, standard heterogeneous rate constant and electron diffusion coefficient were evaluated. With the proposed electrochemical sensors, nitrite in tap water and orange juice could be detected. This investigation suggested that core–shell nanocomposites were superior for the fabrication of electrochemical sensors

  11. Differences in perfusion parameters between upper and lower lumbar vertebral segments with dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE MRI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savvopoulou, Vasiliki; Vlahos, Lampros; Moulopoulos, Lia Angela [University of Athens, Areteion Hospital, Department of Radiology, Medical School, Athens (Greece); Maris, Thomas G. [University of Crete, Deparment of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, Heraklion (Greece)

    2008-09-15

    To investigate the influence of age, sex and spinal level on perfusion parameters of normal lumbar bone marrow with dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE MRI). Sixty-seven subjects referred for evaluation of low back pain or sciatica underwent DCE MRI of the lumbar spine. After subtraction of dynamic images, a region of interest (ROI) was placed on each lumbar vertebral body of all subjects, and time intensity curves were generated. Consequently, perfusion parameters were calculated. Statistical analysis was performed to search for perfusion differences among lumbar vertebrae and in relation to age and sex. Upper (L1, L2) and lower (L3, L4, L5) vertebrae showed significant differences in perfusion parameters (p<0.05). Vertebrae of subjects younger than 50 years showed significantly higher perfusion compared to vertebrae of older ones (p<0.05). Vertebrae of females demonstrated significantly increased perfusion compared to those of males of corresponding age (p<0.05). All perfusion parameters, except for washout (WOUT), showed a mild linear correlation with age. Time to maximum slope (TMSP) and time to peak (TTPK) showed the same correlation with sex (0.22perfusion of the upper compared to the lower lumbar spine, of younger compared to older subjects and of females compared to males. (orig.)

  12. Drug perfusion enhancement in tissue model by steady streaming induced by oscillating microbubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jin Sun; Kwon, Yong Seok; Lee, Kyung Ho; Jeong, Woowon; Chung, Sang Kug; Rhee, Kyehan

    2014-01-01

    Drug delivery into neurological tissue is challenging because of the low tissue permeability. Ultrasound incorporating microbubbles has been applied to enhance drug delivery into these tissues, but the effects of a streaming flow by microbubble oscillation on drug perfusion have not been elucidated. In order to clarify the physical effects of steady streaming on drug delivery, an experimental study on dye perfusion into a tissue model was performed using microbubbles excited by acoustic waves. The surface concentration and penetration length of the drug were increased by 12% and 13%, respectively, with streaming flow. The mass of dye perfused into a tissue phantom for 30s was increased by about 20% in the phantom with oscillating bubbles. A computational model that considers fluid structure interaction for streaming flow fields induced by oscillating bubbles was developed, and mass transfer of the drug into the porous tissue model was analyzed. The computed flow fields agreed with the theoretical solutions, and the dye concentration distribution in the tissue agreed well with the experimental data. The computational results showed that steady streaming with a streaming velocity of a few millimeters per second promotes mass transfer into a tissue. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Morphological, contrast-enhanced and spin labeling perfusion imaging for monitoring of relapse after RF ablation of renal cell carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boss, Andreas; Martirosian, Petros; Schraml, Christina; Schick, Fritz; Clasen, Stephan; Fenchel, Michael; Claussen, Claus D.; Pereira, Philippe L.; Anastasiadis, Artistotelis

    2006-01-01

    MR perfusion imaging was applied for the assessment of completeness in the destruction of renal cell carcinomas by RF ablation (RFA) in a pilot study. An arterial spin labeling (ASL) approach was compared to conventional contrast-enhanced T1-weighted (CE-T1w) imaging. Ten patients suffering from renal cell carcinoma were treated by RFA. For the assessment of the extent of coagulation and for the detection of residual tumor, T1-weighted gradient-echo imaging, T2-weighted spin echo imaging and two different perfusion imaging techniques were performed before, 1 day and 6 weeks after RFA at 1.5 T. Perfusion imaging comprised CE-T1 weighted and FAIR-TrueFISP ASL imaging. Perfusion images recorded in the acute stage after RFA showed higher compliance to the definitive ablation volume reached after 6 weeks than T2-weighted images, which underestimated the true necrosis size. In the detection of residual tumor tissue, both modalities complimented each other. The exclusion of residual tumor tissue could more reliably be performed using perfusion-imaging methods. Both perfusion-imaging modalities showed sufficient imaging quality for post-interventional monitoring. Perfusion imaging provides a higher predictability of the completeness of tumor ablation and extent of coagulation than T2-weighted imaging alone. Since the results of the FAIR-TrueFISP sequence are promising, the administration of potentially nephrotoxic contrast media may be avoided in the respective patient cohort. (orig.)

  14. Chemiluminescence study of carbonate and peroxynitrous acid and its application to the direct determination of nitrite based on solid surface enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Chao; Lin Jinming; Huie, Carmen W.; Yamada, Masaaki

    2004-05-10

    Peroxynitrous acid (ONOOH) was produced by the on-line mixing of acidified hydrogen peroxide with nitrite in a flow system. A strong chemiluminescent (CL) emission was observed when ONOOH reacted with carbonate without any special CL reagents. When cotton was present in the CL cell, the CL emission was enhanced significantly. The method was developed to determine nitrite, which showed a key improvement that any CL reagents and sensitizers were not used, resulting in better selectivity. The applicability of the present CL system was demonstrated for the sensitive and selective determination of nitrite in natural water samples without any special pretreatment. Good agreements were obtained for the determination of nitrite in tap and well waters between the present approach and a standard spectrophotometric method. The average precision was 4.6% (n=7) and detection limit (S/N=3) was 1.0x10{sup -7} M. Based on the CL spectrum, UV spectra, and dissolved oxygen measurement, a possible CL mechanism was proposed. ONOOH was an unstable compound in acidic solution and could be quenched into peroxynitrite (ONOO{sup -}) in basic solution. ONOO{sup -} reacted with CO{sub 2} to produce ONOOCO{sub 2}{sup -}, which can rapidly decompose into {center_dot}NO{sub 2} and {center_dot}CO{sub 3}{sup -} radicals. In the presence of H{sup +}, {center_dot}CO{sub 3}{sup -} radicals can protonate to bicarbonate radical (HCO{sub 3}{center_dot}). The recombination of HCO{sub 3}{center_dot} radicals and decomposition can lead to light emission.

  15. Intramuscular Perfusion Response in Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS): A Quantitative Analysis with Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellermann, Marion; Heiss, Rafael; Swoboda, Bernd; Gelse, Kolja; Freiwald, Jürgen; Grim, Casper; Nagel, Armin; Uder, Michael; Wildner, Dane; Hotfiel, Thilo

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse intramuscular perfusion response in ultrastructural muscle lesions, by applying contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) to a delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) model. Results of this analysis were compared to high-resolution 3 Tesla MRI T2-weighted sequences. 14 healthy participants were recruited. Average perfusion parameters, represented as Peak enhancement (contrast agent inflow) and wash-in area under curve (WiAUC) of the gastrocnemius (GM) and soleus muscle (SM) were assessed before (baseline) and 60 h after inducing DOMS by eccentric exercise. Additionally, conventional ultrasound, high-resolution 3T MRI, creatine kinase level, range of motion (ROM) of the ankle joint, calf circumference and muscle soreness data were collected. Perfusion quantification revealed a statistically significant increase of intramuscular perfusion, corresponding to an increase in peak enhancement of 129.6% (p=0.0031) and in WiAUC of 115.2% (p=0.0107) in the gastrocnemius muscle at post-intervention. At follow-up, the MRI investigations showed intramuscular oedema for GM in all participants corresponding to a significant rise in T2 signal intensity (p=0.001) and in T2 time value (p=0.005). CEUS seems to be able to detect intramuscular perfusion changes and therefore may contribute to gaining deeper insight into the histopathology, inflammatory reactions and regeneration processes of ultrastructural muscle lesions. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Dynamic contrast-enhanced quantitative perfusion measurement of the brain using T-1-weighted MRI at 3T

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H.B.W.; Hansen, A.E.; Berg, H.K.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a method for the measurement of brain perfusion based on dynamic contrast-enhanced T-1-weighted MR imaging. Materials and Methods: Dynamic imaging of the first pass of a bolus of a paramagnetic contrast agent was performed using a 3T whole-body magnet and a T-1-weighted fast...... field echo sequence. The input function was obtained from the internal carotid artery. An initial T-1 measurement was performed in order to convert the MR signal to concentration of the contrast agent. Pixelwise and region of interest (ROI)based calculation of cerebral perfusion (CBF) was performed...... inside the infarct core was, 9 mL/100g/min in one of the stroke patients. The other stroke patient had postischemic hyperperfusion and CBF was 140 mL/100g/min. Conclusion: Absolute values of brain perfusion can be obtained using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. These values correspond,to expected values...

  17. Sporadic insulinomas on volume perfusion CT: dynamic enhancement patterns and timing of optimal tumour-parenchyma contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liang; Wu, Wen-Ming; Xue, Hua-Dan; Liu, Wei; Wang, Xuan; Sun, Hao; Li, Ping; Zhao, Yu-Pei; Jin, Zheng-Yu

    2017-08-01

    To assess enhancement patterns of sporadic insulinomas on volume perfusion CT (VPCT), and to identify timing of optimal tumour-parenchyma contrast. Consecutive patients who underwent VPCT for clinically suspected insulinomas were retrospectively identified. Patients with insulinomas confirmed by surgery were included, and patients with familial syndromes were excluded. Two radiologists evaluated VPCT images in consensus. Tumour-parenchyma contrast at each time point was measured, and timing of optimal contrast was determined. Time duration of hyperenhancement (tumour-parenchyma contrast >20 Hounsfield units, HU) was recorded. Perfusion parameters were evaluated. Three dynamic enhancement patterns were observed in 63 tumours: persistent hyperenhancement (hyperenhancement time window ≥10 s) in 39 (61.9%), transient hyperenhancement (hyperenhancement perfusion. Insulinomas have variable enhancement patterns. Tumour-parenchyma contrast is time-dependent. Optimal timing of enhancement is 9 s after AAT. VPCT enables tumour detection even if the hyperenhancement is transient. • Enhancement patterns of insulinomas are variable and tumour-parenchyma contrast is time-dependent. • An optimized single-phase scan found 77.8% tumours to be hyperenhancing. • Hyperenhancing tumours increase to 84.1% and 87.3% with biphasic/triphasic scan. • Volume perfusion CT enables detection of insulinomas with missed transient hyperenhancement.

  18. The correlation of contrast-enhanced ultrasound and MRI perfusion quantitative analysis in rabbit VX2 liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Zhiming; Liang, Qianwen; Liang, Changhong; Zhong, Guimian

    2014-12-01

    Our objective is to explore the value of liver cancer contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and MRI perfusion quantitative analysis in liver cancer and the correlation between these two analysis methods. Rabbit VX2 liver cancer model was established in this study. CEUS was applied. Sono Vue was applied in rabbits by ear vein to dynamically observe and record the blood perfusion and changes in the process of VX2 liver cancer and surrounding tissue. MRI perfusion quantitative analysis was used to analyze the mean enhancement time and change law of maximal slope increasing, which were further compared with the pathological examination results. Quantitative indicators of liver cancer CEUS and MRI perfusion quantitative analysis were compared, and the correlation between them was analyzed by correlation analysis. Rabbit VX2 liver cancer model was successfully established. CEUS showed that time-intensity curve of rabbit VX2 liver cancer showed "fast in, fast out" model while MRI perfusion quantitative analysis showed that quantitative parameter MTE of tumor tissue increased and MSI decreased: the difference was statistically significant (P quantitative analysis were not significantly different (P > 0.05). However, the quantitative parameter of them were significantly positively correlated (P quantitative analysis can both dynamically monitor the liver cancer lesion and surrounding liver parenchyma, and the quantitative parameters of them are correlated. The combined application of both is of importance in early diagnosis of liver cancer.

  19. A facile fabrication of copper particle-decorated novel graphene flower composites for enhanced detecting of nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huiwen; Wang, Caiqin; Yang, Beibei; Zhai, Chunyang; Bin, Duan; Zhang, Ke; Yang, Ping; Du, Yukou

    2015-02-21

    We describe a simple electrochemical preparation method of a novel three dimensional (3D) graphene material, porous flower-like reduced graphene oxide (f-RGO) nanosheets, which was explored as the support for Cu particles on a glassy carbon electrode (Cu/f-RGO/GCE) for detecting nitrite. In morphology studies, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) demonstrates the 3D porous structure of f-RGO enlarges the surface area of the electrode and promotes more Cu particles depositing on the surface of f-RGO with homogeneous dispersion. In cyclic voltammetry (CV), a well-defined voltammetric peak along with the remarkable reduction current indicates excellent electrocatalytic activity of the Cu/f-RGO/GCE for NaNO2 reduction compared with other corresponding electrodes. The effects of pH value and detection potential on the current responses of Cu/f-RGO/GCE towards nitrite were optimized to obtain the maximal sensitivity. In the optimal experimental conditions, Cu/f-RGO/GCE displays the wide detection range from 0.15 μM to 10,500 μM and the low limit of detection of 0.06 μM (S/N = 3) with fast response time 2 s for detecting NaNO2 through an amperometric method. Furthermore, the presence of K(+), Na(+), Cl(-), NH4(+), NO3(-), SO4(2-) and ascorbic acid show a negligible effect on the current response of nitrite determination suggesting Cu/f-RGO/GCE have the high selectivity for detecting nitrite even in the presence of high concentration of interferents. Moreover, the real sample determination experiment indicated practical feasibility of the obtained sensor. The prepared sensor for determination of NaNO2 exhibited wide liner range, low detection limit, good reproducibility, nice stability and remarkable anti-interference ability. In this paper, not only did the Cu/f-RGO/GCE show high performance for determination of nitrite, but also it was simple to prepare, user-friendly and cost-effective.

  20. Nebulization of the acidified sodium nitrite formulation attenuates acute hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surber Mark W

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Generalized hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV occurring during exposure to hypoxia is a detrimental process resulting in an increase in lung vascular resistance. Nebulization of sodium nitrite has been shown to inhibit HPV. The aim of this project was to investigate and compare the effects of nebulization of nitrite and different formulations of acidified sodium nitrite on acute HPV. Methods Ex vivo isolated rabbit lungs perfused with erythrocytes in Krebs-Henseleit buffer (adjusted to 10% hematocrit and in vivo anesthetized catheterized rabbits were challenged with periods of hypoxic ventilation alternating with periods of normoxic ventilation. After baseline hypoxic challenges, vehicle, sodium nitrite or acidified sodium nitrite was delivered via nebulization. In the ex vivo model, pulmonary arterial pressure and nitric oxide concentrations in exhaled gas were monitored. Nitrite and nitrite/nitrate were measured in samples of perfusion buffer. Pulmonary arterial pressure, systemic arterial pressure, cardiac output and blood gases were monitored in the in vivo model. Results In the ex vivo model, nitrite nebulization attenuated HPV and increased nitric oxide concentrations in exhaled gas and nitrite concentrations in the perfusate. The acidified forms of sodium nitrite induced higher levels of nitric oxide in exhaled gas and had longer vasodilating effects compared to nitrite alone. All nitrite formulations increased concentrations of circulating nitrite to the same degree. In the in vivo model, inhaled nitrite inhibited HPV, while pulmonary arterial pressure, cardiac output and blood gases were not affected. All nitrite formulations had similar potency to inhibit HPV. The tested concentration of appeared tolerable. Conclusion Nitrite alone and in acidified forms effectively and similarly attenuates HPV. However, acidified nitrite formulations induce a more pronounced increase in nitric oxide exhalation.

  1. Interobserver Variation of the Bolus-and-Burst Method for Pancreatic Perfusion with Dynamic – Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stangeland, M.; Engjom, T.; Mézl, M.; Jiřík, Radovan; Gilja, O.H.; Dimcevski, G.; Nylund, K.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 3 (2017), E99-E106 E-ISSN 2199-7152 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : interobserver * dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound * perfusion * pancreas Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Medical engineering https://www.thieme-connect.com/products/ejournals/abstract/10.1055/s-0043-110475

  2. Perfusion of surgical cavity wall enhancement in early post-treatment MR imaging may stratify the time-to-progression in glioblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Eun Park

    Full Text Available To determine if perfusion in surgical cavity wall enhancement (SCWE obtained in early post-treatment MR imaging can stratify time-to-progression (TTP in glioblastoma.This study enrolled 60 glioblastoma patients with more than 5-mm-thick SCWEs as detected on contrast-enhanced MR imaging after concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Two independent readers categorized the shape and perfusion state of SCWEs as nodular or non-nodular and as having positive or negative perfusion compared with the contralateral grey matter on arterial spin labeling (ASL. The perfusion fraction on ASL within the contrast-enhancing lesion was calculated. The independent predictability of TTP was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards modelling.The perfusion fraction was higher in the non-progression group, significantly for reader 2 (P = 0.03 and borderline significantly for reader 1 (P = 0.08. A positive perfusion state and (P = 0.02 a higher perfusion fraction of the SCWE were found to become an independent predictor of longer TTP (P = 0.001 for reader 1 and P < 0.001 for reader 2. The contrast enhancement pattern did not become a TTP predictor.Assessment of perfusion in early post-treatment MR imaging can stratify TTP in patients with glioblastoma for adjuvant temozolomide therapy. Positive perfusion in SCWEs can become a predictor of a longer TTP.

  3. Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound and transient arterial occlusion for quantification of arterial perfusion reserve in peripheral arterial disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amarteifio, E.; Wormsbecher, S.; Krix, M.; Demirel, S.; Braun, S.; Delorme, S.; Böckler, D.; Kauczor, H.-U.; Weber, M.-A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To quantify muscular micro-perfusion and arterial perfusion reserve in peripheral arterial disease (PAD) with dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and transient arterial occlusion. Materials and methods: This study had local institutional review board approval and written informed consent was obtained from all subjects. We examined the dominant lower leg of 40 PAD Fontaine stage IIb patients (mean age, 65 years) and 40 healthy volunteers (mean age, 54 years) with CEUS (7 MHz; MI, 0.28) during continuous intravenous infusion of 4.8 mL microbubbles. Transient arterial occlusion at mid-thigh level simulated physical exercise. With time–CEUS–intensity curves obtained from regions of interest within calf muscles, we derived the maximum CEUS signal after occlusion (max) and its time (t max ), slope to maximum (m), vascular response after occlusion (AUC post ), and analysed accuracy, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, and correlations with ankle-brachial index (ABI) and walking distance. Results: All parameters differed in PAD and volunteers (p max was delayed (31.2 ± 13.6 vs. 16.7 ± 8.5 s, p post as optimal parameter combination for diagnosing PAD and therefore impaired arterial perfusion reserve. Conclusions: Dynamic CEUS with transient arterial occlusion quantifies muscular micro-perfusion and arterial perfusion reserve. The technique is accurate to diagnose PAD.

  4. Post-operative monitoring of tissue transfers: advantages using contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and contrast enhanced MRI (ceMRI) with dynamic perfusion analysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamby, P; Prantl, L; Fellner, C; Geis, S; Jung, E M

    2011-01-01

    The immediate evaluation of microvascular tissue flaps with respect to microcirculation after transplantation is crucial for optimal monitoring and outcome. The purpose of our investigation was to evaluate the clinical value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and contrast-enhanced MRI (ceMRI) for monitoring the integrity of tissue flaps in plastic surgery. To this end, we investigated 10 patients (47 ± 16 a) between postoperative day 7 and 14 who underwent flap surgery in order to cover tissue defects in various body regions. For CEUS we utilized the GE LOGIQ E9 equipped with a linear transducer (6-9 MHz). After application of 2.4 ml SonoVue, the tissue perfusion was detected in Low MI-Technique (MI present, both technologies provide an optimal assessment of perfusion in cutaneous, subcutaneous and muscle tissue layers, whereby the detection of fatty tissue perfusion is currently more easily detected using CEUS compared to ceMRI.

  5. Enhancing colour and oxidative stabilities of reduced-nitrite turkey meat sausages during refrigerated storage using fucoxanthin purified from the Tunisian seaweed Cystoseira barbata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellimi, Sabrine; Ksouda, Ghada; Benslima, Abdelkarim; Nasri, Rim; Rinaudo, Marguerite; Nasri, Moncef; Hajji, Mohamed

    2017-09-01

    The present study investigated the angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity and the antioxidant properties, in vitro and in cured meat sausages containing reduced levels of sodium nitrite, of fucoxanthin extracted from the Tunisian brown seaweed Cystoseira barbata (CBFX). Results revealed that CBFX exhibited great scavenging activities against DPPH free radicals (EC 50  = 136 μg/ml), peroxyl radicals in the linoleate-β-carotene system (EC 50  = 43 μg/ml) and hydroxyl radicals generated by Fenton reaction (DNA nicking assay). A considerable ferric reducing potential was also recorded for CBFX (EC 50  = 34 μg/ml). It is interesting to note that CBFX was found to modulate the ACE activity, which is the key enzyme involved in the blood pressure regulation, with an EC 50 of 5 μg/ml. When fucoxanthin was supplemented, the concentration of sodium nitrite added to cured turkey meat sausages was reduced from 150 to 80 ppm, coupled with the enhancement of colour and oxidative stabilities. Thus, CBFX, with noticeable antioxidant and antihyertensive effects, could be used as a natural additive in functional foods to alleviate potential human health hazards caused by carcinogenic nitrosamines formation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound and transient arterial occlusion for quantification of arterial perfusion reserve in peripheral arterial disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amarteifio, E., E-mail: erick.amarteifio@med.uni-heidelberg.de [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Wormsbecher, S. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Krix, M. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Bracco Imaging Germany, Konstanz (Germany); Demirel, S. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Vascular Surgery, Heidelberg (Germany); Braun, S. [Department of Biostatistics, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Delorme, S. [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Boeckler, D. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Vascular Surgery, Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, H.-U. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Weber, M.-A. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    Objective: To quantify muscular micro-perfusion and arterial perfusion reserve in peripheral arterial disease (PAD) with dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and transient arterial occlusion. Materials and methods: This study had local institutional review board approval and written informed consent was obtained from all subjects. We examined the dominant lower leg of 40 PAD Fontaine stage IIb patients (mean age, 65 years) and 40 healthy volunteers (mean age, 54 years) with CEUS (7 MHz; MI, 0.28) during continuous intravenous infusion of 4.8 mL microbubbles. Transient arterial occlusion at mid-thigh level simulated physical exercise. With time-CEUS-intensity curves obtained from regions of interest within calf muscles, we derived the maximum CEUS signal after occlusion (max) and its time (t{sub max}), slope to maximum (m), vascular response after occlusion (AUC{sub post}), and analysed accuracy, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, and correlations with ankle-brachial index (ABI) and walking distance. Results: All parameters differed in PAD and volunteers (p < 0.014). In PAD, t{sub max} was delayed (31.2 {+-} 13.6 vs. 16.7 {+-} 8.5 s, p < 0.0001) and negatively correlated with ankle-brachial-index (r = -0.65). m was decreased in PAD (4.3 {+-} 4.6 mL/s vs. 13.1 {+-} 8.4 mL/s, p < 0.0001) and had highest diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity/specificity, 75%/93%) for detection of diminished muscular micro-perfusion in PAD (cut-off value, m < 5{approx}mL/s). Discriminant analysis and ROC curves revealed m, and AUC{sub post} as optimal parameter combination for diagnosing PAD and therefore impaired arterial perfusion reserve. Conclusions: Dynamic CEUS with transient arterial occlusion quantifies muscular micro-perfusion and arterial perfusion reserve. The technique is accurate to diagnose PAD.

  7. Sporadic insulinomas on volume perfusion CT: dynamic enhancement patterns and timing of optimal tumour-parenchyma contrast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Liang; Xue, Hua-dan; Liu, Wei; Wang, Xuan; Sun, Hao; Li, Ping; Jin, Zheng-yu [Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Wu, Wen-ming; Zhao, Yu-pei [Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Department of General Surgery, Beijing (China)

    2017-08-15

    To assess enhancement patterns of sporadic insulinomas on volume perfusion CT (VPCT), and to identify timing of optimal tumour-parenchyma contrast. Consecutive patients who underwent VPCT for clinically suspected insulinomas were retrospectively identified. Patients with insulinomas confirmed by surgery were included, and patients with familial syndromes were excluded. Two radiologists evaluated VPCT images in consensus. Tumour-parenchyma contrast at each time point was measured, and timing of optimal contrast was determined. Time duration of hyperenhancement (tumour-parenchyma contrast >20 Hounsfield units, HU) was recorded. Perfusion parameters were evaluated. Three dynamic enhancement patterns were observed in 63 tumours: persistent hyperenhancement (hyperenhancement time window ≥10 s) in 39 (61.9%), transient hyperenhancement (hyperenhancement <10 s) in 19 (30.2%) and non-hyperenhancement in 5 (7.9%). Timing of optimal contrast was 9 s after abdominal aorta threshold (AAT) of 200 HU, with tumour-parenchyma contrast of 77.6 ± 57.2 HU. At 9 s after AAT, 14 (22.2%) tumours were non-hyperenhancing, nine of which had missed transient hyperenhancement. Insulinomas with transient and persistent hyperenhancement patterns had significantly increased perfusion. Insulinomas have variable enhancement patterns. Tumour-parenchyma contrast is time-dependent. Optimal timing of enhancement is 9 s after AAT. VPCT enables tumour detection even if the hyperenhancement is transient. (orig.)

  8. Reproducibility of rest and exercise stress contrast-enhanced calf perfusion magnetic resonance imaging in peripheral arterial disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiji Ronny S

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose was to determine the reproducibility and utility of rest, exercise, and perfusion reserve (PR measures by contrast-enhanced (CE calf perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the calf in normal subjects (NL and patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD. Methods Eleven PAD patients with claudication (ankle-brachial index 0.67 ±0.14 and 16 age-matched NL underwent symptom-limited CE-MRI using a pedal ergometer. Tissue perfusion and arterial input were measured at rest and peak exercise after injection of 0.1 mM/kg of gadolinium-diethylnetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA. Tissue function (TF and arterial input function (AIF measurements were made from the slope of time-intensity curves in muscle and artery, respectively, and normalized to proton density signal to correct for coil inhomogeneity. Perfusion index (PI = TF/AIF. Perfusion reserve (PR = exercise TF/ rest TF. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC was calculated from 11 NL and 10 PAD with repeated MRI on a different day. Results Resting TF was low in NL and PAD (mean ± SD 0.25 ± 0.18 vs 0.35 ± 0.71, p = 0.59 but reproducible (ICC 0.76. Exercise TF was higher in NL than PAD (5.5 ± 3.2 vs. 3.4 ± 1.6, p = 0.04. Perfusion reserve was similar between groups and highly variable (28.6 ± 19.8 vs. 42.6 ± 41.0, p = 0.26. Exercise TF and PI were reproducible measures (ICC 0.63 and 0.60, respectively. Conclusion Although rest measures are reproducible, they are quite low, do not distinguish NL from PAD, and lead to variability in perfusion reserve measures. Exercise TF and PI are the most reproducible MRI perfusion measures in PAD for use in clinical trials.

  9. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of perfusion measurements in dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography: development, validation and clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peladeau-Pigeon, M; Coolens, C

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) is an imaging tool that aids in evaluating functional characteristics of tissue at different stages of disease management: diagnostic, radiation treatment planning, treatment effectiveness, and monitoring. Clinical validation of DCE-derived perfusion parameters remains an outstanding problem to address prior to perfusion imaging becoming a widespread standard as a non-invasive quantitative measurement tool. One approach to this validation process has been the development of quality assurance phantoms in order to facilitate controlled perfusion ex vivo. However, most of these systems fail to establish and accurately replicate physiologically relevant capillary permeability and exchange performance. The current work presents the first step in the development of a prospective suite of physics-based perfusion simulations based on coupled fluid flow and particle transport phenomena with the goal of enhancing the understanding of clinical contrast agent kinetics. Existing knowledge about a controllable, two-compartmental fluid exchange phantom was used to validate the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation model presented herein. The sensitivity of CFD-derived contrast uptake curves to contrast injection parameters, including injection duration and flow rate, were quantified and found to be within 10% accuracy. The CFD model was employed to evaluate two commonly used clinical kinetic algorithms used to derive perfusion parameters: Fick's principle and the modified Tofts model. Neither kinetic model was able to capture the true transport phenomena it aimed to represent but if the overall contrast concentration after injection remained identical, then successive DCE-CT evaluations could be compared and could indeed reflect differences in regional tissue flow. This study sets the groundwork for future explorations in phantom development and pharmaco-kinetic modelling, as well as the development of novel contrast

  10. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of perfusion measurements in dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography: development, validation and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peladeau-Pigeon, M; Coolens, C

    2013-09-07

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) is an imaging tool that aids in evaluating functional characteristics of tissue at different stages of disease management: diagnostic, radiation treatment planning, treatment effectiveness, and monitoring. Clinical validation of DCE-derived perfusion parameters remains an outstanding problem to address prior to perfusion imaging becoming a widespread standard as a non-invasive quantitative measurement tool. One approach to this validation process has been the development of quality assurance phantoms in order to facilitate controlled perfusion ex vivo. However, most of these systems fail to establish and accurately replicate physiologically relevant capillary permeability and exchange performance. The current work presents the first step in the development of a prospective suite of physics-based perfusion simulations based on coupled fluid flow and particle transport phenomena with the goal of enhancing the understanding of clinical contrast agent kinetics. Existing knowledge about a controllable, two-compartmental fluid exchange phantom was used to validate the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation model presented herein. The sensitivity of CFD-derived contrast uptake curves to contrast injection parameters, including injection duration and flow rate, were quantified and found to be within 10% accuracy. The CFD model was employed to evaluate two commonly used clinical kinetic algorithms used to derive perfusion parameters: Fick's principle and the modified Tofts model. Neither kinetic model was able to capture the true transport phenomena it aimed to represent but if the overall contrast concentration after injection remained identical, then successive DCE-CT evaluations could be compared and could indeed reflect differences in regional tissue flow. This study sets the groundwork for future explorations in phantom development and pharmaco-kinetic modelling, as well as the development of novel contrast

  11. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of perfusion measurements in dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography: development, validation and clinical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peladeau-Pigeon, M.; Coolens, C.

    2013-09-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) is an imaging tool that aids in evaluating functional characteristics of tissue at different stages of disease management: diagnostic, radiation treatment planning, treatment effectiveness, and monitoring. Clinical validation of DCE-derived perfusion parameters remains an outstanding problem to address prior to perfusion imaging becoming a widespread standard as a non-invasive quantitative measurement tool. One approach to this validation process has been the development of quality assurance phantoms in order to facilitate controlled perfusion ex vivo. However, most of these systems fail to establish and accurately replicate physiologically relevant capillary permeability and exchange performance. The current work presents the first step in the development of a prospective suite of physics-based perfusion simulations based on coupled fluid flow and particle transport phenomena with the goal of enhancing the understanding of clinical contrast agent kinetics. Existing knowledge about a controllable, two-compartmental fluid exchange phantom was used to validate the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation model presented herein. The sensitivity of CFD-derived contrast uptake curves to contrast injection parameters, including injection duration and flow rate, were quantified and found to be within 10% accuracy. The CFD model was employed to evaluate two commonly used clinical kinetic algorithms used to derive perfusion parameters: Fick's principle and the modified Tofts model. Neither kinetic model was able to capture the true transport phenomena it aimed to represent but if the overall contrast concentration after injection remained identical, then successive DCE-CT evaluations could be compared and could indeed reflect differences in regional tissue flow. This study sets the groundwork for future explorations in phantom development and pharmaco-kinetic modelling, as well as the development of novel contrast

  12. Functional lung MRI in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: comparison of T1 mapping, oxygen-enhanced T1 mapping and dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertram J Jobst

    Full Text Available Monitoring of regional lung function in interventional COPD trials requires alternative endpoints beyond global parameters such as FEV1. T1 relaxation times of the lung might allow to draw conclusions on tissue composition, blood volume and oxygen fraction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential value of lung Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI with native and oxygen-enhanced T1 mapping for the assessment of COPD patients in comparison with contrast enhanced perfusion MRI.20 COPD patients (GOLD I-IV underwent a coronal 2-dimensional inversion recovery snapshot flash sequence (8 slices/lung at room air and during inhalation of pure oxygen, as well as dynamic contrast-enhanced first-pass perfusion imaging. Regional distribution of T1 at room air (T1, oxygen-induced T1 shortening (ΔT1 and peak enhancement were rated by 2 chest radiologists in consensus using a semi-quantitative 3-point scale in a zone-based approach.Abnormal T1 and ΔT1 were highly prevalent in the patient cohort. T1 and ΔT1 correlated positively with perfusion abnormalities (r = 0.81 and r = 0.80; p&0.001, and with each other (r = 0.80; p<0.001. In GOLD stages I and II ΔT1 was normal in 16/29 lung zones with mildly abnormal perfusion (15/16 with abnormal T1. The extent of T1 (r = 0.45; p<0.05, ΔT1 (r = 0.52; p<0.05 and perfusion abnormalities (r = 0.52; p<0.05 showed a moderate correlation with GOLD stage.Native and oxygen-enhanced T1 mapping correlated with lung perfusion deficits and severity of COPD. Under the assumption that T1 at room air correlates with the regional pulmonary blood pool and that oxygen-enhanced T1 reflects lung ventilation, both techniques in combination are principally suitable to characterize ventilation-perfusion imbalance. This appears valuable for the assessment of regional lung characteristics in COPD trials without administration of i.v. contrast.

  13. Clinical Applications of Contrast-Enhanced Perfusion MRI Techniques in Gliomas: Recent Advances and Current Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junfeng Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gliomas possess complex and heterogeneous vasculatures with abnormal hemodynamics. Despite considerable advances in diagnostic and therapeutic techniques for improving tumor management and patient care in recent years, the prognosis of malignant gliomas remains dismal. Perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging techniques that could noninvasively provide superior information on vascular functionality have attracted much attention for evaluating brain tumors. However, nonconsensus imaging protocols and postprocessing analysis among different institutions impede their integration into standard-of-care imaging in clinic. And there have been very few studies providing a comprehensive evidence-based and systematic summary. This review first outlines the status of glioma theranostics and tumor-associated vascular pathology and then presents an overview of the principles of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI and dynamic susceptibility contrast-MRI (DSC-MRI, with emphasis on their recent clinical applications in gliomas including tumor grading, identification of molecular characteristics, differentiation of glioma from other brain tumors, treatment response assessment, and predicting prognosis. Current challenges and future perspectives are also highlighted.

  14. Endotoxemia reduces cerebral perfusion but enhances dynamic cerebrovascular autoregulation at reduced arterial carbon dioxide tension*

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brassard, Patrice; Kim, Yu-Sok; van Lieshout, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: The administration of endotoxin to healthy humans reduces cerebral blood flow but its influence on dynamic cerebral autoregulation remains unknown. We considered that a reduction in arterial carbon dioxide tension would attenuate cerebral perfusion and improve dynamic cerebral autoreg...

  15. 21 CFR 181.34 - Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... fixatives and preservative agents, with or without sodium or potassium nitrate, in the curing of red meat... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. 181.34...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.34 Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. Sodium nitrite and potassium...

  16. Enhancement of the complete autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite process in a modified single-stage subsurface vertical flow constructed wetland: Effect of saturated zone depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Menglu; Wang, Zhen; Qi, Ran

    2017-06-01

    This study was conducted to explore enhancement of the complete autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) process in a modified single-stage subsurface vertical flow constructed wetland (VSSF) with saturated zone, and nitrogen transformation pathways in the VSSF treating digested swine wastewater were investigated at four different saturated zone depths (SZDs). SZD significantly affected nitrogen transformation pathways in the VSSF throughout the experiment. As the SZD was 45cm, the CANON process was enhanced most effectively in the system owing to the notable enhancement of anammox. Correspondingly, the VSSF had the best TN removal performance [(76.74±7.30)%] and lower N 2 O emission flux [(3.50±0.22)mg·(m 2 ·h) - 1 ]. It could be concluded that autotrophic nitrogen removal via CANON process could become a primary route for nitrogen removal in the VSSF with optimized microenvironment that developed as a result of the appropriate SZD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Brief ex vivo perfusion with heparinized and/or citrated whole blood enhances tolerance of free muscle flaps to prolonged ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, J D; Li, X; Cooley, B C

    1999-01-01

    This study investigated the use of heparinized and/or citrated whole blood as a perfusate for enhancing muscle tolerance to warm ischemia. Unilateral cutaneous trunci muscle flaps were harvested from Sprague-Dawley rats and stored for 10 hr at 22-24 degrees C prior to transplantation to the groin. One group served as a non-perfused control. In three experimental groups, the flaps were hand-perfused ex vivo with 1.0 ml of heparinized, citrated, or heparinized and citrated autogenous whole blood at physiological pressures. Perfusion was administered over a 10-min period 5 hr into the ischemic period. Flaps were revascularized on the femoral vessels and then harvested 48 hr following revascularization. Tissue injury was assessed by calculation of flap weight change (indicator of tissue edema), histochemical evaluation of muscle dehydrogenase activity (nitroblue tetrazolium assay), and light microscopy. All perfused groups had significantly higher muscle dehydrogenase activity compared with non-perfused controls (P flap edema was seen in the combined heparin-citrate perfusion of flaps compared with nonperfused controls (P flaps. We conclude that mid-ischemic perfusion with heparinized and/or citrated blood limits the deleterious effects of extended warm ischemia.

  18. Contrast-enhanced, real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging of tissue perfusion: preliminary results in a rabbit model of testicular torsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paltiel, H. J.; Padua, H. M.; Gargollo, P. C.; Cannon, G. M., Jr.; Alomari, A. I.; Yu, R.; Clement, G. T.

    2011-04-01

    Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (US) imaging is potentially applicable to the clinical investigation of a wide variety of perfusion disorders. Quantitative analysis of perfusion is not widely performed, and is limited by the fact that data are acquired from a single tissue plane, a situation that is unlikely to accurately reflect global perfusion. Real-time perfusion information from a tissue volume in an experimental rabbit model of testicular torsion was obtained with a two-dimensional matrix phased array US transducer. Contrast-enhanced imaging was performed in 20 rabbits during intravenous infusion of the microbubble contrast agent Definity® before and after unilateral testicular torsion and contralateral orchiopexy. The degree of torsion was 0° in 4 (sham surgery), 180° in 4, 360° in 4, 540° in 4, and 720° in 4. An automated technique was developed to analyze the time history of US image intensity in experimental and control testes. Comparison of mean US intensity rate of change and of ratios between mean US intensity rate of change in experimental and control testes demonstrated good correlation with testicular perfusion and mean perfusion ratios obtained with radiolabeled microspheres, an accepted 'gold standard'. This method is of potential utility in the clinical evaluation of testicular and other organ perfusion.

  19. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Perfusion MRI of High Grade Brain Gliomas Obtained with Arterial or Venous Waveform Input Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filice, Silvano; Crisi, Girolamo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the differences in dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) perfusion estimates of high-grade brain gliomas (HGG) due to the use of an input function (IF) obtained respectively from arterial (AIF) and venous (VIF) approaches by two different commercially available software applications. This prospective study includes 20 patients with pathologically confirmed diagnosis of high-grade gliomas. The data source was processed by using two DCE dedicated commercial packages, both based on the extended Toft model, but the first customized to obtain input function from arterial measurement and the second from sagittal sinus sampling. The quantitative parametric perfusion maps estimated from the two software packages were compared by means of a region of interest (ROI) analysis. The resulting input functions from venous and arterial data were also compared. No significant difference has been found between the perfusion parameters obtained with the two different software packages (P-value < .05). The comparison of the VIFs and AIFs obtained by the two packages showed no statistical differences. Direct comparison of DCE-MRI measurements with IF generated by means of arterial or venous waveform led to no statistical difference in quantitative metrics for evaluating HGG. However, additional research involving DCE-MRI acquisition protocols and post-processing would be beneficial to further substantiate the effectiveness of venous approach as the IF method compared with arterial-based IF measurement. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  20. Prognostic value of preoperative dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI perfusion parameters for high-grade glioma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulyte, Agne [Vilnius University, Faculty of Medicine, Vilnius (Lithuania); Katsaros, Vasileios K. [General Anticancer and Oncological Hospital ' ' St. Savvas' ' , Department of Advanced Imaging Modalities - CT and MRI, Athens (Greece); University of Athens, Department of Neurosurgery, Evangelismos Hospital, Athens (Greece); Liouta, Evangelia; Stranjalis, Georgios [University of Athens, Department of Neurosurgery, Evangelismos Hospital, Athens (Greece); Boskos, Christos [University of Athens, Department of Neurosurgery, Evangelismos Hospital, Athens (Greece); General Anticancer and Oncological Hospital ' ' St. Savvas' ' , Department of Radiation Oncology, Athens (Greece); Papanikolaou, Nickolas [Champalimaud Foundation, Department of Radiology, Centre for the Unknown, Lisbon (Portugal); Usinskiene, Jurgita [National Cancer Institute, Vilnius (Lithuania); Affidea Lietuva, Vilnius (Lithuania); Bisdas, Sotirios [University College London Hospitals, Department of Neuroradiology, The National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-15

    The prognostic value of the dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI perfusion and its histogram analysis-derived metrics is not well established for high-grade glioma (HGG) patients. The aim of this prospective study was to investigate DCE perfusion transfer coefficient (K{sup trans}), vascular plasma volume fraction (v{sub p}), extracellular volume fraction (v{sub e}), reverse transfer constant (k{sub ep}), and initial area under gadolinium concentration time curve (IAUGC) as predictors of progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in HGG patients. Sixty-nine patients with suspected anaplastic astrocytoma or glioblastoma underwent preoperative DCE-MRI scans. DCE perfusion whole tumor region histogram parameters, clinical details, and PFS and OS data were obtained. Univariate, multivariate, and Kaplan-Meier survival analyses were conducted. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was employed to identify perfusion parameters with the best differentiation performance. On univariate analysis, v{sub e} and skewness of v{sub p} had significant negative impacts, while k{sub ep} had significant positive impact on OS (P < 0.05). v{sub e} was also a negative predictor of PFS (P < 0.05). Patients with lower v{sub e} and IAUGC had longer median PFS and OS on Kaplan-Meier analysis (P < 0.05). K{sup trans} and v{sub e} could also differentiate grade III from IV gliomas (area under the curve 0.819 and 0.791, respectively). High v{sub e} is a consistent predictor of worse PFS and OS in HGG glioma patients. v{sub p} skewness and k{sub ep} are also predictive for OS. K{sup trans} and v{sub e} demonstrated the best diagnostic performance for differentiating grade III from IV gliomas. (orig.)

  1. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging: fundamentals and application to the evaluation of the peripheral perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Yaron; Partovi, Sasan; Müller-Eschner, Matthias; Amarteifio, Erick; Bäuerle, Tobias; Weber, Marc-André; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Rengier, Fabian

    2014-04-01

    The ability to ascertain information pertaining to peripheral perfusion through the analysis of tissues' temporal reaction to the inflow of contrast agent (CA) was first recognized in the early 1990's. Similar to other functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques such as arterial spin labeling (ASL) and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) MRI, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) was at first restricted to studies of the brain. Over the last two decades the spectrum of ailments, which have been studied with DCE-MRI, has been extensively broadened and has come to include pathologies of the heart notably infarction, stroke and further cerebral afflictions, a wide range of neoplasms with an emphasis on antiangiogenic treatment and early detection, as well as investigations of the peripheral vascular and musculoskeletal systems. DCE-MRI possesses an unparalleled capacity to quantitatively measure not only perfusion but also other diverse microvascular parameters such as vessel permeability and fluid volume fractions. More over the method is capable of not only assessing blood flowing through an organ, but in contrast to other noninvasive methods, the actual tissue perfusion. These unique features have recently found growing application in the study of the peripheral vascular system and most notably in the diagnosis and treatment of peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). The first part of this review will elucidate the fundamentals of data acquisition and interpretation of DCE-MRI, two areas that often remain baffling to the clinical and investigating physician because of their complexity. The second part will discuss developments and exciting perspectives of DCE-MRI regarding the assessment of perfusion in the extremities. Emerging clinical applications of DCE-MRI will be reviewed with a special focus on investigation of physiology and pathophysiology of the microvascular and vascular systems of the extremities.

  2. Impact of hemoglobin nitrite to nitric oxide reductase on blood transfusion for resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad Brouse

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Transfusion of blood remains the gold standard for fluid resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock. Hemoglobin (Hb within the red blood cell transports oxygen and modulates nitric oxide (NO through NO scavenging and nitrite reductase. Aims: This study was designed to examine the effects of incorporating a novel NO modulator, RRx-001, on systemic and microvascular hemodynamic response after blood transfusion for resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock in a hamster window chamber model. In addition, to RRx-001 the role of low dose of nitrite (1 × 10−9 moles per animal supplementation after resuscitation was studied. Materials and Methods: Severe hemorrhage was induced by arterial controlled bleeding of 50% of the blood volume (BV and the hypovolemic state was maintained for 1 h. The animals received volume resuscitation by an infusion of 25% of BV using fresh blood alone or with added nitrite, or fresh blood treated with RRx-001 (140 mg/kg or RRx-001 (140 mg/kg with added nitrite. Systemic and microvascular hemodynamics were followed at baseline and at different time points during the entire study. Tissue apoptosis and necrosis were measured 8 h after resuscitation to correlate hemodynamic changes with tissue viability. Results: Compared to resuscitation with blood alone, blood treated with RRx-001 decreased vascular resistance, increased blood flow and functional capillary density immediately after resuscitation and preserved tissue viability. Furthermore, in RRx-001 treated animals, both mean arterial pressure (MAP and met Hb were maintained within normal levels after resuscitation (MAP >90 mmHg and metHb <2%. The addition of nitrite to RRx-001 did not significantly improve the effects of RRx-001, as it increased methemoglobinemia and lower MAP. Conclusion: RRx-001 alone enhanced perfusion and reduced tissue damage as compared to blood; it may serve as an adjunct therapy to the current gold standard treatment for resuscitation from

  3. Cardiac contractility in Antarctic teleost is modulated by nitrite through xanthine oxidase and cytochrome p-450 nitrite reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, Filippo; Amelio, Daniela; Gattuso, Alfonsina; Cerra, Maria Carmela; Pellegrino, Daniela

    2015-09-15

    In mammalian and non-mammalian vertebrates, nitrite anion, the largest pool of intravascular and tissue nitric oxide storage, represents a key player of many biological processes, including cardiac modulation. As shown by our studies on Antarctic teleosts, nitrite-dependent cardiac regulation is of great relevance also in cold-blooded vertebrates. This study analysed the influence elicited by nitrite on the performance of the perfused beating heart of two Antarctic stenotherm teleosts, the haemoglobinless Chionodraco hamatus (icefish) and the red-blooded Trematomus bernacchii. Since haemoglobin is crucial in nitric oxide homeostasis, the icefish, a naturally occurring genetic knockout for this protein, provides exclusive opportunities to investigate nitric oxide/nitrite signaling. In vivo, nitrite conversion to nitric oxide requires the nitrite reductase activity of xanthine oxidase and cytochrome P-450, thus the involvement of these enzymes was also evaluated. We showed that, in C. hamatus and T. bernacchii, nitrite influenced cardiac performance by inducing a concentration-dependent positive inotropic effect which was unaffected by nitric oxide scavenging by PTIO in C. hamatus, while it was abolished in T. bernacchii. Specific inhibition of xanthine oxidase and cytochrome P-450 revealed, in the two teleosts, that the nitrite-dependent inotropism required the nitrite reductase activity of both enzymes. We also found that xanthine oxidase is more expressed in C. hamatus than in T. bernacchii, while the opposite was observed concerning cytochrome P-450. Results suggested that in the heart of C. hamatus and T. bernacchii, nitrite is an integral physiological source of nitric oxide with important signaling properties, which require the nitrite reductase activity of xanthine oxidase and cytochrome P-450. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted perfusion MRI in the differentiation of tumor recurrence from radiation necrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anne Vibeke Andrée; Simonsen, Helle J; Law, Ian

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: To investigate if perfusion measured with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) can be used to differentiate radiation necrosis from tumor recurrence in patients with high-grade glioma. METHODS: The study was approved by the institutional review board......-PET and DCE-MRI agreed in classification of tumor status in 13 out of the 16 cases where an FDG-PET classification was obtained. In two of the remaining three patients, MRI follow-up and histology was available and both indicated that the DCE-MRI answer was correct. CONCLUSION: CBV measurements using DCE...

  5. Assessment of Semiquantitative Parameters of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Perfusion MR Imaging in Differentiation of Subtypes of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel Razek, Ahmed Abdel Khalek; Mousa, Amani; Farouk, Ahmed; Nabil, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    To assess semiquantitative parameters of dynamic contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging (DCE) in differentiation of subtypes of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Prospective study conducted upon 34 patients (27 M, 7 F, aged 25–72 ys: mean 45 ys) with RCC. Abdominal dynamic contrast-enhanced gradient-recalled echo MR sequence after administration of gadopentetate dimeglumine was obtained. The time signal intensity curve (TIC) of the lesion was created with calculation of enhancement ratio (ER), and washout ratio (WR). The subtypes of RCC were as follows: clear cell carcinomas (n=23), papillary carcinomas (n=6), and chromophobe carcinomas (n=5). The mean ER of clear cell, papillary and chromophobe RCC were 188±49.7, 35±8.9, and 120±41.6 respectively. The mean WR of clear cell, papillary and chromophobe RCCs were 28.6±6.8, 47.6±5.7 and 42.7±10, respectively. There was a significant difference in ER (P=0.001) and WR (P=0.001) between clear cell RCC and other subtypes of RCC. The threshold values of ER and WR used for differentiating clear cell RCC from other subtypes of RCC were 142 and 38 with areas under the curve of 0.937 and 0.895, respectively. We concluded that ER and WR are semiquantitative perfusion parameters useful in differentiation of clear cell RCC from chromophobe and papillary RCCs

  6. [Application on the quantitative perfusion parameters of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in the pathological subtype of uterine leiomyoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, J; Zhao, Z H; Yang, J F; Zhao, L; Yang, L M; Hu, H J

    2017-04-18

    Objective: To analyze the value of the quantitative perfusion parameters of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI(DCE-MRI) in the pathological subtype of uterine leiomyoma. Methods: A total of 35 cases of uterine leiomyoma confirmed by surgery and pathology were retrospectively analyzed in Shaoxing People's Hospital from October 2015 to May 2016.All cases underwent DCE-MRI. Quantitative perfusion parameters were prospectively measured and analyzed, including transfer constant (K(trans)) , efflux rate constant (K(ep)), extravascular extracellular space volume ratio (V(e)), blood plasma volume ratio (V(p)), permeability surface area product (PS) and plasma flow (F(p)) , using signal-input two-compartment tracer kinetic models (Extended Tofts model and Exchange model) in 35 leiomyoma cases.After the operation, the 35 cases were divided into three groups according to the pathological classfication , the ordinary, the cellular and the degeneration type.To analyze the differences among the three groups about the quantitative perfusion parameters of uterine leiomyoma. Compared with the gold standard of pathological findings, the ROC curves were drawn to evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of different quantitative perfusion parameters. Results: In the ordinary, cellular and degeneration type of uterine leiomyoma, K(trans) value were respectively(0.684±0.341), (1.897±0.458), (0.554±0.514)/min; K(ep) were respectively(1.004±0.685), (2.362±1.001), (1.274±1.093)/min; V(e) were respectively 0.789%±0.186%, 0.806%±0.203%, 0.537%±0.314%; V(p) were respectively 0.145%±0.196%, 0.502%±0.338%, 0.062%±0.106% and F(p) were respectively(0.792±0.461), (2.426±0.509), (0.628±0.551)ml/min.Among three groups, the value of K(trans), K(ep), V(e), V(p) and F(p) had statistical difference(all P difference. The value of K(trans), K(ep), V(p) and F(p) in cellular type were higher than the ordinary type(all P quantitative perfusion parameters of DCE-MRI , especially the value of K(trans), K

  7. Combined magnetic resonance coronary artery imaging, myocardial perfusion and late gadolinium enhancement in patients with suspected coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dreysse Stephan

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR imaging offers methods for the detection of ischemia and myocardial infarction as well as visualization of the coronary arteries (MRCA. However, a direct comparison of adenosine perfusion (PERF, late gadolinium enhancement (LGE and MRCA or the results of their combination has not been performed. Aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility/diagnostic performance of rest/stress perfusion, late gadolinium enhancement and MRCA and their combination in patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD in comparison to invasive angiography. Methods Fifty-four patients (60 ± 10 years, 35 men, CAD 48% underwent CMR including MRCA (steady state free precession, navigator whole heart approach, spatial resolution 0.7 × 0.7 × .0.9 mm, trigger delay and temporal resolution adjusted individually, stress PERF (adenosine 140 μg/min/kg, rest PERF (SSFP, 3 short axis, 1 saturation prepulse per slice and LGE (3D inversion recovery technique using Gd-BOPTA. Images were analyzed visually. Stenosis >50% in invasive angiography was considered significant. Results Mean study time was 68 ± 11 minutes. Sensitivity for PERF, LGE, MRCA and the combination of PERF/LGE and PERF/LGE/MRCA was 87%, 50%, 91%, 88% and 92%, respectively and specificity 88%, 96%, 46%, 88% and 56%, respectively. If image quality of MRCA was excellent (n = 18 the combination of MRCA/PERF/LGE yield a sensitivity of 86% and specificity of 91%. However, no test or combination improved diagnostic performance significantly compared to PERF alone. Conclusion In patients with CAD, the combination of stress PERF, LGE and MRCA is feasible. When compared to invasive angiography, adenosine stress perfusion outperforms CMR coronary angiography in direct comparison and yields the best results with non-significant improvement in combination with LGE and significant deterioration in combination with MRCA. MRCA may be of additional value only in

  8. Enhanced task related brain activation and resting perfusion in healthy older adults after chronic blueberry supplementation

    OpenAIRE

    Bowtell, J.; Zainie, A.; Conway, M. E.; Adlam, A.; Fulford, J.

    2017-01-01

    Blueberries are rich in flavonoids, which possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. High flavonoid intakes attenuate age-related cognitive decline, but data from human intervention studies are sparse. We investigated whether 12 weeks of blueberry concentrate supplementation improved brain\\ud perfusion, task-related activation and cognitive function in healthy older adults. Participants were randomised to consume either 30 ml blueberry concentrate providing 387 mg anthocyanidins (5...

  9. Automated scoring of regional lung perfusion in children from contrast enhanced 3D MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimann, Tobias; Eichinger, Monika; Bauman, Grzegorz; Bischoff, Arved; Puderbach, Michael; Meinzer, Hans-Peter

    2012-03-01

    MRI perfusion images give information about regional lung function and can be used to detect pulmonary pathologies in cystic fibrosis (CF) children. However, manual assessment of the percentage of pathologic tissue in defined lung subvolumes features large inter- and intra-observer variation, making it difficult to determine disease progression consistently. We present an automated method to calculate a regional score for this purpose. First, lungs are located based on thresholding and morphological operations. Second, statistical shape models of left and right children's lungs are initialized at the determined locations and used to precisely segment morphological images. Segmentation results are transferred to perfusion maps and employed as masks to calculate perfusion statistics. An automated threshold to determine pathologic tissue is calculated and used to determine accurate regional scores. We evaluated the method on 10 MRI images and achieved an average surface distance of less than 1.5 mm compared to manual reference segmentations. Pathologic tissue was detected correctly in 9 cases. The approach seems suitable for detecting early signs of CF and monitoring response to therapy.

  10. Synthesis of Superparamagnetic Core-Shell Structure Supported Pd Nanocatalysts for Catalytic Nitrite Reduction with Enhanced Activity, No Detection of Undesirable Product of Ammonium, and Easy Magnetic Separation Capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wuzhu; Yang, Weiyi; Xu, Zhengchao; Li, Qi; Shang, Jian Ku

    2016-01-27

    Superparamagnetic nanocatalysts could minimize both the external and internal mass transport limitations and neutralize OH(-) produced in the reaction more effectively to enhance the catalytic nitrite reduction efficiency with the depressed product selectivity to undesirable ammonium, while possess an easy magnetic separation capability. However, commonly used qusi-monodispersed superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanosphere is not suitable as catalyst support for nitrite reduction because it could reduce the catalytic reaction efficiency and the product selectivity to N2, and the iron leakage could bring secondary contamination to the treated water. In this study, protective shells of SiO2, polymethylacrylic acid, and carbon were introduced to synthesize Fe3O4@SiO2/Pd, Fe3O4@PMAA/Pd, and Fe3O4@C/Pd catalysts for catalytic nitrite reduction. It was found that SiO2 shell could provide the complete protection to Fe3O4 nanosphere core among these shells. Because of its good dispersion, dense structure, and complete protection to Fe3O4, the Fe3O4@SiO2/Pd catalyst demonstrated the highest catalytic nitrite reduction activity without the detection of NH4(+) produced. Due to this unique structure, the activity of Fe3O4@SiO2/Pd catalysts for nitrite reduction was found to be independent of the Pd nanoparticle size or shape, and their product selectivity was independent of the Pd nanoparticle size, shape, and content. Furthermore, their superparamagnetic nature and high saturation magnetization allowed their easy magnetic separation from treated water, and they also demonstrated a good stability during the subsequent recycling experiment.

  11. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound with SonoVue could accurately assess the renal microvascular perfusion in diabetic kidney damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fang; Cang, Yanqin; Zhao, Baozhen; Liu, Yuanyuan; Wang, Chaoqing; Liu, Bo; Wu, Tianfu; Song, Yaxiang; Peng, Ai

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of real-time gray-scale contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) through evaluating renal microvascular perfusion in diabetic kidney damage. Diabetic patients (aged: 62.5±7.2, n=33) were divided into Group A with chronic kidney disease (CKD) Stages I and II (n=19) and Group B (n=14) with CKD Stages IV and V. Twenty-one healthy adults were selected as control group. The real-time and dynamic imaging from renal cortex was performed using contrast-enhanced ultrasound with SonoVue. The outage time-intensity curves (TICs) with >85% goodness-of-fit index were chosen for the analysis of basic intensity, intensity increment (A1), arriving time (AT), time to peak (TTP), mean transit time, peak intensity (PI) and total area under the curve (AUC). (i) After intravenous injection of a contrast agent, the renal artery, cortex, pyramid and renal vein were clearly displayed in sequence. (ii) TIC of renal cortical Perfusion in all groups showed an asymmetrical single-peak curve, which has an obvious ascending slope, peak and descending slope. The ascending slope was steep, whereas the descending slope was flat. However, the ascending slope in Group A and B was flatter than that in the control group. (iii) Compared to the control group, AT and TTP were all markedly prolonged but A1 and PI were significantly decreased in Group A and B (P<0.05). In Group A, the AUC had a trend of increase; however, the area under the ascending slope (AUC1), area under the descending slope (AUC2) and AUC were all decreased in Group B (P<0.05). (iv) AUC positively correlated with glomerular filtration rate (GFR) (r=0.472, P=0.01), but TTP did not correlate well with GFR (r=0.262, P=0.177). CEUS could accurately assess renal microvascular perfusion in a real-time and dynamic manner. PI, TTP and AUC could be used for the diagnosis of the renal microvascular damage in early and late stage diabetic patients. CEUS is a safe, noninvasive and

  12. Comparison between perfusion computed tomography and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in assessing glioblastoma microvasculature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Zhong Zheng, E-mail: jzz2397@163.com [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, No. 20 Xisi Road Nantong 226001, Jiangsu (China); Shi, Wei, E-mail: sw740104@hotmail.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, 20 Xisi Road, Nantong 226001, Jiangsu (China); Shi, Jin Long, E-mail: shij_ns@163.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, 20 Xisi Road, Nantong 226001, Jiangsu (China); Shen, Dan Dan, E-mail: 1021121084@qq.com [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, No. 20 Xisi Road Nantong 226001, Jiangsu (China); Gu, Hong Mei, E-mail: guhongmei71@163.com [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, No. 20 Xisi Road Nantong 226001, Jiangsu (China); Zhou, Xue Jun, E-mail: 56516400@qq.com [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, No. 20 Xisi Road Nantong 226001, Jiangsu (China)

    2017-02-15

    Purpose: Perfusion computed tomography (PCT) and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) provide independent measurements of biomarkers related to tumor perfusion. The aim of this study was to compare the two techniques in assessing glioblastoma microvasculature. Materials and methods: Twenty-five patients diagnosed with glioblastoma (14 males and 11 females; 51 ± 11 years old, ranging from 33 to 70 years) were includede in this prospective study. All patients underwent both PCT and DCE-MRI. Imaging was performed on a 256-slice CT scanner and a 3-T MRI system. PCT yielded permeability surface-area product (PS) using deconvolution physiological models; meanwhile, DCE-MRI determined volume transfer constant (K{sup trans}) using the Tofts-Kermode compartment model. All cases were submitted to surgical intervention, and CD105-microvascular density (CD105-MVD) was measured in each glioblastoma specimen. Then, Spearman’s correlation coefficients and Bland-Altman plots were obtained for PS, K{sup trans} and CD105-MVD. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Tumor PS and K{sup trans} values were correlated with CD105-MVD (r = 0.644, P < 0.001; r = 0.683, P < 0.001). In addition, PS was correlated with K{sup trans} in glioblastoma (r = 0.931, P < 0.001). Finally, Bland-Altman plots showed no significant differences between PS and K{sup trans} (P = 0.063). Conclusion: PCT and DCE-MRI measurements of glioblastoma perfusion biomarkers have similar results, suggesting that both techniques may have comparable utility. Therefore, PCT may serve as an alternative modality to DCE-MRI for the in vivo evaluation of glioblastoma microvasculature.

  13. Influence of vascular enhancement, age and gender on pulmonary perfused blood volume quantified by dual-energy-CTPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meinel, Felix G.; Graef, Anita; Sommer, Wieland H.; Thierfelder, Kolja M.; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Johnson, Thorsten R.C.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the influence of technical and demographic parameters on quantification of pulmonary perfused blood volume (PBV) in dual energy computed tomography pulmonary angiography (DE-CTPA). Materials and methods: Pulmonary PBV was quantified in 142 patients who underwent DE-CTPA for suspected pulmonary embolism but in whom no thoracic pathologies were detected. Multivariate linear regression analysis was performed to calculate the influence of age, gender, enhancement of pulmonary trunk and enhancement difference between pulmonary trunk and left atrium (as a measure of timing) on PBV values. The resulting regression coefficients were used to calculate age-specific ranges of normal for PBV values adjusted for vascular enhancement and timing. Results: Enhancement of the pulmonary trunk (β = −0.29, p = 0.001) and enhancement difference between pulmonary trunk and left atrium (β = −0.24, p = 0.003) were found to significantly influence PBV values. Age (β = −0.33, p < 0.001) but not gender (β = 0.14, p = 0.05) had a significant negative influence on pulmonary PBV values. There was a 20% relative decrease of pulmonary PBV from patients aged <30 to patients over 80 years of age. Conclusions: DE-CTPA derived PBV values need to be corrected for age, vascular enhancement and timing but not for gender. The age-specific ranges of normal derived from this study can be used as a reference in future studies of PBV in pulmonary pathologies

  14. Multimodality functional imaging of spontaneous canine tumors using 64CU-ATSM and 18FDG PET/CT and dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders E; Kristensen, Annemarie T; Law, Ian

    2012-01-01

    To compare the distribution and uptake of the hypoxia tracer (64)Cu-diacetyl-bis(N(4)-methylthiosemicarbazone) ((64)Cu-ATSM) PET/CT, FDG PET/CT and dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion CT (DCE-pCT) in spontaneous canine tumors. In addition (64)Cu-ATSM distribution over time was evaluated.......To compare the distribution and uptake of the hypoxia tracer (64)Cu-diacetyl-bis(N(4)-methylthiosemicarbazone) ((64)Cu-ATSM) PET/CT, FDG PET/CT and dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion CT (DCE-pCT) in spontaneous canine tumors. In addition (64)Cu-ATSM distribution over time was evaluated....

  15. Paradox: increased blood perfusion to the face enhances protection against frostbite while it lowers wind chill equivalent temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shitzer, Avraham

    2007-05-01

    A model of facial heat exchange in cold and windy environments is presented. The tissue is depicted as a hollow cylinder and the model includes heat conduction and heat transport by blood circulation from the warmer core. A steady-state solution facilitating the estimation of wind chill equivalent temperature (WCET) as a function of the effective wind velocity, air temperature and blood perfusion rate was obtained. The results quantify and demonstrate the elevation of skin temperatures caused by increased flow of warmer blood from the inner core to the face. Elevated facial temperatures, while enhancing protection against frostbite and other cold-related injuries, also increase heat loss to the colder environment. Paradoxically, such elevated facial temperatures cause WCETs, as estimated by the prevailing definition, to attain lower rather than higher values, indicating, in fact, increased risk of frostbite. The results of this study should be useful in understanding and quantifying the effects of blood perfusion in protection against cold-related injuries. They should also be considered in the re-evaluation and re-formulation of the concept of wind chill, which has been a useful cold weather indicator for decades.

  16. Cerebral Perfusion Enhancing Interventions: A New Strategy for the Prevention of Alzheimer Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre, Jack C

    2016-09-01

    Cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases are major risk factors in the development of cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease (AD). These cardio-cerebral disorders promote a variety of vascular risk factors which in the presence of advancing age are prone to markedly reduce cerebral perfusion and create a neuronal energy crisis. Long-term hypoperfusion of the brain evolves mainly from cardiac structural pathology and brain vascular insufficiency. Brain hypoperfusion in the elderly is strongly associated with the development of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and both conditions are presumed to be precursors of Alzheimer dementia. A therapeutic target to prevent or treat MCI and consequently reduce the incidence of AD aims to elevate cerebral perfusion using novel pharmacological agents. As reviewed here, the experimental pharmaca include the use of Rho kinase inhibitors, neurometabolic energy boosters, sirtuins and vascular growth factors. In addition, a compelling new technique in laser medicine called photobiomodulation is reviewed. Photobiomodulation is based on the use of low level laser therapy to stimulate mitochondrial energy production non-invasively in nerve cells. The use of novel pharmaca and photobiomodulation may become important tools in the treatment or prevention of cognitive decline that can lead to dementia. © 2016 International Society of Neuropathology.

  17. Evaluation of blood perfusion in liver cirrhosis by dynamic contrast enhanced computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mette L.; Fallentin, Eva; Lauridsen, Carsten Ammitzbøl

    2017-01-01

    -CT), in patients with varying degrees of cirrhosis categorised by Child Pugh score (CP). We compared the perfusion values and the hepatic perfusion index (HPI) ((AP/AP+PP) x 100) in between the three respective CP groups, to evaluate if AP, PP and HPI correlated with the CP level and hepatic venous pressure...... patients, and C in six patients. The mean values of AP were significantly increased in patients with CP C vs. A+B, (70,4 ml/ vs. 43.1) ml/min/100ml tissue (p=0.0003). Patients with Child Pugh A tended to have higher PP values, 117,7 and Child B+C 105.3 ml/min/100ml tissue, respectively (p=0,44). The HPI...... increased significant with the degree of cirrhosis (mean A 29.6/B 30,96/C 44.9 ml/min/100ml tissue ANOVA p=0,046). Testing for linear regression with PP and HVPG values, the r-values raised with CP score (CP A r=0,137 p=0,049, CP B r=0,314 p=0,215 and CP C r=0,427 p=0,12). We found no correlation between...

  18. Assessment of quantitative perfusion parameters by dynamic contrast-enhanced sonography using a deconvolution method: an in vitro and in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Marianne; Tabarout, Farid; Leguerney, Ingrid; Polrot, Mélanie; Pitre, Stéphanie; Peronneau, Pierre; Lassau, Nathalie

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of the arterial input on perfusion parameters measured using dynamic contrast-enhanced sonography combined with a deconvolution method after bolus injections of a contrast agent. The in vitro experiments were conducted using a custom-made setup consisting of pumping a fluid through a phantom made of 3 intertwined silicone pipes, mimicking a complex structure akin to that of vessels in a tumor, combined with their feeding pipe, mimicking the arterial input. In the in vivo experiments, B16F10 melanoma cells were xenografted to 5 nude mice. An ultrasound scanner combined with a linear transducer was used to perform pulse inversion imaging based on linear raw data throughout the experiments. A mathematical model developed by the Gustave Roussy Institute (patent WO/2008/053268) and based on the dye dilution theory was used to evaluate 7 semiquantitative perfusion parameters directly from time-intensity curves and 3 quantitative perfusion parameters from the residue function obtained after a deconvolution process developed in our laboratory based on the Tikhonov regularization method. We evaluated and compared the intraoperator variability values of perfusion parameters determined after these two signal-processing methods. In vitro, semiquantitative perfusion parameters exhibited intraoperator variability values ranging from 3.39% to 13.60%. Quantitative parameters derived after the deconvolution process ranged from 4.46% to 11.82%. In vivo, tumors exhibited perfusion parameter intraoperator variability values ranging from 3.74% to 29.34%, whereas quantitative ones varied from 5.00% to 12.43%. Taking into account the arterial input in evaluating perfusion parameters improves the intraoperator variability and may improve the dynamic contrast-enhanced sonographic technique.

  19. Nitrate-enhanced gated SPECT in patients with primary angioplasty for acute myocardial infarction: evidence of a reversible and nitrate-sensitive impairment of myocardial perfusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djaballah, Wassila [CHU-Nancy, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nancy (France); UHP-INSERM ERI13, Nancy (France); Hopital de Brabois, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, CHU-Nancy, Vandoeuvre Cedex (France); Muller, Marc A.; Karcher, Gilles [CHU-Nancy, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nancy (France); Angioi, Michael [CHU-Nancy, Department of Cardiology, Nancy (France); UHP-INSERM U684, Nancy (France); Moulin, Frederic; Ethevenot, Gerard; Aliot, Etienne [CHU-Nancy, Department of Cardiology, Nancy (France); Codreanu, Andrei [UHP-INSERM ERI13, Nancy (France); CHU-Nancy, Department of Cardiology, Nancy (France); Mandry, Damien [UHP-INSERM ERI13, Nancy (France); CHU-Nancy, Department of Radiology, Nancy (France); Marie, Pierre Y. [CHU-Nancy, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nancy (France); UHP-INSERM U684, Nancy (France)

    2007-12-15

    Reperfusion of myocardial infarction (MI) leads to a reversible dysfunction of coronary vessels. We hypothesised that vasodilating drugs such as nitrates might improve sestamibi uptake within viable areas of recently reperfused MI, thereby enhancing prediction of subsequent improvements in perfusion and contractility. This study was aimed at assessing nitrate-enhanced sestamibi gated SPECT after MI reperfusion. Twenty-nine patients underwent rest followed by nitrate sestamibi gated SPECT at 9 {+-} 3 days after primary angioplasty for acute MI and at follow-up, 4-10 months later. Four MBq/kg of {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi was injected at rest, and 12 MBq/kg after nitroglycerin spray. Follow-up improvements were documented for both perfusion (P+) and contractility (C+) in 18% of the 180 initially abnormal segments, in neither perfusion (P-) nor contractility (C-) in 44%, in contractility only (C+P-) in 16% and in perfusion only (C-P+) in 22%. Perfusion improvement was related to lower sestamibi uptake on baseline rest SPECT (P+: 42 {+-} 15% vs P-: 50 {+-} 15%, p = 0.001) and, moreover, to a higher increase between rest and nitrate uptake (P+: +9.5 {+-} 6.5% vs P-: +2.0 {+-} 5.9%, p < 0.001). Contractility improvement was related to sestamibi uptake on baseline nitrate SPECT (C+: 58 {+-} 15% vs C-: 38 {+-} 16%, p < 0.001), a variable enhancing the prediction provided by sestamibi uptake at rest (p < 0.05). The improvement in perfusion which is documented in the months following MI reperfusion is predicted by initial nitrate enhancement of sestamibi uptake, suggesting a mechanism of reversible vascular injury. In this particular setting, sestamibi uptake is a better predictor of contractility recovery when determined after nitrate administration rather than under conventional resting conditions. (orig.)

  20. Evaluation of liver parenchyma and perfusion using dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography in captive green iguanas (Iguana iguana) under general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardini, Giordano; Di Girolamo, Nicola; Leopardi, Stefania; Paganelli, Irene; Zaghini, Anna; Origgi, Francesco C; Vignoli, Massimo

    2014-05-13

    Contrast-enhanced diagnostic imaging techniques are considered useful in veterinary and human medicine to evaluate liver perfusion and focal hepatic lesions. Although hepatic diseases are a common occurrence in reptile medicine, there is no reference to the use of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) to evaluate the liver in lizards. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the pattern of change in echogenicity and attenuation of the liver in green iguanas (Iguana iguana) after administration of specific contrast media. An increase in liver echogenicity and density was evident during CEUS and CECT, respectively. In CEUS, the mean ± SD (median; range) peak enhancement was 19.9% ± 7.5 (18.3; 11.7-34.6). Time to peak enhancement was 134.0 ± 125.1 (68.4; 59.6-364.5) seconds. During CECT, first visualization of the contrast medium was at 3.6 ± 0.5 (4; 3-4) seconds in the aorta, 10.7 ± 2.2 (10.5; 7-14) seconds in the hepatic arteries, and 15 ± 4.5 (14.5; 10-24) seconds in the liver parenchyma. Time to peak was 14.1 ± 3.4 (13; 11-21) and 31 ± 9.6 (29; 23-45) seconds in the aorta and the liver parenchyma, respectively. CEUS and dynamic CECT are practical means to determine liver hemodynamics in green iguanas. Distribution of contrast medium in iguana differed from mammals. Specific reference ranges of hepatic perfusion for diagnostic evaluation of the liver in iguanas are necessary since the use of mammalian references may lead the clinician to formulate incorrect diagnostic suspicions.

  1. Enhanced angiogenesis and increased cardiac perfusion after myocardial infarction in protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besnier, Marie; Galaup, Ariane; Nicol, Lionel; Henry, Jean-Paul; Coquerel, David; Gueret, Alexandre; Mulder, Paul; Brakenhielm, Ebba; Thuillez, Christian; Germain, Stéphane; Richard, Vincent; Ouvrard-Pascaud, Antoine

    2014-08-01

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) modulates tyrosine kinase receptors, among which is the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2 (VEGFR2), a key component of angiogenesis. Because PTP1B deficiency in mice improves left ventricular (LV) function 2 mo after myocardial infarction (MI), we hypothesized that enhanced angiogenesis early after MI via activated VEGFR2 contributes to this improvement. At 3 d after MI, capillary density was increased at the infarct border of PTP1B(-/-) mice [+7±2% vs. wild-type (WT), P = 0.05]. This was associated with increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 phosphorylation and VEGFR2 activation (i.e., phosphorylated-Src/Src/VEGFR2 and dissociation of endothelial VEGFR2/VE-cadherin), together with higher infiltration of proangiogenic M2 macrophages within unchanged overall infiltration. In vitro, we showed that PTP1B inhibition or silencing using RNA interference increased VEGF-induced migration and proliferation of mouse heart microvascular endothelial cells as well as fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-induced proliferation of rat aortic smooth muscle cells. At 8 d after MI in PTP1B(-/-) mice, increased LV capillary density (+21±3% vs. WT; P<0.05) and an increased number of small diameter arteries (15-50 μm) were likely to participate in increased LV perfusion assessed by magnetic resonance imaging and improved LV compliance, indicating reduced diastolic dysfunction. In conclusion, PTP1B deficiency reduces MI-induced heart failure promptly after ischemia by enhancing angiogenesis, myocardial perfusion, and diastolic function. © FASEB.

  2. Diagnostic accuracy of unenhanced, contrast-enhanced perfusion and angiographic MRI sequences for pulmonary embolism diagnosis: results of independent sequence readings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Revel, Marie Pierre [Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, APHP, Departments of Radiology, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Hotel-Dieu, Service de Radiologie, Paris (France); Sanchez, Olivier; Meyer, Guy [Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, APHP, Respiratory and intensive care and, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); INSERM Unite 765, Paris (France); Lefort, Catherine; Couchon, Sophie; Hernigou, Anne; Frija, Guy [Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, APHP, Departments of Radiology, Paris (France); Niarra, Ralph [Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, APHP, Clinical Epidemiology, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Chatellier, Gilles [Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, APHP, Clinical Epidemiology, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); INSERM CIC-EC E4, Paris (France)

    2013-09-15

    To independently evaluate unenhanced, contrast-enhanced perfusion and angiographic MR sequences for pulmonary embolism (PE) diagnosis. Prospective investigation, including 274 patients who underwent perfusion, unenhanced 2D steady-state-free-precession (SSFP) and contrast-enhanced 3D angiographic MR sequences on a 1.5-T unit, in addition to CTA (CT angiography). Two independent readers evaluated each sequence independently in random order. Sensitivity, specificity, predictive values and inter-reader agreement were calculated for each sequence, excluding sequences judged inconclusive. Sensitivity was also calculated according to PE location. Contrast-enhanced angiographic sequences showed the highest sensitivity (82.9 and 89.7 %, reader 1 and reader 2, respectively), specificity (98.5 and 100 %) and agreement (kappa value 0.77). Unenhanced angiographic sequences, although less sensitive overall (68.7 and 76.4 %), were sensitive for the detection of proximal PE (92.7 and 100 %) and showed high specificity (96.1 and 99.1 %) and good agreement (kappa value 0.62). Perfusion sequences showed lower sensitivity (75.0 and 79.3 %), specificity (84.8 and 89.7 %) and agreement (kappa value 0.51), and a negative predictive value of 84.8 % at best. Compared with contrast-enhanced angiographic sequences, unenhanced sequences demonstrate lower sensitivity, except for proximal PE, but high specificity and agreement. The negative predictive value of perfusion sequences was insufficient to safely rule out PE. (orig.)

  3. Quantitative assessment of pulmonary perfusion using dynamic contrast-enhanced CT in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: correlations with pulmonary function test and CT volumetric parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yu; Xia, Yi; Fan, Li; Liu, Shi-yuan; Yu, Hong; Li, Bin; Zhao, Li-ming; Li, Bing

    2015-05-01

    Pulmonary function test (PFT) is commonly used to help diagnose chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and other lung diseases. However, it cannot be used to evaluate regional function and morphological abnormalities. To quantitatively evaluate pulmonary perfusion imaging using dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) computed tomography (CT) and observe its correlations with PFT and CT volumetric parameters in COPD patients. PFT and CT pulmonary perfusion examination were performed in 63 COPD patients. Perfusion defects were quantitated by calculating the CT value ratio (RHU) between perfusion defects (HUdefect) and normal lung (HUnormal). Volumetric CT data were used to calculate emphysema index (EI), total lung volume (TLV), and total emphysema volume (TEV). Emphysematous parenchyma was defined as the threshold of lung area lower than -950 HU. Correlations between RHU and TLV, TEV, EI, and PFT were assessed using Spearman correlation analysis. The positive rate of perfusion defects on CT perfusion images was higher than that of emphysema on CT mask images (χ(2) = 17.027, P < 0.001). The Spearman correlation test showed that RHU was positively correlated with FEV1 (R = 0.59, P < 0.001), FEV1% Predicted (R = 0.61, P < 0.001), FVC (R = 0.47, P = 0.002), and FEV1/FVC (R = 0.65, P < 0.001), and negatively correlated with EI (R = -0.67, P < 0.001). CT perfusion imaging is more sensitive in detecting emphysema that is inconspicuous on CT images. RHU is correlated with PFT and CT volumetric parameters, suggesting that it is more sensitive in detecting early COPD changes and may prove to be a potential predictor of focal lung function. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  4. Contrast-enhanced 3T MR perfusion of musculoskeletal tumours. T1 value heterogeneity assessment and evaluation of the influence of T1 estimation methods on quantitative parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondim Teixeira, Pedro Augusto; Leplat, Christophe; Verbizier, Jacques de; Blum, Alain; Chen, Bailiang; Beaumont, Marine; Badr, Sammy; Cotten, Anne

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate intra-tumour and striated muscle T1 value heterogeneity and the influence of different methods of T1 estimation on the variability of quantitative perfusion parameters. Eighty-two patients with a histologically confirmed musculoskeletal tumour were prospectively included in this study and, with ethics committee approval, underwent contrast-enhanced MR perfusion and T1 mapping. T1 value variations in viable tumour areas and in normal-appearing striated muscle were assessed. In 20 cases, normal muscle perfusion parameters were calculated using three different methods: signal based and gadolinium concentration based on fixed and variable T1 values. Tumour and normal muscle T1 values were significantly different (p = 0.0008). T1 value heterogeneity was higher in tumours than in normal muscle (variation of 19.8% versus 13%). The T1 estimation method had a considerable influence on the variability of perfusion parameters. Fixed T1 values yielded higher coefficients of variation than variable T1 values (mean 109.6 ± 41.8% and 58.3 ± 14.1% respectively). Area under the curve was the least variable parameter (36%). T1 values in musculoskeletal tumours are significantly different and more heterogeneous than normal muscle. Patient-specific T1 estimation is needed for direct inter-patient comparison of perfusion parameters. (orig.)

  5. Contrast-enhanced 3T MR perfusion of musculoskeletal tumours. T1 value heterogeneity assessment and evaluation of the influence of T1 estimation methods on quantitative parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gondim Teixeira, Pedro Augusto; Leplat, Christophe; Verbizier, Jacques de; Blum, Alain [Hopital Central, CHRU-Nancy, Service d' Imagerie Guilloz, Nancy (France); Chen, Bailiang; Beaumont, Marine [Universite de Lorraine, Laboratoire IADI, UMR S 947, Nancy (France); Badr, Sammy; Cotten, Anne [CHRU Lille Centre de Consultations et d' Imagerie de l' Appareil Locomoteur, Department of Radiology and Musculoskeletal Imaging, Lille (France)

    2017-12-15

    To evaluate intra-tumour and striated muscle T1 value heterogeneity and the influence of different methods of T1 estimation on the variability of quantitative perfusion parameters. Eighty-two patients with a histologically confirmed musculoskeletal tumour were prospectively included in this study and, with ethics committee approval, underwent contrast-enhanced MR perfusion and T1 mapping. T1 value variations in viable tumour areas and in normal-appearing striated muscle were assessed. In 20 cases, normal muscle perfusion parameters were calculated using three different methods: signal based and gadolinium concentration based on fixed and variable T1 values. Tumour and normal muscle T1 values were significantly different (p = 0.0008). T1 value heterogeneity was higher in tumours than in normal muscle (variation of 19.8% versus 13%). The T1 estimation method had a considerable influence on the variability of perfusion parameters. Fixed T1 values yielded higher coefficients of variation than variable T1 values (mean 109.6 ± 41.8% and 58.3 ± 14.1% respectively). Area under the curve was the least variable parameter (36%). T1 values in musculoskeletal tumours are significantly different and more heterogeneous than normal muscle. Patient-specific T1 estimation is needed for direct inter-patient comparison of perfusion parameters. (orig.)

  6. Cerebral blood volume calculated by dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging: preliminary correlation study with glioblastoma genetic profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inseon Ryoo

    Full Text Available To evaluate the usefulness of dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC enhanced perfusion MR imaging in predicting major genetic alterations in glioblastomas.Twenty-five patients (M:F = 13∶12, mean age: 52.1±15.2 years with pathologically proven glioblastoma who underwent DSC MR imaging before surgery were included. On DSC MR imaging, the normalized relative tumor blood volume (nTBV of the enhancing solid portion of each tumor was calculated by using dedicated software (Nordic TumorEX, NordicNeuroLab, Bergen, Norway that enabled semi-automatic segmentation for each tumor. Five major glioblastoma genetic alterations (epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN, Ki-67, O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT and p53 were confirmed by immunohistochemistry and analyzed for correlation with the nTBV of each tumor. Statistical analysis was performed using the unpaired Student t test, ROC (receiver operating characteristic curve analysis and Pearson correlation analysis.The nTBVs of the MGMT methylation-negative group (mean 9.5±7.5 were significantly higher than those of the MGMT methylation-positive group (mean 5.4±1.8 (p = .046. In the analysis of EGFR expression-positive group, the nTBVs of the subgroup with loss of PTEN gene expression (mean: 10.3±8.1 were also significantly higher than those of the subgroup without loss of PTEN gene expression (mean: 5.6±2.3 (p = .046. Ki-67 labeling index indicated significant positive correlation with the nTBV of the tumor (p = .01.We found that glioblastomas with aggressive genetic alterations tended to have a high nTBV in the present study. Thus, we believe that DSC-enhanced perfusion MR imaging could be helpful in predicting genetic alterations that are crucial in predicting the prognosis of and selecting tailored treatment for glioblastoma patients.

  7. Enhancing cerebral perfusion with external counterpulsation after ischaemic stroke: how long does it last?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Li; Lin, Wenhua; Han, Jinghao; Chen, Xiangyan; Leung, Thomas; Soo, Yannie; Wong, Ka Sing

    2016-05-01

    External counterpulsation (ECP) is a non-invasive method used to augment cerebral perfusion in ischaemic stroke. We aimed to investigate time-course effects on blood pressure elevation and cerebral blood flow augmentation induced by ECP in ischaemic stroke. Patients with acute unilateral ischaemic stroke and large artery occlusive disease were recruited to receive 35 daily 1 h ECP treatment sessions. Serial transcranial Doppler monitoring of bilateral middle cerebral arteries was performed on days 3, 5, 7, 10, 14, 21, 28 and 35 after stroke onset. Flow velocity changes before, during and after ECP and continuous beat-to-beat blood pressure data were recorded. The cerebral augmentation index (CAI) is the increase in the percentage of the middle cerebral artery mean flow velocity during ECP compared with baseline. The CAI in patients with stroke was significantly higher on the ipsilateral side and on the contralateral side on day 3 (ipsilateral CAI, 9.3%; contralateral CAI, 7.2%), day 5 (7.0%; 6.7%), day 7 (6.8%; 6.0%), day 10 (6.0%; 5.1%), day 14 (4.7%; 2.6%) and day 21 (4.1%; 2.2%) after stroke onset than that in controls (-2.0%) (all pstroke. Differences in the percentage increase in the mean blood pressure did not change significantly over time in patients with stroke. Blood pressure elevation persists throughout ECP treatment, which consists of 35 sessions. However, cerebral blood flow augmentation may last at least 3 weeks and then appears to return to baseline 1 month after acute stroke onset. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  8. Measurement of extracellular volume and transit time heterogeneity using contrast-enhanced myocardial perfusion MRI in patients after acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunze, Karl P; Rischpler, Christoph; Hayes, Carmel; Ibrahim, Tareq; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Haase, Axel; Schwaiger, Markus; Nekolla, Stephan G

    2017-06-01

    To assess the ability of dynamic contrast-enhanced myocardial perfusion MRI to measure extracellular volume (ECV) and to investigate the possibility of estimating capillary transit time heterogeneity (CTH) in patients after myocardial infarction and successful revascularization. Twenty-four perfusion data sets were acquired on a 3 Tesla positron emission tomography (PET)/MRI scanner. Three perfusion models of different complexity were implemented in a hierarchical fashion with an Akaike information criterion being used to determine the number of fit parameters supported by the data. Results were compared sector-wise to ECV from an equilibrium T 1 mapping method (modified look-locker inversion recovery (MOLLI)). ECV derived from the perfusion analysis correlated well with equilibrium measurements (R² = 0.76). Estimation of CTH was supported in 16% of sectors (mostly remote). Inclusion of a nonzero CTH parameter usually led to lower estimates of first-pass extraction and slightly higher estimates of blood volume and flow. Estimation of the capillary permeability-surface area product was feasible in 81% of sectors. Transit time heterogeneity has a measurable effect on the kinetic analysis of myocardial perfusion MRI data, and Gd-DTPA extravasation in the myocardium is usually not flow-limited in infarct-related pathology. Measurement of myocardial ECV using perfusion imaging could provide a scan-time efficient alternative to methods based on T 1 mapping. Magn Reson Med 77:2320-2330, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  9. Internet-based virtual classroom and educational management software enhance students' didactic and clinical experiences in perfusion education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Jeffrey B; Austin, Jon W; Holt, David W; Searles, Bruce E; Darling, Edward M

    2004-09-01

    A challenge faced by many university-based perfusion education (PE) programs is the need for student clinical rotations at hospital locations that are geographically disparate from the main educational campus. The problem has been addressed through the employment of distance-learning environments. The purpose of this educational study is to evaluate the effectiveness of this teaching model as it is applied to PE. Web-based virtual classroom (VC) environments and educational management system (EMS) software were implemented independently and as adjuncts to live, interactive Internet-based audio/video transmission from classroom to classroom in multiple university-based PE programs. These Internet environments have been used in a variety of ways including: 1) forum for communication between the university faculty, students, and preceptors at clinical sites, 2) didactic lectures from expert clinicians to students assigned to distant clinical sites, 3) small group problem-based-learning modules designed to enhance students analytical skills, and 4) conversion of traditional face-to-face lectures to asynchronous learning modules. Hypotheses and measures of student and faculty satisfaction, clinical experience, and learning outcomes are proposed, and some early student feedback was collected. For curricula that emphasize both didactic and clinical education, the use of Internet-based VC and EMS software provides significant advancements over traditional models. Recognized advantages include: 1) improved communications between the college faculty and the students and clinical preceptors, 2) enhanced access to a national network of clinical experts in specialized techniques, 3) expanded opportunity for student distant clinical rotations with continued didactic course work, and 4) improved continuity and consistency of clinical experiences between students through implementation of asynchronous learning modules. Students recognize the learning efficiency of on

  10. Citrulline Supplementation Improves Organ Perfusion and Arginine Availability under Conditions with Enhanced Arginase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijnands, Karolina A P; Meesters, Dennis M; van Barneveld, Kevin W Y; Visschers, Ruben G J; Briedé, Jacob J; Vandendriessche, Benjamin; van Eijk, Hans M H; Bessems, Babs A F M; van den Hoven, Nadine; von Wintersdorff, Christian J H; Brouckaert, Peter; Bouvy, Nicole D; Lamers, Wouter H; Cauwels, Anje; Poeze, Martijn

    2015-06-29

    Enhanced arginase-induced arginine consumption is believed to play a key role in the pathogenesis of sickle cell disease-induced end organ failure. Enhancement of arginine availability with L-arginine supplementation exhibited less consistent results; however, L-citrulline, the precursor of L-arginine, may be a promising alternative. In this study, we determined the effects of L-citrulline compared to L-arginine supplementation on arginine-nitric oxide (NO) metabolism, arginine availability and microcirculation in a murine model with acutely-enhanced arginase activity. The effects were measured in six groups of mice (n = 8 each) injected intraperitoneally with sterile saline or arginase (1000 IE/mouse) with or without being separately injected with L-citrulline or L-arginine 1 h prior to assessment of the microcirculation with side stream dark-field (SDF)-imaging or in vivo NO-production with electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Arginase injection caused a decrease in plasma and tissue arginine concentrations. L-arginine and L-citrulline supplementation both enhanced plasma and tissue arginine concentrations in arginase-injected mice. However, only the citrulline supplementation increased NO production and improved microcirculatory flow in arginase-injected mice. In conclusion, the present study provides for the first time in vivo experimental evidence that L-citrulline, and not L-arginine supplementation, improves the end organ microcirculation during conditions with acute arginase-induced arginine deficiency by increasing the NO concentration in tissues.

  11. Assessment of perfusion by dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging using a deconvolution approach based on regression and singular value decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, T S; Wu, X Y; Cheong, L H; Lim, C C T

    2004-12-01

    The assessment of tissue perfusion by dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) imaging involves a deconvolution process. For analysis of DCE imaging data, we implemented a regression approach to select appropriate regularization parameters for deconvolution using the standard and generalized singular value decomposition methods. Monte Carlo simulation experiments were carried out to study the performance and to compare with other existing methods used for deconvolution analysis of DCE imaging data. The present approach is found to be robust and reliable at the levels of noise commonly encountered in DCE imaging, and for different models of the underlying tissue vasculature. The advantages of the present method, as compared with previous methods, include its efficiency of computation, ability to achieve adequate regularization to reproduce less noisy solutions, and that it does not require prior knowledge of the noise condition. The proposed method is applied on actual patient study cases with brain tumors and ischemic stroke, to illustrate its applicability as a clinical tool for diagnosis and assessment of treatment response.

  12. Graphitic Carbon Nitride Supported Ultrafine Pd and Pd-Cu Catalysts: Enhanced Reactivity, Selectivity, and Longevity for Nitrite and Nitrate Hydrogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Tao; Durkin, David P; Banek, Nathan A; Wagner, Michael J; Shuai, Danmeng

    2017-08-23

    Novel Pd-based catalysts (i.e., Pd and Pd-Cu) supported on graphitic carbon nitride (g-C 3 N 4 ) were prepared for nitrite and nitrate hydrogenation. The catalysts prepared by ethylene glycol reduction exhibited ultrafine Pd and Pd-Cu nanoparticles (∼2 nm), and they showed high reactivity, high selectivity toward nitrogen gas over byproduct ammonium, and excellent stability over multiple reaction cycles. The unique nitrogen-abundant surface, porous structure, and hydrophilic nature of g-C 3 N 4 facilitates metal nanoparticle dispersion, mass transfer of reactants, and nitrogen coupling for nitrogen gas production to improve catalytic performance.

  13. Retention and leaching of nitrite by municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash under the landfill circumstance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jun; Kong, Qingna; Zhu, Huayue; Long, Yuyang; Shen, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    The retention and leaching of nitrite by municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) bottom ash could affect its migration in the landfill. In this study, the effect of the dosage of MSWI bottom ash as well as the variation of the landfill environmental parameters including pH, anions and organic matter on the nitrite retention and leaching behavior was investigated by batch experiments. The highest removal percentage (73.0%) of nitrite was observed when the dosage of MSWI bottom ash was 10 g L(-1) in 2 mg L(-1) nitrite solution. Further increase of the dosage would retard the retention, as the nitrite leaching from MSWI bottom ash was enhanced. The optimum retention of nitrite was observed when the pH was 5.0, while the leaching of nitrite showed a consistent reduction with the increase of pH. Besides, the presence of Cl(-), SO4(2)(-) and acetic acid could enhance the leaching of nitrite and mitigate the retention process. However, the retention of nitrite was enhanced by PO4(3)(-), which was probably due to the formation of the apatite, an active material for the adsorption of the nitrite. These results suggested that MSWI bottom ash could affect the migration of nitrite in the landfill, which was related to the variation of the landfill circumstance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Contrast enhancement by arterial perfusion during computed tomography (computed tomographic arteriography) of the pancreatic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaki, Yukiari

    1983-01-01

    Computed tomographic arteriography (CTA) was performed on 52 cases of pancreatic disease in which was suspected clinically, and in which other method failed to yield a definitive diagnosis. For CTA, 65% meglumine diatrizoate 20 ml, diluted 1:3, was injected via a catherter inserted in an artery connected with the pancreas and the change with time of the pacreas CT number was studied. The normal pancreas stains deeply and the best contrast enhancement was obtained between 17 to 21 seconds after instillation of contrast medium. In the CTA findings in pancreatic cancer, low density areas with irregular internal structures are characteristic, and these characteristics were seen even in minute pancreatic cancers which could not be recognized by CT or the intravenous bolus injection method. On the other hand, in chronic pancreatitis, even when differentiation from pancreatic cancer is difficult with arterial and venous encasement in angiography, as long as the chronic pancreatitis is not very advanced ischemic changes are not seen, and this permits differentiation form normal pancreas. This also facilitates differentiation between pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. In the intravenous bolus injection method, the chronological change of contrast enhancement in the pancreas was studied and the best contrast enhancement was obtained after 60 to 120 seconds. This method revealed no findings peculiar to pancreatic cancer. Based on the above, CTA was found to be useful for making in contributing to establishing a definitive diagnosis, detecting minute pancreatic cancer and to differentiate pancreatic cancer from chronic pancreatitis. (author)

  15. Quantitative contrast-enhanced first-pass cardiac perfusion MRI at 3 tesla with accurate arterial input function and myocardial wall enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, Elodie; Kim, Daniel; Chung, Sohae; Axel, Leon

    2011-09-01

    To develop, and validate in vivo, a robust quantitative first-pass perfusion cardiovascular MR (CMR) method with accurate arterial input function (AIF) and myocardial wall enhancement. A saturation-recovery (SR) pulse sequence was modified to sequentially acquire multiple slices after a single nonselective saturation pulse at 3 Tesla. In each heartbeat, an AIF image is acquired in the aortic root with a short time delay (TD) (50 ms), followed by the acquisition of myocardial images with longer TD values (∼150-400 ms). Longitudinal relaxation rates (R(1) = 1/T(1)) were calculated using an ideal saturation recovery equation based on the Bloch equation, and corresponding gadolinium contrast concentrations were calculated assuming fast water exchange condition. The proposed method was validated against a reference multi-point SR method by comparing their respective R(1) measurements in the blood and left ventricular myocardium, before and at multiple time-points following contrast injections, in 7 volunteers. R(1) measurements with the proposed method and reference multi-point method were strongly correlated (r > 0.88, P < 10(-5)) and in good agreement (mean difference ±1.96 standard deviation 0.131 ± 0.317/0.018 ± 0.140 s(-1) for blood/myocardium, respectively). The proposed quantitative first-pass perfusion CMR method measured accurate R(1) values for quantification of AIF and myocardial wall contrast agent concentrations in 3 cardiac short-axis slices, in a total acquisition time of 523 ms per heartbeat. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Quantitative Myocardial Perfusion with Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Imaging in MRI and CT : Theoretical Models and Current Implementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelgrim, G J; Handayani, A; Dijkstra, H; Prakken, N H J; Slart, R H J A; Oudkerk, M; Van Ooijen, P M A; Vliegenthart, R; Sijens, P E

    2016-01-01

    Technological advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT), including higher spatial and temporal resolution, have made the prospect of performing absolute myocardial perfusion quantification possible, previously only achievable with positron emission tomography (PET).

  17. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging to assess physiologic variations of myometrial perfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassin-Naggara, Isabelle; Balvay, Daniel; Cuenod, Charles A.; Darai, Emile; Marsault, Claude; Bazot, Marc

    2010-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate the ability of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) to assess physiological microvascular states in normal myometrium. Eighty-five women (62 women of reproductive age, 23 postmenopausal) undergoing DCE-MRI of the pelvis were included. Microvascular parameters for the inner and outer myometrium were analysed using a pharmacokinetic model. These parameters were tissue blood flow (F), blood volume fraction (V b ), permeability-surface area product (PS), interstitial volume fraction (V e ) and lag time (Dt). In the women of reproductive age, the inner myometrium displayed higher F and PS, lower V b and V e , and longer Dt than the outer myometrium (p = 0.02, p = 0.01, p = 0.005, p = 0.03 and p = 0.01, respectively). The inner myometrium presented microvascular variations during the menstrual cycle with a pre-ovulatory peak followed by a fall reaching a nadir of F and V b about 4 days after ovulation. Compared with women of reproductive age, in the postmenopausal state, F and V b decreased in the outer myometrium, while PS, V e and Dt increased (p < 0.0001, p = 0.001, p = 0.001, p = 0.03 and p = 0.0004, respectively). DCE-MRI is a non-invasive technique that can measure variations of myometrial microcirculation, and thereby be potentially useful to help characterize the role and states of the myometrium in assisted reproductive therapy. (orig.)

  18. Perfusion characteristics of parotid gland tumors evaluated by contrast-enhanced ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klotz, Laura V., E-mail: Laura.Klotz@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Surgery, University of Munich, Munich (Germany); Gürkov, Robert [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Munich, Munich (Germany); Eichhorn, Martin E. [Department of Surgery, University of Munich, Munich (Germany); Siedek, Vanessa; Krause, Eike [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Munich, Munich (Germany); Jauch, Karl-Walter [Department of Surgery, University of Munich, Munich (Germany); Reiser, Maximilian F.; Clevert, Dirk-Andre [Department of Clinical Radiology, University of Munich, Munich (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Contrast enhanced ultrasound (CE-US) is a promising imaging modality for non-invasive analysis of parotid gland lesions because their vascularisation differs from normal gland tissue. This clinical study should further investigate CE-US as a diagnostic tool for parotid gland tumors. Materials and methods: 39 patients underwent CE-US measurements after intravenous application of a contrast agent (SonoVue, Bracco, Italy) before surgical tumor resection. Time–intensity curves gradients were calculated and parameters of intratumoral microcirculation were analysed. The vascularisation parameters were compared among the different tumor entities as defined per definitive histological diagnosis. Results: Histological analyses revealed 17 pleomorphic adenoma, 15 cystadenolymphoma and 7 malignoma. A significant difference of area below intensity time curve (AUC) and mean transit time (MTT) was measured in the malignant lesions compared to benign tumors (p < 0.05). A significant difference of AUC and maximum of signal increase (ΔSI{sub max}) for pleomorphic adenoma versus cystadenolymphoma was found (p < 0.05). Conclusion: CE-US seems to be a quantitative and independent method for the assessment of malign and benign parotid gland tumors. Further studies and clinical experience will have to validate this method as a reliable diagnostic tool that facilitates preoperative planning.

  19. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging to assess physiologic variations of myometrial perfusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomassin-Naggara, Isabelle [Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Department of Radiology, Hopital Tenon, Paris (France); Universite Rene Descartes, Laboratoire de Recherche en Imagerie-INSERM U970, Paris (France); Hopital Tenon, Service de Radiologie, Paris (France); Balvay, Daniel [Universite Rene Descartes, Laboratoire de Recherche en Imagerie-INSERM U970, Paris (France); Cuenod, Charles A. [Universite Rene Descartes, Laboratoire de Recherche en Imagerie-INSERM U970, Paris (France); Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou (HEGP), Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Darai, Emile [Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Department of Gynaecology-Obstetrics, Hopital Tenon, Paris (France); Marsault, Claude; Bazot, Marc [Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Department of Radiology, Hopital Tenon, Paris (France)

    2010-04-15

    To prospectively evaluate the ability of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) to assess physiological microvascular states in normal myometrium. Eighty-five women (62 women of reproductive age, 23 postmenopausal) undergoing DCE-MRI of the pelvis were included. Microvascular parameters for the inner and outer myometrium were analysed using a pharmacokinetic model. These parameters were tissue blood flow (F), blood volume fraction (V{sub b}), permeability-surface area product (PS), interstitial volume fraction (V{sub e}) and lag time (Dt). In the women of reproductive age, the inner myometrium displayed higher F and PS, lower V{sub b} and V{sub e}, and longer Dt than the outer myometrium (p = 0.02, p = 0.01, p = 0.005, p = 0.03 and p = 0.01, respectively). The inner myometrium presented microvascular variations during the menstrual cycle with a pre-ovulatory peak followed by a fall reaching a nadir of F and V{sub b} about 4 days after ovulation. Compared with women of reproductive age, in the postmenopausal state, F and V{sub b} decreased in the outer myometrium, while PS, V{sub e} and Dt increased (p < 0.0001, p = 0.001, p = 0.001, p = 0.03 and p = 0.0004, respectively). DCE-MRI is a non-invasive technique that can measure variations of myometrial microcirculation, and thereby be potentially useful to help characterize the role and states of the myometrium in assisted reproductive therapy. (orig.)

  20. Study of proximal femoral bone perfusion with 3D T1 dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budzik, Jean-François; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Forzy, Gerard; El Rafei, Mazen; Chechin, David; Cotten, Anne

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to compare measurements of semi-quantitative and pharmacokinetic parameters in areas of red (RBM) and yellow bone marrow (YBM) of the hip, using an in-house high-resolution DCE T1 sequence, and to assess intra- and inter-observer reproducibility of these measurements. The right hips of 21 adult patients under 50 years of age were studied. Spatial resolution was 1.8 × 1.8 × 1.8 mm(3), and temporal resolution was 13.5 seconds. Two musculoskeletal radiologists independently processed DCE images and measured semi-quantitative and pharmacokinetic parameters in areas of YBM and RBM. Signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratios were calculated. Intra- and inter-observer reproducibility was assessed. Area under the curve (AUC) and initial slope (IS) were significantly greater for RBM than for YBM (p < 0.05). K(trans) and kep were also significantly greater for RBM (p < 0.05). There was no significant difference in time to peak between the regions (p < 0.05). SNR, CNR, and intra- and inter-observer reproducibility were all good. DCE study of the whole hip is feasible with high spatial resolution using a 3D T1 sequence. Measures were possible even in low vascularized areas of the femoral head. K(trans), kep, AUC, and IS values were significantly different between red and yellow marrow, whereas TTP values were not. High-spatial-resolution dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of hip structures is feasible. Intra- and inter-observer reproducibility is good. Red and yellow bone marrow have different perfusion patterns.

  1. Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology criteria, contrast enhancement and perfusion MRI for assessing progression in glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tensaouti, Fatima [Universite de Toulouse, Inserm, UPS, ToNIC, Toulouse NeuroImaging Center, Toulouse (France); Khalifa, Jonathan [Claudius Regaud Institute / Toulouse University Cancer Institute - Oncopole, Department of Radiation Oncology, Toulouse (France); Lusque, Amelie [Claudius Regaud Institute / Toulouse University Cancer Institute - Oncopole, Department of Biostatistics, Toulouse (France); Plas, Benjamin [CHU Toulouse, Department of Neurosurgery, Toulouse (France); Lotterie, Jean Albert; Berry, Isabelle [Universite de Toulouse, Inserm, UPS, ToNIC, Toulouse NeuroImaging Center, Toulouse (France); CHU Toulouse, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Toulouse (France); Laprie, Anne [Universite de Toulouse, Inserm, UPS, ToNIC, Toulouse NeuroImaging Center, Toulouse (France); Claudius Regaud Institute / Toulouse University Cancer Institute - Oncopole, Department of Radiation Oncology, Toulouse (France); Cohen-Jonathan Moyal, Elizabeth [Claudius Regaud Institute / Toulouse University Cancer Institute - Oncopole, Department of Radiation Oncology, Toulouse (France); Toulouse Center for Cancer Research (U1037), Inserm, Toulouse (France); Lubrano, Vincent [Universite de Toulouse, Inserm, UPS, ToNIC, Toulouse NeuroImaging Center, Toulouse (France); CHU Toulouse, Department of Neurosurgery, Toulouse (France)

    2017-10-15

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology (RANO) criteria in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), with respect to the Macdonald criteria and changes in contrast-enhancement (CE) volume. Related variations in relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) were investigated. Forty-three patients diagnosed between 2006 and 2010 were included. All underwent surgical resection, followed by temozolomide-based chemoradiation. MR images were retrospectively reviewed. Times to progression (TTPs) according to RANO criteria, Macdonald criteria and increased CE volume (CE-3D) were compared, and the percentage change in the 75th percentile of rCBV (rCBV75) was evaluated. After a median follow-up of 22.7 months, a total of 39 patients had progressed according to RANO criteria, 32 according to CE-3D, and 42 according to Macdonald. Median TTPs were 6.4, 9.3, and 6.6 months, respectively. Overall agreement was 79.07% between RANO and CE-3D and 93.02% between RANO and Macdonald. The mean percentage change in rCBV75 at RANO progression onset was over 73% in 87.5% of patients. In conclusion, our findings suggest that CE-3D criterion is not yet suitable to assess progression in routine clinical practice. Indeed, the accurate threshold is still not well defined. To date, in our opinion, early detection of disease progression by RANO combined with advanced MRI imaging techniques like MRI perfusion and diffusion remains the best way to assess disease progression. Further investigations that would examine the impact of treatment modifications after progression determined by different criteria on overall survival would be of great value. (orig.)

  2. : Myocardial Perfusion

    OpenAIRE

    Dacher, Jean-Nicolas; Lefebvre, V.; Dubourg, Bernard; Deux, Jean-François; Caudron, Jérôme

    2013-01-01

    International audience; The analysis of myocardial perfusion is a key step in the cardiac MRI examination. In routine work, this exploration carried out at rest is based on the qualitative first pass study of gadolinium with an ECG-triggered saturation recovery bFFE sequence. In view of recent knowledge, the analysis of the myocardial perfusion under vasodilator stress may be carried out by scintigraphy or MRI, the latter benefiting from the absence of exposure to ionizing rays and a lower co...

  3. Comparison of transient arterial occlusion and muscle exercise provocation for assessment of perfusion reserve in skeletal muscle with real-time contrast-enhanced ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krix, Martin, E-mail: martin.krix@kabelbw.de [German Cancer Research Center, Research Program Imaging and Radiooncology, Department of Radiology, INF 280, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Bracco Imaging Germany, Max-Stromeyer-Str. 116, D-78467 Konstanz (Germany); Krakowski-Roosen, Holger [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Translational Oncology, INF 280, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Armarteifio, Erick [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, INF 110, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Fuerstenberger, Susanne [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Vascular Surgery, INF 110, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Delorme, Stefan [German Cancer Research Center, Research Program Imaging and Radiooncology, Department of Radiology, INF 280, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Weber, Marc-Andre [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, INF 110, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    Objective: Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is able to quantify muscle perfusion and changes in perfusion due to muscle exercise in real-time. However, reliable measurement of standardized muscle exercise is difficult to perform in clinical examinations. We compared perfusion reserve assessed by CEUS after transient arterial occlusion and exercise to find the most suitable measurement for clinical application. Methods: Contrast pulse sequencing (7 MHz) during continuous IV infusion of SonoVue (4.8 mL/300 s) was used in 8 healthy volunteers to monitor muscle perfusion of the gastrocnemius muscle during transient (1 min) arterial occlusion produced by a thigh cuff of a venous occlusion plethysmograph. Isometric muscle exercise (50% of individual maximum strength for 20 s) was subsequently performed during the same examination, and several CEUS parameters obtained from ultrasound-signal-intensity-time curves and its calculation errors were compared. Results: The mean maximum local blood volume after occlusion was 13.9 [{approx}mL] (range, 4.5-28.8 [{approx}mL]), and similar values were measured after sub-maximum exercise 13.8 [{approx}mL], (range, 4.6-22.2 [{approx}mL]. The areas under the curve during reperfusion vs. recovery were also similar (515.2 {+-} 257.5 compared to 482.2 {+-} 187.5 [{approx}mL s]) with a strong correlation (r = 0.65), as were the times to maximum (15.3 s vs. 15.9 s), with a significantly smaller variation for the occlusion method ({+-}2.1 s vs. {+-}9.0 s, p = 0.03). The mean errors for all calculated CEUS parameters were lower for the occlusion method than for the exercise test. Conclusions: CEUS muscle perfusion measurements can be easily performed after transient arterial occlusion. It delivers data which are comparable to CEUS measurements after muscle exercise but with a higher robustness. This method can be easily applied in clinical examination of patients with e.g. PAOD or diabetic microvessel diseases to assess perfusion reserve.

  4. Comparison of transient arterial occlusion and muscle exercise provocation for assessment of perfusion reserve in skeletal muscle with real-time contrast-enhanced ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krix, Martin; Krakowski-Roosen, Holger; Armarteifio, Erick; Fuerstenberger, Susanne; Delorme, Stefan; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Weber, Marc-Andre

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is able to quantify muscle perfusion and changes in perfusion due to muscle exercise in real-time. However, reliable measurement of standardized muscle exercise is difficult to perform in clinical examinations. We compared perfusion reserve assessed by CEUS after transient arterial occlusion and exercise to find the most suitable measurement for clinical application. Methods: Contrast pulse sequencing (7 MHz) during continuous IV infusion of SonoVue (4.8 mL/300 s) was used in 8 healthy volunteers to monitor muscle perfusion of the gastrocnemius muscle during transient (1 min) arterial occlusion produced by a thigh cuff of a venous occlusion plethysmograph. Isometric muscle exercise (50% of individual maximum strength for 20 s) was subsequently performed during the same examination, and several CEUS parameters obtained from ultrasound-signal-intensity-time curves and its calculation errors were compared. Results: The mean maximum local blood volume after occlusion was 13.9 [∼mL] (range, 4.5-28.8 [∼mL]), and similar values were measured after sub-maximum exercise 13.8 [∼mL], (range, 4.6-22.2 [∼mL]. The areas under the curve during reperfusion vs. recovery were also similar (515.2 ± 257.5 compared to 482.2 ± 187.5 [∼mL s]) with a strong correlation (r = 0.65), as were the times to maximum (15.3 s vs. 15.9 s), with a significantly smaller variation for the occlusion method (±2.1 s vs. ±9.0 s, p = 0.03). The mean errors for all calculated CEUS parameters were lower for the occlusion method than for the exercise test. Conclusions: CEUS muscle perfusion measurements can be easily performed after transient arterial occlusion. It delivers data which are comparable to CEUS measurements after muscle exercise but with a higher robustness. This method can be easily applied in clinical examination of patients with e.g. PAOD or diabetic microvessel diseases to assess perfusion reserve.

  5. Relationship of idiopathic osteonecrosis of the femoral head to perfusion changes in the proximal femur by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Wing P; Liu, Yi-Jui; Huang, Guo-Shu; Lin, Min-Fang; Huang, Sydney; Chang, Yue-Cune; Jiang, Ching-Chuan

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to relate intramedullary perfusion of the proximal femur to severity of osteonecrosis of the femoral head by using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI). Twelve patients (14 symptomatic hips) who underwent DCE-MRI and had subsequent core decompression of the femoral head were examined. Hips were graded for severity according to MRI findings and were assigned scores of 0 (negative findings), 1 (focal marrow abnormalities), and 2 (subchondral collapse). Thirteen asymptomatic hips acted as controls. The DCE-MRI data were analyzed by use of a pharmacokinetic two-compartment model. Compared with control hips, there was significantly greater peak enhancement in the femoral head in hips of all grades (p femoral neck (p = 0.001) and intertrochanteric area (p = 0.001) in grade 2 hips. The time to peak was significantly delayed in the femoral head in grade 0 hips (p = 0.02) and in the intertrochanteric area in grade 2 hips (p = 0.003) compared with the controls. As evaluated by DCE-MRI, intramedullary peak enhancement in the femoral head increased with progression of idiopathic osteonecrosis of the femoral head, whereas there was delayed peak enhancement in the femoral head in hips with negative findings and intertrochanteric stasis in advanced osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Such perfusion changes as shown on MRI can occur with early osteonecrosis in the absence of other MRI abnormalities.

  6. Perfusion maps of the whole liver based on high temporal and spatial resolution contrast-enhanced MRI (4D THRIVE): Feasibility and initial results in focal liver lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coenegrachts, Kenneth; Ghekiere, Johan; Denolin, Vincent; Gabriele, Beck; Herigault, Gwen; Haspeslagh, Marc; Daled, Peter; Bipat, Shandra; Stoker, Jaap; Rigauts, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate a new imaging sequence (4D THRIVE) for whole liver perfusion in high temporal and spatial resolution. Feasibility of parametric mapping and its potential for characterizing focal liver lesions (FLLs) are investigated. Materials and methods: Fifteen patients suspected for colorectal liver metastases (LMs) were included. Parametric maps were evaluated qualitatively (ring-enhancement and lesion heterogeneity) and compared to three-phased contrast-enhanced MRI. Quantitative analysis was based on average perfusion values of entire FLLs. Reference standard comprised surgery with histopathology or follow-up imaging. Fisher's exact test was used for qualitative and Kruskal-Wallis test for quantitative analysis. Results: In total 29 LMs, 17 hemangiomas and 4 focal nodular hyperplasias were evaluated. FLLs could be differentiated by qualitative assessment of parametric maps respectively three-phased contrast-enhanced MRI (Fisher's p < 0.001 for comparisons between LMs and hemangiomas and LMs and FNHs for both ring-enhancement and lesion heterogeneity) rather than by quantitative analysis of parametric maps (Chi-square for Kep = 0.33 (p = 0.847) and Chi-square for Kel = 1.35 (p = 0.509)). Conclusion: This preliminary study shows potential of 4D THRIVE for whole liver imaging enabling calculation of parametric maps. Qualitative rather than quantitative analysis was accurate for differentiating malignant and benign FLLs.

  7. Validation of Fourier decomposition MRI with dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI using visual and automated scoring of pulmonary perfusion in young cystic fibrosis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauman, Grzegorz; Puderbach, Michael; Heimann, Tobias; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Fritzsching, Eva; Mall, Marcus A.; Eichinger, Monika

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To validate Fourier decomposition (FD) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MR imaging. Materials and methods: Thirty-four CF patients (median age 4.08 years; range 0.16–30) were examined on a 1.5-T MR imager. For FD MR imaging, sets of lung images were acquired using an untriggered two-dimensional balanced steady-state free precession sequence. Perfusion-weighted images were obtained after correction of the breathing displacement and Fourier analysis of the cardiac frequency from the time-resolved data sets. DCE data sets were acquired with a three-dimensional gradient echo sequence. The FD and DCE images were visually assessed for perfusion defects by two readers independently (R1, R2) using a field based scoring system (0–12). Software was used for perfusion impairment evaluation (R3) of segmented lung images using an automated threshold. Both imaging and evaluation methods were compared for agreement and tested for concordance between FD and DCE imaging. Results: Good or acceptable intra-reader agreement was found between FD and DCE for visual and automated scoring: R1 upper and lower limits of agreement (ULA, LLA): 2.72, −2.5; R2: ULA, LLA: ±2.5; R3: ULA: 1.5, LLA: −2. A high concordance was found between visual and automated scoring (FD: 70–80%, DCE: 73–84%). Conclusions: FD MR imaging provides equivalent diagnostic information to DCE MR imaging in CF patients. Automated assessment of regional perfusion defects using FD and DCE MR imaging is comparable to visual scoring but allows for percentage-based analysis

  8. Validation of Fourier decomposition MRI with dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI using visual and automated scoring of pulmonary perfusion in young cystic fibrosis patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauman, Grzegorz, E-mail: g.bauman@dkfz.de [German Cancer Research Center, Division of Medical Physics in Radiology, Im Neuenheimer Feld 223, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Puderbach, Michael, E-mail: m.puderbach@dkfz.de [Chest Clinics at the University of Heidelberg, Clinics for Interventional and Diagnostic Radiology, Amalienstr. 5, 69126 Heidelberg (Germany); Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC), Member of the German Center for Lung Research (Germany); Heimann, Tobias, E-mail: t.heimann@dkfz.de [German Cancer Research Center, Division of Medical and Biological Informatics, Im Neuenheimer Feld 223, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kopp-Schneider, Annette, E-mail: kopp@dkfz.de [German Cancer Research Center, Division of Biostatistics, Im Neuenheimer Feld 223, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Fritzsching, Eva, E-mail: eva.fritzsching@med.uni-heidelberg.de [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Translational Pulmonology and Division of Pediatric Pulmonology and Allergy and Cystic Fibrosis Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld 430, Heidelberg (Germany); Mall, Marcus A., E-mail: marcus.mall@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC), Member of the German Center for Lung Research (Germany); University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Translational Pulmonology and Division of Pediatric Pulmonology and Allergy and Cystic Fibrosis Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld 430, Heidelberg (Germany); Eichinger, Monika, E-mail: m.eichinger@dkfz.de [Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC), Member of the German Center for Lung Research (Germany); German Cancer Research Center, Division of Radiology, Im Neuenheimer Feld 223, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To validate Fourier decomposition (FD) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MR imaging. Materials and methods: Thirty-four CF patients (median age 4.08 years; range 0.16–30) were examined on a 1.5-T MR imager. For FD MR imaging, sets of lung images were acquired using an untriggered two-dimensional balanced steady-state free precession sequence. Perfusion-weighted images were obtained after correction of the breathing displacement and Fourier analysis of the cardiac frequency from the time-resolved data sets. DCE data sets were acquired with a three-dimensional gradient echo sequence. The FD and DCE images were visually assessed for perfusion defects by two readers independently (R1, R2) using a field based scoring system (0–12). Software was used for perfusion impairment evaluation (R3) of segmented lung images using an automated threshold. Both imaging and evaluation methods were compared for agreement and tested for concordance between FD and DCE imaging. Results: Good or acceptable intra-reader agreement was found between FD and DCE for visual and automated scoring: R1 upper and lower limits of agreement (ULA, LLA): 2.72, −2.5; R2: ULA, LLA: ±2.5; R3: ULA: 1.5, LLA: −2. A high concordance was found between visual and automated scoring (FD: 70–80%, DCE: 73–84%). Conclusions: FD MR imaging provides equivalent diagnostic information to DCE MR imaging in CF patients. Automated assessment of regional perfusion defects using FD and DCE MR imaging is comparable to visual scoring but allows for percentage-based analysis.

  9. Dynamic contrast-enhanced perfusion area-detector CT assessed with various mathematical models: Its capability for therapeutic outcome prediction for non-small cell lung cancer patients with chemoradiotherapy as compared with that of FDG-PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, Yoshiharu, E-mail: yosirad@kobe-u.ac.jp [Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Advanced Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Fujisawa, Yasuko [Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation, Otawara (Japan); Koyama, Hisanobu; Kishida, Yuji; Seki, Shinichiro [Division of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Sugihara, Naoki [Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation, Otawara (Japan); Yoshikawa, Takeshi [Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Advanced Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan)

    2017-01-15

    Purpose: To directly compare the capability of dynamic first-pass contrast-enhanced (CE-) perfusion area-detector CT (ADCT) and PET/CT for early prediction of treatment response, disease progression and overall survival of non-small cell carcinoma (NSCLC) patients treated with chemoradiotherapy. Materials and methods: Fifty-three consecutive Stage IIIB NSCLC patients who had undergone PET/CT, dynamic first-pass CE-perfusion ADCT, chemoradiotherapy, and follow-up examination were enrolled in this study. They were divided into two groups: 1) complete or partial response (CR + PR) and 2) stable or progressive disease (SD + PD). Pulmonary arterial and systemic arterial perfusions and total perfusion were assessed at targeted lesions with the dual-input maximum slope method, permeability surface and distribution volume with the Patlak plot method, tumor perfusion with the single-input maximum slope method, and SUV{sub max}, and results were averaged to determine final values for each patient. Next, step-wise regression analysis was used to determine which indices were the most useful for predicting therapeutic effect. Finally, overall survival of responders and non-responders assessed by using the indices that had a significant effect on prediction of therapeutic outcome was statistically compared. Results: The step-wise regression test showed that therapeutic effect (r{sup 2} = 0.63, p = 0.01) was significantly affected by the following three factors in order of magnitude of impact: systemic arterial perfusion, total perfusion, and SUV{sub max}. Mean overall survival showed a significant difference for total perfusion (p = 0.003) and systemic arterial perfusion (p = 0.04). Conclusion: Dynamic first-pass CE-perfusion ADCT as well as PET/CT are useful for treatment response prediction in NSCLC patients treated with chemoradiotherapy.

  10. Quantitative Myocardial Perfusion with Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Imaging in MRI and CT: Theoretical Models and Current Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. J. Pelgrim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Technological advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and computed tomography (CT, including higher spatial and temporal resolution, have made the prospect of performing absolute myocardial perfusion quantification possible, previously only achievable with positron emission tomography (PET. This could facilitate integration of myocardial perfusion biomarkers into the current workup for coronary artery disease (CAD, as MRI and CT systems are more widely available than PET scanners. Cardiac PET scanning remains expensive and is restricted by the requirement of a nearby cyclotron. Clinical evidence is needed to demonstrate that MRI and CT have similar accuracy for myocardial perfusion quantification as PET. However, lack of standardization of acquisition protocols and tracer kinetic model selection complicates comparison between different studies and modalities. The aim of this overview is to provide insight into the different tracer kinetic models for quantitative myocardial perfusion analysis and to address typical implementation issues in MRI and CT. We compare different models based on their theoretical derivations and present the respective consequences for MRI and CT acquisition parameters, highlighting the interplay between tracer kinetic modeling and acquisition settings.

  11. Quantitative Myocardial Perfusion with Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Imaging in MRI and CT: Theoretical Models and Current Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handayani, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Prakken, N. H. J.; Slart, R. H. J. A.; Oudkerk, M.; Van Ooijen, P. M. A.; Vliegenthart, R.; Sijens, P. E.

    2016-01-01

    Technological advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT), including higher spatial and temporal resolution, have made the prospect of performing absolute myocardial perfusion quantification possible, previously only achievable with positron emission tomography (PET). This could facilitate integration of myocardial perfusion biomarkers into the current workup for coronary artery disease (CAD), as MRI and CT systems are more widely available than PET scanners. Cardiac PET scanning remains expensive and is restricted by the requirement of a nearby cyclotron. Clinical evidence is needed to demonstrate that MRI and CT have similar accuracy for myocardial perfusion quantification as PET. However, lack of standardization of acquisition protocols and tracer kinetic model selection complicates comparison between different studies and modalities. The aim of this overview is to provide insight into the different tracer kinetic models for quantitative myocardial perfusion analysis and to address typical implementation issues in MRI and CT. We compare different models based on their theoretical derivations and present the respective consequences for MRI and CT acquisition parameters, highlighting the interplay between tracer kinetic modeling and acquisition settings. PMID:27088083

  12. Influence of amplitude-related perfusion parameters in the parotid glands by non-fat-saturated dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, Su-Chin [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Electronics and Bioinformatics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan, Republic of China and Department of Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei 114, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Cheng-Chieh [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Chang, Hing-Chiu [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, The University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Chung, Hsiao-Wen [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Electronics and Bioinformatics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei 114, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiology, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei 114, Taiwan (China); Chiu, Hui-Chu [Ph.D. Program of Technology Management, Chung Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Liu, Yi-Jui [Department of Automatic Control Engineering, Feng-Chia University, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Hsian-He; Juan, Chun-Jung, E-mail: peterjuancj@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei 114, Taiwan and Department of Radiology, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei 114, Taiwan (China)

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: To verify whether quantification of parotid perfusion is affected by fat signals on non-fat-saturated (NFS) dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and whether the influence of fat is reduced with fat saturation (FS). Methods: This study consisted of three parts. First, a retrospective study analyzed DCE-MRI data previously acquired on different patients using NFS (n = 18) or FS (n = 18) scans. Second, a phantom study simulated the signal enhancements in the presence of gadolinium contrast agent at six concentrations and three fat contents. Finally, a prospective study recruited nine healthy volunteers to investigate the influence of fat suppression on perfusion quantification on the same subjects. Parotid perfusion parameters were derived from NFS and FS DCE-MRI data using both pharmacokinetic model analysis and semiquantitative parametric analysis. T tests and linear regression analysis were used for statistical analysis with correction for multiple comparisons. Results: NFS scans showed lower amplitude-related parameters, including parameter A, peak enhancement (PE), and slope than FS scans in the patients (all with P < 0.0167). The relative signal enhancement in the phantoms was proportional to the dose of contrast agent and was lower in NFS scans than in FS scans. The volunteer study showed lower parameter A (6.75 ± 2.38 a.u.), PE (42.12% ± 14.87%), and slope (1.43% ± 0.54% s{sup −1}) in NFS scans as compared to 17.63 ± 8.56 a.u., 104.22% ± 25.15%, and 9.68% ± 1.67% s{sup −1}, respectively, in FS scans (all with P < 0.005). These amplitude-related parameters were negatively associated with the fat content in NFS scans only (all with P < 0.05). Conclusions: On NFS DCE-MRI, quantification of parotid perfusion is adversely affected by the presence of fat signals for all amplitude-related parameters. The influence could be reduced on FS scans.

  13. Relationship of preoperative gastric cancer CT enhancement ratio and perfusion parameters with serum tumor marker levels and proliferation molecule expression in tumor lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Hong Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the relationship of preoperative gastric cancer CT enhancement ratio and perfusion parameters with serum tumor marker levels and proliferation molecule expression in tumor lesions. Methods: A total of 68 patients with gastric cancer treated in the Second Hospital of Yulin City between May 2012 and May 2016 were chosen as observation group and sub-divided into early and middle gastric cancer group (n=41 and advanced gastric cancer group (n=27 according to the tumor stage; 50 patients diagnosed with benign gastric diseases in our hospital during the same period were selected as benign gastric lesion group. CT enhancement rate and perfusion parameters of three groups of patients were detected by CT scan, serum tumor marker levels were evacuated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, and the proliferation gene mRNA expression levels were detected by RTPCR method. Results: CER, AF, BV and CL levels of advanced gastric cancer group were higher than those of early and middle gastric cancer group and benign gastric lesion group; serum CA72-4, CA19-9, CA125 and CEA contents of advanced gastric cancer group were higher than those of early and middle gastric cancer group and benign gastric lesion group; CADM1, miRNA-34a and Cystatin M mRNA expression in tissue of advanced gastric cancer group were lower than those of early and middle gastric cancer group and benign gastric lesion group while Survivin and I2PP2A mRNA expression were higher than those of early and middle gastric cancer group and benign gastric lesion group. The Pearson test showed that the CT enhancement rate and perfusion parameters in patients with gastric cancer are directly correlated with the serum tumor marker levels and the proliferation gene expression in tumor lesions. Conclusion: Preoperative gastric cancer CT enhancement rate and perfusion parameters are directly related to the tumor malignancy, and can be used as a reliable method for the long-term tumor

  14. Validation of Perfusion Quantification with 3D Gradient Echo Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using a Blood Pool Contrast Agent in Skeletal Swine Muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Hindel

    Full Text Available The purpose of our study was to validate perfusion quantification in a low-perfused tissue by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI with shared k-space sampling using a blood pool contrast agent. Perfusion measurements were performed in a total of seven female pigs. An ultrasonic Doppler probe was attached to the right femoral artery to determine total flow in the hind leg musculature. The femoral artery was catheterized for continuous local administration of adenosine to increase blood flow up to four times the baseline level. Three different stable perfusion levels were induced. The MR protocol included a 3D gradient-echo sequence with a temporal resolution of approximately 1.5 seconds. Before each dynamic sequence, static MR images were acquired with flip angles of 5°, 10°, 20°, and 30°. Both static and dynamic images were used to generate relaxation rate and baseline magnetization maps with a flip angle method. 0.1 mL/kg body weight of blood pool contrast medium was injected via a central venous catheter at a flow rate of 5 mL/s. The right hind leg was segmented in 3D into medial, cranial, lateral, and pelvic thigh muscles, lower leg, bones, skin, and fat. The arterial input function (AIF was measured in the aorta. Perfusion of the different anatomic regions was calculated using a one- and a two-compartment model with delay- and dispersion-corrected AIFs. The F-test for model comparison was used to decide whether to use the results of the one- or two-compartment model fit. Total flow was calculated by integrating volume-weighted perfusion values over the whole measured region. The resulting values of delay, dispersion, blood volume, mean transit time, and flow were all in physiologically and physically reasonable ranges. In 107 of 160 ROIs, the blood signal was separated, using a two-compartment model, into a capillary and an arteriolar signal contribution, decided by the F-test. Overall flow in hind leg muscles

  15. A Review of Nitrate and Nitrite Toxicity in Foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir-Jamal Hosseini

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural advancement and population growth have prompted increases in food supplies, and higher crop yields have been made possible through the application of fertilizers. Large quantities of livestock and poultry on farms, along with the accumulation of biomass and agricultural residues, can cause contamination of ground water resources and other water sanitation concerns in both developing and developed countries. Nitrate is mainly used as a fertilizer in agriculture, and because of its high solubility in water, it can create biological problems in the environment. High usage of nitrite in the food industry as a preservative, flavor enhancer, antioxidant, and color stabilizing agent can cause human exposure to this toxic compound. Nitrite is 10 times as toxic as nitrate in humans. Nitrate is converted to nitrite and nitrosamine compounds in the human stomach, which can lead to bladder cancer. In this review, sources of nitrate and nitrite exposure were investigated. Furthermore, the review evaluates standard levels of nitrate and nitrite in different foods, and acceptable daily doses of these compounds in various countries. Finally, we discuss valid methods of nitrate and nitrite identification and removal in foods.

  16. Mutagenicity of some alkyl nitrites used as recreational drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunkel, V.C.; Cameron, T.P. (National Institute of Health, Bethesda (USA)); Rogers-Back, A.M.; Lawlor, T.E.; Harbell, J.W. (Microbiological Associates Inc., Rockville, MD (USA))

    1989-01-01

    When the AIDS epidemic was in its earliest stages, and prior to identification of HIV as the etiological factor, the use of volatile nitrites by the male homosexual community to enhance sexual activities appeared to have a significant role in this disease. Preliminary observations indicated that that portion of the male homosexual community which developed Kaposi's sarcoma were also heavy nitrite users. These nitrites had been demonstrated to be mutagenic in bacteria and thus it was postulated that they could be responsible for the appearance of the sarcoma. To evaluate further the genotoxic activity of these chemicals, six nitrites, including those most commonly used by homosexuals for sexual gratification, were selected for testing in the mouse lymphoma TK {plus minus} and Salmonell typhimurium mutagenicity assays. One chemical, n-amyl nitrite, was negative in the mouse lymphoma assay, while the other five chemicals, n-butyl, isobutyl, iso-amyl, sec-butyl, and n-propyl nitrite, were positive. All six compounds were positive in the Salmonella assay. The mutagenic and known toxic effects of these chemicals remain a concern because a large population of teenagers and young adults continue to abuse these substances.

  17. Enhanced task-related brain activation and resting perfusion in healthy older adults after chronic blueberry supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowtell, Joanna L; Aboo-Bakkar, Zainie; Conway, Myra E; Adlam, Anna-Lynne R; Fulford, Jonathan

    2017-07-01

    Blueberries are rich in flavonoids, which possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. High flavonoid intakes attenuate age-related cognitive decline, but data from human intervention studies are sparse. We investigated whether 12 weeks of blueberry concentrate supplementation improved brain perfusion, task-related activation, and cognitive function in healthy older adults. Participants were randomised to consume either 30 mL blueberry concentrate providing 387 mg anthocyanidins (5 female, 7 male; age 67.5 ± 3.0 y; body mass index, 25.9 ± 3.3 kg·m -2 ) or isoenergetic placebo (8 female, 6 male; age 69.0 ± 3.3 y; body mass index, 27.1 ± 4.0 kg·m -2 ). Pre- and postsupplementation, participants undertook a battery of cognitive function tests and a numerical Stroop test within a 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging scanner while functional magnetic resonance images were continuously acquired. Quantitative resting brain perfusion was determined using an arterial spin labelling technique, and blood biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress were measured. Significant increases in brain activity were observed in response to blueberry supplementation relative to the placebo group within Brodmann areas 4/6/10/21/40/44/45, precuneus, anterior cingulate, and insula/thalamus (p blueberry versus placebo supplementation (p = 0.05). Supplementation with an anthocyanin-rich blueberry concentrate improved brain perfusion and activation in brain areas associated with cognitive function in healthy older adults.

  18. Perfusion CT in acute stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckert, Bernd; Roether, Joachim; Fiehler, Jens; Thomalla, Goetz

    2015-01-01

    Modern multislice CT scanners enable multimodal protocols including non-enhanced CT, CT angiography, and CT perfusion. A 64-slice CT scanner provides 4-cm coverage. To cover the whole brain, a 128 - 256-slice scanner is needed. The use of perfusion CT requires an optimized scan protocol in order to reduce exposure to radiation. As compared to non-enhanced CT and CT angiography, the use of CT perfusion increases detection rates of cerebral ischemia, especially small cortical ischemic lesions, while the detection of lacunar and infratentorial stroke lesions remains limited. Perfusion CT enables estimation of collateral flow in acute occlusion of large intra- or extracranial arteries. Currently, no established reliable thresholds are available for determining infarct core and penumbral tissue by CT perfusion. Moreover, perfusion parameters depend on the processing algorithms and the software used for calculation. However, a number of studies point towards a reduction of cerebral blood volume (CBV) below 2 ml/100 g as a critical threshold that identifies infarct core. Large CBV lesions are associated with poor outcome even in the context of recanalization. The extent of early ischemic signs on non-enhanced CT remains the main parameter from CT imaging to guide acute reperfusion treatment. Nevertheless, perfusion CT increases diagnostic and therapeutic certainty in the acute setting. Similar to stroke MRI, perfusion CT enables the identification of tissue at risk of infarction by the mismatch between infarct core and the larger area of critical hypoperfusion. Further insights into the validity of perfusion parameters are expected from ongoing trials of mechanical thrombectomy in stroke.

  19. Enhancing microdialysis recovery of metal ions by incorporating poly-L-aspartic acid and poly-L-histidine in the perfusion liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mogopodi, Dikabo; Torto, Nelson

    2003-04-10

    A study of the evaluation of poly-L-aspartic acid and poly-L-histidine as binding agents to enhance microdialysis recovery of metal ions is presented. Investigations were carried out to compare microdialysis recovery for Cr, Cu, Ni, and Pb when using water as the perfusion liquid as well as when using various concentrations of poly-L-aspartic acid and poly-L-histidine in the perfusion liquid. All experiments were carried out under quiescent conditions using a concentric type of microdialysis probe fitted with a polysulfone membrane having a 30 kDa molecular weight cut-off and a 10 mm effective dialysis length. The metal ions were determined using an electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometer equipped with a Zeemann background corrector. Incorporation of 0.032% (w/v) of poly-L-aspartic acid enhanced the recovery of Cu and Pb by factors of 90 and 64%, respectively (%RSD<3). The recovery of Cr was enhanced by 5%, but that of Ni never exceeded values achieved using ultra pure water. The use of 20% (w/v) of poly-L-histidine resulted in enhancement factors of 66 and 4% for Cu and Pb, respectively (%RSD<2). For both Cr and Ni, the recovery never exceeded that achieved with water. The data from these studies demonstrate the suitability of poly-L-aspartic and poly-L-histidine as selective and effective binding agents that enhance the microdialysis recovery of metal ions. Application of the optimised conditions to the determination of Pb and Cu in a wastewater sample confirmed the versatility of microdialysis, as higher recoveries of Cu were obtained with poly-L-aspartic acid compared to direct determination.

  20. A comparison of perfusion computed tomography and contrast enhanced computed tomography on radiation target volume delineation using rabbit VX2 brain tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Changjin; Luo Yunxiu; Yu Jinming; Lu Haibo; Li Chao; Zhang Dekang; Huang Jianming; Wang Jie; Lang Jinyi

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To compare the accuracy of blood volume perfusion imaging (perfusion CT)with contrast enhanced 64-slice spiral computed tomography (CECT) in the evaluation of gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) using rabbits with VX2 brain tumor. Methods: Perfusion CT and CECT were performed in 20 rabbits with VX2 brain tumor. The GTV and CTV calculated with the maximal and minimal diameter of each tumor in the blood volume (BV) maps and CECT were measured and compared to those in pathological specimens. Results: The mean value of the maximal and minimal diameter of GTV was (8.19 ± 2.29) mm and (4.83 ± 1.31) mm in pathological specimens, (11.98 ±3.29) mm and (7.03±1.82) mm in BV maps, while (6.36±3.85) mm and (3.17±1.93) mm in CECT images, which were significantly different (pathological specimen vs. BV map, t = 7.17, P =0.000;pathological specimen vs. CECT, t = 8.37, P = 0.000, respectively). The mean value of the maximal and minimal diameter of CTV in pathologic specimens was (12.87 ± 3.74) mm and (7.71 ± 2.15) mm, which was significantly different from that of GTV and CTV in CECT (t = - 3. 18, P = 0. 005 and t = - 4.24, P =0.000; t= -11.59,P=0.000 and t= -9.39, P=0.000), while similar with that of GTV in BV maps (t = - 1.95,P = 0. 067; t = - 2. 06, P = 0. 054). For CECT, the margin from GTV to CTV was 81.83% ±40.33% for the maximal diameter and 276.73% ± 131.46% for the minimal. While for BV maps, the margin was 7.93% ± 17. 84% and 12.52% ± 27. 83%, which was significant different from that for CECT images (t=7.36, P=0. 000 and t= -8.78, P=0.000). Conclusions: Compared with CECT, the BV map from 64-slice spiral CT perfusion imaging might have higher accuracy in target volume delineation for brain tumor. (authors)

  1. Dynamic contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging of diseased vertebrae: analysis of three parameters and the distribution of the time-intensity curve patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuda, Osamu; Hayashi, Noriko; Taguchi, Koutarou; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2005-01-01

    To assess the diagnostic value of perfusion MR imaging of diseased vertebrae by analysis of three parameters and the distribution of the time-intensity curve (TIC) patterns. Dynamic MR imaging was performed on 34 patients with 48 lesions. All lesions were assigned to one of four groups: osteoporotic compression fracture, benign lesion without compression fracture, pathologic compression fracture, or metastatic lesion without fracture. Peak enhancement, steepest slope, and slope value were calculated from the TIC of diseased vertebrae. TICs were classified into five types. Comparisons were made among groups by analysis of the three parameters and the distributions of the TICs pattern. All parameters of pathologic compression fracture were significantly higher than those of osteoporotic compression fracture (P<0.05). The steepest slopes of metastatic lesions with and without pathologic compression fracture were significantly higher than those of benign lesions without compression fracture (P<0.05). No characteristic distribution of the TIC pattern helpful for the differentiation of benign and metastatic lesions was found. In distinguishing osteoporotic from pathologic compression fractures, semiquantitative analysis of the perfusion MR imaging may be useful. However, the analysis of the TIC patterns can not significantly contribute to the differential diagnosis. (orig.)

  2. Evaluation of pharmacokinetic models for perfusion imaging with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in porcine skeletal muscle using low-molecular-weight contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindel, Stefan; Papanastasiou, Giorgos; Wust, Peter; Maaß, Marc; Söhner, Anika; Lüdemann, Lutz

    2018-06-01

    Pharmacokinetic models for perfusion quantification with a low-molecular-weight contrast agent (LMCA) in skeletal muscle using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) were evaluated. Tissue perfusion was measured in seven regions of interest (ROIs) placed in the total hind leg supplied by the femoral artery in seven female pigs. DCE-MRI was performed using a 3D gradient echo sequence with k-space sharing. The sequence was acquired twice, first after LMCA and then after blood pool contrast agent injection. Blood flow was augmented by continuous infusion of the vasodilator adenosine into the femoral artery, resulting in up to four times increased blood flow. The results obtained with several LMCA models were compared with those of a two-compartment blood pool model (2CBPM) consisting of a capillary and an arteriolar compartment. Measurements performed with a Doppler flow probe placed at the femoral artery served as ground truth. The two-compartment exchange model extended by an arteriolar compartment (E2CXM) showed the highest fit quality of all LMCA models and the most significant correlation with the Doppler measurements, r = 0.78 (P Reson Med 79:3154-3162, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  3. The human milk oligosaccharide 2'-fucosyllactose attenuates the severity of experimental necrotising enterocolitis by enhancing mesenteric perfusion in the neonatal intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Misty; Sodhi, Chhinder P; Yamaguchi, Yukihiro; Jia, Hongpeng; Lu, Peng; Fulton, William B; Martin, Laura Y; Prindle, Thomas; Nino, Diego F; Zhou, Qinjie; Ma, Congrong; Ozolek, John A; Buck, Rachael H; Goehring, Karen C; Hackam, David J

    2016-10-01

    Necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) is a common disease in premature infants characterised by intestinal ischaemia and necrosis. The only effective preventative strategy against NEC is the administration of breast milk, although the protective mechanisms remain unknown. We hypothesise that an abundant human milk oligosaccharide (HMO) in breast milk, 2'-fucosyllactose (2'FL), protects against NEC by enhancing intestinal mucosal blood flow, and we sought to determine the mechanisms underlying this protection. Administration of HMO-2'FL protected against NEC in neonatal wild-type mice, resulted in a decrease in pro-inflammatory markers and preserved the small intestinal mucosal architecture. These protective effects occurred via restoration of intestinal perfusion through up-regulation of the vasodilatory molecule endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), as administration of HMO-2'FL to eNOS-deficient mice or to mice that received eNOS inhibitors did not protect against NEC, and by 16S analysis HMO-2'FL affected the microbiota of the neonatal mouse gut, although these changes do not seem to be the primary mechanism of protection. Induction of eNOS by HMO-2'FL was also observed in cultured endothelial cells, providing a link between eNOS and HMO in the endothelium. These data demonstrate that HMO-2'FL protects against NEC in part through maintaining mesenteric perfusion via increased eNOS expression, and suggest that the 2'FL found in human milk may be mediating some of the protective benefits of breast milk in the clinical setting against NEC.

  4. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Perfusion Area-Detector CT: Preliminary Comparison of Diagnostic Performance for N Stage Assessment With FDG PET/CT in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Fujisawa, Yasuko; Sugihara, Naoki; Kishida, Yuji; Seki, Shinichiro; Koyama, Hisanobu; Yoshikawa, Takeshi

    2017-11-01

    The objective of our study was to directly compare the capability of dynamic first-pass contrast-enhanced (CE) perfusion area-detector CT (ADCT) and FDG PET/CT for differentiation of metastatic from nonmetastatic lymph nodes and assessment of N stage in patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Seventy-seven consecutive patients, 45 men (mean age ± SD, 70.4 ± 5.9 years) and 32 women (71.2 ± 7.7 years), underwent dynamic first-pass CE-perfusion ADCT at two or three different positions for covering the entire thorax, FDG PET/CT, surgical treatment, and pathologic examination. From all ADCT data for each of the subjects, a whole-chest perfusion map was computationally generated using the dual- and single-input maximum slope and Patlak plot methods. For quantitative N stage assessment, perfusion parameters and the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ) for each lymph node were determined by measuring the relevant ROI. ROC curve analyses were performed for comparing the diagnostic capability of each of the methods on a per-node basis. N stages evaluated by each of the indexes were then statistically compared with the final pathologic diagnosis by means of chi-square and kappa statistics. The area under the ROC curve (A z ) values of systemic arterial perfusion (A z = 0.89), permeability surface (A z = 0.78), and SUV max (A z = 0.85) were significantly larger than the A z values of total perfusion (A z = 0.70, p perfusion calculated using the dual-input maximum slope model was substantial (κ = 0.70, p perfusion ADCT is as useful as FDG PET/CT for the differentiation of metastatic from nonmetastatic lymph nodes and assessment of N stage in patients with NSCLC.

  5. Expansion of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Perfused 3D Ceramic Scaffolds Enhances In Vivo Bone Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, Allison I; Duhr, Ralph; Di Maggio, Nunzia; Mehrkens, Arne; Jakob, Marcel; Wendt, David

    2017-12-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSC), when expanded directly within 3D ceramic scaffolds in perfusion bioreactors, more reproducibly form bone when implanted in vivo as compared to conventional expansion on 2D polystyrene dishes/flasks. Since the bioreactor-based expansion on 3D ceramic scaffolds encompasses multiple aspects that are inherently different from expansion on 2D polystyrene, we aimed to decouple the effects of specific parameters among these two model systems. We assessed the effects of the: 1) 3D scaffold vs. 2D surface; 2) ceramic vs. polystyrene materials; and 3) BMSC niche established within the ceramic pores during in vitro culture, on subsequent in vivo bone formation. While BMSC expanded on 3D polystyrene scaffolds in the bioreactor could maintain their in vivo osteogenic potential, results were similar as BMSC expanded in monolayer on 2D polystyrene, suggesting little influence of the scaffold 3D environment. Bone formation was most reproducible when BMSC are expanded on 3D ceramic, highlighting the influence of the ceramic substrate. The presence of a pre-formed niche within the scaffold pores had negligible effects on the in vivo bone formation. The results of this study allow a greater understanding of the parameters required for perfusion bioreactor-based manufacturing of osteogenic grafts for clinical applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. A novel marine nitrite-oxidizing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haaijer, S.C.M.; Ji, K.; van Niftrik, L.; Hoischen, A.; Speth, D.R.; Jetten, M.S.M.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Op den Camp, H.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Marine microorganisms are important for the global nitrogen cycle, but marine nitrifiers, especially aerobic nitrite oxidizers, remain largely unexplored. To increase the number of cultured representatives of marine nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB), a bioreactor cultivation approach was adopted to

  7. The Reaction of Oxy Hemoglobin with Nitrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hathazi, Denisa; Scurtu, Florina; Bischin, Cristina

    2018-01-01

    -peroxynitrate. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations support this latter assignment. The reaction allows for differentiating between the reactivities of various chemically modified hemoglobins, including candidates for blood substitutes. Polymerization of hemoglobin slows the nitrite-induced oxidation, in sharp...... contrast to oxidative-stress type reactions which are generally accelerated, not inhibited. Sheep hemoglobin is found to be distinctly more resistant to reaction with nitrite compared to bovine Hb, at large nitrite concentrations (stopped-flow experiments directly observing the oxy + nitrite reaction...

  8. Brain capillary transit time heterogeneity in healthy volunteers measured by dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted perfusion MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, Henrik B.W.; Vestergaard, Mark B.; Lindberg, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    based on a gamma-variate model of the capillary transit time distribution. In addition, we wanted to investigate if a subtle increase of the blood–brain barrier permeability can be incorporated into the model, still allowing estimation of CTH. Materials and Methods: Twenty-three healthy subjects were...... scanned at 3.0T MRI system applying DCE-MRI and using a gamma-variate model to estimate CTH as well as cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and permeability of the blood–brain barrier, measured as the influx constant Ki. For proof of principle we also investigated three patients...... response function. Conclusion: Our results open the possibility of characterizing brain perfusion by the capillary transit time distribution using DCE-MRI, theoretically a determinant of efficient blood to brain transport of important substances. Level of Evidence: 2. J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2017;45:1809–1820....

  9. 21 CFR 172.175 - Sodium nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Preservatives § 172.175 Sodium nitrite. The food additive sodium nitrite may be safely used in or on specified... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrite. 172.175 Section 172.175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN...

  10. 21 CFR 573.700 - Sodium nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Listing § 573.700 Sodium nitrite. Sodium nitrite may be safely used in canned pet food containing meat and... as a preservative and color fixative in canned pet food containing fish, meat, and fish and meat... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium nitrite. 573.700 Section 573.700 Food and...

  11. Comparison of semi-quantitative and quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI evaluations of vertebral marrow perfusion in a rat osteoporosis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jingqi; Xiong, Zuogang; Zhang, Jiulong; Qiu, Yuyou; Hua, Ting; Tang, Guangyu

    2017-11-14

    This study aims to investigate the technical feasibility of semi-quantitative and quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in the assessment of longitudinal changes of marrow perfusion in a rat osteoporosis model, using bone mineral density (BMD) measured by micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and histopathology as the gold standards. Fifty rats were randomly assigned to the control group (n=25) and ovariectomy (OVX) group whose bilateral ovaries were excised (n=25). Semi-quantitative and quantitative DCE-MRI, micro-CT, and histopathological examinations were performed on lumbar vertebrae at baseline and 3, 6, 9, and 12 weeks after operation. The differences between the two groups in terms of semi-quantitative DCE-MRI parameter (maximum enhancement, E max ), quantitative DCE-MRI parameters (volume transfer constant, K trans ; interstitial volume, V e ; and efflux rate constant, K ep ), micro-CT parameter (BMD), and histopathological parameter (microvessel density, MVD) were compared at each of the time points using an independent-sample t test. The differences in these parameters between baseline and other time points in each group were assessed via Bonferroni's multiple comparison test. A Pearson correlation analysis was applied to assess the relationships between DCE-MRI, micro-CT, and histopathological parameters. In the OVX group, the E max values decreased significantly compared with those of the control group at weeks 6 and 9 (p=0.003 and 0.004, respectively). The K trans values decreased significantly compared with those of the control group from week 3 (pquantitative DCE-MRI, the quantitative DCE-MRI parameter K trans is a more sensitive and accurate index for detecting early reduced perfusion in osteoporotic bone.

  12. Quantitative lung perfusion evaluation using Fourier decomposition perfusion MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjørstad, Åsmund; Corteville, Dominique M R; Fischer, Andre; Henzler, Thomas; Schmid-Bindert, Gerald; Zöllner, Frank G; Schad, Lothar R

    2014-08-01

    To quantitatively evaluate lung perfusion using Fourier decomposition perfusion MRI. The Fourier decomposition (FD) method is a noninvasive method for assessing ventilation- and perfusion-related information in the lungs, where the perfusion maps in particular have shown promise for clinical use. However, the perfusion maps are nonquantitative and dimensionless, making follow-ups and direct comparisons between patients difficult. We present an approach to obtain physically meaningful and quantifiable perfusion maps using the FD method. The standard FD perfusion images are quantified by comparing the partially blood-filled pixels in the lung parenchyma with the fully blood-filled pixels in the aorta. The percentage of blood in a pixel is then combined with the temporal information, yielding quantitative blood flow values. The values of 10 healthy volunteers are compared with SEEPAGE measurements which have shown high consistency with dynamic contrast enhanced-MRI. All pulmonary blood flow (PBF) values are within the expected range. The two methods are in good agreement (mean difference = 0.2 mL/min/100 mL, mean absolute difference = 11 mL/min/100 mL, mean PBF-FD = 150 mL/min/100 mL, mean PBF-SEEPAGE = 151 mL/min/100 mL). The Bland-Altman plot shows a good spread of values, indicating no systematic bias between the methods. Quantitative lung perfusion can be obtained using the Fourier Decomposition method combined with a small amount of postprocessing. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. The human milk oligosaccharide 2′-fucosyllactose attenuates the severity of experimental necrotising enterocolitis by enhancing mesenteric perfusion in the neonatal intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Misty; Sodhi, Chhinder P.; Yamaguchi, Yukihiro; Jia, Hongpeng; Lu, Peng; Fulton, William B.; Martin, Laura Y.; Prindle, Thomas; Nino, Diego F.; Zhou, Qinjie; Ma, Congrong; Ozolek, John A.; Buck, Rachael H.; Goehring, Karen C.; Hackam, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) is a common disease in premature infants characterised by intestinal ischaemia and necrosis. The only effective preventative strategy against NEC is the administration of breast milk, although the protective mechanisms remain unknown. We hypothesise that an abundant human milk oligosaccharide (HMO) in breast milk, 2′-fucosyllactose (2′FL), protects against NEC by enhancing intestinal mucosal blood flow, and we sought to determine the mechanisms underlying this protection. Administration of HMO-2′FL protected against NEC in neonatal wild-type mice, resulted in a decrease in pro-inflammatory markers and preserved the small intestinal mucosal architecture. These protective effects occurred via restoration of intestinal perfusion through up-regulation of the vasodilatory molecule endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), as administration of HMO-2′FL to eNOS-deficient mice or to mice that received eNOS inhibitors did not protect against NEC, and by 16S analysis HMO-2′FL affected the microbiota of the neonatal mouse gut, although these changes do not seem to be the primary mechanism of protection. Induction of eNOS by HMO-2′FL was also observed in cultured endothelial cells, providing a link between eNOS and HMO in the endothelium. These data demonstrate that HMO-2′FL protects against NEC in part through maintaining mesenteric perfusion via increased eNOS expression, and suggest that the 2′FL found in human milk may be mediating some of the protective benefits of breast milk in the clinical setting against NEC. PMID:27609061

  14. Electrochemical detection of nitrite based on the polythionine/carbon nanotube modified electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Chunyan; Chen, Jinzhuo; Nie, Zhou; Yang, Minghui; Si, Shihui

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, thionine was electro-polymerized onto the surface of carbon nanotube (CNT)-modified glassy carbon (GC) to fabricate the polythionine (PTH)/CNT/GC electrode. It was found that the electro-reduction current of nitrite was enhanced greatly at the PTH/CNT/GC electrode. It may be demonstrated that PTH was used as a mediator for electrocatalytic reduction of nitrite, and CNTs as an excellent nanomaterial can improve the electron transfer between the electrode and nitrite. Therefore, based on the synergic effect of PTH and CNTs, the PTH/CNT/GC electrode was employed to detect nitrite, and the high sensitivity of 5.81 μA mM −1 , and the detection limit of 1.4 × 10 −6 M were obtained. Besides, the modified electrode showed an inherent stability, fast response time, and good anti-interference ability. These suggested that the PTH/CNT/GC electrode was favorable and reliable for the detection of nitrite. - Highlights: ► Polythionine (PTH) was used as a mediator for electrocatalytic reduction of nitrite. ► Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) improve electron transfer between the electrode and nitrite. ► The PTH/CNT/glassy carbon electrode showed excellent nitrite detection performance.

  15. Improved visualization of delayed perfusion in lung MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risse, Frank; Eichinger, Monika; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Semmler, Wolfhard; Puderbach, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The investigation of pulmonary perfusion by three-dimensional (3D) dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) was proposed recently. Subtraction images are generated for clinical evaluation, but temporal information is lost and perfusion defects might therefore be masked in this process. The aim of this study is to demonstrate a simple analysis strategy and classification for 3D-DCE-MRI perfusion datasets in the lung without omitting the temporal information. Materials and methods: Pulmonary perfusion measurements were performed in patients with different lung diseases using a 1.5 T MR-scanner with a time-resolved 3D-GRE pulse sequence. 25 3D-volumes were acquired after iv-injection of 0.1 mmol/kg KG Gadolinium-DTPA. Three parameters were determined for each pixel: (1) peak enhancement S n,max normalized to the arterial input function to detect regions of reduced perfusion; (2) time between arterial peak enhancement in the large pulmonary artery and tissue peak enhancement τ to visualize regions with delayed bolus onset; and (3) ratio R = S n,max /τ was calculated to visualize impaired perfusion, irrespectively of whether related to reduced or delayed perfusion. Results: A manual selection of peak perfusion images is not required. Five different types of perfusion can be found: (1) normal perfusion; (2) delayed non-reduced perfusion; (3) reduced non-delayed perfusion; (4) reduced and delayed perfusion; and (5) no perfusion. Types II and IV could not be seen in subtraction images since the temporal information is necessary for this purpose. Conclusions: The analysis strategy in this study allows for a simple and observer-independent visualization and classification of impaired perfusion in dynamic contrast-enhanced pulmonary perfusion MRI by using the temporal information of the datasets.

  16. Automatic Detection of Myocardial Boundaries in MR Cardio Perfusion Images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spreeuwers, Luuk; Breeuwer, Marcel

    2001-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases often result in reduced blood perfusion of the myocardium (MC). Recent advances in MR allow fast recordingof contrast enhanced myocardial perfusion scans. For perfusion analysis the myocardial boundaries must be traced. Currently this is done manually. In this paper a method

  17. Dietary Nitrite: from menace to marvel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan S. Bryan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The health benefits of nitrite are now indisputable when administered in a clinical setting for specific diseases. Currently, most published reports identify the production of nitric oxide (NO as the mechanism of action for nitrite. Basic science, in addition to clinical studies, demonstrate that nitrite and/or nitrate cannot restore NO homeostasis as an endothelium independent source of NO that may be a redundant system for endogenous NO production. Nitrate must first be reduced to nitrite by oral commensal bacteria; nitrite can then be further reduced to NO along the physiological oxygen gradient. But despite decades of rigorous research on sodium nitrate’s safety and efficacy as a curing agent, sodium nitrite is still regarded by many as a toxic undesirable food additive. However, research within the biomedical science community has revealed enormous therapeutic benefits of nitrite which are being developed as novel therapies for conditions associated with nitric oxide insufficiency. Thus, this review will highlight the fundamental biochemistry of nitrite in human physiology and provide evidence that nitrite be considered an essential nutrient. Foods or diets enriched with nitrite can have profound positive health benefits.

  18. Use of Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound to Study Relationship between Serum Uric Acid and Renal Microvascular Perfusion in Diabetic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the relationship between uric acid and renal microvascular perfusion in diabetic kidney disease (DKD using contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS method. Materials and Methods. 79 DKD patients and 26 healthy volunteers were enrolled. Renal function and urine protein markers were tested. DKD patients were subdivided into two groups including a normal serum uric acid (SUA group and a high SUA group. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS was performed, and low acoustic power contrast-specific imaging was used for quantitative analysis. Results. Normal controls (NCs had the highest levels of AUC, AUC1, and AUC2. Compared to the normal SUA DKD group, high SUA DKD patients had significantly higher IMAX, AUC, and AUC1 (P<0.05. DKD patients with low urinary uric acid (UUA excretion had significantly higher AUC2 compared to DKD patients with normal UUA (P<0.05. Conclusion. Hyperuricemia in DKD patients was associated with a renal ultrasound image suggestive of microvascular hyperperfusion. The CEUS parameter AUC1 holds promise as an indicator for renal microvascular hyperperfusion, while AUC2 might be a useful indicator of declining glomerular filtration rate in DKD patients with decreased excretion of uric acid.

  19. Prevalence of first-pass myocardial perfusion defects detected by contrast-enhanced dual-source CT in patients with non-ST segment elevation acute coronary syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schepis, Tiziano; Achenbach, Stephan; Marwan, Mohamed; Muschiol, Gerd; Ropers, Dieter; Daniel, Werner G.; Pflederer, Tobias [University of Erlangen, Department of Internal Medicine 2 (Cardiology), Erlangen (Germany)

    2010-07-15

    To investigate the prevalence and diagnostic value of first-pass myocardial perfusion defects (PD) visualised by contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in patients admitted for a first acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Thirty-eight patients with non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) or unstable angina (UA) and scheduled for percutaneous coronary intervention underwent dual-source CT immediately before catheterisation. CT images were analysed for the presence of any PD by using a 17-segment model. Results were compared with peak cardiac troponin-I (cTnI) and angiography findings. PD were seen in 21 of the 24 patients with NSTEMI (median peak cTnI level 7.07 ng/mL; range 0.72-37.07 ng/mL) and in 2 of 14 patients with UA. PD corresponded with the territory of the infarct-related artery in 20 out of 22 patients. In a patient-based analysis, sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive predictive values of any PD for predicting NSTEMI were 88%, 86%, 80% and 91%. Per culprit artery, the respective values were 86%, 75%, 80% and 83%. In patients with non-ST segment elevation ACS, first-pass myocardial PD in contrast-enhanced MDCT correlate closely with the presence of myocardial necrosis, as determined by increases in cTnI levels. (orig.)

  20. Contrast-Enhanced Microtomographic Characterisation of Vessels in Native Bone and Engineered Vascularised Grafts Using Ink-Gelatin Perfusion and Phosphotungstic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Sutter

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Bone ischemia and necrosis are challenging to treat, requiring investigation of native and engineered bone revascularisation processes through advanced imaging techniques. This study demonstrates an experimental two-step method for precise bone and vessel analysis in native bones or vascularised bone grafts using X-ray microtomography (μCT, without interfering with further histological processing. Methods. Distally ligated epigastric arteries or veins of 6 nude rats were inserted in central channels of porous hydroxyapatite cylinders and these pedicled grafts were implanted subcutaneously. One week later, the rats were perfused with ink-gelatin and euthanised and the femurs, tibias, and grafts were explanted. Samples were scanned using μCT, decalcified, incubated with phosphotungstic acid (PTA for contrast enhancement, rescanned, and processed histologically. Results. Contrast-enhanced μCT displayed the course and branching of native bone vessels. Histologically, both central (−17% and epiphyseal vessels (−58% appeared smaller than in μCT scans. Hydroxyapatite cylinders were thoroughly vascularised but did not display bone formation. Grafts with a central artery had more (+58% and smaller (−52% vessel branches compared to grafts with a vein. Conclusions. We present a relatively inexpensive and easy-to-perform two-step method to analyse bone and vessels by μCT, suitable to assess a variety of bone-regenerative strategies.

  1. Boletus edulis Nitrite Reductase Reduces Nitrite Content of Pickles and Mitigates Intoxication in Nitrite-intoxicated Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Tian, Guoting; Feng, Shanshan; Wong, Jack Ho; Zhao, Yongchang; Chen, Xiao; Wang, Hexiang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2015-10-08

    Pickles are popular in China and exhibits health-promoting effects. However, nitrite produced during fermentation adversely affects health due to formation of methemoglobin and conversion to carcinogenic nitrosamine. Fruiting bodies of the mushroom Boletus edulis were capable of inhibiting nitrite production during pickle fermentation. A 90-kDa nitrite reductase (NiR), demonstrating peptide sequence homology to fungal nitrite reductase, was isolated from B. edulis fruiting bodies. The optimum temperature and pH of the enzyme was 45 °C and 6.8, respectively. B. edulis NiR was capable of prolonging the lifespan of nitrite-intoxicated mice, indicating that it had the action of an antidote. The enzyme could also eliminate nitrite from blood after intragastric administration of sodium nitrite, and after packaging into capsule, this nitrite-eliminating activity could persist for at least 120 minutes thus avoiding immediate gastric degradation. B. edulis NiR represents the first nitrite reductase purified from mushrooms and may facilitate subsequent applications.

  2. Nitrite and nitroso compounds can serve as specific catalase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, Vladimir Yu; Osipov, Anatoly N

    2017-03-01

    We present evidence that nitrite and nitrosothiols, nitrosoamines and non-heme dinitrosyl iron complexes can reversibly inhibit catalase with equal effectiveness. Catalase activity was evaluated by the permanganatometric and calorimetric assays. This inhibition is not the result of chemical transformations of these compounds to a single inhibitor, as well as it is not the result of NO release from these substances (as NO traps have no effect on the extent of inhibition). It was found that chloride and bromide in concentration above 80 mM and thiocyanate in concentration above 20 μM enhance catalase inhibition by nitrite and the nitroso compounds more than 100 times. The inhibition degree in this case is comparable with that induced by azide. We propose that the direct catalase inhibitor is a positively charged NO-group. This group acquires a positive charge in the active center of enzyme by interaction of nitrite or nitroso compounds with some enzyme groups. Halides and thiocyanate protect the NO + group from hydration and thus increase its inhibition effect. It is probable that a comparatively low chloride concentration in many cells is the main factor to protect catalase from inhibition by nitrite and nitroso compounds.

  3. Early changes in perfusion of glioblastoma during radio- and chemotherapy evaluated by T1-dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Lundemann, Michael; Law, Ian

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The survival times of patients with glioblastoma differ widely and biomarkers that would enable individualized treatment are needed. The objective of this study was to measure changes in the vascular physiology of tumor using T1-dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE...... months post-Tx. DCE-MRI at three Tesla generated maps of blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), permeability (Ki) and volume of distribution (Vd) using a combination of model-free deconvolution and Patlak plots. Regions of interest in contrast enhancing tumor and in normal appearing white matter were...

  4. Early perfusion changes within 1 week of systemic treatment measured by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI may predict survival in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Bang-Bin; Yu, Chih-Wei; Liang, Po-Chin [National Taiwan University College of Medicine and Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiology, Taipei City (China); Hsu, Chao-Yu [National Taiwan University College of Medicine and Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiology, Taipei City (China); Taipei Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Department of Radiology, New Taipei City (China); Hsu, Chiun; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Cheng, Ann-Lii [National Taiwan University College of Medicine and Hospital, Department of Oncology, Taipei City (China); Shih, Tiffany Ting-Fang [National Taiwan University College of Medicine and Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiology, Taipei City (China); Taipei City Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Taipei City (China); National Taiwan University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Taipei (China)

    2017-07-15

    To correlate early changes in the parameters of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) within 1 week of systemic therapy with overall survival (OS) in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Eighty-nine patients with advanced HCC underwent DCE-MRI before and within 1 week following systemic therapy. The relative changes of six DCE-MRI parameters (Peak, Slope, AUC, Ktrans, Kep and Ve) of the tumours were correlated with OS using the Kaplan-Meier model and the double-sided log-rank test. All patients died and the median survival was 174 days. Among the six DCE-MRI parameters, reductions in Peak, AUC, and Ktrans, were significantly correlated with one another. In addition, patients with a high Peak reduction following treatment had longer OS (P = 0.023) compared with those with a low Peak reduction. In multivariate analysis, a high Peak reduction was an independent favourable prognostic factor in all patients [hazard ratio (HR), 0.622; P = 0.038] after controlling for age, sex, treatment methods, tumour size and stage, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status. Early perfusion changes within 1 week following systemic therapy measured by DCE-MRI may aid in the prediction of the clinical outcome in patients with advanced HCC. (orig.)

  5. CT Perfusion of the Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Site Index A-Z CT Perfusion of the Head Computed tomography (CT) perfusion of the head uses ... the Head? What is CT Perfusion of the Head? Computed tomography (CT) perfusion imaging shows which areas ...

  6. Tempol improves xanthine oxidoreductase-mediated vascular responses to nitrite in experimental renovascular hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo H. Oliveira-Paula

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Upregulation of xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR increases vascular reactive oxygen species (ROS levels and contributes to nitroso-redox imbalance. However, XOR can generate nitric oxide (NO from nitrite, and increased superoxide could inactivate NO formed from nitrite. This study tested the hypothesis that XOR contributes to the cardiovascular effects of nitrite in renovascular hypertension, and that treatment with the antioxidant tempol (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl improves XOR-mediated effects of nitrite. Blood pressure was assessed weekly in two-kidney one-clip (2K1C and control rats. After six weeks of hypertension, the relaxing responses to nitrite were assessed in aortic rings in the presence of the XOR inhibitor oxypurinol (or vehicle, either in the absence or in the presence of tempol. Moreover, in vivo hypotensive responses to nitrite were also examined in the presence of oxypurinol (or vehicle and tempol (or vehicle. Aortic XOR activity and expression were evaluated by fluorescence and Western blot, respectively. Vascular ROS production was assessed by the dihydroethidium assay. 2K1C hypertensive rats showed increased aortic XOR activity and vascular ROS production compared with control rats. Oxypurinol shifted the nitrite concentration–response curve to the right in aortic rings from 2K1C rats (but not in controls. Oxypurinol also attenuated the hypotensive responses to nitrite in 2K1C rats (but not in controls. These functional findings agree with increased aortic and plasma XOR activity found in 2K1C rats. Tempol treatment enhanced oxypurinol-induced shift of the nitrite concentration–response curve to the right. However, antioxidant treatment did not affect XOR-mediated hypotensive effects of nitrite. Our results show that XOR is important to the cardiovascular responses to nitrite in 2K1C hypertension, and XOR inhibitors commonly used by patients may cancel this effect. This finding suggests that nitrite

  7. Tempol improves xanthine oxidoreductase-mediated vascular responses to nitrite in experimental renovascular hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Paula, Gustavo H; Pinheiro, Lucas C; Guimaraes, Danielle A; Tella, Sandra O Conde; Blanco, Ana L Furlan; Angelis, Celio D; Schechter, Alan N; Tanus-Santos, Jose E

    2016-08-01

    Upregulation of xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) increases vascular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and contributes to nitroso-redox imbalance. However, XOR can generate nitric oxide (NO) from nitrite, and increased superoxide could inactivate NO formed from nitrite. This study tested the hypothesis that XOR contributes to the cardiovascular effects of nitrite in renovascular hypertension, and that treatment with the antioxidant tempol (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl) improves XOR-mediated effects of nitrite. Blood pressure was assessed weekly in two-kidney one-clip (2K1C) and control rats. After six weeks of hypertension, the relaxing responses to nitrite were assessed in aortic rings in the presence of the XOR inhibitor oxypurinol (or vehicle), either in the absence or in the presence of tempol. Moreover, in vivo hypotensive responses to nitrite were also examined in the presence of oxypurinol (or vehicle) and tempol (or vehicle). Aortic XOR activity and expression were evaluated by fluorescence and Western blot, respectively. Vascular ROS production was assessed by the dihydroethidium assay. 2K1C hypertensive rats showed increased aortic XOR activity and vascular ROS production compared with control rats. Oxypurinol shifted the nitrite concentration-response curve to the right in aortic rings from 2K1C rats (but not in controls). Oxypurinol also attenuated the hypotensive responses to nitrite in 2K1C rats (but not in controls). These functional findings agree with increased aortic and plasma XOR activity found in 2K1C rats. Tempol treatment enhanced oxypurinol-induced shift of the nitrite concentration-response curve to the right. However, antioxidant treatment did not affect XOR-mediated hypotensive effects of nitrite. Our results show that XOR is important to the cardiovascular responses to nitrite in 2K1C hypertension, and XOR inhibitors commonly used by patients may cancel this effect. This finding suggests that nitrite treatment may not be

  8. SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION OF NITRITE BY ITS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    The main sources of nitrite ion in unpolluted surface waters are the processes of organic matter mineralization and nitrification by Nitrosomonas bacteria. The content of nitrite in unpolluted surface and ground water is very low, generally < 0.01–0.02 mg L-1 NO2. - [2]. Similar concentrations are typically found in unpolluted ...

  9. Perfusion of subchondral bone marrow in knee osteoarthritis: A dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budzik, Jean-François, E-mail: Budzik.jean-francois@ghicl.net [Lille Catholic Hospitals, Imaging Department, Lille Catholic University, Lille (France); PMOI Physiopathology of Inflammatory Bone Diseases, EA 4490, Lille (France); Ding, Juliette, E-mail: Ding.juliette@gmail.com [Lille Catholic Hospitals, Imaging Department, Lille Catholic University, Lille (France); Norberciak, Laurène, E-mail: Norberciak.Laurene@ghicl.net [Lille Catholic Hospitals, Biostatistics Department, Lille Catholic University, Lille (France); Pascart, Tristan, E-mail: Pascart.tristan@ghicl.net [Lille Catholic Hospitals, Rheumatology Department, Lille Catholic University, Lille (France); Toumi, Hechmi, E-mail: hechmi.toumi@univ-orleans.fr [EA4708 I3MTO, Orleans Regional Hospital, University of Orleans, Orleans (France); Verclytte, Sébastien, E-mail: Verclytte.Sebastien@ghicl.net [Lille Catholic Hospitals, Imaging Department, Lille Catholic University, Lille (France); Coursier, Raphaël, E-mail: Coursier.Raphael@ghicl.net [Lille Catholic Hospitals, Orthopaedic Surgery Department, Lille Catholic University, Lille (France)

    2017-03-15

    The role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis is being given major interest, and inflammation is closely linked with vascularization. It was recently demonstrated that dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) could identify the subchondral bone marrow vascularization changes occurring in osteoarthritis in animals. These changes appeared before cartilage lesions were visible and were correlated with osteoarthritis severity. Thus the opportunity to obtain an objective assessment of bone vascularization in non-invasive conditions in humans might help better understanding osteoarthritis pathophysiology and finding new biomarkers. We hypothesized that, as in animals, DCE-MRI has the ability to identify subchondral bone marrow vascularization changes in human osteoarthritis. We performed knee MRI in 19 patients with advanced knee osteoarthritis. We assessed subchondral bone marrow vascularization in medial and lateral femorotibial compartments with DCE-MRI and graded osteoarthritis lesions on MR images. Statistical analysis assessed intra- and inter-observer agreement, compared DCE-MRI values between the different subchondral zones, and sought for an influence of age, sex, body mass index, and osteoarthritis garde on these values. The intra- and inter-observer agreement for DCE-MRI values were excellent. These values were significantly higher in the femorotibial compartment the most affected by osteoarthritis, both in femur and tibia (p < 0.0001) and were significantly and positively correlated with cartilage lesions (p = 0.02) and bone marrow oedema grade (p < 0.0001) after adjustment. We concluded that, as in animals, subchondral bone marrow vascularization changes assessed with DCE-MRI were correlated with osteoarthritis severity in humans.

  10. The Comparison of Computed Tomography Perfusion, Contrast-Enhanced Computed Tomography and Positron-Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography for the Detection of Primary Esophageal Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genc, Berhan; Kantarci, Mecit; Sade, Recep; Orsal, Ebru; Ogul, Hayri; Okur, Aylin; Aydin, Yener; Karaca, Leyla; Eroğlu, Atilla

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficiency of computed tomography perfusion (CTP), contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) and 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) positron-emission tomography (PET/CT) in the diagnosis of esophageal cancer. This prospective study consisted of 33 patients with pathologically confirmed esophageal cancer, 2 of whom had an esophageal abscess. All the patients underwent CTP, CECT and PET/CT imaging and the imaging findings were evaluated. Sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values were calculated for each of the 3 imaging modalities relative to the histological diagnosis. Thirty-three tumors were visualized on CTP, 29 on CECT and 27 on PET/CT. Six tumors were stage 1, and 2 and 4 of these tumors were missed on CECT and PET/CT, respectively. Significant differences between CTP and CECT (p = 0.02), and between CTP and PET/CT (p = 0.04) were found for stage 1 tumors. Values for the sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values on CTP were 100, 100, 100 and 100%, respectively. Corresponding values on CECT were 93.94, 0, 93.94 and 0%, respectively, and those on PET/CT were 87.88, 0, 93.55 and 0%, respectively. Hence, the sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values of CTP were better than those of CECT and PET/CT. CTP had an advantage over CECT and PET/CT in detecting small lesions. CTP was valuable, especially in detecting stage 1 tumors. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Astrocytic tumour grading: a comparative study of three-dimensional pseudocontinuous arterial spin labelling, dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion-weighted imaging, and diffusion-weighted imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Hua-Feng; Chen, Zhi-Ye; Wang, Yu-Lin; Wang, Yan; Ma, Lin; Lou, Xin; Gui, Qiu-Ping; Shi, Kai-Ning; Zhou, Zhen-Yu; Zheng, Dan-Dan

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that three-dimensional pseudocontinuous arterial spin labelling (pCASL) may have similar efficacy in astrocytic tumour grading as dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion-weighted imaging (DSC-PWI), and the grading accuracy may be further improved when combined with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values. Forty-three patients with astrocytic tumours were studied using diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), pCASL, and DSC-PWI. Histograms of ADC and normalized tumour cerebral blood flow values (nCBF on pCASL and nrCBF on DSC-PWI) were measured and analyzed. The mean 10 % ADC value was the DWI parameter that provided the best differentiation between low-grade astrocytoma (LGA) and high-grade astrocytoma (HGA). The nCBF and nrCBF (1.810 ± 0.979 and 2.070 ± 1.048) in LGA were significantly lower than those (4.505 ± 2.270 and 5.922 ± 2.630) in HGA. For differentiation between LGA and HGA, the cutoff values of 0.764 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s for mean 10 % ADC, 2.374 for nCBF, and 3.464 for nrCBF provided the optimal accuracy (74.4 %, 86.1 %, and 88.6 %, respectively). Combining the ADC values with nCBF or nrCBF could further improve the grading accuracy to 97.7 % or 95.3 %, respectively. pCASL is an alternative to DSC-PWI for astrocytic tumour grading. The combination of DWI and contrast-free pCASL offers a valuable choice in patients with risk factors. (orig.)

  12. Astrocytic tumour grading: a comparative study of three-dimensional pseudocontinuous arterial spin labelling, dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion-weighted imaging, and diffusion-weighted imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Hua-Feng [302 Hospital of Chinese People' s Liberation Army, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Chen, Zhi-Ye; Wang, Yu-Lin; Wang, Yan; Ma, Lin [People' s Liberation Army General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Lou, Xin [People' s Liberation Army General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); University of California, Department of Neurology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Gui, Qiu-Ping [People' s Liberation Army General Hospital, Department of Pathology, Beijing (China); Shi, Kai-Ning; Zhou, Zhen-Yu; Zheng, Dan-Dan [General Electric Healthcare (China) Co., Ltd., Beijing; Wang, Danny J.J. [University of California, Department of Neurology, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-12-15

    We hypothesized that three-dimensional pseudocontinuous arterial spin labelling (pCASL) may have similar efficacy in astrocytic tumour grading as dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion-weighted imaging (DSC-PWI), and the grading accuracy may be further improved when combined with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values. Forty-three patients with astrocytic tumours were studied using diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), pCASL, and DSC-PWI. Histograms of ADC and normalized tumour cerebral blood flow values (nCBF on pCASL and nrCBF on DSC-PWI) were measured and analyzed. The mean 10 % ADC value was the DWI parameter that provided the best differentiation between low-grade astrocytoma (LGA) and high-grade astrocytoma (HGA). The nCBF and nrCBF (1.810 ± 0.979 and 2.070 ± 1.048) in LGA were significantly lower than those (4.505 ± 2.270 and 5.922 ± 2.630) in HGA. For differentiation between LGA and HGA, the cutoff values of 0.764 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s for mean 10 % ADC, 2.374 for nCBF, and 3.464 for nrCBF provided the optimal accuracy (74.4 %, 86.1 %, and 88.6 %, respectively). Combining the ADC values with nCBF or nrCBF could further improve the grading accuracy to 97.7 % or 95.3 %, respectively. pCASL is an alternative to DSC-PWI for astrocytic tumour grading. The combination of DWI and contrast-free pCASL offers a valuable choice in patients with risk factors. (orig.)

  13. Effect of nitrite on the formation of halonitromethanes during chlorination of organic matter from different origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Huachang; Qian, Lingya; Xiao, Zhuoqun; Zhang, Jianqing; Chen, Jianrong; Lin, Hongjun; Yu, Haiying; Shen, Liguo; Liang, Yan

    2015-12-01

    Occurrence of halonitromethanes (HNMs) in drinking water has been a public concern due to the potential risks to human health. Though quite a lot of work has been carried out to understand the formation of HNMs, the relationship between HNMs formation and the nitrite remains unclear. In this study, the effects of nitrite on the formation of HNMs during chlorination of organic matter from different origin were assessed. Organic matter (OM) derived from phoenix tree (fallen leaves: FLOM; green leaves: GLOM) and Microcystis aeruginosa (intracellular organic matter: IOM) were used to mimic the allochthonous and autochthonous organic matter in surface water, respectively. Results showed that HNMs yields were significantly enhanced with the addition of nitrite, and the highest enhancement was observed for FLOM, successively followed by GLOM and IOM, suggesting that the contribution of nitrite to HNMs formation was positively related with SUVA (an indicator for aromaticity) of OM. Therefore, the nitrite contamination should be strictly controlled for the source water dominated by allochthonous OM, which may significantly reduce the formation of HNMs during chlorination. Moreover, given a certain nitrite level, the higher pH resulted in higher stimulation of HNM formation, yet the chlorine dose (always added in excess resulting in residual reactive chlorine), reaction time and temperature did not show obvious influence.

  14. C-Arm Conebeam CT Perfusion Imaging in the Angiographic Suite: A Comparison with Multidetector CT Perfusion Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, K; Yang, P; Wu, Y; Struffert, T; Doerfler, A; Schafer, S; Royalty, K; Strother, C; Chen, G-H

    2016-07-01

    Perfusion imaging in the angiography suite may provide a way to reduce time from stroke onset to endovascular revascularization of patients with large-vessel occlusion. Our purpose was to compare conebeam CT perfusion with multidetector CT perfusion. Data from 7 subjects with both multidetector CT perfusion and conebeam CT perfusion were retrospectively processed and analyzed. Two algorithms were used to enhance temporal resolution and temporal sampling density and reduce the noise of conebeam CT data before generating perfusion maps. Two readers performed qualitative image-quality evaluation on maps by using a 5-point scale. ROIs indicating CBF/CBV abnormalities were drawn. Quantitative analyses were performed by using the Sørensen-Dice coefficients to quantify the similarity of abnormalities. A noninferiority hypothesis was tested to compare conebeam CT perfusion against multidetector CT perfusion. Average image-quality scores for multidetector CT perfusion and conebeam CT perfusion images were 2.4 and 2.3, respectively. The average confidence score in diagnosis was 1.4 for both multidetector CT and conebeam CT; the average confidence scores for the presence of a CBV/CBF mismatch were 1.7 (κ = 0.50) and 1.5 (κ = 0.64). For multidetector CT perfusion and conebeam CT perfusion maps, the average scores of confidence in making treatment decisions were 1.4 (κ = 0.79) and 1.3 (κ = 0.90). The area under the visual grading characteristic for the above 4 qualitative quality scores showed an average area under visual grading characteristic of 0.50, with 95% confidence level cover centered at the mean for both readers. The Sørensen-Dice coefficient for CBF maps was 0.81, and for CBV maps, 0.55. After postprocessing methods were applied to enhance image quality for conebeam CT perfusion maps, the conebeam CT perfusion maps were not inferior to those generated from multidetector CT perfusion. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  15. Fluorometric determination of nitrite with 4-hydroxycoumarin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohta, T.; Arai, Y.; Takitani, S.

    1986-12-01

    A simple, sensitive, and reproducible fluorometric method for determination of nitrite has been developed. This method is based on the nitrosation of 4-hydroxycoumarin in acidic medium and subsequent reduction to 3-amino-4-hydroxy-coumarin, which is fluorescent in alkaline medium. The fluorescence intensity is proportional to the nitrite concentration in the range of 3 ng/mL to 1 ..mu..g/mL in the sample solution, with a relative standard deviation of 0.5% (50 ng/mL). The method has been applied to the determination of nitrite in saliva.

  16. 2AF sodium nitrite monitor: interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dierks, R.D.; Russell, J.L.

    1970-01-01

    The feasibility of monitoring the sodium nitrite in the 2AF makeup tank in the Purex process by measuring the NO 2 concentration of the gas phase was investigated in simulation studies. It was concluded that the NO 2 concentration is a function of the nitrite concentration but is also dependent on the sample temperature, acid concentration of the sample, and air/liquid ratio maintained in the simulated conditions. However under proper conditions of constant air purging, the NO 2 content can be related to the nitrite concentration. (U.S.)

  17. Evaluation of Texture Analysis Parameter for Response Prediction in Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma Undergoing Drug-eluting Bead Transarterial Chemoembolization (DEB-TACE) Using Biphasic Contrast-enhanced CT Image Data: Correlation with Liver Perfusion CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloth, Christopher; Thaiss, Wolfgang M; Kärgel, Rainer; Grimmer, Rainer; Fritz, Jan; Ioanoviciu, Sorin Dumitru; Ketelsen, Dominik; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Horger, Marius

    2017-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the potential role of computed tomography texture analysis (CTTA) of arterial and portal-venous enhancement phase image data for prediction and accurate assessment of response of hepatocellular carcinoma undergoing drug-eluting bead transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) by comparison to liver perfusion CT (PCT). Twenty-eight patients (27 male; mean age 67.2 ± 10.4) with 56 hepatocellular carcinoma-typical liver lesions were included. Arterial and portal-venous phase CT data obtained before and after TACE with a mean time of 39.93 ± 62.21 days between examinations were analyzed. TACE was performed within 48 hours after first contrast-enhanced CT. CTTA software was a prototype. CTTA analysis was performed blinded (for results) by two observers separately. Combined results of modified Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (mRECIST) and PCT of the liver were used as the standard of reference. Time to progression was additionally assessed for all patients. CTTA parameters included heterogeneity, intensity, average, deviation, skewness, and entropy of co-occurrence. Each parameter was compared to those of PCT (blood flow [BF], blood volume, arterial liver perfusion [ALP], portal-venous perfusion, and hepatic perfusion index) measured before and after TACE. mRECIST + PCT yielded 28.6% complete response (CR), 42.8% partial response, and 28.6% stable disease. Significant correlations were registered in the arterial phase in CR between changes in mean heterogeneity and BF (P = .004, r = -0.815), blood volume (P = .002, r = -0.851), and ALP (P = .002, r = -0.851), respectively. In the partial response group, changes in mean heterogeneity correlated with changes in ALP (P = .003) and to a lesser degree with hepatic perfusion index (P = .027) in the arterial phase. In the stable disease group, BF correlated with entropy of nonuniformity (P = .010). In the portal-venous phase, no statistically

  18. Diagnostic examination performance by using microvascular leakage, cerebral blood volume, and blood flow derived from 3-T dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging in the differentiation of glioblastoma multiforme and brain metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Server, Andres; Nakstad, Per H.; Orheim, Tone E.D.; Graff, Bjoern A.; Josefsen, Roger; Kumar, Theresa

    2011-01-01

    Conventional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has limited capacity to differentiate between glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and metastasis. The purposes of this study were: (1) to compare microvascular leakage (MVL), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and blood flow (CBF) in the distinction of metastasis from GBM using dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging (DSC-MRI), and (2) to estimate the diagnostic accuracy of perfusion and permeability MR imaging. A prospective study of 61 patients (40 GBMs and 21 metastases) was performed at 3 T using DSC-MRI. Normalized rCBV and rCBF from tumoral (rCBVt, rCBFt), peri-enhancing region (rCBVe, rCBFe), and by dividing the value in the tumor by the value in the peri-enhancing region (rCBVt/e, rCBFt/e), as well as MVL were calculated. Hemodynamic and histopathologic variables were analyzed statistically and Spearman/Pearson correlations. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed for each of the variables. The rCBVe, rCBFe, and MVL were significantly greater in GBMs compared with those of metastases. The optimal cutoff value for differentiating GBM from metastasis was 0.80 which implies a sensitivity of 95%, a specificity of 92%, a positive predictive value of 86%, and a negative predictive value of 97% for rCBVe ratio. We found a modest correlation between rCBVt and rCBFt ratios. MVL measurements in GBMs are significantly higher than those in metastases. Statistically, both rCBVe, rCBVt/e and rCBFe, rCBFt/e were useful in differentiating between GBMs and metastases, supporting the hypothesis that perfusion MR imaging can detect infiltration of tumor cells in the peri-enhancing region. (orig.)

  19. Electro-oxidation nitrite based on copper calcined layered double hydroxide and gold nanoparticles modified glassy carbon electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Lin; Meng Xiaomeng; Xu Minrong; Shang Kun; Ai Shiyun; Liu Yinping

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A nitrite sensor fabricated based on copper calcined layered double hydroxides and gold nanoparticles modified electrode. → This sensor exhibited excellent electrocatalytic oxidation to nitrite. → This nitrite sensor exhibited very good analytical performance with low cost, convenient preparation and rapid detection. - Abstract: In this paper, a novel nitrite sensor was constructed based on electrodeposition of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on a copper calcined layered double hydroxide (Cu-CLDH) modified glassy carbon electrode. Electrochemical experiments showed that AuNPs/CLDH composite film exhibited excellent electrocatalytic oxidation activity with nitrite due to the synergistic effect of the Cu-CLDH with AuNPs. The fabricated sensor exhibited excellent performance for nitrite detection within a wide concentration interval of 1-191 μM and with a detection limit of 0.5 μM. The superior electrocatalytic response to nitrite was mainly attributed to the large surface area, minimized diffusion resistance, and enhanced electron transfer of the Cu-CLDH and AuNPs composition film. This platform offers a novel route for nitrite sensing with wide analytical applications and will supply the practical applications for a variety of simple, robust, and easy-to-manufacture analytical approaches in the future.

  20. Nitrite regulates hypoxic vasodilation via myoglobin-dependent nitric oxide generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totzeck, Matthias; Hendgen-Cotta, Ulrike B; Luedike, Peter; Berenbrink, Michael; Klare, Johann P; Steinhoff, Heinz-Juergen; Semmler, Dominik; Shiva, Sruti; Williams, Daryl; Kipar, Anja; Gladwin, Mark T; Schrader, Juergen; Kelm, Malte; Cossins, Andrew R; Rassaf, Tienush

    2012-07-17

    Hypoxic vasodilation is a physiological response to low oxygen tension that increases blood supply to match metabolic demands. Although this response has been characterized for >100 years, the underlying hypoxic sensing and effector signaling mechanisms remain uncertain. We have shown that deoxygenated myoglobin in the heart can reduce nitrite to nitric oxide (NO·) and thereby contribute to cardiomyocyte NO· signaling during ischemia. On the basis of recent observations that myoglobin is expressed in the vasculature of hypoxia-tolerant fish, we hypothesized that endogenous nitrite may contribute to physiological hypoxic vasodilation via reactions with vascular myoglobin to form NO·. We show in the present study that myoglobin is expressed in vascular smooth muscle and contributes significantly to nitrite-dependent hypoxic vasodilation in vivo and ex vivo. The generation of NO· from nitrite reduction by deoxygenated myoglobin activates canonical soluble guanylate cyclase/cGMP signaling pathways. In vivo and ex vivo vasodilation responses, the reduction of nitrite to NO·, and the subsequent signal transduction mechanisms were all significantly impaired in mice without myoglobin. Hypoxic vasodilation studies in myoglobin and endothelial and inducible NO synthase knockout models suggest that only myoglobin contributes to systemic hypoxic vasodilatory responses in mice. Endogenous nitrite is a physiological effector of hypoxic vasodilation. Its reduction to NO· via the heme globin myoglobin enhances blood flow and matches O(2) supply to increased metabolic demands under hypoxic conditions.

  1. Increased perfusion pressure enhances the expression of endothelin (ETB) and angiotensin II (AT1, AT2) receptors in rat mesenteric artery smooth muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindstedt, Isak; Xu, Cang-Bao; Zhang, Yaping

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, we hypothesized that changes in perfusion pressure result in altered expression of mRNA and protein encoding for the ETA-, ETB-, AT1- and AT2-receptors in rat mesenteric vessels. Segments of the rat mesenteric artery were cannulated with glass micropipettes, pressurized and ...

  2. AMC-Bio-Artificial Liver culturing enhances mitochondrial biogenesis in human liver cell lines: The role of oxygen, medium perfusion and 3D configuration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adam, Aziza A. A.; van Wenum, Martien; van der Mark, Vincent A.; Jongejan, Aldo; Moerland, Perry D.; Houtkooper, Riekelt H.; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Oude Elferink, Ronald P.; Chamuleau, Robert A. F. M.; Hoekstra, Ruurdtje

    2017-01-01

    Human liver cell lines, like HepaRG and C3A, acquire higher functionality when cultured in the AMC-Bio-Artificial Liver (AMC-BAL). The three main differences between BAL and monolayer culture are the oxygenation (40% vs 20%O2), dynamic vs absent medium perfusion and 3D vs 2D configuration. Here, we

  3. Physiological assessment of myocardial perfusion using nuclear cardiology would enhance coronary artery disease patient care. Which imaging modality is best for evaluation of myocardial ischemia? (SPECT-side)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Manabe, Osamu; Tamaki, Nagara

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology has played an important role in both diagnosis and risk assessments of coronary artery disease since early 1970. Among the non-invasive diagnostic tests, the great advantage of nuclear imaging is that this technique can obtain physiological information, such as myocardial perfusion, which is difficult to obtain by other techniques. When patients have inducible myocardial ischemia and sufficient viable myocardium, coronary revascularization treatment should be performed. Both stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) and viability imaging provide important information. Another important aspect of stress perfusion imaging is that normal stress perfusion is associated with low risk for future cardiac events. Therefore, stress MPI plays an important role in the selection of an invasive therapeutic regime and also in avoiding unnecessary invasive procedures. As is the case for other imaging techniques, there have been many technical and instrumental developments in recent years in nuclear cardiology imaging, including new single-photon-emission computed tomography tracers, new pharmacological stress agents, a new generation of γ camera, and positron emission tomography. This review will address the advantages of nuclear cardiology in the clinical setting and recent developments in nuclear cardiology. (author)

  4. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance: myocardial perfusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagel, E.; Al-Saadi, N.; Fleck, E. [Dept. of Internal Medicine/Cardiology, German Heart Inst. Berlin and Charite, Campus Virchow, Humboldt Univ. (Germany)

    2000-06-01

    There is growing evidence that the noninvasive assessment of myocardial perfusion with cardiovascular magnetic resonance is a valid and accurate tool for the assessment of ischemic heart disease and its introduction into routine clinical evaluation of patients is rapidly expected. Magnetic resonance measurements allow the evaluation of reversible and irreversible myocardial ischemia, the assessment of acute myocardial infarction, as well as the recognition and detection of viable myocardium. Magnetic resonance perfusion measurements are mainly performed with T1-shortening contrast agents such as gadolinium-DTPA either by visual analysis or based on the analyses of signal intensity time curves. For the detection of myocardial ischemia the first pass kinetics of a gadolinium-DTPA bolus and for the detection of myocardial necrosis and the definition of viable myocardium steady state distribution kinetics are assessed. Quantitative analysis of myocardial perfusion can be performed but requires complex modeling due to the characteristics of gadolinium-DTPA. Thus, semi-quantitative parameters are preferred. There is accumulating evidence in the literature that magnetic resonance imaging can be used for the detection of coronary artery stenosis with high diagnostic accuracy both with semi-quantitative or visual analysis. Myocardial infarction can be reliably detected and the infarcted area determined. Non-reperfused infarcted myocardium can be differentiated from reperfused myocardium by different enhancement patterns that correlates with viability. (orig.) [German] Die Magnetresonanztomographie (MR) erlangt bei der nichtinvasiven Diagnostik der koronaren Herzerkrankung eine zunehmende Bedeutung. Mit dieser Technik koennen sowohl die globale und regionale Myokardfunktion als auch die myokardiale Perfusion exakt beurteilt werden. Bisher liegen die meisten Daten fuer die Analyse von Wandbewegungsstoerun-gen unter Belastung vor, wobei sich eine deutliche diagnostische

  5. Differentiation of brain abscesses from glioblastomas and metastatic brain tumors: comparisons of diagnostic performance of dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging before and after mathematic contrast leakage correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Cheng Hong; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Chang, Chen-Nen; Ng, Shu-Hang; Wong, Ho-Fai; Lin, Ching-Po

    2014-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance of dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion MRI before and after mathematic contrast leakage correction in differentiating pyogenic brain abscesses from glioblastomas and/or metastatic brain tumors. Cerebral blood volume (CBV), leakage-corrected CBV and leakage coefficient K2 were measured in enhancing rims, perifocal edema and contralateral normal appearing white matter (NAWM) of 17 abscesses, 19 glioblastomas and 20 metastases, respectively. The CBV and corrected CBV were normalized by dividing the values in the enhancing rims or edema to those of contralateral NAWM. For each study group, a paired t test was used to compare the K2 of the enhancing rims or edema with those of NAWM, as well as between CBV and corrected CBV of the enhancing rims or edema. ANOVA was used to compare CBV, corrected CBV and K2 among three lesion types. The diagnostic performance of CBV and corrected CBV was assessed with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. The CBV and correction CBV of enhancing rim were 1.45±1.17 and 1.97±1.01 for abscesses, 3.85±2.19 and 4.39±2.33 for glioblastomas, and 2.39±0.90 and 2.97±0.78 for metastases, respectively. The CBV and corrected CBV in the enhancing rim of abscesses were significantly lower than those of glioblastomas and metastases (P = 0.001 and P = 0.007, respectively). In differentiating abscesses from glioblastomas and metastases, the AUC values of corrected CBV (0.822) were slightly higher than those of CBV (0.792). Mathematic leakage correction slightly increases the diagnostic performance of CBV in differentiating pyogenic abscesses from necrotic glioblastomas and cystic metastases. Clinically, DSC perfusion MRI may not need mathematic leakage correction in differentiating abscesses from glioblastomas and/or metastases.

  6. Is there any correlation between model-based perfusion parameters and model-free parameters of time-signal intensity curve on dynamic contrast enhanced MRI in breast cancer patients?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Boram; Kang, Doo Kyoung; Kim, Tae Hee [Ajou University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Dukyong [Ajou University School of Medicine, Department of Biomedical Informatics, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Yong Sik; Kim, Ku Sang [Ajou University School of Medicine, Department of Surgery, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Yim, Hyunee [Ajou University School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    To find out any correlation between dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) model-based parameters and model-free parameters, and evaluate correlations between perfusion parameters with histologic prognostic factors. Model-based parameters (Ktrans, Kep and Ve) of 102 invasive ductal carcinomas were obtained using DCE-MRI and post-processing software. Correlations between model-based and model-free parameters and between perfusion parameters and histologic prognostic factors were analysed. Mean Kep was significantly higher in cancers showing initial rapid enhancement (P = 0.002) and a delayed washout pattern (P = 0.001). Ve was significantly lower in cancers showing a delayed washout pattern (P = 0.015). Kep significantly correlated with time to peak enhancement (TTP) (ρ = -0.33, P < 0.001) and washout slope (ρ = 0.39, P = 0.002). Ve was significantly correlated with TTP (ρ = 0.33, P = 0.002). Mean Kep was higher in tumours with high nuclear grade (P = 0.017). Mean Ve was lower in tumours with high histologic grade (P = 0.005) and in tumours with negative oestrogen receptor status (P = 0.047). TTP was shorter in tumours with negative oestrogen receptor status (P = 0.037). We could acquire general information about the tumour vascular physiology, interstitial space volume and pathologic prognostic factors by analyzing time-signal intensity curve without a complicated acquisition process for the model-based parameters. (orig.)

  7. Nitrite and nitrite reductases: from molecular mechanisms to significance in human health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiglione, Nicoletta; Rinaldo, Serena; Giardina, Giorgio; Stelitano, Valentina; Cutruzzolà, Francesca

    2012-08-15

    Nitrite, previously considered physiologically irrelevant and a simple end product of endogenous nitric oxide (NO) metabolism, is now envisaged as a reservoir of NO to be activated in response to oxygen (O(2)) depletion. In the first part of this review, we summarize and compare the mechanisms of nitrite-dependent production of NO in selected bacteria and in eukaryotes. Bacterial nitrite reductases, which are copper or heme-containing enzymes, play an important role in the adaptation of pathogens to O(2) limitation and enable microrganisms to survive in the human body. In mammals, reduction of nitrite to NO under hypoxic conditions is carried out in tissues and blood by an array of metalloproteins, including heme-containing proteins and molybdenum enzymes. In humans, tissues play a more important role in nitrite reduction, not only because most tissues produce more NO than blood, but also because deoxyhemoglobin efficiently scavenges NO in blood. In the second part of the review, we outline the significance of nitrite in human health and disease and describe the recent advances and pitfalls of nitrite-based therapy, with special attention to its application in cardiovascular disorders, inflammation, and anti-bacterial defence. It can be concluded that nitrite (as well as nitrate-rich diet for long-term applications) may hold promise as therapeutic agent in vascular dysfunction and ischemic injury, as well as an effective compound able to promote angiogenesis.

  8. Effect of sodium lactate /sodium diacetate in combination with sodium nitrite on physiochemical, microbial properties and sensory evaluation of cow sausage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habib Sedghi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Sodium nitrite has been always considered as one of the common additives due to its antibacterial effects on Clostridium botulinum and meat products' color, however it produces cancer creating nitrosamine. Recently, organic acids and their salts such as lactates have been employed as antimicrobial compounds. Lactates also improve organileptic properties including color, texture and taste and antioxidant properties. Sodium lactate causes to more reduction of anaerobic spore former bacteria than nitrite, inhibits botulin produced by Clostridium botulinum. Sodium lactate produces a permanent reddish pink color through reduction of deoxymygloboline and producing deoxymyoglobuline. In this study, the decrease of sodium nitrite amount from 120ppm to 15ppm by adding sodium lactate / sodium diacetate led to achieve an acceptable product. The best results revealed through adding 3.0625% of sodium lactate / sodium diacetate in combination with 30ppm sodium nitrite. Results also exhibited more reduction of pathogens' growth than nitrite, enhanced flavor slightly, but unable to produce reddish pink color as produced by nitrite. Results also exhibited that sodium lactate / diacetate cause to retard in microbial growth, reducing chemical change, enhance sensory properties, partially improvement in taste and texture. Although inappropriate color demonstrated sodium lactate / diacetate's inability in red pink color production in 4th sample (contains 15 ppm nitrite, its synergy effect in combination with sodium nitrite on nitroso myoglobuline production has been proven, led to sodium nitrite reduction in sausages.

  9. Early Changes in Tumor Perfusion from T1-Weighted Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI following Neural Stem Cell-Mediated Therapy of Recurrent High-Grade Glioma Correlate with Overall Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prativa Sahoo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this study was to correlate T1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI- (DCE-MRI- derived perfusion parameters with overall survival of recurrent high-grade glioma patients who received neural stem cell- (NSC- mediated enzyme/prodrug gene therapy. Methods. A total of 12 patients were included in this retrospective study. All patients were enrolled in a first-in-human study (NCT01172964 of NSC-mediated therapy for recurrent high-grade glioma. DCE-MRI data from all patients were collected and analyzed at three time points: MRI#1—day 1 postsurgery/treatment, MRI#2— day 7 ± 3 posttreatment, and MRI#3—one-month follow-up. Plasma volume (Vp, permeability (Ktr, and leakage (λtr perfusion parameters were calculated by fitting a pharmacokinetic model to the DCE-MRI data. The contrast-enhancing (CE volume was measured from the last dynamic phase acquired in the DCE sequence. Perfusion parameters and CE at each MRI time point were recorded along with their relative change between MRI#2 and MRI#3 (Δ32. Cox regression was used to analyze patient survival. Results. At MRI#1 and at MRI#3, none of the parameters showed a significant correlation with overall survival (OS. However, at MRI#2, CE and λtr were significantly associated with OS (p<0.05. The relative λtr and Vp from timepoint 2 to timepoint 3 (Δ32λtr and Δ32Vp were each associated with a higher hazard ratio (p<0.05. All parameters were highly correlated, resulting in a multivariate model for OS including only CE at MRI#2 and Δ32Vp, with an R2 of 0.89. Conclusion. The change in perfusion parameter values from 1 week to 1 month following NSC-mediated therapy combined with contrast-enhancing volume may be a useful biomarker to predict overall survival in patients with recurrent high-grade glioma.

  10. Discrimination between glioma grades II and III in suspected low-grade gliomas using dynamic contrast-enhanced and dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion MR imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Anna; Fahlström, Markus; Rostrup, Egill

    2014-01-01

    that could best discriminate between grade II and III gliomas. METHODS: MRI (3 T) including morphological ((T2 fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and T1-weighted (T1W)+Gd)) and perfusion (DCE and DSC) sequences was performed in 39 patients with newly diagnosed suspected low-grade glioma after...... written informed consent in this review board-approved study. Regions of interests (ROIs) in tumour area were delineated on FLAIR images co-registered to DCE and DSC, respectively, in 25 patients with histopathological grade II (n = 18) and III (n = 7) gliomas. Statistical analysis of differences between...... grade II and grade III gliomas in histogram perfusion parameters was performed, and the areas under the curves (AUC) from the ROC analyses were evaluated. RESULTS: In DCE, the skewness of transfer constant (k(trans)) was found superior for differentiating grade II from grade III in all gliomas (AUC 0...

  11. Analysis of perfusion defects by causes other than acute pulmonary thromboembolism on contrast-enhanced dual-energy CT in consecutive 537 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bo Hyun; Seo, Joon Beom; Chae, Eun Jin; Lee, Hyun Joo; Hwang, Hye Jeon; Lim, Chaehun

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess causes, incidence and patterns of perfusion defects (PDs) on dual-energy perfusion CT angiography (DECTA) in clinically suspected acute pulmonary thromboembolisms (PTE). Materials and methods: Consecutive 537 patients who underwent DECTA for suspicion of PTE were retrospectively reviewed. After excluding patients with possible PTE or unsatisfactory perfusion map quality, 299 patients with 1697 lobes were included. The DECTA (Somatom Definition, Siemens) was performed at 140 kV and 80 kV. Color-coded perfusion images were obtained with a lung PBV application of the workstation software (Syngo Dual Energy). The presence, incidence, three patterns of PDs (wedge-shaped, heterogeneous, and regionally homogeneous), pulmonary diseases, and the matchedness between the PD and the disease extent were studied. Results: 315 of 1697 lobes (18.6%) in 156 of 299 patients (81.3%) showed PDs. Among them, 51 (3%), 257 (15.1%), and 7 (0.4%) lobes had PDs due to vascular, nonvascular, and unidentifiable causes, respectively. Vascular causes include: pulmonary arterial (PA) hypertension (0.7%), extrinsic occlusion of PA by fibrosis (0.6%), PA hypoplasia (0.6%), vasculitis (0.5%), cancer mass compressing PA, venous occlusion, AVM, and pulmonary angiosarcoma. Most of PDs were wedge-shaped and well-matched. Nonvascular causes include: mosaic attenuation (4.1%), emphysema (3.2%), interstitial fibrosis (1.6%), bronchitis (1.4%), GGO (1.2%), cellular bronchiolitis (1%), bronchiectasis, airway obstruction, compensaroty lung hyperinflation, air trapping, cor-pulmonale, bronchopneumonia, physiologic decreased ventilation, and segmental bronchial atresia. Most of PDs showed heterogeneous pattern and were not matched. Conclusions: Various vascular and nonvascular diseases cause PDs on DECTA. Each disease shows different pattern of PD depending on pathophysiology and physiologic compensation.

  12. Measurement of brain perfusion, blood volume, and blood-brain barrier permeability, using dynamic contrast-enhanced T(1)-weighted MRI at 3 tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Henrik B W; Courivaud, Frédéric; Rostrup, Egill; Hansen, Adam E

    2009-11-01

    Assessment of vascular properties is essential to diagnosis and follow-up and basic understanding of pathogenesis in brain tumors. In this study, a procedure is presented that allows concurrent estimation of cerebral perfusion, blood volume, and blood-brain permeability from dynamic T(1)-weighted imaging of a bolus of a paramagnetic contrast agent passing through the brain. The methods are applied in patients with brain tumors and in healthy subjects. Perfusion was estimated by model-free deconvolution using Tikhonov's method (gray matter/white matter/tumor: 72 +/- 16/30 +/- 8/56 +/- 45 mL/100 g/min); blood volume (6 +/- 2/4 +/- 1/7 +/- 6 mL/100 g) and permeability (0.9 +/- 0.4/0.8 +/- 0.3/3 +/- 5 mL/100 g/min) were estimated by using Patlak's method and a two-compartment model. A corroboration of these results was achieved by using model simulation. In addition, it was possible to generate maps on a pixel-by-pixel basis of cerebral perfusion, cerebral blood volume, and blood-brain barrier permeability. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Laser doppler perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waardell, K.

    1992-01-01

    Recording of tissue perfusion is important in assessing the influence of peripheral vascular diseases on the microcirculation. This thesis reports on a laser doppler perfusion imager based on dynamic light scattering in tissue. When a low power He-Ne laser beam sequentally scans the tissue, moving blood cells generate doppler components in the back-scattered light. A fraction of this light is detected by a photodetector and converted into an electrical signal. In the processor, a signal proportional to the tissue perfusion at each measurement site is calculated and stored. When the scanning procedure is completed, a color-coded perfusion image is presented on a monitor. To convert important aspects of the perfusion image into more quantitative parameters, data analysis functions are implemented in the software. A theory describing the dependence of the distance between individual measurement points and detector on the system amplification factor is proposed and correction algorithms are presented. The performance of the laser doppler perfusion imager was evaluated using a flow simulator. A linear relationship between processor output signal and flow through the simulator was demonstrated for blood cell concentrations below 0.2%. The median sampling depth of the laser beam was simulated by a Monte Carlo technique and estimated to 235 μm. The perfusion imager has been used in the clinic to study perfusion changes in port wine stains treated with argon laser and to investigate the intensity and extension of the cutaneous axon reflex response after electrical nerve stimulation. The fact that perfusion can be visualized without touching the tissue implies elimination of sterilization problems, thus simplifying clinical investigations of perfusion in association with diagnosis and treatment of peripheral vascular diseases. 22 refs

  14. Theoretical considerations in measurement of time discrepancies between input and myocardial time-signal intensity curves in estimates of regional myocardial perfusion with first-pass contrast-enhanced MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsume, Takahiro; Ishida, Masaki; Kitagawa, Kakuya; Nagata, Motonori; Sakuma, Hajime; Ichihara, Takashi

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a method to determine time discrepancies between input and myocardial time-signal intensity (TSI) curves for accurate estimation of myocardial perfusion with first-pass contrast-enhanced MRI. Estimation of myocardial perfusion with contrast-enhanced MRI using kinetic models requires faithful recording of contrast content in the blood and myocardium. Typically, the arterial input function (AIF) is obtained by setting a region of interest in the left ventricular cavity. However, there is a small delay between the AIF and the myocardial curves, and such time discrepancies can lead to errors in flow estimation using Patlak plot analysis. In this study, the time discrepancies between the arterial TSI curve and the myocardial tissue TSI curve were estimated based on the compartment model. In the early phase after the arrival of the contrast agent in the myocardium, the relationship between rate constant K1 and the concentrations of Gd-DTPA contrast agent in the myocardium and arterial blood (LV blood) can be described by the equation K1={dCmyo(tpeak)/dt}/Ca(tpeak), where Cmyo(t) and Ca(t) are the relative concentrations of Gd-DTPA contrast agent in the myocardium and in the LV blood, respectively, and tpeak is the time corresponding to the peak of Ca(t). In the ideal case, the time corresponding to the maximum upslope of Cmyo(t), tmax, is equal to tpeak. In practice, however, there is a small difference in the arrival times of the contrast agent into the LV and into the myocardium. This difference was estimated to correspond to the difference between tpeak and tmax. The magnitudes of such time discrepancies and the effectiveness of the correction for these time discrepancies were measured in 18 subjects who underwent myocardial perfusion MRI under rest and stress conditions. The effects of the time discrepancies could be corrected effectively in the myocardial perfusion estimates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  15. Hypoxia tolerance, nitric oxide, and nitrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fago, Angela; Jensen, Frank Bo

    2015-01-01

    survival resides in concerted physiological responses, including strong metabolic depression, protection against oxidative damage and – in air breathing animals - redistribution of blood flow. Each of these responses is known to be tightly regulated by nitric oxide (NO) and during hypoxia by its metabolite...... nitrite. The aim of this review is to highlight recent work illustrating the widespread roles of NO and nitrite in the tolerance to extreme oxygen deprivation, in particular in the red-eared slider turtle and crucian carp, but also in diving marine mammals. The emerging picture underscores the importance...

  16. Mechanisms underlying erythrocyte and endothelial nitrite reduction to NO in hypoxia: role for Xanthine Oxidoreductase and eNOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Andrew J.; Milsom, Alexandra B.; Rathod, Krishnaraj S.; Chu, Wai Lum; Qureshi, Shehla; Lovell, Matthew J.; Lecomte, Florence M.J.; Perrett, David; Raimondo, Carmello; Khoshbin, Espeed; Ahmed, Zubair; Uppal, Rakesh; Benjamin, Nigel; Hobbs, Adrian J.; Ahluwalia, Amrita

    2010-01-01

    Reduction of nitrite (NO2−) provides a major source of nitric oxide (NO) in the circulation, especially in hypoxemic conditions. Our previous studies suggest that xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) is an important nitrite reductase in the heart and kidney. Herein, we have demonstrated that conversion of nitrite to NO by blood vessels and RBCs was enhanced in the presence of the XOR substrate, xanthine (10μM), and attenuated by the XOR inhibitor, allopurinol (100μM) in acidic and hypoxic conditions only. Whilst endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) inhibition had no effect on vascular nitrite reductase activity, in RBCs L-NAME, L-NMMA and L-arginine inhibited nitrite-derived NO production by >50% (p<0.01), at pH 7.4 and 6.8 under hypoxic conditions. Western blot and immunohistochemical analysis of RBC membranes confirmed the presence of eNOS and abundant XOR on whole RBCs. Thus, XOR and eNOS are ideally situated on the membranes of RBCs and blood vessels to generate intravascular vasodilator NO from nitrite during ischemic episodes. In addition to the proposed role of deoxyhemoglobin, our findings suggest that the nitrite reductase activity within the circulation, under hypoxic conditions (at physiological pH), is mediated by eNOS; however, as acidosis develops a substantial role for XOR becomes evident. PMID:18818408

  17. The effects of calcium channel antagonists on coronary nitrite outflow in isolated rat heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djuric, Dragan; Mitrovic, Veselin; Jakovljevic, Vladimir

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effects of Ca2+ channel antagonists on coronary endothelial L-arginine/NO system in isolated rat heart. The hearts of male Wistar albino rats (n = 36, age 8 weeks, body mass 180-200 g) were perfused according to Langendorff technique at gradually increased coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) which induced flow-dependent NO release (nitrite outflow). The experiments were performed during control condition or in the presence of different Ca2+ channel antagonists: nifedipine (CAS 21829-25-4, 30 nmol/l), diltiazem (CAS 42399-41-7, 3 mumol/l), verapamil (CAS 52-53-9, 0.4 mumol/l) or amlodipine (CAS 88150-42-9, 100 nmol/l) were administered separately. Also, nifedipine or amlodipine were administered in combination with an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), L-NAME (NG-nitro-L-arginine-methylester, 30 mumol/l). Coronary flow (CF) varied in autoregulatory range from 3.93 +/- 0.25 ml/min/g wt at 50 cmH2O to 4.49 +/- 0.31 ml/min/g wt at 90 cmH2O. In autoregulatory range nitrite outflow varied from 1.80 +/- 0.22 nmol/min/g wt at 50 cmH2O to 2.21 +/- 0.25 nmol/min/g wt at 90 cmH2O and was strictly parallel with the CPP-CF (coronary perfusion pressure/coronary flow) curve. The autoregulatory range of CF was significantly extended (40-100 cmH2O) under the influence of nifedipine. Hemodynamic effects were accompanied by significant changes in nitrite outflow in all groups except for the verapamil group. Nifedipine and diltiazem induced statistically significant increases of nitrite outflow in coronary venous effluent, strictly parallel with the CPP-CF curve, from 58% at 120 cmH2O to 190% at 40 cmH2O and from 74% at 120 cmH2O to 166% at 40 cmH2O, respectively. On the contrary, amlodipine induced significant reduction of nitrite outflow which was stronger at the lower value of CPP (44-46% at 40-80 cmH2O), compared to the higher value of CPP (32-37% at 100-120 cmH2O). When L-NAME was applied in combination with nifedipine or amlodipine

  18. Optimization of nitrogen removal from piggery waste by nitrite nitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eum, Y; Choi, E

    2002-01-01

    The piggery waste characteristics greatly vary with types of manure collections and the amount of water used. If solids are separated well, the waste strength will be greatly reduced resulting in lower TCOD/TKN ratio of 4 (average). If solids are separated by a mechanical scraper, some solids will remain and the waste strength will be increased with a TCOD/TKN ratio of 7. This study was conducted to find an optimum operating condition for nitrogen removal with these two ratios. Nitrite nitrification was targeted because it could be a short cut process for savings in oxygen for nitrification and carbon requirements for denitrification. The study results indicated that nitrogen loading rate and pH were the most important factors to be considered for stable nitrite nitrification. The applicable nitrogen loads were estimated to be 0.3 to 2.0 kgTKN/oxic m3/d for high TCOD/TKN ratio without pH control. With higher pH > 8, NO2N/NOxN ratios in oxic stages even with lower nitrogen loads were increased. The SBR with low TCOD/TKN ratio less than 4 required additional alkalinity. For a complete denitrification, the influent TCOD/TKN ratio must exceed 6 with oxic/total reactor volume ratio of 0.5. Nitrite nitrification and denitrification could save about 35% in tank volume and 50% in carbon requirement, respectively. However, 9.5% oxygen saving could be expected during the operation with low TCOD/TKN ratio. The elevated temperature due to the heat released from COD removal also enhanced microbial activities for nitrification and denitrification as well as ammonia stripping. However, careful attention must be provided for the reactor temperature not to inhibit the nitrification process.

  19. Nitrite maxima in the Northern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sankaranarayanan, V.N.; DeSousa, S.N.; Fondekar, S.P.

    There are 2 nitrite maxima in the Northern Arabian Sea, one at the thermocline depth and the other at depths between 300 and 500 m. The 2nd maximum is more prominent in the northeastern part of the Arabian Sea. The 1st maximum is associated...

  20. Neutralization of wastewater from nitrite passivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawlowski, L.; Mientki, B.; Wasag, H.

    1982-01-01

    A method for neutralization of wastewater formed in nitrite passivation has been presented. The method consists of introducing urea into wastewater and acidifying it with sulphuric acid. Wastewater is neutralized with lime. After clarification, wastewater can be drained outside the plant

  1. 9 CFR 319.2 - Products and nitrates and nitrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... and nitrates and nitrites. Any product, such as frankfurters and corned beef, for which there is a... without nitrate or nitrite and labeled with such standard name when immediately preceded with the term... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Products and nitrates and nitrites...

  2. The role of nitrite in nitric oxide homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank Bo

    2009-01-01

    Nitrite is endogenously produced as an oxidative metabolite of nitric oxide, but it also functions as a NO donor that can be activated by a number of cellular proteins under hypoxic conditions. This article discusses the physiological role of nitrite and nitrite-derived NO in blood flow regulatio...

  3. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The category of chemical substances which are nitrites of the alkali metals (Group IA in the...

  4. Perfusion- and pattern-based quantitative CT indexes using contrast-enhanced dual-energy computed tomography in diffuse interstitial lung disease: relationships with physiologic impairment and prediction of prognosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Jung Won [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Jang Pyo; Kim, Namkug; Chang, Yongjun; Seo, Joon Beom [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ho Yun; Lee, Kyung Soo [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Man Pyo; Park, Hye Yun [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Pulmonology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    To evaluate automated texture-based segmentation of dual-energy CT (DECT) images in diffuse interstitial lung disease (DILD) patients and prognostic stratification by overlapping morphologic and perfusion information of total lung. Suspected DILD patients scheduled for surgical biopsy were prospectively included. Texture patterns included ground-glass opacity (GGO), reticulation and consolidation. Pattern- and perfusion-based CT measurements were assessed to extract quantitative parameters. Accuracy of texture-based segmentation was analysed. Correlations between CT measurements and pulmonary function test or 6-minute walk test (6MWT) were calculated. Parameters of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis/usual interstitial pneumonia (IPF/UIP) and non-IPF/UIP were compared. Survival analysis was performed. Overall accuracy was 90.47 % for whole lung segmentation. Correlations between mean iodine values of total lung, 50-97.5th (%) attenuation and forced vital capacity or 6MWT were significant. Volume of GGO, reticulation and consolidation had significant correlation with DLco or SpO{sub 2} on 6MWT. Significant differences were noted between IPF/UIP and non-IPF/UIP in 6MWT distance, mean iodine value of total lung, 25-75th (%) attenuation and entropy. IPF/UIP diagnosis, GGO ratio, DILD extent, 25-75th (%) attenuation and SpO{sub 2} on 6MWT showed significant correlations with survival. DECT combined with pattern analysis is useful for analysing DILD and predicting survival by provision of morphology and enhancement. (orig.)

  5. MRI of myocardial perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Muehling, Olaf; Wilke, Norbert

    2006-02-01

    An overwhelming number of myocardial perfusion studies are done by nuclear isotope imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging during the first pass of an injected, contrast bolus has some significant advantages for detection of blood flow deficits, namely higher spatial resolution, absence of ionizing radiation, and speed of the test. Previous clinical studies have demonstrated that excellent sensitivity and specificity can be achieved with MR myocardial perfusion imaging for detecting coronary artery disease, and assessment of patients with acute chest pain. Furthermore, an absolute quantification of myocardial blood flow is feasible, as was demonstrated by comparison of MR perfusion imaging, to measurements with isotope labeled microspheres in experimental models. An integrated assessment of perfusion, function, and viability, is thus feasible by MRI to answer important clinical challenges such as the identification of stunned or hibernating, but viable myocardium.

  6. Measuring myocardial perfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qayyum, A A; Kastrup, J

    2015-01-01

    Recently, focus has changed from anatomical assessment of coronary arteries towards functional testing to evaluate the effect of stenosis on the myocardium before intervention. Besides positron-emission tomography (PET), cardiac MRI (CMR), and cardiac CT are able to measure myocardial perfusion......-known and is used in routine clinical practice. However, PET uses radioactive tracers and has a lower spatial resolution compared to CMR and CT. CMR and CT are emerging techniques in the field of myocardial perfusion imaging. CMR uses magnetic resonance to obtain images, whereas CT uses x-rays during first....... Myocardial perfusion abnormalities are the first sign of the ischaemic cascade in the development of coronary artery disease (CAD). PET is considered the non-invasive clinical reference standard for absolute quantification of myocardial perfusion. The diagnostic and prognostic value of PET is well...

  7. Safer and healthier reduced nitrites turkey meat sausages using lyophilized Cystoseira barbata seaweed extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellimi, Sabrine; Benslima, Abdelkarim; Ksouda, Ghada; Montero, Veronique Barragan; Hajji, Mohamed; Nasri, Moncef

    2017-10-21

    Background Nitrite salts are still common additives in the meat industry. The present study provides a first approach on the employment of the lyophilized aqueous extract (WE) of the Tunisian seaweed Cystoseira barbata for the quality enhancement of turkey meat sausage. Methods WE was supplemented as a natural antioxidant agent to investigate its effectiveness in delaying lipid oxidation turkey meat sausages containing reduced amounts of sodium nitrites. Results On storage day 5, all concentrations of WE (0.01-0.4 %) reduced the meat lipid oxidation by approximately 36 %, as compared to the negative control containing only 80 mg/kg of meat of sodium nitrites as antioxidant. It was noted that within 15 days of refrigerated storage, a meat system containing 80 mg/kg of meat of sodium nitrites and 0.02 % and 0.04 % of WE had similar Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances (TBARS) levels (19±1.32 and 17±1.12 µmol/kg of meat, respectively), which were comparable to the positive control containing sodium nitrites (150 mg/kg of meat) and 0.045 % vitamin C (18.46±1.27 µmol/kg of meat). In-depth, the metabolomic profiling using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and liquid chromatography-quadripole-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS) analyses of the Tunisian seaweed C. barbata solvent extracts showed that the main active compounds were phenolic compounds, fatty acids and sterols. Conclusions Overall, the cold medium containing C. barbata lyophilized aqueous extrac, with strong antioxidant activity and antihypertensive properties, may open the way to the development of a natural quality enhancement strategy for new functional and ever healthier reduced nitrites meat sausages based on algae.

  8. Investigation of the photocatalytic effect of zinc oxide nanoparticles in the presence of nitrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Min; Abbood, Hayder A. [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430074 (China); Institute of Inorganic Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Hubei key Laboratory of Bioinorganic Chemistry and Medicine, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhu, Zhening [National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, No.11 ZhongGuanCun BeiYiTiao Road, Beijing 100190 (China); Li, Hailing [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430074 (China); Institute of Inorganic Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Hubei key Laboratory of Bioinorganic Chemistry and Medicine, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430074 (China); Gao, Zhonghong, E-mail: zhgao144@mail.hust.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430074 (China); Institute of Inorganic Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Hubei key Laboratory of Bioinorganic Chemistry and Medicine, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: ► Nitrite enhanced the photo-damage by ZnO nanoparticles to BSA and HaCaT cells. ► Protein nitration was induced by nitrite in photo-damaged BSA and HaCaT cells. ► The effects of photo-damage on BSA were affected by various factors. ► 50-nm ZnO induced more apoptosis than 90-nm ZnO in HaCaT cells. -- Abstract: Zinc oxide nanoparticles are widely used in sunscreen products because of their chemical stability and capability of blocking harmful ultraviolet rays. However, zinc oxide nanoparticles can also generate reactive species under ultraviolet irradiation. Because nitrite can form reactive nitrogen species under oxidative stress and because it exists in perspiration and cosmetics, we studied the effects of nitrites on the photocatalytic damage of zinc oxide nanoparticles (50 nm and 90 nm) to bovine serum albumin and human keratinocyte cells under ultraviolet irradiation (365 nm and 254 nm). The results indicate that nitrite plays an enhancing role in photocatalytic damage by breaking amino acid residues and promoting protein oxidation and nitration. The concentrations of zinc oxide and nitrite, the irradiation light and duration, and the pH of the medium are important factors influencing this photocatalytic damage. Size effects of ZnO nanoparticles on bovine serum albumin and keratinocyte cells are different. It is speculated that the extent of photo-damage is partially dependent on the aggregation of zinc oxide. These findings may be valuable for understanding potential risks of applying zinc oxide nanoparticle-containing sunscreens to human skin under sunlight exposure.

  9. GPU-accelerated voxelwise hepatic perfusion quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H; Cao, Y

    2012-09-07

    Voxelwise quantification of hepatic perfusion parameters from dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) imaging greatly contributes to assessment of liver function in response to radiation therapy. However, the efficiency of the estimation of hepatic perfusion parameters voxel-by-voxel in the whole liver using a dual-input single-compartment model requires substantial improvement for routine clinical applications. In this paper, we utilize the parallel computation power of a graphics processing unit (GPU) to accelerate the computation, while maintaining the same accuracy as the conventional method. Using compute unified device architecture-GPU, the hepatic perfusion computations over multiple voxels are run across the GPU blocks concurrently but independently. At each voxel, nonlinear least-squares fitting the time series of the liver DCE data to the compartmental model is distributed to multiple threads in a block, and the computations of different time points are performed simultaneously and synchronically. An efficient fast Fourier transform in a block is also developed for the convolution computation in the model. The GPU computations of the voxel-by-voxel hepatic perfusion images are compared with ones by the CPU using the simulated DCE data and the experimental DCE MR images from patients. The computation speed is improved by 30 times using a NVIDIA Tesla C2050 GPU compared to a 2.67 GHz Intel Xeon CPU processor. To obtain liver perfusion maps with 626 400 voxels in a patient's liver, it takes 0.9 min with the GPU-accelerated voxelwise computation, compared to 110 min with the CPU, while both methods result in perfusion parameters differences less than 10(-6). The method will be useful for generating liver perfusion images in clinical settings.

  10. GPU-Accelerated Voxelwise Hepatic Perfusion Quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H; Cao, Y

    2012-01-01

    Voxelwise quantification of hepatic perfusion parameters from dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) imaging greatly contributes to assessment of liver function in response to radiation therapy. However, the efficiency of the estimation of hepatic perfusion parameters voxel-by-voxel in the whole liver using a dual-input single-compartment model requires substantial improvement for routine clinical applications. In this paper, we utilize the parallel computation power of a graphics processing unit (GPU) to accelerate the computation, while maintaining the same accuracy as the conventional method. Using CUDA-GPU, the hepatic perfusion computations over multiple voxels are run across the GPU blocks concurrently but independently. At each voxel, non-linear least squares fitting the time series of the liver DCE data to the compartmental model is distributed to multiple threads in a block, and the computations of different time points are performed simultaneously and synchronically. An efficient fast Fourier transform in a block is also developed for the convolution computation in the model. The GPU computations of the voxel-by-voxel hepatic perfusion images are compared with ones by the CPU using the simulated DCE data and the experimental DCE MR images from patients. The computation speed is improved by 30 times using a NVIDIA Tesla C2050 GPU compared to a 2.67 GHz Intel Xeon CPU processor. To obtain liver perfusion maps with 626400 voxels in a patient’s liver, it takes 0.9 min with the GPU-accelerated voxelwise computation, compared to 110 min with the CPU, while both methods result in perfusion parameters differences less than 10−6. The method will be useful for generating liver perfusion images in clinical settings. PMID:22892645

  11. Measurement of brain perfusion, blood volume, and blood-brain barrier permeability, using dynamic contrast-enhanced T(1)-weighted MRI at 3 tesla

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, Henrik B W; Courivaud, Frédéric; Rostrup, Egill

    2009-01-01

    /min); blood volume (6 +/- 2/4 +/- 1/7 +/- 6 mL/100 g) and permeability (0.9 +/- 0.4/0.8 +/- 0.3/3 +/- 5 mL/100 g/min) were estimated by using Patlak's method and a two-compartment model. A corroboration of these results was achieved by using model simulation. In addition, it was possible to generate maps...... imaging of a bolus of a paramagnetic contrast agent passing through the brain. The methods are applied in patients with brain tumors and in healthy subjects. Perfusion was estimated by model-free deconvolution using Tikhonov's method (gray matter/white matter/tumor: 72 +/- 16/30 +/- 8/56 +/- 45 mL/100 g...

  12. Modification of membrane sulfhydryl groups in bacteriostatic action of nitrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchman, G.W. III; Hansen, J.N.

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism by which nitrite inhibits outgrowing spores of bacillus cereus T was examined by using techniques developed earlier for nitrite analogs. The morphological stage of inhibition, cooperativity effects, effect of pH on inhibition, kinetics of protection against tritiated iodoacetate incorporation into membrane sulfhydryl groups, and protection against the bacteriocidal effect of carboxymethylation of iodoacetate indicate that nitrite acts as a membrane-directed sulfhydryl agent. The mechanism by which nitrite modifies the chemical reactivity of the sulfhyrdyl group could be either direct covalent modification or inactivation through communication with another modified membrane component. Profiles of pH effects suggest that the active agent is the protonated form of nitrite. The nitrite concentrations which modify membrane sulfhydryl activity coincide with those which have a bacteriostatic effect. These results are consistent with membrane sulfhydryl modification as a component of the mechanism of nitrite-induced bacteriostasis in this aerobic sporeformer

  13. Mutagenesis breeding research of Lactobacillus brevis of nitrite reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Zeli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The pollution of nitrite in food became one of the focus of food safety issues,the use of biotechnology methods degrading nitrite became hotspot.The primitive strain was Lactobacillus brevis C2,preserved in our laboratory,had the ability to degrade nitrite,through composite mutagenesis of 15 W,254 nm,20 cm ultraviolet mutagenesis (UV for 120 s and 0.8% diethyl sulfate(DES in 37℃ mutation for 40 min,after screening,we successfully obtained high efficient strain of nitrite degradation,named UV6-DS2,relative to the starting strain,under the condition of 400 mg/L nitrite,after 12 h degradation,nitrite degradation rate increased from 92.8% to 97.8%,to explore its application in food was able to effectively reduce concentration of nitrite in food.

  14. Inhibition kinetics of nitritation and half-nitritation of old landfill leachate in a membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun; Wang, Zhaozhao; Li, Jun; Wei, Jia; Zhang, Yanzhuo; Zhao, Baihang

    2017-04-01

    Nitritation can be used as a pretreatment for anaerobic ammonia oxidation (anammox). Various control strategies for nitritation and half-nitritation of old landfill leachate in a membrane bioreactor were investigated in this study and the inhibition kinetics of substrate, product and old landfill leachate on nitritation were analyzed via batch tests. The results demonstrated that old landfill leachate nitritation in the membrane bioreactor can be achieved by adjusting the influent loading and dissolved oxygen (DO). From days 105-126 of the observation period, the average effluent concentration was 871.3 mg/L and the accumulation rate of [Formula: see text] was 97.2%. Half-nitritation was realized quickly by adjusting hydraulic retention time and DO. A low-DO control strategy appeared to best facilitate long-term and stable operation. Nitritation inhibition kinetic experiments showed that the inhibition of old landfill leachate was stronger than that of the substrate [Formula: see text] or product [Formula: see text] . The ammonia oxidation rate dropped by 22.2% when the concentration of old landfill leachate (calculated in chemical oxygen demand) was 1600.2 mg/L; further, when only free ammonia or free nitrous acid were used as a single inhibition factor, the ammonia oxidation rate dropped by 4.7-6.5% or 14.5-15.9%, respectively. Haldane, Aiba, and a revised inhibition kinetic model were adopted to separately fit the experimental data. The R 2 correlation coefficient values for these three models were 0.982, 0.996, and 0.992, respectively. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Nitrite Regulates Hypoxic Vasodilation via Myoglobin–Dependent Nitric Oxide Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totzeck, Matthias; Hendgen-Cotta, Ulrike B.; Luedike, Peter; Berenbrink, Michael; Klare, Johann P.; Steinhoff, Heinz-Juergen; Semmler, Dominik; Shiva, Sruti; Williams, Daryl; Kipar, Anja; Gladwin, Mark T.; Schrader, Juergen; Kelm, Malte; Cossins, Andrew R.; Rassaf, Tienush

    2012-01-01

    Background Hypoxic vasodilation is a physiological response to low oxygen (O2) tension that increases blood supply to match metabolic demands. While this response has been characterized for more than 100 years, the underlying hypoxic sensing and effector signaling mechanisms remain uncertain. We have shown that deoxygenated myoglobin (deoxyMb) in the heart can reduce nitrite to nitric oxide (NO˙) and thereby contribute to cardiomyocyte NO˙ signaling during ischemia. Based on recent observations that Mb is expressed in the vasculature of hypoxia-tolerant fish, we hypothesized that endogenous nitrite may contribute to physiological hypoxic vasodilation via reactions with vascular Mb to form NO˙. Methods and Results We here show that Mb is expressed in vascular smooth muscle and contributes significantly to nitrite-dependent hypoxic vasodilation in vivo and ex vivo. The generation of NO˙ from nitrite reduction by deoxyMb activates canonical soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC)/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signaling pathways. In vivo and ex vivo vasodilation responses, the reduction of nitrite to NO˙ and the subsequent signal transduction mechanisms were all significantly impaired in mice without myoglobin (Mb−/−). Hypoxic vasodilation studies in Mb, endothelial and inducible NO synthase knockout models (eNOS−/−, iNOS−/−) suggest that only Mb contributes to systemic hypoxic vasodilatory responses in mice. Conclusions Endogenous nitrite is a physiological effector of hypoxic vasodilation. Its reduction to NO˙ via the heme globin Mb enhances blood flow and matches O2 supply to increased metabolic demands under hypoxic conditions. PMID:22685116

  16. Perfusion CT in childhood stroke—Initial observations and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zebedin, D., E-mail: doris.zebedin@medunigraz.at [Division of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, University Hospital LKH Graz (Austria); Sorantin, E.; Riccabona, M. [Division of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, University Hospital LKH Graz (Austria)

    2013-07-15

    Introduction: To report the preliminary results of contrast-enhanced perfusion multi-detector CT for diagnoses of perfusion disturbances in children with clinical suspicion of stroke. Patients and methods: Within the last two years emergency perfusion CT was performed in ten children (age: 8–17 years, male:female = 3:7) for assessment of suspected childhood stroke. These intracranial perfusion CT, intracranial CT-digital subtraction angiography (CT-DSA) and extracranial CT-angiography (CTA) studies were retrospectively reviewed and compared with MRI, follow-up CT, catheter angiography and final clinical diagnosis. The total dose length product (DLP) for the entire examination was recorded. The image quality of perfusion CT-maps, CT-DSA and CTA were evaluated with a subjective three-point scale ranging from very good to non-diagnostic image quality rating perfusion disturbance, intracranial peripheral vessel depiction, and motion- or streak artifacts. Results: In nine of ten children perfusion CT showed no false positive or false negative results. In one of ten children suffering from migraine focal hypo-perfusion was read as perfusion impairment potentially indicating early stroke, but MRI and MRA follow-up were negative. Overall, perfusion-CT with CT-DSA was rated very good in 80% of cases for the detection of perfusion disturbances and vessel anatomy. Conclusions: In comparison to standard CT, contrast-enhanced perfusion CT improves CTs’ diagnostic capability in the emergency examination of children with a strong suspicion of ischemic cerebral infarction.

  17. Nitric oxide formation from nitrite in zebrafish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank Bo

    2007-01-01

    nitrite levels for variable time periods, and changes in blood nitrosylhemoglobin (HbNO), methemoglobin (metHb), oxygenated hemoglobin (oxyHb) and deoxygenated hemoglobin (deoxyHb) were evaluated by spectral deconvolution. Blood HbNO (a biomarker of internal NO production) was low in controls, increased......, and the possibility that excess NO may inhibit mitochondrial respiration, whole animal routine oxygen consumption was not depressed....

  18. STUDY ON DECREASE OF NITRITE AND NITRATE USAGE IN PROCESSED MEAT WITH ADDITION OF NATURAL SALT AND CARBON MONOXIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sakata

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to examine the reddening of meat products due to the addition of natural yellow salt (YS and carbon monoxide (CO. Following YS or NaCl addition at 2% to pork subsequent to nitrite (0~100 ppm treatment, color development due to this addition was analyzed optically. Heme pigment content in the meat was also determined spectrophotometrically. YS was found to bring about greater reddening than NaCl, indicating residual nitrite and nitrate content to be significantly higher in meat containing YS, through the amount of either was quite small. The nitrite itself in YS could never explain the color formation by the YS. Because the YS included not only nitrite but also nitrate, the effects of nitrate on the color stability of cooked cured pork were examined. Nitrate inhibited the nitrite decrement and discoloration in the cooked cured ham. The degradation rate of nitrite was clearly found to decrease with nitric acid content. Nitrate does not appear to serve as a donor of nitrite, but rather inhibits nitrite reduction in cooked meat products, with consequent prolongation of color stability. Nitrate, observed in many rock salt and also in this case, could enhance the color formation. CO treatment of pork caused the formation of carboxy myoglobin (COMb with consequent reddening of the meat. COMb was shown to be heat-stable and form stably at pH 5.0 to 8.0 and to be extractable with water, but was barely extractable at all with acetone. Nitric oxide was found to have greater affinity toward myoglobin (Mb than CO. Nitrosyl Mb was noted to be stable in all meat products examined. CO was seen to be capable of controlling the extent of lipid oxidation.

  19. Nitrite in feed: From Animal health to human health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cockburn, Andrew [Institute for Research on Environment and Sustainability, Devonshire Building, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE17RU (United Kingdom); Brambilla, Gianfranco [Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Toxicological chemistry unit, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Fernández, Maria-Luisa [Departamento de Medio Ambiente, Instituto Nacional de Investigación y Tecnología Agraria y Alimentaria (INIA), Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación, Carretera de la Coruña, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Arcella, Davide [Unit on Data Collection and Exposure, European Food Safety Authority, Largo N. Palli 5/A43100 Parma (Italy); Bordajandi, Luisa R. [Unit on Contaminants in the Food chain, European Food Safety Authority, Largo N. Palli 5/A, 43100 Parma (Italy); Cottrill, Bruce [Policy Delivery Group, Animal Health and Welfare, ADAS, Wolverhampton (United Kingdom); Peteghem, Carlos van [University of Gent, Harelbekestraat 72, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Dorne, Jean-Lou, E-mail: jean-lou.dorne@efsa.europa.eu [Unit on Contaminants in the Food chain, European Food Safety Authority, Largo N. Palli 5/A, 43100 Parma (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    Nitrite is widely consumed from the diet by animals and humans. However the largest contribution to exposure results from the in vivo conversion of exogenously derived nitrate to nitrite. Because of its potential to cause to methaemoglobin (MetHb) formation at excessive levels of intake, nitrite is regulated in feed and water as an undesirable substance. Forages and contaminated water have been shown to contain high levels of nitrate and represent the largest contributor to nitrite exposure for food-producing animals. Interspecies differences in sensitivity to nitrite intoxication principally result from physiological and anatomical differences in nitrite handling. In the case of livestock both pigs and cattle are relatively susceptible. With pigs this is due to a combination of low levels of bacterial nitrite reductase and hence potential to reduce nitrite to ammonia as well as reduced capacity to detoxify MetHb back to haemoglobin (Hb) due to intrinsically low levels of MetHb reductase. In cattle the sensitivity is due to the potential for high dietary intake and high levels of rumen conversion of nitrate to nitrite, and an adaptable gut flora which at normal loadings shunts nitrite to ammonia for biosynthesis. However when this escape mechanism gets overloaded, nitrite builds up and can enter the blood stream resulting in methemoglobinemia. Looking at livestock case histories reported in the literature no-observed-effect levels of 3.3 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) per day for nitrite in pigs and cattle were estimated and related to the total daily nitrite intake that would result from complete feed at the EU maximum permissible level. This resulted in margins of safety of 9-fold and 5-fold for pigs and cattle, respectively. Recognising that the bulkiness of animal feed limits their consumption, these margins in conjunction with good agricultural practise were considered satisfactory for the protection of livestock health. A human health risk assessment was also

  20. Sustained release of growth hormone and sodium nitrite from biomimetic collagen coating immobilized on silicone tubes improves endothelialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi-Nik, Nasim; Malaie-Balasi, Zahra; Amoabediny, Ghassem; Banikarimi, Seyedeh Parnian; Zandieh-Doulabi, Behrouz; Klein-Nulend, Jenneke

    2017-08-01

    Biocompatibility of biomedical devices can be improved by endothelialization of blood-contacting parts mimicking the vascular endothelium's function. Improved endothelialization might be obtained by using biomimetic coatings that allow local sustained release of biologically active molecules, e.g. anti-thrombotic and growth-inducing agents, from nanoliposomes. We aimed to test whether incorporation of growth-inducing nanoliposomal growth hormone (nGH) and anti-thrombotic nanoliposomal sodium nitrite (nNitrite) into collagen coating of silicone tubes enhances endothelialization by stimulating endothelial cell proliferation and inhibiting platelet adhesion. Collagen coating stably immobilized on acrylic acid-grafted silicone tubes decreased the water contact angle from 102° to 56°. Incorporation of 50 or 500nmol/ml nNitrite and 100 or 1000ng/ml nGH into collagen coating decreased the water contact angle further to 48°. After 120h incubation, 58% nitrite and 22% GH of the initial amount of sodium nitrite and GH in nanoliposomes were gradually released from the nNitrite-nGH-collagen coating. Endothelial cell number was increased after surface coating of silicone tubes with collagen by 1.6-fold, and with nNitrite-nGH-collagen conjugate by 1.8-3.9-fold after 2days. After 6days, endothelial cell confluency in the absence of surface coating was 22%, with collagen coating 74%, and with nNitrite-nGH-collagen conjugate coating 83-119%. In the absence of endothelial cells, platelet adhesion was stimulated after collagen coating by 1.3-fold, but inhibited after nNitrite-nGH-collagen conjugate coating by 1.6-3.7-fold. The release of anti-thrombotic prostaglandin I 2 from endothelial cells was stimulated after nNitrite-nGH-collagen conjugate coating by 1.7-2.2-fold compared with collagen coating. Our data shows improved endothelialization and blood compatibility using nNitrite-nGH-collagen conjugate coating on silicone tubes suggesting that these coatings are highly suitable

  1. Tissue-specific sparse deconvolution for brain CT perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ruogu; Jiang, Haodi; Huang, Junzhou

    2015-12-01

    Enhancing perfusion maps in low-dose computed tomography perfusion (CTP) for cerebrovascular disease diagnosis is a challenging task, especially for low-contrast tissue categories where infarct core and ischemic penumbra usually occur. Sparse perfusion deconvolution has been recently proposed to effectively improve the image quality and diagnostic accuracy of low-dose perfusion CT by extracting the complementary information from the high-dose perfusion maps to restore the low-dose using a joint spatio-temporal model. However the low-contrast tissue classes where infarct core and ischemic penumbra are likely to occur in cerebral perfusion CT tend to be over-smoothed, leading to loss of essential biomarkers. In this paper, we propose a tissue-specific sparse deconvolution approach to preserve the subtle perfusion information in the low-contrast tissue classes. We first build tissue-specific dictionaries from segmentations of high-dose perfusion maps using online dictionary learning, and then perform deconvolution-based hemodynamic parameters estimation for block-wise tissue segments on the low-dose CTP data. Extensive validation on clinical datasets of patients with cerebrovascular disease demonstrates the superior performance of our proposed method compared to state-of-art, and potentially improve diagnostic accuracy by increasing the differentiation between normal and ischemic tissues in the brain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Assessment of the relationship between morphological emphysema phenotype and corresponding pulmonary perfusion pattern on a segmental level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, Mark; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [University of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Member of German Lung Research Center DZL, Translational Lung Research Center TLRC-H, Heidelberg (Germany); Ley, Sebastian [Chirurgische Klinik Dr. Rinecker, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Munich (Germany); Ludwig Maximilians University, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Eberhardt, Ralf; Herth, Felix [Thoraxklinik University of Heidelberg, Department of Pneumology and Critical Care Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Member of German Lung Research Center DZL, Translational Lung Research Center TLRC-H, Heidelberg (Germany); Menezes, Ravi [University of Toronto, Medical Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Sedlaczek, Oliver [University of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Member of German Lung Research Center DZL, Translational Lung Research Center TLRC-H, Heidelberg (Germany); Ley-Zaporozhan, Julia [University of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Ludwig Maximilians University, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2015-01-15

    Distinct morphological emphysema phenotypes were assessed by CT to show characteristic perfusion defect patterns. Forty-one patients with severe emphysema (GOLD III/IV) underwent three-dimensional high resolution computed tomography (3D-HRCT) and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion. 3D-HRCT data was visually analyzed for emphysema phenotyping and quantification by consensus of three experts in chest-radiology. The predominant phenotype per segment was categorized as normal, centrilobular, panlobular or paraseptal. Segmental lung perfusion was visually analyzed using six patterns of pulmonary perfusion (1-normal; 2-mild homogeneous reduction in perfusion; 3-heterogeneous perfusion without focal defects; 4-heterogeneous perfusion with focal defects; 5-heterogeneous absence of perfusion; 6-homogeneous absence of perfusion), with the extent of the defect given as a percentage. 730 segments were evaluated. CT categorized 566 (78 %) as centrilobular, 159 (22 %) as panlobular and 5 (<1 %) as paraseptal with no normals. Scores with regards to MR perfusion patterns were: 1-0; 2-0; 3-28 (4 %); 4-425 (58 %); 5-169 (23 %); 6-108 (15 %). The predominant perfusion pattern matched as follows: 70 % centrilobular emphysema - heterogeneous perfusion with focal defects (score 4); 42 % panlobular - homogeneous absence of perfusion (score 5); and 43 % panlobular - heterogeneous absence of perfusion (score 6). MR pulmonary perfusion patterns correlate with the CT phenotype at a segmental level in patients with severe emphysema. (orig.)

  3. Determination of Nitrite in Meat Products using a Metalloporphyrin Based Nitrite-Selective Membrane Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana VLASCICI

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The potentiometric response characteristics of a nitrite-selective electrode based on Co (III tetraphenylporphyrins (TPP in o-nitrophenyloctylether plasticized polyvinyl chloride membranes are compared. To establish the optimum composition of the membrane, different molar percents of cationic derivative (0-100 mol% relative to ionophore were used. The influence of different plasticizers: o-nitrophenyloctylether, dioctylphtalate and tricresilphosphate on potentiometric answer were studied. Electrodes formulated with membranes containing 1 wt% ClCoTPP, 66 wt% o-NPOE, 33 wt% PVC (plasticizer:PVC = 2:1 and the lipophilic cationic derivative (10 mol% are shown to exhibit high selectivity for nitrite over many anions, except the lipophilic anions perchlorate and thiocyanate. The electrodes based on Co (III porphyrins were used for the potentiometric determination of nitrites in meat products. The results were compared with a colorimetric method used as the reference method. There was a good agreement between the potentiometric and colorimetric procedures.

  4. In vivo assessment of myocardial viability after acute myocardial infarction: A head-to-head comparison of the perfusable tissue index by PET and delayed contrast-enhanced CMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmer, Stefan A J; Teunissen, Paul F A; Danad, Ibrahim; Robbers, Lourens F H J; Raijmakers, Pieter G H M; Nijveldt, Robin; van Rossum, Albert C; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; van Royen, Niels; Knaapen, Paul

    2017-04-01

    Early recognition of viable myocardium after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is of clinical relevance, since affected segments have the potential of functional recovery. Delayed contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-CMR) has been validated extensively for the detection of viable myocardium. An alternative parameter for detecting viability is the perfusable tissue index (PTI), derived using [ 15 O]H 2 O positron emission tomography (PET), which is inversely related to the extent of myocardial scar (non-perfusable tissue). The aim of the present study was to investigate the predictive value of PTI on recovery of LV function as compared to DCE-CMR in patients with AMI, after successful percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Thirty-eight patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) successfully treated by PCI were prospectively recruited. Subjects were examined 1 week and 3 months (mean follow-up time: 97 ± 10 days) after AMI using [ 15 O]H 2 O PET and DCE-CMR to assess PTI, regional function and scar. Viability was defined as recovery of systolic wall thickening ≥3.0 mm at follow-up by use of CMR. A total of 588 segments were available for serial analysis. At baseline, 180 segments were dysfunctional and exhibited DCE. Seventy-three (41%) of these dysfunctional segments showed full recovery during follow-up (viable), whereas 107 (59%) segments remained dysfunctional (nonviable). Baseline PTI of viable segments was 0.94 ± 0.09 and was significantly higher compared to nonviable segments (0.80 ± 0.13, P myocardial viability shortly after reperfused AMI is feasible using PET. PET-derived PTI yields a good predictive value for the recovery of LV function in PCI-treated STEMI patients, in excellent agreement with DCE-CMR.

  5. Diagnostic value of dynamic contrast-enhanced CT with perfusion imaging in the quantitative assessment of tumor response to sorafenib in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippolito, Davide; Querques, Giulia; Okolicsanyi, Stefano; Franzesi, Cammillo Talei; Strazzabosco, Mario; Sironi, Sandro

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the feasibility of perfusion-CT (p-CT) measurements in quantitative assessment of hemodynamic changes related to sorafenib in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Twenty-two patients with advanced HCC underwent p-CT study (256-MDCT scanner) before and 2 months after sorafenib administration. Dedicated perfusion software generated a quantitative map of arterial and portal perfusion and calculated the following perfusion parameters in target liver lesion: hepatic perfusion (HP), time-to-peak (TTP), blood volume (BV), arterial perfusion (AP), and hepatic perfusion index (HPI). After the follow-up scan, patients were categorized as responders and non-responders, according to mRECIST. Perfusion values were analyzed and compared in HCC lesions and in the cirrhotic parenchyma (n=22), such as between baseline and follow-up in progressors and non-progressors. Before treatment, all mean perfusion values were significantly higher in HCC lesions than in the cirrhotic parenchyma (HP 47.8±17.2 vs 13.3±6.3mL/s per 100g; AP 47.9±18.1 vs 12.9±10.7mL/s; pCT technique can be used for HCC quantitative assessment of changes related to anti-angiogenic therapy. Identification of response predictors might help clinicians in selection of patients who may benefit from targeted-therapy allowing for optimization of individualized treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Nitrite-free Asian hot dog sausages reformulated with nitrite replacers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Capillas, C; Tahmouzi, S; Triki, M; Rodríguez-Salas, L; Jiménez-Colmenero, F; Herrero, A M

    2015-07-01

    This research deals with the application of a global strategy designed to produce a nitrite-free Asian hot dog. Different ingredients such as annatto, cochineal, orange dietary fibre, vitamins E and C, lactate and celery were combined in order to study the appearance (colour), lipid oxidation stability and microbial stability of the nitrite-free formulations. The control sample contained much more (P annatto (RA) had the lowest a* values. Lipid oxidation levels were similar irrespective of formulation. The hot dog reformulated with cochineal (RC) scored higher for overall acceptability than RA, mainly due to its colour.

  7. Extremity perfusion for sarcoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Harald Joan

    2008-01-01

    For more than 50 years, the technique of extremity perfusion has been explored in the limb salvage treatment of local, recurrent, and multifocal sarcomas. The "discovery" of tumor necrosis factor-or. in combination with melphalan was a real breakthrough in the treatment of primarily irresectable

  8. Isolated limb perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Rosalyn; Chantier, Nariane

    1994-12-08

    Growing concern over the rising incidence of malignant melanoma has brought about a need for information on this disorder and the treatment available. Isolated limb perfusion is a relatively new technique used in only a few hospitals. An increased knowledge base will lead to a better understanding of the nursing care required and to a more in-depth care plan.

  9. Dynamic (4D) CT perfusion offers simultaneous functional and anatomical insights into pulmonary embolism resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirsadraee, Saeed, E-mail: saeed.mirsadraee@ed.ac.uk [Clinical Research Imaging Centre, Queen' s Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh, 47 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh EH16 4TJ (United Kingdom); Reid, John H.; Connell, Martin [Clinical Research Imaging Centre, Queen' s Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh, 47 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh EH16 4TJ (United Kingdom); MacNee, William; Hirani, Nikhil [The Queen' s Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh, 47 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh EH16 4TJ (United Kingdom); Murchison, John T. [Department of Radiology, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, 51 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh EH16 4SA (United Kingdom); Beek, Edwin J. van [Clinical Research Imaging Centre, Queen' s Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh, 47 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh EH16 4TJ (United Kingdom)

    2016-10-15

    Objective: Resolution and long-term functional effects of pulmonary emboli are unpredictable. This study was carried out to assess persisting vascular bed perfusion abnormalities and resolution of arterial thrombus in patients with recent pulmonary embolism (PE). Methods and materials: 26 Patients were prospectively evaluated by dynamic (4D) contrast enhanced CT perfusion dynamic pulmonary CT perfusion. Intermittent volume imaging was performed every 1.5–1.7 s during breath-hold and perfusion values were calculated by maximum-slope technique. Thrombus load (modified Miller score; MMS) and ventricular diameter were determined. Perfusion maps were visually scored and correlated with residual endoluminal filling defects. Results: The mean initial thrombus load was 13.1 ± 4.6 MMS (3–16), and 1.2 ± 2.1 MMS (0–8) at follow up. From the 24 CTPs with diagnostic quality perfusion studies, normal perfusion was observed in 7 (29%), and mildly-severely abnormal in 17 (71%). In 15 patients with no residual thrombus on follow up CTPA, normal perfusion was observed in 6, and abnormal perfusion in 9. Perfusion was abnormal in all patients with residual thrombus on follow up CTPA. Pulmonary perfusion changes were classified as reduced (n = 4), delayed (systemic circulation pattern; n = 5), and absent (no-flow; n = 5). The right ventricle was dilated in 12/25 (48%) at presentation, and normal in all 26 follow up scans. Weak correlation was found between initial ventricular dilatation and perfusion abnormality at follow up (r = 0.15). Conclusions: Most patients had substantial perfusion abnormality at 3–6 months post PE. Abnormal perfusion patterns were frequently observed in patients and in regions with no corresponding evidence of residual thrombus on CTPA. Some defects exhibit delayed, presumed systemic, enhancement (which we have termed ‘stunned’ lung). CT perfusion provides combined anatomical and functional information about PE resolution.

  10. Glioma Grading and Determination of IDH Mutation Status and ATRX loss by DCE and ASL Perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendle, Cornelia; Hempel, Johann-Martin; Schittenhelm, Jens; Skardelly, Marco; Tabatabai, Ghazaleh; Bender, Benjamin; Ernemann, Ulrike; Klose, Uwe

    2017-05-09

    To evaluate arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) perfusion in glioma grading according to the previous WHO classification of 2007, as well as concerning isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutation status and ATRX expression as required by the new WHO 2016 brain tumor classification. The mean values of Ktrans, Kep, Ve, and Vp by DCE perfusion, and cerebral blood flow (CBF) by ASL perfusion were assessed retrospectively in 40 patients with initial glioma diagnosis. Perfusion parameters were correlated and compared concerning glioma grading, IDH mutation status and ATRX expression. The DCE and ASL perfusion parameters showed merely moderate correlation. The Ktrans, Ve, and CBF by DCE perfusion were different in low-grade and high-grade gliomas (p = 0.0018, p IDH mutation (p = 0.014, sensitivity = 0.75, specificity = 0.88) and showed a trend for the discrimination of astrocytomas with IDH mutation from oligodendrogliomas (p = 0.074). In conclusion, DCE and ASL perfusion are complementary in the differentiation of gliomas. The discrimination of low- and high-grade gliomas is possible by the DCE perfusion parameter Ve, while ASL perfusion shows potential for the differentiation of the IDH and ATRX mutation status of gliomas following the new WHO classification 2016. Both perfusion techniques might represent different aspects of brain tumor perfusion.

  11. Diagnostic Performance of Dual-Energy CT Stress Myocardial Perfusion Imaging: Direct Comparison With Cardiovascular MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Sung Min; Song, Meong Gun; Chee, Hyun Kun; Hwang, Hweung Kon; Feuchtner, Gudrun Maria; Min, James K.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of stress perfusion dual-energy CT (DECT) and its incremental value when used with coronary CT angiography (CTA) for identifying hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease. SUBJECTS AND METHODS One hundred patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease without chronic myocardial infarction detected with coronary CTA underwent stress perfusion DECT, stress cardiovascular perfusion MRI, and invasive coronary angiography (ICA). Stress perfusion DECT and cardiovascular stress perfusion MR images were used for detecting perfusion defects. Coronary CTA and ICA were evaluated in the detection of ≥ 50% coronary stenosis. The diagnostic performance of coronary CTA for detecting hemodynamically significant stenosis was assessed before and after stress perfusion DECT on a pervessel basis with ICA and cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI as the reference standard. RESULTS The performance of stress perfusion DECT compared with cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI on a per-vessel basis in the detection of perfusion defects was sensitivity, 89%; specificity, 74%; positive predictive value, 73%; negative predictive value, 90%. Per segment, these values were sensitivity, 76%; specificity, 80%; positive predictive value, 63%; and negative predictive value, 88%. Compared with ICA and cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI per vessel territory the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of coronary CTA were 95%, 61%, 61%, and 95%. The values for stress perfusion DECT were 92%, 72%, 68%, and 94%. The values for coronary CTA and stress perfusion DECT were 88%, 79%, 73%, and 91%. The ROC AUC increased from 0.78 to 0.84 (p = 0.02) with the use of coronary CTA and stress perfusion DECT compared with coronary CTA alone. CONCLUSION Stress perfusion DECT plays a complementary role in enhancing the accuracy of coronary CTA for identifying hemodynamically

  12. Comparative analysis of nitrite uptake and hemoglobin-nitrite reactions in erythrocytes: sorting out uptake mechanisms and oxygenation dependencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank Bo; Rohde, Sabina

    2010-01-01

    (hagfish and lamprey) anion exchanger-1 (AE1) in the membrane, with the aim to unravel the mechanisms and oxygenation dependencies of nitrite transport. Added nitrite rapidly diffused into the RBCs until equilibrium. The distribution ratio of nitrite across the membrane agreed with that expected from HNO2...... diffusion and AE1-mediated facilitated NO2- diffusion. Participation of HNO2 diffusion was emphasized by rapid transmembrane nitrite equilibration also in the natural AE1 knockouts. Following the equilibration, nitrite was consumed by reacting with Hb, which created a continued inward diffusion controlled....... We propose a model for RBC nitrite uptake that involves both HNO2 diffusion and AE1-mediated transport and which explains both the present and previous (sometimes puzzling) results....

  13. Fluorimetry of nitrite and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Hongjuan; Wu Jizong; Zhang Lihua; Liu Junling

    2007-01-01

    A new fluorimetric method for determination of nitrite was studied, based on the reaction of 5-aminofluorescein in acidic medium to form a new compound which was no fluorescence and reduced to highly fluorescence in alkaline medium. Effects of metal ions impurity were discussed. The acidity and measuring time were given. The precision of this method are 4% and 5% respectively. The recoveries are between 96% and 106% in nuclear fuel reprocessing solution and between 96% and 103% in high-level radioactive liquid waste. The method is applied to the determination of NO 2 - in nuclear fuel reprocessing solution and high- level radioactive liquid waste and nitrocompound in organic liquid waste. (authors)

  14. Electrochemical preparation of iron cuboid nanoparticles and their catalytic properties for nitrite reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Yanxin; Chen Shengpei; Chen Qingsong; Zhou Zhiyou [State Key Lab of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces, Department of Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Sun Shigang [State Key Lab of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces, Department of Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China)], E-mail: sgsun@xmu.edu.cn

    2008-10-01

    Iron cuboid nanoparticles supported on glassy carbon (denoted nm-Fe/GC) were prepared by electrochemical deposition under cyclic voltammetric (CV) conditions. The structure and composition of the Fe nanomaterials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The results demonstrated that the Fe cuboid nanoparticles are dispersed discretely on GC substrate with an average size ca. 171 nm, and confirmed that the electrochemical synthesized nanocubes are single crystals of pure Fe. The catalytic properties of the Fe cuboid nanoparticles towards nitrite electroreduction were investigated, and enhanced electrocatalytic activity of the Fe nanocubes has been determined. In comparison with the data obtained on a bulk-Fe electrode, the onset potential of nitrite reduction on nm-Fe/GC is positively sifted by 100 mV, and the steady reduction current density is enhanced about 2.4-3.2 times.

  15. Electrochemical preparation of iron cuboid nanoparticles and their catalytic properties for nitrite reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yanxin; Chen Shengpei; Chen Qingsong; Zhou Zhiyou; Sun Shigang

    2008-01-01

    Iron cuboid nanoparticles supported on glassy carbon (denoted nm-Fe/GC) were prepared by electrochemical deposition under cyclic voltammetric (CV) conditions. The structure and composition of the Fe nanomaterials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The results demonstrated that the Fe cuboid nanoparticles are dispersed discretely on GC substrate with an average size ca. 171 nm, and confirmed that the electrochemical synthesized nanocubes are single crystals of pure Fe. The catalytic properties of the Fe cuboid nanoparticles towards nitrite electroreduction were investigated, and enhanced electrocatalytic activity of the Fe nanocubes has been determined. In comparison with the data obtained on a bulk-Fe electrode, the onset potential of nitrite reduction on nm-Fe/GC is positively sifted by 100 mV, and the steady reduction current density is enhanced about 2.4-3.2 times

  16. Towards robust deconvolution of low-dose perfusion CT: Sparse perfusion deconvolution using online dictionary learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ruogu; Chen, Tsuhan; Sanelli, Pina C.

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography perfusion (CTP) is an important functional imaging modality in the evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases, particularly in acute stroke and vasospasm. However, the post-processed parametric maps of blood flow tend to be noisy, especially in low-dose CTP, due to the noisy contrast enhancement profile and the oscillatory nature of the results generated by the current computational methods. In this paper, we propose a robust sparse perfusion deconvolution method (SPD) to estimate cerebral blood flow in CTP performed at low radiation dose. We first build a dictionary from high-dose perfusion maps using online dictionary learning and then perform deconvolution-based hemodynamic parameters estimation on the low-dose CTP data. Our method is validated on clinical data of patients with normal and pathological CBF maps. The results show that we achieve superior performance than existing methods, and potentially improve the differentiation between normal and ischemic tissue in the brain. PMID:23542422

  17. The effects of nitric oxide synthase--versus lipoxygenase inhibition on coronary flow and nitrite outflow in isolated rat heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovljevic, V Lj; Djuric, D M

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the changes of coronary flow (CF) and nitrite outflow under inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) by Nomega-nitro-L-arginine monomethyl ester (L-NAME) or lipoxygenase (LOX) induced by nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) in isolated rat heart. The hearts of male Wistar albino rats (n=18, age 8 weeks, body mass 180-200 g) were retrograde perfused according to the Langendorff's technique at gradually increased constant coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) conditions (40-120 cm H2O) which induced flow-dependent nitric oxide (NO) release (nitrite outflow). The experiments were performed during control conditions, in the presence of NO synthesis inhibitor L-NAME (30 micromol/l) or nonspecific LOX inhibitor (NDGA, 0.1 mmol/l) which were administered separately or in combination. CF varied in autoregulatory range from 4.12+/-0.26 ml/min/g wt at 50 cm H2O to 5.22+/-0.26 ml/min/g wt at 90 cm H2O. In autoregulatory range, nitrite outflow varied from 2.05+/-0.17 nmol/min/g wt at 50 cm H2O to 2.52+/-0.21 nmol/min/g wt at 90 cm H2O and was strictly parallel with CPP/CF curve. The autoregulatory range of CF was significantly extended (40-100 cm H2O, 2.22+/-0.12 ml/min/g wt and 2.90+/-0.25 ml/min/g wt, respectively) under the influence of L-NAME. Hemodynamic effects were accompanied by significant decrease in nitrite outflow after L-NAME administration (0.56+/-0.11 nmol/min/g wt at 40 cm H2O to 1.45+/-0.14 nmol/min/g wt at 100 cm H2O). NDGA affected CF in the range of CPP 40-70 cm H2O only (from 42% at 50 cm H2O to 12% at 90 cm H2O, respectively) with no significant changes in nitrite outflow. When L-NAME was applied in combination with NDGA vs. NDGA only, CF was significantly reduced (from 34% at 50 cm H2O to 50% at 90 cm H2O, respectively) with parallel changes in nitrite outflow (from 40% at 50 cm H2O to 51% at 90 cm H2O, respectively). The results showed that CF and nitrite outflow could be decreased under L-NAME administration. Nonselective

  18. Pulmonary MR angiography and perfusion imaging—A review of methods and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johns, Christopher S.; Swift, Andrew J.; Hughes, Paul J.C.; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Schiebler, Mark; Wild, Jim M.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • This article represents an overview of the methodology and clinical applications of pulmonary MRA and perfusion imaging. • Both contrast enhanced and non-contrast enhanced metholodology for MRA and perfusion are covered. • The current clinical uses and future directions of MRA and MR perfusion are discussed. - Abstract: The pulmonary vasculature and its role in perfusion and gas exchange is an important consideration in many conditions of the lung and heart. Currently the mainstay of imaging of the vasculature and perfusion of the lungs lies with CT and nuclear medicine perfusion scans, both of which require ionizing radiation exposure. Improvements in MRI techniques have increased the use of MRI in pulmonary vascular imaging. Here we review MRI methods for imaging the pulmonary vasculature and pulmonary perfusion, both using contrast enhanced and non-contrast enhanced methodology. In many centres pulmonary MR angiography and dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion MRI are now well established in the routine workflow of patients particularly with pulmonary hypertension and thromboembolic disease. However, these imaging modalities offer exciting new directions for future research and clinical use in other respiratory diseases where consideration of pulmonary perfusion and gas exchange can provide insight in to pathophysiology.

  19. Pulmonary MR angiography and perfusion imaging—A review of methods and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johns, Christopher S.; Swift, Andrew J.; Hughes, Paul J.C. [University of Sheffield (United Kingdom); Ohno, Yoshiharu [Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, KobeUniversity Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Schiebler, Mark [UW-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States); Wild, Jim M., E-mail: j.m.wild@sheffield.ac.uk [University of Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • This article represents an overview of the methodology and clinical applications of pulmonary MRA and perfusion imaging. • Both contrast enhanced and non-contrast enhanced metholodology for MRA and perfusion are covered. • The current clinical uses and future directions of MRA and MR perfusion are discussed. - Abstract: The pulmonary vasculature and its role in perfusion and gas exchange is an important consideration in many conditions of the lung and heart. Currently the mainstay of imaging of the vasculature and perfusion of the lungs lies with CT and nuclear medicine perfusion scans, both of which require ionizing radiation exposure. Improvements in MRI techniques have increased the use of MRI in pulmonary vascular imaging. Here we review MRI methods for imaging the pulmonary vasculature and pulmonary perfusion, both using contrast enhanced and non-contrast enhanced methodology. In many centres pulmonary MR angiography and dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion MRI are now well established in the routine workflow of patients particularly with pulmonary hypertension and thromboembolic disease. However, these imaging modalities offer exciting new directions for future research and clinical use in other respiratory diseases where consideration of pulmonary perfusion and gas exchange can provide insight in to pathophysiology.

  20. [Value of perfusion scintigraphy of the testis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotzerke, J; Erpenbach, K; Hengst, W

    1987-10-01

    Perfusion scintigraphy of the testicles has still its place, in addition to scrotal ultrasound imaging, in the investigation of the "acute scrotum". It reveals scintigraphic patterns typical for twisted testicle and acute or subacute epididymitis. Especially in the Bundeswehr, with its large number of young men, this method enhances the diagnostic spectrum and helps in making surgical decisions. However, in the examination of scrotal masses, ultrasound imaging or surgery is to be preferred.

  1. Electrocatalytic reduction of nitrite on tetraruthenated metalloporphyrins/Nafion glassy carbon modified electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calfuman, Karla [Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Quimica, Universidad de Chile, Las Palmeras 3425, Casilla 653, Nunoa, Santiago (Chile); Aguirre, Maria Jesus [Facultad de Quimica y Biologia, Departamento de Quimica de los Materiales, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Canete-Rosales, Paulina; Bollo, Soledad [Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas y Farmaceuticas, Departamento de Quimica Farmacologica y Toxicologica, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Llusar, Rosa [Departamento de Quimica Fisica y Analitica, Universidad de Jaume I, Castellon (Spain); Isaacs, Mauricio, E-mail: misaacs@uchile.cl [Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Quimica, Universidad de Chile, Las Palmeras 3425, Casilla 653, Nunoa, Santiago (Chile)

    2011-10-01

    Highlights: > Preparation and characterization of modified electrodes with M(II) Tetraruthenated porphyrins onto a Nafion film. > The electrodes were characterized by SEM, TEM, AFM and SECM techniques. > The modified electrodes are active in the electrochemical reduction of nitrite at -660 mV vs Ag/AgCl. > GC/Nf/CoTRP modified electrode is more electrochemically active than their Ni and Zn analogues. - Abstract: This paper describes the electrochemical reduction of nitrite ion in neutral aqueous solution mediated by tetraruthenated metalloporphyrins (Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II)) electrostatically assembled onto a Nafion film previously adsorbed on glassy carbon or ITO electrodes. Scanning electron microscope (SEM-EDX) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results have shown that on ITO electrodes the macrocycles forms multiple layers with a disordered stacking orientation over the Nafion film occupying hydrophobic and hydrophilic sites in the polyelectrolyte. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) results demonstrated that the Nafion film is 35 nm thick and tetraruthenated metalloporphyrins layers 190 nm thick presenting a thin but compacted morphology. Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) images shows that the Co(II) tetraruthenated porphyrins/Nf/GC modified electrode is more electrochemically active than their Ni and Zn analogues. These modified electrodes are able to reduce nitrite at -660 mV showing enhanced reduction current and a decrease in the required overpotential compared to bare glassy carbon electrode. Controlled potential electrolysis experiments verify the production of ammonia, hydrazine and hydroxylamine at potentials where reduction of solvent is plausible demonstrating some selectivity toward the nitrite ion. Rotating disc electrode voltammetry shows that the factor that governs the kinetics of nitrite reduction is the charge propagation in the film.

  2. Nitrite plasma levels in type 1 and 2 diabetics with and without complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferlito, S; Gallina, M

    1999-01-01

    patients with hypercholesterolemia the mean nitrite value was sharply elevated (24 +/- 0.8 mumol/L); the difference between this group and those of non hypercholesterolemic, non obese, obese and CHD (with or without hypertension) patients was significant (p influence NO production. In hypercholesterolemic diabetic patients the nitrite enhanced level in plasma might mean a compensatory response to a continuous inactivation of NO involved in a protective competition towards damaging factors and chiefly against oxidised LDL.

  3. In vitro killing of Mycobacterium ulcerans by acidified nitrite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phillips, R.; Kuijper, S.; Benjamin, N.; Wansbrough-Jones, M.; Wilks, M.; Kolk, A. H. J.

    2004-01-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans, which causes Buruli ulcer, was exposed to acidified nitrite or to acid alone for 10 or 20 min. Killing was rapid, and viable counts were reduced below detectable limits within 10 min of exposure to 40 mM acidified nitrite. M. ulcerans is highly susceptible to acidified

  4. determination of nitrite, nitrate and total nitrogen in vegetable samples

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The above colour reaction system has been applied successfully for the determination of nitrite, nitrate and total nitrogen in vegetable samples. Unreduced samples give direct measure for nitrite whilst reduction of samples by copperized-cadmium column gives total nitrogen content and their difference shows nitrate content ...

  5. NITRITE AND NITRATE DETERMINATIONS IN PLASMA - A CRITICAL-EVALUATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MOSHAGE, H; KOK, B; HUIZENGA, [No Value; JANSEN, PLM

    Plasma nitrite and nitrate determinations are increasingly being used in clinical chemistry as markers for the activity of nitric oxide synthase and the production of nitric oxide radicals. However, a systematic evaluation of the determination of nitrite and nitrate in plasma has not been performed.

  6. Occurrence and Toxicological Significance of Nitrate and Nitrite in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To determine and evaluate the levels of nitrate and nitrite in some commercial infant formula in view of the health implications of these factors. Method: Nitrate and nitrite, which may create significant health problems in infants, were determined in four commercial infant formula. The public health and toxicological ...

  7. Nitrite and nitrate determinations in plasma: a critical evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moshage, H.; Kok, B.; Huizenga, J. R.; Jansen, P. L.

    1995-01-01

    Plasma nitrite and nitrate determinations are increasingly being used in clinical chemistry as markers for the activity of nitric oxide synthase and the production of nitric oxide radicals. However, a systematic evaluation of the determination of nitrite and nitrate in plasma has not been performed.

  8. Nitrite as a stimulus for ammonia-starved Nitrosomonas europaea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laanbroek, H.J.; Bär-Gilissen, M.J.; Hoogveld, H.L.

    2002-01-01

    Ammonia-starved cells of Nitrosomonas europaea are able to preserve a high level of ammonia-oxidizing activity in the absence of ammonium. However, when the nitrite-oxidizing cells that form part of the natural nitrifying community do not keep pace with the ammonia-oxidizing cells, nitrite

  9. Nitrite as regulator of hypoxic signaling in mammalian physiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Faassen, E.E.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071100938; Bahrami, S.; Feelisch, M.; Hogg, N.; Kelm, M.

    2009-01-01

    In this review we consider the effects of endogenous and pharmacological levels of nitrite under conditions of hypoxia. In humans, the nitrite anion has long been considered as metastable intermediate in the oxidation of nitric oxide radicals to the stable metabolite nitrate. This oxidation cascade

  10. Inactivation of Yersinia enterocolitica by nitrite and nitrate in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Giusti, M; de Vito, E

    1992-01-01

    The antimicrobial effects of sodium nitrite and sodium and potassium nitrate against Yersinia enterocolitica were investigated in solution and in treated pork meat. Potassium nitrate and sodium nitrate showed only feeble antimicrobial activity in cultures; no antimicrobial activity was detected with sodium nitrite. Conversely, all three salts displayed apparent antimicrobial activity in pork meat, possibly due to selective effects on competitive flora.

  11. Nitrate and nitrite in biology, nutrition and therapeutics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lundberg, J.O.; van Faassen, E.E.H.; Gladwin, M.T.; Ahluwalia, A.; Benjamin, N.

    2009-01-01

    Inorganic nitrate and nitrite from endogenous or dietary sources are metabolized in vivo to nitric oxide (NO) and other bioactive nitrogen oxides. The nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway is emerging as an important mediator of blood flow regulation, cell signaling, energetics and tissue responses to hypoxia.

  12. Electrochemical removal of nitrite in simulated aquaculture wastewater

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Electrochemical removal of nitrite at a concentration of 10 mg l-1 from synthetic aquaculture wastewater was investigated in this study using a batch reactor. The effects of important operating parameters such as electrode material and applied current density were studied. The highest nitrite removal is achieved with nickel ...

  13. Unraveling the origin of the nitrite-mediated hypoxic vasodilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fago, Angela; Dalsgaard, T.; Simonsen, U.

    2007-01-01

    are sufficient to induce NO-mediated vasodilation independently of the nitrite reductase activities here investigated. These results further indicate that the vasoactive effect of nitrite is intrinsic to the vessel and may be due to S-nitrosothiols formed within the arterial smooth muscle....

  14. Nitrite disrupts multiple physiological functions in aquatic animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank Bo

    2003-01-01

    is at the expense of chloride, leading to chloride depletion. Nitrite also activates efflux of potassium from skeletal muscle and erythrocytes, disturbing intracellular and extracellular K+ levels. Nitrite transfer across the erythrocytic membrane leads to oxidation of haemoglobin to methaemoglobin (met......Hb), compromising blood O2 transport. Other haem proteins are also oxidised. Hyperventilation is observed, and eventually tissue O2 shortage becomes reflected in elevated lactate concentrations. Heart rate increases rapidly, before any significant elevations in metHb or extracellular potassium occur. This suggests...... nitrite-induced vasodilation (possibly via nitric oxide generated from nitrite) that is countered by increased cardiac pumping to re-establish blood pressure. Nitrite can form and/or mimic nitric oxide and thereby interfere with processes regulated by this local hormone. Steroid hormone synthesis may...

  15. Effect of ruminal administration of Escherichia coli wild type or a genetically modified strain with enhanced high nitrite reductase activity on methane emission and nitrate toxicity in nitrate-infused sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sar, C; Mwenya, B; Pen, B; Takaura, K; Morikawa, R; Tsujimoto, A; Kuwaki, K; Isogai, N; Shinzato, I; Asakura, Y; Toride, Y; Takahashi, J

    2005-11-01

    The effects of two kinds of Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain, wild-type E. coli W3110 and E. coli nir-Ptac, which has enhanced NO(2) reduction activity, on oral CH(4) emission and NO(3) toxicity in NO(3)-treated sheep were assessed in a respiratory hood system in a 4 x 6 Youden square design. NO(3) (1.3 g NaNO(3)/kg(0.75) body weight) and/or E. coli strains were delivered into the rumen through a fistula as a single dose 30 min after the morning meal. Escherichia coli cells were inoculated for sheep to provide an initial E. coli cell density of optical density at 660 nm of 2, which corresponded to 2 x 10(10) cells/ml. The six treatments consisted of saline, E. coli W3110, E. coli nir-Ptac, NO(3), NO(3) plus E. coli W3110, and NO(3) plus E. coli nir-Ptac. CH(4) emission from sheep was reduced by the inoculation of E. coli W3110 or E. coli nir-Ptac by 6 % and 12 %, respectively. NO(3) markedly inhibited CH(4) emission from sheep. Compared with sheep given NO(3) alone, the inoculation of E. coli W3110 to NO(3)-infused sheep lessened ruminal and plasma toxic NO(2) accumulation and blood methaemoglobin production, while keeping ruminal methanogenesis low. Ruminal and plasma toxic NO(2) accumulation and blood methaemoglobin production in sheep were unaffected by the inoculation of E. coli nir-Ptac. These results suggest that ruminal methanogenesis may be reduced by the inoculation of E. coli W3110 or E. coli nir-Ptac. The inoculation of E. coli W3110 may abate NO(3) toxicity when NO(3) is used to inhibit CH(4) emission from ruminants.

  16. Perfusion based cell culture chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiskanen, Arto; Emnéus, Jenny; Dufva, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Performing cell culture in miniaturized perfusion chambers gives possibilities to experiment with cells under near in vivo like conditions. In contrast to traditional batch cultures, miniaturized perfusion systems provide precise control of medium composition, long term unattended cultures...... and tissue like structuring of the cultures. However, as this chapter illustrates, many issues remain to be identified regarding perfusion cell culture such as design, material choice and how to use these systems before they will be widespread amongst biomedical researchers....

  17. Reverse ventilation--perfusion mismatch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmaz, J.C.; Barnett, C.A.; Reich, S.B.; Krumpe, P.E.; Farrer, P.A.

    1984-01-01

    Patients having lobar airway obstruction or consolidation usually have decreases of both ventilation and perfusion on lung scans. We report three patients in whom hypoxic vasoconstriction was apparently incomplete, resulting in a ''reversed'' ventilation-perfusion mismatch. Perfusion of the hypoxic lobe on the radionuclide scan was associated with metabolic alkalosis, pulmonary venous and pulmonary arterial hypertension in these patients.

  18. Hyperpolarized Water Perfusion in the Porcine Brain – a Pilot Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søvsø Szocska Hansen, Esben; Lipsø, Hans Kasper Wigh; Tougaard, Rasmus Stilling

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MR (DCE-MR) perfusion assessment with gadolinium contrast agents is currently the most widely used cerebral perfusion MR method. Hyperpolarized water has recently been shown to succeed 13C probes as angiography probe. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility...... of hyperpolarized water for visualizing the brain vasculature of a large animal in a clinically relevant setting. In detail, reference perfusion values were obtained and large to small arteries could be identified....

  19. Perfusion Bioreactor Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    1990-01-01

    Perfusion bioreactor module, self-contained, closed-loop cell-culture system that operates in microgravity or on Earth. Equipment supports growth or long-term maintenance of cultures of human or other fragile cells for experiments in basic cell biology or process technology. Designed to support proliferation (initially at exponential rates of growth) of cells in complex growth medium and to maintain confluent cells in defined medium under conditions optimized to permit or encourage selected functions of cells, including secretion of products of cells into medium.

  20. NITRATE AND NITRITE CONCENTRATION IN VEGETABLES GRAWING AROUND ISFAHAN CITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A JAFARI

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The improper and excess use of chemical fertilizers by the farmers special in "urea" form may cause the commulation of nitrates and nitrites in vegetables and fruits. This investigation has been done to determine the concentration of nitrates and nitrites in some vegetables growing around Isfahan. Methods: One hundred and thirteen random samples from 15 different kinds of green lest tuber vegetables were measured by Cadmium Column Procedure for nitrates and nitrites. Results: The mean of the nitrates level in green leaf and tuber-vegetables was 287.9 and 76.3 mg/kg, respectively. These amounts were more higher than standard value (67 mg/kg in the basis of wet material, significantly. The mean of the nitrite level in green leaf and tuber vegetables were 1.7 and 1 mg/kg, repectively, which were more higher than standard value (zero mg/kg in the basis of wet matrial. The most high concentration of nitrites and nitrates was seen in commondill and leek, repectively. Discussion: Amounts of nitrites and nitrates in our analysed samples exceeded the perimissible limits. The comulation of nitrates in some of the vegetables depend on the application of chemical fertilizers, temprature and wether, but the nitrites in vegetables is unusual in normal condition and the unsuitable storage of them causes it"s expansion.

  1. Myocardial perfusion modeling using MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Fritz-Hansen, T; Rostrup, Egill

    1996-01-01

    In the present study, it is shown that it is possible to quantify myocardial perfusion using magnetic resonance imaging in combination with gadolinium diethylenetriaminopentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA). Previously, a simple model and method for measuring myocardial perfusion using an inversion recovery...

  2. Voxelwise comparison of perfusion parameters estimated using dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) computed tomography and DCE-magnetic resonance imaging in locally advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallehauge; Jesper; Nielsen, Thomas; Haack, Soeren

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) imaging has gained interest as an imaging modality for assessment of tumor characteristics and response to cancer treatment. However, for DCE-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tissue contrast enhancement may vary depending on imaging sequence and temporal resolution. The aim of this study is to compare DCE-MRI to DCE-computed tomography (DCE-CT) as the gold standard. Material and methods: Thirteen patients with advanced cervical cancer were scanned once prior to chemo-radiation and during chemo-radiation with DCE-CT and -MRI in immediate succession. A total of 22 paired DCE-CT and -MRI scans were acquired for comparison. Kinetic modeling using the extended Tofts model was applied to both image series. Furthermore the similarity of the spatial distribution was evaluated using a G analysis. The correlation between the two imaging techniques was evaluated using Pe arson's correlation and the parameter means were compared using a Student's t-test (p trans (r = 0.9), flux rate constant k ep (r = 0.77), extracellular volume fraction v e (r = 0.58) and blood plasma volume fraction v p (r = 0.83). All quantitative parameters were found to be significantly different as estimated by DCE-CT and -MRI. The G analysis in normalized maps revealed that 45 % of the voxels failed to find a voxel with the corresponding value allowing for an uncertainty of 3 mm in position and 3 % in value (G 3,3 ). By reducing the criteria, the G-failure rates were: G 3,5 (37 % failure), G 3,10 (26% failure) and at G 3,15 (19 % failure). Conclusion: Good to excellent correlations but significant bias was found between DCE-CT and -MRI. Both the Pearson's correlation and the G analysis proved that the spatial information was similar when analyzing the two sets of DCE data using the extended Tofts model. Improvement of input function sampling is needed to improve kinetic quantification using DCE-MRI

  3. Hypoxia tolerance, nitric oxide, and nitrite: Lessons from extreme animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fago, Angela; B. Jensen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    survival resides in concerted physiological responses, including strong metabolic depression, protection against oxidative damage and – in air breathing animals - redistribution of blood flow. Each of these responses is known to be tightly regulated by nitric oxide (NO) and during hypoxia by its metabolite...... nitrite. The aim of this review is to highlight recent work illustrating the widespread roles of NO and nitrite in the tolerance to extreme oxygen deprivation, in particular in the red-eared slider turtle and crucian carp, but also in diving marine mammals. The emerging picture underscores the importance...... of NO and nitrite signaling in the adaptive response to hypoxia in vertebrate animals....

  4. Generation of nitric oxide from nitrite by carbonic anhydrase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aamand, Rasmus; Dalsgaard, Thomas; Jensen, Frank B

    2009-01-01

    In catalyzing the reversible hydration of CO2 to bicarbonate and protons, the ubiquitous enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA) plays a crucial role in CO2 transport, in acid-base balance, and in linking local acidosis to O2 unloading from hemoglobin. Considering the structural similarity between...... bicarbonate and nitrite, we hypothesized that CA uses nitrite as a substrate to produce the potent vasodilator nitric oxide (NO) to increase local blood flow to metabolically active tissues. Here we show that CA readily reacts with nitrite to generate NO, particularly at low pH, and that the NO produced...

  5. Electrochemical oxidation of nitrite on nanodiamond powder electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, L.H.; Zang, J.B.; Wang, Y.H.; Bian, L.Y. [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); College of Materials Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China)

    2008-03-10

    Nanodiamond (ND) powder electrodes were fabricated and the electrochemical properties were investigated in the solution containing nitrite in this article. This electrode exhibits substantial catalytic ability toward the oxidation of nitrite anions. The electrochemical oxidation mechanism of nitrite on the ND powder electrode is discussed. The oxidation of NaNO{sub 2} is a two-electron transfer process. The electrode reaction rate constant k is estimated to be 2.013 x 10{sup -4} cm/s and (1 - {alpha})n{sub {alpha}} is 0.1643. The peak current increases linearly with the rising of the concentration of NaNO{sub 2}. (author)

  6. Grading diffuse gliomas without intense contrast enhancement by amide proton transfer MR imaging: comparisons with diffusion- and perfusion-weighted imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Togao, Osamu; Hiwatashi, Akio; Yamashita, Koji; Kikuchi, Kazufumi; Honda, Hiroshi [Kyushu University, Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Keupp, Jochen [Philips Research, Hamburg (Germany); Yoshimoto, Koji; Kuga, Daisuke; Iihara, Koji [Kyushu University, Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Yoneyama, Masami [Philips Electronics Japan, Tokyo (Japan); Suzuki, Satoshi O.; Iwaki, Toru [Kyushu University, Department of Neuropathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Takahashi, Masaya [Advanced Imaging Research Center, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2017-02-15

    To investigate whether amide proton transfer (APT) MR imaging can differentiate high-grade gliomas (HGGs) from low-grade gliomas (LGGs) among gliomas without intense contrast enhancement (CE). This retrospective study evaluated 34 patients (22 males, 12 females; age 36.0 ± 11.3 years) including 20 with LGGs and 14 with HGGs, all scanned on a 3T MR scanner. Only tumours without intense CE were included. Two neuroradiologists independently performed histogram analyses to measure the 90th-percentile (APT{sub 90}) and mean (APT{sub mean}) of the tumours' APT signals. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) were also measured. The parameters were compared between the groups with Student's t-test. Diagnostic performance was evaluated with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The APT{sub 90} (2.80 ± 0.59 % in LGGs, 3.72 ± 0.89 in HGGs, P = 0.001) and APT{sub mean} (1.87 ± 0.49 % in LGGs, 2.70 ± 0.58 in HGGs, P = 0.0001) were significantly larger in the HGGs compared to the LGGs. The ADC and rCBV values were not significantly different between the groups. Both the APT{sub 90} and APT{sub mean} showed medium diagnostic performance in this discrimination. APT imaging is useful in discriminating HGGs from LGGs among diffuse gliomas without intense CE. (orig.)

  7. Pancreas tumor model in rabbit imaged by perfusion CT scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Jason; Tichauer, Kenneth; Moodie, Karen; Kane, Susan; Hoopes, Jack; Stewart, Errol E.; Hadway, Jennifer; Lee, Ting-Yim; Pereira, Stephen P.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-03-01

    The goal of this work was to develop and validate a pancreas tumor animal model to investigate the relationship between photodynamic therapy (PDT) effectiveness and photosensitizer drug delivery. More specifically, this work lays the foundation for investigating the utility of dynamic contrast enhanced blood perfusion imaging to be used to inform subsequent PDT. A VX2 carcinoma rabbit cell line was grown in the tail of the pancreas of three New Zealand White rabbits and approximately 3-4 weeks after implantation the rabbits were imaged on a CT scanner using a contrast enhanced perfusion protocol, providing parametric maps of blood flow, blood volume, mean transit time, and vascular permeability surface area product.

  8. Nitrite enhances liver graft protection against cold ischemia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amani Cherif-Sayadi

    2017-03-30

    Mar 30, 2017 ... Applied to Development and Health (UR12ES11), Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Monastir, Rue Avicenne, Monastir 5000, Tunisia. *Both authors contributed equally to this work. LIBYAN JOURNAL OF MEDICINE, 2017. VOL. 12, 1308780 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19932820.2017.1308780. © 2017 The ...

  9. Nitrite-dependent vasodilation is facilitated by hypoxia and is independent of known NO-generating nitrite reductase activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Thomas; Simonsen, Ulf; Fago, Angela

    2007-01-01

    The reduction of circulating nitrite to nitric oxide (NO) has emerged as an important physiological reaction aimed to increase vasodilation during tissue hypoxia. Although hemoglobin, xanthine oxidase, endothelial NO synthase, and the bc(1) complex of the mitochondria are known to reduce nitrite...... effect of nitrite during hypoxia was abolished on inhibition of soluble guanylate cyclase and was unaffected by removal of the endothelium or by inhibition of xanthine oxidase and of the mitochondrial bc(1) complex. In the presence of hemoglobin and inositol hexaphosphate (which increases the fraction...

  10. Measuring nitrate and nitrite concentrations in vegetables, fruits in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) and accuracy was measured by a conventional spectrophotometers. SAS and Excel were used to draw diagrams and statistical calculations. Statistical comparisons showed value of nitrate and nitrite in leafy vegetables is more than fruits and ...

  11. Performance of denitrifying microbial fuel cell with biocathode over nitrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao eHuimin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Microbial fuel cell (MFC with nitrite as an electron acceptor in cathode provided a new technology for nitrogen removal and electricity production simultaneously. The influences of influent nitrite concentration and external resistance on the performance of denitrifying MFC were investigated. The optimal effectiveness were obtained with the maximum total nitrogen (TN removal rate of 54.80±0.01 g m-3 d-1. It would be rather desirable for the TN removal than electricity generation at lower external resistance. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis suggested that Proteobacteria was the predominant phylum, accounting for 35.72%. Thiobacillus and Afipia might benefit to nitrite removal. The presence of nitrifying Devosia indicated that nitrite was oxidized to nitrate via a biochemical mechanism in the cathode. Ignavibacterium and Anaerolineaceae was found in the cathode as a heterotrophic bacterium with sodium acetate as substrate, which illustrated that sodium acetate in anode was likely permeated through proton exchange membrane to the cathode .

  12. Intramolecular electron transfer in Pseudomonas aeruginosa cd(1) nitrite reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Brunori, Maurizio; Cutruzzolà, Francesca

    2009-01-01

    The cd(1) nitrite reductases, which catalyze the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide, are homodimers of 60 kDa subunits, each containing one heme-c and one heme-d(1). Heme-c is the electron entry site, whereas heme-d(1) constitutes the catalytic center. The 3D structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa...... nitrite reductase has been determined in both fully oxidized and reduced states. Intramolecular electron transfer (ET), between c and d(1) hemes is an essential step in the catalytic cycle. In earlier studies of the Pseudomonas stutzeri enzyme, we observed that a marked negative cooperativity...... is controlling this internal ET step. In this study we have investigated the internal ET in the wild-type and His369Ala mutant of P. aeruginosa nitrite reductases and have observed similar cooperativity to that of the Pseudomonas stutzeri enzyme. Heme-c was initially reduced, in an essentially diffusion...

  13. Yield of Ozone, Nitrite Nitrogen and Hydrogen Peroxide Versus Discharge Parameter Using APPJ Under Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Bingyan; Wen Wen; Zhu Changping; Wang Yuan; Gao Ying; Fei Juntao; He Xiang; Yin Cheng; Jiang Yongfeng; Chen Longwei

    2016-01-01

    Discharge plasma in and in contact with water can be accompanied with ultraviolet radiation and electron impact, thus can generate hydroxyl radicals, ozone, nitrite nitrogen and hydrogen peroxide. In this paper, a non-equilibrium plasma processing system was established by means of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet immersed in water. The hydroxyl intensities and discharge energy waveforms were tested. The results show that the positive and negative discharge energy peaks were asymmetric, where the positive discharge energy peak was greater than the negative one. Meanwhile, the yield of ozone and nitrite nitrogen was enhanced with the increase of both the treatment time and the discharge energy. Moreover, the pH value of treated water was reduced rapidly and maintained at a lower level. The residual concentration of hydrogen peroxide in APPJ treated water was kept at a low level. Additionally, both the efficiency energy ratio of the yield of ozone and nitrite nitrogen and that of the removal of p-nitrophenol increased as a function of discharge energy and discharge voltage. The experimental results were fully analyzed and the chemical reaction equations and the physical processes of discharges in water were given. (paper)

  14. Yield of Ozone, Nitrite Nitrogen and Hydrogen Peroxide Versus Discharge Parameter Using APPJ Under Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bingyan; Zhu, Changping; Fei, Juntao; He, Xiang; Yin, Cheng; Wang, Yuan; Gao, Ying; Jiang, Yongfeng; Wen, Wen; Chen, Longwei

    2016-03-01

    Discharge plasma in and in contact with water can be accompanied with ultraviolet radiation and electron impact, thus can generate hydroxyl radicals, ozone, nitrite nitrogen and hydrogen peroxide. In this paper, a non-equilibrium plasma processing system was established by means of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet immersed in water. The hydroxyl intensities and discharge energy waveforms were tested. The results show that the positive and negative discharge energy peaks were asymmetric, where the positive discharge energy peak was greater than the negative one. Meanwhile, the yield of ozone and nitrite nitrogen was enhanced with the increase of both the treatment time and the discharge energy. Moreover, the pH value of treated water was reduced rapidly and maintained at a lower level. The residual concentration of hydrogen peroxide in APPJ treated water was kept at a low level. Additionally, both the efficiency energy ratio of the yield of ozone and nitrite nitrogen and that of the removal of p-nitrophenol increased as a function of discharge energy and discharge voltage. The experimental results were fully analyzed and the chemical reaction equations and the physical processes of discharges in water were given. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11274092, 11404092, 61401146), the Nantong Science and Technology Project, Nantong, China (No. BK2014024), the Open Project of Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory of Environmental Engineering, Nanjing, China (No. KF2014001), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (No. 2014B11414)

  15. A Simplified Whole-Organ CT Perfusion Technique with Biphasic Acquisition: Preliminary Investigation of Accuracy and Protocol Feasibility in Kidneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, XiaoDong; Zhang, Jing; Quan, ChangBin; Tian, Yuan; Li, Hong; Ao, GuoKun

    2016-04-01

    To determine the feasibility and accuracy of a protocol for calculating whole-organ renal perfusion (renal blood flow [RBF]) and regional perfusion on the basis of biphasic computed tomography (CT), with concurrent dynamic contrast material-enhanced (DCE) CT perfusion serving as the reference standard. This prospective study was approved by the institutional review board, and written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Biphasic CT of the kidneys, including precontrast and arterial phase imaging, was integrated with a first-pass dynamic volume CT protocol and performed and analyzed in 23 patients suspected of having renal artery stenosis. The perfusion value derived from biphasic CT was calculated as CT number enhancement divided by the area under the arterial input function and compared with the DCE CT perfusion data by using the paired t test, correlation analysis, and Bland-Altman plots. Correlation analysis was made between the RBF and the extent of renal artery stenosis. All postprocessing was independently performed by two observers and then averaged as the final result. Mean ± standard deviation biphasic and DCE CT perfusion data for RBF were 425.62 mL/min ± 124.74 and 419.81 mL/min ± 121.13, respectively (P = .53), and for regional perfusion they were 271.15 mL/min per 100 mL ± 82.21 and 266.33 mL/min per 100 mL ± 74.40, respectively (P = .31). Good correlation and agreement were shown between biphasic and DCE CT perfusion for RBF (r = 0.93; ±10% variation from mean perfusion data [P perfusion (r = 0.90; ±13% variation from mean perfusion data [P CT perfusion (r = -0.81, P = .012). Biphasic CT perfusion is clinically feasible and provides perfusion data comparable to DCE CT perfusion data at both global and regional levels in the kidney. Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  16. Prediction of Liver Function by Using Magnetic Resonance-based Portal Venous Perfusion Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao Yue, E-mail: yuecao@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Wang Hesheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Johnson, Timothy D. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Pan, Charlie [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hussain, Hero [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Balter, James M.; Normolle, Daniel; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Feng, Mary [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether liver function can be assessed globally and spatially by using volumetric dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging MRI (DCE-MRI) to potentially aid in adaptive treatment planning. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients with intrahepatic cancer undergoing focal radiation therapy (RT) were enrolled in institution review board-approved prospective studies to obtain DCE-MRI (to measure regional perfusion) and indocyanine green (ICG) clearance rates (to measure overall liver function) prior to, during, and at 1 and 2 months after treatment. The volumetric distribution of portal venous perfusion in the whole liver was estimated for each scan. We assessed the correlation between mean portal venous perfusion in the nontumor volume of the liver and overall liver function measured by ICG before, during, and after RT. The dose response for regional portal venous perfusion to RT was determined using a linear mixed effects model. Results: There was a significant correlation between the ICG clearance rate and mean portal venous perfusion in the functioning liver parenchyma, suggesting that portal venous perfusion could be used as a surrogate for function. Reduction in regional venous perfusion 1 month after RT was predicted by the locally accumulated biologically corrected dose at the end of RT (P<.0007). Regional portal venous perfusion measured during RT was a significant predictor for regional venous perfusion assessed 1 month after RT (P<.00001). Global hypovenous perfusion pre-RT was observed in 4 patients (3 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and cirrhosis), 3 of whom had recovered from hypoperfusion, except in the highest dose regions, post-RT. In addition, 3 patients who had normal perfusion pre-RT had marked hypervenous perfusion or reperfusion in low-dose regions post-RT. Conclusions: This study suggests that MR-based volumetric hepatic perfusion imaging may be a biomarker for spatial distribution of liver function, which

  17. Resuscitation of ischemic donor livers with normothermic machine perfusion: a metabolic flux analysis of treatment in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-Louisa Izamis

    Full Text Available Normothermic machine perfusion has previously been demonstrated to restore damaged warm ischemic livers to transplantable condition in animal models. However, the mechanisms of recovery are unclear, preventing rational optimization of perfusion systems and slowing clinical translation of machine perfusion. In this study, organ recovery time and major perfusate shortcomings were evaluated using a comprehensive metabolic analysis of organ function in perfusion prior to successful transplantation. Two groups, Fresh livers and livers subjected to 1 hr of warm ischemia (WI received perfusion for a total preservation time of 6 hrs, followed by successful transplantation. 24 metabolic fluxes were directly measured and 38 stoichiometrically-related fluxes were estimated via a mass balance model of the major pathways of energy metabolism. This analysis revealed stable metabolism in Fresh livers throughout perfusion while identifying two distinct metabolic states in WI livers, separated at t = 2 hrs, coinciding with recovery of oxygen uptake rates to Fresh liver values. This finding strongly suggests successful organ resuscitation within 2 hrs of perfusion. Overall perfused livers regulated metabolism of perfusate substrates according to their metabolic needs, despite supraphysiological levels of some metabolites. This study establishes the first integrative metabolic basis for the dynamics of recovery during perfusion treatment of marginal livers. Our initial findings support enhanced oxygen delivery for both timely recovery and long-term sustenance. These results are expected to lead the optimization of the treatment protocols and perfusion media from a metabolic perspective, facilitating translation to clinical use.

  18. Differential uptake and metabolism of nitrite in normoxic and hypoxic goldfish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank Bo; Hansen, Marie N.

    2011-01-01

    extracellular and intracellular compartments, revealing nitrosative stress with extensive nitros(yl)ation of thiols, amines and heme groups. The degree of nitrosative stress correlated with nitrite load. Nitrate levels increased in all compartments, reflecting that a significant fraction of the nitrite taken up...... was converted to non-toxic nitrate. The generation of methemoglobin and nitrosylhemoglobin (assessed by spectral deconvolution) was more pronounced during normoxic nitrite exposure than during hypoxic nitrite exposure, in agreement with the higher nitrite load in normoxic fish. However, at any given nitrite......Nitrite is a physiological important nitric oxide donor at low concentrations but becomes toxic at high concentrations, as develops in freshwater fish exposed to environmental nitrite. We hypothesized that nitrite uptake across the gills differs between normoxic and hypoxic fish and that nitrite...

  19. Urinary nitrite in symptomatic and asymptomatic urinary infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, H R; McCredie, D A; Ritchie, M A

    1987-01-01

    The dipstrip test for urinary nitrite is fairly unreliable in symptomatic urinary infections and only 104 (52%) of 200 symptomatic children with urinary infection attending an emergency department had a positive result. The test yielded positive results, however, in 83 of 100 outpatients with largely asymptomatic urinary infection attending a follow up clinic because of known predisposition to urinary infection. This difference was highly significant. The finding of urinary nitrite is highly ...

  20. Mitochondria recycle nitrite back to the bioregulator nitric monoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nohl, H.; Staniek, K.; Sobhian, B.; Bahrami, S.; Redl, H.; Kozlov, A.V.

    2000-01-01

    Nitric monoxide (NO) exerts a great variety of physiological functions. L-Arginine supplies amino groups which are transformed to NO in various NO-synthase-active isoenzyme complexes. NO-synthesis is stimulated under various conditions increasing the tissue of stable NO-metabolites. The major oxidation product found is nitrite. Elevated nitrite levels were reported to exist in a variety of diseases including HIV, reperfusion injury and hypovolemic shock. Denitrifying bacteria such as Paracoccus denitrificans have a membrane bound set of cytochromes (cyt cd 1 , cyt bc) which were shown to be involved in nitrite reduction activities. Mammalian mitochondria have similar cytochromes which form part of the respiratory chain. Like in bacteria quinols are used as reductants of these types of cytochromes. The observation of one-e - divergence from this redox-couple to external dioxygen made us to study whether this site of the respiratory chain may also recycle nitrite back to its bioactive form NO. Thus, the aim of the present study was therefore to confirm the existence of a reductive pathway which reestablishes the existence of the bioregulator NO from its main metabolite NO 2 - . Our results show that respiring mitochondria readily reduce added nitrite to NO which was made visible by nitrosylation of deoxyhemoglobin. The adduct gives characteristic triplet-ESR-signals. Using inhibitors of the respiratory chain for chemical sequestration of respiratory segments we were able to identify the site where nitrite is reduced. The results confirm the ubiquinone/cyt bc 1 couple as the reductant site where nitrite is recycled. The high affinity of NO to the heme-iron of cytochrome oxidase will result in an impairment of mitochondrial energy-production. ''Nitrite tolerance'' of angina pectoris patients using NO-donors may be explained in that way. (author)

  1. Nitrate, Nitrite and ascorbic acid content of commercial and home ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The contents of nitrate, nitrite and ascorbic acid were determined in four samples of commercial and fifteen samples of home - prepared complementary infant foods common in Nigeria. The nitrate and nitrite values of the commercial food samples ranged from 3.1– 3.9mgNO3- N/100g and 5.0 - 16.0ug N02 - N/100g ...

  2. Modulation of nitrate-nitrite conversion in the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Maanen, J M; van Geel, A A; Kleinjans, J C

    1996-01-01

    The formation of nitrite from ingested nitrate can give rise to the induction of methemoglobinemia and endogenous nitrosation resulting in the formation of carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds. We investigated the possibility of modulation of the conversion of nitrate into nitrite in the oral cavity in order to seek ways of reducing the formation of the deleterious nitrite. We investigated the effectiveness of several mouthwash solutions with antibacterial constituents on the reduction of nitrate into nitrite in the oral cavity. In 15 studied subjects, the mean percentage of salivary nitrate reduced to nitrite after ingestion of 235 mg (3.8 mmol) nitrate was found to be 16.1 +/- 6.2%. The use of an antiseptic mouthwash with active antibacterial constituent chlorhexidine resulted in an almost complete decrease of the mean percentage of reduced nitrate, to 0.9 +/- 0.8%. Mouthwash solutions with antibacterial component triclosan or antimicrobial enzymes amyloglucosidase and glucose oxidase did not affect the reduction of nitrate into nitrite. A toothpaste with active components triclosan and zinc citrate with synergistic antiplaque activity was also without effect. Use of a pH-regulating chewing gum resulted in a rise in the pH in the oral cavity from 6.8 to 7.3. At 30 min after nitrate ingestion, this rise was accompanied by a significant increase in the salivary nitrite concentration, which might be explained by the pH being close to the optimal pH for nitrate reductase of 8. In conclusion, a limited number of possibilities of modulation of the conversion of nitrate into nitrite in the oral cavity are available.

  3. Technical aspects of MR perfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sourbron, Steven

    2010-01-01

    The most common methods for measuring perfusion with MRI are arterial spin labelling (ASL), dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC-MRI), and T 1 -weighted dynamic contrast enhancement (DCE-MRI). This review focuses on the latter approach, which is by far the most common in the body and produces measures of capillary permeability as well. The aim is to present a concise but complete overview of the technical issues involved in DCE-MRI data acquisition and analysis. For details the reader is referred to the references. The presentation of the topic is essentially generic and focuses on technical aspects that are common to all DCE-MRI measurements. For organ-specific problems and illustrations, we refer to the other papers in this issue. In Section 1 'Theory' the basic quantities are defined, and the physical mechanisms are presented that provide a relation between the hemodynamic parameters and the DCE-MRI signal. Section 2 'Data acquisition' discusses the issues involved in the design of an optimal measurement protocol. Section 3 'Data analysis' summarizes the steps that need to be taken to determine the hemodynamic parameters from the measured data.

  4. Polymeric optical sensors for selective and sensitive nitrite detection using cobalt(III) corrole and rhodium(III) porphyrin as ionophores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Si; Wo, Yaqi; Meyerhoff, Mark E., E-mail: mmeyerho@umich.edu

    2014-09-16

    Highlights: • We examine cobalt(III) corroles and rhodium(III) porphyrins as ionophores in polymeric films for optical sensors to detect nitrite. • Different types of proton chromoionophores are evaluated to optimize nitrite response. • Selectivity over lipophilic anions such as perchlorate and thiocyanate is observed. • Both ionophores yield optical sensors that are fully reversible. • The cobalt(III) corrole based sensor is employed to determine nitric oxide emission rates from NO donor doped polymers with good accuracy. - Abstract: Cobalt(III) 5,10,15-tris(4-tert-butylphenyl) corrole with a triphenylphosphine axial ligand and rhodium(III) 5,10,15,20-tetra(p-tert-butylphenyl) porphyrin are incorporated into plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) films to fabricate nitrite-selective bulk optodes via absorbance measurements. The resulting films yield sensitive, fast and fully reversible response toward nitrite with significantly enhanced nitrite selectivity over other anions including lipophilic anions such as thiocyanate and perchlorate. The selectivity patterns differ greatly from the Hofmeister series based on anion lipophilicity and are consistent with selectivity obtained with potentiometric sensors based on the same ionophores. The optical nitrite sensors are shown to be useful for detecting rates of emission of nitric oxide (NO) from NO releasing polymers containing S-nitroso-N-acetyl-DL-penicillamine.

  5. Nitrite therapy improves survival postexposure to chlorine gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honavar, Jaideep; Doran, Stephen; Oh, Joo-Yeun; Steele, Chad; Matalon, Sadis; Patel, Rakesh P

    2014-12-01

    Exposure to relatively high levels of chlorine (Cl₂) gas can occur in mass-casualty scenarios associated with accidental or intentional release. Recent studies have shown a significant postexposure injury phase to the airways, pulmonary, and systemic vasculatures mediated in part by oxidative stress, inflammation, and dysfunction in endogenous nitric oxide homeostasis pathways. However, there is a need for therapeutics that are amenable to rapid and easy administration in the field and that display efficacy toward toxicity after chlorine exposure. In this study, we tested whether nitric oxide repletion using nitrite, by intramuscular injection after Cl₂ exposure, could prevent Cl₂ gas toxicity. C57bl/6 male mice were exposed to 600 parts per million Cl₂ gas for 45 min, and 24-h survival was determined with or without postexposure intramuscular nitrite injection. A single injection of nitrite (10 mg/kg) administered either 30 or 60 min postexposure significantly improved 24-h survival (from ∼20% to 50%). Survival was associated with decreased neutrophil accumulation in the airways. Rendering mice neutropenic before Cl₂ exposure improved survival and resulted in loss of nitrite-dependent survival protection. Interestingly, female mice were more sensitive to Cl₂-induced toxicity compared with males and were also less responsive to postexposure nitrite therapy. These data provide evidence for efficacy and define therapeutic parameters for a single intramuscular injection of nitrite as a therapeutic after Cl₂ gas exposure that is amenable to administration in mass-casualty scenarios. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Perfusion measurement in acute pancreatitis using dynamic perfusion MDCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bize, Pierre E; Platon, Alexandra; Becker, Christoph D; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre

    2006-01-01

    Our objective was to determine whether MDCT with perfusion imaging could help in assessing the severity of acute pancreatitis in the initial phase of the disease. One hundred six patients with abdominal pain were prospectively enrolled in this study. Patients were separated into two groups: P1 (severe) and P2 (mild) acute pancreatitis. Mean perfusion value was 24.8 mL/100 mL/min in the P1 group and 50.5 mL/100 mL/min in the P2 group (p = 0.0016, significant). Our preliminary data suggest that pancreatic perfusion measurement using MDCT with perfusion imaging could help in assessing the severity of acute pancreatitis.

  7. Perfusion defects in pulmonary perfusion iodine maps: causes and semiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustos Fiore, A; González Vázquez, M; Trinidad López, C; Mera Fernández, D; Costas Álvarez, M

    2017-12-14

    to describe the usefulness of dual-energy CT for obtaining pulmonary perfusion maps to provide morphological and functional information in patients with pulmonary embolisms. To review the semiology of perfusion defects due to pulmonary embolism so they can be differentiated from perfusion defects due to other causes: alterations outside the range used in the iodine map caused by other diseases of the lung parenchyma or artifacts. CT angiography of the pulmonary arteries is the technique of choice for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolisms. New dual-energy CT scanners are useful for detecting perfusion defects secondary to complete or partial obstruction of pulmonary arteries and is most useful for detecting pulmonary embolisms in subsegmental branches. Copyright © 2017 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Nitrate and nitrite content of human, formula, bovine, and soy milks: implications for dietary nitrite and nitrate recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hord, Norman G; Ghannam, Janine S; Garg, Harsha K; Berens, Pamela D; Bryan, Nathan S

    2011-12-01

    Estimation of nitrate and nitrite concentrations of milk sources may provide insight into potential health risks and benefits of these food sources for infants, children, and adults. The World Health Organization and American Academy of Pediatrics recommends exclusive consumption of human milk for the first 6 months of life. Human milk is known to confer significant nutritional and immunological benefits for the infant. Consumption of formula, cow's, and soy milk may be used as alternatives to human milk for infants. We sought to estimate potential exposure to nitrate and nitrite in human, formula, bovine, and soy milk to inform total dietary exposure estimates and recommendations. Using sensitive quantitative methodologies, nitrite and nitrate were analyzed in different samples of milk. Human milk concentrations of colostrum (expressed days 1-3 postpartum; n=12), transition milk (expressed days 3-7 postpartum; n=17), and mature milk (expressed >7 days postpartum; n=50) were 0.08 mg/100 mL nitrite and 0.19 mg/100 mL nitrate, 0.001 mg/100 mL nitrite and 0.52 mg/100 mL nitrate, and 0.001 mg/100 mL nitrite and 0.3 mg/100 mL nitrate, respectively, revealing that the absolute amounts of these anions change as the composition of milk changes. When expressed as a percentage of the World Health Organization's Acceptable Daily Intake limits, Silk® Soy Vanilla (WhiteWave Foods, Broomfield, CO) intake could result in high nitrate intakes (104% of this standard), while intake of Bright Beginnings Soy Pediatric® formula (PBM Nutritionals, Georgia, VT) could result in the highest nitrite intakes (383% of this standard). The temporal relationship between the provision of nitrite in human milk and the development of commensal microbiota capable of reducing dietary nitrate to nitrite supports a hypothesis that humans are adapted to provide nitrite to the gastrointestinal tract from birth. These data support the hypothesis that the high concentrations of

  9. Intermediates detected by visible spectroscopy during the reaction of nitrite with deoxyhemoglobin: the effect of nitrite concentration and diphosphoglycerate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagababu, Enika; Ramasamy, Somasundaram; Rifkind, Joseph M

    2007-10-16

    The reaction of nitrite with deoxyhemoglobin (deoxyHb) results in the reduction of nitrite to NO, which binds unreacted deoxyHb forming Fe(II)-nitrosylhemoglobin (Hb(II)NO). The tight binding of NO to deoxyHb is, however, inconsistent with reports implicating this reaction with hypoxic vasodilation. This dilemma is resolved by the demonstration that metastable intermediates are formed in the course of the reaction of nitrite with deoxyHb. The level of intermediates is quantitated by the excess deoxyHb consumed over the concentrations of the final products formed. The dominant intermediate has a spectrum that does not correspond to that of Hb(III)NO formed when NO reacts with methemoglobin (MetHb), but is similar to metHb resulting in the spectroscopic determinations of elevated levels of metHb. It is a delocalized species involving the heme iron, the NO, and perhaps the beta-93 thiol. The putative role for red cell reacted nitrite on vasodilation is associated with reactions involving the intermediate. (1) The intermediate is less stable with a 10-fold excess of nitrite and is not detected with a 100-fold excess of nitrite. This observation is attributed to the reaction of nitrite with the intermediate producing N2O3. (2) The release of NO quantitated by the formation of Hb(II)NO is regulated by changes in the distal heme pocket as shown by the 4.5-fold decrease in the rate constant in the presence of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate. The regulated release of NO or N2O3 as well as the formation of the S-nitroso derivative of hemoglobin, which has also been reported to be formed from the intermediates generated during nitrite reduction, should be associated with any hypoxic vasodilation attributed to the RBC.

  10. Effect of Dry Red Grape Pomace as a Nitrite Substitute on the Microbiological and Physicochemical Properties and Residual Nitrite of Dry-cured Sausage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Riazi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite have been traditionally used for inhibition of Clostridium botulinum and also as an agent to stabilize the color of meat products; however, usage of these additives at high levels could lead to toxicity and cancer originating from the formation of nitrosamines. Nowadays, application of natural preservatives in order to reduce the nitrite content in meat products is increasing. Thus, we used dry red grape pomace (DRGP as a natural alternative to sodium nitrite. Materials and Methods: The effect of two levels of DRGP (1 and 2% on the proximate composition, microbial counts, pH values and residual nitrite level of the samples formulated with two levels of sodium nitrite (30 and 60 mg/kg, as well as the comparison of these sausages with the blank (nitrite-free  and control (full nitrite added samples on the 1rst, 10th, 20th and 30th days of storage at 3-5 °C were evaluated. Results: The results showed that all chemical compositions were in the ranges reported by other researchers, and nitrite was very effective in preventing the microbial growth. Also about 50 % of the ingoing nitrite could be analyzed in the samples after processing. Moreover, the residual nitrite level declined both during the storage of sausage and after the addition of DRGP. Conclusions: The use of DRGP in combination with nitrite for sausages was more effective in keeping the quality and safety of the refrigerated consumer products as indicated by the lower nitrite levels, microbial count and similar composition as compared to the samples treated with nitrite and without nitrite. Keywords: Dry red grape pomace (DRGP, Sausage, Nitrite, Microbial count

  11. Determination of low level nitrate/nitrite contamination using SERS-active Ag/ITO substrates coupled to a self-designed Raman spectroscopy system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi T.K. Tran

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A portable and simple Raman scattering and photoluminescence spectroscopy system was set up for sensitive and rapid determination of nitrate/nitrite at low concentrations in water samples. The SERS (Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering – active Ag/ITO substrates were prepared and employed to obtain the enhanced Raman scattering light from the sample. Concentrations as low as 1 ppm and 0.1 ppm were detectable for nitrate and nitrite, respectively. The obtained results confirmed the usefulness of the designed system in actual environmental measurements and analysis.

  12. Multi-detector CT perfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf M. Enite

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: CTP is a promising non-invasive technique assessing the efficacy, predicting early response to local treatment therapies and monitoring tumor recurrence. It assesses the degree of post therapy tumor perfusion especially the degree of arterialization.

  13. A quantitative high resolution voxel-wise assessment of myocardial blood flow from contrast-enhanced first-pass magnetic resonance perfusion imaging: microsphere validation in a magnetic resonance compatible free beating explanted pig heart model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuster, Andreas; Sinclair, Matthew; Zarinabad, Niloufar; Ishida, Masaki; van den Wijngaard, Jeroen P. H. M.; Paul, Matthias; van Horssen, Pepijn; Hussain, Shazia T.; Perera, Divaka; Schaeffter, Tobias; Spaan, Jos A. E.; Siebes, Maria; Nagel, Eike; Chiribiri, Amedeo

    2015-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of high-resolution quantitative cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) voxel-wise perfusion imaging using clinical 1.5 and 3 T sequences and to validate it using fluorescently labelled microspheres in combination with a state of the art imaging cryomicrotome in a novel,

  14. A quantitative high resolution voxel-wise assessment of myocardial blood flow from contrast-enhanced first-pass magnetic resonance perfusion imaging: microsphere validation in a magnetic resonance compatible free beating explanted pig heart model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Andreas; Sinclair, Matthew; Zarinabad, Niloufar; Ishida, Masaki; van den Wijngaard, Jeroen P H M; Paul, Matthias; van Horssen, Pepijn; Hussain, Shazia T; Perera, Divaka; Schaeffter, Tobias; Spaan, Jos A E; Siebes, Maria; Nagel, Eike; Chiribiri, Amedeo

    2015-10-01

    To assess the feasibility of high-resolution quantitative cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) voxel-wise perfusion imaging using clinical 1.5 and 3 T sequences and to validate it using fluorescently labelled microspheres in combination with a state of the art imaging cryomicrotome in a novel, isolated blood-perfused MR-compatible free beating pig heart model without respiratory motion. MR perfusion imaging was performed in pig hearts at 1.5 (n = 4) and 3 T (n = 4). Images were acquired at physiological flow ('rest'), reduced flow ('ischaemia'), and during adenosine-induced hyperaemia ('stress') in control and coronary occlusion conditions. Fluorescently labelled microspheres and known coronary myocardial blood flow represented the reference standards for quantitative perfusion validation. For the comparison with microspheres, the LV was divided into 48 segments based on a subdivision of the 16 AHA segments into subendocardial, midmyocardial, and subepicardial subsegments. Perfusion quantification of the time-signal intensity curves was performed using a Fermi function deconvolution. High-resolution quantitative voxel-wise perfusion assessment was able to distinguish between occluded and remote myocardium (P < 0.001) and between rest, ischaemia, and stress perfusion conditions at 1.5 T (P < 0.001) and at 3 T (P < 0.001). CMR-MBF estimates correlated well with the microspheres at the AHA segmental level at 1.5 T (r = 0.94, P < 0.001) and at 3 T (r = 0.96, P < 0.001) and at the subendocardial, midmyocardial, and subepicardial level at 1.5 T (r = 0.93, r = 0.9, r = 0.88, P < 0.001, respectively) and at 3 T (r = 0.91, r = 0.95, r = 0.84, P < 0.001, respectively). CMR-derived voxel-wise quantitative blood flow assessment is feasible and very accurate compared with microspheres. This technique is suitable for both clinically used field strengths and may provide the tools to assess extent and severity of myocardial ischaemia. Published on behalf of the European Society

  15. Liver perfusion in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI): comparison of enhancement in Gd-BT-DO3A and Gd-EOB-DTPA in normal liver parenchyma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schalkx, Hanke J.; Bosch, Maurice A.A.J. van den; Veldhuis, Wouter B.; Leeuwen, Maarten S. van [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, PO Box 58800, Utrecht (Netherlands); Stralen, Marijn van; Pluim, Josien P.W. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute, Utrecht (Netherlands); Coenegrachts, Kenneth [Department of Radiology, Bruges (Belgium); Kessel, Charlotte S. van; Hillegersberg, Richard van [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Surgery, Utrecht (Netherlands); Erpecum, Karel J. van [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Gastroenterology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Verkooijen, Helena M. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Clinical epidemiologist, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2014-09-15

    Within-patient comparison of the enhancement patterns of normal liver parenchyma after gadobutrol and gadoxetate disodium, with emphasis on the start of hepatocytic uptake of gadoxetate disodium. Twenty-one patients (12 female, 9 male) without chronic liver disease underwent 1.5-T contrast-enhanced MRI twice, once with an extracellular contrast agent (gadobutrol) and once with a hepatospecific agent (gadoxetate disodium), using a T1-weighted keyhole sequence. Fifteen whole-liver datasets were acquired up to 5 min for both contrast agents and two additional datasets, up to 20 min, for gadoxetate. Signal intensities (SI) of the parenchyma, aorta and portal vein were measured and analysed relative to pre-contrast parenchymal SI. After gadoxetate, in 29 % of the patients the parenchymal SI decreased by ≥5 % after the initial vascular-phase-induced peak, while in the other 71 % the parenchymal SI remained stable or gradually increased until up to 20 min after the initial peak. The hepatocytic gadoxetate uptake started at a mean of 37.8 s (SD 14.7 s) and not later than 76 s after left ventricle enhancement. Parenchymal enhancement due to hepatocytic uptake of gadoxetate can start as early as in the late arterial phase. This may confound the assessment of lesion appearance as compared to extracellular contrast such as gadobutrol. (orig.)

  16. The diagnosis of renal perfusion abnormalities by sequential CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treugut, H.; Andersson, I.; Hildell, J.; Nyman, U.; Weibull, H.

    1981-01-01

    Abnormalities of renal perfusion can be recognised more readily by sequential CT than by plain CT scan or after static enhancement with contrast medium. Haemodynamically significant stenoses of the renal arteries and total, or partial, infarcts can be diagnosed in this way. Intrarenal and capsular collaterals can be recognised by slow contrast accumulation in the infarcted area, or by the development of contrast in the sub-capsular portion of the cortex. Renal cortical necrosis is very well demonstrated by the absence of cortical perfusion; this is seen, for instance, in the DIC syndrome or during rejection after renal transplant. (orig.) [de

  17. Nitrogen cycling in the secondary nitrite maximum of the eastern tropical North Pacific off Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwald, Carolyn; Santoro, Alyson E.; Stanley, Rachel H. R.; Casciotti, Karen L.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrite is a central intermediate in the marine nitrogen cycle and represents a critical juncture where nitrogen can be reduced to the less bioavailable N2 gas or oxidized to nitrate and retained in a more bioavailable form. We present an analysis of rates of microbial nitrogen transformations in the oxygen deficient zone (ODZ) within the eastern tropical North Pacific Ocean (ETNP). We determined rates using a novel one-dimensional model using the distribution of nitrite and nitrate concentrations, along with their natural abundance nitrogen (N) and oxygen (O) isotope profiles. We predict rate profiles for nitrate reduction, nitrite reduction, and nitrite oxidation throughout the ODZ, as well as the contributions of anammox to nitrite reduction and nitrite oxidation. Nitrate reduction occurs at a maximum rate of 25 nM d-1 at the top of the ODZ, at the same depth as the maximum rate of nitrite reduction, 15 nM d-1. Nitrite oxidation occurs at maximum rates of 10 nM d-1 above the secondary nitrite maximum, but also in the secondary nitrite maximum, within the ODZ. Anammox contributes to nitrite oxidation within the ODZ but cannot account for all of it. Nitrite oxidation within the ODZ that is not through anammox is also supported by microbial gene abundance profiles. Our results suggest the presence of nitrite oxidation within the ETNP ODZ, with implications for the distribution and physiology of marine nitrite-oxidizing bacteria, and for total nitrogen loss in the largest marine ODZ.

  18. The Development of a Thin-Filmed Noninvasive Tissue Perfusion Sensor to Quantify Capillary Pressure Occlusion of Explanted Organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Timothy J; Roghanizad, Ali R; Jones, Philip A; Aardema, Charles H; Robertson, John L; Diller, Thomas E

    2017-07-01

    A new thin-filmed perfusion sensor was developed using a heat flux gauge, thin-film thermocouple, and a heating element. This sensor, termed "CHFT+," is an enhancement of the previously established combined heat flux-temperature (CHFT) sensor technology predominately used to quantify the severity of burns [1]. The CHFT+ sensor was uniquely designed to measure tissue perfusion on explanted organs destined for transplantation, but could be functionalized and used in a wide variety of other biomedical applications. Exploiting the thin and semiflexible nature of the new CHFT+ sensor assembly, perfusion measurements can be made from the underside of the organ-providing a quantitative indirect measure of capillary pressure occlusion. Results from a live tissue test demonstrated, for the first time, the effects of pressure occlusion on an explanted porcine kidney. CHFT+ sensors were placed on top of and underneath 18 kidneys to measure and compare perfusion at perfusate temperatures of 5 and 20 °C. The data collected show a greater perfusion on the topside than the underside of the specimen for the length of the experiment. This indicates that the pressure occlusion is truly affecting the perfusion, and, thus, the overall preservation of explanted organs. Moreover, the results demonstrate the effect of preservation temperature on the tissue vasculature. Focusing on the topside perfusion only, the 20 °C perfusion was greater than the 5 °C perfusion, likely due to the vasoconstrictive response at the lower perfusion temperatures.

  19. Nitrite as regulator of hypoxic signaling in mammalian physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Faassen, Ernst E.; Bahrami, Soheyl; Feelisch, Martin; Hogg, Neil; Kelm, Malte; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.; Kozlov, Andrey V.; Li, Haitao; Lundberg, Jon O.; Mason, Ron; Nohl, Hans; Rassaf, Tienush; Samouilov, Alexandre; Slama-Schwok, Anny; Shiva, Sruti; Vanin, Anatoly F.; Weitzberg, Eddie; Zweier, Jay; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2009-01-01

    In this review we consider the physiological effects of endogenous and pharmacological levels of nitrite under conditions of hypoxia. In humans, the nitrite anion has long been considered as metastable intermediate in the oxidation of nitric oxide radicals to the stable metabolite nitrate. This oxidation cascade was thought to be irreversible under physiological conditions. However, a growing body of experimental observations attests that the presence of endogenous nitrite regulates a number of signaling events along the physiological and pathophysiological oxygen gradient. Hypoxic signaling events include vasodilation, modulation of mitochondrial respiration, and cytoprotection following ischemic insult. These phenomena are attributed to the reduction of nitrite anions to nitric oxide if local oxygen levels in tissues decrease. Recent research identified a growing list of enzymatic and non-enzymatic pathways for this endogenous reduction of nitrite. Additional direct signaling events not involving free nitric oxide are proposed. We here discuss the mechanisms and properties of these various pathways and the role played by the local concentration of free oxygen in the affected tissue. PMID:19219851

  20. Nitrite therapy prevents chlorine gas toxicity in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honavar, Jaideep; Doran, Stephen; Ricart, Karina; Matalon, Sadis; Patel, Rakesh P

    2017-04-05

    Chlorine (Cl 2 ) gas exposure and toxicity remains a concern in military and industrial sectors. While post-Cl 2 exposure damage to the lungs and other tissues has been documented and major underlying mechanisms elucidated, no targeted therapeutics that are effective when administered post-exposure, and which are amenable to mass-casualty scenarios have been developed. Our recent studies show nitrite administered by intramuscular (IM) injection post-Cl 2 exposure is effective in preventing acute lung injury and improving survival in rodent models. Our goal in this study was to develop a rabbit model of Cl 2 toxicity and test whether nitrite affords protection in a non-rodent model. Exposure of New Zealand White rabbits to Cl 2 gas (600ppm, 45min) caused significant increases in protein and neutrophil accumulation in the airways and ∼35% mortality over 18h. Nitrite administered 30min post Cl 2 exposure by a single IM injection, at 1mg/kg or 10mg/kg, prevented indices of acute lung injury at 6h by up to 50%. Moreover, all rabbits that received nitrite survived over the study period. These data provide further rationale for developing nitrite as post-exposure therapeutic to mitigate against Cl 2 gas exposure injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Relation between nitrate and nitrite food habits with lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimzadeh, Laleh; Koohdani, Fariba; Siassi, Fereydoon; Mahmoudi, Mahmoud; Moslemi, Daryoush; Safari, Farid

    2012-01-01

    Nitrites, a probable human carcinogen, generate reactive nitrogen species that may cause damage to the lung. We evaluated the association between nutritional habits related to nitrite and nitrate intake and risk of lung cancer in Mazandaran, Northern Province of Iran. In this case-control study the two groups were matched for gender and age (+/- 5 years). A semi -quantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) was used to collect dietary data about nutritional habits related to nitrate, nitrite, vitamins E and C intake, from 40 lung cancer cases and 40 control subjects admitted at Mazanaran hospitals. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the risk of lung cancer using logistic regression. Mean score of nutritional habits in case group was significantly lower than that in control group (P less than or equal 0.001). We observed a positive association between animal sources of nitrate and nitrite intake (OR = 2.7, 95% CI: 0.13-0.96) and risk of lung cancer. Decreased risk of lung cancer was also observed with fruit intake (OR = 0.26, 95% CI: 1.3-11). Our results indicate a probable association between nutritional habits related to animal sources of nitrate and nitrite intake and the risk of lung cancer that requires to be confirmed by other studies.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of luxury perfusion of the optic nerve head in anterior ischemic optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yovel, Oren S; Katz, Miriam; Leiba, Hana

    2012-09-01

    A 49-year-old woman with painless reduction in visual acuity in her left eye was found to have nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION). Fluorescein angiography revealed optic disc capillary leakage consistent with "luxury perfusion." Contrast-enhanced FLAIR magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed marked enhancement of the left optic disc. Resolution of the optic disc edema and the MRI abnormalities followed a similar time course. This report appears unique in documenting the MRI findings of luxury perfusion in NAION.

  3. Associations between muscle perfusion and symptoms in knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandak, E; Boesen, M; Bliddal, H

    2015-01-01

    a relatively rapid decline (washout pattern) relative to the total number of voxels within the muscle VOI. CONCLUSIONS: More widespread perfusion in the peri-articular knee muscles was associated with less pain in patients with KOA. These results give rise to investigations of the effects of exercise on muscle......OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between muscle perfusion in the peri-articular knee muscles assessed by dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and symptoms in patients with knee osteoarthritis (KOA). DESIGN: In a cross-sectional setting, muscle perfusion...... was quantified by DCE-MRI in KOA. Regions of interest (ROI) were drawn around the peri-articular muscles, summed and averaged into one single "Total Muscle Volume" volume of interest (VOI). Symptoms were assessed via the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) (0: worst; 100: best). RESULTS: DCE...

  4. MR-based assessment of pulmonary ventilation-perfusion in animal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jian; Wan Mingxi; Guo Youmin

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To show the feasibility and value in the diagnosis of airway obstruction and pulmonary embolism with MR oxygen-enhanced ventilation combined with pulmonary perfusion imaging. Methods: Eight canines were implemented for peripheral pulmonary embolism by intravenous injection of gelfoam granules at pulmonary segmental arterial level, and five of them were formed airway obstruction models by inserting self-made balloon catheter at second-bronchia. The oxygen-enhanced MR ventilation imaging was introduced by subtracting the images of pre- and post- inhaled pure oxygen. The MR pulmonary perfusion imaging was achieved by the first-pass contrast agent method. Moreover, the manifestation of MR ventilation and perfusion imaging was observed and contradistinguished with that of general pathologic anatomy, ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy, and pulmonary angiography. Results: The manifestations of airway obstruction regions in MR ventilation and perfusion imaging were matched, but those of pulmonary embolism regions were dismatched. The defect range of airway obstruction in MR ventilation image was smaller than that in ventilation scintigraphy. The abnormal perfusion regions of pulmonary embolism were divided into defect regions and reduce regions based on the time courses of signal intensity changes. The sensitivity and specificity of diagnosis on pulmonary embolism by MR ventilation combined with perfusion technique were 75.0% and 98.1%. The diagnostic results were in good coherence with ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy and pulmonary angiography (K=0.743, 0.899). Conclusion: The MR oxygen-enhanced ventilation combined with pulmonary perfusion imaging can be used to diagnose the airway and vascular abnormity in lung. This technique resembles the ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy. It can provide quantitative functional information and better spatial and temporal resolution, and possesses the value of clinical application

  5. Recent structural insights into the function of copper nitrite reductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horrell, Sam; Kekilli, Demet; Strange, Richard W; Hough, Michael A

    2017-11-15

    Copper nitrite reductases (CuNiR) carry out the first committed step of the denitrification pathway of the global nitrogen cycle, the reduction of nitrite (NO 2 - ) to nitric oxide (NO). As such, they are of major agronomic and environmental importance. CuNiRs occur primarily in denitrifying soil bacteria which carry out the overall reduction of nitrate to dinitrogen. In this article, we review the insights gained into copper nitrite reductase (CuNiR) function from three dimensional structures. We particularly focus on developments over the last decade, including insights from serial femtosecond crystallography using X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) and from the recently discovered 3-domain CuNiRs.

  6. Comparison of the relative propensities of isoamyl nitrite and sodium nitrite to ameliorate acute cyanide poisoning in mice and a novel antidotal effect arising from anesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambal, Leah K; Weitz, Andrew C; Li, Hui-Hua; Zhang, Yang; Zheng, Xi; Pearce, Linda L; Peterson, Jim

    2013-05-20

    Isoamyl nitrite has previously been considered acceptable as an inhaled cyanide antidote; therefore, the antidotal utility of this organic nitrite compared with sodium nitrite was investigated. To facilitate a quantitative comparison, doses of both sodium nitrite and isoamyl nitrite were given intraperitoneally in equimolar amounts to sublethally cyanide-challenged mice. Righting recovery from the knockdown state was clearly compromised in the isoamyl nitrite-treated animals, the effect being attributable to the toxicity of the isoamyl alchol produced during hydrolysis of the isoamyl nitrite to release nitrite anion. Subsequently, inhaled aqueous sodium nitrite aerosol was demonstrated to ameliorate sublethal cyanide toxicity, when provided to mice after the toxic dose, by the more rapid recovery of righting ability compared to that of the control animals given only the toxicant. Aerosolized sodium nitrite has thus been shown by these experiments to have promise as a better alternative to organic nitrites for development as an inhaled cyanide antidote. The inhaled sodium nitrite led to the production of NO in the bloodstream as determined by the appearance of EPR signals attributable to nitrosylhemoglobin and methemoglobin. The aerosol delivery was performed in an unmetered inhalation chamber, and in this study, no attempt was made to optimize the procedure. It is argued that administration of an effective inhaled aqueous sodium nitrite dose in humans is possible, though just beyond the capability of current individual metered-dose inhaler designs, such as those used for asthma. Finally, working at slightly greater than LD50 NaCN doses, it was fortuitously discovered that (i) anesthesia leads to significantly prolonged survival compared to that of unanesthetized animals and that (ii) the antidotal activity of nitrite anion was completely abolished under anesthesia. Plausible explanations for these effects in mice and their practical consequences in relation to

  7. Nitrite Contents in Fresh Vegetables of Different Families and Genus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yuqian; Li, Xiao; Xu, Lingyi; Pang, Meixia; Qi, Jinghua; Wang, Fang

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study is firstly aimed at investigating the contents of nitrite in common consumed vegetables according to families and genus classification. The vegetables were randomly collected and analyzed in quartile sampling according to GB5009.30-2016. The vegetables were analyzed by the software of Spss20.0 and statistically significant Duncan multiple comparisons. The data indicates that the nitrite contents in different families and different genus vegetables in same family were significant (Pcorn kernels (0.7119mg/kg dry weight), Lotus root (0.592mg/kg dry weight).

  8. Lung perfusion scintigraphy by SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, Takanobu

    1990-01-01

    The initial study reports the characteristic performance using lung segmental phantom filled in Tc-99m pertechnetate. To evaluate the segmental defect in lung perfusion scintigraphy, we applied Bull's-eye analysis in addition to planar image set. Bull's-eye analysis especially facilitated the interpretation in both middle and lower lobes. Subsequently, to evolute the clinical application of Bull's-eye analysis, pulmonary scintigraphy was performed on 10 normal subjects and 60 patients with several pulmonary diseases. Of interest, Bull's-eye analysis, however, encouraged the interpretation in both lower lobes. To calculate the extention and severity of perfusion defect, the present study describes Bull's-eye analysis. Quantitative scoring showed higher in patients with lung cancer than those with pulmonary tuberculosis. The present study focus that Bull's-eye analysis can be useful for evaluating perfusion in patients with a couple of pulmonary diseases. (author)

  9. Dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caruso, Damiano [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncological and Pathological Sciences, University of Rome “Sapienza”, Latina (Italy); Eid, Marwen [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Schoepf, U. Joseph, E-mail: schoepf@musc.edu [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Jin, Kwang Nam [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Radiology, Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Varga-Szemes, Akos [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Tesche, Christian [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Heart Center Munich-Bogenhausen, Munich (Germany); Mangold, Stefanie [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); and others

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • CT myocardial perfusion provides functional assessment of the myocardium. • CCTA is limited in determining the hemodynamic significance of coronary stenosis. • CT-MPI can accurately detect hemodynamically significant coronary artery stenosis. - Abstract: Non-invasive cardiac imaging has rapidly evolved during the last decade due to advancements in CT based technologies. Coronary CT angiography has been shown to reliably assess coronary anatomy and detect high risk coronary artery disease. However, this technique is limited to anatomical assessment, thus non-invasive techniques for functional assessment of the heart are necessary. CT myocardial perfusion is a new CT based technique that provides functional assessment of the myocardium and allows for a comprehensive assessment of coronary artery disease with a single modality when combined with CTA. This review aims to discuss dynamic CT myocardial perfusion as a new technique in the assessment of CAD.

  10. PENGARUH PENAMBAHAN UREA TERHADAP PENINGKATAN PENCEMARAN NITRIT DAN NITRAT DALAM TANAH (Influence of Addition of Urea to Increased Pollution of Nitrite and Nitrate in The Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida Mawaddah

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK Nitrat dan nitrit merupakan sumber nitrogen bagi tanaman. Nitrogen sangat diperlukan tanaman untuk pertumbuhan dan perkembangan. Bentuk-bentuk nitrogen di lingkungan mengalami transformasi sebagai bagian dari siklus nitrogen seperti nitrifikasi dan denitrifikasi. Apabila kadar nitrogen dalam tanah rendah, maka urea digunakan sebagai sumber nitrogen. Perubahan urea menjadi nitrit atau nitrat pada beberapa sampel tanah perlu diketahui. Kadar nitrit dan nitrat yang tinggi dapat meningkatkan pencemaran di dalam tanah. Sampel tanah yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini adalah tanah pasir, tanah sawah, tanah pupuk kompos dan tanah pupuk kandang. Analisis nitrit dan nitrat dilakukan dengan menggunakan pereaksi asam p-amino benzoat (PABA yang dikopling dengan N-naftiletilendiamin (NEDA dan reduktor spongy cadmium. Sebelum digunakan untuk analisis nitrit dan nitrat, metode divalidasi terlebih dahulu. Hasil validasi metode analisis nitrit dan nitrat dengan pereaksi PABA/NEDA menunjukkan persentase perolehan kembali masing-masing antara 87,15–100,8% untuk nitrit dan 88,16–105,7% untuk nitrat. Setelah ditambah urea sebesar 0,66 g.kg-1 ke dalam tanah, konsentrasi nitrit dan nitrat pada semua sampel tanah mengalami peningkatan. Dari penelitian ini diketahui bahwa peningkatan kadar nitrit dan nitrat setelah ditambahkan urea sangat dipengaruhi oleh kondisi tanah.   ABSTRACT Nitrate and nitrite were sources of nitrogen for plants. Nitrogen is indispensable for the growth and development of plants. The forms of nitrogen in the environment undergoes a transformation as part of the nitrogen cycle like nitrification and denitrification. If nitrogen level in the soil is low, urea is used as a source of nitrogen. Changes of urea into nitrite or nitrate in some of soil samples need to be known. The levels of nitrite and nitrate are high can increase pollution in the soil. Some of soil samples which is used in this research were sandy soil, paddy soil

  11. Diagnostic accuracy of stress perfusion CMR in comparison with quantitative coronary angiography: fully quantitative, semiquantitative, and qualitative assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordini, Federico E; Haddad, Tariq; Hsu, Li-Yueh; Kellman, Peter; Lowrey, Tracy B; Aletras, Anthony H; Bandettini, W Patricia; Arai, Andrew E

    2014-01-01

    This study's primary objective was to determine the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of fully quantitative stress perfusion cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) versus a reference standard of quantitative coronary angiography. We hypothesized that fully quantitative analysis of stress perfusion CMR would have high diagnostic accuracy for identifying significant coronary artery stenosis and exceed the accuracy of semiquantitative measures of perfusion and qualitative interpretation. Relatively few studies apply fully quantitative CMR perfusion measures to patients with coronary disease and comparisons to semiquantitative and qualitative methods are limited. Dual bolus dipyridamole stress perfusion CMR exams were performed in 67 patients with clinical indications for assessment of myocardial ischemia. Stress perfusion images alone were analyzed with a fully quantitative perfusion (QP) method and 3 semiquantitative methods including contrast enhancement ratio, upslope index, and upslope integral. Comprehensive exams (cine imaging, stress/rest perfusion, late gadolinium enhancement) were analyzed qualitatively with 2 methods including the Duke algorithm and standard clinical interpretation. A 70% or greater stenosis by quantitative coronary angiography was considered abnormal. The optimum diagnostic threshold for QP determined by receiver-operating characteristic curve occurred when endocardial flow decreased to qualitative methods: Duke algorithm: 70%; and clinical interpretation: 78% (p quantitative stress perfusion CMR has high diagnostic accuracy for detecting obstructive coronary artery disease. QP outperforms semiquantitative measures of perfusion and qualitative methods that incorporate a combination of cine, perfusion, and late gadolinium enhancement imaging. These findings suggest a potential clinical role for quantitative stress perfusion CMR. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging identifies early perfusion abnormalities in diabetes and hypertension : Insights from a multicenter registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; De Cecco, Carlo N.; Wichmann, Julian L.; Meinel, Felix G.; Pelgrim, Gert Jan; Tesche, Christian; Ebersberger, Ullrich; Pugliese, Francesca; Bamberg, Fabian; Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Wang, Yining; Schoepf, U. Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Background: To identify patients with early signs of myocardial perfusion reduction, a reference base for perfusion measures is needed. Objective: To analyze perfusion parameters derived from dynamic computed tomography perfusion imaging (CTPI) in patients with suspected coronary artery disease

  13. Placental perfusion - a human alternative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mose, Tina; Knudsen, Lisbeth E

    2006-01-01

    between the mother and foetus. Dual perfusion of a single cotyledon in the human placenta can contribute to a better understanding of the placental barrier, transport rate and mechanisms of different substances and placental metabolism. The perfusion system has recently been established in Copenhagen...... and represents a supplement and alternative to animal testing, bypassing the animal to human extrapolation. Placentas are readily obtainable from most births upon informed consent from the mothers and are considered a promising tissue alternative/supplement to animal experiments. The system is validated...... as a part of work package 2 of the integrated project ReProTect....

  14. Effect of the kinetics of ammonium and nitrite oxidation on nitritation success or failure for different biofilm reactor geometries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lackner, Susanne; Smets, Barth F.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of biokinetics on nitritation was investigated in two biofilm geometries, the Membrane Aerated Biofilm Reactor (MABR) and a conventional biofilm system. A 1D biofilm model was used and evaluated by global sensitivity analysis using the variance based Sobol method. The main focus...... strongly depends on the chosen kinetic parameters of AOB and NOB. The maximum specific growth rates (μmax,AOB and μmax,NOB) had the strongest impact on nitritation efficiency (NE). In comparison, the counter-diffusion geometry yielded more parameter combinations (27.5%) that resulted in high NE than the co...

  15. Removal of nitrite from aqueous solution by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens biofilm adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Cai; Guo, Xiaoxiao; Sun, Pengfei; Khan, Rashid Azim; Zhang, Qichun; Liang, Yongchao; Zhao, Yu-Hua

    2018-01-01

    A newly verified adsorbent biofilm produced by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens DT was investigated for nitrite removal from aqueous solutions. The biofilm's characteristics and adsorption mechanism were determined, with results indicating that nitrite ions were adsorbed onto the protonated amine sites of biofilm under acidic conditions. Analysis of various factors showed that higher nitrite adsorption capacities occurred at pH amyloliquefaciens biofilm can be considered as a promising adsorbent for nitrite removal from wastewater. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Automatic assessment of cardiac perfusion MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ólafsdóttir, Hildur; Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Larsson, Henrik B.W.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a method based on Active Appearance Models (AAM) is applied for automatic registration of myocardial perfusion MRI. A semi-quantitative perfusion assessment of the registered image sequences is presented. This includes the formation of perfusion maps for three parameters; maximum up...

  17. The effects of nitrogen and phosphorus deficiencies and nitrite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of 50% N, 100% N, 50% N plus 50% P and 50% P deficiencies and nitrite addition were treated on Chlorella vulgaris (Chlorophyceae) was studied in laboratory conditions with the aim to determine the effects of the deficient nutrient and different nitrogen sources on lipid and protein contents. Protein and lipid ...

  18. Electrochemical removal of nitrite in simulated aquaculture wastewater

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-11-21

    Nov 21, 2011 ... which may cause cancer in several animal species (Liao and Mayo, 1974). Nitrite also can result in the emission of nitrous oxide (N2O) to the atmosphere, ..... Biofouling Management in the Cooling Circuit of a. Power Industry Using Electrochemical Process. J. Chem. Soc. Pak. 33 (3): 295-304. Sun CC ...

  19. Presence of nitrites, nitrates, nitrosamines in the eggs of Intensively ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the presence and concentrations of nitrosamines and their precursors (nitrates and nitrites) in raw table eggs obtained from four layer-farms in Abeokuta, were analysed. Nitrosamines are highly toxic and carcinogenic group of chemicals that have the potential to be formed in the body through a process called ...

  20. Cyanide, Nitrates and Nitrite Contents of Livestock Feeds in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The cyanide nitrate and nitrite contents in pig feeds from six different farms in Umuahia, Nigeria were assayed using spectrophotometric and enzymatic methods. Enzymatic analysis of the feed samples indicated mean total cyanide level of 59.30 ± 3.72 – 361.90 ± 11.2mg-1 DM. The mean cyanide content of cyanogenic ...

  1. Seasonal Distribution of Nitrate and Nitrite Levels in Eleme Abattoir ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study deals with the seasonal distribution of nitrate (NO3) and nitrite (NO2) levels in Eleme Abattoir environment. Samples of soil, surface water and groundwater were collected from areas unaffected and those affected by abattoir activities. For the soils from the affected area and control points respectively, nitrate levels ...

  2. Hydrogen ion (Ph), ammonia, dissolved oxygen and nitrite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hydrogen ion (pH), dissolved oxygen, ammonia and nitrite concentrations were studied monthly in two systems (re-circulatory and semi-intensive of 3 m2 sizes) each for six months. The systems were each stocked with 200 g of Clarias gariepinus fingerlings. Results showed that all parameters were within acceptable limits ...

  3. Nitrate, Nitrite, and Ammonium Variability in Drinking Water Distribution Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schullehner, Jörg; Stayner, Leslie; Hansen, Birgitte

    2017-03-09

    Accurate assessments of exposure to nitrate in drinking water is a crucial part of epidemiological studies investigating long-term adverse human health effects. However, since drinking water nitrate measurements are usually collected for regulatory purposes, assumptions on (1) the intra-distribution system variability and (2) short-term (seasonal) concentration variability have to be made. We assess concentration variability in the distribution system of nitrate, nitrite, and ammonium, and seasonal variability in all Danish public waterworks from 2007 to 2016. Nitrate concentrations at the exit of the waterworks are highly correlated with nitrate concentrations within the distribution net or at the consumers' taps, while nitrite and ammonium concentrations are generally lower within the net compared with the exit of the waterworks due to nitrification. However, nitrification of nitrite and ammonium in the distribution systems only results in a relatively small increase in nitrate concentrations. No seasonal variation for nitrate, nitrite, or ammonium was observed. We conclude that nitrate measurements taken at the exit of the waterworks are suitable to calculate exposures for all consumers connected to that waterworks and that sampling frequencies in the national monitoring programme are sufficient to describe temporal variations in longitudinal studies.

  4. Spectrophotometric determination of nitrite by its catalytic effect on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A novel simple, sensitive and rapid kinetic-spectrophotometric method for the determination of trace amounts of nitrite is proposed. The method is based on its catalytic effect on the oxidation of congo red (CR) by potassium bromate in acidic solution. The oxidation reaction is monitored spectrophotometrically by measuring ...

  5. The intramolecular electron transfer between copper sites of nitrite reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Eady, R R; Abraham, Z H

    1998-01-01

    The intramolecular electron transfer (ET) between the type 1 Cu(I) and the type 2 Cu(II) sites of Alcaligenes xylosoxidans dissimilatory nitrite reductase (AxNiR) has been studied in order to compare it with the analogous process taking place in ascorbate oxidase (AO). This internal process is in...

  6. Neurotoxicity induced by alkyl nitrites: Impairment in learning/memory and motor coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Hye Jin; Kim, Yun Ji; Jeon, Seo Young; Kim, Young-Hoon; Shin, Jisoon; Yun, Jaesuk; Han, Kyoungmoon; Park, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Hyung Soo

    2016-04-21

    Although alkyl nitrites are used as recreational drugs, there is only little research data regarding their effects on the central nervous system including their neurotoxicity. This study investigated the neurotoxicity of three representative alkyl nitrites (isobutyl nitrite, isoamyl nitrite, and butyl nitrite), and whether it affected learning/memory function and motor coordination in rodents. Morris water maze test was performed in mice after administrating the mice with varying doses of the substances in two different injection schedules of memory acquisition and memory retention. A rota-rod test was then performed in rats. All tested alkyl nitrites lowered the rodents' capacity for learning and memory, as assessed by both the acquisition and retention tests. The results of the rota-rod test showed that isobutyl nitrite in particular impaired motor coordination in chronically treated rats. The mice chronically injected with isoamyl nitrite also showed impaired function, while butyl nitrite had no significant effect. The results of the water maze test suggest that alkyl nitrites may impair learning and memory. Additionally, isoamyl nitrite affected the rodents' motor coordination ability. Collectively, our findings suggest that alkyl nitrites may induce neurotoxicity, especially on the aspect of learning and memory function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Intramolecular electron transfer in cytochrome cd(1) nitrite reductase from Pseudomonas stutzeri; kinetics and thermodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Kroneck, Peter M H; Zumft, Walter G

    2002-01-01

    Cytochrome cd(1) nitrite reductase from Pseudomonas stutzeri catalyzes the one electron reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide. It is a homodimer, each monomer containing one heme-c and one heme-d(1), the former being the electron uptake site while the latter is the nitrite reduction site. Hence, i...

  8. Steady-state first-pass perfusion (SSFPP): a new approach to 3D first-pass myocardial perfusion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Shivraman; Xue, Hui; Maiseyeu, Andrei; Kroeker, Randall; Rajagopalan, Sanjay; White, Richard D; Zuehlsdorff, Sven; Raman, Subha V; Simonetti, Orlando P

    2014-01-01

    To describe and characterize a new approach to first-pass myocardial perfusion utilizing balanced steady-state free precession acquisition without the use of saturation recovery or other magnetization preparation. The balanced steady-state free precession sequence is inherently sensitive to contrast agent enhancement of the myocardium. This sensitivity can be used to advantage in first-pass myocardial perfusion imaging by eliminating the need for magnetization preparation. Bloch equation simulations, phantom experiments, and in vivo 2D imaging studies were run comparing the proposed technique with three other methods: saturation recovery spoiled gradient echo, saturation recovery steady-state free precession, and steady-state spoiled gradient echo without magnetization preparation. Additionally, an acquisition-reconstruction strategy for 3D perfusion imaging is proposed and initial experience with this approach is demonstrated in healthy subjects and one patient. Phantom experiments verified simulation results showing the sensitivity of the balanced steady-state free precession sequence to contrast agent enhancement in solid tissue is similar to that of magnetization-prepared acquisitions. Images acquired in normal volunteers showed the proposed technique provided superior signal and signal-to-noise ratio compared with all other sequences at baseline as well as postcontrast. A new approach to first-pass myocardial perfusion is presented that obviates the need for magnetization preparation and provides high signal-to-noise ratio. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. [IV drug perfusions: safety principles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelieur, Florence; Cabelguenne, Delphine; Marcel, Marie; Favier, Claudine; Piriou, Vincent

    2017-05-01

    An intravenous perfusion is a procedure which comprises infection and medication risks. To manage these risks, caregivers must respect, in addition to the usual hygiene rules, a series of best practices, ensuring the proper use and management of the medical devices and administered drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to stop eating (fast), be on a special diet, or take any medicines before the test. A chest x-ray is usually done before or after a ventilation and perfusion scan. You wear a hospital gown or comfortable clothing that does not have ...

  11. Reactivity of the isolated perfused rat tail vascular bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. França

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available Isolated segments of the perfused rat tail artery display a high basal tone when compared to other isolated arteries such as the mesenteric and are suitable for the assay of vasopressor agents. However, the perfusion of this artery in the entire tail has not yet been used for functional studies. The main purpose of the present study was to identify some aspects of the vascular reactivity of the rat tail vascular bed and validate this method to measure vascular reactivity. The tail severed from the body was perfused with Krebs solution containing different Ca2+ concentrations at different flow rates. Rats were anesthetized with sodium pentobarbital (65 mg/kg and heparinized (500 U. The tail artery was dissected near the tail insertion, cannulated and perfused with Krebs solution plus 30 µM EDTA at 36oC and 2.5 ml/min and the procedures were started after equilibration of the perfusion pressure. In the first group a dose-response curve to phenylephrine (PE (0.5, 1, 2 and 5 µg, bolus injection was obtained at different flow rates (1.5, 2.5 and 3.5 ml/min. The mean perfusion pressure increased with flow as well as PE vasopressor responses. In a second group the flow was changed (1.5, 2, 2.5, 3 and 3.5 ml/min at different Ca2+ concentrations (0.62, 1.25, 2.5 and 3.75 mM in the Krebs solution. Increasing Ca2+ concentrations did not alter the flow-pressure relationship. In the third group a similar protocol was performed but the rat tail vascular bed was perfused with Krebs solution containing PE (0.1 µg/ml. There was an enhancement of the effect of PE with increasing external Ca2+ and flow. PE vasopressor responses increased after endothelial damage with air and CHAPS, suggesting an endothelial modulation of the tone of the rat tail vascular bed. These experiments validate the perfusion of the rat tail vascular bed as a method to investigate vascular reactivity

  12. Prognostic Value of Quantitative Stress Perfusion Cardiac Magnetic Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammut, Eva C; Villa, Adriana D M; Di Giovine, Gabriella; Dancy, Luke; Bosio, Filippo; Gibbs, Thomas; Jeyabraba, Swarna; Schwenke, Susanne; Williams, Steven E; Marber, Michael; Alfakih, Khaled; Ismail, Tevfik F; Razavi, Reza; Chiribiri, Amedeo

    2017-11-10

    This study sought to evaluate the prognostic usefulness of visual and quantitative perfusion cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) ischemic burden in an unselected group of patients and to assess the validity of consensus-based ischemic burden thresholds extrapolated from nuclear studies. There are limited data on the prognostic value of assessing myocardial ischemic burden by CMR, and there are none using quantitative perfusion analysis. Patients with suspected coronary artery disease referred for adenosine-stress perfusion CMR were included (n = 395; 70% male; age 58 ± 13 years). The primary endpoint was a composite of cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, aborted sudden death, and revascularization after 90 days. Perfusion scans were assessed visually and with quantitative analysis. Cross-validated Cox regression analysis and net reclassification improvement were used to assess the incremental prognostic value of visual or quantitative perfusion analysis over a baseline clinical model, initially as continuous covariates, then using accepted thresholds of ≥2 segments or ≥10% myocardium. After a median 460 days (interquartile range: 190 to 869 days) follow-up, 52 patients reached the primary endpoint. At 2 years, the addition of ischemic burden was found to increase prognostic value over a baseline model of age, sex, and late gadolinium enhancement (baseline model area under the curve [AUC]: 0.75; visual AUC: 0.84; quantitative AUC: 0.85). Dichotomized quantitative ischemic burden performed better than visual assessment (net reclassification improvement 0.043 vs. 0.003 against baseline model). This study was the first to address the prognostic benefit of quantitative analysis of perfusion CMR and to support the use of consensus-based ischemic burden thresholds by perfusion CMR for prognostic evaluation of patients with suspected coronary artery disease. Quantitative analysis provided incremental prognostic value to visual assessment and

  13. Contralateral thalamic hypoperfusion on brain perfusion SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seok Mo; Bae, Sang Kyun; Yoo, Kyung Moo; Yum, Ha Yong

    2000-01-01

    Brain perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is useful for the localization of cerebrovascular lesion and sometimes reveals more definite lesion than radiologic imaging modality such as CT or MRI does. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of brain perfusion SPECT in patients with hemisensory impairment. Thirteen consecutive patients (M:F= 8:5, mean age = 48) who has hemisensory impairment were included. Brain perfusion SPECT was performed after intravenous injection of 1110 MBq of Tc-99m ECD. The images were obtained using a dual-head gamma camera with ultra-high resolution collimator. Semiquantitative analysis was performed after placing multiple ROIs on cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus and cerebellum. There were 10 patients with left hemisensory impairment and 3 patients with right-sided symptom. Only 2 patients revealed abnormal signal change in the thalamus on MRI. But brain perfusion SPECT showed decreased perfusion in the thalamus in 9 patients. Six patients among 10 patients with left hemisensory impairment revealed decreased perfusion in the contralateral thalamus on brain SPECT. The other 4 patients revealed no abnormality. Two patients among 3 patients with right hemisensory impairment also showed decreased perfusion in the contralateral thalamus on brain SPECT. One patients with right hemisensory impairment showed ipsilateral perfusion decrease. Two patients who had follow-up brain perfusion SEPCT after treatment revealed normalization of perfusion in the thalamus. Brain perfusion SPECT might be a useful tool in diagnosing patients with hemisensory impairment

  14. Magnetic resonance perfusion imaging without contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martirosian, Petros; Graf, Hansjoerg; Schick, Fritz; Boss, Andreas; Schraml, Christina; Schwenzer, Nina F.; Claussen, Claus D.

    2010-01-01

    Principles of magnetic resonance imaging techniques providing perfusion-related contrast weighting without administration of contrast media are reported and analysed systematically. Especially common approaches to arterial spin labelling (ASL) perfusion imaging allowing quantitative assessment of specific perfusion rates are described in detail. The potential of ASL for perfusion imaging was tested in several types of tissue. After a systematic comparison of technical aspects of continuous and pulsed ASL techniques the standard kinetic model and tissue properties of influence to quantitative measurements of perfusion are reported. For the applications demonstrated in this paper a flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) ASL perfusion preparation approach followed by true fast imaging with steady precession (true FISP) data recording was developed and implemented on whole-body scanners operating at 0.2, 1.5 and 3 T for quantitative perfusion measurement in various types of tissue. ASL imaging provides a non-invasive tool for assessment of tissue perfusion rates in vivo. Images recorded from kidney, lung, brain, salivary gland and thyroid gland provide a spatial resolution of a few millimetres and sufficient signal to noise ratio in perfusion maps after 2-5 min of examination time. Newly developed ASL techniques provide especially high image quality and quantitative perfusion maps in tissues with relatively high perfusion rates (as also present in many tumours). Averaging of acquisitions and image subtraction procedures are mandatory, leading to the necessity of synchronization of data recording to breathing in abdominal and thoracic organs. (orig.)

  15. Assessment of pulmonary parenchyma perfusion with FAIR in comparison with DCE-MRI-Initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Li; Liu Shiyuan; Sun Fei; Xiao Xiangsheng

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess pulmonary parenchyma perfusion with flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) in comparison with 3D dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) imaging in healthy volunteers and in patients with pulmonary embolism or lung cancer. Materials and methods: Sixteen healthy volunteers and 16 patients with pulmonary embolism (5 cases) or lung cancer (11 cases) were included in this study. Firstly, the optimized inversion time of FAIR (TI) was determined in 12 healthy volunteers. Then, FAIR imaging with the optimized TI was performed followed by DCE-MRI on the other 4 healthy volunteers and 16 patients. Tagging efficiency of lung and SNR of perfusion images were calculated with different TI values. In the comparison of FAIR with DCE-MRI, the homogeneity of FAIR and DCE-MRI perfusion was assessed. In the cases of perfusion abnormality, the contrast between normal lung and perfusion defects was quantified by calculating a normalized signal intensity ratio. Results: One thousand milliseconds was the optimal TI, which generated the highest lung tagging efficiency and second highest PBF SNR. In the volunteers, the signal intensity of perfusion images acquired with both FAIR and DCE-MRI was homogeneous. Wedged-shaped or triangle perfusion defects were visualized in five pulmonary embolisms and three lung cancer cases. There was no significant statistical difference in signal intensity ratio between FAIR and DCE-MRI (P > 0.05). In the rest of eight lung cancers, all the lesions showed low perfusion against the higher perfused pulmonary parenchyma in both FAIR and DCE-MRI. Conclusion: Pulmonary parenchyma perfusion imaging with FAIR was feasible, consistent and could obtain similar functional information to that from DCE-MRI.

  16. Practical Use of Nitrite and Basis for Dosage in the Manufacture of Meat Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adler-Nissen, Jens; Ekgreen, Maria Helbo; Risum, Jørgen

    . Nitrite also has a desirable anti-oxidant activity and contributes to the formation of pleasant flavours. A systematic literature review on the function and use of nitrite in meat leads to a tentative first conclusion that if the level of nitrite added to meat products is sufficient to protect against......The use of nitrite (NaNO2) in the manufacture of salted (cured) meat products has a long tradition in the industry, dating back to the early twentieth century. Nitrite serves several technological purposes, primarily by the formation of a stable red colour in the meat and the inhibition...... of the growth of Clostridium botulinum. According to an assessment report by the European Food Safety Authority (The EFSA Journal, 14, p. 1-134, 2003) all evidence points to that it is the added amount of nitrite rather than the residual amount of nitrite in the product which exerts the antimicrobial effect...

  17. Clinical evaluation of pulmonary perfusion MRI using FAIR (flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery)-HASTE (Half-Fourier Single-Shot TurboSE) method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Togami, Izumi; Sasai, Nobuya; Tsunoda, Masatoshi; Sei, Tetsurou; Sato, Shuhei; Yabuki, Takayuki; Hiraki, Yoshio

    2002-01-01

    The FAIR-HASTE method is a kind of noninvasive perfusion MR imaging obtained without the use of contrast media. By subtracting a flow-insensitive image from a flow-sensitive image, contrast enhancement of inflowing blood achieved. In the present study, we applied pulmonary perfusion FAIR-HASTE sequence for 23 patients with various pulmonary diseases, and compared the findings with those by pulmonary perfusion scintigraphy and Gadolinium perfusion MRI. Pulmonary perfusion imaging with the FAIR-HASTE method was possible in all clinical cases, and the findings corresponded well to those obtained by perfusion MRI using contrast media or pulmonary scintigraphy. The FAIR-HASTE method is a promising method for the evaluation of pulmonary perfusion. (author)

  18. Bimodal effect of hydrogen peroxide and oxidative events in nitrite-induced rapid root abscission by the water fern Azolla pinnata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael F Cohen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In the genus Azolla rapid abscission of roots from floating fronds occurs within minutes in response to a variety of stresses, including exposure to nitrite. We found that hydrogen peroxide, though itself not an inducer of root abscission, modulates nitrite-induced root abscission by Azolla pinnata in a dose-dependent manner, with 2 mM H2O2 significantly diminishing the responsiveness to 2 mM NaNO2, and 10 mM H2O2 slightly enhancing it. Hypoxia, which has been found in other plants to result in autogenic production of H2O2, dramatically stimulated root abscission of A. pinnata in response to nitrite, especially for plants previously cultivated in medium containing 5 mM KNO3 compared to plants cultivated under N2-fixing conditions without combined nitrogen. Plants, including Azolla, produce the small signaling molecule nitric oxide (NO from nitrite using nitrate reductase. We found Azolla plants to display dose-dependent root abscission in response to the NO donor spermine NONOate. Treatment of plants with the thiol-modifying agents S-methyl methanethiosulfonate or glutathione inhibited the nitrite-induced root abscission response. Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR spectromicroscopy revealed higher levels of carbonylation in the abscission zone of dropped roots, indicative of reaction products of polysaccharides with potent free radical oxidants. We hypothesize that metabolic products of nitrite and NO react with H2O2 in the apoplast leading to free-radical-mediated cleavage of structural polysaccharides and consequent rapid root abscission.

  19. Nitrite reductase activity of rat and human xanthine oxidase, xanthine dehydrogenase, and aldehyde oxidase: evaluation of their contribution to NO formation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Luisa B; Pereira, Vânia; Mira, Lurdes; Moura, José J G

    2015-01-27

    Nitrite is presently considered a NO "storage form" that can be made available, through its one-electron reduction, to maintain NO formation under hypoxia/anoxia. The molybdoenzymes xanthine oxidase/dehydrogenase (XO/XD) and aldehyde oxidase (AO) are two of the most promising mammalian nitrite reductases, and in this work, we characterized NO formation by rat and human XO/XD and AO. This is the first characterization of human enzymes, and our results support the employment of rat liver enzymes as suitable models of the human counterparts. A comprehensive kinetic characterization of the effect of pH on XO and AO-catalyzed nitrite reduction showed that the enzyme's specificity constant for nitrite increase 8-fold, while the Km(NO2(-)) decrease 6-fold, when the pH decreases from 7.4 to 6.3. These results demonstrate that the ability of XO/AO to trigger NO formation would be greatly enhanced under the acidic conditions characteristic of ischemia. The dioxygen inhibition was quantified, and the Ki(O2) values found (24.3-48.8 μM) suggest that in vivo NO formation would be fine-tuned by dioxygen availability. The potential in vivo relative physiological relevance of XO/XD/AO-dependent pathways of NO formation was evaluated using HepG2 and HMEC cell lines subjected to hypoxia. NO formation by the cells was found to be pH-, nitrite-, and dioxygen-dependent, and the relative contribution of XO/XD plus AO was found to be as high as 50%. Collectively, our results supported the possibility that XO/XD and AO can contribute to NO generation under hypoxia inside a living human cell. Furthermore, the molecular mechanism of XO/AO-catalyzed nitrite reduction was revised.

  20. Myocardial perfusion modeling using MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Fritz-Hansen, T; Rostrup, Egill

    1996-01-01

    In the present study, it is shown that it is possible to quantify myocardial perfusion using magnetic resonance imaging in combination with gadolinium diethylenetriaminopentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA). Previously, a simple model and method for measuring myocardial perfusion using an inversion recovery...... of Gd-DTPA (lambda), the vascular blood volume (Vb), and the time delay through the coronary arteries (delta T). The model was evaluated by computer simulation and used on experimental results from seven healthy subjects. The results in the healthy volunteers for a region of interest placed...... in the anterior myocardial wall were (mean +/- SD) Ki = 54 +/- 10 ml/100 g/min, lambda = 30 +/- 3 ml/100 g, Vb = 9 +/- 2 ml/100 g, delta T = 3.2 +/- 1.1 s. These results are in good agreement with similar results obtained by other methods....

  1. Two cases of methemoglobinaemia caused by suspected sodium nitrite poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo Matteucci

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Among the causes of acute methemo-globinaemia are the ingestion and inhalation of over 40 oxidising substances, including nitrite, nitrate, carbon monoxide, some medicines, chlorine. The authors describe a case of acute methemoglobinaemia in two people that most probably suffered from food poisoning resulting from the consumption of a preparation of a dish called turkey alla canzanese that contained significant amounts of sodium nitrite. Both subjects who were treated promptly with methylene blue and hyperbaric oxygen therapy room recovered fully. Epidemiological investigations performed to clarify the dynamics of the episode suggested that among the causes of contamination were the swapping of products at the time of sale and the non-compliance to rules for the preparation of foods for human consumption.

  2. Nitrates and nitrites content of water boreholes and packaged water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nitrate and nitrite levels were determined in forty-three water samples obtained from different locations in Calabar using colorimetric methods. Twenty-three of these samples were packaged water while twenty were borehole water. Nitrate levels were found to be 24.28 ± 9.30μg/ml and 34.57 ± 14.56µ/ml for packaged water ...

  3. Determination of nitrate and nitrite content of Turkish cheeses ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The levels of nitrate and nitrite were determined in 185 samples of Turkish cheese having high consumption rate. All cheese samples contained nitrate and its level in Turkish white cheese produced from cow's and sheep's milk were found between 0.92 - 22.40 (mean 8.96±4.93) mg/kg and 0.47 - 23.68 (mean 12.35±6.28) ...

  4. Nitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: a hidden source of nitrite?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balk, Melike; Laverman, Anniet M; Keuskamp, Joost A; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate reduction is considered to be a minor microbial pathway in the oxidation of mangrove-derived organic matter due to a limited supply of nitrate in mangrove soils. At a limited availability of this electron acceptor compared to the supply of degradable carbon, nitrate ammonification is thought to be the preferential pathway of nitrate reduction. Mangrove forest mutually differ in their productivity, which may lead to different available carbon to nitrate ratios in their soil. Hence, nitrate ammonification is expected to be of more importance in high- compared to low-productive forests. The hypothesis was tested in flow-through reactors that contain undisturbed mangrove soils from high-productive Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle forests in Florida and low-productive Avicennia marina forests in Saudi Arabia. Nitrate was undetectable in the soils from both regions. It was assumed that a legacy of nitrate ammonification would be reflected by a higher ammonium production from these soils upon the addition of nitrate. Unexpectedly, the soils from the low-productive forests in Saudi Arabia produced considerably more ammonium than the soils from the high-productive forests in Florida. Hence, other environmental factors than productivity must govern the selection of nitrate ammonification or denitrification. A rather intriguing observation was the 1:1 production of nitrite and ammonium during the consumption of nitrate, more or less independent from sampling region, location, sampling depth, mangrove species and from the absence or presence of additional degradable carbon. This 1:1 ratio points to a coupled production of ammonium and nitrite by one group of nitrate-reducing microorganisms. Such a production of nitrite will be hidden by the presence of active nitrite-reducing microorganisms under the nitrate-limited conditions of most mangrove forest soils.

  5. The negative phonon confinement effect in nanoscopic sodium nitrite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koroleva, E.Yu.; Nuzhnyy, Dmitry; Pokorný, Jan; Kamba, Stanislav; Kumzerov, Y. A.; Vakhrushev, S. B.; Petzelt, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 39 (2009), 395706/1-395706/7 ISSN 0957-4484 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB100100704; GA ČR(CZ) GA202/09/0682 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : nanocomposite * sodium nitrite * infrared * THz * Raman * phonon * effective medium approach Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.137, year: 2009

  6. Cloning and characterization of a nitrite reductase gene related to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-03-01

    Mar 1, 2010 ... BL21 (DE3) strain with the recombinant expression vector pET-28A-GhNiR. NiR activity assay showed that the crude GhNiR protein had obvious activity to NaNO2 substrate. Key words: Cotton, nitrite reductase, prokaryotic expression, semi-quantitative RT-PCR, GenBank Accession. No: GQ389691.

  7. Nitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: a hidden source of nitrite?

    KAUST Repository

    Balk, Melike

    2015-03-02

    Nitrate reduction is considered to be a minor microbial pathway in the oxidation of mangrove-derived organic matter due to a limited supply of nitrate in mangrove soils. At a limited availability of this electron acceptor compared to the supply of degradable carbon, nitrate ammonification is thought to be the preferential pathway of nitrate reduction. Mangrove forest mutually differ in their productivity, which may lead to different available carbon to nitrate ratios in their soil. Hence, nitrate ammonification is expected to be of more importance in high- compared to low-productive forests. The hypothesis was tested in flow-through reactors that contain undisturbed mangrove soils from high-productive Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle forests in Florida and low-productive Avicennia marina forests in Saudi Arabia. Nitrate was undetectable in the soils from both regions. It was assumed that a legacy of nitrate ammonification would be reflected by a higher ammonium production from these soils upon the addition of nitrate. Unexpectedly, the soils from the low-productive forests in Saudi Arabia produced considerably more ammonium than the soils from the high-productive forests in Florida. Hence, other environmental factors than productivity must govern the selection of nitrate ammonification or denitrification. A rather intriguing observation was the 1:1 production of nitrite and ammonium during the consumption of nitrate, more or less independent from sampling region, location, sampling depth, mangrove species and from the absence or presence of additional degradable carbon. This 1:1 ratio points to a coupled production of ammonium and nitrite by one group of nitrate-reducing microorganisms. Such a production of nitrite will be hidden by the presence of active nitrite-reducing microorganisms under the nitrate-limited conditions of most mangrove forest soils.

  8. Determination of nitrate, nitrite, N- nitrosamines, cyanide and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The nitrate, nitrite, N- nitrosamines and ascorbic acid content as well as the levels of cyanide in eight brands of fruit juices and twelve brands of sachet water commonly marketed and consumed in Nigeria were estimated. The mean values of nitrate ranged from 2.29±0.05 to 16.50±1.21 mg/L for the juices and 0.64±0.21 to ...

  9. Regioselective synthesis of nitrosoimidazoheterocycles using tert-butyl nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monir, Kamarul; Ghosh, Monoranjan; Jana, Sourav; Mondal, Pallab; Majee, Adinath; Hajra, Alakananda

    2015-08-28

    A simple and practical method has been developed for the regioselective nitrosylation of imidazopyridines via C(sp(2))-H bond functionalization using tert-butyl nitrite under mild reaction conditions in a short time. A library of 3-nitrosoimidazopyridines with broad functionalities was synthesized in near quantitative yields. The present protocol is also applicable to imidazo[2,1-b]thiazole and benzo[d]imidazo[2,1-b]thiazole.

  10. Role of dynamic CT perfusion study in evaluating various intracranial space-occupying lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra B Kamble

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Differentiating intracranial mass lesions on CT scan is challenging. The purpose of our study was to determine the perfusion parameters in various intracranial space-occupying lesions (ICSOL, differentiate benign and malignant lesions, and differentiate between grades of gliomas. Materials and Methods: We performed CT perfusion (CTP in 64 patients, with age ranging from 17 to 68 years, having space-occupying lesions in brain and calculated relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF and relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV. Results: We found significantly lower perfusion in low-grade gliomas as compared to high-grade tumors, lymphoma, and metastases. Similarly in infective lesions, TWT and abscesses showed significantly lower perfusion compared to TOT. In ring enhancing lesions, capsule of TWT showed significantly lower perfusion as compared to abscesses, TOT, and metastases. Conclusion: Thus, in conclusion, infective lesions can be differentiated from tumors like lymphomas, high-grade gliomas, or metastases based on perfusion parameters. The cut off value of rCBV 1.64 can be used to differentiate between low grade and high grade gliomas. However, depending only on perfusion parameters, differentiation between the tumors like lymphomas, high-grade gliomas, and metastases may not be possible.

  11. Monitoring Disease Activity in Patients with Aortitis and Chronic Periaortitis Undergoing Immunosuppressive Therapy by Perfusion CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bier, Georg; Kurucay, Mustafa; Henes, Jörg; Xenitidis, Theodoros; Preibsch, Heike; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Horger, Marius

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the role of perfusion CT for monitoring inflammatory activity in patients with aortitis and chronic periaortitis undergoing immunosuppressive therapy. Seventeen symptomatic patients (median age 68.5 years) who underwent perfusion-based computed tomography (CT) monitoring after diagnostic contrast-enhanced CT were retrospectively included in this study. Blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), volume transfer constant (k-trans), time to peak, and mean transit time were determined by setting circular regions of interest in prominently thickened parts of the vessel wall or perfused surrounding tissue at sites where the perfusion CT color maps showed a maximum BF value. Differences in CT perfusion and, morphological parameters, C-reactive protein (CRP), and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were tested for significance during therapy. In all patients BF and BV dropped at second perfusion CT (P perfusion CT parameters in aortitis and chronic periaortitis undergoing immunosuppressive therapy dropped at different extent after therapy. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Dosimetry in myocardial perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledo, Janine M.; Trindade, Bruno; Ribeiro, Tarcisio P.C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper conducts a dosimetric investigation on the myocardial perfusion image protocol, together with a literature reviewing, motivated by the significant statistic increasing on mortality, morbidity and disability associated with cardiovascular disease, surpassing infectious diseases. Nuclear Cardiology plays a role n the diagnostic functional evaluation of the heart and in the prognostic of patients with suspected or known cardiac ischemia. In the context of unstable myocardial ischemic syndrome, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy is a non-invasive procedure performed by administering a radiopharmaceutical targeted to the heart. As tool for this study are that the images obtained by thoracic angiotomography and abdominal aorta as a anatomic and functional information for model reproduction in SISCODES - System of Codes for Absorbed Dose Calculations based on Stochastic Methods. Data were manipulated in order to create a voxel computational model of the heart to be running in MCNP - Monte Carlo Neutron Particle Code. . It was assumed a homogeneous distribution of Tl-201 in cardiac muscle. Simulations of the transport of particles through the voxel and the interaction with the heart tissue were performed. As a result, the isodose curves in the heart model are displayed as well as the dose versus volume histogram of the heart muscle. We conclude that the present computational tools can generate doses distributed in myocardial perfusion. (author)

  13. Dosimetry in myocardial perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toledo, Janine M.; Trindade, Bruno; Ribeiro, Tarcisio P.C. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (DEN/UFMG), Belo Horizonte (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear. Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares

    2011-07-01

    This paper conducts a dosimetric investigation on the myocardial perfusion image protocol, together with a literature reviewing, motivated by the significant statistic increasing on mortality, morbidity and disability associated with cardiovascular disease, surpassing infectious diseases. Nuclear Cardiology plays a role n the diagnostic functional evaluation of the heart and in the prognostic of patients with suspected or known cardiac ischemia. In the context of unstable myocardial ischemic syndrome, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy is a non-invasive procedure performed by administering a radiopharmaceutical targeted to the heart. As tool for this study are that the images obtained by thoracic angiotomography and abdominal aorta as a anatomic and functional information for model reproduction in SISCODES - System of Codes for Absorbed Dose Calculations based on Stochastic Methods. Data were manipulated in order to create a voxel computational model of the heart to be running in MCNP - Monte Carlo Neutron Particle Code. . It was assumed a homogeneous distribution of Tl-201 in cardiac muscle. Simulations of the transport of particles through the voxel and the interaction with the heart tissue were performed. As a result, the isodose curves in the heart model are displayed as well as the dose versus volume histogram of the heart muscle. We conclude that the present computational tools can generate doses distributed in myocardial perfusion. (author)

  14. Standardized perfusion value of the esophageal carcinoma and its correlation with quantitative CT perfusion parameter values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djuric-Stefanovic, A; Saranovic, Dj; Sobic-Saranovic, D; Masulovic, D; Artiko, V

    2015-03-01

    Standardized perfusion value (SPV) is a universal indicator of tissue perfusion, normalized to the whole-body perfusion, which was proposed to simplify, unify and allow the interchangeability among the perfusion measurements and comparison between the tumor perfusion and metabolism. The aims of our study were to assess the standardized perfusion value (SPV) of the esophageal carcinoma, and its correlation with quantitative CT perfusion measurements: blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), mean transit time (MTT) and permeability surface area product (PS) of the same tumor volume samples, which were obtained by deconvolution-based CT perfusion analysis. Forty CT perfusion studies of the esophageal cancer were analyzed, using the commercial deconvolution-based CT perfusion software (Perfusion 3.0, GE Healthcare). The SPV of the esophageal tumor and neighboring skeletal muscle were correlated with the corresponding mean tumor and muscle quantitative CT perfusion parameter values, using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rS). Median SPV of the esophageal carcinoma (7.1; range: 2.8-13.4) significantly differed from the SPV of the skeletal muscle (median: 1.0; range: 0.4-2.4), (Z=-5.511, pCT perfusion measurements and statistically significant correlation was proved. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Hypoxia tolerance, nitric oxide, and nitrite: lessons from extreme animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fago, Angela; Jensen, Frank B

    2015-03-01

    Among vertebrates able to tolerate periods of oxygen deprivation, the painted and red-eared slider turtles (Chrysemys picta and Trachemys scripta) and the crucian carp (Carassius carassius) are the most extreme and can survive even months of total lack of oxygen during winter. The key to hypoxia survival resides in concerted physiological responses, including strong metabolic depression, protection against oxidative damage and-in air-breathing animals-redistribution of blood flow. Each of these responses is known to be tightly regulated by nitric oxide (NO) and during hypoxia by its metabolite nitrite. The aim of this review is to highlight recent work illustrating the widespread roles of NO and nitrite in the tolerance to extreme oxygen deprivation, in particular in the red-eared slider turtle and crucian carp, but also in diving marine mammals. The emerging picture underscores the importance of NO and nitrite signaling in the adaptive response to hypoxia in vertebrate animals. ©2015 Int. Union Physiol. Sci./Am. Physiol. Soc.

  16. Simple methods to decrease sodium and nitrite contents in hams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talia Franco-Avila

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ham is a product highly consumed by society; however it contains some elements that make it a non-recommended food. Thus, it has been attempted to eliminate or reduce those components.Material and Methods: Content of sodium, nitrites, peroxides and total coliforms were compared after processes of Washing (W and Simple Cooking (SC in turkey and pork ham in a cross-sectional analytical experimental study. Furthermore, sensory acceptance of thesamples through an acceptance test of five points was evaluated. One-way ANOVA with post hoc Bonferroni were used to assess the mean difference between groups. The value of p≤0.05 was considered statistically significant.Results: Both processes reduced the amount of sodium in both types of ham in statistically significant way (p≤0.001. The major percentage of reduction was presented with SC: 73.4% for turkey ham and 63.5% for pork ham. Likewise, the higher percentage of nitrite reduction was 50.6% in pork ham with SC technique (p≤0.05. Peroxide index decreased with both techniques in both hams without statistical significance. Total coliforms count was kept constant in all samples. Higher sensory acceptance of W concerning SC in all sensory characteristics was observed.Conclusions: W and SC techniques reduce sodium, nitrite and peroxide index without affecting the sanitation of hams. Furthermore, W is accepted in all sensory categories. We recommend using W technique before consumption of the product.

  17. Structural and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging of the lung in cystic fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaxopoulou, Christina; Gnannt, Ralph; Kellenberger, Christian J.; Higashigaito, Kai; Jung, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    Because of its absence of ionising radiation and possibility for obtaining functional information, MRI is promising for assessing lung disease in children who require repetitive imaging for long-term follow-up. To describe MRI findings in children with cystic fibrosis and evaluate semi-quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced lung perfusion. We retrospectively compared lung MRI in 25 children and young adults with cystic fibrosis (median age 3.7 years) to 12 children (median age 2 years) imaged for other pathologies. MRI at 1.5 T included respiratory-gated sequences and contrast-enhanced lung perfusion imaging. We described and graded any morphologic change. Signal enhancement and time to peak values of perfusion abnormalities were compared to those of normally enhancing lung parenchyma. Frequent findings in patients with cystic fibrosis were bronchial wall thickening (24/25, 96%), areas of consolidation (22/25, 88%), enlarged lymph nodes (20/25, 80%), bronchiectasis (5/25, 20%) and mucus plugging (3/25, 12%). Compared to normally enhancing lung, perfusion defects (21/25, 84%), characterised by decreased enhancement, showed prolonged time to peak. Areas of consolidation showed increased enhancement. While time to peak of procedure-related atelectasis was not significantly different from that of normal lung, disease-related consolidation showed prolonged time to peak (P=0.01). Lung MRI demonstrates structural and perfusion abnormalities in children and young people with cystic fibrosis. Semi-quantitative assessment of dynamic contrast-enhanced perfusion imaging might allow differentiation between procedure-related atelectasis and disease-related consolidation. (orig.)

  18. Stable-isotope dilution GC-MS approach for nitrite quantification in human whole blood, erythrocytes, and plasma using pentafluorobenzyl bromide derivatization: nitrite distribution in human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Alexandra; Modun, Darko; Heusser, Karsten; Tank, Jens; Gutzki, Frank-Mathias; Mitschke, Anja; Jordan, Jens; Tsikas, Dimitrios

    2011-05-15

    Previously, we reported on the usefulness of pentafluorobenzyl bromide (PFB-Br) for the simultaneous derivatization and quantitative determination of nitrite and nitrate in various biological fluids by GC-MS using their (15)N-labelled analogues as internal standards. As nitrite may be distributed unevenly in plasma and blood cells, its quantification in whole blood rather than in plasma or serum may be the most appropriate approach to determine nitrite concentration in the circulation. So far, GC-MS methods based on PFB-Br derivatization failed to measure nitrite in whole blood and erythrocytes because of rapid nitrite loss by oxidation and other unknown reactions during derivatization. The present article reports optimized and validated procedures for sample preparation and nitrite derivatization which allow for reliable quantification of nitrite in human whole blood and erythrocytes. Essential measures for stabilizing nitrite in these samples include sample cooling (0-4°C), hemoglobin (Hb) removal by precipitation with acetone and short derivatization of the Hb-free supernatant (5 min, 50°C). Potassium ferricyanide (K(3)Fe(CN)(6)) is useful in preventing Hb-caused nitrite loss, however, this chemical is not absolutely required in the present method. Our results show that accurate GC-MS quantification of nitrite as PFB derivative is feasible virtually in every biological matrix with similar accuracy and precision. In EDTA-anticoagulated venous blood of 10 healthy young volunteers, endogenous nitrite concentration was measured to be 486±280 nM in whole blood, 672±496 nM in plasma (C(P)), and 620±350 nM in erythrocytes (C(E)). The C(E)-to-C(P) ratio was 0.993±0.188 indicating almost even distribution of endogenous nitrite between plasma and erythrocytes. By contrast, the major fraction of nitrite added to whole blood remained in plasma. The present GC-MS method is useful to investigate distribution and metabolism of endogenous and exogenous nitrite in blood

  19. Nitrite reductase activity and inhibition of H₂S biogenesis by human cystathionine ß-synthase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Gherasim

    Full Text Available Nitrite was recognized as a potent vasodilator >130 years and has more recently emerged as an endogenous signaling molecule and modulator of gene expression. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate nitrite metabolism is essential for its use as a potential diagnostic marker as well as therapeutic agent for cardiovascular diseases. In this study, we have identified human cystathionine ß-synthase (CBS as a new player in nitrite reduction with implications for the nitrite-dependent control of H₂S production. This novel activity of CBS exploits the catalytic property of its unusual heme cofactor to reduce nitrite and generate NO. Evidence for the possible physiological relevance of this reaction is provided by the formation of ferrous-nitrosyl (Fe(II-NO CBS in the presence of NADPH, the human diflavin methionine synthase reductase (MSR and nitrite. Formation of Fe(II-NO CBS via its nitrite reductase activity inhibits CBS, providing an avenue for regulating biogenesis of H₂S and cysteine, the limiting reagent for synthesis of glutathione, a major antioxidant. Our results also suggest a possible role for CBS in intracellular NO biogenesis particularly under hypoxic conditions. The participation of a regulatory heme cofactor in CBS in nitrite reduction is unexpected and expands the repertoire of proteins that can liberate NO from the intracellular nitrite pool. Our results reveal a potential molecular mechanism for cross-talk between nitrite, NO and H₂S biology.

  20. Implications of Limited Thermophilicity of Nitrite Reduction for Control of Sulfide Production in Oil Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fida, Tekle Tafese; Chen, Chuan; Okpala, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nitrate reduction to nitrite in oil fields appears to be more thermophilic than the subsequent reduction of nitrite. Concentrated microbial consortia from oil fields reduced both nitrate and nitrite at 40 and 45°C but only nitrate at and above 50°C. The abundance of the nirS gene correlated with mesophilic nitrite reduction activity. Thauera and Pseudomonas were the dominant mesophilic nitrate-reducing bacteria (mNRB), whereas Petrobacter and Geobacillus were the dominant thermophilic NRB (tNRB) in these consortia. The mNRB Thauera sp. strain TK001, isolated in this study, reduced nitrate and nitrite at 40 and 45°C but not at 50°C, whereas the tNRB Petrobacter sp. strain TK002 and Geobacillus sp. strain TK003 reduced nitrate to nitrite but did not reduce nitrite further from 50 to 70°C. Testing of 12 deposited pure cultures of tNRB with 4 electron donors indicated reduction of nitrate in 40 of 48 and reduction of nitrite in only 9 of 48 incubations. Nitrate is injected into high-temperature oil fields to prevent sulfide formation (souring) by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), which are strongly inhibited by nitrite. Injection of cold seawater to produce oil creates mesothermic zones. Our results suggest that preventing the temperature of these zones from dropping below 50°C will limit the reduction of nitrite, allowing more effective souring control. IMPORTANCE Nitrite can accumulate at temperatures of 50 to 70°C, because nitrate reduction extends to higher temperatures than the subsequent reduction of nitrite. This is important for understanding the fundamentals of thermophilicity and for the control of souring in oil fields catalyzed by SRB, which are strongly inhibited by nitrite. PMID:27208132

  1. Differentiation of malignant and benign pulmonary nodules with first-pass dual-input perfusion CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaodong; Zhang, Jing; Quan, Changbin; Cao, Jianxia; Ao, Guokun; Tian, Yuan; Li, Hong

    2013-09-01

    To assess diagnostic performance of dual-input CT perfusion for distinguishing malignant from benign solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs). Fifty-six consecutive subjects with SPNs underwent contrast-enhanced 320-row multidetector dynamic volume CT. The dual-input maximum slope CT perfusion analysis was employed to calculate the pulmonary flow (PF), bronchial flow (BF), and perfusion index [Formula: see text]. Differences in perfusion parameters between malignant and benign tumours were assessed with histopathological diagnosis as the gold standard. Diagnostic value of the perfusion parameters was calculated using the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Amongst 56 SPNs, statistically significant differences in all three perfusion parameters were revealed between malignant and benign tumours. The PI demonstrated the biggest difference between malignancy and benignancy: 0.30 ± 0.07 vs. 0.51 ± 0.13 , P perfusion parameters, producing a sensitivity of 0.95, specificity of 0.83, positive likelihood ratio (+LR) of 5.59, and negative likelihood ratio (-LR) of 0.06 in identifying malignancy. The PI derived from the dual-input maximum slope CT perfusion analysis is a valuable biomarker for identifying malignancy in SPNs. PI may be potentially useful for lung cancer treatment planning and forecasting the therapeutic effect of radiotherapy treatment. • Modern CT equipment offers assessment of vascular parameters of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs) • Dual vascular supply was investigated to differentiate malignant from benign SPNs. • Different dual vascular supply patterns were found in malignant and benign SPNs. • The perfusion index is a useful biomarker for differentiate malignancy from benignancy.

  2. Basic considerations in organ perfusion physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Michael A; Martin, Alicia; Hong, Johnny C

    2016-06-01

    Owing to a severe shortage of organs for patients with end-stage diseases, novel techniques in organ preservation and perfusion need to be studied and reviewed to increase the number of available organs for transplant. Many patients will die while waiting for an organ. To make organs from extended-criteria donors feasible, optimal conditions for pulsatile perfusion and the potential for organ reconditioning at implantation need to be addressed. Many techniques in organ preservation and perfusion are being studied. Several laboratories are studying the effects of temperature for organ perfusion. Two areas being studied are hypothermic and normothermic machine perfusion. In the area of organ preservation, new solutions are being studied such as a substrate-enriched, oxygen-saturated, and leukocyte-depleted perfusate to help with organ quality. Even with the strides being made in organ preservation and perfusion, there are still many unanswered questions. More studies will need to be done to find the optimal conditions for duration of perfusion in the cold phase, optimal perfusion solution, degree of oxygenation, and the addition of pharmacologic agents, to improve organ function and expand the organ pool.

  3. Liver perfusion in sepsis, septic shock, and multiorgan failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spapen, Herbert

    2008-06-01

    Sepsis causes significant alterations in the hepatic macro- and microcirculation. Diverging views exist on global hepatic blood flow during experimental sepsis because of the large variety in animal and sepsis models. Fluid-resuscitated clinical sepsis is characterized by ongoing liver ischemia due to a defective oxygen extraction despite enhanced perfusion. The effects of vasoactive agents on the hepatosplanchnic circulation are variable, mostly anecdotal, and depend on baseline perfusion, time of drug administration, and use of concomitant medication. Microvascular blood flow disturbances are thought to play a pivotal role in the development of sepsis-induced multiorgan failure. Redistribution of intrahepatic blood flow in concert with a complex interplay between sinusoidal endothelial cells, liver macrophages, and passing leukocytes lead to a decreased perfusion and blood flow velocity in the liver sinusoids. Activation and dysfunction of the endothelial cell barrier with subsequent invasion of neutrophils and formation of microthrombi further enhance liver tissue ischemia and damage. Substances that regulate (micro)vascular tone, such as nitric oxide, endothelin-1, and carbon monoxide, are highly active during sepsis. Possible interactions between these mediators are not well understood, and their therapeutic manipulation produces equivocal or disappointing results. Whether and how standard resuscitation therapy influences the hepatic microvascular response to sepsis is unknown. Indirect evidence supports the concept that improving the microcirculation may prevent or ameliorate sepsis-induced organ failure.

  4. Hyperventilation, cerebral perfusion, and syncope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Immink, R V; Pott, F C; Secher, N H

    2014-01-01

    the contribution of a low PaCO2 to the early postural reduction in middle cerebral artery blood velocity is transient. HV together with postural stress does not reduce cerebral perfusion to such an extent that TLOC develops. However when HV is combined with cardiovascular stressors like cold immersion or reduced...... dioxide (PaCO2) and oxygen (PaO2) partial pressures so that hypercapnia/hypoxia increases and hypocapnia/hyperoxia reduces global cerebral blood flow. Cerebral hypoperfusion and TLOC have been associated with hypocapnia related to HV. Notwithstanding pronounced cerebrovascular effects of PaCO2...

  5. Role of blood and vascular smooth muscle in the vasoactivity of nitrite

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Taiming; Schroeder, Hobe J.; Barcelo, Lisa; Bragg, Shannon L.; Terry, Michael H.; Wilson, Sean M.; Power, Gordon G.; Blood, Arlin B.

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence from humans and rats indicates that nitrite is a vasodilator under hypoxic conditions by reacting with metal-containing proteins to produce nitric oxide (NO). We tested the hypothesis that near-physiological concentrations of nitrite would produce vasodilation in a hypoxia- and concentration-dependent manner in the hind limb of sheep. Anesthetized sheep were instrumented to measure arterial blood pressure and femoral blood flows continuously in both hind limbs. Nitrite was inf...

  6. Nitrate reduction to nitrite, nitric oxide and ammonia by gut bacteria under physiological conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Tiso

    Full Text Available The biological nitrogen cycle involves step-wise reduction of nitrogen oxides to ammonium salts and oxidation of ammonia back to nitrites and nitrates by plants and bacteria. Neither process has been thought to have relevance to mammalian physiology; however in recent years the salivary bacterial reduction of nitrate to nitrite has been recognized as an important metabolic conversion in humans. Several enteric bacteria have also shown the ability of catalytic reduction of nitrate to ammonia via nitrite during dissimilatory respiration; however, the importance of this pathway in bacterial species colonizing the human intestine has been little studied. We measured nitrite, nitric oxide (NO and ammonia formation in cultures of Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species grown at different sodium nitrate concentrations and oxygen levels. We found that the presence of 5 mM nitrate provided a growth benefit and induced both nitrite and ammonia generation in E.coli and L.plantarum bacteria grown at oxygen concentrations compatible with the content in the gastrointestinal tract. Nitrite and ammonia accumulated in the growth medium when at least 2.5 mM nitrate was present. Time-course curves suggest that nitrate is first converted to nitrite and subsequently to ammonia. Strains of L.rhamnosus, L.acidophilus and B.longum infantis grown with nitrate produced minor changes in nitrite or ammonia levels in the cultures. However, when supplied with exogenous nitrite, NO gas was readily produced independently of added nitrate. Bacterial production of lactic acid causes medium acidification that in turn generates NO by non-enzymatic nitrite reduction. In contrast, nitrite was converted to NO by E.coli cultures even at neutral pH. We suggest that the bacterial nitrate reduction to ammonia, as well as the related NO formation in the gut, could be an important aspect of the overall mammalian nitrate/nitrite/NO metabolism and is yet another way in

  7. Presence of Nitrate and Nitrite in Well Water in Mureș County

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fogarasi Erzsébet

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: One of the most important sources of nitrite and nitrate anions, besides vegetables and meat products, is the drinking water. Presence of nitrite and nitrate in the water in higher concentrations than those set by EFSA (0.5 mg/l nitrite, 50 mg/l nitrate, may have toxicological significance. A quantitative determination of these ions in samples collected from several pleases from Mureș County was made.

  8. Differentiating benign and malignant breast lesions with T2*-weighted first pass perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kvistad, K.A.; Smenes, E.; Haraldseth, O.; Lundgren, S.; Fjoesne, H.E.; Smethurst, H.B.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Invasive breast carcinomas and fibroadenomas are often difficult to differentiate in dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MR imaging of the breast, because both tumors can enhance strongly after contrast injection. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the addition of T2*-weighted first pass perfusion imaging can increase the differentiation of malignant from benign lesions. Material and Methods: Nine patients with invasive carcinomas and 10 patients with contrast enhancing fibroadenomas were examined by a dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted 3D sequence immediately followed by a single slice T2*-weighted first pass perfusion sequence positioned in the contrast-enhancing lesion. Results: The carcinomas and the fibroadenomas were impossible to differentiate based on the contrast enhancement characteristics in the T1-weighted sequence. The signal loss in the T2*-weighted perfusion sequence was significantly stronger in the carcinomas than in the fibroadenomas (p=0.0004). Conclusion: Addition of a T2*-weighted first pass perfusion sequence with a high temporal resolution can probably increase the differentiation of fibroadenomas from invasive carcinomas in contrast-enhanced MR imaging of the breast. (orig.)

  9. Roles of nitric oxide, nitrite and myoglobin on myocardial efficiency in trout (Oncorthynchus mykiss) and goldfish (Carassius auratus): implications for hypoxia tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Claus Lunde; Faggiano, Serena; Helbo, Signe

    2010-01-01

    that mitochondrial respiration is under a tone of NOS-produced NO. When trout myocardial twitch force and O2 consumption are enhanced by adrenaline, this NO tone disappears. Consistent with its conversion to NO, nitrite reduced O2 consumption and increased myocardial efficiency in trout but not in goldfish...... and nitrite on the O2 consumption rate and isometric twitch force development in electrically paced ventricular preparations during hypoxia, and measured O2 affinity and nitrite reductase activity of the purified heart Mbs of both species. Upon hypoxia (9% O2), O2 consumption and developed force decreased...... in both trout and goldfish myocardium, with trout showing a significant increase in the O2 utilization efficiency, i.e. the ratio of twitch force to O2 consumption, suggesting an increased anaerobic metabolism. NOS inhibition enhanced myocardial O2 consumption and decreased efficiency, indicating...

  10. Nitrogen removal and electricity production at a double-chamber microbial fuel cell with cathode nitrite denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yangyang; Zhao, Jianqiang; Wang, Sha; Zhao, Huimin; Ding, Xiaoqian; Gao, Kun

    2017-12-01

    Double-chamber microbial fuel cell was applied to investigate the performance of the electricity production and nitrite denitrification through feeding nitrite into the cathode. Factors influencing denitrification performance and power production, such as external resistance, influent nitrite concentration and Nitrite Oxygen Bacteria inhibitors, were studied. The results show that when the concentration of nitrite nitrogen and external resistance were 100 mg L -1 and 10 Ω, respectively, the nitrite denitrification reached the best state. The NaN 3 can inhibit nitrite oxidation effectively; meanwhile, the nitrite denitrification with N 2 O as the final products was largely improved. The [Formula: see text] was reduced to [Formula: see text], causing the cathode denitrification coulombic efficiency to exceed 100%. In chemoautotrophic bio-nitrification, microorganisms may utilize H 2 O to oxidize nitrite under anaerobic conditions. Proteobacteria might play a major role in the process of denitrification in MFC.

  11. Correlation analysis of dual-energy CT iodine maps with quantitative pulmonary perfusion MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansmann, Jan; Apfaltrer, Paul; Zoellner, Frank G; Henzler, Thomas; Meyer, Mathias; Weisser, Gerald; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Attenberger, Ulrike I

    2013-05-28

    To correlate dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) pulmonary angiography derived iodine maps with parameter maps of quantitative pulmonary perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Eighteen patients with pulmonary perfusion defects detected on DECT derived iodine maps were included in this prospective study and additionally underwent time-resolved contrast-enhanced pulmonary MRI [dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-MRI]. DCE-MRI data were quantitatively analyzed using a pixel-by-pixel deconvolution analysis calculating regional pulmonary blood flow (PBF), pulmonary blood volume (PBV) and mean transit time (MTT) in visually normal lung parenchyma and perfusion defects. Perfusion parameters were correlated to mean attenuation values of normal lung and perfusion defects on DECT iodine maps. Two readers rated the concordance of perfusion defects in a visual analysis using a 5-point Likert-scale (1 = no correlation, 5 = excellent correlation). In visually normal pulmonary tissue mean DECT and MRI values were: 22.6 ± 8.3 Hounsfield units (HU); PBF: 58.8 ± 36.0 mL/100 mL per minute; PBV: 16.6 ± 8.5 mL; MTT: 17.1 ± 10.3 s. In areas with restricted perfusion mean DECT and MRI values were: 4.0 ± 3.9 HU; PBF: 10.3 ± 5.5 mL/100 mL per minute, PBV: 5 ± 4 mL, MTT: 21.6 ± 14.0 s. The differences between visually normal parenchyma and areas of restricted perfusion were statistically significant for PBF, PBV and DECT (P < 0.0001). No linear correlation was found between MRI perfusion parameters and attenuation values of DECT iodine maps (PBF: r = 0.35, P = 0.15; PBV: r = 0.34, P = 0.16; MTT: r = 0.41, P = 0.08). Visual analysis revealed a moderate correlation between perfusion defects on DECT iodine maps and the parameter maps of DCE-MRI (mean score 3.6, κ 0.45). There is a moderate visual but not statistically significant correlation between DECT iodine maps and perfusion parameter maps of DCE-MRI.

  12. Effect of Nitrite Inhibitor on the Macrocell Corrosion Behavior of Reinforcing Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonglu Cao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of nitrite ions on the macrocell corrosion behavior of reinforcing steel embedded in cement mortar was investigated by comparing and analyzing the macrocell corrosion current, macrocell polarization ratios, and slopes of anodic and cathodic steels. Based on the experimental results, the relationship between macrocell potential difference and macrocell current density was analyzed, and the mechanism of macrocell corrosion affected by nitrite ions was proposed. The results indicated that nitrite ions had significant impact on the macrocell polarization ratios of cathode and anode. The presence of nitrite could reduce the macrocell current by decreasing the macrocell potential difference and increasing the macrocell polarization resistance of the anode.

  13. Exposure to inhaled isobutyl nitrite reduces T cell-dependent responsiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soderberg, L.S.F.; Barnett, J.B. (Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock (United States))

    1991-03-11

    Isobutyl nitrite is a drug of abuse popular among male homosexuals and among adolescents. In order to approximate the nitrite exposures of inhalant abusers, mice were treated with 900 ppm isobutyl nitrite in an inhalation chamber for 45 min per day for 14 days. At 72 hr after the last exposure, mice were assayed for immune competence. Under these conditions, mice gained only half the weight of mice exposed to air. The spleens of nitrite exposed mice weighed 15% less and had 24% fewer cells per spleen than controls. Adjusted for equal cell numbers, T cell mitogenic and allogeneic proliferative responses were significantly reduce by 33% and 47%, respectively. Unstimulated spleen cells had elevated levels of IL-2 transcription following exposure to isobutyl nitrite suggesting that nitrite inhalation caused a nonspecific induction of T cells. In contrast, B cell proliferative responses to LPS were unaltered. Exposure to the nitrite reduced the frequency of T-dependent antibody plaque-forming cells (PFC) by 63% and the total number of reduced by 60% after as few as five daily exposures to isobutyl nitrite. Therefore, the data suggest that habitual inhalation of isobutyl nitrite impairs immune competence and that toxicity appears to be directed toward T cell functions.

  14. Radiation preservation with reduced nitrites of bacon and other cured meats - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, H.

    1987-01-01

    The main problem caused by nitrite as a preservative is the formation of carcinogenic nitrosamines in bacon and other cured meats. This has led to a search for alternatives to the use of nitrite. Irradiation with reduced level of nitrite is a promising alternative to the use of current levels of nitrite. Radurization (radiation pasteurization) of bacon containing 20 to to 40 mg/kg of nitrite in evacuated packages, irradiated and stored at 4 degrees C, gives a product with good organoleptic qualities and extended shelf life of > 80 days vs. < days 30 days for the conventionally treated bacon. Radappertization (radiation sterilization) of bacon containing 20 mg/kg of nitrite at a dose of about 30 kGy, irradiated at -20 degrees or lower in evacuated packages, results in a product that is shelf stable for months to years at room temperature (∼ 25 degrees C). It has organoleptic properties comparable to commercial bacon in terms of color, flavor, odor and texture. Irradiation also reduces the nitrite and preformed nitrosamines present in bacon. Lower levels of nitrosamines are formed on cooking irradiated bacon containing presently used commercial levels of nitrite (120-150 mg/kg) and the levels of nitrosamines become negligible with 20 mg/kg of nitrite. Various aspects of preservation of bacon and other cured meats are reviewed in this report with emphasis on radiation processing. 357 refs

  15. METHOD FOR NITRATE DETERMINATION IN WATER IN THE PRESENCE OF NITRITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sandu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study relates to determination of nitrate in presence of nitrite in water and can be used in the quality monitoring of natural water (surface and groundwater, drinking water, water from fish farms and public aquaria where autonomous filters is used. The nature and quantity of reagents used have insignificant impact on natural waters and sewages. According to the investigation, the method includes the removal of nitrite from the solution/water with sulfaminic acid, the nitrate ion reduction to nitrite using a reducing mixture that contains Na2SO4 and zinc dust in ratio of 100:5 and determining the nitrite with the Griess reagent.

  16. Implications of Limited Thermophilicity of Nitrite Reduction for Control of Sulfide Production in Oil Reservoirs

    OpenAIRE

    Fida, Tekle Tafese; Chen, Chuan; Okpala, Gloria; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate reduction to nitrite in oil fields appears to be more thermophilic than the subsequent reduction of nitrite. Concentrated microbial consortia from oil fields reduced both nitrate and nitrite at 40 and 45°C but only nitrate at and above 50°C. The abundance of the nirS gene correlated with mesophilic nitrite reduction activity. Thauera and Pseudomonas were the dominant mesophilic nitrate-reducing bacteria (mNRB), whereas Petrobacter and Geobacillus were the dominant thermophilic NRB (tN...

  17. Nitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: A hidden source of nitrite?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melike eBalk

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate reduction is considered to be a minor microbial pathway in the oxidation of mangrove-derived organic matter due to a limited supply of nitrate in mangrove soils. At a limited availability of this electron acceptor compared to the supply of degradable carbon, nitrate ammonification is thought to be the preferential pathway of nitrate reduction. Mangrove forest mutually differ in their productivity, which may lead to different available carbon to nitrate ratios in their soil. Hence, nitrate ammonification is expected to be of more importance in high- compared to low-productive forests.The hypothesis was tested in flow-through reactors that contain undisturbed mangrove soils from high-productive Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle forests in Florida and low-productive Avicennia marina forests in Saudi Arabia. Nitrate was undetectable in the soils from both regions. It was assumed that a legacy of nitrate ammonification would be reflected by a higher ammonium production from these soils upon the addition of nitrate. Unexpectedly, the soils from the low-productive forests in Saudi Arabia produced considerably more ammonium than the soils from the high-productive forests in Florida. Hence, other environmental factors than productivity must govern the selection of nitrate ammonification or denitrification. A rather intriguing observation was the 1:1 production of nitrite and ammonium during the consumption of nitrate, more or less independent from sampling region, location, sampling depth, mangrove species and from the absence or presence of additional degradable carbon. This 1:1 ratio points to a coupled production of ammonium and nitrite by one group of nitrate-reducing microorganisms. Such a production of nitrite will be hidden under the nitrate-limited conditions of most mangrove forest soils.

  18. Microbial competition among anammox bacteria in nitrite-limited bioreactors

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Lei

    2017-08-26

    Phylogenetically diverse anammox bacteria have been detected in most of anoxic natural and engineered ecosystems and thus regarded as key players in the global nitrogen cycle. However, ecological niche differentiation of anammox bacteria remains unresolved despite its ecological and practical importance. In this study, the microbial competitions for a common substrate (nitrite) among three anammox species (i.e. “Candidatus Brocadia sinica”, “Candidatus Jettenia caeni” and “Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis”) were systematically investigated in nitrite-limited gel-immobilized column reactors (GICR) and membrane bioreactors (MBRs) under different nitrogen loading rates (NLRs). 16 S rRNA gene-based population dynamics revealed that “Ca. J. caeni” could proliferate only at low NLRs, whereas “Ca. B. sinica” outcompeted other two species at higher NLRs in both types of reactors. Furthermore, FISH analysis revealed that “Ca. J. caeni” was mainly present as spherical microclusters at the inner part (low NO2− environment), whereas “Ca. B. sinica” was present throughout the gel beads and granules. This spatial distribution supports the outcomes of the competition experiments. However, the successful competition of “Ca. J. caeni” at low NLR could not be explained with the Monod model probably due to inaccuracy of kinetic parameters such as half saturation constant (Ks) for nitrite and a difference in the maintenance rate (m). In addition, the growth of “Ca. K. stuttgartiensis” could not be observed in any experimental conditions, suggesting possible unknown factor(s) is missing. Taken together, NLR was one of factors determining ecological niche differentiation of “Ca. B. sinica” and “Ca. J. caeni”.

  19. Cultivation, growth physiology, and chemotaxonomy of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spieck, Eva; Lipski, André

    2011-01-01

    Lithoautotrophic nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) are known as fastidious microorganisms, which are hard to maintain and not many groups are trained to keep them in culture. They convert nitrite stoichiometrically to nitrate and growth is slow due to the poor energy balance. NOB are comprised of five genera, which are scattered among the phylogenetic tree. Because NOB proliferate in a broad range of environmental conditions (terrestrial, marine, acidic) and have diverse lifestyles (lithoautotrophic, mixotrophic, and heterotrophic), variation in media composition is necessary to match their individual growth requirements in the laboratory. From Nitrobacter and Nitrococcus relatively high cell amounts can be achieved by consumption of high nitrite concentrations, whereas accumulation of cells belonging to Nitrospira, Nitrospina, or the new candidate genus Nitrotoga needs prolonged feeding procedures. Isolation is possible for planktonic cells by dilution series or plating techniques, but gets complicated for strains with a tendency to develop microcolonies like Nitrospira. Physiological experiments including determination of the temperature or pH-optimum can be conducted with active laboratory cultures of NOB, but the attainment of reference values like cell protein content or cell numbers might be hard to realize due to the formation of flocs and the low cell density. Monitoring of laboratory enrichments is necessary especially if several species or genera coexist within the same culture and due to population shifts over time. Chemotaxonomy is a valuable method to identify and quantify NOB in biofilms and pure cultures alike, since fatty acid profiles reflect their phylogenetic heterogeneity. This chapter focusses on methods to enrich, isolate, and characterize NOB by various cultivation-based techniques. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Clinical application of cerebral dynamic perfusion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLand, F.H.

    1975-01-01

    Radionuclide cerebral perfusion studies are assuming a far greater importance in the detection and differential diagnosis of cerebral lesions. Perfusion studies not only contribute to the differential diagnosis of lesions but in certain cases are the preferred methods by which more accurate clinical interpretations can be made. The characteristic blood flow of arterio-venous malformations readily differentiates this lesion from neoplasms. The decreased perfusion or absent perfusion observed in cerebral infarctions is diagnostic without concurrent evidence from static images. Changes in rates and direction of blood flow contribute fundamental information to the status of stenosis and vascular occlusion and, in addition, offer valuable information on the competency and routes of collateral circulation. The degree of cerebral perfusion after cerebral vascular accidents appears to be directly related to patient recovery, particularly muscular function. Cerebral perfusion adds a new parameter in the diagnosis of subdural haematomas and concussion and in the differentiation of obscuring radioactivity from superficial trauma. Although pictorial displays of perfusion blood flow will offer information in most cerebral vascular problems, the addition of computer analysis better defines temporal relationships of regional blood flow, quantitative changes in flow and the detection of the more subtle increases or decreases in cerebral blood flow. The status of radionuclide cerebral perfusion studies has taken on an importance making it the primary modality for the diagnosis of cerebral lesions. (author)

  1. The study of abiotic reduction of nitrate and nitrite in Boom Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariën, A.; Bleyen, N.; Aerts, S.; Valcke, E.

    In Belgium, Boom Clay is studied as a reference host rock for the geological disposal of high-level and intermediate-level radioactive waste. Compatibility studies at the SCK•CEN aim at investigating a perturbation of the capacity of Boom Clay to retard the migration of radionuclides to the biosphere, after disposal of Eurobitum bituminized radioactive waste in the clay ( Valcke et al., 2009; Aertsens et al., 2009; Bleyen et al., 2010). One of the geo-chemical perturbations is the possible oxidation of Boom Clay by the large amounts of nitrate that will be released by Eurobitum. A more oxidised Boom Clay could have a lower reducing capacity towards redox sensitive radionuclides, possibly enhancing their migration. As the conditions in the Boom Clay formation around a disposal gallery for Eurobitum are far from optimal for the growth of prokaryotes (limited space in the far-field, high pH in the near-field, gamma radiation by the waste during the first ∼300 years (effect limited to the primary and secondary waste package)), the impact of microbially mediated reduction of nitrate and nitrite is unclear. Therefore, batch tests are performed at the SCK•CEN to study whether nitrate and nitrite can directly oxidise the main redoxactive components of Boom Clay (dissolved organic matter, kerogen, pyrite) without the mediation of prokaryotes. In a first series of batch tests, which are reported in this paper, the activity of denitrifying and nitrate reducing prokaryotes was inhibited by the addition of NaN 3. NaN 3 revealed to be an efficient inhibitor for these prokaryotes without affecting considerably the geochemistry of Boom Clay and/or Boom Clay pore water. Neither in batch tests with the Boom Clay slurries (with NaNO 3 (0.1 and 1 M) or NaNO 2 (0.1 M)) and with Boom Clay water (with 0.05 and 0.2 M NaNO 3) a pure chemical nitrate or nitrite reduction was observed after respectively 3, 7 and 17 weeks and 1 year (Boom Clay slurries) and about 2 years (Boom Clay

  2. ADSORPTION OF NITRITE FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTION USING SAWDUST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiz Nuran ACAR

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of nitrites ions onto sawdust materials have been studied using a batch system. In this study, using adsorbents are beech, pine, poplar and walnut sawdust materials. The maximum adsorption percentage was occured by beech sawdust. In the studies, the effects of adsorbents and the solution of initial pH for beech sawdust were analysed using the first order reversible reaction kinetic model. For the different experimental conditions, the reaction rate constants and equilibrium constant have been determined with this kinetic model.

  3. Hyperpolarized13C urea myocardial first-pass perfusion imaging using velocity-selective excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuetterer, Maximilian; Busch, Julia; Peereboom, Sophie M; von Deuster, Constantin; Wissmann, Lukas; Lipiski, Miriam; Fleischmann, Thea; Cesarovic, Nikola; Stoeck, Christian T; Kozerke, Sebastian

    2017-06-21

    A velocity-selective binomial excitation scheme for myocardial first-pass perfusion measurements with hyperpolarized 13 C substrates, which preserves bolus magnetization inside the blood pool, is presented. The proposed method is evaluated against gadolinium-enhanced 1 H measurements in-vivo. The proposed excitation with an echo-planar imaging readout was implemented on a clinical CMR system. Dynamic myocardial stress perfusion images were acquired in six healthy pigs after bolus injection of hyperpolarized 13 C urea with the velocity-selective vs. conventional excitation, as well as standard 1 H gadolinium-enhanced images. Signal-to-noise, contrast-to-noise (CNR) and homogeneity of semi-quantitative perfusion measures were compared between methods based on first-pass signal-intensity time curves extracted from a mid-ventricular slice. Diagnostic feasibility is demonstrated in a case of septal infarction. Velocity-selective excitation provides over three-fold reduction in blood pool signal with a two-fold increase in myocardial CNR. Extracted first-pass perfusion curves reveal a significantly reduced variability of semi-quantitative first-pass perfusion measures (12-20%) for velocity-selective excitation compared to conventional excitation (28-93%), comparable to that of reference 1 H gadolinium data (9-15%). Overall image quality appears comparable between the velocity-selective hyperpolarized and gadolinium-enhanced imaging. The feasibility of hyperpolarized 13 C first-pass perfusion CMR has been demonstrated in swine. Comparison with reference 1 H gadolinium data revealed sufficient data quality and indicates the potential of hyperpolarized perfusion imaging for human applications.

  4. Assessment of the relationship between lung parenchymal destruction and impaired pulmonary perfusion on a lobar level in patients with emphysema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ley-Zaporozhan, Julia; Ley, Sebastian; Eberhardt, Ralf; Weinheimer, Oliver; Fink, Christian; Puderbach, Michael; Eichinger, Monika; Herth, Felix; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the relationship between lung parenchymal destruction and impaired pulmonary perfusion on a lobar level using CT and MRI in patients with emphysema. Material and methods: Forty-five patients with severe emphysema (GOLD III and IV) underwent inspiratory 3D-HRCT and contrast-enhanced MR-perfusion (1.5T; 3.5 mm x 1.9 mm x 4 mm). 3D-HRCT data was analyzed using a software for detection and visualization of emphysema. Emphysema was categorized in four clusters with different volumes and presented as overlay on the CT. CT and lung perfusion were visually analyzed for three lobes on each side using a four-point-score to grade the abnormalities on CT (1: predominantly small emphysema-clusters to 4: >75% large emphysema-clusters) and MRI (1: normal perfusion to 4: no perfusion). Results: A total of 270 lobes were evaluated. At CT, the score was 1 for 9 lobes, 2 for 43, 3 for 77, and 4 for 141 lobes. At MRI, the score was 1 for 13 lobes, 2 for 45, 3 for 92, and 4 for 120 lobes. Matching of lung parenchymal destruction and reduced perfusion was found in 213 lobes (weighted kappa = 0.8). The score was higher on CT in 44, and higher on MRI in 13 lobes. Conclusion: 3D-HRCT and 3D MR-perfusion show a high lobar agreement between parenchymal destruction and reduction of perfusion in patients with severe emphysema

  5. Methodology for ventilation/perfusion SPECT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bajc, Marika; Neilly, Brian; Miniati, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    radiolabeled liquid aerosols are not restricted to the presence of obstructive lung disease. Radiolabeled macroaggregated human albumin is the imaging agent of choice for perfusion scintigraphy. An optimal combination of nuclide activities and acquisition times for ventilation and perfusion, collimators......Ventilation/perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (V/Q SPECT) is the scintigraphic technique of choice for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism and many other disorders that affect lung function. Data from recent ventilation studies show that the theoretic advantages of Technegas over......, and imaging matrix yields an adequate V/Q SPECT study in approximately 20 minutes of imaging time. The recommended protocol based on the patient remaining in an unchanged position during the initial ventilation study and the perfusion study allows presentation of matching ventilation and perfusion slices...

  6. Brain Perfusion Changes in Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mititelu, R.; Mazilu, C.; Ghita, S.; Rimbu, A.; Marinescu, G.; Codorean, I.; Bajenaru, O.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Purpose: Despite the latest advances in medical treatment and neuro critical care, patients suffering spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (SICH) still have a very poor prognosis, with a greater mortality and larger neurological deficits at the survivors than for ischemic stroke. Many authors have shown that there are many mechanisms involved in the pathology of SICH: edema, ischemia, inflammation, apoptosis. All of these factors are affecting brain tissue surrounding hematoma and are responsible of the progressive neurological deterioration; most of these damages are not revealed by anatomical imaging techniques. The aim of our study was to asses the role of brain perfusion SPECT in demonstrating perfusion changes in SICH patients. Method: 17 SICH pts were studied. All pts underwent same day CT and brain SPECT with 99mTcHMPAO, 24h-5d from onset of stroke. Results: 14/17 pts showed a larger perfusion defect than expected after CT. In 2 pts hematoma diameter was comparable on CT and SPECT; 1pt had quasinormal aspect of SPECT study. In pts with larger defects, SPECT revealed a large cold spot with similar size compared with CT, and a surrounding hypo perfused area. 6/17 pts revealed cortical hyper perfusion adjacent to hypo perfused area and corresponding to a normal-appearing brain tissue on CT. In 3 pts we found crossed cerebellar diaskisis.In 2 pts we found cortical hypo perfused area in the contralateral cortex, with normal appearing brain tissue on CT. Conclusions: Brain perfusion SPECT revealed different types of perfusion changes in the brain tissue surrounding hematoma. These areas contain viable brain tissue that may be a target for future ne uroprotective strategies. Further studies are definitely required to demonstrate prognostic significance of these changes, but we can conclude that brain perfusion SPECT can play an important role in SICH, by early demonstrating functional changes responsible of clinical deterioration, thus allowing prompt

  7. Simulation evaluation of quantitative myocardial perfusion assessment from cardiac CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindschadler, Michael; Modgil, Dimple; Branch, Kelley R.; La Riviere, Patrick J.; Alessio, Adam M.

    2014-03-01

    Contrast enhancement on cardiac CT provides valuable information about myocardial perfusion and methods have been proposed to assess perfusion with static and dynamic acquisitions. There is a lack of knowledge and consensus on the appropriate approach to ensure 1) sufficient diagnostic accuracy for clinical decisions and 2) low radiation doses for patient safety. This work developed a thorough dynamic CT simulation and several accepted blood flow estimation techniques to evaluate the performance of perfusion assessment across a range of acquisition and estimation scenarios. Cardiac CT acquisitions were simulated for a range of flow states (Flow = 0.5, 1, 2, 3 ml/g/min, cardiac output = 3,5,8 L/min). CT acquisitions were simulated with a validated CT simulator incorporating polyenergetic data acquisition and realistic x-ray flux levels for dynamic acquisitions with a range of scenarios including 1, 2, 3 sec sampling for 30 sec with 25, 70, 140 mAs. Images were generated using conventional image reconstruction with additional image-based beam hardening correction to account for iodine content. Time attenuation curves were extracted for multiple regions around the myocardium and used to estimate flow. In total, 2,700 independent realizations of dynamic sequences were generated and multiple MBF estimation methods were applied to each of these. Evaluation of quantitative kinetic modeling yielded blood flow estimates with an root mean square error (RMSE) of ~0.6 ml/g/min averaged across multiple scenarios. Semi-quantitative modeling and qualitative static imaging resulted in significantly more error (RMSE = ~1.2 and ~1.2 ml/min/g respectively). For quantitative methods, dose reduction through reduced temporal sampling or reduced tube current had comparable impact on the MBF estimate fidelity. On average, half dose acquisitions increased the RMSE of estimates by only 18% suggesting that substantial dose reductions can be employed in the context of quantitative myocardial

  8. Functional Assessment of Coronary Artery Disease Using Whole-Heart Dynamic Computed Tomographic Perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Logan; Ziemer, Benjamin; Lipinski, Jerry; Sadeghi, Bahman; Javan, Hanna; Groves, Elliott M; Malkasian, Shant; Molloi, Sabee

    2016-12-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) angiography is an important tool for the evaluation of coronary artery disease but often correlates poorly with myocardial ischemia. Current dynamic CT perfusion techniques can assess ischemia but have limited accuracy and deliver high radiation dose. Therefore, an accurate, low-dose, dynamic CT perfusion technique is needed. A total of 20 contrast-enhanced CT volume scans were acquired in 5 swine (40±10 kg) to generate CT angiography and perfusion images. Varying degrees of stenosis were induced using a balloon catheter in the proximal left anterior descending coronary artery, and a pressure wire was used for reference fractional flow reserve (FFR) measurement. Perfusion measurements were made with only 2 volume scans using a new first-pass analysis (FPA) technique and with 20 volume scans using an existing maximum slope model (MSM) technique. Perfusion (P) and FFR measurements were related by P FPA =1.01 FFR-0.03 (R 2 =0.85) and P MSM =1.03 FFR-0.03 (R 2 =0.80) for FPA and MSM techniques, respectively. Additionally, the effective radiation doses were calculated to be 2.64 and 26.4 mSv for FPA and MSM techniques, respectively. A new FPA-based dynamic CT perfusion technique was validated in a swine animal model. The results indicate that the FPA technique can potentially be used for improved anatomical and functional assessment of coronary artery disease at a relatively low radiation dose. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Excessive nitrite affects zebrafish valvulogenesis through yielding too much NO signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junbo Li

    Full Text Available Sodium nitrite, a common food additive, exists widely not only in the environment but also in our body. Excessive nitrite causes toxicological effects on human health; however, whether it affects vertebrate heart valve development remains unknown. In vertebrates, developmental defects of cardiac valves usually lead to congenital heart disease. To understand the toxic effects of nitrite on valvulogenesis, we exposed zebrafish embryos with different concentrations of sodium nitrite. Our results showed that sodium nitrite caused developmental defects of zebrafish heart dose dependently. It affected zebrafish heart development starting from 36 hpf (hour post fertilization when heart initiates looping process. Comprehensive analysis on the embryos at 24 hpf and 48 hpf showed that excessive nitrite did not affect blood circulation, vascular network, myocardium and endocardium development. But development of endocardial cells in atrioventricular canal (AVC of the embryos at 48 hpf was disrupted by too much nitrite, leading to defective formation of primitive valve leaflets at 76 hpf. Consistently, excessive nitrite diminished expressions of valve progenitor markers including bmp4, has2, vcana and notch1b at 48 hpf. Furthermore, 3', 5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP, downstream of nitric oxide (NO signaling, was increased its level significantly in the embryos exposed with excessive nitrite and microinjection of soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor ODQ (1H-[1], [2], [4]Oxadiazolo[4,3-a] quinoxalin-1-one, an antagonist of NO signaling, into nitrite-exposed embryos could partly rescue the cardiac valve malformation. Taken together, our results show that excessive nitrite affects early valve leaflet formation by producing too much NO signaling.

  10. Toluene nitration in irradiated nitric acid and nitrite solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, Gracy, E-mail: gracy.elias@inl.go [Idaho National Laboratory, Chemical and Radiation Measurement Department, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2213 (United States); Mincher, Bruce J. [Idaho National Laboratory, Aqueous Separations and Radiochemistry Department, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6180 (United States); Mezyk, Stephen P. [California State University-Long Beach, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 1250 Bellflower Boulevard, Long Beach, CA 90840-3903 (United States); Muller, Jim [University of Utah, Department of Chemistry, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0850 (United States); Martin, Leigh R. [Idaho National Laboratory, Aqueous Separations and Radiochemistry Department, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6180 (United States)

    2011-04-15

    The kinetics, mechanisms, and stable products produced for the nitration of aryl alkyl mild ortho-para director toluene in irradiated nitric acid and neutral nitrite solutions were investigated using {gamma} and pulse radiolysis. Electron pulse radiolysis was used to determine the bimolecular rate constants for the reaction of toluene with different transient species produced by irradiation. HPLC with UV detection, GC-MS and LC-MS, were used to assess the stable reaction products. Free-radical based nitration reaction products were found in irradiated acidic and neutral media. In 6.0 M HNO{sub 3}, ring substitution, side chain substitution, and oxidation, produced different nitrated toluene products. For ring substitution, nitrogen oxide radicals were added mainly to cyclohexadienyl radicals, whereas for side chain substitution, these radicals were added to the carbon-centered benzyl radical produced by H-atom abstraction. In neutral nitrite solutions, radiolytically-induced ring nitration products approached a statistically random distribution, suggesting a direct free-radical reaction involving addition of the {sup {center_dot}N}O{sub 2} radical.

  11. Toluene nitration in irradiated nitric acid and nitrite solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Gracy; Mincher, Bruce J.; Mezyk, Stephen P.; Muller, Jim; Martin, Leigh R.

    2011-04-01

    The kinetics, mechanisms, and stable products produced for the nitration of aryl alkyl mild ortho-para director toluene in irradiated nitric acid and neutral nitrite solutions were investigated using γ and pulse radiolysis. Electron pulse radiolysis was used to determine the bimolecular rate constants for the reaction of toluene with different transient species produced by irradiation. HPLC with UV detection, GC-MS and LC-MS, were used to assess the stable reaction products. Free-radical based nitration reaction products were found in irradiated acidic and neutral media. In 6.0 M HNO3, ring substitution, side chain substitution, and oxidation, produced different nitrated toluene products. For ring substitution, nitrogen oxide radicals were added mainly to cyclohexadienyl radicals, whereas for side chain substitution, these radicals were added to the carbon-centered benzyl radical produced by H-atom abstraction. In neutral nitrite solutions, radiolytically-induced ring nitration products approached a statistically random distribution, suggesting a direct free-radical reaction involving addition of the rad NO2 radical.

  12. Toluene nitration in irradiated nitric acid and nitrite solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gracy Elias; Bruce J. Mincher; Stephen P. Mezyk; Jim Muller; Leigh R. Martin

    2011-04-01

    The kinetics, mechanisms, and stable products produced for the aryl alkyl mild ortho-para director - toluene, in irradiated nitric acid and neutral nitrite solutions were investigated using ?, and pulse radiolysis. Electron pulse radiolysis was used to determine the bimolecular rate constants for the reaction of toluene with different transient species produced by irradiation. HPLC with UV detection was primarily used to assess the stable reaction products. GC-MS and LC-MS were used to confirm the results from HPLC. Free-radical nitration reaction products were found in irradiated acidic and neutral media. In acidic medium, the ring substitution and side chain substitution and oxidation produced different nitro products. In ring substitution, nitrogen oxide radicals were added mainly to hydroxyl radical-produced cyclohexadienyl radical, and in side chain substitution they were added to the carbon-centered benzyl radical produced by H-atom abstraction. In neutral nitrite toluene solution, radiolytic ring nitration products approached a statistically random distribution, suggesting a free-radical reaction involving addition of the •NO2 radical.

  13. Toluene nitration in irradiated nitric acid and nitrite solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, Gracy; Mincher, Bruce J.; Mezyk, Stephen P.; Muller, Jim; Martin, Leigh R.

    2011-01-01

    The kinetics, mechanisms, and stable products produced for the nitration of aryl alkyl mild ortho-para director toluene in irradiated nitric acid and neutral nitrite solutions were investigated using γ and pulse radiolysis. Electron pulse radiolysis was used to determine the bimolecular rate constants for the reaction of toluene with different transient species produced by irradiation. HPLC with UV detection, GC-MS and LC-MS, were used to assess the stable reaction products. Free-radical based nitration reaction products were found in irradiated acidic and neutral media. In 6.0 M HNO 3 , ring substitution, side chain substitution, and oxidation, produced different nitrated toluene products. For ring substitution, nitrogen oxide radicals were added mainly to cyclohexadienyl radicals, whereas for side chain substitution, these radicals were added to the carbon-centered benzyl radical produced by H-atom abstraction. In neutral nitrite solutions, radiolytically-induced ring nitration products approached a statistically random distribution, suggesting a direct free-radical reaction involving addition of the · NO 2 radical.

  14. Nitrous oxide production pathways in a partial nitritation-anammox reactor: Isotopic evidence for nitrous oxide production associated anaerobic ammonium oxidation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderlin, P.; Harris, E. J.; Joss, A.; Emmenegger, L.; Kipf, M.; Mohn, J.; Siegrist, H.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a strong greenhouse gas and a major sink for stratospheric ozone. In biological wastewater treatment N2O can be produced via several pathways. This study investigates the dynamics of N2O emissions from a nitritation-anammox reactor, and links its interpretation to the nitrogen and oxygen isotopic signature of the emitted N2O. A 400-litre single-stage nitritation-anammox reactor was operated and continuously fed with digester liquid. The isotopic composition of N2O emissions was monitored online with quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS; Aerodyne Research, Inc.; Waechter et al., 2008). Dissolved ammonium and nitrate were monitored online (ISEmax, Endress + Hauser), while nitrite was measured with test strips (Nitrite-test 0-24mgN/l, Merck). Table 1. Summary of experiments conducted to understand N2O emissions Experimental conditions O2[mgO2/L] NO2-[mgN/L] NH4+[mgN/L] N2O/NH4+[%] Normal operation in the reactor. Our data reveal that N2O emissions increased when reactor operation was not ideal, for example when dissolved oxygen was too high (Table 1). SP measurements confirmed that these N2O peaks were due to enhanced nitrifier denitrification, generally related to nitrite build-up in the reactor (Figure 1; Table 1). Overall, process control via online N2O monitoring was confirmed to be an ideal method to detect imbalances in reactor operation and regulate aeration, to ensure optimal reactor conditions and minimise N2O emissions. ReferencesWaechter H. et al. (2008) Optics Express, 16: 9239-9244. Wunderlin, P et al. (2013) Environmental Science & Technology 47: 1339-1348.

  15. A microfluidically perfused three dimensional human liver model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennert, Knut; Steinborn, Sandra; Gröger, Marko; Ungerböck, Birgit; Jank, Anne-Marie; Ehgartner, Josef; Nietzsche, Sandor; Dinger, Julia; Kiehntopf, Michael; Funke, Harald; Peters, Frank T; Lupp, Amelie; Gärtner, Claudia; Mayr, Torsten; Bauer, Michael; Huber, Otmar; Mosig, Alexander S

    2015-12-01

    Within the liver, non-parenchymal cells (NPCs) are critically involved in the regulation of hepatocyte polarization and maintenance of metabolic function. We here report the establishment of a liver organoid that integrates NPCs in a vascular layer composed of endothelial cells and tissue macrophages and a hepatic layer comprising stellate cells co-cultured with hepatocytes. The three-dimensional liver organoid is embedded in a microfluidically perfused biochip that enables sufficient nutrition supply and resembles morphological aspects of the human liver sinusoid. It utilizes a suspended membrane as a cell substrate mimicking the space of Disse. Luminescence-based sensor spots were integrated into the chip to allow online measurement of cellular oxygen consumption. Application of microfluidic flow induces defined expression of ZO-1, transferrin, ASGPR-1 along with an increased expression of MRP-2 transporter protein within the liver organoids. Moreover, perfusion was accompanied by an increased hepatobiliary secretion of 5(6)-carboxy-2',7'-dichlorofluorescein and an enhanced formation of hepatocyte microvilli. From this we conclude that the perfused liver organoid shares relevant morphological and functional characteristics with the human liver and represents a new in vitro research tool to study human hepatocellular physiology at the cellular level under conditions close to the physiological situation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Quantitative dual energy CT measurements in rabbit VX2 liver tumors: Comparison to perfusion CT measurements and histopathological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Long Jiang; Wu, Shengyong; Wang, Mei; Lu, Li; Chen, Bo; Jin, Lixin; Wang, Jiandong; Larson, Andrew C.; Lu, Guang Ming

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the correlation between quantitative dual energy CT and perfusion CT measurements in rabbit VX2 liver tumors. Materials and methods: This study was approved by the institutional animal care and use committee at our institution. Nine rabbits with VX2 liver tumors underwent contrast-enhanced dual energy CT and perfusion CT. CT attenuation for the tumors and normal liver parenchyma and tumor-to-liver ratio were obtained at the 140 kVp, 80 kVp, average weighted images and dual energy CT iodine maps. Quantitative parameters for the viable tumor and adjacent liver were measured with perfusion CT. The correlation between the enhancement values of the tumor in iodine maps and perfusion CT parameters of each tumor was analyzed. Radiation dose from dual energy CT and perfusion CT was measured. Results: Enhancement values for the tumor were higher than that for normal liver parenchyma at the hepatic arterial phase (P < 0.05). The highest tumor-to-liver ratio was obtained in hepatic arterial phase iodine map. Hepatic blood flow of the tumor was higher than that for adjacent liver (P < 0.05). Enhancement values of hepatic tumors in the iodine maps positively correlated with permeability of capillary vessel surface (r = 0.913, P < 0.001), hepatic blood flow (r = 0.512, P = 0.010), and hepatic blood volume (r = 0.464, P = 0.022) at the hepatic arterial phases. The effective radiation dose from perfusion CT was higher than that from DECT (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The enhancement values for viable tumor tissues measured in iodine maps were well correlated to perfusion CT measurements in rabbit VX2 liver tumors. Compared with perfusion CT, dual energy CT of the liver required a lower radiation dose.

  17. Spectrofluorometric and Molecular Modeling Studies on Binding of Nitrite Ion with Bovine Hemoglobin: Effect of Nitrite Ion on Amino Acid Residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrakian, T.; Bagheri, H.; Afkhami, A.

    2015-05-01

    The interaction between nitrite ion and bovine hemoglobin was investigated by a spectrofluorometric technique. The experimental results indicated that the interaction causes a static quenching of the fluorescence of bovine hemoglobin, that the binding reaction is spontaneous, and that H-bonding interactions play a major role in binding of this ion to bovine hemoglobin. The formation constant for this interaction was calculated. Based on Förster's theory of nonradiative energy transfer, the binding distance between this ion and bovine hemoglobin was determined. Furthermore, the interaction of nitrite ion with tyrosine and tryptophan was investigated with synchronous fluorescence. There was no significant shift of the maximum emission wavelength with interactions of the mentioned ion with bovine hemoglobin, which implies that interaction of nitrite ion with bovine hemoglobin does not affect the microenvironment around the tryptophan and tyrosine residues. Furthermore, the effect of nitrite ion on amino acid residues of bovine hemoglobin was studied by a molecular docking technique.

  18. Metabolic fates and effects of nitrite in brown trout under normoxic and hypoxic conditions: blood and tissue nitrite metabolism and interactions with branchial NOS, Na+/K+-ATPase and hsp70 expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank Bo; Gerber, Lucie; Hansen, Marie Niemann

    2015-01-01

    Nitrite secures essential nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability in hypoxia at low endogenous concentrations, whereas it becomes toxic at high concentrations. We exposed brown trout to normoxic and hypoxic water in the absence and presence of added ambient nitrite to decipher the cellular metabolism...... and effects of nitrite at basal and elevated concentrations under different oxygen regimes. We also tested hypotheses concerning the influence of nitrite on branchial nitric oxide synthase (NOS), Na+/K+-ATPase (nka) and heat shock protein (hsp70) mRNA expression. Basal plasma and erythrocyte nitrite levels...... were higher in hypoxia than normoxia, suggesting increased NOS activity. Nitrite exposure strongly elevated nitrite concentrations in plasma, erythrocytes, heart tissue and white muscle, which was associated with an extensive metabolism of nitrite to nitrate and to iron-nitrosylated and S...

  19. Perfusion MR imaging for differentiation of benign and malignant meningiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hao [University of Groningen, Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Shanghai Jiaotong University, Department of Radiology, First People' s Hospital, Shanghai (China); Roediger, Lars A.; Oudkerk, Matthijs [University of Groningen, Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Shen, Tianzhen [Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Miao, Jingtao [Shanghai Jiaotong University, Department of Radiology, First People' s Hospital, Shanghai (China)

    2008-06-15

    Our purpose was to determine whether perfusion MR imaging can be used to differentiate benign and malignant meningiomas on the basis of the differences in perfusion of tumor parenchyma and/or peritumoral edema. A total of 33 patients with preoperative meningiomas (25 benign and 8 malignant) underwent conventional and dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion MR imaging. Maximal relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) and the corresponding relative mean time to enhance (rMTE) (relative to the contralateral normal white matter) in both tumor parenchyma and peritumoral edema were measured. The independent samples t-test was used to determine whether there was a statistically significant difference in the mean rCBV and rMTE ratios between benign and malignant meningiomas. The mean maximal rCBV values of benign and malignant meningiomas were 7.16{+-}4.08 (mean{+-}SD) and 5.89{+-}3.86, respectively, in the parenchyma, and 1.05{+-}0.96 and 3.82{+-}1.39, respectively, in the peritumoral edema. The mean rMTE values were 1.16{+-}0.24 and 1.30{+-}0.32, respectively, in the parenchyma, and 0.91{+-}0.25 and 1.24{+-}0.35, respectively, in the peritumoral edema. The differences in rCBV and rMTE values between benign and malignant meningiomas were not statistically significant (P>0.05) in the parenchyma, but both were statistically significant (P<0.05) in the peritumoral edema. Perfusion MR imaging can provide useful information on meningioma vascularity which is not available from conventional MRI. Measurement of maximal rCBV and corresponding rMTE values in the peritumoral edema is useful in the preoperative differentiation between benign and malignant meningiomas. (orig.)

  20. Effect of Electrolytes on the Adsorption of Nitrite and Nitrate from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nitrite and nitrate levels were quantitatively adsorbed to wood-derived activated carbon in aqueous system and the effects of electrolytes investigated in this study using batch sorption process. The data showed that nitrate adsorbed nearly 1.5 times higher than that of nitrite. The adsorption is adequately explained by ...

  1. Haematological and ion regulatory effects of nitrite in the air-breathing snakehead fish Channa striata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefevre, Sjannie; Jensen, Frank Bo; Huong, Do T.T.

    2012-01-01

    The tolerance and effects of nitrite on ion balance and haematology were investigated in the striped snakehead, Channa striata Bloch 1793, which is an air-breathing fish with reduced gills of importance for aquaculture in South East Asia. C. striata was nitrite tolerant with a 96 h LC50 of 4.7 m...

  2. The effect of environmental hypercapnia and size on nitrite toxicity in the striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Malthe; Damsgaard, Christian; Gam, Le Thi Hong

    2016-01-01

    Striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) are farmed intensively at high stocking densities in Vietnam where they are likely to encounter environmental hypercapnia as well as occasional high levels of aquatic nitrite. Nitrite competes with Cl- for uptake at the branchial HCO3-/Cl- exchanger, ...... the ambient concentration, while small fish did not. Small P. hypophthalmus instead had significantly higher plasma [nitrate], and haemoglobin concentrations, revealing greater capacity for detoxifying nitrite by oxidising it to nitrate.......Striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) are farmed intensively at high stocking densities in Vietnam where they are likely to encounter environmental hypercapnia as well as occasional high levels of aquatic nitrite. Nitrite competes with Cl- for uptake at the branchial HCO3-/Cl- exchanger...... to a reduced nitrite uptake. To assess the effect of hypercapnia on nitrite uptake, fish were cannulated in the dorsal aorta, allowing repeated blood sampling for measurements of haemoglobin derivatives, plasma ions and acid-base status during exposure to 0.9 mM nitrite alone and in combination with acute...

  3. 21 CFR 172.177 - Sodium nitrite used in processing smoked chub.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Food Preservatives § 172.177 Sodium nitrite used in processing smoked chub. The food additive sodium nitrite may be safely used in combination with salt (NaCl) to aid in...

  4. Dietary nitrite attenuates oxidative stress and activates antioxidant genes in rat heart during hypobaric hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manjulata; Arya, Aditya; Kumar, Rajesh; Bhargava, Kalpana; Sethy, Niroj Kumar

    2012-01-01

    The nitrite anion represents the circulatory and tissue storage form of nitric oxide (NO) and a signaling molecule, capable of conferring cardioprotection and many other health benefits. However, molecular mechanisms for observed cardioprotective properties of nitrite remain largely unknown. We have evaluated the NO-like bioactivity and cardioprotective efficacies of sodium nitrite supplemented in drinking water in rats exposed to short-term chronic hypobaric hypoxia. We observed that, nitrite significantly attenuates hypoxia-induced oxidative stress, modulates HIF-1α stability and promotes NO-cGMP signaling in hypoxic heart. To elucidate potential downstream targets of nitrite during hypoxia, we performed a microarray analysis of nitrite supplemented hypoxic hearts and compared with both hypoxic and nitrite supplemented normoxic hearts respectively. The analysis revealed a significant increase in the expression of many antioxidant genes, transcription factors and cardioprotective signaling pathways which was subsequently confirmed by qRT-PCR and Western blotting. Conversely, hypoxia exposure increased oxidative stress, activated inflammatory cytokines, downregulated ion channels and altered expression of both pro- and anti-oxidant genes. Our results illustrate the physiological function of nitrite as an eNOS-independent source of NO in heart profoundly modulating the oxidative status and cardiac transcriptome during hypoxia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Bioavailability of sodium nitrite from an aqueous solution in healthy adults.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunault, C.C.; van Velzen, A.G.; Sips, A.J.; Schothorst, R.C.; Meulenbelt, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/079479227

    2009-01-01

    Nitrate intake in humans is high through intake of vegetables such as beets, lettuce, and spinach. Nitrate itself is a compound of low toxicity but its metabolite, nitrite, formed by bacteria in the oral cavity and gastrointestinal tract, has been suspected of potential carcinogenic effects. Nitrite

  6. 77 FR 71006 - Sodium Nitrite Injection and Sodium Thiosulfate Injection Drug Products Labeled for the Treatment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-28

    ... Sodium Nitrite Injection and Sodium Thiosulfate Injection Drug Products Labeled for the Treatment of... against unapproved injectable drug products containing sodium nitrite labeled for the treatment of cyanide poisoning and unapproved injectable drug products containing sodium thiosulfate labeled for the treatment of...

  7. Influence of turkey meat on residual nitrite in cured meat products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, B; Cassens, R G; Borchert, L L

    2001-02-01

    A response surface experimental design was employed to estimate residual nitrite level at various initial nitrite concentrations, percent turkey meat in the formula, and heat quantity (F) values using a typical wiener as the test system. Pork and mechanically separated turkey were used as the meat ingredients. Residual nitrite and pH were measured at day 1, 7 days, 14 days, and 49 days after processing. Protein, fat, salt, moisture, and CIE (L*a*b*) color values were also determined. Results showed that the effect of turkey meat on residual nitrite level was significant (P meat in the formula resulted in lower residual nitrite levels at a fixed pH. The residual nitrite level was initially proportional to initial nitrite concentration, but it became a nonsignificant factor during longer storage time. Differences in heat quantity had a significant effect (P meat products at a fixed pH. However, this effect became nonsignificant during longer storage. Reduction of residual nitrite in wieners because of turkey meat addition at a fixed pH was due to characteristics of the turkey tissue, but the mechanism of action remains unknown. It was also established that commercial wieners had a higher pH if poultry meat was included in the formulation.

  8. Low nitrous oxide production in intermittent-feed high performance nitritating reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, Qingxian; Jensen, Malene M.; Smets, Barth F.

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) production from autotrophic nitrogen removal processes, especially nitritating systems, is of growing concern. N2O dynamics were characterized and N2O production factors were quantified in two lab-scale intermittent-feed nitritating SBRs. 93 ± 14% of the oxidized ammonium...

  9. Catalyst free, base free microwave irradiated synthesis of aryl nitrites from potassium aryltrifluoroborates and bismuth nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Masum, Mohammad; Welch, Rebecca L.

    2014-01-01

    A mixture of bismuth nitrate pentahydrate and potassium aryltrifluoroborate in toluene under microwave heating at 120 °C for 20 min provides an interesting and mild reaction protocol for the synthesis of aryl nitrite. The conversion to aryl nitrites from aryltrifluoroborates without transition metal catalyst and base in high yields is remarkable. PMID:25242828

  10. Quantification of myocardial perfusion based on signal intensity of flow sensitized MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeykoon, Sumeda B.

    maximum percentage deviation is about 5%. Then the SI-method was used in comparison to a delayed enhanced method to qualitatively and quantitatively assess perfusion deficits in an ischemia-reperfusion (IR) mouse model. The infarcted region of the perfusion map is comparable to the hyper intense region of the delayed enhanced image of the IR mouse. The SI method also used to record a chronological comparison of perfusion on delta sarcoglycan null (DSG) mice. Perfusion of DSG and wild-type (WT) mice at ages of 12 weeks and 32 weeks were compared and percentage change of perfusion was estimated. The result shows that in DSG mice perfusion changes considerably. Finally, the SI method was implemented on a 3 Tesla Philip scanner by modifying to data acquisition method. The perfusion obtained in this is consistent with literature values but further adjustment of pulse sequence and modification of numerical solution is needed. The most important benefit of the SI method is that it reduces scan time 30%--40% and lessens motion artifacts of images compared to the T1 method. This study demonstrates that the signal intensity-based ASL method is a robust alternative to the conventional T1-method.

  11. Brain perfusion imaging using a Reconstruction-of-Difference (RoD) approach for cone-beam computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mow, M.; Zbijewski, W.; Sisniega, A.; Xu, J.; Dang, H.; Stayman, J. W.; Wang, X.; Foos, D. H.; Koliatsos, V.; Aygun, N.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2017-03-01

    Purpose: To improve the timely detection and treatment of intracranial hemorrhage or ischemic stroke, recent efforts include the development of cone-beam CT (CBCT) systems for perfusion imaging and new approaches to estimate perfusion parameters despite slow rotation speeds compared to multi-detector CT (MDCT) systems. This work describes development of a brain perfusion CBCT method using a reconstruction of difference (RoD) approach to enable perfusion imaging on a newly developed CBCT head scanner prototype. Methods: A new reconstruction approach using RoD with a penalized-likelihood framework was developed to image the temporal dynamics of vascular enhancement. A digital perfusion simulation was developed to give a realistic representation of brain anatomy, artifacts, noise, scanner characteristics, and hemo-dynamic properties. This simulation includes a digital brain phantom, time-attenuation curves and noise parameters, a novel forward projection method for improved computational efficiency, and perfusion parameter calculation. Results: Our results show the feasibility of estimating perfusion parameters from a set of images reconstructed from slow scans, sparse data sets, and arc length scans as short as 60 degrees. The RoD framework significantly reduces noise and time-varying artifacts from inconsistent projections. Proper regularization and the use of overlapping reconstructed arcs can potentially further decrease bias and increase temporal resolution, respectively. Conclusions: A digital brain perfusion simulation with RoD imaging approach has been developed and supports the feasibility of using a CBCT head scanner for perfusion imaging. Future work will include testing with data acquired using a 3D-printed perfusion phantom currently and translation to preclinical and clinical studies.

  12. Controls of nitrite oxidation in ammonia-removing biological air filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhler, Susanne; Ottosen, Lars Ditlev Mørck; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2008-01-01

    in accumulation of nitrate rather than nitrite and a significant decline in pH. As a consequence, ammonia is removed more efficiently, but heterotrophic oxidation of odorous compounds might be inhibited.  To identify the controlling mechanisms of nitrite oxidation, full-scale biological air filters were...... activity resulting in a lowered pH and thus a decreased FA concentration, promoting further growth of NOB. Yet, in some cases a situation with a nitrate-to-nitrite ratio of 1 and moderate pH remained stable even under varying air load and water supply, suggesting that additional mechanisms were involved......In biological air filters ammonia is removed due to the action of Ammonia Oxidizing Bacteria (AOB) resulting in nitrite accumulation exceeding 100 mM. Among filters treating exhaust air from pig facilities successful establishment of Nitrite Oxidizing Bacteria (NOB) sometimes occurs, resulting...

  13. Aggregate Size and Architecture Determine Microbial Activity Balance for One-Stage Partial Nitritation and Anammox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlaeminck, S.E.; Terada, Akihiko; Smets, Barth F.

    2010-01-01

    and the activity balance for the different aggregate sizes and (ii) to relate aggregate morphology, size distribution, and architecture putatively to the inoculation and operation of the three reactors. A nitrite accumulation rate ratio (NARR) was defined as the net aerobic nitrite production rate divided...... by the anoxic nitrite consumption rate. The smallest reactor A, B, and C aggregates were nitrite sources (NARR, > 1.7). Large reactor A and C aggregates were granules capable of autonomous nitrogen removal (NARR, 0.6 to 1.1) with internal AnAOB zones surrounded by an AerAOB rim. Around 50% of the autotrophic...... space in these granules consisted of AerAOB- and AnAOB-specific extracellular polymeric substances. Large reactor B aggregates were thin film-like nitrite sinks (NARR,

  14. Electrochemical Single‐Molecule AFM of the Redox Metalloenzyme Copper Nitrite Reductase in Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hao, Xian; Zhang, Jingdong; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager

    2012-01-01

    We studied the electrochemical behavior of the redox metalloenzyme copper nitrite reductase (CNiR, Achromobacter xylosoxidans) immobilized on a Au(111)‐electrode surface modified by a self‐assembled cysteamine molecular monolayer (SAM) using a combination of cyclic voltammetry and electrochemically......‐controlled atomic force microscopy (in situ AFM). The enzyme showed no voltammetric signals in the absence of nitrite substrate, whereas a strong reductive electrocatalytic signal appeared in the presence of nitrite. Such a pattern is common in protein film and monolayer voltammetry and points to conformational...... in the presence of nitrite. No change in size was observed in the absence of nitrite over the same potential range. The enzyme size variation is suggested to offer clues to the broadly observed substrate triggering in metalloenzyme monolayer voltammetry....

  15. Food sources of nitrates and nitrites: the physiologic context for potential health benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hord, Norman G; Tang, Yaoping; Bryan, Nathan S

    2009-07-01

    The presence of nitrates and nitrites in food is associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal cancer and, in infants, methemoglobinemia. Despite the physiologic roles for nitrate and nitrite in vascular and immune function, consideration of food sources of nitrates and nitrites as healthful dietary components has received little attention. Approximately 80% of dietary nitrates are derived from vegetable consumption; sources of nitrites include vegetables, fruit, and processed meats. Nitrites are produced endogenously through the oxidation of nitric oxide and through a reduction of nitrate by commensal bacteria in the mouth and gastrointestinal tract. As such, the dietary provision of nitrates and nitrites from vegetables and fruit may contribute to the blood pressure-lowering effects of the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet. We quantified nitrate and nitrite concentrations by HPLC in a convenience sample of foods. Incorporating these values into 2 hypothetical dietary patterns that emphasize high-nitrate or low-nitrate vegetable and fruit choices based on the DASH diet, we found that nitrate concentrations in these 2 patterns vary from 174 to 1222 mg. The hypothetical high-nitrate DASH diet pattern exceeds the World Health Organization's Acceptable Daily Intake for nitrate by 550% for a 60-kg adult. These data call into question the rationale for recommendations to limit nitrate and nitrite consumption from plant foods; a comprehensive reevaluation of the health effects of food sources of nitrates and nitrites is appropriate. The strength of the evidence linking the consumption of nitrate- and nitrite-containing plant foods to beneficial health effects supports the consideration of these compounds as nutrients.

  16. Characterization of nitrite degradation by Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus LCR 6013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-mei Liu

    Full Text Available Nitrites are potential carcinogens. Therefore, limiting nitrites in food is critically important for food safety. The nitrite degradation capacity of Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus LCR 6013 was investigated in pickle fermentation. After LCR 6013 fermentation for 120 h at 37°C, the nitrite concentration in the fermentation system was significantly lower than that in the control sample without the LCR 6013 strain. The effects of NaCl and Vc on nitrite degradation by LCR 6013 in the De Man, Rogosa and Sharpe (MRS medium were also investigated. The highest nitrite degradations, 9.29 mg/L and 9.89 mg/L, were observed when NaCl and Vc concentrations were 0.75% and 0.02%, respectively in the MRS medium, which was significantly higher than the control group (p ≤ 0.01. Electron capture/gas chromatography and indophenol blue staining were used to study the nitrite degradation pathway of LCR 6013. The nitrite degradation products contained N2O, but no NH4(+. The LCR 6013 strain completely degraded all NaNO2 (50.00 mg/L after 16 h of fermentation. The enzyme activity of NiR in the periplasmic space was 2.5 times of that in the cytoplasm. Our results demonstrated that L. casei subsp. rhamnosus LCR 6013 can effectively degrade nitrites in both the pickle fermentation system and in MRS medium by NiR. Nitrites are degraded by the LCR 6013 strain, likely via the nitrate respiration pathway (NO2(->NO->N2O->N2, rather than the aammonium formation pathway (dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium, DNRA, because the degradation products contain N2O, but not NH4(+.

  17. Crosstalk between nitrite, myoglobin and reactive oxygen species to regulate vasodilation under hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Totzeck

    Full Text Available The systemic response to decreasing oxygen levels is hypoxic vasodilation. While this mechanism has been known for more than a century, the underlying cellular events have remained incompletely understood. Nitrite signaling is critically involved in vessel relaxation under hypoxia. This can be attributed to the presence of myoglobin in the vessel wall together with other potential nitrite reductases, which generate nitric oxide, one of the most potent vasodilatory signaling molecules. Questions remain relating to the precise concentration of nitrite and the exact dose-response relations between nitrite and myoglobin under hypoxia. It is furthermore unclear whether regulatory mechanisms exist which balance this interaction. Nitrite tissue levels were similar across all species investigated. We then investigated the exact fractional myoglobin desaturation in an ex vivo approach when gassing with 1% oxygen. Within a short time frame myoglobin desaturated to 58±12%. Given that myoglobin significantly contributes to nitrite reduction under hypoxia, dose-response experiments using physiological to pharmacological nitrite concentrations were conducted. Along all concentrations, abrogation of myoglobin in mice impaired vasodilation. As reactive oxygen species may counteract the vasodilatory response, we used superoxide dismutase and its mimic tempol as well as catalase and ebselen to reduce the levels of reactive oxygen species during hypoxic vasodilation. Incubation of tempol in conjunction with catalase alone and catalase/ebselen increased the vasodilatory response to nitrite. Our study shows that modest hypoxia leads to a significant nitrite-dependent vessel relaxation. This requires the presence of vascular myoglobin for both physiological and pharmacological nitrite levels. Reactive oxygen species, in turn, modulate this vasodilation response.

  18. Tumor Vessel Compression Hinders Perfusion of Ultrasonographic Contrast Agents1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiè, Mirco; D'Onofrio, Mirko; Montani, Maura; Amici, Augusto; Calderan, Laura; Marzola, Pasquina; Benati, Donatella; Merigo, Flavia; Marchini, Cristina; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is an advanced approach to in vivo assessment of tumor vascularity and is being increasingly adopted in clinical oncology. It is based on 1- to 10 µm-sized gas microbubbles, which can cross the capillary beds of the lungs and are effective echo enhancers. It is known that high cell density, high transendothelial fluid exchange, and poorly functioning lymphatic circulation all provoke solid stress, which compresses vessels and drastically reduces tumor blood flow. Given their size, we supposed that the perfusion of microbubbles is affected by anatomic features of tumor vessels more than are contrast agents traditionally used in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Here, we compared dynamic information obtained from CEUS and DCE-MRI on two experimental tumor models exhibiting notable differences in vessel anatomy. We found that tumors with small, flattened vessels show a much higher resistance to microbubble perfusion than to MRI contrast agents, and appear scarcely vascularized at CEUS examination, despite vessel volume adequate for normal function. Thus, whereas CEUS alone could induce incorrect diagnosis when tumors have small or collapsed vessels, integrated analysis using CEUS and DCE-MRI allows in vivo identification of tumors with a vascular profile frequently associated with malignant phenotypes. PMID:15967105

  19. Regional heterogeneity of myocardial perfusion in healthy human myocardium: assessment with magnetic resonance perfusion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehling, Olaf M; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Panse, Prasad; Zenovich, Andrey; Wilson, Betsy V; Wilson, Robert F; Wilke, Norbert

    2004-01-01

    The knowledge of myocardial perfusion in healthy volunteers is fundamental for evaluation of patients with ischemic heart disease. The study was conducted to determine range, regional variability, and transmural gradient of myocardial perfusion in normal volunteers with Magnetic Resonance Perfusion Imaging (MRPI). Perfusion was assessed in 17 healthy volunteers (age: 20-47 yr, 11 males) at rest and adenosine-induced hyperemia using a 1.5 T MR scanner. Perfusion was quantified (mL/g/min) for the transmural myocardium and separately for the endo- and epimyocardium in the anterior, lateral, posterior, and septal left ventricular wall using the Fermi model for constrained deconvolution. Regional variabilities for resting, hyperemic perfusion, and perfusion reserve were 22 +/- 8%, 21 +/- 10%, and 35 +/- 18%. Mean resting, hyperemic perfusion, and perfusion reserve were 1.1 +/- 0.4 mL/g/min, 4.2 +/- 1.1 mL/g/min, and 4.1 +/- 1.4. Perfusion in the septum was higher at rest (1.3 +/- 0.3 mL/g/min vs. 1.0 +/- 0.3 mL/g/min, p < 0.05) and lower during hyperemia (3.6 +/- 0.8 mL/g/min vs. 4.5 +/- 1.1 mL/g/min, p < 0.03), resulting in a reduced perfusion reserve (PR) (3.2 +/- 0.9 vs. 4.5 +/- 1.4, p < 0.01) in the septum vs. the combined anterior, lateral, and posterior segments. Resting (0.9 +/- 0.3 mL/g/min vs. 1.4 +/- 0.5 mL/g/min, p < 0.01), but not hyperemic perfusion, was lower in the epi- vs. endomyocardium, resulting in a higher epimyocardial PR (4.8 +/- 1.8 vs. 3.5 +/- 1.4, p < 0.01) in all regions but the septum, where endo- and epimyocardial perfusion and perfusion reserve were not different. A considerable regional variability of myocardial perfusion was confirmed with MRPI. The exceptional anatomical position of the septum is reflected by the lack of a perfusion gradient, which was demonstrated in all other regions but the septum.

  20. Intake assessment of the food additives nitrite (E 249 and E 250) and nitrate (E 251 and E 252)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprong RC; Niekerk EM; Beukers MH; VVH; V&Z

    2017-01-01

    Nitrate and nitrite are authorised as preservatives in certain food products, such as salami, ham (nitrite) and cheese (nitrate). They prevent food spoilage and protect the consumer against food-borne pathogens. Next to that, nitrate and nitrite play a role in food colour retention and contribute to

  1. Diversity of nitrite reductase genes (nirS) in the denitrifying water column of the coastal Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jayakumar, D.A.; Francis, C.A.; Naqvi, S.W.A.; Ward, B.B.

    are investigated. Nitrite reduction to nitric oxide is the key step in the denitrification pathway, and is catalyzed by the enzyme nitrite reductase, which is encoded by the genes nirS and nirK. The diversity and distribution of nirS genes in relation to nitrite...

  2. MRI of pulmonary perfusion; MRT der Lungenperfusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, C. [Klinikum Grosshadern der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen (Germany). Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie; Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Abteilung Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany); Risse, F.; Semmler, W. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Abteilung Medizinische Physik in der Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany); Schoenberg, S.O.; Reiser, M.F. [Klinikum Grosshadern der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen (Germany). Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie; Kauczor, H.-U. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Abteilung Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2006-04-15

    Lung perfusion is a crucial prerequisite for effective gas exchange. Quantification of pulmonary perfusion is important for diagnostic considerations and treatment planning in various diseases of the lungs. Besides disorders of pulmonary vessels such as acute pulmonary embolism and pulmonary hypertension, these also include diseases of the respiratory tract and lung tissue as well as pulmonary tumors. This contribution presents the possibilities and technical requirements of MRI for diagnostic work-up of pulmonary perfusion. (orig.) [German] Die Perfusion der Lunge ist eine entscheidende Voraussetzung fuer einen effektiven Gasaustausch. Die Bestimmung der Lungenperfusion ist bei verschiedenen Erkrankungen der Lunge fuer Diagnostik und Therapieplanung bedeutsam. Hierzu zaehlen neben Erkrankungen der Lungengefaesse wie akute Lungenembolie und pulmonale Hypertension ebenso Erkrankungen der Atemwege, des Lungengeruests und Lungentumoren. In diesem Beitrag werden die Moeglichkeiten und technischen Voraussetzungen der MRT zur Diagnostik der Lungenperfusion dargestellt. (orig.)

  3. Kombineret ventilations/perfusions-SPECT/CT er bedst til diagnostik af lungeemboli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutte Borgwardt, Henrik; Mortensen, Jann; Kristoffersen, Ulrik Sloth

    2012-01-01

    and very limited data comparing these modalities are available. With the use of hybrid scanners, ventilation/perfusion-single-photon-emission-tomography (V/Q-SPECT) in combination with low-dose CT without contrast enhancement is feasible and should probably be considered first-line imaging in diagnosing PE....

  4. Ventilation-perfused studies using SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwijnenburg, A.

    1989-01-01

    A method for the quantitative analysis of ventilation-perfusion SPECT studies is decribed and an effort is made to evaluate its usefullness. The technical details of the emthod are described. In the the transaxial reconstructions of the tomographic studies the contour of the lungs is detected and regional values of lung volume, ventilation, perfusion and ventilation-perfusion ratios are calculated. The method is operator independent. The lung volume calculations from the SPECT studies are validated by comparing them with lung volume measurements using the helium dilution technique. A good correlation (r=0.91) was found between the two volumes. SPECT volume was greater than the volume measured with helium dilution, which was attributed to non-gas-containing structures in the. lungs. The use of ventilation-perfusion ratio SPECT is described to evaluate the effect of ionizing radiation on the lungs in patients treated with mantle field irradiation for Hodgkin's disease. Perfusion changes appear as early as 2 months after the start of irradiation. Ventilation changes appear later and relatively minor. No changes are seen outside the radiation portals. The ventilation-perfusion inequality in pulmonary sarcoidosis is treated. It is suggested that the decrease D LCO in these patients may be partly due to an even distribution of ventilation perfusion ratios. An effort is made to establish the properties of a new tracer used for the assessment of the metabolic function of the pulmonary endothelium. The lung uptake of I-123 IMP mimics the distribution of a perfusion tracer and it is suggested that this tracer may be useful for the early detection of pulmonary vascular damage, even when blood flow is still intact. Some aspects of the use of Kr-81m as a ventilation tracer are discussed as well as the effect of noise on Kr-81m SPECT reconstructions. (author). 146 refs.; 39 figs.; 8 tabs

  5. Vicarious audiovisual learning in perfusion education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Thomas E; Holt, David W

    2010-12-01

    Perfusion technology is a mechanical and visual science traditionally taught with didactic instruction combined with clinical experience. It is difficult to provide perfusion students the opportunity to experience difficult clinical situations, set up complex perfusion equipment, or observe corrective measures taken during catastrophic events because of patient safety concerns. Although high fidelity simulators offer exciting opportunities for future perfusion training, we explore the use of a less costly low fidelity form of simulation instruction, vicarious audiovisual learning. Two low fidelity modes of instruction; description with text and a vicarious, first person audiovisual production depicting the same content were compared. Students (n = 37) sampled from five North American perfusion schools were prospectively randomized to one of two online learning modules, text or video.These modules described the setup and operation of the MAQUET ROTAFLOW stand-alone centrifugal console and pump. Using a 10 question multiple-choice test, students were assessed immediately after viewing the module (test #1) and then again 2 weeks later (test #2) to determine cognition and recall of the module content. In addition, students completed a questionnaire assessing the learning preferences of today's perfusion student. Mean test scores from test #1 for video learners (n = 18) were significantly higher (88.89%) than for text learners (n = 19) (74.74%), (p learning module than text learners. Vicarious audiovisual learning modules may be an efficacious, low cost means of delivering perfusion training on subjects such as equipment setup and operation. Video learning appears to improve cognition and retention of learned content and may play an important role in how we teach perfusion in the future, as simulation technology becomes more prevalent.

  6. Measurement of myocardial perfusion using magnetic resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritz-Hansen, T.; Jensen, L.T.; Larsson, H.B.

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved rapidly. Recent developments have made non-invasive quantitative myocardial perfusion measurements possible. MRI is particularly attractive due to its high spatial resolution and because it does not involve ionising radiation. This paper reviews...... myocardial perfusion imaging with MR contrast agents: methods, validation and experiences from clinical studies. Unresolved issues still restrict the use of these techniques to research although clinical applications are within reach Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12/8...

  7. CT perfusion study of neck lymph nodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Jin; Liu Jun; Hua Rui; Qiao Hui; Gong Yi

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the CT perfusion features of various lymph nodes in the neck. Methods: Dynamic perfusion CT scanning was performed in 83 neck lymph nodes proved by pathology, including tuberculosis lymph nodes, lymphoma and metastatic lymph nodes. The shapes, blood flow modes, and perfusion parameters of these lymph nodes were compared among 3 groups. Statistical analysis of L/T and CT perfusion parameters was performed by one-way ANOVA and LSD test. Results: The values of MTT of tuberculosis lymph nodes, lymphoma and metastatic lymph nodes were (28.13±5.08), (31.08±5.82), and (11.24±5.31) s, respectively. The MTT of metastatic lymph nodes was statistically lower than that of tuberculosis lymph nodes and lymphoma (P -1 · 100 g -1 , respectively. The values of BV were (24.68±2.84), (25.30±3.16), and (25.15± 8.81) ml·100 g -1 respectively. The values of TTP were (40.90±8.85), (40.67±6.45), and (40.98±6.62) s, respectively. There were no significant differences in L/T, BF, BV and TTP among tuberculosis lymph nodes, lymphoma and metastatic lymph nodes (P>0.05). Conclusion: CT perfusion, especially combination functional imaging with perfusion images may be helpful in judging the nature of neck lymph nodes. (authors)

  8. Ultrasound imaging of breast tumor perfusion and neovascular morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, Kenneth; Umphrey, Heidi; Lockhart, Mark; Robbin, Michelle; Forero-Torres, Andres

    2015-09-01

    A novel image processing strategy is detailed for simultaneous measurement of tumor perfusion and neovascular morphology parameters from a sequence of dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) images. After normalization and tumor segmentation, a global time-intensity curve describing contrast agent flow was analyzed to derive surrogate measures of tumor perfusion (i.e., peak intensity, time-to-peak intensity, area under the curve, wash-in rate, wash-out rate). A maximum intensity image was generated from these same segmented image sequences, and each vascular component was skeletonized via a thinning algorithm. This skeletonized data set and collection of vessel segments were then investigated to extract parameters related to the neovascular network and physical architecture (i.e., vessel-to-tissue ratio, number of bifurcations, vessel count, average vessel length and tortuosity). An efficient computation of local perfusion parameters was also introduced and operated by averaging time-intensity curve data over each individual neovascular segment. Each skeletonized neovascular segment was then color-coded by these local measures to produce a parametric map detailing spatial properties of tumor perfusion. Longitudinal DCE-US image data sets were collected in six patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer using a Philips iU22 ultrasound system equipped with a L9-3 transducer and Definity contrast agent. Patients were imaged using US before and after contrast agent dosing at baseline and again at weeks 6, 12, 18 and 24 after treatment started. Preliminary clinical results suggested that breast tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy may be associated with temporal and spatial changes in DCE-US-derived parametric measures of tumor perfusion. Moreover, changes in neovascular morphology parametric measures may also help identify any breast tumor response (or lack thereof) to systemic treatment. Breast cancer management from early detection to therapeutic

  9. Nitrite reduction and methanogenesis in a single-stage UASB reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, L I; López-Vazquez, C M; García, H; van Lier, J B

    2015-01-01

    In this study, nitrite reduction and methanogenesis in a single-stage upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor was investigated, using high-strength synthetic domestic wastewater as substrate. To assess long-term effects and evaluate the mechanisms that allow successful nitrite reduction and methanogenesis in a single-stage UASB, sludge was exposed to relatively high nitrite loading rates (315 ± 13 mgNO(2)(-)-N/(l.d)), using a chemical oxygen demand (COD) to nitrogen ratio of 18 gCOD/gNO(2)(-)-N, and an organic loading rate of 5.4 ± 0.2 gCOD/(l.d). In parallel, the effects of sludge morphology on methanogenesis inhibition were studied by performing short-term batch activity tests at different COD/NO(2)(-)-N ratios with anaerobic sludge samples. In long-term tests, denitrification was practically complete and COD removal efficiency did not change significantly after nitrite addition. Furthermore, methane production only decreased by 13%, agreeing with the reducing equivalents requirement for complete NO(2)(-) reduction to N₂. Apparently, the spatial separation of denitrification and methanogenesis zones inside the UASB reactor allowed nitrite reduction and methanogenesis to occur at the same moment. Batch tests showed that granules seem to protect methanogens from nitrite inhibition, probably due to transport limitations. Combined COD and N removal via nitrite in a single-stage UASB reactor could be a feasible technology to treat high-strength domestic wastewater.

  10. The protective potential of Yucca schidigera (Sarsaponin 30) against nitrite-induced oxidative stress in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigerci, I Hakki; Fidan, A Fatih; Konuk, Muhsin; Yuksel, Hayati; Kucukkurt, Ismail; Eryavuz, Abdullah; Sozbilir, Nalan Baysu

    2009-07-01

    The present study was designed to determine the protective effects of Yucca schidigera (Ys) against oxidative damage induced by acute nitrite intoxication as well as the histopathological evaluation of Ys in rats. The rats were divided into three groups each containing 12 rats: control (C); nitrite intoxication (N); Ys + nitrite intoxication (NY). C and N groups were fed standard rat feed (SRF). The NY group was fed SRF + 100 ppm Ys powder for 4 weeks. Acute nitrite intoxication was induced by subcutaneous (s.c.) administration of sodium nitrite (60 mg/kg) 1 day after the feeding period. Fifty minutes after sodium nitrite administration, blood samples and tissues including lung, liver, and kidney were collected for clinical biochemistry and histopathological investigations. Ys treatment was found to decrease methemoglobin, blood and tissue malondialdehyde, and tissue nitric oxide concentrations, and to increase the glutathione in blood and various tissues. However, plasma nitric oxide, total antioxidant activity, beta-carotene, and vitamin A did not differ between N and NY groups. While the N group rats showed distinct pathology in various tissues (compared with controls), the NY group had similar lung and liver pathology to the control. Only moderate or mild hemorrhage and hyperemia were seen in kidneys of NY group rats. Consequently, the natural compounds found in Ys, such as polyphenols, steroidal saponins, and other phytonutrients, could be used to substantially protect the organism from nitrite-induced oxidative damage and its complications.

  11. Erratum to ;Coastal water column ammonium and nitrite oxidation are decoupled in summer;

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Elise M.; Fulweiler, Robinson W.

    2017-07-01

    Water column nitrification is a key process in the nitrogen cycle as it links reduced and oxidized forms of nitrogen and also provides the substrate (nitrate) needed for reactive nitrogen removal by denitrification. We measured potential water column ammonium and nitrite oxidation rates at four sites along an estuary to continental shelf gradient over two summers. In most cases, nitrite oxidation rates outpaced ammonium oxidation rates. Overall, ammonium and nitrite oxidation rates were higher outside of the estuary, and this trend was primarily driven by higher oxidation rates in deeper waters. Additionally, both ammonium and nitrite oxidation rates were impacted by different in situ variables. Ammonium oxidation rates throughout the water column as a whole were most positively correlated to depth and salinity and negatively correlated to dissolved oxygen, light, and temperature. In contrast, nitrite oxidation rates throughout the water column were negatively correlated with temperature, light and pH. Multivariate regression analysis revealed that surface (20 m) rates were regulated by temperature, light, and [H+] (i.e. pH). In addition, surface (20 m) nitrite oxidation rates. These results support the growing body of evidence that ammonium oxidation and nitrite oxidation are not always coupled, should be measured separately, and are influenced by different environmental conditions.

  12. Effect of Ethanolamines on Corrosion Inhibition of Ductile Cast Iron in Nitrite Containing Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K. T.; Kim, Y. S.; Chang, H. Y.; Lim, B. T.; Park, H. B.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, synergistic corrosion inhibition effect of nitrite and 3 kinds of ethanolamines on ductile cast iron using chemical and electrochemical methods was evaluated. This work attempts to clarify the synergistic effect of nitrite and ethanolamines. The effects of single addition of TEA, DEA, and MEA, and mixed addition of nitrite plus TEA, DEA or MEA on the corrosion inhibition of ductile cast iron in a tap water were evaluated. A huge amount of single addition of ethanolamine was needed. However, the synergistic effect by mixed addition was observed regardless of the combination of nitrite and triethanolamines, but their effects increased in a series of MEA + nitrite > DEA + nitrite > TEA + nitrite. This tendency of synergistic effect was attributed to the film properties and polar effect; TEA addition couldn't form the film showing high film resistance and semiconductive properties, but DEA or MEA could build the film having relatively high film resistance and n-type semiconductive properties. Moreover, it can be explained that this behaviour was closely related to electron attractive group within the ethanolamines, and thus corrosion inhibition power depends upon the number of the electron attractive group of MEA, DEA, and TEA.

  13. Effect of Ethanolamines on Corrosion Inhibition of Ductile Cast Iron in Nitrite Containing Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K. T.; Kim, Y. S. [Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of); Chang, H. Y.; Lim, B. T.; Park, H. B. [KEPCO Engineering and Construction Company, Gimcheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    In this work, synergistic corrosion inhibition effect of nitrite and 3 kinds of ethanolamines on ductile cast iron using chemical and electrochemical methods was evaluated. This work attempts to clarify the synergistic effect of nitrite and ethanolamines. The effects of single addition of TEA, DEA, and MEA, and mixed addition of nitrite plus TEA, DEA or MEA on the corrosion inhibition of ductile cast iron in a tap water were evaluated. A huge amount of single addition of ethanolamine was needed. However, the synergistic effect by mixed addition was observed regardless of the combination of nitrite and triethanolamines, but their effects increased in a series of MEA + nitrite > DEA + nitrite > TEA + nitrite. This tendency of synergistic effect was attributed to the film properties and polar effect; TEA addition couldn't form the film showing high film resistance and semiconductive properties, but DEA or MEA could build the film having relatively high film resistance and n-type semiconductive properties. Moreover, it can be explained that this behaviour was closely related to electron attractive group within the ethanolamines, and thus corrosion inhibition power depends upon the number of the electron attractive group of MEA, DEA, and TEA.

  14. Preliminary nitrite, nitrate and colour analysis of Malaysian edible bird’s nest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meei Chien Quek

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The high nitrite content in edible bird’s nests is a major concern to the local swiftlet industry. It lowers the price of the edible bird’s nests and it brings severe health hazards to consumers and farmers. This research investigated the nitrite and nitrate contents of eight types of local edible bird’s nests by using ion chromatography system and evaluating its colour using the CIE system in L∗a∗b∗ parameters. The nitrite content obtained ranged from 5.7 μg/g for the house nests to 843.8 μg/g for the cave nests. The nitrate content for the house and cave nests was 98.2 μg/g and 36,999.4 μg/g, respectively. The cave nests with darker and redder colour had higher nitrite and nitrate contents than the brighter and more yellow house nests. This likely suggests that the nitrite and nitrate contents have correlations with edible bird’s nests colour. Correlations studies suggested that the nitrite content had high correlations with colour parameters, L∗a∗b∗ of edible bird’s nests at significant level of P < 0.10. These findings suggest that edible bird’s nests’ colour may be a useful indicator for measuring nitrite and nitrate contaminations.

  15. Effect of luminal or circulating nitrite on colonic ion movement in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radcliffe, B.C.; Nance, S.H.; Deakin, E.J.; Roediger, W.E.W.

    1987-01-01

    The disposition of intravenously or luminally administered nitrite across the colonic mucosa and its effect on ion movement into or from the colon was assessed in anesthetized Porton rats using the isolated colon instilled either with sodium chloride or sodium chloride with sodium butyrate. Ionic changes in the colon after intravenous injection of 10 μmol NaNO 2 were compared with those occurring after injection of 10 μmol NaCl. After intravenous administration of nitrite, both nitrite and nitrate appeared in the colonic instillate in a ratio of 1:1. Nitrite increased chloride absorption (110%) and bicarbonate production (20%) when 40 mM butyrate was included in the instillate. Net sodium absorption, measured in the whole colon, was unchanged. Intravenous nitrite had no effect on ionic movement in the absence of butyrate. When NaNO 2 was included luminally with the sodium chloride-butyrate instillate, bicarbonate production rate increased, but sodium and chloride absorption were unaffected. Nitrite concentration in the instillate decreased during the 40-min experimental period at a rate of 0.275 nmol·min -1 ·cm -2 and nitrate appeared at a rate of 0.037 nmol·min -1 ·cm -2 . The authors conclude that nitrite stimulates bicarbonate production in the colon, probably by stimulating the oxidation by butyrate, the main source of CO 2 generation by the colonic mucosa

  16. Role of nitrite in the photochemical formation of radicals in the snow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobi, Hans-Werner; Kleffmann, Jörg; Villena, Guillermo; Wiesen, Peter; King, Martin; France, James; Anastasio, Cort; Staebler, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Photochemical reactions in snow can have an important impact on the composition of the atmosphere over snow-covered areas as well as on the composition of the snow itself. One of the major photochemical processes is the photolysis of nitrate leading to the formation of volatile nitrogen compounds. We report nitrite concentrations determined together with nitrate and hydrogen peroxide in surface snow collected at the coastal site of Barrow, Alaska. The results demonstrate that nitrite likely plays a significant role as a precursor for reactive hydroxyl radicals as well as volatile nitrogen oxides in the snow. Pollution events leading to high concentrations of nitrous acid in the atmosphere contributed to an observed increase in nitrite in the surface snow layer during nighttime. Observed daytime nitrite concentrations are much higher than values predicted from steady-state concentrations based on photolysis of nitrate and nitrite indicating that we do not fully understand the production of nitrite and nitrous acid in snow. The discrepancy between observed and expected nitrite concentrations is probably due to a combination of factors, including an incomplete understanding of the reactive environment and chemical processes in snow, and a lack of consideration of the vertical structure of snow.

  17. Feasibility of ASL spinal bone marrow perfusion imaging with optimized inversion time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Dong; Zha, Yunfei; Yan, Liyong; Wang, Kejun; Gong, Wei; Lin, Hui

    2015-11-01

    To assess the correlation between flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in the measurement of spinal bone marrow (SBM) perfusion; in addition, to assess for an optimized inversion time (TI) as well as the reproducibility of SBM FAIR perfusion. The optimized TI of a FAIR SBM perfusion experiment was carried out on 14 volunteers; two adjacent vertebral bodies were selected from each volunteer to measure the change of signal intensity (ΔM) and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of FAIR perfusion MRI with five different TIs. Then, reproducibility of FAIR data from 10 volunteers was assessed by the reposition SBM FAIR experiments. Finally, FAIR and DCE-MRI were performed on 27 subjects. The correlation between the blood flow on FAIR (BFASL ) and perfusion-related parameters on DCE-MRI was evaluated. The maximum value of ΔM and SNR were 36.39 ± 12.53 and 2.38 ± 0.97, respectively; both were obtained when TI was near 1200 msec. There were no significant difference between the two successive measurements of SBM BFASL perfusion (P = 0.879), and the within-subject coefficients of variation (wCV) of the measurements was 3.28%. The BFASL showed a close correlation with K(trans) (P FAIR perfusion scan protocol has good reproducibility, and as blood flow measurement on FAIR is reliable and closely related with the parameters on DCE-MRI, FAIR is feasible for measuring SBM blood flow. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Perfusion seed cultures improve biopharmaceutical fed-batch production capacity and product quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, William C; Lu, Jiuyi; Kwiatkowski, Chris; Yuan, Hang; Kshirsagar, Rashmi; Ryll, Thomas; Huang, Yao-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Volumetric productivity and product quality are two key performance indicators for any biopharmaceutical cell culture process. In this work, we showed proof-of-concept for improving both through the use of alternating tangential flow perfusion seed cultures coupled with high-seed fed-batch production cultures. First, we optimized the perfusion N-1 stage, the seed train bioreactor stage immediately prior to the production bioreactor stage, to minimize the consumption of perfusion media for one CHO cell line and then successfully applied the optimized perfusion process to a different CHO cell line. Exponential growth was observed throughout the N-1 duration, reaching >40 × 10(6) vc/mL at the end of the perfusion N-1 stage. The cultures were subsequently split into high-seed (10 × 10(6) vc/mL) fed-batch production cultures. This strategy significantly shortened the culture duration. The high-seed fed-batch production processes for cell lines A and B reached 5 g/L titer in 12 days, while their respective low-seed processes reached the same titer in 17 days. The shortened production culture duration potentially generates a 30% increase in manufacturing capacity while yielding comparable product quality. When perfusion N-1 and high-seed fed-batch production were applied to cell line C, higher levels of the active protein were obtained, compared to the low-seed process. This, combined with correspondingly lower levels of the inactive species, can enhance the overall process yield for the active species. Using three different CHO cell lines, we showed that perfusion seed cultures can optimize capacity utilization and improve process efficiency by increasing volumetric productivity while maintaining or improving product quality. © 2014 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  19. Role of blood and vascular smooth muscle in the vasoactivity of nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Taiming; Schroeder, Hobe J; Barcelo, Lisa; Bragg, Shannon L; Terry, Michael H; Wilson, Sean M; Power, Gordon G; Blood, Arlin B

    2014-10-01

    Recent evidence from humans and rats indicates that nitrite is a vasodilator under hypoxic conditions by reacting with metal-containing proteins to produce nitric oxide (NO). We tested the hypothesis that near-physiological concentrations of nitrite would produce vasodilation in a hypoxia- and concentration-dependent manner in the hind limb of sheep. Anesthetized sheep were instrumented to measure arterial blood pressure and femoral blood flows continuously in both hind limbs. Nitrite was infused into one femoral artery to raise the nitrite concentration in the femoral vein by 10 to 15-fold while the sheep breathed 50%, 14% or 12% oxygen in inspired air. In contrast to reports in humans and rats, the nitrite infusion had no measurable effect on mean femoral blood flows or vascular conductances, regardless of inspired O2 levels. In vitro experiments showed no significant difference in the release of NO from nitrite in sheep and human red blood cells. Further experiments demonstrated nitrite is converted to NO in rat artery homogenates faster than sheep arteries, and that this source of NO production is attenuated in the presence of a heme oxidizer. Finally, western blots indicate that concentrations of the heme-containing protein cytoglobin, but not myoglobin, are markedly lower in sheep arteries compared with rats. Overall, the results demonstrate that nitrite is not a physiological vasodilator in sheep. This is likely due to a lack of conversion of nitrite to NO within the vascular smooth muscle, perhaps due to deficient amounts of the heme-containing protein cytoglobin. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Randomised phase 2 trial of intra-coronary nitrite during acute myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Daniel A; Pellaton, Cyril; Velmurugan, Shanti; Rathod, Krishnaraj Sinha; Andiapen, Mervyn; Antoniou, Sotiris; van Eijl, Sven; Webb, Andrew J; Westwood, Mark A; Parmar, Mahesh K; Mathur, Anthony; Ahluwalia, Amrita

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Pre-clinical evidence demonstrates that inorganic nitrite, following its in situ conversion to nitric oxide, attenuates consequent myocardial reperfusion injury. Objective We investigated whether intra-coronary injection of nitrite during primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) might improve infarct size in ST-elevated myocardial infarction (STEMI). Methods and Results Patients undergoing primary PCI (n=80) were randomised to receive intracoronary (10mL) sodium nitrite (1.8μmol) or NaCl (placebo) before balloon inflation. The primary endpoint was infarct size assessed by measuring creatine kinase (CK) release. Secondary outcomes included infarct size assessed by troponin T release and by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) on day 2. Baseline characteristics were similar between the groups. No evidence of differences in CK release (p=0.92), troponin T (p=0.85) or CMR-assessed infarct size (p=0.254) were evident. In contrast there was an improvement in myocardial salvage index (p=0.05) and reduction in MACE at 1 year (2.6% vs 15.8%, p=0.04) in the nitrite group. In a 66-patient sub-group with TIMI≤1 flow there was reduced serum CK (p=0.030) and a 19% reduction in CMR-determined infarct size (p=0.034) with nitrite. No adverse effects of nitrite were detected. Conclusions In this phase II study intra-coronary nitrite infusion did not alter infarct size although a trend to improved myocardial salvage index and a significant reduction in MACE was evident. In a sub-group of patients with TIMI flow≤1 nitrite reduced infarct size and MACE and improved myocardial salvage index indicating that a phase III clinical trial assessing intra-coronary nitrite administration as an adjunct to PCI in STEMI patients is warranted. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://clinicaltrials.gov NCT01584453. PMID:25512434

  1. Role of blood and vascular smooth muscle in the vasoactivity of nitrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Taiming; Schroeder, Hobe J.; Barcelo, Lisa; Bragg, Shannon L.; Terry, Michael H.; Wilson, Sean M.; Power, Gordon G.

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence from humans and rats indicates that nitrite is a vasodilator under hypoxic conditions by reacting with metal-containing proteins to produce nitric oxide (NO). We tested the hypothesis that near-physiological concentrations of nitrite would produce vasodilation in a hypoxia- and concentration-dependent manner in the hind limb of sheep. Anesthetized sheep were instrumented to measure arterial blood pressure and femoral blood flows continuously in both hind limbs. Nitrite was infused into one femoral artery to raise the nitrite concentration in the femoral vein by 10 to 15-fold while the sheep breathed 50%, 14% or 12% oxygen in inspired air. In contrast to reports in humans and rats, the nitrite infusion had no measurable effect on mean femoral blood flows or vascular conductances, regardless of inspired O2 levels. In vitro experiments showed no significant difference in the release of NO from nitrite in sheep and human red blood cells. Further experiments demonstrated nitrite is converted to NO in rat artery homogenates faster than sheep arteries, and that this source of NO production is attenuated in the presence of a heme oxidizer. Finally, western blots indicate that concentrations of the heme-containing protein cytoglobin, but not myoglobin, are markedly lower in sheep arteries compared with rats. Overall, the results demonstrate that nitrite is not a physiological vasodilator in sheep. This is likely due to a lack of conversion of nitrite to NO within the vascular smooth muscle, perhaps due to deficient amounts of the heme-containing protein cytoglobin. PMID:25108012

  2. Abnormal perfusion on myocardial perfusion SPECT in patients with WPW syndrome: clinical implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Do Young; Cha, Kwang Soo; Kim, Moo Hyun; Kim, Young Dae; Kim, Duk Kyu

    2001-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion is altered significantly in patients with rhythm disturbances such as CLBBB and right ventricular pacing rhythm. Abnormal myocardial perfusion may be caused by ventricular preexcitation, but its location, extent, severity and correlation with accessory pathway (AP) are not established. We evaluated perfusion patterns on SPECT in patients with WPW syndrome. Adenosine Tc-99m MIBI or Tl-201 myocardial SPECT with or without coronary angiography were performed in 11 patients with WPW syndrome. Perfusion defects (PD) were compared to AP location based on ECG or electrophysiologic study. Small to large extent (11.0 8.5%, range: 0 35%) and mild to moderate severity (-71.8 42.7%, range: -217 0%) of reversible (n=9) or fixed (n=1) perfusion defects were noted. One patient with right free wall AP showed normal. Other defect locations were as follows. Myocardial perfusion defect showed variable extent, severity and location in patients with WPW syndrome. It was not specifically correlated with location of accessory pathway, but most of all patients were abnormal perfusion pattern. Therefore myocardial perfusion SPECT was interpreted carefully in patients with WPW syndrome

  3. Stress Corrosion Cracking of an Austenitic Stainless Steel in Nitrite-Containing Chloride Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Singh Raman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the susceptibility of 316L stainless steel to stress corrosion cracking (SCC in a nitrite-containing chloride solution. Slow strain rate testing (SSRT in 30 wt. % MgCl2 solution established SCC susceptibility, as evidenced by post-SSRT fractography. Addition of nitrite to the chloride solution, which is reported to have inhibitive influence on corrosion of stainless steels, was found to increase SCC susceptibility. The susceptibility was also found to increase with nitrite concentration. This behaviour is explained on the basis of the passivation and pitting characteristics of 316L steel in chloride solution.

  4. Solubilities of sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, and sodium aluminate in simulated nuclear waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, D.A.; Herting, D.L.

    1984-09-01

    Solubilities were determined for sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, and sodium aluminate in synthetic nuclear waste liquor. Solubilities were determined as a function of temperature and solution composition (concentrations of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, and sodium aluminate). Temperature had the greatest effect on the solubilities of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite and a somewhat lesser effect on sodium aluminate solubility. Hydroxide had a great effect on the solubilities of all three salts. Other solution components had minor effects. 2 references, 8 figures, 11 tables.

  5. Color and oxidative stability of nitrite-free cured meat after gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahidi, F.; Pegg, R.B.; Shamsuzzaman, K.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of 5 and 10 kGy irradiation on the color and oxidative stability of meats treated with nitrite or a nitrite-free curing system were investigated. The nitrite-free curing system consisted of the preformed cooked cured-meat pigment, sodium ascorbate and sodium tripolyphosphate with or without sodium acid pyrophosphate. Irradiation had no detrimental effects on the color or flavor of either cured samples. Polyphosphates had a beneficial effect on oxidative stability but had a slight detrimental effect on color stability of irradiated samples

  6. Post Chlorine gas exposure administration of nitrite prevents lung injury: effect of administration modality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samal, Andrey A.; Honavar, Jaideep; Brandon, Angela; Bradley, Kelley M.; Doran, Stephen; Liu, Yanping; Dunaway, Chad; Steele, Chad; Postlethwait, Edward M.; Squadrito, Giuseppe L.; Fanucchi, Michelle V.; Matalon, Sadis; Patel, Rakesh P.

    2012-01-01

    Cl2 gas toxicity is complex and occurs during, and post exposure leading to acute lung injury (ALI) and reactive airway syndrome (RAS). Moreover, Cl2 exposure can occur in diverse situations encompassing mass casualty scenarios underscoring the need for post-exposure therapies that are efficacious and amenable to rapid and easy administration. In this study, we compared the efficacy of a single dose, post (30min) Cl2 exposure administration of nitrite (1mg/kg) via intraperitoneal (IP) or intramuscular (IM) injection in rats, to decrease ALI. Exposure of rats to Cl2 gas (400ppm, 30min) significantly increased ALI and caused RAS 6–24h post exposure as indexed by BAL sampling of lung surface protein, PMN and increased airway resistance and elastance prior to and post methacholine challenge. IP nitrite decreased Cl2 - dependent increases in BAL protein but not PMN. In contrast IM nitrite decreased BAL PMN levels without decreasing BAL protein in a xanthine oxidoreductase independent manner. Histological evaluation of airways 6h post exposure showed significant bronchial epithelium exfoliation and inflammatory injury in Cl2 exposed rats. Both IP and IM nitrite improved airway histology compared to Cl2 gas alone, but more coverage of the airway by cuboidal or columnar epithelium was observed with IM compared to IP nitrite. Airways were rendered more sensitive to methacholine induced resistance and elastance after Cl2 gas exposure. Interestingly, IM nitrite, but not IP nitrite, significantly decreased airway sensitivity to methacholine challenge. Further evaluation and comparison of IM and IP therapy showed a two-fold increase in circulating nitrite levels with the former, which was associated with reversal of post-Cl2 exposure dependent increases in circulating leukocytes. Halving the IM nitrite dose resulted in no effect in PMN accumulation but significant reduction of of BAL protein levels indicating distinct nitrite dose dependence for inhibition of Cl2 dependent

  7. Administration of nitrite after chlorine gas exposure prevents lung injury: effect of administration modality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samal, Andrey A; Honavar, Jaideep; Brandon, Angela; Bradley, Kelley M; Doran, Stephen; Liu, Yanping; Dunaway, Chad; Steele, Chad; Postlethwait, Edward M; Squadrito, Giuseppe L; Fanucchi, Michelle V; Matalon, Sadis; Patel, Rakesh P

    2012-10-01

    Cl(2) gas toxicity is complex and occurs during and after exposure, leading to acute lung injury (ALI) and reactive airway syndrome (RAS). Moreover, Cl(2) exposure can occur in diverse situations encompassing mass casualty scenarios, highlighting the need for postexposure therapies that are efficacious and amenable to rapid and easy administration. In this study, we assessed the efficacy of a single dose of nitrite (1 mg/kg) to decrease ALI when administered to rats via intraperitoneal (ip) or intramuscular (im) injection 30 min after Cl(2) exposure. Exposure of rats to Cl(2) gas (400 ppm, 30 min) significantly increased ALI and caused RAS 6-24h postexposure as indexed by BAL sampling of lung surface protein and polymorphonucleocytes (PMNs) and increased airway resistance and elastance before and after methacholine challenge. Intraperitoneal nitrite decreased Cl(2)-dependent increases in BAL protein but not PMNs. In contrast im nitrite decreased BAL PMN levels without decreasing BAL protein in a xanthine oxidoreductase-dependent manner. Histological evaluation of airways 6h postexposure showed significant bronchial epithelium exfoliation and inflammatory injury in Cl(2)-exposed rats. Both ip and im nitrite improved airway histology compared to Cl(2) gas alone, but more coverage of the airway by cuboidal or columnar epithelium was observed with im compared to ip nitrite. Airways were rendered more sensitive to methacholine-induced resistance and elastance after Cl(2) gas exposure. Interestingly, im nitrite, but not ip nitrite, significantly decreased airway sensitivity to methacholine challenge. Further evaluation and comparison of im and ip therapy showed a twofold increase in circulating nitrite levels with the former, which was associated with reversal of post-Cl(2) exposure-dependent increases in circulating leukocytes. Halving the im nitrite dose resulted in no effect in PMN accumulation but significant reduction of BAL protein levels, indicating a distinct

  8. Stress Corrosion Cracking of an Austenitic Stainless Steel in Nitrite-Containing Chloride Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, R K Singh; Siew, Wai Hoong

    2014-12-05

    This article describes the susceptibility of 316L stainless steel to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in a nitrite-containing chloride solution. Slow strain rate testing (SSRT) in 30 wt. % MgCl₂ solution established SCC susceptibility, as evidenced by post-SSRT fractography. Addition of nitrite to the chloride solution, which is reported to have inhibitive influence on corrosion of stainless steels, was found to increase SCC susceptibility. The susceptibility was also found to increase with nitrite concentration. This behaviour is explained on the basis of the passivation and pitting characteristics of 316L steel in chloride solution.

  9. Topical sodium nitrite for chronic leg ulcers in patients with sickle cell anaemia: a phase 1 dose-finding safety and tolerability trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minniti, Caterina P; Gorbach, Alexander M; Xu, Dihua; Hon, Yuen Yi; Delaney, Kara-Marie; Seidel, Miles; Malik, Nitin; Peters-Lawrence, Marlene; Cantilena, Carly; Nichols, James S; Mendelsohn, Laurel; Conrey, Anna; Grimes, George; Kato, Gregory J

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Well-tolerated and effective treatments are needed for chronic leg ulcers in sickle cell anaemia. Topical sodium nitrite, a known nitric oxide donor, enhances blood flow in ulcers and has known bacteriostatic effects. We aimed to assess the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of topical sodium nitrite in patients with sickle cell disease and chronic leg ulcers. Methods We enrolled adult patients from an ambulatory clinic at the National Institutes of Health (Bethesda, MD, USA) with sickle cell anaemia with leg ulcers (with a surface area of 2.5–100 cm2) persisting for at least 4 weeks into a safety and tolerability phase 1 dose-escalation trial of topical sodium nitrite. Increasing concentrations of sodium nitrite cream were applied twice weekly for 4 weeks to one ulcer per patient at five dose levels (0.5%, 1%, 1.5%, 1.8%, and 2%). The primary endpoints were safety and tolerability, with secondary endpoints of pharmacokinetics, blood flow, and wound healing. Pain relief was analysed post hoc. Endpoints were analysed over time for the whole study population and according to dose level. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01316796. Findings Between April 4, 2011, and March 19, 2013, we enrolled 18 adult patients with sickle cell anaemia and leg ulcers into our trial. We assigned three patients into each cohort, and each cohort was treated with a different concentration of sodium nitrite cream (cohort 1: 0.5%, cohort 2: 1.0%, cohort 3: 1.5%, and cohort 4: 2.0%). Patients were not enrolled into the next cohort dose until we were able to establish that no dose-limiting toxicities were observed. An additional six patients were enrolled to cohort 3a: 1.8%, after two patients in cohort 4 had asymptomatic drops in diastolic blood pressure. No grade 3–4 adverse events were observed, and there were no serious adverse events or dose-limiting side-effects. Pharmacokinetic analysis showed that systemic absorption of sodium

  10. A carbon nanotube/polyvanillin composite film as an electrocatalyst for the electrochemical oxidation of nitrite and its application as a nitrite sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng Dongyun [College of Chemistry and Molecular Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Hu Chengguo [College of Chemistry and Molecular Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)], E-mail: cghu@whu.edu.cn; Peng Yanfen [College of Chemistry and Molecular Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Hu Shengshui [College of Chemistry and Molecular Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)], E-mail: sshu@whu.edu.cn

    2009-08-30

    We report a simple method for the stable dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) in water by vanillin and controllable surface addition onto carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFE) via electropolymerization. We have characterized these polyvanillin-carbon nanotube (PVN-MWNT) composite films with techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), infrared spectroscopy (IR) and voltammetry. These investigations showed that the films have a uniform porous nanostructure with a large surface area. This PVN-MWNT composite-modified CFE (PVN-MWNT/CFE) exhibited a sensitive response to the electrochemical oxidation of nitrite. Under optimal working conditions, the oxidation peak current of nitrite linearly increased with its concentration in the range of 0.2 {mu}M-3.1 mM, with the system exhibiting a lower detection limit of 50 nM (S/N = 3). We successfully applied the PVN-MWNT/CFE system to the determination of nitrite from lake water. The efficient recovery of nitrite indicated that this electrode was able to detect nitrite in real samples.

  11. Acute, Sub-lethal Cyanide Poisoning in Mice is Ameliorated by Nitrite Alone: Complications Arising from Concomitant Administration of Nitrite and Thiosulfate as an Antidotal Combination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambal, Leah K.; Swanson, Megan R.; Yuan, Quan; Weitz, Andrew C.; Li, Hui-Hua; Pitt, Bruce R.; Pearce, Linda L.; Peterson, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Sodium nitrite alone is shown to ameliorate sub-lethal cyanide toxicity in mice when given from ~1 hour before until 20 minutes after the toxic dose as demonstrated by the recovery of righting ability. An optimum dose (12 mg/kg) was determined to significantly relieve cyanide toxicity (5.0 mg/kg) when administered to mice intraperitoneally. Nitrite so administered was shown to rapidly produce NO in the bloodsteam as judged by the dose dependent appearance of EPR signals attributable to nitrosylhemoglobin and methemoglobin. It is argued that antagonism of cyanide inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase by NO is the crucial antidotal activity rather than the methemoglobin-forming action of nitrite. Concomitant addition of sodium thiosulfate to nitrite-treated blood resulted in the detection of sulfidomethemoblobin by EPR spectroscopy. Sulfide is a product of thiosulfate hydrolysis and, like cyanide, is known to be a potent inhibitor of cytochrome c oxidase; the effects of the two inhibitors being essentially additive under standard assay conditions, rather than dominated by either one. The findings afford a plausible explanation for an observed detrimental effect in mice associated with the use of the standard nitrite-thiosulfate combination therapy at sub-lethal levels of cyanide intoxication. PMID:21534623

  12. Acute, sublethal cyanide poisoning in mice is ameliorated by nitrite alone: complications arising from concomitant administration of nitrite and thiosulfate as an antidotal combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambal, Leah K; Swanson, Megan R; Yuan, Quan; Weitz, Andrew C; Li, Hui-Hua; Pitt, Bruce R; Pearce, Linda L; Peterson, Jim

    2011-07-18

    Sodium nitrite alone is shown to ameliorate sublethal cyanide toxicity in mice when given from ∼1 h before until 20 min after the toxic dose as demonstrated by the recovery of righting ability. An optimum dose (12 mg/kg) was determined to significantly relieve cyanide toxicity (5.0 mg/kg) when administered to mice intraperitoneally. Nitrite so administered was shown to rapidly produce NO in the bloodsteam as judged by the dose-dependent appearance of EPR signals attributable to nitrosylhemoglobin and methemoglobin. It is argued that antagonism of cyanide inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase by NO is the crucial antidotal activity rather than the methemoglobin-forming action of nitrite. Concomitant addition of sodium thiosulfate to nitrite-treated blood resulted in the detection of sulfidomethemoblobin by EPR spectroscopy. Sulfide is a product of thiosulfate hydrolysis and, like cyanide, is known to be a potent inhibitor of cytochrome c oxidase, the effects of the two inhibitors being essentially additive under standard assay conditions rather than dominated by either one. The findings afford a plausible explanation for an observed detrimental effect in mice associated with the use of the standard nitrite-thiosulfate combination therapy at sublethal levels of cyanide intoxication. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  13. MRI methods for pulmonary ventilation and perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, G.; Bauman, G.

    2016-01-01

    Separate assessment of respiratory mechanics, gas exchange and pulmonary circulation is essential for the diagnosis and therapy of pulmonary diseases. Due to the global character of the information obtained clinical lung function tests are often not sufficiently specific in the differential diagnosis or have a limited sensitivity in the detection of early pathological changes. The standard procedures of pulmonary imaging are computed tomography (CT) for depiction of the morphology as well as perfusion/ventilation scintigraphy and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for functional assessment. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with hyperpolarized gases, O 2 -enhanced MRI, MRI with fluorinated gases and Fourier decomposition MRI (FD-MRI) are available for assessment of pulmonary ventilation. For assessment of pulmonary perfusion dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), arterial spin labeling (ASL) and FD-MRI can be used. Imaging provides a more precise insight into the pathophysiology of pulmonary function on a regional level. The advantages of MRI are a lack of ionizing radiation, which allows a protective acquisition of dynamic data as well as the high number of available contrasts and therefore accessible lung function parameters. Sufficient clinical data exist only for certain applications of DCE-MRI. For the other techniques, only feasibility studies and case series of different sizes are available. The clinical applicability of hyperpolarized gases is limited for technical reasons. The clinical application of the techniques described, except for DCE-MRI, should be restricted to scientific studies. (orig.) [de

  14. Stress perfusion magnetic resonance imaging of the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Muehling, Olaf

    2008-02-01

    Extensive research has documented that rapid imaging during the first pass of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent provides good sensitivity to detect myocardial blood flow deficits caused by coronary disease, cardiomyopathies, or microvascular dysfunction in patients without obstructive lesions in the coronary arteries. The autoregulatory mechanisms of the coronary circulation serve the purpose of maintaining sufficient blood flow at baseline in the presence of flow-obstructing coronary lesions. Stress testing is most commonly used in this setting to determine the hemodynamic effect of coronary lesions in the epicardial arteries when the small-vessel resistance has been minimized by vasodilation. The protocols for perfusion MRI combined with vasodilation have been successfully tested in large patient studies. Besides the absence of any ionizing radiation, MRI offers the advantages of relatively high spatial resolution to detect perfusion defects limited to the inner layer of the heart muscle. Furthermore, MRI can be used for noninvasive quantitative measurements of myocardial blood flow that compare well with invasive measurements with labeled microspheres. Additional useful markers, such as the dynamic distribution volume, the delay in the arrival of the contrast agent in a myocardial region relative to the enhancement in the arterial input, and the capillary permeability-surface area product, may, in the future, further enhance the capabilities to characterize with MRI coronary atherosclerosis, coronary vascular dysfunction, and adaptive mechanisms in the coronary circulation, such as arteriogenesis, that reduce ischemia.

  15. Bioprinting of 3D Convoluted Renal Proximal Tubules on Perfusable Chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homan, Kimberly A.; Kolesky, David B.; Skylar-Scott, Mark A.; Herrmann, Jessica; Obuobi, Humphrey; Moisan, Annie; Lewis, Jennifer A.

    2016-10-01

    Three-dimensional models of kidney tissue that recapitulate human responses are needed for drug screening, disease modeling, and, ultimately, kidney organ engineering. Here, we report a bioprinting method for creating 3D human renal proximal tubules in vitro that are fully embedded within an extracellular matrix and housed in perfusable tissue chips, allowing them to be maintained for greater than two months. Their convoluted tubular architecture is circumscribed by proximal tubule epithelial cells and actively perfused through the open lumen. These engineered 3D proximal tubules on chip exhibit significantly enhanced epithelial morphology and functional properties relative to the same cells grown on 2D controls with or without perfusion. Upon introducing the nephrotoxin, Cyclosporine A, the epithelial barrier is disrupted in a dose-dependent manner. Our bioprinting method provides a new route for programmably fabricating advanced human kidney tissue models on demand.

  16. Increased brainstem perfusion, but no blood-brain barrier disruption, during attacks of migraine with aura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Anders; Amin, Faisal M; Christensen, Casper E

    2017-01-01

    symptoms are related to the headache phase of migraine. Animal studies suggest that cortical spreading depression, the likely mechanism of migraine aura, causes disruption of the blood-brain barrier and noxious stimulation of trigeminal afferents leading to activation of brainstem nuclei and triggering...... of migraine headache. We used the sensitive and validated technique of dynamic contrast-enhanced high-field magnetic resonance imaging to simultaneously investigate blood-brain barrier permeability and tissue perfusion in the brainstem (at the level of the lower pons), visual cortex, and brain areas......-free day. The mean time from attack onset to scanning was 7.6 h. We found increased brainstem perfusion bilaterally during migraine with aura attacks. Perfusion also increased in the visual cortex and posterior white matter following migraine aura. We found no increase in blood-brain barrier permeability...

  17. Renal versus splenic maximum slope based perfusion CT modelling in patients with portal-hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Michael A. [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Karolinska Institutet, Division of Medical Imaging and Technology, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Stockholm (Sweden); Brehmer, Katharina [Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Department of Radiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Svensson, Anders; Aspelin, Peter; Brismar, Torkel B. [Karolinska Institutet, Division of Medical Imaging and Technology, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Department of Radiology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2016-11-15

    To assess liver perfusion-CT (P-CT) parameters derived from peak-splenic (PSE) versus peak-renal enhancement (PRE) maximum slope-based modelling in different levels of portal-venous hypertension (PVH). Twenty-four patients (16 men; mean age 68 ± 10 years) who underwent dynamic P-CT for detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) were retrospectively divided into three groups: (1) without PVH (n = 8), (2) with PVH (n = 8), (3) with PVH and thrombosis (n = 8). Time to PSE and PRE and arterial liver perfusion (ALP), portal-venous liver perfusion (PLP) and hepatic perfusion-index (HPI) of the liver and HCC derived from PSE- versus PRE-based modelling were compared between the groups. Time to PSE was significantly longer in PVH groups 2 and 3 (P = 0.02), whereas PRE was similar in groups 1, 2 and 3 (P > 0.05). In group 1, liver and HCC perfusion parameters were similar for PSE- and PRE-based modelling (all P > 0.05), whereas significant differences were seen for PLP and HPI (liver only) in group 2 and ALP in group 3 (all P < 0.05). PSE is delayed in patients with PVH, resulting in a miscalculation of PSE-based P-CT parameters. Maximum slope-based P-CT might be improved by replacing PSE with PRE-modelling, whereas the difference between PSE and PRE might serve as a non-invasive biomarker of PVH. (orig.)

  18. The Effect of Influent Characteristics and Operational Conditions over the Performance and Microbial Community Structure of Partial Nitritation Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Rodriguez-Sanchez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen is a main contaminant of wastewater worldwide. Novel processes for nitrogen removal have been developed over the last several decades. One of these is the partial nitritation process. This process includes the oxidation of ammonium to nitrite without the generation of nitrate. The partial nitritation process has several advantages over traditional nitrification-denitrification processes for nitrogen removal from wastewaters. In addition, partial nitritation is required for anammox elimination of nitrogen from wastewater. Partial nitritation is affected by operational conditions and substances present in the influent, such as quinolone antibiotics. In this review, the impact that several operational conditions, such as temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen concentration, hydraulic retention time and solids retention time, have over the partial nitritation process is covered. The effect of quinolone antibiotics and other emerging contaminants are discussed. Finally, future perspectives for the partial nitritation process are commented upon.

  19. Effect of Initial nitrite concentration on growth of spirulina platensis; Supirurina no zoshoku ni oyobosu ashosan ion shonodo no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohira, Y.; Obata, E.; Kuga, Y.; Ando, K. [Muroran Inst. of Tech., Hokkaido (Japan). Dept. of Applied Chemistry; Yamada, S.

    2000-09-10

    The effect of the initial nitrite concentration on the growth of S. platensis was experimentally investigated using the medium added to the sodium nitrite of 0.0-1.6 kg{center_dot}m{sup -3}. When the initial nitrite concentration is smaller than 0.8 kg{center_dot}m{sup -3}, the growth rate is greater than that without nitrite. The specific growth rate had the maximum value and is approximately 1.3 times that of a standard medium when the range of the initial nitrite concentration is 0.3-0.4 kg{center_dot}m{sup -3}. When the initial nitrite concentration is greater than 0.8 kg{center_dot}m{sup -3}, the growth rate was smaller than that of a standard medium due to nitrite inhibition. (author)

  20. Comprehensive Assessment of Coronary Artery Disease by Using First-Pass Analysis Dynamic CT Perfusion: Validation in a Swine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Logan; Lipinski, Jerry; Ziemer, Benjamin; Malkasian, Shant; Sadeghi, Bahman; Javan, Hanna; Groves, Elliott M; Dertli, Brian; Molloi, Sabee

    2018-01-01

    Purpose To retrospectively validate a first-pass analysis (FPA) technique that combines computed tomographic (CT) angiography and dynamic CT perfusion measurement into one low-dose examination. Materials and Methods The study was approved by the animal care committee. The FPA technique was retrospectively validated in six swine (mean weight, 37.3 kg ± 7.5 [standard deviation]) between April 2015 and October 2016. Four to five intermediate-severity stenoses were generated in the left anterior descending artery (LAD), and 20 contrast material-enhanced volume scans were acquired per stenosis. All volume scans were used for maximum slope model (MSM) perfusion measurement, but only two volume scans were used for FPA perfusion measurement. Perfusion measurements in the LAD, left circumflex artery (LCx), right coronary artery, and all three coronary arteries combined were compared with microsphere perfusion measurements by using regression, root-mean-square error, root-mean-square deviation, Lin concordance correlation, and diagnostic outcomes analysis. The CT dose index and size-specific dose estimate per two-volume FPA perfusion measurement were also determined. Results FPA and MSM perfusion measurements (P FPA and P MSM ) in all three coronary arteries combined were related to reference standard microsphere perfusion measurements (P MICRO ), as follows: P FPA_COMBINED = 1.02 P MICRO_COMBINED + 0.11 (r = 0.96) and P MSM_COMBINED = 0.28 P MICRO_COMBINED + 0.23 (r = 0.89). The CT dose index and size-specific dose estimate per two-volume FPA perfusion measurement were 10.8 and 17.8 mGy, respectively. Conclusion The FPA technique was retrospectively validated in a swine model and has the potential to be used for accurate, low-dose vessel-specific morphologic and physiologic assessment of coronary artery disease. © RSNA, 2017.

  1. Analysis of blood flow in a third ventricular ependymoma and an olfactory bulb meningioma by usisng perfusion computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, M.; Yamada, K.; Seok, J.S.; Shimizu, J.; Kobayashi, Y.; Akiba, Y.; Morishita, Y.; Iwasa, A.; Iwasaki, T.; Miyake, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Brain perfusion computed tomography (CT) scanning was performed in a mongrel dog and a golden retriever that were diagnosed with third ventricular tumor and olfactory bulb tumor, respectively, by contrast-enhanced CT. The tumors were pathologically diagnosed as ependymoma and meningioma, respectively. Perfusion CT results revealed that the ependymoma in this study had a lower blood flow, higher blood volume, and greater transit time of blood than the adjacent brain tissue. Further, the meningioma in this study had a higher blood flow, higher blood volume, and greater transit time of blood than the adjacent brain tissue. Perfusion CT can potentially be used for the grading of brain tumors and narrowing differential diagnosis, provided the perfusion CT data of animals are accumulated

  2. Quantification of the effect of water exchange in dynamic contrast MRI perfusion measurements in the brain and heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Rosenbaum, S; Fritz-Hansen, T

    2001-01-01

    Measurement of myocardial and brain perfusion when using exogenous contrast agents (CAs) such as gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) and MRI is affected by the diffusion of water between compartments. This water exchange may have an impact on signal enhancement, or, equivalently, on the longitudinal......(i)) by using a realistic simulation. These results were verified by in vivo studies of the heart and brain in humans. The conclusion is that water exchange between the vascular and extravascular extracellular space has no effect on K(i) estimation in the myocardium when a normal dose of Gd-DTPA is used. Water...... relaxation rate, and could therefore cause a systematic error in the calculation of perfusion (F) or the perfusion-related parameter, the unidirectional influx constant over the capillary membranes (K(i)). The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of water exchange on estimated perfusion (F or K...

  3. The Relation Between Perfusion Pattern of Hepatic Artery Perfusion Scintigraphy and Response to Y-90 Microsphere Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilge Volkan-Salancı

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Hepatic artery perfusion scintigraphy is a routine procedure for patient evaluation before Y-90 radiomicrosphere therapy and mostly used for prediction of extrahepatic leakage. Moreover, it also displays perfusion pattern of tumours, which is an important parameter on success of the therapy. The aim of this study is to assess the relation between the perfusion pattern on hepatic artery perfusion scintigraphy and radiomicrosphere therapy response. Methods: A total of 99 radiomicrosphere therapy applications were carried out in 80 patients (M/F: 55/25. Results: Heterogeneous and diffuse perfusion patterns were observed in 47 patients and 52 patients, respectively. The patients with diffuse perfusion pattern had better therapy response both on FDG PET/CT (p= 0.04 and CT (p=0.008 when compared to those with heterogenous perfusion pattern. Conclusion: Perfusion pattern observed on hepatic artery perfusion scintigraphy may be a successful predictor of early response to radiomicrosphere therapy

  4. Neurotensin releases norepinephrine differentially from perfused hypothalamus of sated and fasted rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, T.F.; Rezvani, A.H.; Hepler, J.R.; Myers, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    The central injection of neurotensin (NT) has been reported to attenuate the intake of food in the fasted animal. To determine whether endogenous norepinephrine (NE) is involved in the satiating effect of NT, the in vivo activity of NE in circumscribed sites in the hypothalamus of the unanesthetized rat was examined. Bilateral guide tubes for push-pull perfusion were implanted stereotaxically to rest permanently above one of several intended sites of perfusion, which included the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), ventromedial nucleus (VMN), and the lateral hypothalamic (LH) area. After endogenous stores of NE at a specific hypothalamic locus were radiolabeled by microinjection of 0.02-0.5 μCi of [ 3 H]NE, an artificial cerebrospinal fluid was perfused at the site at a rate of 20 μl/min over successive intervals of 5.0 min. When 0.05 or 0.1 μg/μl NT was added to the perfusate, the peptide served either to enhance or educe the local release of NE at 50% of the sites of perfusion. In these experiments, the circumscribed effect of NT on the characteristics of catecholamine efflux depended entirely on the state of hunger or satiety of the rat. That is, when NT was perfused in the fully satiated rat, NE release was augmented within the PVn or VMN; conversely, NE release was inhibited in the LH. in the animal fasted for 18-22 h, NT exerted an opposite effect on the activity of NE within the same anatomical loci in that the efflux of NE was enhanced in the LH but attenuated or unaffected in the PVN or VMN. Taken together, these observations provide experimental support for the view-point that NT could act as a neuromodulator of the activity of hypothalamic noradrenergic neurons that are thought to play a functional role in the regulation of food intake

  5. [MSCT perfusion imaging and its correlation with perfusion parameters, survivin expression, MVD, and pathologic grade in hepatocellular carcinomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Xueying; Cao, Jue; Shi, Linbo; Li, Wenzheng; Liu, Hui

    2009-11-01

    (1)To obtain the perfusion parameters of hepatocellular carcinomas(HCCs), peritumour livers and normal livers by multi-slice CT(MSCT)and to investigate their characteristics and clinical significances;(2)To investigate the correlation among perfusion parameters, survivin expression, microvessel density(MVD)and pathologic grade of HCCs. A total of 31 patients with HCC (5 well-differentiated HCCs, 17 moderately differentiated HCCs, and 9 poorly differentiated HCCs) and 10 normal liver were studied. All underwent CT plain scan, perfusion scan, and conventional enhancement scan of the whole liver using 16-slice spiral CT (Philips Brilliance 16). Perfusion parameters were obtained by time-density curves (TDC) of region of interest (ROI) through the perfusion scans. Tissue sections of HCCs and their corresponding peritumour liver tissues of the 31 patients were detected by immunohistochemistry (SABC methods) for protein expression of survivin and MVD, and 10 normal liver tissue sections were as used as negative controls. The correlation among the perfusion parameters, survivin expression, MVD and pathology grade were analysed. (1)The mean values of HAP, HPP, TLP, and HAI of HCCs were 27.50 mL/(min.100 mL), 19.37 mL/(min.100 mL), 46.87 mL/(min.100 mL), and 60.38%, respectively. The mean values of those of the peritumour livers were 14.93 mL/(min.100 mL), 55.70 mL/(min.100 mL), 69.63 mL/(min.100 mL), and 21.51%, respectively. The mean value of those of the normal livers were 12.22 mL/(min.100mL), 74.56 mL/(min.100 mL), 86.78 mL/(min.100 mL), and 14.00%, respectively. The values of HAP and HAI of HCCs were significantly higher than those of the peritumor livers and the normal livers(PHAP and decrease of HPP of peritumor livers were both significant compared with that of the normal livers(PHAP, HPP, and HAI of HCCs were significantly different from those of peritumor livers (Pcancerous adjacent liver tissues and normal liver tissues (PHAP values were significantly and

  6. Myocardial perfusion imaging with dual energy CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Kwang Nam [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Radiology, SMG-SNU Boramae Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); De Cecco, Carlo N. [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Caruso, Damiano [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology, University of Rome “Sapienza”, Rome (Italy); Tesche, Christian [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Heart Center Munich-Bogenhausen, Munich (Germany); Spandorfer, Adam; Varga-Szemes, Akos [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Schoepf, U. Joseph, E-mail: schoepf@musc.edu [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Stress dual-energy sCTMPI offers the possibility to directly detect the presence of myocardial perfusion defects. • Stress dual-energy sCTMPI allows differentiating between reversible and fixed myocardial perfusion defects. • The combination of coronary CT angiography and dual-energy sCTMPI can improve the ability of CT to detect hemodynamically relevant coronary artery disease. - Abstract: Dual-energy CT (DECT) enables simultaneous use of two different tube voltages, thus different x-ray absorption characteristics are acquired in the same anatomic location with two different X-ray spectra. The various DECT techniques allow material decomposition and mapping of the iodine distribution within the myocardium. Static dual-energy myocardial perfusion imaging (sCTMPI) using pharmacological stress agents demonstrate myocardial ischemia by single snapshot images of myocardial iodine distribution. sCTMPI gives incremental values to coronary artery stenosis detected on coronary CT angiography (CCTA) by showing consequent reversible or fixed myocardial perfusion defects. The comprehensive acquisition of CCTA and sCTMPI offers extensive morphological and functional evaluation of coronary artery disease. Recent studies have revealed that dual-energy sCTMPI shows promising diagnostic accuracy for the detection of hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease compared to single-photon emission computed tomography, invasive coronary angiography, and cardiac MRI. The aim of this review is to present currently available DECT techniques for static myocardial perfusion imaging and recent clinical applications and ongoing investigations.

  7. Characteristic of nitrous oxide production in partial denitrification process with high nitrite accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Rui; Peng, Yongzhen; Cao, Shenbin; Wang, Shuying; Niu, Meng

    2016-03-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) production during the partial denitrification process with nitrate (NO3(-)-N) to nitrite (NO2(-)-N) transformation ratio of 80% was investigated in this study. Results showed that N2O was seldom observed before complete depletion of NO3(-)-N, but it was closely related to the reduction of NO2(-)-N rather than NO3(-)-N. High COD/NO3(-)-N was in favor of N2O production in partial denitrification with high NO2(-)-N accumulation. It was seriously enhanced at constant acidic pH due to the free nitrous acid (FNA) inhibition. However, the N2O production was much lower at initial pH of 5.5 and 6.5 due to the pH increase during denitrification process. Significantly, the pH turning point could be chosen as a controlled parameter to denote the end of NO3(-)-N reduction, which could not only achieve high NO2(-)-N accumulation but also decrease the N2O production significantly for practical application. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Standardized perfusion value of the esophageal carcinoma and its correlation with quantitative CT perfusion parameter values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djuric-Stefanovic, A., E-mail: avstefan@eunet.rs [Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Unit of Digestive Radiology (First University Surgical Clinic), Center of Radiology and MR, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade (Serbia); Saranovic, Dj., E-mail: crvzve4@gmail.com [Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Unit of Digestive Radiology (First University Surgical Clinic), Center of Radiology and MR, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade (Serbia); Sobic-Saranovic, D., E-mail: dsobic2@gmail.com [Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Center of Nuclear Medicine, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade (Serbia); Masulovic, D., E-mail: draganmasulovic@yahoo.com [Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Unit of Digestive Radiology (First University Surgical Clinic), Center of Radiology and MR, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade (Serbia); Artiko, V., E-mail: veraart@beotel.rs [Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Center of Nuclear Medicine, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade (Serbia)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Standardized perfusion value (SPV) is a universal indicator of tissue perfusion, normalized to the whole-body perfusion, which was proposed to simplify, unify and allow the interchangeability among the perfusion measurements and comparison between the tumor perfusion and metabolism. The aims of our study were to assess the standardized perfusion value (SPV) of the esophageal carcinoma, and its correlation with quantitative CT perfusion measurements: blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), mean transit time (MTT) and permeability surface area product (PS) of the same tumor volume samples, which were obtained by deconvolution-based CT perfusion analysis. Methods: Forty CT perfusion studies of the esophageal cancer were analyzed, using the commercial deconvolution-based CT perfusion software (Perfusion 3.0, GE Healthcare). The SPV of the esophageal tumor and neighboring skeletal muscle were correlated with the corresponding mean tumor and muscle quantitative CT perfusion parameter values, using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (r{sub S}). Results: Median SPV of the esophageal carcinoma (7.1; range: 2.8–13.4) significantly differed from the SPV of the skeletal muscle (median: 1.0; range: 0.4–2.4), (Z = −5.511, p < 0.001). The cut-off value of the SPV of 2.5 enabled discrimination of esophageal cancer from the skeletal muscle with sensitivity and specificity of 100%. SPV of the esophageal carcinoma significantly correlated with corresponding tumor BF (r{sub S} = 0.484, p = 0.002), BV (r{sub S} = 0.637, p < 0.001) and PS (r{sub S} = 0.432, p = 0.005), and SPV of the skeletal muscle significantly correlated with corresponding muscle BF (r{sub S} = 0.573, p < 0.001), BV (r{sub S} = 0.849, p < 0.001) and PS (r{sub S} = 0.761, p < 0.001). Conclusions: We presented a database of the SPV for the esophageal cancer and proved that SPV of the esophageal neoplasm significantly differs from the SPV of the skeletal muscle, which represented a sample of healthy

  9. Major role of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria in dark ocean carbon fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachiadaki, Maria G; Sintes, Eva; Bergauer, Kristin; Brown, Julia M; Record, Nicholas R; Swan, Brandon K; Mathyer, Mary Elizabeth; Hallam, Steven J; Lopez-Garcia, Purificacion; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Nunoura, Takuro; Woyke, Tanja; Herndl, Gerhard J; Stepanauskas, Ramunas

    2017-11-24

    Carbon fixation by chemoautotrophic microorganisms in the dark ocean has a major impact on global carbon cycling and ecological relationships in the ocean's interior, but the relevant taxa and energy sources remain enigmatic. We show evidence that nitrite-oxidizing bacteria affiliated with the Nitrospinae phylum are important in dark ocean chemoautotrophy. Single-cell genomics and community metagenomics revealed that Nitrospinae are the most abundant and globally distributed nitrite-oxidizing bacteria in the ocean. Metaproteomics and metatranscriptomics analyses suggest that nitrite oxidation is the main pathway of energy production in Nitrospinae. Microautoradiography, linked with catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization, indicated that Nitrospinae fix 15 to 45% of inorganic carbon in the mesopelagic western North Atlantic. Nitrite oxidation may have a greater impact on the carbon cycle than previously assumed. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  10. Statistics analysis regarding nitrate and nitrite content in lettuce from the west side of Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersilia ALEXA

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we studied the statistics interpretation of nitrate and nitrite content in lettuce.During three years, between 2005 - 2007 have been made determinations regarding nitrate and nitrite content in garden lettuce. Samples have been taken from agro-food markets in Timisoara, proceed from a few places in Timis County, in the west part of Romania.Nitrate and nitrite content determination have been realized colorimetrically in the Laboratory for the Measurement of Residues of the Department of Agro-techniques of the U.S.A-V.M.B in Timisoara. The analysis were done with the help of rapid tests AQUA MERCK, with the Spectrophotometer SQ 118 at a wavelength of 515 and 525 nm for nitrate, nitrites.The statistics interpretation of the results was done by using the analysis of some statistics parameters like: mean, range, kurtosis, skewness.

  11. Rapid and simple preparation of rhodamine 6G loaded HY zeolite for highly selective nitrite detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viboonratanasri, Duangkamon; Pabchanda, Suwat; Prompinit, Panida

    2018-05-01

    In this study, a simple, rapid and relatively less toxic method for rhodamine 6G dye adsorption on hydrogen-form Y-type zeolite for highly selective nitrite detection was demonstrated. The adsorption behavior was described by Langmuir isotherm and the adsorption process reached the equilibrium promptly within a minute. The developed test papers characterized by fluorescence technique display high sensing performance with wide working range (0.04-20.0 mg L-1) and high selectivity. The test papers show good reproducibility with relative standard deviation (RSD) of 7% for five replicated determinations of 3 mg L-1 of nitrite. The nitrite concentration determined by using the test paper was in the same range as using ion chromatography within a 95% confidence level. The test papers offer advantages in terms of low cost and practical usage enabling them to be a promising candidate for nitrite sensor in environmental samples, food, and fertilizers.

  12. Dramatic loss of comammox Nitrospira associated with long-term nitrite feeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinnunen, Marta; Palomo, Alejandro; Dechesne, Arnaud

    Until recently, nitrification was thought to be a strict two-step process where ammonia was first oxidized to nitrite by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and/or archaea, and subsequently to nitrate by nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB). Recent studies in NOB metabolism, however, have revealed that certain......, with nitrite as the main energy source. Community assembly was monitored on well-established biofilms formed on the grains of rapid sand filter (RSF) for drinking water production. RSF sand was placed in laboratory scale column bioreactors and subjected to continuous feeding of tap water spiked with NO2- (1 mg...... sequences (100% similarity to uncultured Nitrospira sp. clone KC836101 (Pester et al., 2014)). These observations indicate different behavior of Nitrospira in the absence of ammonia and point to a possible competitive advantage of canonical Nitrospira in environments where nitrite is the sole nitrogen...

  13. Evaluation of the Intake of Nitrate, Nitrite, Nitrosodiethylamine and Nitrosodimethylamine by Food Consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Avasilcai

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was the evaluation of nitrate, nitrite, nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA and nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA intake by food consumption. We determined concentrations of nitrates, nitrites in 102 food samples (40 meat products, 15 fermented cheese, 25 vegetables, 22 fruits and the concentration NDEA, NDMA in 40 meat products. Nitrates and nitrites were determined using Peter-Griess method; nitrosamines were quantified by HPLC with UV detection.  We designed vegetalian, vegetarian and conventional diets of about 2500 kcal/day.  Based of the values found, we calculated the intake of nitrates, nitrites and nitrosamines. The obtained values fits to WHO’s recommendations, except for vegetalian and conventional diet, in which the nitrate content was 3,46 respectively 1,64 times higher than the acceptable daily intake (157 mg NO3-/day.

  14. Peroxynitrite formation from the simultaneous reduction of nitrite and oxygen by xanthine oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, Timothy M

    2004-03-26

    One electron reductions of oxygen and nitrite by xanthine oxidase form peroxynitrite. The nitrite and oxygen reducing activities of xanthine oxidase are regulated by oxygen with K(oxygen) 26 and 100 microM and K(nitrite) 1.0 and 1.1 mM with xanthine and NADH as donor substrates. Optimal peroxynitrite formation occurs at 70 microM oxygen with purine substrates. Kinetic parameters: V(max) approximately 50 nmol/min/mg and K(m) of 22, 36 and 70 microM for hypoxanthine, pterin and nitrite respectively. Peroxynitrite generation is inhibited by allopurinol, superoxide dismutase and diphenylene iodonium. A role for this enzyme activity can be found in the antibacterial activity of milk and circulating xanthine oxidase activity.

  15. Aggregate size and architecture determine biomass activity for one-stage partial nitritation and anammox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlaeminck, S.; Terada, Akihiko; Smets, Barth F.

    2010-01-01

    to the inoculation and operation of the reactors. Fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) was applied on aggregate sections to quantify AerAOB and AnAOB, as well as to visualize the aggregate architecture. The activity balance of the aggregates was calculated as the nitrite accumulation rate ratio (NARR), i.......e. the net aerobic nitrite production rate divided by the anoxic nitrite consumption rate, with all rates determined in aerobic and anoxic batch tests. The space occupied by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) was calculated from transmission electron micrographs. All smallest aggregates were flocs...... and nitrite sources (NARR, > 1.7). Large A and C aggregates were granules capable of autonomous nitrogen removal (NARR, 0.6 to 1.1) with internal AnAOB zones surrounded by an AerAOB rim. Around 50% of the autotrophic space in these granules consisted of AerAOB- and AnAOB-specific EPS. Large B aggregates were...

  16. Determination of nitrite ion at schiff's base derivative of chitosan modified glassy carbon electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Zhongliang; Zhang Jianmei; Liu Shujuan; Peng Daofeng

    2007-01-01

    Chitosan react with salicyclaldehyde by schiff's base reaction in water, a polymer product S-CTS can be prepared. Glassy carbon electrode was modified with S-CTS by drop-coating method. Then, its electrocatalysis effect on the reduction of nitrite by the films of S-CTS was investigated. Experimental results showed that S-CTS modified electrode could reduce the oxidation overpotential of nitrite in pH4.5 B-R buffer solution, the peak current of reduction was proportional to the concentration of nitrite and a good linear relation from 0.20 to 81 mg/kg (r=0.9899) with a detection limit of 2.8 x 10 -7 mol/L was obtained. The methods have been applied to determining nitrite in some samples, satisfactory results were obtained. (authors)

  17. Changes of sodium nitrate, nitrite, and N-nitrosodiethylamine during in vitro human digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeong Sang; Hur, Sun Jin

    2017-06-15

    This study aimed to determine the changes in sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, and N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) during in vitro human digestion, and the effect of enterobacteria on the changes in these compounds. The concentrations of nitrate, nitrite, and NDEA were significantly reduced from 150, 150, and 1ppm to 42.8, 63.2, and 0.85ppm, respectively, during in vitro human digestion (pdigestion. This study is the first to report that E. coli can dramatically reduce the amount of nitrite during in vitro human digestion and this may be due to the effect of nitrite reductase present in E. coli. We therefore conclude that the amounts of potentially harmful substances and their toxicity can be decreased during human digestion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. EVALUASI PENCEMARAN NITRAT-NITRIT PADA AIR MINUM PDAM DI DKI JAKARTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukar Sukar

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A survey on drinking water quality was conducted in 1990/1991 to evaluate the impact of organic matters particularly of nitrate-nitrite contamination in raw water. Water samples were taken from Water Supply Enterprices (WSE in Jakarta, i.e Pejompongan WSE and Pulogadung WSE. The results showed that the treatment efficiency of Pejompongan WSE to reduce nitrate and nitrite concentration was 5% and 82.1% respectively, and that of Pulogadung WSE were 50.0% and 63.2%. The concentration of nitrate in water the supply from Pejompongan WSE and Pulogadung WSE in general is in accordance with the water quality standard. The nitrite level in the water supply from Pejompongan also met the standard, while from Pulogadung did not. It has been observed that the nitrite concentration in water from Pejompongan distribution pipe is increasing with the distance from water treatment installation.

  19. Nitrite Biosensing via Selective Enzymes—A Long but Promising Route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gabriela Almeida

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The last decades have witnessed a steady increase of the social and political awareness for the need of monitoring and controlling environmental and industrial processes. In the case of nitrite ion, due to its potential toxicity for human health, the European Union has recently implemented a number of rules to restrict its level in drinking waters and food products. Although several analytical protocols have been proposed for nitrite quantification, none of them enable a reliable and quick analysis of complex samples. An alternative approach relies on the construction of biosensing devices using stable enzymes, with both high activity and specificity for nitrite. In this paper we review the current state-of-the-art in the field of electrochemical and optical biosensors using nitrite reducing enzymes as biorecognition elements and discuss the opportunities and challenges in this emerging market.

  20. SERR Spectroelectrochemical Study of Cytochrome cd1 Nitrite Reductase Co-Immobilized with Physiological Redox Partner Cytochrome c552 on Biocompatible Metal Electrodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia M Silveira

    Full Text Available Cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductases (cd1NiRs catalyze the one-electron reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide. Due to their catalytic reaction, cd1NiRs are regarded as promising components for biosensing, bioremediation and biotechnological applications. Motivated by earlier findings that catalytic activity of cd1NiR from Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus (Mhcd1 depends on the presence of its physiological redox partner, cytochrome c552 (cyt c552, we show here a detailed surface enhanced resonance Raman characterization of Mhcd1 and cyt c552 attached to biocompatible electrodes in conditions which allow direct electron transfer between the conducting support and immobilized proteins. Mhcd1 and cyt c552 are co-immobilized on silver electrodes coated with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs and the electrocatalytic activity of Ag // SAM // Mhcd1 // cyt c552 and Ag // SAM // cyt c552 // Mhcd1 constructs is tested in the presence of nitrite. Simultaneous evaluation of structural and thermodynamic properties of the immobilized proteins reveals that cyt c552 retains its native properties, while the redox potential of apparently intact Mhcd1 undergoes a ~150 mV negative shift upon adsorption. Neither of the immobilization strategies results in an active Mhcd1, reinforcing the idea that subtle and very specific interactions between Mhcd1 and cyt c552 govern efficient intermolecular electron transfer and catalytic activity of Mhcd1.

  1. SERR Spectroelectrochemical Study of Cytochrome cd1 Nitrite Reductase Co-Immobilized with Physiological Redox Partner Cytochrome c552 on Biocompatible Metal Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Célia M; Quintas, Pedro O; Moura, Isabel; Moura, José J G; Hildebrandt, Peter; Almeida, M Gabriela; Todorovic, Smilja

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductases (cd1NiRs) catalyze the one-electron reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide. Due to their catalytic reaction, cd1NiRs are regarded as promising components for biosensing, bioremediation and biotechnological applications. Motivated by earlier findings that catalytic activity of cd1NiR from Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus (Mhcd1) depends on the presence of its physiological redox partner, cytochrome c552 (cyt c552), we show here a detailed surface enhanced resonance Raman characterization of Mhcd1 and cyt c552 attached to biocompatible electrodes in conditions which allow direct electron transfer between the conducting support and immobilized prot